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Sample records for raft-dependent endocytic pathway

  1. Recombinant VSV G proteins reveal a novel raft-dependent endocytic pathway in resorbing osteoclasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mulari, Mika T.K. Nars, Martin; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina; Kaisto, Tuula; Metsikkoe, Kalervo; Sun Yi; Vaeaenaenen, H. Kalervo

    2008-05-01

    Transcytotic membrane flow delivers degraded bone fragments from the ruffled border to the functional secretory domain, FSD, in bone resorbing osteoclasts. Here we show that there is also a FSD-to-ruffled border trafficking pathway that compensates for the membrane loss during the matrix uptake process and that rafts are essential for this ruffled border-targeted endosomal pathway. Replacing the cytoplasmic tail of the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein with that of CD4 resulted in partial insolubility in Triton X-100 and retargeting from the peripheral non-bone facing plasma membrane to the FSD. Recombinant G proteins were subsequently endosytosed and delivered from the FSD to the peripheral fusion zone of the ruffled border, which were both rich in lipid rafts as suggested by viral protein transport analysis and visualizing the rafts with fluorescent recombinant cholera toxin. Cholesterol depletion by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin impaired the ruffled border-targeted vesicle trafficking pathway and inhibited bone resorption dose-dependently as quantified by measuring the CTX and TRACP 5b secreted to the culture medium and by measuring the resorbed area visualized with a bi-phasic labeling method using sulpho-NHS-biotin and WGA-lectin. Thus, rafts are vital for membrane recycling from the FSD to the late endosomal/lysosomal ruffled border and bone resorption.

  2. Signaling on the endocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    McPherson, P S; Kay, B K; Hussain, N K

    2001-06-01

    Ligand binding to receptor tyrosine kinases and G-protein-coupled receptors initiates signal transduction events and induces receptor endocytosis via clathrin-coated pits and vesicles. While receptor-mediated endocytosis has been traditionally considered an effective mechanism to attenuate ligand-activated responses, more recent studies demonstrate that signaling continues on the endocytic pathway. In fact, certain signaling events, such as the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases, appear to require endocytosis. Protein components of signal transduction cascades can assemble at clathrin coated pits and remain associated with endocytic vesicles following their dynamin-dependent release from the plasma membrane. Thus, endocytic vesicles can function as a signaling compartment distinct from the plasma membrane. These observations demonstrate that endocytosis plays an important role in the activation and propagation of signaling pathways.

  3. Signaling on the endocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    McPherson, P S; Kay, B K; Hussain, N K

    2001-06-01

    Ligand binding to receptor tyrosine kinases and G-protein-coupled receptors initiates signal transduction events and induces receptor endocytosis via clathrin-coated pits and vesicles. While receptor-mediated endocytosis has been traditionally considered an effective mechanism to attenuate ligand-activated responses, more recent studies demonstrate that signaling continues on the endocytic pathway. In fact, certain signaling events, such as the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases, appear to require endocytosis. Protein components of signal transduction cascades can assemble at clathrin coated pits and remain associated with endocytic vesicles following their dynamin-dependent release from the plasma membrane. Thus, endocytic vesicles can function as a signaling compartment distinct from the plasma membrane. These observations demonstrate that endocytosis plays an important role in the activation and propagation of signaling pathways. PMID:11389765

  4. Effects of PDT on the endocytic pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David

    2010-02-01

    Two lines of evidence point to an early effect of photodamage on membrane trafficking. [1] Internalization of a fluorescent probe for hydrophobic membrane loci was impaired by prior photodamage. [2] Interference with the endocytic pathway by the PI-3 kinase antagonist wortmannin led to accumulation of cytoplasmic vacuoles suggesting a block in the recycling of plasma membrane components. Prior photodamage blocked this pathway so that no vacuoles were formed upon exposure of cells to wortmannin. In a murine hepatoma line, the endocytic pathway was preferentially sensitive to lysosomal photodamage. The role of photodamage to the endocytic pathway as a factor in PDT efficacy remains to be assessed.

  5. Endocytic pathways and endosomal trafficking: a primer.

    PubMed

    Elkin, Sarah R; Lakoduk, Ashley M; Schmid, Sandra L

    2016-05-01

    This brief overview of endocytic trafficking is written in honor of Renate Fuchs, who retires this year. In the mid-1980s, Renate pioneered studies on the ion-conducting properties of the recently discovered early and late endosomes and the mechanisms governing endosomal acidification. As described in this review, after uptake through one of many mechanistically distinct endocytic pathways, internalized proteins merge into a common early/sorting endosome. From there they again diverge along distinct sorting pathways, back to the cell surface, on to the trans-Golgi network or across polarized cells. Other transmembrane receptors are packaged into intraluminal vesicles of late endosomes/multivesicular bodies that eventually fuse with and deliver their content to lysosomes for degradation. Endosomal acidification, in part, determines sorting along this pathway. We describe other sorting machinery and mechanisms, as well as the rab proteins and phosphatidylinositol lipids that serve to dynamically define membrane compartments along the endocytic pathway. PMID:26861668

  6. Molecular aspects of the endocytic pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Clague, M J

    1998-01-01

    Observation of the flow of material along the endocytic pathway has lead to the description of the basic architecture of the pathway and provided insight into the relationship between compartments. Significant advances have been made in the study of endocytic transport steps at the molecular level, of which studies of cargo selection, vesicle budding and membrane fusion events comprise the major part. Progress in this area has been driven by two approaches, yeast genetics and in vitro or cell-free assays, which reconstitute particular transport steps and allow biochemical manipulation. The complex protein machineries that control vesicle budding and fusion are significantly conserved between the secretory and endocytic pathways such that proteins that regulate particular steps are often part of a larger family of proteins which exercise a conserved function at other locations within the cell. Well characterized examples include vesicle coat proteins, rabs (small GTPases) and soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) attachment protein (SNAP) receptors (SNAREs). Intracompartmental pH, lipid composition and cytoskeletal organization have also been identified as important determinants of the orderly flow of material within the endocytic pathway. PMID:9820800

  7. The clathrin endocytic pathway in viral infection.

    PubMed Central

    DeTulleo, L; Kirchhausen, T

    1998-01-01

    How important is the clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway for entry of viruses into host cells? While it is widely accepted that Semliki Forest virus (SFV), an enveloped virus, requires this pathway there are conflicting data concerning the closely related Sindbis virus, as well as varying results with picornaviruses such as human rhinovirus 14 (HRV 14) and poliovirus. We have examined the entry mode of SFV, Sindbis virus, HRV 14 and poliovirus using a method that identifies single infected cells. This assay takes advantage of the observation that the clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway is specifically and potently arrested by overexpression of dynamin mutants that prevent clathrin-coated pit budding. Using HeLa cells and conditions of low multiplicity of infection to favor use of the most avid pathway of cell entry, it was found that SFV, Sindbis virus and HRV 14 require an active clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway for successful infection. In marked contrast, infection of HeLa cells by poliovirus did not appear to require the clathrin pathway. PMID:9707418

  8. Pathways and mechanisms of endocytic recycling

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Barth D.; Donaldson, Julie G.

    2011-01-01

    Endocytic recycling is coordinated with endocytic uptake to control the composition of the plasma membrane. Although much of our understanding of endocytic recycling has come from studies on the transferrin receptor, a protein internalized through clathrin-dependent endocytosis, increased interest in clathrin-independent endocytosis has led to the discovery of new endocytic recycling systems. Recent insights into the regulatory mechanisms that control endocytic recycling have focused on recycling through tubular carriers and the return to the cell surface of cargo that enters cells through clathrin-independent mechanisms. Recent work emphasizes the importance of regulated recycling in such diverse processes as cytokinesis, cell adhesion and morphogenesis, cell fusion, and learning and memory. PMID:19696797

  9. Chemokine-containing exosomes are released from heat-stressed tumor cells via lipid raft-dependent pathway and act as efficient tumor vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Taoyong; Guo, Jun; Yang, Mingjin; Zhu, Xuhui; Cao, Xuetao

    2011-02-15

    Exosomes derived from dendritic cells or tumor cells are a population of nanometer-sized membrane vesicles that can induce specific antitumor immunity. During investigation of the effects of hyperthermia on antitumor immune response, we found that exosomes derived from heat-stressed tumor cells (HS-TEX) could chemoattract and activate dendritic cells (DC) and T cells more potently than that by conventional tumor-derived exosomes. We show that HS-TEX contain chemokines, such as CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, and CCL20, and the chemokine-containing HS-TEX are functionally competent in chemoattracting CD11c(+) DC and CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cells both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the production of chemokine-containing HS-TEX could be inhibited by ATP inhibitor, calcium chelator, and cholesterol scavenger, indicating that the mobilization of chemokines into exosomes was ATP- and calcium-dependent and via a lipid raft-dependent pathway. We consistently found that the intracellular chemokines could be enriched in lipid rafts after heat stress. Accordingly, intratumoral injection of HS-TEX could induce specific antitumor immune response more efficiently than that by tumor-derived exosomes, thus inhibiting tumor growth and prolonging survival of tumor-bearing mice more significantly. Therefore, our results demonstrate that exosomes derived from HS-TEX represent a kind of efficient tumor vaccine and can chemoattract and activate DC and T cells, inducing more potent antitumor immune response. Release of chemokines through exosomes via lipid raft-dependent pathway may be a new method of chemokine exocytosis.

  10. Decreased function of survival motor neuron protein impairs endocytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadi, Maria; Derdowski, Aaron; Kalloo, Geetika; Maginnis, Melissa S; O'Hern, Patrick; Bliska, Bryn; Sorkaç, Altar; Nguyen, Ken C Q; Cook, Steven J; Poulogiannis, George; Atwood, Walter J; Hall, David H; Hart, Anne C

    2016-07-26

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by depletion of the ubiquitously expressed survival motor neuron (SMN) protein, with 1 in 40 Caucasians being heterozygous for a disease allele. SMN is critical for the assembly of numerous ribonucleoprotein complexes, yet it is still unclear how reduced SMN levels affect motor neuron function. Here, we examined the impact of SMN depletion in Caenorhabditis elegans and found that decreased function of the SMN ortholog SMN-1 perturbed endocytic pathways at motor neuron synapses and in other tissues. Diminished SMN-1 levels caused defects in C. elegans neuromuscular function, and smn-1 genetic interactions were consistent with an endocytic defect. Changes were observed in synaptic endocytic proteins when SMN-1 levels decreased. At the ultrastructural level, defects were observed in endosomal compartments, including significantly fewer docked synaptic vesicles. Finally, endocytosis-dependent infection by JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) was reduced in human cells with decreased SMN levels. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that SMN depletion causes defects in endosomal trafficking that impair synaptic function, even in the absence of motor neuron cell death. PMID:27402754

  11. A role for adaptor protein-3 complex in the organization of the endocytic pathway in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Charette, Steve J; Mercanti, Valentina; Letourneur, François; Bennett, Nelly; Cosson, Pierre

    2006-11-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum cells continuously internalize extracellular material, which accumulates in well-characterized endocytic vacuoles. In this study, we describe a new endocytic compartment identified by the presence of a specific marker, the p25 protein. This compartment presents features reminiscent of mammalian recycling endosomes: it is localized in the pericentrosomal region but distinct from the Golgi apparatus. It specifically contains surface proteins that are continuously endocytosed but rapidly recycled to the cell surface and thus absent from maturing endocytic compartments. We evaluated the importance of each clathrin-associated adaptor complex in establishing a compartmentalized endocytic system by studying the phenotype of the corresponding mutants. In knockout cells for mu3, a subunit of the AP-3 clathrin-associated complex, membrane proteins normally restricted to p25-positive endosomes were mislocalized to late endocytic compartments. Our results suggest that AP-3 plays an essential role in the compartmentalization of the endocytic pathway in Dictyostelium. PMID:17010123

  12. Bifurcation of the endocytic pathway into Rab5-dependent and -independent transport to the vacuole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshima, Junko Y.; Nishinoaki, Show; Sato, Yoshifumi; Yamamoto, Wataru; Furukawa, Daiki; Siekhaus, Daria Elisabeth; Sawaguchi, Akira; Toshima, Jiro

    2014-03-01

    The yeast Rab5 homologue, Vps21p, is known to be involved both in the vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) pathway from the trans-Golgi network to the vacuole, and in the endocytic pathway from the plasma membrane to the vacuole. However, the intracellular location at which these two pathways converge remains unclear. In addition, the endocytic pathway is not completely blocked in yeast cells lacking all Rab5 genes, suggesting the existence of an unidentified route that bypasses the Rab5-dependent endocytic pathway. Here we show that convergence of the endocytic and VPS pathways occurs upstream of the requirement for Vps21p in these pathways. We also identify a previously unidentified endocytic pathway mediated by the AP-3 complex. Importantly, the AP-3-mediated pathway appears mostly intact in Rab5-disrupted cells, and thus works as an alternative route to the vacuole/lysosome. We propose that the endocytic traffic branches into two routes to reach the vacuole: a Rab5-dependent VPS pathway and a Rab5-independent AP-3-mediated pathway.

  13. Vibrio vulnificus VvhA induces autophagy-related cell death through the lipid raft-dependent c-Src/NOX signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun Ju; Lee, Sei-Jung; Lim, Hyeon Su; Kim, Jun Sung; Jang, Kyung Ku; Choi, Sang Ho; Han, Ho Jae

    2016-01-01

    VvhA, a virulent factor of Vibrio (V.) vulnificus, induces acute cell death in a destructive manner. Autophagy plays an important role in cell death, but the functional role of VvhA in autophagy-related cell death has not been elucidated yet. We found that rVvhA significantly increased LC3 puncta formation and autophagic flux in promoting the cell death of human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. The cell death induced by rVvhA was independent of lysosomal permeabilizaton and caspase activation. rVvhA induced rapid phosphorylation of c-Src in the membrane lipid raft, which resulted in an increased interaction between lipid raft molecule caveolin-1 and NADPH oxidase (NOX) complex Rac1 for ROS production. NOX-mediated ROS signaling induced by rVvhA increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) which are required for mRNA expression of Atg5 and Atg16L1 involved in autophagosome formation. In an in vivo model, VvhA increased autophagy activation and paracellular permeabilization in intestinal epithelium. Collectively, the results here show that VvhA plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis and dissemination of V. vulnificus by autophagy upregulation, through the lipid raft-mediated c-Src/NOX signaling pathway and ERK/eIF2α activation. PMID:27250250

  14. Vibrio vulnificus VvhA induces autophagy-related cell death through the lipid raft-dependent c-Src/NOX signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Ju; Lee, Sei-Jung; Lim, Hyeon Su; Kim, Jun Sung; Jang, Kyung Ku; Choi, Sang Ho; Han, Ho Jae

    2016-06-02

    VvhA, a virulent factor of Vibrio (V.) vulnificus, induces acute cell death in a destructive manner. Autophagy plays an important role in cell death, but the functional role of VvhA in autophagy-related cell death has not been elucidated yet. We found that rVvhA significantly increased LC3 puncta formation and autophagic flux in promoting the cell death of human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. The cell death induced by rVvhA was independent of lysosomal permeabilizaton and caspase activation. rVvhA induced rapid phosphorylation of c-Src in the membrane lipid raft, which resulted in an increased interaction between lipid raft molecule caveolin-1 and NADPH oxidase (NOX) complex Rac1 for ROS production. NOX-mediated ROS signaling induced by rVvhA increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) which are required for mRNA expression of Atg5 and Atg16L1 involved in autophagosome formation. In an in vivo model, VvhA increased autophagy activation and paracellular permeabilization in intestinal epithelium. Collectively, the results here show that VvhA plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis and dissemination of V. vulnificus by autophagy upregulation, through the lipid raft-mediated c-Src/NOX signaling pathway and ERK/eIF2α activation.

  15. The Use of Inhibitors to Study Endocytic Pathways of Gene Carriers: Optimization and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Vercauteren, Dries; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E; Jones, Arwyn T; Rejman, Joanna; Demeester, Joseph; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Sanders, Niek N; Braeckmans, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Nonviral gene complexes can enter mammalian cells through different endocytic pathways. For efficient optimization of the gene carrier it is important to profile its cellular uptake, because this largely determines its intracellular processing and subsequent transfection efficiency. Most of the current information on uptake of these gene-delivery vehicles is based on data following the use of chemical inhibitors of endocytic pathways. Here, we have performed a detailed characterization of four commonly used endocytosis inhibitors [chlorpromazine, genistein, methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), and potassium depletion] on cell viability and endocytosis in five well-described cell lines. We found that chlorpromazine and to a lesser extent MβCD significantly decreased cell viability of some cell lines even after short incubation periods and at concentrations that are routinely used to inhibit endocytosis. Through analyzing the uptake and subcellular distribution of two fluorescent endocytic probes transferrin and lactosylceramide (LacCer) that are reported to enter cells via clathrin-dependent (CDE) and clathrin-independent (CIE) mechanisms, respectively, we showed poor specificity of these agents for inhibiting distinct endocytic pathways. Finally, we demonstrate that any inhibitory effects are highly cell line dependent. Overall, the data question the significance of performing endocytosis studies with these agents in the absence of very stringent controls. PMID:20010917

  16. Distinct endocytic pathways identified in tobacco pollen tubes using charged nanogold.

    PubMed

    Moscatelli, Alessandra; Ciampolini, Fabrizio; Rodighiero, Simona; Onelli, Elisabetta; Cresti, Mauro; Santo, Nadia; Idilli, Aurora

    2007-11-01

    In an attempt to dissect endocytosis in Nicotiana tabacum L. pollen tubes, two different probes--positively or negatively charged nanogold--were employed. The destiny of internalized plasma membrane domains, carrying negatively or positively charged residues, was followed at the ultrastructural level and revealed distinct endocytic pathways. Time-course experiments and electron microscopy showed internalization of subapical plasma-membrane domains that were mainly recycled to the secretory pathway through the Golgi apparatus and a second mainly degradative pathway involving plasma membrane retrieval at the tip. In vivo time-lapse experiments using FM4-64 combined with quantitative analysis confirmed the existence of distinct internalization regions. Ikarugamycin, an inhibitor of clathrin-dependent endocytosis, allowed us to further dissect the endocytic process: electron microscopy and time-lapse studies suggested that clathrin-dependent endocytosis occurs in the tip and subapical regions, because recycling of positively charged nanogold to the Golgi bodies and the consignment of negatively charged nanogold to vacuoles were affected. However, intact positively charged-nanogold transport to vacuoles supports the idea that an endocytic pathway that does not require clathrin is also present in pollen tubes.

  17. Endocytic Pathways Used by Andes Virus to Enter Primary Human Lung Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Mike; Lin, Jin-Mann S.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.

    2016-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) is the major cause of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in South America. Despite a high fatality rate (up to 40%), no vaccines or antiviral therapies are approved to treat ANDV infection. To understand the role of endocytic pathways in ANDV infection, we used 3 complementary approaches to identify cellular factors required for ANDV entry into human lung microvascular endothelial cells. We screened an siRNA library targeting 140 genes involved in membrane trafficking, and identified 55 genes required for ANDV infection. These genes control the major endocytic pathways, endosomal transport, cell signaling, and cytoskeleton rearrangement. We then used infectious ANDV and retroviral pseudovirions to further characterize the possible involvement of 9 of these genes in the early steps of ANDV entry. In addition, we used markers of cellular endocytosis along with chemical inhibitors of known endocytic pathways to show that ANDV uses multiple routes of entry to infect target cells. These entry mechanisms are mainly clathrin-, dynamin-, and cholesterol-dependent, but can also occur via a clathrin-independent manner. PMID:27780263

  18. The minute virus of mice exploits different endocytic pathways for cellular uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Garcin, Pierre O.; Panté, Nelly

    2015-08-15

    The minute virus of mice, prototype strain (MVMp), is a non-enveloped, single-stranded DNA virus of the family Parvoviridae. Unlike other parvoviruses, the mechanism of cellular uptake of MVMp has not been studied in detail. We analyzed MVMp endocytosis in mouse LA9 fibroblasts and a tumor cell line derived from epithelial–mesenchymal transition through polyomavirus middle T antigen transformation in transgenic mice. By a combination of immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we found that MVMp endocytosis occurs at the leading edge of migrating cells in proximity to focal adhesion sites. By using drug inhibitors of various endocytic pathways together with immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis, we discovered that MVMp can use a number of endocytic pathways, depending on the host cell type. At least three different mechanisms were identified: clathrin-, caveolin-, and clathrin-independent carrier-mediated endocytosis, with the latter occurring in transformed cells but not in LA9 fibroblasts. - Highlights: • MVMp uptake takes place at the leading edge of migrating cells. • MVMp exploits a variety of endocytic pathways. • MVMp could use clathrin- and caveolin-mediated endocytosis. • MVMp could also use clathrin-independent carriers for cellular uptake.

  19. Probing the endocytic pathway in live cells using dual-color fluorescence cross-correlation analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Bacia, Kirsten; Majoul, Irina V; Schwille, Petra

    2002-01-01

    Fluorescence (auto)correlation spectroscopy (FCS) has developed into a widely used method for investigating molecular dynamics and mobility of molecules in vitro and in vivo. Dual-color cross-correlation, an extension of this technique, also assesses the concomitant movement of two spectrally distinguishable fluorescent molecules and has therefore proven superior to autocorrelation analysis to study interactions between different molecular species in solution. Here we explore the benefits of cross-correlation analysis when applied to live cells, by demonstrating its potential in analyzing endocytic processes. Bacterial cholera toxin (CTX) was labeled with Cy2 and Cy5 dyes on different subunits of the same holotoxin. Along the endocytic pathway, positive cross-correlation between the A and B subunits was first preserved, later followed by a loss in cross-correlation upon their separation in the Golgi. Furthermore, endocytosis of a mixture of only Cy2- and only Cy5-labeled holotoxins also gave rise to cross-correlation. Our results suggest that cross-correlation may be used to recognize whether different cargoes use the same endocytic pathway. Additionally, we show that cross-correlation is applicable to two-dimensional membrane diffusion. CTX bound to GM1-containing artificial giant unilamellar vesicles was diffusible, whereas CTX bound to the plasma membrane was immobile on the FCS time-scale, possibly because of raft-association of GM1. PMID:12124298

  20. Manipulation of the endocytic pathway and phagocyte functions by Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoarabinomannan.

    PubMed

    Vergne, Isabelle; Gilleron, Martine; Nigou, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Lipoarabinomannan is a major immunomodulatory lipoglycan found in the cell envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and related human pathogens. It reproduces several salient properties of M. tuberculosis in phagocytic cells, including inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine production, inhibition of phagolysosome biogenesis, and inhibition of apoptosis as well as autophagy. In this review, we present our current knowledge on lipoarabinomannan structure and ability to manipulate the endocytic pathway as well as phagocyte functions. A special focus is put on the molecular mechanisms employed and the signaling pathways hijacked. Available information is discussed in the context of M. tuberculosis pathogenesis.

  1. A CCR2 macrophage endocytic pathway mediates extravascular fibrin clearance in vivo.

    PubMed

    Motley, Michael P; Madsen, Daniel H; Jürgensen, Henrik J; Spencer, David E; Szabo, Roman; Holmbeck, Kenn; Flick, Matthew J; Lawrence, Daniel A; Castellino, Francis J; Weigert, Roberto; Bugge, Thomas H

    2016-03-01

    Extravascular fibrin deposition accompanies many human diseases and causes chronic inflammation and organ damage, unless removed in a timely manner. Here, we used intravital microscopy to investigate how fibrin is removed from extravascular space. Fibrin placed into the dermis of mice underwent cellular endocytosis and lysosomal targeting, revealing a novel intracellular pathway for extravascular fibrin degradation. A C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2)-positive macrophage subpopulation constituted the majority of fibrin-uptaking cells. Consequently, cellular fibrin uptake was diminished by elimination of CCR2-expressing cells. The CCR2-positive macrophage subtype was different from collagen-internalizing M2-like macrophages. Cellular fibrin uptake was strictly dependent on plasminogen and plasminogen activator. Surprisingly, however, fibrin endocytosis was unimpeded by the absence of the fibrin(ogen) receptors, αMβ2 and ICAM-1, the myeloid cell integrin-binding site on fibrin or the endocytic collagen receptor, the mannose receptor. The study identifies a novel fibrin endocytic pathway engaged in extravascular fibrin clearance and shows that interstitial fibrin and collagen are cleared by different subsets of macrophages employing distinct molecular pathways. PMID:26647393

  2. A CCR2 macrophage endocytic pathway mediates extravascular fibrin clearance in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Motley, Michael P.; Madsen, Daniel H.; Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Spencer, David E.; Szabo, Roman; Holmbeck, Kenn; Flick, Matthew J.; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Castellino, Francis J.; Weigert, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Extravascular fibrin deposition accompanies many human diseases and causes chronic inflammation and organ damage, unless removed in a timely manner. Here, we used intravital microscopy to investigate how fibrin is removed from extravascular space. Fibrin placed into the dermis of mice underwent cellular endocytosis and lysosomal targeting, revealing a novel intracellular pathway for extravascular fibrin degradation. A C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2)-positive macrophage subpopulation constituted the majority of fibrin-uptaking cells. Consequently, cellular fibrin uptake was diminished by elimination of CCR2-expressing cells. The CCR2-positive macrophage subtype was different from collagen-internalizing M2-like macrophages. Cellular fibrin uptake was strictly dependent on plasminogen and plasminogen activator. Surprisingly, however, fibrin endocytosis was unimpeded by the absence of the fibrin(ogen) receptors, αMβ2 and ICAM-1, the myeloid cell integrin-binding site on fibrin or the endocytic collagen receptor, the mannose receptor. The study identifies a novel fibrin endocytic pathway engaged in extravascular fibrin clearance and shows that interstitial fibrin and collagen are cleared by different subsets of macrophages employing distinct molecular pathways. PMID:26647393

  3. Drosophila Epsin mediates a select endocytic pathway that DSL ligands must enter to activate Notch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weidong; Struhl, Gary

    2004-11-01

    Recent findings suggest that Delta/Serrate/Lag2 (DSL) signals activate Notch by an unprecedented mechanism that requires the ligands to be endocytosed in signal-sending cells to activate the receptor in signal-receiving cells. Here, we show that cells devoid of Epsin, a conserved adaptor protein for Clathrin-mediated endocytosis, behave normally except that they cannot send DSL signals. Surprisingly, we find that Epsin is not required for bulk endocytosis of DSL proteins. Instead, Epsin appears to be essential for targeting DSL proteins to a special endocytic pathway that they must enter to acquire signaling activity. We present evidence that DSL proteins must be mono-ubiquitinated to be targeted by Epsin to this pathway. Furthermore, we show that the requirements for both Epsin and mono-ubiquitination can be bypassed by introducing the internalization signal that mediates endocytosis and recycling of the Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) receptor. We propose that Epsin is essential for DSL signaling because it targets mono-ubiquitinated DSL proteins to an endocytic recycling compartment that they must enter to be converted into active ligands. Alternatively Epsin may be required to target mono-ubiquitinated DSL proteins to a particular subclass of coated pits that have special properties essential for Notch activation.

  4. Endocytic pathway mediates refractoriness of insect Bactrocera dorsalis to RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoxue; Dong, Xiaolong; Zou, Cong; Zhang, Hongyu

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful and convenient tool for sequence-specific gene silencing, and it is triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). RNAi can be easily achieved in many eukaryotes by either injecting or feeding dsRNAs. This mechanism has demonstrated its potential in fundamental research on genetics, medicine and agriculture. However, the possibility that insects might develop refractoriness to RNAi remains unexplored. In this study, we report that the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, became refractory to RNAi using orally administered dsRNA targeting endogenous genes. Furthermore, refractoriness to RNAi is not gene-specific, and its duration depends on the dsRNA concentration. RNAi blockage requires the endocytic pathway. Fluorescence microscopy indicated that in RNAi refractory flies, dsRNA uptake is blocked. Genes involved in the entry of dsRNAs into cells, including chc, cog3, light and others, are down-regulated in RNAi refractory flies. Increasing the endocytic capacity by improving F-actin polymerization disrupts RNAi refractoriness after both primary and secondary dsRNA exposures. Our results demonstrate that an insect can become refractory to RNAi by preventing the entry of dsRNA into its cells. PMID:25731667

  5. Molecular mediators for raft-dependent endocytosis of syndecan-1, a highly conserved, multifunctional receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Keyang; Williams, Kevin Jon

    2013-05-17

    Endocytosis via rafts has attracted considerable recent interest, but the molecular mediators remain incompletely characterized. Here, we focused on the syndecan-1 heparan sulfate proteoglycan, a highly conserved, multifunctional receptor that we previously showed to undergo raft-dependent endocytosis upon clustering. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of three to five consecutive cytoplasmic residues at a time revealed that a conserved juxtamembrane motif, MKKK, was the only region required for efficient endocytosis after clustering. Endocytosis of clustered syndecan-1 occurs in two phases, each requiring a kinase and a corresponding cytoskeletal partner. In the initial phase, ligands trigger rapid MKKK-dependent activation of ERK and the localization of syndecan-1 into rafts. Activation of ERK drives the dissociation of syndecan-1 from α-tubulin, a molecule that may act as an anchor for syndecan-1 at the plasma membrane in the basal state. In the second phase, Src family kinases phosphorylate tyrosyl residues within the transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions of syndecan-1, a process that also requires MKKK. Tyrosine phosphorylation of syndecan-1 triggers the robust recruitment of cortactin, which we found to be an essential mediator of efficient actin-dependent endocytosis. These findings represent the first detailed characterization of the molecular events that drive endocytosis of a raft-dependent receptor and identify a novel endocytic motif, MKKK. Moreover, the results provide new tools to study syndecan function and regulation during uptake of its biologically and medically important ligands, such as HIV-1, atherogenic postprandial remnant lipoproteins, and molecules implicated in Alzheimer disease.

  6. The spike protein VP4 defines the endocytic pathway used by rotavirus to enter MA104 cells.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Salinas, Marco A; Romero, Pedro; Espinosa, Rafaela; Hoshino, Yasutaka; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2013-02-01

    Rotaviruses are internalized into MA104 cells by endocytosis, with different endocytic pathways used depending on the virus strain. The bovine rotavirus UK strain enters cells through a clathrin-mediated endocytic process, while the simian rhesus rotavirus (RRV) strain uses a poorly defined endocytic pathway that is clathrin and caveolin independent. The viral surface protein VP7 and the spike protein VP4 interact with cellular receptors during cell binding and penetration. To determine the viral protein that defines the mechanism of internalization, we used a panel of UK × RRV reassortant viruses having different combinations of the viral structural proteins. Characterization of the infectivities of these reassortants in MA104 cells either transfected with a small interfering RNA (siRNA) against the heavy chain of clathrin or incubated with hypertonic medium that destabilizes the clathrin coat clearly showed that VP4 determines the pathway of virus entry. Of interest, the characterization of Nar3, a sialic acid-independent variant of RRV, showed that a single amino acid change in VP4 shifts the route of entry from being clathrin dependent to clathrin independent. Furthermore, characterizations of several additional rotavirus strains that differ in their use of cellular receptors showed that all entered cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, suggesting that diverse VP4-cell surface interactions can lead to rotavirus cell entry through this endocytic pathway.

  7. The endocytic pathway mediates cell entry of dsRNA to induce RNAi silencing

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Maria-Carla; van Rij, Ronald P.; Hekele, Armin; Gillis, Amethyst; Foley, Edan; O’Farrell, Patrick H.; Andino, Raul

    2009-01-01

    Many metazoan cells can take up exogenous double-stranded (ds) RNA and use it to initiate an RNA silencing response, however, the mechanism for this uptake is ill-defined. Here, we identify the pathway for dsRNA uptake in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells. Biochemical and cell biological analyses, and a genome-wide screen for components of the dsRNA-uptake machinery, indicated that dsRNA is taken up by an active process involving receptor-mediated endocytosis. Pharmacological inhibition of endocytic pathways disrupted exogenous dsRNA entry and the induction of gene silencing. This dsRNA uptake mechanism seems to be evolutionarily conserved, as knockdown of orthologues in Caenorhabditis elegans inactivated the RNA interference response in worms. Thus, this entry pathway is required for systemic RNA silencing in whole organisms. In Drosophila cells, pharmacological evidence suggests that dsRNA entry is mediated by pattern-recognition receptors. The possible role of these receptors in dsRNA entry may link RNA interference (RNAi) silencing to other innate immune responses. PMID:16862146

  8. Amyloid precursor protein–mediated endocytic pathway disruption induces axonal dysfunction and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Weissmiller, April M.; White, Joseph A.; Fang, Fang; Wang, Xinyi; Wu, Yiwen; Pearn, Matthew L.; Zhao, Xiaobei; Chen, Shengdi; Gunawardena, Shermali; Ding, Jianqing; Mobley, William C.

    2016-01-01

    The endosome/lysosome pathway is disrupted early in the course of both Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Down syndrome (DS); however, it is not clear how dysfunction in this pathway influences the development of these diseases. Herein, we explored the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which endosomal dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of AD and DS. We determined that full-length amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its β-C-terminal fragment (β-CTF) act though increased activation of Rab5 to cause enlargement of early endosomes and to disrupt retrograde axonal trafficking of nerve growth factor (NGF) signals. The functional impacts of APP and its various products were investigated in PC12 cells, cultured rat basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs), and BFCNs from a mouse model of DS. We found that the full-length wild-type APP (APPWT) and β-CTF both induced endosomal enlargement and disrupted NGF signaling and axonal trafficking. β-CTF alone induced atrophy of BFCNs that was rescued by the dominant-negative Rab5 mutant, Rab5S34N. Moreover, expression of a dominant-negative Rab5 construct markedly reduced APP-induced axonal blockage in Drosophila. Therefore, increased APP and/or β-CTF impact the endocytic pathway to disrupt NGF trafficking and signaling, resulting in trophic deficits in BFCNs. Our data strongly support the emerging concept that dysregulation of Rab5 activity contributes importantly to early pathogenesis of AD and DS. PMID:27064279

  9. Cellular uptake of cyclotide MCoTI-I follows multiple endocytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Janette; Elnagar, Ahmed Y O; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F; Camarero, Julio A

    2011-10-30

    Cyclotides are plant-derived proteins that naturally exhibit various biological activities and whose unique cyclic structure makes them remarkably stable and resistant to denaturation or degradation. These attributes, among others, make them ideally suited for use as drug development tools. This study investigated the cellular uptake of cyclotide, MCoTI-I in live HeLa cells. Using real time confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging, we show that MCoTI-I is readily internalized in live HeLa cells and that its endocytosis is temperature-dependent. Endocytosis of MCoTI-I in HeLa cells is achieved primarily through fluid-phase endocytosis, as evidenced by its significant colocalization with 10K-dextran, but also through other pathways as well, as evidenced by its colocalization with markers for cholesterol-dependent and clathrin-mediated endocytosis, cholera toxin B and EGF respectively. Uptake does not appear to occur only via macropinocytosis as inhibition of this pathway by Latrunculin B-induced disassembly of actin filaments did not affect MCoTI-I uptake and treatment with EIPA which also seemed to inhibit other pathways collectively inhibited approximately 80% of cellular uptake. As well, a significant amount of MCoTI-I accumulates in late endosomal and lysosomal compartments and MCoTI-I-containing vesicles continue to exhibit directed movements. These findings demonstrate internalization of MCoTI-I through multiple endocytic pathways that are dominant in the cell type investigated, suggesting that this cyclotide has ready access to general endosomal/lysosomal pathways but could readily be re-targeted to specific receptors through addition of targeting ligands. PMID:21906641

  10. Cellular uptake of cyclotide MCoTI-I follows multiple endocytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Janette; Elnagar, Ahmed Y O; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F; Camarero, Julio A

    2011-10-30

    Cyclotides are plant-derived proteins that naturally exhibit various biological activities and whose unique cyclic structure makes them remarkably stable and resistant to denaturation or degradation. These attributes, among others, make them ideally suited for use as drug development tools. This study investigated the cellular uptake of cyclotide, MCoTI-I in live HeLa cells. Using real time confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging, we show that MCoTI-I is readily internalized in live HeLa cells and that its endocytosis is temperature-dependent. Endocytosis of MCoTI-I in HeLa cells is achieved primarily through fluid-phase endocytosis, as evidenced by its significant colocalization with 10K-dextran, but also through other pathways as well, as evidenced by its colocalization with markers for cholesterol-dependent and clathrin-mediated endocytosis, cholera toxin B and EGF respectively. Uptake does not appear to occur only via macropinocytosis as inhibition of this pathway by Latrunculin B-induced disassembly of actin filaments did not affect MCoTI-I uptake and treatment with EIPA which also seemed to inhibit other pathways collectively inhibited approximately 80% of cellular uptake. As well, a significant amount of MCoTI-I accumulates in late endosomal and lysosomal compartments and MCoTI-I-containing vesicles continue to exhibit directed movements. These findings demonstrate internalization of MCoTI-I through multiple endocytic pathways that are dominant in the cell type investigated, suggesting that this cyclotide has ready access to general endosomal/lysosomal pathways but could readily be re-targeted to specific receptors through addition of targeting ligands.

  11. γ-SNAP stimulates disassembly of endosomal SNARE complexes and regulates endocytic trafficking pathways.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroki; Matsuzaki, Yuka; Tanaka, Ayaka; Hosoi, Kaori; Ichimura, Kaoru; Arasaki, Kohei; Wakana, Yuichi; Asano, Kenichi; Tanaka, Masato; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Tani, Katsuko; Tagaya, Mitsuo

    2015-08-01

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) that reside in the target membranes and transport vesicles assemble into specific SNARE complexes to drive membrane fusion. N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) and its attachment protein, α-SNAP (encoded by NAPA), catalyze disassembly of the SNARE complexes in the secretory and endocytic pathways to recycle them for the next round of fusion events. γ-SNAP (encoded by NAPG) is a SNAP isoform, but its function in SNARE-mediated membrane trafficking remains unknown. Here, we show that γ-SNAP regulates the endosomal trafficking of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) and transferrin. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analyses revealed that γ-SNAP interacts with a limited range of SNAREs, including endosomal ones. γ-SNAP, as well as α-SNAP, mediated the disassembly of endosomal syntaxin-7-containing SNARE complexes. Overexpression and small interfering (si)RNA-mediated depletion of γ-SNAP changed the morphologies and intracellular distributions of endosomes. Moreover, the depletion partially suppressed the exit of EGFR and transferrin from EEA1-positive early endosomes to delay their degradation and uptake. Taken together, our findings suggest that γ-SNAP is a unique SNAP that functions in a limited range of organelles - including endosomes - and their trafficking pathways.

  12. Recombinant antibody mediated delivery of organelle-specific DNA pH sensors along endocytic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Souvik; Halder, Saheli; Nizak, Clément; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2013-12-01

    DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing the sequence of the pH sensitive domain of the DNA sensor, we have been able to tune their pH sensitive regimes and create a family of DNA sensors spanning ranges from pH 4 to 7.6. To enable a generalizable targeting methodology, this new sensor design also incorporates a `handle' domain. We have identified, using a phage display screen, a set of three recombinant antibodies (scFv) that bind sequence specifically to the handle domain. Sequence analysis of these antibodies revealed several conserved residues that mediate specific interactions with the cognate DNA duplex. We also found that all three scFvs clustered into different branches indicating that their specificity arises from mutations in key residues. When one of these scFvs is fused to a membrane protein (furin) that traffics via the cell surface, the scFv-furin chimera binds the `handle' and ferries a family of DNA pH sensors along the furin endocytic pathway. Post endocytosis, all DNA nanodevices retain their functionality in cellulo and provide spatiotemporal pH maps of retrogradely trafficking furin inside living cells. This new molecular technology of DNA-scFv-protein chimeras can be used to site-specifically complex DNA nanostructures for bioanalytical applications.DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing

  13. Dynamin- and clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway in unicellular eukaryote Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Wiejak, Jolanta; Surmacz, Liliana; Wyroba, Elzbieta

    2004-10-01

    The first evidence of dynamin presence and its colocalization with clathrin in the compartment involved in Paramecium receptor-mediated endocytosis is presented. We identified dynamin by cloning, Western blotting, and immunodetection in confocal and electron microscopy. The partial genes, which we have designated ParDyn1 and ParDyn2, are 1091 bp long, 90% identical to one another and encode the N-terminal and middle domains of Paramecium dynamin isoform 1 and isoform 2. The deduced amino acid sequences contain all three guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP)-binding motifs and show 67% homology to mammalian dynamins. Antibodies generated against the cloned GTPase domain revealed dynamin association with endosomes containing transferrin, the marker of receptor-mediated endocytosis. In Western blotting a strong immunoreactive polypeptide of approximately 116 kDa, which seems to be phosphorylated, was accompanied by a faint one of approximately 90 kDa in cytosolic fraction (S2). Dynamin level was correlated with internalization of transferrin and it was significantly decreased upon inhibition of this process. Immunogold labeling in electron microscopy revealed colocalization of dynamin and clathrin in coated pits and endocytic vesicles. Moreover, the polypeptide cross-reaction with 2 different antibodies against mammalian clathrin was identified by immunoblotting. These results indicate that dynamin- and clathrin-dependent pathway exists in this evolutionary ancient cell.

  14. Disulfide Reduction in the Endocytic Pathway: Immunological Functions of Gamma-Interferon-Inducible Lysosomal Thiol Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) is constitutively expressed in most antigen presenting cells and is interferon γ inducible in other cell types via signal transducer and activator of transcription 1. Normally, N- and C-terminal propeptides are cleaved in the early endosome, and the mature protein resides in late endosomes and lysosomes. Correspondingly, GILT has maximal reductase activity at an acidic pH. Monocyte differentiation via Toll-like receptor 4 triggers secretion of a disulfide-linked dimer of the enzymatically active precursor, which may contribute to inflammation. GILT facilitates major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted processing through reduction of protein disulfide bonds in the endocytic pathway and is hypothesized to expose buried epitopes for MHC class II binding. GILT can also facilitate the transfer of disulfide-containing antigens into the cytosol, enhancing their cross-presentation by MHC class I. A variety of antigens are strongly influenced by GILT-mediated reduction, including hen egg lysozyme, melanocyte differentiation antigens, and viral envelope glycoproteins. In addition, GILT is conserved among lower eukaryotes and likely has additional functions. For example, GILT expression increases the stability of superoxide dismutase 2 and decreases reactive oxygen species, which correlates with decreased cellular proliferation. It is also a critical host factor for infection with Listeria monocytogenes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 657–668. PMID:21506690

  15. Endospanins Regulate a Postinternalization Step of the Leptin Receptor Endocytic Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Séron, Karin; Couturier, Cyril; Belouzard, Sandrine; Bacart, Johan; Monté, Didier; Corset, Laetitia; Bocquet, Olivier; Dam, Julie; Vauthier, Virginie; Lecœur, Cécile; Bailleul, Bernard; Hoflack, Bernard; Froguel, Philippe; Jockers, Ralf; Rouillé, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Endospanin-1 is a negative regulator of the cell surface expression of leptin receptor (OB-R), and endospanin-2 is a homologue of unknown function. We investigated the mechanism for endospanin-1 action in regulating OB-R cell surface expression. Here we show that endospanin-1 and -2 are small integral membrane proteins that localize in endosomes and the trans-Golgi network. Antibody uptake experiments showed that both endospanins are transported to the plasma membrane and then internalized into early endosomes but do not recycle back to the trans-Golgi network. Overexpression of endospanin-1 or endospanin-2 led to a decrease of OB-R cell surface expression, whereas shRNA-mediated depletion of each protein increased OB-R cell surface expression. This increased cell surface expression was not observed with OB-Ra mutants defective in endocytosis or with transferrin and EGF receptors. Endospanin-1 or endospanin-2 depletion did not change the internalization rate of OB-Ra but slowed down its lysosomal degradation. Thus, both endospanins are regulators of postinternalization membrane traffic of the endocytic pathway of OB-R. PMID:21454707

  16. Endospanins regulate a postinternalization step of the leptin receptor endocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Séron, Karin; Couturier, Cyril; Belouzard, Sandrine; Bacart, Johan; Monté, Didier; Corset, Laetitia; Bocquet, Olivier; Dam, Julie; Vauthier, Virginie; Lecœur, Cécile; Bailleul, Bernard; Hoflack, Bernard; Froguel, Philippe; Jockers, Ralf; Rouillé, Yves

    2011-05-20

    Endospanin-1 is a negative regulator of the cell surface expression of leptin receptor (OB-R), and endospanin-2 is a homologue of unknown function. We investigated the mechanism for endospanin-1 action in regulating OB-R cell surface expression. Here we show that endospanin-1 and -2 are small integral membrane proteins that localize in endosomes and the trans-Golgi network. Antibody uptake experiments showed that both endospanins are transported to the plasma membrane and then internalized into early endosomes but do not recycle back to the trans-Golgi network. Overexpression of endospanin-1 or endospanin-2 led to a decrease of OB-R cell surface expression, whereas shRNA-mediated depletion of each protein increased OB-R cell surface expression. This increased cell surface expression was not observed with OB-Ra mutants defective in endocytosis or with transferrin and EGF receptors. Endospanin-1 or endospanin-2 depletion did not change the internalization rate of OB-Ra but slowed down its lysosomal degradation. Thus, both endospanins are regulators of postinternalization membrane traffic of the endocytic pathway of OB-R. PMID:21454707

  17. Transport through the yeast endocytic pathway occurs through morphologically distinct compartments and requires an active secretory pathway and Sec18p/N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hicke, L; Zanolari, B; Pypaert, M; Rohrer, J; Riezman, H

    1997-01-01

    Molecules travel through the yeast endocytic pathway from the cell surface to the lysosome-like vacuole by passing through two sequential intermediates. Immunofluorescent detection of an endocytosed pheromone receptor was used to morphologically identify these intermediates, the early and late endosomes. The early endosome is a peripheral organelle that is heterogeneous in appearance, whereas the late endosome is a large perivacuolar compartment that corresponds to the prevacuolar compartment previously shown to be an endocytic intermediate. We demonstrate that inhibiting transport through the early secretory pathway in sec mutants quickly impedes transport from the early endosome. Treatment of sensitive cells with brefeldin A also blocks transport from this compartment. We provide evidence that Sec18p/N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein, a protein required for membrane fusion, is directly required in vivo for forward transport early in the endocytic pathway. Inhibiting protein synthesis does not affect transport from the early endosome but causes endocytosed proteins to accumulate in the late endosome. As newly synthesized proteins and the late steps of secretion are not required for early to late endosome transport, but endoplasmic reticulum through Golgi traffic is, we propose that efficient forward transport in the early endocytic pathway requires delivery of lipid from secretory organelles to endosomes. Images PMID:9017592

  18. Meeting of the apical and basolateral endocytic pathways of the Madin- Darby canine kidney cell in late endosomes

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Electron microscopic approaches have been used to study the endocytic pathways from the apical and basolateral surface domains of the polarized epithelial cell, MDCK strain I, grown on polycarbonate filters. The cells were incubated at 37 degrees C in the presence of two distinguishable markers administered separately to the apical or the basolateral domain. Initially each marker was visualized within distinct apical or basolateral peripheral endosomes. However, after 15 min at 37 degrees C, both markers were observed within common perinuclear structures. The compartment in which meeting first occurred was shown to be a late endosome (prelysosome) that labeled extensively with antibodies against the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (MPR) on cryosections. With increasing incubation times, markers passed from these MPR-positive structures into a common set of MPR-negative lysosomes that were mainly located in the apical half of the cell. A detailed quantitative analysis of the endocytic pathways was carried out using stereological techniques in conjunction with horseradish peroxidase and acid phosphatase cytochemistry. This enabled us to estimate the absolute volumes and membrane surface areas of the endocytic organelles involved in apical and basolateral endocytosis. PMID:2557351

  19. Differential interaction with endocytic and exocytic pathways distinguish parasitophorous vacuoles of Coxiella burnetii and Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Heinzen, R A; Scidmore, M A; Rockey, D D; Hackstadt, T

    1996-03-01

    Coxiella burnetii and Chlamydia trachomatis are bacterial obligate intracellular parasites that occupy distinct vacuolar niches within eucaryotic host cells. We have employed immunofluorescence, cytochemistry, fluorescent vital stains, and fluid-phase markers in conjunction with electron, confocal, and conventional microscopy to characterize the vacuolar environments of these pathogens. The acidic nature of the C. burnetii-containing vacuole was confirmed by its acquisition of the acidotropic base acridine orange (AO). The presence of the vacuolar-type (H+) ATPase (V-ATPase) within the Coxiella vacuolar membrane was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence, and growth of C. burnetii was inhibited by bafilomycin A1 (Baf A), a specific inhibitor of the V-ATPase. In contrast, AO did not accumulate in C. trachomatis inclusions nor was the V-ATPase found in the inclusion membrane. Moreover, chlamydial growth was not inhibited by Baf A or the lysosomotropic amines methylamine, ammonium chloride, and chloroquine. Vacuoles harboring C. burnetii incorporated the fluorescent fluid- phase markers, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FITC-dex) and Lucifer yellow (LY), indicating trafficking between that vacuole and the endocytic pathway. Neither FITC-dex nor LY was sequestered by chlamydial inclusions. The late endosomal-prelysosomal marker cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor was not detectable in the vacuolar membranes encompassing either parasite. However, the lysosomal enzymes acid phosphatase and cathepsin D and the lysosomal glycoproteins LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 localized to the C. burnetii vacuole but not the chlamydial vacuole. Interaction of C. trachomatis inclusions with the Golgi-derived vesicles was demonstrated by the transport of sphingomyelin, endogenously synthesized from C6-NBD-ceramide, to the chlamydial inclusion and incorporation into the bacterial cell wall. Similar trafficking of C-NBD-ceramide was not evident in C. burnetii-infected cells

  20. Differential interaction with endocytic and exocytic pathways distinguish parasitophorous vacuoles of Coxiella burnetii and Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed Central

    Heinzen, R A; Scidmore, M A; Rockey, D D; Hackstadt, T

    1996-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii and Chlamydia trachomatis are bacterial obligate intracellular parasites that occupy distinct vacuolar niches within eucaryotic host cells. We have employed immunofluorescence, cytochemistry, fluorescent vital stains, and fluid-phase markers in conjunction with electron, confocal, and conventional microscopy to characterize the vacuolar environments of these pathogens. The acidic nature of the C. burnetii-containing vacuole was confirmed by its acquisition of the acidotropic base acridine orange (AO). The presence of the vacuolar-type (H+) ATPase (V-ATPase) within the Coxiella vacuolar membrane was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence, and growth of C. burnetii was inhibited by bafilomycin A1 (Baf A), a specific inhibitor of the V-ATPase. In contrast, AO did not accumulate in C. trachomatis inclusions nor was the V-ATPase found in the inclusion membrane. Moreover, chlamydial growth was not inhibited by Baf A or the lysosomotropic amines methylamine, ammonium chloride, and chloroquine. Vacuoles harboring C. burnetii incorporated the fluorescent fluid- phase markers, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FITC-dex) and Lucifer yellow (LY), indicating trafficking between that vacuole and the endocytic pathway. Neither FITC-dex nor LY was sequestered by chlamydial inclusions. The late endosomal-prelysosomal marker cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor was not detectable in the vacuolar membranes encompassing either parasite. However, the lysosomal enzymes acid phosphatase and cathepsin D and the lysosomal glycoproteins LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 localized to the C. burnetii vacuole but not the chlamydial vacuole. Interaction of C. trachomatis inclusions with the Golgi-derived vesicles was demonstrated by the transport of sphingomyelin, endogenously synthesized from C6-NBD-ceramide, to the chlamydial inclusion and incorporation into the bacterial cell wall. Similar trafficking of C-NBD-ceramide was not evident in C. burnetii-infected cells

  1. A Comparative Study on the Alterations of Endocytic Pathways in Multiple Lysosomal Storage Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Jeff; Manthe, Rachel L; Solomon, Melani; Garnacho, Carmen; Muro, Silvia

    2016-02-01

    Many cellular activities and pharmaceutical interventions involve endocytosis and delivery to lysosomes for processing. Hence, lysosomal processing defects can cause cell and tissue damage, as in lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) characterized by lysosomal accumulation of undegraded materials. This storage causes endocytic and trafficking alterations, which exacerbate disease and hinder treatment. However, there have been no systematic studies comparing different endocytic routes in LSDs. Here, we used genetic and pharmacological models of four LSDs (type A Niemann-Pick, type C Niemann-Pick, Fabry, and Gaucher diseases) and evaluated the pinocytic and receptor-mediated activity of the clathrin-, caveolae-, and macropinocytic routes. Bulk pinocytosis was diminished in all diseases, suggesting a generic endocytic alteration linked to lysosomal storage. Fluid-phase (dextran) and ligand (transferrin) uptake via the clathrin route were lower for all LSDs. Fluid-phase and ligand (cholera toxin B) uptake via the caveolar route were both affected but less acutely in Fabry or Gaucher diseases. Epidermal growth factor-induced macropinocytosis was altered in Niemann-Pick cells but not other LSDs. Intracellular trafficking of ligands was also distorted in LSD versus wild-type cells. The extent of these endocytic alterations paralleled the level of cholesterol storage in disease cell lines. Confirming this, pharmacological induction of cholesterol storage in wild-type cells disrupted endocytosis, and model therapeutics restored uptake in proportion to their efficacy in attenuating storage. This suggests a proportional and reversible relationship between endocytosis and lipid (cholesterol) storage. By analogy, the accumulation of biological material in other diseases, or foreign material from drugs or their carriers, may cause similar deficits, warranting further investigation. PMID:26702793

  2. Regulation of the V-ATPase along the Endocytic Pathway Occurs through Reversible Subunit Association and Membrane Localization

    PubMed Central

    Lafourcade, Céline; Sobo, Komla; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Garin, Jérome; van der Goot, F. Gisou

    2008-01-01

    The lumen of endosomal organelles becomes increasingly acidic when going from the cell surface to lysosomes. Luminal pH thereby regulates important processes such as the release of internalized ligands from their receptor or the activation of lysosomal enzymes. The main player in endosomal acidification is the vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), a multi-subunit transmembrane complex that pumps protons from the cytoplasm to the lumen of organelles, or to the outside of the cell. The active V-ATPase is composed of two multi-subunit domains, the transmembrane V0 and the cytoplasmic V1. Here we found that the ratio of membrane associated V1/Vo varies along the endocytic pathway, the relative abundance of V1 being higher on late endosomes than on early endosomes, providing an explanation for the higher acidity of late endosomes. We also found that all membrane-bound V-ATPase subunits were associated with detergent resistant membranes (DRM) isolated from late endosomes, raising the possibility that association with lipid-raft like domains also plays a role in regulating the activity of the proton pump. In support of this, we found that treatment of cells with U18666A, a drug that leads to the accumulation of cholesterol in late endosomes, affected acidification of late endosome. Altogether our findings indicate that the activity of the vATPase in the endocytic pathway is regulated both by reversible association/dissociation and the interaction with specific lipid environments. PMID:18648502

  3. AtVPS41-mediated endocytic pathway is essential for pollen tube–stigma interaction in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lihong; Liu, Jingjing; Zhong, Sheng; Gu, Hongya; Qu, Li-Jia

    2016-01-01

    In flowering plants, extensive male–female interactions are required for successful fertilization in which various signaling cascades are involved. Prevacuolar compartments (PVC) and vacuoles are two types of subcellular compartments that terminate signal transduction by sequestrating signaling molecules in yeast and mammalian cells; however, the manner in which they might be involved in male–female interactions in plants is unknown. In this study, we identified Arabidopsis thaliana vacuolar protein sorting 41 (AtVPS41), encoded by a single-copy gene with sequence similarity to yeast Vps41p, as a new factor controlling pollen tube–stigma interaction. Loss of AtVPS41 function disrupted penetration of pollen tubes into the transmitting tissue and thus led to failed male transmission. In the pollen tubes, AtVPS41 protein is associated with PVCs and the tonoplast. We demonstrate that AtVPS41 is required for the late stage of the endocytic pathway (i.e., endomembrane trafficking from PVCs to vacuoles) because internalization of cell-surface molecules was normal in the vps41-deficient pollen tubes, whereas PVC-to-vacuole trafficking was impaired. We further show that the CHCR domain is required for subcellular localization and biological functioning of AtVPS41. These results indicate that the AtVPS41-mediated late stage of the endocytic pathway is essential for pollen tube–stigma interaction in Arabidopsis. PMID:27185920

  4. Endocytic pathway rapidly delivers internalized molecules to lysosomes: an analysis of vesicle trafficking, clustering and mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Pangarkar, Chinmay; Dinh, Anh-Tuan; Mitragotri, Samir

    2012-08-20

    Lysosomes play a critical role in intracellular drug delivery. For enzyme-based therapies, they represent a potential target site whereas for nucleic acid or many protein drugs, they represent the potential degradation site. Either way, understanding the mechanisms and processes involved in routing of materials to lysosomes after cellular entry is of high interest to the field of drug delivery. Most therapeutic cargoes other than small hydrophobic molecules enter the cells through endocytosis. Endocytosed cargoes are routed to lysosomes via microtubule-based transport and are ultimately shared by various lysosomes via tethering and clustering of endocytic vesicles followed by exchange of their contents. Using a combined experimental and numerical approach, here we studied the rates of mass transfer into and among the endocytic vesicles in a model cell line, 3T3 fibroblasts. In order to understand the relationship of mass transfer with microtubular transport and vesicle clustering, we varied both properties through various pharmacological agents. At the same time, microtubular transport and vesicle clustering were modeled through diffusion-advection equations and the Smoluchowski equations, respectively. Our analysis revealed that the rate of mass transfer is optimally related to microtubular transport and clustering properties of vesicles. Further, the rate of mass transfer is highest in the innate state of the cell. Any perturbation to either microtubular transport or vesicle aggregation led to reduced mass transfer to lysosome. These results suggest that in the absence of an external intervention the endocytic pathway appears to maximize molecular delivery to lysosomes. Strategies are discussed to reduce mass transfer to lysosomes so as to extend the residence time of molecules in endosomes or late endosomes, thus potentially increasing the likelihood of their escape before disposition in the lysosomes.

  5. Functionalized quantum dots induce proinflammatory responses in vitro: the role of terminal functional group-associated endocytic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yijuan; Pan, Hong; Zhang, Pengfei; Gao, Ningning; Lin, Yi; Luo, Zichao; Li, Ping; Wang, Ce; Liu, Lanlan; Pang, Daiwen; Cai, Lintao; Ma, Yifan

    2013-06-01

    PEGylation has been applied as an effective strategy of surface functionalization to improve the stability and reduce non-specific binding of quantum dots (QDs). However, its effects on the proinflammatory properties of QDs and the underlying mechanism have not been well elucidated yet. Herein, the proinflammatory effects of PEGylated CdSe/ZnS QDs with an amphiphilic polymer coating (PEG-pQDs) were investigated in human pulmonary epithelial cells and macrophages by evaluating the cytokine/chemokine production. The results showed that the proinflammatory effects of PEG-pQDs were strongly associated with the functional groups (-COOH, -NH2, -OH, and -OCH3) at the end of PEG chain. COOH-PEG-pQDs demonstrated the most proinflammatory effects followed by NH2-PEG-pQDs and HO-PEG-pQDs with CH3O-PEG-pQDs exhibiting the least proinflammatory effects. The proinflammatory effects of PEG-pQDs relied on lipid raft- and class A scavenger receptor (SRA)-dependent endocytic pathways as well as the downstream NF-κB and MAPK signaling cascades. COOH-PEG-pQDs were selectively internalized by lipid raft- and SRA-mediated endocytosis, which consequently activated NF-κB signaling pathway. On the other hand, NH2-PEG-pQDs and HO-PEG-pQDs were mostly internalized via lipid raft-mediated endocytosis, thereby activating p38 MAPK/AP-1 signaling cascades. These data revealed a critical role of terminal functional group-associated endocytic pathways in the proinflammatory responses induced by PEGylated QDs in human pulmonary epithelial cells and macrophages.PEGylation has been applied as an effective strategy of surface functionalization to improve the stability and reduce non-specific binding of quantum dots (QDs). However, its effects on the proinflammatory properties of QDs and the underlying mechanism have not been well elucidated yet. Herein, the proinflammatory effects of PEGylated CdSe/ZnS QDs with an amphiphilic polymer coating (PEG-pQDs) were investigated in human pulmonary epithelial

  6. Different rotavirus strains enter MA104 cells through different endocytic pathways: the role of clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Michelle; Isa, Pavel; Sánchez-San Martin, Claudia; Pérez-Vargas, Jimena; Espinosa, Rafaela; Arias, Carlos F; López, Susana

    2010-09-01

    Rotaviruses, the single most important agents of acute severe gastroenteritis in children, are nonenveloped viruses formed by a three-layered capsid that encloses a genome formed by 11 segments of double-stranded RNA. The mechanism of entry of these viruses into the host cell is not well understood. The best-studied strain, RRV, which is sensitive to neuraminidase (NA) treatment of the cells, uses integrins alpha2 beta1 and alphav beta3 and the heat shock protein hsc70 as receptors and enters MA104 cells through a non-clathrin-, non-caveolin-mediated pathway that depends on a functional dynamin and on the presence of cholesterol on the cell surface. In this work, using a combination of pharmacological, biochemical, and genetic approaches, we compared the entry characteristics of four rotavirus strains known to have different receptor requirements. We chose four rotavirus strains that represent all phenotypic combinations of NA resistance or sensitivity and integrin dependence or independence. We found that even though all the strains share their requirements for hsc70, dynamin, and cholesterol, three of them differ from the simian strain RRV in the endocytic pathway used. The human strain Wa, porcine strain TFR-41, and bovine strain UK seem to enter the cell through clathrin-mediated endocytosis, since treatments that inhibit this pathway block their infectivity; consistent with this entry route, these strains were sensitive to changes in the endosomal pH. The inhibition of other endocytic mechanisms, such as macropinocytosis or caveola-mediated uptake, had no effect on the internalization of the rotavirus strains tested here.

  7. Localization of the Rsp5p Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase at Multiple Sites within the Endocytic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangli; McCaffery, J. Michael; Wendland, Beverly; Dupré, Sophie; Haguenauer-Tsapis, Rosine; Huibregtse, Jon M.

    2001-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RSP5 gene encodes an essential HECT E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase. Rsp5p contains an N-terminal C2 domain, three WW domains in the central portion of the molecule, and a C-terminal catalytic HECT domain. A diverse group of substrates of Rsp5p and vertebrate C2 WW-domain-containing HECT E3s have been identified, including both nuclear and membrane-associated proteins. We determined the intracellular localization of Rsp5p and the determinants necessary for localization, in order to better understand how Rsp5p activities are coordinated. Using both green fluorescent protein fusions to Rsp5p and immunogold electron microscopy, we found that Rsp5p was distributed in a punctate pattern at the plasma membrane, corresponding to membrane invaginations that are likely sites of endosome formation, as well as at perivacuolar sites. The latter appeared to correspond to endocytic intermediates, as these structures were not seen in a sla2/end4-1 mutant, and double-immunogold labeling demonstrated colocalization of Rsp5p with the endosomal markers Pep12p and Vps32p. The C2 domain was an important determinant of localization; however, mutations that disrupted HECT domain function also caused mislocalization of Rsp5p, indicating that enzymatic activity is linked to localization. Deletion of the C2 domain partially stabilized Fur4p, a protein previously shown to undergo Rsp5p- and ubiquitin-mediated endocytosis; however, Fur4p was still ubiquitinated at the plasma membrane when the C2 domain was deleted from the protein. Together, these results indicate that Rsp5p is located at multiple sites within the endocytic pathway and suggest that Rsp5p may function at multiple steps in the ubiquitin-mediated endocytosis pathway. PMID:11313482

  8. GLUT4 and transferrin receptor are differentially sorted along the endocytic pathway in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, M L; Bonzelius, F; Scully, R M; Kelly, R B; Herman, G A

    1998-02-01

    The trafficking of GLUT4, a facilitative glucose transporter, is examined in transfected CHO cells. In previous work, we expressed GLUT4 in neuroendocrine cells and fibroblasts and found that it was targeted to a population of small vesicles slightly larger than synaptic vesicles (Herman, G.A, F. Bonzelius, A.M. Cieutat, and R.B. Kelly. 1994. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 91: 12750-12754.). In this study, we demonstrate that at 37 degrees C, GLUT4-containing small vesicles (GSVs) are detected after cell surface radiolabeling of GLUT4 whereas uptake of radioiodinated human transferrin does not show appreciable accumulation within these small vesicles. Immunofluorescence microscopy experiments show that at 37 degrees C, cell surface-labeled GLUT4 as well as transferrin is internalized into peripheral and perinuclear structures. At 15 degrees C, endocytosis of GLUT4 continues to occur at a slowed rate, but whereas fluorescently labeled GLUT4 is seen to accumulate within large peripheral endosomes, no perinuclear structures are labeled, and no radiolabeled GSVs are detectable. Shifting cells to 37 degrees C after accumulating labeled GLUT4 at 15 degrees C results in the reappearance of GLUT4 in perinuclear structures and GSV reformation. Cytosol acidification or treatment with hypertonic media containing sucrose prevents the exit of GLUT4 from peripheral endosomes as well as GSV formation, suggesting that coat proteins may be involved in the endocytic trafficking of GLUT4. In contrast, at 15 degrees C, transferrin continues to traffic to perinuclear structures and overall labels structures similar in distribution to those observed at 37 degrees C. Furthermore, treatment with hypertonic media has no apparent effect on transferrin trafficking from peripheral endosomes. Double-labeling experiments after the internalization of both transferrin and surface-labeled GLUT4 show that GLUT4 accumulates within peripheral compartments that exclude the transferrin receptor (TfR) at

  9. Interaction of the Human Papillomavirus E6 Oncoprotein with Sorting Nexin 27 Modulates Endocytic Cargo Transport Pathways.

    PubMed

    Ganti, Ketaki; Massimi, Paola; Manzo-Merino, Joaquin; Tomaić, Vjekoslav; Pim, David; Playford, Martin P; Lizano, Marcela; Roberts, Sally; Kranjec, Christian; Doorbar, John; Banks, Lawrence

    2016-09-01

    A subset of high-risk Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of a large number of human cancers, of which cervical is the most common. Two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, contribute directly towards the development and maintenance of malignancy. A characteristic feature of the E6 oncoproteins from cancer-causing HPV types is the presence of a PDZ binding motif (PBM) at its C-terminus, which confers interaction with cellular proteins harbouring PDZ domains. Here we show that this motif allows E6 interaction with Sorting Nexin 27 (SNX27), an essential component of endosomal recycling pathways. This interaction is highly conserved across E6 proteins from multiple high-risk HPV types and is mediated by a classical PBM-PDZ interaction but unlike many E6 targets, SNX27 is not targeted for degradation by E6. Rather, in HPV-18 positive cell lines the association of SNX27 with components of the retromer complex and the endocytic transport machinery is altered in an E6 PBM-dependent manner. Analysis of a SNX27 cargo, the glucose transporter GLUT1, reveals an E6-dependent maintenance of GLUT1 expression and alteration in its association with components of the endocytic transport machinery. Furthermore, knockdown of E6 in HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells phenocopies the loss of SNX27, both in terms of GLUT1 expression levels and its vesicular localization, with a concomitant marked reduction in glucose uptake, whilst loss of SNX27 results in slower cell proliferation in low nutrient conditions. These results demonstrate that E6 interaction with SNX27 can alter the recycling of cargo molecules, one consequence of which is modulation of nutrient availability in HPV transformed tumour cells. PMID:27649450

  10. Interaction of the Human Papillomavirus E6 Oncoprotein with Sorting Nexin 27 Modulates Endocytic Cargo Transport Pathways.

    PubMed

    Ganti, Ketaki; Massimi, Paola; Manzo-Merino, Joaquin; Tomaić, Vjekoslav; Pim, David; Playford, Martin P; Lizano, Marcela; Roberts, Sally; Kranjec, Christian; Doorbar, John; Banks, Lawrence

    2016-09-01

    A subset of high-risk Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of a large number of human cancers, of which cervical is the most common. Two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, contribute directly towards the development and maintenance of malignancy. A characteristic feature of the E6 oncoproteins from cancer-causing HPV types is the presence of a PDZ binding motif (PBM) at its C-terminus, which confers interaction with cellular proteins harbouring PDZ domains. Here we show that this motif allows E6 interaction with Sorting Nexin 27 (SNX27), an essential component of endosomal recycling pathways. This interaction is highly conserved across E6 proteins from multiple high-risk HPV types and is mediated by a classical PBM-PDZ interaction but unlike many E6 targets, SNX27 is not targeted for degradation by E6. Rather, in HPV-18 positive cell lines the association of SNX27 with components of the retromer complex and the endocytic transport machinery is altered in an E6 PBM-dependent manner. Analysis of a SNX27 cargo, the glucose transporter GLUT1, reveals an E6-dependent maintenance of GLUT1 expression and alteration in its association with components of the endocytic transport machinery. Furthermore, knockdown of E6 in HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells phenocopies the loss of SNX27, both in terms of GLUT1 expression levels and its vesicular localization, with a concomitant marked reduction in glucose uptake, whilst loss of SNX27 results in slower cell proliferation in low nutrient conditions. These results demonstrate that E6 interaction with SNX27 can alter the recycling of cargo molecules, one consequence of which is modulation of nutrient availability in HPV transformed tumour cells.

  11. Interaction of the Human Papillomavirus E6 Oncoprotein with Sorting Nexin 27 Modulates Endocytic Cargo Transport Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ganti, Ketaki; Massimi, Paola; Manzo-Merino, Joaquin; Tomaić, Vjekoslav; Pim, David; Playford, Martin P.; Lizano, Marcela; Roberts, Sally; Kranjec, Christian; Doorbar, John; Banks, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    A subset of high-risk Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of a large number of human cancers, of which cervical is the most common. Two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, contribute directly towards the development and maintenance of malignancy. A characteristic feature of the E6 oncoproteins from cancer-causing HPV types is the presence of a PDZ binding motif (PBM) at its C-terminus, which confers interaction with cellular proteins harbouring PDZ domains. Here we show that this motif allows E6 interaction with Sorting Nexin 27 (SNX27), an essential component of endosomal recycling pathways. This interaction is highly conserved across E6 proteins from multiple high-risk HPV types and is mediated by a classical PBM-PDZ interaction but unlike many E6 targets, SNX27 is not targeted for degradation by E6. Rather, in HPV-18 positive cell lines the association of SNX27 with components of the retromer complex and the endocytic transport machinery is altered in an E6 PBM-dependent manner. Analysis of a SNX27 cargo, the glucose transporter GLUT1, reveals an E6-dependent maintenance of GLUT1 expression and alteration in its association with components of the endocytic transport machinery. Furthermore, knockdown of E6 in HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells phenocopies the loss of SNX27, both in terms of GLUT1 expression levels and its vesicular localization, with a concomitant marked reduction in glucose uptake, whilst loss of SNX27 results in slower cell proliferation in low nutrient conditions. These results demonstrate that E6 interaction with SNX27 can alter the recycling of cargo molecules, one consequence of which is modulation of nutrient availability in HPV transformed tumour cells. PMID:27649450

  12. Oncogenic activation of the Met receptor tyrosine kinase fusion protein, Tpr-Met, involves exclusion from the endocytic degradative pathway.

    PubMed

    Mak, H H L; Peschard, P; Lin, T; Naujokas, M A; Zuo, D; Park, M

    2007-11-01

    Multiple mechanisms of dysregulation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are observed in human cancers. In addition to gain-of-function, loss of negative regulation also contributes to oncogenic activation of RTKs. Negative regulation of many RTKs involves their internalization and degradation in the lysosome, a process regulated through ubiquitination. RTK oncoproteins activated following chromosomal translocation, are no longer transmembrane proteins, and are predicted to escape lysosomal degradation. To test this, we used the Tpr-Met oncogene, generated following chromosomal translocation of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor (Met). Unlike Met, Tpr-Met is localized in the cytoplasm and also lacks the binding site for Cbl ubiquitin ligases. We determined whether subcellular localization of Tpr-Met, and/or loss of its Cbl-binding site, is important for oncogenic activity. Presence of a Cbl-binding site and ubiquitination of cytosolic Tpr-Met oncoproteins does not alter their transforming activity. In contrast, plasma membrane targeting allows Tpr-Met to enter the endocytic pathway, and Tpr-Met transforming activity as well as protein stability are decreased in a Cbl-dependent manner. We show that transformation by Tpr-Met is in part dependent on its ability to escape normal downregulatory mechanisms. This provides a paradigm for many RTK oncoproteins activated following chromosomal translocation.

  13. Drosophila endocytic neoplastic tumor suppressor genes regulate Sav/Wts/Hpo signaling and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Brian S; Moberg, Kenneth H

    2011-12-01

    Genetic screens in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster have identified a class of neoplastic tumor suppressor genes (endocytic nTSGs), which encode proteins that localize to endosomes and facilitate the trafficking of membrane-bound receptors and adhesion molecules into the degradative lysosome. Loss of endocytic nTSGs transforms imaginal disc epithelia into highly proliferative, invasive tissues that fail to differentiate and display defects in cellular apicobasal polarity, adhesion and tissue architecture. As vertebrate homologs of some Drosophila nTSGs are linked to tumor formation, identifying molecular changes in signaling associated with nTSG loss could inform understanding of neoplastic transformation in vertebrates. Here we show that mutations in genes that act at multiple steps of the endolysosomal pathway lead to autonomous activation of the Sav/Wts/Hpo (SWH) transcriptional effector Yki (YAP/TAZ in vertebrates) and the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which is known to promote Yki activity in cells with disrupted polarity. Yki and JNK activity are elevated by mutations at multiple steps in the endolysosomal pathway including mutations in the AP-2σ gene, which encodes a component of the AP-2 adaptor complex that recruits cargoes into clathrin-coated pits for subsequent internalization. Moreover, reduction of JNK activity can decrease elevated Yki-signaling caused by altered endocytosis. These studies reveal a broad requirement for components of the endocytic pathway in regulating SWH and JNK outputs, and place Drosophila endocytic nTSGs into a network that involving two major signaling pathways implicated in oncogenesis. PMID:22101275

  14. Two DNA nanomachines map pH changes along intersecting endocytic pathways inside the same cell.

    PubMed

    Modi, Souvik; Nizak, Clément; Surana, Sunaina; Halder, Saheli; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2013-06-01

    DNA is a versatile scaffold for molecular sensing in living cells, and various cellular applications of DNA nanodevices have been demonstrated. However, the simultaneous use of different DNA nanodevices within the same living cell remains a challenge. Here, we show that two distinct DNA nanomachines can be used simultaneously to map pH gradients along two different but intersecting cellular entry pathways. The two nanomachines, which are molecularly programmed to enter cells via different pathways, can map pH changes within well-defined subcellular environments along both pathways inside the same cell. We applied these nanomachines to probe the pH of early endosomes and the trans-Golgi network, in real time. When delivered either sequentially or simultaneously, both nanomachines localized into and independently captured the pH of the organelles for which they were designed. The successful functioning of DNA nanodevices within living systems has important implications for sensing and therapies in a diverse range of contexts.

  15. Infectious Entry of West Nile Virus Occurs through a Clathrin-Mediated Endocytic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chu, J. J. H.; Ng, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    The pathway of West Nile flavivirus early internalization events was mapped in detail in this study. Overexpression of dominant-negative mutants of Eps15 strongly inhibits West Nile virus (WNV) internalization, and pharmacological drugs that blocks clathrin also caused a marked reduction in virus entry but not caveola-dependent endocytosis inhibitory agent, filipin. Using immunocryoelectron microscopy, WNV particles were seen within clathrin-coated pits after 2 min postinfection. Double-labeling immunofluorescence assays and immunoelectron microscopy performed with anti-WNV envelope or capsid proteins and cellular markers (EEA1 and LAMP1) revealed the trafficking pathway of internalized virus particles from early endosomes to lysosomes and finally the uncoating of the virus particles. Disruption of host cell cytoskeleton (actin filaments and microtubules) with cytochalasin D and nocodazole showed significant reduction in virus infectivity. Actin filaments are shown to be essential during the initial penetration of the virus across the plasma membrane, whereas microtubules are involved in the trafficking of internalized virus from early endosomes to lysosomes for uncoating. Cells treated with lysosomotropic agents were largely resistant to infection, indicating that a low-pH-dependent step is required for WNV infection. In situ hybridization of DNA probes specific for viral RNA demonstrated the trafficking of uncoated viral RNA genomes to the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:15367621

  16. A membrane microdomain-associated protein, Arabidopsis Flot1, is involved in a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway and is required for seedling development.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruili; Liu, Peng; Wan, Yinglang; Chen, Tong; Wang, Qinli; Mettbach, Ursula; Baluska, Frantisek; Samaj, Jozef; Fang, Xiaohong; Lucas, William J; Lin, Jinxing

    2012-05-01

    Endocytosis is essential for the maintenance of protein and lipid compositions in the plasma membrane and for the acquisition of materials from the extracellular space. Clathrin-dependent and -independent endocytic processes are well established in yeast and animals; however, endocytic pathways involved in cargo internalization and intracellular trafficking remain to be fully elucidated for plants. Here, we used transgenic green fluorescent protein-flotillin1 (GFP-Flot1) Arabidopsis thaliana plants in combination with confocal microscopy analysis and transmission electron microscopy immunogold labeling to study the spatial and dynamic aspects of GFP-Flot1-positive vesicle formation. Vesicle size, as outlined by the gold particles, was ∼100 nm, which is larger than the 30-nm size of clathrin-coated vesicles. GFP-Flot1 also did not colocalize with clathrin light chain-mOrange. Variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy also revealed that the dynamic behavior of GFP-Flot1-positive puncta was different from that of clathrin light chain-mOrange puncta. Furthermore, disruption of membrane microdomains caused a significant alteration in the dynamics of Flot1-positive puncta. Analysis of artificial microRNA Flot1 transgenic Arabidopsis lines established that a reduction in Flot1 transcript levels gave rise to a reduction in shoot and root meristem size plus retardation in seedling growth. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that, in plant cells, Flot1 is involved in a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway and functions in seedling development.

  17. Uptake of Helicobacter pylori Vesicles Is Facilitated by Clathrin-Dependent and Clathrin-Independent Endocytic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Annelie; Nygård Skalman, Lars; Obi, Ikenna; Lundmark, Richard

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria shed a diverse set of outer membrane vesicles that function as transport vehicles to deliver effector molecules and virulence factors to host cells. Helicobacter pylori is a gastric pathogen that infects half of the world’s population, and in some individuals the infection progresses into peptic ulcer disease or gastric cancer. Here we report that intact vesicles from H. pylori are internalized by clathrin-dependent endocytosis and further dynamin-dependent processes, as well as in a cholesterol-sensitive manner. We analyzed the uptake of H. pylori vesicles by gastric epithelial cells using a method that we refer to as quantification of internalized substances (qIS). The qIS assay is based on a near-infrared dye with a cleavable linker that enables the specific quantification of internalized substances after exposure to reducing conditions. Both chemical inhibition and RNA interference in combination with the qIS assay showed that H. pylori vesicles enter gastric epithelial cells via both clathrin-mediated endocytosis and additional endocytic processes that are dependent on dynamin. Confocal microscopy revealed that H. pylori vesicles colocalized with clathrin and dynamin II and with markers of subsequent endosomal and lysosomal trafficking. Interestingly, however, knockdown of components required for caveolae had no significant effect on internalization and knockdown of components required for clathrin-independent carrier (CLIC) endocytosis increased internalization of H. pylori vesicles. Furthermore, uptake of vesicles by both clathrin-dependent and -independent pathways was sensitive to depletion, but not sequestering, of cholesterol in the host cell membrane suggesting that membrane fluidity influences the efficiency of H. pylori vesicle uptake. PMID:24846379

  18. Urothelial endocytic vesicle recycling and lysosomal degradative pathway regulated by lipid membrane composition.

    PubMed

    Grasso, E J; Calderón, R O

    2013-02-01

    The urothelium, a specialized epithelium that covers the mucosa cell surface of the urinary bladder, undergoes dramatic morphological changes during the micturition cycle that involve a membrane apical traffic. This traffic was first described as a lysosomal pathway, in addition to the known endocytosis/exocytosis membrane recycling. In an attempt to understand the role of membrane lipid composition in those effects, we previously described the lipid-dependent leakage of the endocytosed vesicle content. In this work, we demonstrated clear differences in the traffic of both the fluid probe and the membrane-bound probe in urothelial umbrella cells by using spectrofluorometry and/or confocal and epifluorescence microscopy. Different membrane lipid compositions were established by using three diet formulae enriched in oleic acid, linoleic acid and a commercial formula. Between three and five animals for each dietary treatment were used for each analysis. The decreased endocytosis of both fluid and membrane-bound probes (approximately 32 and 49 % lower, respectively) in oleic acid-derived umbrella cells was concomitant with an increased recycling (approximately 4.0 and 3.7 times, respectively) and diminished sorting to the lysosome (approximately 23 and 37 %, respectively) when compared with the control umbrella cells. The higher intravesicular pH and the impairment of the lysosomal pathway of oleic acid diet-derived vesicles compared to linoleic acid diet-derived vesicles and control diet-derived vesicles correlate with our findings of a lower V-ATPase activity previously reported. We integrated the results obtained in the present and previous work to determine the sorting of endocytosed material (fluid and membrane-bound probes) into the different cell compartments. Finally, the weighted average effect of the individual alterations on the intracellular distribution was evaluated. The results shown in this work add evidences for the modulatory role of the membrane

  19. Direct Visualization of Ebola Virus Fusion Triggering in the Endocytic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Jennifer S.; Krause, Tyler B.; Mittler, Eva; Jangra, Rohit K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ebola virus (EBOV) makes extensive and intricate use of host factors in the cellular endosomal/lysosomal pathway to release its genome into the cytoplasm and initiate infection. Following viral internalization into endosomes, host cysteine proteases cleave the EBOV fusion glycoprotein (GP) to unmask the binding site for its intracellular receptor, the cholesterol transporter Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1). GP-NPC1 interaction is required for viral entry. Despite these and other recent discoveries, late events in EBOV entry following GP-NPC1 binding and culminating in GP-catalyzed fusion between viral and cellular lipid bilayers remain enigmatic. A mechanistic understanding of EBOV membrane fusion has been hampered by the failure of previous efforts to reconstitute fusion in vitro or at the cell surface. This report describes an assay to monitor initial steps directly in EBOV membrane fusion—triggering of GP and virus-cell lipid mixing—by single virions in live cells. Fusogenic triggering of GP occurs predominantly in Rab7-positive (Rab7+) endosomes, absolutely requires interaction between proteolytically primed GP and NPC1, and is blocked by key GP-specific neutralizing antibodies with therapeutic potential. Unexpectedly, cysteine protease inhibitors do not inhibit lipid mixing by virions bearing precleaved GP, even though they completely block cytoplasmic entry by these viruses, as shown previously. These results point to distinct cellular requirements for different steps in EBOV membrane fusion and suggest a model in which host cysteine proteases are dispensable for GP fusion triggering after NPC1 binding but are required for the formation of fusion pores that permit genome delivery. PMID:26861015

  20. Desmosome Assembly and Disassembly Are Membrane Raft-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Faundez, Victor; Koval, Michael; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Strong intercellular adhesion is critical for tissues that experience mechanical stress, such as the skin and heart. Desmosomes provide adhesive strength to tissues by anchoring desmosomal cadherins of neighboring cells to the intermediate filament cytoskeleton. Alterations in assembly and disassembly compromise desmosome function and may contribute to human diseases, such as the autoimmune skin blistering disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV). We previously demonstrated that PV auto-antibodies directed against the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) cause loss of adhesion by triggering membrane raft-mediated Dsg3 endocytosis. We hypothesized that raft membrane microdomains play a broader role in desmosome homeostasis by regulating the dynamics of desmosome assembly and disassembly. In human keratinocytes, Dsg3 is raft associated as determined by biochemical and super resolution immunofluorescence microscopy methods. Cholesterol depletion, which disrupts rafts, prevented desmosome assembly and adhesion, thus functionally linking rafts to desmosome formation. Interestingly, Dsg3 did not associate with rafts in cells lacking desmosomal proteins. Additionally, PV IgG-induced desmosome disassembly occurred by redistribution of Dsg3 into raft-containing endocytic membrane domains, resulting in cholesterol-dependent loss of adhesion. These findings demonstrate that membrane rafts are required for desmosome assembly and disassembly dynamics, suggesting therapeutic potential for raft targeting agents in desmosomal diseases such as PV. PMID:24498201

  1. Novel role of the small GTPase Rheb: its implication in endocytic pathway independent of the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kota; Araki, Yasuhiro; Kontani, Kenji; Nishina, Hiroshi; Katada, Toshiaki

    2005-03-01

    The Ras-homologous GTPase Rheb that is conserved from yeast to human appears to be involved not only in cell growth but also in nutrient uptake. Recent biochemical analysis revealed that tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a GTPase-activating protein (GAP), deactivates Rheb and that phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3k)-Akt/PKB kinase pathway activates Rheb through inhibition of the GAP-mediated deactivation. Although mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is implicated in the downstream target of Rheb, the direct effector(s) and exact functions of Rheb have not been fully elucidated. Here we identified that Rheb expression in cultured cells induces the formation of large cytoplasmic vacuoles, which are characterized as late endocytic (late endosome- and lysosome-like) components. The vacuole formation required the GTP form of Rheb, but not the activation of the downstream mTOR kinase. These results suggest that Rheb regulates endocytic trafficking pathway independent of the previously identified mTOR pathway. The physiological roles of the two Rheb-dependent signaling pathways are discussed in terms of nutrient uptake and cell growth or cell cycle progression. PMID:15809346

  2. A Membrane Microdomain-Associated Protein, Arabidopsis Flot1, Is Involved in a Clathrin-Independent Endocytic Pathway and Is Required for Seedling Development[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruili; Liu, Peng; Wan, Yinglang; Chen, Tong; Wang, Qinli; Mettbach, Ursula; Baluška, František; Šamaj, Jozef; Fang, Xiaohong; Lin, Jinxing

    2012-01-01

    Endocytosis is essential for the maintenance of protein and lipid compositions in the plasma membrane and for the acquisition of materials from the extracellular space. Clathrin-dependent and -independent endocytic processes are well established in yeast and animals; however, endocytic pathways involved in cargo internalization and intracellular trafficking remain to be fully elucidated for plants. Here, we used transgenic green fluorescent protein–flotillin1 (GFP-Flot1) Arabidopsis thaliana plants in combination with confocal microscopy analysis and transmission electron microscopy immunogold labeling to study the spatial and dynamic aspects of GFP-Flot1–positive vesicle formation. Vesicle size, as outlined by the gold particles, was ∼100 nm, which is larger than the 30-nm size of clathrin-coated vesicles. GFP-Flot1 also did not colocalize with clathrin light chain-mOrange. Variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy also revealed that the dynamic behavior of GFP-Flot1–positive puncta was different from that of clathrin light chain-mOrange puncta. Furthermore, disruption of membrane microdomains caused a significant alteration in the dynamics of Flot1-positive puncta. Analysis of artificial microRNA Flot1 transgenic Arabidopsis lines established that a reduction in Flot1 transcript levels gave rise to a reduction in shoot and root meristem size plus retardation in seedling growth. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that, in plant cells, Flot1 is involved in a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway and functions in seedling development. PMID:22589463

  3. HLB1 Is a Tetratricopeptide Repeat Domain-Containing Protein That Operates at the Intersection of the Exocytic and Endocytic Pathways at the TGN/EE in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sparks, J Alan; Kwon, Taegun; Renna, Luciana; Liao, Fuqi; Brandizzi, Federica; Blancaflor, Elison B

    2016-03-01

    The endomembrane system plays essential roles in plant development, but the proteome responsible for its function and organization remains largely uncharacterized in plants. Here, we identified and characterized the HYPERSENSITIVE TO LATRUNCULIN B1 (HLB1) protein isolated through a forward-genetic screen in Arabidopsis thaliana for mutants with heightened sensitivity to actin-disrupting drugs. HLB1 is a plant-specific tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing protein of unknown function encoded by a single Arabidopsis gene. HLB1 associated with the trans-Golgi network (TGN)/early endosome (EE) and tracked along filamentous actin, indicating that it could link post-Golgi traffic with the actin cytoskeleton in plants. HLB1 was found to interact with the ADP-ribosylation-factor guanine nucleotide exchange factor, MIN7/BEN1 (HOPM INTERACTOR7/BREFELDIN A-VISUALIZED ENDOCYTIC TRAFFICKING DEFECTIVE1) by coimmunoprecipitation. The min7/ben1 mutant phenocopied the mild root developmental defects and latrunculin B hypersensitivity of hlb1, and analyses of ahlb1/ min7/ben1 double mutant showed that hlb1 and min7/ben1 operate in common genetic pathways. Based on these data, we propose that HLB1 together with MIN7/BEN1 form a complex with actin to modulate the function of the TGN/EE at the intersection of the exocytic and endocytic pathways in plants. PMID:26941089

  4. EGF‑stimulated AKT activation is mediated by EGFR recycling via an early endocytic pathway in a gefitinib‑resistant human lung cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yukio; Takiguchi, Soichi; Ito, Shigeru; Itoh, Kazuyuki

    2015-04-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its ligand epidermal growth factor (EGF) are known to play important roles in malignant tumor cells, and the EGFR signaling pathway is one of the most important targets in various tumors, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We reported recently that an aberration in certain steps of EGF-stimulated phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (pEGFR) endocytic trafficking from the early endosomes to the late endosomes occurs in the gefitinib-resistant NSCLC cells, in which large amounts of sorting nexin 1 (SNX1) are colocalized with EGFR in the aggregated early endosomes where the internalized pEGFR is also accumulated of these cells. To further investigate the role of SNX1 in EGF‑stimulated pEGFR endocytosis, followed by downstream signaling leading to the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)--the serine/threonine kinase AKT pathway, we examined the effect of depletion of SNX1 knock-down expression by siRNA and an inhibition of targeting membrane recycling using monensin. Using immunofluorescence, we observed an efficient endocytic transport of pEGFR from early endosomes to late endosomes/lysosomes after EGF-stimulation in the cells transfected with siRNA‑SNX1, whereas the delayed endocytic delivery of pEGFR was evident in the siRNA-control-transfected cells. Furthermore, a large amount of endocytosed pEGFR was accumulated in the presence of monensin in the early endosomes of the SNX1 knock-down cells. In western blot analysis, EGF stimulation of both control and cells transfected with siRNA-SNX1 resulted in rapid phosphorylation of EGFR and enhanced AKT phosphorylation. Monensin-dependent inhibition of AKT phosphorylation was stronger in SNX1 knock-down cells than in controls. In contrast, however, monensin had no effect on AKT phosphorylation triggered by activation of the MET receptor tyrosine kinase. Collectively, we suggest that EGF-stimulated recycling of

  5. Visualization of the endocytic pathway in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae using an EGFP-fused plasma membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Yujiro; Nakahama, Tomoyuki; Shoji, Jun-ya; Arioka, Manabu; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko . E-mail: akitamo@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-02-17

    Endocytosis is an important process for cellular activities. However, in filamentous fungi, the existence of endocytosis has been so far elusive. In this study, we used AoUapC-EGFP, the fusion protein of a putative uric acid-xanthine permease with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in Aspergillus oryzae, to examine whether the endocytic process occurs or not. Upon the addition of ammonium into the medium the fusion protein was internalized from the plasma membrane. The internalization of AoUapC-EGFP was completely blocked by sodium azide, cold, and cytochalasin A treatments, suggesting that the internalization possesses the general features of endocytosis. These results demonstrate the occurrence of endocytosis in filamentous fungi. Moreover, we discovered that the endosomal compartments appeared upon the induction of endocytosis and moved in a microtubule-dependent manner.

  6. DJ-1 associates with lipid rafts by palmitoylation and regulates lipid rafts-dependent endocytosis in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Soo; Kim, Jin Soo; Park, Ji-Young; Suh, Young Ho; Jou, Ilo; Joe, Eun-Hye; Park, Sang Myun

    2013-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common progressive neurodegenerative disease. Several genes have been associated with familial type PD, providing tremendous insights into the pathogenesis of PD. Gathering evidence supports the view that these gene products may operate through common molecular pathways. Recent reports suggest that many PD-associated gene products, such as α-synuclein, LRRK2, parkin and PINK1, associate with lipid rafts and lipid rafts may be associated with neurodegeneration. Here, we observed that DJ-1 protein also associated with lipid rafts. Palmitoylation of three cysteine residues (C46/53/106) and C-terminal region of DJ-1 were required for this association. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced the localization of DJ-1 into lipid rafts in astrocytes. The LPS-TLR4 signaling was more augmented in DJ-1 knock-out astrocytes by the impairment of TLR4 endocytosis. Furthermore, lipid rafts-dependent endocytosis including the endocytosis of CD14, which play a major role in regulating TLR4 endocytosis was also impaired, but clathrin-dependent endocytosis was not. This study provides a novel function of DJ-1 in lipid rafts, which may contribute the pathogenesis of PD. Moreover, it also provides the possibility that many PD-related proteins may operate through common molecular pathways in lipid rafts.

  7. Cholesterol and ORP1L-mediated ER contact sites control autophagosome transport and fusion with the endocytic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wijdeven, Ruud H.; Janssen, Hans; Nahidiazar, Leila; Janssen, Lennert; Jalink, Kees; Berlin, Ilana; Neefjes, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is the main homeostatic pathway guiding cytosolic materials for degradation by the lysosome. Maturation of autophagosomes requires their transport towards the perinuclear region of the cell, with key factors underlying both processes still poorly understood. Here we show that transport and positioning of late autophagosomes depends on cholesterol by way of the cholesterol-sensing Rab7 effector ORP1L. ORP1L localizes to late autophagosomes and—under low-cholesterol conditions—contacts the ER protein VAP-A, forming ER-autophagosome contact sites, which prevent minus-end transport by the Rab7–RILP–dynein complex. ORP1L-mediated contact sites also inhibit localization of PLEKHM1 to Rab7. PLEKHM1, together with RILP, then recruits the homotypic fusion and vacuole protein-sorting (HOPS) complex for fusion of autophagosomes with late endosomes and lysosomes. Thus, ORP1L, via its liganding by lipids and the formation of contacts between autophagic vacuoles and the ER, governs the last steps in autophagy that lead to the lysosomal degradation of cytosolic material. PMID:27283760

  8. Cholesterol and ORP1L-mediated ER contact sites control autophagosome transport and fusion with the endocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Wijdeven, Ruud H; Janssen, Hans; Nahidiazar, Leila; Janssen, Lennert; Jalink, Kees; Berlin, Ilana; Neefjes, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is the main homeostatic pathway guiding cytosolic materials for degradation by the lysosome. Maturation of autophagosomes requires their transport towards the perinuclear region of the cell, with key factors underlying both processes still poorly understood. Here we show that transport and positioning of late autophagosomes depends on cholesterol by way of the cholesterol-sensing Rab7 effector ORP1L. ORP1L localizes to late autophagosomes and-under low-cholesterol conditions-contacts the ER protein VAP-A, forming ER-autophagosome contact sites, which prevent minus-end transport by the Rab7-RILP-dynein complex. ORP1L-mediated contact sites also inhibit localization of PLEKHM1 to Rab7. PLEKHM1, together with RILP, then recruits the homotypic fusion and vacuole protein-sorting (HOPS) complex for fusion of autophagosomes with late endosomes and lysosomes. Thus, ORP1L, via its liganding by lipids and the formation of contacts between autophagic vacuoles and the ER, governs the last steps in autophagy that lead to the lysosomal degradation of cytosolic material. PMID:27283760

  9. Endocytic traffic: vesicle fusion cascade in the early endosomes.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Michael P

    2012-08-01

    New research shows that vesicles in the early endosomal network coalesce according to a classical theoretical description of aggregation put forward by Smoluchowski more than 100 years ago. This gives a new tool for unraveling complexities of the endocytic pathways.

  10. HLB1 Is a Tetratricopeptide Repeat Domain-Containing Protein That Operates at the Intersection of the Exocytic and Endocytic Pathways at the TGN/EE in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, J. Alan; Renna, Luciana; Liao, Fuqi; Brandizzi, Federica

    2016-01-01

    The endomembrane system plays essential roles in plant development, but the proteome responsible for its function and organization remains largely uncharacterized in plants. Here, we identified and characterized the HYPERSENSITIVE TO LATRUNCULIN B1 (HLB1) protein isolated through a forward-genetic screen in Arabidopsis thaliana for mutants with heightened sensitivity to actin-disrupting drugs. HLB1 is a plant-specific tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing protein of unknown function encoded by a single Arabidopsis gene. HLB1 associated with the trans-Golgi network (TGN)/early endosome (EE) and tracked along filamentous actin, indicating that it could link post-Golgi traffic with the actin cytoskeleton in plants. HLB1 was found to interact with the ADP-ribosylation-factor guanine nucleotide exchange factor, MIN7/BEN1 (HOPM INTERACTOR7/BREFELDIN A-VISUALIZED ENDOCYTIC TRAFFICKING DEFECTIVE1) by coimmunoprecipitation. The min7/ben1 mutant phenocopied the mild root developmental defects and latrunculin B hypersensitivity of hlb1, and analyses of a hlb1/ min7/ben1 double mutant showed that hlb1 and min7/ben1 operate in common genetic pathways. Based on these data, we propose that HLB1 together with MIN7/BEN1 form a complex with actin to modulate the function of the TGN/EE at the intersection of the exocytic and endocytic pathways in plants. PMID:26941089

  11. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of endocytic recycling.

    PubMed

    Reineke, James B; Xie, Shuwei; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis, which encompasses the internalization and sorting of plasma membrane (PM) lipids and proteins to distinct membrane-bound intracellular compartments, is a highly regulated and fundamental cellular process by which eukaryotic cells dynamically regulate their PM composition. Indeed, endocytosis is implicated in crucial cellular processes that include proliferation, migration, and cell division as well as maintenance of tissue homeostasis such as apical-basal polarity. Once PM constituents have been taken up into the cell, either via clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE) or clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE), they typically have two fates: degradation through the late-endosomal/lysosomal pathway or returning to the PM via endocytic recycling pathways. In this review, we will detail experimental procedures that allow for both qualitative and quantitative assessment of endocytic recycling of transmembrane proteins internalized by CDE and CIE, using the HeLa cervical cancer cell line as a model system. PMID:26360033

  12. shRNA-Based Screen Identifies Endocytic Recycling Pathway Components That Act as Genetic Modifiers of Alpha-Synuclein Aggregation, Secretion and Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Susana A; Macedo, Diana; Raquel, Helena; Simões, Pedro D; Giorgini, Flaviano; Ramalho, José S; Barral, Duarte C; Ferreira Moita, Luís; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming

    2016-04-01

    Alpha-Synuclein (aSyn) misfolding and aggregation is common in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, which are known as synucleinopathies. Accumulating evidence suggests that secretion and cell-to-cell trafficking of pathological forms of aSyn may explain the typical patterns of disease progression. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling aSyn aggregation and spreading of pathology are still elusive. In order to obtain unbiased information about the molecular regulators of aSyn oligomerization, we performed a microscopy-based large-scale RNAi screen in living cells. Interestingly, we identified nine Rab GTPase and kinase genes that modulated aSyn aggregation, toxicity and levels. From those, Rab8b, Rab11a, Rab13 and Slp5 were able to promote the clearance of aSyn inclusions and rescue aSyn induced toxicity. Furthermore, we found that endocytic recycling and secretion of aSyn was enhanced upon Rab11a and Rab13 expression in cells accumulating aSyn inclusions. Overall, our study resulted in the identification of new molecular players involved in the aggregation, toxicity, and secretion of aSyn, opening novel avenues for our understanding of the molecular basis of synucleinopathies.

  13. shRNA-Based Screen Identifies Endocytic Recycling Pathway Components That Act as Genetic Modifiers of Alpha-Synuclein Aggregation, Secretion and Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Susana A; Macedo, Diana; Raquel, Helena; Simões, Pedro D; Giorgini, Flaviano; Ramalho, José S; Barral, Duarte C; Ferreira Moita, Luís; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming

    2016-04-01

    Alpha-Synuclein (aSyn) misfolding and aggregation is common in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, which are known as synucleinopathies. Accumulating evidence suggests that secretion and cell-to-cell trafficking of pathological forms of aSyn may explain the typical patterns of disease progression. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling aSyn aggregation and spreading of pathology are still elusive. In order to obtain unbiased information about the molecular regulators of aSyn oligomerization, we performed a microscopy-based large-scale RNAi screen in living cells. Interestingly, we identified nine Rab GTPase and kinase genes that modulated aSyn aggregation, toxicity and levels. From those, Rab8b, Rab11a, Rab13 and Slp5 were able to promote the clearance of aSyn inclusions and rescue aSyn induced toxicity. Furthermore, we found that endocytic recycling and secretion of aSyn was enhanced upon Rab11a and Rab13 expression in cells accumulating aSyn inclusions. Overall, our study resulted in the identification of new molecular players involved in the aggregation, toxicity, and secretion of aSyn, opening novel avenues for our understanding of the molecular basis of synucleinopathies. PMID:27123591

  14. Calcineurin may regulate multiple endocytic processes in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Ok; Ahnn, Joohong

    2011-02-01

    Calcineurin is a serine/threonine protein phosphatase controlled by Ca(2+) and calmodulin that has been implicated in various signaling pathways. Previously, we reported that calcineurin regulates coelomocyte endocytosis in Caenorhabditis elegans. So far, simple and powerful in vivo approaches have been developed to study various endocytic processes in C. elegans. Using these in vivo assays, we further analyzed the endocytic phenotypes of calcineurin mutants. We observed that the calcineurin mutants were defective in apical endocytosis in the intestine as well as synaptic vesicle recycling in the nerve cord. However, we found that calcineurin mutants displayed normal receptor-mediated endocytosis in oocytes. Therefore, our results suggest that calcineurin may regulate specific sets of endocytic processes in nematode.

  15. The novel chlamydial adhesin CPn0473 mediates the lipid raft-dependent uptake of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Fechtner, Tim; Galle, Jan N; Hegemann, Johannes H

    2016-08-01

    Chlamydiae are Gram-negative, obligate intracellular pathogens that pose a serious threat to public health worldwide. Chlamydial surface molecules are essential for host cell invasion. The first interaction with the host cell is thereby accomplished by the Outer membrane complex protein B (OmcB) binding to heparan sulfate moieties on the host cell surface, followed by the interaction of the chlamydial polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmps) with host cell receptors. Specifically, the interaction of the Pmp21 adhesin and invasin with its human interaction partner, the epidermal growth factor receptor, results in receptor activation, down-stream signalling and finally internalization of the bacteria. Blocking both, the OmcB and Pmp21 adhesion pathways, did not completely abolish infection, suggesting the presence of additional factors relevant for host cell invasion. Here, we show that the novel surface protein CPn0473 of Chlamydia pneumoniae contributes to the binding and invasion of infectious chlamydial particles. CPn0473 is expressed late in the infection cycle and located on the infectious chlamydial cell surface. Soluble recombinant CPn0473 as well as rCPn0473-coupled fluorescent latex beads adhere to human epithelial HEp-2 cells. Interestingly, in classical infection blocking experiments pretreatment of HEp-2 cells with rCPn0473 does not attenuate adhesion but promotes dose-dependently internalization by C. pneumoniae suggesting an unusual mode of action for this adhesin. This CPn0473-dependent promotion of infection by C. pneumoniae depends on two different domains within the protein and requires intact lipid rafts. Thus, inhibition of the interaction of CPn0473 with the host cell could provide a way to reduce the virulence of C. pneumoniae.

  16. Spatio-temporal Model of Endogenous ROS and Raft-Dependent WNT/Beta-Catenin Signaling Driving Cell Fate Commitment in Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Fiete; Lemcke, Heiko; Ewald, Roland; Rharass, Tareck; Uhrmacher, Adelinde M.

    2015-01-01

    Canonical WNT/β-catenin signaling is a central pathway in embryonic development, but it is also connected to a number of cancers and developmental disorders. Here we apply a combined in-vitro and in-silico approach to investigate the spatio-temporal regulation of WNT/β-catenin signaling during the early neural differentiation process of human neural progenitors cells (hNPCs), which form a new prospect for replacement therapies in the context of neurodegenerative diseases. Experimental measurements indicate a second signal mechanism, in addition to canonical WNT signaling, being involved in the regulation of nuclear β-catenin levels during the cell fate commitment phase of neural differentiation. We find that the biphasic activation of β-catenin signaling observed experimentally can only be explained through a model that combines Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and raft dependent WNT/β-catenin signaling. Accordingly after initiation of differentiation endogenous ROS activates DVL in a redox-dependent manner leading to a transient activation of down-stream β-catenin signaling, followed by continuous auto/paracrine WNT signaling, which crucially depends on lipid rafts. Our simulation studies further illustrate the elaborate spatio-temporal regulation of DVL, which, depending on its concentration and localization, may either act as direct inducer of the transient ROS/β-catenin signal or as amplifier during continuous auto-/parcrine WNT/β-catenin signaling. In addition we provide the first stochastic computational model of WNT/β-catenin signaling that combines membrane-related and intracellular processes, including lipid rafts/receptor dynamics as well as WNT- and ROS-dependent β-catenin activation. The model’s predictive ability is demonstrated under a wide range of varying conditions for in-vitro and in-silico reference data sets. Our in-silico approach is realized in a multi-level rule-based language, that facilitates the extension and modification of the

  17. IMAGING ENDOCYTIC CLATHRIN STRUCTURES IN LIVING CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhausen, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of the clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway owes much to new visualization techniques. Budding coated pits and clathrin-coated structures are transient molecular machines with distinctive morphological characteristics, and fluorescently labeled versions of a variety of marker proteins have given us a tantalizing glimpse of the dynamics of the system in living cells. Recent live-cell imaging studies reveal unexpected modes of coat assembly, with distinct kinetics, recruitment of associated proteins, requirements for the participation of actin and its accessory proteins, and apparently, distinct mechanisms of membrane deformation. A crucial issue is to connect the events detected by light microscopy with the structures and properties of the molecular constituents. Here, I outline descriptions of coat assembly in different circumstances that are consistent with what is known from x-ray crystallography and electron microscopy. PMID:19836955

  18. Efficient Endocytic Uptake and Maturation in Drosophila Oocytes Requires Dynamitin/p50

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guojun; Sanghavi, Paulomi; Bollinger, Kathryn E.; Perry, Libby; Marshall, Brendan; Roon, Penny; Tanaka, Tsubasa; Nakamura, Akira; Gonsalvez, Graydon B.

    2015-01-01

    Dynactin is a multi-subunit complex that functions as a regulator of the Dynein motor. A central component of this complex is Dynamitin/p50 (Dmn). Dmn is required for endosome motility in mammalian cell lines. However, the extent to which Dmn participates in the sorting of cargo via the endosomal system is unknown. In this study, we examined the endocytic role of Dmn using the Drosophila melanogaster oocyte as a model. Yolk proteins are internalized into the oocyte via clathrin-mediated endocytosis, trafficked through the endocytic pathway, and stored in condensed yolk granules. Oocytes that were depleted of Dmn contained fewer yolk granules than controls. In addition, these oocytes accumulated numerous endocytic intermediate structures. Particularly prominent were enlarged endosomes that were relatively devoid of Yolk proteins. Ultrastructural and genetic analyses indicate that the endocytic intermediates are produced downstream of Rab5. Similar phenotypes were observed upon depleting Dynein heavy chain (Dhc) or Lis1. Dhc is the motor subunit of the Dynein complex and Lis1 is a regulator of Dynein activity. We therefore propose that Dmn performs its function in endocytosis via the Dynein motor. Consistent with a role for Dynein in endocytosis, the motor colocalized with the endocytic machinery at the oocyte cortex in an endocytosis-dependent manner. Our results suggest a model whereby endocytic activity recruits Dynein to the oocyte cortex. The motor along with its regulators, Dynactin and Lis1, functions to ensure efficient endocytic uptake and maturation. PMID:26265702

  19. Endocytic adaptors – social networking at the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Reider, Amanda; Wendland, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis is a dynamic process that is crucial for maintaining plasma membrane composition and controlling cell-signaling pathways. A variety of entry routes have evolved to ensure that the vast array of molecules on the cell surface can be differentially internalized by endocytosis. This diversity has extended to include a growing list of endocytic adaptor proteins, which are thought to initiate the internalization process. The key function of adaptors is to select the proteins that should be removed from the cell surface. Thus, they have a central role in defining the physiology of a cell. This has made the study of adaptor proteins a very active area of research that is ripe for exciting future discoveries. Here, we review recent work on how adaptors mediate endocytosis and address the following questions: what characteristics define an endocytic adaptor protein? What roles do these proteins fulfill in addition to selecting cargo and how might adaptors function in clathrin-independent endocytic pathways? Through the findings discussed in this Commentary, we hope to stimulate further characterization of known adaptors and expansion of the known repertoire by identification of new adaptors. PMID:21536832

  20. The Cell Biology of the Endocytic System from an Evolutionary Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wideman, Jeremy G.; Leung, Ka Fai; Field, Mark C.; Dacks, Joel B.

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary cell biology can afford an interdisciplinary comparative view that gives insights into both the functioning of modern cells and the origins of cellular systems, including the endocytic organelles. Here, we explore several recent evolutionary cell biology studies, highlighting investigations into the origin and diversity of endocytic systems in eukaryotes. Beginning with a brief overview of the eukaryote tree of life, we show how understanding the endocytic machinery in a select, but diverse, array of organisms provides insights into endocytic system origins and predicts the likely configuration in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). Next, we consider three examples in which a comparative approach yielded insight into the function of modern cellular systems. First, using ESCRT-0 as an example, we show how comparative cell biology can discover both lineage-specific novelties (ESCRT-0) as well as previously ignored ancient proteins (Tom1), likely of both evolutionary and functional importance. Second, we highlight the power of comparative cell biology for discovery of previously ignored but potentially ancient complexes (AP5). Finally, using examples from ciliates and trypanosomes, we show that not all organisms possess canonical endocytic pathways, but instead likely evolved lineage-specific mechanisms. Drawing from these case studies, we conclude that a comparative approach is a powerful strategy for advancing knowledge about the general mechanisms and functions of endocytic systems. PMID:24478384

  1. EARP is a multisubunit tethering complex involved in endocytic recycling.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Christina; Chen, Yu; Pu, Jing; Guo, Xiaoli; Bonifacino, Juan S

    2015-05-01

    Recycling of endocytic receptors to the cell surface involves passage through a series of membrane-bound compartments by mechanisms that are poorly understood. In particular, it is unknown if endocytic recycling requires the function of multisubunit tethering complexes, as is the case for other intracellular trafficking pathways. Herein we describe a tethering complex named endosome-associated recycling protein (EARP) that is structurally related to the previously described Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex. The two complexes share the Ang2, Vps52 and Vps53 subunits, but EARP contains an uncharacterized protein, syndetin, in place of the Vps54 subunit of GARP. This change determines differential localization of EARP to recycling endosomes and GARP to the Golgi complex. EARP interacts with the target SNARE syntaxin 6 and various cognate SNAREs. Depletion of syndetin or syntaxin 6 delays recycling of internalized transferrin to the cell surface. These findings implicate EARP in canonical membrane-fusion events in the process of endocytic recycling. PMID:25799061

  2. EARP is a multisubunit tethering complex involved in endocytic recycling.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Christina; Chen, Yu; Pu, Jing; Guo, Xiaoli; Bonifacino, Juan S

    2015-05-01

    Recycling of endocytic receptors to the cell surface involves passage through a series of membrane-bound compartments by mechanisms that are poorly understood. In particular, it is unknown if endocytic recycling requires the function of multisubunit tethering complexes, as is the case for other intracellular trafficking pathways. Herein we describe a tethering complex named endosome-associated recycling protein (EARP) that is structurally related to the previously described Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex. The two complexes share the Ang2, Vps52 and Vps53 subunits, but EARP contains an uncharacterized protein, syndetin, in place of the Vps54 subunit of GARP. This change determines differential localization of EARP to recycling endosomes and GARP to the Golgi complex. EARP interacts with the target SNARE syntaxin 6 and various cognate SNAREs. Depletion of syndetin or syntaxin 6 delays recycling of internalized transferrin to the cell surface. These findings implicate EARP in canonical membrane-fusion events in the process of endocytic recycling.

  3. Functional links between Aβ toxicity, endocytic trafficking, and Alzheimer's disease risk factors in yeast.

    PubMed

    Treusch, Sebastian; Hamamichi, Shusei; Goodman, Jessica L; Matlack, Kent E S; Chung, Chee Yeun; Baru, Valeriya; Shulman, Joshua M; Parrado, Antonio; Bevis, Brooke J; Valastyan, Julie S; Han, Haesun; Lindhagen-Persson, Malin; Reiman, Eric M; Evans, Denis A; Bennett, David A; Olofsson, Anders; DeJager, Philip L; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Caldwell, Kim A; Caldwell, Guy A; Lindquist, Susan

    2011-12-01

    Aβ (beta-amyloid peptide) is an important contributor to Alzheimer's disease (AD). We modeled Aβ toxicity in yeast by directing the peptide to the secretory pathway. A genome-wide screen for toxicity modifiers identified the yeast homolog of phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly protein (PICALM) and other endocytic factors connected to AD whose relationship to Aβ was previously unknown. The factors identified in yeast modified Aβ toxicity in glutamatergic neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans and in primary rat cortical neurons. In yeast, Aβ impaired the endocytic trafficking of a plasma membrane receptor, which was ameliorated by endocytic pathway factors identified in the yeast screen. Thus, links between Aβ, endocytosis, and human AD risk factors can be ascertained with yeast as a model system.

  4. Selective endocytic trafficking in live cells with fluorescent naphthoxazoles and their boron complexes.

    PubMed

    Dias, Gleiston G; Rodrigues, Bernardo L; Resende, Jarbas M; Calado, Hállen D R; de Simone, Carlos A; Silva, Valter H C; Neto, Brenno A D; Goulart, Marilia O F; Ferreira, Fabricia R; Meira, Assuero S; Pessoa, Claudia; Correa, José R; da Silva Júnior, Eufrânio N

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescent naphthoxazoles and their boron derivatives have been synthesized and applied as superior and selective probes for endocytic pathway tracking in live cancer cells. The best fluorophores were compared with the commercially available acridine orange (co-staining experiments), showing far better selectivity.

  5. Endocytic SNAREs are involved in optimal Coxiella burnetii vacuole development.

    PubMed

    Campoy, Emanuel Martín; Mansilla, María Eugenia; Colombo, María Isabel

    2013-06-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a Gram-negative intracellular bacterium. As previously described, both the endocytic and the autophagic pathways contribute to the maturation of Coxiella replicative vacuoles (CRVs). The large CRVs share the properties of both phagolysosomal and autophagolysosomal compartments. Vamp3, Vamp7 and Vamp8 are v-SNAREs involved in the endocytic pathway which participate mainly in the fusion between endosomes and lysosomes. In the present study we observed that Vamp7 interacts with C. burnetii at different infection times (1 h-48 h p.i.). We have determined that a truncated mutant of Vamp7 (Vamp7 NT) and a siRNA against this SNARE protein affects the optimal development of CRVs, suggesting that Vamp7 mediates fusion events that are required for the biogenesis of CRVs. Indeed, we have observed that overexpression of Vamp7 NT inhibited the heterotypic fusion with lysosomes and the homotypic fusion between individual Coxiella phagosomes and CRVs. Moreover, we have detected in the vacuole membrane, at different infection times, the Vamp7 partners (Vti1a and Vti1b). Interestingly, treatment with chloramphenicol reduced the colocalization between C. burnetii and Vamp7, Vti1a or Vti1b, indicating that the recruitment of these SNAREs proteins is a bacteria-driven process that favours the CRV biogenesis, likely by facilitating the interaction with the endolysosomal compartment.

  6. NECAP2 controls clathrin coat recruitment to early endosomes for fast endocytic recycling.

    PubMed

    Chamberland, John P; Antonow, Lauren T; Dias Santos, Michel; Ritter, Brigitte

    2016-07-01

    Endocytic recycling returns receptors to the plasma membrane following internalization and is essential to maintain receptor levels on the cell surface, re-sensitize cells to extracellular ligands and for continued nutrient uptake. Yet, the protein machineries and mechanisms that drive endocytic recycling remain ill-defined. Here, we establish that NECAP2 regulates the endocytic recycling of EGFR and transferrin receptor. Our analysis of the recycling dynamics revealed that NECAP2 functions in the fast recycling pathway that directly returns cargo from early endosomes to the cell surface. In contrast, NECAP2 does not regulate the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of these cargos, the degradation of EGFR or the recycling of transferrin along the slow, Rab11-dependent recycling pathway. We show that protein knockdown of NECAP2 leads to enlarged early endosomes and causes the loss of the clathrin adapter AP-1 from the organelle. Through structure-function analysis, we define the protein-binding interfaces in NECAP2 that are crucial for AP-1 recruitment to early endosomes. Together, our data identify NECAP2 as a pathway-specific regulator of clathrin coat formation on early endosomes for fast endocytic recycling.

  7. A Systematic Analysis Reveals Heterogeneous Changes in the Endocytic Activities of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Elkin, Sarah R.; Bendris, Nawal; Reis, Carlos R.; Zhou, Yunyun; Xie, Yang; Huffman, Kenneth E.; Minna, John D.; Schmid, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is a multistep process requiring cancer cell signaling, invasion, migration, survival, and proliferation. These processes require dynamic modulation of cell surface proteins by endocytosis. Given this functional connection, it has been suggested that endocytosis is dysregulated in cancer. To test this, we developed In-Cell ELISA assays to measure three different endocytic pathways: clathrin-mediated endocytosis, caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and clathrin-independent endocytosis and compared these activities using two different syngeneic models for normal and oncogene-transformed human lung epithelial cells. We found that all endocytic activities were reduced in the transformed versus normal counterparts. However, when we screened 29 independently isolated non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines to determine whether these changes were systematic, we observed significant heterogeneity. Nonetheless, using hierarchical clustering based on their combined endocytic properties, we identified two phenotypically distinct clusters of NSCLCs. One co-clustered with mutations in KRAS, a mesenchymal phenotype, increased invasion through collagen and decreased growth in soft agar, whereas the second was enriched in cells with an epithelial phenotype. Interestingly, the two clusters also differed significantly in clathrin-independent internalization and surface expression of CD44 and CD59. Taken together, our results suggest that endocytotic alterations in cancer cells that affect cell surface expression of critical molecules have a significant influence on cancer-relevant phenotypes, with potential implications for interventions to control cancer by modulating endocytic dynamics. PMID:26359453

  8. The CD63-Syntenin-1 Complex Controls Post-Endocytic Trafficking of Oncogenic Human Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Gräßel, Linda; Fast, Laura Aline; Scheffer, Konstanze D.; Boukhallouk, Fatima; Spoden, Gilles A.; Tenzer, Stefan; Boller, Klaus; Bago, Ruzica; Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Berditchevski, Fedor; Florin, Luise

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses enter host cells via a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway involving tetraspanin proteins. However, post-endocytic trafficking required for virus capsid disassembly remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the early trafficking pathway of internalised HPV particles involves tetraspanin CD63, syntenin-1 and ESCRT-associated adaptor protein ALIX. Following internalisation, viral particles are found in CD63-positive endosomes recruiting syntenin-1, a CD63-interacting adaptor protein. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence experiments indicate that the CD63-syntenin-1 complex controls delivery of internalised viral particles to multivesicular endosomes. Accordingly, infectivity of high-risk HPV types 16, 18 and 31 as well as disassembly and post-uncoating processing of viral particles was markedly suppressed in CD63 or syntenin-1 depleted cells. Our analyses also present the syntenin-1 interacting protein ALIX as critical for HPV infection and CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex formation as a prerequisite for intracellular transport enabling viral capsid disassembly. Thus, our results identify the CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex as a key regulatory component in post-endocytic HPV trafficking. PMID:27578500

  9. The CD63-Syntenin-1 Complex Controls Post-Endocytic Trafficking of Oncogenic Human Papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Gräßel, Linda; Fast, Laura Aline; Scheffer, Konstanze D; Boukhallouk, Fatima; Spoden, Gilles A; Tenzer, Stefan; Boller, Klaus; Bago, Ruzica; Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Berditchevski, Fedor; Florin, Luise

    2016-08-31

    Human papillomaviruses enter host cells via a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway involving tetraspanin proteins. However, post-endocytic trafficking required for virus capsid disassembly remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the early trafficking pathway of internalised HPV particles involves tetraspanin CD63, syntenin-1 and ESCRT-associated adaptor protein ALIX. Following internalisation, viral particles are found in CD63-positive endosomes recruiting syntenin-1, a CD63-interacting adaptor protein. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence experiments indicate that the CD63-syntenin-1 complex controls delivery of internalised viral particles to multivesicular endosomes. Accordingly, infectivity of high-risk HPV types 16, 18 and 31 as well as disassembly and post-uncoating processing of viral particles was markedly suppressed in CD63 or syntenin-1 depleted cells. Our analyses also present the syntenin-1 interacting protein ALIX as critical for HPV infection and CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex formation as a prerequisite for intracellular transport enabling viral capsid disassembly. Thus, our results identify the CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex as a key regulatory component in post-endocytic HPV trafficking.

  10. The CD63-Syntenin-1 Complex Controls Post-Endocytic Trafficking of Oncogenic Human Papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Gräßel, Linda; Fast, Laura Aline; Scheffer, Konstanze D; Boukhallouk, Fatima; Spoden, Gilles A; Tenzer, Stefan; Boller, Klaus; Bago, Ruzica; Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Berditchevski, Fedor; Florin, Luise

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses enter host cells via a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway involving tetraspanin proteins. However, post-endocytic trafficking required for virus capsid disassembly remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the early trafficking pathway of internalised HPV particles involves tetraspanin CD63, syntenin-1 and ESCRT-associated adaptor protein ALIX. Following internalisation, viral particles are found in CD63-positive endosomes recruiting syntenin-1, a CD63-interacting adaptor protein. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence experiments indicate that the CD63-syntenin-1 complex controls delivery of internalised viral particles to multivesicular endosomes. Accordingly, infectivity of high-risk HPV types 16, 18 and 31 as well as disassembly and post-uncoating processing of viral particles was markedly suppressed in CD63 or syntenin-1 depleted cells. Our analyses also present the syntenin-1 interacting protein ALIX as critical for HPV infection and CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex formation as a prerequisite for intracellular transport enabling viral capsid disassembly. Thus, our results identify the CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex as a key regulatory component in post-endocytic HPV trafficking. PMID:27578500

  11. Yeast Eps15-like endocytic protein Pan1p regulates the interaction between endocytic vesicles, endosomes and the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Toshima, Junko Y; Furuya, Eri; Nagano, Makoto; Kanno, Chisa; Sakamoto, Yuta; Ebihara, Masashi; Siekhaus, Daria Elisabeth; Toshima, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays important roles in the formation and internalization of endocytic vesicles. In yeast, endocytic vesicles move towards early endosomes along actin cables, however, the molecular machinery regulating interaction between endocytic vesicles and actin cables is poorly understood. The Eps15-like protein Pan1p plays a key role in actin-mediated endocytosis and is negatively regulated by Ark1 and Prk1 kinases. Here we show that pan1 mutated to prevent phosphorylation at all 18 threonines, pan1-18TA, displayed almost the same endocytic defect as ark1Δ prk1Δ cells, and contained abnormal actin concentrations including several endocytic compartments. Early endosomes were highly localized in the actin concentrations and displayed movement along actin cables. The dephosphorylated form of Pan1p also caused stable associations between endocytic vesicles and actin cables, and between endocytic vesicles and endosomes. Thus Pan1 phosphorylation is part of a novel mechanism that regulates endocytic compartment interactions with each other and with actin cables. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10276.001 PMID:26914139

  12. Release of canine parvovirus from endocytic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Suikkanen, Sanna; Antila, Mia; Jaatinen, Anne; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Vuento, Matti

    2003-11-25

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a small nonenveloped virus with a single-stranded DNA genome. CPV enters cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and requires an acidic endosomal step for productive infection. Virion contains a potential nuclear localization signal as well as a phospholipase A(2) like domain in N-terminus of VP1. In this study we characterized the role of PLA(2) activity on CPV entry process. PLA(2) activity of CPV capsids was triggered in vitro by heat or acidic pH. PLA(2) inhibitors inhibited the viral proliferation suggesting that PLA(2) activity is needed for productive infection. The N-terminus of VP1 was exposed during the entry, suggesting that PLA(2) activity might have a role during endocytic entry. The presence of drugs modifying endocytosis (amiloride, bafilomycin A(1), brefeldin A, and monensin) caused viral proteins to remain in endosomal/lysosomal vesicles, even though the drugs were not able to inhibit the exposure of VP1 N-terminal end. These results indicate that the exposure of N-terminus of VP1 alone is not sufficient to allow CPV to proliferate. Some other pH-dependent changes are needed for productive infection. In addition to blocking endocytic entry, amiloride was able to block some postendocytic steps. The ability of CPV to permeabilize endosomal membranes was demonstrated by feeding cells with differently sized rhodamine-conjugated dextrans together with the CPV in the presence or in the absence of amiloride, bafilomycin A(1), brefeldin A, or monensin. Dextran with a molecular weight of 3000 was released from vesicles after 8 h of infection, while dextran with a molecular weight of 10,000 was mainly retained in vesicles. The results suggest that CPV infection does not cause disruption of endosomal vesicles. However, the permeability of endosomal membranes apparently changes during CPV infection, probably due to the PLA(2) activity of the virus. These results suggest that parvoviral PLA(2) activity is essential for productive

  13. The Mammalian Orthologs of Drosophila Lgd, CC2D1A and CC2D1B, Function in the Endocytic Pathway, but Their Individual Loss of Function Does Not Affect Notch Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Drusenheimer, Nadja; Migdal, Bernhard; Jäckel, Sandra; Tveriakhina, Lena; Scheider, Kristina; Schulz, Katharina; Gröper, Jieny; Köhrer, Karl; Klein, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    CC2D1A and CC2D1B belong to the evolutionary conserved Lgd protein family with members in all multi-cellular animals. Several functions such as centrosomal cleavage, involvement in signalling pathways, immune response and synapse maturation have been described for CC2D1A. Moreover, the Drosophila melanogaster ortholog Lgd was shown to be involved in the endosomal trafficking of the Notch receptor and other transmembrane receptors and physically interacts with the ESCRT-III component Shrub/CHMP4. To determine if this function is conserved in mammals we generated and characterized Cc2d1a and Cc2d1b conditional knockout mice. While Cc2d1b deficient mice displayed no obvious phenotype, we found that Cc2d1a deficient mice as well as conditional mutants that lack CC2D1A only in the nervous system die shortly after birth due to respiratory distress. This finding confirms the suspicion that the breathing defect is caused by the central nervous system. However, an involvement in centrosomal function could not be confirmed in Cc2d1a deficient MEF cells. To analyse an influence on Notch signalling, we generated intestine specific Cc2d1a mutant mice. These mice did not display any alterations in goblet cell number, proliferating cell number or expression of the Notch reporter Hes1-emGFP, suggesting that CC2D1A is not required for Notch signalling. However, our EM analysis revealed that the average size of endosomes of Cc2d1a mutant cells, but not Cc2d1b mutant cells, is increased, indicating a defect in endosomal morphogenesis. We could show that CC2D1A and its interaction partner CHMP4B are localised on endosomes in MEF cells, when the activity of the endosomal protein VPS4 is reduced. This indicates that CC2D1A cycles between the cytosol and the endosomal membrane. Additionally, in rescue experiments in D. melanogaster, CC2D1A and CC2D1B were able to functionally replace Lgd. Altogether our data suggest a functional conservation of the Lgd protein family in the ESCRT

  14. Pulse Dynamics in Endocytic Protein Patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Anders; Wang, Xinxin

    2015-03-01

    During the process of endocytosis in yeast, submicron-sized protein patches assemble, exert forces on the membrane to bend it, and finally disassemble. The patches contain an initial coat that establishes the endocytic site and binds cargo, polymers of the protein actin, ``nucleation-promoting factors'' (NPFs) that catalyze actin polymerization, and curvature-generating proteins. We model the dynamics of protein patches in yeast using a variant of the activator-inhibitor ``Fitzhugh-Nagumo'' model. We treat NPFs as the activator, and polymerized actin as the inhibitor, on the basis of findings that the lifetime of NPF patches is extended when actin polymerization is inhibited. Using this model, we find that as the polymerization rate is reduced, there is a discontinuous transition from protein pulses to persistent patches. We also find, surprisingly, that in some parameter regimes reducing the polymerization rate can increase the polymerized-actin content of the patch. We present data for NPF dynamics budding yeast, which confirm some of the predictions of the model. Supported by NIH under Grant R01-GM107667.

  15. Evolutionary conservancy of the endocytic and trafficking machinery in the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Surmacz, Liliana; Wiejak, Jolanta; Wyroba, Elzbieta

    2003-01-01

    Molecular search for the homologues of the mammalian proteins in the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium involved in endocytosis and membrane trafficking is discussed. We cloned and sequenced the gene fragments encoding the following components participating in endosome formation, sorting and maturation of the proprotein precursors, respectively, dynamin 2, Rab7 and furin. There is a proof that all these genes are expressed in this unicellular organism. The function of the identified immunoanalogues of the above described components of Paramecium endocytic machinery as well as a high degree of sequence homology to the respective human counterparts points to the evolutionary conservancy of these pathways.

  16. Human B lymphoblastoid cells contain distinct patterns of cathepsin activity in endocytic compartments and regulate MHC class II transport in a cathepsin S-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Lautwein, Alfred; Kraus, Marianne; Reich, Michael; Burster, Timo; Brandenburg, J; Overkleeft, Herman S; Schwarz, Gerold; Kammer, Winfried; Weber, Ekkehard; Kalbacher, Hubert; Nordheim, Alfred; Driessen, Christoph

    2004-05-01

    Endocytic proteolysis represents a major functional component of the major histocompatibility complex class II antigen-presentation machinery. Although transport and assembly of class II molecules in the endocytic compartment are well characterized, we lack information about the pattern of endocytic protease activity along this pathway. Here, we used chemical tools that visualize endocytic proteases in an activity-dependent manner in combination with subcellular fractionation to dissect the subcellular distribution of the major cathepsins (Cat) CatS, CatB, CatH, CatD, CatC, and CatZ as well as the asparagine-specific endoprotease (AEP) in human B-lymphoblastoid cells (BLC). Endocytic proteases were distributed in two distinct patterns: CatB and CatZ were most prominent in early and late endosomes but absent from lysosomes, and CatH, CatS, CatD, CatC, and AEP distributed between late endosomes and lysosomes, suggesting that CatB and CatZ might be involved in the initial proteolytic attack on a given antigen. The entire spectrum of protease activity colocalized with human leukocyte antigen-DM and the C-terminal and N-terminal processing of invariant chain (Ii) in late endosomes. CatS was active in all endocytic compartments. Surprisingly and in contrast with results from dendritic cells, inhibition of CatS activity by leucine-homophenylalanine-vinylsulfone-phenol prevented N-terminal processing of Ii but did not alter the subcellular trafficking or surface delivery of class II complexes, as deferred from pulse-chase analysis in combination with subcellular fractionation and biotinylation of cell-surface protein. Thus, BLC contain distinct activity patterns of proteases in endocytic compartments and regulate the intracellular transport and surface-delivery of class II in a CatS-independent manner. PMID:14966190

  17. Endocytic Accessory Factors and Regulation of Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Merrifield, Christien J.; Kaksonen, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Up to 60 different proteins are recruited to the site of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in an ordered sequence. These accessory proteins have roles during all the different stages of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. First, they participate in the initiation of the endocytic event, thereby determining when and where endocytic vesicles are made; later they are involved in the maturation of the clathrin coat, recruitment of specific cargo molecules, bending of the membrane, and finally in scission and uncoating of the nascent vesicle. In addition, many of the accessory components are involved in regulating and coupling the actin cytoskeleton to the endocytic membrane. We will discuss the different accessory components and their various roles. Most of the data comes from studies performed with cultured mammalian cells or yeast cells. The process of endocytosis is well conserved between these different organisms, but there are also many interesting differences that may shed light on the mechanistic principles of endocytosis. PMID:25280766

  18. Ultrastructural Imaging of Endocytic Sites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Immunolabeling

    PubMed Central

    Buser, Christopher; Drubin, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Defining the ultrastructure of endocytic sites and localization of endocytic proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by immunoelectron microscopy is central in understanding the mechanisms of membrane deformation and scission during endocytosis. We show that an improved sample preparation protocol based on high-pressure freezing, freeze substitution, and low-temperature embedding allows us to maintain the cellular fine structure and to immunolabel green fluorescent protein–tagged endocytic proteins or actin in the same sections. Using this technique we analyzed the stepwise deformation of endocytic membranes and immuno-localized the endocytic proteins Abp1p, Sla1p, Rvs167p, and actin, and were able to draw a clear ultrastructural distinction between endocytic sites and eisosomes by immunolocalizing Pil1p. In addition to defining the geometry and the fine structure of budding yeast endocytic sites, we observed associated actin filaments forming a cage-like meshwork around the endocytic membrane. PMID:23458500

  19. Single Vesicle Analysis of Endocytic Fission on Microtubules In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wolkoff, Allan W.

    2016-01-01

    Following endocytosis, internalized molecules are found within intracellular vesicles and tubules that move along the cytoskeleton and undergo fission, as demonstrated here using primary cultured rat hepatocytes. Although the use of depolymerizing drugs has shown that the cytoskeleton is not required to segregate endocytic protein, many studies suggest that the cytoskeleton is involved in the segregation of protein in normal cells. To investigate whether cytoskeletal-based movement results in the segregation of protein, we tracked the contents of vesicles during in vitro microscopy assays. These studies showed that the addition of ATP causes fission of endocytic contents along microtubules, resulting in the segregation of proteins that are targeted for different cellular compartments. The plasma membrane proteins, sodium (Na+) taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (ntcp) and transferrin receptor, segregated from asialoorosomucoid (ASOR), an endocytic ligand that is targeted for degradation. Epidermal growth factor receptor, which is degraded, and the asialoglycoprotein receptor, which remains partially bound to ASOR, segregated less efficiently from ASOR. Vesicles containing ntcp and transferrin receptor had reduced fission in the absence of ASOR, suggesting that fission is regulated to allow proteins to segregate. A single round of fission resulted in 6.5-fold purification of ntcp from ASOR, and 25% of the resulting vesicles were completely depleted of the endocytic ligand. PMID:18284582

  20. The late endocytic Rab39a GTPase regulates the interaction between multivesicular bodies and chlamydial inclusions.

    PubMed

    Gambarte Tudela, Julian; Capmany, Anahi; Romao, Maryse; Quintero, Cristian; Miserey-Lenkei, Stephanie; Raposo, Graca; Goud, Bruno; Damiani, Maria Teresa

    2015-08-15

    Given their obligate intracellular lifestyle, Chlamydia trachomatis ensure that they have access to multiple host sources of essential lipids by interfering with vesicular transport. These bacteria hijack Rab6-, Rab11- and Rab14-controlled trafficking pathways to acquire sphingomyelin from the Golgi complex. Another important source of sphingolipids, phospholipids and cholesterol are multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Despite their participation in chlamydial inclusion development and bacterial replication, the molecular mechanisms mediating the interaction between MVBs and chlamydial inclusions remain unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that Rab39a labels a subset of late endocytic vesicles - mainly MVBs - that move along microtubules. Moreover, Rab39a is actively recruited to chlamydial inclusions throughout the pathogen life cycle by a bacterial-driven process that depends on the Rab39a GTP- or GDP-binding state. Interestingly, Rab39a participates in the delivery of MVBs and host sphingolipids to maturing chlamydial inclusions, thereby promoting inclusion growth and bacterial development. Taken together, our findings indicate that Rab39a favours chlamydial replication and infectivity. This is the first report showing that a late endocytic Rab GTPase is involved in chlamydial infection development. PMID:26163492

  1. The Endocytic Recycling Protein EHD2 Interacts with Myoferlin to Regulate Myoblast Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Katherine R.; Demonbreun, Alexis R.; Wallace, Gregory Q.; Cave, Andrew; Posey, Avery D.; Heretis, Konstantina; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a multinucleated syncytium that develops and is maintained by the fusion of myoblasts to the syncytium. Myoblast fusion involves the regulated coalescence of two apposed membranes. Myoferlin is a membrane-anchored, multiple C2 domain-containing protein that is highly expressed in fusing myoblasts and required for efficient myoblast fusion to myotubes. We found that myoferlin binds directly to the eps15 homology domain protein, EHD2. Members of the EHD family have been previously implicated in endocytosis as well as endocytic recycling, a process where membrane proteins internalized by endocytosis are returned to the plasma membrane. EHD2 binds directly to the second C2 domain of myoferlin, and EHD2 is reduced in myoferlin null myoblasts. In contrast to normal myoblasts, myoferlin null myoblasts accumulate labeled transferrin and have delayed recycling. Introduction of dominant negative EHD2 into myoblasts leads to the sequestration of myoferlin and inhibition of myoblast fusion. The interaction of myoferlin with EHD2 identifies molecular overlap between the endocytic recycling pathway and the machinery that regulates myoblast membrane fusion. PMID:18502764

  2. APPL endosomes are not obligatory endocytic intermediates but act as stable cargo-sorting compartments

    PubMed Central

    Kalaidzidis, Inna; Miaczynska, Marta; Brewińska-Olchowik, Marta; Hupalowska, Anna; Ferguson, Charles; Parton, Robert G.; Kalaidzidis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis allows cargo to enter a series of specialized endosomal compartments, beginning with early endosomes harboring Rab5 and its effector EEA1. There are, however, additional structures labeled by the Rab5 effector APPL1 whose role in endocytic transport remains unclear. It has been proposed that APPL1 vesicles are transport intermediates that convert into EEA1 endosomes. Here, we tested this model by analyzing the ultrastructural morphology, kinetics of cargo transport, and stability of the APPL1 compartment over time. We found that APPL1 resides on a tubulo-vesicular compartment that is capable of sorting cargo for recycling or degradation and that displays long lifetimes, all features typical of early endosomes. Fitting mathematical models to experimental data rules out maturation of APPL1 vesicles into EEA1 endosomes as a primary mechanism for cargo transport. Our data suggest instead that APPL1 endosomes represent a distinct population of Rab5-positive sorting endosomes, thus providing important insights into the compartmental organization of the early endocytic pathway. PMID:26459602

  3. Endocytic uptake of advanced glycation end products by mouse liver sinusoidal endothelial cells is mediated by a scavenger receptor distinct from the macrophage scavenger receptor class A.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, K; Sano, H; Nagai, R; Suzuki, H; Kodama, T; Yoshida, M; Ueda, S; Smedsrød, B; Horiuchi, S

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies with peritoneal macrophages obtained from macrophage scavenger receptor class A (MSR-A) knock-out mice showed that the endocytic uptake of advanced glycation end products (AGE) by macrophages was mediated mainly by MSR-A. However, it is controversial whether the endocytic uptake of intravenously injected AGE proteins by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LECs) is similarly explained by receptor-mediated endocytosis via MSR-A. The present study was conducted to compare the capacity to endocytose AGE proteins in LECs and peritoneal macrophages obtained from MSR-A knock-out and littermate wild-type mice. The endocytic degradation capacity of MSR-A knock-out LECs for AGE-BSA was indistinguishable from that of wild-type LECs, whereas that of MSR-A knock-out peritoneal macrophages for AGE-BSA was decreased to 30% of that in wild-type cells. Similarly, the endocytic degradation of MSR-A knock-out LECs for acetylated low-density lipoprotein (acetyl-LDL) did not differ from that of wild-type LECs, whereas the endocytic degradation of acetyl-LDL by MSR-A knock-out peritoneal macrophages was less than 20% of that in wild-type cells. Furthermore, formaldehyde-treated serum albumin (f-Alb), a ligand known to undergo scavenger-receptor-mediated endocytosis by LECs, was effectively taken up by MSR-A knock-out LECs at a capacity that did not differ from that of wild-type LECs. Moreover, the endocytic uptake of AGE-BSA by LECs was effectively competed for by unlabelled f-Alb or acetyl-LDL. These results indicate that the scavenger-receptor ligands AGE proteins, acetyl-LDL and f-Alb are endocytosed by LECs through a non-MSR-A pathway. PMID:11062078

  4. Endocytic membrane trafficking and neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Schreij, Andrea M A; Fon, Edward A; McPherson, Peter S

    2016-04-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are amongst the most devastating of human disorders. New technologies have led to a rapid increase in the identification of disease-related genes with an enhanced appreciation of the key roles played by genetics in the etiology of these disorders. Importantly, pinpointing the normal function of disease gene proteins leads to new understanding of the cellular machineries and pathways that are altered in the disease process. One such emerging pathway is membrane trafficking in the endosomal system. This key cellular process controls the localization and levels of a myriad of proteins and is thus critical for normal cell function. In this review we will focus on three neurodegenerative diseases; Parkinson disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and hereditary spastic paraplegias, for which a large number of newly discovered disease genes encode proteins that function in endosomal membrane trafficking. We will describe how alterations in these proteins affect endosomal function and speculate on the contributions of these disruptions to disease pathophysiology. PMID:26721251

  5. Polar localization and endocytic degradation of a boron transporter, BOR1, is dependent on specific tyrosine residues.

    PubMed

    Yoshinari, Akira; Kasai, Koji; Fujiwara, Toru; Naito, Satoshi; Takano, Junpei

    2012-01-01

    Boron (B) is essential for plants, but is toxic in excess. Plants have to strictly regulate the uptake and translocation of B. In Arabidopsis thaliana root cells, a boric acid channel, NIP5;1, and a boric acid/borate exporter, BOR1, localize to the outer (facing soil) and inner plasma membrane domains, respectively, under B limitation. The opposite polar localizations of the importer and exporter would enable plant roots to transport B efficiently towards the xylem. In addition, accumulation of the B transporters is controlled by B conditions. When plants are shifted from low to high B conditions, NIP5;1 transcript accumulation is down-regulated through mRNA degradation. The BOR1 protein is transported to the trans-Golgi network/early endosome and multivesicular body and finally degraded in the vacuole. We have recently shown that both the polar localization and the endocytic degradation of BOR1 are controlled by at least two tyrosine residues in a large loop located in the cytosol. We also showed that ubiquitination is required for the endocytic degradation of BOR1. Here, we analyzed possible involvement of an additional tyrosine residue (Y414) in the loop region and discuss the pathway of the BOR1 trafficking for polar localization and endocytic degradation of BOR1. PMID:22301967

  6. Endocytic structures and synaptic vesicle recycling at a central synapse in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Körber, Christoph; Horstmann, Heinz; Sätzler, Kurt; Kuner, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    The synaptic vesicle (SV) cycle has been studied extensively in cultured cells and slice preparations, but not much is known about the roles and relative contributions of endocytic pathways and mechanisms of SV recycling in vivo, under physiological patterns of activity. We employed horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as an in vivo marker of endocytosis at the calyx of Held synapse in the awake rat. Ex vivo serial section scanning electron microscopy and 3D reconstructions revealed two categories of labelled structures: HRP-filled SVs and large cisternal endosomes. Inhibition of adaptor protein complexes 1 and 3 (AP-1, AP-3) by in vivo application of Brefeldin A (BFA) disrupted endosomal SV budding while SV recycling via clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) remained unaffected. In conclusion, our study establishes cisternal endosomes as an intermediate of the SV cycle and reveals CME and endosomal budding as the predominant mechanisms of SV recycling in a tonically active central synapse in vivo.

  7. Stem-cell-specific endocytic degradation defects lead to intestinal dysplasia in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Péter; Kovács, Laura; Sándor, Gyöngyvér O.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT UV radiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG) is a tumor suppressor involved in autophagy, endocytosis and DNA damage repair, but how its loss contributes to colorectal cancer is poorly understood. Here, we show that UVRAG deficiency in Drosophila intestinal stem cells leads to uncontrolled proliferation and impaired differentiation without preventing autophagy. As a result, affected animals suffer from gut dysfunction and short lifespan. Dysplasia upon loss of UVRAG is characterized by the accumulation of endocytosed ligands and sustained activation of STAT and JNK signaling, and attenuation of these pathways suppresses stem cell hyperproliferation. Importantly, the inhibition of early (dynamin-dependent) or late (Rab7-dependent) steps of endocytosis in intestinal stem cells also induces hyperproliferation and dysplasia. Our data raise the possibility that endocytic, but not autophagic, defects contribute to UVRAG-deficient colorectal cancer development in humans. PMID:26921396

  8. Automated selection of regions of interest for intensity-based FRET analysis of transferrin endocytic trafficking in normal vs. cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Talati, Ronak; Vanderpoel, Andrew; Eladdadi, Amina; Anderson, Kate; Abe, Ken; Barroso, Margarida

    2014-03-15

    The overexpression of certain membrane-bound receptors is a hallmark of cancer progression and it has been suggested to affect the organization, activation, recycling and down-regulation of receptor-ligand complexes in human cancer cells. Thus, comparing receptor trafficking pathways in normal vs. cancer cells requires the ability to image cells expressing dramatically different receptor expression levels. Here, we have presented a significant technical advance to the analysis and processing of images collected using intensity based Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) confocal microscopy. An automated Image J macro was developed to select region of interests (ROI) based on intensity and statistical-based thresholds within cellular images with reduced FRET signal. Furthermore, SSMD (strictly standardized mean differences), a statistical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) evaluation parameter, was used to validate the quality of FRET analysis, in particular of ROI database selection. The Image J ROI selection macro together with SSMD as an evaluation parameter of SNR levels, were used to investigate the endocytic recycling of Tfn-TFR complexes at nanometer range resolution in human normal vs. breast cancer cells expressing significantly different levels of endogenous TFR. Here, the FRET-based assay demonstrates that Tfn-TFR complexes in normal epithelial vs. breast cancer cells show a significantly different E% behavior during their endocytic recycling pathway. Since E% is a relative measure of distance, we propose that these changes in E% levels represent conformational changes in Tfn-TFR complexes during endocytic pathway. Thus, our results indicate that Tfn-TFR complexes undergo different conformational changes in normal vs. cancer cells, indicating that the organization of Tfn-TFR complexes at the nanometer range is significantly altered during the endocytic recycling pathway in cancer cells. In summary, improvements in the automated selection of FRET ROI datasets

  9. Reconstitution and Protein Composition Analysis of Endocytic Actin Patches

    PubMed Central

    Michelot, Alphée; Costanzo, Michael; Sarkeshik, Ali; Boone, Charles; Yates, John R.; Drubin, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Clathrin-actin-mediated endocytosis in yeast involves the progressive assembly of at least 60 different proteins at cortical sites. More than half of these proteins are involved in the assembly of a branched network of actin filaments to provide the forces required for plasma membrane invagination. Results To gain insights into the regulation of endocytic actin patch dynamics, we developed an in vitro actin assembly assay using microbeads functionalized with the nucleation promoting factor (NPF) Las17 (yeast WASP). When incubated in a yeast extract, these beads assembled actin networks and a significant fraction became motile. Multi dimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) showed that the recruitment of actin binding proteins to these Las17-derived actin networks is selective. None of the proteins known to exclusively regulate the in vivo formation of actin cables or the actin contractile ring were identified. Intriguingly, our analysis also identified components of three other cortical structures, eisosomes, PIK patches and the TORC2 complex, establishing intriguing biochemical connections between four different yeast cortical complexes. Finally, we identified Aim3 as a regulator of actin dynamics at endocytic sites. Conclusions WASP is sufficient to trigger assembly of actin networks composed selectively of actin-patch proteins. These experiments establish that the protein composition of different F-actin structures is determined by the protein factor that initiates the network. The identification of binding partners revealed new biochemical connections between WASP derived networks and other cortical complexes and identified Aim3 as a novel regulator of the endocytic actin patch. PMID:21035341

  10. Endocytic uptake of a large array of HPMA copolymers: Elucidation into the dependence on the physicochemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jihua; Bauer, Hillevi; Callahan, Jon; Kopecková, Pavla; Pan, Huaizhong; Kopecek, Jindrich

    2010-04-01

    Endocytic uptake and subcellular trafficking of a large array of HPMA (N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide) based copolymers possessing positively or negatively charged residues, or hydrophobic groups were evaluated by flow cytometry and living cell confocal microscopy in cultured prostate cancer cells. The degrees of cellular uptake of various copolymer fractions with narrow polydispersities were quantified. The copolymer charge was the predominant physicochemical feature in terms of cellular uptake. Fast and efficient uptake occurred in positively charged copolymers due to non-specific adsorptive endocytosis, whereas slow uptake of negatively charged copolymers was observed. The uptake of copolymers was also molecular weight dependent. The copolymers were internalized into the cells through multiple endocytic pathways: positively charged copolymers robustly engaged clathrin-mediated endocytosis, macropinocytosis and dynamin-dependent endocytosis, while weakly negatively charged copolymers weakly employed these pathways; strongly negatively charged copolymers only mobilized macropinocytosis. HPMA copolymer possessing 4 mol% of moderately hydrophobic functional groups did not show preferential uptake. All copolymers ultimately localized in late endosomes/lysosomes via early endosomes; with varying kinetics among the copolymers. This study indicates that cell entry and subsequent intracellular trafficking of polymeric drug carriers are strongly dependent on the physicochemical characteristics of the nanocarrier, such as charge and molecular weight.

  11. Matrix stiffness affects endocytic uptake of MK2-inhibitor peptides.

    PubMed

    Brugnano, Jamie L; Panitch, Alyssa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the role of substrate stiffness on the endocytic uptake of a cell-penetrating peptide was investigated. The cell-penetrating peptide, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase activated protein kinase II (MK2), enters a primary mesothelial cell line predominantly through caveolae. Using tissue culture polystyrene and polyacrylamide gels of varying stiffness for cell culture, and flow cytometry quantification and enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISA) for uptake assays, we showed that the amount of uptake of the peptide is increased on soft substrates. Further, peptide uptake per cell increased at lower cell density. The improved uptake seen on soft substrates in vitro better correlates with in vivo functional studies where 10-100 µM concentrations of the MK2 inhibitor cell penetrating peptide demonstrated functional activity in several disease models. Additional characterization showed actin polymerization did not affect uptake, while microtubule polymerization had a profound effect on uptake. This work demonstrates that cell culture substrate stiffness can play a role in endocytic uptake, and may be an important consideration to improve correlations between in vitro and in vivo drug efficacy.

  12. Matrix Stiffness Affects Endocytic Uptake of MK2-Inhibitor Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Brugnano, Jamie L.; Panitch, Alyssa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the role of substrate stiffness on the endocytic uptake of a cell-penetrating peptide was investigated. The cell-penetrating peptide, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase activated protein kinase II (MK2), enters a primary mesothelial cell line predominantly through caveolae. Using tissue culture polystyrene and polyacrylamide gels of varying stiffness for cell culture, and flow cytometry quantification and enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISA) for uptake assays, we showed that the amount of uptake of the peptide is increased on soft substrates. Further, peptide uptake per cell increased at lower cell density. The improved uptake seen on soft substrates in vitro better correlates with in vivo functional studies where 10–100 µM concentrations of the MK2 inhibitor cell penetrating peptide demonstrated functional activity in several disease models. Additional characterization showed actin polymerization did not affect uptake, while microtubule polymerization had a profound effect on uptake. This work demonstrates that cell culture substrate stiffness can play a role in endocytic uptake, and may be an important consideration to improve correlations between in vitro and in vivo drug efficacy. PMID:24400117

  13. Endocytic activity of Sertoli cells grown in bicameral culture chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, R.X.; Djakiew, D.; Dym, M.

    1987-07-01

    Immature rat Sertoli cells were cultured for 7 to 14 days on Millipore filters impregnated with a reconstituted basement membrane extract in dual-environment (bicameral) culture chambers. Electron microscopy of the cultured cells revealed the presence of rod-shaped mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and Sertoli-Sertoli tight junctions, typical of these cells in vivo. The endocytic activity of both the apical and basal surfaces of the Sertoli cells was examined by either adding alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2-M) conjugated to 20 nm gold particles to the apical chamber or by adding /sup 125/I labeled alpha 2-M to the basal chamber. During endocytosis from the apical surface of Sertoli cells, the alpha 2-M-gold particles were bound initially to coated pits and then internalized into coated vesicles within 5 minutes. After 10 minutes, the alpha 2-M-gold was found in multi-vesicular bodies (MVBs) and by 30 minutes it was present in the lysosomes. The proportion of alpha 2-M-gold found within endocytic cell organelles after 1 hour of uptake was used to estimate the approximate time that this ligand spent in each type of organelle. The alpha 2-M-gold was present in coated pits, coated vesicles, multivesicular bodies, and lysosomes for approximately 3, 11, 22, and 24 minutes, respectively. This indicates that the initial stages of endocytosis are rapid, whereas MVBs and lysosomes are relatively long-lived.

  14. Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-2 (Crmp2) Regulates Trafficking by Linking Endocytic Regulatory Proteins to Dynein Motors*

    PubMed Central

    Rahajeng, Juliati; Giridharan, Sai S. P.; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Endocytosis is a conserved cellular process in which nutrients, lipids, and receptors are internalized and transported to early endosomes, where they are sorted and either channeled to degradative pathways or recycled to the plasma membrane. MICAL-L1 and EHD1 are important regulatory proteins that control key endocytic transport steps. However, the precise mechanisms by which they mediate transport, and particularly the mode by which they connect to motor proteins, have remained enigmatic. Here we have identified the collapsin response mediator protein-2 (Crmp2) as an interaction partner of MICAL-L1 in non-neuronal cells. Crmp2 interacts with tubulin dimers and kinesin and negatively regulates dynein-based transport in neuronal cells, but its expression and function in non-neuronal cells have remained poorly characterized. Upon Crmp2 depletion, we observed dramatic relocalization of internalized transferrin (Tf) from peripheral vesicles to the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), similar to the effect of depleting either MICAL-L1 or EHD1. Moreover, Tf relocalization to the ERC could be inhibited by interfering with microtubule polymerization, consistent with a role for uncoupled motor protein-based transport upon depletion of Crmp2, MICAL-L1, or EHD1. Finally, transfection of dynamitin, a component of the dynactin complex whose overexpression inhibits dynein activity, prevented the relocalization of internalized Tf to the ERC upon depletion of Crmp2, MICAL-L1, or EHD1. These data provide the first trafficking regulatory role for Crmp2 in non-neuronal cells and support a model in which Crmp2 is an important endocytic regulatory protein that links MICAL-L1·EHD1-based vesicular transport to dynein motors. PMID:20801876

  15. Constitutive Endocytic Recycling and Protein Kinase C-mediated Lysosomal Degradation Control KATP Channel Surface Density*

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Paul T.; Smith, Andrew J.; Taneja, Tarvinder K.; Howell, Gareth J.; Lippiat, Jonathan D.; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels control insulin secretion by coupling the excitability of the pancreatic β-cell to glucose metabolism. Little is currently known about how the plasma membrane density of these channels is regulated. We therefore set out to examine in detail the endocytosis and recycling of these channels and how these processes are regulated. To achieve this goal, we expressed KATP channels bearing an extracellular hemagglutinin epitope in human embryonic kidney cells and followed their fate along the endocytic pathway. Our results show that KATP channels undergo multiple rounds of endocytosis and recycling. Further, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate significantly decreases KATP channel surface density by reducing channel recycling and diverting the channel to lysosomal degradation. These findings were recapitulated in the model pancreatic β-cell line INS1e, where activation of PKC leads to a decrease in the surface density of native KATP channels. Because sorting of internalized channels between lysosomal and recycling pathways could have opposite effects on the excitability of pancreatic β-cells, we propose that PKC-regulated KATP channel trafficking may play a role in the regulation of insulin secretion. PMID:20026601

  16. Endocytic Trafficking of Membrane-Bound Cargo: A Flotillin Point of View

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Melanie; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous and highly conserved flotillin proteins, flotillin-1 and flotillin-2, have been shown to be involved in various cellular processes such as cell adhesion, signal transduction through receptor tyrosine kinases as well as in cellular trafficking pathways. Due to the fact that flotillins are acylated and form hetero-oligomers, they constitutively associate with cholesterol-enriched lipid microdomains. In recent years, such microdomains have been appreciated as platforms that participate in endocytosis and other cellular trafficking steps. This review summarizes the current findings on the role of flotillins in membrane-bound cargo endocytosis and endosomal trafficking events. We will discuss the proposed function of flotillins in endocytosis in the light of recent findings that point towards a role for flotillins in a step that precedes the actual endocytic uptake of cargo molecules. Recent findings have also revealed that flotillins may be important for endosomal sorting and recycling of specific cargo molecules. In addition to these aspects, the cellular trafficking pathway of flotillins themselves as potential cargo in the context of growth factor signaling will be discussed. PMID:25019426

  17. Proteomics of Secretory and Endocytic Organelles in Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Wampfler, Petra B.; Tosevski, Vinko; Nanni, Paolo; Spycher, Cornelia; Hehl, Adrian B.

    2014-01-01

    Giardia lamblia is a flagellated protozoan enteroparasite transmitted as an environmentally resistant cyst. Trophozoites attach to the small intestine of vertebrate hosts and proliferate by binary fission. They access nutrients directly via uptake of bulk fluid phase material into specialized endocytic organelles termed peripheral vesicles (PVs), mainly on the exposed dorsal side. When trophozoites reach the G2/M restriction point in the cell cycle they can begin another round of cell division or encyst if they encounter specific environmental cues. They induce neogenesis of Golgi-like organelles, encystation-specific vesicles (ESVs), for regulated secretion of cyst wall material. PVs and ESVs are highly simplified and thus evolutionary diverged endocytic and exocytic organelle systems with key roles in proliferation and transmission to a new host, respectively. Both organelle systems physically and functionally intersect at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) which has catabolic as well as anabolic functions. However, the unusually high degree of sequence divergence in Giardia rapidly exhausts phylogenomic strategies to identify and characterize the molecular underpinnings of these streamlined organelles. To define the first proteome of ESVs and PVs we used a novel strategy combining flow cytometry-based organelle sorting with in silico filtration of mass spectrometry data. From the limited size datasets we retrieved many hypothetical but also known organelle-specific factors. In contrast to PVs, ESVs appear to maintain a strong physical and functional link to the ER including recruitment of ribosomes to organelle membranes. Overall the data provide further evidence for the formation of a cyst extracellular matrix with minimal complexity. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PXD000694. PMID:24732305

  18. Proteomics of secretory and endocytic organelles in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Wampfler, Petra B; Tosevski, Vinko; Nanni, Paolo; Spycher, Cornelia; Hehl, Adrian B

    2014-01-01

    Giardia lamblia is a flagellated protozoan enteroparasite transmitted as an environmentally resistant cyst. Trophozoites attach to the small intestine of vertebrate hosts and proliferate by binary fission. They access nutrients directly via uptake of bulk fluid phase material into specialized endocytic organelles termed peripheral vesicles (PVs), mainly on the exposed dorsal side. When trophozoites reach the G2/M restriction point in the cell cycle they can begin another round of cell division or encyst if they encounter specific environmental cues. They induce neogenesis of Golgi-like organelles, encystation-specific vesicles (ESVs), for regulated secretion of cyst wall material. PVs and ESVs are highly simplified and thus evolutionary diverged endocytic and exocytic organelle systems with key roles in proliferation and transmission to a new host, respectively. Both organelle systems physically and functionally intersect at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) which has catabolic as well as anabolic functions. However, the unusually high degree of sequence divergence in Giardia rapidly exhausts phylogenomic strategies to identify and characterize the molecular underpinnings of these streamlined organelles. To define the first proteome of ESVs and PVs we used a novel strategy combining flow cytometry-based organelle sorting with in silico filtration of mass spectrometry data. From the limited size datasets we retrieved many hypothetical but also known organelle-specific factors. In contrast to PVs, ESVs appear to maintain a strong physical and functional link to the ER including recruitment of ribosomes to organelle membranes. Overall the data provide further evidence for the formation of a cyst extracellular matrix with minimal complexity. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PXD000694. PMID:24732305

  19. Role of Dynactin in Endocytic Traffic: Effects of Dynamitin Overexpression and Colocalization with CLIP-170

    PubMed Central

    Valetti, Caterina; Wetzel, Dawn M.; Schrader, Michael; Hasbani, M. Josh; Gill, Steven R.; Kreis, Thomas E.; Schroer, Trina A.

    1999-01-01

    The flow of material from peripheral, early endosomes to late endosomes requires microtubules and is thought to be facilitated by the minus end-directed motor cytoplasmic dynein and its activator dynactin. The microtubule-binding protein CLIP-170 may also play a role by providing an early link to endosomes. Here, we show that perturbation of dynactin function in vivo affects endosome dynamics and trafficking. Endosome movement, which is normally bidirectional, is completely inhibited. Receptor-mediated uptake and recycling occur normally, but cells are less susceptible to infection by enveloped viruses that require delivery to late endosomes, and they show reduced accumulation of lysosomally targeted probes. Dynactin colocalizes at microtubule plus ends with CLIP-170 in a way that depends on CLIP-170’s putative cargo-binding domain. Overexpression studies using p150Glued, the microtubule-binding subunit of dynactin, and mutant and wild-type forms of CLIP-170 indicate that CLIP-170 recruits dynactin to microtubule ends. These data suggest a new model for the formation of motile complexes of endosomes and microtubules early in the endocytic pathway. PMID:10588646

  20. Identification of a Novel Lysosomal Trafficking Peptide using Phage Display Biopanning Coupled with Endocytic Selection Pressure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Methods to select ligands that accumulate specifically in cancer cells and traffic through a defined endocytic pathway may facilitate rapid pairing of ligands with linkers suitable for drug conjugate therapies. We performed phage display biopanning on cancer cells that are treated with selective inhibitors of a given mechanism of endocytosis. Using chlorpromazine to inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis in H1299 nonsmall cell lung cancer cells, we identified two clones, ATEPRKQYATPRVFWTDAPG (15.1) and a novel peptide LQWRRDDNVHNFGVWARYRL (H1299.3). The peptides segregate by mechanism of endocytosis and subsequent location of subcellular accumulation. The H1299.3 peptide primarily utilizes clathrin-mediated endocytosis and colocalizes with Lamp1, a lysosomal marker. Conversely, the 15.1 peptide is clathrin-independent and localizes to a perinuclear region. Thus, this novel phage display scheme allows for selection of peptides that selectively internalize into cells via a known mechanism of endocytosis. These types of selections may allow for better matching of linker with targeting ligand by selecting ligands that internalize and traffic to known subcellular locations. PMID:25188559

  1. Cell-free fusion of bacteria-containing phagosomes with endocytic compartments

    PubMed Central

    Becken, Ulrike; Jeschke, Andreas; Veltman, Katharina; Haas, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Uptake of microorganisms by professional phagocytic cells leads to formation of a new subcellular compartment, the phagosome, which matures by sequential fusion with early and late endocytic compartments, resulting in oxidative and nonoxidative killing of the enclosed microbe. Few tools are available to study membrane fusion between phagocytic and late endocytic compartments in general and with pathogen-containing phagosomes in particular. We have developed and applied a fluorescence microscopy assay to study fusion of microbe-containing phagosomes with different-aged endocytic compartments in vitro. This revealed that fusion of phagosomes containing nonpathogenic Escherichia coli with lysosomes requires Rab7 and SNARE proteins but not organelle acidification. In vitro fusion experiments with phagosomes containing pathogenic Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium indicated that reduced fusion of these phagosomes with early and late endocytic compartments was independent of endosome and cytosol sources and, hence, a consequence of altered phagosome quality. PMID:21071675

  2. CULD is required for rhodopsin and TRPL channel endocytic trafficking and survival of photoreceptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endocytosis of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and associated channels contributes to desensitization and adaptation of a variety of signaling cascades. In Drosophila melanogaster, the main light-sensing rhodopsin (Rh1; encoded by ninaE) and the downstream ion channel, transient receptor potential like (TRPL), are endocytosed in response to light, but the mechanism is unclear. By using an RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) approach, we discovered a protein we named CULD, a photoreceptor-cell enriched CUB- and LDLa-domain transmembrane protein, that is required for endocytic trafficking of Rh1 and TRPL. CULD localized to endocytic Rh1-positive or TRPL-positive vesicles. Mutations in culd resulted in the accumulation of Rh1 and TRPL within endocytic vesicles, and disrupted the regular turnover of endocytic Rh1 and TRPL. In addition, loss of CULD induced light- and age-dependent retinal degeneration, and reduced levels of Rh1, but not of TRPL, suppressed retinal degeneration in culd-null mutant flies. Our data demonstrate that CULD plays an important role in the endocytic turnover of Rh1 and TRPL, and suggest that CULD-dependent rhodopsin endocytic trafficking is required for maintaining photoreceptor integrity. PMID:26598556

  3. Analysis of yeast endocytic site formation and maturation through a regulatory transition point

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Susheela Y.; Stimpson, Helen E. M.; Weinberg, Jasper; Toret, Christopher P.; Sun, Yidi; Drubin, David G.

    2012-01-01

    The earliest stages of endocytic site formation and the regulation of endocytic site maturation are not well understood. Here we analyzed the order in which the earliest proteins are detectable at endocytic sites in budding yeast and found that an uncharacterized protein, Pal1p/Ydr348cp, is also present at the initial stages of endocytosis. Because Ede1p (homologue of Eps15) and clathrin are the early-arriving proteins most important for cargo uptake, their roles during the early stages of endocytosis were examined more comprehensively. Ede1p is necessary for efficient recruitment of most early-arriving proteins, but not for the recruitment of the adaptor protein Yap1802p, to endocytic sites. The early-arriving proteins, as well as the later-arriving proteins Sla2p and Ent1/2p (homologues of Hip1R and epsins), were found to have longer lifetimes in CLC1-knockout yeast, which indicates that clathrin light chain facilitates the transition from the intermediate to late coat stages. Cargo also arrives during the early stages of endocytosis, and therefore its effect on endocytic machinery dynamics was investigated. Our results are consistent with a role for cargo in regulating the transition of endocytic sites from the early stages of formation to the late stages during which vesicle formation occurs. PMID:22190733

  4. The role of Ca2+ influx in endocytic vacuole formation in pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Voronina, Svetlana; Collier, David; Chvanov, Michael; Middlehurst, Ben; Beckett, Alison J; Prior, Ian A; Criddle, David N; Begg, Malcolm; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Sutton, Robert; Tepikin, Alexei V

    2015-02-01

    The inducers of acute pancreatitis trigger a prolonged increase in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c), which is responsible for the damage to and eventual death of pancreatic acinar cells. Vacuolization is an important indicator of pancreatic acinar cell damage. Furthermore, activation of trypsinogen occurs in the endocytic vacuoles; therefore the vacuoles can be considered as 'initiating' organelles in the development of the cell injury. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between the formation of endocytic vacuoles and Ca(2+) influx developed in response to the inducers of acute pancreatitis [bile acid taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate (TLC-S) and supramaximal concentration of cholecystokinin-8 (CCK)]. We found that the inhibitor of STIM (stromal interaction molecule)/Orai channels, GSK-7975A, effectively suppressed both the Ca(2+) influx (stimulated by inducers of pancreatitis) and the formation of endocytic vacuoles. Cell death induced by TLC-S or CCK was also inhibited by GSK-7975A. We documented the formation of endocytic vacuoles in response to store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) induced by thapsigargin [TG; inhibitor of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) pumps] and observed strong inhibition of TG-induced vacuole formation by GSK-7975A. Finally, we found that structurally-unrelated inhibitors of calpain suppress formation of endocytic vacuoles, suggesting that this Ca2+-dependent protease is a mediator between Ca(2+) elevation and endocytic vacuole formation.

  5. Let's go bananas: revisiting the endocytic BAR code.

    PubMed

    Qualmann, Britta; Koch, Dennis; Kessels, Michael Manfred

    2011-08-31

    Against the odds of membrane resistance, members of the BIN/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain superfamily shape membranes and their activity is indispensable for a plethora of life functions. While crystal structures of different BAR dimers advanced our understanding of membrane shaping by scaffolding and hydrophobic insertion mechanisms considerably, especially life-imaging techniques and loss-of-function studies of clathrin-mediated endocytosis with its gradually increasing curvature show that the initial idea that solely BAR domain curvatures determine their functions is oversimplified. Diagonal placing, lateral lipid-binding modes, additional lipid-binding modules, tilde shapes and formation of macromolecular lattices with different modes of organisation and arrangement increase versatility. A picture emerges, in which BAR domain proteins create macromolecular platforms, that recruit and connect different binding partners and ensure the connection and coordination of the different events during the endocytic process, such as membrane invagination, coat formation, actin nucleation, vesicle size control, fission, detachment and uncoating, in time and space, and may thereby offer mechanistic explanations for how coordination, directionality and effectiveness of a complex process with several steps and key players can be achieved. PMID:21878992

  6. Rapid subcellular fractionation of the rat liver endocytic compartments involved in transcytosis of polymeric immunoglobulin A and endocytosis of asialofetuin.

    PubMed Central

    Branch, W J; Mullock, B M; Luzio, J P

    1987-01-01

    The distributions of two endocytosed radiolabelled ligands (polymeric immunoglobulin A and asialofetuin) in rat liver endocytic compartments were investigated by using rapid subcellular fractionation of post-mitochondrial supernatants on vertical density gradients of Ficoll or Nycodenz. Two endocytic compartments were identified, both ligands being initially associated with a light endocytic-vesicle fraction on Ficoll gradients, asialofetuin then accumulating in denser endosomes before transfer to lysosomes for degradation. PMID:2444213

  7. Probiotics promote endocytic allergen degradation in gut epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chun-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Huang, Shelly; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antigens transported across A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers conserved antigenicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Probiotic proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Epithelial barrier dysfunction plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases; the mechanism is to be further understood. The ubiquitin E3 ligase A20 (A20) plays a role in the endocytic protein degradation in the cells. This study aims to elucidate the role of A20 in the maintenance of gut epithelial barrier function. Methods: Gut epithelial cell line, HT-29 cell, was cultured into monolayers to evaluate the barrier function in transwells. RNA interference was employed to knock down the A20 gene in HT-29 cells to test the role of A20 in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function. Probiotic derived proteins were extracted from the culture supernatants using to enhance the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. Results: The results showed that the knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function in HT-29 monolayers, mainly increased the intracellular permeability. The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Allergens collected from the transwell basal chambers of A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers still conserved functional antigenicity. Treating with probiotic derived proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells and promote the barrier function. Conclusion: A20 plays an important role in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function as shown by HT-29 monolayer. Probiotic derived protein increases the expression of A20 and promote the HT-29 monolayer barrier function.

  8. Endocytic vesicle scission by lipid phase boundary forces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Kaksonen, Marko; Drubin, David G.; Oster, George

    2006-01-01

    Endocytosis in budding yeast is thought to occur in several phases. First, the membrane invaginates and then elongates into a tube. A vesicle forms at the end of the tube, eventually pinching off to form a “free” vesicle. Experiments show that actin polymerization is an active participant in the endocytic process, along with a number of membrane-associated proteins. Here we investigate the possible roles of these components in driving vesiculation by constructing a quantitative model of the process beginning at the stage where the membrane invagination has elongated into a tube encased in a sheath of membrane-associated protein. This protein sheath brings about the scission step where the vesicle separates from the tube. When the protein sheath is dynamin, it is commonly assumed that scission is brought about by the constriction of the sheath. Here, we show that an alternative scenario can work as well: The protein sheath acts as a “filter” to effect a phase separation of lipid species. The resulting line tension tends to minimize the interface between the tube region and the vesicle region. Interestingly, large vesicle size can further facilitate the reduction of the interfacial diameter down to a few nanometers, small enough so that thermal fluctuations can fuse the membrane and pinch off the vesicle. To deform the membrane into the tubular vesicle shape, the membrane elastic resistance forces must be balanced by some additional forces that we show can be generated by actin polymerization and/or myosin I. These active forces are shown to be important in successful scission processes as well. PMID:16801551

  9. Dimerization drives EGFR endocytosis through two sets of compatible endocytic codes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Chen, Xinmei; Wang, Zhixiang

    2015-03-01

    We have shown previously that epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) endocytosis is controlled by EGFR dimerization. However, it is not clear how the dimerization drives receptor internalization. We propose that EGFR endocytosis is driven by dimerization, bringing two sets of endocytic codes, one contained in each receptor monomer, in close proximity. Here, we tested this hypothesis by generating specific homo- or hetero-dimers of various receptors and their mutants. We show that ErbB2 and ErbB3 homodimers are endocytosis deficient owing to the lack of endocytic codes. Interestingly, EGFR-ErbB2 or EGFR-ErbB3 heterodimers are also endocytosis deficient. Moreover, the heterodimer of EGFR and the endocytosis-deficient mutant EGFRΔ1005-1017 is also impaired in endocytosis. These results indicate that two sets of endocytic codes are required for receptor endocytosis. We found that an EGFR-PDGFRβ heterodimer is endocytosis deficient, although both EGFR and PDGFRβ homodimers are endocytosis-competent, indicating that two compatible sets of endocytic codes are required. Finally, we found that to mediate the endocytosis of the receptor dimer, the two sets of compatible endocytic codes, one contained in each receptor molecule, have to be spatially coordinated.

  10. Flotillin-mediated endocytic events dictate cell-type specific responses to Semaphorin 3A

    PubMed Central

    Carcea, Ioana; Ma'ayan, Avi; Mesias, Roxana; Sepulveda, Bryan; Salton, Stephen R.; Benson, Deanna L.

    2010-01-01

    Cortical efferents growing in the same environment diverge early in development. The expression of particular transcription factors dictates the trajectories taken presumably by regulating responsiveness to guidance cues via cellular mechanisms that are not yet known. Here we show that cortical neurons that are dissociated and grown in culture maintain their cell-type specific identities defined by the expression of transcription factors. Using this model system we sought to identify and characterize mechanisms that are recruited to produce cell-type specific responses to Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A), a guidance cue that would be presented similarly to cortical axons in vivo. Axons from presumptive corticofugal neurons lacking the transcription factor Satb2 and expressing Ctip2 or Tbr1 respond far more robustly to Sema3A than those from presumptive callosal neurons expressing Satb2. Both populations of axons express similar levels of Sema3A receptors (Neuropilin-1, L1CAM and PlexinA4), but significantly, axons from neurons lacking Satb2 internalize more Sema3A and they do so via a raft-mediated endocytic pathway. We used an in silico approach to identify the endocytosis effector Flotillin-1 as a Sema3A signaling candidate. We tested the contributions of Flotillin-1 to Sema3A endocytosis and signaling, and show that raft-mediated Sema3A endocytosis is defined by and depends on the recruitment of Flotillin-1, which mediates LIMK activation, and regulates axon responsiveness to Sema3A in presumptive corticofugal axons. PMID:21068336

  11. Ubiquitin-Related Roles of β-Arrestins in Endocytic Trafficking and Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Jean-Charles, Pierre-Yves; Rajiv, Vishwaesh; Shenoy, Sudha K

    2016-10-01

    The non-visual arrestins, β-arrestin1, and β-arrestin2 were originally identified as proteins that bind to seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs, also called G protein-coupled receptors, GPCRs) and block heterotrimeric G protein activation, thus leading to desensitization of transmembrane signaling. However, as subsequent discoveries have continually demonstrated, their functionality is not constrained to desensitization. They are now recognized for their critical roles in mediating intracellular trafficking of 7TMRs, growth factor receptors, ion transporters, ion channels, nuclear receptors, and non-receptor proteins. Additionally, they function as crucial mediators of ubiquitination of 7TMRs as well as other receptors and non-receptor proteins. Recently, emerging studies suggest that a class of proteins with predicted structural features of β-arrestins regulate substrate ubiquitination in yeast and higher mammals, lending support to the idea that the adaptor role of β-arrestins in protein ubiquitination is evolutionarily conserved. β-arrestins also function as scaffolds for kinases and transduce signals from 7TMRs through pathways that do not require G protein activation. Remarkably, the endocytic and scaffolding functions of β-arrestin are intertwined with its ubiquitination status; the dynamic and site specific ubiquitination on β-arrestin plays a critical role in stabilizing β-arrestin-7TMR association and the formation of signalosomes. This review summarizes the current findings on ubiquitin-dependent regulation of 7TMRs as well as β-arrestins and the potential role of reversible ubiquitination as a "biological switch" in signal transduction. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2071-2080, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Plasticity Harnesses Endocytic Circuitries

    PubMed Central

    Corallino, Salvatore; Malabarba, Maria Grazia; Zobel, Martina; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Scita, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The ability of cells to alter their phenotypic and morphological characteristics, known as cellular plasticity, is critical in normal embryonic development and adult tissue repair and contributes to the pathogenesis of diseases, such as organ fibrosis and cancer. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a type of cellular plasticity. This transition involves genetic and epigenetic changes as well as alterations in protein expression and post-translational modifications. These changes result in reduced cell-cell adhesion, enhanced cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix, and altered organization of the cytoskeleton and of cell polarity. Among these modifications, loss of cell polarity represents the nearly invariable, distinguishing feature of EMT that frequently precedes the other traits or might even occur in their absence. EMT transforms cell morphology and physiology, and hence cell identity, from one typical of cells that form a tight barrier, like epithelial and endothelial cells, to one characterized by a highly motile mesenchymal phenotype. Time-resolved proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses of cells undergoing EMT recently identified thousands of changes in proteins involved in many cellular processes, including cell proliferation and motility, DNA repair, and – unexpectedly – membrane trafficking (1). These results have highlighted a picture of great complexity. First, the EMT transition is not an all-or-none response but rather a gradual process that develops over time. Second, EMT events are highly dynamic and frequently reversible, involving both cell-autonomous and non-autonomous mechanisms. The net results is that EMT generates populations of mixed cells, with partial or full phenotypes, possibly accounting (at least in part) for the physiological as well as pathological cellular heterogeneity of some tissues. Endocytic circuitries have emerged as complex connectivity infrastructures for numerous cellular networks required for the

  13. Phylogeny of endocytic components yields insight into the process of nonendosymbiotic organelle evolution.

    PubMed

    Dacks, Joel B; Poon, Pak P; Field, Mark C

    2008-01-15

    The process by which some eukaryotic organelles, for example the endomembrane system, evolved without endosymbiotic input remains poorly understood. This problem largely arises because many major cellular systems predate the last common eukaryotic ancestor (LCEA) and thus do not provide examples of organellogenesis in progress. A model is emerging whereby gene duplication and divergence of multiple "specificity-" or "identity-" encoding proteins for the various endomembranous organelles produced the diversity of nonendosymbiotically derived cellular compartments present in modern eukaryotes. To address this possibility, we analyzed three molecular components of the endocytic membrane-trafficking machinery. Phylogenetic analyses of the endocytic syntaxins, Rab 5, and the beta-adaptins each reveal a pattern of ancestral, undifferentiated endocytic homologues in the LCEA. Subsequently, these undifferentiated progenitors independently duplicated in widely divergent lineages, convergently producing components with similar endocytic roles, e.g., beta1 and beta2-adaptin. In contrast, beta3, beta4, and all other adaptin complex subunits, as well as paralogues of the syntaxins and Rabs specific for the other membrane-trafficking organelles, all evolved before the LCEA. Thus, the process giving rise to the differentiated organelles of the endocytic system appears to have been interrupted by the major speciation event that produced the extant eukaryotic lineages. These results suggest that although many endocytic components evolved before the LCEA, other major features evolved independently and convergently after diversification into the primary eukaryotic supergroups. This finding provides an example of a basic cellular system that was simpler in the LCEA than in many extant eukaryotes and yields insight into nonendosymbiotic organelle evolution.

  14. Phosphorylation Regulates the Endocytic Function of the Yeast Dynamin-Related Protein Vps1.

    PubMed

    Smaczynska-de Rooij, Iwona I; Marklew, Christopher J; Allwood, Ellen G; Palmer, Sarah E; Booth, Wesley I; Mishra, Ritu; Goldberg, Martin W; Ayscough, Kathryn R

    2016-03-01

    The family of dynamin proteins is known to function in many eukaryotic membrane fusion and fission events. The yeast dynamin-related protein Vps1 functions at several stages of membrane trafficking, including Golgi apparatus to endosome and vacuole, peroxisomal fission, and endocytic scission. We have previously shown that in its endocytic role, Vps1 functions with the amphiphysin heterodimer Rvs161/Rvs167 to facilitate scission and release of vesicles. Phosphoproteome studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified a phosphorylation site in Vps1 at serine 599. In this study, we confirmed this phosphorylation event, and we reveal that, like Rvs167, Vps1 can be phosphorylated by the yeast cyclin-associated kinase Pho85 in vivo and in vitro. The importance of this posttranslational modification was revealed when mutagenesis of S599 to a phosphomimetic or nonphosphorylatable form caused defects in endocytosis but not in other functions associated with Vps1. Mutation to nonphosphorylatable valine inhibited the Rvs167 interaction, while both S599V and S599D caused defects in vesicle scission, as shown by both live-cell imaging and electron microscopy of endocytic invaginations. Our data support a model in which phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of Vps1 promote distinct interactions and highlight the importance of such regulatory events in facilitating sequential progression of the endocytic process. PMID:26711254

  15. Phosphorylation Regulates the Endocytic Function of the Yeast Dynamin-Related Protein Vps1

    PubMed Central

    Smaczynska-de Rooij, Iwona I.; Marklew, Christopher J.; Allwood, Ellen G.; Palmer, Sarah E.; Booth, Wesley I.; Mishra, Ritu; Goldberg, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    The family of dynamin proteins is known to function in many eukaryotic membrane fusion and fission events. The yeast dynamin-related protein Vps1 functions at several stages of membrane trafficking, including Golgi apparatus to endosome and vacuole, peroxisomal fission, and endocytic scission. We have previously shown that in its endocytic role, Vps1 functions with the amphiphysin heterodimer Rvs161/Rvs167 to facilitate scission and release of vesicles. Phosphoproteome studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified a phosphorylation site in Vps1 at serine 599. In this study, we confirmed this phosphorylation event, and we reveal that, like Rvs167, Vps1 can be phosphorylated by the yeast cyclin-associated kinase Pho85 in vivo and in vitro. The importance of this posttranslational modification was revealed when mutagenesis of S599 to a phosphomimetic or nonphosphorylatable form caused defects in endocytosis but not in other functions associated with Vps1. Mutation to nonphosphorylatable valine inhibited the Rvs167 interaction, while both S599V and S599D caused defects in vesicle scission, as shown by both live-cell imaging and electron microscopy of endocytic invaginations. Our data support a model in which phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of Vps1 promote distinct interactions and highlight the importance of such regulatory events in facilitating sequential progression of the endocytic process. PMID:26711254

  16. MLN64 Is Involved in Actin-mediated Dynamics of Late Endocytic OrganellesD⃞V⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hölttä-Vuori, Maarit; Alpy, Fabien; Tanhuanpää, Kimmo; Jokitalo, Eija; Mutka, Aino-Liisa; Ikonen, Elina

    2005-01-01

    MLN64 is a late endosomal cholesterol-binding membrane protein of an unknown function. Here, we show that MLN64 depletion results in the dispersion of late endocytic organelles to the cell periphery similarly as upon pharmacological actin disruption. The dispersed organelles in MLN64 knockdown cells exhibited decreased association with actin and the Arp2/3 complex subunit p34-Arc. MLN64 depletion was accompanied by impaired fusion of late endocytic organelles and delayed cargo degradation. MLN64 overexpression increased the number of actin and p34-Arc-positive patches on late endosomes, enhanced the fusion of late endocytic organelles in an actin-dependent manner, and stimulated the deposition of sterol in late endosomes harboring the protein. Overexpression of wild-type MLN64 was capable of rescuing the endosome dispersion in MLN64-depleted cells, whereas mutants of MLN64 defective in cholesterol binding were not, suggesting a functional connection between MLN64-mediated sterol transfer and actin-dependent late endosome dynamics. We propose that local sterol enrichment by MLN64 in the late endosomal membranes facilitates their association with actin, thereby governing actin-dependent fusion and degradative activity of late endocytic organelles. PMID:15930133

  17. Fluorescence-Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Visualization of Quantum Dots’ Endocytic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Damalakiene, Leona; Karabanovas, Vitalijus; Bagdonas, Saulius; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of carboxylated polyethylene glycol (PEG) CdSe/ZnSquantum dots (QDs) has been monitored in living fibroblasts using confocal microscopy for fluorescence intensity and fluorescence-lifetime imaging (FLIM). The wide range of mean photoluminescence (PL) lifetime values was observed for the intracellular QDs in different intracellular microenvironment, which revealed structural heterogeneity of endosomes and enabled the distinguishing among endosomes of different maturity.

  18. Activity-dependent BDNF release via endocytic pathways is regulated by synaptotagmin-6 and complexin

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yu-Hui; Lee, Chia-Ming; Xie, Wenjun; Cui, Bianxiao; Poo, Mu-ming

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to modulate synapse development and plasticity, but the source of synaptic BDNF and molecular mechanisms regulating BDNF release remain unclear. Using exogenous BDNF tagged with quantum dots (BDNF-QDs), we found that endocytosed BDNF-QDs were preferentially localized to postsynaptic sites in the dendrite of cultured hippocampal neurons. Repetitive neuronal spiking induced the release of BDNF-QDs at these sites, and this process required activation of glutamate receptors. Down-regulating complexin 1/2 (Cpx1/2) expression eliminated activity-induced BDNF-QD secretion, although the overall activity-independent secretion was elevated. Among eight synaptotagmin (Syt) isoforms examined, down-regulation of only Syt6 impaired activity-induced BDNF-QD secretion. In contrast, activity-induced release of endogenously synthesized BDNF did not depend on Syt6. Thus, neuronal activity could trigger the release of endosomal BDNF from postsynaptic dendrites in a Cpx- and Syt6-dependent manner, and endosomes containing BDNF may serve as a source of BDNF for activity-dependent synaptic modulation. PMID:26216953

  19. Simultaneous pH measurement in endocytic and cytosolic compartments in living cells using confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lucien, Fabrice; Harper, Kelly; Pelletier, Pierre-Paul; Volkov, Leonid; Dubois, Claire M

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH is tightly regulated and differences in pH between the cytoplasm and organelles have been reported(1). Regulation of cellular pH is crucial for homeostatic control of physiological processes that include: protein, DNA and RNA synthesis, vesicular trafficking, cell growth and cell division. Alterations in cellular pH homeostasis can lead to detrimental functional changes and promote progression of various diseases(2). Various methods are available for measuring intracellular pH but very few of these allow simultaneous measurement of pH in the cytoplasm and in organelles. Here, we describe in detail a rapid and accurate method for the simultaneous measurement of cytoplasmic and organellar pH by using confocal microscopy on living cells(3). This goal is achieved with the use of two pH-sensing ratiometric dyes that possess selective cellular compartment partitioning. For instance, SNARF-1 is compartmentalized inside the cytoplasm whereas HPTS is compartmentalized inside endosomal/lysosomal organelles. Although HPTS is commonly used as a cytoplasmic pH indicator, this dye can specifically label vesicles along the endosomal-lysosomal pathway after being taken up by pinocytosis(3,4). Using these pH-sensing probes, it is possible to simultaneously measure pH within the endocytic and cytoplasmic compartments. The optimal excitation wavelength of HPTS varies depending on the pH while for SNARF-1, it is the optimal emission wavelength that varies. Following loading with SNARF-1 and HPTS, cells are cultured in different pH-calibrated solutions to construct a pH standard curve for each probe. Cell imaging by confocal microscopy allows elimination of artifacts and background noise. Because of the spectral properties of HPTS, this probe is better suited for measurement of the mildly acidic endosomal compartment or to demonstrate alkalinization of the endosomal/lysosomal organelles. This method simplifies data analysis, improves accuracy of pH measurements and can

  20. Simultaneous pH Measurement in Endocytic and Cytosolic Compartments in Living Cells using Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lucien, Fabrice; Harper, Kelly; Pelletier, Pierre-Paul; Volkov, Leonid; Dubois, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH is tightly regulated and differences in pH between the cytoplasm and organelles have been reported1. Regulation of cellular pH is crucial for homeostatic control of physiological processes that include: protein, DNA and RNA synthesis, vesicular trafficking, cell growth and cell division. Alterations in cellular pH homeostasis can lead to detrimental functional changes and promote progression of various diseases2. Various methods are available for measuring intracellular pH but very few of these allow simultaneous measurement of pH in the cytoplasm and in organelles. Here, we describe in detail a rapid and accurate method for the simultaneous measurement of cytoplasmic and organellar pH by using confocal microscopy on living cells3. This goal is achieved with the use of two pH-sensing ratiometric dyes that possess selective cellular compartment partitioning. For instance, SNARF-1 is compartmentalized inside the cytoplasm whereas HPTS is compartmentalized inside endosomal/lysosomal organelles. Although HPTS is commonly used as a cytoplasmic pH indicator, this dye can specifically label vesicles along the endosomal-lysosomal pathway after being taken up by pinocytosis3,4. Using these pH-sensing probes, it is possible to simultaneously measure pH within the endocytic and cytoplasmic compartments. The optimal excitation wavelength of HPTS varies depending on the pH while for SNARF-1, it is the optimal emission wavelength that varies. Following loading with SNARF-1 and HPTS, cells are cultured in different pH-calibrated solutions to construct a pH standard curve for each probe. Cell imaging by confocal microscopy allows elimination of artifacts and background noise. Because of the spectral properties of HPTS, this probe is better suited for measurement of the mildly acidic endosomal compartment or to demonstrate alkalinization of the endosomal/lysosomal organelles. This method simplifies data analysis, improves accuracy of pH measurements and can be used

  1. Identification of a New Exo-Endocytic Mechanism Triggered by Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone in Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Balseiro-Gomez, Santiago; Flores, Juan A; Acosta, Jorge; Ramirez-Ponce, M Pilar; Ales, Eva

    2015-09-01

    The key role of mast cells (MC), either in development of inflammatory pathologies or in response to environmental stress, has been widely reported in recent years. Previous studies have described the effects of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is released from inflamed tissues by cellular stress signals, on MC degranulation, a process possibly driven by selective secretion of mediators (piecemeal degranulation). In this study, we introduce a novel granular exo-endocytic pathway induced by CRH on peritoneal MC. We found that CRH triggers substantial exocytosis, which is even stronger than that induced by Ag stimulation and is characterized by large quantal size release events. Membrane fluorescence increases during stimulation in the presence of FM1-43 dye, corroborating the strength of this exocytosis, given that discrete upward fluorescence steps are often observed and suggesting that secretory granules are preferentially released by compound exocytosis. Additionally, the presence of a depot of large tubular organelles in the cytoplasm suggests that the exocytotic process is tightly coupled to a fast compound endocytosis. This CRH-stimulated mechanism is mediated through activation of adenylate cyclase and an increase of cAMP and intracellular Ca(2+), as evidenced by the fact that the effect of CRH is mimicked by forskolin and 8-bromo-cAMP. Thus, these outcomes constitute new evidence for the critical role of MC in pathophysiological conditions within a cellular stress environment and an alternative membrane trafficking route mediated by CRH.

  2. The single dynamin family protein in the primitive protozoan Giardia lamblia is essential for stage conversion and endocytic transport.

    PubMed

    Gaechter, Verena; Schraner, Elisabeth; Wild, Peter; Hehl, Adrian B

    2008-01-01

    Dynamins are universally conserved large guanosine triphosphatases, which function as mechanoenzymes in membrane scission. The primitive protozoan Giardia lamblia has a single dynamin-related protein (GlDRP) with an unusual domain structure. Giardia lacks a Golgi apparatus but generates transient Golgi-like delay compartments dubbed encystation-specific vesicles (ESVs), which serve to accumulate and mature cyst wall proteins during differentiation to infectious cyst forms. Here, we analyze the function of GlDRP during growth and encystation and demonstrate that it relocalizes from peripheral endosomal-lysosomal compartments to nascent ESVs. We show that GlDRP is necessary for secretion of the cyst wall material and ESV homeostasis. Expression of a dominant-negative GlDRP variant does not interfere with ESV formation but blocks cyst formation completely prior to regulated exocytosis. GlDRP colocalizes with clathrin at the cell periphery and is necessary for endocytosis of surface proteins to endosomal-lysosomal organelles in trophozoites. Electron microscopy and live cell imaging reveal gross morphological changes as well as functional impairment of the endocytic system in cells expressing the dominant-negative GlDRP. Thus, giardial DRP plays a key role in two distinct trafficking pathways and in organelle homeostasis, both essential functions for the proliferation of the parasite in the gut and its transmission to a new host. PMID:17892527

  3. Salmonella Disrupts Host Endocytic Trafficking by SopD2-Mediated Inhibition of Rab7.

    PubMed

    D'Costa, Vanessa M; Braun, Virginie; Landekic, Marija; Shi, Rong; Proteau, Ariane; McDonald, Laura; Cygler, Miroslaw; Grinstein, Sergio; Brumell, John H

    2015-09-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens of a diverse nature share the ability to evade host immunity by impairing trafficking of endocytic cargo to lysosomes for degradation, a process that is poorly understood. Here, we show that the Salmonella enterica type 3 secreted effector SopD2 mediates this process by binding the host regulatory GTPase Rab7 and inhibiting its nucleotide exchange. Consequently, this limits Rab7 interaction with its dynein- and kinesin-binding effectors RILP and FYCO1 and thereby disrupts host-driven regulation of microtubule motors. Our study identifies a bacterial effector capable of directly binding and thereby modulating Rab7 activity and a mechanism of endocytic trafficking disruption that may provide insight into the pathogenesis of other bacteria. Additionally, we provide a powerful tool for the study of Rab7 function, and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26299973

  4. Interpretation of the FGF8 morphogen gradient is regulated by endocytic trafficking.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Matthias; Machate, Anja; Yu, Shuizi Rachel; Gupta, Mansi; Brand, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Forty years ago, it was proposed that during embryonic development and organogenesis, morphogen gradients provide positional information to the individual cells within a tissue leading to specific fate decisions. Recently, much insight has been gained into how such morphogen gradients are formed and maintained; however, which cellular mechanisms govern their interpretation within target tissues remains debated. Here we used in vivo fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and automated image analysis to assess the role of endocytic sorting dynamics on fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) morphogen gradient interpretation. By interfering with the function of the ubiquitin ligase Cbl, we found an expanded range of Fgf target gene expression and a delay of Fgf8 lysosomal transport. However, the extracellular Fgf8 morphogen gradient remained unchanged, indicating that the observed signalling changes are due to altered gradient interpretation. We propose that regulation of morphogen signalling activity through endocytic sorting allows fast feedback-induced changes in gradient interpretation during the establishment of complex patterns.

  5. Salmonella Disrupts Host Endocytic Trafficking by SopD2-Mediated Inhibition of Rab7.

    PubMed

    D'Costa, Vanessa M; Braun, Virginie; Landekic, Marija; Shi, Rong; Proteau, Ariane; McDonald, Laura; Cygler, Miroslaw; Grinstein, Sergio; Brumell, John H

    2015-09-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens of a diverse nature share the ability to evade host immunity by impairing trafficking of endocytic cargo to lysosomes for degradation, a process that is poorly understood. Here, we show that the Salmonella enterica type 3 secreted effector SopD2 mediates this process by binding the host regulatory GTPase Rab7 and inhibiting its nucleotide exchange. Consequently, this limits Rab7 interaction with its dynein- and kinesin-binding effectors RILP and FYCO1 and thereby disrupts host-driven regulation of microtubule motors. Our study identifies a bacterial effector capable of directly binding and thereby modulating Rab7 activity and a mechanism of endocytic trafficking disruption that may provide insight into the pathogenesis of other bacteria. Additionally, we provide a powerful tool for the study of Rab7 function, and a potential therapeutic target.

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 endocytic trafficking through macrophage bridging conduits facilitates spread of infection.

    PubMed

    Kadiu, Irena; Gendelman, Howard E

    2011-12-01

    Bridging conduits (BC) sustain communication and homeostasis between distant tethered cells. These are also exploited commonly for direct cell-to-cell transfer of microbial agents. Conduits efficiently spread infection, effectively, at speeds faster than fluid phase exchange while shielding the microbe against otherwise effective humoral immunity. Our laboratory has sought to uncover the mechanism(s) for these events for human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1) infection. Indeed, in our prior works HIV-1 Env and Gag antigen and fluorescent virus tracking were shown sequestered into endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi organelles but the outcomes for spreading viral infection remained poorly defined. Herein, we show that HIV-1 specifically traffics through endocytic compartments contained within BC and directing such macrophage-to-macrophage viral transfers. Following clathrin-dependent viral entry, HIV-1 constituents bypass degradation by differential sorting from early to Rab11(+) recycling endosomes and multivesicular bodies. Virus-containing endocytic viral cargoes propelled by myosin II through BC spread to neighboring uninfected cells. Disruption of endosomal motility with cytochalasin D, nocodasole and blebbistatin diminish intercellular viral spread. These data lead us to propose that HIV-1 hijacks macrophage endocytic and cytoskeletal machineries for high-speed cell-to-cell spread.

  7. Annexin A2 facilitates endocytic trafficking of antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyu; Sun, Hong; Tanowitz, Michael; Liang, Xue-hai; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2016-01-01

    Chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) designed to mediate site-specific cleavage of RNA by RNase H1 are used as research tools and as therapeutics. ASOs modified with phosphorothioate (PS) linkages enter cells via endocytotic pathways. The mechanisms by which PS-ASOs are released from membrane-enclosed endocytotic organelles to reach target RNAs remain largely unknown. We recently found that annexin A2 (ANXA2) co-localizes with PS-ASOs in late endosomes (LEs) and enhances ASO activity. Here, we show that co-localization of ANXA2 with PS-ASO is not dependent on their direct interactions or mediated by ANXA2 partner protein S100A10. Instead, ANXA2 accompanies the transport of PS-ASOs to LEs, as ANXA2/PS-ASO co-localization was observed inside LEs. Although ANXA2 appears not to affect levels of PS-ASO internalization, ANXA2 reduction caused significant accumulation of ASOs in early endosomes (EEs) and reduced localization in LEs and decreased PS-ASO activity. Importantly, the kinetics of PS-ASO activity upon free uptake show that target mRNA reduction occurs at least 4 hrs after PS-ASOs exit from EEs and is coincident with release from LEs. Taken together, our results indicate that ANXA2 facilitates PS-ASO trafficking from early to late endosomes where it may also contribute to PS-ASO release. PMID:27378781

  8. Endosome-mediated endocytic mechanism replenishes the majority of synaptic vesicles at mature CNS synapses in an activity-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Park, Joohyun; Cho, Oh Yeon; Kim, Jung Ah; Chang, Sunghoe

    2016-01-01

    Whether synaptic vesicles (SVs) are recovered via endosome-mediated pathways is a matter of debate; however, recent evidence suggests that clathrin-independent bulk endocytosis (CIE) via endosomes is functional and preferentially replenishes SV pools during strong stimulation. Here, using brefeldin-A (BFA) to block CIE, we found that CIE retrieved a minority of SVs at developing CNS synapses during strong stimulation, but its contribution increased up to 61% at mature CNS synapses. Contrary to previous views, BFA not only blocked SV formation from the endosome but also blocked the endosome formation at the plasma membrane. Adaptor protein 1 and 3 (AP-1/3) have key roles in SV reformation from endosomes during CIE, and AP-1 also affects bulk endosome formation from the plasma membrane. Finally, temporary blocking of chronic or acute neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin in mature neurons redirected most SV retrieval to endosome-independent pathways. These results show that during high neuronal activity, CIE becomes the major endocytic pathway at mature CNS synapses. Moreover, mature neurons use clathrin-mediated endocytosis and the CIE pathway to different extents depending on their previous activity; this may result in activity-dependent alterations of the SV composition which ultimately influence transmitter release and contribute to synaptic plasticity. PMID:27534442

  9. Endosome-mediated endocytic mechanism replenishes the majority of synaptic vesicles at mature CNS synapses in an activity-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joohyun; Cho, Oh Yeon; Kim, Jung Ah; Chang, Sunghoe

    2016-01-01

    Whether synaptic vesicles (SVs) are recovered via endosome-mediated pathways is a matter of debate; however, recent evidence suggests that clathrin-independent bulk endocytosis (CIE) via endosomes is functional and preferentially replenishes SV pools during strong stimulation. Here, using brefeldin-A (BFA) to block CIE, we found that CIE retrieved a minority of SVs at developing CNS synapses during strong stimulation, but its contribution increased up to 61% at mature CNS synapses. Contrary to previous views, BFA not only blocked SV formation from the endosome but also blocked the endosome formation at the plasma membrane. Adaptor protein 1 and 3 (AP-1/3) have key roles in SV reformation from endosomes during CIE, and AP-1 also affects bulk endosome formation from the plasma membrane. Finally, temporary blocking of chronic or acute neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin in mature neurons redirected most SV retrieval to endosome-independent pathways. These results show that during high neuronal activity, CIE becomes the major endocytic pathway at mature CNS synapses. Moreover, mature neurons use clathrin-mediated endocytosis and the CIE pathway to different extents depending on their previous activity; this may result in activity-dependent alterations of the SV composition which ultimately influence transmitter release and contribute to synaptic plasticity. PMID:27534442

  10. Ack1 is a dopamine transporter endocytic brake that rescues a trafficking-dysregulated ADHD coding variant

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sijia; Bellve, Karl D.; Fogarty, Kevin E.; Melikian, Haley E.

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) facilitates high-affinity presynaptic DA reuptake that temporally and spatially constrains DA neurotransmission. Aberrant DAT function is implicated in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder. DAT is a major psychostimulant target, and psychostimulant reward strictly requires binding to DAT. DAT function is acutely modulated by dynamic membrane trafficking at the presynaptic terminal and a PKC-sensitive negative endocytic mechanism, or “endocytic brake,” controls DAT plasma membrane stability. However, the molecular basis for the DAT endocytic brake is unknown, and it is unknown whether this braking mechanism is unique to DAT or common to monoamine transporters. Here, we report that the cdc42-activated, nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, Ack1, is a DAT endocytic brake that stabilizes DAT at the plasma membrane and is released in response to PKC activation. Pharmacologic and shRNA-mediated Ack1 silencing enhanced basal DAT internalization and blocked PKC-stimulated DAT internalization, but had no effects on SERT endocytosis. Both cdc42 activation and PKC stimulation converge on Ack1 to control Ack1 activity and DAT endocytic capacity, and Ack1 inactivation is required for stimulated DAT internalization downstream of PKC activation. Moreover, constitutive Ack1 activation is sufficient to rescue the gain-of-function endocytic phenotype exhibited by the ADHD DAT coding variant, R615C. These findings reveal a unique endocytic control switch that is highly specific for DAT. Moreover, the ability to rescue the DAT(R615C) coding variant suggests that manipulating DAT trafficking mechanisms may be a potential therapeutic approach to correct DAT coding variants that exhibit trafficking dysregulation. PMID:26621748

  11. ΔF508 CFTR surface stability is regulated by DAB2 and CHIP-mediated ubiquitination in post-endocytic compartments.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lianwu; Rab, Andras; Tang, Li ping; Bebok, Zsuzsa; Rowe, Steven M; Bartoszewski, Rafal; Collawn, James F

    2015-01-01

    The ΔF508 mutant form of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (ΔF508 CFTR) that is normally degraded by the ER-associated degradative pathway can be rescued to the cell surface through low-temperature (27°C) culture or small molecular corrector treatment. However, it is unstable on the cell surface, and rapidly internalized and targeted to the lysosomal compartment for degradation. To understand the mechanism of this rapid turnover, we examined the role of two adaptor complexes (AP-2 and Dab2) and three E3 ubiquitin ligases (c-Cbl, CHIP, and Nedd4-2) on low-temperature rescued ΔF508 CFTR endocytosis and degradation in human airway epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate that siRNA depletion of either AP-2 or Dab2 inhibits ΔF508 CFTR endocytosis by 69% and 83%, respectively. AP-2 or Dab2 depletion also increases the rescued protein half-life of ΔF508 CFTR by ~18% and ~91%, respectively. In contrast, the depletion of each of the E3 ligases had no effect on ΔF508 CFTR endocytosis, whereas CHIP depletion significantly increased the surface half-life of ΔF508 CFTR. To determine where and when the ubiquitination occurs during ΔF508 CFTR turnover, we monitored the ubiquitination of rescued ΔF508 CFTR during the time course of CFTR endocytosis. Our results indicate that ubiquitination of the surface pool of ΔF508 CFTR begins to increase 15 min after internalization, suggesting that CFTR is ubiquitinated in a post-endocytic compartment. This post-endocytic ubiquination of ΔF508 CFTR could be blocked by either inhibiting endocytosis, by siRNA knockdown of CHIP, or by treating cells with the CFTR corrector, VX-809. Our results indicate that the post-endocytic ubiquitination of CFTR by CHIP is a critical step in the peripheral quality control of cell surface ΔF508 CFTR.

  12. Localization and role of MYO-1, an endocytic protein in hyphae of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Lara-Rojas, Fernando; Bartnicki-García, Salomón; Mouriño-Pérez, Rosa R

    2016-03-01

    The subapical endocytic collar is a prominent feature of hyphae of Neurospora crassa. It comprises a dynamic collection of actin patches associated with a number of proteins required for endocytosis, namely, ARP-2/3 complex, fimbrin, coronin, etc. We presently show that MYO-1 is another key component of this endocytic collar. A myo-1 sequence was identified in the genome of N. crassa and used it to generate a strain with a myo-1-sgfp allele under the ccg1 promoter. Examination of living hyphae by confocal microscopy, revealed MYO-1-GFP located mainly as a dynamic collection of small patches arranged in collar-like fashion in the hyphal subapex. Dual tagging showed MYO-1-GFP partially colocalized with two other endocytic proteins, fimbrin and coronin. MYO-1 was also present during septum formation. By recovering a viable strain, albeit severely inhibited, after deletion of myo-1, it was possible to investigate the phenotypic consequences of the elimination of MYO-1. Deletion of myo-1 caused a severe reduction in growth rate (95%), near absence of aerial mycelium and no conidiation. A reduced uptake of the lipophilic dye FM4-64 indicated a deficiency in endocytosis in the Δmyo-1 mutant. Hyphae were produced by the Δmyo-1 mutant but their morphogenesis was severely affected; hyphal morphology was distorted displaying irregular periods of isotropic and polarized growth. The morphological alterations were accompanied, and presumably caused, by a disruption in the organization and dynamics of a myosin-deprived actin cytoskeleton that, ultimately, compromised the stability and function of the Spitzenkörper as a vesicle supply center.

  13. The deubiquitinating enzyme USP10 regulates the endocytic recycling of CFTR in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Barnaby, Roxanna L; Stanton, Bruce A

    2010-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a cyclic AMP-regulated chloride channel that plays an important role in regulating the volume of the lung airway surface liquid, and thereby mucociliary clearance and elimination of pathogens from the lung. In epithelial cells, cell surface CFTR abundance is determined in part by regulating both CFTR endocytosis from the apical plasma membrane and recycling back to the plasma membrane. We recently reported, using an activity-based chemical screen to identify active deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) in human airway epithelial cells, that Ubiquitin Specific Protease-10 (USP10) is located and active in the early endosomal compartment and regulates the deubiquitination of CFTR and thereby promotes its endocytic recycling. siRNA-mediated knockdown of USP10 increased the multi-ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of CFTR and decreased the endocytic recycling and the half-life of CFTR in the apical membrane, as well as CFTR-mediated chloride secretion. Overexpression of wild-type USP10 reduced CFTR multi-ubiquitination and degradation, while overexpression of a dominant-negative USP10 promoted increased multi-ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of CFTR. In the current study, we show localization and activity of USP10 in the early endosomal compartment of primary bronchial epithelial cells, as well as an interaction between CFTR and USP10 in this compartment. These studies demonstrate a novel function for USP10 in facilitating the deubiquitination of CFTR in early endosomes, thereby enhancing the endocytic recycling and cell surface expression of CFTR.

  14. Neuroprotective peptides fused to arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides: Neuroprotective mechanism likely mediated by peptide endocytic properties.

    PubMed

    Meloni, Bruno P; Milani, Diego; Edwards, Adam B; Anderton, Ryan S; O'Hare Doig, Ryan L; Fitzgerald, Melinda; Palmer, T Norman; Knuckey, Neville W

    2015-09-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that TAT and other arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have intrinsic neuroprotective properties in their own right. Examples, we have demonstrated that in addition to TAT, poly-arginine peptides (R8 to R18; containing 8-18 arginine residues) as well as some other arginine-rich peptides are neuroprotective in vitro (in neurons exposed to glutamic acid excitotoxicity and oxygen glucose deprivation) and in the case of R9 in vivo (after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat). Based on several lines of evidence, we propose that this neuroprotection is related to the peptide's endocytosis-inducing properties, with peptide charge and arginine residues being critical factors. Specifically, we propose that during peptide endocytosis neuronal cell surface structures such as ion channels and transporters are internalised, thereby reducing calcium influx associated with excitotoxicity and other receptor-mediated neurodamaging signalling pathways. We also hypothesise that a peptide cargo can act synergistically with TAT and other arginine-rich CPPs due to potentiation of the CPPs endocytic traits rather than by the cargo-peptide acting directly on its supposedly intended intracellular target. In this review, we systematically consider a number of studies that have used CPPs to deliver neuroprotective peptides to the central nervous system (CNS) following stroke and other neurological disorders. Consequently, we critically review evidence that supports our hypothesis that neuroprotection is mediated by carrier peptide endocytosis. In conclusion, we believe that there are strong grounds to regard arginine-rich peptides as a new class of neuroprotective molecules for the treatment of a range of neurological disorders.

  15. Endophilin B1 regulates EGFR endocytic degradation in prostate cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J-Y; Xiong, Y; Zhang, W; Wan, J; Wan, J

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (Pca) is one of the most common types of cancer for elder men. Aberrant expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and EGFR downstream signaling have been known to contribute to disease progression in prostate cancer. EGF-stimulated EGFR is internalized and the process of endocytic degradation of EGFR mediates its signaling which is frequently dysregulated in many kinds of cancer. In the present study, we demonstrated that endophilin B1 expression was inhibited and EGFR expression was significantly increased in prostate cancer cell lines. We demonstrated that suppression of endophilin B1 increased EGFR levels via delaying EGFR internalization triggered by EGF and its intracellular degradation. Endophilin B1 decreased also sustained EGFR downstream signaling such as Erk1/2 phosphorylation in response to EGF stimulation and promoted prostate cancer cell proliferation which is EGF independent. Our data indicated that endophilin B1 mediated the biological function of EGFR in cancer cell proliferation through regulating the EGFR endocytic trafficking and downstream signaling. PMID:27609472

  16. Endocytic recycling protein EHD1 regulates primary cilia morphogenesis and SHH signaling during neural tube development

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sohinee; Rainey, Mark A; Arya, Priyanka; Dutta, Samikshan; George, Manju; Storck, Matthew D.; McComb, Rodney D.; Muirhead, David; Todd, Gordon L.; Gould, Karen; Datta, Kaustubh; Waes, Janee Gelineau-van; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Members of the four-member C-terminal EPS15-Homology Domain-containing (EHD) protein family play crucial roles in endocytic recycling of cell surface receptors from endosomes to the plasma membrane. In this study, we show that Ehd1 gene knockout in mice on a predominantly B6 background is embryonic lethal. Ehd1-null embryos die at mid-gestation with a failure to complete key developmental processes including neural tube closure, axial turning and patterning of the neural tube. We found that Ehd1-null embryos display short and stubby cilia on the developing neuroepithelium at embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5). Loss of EHD1 also deregulates the ciliary SHH signaling with Ehd1-null embryos displaying features indicative of increased SHH signaling, including a significant downregulation in the formation of the GLI3 repressor and increase in the ventral neuronal markers specified by SHH. Using Ehd1-null MEFS we found that EHD1 protein co-localizes with the SHH receptor Smoothened in the primary cilia upon ligand stimulation. Under the same conditions, EHD1 was shown to co-traffic with Smoothened into the developing primary cilia and we identify EHD1 as a direct binding partner of Smoothened. Overall, our studies identify the endocytic recycling regulator EHD1 as a novel regulator of the primary cilium-associated trafficking of Smoothened and Hedgehog signaling. PMID:26884322

  17. Residues in the hendra virus fusion protein transmembrane domain are critical for endocytic recycling.

    PubMed

    Popa, Andreea; Carter, James R; Smith, Stacy E; Hellman, Lance; Fried, Michael G; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2012-03-01

    Hendra virus is a highly pathogenic paramyxovirus classified as a biosafety level four agent. The fusion (F) protein of Hendra virus is critical for promoting viral entry and cell-to-cell fusion. To be fusogenically active, Hendra virus F must undergo endocytic recycling and cleavage by the endosomal/lysosomal protease cathepsin L, but the route of Hendra virus F following internalization and the recycling signals involved are poorly understood. We examined the intracellular distribution of Hendra virus F following endocytosis and showed that it is primarily present in Rab5- and Rab4-positive endosomal compartments, suggesting that cathepsin L cleavage occurs in early endosomes. Hendra virus F transmembrane domain (TMD) residues S490 and Y498 were found to be important for correct Hendra virus F recycling, with the hydroxyl group of S490 and the aromatic ring of Y498 important for this process. In addition, changes in association of isolated Hendra virus F TMDs correlated with alterations to Hendra virus F recycling, suggesting that appropriate TMD interactions play an important role in endocytic trafficking.

  18. Rapid kinetics of endocytosis at rod photoreceptor synapses depends upon endocytic load and calcium.

    PubMed

    Cork, Karlene M; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2014-05-01

    Release from rods is triggered by the opening of L-type Ca2+ channels that lie beneath synaptic ribbons. After exocytosis, vesicles are retrieved by compensatory endocytosis. Previous work showed that endocytosis is dynamin-dependent in rods but dynamin-independent in cones. We hypothesized that fast endocytosis in rods may also differ from cones in its dependence upon the amount of Ca2+ influx and/or endocytic load. We measured exocytosis and endocytosis from membrane capacitance (C m) changes evoked by depolarizing steps in voltage clamped rods from tiger salamander retinal slices. Similar to cones, the time constant for endocytosis in rods was quite fast, averaging <200 ms. We manipulated Ca2+ influx and the amount of vesicle release by altering the duration and voltage of depolarizing steps. Unlike cones, endocytosis kinetics in rods slowed after increasing Ca2+ channel activation with longer step durations or more strongly depolarized voltage steps. Endocytosis kinetics also slowed as Ca2+ buffering was decreased by replacing BAPTA (10 or 1 mM) with the slower Ca2+ buffer EGTA (5 or 0.5 mM) in the pipette solution. These data provide further evidence that endocytosis mechanisms differ in rods and cones and suggest that endocytosis in rods is regulated by both endocytic load and local Ca2+ levels.

  19. The endocytic recycling compartment maintains cargo segregation acquired upon exit from the sorting endosome

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shuwei; Bahl, Kriti; Reinecke, James B.; Hammond, Gerald R. V.; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2016-01-01

    The endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) is a series of perinuclear tubular and vesicular membranes that regulates recycling to the plasma membrane. Despite evidence that cargo is sorted at the early/sorting endosome (SE), whether cargo mixes downstream at the ERC or remains segregated is an unanswered question. Here we use three-dimensional (3D) structured illumination microscopy and dual-channel and 3D direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) to obtain new information about ERC morphology and cargo segregation. We show that cargo internalized either via clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) or independently of clathrin (CIE) remains segregated in the ERC, likely on distinct carriers. This suggests that no further sorting occurs upon cargo exit from SE. Moreover, 3D dSTORM data support a model in which some but not all ERC vesicles are tethered by contiguous “membrane bridges.” Furthermore, tubular recycling endosomes preferentially traffic CIE cargo and may originate from SE membranes. These findings support a significantly altered model for endocytic recycling in mammalian cells in which sorting occurs in peripheral endosomes and segregation is maintained at the ERC. PMID:26510502

  20. The ABCA1 transporter modulates late endocytic trafficking: insights from the correction of the genetic defect in Tangier disease.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Edward B; Stonik, John A; Demosky, Stephen J; Knapper, Catherine L; Combs, Christian A; Cooney, Adele; Comly, Marcella; Dwyer, Nancy; Blanchette-Mackie, Joan; Remaley, Alan T; Santamarina-Fojo, Silvia; Brewer, H Bryan

    2004-04-01

    We have previously established that the ABCA1 transporter, which plays a critical role in the lipidation of extracellular apolipoprotein acceptors, traffics between late endocytic vesicles and the cell surface (Neufeld, E. B., Remaley, A. T., Demosky, S. J., Jr., Stonik, J. A., Cooney, A. M., Comly, M., Dwyer, N. K., Zhang, M., Blanchette-Mackie, J., Santamarina-Fojo, S., and Brewer, H. B., Jr. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 27584-27590). The present study provides evidence that ABCA1 in late endocytic vesicles plays a role in cellular lipid efflux. Late endocytic trafficking was defective in Tangier disease fibroblasts that lack functional ABCA1. Consistent with a late endocytic protein trafficking defect, the hydrophobic amine U18666A retained NPC1 in abnormally tubulated, cholesterol-poor, Tangier disease late endosomes, rather than cholesterol-laden lysosomes, as in wild type fibroblasts. Consistent with a lipid trafficking defect, Tangier disease late endocytic vesicles accumulated both cholesterol and sphingomyelin and were immobilized in a perinuclear localization. The excess cholesterol in Tangier disease late endocytic vesicles retained massive amounts of NPC1, which traffics lysosomal cholesterol to other cellular sites. Exogenous apoA-I abrogated the cholesterol-induced retention of NPC1 in wild type but not in Tangier disease late endosomes. Adenovirally mediated ABCA1-GFP expression in Tangier disease fibroblasts corrected the late endocytic trafficking defects and restored apoA-I-mediated cholesterol efflux. ABCA1-GFP expression in wild type fibroblasts also reduced late endosome-associated NPC1, induced a marked uptake of fluorescent apoA-I into ABCA1-GFP-containing endosomes (that shuttled between late endosomes and the cell surface), and enhanced apoA-I-mediated cholesterol efflux. The combined results of this study suggest that ABCA1 converts pools of late endocytic lipids that retain NPC1 to pools that can associate with endocytosed apoA-I, and be

  1. Dependence of PEI and PAMAM Gene Delivery on Clathrin- and Caveolin-Dependent Trafficking Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Mark E.; Keswani, Rahul K.; Pack, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Non-viral gene delivery vehicles such as polyethylenimine and polyamidoamine dendrimer effectively condense plasmid DNA, facilitate endocytosis, and deliver nucleic acid cargo to the nucleus in vitro. Better understanding of intracellular trafficking mechanisms involved in polymeric gene delivery is a prerequisite to clinical application. This study investigates the role of clathrin and caveolin endocytic pathways in cellular uptake and subsequent vector processing. Methods We formed 25-kD polyethylenimine (PEI) and generation 4 (G4) polyamidoamine (PAMAM) polyplexes at N/P 10 and evaluated internalization pathways and gene delivery in HeLa cells. Clathrin- and caveolin-dependent endocytosis inhibitors were used at varying concentrations to elucidate the roles of these important pathways. Results PEI and PAMAM polyplexes were internalized by both pathways. However, the amount of polyplex internalized poorly correlated with transgene expression. While the caveolin-dependent pathway generally led to effective gene delivery with both polymers, complete inhibition of the clathrin-dependent pathway was also deleterious to transfection with PEI polyplexes. Inhibition of one endocytic pathway may lead to an overall increase in uptake via unaffected pathways, suggesting the existence of compensatory endocytic mechanisms. Conclusions The well-studied clathrin- and caveolin-dependent endocytosis pathways are not necessarily independent, and perturbing one mechanism of trafficking influences the larger trafficking network. PMID:25511918

  2. A SPOPL/Cullin-3 ubiquitin ligase complex regulates endocytic trafficking by targeting EPS15 at endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gschweitl, Michaela; Ulbricht, Anna; Barnes, Christopher A; Enchev, Radoslav I; Stoffel-Studer, Ingrid; Meyer-Schaller, Nathalie; Huotari, Jatta; Yamauchi, Yohei; Greber, Urs F; Helenius, Ari; Peter, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Cullin-3 (CUL3)-based ubiquitin ligases regulate endosome maturation and trafficking of endocytic cargo to lysosomes in mammalian cells. Here, we report that these functions depend on SPOPL, a substrate-specific CUL3 adaptor. We find that SPOPL associates with endosomes and is required for both the formation of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and the endocytic host cell entry of influenza A virus. In SPOPL-depleted cells, endosomes are enlarged and fail to acquire intraluminal vesicles (ILVs). We identify a critical substrate ubiquitinated by CUL3-SPOPL as EPS15, an endocytic adaptor that also associates with the ESCRT-0 complex members HRS and STAM on endosomes. Indeed, EPS15 is ubiquitinated in a SPOPL-dependent manner, and accumulates with HRS in cells lacking SPOPL. Together, our data indicates that a CUL3-SPOPL E3 ubiquitin ligase complex regulates endocytic trafficking and MVB formation by ubiquitinating and degrading EPS15 at endosomes, thereby influencing influenza A virus infection as well as degradation of EGFR and other EPS15 targets. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13841.001 PMID:27008177

  3. A SPOPL/Cullin-3 ubiquitin ligase complex regulates endocytic trafficking by targeting EPS15 at endosomes.

    PubMed

    Gschweitl, Michaela; Ulbricht, Anna; Barnes, Christopher A; Enchev, Radoslav I; Stoffel-Studer, Ingrid; Meyer-Schaller, Nathalie; Huotari, Jatta; Yamauchi, Yohei; Greber, Urs F; Helenius, Ari; Peter, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Cullin-3 (CUL3)-based ubiquitin ligases regulate endosome maturation and trafficking of endocytic cargo to lysosomes in mammalian cells. Here, we report that these functions depend on SPOPL, a substrate-specific CUL3 adaptor. We find that SPOPL associates with endosomes and is required for both the formation of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and the endocytic host cell entry of influenza A virus. In SPOPL-depleted cells, endosomes are enlarged and fail to acquire intraluminal vesicles (ILVs). We identify a critical substrate ubiquitinated by CUL3-SPOPL as EPS15, an endocytic adaptor that also associates with the ESCRT-0 complex members HRS and STAM on endosomes. Indeed, EPS15 is ubiquitinated in a SPOPL-dependent manner, and accumulates with HRS in cells lacking SPOPL. Together, our data indicates that a CUL3-SPOPL E3 ubiquitin ligase complex regulates endocytic trafficking and MVB formation by ubiquitinating and degrading EPS15 at endosomes, thereby influencing influenza A virus infection as well as degradation of EGFR and other EPS15 targets. PMID:27008177

  4. Compensatory flux changes within an endocytic trafficking network maintain thermal robustness of Notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hideyuki; Woodcock, Simon A; Wilkin, Marian B; Trubenová, Barbora; Monk, Nicholas A M; Baron, Martin

    2014-05-22

    Developmental signaling is remarkably robust to environmental variation, including temperature. For example, in ectothermic animals such as Drosophila, Notch signaling is maintained within functional limits across a wide temperature range. We combine experimental and computational approaches to show that temperature compensation of Notch signaling is achieved by an unexpected variety of endocytic-dependent routes to Notch activation which, when superimposed on ligand-induced activation, act as a robustness module. Thermal compensation arises through an altered balance of fluxes within competing trafficking routes, coupled with temperature-dependent ubiquitination of Notch. This flexible ensemble of trafficking routes supports Notch signaling at low temperature but can be switched to restrain Notch signaling at high temperature and thus compensates for the inherent temperature sensitivity of ligand-induced activation. The outcome is to extend the physiological range over which normal development can occur. Similar mechanisms may provide thermal robustness for other developmental signals.

  5. Compensatory Flux Changes within an Endocytic Trafficking Network Maintain Thermal Robustness of Notch Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Hideyuki; Woodcock, Simon A.; Wilkin, Marian B.; Trubenová, Barbora; Monk, Nicholas A.M.; Baron, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Developmental signaling is remarkably robust to environmental variation, including temperature. For example, in ectothermic animals such as Drosophila, Notch signaling is maintained within functional limits across a wide temperature range. We combine experimental and computational approaches to show that temperature compensation of Notch signaling is achieved by an unexpected variety of endocytic-dependent routes to Notch activation which, when superimposed on ligand-induced activation, act as a robustness module. Thermal compensation arises through an altered balance of fluxes within competing trafficking routes, coupled with temperature-dependent ubiquitination of Notch. This flexible ensemble of trafficking routes supports Notch signaling at low temperature but can be switched to restrain Notch signaling at high temperature and thus compensates for the inherent temperature sensitivity of ligand-induced activation. The outcome is to extend the physiological range over which normal development can occur. Similar mechanisms may provide thermal robustness for other developmental signals. PMID:24855951

  6. Endocytic Trafficking and Recycling Maintain a Pool of Mobile Surface AMPA Receptors Required for Synaptic Potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Enrica Maria; Lu, Jiuyi; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim; Ehlers, Michael D.; Choquet, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY At excitatory glutamatergic synapses, postsynaptic endocytic zones (EZs), which are adjacent to the postsynaptic density (PSD), mediate clathrin-dependent endocytosis of surface AMPA Receptors (AMPAR) as a first step to receptor recycling or degradation. However, it remains unknown if receptor recycling influences AMPARs lateral diffusion, and if EZs are important for the expression of synaptic potentiation. Here we demonstrate that the presence of both EZs and AMPAR recycling maintain a large pool of mobile AMPARs at synapses. In addition, we find that synaptic potentiation is accompanied by an accumulation and immobilization of AMPARs at synapses resulting from both their exocytosis and stabilization at the PSD. Displacement of EZs from the postsynaptic region impairs the expression of synaptic potentiation by blocking AMPAR recycling. Thus receptor recycling is crucial for maintaining a mobile population of surface AMPARs which can be delivered to synapses for increases in synaptic strength. PMID:19607795

  7. Phospholipase D in Endocytosis and Endosomal Recycling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Julie G.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery that Arf GTPases, mediators of membrane traffic, activate phospholipase D (PLD) raised the possibility that Arfs could facilitate membrane traffic by altering membrane lipid composition. PLD hydrolyzes phosphatidylcholine to generate phosphatidic acid (PA), a lipid that favors membranes with negative curvature and thus can facilitate both membrane fission and fusion. This review examines studies that have reported a role for PLD in endocytosis and membrane recycling from endocytic pathways. PMID:19540357

  8. Macropinocytosis: a pathway to protozoan infection

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Tecia M. U.; Barrias, Emile S.; de Souza, Wanderley

    2015-01-01

    Among the various endocytic mechanisms in mammalian cells, macropinocytosis involves internalization of large amounts of plasma membrane together with extracellular medium, leading to macropinosome formation. These structures are formed when plasma membrane ruffles are assembled after actin filament rearrangement. In dendritic cells, macropinocytosis has been reported to play a role in antigen presentation. Several intracellular pathogens are internalized by host cells via multiple endocytic pathways and macropinocytosis has been described as an important entry site for various organisms. Some bacteria, such as Legionella pneumophila, as well as various viruses, use this pathway to penetrate and subvert host cells. Some protozoa, which are larger than bacteria and virus, can also use this pathway to invade host cells. As macropinocytosis is characterized by the formation of large uncoated vacuoles and is triggered by various signaling pathways, which is similar to what occurs during the formation of the majority of parasitophorous vacuoles, it is believed that this phenomenon may be more widely used by parasites than is currently appreciated. Here we review protozoa host cell invasion via macropinocytosis. PMID:25914647

  9. Macropinocytosis: a pathway to protozoan infection.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Tecia M U; Barrias, Emile S; de Souza, Wanderley

    2015-01-01

    Among the various endocytic mechanisms in mammalian cells, macropinocytosis involves internalization of large amounts of plasma membrane together with extracellular medium, leading to macropinosome formation. These structures are formed when plasma membrane ruffles are assembled after actin filament rearrangement. In dendritic cells, macropinocytosis has been reported to play a role in antigen presentation. Several intracellular pathogens are internalized by host cells via multiple endocytic pathways and macropinocytosis has been described as an important entry site for various organisms. Some bacteria, such as Legionella pneumophila, as well as various viruses, use this pathway to penetrate and subvert host cells. Some protozoa, which are larger than bacteria and virus, can also use this pathway to invade host cells. As macropinocytosis is characterized by the formation of large uncoated vacuoles and is triggered by various signaling pathways, which is similar to what occurs during the formation of the majority of parasitophorous vacuoles, it is believed that this phenomenon may be more widely used by parasites than is currently appreciated. Here we review protozoa host cell invasion via macropinocytosis. PMID:25914647

  10. Sequestration of organic cations by acidified hepatic endocytic vesicles and implications for biliary excretion.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, R W; Faber, E D; Meijer, D K

    1992-04-01

    A number of cationic amine drugs that are taken up by liver and excreted into bile may accumulate in acidified intracellular organelles such as lysosomes and endosomes. These studies were undertaken to assess directly the uptake and accumulation of three types of model organic cationic amines by endocytic vesicles, and the role of vesicle acidification in this process. Uptake of tubocurarine (TC), vecuronium and tributylmethylammonium (TBuMA) by purified rat liver multivesicular bodies (MVB) (prelysosomal endocytic vesicles) was dependent upon MgATP, time and drug concentration. After 60 min, 52 to 81% of MVB cation content was dependent upon vesicle acidification (due to an electrogenic proton pump), but not upon an interior positive vesicle membrane potential. Nineteen to 42% of MVB cation content appeared due to binding to MVB membranes or to internal lipoproteins. Vesicle-to-medium ATP-dependent apparent concentration ratios for these three cations were 3.3 to 51. MVB uptake of these cations resembled uptake of methylamine, a tertiary amine known to distribute across organellar membranes according to pH gradients. By contrast, MVB uptake of the lipophilic quaternary amine methyldeptropine was not dependent upon MgATP or on development of MVB pH or membrane potential gradients. In further studies, TC, vecuronium and TBuMA were rapidly taken up by the isolated perfused rat liver and excreted in bile. Exposure to 250 mciroM primaquin (which partially alkalinized acidic endosomes and lysosomes) reduced accumulation of [3H]vecuronium in a lysosomal fraction by 23%, decreased perfusate disappearance of TC and TBuMA, but not of vecuronium, and decreased biliary appearance of all three cations. These studies suggest that acidified intracellular organelles sequester certain organic cationic drugs, possibly via a drug/proton antiporter, and/or diffusion followed by intravesicular protonation and trapping of tertiary amines. However, attempts at partial displacement of

  11. Exosomes surf on filopodia to enter cells at endocytic hot spots, traffic within endosomes, and are targeted to the ER.

    PubMed

    Heusermann, Wolf; Hean, Justin; Trojer, Dominic; Steib, Emmanuelle; von Bueren, Stefan; Graff-Meyer, Alexandra; Genoud, Christel; Martin, Katrin; Pizzato, Nicolas; Voshol, Johannes; Morrissey, David V; Andaloussi, Samir E L; Wood, Matthew J; Meisner-Kober, Nicole C

    2016-04-25

    Exosomes are nanovesicles released by virtually all cells, which act as intercellular messengers by transfer of protein, lipid, and RNA cargo. Their quantitative efficiency, routes of cell uptake, and subcellular fate within recipient cells remain elusive. We quantitatively characterize exosome cell uptake, which saturates with dose and time and reaches near 100% transduction efficiency at picomolar concentrations. Highly reminiscent of pathogenic bacteria and viruses, exosomes are recruited as single vesicles to the cell body by surfing on filopodia as well as filopodia grabbing and pulling motions to reach endocytic hot spots at the filopodial base. After internalization, exosomes shuttle within endocytic vesicles to scan the endoplasmic reticulum before being sorted into the lysosome as their final intracellular destination. Our data quantify and explain the efficiency of exosome internalization by recipient cells, establish a new parallel between exosome and virus host cell interaction, and suggest unanticipated routes of subcellular cargo delivery. PMID:27114500

  12. Endocytic Sorting of CFTR variants Monitored by Single Cell Fluorescence Ratio Image Analysis (FRIA) in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barriere, H.; Apaja, P.; Okiyoneda, T.; Lukacs, G. L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The wild-type CFTR channel undergoes constitutive internalization and recycling at the plasma membrane. This process is initiated by the recognition of the Tyr- and di-Leu-based endocytic motifs of CFTR by the AP-2 adaptor complex, leading to the formation of clathrin-coated vesicles and the channel delivery to sorting/recycling endosomes. Accumulating evidence suggests that conformationally defective mutant CFTRs (e.g. rescued ΔF508 and glycosylation-deficient channel) are unstable at the plasma membrane and undergo augmented ubiquitination in post-Golgi compartments. Ubiquitination conceivably accounts for the metabolic instability at cell surface by provoking accelerated internalization, as well as rerouting the channel from recycling towards lysosomal degradation. We developed an in vivo fluorescence ratio imaging assay (FRIA) that in concert with genetic manipulation can be utilized to establish the post-endocytic fate and sorting determinants of mutant CFTRs. PMID:21594793

  13. Exosomes surf on filopodia to enter cells at endocytic hot spots, traffic within endosomes, and are targeted to the ER

    PubMed Central

    Hean, Justin; Trojer, Dominic; Steib, Emmanuelle; von Bueren, Stefan; Graff-Meyer, Alexandra; Genoud, Christel; Martin, Katrin; Pizzato, Nicolas; Voshol, Johannes; Morrissey, David V.; Andaloussi, Samir E.L.; Wood, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are nanovesicles released by virtually all cells, which act as intercellular messengers by transfer of protein, lipid, and RNA cargo. Their quantitative efficiency, routes of cell uptake, and subcellular fate within recipient cells remain elusive. We quantitatively characterize exosome cell uptake, which saturates with dose and time and reaches near 100% transduction efficiency at picomolar concentrations. Highly reminiscent of pathogenic bacteria and viruses, exosomes are recruited as single vesicles to the cell body by surfing on filopodia as well as filopodia grabbing and pulling motions to reach endocytic hot spots at the filopodial base. After internalization, exosomes shuttle within endocytic vesicles to scan the endoplasmic reticulum before being sorted into the lysosome as their final intracellular destination. Our data quantify and explain the efficiency of exosome internalization by recipient cells, establish a new parallel between exosome and virus host cell interaction, and suggest unanticipated routes of subcellular cargo delivery. PMID:27114500

  14. Local and global analysis of endocytic patch dynamics in fission yeast using a new “temporal superresolution” realignment method

    PubMed Central

    Berro, Julien; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative microscopy is a valuable tool for inferring molecular mechanisms of cellular processes such as clathrin-mediated endocytosis, but, for quantitative microscopy to reach its potential, both data collection and analysis needed improvement. We introduce new tools to track and count endocytic patches in fission yeast to increase the quality of the data extracted from quantitative microscopy movies. We present a universal method to achieve “temporal superresolution” by aligning temporal data sets with higher temporal resolution than the measurement intervals. These methods allowed us to extract new information about endocytic actin patches in wild-type cells from measurements of the fluorescence of fimbrin-mEGFP. We show that the time course of actin assembly and disassembly varies <600 ms between patches. Actin polymerizes during vesicle formation, but we show that polymerization does not participate in vesicle movement other than to limit the complex diffusive motions of newly formed endocytic vesicles, which move faster as the surrounding actin meshwork decreases in size over time. Our methods also show that the number of patches in fission yeast is proportional to cell length and that the variability in the repartition of patches between the tips of interphase cells has been underestimated. PMID:25143395

  15. TAG1 regulates the endocytic trafficking and signalling of the Semaphorin3A receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Puneet; Smythe, Elizabeth; Furley, Andrew J. W.

    2012-01-01

    Endocytic trafficking of membrane proteins is essential for neuronal structure and function. We show that Transient Axonal Glycoprotein1 (TAG1 or CNTN2), a contactin-related adhesion molecule, plays a central role in the differential trafficking of components of the semaphorin3A receptor complex into distinct endosomal compartments in murine spinal sensory neuron growth cones. The semaphorin3A receptor is composed of Neuropilin1 (NRP1), PlexinA4 and L1, with NRP1 being the ligand-binding component. TAG1 interacts with NRP1 causing a change in its association with L1 in the Sema3A response, such that L1 is lost from the complex following Sema3A binding. Initially, however, L1 and NRP1 endocytose together and only become separated intracellularly, NRP1 becoming associated with endosomes enriched in lipid rafts and co-localising with TAG1 and PlexinA4. When TAG1 is missing, NRP1 and L1 fail to separate and NRP1 does not become raft-associated; co-localisation with PlexinA4 is reduced and Plexin signalling is not initiated. These observations identify a novel role for TAG1 in modulating the intracellular sorting of signalling receptor complexes. PMID:22836270

  16. SERS nanosensors that report pH of endocytic compartments during FcεRI transit

    PubMed Central

    Nowak-Lovato, K.L.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Rector, K.D.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the development of an IgE receptor (FcεRI)-targeted, pH sensitive, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) nanosensor has been demonstrated [1]. The targeted nanosensor enables spatial and temporal pH measurements as internalized receptors progress through endosomal compartments in live cells. Trafficking of receptor-bound nanosensors was compared at physiological temperature (37°C) versus room temperature (25°C). As expected, we observed markedly slower progression of receptors through low pH endocytic compartments at the lower temperature. We also demonstrate the utility of the nanosensors to measure directly changes in the pH of intracellular compartments after treatment with bafilomycin or amiloride. We report an increase in endosome compartment pH after treatment with bafilomycin, an H+ ATPase pump inhibitor. Decreased endosomal luminal pH was measured in cells treated with amiloride, an inhibitor of Na+/H+ exchange. The decrease in amiloride-treated cells was transient, followed by a recovery period of approximately 15–20 minutes to restore endosomal pH. These experiments demonstrate the novel application of Raman spectroscopy to monitor local pH environment in live cells with the use of targeted SERS nanosensors. PMID:20842349

  17. Imaging single endocytic events reveals diversity in clathrin, dynamin and vesicle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mattheyses, Alexa L; Atkinson, Claire E; Simon, Sanford M

    2011-10-01

    The dynamics of clathrin-mediated endocytosis can be assayed using fluorescently tagged proteins and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Many of these proteins, including clathrin and dynamin, are soluble and changes in fluorescence intensity can be attributed either to membrane/vesicle movement or to changes in the numbers of individual molecules. It is important for assays to discriminate between physical membrane events and the dynamics of molecules. Two physical events in endocytosis were investigated: vesicle scission from the plasma membrane and vesicle internalization. Single vesicle analysis allowed the characterization of dynamin and clathrin dynamics relative to scission and internalization. We show that vesicles remain proximal to the plasma membrane for variable amounts of time following scission, and that uncoating of clathrin can occur before or after vesicle internalization. The dynamics of dynamin also vary with respect to scission. Results from assays based on physical events suggest that disappearance of fluorescence from the evanescent field should be re-evaluated as an assay for endocytosis. These results illustrate the heterogeneity of behaviors of endocytic vesicles and the importance of establishing suitable evaluation criteria for biophysical processes.

  18. RILP interacts with HOPS complex via VPS41 subunit to regulate endocytic trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaosi; Yang, Ting; Wang, Shicong; Wang, Zhen; Yun, Ye; Sun, Lixiang; Zhou, Yunhe; Xu, Xiaohui; Akazawa, Chihiro; Hong, Wanjin; Wang, Tuanlao

    2014-01-01

    The HOPS complex serves as a tethering complex with GEF activity for Ypt7p in yeast to regulate late endosomal membrane maturation. While the role of HOPS complex is well established in yeast cells, its functional and mechanistic aspects in mammalian cells are less well defined. In this study, we report that RILP, a downstream effector of Rab7, interacts with HOPS complex and recruits HOPS subunits to the late endosomal compartment. Structurally, the amino-terminal portion of RILP interacts with HOPS complex. Unexpectedly, this interaction is independent of Rab7. VPS41 subunit of HOPS complex was defined to be the major partner for interacting with RILP. The carboxyl-terminal region of VPS41 was mapped to be responsible for the interaction. Functionally, either depletion of VPS41 by shRNA or overexpression of VPS41 C-terminal half retarded EGF-induced degradation of EGFR. These results suggest that interaction of RILP with HOPS complex via VPS41 plays a role in endocytic trafficking of EGFR. PMID:25445562

  19. HDAC6 regulates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) endocytic trafficking and degradation in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Fan, Lucy X; Zhou, Xia; Sweeney, William E; Avner, Ellis D; Li, Xiaogang

    2012-01-01

    We present for the first time that histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) regulates EGFR degradation and trafficking along microtubules in Pkd1 mutant renal epithelial cells. HDAC6, the microtubule-associated α-tubulin deacetylase, demonstrates increased expression and activity in Pkd1 mutant mouse embryonic kidney cells. Targeting HDAC6 with a general HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin (TSA), or a specific HDAC6 inhibitor, tubacin, increased the acetylation of α-tubulin and downregulated the expression of EGFR in Pkd1 mutant renal epithelial cells. HDAC6 was co-localized with EGF induced endocytic EGFR and endosomes, respectively. Inhibition of the activity of HDAC6 accelerated the trafficking of EGFR from early endosomes to late endosomes along the microtubules. Without EGF stimulation EGFR was randomly distributed while after stimulation with EGF for 30 min, EGFR was accumulated around α-tubulin labeled microtubule bundles. These data suggested that the Pkd1 mutation induced upregulation of HDAC6 might act to slow the trafficking of EGFR from early endosomes to late endosomes along the microtubules for degradation through deacetylating α-tubulin. In addition, inhibition of HDAC activity decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, the downstream target of EGFR axis, and normalized EGFR localization from apical to basolateral in Pkd1 knockout mouse kidneys. Thus, targeting HDAC6 to downregulate EGFR activity may provide a potential therapeutic approach to treat polycystic kidney disease.

  20. Endocytic mechanisms utilized by chlamydiae and their influence on induction of productive infection.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, D J; Pearce, J H

    1991-09-01

    The microfilament-disrupting drug cytochalasin D and, initially, inoculation at 20 degrees C were used to differentiate between phagocytosis (sensitive to both treatments) and pinocytosis (resistant to both treatments) to assess whether chlamydial uptake into McCoy cells occurred by one or both mechanisms and whether each could contribute to productive infection. Both treatments suppressed the infectivity of Chlamydia trachomatis L2/434/Bu and C. psittaci GPIC (the guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis strain) following static inoculation by only 50%, indicating that there was simultaneous operation of both phagocytosis and pinocytosis during uptake that led to productive infection. Measurement of the entry of organisms by two separate assays established that both strains predominantly used a cytochalasin D-resistant (pinocytic) mechanism, implying that phagocytic uptake was coupled to a higher frequency of productive infection. Integration of the data on infectivity and entry allowed the potential for an organism to infect a host cell to be quantified. This synthesis revealed that for both strains the infectivity potential following phagocytic entry was ca. 10-fold greater than that following pinocytic entry. However, both entry mechanisms were exploited more efficiently by strain L2/434/Bu than by strain GPIC (unless the latter was inoculated with centrifugation), indicating that intrinsic strain properties are more important for infectivity potential than the endocytic mechanism utilized.

  1. Loss of the BBSome perturbs endocytic trafficking and disrupts virulence of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Langousis, Gerasimos; Shimogawa, Michelle M.; Saada, Edwin A.; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Spreafico, Roberto; Nager, Andrew R.; Barshop, William D.; Nachury, Maxence V.; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Hill, Kent L.

    2016-01-01

    Cilia (eukaryotic flagella) are present in diverse eukaryotic lineages and have essential motility and sensory functions. The cilium’s capacity to sense and transduce extracellular signals depends on dynamic trafficking of ciliary membrane proteins. This trafficking is often mediated by the Bardet–Biedl Syndrome complex (BBSome), a protein complex for which the precise subcellular distribution and mechanisms of action are unclear. In humans, BBSome defects perturb ciliary membrane protein distribution and manifest clinically as Bardet–Biedl Syndrome. Cilia are also important in several parasites that cause tremendous human suffering worldwide, yet biology of the parasite BBSome remains largely unexplored. We examined BBSome functions in Trypanosoma brucei, a flagellated protozoan parasite that causes African sleeping sickness in humans. We report that T. brucei BBS proteins assemble into a BBSome that interacts with clathrin and is localized to membranes of the flagellar pocket and adjacent cytoplasmic vesicles. Using BBS gene knockouts and a mouse infection model, we show the T. brucei BBSome is dispensable for flagellar assembly, motility, bulk endocytosis, and cell viability but required for parasite virulence. Quantitative proteomics reveal alterations in the parasite surface proteome of BBSome mutants, suggesting that virulence defects are caused by failure to maintain fidelity of the host–parasite interface. Interestingly, among proteins altered are those with ubiquitination-dependent localization, and we find that the BBSome interacts with ubiquitin. Collectively, our data indicate that the BBSome facilitates endocytic sorting of select membrane proteins at the base of the cilium, illuminating BBSome roles at a critical host–pathogen interface and offering insights into BBSome molecular mechanisms. PMID:26721397

  2. Loss of the BBSome perturbs endocytic trafficking and disrupts virulence of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Langousis, Gerasimos; Shimogawa, Michelle M; Saada, Edwin A; Vashisht, Ajay A; Spreafico, Roberto; Nager, Andrew R; Barshop, William D; Nachury, Maxence V; Wohlschlegel, James A; Hill, Kent L

    2016-01-19

    Cilia (eukaryotic flagella) are present in diverse eukaryotic lineages and have essential motility and sensory functions. The cilium's capacity to sense and transduce extracellular signals depends on dynamic trafficking of ciliary membrane proteins. This trafficking is often mediated by the Bardet-Biedl Syndrome complex (BBSome), a protein complex for which the precise subcellular distribution and mechanisms of action are unclear. In humans, BBSome defects perturb ciliary membrane protein distribution and manifest clinically as Bardet-Biedl Syndrome. Cilia are also important in several parasites that cause tremendous human suffering worldwide, yet biology of the parasite BBSome remains largely unexplored. We examined BBSome functions in Trypanosoma brucei, a flagellated protozoan parasite that causes African sleeping sickness in humans. We report that T. brucei BBS proteins assemble into a BBSome that interacts with clathrin and is localized to membranes of the flagellar pocket and adjacent cytoplasmic vesicles. Using BBS gene knockouts and a mouse infection model, we show the T. brucei BBSome is dispensable for flagellar assembly, motility, bulk endocytosis, and cell viability but required for parasite virulence. Quantitative proteomics reveal alterations in the parasite surface proteome of BBSome mutants, suggesting that virulence defects are caused by failure to maintain fidelity of the host-parasite interface. Interestingly, among proteins altered are those with ubiquitination-dependent localization, and we find that the BBSome interacts with ubiquitin. Collectively, our data indicate that the BBSome facilitates endocytic sorting of select membrane proteins at the base of the cilium, illuminating BBSome roles at a critical host-pathogen interface and offering insights into BBSome molecular mechanisms. PMID:26721397

  3. Loss of the BBSome perturbs endocytic trafficking and disrupts virulence of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Langousis, Gerasimos; Shimogawa, Michelle M; Saada, Edwin A; Vashisht, Ajay A; Spreafico, Roberto; Nager, Andrew R; Barshop, William D; Nachury, Maxence V; Wohlschlegel, James A; Hill, Kent L

    2016-01-19

    Cilia (eukaryotic flagella) are present in diverse eukaryotic lineages and have essential motility and sensory functions. The cilium's capacity to sense and transduce extracellular signals depends on dynamic trafficking of ciliary membrane proteins. This trafficking is often mediated by the Bardet-Biedl Syndrome complex (BBSome), a protein complex for which the precise subcellular distribution and mechanisms of action are unclear. In humans, BBSome defects perturb ciliary membrane protein distribution and manifest clinically as Bardet-Biedl Syndrome. Cilia are also important in several parasites that cause tremendous human suffering worldwide, yet biology of the parasite BBSome remains largely unexplored. We examined BBSome functions in Trypanosoma brucei, a flagellated protozoan parasite that causes African sleeping sickness in humans. We report that T. brucei BBS proteins assemble into a BBSome that interacts with clathrin and is localized to membranes of the flagellar pocket and adjacent cytoplasmic vesicles. Using BBS gene knockouts and a mouse infection model, we show the T. brucei BBSome is dispensable for flagellar assembly, motility, bulk endocytosis, and cell viability but required for parasite virulence. Quantitative proteomics reveal alterations in the parasite surface proteome of BBSome mutants, suggesting that virulence defects are caused by failure to maintain fidelity of the host-parasite interface. Interestingly, among proteins altered are those with ubiquitination-dependent localization, and we find that the BBSome interacts with ubiquitin. Collectively, our data indicate that the BBSome facilitates endocytic sorting of select membrane proteins at the base of the cilium, illuminating BBSome roles at a critical host-pathogen interface and offering insights into BBSome molecular mechanisms.

  4. Interactions of pathogen-containing compartments with the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Canton, Johnathan; Kima, Peter E

    2012-11-01

    A subgroup of intracellular pathogens reside and replicate within membrane-bound compartments often termed pathogen-containing compartments (PCC). PCCs navigate around a wide range of host cell vesicles and organelles. In light of the perils of engaging with vesicles of the endocytic pathway, most PCCs modulate their interactions with endocytic vesicles while a few avoid those interactions. The secretory pathway constitutes another important grouping of vesicles and organelles in host cells. Although the negative consequences of engaging with the secretory pathway are not known, there is evidence that PCCs interact differentially with vesicles and organelles in this pathway as well. In this review, we consider three prokaryote pathogens and two protozoan parasites for which there is information on the interactions of their PCCs with the secretory pathway. Current understandings of the molecular interactions as well as the metabolic benefits that accompany those interactions are discussed. Not unexpectedly, our understanding of the extent of these interactions is variable. An underlying theme that is brought to the fore is that PCCs establish preferential interactions with distinct compartments of the secretory pathway.

  5. CD36 is not involved in scavenger receptor-mediated endocytic uptake of glycolaldehyde- and methylglyoxal-modified proteins by liver endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nakajou, Keisuke; Horiuchi, Seikoh; Sakai, Masakazu; Hirata, Kenshiro; Tanaka, Makiko; Takeya, Motohiro; Kai, Toshiya; Otagiri, Masaki

    2005-05-01

    Circulating proteins modified by advanced glycation end-products (AGE) are mainly taken up by liver endothelial cells (LECs) via scavenger receptor-mediated endocytosis. Endocytic uptake of chemically modified proteins by macrophages and macrophage-derived cells is mediated by class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) and CD36. In a previous study using SR-A knockout mice, we demonstrated that SR-A is not involved in endocytic uptake of AGE proteins by LECs [Matsumoto et al. (2000) Biochem. J. 352, 233-240]. The present study was conducted to determine the contribution of CD36 to this process. Glycolaldehyde-modified BSA (GA-BSA) and methylglyoxal-modified BSA (MG-BSA) were used as AGE proteins. 125I-GA-BSA and 125I-MG-BSA underwent endocytic degradation by these cells at 37 degrees C, and this process was inhibited by several ligands for the scavenger receptors. However, this endocytic uptake of 125I-GA-BSA by LECs was not inhibited by a neutralizing anti-CD36 antibody. Similarly, hepatic uptake of (111)In-GA-BSA after its intravenous injection was not significantly attenuated by co-administration of the anti-CD36 antibody. These results clarify that CD36 does not play a significant role in elimination of GA-BSA and MG-BSA from the circulation, suggesting that the receptor involved in endocytic uptake of circulating AGE proteins by LEC is not SR-A or CD36.

  6. Differential effects of c-Src and c-Yes on the endocytic vesicle-mediated trafficking events at the Sertoli cell blood-testis barrier: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D; Wong, Elissa W P; Lee, Will M; Han, Daishu; Wong, Chris K C; Cheng, C Yan

    2014-10-01

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB) is one of the tightest blood-tissue barriers in the mammalian body. However, it undergoes cyclic restructuring during the epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis in which the "old" BTB located above the preleptotene spermatocytes being transported across the immunological barrier is "disassembled," whereas the "new" BTB found behind these germ cells is rapidly "reassembled," i.e., mediated by endocytic vesicle-mediated protein trafficking events. Thus, the immunological barrier is maintained when preleptotene spermatocytes connected in clones via intercellular bridges are transported across the BTB. Yet the underlying mechanism(s) in particular the involving regulatory molecules that coordinate these events remains unknown. We hypothesized that c-Src and c-Yes might work in contrasting roles in endocytic vesicle-mediated trafficking, serving as molecular switches, to effectively disassemble and reassemble the old and the new BTB, respectively, to facilitate preleptotene spermatocyte transport across the BTB. Following siRNA-mediated specific knockdown of c-Src or c-Yes in Sertoli cells, we utilized biochemical assays to assess the changes in protein endocytosis, recycling, degradation and phagocytosis. c-Yes was found to promote endocytosed integral membrane BTB proteins to the pathway of transcytosis and recycling so that internalized proteins could be effectively used to assemble new BTB from the disassembling old BTB, whereas c-Src promotes endocytosed Sertoli cell BTB proteins to endosome-mediated protein degradation for the degeneration of the old BTB. By using fluorescence beads mimicking apoptotic germ cells, Sertoli cells were found to engulf beads via c-Src-mediated phagocytosis. A hypothetical model that serves as the framework for future investigation is thus proposed.

  7. Comparison of the endocytic properties of linear and branched PEIs, and cationic PAMAM dendrimers in B16f10 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Seib, F Philipp; Jones, Arwyn T; Duncan, Ruth

    2007-02-26

    Many different polymers and architectures are now being developed as polymer therapeutics and non-viral vectors for cytosolic delivery, and cationic dendrimers, and linear and branched poly(ethylenimine)s (PEIs) have been widely used. For rational design and safe transfer into the clinic, it is important to better understand the cellular pharmacokinetics of the carrier, even if this will likely change when it is conjugated to, or complexed with, a targeting residue or therapeutic payload. The aim of these studies was to compare binding, endocytic capture and intracellular trafficking of linear and branched PEIs (Mw 25,000 g/mol) and cationic PAMAM dendrimers (generations (gen) 2- 4) using B16F10 murine melanoma cells. FITC-dextran was used as a control for comparison. All polymers were first conjugated to Oregon Green (OG) and carefully characterised in respect of pH- and concentration-dependence of fluorescence. Throughout, non-toxic concentrations of polymer were used. Flow cytometry showed that all the cationic polymers were internalised by "adsorptive" endocytosis, with maximum uptake seen for PAMAM gen 4>branched PEI>linear PEI>PAMAM gen 3>PAMAM gen 2. The PAMAM gen 4 uptake rate was 130 fold greater than seen for FITC-dextran. Branched PEI had the highest extracellular binding (accounting for >50% of total cell-associated fluorescence) whereas for the linear PEI, binding was only 13% of the cell-associated fluorescence. Unlike FITC-dextran, all cationic polymers lacked significant exocytosis over the time period studied. Whereas PAMAM gen 4 and the branched PEI were predominately internalised by cholesterol-dependent pathways, internalisation of linear PEI appeared to be independent of clathrin and cholesterol. A perception of the rate and mechanisms of cellular uptake of these vectors will be important in the context of their proposed use as drug delivery systems.

  8. Contribution of Endocytic Motifs in the Cytoplasmic Tail of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Glycoprotein B to Virus Replication and Cell-Cell Fusion▿

    PubMed Central

    Beitia Ortiz de Zarate, Igor; Cantero-Aguilar, Lilia; Longo, Magalie; Berlioz-Torrent, Clarisse; Rozenberg, Flore

    2007-01-01

    The use of endocytic pathways by viral glycoproteins is thought to play various functions during viral infection. We previously showed in transfection assays that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein B (gB) is transported from the cell surface back to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and that two motifs of gB cytoplasmic tail, YTQV and LL, function distinctly in this process. To investigate the role of each of these gB trafficking signals in HSV-1 infection, we constructed recombinant viruses in which each motif was rendered nonfunctional by alanine mutagenesis. In infected cells, wild-type gB was internalized from the cell surface and concentrated in the TGN. Disruption of YTQV abolished internalization of gB during infection, whereas disruption of LL induced accumulation of internalized gB in early recycling endosomes and impaired its return to the TGN. The growth of both recombinants was moderately diminished. Moreover, the fusion phenotype of cells infected with the gB recombinants differed from that of cells infected with the wild-type virus. Cells infected with the YTQV-mutated virus displayed reduced cell-cell fusion, whereas giant syncytia were observed in cells infected with the LL-mutated virus. Furthermore, blocking gB internalization or impairing gB recycling to the cell surface, using drugs or a transdominant negative form of Rab11, significantly reduced cell-cell fusion. These results favor a role for endocytosis in virus replication and suggest that gB intracellular trafficking is involved in the regulation of cell-cell fusion. PMID:17913800

  9. V-ATPase-dependent luminal acidification is required for endocytic recycling of a yeast cell wall stress sensor, Wsc1p

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, Kazuma; Saito, Mayu; Nagashima, Makiko; Kojima, Ai; Nishinoaki, Show; Toshima, Junko Y.; Toshima, Jiro

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •A targeted genome screen identified 5 gene groups affecting Wsc1p recycling. •V-ATPase-dependent luminal acidification is required for Wsc1p recycling. •Activity of V-ATPase might be required for cargo recognition by the retromer complex. -- Abstract: Wsc1p is a major cell wall sensor protein localized at the polarized cell surface. The localization of Wsc1p is maintained by endocytosis and recycling from endosomes back to the cell surface, but changes to the vacuole when cells are subjected to heat stress. Exploiting this unique property of Wsc1p, we screened for yeast single-gene deletion mutants exhibiting defects in Wsc1p trafficking. By expressing 3GFP-tagged Wsc1p in mutants with deleted genes whose function is related to intracellular trafficking, we identified 5 gene groups affecting Wsc1p trafficking, impaired respectively in endocytic internalization, multivesicular body sorting, the GARP complex, endosomal maturation/vacuolar fusion, and V-ATPase. Interestingly, deletion of the VPH1 gene, encoding the V{sub o} subunit of vacuolar-type H{sup +}-ATPase (V-ATPase), led to mis-localization of Wsc1p from the plasma membrane to the vacuole. In addition, disruption of other V-ATPase subunits (vma mutants) also caused defects of Wsc1p trafficking and vacuolar acidification similar to those seen in the vph1Δ mutant. Moreover, we found that deletion of the VPS26 gene, encoding a subunit of the retromer complex, also caused a defect in Wsc1p recycling and mis-localization of Wsc1p to the vacuole. These findings clarified the previously unidentified Wsc1p recycling pathway and requirement of V-ATPase-dependent luminal acidification for Wsc1p recycling.

  10. Probing heterobivalent binding to the endocytic AP-2 adaptor complex by DNA-based spatial screening.

    PubMed

    Diezmann, F; von Kleist, L; Haucke, V; Seitz, O

    2015-08-01

    The double helical DNA scaffold offers a unique set of properties, which are particularly useful for studies of multivalency in biomolecular interactions: (i) multivalent ligand displays can be formed upon nucleic acid hybridization in a self-assembly process, which facilitates spatial screening (ii) valency and spatial arrangement of the ligand display can be precisely controlled and (iii) the flexibility of the ligand display can be adjusted by integrating nick sites and unpaired template regions. Herein we describe the use of DNA-based spatial screening for the characterization of the adaptor complex 2 (AP-2), a central interaction hub within the endocytic protein network in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. AP-2 is comprised of a core domain and two, so-called appendage domains, the α- and the β2-ear, which associate with cytoplasmatic proteins required for the formation or maturation of clathrin/AP-2 coated pits. Each appendage domain has two binding grooves which recognize distinct peptide motives with micromolar affinity. This provides opportunities for enhanced interactions with protein molecules that contain two (or more) different peptide motives. To determine whether a particular, spatial arrangement of binding motifs is required for high affinity binding we probed the distance-affinity relationships by means of DNA-programmed spatial screening with self-assembled peptide-DNA complexes. By using trimolecular and tetramolecular assemblies two different peptides were positioned in 2-22 nucleotide distance. The binding data obtained with both recombinant protein in well-defined buffer systems and native AP-2 in brain extract suggests that the two binding sites of the AP-2 α-appendage can cooperate to provide up to 40-fold enhancement of affinity compared to the monovalent interaction. The distance between the two recognized peptide motives was less important provided that the DNA duplex segments were connected by flexible, single strand segments. By

  11. Endocytic uptake of nonenzymatically glycosylated proteins is mediated by a scavenger receptor for aldehyde-modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Takata, K; Horiuchi, S; Araki, N; Shiga, M; Saitoh, M; Morino, Y

    1988-10-15

    Long term incubation of proteins with glucose, named the Maillard reaction (Maillard, L. C. (1912) C. R. Acad. Sci. (Paris) 154, 66-68), gives rise to advanced glycosylation end product (AGE) with fluorescence, color, as well as cross-linked properties. The receptor-mediated endocytosis of AGE-proteins by macrophages was reported (Vlassara, H., Brownlee, M., and Cerami, A. (1985) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 82, 5588-5592). The present study on the binding of AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) to rat peritoneal macrophages and sinusoidal liver cells demonstrated the presence of a saturable, high affinity receptor for AGE-BSA with Kd = 2.4 x 10(-7) M (macrophages) and 2.1 x 10(-7) M (sinusoidal cells). The cellular binding of AGE-BSA and its endocytic uptake by these cells were competitively inhibited by BSA preparations modified with aliphatic aldehydes such as formaldehyde or glycolaldehyde, ligands known to be specific for a scavenger receptor for aldehyde-modified proteins (Horiuchi, S., Murakami, M., Takata, K., and Morino, Y. (1986). J. Biol. Chem. 261, 4962-4966). These ligands also had a profound in vivo effect on the plasma clearance of 125I-AGE-BSA as well as its hepatic uptake. Thus, endocytic uptake of AGE-proteins by macrophages appeared to be mediated by a scavenger receptor for aldehyde-modified proteins. This provides evidence for the biological importance of the scavenger receptor in eliminating senescent macromolecules from the circulation.

  12. Syp1 is a conserved endocytic adaptor that contains domains involved in cargo selection and membrane tubulation

    SciTech Connect

    Reider, Amanda; Barker, Sarah L.; Mishra, Sanjay K.; Im, Young Jun; Maldonado-Báez, Lymarie; Hurley, James H.; Traub, Linton M.; Wendland, Beverly

    2010-10-28

    Internalization of diverse transmembrane cargos from the plasma membrane requires a similarly diverse array of specialized adaptors, yet only a few adaptors have been characterized. We report the identification of the muniscin family of endocytic adaptors that is conserved from yeast to human beings. Solving the structures of yeast muniscin domains confirmed the unique combination of an N-terminal domain homologous to the crescent-shaped membrane-tubulating EFC/F-BAR domains and a C-terminal domain homologous to cargo-binding {mu} homology domains ({mu}HDs). In vitro and in vivo assays confirmed membrane-tubulation activity for muniscin EFC/F-BAR domains. The {mu}HD domain has conserved interactions with the endocytic adaptor/scaffold Ede1/eps15, which influences muniscin localization. The transmembrane protein Mid2, earlier implicated in polarized Rho1 signalling, was identified as a cargo of the yeast adaptor protein. These and other data suggest a model in which the muniscins provide a combined adaptor/membrane-tubulation activity that is important for regulating endocytosis.

  13. Generation of Stable Lipid Raft Microdomains in the Enterocyte Brush Border by Selective Endocytic Removal of Non-Raft Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, E. Michael; Hansen, Gert H.

    2013-01-01

    The small intestinal brush border has an unusually high proportion of glycolipids which promote the formation of lipid raft microdomains, stabilized by various cross-linking lectins. This unique membrane organization acts to provide physical and chemical stability to the membrane that faces multiple deleterious agents present in the gut lumen, such as bile salts, digestive enzymes of the pancreas, and a plethora of pathogens. In the present work, we studied the constitutive endocytosis from the brush border of cultured jejunal explants of the pig, and the results indicate that this process functions to enrich the contents of lipid raft components in the brush border. The lipophilic fluorescent marker FM, taken up into early endosomes in the terminal web region (TWEEs), was absent from detergent resistant membranes (DRMs), implying an association with non-raft membrane. Furthermore, neither major lipid raft-associated brush border enzymes nor glycolipids were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy in subapical punctae resembling TWEEs. Finally, two model raft lipids, BODIPY-lactosylceramide and BODIPY-GM1, were not endocytosed except when cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) was present. In conclusion, we propose that constitutive, selective endocytic removal of non-raft membrane acts as a sorting mechanism to enrich the brush border contents of lipid raft components, such as glycolipids and the major digestive enzymes. This sorting may be energetically driven by changes in membrane curvature when molecules move from a microvillar surface to an endocytic invagination. PMID:24124585

  14. Slit-Dependent Endocytic Trafficking of the Robo Receptor Is Required for Son of Sevenless Recruitment and Midline Axon Repulsion

    PubMed Central

    Chance, Rebecca K.; Bashaw, Greg J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how axon guidance receptors are activated by their extracellular ligands to regulate growth cone motility is critical to learning how proper wiring is established during development. Roundabout (Robo) is one such guidance receptor that mediates repulsion from its ligand Slit in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Here we show that endocytic trafficking of the Robo receptor in response to Slit-binding is necessary for its repulsive signaling output. Dose-dependent genetic interactions and in vitro Robo activation assays support a role for Clathrin-dependent endocytosis, and entry into both the early and late endosomes as positive regulators of Slit-Robo signaling. We identify two conserved motifs in Robo’s cytoplasmic domain that are required for its Clathrin-dependent endocytosis and activation in vitro; gain of function and genetic rescue experiments provide strong evidence that these trafficking events are required for Robo repulsive guidance activity in vivo. Our data support a model in which Robo’s ligand-dependent internalization from the cell surface to the late endosome is essential for receptor activation and proper repulsive guidance at the midline by allowing recruitment of the downstream effector Son of Sevenless in a spatially constrained endocytic trafficking compartment. PMID:26335920

  15. Generation of stable lipid raft microdomains in the enterocyte brush border by selective endocytic removal of non-raft membrane.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H

    2013-01-01

    The small intestinal brush border has an unusually high proportion of glycolipids which promote the formation of lipid raft microdomains, stabilized by various cross-linking lectins. This unique membrane organization acts to provide physical and chemical stability to the membrane that faces multiple deleterious agents present in the gut lumen, such as bile salts, digestive enzymes of the pancreas, and a plethora of pathogens. In the present work, we studied the constitutive endocytosis from the brush border of cultured jejunal explants of the pig, and the results indicate that this process functions to enrich the contents of lipid raft components in the brush border. The lipophilic fluorescent marker FM, taken up into early endosomes in the terminal web region (TWEEs), was absent from detergent resistant membranes (DRMs), implying an association with non-raft membrane. Furthermore, neither major lipid raft-associated brush border enzymes nor glycolipids were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy in subapical punctae resembling TWEEs. Finally, two model raft lipids, BODIPY-lactosylceramide and BODIPY-GM1, were not endocytosed except when cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) was present. In conclusion, we propose that constitutive, selective endocytic removal of non-raft membrane acts as a sorting mechanism to enrich the brush border contents of lipid raft components, such as glycolipids and the major digestive enzymes. This sorting may be energetically driven by changes in membrane curvature when molecules move from a microvillar surface to an endocytic invagination.

  16. Endocytic membrane turnover at the leading edge is driven by a transient interaction between Cdc42 and GRAF1

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Monika K.; Holst, Mikkel R.; Vidal-Quadras, Maite; Henriksson, Sara; Santarella-Mellwig, Rachel; Sandblad, Linda; Lundmark, Richard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Changes in cell morphology require coordination of plasma membrane turnover and cytoskeleton dynamics, processes that are regulated by Rho GTPases. Here, we describe how a direct interaction between the Rho GTPase Cdc42 and the GTPase-activating protein (GAP) GRAF1 (also known as ARHGAP26), facilitates rapid cell surface turnover at the leading edge. Both Cdc42 and GRAF1 were required for fluid-phase uptake and regulated the generation of transient GRAF1-coated endocytic carriers, which were distinct from clathrin-coated vesicles. GRAF1 was found to transiently assemble at discrete Cdc42-enriched punctae at the plasma membrane, resulting in a corresponding decrease in the microdomain association of Cdc42. However, Cdc42 captured in its active state was, through a GAP-domain-mediated interaction, localised together with GRAF1 on accumulated internal structures derived from the cell surface. Correlative fluorescence and electron tomography microscopy revealed that these structures were clusters of small membrane carriers with defective endosomal processing. We conclude that a transient interaction between Cdc42 and GRAF1 drives endocytic turnover and controls the transition essential for endosomal maturation of plasma membrane internalised by this mechanism. PMID:26446261

  17. Clathrin-dependent pathways and the cytoskeleton network are involved in ceramide endocytosis by a parasitic protozoan, Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Yunuen; Castillo, Cynthia; Roychowdhury, Sukla; Hehl, Adrian; Aley, Stephen B; Das, Siddhartha

    2007-01-01

    Although identified as an early-diverged protozoan, Giardia lamblia shares many similarities with higher eukaryotic cells, including an internal membrane system and cytoskeleton, as well as secretory pathways. However, unlike many other eukaryotes, Giardia does not synthesize lipids de novo, but rather depends on exogenous sources for both energy production and organelle or membrane biogenesis. It is not known how lipid molecules are taken up by this parasite and if endocytic pathways are involved in this process. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that highly regulated and selective lipid transport machinery is present in Giardia and necessary for the efficient internalization and intracellular targeting of ceramide molecules, the major sphingolipid precursor. Using metabolic and pathway inhibitors, we demonstrate that ceramide is internalized through endocytic pathways and is primarily targeted into perinuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Further investigations suggested that Giardia uses both clathrin-dependent pathways and the actin cytoskeleton for ceramide uptake, as well as microtubule filaments for intracellular localization and targeting. We speculate that this parasitic protozoan has evolved cytoskeletal and clathrin-dependent endocytic mechanisms for importing ceramide molecules from the cell exterior for the synthesis of membranes and vesicles during growth and differentiation. PMID:17087963

  18. Microarray analysis of E9.5 reduced folate carrier (RFC1; Slc19a1) knockout embryos reveals altered expression of genes in the cubilin-megalin multiligand endocytic receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Gelineau-van Waes, Janee; Maddox, Joyce R; Smith, Lynette M; van Waes, Michael; Wilberding, Justin; Eudy, James D; Bauer, Linda K; Finnell, Richard H

    2008-01-01

    Background The reduced folate carrier (RFC1) is an integral membrane protein and facilitative anion exchanger that mediates delivery of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate into mammalian cells. Adequate maternal-fetal transport of folate is necessary for normal embryogenesis. Targeted inactivation of the murine RFC1 gene results in post-implantation embryolethality, but daily folic acid supplementation of pregnant dams prolongs survival of homozygous embryos until mid-gestation. At E10.5 RFC1-/- embryos are developmentally delayed relative to wildtype littermates, have multiple malformations, including neural tube defects, and die due to failure of chorioallantoic fusion. The mesoderm is sparse and disorganized, and there is a marked absence of erythrocytes in yolk sac blood islands. The identification of alterations in gene expression and signaling pathways involved in the observed dysmorphology following inactivation of RFC1-mediated folate transport are the focus of this investigation. Results Affymetrix microarray analysis of the relative gene expression profiles in whole E9.5 RFC1-/- vs. RFC1+/+ embryos identified 200 known genes that were differentially expressed. Major ontology groups included transcription factors (13.04%), and genes involved in transport functions (ion, lipid, carbohydrate) (11.37%). Genes that code for receptors, ligands and interacting proteins in the cubilin-megalin multiligand endocytic receptor complex accounted for 9.36% of the total, followed closely by several genes involved in hematopoiesis (8.03%). The most highly significant gene network identified by Ingenuity™ Pathway analysis included 12 genes in the cubilin-megalin multiligand endocytic receptor complex. Altered expression of these genes was validated by quantitative RT-PCR, and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that megalin protein expression disappeared from the visceral yolk sac of RFC1-/- embryos, while cubilin protein was widely misexpressed. Conclusion Inactivation of

  19. Rationally Engineering Phototherapy Modules of Eosin-Conjugated Responsive Polymeric Nanocarriers via Intracellular Endocytic pH Gradients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guhuan; Hu, Jinming; Zhang, Guoying; Liu, Shiyong

    2015-07-15

    Spatiotemporal switching of respective phototherapy modes at the cellular level with minimum side effects and high therapeutic efficacy is a major challenge for cancer phototherapy. Herein we demonstrate how to address this issue by employing photosensitizer-conjugated pH-responsive block copolymers in combination with intracellular endocytic pH gradients. At neutral pH corresponding to extracellular and cytosol milieu, the copolymers self-assemble into micelles with prominently quenched fluorescence emission and low (1)O2 generation capability, favoring a highly efficient photothermal module. Under mildly acidic pH associated with endolysosomes, protonation-triggered micelle-to-unimer transition results in recovered emission and enhanced photodynamic (1)O2 efficiency, which synergistically actuates release of encapsulated drugs, endosomal escape, and photochemical internalization processes.

  20. Progranulin Is a Chemoattractant for Microglia and Stimulates Their Endocytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pickford, Fiona; Marcus, Jacob; Camargo, Luiz Miguel; Xiao, Qiurong; Graham, Danielle; Mo, Jan-Rung; Burkhardt, Matthew; Kulkarni, Vinayak; Crispino, Jamie; Hering, Heike; Hutton, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Mutations resulting in progranulin haploinsufficiency cause disease in patients with a subset of frontotemporal lobar degeneration; however, the biological functions of progranulin in the brain remain unknown. To address this subject, the present study initially assessed changes in gene expression and cytokine secretion in rat primary cortical neurons treated with progranulin. Molecular pathways enriched in the progranulin gene set included cell adhesion and cell motility pathways and pathways involved in growth and development. Secretion of cytokines and several chemokines linked to chemoattraction but not inflammation were also increased from progranulin-treated primary neurons. Therefore, whether progranulin is involved in recruitment of immune cells in the brain was investigated. Localized lentiviral expression of progranulin in C57BL/6 mice resulted in an increase of Iba1-positive microglia around the injection site. Moreover, progranulin alone was sufficient to promote migration of primary mouse microglia in vitro. Primary microglia and C4B8 cells demonstrated more endocytosis of amyloid β1-42 when treated with progranulin. These data demonstrate that progranulin acts as a chemoattractant in the brain to recruit or activate microglia and can increase endocytosis of extracellular peptides such as amyloid β. PMID:21224065

  1. Direct Observation of α-Synuclein Amyloid Aggregates in Endocytic Vesicles of Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Vinod; Canters, Gerard W.; Schmidt, Thomas; Aartsma, Thijs J.

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of α-synuclein has been linked to both familial and sporadic Parkinson’s disease. Recent studies suggest that α-synuclein aggregates may spread from cell to cell and raise questions about the propagation of neurodegeneration. While continuous progress has been made characterizing α-synuclein aggregates in vitro, there is a lack of information regarding the structure of these species inside the cells. Here, we use confocal fluorescence microscopy in combination with direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, dSTORM, to investigate α-synuclein uptake when added exogenously to SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, and to probe in situ morphological features of α-synuclein aggregates with near nanometer resolution. We demonstrate that using dSTORM, it is possible to follow noninvasively the uptake of extracellularly added α-synuclein aggregates by the cells. Once the aggregates are internalized, they move through the endosomal pathway and accumulate in lysosomes to be degraded. Our dSTORM data show that α-synuclein aggregates remain assembled after internalization and they are shortened as they move through the endosomal pathway. No further aggregation was observed inside the lysosomes as speculated in the literature, nor in the cytoplasm of the cells. Our study thus highlights the super-resolution capability of dSTORM to follow directly the endocytotic uptake of extracellularly added amyloid aggregates and to probe the morphology of in situ protein aggregates even when they accumulate in small vesicular compartments. PMID:27105068

  2. A kinase inhibitor screen reveals protein kinase C-dependent endocytic recycling of ErbB2 in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Tameka A; Luan, Haitao; Tom, Eric; Bielecki, Timothy Alan; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Ahmad, Gulzar; George, Manju; Kelly, David L; Natarajan, Amarnath; Raja, Srikumar M; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2014-10-31

    ErbB2 overexpression drives oncogenesis in 20-30% cases of breast cancer. Oncogenic potential of ErbB2 is linked to inefficient endocytic traffic into lysosomes and preferential recycling. However, regulation of ErbB2 recycling is incompletely understood. We used a high-content immunofluorescence imaging-based kinase inhibitor screen on SKBR-3 breast cancer cells to identify kinases whose inhibition alters the clearance of cell surface ErbB2 induced by Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG. Less ErbB2 clearance was observed with broad-spectrum PKC inhibitor Ro 31-8220. A similar effect was observed with Go 6976, a selective inhibitor of classical Ca(2+)-dependent PKCs (α, β1, βII, and γ). PKC activation by PMA promoted surface ErbB2 clearance but without degradation, and ErbB2 was observed to move into a juxtanuclear compartment where it colocalized with PKC-α and PKC-δ together with the endocytic recycling regulator Arf6. PKC-α knockdown impaired the juxtanuclear localization of ErbB2. ErbB2 transit to the recycling compartment was also impaired upon PKC-δ knockdown. PMA-induced Erk phosphorylation was reduced by ErbB2 inhibitor lapatinib, as well as by knockdown of PKC-δ but not that of PKC-α. Our results suggest that activation of PKC-α and -δ mediates a novel positive feedback loop by promoting ErbB2 entry into the endocytic recycling compartment, consistent with reported positive roles for these PKCs in ErbB2-mediated tumorigenesis. As the endocytic recycling compartment/pericentrion has emerged as a PKC-dependent signaling hub for G-protein-coupled receptors, our findings raise the possibility that oncogenesis by ErbB2 involves previously unexplored PKC-dependent endosomal signaling.

  3. The deubiquitinating enzyme USP10 regulates the post-endocytic sorting of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Barnaby, Roxanna L; Stanton, Bruce A

    2009-07-10

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the ABC transporter superfamily, is a cyclic AMP-regulated chloride channel and a regulator of other ion channels and transporters. In epithelial cells CFTR is rapidly endocytosed from the apical plasma membrane and efficiently recycles back to the plasma membrane. Because ubiquitination targets endocytosed CFTR for degradation in the lysosome, deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are likely to facilitate CFTR recycling. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to identify DUBs that regulate the post-endocytic sorting of CFTR. Using an activity-based chemical screen to identify active DUBs in human airway epithelial cells, we demonstrated that Ubiquitin Specific Protease-10 (USP10) is located in early endosomes and regulates the deubiquitination of CFTR and its trafficking in the post-endocytic compartment. small interference RNA-mediated knockdown of USP10 increased the amount of ubiquitinated CFTR and its degradation in lysosomes, and reduced both apical membrane CFTR and CFTR-mediated chloride secretion. Moreover, a dominant negative USP10 (USP10-C424A) increased the amount of ubiquitinated CFTR and its degradation, whereas overexpression of wt-USP10 decreased the amount of ubiquitinated CFTR and increased the abundance of CFTR. These studies demonstrate a novel function for USP10 in facilitating the deubiquitination of CFTR in early endosomes and thereby enhancing the endocytic recycling of CFTR.

  4. Endocytic Recycling Proteins EHD1 and EHD2 Interact with Fer-1-like-5 (Fer1L5) and Mediate Myoblast Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Posey, Avery D.; Pytel, Peter; Gardikiotes, Konstantina; Demonbreun, Alexis R.; Rainey, Mark; George, Manju; Band, Hamid; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian ferlins are calcium-sensing, C2 domain-containing proteins involved in vesicle trafficking. Myoferlin and dysferlin regulate myoblast fusion and muscle membrane resealing, respectively. Correspondingly, myoferlin is most highly expressed in singly nucleated myoblasts, whereas dysferlin expression is increased in mature, multinucleated myotubes. Myoferlin also mediates endocytic recycling and participates in trafficking the insulin-like growth factor receptor. We have now characterized a novel member of the ferlin family, Fer1L5, because of its high homology to dysferlin and myoferlin. We found that Fer1L5 protein is expressed in small myotubes that contain only two to four nuclei. We also found that Fer1L5 protein binds directly to the endocytic recycling proteins EHD1 and EHD2 and that the second C2 domain in Fer1L5 mediates this interaction. Reduction of EHD1 and/or EHD2 inhibits myoblast fusion, and EHD2 is required for normal translocation of Fer1L5 to the plasma membrane. The characterization of Fer1L5 and its interaction with EHD1 and EHD2 underscores the complex requirement of ferlin proteins and mediators of endocytic recycling for membrane trafficking events during myotube formation. PMID:21177873

  5. Endocytic recycling proteins EHD1 and EHD2 interact with fer-1-like-5 (Fer1L5) and mediate myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Posey, Avery D; Pytel, Peter; Gardikiotes, Konstantina; Demonbreun, Alexis R; Rainey, Mark; George, Manju; Band, Hamid; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2011-03-01

    The mammalian ferlins are calcium-sensing, C2 domain-containing proteins involved in vesicle trafficking. Myoferlin and dysferlin regulate myoblast fusion and muscle membrane resealing, respectively. Correspondingly, myoferlin is most highly expressed in singly nucleated myoblasts, whereas dysferlin expression is increased in mature, multinucleated myotubes. Myoferlin also mediates endocytic recycling and participates in trafficking the insulin-like growth factor receptor. We have now characterized a novel member of the ferlin family, Fer1L5, because of its high homology to dysferlin and myoferlin. We found that Fer1L5 protein is expressed in small myotubes that contain only two to four nuclei. We also found that Fer1L5 protein binds directly to the endocytic recycling proteins EHD1 and EHD2 and that the second C2 domain in Fer1L5 mediates this interaction. Reduction of EHD1 and/or EHD2 inhibits myoblast fusion, and EHD2 is required for normal translocation of Fer1L5 to the plasma membrane. The characterization of Fer1L5 and its interaction with EHD1 and EHD2 underscores the complex requirement of ferlin proteins and mediators of endocytic recycling for membrane trafficking events during myotube formation.

  6. Direct Delivery of Antigens to Dendritic Cells via Antibodies Specific for Endocytic Receptors as a Promising Strategy for Future Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Christian H. K.; Heger, Lukas; Heidkamp, Gordon F.; Baranska, Anna; Lühr, Jennifer J.; Hoffmann, Alana; Dudziak, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent professional antigen presenting cells and are therefore indispensable for the control of immunity. The technique of antibody mediated antigen targeting to DC subsets has been the basis of intense research for more than a decade. Many murine studies have utilized this approach of antigen delivery to various kinds of endocytic receptors of DCs both in vitro and in vivo. Today, it is widely accepted that different DC subsets are important for the induction of select immune responses. Nevertheless, many questions still remain to be answered, such as the actual influence of the targeted receptor on the initiation of the immune response to the delivered antigen. Further efforts to better understand the induction of antigen-specific immune responses will support the transfer of this knowledge into novel treatment strategies for human diseases. In this review, we will discuss the state-of-the-art aspects of the basic principles of antibody mediated antigen targeting approaches. A table will also provide a broad overview of the latest studies using antigen targeting including addressed DC subset, targeted receptors, outcome, and applied coupling techniques. PMID:27043640

  7. Endocytic delivery of lipocalin-siderophore-iron complex rescues the kidney from ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kiyoshi; Lee, H. Thomas; Rapoport, Dana; Drexler, Ian R.; Foster, Kirk; Yang, Jun; Schmidt-Ott, Kai M.; Chen, Xia; Li, Jau Yi; Weiss, Stacey; Mishra, Jaya; Cheema, Faisal H.; Markowitz, Glenn; Suganami, Takayoshi; Sawai, Kazutomo; Mukoyama, Masashi; Kunis, Cheryl; D’Agati, Vivette; Devarajan, Prasad; Barasch, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    Neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin (Ngal), also known as siderocalin, forms a complex with iron-binding siderophores (Ngal:siderophore:Fe). This complex converts renal progenitors into epithelial tubules. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that Ngal:siderophore:Fe protects adult kidney epithelial cells or accelerates their recovery from damage. Using a mouse model of severe renal failure, ischemia-reperfusion injury, we show that a single dose of Ngal (10 μg), introduced during the initial phase of the disease, dramatically protects the kidney and mitigates azotemia. Ngal activity depends on delivery of the protein and its siderophore to the proximal tubule. Iron must also be delivered, since blockade of the siderophore with gallium inhibits the rescue from ischemia. The Ngal:siderophore:Fe complex upregulates heme oxygenase-1, a protective enzyme, preserves proximal tubule N-cadherin, and inhibits cell death. Because mouse urine contains an Ngal-dependent siderophore-like activity, endogenous Ngal might also play a protective role. Indeed, Ngal is highly accumulated in the human kidney cortical tubules and in the blood and urine after nephrotoxic and ischemic injury. We reveal what we believe to be a novel pathway of iron traffic that is activated in human and mouse renal diseases, and it provides a unique method for their treatment. PMID:15711640

  8. GGA3 mediates TrkA endocytic recycling to promote sustained Akt phosphorylation and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuezhi; Lavigne, Pierre; Lavoie, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Although TrkA postendocytic sorting significantly influences neuronal cell survival and differentiation, the molecular mechanism underlying TrkA receptor sorting in the recycling or degradation pathways remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that Golgi-localized, γ adaptin-ear–containing ADP ribosylation factor-binding protein 3 (GGA3) interacts directly with the TrkA cytoplasmic tail through an internal DXXLL motif and mediates the functional recycling of TrkA to the plasma membrane. We find that GGA3 depletion by siRNA delays TrkA recycling, accelerates TrkA degradation, attenuates sustained NGF-induced Akt activation, and reduces cell survival. We also show that GGA3’s effect on TrkA recycling is dependent on the activation of Arf6. This work identifies GGA3 as a key player in a novel DXXLL-mediated endosomal sorting machinery that targets TrkA to the plasma membrane, where it prolongs the activation of Akt signaling and survival responses. PMID:26446845

  9. The ciliary pocket: an endocytic membrane domain at the base of primary and motile cilia.

    PubMed

    Molla-Herman, Anahi; Ghossoub, Rania; Blisnick, Thierry; Meunier, Alice; Serres, Catherine; Silbermann, Flora; Emmerson, Chris; Romeo, Kelly; Bourdoncle, Pierre; Schmitt, Alain; Saunier, Sophie; Spassky, Nathalie; Bastin, Philippe; Benmerah, Alexandre

    2010-05-15

    Cilia and flagella are eukaryotic organelles involved in multiple cellular functions. The primary cilium is generally non motile and found in numerous vertebrate cell types where it controls key signalling pathways. Despite a common architecture, ultrastructural data suggest some differences in their organisation. Here, we report the first detailed characterisation of the ciliary pocket, a depression of the plasma membrane in which the primary cilium is rooted. This structure is found at low frequency in kidney epithelial cells (IMCD3) but is associated with virtually all primary cilia in retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE1). Transmission and scanning electron microscopy, immunofluorescence analysis and videomicroscopy revealed that the ciliary pocket establishes closed links with the actin-based cytoskeleton and that it is enriched in active and dynamic clathrin-coated pits. The existence of the ciliary pocket was confirmed in mouse tissues bearing primary cilia (cumulus), as well as motile cilia and flagella (ependymal cells and spermatids). The ciliary pocket shares striking morphological and functional similarities with the flagellar pocket of Trypanosomatids, a trafficking-specialised membrane domain at the base of the flagellum. Our data therefore highlight the conserved role of membrane trafficking in the vicinity of cilia. PMID:20427320

  10. A TOCA/CDC-42/PAR/WAVE functional module required for retrograde endocytic recycling.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhiyong; Grant, Barth D

    2015-03-24

    Endosome-to-Golgi transport is required for the function of many key membrane proteins and lipids, including signaling receptors, small-molecule transporters, and adhesion proteins. The retromer complex is well-known for its role in cargo sorting and vesicle budding from early endosomes, in most cases leading to cargo fusion with the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Transport from recycling endosomes to the TGN has also been reported, but much less is understood about the molecules that mediate this transport step. Here we provide evidence that the F-BAR domain proteins TOCA-1 and TOCA-2 (Transducer of Cdc42 dependent actin assembly), the small GTPase CDC-42 (Cell division control protein 42), associated polarity proteins PAR-6 (Partitioning defective 6) and PKC-3/atypical protein kinase C, and the WAVE actin nucleation complex mediate the transport of MIG-14/Wls and TGN-38/TGN38 cargo proteins from the recycling endosome to the TGN in Caenorhabditis elegans. Our results indicate that CDC-42, the TOCA proteins, and the WAVE component WVE-1 are enriched on RME-1-positive recycling endosomes in the intestine, unlike retromer components that act on early endosomes. Furthermore, we find that retrograde cargo TGN-38 is trapped in early endosomes after depletion of SNX-3 (a retromer component) but is mainly trapped in recycling endosomes after depletion of CDC-42, indicating that the CDC-42-associated complex functions after retromer in a distinct organelle. Thus, we identify a group of interacting proteins that mediate retrograde recycling, and link these proteins to a poorly understood trafficking step, recycling endosome-to-Golgi transport. We also provide evidence for the physiological importance of this pathway in WNT signaling.

  11. Uptake and intracytoplasmic storage of pigmented particles by human CD34+ stromal cells/telocytes: endocytic property of telocytes

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Flores, Lucio; Gutiérrez, Ricardo; García, Mª Pino; Sáez, Francisco J; Aparicio, Fernando; Díaz-Flores, Lucio; Madrid, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    We studied the phagocytic-like capacity of human CD34+ stromal cells/telocytes (TCs). For this, we examined segments of the colon after injection of India ink to help surgeons localize lesions identified at endoscopy. Our results demonstrate that CD34+ TCs have endocytic properties (phagocytic-like TCs: phTCs), with the capacity to uptake and store India ink particles. phTCs conserve the characteristics of TCs (long, thin, bipolar or multipolar, moniliform cytoplasmic processes/telopodes, with linear distribution of the pigment) and maintain their typical distribution. Likewise, they are easily distinguished from pigment-loaded macrophages (CD68+ macrophages, with oval morphology and coarse granules of pigment clustered in their cytoplasm). A few c-kit/CD117+ interstitial cells of Cajal also incorporate pigment and may conserve the phagocytic-like property of their probable TC precursors. CD34+ stromal cells in other locations (skin and periodontal tissues) also have the phagocytic-like capacity to uptake and store pigments (hemosiderin, some components of dental amalgam and melanin). This suggests a function of TCs in general, which may be related to the transfer of macromolecules in these cells. Our ultrastructural observation of melanin-storing stromal cells with characteristics of TCs (telopodes with dichotomous branching pattern) favours this possibility. In conclusion, intestinal TCs have a phagocytic-like property, a function that may be generalized to TCs in other locations. This function (the ability to internalize small particles), together with the capacity of these cells to release extracellular vesicles with macromolecules, could close the cellular bidirectional cooperative circle of informative exchange and intercellular interactions. PMID:25266164

  12. Adaptor Protein-1 Complex Affects the Endocytic Trafficking and Function of Peptidylglycine α-Amidating Monooxygenase, a Luminal Cuproenzyme.

    PubMed

    Bonnemaison, Mathilde L; Bäck, Nils; Duffy, Megan E; Ralle, Martina; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A

    2015-08-28

    The adaptor protein-1 complex (AP-1), which transports cargo between the trans-Golgi network and endosomes, plays a role in the trafficking of Atp7a, a copper-transporting P-type ATPase, and peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), a copper-dependent membrane enzyme. Lack of any of the four AP-1 subunits impairs function, and patients with MEDNIK syndrome, a rare genetic disorder caused by lack of expression of the σ1A subunit, exhibit clinical and biochemical signs of impaired copper homeostasis. To explore the role of AP-1 in copper homeostasis in neuroendocrine cells, we used corticotrope tumor cells in which AP-1 function was diminished by reducing expression of its μ1A subunit. Copper levels were unchanged when AP-1 function was impaired, but cellular levels of Atp7a declined slightly. The ability of PAM to function was assessed by monitoring 18-kDa fragment-NH2 production from proopiomelanocortin. Reduced AP-1 function made 18-kDa fragment amidation more sensitive to inhibition by bathocuproine disulfonate, a cell-impermeant Cu(I) chelator. The endocytic trafficking of PAM was altered, and PAM-1 accumulated on the cell surface when AP-1 levels were reduced. Reduced AP-1 function increased the Atp7a presence in early/recycling endosomes but did not alter the ability of copper to stimulate its appearance on the plasma membrane. Co-immunoprecipitation of a small fraction of PAM and Atp7a supports the suggestion that copper can be transferred directly from Atp7a to PAM, a process that can occur only when both proteins are present in the same subcellular compartment. Altered luminal cuproenzyme function may contribute to deficits observed when the AP-1 function is compromised.

  13. Adaptor Protein-1 Complex Affects the Endocytic Trafficking and Function of Peptidylglycine α-Amidating Monooxygenase, a Luminal Cuproenzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Bonnemaison, Mathilde L.; Bäck, Nils; Duffy, Megan E.; Ralle, Martina; Mains, Richard E.; Eipper, Betty A.

    2015-01-01

    The adaptor protein-1 complex (AP-1), which transports cargo between the trans-Golgi network and endosomes, plays a role in the trafficking of Atp7a, a copper-transporting P-type ATPase, and peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), a copper-dependent membrane enzyme. Lack of any of the four AP-1 subunits impairs function, and patients with MEDNIK syndrome, a rare genetic disorder caused by lack of expression of the σ1A subunit, exhibit clinical and biochemical signs of impaired copper homeostasis. To explore the role of AP-1 in copper homeostasis in neuroendocrine cells, we used corticotrope tumor cells in which AP-1 function was diminished by reducing expression of its μ1A subunit. Copper levels were unchanged when AP-1 function was impaired, but cellular levels of Atp7a declined slightly. The ability of PAM to function was assessed by monitoring 18-kDa fragment-NH2 production from proopiomelanocortin. Reduced AP-1 function made 18-kDa fragment amidation more sensitive to inhibition by bathocuproine disulfonate, a cell-impermeant Cu(I) chelator. The endocytic trafficking of PAM was altered, and PAM-1 accumulated on the cell surface when AP-1 levels were reduced. Reduced AP-1 function increased the Atp7a presence in early/recycling endosomes but did not alter the ability of copper to stimulate its appearance on the plasma membrane. Co-immunoprecipitation of a small fraction of PAM and Atp7a supports the suggestion that copper can be transferred directly from Atp7a to PAM, a process that can occur only when both proteins are present in the same subcellular compartment. Altered luminal cuproenzyme function may contribute to deficits observed when the AP-1 function is compromised. PMID:26170456

  14. Lipid raft-dependent uptake, signaling, and intracellular fate of Porphyromonas gingivalis in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Hajishengallis, George

    2009-01-01

    Summary Lipid rafts are cholesterol-enriched microdomains involved in cellular trafficking and implicated as portals for certain pathogens. We sought to determine whether the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis enters macrophages via lipid rafts, and if so, to examine the impact of raft entry on its intracellular fate. Using J774A.1 mouse macrophages, we found that P. gingivalis colocalizes with lipid rafts in a cholesterol-dependent way. Depletion of cellular cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin resulted in about 50% inhibition of P. gingivalis uptake, although this effect was reversed by cholesterol reconstitution. The intracellular survival of P. gingivalis was dramatically inhibited in cholesterol-depleted cells relative to untreated or cholesterol-reconstituted cells, even when infections were adjusted to allow equilibration of the initial intracellular bacterial load. P. gingivalis thus appeared to exploit raft-mediated uptake for promoting its survival. Consistent with this, lipid raft disruption enhanced the colocalization of internalized P. gingivalis with lysosomes. In contrast, raft disruption did not affect the expression of host receptors interacting with P. gingivalis, although it significantly inhibited signal transduction. In summary, P. gingivalis uses macrophage lipid rafts as signaling and entry platforms, which determine its intracellular fate to the pathogen’s own advantage. PMID:18547335

  15. Lipid raft-dependent plasma membrane repair interferes with the activation of B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Heather; Castro-Gomes, Thiago; Corrotte, Matthias; Tam, Christina; Maugel, Timothy K; Andrews, Norma W; Song, Wenxia

    2015-12-21

    Cells rapidly repair plasma membrane (PM) damage by a process requiring Ca(2+)-dependent lysosome exocytosis. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) released from lysosomes induces endocytosis of injured membrane through caveolae, membrane invaginations from lipid rafts. How B lymphocytes, lacking any known form of caveolin, repair membrane injury is unknown. Here we show that B lymphocytes repair PM wounds in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Wounding induces lysosome exocytosis and endocytosis of dextran and the raft-binding cholera toxin subunit B (CTB). Resealing is reduced by ASM inhibitors and ASM deficiency and enhanced or restored by extracellular exposure to sphingomyelinase. B cell activation via B cell receptors (BCRs), a process requiring lipid rafts, interferes with PM repair. Conversely, wounding inhibits BCR signaling and internalization by disrupting BCR-lipid raft coclustering and by inducing the endocytosis of raft-bound CTB separately from BCR into tubular invaginations. Thus, PM repair and B cell activation interfere with one another because of competition for lipid rafts, revealing how frequent membrane injury and repair can impair B lymphocyte-mediated immune responses.

  16. Syntaxin and VAMP association with lipid rafts depends on cholesterol depletion in capacitating sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Shiue; De Vries, Klaas J; De Boer-Brouwer, Mieke; Garcia-Gil, Nuria; Van Gestel, Renske A; Colenbrander, Ben; Gadella, Bart M; Van Haeften, Theo

    2007-01-01

    Sperm cells represent a special exocytotic system since mature sperm cells contain only one large secretory vesicle, the acrosome, which fuses with the overlying plasma membrane during the fertilization process. Acrosomal exocytosis is believed to be regulated by activation of SNARE proteins. In this paper, we identified specific members of the SNARE protein family, i.e., the t-SNAREs syntaxin1 and 2, and the v-SNARE VAMP, present in boar sperm cells. Both syntaxins were predominantly found in the plasma membrane whereas v-SNAREs are mainly located in the outer acrosomal membrane of these cells. Under non-capacitating conditions both syntaxins and VAMP are scattered in well-defined punctate structures over the entire sperm head. Bicarbonate-induced in vitro activation in the presence of BSA causes a relocalization of these SNAREs to a more homogeneous distribution restricted to the apical ridge area of the sperm head, exactly matching the site of sperm zona binding and subsequent induced acrosomal exocytosis. This redistribution of syntaxin and VAMP depends on cholesterol depletion and closely resembles the previously reported redistribution of lipid raft marker proteins. Detergent-resistant membrane isolation and subsequent analysis shows that a significant proportion of syntaxin emerges in the detergent-resistant membrane (raft) fraction under such conditions, which is not the case under those conditions where cholesterol depletion is blocked. The v-SNARE VAMP displays a similar cholesterol depletion-dependent lateral and raft redistribution. Taken together, our results indicate that redistribution of syntaxin and VAMP during capacitation depends on association of these SNAREs with lipid rafts and that such a SNARE-raft association may be essential for spatial control of exocytosis and/or regulation of SNARE functioning.

  17. Oxidation by Neutrophils-Derived HOCl Increases Immunogenicity of Proteins by Converting Them into Ligands of Several Endocytic Receptors Involved in Antigen Uptake by Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Biedroń, Rafał; Konopiński, Maciej K.; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Józefowski, Szczepan

    2015-01-01

    The initiation of adaptive immune responses to protein antigens has to be preceded by their uptake by antigen presenting cells and intracellular proteolytic processing. Paradoxically, endocytic receptors involved in antigen uptake do not bind the majority of proteins, which may be the main reason why purified proteins stimulate at most weak immune responses. A shared feature of different types of adjuvants, capable of boosting immunogenicity of protein vaccines, is their ability to induce acute inflammation, characterized by early influx of activated neutrophils. Neutrophils are also rapidly recruited to sites of tissue injury or infection. These cells are the source of potent oxidants, including hypochlorous acid (HOCl), causing oxidation of proteins present in inflammatory foci. We demonstrate that oxidation of proteins by endogenous, neutrophils-derived HOCl increases their immunogenicity. Upon oxidation, different, randomly chosen simple proteins (yeast alcohol dehydrogenase, human and bovine serum albumin) and glycoproteins (human apo-transferrin, ovalbumin) gain the ability to bind with high affinity to several endocytic receptors on antigen presenting cells, which seems to be the major mechanism of their increased immunogenicity. The mannose receptor (CD206), scavenger receptors A (CD204) and CD36 were responsible for the uptake and presentation of HOCl-modified proteins by murine dendritic cells and macrophages. Other scavenger receptors, SREC-I and LOX-1, as well as RAGE were also able to bind HOCl-modified proteins, but they did not contribute significantly to these ligands uptake by dendritic cells because they were either not expressed or exhibited preference for more heavily oxidised proteins. Our results indicate that oxidation by neutrophils-derived HOCl may be a physiological mechanism of conferring immunogenicity on proteins which in their native forms do not bind to endocytic receptors. This mechanism might enable the immune system to detect

  18. Expression of GM1, a marker of lipid rafts, defines two subsets of human monocytes with differential endocytic capacity and lipopolysaccharide responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Altamirano, M Maximina Bertha; Aguilar-Carmona, Israel; Sánchez-García, F Javier

    2007-01-01

    Monocytes constitute 5–10% of total human peripheral blood leucocytes and remain in circulation for several days before replenishing the tissue macrophage populations. Monocytes display heterogeneity in size, granularity and nuclear morphology, and in the expression of cell membrane molecules, such as CD14, CD16, CD32, CD64, major histocompatibility complex class II, CCR2, CCR5, among others. This has led to the suggestion that individual monocyte/macrophage populations have specialized functions within their microenvironments. This study provides evidence for the occurrence of two peripheral blood monocyte subpopulations on the basis of their differential expression of GM1, a sphingolipid found mostly in lipid rafts, a CD14+ GM1low population and a CD14+ GM1high population comprising about 97·5% and 2·5% of total CD14+ cells, respectively. GM1 expression correlates with functional differences in terms of endocytic activity, susceptibility to mycobacterial infection, and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (modulation of Toll-like receptor-4 expression). CD14+ GM1low cells proved to be less endocytic and more responsive to LPS, whereas CD14+ GM1high cells are more endocytic and less responsive to LPS. In addition, during monocyte to macrophage differentiation in vitro, the percentage of CD14+ GM1high cells increases from about 2·5% at day 1 to more than 50% at day 7 of culture. These results suggest that GM1low and GM1high monocytes in peripheral blood, represent either different stages of maturation or different subsets with specialized activities. The expression of CD16 on GM1high favours the first possibility and, on the other hand that up-regulation of GM1 expression and probably lipid rafts function is involved in the monocyte to macrophage differentiation process. PMID:17250589

  19. Endocytosis as a mechanism of regulating natural killer cell function: unique endocytic and trafficking pathway for CD94/NKG2A

    PubMed Central

    Peruzzi, Giovanna; Masilamani, Madhan; Borrego, Francisco; Coligan, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes generally recognized as sentinels of the innate immune system due to their inherent capacity to deal with diseased (stressed) cells, including malignant and infected. This ability to recognize many potentially pathogenic situations is due to the expression of a diverse panel of activation receptors. Because NK cell activation triggers an aggressive inflammatory response, it is important to have a means of throttling this response. Hence, NK cells also express a panel of inhibitory receptors that recognize ligands expressed by “normal” cells. Little or nothing is known about the endocytosis and trafficking of NK cell receptors, which are of great relevance to understanding how NK cells maintain the appropriate balance of activating and inhibitory receptors on their cell surface. In this review, we focus on the ITIM-containing inhibitory receptor CD94/NKG2A showing that it is endocytosed by a previously undescribed macropinocytic-like process that may be related to the maintenance of its surface expression. PMID:18979076

  20. Raft endocytosis of AMF regulates mitochondrial dynamics through Rac1 signaling and the Gp78 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Jay; Kojic, Liliana D; St-Pierre, Pascal; Wang, Peter T C; Fu, Min; Joshi, Bharat; Nabi, Ivan R

    2013-08-01

    Gp78 is a cell surface receptor that also functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. The Gp78 ligand, the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI; also called autocrine motility factor, AMF), functions as a cytokine upon secretion by tumor cells. AMF is internalized through a PI3K- and dynamin-dependent raft endocytic pathway to the smooth ER; however, the relationship between AMF and Gp78 ubiquitin ligase activity remains unclear. AMF uptake to the smooth ER is inhibited by the dynamin inhibitor, dynasore, is reduced in Gp78 knockdown cells and induces the dynamin-dependent downregulation of its cell surface receptor. AMF uptake is Rac1-dependent and is inhibited by expression of dominant-negative Rac1 and the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766, and is therefore distinct from Cdc42- and RhoA-dependent raft endocytic pathways. AMF stimulates Rac1 activation, but this is reduced by dynasore treatment and is absent in Gp78-knockdown cells; therefore, AMF activities require Gp78-mediated endocytosis. AMF also prevents Gp78-induced degradation of the mitochondrial fusion proteins, mitofusin 1 and 2 in a dynamin-, Rac1- and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent manner. Gp78 induces mitochondrial clustering and fission in a manner dependent on GP78 ubiquitin ligase activity, and this is also reversed by uptake of AMF. The raft-dependent endocytosis of AMF, therefore, promotes Rac1-PI3K signaling that feeds back to promote AMF endocytosis and also inhibits the ability of Gp78 to target the mitofusins for degradation, thereby preventing Gp78-dependent mitochondrial fission. Through regulation of an ER-localized ubiquitin ligase, the raft-dependent endocytosis of AMF represents an extracellular regulator of mitochondrial fusion and dynamics.

  1. The Viral G Protein-Coupled Receptor ORF74 Hijacks β-Arrestins for Endocytic Trafficking in Response to Human Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    de Munnik, Sabrina M.; Kooistra, Albert J.; van Offenbeek, Jody; Nijmeijer, Saskia; de Graaf, Chris; Smit, Martine J.; Leurs, Rob; Vischer, Henry F.

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-infected cells express the virally encoded G protein-coupled receptor ORF74. Although ORF74 is constitutively active, it binds human CXC chemokines that modulate this basal activity. ORF74-induced signaling has been demonstrated to underlie the development of the angioproliferative tumor Kaposi’s sarcoma. Whereas G protein-dependent signaling of ORF74 has been the subject of several studies, the interaction of this viral GPCR with β-arrestins has hitherto not been investigated. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer experiments demonstrate that ORF74 recruits β-arrestins and subsequently internalizes in response to human CXCL1 and CXCL8, but not CXCL10. Internalized ORF74 traffics via early endosomes to recycling and late endosomes. Site-directed mutagenesis and homology modeling identified four serine and threonine residues at the distal end of the intracellular carboxyl-terminal of ORF74 that are required for β-arrestin recruitment and subsequent endocytic trafficking. Hijacking of the human endocytic trafficking machinery is a previously unrecognized action of ORF74. PMID:25894435

  2. The Viral G Protein-Coupled Receptor ORF74 Hijacks β-Arrestins for Endocytic Trafficking in Response to Human Chemokines.

    PubMed

    de Munnik, Sabrina M; Kooistra, Albert J; van Offenbeek, Jody; Nijmeijer, Saskia; de Graaf, Chris; Smit, Martine J; Leurs, Rob; Vischer, Henry F

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-infected cells express the virally encoded G protein-coupled receptor ORF74. Although ORF74 is constitutively active, it binds human CXC chemokines that modulate this basal activity. ORF74-induced signaling has been demonstrated to underlie the development of the angioproliferative tumor Kaposi's sarcoma. Whereas G protein-dependent signaling of ORF74 has been the subject of several studies, the interaction of this viral GPCR with β-arrestins has hitherto not been investigated. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer experiments demonstrate that ORF74 recruits β-arrestins and subsequently internalizes in response to human CXCL1 and CXCL8, but not CXCL10. Internalized ORF74 traffics via early endosomes to recycling and late endosomes. Site-directed mutagenesis and homology modeling identified four serine and threonine residues at the distal end of the intracellular carboxyl-terminal of ORF74 that are required for β-arrestin recruitment and subsequent endocytic trafficking. Hijacking of the human endocytic trafficking machinery is a previously unrecognized action of ORF74.

  3. Kif5B and Kifc1 Interact and Are Required for Motility and Fission of Early Endocytic Vesicles in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Sangeeta; Bananis, Eustratios; Sarkar, Souvik; Stockert, Richard J.; Sperry, Ann O.; Murray, John W.

    2007-01-01

    Early endocytic vesicles loaded with Texas Red asialoorosomucoid were prepared from mouse liver. These vesicles bound to microtubules in vitro, and upon ATP addition, they moved bidirectionally, frequently undergoing fission into two daughter vesicles. There was no effect of vanadate (inhibitor of dynein) on motility, whereas 5′-adenylylimido-diphosphate (kinesin inhibitor) was highly inhibitory. Studies with specific antibodies confirmed that dynein was not associated with these vesicles and that Kif5B and the minus-end kinesin Kifc1 mediated their plus- and minus-end motility, respectively. More than 90% of vesicles associated with Kifc1 also contained Kif5B, and inhibition of Kifc1 with antibody resulted in enhancement of plus-end–directed motility. There was reduced vesicle fission when either Kifc1 or Kif5B activity was inhibited by antibody, indicating that the opposing forces resulting from activity of both motors are required for fission to occur. Immunoprecipitation of native Kif5B by FLAG antibody after expression of FLAG-Kifc1 in 293T cells indicates that these two motors can interact with each other. Whether they interact directly or through a complex of potential regulatory proteins will need to be clarified in future studies. However, the present study shows that coordinated activity of these kinesins is essential for motility and processing of early endocytic vesicles. PMID:17360972

  4. Polarized Traffic of LRP1 Involves AP1B and SNX17 Operating on Y-dependent Sorting Motifs in Different Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Donoso, Maribel; Cancino, Jorge; Lee, Jiyeon; van Kerkhof, Peter; Retamal, Claudio; Bu, Guojun; Gonzalez, Alfonso; Cáceres, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 1 (LRP1) is an endocytic recycling receptor with two cytoplasmic tyrosine-based basolateral sorting signals. Here we show that during biosynthetic trafficking LRP1 uses AP1B adaptor complex to move from a post-TGN recycling endosome (RE) to the basolateral membrane. Then it recycles basolaterally from the basolateral sorting endosome (BSE) involving recognition by sorting nexin 17 (SNX17). In the biosynthetic pathway, Y29 but not N26 from a proximal NPXY directs LRP1 basolateral sorting from the TGN. A N26A mutant revealed that this NPXY motif recognized by SNX17 is required for the receptor's exit from BSE. An endocytic Y63ATL66 motif also functions in basolateral recycling, in concert with an additional endocytic motif (LL86,87), by preventing LRP1 entry into the transcytotic apical pathway. All this sorting information operates similarly in hippocampal neurons to mediate LRP1 somatodendritic distribution regardless of the absence of AP1B in neurons. LRP1 basolateral distribution results then from spatially and temporally segregation steps mediated by recognition of distinct tyrosine-based motifs. We also demonstrate a novel function of SNX17 in basolateral/somatodendritic recycling from a different compartment than AP1B endosomes. PMID:19005208

  5. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Semaphorin Induce Neuropilin-1 Endocytosis via Separate Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Salikhova, Anna; Wang, Ling; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Liu, Miaoliang; Simons, Michael; Leenders, William P. J.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Horowitz, Arie

    2009-01-01

    The neuropilin (Nrp)1 receptor is essential for both nervous and vascular system development. Nrp1 is unusually versatile, because it transmits both chemoattractive and repulsive signals in response to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A and class 3 semaphorins, respectively. Both Nrp1 and VEGF receptor 2 undergo ligand-dependent endocytosis. We sought to establish the endocytic pathway of Nrp1 and to determine whether uptake is required for its signaling. Whereas Nrp1 underwent clathrin-dependent endocytosis in response to VEGFA165 treatment, semaphorin 3C (sema3C) induced lipid raft–dependent endocytosis. The myosin VI PDZ (postsynaptic density 95, Disk large, Zona occludens-1) adaptor protein synectin was essential for Nrp1 trafficking. Sema3C failed to inhibit migration of synectin−/− endothelial cells, mirroring the lower migratory response of these cells to VEGFA165. These results show that the endocytic pathway of Nrp1 is determined by its ligand and that the trafficking of Nrp1 is essential for its signaling. PMID:18723443

  6. Determining the role of Rab7 in constitutive and ligand-mediated epidermal growth factor receptor endocytic trafficking using single cell assays.

    PubMed

    Ceresa, Brian P

    2015-01-01

    RAB proteins are essential for the proper membrane trafficking of a number of proteins. Each of the 60+ RABs that have been identified has a discrete role in coordinating the movement from one subcellular compartment to another. Early attempts at deciphering the roles of individual RAB proteins relied heavily on the use of activating and/or dominant negative mutants (Ceresa, Histol Histopathol 21:987-993, 2006). However, overexpression of mutant proteins can lead to misleading information; high levels of expression can drive low affinity (and possibly, nonphysiological) interactions as well as cause mislocalization. The use of RNAi for transient protein knock down will reveal which membrane trafficking steps absolutely require the attenuated RAB. When determining the role of RAB protein in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) membrane trafficking, there are special considerations. The EGFR undergoes constitutive and ligand-mediated endocytic trafficking. Both affect receptor signaling, but via different mechanisms. Here, we discuss how to experimentally dissect those two processes.

  7. Brush border myosin-I truncated in the motor domain impairs the distribution and the function of endocytic compartments in an hepatoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Durrbach, A; Collins, K; Matsudaira, P; Louvard, D; Coudrier, E

    1996-01-01

    Myosins I, a ubiquitous monomeric class of myosins that exhibits actin-based motor properties, are associated with plasma and/or vesicular membranes and have been suggested as players for trafficking events between cell surface and intracellular membranous structures. To investigate the function of myosins 1, we have transfected a mouse hepatoma cell line (BWTG3) with cDNAs encoding the chicken brush border myosin-I (BBMI) and two variants truncated in the motor domain. One variant is deleted of the first 446 amino acids and thereby lacks the ATP binding site, whereas the other is deleted of the entire motor domain and lacks the ATP and actin binding sites. We have observed (i) that significant amounts of the truncated variants are recovered with membrane fractions after cell fractionation, (ii) that they codistribute with a compartment containing alpha2-macroglobulin internalized for 30 min as determined by fluorescent microscopy, (iii) that the production of BBMI-truncated variants impairs the distribution of the acidic compartment and ligands internalized for 30 min, and (iv) that the production of the truncated variant containing the actin binding site decreases the rate of alpha2-macroglobulin degradation whereas the production of the variant lacking the ATP binding site and the actin binding site increases the rate of a2-macroglobulin degradation. These observations indicate that the two truncated variants have a dominant negative effect on the distribution and the function of the endocytic compartments. We propose that an unidentified myosin-I might contribute to the distribution of endocytic compartments in a juxtanuclear position and/or to the regulation of the delivery of ligands to the degradative compartment in BWTG3 cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8692943

  8. Synaptotagmin III is a critical factor for the formation of the perinuclear endocytic recycling compartment and determination of secretory granules size.

    PubMed

    Grimberg, Elena; Peng, Ze; Hammel, Ilan; Sagi-Eisenberg, Ronit

    2003-01-01

    Early endosomes and a perinuclear, Rab-11-positive compartment have been implicated in the recycling of internalized receptors. In this study, we show that synaptotagmin III (Syt III), a member of the Syt family of proteins, is required for the formation and delivery of cargo to the perinuclear endocytic recycling compartment (ERC). We demonstrate that rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) mast cells endogenously express Syt III, and >70% of this protein colocalizes with early endosomal markers, such as EEA1, annexin II and syntaxin 7, and the remaining protein colocalizes with secretory granule (SG) markers such as beta-hexosaminidase, histamine and serotonin. To study the functional role of Syt III, we stably transfected RBL cells with Syt III antisense cDNA and monitored the route of transferrin (Tfn) internalization in cells that displayed substantially reduced (<90%) levels of Syt III (RBL-Syt III(-)). In these cells, Tfn binding and internalization into early endosomes were unaltered. However, whereas in the mock-transfected cells Tfn was subsequently delivered to the ERC, in the RBL-Syt III(-) cells, Tfn remained associated with dispersed peripheral vesicles and Rab 11 remained cytosolic. Nevertheless, the rates of Tfn internalization and recycling were not affected. RBL-Syt III(-) cells also displayed enlarged SGs, reminiscent of the SGs present in Chediak-Higashi (beige) mice. However, morphometric analyses suggested that granule formation was unaltered and that the calculated unit granule volume is the same in both cell lines. Therefore, our results implicate Syt III as a critical factor for the generation and delivery of internalized cargo to the perinuclear endocytic recycling compartment and suggest a possible link between ERC and recycling from immature SGs during the process of SG maturation.

  9. Palmitoylation of protease-activated receptor-1 regulates adaptor protein complex-2 and -3 interaction with tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting.

    PubMed

    Canto, Isabel; Trejo, JoAnn

    2013-05-31

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor for the coagulant protease thrombin. Thrombin binds to and cleaves the N terminus of PAR1, generating a new N terminus that functions as a tethered ligand that cannot diffuse away. In addition to rapid desensitization, PAR1 trafficking is critical for the regulation of cellular responses. PAR1 displays constitutive and agonist-induced internalization. Constitutive internalization of unactivated PAR1 is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), which binds to a distal tyrosine-based motif localized within the C-terminal tail (C-tail) domain. Once internalized, PAR1 is sorted from endosomes to lysosomes via AP-3 interaction with a second C-tail tyrosine motif proximal to the transmembrane domain. However, the regulatory processes that control adaptor protein recognition of PAR1 C-tail tyrosine-based motifs are not known. Here, we report that palmitoylation of PAR1 is critical for regulating proper utilization of tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting. We show that PAR1 is basally palmitoylated at highly conserved C-tail cysteines. A palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 mutant is competent to signal and exhibits a marked increase in constitutive internalization and lysosomal degradation compared with wild type receptor. Intriguingly, enhanced constitutive internalization of PAR1 is mediated by AP-2 and requires the proximal tyrosine-based motif rather than the distal tyrosine motif used by wild type receptor. Moreover, palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 displays increased degradation that is mediated by AP-3. These findings suggest that palmitoylation of PAR1 regulates appropriate utilization of tyrosine-based motifs by adaptor proteins and endocytic trafficking, processes that are critical for maintaining appropriate expression of PAR1 at the cell surface. PMID:23580642

  10. Palmitoylation of protease-activated receptor-1 regulates adaptor protein complex-2 and -3 interaction with tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting.

    PubMed

    Canto, Isabel; Trejo, JoAnn

    2013-05-31

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor for the coagulant protease thrombin. Thrombin binds to and cleaves the N terminus of PAR1, generating a new N terminus that functions as a tethered ligand that cannot diffuse away. In addition to rapid desensitization, PAR1 trafficking is critical for the regulation of cellular responses. PAR1 displays constitutive and agonist-induced internalization. Constitutive internalization of unactivated PAR1 is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), which binds to a distal tyrosine-based motif localized within the C-terminal tail (C-tail) domain. Once internalized, PAR1 is sorted from endosomes to lysosomes via AP-3 interaction with a second C-tail tyrosine motif proximal to the transmembrane domain. However, the regulatory processes that control adaptor protein recognition of PAR1 C-tail tyrosine-based motifs are not known. Here, we report that palmitoylation of PAR1 is critical for regulating proper utilization of tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting. We show that PAR1 is basally palmitoylated at highly conserved C-tail cysteines. A palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 mutant is competent to signal and exhibits a marked increase in constitutive internalization and lysosomal degradation compared with wild type receptor. Intriguingly, enhanced constitutive internalization of PAR1 is mediated by AP-2 and requires the proximal tyrosine-based motif rather than the distal tyrosine motif used by wild type receptor. Moreover, palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 displays increased degradation that is mediated by AP-3. These findings suggest that palmitoylation of PAR1 regulates appropriate utilization of tyrosine-based motifs by adaptor proteins and endocytic trafficking, processes that are critical for maintaining appropriate expression of PAR1 at the cell surface.

  11. Planar Cell Polarity Pathway Regulates Nephrin Endocytosis in Developing Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Babayeva, Sima; Rocque, Brittany; Aoudjit, Lamine; Zilber, Yulia; Li, Jane; Baldwin, Cindy; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Takano, Tomoko; Torban, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The noncanonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway controls a variety of cell behaviors such as polarized protrusive cell activity, directional cell movement, and oriented cell division and is crucial for the normal development of many tissues. Mutations in the PCP genes cause malformation in multiple organs. Recently, the PCP pathway was shown to control endocytosis of PCP and non-PCP proteins necessary for cell shape remodeling and formation of specific junctional protein complexes. During formation of the renal glomerulus, the glomerular capillary becomes enveloped by highly specialized epithelial cells, podocytes, that display unique architecture and are connected via specialized cell-cell junctions (slit diaphragms) that restrict passage of protein into the urine; podocyte differentiation requires active remodeling of cytoskeleton and junctional protein complexes. We report here that in cultured human podocytes, activation of the PCP pathway significantly stimulates endocytosis of the core slit diaphragm protein, nephrin, via a clathrin/β-arrestin-dependent endocytic route. In contrast, depletion of the PCP protein Vangl2 leads to an increase of nephrin at the cell surface; loss of Vangl2 functions in Looptail mice results in disturbed glomerular maturation. We propose that the PCP pathway contributes to podocyte development by regulating nephrin turnover during junctional remodeling as the cells differentiate. PMID:23824190

  12. HIV-1 Tat Protein Induces Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines by Human Dendritic Cells and Monocytes/Macrophages through Engagement of TLR4-MD2-CD14 Complex and Activation of NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Leghmari, Kaoutar; Serrero, Manutea; Delobel, Pierre; Izopet, Jacques; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Bahraoui, Elmostafa

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) Tat protein induced the expression of programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) on dendritic cells (DCs) through a TLR4 pathway. However, the underlying mechanisms by which HIV-1 Tat protein induces the abnormal hyper-activation of the immune system seen in HIV-1 infected patients remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, we report that HIV-1 Tat protein induced the production of significant amounts of the pro-inflammatory IL-6 and IL-8 cytokines by DCs and monocytes from both healthy and HIV-1 infected patients. Such production was abrogated in the presence of anti-TLR4 blocking antibodies or soluble recombinant TLR4-MD2 as a decoy receptor, suggesting TLR4 was recruited by Tat protein. Tat-induced murine IL-6 and CXCL1/KC a functional homologue of human IL-8 was abolished in peritoneal macrophages derived from TLR4 KO but not from Wt mice, confirming the involvement of the TLR4 pathway. Furthermore, the recruitment of TLR4-MD2-CD14 complex by Tat protein was demonstrated by the activation of TLR4 downstream pathways including NF-κB and SOCS-1 and by down-modulation of cell surface TLR4 by endocytosis in dynamin and lipid-raft-dependent manners. Collectively, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that HIV-1 Tat interacts with TLR4-MD2-CD14 complex and activates the NF-κB pathway, leading to overproduction of IL-6 and IL-8 pro-inflammatory cytokines by myeloid cells from both healthy and HIV-1 infected patients. This study reveals a novel mechanism by which HIV-1, via its early expressed Tat protein, hijacks the TLR4 pathway, hence establishing abnormal hyper-activation of the immune system. PMID:26090662

  13. RAB2A controls MT1-MMP endocytic and E-cadherin polarized Golgi trafficking to promote invasive breast cancer programs.

    PubMed

    Kajiho, Hiroaki; Kajiho, Yuko; Frittoli, Emanuela; Confalonieri, Stefano; Bertalot, Giovanni; Viale, Giuseppe; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Oldani, Amanda; Garre, Massimiliano; Beznoussenko, Galina V; Palamidessi, Andrea; Vecchi, Manuela; Chavrier, Philippe; Perez, Frank; Scita, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    The mechanisms of tumor cell dissemination and the contribution of membrane trafficking in this process are poorly understood. Through a functional siRNA screening of human RAB GTPases, we found that RAB2A, a protein essential for ER-to-Golgi transport, is critical in promoting proteolytic activity and 3D invasiveness of breast cancer (BC) cell lines. Remarkably, RAB2A is amplified and elevated in human BC and is a powerful and independent predictor of disease recurrence in BC patients. Mechanistically, RAB2A acts at two independent trafficking steps. Firstly, by interacting with VPS39, a key component of the late endosomal HOPS complex, it controls post-endocytic trafficking of membrane-bound MT1-MMP, an essential metalloprotease for matrix remodeling and invasion. Secondly, it further regulates Golgi transport of E-cadherin, ultimately controlling junctional stability, cell compaction, and tumor invasiveness. Thus, RAB2A is a novel trafficking determinant essential for regulation of a mesenchymal invasive program of BC dissemination. PMID:27255086

  14. White spot syndrome virus entry is dependent on multiple endocytic routes and strongly facilitated by Cq-GABARAP in a CME-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong-Yuan; Shen, Kai-Li; Chen, Zhen; Fan, Wei-Wei; Xie, Xiao-Lu; Meng, Chuang; Chang, Xue-Jiao; Zheng, Li-Bing; Jeswin, Joseph; Li, Cheng-Hua; Wang, Ke-Jian; Liu, Hai-Peng

    2016-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a lethal pathogen of shrimp and many other crustaceans, including crayfish. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its cellular entry remains elusive due to the lack of shrimp cell lines for viral propagation. Crayfish hematopoietic tissue (Hpt) cell culture was recently established as a good model for WSSV infection study. Here, we showed that multiple endocytic routes, including clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), macropinocytosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, were indispensably employed for the viral entry into Hpt cell of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. Intriguingly, cellular autophagic activity was positively correlated with efficient viral entry, in which a key autophagy-related protein, γ-aminobutyric acid receptor-associated protein (Cq-GABARAP), that not only localized but also co-localized with WSSV on the Hpt cell membrane, strongly facilitated WSSV entry by binding to the viral envelope VP28 in a CME-dependent manner that was negatively regulated by Cq-Rac1. Furthermore, cytoskeletal components, including Cq-β-tubulin and Cq-β-actin, bound to both recombinant rCq-GABARAP and WSSV envelope proteins, which likely led to viral entry promotion via cooperation with rCq-GABARAP. Even under conditions that promoted viral entry, rCq-GABARAP significantly reduced viral replication at an early stage of infection, which was probably caused by the formation of WSSV aggregates in the cytoplasm. PMID:27385304

  15. White spot syndrome virus entry is dependent on multiple endocytic routes and strongly facilitated by Cq-GABARAP in a CME-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong-yuan; Shen, Kai-li; Chen, Zhen; Fan, Wei-wei; Xie, Xiao-lu; Meng, Chuang; Chang, Xue-jiao; Zheng, Li-bing; Jeswin, Joseph; Li, Cheng-hua; Wang, Ke-jian; Liu, Hai-peng

    2016-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a lethal pathogen of shrimp and many other crustaceans, including crayfish. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its cellular entry remains elusive due to the lack of shrimp cell lines for viral propagation. Crayfish hematopoietic tissue (Hpt) cell culture was recently established as a good model for WSSV infection study. Here, we showed that multiple endocytic routes, including clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), macropinocytosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, were indispensably employed for the viral entry into Hpt cell of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. Intriguingly, cellular autophagic activity was positively correlated with efficient viral entry, in which a key autophagy-related protein, γ-aminobutyric acid receptor-associated protein (Cq-GABARAP), that not only localized but also co-localized with WSSV on the Hpt cell membrane, strongly facilitated WSSV entry by binding to the viral envelope VP28 in a CME-dependent manner that was negatively regulated by Cq-Rac1. Furthermore, cytoskeletal components, including Cq-β-tubulin and Cq-β-actin, bound to both recombinant rCq-GABARAP and WSSV envelope proteins, which likely led to viral entry promotion via cooperation with rCq-GABARAP. Even under conditions that promoted viral entry, rCq-GABARAP significantly reduced viral replication at an early stage of infection, which was probably caused by the formation of WSSV aggregates in the cytoplasm. PMID:27385304

  16. C1 domain residues Lys 2092 and Phe 2093 are of major importance for the endocytic uptake of coagulation factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Meems, Henriët; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Rondaij, Mariska; van der Zwaan, Carmen; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B

    2011-08-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) catabolism has been demonstrated to involve LDL receptor-related protein (LRP). We have established that antibody fragment KM33 inhibits cofactor function of FVIII by interacting with the membrane binding region 2092-2093 of the C1 domain. As KM33 also inhibits LRP-dependent uptake of FVIII, we now assessed the role of region 2092-2093 for LRP-dependent endocytosis. For this purpose, we employed functional fluorescent FVIII-YFP or -GFP derivatives and U87MG cells which express high levels of LRP. Confocal microscopy studies and flow cytometry analysis combined with siRNA technology showed that the fluorescent FVIII derivatives are indeed effectively internalized by U87MG cells in a LRP-dependent manner. Competition experiments employing an antagonist of the LDL receptor family members revealed that there is a cell surface binding event for FVIII, which is independent of LRP. Cell surface binding proved to be less effective for the FVIII-YFP variants K2092A, F2093A and K2092A/F2093A. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that these substitutions affect LRP binding as well. Finally, flow cytometry analysis revealed a major reduction of endocytic uptake of these FVIII-YFP variants. Our results demonstrate that C1 domain residues 2092-2093 are of major importance for FVIII endocytosis by contributing to cell surface binding and receptor binding. PMID:21497669

  17. Ubiquitin initiates sorting of Golgi and plasma membrane proteins into the vacuolar degradation pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In yeast and mammals, many plasma membrane (PM) proteins destined for degradation are tagged with ubiquitin. These ubiquitinated proteins are internalized into clathrin-coated vesicles and are transported to early endosomal compartments. There, ubiquitinated proteins are sorted by the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery into the intraluminal vesicles of multivesicular endosomes. Degradation of these proteins occurs after endosomes fuse with lysosomes/lytic vacuoles to release their content into the lumen. In plants, some PM proteins, which cycle between the PM and endosomal compartments, have been found to be ubiquitinated, but it is unclear whether ubiquitin is sufficient to mediate internalization and thus acts as a primary sorting signal for the endocytic pathway. To test whether plants use ubiquitin as a signal for the degradation of membrane proteins, we have translationally fused ubiquitin to different fluorescent reporters for the plasma membrane and analyzed their transport. Results Ubiquitin-tagged PM reporters localized to endosomes and to the lumen of the lytic vacuole in tobacco mesophyll protoplasts and in tobacco epidermal cells. The internalization of these reporters was significantly reduced if clathrin-mediated endocytosis was inhibited by the coexpression of a mutant of the clathrin heavy chain, the clathrin hub. Surprisingly, a ubiquitin-tagged reporter for the Golgi was also transported into the lumen of the vacuole. Vacuolar delivery of the reporters was abolished upon inhibition of the ESCRT machinery, indicating that the vacuolar delivery of these reporters occurs via the endocytic transport route. Conclusions Ubiquitin acts as a sorting signal at different compartments in the endomembrane system to target membrane proteins into the vacuolar degradation pathway: If displayed at the PM, ubiquitin triggers internalization of PM reporters into the endocytic transport route, but it also mediates

  18. Clerkship pathway

    PubMed Central

    MacLellan, Anne-Marie; Brailovsky, Carlos; Miller, François; Leboeuf, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify factors that help predict success for international medical graduates (IMGs) who train in Canadian residency programs and pass the Canadian certification examinations. Design A retrospective analysis of 58 variables in the files of IMGs who applied to the Collège des médecins du Québec between 2000 and 2008. Setting Quebec. Participants Eight hundred ten IMGs who applied to the Collège des médecins du Québec through either the “equivalency pathway” (ie, starting training at a residency level) or the “clerkship pathway” (ie, relearning at the level of a medical student in the last 2 years of the MD diploma). Main outcome measures Success factors in achieving certification. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and ANOVA (analysis of variance). Results International medical graduates who chose the “clerkship pathway” had greater success on certification examinations than those who started at the residency level did. Conclusion There are several factors that influence IMGs’ success on certification examinations, including integration issues, the acquisition of clinical decision-making skills, and the varied educational backgrounds. These factors perhaps can be better addressed by a regular clerkship pathway, in which IMGs benefit from learner-centred teaching and have more time for reflection on and understanding of the North American approach to medical education. The clerkship pathway is a useful strategy for assuring the integration of IMGs in the North American health care system. A 2-year relearning period in medical school at a clinical clerkship level deserves careful consideration. PMID:22859630

  19. Modulation of Endocytic Traffic in Polarized Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells by the Small GTPase RhoA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Som-Ming; Rojas, Raul; Maples, Christopher; Flynn, Christopher; Ruiz, Wily G.; Jou, Tzuu-Shuh; Apodaca, Gerard

    1999-01-01

    Efficient postendocytic membrane traffic in polarized epithelial cells is thought to be regulated in part by the actin cytoskeleton. RhoA modulates assemblies of actin in the cell, and it has been shown to regulate pinocytosis and phagocytosis; however, its effects on postendocytic traffic are largely unexplored. To this end, we expressed wild-type RhoA (RhoAWT), dominant active RhoA (RhoAV14), and dominant inactive RhoA (RhoAN19) in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells expressing the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor. RhoAV14 expression stimulated the rate of apical and basolateral endocytosis, whereas RhoAN19 expression decreased the rate from both membrane domains. Polarized basolateral recycling of transferrin was disrupted in RhoAV14-expressing cells as a result of increased ligand release at the apical pole of the cell. Degradation of basolaterally internalized epidermal growth factor was slowed in RhoAV14-expressing cells. Although apical recycling of immunoglobulin A (IgA) was largely unaffected in cells expressing RhoAV14, transcytosis of basolaterally internalized IgA was severely impaired. Morphological and biochemical analyses demonstrated that a large proportion of IgA internalized from the basolateral pole of RhoAV14-expressing cells remained within basolateral early endosomes and was slow to exit these compartments. RhoAN19 and RhoAWT expression had little effect on these postendocytic pathways. These results indicate that in polarized MDCK cells activated RhoA may modulate endocytosis from both membrane domains and postendocytic traffic at the basolateral pole of the cell. PMID:10588664

  20. The Endosomal Pathway and the Golgi Complex Are Involved in the Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Delgui, Laura R.; Rodríguez, José F.

    2013-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), a double-stranded RNA virus belonging to the Birnaviridae family, causes immunosuppression in chickens. In this study, we defined the localization of IBDV replication complexes based on colocalization analysis of VP3, the major protein component of IBDV ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). Our results indicate that VP3 localizes to vesicular structures bearing features of early and late endocytic compartments located in the juxtanuclear region. Interfering with the endocytic pathway with a dominant negative version of Rab5 after the internalization step leads to a reduction in virus titer. Triple-immunostaining studies between VP3, the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase VP1, and viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) showed a well-defined colocalization, indicating that the three critical components of the RNPs colocalize in the same structure, likely representing replication complexes. Interestingly, recombinant expressed VP3 also localizes to endosomes. Employing Golgi markers, we found that VP3-containing vesicles were closely associated with this organelle. Depolymerization of microtubules with nocodazole caused a profound change in VP3 localization, showing a punctate distribution scattered throughout the cytoplasm. However, these VP3-positive structures remained associated with Golgi ministacks. Similarly, brefeldin A (BFA) treatment led to a punctate distribution of VP3, scattered throughout the cytoplasm of infected cells. In addition, analysis of intra- and extracellular viral infective particles after BFA treatment of avian cells suggested a role for the Golgi complex in viral assembly. These results constitute the first study elucidating the localization of IBDV replication complexes (i.e., in endocytic compartments) and establishing a role for the Golgi apparatus in the assembly step of a birnavirus. PMID:23741000

  1. Human transferrin receptor triggers an alternative Tacaribe virus internalization pathway.

    PubMed

    Roldán, Julieta S; Martínez, María G; Forlenza, María B; Whittaker, Gary R; Candurra, Nélida A

    2016-02-01

    Tacaribe virus (TCRV) entry occurs by receptor-mediated endocytosis. To explore the entry mechanism used by TCRV, the inhibitory effects of drugs and dominant negative (DN) constructions affecting the main endocytic pathways were analyzed. In cells lacking the human transferrin receptor (hTfR), compounds and DN proteins that impair clathrin-mediated endocytosis were shown to reduce virus internalization without affecting virion binding. In contrast, in cells expressing the hTfR, compounds that affect clathrin-mediated endocytosis did not affect TCRV infection. Destabilization of cholesterol-rich plasma membrane microdomains by treatment with nystatin was not able to block virus entry in the presence of hTfR. However methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which extracts cholesterol from cell membranes, reduced virus internalization in cells expressing the hTfR. Inhibition of dynamin and neutralization of the pH of intracellular vesicles reduced virus internalization in all cell lines tested. Taken together, these results demonstrate that in cells expressing the hTfR, TCRV internalization depends on the presence of cholesterol, dynamin and acidic intracellular vesicles, while in the rest of the cell lines analyzed, clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the main TCRV entry pathway and, as expected, depends on dynamin and acidic intracellular vesicles. These results represent an important contribution to the characterization of the arenavirus replication cycle. PMID:26559962

  2. G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase-mediated Phosphorylation Regulates Post-endocytic Trafficking of the D2 Dopamine Receptor*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Namkung, Yoon; Dipace, Concetta; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Sibley, David R.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the role of G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)-mediated phosphorylation in agonist-induced desensitization, arrestin association, endocytosis, and intracellular trafficking of the D2 dopamine receptor (DAR). Agonist activation of D2 DARs results in rapid and sustained receptor phosphorylation that is solely mediated by GRKs. A survey of GRKs revealed that only GRK2 or GRK3 promotes D2 DAR phosphorylation. Mutational analyses resulted in the identification of eight serine/threonine residues within the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor that are phosphorylated by GRK2/3. Simultaneous mutation of these eight residues results in a receptor construct, GRK(-), that is completely devoid of agonist-promoted GRK-mediated receptor phosphorylation. We found that both wild-type (WT) and GRK(-) receptors underwent a similar degree of agonist-induced desensitization as assessed using [35S]GTPγS binding assays. Similarly, both receptor constructs internalized to the same extent in response to agonist treatment. Furthermore, using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays to directly assess receptor association with arrestin3, we found no differences between the WT and GRK(-) receptors. Thus, phosphorylation is not required for arrestin-receptor association or agonist-induced desensitization or internalization. In contrast, when we examined recycling of the D2 DARs to the cell surface, subsequent to agonist-induced endocytosis, the GRK(-) construct exhibited less recycling in comparison with the WT receptor. This impairment appears to be due to a greater propensity of the GRK(-) receptors to down-regulate once internalized. In contrast, if the receptor is highly phosphorylated, then receptor recycling is promoted. These results reveal a novel role for GRK-mediated phosphorylation in regulating the post-endocytic trafficking of a G protein-coupled receptor. PMID:19332542

  3. IDENTIFICATION OF A DEVELOPMENTALLY-REGULATED PATHWAY OF MEMBRANE RETRIEVAL IN NEURONAL GROWTH CONES

    PubMed Central

    Bonanomi, Dario; Fornasiero, Eugenio F.; Valdez, Gregorio; Halegoua, Simon; Benfenati, Fabio; Menegon, Andrea; Valtorta, Flavia

    2009-01-01

    During axon navigation and upon target recognition the growth cone plasma membrane is constantly reconfigured as a result of changes in cytoskeletal and membrane dynamics. The identity and regulation of the membrane pathway(s) participating in remodeling of the growth cone surface remain elusive. Here, we identify a constitutive, high capacity plasma membrane recycling activity in the axonal growth cones which is mediated by a novel bulk endocytic pathway mechanistically related to macropinocytosis. This pathway, involving large compartments distributed at sites of intense actin-based membrane ruffling, requires phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, the small GTPase Rac1 and the pinocytic chaperone Pincher. At early developmental stages, the synaptic vesicle and classical endosomal recycling pathways do not participate in the rapid retrieval of the growth cone plasma membrane. At later stages, during the onset of synaptogenesis, an intrinsic program of maturation leads to downregulation of basal bulk endocytosis and the emergence of depolarization-induced synaptic vesicle exo-endocytosis. We propose that the control of bulk membrane retrieval contributes to the homeostatic regulation of the axonal plasma membrane and growth cone remodeling during axonal outgrowth. In addition, we suggest that the downregulation of bulk endocytosis during synaptogenesis might contribute to the preservation of synaptic vesicle specificity. PMID:18940911

  4. Controlling the intracellular fate of nano-bioconjugates: pathways for realizing nanoparticle-mediated theranostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delehanty, James B.; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B.; Bradburne, Christopher E.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael H.; Prasuhn, Duane E.; Dawson, Philip E.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2014-08-01

    For nanomaterials to realize their full potential in disease diagnosis and drug delivery applications, one must be able to exert fine control over their cellular delivery, localization and long-term fate in biological systems. Our laboratory has been active in developing methodologies for the controlled and site-specific delivery of a range of nanomaterials (e.g., quantum dots, colloidal gold, nematic liquid crystals) for cellular labeling, imaging and sensing. This talk will highlight several examples from these efforts and will demonstrate the use of peptide- and protein-mediated facilitated delivery of nanomaterials to discrete cellular locations including the endocytic pathway, the plasma membrane and the cellular cytosol. The implications of the ability to exert fine control over nanomaterial constructs in biological settings will be discussed with a particular focus on their use in nanoparticle-based theranostics.

  5. Vitellogenesis in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster: antagonists demonstrate that the PLC, IP3/DAG, PK-C pathway is triggered by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Brubaker-Purkey, Bethany J; Woodruff, Richard I

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster M. (Diptera: Drosophilidae), a phospholipase-C to proteininase-C signal cascade leads to the endocytic uptake of yolk precursor molecules. The data suggest that D. melanogaster has a phospholipase-C/proteinkinase-C signaling pathway similar to that previously shown to be required for vitellogenesis in the milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus Dallas (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae). Calmodulin, derived from epithelial cells and transported to the oocytes via gap junctions, may trigger this pathway. To investigate this, a series of known antagonists to various elements of the pathway were used. W-7 (which prevents calmodulin binding to phospholipase-C), U-73122 (which prevents activation of phospholipase-C), verapamil (which blocks Ca(2+) release by IP3), HAG (which blocks diacylglycerol), and staurosporine (which inactivates proteinkinase-C) were each shown to inhibit endocytosis, thereby blocking formation of nascent yolk spheres. PMID:24228869

  6. Vitellogenesis in the Fruit Fly, Drosophila melanogaster: Antagonists Demonstrate that the PLC, IP3/DAG, PK-C Pathway is Triggered by Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker-Purkey, Bethany J.; Woodruff, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster M. (Diptera: Drosophilidae), a phospholipase-C to proteininase-C signal cascade leads to the endocytic uptake of yolk precursor molecules. The data suggest that D. melanogaster has a phospholipase-C/proteinkinase-C signaling pathway similar to that previously shown to be required for vitellogenesis in the milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus Dallas (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae). Calmodulin, derived from epithelial cells and transported to the oocytes via gap junctions, may trigger this pathway. To investigate this, a series of known antagonists to various elements of the pathway were used. W-7 (which prevents calmodulin binding to phospholipase-C), U-73122 (which prevents activation of phospholipase-C), verapamil (which blocks Ca2+ release by IP3), HAG (which blocks diacylglycerol), and staurosporine (which inactivates proteinkinase-C) were each shown to inhibit endocytosis, thereby blocking formation of nascent yolk spheres. PMID:24228869

  7. CHOLINE PARTIALLY PREVENTS THE IMPACT OF ETHANOL ON THE LIPID RAFT DEPENDENT FUNCTIONS OF L1 CELL ADHESION MOLECULE

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ningfeng; Bamford, Penny; Jones, Jace; He, Min; Kane, Maureen A.; Mooney, Sandra M.; Bearer, Cynthia F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, the leading known cause of mental retardation, is caused by alcohol exposure during pregnancy. One mechanism of ethanol teratogenicity is the disruption of the function of L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1). These functions include enhancement of neurite outgrowth, trafficking through lipid rafts, and signal transduction. Recent data have shown that choline supplementation of rat pups reduces the effects of ethanol on neurobehavior. We sought to determine if choline could prevent the effect of ethanol on L1 function using a simple experimental system. Methods Cerebellar granule neurons (CGN) from postnatal day 6 rat pups were cultured with and without supplemental choline, and the effects on L1 signaling, lipid raft distribution and neurite outgrowth were measured in the presence or absence of ethanol. Results Choline significantly reduced the effect of ethanol on L1 signaling, the distribution of L1 in lipid rafts and L1 mediated neurite outgrowth. However, choline supplemented ethanol exposed cultures remained significantly different than controls. Conclusions Choline pretreatment of CGN significantly reduces the disruption of L1 function by ethanol, but does not completely return L1 function to baseline. This experimental system will enable discovery of the mechanism of the neuroprotective effect of choline. PMID:25421509

  8. Role of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway and rapamycin in lentiviral vector gene transduction of hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cathy X.; Torbett, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review A major goal in repopulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapies is achieving high-efficacy gene transfer, while maintaining robust HSC engraftment and differentiation in vivo. Recent studies have documented that rapamycin treatment of HSC during lentiviral vector transduction enhances gene transfer to human and mouse HSCs and maintains engraftment capacity. In this review, we place into context the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways in HSC quiescence and function, endocytic regulation, and lentiviral gene delivery. Recent findings Lentiviral vector transduction of human and mouse HSCs is considerably enhanced by rapamycin treatment. Furthermore, rapamycin preserves long-term engraftment of human and mouse HSCs. Investigations of cellular mechanisms that contribute to increased transduction in HSCs uncovered a role for mTOR inhibition-dependent activation of endocytosis. Summary Rapamycin enhances lentiviral vector transduction of HSCs through regulation of endocytic activity via mTOR inhibition. An important attribute of rapamycin treatment during transduction is the preservation of HSC function, allowing reconstitution of long-term hematopoiesis in vivo in murine models. PMID:26049750

  9. The CD20 homologue MS4A4 directs trafficking of KIT toward clathrin-independent endocytosis pathways and thus regulates receptor signaling and recycling

    PubMed Central

    Cruse, Glenn; Beaven, Michael A.; Music, Stephen C.; Bradding, Peter; Gilfillan, Alasdair M.; Metcalfe, Dean D.

    2015-01-01

    MS4A family members differentially regulate the cell cycle, and aberrant, or loss of, expression of MS4A family proteins has been observed in colon and lung cancer. However, the precise functions of MS4A family proteins and their mechanistic interactions remain unsolved. Here we report that MS4A4 facilitates trafficking of the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT through endocytic recycling rather than degradation pathways by a mechanism that involves recruitment of KIT to caveolin-1–enriched microdomains. Silencing of MS4A4 in human mast cells altered ligand-induced KIT endocytosis pathways and reduced receptor recycling to the cell surface, thus promoting KIT signaling in the endosomes while reducing that in the plasma membrane, as exemplified by Akt and PLCγ1 phosphorylation, respectively. The altered endocytic trafficking of KIT also resulted in an increase in SCF-induced mast cell proliferation and migration, which may reflect altered signaling in these cells. Our data reveal a novel function for MS4A family proteins in regulating trafficking and signaling, which could have implications in both proliferative and immunological diseases. PMID:25717186

  10. Characterization of ovalbumin absorption pathways in the rat intestine, including the effects of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Yokooji, Tomoharu; Nouma, Hitomi; Matsuo, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Ingested proteins are absorbed from the intestinal lumen via the paracellular and/or transcellular pathways, depending on their physicochemical properties. In this study, we investigated the absorption pathway(s) of ovalbumin (OVA), an egg white-allergen, as well as the mechanisms of aspirin-facilitated OVA absorption in rats. In situ intestinal re-circulating perfusion experiments showed that the absorption rate of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled OVA in the distal intestine was higher than that for a marker of non-specific absorption, FITC-dextran (FD-40), and that colchicine, a general endocytosis inhibitor, suppressed OVA absorption. In the distal intestine, bafiromycin A1 and phenylarsine oxide inhibited the OVA absorption rate, whereas mehyl-β-cyclodextrin exerted no significant effects. Thus, OVA is preferentially absorbed from the distal intestine via the paracellular and receptor- and clathrin-mediated endocytic pathways. Furthermore, aspirin increased OVA absorption in the presence or absence of colchicine, indicating that aspirin facilitated OVA absorption by inducing intestinal barrier disruption and paracellular permeability.

  11. Insights into endosomal maturation of human holo-transferrin in the enteric parasite Entamoeba histolytica: essential roles of Rab7A and Rab5 in biogenesis of giant early endocytic vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Verma, Kuldeep; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Datta, Sunando

    2015-12-01

    The pathogenic amoeba Entamoeba histolytica is one of the causative agents of health hazards in tropical countries. It causes amoebic dysentery, colitis and liver abscesses in human. Iron is one of the essential nutritional resources for survival and chronic infection caused by the amoeba. The parasite has developed multiple ways to import, sequester and utilize iron from various iron-binding proteins from its host. In spite of its central role in pathogenesis, the mechanism of iron uptake by the parasite is largely unknown. Here, we carried out a systematic study to understand the role of some of the amoebic homologues of mammalian endocytic Rab GTPases (Rab5 and Rab21, Rab7A and Rab7B) in intracellular transport of human holo-transferrin by the parasite. Flow cytometry and quantitative microscopic image analysis revealed that Rab5 and Rab7A are required for the biogenesis of amoebic giant endocytic vacuoles (GEVs) and regulate the early phase of intracellular trafficking of transferrin. Rab7B is involved in the late phase, leading to the degradation of transferrin in the amoebic lysosome-like compartments. Using time-lapse fluorescence imaging in fixed trophozoites, we determined the kinetics of the vesicular transport of transferrin through Rab5-, Rab7A- and Rab7B-positive compartments. The involvement of Rab7A in the early phase of endocytosis by the parasite marks a significant divergence from its host in terms of spatiotemporal regulation by the Rab GTPases. PMID:26096601

  12. Infectious Entry Pathway Mediated by the Human Endogenous Retrovirus K Envelope Protein

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Lindsey R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), the majority of which exist as degraded remnants of ancient viruses, comprise approximately 8% of the human genome. The youngest human ERVs (HERVs) belong to the HERV-K(HML-2) subgroup and were endogenized within the past 1 million years. The viral envelope protein (ENV) facilitates the earliest events of endogenization (cellular attachment and entry), and here, we characterize the requirements for HERV-K ENV to mediate infectious cell entry. Cell-cell fusion assays indicate that a minimum of two events are required for fusion, proteolytic processing by furin-like proteases and exposure to acidic pH. We generated an infectious autonomously replicating recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in which the glycoprotein was replaced by HERV-K ENV. HERV-K ENV imparts an endocytic entry pathway that requires dynamin-mediated membrane scission and endosomal acidification but is distinct from clathrin-dependent or macropinocytic uptake pathways. The lack of impediments to the replication of the VSV core in eukaryotic cells allowed us to broadly survey the HERV-K ENV-dictated tropism. Unlike extant betaretroviral envelopes, which impart a narrow species tropism, we found that HERV-K ENV mediates broad tropism encompassing cells from multiple mammalian and nonmammalian species. We conclude that HERV-K ENV dictates an evolutionarily conserved entry pathway and that the restriction of HERV-K to primate genomes reflects downstream stages of the viral replication cycle. IMPORTANCE Approximately 8% of the human genome is of retroviral origin. While many of those viral genomes have become inactivated, some copies of the most recently endogenized human retrovirus, HERV-K, can encode individual functional proteins. Here, we characterize the envelope protein (ENV) of the virus to define how it mediates infection of cells. We demonstrate that HERV-K ENV undergoes a proteolytic processing step and triggers membrane fusion in response to

  13. Trafficking and degradation pathways in pathogenic conversion of prions and prion-like proteins in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Victoria, Guiliana Soraya; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2015-09-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases such as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases are caused by the conversion of cellular proteins to a pathogenic conformer. Despite differences in the primary structure and subcellular localization of these proteins, which include the prion protein, α-synuclein and amyloid precursor protein (APP), striking similarity has been observed in their ability to seed and convert naïve protein molecules as well as transfer between cells. This review aims to cover what is known about the intracellular trafficking of these proteins as well as their degradation mechanisms and highlight similarities in their movement through the endocytic pathway that could contribute to the pathogenic conversion and seeding of these proteins which underlies the basis of these diseases.

  14. Mechanisms of JAK/STAT pathway negative regulation by the short coreceptor Eye Transformer/Latran.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Katherine H; Stec, Wojciech; Brown, Stephen; Zeidler, Martin P

    2016-02-01

    Transmembrane receptors interact with extracellular ligands to transduce intracellular signaling cascades, modulate target gene expression, and regulate processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and homeostasis. As a consequence, aberrant signaling events often underlie human disease. Whereas the vertebrate JAK/STAT signaling cascade is transduced via multiple receptor combinations, the Drosophila pathway has only one full-length signaling receptor, Domeless (Dome), and a single negatively acting receptor, Eye Transformer/Latran (Et/Lat). Here we investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying Et/Lat activity. We demonstrate that Et/Lat negatively regulates the JAK/STAT pathway activity and can bind to Dome, thus reducing Dome:Dome homodimerization by creating signaling-incompetent Dome:Et/Lat heterodimers. Surprisingly, we find that Et/Lat is able to bind to both JAK and STAT92E but, despite the presence of putative cytokine-binding motifs, does not detectably interact with pathway ligands. We find that Et/Lat is trafficked through the endocytic machinery for lysosomal degradation but at a much slower rate than Dome, a difference that may enhance its ability to sequester Dome into signaling-incompetent complexes. Our data offer new insights into the molecular mechanism and regulation of Et/Lat in Drosophila that may inform our understanding of how short receptors function in other organisms.

  15. An endocytosis pathway initiated through neuropilin-1 and regulated by nutrient availability

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Hong-Bo; Braun, Gary B.; Friman, Tomas; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Ruidiaz, Manuel E.; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Teesalu, Tambet; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2014-01-01

    Neuropilins (NRPs) are trans-membrane receptors involved in axon guidance and vascular development. Many growth factors and other signaling molecules bind to NRPs through a C-terminal, basic sequence motif (C-end Rule or CendR motif). Peptides with this motif (CendR peptides) are taken up into cells by endocytosis. Tumor-homing CendR peptides penetrate through tumor tissue and have shown utility in enhancing drug delivery into tumors. Here we show, using RNAi screening and subsequent validation studies, that NRP1-mediated endocytosis of CendR peptides is distinct from known endocytic pathways. Ultrastructurally, CendR endocytosis resembles macropinocytosis, but is mechanistically different. We also show that nutrient-sensing networks such as mTOR signaling regulate CendR endocytosis and subsequent intercellular transport of CendR cargo, both of which are stimulated by nutrient depletion. As CendR is a bulk transport pathway, our results suggest a role for it in nutrient transport; CendR-enhanced drug delivery then makes use of this natural pathway. PMID:25277522

  16. Dual pathways of internalization of the cholecystokinin receptor

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Receptor molecules play a major role in the desensitization of agonist- stimulated cellular responses. For G protein-coupled receptors, rapid desensitization occurs via receptor phosphorylation, sequestration, and internalization, yet the cellular compartments in which these events occur and their interrelationships are unclear. In this work, we focus on the cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor, which has been well characterized with respect to phosphorylation. We have used novel fluorescent and electron-dense CCK receptor ligands and an antibody to probe receptor localization in a CCK receptor-bearing CHO cell line. In the unstimulated state, receptors were diffusely distributed over the plasmalemma. Agonist occupation stimulated endocytosis via both clathrin-dependent and independent pathways. The former was predominant, leading to endosomal and lysosomal compartments, as well as recycling to the plasmalemma. The clathrin-independent processes led to a smooth vesicular compartment adjacent to the plasmalemma resembling caveolae, which did not transport ligand deeper within the cell. Potassium depletion largely eliminated clathrin-dependent endocytosis, while not interfering with agonist-stimulated receptor movement into subplasmalemmal smooth vesicle compartments. These cellular endocytic events can be related to the established cycle of CCK receptor phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, which we have previously described (Klueppelberg, U. G., L. K. Gates, F. S. Gorelick, and L. J. Miller. 1991. J. Biol. Chem. 266:2403-2408; Lutz, M. P., D. I. Pinon, L. K. Gates, S. Shenolikar, and L. J. Miller. 1993. J. Biol. Chem. 268:12136-12142). The rapid onset and peak of receptor phosphorylation after agonist occupation correlates best with a plasmalemmal localization, while stimulated receptor phosphatase activity correlates best with receptor residence in intracellular compartments. We postulate that the smooth vesicular compartment adjacent to the plasmalemma functions for

  17. Pathway modulators and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Smith, John A

    2009-07-01

    Inhibitors of specific cellular pathways are useful for investigating the roles of proteins of unknown function, and for selectively inhibiting a protein in complex pathways to uncover its relationships to other proteins in this and other interacting pathways. This appendix provides links to Web sites that describe cellular processes and pathways along with the various classes of inhibitors, numerous references, downloadable diagrams, and technical tips.

  18. The Frizzled-dependent planar polarity pathway locally promotes E-cadherin turnover via recruitment of RhoGEF2

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Samantha J.; Strutt, Helen; Strutt, David

    2013-01-01

    Polarised tissue elongation during morphogenesis involves cells within epithelial sheets or tubes making and breaking intercellular contacts in an oriented manner. Growing evidence suggests that cell adhesion can be modulated by endocytic trafficking of E-cadherin (E-cad), but how this process can be polarised within individual cells is poorly understood. The Frizzled (Fz)-dependent core planar polarity pathway is a major regulator of polarised cell rearrangements in processes such as gastrulation, and has also been implicated in regulation of cell adhesion through trafficking of E-cad; however, it is not known how these functions are integrated. We report a novel role for the core planar polarity pathway in promoting cell intercalation during tracheal tube morphogenesis in Drosophila embryogenesis, and present evidence that this is due to regulation of turnover and levels of junctional E-cad by the guanine exchange factor RhoGEF2. Furthermore, we show that core pathway activity leads to planar-polarised recruitment of RhoGEF2 and E-cad turnover in the epidermis of both the embryonic germband and the pupal wing. We thus reveal a general mechanism by which the core planar polarity pathway can promote polarised cell rearrangements. PMID:23364328

  19. Epidermal growth factor receptors destined for the nucleus are internalized via a clathrin-dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    De Angelis Campos, Ana Carolina; Rodrigues, Michele Angela; Andrade, Carolina de; Miranda de Goes, Alfredo; Nathanson, Michael H.; Gomes, Dawidson A.

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} EGF and its receptor translocates to the nucleus in liver cells. {yields} Real time imaging shows that EGF moves to the nucleus. {yields} EGF moves with its receptor to the nucleus. {yields} Dynamin and clathrin are necessary for EGFR nuclear translocation. -- Abstract: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) transduces its actions via the EGF receptor (EGFR), which can traffic from the plasma membrane to either the cytoplasm or the nucleus. However, the mechanism by which EGFR reaches the nucleus is unclear. To investigate these questions, liver cells were analyzed by immunoblot of cell fractions, confocal immunofluorescence and real time confocal imaging. Cell fractionation studies showed that EGFR was detectable in the nucleus after EGF stimulation with a peak in nuclear receptor after 10 min. Movement of EGFR to the nucleus was confirmed by confocal immunofluorescence and labeled EGF moved with the receptor to the nucleus. Small interference RNA (siRNA) was used to knockdown clathrin in order to assess the first endocytic steps of EGFR nuclear translocation in liver cells. A mutant dynamin (dynamin K44A) was also used to determine the pathways for this traffic. Movement of labeled EGF or EGFR to the nucleus depended upon dynamin and clathrin. This identifies the pathway that mediates the first steps for EGFR nuclear translocation in liver cells.

  20. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-activating Polypeptide (PACAP)/PAC1HOP1 Receptor Activation Coordinates Multiple Neurotrophic Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    May, Victor; Lutz, Eve; MacKenzie, Christopher; Schutz, Kristin C.; Dozark, Kate; Braas, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    MAPK and Akt pathways are predominant mediators of trophic signaling for many neuronal systems. Among the vasoactive intestinal peptide/secretin/glucagon family of related peptides, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) binding to specific PAC1 receptor isoforms can engage multiple signaling pathways and promote neuroprotection through mechanisms that are not well understood. Using a primary sympathetic neuronal system, the current studies demonstrate that PACAP activation of PAC1HOP1 receptors engages both MAPK and Akt neurotrophic pathways in an integrated program to facilitate neuronal survival after growth factor withdrawal. PACAP not only stimulated prosurvival ERK1/2 and ERK5 activation but also abrogated SAPK/JNK and p38 MAPK signaling in parallel. In contrast to the potent and rapid effects of PACAP in ERK1/2 phosphorylation, PACAP stimulated Akt phosphorylation in a late phase of PAC1HOP1 receptor signaling. From inhibitor and immunoprecipitation analyses, the PACAP/PAC1HOP1 receptor-mediated Akt responses did not represent transactivation mechanisms but appeared to depend on Gαq/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ activity and vesicular internalization pathways. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ-selective inhibitors blocked PACAP-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in primary neuronal cultures and in PAC1HOP1-overexpressing cell lines; RNA interference-mediated knockdown of the receptor effectors attenuated PACAP-mediated Akt activation. Similarly, perturbation of endocytic pathways also blocked Akt phosphorylation. Between ERK and Akt pathways, PACAP-stimulated Akt signaling was the primary cascade that attenuated cultured neuron apoptosis after growth factor withdrawal. The partitioning of PACAP-mediated Akt signaling in endosomes may be a key mechanism contributing to the high spatial and temporal specificity in signal transduction necessary for survival pathways. PMID:20093365

  1. Pathways from Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Barbara, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Articles in this theme issue are based on presentations at the Pathways from Poverty Workshop held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on May 18-25, 1995. The event aimed to foster development of a network to address rural poverty issues in the Western Rural Development Center (WRDC) region. Articles report on outcomes from the Pathways from Poverty…

  2. Career Pathways in Indiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaskey, Steve; Johnson, Tricia

    2010-01-01

    The revisions to the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 require that career and technical education (CTE) programs provide students with a clear pathway from secondary to postsecondary education, and into high-wage, high-skill and high-demand careers. States nationwide are developing programs, called career pathways, to…

  3. Building clinical pathways.

    PubMed

    Leininger, S M

    1998-01-01

    TQM principles change the work environment so that point-of-service personnel can improve health care delivery to patients. The clinical pathway process starts with the principles of TQM. In the era of managed care, health care resources can be managed effectively using a clinical pathway. The multidisciplinary team has the opportunity to improve the health care services provided to patients.

  4. Crystallization Pathways in Biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, Steve; Addadi, Lia

    2011-08-01

    A crystallization pathway describes the movement of ions from their source to the final product. Cells are intimately involved in biological crystallization pathways. In many pathways the cells utilize a unique strategy: They temporarily concentrate ions in intracellular membrane-bound vesicles in the form of a highly disordered solid phase. This phase is then transported to the final mineralization site, where it is destabilized and crystallizes. We present four case studies, each of which demonstrates specific aspects of biological crystallization pathways: seawater uptake by foraminifera, calcite spicule formation by sea urchin larvae, goethite formation in the teeth of limpets, and guanine crystal formation in fish skin and spider cuticles. Three representative crystallization pathways are described, and aspects of the different stages of crystallization are discussed. An in-depth understanding of these complex processes can lead to new ideas for synthetic crystallization processes of interest to materials science.

  5. Human rhinovirus 14 enters rhabdomyosarcoma cells expressing icam-1 by a clathrin-, caveolin-, and flotillin-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Ghafoor; Pickl-Herk, Angela; Gajdzik, Leszek; Marlovits, Thomas C; Fuchs, Renate; Blaas, Dieter

    2010-04-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) mediates binding and entry of major group human rhinoviruses (HRVs). Whereas the entry pathway of minor group HRVs has been studied in detail and is comparatively well understood, the pathway taken by major group HRVs is largely unknown. Use of immunofluorescence microscopy, colocalization with specific endocytic markers, dominant negative mutants, and pharmacological inhibitors allowed us to demonstrate that the major group virus HRV14 enters rhabdomyosarcoma cells transfected to express human ICAM-1 in a clathrin-, caveolin-, and flotillin-independent manner. Electron microscopy revealed that many virions accumulated in long tubular structures, easily distinguishable from clathrin-coated pits and caveolae. Virus entry was strongly sensitive to the Na(+)/H(+) ion exchange inhibitor amiloride and moderately sensitive to cytochalasin D. Thus, cellular uptake of HRV14 occurs via a pathway exhibiting some, but not all, characteristics of macropinocytosis and is similar to that recently described for adenovirus 3 entry via alpha(v) integrin/CD46 in HeLa cells.

  6. Human Rhinovirus 14 Enters Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells Expressing ICAM-1 by a Clathrin-, Caveolin-, and Flotillin-Independent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abdul Ghafoor; Pickl-Herk, Angela; Gajdzik, Leszek; Marlovits, Thomas C.; Fuchs, Renate; Blaas, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) mediates binding and entry of major group human rhinoviruses (HRVs). Whereas the entry pathway of minor group HRVs has been studied in detail and is comparatively well understood, the pathway taken by major group HRVs is largely unknown. Use of immunofluorescence microscopy, colocalization with specific endocytic markers, dominant negative mutants, and pharmacological inhibitors allowed us to demonstrate that the major group virus HRV14 enters rhabdomyosarcoma cells transfected to express human ICAM-1 in a clathrin-, caveolin-, and flotillin-independent manner. Electron microscopy revealed that many virions accumulated in long tubular structures, easily distinguishable from clathrin-coated pits and caveolae. Virus entry was strongly sensitive to the Na+/H+ ion exchange inhibitor amiloride and moderately sensitive to cytochalasin D. Thus, cellular uptake of HRV14 occurs via a pathway exhibiting some, but not all, characteristics of macropinocytosis and is similar to that recently described for adenovirus 3 entry via αv integrin/CD46 in HeLa cells. PMID:20130060

  7. Updating the Wnt pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jia; Virshup, David M.

    2014-01-01

    In the three decades since the discovery of the Wnt1 proto-oncogene in virus-induced mouse mammary tumours, our understanding of the signalling pathways that are regulated by the Wnt proteins has progressively expanded. Wnts are involved in an complex signalling network that governs multiple biological processes and cross-talk with multiple additional signalling cascades, including the Notch, FGF (fibroblast growth factor), SHH (Sonic hedgehog), EGF (epidermal growth factor) and Hippo pathways. The Wnt signalling pathway also illustrates the link between abnormal regulation of the developmental processes and disease manifestation. Here we provide an overview of Wnt-regulated signalling cascades and highlight recent advances. We focus on new findings regarding the dedicated Wnt production and secretion pathway with potential therapeutic targets that might be beneficial for patients with Wnt-related diseases. PMID:25208913

  8. The small GTPase Cdc42 interacts with Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) and controls its movement from endocytic recycling compartment to plasma membrane in a cholesterol-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chang; Li, Na; Chen, Zheng-Jun; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang

    2011-10-14

    Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) is a multi-transmembrane protein that mediates the absorption of dietary and biliary cholesterol through vesicular endocytosis. The subcellular localization of NPC1L1 is regulated by cholesterol. Cholesterol depletion induces the transport of NPC1L1 to plasma membrane (PM) from endocytic recycling compartment that requires MyoVb·Rab11a·Rab11-FIP2 triple complex, and cholesterol-replenishment renders the internalization of NPC1L1 together with cholesterol. Here, we find that GTP-bound Cdc42 interacts with NPC1L1. Cholesterol depletion regulates the activation of Cdc42 and enhances NPC1L1-Cdc42 interaction. Overexpression of constitutive GTP-bound Cdc42 mutant form or knockdown of Cdc42 inhibits the transport of NPC1L1 to the PM and disturbs the cholesterol-regulated binding of NPC1L1 to Rab11a, MyoVb, and actin. Knockdown of Cdc42 downstream effectors N-WASP or Arp3 also leads to the similar results. In liver-specific Cdc42 knock-out (Cdc42 LKO) mice, NPC1L1 fails to localize to bile canaliculi, and the biliary cholesterol cannot be efficiently reabsorbed. These results indicate that Cdc42 controls the cholesterol-regulated transport and localization of NPC1L1, and plays a role in cholesterol absorption.

  9. The Small GTPase Cdc42 Interacts with Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) and Controls Its Movement from Endocytic Recycling Compartment to Plasma Membrane in a Cholesterol-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chang; Li, Na; Chen, Zheng-Jun; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang

    2011-01-01

    Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) is a multi-transmembrane protein that mediates the absorption of dietary and biliary cholesterol through vesicular endocytosis. The subcellular localization of NPC1L1 is regulated by cholesterol. Cholesterol depletion induces the transport of NPC1L1 to plasma membrane (PM) from endocytic recycling compartment that requires MyoVb·Rab11a·Rab11-FIP2 triple complex, and cholesterol-replenishment renders the internalization of NPC1L1 together with cholesterol. Here, we find that GTP-bound Cdc42 interacts with NPC1L1. Cholesterol depletion regulates the activation of Cdc42 and enhances NPC1L1-Cdc42 interaction. Overexpression of constitutive GTP-bound Cdc42 mutant form or knockdown of Cdc42 inhibits the transport of NPC1L1 to the PM and disturbs the cholesterol-regulated binding of NPC1L1 to Rab11a, MyoVb, and actin. Knockdown of Cdc42 downstream effectors N-WASP or Arp3 also leads to the similar results. In liver-specific Cdc42 knock-out (Cdc42 LKO) mice, NPC1L1 fails to localize to bile canaliculi, and the biliary cholesterol cannot be efficiently reabsorbed. These results indicate that Cdc42 controls the cholesterol-regulated transport and localization of NPC1L1, and plays a role in cholesterol absorption. PMID:21844200

  10. Phosphorylation of the Deubiquitinase USP20 by Protein Kinase A Regulates Post-endocytic Trafficking of β2 Adrenergic Receptors to Autophagosomes during Physiological Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Kommaddi, Reddy Peera; Jean-Charles, Pierre-Yves; Shenoy, Sudha K.

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitination by the E3 ligase Nedd4 and deubiquitination by the deubiquitinases USP20 and USP33 have been shown to regulate the lysosomal trafficking and recycling of agonist-activated β2 adrenergic receptors (β2ARs). In this work, we demonstrate that, in cells subjected to physiological stress by nutrient starvation, agonist-activated ubiquitinated β2ARs traffic to autophagosomes to colocalize with the autophagy marker protein LC3-II. Furthermore, this trafficking is synchronized by dynamic posttranslational modifications of USP20 that, in turn, are induced in a β2AR-dependent manner. Upon β2AR activation, a specific isoform of the second messenger cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKAα) rapidly phosphorylates USP20 on serine 333 located in its unique insertion domain. This phosphorylation of USP20 correlates with a characteristic SDS-PAGE mobility shift of the protein, blocks its deubiquitinase activity, promotes its dissociation from the activated β2AR complex, and facilitates trafficking of the ubiquitinated β2AR to autophagosomes, which fuse with lysosomes to form autolysosomes where receptors are degraded. Dephosphorylation of USP20 has reciprocal effects and blocks trafficking of the β2AR to autophagosomes while promoting plasma membrane recycling of internalized β2ARs. Our findings reveal a dynamic regulation of USP20 by site-specific phosphorylation as well as the interdependence of signal transduction and trafficking pathways in balancing adrenergic stimulation and maintaining cellular homeostasis. PMID:25666616

  11. Molecular Basis for the Sorting of the SNARE VAMP7 into Endocytic Clathrin-Coated Vesicles by the ArfGAP Hrb

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, Paul R.; Jackson, Lauren; Gray, Sally R.; Edeling, Melissa A.; Thompson, Amanda; Sanderson, Christopher M.; Evans, Philip R.; Owen, David J.; Luzio, J. Paul

    2008-01-01

    Summary SNAREs provide the specificity and energy for the fusion of vesicles with their target membrane, but how they are sorted into the appropriate vesicles on post-Golgi trafficking pathways is largely unknown. We demonstrate that the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of the SNARE VAMP7 is directly mediated by Hrb, a clathrin adaptor and ArfGAP. Hrb wraps 20 residues of its unstructured C-terminal tail around the folded VAMP7 longin domain, demonstrating that unstructured regions of clathrin adaptors can select cargo. Disrupting this interaction by mutation of the VAMP7 longin domain or depletion of Hrb causes VAMP7 to accumulate on the cell's surface. However, the SNARE helix of VAMP7 binds back onto its longin domain, outcompeting Hrb for binding to the same groove and suggesting that Hrb-mediated endocytosis of VAMP7 occurs only when VAMP7 is incorporated into a cis-SNARE complex. These results elucidate the mechanism of retrieval of a postfusion SNARE complex in clathrin-coated vesicles. PMID:18775314

  12. Differential infectious entry of human influenza A/NWS/33 virus (H1N1) in mammalian kidney cells.

    PubMed

    De Conto, Flora; Covan, Silvia; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Orlandini, Guido; Gatti, Rita; Dettori, Giuseppe; Chezzi, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    In this report we focused our interest on the early events of the replication cycle of NWS/33 human influenza A (NWS) virus in MDCK (canine), LLC-MK2 (simian), and NSK (swine) kidney cells, with different susceptibility upon infection. We have previously demonstrated that actin organization induces restriction to viral replication during the early stages of NWS virus infection in simian kidney cells. To explore how cell endocytic mechanisms are hijacked by NWS virus and may modulate the outcome of viral infection, the effect of drugs affecting selectively the entry via clathrin-coated pits, caveolar/raft-dependent endocytosis and macropinocytosis was analyzed. Results point to critical differences in terms of internalization pathways exploited by NWS virus to enter the examined cell models. Moreover, we show that some ways of entry do not allow an effective virus internalization, depending on the cell type. Understanding how specific cell functions/components may regulate early phases of viral replication allows us to deepen our knowledge on influenza virus infection and provides new insights for anti-viral researches. PMID:20951747

  13. Insulin receptors internalize by a rapid, saturable pathway requiring receptor autophosphorylation and an intact juxtamembrane region

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The effect of receptor occupancy on insulin receptor endocytosis was examined in CHO cells expressing normal human insulin receptors (CHO/IR), autophosphorylation- and internalization-deficient receptors (CHO/IRA1018), and receptors which undergo autophosphorylation but lack a sequence required for internalization (CHO/IR delta 960). The rate of [125I]insulin internalization in CHO/IR cells at 37 degrees C was rapid at physiological concentrations, but decreased markedly in the presence of increasing unlabeled insulin (ED50 = 1-3 nM insulin, or 75,000 occupied receptors/cell). In contrast, [125I]insulin internalization by CHO/IRA1018 and CHO/IR delta 960 cells was slow and was not inhibited by unlabeled insulin. At saturating insulin concentrations, the rate of internalization by wild-type and mutant receptors was similar. Moreover, depletion of intracellular potassium, which has been shown to disrupt coated pit formation, inhibited the rapid internalization of [125I]insulin at physiological insulin concentrations by CHO/IR cells, but had little or no effect on [125I]insulin uptake by CHO/IR delta 960 and CHO/IRA1018 cells or wild-type cells at high insulin concentrations. These data suggest that the insulin-stimulated entry of the insulin receptor into a rapid, coated pit-mediated internalization pathway is saturable and requires receptor autophosphorylation and an intact juxtamembrane region. Furthermore, CHO cells also contain a constitutive nonsaturable pathway which does not require receptor autophosphorylation or an intact juxtamembrane region; this second pathway is unaffected by depletion of intracellular potassium, and therefore may be independent of coated pits. Our data suggest that the ligand-stimulated internalization of the insulin receptor may require specific saturable interactions between the receptor and components of the endocytic system. PMID:1757462

  14. Pathways to chromothripsis.

    PubMed

    Ivkov, Robert; Bunz, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Chromothripsis is a recently recognized mode of genetic instability that generates chromosomes with strikingly large numbers of segmental re-arrangements. While the characterization of these derivative chromosomes has provided new insights into the processes by which cancer genomes can evolve, the underlying signaling events and molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In medulloblastomas, chromothripsis has been observed to occur in the context of mutational inactivation of p53 and activation of the canonical Hedgehog (Hh) pathway. Recent studies have illuminated mechanistic links between these 2 signaling pathways, including a novel PTCH1 homolog that is regulated by p53. Here, we integrate this new pathway into a hypothetical model for the catastrophic DNA breakage that appears to trigger profound chromosomal rearrangements. PMID:26178348

  15. Clinical Pathway for Thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Villar del Moral, Jesús María; Soria Aledo, Víctor; Colina Alonso, Alberto; Flores Pastor, Benito; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, María Teresa; Ortega Serrano, Joaquín; Parra Hidalgo, Pedro; Ros López, Susana

    2015-05-01

    Clinical pathways are care plans applicable to patient care procedures that present variations in practice and a predictable clinical course. They are designed not as a substitute for clinical judgment, but rather as a means to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the procedures. This clinical pathway is the result of a collaborative work of the Sections of Endocrine Surgery and Quality Management of the Spanish Association of Surgeons. It attempts to provide a framework for standardizing the performance of thyroidectomy, the most frequently performed operation in endocrine surgery. Along with the usual documents of clinical pathways (temporary matrix, variance tracking and information sheets, assessment indicators and a satisfaction questionnaire) it includes a review of the scientific evidence around different aspects of pre, intra and postoperative management. Among others, antibiotic and antithrombotic prophylaxis, preoperative preparation in hyperthyroidism, intraoperative neuromonitoring and systems for obtaining hemostasis are included, along with management of postoperative hypocalcemia. PMID:25732107

  16. Clinical Pathway for Thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Villar del Moral, Jesús María; Soria Aledo, Víctor; Colina Alonso, Alberto; Flores Pastor, Benito; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, María Teresa; Ortega Serrano, Joaquín; Parra Hidalgo, Pedro; Ros López, Susana

    2015-05-01

    Clinical pathways are care plans applicable to patient care procedures that present variations in practice and a predictable clinical course. They are designed not as a substitute for clinical judgment, but rather as a means to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the procedures. This clinical pathway is the result of a collaborative work of the Sections of Endocrine Surgery and Quality Management of the Spanish Association of Surgeons. It attempts to provide a framework for standardizing the performance of thyroidectomy, the most frequently performed operation in endocrine surgery. Along with the usual documents of clinical pathways (temporary matrix, variance tracking and information sheets, assessment indicators and a satisfaction questionnaire) it includes a review of the scientific evidence around different aspects of pre, intra and postoperative management. Among others, antibiotic and antithrombotic prophylaxis, preoperative preparation in hyperthyroidism, intraoperative neuromonitoring and systems for obtaining hemostasis are included, along with management of postoperative hypocalcemia.

  17. Endocytosis of Ligand-Activated Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 1 Mediated by the Clathrin-Pathway.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Patrick M; Kang, Yuan-Lin; Kirchhausen, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) is one of five G protein-coupled receptors activated by the lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). Stimulation of S1PR1 by binding S1P or the synthetic agonist FTY720P results in rapid desensitization, associated in part with depletion of receptor from the cell surface. We report here combining spinning disc confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to show that rapid internalization of activated S1PR1 relies on a functional clathrin-mediated endocytic pathway. Uptake of activated S1PR1 was strongly inhibited in cells disrupted in their clathrin-mediated endocytosis by depleting clathrin or AP-2 or by treating cells with dynasore-OH. The uptake of activated S1P1R was strongly inhibited in cells lacking both β-arrestin 1 and β-arrestin 2, indicating that activated S1PR1 follows the canonical route of endocytosis for G-protein coupled receptor's (GPCR)'s.

  18. Macrophage Receptor with Collagenous Structure (MARCO) Is Processed by either Macropinocytosis or Endocytosis-Autophagy Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Seishiro; Kanno, Sanae

    2015-01-01

    The Macrophage Receptor with COllagenous structure (MARCO) protein is a plasma membrane receptor for un-opsonized or environmental particles on phagocytic cells. Here, we show that MARCO was internalized either by ruffling of plasma membrane followed by macropinocytosis or by endocytosis followed by fusion with autophagosome in CHO-K1 cells stably transfected with GFP-MARCO. The macropinocytic process generated large vesicles when the plasma membrane subsided. The endocytosis/autophagosome (amphisome) generated small fluorescent puncta which were visible in the presence of glutamine, chloroquine, bafilomycin, ammonia, and other amines. The small puncta, but not the large vesicles, co-localized with LC3B and lysosomes. The LC3-II/LC3-I ratio increased in the presence of glutamine, ammonia, and chloroquine in various cells. The small puncta trafficked between the peri-nuclear region and the distal ends of cells back and forth at rates of up to 2–3 μm/sec; tubulin, but not actin, regulated the trafficking of the small puncta. Besides phagocytosis MARCO, an adhesive plasma membrane receptor, may play a role in incorporation of various extracellular materials into the cell via both macropinocytic and endocytic pathways. PMID:26545255

  19. Antiviral Cyclic D,L-α-Peptides: Targeting a General Biochemical Pathway in Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Horne, W. Seth; Wiethoff, Christopher M.; Cui, Chunli; Wilcoxen, Keith M.; Amorin, Manuel; Ghadiri, M. Reza; Nemerow, Glen R.

    2007-01-01

    Diverse virus families have evolved to exploit the acidification of endosomal compartments to gain entry into cells. We describe a supramolecular approach for selectively targeting and inhibiting viral infections through this central biochemical pathway. Using adenovirus as a model non-enveloped virus, we have determined that an eight-residue cyclic D,L-α-peptide, selected from a directed combinatorial library, can specifically prevent the development of low pH in endocytic vesicles, arrest the escape of virions from the endosome, and abrogate adenovirus infection without an apparent adverse effect on cell viability. The likely generality of this approach against other pH-dependent viral infections is supported by the inhibition of type-A influenza virus escape from endosomes in the presence of the same peptide. Our studies suggest that self-assembling cyclic D,L-α-peptides hold considerable potential as a new rational supramolecular approach toward the design and discovery of broad-spectrum antiviral agents. PMID:15993611

  20. The Rab11 Pathway Is Required for Influenza A Virus Budding and Filament Formation▿

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Emily A.; Digard, Paul; Stuart, Amanda D.

    2010-01-01

    Influenza A virus buds through the apical plasma membrane, forming enveloped virus particles that can take the shape of pleomorphic spheres or vastly elongated filaments. For either type of virion, the factors responsible for separation of viral and cell membranes are not known. We find that cellular Rab11 (a small GTP-binding protein involved in endocytic recycling) and Rab11-family interacting protein 3 ([FIP3] which plays a role in membrane trafficking and regulation of actin dynamics) are both required to support the formation of filamentous virions, while Rab11 is additionally involved in the final budding step of spherical particles. Cells transfected with Rab11 GTP-cycling mutants or depleted of Rab11 or FIP3 content by small interfering RNA treatment lost the ability to form virus filaments. Depletion of Rab11 resulted in up to a 100-fold decrease in titer of spherical virus released from cells. Scanning electron microscopy of Rab11-depleted cells showed high densities of virus particles apparently stalled in the process of budding. Transmission electron microscopy of thin sections confirmed that Rab11 depletion resulted in significant numbers of abnormally formed virus particles that had failed to pinch off from the plasma membrane. Based on these findings, we see a clear role for a Rab11-mediated pathway in influenza virus morphogenesis and budding. PMID:20357086

  1. The Secretory Pathway Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Sreelatha, Anju; Kinch, Lisa N.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a nearly universal post-translation modification involved in a plethora of cellular events. Even though phosphorylation of extracellular proteins had been observed, the identity of the kinases that phosphorylate secreted proteins remained a mystery until recently. Advances in genome sequencing and genetic studies have paved the way for the discovery of a new class of kinases that localize within the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and the extracellular space. These novel kinases phosphorylate proteins and proteoglycans in the secretory pathway and appear to regulate various extracellular processes. Mutations in these kinases cause human disease, thus underscoring the biological importance of phosphorylation within the secretory pathway. PMID:25862977

  2. Tyrosine-based signal mediates LRP6 receptor endocytosis and desensitization of Wnt/β-catenin pathway signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Chen; Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Roth, Barbara; Bu, Guojun

    2014-10-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling orchestrates a number of critical events including cell growth, differentiation, and cell survival during development. Misregulation of this pathway leads to various human diseases, specifically cancers. Endocytosis and phosphorylation of the LDL receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6), an essential co-receptor for Wnt/β-catenin signaling, play a vital role in mediating Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction. However, its regulatory mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we define the mechanisms by which LRP6 endocytic trafficking regulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling activation. We show that LRP6 mutant with defective tyrosine-based signal in its cytoplasmic tail has an increased cell surface distribution and decreased endocytosis rate. These changes in LRP6 endocytosis coincide with an increased distribution to caveolae, increased phosphorylation, and enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We further demonstrate that treatment of Wnt3a ligands or blocking the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of LRP6 leads to a redistribution of wild-type receptor to lipid rafts. The LRP6 tyrosine mutant also exhibited an increase in signaling activation in response to Wnt3a stimulation when compared with wild-type LRP6, and this activation is suppressed when caveolae-mediated endocytosis is blocked. Our results reveal molecular mechanisms by which LRP6 endocytosis routes regulate its phosphorylation and the strength of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and have implications on how this pathway can be modulated in human diseases.

  3. Entry of aminoglycosides into renal tubular epithelial cells via endocytosis-dependent and endocytosis-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Junya; Takano, Mikihisa

    2014-08-15

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics such as gentamicin and amikacin are well recognized as a clinically important antibiotic class because of their reliable efficacy and low cost. However, the clinical use of aminoglycosides is limited by their nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. Nephrotoxicity is induced mainly due to high accumulation of the antibiotics in renal proximal tubular cells. Therefore, a lot of studies on characterization of the renal transport system for aminoglycosides so far reported involved various in-vivo and in-vitro techniques. Early studies revealed that aminoglycosides are taken up through adsorptive endocytosis in renal epithelial cells. Subsequently, it was found that megalin, a multiligand endocytic receptor abundantly expressed on the apical side of renal proximal tubular cells, can bind aminoglycosides and that megalin-mediated endocytosis plays a crucial role in renal accumulation of aminoglycosides. Therefore, megalin has been suggested to be a promising molecular target for the prevention of aminoglycoside-induced nephrotoxicity. On the other hand, recently, some reports have indicated that aminoglycosides are transported via a pathway that does not require endocytosis, such as non-selective cation channel-mediated entry, in cultured renal tubular cells as well as cochlear outer hair cells. In this commentary article, we review the cellular transport of aminoglycosides in renal epithelial cells, focusing on endocytosis-dependent and -independent pathways.

  4. AtRabF2b (Ara7) acts on the vacuolar trafficking pathway in tobacco leaf epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Kotzer, Amanda M; Brandizzi, Federica; Neumann, Ulla; Paris, Nadine; Moore, Ian; Hawes, Chris

    2004-12-15

    Rab GTPases are universal key regulators of intracellular secretory trafficking events. In particular, Rab 5 homologues have been implicated in endocytic events and in the vacuolar pathway. In this study, we investigate the location and function of a member of this family, AtRabF2b (Ara7) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaf epidermal cells using a live cell imaging approach. Fluorescent-tagged AtRabF2b[wt] localized to the prevacuolar compartment and Golgi apparatus, as determined by coexpression studies with fluorescent markers for these compartments. Mutations that impair AtRabF2b function also alter the subcellular location of the GTPase. In addition, coexpression studies of the protein with the vacuole-targeted aleurain-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and rescue experiments with wild-type AtRabF2b indicate that the dominant-negative mutant of AtRabF2b causes the vacuolar marker to be secreted to the apoplast. Our results indicate a clear role of AtRabF2b in the vacuolar trafficking pathway.

  5. Pathways to School Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Pittsburgh Office of Child Development, 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2006, the University of Pittsburgh Office of Child Development began implementing a multi-year school readiness project in several area schools. Evidence from both research and the field point to several key elements that foster school readiness and create pathways to school success for all children. This paper presents components of a…

  6. Dexter energy transfer pathways.

    PubMed

    Skourtis, Spiros S; Liu, Chaoren; Antoniou, Panayiotis; Virshup, Aaron M; Beratan, David N

    2016-07-19

    Energy transfer with an associated spin change of the donor and acceptor, Dexter energy transfer, is critically important in solar energy harvesting assemblies, damage protection schemes of photobiology, and organometallic opto-electronic materials. Dexter transfer between chemically linked donors and acceptors is bridge mediated, presenting an enticing analogy with bridge-mediated electron and hole transfer. However, Dexter coupling pathways must convey both an electron and a hole from donor to acceptor, and this adds considerable richness to the mediation process. We dissect the bridge-mediated Dexter coupling mechanisms and formulate a theory for triplet energy transfer coupling pathways. Virtual donor-acceptor charge-transfer exciton intermediates dominate at shorter distances or higher tunneling energy gaps, whereas virtual intermediates with an electron and a hole both on the bridge (virtual bridge excitons) dominate for longer distances or lower energy gaps. The effects of virtual bridge excitons were neglected in earlier treatments. The two-particle pathway framework developed here shows how Dexter energy-transfer rates depend on donor, bridge, and acceptor energetics, as well as on orbital symmetry and quantum interference among pathways.

  7. Pathways to Prosperity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symonds, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Symonds, director of the Pathways to Prosperity Project, asserts that the current U.S. system of preparing students for successful adult lives fails too many youth. Citing data showing that only 40 percent of young Americans earn an associate's or bachelor's degree by age 27--and that many employers say they see candidates who don't have…

  8. An endocytic YXXΦ (YRRF) cargo sorting motif in the cytoplasmic tail of murine cytomegalovirus AP2 'adapter adapter' protein m04/gp34 antagonizes virus evasion of natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Fink, Annette; Blaum, Franziska; Babic Cac, Marina; Ebert, Stefan; Lemmermann, Niels A W; Reddehase, Matthias J

    2015-06-01

    Viruses have evolved proteins that bind immunologically relevant cargo molecules at the cell surface for their downmodulation by internalization. Via a tyrosine-based sorting motif YXXΦ in their cytoplasmic tails, they link the bound cargo to the cellular adapter protein-2 (AP2), thereby sorting it into clathrin-triskelion-coated pits for accelerated endocytosis. Downmodulation of CD4 molecules by lentiviral protein NEF represents the most prominent example. Based on connecting cargo to cellular adapter molecules, such specialized viral proteins have been referred to as 'connectors' or 'adapter adapters.' Murine cytomegalovirus glycoprotein m04/gp34 binds stably to MHC class-I (MHC-I) molecules and suspiciously carries a canonical YXXΦ endocytosis motif YRRF in its cytoplasmic tail. Disconnection from AP2 by motif mutation ARRF should retain m04-MHC-I complexes at the cell surface and result in an enhanced silencing of natural killer (NK) cells, which recognize them via inhibitory receptors. We have tested this prediction with a recombinant virus in which the AP2 motif is selectively destroyed by point mutation Y248A, and compared this with the deletion of the complete protein in a Δm04 mutant. Phenotypes were antithetical in that loss of AP2-binding enhanced NK cell silencing, whereas absence of m04-MHC-I released them from silencing. We thus conclude that AP2-binding antagonizes NK cell silencing by enhancing endocytosis of the inhibitory ligand m04-MHC-I. Based on a screen for tyrosine-based endocytic motifs in cytoplasmic tail sequences, we propose here the new hypothesis that most proteins of the m02-m16 gene family serve as 'adapter adapters,' each selecting its specific cell surface cargo for clathrin-assisted internalization.

  9. Exocytosis of Varicella-Zoster Virus Virions Involves a Convergence of Endosomal and Autophagy Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Erin M.; Jarosinski, Keith W.; Jackson, Wallen; Carpenter, John E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is an extremely cell-associated herpesvirus with limited egress of viral particles. The induction of autophagy in VZV-infected monolayers is easily detectable; inhibition of autophagy leads to decreased VZV glycoprotein biosynthesis and diminished viral titers. To explain how autophagic flux could exert a proviral effect on the VZV infectious cycle, we postulated that the VZV exocytosis pathway following secondary envelopment may converge with the autophagy pathway. This hypothesis depended on known similarities between VZV gE and autophagy-related (Atg) Atg9/Atg16L1 trafficking pathways. Investigations were carried out with highly purified fractions of VZV virions. When the virion fraction was tested for the presence of autophagy and endosomal proteins, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain (MAP1LC3B) and Ras-like GTPase 11 (Rab11) were detected. By two-dimensional (2D) and 3D imaging after immunolabeling, both proteins also colocalized with VZV gE in a proportion of cytoplasmic vesicles. When purified VZV virions were enumerated after immunoelectron microscopy, gold beads were detected on viruses following incubation with antibodies to VZV gE (∼100%), Rab11 (50%), and LC3B (30%). Examination of numerous electron micrographs demonstrated that enveloped virions were housed in single-membraned vesicles; viral particles were not observed in autophagosomes. Taken together, our data suggested that some viral particles after secondary envelopment accumulated in a heterogeneous population of single-membraned vesicular compartments, which were decorated with components from both the endocytic pathway (Rab11) and the autophagy pathway (LC3B). The latter cytoplasmic viral vesicles resembled an amphisome. IMPORTANCE VZV infection leads to increased autophagic flux, while inhibition of autophagy leads to a marked reduction in virus spread. In this investigation of the proviral role of autophagy, we found evidence for an

  10. siRNA screen of the human signaling proteome identifies the PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-mTOR signaling pathway as a primary regulator of transferrin uptake

    PubMed Central

    Galvez, Thierry; Teruel, Mary N; Heo, Won Do; Jones, Joshua T; Kim, Man Lyang; Liou, Jen; Myers, Jason W; Meyer, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    Background Iron uptake via endocytosis of iron-transferrin-transferrin receptor complexes is a rate-limiting step for cell growth, viability and proliferation in tumor cells as well as non-transformed cells such as activated lymphocytes. Signaling pathways that regulate transferrin uptake have not yet been identified. Results We surveyed the human signaling proteome for regulators that increase or decrease transferrin uptake by screening 1,804 dicer-generated signaling small interfering RNAs using automated quantitative imaging. In addition to known transport proteins, we identified 11 signaling proteins that included a striking signature set for the phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3)-target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. We show that the PI3K-mTOR signaling pathway is a positive regulator of transferrin uptake that increases the number of transferrin receptors per endocytic vesicle without affecting endocytosis or recycling rates. Conclusion Our study identifies the PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-mTOR signaling pathway as a new regulator of iron-transferrin uptake and serves as a proof-of-concept that targeted RNA interference screens of the signaling proteome provide a powerful and unbiased approach to discover or rank signaling pathways that regulate a particular cell function. PMID:17640392

  11. Endothelial Cell-Surface Gp60 Activates Vesicle Formation and Trafficking via Gi-Coupled Src Kinase Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Minshall, Richard D.; Tiruppathi, Chinnaswamy; Vogel, Stephen M.; Niles, Walter D.; Gilchrist, Annette; Hamm, Heidi E.; Malik, Asrar B.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the albumin-docking protein gp60, which is localized in caveolae, couples to the heterotrimeric GTP binding protein Gi, and thereby activates plasmalemmal vesicle formation and the directed migration of vesicles in endothelial cells (ECs). We used the water-soluble styryl pyridinium dye N-(3-triethylaminopropyl)-4-(p-dibutylaminostyryl) pyridinium dibromide (FM 1-43) to quantify vesicle trafficking by confocal and digital fluorescence microscopy. FM 1-43 and fluorescently labeled anti-gp60 antibody (Ab) were colocalized in endocytic vesicles within 5 min of gp60 activation. Vesicles migrated to the basolateral surface where they released FM 1-43, the fluid phase styryl probe. FM 1-43 fluorescence disappeared from the basolateral EC surface without the loss of anti-gp60 Ab fluorescence. Activation of cell-surface gp60 by cross-linking (using anti-gp60 Ab and secondary Ab) in EC grown on microporous filters increased transendothelial 125I-albumin permeability without altering liquid permeability (hydraulic conductivity), thus, indicating the dissociation of hydraulic conductivity from the albumin permeability pathway. The findings that the sterol-binding agent, filipin, prevented gp60-activated vesicle formation and that caveolin-1 and gp60 were colocalized in vesicles suggest the caveolar origin of endocytic vesicles. Pertussis toxin pretreatment and expression of the dominant negative construct encoding an 11–amino acid Gαi carboxyl-terminal peptide inhibited endothelial 125I-albumin endocytosis and vesicle formation induced by gp60 activation. Expression of dominant negative Src (dn-Src) and overexpression of wild-type caveolin-1 also prevented gp60-activated endocytosis. Caveolin-1 overexpression resulted in the sequestration of Gαi with the caveolin-1, whereas dn-Src inhibited Gαi binding to caveolin-1. Thus, vesicle formation induced by gp60 and migration of vesicles to the basolateral membrane requires the interaction of gp60

  12. AIP Career Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchak, Amanda

    2012-02-01

    American Institute of Physics (AIP) Career Pathways is a new project funded by the National Science Foundation. One of the goals of AIP Career Pathways is to prepare students to compete for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) careers with a bachelor's degree in physics. In order to do so, I reviewed and compiled useful resources on finding a STEM career with a bachelor's degree in physics. These resources not only supply the job seeker with job postings in STEM careers but also provide them with information on resumes, interviewing skills, and networking. Recently at the 2011 Industrial Physics Forum, I interviewed companies in the private sector to obtain a unique perspective on what types of skills potential employers expect an applicant to posses with a bachelor's degree in physics. Ultimately, these components will be used as supplements at student career workshops held at annual Society of Physics Students Zone Meetings.

  13. Molecular pathways in dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Bragg, D. Cristopher; Armata, Ioanna A.; Nery, Flavia C.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Sharma, Nutan

    2011-01-01

    The hereditary dystonias comprise a set of diseases defined by a common constellation of motor deficits. These disorders are most likely associated with different molecular etiologies, many of which have yet to be elucidated. Here we discuss recent advances in three forms of hereditary dystonia, DYT1, DYT6 and DYT16, which share a similar clinical picture: onset in childhood or adolescence, progressive spread of symptoms with generalized involvement of body regions and a steady state affliction without treatment. Unlike DYT1, the genes responsible for DYT6 and DYT16 have only recently been identified, with relatively little information about the function of the encoded proteins. Nevertheless, recent data suggest that these proteins may fit together within interacting pathways involved in dopaminergic signaling, transcriptional regulation, and cellular stress responses. This review focuses on these molecular pathways, highlighting potential common themes among these dystonias which may serve as areas for future research. PMID:21134457

  14. Pathways of tau fibrillization.

    PubMed

    Kuret, Jeff; Chirita, Carmen N; Congdon, Erin E; Kannanayakal, Theresa; Li, Guibin; Necula, Mihaela; Yin, Haishan; Zhong, Qi

    2005-01-01

    New methods for analyzing tau fibrillization have yielded insights into the biochemical transitions involved in the process. Here we review the parallels between the sequential progression of tau fibrillization observed macroscopically in Alzheimer's disease (AD) lesions and the pathway of tau aggregation observed in vitro with purified tau preparations. In addition, pharmacological agents for further dissection of fibrillization mechanism and lesion formation are discussed. PMID:15615636

  15. Physiology of central pathways.

    PubMed

    Cullen, K E

    2016-01-01

    The relative simplicity of the neural circuits that mediate vestibular reflexes is well suited for linking systems and cellular levels of analyses. Notably, a distinctive feature of the vestibular system is that neurons at the first central stage of sensory processing in the vestibular nuclei are premotor neurons; the same neurons that receive vestibular-nerve input also send direct projections to motor pathways. For example, the simplicity of the three-neuron pathway that mediates the vestibulo-ocular reflex leads to the generation of compensatory eye movements within ~5ms of a head movement. Similarly, relatively direct pathways between the labyrinth and spinal cord control vestibulospinal reflexes. A second distinctive feature of the vestibular system is that the first stage of central processing is strongly multimodal. This is because the vestibular nuclei receive inputs from a wide range of cortical, cerebellar, and other brainstem structures in addition to direct inputs from the vestibular nerve. Recent studies in alert animals have established how extravestibular signals shape these "simple" reflexes to meet the needs of current behavioral goal. Moreover, multimodal interactions at higher levels, such as the vestibular cerebellum, thalamus, and cortex, play a vital role in ensuring accurate self-motion and spatial orientation perception. PMID:27638060

  16. An early secretory pathway mediated by GNOM-LIKE 1 and GNOM is essential for basal polarity establishment in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Siamsa M; Haeger, Ash; Vain, Thomas; Rigal, Adeline; Viotti, Corrado; Łangowska, Małgorzata; Ma, Qian; Friml, Jiří; Raikhel, Natasha V; Hicks, Glenn R; Robert, Stéphanie

    2015-02-17

    Spatial regulation of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, or auxin) is essential for plant development. Auxin gradient establishment is mediated by polarly localized auxin transporters, including PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins. Their localization and abundance at the plasma membrane are tightly regulated by endomembrane machinery, especially the endocytic and recycling pathways mediated by the ADP ribosylation factor guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ARF-GEF) GNOM. We assessed the role of the early secretory pathway in establishing PIN1 polarity in Arabidopsis thaliana by pharmacological and genetic approaches. We identified the compound endosidin 8 (ES8), which selectively interferes with PIN1 basal polarity without altering the polarity of apical proteins. ES8 alters the auxin distribution pattern in the root and induces a strong developmental phenotype, including reduced root length. The ARF-GEF-defective mutants gnom-like 1 (gnl1-1) and gnom (van7) are significantly resistant to ES8. The compound does not affect recycling or vacuolar trafficking of PIN1 but leads to its intracellular accumulation, resulting in loss of PIN1 basal polarity at the plasma membrane. Our data confirm a role for GNOM in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi trafficking and reveal that a GNL1/GNOM-mediated early secretory pathway selectively regulates PIN1 basal polarity establishment in a manner essential for normal plant development.

  17. An early secretory pathway mediated by GNOM-LIKE 1 and GNOM is essential for basal polarity establishment in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Siamsa M.; Haeger, Ash; Vain, Thomas; Rigal, Adeline; Viotti, Corrado; Łangowska, Małgorzata; Ma, Qian; Friml, Jiří; Raikhel, Natasha V.; Hicks, Glenn R.; Robert, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Spatial regulation of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, or auxin) is essential for plant development. Auxin gradient establishment is mediated by polarly localized auxin transporters, including PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins. Their localization and abundance at the plasma membrane are tightly regulated by endomembrane machinery, especially the endocytic and recycling pathways mediated by the ADP ribosylation factor guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ARF-GEF) GNOM. We assessed the role of the early secretory pathway in establishing PIN1 polarity in Arabidopsis thaliana by pharmacological and genetic approaches. We identified the compound endosidin 8 (ES8), which selectively interferes with PIN1 basal polarity without altering the polarity of apical proteins. ES8 alters the auxin distribution pattern in the root and induces a strong developmental phenotype, including reduced root length. The ARF-GEF–defective mutants gnom-like 1 (gnl1-1) and gnom (van7) are significantly resistant to ES8. The compound does not affect recycling or vacuolar trafficking of PIN1 but leads to its intracellular accumulation, resulting in loss of PIN1 basal polarity at the plasma membrane. Our data confirm a role for GNOM in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–Golgi trafficking and reveal that a GNL1/GNOM-mediated early secretory pathway selectively regulates PIN1 basal polarity establishment in a manner essential for normal plant development. PMID:25646449

  18. Pathway and Resource Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, M. F.

    2009-11-16

    This presentation provides information about hydrogen pathway analysis, which is analysis of the total levelized cost (including return on investment). Well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use, and WTW emissions for hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

  19. Modulation of the Surface Proteome through Multiple Ubiquitylation Pathways in African Trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Zoltner, Martin; Leung, Ka Fai; Alsford, Sam; Horn, David; Field, Mark C

    2015-10-01

    Recently we identified multiple suramin-sensitivity genes with a genome wide screen in Trypanosoma brucei that includes the invariant surface glycoprotein ISG75, the adaptin-1 (AP-1) complex and two deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) orthologous to ScUbp15/HsHAUSP1 and pVHL-interacting DUB1 (type I), designated TbUsp7 and TbVdu1, respectively. Here we have examined the roles of these genes in trafficking of ISG75, which appears key to suramin uptake. We found that, while AP-1 does not influence ISG75 abundance, knockdown of TbUsp7 or TbVdu1 leads to reduced ISG75 abundance. Silencing TbVdu1 also reduced ISG65 abundance. TbVdu1 is a component of an evolutionarily conserved ubiquitylation switch and responsible for rapid receptor modulation, suggesting similar regulation of ISGs in T. brucei. Unexpectedly, TbUsp7 knockdown also blocked endocytosis. To integrate these observations we analysed the impact of TbUsp7 and TbVdu1 knockdown on the global proteome using SILAC. For TbVdu1, ISG65 and ISG75 are the only significantly modulated proteins, but for TbUsp7 a cohort of integral membrane proteins, including the acid phosphatase MBAP1, that is required for endocytosis, and additional ISG-related proteins are down-regulated. Furthermore, we find increased expression of the ESAG6/7 transferrin receptor and ESAG5, likely resulting from decreased endocytic activity. Therefore, multiple ubiquitylation pathways, with a complex interplay with trafficking pathways, control surface proteome expression in trypanosomes. PMID:26492041

  20. Modulation of the Surface Proteome through Multiple Ubiquitylation Pathways in African Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Alsford, Sam; Horn, David; Field, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Recently we identified multiple suramin-sensitivity genes with a genome wide screen in Trypanosoma brucei that includes the invariant surface glycoprotein ISG75, the adaptin-1 (AP-1) complex and two deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) orthologous to ScUbp15/HsHAUSP1 and pVHL-interacting DUB1 (type I), designated TbUsp7 and TbVdu1, respectively. Here we have examined the roles of these genes in trafficking of ISG75, which appears key to suramin uptake. We found that, while AP-1 does not influence ISG75 abundance, knockdown of TbUsp7 or TbVdu1 leads to reduced ISG75 abundance. Silencing TbVdu1 also reduced ISG65 abundance. TbVdu1 is a component of an evolutionarily conserved ubiquitylation switch and responsible for rapid receptor modulation, suggesting similar regulation of ISGs in T. brucei. Unexpectedly, TbUsp7 knockdown also blocked endocytosis. To integrate these observations we analysed the impact of TbUsp7 and TbVdu1 knockdown on the global proteome using SILAC. For TbVdu1, ISG65 and ISG75 are the only significantly modulated proteins, but for TbUsp7 a cohort of integral membrane proteins, including the acid phosphatase MBAP1, that is required for endocytosis, and additional ISG-related proteins are down-regulated. Furthermore, we find increased expression of the ESAG6/7 transferrin receptor and ESAG5, likely resulting from decreased endocytic activity. Therefore, multiple ubiquitylation pathways, with a complex interplay with trafficking pathways, control surface proteome expression in trypanosomes. PMID:26492041

  1. Glypican-1 regulates myoblast response to HGF via Met in a lipid raft-dependent mechanism: effect on migration of skeletal muscle precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Via the hepatocyte growth factor receptor (Met), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) exerts key roles involving skeletal muscle development and regeneration. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are critical modulators of HGF activity, but the role of specific HSPGs in HGF regulation is poorly understood. Glypican-1 is the only HSPG expressed in myoblasts that localize in lipid raft membrane domains, controlling cell responses to extracellular stimuli. We determined if glypican-1 in these domains is necessary to stabilize the HGF-Met signaling complex and myoblast response to HGF. Methods C2C12 myoblasts and a derived clone (C6) with low glypican-1 expression were used as an experimental model. The activation of Met, ERK1/2 and AKT in response to HGF was evaluated. The distribution of Met and its activated form in lipid raft domains, as well as its dependence on glypican-1, were characterized by sucrose density gradient fractionation in both cell types. Rescue experiments reexpressing glypican-1 or a chimeric glypican-1 fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of mouse syndecan-1 or myoblast pretreatment with MβCD were conducted. In vitro and in vivo myoblast migration assays in response to HGF were also performed. Results Glypican-1 localization in membrane raft domains was required for a maximum cell response to HGF. It stabilized Met and HGF in lipid raft domains, forming a signaling complex where the active phospho-Met receptor was concentrated. Glypican-1 also stabilized CD44 in a HGF-dependent manner. In addition, glypican-1 was required for in vitro and in vivo HGF-dependent myoblast migration. Conclusions Glypican-1 is a regulator of HGF-dependent signaling via Met in lipid raft domains. PMID:24517345

  2. Carbon nanoparticles induce ceramide- and lipid raft-dependent signalling in lung epithelial cells: a target for a preventive strategy against environmentally-induced lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Particulate air pollution in lung epithelial cells induces pathogenic endpoints like proliferation, apoptosis, and pro-inflammatory reactions. The activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a key event responsible for signalling events involving mitogen activated protein kinases specific for these endpoints. The molecular events leading to receptor activation however are not well understood. These events are relevant for the toxicological evaluation of inhalable particles as well as for potential preventive strategies in situations when particulate air pollution cannot be avoided. The current study therefore had the objective to elucidate membrane-coupled events leading to EGFR activation and the subsequent signalling cascade in lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, we aimed to identify the molecular target of ectoine, a biophysical active substance which we described to prevent carbon nanoparticle-induced lung inflammation. Methods Membrane signalling events were investigated in isolated lipid rafts from lung epithelial cells with regard to lipid and protein content of the signalling platforms. Using positive and negative intervention approaches, lipid raft changes, subsequent signalling events, and lung inflammation were investigated in vitro in lung epithelial cells (RLE-6TN) and in vivo in exposed animals. Results Carbon nanoparticle treatment specifically led to an accumulation of ceramides in lipid rafts. Detailed analyses demonstrated a causal link of ceramides and subsequent EGFR activation coupled with a loss of the receptor in the lipid raft fractions. In vitro and in vivo investigations demonstrate the relevance of these events for carbon nanoparticle-induced lung inflammation. Moreover, the compatible solute ectoine was able to prevent ceramide-mediated EGFR phosphorylation and subsequent signalling as well as lung inflammation in vivo. Conclusion The data identify a so far unknown event in pro-inflammatory signalling and contribute to the understanding of particle cell interaction and therefore to risk identification and risk assessment of inhalable xenobiotics. Moreover, as this cellular reaction can be prevented by the well tolerated substance ectoine, a molecular preventive strategy for susceptible persons against airway inflammation is proposed. PMID:23228165

  3. Pathways with PathWhiz

    PubMed Central

    Pon, Allison; Jewison, Timothy; Su, Yilu; Liang, Yongjie; Knox, Craig; Maciejewski, Adam; Wilson, Michael; Wishart, David S.

    2015-01-01

    PathWhiz (http://smpdb.ca/pathwhiz) is a web server designed to create colourful, visually pleasing and biologically accurate pathway diagrams that are both machine-readable and interactive. As a web server, PathWhiz is accessible from almost any place and compatible with essentially any operating system. It also houses a public library of pathways and pathway components that can be easily viewed and expanded upon by its users. PathWhiz allows users to readily generate biologically complex pathways by using a specially designed drawing palette to quickly render metabolites (including automated structure generation), proteins (including quaternary structures, covalent modifications and cofactors), nucleic acids, membranes, subcellular structures, cells, tissues and organs. Both small-molecule and protein/gene pathways can be constructed by combining multiple pathway processes such as reactions, interactions, binding events and transport activities. PathWhiz's pathway replication and propagation functions allow for existing pathways to be used to create new pathways or for existing pathways to be automatically propagated across species. PathWhiz pathways can be saved in BioPAX, SBGN-ML and SBML data exchange formats, as well as PNG, PWML, HTML image map or SVG images that can be viewed offline or explored using PathWhiz's interactive viewer. PathWhiz has been used to generate over 700 pathway diagrams for a number of popular databases including HMDB, DrugBank and SMPDB. PMID:25934797

  4. Career pathways in research: pharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Kenkre, J E; Foxcroft, D R

    The pharmaceutical pathway is the final article in this series on career pathways and highlights opportunities for nurses within associated industries. This pathway shows that nurses can use their nursing qualifications, combined with their knowledge, skills and expertise, to develop a career within another sphere of employment.

  5. Improving carbon fixation pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Ducat, DC; Silver, PA

    2012-08-01

    A recent resurgence in basic and applied research on photosynthesis has been driven in part by recognition that fulfilling future food and energy requirements will necessitate improvements in crop carbon-fixation efficiencies. Photosynthesis in traditional terrestrial crops is being reexamined in light of molecular strategies employed by photosynthetic microbes to enhance the activity of the Calvin cycle. Synthetic biology is well-situated to provide original approaches for compartmentalizing and enhancing photosynthetic reactions in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the elucidation of alternative carbon-fixation routes distinct from the Calvin cycle raises possibilities that novel pathways and organisms can be utilized to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide into useful materials.

  6. Developmental pathways in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Fred E.; Angus, C. William; Partis, William J.; Sigounas, George

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of cancer is reactivation/alteration of pathways that control cellular differentiation during developmental processes. Evidence indicates that WNT, Notch, BMP and Hedgehog pathways have a role in normal epithelial cell differentiation, and that alterations in these pathways accompany establishment of the tumorigenic state. Interestingly, there is recent evidence that these pathways are intertwined at the molecular level, and these nodes of intersection may provide opportunities for effective targeted therapies. This review will highlight the role of the WNT, Notch, BMP and Hedgehog pathways in colon cancer. PMID:23032367

  7. Cultural pathways through universal development.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Patricia M; Keller, Heidi; Fuligni, Andrew; Maynard, Ashley

    2003-01-01

    We focus our review on three universal tasks of human development: relationship formation, knowledge acquisition, and the balance between autonomy and relatedness at adolescence. We present evidence that each task can be addressed through two deeply different cultural pathways through development: the pathways of independence and interdependence. Whereas core theories in developmental psychology are universalistic in their intentions, they in fact presuppose the independent pathway of development. Because the independent pathway is therefore well-known in psychology, we focus a large part of our review on empirically documenting the alternative, interdependent pathway for each developmental task. We also present three theoretical approaches to culture and development: the ecocultural, the sociohistorical, and the cultural values approach. We argue that an understanding of cultural pathways through human development requires all three approaches. We review evidence linking values (cultural values approach), ecological conditions (ecocultural approach), and socialization practices (sociohistorical approach) to cultural pathways through universal developmental tasks. PMID:12415076

  8. WikiPathways: capturing the full diversity of pathway knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Kutmon, Martina; Riutta, Anders; Nunes, Nuno; Hanspers, Kristina; Willighagen, Egon L.; Bohler, Anwesha; Mélius, Jonathan; Waagmeester, Andra; Sinha, Sravanthi R.; Miller, Ryan; Coort, Susan L.; Cirillo, Elisa; Smeets, Bart; Evelo, Chris T.; Pico, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    WikiPathways (http://www.wikipathways.org) is an open, collaborative platform for capturing and disseminating models of biological pathways for data visualization and analysis. Since our last NAR update, 4 years ago, WikiPathways has experienced massive growth in content, which continues to be contributed by hundreds of individuals each year. New aspects of the diversity and depth of the collected pathways are described from the perspective of researchers interested in using pathway information in their studies. We provide updates on extensions and services to support pathway analysis and visualization via popular standalone tools, i.e. PathVisio and Cytoscape, web applications and common programming environments. We introduce the Quick Edit feature for pathway authors and curators, in addition to new means of publishing pathways and maintaining custom pathway collections to serve specific research topics and communities. In addition to the latest milestones in our pathway collection and curation effort, we also highlight the latest means to access the content as publishable figures, as standard data files, and as linked data, including bulk and programmatic access. PMID:26481357

  9. Signaling Pathways in Melanogenesis

    PubMed Central

    D’Mello, Stacey A. N.; Finlay, Graeme J.; Baguley, Bruce C.; Askarian-Amiri, Marjan E.

    2016-01-01

    Melanocytes are melanin-producing cells found in skin, hair follicles, eyes, inner ear, bones, heart and brain of humans. They arise from pluripotent neural crest cells and differentiate in response to a complex network of interacting regulatory pathways. Melanins are pigment molecules that are endogenously synthesized by melanocytes. The light absorption of melanin in skin and hair leads to photoreceptor shielding, thermoregulation, photoprotection, camouflage and display coloring. Melanins are also powerful cation chelators and may act as free radical sinks. Melanin formation is a product of complex biochemical events that starts from amino acid tyrosine and its metabolite, dopa. The types and amounts of melanin produced by melanocytes are determined genetically and are influenced by a variety of extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as hormonal changes, inflammation, age and exposure to UV light. These stimuli affect the different pathways in melanogenesis. In this review we will discuss the regulatory mechanisms involved in melanogenesis and explain how intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulate melanin production. We will also explain the regulatory roles of different proteins involved in melanogenesis. PMID:27428965

  10. Signaling Pathways in Melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Stacey A N; Finlay, Graeme J; Baguley, Bruce C; Askarian-Amiri, Marjan E

    2016-01-01

    Melanocytes are melanin-producing cells found in skin, hair follicles, eyes, inner ear, bones, heart and brain of humans. They arise from pluripotent neural crest cells and differentiate in response to a complex network of interacting regulatory pathways. Melanins are pigment molecules that are endogenously synthesized by melanocytes. The light absorption of melanin in skin and hair leads to photoreceptor shielding, thermoregulation, photoprotection, camouflage and display coloring. Melanins are also powerful cation chelators and may act as free radical sinks. Melanin formation is a product of complex biochemical events that starts from amino acid tyrosine and its metabolite, dopa. The types and amounts of melanin produced by melanocytes are determined genetically and are influenced by a variety of extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as hormonal changes, inflammation, age and exposure to UV light. These stimuli affect the different pathways in melanogenesis. In this review we will discuss the regulatory mechanisms involved in melanogenesis and explain how intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulate melanin production. We will also explain the regulatory roles of different proteins involved in melanogenesis. PMID:27428965

  11. The Reactome pathway Knowledgebase

    PubMed Central

    Fabregat, Antonio; Sidiropoulos, Konstantinos; Garapati, Phani; Gillespie, Marc; Hausmann, Kerstin; Haw, Robin; Jassal, Bijay; Jupe, Steven; Korninger, Florian; McKay, Sheldon; Matthews, Lisa; May, Bruce; Milacic, Marija; Rothfels, Karen; Shamovsky, Veronica; Webber, Marissa; Weiser, Joel; Williams, Mark; Wu, Guanming; Stein, Lincoln; Hermjakob, Henning; D'Eustachio, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Reactome Knowledgebase (www.reactome.org) provides molecular details of signal transduction, transport, DNA replication, metabolism and other cellular processes as an ordered network of molecular transformations—an extended version of a classic metabolic map, in a single consistent data model. Reactome functions both as an archive of biological processes and as a tool for discovering unexpected functional relationships in data such as gene expression pattern surveys or somatic mutation catalogues from tumour cells. Over the last two years we redeveloped major components of the Reactome web interface to improve usability, responsiveness and data visualization. A new pathway diagram viewer provides a faster, clearer interface and smooth zooming from the entire reaction network to the details of individual reactions. Tool performance for analysis of user datasets has been substantially improved, now generating detailed results for genome-wide expression datasets within seconds. The analysis module can now be accessed through a RESTFul interface, facilitating its inclusion in third party applications. A new overview module allows the visualization of analysis results on a genome-wide Reactome pathway hierarchy using a single screen page. The search interface now provides auto-completion as well as a faceted search to narrow result lists efficiently. PMID:26656494

  12. AIP's Career Pathways Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Jose

    2014-03-01

    The American Institute of Physics (AIP) Career Pathways Project, funded by the National Science Foundation, aims to increase the number of undergraduates going into STEM careers. The main purposes of this project are to show students the professional opportunities for a STEM career, understand what departments can do to better prepare physics bachelor's degree recipients to enter the workforce, understand what students can do to better prepare themselves, and develop resources based on these findings. I was chosen by the Society of Physics Students (SPS) to be the 2013 summer intern of the AIP's Career Pathways Project. In this talk I will discuss several resources I worked on with the Statistical Research Center of the American Institute of Physics and SPS. These resources include how to write a resume and cover letter, how to perform an informational interview, common job titles for physics bachelors, how to find career information in physics and STEM, how to search and use job postings, and how to network.

  13. Endocytic internalization of nanoparticles into polymeric vesicles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, Anja; Jaskiewicz, Karmena; Larsen, Antje; Fytas, George

    2011-03-01

    The monitoring of transport through cell membranes is essential for proper functioning of all living organisms. Poorly understood mechanisms of endocytosis have become the focus of intense investigations. Here we present a photon correlation spectroscopy study of the uptake of polystyrene nanoparticles (hydrodynamic radius, Rh = 16nm) by poly(dimethylsiloxane)-b-poly(2-methyloxazoline) polymersomes (Rh = 150nm) in aqueous solution. The relaxation function C(q,t) for a particle/polymersome mixture with a molar ratio 100:1 at different scattering wave vectors (q) reveal the presence of free and bound particles. Both the experimental form factor P(q) and the effective diffusion coefficient D(q) of the polymersome in the q-range of 0.005- 0.033 nm -1 are consistently described by modeling these q-patterns by a filled polymersome with about 30 particles under the examined conditions. The emerged picture is supported by cryo-TEM imaging.

  14. Pathways of Antigen Processing

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Janice S.; Wearsch, Pamela A.; Cresswell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    T cell recognition of antigen presenting cells depends on their expression of a spectrum of peptides bound to Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) and class II (MHC-II) molecules. Conversion of antigens from pathogens or transformed cells into MHC-I and MHC-II-bound peptides is critical for mounting protective T cell responses, and similar processing of self proteins is necessary to establish and maintain tolerance. Cells use a variety of mechanisms to acquire protein antigens, from translation in the cytosol to variations on the theme of endocytosis, and to degrade them once acquired. In this review we highlight the aspects of MHC-I and MHC-II biosynthesis and assembly that have evolved to intersect these pathways and sample the peptides that are produced. PMID:23298205

  15. Summer 2014 Pathways Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hand, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    Over the summer I had the exciting opportunity to work for NASA at the Kennedy Space Center as a Mission Assurance Engineering intern. When I was offered a position in mission assurance for the Safety and Mission Assurance directorate's Launch Services Division, I didn't really know what I would be doing, but I knew it would be an excellent opportunity to learn and grow professionally. In this report I will provide some background information on the Launch Services Division, as well as detail my duties and accomplishments during my time as an intern. Additionally, I will relate the significance of my work experience to my current academic work and future career goals. This report contains background information on Mission Assurance Engineering, a description of my duties and accomplishments over the summer of 2014, and relates the significance of my work experience to my school work and future career goals. It is a required document for the Pathways program.

  16. Characterization of Aspergillus nidulans DidBDid2, a non-essential component of the multivesicular body pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hervás-Aguilar, América; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; Galindo, Antonio; Abenza, Juan F.; Arst, Herbert N.; Peñalva, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    ESCRT-III heteropolymers mediate membrane protein cargo sorting into multivesicular endosomes for subsequent vacuolar degradation. We studied the localization of largely uncharacterized Aspergillus nidulans ESCRT-III using its key structural component Vps32 and the ‘associated’ component DidBDid2. Vps32-GFP localizes to motile early endosomes as reported, but predominates in aggregates often associated with vacuoles due to inability to dissociate from endosomes. DidBDid2 regulating Vps4 (the ATPase disassembling ESCRT-III) is not essential. Consistent with this accessory role, didBΔ is unable to block the MVB sorting of the glutamate transporter AgtA, but increases its steady-state level and mislocalizes a fraction of the permease to the plasma membrane under conditions promoting its vacuolar targeting. didBΔ exacerbates the dominant-negative growth defect resulting from Vps32-GFP over-expression. A proportion of DidB-GFP is detectable in early endosomes colocalizing with RabARab5 and accumulating in nudA1 tips, suggesting that ESCRT-III assembles on endosomes from the early steps of the endocytic pathway. PMID:20362686

  17. Insight concerning the mechanism of therapeutic ultrasound facilitating gene delivery: increasing cell membrane permeability or interfering with intracellular pathways?

    PubMed

    Duvshani-Eshet, Maayan; Haber, Tom; Machluf, Marcelle

    2014-02-01

    Nonviral gene delivery methods encounter major barriers in plasmid DNA (pDNA) trafficking toward the nucleus. The present study aims to understand the role and contribution of therapeutic ultrasound (TUS), if any, in pDNA trafficking in primary cells such as fibroblasts and cell lines (e.g., baby hamster kidney [BHK]) during the transfection process. Using compounds that alter the endocytic pathways and the cytoskeletal network, we show that after TUS application, pDNA trafficking in the cytoplasm is not mediated by endocytosis or by the cytoskeletal network. Transfection studies and confocal analyses showed that the actin fibers impeded TUS-mediated transfection in BHK cells, but not in fibroblasts. Flow cytometric analyses indicated that pDNA uptake by cells occurs primarily when the pDNA is added before and not after TUS application. Taken together, these results suggest that TUS by itself operates as a mechanical force driving the pDNA through the cell membrane, traversing the cytoplasmic network and into the nucleus.

  18. Binding of Alphaherpesvirus Glycoprotein H to Surface α4β1-Integrins Activates Calcium-Signaling Pathways and Induces Phosphatidylserine Exposure on the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Gramatica, Andrea; Herrmann, Andreas; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracellular signaling connected to integrin activation is known to induce cytoplasmic Ca2+ release, which in turn mediates a number of downstream signals. The cellular entry pathways of two closely related alphaherpesviruses, equine herpesviruses 1 and 4 (EHV-1 and EHV-4), are differentially regulated with respect to the requirement of interaction of glycoprotein H (gH) with α4β1-integrins. We show here that binding of EHV-1, but not EHV-4, to target cells resulted in a rapid and significant increase in cytosolic Ca2+ levels. EHV-1 expressing EHV-4 gH (gH4) in lieu of authentic gH1 failed to induce Ca2+ release, while EHV-4 with gH1 triggered significant Ca2+ release. Blocking the interaction between gH1 and α4β1-integrins, inhibiting phospholipase C (PLC) activation, or blocking binding of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) to its receptor on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) abrogated Ca2+ release. Interestingly, phosphatidylserine (PS) was exposed on the plasma membrane in response to cytosolic calcium increase after EHV-1 binding through a scramblase-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of both Ca2+ release from the ER and scramblase activation blocked PS scrambling and redirected virus entry to the endocytic pathway, indicating that PS may play a role in facilitating virus entry directly at the plasma membrane. PMID:26489864

  19. TI-VAMP/VAMP7 and VAMP3/cellubrevin: two v-SNARE proteins involved in specific steps of the autophagy/multivesicular body pathways.

    PubMed

    Fader, Claudio Marcelo; Sánchez, Diego Germán; Mestre, María Belén; Colombo, María Isabel

    2009-12-01

    During reticulocyte maturation, some membrane proteins and organelles that are not required in the mature red cell are lost. Several of these proteins are released into the extracellular medium associated with the internal vesicles present in multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Likewise, organelles such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum are wrapped into double membrane vacuoles (i.e., autophagosomes) and degraded via autophagy. Morphological, molecular, and biochemical studies have shown that autophagosomes fuse with MVBs forming the so-called amphisomes, a prelysosomal hybrid organelle. SNAREs are key molecules of the vesicle fusion machinery. TI-VAMP/VAMP7 and VAMP3/cellubrevin are two v-SNARE proteins involved in the endocytic and exocytic pathways. We have previously shown that in the human leukemic K562 cells, Rab11 decorates MVBs and it is necessary for fusion between autophagosomes with MVBs. In the present report, we present evidence indicating that VAMP3 is required for the fusion between MVBs with autophagosomes to generate the amphisome, allowing the maturation of the autophagosome, but it does not seem to be involved in the next step, i. e., fusion with the lysosome. On the other hand, we demonstrate that VAMP7 is necessary for this latter event, allowing the completion of the autophagic pathway. Furthermore, VAMP7 and ATPase NSF, a protein required for SNAREs disassembly, participate in the fusion between MVBs with the plasma membrane to release the internal vesicles (i.e., exosomes) into the extracellular medium.

  20. A pathway to spirituality.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jon A

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenology of mystical experiences has been described throughout all the ages and in all religions. All mystical traditions identify some sense of union with the absolute as the ultimate spiritual goal. I assume that the pathway to both theistic and secular spirituality and our readiness to seek a solution in a psychological merger with something beyond the self evolves out of our human experience. Spirituality is one of man's strategies for dealing with the limitations of the life cycle, separation and loss, biological fragility, transience, and non-existence. Spirituality may serve as the affective component to a belief system or myth that is not rooted in scientific evidence but is lived as if it is true. Spirituality may take many forms, but I will suggest that in some instances it may serve as a reparative process in which one creates in the external world, through symbolic form, a nuance or facet of an internalized mental representation which has become lost or is no longer available to the self; or it may represent the continuity of the self-representation after death through a self-object merger. Lastly I will illustrate from the writings of two of our greatest poets, Dante Alighieri and William Wordsworth, how their poetry became interwoven with a profound spirituality. In Dante we will see the elaboration of a religious spirituality, while in the writings of Wordsworth a secular spirituality emerges interwoven with nature and belatedly his identification with "tragic man" as his mythos.

  1. Pathways to legal immigration

    PubMed Central

    MASSEY, DOUGLAS S.; MALONE, NOLAN

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we use the New Immigrant Survey Pilot Study (NISP) to describe the amount and kind of experience that immigrants accumulate in the United States before they become permanent resident aliens. The NISP surveyed a representative sample of legal immigrants who acquired residence papers during July and August of 1996, yielding a completed sample of 1,135 adults. Our analysis revealed that roughly two-thirds of these newly arrived immigrants had prior experience in the United States within one of six basic categories: illegal border-crossers, visa abusers, non-resident visitors, non-resident workers, students or exchange visitors, and refugees/asylees. Each of these pathways to legal immigration was associated with a different profile with respect to nationality, social background, and economic status. Using simple earnings regressions we demonstrate how these differences can yield misleading conclusions about the process of immigrant adaptation and assimilation, even if measured effects are reasonably accurate. We suggest that social scientists should change the way they think and ask about immigrants’ arrival in the United States. PMID:20830313

  2. Pathway Interaction Database (PID) —

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) in collaboration with Nature Publishing Group has established the Pathway Interaction Database (PID) in order to provide a highly structured, curated collection of information about known biomolecular interactions and key cellular processes assembled into signaling pathways.

  3. MPW : the metabolic pathways database.

    SciTech Connect

    Selkov, E., Jr.; Grechkin, Y.; Mikhailova, N.; Selkov, E.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Russian Academy of Sciences

    1998-01-01

    The Metabolic Pathways Database (MPW) (www.biobase.com/emphome.html/homepage. html.pags/pathways.html) a derivative of EMP (www.biobase.com/EMP) plays a fundamental role in the technology of metabolic reconstructions from sequenced genomes under the PUMA (www.mcs.anl.gov/home/compbio/PUMA/Production/ ReconstructedMetabolism/reconstruction.html), WIT (www.mcs.anl.gov/home/compbio/WIT/wit.html ) and WIT2 (beauty.isdn.msc.anl.gov/WIT2.pub/CGI/user.cgi) systems. In October 1997, it included some 2800 pathway diagrams covering primary and secondary metabolism, membrane transport, signal transduction pathways, intracellular traffic, translation and transcription. In the current public release of MPW (beauty.isdn.mcs.anl.gov/MPW), the encoding is based on the logical structure of the pathways and is represented by the objects commonly used in electronic circuit design. This facilitates drawing and editing the diagrams and makes possible automation of the basic simulation operations such as deriving stoichiometric matrices, rate laws, and, ultimately, dynamic models of metabolic pathways. Individual pathway diagrams, automatically derived from the original ASCII records, are stored as SGML instances supplemented by relational indices. An auxiliary database of compound names and structures, encoded in the SMILES format, is maintained to unambiguously connect the pathways to the chemical structures of their intermediates.

  4. Vestibular pathways involved in cognition

    PubMed Central

    Hitier, Martin; Besnard, Stephane; Smith, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent discoveries have emphasized the role of the vestibular system in cognitive processes such as memory, spatial navigation and bodily self-consciousness. A precise understanding of the vestibular pathways involved is essential to understand the consequences of vestibular diseases for cognition, as well as develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate recovery. The knowledge of the “vestibular cortical projection areas”, defined as the cortical areas activated by vestibular stimulation, has dramatically increased over the last several years from both anatomical and functional points of view. Four major pathways have been hypothesized to transmit vestibular information to the vestibular cortex: (1) the vestibulo-thalamo-cortical pathway, which probably transmits spatial information about the environment via the parietal, entorhinal and perirhinal cortices to the hippocampus and is associated with spatial representation and self-versus object motion distinctions; (2) the pathway from the dorsal tegmental nucleus via the lateral mammillary nucleus, the anterodorsal nucleus of the thalamus to the entorhinal cortex, which transmits information for estimations of head direction; (3) the pathway via the nucleus reticularis pontis oralis, the supramammillary nucleus and the medial septum to the hippocampus, which transmits information supporting hippocampal theta rhythm and memory; and (4) a possible pathway via the cerebellum, and the ventral lateral nucleus of the thalamus (perhaps to the parietal cortex), which transmits information for spatial learning. Finally a new pathway is hypothesized via the basal ganglia, potentially involved in spatial learning and spatial memory. From these pathways, progressively emerges the anatomical network of vestibular cognition. PMID:25100954

  5. Career pathways in research: academic.

    PubMed

    Kenkre, J E; Foxcroft, D R

    The academic pathway is the fourth in this series on career pathways and might be considered the most traditional career related to research. However, as is demonstrated in this series, research is every nurse's business and not a discipline to be conducted solely through academic institutions.

  6. Vestibular pathways involved in cognition.

    PubMed

    Hitier, Martin; Besnard, Stephane; Smith, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    Recent discoveries have emphasized the role of the vestibular system in cognitive processes such as memory, spatial navigation and bodily self-consciousness. A precise understanding of the vestibular pathways involved is essential to understand the consequences of vestibular diseases for cognition, as well as develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate recovery. The knowledge of the "vestibular cortical projection areas", defined as the cortical areas activated by vestibular stimulation, has dramatically increased over the last several years from both anatomical and functional points of view. Four major pathways have been hypothesized to transmit vestibular information to the vestibular cortex: (1) the vestibulo-thalamo-cortical pathway, which probably transmits spatial information about the environment via the parietal, entorhinal and perirhinal cortices to the hippocampus and is associated with spatial representation and self-versus object motion distinctions; (2) the pathway from the dorsal tegmental nucleus via the lateral mammillary nucleus, the anterodorsal nucleus of the thalamus to the entorhinal cortex, which transmits information for estimations of head direction; (3) the pathway via the nucleus reticularis pontis oralis, the supramammillary nucleus and the medial septum to the hippocampus, which transmits information supporting hippocampal theta rhythm and memory; and (4) a possible pathway via the cerebellum, and the ventral lateral nucleus of the thalamus (perhaps to the parietal cortex), which transmits information for spatial learning. Finally a new pathway is hypothesized via the basal ganglia, potentially involved in spatial learning and spatial memory. From these pathways, progressively emerges the anatomical network of vestibular cognition.

  7. Pathways from Poverty Educational Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northeast Regional Center for Rural Development, University Park, PA.

    Pathways from Poverty is a public policy education and research initiative organized by the Rural Sociological Society's Task Force on Persistent Rural Poverty and the four regional rural development centers. This publication focuses on project efforts in the Northeast and includes three sections. The first section describes the Pathways from…

  8. Two major pathways of zinc(II) acquisition by human placental syncytiotrophoblast.

    PubMed

    Bax, C M; Bloxam, D L

    1995-09-01

    Uptake of zinc into placental villous syncytiotrophoblast is the first step in its transfer from mother to fetus. To help characterise physiologically significant pathways of zinc accumulation by these cells, we incubated cultured layers of syncytiotrophoblast cells derived from human near-term placental tissue with serum ultrafiltrate (containing the zinc complexed with low molecular mass serum constituents), dialysed serum (containing the zinc bound to the serum proteins) and whole serum, each of whose endogenous zinc was tracer-labelled with 65Zn(II). Zinc label from both fractions of serum readily entered a rapidly labelled EDTA-sensitive cellular compartment, probably representing zinc bound to the outside cell surface and in accumulative fashion, an EDTA-resistant compartment, probably consisting largely of internalised cellular zinc. Movement of zinc into the EDTA-resistant pool was strongly temperature-dependent and did not occur via the EDTA-sensitive pool from either serum source. Transfer of zinc from the low molecular mass serum fraction into the EDTA-resistant pool was saturable, the concentration giving half-maximal rate being 1.2 mumol/l nonprotein-bound zinc. No nonsaturable component was detected. Zinc from the serum protein-bound fraction entered by a saturable component, already saturated at physiological total protein-bound zinc concentration, and by an apparently nonsaturable component, not appreciably accounted for by nonspecific fluid-phase endocytosis. The results show that zinc is acquired by placental syncytiotrophoblast from the low molecular mass serum zinc pool probably by a carrier-mediated process, and at least as importantly, from the zinc bound to serum protein, possibly by an endocytic mechanism.

  9. Refining the quantitative pathway of the Pathways to Mathematics model.

    PubMed

    Sowinski, Carla; LeFevre, Jo-Anne; Skwarchuk, Sheri-Lynn; Kamawar, Deepthi; Bisanz, Jeffrey; Smith-Chant, Brenda

    2015-03-01

    In the current study, we adopted the Pathways to Mathematics model of LeFevre et al. (2010). In this model, there are three cognitive domains--labeled as the quantitative, linguistic, and working memory pathways--that make unique contributions to children's mathematical development. We attempted to refine the quantitative pathway by combining children's (N=141 in Grades 2 and 3) subitizing, counting, and symbolic magnitude comparison skills using principal components analysis. The quantitative pathway was examined in relation to dependent numerical measures (backward counting, arithmetic fluency, calculation, and number system knowledge) and a dependent reading measure, while simultaneously accounting for linguistic and working memory skills. Analyses controlled for processing speed, parental education, and gender. We hypothesized that the quantitative, linguistic, and working memory pathways would account for unique variance in the numerical outcomes; this was the case for backward counting and arithmetic fluency. However, only the quantitative and linguistic pathways (not working memory) accounted for unique variance in calculation and number system knowledge. Not surprisingly, only the linguistic pathway accounted for unique variance in the reading measure. These findings suggest that the relative contributions of quantitative, linguistic, and working memory skills vary depending on the specific cognitive task.

  10. Refining the quantitative pathway of the Pathways to Mathematics model.

    PubMed

    Sowinski, Carla; LeFevre, Jo-Anne; Skwarchuk, Sheri-Lynn; Kamawar, Deepthi; Bisanz, Jeffrey; Smith-Chant, Brenda

    2015-03-01

    In the current study, we adopted the Pathways to Mathematics model of LeFevre et al. (2010). In this model, there are three cognitive domains--labeled as the quantitative, linguistic, and working memory pathways--that make unique contributions to children's mathematical development. We attempted to refine the quantitative pathway by combining children's (N=141 in Grades 2 and 3) subitizing, counting, and symbolic magnitude comparison skills using principal components analysis. The quantitative pathway was examined in relation to dependent numerical measures (backward counting, arithmetic fluency, calculation, and number system knowledge) and a dependent reading measure, while simultaneously accounting for linguistic and working memory skills. Analyses controlled for processing speed, parental education, and gender. We hypothesized that the quantitative, linguistic, and working memory pathways would account for unique variance in the numerical outcomes; this was the case for backward counting and arithmetic fluency. However, only the quantitative and linguistic pathways (not working memory) accounted for unique variance in calculation and number system knowledge. Not surprisingly, only the linguistic pathway accounted for unique variance in the reading measure. These findings suggest that the relative contributions of quantitative, linguistic, and working memory skills vary depending on the specific cognitive task. PMID:25521665

  11. Ascorbate Synthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gabbay, Kenneth H.; Bohren, Kurt M.; Morello, Roy; Bertin, Terry; Liu, Jeff; Vogel, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Using mouse gene knock-out models, we identify aldehyde reductase (EC 1.1.1.2, Akr1a4 (GR)) and aldose reductase (EC 1.1.1.21, Akr1b3 (AR)) as the enzymes responsible for conversion of d-glucuronate to l-gulonate, a key step in the ascorbate (ASC) synthesis pathway in mice. The gene knock-out (KO) mice show that the two enzymes, GR and AR, provide ∼85 and ∼15% of l-gulonate, respectively. GRKO/ARKO double knock-out mice are unable to synthesize ASC (>95% ASC deficit) and develop scurvy. The GRKO mice (∼85% ASC deficit) develop and grow normally when fed regular mouse chow (ASC content = 0) but suffer severe osteopenia and spontaneous fractures with stresses that increase ASC requirements, such as pregnancy or castration. Castration greatly increases osteoclast numbers and activity in GRKO mice and promotes increased bone loss as compared with wild-type controls and additionally induces proliferation of immature dysplastic osteoblasts likely because of an ASC-sensitive block(s) in early differentiation. ASC and the antioxidants pycnogenol and resveratrol block osteoclast proliferation and bone loss, but only ASC feeding restores osteoblast differentiation and prevents their dysplastic proliferation. This is the first in vivo demonstration of two independent roles for ASC as an antioxidant suppressing osteoclast activity and number as well as a cofactor promoting osteoblast differentiation. Although humans have lost the ability to synthesize ASC, our mouse models suggest the mechanisms by which suboptimal ASC availability facilitates the development of osteoporosis, which has important implications for human osteoporosis. PMID:20410296

  12. Pathways Intern Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Evan A.

    2015-01-01

    During my time at NASA, I worked with the Granular Mechanics and Regolith Organization (GMRO), better known as Swamp Works. The goal of the lab is to find ways to utilize resources found after the astronaut or robot has landed on another planet or asteroid. This concept is known as in-situ resource utilization and it is critical to long term missions such as those to Mars. During my time here I worked on the Asteroid and Lava Tube Free Flyer project (ALTFF). A lava tube, such as the one shown in figure 1, is a long tear drop shaped cavern that is produced when molten lava tunnels through the surrounding rock creating large unground pathways. Before mining for resources on Mars or on asteroids, a sampling mission must be done to scout out useful resource deposits. ALTFF's goal is to provide a low cost, autonomous scout robot that can sample the surface and return to the mother ship or lander for further processing of the samples. The vehicle will be looking for water ice in the regolith that can be processed into either potable water, hydrogen and oxygen fuel, or a binder material for 3D printing. By using a low cost craft to sample, there is much less risk to the more expensive mother ship or lander. While my main task was the construction of a simulation environment to test control code in and the construction of the asteroid free flyer prototype, there were other tasks that I performed relating to the ALTFF project.

  13. Dynamical pathway analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hao; Choe, Yoonsuck

    2008-01-01

    Background Although a great deal is known about one gene or protein and its functions under different environmental conditions, little information is available about the complex behaviour of biological networks subject to different environmental perturbations. Observing differential expressions of one or more genes between normal and abnormal cells has been a mainstream method of discovering pertinent genes in diseases and therefore valuable drug targets. However, to date, no such method exists for elucidating and quantifying the differential dynamical behaviour of genetic regulatory networks, which can have greater impact on phenotypes than individual genes. Results We propose to redress the deficiency by formulating the functional study of biological networks as a control problem of dynamical systems. We developed mathematical methods to study the stability, the controllability, and the steady-state behaviour, as well as the transient responses of biological networks under different environmental perturbations. We applied our framework to three real-world datasets: the SOS DNA repair network in E. coli under different dosages of radiation, the GSH redox cycle in mice lung exposed to either poisonous air or normal air, and the MAPK pathway in mammalian cell lines exposed to three types of HIV type I Vpr, a wild type and two mutant types; and we found that the three genetic networks exhibited fundamentally different dynamical properties in normal and abnormal cells. Conclusion Difference in stability, relative stability, degrees of controllability, and transient responses between normal and abnormal cells means considerable difference in dynamical behaviours and different functioning of cells. Therefore differential dynamical properties can be a valuable tool in biomedical research. PMID:18221557

  14. Protein design for pathway engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksen, DT; Lian, JZ; Zhao, HM

    2014-02-01

    Design and construction of biochemical pathways has increased the complexity of biosynthetically-produced compounds when compared to single enzyme biocatalysis. However, the coordination of multiple enzymes can introduce a complicated set of obstacles to overcome in order to achieve a high titer and yield of the desired compound. Metabolic engineering has made great strides in developing tools to optimize the flux through a target pathway, but the inherent characteristics of a particular enzyme within the pathway can still limit the productivity. Thus, judicious protein design is critical for metabolic and pathway engineering. This review will describe various strategies and examples of applying protein design to pathway engineering to optimize the flux through the pathway. The proteins can be engineered for altered substrate specificity/selectivity, increased catalytic activity, reduced mass transfer limitations through specific protein localization, and reduced substrate/product inhibition. Protein engineering can also be expanded to design biosensors to enable high through-put screening and to customize cell signaling networks. These strategies have successfully engineered pathways for significantly increased productivity of the desired product or in the production of novel compounds. (C) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Protein Design for Pathway Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Eriksen, Dawn T.; Lian, Jiazhang; Zhao, Huimin

    2013-01-01

    Design and construction of biochemical pathways has increased the complexity of biosynthetically-produced compounds when compared to single enzyme biocatalysis. However, the coordination of multiple enzymes can introduce a complicated set of obstacles to overcome in order to achieve a high titer and yield of the desired compound. Metabolic engineering has made great strides in developing tools to optimize the flux through a target pathway, but the inherent characteristics of a particular enzyme within the pathway can still limit the productivity. Thus, judicious protein design is critical for metabolic and pathway engineering. This review will describe various strategies and examples of applying protein design to pathway engineering to optimize the flux through the pathway. The proteins can be engineered for altered substrate specificity/selectivity, increased catalytic activity, reduced mass transfer limitations through specific protein localization, and reduced substrate/product inhibition. Protein engineering can also be expanded to design biosensors to enable high through-put screening and to customize cell signaling networks. These strategies have successfully engineered pathways for significantly increased productivity of the desired product or in the production of novel compounds. PMID:23558037

  16. Mechanisms of Hippo pathway regulation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhipeng; Moroishi, Toshiro; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo pathway was initially identified in Drosophila melanogaster screens for tissue growth two decades ago and has been a subject extensively studied in both Drosophila and mammals in the last several years. The core of the Hippo pathway consists of a kinase cascade, transcription coactivators, and DNA-binding partners. Recent studies have expanded the Hippo pathway as a complex signaling network with >30 components. This pathway is regulated by intrinsic cell machineries, such as cell-cell contact, cell polarity, and actin cytoskeleton, as well as a wide range of signals, including cellular energy status, mechanical cues, and hormonal signals that act through G-protein-coupled receptors. The major functions of the Hippo pathway have been defined to restrict tissue growth in adults and modulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration in developing organs. Furthermore, dysregulation of the Hippo pathway leads to aberrant cell growth and neoplasia. In this review, we focus on recent developments in our understanding of the molecular actions of the core Hippo kinase cascade and discuss key open questions in the regulation and function of the Hippo pathway. PMID:26728553

  17. Mechanisms of Hippo pathway regulation

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhipeng; Moroishi, Toshiro; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo pathway was initially identified in Drosophila melanogaster screens for tissue growth two decades ago and has been a subject extensively studied in both Drosophila and mammals in the last several years. The core of the Hippo pathway consists of a kinase cascade, transcription coactivators, and DNA-binding partners. Recent studies have expanded the Hippo pathway as a complex signaling network with >30 components. This pathway is regulated by intrinsic cell machineries, such as cell–cell contact, cell polarity, and actin cytoskeleton, as well as a wide range of signals, including cellular energy status, mechanical cues, and hormonal signals that act through G-protein-coupled receptors. The major functions of the Hippo pathway have been defined to restrict tissue growth in adults and modulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration in developing organs. Furthermore, dysregulation of the Hippo pathway leads to aberrant cell growth and neoplasia. In this review, we focus on recent developments in our understanding of the molecular actions of the core Hippo kinase cascade and discuss key open questions in the regulation and function of the Hippo pathway. PMID:26728553

  18. Nutrient Sensing Mechanisms and Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Efeyan, Alejo; Comb, William C.; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-01-01

    PREFACE The ability to sense and respond to fluctuations in environmental nutrient levels is a requisite for life. Nutrient scarcity is a selective pressure that has shaped the evolution of most cellular processes. Different pathways that detect intracellular and extracellular levels of sugars, amino acids and lipids, and surrogate metabolites, are then integrated and coordinated at the organismal level via hormonal signals. During food abundance, nutrient sensing pathways engage anabolism and storage, and scarcity triggers homeostatic mechanisms, like the mobilization of internal stores through mechanisms such as autophagy. Nutrient sensing pathways are commonly deregulated in human metabolic diseases. PMID:25592535

  19. Targeting Wnt pathways in disease.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Zachary F; Moon, Randall T; Chien, Andy J

    2012-11-01

    Wnt-mediated signal transduction pathways have long been recognized for their roles in regulating embryonic development, and have more recently been linked to cancer, neurologic diseases, inflammatory diseases, and disorders of endocrine function and bone metabolism in adults. Although therapies targeting Wnt signaling are attractive in theory, in practice it has been difficult to obtain specific therapeutics because many components of Wnt signaling pathways are also involved in other cellular processes, thereby reducing the specificity of candidate therapeutics. New technologies, and advances in understanding the mechanisms of Wnt signaling, have improved our understanding of the nuances of Wnt signaling and are leading to promising new strategies to target Wnt signaling pathways.

  20. THE PATHWAY OF ARSENIC METABLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pathway of Arsenic Methylation

    David J. Thomas, Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Understanding ...

  1. Lectin-dependent enhancement of Ebola virus infection via soluble and transmembrane C-type lectin receptors.

    PubMed

    Brudner, Matthew; Karpel, Marshall; Lear, Calli; Chen, Li; Yantosca, L Michael; Scully, Corinne; Sarraju, Ashish; Sokolovska, Anna; Zariffard, M Reza; Eisen, Damon P; Mungall, Bruce A; Kotton, Darrell N; Omari, Amel; Huang, I-Chueh; Farzan, Michael; Takahashi, Kazue; Stuart, Lynda; Stahl, Gregory L; Ezekowitz, Alan B; Spear, Gregory T; Olinger, Gene G; Schmidt, Emmett V; Michelow, Ian C

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key soluble effector of the innate immune system that recognizes pathogen-specific surface glycans. Surprisingly, low-producing MBL genetic variants that may predispose children and immunocompromised individuals to infectious diseases are more common than would be expected in human populations. Since certain immune defense molecules, such as immunoglobulins, can be exploited by invasive pathogens, we hypothesized that MBL might also enhance infections in some circumstances. Consequently, the low and intermediate MBL levels commonly found in human populations might be the result of balancing selection. Using model infection systems with pseudotyped and authentic glycosylated viruses, we demonstrated that MBL indeed enhances infection of Ebola, Hendra, Nipah and West Nile viruses in low complement conditions. Mechanistic studies with Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviruses confirmed that MBL binds to N-linked glycan epitopes on viral surfaces in a specific manner via the MBL carbohydrate recognition domain, which is necessary for enhanced infection. MBL mediates lipid-raft-dependent macropinocytosis of EBOV via a pathway that appears to require less actin or early endosomal processing compared with the filovirus canonical endocytic pathway. Using a validated RNA interference screen, we identified C1QBP (gC1qR) as a candidate surface receptor that mediates MBL-dependent enhancement of EBOV infection. We also identified dectin-2 (CLEC6A) as a potentially novel candidate attachment factor for EBOV. Our findings support the concept of an innate immune haplotype that represents critical interactions between MBL and complement component C4 genes and that may modify susceptibility or resistance to certain glycosylated pathogens. Therefore, higher levels of native or exogenous MBL could be deleterious in the setting of relative hypocomplementemia which can occur genetically or because of immunodepletion during active

  2. Thermodynamic Analysis of Biodegradation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Finley, Stacey D.; Broadbelt, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms provide a wealth of biodegradative potential in the reduction and elimination of xenobiotic compounds in the environment. One useful metric to evaluate potential biodegradation pathways is thermodynamic feasibility. However, experimental data for the thermodynamic properties of xenobiotics is scarce. The present work uses a group contribution method to study the thermodynamic properties of the University of Minnesota Biocatalysis/Biodegradation Database. The Gibbs free energies of formation and reaction are estimated for 914 compounds (81%) and 902 reactions (75%), respectively, in the database. The reactions are classified based on the minimum and maximum Gibbs free energy values, which accounts for uncertainty in the free energy estimates and a feasible concentration range relevant to biodegradation. Using the free energy estimates, the cumulative free energy change of 89 biodegradation pathways (51%) in the database could be estimated. A comparison of the likelihood of the biotransformation rules in the Pathway Prediction System and their thermodynamic feasibility was then carried out. This analysis revealed that when evaluating the feasibility of biodegradation pathways, it is important to consider the thermodynamic topology of the reactions in the context of the complete pathway. Group contribution is shown to be a viable tool for estimating, a priori, the thermodynamic feasibility and the relative likelihood of alternative biodegradation reactions. This work offers a useful tool to a broad range of researchers interested in estimating the feasibility of the reactions in existing or novel biodegradation pathways. PMID:19288443

  3. Evolution of the TOR pathway.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Teunis J P; Zwartkruis, Fried J T; Bos, Johannes L; Snel, Berend

    2011-10-01

    The TOR kinase is a major regulator of growth in eukaryotes. Many components of the TOR pathway are implicated in cancer and metabolic diseases in humans. Analysis of the evolution of TOR and its pathway may provide fundamental insight into the evolution of growth regulation in eukaryotes and provide a practical framework on which experimental evidence can be compared between species. Here we performed phylogenetic analyses on the components of the TOR pathway and determined their point of invention. We find that the two TOR complexes and a large part of the TOR pathway originated before the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor and form a core to which new inputs have been added during animal evolution. In addition, we provide insight into how duplications and sub-functionalization of the S6K, RSK, SGK and PKB kinases shaped the complexity of the TOR pathway. In yeast we identify novel AGC kinases that are orthologous to the S6 kinase. These results demonstrate how a vital signaling pathway can be both highly conserved and flexible in eukaryotes.

  4. SRNL ALL-PATHWAYS APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Koffman, L; Elmer Wilhite, E; Leonard Collard, L

    2007-05-29

    The Environmental Analysis and Performance Modeling group of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs performance assessments of the Savannah River Site (SRS) low-level waste facilities to meet the requirements of DOE Order 435.1. One of the performance objectives in the DOE Order is that the radiological dose to representative members of the public shall not exceed 25 mrem in a year total effective dose equivalent from all exposure pathways, excluding radon. Analysis to meet this performance objective is generally referred to as all-pathways analysis. SRNL performs detailed transient groundwater transport analysis for the waste disposal units, which has been used as input for the groundwater part of all-pathways analysis. The desire to better integrate all-pathways analysis with the groundwater transport analysis lead to the development of a software application named the SRNL All-Pathways Application. Another requirement of DOE Order 435.1 is to assess the impact of nuclear waste disposal on water resources, which SRS has interpreted for groundwater protection as meeting the EPA regulations for radionuclides in drinking water. EPA specifies four separate criteria as part of their implementation guidance for radionuclides, which are specified as maximum contaminant levels (MCL). (1) Beta/gamma emitters have a combined dose limit of 4 mrem/year. (2) Alpha emitters have a combined concentration limit of 15 pCi/L (called gross alpha), excluding uranium and radon, but including radium-226. (3) Combined radium-226 and radium-228 have a concentration limit of 5 pCi/L. (4) Isotopes of uranium have a combined concentration limit of 30 {micro}g/L. The All-Pathways Application was designed to be an easy-to-use software application that utilizes transient concentration results from groundwater transport analysis to (1) calculate the groundwater part of all-pathways dose and to (2) evaluate the four EPA criteria for groundwater protection.

  5. HealthPathways: creating a pathway for health systems reform.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Suzanne; Varhol, Richard; Bell, Colin; Quirk, Frances; Durrington, Learne

    2015-02-01

    Inefficiencies in the co-ordination and integration of primary and secondary care services in Australia, have led to increases in waiting times, unnecessary presentations to emergency departments and issues around poor discharge of patients. HealthPathways is a program developed in Canterbury, New Zealand, that builds relationships between General Practitioners and Specialists and uses information technology so that efficiency is maximised and the right patient is given the right care at the right time. Healthpathways is being implemented by a number of Medicare Locals across Australia however, little is known about the impact HealthPathways may have in Australia. This article provides a short description of HealthPathways and considers what it may offer in the Australian context and some of the barriers and facilitators to implementation. PMID:25433515

  6. HealthPathways: creating a pathway for health systems reform.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Suzanne; Varhol, Richard; Bell, Colin; Quirk, Frances; Durrington, Learne

    2015-02-01

    Inefficiencies in the co-ordination and integration of primary and secondary care services in Australia, have led to increases in waiting times, unnecessary presentations to emergency departments and issues around poor discharge of patients. HealthPathways is a program developed in Canterbury, New Zealand, that builds relationships between General Practitioners and Specialists and uses information technology so that efficiency is maximised and the right patient is given the right care at the right time. Healthpathways is being implemented by a number of Medicare Locals across Australia however, little is known about the impact HealthPathways may have in Australia. This article provides a short description of HealthPathways and considers what it may offer in the Australian context and some of the barriers and facilitators to implementation.

  7. SRNL All-Pathways Application

    SciTech Connect

    Koffman, Larry D.; Wilhite, Elmer L.; Collard, Leonard B.

    2008-01-15

    The Environmental Analysis and Performance Modeling group of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs performance assessments of the Savannah River Site (SRS) low-level waste facilities to meet the requirements of DOE Order 435.1. One of the performance objectives in the DOE Order is that the radiological dose to representative members of the public shall not exceed 25 mrem in a year total effective dose equivalent from all exposure pathways, excluding radon. Analysis to meet this performance objective is generally referred to as all-pathways analysis. SRNL performs detailed transient groundwater transport analysis for the waste disposal units, which has been used as input for the groundwater part of all-pathways analysis. The desire to better integrate all-pathways analysis with the groundwater transport analysis lead to the development of a software application named the SRNL All-Pathways Application. Another requirement of DOE Order 435.1 is to assess the impact of nuclear waste disposal on water resources, which SRS has interpreted for groundwater protection as meeting the EPA regulations for radionuclides in drinking water. EPA specifies four separate criteria as part of their implementation guidance for radionuclides, which are specified as maximum contaminant levels (MCL). 1. Beta/gamma emitters have a combined dose limit of 4 mrem/year. 2. Alpha emitters have a combined concentration limit of 15 pCi/L (called gross alpha), excluding uranium and radon, but including radium-226. 3. Combined radium-226 and radium-228 have a concentration limit of 5 pCi/L. 4. Isotopes of uranium have a combined concentration limit of 30 {mu}g/L. The All-Pathways Application was designed to be an easy-to-use software application that utilizes transient concentration results from groundwater transport analysis to (1) calculate the groundwater part of all-pathways dose and to (2) evaluate the four EPA criteria for groundwater protection. An application has been developed

  8. Coherence in electron transfer pathways

    PubMed Central

    Skourtis, Spiros S.; Beratan, David N.; Waldeck, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Central to the view of electron-transfer reactions is the idea that nuclear motion generates a transition state geometry at which the electron/hole amplitude propagates coherently from the electron donor to the electron acceptor. In the weakly coupled or nonadiabatic regime, the electron amplitude tunnels through an electronic barrier between the donor and acceptor. The structure of the barrier is determined by the covalent and noncovalent interactions of the bridge. Because the tunneling barrier depends on the nuclear coordinates of the reactants (and on the surrounding medium), the tunneling barrier is highly anisotropic, and it is useful to identify particular routes, or pathways, along which the transmission amplitude propagates. Moreover, when more than one such pathway exists, and the paths give rise to comparable transmission amplitude magnitudes, one may expect to observe quantum interferences among pathways if the propagation remains coherent. Given that the effective tunneling barrier height and width are affected by the nuclear positions, the modulation of the nuclear coordinates will lead to a modulation of the tunneling barrier and hence of the electron flow. For long distance electron transfer in biological and biomimetic systems, nuclear fluctuations, arising from flexible protein moieties and mobile water bridges, can become quite significant. We discuss experimental and theoretical results that explore the quantum interferences among coupling pathways in electron-transfer kinetics; we emphasize recent data and theories associated with the signatures of chirality and inelastic processes, which are manifested in the tunneling pathway coherence (or absence of coherence). PMID:23833692

  9. Coherence in electron transfer pathways.

    PubMed

    Skourtis, Spiros S; Beratan, David N; Waldeck, David H

    2011-01-01

    Central to the view of electron-transfer reactions is the idea that nuclear motion generates a transition state geometry at which the electron/hole amplitude propagates coherently from the electron donor to the electron acceptor. In the weakly coupled or nonadiabatic regime, the electron amplitude tunnels through an electronic barrier between the donor and acceptor. The structure of the barrier is determined by the covalent and noncovalent interactions of the bridge. Because the tunneling barrier depends on the nuclear coordinates of the reactants (and on the surrounding medium), the tunneling barrier is highly anisotropic, and it is useful to identify particular routes, or pathways, along which the transmission amplitude propagates. Moreover, when more than one such pathway exists, and the paths give rise to comparable transmission amplitude magnitudes, one may expect to observe quantum interferences among pathways if the propagation remains coherent. Given that the effective tunneling barrier height and width are affected by the nuclear positions, the modulation of the nuclear coordinates will lead to a modulation of the tunneling barrier and hence of the electron flow. For long distance electron transfer in biological and biomimetic systems, nuclear fluctuations, arising from flexible protein moieties and mobile water bridges, can become quite significant. We discuss experimental and theoretical results that explore the quantum interferences among coupling pathways in electron-transfer kinetics; we emphasize recent data and theories associated with the signatures of chirality and inelastic processes, which are manifested in the tunneling pathway coherence (or absence of coherence).

  10. Targeting Wnt Pathways in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Zachary F.; Moon, Randall T.

    2012-01-01

    Wnt-mediated signal transduction pathways have long been recognized for their roles in regulating embryonic development, and have more recently been linked to cancer, neurologic diseases, inflammatory diseases, and disorders of endocrine function and bone metabolism in adults. Although therapies targeting Wnt signaling are attractive in theory, in practice it has been difficult to obtain specific therapeutics because many components of Wnt signaling pathways are also involved in other cellular processes, thereby reducing the specificity of candidate therapeutics. New technologies, and advances in understanding the mechanisms of Wnt signaling, have improved our understanding of the nuances of Wnt signaling and are leading to promising new strategies to target Wnt signaling pathways. PMID:23001988

  11. LXR signaling pathways and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Calkin, Anna; Tontonoz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    First discovered as orphan receptors, liver X receptors (LXRs) were subsequently identified as the nuclear receptor target of the cholesterol metabolites, oxysterols.1 There are 2 LXR receptors encoded by distinct genes: LXRα is most highly expressed in the liver, adipose, kidney, adrenal tissues and macrophages, and LXRβ is ubiquitously expressed. Despite differential tissue distribution, these isoforms have 78% homology in their ligand-binding domain and appear to respond to the same endogenous ligands. Work over the past 10 years has shown that the LXR pathway regulates lipid metabolism and inflammation via both the induction and repression of target genes. Given the importance of cholesterol regulation and inflammation in the development of cardiovascular disease, it is not surprising that activation of the LXR pathway attenuates various mechanisms underlying atherosclerotic plaque development.2 In this minireview we will discuss the impact of the LXR pathway on both cholesterol metabolism and atherosclerosis. PMID:20631351

  12. The HEART Pathway Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Simon A.; Riley, Robert F.; Hiestand, Brian C.; Russell, Gregory B.; Hoekstra, James W.; Lefebvre, Cedric W.; Nicks, Bret A.; Cline, David M.; Askew, Kim L.; Elliott, Stephanie B.; Herrington, David M.; Burke, Gregory L.; Miller, Chadwick D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The HEART Pathway is a decision aid designed to identify emergency department patients with acute chest pain for early discharge. No randomized trials have compared the HEART Pathway with usual care. Methods and Results Adult emergency department patients with symptoms related to acute coronary syndrome without ST-elevation on ECG (n=282) were randomized to the HEART Pathway or usual care. In the HEART Pathway arm, emergency department providers used the HEART score, a validated decision aid, and troponin measures at 0 and 3 hours to identify patients for early discharge. Usual care was based on American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines. The primary outcome, objective cardiac testing (stress testing or angiography), and secondary outcomes, index length of stay, early discharge, and major adverse cardiac events (death, myocardial infarction, or coronary revascularization), were assessed at 30 days by phone interview and record review. Participants had a mean age of 53 years, 16% had previous myocardial infarction, and 6% (95% confidence interval, 3.6%–9.5%) had major adverse cardiac events within 30 days of randomization. Compared with usual care, use of the HEART Pathway decreased objective cardiac testing at 30 days by 12.1% (68.8% versus 56.7%; P=0.048) and length of stay by 12 hours (9.9 versus 21.9 hours; P=0.013) and increased early discharges by 21.3% (39.7% versus 18.4%; P<0.001). No patients identified for early discharge had major adverse cardiac events within 30 days. Conclusions The HEART Pathway reduces objective cardiac testing during 30 days, shortens length of stay, and increases early discharges. These important efficiency gains occurred without any patients identified for early discharge suffering MACE at 30 days. PMID:25737484

  13. The human prothrombin kringle-2 derived peptide, NSA9, is internalized into bovine capillary endothelial cells through endocytosis and energy-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Soung Soo . E-mail: kimss518@yonsei.ac.kr

    2005-09-23

    Human prothrombin kringle-2 and its partial peptide, NSA9 (NSAVQLVEN), have been reported to have potent anti-angiogenic activities. Here, the internalization mechanism of NSA9 into bovine capillary endothelial (BCE) cells was examined using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay, fluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. LDH release assay results suggested that the integrity of the BCE cell membrane was unaffected by NSA9. Fluorescence microscopy indicated that internalized NSA9 was localized in the cytoplasm around the nucleus, and showed a punctuated fluorescence pattern, which is indicative of endocytic vesicles. Also, the cellular internalization of NSA9 is significantly inhibited by depletion of the cellular ATP pool, endocytosis inhibitors such as chloroquine and nocodazole, and incubation at low temperature (4 deg C). In addition, the anti-proliferative activity of NSA9 against BCE cells was diminished in the presence of endocytosis or metabolic inhibitors. In conclusion, these results strongly suggest that NSA9 might exert its anti-proliferative activity through internalization into BCE cells by endocytosis and energy-dependent pathways.

  14. Collateral Pathways in Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram S.

    2012-01-01

    Presence of portosystemic collateral veins (PSCV) is common in portal hypertension due to cirrhosis. Physiologically, normal portosystemic anastomoses exist which exhibit hepatofugal flow. With the development of portal hypertension, transmission of backpressure leads to increased flow in these patent normal portosystemic anastomoses. In extrahepatic portal vein obstruction collateral circulation develops in a hepatopetal direction and portoportal pathways are frequently found. The objective of this review is to illustrate the various PSCV and portoportal collateral vein pathways pertinent to portal hypertension in liver cirrhosis and EHPVO. PMID:25755456

  15. SMPDB: The Small Molecule Pathway Database.

    PubMed

    Frolkis, Alex; Knox, Craig; Lim, Emilia; Jewison, Timothy; Law, Vivian; Hau, David D; Liu, Phillip; Gautam, Bijaya; Ly, Son; Guo, An Chi; Xia, Jianguo; Liang, Yongjie; Shrivastava, Savita; Wishart, David S

    2010-01-01

    The Small Molecule Pathway Database (SMPDB) is an interactive, visual database containing more than 350 small-molecule pathways found in humans. More than 2/3 of these pathways (>280) are not found in any other pathway database. SMPDB is designed specifically to support pathway elucidation and pathway discovery in clinical metabolomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and systems biology. SMPDB provides exquisitely detailed, hyperlinked diagrams of human metabolic pathways, metabolic disease pathways, metabolite signaling pathways and drug-action pathways. All SMPDB pathways include information on the relevant organs, organelles, subcellular compartments, protein cofactors, protein locations, metabolite locations, chemical structures and protein quaternary structures. Each small molecule is hyperlinked to detailed descriptions contained in the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB) or DrugBank and each protein or enzyme complex is hyperlinked to UniProt. All SMPDB pathways are accompanied with detailed descriptions, providing an overview of the pathway, condition or processes depicted in each diagram. The database is easily browsed and supports full text searching. Users may query SMPDB with lists of metabolite names, drug names, genes/protein names, SwissProt IDs, GenBank IDs, Affymetrix IDs or Agilent microarray IDs. These queries will produce lists of matching pathways and highlight the matching molecules on each of the pathway diagrams. Gene, metabolite and protein concentration data can also be visualized through SMPDB's mapping interface. All of SMPDB's images, image maps, descriptions and tables are downloadable. SMPDB is available at: http://www.smpdb.ca. PMID:19948758

  16. Cancer stem cell signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Matsui, William H

    2016-09-01

    Tissue development and homeostasis are governed by the actions of stem cells. Multipotent cells are capable of self-renewal during the course of one's lifetime. The accurate and appropriate regulation of stem cell functions is absolutely critical for normal biological activity. Several key developmental or signaling pathways have been shown to play essential roles in this regulatory capacity. Specifically, the Janus-activated kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription, Hedgehog, Wnt, Notch, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/phosphatase and tensin homolog, and nuclear factor-κB signaling pathways have all been shown experimentally to mediate various stem cell properties, such as self-renewal, cell fate decisions, survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Unsurprisingly, many of these crucial signaling pathways are dysregulated in cancer. Growing evidence suggests that overactive or abnormal signaling within and among these pathways may contribute to the survival of cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are a relatively rare population of cancer cells capable of self-renewal, differentiation, and generation of serially transplantable heterogeneous tumors of several types of cancer. PMID:27611937

  17. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  18. Capstone Design Project Course Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eppes, Tom A.; Milanovic, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Capstones are open-ended undertakings where students are expected to creatively analyze, synthesize, and apply a wide-variety of learning outcomes from prior coursework. This paper discusses the structure, approach and evolution of the capstone project pathways within our College. Specifically two programs, MET and EET, have adopted different…

  19. Auditory pathways: anatomy and physiology.

    PubMed

    Pickles, James O

    2015-01-01

    This chapter outlines the anatomy and physiology of the auditory pathways. After a brief analysis of the external, middle ears, and cochlea, the responses of auditory nerve fibers are described. The central nervous system is analyzed in more detail. A scheme is provided to help understand the complex and multiple auditory pathways running through the brainstem. The multiple pathways are based on the need to preserve accurate timing while extracting complex spectral patterns in the auditory input. The auditory nerve fibers branch to give two pathways, a ventral sound-localizing stream, and a dorsal mainly pattern recognition stream, which innervate the different divisions of the cochlear nucleus. The outputs of the two streams, with their two types of analysis, are progressively combined in the inferior colliculus and onwards, to produce the representation of what can be called the "auditory objects" in the external world. The progressive extraction of critical features in the auditory stimulus in the different levels of the central auditory system, from cochlear nucleus to auditory cortex, is described. In addition, the auditory centrifugal system, running from cortex in multiple stages to the organ of Corti of the cochlea, is described.

  20. Pentose pathway in human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, I; Chandramouli, V; Schumann, W C; Kumaran, K; Wahren, J; Landau, B R

    1988-01-01

    [1-14C]Ribose and [2-14C]glucose were given to normal subjects along with glucose loads (1 g per kg of body weight) after administration of diflunisal and acetaminophen, drugs that are excreted in urine as glucuronides. Distributions of 14C were determined in the carbons of the excreted glucuronides and in the glucose from blood samples drawn from hepatic veins before and after glucagon administration. Eighty percent or more of the 14C from [1-14C]ribose incorporated into the glucuronic acid moiety of the glucuronides was in carbons 1 and 3, with less than 8% in carbon 2. In glucuronic acid from glucuronide excreted when [2-14C]glucose was given, 3.5-8.1% of the 14C was in carbon 1, 2.5-4.3% in carbon 3, and more than 70% in carbon 2. These distributions are in accord with the glucuronides sampling the glucose unit of the glucose 6-phosphate pool that is a component of the pentose pathway and is intermediate in glycogen formation. It is concluded that the glucuronic acid conjugates of the drugs can serve as a noninvasive means of sampling hepatic glucose 6-phosphate. In human liver, as in animal liver, the classical pentose pathway functions, not the L-type pathway, and only a small percentage of the glucose is metabolized via the pathway. PMID:3133657

  1. Pentose pathway in human liver

    SciTech Connect

    Magnusson, I.; Chandramouli, V.; Schumann, W.C.; Kumaran, K.; Wahren, J.; Landau, B.R. )

    1988-07-01

    (1-{sup 14}C)Ribose and (1-{sup 14}C)glucose were given to normal subjects along with glucose loads (1 g per kg of body weight) after administration of diflunisal and acetaminophen, drugs that are excreted in urine as glucuronides. Distributions of {sup 14}C were determined in the carbons of the excreted glucoronides and in the glucose from blood samples drawn from hepatic veins before and after glucagon administration. Eighty percent or more of the {sup 14}C from (1-{sup 14}C)ribose incorporated into the glucuronic acid moiety of the glucuronides was in carbons 1 and 3, with less than 8% in carbon 2. In glucuronic acid from glucuronide excreted when (2-{sup 14}C)glucose was given, 3.5-8.1% of the {sup 14}C was in carbon 1, 2.5-4.3% in carbon 3, and more than 70% in carbon 2. These distributions are in accord with the glucuronides sampling the glucose unit of the glucose 6-phosphate pool that is a component of the pentose pathway and is intermediate in glycogen formation. It is concluded that the glucuronic acid conjugates of the drugs can serve as a noninvasive means of sampling hepatic glucose 6-phosphate. In human liver, as in animal liver, the classical pentose pathway functions, not the L-type pathway, and only a small percentage of the glucose is metabolized via the pathway.

  2. Multiple Pathways for All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stirling, Lee Anna

    2012-01-01

    Maine has been focusing on the importance of postsecondary training. Maine's Skowhegan Area High School (SAHS) and Somerset Career and Technical Center (SCTC) have partnered in a Multiple Pathways initiative (funded by the Nellie Mae Education Foundation) to increase students' high school completion rate and to increase enrollment in postsecondary…

  3. Rapid prototype extruded conductive pathways

    DOEpatents

    Bobbitt, III, John T.

    2016-06-21

    A process of producing electrically conductive pathways within additively manufactured parts and similar parts made by plastic extrusion nozzles. The process allows for a three-dimensional part having both conductive and non-conductive portions and allows for such parts to be manufactured in a single production step.

  4. Diverse Pathways in Children's Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Beverley

    1996-01-01

    Used a Partially Ordered Scaling of Items method to analyze block construction play in a replication of Innes and King-Shaw's 1985 study. Found several developmental pathways for block play, illustrating the web-like nature of conceptual development. Results suggest a contextual developmental approach to better acknowledge individual diversity in…

  5. Career Technical Education Pathways Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2013

    2013-01-01

    California's education system--the largest in the United States--is an essential resource for ensuring strong economic growth in the state. The Career Technical Education Pathways Initiative (referred to as the Initiative in this report), which became law in 2005, brings together community colleges, K-12 school districts, employers, organized…

  6. Multiple pathways regulate shoot branching

    PubMed Central

    Rameau, Catherine; Bertheloot, Jessica; Leduc, Nathalie; Andrieu, Bruno; Foucher, Fabrice; Sakr, Soulaiman

    2015-01-01

    Shoot branching patterns result from the spatio-temporal regulation of axillary bud outgrowth. Numerous endogenous, developmental and environmental factors are integrated at the bud and plant levels to determine numbers of growing shoots. Multiple pathways that converge to common integrators are most probably involved. We propose several pathways involving not only the classical hormones auxin, cytokinins and strigolactones, but also other signals with a strong influence on shoot branching such as gibberellins, sugars or molecular actors of plant phase transition. We also deal with recent findings about the molecular mechanisms and the pathway involved in the response to shade as an example of an environmental signal controlling branching. We propose the TEOSINTE BRANCHED1, CYCLOIDEA, PCF transcription factor TB1/BRC1 and the polar auxin transport stream in the stem as possible integrators of these pathways. We finally discuss how modeling can help to represent this highly dynamic system by articulating knowledges and hypothesis and calculating the phenotype properties they imply. PMID:25628627

  7. Two-Electron Transfer Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiaxing; Balamurugan, D; Zhang, Peng; Skourtis, Spiros S; Beratan, David N

    2015-06-18

    The frontiers of electron-transfer chemistry demand that we develop theoretical frameworks to describe the delivery of multiple electrons, atoms, and ions in molecular systems. When electrons move over long distances through high barriers, where the probability for thermal population of oxidized or reduced bridge-localized states is very small, the electrons will tunnel from the donor (D) to acceptor (A), facilitated by bridge-mediated superexchange interactions. If the stable donor and acceptor redox states on D and A differ by two electrons, it is possible that the electrons will propagate coherently from D to A. While structure-function relations for single-electron superexchange in molecules are well established, strategies to manipulate the coherent flow of multiple electrons are largely unknown. In contrast to one-electron superexchange, two-electron superexchange involves both one- and two-electron virtual intermediate states, the number of virtual intermediates increases very rapidly with system size, and multiple classes of pathways interfere with one another. In the study described here, we developed simple superexchange models for two-electron transfer. We explored how the bridge structure and energetics influence multielectron superexchange, and we compared two-electron superexchange interactions to single-electron superexchange. Multielectron superexchange introduces interference between singly and doubly oxidized (or reduced) bridge virtual states, so that even simple linear donor-bridge-acceptor systems have pathway topologies that resemble those seen for one-electron superexchange through bridges with multiple parallel pathways. The simple model systems studied here exhibit a richness that is amenable to experimental exploration by manipulating the multiple pathways, pathway crosstalk, and changes in the number of donor and acceptor species. The features that emerge from these studies may assist in developing new strategies to deliver multiple

  8. The Pore-Forming Toxin Listeriolysin O Mediates a Novel Entry Pathway of L. monocytogenes into Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Vadia, Stephen; Arnett, Eusondia; Haghighat, Anne-Cécile; Wilson-Kubalek, Elisabeth M.; Tweten, Rodney K.; Seveau, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens have evolved diverse strategies to invade and survive within host cells. Among the most studied facultative intracellular pathogens, Listeria monocytogenes is known to express two invasins-InlA and InlB-that induce bacterial internalization into nonphagocytic cells. The pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O (LLO) facilitates bacterial escape from the internalization vesicle into the cytoplasm, where bacteria divide and undergo cell-to-cell spreading via actin-based motility. In the present study we demonstrate that in addition to InlA and InlB, LLO is required for efficient internalization of L. monocytogenes into human hepatocytes (HepG2). Surprisingly, LLO is an invasion factor sufficient to induce the internalization of noninvasive Listeria innocua or polystyrene beads into host cells in a dose-dependent fashion and at the concentrations produced by L. monocytogenes. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying LLO-induced bacterial entry, we constructed novel LLO derivatives locked at different stages of the toxin assembly on host membranes. We found that LLO-induced bacterial or bead entry only occurs upon LLO pore formation. Scanning electron and fluorescence microscopy studies show that LLO-coated beads stimulate the formation of membrane extensions that ingest the beads into an early endosomal compartment. This LLO-induced internalization pathway is dynamin-and F-actin-dependent, and clathrin-independent. Interestingly, further linking pore formation to bacteria/bead uptake, LLO induces F-actin polymerization in a tyrosine kinase-and pore-dependent fashion. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that a bacterial pathogen perforates the host cell plasma membrane as a strategy to activate the endocytic machinery and gain entry into the host cell. PMID:22072970

  9. Characterization and Visualization of Vesicles in the Endo-Lysosomal Pathway with Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and Chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Huefner, Anna; Kuan, Wei-Li; Müller, Karin H; Skepper, Jeremy N; Barker, Roger A; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2016-01-26

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is an ultrasensitive vibrational fingerprinting technique widely used in analytical and biosensing applications. For intracellular sensing, typically gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are employed as transducers to enhance the otherwise weak Raman spectroscopy signals. Thus, the signature patterns of the molecular nanoenvironment around intracellular unlabeled AuNPs can be monitored in a reporter-free manner by SERS. The challenge of selectively identifying molecular changes resulting from cellular processes in large and multidimensional data sets and the lack of simple tools for extracting this information has resulted in limited characterization of fundamental cellular processes by SERS. Here, this shortcoming in analysis of SERS data sets is tackled by developing a suitable methodology of reference-based PCA-LDA (principal component analysis-linear discriminant analysis). This method is validated and exemplarily used to extract spectral features characteristic of the endocytic compartment inside cells. The voluntary uptake through vesicular endocytosis is widely used for the internalization of AuNPs into cells, but the characterization of the individual stages of this pathway has not been carried out. Herein, we use reporter-free SERS to identify and visualize the stages of endocytosis of AuNPs in cells and map the molecular changes via the adaptation and advantageous use of chemometric methods in combination with tailored sample preparation. Thus, our study demonstrates the capabilities of reporter-free SERS for intracellular analysis and its ability to provide a way of characterizing intracellular composition. The developed analytical approach is generic and enables the application of reporter-free SERS to identify unknown components in different biological matrices and materials.

  10. TREM-2 serves as a negative immune regulator through Syk pathway in an IL-10 dependent manner in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junjun; Xu, Weiyi; Yang, Guangdie; Bao, Zhang; Xia, Dajing; Lu, Guohua; Hu, Shuwen; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    During infection, triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM-2) restrains dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MΦs) phagocytosis, as well as reduces pro-inflammatory cytokines release through DNAX-activation protein 12 (DAP12) signaling. However, the role of TREM-2 signaling in cancer has never been elucidated. In the current study, we found that TREM-2 was up-regulated on peripheral blood monocytes in tumor-bearing host. More TREM-2+DCs were detected in the lung of 3LL tumor-bearing mice. On the other hand, the level of TREM-2 on pulmonary MΦs positively correlated with the pathological staging of lung cancer. However, surgical or chemotherapeutic reduction of tumor burden led to the obvious decline of TREM-2. In vitro, TREM-2 expression of bone marrow (BM)-derived DCs and MΦs was induced by conditional medium (CM) containing the supernatant of 3LL cells. TREM-2+DCs from CM and/or tumor-bearing mice held altered phenotypes (CD80LowCD86LowMHCIILow) and impaired functions, such as, reduced interleukin (IL)-12 secretion, increased IL-10 production, and weakened ovalbumin (OVA)-endocytic capacity; also developed potent inhibitory effect on T cell proliferation that could be partially reversed by TREM-2 blockage. Moreover, spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) inhibitor restrained IL-10 production of TREM-2+DC. Remarkably, IL-10 neutralizing antibody and Syk inhibitor both lowered the suppressive potential of TREM-2+DCs in T cell proliferation. Also, adoptive transfer of this TREM-2+DCs accelerated the tumor growth rather than jeopardized survival in lung cancer-bearing mice. In conclusion, these results indicate that TREM-2 might act as a negative immuno-regulatory molecule through Syk pathway in an IL-10 dependent manner and partially predicts prognosis in lung cancer patients. PMID:27102437

  11. Reactome from a WikiPathways Perspective.

    PubMed

    Bohler, Anwesha; Wu, Guanming; Kutmon, Martina; Pradhana, Leontius Adhika; Coort, Susan L; Hanspers, Kristina; Haw, Robin; Pico, Alexander R; Evelo, Chris T

    2016-05-01

    Reactome and WikiPathways are two of the most popular freely available databases for biological pathways. Reactome pathways are centrally curated with periodic input from selected domain experts. WikiPathways is a community-based platform where pathways are created and continually curated by any interested party. The nascent collaboration between WikiPathways and Reactome illustrates the mutual benefits of combining these two approaches. We created a format converter that converts Reactome pathways to the GPML format used in WikiPathways. In addition, we developed the ComplexViz plugin for PathVisio which simplifies looking up complex components. The plugin can also score the complexes on a pathway based on a user defined criterion. This score can then be visualized on the complex nodes using the visualization options provided by the plugin. Using the merged collection of curated and converted Reactome pathways, we demonstrate improved pathway coverage of relevant biological processes for the analysis of a previously described polycystic ovary syndrome gene expression dataset. Additionally, this conversion allows researchers to visualize their data on Reactome pathways using PathVisio's advanced data visualization functionalities. WikiPathways benefits from the dedicated focus and attention provided to the content converted from Reactome and the wealth of semantic information about interactions. Reactome in turn benefits from the continuous community curation available on WikiPathways. The research community at large benefits from the availability of a larger set of pathways for analysis in PathVisio and Cytoscape. The pathway statistics results obtained from PathVisio are significantly better when using a larger set of candidate pathways for analysis. The conversion serves as a general model for integration of multiple pathway resources developed using different approaches. PMID:27203685

  12. Reactome from a WikiPathways Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bohler, Anwesha; Wu, Guanming; Pradhana, Leontius Adhika; Hanspers, Kristina; Haw, Robin; Pico, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Reactome and WikiPathways are two of the most popular freely available databases for biological pathways. Reactome pathways are centrally curated with periodic input from selected domain experts. WikiPathways is a community-based platform where pathways are created and continually curated by any interested party. The nascent collaboration between WikiPathways and Reactome illustrates the mutual benefits of combining these two approaches. We created a format converter that converts Reactome pathways to the GPML format used in WikiPathways. In addition, we developed the ComplexViz plugin for PathVisio which simplifies looking up complex components. The plugin can also score the complexes on a pathway based on a user defined criterion. This score can then be visualized on the complex nodes using the visualization options provided by the plugin. Using the merged collection of curated and converted Reactome pathways, we demonstrate improved pathway coverage of relevant biological processes for the analysis of a previously described polycystic ovary syndrome gene expression dataset. Additionally, this conversion allows researchers to visualize their data on Reactome pathways using PathVisio’s advanced data visualization functionalities. WikiPathways benefits from the dedicated focus and attention provided to the content converted from Reactome and the wealth of semantic information about interactions. Reactome in turn benefits from the continuous community curation available on WikiPathways. The research community at large benefits from the availability of a larger set of pathways for analysis in PathVisio and Cytoscape. The pathway statistics results obtained from PathVisio are significantly better when using a larger set of candidate pathways for analysis. The conversion serves as a general model for integration of multiple pathway resources developed using different approaches. PMID:27203685

  13. Fundamental reaction pathways during coprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Gatsis, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the fundamental reaction pathways in coal petroleum residuum coprocessing. Once the reaction pathways are defined, further efforts can be directed at improving those aspects of the chemistry of coprocessing that are responsible for the desired results such as high oil yields, low dihydrogen consumption, and mild reaction conditions. We decided to carry out this investigation by looking at four basic aspects of coprocessing: (1) the effect of fossil fuel materials on promoting reactions essential to coprocessing such as hydrogen atom transfer, carbon-carbon bond scission, and hydrodemethylation; (2) the effect of varied mild conditions on the coprocessing reactions; (3) determination of dihydrogen uptake and utilization under severe conditions as a function of the coal or petroleum residuum employed; and (4) the effect of varied dihydrogen pressure, temperature, and residence time on the uptake and utilization of dihydrogen and on the distribution of the coprocessed products. Accomplishments are described.

  14. Empirical pathway analysis, without permutation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi-Hui; Barry, William T; Wright, Fred A

    2013-07-01

    Resampling-based expression pathway analysis techniques have been shown to preserve type I error rates, in contrast to simple gene-list approaches that implicitly assume the independence of genes in ranked lists. However, resampling is intensive in computation time and memory requirements. We describe accurate analytic approximations to permutations of score statistics, including novel approaches for Pearson's correlation, and summed score statistics, that have good performance for even relatively small sample sizes. Our approach preserves the essence of permutation pathway analysis, but with greatly reduced computation. Extensions for inclusion of covariates and censored data are described, and we test the performance of our procedures using simulations based on real datasets. These approaches have been implemented in the new R package safeExpress.

  15. Signaling Pathways in Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Erminia; Pulsatelli, Lia; Facchini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    In adult healthy cartilage, chondrocytes are in a quiescent phase characterized by a fine balance between anabolic and catabolic activities. In ageing, degenerative joint diseases and traumatic injuries of cartilage, a loss of homeostatic conditions and an up-regulation of catabolic pathways occur. Since cartilage differentiation and maintenance of homeostasis are finely tuned by a complex network of signaling molecules and biophysical factors, shedding light on these mechanisms appears to be extremely relevant for both the identification of pathogenic key factors, as specific therapeutic targets, and the development of biological approaches for cartilage regeneration. This review will focus on the main signaling pathways that can activate cellular and molecular processes, regulating the functional behavior of cartilage in both physiological and pathological conditions. These networks may be relevant in the crosstalk among joint compartments and increased knowledge in this field may lead to the development of more effective strategies for inducing cartilage repair. PMID:24837833

  16. The updated RGD Pathway Portal utilizes increased curation efficiency and provides expanded pathway information.

    PubMed

    Hayman, G Thomas; Jayaraman, Pushkala; Petri, Victoria; Tutaj, Marek; Liu, Weisong; De Pons, Jeff; Dwinell, Melinda R; Shimoyama, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The RGD Pathway Portal provides pathway annotations for rat, human and mouse genes and pathway diagrams and suites, all interconnected via the pathway ontology. Diagram pages present the diagram and description, with diagram objects linked to additional resources. A newly-developed dual-functionality web application composes the diagram page. Curators input the description, diagram, references and additional pathway objects. The application combines these with tables of rat, human and mouse pathway genes, including genetic information, analysis tool and reference links, and disease, phenotype and other pathway annotations to pathway genes. The application increases the information content of diagram pages while expediting publication.

  17. Identification of Metabolic Pathway Systems.

    PubMed

    Dolatshahi, Sepideh; Voit, Eberhard O

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of parameters in even moderately large biological systems is a significant challenge. This challenge is greatly exacerbated if the mathematical formats of appropriate process descriptions are unknown. To address this challenge, the method of dynamic flux estimation (DFE) was proposed for the analysis of metabolic time series data. Under ideal conditions, the first phase of DFE yields numerical representations of all fluxes within a metabolic pathway system, either as values at each time point or as plots against their substrates and modulators. However, this numerical result does not reveal the mathematical format of each flux. Thus, the second phase of DFE selects functional formats that are consistent with the numerical trends obtained from the first phase. While greatly facilitating metabolic data analysis, DFE is only directly applicable if the pathway system contains as many dependent variables as fluxes. Because most actual systems contain more fluxes than metabolite pools, this requirement is seldom satisfied. Auxiliary methods have been proposed to alleviate this issue, but they are not general. Here we propose strategies that extend DFE toward general, slightly underdetermined pathway systems.

  18. Identification of Metabolic Pathway Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dolatshahi, Sepideh; Voit, Eberhard O.

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of parameters in even moderately large biological systems is a significant challenge. This challenge is greatly exacerbated if the mathematical formats of appropriate process descriptions are unknown. To address this challenge, the method of dynamic flux estimation (DFE) was proposed for the analysis of metabolic time series data. Under ideal conditions, the first phase of DFE yields numerical representations of all fluxes within a metabolic pathway system, either as values at each time point or as plots against their substrates and modulators. However, this numerical result does not reveal the mathematical format of each flux. Thus, the second phase of DFE selects functional formats that are consistent with the numerical trends obtained from the first phase. While greatly facilitating metabolic data analysis, DFE is only directly applicable if the pathway system contains as many dependent variables as fluxes. Because most actual systems contain more fluxes than metabolite pools, this requirement is seldom satisfied. Auxiliary methods have been proposed to alleviate this issue, but they are not general. Here we propose strategies that extend DFE toward general, slightly underdetermined pathway systems. PMID:26904095

  19. Fragmentation pathways of protonated peptides.

    PubMed

    Paizs, Béla; Suhai, Sándor

    2005-01-01

    The fragmentation pathways of protonated peptides are reviewed in the present paper paying special attention to classification of the known fragmentation channels into a simple hierarchy defined according to the chemistry involved. It is shown that the 'mobile proton' model of peptide fragmentation can be used to understand the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides only in a qualitative manner rationalizing differences observed for low-energy collision induced dissociation of peptide ions having or lacking a mobile proton. To overcome this limitation, a deeper understanding of the dissociation chemistry of protonated peptides is needed. To this end use of the 'pathways in competition' (PIC) model that involves a detailed energetic and kinetic characterization of the major peptide fragmentation pathways (PFPs) is proposed. The known PFPs are described in detail including all the pre-dissociation, dissociation, and post-dissociation events. It is our hope that studies to further extend PIC will lead to semi-quantative understanding of the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides which could be used to develop refined bioinformatics algorithms for MS/MS based proteomics. Experimental and computational data on the fragmentation of protonated peptides are reevaluated from the point of view of the PIC model considering the mechanism, energetics, and kinetics of the major PFPs. Evidence proving semi-quantitative predictability of some of the ion intensity relationships (IIRs) of the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides is presented. PMID:15389847

  20. Alcohol Effects on Stress Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Blaine, Sara K.; Milivojevic, Verica; Fox, Helen

    2016-01-01

    A significant amount of neurobiological research regarding the development of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) has focused on alcohol-related activation and long-term alterations in the mesocortical dopaminergic reward pathways. However, alcohol does not only interact with brain reward systems. Many of its acute and chronic effects may be related to allostatic adaptations in hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic stress regulation pathways. For example, acute binge intoxication is associated with hypothalamically driven increases in blood cortisol, norepinephrine, and sex steroid metabolite levels. This may contribute to the development of mesocortical sensitization to alcohol. Furthermore, chronic alcohol exposure is associated with systemic dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis, sympathetic adrenal medullary system, and sex steroid systems. This dysregulation appears to manifest as neuroendocrine tolerance. In this review, we first summarize the literature suggesting that alcohol-induced alterations in these hypothalamic systems influence craving and contribute to the development of AUDs. We note that for women, the effects of alcohol on these neuroendocrine stress regulation systems may be influenced by the rhythmic variations of hormones and steroids across the menstrual cycle. Second, we discuss how changes in these systems may indicate progression of AUDs and increased risk of relapse in both sexes. Specifically, neuroendocrine tolerance may contribute to mesocortical sensitization, which in turn may lead to decreased prefrontal inhibitory control of the dopaminergic reward and hypothalamic stress systems. Thus, pharmacological strategies that counteract alcohol-associated changes in hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic stress regulation pathways may slow the development and progression of AUDs. PMID:27254089

  1. Dual pathways to prospective remembering

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Mark A.; Umanath, Sharda; Einstein, Gilles O.; Waldum, Emily R.

    2015-01-01

    According to the multiprocess framework (McDaniel and Einstein, 2000), the cognitive system can support prospective memory (PM) retrieval through two general pathways. One pathway depends on top–down attentional control processes that maintain activation of the intention and/or monitor the environment for the triggering or target cues that indicate that the intention should be executed. A second pathway depends on (bottom–up) spontaneous retrieval processes, processes that are often triggered by a PM target cue; critically, spontaneous retrieval is assumed not to require monitoring or active maintenance of the intention. Given demand characteristics associated with experimental settings, however, participants are often inclined to monitor, thereby potentially masking discovery of bottom–up spontaneous retrieval processes. In this article, we discuss parameters of laboratory PM paradigms to discourage monitoring and review recent behavioral evidence from such paradigms that implicate spontaneous retrieval in PM. We then re-examine the neuro-imaging evidence from the lens of the multiprocess framework and suggest some critical modifications to existing neuro-cognitive interpretations of the neuro-imaging results. These modifications illuminate possible directions and refinements for further neuro-imaging investigations of PM. PMID:26236213

  2. Dual pathways to prospective remembering.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Mark A; Umanath, Sharda; Einstein, Gilles O; Waldum, Emily R

    2015-01-01

    According to the multiprocess framework (McDaniel and Einstein, 2000), the cognitive system can support prospective memory (PM) retrieval through two general pathways. One pathway depends on top-down attentional control processes that maintain activation of the intention and/or monitor the environment for the triggering or target cues that indicate that the intention should be executed. A second pathway depends on (bottom-up) spontaneous retrieval processes, processes that are often triggered by a PM target cue; critically, spontaneous retrieval is assumed not to require monitoring or active maintenance of the intention. Given demand characteristics associated with experimental settings, however, participants are often inclined to monitor, thereby potentially masking discovery of bottom-up spontaneous retrieval processes. In this article, we discuss parameters of laboratory PM paradigms to discourage monitoring and review recent behavioral evidence from such paradigms that implicate spontaneous retrieval in PM. We then re-examine the neuro-imaging evidence from the lens of the multiprocess framework and suggest some critical modifications to existing neuro-cognitive interpretations of the neuro-imaging results. These modifications illuminate possible directions and refinements for further neuro-imaging investigations of PM.

  3. Quantifying macromolecular conformational transition pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyler, Sean; Kumar, Avishek; Thorpe, Michael; Beckstein, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    Diverse classes of proteins function through large-scale conformational changes that are challenging for computer simulations. A range of fast path-sampling techniques have been used to generate transitions, but it has been difficult to compare paths from (and assess the relative strengths of) different methods. We introduce a comprehensive method (pathway similarity analysis, PSA) for quantitatively characterizing and comparing macromolecular pathways. The Hausdorff and Fréchet metrics (known from computational geometry) are used to quantify the degree of similarity between polygonal curves in configuration space. A strength of PSA is its use of the full information available from the 3 N-dimensional configuration space trajectory without requiring additional specific knowledge about the system. We compare a sample of eleven different methods for the closed-to-open transitions of the apo enzyme adenylate kinase (AdK) and also apply PSA to an ensemble of 400 AdK trajectories produced by dynamic importance sampling MD and the Geometrical Pathways algorithm. We discuss the method's potential to enhance our understanding of transition path sampling methods, validate them, and help guide future research toward deeper physical insights into conformational transitions.

  4. MOLECULAR PATHWAYS: JAK/STAT PATHWAY: MUTATIONS, INHIBITORS, AND RESISTANCE

    PubMed Central

    Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the JAK/STAT pathway has been reported in a variety of disease states, including inflammatory conditions, hematologic malignancies, and solid tumors. For instance, a large proportion of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) carry the acquired gain-of-function JAK2 V617F somatic mutation. This knowledge has dramatically improved our understanding of the pathogenesis of MPNs and it has facilitated the development of therapeutics capable of suppressing the constitutive activation of the JAK/STAT pathway, now recognized as a common underlying biological abnormality in MPNs. Ruxolitinib is an oral JAK1 and JAK2 inhibitor that has recently been approved for the treatment of myelofibrosis and has been tested against other hematologic malignancies. A series of agents with different specificities against different members of the JAK family of proteins is currently undergoing evaluation in clinical trials for patients with MPNs, lymphoma, and solid tumors such as breast or pancreatic cancer. Despite their significant clinical activity exhibited in myelofibrosis, some patients fail to respond or progress during JAK kinase inhibitor therapy. Recent reports have shed light into the mechanisms of resistance to JAK kinase inhibitor therapy. Several approaches hold promise to overcome such resistance. PMID:23406773

  5. Apoptosis pathways and neuroblastoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Fulda, S

    2009-01-01

    Evasion of apoptosis, the cell's intrinsic death program, is a hallmark of human cancers including neuroblastoma. Also, failure to undergo apoptosis may cause treatment resistance, since the cytotoxic activity of anticancer therapies commonly used in the clinic, e.g. chemotherapy, gamma-irradiation or immunotherapy, is predominantly mediated by triggering apoptosis in tumor cells. Therefore, a better understanding of the signaling pathways and molecules that govern apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells is expected to open new avenues for the design of molecular targeted therapies for neuroblastoma.

  6. Pharmacology of intracellular signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nahorski, Stefan R

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a brief and somewhat personalized review of the dramatic developments that have occurred over the last 45 years in our understanding of intracellular signalling pathways associated with G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Signalling via cyclic AMP, the phosphoinositides and Ca2+ is emphasized and these systems have already been revealed as new pharmacological targets. The therapeutic benefits of most of such targets are, however, yet to be realized, but it is certain that the discipline of pharmacology needs to widen its boundaries to meet these challenges in the future. PMID:16402119

  7. AlzPathway, an Updated Map of Curated Signaling Pathways: Towards Deciphering Alzheimer's Disease Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ogishima, Soichi; Mizuno, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Masataka; Miyashita, Akinori; Kuwano, Ryozo; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Nakaya, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder in which loss of neurons and synaptic function causes dementia in the elderly. To clarify AD pathogenesis and develop drugs for AD, thousands of studies have elucidated signaling pathways involved. However, knowledge of AD signaling pathways has not been compiled as a pathway map. In this chapter, we introduce the manual construction of a pathway map in AD which we call "AlzPathway", that comprehensively catalogs signaling pathways in the field of AD. We have collected and manually curated over 100 review articles related to AD, and have built the AD pathway map. AlzPathway is currently composed of thousands of molecules and reactions in neurons, brain blood barrier, presynaptic, postsynaptic, astrocyte, and microglial cells, with their cellular localizations. AlzPathway provides a systems-biology platform of comprehensive AD signaling and related pathways which is expected to contribute to clarification of AD pathogenesis and AD drug development.

  8. An algorithm for linear metabolic pathway alignment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Hofestaedt, Ralf

    2005-01-01

    Metabolic pathway alignment represents one of the most powerful tools for comparative analysis of metabolism. It involves recognition of metabolites common to a set of functionally-related metabolic pathways, interpretation of biological evolution processes and determination of alternative metabolic pathways. Moreover, it is of assistance in function prediction and metabolism modeling. Although research on genomic sequence alignment is extensive, the problem of aligning metabolic pathways has received less attention. We are motivated to develop an algorithm of metabolic pathway alignment to reveal the similarities between metabolic pathways. A new definition of the metabolic pathway is introduced. The algorithm has been implemented into the PathAligner system; its web-based interface is available at http://bibiserv.techfak.uni-bielefeld.de/pathaligner/.

  9. Proteolysis in the secretory pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Guzowski, D.E.; Bienkowski, R.S.

    1987-05-01

    Many secretory proteins are degraded intracellularly rather than secreted, however the location of this catabolic process is not known. The authors have tested the hypothesis that the degradation occurs in the organelles of the secretory pathway. Slices of rat liver were incubated with (/sup 14/C)leucine for 3 h and then incubated under chase conditions for 30 min. The tissue was homogenized and the Golgi apparatus, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER) and rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) were isolated by ultracentrifugation on a discontinuous sucrose gradient. The organelles were incubated in 0.3M sucrose-50 mM citrate (pH 4) for 8-12 h at 37 C; control samples were incubated at 4 C. Percent degradation was calculated as the amount of acid soluble radioactivity released relative to total radioactivity in the sample. Proteolysis in the organelles incubated at 37 C was as follows: Golgi: 15-25%; sER: 10-20%; rER: 10-20%. Proteolysis at 4 C was negligible in all cases. These results support the hypothesis that the compartments of the secretory pathway are capable of degrading newly synthesized secretory proteins.

  10. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  11. Transneuronal pathways to the vestibulocerebellum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, G. D.; Mustari, M. J.; Miselis, R. R.; Perachio, A. A.

    1996-01-01

    The alpha-herpes virus (pseudorabies, PRV) was used to observe central nervous system (CNS) pathways associated with the vestibulocerebellar system. Retrograde transneuronal migration of alpha-herpes virions from specific lobules of the gerbil and rat vestibulo-cerebellar cortex was detected immunohistochemically. Using a time series analysis, progression of infection along polyneuronal cerebellar afferent pathways was examined. Pressure injections of > 20 nanoliters of a 10(8) plaque forming units (pfu) per ml solution of virus were sufficient to initiate an infectious locus which resulted in labeled neurons in the inferior olivary subnuclei, vestibular nuclei, and their afferent cell groups in a progressive temporal fashion and in growing complexity with increasing incubation time. We show that climbing fibers and some other cerebellar afferent fibers transported the virus retrogradely from the cerebellum within 24 hours. One to three days after cerebellar infection discrete cell groups were labeled and appropriate laterality within crossed projections was preserved. Subsequent nuclei labeled with PRV after infection of the flocculus/paraflocculus, or nodulus/uvula, included the following: vestibular (e.g., z) and inferior olivary nuclei (e.g., dorsal cap), accessory oculomotor (e.g., Darkschewitsch n.) and accessory optic related nuclei, (e.g., the nucleus of the optic tract, and the medial terminal nucleus); noradrenergic, raphe, and reticular cell groups (e.g., locus coeruleus, dorsal raphe, raphe pontis, and the lateral reticular tract); other vestibulocerebellum sites, the periaqueductal gray, substantia nigra, hippocampus, thalamus and hypothalamus, amygdala, septal nuclei, and the frontal, cingulate, entorhinal, perirhinal, and insular cortices. However, there were differences in the resulting labeling between infection in either region. Double-labeling experiments revealed that vestibular efferent neurons are located adjacent to, but are not included

  12. Asparagine Metabolic Pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gaufichon, Laure; Rothstein, Steven J; Suzuki, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Inorganic nitrogen in the form of ammonium is assimilated into asparagine via multiple steps involving glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) and asparagine synthetase (AS) in Arabidopsis. The asparagine amide group is liberated by the reaction catalyzed by asparaginase (ASPG) and also the amino group of asparagine is released by asparagine aminotransferase (AsnAT) for use in the biosynthesis of amino acids. Asparagine plays a primary role in nitrogen recycling, storage and transport in developing and germinating seeds, as well as in vegetative and senescence organs. A small multigene family encodes isoenzymes of each step of asparagine metabolism in Arabidopsis, except for asparagine aminotransferase encoded by a single gene. The aim of this study is to highlight the structure of the genes and encoded enzyme proteins involved in asparagine metabolic pathways; the regulation and role of different isogenes; and kinetic and physiological properties of encoded enzymes in different tissues and developmental stages. PMID:26628609

  13. Apoptosis pathways in neuroblastoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Fulda, Simone; Debatin, Klaus Michael

    2003-07-18

    Apoptosis, the cell's intrinsic death program, plays a crucial role in the regulation of tissue homeostasis, and an imbalance between cell death and proliferation may result in tumor formation. Also, killing of tumor cells by diverse cytotoxic approaches such as anticancer drugs, gamma-irradiation, suicide genes or immunotherapy, is predominantly mediated through induction of apoptosis. Failure to activate apoptotic pathways in response to drug treatment may lead to resistance of neuroblastoma cells to anticancer therapies. Understanding the molecular events that regulate apoptosis induced by cytotoxic therapies and how neuroblastoma cells evade apoptotic events may provide a new paradigm for neuroblastoma therapy. Thus, novel strategies targeting resistance of neuroblastoma cells will be based on insights into the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis as well as other forms of cell death.

  14. Nonicosahedral pathways for capsid expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermelli, Paolo; Indelicato, Giuliana; Twarock, Reidun

    2013-09-01

    For a significant number of viruses a structural transition of the protein container that encapsulates the viral genome forms an important part of the life cycle and is a prerequisite for the particle becoming infectious. Despite many recent efforts the mechanism of this process is still not fully understood, and a complete characterization of the expansion pathways is still lacking. We present here a coarse-grained model that captures the essential features of the expansion process and allows us to investigate the conditions under which a viral capsid becomes unstable. Based on this model we demonstrate that the structural transitions in icosahedral viral capsids are likely to occur through a low-symmetry cascade of local expansion events spreading in a wavelike manner over the capsid surface.

  15. Longevity pathways and memory aging.

    PubMed

    Gkikas, Ilias; Petratou, Dionysia; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2014-01-01

    The aging process has been associated with numerous pathologies at the cellular, tissue, and organ level. Decline or loss of brain functions, including learning and memory, is one of the most devastating and feared aspects of aging. Learning and memory are fundamental processes by which animals adjust to environmental changes, evaluate various sensory signals based on context and experience, and make decisions to generate adaptive behaviors. Age-related memory impairment is an important phenotype of brain aging. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying age-related memory impairment is crucial for the development of therapeutic strategies that may eventually lead to the development of drugs to combat memory loss. Studies in invertebrate animal models have taught us much about the physiology of aging and its effects on learning and memory. In this review we survey recent progress relevant to conserved molecular pathways implicated in both aging and memory formation and consolidation. PMID:24926313

  16. Mars - Pathway to the stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelo, J. A., Jr.; Buden, D.

    Mars has and will continue to play a key role in our exploration and conquest of the Solar System. Within the context of the creation of humanity's extraterrestrial civilization, the major technical features of the following Mars programs are reviewed: the Mars Geoscience/Climatology Orbiter; the Mars Aeronomy Orbiter; the Mars airplane; the Mars Penetrator Network; Mars surface rovers and mobility systems; human exploration of Mars; and permanent Martian bases and settlements. Mars properly explored and utilized opens the way to the resources of the asteroid belt and the outer planets; supports the creation of smart machines for space exploration and exploitation; and encourages the creation of autonomous niches of intelligent life within heliocentric space. All of these developments, in turn, establish the technological pathway for the first interstellar missions.

  17. Biosynthetic Pathways of Ergot Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Gerhards, Nina; Neubauer, Lisa; Tudzynski, Paul; Li, Shu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are nitrogen-containing natural products belonging to indole alkaloids. The best known producers are fungi of the phylum Ascomycota, e.g., Claviceps, Epichloë, Penicillium and Aspergillus species. According to their structures, ergot alkaloids can be divided into three groups: clavines, lysergic acid amides and peptides (ergopeptines). All of them share the first biosynthetic steps, which lead to the formation of the tetracyclic ergoline ring system (except the simplest, tricyclic compound: chanoclavine). Different modifications on the ergoline ring by specific enzymes result in an abundance of bioactive natural products, which are used as pharmaceutical drugs or precursors thereof. From the 1950s through to recent years, most of the biosynthetic pathways have been elucidated. Gene clusters from several ergot alkaloid producers have been identified by genome mining and the functions of many of those genes have been demonstrated by knock-out experiments or biochemical investigations of the overproduced enzymes. PMID:25513893

  18. Human stretch reflex pathways reexamined

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Ş. Utku; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Sebik, Oğuz; Berna Ünver, M.; Farina, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Reflex responses of tibialis anterior motor units to stretch stimuli were investigated in human subjects. Three types of stretch stimuli were applied (tap-like, ramp-and-hold, and half-sine stretch). Stimulus-induced responses in single motor units were analyzed using the classical technique, which involved building average surface electromyogram (SEMG) and peristimulus time histograms (PSTH) from the discharge times of motor units and peristimulus frequencygrams (PSF) from the instantaneous discharge rates of single motor units. With the use of SEMG and PSTH, the tap-like stretch stimulus induced five separate reflex responses, on average. With the same single motor unit data, the PSF technique indicated that the tap stimulus induced only three reflex responses. Similar to the finding using the tap-like stretch stimuli, ramp-and-hold stimuli induced several peaks and troughs in the SEMG and PSTH. The PSF analyses displayed genuine increases in discharge rates underlying the peaks but not underlying the troughs. Half-sine stretch stimuli induced a long-lasting excitation followed by a long-lasting silent period in SEMG and PSTH. The increase in the discharge rate, however, lasted for the entire duration of the stimulus and continued during the silent period. The results are discussed in the light of the fact that the discharge rate of a motoneuron has a strong positive linear association with the effective synaptic current it receives and hence represents changes in the membrane potential more directly and accurately than the other indirect measures. This study suggests that the neuronal pathway of the human stretch reflex does not include inhibitory pathways. PMID:24225537

  19. Changing Arctic Ocean freshwater pathways.

    PubMed

    Morison, James; Kwok, Ron; Peralta-Ferriz, Cecilia; Alkire, Matt; Rigor, Ignatius; Andersen, Roger; Steele, Mike

    2012-01-04

    Freshening in the Canada basin of the Arctic Ocean began in the 1990s and continued to at least the end of 2008. By then, the Arctic Ocean might have gained four times as much fresh water as comprised the Great Salinity Anomaly of the 1970s, raising the spectre of slowing global ocean circulation. Freshening has been attributed to increased sea ice melting and contributions from runoff, but a leading explanation has been a strengthening of the Beaufort High--a characteristic peak in sea level atmospheric pressure--which tends to accelerate an anticyclonic (clockwise) wind pattern causing convergence of fresh surface water. Limited observations have made this explanation difficult to verify, and observations of increasing freshwater content under a weakened Beaufort High suggest that other factors must be affecting freshwater content. Here we use observations to show that during a time of record reductions in ice extent from 2005 to 2008, the dominant freshwater content changes were an increase in the Canada basin balanced by a decrease in the Eurasian basin. Observations are drawn from satellite data (sea surface height and ocean-bottom pressure) and in situ data. The freshwater changes were due to a cyclonic (anticlockwise) shift in the ocean pathway of Eurasian runoff forced by strengthening of the west-to-east Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation characterized by an increased Arctic Oscillation index. Our results confirm that runoff is an important influence on the Arctic Ocean and establish that the spatial and temporal manifestations of the runoff pathways are modulated by the Arctic Oscillation, rather than the strength of the wind-driven Beaufort Gyre circulation.

  20. A pathway to academic accreditation

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, M.R.

    1994-09-01

    The pathways to successfully accrediting programs through a partnership with a local college can be convoluted and offer many dead ends. Those pathways can be made straighter and have fewer false starts by following a plan that has worked. Accreditation of courses and programs can add credibility and prestige to a program. The process can be facilitated by following a basic plan such as the one outlined. The discussion will track the preliminary activities that form the ground work for the beginning of the accreditation process through final approval by a college`s State Board of trustees or regents. On the road to approval, the packaging of courses for presentation, the formulation and composition of an advisory committee, the subsequent use of the advisors, presentation to the faculty committees, the presentation to the college`s governing board of trustees or regents, and final approval by the State Board are covered. An important benefit of accreditation is the formation of a partnership with the local college. Teaming with a local college to provide an accredited certificate in a field of employee training is an excellent opportunity to establish an educational partnership within the local community that will be of benefit to the participating entities. It also represents a training/retraining opportunity in direct support of the US Department of Energy`s current missions of partnership and localization. The accredited modules can be taught where appropriate by college personnel or loaned instructors from the work site. By using the company employees who are working with the topics covered in the modules, the courses are kept up-to-date.

  1. Fuel Dependence of Benzene Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Eddings, E; Sarofim, A; Westbrook, C

    2008-07-14

    The relative importance of formation pathways for benzene, an important precursor to soot formation, was determined from the simulation of 22 premixed flames for a wide range of equivalence ratios (1.0 to 3.06), fuels (C{sub 1}-C{sub 12}), and pressures (20 to 760 torr). The maximum benzene concentrations in 15 out of these flames were well reproduced within 30% of the experimental data. Fuel structural properties were found to be critical for benzene production. Cyclohexanes and C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} fuels were found to be among the most productive in benzene formation; and long-chain normal paraffins produce the least amount of benzene. Other properties, such as equivalence ratio and combustion temperatures, were also found to be important in determining the amount of benzene produced in flames. Reaction pathways for benzene formation were examined critically in four premixed flames of structurally different fuels of acetylene, n-decane, butadiene, and cyclohexane. Reactions involving precursors, such as C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} species, were examined. Combination reactions of C{sub 3} species were identified to be the major benzene formation routes with the exception of the cyclohexane flame, in which benzene is formed exclusively from cascading fuel dehydrogenation via cyclohexene and cyclohexadiene intermediates. Acetylene addition makes a minor contribution to benzene formation, except in the butadiene flame where C{sub 4}H{sub 5} radicals are produced directly from the fuel, and in the n-decane flame where C{sub 4}H{sub 5} radicals are produced from large alkyl radical decomposition and H atom abstraction from the resulting large olefins.

  2. Folate metabolic pathways in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Tim J; Beverley, Stephen M

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosomatid parasitic protozoans of the genus Leishmania are autotrophic for both folate and unconjugated pteridines. Leishmania salvage these metabolites from their mammalian hosts and insect vectors through multiple transporters. Within the parasite, folates are reduced by a bifunctional DHFR (dihydrofolate reductase)-TS (thymidylate synthase) and by a novel PTR1 (pteridine reductase 1), which reduces both folates and unconjugated pteridines. PTR1 can act as a metabolic bypass of DHFR inhibition, reducing the effectiveness of existing antifolate drugs. Leishmania possess a reduced set of folate-dependent metabolic reactions and can salvage many of the key products of folate metabolism from their hosts. For example, they lack purine synthesis, which normally requires 10-formyltetrahydrofolate, and instead rely on a network of purine salvage enzymes. Leishmania elaborate at least three pathways for the synthesis of the key metabolite 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate, required for the synthesis of thymidylate, and for 10-formyltetrahydrofolate, whose presumptive function is for methionyl-tRNAMet formylation required for mitochondrial protein synthesis. Genetic studies have shown that the synthesis of methionine using 5-methyltetrahydrofolate is dispensable, as is the activity of the glycine cleavage complex, probably due to redundancy with serine hydroxymethyltransferase. Although not always essential, the loss of several folate metabolic enzymes results in attenuation or loss of virulence in animal models, and a null DHFR-TS mutant has been used to induce protective immunity. The folate metabolic pathway provides numerous opportunities for targeted chemotherapy, with strong potential for 'repurposing' of compounds developed originally for treatment of human cancers or other infectious agents.

  3. Developmental pathways: Sonic hedgehog-Patched-GLI.

    PubMed Central

    Walterhouse, D O; Yoon, J W; Iannaccone, P M

    1999-01-01

    Developmental pathways are networks of genes that act coordinately to establish the body plan. Disruptions of genes in one pathway can have effects in related pathways and may result in serious dysmorphogenesis or cancer. Environmental exposures can be associated with poor pregnancy outcomes, including dysmorphic offspring or children with a variety of diseases. An important goal of environmental science should be reduction of these poor outcomes. This will require an understanding of the genes affected by specific exposures and the consequence of alterations in these genes or their products, which in turn will require an understanding of the pathways critical in development. The ligand Sonic hedgehog, the receptors Patched and Smoothened, and the GLI family of transcription factors represent one such pathway. This pathway illustrates several operating principles important in the consideration of developmental consequences of environmental exposures to toxins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10064544

  4. Premetazoan origin of the Hippo signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Zheng, Yonggang; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Pan, Duojia

    2012-01-01

    Summary Non-aggregative multicellularity requires strict control of cell number. The Hippo signaling pathway coordinates cell proliferation and apoptosis and is a central regulator of organ size in animals. Recent studies have shown the presence of key members of the Hippo pathway in non-bilaterian animals, but failed to identify this pathway outside Metazoa. Through comparative analyses of recently sequenced holozoan genomes, we show that Hippo pathway components, such as the kinases Hippo and Warts, the co-activator Yorkie and the transcription factor Scalloped, were already present in the unicellular ancestors of animals. Remarkably, functional analysis of Hippo components of the amoeboid holozoan Capsaspora owczarzaki, performed in Drosophila, demonstrate that the growth-regulatory activity of the Hippo pathway is conserved in this unicellular lineage. Our findings show that the Hippo pathway evolved well before the origin of Metazoa and highlight the importance of Hippo signaling as a key developmental mechanism pre-dating the origin of Metazoa. PMID:22832104

  5. Stochasticity in the yeast mating pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-Li; Fu, Zheng-Ping; Xu, Xin-Hang; Ouyang, Qi

    2009-05-01

    We report stochastic simulations of the yeast mating signal transduction pathway. The effects of intrinsic and external noise, the influence of cell-to-cell difference in the pathway capacity, and noise propagation in the pathway have been examined. The stochastic temporal behaviour of the pathway is found to be robust to the influence of inherent fluctuations, and intrinsic noise propagates in the pathway in a uniform pattern when the yeasts are treated with pheromones of different stimulus strengths and of varied fluctuations. In agreement with recent experimental findings, extrinsic noise is found to play a more prominent role than intrinsic noise in the variability of proteins. The occurrence frequency for the reactions in the pathway are also examined and a more compact network is obtained by dropping most of the reactions of least occurrence.

  6. Clathrin-Independent Pathways of Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayor, Satyajit; Parton, Robert G.; Donaldson, Julie G.

    2014-01-01

    There are many pathways of endocytosis at the cell surface that apparently operate at the same time. With the advent of new molecular genetic and imaging tools, an understanding of the different ways by which a cell may endocytose cargo is increasing by leaps and bounds. In this review we explore pathways of endocytosis that occur in the absence of clathrin. These are referred to as clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE). Here we primarily focus on those pathways that function at the small scale in which some have distinct coats (caveolae) and others function in the absence of specific coated intermediates. We follow the trafficking itineraries of the material endocytosed by these pathways and finally discuss the functional roles that these pathways play in cell and tissue physiology. It is likely that these pathways will play key roles in the regulation of plasma membrane area and tension and also control the availability of membrane during cell migration. PMID:24890511

  7. Pathway-Based Functional Analysis of Metagenomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, Sivan; Sharon, Itai; Pinter, Ron Y.; Shlomi, Tomer

    Metagenomic data enables the study of microbes and viruses through their DNA as retrieved directly from the environment in which they live. Functional analysis of metagenomes explores the abundance of gene families, pathways, and systems, rather than their taxonomy. Through such analysis researchers are able to identify those functional capabilities most important to organisms in the examined environment. Recently, a statistical framework for the functional analysis of metagenomes was described that focuses on gene families. Here we describe two pathway level computational models for functional analysis that take into account important, yet unaddressed issues such as pathway size, gene length and overlap in gene content among pathways. We test our models over carefully designed simulated data and propose novel approaches for performance evaluation. Our models significantly improve over current approach with respect to pathway ranking and the computations of relative abundance of pathways in environments.

  8. Neural pathways underlying vocal control.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, Uwe

    2002-03-01

    Vocalization is a complex behaviour pattern, consisting of essentially three components: laryngeal activity, respiratory movements and supralaryngeal (articulatory) activity. The motoneurones controlling this behaviour are located in various nuclei in the pons (trigeminal motor nucleus), medulla (facial nucleus, nucl. ambiguus, hypoglossal nucleus) and ventral horn of the spinal cord (cervical, thoracic and lumbar region). Coordination of the different motoneurone pools is carried out by an extensive network comprising the ventrolateral parabrachial area, lateral pontine reticular formation, anterolateral and caudal medullary reticular formation, and the nucl. retroambiguus. This network has a direct access to the phonatory motoneurone pools and receives proprioceptive input from laryngeal, pulmonary and oral mechanoreceptors via the solitary tract nucleus and principal as well as spinal trigeminal nuclei. The motor-coordinating network needs a facilitatory input from the periaqueductal grey of the midbrain and laterally bordering tegmentum in order to be able to produce vocalizations. Voluntary control of vocalization, in contrast to completely innate vocal reactions, such as pain shrieking, needs the intactness of the forebrain. Voluntary control over the initiation and suppression of vocal utterances is carried out by the mediofrontal cortex (including anterior cingulate gyrus and supplementary as well as pre-supplementary motor area). Voluntary control over the acoustic structure of vocalizations is carried out by the motor cortex via pyramidal/corticobulbar as well as extrapyramidal pathways. The most important extrapyramidal pathway seems to be the connection motor cortex-putamen-substantia nigra-parvocellular reticular formation-phonatory motoneurones. The motor cortex depends upon a number of inputs for fulfilling its task. It needs a cerebellar input via the ventrolateral thalamus for allowing a smooth transition between consecutive vocal elements. It

  9. Photodegradation Pathways in Arid Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. Y.; Lin, Y.; Adair, E. C.; Brandt, L.; Carbone, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Recent interest in improving our understanding of decomposition patterns in arid and semi-arid ecosystems and under potentially drier future conditions has led to a flurry of research related to abiotic degradation processes. Oxidation of organic matter by solar radiation (photodegradation) is one abiotic degradation process that contributes significantly to litter decomposition rates. Our meta-analysis results show that increasing solar radiation exposure corresponds to an average increase of 23% in litter mass loss rate with large variation among studies associated primarily with environmental and litter chemistry characteristics. Laboratory studies demonstrate that photodegradation results in CO2 emissions. Indirect estimates suggest that photodegradation could account for as much as 60% of ecosystem CO2 emissions from dry ecosystems, but these CO2 fluxes have not been measured in intact ecosystems. The current data suggest that photodegradation is important, not only for understanding decomposition patterns, but also for modeling organic matter turnover and ecosystem C cycling. However, the mechanisms by which photodegradation operates, along with their environmental and litter chemistry controls, are still poorly understood. Photodegradation can directly influence decomposition rates and ecosystem CO2 flux via photochemical mineralization. It can also indirectly influence biotic decomposition rates by facilitating microbial degradation through breakdown of more recalcitrant compounds into simpler substrates or by suppressing microbial activity directly. All of these pathways influence the decomposition process, but the relative importance of each is uncertain. Furthermore, a specific suite of controls regulates each of these pathways (e.g., environmental conditions such as temperature and relative humidity; physical environment such as canopy architecture and contact with soil; and litter chemistry characteristics such as lignin and cellulose content), and

  10. Racial discrimination & health: pathways & evidence.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ameena T; Mohammed, Selina A; Williams, David R

    2007-10-01

    This review provides an overview of the existing empirical research of the multiple ways by which discrimination can affect health. Institutional mechanisms of discrimination such as restricting marginalized groups to live in undesirable residential areas can have deleterious health consequences by limiting socio-economic status (SES) and creating health-damaging conditions in residential environments. Discrimination can also adversely affect health through restricting access to desirable services such as medical care and creating elevated exposure to traditional stressors such as unemployment and financial strain. Central to racism is an ideology of inferiority that can adversely affect non-dominant groups because some members of marginalized populations will accept as true the dominant society's ideology of their group's inferiority. Limited empirical research indicates that internalized racism is inversely related to health. In addition, the existence of these negative stereotypes can lead dominant group members to consciously and unconsciously discriminate against the stigmatized. An overview of the growing body of research examining the ways in which psychosocial stress generated by subjective experiences of discrimination can affect health is also provided. We review the evidence from the United States and other societies that suggest that the subjective experience of discrimination can adversely affect health and health enhancing behaviours. Advancing our understanding of the relationship between discrimination and health requires improved assessment of the phenomenon of discrimination and increased attention to identifying the psychosocial and biological pathways that may link exposure to discrimination to health status.

  11. Inconsistent pathways of household waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlen, Lisa Aberg, Helena; Lagerkvist, Anders; Berg, Per E.O.

    2009-06-15

    The aim of this study was to provide policy-makers and waste management planners with information about how recycling programs affect the quantities of specific materials recycled and disposed of. Two questions were addressed: which factors influence household waste generation and pathways? and how reliable are official waste data? Household waste flows were studied in 35 Swedish municipalities, and a wide variation in the amount of waste per capita was observed. When evaluating the effect of different waste collection policies, it was found to be important to identify site-specific factors influencing waste generation. Eleven municipal variables were investigated in an attempt to explain the variation. The amount of household waste per resident was higher in populous municipalities and when net commuting was positive. Property-close collection of dry recyclables led to increased delivery of sorted metal, plastic and paper packaging. No difference was seen in the amount of separated recyclables per capita when weight-based billing for the collection of residual waste was applied, but the amount of residual waste was lower. Sixteen sources of error in official waste statistics were identified and the results of the study emphasize the importance of reliable waste generation and composition data to underpin waste management policies.

  12. Two pathways ensuring social harmony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, Matthias; Pamminger, Tobias; Foitzik, Susanne

    2012-08-01

    Reproductive division of labour is a characteristic trait of social insects. The dominant reproductive individual, often the queen, uses chemical communication and/or behaviour to maintain her social status. Queens of many social insects communicate their fertility status via cuticle-bound substances. As these substances usually possess a low volatility, their range in queen-worker communication is potentially limited. Here, we investigate the range and impact of behavioural and chemical queen signals on workers of the ant Temnothorax longispinosus. We compared the behaviour and ovary development of workers subjected to three different treatments: workers with direct chemical and physical contact to the queen, those solely under the influence of volatile queen substances and those entirely separated from the queen. In addition to short-ranged queen signals preventing ovary development in workers, we discovered a novel secondary pathway influencing worker behaviour. Workers with no physical contact to the queen, but exposed to volatile substances, started to develop their ovaries, but did not change their behaviour compared to workers in direct contact to the queen. In contrast, workers in queen-separated groups showed both increased ovary development and aggressive dominance interactions. We conclude that T. longispinosus queens influence worker ovary development and behaviour via two independent signals, both ensuring social harmony within the colony.

  13. Nicotinic receptors in addiction pathways.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Frances M; Mojica, Celina Y; Reynaga, Daisy D

    2013-04-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that consist of pentameric combinations of α and β subunits. These receptors are widely distributed throughout the brain and are highly expressed in addiction circuitry. The role of nAChRs in regulating neuronal activity and motivated behavior is complex and varies both in and among brain regions. The rich diversity of central nAChRs has hampered the characterization of their structure and function with use of classic pharmacological techniques. However, recent molecular approaches using null mutant mice with specific regional lentiviral re-expression, in combination with neuroanatomical and electrophysiological techniques, have allowed the elucidation of the influence of different nAChR types on neuronal circuit activity and behavior. This review will address the influence of nAChRs on limbic dopamine circuitry and the medial habenula-interpeduncular nucleus complex, which are critical mediators of reinforced behavior. Characterization of the mechanisms underlying regulation of addiction pathways by endogenous cholinergic transmission and by nicotine may lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for treating tobacco dependence and other addictions. PMID:23247824

  14. Modeling biochemical pathways in the gene ontology.

    PubMed

    Hill, David P; D'Eustachio, Peter; Berardini, Tanya Z; Mungall, Christopher J; Renedo, Nikolai; Blake, Judith A

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a biological pathway, an ordered sequence of molecular transformations, is used to collect and represent molecular knowledge for a broad span of organismal biology. Representations of biomedical pathways typically are rich but idiosyncratic presentations of organized knowledge about individual pathways. Meanwhile, biomedical ontologies and associated annotation files are powerful tools that organize molecular information in a logically rigorous form to support computational analysis. The Gene Ontology (GO), representing Molecular Functions, Biological Processes and Cellular Components, incorporates many aspects of biological pathways within its ontological representations. Here we present a methodology for extending and refining the classes in the GO for more comprehensive, consistent and integrated representation of pathways, leveraging knowledge embedded in current pathway representations such as those in the Reactome Knowledgebase and MetaCyc. With carbohydrate metabolic pathways as a use case, we discuss how our representation supports the integration of variant pathway classes into a unified ontological structure that can be used for data comparison and analysis. PMID:27589964

  15. Women's Work Pathways Across the Life Course.

    PubMed

    Damaske, Sarah; Frech, Adrianne

    2016-04-01

    Despite numerous changes in women's employment in the latter half of the twentieth century, women's employment continues to be uneven and stalled. Drawing from data on women's weekly work hours in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), we identify significant inequality in women's labor force experiences across adulthood. We find two pathways of stable full-time work for women, three pathways of part-time employment, and a pathway of unpaid labor. A majority of women follow one of the two full-time work pathways, while fewer than 10% follow a pathway of unpaid labor. Our findings provide evidence of the lasting influence of work-family conflict and early socioeconomic advantages and disadvantages on women's work pathways. Indeed, race, poverty, educational attainment, and early family characteristics significantly shaped women's work careers. Work-family opportunities and constraints also were related to women's work hours, as were a woman's gendered beliefs and expectations. We conclude that women's employment pathways are a product of both their resources and changing social environment as well as individual agency. Significantly, we point to social stratification, gender ideologies, and work-family constraints, all working in concert, as key explanations for how women are "tracked" onto work pathways from an early age. PMID:27001314

  16. Modeling biochemical pathways in the gene ontology

    PubMed Central

    Hill, David P.; D’Eustachio, Peter; Berardini, Tanya Z.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Renedo, Nikolai; Blake, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a biological pathway, an ordered sequence of molecular transformations, is used to collect and represent molecular knowledge for a broad span of organismal biology. Representations of biomedical pathways typically are rich but idiosyncratic presentations of organized knowledge about individual pathways. Meanwhile, biomedical ontologies and associated annotation files are powerful tools that organize molecular information in a logically rigorous form to support computational analysis. The Gene Ontology (GO), representing Molecular Functions, Biological Processes and Cellular Components, incorporates many aspects of biological pathways within its ontological representations. Here we present a methodology for extending and refining the classes in the GO for more comprehensive, consistent and integrated representation of pathways, leveraging knowledge embedded in current pathway representations such as those in the Reactome Knowledgebase and MetaCyc. With carbohydrate metabolic pathways as a use case, we discuss how our representation supports the integration of variant pathway classes into a unified ontological structure that can be used for data comparison and analysis. PMID:27589964

  17. Pathways to Success for Michigan's Opportunity Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Youth Policy Forum, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Each young person must navigate his/her own pathway into and through postsecondary education and the workforce to long-term success personalized to his/her own unique needs and desires. The pathway to long-term success is often articulated as a straight road through K-12 education into postsecondary education (either academic or technical…

  18. Fuel Pathway Integration Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    The Fuel Pathway Integration Technical Team (FPITT) supports the U.S. DRIVE Partnership (the Partnership) in the identification and evaluation of implementation scenarios for fuel cell technology pathways, including hydrogen and fuel cell electric vehicles in the transportation sector, both during a transition period and in the long term.

  19. Optic pathway degeneration in Japanese black cattle.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Shiori; Funato, Shingo; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Inokuma, Hisashi; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu

    2015-02-01

    Degeneration of the optic pathway has been reported in various animal species including cattle. We experienced a case of bilateral optic tract degeneration characterized by severe gliosis in a Japanese black cattle without any obvious visual defects. To evaluate the significance, pathological nature and pathogenesis of the lesions, we examined the optic pathway in 60 cattle (41 Japanese black, 13 Holstein and 6 crossbreed) with or without ocular abnormalities. None of these animals had optic canal stenosis. Degenerative changes with severe gliosis in the optic pathway, which includes the optic nerve, optic chiasm and optic tract, were only observed in 8 Japanese black cattle with or without ocular abnormalities. Furthermore, strong immunoreactivity of glial fibrillary acidic protein was observed in the retinal stratum opticum and ganglion cell layer in all 5 cattle in which the optic pathway lesions could be examined. As etiological research, we also examined whether the concentrations of vitamin A and vitamin B12 or bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection was associated with optic pathway degeneration. However, our results suggested that the observed optic pathway degeneration was probably not caused by these factors. These facts indicate the presence of optic pathway degeneration characterized by severe gliosis that has never been reported in cattle without bilateral compressive lesions in the optic pathway or bilateral severe retinal atrophy. PMID:25421501

  20. Optic pathway degeneration in Japanese black cattle.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Shiori; Funato, Shingo; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Inokuma, Hisashi; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu

    2015-02-01

    Degeneration of the optic pathway has been reported in various animal species including cattle. We experienced a case of bilateral optic tract degeneration characterized by severe gliosis in a Japanese black cattle without any obvious visual defects. To evaluate the significance, pathological nature and pathogenesis of the lesions, we examined the optic pathway in 60 cattle (41 Japanese black, 13 Holstein and 6 crossbreed) with or without ocular abnormalities. None of these animals had optic canal stenosis. Degenerative changes with severe gliosis in the optic pathway, which includes the optic nerve, optic chiasm and optic tract, were only observed in 8 Japanese black cattle with or without ocular abnormalities. Furthermore, strong immunoreactivity of glial fibrillary acidic protein was observed in the retinal stratum opticum and ganglion cell layer in all 5 cattle in which the optic pathway lesions could be examined. As etiological research, we also examined whether the concentrations of vitamin A and vitamin B12 or bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection was associated with optic pathway degeneration. However, our results suggested that the observed optic pathway degeneration was probably not caused by these factors. These facts indicate the presence of optic pathway degeneration characterized by severe gliosis that has never been reported in cattle without bilateral compressive lesions in the optic pathway or bilateral severe retinal atrophy.

  1. The Career Pathways How-To Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Davis; Spence, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Career pathways is a series of connected education and training programs and support services that enable individuals to secure employment within a specific industry or occupational sector, and to advance over time to successively higher levels of education and employment in that sector. Career pathways are distinct from most educational efforts…

  2. Career pathways in research: clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Foxcroft, K J

    This article, the first in a five-part series on career pathways, discusses the facility for nurses to develop their clinical expertise to consultant level, which is an exciting development on the career pathway for nurses in clinical practice. The introduction of consultant nurses has re-emphasised the need for experienced leadership in research and practice development in clinical settings.

  3. Greater Capital Region Career Pathways Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workforce Strategy Center, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This case study documents the activities of the Greater Capital Region Career Pathways Initiative (CPI), a partnership to develop regional, demand driven career pathways for the biotechnology sector in and around Albany, NY. This document is written for three primary audiences. First, it provides a report to the New York State Department of Labor…

  4. Opportunities for pharmaceutical care with critical pathways.

    PubMed

    Koch, K E

    1995-01-01

    Critical pathways are multidisciplinary tools designed to improve patient care and efficiency. Almost every path requires some type of pharmacotherapeutic intervention, from selection of surgical prophylaxis to management of anticoagulation. Pharmacists should become involved with the critical pathway process because it offers an excellent opportunity to incorporate pharmaceutical care and to meet Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization compliance criteria.

  5. Pathways for virus assembly around nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, Jason D; Perkett, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the pathways by which viral capsid proteins assemble around their genomes could identify key intermediates as potential drug targets. In this work we use computer simulations to characterize assembly over a wide range of capsid protein-protein interaction strengths and solution ionic strengths. We find that assembly pathways can be categorized into two classes, in which intermediates are either predominantly ordered or disordered. Our results suggest that estimating the protein-protein and the protein-genome binding affinities may be sufficient to predict which pathway occurs. Furthermore, the calculated phase diagrams suggest that knowledge of the dominant assembly pathway and its relationship to control parameters could identify optimal strategies to thwart or redirect assembly to block infection. Finally, analysis of simulation trajectories suggests that the two classes of assembly pathways can be distinguished in single molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy or bulk time resolved small angle x-ray scattering experiments. PMID:25036288

  6. Methylerythritol Phosphate Pathway of Isoprenoid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lishan; Chang, Wei-chen; Xiao, Youli; Liu, Hung-wen; Liu, Pinghua

    2016-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a class of natural products with more than 50,000 members. All isoprenoids are constructed from two precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and its isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). Two of the most important discoveries in isoprenoid biosynthetic studies in recent years are the elucidation of a second isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway) and a modified mevalonate (MVA) pathway. In this review, mechanistic insights on the MEP pathway enzymes are summarized. Since many isoprenoids have important biological activities, the need to produce them in sufficient quantities for downstream research efforts or commercial application is apparent. Recent advances in both the MVA and MEP pathway-based synthetic biology efforts are also illustrated by reviewing the landmark work of artemisinic acid and taxadien-5α-ol production through microbial fermentations. PMID:23746261

  7. A thermosensory pathway that controls body temperature.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Morrison, Shaun F

    2008-01-01

    Defending body temperature against environmental thermal challenges is one of the most fundamental homeostatic functions that are governed by the nervous system. Here we describe a somatosensory pathway that essentially constitutes the afferent arm of the thermoregulatory reflex that is triggered by cutaneous sensation of environmental temperature changes. Using in vivo electrophysiological and anatomical approaches in the rat, we found that lateral parabrachial neurons are pivotal in this pathway by glutamatergically transmitting cutaneous thermosensory signals received from spinal somatosensory neurons directly to the thermoregulatory command center, the preoptic area. This feedforward pathway mediates not only sympathetic and shivering thermogenic responses but also metabolic and cardiac responses to skin cooling challenges. Notably, this 'thermoregulatory afferent' pathway exists in parallel with the spinothalamocortical somatosensory pathway that mediates temperature perception. These findings make an important contribution to our understanding of both the somatosensory system and thermal homeostasis -- two mechanisms that are fundamental to the nervous system and to our survival.

  8. Proton Pathways in Green Fluorescence Protein

    PubMed Central

    Agmon, Noam

    2005-01-01

    Proton pathways in green fluorescent protein (GFP) are more extended than previously reported. In the x-ray data of wild-type GFP, a two-step exit pathway exists from the active site to the protein surface, controlled by a threonine switch. A proton entry pathway begins at a glutamate-lysine cluster around Glu-5, and extends all the way to the buried Glu-222 near the active site. This structural evidence suggests that GFP may function as a portable light-driven proton-pump, with proton emitted in the excited state through the switchable exit pathway, and replenished from Glu-222 and the Glu-5 entry pathway in the ground state. PMID:15681647

  9. Biological pathways as communicating computer systems.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Marta Z; Heath, John K

    2009-08-15

    Time and cost are the enemies of cell biology. The number of experiments required to rigorously dissect and comprehend a pathway of even modest complexity is daunting. Methods are needed to formulate biological pathways in a machine-analysable fashion, which would automate the process of considering all possible experiments in a complex pathway and identify those that command attention. In this Essay, we describe a method that is based on the exploitation of computational tools that were originally developed to analyse reactive communicating computer systems such as mobile phones and web browsers. In this approach, the biological process is articulated as an executable computer program that can be interrogated using methods that were developed to analyse complex software systems. Using case studies of the FGF, MAPK and Delta/Notch pathways, we show that the application of this technology can yield interesting insights into the behaviour of signalling pathways, which have subsequently been corroborated by experimental data. PMID:19657015

  10. Pathway Analysis Incorporating Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Identified Candidate Pathways for the Seven Common Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peng-Lin; Yu, Ya-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Pathway analysis has become popular as a secondary analysis strategy for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Most of the current pathway analysis methods aggregate signals from the main effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes within a pathway without considering the effects of gene-gene interactions. However, gene-gene interactions can also have critical effects on complex diseases. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks have been used to define gene pairs for the gene-gene interaction tests. Incorporating the PPI information to define gene pairs for interaction tests within pathways can increase the power for pathway-based association tests. We propose a pathway association test, which aggregates the interaction signals in PPI networks within a pathway, for GWAS with case-control samples. Gene size is properly considered in the test so that genes do not contribute more to the test statistic simply due to their size. Simulation studies were performed to verify that the method is a valid test and can have more power than other pathway association tests in the presence of gene-gene interactions within a pathway under different scenarios. We applied the test to the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium GWAS datasets for seven common diseases. The most significant pathway is the chaperones modulate interferon signaling pathway for Crohn’s disease (p-value = 0.0003). The pathway modulates interferon gamma, which induces the JAK/STAT pathway that is involved in Crohn’s disease. Several other pathways that have functional implications for the seven diseases were also identified. The proposed test based on gene-gene interaction signals in PPI networks can be used as a complementary tool to the current existing pathway analysis methods focusing on main effects of genes. An efficient software implementing the method is freely available at http://puppi.sourceforge.net. PMID:27622767

  11. Pathway Analysis Incorporating Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Identified Candidate Pathways for the Seven Common Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peng-Lin; Yu, Ya-Wen; Chung, Ren-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pathway analysis has become popular as a secondary analysis strategy for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Most of the current pathway analysis methods aggregate signals from the main effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes within a pathway without considering the effects of gene-gene interactions. However, gene-gene interactions can also have critical effects on complex diseases. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks have been used to define gene pairs for the gene-gene interaction tests. Incorporating the PPI information to define gene pairs for interaction tests within pathways can increase the power for pathway-based association tests. We propose a pathway association test, which aggregates the interaction signals in PPI networks within a pathway, for GWAS with case-control samples. Gene size is properly considered in the test so that genes do not contribute more to the test statistic simply due to their size. Simulation studies were performed to verify that the method is a valid test and can have more power than other pathway association tests in the presence of gene-gene interactions within a pathway under different scenarios. We applied the test to the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium GWAS datasets for seven common diseases. The most significant pathway is the chaperones modulate interferon signaling pathway for Crohn's disease (p-value = 0.0003). The pathway modulates interferon gamma, which induces the JAK/STAT pathway that is involved in Crohn's disease. Several other pathways that have functional implications for the seven diseases were also identified. The proposed test based on gene-gene interaction signals in PPI networks can be used as a complementary tool to the current existing pathway analysis methods focusing on main effects of genes. An efficient software implementing the method is freely available at http://puppi.sourceforge.net. PMID:27622767

  12. Pain pathways in the primate.

    PubMed

    Willis, W D

    1985-01-01

    From the work reviewed here, it appears that the classical view that there is a sensory channel for pain sensation rather like sensory channels for other sensations seems plausible. However, pain has the property of producing more prominent motivational-affective behaviors than do other sensations (although there are certainly motivational-affective components of the responses to many sensory experiences, such as a verbal attack or the odor of a favorite perfume). It may be that certain nociceptive neurons, such as the STT cells that project to the medial thalamus that have total body receptive fields and many similar spinoreticular neurons, are concerned not so much with sensory events but rather with motivational-affective responses. Nevertheless, there are specific nociceptive afferent fibers, nociceptive spinothalamic tract cells with restricted receptive fields, nociceptive VPL thalamic and SI cortical neurons that presumably could play a crucial role in the sensory-discriminative aspects of pain (signalling, for example, stimulus intensity, location, duration, rate, and quality). Interestingly, many nociceptive neurons receive a convergent input from both sensitive mechanoreceptors and from nociceptors and so can be classified as "wide dynamic range" or multiconvergent neurons. It is not at all clear what the significance is of this kind of multimodal convergence. One possibility is that the weaker tactile input is treated as noise and largely ignored by higher processing centers in the brain. Another possibility is that WDR cells are switched in function by the action of descending pathways originating in the brain stem or cerebral cortex (cf., Gerhart et al., 1984; Yezierski et al., 1983). In any event, the solution of this problem is likely to be very important for the full understanding of the coding properties of nociceptive neurons, and this issue is reminiscent of the coding problem discussed by David Smith in this volume with respect to the gustatory

  13. The quantitative role of alternative pathway amplification in classical pathway induced terminal complement activation.

    PubMed

    Harboe, M; Ulvund, G; Vien, L; Fung, M; Mollnes, T E

    2004-12-01

    Complement activation with formation of biologically potent mediators like C5a and the terminal C5b-9 complex (TCC) contributes essentially to development of inflammation and tissue damage in a number of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. A particular role for complement in the ischaemia/reperfusion injury of the heart, skeletal muscle, central nervous system, intestine and kidney has been suggested from animal studies. Previous experiments in C3 and C4 knockout mice suggested an important role of the classical or lectin pathway in initiation of complement activation during intestinal ischaemia/reperfusion injury while later use of factor D knockout mice showed the alternative pathway to be critically involved. We hypothesized that alternative pathway amplification might play a more critical role in classical pathway-induced C5 activation than previously recognized and used pathway-selective inhibitory mAbs to further elucidate the role of the alternative pathway. Here we demonstrate that selective blockade of the alternative pathway by neutralizing factor D in human serum diluted 1 : 2 with mAb 166-32 inhibited more than 80% of C5a and TCC formation induced by solid phase IgM and solid- and fluid-phase human aggregated IgG via the classical pathway. The findings emphasize the influence of alternative pathway amplification on the effect of initial classical pathway activation and the therapeutic potential of inhibiting the alternative pathway in clinical conditions with excessive and uncontrolled complement activation. PMID:15544620

  14. Remodeling the isoprenoid pathway in tobacco by expressing the cytoplasmic mevalonate pathway in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shashi; Hahn, Frederick M; Baidoo, Edward; Kahlon, Talwinder S; Wood, Delilah F; McMahan, Colleen M; Cornish, Katrina; Keasling, Jay D; Daniell, Henry; Whalen, Maureen C

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic engineering to enhance production of isoprenoid metabolites for industrial and medical purposes is an important goal. The substrate for isoprenoid synthesis in plants is produced by the mevalonate pathway (MEV) in the cytosol and by the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway in plastids. A multi-gene approach was employed to insert the entire cytosolic MEV pathway into the tobacco chloroplast genome. Molecular analysis confirmed the site-specific insertion of seven transgenes and homoplasmy. Functionality was demonstrated by unimpeded growth on fosmidomycin, which specifically inhibits the MEP pathway. Transplastomic plants containing the MEV pathway genes accumulated higher levels of mevalonate, carotenoids, squalene, sterols, and triacyglycerols than control plants. This is the first time an entire eukaryotic pathway with six enzymes has been transplastomically expressed in plants. Thus, we have developed an important tool to redirect metabolic fluxes in the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway and a viable multigene strategy for engineering metabolism in plants.

  15. Logical modelling of Drosophila signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Mbodj, Abibatou; Junion, Guillaume; Brun, Christine; Furlong, Eileen E M; Thieffry, Denis

    2013-09-01

    A limited number of signalling pathways are involved in the specification of cell fate during the development of all animals. Several of these pathways were originally identified in Drosophila. To clarify their roles, and possible cross-talk, we have built a logical model for the nine key signalling pathways recurrently used in metazoan development. In each case, we considered the associated ligands, receptors, signal transducers, modulators, and transcription factors reported in the literature. Implemented using the logical modelling software GINsim, the resulting models qualitatively recapitulate the main characteristics of each pathway, in wild type as well as in various mutant situations (e.g. loss-of-function or gain-of-function). These models constitute pluggable modules that can be used to assemble comprehensive models of complex developmental processes. Moreover, these models of Drosophila pathways could serve as scaffolds for more complicated models of orthologous mammalian pathways. Comprehensive model annotations and GINsim files are provided for each of the nine considered pathways.

  16. Hippo pathway regulation of gastrointestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fa-Xing; Meng, Zhipeng; Plouffe, Steven W; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo pathway plays a crucial role in regulating tissue homeostasis and organ size, and its deregulation is frequently observed in human cancer. Yap is the major effector of and is inhibited by the Hippo pathway. In mouse model studies, inducible Yap expression in multiple tissues results in organ overgrowth. In the liver, knockout of upstream Hippo pathway components or transgenic expression of Yap leads to liver enlargement and hepatocellular carcinoma. In the small intestine or colon, deletion of upstream Hippo pathway components also results in expansion of intestinal progenitor cells and eventual development of adenomas. Genetic deletion of Yap in the intestine does not change the intestinal structure, but Yap is essential for intestinal repair upon certain types of tissue injury. The function of the Hippo pathway has also been studied in other gastrointestinal tissues, including the pancreas and stomach. Here we provide a brief overview of the Hippo pathway and discuss the physiological and pathological functions of this tumor suppressor pathway in gastrointestinal tissues.

  17. Brain evolution by brain pathway duplication.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Jarvis, Erich D

    2015-12-19

    Understanding the mechanisms of evolution of brain pathways for complex behaviours is still in its infancy. Making further advances requires a deeper understanding of brain homologies, novelties and analogies. It also requires an understanding of how adaptive genetic modifications lead to restructuring of the brain. Recent advances in genomic and molecular biology techniques applied to brain research have provided exciting insights into how complex behaviours are shaped by selection of novel brain pathways and functions of the nervous system. Here, we review and further develop some insights to a new hypothesis on one mechanism that may contribute to nervous system evolution, in particular by brain pathway duplication. Like gene duplication, we propose that whole brain pathways can duplicate and the duplicated pathway diverge to take on new functions. We suggest that one mechanism of brain pathway duplication could be through gene duplication, although other mechanisms are possible. We focus on brain pathways for vocal learning and spoken language in song-learning birds and humans as example systems. This view presents a new framework for future research in our understanding of brain evolution and novel behavioural traits.

  18. Brain evolution by brain pathway duplication

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of evolution of brain pathways for complex behaviours is still in its infancy. Making further advances requires a deeper understanding of brain homologies, novelties and analogies. It also requires an understanding of how adaptive genetic modifications lead to restructuring of the brain. Recent advances in genomic and molecular biology techniques applied to brain research have provided exciting insights into how complex behaviours are shaped by selection of novel brain pathways and functions of the nervous system. Here, we review and further develop some insights to a new hypothesis on one mechanism that may contribute to nervous system evolution, in particular by brain pathway duplication. Like gene duplication, we propose that whole brain pathways can duplicate and the duplicated pathway diverge to take on new functions. We suggest that one mechanism of brain pathway duplication could be through gene duplication, although other mechanisms are possible. We focus on brain pathways for vocal learning and spoken language in song-learning birds and humans as example systems. This view presents a new framework for future research in our understanding of brain evolution and novel behavioural traits. PMID:26554045

  19. Targeting the Apoptosis Pathway in Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Shadia; Wang, Rui; Gandhi, Varsha

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is a cell death program that is well-orchestrated for normal tissue homeostasis and for removal of damaged, old, or infected cells. It is regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. The intrinsic pathway responds to signals such as ultraviolet radiation or DNA damage and activates “executioner” caspases through a mitochondria-dependent pathway. The extrinsic pathway is activated by death signals induced, for example, by an infection that activates the immune system or receptor-mediated pathways. The extrinsic pathway signals also cascade down to executioner caspases that cleave target proteins and lead to cell death. Strict control of cellular apoptosis is important for the hematopoietic system as it has a high turnover rate. However, the apoptosis program is often deregulated in hematologic malignancies leading to the accumulation of malignant cells. Therefore, apoptosis pathways have been identified for development of anticancer therapeutics. We review here the proteins that have been targeted for anticancer drug development in hematologic malignancies. These include BCL-2 family proteins, death ligands and receptors, inhibitor of apoptosis family proteins, and caspases. Except for caspase activators, drugs that target each of these classes of proteins have advanced into clinical trials. PMID:24295132

  20. Biosynthetic Pathways of Brassinolide in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takahiro; Fujioka, Shozo; Choe, Sunghwa; Takatsuto, Suguru; Tax, Frans E.; Yoshida, Shigeo; Feldmann, Kenneth A.

    2000-01-01

    Our previous studies on the endogenous brassinosteroids (BRs) in Arabidopsis have provided suggestive evidence for the operation of the early C6-oxidation and the late C6-oxidation pathways, leading to brassinolide (BL) in Arabidopsis. However, to date the in vivo operation of these pathways has not been fully confirmed in this species. This paper describes metabolic studies using deuterium-labeled BRs in wild-type and BR-insensitive mutant (bri1) seedlings to establish the intermediates of the biosynthetic pathway of BL in Arabidopsis. The first evidence for the conversion of campestanol to 6-deoxocathasterone and the conversion of 6-deoxocathasterone to 6-deoxoteasterone is provided. The later biosynthetic steps (6-deoxoteasterone → 3-dehydro-6-deoxoteasterone → 6-deoxotyphasterol → 6-deoxocastasterone → 6α-hydroxycastasterone → castasterone → BL) were demonstrated by stepwise metabolic experiments. Therefore, these studies complete the documentation of the late C6-oxidation pathway. The biosynthetic sequence involved in the early C6-oxidation pathway (teasterone → 3-dehydroteasterone → typhasterol → castasterone → BL) was also demonstrated. These results show that both the early and late C6-oxidation pathways are functional in Arabidopsis. In addition we report two new observations: the presence of a new branch in the pathway, C6 oxidation of 6-deoxotyphasterol to typhasterol, and increased metabolic flow in BR-insensitive mutants. PMID:10982435

  1. Bioretrosynthetic construction of a didanosine biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Birmingham, William R.; Starbird, Chrystal A.; Panosian, Timothy D.; Nannemann, David P.; Iverson, T. M.; Bachmann, Brian O.

    2014-01-01

    Concatenation of engineered biocatalysts into multistep pathways dramatically increases their utility, but development of generalizable assembly methods remains a significant challenge. Herein we evaluate ‘bioretrosynthesis’, which is an application of the retrograde evolution hypothesis, for biosynthetic pathway construction. To test bioretrosynthesis, we engineered a pathway for synthesis of the antiretroviral nucleoside analog didanosine (2,3-dideoxyinosine). Applying both directed evolution and structure-based approaches, we began pathway construction with a retro-extension from an engineered purine nucleoside phosphorylase and evolved 1,5-phosphopentomutase to accept the substrate 2,3-dideoxyribose 5-phosphate with a 700-fold change in substrate selectivity and 3-fold increased turnover in cell lysate. A subsequent retrograde pathway extension, via ribokinase engineering, resulted in a didanosine pathway with a 9,500-fold change in nucleoside production selectivity and 50-fold increase in didanosine production. Unexpectedly, the result of this bioretrosynthetic step was not a retro-extension from phosphopentomutase, but rather the discovery of a fortuitous pathway-shortening bypass via the engineered ribokinase. PMID:24657930

  2. Brain evolution by brain pathway duplication.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Jarvis, Erich D

    2015-12-19

    Understanding the mechanisms of evolution of brain pathways for complex behaviours is still in its infancy. Making further advances requires a deeper understanding of brain homologies, novelties and analogies. It also requires an understanding of how adaptive genetic modifications lead to restructuring of the brain. Recent advances in genomic and molecular biology techniques applied to brain research have provided exciting insights into how complex behaviours are shaped by selection of novel brain pathways and functions of the nervous system. Here, we review and further develop some insights to a new hypothesis on one mechanism that may contribute to nervous system evolution, in particular by brain pathway duplication. Like gene duplication, we propose that whole brain pathways can duplicate and the duplicated pathway diverge to take on new functions. We suggest that one mechanism of brain pathway duplication could be through gene duplication, although other mechanisms are possible. We focus on brain pathways for vocal learning and spoken language in song-learning birds and humans as example systems. This view presents a new framework for future research in our understanding of brain evolution and novel behavioural traits. PMID:26554045

  3. Dissecting the PCP pathway: one or more pathways?: Does a separate Wnt-Fz-Rho pathway drive morphogenesis?

    PubMed

    Lapébie, Pascal; Borchiellini, Carole; Houliston, Evelyn

    2011-10-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP), the alignment of cells within 2D tissue planes, involves a set of core molecular regulators highly conserved between animals and cell types. These include the transmembrane proteins Frizzled (Fz) and VanGogh and the cytoplasmic regulators Dishevelled (Dsh) and Prickle. It is widely accepted that this core forms part of a 'PCP pathway' for signal transduction, which can affect cell morphology through activation of an evolutionary ancient regulatory module involving Rho family GTPases and Myosin II, and/or the JNK kinase cascade. We have re-examined the evidence for interactions between the proposed PCP pathway components, and question the placing of the cell morphology regulators in the same pathway as the PCP core. While Fz and Dsh are clearly involved in both PCP and Rho-based cell morphology regulation, available evidence cannot currently discriminate whether these processes are linked mechanistically by a shared Fz/Dsh population, or pass by two distinct pathways.

  4. Role of care pathways in interprofessional teamwork.

    PubMed

    Scaria, Minimol Kulakkottu

    2016-08-24

    Cohesive interprofessional teamwork is essential to successful healthcare services. Interprofessional teamwork is the means by which different healthcare professionals - with diverse knowledge, skills and talents - collaborate to achieve a common goal. Several interventions are available to improve teamwork in the healthcare setting. This article explores the role of care pathways in improving interprofessional teamwork. Care pathways enhance teamwork by promoting coordination, collaboration, communication and decision making to achieve optimal healthcare outcomes. They result in improved staff knowledge, communication, documentation and interprofessional relations. Care pathways also contribute to patient-centred care and increase patient satisfaction.

  5. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  6. The Evolution of the Wnt Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Wnt genes are important regulators of embryogenesis and cell differentiation in vertebrates and insects. New data revealed by comparative genomics have now shown that members of the Wnt signaling pathway can be found in all clades of metazoans, but not in fungi, plants, or unicellular eukaryotes. This article focuses on new data from recent genomic analyses of several basal metazoan organisms, providing evidence that the Wnt pathway was a primordial signaling pathway during evolution. The formation of a Wnt signaling center at the site of gastrulation was instrumental for the formation of a primary, anterior–posterior body axis, which can be traced throughout animal evolution. PMID:22751150

  7. Role of care pathways in interprofessional teamwork.

    PubMed

    Scaria, Minimol Kulakkottu

    2016-08-24

    Cohesive interprofessional teamwork is essential to successful healthcare services. Interprofessional teamwork is the means by which different healthcare professionals - with diverse knowledge, skills and talents - collaborate to achieve a common goal. Several interventions are available to improve teamwork in the healthcare setting. This article explores the role of care pathways in improving interprofessional teamwork. Care pathways enhance teamwork by promoting coordination, collaboration, communication and decision making to achieve optimal healthcare outcomes. They result in improved staff knowledge, communication, documentation and interprofessional relations. Care pathways also contribute to patient-centred care and increase patient satisfaction. PMID:27641591

  8. Algorithm to assemble pathways from processes

    SciTech Connect

    Mittenthal, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    To understand or to modify a biological pathway, the first step is to determine the patterns of coupling among its processes that are compatible with its input-output relation. Algorithms for this purpose have been devised for metabolic pathways, in which the reactions typically leave the enzymes unmodified. As shown here, one of these algorithms can also assemble molecular networks in which reactions modify proteins, if the proteins are included among the inputs to the reactions. Thus one procedure suffices to assemble pathways for metabolism, cytoplasmic signal transduction, and gene regulation. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Quantum control and pathway manipulation in rubidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fang; Wang, Yaoxiong; Rey-de-Castro, Roberto; Rabitz, Herschel; Shuang, Feng

    2015-09-01

    There is an increasing interest in the extraction and control of the interfering quantum pathway amplitudes induced by control fields during laser-matter interactions. The Hamiltonian-encoding and observable-decoding (HE-OD) technique has been introduced for extracting the amplitudes of the pathways present in the dynamics and has recently been experimentally applied to the pathway manipulation of atomic rubidium. This paper theoretically explores various strategies for manipulating pathway amplitudes in the context of a laser field interacting with a multilevel system similar to atomic rubidium for both narrow-band and broadband ultrafast fields. In the perturbation regime, two second-order quantum pathways connecting the Rb states 5 S1 /2 and 5 D3 /2 dominate the dynamics, namely, 5 S1 /2→5 P3 /2→5 D3 /2 (pathway 1) and 5 S1 /2→5 P1 /2→5 D3 /2 (pathway 2). For narrow-band field control, the analysis is carried out in the time domain with the laser field including only four narrow-band envelope subpulses centered at the resonant frequencies. When the two pathways cooperate constructively, temporal oscillations appear in the ratio of the two pathway amplitudes, and we conclude in this case that the period corresponds to the detuning between transitions 5 S1 /2→5 P3 /2 and 5 P3 /2→5 D3 /2 . For broadband field control, the dynamics are treated in the frequency domain with the laser field including both resonant and continuous nonresonant frequency components. Various control strategies based on manipulating the phase of selected spectral components are tested. Compared to the outcome from a transform limited pulse, a π/2 step scheme can increase the dynamic range of the ratio between the two pathway amplitudes by a factor of ˜3 . A scheme that manipulates eight spectral blocks, in which the spectral boundaries depend on the resonant frequencies, can increase the ratio by several orders of magnitude. Numerical simulations show that further dividing the

  10. Laboratory evolution of catabolic enzymes and pathways.

    PubMed

    Parales, Rebecca E; Ditty, Jayna L

    2005-06-01

    The laboratory evolution of environmentally relevant enzymes and proteins has resulted in the generation of optimized and stabilized enzymes, as well as enzymes with activity against new substrates. Numerous methods, including random mutagenesis, site-directed mutagenesis and DNA shuffling, have been widely used to generate variants of existing enzymes. These evolved catabolic enzymes have application for improving biodegradation pathways, generating engineered pathways for the degradation of particularly recalcitrant compounds, and for the development of biocatalytic processes to produce useful compounds. Regulatory proteins associated with catabolic pathways have been utilized to generate biosensors for the detection of bioavailable concentrations of environmentally relevant chemicals.

  11. The Hippo pathway: regulators and regulations

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fa-Xing; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Control of cell number is crucial in animal development and tissue homeostasis, and its dysregulation may result in tumor formation or organ degeneration. The Hippo pathway in both Drosophila and mammals regulates cell number by modulating cell proliferation, cell death, and cell differentiation. Recently, numerous upstream components involved in the Hippo pathway have been identified, such as cell polarity, mechanotransduction, and G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Actin cytoskeleton or cellular tension appears to be the master mediator that integrates and transmits upstream signals to the core Hippo signaling cascade. Here, we review regulatory mechanisms of the Hippo pathway and discuss potential implications involved in different physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:23431053

  12. Virus Budding and the ESCRT Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Votteler, Jörg; Sundquist, Wesley I.

    2013-01-01

    Enveloped viruses escape infected cells by budding through limiting membranes. In the decade since the discovery that the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) recruits cellular ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport) machinery to facilitate viral budding, this pathway has emerged as the major escape route for enveloped viruses. In cells, the ESCRT pathway catalyzes the analogous membrane fission events required for the abscission stage of cytokinesis and for a series of “reverse topology” vesiculation events. Studies of enveloped virus budding are therefore providing insights into the complex cellular mechanisms of cell division and membrane protein trafficking (and vice versa). Here, we review how viruses mimic cellular recruiting signals to usurp the ESCRT pathway, discuss mechanistic models for ESCRT pathway functions, and highlight important research frontiers. PMID:24034610

  13. Advances in Targeting Signal Transduction Pathways

    PubMed Central

    McCubrey, James A.; Steelman, Linda S.; Chappell, William H.; Sun, Lin; Davis, Nicole M.; Abrams, Stephen L.; Franklin, Richard A.; Cocco, Lucio; Evangelisti, Camilla; Chiarini, Francesca; Martelli, Alberto M.; Libra, Massimo; Candido, Saverio; Ligresti, Giovanni; Malaponte, Grazia; Mazzarino, Maria C.; Fagone, Paolo; Donia, Marco; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Polesel, Jerry; Talamini, Renato; Bäsecke, Jörg; Mijatovic, Sanja; Maksimovic-Ivanic, Danijela; Milella, Michele; Tafuri, Agostino; Dulińska-Litewka, Joanna; Laidler, Piotr; D'Assoro, Antonio B.; Drobot, Lyudmyla; Umezawa, Kazuo; Montalto, Giuseppe; Cervello, Melchiorre; Demidenko, Zoya N.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, significant advances have occurred in both our understanding of the complexity of signal transduction pathways as well as the isolation of specific inhibitors which target key components in those pathways. Furthermore critical information is being accrued regarding how genetic mutations can affect the sensitivity of various types of patients to targeted therapy. Finally, genetic mechanisms responsible for the development of resistance after targeted therapy are being discovered which may allow the creation of alternative therapies to overcome resistance. This review will discuss some of the highlights over the past few years on the roles of key signaling pathways in various diseases, the targeting of signal transduction pathways and the genetic mechanisms governing sensitivity and resistance to targeted therapies. PMID:23455493

  14. The Pentose Phosphate Pathway in Parasitic Trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Kovářová, Julie; Barrett, Michael P

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic trypanosomatids cause important diseases. Dissecting the biochemistry of these organisms offers a means of discovering targets against which inhibitors may be designed and developed as drugs. The pentose phosphate pathway is a key route of glucose metabolism in most organisms, providing NADPH for use as a cellular reductant and various carbohydrate intermediates used in cellular metabolism. The pathway and its enzymes have been studied in Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and various Leishmania species. Its functions in these parasites are becoming clear. Some enzymes of the pathway are essential to the parasites and have structural features distinguishing them from their mammalian counterparts, and this has stimulated several programs of inhibitor discovery with a view to targeting the pathway with new drugs.

  15. Hippo Pathway Activity Influences Liver Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Yimlamai, Dean; Christodoulou, Constantina; Galli, Giorgio G.; Yanger, Kilangsungla; Pepe-Mooney, Brian; Gurung, Basanta; Shrestha, Kriti; Cahan, Patrick; Stanger, Ben Z.; Camargo, Fernando D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is an important regulator of cellular proliferation and organ size. However, little is known about the role of this cascade in the control of cell fate. Employing a combination of lineage tracing, clonal analysis, and organoid culture approaches, we demonstrate that Hippo-pathway activity is essential for the maintenance of the differentiated hepatocyte state. Remarkably, acute inactivation of Hippo-pathway signaling in vivo is sufficient to de-differentiate, at very high efficiencies, adult hepatocytes into cells bearing progenitor characteristics. These hepatocyte-derived progenitor cells demonstrate self-renewal and engraftment capacity at the single cell level. We also identify the NOTCH signaling pathway as a functional important effector downstream of the Hippo transducer YAP. Our findings uncover a potent role for Hippo/YAP signaling in controlling liver cell fate, and reveal an unprecedented level of phenotypic plasticity in mature hepatocytes, which has implications for the understanding and manipulation of liver regeneration. PMID:24906150

  16. Targeting RTK Signaling Pathways in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Regad, Tarik

    2015-01-01

    The RAS/MAP kinase and the RAS/PI3K/AKT pathways play a key role in the regulation of proliferation, differentiation and survival. The induction of these pathways depends on Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) that are activated upon ligand binding. In cancer, constitutive and aberrant activations of components of those pathways result in increased proliferation, survival and metastasis. For instance, mutations affecting RTKs, Ras, B-Raf, PI3K and AKT are common in perpetuating the malignancy of several types of cancers and from different tissue origins. Therefore, these signaling pathways became prime targets for cancer therapy. This review aims to provide an overview about the most frequently encountered mutations, the pathogenesis that results from such mutations and the known therapeutic strategies developed to counteract their aberrant functions. PMID:26404379

  17. Biochemical pathways in seed oil synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bates, Philip D; Stymne, Sten; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-06-01

    Oil produced in plant seeds is utilized as a major source of calories for human nutrition, as feedstocks for non-food uses such as soaps and polymers, and can serve as a high-energy biofuel. The biochemical pathways leading to oil (triacylglycerol) synthesis in seeds involve multiple subcellular organelles, requiring extensive lipid trafficking. Phosphatidylcholine plays a central role in these pathways as a substrate for acyl modifications and likely as a carrier for the trafficking of acyl groups between organelles and membrane subdomains. Although much has been clarified regarding the enzymes and pathways responsible for acyl-group flux, there are still major gaps in our understanding. These include the identity of several key enzymes, how flux between alternative pathways is controlled and the specialized cell biology leading to biogenesis of oil bodies that store up to 80% of carbon in seeds.

  18. Genetic pathways in colorectal and other cancers.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, M; Straub, J; Tomlinson, I P; Bodmer, W F

    1999-12-01

    Cells from cancers show aberrant behaviour such as unrestrained growth, invasion into adjacent tissue and metastasis. All these features of cancer cell behaviour can be explained in terms of genetic changes and the functional impact of these changes. In this review, colorectal cancer (CRC) is examined as a classical example of multistep carcinogenesis. First there is an overview which shows that cancers develop by a process of somatic evolution. This gives rise to preferred genetic pathways of tumorigenesis. The factors which may influence the development and ultimate choice of genetic pathways are then examined. Next, CRC is studied as a specific disease and the putative genetic pathways are described. The mutations that comprise these pathways and the possible functional sequelae of these are explored. The review concludes with a look at those avenues which may further elucidate the natural history of CRC and lead to improved therapy.

  19. Genetic pathways in colorectal and other cancers.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, M; Straub, J; Tomlinson, I P; Bodmer, W F

    1999-03-01

    Cells from cancers show aberrant behaviour such as unrestrained growth, invasion into adjacent tissue and metastasis. All these features of cancer cell behaviour can be explained in terms of genetic changes and the functional impact of these changes. In this review, colorectal cancer (CRC) is examined as a classical example of multistep carcinogenesis. First there is an overview which shows that cancers develop by a process of somatic evolution. This gives rise to preferred genetic pathways of tumorigenesis. The factors which may influence the development and ultimate choice of genetic pathways are then examined. Next, CRC is studied as a specific disease and the putative genetic pathways are described. The mutations that comprise these pathways and the possible functional sequelae of these are explored. The review concludes with a look at those avenues which may further elucidate the natural history of CRC and lead to improved therapy.

  20. Minimal distortion pathways in polyhedral rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Casanova, David; Cirera, Jordi; Llunell, Miquel; Alemany, Pere; Avnir, David; Alvarez, Santiago

    2004-02-18

    A definition of minimum distortion paths between two polyhedra in terms of continuous shape measures (CShM) is presented. A general analytical expression deduced for such pathways makes use of one parameter, the minimum distortion constant, that can be easily obtained through the CShM methodology and is herein tabulated for pairs of polyhedra having four to eight vertexes. The work presented here also allows us to obtain representative model molecular structures along the interconversion pathways. Several commonly used polytopal rearrangement pathways are shown to be in fact minimum distortion pathways: the spread path leading from the tetrahedron to the square, the Berry pseudorotation that interconverts a square pyramid and a trigonal bipyramid, and the Bailar twist for the interconversion of the octahedron and the trigonal prism. Examples of applications to the analysis of the stereochemistries of several families of metal complexes are presented. PMID:14871107

  1. Unique sugar metabolic pathways of bifidobacteria.

    PubMed

    Fushinobu, Shinya

    2010-01-01

    Bifidobacteria have many beneficial effects for human health. The gastrointestinal tract, where natural colonization of bifidobacteria occurs, is an environment poor in nutrition and oxygen. Therefore, bifidobacteria have many unique glycosidases, transporters, and metabolic enzymes for sugar fermentation to utilize diverse carbohydrates that are not absorbed by host humans and animals. They have a unique, effective central fermentative pathway called bifid shunt. Recently, a novel metabolic pathway that utilizes both human milk oligosaccharides and host glycoconjugates was found. The galacto-N-biose/lacto-N-biose I metabolic pathway plays a key role in colonization in the infant gastrointestinal tract. These pathways involve many unique enzymes and proteins. This review focuses on their molecular mechanisms, as revealed by biochemical and crystallographic studies.

  2. Genetic dissection of cardiac growth control pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLellan, W. R.; Schneider, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac muscle cells exhibit two related but distinct modes of growth that are highly regulated during development and disease. Cardiac myocytes rapidly proliferate during fetal life but exit the cell cycle irreversibly soon after birth, following which the predominant form of growth shifts from hyperplastic to hypertrophic. Much research has focused on identifying the candidate mitogens, hypertrophic agonists, and signaling pathways that mediate these processes in isolated cells. What drives the proliferative growth of embryonic myocardium in vivo and the mechanisms by which adult cardiac myocytes hypertrophy in vivo are less clear. Efforts to answer these questions have benefited from rapid progress made in techniques to manipulate the murine genome. Complementary technologies for gain- and loss-of-function now permit a mutational analysis of these growth control pathways in vivo in the intact heart. These studies have confirmed the importance of suspected pathways, have implicated unexpected pathways as well, and have led to new paradigms for the control of cardiac growth.

  3. Modularized TGFbeta-Smad Signaling Pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Yongfeng; Wang, M.; Carra, C.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFbeta) signaling pathway is a prominent regulatory signaling pathway controlling various important cellular processes. It can be induced by several factors, including ionizing radiation. It is regulated by Smads in a negative feedback loop through promoting increases in the regulatory Smads in the cell nucleus, and subsequent expression of inhibitory Smad, Smad7 to form a ubiquitin ligase with Smurf targeting active TGF receptors for degradation. In this work, we proposed a mathematical model to study the radiation-induced Smad-regulated TGF signaling pathway. By modularization, we are able to analyze each module (subsystem) and recover the nonlinear dynamics of the entire network system. Meanwhile the excitability, a common feature observed in the biological systems, along the TGF signaling pathway is discussed by mathematical analysis and numerical simulation.

  4. Adverse Outcome Pathways: From Definition to Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    A challenge for both human health and ecological toxicologists is the transparent application of mechanistic (e.g., molecular, biochemical, histological) data to risk assessments. The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) is a conceptual framework designed to meet this need. Specifical...

  5. Critical pathways: effectiveness in achieving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ireson, C L

    1997-06-01

    Refining the clinical care process to produce high-quality patient outcomes is becoming increasingly important as health care administrators strive for success in a mature managed care environment. This study examines the effect of structuring interventions and the evaluation of patient response, inherent in the critical pathway process, on clinical, length-of-hospital-stay, and financial patient outcomes. This study differs from previous critical pathway trials in that an objective measure of quality was used and the critical pathways were not introduced concurrently with a case management delivery model. The results show that critical pathways may be a significant determinant of improved quality in a managed care environment. The findings also suggest ways to improve nursing practice, nursing education, and nursing informatics.

  6. Chemical Secretory Pathway Modulation in Plant Protoplasts.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, Francesca; Pompa, Andrea; Bellucci, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The classical Golgi pathway is not the only mechanism for vacuolar protein transport in plants because alternative transport mechanisms have been described. The existence of these alternative pathways can be demonstrated using several chemicals and here we describe the use of brefeldin A (BFA), endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase H (Endo-H), and tunicamycin, on isolated tobacco leaf protoplasts. Two main methods are illustrated in this chapter, protoplast pulse-chase followed by protein immunoprecipitation, and protoplast immunofluorescence. PMID:27665551

  7. A more flexible lipoprotein sorting pathway.

    PubMed

    Chahales, Peter; Thanassi, David G

    2015-05-01

    Lipoprotein biogenesis in Gram-negative bacteria occurs by a conserved pathway, each step of which is considered essential. In contrast to this model, LoVullo and colleagues demonstrate that the N-acyl transferase Lnt is not required in Francisella tularensis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This suggests the existence of a more flexible lipoprotein pathway, likely due to a modified Lol transporter complex, and raises the possibility that pathogens may regulate lipoprotein processing to modulate interactions with the host. PMID:25755190

  8. Pathway Model and Nonextensive Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathai, A. M.; Haubold, H. J.; Tsallis, C.

    2015-12-01

    The established technique of eliminating upper or lower parameters in a general hypergeometric series is profitably exploited to create pathways among confluent hypergeometric functions, binomial functions, Bessel functions, and exponential series. One such pathway, from the mathematical statistics point of view, results in distributions which naturally emerge within nonextensive statistical mechanics and Beck-Cohen superstatistics, as pursued in generalizations of Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics.

  9. Subpathway Analysis based on Signaling-Pathway Impact Analysis of Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianbin; Shen, Liangzhong; Shang, Xuequn; Liu, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Pathway analysis is a common approach to gain insight from biological experiments. Signaling-pathway impact analysis (SPIA) is one such method and combines both the classical enrichment analysis and the actual perturbation on a given pathway. Because this method focuses on a single pathway, its resolution generally is not very high because the differentially expressed genes may be enriched in a local region of the pathway. In the present work, to identify cancer-related pathways, we incorporated a recent subpathway analysis method into the SPIA method to form the “sub-SPIA method.” The original subpathway analysis uses the k-clique structure to define a subpathway. However, it is not sufficiently flexible to capture subpathways with complex structure and usually results in many overlapping subpathways. We therefore propose using the minimal-spanning-tree structure to find a subpathway. We apply this approach to colorectal cancer and lung cancer datasets, and our results show that sub-SPIA can identify many significant pathways associated with each specific cancer that other methods miss. Based on the entire pathway network in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, we find that the pathways identified by sub-SPIA not only have the largest average degree, but also are more closely connected than those identified by other methods. This result suggests that the abnormality signal propagating through them might be responsible for the specific cancer or disease. PMID:26207919

  10. Endocytic Control of Cellular Signaling at the Primary Cilium.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Lotte B; Mogensen, Johanne B; Christensen, Søren T

    2016-09-01

    Primary cilia are dynamic signaling organelles that project from the cell surface to sense diverse chemical, physical and morphogenetic cues. Ciliary defects therefore cause diseases (ciliopathies) that affect multiple organs in developing and adult organisms. Cilia-mediated signaling involves the orchestrated movement of signaling proteins in and out of the ciliary compartment, including movement of receptors such as the Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) receptor Patched 1 (PTCH1), Smoothened (SMO), and various other G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), as well as transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptors I and II (TGF-β-RI/II). We provide here a current understanding of trafficking events associated with cilia-mediated signaling, with emphasis on the involvement of clathrin-dependent receptor-mediated endocytosis in regulating ciliary Shh and TGF-β signaling. PMID:27364476

  11. Prion aggregates transfer through tunneling nanotubes in endocytic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Seng; Victoria, Guiliana Soraya; Marzo, Ludovica; Ghosh, Rupam; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of neurodegenerative diseases caused by the misfolding of the cellular prion protein to an infectious form PrP(Sc). The intercellular transfer of PrP(Sc) is a question of immediate interest as the cell-to-cell movement of the infectious particle causes the inexorable propagation of disease. We have previously identified tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) as one mechanism by which PrP(Sc) can move between cells. Here we investigate further the details of this mechanism and show that PrP(Sc) travels within TNTs in endolysosomal vesicles. Additionally we show that prion infection of CAD cells increases both the number of TNTs and intercellular transfer of membranous vesicles, thereby possibly playing an active role in its own intercellular transfer via TNTs.

  12. Prion aggregates transfer through tunneling nanotubes in endocytic vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Seng; Victoria, Guiliana Soraya; Marzo, Ludovica; Ghosh, Rupam; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of neurodegenerative diseases caused by the misfolding of the cellular prion protein to an infectious form PrPSc. The intercellular transfer of PrPSc is a question of immediate interest as the cell-to-cell movement of the infectious particle causes the inexorable propagation of disease. We have previously identified tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) as one mechanism by which PrPSc can move between cells. Here we investigate further the details of this mechanism and show that PrPSc travels within TNTs in endolysosomal vesicles. Additionally we show that prion infection of CAD cells increases both the number of TNTs and intercellular transfer of membranous vesicles, thereby possibly playing an active role in its own intercellular transfer via TNTs. PMID:25996400

  13. Force generation by endocytic actin patches in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Anders E; Bayly, Philip V

    2014-04-15

    Membrane deformation during endocytosis in yeast is driven by local, templated assembly of a sequence of proteins including polymerized actin and curvature-generating coat proteins such as clathrin. Actin polymerization is required for successful endocytosis, but it is not known by what mechanisms actin polymerization generates the required pulling forces. To address this issue, we develop a simulation method in which the actin network at the protein patch is modeled as an active gel. The deformation of the gel is treated using a finite-element approach. We explore the effects and interplay of three different types of force driving invagination: 1), forces perpendicular to the membrane, generated by differences between actin polymerization rates at the edge of the patch and those at the center; 2), the inherent curvature of the coat-protein layer; and 3), forces parallel to the membrane that buckle the coat protein layer, generated by an actomyosin contractile ring. We find that with optimistic estimates for the stall stress of actin gel growth and the shear modulus of the actin gel, actin polymerization can generate almost enough force to overcome the turgor pressure. In combination with the other mechanisms, actin polymerization can the force over the critical value.

  14. Force Generation by Endocytic Actin Patches in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Anders E.; Bayly, Philip V.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane deformation during endocytosis in yeast is driven by local, templated assembly of a sequence of proteins including polymerized actin and curvature-generating coat proteins such as clathrin. Actin polymerization is required for successful endocytosis, but it is not known by what mechanisms actin polymerization generates the required pulling forces. To address this issue, we develop a simulation method in which the actin network at the protein patch is modeled as an active gel. The deformation of the gel is treated using a finite-element approach. We explore the effects and interplay of three different types of force driving invagination: 1), forces perpendicular to the membrane, generated by differences between actin polymerization rates at the edge of the patch and those at the center; 2), the inherent curvature of the coat-protein layer; and 3), forces parallel to the membrane that buckle the coat protein layer, generated by an actomyosin contractile ring. We find that with optimistic estimates for the stall stress of actin gel growth and the shear modulus of the actin gel, actin polymerization can generate almost enough force to overcome the turgor pressure. In combination with the other mechanisms, actin polymerization can the force over the critical value. PMID:24739159

  15. Neural pathways for visual speech perception

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Lynne E.; Liebenthal, Einat

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the questions, what levels of speech can be perceived visually, and how is visual speech represented by the brain? Review of the literature leads to the conclusions that every level of psycholinguistic speech structure (i.e., phonetic features, phonemes, syllables, words, and prosody) can be perceived visually, although individuals differ in their abilities to do so; and that there are visual modality-specific representations of speech qua speech in higher-level vision brain areas. That is, the visual system represents the modal patterns of visual speech. The suggestion that the auditory speech pathway receives and represents visual speech is examined in light of neuroimaging evidence on the auditory speech pathways. We outline the generally agreed-upon organization of the visual ventral and dorsal pathways and examine several types of visual processing that might be related to speech through those pathways, specifically, face and body, orthography, and sign language processing. In this context, we examine the visual speech processing literature, which reveals widespread diverse patterns of activity in posterior temporal cortices in response to visual speech stimuli. We outline a model of the visual and auditory speech pathways and make several suggestions: (1) The visual perception of speech relies on visual pathway representations of speech qua speech. (2) A proposed site of these representations, the temporal visual speech area (TVSA) has been demonstrated in posterior temporal cortex, ventral and posterior to multisensory posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS). (3) Given that visual speech has dynamic and configural features, its representations in feedforward visual pathways are expected to integrate these features, possibly in TVSA. PMID:25520611

  16. Leptin signalling pathways in hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Obin; Kim, Ki Woo; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is the most critical hormone in the homeostatic regulation of energy balance among those so far discovered. Leptin primarily acts on the neurons of the mediobasal part of hypothalamus to regulate food intake, thermogenesis, and the blood glucose level. In the hypothalamic neurons, leptin binding to the long form leptin receptors on the plasma membrane initiates multiple signaling cascades. The signaling pathways known to mediate the actions of leptin include JAK-STAT signaling, PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 signaling, SHP2-ERK signaling, AMPK signaling, and mTOR-S6K signaling. Recent evidence suggests that leptin signaling in hypothalamic neurons is also linked to primary cilia function. On the other hand, signaling molecules/pathways mitigating leptin actions in hypothalamic neurons have been extensively investigated in an effort to treat leptin resistance observed in obesity. These include SOCS3, tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B, and inflammatory signaling pathways such as IKK-NFκB and JNK signaling, and ER stress-mitochondrial signaling. In this review, we discuss leptin signaling pathways in the hypothalamus, with a particular focus on the most recently discovered pathways. PMID:26786898

  17. Pathways to hydrogen as an energy carrier.

    PubMed

    Sigfusson, Thorsteinn I

    2007-04-15

    When hydrogen is used as an alternative energy carrier, it is very important to understand the pathway from the primary energy source to the final use of the carrier. This involves, for example, the understanding of greenhouse gas emissions associated with the production of hydrogen and throughout the lifecycle of a given utilization pathway as well as various energy or exergy efficiencies and aspects involved. This paper which is based on a talk given at the Royal Society in London assesses and reviews the various production pathways for hydrogen with emphasis on emissions, energy use and energy efficiency. The paper also views some aspects of the breaking of the water molecule and examines some new emerging physical evidence which could pave the way to a new and more feasible pathway. A special attention will be given to the use of the renewable energy pathway. As an example of a hydrogen society that could be based on renewable primary energy, the paper describes the hydrogen society experiments in Iceland as well as unconventional hydrogen obtained from geothermal gases. In the light of our experience, attempts will be made to shed light upon drivers as well as obstacles in the development of a hydrogen society.

  18. Leptin signalling pathways in hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Obin; Kim, Ki Woo; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is the most critical hormone in the homeostatic regulation of energy balance among those so far discovered. Leptin primarily acts on the neurons of the mediobasal part of hypothalamus to regulate food intake, thermogenesis, and the blood glucose level. In the hypothalamic neurons, leptin binding to the long form leptin receptors on the plasma membrane initiates multiple signaling cascades. The signaling pathways known to mediate the actions of leptin include JAK-STAT signaling, PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 signaling, SHP2-ERK signaling, AMPK signaling, and mTOR-S6K signaling. Recent evidence suggests that leptin signaling in hypothalamic neurons is also linked to primary cilia function. On the other hand, signaling molecules/pathways mitigating leptin actions in hypothalamic neurons have been extensively investigated in an effort to treat leptin resistance observed in obesity. These include SOCS3, tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B, and inflammatory signaling pathways such as IKK-NFκB and JNK signaling, and ER stress-mitochondrial signaling. In this review, we discuss leptin signaling pathways in the hypothalamus, with a particular focus on the most recently discovered pathways.

  19. Unraveling tissue regeneration pathways using chemical genetics.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Lijoy K; Sengupta, Sumitra; Kawakami, Atsushi; Andreasen, Eric A; Löhr, Christiane V; Loynes, Catherine A; Renshaw, Stephen A; Peterson, Randall T; Tanguay, Robert L

    2007-11-30

    Identifying the molecular pathways that are required for regeneration remains one of the great challenges of regenerative medicine. Although genetic mutations have been useful for identifying some molecular pathways, small molecule probes of regenerative pathways might offer some advantages, including the ability to disrupt pathway function with precise temporal control. However, a vertebrate regeneration model amenable to rapid throughput small molecule screening is not currently available. We report here the development of a zebrafish early life stage fin regeneration model and its use in screening for small molecules that modulate tissue regeneration. By screening 2000 biologically active small molecules, we identified 17 that specifically inhibited regeneration. These compounds include a cluster of glucocorticoids, and we demonstrate that transient activation of the glucocorticoid receptor is sufficient to block regeneration, but only if activation occurs during wound healing/blastema formation. In addition, knockdown of the glucocorticoid receptor restores regenerative capability to nonregenerative, glucocorticoid-exposed zebrafish. To test whether the classical anti-inflammatory action of glucocorticoids is responsible for blocking regeneration, we prevented acute inflammation following amputation by antisense repression of the Pu.1 gene. Although loss of Pu.1 prevents the inflammatory response, regeneration is not affected. Collectively, these results indicate that signaling from exogenous glucocorticoids impairs blastema formation and limits regenerative capacity through an acute inflammation-independent mechanism. These studies also demonstrate the feasibility of exploiting chemical genetics to define the pathways that govern vertebrate regeneration. PMID:17848559

  20. Metabolic pathway alterations that support cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Vander Heiden, M G; Lunt, S Y; Dayton, T L; Fiske, B P; Israelsen, W J; Mattaini, K R; Vokes, N I; Stephanopoulos, G; Cantley, L C; Metallo, C M; Locasale, J W

    2011-01-01

    Proliferating cells adapt metabolism to support the conversion of available nutrients into biomass. How cell metabolism is regulated to balance the production of ATP, metabolite building blocks, and reducing equivalents remains uncertain. Proliferative metabolism often involves an increased rate of glycolysis. A key regulated step in glycolysis is catalyzed by pyruvate kinase to convert phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate. Surprisingly, there is strong selection for expression of the less active M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) in tumors and other proliferative tissues. Cell growth signals further decrease PKM2 activity, and cells with less active PKM2 use another pathway with separate regulatory properties to convert PEP to pyruvate. One consequence of using this alternative pathway is an accumulation of 3-phosphoglycerate (3PG) that leads to the diversion of 3PG into the serine biosynthesis pathway. In fact, in some cancers a substantial portion of the total glucose flux is directed toward serine synthesis, and genetic evidence suggests that glucose flux into this pathway can promote cell transformation. Environmental conditions can also influence the pathways that cells use to generate biomass with the source of carbon for lipid synthesis changing based on oxygen availability. Together, these findings argue that distinct metabolic phenotypes exist among proliferating cells, and both genetic and environmental factors influence how metabolism is regulated to support cell growth.

  1. RNAi pathways in parasitic protists and worms.

    PubMed

    Batista, Thiago Mafra; Marques, João Trindade

    2011-08-24

    Tropical diseases caused by parasitic worms and protists are of major public health concern affecting millions of people worldwide. New therapeutic and diagnostic tools would be of great help in dealing with the public health and economic impact of these diseases. RNA interference (RNAi) pathways utilize small non-coding RNAs to regulate gene expression in a sequence-specific manner. In recent years, a wealth of data about the mechanisms and biological functions of RNAi pathways in distinct groups of eukaryotes has been described. Often, RNAi pathways have unique features that are restricted to groups of eukaryotes. The focus of this review will be on RNAi pathways in specific groups of parasitic eukaryotes that include Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium and Schistosoma mansoni. These parasites are the causative agents of Chagas disease, Malaria, and Schistosomiasis, respectively, all of which are tropical diseases that would greatly benefit from the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools. In this context, we will describe specific features of RNAi pathways in each of these parasitic eukaryotic groups and discuss how they could be exploited for the treatment of tropical diseases.

  2. The Mevalonate Pathway of Staphylococcus aureus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Balibar, Carl J.; Shen, Xiaoyu; Tao, Jianshi

    2009-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a class of ubiquitous organic molecules synthesized from the five-carbon starter unit isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP). Comprising more than 30,000 known natural products, isoprenoids serve various important biological functions in many organisms. In bacteria, undecaprenyl pyrophosphate is absolutely required for the formation of cell wall peptidoglycan and other cell surface structures, while ubiquinones and menaquinones, both containing an essential prenyl moiety, are key electron carriers in respiratory energy generation. There is scant knowledge on the nature and regulation of bacterial isoprenoid pathways. In order to explore the cellular responses to perturbations in the mevalonate pathway, responsible for producing the isoprenoid precursor IPP in many gram-positive bacteria and eukaryotes, we constructed three strains of Staphylococcus aureus in which each of the mevalonate pathway genes is regulated by an IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside)-inducible promoter. We used DNA microarrays to profile the transcriptional effects of downregulating the components of the mevalonate pathway in S. aureus and demonstrate that decreased expression of the mevalonate pathway leads to widespread downregulation of primary metabolism genes, an upregulation in virulence factors and cell wall biosynthetic determinants, and surprisingly little compensatory expression in other isoprenoid biosynthetic genes. We subsequently correlate these transcriptional changes with downstream metabolic consequences. PMID:19028897

  3. Pyrimidine salvage pathway in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Villela, A D; Sánchez-Quitian, Z A; Ducati, R G; Santos, D S; Basso, L A

    2011-01-01

    The causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, infects one-third of the world population. TB remains the leading cause of mortality due to a single bacterial pathogen. The worldwide increase in incidence of M. tuberculosis has been attributed to the high proliferation rates of multi and extensively drug-resistant strains, and to co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus. There is thus a continuous requirement for studies on mycobacterial metabolism to identify promising targets for the development of new agents to combat TB. Singular characteristics of this pathogen, such as functional and structural features of enzymes involved in fundamental metabolic pathways, can be evaluated to identify possible targets for drug development. Enzymes involved in the pyrimidine salvage pathway might be attractive targets for rational drug design against TB, since this pathway is vital for all bacterial cells, and is composed of enzymes considerably different from those present in humans. Moreover, the enzymes of the pyrimidine salvage pathway might have an important role in the mycobacterial latent state, since M. tuberculosis has to recycle bases and/or nucleosides to survive in the hostile environment imposed by the host. The present review describes the enzymes of M. tuberculosis pyrimidine salvage pathway as attractive targets for the development of new antimycobacterial agents. Enzyme functional and structural data have been included to provide a broader knowledge on which to base the search for compounds with selective biological activity.

  4. Infectious Entry Pathway of Enterovirus B Species

    PubMed Central

    Marjomäki, Varpu; Turkki, Paula; Huttunen, Moona

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus B species (EV-B) are responsible for a vast number of mild and serious acute infections. They are also suspected of remaining in the body, where they cause persistent infections contributing to chronic diseases such as type I diabetes. Recent studies of the infectious entry pathway of these viruses revealed remarkable similarities, including non-clathrin entry of large endosomes originating from the plasma membrane invaginations. Many cellular factors regulating the efficient entry have recently been associated with macropinocytic uptake, such as Rac1, serine/threonine p21-activated kinase (Pak1), actin, Na/H exchanger, phospholipace C (PLC) and protein kinase Cα (PKCα). Another characteristic feature is the entry of these viruses to neutral endosomes, independence of endosomal acidification and low association with acidic lysosomes. The biogenesis of neutral multivesicular bodies is crucial for their infection, at least for echovirus 1 (E1) and coxsackievirus A9 (CVA9). These pathways are triggered by the virus binding to their receptors on the plasma membrane, and they are not efficiently recycled like other cellular pathways used by circulating receptors. Therefore, the best “markers” of these pathways may be the viruses and often their receptors. A deeper understanding of this pathway and associated endosomes is crucial in elucidating the mechanisms of enterovirus uncoating and genome release from the endosomes to start efficient replication. PMID:26690201

  5. t4 workshop report: Pathways of Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kleensang, Andre; Maertens, Alexandra; Rosenberg, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne; Lamb, Justin; Auerbach, Scott; Brennan, Richard; Crofton, Kevin M; Gordon, Ben; Fornace, Albert J; Gaido, Kevin; Gerhold, David; Haw, Robin; Henney, Adriano; Ma'ayan, Avi; McBride, Mary; Monti, Stefano; Ochs, Michael F; Pandey, Akhilesh; Sharan, Roded; Stierum, Rob; Tugendreich, Stuart; Willett, Catherine; Wittwehr, Clemens; Xia, Jianguo; Patton, Geoffrey W; Arvidson, Kirk; Bouhifd, Mounir; Hogberg, Helena T; Luechtefeld, Thomas; Smirnova, Lena; Zhao, Liang; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Kanehisa, Minoru; Carmichael, Paul; Andersen, Melvin E; Hartung, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Despite wide-spread consensus on the need to transform toxicology and risk assessment in order to keep pace with technological and computational changes that have revolutionized the life sciences, there remains much work to be done to achieve the vision of toxicology based on a mechanistic foundation. To this end, a workshop was organized to explore one key aspect of this transformation - the development of Pathways of Toxicity as a key tool for hazard identification based on systems biology. Several issues were discussed in depth in the workshop: The first was the challenge of formally defining the concept of a Pathway of Toxicity (PoT), as distinct from, but complementary to, other toxicological pathway concepts such as mode of action (MoA). The workshop came up with a preliminary definition of PoT as "A molecular definition of cellular processes shown to mediate adverse outcomes of toxicants". It is further recognized that normal physiological pathways exist that maintain homeostasis and these, sufficiently perturbed, can become PoT. Second, the workshop sought to define the adequate public and commercial resources for PoT information, including data, visualization, analyses, tools, and use-cases, as well as the kinds of efforts that will be necessary to enable the creation of such a resource. Third, the workshop explored ways in which systems biology approaches could inform pathway annotation, and which resources are needed and available that can provide relevant PoT information to the diverse user communities.

  6. Abnormalities in signaling pathways in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Brosius, Frank C; Khoury, Charbel C; Buller, Carolyn L; Chen, Sheldon

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is characterized by a plethora of signaling abnormalities that together ultimately result in the clinical and pathologic hallmarks of DN, namely progressive albuminuria followed by a gradual decline in glomerular filtration rate leading to kidney failure, and accompanied by podocyte loss, progressive glomerular sclerosis and, ultimately, progressive tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Over the past few years, the general understanding of the abnormalities in signaling pathways that lead to DN has expanded considerably. In this review, some of the important pathways that appear to be involved in driving this process are discussed, with special emphasis on newer findings and insights. Newer concepts regarding signaling changes in bradykinin, mTOR, JAK/STAT, MCP-1, VEGF, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, activated protein C and other pathways are discussed. PMID:20224802

  7. Multiple Pathways Linking Racism to Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Harrell, Camara Jules P; Burford, Tanisha I; Cage, Brandi N; Nelson, Travette McNair; Shearon, Sheronda; Thompson, Adrian; Green, Steven

    2011-04-15

    This commentary discusses advances in the conceptual understanding of racism and selected research findings in the social neurosciences. The traditional stress and coping model holds that racism constitutes a source of aversive experiences that, when perceived by the individual, eventually lead to poor health outcomes. Current evidence points to additional psychophysiological pathways linking facets of racist environments with physiological reactions that contribute to disease. The alternative pathways emphasize prenatal experiences, subcortical emotional neural circuits, conscious and preconscious emotion regulation, perseverative cognitions, and negative affective states stemming from racist cognitive schemata. Recognition of these pathways challenges change agents to use an array of cognitive and self-controlling interventions in mitigating racism's impact. Additionally, it charges policy makers to develop strategies that eliminate deep-seated structural aspects of racism in society.

  8. The Bacterial Twin-Arginine Translocation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Philip A.; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle; Georgiou, George

    2009-01-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway is responsible for the export of folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria. Substrates for the Tat pathway include redox enzymes requiring cofactor insertion in the cytoplasm, multimeric proteins that have to assemble into a complex prior to export, certain membrane proteins, and proteins whose folding is incompatible with Sec export. These proteins are involved in a diverse range of cellular activities including anaerobic metabolism, cell envelope biogenesis, metal acquisition and detoxification, and virulence. The Escherichia coli translocase consists of the TatA, TatB, and TatC proteins, but little is known about the precise sequence of events that leads to protein translocation, the energetic requirements, or the mechanism that prevents the export of misfolded proteins. Owing to the unique characteristics of the pathway, it holds promise for biotechnological applications. PMID:16756481

  9. [Wnt signalling pathway and cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Ramos-Solano, Moisés; Álvarez-Zavala, Monserrat; García-Castro, Beatriz; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is a pathology that arises in the cervical epithelium, whose major cause of risk is human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Due to the fact that HPV infection per se is not enough to generate a carcinogenic process, it has been proposed that alterations in the Wnt signaling pathway are involved in cervical carcinogenesis. The Wnt family consists of 13 receptors and 19 ligands, and it is highly conserved phylogenetically due to its contribution in different biological processes, such as embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Additionally, this signaling pathway modulates various cellular functions, for instance: cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and cell polarity. This paper describes the Wnt signaling pathways and alterations that have been found in members of this family in different cancer types and, especially, in CC.

  10. Small RNA pathways in Schmidtea mediterranea.

    PubMed

    Resch, Alissa M; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi

    2012-01-01

    Planarians are bilaterally symmetrical fresh water organisms capable of regenerating body parts from small fragments following bodily injury. Planarians possess a specialized population of pluripotent cells called neoblasts, which are responsible for their unique regenerative ability. The study of planarian stem cell biology and regeneration has traditionally focused on the transcription factors and proteins that regulate signal transduction pathways. New evidence shows that small RNA molecules are important players in stem cell function and regeneration, yet little is known about the exact nature of their regulatory roles during the regenerative process. In this review, we discuss biogenesis of microRNAs and piwiRNAs and their functional role in key developmental pathways in vertebrates and invertebrates with an emphasis on recent studies on planarian small RNA pathways.

  11. Remodeling of Calcium Entry Pathways in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Carlos; Sobradillo, Diego; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Núñez, Lucía

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+) entry pathways play important roles in control of many cellular functions, including long-term proliferation, migration and cell death. In recent years, it is becoming increasingly clear that, in some types of tumors, remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways could contribute to cancer hallmarks such as excessive proliferation, cell migration and invasion as well as resistance to cell death or survival. In this chapter we briefly review findings related to remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways in cancer with emphasis on the mechanisms that contribute to increased store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and store-operated currents (SOCs) in colorectal cancer cells. Finally, since SOCE appears critically involved in colon tumorogenesis, the inhibition of SOCE by aspirin and other NSAIDs and its possible contribution to colon cancer chemoprevention is reviewed.

  12. Pathways of microbial metabolism of parathion.

    PubMed

    Munnecke, D M; Hsieh, D P

    1976-01-01

    A mixed bacterial culture, consisting of a minimum of nine isolates, was adapted to growth on technical parathion (PAR) as a sole carbon and energy source. The primary oxidative pathway for PAR metabolism involved an initial hydrolysis to yield diethylthiophosphoric acid and p-nitrophenol. A secondary oxidative pathway involved the oxidation of PAR to paraoxon and then hydrolysis to yield p-nitrophenol and diethylphosphoric acid. Under low oxgen conditions PAR was reduced via a third pathway to p-aminoparathion and subsequently hydrolyzed to p-aminophenol and diethylthiophosphoric acid. PAR hydrolase, an enzyme produced by an isolate from the mixed culture, rapidly hydrolyzed PAR and paraoxon (6.0 mumol/mg per min). This enzyme was inducible and stable at room temperature and retained 100% of its activity when heated for 55 C for 10 min.

  13. Remodeling of Calcium Entry Pathways in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Carlos; Sobradillo, Diego; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Núñez, Lucía

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+) entry pathways play important roles in control of many cellular functions, including long-term proliferation, migration and cell death. In recent years, it is becoming increasingly clear that, in some types of tumors, remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways could contribute to cancer hallmarks such as excessive proliferation, cell migration and invasion as well as resistance to cell death or survival. In this chapter we briefly review findings related to remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways in cancer with emphasis on the mechanisms that contribute to increased store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and store-operated currents (SOCs) in colorectal cancer cells. Finally, since SOCE appears critically involved in colon tumorogenesis, the inhibition of SOCE by aspirin and other NSAIDs and its possible contribution to colon cancer chemoprevention is reviewed. PMID:27161240

  14. Kynurenine pathway and disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Königsberg, Mina; Santamaría, Abel

    2007-12-01

    Kynurenine pathway is gaining more and more attention every day in biomedical research since this catabolic route for tryptophan decomposition is not only implicated in different neurological disorders, but also possesses neuroactive metabolites with different biological properties, such as pro-oxidant and antioxidant regulators. Thus, the intensive research on this metabolic pathway is helping us to understand those mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative events during the occurrence of pathological process in the central nervous system (CNS), thereby allowing the design of potential therapies for those disorders involving excitotoxic, oxidative and inflammatory components. Here we intend to provide a brief overview on the relevance of this route for several CNS disorders, and discuss recent information on the different biological properties of the neuroactive metabolites of this pathway and their significance for further research.

  15. Modeling Molecular Pathways of Neuronal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Taxin, Zachary H.; Neymotin, Samuel A.; Mohan, Ashutosh; Lipton, Peter; Lytton, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal ischemia, the consequence of a stroke (cerebrovascular accident), is a condition of reduced delivery of nutrients to brain neurons. The brain consumes more energy per gram of tissue than any other organ, making continuous blood flow critical. Loss of nutrients, most critically glucose and O2, triggers a large number of interacting molecular pathways in neurons and astrocytes. The dynamics of these pathways take place over multiple temporal scales and occur in multiple interacting cytosolic and organelle compartments: in mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and nucleus. The complexity of these relationships suggests the use of computer simulation to understand the interplay between pathways leading to reversible or irreversible damage, the forms of damage, and interventions that could reduce damage at different stages of stroke. We describe a number of models and simulation methods that can be used to further our understanding of ischemia. PMID:24560148

  16. Vaccinia virus A25 and A26 proteins are fusion suppressors for mature virions and determine strain-specific virus entry pathways into HeLa, CHO-K1, and L cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Jung; Chang, Yu-Xun; Izmailyan, Roza; Tang, Yin-Liang; Chang, Wen

    2010-09-01

    Mature vaccinia virus enters cells through either fluid-phase endocytosis/macropinocytosis or plasma membrane fusion. This may explain the wide range of host cell susceptibilities to vaccinia virus entry; however, it is not known how vaccinia virus chooses