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Sample records for raik valentin tihhomirov

  1. Valentine 2006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    14 February 2006 Happy Valentine's Day from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) team!

    This somewhat heart-shaped, eroded and partially-filled crater is located near the southeast wall of Columbus Crater in the Mare Sirenum region of Mars. North is toward the bottom/lower left.

    Location near: 29.9oS, 165.2oW Image width: 400 meter scale bar = 1,312 feet Illumination from: lower right Season: Southern Autumn

  2. Valentine's Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02174 Valentine's Day

    This isolated mesa [lower left center of the image] has an almost heart-shaped margin. Happy Valentine's Day from Mars.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 29.4N, Longitude 79.1E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Valentine's Day: a Brief History and Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, D. Jackson

    2009-01-01

    Valentine's Day presents an opportunity to show loved ones they are appreciated. Sweethearts, spouses, and families exchange gifts to express affection. Beyond traditional celebrations, new customs such as a romantic dinner, attending movies, and exchanging jewelry have been added. This article presents a brief history of Valentine's Day and a…

  4. 75 FR 15740 - Valentine Tool and Stamping, Inc.: Norton, MA; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Valentine Tool and Stamping, Inc.: Norton, MA; Notice of Termination... of Valentine Tool and Stamping, Inc., Norton, Massachusetts. The petitioner has requested that...

  5. The case of Valentine Shortis--yesterday and today.

    PubMed

    Friedland, M L

    1991-04-01

    Valentine Shortis, a young Irish immigrant, was convicted of murder in Quebec in 1895. His insanity defence was unsuccessful in spite of psychiatric evidence given by the leading psychiatrists in Canada. Shortis spent the next 42 years in custody. The case provides a good vehicle for exploring a number of aspects of the history of psychiatry, the insanity defence, and the treatment of the criminally insane in Canada. Comparisons are made with the insanity defence and the treatment of the criminally insane today.

  6. Influence of Valentine's Day and Halloween on birth timing.

    PubMed

    Levy, Becca R; Chung, Pil H; Slade, Martin D

    2011-10-01

    It is known that cultural representations, in the form of stereotypes, can influence functional health. We predicted that the influence of cultural representations, in the form of salient holidays, would extend to birth timing. On Valentine's Day, which conveys positive symbolism, there was a 3.6% increase in spontaneous births and a 12.1% increase in cesarean births. Whereas, on Halloween, which conveys negative symbolism, there was a 5.3% decrease in spontaneous births and a 16.9% decrease in cesarean births. These effects reached significance at p < .0001, after adjusting for year and day of the week. The sample was based on birth-certificate information for all births in the United States within one week on either side of each holiday across 11 years. The Valentine's-Day window included 1,676,217 births and the Halloween window included 1,809,304 births. Our findings raise the possibility that pregnant women may be able to control the timing of spontaneous births, in contrast to the traditional assumption, and that scheduled births are also influenced by the cultural representations of the two holidays. PMID:21880409

  7. Influence of Valentine's Day and Halloween on birth timing.

    PubMed

    Levy, Becca R; Chung, Pil H; Slade, Martin D

    2011-10-01

    It is known that cultural representations, in the form of stereotypes, can influence functional health. We predicted that the influence of cultural representations, in the form of salient holidays, would extend to birth timing. On Valentine's Day, which conveys positive symbolism, there was a 3.6% increase in spontaneous births and a 12.1% increase in cesarean births. Whereas, on Halloween, which conveys negative symbolism, there was a 5.3% decrease in spontaneous births and a 16.9% decrease in cesarean births. These effects reached significance at p < .0001, after adjusting for year and day of the week. The sample was based on birth-certificate information for all births in the United States within one week on either side of each holiday across 11 years. The Valentine's-Day window included 1,676,217 births and the Halloween window included 1,809,304 births. Our findings raise the possibility that pregnant women may be able to control the timing of spontaneous births, in contrast to the traditional assumption, and that scheduled births are also influenced by the cultural representations of the two holidays.

  8. [Severe infection by methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus producing Panton-Valentine leukocidin: reports of two cases].

    PubMed

    Brizuela, Martín; Pérez, Guadalupe; Ruvinsky, Silvina; Sarkis, Claudia; Romero, Romina; Mastroianni, Alejandra; Casimir, Lidia; Venuta, María E; Gómez Bonduele, Verónica; Bologna, Rosa

    2016-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major etiologic agent of infections in children from the community and the hospital setting. The severity of these conditions is associated with virulence factors, including the Panton-Valentine leukocidin. Both methicillin resistant and sensitive Staphylococcus aureus produce this leukocidin although with varying frequency. We present two children with severe infection by sensitive Staphylococcus aureus producer of Panton-Valentine leukocidin with musculoskeletal and endovascular complications. It is essential the suspected diagnosis, appropriate antibiotic treatment and early surgical management to improve the approach of these infections. Epidemiological surveillance should be mantained to detect the frequency of infections caused by these bacteria. PMID:27399020

  9. [Severe infection by methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus producing Panton-Valentine leukocidin: reports of two cases].

    PubMed

    Brizuela, Martín; Pérez, Guadalupe; Ruvinsky, Silvina; Sarkis, Claudia; Romero, Romina; Mastroianni, Alejandra; Casimir, Lidia; Venuta, María E; Gómez Bonduele, Verónica; Bologna, Rosa

    2016-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major etiologic agent of infections in children from the community and the hospital setting. The severity of these conditions is associated with virulence factors, including the Panton-Valentine leukocidin. Both methicillin resistant and sensitive Staphylococcus aureus produce this leukocidin although with varying frequency. We present two children with severe infection by sensitive Staphylococcus aureus producer of Panton-Valentine leukocidin with musculoskeletal and endovascular complications. It is essential the suspected diagnosis, appropriate antibiotic treatment and early surgical management to improve the approach of these infections. Epidemiological surveillance should be mantained to detect the frequency of infections caused by these bacteria.

  10. Be My Valentine: The Social Engineering of Children's Concepts of Love and Friendship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, Robin M.

    1997-01-01

    Gender stereotyping manifests itself in educational settings through perceptions of friendship and love relationships. This study examined how Valentine's Day is celebrated in 20 Canadian elementary classrooms and by 40 school children. Data revealed that children attempt to make sense of their own socialization as evidenced by the fact boys and…

  11. [Valentine's Day Activities Compiled from Eleven Years of February Issues of Instructor Magazine, 1973-1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Valentine's Day activities which include a play, music, poetry, and numerous art and craft projects are presented in this compilation from February issues of "Instructor" magazine. The short and easy projects, suitable for primary and elementary students, use inexpensive and easily found materials such as paper, cloth, yarn, magazine pictures,…

  12. Outbreak of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-Associated Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Infection in a Rugby Team, France, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Couvé-Deacon, Elodie; Tristan, Anne; Pestourie, Nathalie; Faure, Christian; Doffoel-Hantz, Valérie; Garnier, Fabien; Laurent, Frédéric; Lina, Gerard; Ploy, Marie-Cecile

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus strains that produce Panton-Valentine leukocidin are known to cause community infections. We describe an outbreak of skin abscesses caused by Panton-Valentine leukocidin-producing methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (clonal complex 121) in a professional rugby team in France during July 2010-February 2011. Eight team members were carriers; 7 had skin abscesses. PMID:26690308

  13. Disseminated Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-Positive Staphylococcus aureus infection in a child.

    PubMed

    Karli, Arzu; Yanik, Keramettin; Paksu, Muhammet S; Sensoy, Gulnar; Aykanat, Alper; Yener, Nazik; Belet, Nursen; Ceyhan, Meltem

    2016-04-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is an exotoxin that is produced by many strains of Staphylococcus aureus, and an important virulence factor. A PVL-positive S. aureus infection leads to rapid and severe infections of soft tissue and necrotizing pneumonia in healthy adolescents, and has a high mortality. This case report included a 12-year-old male patient who admitted for fever, respiratory distress and hip pain and was identified with necrotizing pneumonia with septic pulmonary embolism, psoas abscess, cellulitis and osteomyelitis. The PVL positive methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) was isolated in the patient blood culture.

  14. [Fatal Panton-Valentine leukocidine-associated Staphylococcus aureus necrotizing pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Laverdure, F; Neulier, C; Sudant, J; Legriel, S; Bruneel, F

    2014-11-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin-producing Staphylococcus aureus necrotizing pneumonia is an unusual cause of community-acquired pneumonia associated with a high fatality rate. The specificities of its presentation must be known by the critical care doctor, in order to quickly make the diagnosis and start the right antibiotics and discuss adjunctive therapy with intravenous immunoglobin. Moreover, the management of close contacts (household and healthcare workers) of patient with such a pneumonia is not well-known. The present case report underlines the clinical presentation of this pneumonia, the specificities of its treatment, and specifies the management of close contacts.

  15. Inhibitory effect of peroxyacetyl nitrate on cyclic photophosphorylation by chloroplasts from black valentine bean leaves.

    PubMed

    Koukol, J; Dugger, W M; Palmer, R L

    1967-10-01

    The inhibitory effect of peroxyacetyl nitrate on the cyclic photophosphorylation of chloroplasts isolated from Black Valentine variety bean leaves (Phaseolis vulgaris L.) has been studied. Peroxyacetyl nitrate caused inhibition to photophosphorylation, in either the dark or the light, by affecting the chloroplast. Evidence is presented which suggests that peroxyacetyl nitrate could oxidize sulfhydryl groups on enzymes necessary for photophosphorylation. The inhibition to photophosphorylation caused by peroxyacetyl nitrate cannot be reversed by glutathione, even when added in large amounts, whereas the inhibition to photophosphorylation caused by para-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid is easily reversed by small quantities of glutathione. This suggests that if peroxyacetyl nitrate is oxidizing sulfhydryl groups necessary for photophosphorylation, this oxidation is proceeding beyond the disulfide state.

  16. Investigations of fluvial sediments of the Niobrara River near Valentine, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colby, Bruce R.; Matejka, D.Q.; Hubbell, David Wellington

    1953-01-01

    This report contains results of observations that were made from the time when a natural constriction was formed in the Niobrara River near Valentine, Nebr., to the time when it was widened by high flows. After the constriction was widened, insufficient turbulence was developed to suspend most of the sediment. The report gives information on the amount and characteristics of the sediment that moves as unmeasured load at normal sections of the stream near the constriction and at the measuring sections at the Sparks gaging station. Lateral distributions of depth, velocity, and concentration are shown for the sections where sediment discharge was measured. In addition, vertical distributions of concentration, velocity, and percentage of particles coarser than 0.25 mm are shown for the contracted section. The vertical distributions seem to indicate that the total sediment load of the stream was usually in suspension at the contracted section. Exclusive of the period during the winter when upstream reservoirs. were not flushed, the measured discharge of suspended sediment at the normal sections near the contraction averaged 47 percent and at the Sparks gaging station 41 percent of the measured sediment discharge at the contracted section. Particle sizes of suspended sediment and bed material are tabulated, and some size distributions are plotted. In conformity with bedload theory, the computed particle sizes of the unmeasured load were slightly smaller than the average particle sizes in the samples of bed material.

  17. Infection by Panton-Valentine leukocidin-producing Staphylococcus aureus clinically mimicking Lemierre's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shivashankar, Girish H; Murukesh, Nishanth; Varma, M P S; Sharif, Ikram M; Glynn, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an oropharyngeal infection which leads to severe septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and metastatic abscesses of the lungs and other organs. It is usually caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, a Gram-negative obligate anaerobe. An unusual case of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-producing Staphylococcus aureus infection masquerading as Lemierre's syndrome is reported here. A 32-year-old fit and otherwise healthy male presented on Christmas morning with a boil on his left cheek for 2 days and generalized rash for 3 h. His general condition began to worsen, he developed facial swelling and loss of vision in the left eye and was transferred to the intensive care unit. His treatment was taken over by team of specialists and further investigations revealed thrombophlebitis of the left internal jugular vein and cavernous sinus thrombosis with multiple brain infarcts and lung abscesses. His condition remained critical with multiple cranial nerve involvement despite being on broad-spectrum antibiotics. Blood cultures grew S. aureus which was producing PVL toxin. He improved gradually over several weeks. He underwent intensive physiotherapy and made a good recovery. Although a rare entity, it is important to consider Lemierre's syndrome in septic patients who present with rapidly worsening symptoms.

  18. Dissemination of panton-valentine leukocidin-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Mine, Yoshiko; Nakasone, Isamu; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Utani, Atsushi; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Uezato, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kenzo

    2013-01-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is a pore-forming cytotoxin that is produced by Staphylococcus aureus closely associated with skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTI). PVL-positive S. aureus strains have been identified worldwide, including in the USA; however, few studies have reported the presence of these strains in Japan. In this study, we prospectively investigated the prevalence of PVL in S. aureus strains from outpatients presenting with SSTI in Okinawa and characterized the PVL-positive S. aureus strains by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). From 2008-2010, 499 clinical samples were obtained from 497 people. S. aureus was identified in 274 samples, and 36% (99 of 274) were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Seventeen (6.2%) PVL-positive S. aureus strains were detected by PCR, and 12 of the 17 PVL-positive strains were MRSA. Most PVL-positive S. aureus caused furuncles or carbuncles. Nine of the 17 PVL-positive isolates had an ST8 MRSA genotype and most harbored SCCmec type IVa and the arcA gene of the arginine catabolic mobile element, which is identical to the USA300 clone prevalent in the USA. PVL-positive S. aureus strains were more likely to be resistant to erythromycin (65%) and levofloxacin (53%). PVL-positive S. aureus strains have emerged and are spreading as a causative pathogen for SSTI in Okinawa.

  19. [Identification and characterization of Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive Staphylococcus aureus isolated in Okinawa, Japan].

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Ayano; Tokashiki, Yoshino T; Nakasone, Isamu; Kisanuki, Kyoko; Nago, Tamami T; Yamane, Nobuhisa

    2010-09-01

    We experienced hospital-acquired infection in March 2008 that three nurses became infected with Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Accordingly, we performed the retrospective study to determine the prevalence of PVL-positive S. aureus in Okinawa. A total of 731 clinical isolates, consisting of 600 MRSA and 131 methicillin-susceptible isolates in Okinawa, were included. Of the isolates, 16 were positive for PVL gene (lukS-PV-lukF-PV). All the PVL-positive isolates were MRSA, and the first appeared in March 2008. The isolates from the University Hospital were characterized as staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec type IVa. Through the analysis of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), 16 PVL-positive MRSA isolates were divided in three groups. One isolate (the first group) from the other hospital was less similar (< 40% similarity) when compared with the remaining 15 isolates from the University Hospital. The second group consisted of two respective paired isolates from the same department wards, and those were very similar with each other, indicating possible patient-to-patient transmission. The 11 isolates were characterized as the third group with >80% similarity. The DiversiLab system (bioMérieux) based on repetitive-sequence-based PCR typing demonstrated that the isolates of the third group were similar and indistinguishable with the strains of USA300 clone. However, the first and second groups were not determinable which USA clone was the origin. With these, we could conclude that the PVL-positive MRSA close to USA300 clone first appeared in Okinawa in 2008 and is now becoming prevalent multi-focally. Also, person-to-person transmission is already likely in a hospital setting.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus Panton-Valentine Leukocidin Is a Very Potent Cytotoxic Factor for Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Löffler, Bettina; Hussain, Muzaffar; Grundmeier, Matthias; Brück, Michaela; Holzinger, Dirk; Varga, Georg; Roth, Johannes; Kahl, Barbara C.; Proctor, Richard A.; Peters, Georg

    2010-01-01

    The role of the pore-forming Staphylococcus aureus toxin Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) in severe necrotizing diseases is debated due to conflicting data from epidemiological studies of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) infections and various murine disease-models. In this study, we used neutrophils isolated from different species to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of PVL in comparison to other staphylococcal cytolytic components. Furthermore, to study the impact of PVL we expressed it heterologously in a non-virulent staphylococcal species and examined pvl-positive and pvl-negative clinical isolates as well as the strain USA300 and its pvl-negative mutant. We demonstrate that PVL induces rapid activation and cell death in human and rabbit neutrophils, but not in murine or simian cells. By contrast, the phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs), a newly identified group of cytolytic staphylococcal components, lack species-specificity. In general, after phagocytosis of bacteria different pvl-positive and pvl-negative staphylococcal strains, expressing a variety of other virulence factors (such as surface proteins), induced cell death in neutrophils, which is most likely associated with the physiological clearing function of these cells. However, the release of PVL by staphylococcal strains caused rapid and premature cell death, which is different from the physiological (and programmed) cell death of neutrophils following phagocytosis and degradation of virulent bacteria. Taken together, our results question the value of infection-models in mice and non-human primates to elucidate the impact of PVL. Our data clearly demonstrate that PVL acts differentially on neutrophils of various species and suggests that PVL has an important cytotoxic role in human neutrophils, which has major implications for the pathogenesis of CA-MRSA infections. PMID:20072612

  1. Increased Susceptibility of Humanized NSG Mice to Panton-Valentine Leukocidin and Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Ching Wen; Kolar, Stacey L.; Müller, Sabrina; Rodriguez, Maria D.; Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Fan, Xuemo; Beenhouwer, David O.; Town, Terrence; Liu, George Y.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of skin and soft-tissue infections worldwide. Mice are the most commonly used animals for modeling human staphylococcal infections. However a supra-physiologic S. aureus inoculum is required to establish gross murine skin pathology. Moreover, many staphylococcal factors, including Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) elaborated by community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA), exhibit selective human tropism and cannot be adequately studied in mice. To overcome these deficiencies, we investigated S. aureus infection in non-obese diabetic (NOD)/severe combined immune deficiency (SCID)/IL2rγnull (NSG) mice engrafted with human CD34+ umbilical cord blood cells. These “humanized” NSG mice require one to two log lower inoculum to induce consistent skin lesions compared with control mice, and exhibit larger cutaneous lesions upon infection with PVL+ versus isogenic PVL- S. aureus. Neutrophils appear important for PVL pathology as adoptive transfer of human neutrophils alone to NSG mice was sufficient to induce dermonecrosis following challenge with PVL+ S. aureus but not PVL- S. aureus. PMX53, a human C5aR inhibitor, blocked PVL-induced cellular cytotoxicity in vitro and reduced the size difference of lesions induced by the PVL+ and PVL- S. aureus, but PMX53 also reduced recruitment of neutrophils and exacerbated the infection. Overall, our findings establish humanized mice as an important translational tool for the study of S. aureus infection and provide strong evidence that PVL is a human virulence factor. PMID:26618545

  2. Association of recurrent furunculosis with Panton-Valentine leukocidin and the genetic background of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Masiuk, Helena; Kopron, Katarzyna; Grumann, Dorothee; Goerke, Christiane; Kolata, Julia; Jursa-Kulesza, Joanna; Giedrys-Kalemba, Stefania; Bröker, Barbara M; Holtfreter, Silva

    2010-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of skin and soft tissue infections, such as furuncles, carbuncles, and abscesses, but it also frequently colonizes the human skin and mucosa without causing clinical symptoms. Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is a pore-forming toxin that has been associated with soft tissue infections and necrotizing pneumonia. We have compared the genotypes, virulence gene repertoires, and phage patterns of 74 furunculosis isolates with those of 108 control strains from healthy nasal carriers. The large majority of furunculosis strains were methicillin sensitive. Clonal cluster (CC) 121 (CC121) and CC22 accounted for 70% of the furunculosis strains but for only 8% of the nasal isolates. The PVL-encoding genes luk-PV were detected in 85% of furunculosis strains, while their prevalence among colonizing S. aureus strains was below 1%. luk-PV genes were distributed over several lineages (CCs 5, 8, 22, 30, and 121 and sequence type 59). Even within the same lineages, luk-PV-positive phages characterized furunculosis strains, while their luk-PV-negative variants were frequent among nasal strains. The very tight epidemiological linkage between luk-PV and furunculosis, which could be separated from the genetic background of the S. aureus strain as well as from the gene makeup of the luk-PV-transducing phage, lends support to the notion of an important role for PVL in human furunculosis. These results make a case for the determination of luk-PV in recurrent soft tissue infections with methicillin-sensitive as well as methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:20200289

  3. Panton-Valentine leukocidin positive Staphylococcal aureus infections of the head and neck: case series and brief review of literature.

    PubMed

    Hanratty, John; Changez, Huma; Smith, Andrew; Wales, Craig

    2015-04-01

    Panton-valentine leukocidin (PVL) is a pore-forming cytotoxin produced by some clones of Staphylococcus aureus that is associated with infections ranging from uncomplicated skin and soft tissue infections to life-threatening necrotizing pneumonia. PVL S aureus-associated maxillofacial infections are rarely reported; therefore, a high degree of clinical suspicion is warranted and close liaison with microbiologists and appropriate samples are required for optimal management. This report discusses the management and learning points from 3 such cases managed by the Greater Glasgow and Clyde National Health Service maxillofacial surgical teams.

  4. Panton-Valentine leukocidin positive Staphylococcal aureus infections of the head and neck: case series and brief review of literature.

    PubMed

    Hanratty, John; Changez, Huma; Smith, Andrew; Wales, Craig

    2015-04-01

    Panton-valentine leukocidin (PVL) is a pore-forming cytotoxin produced by some clones of Staphylococcus aureus that is associated with infections ranging from uncomplicated skin and soft tissue infections to life-threatening necrotizing pneumonia. PVL S aureus-associated maxillofacial infections are rarely reported; therefore, a high degree of clinical suspicion is warranted and close liaison with microbiologists and appropriate samples are required for optimal management. This report discusses the management and learning points from 3 such cases managed by the Greater Glasgow and Clyde National Health Service maxillofacial surgical teams. PMID:25544295

  5. Community-acquired infections due to Staphylococcus argenteus lineage isolates harbouring the Panton-Valentine leucocidin, France, 2014.

    PubMed

    Dupieux, C; Blondé, R; Bouchiat, C; Meugnier, H; Bes, M; Laurent, S; Vandenesch, F; Laurent, F; Tristan, A

    2015-06-11

    We describe two cases of human infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex (CC) 75, also called Staphylococcus argenteus, harbouring the Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL). These two sporadic cases were community-acquired, and identified in France in 2014. Both had an epidemiological link with Mayotte, an overseas department of France located in the Indian Ocean off the south-eastern African coast. This report illustrates that, contrary to previous descriptions, S. argenteus can acquire important virulence factors and be responsible for severe infections.

  6. Necrotizing pneumonia due to clonally diverse Staphylococcus aureus strains producing Panton-Valentine leukocidin: the Czech experience.

    PubMed

    Rájová, J; Pantůček, R; Petráš, P; Varbanovová, I; Mašlaňová, I; Beneš, J

    2016-02-01

    A prospective study (2007-2013) was undertaken to investigate clinical features and prognostic factors of necrotizing pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus producing Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) in the Czech Republic. Twelve cases of necrotizing pneumonia were detected in 12 patients (median age 25 years) without severe underlying disease. Eight cases occurred in December and January and the accumulation of cases in the winter months preceding the influenza season was statistically significant (P < 0·001). The course of pneumonia was very rapid, leading to early sepsis and/or septic shock in all but one patient. Seven patients died and mortality was fourfold higher in those patients presenting with primary pneumonia than with pneumonia complicating other staphylococcal/pyogenic infection elsewhere in the body. The S. aureus isolates displayed considerable genetic variability and were assigned to five lineages CC8 (n = 3), CC15 (n = 2), CC30 (n = 2), CC80 (n = 1), and CC121 (n = 3) and one was a singleton of ST154 (n = 1), all were reported to be associated with community-acquired infection. Four strains were methicillin resistant. The high case-fatality rate can only be reduced by improving the speed of diagnosis and a rapid test to detect S. aureus in the airways is needed.

  7. Clinical isolates of Pantone-Valentine leucocidin- and gamma-haemolysin-producing Staphylococcus aureus: prevalence and association with clinical infections.

    PubMed

    Mesrati, I; Saïdani, M; Ennigrou, S; Zouari, B; Ben Redjeb, S

    2010-08-01

    Pantone-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) and gAMMA-haemolysin (Hlg) are members of the synergohymenotropic toxin family produced by Staphylococcus aureus and encoded by pvl and hlg genes, respectively. Many reports describe an association between PVL toxin and necrotic lesions involving skin and mucosa. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of S. aureus strains carrying pvl and hlg genes and to investigate a possible relationship between pvl- and hlg-positive S. aureus with specific clinical presentations. Between January 2005 and July 2007, a total of 143 S. aureus strains including 58 meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and 85 meticillin-susceptible S. aureus were screened for pvl and hlg genes by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. These strains were isolated from 141 patients for whom demographic and clinical data were recorded. Thirty-one (21.7%) and 77 (53.7%) isolates were positive for pvl and hlg genes, respectively. Twenty-one (67.7%) pvl-positive strains were MRSA (P = 0.001). Among pvl-positive strains, 16 (51.6%) were community-acquired. There was a strong association between pvl genes and skin and soft tissue infections, especially abscesses (60% of strains; P = 0.008) and furunculosis (55.5% of strains; P = 0.036). Our findings confirmed the association between pvl-positive strains, cutaneous infections and meticillin resistance in S. aureus. PMID:20635511

  8. High frequency of Panton-Valentine leukocidin in Staphylococcus aureus causing pediatric infections in the city of Cartagena-Colombia.

    PubMed

    Correa-Jiménez, Oscar; Pinzón-Redondo, Hernando; Reyes, Niradiz

    2016-01-01

    Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) is a pore-forming toxin that has been epidemiologically associated with CA-MRSA infections. However, its role in the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus is still unclear. We evaluated the prevalence of PVL-coding genes in methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) isolates that cause infections in pediatric patients in the city of Cartagena, Colombia. We obtained S. aureus isolates from patients at the Napoleon Franco Pareja Children's Hospital in Cartagena. Then, we evaluated the presence of the nuc, mecA, and PVL genes in these isolates by multiplex PCR and determined the antibiotic susceptibility profiles using CLSI standards. We further correlated methicillin susceptibility and the presence of PVL genes with clinical variables. Overall PVL prevalence in S. aureus isolates was 73.91%, with a frequency of 80.92% among MRSA isolates and 67.59% among MSSA. We found a correlation between erythromycin resistance and lack of PVL and found that PVL+ cases were more common in older patients. We found a high PVL prevalence in both MRSA and MSSA isolates, in concordance with previous regional reports.

  9. Basis of virulence in a Panton-Valentine leukocidin-negative community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Yeh, Anthony J; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Villaruz, Amer E; Tan, Vee Y; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Chatterjee, Som S; Yu, Yunsong; Otto, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Community-associated (CA) infections with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are on a global rise. However, analysis of virulence characteristics has been limited almost exclusively to the US endemic strain USA300. CA-MRSA strains that do not produce Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) have not been investigated on a molecular level. Therefore, we analyzed virulence determinants in a PVL-negative CA-MRSA strain, ST72, from Korea. Genome-wide analysis identified 3 loci that are unique to that strain, but did not affect virulence. In contrast, phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) and the global virulence regulator Agr strongly affected lysis of neutrophils and erythrocytes, while α-toxin and Agr had a major impact on in vivo virulence. Our findings substantiate the general key roles these factors play in CA-MRSA virulence. However, our analyses also showed noticeable differences to strain USA300, inasmuch as α-toxin emerged as a much more important factor than PSMs in experimental skin infection caused by ST72.

  10. Back to the future: Valentin Magnan, French psychiatry, and the classification of mental diseases, 1885-1925.

    PubMed

    Dowbiggin, I

    1996-12-01

    To this day one of the most curious gaps in the historiography of French psychiatry is the era between the fin-de-siècle and the 1920s, years that overlapped the life and career of Valentin Magnan (1835-1916), a pivotal figure in the historical classification of mental diseases. This paper seeks to address this shortcoming as well as contribute to the growing scholarly interest in the history of clinical psychiatry. It argues that Magnan was in many ways a tragic figure, someone who lived and worked at a time when circumstances conspired against him and his efforts to reform psychiatric classification. Essentially Magnan had the misfortune to practise psychiatry when Emil Kraepelin's influence began to spread beyond Germany's borders, sparking a nationalist reaction that penalized both French Kraepelinians and Magnan whose theories shared similarities with Kraepelin's. But Magnan's stature also suffered because of the intense internecine quarrels that arose in late nineteenth-century French psychiatry. Magnan was no helpless victim, though, and there is reason to believe that some of the criticism directed at him was based on documented personal failings. Ultimately, Magnan's theory of psychiatric classification was overtaken by these and other events in French psychiatry, culminating by the interwar period in the emergence of a new national, nosological pardigm that has dominated French psychiatry for most of the twentieth century. Thus Magnan was in many respects a pariah within French psychiatry by the early twentieth century. An examination of his career casts light on this crucial turning-point in the history of French psychiatry and indicates why and how the new model of classification was more to the tastes of his medical colleagues. PMID:11618728

  11. The role of the Panton-Valentine leucocidin toxin in staphylococcal disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shallcross, Laura J; Fragaszy, Ellen; Johnson, Anne M; Hayward, Andrew C

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Invasive community-onset staphylococcal disease has emerged worldwide associated with Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) toxin. Whether PVL is pathogenic or an epidemiological marker is unclear. We investigate the role of PVL in disease, colonisation, and clinical outcome. Methods We searched Medline and Embase for original research reporting the prevalence of PVL genes among Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia, bacteraemia, musculoskeletal infection, skin and soft-tissue infection, or colonisation published before Oct 1, 2011. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) to compare patients with PVL-positive colonisation and each infection relative to the odds of PVL-positive skin and soft-tissue infection. We did meta-analyses to estimate odds of infection or colonisation with a PVL-positive strain with fixed-effects or random-effects models, depending on the results of tests for heterogeneity. Results Of 509 articles identified by our search strategy, 76 studies from 31 countries met our inclusion criteria. PVL strains are strongly associated with skin and soft-tissue infections, but are comparatively rare in pneumonia (OR 0·37, 95% CI 0·22–0·63), musculoskeletal infections (0·44, 0·19–0·99), bacteraemias (0·10, 0·06–0·18), and colonising strains (0·07, 0·01–0·31). PVL-positive skin and soft-tissue infections are more likely to be treated surgically than are PVL-negative infections, and children with PVL-positive musculoskeletal disease might have increased morbidity. For other forms of disease we identified no evidence that PVL affects outcome. Interpretation PVL genes are consistently associated with skin and soft-tissue infections and are comparatively rare in invasive disease. This finding challenges the view that PVL mainly causes invasive disease with poor prognosis. Population-based studies are needed to define the role of PVL in mild, moderate, and severe disease and to inform control strategies. Funding None. PMID:23103172

  12. A pentaplex PCR assay for the rapid detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Panton-Valentine Leucocidin

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen, especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), which causes a wide range of hospital and community-acquired infections worldwide. Conventional testing for detection of MRSA takes 2–5 days to yield complete information of the organism and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Results The present study focused on the development of a pentaplex PCR assay for the rapid detection of MRSA. The assay simultaneously detected five genes, namely 16S rRNA of the Staphylococcus genus, femA of S. aureus, mecA that encodes methicillin resistance, lukS that encodes production of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), a necrotizing cytotoxin, and one internal control. Specific primer pairs were successfully designed and simultaneously amplified the targeted genes. The analytical sensitivity and specificity of the pentaplex PCR assay was evaluated by comparing it with the conventional method. The analytical sensitivity of the pentaplex PCR at the DNA level was found to be 10 ng DNA. The analytical specificity was evaluated with 34 reference staphylococci and non-staphylococcal strains and was found to be 100%. The diagnostic evaluation of MRSA carried out using 230 clinical isolates, showed 97.6% of sensitivity, 99.3% of specificity, 98.8% of positive predictive value and 98.6% of negative predictive value compared to the conventional method. The presence of an internal control in the pentaplex PCR assay is important to exclude false-negative cases. Conclusion The pentaplex PCR assay developed was rapid and gave results within 4 h, which is essential for the identification of Staphylococcus spp., virulence and their resistance to methicillin. Our PCR assay may be used as an effective surveillance tool to survey the prevalence of MRSA and PVL-producing strains in hospitals and the community. PMID:19476638

  13. Nasal carriage of multi-drug resistant Panton-Valentine leucocidin-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in children in Tripoli-Libya.

    PubMed

    Al-haddad, Omaima H; Zorgani, Abdulaziz; Ghenghesh, Khalifa Sifaw

    2014-04-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonized children are at an increased risk of developing infections than methicillin-sensitive S. aureus colonized children. Nasal specimens from inpatient children, mothers of inpatient children, healthcare workers, and outpatient children at Tripoli Children Hospital (TCH) were examined for MRSA by chromogenic MRSA ID medium. Susceptibility of MRSA isolates to antibiotics was determined by the disc diffusion method. The nasal carriage rate of MRSA among inpatient children (8.3%, 24 of 289), their mothers (11%, 22 of 200), and healthcare workers (12.4%, 22 of 178) was significantly higher than among outpatient children (2.2%, 2 of 91) (P < 0.05, P < 0.02, and P < 0.006, respectively). Of the examined MRSA isolates (N = 35) 10 (28.6%) were positive for Panton-Valentine leucocidin genes by polymerase chain reaction. Multidrug resistance was found in 24.3% (17 of 70) of MRSA isolates. Nasal carriage of multidrug-resistant Panton-Valentine leucocidin-positive MRSA is not uncommon among inpatient children and their mothers in Tripoli.

  14. No More Valentines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Morgaen L.

    2010-01-01

    Too often, teacher evaluations haven't provided enough information to spur improvement in teaching. The vast majority of teachers in any school, district, or state are rated above--sometimes well above--average. The feedback that teachers do receive is often not specific enough to help them improve. In this article, Morgaen Donaldson explores some…

  15. Gene of LukF-PV-like component of Panton-Valentine leukocidin in Staphylococcus aureus P83 is linked with lukM.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, J; Muramoto, K; Kamio, Y

    1997-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus P83 (ATCC 31890) produces five components, I to V for synergistic toxins, leukocidin and gamma-hemolysin [Sudo et al., Biosci. Biotech. Biochem., 56, 1786-1789 (1995)]. We report here the identification of component II, which is designated LukF-PV(P83) and its gene (lukF-PV(P83)). The lukF-PV(P83) gene was found to be one base downstream of the stop codon of the lukM gene. The deduced amino acid sequence of LukF-PV(P83) showed 78.4% identity with that of LukF-PV. The lukM and lukF-PV(P83) genes were encoded as one operon like that of Panton-Valentine leukocidin.

  16. Infective Endocarditis Caused by Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-producing Methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Identified by the Broad-range PCR Method.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Dohi, Kaoru; Tanabe, Masaki; Nakamura, Akiko; Kanemitsu, Shinji; Wada, Hideo; Yamada, Norikazu; Nobori, Tsutomu; Shinpo, Hideto; Ito, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old man was admitted to a community hospital due to a persistent high fever. He became afebrile after the administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics, but developed heart failure due to progressive aortic and mitral valve insufficiency and was transferred to our hospital. Although sequential blood cultures were negative, a broad-range polymerase chain reaction targeting the bacterial 16S-rRNA gene followed by the direct sequencing of whole blood revealed spa(+), mecA(-) and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)(+). He was finally diagnosed with infective endocarditis (IE) caused by PVL-producing methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), and underwent cardiac surgery. This is the first reported case of IE due to MSSA producing PVL. PMID:27432095

  17. Accumulation of staphylococcal Panton-Valentine leukocidin in the detergent-resistant membrane microdomains on the target cells is essential for its cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Akihito; Isobe, Hirokazu; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Takano, Tomomi; Hung, Wei-Chun; Taneike, Ikue; Nakagawa, Saori; Dohmae, Soshi; Iwakura, Nobuhiro; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2012-12-01

    The mechanisms for the cytotoxicity of staphylococcal Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), a pore-forming toxin consisting of LukS-PV and LukF-PV, in human immune cells are still unclear. Because LukS-PV binds to ganglioside GM1, a constituent of detergent-resistant membrane microdomains (DRMs) of the plasma membrane, the role of DRMs in PVL cytotoxicity was examined in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), monocytes, HL-60 cells, and THP-1 cells. PVL binding capacities in HL-60 and THP-1 cells were higher than those in PMNs and monocytes; however, the PVL concentration to obtain more than 80% cell lysis in HL-60 cells was 10 times higher than that in PMNs and PVL even at such concentration induced < 10% cell lysis in THP-1 cells. After incubation of PMNs with LukS-PV, more than 90% of LukS-PV bound to the detergent-soluble membranes. Subsequent incubation with LukF-PV at 4 °C induced the accumulation of more than 70% of PVL components and 170- to 220-kDa complex formation in DRMs in an actin-independent manner. However, only 30% of PVL was found, and complex formation was under detectable level in DRMs in HL-60 cells. PVL did not accumulate in DRMs in THP-1 cells. Our observations strongly indicate that PVL accumulation in DRMs is essential for PVL cytotoxicity.

  18. High Prevalence of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) Genes in Nosocomial-Acquired Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Tertiary Care Hospitals in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Bidya; Singh, Winny; Raj, V. Samuel; Pokhrel, Bharat Mani; Mohapatra, Tribhuban Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carrying the important virulence determinant, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), is an emerging infectious pathogen associated with skin and soft tissue infections as well as life-threatening invasive diseases. In carrying out the first PVL prevalence study in Nepal, we screened 73 nosocomial isolates of S. aureus from 2 tertiary care Nepali hospitals and obtained an overall PVL-positivity rate of 35.6% among the hospital isolates: 26.1% of MRSA and 51.9% of methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) isolates were found to be positive for the PVL genes. PVL prevalence was not associated with a specific (i) infection site, (ii) age group, or (iii) hospital of origin. It was found to be positively associated with heterogeneous MRSA (73.3%) compared to homogeneous MRSA (3.2%) and MSSA (51.9%); negatively associated with multiresistant MRSA (22%) compared to nonmultiresistant MRSA (60%) and MSSA (51.9%); and positively associated with macrolide-streptogramin B resistance (93.8%) compared to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance (0%) and no-resistance (45.8%) types. Macrolide-streptogramin B resistance was confirmed by the presence of msr(A) gene. Restriction pattern analyses provided evidence to support the circulation of a limited number of clones of PVL-positive MRSA, arguing for the adaptability of these isolates to a hospital setting. PMID:25045702

  19. Residues Essential for Panton-Valentine Leukocidin S Component Binding to Its Cell Receptor Suggest Both Plasticity and Adaptability in Its Interaction Surface

    PubMed Central

    Laventie, Benoit-Joseph; Guérin, Frédéric; Mourey, Lionel; Tawk, Mira Y.; Jover, Emmanuel; Maveyraud, Laurent; Prévost, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), a bicomponent staphylococcal leukotoxin, is involved in the poor prognosis of necrotizing pneumonia. The present study aimed to elucidate the binding mechanism of PVL and in particular its cell-binding domain. The class S component of PVL, LukS-PV, is known to ensure cell targeting and exhibits the highest affinity for the neutrophil membrane (Kd∼10−10 M) compared to the class F component of PVL, LukF-PV (Kd∼10−9 M). Alanine scanning mutagenesis was used to identify the residues involved in LukS-PV binding to the neutrophil surface. Nineteen single alanine mutations were performed in the rim domain previously described as implicated in cell membrane interactions. Positions were chosen in order to replace polar or exposed charged residues and according to conservation between leukotoxin class S components. Characterization studies enabled to identify a cluster of residues essential for LukS-PV binding, localized on two loops of the rim domain. The mutations R73A, Y184A, T244A, H245A and Y250A led to dramatically reduced binding affinities for both human leukocytes and undifferentiated U937 cells expressing the C5a receptor. The three-dimensional structure of five of the mutants was determined using X-ray crystallography. Structure analysis identified residues Y184 and Y250 as crucial in providing structural flexibility in the receptor-binding domain of LukS-PV. PMID:24643034

  20. Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus harboring the mecA or Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes in hospitals in Java and Bali, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Santosaningsih, Dewi; Santoso, Sanarto; Budayanti, Nyoman S; Kuntaman, Kuntaman; Lestari, Endang S; Farida, Helmia; Hapsari, Rebriarina; Hadi, Purnomo; Winarto, Winarto; Milheiriço, Catarina; Maquelin, Kees; Willemse-Erix, Diana; van Belkum, Alex; Severin, Juliëtte A; Verbrugh, Henri A

    2014-04-01

    Data of Staphylococcus aureus carriage in Indonesian hospitals are scarce. Therefore, the epidemiology of S. aureus among surgery patients in three academic hospitals in Indonesia was studied. In total, 366 of 1,502 (24.4%) patients carried S. aureus. The methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) carriage rate was 4.3%, whereas 1.5% of the patients carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-positive methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA). Semarang and Malang city (odds ratio [OR] 9.4 and OR 9.0), being male (OR 2.4), hospitalization for more than 5 days (OR 11.708), and antibiotic therapy during hospitalization (OR 2.6) were independent determinants for MRSA carriage, whereas prior hospitalization (OR 2.5) was the only one risk factor for PVL-positive MSSA carriage. Typing of MRSA strains by Raman spectroscopy showed three large clusters assigned type 21, 24, and 38, all corresponding to ST239-MRSA-SCCmec type III. In conclusion, MRSA and PVL-positive MSSA are present among patients in surgical wards in Indonesian academic hospitals.

  1. Recurrence of pelvic abscess from Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive community-acquired ST30 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Hirokazu; Miyasaka, Dai; Ito, Tomoyuki; Takano, Tomomi; Nishiyama, Akihito; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Khokhlova, Olga E; Okubo, Takeshi; Endo, Naoto; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2013-02-01

    A 17-year-old female patient (a basketball player) suffered from recurrent pelvic abscesses from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The first episode, from strain NN12, occurred in October 2004. Her cutaneous abscesses complicated into systemic progression to osteomyelitis and multifocal pelvic abscesses, adjacent to the sacroiliac joint. The second episode, abscesses at tissues adjacent to the sacroiliac joint from strain NN31A, occurred late in February 2005. The third episode, from strain NN31B, occurred on July 30, 2005, repeating the second episode. Three MRSA strains were identical in terms of genotypes (belonging to Panton-Valentine leukocidin [PVL]-positive ST30 community-acquired MRSA, CA-MRSA), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, and peptide cytolysin gene (psmα) expression levels. The three MRSA strains exhibited superior THP-1 cell invasion ability over hospital-acquired MRSA (New York/Japan clone). The data suggest that PVL-positive ST30 CA-MRSA, with high levels of cell invasion and peptide cytolysins, causes recurrence of pelvic abscesses in a healthy adolescent.

  2. High Nasal Carriage Rate of Staphylococcus aureus Containing Panton-Valentine leukocidin- and EDIN-Encoding Genes in Community and Hospital Settings in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Ouedraogo, Abdoul-Salam; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine; Kissou, Aimée; Sanou, Soufiane; Poda, Armel; Kyelem, Carole G.; Solassol, Jérôme; Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Van De Perre, Philippe; Ouédraogo, Rasmata; Jean-Pierre, Hélène; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Godreuil, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate the rate of S.aureus nasal carriage and molecular characteristics in hospital and community settings in Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso. Nasal samples (n = 219) were collected from 116 healthy volunteers and 103 hospitalized patients in July and August 2014. Samples were first screened using CHROMagar Staph aureus chromogenic agar plates, and S. aureus strains were identified by mass spectrometry. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested using the disk diffusion method on Müller-Hinton agar. All S. aureus isolates were genotyped using DNA microarray. Overall, the rate of S. aureus nasal carriage was 32.9% (72/219) with 29% in healthy volunteers and 37% in hospital patients. Among the S. aureus isolates, only four methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains were identified and all in hospital patients (3.9%). The 72 S. aureus isolates from nasal samples belonged to 16 different clonal complexes, particularly to CC 152-MSSA (22 clones) and CC1-MSSA (nine clones). Two clones were significantly associated with community settings: CC1-MSSA and CC45-MSSA. The MRSA strains belonged to the ST88-MRSA-IV or the CC8-MRSA-V complex. A very high prevalence of toxinogenic strains 52.2% (36/69), containing Panton-Valentine leucocidin- and EDIN-encoding genes, was identified among the S. aureus isolates in community and hospital settings. This study provides the first characterization of S. aureus clones and their genetic characteristics in Burkina Faso. Altogether, it highlights the low prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, high diversity of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus clones and high frequency of toxinogenic S. aureus strains. PMID:27679613

  3. Molecular epidemiologic study of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene among family members in Japan.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Yuki; Ito, Teruyo; Ogawa, Yu; Hirotaki, Shintaro; Shoji, Takayo; Tame, Tomoyuki; Horikoshi, Yuho; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2015-09-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is one of the worldwide concerns of antimicrobial chemotherapy. An accumulation of ten patients in five families (A-E) suffering from skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI) of CA-MRSA was experienced in 2012, in Fuchu-shi, Tokyo, Japan. Molecular epidemiological investigation was performed for the 10 MRSA strains obtained from 8 children and 2 of their parents to assess endemic patterns of CA-MRSA in the community. Results of molecular typing, presence of toxin genes and antimicrobial susceptibilities were analyzed combined with the patients' clinical information. Each family had its own unique MRSA strain: A, ST30-SCCmec IVd; B, ST8-SCCmec IVd; C, ST8-SCCmec IVa; D, ST8-SCCmec IVl; E, ST8-SCCmec IVl and ST858-SCCmec IVl. Seven strains from the families A-C carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene. Three strains from the families D and E carried toxic shock syndrome toxin gene. Strains belonged to the same family demonstrated genetically related banding patterns of pulsed-filed gel electrophoresis. The family C experienced intrafamilial transmission of USA300-0114. Our data showed the MRSA clones disseminating in this community were highly diverse. They contained USA300-0114 clone, the rapidly distributing clone in the world, as well as MRSA clones identified in Japan. Our results suggested intrafamilial transmission of MRSA could be initial phenomenon of wide transmission in a community, therefore CA-MRSA SSTI in children and their family members should be monitored closely in order to notice the spread of highly pathogenic and transmittable strains. PMID:26091885

  4. Molecular epidemiologic study of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene among family members in Japan.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Yuki; Ito, Teruyo; Ogawa, Yu; Hirotaki, Shintaro; Shoji, Takayo; Tame, Tomoyuki; Horikoshi, Yuho; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2015-09-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is one of the worldwide concerns of antimicrobial chemotherapy. An accumulation of ten patients in five families (A-E) suffering from skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI) of CA-MRSA was experienced in 2012, in Fuchu-shi, Tokyo, Japan. Molecular epidemiological investigation was performed for the 10 MRSA strains obtained from 8 children and 2 of their parents to assess endemic patterns of CA-MRSA in the community. Results of molecular typing, presence of toxin genes and antimicrobial susceptibilities were analyzed combined with the patients' clinical information. Each family had its own unique MRSA strain: A, ST30-SCCmec IVd; B, ST8-SCCmec IVd; C, ST8-SCCmec IVa; D, ST8-SCCmec IVl; E, ST8-SCCmec IVl and ST858-SCCmec IVl. Seven strains from the families A-C carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene. Three strains from the families D and E carried toxic shock syndrome toxin gene. Strains belonged to the same family demonstrated genetically related banding patterns of pulsed-filed gel electrophoresis. The family C experienced intrafamilial transmission of USA300-0114. Our data showed the MRSA clones disseminating in this community were highly diverse. They contained USA300-0114 clone, the rapidly distributing clone in the world, as well as MRSA clones identified in Japan. Our results suggested intrafamilial transmission of MRSA could be initial phenomenon of wide transmission in a community, therefore CA-MRSA SSTI in children and their family members should be monitored closely in order to notice the spread of highly pathogenic and transmittable strains.

  5. Application of monoclonal antibodies generated against Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL-S) toxin for specific identification of community acquired methicillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Poojary, Niveditha Sundar; Ramlal, Shylaja; Urs, Radhika Madan; Sripathy, Murali Harishchandra; Batra, Harsh Vardhan

    2014-12-01

    Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) produced by community acquired methicillin Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) involved in skin and soft-tissue infections and necrotizing pneumonia comprised of two fractions, namely PVL S and PVL F. In the present study, three monoclonal antibodies designated as MAb1, MAb9 and MAb10 were generated against recombinant PVL-S (35kDa) protein of S. aureus. All the three MAbs specifically reacted to confirm PVL-S positive strains of S. aureus recovered from clinical samples in Western blot analysis. Similarly all the three MAbs did not show any binding to other tested 14 different pathogenic bacteria belonging to other genera and species in Western blot analysis. Furthermore, a simple dot-ELISA method was standardized for the identification of PVL-S toxin containing S. aureus strains. Initially in dot-ELISA, Protein A (Spa) of S. aureus posed background noise problems due to the non-specific binding of antibodies resulting in false positive reactions. With the addition of 10mM diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) along with 5% milk in PBS in the blocking step prevented this non-specific binding of Spa to mouse anti-PVL monoclonal antibodies in dot-ELISA. Once standardized, this simple dot-ELISA was evaluated with nine PVL positive strains recovered from food, environmental and clinical samples and the results were compared with PCR assay for the presence of PVL toxin genes and also with Western blot analysis. A 100% correlation was found between dot-ELISA, PCR assay and Western blot analysis. Collectively our results suggest the newly developed simple dot-ELISA system can be of immense help in providing, rapid detection of the PVL toxin containing S. aureus strains at a relatively low cost and will be a valuable tool for the reliable identification of CA-MRSA.

  6. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated From Various Types of Hospital Infections in Pediatrics: Panton-Valentine Leukocidin, Staphylococcal Chromosomal Cassette mec SCCmec Phenotypes and Antibiotic Resistance Properties

    PubMed Central

    Dormanesh, Banafshe; Siroosbakhat, Soheila; Khodaverdi Darian, Ebrahim; Afsharkhas, Ladan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus has long been considered as a major pathogen of hospital infections. Objectives: The present investigation was carried out to study the distribution of Staphylococcal Chromosomal Cassette mec (SCCmec) types, Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) gene and antibiotic resistance properties of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from various types of infections found in Iranian pediatric patients. Patients and Methods: Two-hundred and fifty-five clinical specimens were collected from four major provinces of Iran. Samples were cultured and the MRSA strains were subjected to Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The patterns of antibiotic resistance were determined using the disk diffusion method. Results: Seventy-four out of 255 (29.01%) clinical samples were positive for MRSA. Of the 74 MRSA strains, 47 (63.51%) were PVL positive. The clinical samples of respiratory tract infections (36.36%), those from the Shiraz province (37.87%) and samples collected during the summer season (56.48%) were the most commonly infected samples. The most commonly detected antibiotic resistance genes were tetK (89.18%), mecA (71.62%), msrA (56.75%) and tetM (54.05%). Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus had the highest levels of resistance against penicillin (100%), tetracycline (98.64%), ampicillin (93.24%) and oxacillin (93.24%). The most commonly detected SCCmec types in the MRSA strains were type V (18.91%) and III (17.56%). Conclusions: Regular surveillance of hospital-associated infections and monitoring of the antibiotic sensitivity patterns are required to reduce the prevalence of MRSA. We recommend initial management of children affected by MRSA with imipenem, lincomycin and cephalothin prescriptions. PMID:26862375

  7. The Association of Panton-Valentine leukocidin and mecA Genes in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates From Patients Referred to Educational Hospitals in Ahvaz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Motamedi, Hossein; Rahmat Abadi, Seyyed Soheil; Moosavian, Seyyed Mojtaba; Torabi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus, an important human pathogen is one of the main causative agents of nosocomial infection. Virulence genes play a major role in the pathogenicity of this agent and its infections. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates are major challenge among infectious agents that can cause severe infections and mortality. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus produces a unique type of Penicillin Binding Protein 2a (PBP2a) that has low affinity for β-lactam antibiotics. Most of the MRSA bacterial strains can also produce a leukotoxin as Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) that increases the virulence of MRSA strains and can cause severe necrotic pneumonia. The presence of pvl gene is a genetic marker for the MRSA populations. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the association of pvl and mecA genes in clinical isolates of MRSA. Materials and Methods: Fifty MRSA isolates were collected from 200 clinical samples from three different educational hospitals in Ahvaz, Iran, and identified by biochemical tests including catalase, oxidase, tube coagulase, mannitol fermentation, and sensitivity to furazolidone, resistance to bacitracin, PYR test and Voges-Proskauer test. Their resistance to methicillin was evaluated using the disc diffusion method. DNA was extracted by boiling and then the presence of pvl and mecA genes was investigated by the polymerase chain reaction method using specific primers. Results: The results revealed that mecA and pvl genes were positive for 15 (30%) and 3 (6%) of the isolates, respectively. None of mecA positive isolates was positive for pvl gene. Conclusions: It can be concluded from these results that fortunately the prevalence of pvl gene is low in MRSA isolates in this region and there is no association between the presence of pvl and mecA genes in these isolates. PMID:26468365

  8. Prevalence of Panton-Valentine leucocidin and phenotypic and genotypic characterization of biofilm formation among Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from children with adenoid hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Emaneini, Mohammad; Khoramrooz, Seyed Sajjad; Shahsavan, Shadi; Dabiri, Hossein; Jabalameli, Fereshteh

    2015-12-01

    Adenoids as a first line of host defense against respiratory microbes play an important role in majority of upper airway infectious and noninfectious illnesses. Bacterial pathogen can colonize on the adenoid tissue and probably act as a reservoir for them. To determine phenotypic and genotypic characterization of biofilm forming capacity of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from children with adenoid hypertrophy and prevalence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene we collected 17 consecutive, clinically significant S. aureus isolates from children with adenoid hypertrophy undergoing adenoidectomy with one or more of the upper airway obstruction symptoms, nasal obstruction, mouth breathing, snoring, or sleep apnea. Biofilm formation was evaluated by colorimetric microtiter plate's assay. Gene encoding PVL and adhesion- or biofilm formation-encoding genes were targeted by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. According to the results, all strains produced biofilm. Seven (41.2%) isolates produced strong biofilm whereas 7 (41.2%) isolates produced week and 3 (17.6%) isolates produced medium biofilm. Regarding the adhesion- or biofilm formation-encoding genes, 16 (94.1%) isolates were positive for the gene eno, 13(76.4%) for icaA, 13 (76.4%) for icaD, 10 (58.8%) for fib, 10 (58.8%) for fnbB, 4(23.5%) for can, and 1(5.8%) for fnbA. The high prevalence of genes encoding biofilms and adhesins and phenotypic ability to form a biofilm by S. aureus strains emphasizes the pathogenic character of strains isolated from children with adenoid hypertrophy.

  9. Typing of Panton-Valentine leukocidin-encoding phages carried by methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Italy.

    PubMed

    Sanchini, A; Del Grosso, M; Villa, L; Ammendolia, M G; Superti, F; Monaco, M; Pantosti, A

    2014-11-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is the hallmark of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) but can also be found in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) sharing pathogenic and epidemiological characteristics of CA-MRSA. PVL is encoded by two co-transcribed genes that are carried by different staphylococcal bacteriophages. We applied an extended PCR-based typing scheme for the identification of two morphological groups (elongated-head group and icosahedral-head group I phages) and specific PVL phage types in S. aureus isolates recovered in Italy. We examined 48 PVL-positive isolates (25 MSSA and 23 MRSA) collected from different hospital laboratories from April 2005 to May 2011. spa typing, multilocus sequence typing and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec typing were applied to categorize the isolates. Phage typeability was 48.0% in MSSA and 91.3% in MRSA, highlighting the limitation of the PCR typing scheme when applied to PVL-positive MSSA. Five different PVL phages and two variants of a known phage were detected, the most prevalent being ΦSa2usa, recovered in 15 out of 48 (31.2%) isolates, and carried by both MSSA and MRSA belonging to CC8 and CC5. The recently described ΦTCH60 was recovered in four isolates. A PVL phage (ΦSa119) from an ST772 MRSA, that was not detected using the previous typing scheme, was sequenced, and new primers were designed for the identification of the icosahedral-head group II PVL phages present in ST772 and ST59 MRSA. A comprehensive PVL-phage typing can contribute to the understanding of the epidemiology and evolution of PVL-positive MSSA and MRSA.

  10. High Nasal Carriage Rate of Staphylococcus aureus Containing Panton-Valentine leukocidin- and EDIN-Encoding Genes in Community and Hospital Settings in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Ouedraogo, Abdoul-Salam; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine; Kissou, Aimée; Sanou, Soufiane; Poda, Armel; Kyelem, Carole G; Solassol, Jérôme; Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Van De Perre, Philippe; Ouédraogo, Rasmata; Jean-Pierre, Hélène; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Godreuil, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate the rate of S.aureus nasal carriage and molecular characteristics in hospital and community settings in Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso. Nasal samples (n = 219) were collected from 116 healthy volunteers and 103 hospitalized patients in July and August 2014. Samples were first screened using CHROMagar Staph aureus chromogenic agar plates, and S. aureus strains were identified by mass spectrometry. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested using the disk diffusion method on Müller-Hinton agar. All S. aureus isolates were genotyped using DNA microarray. Overall, the rate of S. aureus nasal carriage was 32.9% (72/219) with 29% in healthy volunteers and 37% in hospital patients. Among the S. aureus isolates, only four methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains were identified and all in hospital patients (3.9%). The 72 S. aureus isolates from nasal samples belonged to 16 different clonal complexes, particularly to CC 152-MSSA (22 clones) and CC1-MSSA (nine clones). Two clones were significantly associated with community settings: CC1-MSSA and CC45-MSSA. The MRSA strains belonged to the ST88-MRSA-IV or the CC8-MRSA-V complex. A very high prevalence of toxinogenic strains 52.2% (36/69), containing Panton-Valentine leucocidin- and EDIN-encoding genes, was identified among the S. aureus isolates in community and hospital settings. This study provides the first characterization of S. aureus clones and their genetic characteristics in Burkina Faso. Altogether, it highlights the low prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, high diversity of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus clones and high frequency of toxinogenic S. aureus strains. PMID:27679613

  11. High Nasal Carriage Rate of Staphylococcus aureus Containing Panton-Valentine leukocidin- and EDIN-Encoding Genes in Community and Hospital Settings in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Ouedraogo, Abdoul-Salam; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine; Kissou, Aimée; Sanou, Soufiane; Poda, Armel; Kyelem, Carole G.; Solassol, Jérôme; Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Van De Perre, Philippe; Ouédraogo, Rasmata; Jean-Pierre, Hélène; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Godreuil, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate the rate of S.aureus nasal carriage and molecular characteristics in hospital and community settings in Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso. Nasal samples (n = 219) were collected from 116 healthy volunteers and 103 hospitalized patients in July and August 2014. Samples were first screened using CHROMagar Staph aureus chromogenic agar plates, and S. aureus strains were identified by mass spectrometry. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested using the disk diffusion method on Müller-Hinton agar. All S. aureus isolates were genotyped using DNA microarray. Overall, the rate of S. aureus nasal carriage was 32.9% (72/219) with 29% in healthy volunteers and 37% in hospital patients. Among the S. aureus isolates, only four methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains were identified and all in hospital patients (3.9%). The 72 S. aureus isolates from nasal samples belonged to 16 different clonal complexes, particularly to CC 152-MSSA (22 clones) and CC1-MSSA (nine clones). Two clones were significantly associated with community settings: CC1-MSSA and CC45-MSSA. The MRSA strains belonged to the ST88-MRSA-IV or the CC8-MRSA-V complex. A very high prevalence of toxinogenic strains 52.2% (36/69), containing Panton-Valentine leucocidin- and EDIN-encoding genes, was identified among the S. aureus isolates in community and hospital settings. This study provides the first characterization of S. aureus clones and their genetic characteristics in Burkina Faso. Altogether, it highlights the low prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, high diversity of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus clones and high frequency of toxinogenic S. aureus strains.

  12. High Nasal Carriage Rate of Staphylococcus aureus Containing Panton-Valentine leukocidin- and EDIN-Encoding Genes in Community and Hospital Settings in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Ouedraogo, Abdoul-Salam; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine; Kissou, Aimée; Sanou, Soufiane; Poda, Armel; Kyelem, Carole G; Solassol, Jérôme; Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Van De Perre, Philippe; Ouédraogo, Rasmata; Jean-Pierre, Hélène; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Godreuil, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate the rate of S.aureus nasal carriage and molecular characteristics in hospital and community settings in Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso. Nasal samples (n = 219) were collected from 116 healthy volunteers and 103 hospitalized patients in July and August 2014. Samples were first screened using CHROMagar Staph aureus chromogenic agar plates, and S. aureus strains were identified by mass spectrometry. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested using the disk diffusion method on Müller-Hinton agar. All S. aureus isolates were genotyped using DNA microarray. Overall, the rate of S. aureus nasal carriage was 32.9% (72/219) with 29% in healthy volunteers and 37% in hospital patients. Among the S. aureus isolates, only four methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains were identified and all in hospital patients (3.9%). The 72 S. aureus isolates from nasal samples belonged to 16 different clonal complexes, particularly to CC 152-MSSA (22 clones) and CC1-MSSA (nine clones). Two clones were significantly associated with community settings: CC1-MSSA and CC45-MSSA. The MRSA strains belonged to the ST88-MRSA-IV or the CC8-MRSA-V complex. A very high prevalence of toxinogenic strains 52.2% (36/69), containing Panton-Valentine leucocidin- and EDIN-encoding genes, was identified among the S. aureus isolates in community and hospital settings. This study provides the first characterization of S. aureus clones and their genetic characteristics in Burkina Faso. Altogether, it highlights the low prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, high diversity of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus clones and high frequency of toxinogenic S. aureus strains.

  13. Typing of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-Encoding Phages and lukSF-PV Gene Sequence Variation in Staphylococcus aureus from China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huanqiang; Hu, Fupin; Jin, Shu; Xu, Xiaogang; Zou, Yuhan; Ding, Baixing; He, Chunyan; Gong, Fang; Liu, Qingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, encoded by lukSF-PV genes), a bi-component and pore-forming toxin, is carried by different staphylococcal bacteriophages. The prevalence of PVL in Staphylococcus aureus has been reported around the globe. However, the data on PVL-encoding phage types, lukSF-PV gene variation and chromosomal phage insertion sites for PVL-positive S. aureus are limited, especially in China. In order to obtain a more complete understanding of the molecular epidemiology of PVL-positive S. aureus, an integrated and modified PCR-based scheme was applied to detect the PVL-encoding phage types. Phage insertion locus and the lukSF-PV variant were determined by PCR and sequencing. Meanwhile, the genetic background was characterized by staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, staphylococcal protein A (spa) gene polymorphisms typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing, accessory gene regulator (agr) locus typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Seventy eight (78/1175, 6.6%) isolates possessed the lukSF-PV genes and 59.0% (46/78) of PVL-positive strains belonged to CC59 lineage. Eight known different PVL-encoding phage types were detected, and Φ7247PVL/ΦST5967PVL (n = 13) and ΦPVL (n = 12) were the most prevalent among them. While 25 (25/78, 32.1%) isolates, belonging to ST30, and ST59 clones, were unable to be typed by the modified PCR-based scheme. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified at five locations in the lukSF-PV genes, two of which were non-synonymous. Maximum-likelihood tree analysis of attachment sites sequences detected six SNP profiles for attR and eight for attL, respectively. In conclusion, the PVL-positive S. aureus mainly harbored Φ7247PVL/ΦST5967PVL and ΦPVL in the regions studied. lukSF-PV gene sequences, PVL-encoding phages, and phage insertion locus generally varied with lineages. Moreover, PVL-positive clones that have emerged worldwide likely carry distinct phages. PMID:27536288

  14. Typing of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-Encoding Phages and lukSF-PV Gene Sequence Variation in Staphylococcus aureus from China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huanqiang; Hu, Fupin; Jin, Shu; Xu, Xiaogang; Zou, Yuhan; Ding, Baixing; He, Chunyan; Gong, Fang; Liu, Qingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, encoded by lukSF-PV genes), a bi-component and pore-forming toxin, is carried by different staphylococcal bacteriophages. The prevalence of PVL in Staphylococcus aureus has been reported around the globe. However, the data on PVL-encoding phage types, lukSF-PV gene variation and chromosomal phage insertion sites for PVL-positive S. aureus are limited, especially in China. In order to obtain a more complete understanding of the molecular epidemiology of PVL-positive S. aureus, an integrated and modified PCR-based scheme was applied to detect the PVL-encoding phage types. Phage insertion locus and the lukSF-PV variant were determined by PCR and sequencing. Meanwhile, the genetic background was characterized by staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, staphylococcal protein A (spa) gene polymorphisms typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing, accessory gene regulator (agr) locus typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Seventy eight (78/1175, 6.6%) isolates possessed the lukSF-PV genes and 59.0% (46/78) of PVL-positive strains belonged to CC59 lineage. Eight known different PVL-encoding phage types were detected, and Φ7247PVL/ΦST5967PVL (n = 13) and ΦPVL (n = 12) were the most prevalent among them. While 25 (25/78, 32.1%) isolates, belonging to ST30, and ST59 clones, were unable to be typed by the modified PCR-based scheme. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified at five locations in the lukSF-PV genes, two of which were non-synonymous. Maximum-likelihood tree analysis of attachment sites sequences detected six SNP profiles for attR and eight for attL, respectively. In conclusion, the PVL-positive S. aureus mainly harbored Φ7247PVL/ΦST5967PVL and ΦPVL in the regions studied. lukSF-PV gene sequences, PVL-encoding phages, and phage insertion locus generally varied with lineages. Moreover, PVL-positive clones that have emerged worldwide likely carry distinct phages. PMID:27536288

  15. Jim Dine-Inspired Valentines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlett, April

    2011-01-01

    Jim Dine was born in 1935 in Cincinnati. He earned a BFA from Ohio University in 1957 and then moved to New York in 1959, where he fell in with a group of artists that included Claes Oldenburg. Dine is best known as a Pop innovator, whose paintings, sculptures, and prints were layered with everyday objects, including ties, tools, and even a…

  16. Valentines Day X2 Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    Active region 1158 let loose with an X2.2 flare at 0153 UT or 8:50 pm ET on February 15, 2011, the largest flare since Dec. 2006 and the biggest flare so far in Solar Cycle 24. This video was taken...

  17. [Investigation of the presence of mecC and Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from clinical specimens during seven years period].

    PubMed

    Kılıç, Abdullah; Doğan, Eyüp; Kaya, Sinem; Baysallar, Mehmet

    2015-10-01

    Detection and identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in clinical microbiology laboratories are important for the selection of appropriate treatment and obtaining epidemiological data. mecC gene, is a mecA homologue, showing almost 69% DNA similarity with the mecA gene and the encoded protein by this gene shows almost 63% similarity with the PBP2a/2' protein. Several studies indicated that mecC positive MRSA strains can be transmitted from the livestock to humans by cross contamination. Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), a potent cytotoxin of S.aureus is also considered as an important virulence factor. The aim of this study was to determine the existence and prevalence of mecC and pvl genes among S.aureus strains isolated from clinical specimens. A total of 1700 S.aureus isolates including 1177 methicillin-susceptible S.aureus (MSSA) and 523 MRSA, isolated in our hospital between January 2007 to December 2014, were included in the study. The isolates were identified by both conventional methods and BD Phoenix automated system (BD Diagnostic Instrument Systems, USA). Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method with oxacillin (1 μg) and cefoxitin (30 μg) according to the CLSI standards. The presence of mecA gene was investigated by the use of real-time PCR, and the presence of pvl and mecC genes were detected by conventional PCR method. Among the patients, 44.6% (759/1700) were outpatients, 65.8% (1119/1700) were male and the mean age of of patients was 39.7 years. Of 1700 isolates evaluated in this study, 523 (30.7%) were positive for mecA gene, however all of them were negative for mecC gene. A total of 32 (1.8%) isolates were positive for pvl gene including 23 (1.9%) out of 1177 MSSA and nine (1.7%) out of 523 MRSA strains. Eighteen (56.2%) of the PVL-positive S.aureus strains were isolated from skin and soft tissue infections. The frequency of PVL detected in this study was similar to the

  18. Elderly infection in the community due to ST5/SCCmecII methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (the New York/Japan clone) in Japan: Panton-Valentine leukocidin-negative necrotizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Olga; Tomita, Yusuke; Hung, Wei-Chun; Takano, Tomomi; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Higuchi, Wataru; Nishiyama, Akihito; Reva, Ivan; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2015-06-01

    An 89-year-old man suffered from and died of necrotizing pneumonia with rapid progression and cavity formation due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). He was at no risk for hospital-acquired MRSA infection. His MRSA exhibited genotype ST5/spa2(t002)/agr2/SCCmecII/coagulaseII and was negative for Panton-Valentine leukocidin, indicating the New York/Japan clone (the predominant epidemic hospital-acquired MRSA clone in Japan). However, this strain expressed the cytolytic peptide (phenol-soluble modulin or δ-hemolysin) genes at high level, similar to USA300 (the most common community-acquired MRSA in the United States), indicating a variant of the New York/Japan clone with an important feature of community-acquired MRSA.

  19. Emergence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive ST59 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus with high cytolytic peptide expression in association with community-acquired pediatric osteomyelitis complicated by pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Sawanobori, Emi; Hung, Wei-Chun; Takano, Tomomi; Hachuda, Koji; Horiuchi, Tadahiro; Higuchi, Wataru; Hung, Wei-Wen; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Nishiyama, Akihito; Reva, Ivan; Reva, Galina; Teng, Lee-Jene; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2015-10-01

    A 15-year-old boy, who had had a furuncle on his femur, developed femoral pyomyositis and osteomyelitis complicated by septic pulmonary embolism. Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive (PVL(+)) ST59 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) was isolated from pus and blood. Chemotherapy was started with cefazolin, followed by combination therapy with meropenem/vancomycin with surgery. The MSSA (strain KS1) was positive for increased levels of cytolytic peptide (psmα and hld) and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), and manifested IS1216V-mediated multidrug resistance (to erythromycin, clindamycin, kanamycin, streptomycin, and chloramphenicol), similar to a genome-analyzed reference strain (PM1) of ST59/SCCmecV(5C2&5) community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (Taiwan CA-MRSA), but unlike another reference strain (M013) of Taiwan CA-MRSA in terms of resistance. The data suggest that CA-MSSA KS1, characterized by PVL, increased levels of cytolytic peptide, SEB, and multidrug resistance, is a possible ancestral strain of Taiwan CA-MRSA and causes the unique association of osteomyelitis and septic pulmonary embolism, requiring complicated management.

  20. Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL)-Positive Health Care-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Are Associated with Skin and Soft Tissue Infections and Colonized Mainly by Infective PVL-Encoding Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qiwen; Cheng, Hang; Yuan, Wenchang; Zeng, Fangyin; Shang, Weilong; Tang, Dahai; Xue, Wencheng; Fu, Jianfeng; Zhou, Renjie; Zhu, Junmin; Yang, Jie; Hu, Zhen; Yuan, Jizhen; Zhang, Xia; Rao, Qing; Li, Shu; Chen, Zhijin; Hu, Xiaomei; Wu, Xingan

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a public health concern worldwide. PVL is associated with community-associated MRSA and is linked to skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). However, PVL genes have also been detected in health care-associated (HA) MRSA isolates. The diseases associated with PVL-positive HA-MRSA isolates and the distributions of PVL-encoding bacteriophages in HA-MRSA have not been determined. In this study, a total of 259 HA-MRSA strains isolated between 2009 and 2012 in China from inpatients with SSTIs, pneumonia, and bacteremia were selected for molecular typing, including staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec typing, multilocus sequence typing, and staphylococcal protein A gene typing. The PVL genes and PVL bacteriophages in the MRSA isolates were characterized by PCR. Among the tested MRSA isolates, 28.6% (74/259) were PVL positive. The high prevalence of PVL-carrying HA-MRSA was observed to be associated with SSTIs but not with pneumonia or bacteremia. The PVL-positive HA-MRSA isolates were colonized mainly by infective PVL phages, namely, Φ7247PVL, ΦSLT, and ΦSa2958. The distribution of PVL-carrying bacteriophages differed geographically. Our study highlights the potential risk of the emergence of multidrug-resistant HA-MRSA strains with increased virulence. PMID:25339405

  1. Detection of ST772 Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (Bengal Bay clone) and ST22 S. aureus isolates with a genetic variant of elastin binding protein in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Pokhrel, R.H.; Aung, M.S.; Thapa, B.; Chaudhary, R.; Mishra, S.K.; Kawaguchiya, M.; Urushibara, N.; Kobayashi, N.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic characteristics were analysed for recent clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant and -susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and MSSA respectively) in Kathmandu, Nepal. MRSA isolates harbouring Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes were classified into ST1, ST22 and ST88 with SCCmec-IV and ST772 with SCCmec-V (Bengal Bay clone), while PVL-positive MSSA into ST22, ST30 and ST772. ST22 isolates (PVL-positive MRSA and MSSA, PVL-negative MRSA) possessed a variant of elastin binding protein gene (ebpS) with an internal deletion of 180 bp, which was similar to that reported for ST121 S. aureus previously outside Nepal. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the ebpS variant in ST22 might have occurred independently of ST121 strains. This is the first report of ST772 PVL-positive MRSA in Nepal and detection of the deletion variant of ebpS in ST22 S. aureus. PMID:27014464

  2. Prevalence of community-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Panton-Valentine leucocidin-positive S. aureus in general practice patients with skin and soft tissue infections in the northern and southern regions of The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Mithoe, D; Rijnders, M I A; Roede, B M; Stobberingh, E; Möller, A V M

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the prevalence of community-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) and Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL)-positive S. aureus in general practice (GP) patients with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) in the northern (Groningen and Drenthe) and southern (Limburg) regions of The Netherlands. Secondary objectives were to assess the possible risk factors for patients with SSTI caused by S. aureus and PVL-positive S. aureus using a questionnaire-based survey. From 2007 to 2008, wound and nose cultures were obtained from patients with SSTI in general practice. These swabs were analysed for the presence of S. aureus and the antibiotic susceptibility was determined. The presence of the PVL toxin gene was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the genetic background with the use of spa typing. A survey was performed to detect risk factors for S. aureus infection and for the presence of PVL toxin.S. aureus was isolated from 219 out of 314 (70%) patients with SSTI, of which two (0.9%) patients were MRSA-positive. In 25 (11%) patients, the PVL toxin gene was found. A higher prevalence of PVL-positive S. aureus of patients with SSTI was found in the northern region compared to the south (p < 0.05). Regional differences were found in the spa types of PVL-positive S. aureus isolates, and for PVL-negative S. aureus isolates, the genetic background was similar in both regions. The prevalence of CA-MRSA in GP patients with SSTI in The Netherlands is low. Regional differences were found in the prevalence of PVL-positive S. aureus isolates from GP patients with SSTI. Household contacts having similar symptoms were found to be a risk factor for SSTI with S. aureus.

  3. Prophage, phiPV83-pro, carrying panton-valentine leukocidin genes, on the Staphylococcus aureus P83 chromosome: comparative analysis of the genome structures of phiPV83-pro, phiPVL, phi11, and other phages.

    PubMed

    Zou, D; Kaneko, J; Narita, S; Kamio, Y

    2000-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus P83 has Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-like genes, lukM and lukF-PV. Here, lukM and lukF-PV genes were found on the genome of a prophage, which was designated as phiPV83-pro. The precise genome size was 45,636 bp with att core sequences of 10 base pairs. Sixty-four ORFs were identified on the phiPV83-pro genome, including two extra operons, lukM-lukF-PV and orfs63-64. The lukM-lukF-PV cluster was located 2.1 kb upstream of the attL site. The most striking feature of the phiPV83-pro genome was a constituent of at least 4 regions from phi11, phiPVL, and other phages, i.e., (i) att sites identical with those of phi11, (ii) a cos sequence and the genes encoding packaging and head proteins of phiPVL (occupied half region of phiPV83-pro), and (iii) the other two regions which showed no significant similarity with known phages (occupied about 40% of phiPV83-pro). Furthermore, two insertion sequences, ISSA1 and ISSA2 were integrated into attL site and orf44, respectively. PhiPV83-pro was not induced as phage particles from S. aureus P83 regardless of its treatment with mitomycin C. The insertion of ISSA1 into the attL site was one of the reasons of the failure of the induction of the phage particles by mitomycin C treatment of the strain P83.

  4. Emergence of Panton-Valentine leucocidin-positive ST8-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (USA300 clone) in Korea causing healthcare-associated and hospital-acquired bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Jung, J; Song, E H; Park, S Y; Lee, S-R; Park, S-J; Sung, H; Kim, M-N; Kim, S-H; Lee, S-O; Choi, S-H; Woo, J H; Kim, Y S; Chong, Y P

    2016-08-01

    Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL)-positive sequence type (ST)8-MRSA-SCCmec IVa (USA300) is the epidemic strain of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) in North America. USA300 is extremely rare in South Korea, and PVL-negative ST72 SCCmec type IVc is the predominant CA-MRSA clone. In a multicentre, prospective cohort study of S. aureus bacteraemia, we identified PVL-positive ST8-MRSA isolates by performing multilocus sequence typing and PCR for PVL. We analyzed the clinical characteristics of patients with PVL-positive ST8-MRSA bacteraemia, and performed SCCmec, spa, and agr typing, PCR for arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), virulence gene profiling, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among a total of 818 MRSA isolates, we identified ten isolates of PVL-positive ST8-MRSA (USA300) (3 from Hospital D, 4 from Hospital G, and 3 from Hospital A), all of which involved exclusively healthcare-associated (5 isolates) and hospital-acquired bacteraemia (5 isolates). This strain accounted for 8~10 % of the hospital-acquired MRSA bacteraemia in Hospitals D and G. Bacteraemia of unknown origin was the most common type of infection followed by pneumonia. All the isolates were SCCmec type IVa, spa type t008, and agr group I. Eight of the isolates harboured ACME. In a PFGE analysis, four isolates were identical to the USA300 control strain, five differed by a single band, and the remaining one differed by two bands. All the isolates were pulsed-field type USA300. This is the first report of healthcare-associated and hospital-acquired bacteraemia caused by USA300 in South Korea. USA300 seems to be an emerging hospital clone in this country. PMID:27209287

  5. Genotyping of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman reveals the dominance of Panton–Valentine leucocidin-negative ST6-IV/t304 clone

    PubMed Central

    Udo, E E; Al-Lawati, B A-H; Al-Muharmi, Z; Thukral, S S

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and distribution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) genotypes circulating at a tertiary hospital in the Sultanate of Oman. A total of 79 MRSA isolates were obtained from different clinical samples and investigated using antibiogram, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec), Spa typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The isolates were susceptible to linezolid, vancomycin, teicoplanin, tigecycline and mupirocin but were resistant to tetracycline (30.4%), erythromycin (26.6%), clindamycin (24.1%), trimethoprim (19.0%), ciprofloxacin (17.7%), fusidic acid (15.2%) and gentamicin (12.7%). Molecular typing revealed 19 PFGE patterns, 26 Spa types and 21 sequence types. SCCmec-IV (86.0%) was the dominant SCCmec type, followed by SCCmec-V (10.1%). SCCmec-III (2.5%) and SCCmec-II (1.3%) were less common. ST6-IV/t304 (n = 30) and ST1295-IV/t690 (n = 12) were the dominant genotypes followed by ST772-V/t657 (n = 5), ST30-IV/t019/t021 (n = 5), ST22-IV/t852 (n = 4), ST80-IV/t044 (n = 3) and 18 single genotypes that were isolated sporadically. On the basis of SCCmec typing and MLST, 91.2% of the isolates were classified as community-associated MRSA and 8.8% of the isolates (consisting of four ST22-IV/t852, one ST239-III/t632, one ST5-III/t311 and one ST5-II/t003) were classified as healthcare-associated MRSA. The study has revealed the dominance of a Panton–Valentine leucocidin-negative ST6-IV/t304 clone and provided insights into the distribution of antibiotic resistance in MRSA at the tertiary hospital in Oman. It also highlights the importance of surveillance in detecting the emergence of new MRSA clones in a healthcare facility. PMID:25356354

  6. Presence of the Panton-Valentine Leukocidin Genes in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Is Associated with Severity and Clinical Outcome of Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia in a Single Center Study in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuanling; Guo, Liang; Chu, Xu; Shen, Limeng; Guo, Yuanyu; Dong, Huali; Mao, Jianfeng; van der Veen, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    The Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have previously been associated with severe infections. Here, the impact of the PVL genes on severity of disease and clinical outcome of patients with hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) or ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) due to MRSA was investigated in a single center observational study in a hospital in China. HAP due to MRSA was diagnosed in 100 patients and 13 of the patients were PVL positive, while VAP was diagnosed in 5 patients and 2 were PVL positive. The PVL positive patient group showed a significantly higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score (14.3 ±7.8 vs. 10.1 ±4.7, P = 0.005) and significantly more patients with CRP levels >80 mg/L (8/15 vs. 12/90, P = 0.006) or WBC counts >15x109/L (7/15 vs. 12/90, P = 0.006), indicating that the severity of disease is affected by the presence of the PVL genes. The outcome of the study was defined by 30-day mortality. Four (27%) of the PVL positive patients and four (4%) of the PVL negative patients died within 30 days (P = 0.01, Fisher exact test). Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated for the PVL positive and PVL negative patient groups, which differed significantly (P = 0.003). Among the patients that died, the mean interval between diagnosis and death was shorter for the PVL positive patients (9.3 ±5.6 vs. 40.8 ±6.6 days, P = 0.013). Further analysis within the HAP and VAP patient groups showed that the presence of PVL in MRSA impacted the severity of disease and clinical outcome of HAP, but for VAP the number of patients included in the study was too low. In conclusion, in this single center study in a Chinese hospital the presence of the PVL genes in MRSA impacted the severity of disease and clinical outcome in patients with HAP due to MRSA. PMID:27249225

  7. 2011 Valentines Day X-Class Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    The video clip of the large X2 flare seen by Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) in extreme ultraviolet light on February 15, 2011, has been enlarged and superimposed on a video of SOHO's C2 coronagra...

  8. A Valentine's Day bouquet for Temperature readers: pleasing with prizes, searching for the right words, and keeping things mysterious.

    PubMed

    Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2015-01-01

    This editorial tells its readers that the journal Temperature awards its first prizes for best papers to Boris Kingma and Assaf Yacobi. It also discusses the use of several thermoregulation-related terms and expressions, including "cold temperature," "thermoneutral temperature," and "warm-sensitive" and offers, arguably, better alternatives. The editorial also contains a new puzzle: how can color affect temperature perception?

  9. A Valentine's Day bouquet for Temperature readers: pleasing with prizes, searching for the right words, and keeping things mysterious

    PubMed Central

    Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2015-01-01

    This editorial tells its readers that the journal Temperature awards its first prizes for best papers to Boris Kingma and Assaf Yacobi. It also discusses the use of several thermoregulation-related terms and expressions, including “cold temperature,” “thermoneutral temperature,” and “warm-sensitive” and offers, arguably, better alternatives. The editorial also contains a new puzzle: how can color affect temperature perception? PMID:27226997

  10. Evolution of a fatal septic arthritis caused by a Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-producing Staphylococcus aureus strain.

    PubMed

    Rafai, Mostafa; Abouelalaa, Khalil; Skhsoukh, Yassine; Balkhi, Hicham; Belyamani, Lahcen; Dimou, M'barek

    2013-10-01

    We report the observation of a septic arthritis of the knee complicated within first 36 hours by multiorgan failure including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), heart failure, acute renal failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). A diagnosis of staphylococcal arthritis was suspected confirmed by direct examination, and culture showed a Staphylococcus aureus sensitive to methicillin. The sample sent to the National Reference Centre for Staphylococci (Lyon, France) for genetic analysis confirmed the isolate positive for the PVL gene expression. The fulminating evolution of a septic S. aureus arthritis in an otherwise healthy man should probably evoke the possibility of LPV strain. Anti-PLV antibiotics with anti-staphylococcal activity, such as clindamycin and linezolid should be started without waiting for typing of the S. aureus strain.

  11. Share the Love: Why Not Celebrate Valentine's Day by Encouraging Kids to Give Back to the Community?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Nancy Mann

    2011-01-01

    February is a natural time to teach students that love involves more than hearts and candy--it also means giving of oneself. According to Terri Kennamer, a third-grade teacher at West Elementary School in Vestavia Hills, Alabama, it is the responsibility of educators to help students recognize that they are citizens of the world. Children have…

  12. Staphylococcus aureus Panton-Valentine leukocidin induces an inflammatory response in human phagocytes via the NLRP3 inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Dirk; Gieldon, Laura; Mysore, Vijayashree; Nippe, Nadine; Taxman, Debra J.; Duncan, Joseph A.; Broglie, Peter M.; Marketon, Kristina; Austermann, Judith; Vogl, Thomas; Foell, Dirk; Niemann, Silke; Peters, Georg; Roth, Johannes; Löffler, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus pore-forming toxin PVL is most likely causative for life-threatening necrotizing infections, which are characterized by massive tissue inflammation and necrosis. Whereas the cytotoxic action of PVL on human neutrophils is already well established, the PVL effects on other sensitive cell types, such as monocytes and macrophages, are less clear. In this study, we used different types of human leukocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, lymphocytes) to investigate cell-specific binding of PVL subunits and subsequent proinflammatory and cytotoxic effects. In all PVL-sensitive cells, we identified the binding of the subunit LukS-PV as the critical factor for PVL-induced cytotoxicity, which was followed by binding of LukF-PV. LukS-PV binds to monocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils but not to lymphocytes. Additionally, we showed that PVL binding to monocytes and macrophages leads to release of caspase-1-dependent proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. PVL activates the NLRP3 inflammasome, a signaling complex of myeloid cells that is involved in caspase-1-dependent IL-1β processing in response to pathogens and endogenous danger signals. Specific inhibition of this pathway at several steps significantly reduced inflammasome activation and subsequent pyronecrosis. Furthermore, we found that PAMPs and DAMPs derived from dying neutrophils can dramatically enhance this response by up-regulating pro-IL-1β in monocytes/macrophages. This study analyzes a specific host signaling pathway that mediates PVL-induced inflammation and cytotoxicity, which has high relevance for CA-MRSA-associated and PVL-mediated pathogenic processes, such as necrotizing infections. PMID:22892107

  13. A Valentine's Day bouquet for Temperature readers: pleasing with prizes, searching for the right words, and keeping things mysterious.

    PubMed

    Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2015-01-01

    This editorial tells its readers that the journal Temperature awards its first prizes for best papers to Boris Kingma and Assaf Yacobi. It also discusses the use of several thermoregulation-related terms and expressions, including "cold temperature," "thermoneutral temperature," and "warm-sensitive" and offers, arguably, better alternatives. The editorial also contains a new puzzle: how can color affect temperature perception? PMID:27226997

  14. Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-Positive and Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1-Positive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a French Multicenter Prospective Study in 2008▿

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Jérôme; Tristan, Anne; Cavalié, Laurent; Decousser, Jean-Winoc; Bes, Michèle; Etienne, Jerome; Laurent, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    The epidemiology of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) differs from country to country. We assess the features of the ST80 European clone, which is the most prevalent PVL-positive CA-MRSA clone in Europe, and the TSST-1 ST5 clone that was recently described in France. In 2008, all MRSA strains susceptible to fluoroquinolones and gentamicin and resistant to fusidic acid that were isolated in 104 French laboratories were characterized using agr alleles, spa typing, and the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element and PCR profiling of 21 toxin genes. Three phenotypes were defined: (i) kanamycin resistant, associated with the ST80 clone; (ii) kanamycin and tobramycin resistant, associated with the ST5 clone; and (iii) aminoglycoside susceptible, which was less frequently associated with the ST5 clone. Among the 7,253 MRSA strains isolated, 91 (1.3%) were ST80 CA-MRSA (89 phenotype 1) and 190 (2.6%) were ST5 CA-MRSA (146 phenotype 2, 42 phenotype 3). Compared to the latter, ST80 CA-MRSAs were more likely to be community acquired (80% versus 46%) and found in young patients (median age, 26.0 years versus 49.5 years) with deep cutaneous infections (48% versus 6%). They were less likely to be tetracycline susceptible (22% versus 85%) and to be isolated from respiratory infections (6% versus 27%). The TSST-1 ST5 clone has rapidly emerged in France and has become even more prevalent than the ST80 European clone, whose prevalence has remained stable. The epidemiological and clinical patterns of the two clones differ drastically. Given the low prevalence of both among all staphylococcal infections, no modification of antibiotic recommendations is required yet. PMID:21220529

  15. Incidence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carrying Pantone-Valentine leucocidin gene at a referral hospital in United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Dash, Nihar; Panigrahi, Debadatta; Al Zarouni, Mansour; Yassin, Faten; Al-Shamsi, Moza

    2014-04-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an emerging pathogen in hospitalized patients worldwide. The present study was undertaken to identify CA-MRSA in hospitalized patients in a 350-bed tertiary care hospital in Sharjah, UAE over a 2-year period from January 2011 to December 2012. CA-MRSA was defined based on identification within first 48 h of admission in the hospital. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mec typing of the CA-MRSA isolates was carried out by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Detection of PVL and mecA genes was done by PCR using the GenoType(®) MRSA test system (Hain Lifescience). Patient's clinical data and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the CA-MRSA isolates were also evaluated. Fifty seven of the 187 MRSA isolates were identified as CA-MRSA. All the CA-MRSA strains in our study belonged to SCCmecIV type and were positive for both PVL and mecA genes. The patients with CA-MRSA infections were young (median age, 32 years) and the majority of infections involved the skin and soft tissue (36%). Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the CA-MRSA isolates showed a better susceptibility profile to the non-beta-lactam antimicrobials with the exception of ciprofloxacin having 28% resistance. This study evidently strengthens the recent observation of an increase in CA-MRSA emergence among hospitalized patients in the UAE. PMID:23919760

  16. Outbreak of Skin Infections Due to Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-Positive Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus in a French Prison in 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Bourigault, Céline; Corvec, Stéphane; Brulet, Virginie; Robert, Pierre-Yves; Mounoury, Olivier; Goubin, Chloé; Boutoille, David; Hubert, Bruno; Bes, Michèle; Tristan, Anne; Etienne, Jérôme; Lepelletier, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Background. An outbreak of PVL-positive MSSA skin and soft tissue-infections (SSTIs) was suspected in May 2010 when recurrent SSTI was diagnosed in an inmate of a large prison in Nantes, France. Methods and findings. Retrospective and prospective investigations were performed. Microbiological characterisation was by DNA microarray testing (S. aureus genotyping - Identibac, Alere). We identified 14 inmates meeting our clinical and microbiological case definition for PVL-MSSA SSTI between March 2010 and April 2011. The SSTIs developed in tattooed areas in 4 patients and in areas shaved daily with a mechanical razor in 4 other patients. All case isolates exhibited a similar SmaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. Microarray analysis showed that all 14 isolates harboured genes encoding PVL and enterotoxins (A, H, K, and Q) and belonged to clonal complex 1 (CC1). Individual and collective hygiene measures, education delivered to inmates and prison employees, and antibiotic treatment of SSTIs were successful in controlling the outbreak. No new cases were identified after April 2011. Routine screening for PVL-positive MSSA carriage was not feasible. Conclusions. Our data suggest that tattooing and shaving with mechanical razors may constitute risk factors for SSTIs among previously colonised inmates and contribute to the PVL-MSSA outbreak in the prison. Allowing inmates access to professional tattooists and to the hygiene and safety conditions available to people in the community would help to prevent tattoo-related infections. PMID:24619564

  17. The Effects of Early Reading with Parents on Developing Literacy Skills. Science Briefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Science Briefs" summarize the findings and implications of a recent study in basic science or clinical research. This brief reports on the study "Mother-Child Bookreading in Low-Income Families: Correlates and Outcomes during the First Three Years of Life" (H. Raikes, B. A. Pan, G. Luze, C. S. Tamis-LeMonda, J. Brooks-Gunn, J. Constantine, L. B.…

  18. Deliberate self-harm and public holidays: is there a link?

    PubMed

    Cullum, S J; Catalan, J; Berelowitz, K; O'Brien, S; Millington, H T; Preston, D

    1993-01-01

    It has previously been reported [Davenport & Birtle, 1990] that there is a positive association between nonfatal deliberate self-harm in adolescents and emotionally charged festivals, such as St Valentine's Day and Christmas Day. We studied all cases of nonfatal deliberate self-harm presenting to three Central London hospitals on St Valentine's Day and Christmas Day and on two control dates, between 1983 and 1989. No association was found between cases of deliberate self-harm and St Valentine's Day, but a negative association was found with Christmas Day.

  19. 'Business Diet' a Bad Deal for The Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... author Dr. Valentin Fuster. He's a professor of cardiology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount ... in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology . The finding "underscores the importance of developing healthful ...

  20. 76 FR 21622 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does... 17500 THEDFORD, NE VOR/DME MARSS, NE FIX 4900 17500 MARSS, NE FIX VALENTINE, NE NDB 4800 17500...

  1. 77 FR 14770 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests AGENCY: Department of Education. ACTION: Comment... information technology. Dated: March 7, 2012. Stephanie Valentine, Acting Director, Information Collection... for information should be addressed to U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW.,...

  2. 78 FR 53737 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to the Office of Management and Budget for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... information technology. Please note that written comments received in response to this notice will be... assistive technology services. Dated: August 22, 2013. Stephanie Valentine, Acting Director, Information... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF...

  3. Arts/Crafts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Described are various arts and crafts ideas, mostly with a February theme. Included are: ceramic boxes, valentine ideas, and patriotic projects--symbols of our country, silhouettes of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, and stars and stripes. (KC)

  4. Recurring off-types in lettuce: Their significance in plant breeding and seed production.

    PubMed

    Maxon Smith, J W

    1977-03-01

    The lettuce cv. Valentine regularly produces non-heading off-type plants at the relatively high frequency of 4 × 10(-3). They result from mutation to the dominant condition. A similar propensity has been reported twice before in lettuce; it is highly heritable.The propensity to produce off-types was not present in the parents of Valentine so it must have arisen during the pedigree breeding programme. Closely related cultivars do not carry the character but it was subsequently transmitted to Dandie a new cultivar of which Valentine was one of the parents. Allelism tests to relate Valentine off-types to those in crisphead cultivars were not successful.The elimination of off-types in breeding programmes is discussed. Contrary to the findings in day-neutral crisphead cultivars, mutant phenotypes in long-day butterhead cultivars have no selective advantage for seed production. Consequently, strict roguing ensures adequate varietal stability. PMID:24407526

  5. American Holidays for Spanish Students in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster County School Board, PA.

    Three handouts give the history of three holidays celebrated in the United States: Christmas, Halloween, and St. Valentine's Day. Each holiday is described in Spanish and in English for use in bilingual classrooms. (CFM)

  6. Influence of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) on water stress in bean plants

    SciTech Connect

    Starkey, T.E.; Davis, D.D.; Pell, E.J.; Merrill, W.

    1981-08-01

    Bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cvs. Provider and Stringless Black Valentine) were exposed to 395 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ (0.08 ppm) peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) for 0.5 hr and subjected to drought stress following exposure. PAN influenced the plant potential of PAN-sensitive Provider resulting in visible wilting and reduced soil moisture content. There was no effect of PAN on the water relations of the PAN-tolerant Stringless Black Valentine.

  7. Public Library YA Program Roundup. VOYA's Most Valuable Program 2002: Munching on Books; Really Getting Graphic: A Teen Read Week Art Show Preview; Masquerades and Millionaires: An After-hours Teen Extravaganza; Teen Time Travelers Make Listening a "Hobbit"; Teens Take a Humongous Bite Out of Newly Seasoned Reading Program; Putting a Stake through Valentine's Day; Celebrating the Day of the Dead; Legos in the Library Window; "So that You May Know": Teen Rading Group Meets Holocaust Survivors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falck, Kara; Kan, Kat; Fletcher-Spear, Kristin; Solomon, Beth B.; Dunford, Karen; Rinella, Kay Walsh; Shenoy, Ravi; McIntosh, Jennifer R.; Socha, Debbie; Dudeck, Sharon; Duwel, Lucretia; Stackpole, Diane; Blosveren, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    These nine articles describe public library programs for young adults. Highlights include a read-a-thon with snacks; graphic novels and art; costume party and trivia contest; activities based on "The Hobbit"; a summer reading program that included teen volunteers; writing epitaphs for Day of the Dead celebration; Legos displays; and meeting with…

  8. 75 FR 47252 - Proposed Establishment of Low Altitude Area Navigation Routes (T-281, T-283, T-285, T-286, and T...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... ``significant rule'' under Department of ] Transportation (DOT) Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... continues to read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3...'09'' W.) MARSS, NE Fix (Lat. 42 27'49'' N., long. 100 36'15'' W.) Valentine, NE (VTN) NDB (Lat. 42...

  9. Large-Scale Blast Experiments Examine Subsurface Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonder, Ingo; Graettinger, Alison; Valentine, Greg

    2013-09-01

    Volcanic craters are often formed by multiple subsurface explosions caused by the interaction of magma and groundwater [Lorenz, 1973; Valentine and White, 2012]. To understand the processes and products of such explosions, scientists spent 2 years conducting experiments that produced craters on the meter scale at the Geohazards Field Station in Ashford, N. Y.

  10. Insecure? Keeping New England Campuses Safe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franzosa, Alyssa

    2009-01-01

    On April 16, 2007, Seung-Hui Cho traded in his title as "student" for one of "gunman." That day, Cho, a student at Virginia Tech, was responsible for the deadliest shooting spree by a single person in U.S. history, killing 33 people, including himself. Ten months later on Valentine's Day, Steven Kazmierczak joined Cho in the ranks of student…

  11. “More than skin deep”: Recurrent primary hand abscesses in a warehouse operative

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, L.; O’Connor, C.; Fitzpatrick, F.; O’Sullivan, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    A 25-year-old male right-hand dominant warehouse operator presented with two hand infections within 12 weeks both requiring surgical drainage and antimicrobial therapy. Subsequent testing confirmed Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive Staphylococcus aureus (PVL-SA). This case highlights the need for prompt multidisciplinary management of hand infections to consider, diagnose and manage atypical infections. PMID:27252979

  12. 77 FR 23807 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... Juarez, Valentin Gomez Farias 120A, Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, Mexico; Puerta de Hierro 5594, Colonia...--B, Colonia Reg. 92, Quintana Roo, Benito Juarez 77516, Mexico; Avenida Vallarta No. 6503, Piso 15..., Col. Napoles, Benito Juarez, Mexico City, Distrito Federal 03810, Mexico; Wisconsin No. 68,...

  13. Antioxidant activity, phenolic and anthocyanin contents of various rhubarb (Rheum-spp.) varieties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antioxidant activity (ABTS assay), total phenolics, and total anthocyanins were determined in the petioles of fifteen rhubarb (Rheum spp.) varieties. Antioxidant activity ranged from 491 ± 60 (Victoria 574/27) to 1820 'mol Trolox/g DW (Valentine). The phenolic content varied from 673 ± 41 (Loher Blu...

  14. 77 FR 61597 - Avalon Wind, LLC; Avalon Wind 2, LLC; Catalina Solar, LLC; Catalina Solar 2, LLC; Pacific Wind...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Avalon Wind, LLC; Avalon Wind 2, LLC; Catalina Solar, LLC; Catalina Solar 2, LLC; Pacific Wind Lessee, LLC; Pacific Wind 2, LLC; Valentine Solar, LLC; EDF Renewable Development..., LLC, Avalon Wind 2, LLC, Catalina Solar, LLC, Catalina Solar 2, LLC, Pacific Wind Lessee, LLC,...

  15. What's Happening in February?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissman, Ron; And Others

    Brief information is given on 12 February events celebrated by Puerto Ricans: Groundhog Day; Candlemas; St. Valentine's Day; Mardi Gras; Ash Wednesday; Black History; and the birthdays of Thomas Alva Edison, Abraham Lincoln, Susan B. Anthony, Julia de Burgos, Luis Munoz Marin, and George Washington. Designed as a teacher resource, the booklet…

  16. Eventos de Febrero (February Events).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toro, Leonor; Pla, Myrna

    Designed as a resource for teachers, the booklet contains brief information on eight events celebrated by Puerto Ricans in the month of February: La Candelaria; Abraham Lincoln; Black History; Valentine's Day; Julia de Burgos; Luis Munoz Marin; George Washington; and the Carnaval. Written in Spanish, the booklet discusses the orgin and ways of…

  17. February Folklore: You'll Love It in Your Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, David

    1980-01-01

    Folk tales which are particularly suited to February cover legends about George Washington, the Chinese zodiac, and Groundhog Day. Also included is a calendar of activities for February. These activities are appropriate for Groundhog Day, Valentine's Day, Chinese New Year, President's (Washington and Lincoln) Day, and Leap Year. (KC)

  18. 75 FR 20533 - Interpretation of “Children's Product”

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... animal packaged with a candle as a sentimental gift for Valentine's Day or some other holiday. The candle... stuffed animal, on the other hand, is likely to be considered a children's product even though it has been combined in a promotion with a general use or adult product. The stuffed animal must meet all...

  19. Music Curriculum for Kindergarten.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picht, Harriet

    This kindergarten music curriculum provides a year-long program of a sequenced series of activities designed to develop music concepts. Topics of the units in this guide are: self-concept (beginning of the year), fall, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, winter, a circus, Valentine's Day, spring, and farms. A scope and sequence chart of concepts…

  20. Peers and Plagiarism: The Role of Student Judicial Boards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    After reading Kathryn Valentine's article that talked about her interaction with a Chinese student accused of plagiarism, the author was reminded of the effectiveness of student judicial boards. In this article, the author describes the benefits of having a student judicial board in fighting off plagiarism among students. She relates that although…

  1. Photoproduction of Carbon Monoxide from Natural Organic Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pioneering studies by Valentine provided early kinetic results that used carbon monoxide (CO) production to evaluate the photodecomposition of aquatic natural organic matter (NOM) . (ES&T 1993 27 409-412). Comparatively few kinetic studies have been conducted of the photodegradat...

  2. A Multidimensional Scaling Analysis of Own- and Cross-Race Face Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papesh, Megan H.; Goldinger, Stephen D.

    2010-01-01

    We examined predictions derived from Valentine's (1991) Multidimensional Space (MDS) framework for own- and other-race face processing. A set of 20 computerized faces was generated from a single prototype. Each face was saved as Black and White, changing only skin tone, such that structurally identical faces were represented in both race…

  3. Women and Communicative Power: Theory, Research, and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Carol Ann; Hoar, Nancy, Ed.

    A collection of essays that explores the links among women and communicative power from a variety of perspectives, this monograph focuses on issue analysis and suggestions for future research. The articles and their authors are as follows (1) "Women and Communicative Power: Introduction" (Carol Ann Valentine); (2) "Genderlect, Powerlect, and…

  4. Goal Attainment Scaling as an Effective Strategy to Assess the Outcomes of Mentoring Programs for Troubled Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balcazar, Fabricio E.; Davies, Gethin L.; Viggers, Dave; Tranter, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Mentoring programs are increasingly popular as preventive and/or supportive interventions for youth with various needs. A meta-analysis of mentoring program effects conducted by DuBois, Holloway, Valentine, and Cooper (2002) suggests that youth from backgrounds of risk (defined broadly) have the capacity to benefit from mentoring, especially when…

  5. Creeping bentgrass putting green response to foliar nitrogen fertilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT In 2009 and 2010, three independent fertility trials were conducted on a putting green (PG) managed within the Pennsylvania State University Joseph Valentine Turfgrass Research Center (University Park, PA). The objective was to identify Penn A-1/A-4 creeping bentgrass putting green quality ...

  6. Holidays. Advisory List: Instructional Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Media and Technology Services.

    This document presents an annotated bibliography of instructional materials that deal with subjects relating to holidays. Topics include Christmas, Earth Day, Easter, Halloween, Hannukah, Independence Day, Martin Luther King Day, Thanksgiving, Valentine's Day, and "More than One Holiday." Works cited include illustrated stories, poems, songs, and…

  7. Holidays. Instructional Media Advisory List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Media Evaluation Service.

    This annotated bibliography is directed at teachers of students in grades preK-6 and covers books about holidays. The holidays for which materials are listed are: Christmas, Easter, Halloween, Hanukkah, Passover, Purim, Rosh Hashanah, Sukkot, Thanksgiving, and Valentine's Day. A directory of publishers from whom these items are available is…

  8. Celebrating Traditional Holidays in Public Schools: Books for Basic Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahern, John F.; Moir, Hughes

    1986-01-01

    Provides a brief annotated bibliography of children's books which may be used to foster greater understanding of the five most popular holidays celebrated in U. S. public schools. The holidays are Columbus Day, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and St. Valentine's Day. (JDH)

  9. Post-Secondary Youth and Adult Learning [and] Educational Marketing and Delivery Systems. Trustees' Symposium on Postsecondary Education, Programs Two and Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Walter E., Ed.

    This is the report of a conference held to communicate the results of the Non Traditional Community College Project conducted during 1973-74 to determine the potential learning population of metropolitan St. Louis. The conference report consists of major presentations by J. A. Valentine of the College Entrance Examination Board and by the…

  10. DISPOSITION OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE IN HUMANS FOLLOWING ORAL AND DERMAL EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    DISPOSITION OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE IN HUMANS FOLLOWING ORAL AND DERMAL EXPOSURE. TL Leavens1, MW Case1, RA Pegram1, BC Blount2, DM DeMarini1, MC Madden1, and JL Valentine3. 1NHEERL, USEPA, RTP, NC, USA; 2CDC, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3RTI, RTP, NC, USA.
    The disinfection byproduct ...

  11. 75 FR 63501 - Buy American Exceptions Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... section 1605(c) of the Recovery Act and OMB's implementing guidance published on April 23, 2009 (74 FR... energy efficient bathroom exhaust fans and linoleum flooring for the Fairmont Street, Valentine Street... exhaust fans and linoleum flooring) are not produced in the U.S. in sufficient and reasonably...

  12. Using Video Cases to Scaffold Mentoring Competencies: A Program Design from the Young Women Leaders Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Bryan Rossiter

    2013-01-01

    This capstone project conducted an intervention using video cases to scaffold traditional methods of concept presentation in a youth mentoring program. Video cases delivered online were chosen as a methodology to strengthen the support and practitioner aspects indicative of mentoring program success rates (D. L. DuBois, Holloway, Valentine, &…

  13. Courtside: NCLB=New Cause for Litigious Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2004-01-01

    In September 2002, the children of parents Latasha Gibbs, Carmella Glass, Laverne Jones, Charlene Mingo, Deborah Powell-Jasper, Eunice Staton, and Keikola Valentine were attending New York City public schools that the state education department identified as needing improvement -- in other words, failing -- under the No Child Left Behind (NCLB)…

  14. 77 FR 74842 - Sunshine Act Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... Lessee, LLC, Pacific Wind 2, LLC, Valentine Solar, LLC, and EDF Renewables Development, Inc. E-23 OMITTED... Renewables, Inc., PacificCorp, NextEra Energy Resources, LLC, Invenergy Wind North America LLC, and Horizon Wind Energy LLC v. Bonneville Power Administration. E-3 EL11-44-002 Iberdrola Renewables, Inc.,...

  15. Swap Shop: Original Teaching Ideas Submitted by Readers of "Learning" Magazine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1983

    1983-01-01

    This collection of classroom ideas for the elementary school teacher contains learning activities, teaching methods, and suggestions on a wide variety of topics. The 22 teacher-submitted articles include ideas on writing, art, getting acquainted, vocabulary, self-esteem, open house, Halloween, mathematics, drama, hobbies, Valentine's Day, oral…

  16. Mental Health in Head Start: Leave No Child Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jellinek, Michael S.; Bishop-Josef, Sandra J.; Murphy, Michael; Zigler, Edward F.

    2005-01-01

    The original vision of Head Start called for a program that would "get kids ready so they would have a chance in school...a chance in life" (Sargent Shriver; quoted in Zigler and Valentine, 1997, p. 59). President George W. Bush's recent emphasis on literacy and school achievement in Head Start highlights the academic aspect of the Head Start…

  17. Relational Framing Theory and Coming-Out Narratives: A Data Analysis Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helens-Hart, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Coming-out scenarios have been described as potentially traumatic events that change the parent-child relationship (MacDonald, 1983). Little research in the field of communication studies has been conducted on how the process of coming out unfolds within families (Valentine, Skelton, & Butler, 2003). The exercise described in this article…

  18. Proceedings of the Annual Western Regional Conference on Testing Problems (20th, Oakland, California, May 7, 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ.

    Conference papers include: "The 'New Approach of the California State Colleges'" (Glenn S. Dumke); "Toward Institutional Goal-Consciousness" (Richard E. Peterson); "The Commission on Non-traditional Study - Who Needs It?" (John A. Valentine); "The Impact of Mandated Evaluation on Education" (Alexander I. Law); "A Workable Solution to the Demand…

  19. Community-acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao Xue; Galiana, Antonio; Pedreira, Walter; Mowszowicz, Martin; Christophersen, Inés; Machiavello, Silvia; Lope, Liliana; Benaderet, Sara; Buela, Fernanda; Vicentino, Walter; Albini, María; Bertaux, Olivier; Constenla, Irene; Bagnulo, Homero; Llosa, Luis; Ito, Teruyo

    2005-01-01

    A novel, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone (Uruguay clone) with a non–multidrug-resistant phenotype caused a large outbreak, including 7 deaths, in Montevideo, Uruguay. The clone was distinct from the highly virulent community clone represented by strain MW2, although both clones carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene and cna gene. PMID:15963301

  20. Traduction et langues de specialite: Approches theoriques et considerations pedagogiques (Translation and Specialty Languages: Theoretical Approaches and Pedagogic Considerations).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guevel, Zelie, Ed.; Valentine, Egan, Ed.

    Essays on the teaching of translation and on specialized translation, all in French, include: "Perspectives d'optimisation de la formation du traducteur: quelques reflexions" ("Perspectives on Optimization of Training of Translation Teachers: Some Reflections") (Egan Valentine); "L'enseignement de la revision pedagogique" ("The Teaching of…

  1. Evaluating Principals. Research Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Carl

    1990-01-01

    Five recent studies included in this annotated bibliography highlight the diverse facets of an effective principal evaluation system. A technical report by Jerry W. Valentine and Michael L. Bowman includes a clinical instrument for assessing teachers' perception of principals' effectiveness. In a second report, Daniel L. Duke and Richard J.…

  2. Chemistry with Inexpensive Materials: Spray Bottles and Plastic Bags.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoltewicz, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Presents eight chemistry activities that are interesting and involve simple, easily available materials. Topics include mystery writing, valentine hearts, flame tests, evaporation race, buoyancy versus mass, determination of relative masses of gases, mole sample container, and cold and hot packs. (DDR)

  3. What Works for Me.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vishwanadha, Hari; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Provides suggestions on various English instruction topics. Includes (1) "Argumentation Exercise," Hari Vishwanadha; (2) "How to Survive Developmental (or Any Other) English," Sally Russell; (3) "Reach Out to an Expert," Norma A. Register; (4) "Summary and Response Writing," Alec Valentine; (5) "The Living Journal," Blair Spencer Ray; and (6)…

  4. Football or Physics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handorf, William C.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the United States commemorative stamps and what the stamp-buying public knows about higher education. United States commemorative stamps have illustrated individuals such as Marilyn Monroe (1995); characters such as Bugs Bunny (1997); American motorcycles (2006); and Valentine candy hearts (2004). Higher…

  5. A multidimensional scaling analysis of own- and cross-race face spaces.

    PubMed

    Papesh, Megan H; Goldinger, Stephen D

    2010-08-01

    We examined predictions derived from Valentine's (1991) Multidimensional Space (MDS) framework for own- and other-race face processing. A set of 20 computerized faces was generated from a single prototype. Each face was saved as Black and White, changing only skin tone, such that structurally identical faces were represented in both race categories. Participants made speeded "same-different" judgments to all possible combinations of faces, from which we generated psychological spaces, with "different" RTs as the measure of similarity. Consistent with the MDS framework, all faces were pseudo-normally distributed around the (unseen) prototype. The distribution of faces was consistent with Valentine's (1991) predictions: despite their physical identity to the White faces, Black faces had lower mean inter-object distances in psychological space. Other-race faces are more densely clustered in psychological space, which could underlie well-known recognition deficits.

  6. The effects of oil spill chemicals on carbon translocation rates in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Daly, E J; Hoddinott, J; Dale, M R

    1988-01-01

    Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Black Valentine when sprayed with Corexit dispersants shows a rapid inhibition of photosynthesis. The plant retains the ability to translocate fixed carbon, and this involves mobilising previously fixed carbon in the sprayed leaf or the repartitioning of carbon from unsprayed regions of the plant towards the growing sink regions. The ability to maintain carbon translocation while photosynthesis is declining maximises the regrowth potential of the plant. PMID:15092613

  7. Epidemic Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Lineages Are the Main Cause of Infections at an Iranian University Hospital ▿

    PubMed Central

    Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Vidovic, Sinisa; Tahmineh, Narimani; Mohammad, Kazemi; Mohsen, Karbalaei; Starnino, Stefania; Dillon, Jo-Anne R.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of Staphylococcus aureus infections from Isfahan, Iran, were caused by epidemic methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) lineages, sequence type 8 (ST8), ST22, ST30, and ST6. The predominant methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain was ST239. We observed a high prevalence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive MSSA strains (19.7%), which is a matter of considerable concern, since these strains have the ability to cause severe infections. PMID:21940478

  8. "U-X-L Encyclopedia of U. S. History" Hones Students' Subject Search and Indexing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, Karla

    2010-01-01

    This article features the "U-X-L Encyclopedia of U.S. History" by Sonia Benson, Daniel E. Brannen, Jr., and Rebecca Valentine is a new eight-volume set available in print or ebook (2009). The set has 1,745 pages and 677 entries ranging from just under one page to around eight pages in length. The ebook option may be accessed through Gale Virtual…

  9. Division II: Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Scrijver, Karel J.; Klimchuk, James A.; Charbonneau, Paul; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hasan, S. Sirajul; Hudson, Hugh S.; Kusano, Kanya; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Vršnak, Bojan; Yan, Yihua

    2015-08-01

    The Business Meeting of Commission 10 was held as part of the Business Meeting of Division II (Sun and Heliosphere), chaired by Valentin Martínez-Pillet, the President of the Division. The President of Commission 10 (C10; Solar activity), Lidia van Driel-Gesztelyi, took the chair for the business meeting of C10. She summarised the activities of C10 over the triennium and the election of the incoming OC.

  10. Molecular identification and antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus nasal isolates from medical students in Cartagena, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Bettin, Alfonso; Causil, Ceyla; Reyes, Niradiz

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) remains a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections worldwide. Nasal carriage of this bacterium among hospital personnel constitutes an important source for nosocomial infections. A cross-sectional study enrolling the whole medical student population (n=387) of the School of Medicine at the Universidad de Cartagena, Colombia, was conducted to evaluate the carriage rates of both methicillin sensitive- and methicillin resistant-SA, the frequency of Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes in the isolates, and risk factors associated with carriage in this selected population. After signing an informed consent, participants completed a survey related to possible risk factors for colonization, and nasal swabs were collected from anterior nares. Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from carriers were subjected to DNA extraction and PCR assays to determine the presence of MecA and Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes. Typing of the staphylococcal chromosomal cassette was performed for methicillin resistant strains. Molecular analysis was performed for only one strain per carrier. Prevalence of carriage for methicillin sensitive- and methicillin resistant-SA was 25% and 1.6% respectively. Most of the methicillin resistant isolates carried the staphylococcal chromosomal cassette type IV and the genes for Panton-Valentine leukocidin. To determine carrier types among medical students, each participant was subjected to four additional swabs, each taken two weeks apart. 9.8% persistent carriers, 53.1% intermittent carriers, and 37.1% non-carriers of SA were found. There was no association between risk factors analyzed and carriage of the bacterium. The study was conducted from April to September 2009 and found a persistent carriage of methicillin resistant-SA strains bearing the genes for Panton-Valentine leukocidin among medical students, evidencing the potential contribution of this portion of healthcare personnel either to the spread or

  11. From theory to implementation: building a multidimensional space for face recognition.

    PubMed

    Catz, Or; Kampf, Michal; Nachson, Israel; Babkoff, Harvey

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to empirically construct a multidimensional model of face space based upon Valentine's [Valentine, T. (1991). A unified account of the effects of distinctiveness, inversion, and race in face recognition. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 43A, 161-204; Valentine, T. (2001). Face-space models of face recognition. In M. J. Wenger, & J. T. Townsend, (Eds.). Computational, geometric, and process perspectives on facial cognition: Contexts and challenges. Scientific psychology series (pp. 83-113). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum] metaphoric model. Two-hundred and ten participants ranked 200 faces on a 21-dimensional space composed of internal facial features. On the basis of these dimensions an index of distance from the center of the dimensional space was calculated. A factor analysis revealed six factors which highlighted the importance of both featural and holistic processes in face recognition. Testing the model in relation to facial distinctiveness and face recognition strengthened its validity by emphasizing the relevance of the constructed multidimensional space for face recognition. The data are discussed within the framework of theoretical models of face recognition.

  12. Simulating the 'other-race' effect with autoassociative neural networks: further evidence in favor of the face-space model.

    PubMed

    Caldara, Roberto; Hervé, Abdi

    2006-01-01

    Other-race (OR) faces are less accurately recognized than same-race (SR) faces, but faster classified by race. This phenomenon has often been reported as the 'other-race' effect (ORE). Valentine (1991 Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology A: Human Experimental Psychology 43 161-204) proposed a theoretical multidimensional face-space model that explained both of these results, in terms of variations in exemplar density between races. According to this model, SR faces are more widely distributed across the dimensions of the space than OR faces. However, this model does not quantify nor state the dimensions coded within this face space. The aim of the present study was to test the face-space explanation of the ORE with neural network simulations by quantifying its dimensions. We found the predicted density properties of Valentine's framework in the face-projection spaces of the autoassociative memories. This was supported by an interaction for exemplar density between the race of the learned face set and the race of the faces. In addition, the elaborated face representations showed optimal responses for SR but not for OR faces within SR face spaces when explored at the individual level, as gender errors occurred significantly more often in OR than in SR face-space representations. Altogether, our results add further evidence in favor of a statistical exemplar density explanation of the ORE as suggested by Valentine, and question the plausibility of such coding for faces in the framework of recent neuroimaging studies.

  13. Geological Interpretation of Bathymetric and Backscatter Imagery of the Sea Floor off Eastern Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, Larry J.; Paskevich, Valerie F.; Butman, Bradford; Ackerman, Seth D.; Danforth, William W.; Foster, Dave S.; Blackwood, Dann S.

    2006-01-01

    The imagery, interpretive data layers, and data presented herein were derived from multibeam echo-sounder data collected off Eastern Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and from the stations occupied to verify these acoustic data. The basic data layers show sea-floor topography, sun-illuminated shaded relief, and backscatter intensity; interpretive layers show the distributions of surficial sediment and sedimentary environments. Presented verification data include new and historical sediment grain-size analyses and a gallery of still photographs of the seabed. The multibeam data, which cover a narrow band of the sea floor extending from Provincetown around the northern tip of Cape Cod and south southeastward to off Monomoy Island, were collected during transits between concurrent mapping projects in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary (Valentine and others, 2001; Butman and others, 2004; and Valentine, 2005) and Great South Channel (Valentine and others, 2003a, b, c, d). Although originally collected to maximize the use of time aboard ship, these data provide a fundamental framework for research and management activities in this part of the Gulf of Maine (Noji and others, 2004), show the composition and terrain of the seabed, and provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat. These data and interpretations also support ongoing modeling studies of the lower Cape's aquifer system (Masterson, 2004) and of erosional hotspots along the Cape Cod National Seashore (List and others, 2006).

  14. ["A shot at the father: a student's assault". Sigmund Freud and the case of Ernst Haberl].

    PubMed

    Aichhorn, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In the fall of 1922, the Freud family was involved in a criminal case: The son of Mathilde Freud's nursing sister, Ernst Haberl, had shot at his father. With the help of August Aichhorn the Viennese Juvenile Court's social assistance department was engaged on behalf of the young man. Freud commissioned the lawyer Valentin Teirich to defend him in court. The Viennese dailies reported the deed and the trial extensively (Haberl was acquitted). That a comment published in the Neue Freie Presse was written by Freud himself, as Teirich believed, is, according to Anna Freud, highly improbable. PMID:24988808

  15. Skin and soft tissue infections in the military.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Lucy; Morgan, M

    2013-09-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) are common in military populations regularly living and training in close contact with each other. The majority of such infections are simple and can be easily treated with antibiotics and appropriate infection control practices. Some, however, can progress to become complex and even life threatening, such as Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL)-associated staphylococcus aureus pneumonia, or Streptococcus pyogenes necrotising fasciitis, which carry a mortality rate of up to 65% and 30%, respectively. This review focuses on the most important SSTIs and those more commonly affecting military personnel with advice on how they are best managed. PMID:24109144

  16. Involvement of Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Related to Sequence Type 25 and Harboring pvl Genes in a Case of Carotid Cavernous Fistula after Community-Associated Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Damasco, Paulo V.; Chamon, Raiane C.; Barbosa, Angélica T. L.; da Cunha, Sérgio; Aquino, José H. W.; Cavalcante, Fernanda S.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes has become the cause of life-threatening infections. We describe a case of carotid cavernous fistula after bacteremia in a 12-year-old male, caused by a methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolate carrying the pvl, fnbA, and ebpS genes and related to sequence type 25 (ST25). The patient's condition was complicated by pleural empyema and osteomyelitis in the right femur. The patient was discharged in good clinical condition after 160 days of hospitalization. PMID:22090398

  17. Optimization of triplex real time PCR for detecting Staphylococcus aureus mecA, pvl and nuc genes.

    PubMed

    Vremeră, Teodora; Iancu, Luminiţa Smaranda; Logigan, Cătălina; Năstase, Eduard; Miftode, Egidia; Luncă, Cătălina; Dorneanu, Olivia

    2011-01-01

    Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) allows simultaneous detection of two or more genes, using the same reaction conditions, and so it is possible the rapid detection of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains (MRSA) in clinical specimens. This study aimed to implement, for the first time in our laboratory, a triplex real time PCR (RT-PCR) technique for detection of genes encoding resistance to oxacillin and synthesis of Panton Valentine leukocidin (pvl), a pathogenicity factor characteristic for community acquired strains (CA-MRSA). The application of this method will permit the epidemiological surveillance of circulating strains and early application of prevention measures.

  18. Mineral Resource of the Month: Antimony

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guberman, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Antimony is a lustrous silvery-white semimetal or metalloid. Archaeological and historical studies indicate that antimony and its mineral sulfides have been used by humans for at least six millennia. The alchemist Basil Valentine is sometimes credited with “discovering” the element; he described the extraction of metallic antimony from stibnite in his treatise “The Triumphal Chariot of Antimony,” published sometime between 1350 and 1600. In the early 18th century, Jöns Jakob Berzelius chose the periodic symbol for antimony (Sb) based on stibium, which is the Latin name for stibnite.

  19. At what depths do magma-water eruptions breach the surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-09-01

    When magma ascends upward in the Earth's crust, it can react violently with groundwater, leading to underground explosions or even full-fledged eruptions. If they breach the surface, these phreatomagmatic eruptions leave debris that falls concentrically around the crater or cone. Previously, researchers have sought to determine the depth within the vent from which the eruption originated by looking at the types of ejected rocks and their original positions beneath the volcanoes, but Valentine et al. found that these two factors are not necessarily directly related.

  20. ["A shot at the father: a student's assault". Sigmund Freud and the case of Ernst Haberl].

    PubMed

    Aichhorn, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In the fall of 1922, the Freud family was involved in a criminal case: The son of Mathilde Freud's nursing sister, Ernst Haberl, had shot at his father. With the help of August Aichhorn the Viennese Juvenile Court's social assistance department was engaged on behalf of the young man. Freud commissioned the lawyer Valentin Teirich to defend him in court. The Viennese dailies reported the deed and the trial extensively (Haberl was acquitted). That a comment published in the Neue Freie Presse was written by Freud himself, as Teirich believed, is, according to Anna Freud, highly improbable.

  1. Nonketotic hyperglycinemia: novel mutation in the aminomethyl transferase gene. Case report.

    PubMed

    Gencpinar, Pinar; Çavuşoğlu, Dilek; Özbeyler, Ömer; Kaya, Özge Ö; Baydan, Figen; Olgac Dundar, Nihal

    2016-06-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is an exotoxin that is produced by many strains of Staphylococcus aureus, and an important virulence factor. A PVL-positive S. aureus infection leads to rapid and severe infections of soft tissue and necrotizing pneumonia in healthy adolescents, and has a high mortality. This case report included a 12-year-old male patient who admitted for fever, respiratory distress and hip pain and was identified with necrotizing pneumonia with septic pulmonary embolism, psoas abscess, cellulitis and osteomyelitis. The PVL positive methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) was isolated in the patient blood culture.

  2. Study of comets at wavelengths between 0.5 and 18 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Net, E. P.; Gehrz, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    Since 1969 every bright comet was measured which has reached a distance of one astronomical unit from the sun. Observing techniques were developed which make it possible to observe as close as elongation 3 deg., and to find, track and measure comets at all wavelengths in full daylight. Comet Halley was measured on twenty four occasions between December 12, 1985 and March 25, 1986. Clear weather seems to come on holidays, and days on which are observed including Winter Solstice, Christmas, New Years, Valentines day, Super Bowl Sunday and the Vernal Equinox. Halley is observed within hours of perihelion passage.

  3. Differences in habitat use by blanding's turtles, Emydoidea blandingii, and painted turtles, Chysemys picta, in the Nebraska sandhills

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bury, R. Bruce; Germano, David J.

    2003-01-01

    We sampled a variety of wetlands in the Nebraska sandhills at Valentine National Wildlife Refuge. Significantly more individuals of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) occurred in lakes and open waters than in marshes or small ponds, and the opposite was true for Blanding's turtles (Emydoidea blandingii). Besides this marked difference in habitat use, 46% of the captured E. blandingii in pond/marsh habitat were juveniles, but only 31.6% in lakes and open water. Current information suggests that marshes and small ponds are important habitat for juvenile turtles, especially Emydoidea blandingii.

  4. Skin and soft tissue infections in the military.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Lucy; Morgan, M

    2013-09-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) are common in military populations regularly living and training in close contact with each other. The majority of such infections are simple and can be easily treated with antibiotics and appropriate infection control practices. Some, however, can progress to become complex and even life threatening, such as Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL)-associated staphylococcus aureus pneumonia, or Streptococcus pyogenes necrotising fasciitis, which carry a mortality rate of up to 65% and 30%, respectively. This review focuses on the most important SSTIs and those more commonly affecting military personnel with advice on how they are best managed.

  5. Here's what top employers, unions are doing about HIV.

    PubMed

    1997-10-17

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that while only one in six large companies offer formal HIV/AIDS education programs, some companies and labor unions are conducting workplace-based prevention. The National Business and Labor Conference on HIV/AIDS, held September 29, 1997 in Washington, DC, recognized a variety of companies for their innovative workplace-based programs. These included Levi Strauss and Company, Sailor's Valentine Gallery, the National Basketball Players Association, Hawaii Industry Venture, IBM, Polaroid, Unum Life Insurance Company, and Gap, Inc. These companies provide a range of programs and services including fundraising for local AIDS organizations, employee education, public awareness, and family education.

  6. Recognition of own-race and other-race caricatures: implications for models of face recognition.

    PubMed

    Byatt, G; Rhodes, G

    1998-08-01

    Valentine's (Valentine T. Q J Exp Psychol 1991;43A:161-204) face recognition framework supports both a norm-based coding (NBC) and an exemplar-only, absolute coding, model (ABC). According to NBC; (1) faces are represented in terms of deviations from a prototype or norm; (2) caricatures are effective because they exaggerate this norm deviation information; and (3) other-race faces are coded relative to the (only available) own-race norm. Therefore NBC predicts that, for European subjects, caricatures of Chinese faces made by distorting differences from the European norm would be more effective than caricatures made relative to the Chinese norm. According to ABC; (1) faces are encoded as absolute values on a set of shared dimensions with the norm playing no role in recognition; (2) caricatures are effective because they minimise exemplar density and (3) the dimensions of face-space are inappropriate for other-race faces leaving them relatively densely clustered. ABC predicts that all faces would be recognised more accurately when caricatured against their own-race norm. We tested European subjects' identification of European and Chinese faces, caricatured against both race norms. The ABC model's prediction was supported. European faces were also rated as more distinctive and recognised more easily than Chinese faces. However, the own-race recognition bias held even when the races were equated for distinctiveness which suggests that the ABC model may not provide a complete account of race effects in recognition.

  7. Social anxiety and the accuracy of predicted affect.

    PubMed

    Martin, Shannon M; Quirk, Stuart W

    2015-01-01

    Social anxiety is theorised to arise from sustained over-activation of a mammalian evolved system for detecting and responding to social threat with corresponding diminished opportunities for attaining the pleasure of safe attachments. Emotional forecasting data from two holidays were used to test the hypothesis that greater social anxiety would be associated with decreased expectations of positive affect (PA) and greater anticipated negative affect (NA) on a holiday marked by group celebration (St. Patrick's Day) while being associated with greater predicted PA for daters on a romantic holiday (Valentine's Day). Participants completed symptom reports, made affective forecasts and provided multiple affect reports throughout each holiday. Higher levels of social anxiety were associated with greater anticipated PA for Valentine's Day daters, but lower experienced PA on the holiday; this was not found for trait anxiety and depression. Alternatively, trait anxiety, depression and social anxiety were associated with less predicted PA for St. Patrick's Day, greater anticipated NA and diminished experienced PA/greater NA during the holiday. Results are discussed in light of perceived hope for rewarding safe emotional contact for those daters in contrast to the greater possibility for social threat associated with group celebration typical of St. Patrick's Day.

  8. Congress moves to set priorities for EPA research spending

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.

    1993-05-31

    Research and development spending at the Environmental Protection Agency is slated to rise more than 5% in President Bill Clinton's fiscal 1994 budget. Congress is stepping in, however, and may have something to say not only about how much money is spent, but also how it is spent. For the first time in a decade, formal authorization of EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) is moving through Congress. The ORD authorization was approved May 20 in the House Science Committee's Subcommittee on Technology, Environment and Aviation. Introduced by subcommittee chairman Rep. Tim Valentine (D.-N.C.), the authorization bill (H.R. 1994) would provide $475 million in funding for fiscal 1994. This equals the amount proposed by Clinton, $536 million, if about $60 million earmarked for Superfund-related research is removed. The Valentine bill would set out programmatic guidelines for EPA research, requiring fundamental research in ecology, health, and risk reduction. It would also require the agency's Science Advisory Board to review these programs and submit progress reports to Congress every two years. Another part of the bill would require EPA to consolidate agency efforts to identify, compare, and assess risk to public health and the environment posed by pollution.

  9. Fly ash as a liming material for corn production

    SciTech Connect

    Tarkalson, D.D.; Hergert, G.W.; Stevens, W.B.; McCallister, D.L.; Kackman, S.D.

    2005-05-01

    Fly ash produced as a by-product of subbituminous coal combustion can potentially serve as an alternative liming material without negatively affecting corn (Zea mays L.) production in areas where use of conventional liming materials can be uneconomical due to transportation costs. A study was conducted to determine if fly ash produced from the Nebraska Public Power District Gerald Gentleman Power Station located in Sutherland, NE could be used as an alternative liming material. Combinations of dry fly ash (DFA), wet fly ash (WFA), beet lime (by-product of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) processing) (BL), and agricultural lime (AGL) were applied at rates ranging from 0.43 to 1.62 times the recommended lime rate to plots on four acidic soils (Anselmo fine sandy loam, Hord fine sandy loam, Holdrege sandy loam, and Valentine fine sand). Soil samples were collected to a depth of 0.2 m from plots and analyzed for pH before lime applications and twice periodically after lime application. The Hord and Valentine soils were analyzed for exchangeable Ca, Mg, K, Na,and Al for determination of percent Al saturation on selected treatments and sampling dates. Corn grain yields were determined annually. It is concluded that the fly ash utilized in this study and applied at rates in this study, increases soil pH comparable to agricultural lime and is an appropriate alternative liming material.

  10. Generating geomorphological catalogues using neural networks: Seamounts in the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, Andrew; Kalnins, Lara; van Dinther, Chantal; Trampert, Jeannot

    2013-04-01

    We recently introduced the idea that neural networks may be used to construct catalogues of geomorphological features, by extrapolating from the characteristics of a set of hand-selected examples (Valentine et al., 2012). These learning algorithms are inspired by the complex pattern identification and recognition capabilities of the human brain and remove the need to develop an a priori model of the feature of interest. In order to demonstrate this approach, and to develop a clearer understanding of its possibilities and pitfalls, we concentrate on the problem of identifying seamounts - isolated topographic highs of volcanic origin - in the world's oceans. The distribution of seamounts in time and space can provide important constraints on the tectonic history and evolution of the Earth and has been studied using several conventional approaches (e.g. Kim & Wessel, 2011). However, these typically perform poorly in the Atlantic, where the slow spreading rate results in a rough 'background' seafloor that produces many false positives. The learning algorithm approach should improve this, as it attempts to encapsulate more complex information about the seamount and its surroundings. We present an overview of our work to date, with a focus on results from a systematic search for seamounts in the Atlantic. We compare the performance of our approach in detecting seamounts in bathymetric, free-air gravity anomaly and vertical gravity gradient (VGG) datasets to examine the particular strengths and weaknesses of each data type and to assess the potential benefits of assimilating information from two or three data types simultaneously. We compare the resulting seamount database with existing catalogues, examining the variations in measures such as total count, height distribution, and spatial and temporal distribution across the Atlantic, and comment on the potential implications for our understanding of the tectonic history of the region. Kim, S.-S. & Wessel, P., 2011. New

  11. In vitro activity of oritavancin against community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA), vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) and daptomycin-non-susceptible S. aureus (DNSSA).

    PubMed

    Saravolatz, Louis D; Pawlak, Joan; Johnson, Leonard B

    2010-07-01

    Isolates of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA), vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) and daptomycin non-susceptible S. aureus (DNSSA) are increasing in frequency and new antistaphylococcal therapies are needed. Microdilution testing using Mueller-Hinton broth was used to determine the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of oritavancin and nine additional antimicrobial agents against 92 CA-MRSA, 23 VISA, 7 DNSSA and 10 VRSA isolates. Minimal bactericidal concentrations were also determined. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing as well as assays for Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) genes were performed. Oritavancin was more bactericidal than any of the other comparators against CA-MRSA and demonstrated excellent activity against VRSA and VISA.

  12. Emerging ST121/agr4 community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with strong adhesin and cytolytic activities: trigger for MRSA pneumonia and fatal aspiration pneumonia in an influenza-infected elderly.

    PubMed

    Wan, T-W; Tomita, Y; Saita, N; Konno, K; Iwao, Y; Hung, W-C; Teng, L-J; Yamamoto, T

    2016-09-01

    The pathogenesis of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) pneumonia in influenza-infected elderly individuals has not yet been elucidated in detail. In the present study, a 92-year-old man infected with influenza developed CA-MRSA pneumonia. His CA-MRSA was an emerging type, originated in ST121/agr4 S. aureus, with diversities of Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL)(-)/spat5110/SCCmecV(+) versus PVL(+)/spat159((etc.))/SCCmec (-), but with common virulence potentials of strong adhesin and cytolytic activities. Resistance to erythromycin/clindamycin (inducible-type) and gentamicin was detected. Pneumonia improved with the administration of levofloxacin, but with the subsequent development of fatal aspiration pneumonia. Hence, characteristic CA-MRSA with strong adhesin and cytolytic activities triggered influenza-related sequential complications.

  13. Clinical photography and patient rights: the need for orthopraxy.

    PubMed

    Berle, I

    2008-02-01

    The increasing use of digital image recording devices, whether they are digital cameras or mobile phone cameras, has democratised clinical photography in the UK. However, when non-professional clinical photographers take photographs of patients the issues of consent and confidentiality are either ignored or given scant attention. Whatever the status of the clinician, the taking of clinical photographs must be practised within the context of a professional etiquette. Best practice recognises the need for informed consent and the constraints associated with confidentiality. Against the background of the poverty of the current discourse of these issues, as presented during the Valentine GMC Fitness to Practice hearing, the paper considers the need for orthopraxy in the use of clinical photography.

  14. Halo naevi, vitiligo and diffuse alopecia areata associated with tocilizumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Nadesalingam, Kavitha; Goodfield, Mark; Emery, Paul

    2016-08-01

    We present a follow-up case report of a 33-year-old lady with juvenile onset arthritis who developed halo naevi while on treatment with tocilizumab. This case report describes the development of halo naevi, vitiligo and diffuse alopecia areata associated with tocilizumab therapy following infection with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Panton-Valentine leukocidin positivity. This is the first case that describes these events and supports previous theories on cellular and humoral immunity as causative factors. The regression of melanocytes during treatment with tocilizumab could also implicate IL-6 and sIL-6R as future targets in the treatment of melanoma through its direct effect of melanocytic cytotoxicity, which supports previous studies. PMID:27516894

  15. Insertion of host DNA into PVL-encoding phages of the Staphylococcus aureus lineage ST80 by intra-chromosomal recombination.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Christiane; Witte, Wolfgang; Wolz, Christiane; Goerke, Christiane

    2010-10-25

    Temperate bacteriophages play a critical role in the pathogenicity of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus by mediating positive lysogenic conversion for different virulence factors such as Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) or by interrupting chromosomal virulence genes. PVL-encoding phages are integrated in the S. aureus genome within a conserved ORF which is surrounded by a cluster of tandemly repeated genes. Here we demonstrate that in S. aureus clonal complex ST80 strains PVL-phage induction led to the acquisition of host DNA into the phage genome probably due to a homologous recombination event between direct repeats of the two paralogous genes adjacent to the phage integration site. Phage excision was accompanied by an additional chromosomal deletion in this region. This so far unrecognized mechanism of DNA uptake into the phage genome may play an important role in the co-evolution of phages and bacteria. PMID:20708208

  16. A method for the concentration of fine-grained rutile (TiO2) from sediment and sedimentary rocks by chemical leaching

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Commeau, Judith A.; Valentine, Page C.

    1991-01-01

    Most of the sample analyzed by the method described were marine muds collected from the Gulf of Maine (Valentine and Commeau, 1990). The silt and clay fraction (up to 99 wt% of the sediment) is composed of clay minerals (chiefly illite-mica and chlorite), silt-size quartz and feldspar, and small crystals (2-12 um) of rutile and hematite. The bulk sediment samples contained an average of 2 to 3 wt percent CaCO3. Tiher samples analyzed include red and gray Carboniferous and Triassic sandstones and siltstones exposed around the Bay of Fundy region and Paleozoic sandstones, siltstones, and shales from northern Maine and New Brunswick. These rocks are probable sources for the fine-grained rutile found in the Gulf of Maine.

  17. Halo naevi, vitiligo and diffuse alopecia areata associated with tocilizumab therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nadesalingam, Kavitha; Goodfield, Mark; Emery, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We present a follow-up case report of a 33-year-old lady with juvenile onset arthritis who developed halo naevi while on treatment with tocilizumab. This case report describes the development of halo naevi, vitiligo and diffuse alopecia areata associated with tocilizumab therapy following infection with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Panton–Valentine leukocidin positivity. This is the first case that describes these events and supports previous theories on cellular and humoral immunity as causative factors. The regression of melanocytes during treatment with tocilizumab could also implicate IL-6 and sIL-6R as future targets in the treatment of melanoma through its direct effect of melanocytic cytotoxicity, which supports previous studies. PMID:27516894

  18. Consensual Nonmonogamy: Psychological Well-Being and Relationship Quality Correlates.

    PubMed

    Rubel, Alicia N; Bogaert, Anthony F

    2015-01-01

    Consensually nonmonogamous relationships are those in which all partners explicitly agree that each partner may have romantic or sexual relationships with others (Conley, Ziegler, Moors, Matsick, & Valentine, 2013 ). In this article, research examining the associations between consensual nonmonogamy, psychological well-being, and relationship quality is reviewed. Specifically, three types of consensual nonmonogamy are examined: swinging, open relationships (including sexually open marriage and gay open relationships), and polyamory. Swinging refers to when a couple practices extradyadic sex with members of another couple; open relationships are relationships in which partners agree that they can have extradyadic sex; and polyamory is the practice of, belief in, or willingness to engage in consensual nonmonogamy, typically in long-term and/or loving relationships. General trends in the research reviewed suggest that consensual nonmonogamists have similar psychological well-being and relationship quality as monogamists. Methodological challenges in research on consensual nonmonogamy and directions for future research are discussed.

  19. Blood and the Revenant in Walter Scott's The Fair Maid of Perth.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    In Sir Walter Scott's The Fair Maid of Perth; or St Valentine's Day (1828), the resuscitated subject is referred to as a revenant, a term that Scott borrowed from Henry Thomson's Blackwoodian tale 'Le Revenant' (1827), meaning 'dead-alive'. Taking its cue from the sanguinary subtext of The Fair Maid of Perth, which is fascinated with the shedding of blood and transfusion of fluids, this chapter reads the Scottish revenant as a literary reflection on the extraordinary promise of blood transfusion in the 1820s: that death could be understood as a process, rather than an absolute state, and that medical intervention could restore life to those on the brink of death and even to the recently deceased.

  20. Precise leveling, space geodesy and geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reilinger, R.

    1981-01-01

    The implications of currently available leveling data on understanding the crustal dynamics of the continental United States are investigated. Neotectonic deformation, near surface movements, systematic errors in releveling measurements, and the implications of this information for earthquake prediction are described. Vertical crustal movements in the vicinity of the 1931 Valentine, Texas, earthquake which may represent coseismic deformation are investigated. The detection of vertical fault displacements by precise leveling in western Kentucky is reported. An empirical basis for defining releveling anomalies and its implications for crustal deformation in southern California is presented. Releveling measurements in the eastern United States and their meaning in the context of possible crustal deformation, including uplift of the Appalachian Mountains, eastward tilting of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, and apparent movements associated with a number of structural features along the east coast, are reported.

  1. Blood and the Revenant in Walter Scott's The Fair Maid of Perth.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    In Sir Walter Scott's The Fair Maid of Perth; or St Valentine's Day (1828), the resuscitated subject is referred to as a revenant, a term that Scott borrowed from Henry Thomson's Blackwoodian tale 'Le Revenant' (1827), meaning 'dead-alive'. Taking its cue from the sanguinary subtext of The Fair Maid of Perth, which is fascinated with the shedding of blood and transfusion of fluids, this chapter reads the Scottish revenant as a literary reflection on the extraordinary promise of blood transfusion in the 1820s: that death could be understood as a process, rather than an absolute state, and that medical intervention could restore life to those on the brink of death and even to the recently deceased. PMID:27132355

  2. Characterisation of a synergohymenotropic toxin produced by Staphylococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Prevost, G; Bouakham, T; Piemont, Y; Monteil, H

    1995-12-01

    Staphylococcal synergohymenotropic (SHT) toxins damage membranes of host defence cells and erythrocytes by the synergy of two secreted and non-associated proteins: class S and class F components. Whereas Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL), gamma-hemolysin and Luk-M from Staphylococcus aureus are members of this toxin family, a new bi-component toxin (LukS-I + LukF-I) from Staphylococcus intermedius, a pathogen for small animals, was characterised and sequenced. It is encoded as a luk-I operon by two cotranscribed genes, like PVL, LukS-I + LukF-I shares a strong leukotoxicity of various PMNs, but only slight haemolytic properties on rabbit erythrocytes. When intradermally injected into rabbit skin, a 100 ng dose caused acute inflammatory reaction leading to tissue necrosis. The new SHT seemed to be largely distributed among various Staphylococcus intermedius strains.

  3. GLYOXYLATE FERMENTATION BY STREPTOCOCCUS ALLANTOICUS

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, R. C.; Drucker, H.; Wolfe, R. S.

    1964-01-01

    Valentine, R. C. (University of Illinois, Urbana), H. Drucker, and R. S. Wolfe. Glyoxylate fermentation by Streptococcus allantoicus. J. Bacteriol. 87:241–246. 1964.—Extracts of Streptococcus allantoicus were found to degrade glyoxylate, yielding tartronic semialdehyde and CO2. Tartronic semialdehyde was prepared chemically, and its properties were compared with the enzymatic product: reduction by sodium borohydride yielded glycerate; heating at 100 C yielded glycolaldehyde and CO2; autoxidation yielded mesoxalic semialdehyde; periodate oxidation yielded glyoxylate and a compound presumed to be formate. Tartronic semialdehyde reductase was present in extracts of S. allantoicus and in a species of Pseudomonas grown on allantoin. A scheme for the synthesis of acetate from glyoxylate by S. allantoicus is discussed. PMID:14151040

  4. The temporal Doppler effect: when the future feels closer than the past.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Eugene M; Van Boven, Leaf; Chin, Mark; Ward, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    People routinely remember events that have passed and imagine those that are yet to come. The past and the future are sometimes psychologically close ("just around the corner") and other times psychologically distant ("ages away"). Four studies demonstrate a systematic asymmetry whereby future events are psychologically closer than past events of equivalent objective distance. When considering specific times (e.g., 1 year) or events (e.g., Valentine's Day), people consistently reported that the future was closer than the past. We suggest that this asymmetry arises because the subjective experience of movement through time (whereby future events approach and past events recede) is analogous to the physical experience of movement through space. Consistent with this hypothesis, experimentally reversing the metaphorical arrow of time (by having participants move backward through virtual space) completely eliminated the past-future asymmetry. We discuss how reducing psychological distance to the future may function to prepare people for upcoming action.

  5. Draft genome sequence of Staphylococcus aureus KT/312045, an ST1-MSSA PVL positive isolated from pus sample in East Coast Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Suhaili, Zarizal; Lean, Soo-Sum; Mohamad, Noor Muzamil; Rachman, Abdul R Abdul; Desa, Mohd Nasir Mohd; Yeo, Chew Chieng

    2016-09-01

    Most of the efforts in elucidating the molecular relatedness and epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus in Malaysia have been largely focused on methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Therefore, here we report the draft genome sequence of the methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) with sequence type 1 (ST1), spa type t127 with Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (pvl) pathogenic determinant isolated from pus sample designated as KT/314250 strain. The size of the draft genome is 2.86 Mbp with 32.7% of G + C content consisting 2673 coding sequences. The draft genome sequence has been deposited in DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number AOCP00000000. PMID:27508119

  6. Photographs of the Sea Floor of Western Massachusetts Bay, Offshore of Boston, Massachusett, July 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutierrez, Benjamin T.; Butman, Bradford; Blackwood, Dann S.

    2001-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains photographs and sediment sample analyses of the sea floor obtained at 142 sites in western Massachusetts Bay (Figure 1) during a research cruise (USGS cruise ISBL99024) aboard the Fishing Vessel (FV) Isabel S. (Figure 2) conducted July 18-21, 1999. These photographs and samples provide critical ground truth information for the interpretation of shaded relief and backscatter intensity maps created using data collected with a multibeam echo sounder system (Butman and others, in press, a, b, c; Valentine and others, in press, a, b, c). Collection of these photographs and samples was undertaken in support of a large project whose overall objective is to map and describe the sea floor of Massachusetts Bay.

  7. Site Description for the University of Nebraska's Sandhills Agricultural Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, B. R.; Blad, B. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Sandhills Agricultural Laboratory is operated by the University of Nebraska. The laboratory is located in the south-central part of the Nebraska Sandhills near Tryon, Nebraska (41 deg. 37' N; 100 deg. 50' W). The laboratory is surrounded on the west and south by native rangeland vegetation, on the south by a large field of corn irrigated by a center pivot, and on the east by wheat stubble. This site is appropriate for moisture stress studies since rainfall is almost always inadequate to meet evaporative demands of agricultural crops during most of the growing season and the sandy soils (Valentine fine sand) at the site do not store large quantities of water. Various levels of water stress are achieved through irrigation from solid set sprinklers.

  8. [Scientific, pedagogical, and surgical work of professor V.F.Voyno-Yasenetsky during the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Kosachev, I D; Gladkikh, P F; Iakovlev, A E

    2011-08-01

    The article is devoted to activities in the period 1941-1945. Krasnoyarsk and Tambov, a professor of surgery Valentine Feliksovich Voyno-Yasenetsky (Archbishop Luka)--doctor of medical sciences, laureate of the State (Stalin) Prize of the USSR, who made a significant contribution to the success of modern surgical science. A brilliant scholar and successor of the ideas of the outstanding scientist and surgeon Nikolai Pirogov, as in the Great Patriotic War surgeon and consultant evacuation hospitals, along with leading surgeons in the Soviet Union had a significant impact on the results of treatment of wounded soldiers and officers, thereby affecting the development of military field surgery. In our country it is rightfully considered the founder of contaminated surgery. PMID:22164990

  9. Consensual Nonmonogamy: Psychological Well-Being and Relationship Quality Correlates.

    PubMed

    Rubel, Alicia N; Bogaert, Anthony F

    2015-01-01

    Consensually nonmonogamous relationships are those in which all partners explicitly agree that each partner may have romantic or sexual relationships with others (Conley, Ziegler, Moors, Matsick, & Valentine, 2013 ). In this article, research examining the associations between consensual nonmonogamy, psychological well-being, and relationship quality is reviewed. Specifically, three types of consensual nonmonogamy are examined: swinging, open relationships (including sexually open marriage and gay open relationships), and polyamory. Swinging refers to when a couple practices extradyadic sex with members of another couple; open relationships are relationships in which partners agree that they can have extradyadic sex; and polyamory is the practice of, belief in, or willingness to engage in consensual nonmonogamy, typically in long-term and/or loving relationships. General trends in the research reviewed suggest that consensual nonmonogamists have similar psychological well-being and relationship quality as monogamists. Methodological challenges in research on consensual nonmonogamy and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:25189189

  10. The temporal Doppler effect: when the future feels closer than the past.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Eugene M; Van Boven, Leaf; Chin, Mark; Ward, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    People routinely remember events that have passed and imagine those that are yet to come. The past and the future are sometimes psychologically close ("just around the corner") and other times psychologically distant ("ages away"). Four studies demonstrate a systematic asymmetry whereby future events are psychologically closer than past events of equivalent objective distance. When considering specific times (e.g., 1 year) or events (e.g., Valentine's Day), people consistently reported that the future was closer than the past. We suggest that this asymmetry arises because the subjective experience of movement through time (whereby future events approach and past events recede) is analogous to the physical experience of movement through space. Consistent with this hypothesis, experimentally reversing the metaphorical arrow of time (by having participants move backward through virtual space) completely eliminated the past-future asymmetry. We discuss how reducing psychological distance to the future may function to prepare people for upcoming action. PMID:23474832

  11. Daptomycin efficacy in the central nervous system of a patient with disseminated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Staphylococcus aureus has emerged as a major nosocomial pathogen in the last decades and also represents the second most common pathogen isolated from patients in outpatient settings. Although methicillin-resistant S.aureus infections were traditionally limited to hospitals, community-associated cases of methicillin-resistant S.aureus infections have been reported. In our case, we observed an unexpected event during treatment. Case presentation A 60-year-old Caucasian man developed fever and multiple muscle and brain abscesses caused by Panton-Valentine leukocidin-negative community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Conclusion Although our patient was given antimicrobials active against the isolated methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain, it was only after the introduction of daptomycin that his skin, soft tissue and muscle lesions and also brain manifestations improved. PMID:22938025

  12. Mapping seafloor volcanism and its record of tectonic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnins, L. M.; Valentine, A. P.; Trampert, J.

    2013-12-01

    One relatively obvious surface reflection of certain types of tectonic and mantle processes is volcanic activity. Ocean covers two thirds of our planet, so naturally much of this evidence will be marine, yet the evidence of volcanic activity in the oceans remains very incompletely mapped. Many seamounts, the products of 'excess' volcanism, have been identified (10,000--20,000 over 1 km in height, depending on the study), but it is estimated that up to 60% of seamounts in this height range remain unmapped. Given the scale of the task, identification of probable seamounts is a process that clearly needs to be automated, but identifying naturally occurring features such as these is difficult because of the degree of inherent variation. A very promising avenue for these questions lies in the use of learning algorithms, such as neural networks, designed to have complex pattern recognition capabilities. Building on the work of Valentine et al. (2013), we present preliminary results of a new global seamount study based on neural network methods. Advantages of this approach include an intrinsic measure of confidence in the seamount identification and full automation, allowing easy re-picking to suit the requirements of different types of studies. Here, we examine the resulting spatial and temporal distribution of marine volcanism and consider what insights this offers into the shifting patterns of plate tectonics and mantle activity. We also consider the size distribution of the seamounts and explore possible classes based on shape and their distributions, potentially reflecting both differing formational processes and later erosional processes. Valentine, A. P., L. M. Kalnins, and J. Trampert (2013), Discovery and analysis of topographic features using learning algorithms: A seamount case study, Geophysical Research Letters, 40(12), p. 3048--3054.

  13. Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from Iranian hospitals: virulence factors and antibiotic resistance properties.

    PubMed

    Momtaz, Hassan; Hafezi, Laleh

    2014-10-05

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important opportunistic pathogen responsible for a variety of diseases. Indiscriminate prescription of antibiotics caused severe antibiotic resistance especially against commonly used drugs. The present investigation was carried out to study the distribution of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin gene, SCCmec types and antibiotic resistance properties of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from Iranian hospitals. A total of 132 clinical specimens were collected from two major Iranian hospitals. Samples were cultured and their positive results were subjected to several PCR methods. The patterns of antibiotic resistance were studied using the disk diffusion method. We found that 66 out of 132 samples (50%) were positive for Staphylococcus aureus. The most commonly infected samples were superficial and surgical wounds (66.12%). The incidence of mecA, tetK, ermA, ermC, tetM, aacA-D, linA, msrA, vatA, vatC and vatB antibiotic resistance genes were 80.30%, 34.84%, 30.30%, 25.75%, 24.24%, 19.69%, 7.57%, 7.57%, 6.06%, 3.03% and 1.51%, respectively. Totally, 40.90% of isolates harbored the Panton-Valentine Leukocidin gene. Of 53 mec positive strains, the distribution of SCCmec V, SCCmec III, SCCmec IVa, SCCmec IVc and SCCmec IVb were 28 (52.83%), 13 (24.52%), 6 (11.32%), 4 (7.54%) and 2 (3.77%), respectively. All isolates were resistant to penicillin, cephalothin, cefazoline and ceftriaxone. The high levels of Staphylococcus aureus resistance against commonly used antibiotics as well as high presence of SCCmec types of meticillin-resistant virulent strains of Staphylococcus aureus suggest that infections with these strains require more advanced hospital care with emerging demand for novel antibiotics.

  14. Functional independence within the self-memory system: new insights from two cases of developmental amnesia.

    PubMed

    Picard, Laurence; Mayor-Dubois, Claire; Maeder, Philippe; Kalenzaga, Sandrine; Abram, Maria; Duval, Céline; Eustache, Francis; Roulet-Perez, Eliane; Piolino, Pascale

    2013-06-01

    Neuropsychological and neuroimaging data suggest that the self-memory system can be fractionated into three functionally independent systems processing personal information at several levels of abstraction, including episodic memories of one's life (episodic autobiographical memory, EAM), semantic knowledge of facts about one's life (semantic autobiographical memory, SAM), and semantic knowledge of one's personality [conceptual self, (CS)]. Through the study of two developmental amnesic patients suffering of neonatal brain injuries, we explored how the different facets of the self-memory system develop when growing up with bilateral hippocampal atrophy. Neuropsychological evaluations showed that both of them suffered from dramatic episodic learning disability with no sense of recollection (Remember/Know procedure), whereas their semantic abilities differed, being completely preserved (Valentine) or not (Jocelyn). Magnetic resonance imaging, including quantitative volumetric measurements of the hippocampus and adjacent (entorhinal, perirhinal, and temporopolar) cortex, showed severe bilateral atrophy of the hippocampus in both patients, with additional atrophy of adjacent cortex in Jocelyn. Exploration of EAM and SAM according to lifetime periods covering the entire lifespan (TEMPAu task, Piolino et al., 2009) showed that both patients had marked impairments in EAM, as they lacked specificity, details and sense of recollection, whereas SAM was completely normal in Valentine, but impaired in Jocelyn. Finally, measures of patients' CS (Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, Fitts and Warren, 1996), checked by their mothers, were generally within normal range, but both patients showed a more positive self-concept than healthy controls. These two new cases support a modular account of the medial-temporal lobe with episodic memory and recollection depending on the hippocampus, and semantic memory and familiarity on adjacent cortices. Furthermore, they highlight developmental

  15. Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Types Among Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Northern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Taherirad, Akram; Jahanbakhsh, Roghayeh; Shakeri, Fatemeh; Anvary, Shaghayegh; Ghaemi, Ezzat Allah

    2016-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections around the world. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing methods are often used to study MRSA molecular epidemiology. Objectives The current study was designed to explore the distribution profiles of different SCCmec types among methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains isolated from hospitals in Gorgan, in northern Iran, and to correlate the types into observed bacterial virulence factors. Materials and Methods Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec typing of 62 MRSA strains isolated from patients and health-care workers in Gorgan was performed using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The prevalence of the strains was then compared according to isolation source, antibiotic susceptibility profiles, biofilm production, and the presence of the Panton-Valentine gene in isolates. Results The most common SCCmec type was type III, with a frequency rate of 76%, followed by types IV, I, and V, with frequency rates of 11.2%, 4.8%, and 3.2%, respectively; three isolates (4.8%) were not typeable by this method. SCCmec type I was only isolated from blood culture, and types IV and V were mainly isolated from wounds and urine samples; SCCmec type III was isolated from all of the clinically samples. All of the MRSA strains that were isolated from healthy carriers were type III. Multidrug resistance in the type III strains was higher compared to the other types. The frequencies of Panton-Valentine and biofilm production were significantly lower in the type III strains compared to the other SCCmec types (P < 0.05). Conclusions Similarly to other geographical regions of Iran, the SCCmec type III MRSA strain was the most frequently isolated strain from patients in Gorgan. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type III showed fewer virulence factors compared to other SCCmec types. PMID:27800133

  16. Possible healthcare-associated transmission as a cause of secondary infection and population structure of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from two wound treatment centres in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Kpeli, G; Darko Otchere, I; Lamelas, A; Buultjens, A L; Bulach, D; Baines, S L; Seemann, T; Giulieri, S; Nakobu, Z; Aboagye, S Y; Owusu-Mireku, E; Pluschke, G; Stinear, T P; Yeboah-Manu, D

    2016-09-01

    We have previously shown that secondary infections of Buruli ulcer wounds were frequently caused by Staphylococcus aureus. To gain understanding into possible routes of secondary infection, we characterized S. aureus isolates from patient lesions and surrounding environments across two Ghanaian health centres. One hundred and one S. aureus isolates were isolated from wounds (n = 93, 92.1%) and the hospital environment (n = 8, 7.9%) and characterized by the spa gene, mecA and the Panton-Valentine leucocidin toxin followed by spa sequencing and whole genome sequencing of a subset of 49 isolates. Spa typing and sequencing of the spa gene from 91 isolates identified 29 different spa types with t355 (ST152), t186 (ST88), and t346 dominating. Although many distinct strains were isolated from both health centres, genotype clustering was identified within centres. In addition, we identified a cluster consisting of isolates from a healthcare worker, patients dressed that same day and forceps used for dressing, pointing to possible healthcare-associated transmission. These clusters were confirmed by phylogenomic analysis. Twenty-four (22.8%) isolates were identified as methicillin-resistant S. aureus and lukFS genes encoding Panton-Valentine leucocidin were identified in 67 (63.8%) of the isolates. Phenotype screening showed widespread resistance to tetracycline, erythromycin, rifampicin, amikacin and streptomycin. Genomics confirmed the widespread presence of antibiotic resistance genes to β-lactams, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, quinolone, streptomycin and tetracycline. Our findings indicate that the healthcare environment probably contributes to the superinfection of Buruli ulcer wounds and calls for improved training in wound management and infection control techniques. PMID:27547406

  17. Hunting for exploding red supergiant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messineo, Maria; Menten, Karl M.; Figer, Donald F.; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Zhu, Qingfeng; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Davies, Ben; Clark, J. Simon; Rich, Michael; Chen, Rosie; Trombley, Christine; MacKenty, John W.; Habing, Harm; Churchwell, Edward

    2015-08-01

    Red supergiants (RSGs) are among the brightest Galactic stars at infrared wavelengths. They lose mass at high-rates and, eventually, explode as supernovae, enriching the interstellar medium. I would like to present results on our ongoing searches for candidate obscured-far-luminous late-type stars, which are based on 2MASS, UKIDSS, and GLIMPSE data, on extinction-free colors(Messineo et al. 2012, A&A, 537) and on the analysis of the extinction curve along a given line-of-sight with clump stars. Messineo et al. (2014, A&A, 571, 43) spectroscopically confirmed two clusters of red supergiants, one on the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm at a distance of ~7 kpc, and another on the Scutum-Crux arm at a distance of ~4 kpc; while Messineo et al. (2014, A&A, 569, 20) have, found several RSGs in the core of SNRs W41 and within the area covered by the SNR G22.7-0.2 in the GMC G23.3-0.3. SNR G22.7-0.2 appears to be most likely a type II SNR.Messineo , M.; Menten, K. M.; Churchwell, E.; Habing, H. 2012A&A...537A..10MMessineo, Maria; Zhu, Qingfeng; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Figer, Donald F.; Davies, Ben; Menten, Karl M.; Kudritzki, Rolf P.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie 2014A&A...571A..43MMessineo, Maria; Menten, Karl M.; Figer, Donald F.; Davies, Ben; Clark, J. Simon; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Rich, R. Michael; MacKenty, John W.; Trombley, Christine; 2014A&A...569A..20M

  18. [MRSA clones identified in outpatient dermatology clinics].

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Shino; Ito, Teruyo; Misawa, Shigeki; Yoshiike, Takashi; Oguri, Toyoko; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    To know the characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains disseminating through the Japanese community, we have determined types of Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements, Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST), and carriages of four exotoxin genes (toxic-shock syndrome toxin, Panton-Valentine Leukocidine, and exfoliative toxins a and b) using 54 MRSA strains isolated from outpatients attending dermatology clinics at the four university hospitals of Juntendo University. Ten clonal complexes and 12 SCCmec types have been identified. As a result, more than 15 MRSA clones that were defined by the combination of genotype and SCCmec type, were identified. Among them, Clonal Complex (CC) 5-type IIa SCCmec strains were the most major (16 strains). In contrast to the fact that CC5- type IIa SCCmec strains known as a hospital-associated MRSA clone in Japan carried toxic-shock syndrome toxin gene (tst), only 2 of 16 strains have been shown to carry tst. Thirty-eight (70.4%) of isolates belonged to the clones distinct from the CC5-type IIa SCCmec strains. Among them, CC8 strains were major (12 strains), which contained 9 tst-positive CC8-type IVl SCCmec clones and a CC8-type IVa SCCmec strain carrying the Panton Valentine Leukocidin gene (lukS, F-PV). Clones related to impetigo were also identified: 7 exfoliative toxin b (etb) -positive clones, CC89-type IIa SCCmec and CC89-type V SCCmec strains; and 2 exfoliative toxin a (eta) -positive CC121-type V SCCmec strains. Other clones were as follows: CC1-type IVa SCCmec, CC8-type I SCCmec, CC81-type IVg SCCmec, CC97-type IVc SCCmec, CC91-type IVa SCCmec, CC59-type IVg SCCmec, CC45-type IIn SCCmec, CC89-SCCmec nontypeable, and CC8-type IVm, novel subtype of type IV SCCmec were identified in this study. Our data showed that many novel MRSA clones have emerged in the community. PMID:25764806

  19. Paper Birch Decline in the Niobrara River Valley, Nebraska: Weather, Microclimate, and Birch Stand Conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stroh, Esther D.; Miller, Joel P.

    2009-01-01

    The Niobrara River Valley in north-central Nebraska supports scattered stands of paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh), a species more typical of boreal forests. These birch stands are considered to be relictual populations that have persisted since the end of the Wisconsin glaciation, when regional flora was more boreal in nature (Wright 1970, Kaul and others, 1988). Dieback of canopy-sized birch has been observed throughout the Niobrara Valley in recent years, although no onset dates are documented. The current dieback event probably started around or after the early 1980's. The study objectives were to understand microclimatic conditions in birch stands relative to nearby weather stations and historic weather conditions, and to assess current health conditions of individual birch trees. Temperature was measured every half-hour from June 2005 through October 2007 in 12 birch stands and individual birch tree health was measured as expressed by percent living canopy in these and 13 additional stands in spring 2006 and 2007. Birch site microclimate was compared to data from a National Weather Service station in Valentine, Nebraska, and to an automated weather station at The Nature Conservancy Niobrara Valley Preserve 24 kilometers north of Johnstown, Nebraska. Historic weather data from the Valentine station and another National Weather Service Station at Ainsworth, Nebraska, were used to reconstruct minimum and maximum temperature at The Nature Conservancy and one microclimate monitoring station using Kalman filtering and smoothing algorithms. Birch stand microclimate differed from local weather stations as well as among stands. Birch health was associated with annual minimum temperature regimes; those stands whose annual daily minimum temperature regimes were most like The Nature Conservancy station contained smaller proportions of living trees. Frequency of freeze/thaw conditions capable of inducing rootlet injury and subsequent crown dieback significantly have

  20. Evolved massive stars in W33 and in GMC 23.3-0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messineo, Maria; Clark, J. Simon; Figer, Donald F.; Menten, Karl M.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Najarro, Francisco; Rich, Michael; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Valenti, Elena; Trombley, Christine; Chen, Rosie; Davies, Ben; MacKenty, John W.

    2015-08-01

    We have conducted an infrared spectroscopic survey for massive evolved stars and/or clusters in the Galactic giant molecular clouds G23.3-0.3 and W33. A large number of extraordinary sub-clumps/clusters of massive stars were detected. The spatial and temporal distribution of these massive stars yields information on the star formation history of the clouds.In G23.3-0.3, we discovered a dozen massive O-type stars, one candidate luminous blue variable, and several red supergiants. The O-type stars have masses from 25 to 50 Msun and ages of 5-8 Myr, while the RSGs belong to a burst that occurred 20-30 Myr ago. Therefore, GMC G23.3-0.3 has had one of the longest known histories of star formation (20-30 Myr). GMC G23.3-0.3 is rich in HII regions and supernova remnants; we detected massive stars in the cores of SNR W41 and of SNR G22.7-0.2.In W33, we detected a few evolved O-type stars and one Wolf-Rayet star, but none of the late-type objects has the luminosity of a red supergiant. W33 is characterized by discrete sources and has had at least 3-5 Myr of star formation history, which is now propagating from west to east. While our detections of massive evolved stars in W33 are made on the west side of the cloud, several dense molecular cores that may harbor proto clusters have recently been detected on the east side of the cloud by Immer et al. (2014).Messineo, Maria; Menten, Karl M.; Figer, Donald F.; Davies, Ben; Clark, J. Simon; Ivanov, Valentin D.Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Rich, R. Michael; MacKenty, John W.; Trombley, Christine 2014A&A...569A..20MMessineo, Maria; Clark, J. Simon; Figer, Donald F.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Francisco, Najarro; Rich, R. Michael; Menten, Karl M.; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Valenti, Elena; Trombley, Christine; Chen, C.H. Rosie; Davies, Ben; submitted to ApJ.

  1. Human Monocyte-Derived Osteoclasts Are Targeted by Staphylococcal Pore-Forming Toxins and Superantigens

    PubMed Central

    Flammier, Sacha; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Badiou, Cédric; Henry, Thomas; Vandenesch, François; Laurent, Frédéric; Trouillet-Assant, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of bone and joint infections (BJIs). Staphylococcal pathogenesis involves numerous virulence factors including secreted toxins such as pore-forming toxins (PFTs) and superantigens. The role of these toxins on BJI outcome is largely unknown. In particular, few studies have examined how osteoclasts, the bone-resorbing cells, respond to exposure to staphylococcal PFTs and superantigens. We investigated the direct impact of recombinant staphylococcal toxins on human primary mature monocyte-derived osteoclasts, in terms of cytotoxicity and cell activation with cell death and bone resorption assays, using macrophages of the corresponding donors as a reference. Monocyte-derived osteoclasts displayed similar toxin susceptibility profiles compared to macrophages. Specifically, we demonstrated that the Panton-Valentine leukocidin, known as one of the most powerful PFT which lyses myeloid cells after binding to the C5a receptor, was able to induce the death of osteoclasts. The archetypal superantigen TSST-1 was not cytotoxic but enhanced the bone resorption activity of osteoclasts, suggesting a novel mechanism by which superantigen-producing S. aureus can accelerate the destruction of bone tissue during BJI. Altogether, our data indicate that the diverse clinical presentations of BJIs could be related, at least partly, to the toxin profiles of S. aureus isolates involved in these severe infections. PMID:26934588

  2. Staphylococcus aureus Hemolysins, bi-component Leukocidins, and Cytolytic Peptides: A Redundant Arsenal of Membrane-Damaging Virulence Factors?

    PubMed Central

    Vandenesch, François; Lina, G.; Henry, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    One key aspect of the virulence of Staphylococcus aureus lies in its ability to target the host cell membrane with a large number of membrane-damaging toxins and peptides. In this review, we describe the hemolysins, the bi-component leukocidins (which include the Panton Valentine leukocidin, LukAB/GH, and LukED), and the cytolytic peptides (phenol soluble modulins). While at first glance, all of these factors might appear redundant, it is now clear that some of these factors play specific roles in certain S. aureus life stages and diseases or target specific cell types or species. In this review, we present an update of the literature on toxin receptors and their cell type and species specificities. Furthermore, we review epidemiological studies and animal models illustrating the role of these membrane-damaging factors in various diseases. Finally, we emphasize the interplay of these factors with the host immune system and highlight all their non-lytic functions. PMID:22919604

  3. First description of PVL-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in wild boar meat.

    PubMed

    Kraushaar, Britta; Fetsch, Alexandra

    2014-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important food-borne pathogen due to the ability of enterotoxigenic strains to produce staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) in food. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) is also an important pathogen for humans, causing severe and hard to treat diseases in hospitals and in the community due to its multiresistance against antimicrobials. In particular, strains harbouring genes encoding for the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) toxin are of concern from a public health perspective as they are usually capable of causing severe skin and soft tissue infections (sSSTIs) and occasionally necrotizing pneumonia which is associated with high mortality. This is the first report on the detection of MRSA with genes encoding for PVL in wild boar meat. Among the 28 MRSA isolated from wild boar meat in the course of a national monitoring programme in Germany, seven harboured PVL-encoding genes. Six of the isolates were identical according to the results of spa-, MLST-, microarray- and PFGE-typing. They could be assigned to the epidemic MRSA clone USA300. Epidemiological investigations revealed that people handling the food were the most likely common source of contamination with these MRSA. These findings call again for suitable hygienic measures at all processing steps of the food production chain. The results of the study underline that monitoring along the food chain is essential to closely characterise the total burden of MRSA for public health.

  4. Waves and Patterns in Chemical and Biological Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinney, Harry L.; Krinsky, Valentin I.

    1991-12-01

    These 28 contributions by leading researchers - from such diverse disciplines as chemistry, biology, physics, mathematics, and physiology - describe recent experiments, numerical simulations, and theoretical analyses of the formation of spatial patterns in chemical and biological systems. Chemical patterns have been systematically studied since the field was established by Alan Turing's landmark 1952 paper, "The chemical basis for morphogenesis," yet only recently have new experimental techniques and numerical analyses of reaction-diffusion equations opened the way to understanding stationary and traveling wave patterns. This collection summarizes the exciting developments in this rapidly growing field. It shows that some biological patterns have been found to be strikingly similar to patterns found in simple, well-controlled laboratory chemical systems, that new chemical reactor designs make it possible to sustain chemical patterns and to study transitions between different kinds of patterns, and that nearly 40 years after Turing's paper, the patterns predicted by Turing have finally been observed in laboratory experiments. Harry L. Swinney is Sid Richardson Foundation Regents Chair, Department of Physics, and Director of the Center for Nonlinear Dynamics at the University of Texas at Austin. Valentin I. Krinsky is Head of the Autowave Laboratory, Institute of Biological Physics, Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, USSR. Chapters cover: Spiral, Ring, and Scroll Patterns: Experiments. Spiral, Ring, and Scroll Patterns: Theory and Simulations. Fronts and Turing Patterns. Waves and Patterns in Biological Systems.

  5. Prevalence and clonality of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the Atlantic Azores islands: predominance of SCCmec types IV, V and VI.

    PubMed

    Conceição, T; Tavares, A; Miragaia, M; Hyde, K; Aires-de-Sousa, M; de Lencastre, H

    2010-05-01

    In order to obtain insights into the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) population structure in the Azores archipelago, 106 MRSA isolates were collected from patients attending an Azorean central hospital between January 2007 and February 2008. Antimicrobial resistance was determined for all isolates. Molecular typing was performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) typing and the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). The majority of the isolates (87%, n = 92) belonged to the EMRSA-15 clone (ST22, SCCmec-IVh), followed by the Pediatric clone (ST5-VI/IVc) (11%, n = 12). The Berlin clone (ST45-IVa) and a new clone (spa type t1839, ST1339 and SCCmec V variant) were represented by single isolates. All of the isolates carried SCCmec types IV, V or VI and a non-multiresistant antibiotic profile, resembling the currently emerging community MRSA. Moreover, PVL was described for the first time to be associated with the Pediatric clone carrying SCCmec type VI. We provided the first description of the population structure of MRSA in the Azores islands, which seems to be shaped by genetic events occurring locally, as well as by the regular population exchange between the islands, continental Portugal, the United Kingdom and the United States. PMID:20229224

  6. [Community associated-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (SAMR-AC): comunication of the first four pediatric cases in the Roberto del Rio Children's Hospital].

    PubMed

    Acuña, Mirta; Benadof, Dona; Jadue, Carla; Hormazábal, Juan C; Alarcón, Pedro; Contreras, Julio; Torres, Ramón; Mülchi, Cristóbal; Aguayo, Carolina; Fernández, Jorge; Araya, Pamela

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a known pathogen in pediatric patients that produces skin infections, cutaneous abscess, cellulitis and osteoarticular infections. Most of these infections are produced by a meticilin susceptible strain. The community associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was published for the first time in 1993, ever since then is has been recognized as a cosmopolite pathogen. The first report in Latin America was published in 2003, and in Chile in 2008 from adult patients that have reported traveling to other countries. The following series describes four pediatric cases, all school-aged children, diagnosed since 2012 with clinical followups and molecular studies. Two cases presented as osteomyelitis of the lower extremity; and one presented as arm cellulitis. These three cases had Panton Valentine leukocidine (PV-L) negative strains from the clone complex 8. The last case presented a renal abscess, the strain was PV-L positive from the clone complex 30. This case series constitutes the first pediatric case report in Chile. PMID:26230445

  7. Prevalence and characteristics of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in humans in contact with farm animals, in livestock, and in food of animal origin, Switzerland, 2009.

    PubMed

    Huber, H; Koller, S; Giezendanner, N; Stephan, R; Zweifel, C

    2010-04-22

    A total of 2,662 samples, collected from March to September 2009 in Switzerland, were tested for the presence of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The collection comprised nasal swabs from 148 pig farmers, 133 veterinarians, 179 slaughterhouse employees, 800 pigs, 300 calves, 400 cattle, 100 pooled neck skin swabs from chicken carcasses, and 460 food samples of animal origin. Moreover, 142 S. aureus strains, isolated from bovine mastitis milk, were included in the study. Twenty samples (< 1%; four veterinarians, 10 pigs, three calves, one young bull, and two mastitis milk samples) tested positive for MRSA. Genotyping of the MRSA strains was performed by multilocus sequence typing, spa- and SCCmec-typing, and revealed ST398 (n=18), ST8 (n=1), ST 1 (n=1), spa types t011 (n=7), t034 (n=11), t064 (n=1), t127 (n=1), and SCCmec types IV (n=4) and V (n=16). The 20 MRSA strains were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis using the restriction enzyme EagI. Supplementary PCR reactions were performed to investigate the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin and staphylococcal enterotoxins A to D. PMID:20430001

  8. Exploring simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug, as a potential topical antibacterial agent.

    PubMed

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F N; Hamed, Maha I; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Hedrick, Victoria E; Paul, Lake N; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics combined with the decline in discovery of novel antibacterial agents has created a global public health crisis. Repurposing existing drugs presents an alternative strategy to potentially expedite the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. The present study demonstrates that simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug exhibited broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against important Gram-positive (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative pathogens (once the barrier imposed by the outer membrane was permeabilized). Proteomics and macromolecular synthesis analyses revealed that simvastatin inhibits multiple biosynthetic pathways and cellular processes in bacteria, including selective interference of bacterial protein synthesis. This property appears to assist in simvastatin's ability to suppress production of key MRSA toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leucocidin) that impair healing of infected skin wounds. A murine MRSA skin infection experiment confirmed that simvastatin significantly reduces the bacterial burden and inflammatory cytokines in the infected wounds. Additionally, simvastatin exhibits excellent anti-biofilm activity against established staphylococcal biofilms and demonstrates the ability to be combined with topical antimicrobials currently used to treat MRSA skin infections. Collectively the present study lays the foundation for further investigation of repurposing simvastatin as a topical antibacterial agent to treat skin infections. PMID:26553420

  9. First description of PVL-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in wild boar meat.

    PubMed

    Kraushaar, Britta; Fetsch, Alexandra

    2014-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important food-borne pathogen due to the ability of enterotoxigenic strains to produce staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) in food. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) is also an important pathogen for humans, causing severe and hard to treat diseases in hospitals and in the community due to its multiresistance against antimicrobials. In particular, strains harbouring genes encoding for the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) toxin are of concern from a public health perspective as they are usually capable of causing severe skin and soft tissue infections (sSSTIs) and occasionally necrotizing pneumonia which is associated with high mortality. This is the first report on the detection of MRSA with genes encoding for PVL in wild boar meat. Among the 28 MRSA isolated from wild boar meat in the course of a national monitoring programme in Germany, seven harboured PVL-encoding genes. Six of the isolates were identical according to the results of spa-, MLST-, microarray- and PFGE-typing. They could be assigned to the epidemic MRSA clone USA300. Epidemiological investigations revealed that people handling the food were the most likely common source of contamination with these MRSA. These findings call again for suitable hygienic measures at all processing steps of the food production chain. The results of the study underline that monitoring along the food chain is essential to closely characterise the total burden of MRSA for public health. PMID:25016468

  10. Paleo- and Neoproterozoic magmatic and tectonometamorphic evolution of the Isla Cristalina de Rivera (Nico Pérez Terrane, Uruguay)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyhantçabal, Pedro; Wagner-Eimer, Martin; Wemmer, Klaus; Schulz, Bernhard; Frei, Robert; Siegesmund, Siegfried

    2012-10-01

    The Isla Cristalina de Rivera crystalline complex in northeastern Uruguay underwent a multistage magmatic and metamorphic evolution. Based on SHRIMP U-Pb zircon, Th-U-Pb monazite (CHIME-EPMA method) and K-Ar age data from key units several events can be recognized: (1) multistage magmatism at 2,171-2,114 Ma, recorded on zircon of the granulitic orthogneisses and their 2,093-2,077 Ma overgrowths; (2) a distinct amphibolite facies metamorphism at ~1,980 Ma, recorded by monazite; (3) greenschist facies reworking and shearing at ca. 606 Ma (monazite and K-Ar on muscovite) along the Rivera Shear Zone, and finally (4) intrusion of the post-tectonic Sobresaliente and Las Flores granites at around 585 Ma. Lithological similarities, geographic proximity and coeval magmatic and metamorphic events indicate a similar tectonometamorphic evolution for the Isla Cristalina de Rivera, the Valentines Block in Uruguay and the Santa María Chico Granulitic Complex in southern Brazil, since at least 2.1 Ga.

  11. Size-to-charge dispersion of collision-induced dissociation product ions for enhancement of structural information and product ion identification.

    PubMed

    Zinnel, Nathanael F; Russell, David H

    2014-05-20

    Ion mobility is used to disperse product ions formed by collision-induced dissociation (CID) on the basis of charge state and size-to-charge ratio. We previously described an approach for combining CID with ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) for dispersing fragment ions along charge state specific trend lines (Zinnel, N. F.; Pai, P. J.; Russell, D. H. Anal. Chem. 2012, 84, 3390; Sowell, R. A.; Koeniger, S. L.; Valentine, S. J.; Moon, M. H.; Clemmer, D. E. J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 2004, 15, 1341; McLean, J. A.; Ruotolo, B. T.; Gillig, K. J.; Russell, D. H. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 2005, 240, 301), and this approach was used to assign metal ion binding sites for human metallothionein protein MT-2a (Chen, S. H.; Russell, W. K.; Russell, D. H. Anal. Chem. 2013, 85, 3229). Here, we use this approach to distinguish b-type N-terminal fragment ions from both internal fragment ions and y-type C-terminal fragment ions. We also show that in some cases specific secondary structural elements, viz., extended coils or helices, can be obtained for the y-type fragment ions series. The advantage of this approach is that product ion identity can be correlated to gas-phase ion structure, which provides rapid identification of the onset and termination of extended coil structure in peptides.

  12. The δ Subunit of RNA Polymerase Guides Promoter Selectivity and Virulence in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Andy; Ibarra, J. Antonio; Paoletti, Jessica; Carroll, Ronan K.

    2014-01-01

    In Gram-positive bacteria, and particularly the Firmicutes, the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) complex contains an additional subunit, termed the δ factor, or RpoE. This enigmatic protein has been studied for more than 30 years for various organisms, but its function is still not well understood. In this study, we investigated its role in the major human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. We showed conservation of important structural regions of RpoE in S. aureus and other species and demonstrated binding to core RNAP that is mediated by the β and/or β′ subunits. To identify the impact of the δ subunit on transcription, we performed transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis and observed 191 differentially expressed genes in the rpoE mutant. Ontological analysis revealed, quite strikingly, that many of the downregulated genes were known virulence factors, while several mobile genetic elements (SaPI5 and prophage ϕSA3usa) were strongly upregulated. Phenotypically, the rpoE mutant had decreased accumulation and/or activity of a number of key virulence factors, including alpha toxin, secreted proteases, and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). We further observed significantly decreased survival of the mutant in whole human blood, increased phagocytosis by human leukocytes, and impaired virulence in a murine model of infection. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the δ subunit of RNAP is a critical component of the S. aureus transcription machinery and plays an important role during infection. PMID:24491578

  13. The Covariance and Biocovariance of the Stochartic Neutron Field

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    The use of stochastic neutron field theory (neutron noise) for the measurement of reactor physics parameters goes back to the early work of Serber, Feynmann, and Orndoff. Since then, a large variety of methods and applications has been developed. In the majority of these methods, some form of modified one-point reactor kinetics was used for the interpretation of the measurements. In fact, the high level of sophistication of the instrumentation used was not matched by the theory. In 1965, Bell developed a general theory of the stochastic neutron field, and in 1987, Munoz-Cobo et al enlarged this treatment to include the effect of the detectors in the neutron field. In both instances, the complexity of the theoretical results were beyond the computing capabilities then available thus, the mismatch between experimental and theoretical methods remained in existence because the powerful Monte-Carlo methods then at work, were only applicable to static neutron fields. This problem was eliminated by the development of a time-dependent Monte-Carlo code specially written by T. E. Valentine for the analysis of stochastic measurements that gave them relevance to the results of the general theory. The purpose of this work is to illustrate the derivation of observables of the stochastic neutron filed from its general treatment.

  14. Now We Know: Assessing Sexual Assault Criminal Justice Case Processing in an Urban Community Using the Sexual Assault Nurse Practitioner Evaluation Toolkit.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Julie L; Shaw, Jessica; Lark, Alyssa; Campbell, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Campbell and colleagues developed an evaluation Toolkit for use by sexual assault nurse examiners (SANEs) to assess criminal case outcomes in adult sexual assault cases seen by SANE programs (Campbell, Townsend, Shaw, Karim, & Markowitz, 2014; Campbell, Bybee, et al., 2014). The Toolkit provides step-by-step directions and an easy-to-use statistical program. This study describes implementation of the Toolkit in Salt Lake County, the first site outside the pilot sites to utilize the program. The Toolkit revealed that, in Salt Lake County from 2003 to 2011, only 6% of adult sexual assault cases were successfully prosecuted. These findings prompted multiple community discussions, media attention, and a call to action to improve the investigation and prosecution of adult sexual assault cases. The primary purpose of this case report is to encourage other SANE teams and communities to use the Toolkit by sharing the successful experience of Salt Lake County in implementing the Toolkit.Video Abstract available for additional insights from Dr. Valentine (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JFN/A19).

  15. Development of a novel multiplex electrochemiluminescent-based immunoassay for quantification of human serum IgG against 10 Staphylococcus aureus toxins.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Rajan P; Haudenschild, Christian; Sterba, Patricia M; Sahandi, Sara; Enterlein, Sven; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Aman, M Javad

    2016-03-01

    An electrochemiluminescent (ECL)-based multiplex immunoassay using Meso-Scale Discovery (MSD) technology was developed for detecting antibody response toward 10 Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) exotoxins. These 10 antigens included three different groups of toxins: 1) single component pore-forming toxins such as alpha- and delta-hemolysins, 2) the bicomponent pore-forming toxin Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), comprised of LukS-PV and LukF-PV subunits, and 3) enterotoxin/superantigens - Staphylococcal enterotoxins A (SEA), B (SEB), C1 (SEC1), D (SED), K (SEK) and Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1). Assay development included optimization steps with a conventional SEB ELISA-based serological assay and then optimized parameters were transferred and re-optimized in a singleplex ECL format. Finally, two pentaplex solid-phase ECL formats were developed. As proof of concept, one set of pentaplex ECL data was compared with conventional ELISA results. During the assay development controls were screened and developed for both the singleplex and multiplex assays. ECL-based multiplex assays were more sensitive with a wide dynamic range and proved more time-efficient than conventional ELISAs. Using the newly developed ECL method we showed, for the first time, that delta-hemolysin toxin can induce an immune response as antibody titers could be detected.

  16. Characterization of SCCmec types, antibiotic resistance, and toxin gene profiles of Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed

    Szczuka, Ewa; Grabska, Katarzyna; Trawczyński, Krzysztof; Bosacka, Karolina; Kaznowski, Adam

    2013-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) causes serious nosocomial and community acquired infections. Resistance to methicillin is mediated by the mecA gene, which is inserted in a mobile genetic element called staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). We determined the SCCmec types, the occurrence of genes encoding toxic shock syndrome toxin (tst), exfoliative toxin (eta, etb), Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl) as well as antibiotic susceptibility of these isolates. Among 65 hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (HA-MRSA) strains, SCCmec types II, III and IV were identified. Type III SCCmec was the most prevalent (62%), followed by mec types II (24%) and IV (14%). Four community acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strains carried SCCmec type IV and were pvl-positive. The most prevalent gene among HA-MRSA was pvl. The toxic shock syndrome toxin and exfoliative toxin genes were found only in hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The results of this study demonstrate that the SCCmec type III is predominant among strains recovered from hospitalized patients with infections and that these strains were resistant to many antibiotics used in the treatment of staphylococcal infections.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus Formyl-Methionyl Transferase Mutants Demonstrate Reduced Virulence Factor Production and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Thomas; Huang, Jianzhong; Fan, Frank; Rogers, Shannon; Gentry, Daniel; Holland, Reannon; DeMarsh, Peter; Zalacain, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of peptide deformylase (PDF) represent a new class of antibacterial agents with a novel mechanism of action. Mutations that inactivate formyl methionyl transferase (FMT), the enzyme that formylates initiator methionyl-tRNA, lead to an alternative initiation of protein synthesis that does not require deformylation and are the predominant cause of resistance to PDF inhibitors in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we report that loss-of-function mutations in FMT impart pleiotropic effects that include a reduced growth rate, a nonhemolytic phenotype, and a drastic reduction in production of multiple extracellular proteins, including key virulence factors, such as α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), that have been associated with S. aureus pathogenicity. Consequently, S. aureus FMT mutants are greatly attenuated in neutropenic and nonneutropenic murine pyelonephritis infection models and show very high survival rates compared with wild-type S. aureus. These newly discovered effects on extracellular virulence factor production demonstrate that FMT-null mutants have a more severe fitness cost than previously anticipated, leading to a substantial loss of pathogenicity and a restricted ability to produce an invasive infection. PMID:23571548

  18. IVIG-mediated protection against necrotizing pneumonia caused by MRSA.

    PubMed

    Diep, Binh An; Le, Vien T M; Badiou, Cedric; Le, Hoan N; Pinheiro, Marcos Gabriel; Duong, Au H; Wang, Xing; Dip, Etyene Castro; Aguiar-Alves, Fábio; Basuino, Li; Marbach, Helene; Mai, Thuy T; Sarda, Marie N; Kajikawa, Osamu; Matute-Bello, Gustavo; Tkaczyk, Christine; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Sellman, Bret R; Chambers, Henry F; Lina, Gerard

    2016-09-21

    New therapeutic approaches are urgently needed to improve survival outcomes for patients with necrotizing pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus One such approach is adjunctive treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), but clinical practice guidelines offer conflicting recommendations. In a preclinical rabbit model, prophylaxis with IVIG conferred protection against necrotizing pneumonia caused by five different epidemic strains of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) as well as a widespread strain of hospital-associated MRSA. Treatment with IVIG, either alone or in combination with vancomycin or linezolid, improved survival outcomes in this rabbit model. Two specific IVIG antibodies that neutralized the toxic effects of α-hemolysin (Hla) and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) conferred protection against necrotizing pneumonia in the rabbit model. This mechanism of action of IVIG was uncovered by analyzing loss-of-function mutant bacterial strains containing deletions in 17 genes encoding staphylococcal exotoxins, which revealed only Hla and PVL as having an impact on necrotizing pneumonia. These results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of IVIG in the treatment of severe pneumonia induced by S. aureus. PMID:27655850

  19. The anatomy and development of normal and abnormal coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Diane E; Henderson, Deborah J; Chaudhry, Bill; Mohun, Timothy J; Anderson, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    At present, there is significant interest in the morphology of the coronary arteries, not least due to the increasingly well-recognised association between anomalous origin of the arteries and sudden cardiac death. Much has also been learnt over the last decade regarding the embryology of the arteries. In this review, therefore, we provide a brief introduction into the recent findings regarding their development. In particular, we emphasise that new evidence, derived using the developing murine heart, points to the arterial stems growing out from the adjacent sinuses of the aortic root, rather than the arteries growing in, as is currently assumed. As we show, the concept of outgrowth provides an excellent explanation for several of the abnormal arrangements encountered in the clinical setting. Before summarising these abnormal features, we draw attention to the need to describe the heart in an attitudinally appropriate manner, following the basic rule of human anatomy, rather than describing the cardiac components with the heart in the "Valentine" orientation. We then show how the major abnormalities involving the coronary arteries in humans can be summarised in terms of abnormal origin from the pulmonary circulation, abnormal aortic origin, or fistulous communications between the coronary arteries and the cardiac cavities. In the case of abnormal aortic origin, we highlight those malformations known to be associated with sudden cardiac death.

  20. Fatal endocarditis with methicilin-sensible Staphylococcus aureus and major complications: rhabdomyolysis, pericarditis, and intracerebral hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, Anca Meda; Azamfirei, Leonard; Szalman, Krisztina; Szekely, Edit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Over the last decades Staphylococcus aureus (SA) has become the dominant etiology of native valve infective endocarditis, with the community-acquired methicillin-sensible Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MSSA) strains being the prevailing type. Case: We report here a case of extremely severe CA-MSSA aortic valve acute endocarditis associated with persistent Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) in a previously healthy man and include a literature review. The patient developed severe and rare complications (purpura, purulent pericarditis, intracerebral hematoma, and rhabdomyolysis) through systemic embolism; they required drainage of pericardial empyema and cerebral hematoma, the latter eventually caused a fatal outcome. The strains recovered from sequential blood culture sets and pericardial fluid were MSSA negative for genes encoding for staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST)-1 and Panton–Valentine leukocidin. C, G, and I enterotoxin genes were detected. Conclusions: This case with unusually severe evolution underlines the limited ability of vancomycin to control some MSSA infections, possibly due to potential involvement of SA virulence factors, hence the importance of clinical vigilance for community SAB cases. PMID:27741135

  1. Affective forecasting and self-rated symptoms of depression, anxiety, and hypomania: evidence for a dysphoric forecasting bias.

    PubMed

    Hoerger, Michael; Quirk, Stuart W; Chapman, Benjamin P; Duberstein, Paul R

    2012-01-01

    Emerging research has examined individual differences in affective forecasting; however, we are aware of no published study to date linking psychopathology symptoms to affective forecasting problems. Pitting cognitive theory against depressive realism theory, we examined whether dysphoria was associated with negatively biased affective forecasts or greater accuracy. Participants (n=325) supplied predicted and actual emotional reactions for three days surrounding an emotionally evocative relational event, Valentine's Day. Predictions were made a month prior to the holiday. Consistent with cognitive theory, we found evidence for a dysphoric forecasting bias-the tendency of individuals in dysphoric states to overpredict negative emotional reactions to future events. The dysphoric forecasting bias was robust across ratings of positive and negative affect, forecasts for pleasant and unpleasant scenarios, continuous and categorical operationalisations of dysphoria, and three time points of observation. Similar biases were not observed in analyses examining the independent effects of anxiety and hypomania. Findings provide empirical evidence for the long-assumed influence of depressive symptoms on future expectations. The present investigation has implications for affective forecasting studies examining information-processing constructs, decision making, and broader domains of psychopathology.

  2. A decade of community MRSA in New Zealand.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. M. B.; Cook, G. M.

    2005-01-01

    In 1992, isolates with a distinctive phage pattern were identified amongst the 186 MRSA recovered in New Zealand. These unusual isolates were recovered in the Auckland region from individuals who came from or had visited Western Samoa, and were called Western Samoan phage pattern (WSPP) MRSA. They were almost exclusively community based and were mainly responsible for the alarming 15-fold increase in MRSA seen in New Zealand over the next 6 years. Since 2000, the number of infections attributable to WSPP MRSA appears to be declining. WSPP isolates are clonal, possess a unique type IV SCC mec element, and a distinctive multilocus sequence allelic profile (ST30). WSPP isolates are invariably not multiresistant with methicillin MICs generally Valentine leukocidin, alpha- and gamma-haemolysins) producing capabilities. Isolates are most frequently associated with cutaneous lesions in younger age groups. Since 1998, MRSA isolates belonging to the UK-derived EMRSA-15 strain (also type IV SCC mec) have continued to increase in New Zealand, and together with WSPP, these strains now dominate MRSA isolations in New Zealand. PMID:16181511

  3. Mate preferences do predict attraction and choices in the early stages of mate selection.

    PubMed

    Li, Norman P; Yong, Jose C; Tov, William; Sng, Oliver; Fletcher, Garth J O; Valentine, Katherine A; Jiang, Yun F; Balliet, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Although mate preference research has firmly established that men value physical attractiveness more than women do and women value social status more than men do, recent speed-dating studies have indicated mixed evidence (at best) for whether people's sex-differentiated mate preferences predict actual mate choices. According to an evolutionary, mate preference priority model (Li, Bailey, Kenrick, & Linsenmeier, 2002; Li & Kenrick, 2006; Li, Valentine, & Patel, 2011), the sexes are largely similar in what they ideally like, but for long-term mates, they should differ on what they most want to avoid in early selection contexts. Following this model, we conducted experiments using online messaging and modified speed-dating platforms. Results indicate that when a mating pool includes people at the low end of social status and physical attractiveness, mate choice criteria are sex-differentiated: Men, more than women, chose mates based on physical attractiveness, whereas women, more than men, chose mates based on social status. In addition, individuals who more greatly valued social status or physical attractiveness on paper valued these traits more in their actual choices. In particular, mate choices were sex-differentiated when considering long-term relationships but not short-term ones, where both sexes shunned partners with low physical attractiveness. The findings validate a large body of mate preferences research and an evolutionary perspective on mating, and they have implications for research using speed-dating and other interactive contexts. PMID:23915041

  4. Now We Know: Assessing Sexual Assault Criminal Justice Case Processing in an Urban Community Using the Sexual Assault Nurse Practitioner Evaluation Toolkit.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Julie L; Shaw, Jessica; Lark, Alyssa; Campbell, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Campbell and colleagues developed an evaluation Toolkit for use by sexual assault nurse examiners (SANEs) to assess criminal case outcomes in adult sexual assault cases seen by SANE programs (Campbell, Townsend, Shaw, Karim, & Markowitz, 2014; Campbell, Bybee, et al., 2014). The Toolkit provides step-by-step directions and an easy-to-use statistical program. This study describes implementation of the Toolkit in Salt Lake County, the first site outside the pilot sites to utilize the program. The Toolkit revealed that, in Salt Lake County from 2003 to 2011, only 6% of adult sexual assault cases were successfully prosecuted. These findings prompted multiple community discussions, media attention, and a call to action to improve the investigation and prosecution of adult sexual assault cases. The primary purpose of this case report is to encourage other SANE teams and communities to use the Toolkit by sharing the successful experience of Salt Lake County in implementing the Toolkit.Video Abstract available for additional insights from Dr. Valentine (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JFN/A19). PMID:27496646

  5. Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) at ambient freshwater beaches.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Lisa R; Haack, Sheridan K; Johnson, Heather E; Brennan, Angela K; Isaacs, Natasha M; Spencer, Chelsea

    2015-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are a threat to human health worldwide, and although detected at marine beaches, they have been largely unstudied at freshwater beaches. Genes indicating S. aureus (SA; femA) and methicillin resistance (mecA) were detected at 11 and 12 of 13 US Great Lakes beaches and in 18% or 27% of 287 recreational water samples, respectively. Eight beaches had mecA+femA (potential MRSA) detections. During an intensive study, higher bather numbers, staphylococci concentrations, and femA detections were found in samples collected after noon than before noon. Local population density, beach cloud cover, and beach wave height were significantly correlated with SA or MRSA detection frequency. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene, associated with community-acquired MRSA, was detected in 12 out of 27 potential MRSA samples. The femA gene was detected less frequently at beaches that met US enterococci criteria or EU enterococci 'excellent' recreational water quality, but was not related to Escherichia coli-defined criteria. Escherichia coli is often the only indicator used to determine water quality at US beaches, given the economic and healthcare burden that can be associated with infections caused by SA and MRSA, monitoring of recreational waters for non-fecal bacteria such as staphylococci and/or SA may be warranted.

  6. A Field Guide to Pandemic, Epidemic and Sporadic Clones of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Monecke, Stefan; Coombs, Geoffrey; Shore, Anna C.; Coleman, David C.; Akpaka, Patrick; Borg, Michael; Chow, Henry; Ip, Margaret; Jatzwauk, Lutz; Jonas, Daniel; Kadlec, Kristina; Kearns, Angela; Laurent, Frederic; O'Brien, Frances G.; Pearson, Julie; Ruppelt, Antje; Schwarz, Stefan; Scicluna, Elizabeth; Slickers, Peter; Tan, Hui-Leen; Weber, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have become a truly global challenge. In addition to the long-known healthcare-associated clones, novel strains have also emerged outside of the hospital settings, in the community as well as in livestock. The emergence and spread of virulent clones expressing Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is an additional cause for concern. In order to provide an overview of pandemic, epidemic and sporadic strains, more than 3,000 clinical and veterinary isolates of MRSA mainly from Germany, the United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Malta, Abu Dhabi, Hong Kong, Australia, Trinidad & Tobago as well as some reference strains from the United States have been genotyped by DNA microarray analysis. This technique allowed the assignment of the MRSA isolates to 34 distinct lineages which can be clearly defined based on non-mobile genes. The results were in accordance with data from multilocus sequence typing. More than 100 different strains were distinguished based on affiliation to these lineages, SCCmec type and the presence or absence of PVL. These strains are described here mainly with regard to clinically relevant antimicrobial resistance- and virulence-associated markers, but also in relation to epidemiology and geographic distribution. The findings of the study show a high level of biodiversity among MRSA, especially among strains harbouring SCCmec IV and V elements. The data also indicate a high rate of genetic recombination in MRSA involving SCC elements, bacteriophages or other mobile genetic elements and large-scale chromosomal replacements. PMID:21494333

  7. Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus in Bangalore, India: emergence of the ST217 clone and high rate of resistance to erythromycin and ciprofloxacin in the community

    PubMed Central

    Bouchiat, C.; El-Zeenni, N.; Chakrakodi, B.; Nagaraj, S.; Arakere, G.; Etienne, J.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and the circulating clones in Bangalore, India. Susceptibility testing was performed for all cases of SA infections in a tertiary-care hospital. Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) encoding genes were detected, and sequence type and spa type were determined. Out of the 92 collected strains, 52.2% were methicillin-resistant SA (MRSA), isolated from community-acquired (CA) infections in 60.4% and hospital-acquired (HA) infections in 39.6%. S. aureus isolates were also highly resistant to erythromycin (54.3%) and ciprofloxacin (70.6%) in methicillin-susceptible SA (MSSA) and MRSA, as well as in CA and HA infections. MRSA were found to be significantly more resistant to gentamicin (p <0.001), cotrimoxazole (p <0.001) and ciprofloxacin (p 0.001) than MSSA, but no significant difference was observed between CA- and HA-SA. ST217 appeared as a new emerging and prevalent clone, but ST772 remained the predominant clone, all being PVL-positive isolates. Our study points out the high prevalence of MRSA, even in the community, and the worrying increase of resistance to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin among CA-MSSA. Emergence of clone ST217 is reported for the first time in India. PMID:26110062

  8. Exploring simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug, as a potential topical antibacterial agent

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F. N.; Hamed, Maha I.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Paul, Lake N.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics combined with the decline in discovery of novel antibacterial agents has created a global public health crisis. Repurposing existing drugs presents an alternative strategy to potentially expedite the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. The present study demonstrates that simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug exhibited broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against important Gram-positive (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative pathogens (once the barrier imposed by the outer membrane was permeabilized). Proteomics and macromolecular synthesis analyses revealed that simvastatin inhibits multiple biosynthetic pathways and cellular processes in bacteria, including selective interference of bacterial protein synthesis. This property appears to assist in simvastatin’s ability to suppress production of key MRSA toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leucocidin) that impair healing of infected skin wounds. A murine MRSA skin infection experiment confirmed that simvastatin significantly reduces the bacterial burden and inflammatory cytokines in the infected wounds. Additionally, simvastatin exhibits excellent anti-biofilm activity against established staphylococcal biofilms and demonstrates the ability to be combined with topical antimicrobials currently used to treat MRSA skin infections. Collectively the present study lays the foundation for further investigation of repurposing simvastatin as a topical antibacterial agent to treat skin infections. PMID:26553420

  9. Quaternary faults of west Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.W.; Raney, J.A. . Bureau of Economic Geology)

    1993-04-01

    North- and northwest-striking intermontane basins and associated normal faults in West Texas and adjacent Chihuahua, Mexico, formed in response to Basin and Range tectonism that began about 24 Ma ago. Data on the precise ages of faulted and unfaulted Quaternary deposits are sparse. However, age estimates made on the basis of field stratigraphic relationships and the degree of calcic soil development have helped determine that many of the faults that bound the basin margins ruptured since the middle Pleistocene and that some faults probably ruptured during the Holocene. Average recurrence intervals between surface ruptures since the middle Pleistocene appear to be relatively long, about 10,000 to 100,000 yr. Maximum throw during single rupture events have been between 1 and 3 m. Historic seismicity in West Texas is low compared to seismicity in many parts of the Basin and Range province. The largest historic earthquake, the 1931 Valentine earthquake in Ryan Flat/Lobo Valley, had a magnitude of 6.4 and no reported surface rupture. The most active Quaternary faults occur within the 120-km-long Hueco Bolson, the 70-km-long Red Light Bolson, and the > 200-km-long Salt Basins/Wild Horse Flat/Lobo Valley/Ryan Flat.

  10. Development and evaluation of hexaplex PCR for rapid detection of methicillin, cadmium/zinc and antiseptic-resistant staphylococci, with simultaneous identification of PVL-positive and -negative Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Panda, Sasmita; Kar, Sarita; Choudhury, Ranginee; Sharma, Savitri; Singh, Durg V

    2014-03-01

    We developed a multiplex PCR to detect the presence of methicillin- (mecA), cadmium/zinc-(czrC) and antiseptic-resistant (qacA/B) staphylococci and to identify Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-positive and -negative Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) from infected and healthy eyes. The assay was validated on 177 staphylococci comprising of 55 each of S. aureus and CoNS isolated from infected eyes and five S. aureus and 62 CoNS isolated from healthy eyes and nine direct ocular samples. Nine direct ocular samples for in situ testing consisted of corneal scrapings (4), conjunctiva swabs (2) and others (3). Multiplex PCR result was correlated with genotype data obtained with single PCR and dot-blot assay. The control strains that were positive in multiplex PCR for 16S rRNA, nuc, mecA, pvl, czrC and qacA/B genes were also positive in the dot-blot assay. The specificity of amplified genes obtained with reference strains was further confirmed by DNA sequencing. The single step-hexaplex PCR method can be used for rapid detection of mecA, nuc, pvl, czrC and qacA/B genes in staphylococci with simultaneous identification of PVL-positive and -negative S. aureus and CoNS from a variety of ocular samples.

  11. Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from skin and soft tissue infections samples and healthy carriers in the Central Slovenia region.

    PubMed

    Svent-Kucina, Natasa; Pirs, Mateja; Kofol, Romina; Blagus, Rok; Smrke, Dragica Maja; Bilban, Marjan; Seme, Katja

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is among the most important human pathogens. It is associated with different infections and is a major cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). The aim of our study was to compare S. aureus isolates associated with SSTIs with isolates obtained from healthy carriers in the Central Slovenia region in terms of antimicrobial susceptibility, genetic diversity by clonal complex (CC)/sequence type, spa type, and by toxin gene profiling. In total, 274 S. aureus isolates were collected prospectively by culturing wound samples from 461 SSTI patients and nasal samples from 451 healthy carriers. We have demonstrated high heterogeneity in terms of CCs and spa type in both groups of isolates. The main clone among SSTI strains was Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene (pvl) positive CC121, whereas the main clone among carrier strains was CC45 carrying a large range of toxin genes. The main spa type in both groups was t091. Pvl was more frequently present in SSTI strains (31.2% SSTI vs 3.6% carrier strains) and staphylococcal enterotoxin C was more frequently present in carrier strains (1.6% SSTI vs 17.0% carrier strains). We have also demonstrated that methicillin-resistant S. aureus was a rare cause (2.8%) of SSTIs in our region.

  12. Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) at ambient freshwater beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogarty, Lisa R.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Johnson, Heather E.; Brennan, Angela K.; Isaacs, Natasha M.; Spencer, Chelsea

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are a threat to human health worldwide, and although detected at marine beaches, they have been largely unstudied at freshwater beaches. Genes indicating S. aureus (SA; femA) and methicillin resistance (mecA) were detected at 11 and 12 of 13 US Great Lakes beaches and in 18% or 27% of 287 recreational water samples, respectively. Eight beaches had mecA + femA (potential MRSA) detections. During an intensive study, higher bather numbers, staphylococci concentrations, and femA detections were found in samples collected after noon than before noon. Local population density, beach cloud cover, and beach wave height were significantly correlated with SA or MRSA detection frequency. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene, associated with community-acquired MRSA, was detected in 12 out of 27 potential MRSA samples. The femA gene was detected less frequently at beaches that met US enterococci criteria or EU enterococci ‘excellent’ recreational water quality, but was not related to Escherichia coli-defined criteria. Escherichia coli is often the only indicator used to determine water quality at US beaches, given the economic and healthcare burden that can be associated with infections caused by SA and MRSA, monitoring of recreational waters for non-fecal bacteria such as staphylococci and/or SA may be warranted.

  13. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Lacking PVL, as a Cause of Severe Invasive Infection Treated with Linezolid

    PubMed Central

    Gavino, Alexandra; Miragaia, Maria; Varandas, Luis; de Lencastre, Herminia; Brito, Maria Joao

    2013-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an emerging public health problem worldwide. Severe invasive infections have been described, mostly associated with the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). In Portugal limited information exists regarding CA-MRSA infections. In this study we describe the case of a previously healthy 12-year-old female, sport athlete, who presented to the hospital with acetabulofemoral septic arthritis, myositis, fasciitis, acetabulum osteomyelitis, and pneumonia. The MRSA isolated from blood and synovial fluid was PVL negative and staphylococcal enterotoxin type P (SEP) and type L (SEL) positive, with a vancomycin MIC of 1.0 mg/L and resistant to clindamycin and ciprofloxacin. The patient was submitted to multiple surgical drainages and started on vancomycin, rifampicin, and gentamycin. Due to persistence of fever and no microbiological clearance, linezolid was started with improvement. This is one of the few reported cases of severe invasive infection caused by CA-MRSA in Portugal, which was successfully treated with linezolid. In spite of the severity of infection, the MRSA isolate did not produce PVL. PMID:23509655

  14. International report Finland

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    The Valentin Shashin, the world's first dynamically positioned ice-class drillship for Arctic conditions, has been completed by Rauma-Repola Oy's Mantyluoto Works in Pori, Finland and delivered to V/O Sudoimport, the Soviet Union. This drillship is the first of three such vessels ordered by the Soviet Union in 1979 for oil exploration in Russia's Arctic waters. All three drillships will be capable of operating in water depths to 300 m and of drilling to 20,000 ft in winds of 23 m/sec, in significant wave heights to 4.7 m and currents to 1 m/sec. Since the vessels are to be used in hostile Arctic conditions, the design incorporates a great deal of sophisticated equipment for operating in heavy seas and avoiding hazards, such as icebergs, that may exist in the drilling area. Included is a quick disconnect system that will allow the ship to detach from the drilling mode in approximately three minutes.

  15. Typing of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Using DNA Fingerprints by Pulsed-field Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Rebic, Velma; Budimir, Ana; Aljicevic, Mufida; Bektas, Sabaheta; Vranic, Sabina Mahmutovic; Rebic, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is responsible for a wide spectrum of nosocomial and community associated infections worldwide. The aim of this study was to analyze MRSA strains from the general population in Canton Sarajevo, B&H. Methods: Our investigation including either phenotypic and genotypic markers such as antimicrobial resistance, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), SCC typing, and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) detection. Results: Antimicrobial susceptibility: all MRSA isolates were resistant to the β-lactam antibiotics tested, and all isolates were susceptible trimethoprim sulphamethoxazole, rifampicin, fusidic acid, linezolid and vancomycin. Sixty-eight per cent of the MRSA isolates were resistant to erythromycin, 5% to clindamycin, 5% to gentamicin and 4% to ciprofloxacin. After the PFGE analysis, the isolates were grouped into five similarity groups: A-E. The largest number of isolates belonged to one of two groups: C: 60 (60%) and D: 27 (27%). In both groups C and D, SCCmec type IV was predominant (60% and 88, 8%, respectively). A total of 24% of the isolates had positive expression of PVL genes, while 76% showed a statistically significantly greater negative expression of PVL genes. Conclusion: SCCmec type IV, together with the susceptibility profile and PFGE grouping, is considered to be typical of CA-MRSA PMID:27708486

  16. Assessment of body concepts and beliefs regarding reproductive physiology.

    PubMed

    Shedlin, M G

    1979-01-01

    Instruments for depicting the way rural women experience and perceive their bodies were administered in an anthropological study in Central Mexico. Body outlines were filled in or finished by the women and concepts of reproductive physiology were shown during the drawing process which showed various degrees of knowledge or accuracy. The organs most frequently drawn were the stomach, intestines, heart, liver, uterus, and lungs. Ribs were the only bones spontaneously included. The external structures most often drawn were breasts, vagina, and umbilicus. All structures were represented as circles of varying sizes except for the intestines, which were lines, and the heart, which was a valentine. Accurate placement of internal organs was unusual. When the names used for the bodily parts were elicited, the breast had 5 different terms. Multiple names were also given to the stomach, uterus, and vagina. The heart is believed to the origin of feeling and emotion and has religious as well as physical meaning. It was often thought that from 2-10 coital incidents were needed to become pregnant since it was believed that the blood of man must mix with the blood of the woman. In this type of survey it is important that the women can identify with the basic body outline; in pretesting certain figures were rejected.

  17. Tlazolteotl, the Aztec goddess of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Téllez-Zenteno, José Francisco

    2016-04-01

    Epilepsy has afflicted humanity during most of the extent of documented history. The Aztecs believed that illnesses were punishments that were sent from a furious goddess. In particular, epilepsy was considered in Aztec culture as a "sacred disease", and convulsions were traditionally associated with a deified woman who had died at childbirth. As the goddess Shiva and Apasmâra in ancient India and Saint Valentine in Germany, Tlazolteotl was considered able to bring about and send away epilepsy. We performed a comprehensive review to identify Tlazolteotl depictions and its historical context related with epilepsy. Tlazolteotl is one of the most endearing and complex goddesses of the Mesoamericans. She was the deity of the black fertile and fecund earth that gains its energy from death and in turn feeds life. Associated with purification, expiation, and regeneration, she embodied fertility and turned all garbage, physical and metaphysical, into rich life. This article reviews the most relevant artistic works related with Tlazolteotl. We also present a modern depiction of the Aztec goddess of epilepsy from the Mexican artist Eduardo Urbano Merino, displaying the supernatural view of epilepsy in America.

  18. The Physics of Cardiac Fibrillation: Strings that kill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2009-03-01

    Fibrillation is a state of spatio-temporal chaos in a 3d-biological excitable medium, namely the heart muscle. The building blocks are wave-emitting three-dimensional topological singularities in the electric excitation field of the tissue. These string like singularities send out a rotating wave fields with very fast frequencies (up to 10 times normal heart rate) and thus dominate over the pacemaker. The incoherent electrical excitation of the spatio-temporal chaotic dynamics leads to an unsynchronized contraction of the cardiac muscle and to the loss of the pumping action, and if untreated to death. Due to the topological nature of the spatio-temporal chaotic state it is very difficult to control. Current defibrillation technologies use strong electric field pulses (1 kV, 30 A, 12 ms) to reset the whole muscle. Here we report that natural muscle heterogeneities act as wave emitting sites when a weak electric field pulse is applied across the tissue. We report theoretical predictions on the physics and support the findings by results from experiment. This work was conducted in collaboration with Stefan Luther (MPIDS), Falvio Fenton ( Cornell), Amgad Squires (Cornell), Robert Gilmour (Cornell), Valentin Krinsky (MPIDS), Alain Pumir (NIce).

  19. Identification of virulence factors in 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer genotyped Staphylococcus aureus isolated from water buffaloes and small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Cremonesi, P; Zottola, T; Locatelli, C; Pollera, C; Castiglioni, B; Scaccabarozzi, L; Moroni, P

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human and animal pathogen, and is regarded as an important cause of intramammary infection (IMI) in ruminants. Staphylococcus aureus genetic variability and virulence factors have been well studied in veterinary medicine, especially in cows as support for control and management of IMI. The aim of the present study was to genotype 71 Staph. aureus isolates from the bulk tank and foremilk of water buffaloes (n=40) and from udder tissue (n=7) and foremilk (n=24) from small ruminants. The method used was previously applied to bovine Staph. aureus and is based on the amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region. The technique applied was able to identify different Staph. aureus genotypes isolated from dairy species other than the bovine species, and cluster the genotypes according to species and herds. Virulence gene distribution was consistent with genotype differentiation. The isolates were also characterized through determination of the presence of 19 virulence-associated genes by specific PCR. Enterotoxins A, C, D, G, I, J, and L were associated with Staph. aureus isolates from buffaloes, whereas enterotoxins C and L were linked to small ruminants. Genes coding for methicillin resistance, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, exfoliative toxins A and B, and enterotoxins B, E, and H were undetected. These findings indicate that RNA template-specific PCR is a valid technique for typing Staph. aureus from buffaloes and small ruminants and is a useful tool for understanding udder infection epidemiology.

  20. [About the origin, evolution and irradiation of Mexican cardiology].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The Mexican cardioangiology started in the nineteen century thanks to first endeavors of surgeons and physicians related to local academies and to School of Medicine, established in 1833 by Dr. Valentin Gómez Farías. Dr. Manuel Carpio, the future first head of department of physiology in this school, translated to Spanish language and published, in 1823, the article On pectoriloquo of the French physician Marat and later performed some experiments on the heart' motion. During the Secont Empire (1864-1867), the physician Samuel von Basch performed studies to define the arterial hypertension, called by him "latent atherosclerosis", i.e. the "essential hypertension". Once he had returned to his country, he invented in 1880, a sphygmomanometer of mercury column, that was the model for the instrument constructed by the Italian physician Scipione Riva-Rocci and presented in 1896. In our time, Dr. Demetrio Sodi Pallares systematized a metabolic therapy called "polarizing therapy", i.e. capable of repolarizing the heart's cells partly depolarized due to hypoxia or direct aggressions. These were the first steps in Mexico on the way to a promising medicine starting and the great adventure of Mexican cardiology. PMID:25260577

  1. Foucault on methadone: beyond biopower.

    PubMed

    Keane, Helen

    2009-09-01

    This essay reviews four texts which critically analyse methadone maintenance therapy using Foucault as a key theoretical framework: [Friedman, J., & Alicea, M. (2001). Surviving heroin: Interviews with women in methadone clinics. Florida: University Press of Florida], [Bourgois, P. (2000). Disciplining addictions: The bio-politics of methadone and heroin in the United States. Culture Medicine and Psychiatry, 24, 165-195], [Bull, M. (2008). Governing the heroin trade: From treaties to treatment. Ashgate: Aldershot], and [Fraser, S., & valentine, k. (2008). Substance & substitution: Methadone subjects in liberal societies. New York: Palgrave Macmillan]. Taken together these works demonstrate one trajectory in the development of critical drug studies over the past decade. While all four view MMT as a regulatory technology which aims to create productive and obedient subjects, their understandings of the power relations of the clinic are quite distinct. The first two texts emphasise the social control of drug users, the third, issues of governmentality and liberal political practice, while the fourth engages with ontological questions about substances themselves. Thus while Foucauldian analysis has become familiar in social studies of drugs and alcohol, new uses for its conceptual tools continue to emerge.

  2. Virulence factors produced by strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Baba-Moussa, L; Anani, L; Scheftel, J M; Couturier, M; Riegel, P; Haïkou, N; Hounsou, F; Monteil, H; Sanni, A; Prévost, G

    2008-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections are widely prevalent in West Africa and are often associated with urinary tract infections (UTIs). Virulence factors from S. aureus have rarely been described for such infections. The purpose of the current study was to determine the prevalence of toxins and adhesion factors obtained from S. aureus isolated from presumed primary UTIs at the Cotonou University Hospital (CUH) in Benin as compared with the Strasbourg University Hospital (SUH) in France. Both ambulatory and hospitalised patients were included in the study. Sixty-five independent strains of S. aureus from CUH and 35 strains from SUH were obtained over a four-month period. Virulence factors were characterised by immunodetection or multiplex polymerase chain reaction, and meticillin susceptibility was recorded. Approximately 50% of all isolates produced at least one enterotoxin. No isolate from SUH produced Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL), whereas 21.5% of the S. aureus isolates from CUH produced PVL (P<0.01). Six of 14 (43%) PVL-positive isolates were meticillin-resistant. At SUH, the incidence of MRSA (57%) was significantly higher (P<0.01) than at CUH (14%). Genes encoding clumping factor B, and elastin and laminin binding proteins were detected in almost all isolates (80%), irrespective of the geographical origin. The results for elastin binding protein differed significantly from published data regarding isolates from other clinical origins. Staphylococcal toxins and adhesion factors may be important in the physiopathology of UTI.

  3. Variability of antibiotic susceptibility and toxin production of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from skin, soft tissue, and bone related infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic commensal bacterium that mostly colonizes the skin and soft tissues. The pathogenicity of S. aureus is due to both its ability to resist antibiotics, and the production of toxins. Here, we characterize a group of genes responsible for toxin production and antibiotic resistance of S. aureus strains isolated from skin, soft tissue, and bone related infections. Results A total of 136 S. aureus strains were collected from five different types of infection: furuncles, pyomyositis, abscesses, Buruli ulcers, and osteomyelitis, from hospital admissions and out-patients in Benin. All strains were resistant to benzyl penicillin, while 25% were resistant to methicillin, and all showed sensitivity to vancomycin. Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) was the most commonly produced virulence factor (70%), followed by staphylococcal enterotoxin B (44%). Exfoliative toxin B was produced by 1.3% of the strains, and was only found in isolates from Buruli ulcers. The tsst-1, sec, and seh genes were rarely detected (≤1%). Conclusions This study provides new insight into the prevalence of toxin and antibiotic resistance genes in S. aureus strains responsible for skin, soft tissue, and bone infections. Our results showed that PVL was strongly associated with pyomyositis and osteomyelitis, and that there is a high prevalence of PVL-MRSA skin infections in Benin. PMID:23924370

  4. Variable expressions of Staphylococcus aureus bicomponent leucotoxins semiquantified by competitive reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Bronner, S; Stoessel, P; Gravet, A; Monteil, H; Prévost, G

    2000-09-01

    A competitive reverse transcription-PCR method was developed for the semiquantitation of the expression of genes encoding bicomponent leucotoxins of Staphylococcus aureus, e.g., Panton-Valentine leucocidin (lukPV), gamma-hemolysin (hlgA and hlgCB), and LukE-LukD (lukED). The optimization procedure included RNA preparation; reverse transcription; the use of various amounts of enzymes, antisense primer, and RNA; and the final amplification chain reaction. Reproducible results were obtained, with sensitivity for detection of cDNA within the range of 1 mRNA/10(4) CFU to 10(2) mRNA/CFU, depending on the gene. Both specific mRNAs were more significantly expressed at the late-exponential phase of growth. Expression was about 100-fold higher in yeast extract-Casamino Acids-pyruvate medium than in heart infusion medium. Expression of the widely distributed gamma-hemolysin locus in the NTCC 8178 strain was around 10-fold diminished compared with that in the ATCC 49775 strain. Because of the lower level of hlgA expression, the corresponding protein, which is generally not abundant in culture supernatant, should be investigated for its contribution to the leucotoxin-associated virulence. The agr, sar, and agr sar mutant strains revealed a great dependence with regard to leucotoxin expression on the global regulatory system in S. aureus, except that expression of hlgA was not affected in the agr mutant.

  5. [About the origin, evolution and irradiation of Mexican cardiology].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The Mexican cardioangiology started in the nineteen century thanks to first endeavors of surgeons and physicians related to local academies and to School of Medicine, established in 1833 by Dr. Valentin Gómez Farías. Dr. Manuel Carpio, the future first head of department of physiology in this school, translated to Spanish language and published, in 1823, the article On pectoriloquo of the French physician Marat and later performed some experiments on the heart' motion. During the Secont Empire (1864-1867), the physician Samuel von Basch performed studies to define the arterial hypertension, called by him "latent atherosclerosis", i.e. the "essential hypertension". Once he had returned to his country, he invented in 1880, a sphygmomanometer of mercury column, that was the model for the instrument constructed by the Italian physician Scipione Riva-Rocci and presented in 1896. In our time, Dr. Demetrio Sodi Pallares systematized a metabolic therapy called "polarizing therapy", i.e. capable of repolarizing the heart's cells partly depolarized due to hypoxia or direct aggressions. These were the first steps in Mexico on the way to a promising medicine starting and the great adventure of Mexican cardiology.

  6. Fatal cases of Staphylococcus aureus pleural empyema in infants.

    PubMed

    Rougemont, Anne-Laure; Buteau, Chantal; Ovetchkine, Philippe; Bergeron, Cybèle; Fournet, Jean-Christophe; Bouron-Dal Soglio, Dorothée

    2009-01-01

    Community-associated infections and especially pleural empyema due to Staphylococcus aureus are increasing worldwide. The virulence of staphylococcal strains is notably determined by different toxin expressing-genes, such as the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene found in S. aureus isolates obtained from pediatric necrotizing pneumonia samples. We describe 2 similar cases of infants with severe respiratory distress and death after an upper respiratory tract infection, having occurred in the same urban area during the same winter time. Necropsies performed between November 2006 and March 2007 revealed bronchopneumonia and an important pleural empyema, justifying the review of clinical charts and laboratory exams. A methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) isolate carrying the PVL gene was identified in both cases. We have subsequently cared for an additional case in the same time interval with sudden death and similar pathological findings. No positive microbiological results were obtained, a negative finding possibly related to a 5-day antibiotics regimen. This report describes the pathological features of these cases and stresses the need to recognize PVL-positive S. aureus infections in young children. Finally, we believe that all lethal infections due to PVL-positive S. aureus, independently of the methicillin resistance profile, deserve a mandatory report to the provincial public health authorities. PMID:19192951

  7. A Big Year for Small Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Louis; Erickson, K.

    2013-10-01

    2013 is a watershed year for celestial events involving the solar system’s unsung heroes, small bodies. The Cosmic Valentine of Asteroid 2012 DA14 which passed within ~ 3.5 Earth radii of the Earth's surface (February 15, 2013), Comet C/2011 L4 PANSTARRS and the Thanksgiving 2013 pass of Comet ISON, which will pass less than 0.012 AU (1.8 million km) from the solar surface and could be visible during the day. All this in addition to Comet Lemmon and a host of meteor showers makes 2013 a landmark year to deliver the excitement of planetary science to the audiences worldwide. To deliver the excitement and wonder of our solar system’s small bodies to worldwide audiences, NASA’s JPL and GSFC education teams in partnership with NASA EDGE will reach out to the public through multiple venues including broadcast media, social media, science and math focused educational activities, observing challenges, interactive visualization tools like “Eyes on the Solar System” and more culminating in the Thanksgiving Day Comet ISON perihelion passage. This talk will highlight NASA’s focused education effort to engage the public in small bodies science and the role these objects play in our understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system.

  8. Cross-modality priming for people's adjectivized names: failure to support the adjectivization hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Akira

    2005-04-01

    This experiment tested a prediction derived from Hollis and Valentine's 2001 adjectivization hypothesis, that having an adjectival form is the key factor that makes certain classes of proper names, i.e., country names, exhibit a common name-like pattern of long-term priming. The hypothesis predicted that, when adjectivized historical celebrity names, e.g., William Shakespeare/Shakespearean, were compared with nonadjectivized historical celebrity names, e.g., Emile Zola, cross-modality long-term priming in a familiarity decision task would occur only for nonadjectivized name stimuli. 32 students of literature, history, or philosophy (21 women and 11 men; age range 18-41 years, M age = 22.4 yr.) were tested. Priming was measured by latency of response. Analysis showed that the mean RT to primed items was faster than the mean RT to unprimed items when the prime task was presented in both visual and auditory modalities both for the adjectivized and nonadjectivized names. Contrary to the hypothesis, cross-modality priming was observed regardless of the adjectivization of name stimuli. The findings of the present experiment did not support the adjectivization hypothesis. PMID:15941119

  9. Relative faces: encoding of family resemblance relative to gender means in face space.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Harry John; McOwan, Peter William; Johnston, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Neurophysiological (W. A. Freiwald, D. Y. Tsao, & M. S. Livingstone, 2009; D. A. Leopold, I. V. Bondar, & M. A. Giese, 2006) and psychophysical (D. A. Leopold, A. J. O'Toole, T. Vetter, & V. Blanz, 2001; G. Rhodes & L. Jeffery, 2006; R. Robbins, E. McKone, & M. Edwards, 2007) evidence suggests that faces are encoded as differences from a mean or prototypical face, consistent with the conceptual framework of a mean-centered face space (T. Valentine, 1991). However, it remains unclear how we encode facial similarity across classes such as gender, age, or race. We synthesized Caucasian male and female cross-gender "siblings" and "anti-siblings" by projecting vectors representing deviations of faces from one gender mean into another gender. Subjects perceived male and female pairings with similar vector deviations from their gender means as more similar, and those with opposite vector deviations as less similar, than randomly selected cross-gender pairings. Agreement in relative direction in a space describing how facial images differ from a mean can therefore provide a basis for perceived facial similarity. We further demonstrate that relative coding for male and female faces is based on the activation of a shared neural population by the transfer of an identity aftereffect between a face and its cross-gender sibling. These results imply whereas structural similarity may be reflected in the Euclidean distance between points in face space configural similarity may be coded by direction in face space.

  10. Short communication: Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from raw milk fresh cheese in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Fanny C; García-López, María-Luisa; Santos, Jesús A

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was the characterization of a collection of 8 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates, obtained from samples of fresh cheese (Doble Crema) produced from raw cow milk in small dairies in Colombia. All the isolates harbored the mecA and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes, presented with SCCmec type IV, and belonged to multilocus sequence type 8 and spa type 024. Seven isolates presented 3 closely related pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles. Three of them carried the staphylococcal enterotoxin B gene. The isolates were resistant to cefoxitin, oxacillin, penicillin, and ampicillin and susceptible to all non-β-lactams antibiotics tested, with minimum inhibitory concentration values for oxacillin of 4 to 8mg/L. The isolates belonged to the community-acquired MRSA group, suggesting a human source of contamination. The risk of human infection by MRSA via contaminated foods is considered low, but contaminated food commodities can contribute to the worldwide dissemination of clones of community-acquired MRSA. PMID:27423957

  11. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Buffalo, Bovine, Ovine, and Caprine Milk Samples Collected in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil▿

    PubMed Central

    Aires-de-Sousa, Marta; Parente, Carlos E. S. R.; Vieira-da-Motta, Olney; Bonna, Isabel C. F.; Silva, Denise A.; de Lencastre, Hermínia

    2007-01-01

    Eighty-four staphylococcal isolates were obtained from milk samples from cows, sheep, goats, and buffalo with subclinical mastitis and from colonization samples from ostriches. The animals were hosted in 18 small dairy herds and an ostrich breeding located in 10 municipalities of the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Thirty isolates were identified as Staphylococcus aureus by biochemical and molecular techniques and were comparatively characterized by phenotypic and genotypic methods. The molecular characterization by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) revealed five clonal types (PFGE A, spa type t359, sequence type 747 [ST747]; PFGE B, spa type t1180, ST750; PFGE C, spa type t605, ST126; PFGE D, spa type t127, ST751; and PFGE F, spa type t002, ST5). None of the isolates harbored the Panton-Valentine leukocidin or exfoliative toxin D gene. The detection of major clone A (in 63% of the isolates) in different herds, among all animal species studied, and in infection and colonization samples evidenced its geographical spread among Rio de Janeiro State and no host preference among the animal species. Comparison with S. aureus from a human origin suggested that all but one clone found in the present study might be animal specific. PMID:17449696

  12. Comparative phenotypic and genotypic discrimination of methicillin resistant and susceptible Staphylococcus aureus in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Hamid, Marwa I; Bendary, M M

    2015-09-26

    The present study was designed to elucidate the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of S. aureus isolates in Egypt. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern of 133 identified S. aureus isolates revealed that over 70% of the isolates were multi-drug resistant (MDR). Fifty MDR isolates were characterized using antibiotyping and different molecular typing methods. Amplification of mecA gene confirmed 30 strains as methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and 20 as methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA). Generally, 22 MRSA (73.33%) and ten MSSA (50%) harbored Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl) gene with no statistically significant difference (p=0.093). Staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mec typing revealed that 48% of the typeable MRSA isolates possessed SCCmec type IV. SCCmec and antimicrobial susceptibility typing signified the presence of community-acquired (CA)-MRSA in Egypt. Surprisingly, all isolates of SCCmec types I, II and III and 50% of both MRSA isolates of SCCmec types IV and V possessed pvl gene. It was clear that staphylococcal protein A (spa) and coagulase (coa) typing discriminated the isolates into eight different groups, whilst polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of coagulase gene yielded ten distinct RFLP banding patterns. This study presented the first baseline information on the characterization of MRSA and MSSA in Egypt.

  13. Human Staphylococcus aureus lineages among Zoological Park residents in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Drougka, E.; Foka, A.; Posantzis, D.; Giormezis, N.; Anastassiou, E.D.; Petinaki, E.; Spiliopoulou, I.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a part of the microbiota flora in many animal species. The clonal spread of S. aureus among animals and personnel in a Zoological Park was investigated. Samples were collected from colonized and infected sites among 32 mammals, 11 birds and eight humans. The genes mecA, mecC, lukF/lukS-PV (encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin, PVL) and tst (toxic shock syndrome toxin-1) were investigated by PCR. Clones were defined by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST), spa type and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Seven S. aureus isolates were recovered from four animals and one from an employee. All were mecA, mecC and tst–negative, whereas, one carried the PVL genes and was isolated from an infected Squirrel monkey. Clonal analysis revealed the occurrence of seven STs, eight PFGE and five spa types including ones of human origin. Even though a variety of genotypes were identified among S. aureus strains colonizing zoo park residents, our results indicate that colonization with human lineages has indeed occurred. PMID:26623381

  14. Evolution and pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus: lessons learned from genotyping and comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ye; Chen, Chih-Jung; Su, Lin-Hui; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2008-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen and the major causative agent of numerous hospital- and community-acquired infections. Multilocus sequence typing reveals a highly clonal structure for S. aureus. Although infrequently occurring across clonal complexes, homologous recombination still contributed to the evolution of this species over the long term. agr-mediated bacterial interference has divided S. aureus into four groups, which are independent of clonality and provide another view on S. aureus evolution. Genome sequencing of nine S. aureus strains has helped identify a number of virulence factors, but the key determinants for infection are still unknown. Comparison of commensal and pathogenic strains shows no difference in diversity or clonal assignments. Thus, phage dynamics and global transcriptome shifts are considered to be responsible for the pathogenicity. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (C-MRSA) is characterized by a short SCCmec and the presence of a Panton-Valentine leukocidin locus, but no studies have proven their exact biologic roles in C-MRSA infection, indicating the existence of other mechanisms for the genesis of C-MRSA. PMID:17983441

  15. Targeting Multidrug-resistant Staphylococci with an anti-rpoA Peptide Nucleic Acid Conjugated to the HIV-1 TAT Cell Penetrating Peptide.

    PubMed

    Abushahba, Mostafa Fn; Mohammad, Haroon; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections present a serious challenge to healthcare practitioners due to the emergence of resistance to numerous conventional antibiotics. Due to their unique mode of action, peptide nucleic acids are novel alternatives to traditional antibiotics to tackle the issue of bacterial multidrug resistance. In this study, we designed a peptide nucleic acid covalently conjugated to the HIV-TAT cell penetrating peptide (GRKKKRRQRRRYK) in order to target the RNA polymerase α subunit gene (rpoA) required for bacterial genes transcription. We explored the antimicrobial activity of the anti-rpoA construct (peptide nucleic acid-TAT) against methicillin-resistant S. aureus, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus, vancomycin-resistant S. aureus, linezolid-resistant S. aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis in pure culture, infected mammalian cell culture, and in an in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. The anti-rpoA construct led to a concentration-dependent inhibition of bacterial growth (at micromolar concentrations) in vitro and in both infected cell culture and in vivo in C. elegans. Moreover, rpoA gene silencing resulted in suppression of its message as well as reduced expression of two important methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin). This study confirms that rpoA gene is a potential target for development of novel antisense therapeutics to treat infections caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:27434684

  16. Mass Spectrometry and Multiplex Antigen Assays to Assess Microbial Quality and Toxin Production of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Clinical and Food Samples

    PubMed Central

    Attien, Paul; Sina, Haziz; Moussaoui, Wardi; Zimmermann-Meisse, Gaëlle; Dadié, Thomas; Keller, Daniel; Riegel, Philippe; Edoh, Vincent; Kotchoni, Simeon O.; Djè, Marcellin; Prévost, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the microbial quality of meat products and on some clinical samples in Abidjan focused on Staphylococcus genus and the toxin production profile of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) isolated. Bacteria were collected from 240 samples of three meat products sold in Abidjan and 180 samples issued from clinical infections. The strains were identified by both microbiological and MALDI-TOF-MS methods. The susceptibility to antibiotics was determined by the disc diffusion method. The production of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin, LukE/D, and epidermolysins was screened using radial gel immunodiffusion. The production of staphylococcal enterotoxins and TSST-1 was screened by a Bio-Plex Assay. We observed that 96/240 of meat samples and 32/180 of clinical samples were contaminated by Staphylococcus. Eleven species were isolated from meats and 4 from clinical samples. Forty-two S. aureus strains were isolated from ours samples. Variability of resistance was observed for most of the tested antibiotics but none of the strains displays a resistance to imipenem and quinolones. We observed that 89% of clinical S. aureus were resistant to methicillin against 58% for those issued from meat products. All S. aureus isolates issued from meat products produce epidermolysins whereas none of the clinical strains produced these toxins. The enterotoxins were variably produced by both clinical and meat product samples. PMID:24987686

  17. Human Monocyte-Derived Osteoclasts Are Targeted by Staphylococcal Pore-Forming Toxins and Superantigens.

    PubMed

    Flammier, Sacha; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Badiou, Cédric; Henry, Thomas; Vandenesch, François; Laurent, Frédéric; Trouillet-Assant, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of bone and joint infections (BJIs). Staphylococcal pathogenesis involves numerous virulence factors including secreted toxins such as pore-forming toxins (PFTs) and superantigens. The role of these toxins on BJI outcome is largely unknown. In particular, few studies have examined how osteoclasts, the bone-resorbing cells, respond to exposure to staphylococcal PFTs and superantigens. We investigated the direct impact of recombinant staphylococcal toxins on human primary mature monocyte-derived osteoclasts, in terms of cytotoxicity and cell activation with cell death and bone resorption assays, using macrophages of the corresponding donors as a reference. Monocyte-derived osteoclasts displayed similar toxin susceptibility profiles compared to macrophages. Specifically, we demonstrated that the Panton-Valentine leukocidin, known as one of the most powerful PFT which lyses myeloid cells after binding to the C5a receptor, was able to induce the death of osteoclasts. The archetypal superantigen TSST-1 was not cytotoxic but enhanced the bone resorption activity of osteoclasts, suggesting a novel mechanism by which superantigen-producing S. aureus can accelerate the destruction of bone tissue during BJI. Altogether, our data indicate that the diverse clinical presentations of BJIs could be related, at least partly, to the toxin profiles of S. aureus isolates involved in these severe infections. PMID:26934588

  18. Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from food and wild animal carcasses in Italy.

    PubMed

    Traversa, A; Gariano, G R; Gallina, S; Bianchi, D M; Orusa, R; Domenis, L; Cavallerio, P; Fossati, L; Serra, R; Decastelli, L

    2015-12-01

    Following the detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST398 in food-producing animals, both livestock and wildlife, and derived products, are considered potential sources of MRSA in humans. There is a paucity of data on MRSA in foods in Italy, and the data regarding wild animals are particularly scarce. A total of 2162 food samples collected during official monitoring activities in 2008 were analyzed for the detection of S. aureus. Also, samples from 1365 wild animals collected by the National Reference Center for Wild Animal Diseases in 2003-2009 were subjected to anatomopathological examination. S. aureus isolates were processed for phenotypic and molecular methicillin resistance determinations. S. aureus was found in 2.0% of wild animal carcasses and in 3.2% of wild boar lymph nodes: none showed methicillin resistance. The prevalence of S. aureus in food was 17.1%. Two MRSA strains, both from bulk tank milk (prevalence 0.77%) were isolated: the strains were resistant to tetracycline, had spa-type t899, and were negative for the Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene. The low prevalence of MRSA suggests that the risk of transmission to humans via food is limited. However, attention should be paid to the cattle food chain, which may be a potential route of transmission of LA-MRSA. PMID:26338130

  19. Human Staphylococcus aureus lineages among Zoological Park residents in Greece.

    PubMed

    Drougka, E; Foka, A; Posantzis, D; Giormezis, N; Anastassiou, E D; Petinaki, E; Spiliopoulou, I

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a part of the microbiota flora in many animal species. The clonal spread of S. aureus among animals and personnel in a Zoological Park was investigated. Samples were collected from colonized and infected sites among 32 mammals, 11 birds and eight humans. The genes mecA, mecC, lukF/lukS-PV (encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin, PVL) and tst (toxic shock syndrome toxin-1) were investigated by PCR. Clones were defined by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST), spa type and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Seven S. aureus isolates were recovered from four animals and one from an employee. All were mecA, mecC and tst-negative, whereas, one carried the PVL genes and was isolated from an infected Squirrel monkey. Clonal analysis revealed the occurrence of seven STs, eight PFGE and five spa types including ones of human origin. Even though a variety of genotypes were identified among S. aureus strains colonizing zoo park residents, our results indicate that colonization with human lineages has indeed occurred. PMID:26623381

  20. Sequencing of leucocidin R from Staphylococcus aureus P83 suggests that staphylococcal leucocidins and gamma-hemolysin are members of a single, two-component family of toxins.

    PubMed

    Supersac, G; Prevost, G; Piemont, Y

    1993-02-01

    A 2,813-bp HincII-ClaI DNA fragment encodes the two S and F components (LukS-R and LukF-R) of leucocidin R (Luk-R) which are secreted by Staphylococcus aureus P83. The two genes (lukS-R and lukF-R) belong to a single operon. Two peptidic sequences were deduced: LukS-R is a 35,721-Da polypeptide of 315 amino acids, including a signal sequence of 29 residues, and LukF-R is a 36,838-Da polypeptide of 325 amino acids, including a signal sequence of 25 residues. LukS-R and LukF-R were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified from the periplasmic space. Luk-R exerts biological activities on polymorphonuclear cells and on erythrocytes from various animals. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of LukF-R with that of the B component of gamma-hemolysin (HlgB), those of the F and S components of another recently sequenced staphylococcal leucocidin, and those of a few peptides of the F component from Panton-Valentine leucocidin suggests that all four toxins belong to a single, two-component family of toxins.

  1. Short communication: Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from raw milk fresh cheese in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Fanny C; García-López, María-Luisa; Santos, Jesús A

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was the characterization of a collection of 8 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates, obtained from samples of fresh cheese (Doble Crema) produced from raw cow milk in small dairies in Colombia. All the isolates harbored the mecA and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes, presented with SCCmec type IV, and belonged to multilocus sequence type 8 and spa type 024. Seven isolates presented 3 closely related pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles. Three of them carried the staphylococcal enterotoxin B gene. The isolates were resistant to cefoxitin, oxacillin, penicillin, and ampicillin and susceptible to all non-β-lactams antibiotics tested, with minimum inhibitory concentration values for oxacillin of 4 to 8mg/L. The isolates belonged to the community-acquired MRSA group, suggesting a human source of contamination. The risk of human infection by MRSA via contaminated foods is considered low, but contaminated food commodities can contribute to the worldwide dissemination of clones of community-acquired MRSA.

  2. Characteristics of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) Strains Isolated from Skin and Soft-Tissue Infections in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, Lorena; Machado, Virginia; Mollerach, Marta; Mota, María Inés; Tuchscherr, Lorena P. N.; Gadea, Pilar; Gardella, Noella; Sordelli, Daniel O.; Vola, Magdalena; Schelotto, Felipe; Varela, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed 90 nonduplicates community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strains isolated from skin and soft-tissue infections. All strains were mecA positive. Twenty-four of the 90 strains showed inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance. All strains produced α-toxin; 96% and 100% of them displayed positive results for lukS-F and cna genes, respectively. Eigthy-five strains expressed capsular polysaccharide serotype 8. Six different pulsotypes were discriminated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and three predominant groups of CA-MRSA strains (1, 2, and 4) were identified, in agreement with phenotypic and genotypic characteristics. Strains of group 1 (pulsotype A, CP8+, and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)+) were the most frequently recovered and exhibited a PFGE band pattern identical to other CA-MRSA strains previously isolated in Uruguay and Brazil. Three years after the first local CA-MRSA report, these strains are still producing skin and soft-tissue infections demonstrating the stability over time of this community-associated emerging pathogen. PMID:20016669

  3. Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from food and wild animal carcasses in Italy.

    PubMed

    Traversa, A; Gariano, G R; Gallina, S; Bianchi, D M; Orusa, R; Domenis, L; Cavallerio, P; Fossati, L; Serra, R; Decastelli, L

    2015-12-01

    Following the detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST398 in food-producing animals, both livestock and wildlife, and derived products, are considered potential sources of MRSA in humans. There is a paucity of data on MRSA in foods in Italy, and the data regarding wild animals are particularly scarce. A total of 2162 food samples collected during official monitoring activities in 2008 were analyzed for the detection of S. aureus. Also, samples from 1365 wild animals collected by the National Reference Center for Wild Animal Diseases in 2003-2009 were subjected to anatomopathological examination. S. aureus isolates were processed for phenotypic and molecular methicillin resistance determinations. S. aureus was found in 2.0% of wild animal carcasses and in 3.2% of wild boar lymph nodes: none showed methicillin resistance. The prevalence of S. aureus in food was 17.1%. Two MRSA strains, both from bulk tank milk (prevalence 0.77%) were isolated: the strains were resistant to tetracycline, had spa-type t899, and were negative for the Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene. The low prevalence of MRSA suggests that the risk of transmission to humans via food is limited. However, attention should be paid to the cattle food chain, which may be a potential route of transmission of LA-MRSA.

  4. Molecular Typing of MRSA and of Clinical Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Iaşi, Romania

    PubMed Central

    Monecke, Stefan; Müller, Elke; Dorneanu, Olivia Simona; Vremeră, Teodora; Ehricht, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Romania is one of the countries with the highest prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the world. To obtain data on affiliation of MRSA to strains and clonal complexes and on the population of methicillin susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), clinical isolates from bloodstream infections, skin and soft tissue infections as well as from screening swabs were collected at hospitals in Ia?i, a city in the North-Eastern part of Romania. Isolates were characterised by microarray hybridisation. Nearly half of all isolates (47%), and about one third (34%) of bloodstream isolates were MRSA. The prevalence of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) was also high (31% among MRSA, 14% among MSSA). The most common MRSA strain was a PVL-negative CC1-MRSA-IV that might have emerged locally, as a related MSSA was also common. PVL-positive CC8-MRSA-IV (“USA300”) and PVL-negative ST239-like MRSA-III were also frequently found while other MRSA strains were only sporadically detected. Among MSSA, PVL-positive CC121 as well as PVL-negative CC1, CC22 and CC45 predominated. Although this study provides only a snapshot of S. aureus/MRSA epidemiology in Romania, it confirms the high burden of MRSA and PVL on Romanian healthcare settings. PMID:24846009

  5. Interactions of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in polymicrobial wound infection.

    PubMed

    Pastar, Irena; Nusbaum, Aron G; Gil, Joel; Patel, Shailee B; Chen, Juan; Valdes, Jose; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Plano, Lisa R; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Davis, Stephen C

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the pathology resulting from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa polymicrobial wound infections is of great importance due to their ubiquitous nature, increasing prevalence, growing resistance to antimicrobial agents, and ability to delay healing. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 is the leading cause of community-associated bacterial infections resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. We utilized a well-established porcine partial thickness wound healing model to study the synergistic effects of USA300 and P. aeruginosa on wound healing. Wound re-epithelialization was significantly delayed by mixed-species biofilms through suppression of keratinocyte growth factor 1. Pseudomonas showed an inhibitory effect on USA300 growth in vitro while both species co-existed in cutaneous wounds in vivo. Polymicrobial wound infection in the presence of P. aeruginosa resulted in induced expression of USA300 virulence factors Panton-Valentine leukocidin and α-hemolysin. These results provide evidence for the interaction of bacterial species within mixed-species biofilms in vivo and for the first time, the contribution of virulence factors to the severity of polymicrobial wound infections.

  6. Selenium levels and Glutathione peroxidase activity in the plasma of patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    González de Vega, Raquel; Fernández-Sánchez, María Luisa; Fernández, Juan Carlos; Álvarez Menéndez, Francisco Vicente; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2016-09-01

    Selenium, an essential trace element, is involved in the complex system of defense against oxidative stress through selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidases (GPx) and other selenoproteins. Because of its antioxidant properties, selenium or its selenospecies at appropriate levels could hinder oxidative stress and so development of diabetes. In this vein, quantitative speciation of selenium in human plasma samples from healthy and diabetic patients (controlled and non-controlled) was carried out by affinity chromatography (AF) coupled on-line to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and isotope dilution analysis (IDA). Similarly, it is well known that patients with diabetes who exhibit poor control of blood glucose show a decreased total antioxidant activity. Thus, we evaluated the enzymatic activity of GPx in diabetic and healthy individuals, using the Paglia and Valentine enzymatic method, observing a significant difference (p<0.05) between the three groups of assayed patients (healthy (n=24): 0.61±0.11U/ml, controlled diabetic (n=38): 0.40±0.12U/ml and non-controlled diabetic patients (n=40): 0.32±0.09U/ml). Our results show that hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic patients compared with healthy controls. What is more, glycation of GPx experiments demonstrated that it is the degree of glycation of the selenoenzyme (another species of the Se protein) what actually modulates its eventual activity against ROS in type II diabetes mellitus patients. PMID:27473831

  7. Use of a multiplex molecular beacon platform for rapid detection of methicillin and vancomycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sinsimer, Daniel; Leekha, Surbhi; Park, Steven; Marras, Salvatore A E; Koreen, Larry; Willey, Barbara; Naidich, Steve; Musser, Kimberlee A; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2005-09-01

    Drug resistance, particularly vancomycin and methicillin resistance, in Staphylococcus aureus continues to emerge as a significant public health threat in both the hospital and community settings. In addition to the limited treatment options, S. aureus strains acquire and express numerous virulence factors that continue to increase its ability to cause a wide spectrum of human disease. As a result, empirical treatment decisions are confounded and there is a heightened need for a diagnostic test (or assay) to rapidly identify antibiotic resistance and specific virulence determinants and indicate the appropriate treatment. To that end we developed a platform using multiplex molecular beacon probes with real-time PCR for the rapid detection of drug resistance-determining genes and virulence factors in S. aureus. In this study, we demonstrate the specificity and sensitivity of our platform for detection of the genes conferring methicillin (mecA) and vancomycin (vanA) resistance as well as a gene encoding the virulence factor Panton-Valentine leucocidin (lukF) in S. aureus isolates.

  8. High-resolution melting analysis of the spa locus reveals significant diversity within sequence type 93 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Tong, S Y C; Lilliebridge, R A; Holt, D C; McDonald, M I; Currie, B J; Giffard, P M

    2009-12-01

    High-resolution melting analysis is an inherently robust, easy and inexpensive approach to the examination of genomic regions containing single-nucleotide polymorphisms and hypervariable loci. Staphylococcus aureus sequence type (ST) 93 is a singleton, Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive clone unique to Australia. A high-resolution melting-based method for the identification of ST93 was developed, and a similar approach was used to reveal diversity within the spa locus of this lineage. Statistical and graphical methods that account for instrumental and operator-dependent variation in high-resolution melting curves were developed, to allow greater confidence and reproducibility in deciding whether another curve is truly different from the baseline curve of an amplicon with known sequence. The data support a very early acquisition, or multiple independent acquisitions, of SCCmec by ST93 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), and the coexistence of MSSA and methicillin-resistant S. aureus versions of the same lineage within northern Australia.

  9. Molecular Types of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Sensitive S. aureus Strains Causing Skin and Soft Tissue Infections and Nasal Colonization, Identified in Community Health Centers in New York City.

    PubMed

    Pardos de la Gandara, Maria; Raygoza Garay, Juan Antonio; Mwangi, Michael; Tobin, Jonathan N; Tsang, Amanda; Khalida, Chamanara; D'Orazio, Brianna; Kost, Rhonda G; Leinberger-Jabari, Andrea; Coffran, Cameron; Evering, Teresa H; Coller, Barry S; Balachandra, Shirish; Urban, Tracie; Parola, Claude; Salvato, Scott; Jenks, Nancy; Wu, Daren; Burgess, Rhonda; Chung, Marilyn; de Lencastre, Herminia; Tomasz, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    In November 2011, The Rockefeller University Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS), the Laboratory of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, and Clinical Directors Network (CDN) launched a research and learning collaborative project with six community health centers in the New York City metropolitan area to determine the nature (clonal type) of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus strains causing skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Between November 2011 and March 2013, wound and nasal samples from 129 patients with active SSTIs suspicious for S. aureus were collected and characterized by molecular typing techniques. In 63 of 129 patients, the skin wounds were infected by S. aureus: methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was recovered from 39 wounds and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) was recovered from 24. Most-46 of the 63-wound isolates belonged to the CC8/Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive (PVL(+)) group of S. aureus clone USA300: 34 of these strains were MRSA and 12 were MSSA. Of the 63 patients with S. aureus infections, 30 were also colonized by S. aureus in the nares: 16 of the colonizing isolates were MRSA, and 14 were MSSA, and the majority of the colonizing isolates belonged to the USA300 clonal group. In most cases (70%), the colonizing isolate belonged to the same clonal type as the strain involved with the infection. In three of the patients, the identity of invasive and colonizing MRSA isolates was further documented by whole-genome sequencing.

  10. Molecular Types of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Sensitive S. aureus Strains Causing Skin and Soft Tissue Infections and Nasal Colonization, Identified in Community Health Centers in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Pardos de la Gandara, Maria; Raygoza Garay, Juan Antonio; Mwangi, Michael; Tobin, Jonathan N.; Tsang, Amanda; Khalida, Chamanara; D'Orazio, Brianna; Kost, Rhonda G.; Leinberger-Jabari, Andrea; Coffran, Cameron; Evering, Teresa H.; Coller, Barry S.; Balachandra, Shirish; Urban, Tracie; Parola, Claude; Salvato, Scott; Jenks, Nancy; Wu, Daren; Burgess, Rhonda; Chung, Marilyn; de Lencastre, Herminia

    2015-01-01

    In November 2011, The Rockefeller University Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS), the Laboratory of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, and Clinical Directors Network (CDN) launched a research and learning collaborative project with six community health centers in the New York City metropolitan area to determine the nature (clonal type) of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus strains causing skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Between November 2011 and March 2013, wound and nasal samples from 129 patients with active SSTIs suspicious for S. aureus were collected and characterized by molecular typing techniques. In 63 of 129 patients, the skin wounds were infected by S. aureus: methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was recovered from 39 wounds and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) was recovered from 24. Most—46 of the 63–wound isolates belonged to the CC8/Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive (PVL+) group of S. aureus clone USA300: 34 of these strains were MRSA and 12 were MSSA. Of the 63 patients with S. aureus infections, 30 were also colonized by S. aureus in the nares: 16 of the colonizing isolates were MRSA, and 14 were MSSA, and the majority of the colonizing isolates belonged to the USA300 clonal group. In most cases (70%), the colonizing isolate belonged to the same clonal type as the strain involved with the infection. In three of the patients, the identity of invasive and colonizing MRSA isolates was further documented by whole-genome sequencing. PMID:26063853

  11. Recurrent Furunculosis Caused by a Community-Acquired Staphylococcus aureus Strain Belonging to the USA300 Clone

    PubMed Central

    Balachandra, Shirish; Pardos de la Gandara, Maria; Salvato, Scott; Urban, Tracie; Parola, Claude; Khalida, Chamanara; Kost, Rhonda G.; Evering, Teresa H.; Pastagia, Mina; D'Orazio, Brianna M.; Tomasz, Alexander; de Lencastre, Herminia

    2015-01-01

    Background: A 24-year-old female with recurrent skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) was enrolled as part of a multicenter observational cohort study conducted by a practice-based research network (PBRN) on community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). Methods: Strains were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, and multilocus sequence typing. MRSA strains were analyzed for SCCmec type and the presence of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) using PCR. Results: In the first episode, S. aureus was recovered from the wound and inguinal folds; in the second, S. aureus was recovered from a lower abdomen furuncle, inguinal folds, and patellar fold. Molecular typing identified CA-MRSA clone USA300 in all samples as spa-type t008, ST8, SCCmecIVa, and a typical PFGE pattern. The strain carried virulence genes pvl and ACME type I. Five SSTI episodes were documented despite successful resolution by antibiotic treatment, with and without incision and drainage. Conclusions: The source of the USA300 strain remains unknown. The isolate may represent a persistent strain capable of surviving extensive antibiotic pressure or a persistent environmental reservoir may be the source, possibly in the patient's household, from which bacteria were repeatedly introduced into the skin flora with subsequent infections. PMID:25668150

  12. Surface energy of zinc. [Effective cleavage surface energy

    SciTech Connect

    Bilello, J.C.; Dew-Hughes, D.; Pucino, A.T.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of temperature and associated dislocation microstructure on the energetics of basal plane cleavage in zinc crystals has been investigated using the method of Hull, Beardmore and Valentine (HBV). A marked temperature dependence was observed in the zinc surface energy, over the range 77 to 298/sup 0/K, contrary to previous expectations. Plastic relaxation was associated with crack initiation at 77/sup 0/K, but not propagation, while at room temperature a plastic zone of 1200-1500 ..mu..m in depth was produced by crack extension. The surface energy could be estimated, independent of the usual Griffith analysis, by measuring the energy dissipation in a fully relaxed deformed zone associated with an explosively formed precursor crack. This method yielded surface energies of 0.066 to 0.079 J-m/sup -2/ which was in good agreement with previous work. It is demonstrated that the cleavage surface energy of zinc is well below the thermodynamic surface energy and that this discrepancy is not related to plastic deformation. 7 figures, 1 table.

  13. Surface energy of zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Bilello, J.C.; Dew-Hughes, D.; Pucino, A.T.

    1983-04-01

    The influence of temperature and associated dislocation microstructure on the energetics of basal plane cleavage in zinc crystals has been investigated using the method of Hull, Beardmore, and Valentine (HBV). A marked temperature dependence was observed in the zinc surface energy, over the range 77--298 /sup 0/K, contrary to previous expectations. Plastic relaxation was associated with crack initiation at 77 /sup 0/K, but not propagation; while at room temperature a plastic zone of 1200--1500 ..mu..m in depth was produced by crack extension. The surface energy could be estimated, independent of the usual Griffith analysis, by measuring the energy dissipation in a fully relaxed deformed zone associated with an explosively formed precursor crack. This method yielded surface energies of 0.066 to 0.079 J m/sup -2/ which was in good agreement with previous work. It is demonstrated that the cleavage surface energy of zinc is well below the thermodynamic surface energy and that this discrepancy is not related to plastic deformation.

  14. Tlazolteotl, the Aztec goddess of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Téllez-Zenteno, José Francisco

    2016-04-01

    Epilepsy has afflicted humanity during most of the extent of documented history. The Aztecs believed that illnesses were punishments that were sent from a furious goddess. In particular, epilepsy was considered in Aztec culture as a "sacred disease", and convulsions were traditionally associated with a deified woman who had died at childbirth. As the goddess Shiva and Apasmâra in ancient India and Saint Valentine in Germany, Tlazolteotl was considered able to bring about and send away epilepsy. We performed a comprehensive review to identify Tlazolteotl depictions and its historical context related with epilepsy. Tlazolteotl is one of the most endearing and complex goddesses of the Mesoamericans. She was the deity of the black fertile and fecund earth that gains its energy from death and in turn feeds life. Associated with purification, expiation, and regeneration, she embodied fertility and turned all garbage, physical and metaphysical, into rich life. This article reviews the most relevant artistic works related with Tlazolteotl. We also present a modern depiction of the Aztec goddess of epilepsy from the Mexican artist Eduardo Urbano Merino, displaying the supernatural view of epilepsy in America. PMID:26921600

  15. The historical seismicity and prediction of ground motion in northeast Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván-Ramírez, Iván N.; Montalvo-Arrieta, Juan C.

    2008-02-01

    This work constitutes the first attempt to understand the seismic hazard in northeast Mexico. We present a compilation of regional seismicity in northeast Mexico (24-31°N, 97-106°W), finding 148 earthquakes for the 1787-2006 period. The study area lies within three morphotectonic provinces: Basin, Range, and Rio Grande rift; Sierra Madre Oriental; and Gulf coastal plain. Peak ground acceleration (PGA) maps were computed for three different scenarios: 1928 Parral, Chihuahua ( MW = 6.5); 1931 Valentine, Texas ( MW = 6.4); and a hypothetical earthquake located in central Coahuila. Ground motion values were computed using attenuation relations developed for central and eastern North America and the Basin and Range provinces. The earthquake in central Coahuila is considered a critical scenario for the main cities of northeast Mexico. The damage associated with this hypothetical earthquake could be severe because most buildings were constructed without seismic criteria. The expected PGA values in Monterrey, Saltillo, and Monclova are between 30 and 70 cm/s 2. This earthquake might also produce or trigger significant landslides and rock falls in the Sierra Madre Oriental, where several cities are located on the mountain range.

  16. [Revealing the structure of the nervous tissue III: From Jan Evangelista Purkyne (1787-1869) to Ludwig Mauthner (1840-1894)].

    PubMed

    Chvátal, A

    2015-01-01

    The works of Jan Evangelista Purkyne, Gabriel Valentin and Robert Remak showed that the nervous system contains not only nerve fibers, but also cellular elements. The use of microscopes and new fixation techniques have enabled the retrieval of accurate data on the structure of nervous tissue and in many European universities microscopes began to be widely used for histological and morphological studies. The present review summarizes the discoveries of the structure of predominantly vertebrate nerve tissue during the period from 1838 to 1865, made by prominent scholars who described the structure of fibers and cells of the nervous system and demonstrated that some nerve fibers are enwrapped by a sheath. In addition, the first attempts were made to make a cytoarchitectonic description of the spinal cord and brain. During the same time the concept of a neuroglial tissue was introduced, first as a tissue for "gluing" nerve fibers, cells and blood capillaries into one unit, but later some glial cells were described for the first time. Microscopic techniques started to be used for examination of physiological as well as pathological nerve tissues. The overall state of knowledge was just a step away from the emergence of the concept of neurons and glial cells. PMID:26852523

  17. Staphylococcus aureus formyl-methionyl transferase mutants demonstrate reduced virulence factor production and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Thomas; Huang, Jianzhong; Fan, Frank; Rogers, Shannon; Gentry, Daniel; Holland, Reannon; Demarsh, Peter; Aubart, Kelly; Zalacain, Magdalena

    2013-07-01

    Inhibitors of peptide deformylase (PDF) represent a new class of antibacterial agents with a novel mechanism of action. Mutations that inactivate formyl methionyl transferase (FMT), the enzyme that formylates initiator methionyl-tRNA, lead to an alternative initiation of protein synthesis that does not require deformylation and are the predominant cause of resistance to PDF inhibitors in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we report that loss-of-function mutations in FMT impart pleiotropic effects that include a reduced growth rate, a nonhemolytic phenotype, and a drastic reduction in production of multiple extracellular proteins, including key virulence factors, such as α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), that have been associated with S. aureus pathogenicity. Consequently, S. aureus FMT mutants are greatly attenuated in neutropenic and nonneutropenic murine pyelonephritis infection models and show very high survival rates compared with wild-type S. aureus. These newly discovered effects on extracellular virulence factor production demonstrate that FMT-null mutants have a more severe fitness cost than previously anticipated, leading to a substantial loss of pathogenicity and a restricted ability to produce an invasive infection.

  18. Molecular Characterization of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Skin and Pus Samples of Outpatients in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Okamura, Sakiko; Miura, Yuri; Koyama, Shinobu; Yanagisawa, Hideji; Matsumoto, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is now endemic in the United States. In Japan, CA-MRSA infections and CA-MRSA surveillance have been scarcely reported. In this study, we conducted a nationwide survey of CA-MRSA in Japan. We collected MRSA strains isolated from outpatients with skin and soft-tissue infection (SSTI) at 107 medical facilities from 24 prefectures in 2010 and 2012. Among 10,385 clinical samples from SSTI patients, 3,581 S. aureus isolates (35%) were obtained and 673 of the S. aureus strains (19%) were identified as MRSA. Among 625 MRSA strains tested in this study, 266 strains (43%) and 114 strains (18%) were classified as SCCmec types IV and V, respectively. Detection of virulence genes was as follows: Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene (57 strains, 9%), exfoliative toxin (ET) gene (179 strains, 29%), toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) gene (195 strains, 31%), or none. PVL-positive strains were classified into eight sequence types (STs) (i.e., ST1, ST5, ST8, ST22, ST30, ST452, ST59, and ST154) and six clonal complexes (i.e., CC1, CC5, CC8, CC22, CC30, and CC59). Only 10 PVL-positive strains (2%) were pulsed-field type USA300 clone. There were a wide variety of CA-MRSA clones in Japan, which were different from the situation in the United States.

  19. [Molecular epidemiological study of community-acquired methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) - an examination of commercially distributed meat as a possible vehicle for CA-MRSA].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Kikuyo; Narimatsu, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Masahiro; Higuchi, Wataru; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Taniguchi, Hatsumi

    2014-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has occupied an important position in public health as a cause of food poisoning and hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) infections. The spread of community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) infections has also recently become a concern. However, the sources of this infection remain unclear, and there are few reports of epidemiology information. In order to understand MRSA spread in the community, we investigated the distribution of MRSA strains in commercially distributed raw meat samples (n=305) and stool samples from outpatients with diarrhea (n=1,543) from the same meat distribution region in Oita Prefecture, Japan. 301 Staphylococcus aureus strains were isolated and 18 of them were MRSA (2 from chicken meat, 1 from duck meat, 1 from pork meat, and 14 from patients with diarrhea). All 18 MRSA strains were negative for Panton-Valentine leucocidin gene. In this study conducting a comparison of properties and a molecular epidemiological analysis of MRSA isolated from commercially distributed meat and diarrhea patient stools, the results suggest that commercially distributed meat could play a role in the prevalence of CA-MRSA in the community.

  20. Systemic CA-MRSA infection following trauma during soccer match in inner Brazil: clinical and molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Carlos Henrique; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza; Bonesso, Mariana Fávero; da Cunha, Fabiana Picoli; Barbosa, Alexandre Naime; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castelo Branco

    2013-07-01

    Even though community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) was described a decade ago, reports from Brazil are scarce and cases occurred in large urban centers. We report MRSA sepsis in a 16-year-old male from a small town and who had no history of exposure to healthcare or recent travel. After trauma during a soccer match, he presented swelling in the right thigh, which evolved in a month to cellulitis complicated by local abscess, orchitis and pneumonia. The patient presented severe sepsis, with fever and respiratory failure. Laboratory findings included blood leukocyte counts above 40,000/mm(3) and thrombocytopenia. He was submitted to mechanical ventilation and therapy with vancomycin and imipenem. He had a slow but favorable response to therapy and was discharged after six weeks of hospitalization. MRSA grew from blood cultures and respiratory aspirates obtained before antimicrobial therapy. The isolate belonged to sequence type 5, spa type t311, harbored SCCmec type IV and genes for Panton-Valentine leukocidin and Enterotoxin A. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern was distinct from North American classic CA-MRSA clones. However, the sequence type and the spa type revealed that the clone belong to the same clonal complex isolated in Argentina. This is the first CA-MRSA infection reported in that region, with significant epidemiologic and clinical implications.

  1. The first report in Brazil of severe infection caused by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA).

    PubMed

    Rozenbaum, R; Sampaio, M G; Batista, G S; Garibaldi, A M; Terra, G M F; Souza, M J; Vieira, E N; Silva-Carvalho, M C; Teixeira, L A; Figueiredo, A M S

    2009-08-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an emergent pathogen in Brazil. However, there are no data on the prevalence of CA-MRSA. We report here the first well-characterized case of severe life-threatening CA-MRSA infection in a child living in Rio de Janeiro city. The patient had many complications including hematogenous osteomyelitis and involvement of multiple sites requiring drainage of soft-tissue abscess, and pleural and pericardial empyema. The MRSA isolates recovered were genotyped using PFGE, SCCmec typing and multilocus sequence typing. Disk diffusion tests were performed following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. In addition, the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) was assessed by PCR amplification, using specific primers for lukF-pv (encoding for the F subunit of the PVL). The bacterial isolates were related to the ST30-SCCmecIV lineage (Oceania Southwest Pacific clone), a PVL producer CA-MRSA previously detected in Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. Also, the isolates analyzed were susceptible to all non-beta-lactam antibiotics tested. The present report demonstrates that disseminated CA-MRSA disease is also occurring in Rio de Janeiro. Thus, the empirical treatment of moderate or severe infections suspected of being associated with CA-MRSA needs to be reviewed in order to allow prompt initiation of an effective therapy that also covers these microorganisms.

  2. A Study of Sympathetic Flaring Using a Full-Sun Event Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, P. A.; Schrijver, C. J.; Title, A. M.; Bloomfield, D.; Gallagher, P.

    2013-12-01

    There has been a trove of papers published on the statistics of flare occurrence. These studies are trying to answer the question of whether or not subsequent solar flares are related. The majority of these works have not included both flare location information and the physical properties of the regions responsible for the eruptions, and none have taken advantage of full-Sun event coverage. Now that SDO/AIA is available and the STEREO spacecraft have progressed past 90 degrees from Earth's heliographic longitude, this new information is available to us. This work aims to quantify how common sympathetic events are, and how important they are in the forecasting of solar flares. A 3D plot of detected and clustered flare events for a full solar rotation, including the Valentine's Day Event of 2011. A full-Sun image in the EUV (304A) including both STEREO view points and AIA. The GOES X-ray light curves during the February period of 2011 are shown in the bottom panel. Detected flare events are indicated by the green dashed lines and the time stamp of this image is denoted by the red line.

  3. Molecular typing of MRSA and of clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Iaşi, Romania.

    PubMed

    Monecke, Stefan; Müller, Elke; Dorneanu, Olivia Simona; Vremeră, Teodora; Ehricht, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Romania is one of the countries with the highest prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the world. To obtain data on affiliation of MRSA to strains and clonal complexes and on the population of methicillin susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), clinical isolates from bloodstream infections, skin and soft tissue infections as well as from screening swabs were collected at hospitals in Ia?i, a city in the North-Eastern part of Romania. Isolates were characterised by microarray hybridisation. Nearly half of all isolates (47%), and about one third (34%) of bloodstream isolates were MRSA. The prevalence of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) was also high (31% among MRSA, 14% among MSSA). The most common MRSA strain was a PVL-negative CC1-MRSA-IV that might have emerged locally, as a related MSSA was also common. PVL-positive CC8-MRSA-IV ("USA300") and PVL-negative ST239-like MRSA-III were also frequently found while other MRSA strains were only sporadically detected. Among MSSA, PVL-positive CC121 as well as PVL-negative CC1, CC22 and CC45 predominated. Although this study provides only a snapshot of S. aureus/MRSA epidemiology in Romania, it confirms the high burden of MRSA and PVL on Romanian healthcare settings.

  4. Reminders Through Association.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Todd; Milkman, Katherine L

    2016-07-01

    People often fail to follow through on good intentions. While limited self-control is frequently the culprit, another cause is simply forgetting to enact intentions when opportunities arise. We introduce a novel, potent approach to facilitating follow-through: the reminders-through-association approach. This approach involves associating intentions (e.g., to mail a letter on your desk tomorrow) with distinctive cues that will capture attention when you have opportunities to act on those intentions (e.g., Valentine's Day flowers that arrived late yesterday, which are sitting on your desk). We showed that cue-based reminders are more potent when the cues they employ are distinctive relative to (a) other regularly encountered stimuli and (b) other stimuli encountered concurrently. Further, they can be more effective than written or electronic reminder messages, and they are undervalued and underused. The reminders-through-association approach, developed by integrating and expanding on past research on self-control, reminders, and prospective memory, can be a powerful tool for policymakers and individuals. PMID:27207873

  5. Robert Bentley Todd's contribution to cell theory and the neuron doctrine.

    PubMed

    Binder, Devin K; Rajneesh, Kiran F; Lee, Darrin J; Reynolds, Edward H

    2011-04-01

    Robert Bentley Todd, who is best remembered for "Todd's paralysis," made many more important contributions to neurology and neuroscience, including the concept of brain electricity and electrical discharges in epilepsy. He was also a pioneering microscopist and we here review his neurohistological studies and his contributions to the application of Schwann's (1839) cell theory to the nervous system and the later neuron doctrine, as described in his textbook The Descriptive and Physiological Anatomy of the Brain, Spinal Cord and Ganglions (Todd, 1845), his Cyclopaedia of Anatomy and Physiology (1847) and his joint textbook with William Bowman The Physiological Anatomy and Physiology of Man (1845). Writing in the mid-1840s, Todd acknowledged that the "vesicles" he observed corresponded to the earlier descriptions of "globules" or "kugeln" by Valentin and which Schwann first interpreted as cell bodies. Todd was among the first to recognize that nerve cell bodies were in continuity with axons ("axis cylinders"), sometimes associated with "the white substance of Schwann" ("tubular" fibers), or sometimes without ("gelatinous" fibers). He also described continuous nerve cell branching processes, later called dendrites. He was the first to recognize the insulating properties of Schwann's "white substance" (myelin) to facilitate conduction. Influenced by his contemporary, Faraday, Todd was also the first to develop the functional concept of dynamic polarization ("nervous polarity") to explain nerve cell conduction. PMID:21480036

  6. An analysis of Staphylococcus aureus infections at a military medical center using the PLEX-ID combined polymerase chain reaction-mass spectrometry system.

    PubMed

    Washington, Michael A; Agee, Willie A; Kajiura, Lauren; Staege, Catherine M; Uyehara, Catherine Ft; Barnhill, Jason C

    2014-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a major cause of morbidity in the military health care setting. Culture-based methods are the most common means of identifying infections caused by this agent. However, culture-based methods lack sensitivity and specificity. The Abbott PLEX-ID instrument uses a combination of the polymerase chain reaction and mass spectrometry for the identification of bacterial isolates. We investigated whether the Abbott PLEX-ID system could identify S. aureus in clinical material and facilitate the epidemiological analysis of individual isolates. The PLEX-ID system positively identified 100% of isolates previously found to be methicillin resistant S. aureus by culture. In addition, analysis using the PLEX-ID software revealed that the majority of S. aureus isolates at Tripler Army Medical Center derive from clonal complex 8 and nearly 100% of these strains express the R-variant of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin virulence factor. These results demonstrate the utility of the PLEX-ID system in identifying clinical isolates and reveal an unexpected level of homogeneity among clinical S. aureus isolates recovered at Tripler Army Medical Center. These results also demonstrate the utility of the PLEX-ID system in identifying the resistance patterns, predicting the virulence properties, and tracking the migration of bacterial pathogens in the clinical setting.

  7. Palaeoceanographic significance of sedimentary features at the Argentine continental margin revealed by multichannel seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruetzner, Jens; Uenzelmann-Neben, Gabriele; Franke, Dieter

    2010-05-01

    The thermohaline circulation in the Argentine Basin today is characterized by the interaction of northward flowing Antarctic water masses (Antarctic Intermediate Water, AAIW; Circumpolar Deep Water, CDW; Antarctic Bottom Water, AABW) and southward flowing North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). The transfer of heat and energy via both AABW and NADW constitutes an important component in maintaining the global conveyor belt. We aim at a better understanding of both paths and intensity of this current system in the past by investigating an extensive (> 11000 km) set of high quality seismic reflection profiles from the Argentine continental margin. The profiles show a significant contourite system containing both erosive and depositional features that formed through the evolution of water masses and their modifications (path, physical and chemical properties) due to plate tectonic events such as the opening of the Drake Passage or the extensive emplacement of volcanic flows at the Rio Grande Rise. Overall the depositional features indicate that along slope (contour current) transport dominates over down slope (turbiditic) processes at the southern Argentine margin south of 45° S. Further to the North down slope transport was more extensive as indicated by the presence of submarine canyons crossing the slope down to a depth of ~3500 m. Here we present preliminary results from the southern part of the continental margin (42°-50° S) where we focus on a set of ~50 km wide terraces on the slope and rise separated by contouritic channels. The terraces developed over time in alternating constructional (depositional) and erosive phases. An initial age frame was developed by mapping regional reflectors and seismic units known from previous studies. The sedimentary layer between regional reflectors AR 4 and AR 5 spanning roughly the time interval from the Eocene/Oligocene boundary to the early middle Miocene is thin (0.1 - 0.4 s TWT) below the Valentine Feilberg Terrace but

  8. Wind Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

    2008-01-18

    Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

  9. The varying effects of age of acquisition.

    PubMed

    Catling, Jonathan C; Johnston, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    There are a number of theories that suggest that age of acquisition (AoA) effects are not uniform across different tasks. Catling and Johnston (2006a) found greater AoA effects within an object-naming task than in a semantic classification task. They explained these findings by suggesting that AoA effects might accumulate according to how many levels of representation a task necessitates access to. Brysbaert and Ghyselinck (2006) explain the difference in AoA effects by proposing two distinct types of AoA (frequency dependent and frequency independent), the first accounted for by a connectionist-type mechanism and the latter situated at the interface between semantics and word production. Moreover, Moore, Smith-Spark, and Valentine (2004) and Holmes and Ellis (2006) have suggested that there are two loci of AoA effects: at the phonological level and somewhere within the perceptual level of representation. Again, this could account for the varying degrees of AoA effects. This study sets about testing these ideas by assessing the effect size of AoA across a series of different tasks that necessitate access to various levels of representation. Experiments 1-4 demonstrate significant effects of AoA in a novel picture-picture verification task, an object classification task, a picture verification task, and an object-naming task. Experiment 5 showed no effects of initial phoneme on the naming of the critical objects used within Experiments 1-4. The implication of the varying AoA effect sizes found within Experiments 1-4 in relation to explanations of AoA are discussed.

  10. High prevalence of toxic shock syndrome toxin-producing epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus 15 (EMRSA-15) strains in Kuwait hospitals.

    PubMed

    Udo, E E; Boswihi, S S; Al-Sweih, N

    2016-07-01

    This study characterized EMRSA-15 isolates obtained from patients in Kuwait hospitals for their genotypic relatedness, antibiotic resistance and carriage of virulence genes using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), coagulase serotyping, SCCmec subtyping, spa typing, multilocus sequence typing and DNA microarray. The isolates were resistant to trimethoprim (75.6%), ciprofloxacin (29.7%), erythromycin and clindamycin (24.3%), tetracycline (19.0%), and gentamicin and kanamycin (21.6%). All 37 isolates belonged to sequence type (ST) 22, coagulase type XI, three PFGE types and eight subtypes, ten spa types including t223 (51.3%), t852 (13.5%), t032 (8.1%), t790 (8.1%), t3107 (5.4%) and one each of t309, t2251, t3935, t5708 and t5983. Twenty-six isolates (70.2%) carried SCCmec IVa, eight isolates carried SCCmec IV and three isolates carried SCCmec IVh. All isolates carried agr1, cap5 and egc gene cluster (seg, sei, selm, seln, selo, and selu). tst (toxic shock syndrome toxin) was detected in 23 isolates. Eight isolates (21.6%) were positive for Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). Genotypic analysis revealed that 62.1% of the isolates comprising ST22-IVa-t223 (51.3%) and ST22-IVa-t309/t2251/t3935/t5708 (10.8%) were CC22-[tst1(+)] UK EMRSA-15/Middle Eastern variant, 21.6% were CC22-PVL(+) EMRSA-15 variant and 16.2% were CC22-UK EMRSA-15/Barnim clone. These results show that the tst1 positive-ST22-IVa-t223 (Middle Eastern variant) and the CC22-PVL(+) EMRSA-15 variant were the dominant EMRSA-15 variants in Kuwait hospitals. PMID:27222714

  11. Epidemiological typing of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Pakistan and India.

    PubMed

    Shabir, Sahida; Hardy, Katherine J; Abbasi, Waseem S; McMurray, Claire L; Malik, Salman A; Wattal, Chand; Hawkey, Peter M

    2010-03-01

    The levels of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Pakistan and India are known to be high, but few studies have described the epidemiology of the different MRSA clones present. In order to gain an understanding of the epidemiology of MRSA within this region, 60 MRSA isolates from Pakistan (49) and India (11) were genotyped. All isolates were typed using PFGE, staphylococcal interspersed repeat units (SIRUs), a restriction-modification method and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing. A subset of isolates that were distinct by PFGE and SIRUs were typed using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Clonal complex (CC) 8 was the dominant clonal complex (57/60) and was present in both Pakistan and India. Within CC8, there were 10 SIRU profiles and 24 PFGE profiles. Two SIRU profiles were present in isolates from both India and Pakistan, whilst seven were distinct for Pakistan and one for India. All PFGE profiles were distinct for each of the two countries. Thirty-four of the 57 isolates carried SCCmec type III/IIIa and the remainder carried type IV SCCmec. MLST analysis of 14 CC8 isolates with diverse SIRU and PFGE profiles showed that all were single-locus variants, with nine belonging to sequence type (ST) 239, three to ST8 and two to ST113. From a single hospital in Pakistan, three isolates belonged to CC30 and all were indistinguishable by PFGE and SIRUs and carried the Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene. Thus, epidemiological typing of strains from three distinct locations in India and Pakistan revealed the predominance of one clonal complex and highly related STs. The ability of SIRUs and PFGE to differentiate within ST239 demonstrates their utility in defining local epidemiology in these countries. PMID:19926728

  12. Pediatric Staphylococcus aureus Isolate Genotypes and Infections from the Dawn of the Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus Epidemic Era in Chicago, 1994 to 1997

    PubMed Central

    Acree, Mary Ellen; Sieth, Julia J.; Boxrud, Dave J.; Dobbins, Ginette; Lynfield, Ruth; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Daum, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Widespread infections with community-associated (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have occurred in the United States with the dissemination of the USA300 strain beginning in 2000. We examined 105 isolates obtained from children treated at the University of Chicago from 1994 to 1997 (75 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus [MSSA] and 30 MRSA isolates) in order to investigate for possible evidence of USA300 during this period. Infections were defined epidemiologically based on medical record review. The isolates underwent multilocus sequence typing (MLST), as well as assays for the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes, the protein A gene (spa), and arcA and opp3, proxy markers for the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), characteristic of USA300 MRSA. MRSA isolates also underwent staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) subtyping. MSSA isolates belonged to 17 sequence type (ST) groups. The 12 epidemiologically defined CA-MRSA infection isolates were either ST1 (n = 4) or ST8 (n = 8). They belonged to 3 different PFGE types: USA100 (n = 1), USA400 (n = 5), and USA500 (n = 6). Among the CA-MRSA infection isolates, 8 (67%) were PVL+. None of the MRSA or MSSA isolates contained arcA or opp3. Only one MRSA isolate was USA300 by PFGE. This was a health care-associated (HA) MRSA isolate, negative for PVL, that carried SCCmec type II. USA300 with its characteristic features was not identified in the collection from the years 1994 to 1997. PMID:26019202

  13. Identification and characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from Austrian companion animals and horses.

    PubMed

    Loncaric, Igor; Künzel, Frank; Licka, Theresia; Simhofer, Hubert; Spergser, Joachim; Rosengarten, Renate

    2014-01-31

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance, resistance gene patterns and genetic relatedness of a collection of Austrian methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from companion animals and horses. A total of 89 non-repetitive MRSA isolates collected during routine veterinary microbiological examinations from April 2004 to the end of 2012, and one isolate from 2013 were used for this study. The presence of mecA and other resistance genes was confirmed by PCR. Isolates were genotyped by spa typing, two multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analyses (MLVA) analyses, SCCmec typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). PCR targeting Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and detection of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE), toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST) was performed using PCR assays. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed. Five sequence types (STs-ST398, ST254, ST22, ST5 and ST1), SCCmec types II, IVa, V, and non-type-abele, 8 spa-types (t003, t011, t036, t127, t386, t1348, and t4450), and two isolates could not be assigned, 21 MLVA-14Orsay types Multiplex-PCR MLVA (mMLVA) displayed 17 different MLVA types. The present study is the most comprehensive dealing with MRSA from Austrian companion animals and horses. The results confirm that MRSA ST398 is present in a wide range of animal species and is predominant especially in horses. In other companion animals it is unclear whether the infections with the different MRSA isolates investigated in the present study truly represents a rare phenomenon or may be an emerging problem in companion animals.

  14. Characterization of PVL/ACME-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (genotypes ST8-MRSA-IV and ST5-MRSA-II) isolated from a university hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Urushibara, Noriko; Yamamoto, Dai; Yamashita, Toshiharu; Shinagawa, Masaaki; Watanabe, Naoki; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2013-02-01

    The ST8 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IVa, known as USA300, is a prevalent community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) clone in the United States and has been spreading worldwide. The USA300 characteristically harbors Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) genes and the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME, type I). Prevalence and molecular characteristics of PVL(+) and/or ACME(+) S. aureus were investigated in a university hospital located in northern Japan, for 1,366 S. aureus isolates, including 601 MRSA strains derived from clinical specimens collected from 2008 to 2010. The PVL gene was identified in three MRSA strains with SCCmec IV, which belonged to ST8, spa type t008, coagulase type III, and agr type I. Two PVL-positive MRSA strains had also type I ACME, and were isolated from skin abscess of outpatients who have not travelled abroad recently. One of these PVL(+)/ACME(+) strains carried tet(K), msrA, and aph(3')-IIIa, showing resistance to kanamycin, tetracycline, erythromycin, and ciprofloxacin, suggesting acquisition of more resistance than ST8 CA-MRSA reported in Japan previously. In contrast, another PVL(+)/ACME(+) strain and a PVL(+)/ACME(-) strain were susceptible to more antimicrobials and had less virulence factors than PVL(-)/ACME(+) MRSA strains. Besides the two PVL(+) MRSA strains, ACME (type-ΔII) was identified into seven MRSA strains with SCCmec II belonging to ST5, one of the three spa types (t002, t067, and t071), coagulase type II, and agr type II. These PVL(-)/ACME(+) MRSA strains showed multiple drug resistance and harbored various toxin genes as observed for ST5 PVL(-)/ACME(-) MRSA-II. The present study suggested the spread of ST8-MRSA-IV in northern Japan, and a potential significance of ACME-positive ST5-MRSA-II as an emerging MRSA clone in a hospital.

  15. Microarray-based genotyping of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from camels.

    PubMed

    Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf; Slickers, Peter; Wernery, Renate; Johnson, Bobby; Jose, Sherry; Wernery, Ulrich

    2011-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of mastitis and other diseases in camels. In order to obtain data on population structure as well as on the carriage of toxin genes and resistance markers, a collection of 45 isolates from dromedaries of Dubai, United Arab Emirates, were genotyped. These isolates belonged to clonal complexes CC6 (twenty isolates; 44.44%), CC30 (sixteen isolates; 35.56%), CC188 (five isolates; 11.11%), CC152 (1 isolate, 2.2%) and to a previously un-described sequence type (ST1755: arcc-18, aroe-115, glpf-6, gmk-2 pta-109, tpi-50 and yqil-2; three isolates; 6.67%). Resistance genes proved to be rare. Only three out of 45 isolates (6.67%) carried the beta-lactamase operon. The tetracycline resistance gene tetK was also detected in three isolates (6.67%). Neither the mecA gene, defining MRSA, nor other resistance genes were found. Common virulence markers included leukocidin genes lukD+lukE (in twenty-five isolates; 55.56%), the staphylokinase gene sak (twenty-two isolates; 48.89%), the enterotoxin gene cluster egc (fifteen isolates; 33.33%), and a distinct variant of the enterotoxin A gene (sea-320E, GenBank AY196686.1; thirteen isolates; 28.89%). One CC152 isolate was positive for genes encoding the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (lukF-PV+lukS-PV). This study provides first genotyping data on the population structure and the presence of toxin genes and resistance markers of S. aureus strains in Middle Eastern camels.

  16. Prevalence and Molecular Characterization of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 Resistant to Tetracycline at a Spanish Hospital over 12 Years

    PubMed Central

    Camoez, Mariana; Sierra, Josep M.; Pujol, Miquel; Hornero, Ana; Martin, Rogélio; Domínguez, M. Angeles

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST398, associated with livestock animals, was described in 2003 as a new lineage infecting or colonizing humans. We evaluated the prevalence and molecular characteristics of MRSA ST398 isolated in the Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge from January 2000 to June 2011. Tetracycline resistant (Tet-R) MRSA isolates from single patients (pts) were screened by SmaI-pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Nontypable MRSA strains by SmaI (NTSmaI)-MRSA were further analysed by ApaI-PFGE, spa, SCCmec, agr, MLST typing, and by DNA microarray hybridization. Among 164 pts harboring Tet-R MRSA, NTSmaI-MRSA ST398-agrI was found in 33 pts (20%). Although the first pt was detected in 2003, 22/33 pts (67%) were registered in the 2010–2011 period. Ten pts (30%) were infected and cancer was the most frequent underlying disease. In one case, death was due to MRSA-ST398-related infection. Five pulsotypes (A–E) were detected using ApaI-PFGE, with type A accounting for 76% of the strains. The majority of the studied isolates presented spa type t011 (70%) and SCCmec type V (88%). One strain was spa negative both by PCR and microarray analysis. Forty-nine percent of the studied isolates showed resistance to 3 or more antibiotic classes, in addition to beta-lactams. Ciprofloxacin resistance was 67%. Tet-R was mediated by tet(M) and tet(K) in 26 isolates. All isolates lacked Panton-Valentine Leukocidin production, as well as other significant toxins. This study displays the molecular features of MRSA-ST398 clone and shows the increase in tetracycline resistance together with arise in MRSA-ST398 isolates infecting or colonizing patients in our clinical setting. PMID:24039806

  17. Rapid Probabilistic Source Inversion Using Machine Learning Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaeufl, P.; Valentine, A. P.; Trampert, J.

    2013-12-01

    Determination of earthquake source parameters is an important task in seismology. For many applications, it is also valuable to understand the uncertainties associated with these determinations, and this is particularly true in the context of earthquake early warning and hazard mitigation. We present a framework for probabilistic centroid moment tensor point source inversions in near real-time, applicable to a wide variety of data-types. Our methodology allows us to find an approximation to p(m|d), the conditional probability of source parameters (m) given observations, (d). This approximation is obtained by smoothly interpolating a set of random prior samples, using a machine learning algorithm able to learn the mapping from d to m. The approximation obtained can be evaluated within milliseconds on a standard desktop computer for a new observation (d). This makes the method well suited for use in situations such as earthquake early warning, where inversions must be performed routinely, for a fixed station geometry, and where it is important that results are obtained rapidly. This is a major advantage over traditional sampling based techniques, such as Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo methods, where a re-sampling of the posterior is necessary every time a new observation is made. We demonstrated the method by applying it to a regional static GPS displacement data set for the 2010 MW 7.2 El Mayor Cucapah earthquake in Baja California and obtained estimates of logarithmic magnitude, centroid location and depth, and focal mechanism (Käufl et al., submitted). We will present an extension of this approach to the inversion of full waveforms and explore possibilities for jointly inverting seismic and geodetic data. (1) P. Käufl, A. P. Valentine, T.B. O'Toole, J. Trampert, submitted, Geophysical Journal International

  18. Probing the face-space of individuals with prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Mayu; Doyle, Jaime; Humphreys, Kate; Behrmann, Marlene

    2010-05-01

    A useful framework for understanding the mental representation of facial identity is face-space (Valentine, 1991), a multi-dimensional cognitive map in which individual faces are coded relative to the average of previously encountered faces, and in which the distance among faces represents their perceived similarity. We examined whether individuals with prosopagnosia, a disorder characterized by an inability to recognize familiar faces despite normal visual acuity and intellectual abilities, evince behavior consistent with this underlying representational schema. To do so, we compared the performance of 6 individuals with congenital prosopagnosia (CP), with a group of age- and gender-matched control participants in a series of experiments involving judgments of facial identity. We used digital images of male and female faces and morphed them to varying degrees relative to an average face, to create caricatures, anti-caricatures, and anti-faces (i.e. faces of the opposite identity). Across 5 behavioral tasks, CP individuals' performance was similar to that of the control group and consistent with the face-space framework. As a test of the sensitivity of our measures in revealing face processing abnormalities, we also tested a single acquired prosopagnosic (AP) individual, whose performance on the same tasks deviated significantly from the control and CP groups. The findings suggest that, despite an inability to recognize individual identities, CPs perceive faces in a manner consistent with norm-based coding of facial identity, although their representation is likely supported by a feature-based strategy. We suggest that the apparently normal posterior cortical regions, including the fusiform face area, serve as the neural substrate for at least a coarse, feature-based face-space map in CP and that their face recognition impairment arises from the disconnection between these regions and more anterior cortical sites.

  19. Epidemiology of emerging methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Denmark: a nationwide study in a country with low prevalence of MRSA infection.

    PubMed

    Faria, Nuno A; Oliveira, Duarte C; Westh, Henrik; Monnet, Dominique L; Larsen, Anders R; Skov, Robert; de Lencastre, Hermínia

    2005-04-01

    Strict infection control measures introduced during the 1970s have kept the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections extremely low in Denmark. Nevertheless, similarly to other countries, MRSA infections began to appear in the community in the late 1990s. A nationwide surveillance program has collected and stored all MRSA isolates since 1988 and, since 1999, clinical information has been also recorded. We used this information and isolates in a detailed epidemiological and molecular analysis of the 81 MRSA infections identified in Denmark in 2001. MRSA isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, multilocus sequence typing, and SCCmec typing. Comparison of the 45 community-onset MRSA (CO-MRSA) infections with the 36 hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) infections showed several striking contrasts. Most CO-MRSA were recovered from skin and soft tissue infections caused by isolates carrying the Panton-Valentine leucocidin toxin genes, and the majority (84%) of isolates belonged to a single clonal type, ST80-IV, which has been found in the community in other European countries. Clone ST80-IV could be traced in Denmark back to 1993. ST80-IV was rarely found in HA-MRSA infections, which belonged to a large number of clonal types, including some pandemic MRSA clones. The low number of HA-MRSA infections and the diversity of MRSA clones in Danish hospitals may be the result of successful infection control measures that prevent spread of clones in hospitals. The mechanism of spread of the ST80-IV clone in the Danish community is not known, and new control measures are needed to control further spread of this and other CA-MRSA clones. PMID:15815005

  20. Adaptive change inferred from genomic population analysis of the ST93 epidemic clone of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Stinear, Timothy P; Holt, Kathryn E; Chua, Kyra; Stepnell, Justin; Tuck, Kellie L; Coombs, Geoffrey; Harrison, Paul Francis; Seemann, Torsten; Howden, Benjamin P

    2014-02-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has emerged as a major public health problem around the world. In Australia, ST93-IV[2B] is the dominant CA-MRSA clone and displays significantly greater virulence than other S. aureus. Here, we have examined the evolution of ST93 via genomic analysis of 12 MSSA and 44 MRSA ST93 isolates, collected from around Australia over a 17-year period. Comparative analysis revealed a core genome of 2.6 Mb, sharing greater than 99.7% nucleotide identity. The accessory genome was 0.45 Mb and comprised additional mobile DNA elements, harboring resistance to erythromycin, trimethoprim, and tetracycline. Phylogenetic inference revealed a molecular clock and suggested that a single clone of methicillin susceptible, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) positive, ST93 S. aureus likely spread from North Western Australia in the early 1970s, acquiring methicillin resistance at least twice in the mid 1990s. We also explored associations between genotype and important MRSA phenotypes including oxacillin MIC and production of exotoxins (α-hemolysin [Hla], δ-hemolysin [Hld], PSMα3, and PVL). High-level expression of Hla is a signature feature of ST93 and reduced expression in eight isolates was readily explained by mutations in the agr locus. However, subtle but significant decreases in Hld were also noted over time that coincided with decreasing oxacillin resistance and were independent of agr mutations. The evolution of ST93 S. aureus is thus associated with a reduction in both exotoxin expression and oxacillin MIC, suggesting MRSA ST93 isolates are under pressure for adaptive change. PMID:24482534

  1. Adaptive Change Inferred from Genomic Population Analysis of the ST93 Epidemic Clone of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Stinear, Timothy P.; Holt, Kathryn E.; Chua, Kyra; Stepnell, Justin; Tuck, Kellie L.; Coombs, Geoffrey; Harrison, Paul Francis; Seemann, Torsten; Howden, Benjamin P.

    2014-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has emerged as a major public health problem around the world. In Australia, ST93-IV[2B] is the dominant CA-MRSA clone and displays significantly greater virulence than other S. aureus. Here, we have examined the evolution of ST93 via genomic analysis of 12 MSSA and 44 MRSA ST93 isolates, collected from around Australia over a 17-year period. Comparative analysis revealed a core genome of 2.6 Mb, sharing greater than 99.7% nucleotide identity. The accessory genome was 0.45 Mb and comprised additional mobile DNA elements, harboring resistance to erythromycin, trimethoprim, and tetracycline. Phylogenetic inference revealed a molecular clock and suggested that a single clone of methicillin susceptible, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) positive, ST93 S. aureus likely spread from North Western Australia in the early 1970s, acquiring methicillin resistance at least twice in the mid 1990s. We also explored associations between genotype and important MRSA phenotypes including oxacillin MIC and production of exotoxins (α-hemolysin [Hla], δ-hemolysin [Hld], PSMα3, and PVL). High-level expression of Hla is a signature feature of ST93 and reduced expression in eight isolates was readily explained by mutations in the agr locus. However, subtle but significant decreases in Hld were also noted over time that coincided with decreasing oxacillin resistance and were independent of agr mutations. The evolution of ST93 S. aureus is thus associated with a reduction in both exotoxin expression and oxacillin MIC, suggesting MRSA ST93 isolates are under pressure for adaptive change. PMID:24482534

  2. Some NACA Muroc personnel with snowman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    The late 1940s saw increased flight activity, and more women computers were needed at the NACA Muroc Flight Test Unit than the ones who had originally arrived in 1946. A call went out to the NACA Langley, Lewis, and Ames laboratories for more women computers. Pictured in this photograph with the Snowman are some of the women computers who responded to the call for help in 1948 along with Roxanah, Emily, Dorothy, who were already here. Standing left to right: Mary (Tut) Hedgepeth, from Langley; Lilly Ann Bajus, Lewis; Roxanah Yancey, Emily Stephens, Jane Collons (Procurement), Leona Corbett (Personnel), Angel Dunn, Langley. Kneeling left to right: Dorothy (Dottie) Crawford Roth, Lewis; Dorothy Clift Hughes, and Gertrude (Trudy) Wilken Valentine, Lewis. In National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) terminology of 1946, computers were employees who performed laborious and time-consuming mathematical calculations and data reduction from long strips of records generated by onboard aircraft instrumentation. Virtually without exception, computers were female; at least part of the rationale seems to have been the notion that the work was long and tedious, and men were not thought to have the patience to do it. Though equipment changed over the years and most computers eventually found themselves programming and operating electronic computers, as well as doing other data processing tasks, being a computer initially meant long hours with a slide rule, hunched over illuminated light boxes measuring line traces from grainy and obscure strips of oscillograph film. Computers suffered terrible eyestrain, and those who didn't begin by wearing glasses did so after a few years. But they were initially essential employees at the Muroc Flight Test Unit and NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, taking the oscillograph flight records and 'reducing' the data on them to make them useful to research engineers, who analyzed the data.

  3. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Site of Acquisition and Strain Variation in High-Risk Nursing Home Residents with Indwelling Devices

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Kristen E.; McNamara, Sara E.; Cassone, Marco; Perri, Mary Beth; Zervos, Marcus; Mody, Lona

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Characterize the clinical and molecular epidemiology of new methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) acquisitions at nasal and extranasal sites among high-risk nursing home (NH) residents. DESIGN Multicenter prospective observational study. SETTING Six NHs in southeast Michigan. PARTICIPANTS A total of 120 NH residents with an indwelling device (feeding tube and/or urinary catheter). METHODS Active surveillance cultures from the nares, oropharynx, groin, perianal area, wounds (if present), and device insertion site(s) were collected upon enrollment, at day 14, and monthly thereafter. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction for SCCmec, agr, and Panton-Valentine leukocidin were performed. RESULTS Of 120 participants observed for 16,290 device-days, 50 acquired MRSA (78% transiently, 22% persistently). New MRSA acquisitions were common in extranasal sites, particularly at device insertion, groin, and perianal areas (27%, 23%, and 17.6% of all acquisitions, respectively). Screening extranasal sites greatly increases the detection of MRSA colonization (100% of persistent carriers and 97.4% of transient carriers detected with nares, groin, perianal, and device site sampling vs 54.5% and 25.6%, respectively, for nares samples alone). Colonization at suprapubic urinary catheter sites generally persisted. Healthcare-associated MRSA (USA100 and USA100 variants) were the dominant strains (79.3% of all new acquisition isolates). Strain diversity was more common in transient carriers, including acquisition of USA500 and USA300 strains. CONCLUSION Indwelling device insertion sites as well as the groin and perianal area are important sites of new MRSA acquisitions in NH residents and play a role in the persistency of MRSA carriage. Clonal types differ among persistent and transient colonizers. PMID:25419767

  4. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in Botucatu, Brazil: a population-based survey.

    PubMed

    Pires, Fabiana Venegas; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza; Abraão, Lígia Maria; Martins, Patrícia Y F; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castelo Branco

    2014-01-01

    Recent increases in the incidence and severity of staphylococcal infections renewed interest in studies that assess the burden of asymptomatic carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in the community setting. We conducted a population-based survey in the city of Botucatu, Brazil (122,000 inhabitants), in order to identify the prevalence of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant strains). Nasal swabs were obtained from 686 persons over one year of age. Resistance to methicillin was assessed through phenotypic methods, identification of the mecA gene and typing of the Staphylococcal Chromosome Cassette mec (SCCmec). Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates were characterized using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE), Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) and spa typing. Polymerase chain reaction was applied to identify genes coding for Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) in isolates. The prevalence of overall S. aureus carriage was 32.7% (95%CI, 29.2%-36.2%). Carriers were significantly younger (mean age, 28.1 versus 36.3 for non-carriers; OR for age, 0.98; 95%CI, 0.97-0.99) and likely to report recent skin infection (OR, 1.85; 95%CI, 1.03-3.34). Carriage of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was found in 0.9% of study subjects (95%CI, 0.4%-1.8%). All MRSA isolates harbored SCCmec type IV, and belonged to spa types t002 or t021, but none among them harbored genes coding for PLV. In MLST, most isolates belonged to clones ST5 or ST1776. However, we found one subject who carried a novel clone, ST2594. Two out of six MRSA carriers had household contacts colonized with isolates similar to theirs. Our study pointed to dissemination of community-associated MRSA among the Brazilian population. PMID:24663818

  5. Survey of community-associated-methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Slovenia: identification of community-associated and livestock-associated clones.

    PubMed

    Dermota, U; Mueller-Premru, M; Švent-Kučina, N; Petrovič, Ž; Ribič, H; Rupnik, M; Janežič, S; Zdovc, I; Grmek-Košnik, I

    2015-09-01

    The epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Slovenia is poorly documented. The aim of this study was to investigate susceptibility patterns, virulence gene profile and clonality among MRSA isolates with positive screened resistance phenotype for CA-MRSA collected from patients in Slovenia, from January 2010 to December 2010. We included only MRSA isolates that were resistant to cefoxitin and oxacillin, and susceptible to at least two of the following four antibiotics: ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin or gentamicin (presumptive CA-MRSA). Altogether 151 isolates fulfilled our screening phenotypic definition, 126 MRSA isolates were classified as CA-MRSA and 25 as HA-MRSA. Thirty-six per cent of them were resistant to ciprofloxacin, 24% to clindamycin, 33% to erythromycin and 13% to gentamicin. The mecA gene was detected in 150 isolates, while the mecC gene only in 1 isolate. The MRSA isolates were classified to 19 different clones. The most prevalent sequence types were ST5 (26.4%), ST45 (25.2%), ST22 (10.6%), ST398 (9.9%), ST8 (5.9%), ST7 (4.6%), ST1 (3.9%), ST152/377 (3.3%), ST228 (2.6%) and ST2883 (1.3%). The ST6, ST9, ST30, ST72, ST88, ST111, ST130, ST225 and ST772 were identified sporadically. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene was detected in 13 (8.6%) isolates that belonged to ST5, ST7, ST8, ST22, ST72, ST88, ST 152/377 and ST772. Our results show high variability of CA-MRSA circulating in Slovenia and also the presence of LA-MRSA clones.

  6. Epidemiology of Emerging Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Denmark: a Nationwide Study in a Country with Low Prevalence of MRSA Infection

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Nuno A.; Oliveira, Duarte C.; Westh, Henrik; Monnet, Dominique L.; Larsen, Anders R.; Skov, Robert; de Lencastre, Hermínia

    2005-01-01

    Strict infection control measures introduced during the 1970s have kept the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections extremely low in Denmark. Nevertheless, similarly to other countries, MRSA infections began to appear in the community in the late 1990s. A nationwide surveillance program has collected and stored all MRSA isolates since 1988 and, since 1999, clinical information has been also recorded. We used this information and isolates in a detailed epidemiological and molecular analysis of the 81 MRSA infections identified in Denmark in 2001. MRSA isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, multilocus sequence typing, and SCCmec typing. Comparison of the 45 community-onset MRSA (CO-MRSA) infections with the 36 hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) infections showed several striking contrasts. Most CO-MRSA were recovered from skin and soft tissue infections caused by isolates carrying the Panton-Valentine leucocidin toxin genes, and the majority (84%) of isolates belonged to a single clonal type, ST80-IV, which has been found in the community in other European countries. Clone ST80-IV could be traced in Denmark back to 1993. ST80-IV was rarely found in HA-MRSA infections, which belonged to a large number of clonal types, including some pandemic MRSA clones. The low number of HA-MRSA infections and the diversity of MRSA clones in Danish hospitals may be the result of successful infection control measures that prevent spread of clones in hospitals. The mechanism of spread of the ST80-IV clone in the Danish community is not known, and new control measures are needed to control further spread of this and other CA-MRSA clones. PMID:15815005

  7. A correlative analysis of epidemiologic and molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clones from diverse geographic locations with virulence measured by a Caenorhabditis elegans host model.

    PubMed

    Wu, K; Zhang, K; McClure, J; Zhang, J; Schrenzel, J; Francois, P; Harbarth, S; Conly, J

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains from different geographic areas have different genetic backgrounds, suggesting independent clonal evolutions. To better understand the virulence of MRSA strains and the relationship to their clonal and geographic origins, we undertook an analysis of epidemiologic, molecular, and virulence characteristics of a large number of MRSA isolates from geographically diverse origins, in a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. A total of 99 MRSA isolates collected between 1993 and 2010 at the Geneva University Hospitals from diverse global origins were characterized with Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST), accessory gene regulator (agr) group, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec), S. aureus protein A (spa), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing. Epidemiologic data were provided from clinical records. The bacterial virulence was tested in a C. elegans host model. The inter-relationships of epidemiological/molecular characteristics in association with nematocidal activities were analyzed with univariate and two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA). Community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains were more virulent than hospital-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA), with higher nematocidal activities in CA-MRSA strains (0.776 vs. 0.506, p = 0.0005). All molecular characteristics (PVL, TSST, spa, SCCmec, MLST, and PFGE types) showed a significant association with nematocidal activities on univariate analysis (p < 0.005). PVL was not a significant predictor after adjusting for genomic backgrounds using spa, MLST, or PFGE typing. The dominant CA-MRSA strains in North America showed higher nematocidal activities than strains from other regions (p < 0.0001). Strains with global origins containing distinct genetic backgrounds have different virulence in the C. elegans model. Nematocidal activities were most highly correlated with SCCmec, spa, MLST

  8. Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Carriage among Beefpacking Workers in a Midwestern United States Slaughterhouse

    PubMed Central

    Leibler, Jessica H.; Jordan, Jeanne A.; Brownstein, Kirsten; Lander, Lina; Price, Lance B.; Perry, Melissa J.

    2016-01-01

    Occupational contact with livestock is an established risk factor for exposure to livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), particularly among industrial swine workers. While S. aureus is known to infect cattle, livestock-associated S. aureus carriage among workers in the beef production chain has received limited attention. Beefpacking workers, who slaughter, butcher and process cattle, have intensified exposure to potentially infectious animal materials and may be at risk of livestock-associated S. aureus exposure. We conducted a cross-sectional study of beefpacking workers (n = 137) at an industrial slaughterhouse in the Midwestern United States to evaluate prevalence and characteristics of S. aureus nasal colonization, specifically the absence of the scn gene to identify putative association with livestock, antibiotic susceptibility, presence of Panton-Valentin leukocidin (PVL) genes lukS-PV and lukF-PV, and spa type. Overall prevalence of S. aureus nasal carriage was 27.0%. No workers carried livestock-associated MRSA. Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus isolates (MSSA) recovered from five workers (3.6%) lacked the scn gene and were considered putative livestock-associated S. aureus (pLA-SA). Among pLA-SA isolates, spa types t338, t748, t1476 and t2379 were identified. To our knowledge, these spa types have not previously been identified as associated with livestock. Prevalence of human-adapted MRSA carriage in workers was 3.6%. MRSA isolates were identified as spa types t002, t008 and t024, and four of five MRSA isolates were PVL-positive. To date, this is the first study to indicate that industrial beefpacking workers in the United States may be exposed to livestock-associated S. aureus, notably MSSA, and to spa types not previously identified in livestock and livestock workers. Occupational exposure to livestock-associated S. aureus in the beef production chain requires further epidemiologic investigation. PMID:26866374

  9. Dissemination of multiple MRSA clones among community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections from Japanese children with impetigo.

    PubMed

    Hisata, Ken; Ito, Teruyo; Matsunaga, Nobuaki; Komatsu, Mitsutaka; Jin, Jingxun; Li, Shanshuang; Watanabe, Shinya; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2011-10-01

    The proportion of MRSA strains that cause skin and soft infections has recently increased. In 3 months we have characterized 17 MRSA strains isolated from children with impetigo at a Japanese hospital. Seventeen MRSA strains belonged to 7 clones defined by clonal complex (CC) in MLST genotype and type of SCCmec, which were rarely identified among healthcare-associated MRSA: CC 91-SCCmecIIb (4 strains); CC91-SCCmecIIn (2 strains); CC91-SCCmecIVa (2 strains); CC91-SCCmecV (4 strains); CC88-SCCmecIVg (3 strains); CC1-SCCmecIVc (1 strain); and CC5-SCCmecIVn (1 strain). Although one strain belonged to CC5, which has been commonly identified in healthcare-associated MRSA, it did not carry type II SCCmec, but carried type IV SCCmec. Fourteen of the 17 strains carried exfoliative toxin a or b gene, and none carried Panton-Valentine leukocidine gene. Furthermore, we determined the entire nucleotide sequences of two type V SCCmec elements carried by strains JCSC5952, a CC91 strain, and TSGH17, a Taiwanese CC59 strain. The structure of SCCmecJCSC5952 was more than 99% homologous in nucleotide identity with those of Taiwanese PVL-positive ST59 MRSA strains TSGH17 and PM1, which were designated as type V (5C2&5). Identification of multiple MRSA clones distinct from those disseminating at the hospital suggests that MRSA strains might be emerging in the community from MSSA strains by acquiring SCCmec elements on various occasions. Carriage of the similar type V(5C2&5) SCCmec element by strains of distinct genetic backgrounds, CC91 and CC59, suggested horizontal transfer of the SCCmec element.

  10. Genotypic Characterization of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Recovered at Baseline from Phase 3 Pneumonia Clinical Trials for Ceftobiprole.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rodrigo E; Deshpande, Lalitagauri M; Costello, Andrew J; Farrell, David J; Jones, Ronald N; Flamm, Robert K

    2016-01-01

    Baseline methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from patients with nosocomial and community-acquired pneumonia collected during Phase 3 trials for ceftobiprole were characterized. Eighty-four unique isolates from patients enrolled in Europe (50.0%), Asia-Western Pacific region (APAC; 20.2%), North America (19.0%), Latin America (8.3%), and South Africa (2.4%) were included. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by broth microdilution and isolates screened for Panton-Valentine leukocidin. SCCmec and agr types were determined. Strains were subjected to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and spa typing. Clonal complexes (CCs) were assigned based on spa and/or multilocus sequence typing. Most isolates were CC5-MRSA-I/II/IV (44.0%; 37/84), followed by CC8-MRSA-IV (22.6%; 19/84) and CC239-MRSA-III (21.4%; 18/84). Other MRSA formed seven clonal clusters. Isolates from North America were associated with USA100, while those from South America belonged to the Cordobes/Chilean CC. A greater clonal diversity was observed in Europe; however, each country had CC5, CC8, or CC239 as prevalent lineages. Isolates from APAC were CC5-MRSA-II (47.1%; 8/17) or CC239-MRSA-III (47.1%; 8/17). Isolates carrying SCCmec I and III had ceftobiprole MIC50 values of 2 μg/ml, while those isolates with SCCmec II and IV had MIC50 values of 1 μg/ml. Ceftobiprole inhibited 96% and 100.0% of the isolates at ≤ 2 and ≤ 4 μg/ml, respectively. These isolates represented common circulating MRSA clones. Ceftobiprole demonstrated in vitro activity with a slight variation of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) according to SCCmec or clonal type.

  11. Microbiological and molecular epidemiological analyses of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus at a tertiary care hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Inomata, Shinya; Yano, Hisakazu; Tokuda, Koichi; Kanamori, Hajime; Endo, Shiro; Ishizawa, Chiyuki; Ogawa, Miho; Ichimura, Sadahiro; Shimojima, Masahiro; Kakuta, Risako; Ozawa, Daiki; Aoyagi, Tetsuji; Gu, Yoshiaki; Hatta, Masumitsu; Oshima, Kengo; Nakashima, Kazutoshi; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2015-10-01

    Molecular characterization of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is generally conducted referred to staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IV or V. CA-MRSA is now a cause of concern since such strains have been isolated not only from individuals in a community but also from patients in healthcare settings. The aim of this study was to analyze microbiological and molecular epidemiological features of CA-MRSA strains at a Japanese tertiary care hospital using PCR based-open reading frame typing (POT). This technique allows for molecular classification into CA-MRSA (POT-CA) and hospital-associated (HA-) MRSA (POT-HA) with clonal discrimination. Clinical MRSA isolates obtained from consecutive patients between October 1, 2012 and September 30, 2013 at the hospital were analyzed in combination with the clinical definition for CA-MRSA by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and POT. Of 219 isolates (76 clonal groups), 64 (29.3%) were clinical-HA/POT-CA isolates (22 clonal groups). Some clones of them accumulated in this hospital and might be involved in nosocomial transmission. Virulent factors of the isolates were analyzed, and only one (1.6%) Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene positive isolate but no arginine catabolic mobile element genes positive isolate were found in clinical-HA/POT-CA. Additionally, clinical-HA/POT-CA isolates showed higher antimicrobial susceptibility than clinical-HA/POT-HA, especially to minocycline, doxycycline, and amikacin. The most frequent genotype of molecular CA-MRSA was multi-locus sequence type 5-SCCmecIV, previously not detected in Japan. Although CA-MRSA at this hospital showed low virulence and higher antimicrobial susceptibility, the risk of nosocomial infection from them should be recognized, requiring stricter infection control measures.

  12. Spa Typing of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated From Clinical Specimens of Patients With Nosocomial Infections in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Fazeli, Maryam; Goudarzi, Hossein; Azad, Mehdi; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus infection is increasing annually and becoming a true global challenge. The pattern of Staphylococcus aureus protein A (spa) types in different geographic regions is diverse. Objectives This study determined the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus and different spa types in S. aureus clinical isolates. Materials and Methods During a six-month period, 90 S. aureus isolates were recovered from 320 clinical specimens. The in vitro susceptibility of various S. aureus isolates to 16 antibiotic discs was assessed using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Molecular typing was carried out with S. aureus protein A typing via polymerase chain reaction. Results The frequency of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in our study was 88.9%. Twenty-three (25.5%) isolates were positive for panton-valentine leukocidin encoding genes. S. aureus presented a high resistance rate to ampicillin (100%) and penicillin (100%). No resistance was observed to vancomycin, teicoplanin, or linezolid. The rates of resistance to the majority of antibiotics tested varied between 23.3% and 82.2%. The rate of multidrug resistance among these clinical isolates was 93.3%. The 90 S. aureus isolates were classified into five S. aureus protein A types: t037 (33.3%), t030 (22.2%), t790 (16.7%), t969 (11.1%), and t044 (7.7%). Eight (8.9%) isolates were not typable using the S. aureus protein A typing method. Conclusions We report a high methicillin-resistant S. aureus rate in our hospital. Additionally, t030 and t037 were the predominant spa-types among hospital-associated S. aureus. Our findings emphasize the need for continuous surveillance to prevent the dissemination of multidrug resistance among different S. aureus protein A types in Iran. PMID:27679706

  13. High incidence of oxacillin-susceptible mecA-positive Staphylococcus aureus (OS-MRSA) associated with bovine mastitis in China.

    PubMed

    Pu, WanXia; Su, Yang; Li, JianXi; Li, ChunHui; Yang, ZhiQiang; Deng, HaiPing; Ni, ChunXia

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a main cause of bovine mastitis and a major pathogen affecting human health. The emergence and spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become a significant concern for both animal health and public health. This study investigated the incidence of MRSA in milk samples collected from dairy cows with clinical mastitis and characterized the MRSA isolates using antimicrobial susceptibility tests and genetic typing methods. In total, 103 S. aureus isolates were obtained from dairy farms in 4 different provinces in China, including Gansu, Shanghai, Sichuan, and Guizhou. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of these isolates revealed that the resistance rates to penicillin and sulfamethoxazole were high, while the resistance rates to ciprofloxacin and vancomycin were low. Among the 103 isolates, 49 (47.6%) were found to be mecA-positive, indicating the high incidence of MRSA. However, 37 of the 49 mecA-positive isolates were susceptible to oxacillin as determined by antimicrobial susceptibility assays and were thus classified as oxacillin-susceptible mecA-positive S. aureus (OS-MRSA). These isolates could be misclassified as methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) if genetic detection of mecA was not performed. Molecular characterization of selected mecA-positive isolates showed that they were all negative with Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), but belonged to different spa types and SCCmec types. These results indicate that OS-MRSA is common in bovine mastitis in China and underscore the need for genetic methods (in addition to phenotypic tests) to accurately identify MRSA.

  14. Epidemiology of methicillin-resistant and -susceptible Staphylococcus aureus in Luanda, Angola: first description of the spread of the MRSA ST5-IVa clone in the African continent.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Teresa; Coelho, Céline; Santos-Silva, Isabel; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Aires-de-Sousa, Marta

    2014-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major human pathogen worldwide, and although surveillance studies are available in the most developed countries, data from Angola are inexistent. In June 2012, 295 inpatients and 199 healthcare workers from three hospitals in Luanda, Angola were nasal swabbed for S. aureus and MRSA carriage. A total of 117 individuals (23.7%) were S. aureus nasal carriers, out of which 68 (58.1%) were colonized with MRSA. The majority of the MRSA isolates (74%) belonged to a single clonal lineage, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) A-ST5-IVa associated with three spa types (spa types t105/t311/t11657), followed by PFGE C-ST88-IVa (spa types t186/t325/t786/t1951/t3869) (n=9; 12%); the other 11 MRSA isolates were representatives of 4 additional lineages. Almost half (49%) of the methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates belonged to three major clones: PFGE B-ST508 (spa types t050/t861/t1346/t1574/t2626/t12218), PFGE D-ST45 (spa types t939/t11656), and PFGE E-ST30 (spa types t1202/t9118). MSSA isolates presented a high variability of virulence factors, including Panton-Valentine leukocidine (7.9%). MRSA carriage in Luanda is considerably high, and the major clone corresponds to a worldwide epidemic lineage, so far scarcely reported in Africa. Additional infection control measures in this metropolis are mandatory for a global MRSA control.

  15. A New Approach for the Discovery of Antibiotics by Targeting Non-Multiplying Bacteria: A Novel Topical Antibiotic for Staphylococcal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yanmin; Shamaei-Tousi, Alireza; Liu, Yingjun; Coates, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    In a clinical infection, multiplying and non-multiplying bacteria co-exist. Antibiotics kill multiplying bacteria, but they are very inefficient at killing non-multipliers which leads to slow or partial death of the total target population of microbes in an infected tissue. This prolongs the duration of therapy, increases the emergence of resistance and so contributes to the short life span of antibiotics after they reach the market. Targeting non-multiplying bacteria from the onset of an antibiotic development program is a new concept. This paper describes the proof of principle for this concept, which has resulted in the development of the first antibiotic using this approach. The antibiotic, called HT61, is a small quinolone-derived compound with a molecular mass of about 400 Daltons, and is active against non-multiplying bacteria, including methicillin sensitive and resistant, as well as Panton-Valentine leukocidin-carrying Staphylococcus aureus. It also kills mupirocin resistant MRSA. The mechanism of action of the drug is depolarisation of the cell membrane and destruction of the cell wall. The speed of kill is within two hours. In comparison to the conventional antibiotics, HT61 kills non-multiplying cells more effectively, 6 logs versus less than one log for major marketed antibiotics. HT61 kills methicillin sensitive and resistant S. aureus in the murine skin bacterial colonization and infection models. No resistant phenotype was produced during 50 serial cultures over a one year period. The antibiotic caused no adverse affects after application to the skin of minipigs. Targeting non-multiplying bacteria using this method should be able to yield many new classes of antibiotic. These antibiotics may be able to reduce the rate of emergence of resistance, shorten the duration of therapy, and reduce relapse rates. PMID:20676403

  16. Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Carriage among Beefpacking Workers in a Midwestern United States Slaughterhouse.

    PubMed

    Leibler, Jessica H; Jordan, Jeanne A; Brownstein, Kirsten; Lander, Lina; Price, Lance B; Perry, Melissa J

    2016-01-01

    Occupational contact with livestock is an established risk factor for exposure to livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), particularly among industrial swine workers. While S. aureus is known to infect cattle, livestock-associated S. aureus carriage among workers in the beef production chain has received limited attention. Beefpacking workers, who slaughter, butcher and process cattle, have intensified exposure to potentially infectious animal materials and may be at risk of livestock-associated S. aureus exposure. We conducted a cross-sectional study of beefpacking workers (n = 137) at an industrial slaughterhouse in the Midwestern United States to evaluate prevalence and characteristics of S. aureus nasal colonization, specifically the absence of the scn gene to identify putative association with livestock, antibiotic susceptibility, presence of Panton-Valentin leukocidin (PVL) genes lukS-PV and lukF-PV, and spa type. Overall prevalence of S. aureus nasal carriage was 27.0%. No workers carried livestock-associated MRSA. Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus isolates (MSSA) recovered from five workers (3.6%) lacked the scn gene and were considered putative livestock-associated S. aureus (pLA-SA). Among pLA-SA isolates, spa types t338, t748, t1476 and t2379 were identified. To our knowledge, these spa types have not previously been identified as associated with livestock. Prevalence of human-adapted MRSA carriage in workers was 3.6%. MRSA isolates were identified as spa types t002, t008 and t024, and four of five MRSA isolates were PVL-positive. To date, this is the first study to indicate that industrial beefpacking workers in the United States may be exposed to livestock-associated S. aureus, notably MSSA, and to spa types not previously identified in livestock and livestock workers. Occupational exposure to livestock-associated S. aureus in the beef production chain requires further epidemiologic investigation.

  17. Book reviews.

    PubMed

    Dein, S; Dein, S; Littlewood, R; Oloyede, Y; Krause, I B; Argenti, N

    1998-04-01

    Millennialism and violence Michael Barkun (Ed.) London, Frank Cass, 1996, 177 pp. Evil and suffering in Jewish philosophy Oliver Leaman Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1995, 157 pp. Religion and the clinical practice of psychology Edward P. Shafranski (ed.) Washington DC, American Psychological Association, 1996, 619 pp., index, bibliographies, figures. Beyond reason: art and psychosis: works from the Prinzhorn Collection London, Hayward Gallery, 1997, £12.95, 195 pp., index, bibliography Madness and art: the life and works of Adolf Wölfli Walter Morgenthaler Lincoln, University of Nebraska Press, 1992, $35.00, xviii, 127 pp., index, bibliography. The encyclopaedia of cultural anthropology David Levinson & Melvin Ember (Eds) New York, Holt/London, Macmillan, 1996, £299, 1486 pp., index, figures, 4 volumes Encyclopaedia of social and cultural anthropology Alan Barnard & Jonathan Spencer (Eds) London, Routledge, 1996, £25, 658 pp., index, figures Hystories: hysterical epidemics and modern culture Elaine Showalter London, Picador, 1997, £16.99 x + 244 pp., index, notes. Charred lullabies: chapters in an anthropology of violence E. Valentine Daniel Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1997, £17.95 (pbk), £35.00 (hbk), xii + 252 pp., maps, notes, bibliog., index Women in pain: gender and morbidity in Mexico Kaja Finkler University of Pennsylvania Press, 1994, xvii + 238 pp., index, bibliog. Reason and necessity in the specification of the multiple self Roland Littlewood. Occasional Paper No. 43. London, Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, 1996 £10.00 (pbk), 75 pp., notes index, bibliog. Mental illness and bodily cures: psychiatric treatment in the first half of the twentieth century Joel Braslow Berkeley, California University Press, 1997, £30.00 xiv + 240pp., ind., notes, tables Mimesis: culture, art, society. Gunter Gebauer & Christoph Wulf Translated from German by Don Reneau Berkeley, University of California Press, 1995.

  18. Structure-function analysis of heterodimer formation, oligomerization, and receptor binding of the Staphylococcus aureus bi-component toxin LukGH.

    PubMed

    Badarau, Adriana; Rouha, Harald; Malafa, Stefan; Logan, Derek T; Håkansson, Maria; Stulik, Lukas; Dolezilkova, Ivana; Teubenbacher, Astrid; Gross, Karin; Maierhofer, Barbara; Weber, Susanne; Jägerhofer, Michaela; Hoffman, David; Nagy, Eszter

    2015-01-01

    The bi-component leukocidins of Staphylococcus aureus are important virulence factors that lyse human phagocytic cells and contribute to immune evasion. The γ-hemolysins (HlgAB and HlgCB) and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL or LukSF) were shown to assemble from soluble subunits into membrane-bound oligomers on the surface of target cells, creating barrel-like pore structures that lead to cell lysis. LukGH is the most distantly related member of this toxin family, sharing only 30-40% amino acid sequence identity with the others. We observed that, unlike other leukocidin subunits, recombinant LukH and LukG had low solubility and were unable to bind to target cells, unless both components were present. Using biolayer interferometry and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence we detected binding of LukH to LukG in solution with an affinity in the low nanomolar range and dynamic light scattering measurements confirmed formation of a heterodimer. We elucidated the structure of LukGH by x-ray crystallography at 2.8-Å resolution. This revealed an octameric structure that strongly resembles that reported for HlgAB, but with important structural differences. Structure guided mutagenesis studies demonstrated that three salt bridges, not found in other bi-component leukocidins, are essential for dimer formation in solution and receptor binding. We detected weak binding of LukH, but not LukG, to the cellular receptor CD11b by biolayer interferometry, suggesting that in common with other members of this toxin family, the S-component has the primary contact role with the receptor. These new insights provide the basis for novel strategies to counteract this powerful toxin and Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis.

  19. Five birds, one stone: neutralization of α-hemolysin and 4 bi-component leukocidins of Staphylococcus aureus with a single human monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Rouha, Harald; Badarau, Adriana; Visram, Zehra C; Battles, Michael B; Prinz, Bianka; Magyarics, Zoltán; Nagy, Gábor; Mirkina, Irina; Stulik, Lukas; Zerbs, Manuel; Jägerhofer, Michaela; Maierhofer, Barbara; Teubenbacher, Astrid; Dolezilkova, Ivana; Gross, Karin; Banerjee, Srijib; Zauner, Gerhild; Malafa, Stefan; Zmajkovic, Jakub; Maier, Sabine; Mabry, Robert; Krauland, Eric; Wittrup, K Dane; Gerngross, Tillman U; Nagy, Eszter

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen associated with high mortality. The emergence of antibiotic resistance and the inability of antibiotics to counteract bacterial cytotoxins involved in the pathogenesis of S. aureus call for novel therapeutic approaches, such as passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The complexity of staphylococcal pathogenesis and past failures with single mAb products represent considerable barriers for antibody-based therapeutics. Over the past few years, efforts have focused on neutralizing α-hemolysin. Recent findings suggest that the concerted actions of several cytotoxins, including the bi-component leukocidins play important roles in staphylococcal pathogenesis. Therefore, we aimed to isolate mAbs that bind to multiple cytolysins by employing high diversity human IgG1 libraries presented on the surface of yeast cells. Here we describe cross-reactive antibodies with picomolar affinity for α-hemolysin and 4 different bi-component leukocidins that share only ∼26% overall amino acid sequence identity. The molecular basis of cross-reactivity is the recognition of a conformational epitope shared by α-hemolysin and F-components of gamma-hemolysin (HlgAB and HlgCB), LukED and LukSF (Panton-Valentine Leukocidin). The amino acids predicted to form the epitope are conserved and known to be important for cytotoxic activity. We found that a single cross-reactive antibody prevented lysis of human phagocytes, epithelial and red blood cells induced by α-hemolysin and leukocidins in vitro, and therefore had superior effectiveness compared to α-hemolysin specific antibodies to protect from the combined cytolytic effect of secreted S. aureus toxins. Such mAb afforded high levels of protection in murine models of pneumonia and sepsis.

  20. Oxacillin alters the toxin expression profile of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Rudkin, Justine K; Laabei, Maisem; Edwards, Andrew M; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Otto, Michael; Lennon, Katrina L; O'Gara, James P; Waterfield, Nicholas R; Massey, Ruth C

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is a growing cause for concern. These strains are more virulent than health care-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) due to higher levels of toxin expression. In a previous study, we showed that the high-level expression of PBP2a, the alternative penicillin binding protein encoded by the mecA gene on type II staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements, reduced toxicity by interfering with the Agr quorum sensing system. This was not seen in strains carrying the CA-MRSA-associated type IV SCCmec element. These strains express significantly lower levels of PBP2a than the other MRSA type, which may explain their relatively high toxicity. We hypothesized that as oxacillin is known to increase mecA expression levels, it may be possible to attenuate the toxicity of CA-MRSA by using this antibiotic. Subinhibitory oxacillin concentrations induced PBP2a expression, repressed Agr activity, and, as a consequence, decreased phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) secretion by CA-MRSA strains. However, consistent with other studies, oxacillin also increased the expression levels of alpha-toxin and Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL). The net effect of these changes on the ability to lyse diverse cell types was tested, and we found that where the PSMs and alpha-toxin are important, oxacillin reduced overall lytic activity, but where PVL is important, it increased lytic activity, demonstrating the pleiotropic effect of oxacillin on toxin expression by CA-MRSA.

  1. Levels of alpha-toxin correlate with distinct phenotypic response profiles of blood mononuclear cells and with agr background of community-associated Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    PubMed

    Mairpady Shambat, Srikanth; Haggar, Axana; Vandenesch, Francois; Lina, Gerard; van Wamel, Willem J B; Arakere, Gayathri; Svensson, Mattias; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of Staphylococcus aureus have shown a relation between certain clones and the presence of specific virulence genes, but how this translates into virulence-associated functional responses is not fully elucidated. Here we addressed this issue by analyses of community-acquired S. aureus strains characterized with respect to antibiotic resistance, ST types, agr types, and virulence gene profiles. Supernatants containing exotoxins were prepared from overnight bacterial cultures, and tested in proliferation assays using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The strains displayed stable phenotypic response profiles, defined by either a proliferative or cytotoxic response. Although, virtually all strains elicited superantigen-mediated proliferative responses, the strains with a cytotoxic profile induced proliferation only in cultures with the most diluted supernatants. This indicated that the superantigen-response was masked by a cytotoxic effect which was also confirmed by flow cytometry analysis. The cytotoxic supernatants contained significantly higher levels of α-toxin than did the proliferative supernatants. Addition of α-toxin to supernatants characterized as proliferative switched the response into cytotoxic profiles. In contrast, no effect of Panton Valentine Leukocidin, δ-toxin or phenol soluble modulin α-3 was noted in the proliferative assay. Furthermore, a significant association between agr type and phenotypic profile was found, where agrII and agrIII strains had predominantly a proliferative profile whereas agrI and IV strains had a predominantly cytotoxic profile. The differential response profiles associated with specific S. aureus strains with varying toxin production could possibly have an impact on disease manifestations, and as such may reflect specific pathotypes.

  2. Application of a Propionyl Coenzyme A Synthetase for Poly(3-Hydroxypropionate-co-3-Hydroxybutyrate) Accumulation in Recombinant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Henry E.; Mitsky, Timothy A.; Mahadeo, Debbie A.; Tran, Minhtien; Gruys, Kenneth J.

    2000-01-01

    The genetic operon for propionic acid degradation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium contains an open reading frame designated prpE which encodes a propionyl coenzyme A (propionyl-CoA) synthetase (A. R. Horswill and J. C. Escalante-Semerena, Microbiology 145:1381–1388, 1999). In this paper we report the cloning of prpE by PCR, its overexpression in Escherichia coli, and the substrate specificity of the enzyme. When propionate was utilized as the substrate for PrpE, a Km of 50 μM and a specific activity of 120 μmol · min−1 · mg−1 were found at the saturating substrate concentration. PrpE also activated acetate, 3-hydroxypropionate (3HP), and butyrate to their corresponding coenzyme A esters but did so much less efficiently than propionate. When prpE was coexpressed with the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biosynthetic genes from Ralstonia eutropha in recombinant E. coli, a PHA copolymer containing 3HP units accumulated when 3HP was supplied with the growth medium. To compare the utility of acyl-CoA synthetases to that of an acyl-CoA transferase for PHA production, PHA-producing recombinant strains were constructed to coexpress the PHA biosynthetic genes with prpE, with acoE (an acetyl-CoA synthetase gene from R. eutropha [H. Priefert and A. Steinbüchel, J. Bacteriol. 174:6590–6599, 1992]), or with orfZ (an acetyl-CoA:4-hydroxybutyrate-CoA transferase gene from Clostridium propionicum [H. E. Valentin, S. Reiser, and K. J. Gruys, Biotechnol. Bioeng. 67:291–299, 2000]). Of the three enzymes, PrpE and OrfZ enabled similar levels of 3HP incorporation into PHA, whereas AcoE was significantly less effective in this capacity. PMID:11097899

  3. High prevalence of methicillin resistance and PVL genes amongStaphylococcus aureus isolates from the nares and skin lesions of pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante, F.S.; Abad, E.D.; Lyra, Y.C.; Saintive, S.B.; Ribeiro, M.; Ferreira, D.C.; dos Santos, K.R.N.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is highly prevalent among patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), and this pathogen may trigger and aggravate AD lesions. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of S. aureus in the nares of pediatric subjects and verify the phenotypic and molecular characteristics of the isolates in pediatric patients with AD. Isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility, SCCmectyping, and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) genes. Lineages were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). AD severity was assessed with the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index. Among 106 patients, 90 (85%) presented S. aureus isolates in their nares, and 8 also presented the pathogen in their skin infections. Two patients had two positive lesions, making a total of 10 S. aureusisolates from skin infections. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus(MRSA) was detected in 24 (26.6%) patients, and PVL genes were identified in 21 (23.3%), including 6 (75%) of the 8 patients with skin lesions but mainly in patients with severe and moderate SCORAD values (P=0.0095). All 24 MRSA isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, while 8 isolates had a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to mupirocin >1024 μg/mL. High lineage diversity was found among the isolates including USA1100/ST30, USA400/ST1, USA800/ST5, ST83, ST188, ST718, ST1635, and ST2791. There was a high prevalence of MRSA and PVL genes among the isolates recovered in this study. PVL genes were found mostly among patients with severe and moderate SCORAD values. These findings can help clinicians improve the therapies and strategies for the management of pediatric patients with AD. PMID:25992644

  4. Cartographic Production for the FLaSH Map Study: Generation of Rugosity Grids, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, Lisa L.; Knorr, Paul O.; Hansen, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Project Summary This series of raster data is a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Data Series release from the Florida Shelf Habitat Project (FLaSH). This disc contains two raster images in Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI) raster grid format, jpeg image format, and Geo-referenced Tagged Image File Format (GeoTIFF). Data is also provided in non-image ASCII format. Rugosity grids at two resolutions (250 m and 1000 m) were generated for West Florida shelf waters to 250 m using a custom algorithm that follows the methods of Valentine and others (2004). The Methods portion of this document describes the specific steps used to generate the raster images. Rugosity, also referred to as roughness, ruggedness, or the surface-area ratio (Riley and others, 1999; Wilson and others, 2007), is a visual and quantitative measurement of terrain complexity, a common variable in ecological habitat studies. The rugosity of an area can affect biota by influencing habitat, providing shelter from elements, determining the quantity and type of living space, influencing the type and quantity of flora, affecting predator-prey relationships by providing cover and concealment, and, as an expression of vertical relief, can influence local environmental conditions such as temperature and moisture. In the marine environment rugosity can furthermore influence current flow rate and direction, increase the residence time of water in an area through eddying and current deflection, influence local water conditions such as chemistry, turbidity, and temperature, and influence the rate and nature of sedimentary deposition. State-of-the-art computer-mapping techniques and data-processing tools were used to develop shelf-wide raster and vector data layers. Florida Shelf Habitat (FLaSH) Mapping Project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/flash) endeavors to locate available data, identify data gaps, synthesize existing information, and expand our understanding of geologic processes in our dynamic

  5. Prevalence of MRSA strains among Staphylococcus aureus isolated from outpatients, 2006.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Geoffrey W; Nimmo, Graeme R; Pearson, Julie C; Christiansen, Keryn J; Bell, Jan M; Collignon, Peter J; McLaws, Mary-Louise

    2009-03-01

    Biennial community-based Staphylococcus aureus antimicrobial surveillance programs have been performed by the Australian Group for Antimicrobial Resistance (AGAR) since 2000. Over this time the percentage of S. aureus identified as methicillin resistant has increased significantly from 10.3% in 2000 to 16% in 2006. This increase has occurred throughout Australia and has been due to the emergence of community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) clones. However, healthcare associated MRSA were still predominant in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory and Victoria/Tasmania. In the 2006 survey CA-MRSA accounted for 8.8% of community-onset S. aureus infections. Although multiple CA-MRSA clones were characterised, the predominate clone identified was Queensland (Qld) MRSA (ST93-MRSA-IV) a Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) positive MRSA that was first reported in Queensland and northern New South Wales in 2003 but has now spread throughout Australia. Several international PVL-positive CA-MRSA clones were also identified including USA300 MRSA (ST8-MRSA-IV). In addition, PVL was detected in an EMRSA-15 (ST22-MRSA-IV) isolate; a hospital associated MRSA clone that is known to be highly transmissible in the healthcare setting. With the introduction of the international clones and the transmission of Qld MRSA throughout the country, over 50% of CA-MRSA in Australia are now PVL positive. This change in the epidemiology of CA-MRSA in the Australian community will potentially result in an increase in skin and soft tissue infections in young Australians. As infections caused by these strains frequently results in hospitalisation their emergence is a major health concern.

  6. Structure-Function Analysis of Heterodimer Formation, Oligomerization, and Receptor Binding of the Staphylococcus aureus Bi-component Toxin LukGH*

    PubMed Central

    Badarau, Adriana; Rouha, Harald; Malafa, Stefan; Logan, Derek T.; Håkansson, Maria; Stulik, Lukas; Dolezilkova, Ivana; Teubenbacher, Astrid; Gross, Karin; Maierhofer, Barbara; Weber, Susanne; Jägerhofer, Michaela; Hoffman, David; Nagy, Eszter

    2015-01-01

    The bi-component leukocidins of Staphylococcus aureus are important virulence factors that lyse human phagocytic cells and contribute to immune evasion. The γ-hemolysins (HlgAB and HlgCB) and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL or LukSF) were shown to assemble from soluble subunits into membrane-bound oligomers on the surface of target cells, creating barrel-like pore structures that lead to cell lysis. LukGH is the most distantly related member of this toxin family, sharing only 30–40% amino acid sequence identity with the others. We observed that, unlike other leukocidin subunits, recombinant LukH and LukG had low solubility and were unable to bind to target cells, unless both components were present. Using biolayer interferometry and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence we detected binding of LukH to LukG in solution with an affinity in the low nanomolar range and dynamic light scattering measurements confirmed formation of a heterodimer. We elucidated the structure of LukGH by x-ray crystallography at 2.8-Å resolution. This revealed an octameric structure that strongly resembles that reported for HlgAB, but with important structural differences. Structure guided mutagenesis studies demonstrated that three salt bridges, not found in other bi-component leukocidins, are essential for dimer formation in solution and receptor binding. We detected weak binding of LukH, but not LukG, to the cellular receptor CD11b by biolayer interferometry, suggesting that in common with other members of this toxin family, the S-component has the primary contact role with the receptor. These new insights provide the basis for novel strategies to counteract this powerful toxin and Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis. PMID:25371205

  7. High-resolution spectroscopy and analysis of the ν1/ν3 stretching dyad of osmium tetroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louviot, M.; Boudon, V.; Manceron, L.; Roy, P.; Balcon, D.

    2012-01-01

    OsO4 is a heavy tetrahedral molecule that may constitute a benchmark for quantum chemistry calculations. Its favorable spin statistics (due to the zero nuclear spin of oxygen atoms) is such that only A1 and A2 rovibrational levels are allowed, leading to a dense, but quite easily resolved spectrum. Most lines are single ones, instead of complex line clusters as in the case of other heavy spherical-tops like SF6, for instance. It is thus possible to fully assign and fit the spectrum and to obtain precise experimental effective molecular parameters. The strong ν3 stretching fundamental has been studied a long time ago as an isolated band [McDowell RS, Radziemski LJ, Flicker H, Galbraith HW, Kennedy RC, Nereson NG, et al. Journal of Chemical Physics 1978;88:1513-21; Bobin B, Valentin A, Henry L. Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy 1987;122:229-41]. We reinvestigate here this region and perform new assignments and effective Hamiltonian parameter fits for the four main isotopologues (192OsO4, 190OsO4, 189OsO4, 188OsO4), by considering the ν1/ν3 stretching dyad. A new experimental spectrum has been recorded at room temperature, thanks to a Bruker IFS 125 HR interferometer and using a natural abundance OsO4 sample. Assignments and analyses were performed thanks to the SPVIEW and XTDS softwares, respectively [Wenger Ch, Boudon V, Rotger M, Sanzharov M, Champion J-P. Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy 2008;251:102-13]. We provide precise effective Hamiltonian parameters, including band centers and Coriolis interaction parameters. We discuss isotopic shifts and estimate the band centers for the three minor isotopologues (187OsO4, 186OsO4, 184OsO4). The Q branches of the first two of them are clearly identified in the experimental spectrum.

  8. Direct, Specific and Rapid Detection of Staphylococcal Proteins and Exotoxins Using a Multiplex Antibody Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Stieber, Bettina; Monecke, Stefan; Müller, Elke; Büchler, Joseph; Ehricht, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background S. aureus is a pathogen in humans and animals that harbors a wide variety of virulence factors and resistance genes. This bacterium can cause a wide range of mild to life-threatening diseases. In the latter case, fast diagnostic procedures are important. In routine diagnostic laboratories, several genotypic and phenotypic methods are available to identify S. aureus strains and determine their resistances. However, there is a demand for multiplex routine diagnostic tests to directly detect staphylococcal toxins and proteins. Methods In this study, an antibody microarray based assay was established and validated for the rapid detection of staphylococcal markers and exotoxins. The following targets were included: staphylococcal protein A, penicillin binding protein 2a, alpha- and beta-hemolysins, Panton Valentine leukocidin, toxic shock syndrome toxin, enterotoxins A and B as well as staphylokinase. All were detected simultaneously within a single experiment, starting from a clonal culture on standard media. The detection of bound proteins was performed using a new fluorescence reading device for microarrays. Results 110 reference strains and clinical isolates were analyzed using this assay, with a DNA microarray for genotypic characterization performed in parallel. The results showed a general high concordance of genotypic and phenotypic data. However, genotypic analysis found the hla gene present in all S. aureus isolates but its expression under given conditions depended on the clonal complex affiliation of the actual isolate. Conclusions The multiplex antibody assay described herein allowed a rapid and reliable detection of clinically relevant staphylococcal toxins as well as resistance- and species-specific markers. PMID:26624622

  9. Cytoplasmic replication of Staphylococcus aureus upon phagosomal escape triggered by phenol-soluble modulin α

    PubMed Central

    Grosz, Magdalena; Kolter, Julia; Paprotka, Kerstin; Winkler, Ann-Cathrin; Schäfer, Daniel; Chatterjee, Som Subra; Geiger, Tobias; Wolz, Christiane; Ohlsen, Knut; Otto, Michael; Rudel, Thomas; Sinha, Bhanu; Fraunholz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive human pathogen that is readily internalized by professional phagocytes such as macrophages and neutrophils but also by non-professional phagocytes such as epithelial or endothelial cells. Intracellular bacteria have been proposed to play a role in evasion of the innate immune system and may also lead to dissemination within migrating phagocytes. Further, S. aureus efficiently lyses host cells with a battery of cytolytic toxins. Recently, phenol-soluble modulins (PSM) have been identified to comprise a genus-specific family of cytolytic peptides. Of these the PSMα peptides have been implicated in killing polymorphonuclear leukocytes after phagocytosis. We questioned if the peptides were active in destroying endosomal membranes to avoid lysosomal killing of the pathogen and monitored integrity of infected host cell endosomes by measuring the acidity of the intracellular bacterial microenvironment via flow cytometry and by a reporter recruitment technique. Isogenic mutants of the methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains USA300 LAC, USA400 MW2 as well as the strongly cytolytic methicillin-sensitive strain 6850 were compared to their respective wild type strains. In all three genetic backgrounds, PSMα mutants were unable to escape from phagosomes in non-professional (293, HeLa, EAhy.926) and professional phagocytes (THP-1), whereas mutants in PSMβ and δ-toxin as well as β-toxin, phosphatidyl inositol-dependent phospholipase C and Panton Valentine leukotoxin escaped with efficiencies of the parental strains. S. aureus replicated intracellularly only in presence of a functional PSMα operon thereby illustrating that bacteria grow in the host cell cytoplasm upon phagosomal escape. PMID:24164701

  10. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: community transmission, pathogenesis, and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Nishiyama, Akihito; Takano, Tomomi; Yabe, Shizuka; Higuchi, Wataru; Razvina, Olga; Shi, Da

    2010-08-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is able to persist not only in hospitals (with a high level of antimicrobial agent use) but also in the community (with a low level of antimicrobial agent use). The former is called hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) and the latter community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA). It is believed MRSA clones are generated from S. aureus through insertion of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec), and outbreaks occur as they spread. Several worldwide and regional clones have been identified, and their epidemiological, clinical, and genetic characteristics have been described. CA-MRSA is likely able to survive in the community because of suitable SCCmec types (type IV or V), a clone-specific colonization/infection nature, toxin profiles (including Pantone-Valentine leucocidin, PVL), and narrow drug resistance patterns. CA-MRSA infections are generally seen in healthy children or young athletes, with unexpected cases of diseases, and also in elderly inpatients, occasionally surprising clinicians used to HA-MRSA infections. CA-MRSA spreads within families and close-contact groups or even through public transport, demonstrating transmission cores. Re-infection (including multifocal infection) frequently occurs, if the cores are not sought out and properly eradicated. Recently, attention has been given to CA-MRSA (USA300), which originated in the US, and is growing as HA-MRSA and also as a worldwide clone. CA-MRSA infection in influenza season has increasingly been noted as well. MRSA is also found in farm and companion animals, and has occasionally transferred to humans. As such, the epidemiological, clinical, and genetic behavior of CA-MRSA, a growing threat, is focused on in this study. PMID:20336341

  11. Development of a new pentaplex real-time PCR assay for the identification of poly-microbial specimens containing Staphylococcus aureus and other staphylococci, with simultaneous detection of staphylococcal virulence and methicillin resistance markers.

    PubMed

    Okolie, Charles E; Wooldridge, Karl G; Turner, David P; Cockayne, Alan; James, Richard

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus strains harbouring genes encoding virulence and antibiotic resistance are of public health importance. In clinical samples, pathogenic S. aureus is often mixed with putatively less pathogenic coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), both of which can harbour mecA, the gene encoding staphylococcal methicillin-resistance. There have been previous attempts at distinguishing MRSA from MRCoNS, most of which were based on the detection of one of the pathognomonic markers of S. aureus, such as coa, nuc or spa. That approach might suffice for discrete colonies and mono-microbial samples; it is inadequate for identification of clinical specimens containing mixtures of S. aureus and CoNS. In the present study, a real-time pentaplex PCR assay has been developed which simultaneously detects markers for bacteria (16S rRNA), coagulase-negative staphylococcus (cns), S. aureus (spa), Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl) and methicillin resistance (mecA). Staphylococcal and non-staphylococcal bacterial strains (n = 283) were used to validate the new assay. The applicability of this test to clinical samples was evaluated using spiked blood cultures (n = 43) containing S. aureus and CoNS in mono-microbial and poly-microbial models, which showed that the 5 markers were all detected as expected. Cycling completes within 1 h, delivering 100% specificity, NPV and PPV with a detection limit of 1.0 × 10(1) to 3.0 × 10(1) colony forming units (CFU)/ml, suggesting direct applicability in routine diagnostic microbiology. This is the most multiplexed real-time PCR-based PVL-MRSA assay and the first detection of a unique marker for CoNS without recourse to the conventional elimination approach. There was no evidence that this new assay produced invalid/indeterminate test results.

  12. Foods from black market at EU border as a neglected route of potential methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission.

    PubMed

    Oniciuc, Elena-Alexandra; Ariza-Miguel, Jaime; Bolocan, Andrei-Sorin; Diez-Valcarce, Marta; Rovira, Jordi; Hernández, Marta; Fernández-Natal, Isabel; Nicolau, Anca Ioana; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David

    2015-09-16

    The illegal entrance of foods to EU through black markets at the EU borders can constitute a neglected route of dissemination of foodborne pathogens, and in particular of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In this study, we have assessed the presence of MRSA in foods sold in a black market at an EU border (the southeast part of Romania, on the border with Republic of Moldavia). We performed a search for MRSA among 200 food samples collected from 2012 to 2013. All S. aureus were studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. MRSA isolates were further characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and SCCmec typing, and tested for the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) virulence factors. Overall, 32 S. aureus isolates were recovered from 16 food samples (8%). One isolate detected in a pork lard sample was MRSA (0.5%). PFGE with the restriction enzyme SmaI revealed 12 genotypes among the 32 S. aureus isolates. The MRSA isolate belonged to sequence type 398, harbored SCCmec type V, tested negative for the presence of the PVL genes and was resistant to ciprofloxacin, tetracycline and cefazolin, besides all β-lactams. Among 31 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA), 29% were resistant to penicillin, 9.7% to tetracycline and 3.2% to ciprofloxacin. In conclusion, in this study we report the presence of livestock-associated MRSA in foods sold in a black market at an EU border: ST398-MRSA-V. These results confirm the potential role of food in the dissemination of MRSA lineages among population, and the potential role of illegally introduced food to EU in the prevalence and evolution of MRSA clones in the community.

  13. Changing Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Iceland from 2000 to 2008: a Challenge to Current Guidelines ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane; Hardardottir, Hjördis; Haraldsson, Gunnsteinn; Westh, Henrik; Valsdottir, Freyja; Boye, Kit; Karlsson, Sigfus; Kristinsson, Karl Gustaf; Gudlaugsson, Olafur

    2010-01-01

    The epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is continuously changing. Iceland has a low incidence of MRSA. A “search and destroy” policy (screening patients with defined risk factors and attempting eradication in carriers) has been implemented since 1991. Clinical and microbiological data of all MRSA patients from the years 2000 to 2008 were collected prospectively. Isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), sequencing of the repeat region of the Staphylococcus protein A gene (spa typing), staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, and screening for the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene. Two hundred twenty-six infected (60%) or colonized (40%) individuals were detected (annual incidence 2.5 to 16/100,000). From 2000 to 2003, two health care-associated outbreaks dominated (spa types t037 and t2802), which were successfully controlled with extensive infection control measures. After 2004, an increasing number of community-associated (CA) cases without relation to the health care system occurred. A great variety of clones (40 PFGE types and 49 spa types) were found, reflecting an influx of MRSA from abroad. The USA300 and Southwest Pacific (SWP) clones were common. SCCmec type IV was most common (72%), and 38% of the isolates were PVL positive. The incidence of MRSA in Iceland has increased since 1999 but remains low and has been stable in the last years. The search and destroy policy was effective to control MRSA in the health care setting. However, MRSA in Iceland is now shifting into the community, challenging the current Icelandic guidelines, which are tailored to the health care system. PMID:20844224

  14. Carriage of Staphylococcus species in the veterinary visiting dog population in mainland UK: molecular characterisation of resistance and virulence.

    PubMed

    Wedley, Amy L; Dawson, Susan; Maddox, Thomas W; Coyne, Karen P; Pinchbeck, Gina L; Clegg, Peter; Jamrozy, Dorota; Fielder, Mark D; Donovan, David; Nuttall, Tim; Williams, Nicola J

    2014-05-14

    This study investigated the prevalence of nasal carriage of staphylococci in dogs and determined the characteristics of the isolates. A total of 724 dogs from 87 veterinary practices across the mainland UK were screened for carriage of Staphylococcus spp. All isolates were examined for meticillin resistance (MR) and the presence of the mecA gene investigated in those isolates showing resistance. All coagulase-positive staphylococci and MR coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS) were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Spa typing and DNA microarray analysis of resistance and virulence genes was carried out on all MR S. aureus (MRSA) and a subset of meticillin susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). Staphylococci were isolated from 399 (55.1%) of the dogs; only seven (1%) carried MRSA, all of which were identified as the dominant UK healthcare-associated strain (EMRSA-15, ST22). MSSA was identified in 47 (6.5%) dogs, the sequence types of which have been suggested as precursors to successful MRSA clones. Forty (5.5%) dogs carried MRCoNS, while no dogs carried MR S. pseudintermedius, although this is increasingly reported in mainland Europe. Resistance to antimicrobials among the isolates varied between species, with multidrug resistance (MDR) in 87.5% of MRCoNS and 21.8% of coagulase positive staphylococci. Microarray analysis of MRSA and a subset of MSSA isolates identified numerous virulence genes associated with pathogenesis, which are commonly identified in isolates of human origin. However, no isolates carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes. This study suggests that MRSA carriage is low in the vet visiting dog population, but there is a diverse range of virulence and resistance determinants in canine S. aureus and MRCoNS isolates.

  15. Interspecies spread of Staphylococcus aureus clones among companion animals and human close contacts in a veterinary teaching hospital. A cross-sectional study in Greece.

    PubMed

    Drougka, Eleanna; Foka, Antigoni; Koutinas, Christos K; Jelastopulu, Eleni; Giormezis, Nikolaos; Farmaki, Ourania; Sarrou, Styliani; Anastassiou, Evangelos D; Petinaki, Efthimia; Spiliopoulou, Iris

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) prevalence among companion animals and veterinary personnel (VP) was investigated. Strains' molecular characteristics were evaluated in order to assess S. aureus transmission. Specimens (224) from colonized and infected sites of 102 animals (92 dogs, 10 cats) and 18 VP were collected during 2012 and 2013. Antibiotic susceptibility was performed by the disk diffusion method and Etest. mecA, mecC, tst (toxic shock syndrome toxin) and lukF/lukS-PV (Panton-Valentine leukocidin, PVL) genes were investigated by PCR. Genotypes were identified by Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST), Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec), accessory gene regulator group (agr), spa and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). S. aureus prevalence among pets and VP was 36.3% (37/102) and 38.9% (7/18), respectively. Younger companion animals, those living in rural areas, having a disease upon admission or Coagulase-negative staphylococci co-carriage showed significantly higher prevalence of S. aureus isolation (p<0.05). Twenty-six pets and five VP carried PVL-positive S. aureus. In total, 60 S. aureus strains were recovered (53 from pets, seven from VP) of which 16 were MRSA (26.7%), 12 mecA- and four mecC-positive. MRSA showed higher resistance rates against other antimicrobials as compared to methicillin-susceptible ones. Strains were classified by MLST in 13 STs, with the predominance of ST80 and ST15. In MRSA, SCCmec types II, IV and XI were identified. The most frequent spa types were t5559 and t7558. Fifty-six strains were classified into 15 PFGE types. Comparison of genetic markers shows that identical or very similar strains disseminate among animals and VP. Companion animals harbor PVL-positive clones constituting a possible source for transmission to humans.

  16. Quaternary faults near the proposed Eagle Flat low-level radioactive waste repository, Trans-Pecos Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.W.; Raney, J.A. . Bureau of Economic Geology)

    1992-01-01

    The Eagle Flat basin, an intermontane basin in Trans-Pecos Texas, is being considered as a possible site for the Texas repository of low-level radioactive wastes. Intermontane basins and associated normal faults formed in response to Basin and Range tectonism that began about 24 Ma ago. The most active late Tertiary and Quaternary faults occur within the Hueco Bolson (HB) and the Salt Basin/Salt Flat/Lobo Valley, west and east, respectively, of the proposed repository. Several faults of the southeast HB which are within 50 km of the site, displace middle Pleistocene deposits 10 to 24 m. The most recent surface rupture in the southeast HB probably occurred on the Amargosa fault during the Holocene. Upper Pleistocene deposits are offset 2.5 to 4.5 m, and middle Pleistocene deposits are displaced 24 m. Fault scarps within 50 km east of the proposed repository are associated with faults bounding the Salt Basin/Salt Flat/Lobo Valley. In the southern Salt Basin and northern Salt Flat, faults offset probable upper Pleistocene to Holocene deposits as much as 1.5 m. A scarp in Red Light Bolson, 13.5 km south of the site, is the closest Quaternary fault scarp to the proposed site. Only 7 km long, this scarp is part of a mostly covered, probably multisegmented, 40-km-long fault that bounds the northeastern margin of Red Light Bolson. Offsets associated with single-rupture events range from 0.6 to 3 m, and average recurrence intervals between surface ruptures since middle Pleistocene are about 10,000 to 100,000 yr. The largest historical earthquake of the region, the 1931 Valentine earthquake, which had a magnitude of 6.4 and no reported surface rupture, occurred about 95 km southeast of the proposed repository.

  17. Molecular epidemiology of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Africa: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Abdulgader, Shima M.; Shittu, Adebayo O.; Nicol, Mark P.; Kaba, Mamadou

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are a serious global problem, with considerable impact on patients and substantial health care costs. This systematic review provides an overview on the clonal diversity of MRSA, as well as the prevalence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-positive MRSA in Africa. A search on the molecular characterization of MRSA in Africa was conducted by two authors using predefined terms. We screened for articles published in English and French through to October 2014 from five electronic databases. A total of 57 eligible studies were identified. Thirty-four reports from 15 countries provided adequate genotyping data. CC5 is the predominant clonal complex in the healthcare setting in Africa. The hospital-associated MRSA ST239/ST241-III [3A] was identified in nine African countries. This clone was also described with SCCmec type IV [2B] in Algeria and Nigeria, and type V [5C] in Niger. In Africa, the European ST80-IV [2B] clone was limited to Algeria, Egypt and Tunisia. The clonal types ST22-IV [2B], ST36-II [2A], and ST612-IV [2B] were only reported in South Africa. No clear distinctions were observed between MRSA responsible for hospital and community infections. The community clones ST8-IV [2B] and ST88-IV [2B] were reported both in the hospital and community settings in Angola, Cameroon, Gabon, Ghana, Madagascar, Nigeria, and São Tomé and Príncipe. The proportion of PVL-positive MRSA carriage and/or infections ranged from 0.3 to 100% in humans. A number of pandemic clones were identified in Africa. Moreover, some MRSA clones are limited to specific countries or regions. We strongly advocate for more surveillance studies on MRSA in Africa. PMID:25983721

  18. [Helicobacter pylori infection (13C-UBT), and its relationship with nutritional and socioeconomic factors in low income school children from Valencia, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Páez Valery, M C; Barón, M A; Solano, L; Nadaff, G; Boccio, J; Barrado, A

    2006-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection (Hp) is widely spread around the world, and it is considered one of the main causes of chronic gastritis, peptic and duodenal ulcers, and gastric cancer. Recent research has shown that it can be associated with nutritional disorders, mainly with iron and other micronutrient deficiencies. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of Hp infection, and infection pattern according to age, sex, nutritional status, and socioeconomic conditions in children who attended the Unidad Educativa "Valentin Espinal" in the city of Valencia. 170 children, between 3 and 14 years of age were studied to assess Hpylori infection (13C-urea breath test), age, nutritional status according to BMI and Height for age, hemoglobin (cianometahemoglobin), serum ferritin (ELISA), socioeconomic status (Graffar-Méndez-Castellano), housing conditions, number of families and of people cohabitating in the same household, and quality of services. 78.8% of the children were infected with Hp, witch was significantly correlated with age but not gender. 25.9% of the sample had undernutrition, and 46.5% were stunted. 98.1% of the families lived in poverty, and 98% of the households showed sanitary deficiencies. A mean of 6.0 +/- 2.4 persons lived in each household (range: 2-15), and an average of 3.2 person shared bedrooms. The odds of being infected were higher in those children who were stunted. Also, socioeconomic status, mother's education level, and poor hosing conditions were significantly associated to being infected. Hpylori is highly prevalent among socially and economically deprived children, and age, overcrowding, and a low education level of the mother increases the risk of being infected.

  19. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Detected at Four U.S. Wastewater Treatment Plants

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Rachel E. Rosenberg; Micallef, Shirley A.; Gibbs, Shawn G.; Davis, Johnnie A.; He, Xin; George, Ashish; Kleinfelter, Lara M.; Schreiber, Nicole A.; Mukherjee, Sampa; Joseph, Sam W.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The incidence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections is increasing in the United States, and it is possible that municipal wastewater could be a reservoir of this microorganism. To date, no U.S. studies have evaluated the occurrence of MRSA in wastewater. Objective: We examined the occurrence of MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) at U.S. wastewater treatment plants. Methods: We collected wastewater samples from two Mid-Atlantic and two Midwest wastewater treatment plants between October 2009 and October 2010. Samples were analyzed for MRSA and MSSA using membrane filtration. Isolates were confirmed using biochemical tests and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Sensititre® microbroth dilution. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) screening, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed to further characterize the strains. Data were analyzed by two-sample proportion tests and analysis of variance. Results: We detected MRSA (n = 240) and MSSA (n = 119) in 22 of 44 (50%) and 24 of 44 (55%) wastewater samples, respectively. The odds of samples being MRSA-positive decreased as treatment progressed: 10 of 12 (83%) influent samples were MRSA-positive, while only one of 12 (8%) effluent samples was MRSA-positive. Ninety-three percent and 29% of unique MRSA and MSSA isolates, respectively, were multidrug resistant. SCCmec types II and IV, the pvl gene, and USA types 100, 300, and 700 (PFGE strain types commonly found in the United States) were identified among the MRSA isolates. Conclusions: Our findings raise potential public health concerns for wastewater treatment plant workers and individuals exposed to reclaimed wastewater. Because of increasing use of reclaimed wastewater, further study is needed to evaluate the risk of exposure to antibiotic-resistant bacteria in treated

  20. List of Organizing Committees and Conference Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-03-01

    Organizers Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH Romanian Neutron Scattering Society Sponsors Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH Comenius University in Bratislava, Slovakia Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry AS CR, Czech Republic Programme Committee Valentin Gordely (chairman)Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Russia Heinrich StuhrmannGermany Jose TeixeiraLaboratoire Leon Brillouin, France Pavel ApelJoint Institute for Nuclear Research, Russia Pavol BalgavyComenius University in Bratislava, Slovakia Alexander BelushkinJoint Institute for Nuclear Research, Russia Georg BueldtInstitute of Structural Biology and Biophysics (ISB), Germany Leonid BulavinTaras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Ukraine Emil BurzoBabes-Bolyai University, Romania Vadim CherezovThe Scripps Research Institute, Department of Molecular Biology, USA Ion IonitaRomanian Society of Neutron Scattering, Romania Alexei KhokhlovMoscow State University, Russia Aziz MuzafarovInstitute of Synthetic Polymeric Materials, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia Alexander OzerinInstitute of Synthetic Polymeric Materials, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia Gerard PepyResearch Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Hungary Josef PlestilInstitute of Macromolecular Chemistry CAS, Czech Republic Aurel RadulescuJuelich Centre for Neutron Science JCNS, Germany Maria BalasoiuJoint Institute for Nuclear Research, Russia Alexander KuklinJoint Institute for Nuclear Research, Russia Local Organizing Committee Alexander Kuklin - Chairman Maria Balasoiu - Co-chairman Tatiana Murugova - Secretary Natalia Malysheva Natalia Dokalenko Julia Gorshkova Andrey Rogachev Oleksandr Ivankov Dmitry Soloviev Lilia Anghel Erhan Raul The PDF also contains the Conference Programme.

  1. Evaluating the usefulness of spa typing, in comparison with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, for epidemiological typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a low-prevalence region in Sweden 2000-2004.

    PubMed

    Petersson, A C; Olsson-Liljequist, B; Miörner, H; Haeggman, S

    2010-05-01

    The usefulness of spa typing was evaluated in relation to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), as a tool for epidemiological typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a low-prevalence region in southern Sweden. Bacterial isolates from 216 MRSA cases, newly identified in 2000-2004, were studied. The isolates were obtained from infected patients (31%), and from colonized individuals found by screening (69%). In total, 49 spa types and 73 PFGE patterns were identified. The discriminatory power of spa typing was lower (94.9 +/- 1.8%) than that of PFGE (97.3 +/- 1.2%). For two spa types (t002 and t008) the Panton-Valentine leukocidin results added useful discriminatory information. The most common spa types were t044 (n = 31; four PFGE patterns), t002 (n = 24; 10 PFGE patterns), t067 (n = 12; four PFGE patterns), t050 (n = 12; one PFGE pattern), and t324 (n = 11; one PFGE pattern). Epidemiological investigations identified 91 single cases and 39 transmission chains, each involving two to 13 cases. All the transmission chains were held together both by spa and PFGE typing. Among the 91 single-case isolates, 33 spa types and 50 PFGE patterns were unique (matchless) at the time of identification. The low prevalence of MRSA, the low number of outbreaks, and the wide spectrum of strains due to frequent acquisitions abroad (49% of the cases), makes spa typing a useful complement to epidemiological investigations in our setting. However, we still recommend the continued use of PFGE for further discrimination of isolates with identical spa types when epidemiological data can not exclude possible transmission.

  2. Physical properties of NxTiO2 prepared by sol-gel route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahimi, Razika; Bessekhouad, Yassine; Trari, Mohamed

    2012-09-01

    The compounds NxTiO2(x=0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2) with the anatase structure have been synthesized by Sol-Gel method using Tri-ethyl Amine as nitrogen source and their optical, electrical and electrochemical properties are investigated. The electrical conductivity and thermoelectric power are measured in the temperature rang 300-600 K. The samples exhibit p-type behavior in contrast to TiO2. The doped-samples exhibit two optical transitions (2.35≤Eh-Vis(eV)≤2.55; 1.97≤El-Vis (eV)≤2.06) directly allowed in the visible region, while only one transition is observed in UV region (EUV∼3.00 eV). Pure TiO2 shows direct band gap transition of 3.17 eV. The results confirm experimentally the calculations of Di. Valentin et al. [42]. The transitions Eh-Vis and El-Vis are attributed respectively to the promotion of electrons from the localized N 2p and π* N-O bond to the conduction band. In all cases, EUV is associated to the forbidden band energy. Though that the conductivity is generally improved by doping process, only N0.05TiO2 and N0.1TiO2 shows an enhanced mobility. The mechanism of conduction takes place by small polaron hopping. The band edge positions of NxTiO2 (x=0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2) at room temperature is predicted from the obtained physical properties. This study proves experimentally the principal role of nitrogen in doping process and permits the electronic states localization associated with N-impurities in TiO2 anatase.

  3. Genotypic Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Obtained from Humans and Bovine Mastitis Samples in India

    PubMed Central

    Prashanth, K; Rao, K Rajender; Reddy, PV Vivek; Saranathan, R; Makki, Abhijith R

    2011-01-01

    Aim and Background: Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that also causes important infections in cattle and sheep. The present study aimed to test genetic diversity among strains of S. aureus isolated from cattle (n=34) and humans (n=22) by DNA typing. Materials and Methods: Fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (FAFLP) is the genotyping tool used in the study. The presence of the mecA and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes among these strain groups was also checked. Results: A dendrogram deduced from FAFLP showed that all the strains clustered into 10 groups (A–J) with a relative genetic divergence of less than 8%. Sixty-seven percent of the isolates from bovine sources clustered together in two clades (A and H), while another major cluster with 13 isolates (59%) (Cluster G) had all strains from a human host. The remaining strains from both the hosts clustered independently into smaller clusters with the exception of two strains of human origin, which clustered along with a bovine cluster. Thirteen strains belonging to cluster G were highly clonal. About 77% of strains obtained from human infections were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), whereas only 29% of strains from bovine origin were MRSA. Only three strains from human origin showed PVL positive, while no strain from cattle had PVL genes. The complete absence of PVL genes in all the bovine strains in the study appears to be significant. Conclusions: FAFLP can be successfully applied to assess the genetic relationship of S. aureus isolates from different hosts. The study also provided the valuable epidemiological data on S. aureus from bovine sources in India, which is lacking. PMID:21731296

  4. Phenotypic and genotypic detection of virulence factors of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical and subclinical mastitis in cattle and water buffaloes from different farms of Sadat City in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, Mohamed Sabry; Mahmoud El-Bagoury, Abd Elrahman; Dawoud, Mai Abdallah

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To characterize Staphylococcus aureus from clinical and subclinical mastitis and identify virulence factors. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and two milk samples were collected, 143 from mastitic cattle and buffaloes 94 and 49, respectively, and 59 from apparently healthy cattle and buffaloes 35 and 24, respectively. Results: California mastitis test was applied and positive prevalence were 91.48% and 75.51% for cattle and buffalo with clinical mastitis and 37.14% and 45.83% for cattle and buffalo with subclinical mastitis. S. aureus was isolated from clinically mastitic cattle and buffaloes were 39.29% and 50%, respectively. While, from subclinical mastitic cattle and buffaloes were 80% and 72.73%, respectively. Hemolytic activity was assessed for S. aureus isolated from clinically and subclinical mastitic cases with prevalences of 100% and 56.25%, respectively. Thermo nuclease production from clinically and subclinical mastitic cases was 25% and 56.25%, respectively. Simplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) conducted on S. aureus using 16S rRNA, clumping factor A, Panton valentine leukocidin, coagulase (Coa), alpha-hemolysin and beta-hemolysin those proved existence in 100%, 46.9%, 65.6%, 100%, 34.4%, and 43.75% of the isolates, respectively. While, multiplex PCR is utilized for detection of enterotoxins and proved that 12.5% was positive for enterotoxine Type D. Conclusions: It is concluded that simplex and multiplex PCR assays can be used as rapid and sensitive diagnostic tools to detect the presence of S. aureus and characterize its virulence factors that help in detection of severity of infection, distribution and stating preventive and control strategies. PMID:27047197

  5. A 12-year survey of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in Greece: ST80-IV epidemic?

    PubMed

    Drougka, E; Foka, A; Liakopoulos, A; Doudoulakakis, A; Jelastopulu, E; Chini, V; Spiliopoulou, A; Levidiotou, S; Panagea, T; Vogiatzi, A; Lebessi, E; Petinaki, E; Spiliopoulou, I

    2014-11-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important cause of both healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) and community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) infections. Severe MRSA infections have been associated with the virulence factor Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). The aim of this study was to investigate susceptibility patterns, the presence of toxin genes, including that encoding PVL, and clonality among MRSA isolates collected from patients in Greece over a 12-year period. MRSA isolates were collected from January 2001 to December 2012 from six different hospitals. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined with the disk diffusion method and the Etest. The presence of the toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 gene (tst), the enterotoxin gene cluster (egc) and the PVL gene was tested with PCR. The genotypic characteristics of the strains were analysed by SCCmec and agr typing, and clonality was determined with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. An increasing rate of MRSA among S. aureus infections was detected up to 2008. The majority of PVL-positive MRSA isolates belonged to a single clone, sequence type (ST)80-IV, which was disseminated both in the community and in hospitals, especially during the warmest months of the year. Carriage of tst was associated with ST30-IV, whereas egc was distributed in different clones. CA-MRSA isolates were recovered mainly from skin and soft tissue infections, whereas HA-MRSA isolates were associated with surgical and wound infections. During the period 2001-2012, ST80-IV predominated in the community and infiltrated the hospital settings in Greece, successfully replacing other PVL-positive clones. The predominance of ST239-III in HA-MRSA infections was constant, whereas new clones have also emerged. Polyclonality was statistically significantly higher among CA-MRSA isolates and isolates from adult patients.

  6. Levels of Alpha-Toxin Correlate with Distinct Phenotypic Response Profiles of Blood Mononuclear Cells and with agr Background of Community-Associated Staphylococcus aureus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Mairpady Shambat, Srikanth; Haggar, Axana; Vandenesch, Francois; Lina, Gerard; van Wamel, Willem J. B.; Arakere, Gayathri; Svensson, Mattias; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of Staphylococcus aureus have shown a relation between certain clones and the presence of specific virulence genes, but how this translates into virulence-associated functional responses is not fully elucidated. Here we addressed this issue by analyses of community-acquired S. aureus strains characterized with respect to antibiotic resistance, ST types, agr types, and virulence gene profiles. Supernatants containing exotoxins were prepared from overnight bacterial cultures, and tested in proliferation assays using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The strains displayed stable phenotypic response profiles, defined by either a proliferative or cytotoxic response. Although, virtually all strains elicited superantigen-mediated proliferative responses, the strains with a cytotoxic profile induced proliferation only in cultures with the most diluted supernatants. This indicated that the superantigen-response was masked by a cytotoxic effect which was also confirmed by flow cytometry analysis. The cytotoxic supernatants contained significantly higher levels of α-toxin than did the proliferative supernatants. Addition of α-toxin to supernatants characterized as proliferative switched the response into cytotoxic profiles. In contrast, no effect of Panton Valentine Leukocidin, δ-toxin or phenol soluble modulin α-3 was noted in the proliferative assay. Furthermore, a significant association between agr type and phenotypic profile was found, where agrII and agrIII strains had predominantly a proliferative profile whereas agrI and IV strains had a predominantly cytotoxic profile. The differential response profiles associated with specific S. aureus strains with varying toxin production could possibly have an impact on disease manifestations, and as such may reflect specific pathotypes. PMID:25166615

  7. CALCULATING SEPARATE MAGNETIC FREE ENERGY ESTIMATES FOR ACTIVE REGIONS PRODUCING MULTIPLE FLARES: NOAA AR11158

    SciTech Connect

    Tarr, Lucas; Longcope, Dana; Millhouse, Margaret

    2013-06-10

    It is well known that photospheric flux emergence is an important process for stressing coronal fields and storing magnetic free energy, which may then be released during a flare. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captured the entire emergence of NOAA AR 11158. This region emerged as two distinct bipoles, possibly connected underneath the photosphere, yet characterized by different photospheric field evolutions and fluxes. The combined active region complex produced 15 GOES C-class, two M-class, and the X2.2 Valentine's Day Flare during the four days after initial emergence on 2011 February 12. The M and X class flares are of particular interest because they are nonhomologous, involving different subregions of the active region. We use a Magnetic Charge Topology together with the Minimum Current Corona model of the coronal field to model field evolution of the complex. Combining this with observations of flare ribbons in the 1600 A channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board SDO, we propose a minimization algorithm for estimating the amount of reconnected flux and resulting drop in magnetic free energy during a flare. For the M6.6, M2.2, and X2.2 flares, we find a flux exchange of 4.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx, 2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx, and 21.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx, respectively, resulting in free energy drops of 3.89 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg, 2.62 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg, and 1.68 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 32} erg.

  8. Genotyping of skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI)-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains among outpatients in a teaching hospital in Japan: application of a phage-open reading frame typing (POT) kit.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tadashi; Saga, Tomoo; Miyazaki, Taito; Kouyama, Yuichi; Harada, Sohei; Iwata, Morihiro; Yoshizawa, Sadako; Kimura, Soichiro; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Urita, Yoshihisa; Sugimoto, Motonobu; Yamaguchi, Keizo; Tateda, Kazuhiro

    2012-12-01

    We aimed to elucidate the current epidemiological features of outpatient skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI)-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Japan. Altogether, we evaluated the performance of a phage-open reading frame typing (POT) kit for genotyping these MRSA strains. We collected 57 MRSA strains from all outpatients with SSTIs attending a teaching hospital in Japan. Drug susceptibility measurement and genotyping including SCCmec typing, spa typing, multilocus sequence typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and commercial POT-kit were performed. The majority of strains (39 strains, 68 %) had the SCCmec-II element. Seventeen strains (30 %) with SCCmec-IV accounted for the second largest population. Strains with SCCmec-IV and SCCmec-V appeared multiclonal, and a predominance of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene-negative CC8/spa-CC008 strains, as well as the first isolate of an ST93 strain in Japan, was observed among them. Only one USA300 strain was identified. Strains with SCCmec-IV and SCCmec-V were significantly susceptible to antimicrobials. The PVL gene was found in 5 SCCmec-IV strains and 1 SCCmec-V strain. The POT-kit successfully predicted the SCCmec type in 54 strains (95 %), and typing by POT1 scores was highly concordant with SCCmec typing and spa typing. Moreover, three PVL-positive strains fell into a particular POT type (POT scores, 106-77-113). Simpson's index of the POT-kit was 0.977. In conclusion, the present study clarified the multiclonal nature of outpatient SSTI-associated MRSA in a teaching hospital in Japan. These data also underscore the utility of the POT-kit for non-outbreak surveillance through its simple platform consisting of two multiplex PCRs without sequencing.

  9. Differentiation of clonal complex 59 community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Geoffrey W; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf; Slickers, Peter; Pearson, Julie C; Tan, Hui-Leen; Christiansen, Keryn J; O'Brien, Frances G

    2010-05-01

    Clonal complex 59 (CC59) community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strains were characterized using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, spa typing, multilocus sequence typing, diagnostic DNA microarrays, and PCRs targeting staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). Six distinct groups within CC59 were characterized. At least seven different variants of SCCmec elements were identified (IVa [2B], IVb [2B], IVd [2B], IV variant [2B], IVa [2B&5], V variant [5C2], and V [5C2&5]). (The structural type is indicated by a Roman numeral, with a lowercase letter indicating the subtype, and the ccr complex and the mec complex are indicated by an Arabic numeral and an uppercase letter, respectively. Where there is an extra ccr element, this is indicated by "&" and an Arabic numeral designating the ccr type.) The first group is similar to the American sequence type 59 (ST59) MRSA-IV CA-MRSA strain USA1000. The second group includes a PVL-negative ST87 strain with an SCCmec element of subtype IVb (2B). The third group comprises PVL-variable ST59 MRSA-IV strains harboring multiple SCCmec IV subtypes. PVL-negative ST59 MRSA strains with multiple or composite SCCmec elements (IVa [2B&5]) form the fourth group. Group 5 corresponds to the internationally known "Taiwan clone," a PVL-positive strain with a variant SCCmec element (V [5C2&5]). This strain proved to be the most common CC59 MRSA strain isolated in Western Australia. Finally, group 6 encompasses the ST59 MRSA-V variant (5C2). The differentiation of CC59 into groups and strains indicates a rapid evolution and spread of SCCmec elements. Observed differences between groups of strains as well as intrastrain variability within a group facilitate the tracing of their spread. PMID:20211891

  10. Five birds, one stone: Neutralization of α-hemolysin and 4 bi-component leukocidins of Staphylococcus aureus with a single human monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Rouha, Harald; Badarau, Adriana; Visram, Zehra C; Battles, Michael B; Prinz, Bianka; Magyarics, Zoltán; Nagy, Gábor; Mirkina, Irina; Stulik, Lukas; Zerbs, Manuel; Jägerhofer, Michaela; Maierhofer, Barbara; Teubenbacher, Astrid; Dolezilkova, Ivana; Gross, Karin; Banerjee, Srijib; Zauner, Gerhild; Malafa, Stefan; Zmajkovic, Jakub; Maier, Sabine; Mabry, Robert; Krauland, Eric; Wittrup, K Dane; Gerngross, Tillman U; Nagy, Eszter

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen associated with high mortality. The emergence of antibiotic resistance and the inability of antibiotics to counteract bacterial cytotoxins involved in the pathogenesis of S. aureus call for novel therapeutic approaches, such as passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The complexity of staphylococcal pathogenesis and past failures with single mAb products represent considerable barriers for antibody-based therapeutics. Over the past few years, efforts have focused on neutralizing α-hemolysin. Recent findings suggest that the concerted actions of several cytotoxins, including the bi-component leukocidins play important roles in staphylococcal pathogenesis. Therefore, we aimed to isolate mAbs that bind to multiple cytolysins by employing high diversity human IgG1 libraries presented on the surface of yeast cells. Here we describe cross-reactive antibodies with picomolar affinity for α-hemolysin and 4 different bi-component leukocidins that share only ∼26% overall amino acid sequence identity. The molecular basis of cross-reactivity is the recognition of a conformational epitope shared by α-hemolysin and F-components of gamma-hemolysin (HlgAB and HlgCB), LukED and LukSF (Panton-Valentine Leukocidin). The amino acids predicted to form the epitope are conserved and known to be important for cytotoxic activity. We found that a single cross-reactive antibody prevented lysis of human phagocytes, epithelial and red blood cells induced by α-hemolysin and leukocidins in vitro, and therefore had superior effectiveness compared to α-hemolysin specific antibodies to protect from the combined cytolytic effect of secreted S. aureus toxins. Such mAb afforded high levels of protection in murine models of pneumonia and sepsis. PMID:25523282

  11. Interspecies spread of Staphylococcus aureus clones among companion animals and human close contacts in a veterinary teaching hospital. A cross-sectional study in Greece.

    PubMed

    Drougka, Eleanna; Foka, Antigoni; Koutinas, Christos K; Jelastopulu, Eleni; Giormezis, Nikolaos; Farmaki, Ourania; Sarrou, Styliani; Anastassiou, Evangelos D; Petinaki, Efthimia; Spiliopoulou, Iris

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) prevalence among companion animals and veterinary personnel (VP) was investigated. Strains' molecular characteristics were evaluated in order to assess S. aureus transmission. Specimens (224) from colonized and infected sites of 102 animals (92 dogs, 10 cats) and 18 VP were collected during 2012 and 2013. Antibiotic susceptibility was performed by the disk diffusion method and Etest. mecA, mecC, tst (toxic shock syndrome toxin) and lukF/lukS-PV (Panton-Valentine leukocidin, PVL) genes were investigated by PCR. Genotypes were identified by Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST), Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec), accessory gene regulator group (agr), spa and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). S. aureus prevalence among pets and VP was 36.3% (37/102) and 38.9% (7/18), respectively. Younger companion animals, those living in rural areas, having a disease upon admission or Coagulase-negative staphylococci co-carriage showed significantly higher prevalence of S. aureus isolation (p<0.05). Twenty-six pets and five VP carried PVL-positive S. aureus. In total, 60 S. aureus strains were recovered (53 from pets, seven from VP) of which 16 were MRSA (26.7%), 12 mecA- and four mecC-positive. MRSA showed higher resistance rates against other antimicrobials as compared to methicillin-susceptible ones. Strains were classified by MLST in 13 STs, with the predominance of ST80 and ST15. In MRSA, SCCmec types II, IV and XI were identified. The most frequent spa types were t5559 and t7558. Fifty-six strains were classified into 15 PFGE types. Comparison of genetic markers shows that identical or very similar strains disseminate among animals and VP. Companion animals harbor PVL-positive clones constituting a possible source for transmission to humans. PMID:26948298

  12. Spa Typing of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated From Clinical Specimens of Patients With Nosocomial Infections in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Fazeli, Maryam; Goudarzi, Hossein; Azad, Mehdi; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus infection is increasing annually and becoming a true global challenge. The pattern of Staphylococcus aureus protein A (spa) types in different geographic regions is diverse. Objectives This study determined the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus and different spa types in S. aureus clinical isolates. Materials and Methods During a six-month period, 90 S. aureus isolates were recovered from 320 clinical specimens. The in vitro susceptibility of various S. aureus isolates to 16 antibiotic discs was assessed using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Molecular typing was carried out with S. aureus protein A typing via polymerase chain reaction. Results The frequency of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in our study was 88.9%. Twenty-three (25.5%) isolates were positive for panton-valentine leukocidin encoding genes. S. aureus presented a high resistance rate to ampicillin (100%) and penicillin (100%). No resistance was observed to vancomycin, teicoplanin, or linezolid. The rates of resistance to the majority of antibiotics tested varied between 23.3% and 82.2%. The rate of multidrug resistance among these clinical isolates was 93.3%. The 90 S. aureus isolates were classified into five S. aureus protein A types: t037 (33.3%), t030 (22.2%), t790 (16.7%), t969 (11.1%), and t044 (7.7%). Eight (8.9%) isolates were not typable using the S. aureus protein A typing method. Conclusions We report a high methicillin-resistant S. aureus rate in our hospital. Additionally, t030 and t037 were the predominant spa-types among hospital-associated S. aureus. Our findings emphasize the need for continuous surveillance to prevent the dissemination of multidrug resistance among different S. aureus protein A types in Iran.

  13. CodY Deletion Enhances In Vivo Virulence of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clone USA300

    PubMed Central

    Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Roux, Agnès; Ebine, Kazumi; Sonenshein, Abraham L.; Daum, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus global regulator CodY responds to nutrient availability by controlling the expression of target genes. In vitro, CodY represses the transcription of virulence genes, but it is not known if CodY also represses virulence in vivo. The dominant community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) clone, USA300, is hypervirulent and has increased transcription of global regulators and virulence genes; these features are reminiscent of a strain defective in CodY. Sequence analysis revealed, however, that the codY genes of USA300 and other sequenced S. aureus isolates are not significantly different from the codY genes in strains known to have active CodY. codY was expressed in USA300, as well as in other pulsotypes assessed. Deletion of codY from a USA300 clinical isolate resulted in modestly increased expression of the global regulators agr and saeRS, as well as the gene encoding the toxin alpha-hemolysin (hla). A substantial increase (>30-fold) in expression of the lukF-PV gene, encoding part of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), was observed in the codY mutant. All of these expression differences were reversed by complementation with a functional codY gene. Moreover, purified CodY protein bound upstream of the lukSF-PV operon, indicating that CodY directly represses expression of lukSF-PV. Deletion of codY increased the virulence of USA300 in necrotizing pneumonia and skin infection. Interestingly, deletion of lukSF-PV from the codY mutant did not attenuate virulence, indicating that the hypervirulence of the codY mutant was not explained by overexpression of PVL. These results demonstrate that CodY is active in USA300 and that CodY-mediated repression restrains the virulence of USA300. PMID:22526672

  14. The Role of Familiarity for Representations in Norm-Based Face Space

    PubMed Central

    Faerber, Stella J.; Kaufmann, Jürgen M.; Leder, Helmut; Martin, Eva Maria; Schweinberger, Stefan R.

    2016-01-01

    According to the norm-based version of the multidimensional face space model (nMDFS, Valentine, 1991), any given face and its corresponding anti-face (which deviates from the norm in exactly opposite direction as the original face) should be equidistant to a hypothetical prototype face (norm), such that by definition face and anti-face should bear the same level of perceived typicality. However, it has been argued that familiarity affects perceived typicality and that representations of familiar faces are qualitatively different (e.g., more robust and image-independent) from those for unfamiliar faces. Here we investigated the role of face familiarity for rated typicality, using two frequently used operationalisations of typicality (deviation-based: DEV), and distinctiveness (face in the crowd: FITC) for faces of celebrities and their corresponding anti-faces. We further assessed attractiveness, likeability and trustworthiness ratings of the stimuli, which are potentially related to typicality. For unfamiliar faces and their corresponding anti-faces, in line with the predictions of the nMDFS, our results demonstrate comparable levels of perceived typicality (DEV). In contrast, familiar faces were perceived much less typical than their anti-faces. Furthermore, familiar faces were rated higher than their anti-faces in distinctiveness, attractiveness, likability and trustworthiness. These findings suggest that familiarity strongly affects the distribution of facial representations in norm-based face space. Overall, our study suggests (1) that familiarity needs to be considered in studies of mental representations of faces, and (2) that familiarity, general distance-to-norm and more specific vector directions in face space make different and interactive contributions to different types of facial evaluations. PMID:27168323

  15. Prevalence and Risk Factor Analysis for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Colonization in Children Attending Child Care Centers▿

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Melissa B.; Weber, David J.; Goodrich, Jennifer S.; Popowitch, Elena B.; Poe, Michele D.; Nyugen, Viet; Shope, Timothy R.; Foster, David T.; Miller, James R.; Kotch, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Children attending child care centers (CCCs) are at increased risk for infections, including those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Nasal colonization often precedes infection, and MRSA colonization has been associated with increased infection risk. Community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) has caused increased MRSA infections in the general population, including children. Little is known about the frequency of MRSA nasal colonization in young children, particularly in those attending CCCs where disease transmission is common. We sampled the nares of 1,163 children in 200 classrooms from 24 CCCs in North Carolina and Virginia to assess S. aureus colonization. MRSA strains were molecularly analyzed for staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type, Panton-Valentine leukocidin status, and multilocus sequence type. A case-control study was performed to identify risk factors for MRSA colonization. We found that 18.1% children were colonized with S. aureus and 1.3% with MRSA. Molecular analysis of the MRSA strains identified 47% as CA-MRSA and 53% as health care-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA). Although two centers had multiple children colonized with MRSA, genotyping indicated that no transmission had occurred within classrooms. The case-control study did not detect statistically significant risk factors for MRSA colonization. However, MRSA-colonized children were more likely to be nonwhite and to have increased exposure to antibiotics and skin infections in the home. Both CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA strains were found colonizing the nares of children attending CCCs. The low frequency of colonization observed highlights the need for a large multicenter study to determine risk factors for MRSA colonization and subsequent infection in this highly susceptible population. PMID:21191058

  16. Dissemination of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), USA300 Sequence Type 8 Lineage in Latin-America

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Jinnethe; Rincón, Sandra; Díaz, Lorena; Panesso, Diana; Contreras, Germán A.; Zurita, Jeannete; Carrillo, Carlos; Rizzi, Adele; Guzmán, Manuel; Adachi, Javier; Chowdhury, Shahreen; Murray, Barbara E.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococus aureus (MRSA) is an important nosocomial and community-associated (CA) pathogen. Recently, a variant of the MRSA USA300 clone emerged and disseminated in South-America causing important clinical problems. Methods S. aureus isolates were prospectively collected (2006 to 2008) from 32 tertiary hospitals in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. MRSA isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and categorized as healthcare-associated (HA)-like or CA-like clones based on genotypic characteristics and detection of genes encoding the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and staphylococcal cassette mec (SCCmec) IV. Additionally, MLST of representative isolates of each major CA-MRSA pulsotype, and detection of USA300-associated toxins and the arcA gene were performed in all isolates categorized as CA-MRSA. Results A total of 1570 S. aureus were included; 651 were MRSA (41%), with the highest rates of MRSA isolation in Peru (62%), and lowest in Venezuela (26%) and 71%, 27%, and 2% were classified as HA-like, CA-like, and non-CA/HA-like clones, respectively. Only 9 MRSA isolates were confirmed to have reduced susceptibility to glycopeptides (GISA phenotype). The most common pulsotype (designated ComA) amongst the CA-like MRSA strains was found in 96% of isolates with the majority (81%) having ≤6 bands difference with the USA300-0114 strain. Representative isolates of this clone were ST8 but, unlike the USA300-0114 strain, they harbored a different SCCmec IV subtype and lacked arcA (an indicator of the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME)). Conclusion A variant CA-MRSA USA300 clone has now become established in South America and, in some countries, is endemic in hospital settings. PMID:19911971

  17. Trends in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Anovaginal Colonization in Pregnant Women in 2005 versus 2009▿

    PubMed Central

    Top, Karina A.; Huard, Richard C.; Fox, Zachary; Wu, Fann; Whittier, Susan; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Saiman, Lisa; Ratner, Adam J.

    2010-01-01

    In 2005, the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) anovaginal colonization in pregnant women at our center (Columbia University Medical Center) was 0.5%, and MRSA-colonized women were less likely to carry group B streptococcus (GBS). In this study, our objectives were to identify changing trends in the prevalence of MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) anovaginal colonization in pregnant women, to assess the association between MRSA and GBS colonization, and to characterize the MRSA strains. From February to July 2009, Lim broths from GBS surveillance samples were cultured for S. aureus. MRSA strains were identified by resistance to cefoxitin and characterized by MicroScan, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, and Panton-Valentine leukocidin PCR. A total of 2,921 specimens from different patients were analyzed. The prevalences of MSSA, MRSA, and GBS colonization were 11.8%, 0.6% and 23.3%, respectively. GBS colonization was associated with S. aureus colonization (odds ratio [OR], 1.9; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.5 to 2.4). The frequencies of GBS colonization were similar in MRSA-positive (34.2%) versus MRSA-negative patients (21.8%) (P = 0.4). All MRSA isolates from 2009 and 13/14 isolates from 2005 were SCCmec type IV or V, consistent with community-associated MRSA; 12/18 (2009) and 0/14 (2005) isolates were the USA300 clone. Levofloxacin resistance increased from 14.3% (2005) to 55.6% (2009) (P = 0.028). In conclusion, the prevalence of MRSA anovaginal colonization in pregnant women in New York City, NY, remained stable from 2005 to 2009, and USA300 emerged as the predominant clone with a significant increase in levofloxacin-resistant isolates. PMID:20686089

  18. Structural constraints for proposed Fort Hancock low-level radioactive waste disposal site (NTP-S34), southern Hudspeth County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Lemone, D.V.

    1989-03-01

    Structural complexities reduce the homogeneity necessary for a site characterization model to an unacceptable level for performance assessment for radioactive waste disposal sites. The proposed site lies between the northern, stable Diablo platform and the southern, mobile Mesozoic Chihuahua tectonic belt. Structural movement along this interface has been active for the past 14,000 years. In addition, the area lies along the northern margin of the Permian Marfa basin and the northeastern margin of the deeply faulted Hueco bolson segment of the late Cenozoic Rio Grande rift system. Recent seismic activity with extensive surface rupture in Quitman Canyon (30 mi southeast of the site) is also documented from the 1931 Valentine, Texas, earthquake (6.4 Richter scale). The site is underlain by either a thrust fault or the complex terminus of a Mesozoic thrust fault. This fault is a segment of the continuous thrust sheet extending from exposures in the Sierra Blanc area, 30 mi east (Devil Ridge fault), to the El Paso area west (Rio Grande fault). This segment of the Devil Ridge-Rio Grande thrust is documented by the Haymond Krupp No. 1 Thaxton wildcat drilled at Campogrande Mountain immediately south of the site. The recent rift fault scarp (Campo Grande) immediately south of the Thaxton well has a 17-mi surface trace and is, no doubt, related to the subsurface Clint fault to the west in the El Paso area. An additional complexity is the presence of a monoclinal flexure with a minimum of 900 ft of surface relief (2 mi northeast of NTP-S34). A 4.5-mi, east-west, down-to-the-south normal fault occurs near the top of the monocline with a small associated graben. These complexities seriously compromise the proposed Fort Hancock site.

  19. PSMs of Hypervirulent Staphylococcus aureus Act as Intracellular Toxins That Kill Infected Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Trouillet-Assant, Sophie; Ferry, Tristan; Diep, Binh An; Sapin, Anaïs; Lhoste, Yannick; Ranfaing, Jérémy; Badiou, Cédric; Benito, Yvonne; Bes, Michèle; Couzon, Florence; Tigaud, Sylvestre; Lina, Gérard; Etienne, Jérôme; Vandenesch, François; Laurent, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Epidemic community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is associated with more severe and acute forms of osteomyelitis than healthcare-associated (HA-) MRSA. Although S. aureus is now recognized as a facultative intracellular pathogen, the contribution of osteoblast invasion by CA-MRSA to the pathogenesis of osteomyelitis is unknown. Using an ex vivo model of intracellular infection of human osteoblasts, we demonstrated that CA-MRSA strains of diverse lineages share an enhanced ability to kill infected osteoblasts compared to HA-MRSA. Cytotoxicity comparisons of CA-MRSA isogenic deletion mutants revealed that phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs), a class of membrane-damaging exoproteins that are expressed at higher levels in CA-MRSA than in HA-MRSA, are involved in this osteoblast killing, whereas other major CA-MRSA virulence determinants, the Panton-Valentine leukocidin and alpha-toxin, are not involved. Similarly, functional agr and sarA regulators, which control the expression of PSMs and alpha-toxin, were required for the expression of the intracellular cytotoxic phenotype by CA-MRSA, whereas the saeRS regulator, which controls the expression of alpha-toxin but not PSMs, had no impact on cytotoxicity. Finally, PSM transcript levels determined by quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR were significantly higher in CA-MRSA than in HA-MRSA strains and associated with cell damage in MRSA-infected osteoblasts. These findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of severe CA-MRSA osteomyelitis and unravel a novel virulence strategy of CA-MRSA, based on the invasion and subsequent killing of osteoblasts by PSMs acting as intracellular toxins. PMID:23690994

  20. Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Bardiau, Marjorie; Yamazaki, Kazuko; Ote, Isabelle; Misawa, Naoaki; Mainil, Jacques G

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) in a collection of S. pseudintermedius strains isolated from dogs and cats with dermatitis in Japan and to compare their genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. Clonal relationships were determined by pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) typing, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Biofilm formation assay was performed using safranin staining in microplates. Three virulence genes coding for S. intermedius exfoliative toxin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (siet, lukS-PV and lukF-PV) were searched for in a collection of strains. Antimicrobial resistance against 15 antibiotics was studied by a disc diffusion method. Twenty-seven MRSP were isolated. According to PFGE results the isolates were not closely related except for a few strains. MLST showed that the strains belonged to five groups, ST71 and ST26 being the two most prevalent. Three types of SCCmec (II, II-III and V) were identified. All isolates were siet-positive but PVL-negative. Most strains (except for two) produced strong biofilm in tryptic soy broth with glucose. Seventy-eight percent of the isolates were resistant or intermediate to twelve or more antibiotics. Our study demonstrates that the ST71 lineage is widespread in Japan and that ST26 could represent an emerging lineage. Moreover, most of our strains are capable of forming strong biofilm and possess siet gene, two virulence characteristics that probably help the bacteria to persist and spread. Finally, our MRSP strains show a strong resistance profile to antibiotics commonly used in veterinary medicine.

  1. PREFACE: The International Conference on Theoretical Physics `Dubna-Nano2008'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, V. A.; Nesterenko, V. O.; Shukrinov, Y. M.

    2008-07-01

    The International Conference on Theoretical Physics `Dubna-Nano2008' was held on 7-11 July 2008 at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region, Russia. The conference provided the opportunity for the presentation and discussion of theoretical and experimental advances in the rapidly growing area of the nanophysics, with the accent on its theoretical aspects. The multidisciplinary character of the conference allowed an effective exchange of ideas between different areas of nanophysics. The following topics were covered: carbon nanosystems (fullerenes, nanotubes, graphene), quantum dots, electron and spin transport, spectroscopy and dynamics of atomic clusters, Josephson junctions, bio-complexes, and applications of nanosystems. Approximately 90 scientists from 16 countries participated in the conference. The program included 48 oral talks and 40 posters. The 51 contributions are included in this proceedings. We would like to express our gratitude to all participants for their presentations and discussions, which made the conference so successful. We are deeply indebted to the members of the International Advisory Committee (Professors T Ando, S Datta, A V Eletskii, J Fabian, F Guinea, P Hawrylak, K Kadowaki, T Koyama, Yu I Latushev, N F Pedersen, P-G Reinhard, J M Rost, A Ya Vul') and the Local Organizing Committee for their fruitful work. The financial support of BLTP JINR, Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Heisenberg-Landau Program and Bogoliubov-Infeld Program was of a great importance. Additional information about `Dubna-Nano2008' is available at the homepage http://theor.jinr.ru/~nano08. Vladimir Osipov, Valentin Nesterenko and Yury Shukrinov Editors

  2. PREFACE: International Conference on Theoretical Physics: Dubna-Nano 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Vladimir; Nesterenko, Valentin; Shukrinov, Yury M.

    2012-11-01

    The International Conference 'Dubna-Nano2012' was held on 9-14 July 2012 at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region, Russia. The conference was the third one in the series started in 2008. 'Dubna-Nano2012' provided an opportunity for presentations and discussions about theoretical and experimental advances in the rapidly growing area of nanophysics. The multidisciplinary character of the conference allowed an effective exchange of ideas between different areas of nanophysics. The following topics were covered: graphene and other carbon nanostructures, topological insulators, quantum transport, quantum dots, atomic clusters, Josephson junctions and applications of nanosystems. About 100 scientists from 22 countries participated in the conference. The program included 38 oral talks and 39 posters. This volume contains 35 contributions. We would like to express our gratitude to all participants for their presentations and discussions. We are deeply indebted to the members of the International Advisory Committee Professors K S Novoselov, T Ando, T Chakraborty, J Fabian, V M Galitski, F Guinea, M Z Hasan, P Hawrylak, K Kadowaki, R Kleiner, T Koyama, Yu I Latyshev, Yu E Lozovik, M Machida, B K Nikolic, N F Pedersen, P-G. Reinhard, J M Rost and A Ya Vul. Financial support from BLTP JINR, Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Heisenberg-Landau Program and Bogoliubov-Infeld Program was of a great importance. Further information about 'Dubna-Nano2012' is available on the homepage http://theor.jinr.ru/~nano12. Vladimir Osipov, Valentin Nesterenko and Yury Shukrinov Editors

  3. PREFACE International Conference on Theoretical Physics Dubna-Nano 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Vladimir; Nesterenko, Valentin; Shukrinov, Yury

    2010-11-01

    The International Conference on Theoretical Physics 'Dubna-Nano2010' was held on 5-10 July 2010, at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region, Russia. The previous conference of this series was at Dubna in 2008. The conference provided the opportunity for the presentation and discussion of theoretical and experimental advances in the rapidly growing area of nanophysics, with the accent on its theoretical aspects. The multidisciplinary character of the conference allowed an effective exchange of ideas between different areas of nanophysics. The following topics were covered: carbon nanosystems (graphene, nanotubes, fullerenes), quantum dots, quantum transport, spectroscopy and dynamics of atomic clusters, Josephson junctions, modelling, applications and perspectives. Approximately 120 scientists from 26 countries participated in the conference. The program included 63 oral talks and 70 posters. The 62 contributions are included in these proceedings. We would like to express our gratitude to all participants for their presentations and discussions, which made the conference indeed successful. We are deeply indebted to the members of the International Advisory Committee (Professors T Ando, J Fabian, F Guinea, P Hawrylak, K Kadowaki, T Koyama, Yu I Latushev, Yu E Lozovik, M Machida, B K Nikolic, N F Pedersen, P-G Reinhard, J M Rost, A Ya Vul') and the Local Organizing Committee for their fruitful work. The financial support of BLTP JINR, Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Heisenberg-Landau Program and Bogoliubov-Infeld Program was of a great importance. Additional information about 'Dubna-Nano2010' is available at the homepage http://theor.jinr.ru/~nano10. Vladimir Osipov, Valentin Nesterenko and Yury Shukrinov Editors

  4. Heterogeneity of disease and clones of community-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in children attending a paediatric hospital in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Vergison, A; Nobre Machado, A; Deplano, A; Doyen, M; Brauner, J; Nonhoff, C; de Mendonça, R; Mascart, G; Denis, O

    2012-08-01

    The increase in the number of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in children has prompted paediatricians to broaden th empirical treatment of common community-onset (CO) infections in children in several countries. Most European countries have reported low rates of CO-MRSA infection, but limited data on paediatric CO-MRSA infections are available. A prospective study was conducted from January 2002 to December 2004 in Brussels. CO-MRSA was defined as MRSA first detected by culture within 48 h of admission or in outpatients. Clinical and epidemiological data were recorded. CO-MRSA strains were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec, toxin (Panton-Valentin leukocidin (PVL), toxic shock syndrome toxin 1, and Eta/b), enterotoxin and antibiotic resistance genes were detected by PCR. The antibiotic resistance phenotype was determined by disk diffusion. S. aureus was isolated in 1681 children. Among these, 107 harboured MRSA. Fifty-one children were colonized or infected by CO-MRSA, 20% of whom had no healthcare exposure. Twelve infants <3 months old and five cystic fibrosis patients were colonized. None of the 22 infected patients (59% with acute otitis media and 36% with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs)) required hospitalization. Two-thirds of them failed to respond to empirical antibiotic therapy. The 37 characterized CO-MRSA strains were genetically diverse. Most of them had healthcare-associated genotypes. Only six strains were PVL-positive, all of which were ciprofloxacin-susceptible and more common in children with SSTIs (p 0.001). CO-MRSA remains uncommon in our paediatric population. So far, there is no need to modify the empirical treatment of common S. aureus infections. Monitoring of MRSA rates in S. aureus CO infections remains mandatory, and further investigation is warranted to establish the source of colonization in young infants. PMID:21958085

  5. The emerging ST8 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone in the community in Japan: associated infections, genetic diversity, and comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Iwao, Yasuhisa; Ishii, Rumiko; Tomita, Yusuke; Shibuya, Yasuhiro; Takano, Tomomi; Hung, Wei-chun; Higuchi, Wataru; Isobe, Hirokazu; Nishiyama, Akihito; Yano, Mio; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Ogata, Kikuyo; Okubo, Takeshi; Khokhlova, Olga; Ho, Pak-leung; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2015-07-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has become a major concern worldwide. In the United States, ST8 CA-MRSA with SCCmecIVa (USA300) has been predominant, affecting the entire United States. In this study, we investigated Japanese ST8 CA-MRSA with new SCCmecIV1 (designated ST8 CA-MRSA/J), which has emerged in Japan since 2003. Regarding community spread and infections, ST8 CA-MRSA/J spread in 16.2-34.4% as a major genotype in the community in Japan, and was associated with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), colitis, and invasive infections (sepsis, epidural abscesses, and necrotizing pneumonia), including influenza prodrome cases and athlete infections, similar to USA300. It spread to even public transport and Hong Kong through a Japanese family. Regarding genetic diversity, ST8 CA-MRSA/J included ST and spa variants and was classified into at least three pulsed-field gel electrophoresis types, ST8 Jα to γ. Of those, ST8 Jβ was associated with severe invasive infections. As for genomics, ST8 CA-MRSA/J showed high similarities to USA300, but with marked diversity in accessory genes; e.g., ST8 CA-MRSA/J possessed enhanced cytolytic peptide genes of CA-MRSA, but lacked the Panton-Valentine leukocidin phage and arginine catabolic mobile element, unlike USA300. The unique features of ST8 CA-MRSA/J included a novel mosaic SaPI (designated SaPIj50) carrying the toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 gene with high expression; the evolution included salvage (through recombination) of hospital-acquired MRSA virulence. The data suggest that ST8 CA-MRSA/J has become a successful native clone in Japan, in association with not only SSTIs but also severe invasive infections (posing a threat), requiring attention.

  6. Increase in SCCmec type IV strains affects trends in antibiograms of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus at a tertiary-care hospital.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ayumu; Nakaminami, Hidemasa; Fujii, Takeshi; Utsumi, Kenta; Noguchi, Norihisa

    2015-07-01

    The prevalence of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strains has become a serious problem worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the annual transitions of MRSA strains with the CA-MRSA feature, which were identified as SCCmec type IV or V, in a hospital setting in Japan. Between 2005 and 2012, MRSA strains were collected from a tertiary-care hospital in Tokyo, Japan, and SCCmec typing, detection of the virulence factors and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were conducted. The rate of detection of type II SCCmec, which is found mainly in healthcare-associated MRSA, significantly decreased from 90.0 (2005-2006) to 74.3 % (2011-2012) (P < 0.01). In contrast, the rate of detection of type IV SCCmec, which is mainly found in CA-MRSA, significantly increased from 5.8 (2005-2006) to 16.3 % (2011-2012) (P < 0.01). The rate of detection of the toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 gene significantly decreased from 66.7 (2005-2006) to 51.6 % (2011-2012) (P < 0.01), whilst that of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene significantly increased from 0.1 (2005-2006) to 2.1 % (2011-2012) (P < 0.01). The resistance rates of cefotaxime, levofloxacin, clarithromycin and minocycline decreased every year. The resistance rates of these antimicrobial agents for the SCCmec type IV or V strains were significantly lower than those for the SCCmec type I or II strains (P < 0.01, respectively). Therefore, these results suggest that the annual transitions of the virulence factors and antibiograms in MRSA are closely related to the increase of SCCmec type IV/V strains.

  7. Molecular epidemiology of community-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in Israel.

    PubMed

    Biber, A; Parizade, M; Taran, D; Jaber, H; Berla, E; Rubin, C; Rahav, G; Glikman, D; Regev-Yochay, G

    2015-08-01

    Data on community-associated (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Israel are scarce. The objective of this study was to characterize the major CA-MRSA clones in Israel. All clinical MRSA isolates detected in the community during a period of 2.5 years (2011-2013) from individuals insured by a major health maintenance organization in Israel were collected, with additional data from medical records. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns and staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) typing were determined. SCCmec IV and V isolates were further typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, and detection of a panel of toxin genes. MRSA were detected in 280 patients, mostly from skin infections. Patients with SCCmec IV (n = 120, 43 %) were younger (p < 0.0001) and reported less contact with healthcare facilities. Almost all isolates were trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole susceptible (98 %). spa-CC032, a typical nosocomial MRSA clone, accounted for 28 % of SCCmec IV. The two major CA-MRSA clones were t008 USA300 (13 %) and t991 (10 %); t991 was isolated mainly from children (75 %), was Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) negative but eta-positive, and was typically susceptible to most antibiotic groups. PVL-positive strains (n = 31) included mainly USA300 (52 %) and t019 (13 %). While multiple genetic lineages were evident among community-onset MRSA in Israel, approximately 20 % are typical CA-MRSA clones, mainly USA300 and a local clone, t991.

  8. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Ocular Infection in Taiwan: Clinical Features, Genotying, and Antibiotic Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu-Chuan; Hsiao, Ching-Hsi; Yeh, Lung-Kun; Ma, David H K; Chen, Phil Y F; Lin, Hsin-Chiung; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Chen, Hung-Chi; Chen, Shin-Yi; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2015-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is an important public health issue. This observational study aimed to characterize clinical features, antibiotic susceptibility, and genotypes of ocular infections caused by MRSA based on the clinical and molecular definitions of community-associated (CA) and healthcare-associated (HA) strains.Fifty-nine patients with culture-proven S aureus ocular infection were enrolled from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2011 at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan. Antibiotic susceptibility was verified using disk diffusion/E test. For characterization, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence type (MLST), and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene, were performed. MRSA isolates from the patients with HA factors were classified as clinically defined HA-MRSA, and those carrying SCCmec type I to III as molecularly defined HA-MRSA.Thirty-four patients with MRSA ocular infection were identified. The most common clone of CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA isolates was ST59/PFGE type D/SCCmec IV,VT/PVL (+) (n = 12) and CC 239/PFGE type A/SCCmec III, IIIA/PVL(-) (n = 10), respectively. All the 11 patients with molecularly defined HA-MRSA infections and 50% of the 22 patients with molecularly defined CA-MRSA infections were found to have HA factors (P = .005). CA-MRSA tended to cause lid infections, whereas HA-MRSA tended to cause corneal infections. Contrary to HA-MRSA isolates, nearly all the CA-MRSA isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and fluoroquinolones under either clinical or molecular classifications.In Taiwan, CA-MRSA isolates exhibited considerably higher susceptibility to fluoroquinolones when compared with HA-MRSA isolates. A strong correlation was observed between the HA factors and molecularly defined HA-MRSA isolates.

  9. Demography and Intercontinental Spread of the USA300 Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Philippe; Martins-Simões, Patrícia; Villain, Adrien; Barbier, Maxime; Tristan, Anne; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Bes, Michele; Laurent, Frederic; Guillemot, Didier; Wirth, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) was recognized worldwide during the 1990s; in less than a decade, several genetically distinct CA-MRSA lineages carrying Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes have emerged on every continent. Most notably, in the United States, the sequence type 18-IV (ST8-IV) clone known as USA300 has become highly prevalent, outcompeting methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and other MRSA strains in both community and hospital settings. CA-MRSA bacteria are much less prevalent in Europe, where the European ST80-IV European CA-MRSA clone, USA300 CA-MRSA strains, and other lineages, such as ST22-IV, coexist. The question that arises is whether the USA300 CA-MRSA present in Europe (i) was imported once or on very few occasions, followed by a broad geographic spread, anticipating an increased prevalence in the future, or (ii) derived from multiple importations with limited spreading success. In the present study, we applied whole-genome sequencing to a collection of French USA300 CA-MRSA strains responsible for sporadic cases and micro-outbreaks over the past decade and United States ST8 MSSA and MRSA isolates. Genome-wide phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the population structure of the French isolates is the product of multiple introductions dating back to the onset of the USA300 CA-MRSA clone in North America. Coalescent-based demography of the USA300 lineage shows that a strong expansion occurred during the 1990s concomitant with the acquisition of the arginine catabolic mobile element and antibiotic resistance, followed by a sharp decline initiated around 2008, reminiscent of the rise-and-fall pattern previously observed in the ST80 lineage. A future expansion of the USA300 lineage in Europe is therefore very unlikely. PMID:26884428

  10. Infections Caused By Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus European Clone (ST80) In Slovenia Between 2006 And 2013

    PubMed Central

    Jurca, Tomaž; Harlander, Tatjana; Košir, Marta; Zajc, Urška; Golob, Majda; Zdovc, Irena; Košnik1, Irena Grmek

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction According to the existing literature, a heterogeneous sequence type (ST) or clones of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) circulate in Europe. In Europe, the European clone that belongs to sequence type ST80 is predominant. Methods The aim of the study was to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics and epidemiological data of CA-MRSA ST80 and its occurrence in Slovenia. We retrospectively analyzed those CA-MRSA isolates that were isolated during microbiological procedures in microbiological laboratories between 2006 and 2013. Only CA-MRSA isolates from the national collection of CA-MRSA strains that belonged to ST80 (European clone) were analyzed. We determined the Pantone-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), mec A genes, exfoliative toxin genes and type of staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCCmec) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We determined also spa type and sequence type. Results ST80 was confirmed in only 2 (0.5%) out of 385 CA-MRSA isolates, collected in a national collection of CAMRSA. Both isolates were positive for the PVL genes, mec A gene, exfoliative toxin type D gene and SCCmec IV. One CA-MRSA isolate was confirmed in a wound swab taken from a 47-year-old male, and the second was isolated from blood cultures of a 69-year-old female. No epidemiological connections between them were found. Conclusions In Slovenia CA-MRSA infections caused by ST80 are rare. In the future, it is necessary that a surveillance study of CA-MRSA at the national level continues and CA-MRSA be considered as a public health threat. PMID:27284382

  11. Adaptive change inferred from genomic population analysis of the ST93 epidemic clone of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Stinear, Timothy P; Holt, Kathryn E; Chua, Kyra; Stepnell, Justin; Tuck, Kellie L; Coombs, Geoffrey; Harrison, Paul Francis; Seemann, Torsten; Howden, Benjamin P

    2014-02-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has emerged as a major public health problem around the world. In Australia, ST93-IV[2B] is the dominant CA-MRSA clone and displays significantly greater virulence than other S. aureus. Here, we have examined the evolution of ST93 via genomic analysis of 12 MSSA and 44 MRSA ST93 isolates, collected from around Australia over a 17-year period. Comparative analysis revealed a core genome of 2.6 Mb, sharing greater than 99.7% nucleotide identity. The accessory genome was 0.45 Mb and comprised additional mobile DNA elements, harboring resistance to erythromycin, trimethoprim, and tetracycline. Phylogenetic inference revealed a molecular clock and suggested that a single clone of methicillin susceptible, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) positive, ST93 S. aureus likely spread from North Western Australia in the early 1970s, acquiring methicillin resistance at least twice in the mid 1990s. We also explored associations between genotype and important MRSA phenotypes including oxacillin MIC and production of exotoxins (α-hemolysin [Hla], δ-hemolysin [Hld], PSMα3, and PVL). High-level expression of Hla is a signature feature of ST93 and reduced expression in eight isolates was readily explained by mutations in the agr locus. However, subtle but significant decreases in Hld were also noted over time that coincided with decreasing oxacillin resistance and were independent of agr mutations. The evolution of ST93 S. aureus is thus associated with a reduction in both exotoxin expression and oxacillin MIC, suggesting MRSA ST93 isolates are under pressure for adaptive change.

  12. The Role of Familiarity for Representations in Norm-Based Face Space.

    PubMed

    Faerber, Stella J; Kaufmann, Jürgen M; Leder, Helmut; Martin, Eva Maria; Schweinberger, Stefan R

    2016-01-01

    According to the norm-based version of the multidimensional face space model (nMDFS, Valentine, 1991), any given face and its corresponding anti-face (which deviates from the norm in exactly opposite direction as the original face) should be equidistant to a hypothetical prototype face (norm), such that by definition face and anti-face should bear the same level of perceived typicality. However, it has been argued that familiarity affects perceived typicality and that representations of familiar faces are qualitatively different (e.g., more robust and image-independent) from those for unfamiliar faces. Here we investigated the role of face familiarity for rated typicality, using two frequently used operationalisations of typicality (deviation-based: DEV), and distinctiveness (face in the crowd: FITC) for faces of celebrities and their corresponding anti-faces. We further assessed attractiveness, likeability and trustworthiness ratings of the stimuli, which are potentially related to typicality. For unfamiliar faces and their corresponding anti-faces, in line with the predictions of the nMDFS, our results demonstrate comparable levels of perceived typicality (DEV). In contrast, familiar faces were perceived much less typical than their anti-faces. Furthermore, familiar faces were rated higher than their anti-faces in distinctiveness, attractiveness, likability and trustworthiness. These findings suggest that familiarity strongly affects the distribution of facial representations in norm-based face space. Overall, our study suggests (1) that familiarity needs to be considered in studies of mental representations of faces, and (2) that familiarity, general distance-to-norm and more specific vector directions in face space make different and interactive contributions to different types of facial evaluations. PMID:27168323

  13. Origin and Evolution of European Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Thierry; Andersen, Paal S.; Skov, Robert L.; De Grassi, Anna; Simões, Patricia Martins; Tristan, Anne; Petersen, Andreas; Aziz, Maliha; Kiil, Kristoffer; Cirković, Ivana; Udo, Edet E.; del Campo, Rosa; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana; Ahmad, Norazah; Tokajian, Sima; Peters, Georg; Schaumburg, Frieder; Olsson-Liljequist, Barbro; Givskov, Michael; Driebe, Elizabeth E.; Vigh, Henrik E.; Shittu, Adebayo; Ramdani-Bougessa, Nadjia; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Price, Lance B.; Vandenesch, Francois; Larsen, Anders R.; Laurent, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) was recognized in Europe and worldwide in the late 1990s. Within a decade, several genetically and geographically distinct CA-MRSA lineages carrying the small SCCmec type IV and V genetic elements and the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) emerged around the world. In Europe, the predominant CA-MRSA strain belongs to clonal complex 80 (CC80) and is resistant to kanamycin/amikacin and fusidic acid. CC80 was first reported in 1993 but was relatively rare until the late 1990s. It has since been identified throughout North Africa, the Middle East, and Europe, with recent sporadic reports in sub-Saharan Africa. While strongly associated with skin and soft tissue infections, it is rarely found among asymptomatic carriers. Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) CC80 strains are extremely rare except in sub-Saharan Africa. In the current study, we applied whole-genome sequencing to a global collection of both MSSA and MRSA CC80 isolates. Phylogenetic analyses strongly suggest that the European epidemic CA-MRSA lineage is derived from a PVL-positive MSSA ancestor from sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, the tree topology suggests a single acquisition of both the SCCmec element and a plasmid encoding the fusidic acid resistance determinant. Four canonical SNPs distinguish the derived CA-MRSA lineage and include a nonsynonymous mutation in accessory gene regulator C (agrC). These changes were associated with a star-like expansion into Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa in the early 1990s, including multiple cases of cross-continent imports likely driven by human migrations. PMID:25161186

  14. Emergence and Characterization of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphyloccocus aureus Infections in Denmark, 1999 to 2006▿

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, A. R.; Stegger, M.; Böcher, S.; Sørum, M.; Monnet, D. L.; Skov, R. L.

    2009-01-01

    The epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections has changed worldwide. From being strictly nosocomial, MRSA is now frequently found as a community-associated (CA) pathogen. Denmark has been a low-prevalence country for MRSA since the mid-1970s but has in recent years experienced an increasing number of CA-MRSA cases. The aim of this study was to describe the emergence of CA-MRSA infections in Denmark. All Danish MRSA specimens and corresponding clinical data from 1999 to 2006 were investigated. Isolates were analyzed by antibiotic resistance and molecular typing and were assigned to clonal complexes (CC). Clinical data were extracted from discharge summaries and general practitioners' notes, from which assessments of community association were made for all infected cases. CA-MRSA cases constituted 29.4% of all MRSA infections (n = 1,790) and an increasing proportion of the annual numbers of MRSA infections during the study period. CA-MRSA was associated with a young age, skin and soft tissue infections, and non-Danish origin. Transmission between household members was frequently reported. Molecular typing showed >60 circulating clones, where 89.4% of the isolates belonged to five CC (CC80, CC8, CC30, CC5, and CC22), 81.2% carried staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec IV, and 163/244 (69.4%) were positive for Panton-Valentine leukocidin. Clinical and microbiological characteristics indicated that import of MRSA occurs frequently. Resistance to ≥3 antibiotic classes was observed for 48.8% of the isolates. The emergence of CA-MRSA in Denmark was caused by diverse strains, both well-known and new CA-MRSA strains. The results suggest multiple introductions of MRSA as an important source for CA-MRSA infections in Denmark. PMID:18971362

  15. Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus from nasal samples of healthy farm animals and pets in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Gharsa, Haythem; Ben Slama, Karim; Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Lozano, Carmen; Zarazaga, Myriam; Messadi, Lilia; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Torres, Carmen

    2015-02-01

    A total of 261 healthy farm and pet animals (75 cattle, 52 goats, 100 dogs, and 34 cats) from different regions of Tunisia were screened for Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage. Molecular typing of isolates (by spa- and multilocus sequence-typing) was performed, and their antimicrobial resistance and virulence genotypes were determined by PCR and sequencing. S. aureus isolates were detected in 17 of 261 tested samples (6.5%). All S. aureus isolates recovered were methicillin-susceptible (MSSA), and one isolate/sample was further studied. Eight different spa types were detected (t189, t279, t582, t701, t1166, t1268, t1534, and t1773), and eight different sequence types were identified (ST6, ST15, ST45, ST133, ST188, ST700 [clonal complex CC130], ST2057, and a new ST2121). MSSA from pets (six isolates) showed resistance to (number of isolates, resistance gene): penicillin (six, blaZ), tetracycline (one, tet[M]), erythromycin one, erm[A]), streptomycin (one, ant[6]-Ia), and ciprofloxacin (one). All isolates from farm animals showed susceptibility to the tested antimicrobials, except for two penicillin-resistant isolates. Five S. aureus isolates from goats and cats harbored the lukF/lukS-PV genes, encoding the Panton-Valentine leukocidin, and six isolates from goats harbored the tst virulence gene. In addition, diverse combinations of enterotoxin genes were detected, including two variants of the egc cluster. Goats and cats could represent a reservoir of important toxin genes, with potential implications in animal and human health.

  16. Five birds, one stone: neutralization of α-hemolysin and 4 bi-component leukocidins of Staphylococcus aureus with a single human monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Rouha, Harald; Badarau, Adriana; Visram, Zehra C; Battles, Michael B; Prinz, Bianka; Magyarics, Zoltán; Nagy, Gábor; Mirkina, Irina; Stulik, Lukas; Zerbs, Manuel; Jägerhofer, Michaela; Maierhofer, Barbara; Teubenbacher, Astrid; Dolezilkova, Ivana; Gross, Karin; Banerjee, Srijib; Zauner, Gerhild; Malafa, Stefan; Zmajkovic, Jakub; Maier, Sabine; Mabry, Robert; Krauland, Eric; Wittrup, K Dane; Gerngross, Tillman U; Nagy, Eszter

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen associated with high mortality. The emergence of antibiotic resistance and the inability of antibiotics to counteract bacterial cytotoxins involved in the pathogenesis of S. aureus call for novel therapeutic approaches, such as passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The complexity of staphylococcal pathogenesis and past failures with single mAb products represent considerable barriers for antibody-based therapeutics. Over the past few years, efforts have focused on neutralizing α-hemolysin. Recent findings suggest that the concerted actions of several cytotoxins, including the bi-component leukocidins play important roles in staphylococcal pathogenesis. Therefore, we aimed to isolate mAbs that bind to multiple cytolysins by employing high diversity human IgG1 libraries presented on the surface of yeast cells. Here we describe cross-reactive antibodies with picomolar affinity for α-hemolysin and 4 different bi-component leukocidins that share only ∼26% overall amino acid sequence identity. The molecular basis of cross-reactivity is the recognition of a conformational epitope shared by α-hemolysin and F-components of gamma-hemolysin (HlgAB and HlgCB), LukED and LukSF (Panton-Valentine Leukocidin). The amino acids predicted to form the epitope are conserved and known to be important for cytotoxic activity. We found that a single cross-reactive antibody prevented lysis of human phagocytes, epithelial and red blood cells induced by α-hemolysin and leukocidins in vitro, and therefore had superior effectiveness compared to α-hemolysin specific antibodies to protect from the combined cytolytic effect of secreted S. aureus toxins. Such mAb afforded high levels of protection in murine models of pneumonia and sepsis. PMID:25523282

  17. Drug resistance and genetic characteristics of clinical isolates of staphylococci in Myanmar: high prevalence of PVL among methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus belonging to various sequence types.

    PubMed

    Aung, M S; Zi, H; Nwe, K M; Maw, W W; Aung, M T; Min, W W; Nyein, N; Kawaguchiya, M; Urushibara, N; Sumi, A; Kobayashi, N

    2016-03-01

    Prevalence, drug resistance and genetic characteristics were analysed for a total of 128 clinical isolates of staphylococci obtained from a tertiary hospital in Myanmar. The dominant species were S. aureus (39%) and S. haemolyticus (35%), followed by S. epidermidis (6%) and S. saprophyticus (5%). The majority of S. haemolyticus isolates (71.1%) harboured mecA, showing high resistance rates to ampicillin, cephalosporins, erythromycin and levofloxacin, while methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was only 8% (four isolates) among S. aureus with type IV SCCmec. Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes were detected in 20 isolates of S. aureus (40%), among which only one isolate was MRSA belonging to sequence type (ST) 88/agr-III/coa-IIIa, and the other 19 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates were classified into six STs (ST88, ST121, ST1153, ST1155, ST1930, ST3206). An ST1153 MSSA isolate with PVL was revealed to belong to a novel coa type, XIIIa. ST121 S. aureus was the most common in the PVL-positive MSSA (47%, 9/19), harbouring genes of bone sialoprotein and variant of elastin binding protein as a distinctive feature. Although PVL-positive MSSA was susceptible to most of the antimicrobial agents examined, ST1930 isolates were resistant to erythromycin and levofloxacin. ST59 PVL-negative MRSA and MSSA had more resistance genes than other MRSA and PVL-positive MSSA, showing resistance to more antimicrobial agents. This study indicated higher prevalence of mecA associated with multiple drug resistance in S. haemolyticus than in S. aureus, and dissemination of PVL genes to multiple clones of MSSA, with ST121 being dominant, among hospital isolates in Myanmar. PMID:27257489

  18. Structurally designed attenuated subunit vaccines for S. aureus LukS-PV and LukF-PV confer protection in a mouse bacteremia model.

    PubMed

    Karauzum, Hatice; Adhikari, Rajan P; Sarwar, Jawad; Devi, V Sathya; Abaandou, Laura; Haudenschild, Christian; Mahmoudieh, Mahta; Boroun, Atefeh R; Vu, Hong; Nguyen, Tam; Warfield, Kelly L; Shulenin, Sergey; Aman, M Javad

    2013-01-01

    Previous efforts towards S. aureus vaccine development have largely focused on cell surface antigens to induce opsonophagocytic killing aimed at providing sterile immunity, a concept successfully applied to other Gram-positive pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, these approaches have largely failed, possibly in part due to the remarkable diversity of the staphylococcal virulence factors such as secreted immunosuppressive and tissue destructive toxins. S. aureus produces several pore-forming toxins including the single subunit alpha hemolysin as well as bicomponent leukotoxins such as Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), gamma hemolysins (Hlg), and LukED. Here we report the generation of highly attenuated mutants of PVL subunits LukS-PV and LukF-PV that were rationally designed, based on an octameric structural model of the toxin, to be deficient in oligomerization. The attenuated subunit vaccines were highly immunogenic and showed significant protection in a mouse model of S. aureus USA300 sepsis. Protection against sepsis was also demonstrated by passive transfer of rabbit immunoglobulin raised against LukS-PV. Antibodies to LukS-PV inhibited the homologous oligomerization of LukS-PV with LukF-PV as well heterologous oligomerization with HlgB. Importantly, immune sera from mice vaccinated with the LukS mutant not only inhibited the PMN lytic activity produced by the PVL-positive USA300 but also blocked PMN lysis induced by supernatants of PVL-negative strains suggesting a broad protective activity towards other bicomponent toxins. These findings strongly support the novel concept of an anti-virulence, toxin-based vaccine intended for prevention of clinical S. aureus invasive disease, rather than achieving sterile immunity. Such a multivalent vaccine may include attenuated leukotoxins, alpha hemolysin, and superantigens. PMID:23762356

  19. Activity of Ceftaroline and Epidemiologic Trends in Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Collected from 43 Medical Centers in the United States in 2009▿

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Sandra S.; Heilmann, Kristopher P.; Dohrn, Cassie L.; Riahi, Fathollah; Costello, Andrew J.; Kroeger, Jennifer S.; Biek, Donald; Critchley, Ian A.; Diekema, Daniel J.; Doern, Gary V.

    2011-01-01

    A Staphylococcus aureus surveillance program was initiated in the United States to examine the in vitro activity of ceftaroline and epidemiologic trends. Susceptibility testing by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute broth microdilution was performed on 4,210 clinically significant isolates collected in 2009 from 43 medical centers. All isolates were screened for mecA by PCR and evaluated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were analyzed for Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes and the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type. All isolates had ceftaroline MICs of ≤2 μg/ml with an MIC50 of 0.5 and an MIC90 of 1 μg/ml. The overall resistance rates, expressed as the percentages of isolates that were intermediate and resistant (or nonsusceptible), were as follows: ceftaroline, 1.0%; clindamycin, 30.2% (17.4% MIC ≥ 4 μg/ml; 12.8% inducible); daptomycin, 0.2%; erythromycin, 65.5%; levofloxacin, 39.9%; linezolid, 0.02%; oxacillin, 53.4%; tetracycline, 4.4%; tigecycline, 0%; trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 1.6%; vancomycin, 0%; and high-level mupirocin, 2.2%. The mecA PCR was positive for 53.4% of the isolates. The ceftaroline MIC90s were 0.25 μg/ml for methicillin-susceptible S. aureus and 1 μg/ml for MRSA. Among the 2,247 MRSA isolates, 51% were USA300 (96.9% PVL positive, 99.7% SCCmec type IV) and 17% were USA100 (93.4% SCCmec type II). The resistance rates for the 1,137 USA300 MRSA isolates were as follows: erythromycin, 90.9%; levofloxacin, 49.1%; clindamycin, 7.6% (6.2% MIC ≥ 4 μg/ml; 1.4% inducible); tetracycline, 3.3%; trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 0.8%; high-level mupirocin, 2.7%; daptomycin, 0.4%; and ceftaroline and linezolid, 0%. USA300 is the dominant clone causing MRSA infections in the United States. Ceftaroline demonstrated potent in vitro activity against recent S. aureus clinical isolates, including MRSA, daptomycin-nonsusceptible, and linezolid-resistant strains. PMID:21709080

  20. Extensive dissemination of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) between the hospital and the community in a country with a high prevalence of nosocomial MRSA.

    PubMed

    Espadinha, Diana; Faria, Nuno A; Miragaia, Maria; Lito, Luís Marques; Melo-Cristino, José; de Lencastre, Hermínia

    2013-01-01

    According to the EARS-Net surveillance data, Portugal has the highest prevalence of nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Europe, but the information on MRSA in the community is very scarce and the links between the hospital and community are not known. In this study we aimed to understand the events associated to the recent sharp increase in MRSA frequency in Portugal and to evaluate how this has shaped MRSA epidemiology in the community. With this purpose, 180 nosocomial MRSA isolates recovered from infection in two time periods and 14 MRSA isolates recovered from 89 samples of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) typing, spa typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). All isolates were also screened for the presence of Panton Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) by PCR. The results showed that ST22-IVh, accounting for 72% of the nosocomial isolates, was the major clone circulating in the hospital in 2010, having replaced two previous dominant clones in 1993, the Iberian (ST247-I) and Portuguese (ST239-III variant) clones. Moreover in 2010, three clones belonging to CC5 (ST105-II, ST125-IVc and ST5-IVc) accounted for 20% of the isolates and may represent the beginning of new waves of MRSA in this hospital. Interestingly, more than half of the MRSA isolates (8/14) causing SSTI in people attending healthcare centers in Portugal belonged to the most predominant clones found in the hospital, namely ST22-IVh (n = 4), ST5-IVc (n = 2) and ST105-II (n = 1). Other clones found included ST5-V (n = 6) and ST8-VI (n = 1). None of the MRSA isolates carried PVL and only five isolates (ST5-V-t179) carried ACME type II. The emergence and spread of EMRSA-15 may be associated to the observed increase in MRSA frequency in the hospital and the consequent spillover of MRSA into the community.

  1. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in slaughtered pigs and abattoir workers in Italy.

    PubMed

    Normanno, Giovanni; Dambrosio, Angela; Lorusso, Vanessa; Samoilis, Georgios; Di Taranto, Pietro; Parisi, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a pathogen present in the hospital environment (HA-MRSA), in the community (CA-MRSA) and in livestock, including pigs (LA-MRSA). MRSA may enter the human food chain during slaughtering and may infect humans coming into direct contact with pigs or pork products. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and characteristics of MRSA isolated from pigs and workers at industrial abattoirs in southern Italy. A total of 215 pig nasal swabs were screened for the presence of MRSA using PCR. An MRSA isolate was detected from each mecA/nuc PCR-positive sample and characterized by spa-typing, Multi-Locus Sequence Typing, SCC-mec and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL), and also tested for the production of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs). Eighty-one MRSA isolates (37.6%) were obtained from the 215 pig nasal swabs; 37 of these isolates were further characterized, and showed 18 different spa-types and 8 different STs. The most frequently recovered STs were ST398 (CC398-t034, t011, t899, t1939 - 43.2%) followed by ST8 (CC8-t008, t064, t2953, t5270 - 24.3%) and ST1 (CC1-t127, t174, t2207 - 10.8%). Nine MRSA isolates were obtained from the 113 human swabs; the isolates showed 5 different spa-types and 5 different STs, including the novel ST2794 (t159). The most representative STs recovered were ST1 (CC1-t127) and ST398 (CC398-t034) (33.3%). None of the MRSA isolates showed the ability to produce SEs and PVL and all resulted resistant to two or more classes of antimicrobials. This study shows the great genetic diversity of MRSA strains in slaughtered pigs and in abattoir employees in Italy, and clearly demonstrates the need for improved hygiene standards to reduce the risk of occupational and food-borne infection linked to the handling/consumption of raw pork containing MRSA.

  2. Nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among Swiss veterinary health care providers: detection of livestock- and healthcare-associated clones.

    PubMed

    Wettstein Rosenkranz, K; Rothenanger, E; Brodard, I; Collaud, A; Overesch, G; Bigler, B; Marschall, J; Perreten, V

    2014-07-01

    We screened a total of 340 veterinarians (including general practitioners, small animal practitioners, large animal practitioners, veterinarians working in different veterinary services or industry), and 29 veterinary assistants for nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) at the 2012 Swiss veterinary annual meeting. MRSA isolates (n = 14) were detected in 3.8 % (95 % CI 2.1 - 6.3 %) of the participants whereas MRSP was not detected. Large animal practitioners were carriers of livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA) ST398-t011-V (n = 2), ST398-t011-IV (n = 4), and ST398-t034-V (n = 1). On the other hand, participants working with small animals harbored human healthcare-associated MRSA (HCA-MRSA) which belonged to epidemic lineages ST225-t003-II (n = 2), ST225-t014-II (n = 1), ST5-t002-II (n = 2), ST5-t283-IV (n = 1), and ST88-t186-IV (n = 1). HCA-MRSA harbored virulence factors such as enterotoxins, β-hemolysin converting phage and leukocidins. None of the MRSA isolates carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). In addition to the methicillin resistance gene mecA, LA-MRSA ST398 isolates generally contained additional antibiotic resistance genes conferring resistance to tetracycline [tet(M) and tet(K)], trimethoprim [dfrK, dfrG], and the aminoglycosides gentamicin and kanamycin [aac(6')-Ie - aph(2')-Ia]. On the other hand, HCA-MRSA ST5 and ST225 mainly contained genes conferring resistance to the macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B antibiotics [erm(A)], to spectinomycin [ant(9)-Ia], amikacin and tobramycin [ant(4')-Ia], and to fluoroquinolones [amino acid substitutions in GrlA (S84L) and GyrA (S80F and S81P)]. MRSA carriage may represent an occupational risk and veterinarians should be aware of possible MRSA colonization and potential for developing infection or for transmitting these strains. Professional exposure to animals should be reported upon hospitalization and before medical

  3. The dominant Australian community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone ST93-IV [2B] is highly virulent and genetically distinct.

    PubMed

    Chua, Kyra Y L; Seemann, Torsten; Harrison, Paul F; Monagle, Shaun; Korman, Tony M; Johnson, Paul D R; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Howden, Brian O; Davies, John K; Howden, Benjamin P; Stinear, Timothy P

    2011-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) USA300 has spread rapidly across North America, and CA-MRSA is also increasing in Australia. However, the dominant Australian CA-MRSA strain, ST93-IV [2B] appears distantly related to USA300 despite strikingly similar clinical and epidemiological profiles. Here, we compared the virulence of a recent Australian ST93 isolate (JKD6159) to other MRSA, including USA300, and found that JKD6159 was the most virulent in a mouse skin infection model. We fully sequenced the genome of JKD6159 and confirmed that JKD6159 is a distinct clone with 7616 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distinguishing this strain from all other S. aureus genomes. Despite its high virulence there were surprisingly few virulence determinants. However, genes encoding α-hemolysin, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and α-type phenol soluble modulins were present. Genome comparisons revealed 32 additional CDS in JKD6159 but none appeared to encode new virulence factors, suggesting that this clone's enhanced pathogenicity could lie within subtler genome changes, such as SNPs within regulatory genes. To investigate the role of accessory genome elements in CA-MRSA epidemiology, we next sequenced three additional Australian non-ST93 CA-MRSA strains and compared them with JKD6159, 19 completed S. aureus genomes and 59 additional S. aureus genomes for which unassembled genome sequence data was publicly available (82 genomes in total). These comparisons showed that despite its distinctive genotype, JKD6159 and other CA-MRSA clones (including USA300) share a conserved repertoire of three notable accessory elements (SSCmecIV, PVL prophage, and pMW2). This study demonstrates that the genetically distinct ST93 CA-MRSA from Australia is highly virulent. Our comparisons of geographically and genetically diverse CA-MRSA genomes suggest that apparent convergent evolution in CA-MRSA may be better explained by the rapid dissemination of a

  4. Molecular Typing and Virulence Characteristic of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Isolates from Pediatric Patients in Bucaramanga, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Machuca, Mayra Alejandra; Sosa, Luis Miguel; González, Clara Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is among the most common global nosocomial pathogens. The emergence and spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a public health problem worldwide that causes nosocomial and community infections. The goals of this study were to establish the clonal complexes (CC) of the isolates of MRSA obtained from pediatric patients in a university hospital in Colombia and to investigate its molecular characteristics based on the virulence genes and the genes of staphylococcal toxins and adhesins. Methods A total of 53 MRSA isolates from pediatric patients with local or systemic infections were collected. The MRSA isolates were typed based on the SCCmec, MLST, spa and agr genes. The molecular characterization included the detection of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin, superantigenic and exfoliative toxins, and adhesin genes. The correlation between the molecular types identified and the profile of virulence factors was determined for all isolates. Results Four CC were identified, including CC8, CC5, CC80 and CC78. The ST8-MRSA-IVc-agrI was the predominant clone among the isolates, followed by the ST5-MRSA-I-agrII and ST5-MRSA-IVc-agrII clones. Twelve spa types were identified, of which t10796 and t10799 were new repeat sequences. The isolates were carriers of toxin genes, and hlg (100%), sek (92%) and pvl (88%) were the most frequent. Ten toxin gene profiles were observed, and the most frequent were seq-sek-hlg (22.6%), sek-hlg (22.6%), seb-seq-sek-hlg (18.9%) and seb-sek-hlg (15.1%). The adhesion genes were present in most of the MRSA isolates, including the following: clf-A (89%), clf-B (87%), fnb-A (83%) and ica (83%). The majority of the strains carried SCCmec-IVc and were identified as causing nosocomial infection. No significant association between a molecular type and the virulence factors was found. Conclusion Four major MRSA clone complexes were identified among the isolates. ST8-MRSA-IVc-agrI pvl+ (USA300-LV) was the

  5. Characterization and Comparison of 2 Distinct Epidemic Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clones of ST59 Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Jung; Unger, Clemens; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Lindsay, Jodi A.; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Götz, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Sequence type (ST) 59 is an epidemic lineage of community-associated (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates. Taiwanese CA-MRSA isolates belong to ST59 and can be grouped into 2 distinct clones, a virulent Taiwan clone and a commensal Asian-Pacific clone. The Taiwan clone carries the Panton–Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes and the staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) VT, and is frequently isolated from patients with severe disease. The Asian-Pacific clone is PVL-negative, carries SCCmec IV, and a frequent colonizer of healthy children. Isolates of both clones were characterized by their ability to adhere to respiratory A549 cells, cytotoxicity to human neutrophils, and nasal colonization of a murine and murine sepsis models. Genome variation was determined by polymerase chain reaction of selected virulence factors and by multi-strain whole genome microarray. Additionally, the expression of selected factors was compared between the 2 clones. The Taiwan clone showed a much higher cytotoxicity to the human neutrophils and caused more severe septic infections with a high mortality rate in the murine model. The clones were indistinguishable in their adhesion to A549 cells and persistence of murine nasal colonization. The microarray data revealed that the Taiwan clone had lost the ø3-prophage that integrates into the β-hemolysin gene and includes staphylokinase- and enterotoxin P-encoding genes, but had retained the genes for human immune evasion, scn and chps. Production of the virulence factors did not differ significantly in the 2 clonal groups, although more α-toxin was expressed in Taiwan clone isolates from pneumonia patients. In conclusion, the Taiwan CA-MRSA clone was distinguished by enhanced virulence in both humans and an animal infection model. The evolutionary acquisition of PVL, the higher expression of α-toxin, and possibly the loss of a large portion of the β-hemolysin-converting prophage likely contribute to

  6. Molecular Evolutionary Pathways toward Two Successful Community-Associated but Multidrug-Resistant ST59 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Lineages in Taiwan: Dynamic Modes of Mobile Genetic Element Salvages.

    PubMed

    Hung, Wei-Chun; Wan, Tsai-Wen; Kuo, Yu-Chia; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Tsai, Jui-Chang; Lin, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Teng, Lee-Jene

    2016-01-01

    Clonal complex 59 (CC59) Staphylococcus aureus in Taiwan includes both methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). As the most prominent community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) in Taiwan, CC59 has two major clones characterized as PVL-negative SCCmec IV (carrying the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec IV but Panton-Valentine leukocidin-negative) and PVL-positive SCCmec V (5C2&5). We investigated the drug resistance, phylogeny and the distribution and sequence variation of SCCmec, staphylococcal bacteriophage φSA3, genomic island νSaβ and MES (an enterococcal mobile genetic element conferring multidrug resistance) in 195 CC59 S. aureus. Sequencing and PCR mapping revealed that all of the CC59/SCCmec V (5C2&5) MRSA strains had acquired MESPM1 or its segregants, and obtained a φSA3-related fragment in νSaβ. In contrast, MES6272-2 and MES4578, which showed gentamicin resistance that was not encoded by MESPM1, were dominant in SCCmec IVg MRSA. Translocation of a whole φSA3 into νSaβ instead of only a φSA3-related fragment was common in SCCmec IVg MRSA. However, the non-subtype-g SCCmec IV MRSA (SCCmec IVa is the major) still carried MES and νSaβ structures similar to those in SCCmec V (5C2&5) MRSA. A minimum spanning tree constructed by multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis revealed that SCCmec IVg MRSA and SCCmec V (5C2&5) MRSA grouped respectively in two major clades. The CC59 MSSA was equally distributed among the two clades, while the non-subtype-g SCCmec IV MRSA mostly clustered with SCCmec V (5C2&5) MRSA. Our findings strongly suggest that CC59 MSSA acquired divergent mobile genetic elements and evolved to SCCmec IVg MRSA and SCCmec V (5C2&5) MRSA/non-subtype-g SCCmec IV MRSA independently. The evolutionary history of CC59 S. aureus explains how mobile genetic elements increase the antimicrobial resistance and virulence and contribute to the success of CA-MRSA in Taiwan. PMID:27606427

  7. Pneumonia Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Does Vancomycin Heteroresistance Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Claeys, Kimberly C.; Lagnf, Abdalhamid M.; Hallesy, Jessica A.; Compton, Matthew T.; Gravelin, Alison L.; Davis, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin remains the mainstay treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, including pneumonia. There is concern regarding the emergence of vancomycin tolerance, caused by heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA), and subsequent vancomycin treatment failure. Pneumonia is associated with high morbidity and mortality, especially with delays in appropriate therapy. This study evaluated the clinical outcomes of patients with hVISA pneumonia compared to those with vancomycin-susceptible S. aureus (VSSA) pneumonia. A retrospective cohort of patients with MRSA pneumonia from 2005 to 2014 was matched at a ratio of 2:1 VSSA to hVISA infections to compare patient characteristics, treatments, and outcomes. hVISA was determined by the 48-h population analysis profile area under the curve. Characteristics between VSSA and hVISA infections were compared by univariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression analysis to determine independent risk factors of inpatient mortality. Eighty-seven patients were included, representing 29 hVISA and 58 VSSA cases of pneumonia. There were no significant differences in demographics or baseline characteristics. Sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores were a median of 7 (interquartile ratio [IQR], 5 to 8) in hVISA patients and 5 (IQR, 3 to 8) in VSSA (P = 0.092) patients. Inpatient mortality was significantly higher in hVISA patients (44.8% versus 24.1%; P = 0.049). Predictors of inpatient mortality upon multivariable regression were SOFA score (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08 to 1.70), Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) positivity (aOR, 6.63; 95% CI, 1.79 to 24.64), and hVISA phenotype (aOR, 3.95; 95% CI, 1.18 to 13.21). Patients with hVISA pneumonia experienced significantly higher inpatient mortality than those with VSSA pneumonia. There is a need to consider the presence of vancomycin heteroresistance in pneumonia caused by MRSA in order to

  8. Nonproportionality of Scintillator Detectors: Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Stephen; Cherepy, Nerine; Hull, Giulia; Valentine, John; Moses, William; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2009-08-17

    On the basis of nonproportionality data obtained for several scintillators, we have developed a theory to describe the carrier dynamics to fit the light yield versus electron energy. The theory of Onsager was adapted to explain how the carriers form excitons or sequentially arrive at the activators to promote the ion to an excited state, and the theory of Birks was employed to allow for exciton-exciton annihilation. We then developed a second theory to deduce the degradation in resolution that results from nonproportionality by evoking Landau fluctuations, which are essentially variations in the deposited energy density that occur as the high energy electron travels along its trajectory. In general there is good agreement with the data, in terms of fitting the nonproportionality curves and reproducing the literature values of nonproportionality's contribution to the scintillator resolution. With the resurgence of interest in developing scintillator detectors that have good energy resolution, an improved understanding of nonproportionality has become a crucial matter since it presents the fundamental limit to the achievable resolution. In order to hasten an improved understanding of scintillator nonproportionality, we have constructed an instrument referred to as SLYNCI (Scintillator Light Yield Nonproportionality Compton Instrument). This is a second-generation instrument to the original device developed by Valentine and coworkers, wherein several new principles of operation have served to increase the data rate by an order of magnitude as discussed in detail in References. In the present article, the focus is on a theory to describe the measured electron response, which is the light yield as a function of the electron energy. To do this, we account for transport of carriers and excitons, in terms of how they transfer their energy to the activators with competition from nonradiative decay pathways. This work builds on the original work of Murray and coworkers, and

  9. PREFACE: XVII International Youth Scientific School on Actual Problems of Magnetic Resonance and its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    Editors: M.S.Tagirov, V.V.Semashko, A.S.Nizamutdinov Kazan is the motherland of Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) which was discovered in Kazan State University in 1944 by prof. E.K.Zavojskii. Since the Young Scientist School of Magnetic Resonance run by professor G.V.Skrotskii from MIPT stopped its work, Kazan took up the activity under the initiative of academician A.S.Borovik-Romanov. Nowadays this school is rejuvenated and the International Youth Scientific School studying "Actual problems of the magnetic resonance and its application" is developing. Traditionally the main subjects of the School meetings are: Magnetic Resonance in Solids, Chemistry, Geology, Biology and Medicine. The unchallenged organizers of that school are Kazan Federal University and Kazan E. K. Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute. The rector of the School is professor Murat Tagirov, vice-rector - professor Valentine Zhikharev. Since 1997 more than 100 famous scientists from Germany, France, Switzerland, USA, Japan, Russia, Ukraine, Moldavia, Georgia provided plenary lecture presentations. Almost 700 young scientists have had an opportunity to participate in discussions of the latest scientific developments, to make their oral reports and to improve their knowledge and skills. To enhance competition among the young scientists, reports take place every year and the Program Committee members name the best reports, the authors of which are invited to prepare full-scale scientific papers. Since 2013 the International Youth Scientific School "Actual problems of the magnetic resonance and its application", following the tendency for comprehensive studies of matter properties and its interaction with electromagnetic fields, expanded "the field of interest" and opened the new section: Coherent Optics and Optical Spectroscopy. Many young people have submitted interesting reports on photonics, quantum electronics, laser physics, quantum optics, traditional optical and laser spectroscopy, non

  10. Modelling staphylococcal pneumonia in a human 3D lung tissue model system delineates toxin-mediated pathology.

    PubMed

    Mairpady Shambat, Srikanth; Chen, Puran; Nguyen Hoang, Anh Thu; Bergsten, Helena; Vandenesch, Francois; Siemens, Nikolai; Lina, Gerard; Monk, Ian R; Foster, Timothy J; Arakere, Gayathri; Svensson, Mattias; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus necrotizing pneumonia is recognized as a toxin-mediated disease, yet the tissue-destructive events remain elusive, partly as a result of lack of mechanistic studies in human lung tissue. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) tissue model composed of human lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts was used to delineate the role of specific staphylococcal exotoxins in tissue pathology associated with severe pneumonia. To this end, the models were exposed to the mixture of exotoxins produced by S. aureus strains isolated from patients with varying severity of lung infection, namely necrotizing pneumonia or lung empyema, or to purified toxins. The necrotizing pneumonia strains secreted high levels of α-toxin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), and triggered high cytotoxicity, inflammation, necrosis and loss of E-cadherin from the lung epithelium. In contrast, the lung empyema strain produced moderate levels of PVL, but negligible amounts of α-toxin, and triggered limited tissue damage. α-toxin had a direct damaging effect on the epithelium, as verified using toxin-deficient mutants and pure α-toxin. Moreover, PVL contributed to pathology through the lysis of neutrophils. A combination of α-toxin and PVL resulted in the most severe epithelial injury. In addition, toxin-induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators from lung tissue models resulted in enhanced neutrophil migration. Using a collection of 31 strains from patients with staphylococcal pneumonia revealed that strains producing high levels of α-toxin and PVL were cytotoxic and associated with fatal outcome. Also, the strains that produced the highest toxin levels induced significantly greater epithelial disruption. Of importance, toxin-mediated lung epithelium destruction could be inhibited by polyspecific intravenous immunoglobulin containing antibodies against α-toxin and PVL. This study introduces a novel model system for study of staphylococcal pneumonia in a human setting. The

  11. A Livestock-Associated, Multidrug-Resistant, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 97 Lineage Spreading in Dairy Cattle and Pigs in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Feltrin, Fabiola; Alba, Patricia; Kraushaar, Britta; Ianzano, Angela; Argudín, María Angeles; Di Matteo, Paola; Porrero, María Concepción; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Butaye, Patrick; Franco, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Pandemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 97 (CC97) lineages originated from livestock-to-human host jumps. In recent years, CC97 has become one of the major MRSA lineages detected in Italian farmed animals. The aim of this study was to characterize and analyze differences in MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) mainly of swine and bovine origins. Forty-seven CC97 isolates, 35 MRSA isolates, and 6 MSSA isolates from different Italian pig and cattle holdings; 5 pig MRSA isolates from Germany; and 1 human MSSA isolate from Spain were characterized by macrorestriction pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, and antimicrobial resistance pattern analysis. Virulence and resistance genes were investigated by PCR and microarray analysis. Most of the isolates were of SCCmec type V (SCCmec V), except for two German MRSA isolates (SCCmec III). Five main clusters were identified by PFGE, with the German isolates (clusters I and II) showing 60.5% similarity with the Italian isolates, most of which (68.1%) grouped into cluster V. All CC97 isolates were Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) negative, and a few (n = 7) tested positive for sak or scn. All MRSA isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR), and the main features were erm(B)- or erm(C)-mediated (n = 18) macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance, vga(A)-mediated (n = 37) pleuromutilin resistance, fluoroquinolone resistance (n = 33), tet(K) in 32/37 tet(M)-positive isolates, and blaZ in almost all MRSA isolates. Few host-associated differences were detected among CC97 MRSA isolates: their extensive MDR nature in both pigs and dairy cattle may be a consequence of a spillback from pigs of a MRSA lineage that originated in cattle as MSSA and needs further investigation. Measures should be implemented at the farm level to prevent spillover to humans in intensive farming

  12. A Livestock-Associated, Multidrug-Resistant, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 97 Lineage Spreading in Dairy Cattle and Pigs in Italy.

    PubMed

    Feltrin, Fabiola; Alba, Patricia; Kraushaar, Britta; Ianzano, Angela; Argudín, María Angeles; Di Matteo, Paola; Porrero, María Concepción; Aarestrup, Frank M; Butaye, Patrick; Franco, Alessia; Battisti, Antonio

    2015-11-20

    Pandemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 97 (CC97) lineages originated from livestock-to-human host jumps. In recent years, CC97 has become one of the major MRSA lineages detected in Italian farmed animals. The aim of this study was to characterize and analyze differences in MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) mainly of swine and bovine origins. Forty-seven CC97 isolates, 35 MRSA isolates, and 6 MSSA isolates from different Italian pig and cattle holdings; 5 pig MRSA isolates from Germany; and 1 human MSSA isolate from Spain were characterized by macrorestriction pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, and antimicrobial resistance pattern analysis. Virulence and resistance genes were investigated by PCR and microarray analysis. Most of the isolates were of SCCmec type V (SCCmec V), except for two German MRSA isolates (SCCmec III). Five main clusters were identified by PFGE, with the German isolates (clusters I and II) showing 60.5% similarity with the Italian isolates, most of which (68.1%) grouped into cluster V. All CC97 isolates were Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) negative, and a few (n = 7) tested positive for sak or scn. All MRSA isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR), and the main features were erm(B)- or erm(C)-mediated (n = 18) macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance, vga(A)-mediated (n = 37) pleuromutilin resistance, fluoroquinolone resistance (n = 33), tet(K) in 32/37 tet(M)-positive isolates, and blaZ in almost all MRSA isolates. Few host-associated differences were detected among CC97 MRSA isolates: their extensive MDR nature in both pigs and dairy cattle may be a consequence of a spillback from pigs of a MRSA lineage that originated in cattle as MSSA and needs further investigation. Measures should be implemented at the farm level to prevent spillover to humans in intensive farming

  13. A Provenance Model for Real-Time Water Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Bai, Q.; Zednik, S.; Taylor, P.; Fox, P. A.; Taylor, K.; Kloppers, C.; Peters, C.; Terhorst, A.; West, P.; Compton, M.; Shu, Y.; Provenance Management Team

    2010-12-01

    Generating hydrological data products, such as flow forecasts, involves complex interactions among instruments, data simulation models, computational facilities and data providers. Correct interpretation of the data produced at various stages requires good understanding of how data was generated or processed. Provenance describes the lineage of a data product. Making provenance information accessible to hydrologists and decision makers not only helps to determine the data’s value, accuracy and authorship, but also enables users to determine the trustworthiness of the data product. In the water domain, WaterML2 [1] is an emerging standard which describes an information model and format for the publication of water observations data in XML. The W3C semantic sensor network incubator group (SSN-XG) [3] is producing ontologies for the description of sensor configurations. By integrating domain knowledge of this kind into the provenance information model, the integrated information model will enable water domain researchers and water resource managers to better analyse how observations and derived data products were generated. We first introduce the Proof Mark Language (PML2) [2], WaterML2 and the SSN-XG sensor ontology as the proposed provenance representation formalism. Then we describe some initial implementations how these standards could be integrated to represent the lineage of water information products. Finally we will highlight how the provenance model for a distributed real-time water information system assists the interpretation of the data product and establishing trust. Reference [1] Taylor, P., Walker, G., Valentine, D., Cox, Simon: WaterML2.0: Harmonising standards for water observation data. Geophysical Research Abstracts. Vol. 12. [2] da Silva, P.P., McGuinness, D.L., Fikes, R.: A proof markup language for semantic web services. Inf. Syst. 31(4) (2006), 381-395. [3] W3C Semantic Sensor Network Incubator Group http://www.w3.org/2005/Incubator

  14. Thyroid Hormones and Moderate Exposure to Perchlorate during Pregnancy in Women in Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Steinmaus, Craig; Pearl, Michelle; Kharrazi, Martin; Blount, Benjamin C.; Miller, Mark D.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; DeLorenze, Gerald; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Liaw, Jane

    2015-01-01

    , Miller MD, Pearce EN, Valentin-Blasini L, DeLorenze G, Hoofnagle AN, Liaw J. 2016. Thyroid hormones and moderate exposure to perchlorate during pregnancy in women in Southern California. Environ Health Perspect 124:861–867; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409614 PMID:26485730

  15. EDITORIAL: Challenges for first-principles based properties of defects in semiconductors and oxides Challenges for first-principles based properties of defects in semiconductors and oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-12-01

    First-principles methods based on density functional theory (DFT) have been the mainstay of theoretical studies of the properties of semiconductor and oxide materials. Despite the tremendous successes of the past few decades, significant challenges remain in adapting these methods for predictive simulations that are quantitatively useful in predicting device behavior. Recent advances in computational capabilities, and improved theoretical methods taking advantage of ever more powerful computer hardware, offer the possibility that computational modeling may finally fulfill the long-sought goal of truly predictive simulations for defect properties. The exciting prospect of using modelling as `virtual experiments' to obtain quantitatively accurate predictions of semiconductor behavior seems tantalizingly close, but challenges still remain, which is evident in the many divergent approaches adopted for the modelling and simulation of various aspects of defect behavior. This special issue consists of papers describing different approaches to the study of defects, and the challenges that remain from the perspective of leading scientists in the field. It includes contributions on the theoretical and computational issues of using density functional methods for defect calculations [Nieminen], treatments to account for finite computational cell effects in periodic defect supercell calculations using analytical constructions [Lany and Zunger], or cell-size extrapolation techniques [Castleton et al], or instead using embedded cluster calculations to model charge-trapping defects [Shluger et al]. This issue also includes a description of the computation of g-tensor and hyperfine splitting for defect centers [Valentin and Pacchione], computation of vibrational properties of impurities from dynamical DFT calculations [Estreicher et al], and the use of DFT supercell calculations to predict charge transition energy levels of intrinsic defects in GaAs [Schultz and von Lilienfeld

  16. The other "Irish question".

    PubMed

    Browne, H

    1992-05-01

    The influence of the Roman Catholic Church on Irish society makes it difficult for sex and health educators and HIV/AIDS prevention efforts. Divorce, abortion, consensual sex between consenting adult men, and contraception for those under 18 years is banned in Ireland. Public opinions and recent court decisions do appear to bring a measure of hope for more lenient attitudes. The trends vary from the recent Supreme Court case of the 14-year old rape victim being permitted an abortion because she was suicidal to a radio talk show host, Father Michael Cleary who suspected she was "set-up" to test the ban on abortion. Father Cleary also outraged health educators by stating inaccurately that condoms did not prevent AIDS. It is estimated that 500 Irish women have abortions each year in Britain; there have been 262 reported AIDS cases and estimates of up to 10,000 HIV infected out of a population of 3.5 million. An AIDS education campaign was mounted in 1987, but in the 37-minute Department of Health video only 1 minute was devoted to condoms and no sex was promoted as the only safe sex. Access is limited to consenting pharmacies and clinics for people 18 years of older; rural chemists may exercise discretion and refuse sales. In 1991, the government proposed lowering the age to 17 years for condom availability and assigning the regional health boards, the responsibility of determining who sells contraceptives. A university lecturer reported that inaction on this bill was close to "criminal inactivity." Challenges in February 1991 were made by the Irish Family Planning Association (IFPA) in setting up a condom sales kiosk in Dublin. The IFPA was fined, but opinion polls indicated that 57% supported condom availability for 16 year olds. On Valentines Day in 1992, condom vending machines, which are illegal, were installed in pubs and nightclubs, police action has been cautious. A new health minister is concerned about AIDS prevention and the republic's first woman President

  17. Detection and genetic characterization of PVL-positive ST8-MRSA-IVa and exfoliative toxin D-positive European CA-MRSA-Like ST1931 (CC80) MRSA-IVa strains in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Paul, Shyamal Kumar; Ghosh, Souvik; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Urushibara, Noriko; Hossain, Mohammad Akram; Ahmed, Salma; Mahmud, Chand; Jilani, Md Shariful Alam; Haq, Jalaluddin Ashraful; Ahmed, Abdullah Akhtar; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2014-08-01

    Severe skin lesions caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection are associated with production from bacterial cells of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), a typical virulence factor of community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA), as well as other toxins represented by exfoliative toxins. Through a retrospective study of 26 S. aureus strains isolated from skin lesions of diabetic patients admitted to a hospital in Bangladesh, 2 PVL-gene-positive MRSA-IVa strains and 8 PVL-negative, exfoliative toxin D (ETD) gene (etd)-positive MRSA-IVa strains were isolated. A PVL-positive MRSA-IVa strain had a type I arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), belonged to ST8/agr-type I/spa-type t121 (a variant of t008), and harbored blaZ, tet(K), msrA, and aph(3')-IIIa, which are mostly typical characteristics found in USA300, a predominant CA-MRSA clone in the United States. Another PVL-positive MRSA strain, belonging to ST1929 (CC88)/agr-type III/spa-type t3341, was negative for ACME, but possessed blaZ and tet(K). The etd-positive MRSA-IVa strains possessed the epidermal cell differentiation inhibitor B (EDIN-B)-encoding gene (edinB) and belonged to ST1931 (CC80)/agr-type III/spa-type t11023 (a variant of t044), which was genetic trait similar to that of the European CA-MRSA ST80 clone. However, unlike the European ST80 strains, the etd-positive MRSA strains detected in the present study harbored seb, sek, and seq, while they were negative for tet(K), aph(3')-IIIa, and fusB, showing susceptibility to fusidic acid. These findings suggested that etd-positive ST1931 MRSA strains belong to the same lineage as the European ST80 MRSA clone, evolving from a common ancestral clone via acquisition of a different pathogenicity island. This is the first report of a USA300-like MRSA-IV strain, PVL-positive ST1929 (CC88) MRSA-IV, and European ST80 CA-MRSA-like etd-positive ST1931 (CC80) MRSA-IV strains isolated in Bangladesh.

  18. Molecular Evolutionary Pathways toward Two Successful Community-Associated but Multidrug-Resistant ST59 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Lineages in Taiwan: Dynamic Modes of Mobile Genetic Element Salvages

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Wei-Chun; Wan, Tsai-Wen; Kuo, Yu-Chia; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Tsai, Jui-Chang; Lin, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Teng, Lee-Jene

    2016-01-01

    Clonal complex 59 (CC59) Staphylococcus aureus in Taiwan includes both methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). As the most prominent community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) in Taiwan, CC59 has two major clones characterized as PVL-negative SCCmec IV (carrying the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec IV but Panton-Valentine leukocidin-negative) and PVL-positive SCCmec V (5C2&5). We investigated the drug resistance, phylogeny and the distribution and sequence variation of SCCmec, staphylococcal bacteriophage φSA3, genomic island νSaβ and MES (an enterococcal mobile genetic element conferring multidrug resistance) in 195 CC59 S. aureus. Sequencing and PCR mapping revealed that all of the CC59/SCCmec V (5C2&5) MRSA strains had acquired MESPM1 or its segregants, and obtained a φSA3-related fragment in νSaβ. In contrast, MES6272-2 and MES4578, which showed gentamicin resistance that was not encoded by MESPM1, were dominant in SCCmec IVg MRSA. Translocation of a whole φSA3 into νSaβ instead of only a φSA3-related fragment was common in SCCmec IVg MRSA. However, the non-subtype-g SCCmec IV MRSA (SCCmec IVa is the major) still carried MES and νSaβ structures similar to those in SCCmec V (5C2&5) MRSA. A minimum spanning tree constructed by multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis revealed that SCCmec IVg MRSA and SCCmec V (5C2&5) MRSA grouped respectively in two major clades. The CC59 MSSA was equally distributed among the two clades, while the non-subtype-g SCCmec IV MRSA mostly clustered with SCCmec V (5C2&5) MRSA. Our findings strongly suggest that CC59 MSSA acquired divergent mobile genetic elements and evolved to SCCmec IVg MRSA and SCCmec V (5C2&5) MRSA/non-subtype-g SCCmec IV MRSA independently. The evolutionary history of CC59 S. aureus explains how mobile genetic elements increase the antimicrobial resistance and virulence and contribute to the success of CA-MRSA in Taiwan. PMID:27606427

  19. Shifts in the Clonal Distribution of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Kuwait Hospitals: 1992-2010

    PubMed Central

    Boswihi, Samar S.; Udo, Edet E.; Al-Sweih, Noura

    2016-01-01

    Background As the epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is constantly changing globally, determining the prevailing MRSA clones in a local healthcare facility is important for better management of infections. This study investigated clonal composition and distribution of MRSA isolates in Kuwait’s hospitals using a combination of molecular typing methods. Materials and Methods In total, 400 non-repeat MRSA isolates were obtained between 1992 and 2010 in 13 public hospitals and were characterized using antibiogram, SCCmec typing, spa typing, and multilocus-sequence typing. Clonal assignment and detection of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes were performed by DNA microarray. Results The isolates were resistant to kanamycin (74.2%), erythromycin (69.5%), tetracycline (66.7%), gentamicin (61%), ciprofloxacin, (61%), fusidic acid (53.5%), clindamycin (41.5%), high-level mupirocin resistance (5.2%) and carried aphA3, aacA-aphD, ermA, ermC, mupA, tetK, tetM, fusC and far1. Molecular typing revealed 31 different MRSA clones consisting of ST239-MRSA-III (52.2%), ST22-MRSA-IV (9.2%), ST80-MRSA-IV (7.5%), ST5-MRSA-II/IV/V/VI (6.5%), ST30-MRSA-IV (3.5%), ST241-MRSA-III (2.7%), ST6-MRSA-IV (2.2%), ST36-MRSA-II (2%) and ST772-MRSA-V (1.75%). The isolates differed in the carriage of genes for enterotoxins, Panton–Valentine leukocidin (PVL), toxic shock syndrome toxin (tst-1), arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) and exfoliative toxins. The number of clones increased from one (ST239-III-t037) in 1992 to 30 in 2010 including ST8-IV-t008 [PVL+] [ACME+] (USA300), ST772-V (Bengal Bay clone) and ST2816 identified for the first time in Kuwait. Conclusion The study revealed that the MRSA isolates belonged to diverse clones that changed in numbers and diversity overtime. Although ST239-MRSA-III, a healthcare-associated clone remained the dominant MRSA clone overtime, the newly emerged clones consisted mostly of community-associated. PMID

  20. MRSA Clonal Complex 22 Strains Harboring Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin (TSST-1) Are Endemic in the Primary Hospital in Gaza, Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Abdelateef, Nahed; Elamreen, Farid Abu; Ginocchio, Christine C.; Pierard, Denis; Becker, Karsten; Kreiswirth, Barry N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important pathogen in both community and healthcare-related settings worldwide. Current knowledge regarding the epidemiology of S. aureus and MRSA in Gaza is based on a single community-based carriage study. Here we describe a cross-sectional analysis of 215 clinical isolates collected from Al-Shifa Hospital in Gaza during 2008 and 2012. Methods All isolates were characterized by spa typing, SCCmec typing, and detection of genes encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST-1). Representative genotypes were also subjected to multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using VITEK2 and MicroScan. Results MRSA represented 56.3% of all S. aureus strains, and increased in frequency from 2008 (54.8%) to 2012 (58.4%). Aside from beta-lactams, resistance was observed to tetracycline, erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamicin, and fluoroquinolones. Molecular typing identified 35 spa types representing 17 MLST clonal complexes (CC), with spa 998 (Ridom t223, CC22) and spa 70 (Ridom t044, CC80) being the most prevalent. SCCmec types I, III, IV, V and VI were identified among MRSA isolates, while type II was not detected. PVL genes (lukF/S-PV) were detected in 40.0% of all isolates, while the TSST-1 gene (tst) was detected in 27.4% of all isolates, with surprisingly high frequency within CC22 (70.4%). Both PVL and TSST-1 genes were found in several isolates from 2012. Conclusions Molecular typing of clinical isolates from Gaza hospitals revealed unusually high prevalence of TSST-1 genes among CC22 MRSA, which is noteworthy given a recent community study describing widespread carriage of a CC22 MRSA clone known as the ‘Gaza strain’. While the latter did not address TSST-1, tst-positive spa 998 (Ridom t223) has been detected in several neighboring countries, and described as endemic in an Italian NICU, suggesting international spread of a

  1. Isolation, pathogenicity and disinfection of Staphylococcus aureus carried by insects in two public hospitals of Vitória da Conquista, Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pollianna S; Souza, Simone G; Campos, Guilherme B; da Silva, Danilo C C; Sousa, Daniel S; Araújo, Suerda P F; Ferreira, Laiziane P; Santos, Verena M; Amorim, Aline T; Santos, Angelita M O G; Timenetsky, Jorge; Cruz, Mariluze P; Yatsuda, Regiane; Marques, Lucas M

    2014-01-01

    Currently, hospital infection is a serious public health problem, and several factors may influence the occurrence of these infections, including the presence of insects, which are carriers of multidrug-resistant bacterial species. The aim of this study was to isolate staphylococci carried by insects in two public hospitals of Vitoria da Conquista, Bahia and to identify the resistance profile, pathogenicity and efficacy of disinfection of the premises. A total of 91 insects were collected in 21 strategic points of these hospitals, and 32 isolated strains of Staphylococcus aureus were isolated. Based on antibiogram and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration results, 95% of these strains were susceptible to oxacillin. These strains were also evaluated for the presence of resistance genes encoding resistance to oxacillin/methicillin by polymerase chain reaction, but the sample was negative for this gene. Pathogenicity tests were performed in vitro biofilm formation induced by glucose, where it was found that eight (27.58%) strains were classified as biofilm producers and 21 (72.4%) as stronger producers. In addition, we performed PCR for their virulence genes: Sea (enterotoxin A), SEB (B), Sec (C), PVL (Panton-Valentine Leukocidin), ClfA (clumping factor A) and Spa (protein A). Of these, Sea, Spa PVL were positive in 7 (21.8%), 2 (6.3%) and 1 (3.1%) samples, respectively. The analysis of cytokine induction in the inflammatory response of J774 macrophages by isolates from the two hospitals did not show statistical difference at the levels of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-10 production. In addition, we verified the antimicrobial activity of disinfecting agents on these strains, quaternary ammonium, 0.5% sodium hypochlorite, 1% sodium hypochlorite, 2% sodium hypochlorite, 2% glutaraldehyde, Lysoform(®), 70% alcohol solution of chlorhexidine digluconate, 2% peracetic acid, and 100% vinegar. Resistance was seen in only for the following two disinfectants: 70% alcohol in 31 (96

  2. Antibodies to S. aureus LukS-PV Attenuated Subunit Vaccine Neutralize a Broad Spectrum of Canonical and Non-Canonical Bicomponent Leukotoxin Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Rajan P.; Kort, Thomas; Shulenin, Sergey; Kanipakala, Tulasikumari; Ganjbaksh, Nader; Roghmann, Mary-Claire; Holtsberg, Frederick W.; Aman, M. Javad

    2015-01-01

    S. aureus vaccine development has proven particularly difficult. The conventional approach to achieve sterile immunity through opsonophagocytic killing has been largely unsuccessful. S. aureus is highly toxigenic and a great body of evidence suggests that a successful future vaccine for this organism should target extracellular toxins which are responsible for host tissue destruction and immunosuppression. Major staphylococcal toxins are alpha toxin (a single subunit hemolysin) along with a group of bicomponent pore-forming toxins (BCPFT), namely Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), gamma hemolysins (HlgCB and AB), LukAB and LukED. In our previous report, an attenuated mutant of LukS-PV (PVL- S subunit) named as “LukS-mut9” elicited high immunogenic response as well as provided a significant protection in a mouse sepsis model. Recent discovery of PVL receptors shows that mice lack receptors for this toxin, thus the reported protection of mice with the PVL vaccine may relate to cross protective responses against other homologous toxins. This manuscript addresses this issue by demonstrating that polyclonal antibody generated by LukS-mut9 can neutralize other canonical and non-canonical leukotoxin pairs. In this report, we also demonstrated that several potent toxins can be created by non-canonical pairing of subunits. Out of 5 pairs of canonical and 8 pairs of non-canonical toxins tested, anti-LukS-mut9 polyclonal antibodies neutralized all except for LukAB. We also studied the potential hemolytic activities of canonical and noncanonical pairs among biocomponent toxins and discovered that a novel non-canonical pair consisting of HlgA and LukD is a highly toxic combination. This pair can lyse RBC from different species including human blood far better than alpha hemolysin. Moreover, to follow-up our last report, we explored the correlation between the levels of pre-existing antibodies to new sets of leukotoxins subunits and clinical outcomes in adult patients with S

  3. Staphylococcus aureus in former Portuguese colonies from Africa and the Far East: missing data to help fill the world map.

    PubMed

    Conceição, T; Coelho, C; Silva, I Santos; de Lencastre, H; Aires-de-Sousa, M

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal carriage among patients and healthcare workers in Angola (ANG), São Tomé and Príncipe (STP), Cape Verde (CV) and East Timor (ET), and to characterize the antimicrobial susceptibility, virulence content and population structure of all S. aureus. Despite the importance of MRSA as a major human pathogen, data from these former Portuguese colonies in Africa and Asia are scarce. A total of 2065 nasal swabs recovered between 2010-14 were included in the study. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing and molecular characterization of S. aureus showed: (i) a very high MRSA prevalence in ANG (61.6%), moderate in STP (25.5%), low in CV (5.6%) and null in ET; (ii) a high prevalence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin in STP (36.8%), ET (29.2%) and CV (28.3%) contrasting with ANG (7.9%); (iii) ST5-SCCmecIVa, ST8-IV/V and ST5-VI were the major MRSA clones in ANG (65.2%), STP (44.8%) and CV (50%), respectively; (iv) a high resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in ANG (66.5%) and STP (50.9%), to rifampin in ANG (77.3%), and to tetracycline in STP (26.3%) and ET (20.8%); (v) three major methicillin-susceptible S. aureus clones (ST15, ST508, ST152) were present in all four countries. Age <18 years (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.24-3.31), previous surgery (OR 2.45, 95% CI 1.24-4.83), no smoking (OR 4.04, 95% CI 1.05-15.50), and longer hospitalization (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.49-4.28) were risk factors for MRSA carriage. This study provided the first comprehensive overview on MRSA in former Portuguese colonies in Africa and Asia, missing data in the world map.

  4. Foods confiscated from non-EU flights as a neglected route of potential methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lázaro, David; Ariza-Miguel, Jaime; Diez-Valcarce, Marta; Fernández-Natal, Isabel; Hernández, Marta; Rovira, Jordi

    2015-09-16

    The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in food-producing animals has provoked a great concern in the presence of MRSA in associated foodstuff. In this study, we have assessed for the first time the presence of MRSA in food confiscated from non-EU flights. We performed a search for MRSA among 195 food samples confiscated from passengers on flights from twenty-one non-EU countries in 2012 and 2013. One hundred and seventeen meat samples of diverse animal origin (including antelope, beef, chicken, duck, guinea pig, pork, rodents, and turkey), 75 dairy products (74 cheeses and 1 butter) and 3 eggs were analyzed. All S. aureus were studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. MRSA isolates were further characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), SCCmec typing, and tested for the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) virulence factors. Overall, 66 food samples were positive for S. aureus (33.9%). Six S. aureus strains were MRSA (9.1%), all of them in flights from Bolivia (and 5 from the same passenger). Among methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) (60 out of 66S. aureus strains), 44.1% were resistant to penicillin, 10.2% to tetracycline, 8.5% were resistant to aminoglycosides (amikacin and tobramycin) and 3.4% exhibited the M phenotype. MRSA isolates were sensitive to all non-β-lactam antibiotics tested. SmaI-PFGE analysis provided 40 genotypes among the S. aureus isolates (three genotypes among the six MRSA). Five MRSA isolates belonged to ST8 and harboured SCCmec type IVc as well as PVL genes. One isolate belonged to ST1649, harboured SCCmec type IVc and tested negative for the presence of the PVL genes. In conclusion, in this study, we report for the first time the presence of CA-MRSA in food confiscated from non-EU flights: ST8/ST1649-MRSA-IV. These results confirm the illegal entrance of food as a neglected route of transmission as well as the dissemination of successful CA

  5. Community-onset Staphylococcus aureus Surveillance Programme annual report, 2012.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Geoffrey W; Daly, Denise A; Pearson, Julie C; Nimmo, Graeme R; Collignon, Peter J; McLaws, Mary-Louise; Robinson, James O; Turnidge, John D

    2014-03-01

    In 2012, the Australian Group on Antimicrobial Resistance (AGAR) conducted a community-onset period-prevalence survey of clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolated from hospital outpatients and general practice patients including nursing homes, long term care facilities and hospice patients. Day surgery and dialysis patients were excluded. Twenty-nine medical microbiology laboratories from all state and mainland territories participated. Isolates were tested by Vitek2® (AST-P612 card). Results were compared with previous AGAR community surveys. Nationally, the proportion of S. aureus that were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) increased significantly from 11.5% in 2000 to 17.9% in 2012 (P<0.0001). Resistance to the non-ß-lactam antimicrobials varied between regions. No resistance was detected to vancomycin, teicoplanin or linezolid. Resistance in methicillin susceptible S. aureus was rare apart from erythromycin (12.8%) and was absent for vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid and daptomycin. The proportion of S. aureus characterised as health care-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) was 5.1%. Three HA-MRSA clones were characterised, with 72.9% and 26.4% of HA-MRSA classified as ST22-IV [2B] (EMRSA-15) and ST239-III [3A] (Aus-2/3 EMRSA) respectively. Multi-clonal community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) accounted for 12.5% of all S. aureus. Regional variation in resistance in MRSA was primarily due to the differential distribution of the 2 major HA-MRSA clones; ST239-III [3A] (Aus-2/3 EMRSA), which is resistant to multiple non-ß-lactam antimicrobials, and ST22-IV [2B] (EMRSA-15), which is resistant to ciprofloxacin and typically erythromycin. Although the majority of CA-MRSA were non-multi-resistant, a significant expansion of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) positive CA-MRSA clones has occurred nationally. The mean age of patients (31.7 years, 95% CI 28.9-34.5) with a PVL positive CA-MRSA infection was significantly lower (P<0.0001), than the mean age of patients with a PVL

  6. FOREWORD: V S Letokhov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroke, H. Henry; Linnartz, Harold

    2012-04-01

    Comments on Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (CAMOP) endeavors periodically to devote an issue to the life and accomplishments of physicists who have made significant contributions to the fields represented in this journal. Vladilen Letokhov is certainly one of them. For a number of years he was also a CAMOP Correspondent. We are grateful to Professor Victor Balykin for having organized this CAMOP special section. It is particularly significant to one of us (HHS) to remember a person who has made seminal advances in so many areas which to this day are at the forefront of studies by a number of physicists. But over the years this acquaintance developed into friendship and gave the wife of one of us, Norma, and HHS the opportunity to host Tina and Vladik in their home, and get to know both a bit better. There was also the seminal International School on Laser Applications in Physics in Vilnius organized by Letokhov, and then a visit to Troitsk and his group at the Institute of Spectroscopy (and even the organization of a couple of piano recitals by one of our daughters, Marija, who accompanied her parents in the then USSR). Our interests crossed in a couple of fields: laser interactions with atoms and sensitive spectroscopy of radioactive atoms. Letokhov was a participant in the early organization of laser spectroscopy at CERN and was instrumental in providing copper vapour lasers to the isotope separator facility, ISOLDE. To this day laser ion sources are under the aegis of Valentin Fedoseyev who came to CERN from Troitsk. The interaction of lasers with atoms, in particular the process of slowing atoms, is discussed by Balykin. It was Christmas time when a card arrived from Oleg Tumanov of the Institute of Spectroscopy: it included a graph of temperature achieved by laser cooling as a function of calendar date. The results of Letokhov's group were the earliest (see figure 1), even though lower temperatures achieved subsequently by others extended our knowledge

  7. Properties and distribution of the protein inhibitor (Mr 17,000) of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, J R; Gröschel-Stewart, U; Walsh, M P

    1987-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent hydrophobic-interaction chromatography is a powerful tool for the identification and isolation of a variety of Ca2+-binding proteins which expose a hydrophobic site(s) in the presence of Ca2+ [Gopalakrishna & Anderson (1982) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 104, 830-836; Walsh, Valentine, Ngai, Carruthers & Hollenberg (1984) Biochem. J. 224, 117-127; McDonald & Walsh (1985) Biochem. J. 232, 559-567]. Using this approach, we isolated two potent and specific protein inhibitors of protein kinase C, of 17 kDa [McDonald & Walsh (1985) Biochem. J. 232, 559-567] and 12 kDa [McDonald & Walsh (1986) Biochem. Soc. Trans. 14, 585-586]. Although these inhibitors were purified by Ca2+-dependent hydrophobic-interaction chromatography and exhibit properties similar to those of calmodulin and related Ca2+-binding proteins, we were unable to demonstrate high-affinity Ca2+ binding to these inhibitors, using equilibrium dialysis. Protein kinase C exhibited half-maximal activity at 0.6 microM-Ca2+ in the presence of phospholipid and diacylglycerol, and complete inhibition by both inhibitors was observed over the range of Ca2+ concentrations examined (10 nM-10 microM). These observations suggest that the inhibitory action of these proteins does not require Ca2+. The inclusion of proteinase inhibitors during isolation of the kinase C inhibitors, as well as two-dimensional peptide mapping and amino acid analysis of the isolated proteins, suggested that the 12 kDa inhibitor is a proteolytic fragment of the 17 kDa protein which is generated during purification. Antibodies raised in rabbits against the bovine brain 17 kDa inhibitor were shown to be specific by Western immunoblotting and the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method and were used to study the tissue and species distribution of this protein. The inhibitor was found to be present in several bovine, murine, avian and human tissues, consistent with a role in the regulation of a variety of physiological

  8. Genetic diversity and virulence potential of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from raw and processed food commodities in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Song, Minghui; Bai, Yalong; Xu, Jie; Carter, Michelle Qiu; Shi, Chunlei; Shi, Xianming

    2015-02-16

    The risk of zoonotic transmission to humans highlights the need to understand the molecular ecology of Staphylococcus aureus in foods. In this study, 142 S. aureus isolates obtained from various raw and processed foods from Shanghai, China were characterized to determine their genetic diversity and virulence gene content. A total of 16 clonal complexes (CCs), 34 staphylococcal protein A (spa) types, and 6 accessory gene regulator (agr) allelic groups were identified and analyzed among the 142 S. aureus isolates. Among these, the genotype CC188-t189-agr Ι was the most prevalent, constituting 28.2% of all isolates. The presence of virulence genes encoding 20 staphylococcal enterotoxins (se), toxic shock syndrome toxin (tsst1), exfoliative toxins (eta, etb, and etd), Panton-Valentine leukocidin (lukS-PV and lukF-PV), as well as methicillin resistance gene (mecA), was determined by PCR. Of these S. aureus isolates, 72.5% harbored toxin genes, in which the most frequent toxin gene was sep (43.7%), followed by sej (26.1%) and pvl (21.1%). In contrast, see, ses, set, tsst1, etb, and etd were not found in any of the isolates tested. Eight S. aureus isolates (5.6%, 8/142), seven from raw milk and one from frozen food, were mecA positive and resistant to oxacillin, thus were MRSA. The 142 S. aureus isolates displayed 52 different toxin gene profiles. Although no direct association was found between toxin gene profile and the S. aureus genotype, the isolates belonging to CC5, CC9, CC20, CC50, and CC72 clonal lineages in general carried more toxin genes (>5) compared with the isolates in other CCs. It was also revealed that raw milk and raw meat were the major sources of isolates containing multiple toxin genes. S. aureus isolates from food that were genetically highly related, displayed diverse toxin gene profiles, implying the significant role of horizontal gene transfer in the emergence of highly toxigenic S. aureus isolates.

  9. Characterization of methicillin-susceptible and -resistant staphylococci in the clinical setting: a multicentre study in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The staphylococci are implicated in a variety of human infections; however, many clinical microbiology laboratories in Nigeria do not identify staphylococci (in particular coagulase negative staphylococci - CNS) to the species level. Moreover, data from multi-centre assessment on antibiotic resistance and epidemiology of the staphylococci are not available in Nigeria. This study investigated 91 non-duplicate staphylococcal isolates obtained from the microbiology laboratories of eight hospitals in Nigeria during the period January to April 2010. Methods Identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using the VITEK 2 system, detection of resistance genes by PCR, and molecular characterization was determined by SCCmec typing, spa and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Results All the isolates were susceptible to mupirocin, tigecycline, vancomycin and linezolid, but 72.5% of CNS and 82.3% of Staphylococcus aureus were resistant to cotrimoxazole, while multiresistance was observed in 37 of the 40 CNS isolates. Untypeable SCCmec types (ccrC/Class A mec and ccr-negative/Class C2 mec gene complex) in two methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were identified. Additionally, ccr-negative/Class A mec and ccr type 4/Class C2 mec gene complex was detected in one isolate each of S. sciuri and S. haemolyticus, respectively. The S. aureus isolates were classified into 21 spa types including two new types (t8987, t9008) among the methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. Two (CC8-SCCmecnon-typeable and CC88-SCCmec IV) and four (CC8-SCCmec III/IV/V; CC30-SCCmec II/III; CC88-SCCmec IV; and ST152-SCCmecnon-typeable) MRSA clones were identified in Maiduguri (North-East Nigeria) and South-West Nigeria, respectively. The proportion of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-positive MSSA was high (44.4%) and 56.3% of these strains were associated with sequence type (ST) 152. Conclusions The identification of multiresistant mecA positive S. haemolyticus

  10. Heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate susceptibility in a community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus epidemic clone, in a case of Infective Endocarditis in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Community-Associated Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has traditionally been related to skin and soft tissue infections in healthy young patients. However, it has now emerged as responsible for severe infections worldwide, for which vancomycin is one of the mainstays of treatment. Infective endocarditis (IE) due to CA-MRSA with heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate susceptibility-(h-VISA) has been recently reported, associated to an epidemic USA 300 CA-MRSA clone. Case Presentation We describe the occurrence of h-VISA phenotype in a case of IE caused by a strain belonging to an epidemic CA-MRSA clone, distinct from USA300, for the first time in Argentina. The isolate h-VISA (SaB2) was recovered from a patient with persistent bacteraemia after a 7-day therapy with vancomycin, which evolved to fatal case of IE complicated with brain abscesses. The initial isolate-(SaB1) was fully vancomycin susceptible (VSSA). Although MRSA SaB2 was vancomycin susceptible (≤2 μg/ml) by MIC (agar and broth dilution, E-test and VITEK 2), a slight increase of MIC values between SaB1 and SaB2 isolates was detected by the four MIC methods, particularly for teicoplanin. Moreover, Sab2 was classified as h-VISA by three different screening methods [MHA5T-screening agar, Macromethod-E-test-(MET) and by GRD E-test] and confirmed by population analysis profile-(PAP). In addition, a significant increase in cell-wall thickness was revealed for SaB2 by electron microscopy. Molecular typing showed that both strains, SaB1 and SaB2, belonged to ST5 lineage, carried SCCmecIV, lacked Panton-Valentine leukocidin-(PVL) genes and had indistinguishable PFGE patterns (subtype I2), thereby confirming their isogenic nature. In addition, they were clonally related to the epidemic CA-MRSA clone (pulsotype I) detected in our country. Conclusions This report demonstrates the ability of this epidemic CA-MRSA clone, disseminated in some regions of Argentina, to produce severe and

  11. Identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus using an integrated and modular microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Soper, Steven A

    2013-02-21

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of hospital-acquired (HA-MRSA) infection worldwide. As a result, the rapid and specific detection of MRSA is crucial not only for early prevention of disease spread, but also for the effective treatment of these infections. We report here an integrated modular-based microfluidic system for MRSA identification, which can carry out the multi-step assay used for MRSA identification in a single disposable fluidic cartridge. The multi-step assay included PCR amplification of the mecA gene harboring methicillin resistance loci that can provide information on drug susceptibility, ligase detection reaction (LDR) to generate fluorescent ligation products appended with a zip-code complement that directs the ligation product to a particular address on a universal array containing zip-code probes and a universal DNA array, which consisted of a planar waveguide for evanescent excitation. The fluidic cartridge design was based on a modular format, in which certain steps of the molecular processing pipeline were poised on a module made from a thermoplastic. The cartridge was comprised of a module interconnected to a fluidic motherboard configured in a 3-dimensional network; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and was used for PCR and LDR, while the module was made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA, and contained an air-embedded waveguide serving as the support for the universal array. Fluid handling, thermal management and optical readout hardware were situated off-chip and configured into a small footprint instrument. In this work, the cartridge was used to carry out a multiplexed PCR/LDR coupled with the universal array allowed for simultaneous detection of five genes that encode for 16S ribosomal RNA (SG16S), protein A (spa), the femA protein of S. epidermidis (femA), the virulence factor of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and the gene that confers methicillin resistance (mecA). Results

  12. High-Density Livestock Production and Molecularly Characterized MRSA Infections in Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Joan A.; Shopsin, Bo; Cosgrove, Sara E.; Nachman, Keeve E.; Curriero, Frank C.; Rose, Hannah R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: European studies suggest that living near high-density livestock production increases the risk of sequence type (ST) 398 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization. To our knowledge, no studies have evaluated associations between livestock production and human infection by other strain types. Objectives: We evaluated associations between MRSA molecular subgroups and high-density livestock production. Methods: We conducted a yearlong 2012 prospective study on a stratified random sample of patients with culture-confirmed MRSA infection; we oversampled patients from the Geisinger Health System with exposure to high-density livestock production in Pennsylvania. Isolates were characterized using S. aureus protein A (spa) typing and detection of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and scn genes. We compared patients with one of two specific MRSA strains with patients with all other strains of MRSA isolates, using logistic regression that accounted for the sampling design, for two different exposure models: one based on the location of the animals (livestock model) and the other on crop field application of manure (crop field model). Results: Of 196 MRSA isolates, we identified 30 spa types, 47 PVL-negative and 15 scn-negative isolates, and no ST398 MRSA. Compared with quartiles 1–3 combined, the highest quartiles of swine livestock and dairy/veal crop field exposures were positively associated with community-onset-PVL-negative MRSA (CO-PVL-negative MRSA vs. all other MRSA), with adjusted odds ratios of 4.24 (95% CI: 1.60, 11.25) and 4.88 (95% CI: 1.40, 17.00), respectively. The association with CO-PVL-negative MRSA infection increased across quartiles of dairy/veal livestock exposure (trend p = 0.05). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that other MRSA strains, beyond ST398, may be involved in livestock-associated MRSA infection in the United States. Citation: Casey JA, Shopsin B, Cosgrove SE, Nachman KE, Curriero FC, Rose HR, Schwartz BS

  13. Molecular characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in nosocomial infections in a tertiary-care facility: emergence of new clonal complexes in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Senok, A; Ehricht, R; Monecke, S; Al-Saedan, R; Somily, A

    2016-11-01

    Changes in the molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continue to be reported. This study was carried out to characterize MRSA isolates in Saudi Arabia. MRSA isolates causing nosocomial infections (n = 117) obtained from 2009-2015 at a tertiary-care facility in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, were studied. Molecular characterization of isolates was carried out using the StaphyType DNA microarray (Alere Technologies, Jena, Germany). Fourteen clonal complexes (CC) were identified, with the most common being CC80 (n = 35), CC6 (n = 15), CC5 (n = 13) and CC22 (n = 12). With the exception of nine ST239 MRSA-III isolates, all others were of community-associated MRSA lineages. The following strains are identified for the first time in Saudi Arabia: ST8-MRSA-IV [PVL(+)/ACME(+)], USA300 (n = 1); ST72-MRSA-IV USA700 (n = 1); CC5-MRSA-IV, [PVL(+)/edinA(+)], WA MRSA-121 (n = 1); CC5-MRSA-V+SCCfus, WA MRSA-14/109 (n = 2), CC97-MRSA-IV, WA MRSA-54/63; CC2250/2277-MRSA-IV and WA MRSA-114. CC15-MRSA (n = 3) was identified for the first time in clinical infection in Saudi Arabia. None of the isolates harboured vancomycin resistance genes, while genes for resistance to mupirocin and quaternary ammonium compounds were found in one and nine isolates respectively. Fifty-seven isolates (48.7%) were positive for Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes. While the staphylokinase (sak) and staphylococcal complement inhibitor (scn) genes were present in over 95% of the isolates, only 37.6% had the chemotaxis-inhibiting protein (chp) gene. Increasing occurrence of community-acquired MRSA lineages plus emergence of pandemic and rare MRSA strains is occurring in our setting. Strict infection control practices are important to limit the dissemination of these MRSA strains. PMID:27621823

  14. Acute haematogenous community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis in an adult: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has of late emerged as a cause of community-acquired infections among immunocompetent adults without risk factors. Skin and soft tissue infections represent the majority of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) clinical presentations, whilst invasive and life-threatening illness like necrotizing pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, pyomyositis, osteomyelitis and sepsis syndrome are less common. Although more widely described in the pediatric age group, the occurrence of CA-MRSA osteomyelitis in adults is an uncommonly reported entity. Case presentation We describe an invasive CA-MRSA infection in a 28 year-old previously healthy male, manifesting with bacteraemia, osteomyelitis of femur, pyomyositis and septic arthritis of the knee. Initially a preliminary diagnosis of osteosarcoma was suggested by imaging studies and patient underwent a bone biopsy. MRSA was subsequently isolated from blood cultures taken on day of admission, bone, tissue and pus cultures. Incision and drainage of abscess was performed and patient was treated with vancomycin, with fusidic acid added later. It took 6 months for the inflammatory markers to normalize, warranting 6-months of anti-MRSA therapy. Patient was a fervent deer hunter and we speculate that he acquired this infection from extensive direct contact with deer. Molecular characterization of this isolate showed that it belonged to multilocus sequence type (MLST) ST30 and exhibited the staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) type IV, staphylococcus protein A (spa) type t019, accessory gene regulator (agr) type III and dru type dt10m. This strain harbored Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl) genes together with 3 other virulent genes; sei (enterotoxin), hlg (hemolysin) and fnbA (fibronectin binding protein). Conclusion This case study alerts physicians that beyond the most commonly encountered skin and soft tissue infections, pvl

  15. 50th anniversary of the laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolotti, M.

    2010-09-01

    On July, 7, 1960 a press conference at Huyghes announced that Maiman had assembled and put into operation the first laser. It was the very pulsed ruby laser that everybody knows today. The announcement came as a bomb. Nobody expected that in an unknown laboratory, new to the race to build a laser, this result could be obtained. It was such an unexpected result that many still today mantain that the true laser was discovered at Bell by Shawlow. This result was achieved through a long story which passed by the Townes maser and many tentative experiments and discussions both in the USA and Soviet Union. In this special issue we present a collection of papers which provide further information as to what happened after Einstein introduced the concept of stimulated emission. The first paper is a short paper by Townes on the development of the physics of microwaves following the creation of the maser. When the laser came on the stage one of its properties was the inherent coherence of the emitted light. Emil Wolf's contribution enlights the early days of coherence to which he so much contributed and the very timely first Rochester Conference which was held on June 27-29, 1960 a few days before the Times announcement of the Maiman achievement. Important contributions were given by Soviet Scientists and, Svetlana Lukishova's contributions helps us understand the work of Valentin Fabrikant which was mostly unknown to western scientists. At the end of his life, Maiman went to Vancouver in Canada and Andrew H. Rawicz gives his testimoniancy of his friendship there. Coherence and the statistical properties of laser light were much studied and we have two exceptional papers by Roy Pike and Jan Perina discussing these arguments. The issue also contains three more papers presenting some earlier achievements in the construction of multiquantumwell laser (M. L. Dotor, P. Huertas, P. A. Postigo, D. Golmayo and F. Briones), the first measurements on very short pulses (H. P. Weber and

  16. Proterozoic geochronologic and isotopic boundary in NW Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, K.R.; Bowring, S.A. )

    1990-05-01

    U-Pb ages determined from zircon, sphene, and apatite in conjunction with Pb isotopic analyses of alkali feldspar establish a regional geochronological framework and constrain the location of a major north-trending Proterozoic crustal boundary in northwestern Arizona. Two regions west of the boundary (Hualapai Mountains and Lost Basin Range-Garnet Mountain) are characterized by complex U-Pb zircon systematics, evidence for inheritance of an older zircon component (1.8-2.3 Ga), and elevated {sup 207}Pb/{sup 204}Pb from feldspars compared to the east. Although the discordia patterns are complex, supracrustal rocks are interpreted to be ca. 1.73 Ga and are intruded by plutonic rocks ca. 1.70 Ga. Deformation is younger than ca. 1.70 Ga foliated granites and older than the 1,682 {plus minus} 4 Ma Garnet Mt. monzogranite. The rocks in one area east of the boundary (Cottonwood Cliffs) are characterized by relatively simple U-Pb zircon systematics, no evidence for inheritance of any older component, and feldspar {sup 207}/{sup 204}Pb near model mantle values. Supracrustal rocks are older than 1.73 Ga, as they are intruded by a 1,730 {plus minus} 9 Ma foliated granodiorite. Timing of deformation is constrained by the late syn-kinematic Valentine granite dated at 1,713 {plus minus} 12 Ma. Mineral ages indicate that the rocks on either side of the boundary had different cooling histories and inferentially, different uplift histories. West of the boundary, the cooling history is inferred from minerals separated from an amphibolite: metamorphic zircon is 1,687 +13/{minus}8 Ma, sphene is 1,660 {plus minus} 5 Ma, hornblende has a {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age of 1,552 {plus minus} 5 Ma, and apatite has a U-Pb age of 1,520 {plus minus} 45 Ma. East of the boundary an amphibolite has sphene with an age of 1,670 {plus minus} 11 Ma and apatite with an age of 1,630 {plus minus} 8 Ma.

  17. Changes in Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during the ROSETTA Era - Shape, Topography and Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, Robert W.; Jorda, Laurent; Sierks, Holger; Gutiérrez, Pedro; Faurschou Hviid, Stubbe; Keller, Horst Uwe; Mottola, Stefano; Capanna, Claire; OSIRIS team

    2016-10-01

    The ROSETTA orbiter began mapping comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 1 Aug 2014. It was high summer on the comet, with a subsolar latitude of 45 degrees, meaning that little of the South was illuminated. At that time, the comet was rotating at a rate of 696 deg/day and was 3.6 AU from the Sun. From September through January 2015, ROSETTA was mostly within 30 km of the comet, at times venturing within 10 km. This allowed for detailed mapping of 67P's northern hemisphere. By the end of January, with the Sun still at 27 degrees North, the comet was at 2.4 AU and was becoming too active for close operations. At the same time, torques due to this activity began slowing the rotation rate until it reached a minimum of 694 deg/day around the end of April, shortly before the autumnal equinox. Except for a daring close approach (8 km) on Valentine's day 2015, ROSETTA would not get within 30 km for another year, just before the vernal equinox, precluding very high resolution mapping of the South. Meanwhile, increasing torques as the comet passed through perihelion in mid August 2015 (1.24 AU) were increasing the rotation rate - it is currently at 716 deg/day - while the direction of the pole has remained unchanged. Some areas of the comet, most notably in the Imhotep region, have shown significant changes in topography during the comet's passage by the Sun. These are being mapped and it is hoped that we shall be able to map additional changes by comparing early and late imaging. By the end of the mission in late September, 67P will have receded to about 3.8 AU and the rotation rate will probably have stabilized to its new value. By early August, the Sun will be about 16 degrees North, but the increased distance from the Sun will reduce the power available and an increasing distance from Earth will reduce data rates. 1 Aug 2016 will be our data cutoff for this work. Removing pre-perihelion images with subsolar latitude > 15 deg still provided enough data to map the North, so

  18. Duttonite, a new quadrivalent vanadium oxide from the Peanut mine, Montrose County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Mary Eleanor; Roach, Carl Houston; Meyrowitz, Robert

    1956-01-01

    Duttonite, a new quadrivalent vanadium oxide from the Peanut mine, Montrose County, Colo., has the formula VO(OH)2. The mineral occurs as crusts and coatings of pale-brown transparent platy crystals, as one of the first oxidation products of montroseite ore. It is associated with melanovanadite and abundant crystals of hexagonal native selenium. Duttonite is biaxial positive, 2V is about 60°, dispersion is r v, moderate; X = a, pale pinkish brown; Y = c, pale yellow-brown; Z = b, pale brown; α = 1.810 ± 0.003, β = 1.900 ± 0.003, γ > 2.01. The hardness is about 2.5; the calculated specific gravity is 3.24. The chemical analysis shows, in percent: V2o3 2.6, V2O4 75.3, FeO 0.4, H2O 18.1, insoluble 4.2, total 100.6. Duttonite is monoclinic, ao = 8.80 ± 0.02A, bo - 3.95 ± 0.01A, co - 5.96 ± 0.02A, β = 90°401 ± 51. The space group is I2/c, (C62h); the cell contents are 4[VO(OH)2]. The crystals are strongly pseudo-orthorhombic, and the structure departs only slightly from the space group Imcm. Duttonite is named for Captain Clarence Edward Dutton (1841-1912). A detailed study of the geology, geochemistry, and mineralogy of the vanadium-uranium ore at the Peanut mine, Montrose County, Colo., was begun early in 1954 by Carl H. Roach of the U. S. Geological Survey. A number of rare and new minerals were found in the ore and the study of these samples was undertaken by Mary E. Thompson. Duttonite is the first new vanadium mineral to be described from the Peanut mine. It is named for Captain Clarence Edward Dutton (1841-1912), who was one of the first geologists to work in the Colorado Plateau region and who was a member of the U. s. Geological Survey from 1879-91. We are indebted to the following members of the Geological Surbey: K. E. Valentine for spectrographic analyses of duttonite, and M. E. Mrose and H. T. Evans, Jr., for measurement of the unit cell constants. This work is part of a program being conducted by the U. S. Geological Survey on behalf of the

  19. Hydrogen isotope systematics among H2-H2O-CH4 during the growth of the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus strain ΔH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Kobayashi, Mariko; Hattori, Shohei; Yamada, Keita; Ueno, Yuichiro; Takai, Ken; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2014-10-01

    Stable hydrogen isotope systematics among H2, H2O, and CH4 during hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis were investigated by growing a thermophilic methanogen, Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus strain ΔH, in batch cultures spiked with deuterium-labeled H2 and/or H2O. The hydrogen isotope ratio of the product, CH4, reflected not only the isotope ratio of the H2O in the medium but also that of the substrate, H2. The D/H ratios of the CH4 were highest during the early phase of growth, and the growth-phase-dependent changes were greatest in the deuterium-enriched H2 cultures. The hydrogen isotope systematics among H2, H2O, and CH4 during growth of the methanogen could be described with the following equations: δDCH4=a×δDH2O+b×δDH2-c a=0.71-0.55×b 0.17⩽b⩽0.38 c=1000×(a+b-1) The greatest effect of δDH2 on δDCH4 (b = 0.38) was observed during the earliest phase of growth. In contrast to this study, the possible disappearance of the effect (b = 0) has been suggested in a previous study (Valentine et al., 2004a) in which Methanothermobacter marburgensis was cultured and hydrogen isotope systematics during growth was monitored, as was the case in this study. The close phylogenetic relationship between M. thermautotrophicus and M. marburgensis, which likely have similar biochemical pathways, suggests a possibly broad range of the b value, 0-0.38. To explain the observed hydrogen isotope systematics, two cellular mechanisms were proposed. One is that the hydrogen atoms of both H2 and H2O are directly incorporated into the product, CH4. The other is that all four hydrogen atoms in the product, CH4, are derived from intracellular H2O, which consists of a mixture of medium-derived pristine H2O and isotopically distinct H2O derived from methanogenic H2 oxidation. Although we attempted to evaluate the feasibility of these mechanisms, both cellular mechanisms remain hypothetical. The hydrogen isotope systematics shown here contribute to put forward utility of δDCH4

  20. The other "Irish question".

    PubMed

    Browne, H

    1992-05-01

    The influence of the Roman Catholic Church on Irish society makes it difficult for sex and health educators and HIV/AIDS prevention efforts. Divorce, abortion, consensual sex between consenting adult men, and contraception for those under 18 years is banned in Ireland. Public opinions and recent court decisions do appear to bring a measure of hope for more lenient attitudes. The trends vary from the recent Supreme Court case of the 14-year old rape victim being permitted an abortion because she was suicidal to a radio talk show host, Father Michael Cleary who suspected she was "set-up" to test the ban on abortion. Father Cleary also outraged health educators by stating inaccurately that condoms did not prevent AIDS. It is estimated that 500 Irish women have abortions each year in Britain; there have been 262 reported AIDS cases and estimates of up to 10,000 HIV infected out of a population of 3.5 million. An AIDS education campaign was mounted in 1987, but in the 37-minute Department of Health video only 1 minute was devoted to condoms and no sex was promoted as the only safe sex. Access is limited to consenting pharmacies and clinics for people 18 years of older; rural chemists may exercise discretion and refuse sales. In 1991, the government proposed lowering the age to 17 years for condom availability and assigning the regional health boards, the responsibility of determining who sells contraceptives. A university lecturer reported that inaction on this bill was close to "criminal inactivity." Challenges in February 1991 were made by the Irish Family Planning Association (IFPA) in setting up a condom sales kiosk in Dublin. The IFPA was fined, but opinion polls indicated that 57% supported condom availability for 16 year olds. On Valentines Day in 1992, condom vending machines, which are illegal, were installed in pubs and nightclubs, police action has been cautious. A new health minister is concerned about AIDS prevention and the republic's first woman President

  1. Molecular characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in nosocomial infections in a tertiary-care facility: emergence of new clonal complexes in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Senok, A; Ehricht, R; Monecke, S; Al-Saedan, R; Somily, A

    2016-11-01

    Changes in the molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continue to be reported. This study was carried out to characterize MRSA isolates in Saudi Arabia. MRSA isolates causing nosocomial infections (n = 117) obtained from 2009-2015 at a tertiary-care facility in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, were studied. Molecular characterization of isolates was carried out using the StaphyType DNA microarray (Alere Technologies, Jena, Germany). Fourteen clonal complexes (CC) were identified, with the most common being CC80 (n = 35), CC6 (n = 15), CC5 (n = 13) and CC22 (n = 12). With the exception of nine ST239 MRSA-III isolates, all others were of community-associated MRSA lineages. The following strains are identified for the first time in Saudi Arabia: ST8-MRSA-IV [PVL(+)/ACME(+)], USA300 (n = 1); ST72-MRSA-IV USA700 (n = 1); CC5-MRSA-IV, [PVL(+)/edinA(+)], WA MRSA-121 (n = 1); CC5-MRSA-V+SCCfus, WA MRSA-14/109 (n = 2), CC97-MRSA-IV, WA MRSA-54/63; CC2250/2277-MRSA-IV and WA MRSA-114. CC15-MRSA (n = 3) was identified for the first time in clinical infection in Saudi Arabia. None of the isolates harboured vancomycin resistance genes, while genes for resistance to mupirocin and quaternary ammonium compounds were found in one and nine isolates respectively. Fifty-seven isolates (48.7%) were positive for Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes. While the staphylokinase (sak) and staphylococcal complement inhibitor (scn) genes were present in over 95% of the isolates, only 37.6% had the chemotaxis-inhibiting protein (chp) gene. Increasing occurrence of community-acquired MRSA lineages plus emergence of pandemic and rare MRSA strains is occurring in our setting. Strict infection control practices are important to limit the dissemination of these MRSA strains.

  2. Modelling staphylococcal pneumonia in a human 3D lung tissue model system delineates toxin-mediated pathology.

    PubMed

    Mairpady Shambat, Srikanth; Chen, Puran; Nguyen Hoang, Anh Thu; Bergsten, Helena; Vandenesch, Francois; Siemens, Nikolai; Lina, Gerard; Monk, Ian R; Foster, Timothy J; Arakere, Gayathri; Svensson, Mattias; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus necrotizing pneumonia is recognized as a toxin-mediated disease, yet the tissue-destructive events remain elusive, partly as a result of lack of mechanistic studies in human lung tissue. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) tissue model composed of human lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts was used to delineate the role of specific staphylococcal exotoxins in tissue pathology associated with severe pneumonia. To this end, the models were exposed to the mixture of exotoxins produced by S. aureus strains isolated from patients with varying severity of lung infection, namely necrotizing pneumonia or lung empyema, or to purified toxins. The necrotizing pneumonia strains secreted high levels of α-toxin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), and triggered high cytotoxicity, inflammation, necrosis and loss of E-cadherin from the lung epithelium. In contrast, the lung empyema strain produced moderate levels of PVL, but negligible amounts of α-toxin, and triggered limited tissue damage. α-toxin had a direct damaging effect on the epithelium, as verified using toxin-deficient mutants and pure α-toxin. Moreover, PVL contributed to pathology through the lysis of neutrophils. A combination of α-toxin and PVL resulted in the most severe epithelial injury. In addition, toxin-induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators from lung tissue models resulted in enhanced neutrophil migration. Using a collection of 31 strains from patients with staphylococcal pneumonia revealed that strains producing high levels of α-toxin and PVL were cytotoxic and associated with fatal outcome. Also, the strains that produced the highest toxin levels induced significantly greater epithelial disruption. Of importance, toxin-mediated lung epithelium destruction could be inhibited by polyspecific intravenous immunoglobulin containing antibodies against α-toxin and PVL. This study introduces a novel model system for study of staphylococcal pneumonia in a human setting. The

  3. A Livestock-Associated, Multidrug-Resistant, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 97 Lineage Spreading in Dairy Cattle and Pigs in Italy.

    PubMed

    Feltrin, Fabiola; Alba, Patricia; Kraushaar, Britta; Ianzano, Angela; Argudín, María Angeles; Di Matteo, Paola; Porrero, María Concepción; Aarestrup, Frank M; Butaye, Patrick; Franco, Alessia; Battisti, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    Pandemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 97 (CC97) lineages originated from livestock-to-human host jumps. In recent years, CC97 has become one of the major MRSA lineages detected in Italian farmed animals. The aim of this study was to characterize and analyze differences in MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) mainly of swine and bovine origins. Forty-seven CC97 isolates, 35 MRSA isolates, and 6 MSSA isolates from different Italian pig and cattle holdings; 5 pig MRSA isolates from Germany; and 1 human MSSA isolate from Spain were characterized by macrorestriction pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, and antimicrobial resistance pattern analysis. Virulence and resistance genes were investigated by PCR and microarray analysis. Most of the isolates were of SCCmec type V (SCCmec V), except for two German MRSA isolates (SCCmec III). Five main clusters were identified by PFGE, with the German isolates (clusters I and II) showing 60.5% similarity with the Italian isolates, most of which (68.1%) grouped into cluster V. All CC97 isolates were Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) negative, and a few (n = 7) tested positive for sak or scn. All MRSA isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR), and the main features were erm(B)- or erm(C)-mediated (n = 18) macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance, vga(A)-mediated (n = 37) pleuromutilin resistance, fluoroquinolone resistance (n = 33), tet(K) in 32/37 tet(M)-positive isolates, and blaZ in almost all MRSA isolates. Few host-associated differences were detected among CC97 MRSA isolates: their extensive MDR nature in both pigs and dairy cattle may be a consequence of a spillback from pigs of a MRSA lineage that originated in cattle as MSSA and needs further investigation. Measures should be implemented at the farm level to prevent spillover to humans in intensive farming

  4. Community-associated Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia among Greek children: epidemiology, molecular characteristics, treatment, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Doudoulakakis, A G; Bouras, D; Drougka, E; Kazantzi, M; Michos, A; Charisiadou, A; Spiliopoulou, I; Lebessi, E; Tsolia, M

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an infrequent cause of community-associated (CA-SA) pneumonia in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical, epidemiological, microbiological, and molecular characteristics of CA-SA pneumonia among children hospitalized in two large tertiary care referral centers during an 8-year period. Cases of CA-SA pneumonia admitted between 2007 and 2014 were retrospectively examined through medical record review. Molecular investigation was performed for available strains; mecA, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) (lukS-lukF-PV), and fibronectin binding protein A (fnbA) genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Clones were assigned by agr groups, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), SCCmec, and multilocus sequencing typing (MLST). In total, 41 cases were recorded (boys, 61 %), with a median age of 4.3 months (range, 1-175). Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) accounted for 31 cases (75.6 %). Complications included empyema (25/41, 61 %), pneumatoceles (7/41, 17 %), and lung abscess (1/41, 2.5 %). Intensive care unit (ICU) admission was required in 58.5 %. Two deaths occurred (4.9 %). Definitive therapy was based on vancomycin with or without other antibiotics (55.9 %), followed by clindamycin and linezolid (26.5 % each). All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin (MIC90 2 mg/L, range 1-2), teicoplanin, and linezolid, whereas 26.8 % were resistant to clindamycin. Among the 25 studied strains, 20 were mecA-positive (MRSA), carrying also the fnbA gene. Of these, 90 % belonged to the ST80-IV/agr3/PVL-positive clone. Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strains showed polyclonality, 3/5 were PVL-positive, and 3/5 were fnbA-positive. MRSA and particularly the ST80-IV clone predominated among staphylococcal pneumonia cases in children. Treatment provided was effective in all but two patients, despite the relatively high minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin and a high resistance to

  5. Structure, regulation, and putative function of the arginine deiminase system of Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed

    Gruening, Petra; Fulde, Marcus; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an important cause of infectious diseases in young pigs. Little is known about the virulence factors or protective antigens of S. suis. Recently, we have identified two proteins of the arginine deiminase system (ADS) of S. suis, which were temperature induced and expressed on the streptococcal surface (N. Winterhoff, R. Goethe, P. Gruening, M. Rohde, H. Kalisz, H. E. Smith, and P. Valentin-Weigand, J. Bacteriol. 184:6768-6776, 2002). In the present study, we analyzed the complete ADS of S. suis. Due to their homologies to the recently published S. gordonii ADS genes, the genes for arginine deiminase, ornithine carbamoyl-transferase, and carbamate kinase, which were previously designated adiS, octS, and ckS, respectively, were renamed arcA, arcB, and arcC, respectively. Our data revealed that arcA, arcB, and arcC of the S. suis ADS are transcribed from an operon (arcABC operon). Additionally, putative ADS-associated genes were cloned and sequenced which, however, did not belong to the arcABC operon. These were the flpS gene upstream of the arcABC operon with homology to the flp transcription regulator of S. gordonii and the arcD, arcT, arcH, and argR genes downstream of the arcABC operon with high homologies to a putative arginine-ornithine antiporter, a putative dipeptidase of S. gordonii, a putative beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase of S. pneumoniae, and a putative arginine repressor of S. gordonii, respectively. The transcriptional start point of the arcABC operon was determined, and promoter analysis provided evidence that multiple factors contribute to the regulation of the ADS. Thus, a putative binding site for a transcription regulator of the Crp/Fnr family, an ArgR-binding site, and two cis-acting catabolite response elements were identified in the promoter-operator region of the operon. Consistent with this, we could demonstrate that the ADS of S. suis is inducible by arginine and reduced O2 tension and subject to carbon catabolite

  6. Thyroid Antagonists (Perchlorate, Thiocyanate, and Nitrate) and Childhood Growth in a Longitudinal Study of U.S. Girls

    PubMed Central

    Mervish, Nancy A.; Pajak, Ashley; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Pinney, Susan M.; Windham, Gayle C.; Kushi, Lawrence H.; Biro, Frank M.; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Blount, Benjamin C.; Wolff, Mary S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Perchlorate, thiocyanate, and nitrate are sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) inhibitors that block iodide uptake into the thyroid, thus affecting thyroid function. Thyroid dysfunction can adversely affect somatic growth and development in children. To our knowledge, no studies have examined effects of NIS inhibitors on body size measures. Objective: We investigated associations between NIS inhibitors and childhood growth in 940 girls from the Puberty Study of the Breast Cancer and Environment Research Program. Methods: Urine samples collected from girls 6–8 years of age at enrollment (2004–2007) from New York City, greater Cincinnati, Ohio, and the Bay Area in California were analyzed for NIS inhibitors and creatinine (C). The longitudinal association between NIS inhibitors and anthropometric measures [height, waist circumference, and body mass index (BMI)] during at least three visits was examined using mixed effects linear models, adjusted for race and site. Results: Compared with girls in the low-exposure group (3.6, 626, and 500 mg/gC, median perchlorate, thiocyanate, and nitrate, respectively) girls with the highest NIS inhibitor exposure (9.6, 2,343, and 955 mg/gC, median perchlorate, thiocyanate, and nitrate, respectively) had slower growth in waist circumference and BMI but not height. Significant differences in the predicted mean waist circumference and BMI between the low- and high-exposure groups were observed beginning at 11 years of age. Conclusions: Higher NIS inhibitor exposure biomarkers were associated with reductions in waist circumference and BMI. These findings underscore the need to assess exposure to NIS inhibitors with respect to their influence on childhood growth. Citation: Mervish NA, Pajak A, Teitelbaum SL, Pinney SM, Windham GC, Kushi LH, Biro FM, Valentin-Blasini L, Blount BC, Wolff MS, for the Breast Cancer and Environment Research Project (BCERP). 2016. Thyroid antagonists (perchlorate, thiocyanate, and nitrate) and

  7. Structural resistance of reinforced concrete buildings under pyroclastic flows: a study of the Vesuvian area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrazzuoli, S. M.; Zuccaro, G.

    2004-05-01

    The analysis of the effects of pyroclastic flows on humans and on buildings represents the main tool to define the boundary of the most hazardous area around an active volcano such as Somma-Vesuvius. Estimation of the lateral pressure on buildings derived from analogies with the damages observed after a nuclear explosion [Valentine (1998) J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 87, 117-140] lead to pressure values and/or structural resistance which are not realistic (too high). Recent evidence [Baxter (2000) Human and Structural Vulnerability Assessment for Emergency Planning in a Future Eruption of Vesuvius. Final Report EC Project ENV4-CT98-0699; Young et al. (1997) EOS, Trans. Am. Geophys. Union, 78, 401] have shown that beyond 2-3 km from the vent, even after a great eruption, resistance to collapse of buildings affected by a pyroclastic flow is still possible. Neri et al. [(2000) Numerical simulation of pyroclastic flows. In: Human and Human and Structural Vulnerability Assessment for Emergency Planning in a Future Eruption of Vesuvius. Final Report EC Project ENV4-CT98-0699], by means of a numerical model of a collapsing column, show that the peak overpressures of the pyroclastic flows range from 1 to 2 kPa at a distance from the vent of about 4-5 km, where important historical centres of the Vesuvian area are located. A detailed analysis of urban settlement of the area [Cherubini et al. (2001) Vulnerabilita' Sismica dell'Area Vesuviana. Gruppo Nazionale per la Difesa dai Terremoti, CNR, Roma] has shown that most of the people live in reinforced concrete (r.c.) structures, not designed to resist horizontal seismic actions. The present work is aimed at analyzing the collapse limit load of r.c. structures to horizontal pressure for different structural design typologies (strong aseismic, weak aseismic, strong non-aseismic, weak non-aseismic). The simulations performed have also taken into account the specific features of the r.c. structures of the area (local building

  8. Historic Seismicity, Computed Peak Ground Accelerations, and Seismic Site Conditions for Northeast Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalvo-Arriet, J. C.; Galván-Ramírez, I. N.; Ramos-Zuñiga, L. G.; Navarro de León, I.; Ramírez-Fernández, J. A.; Quintanilla-López, Y.; Cavazos-Tovar, N. P.

    2007-05-01

    In this study we present the historic seismicity, computed peak ground accelerations, and mapping of seismic site conditions for northeast Mexico. We start with a compilation of the regional seismicity in northeast Mexico (24- 31°N, 87-106°W) for the 1787-2006 period. Our study area lies within three morphotectonic provinces: Basin and Range and Rio Grande rift, Sierra Madre Oriental and Gulf Coastal Plain. Peak ground acceleration (PGA) maps were computed for three different scenarios: 1928 Parral, Chihuahua (MW = 6.5); 1931 Valentine, Texas (MW = 6.4); and a hypothetical earthquake located in central Coahuila (MW = 6.5). Ground acceleration values were computed using attenuation relations developed for central and eastern North America and the Basin and Range province. The hypothetical earthquake in central Coahuila is considered a critical scenario for the main cities of northeast Mexico. The damage associated with this hypothetical earthquake could be severe because the majority of the buildings were constructed without allowance for seismic accelerations. The expected PGA values in Monterrey, Saltillo and Monclova range from 30 to 70 cm/s2 (0.03 to 0.07g). This earthquake might also produce or trigger significant landslides and rock falls in the Sierra Madre Oriental, where several cities are located (e.g. suburbs of Monterrey). Additionally, the Vs30 distribution for the state of Nuevo Leon and the cities of Linares and Monterrey are presented. The Vs30 data was obtained using seismic refraction profiling correlated with borehole information. According to NEHRP soil classification, sites classes A, B and C are dominant. Sites with class D occupy minor areas in both cities. Due to the semi-arid conditions in northeast Mexico, we obtained the highest values of Vs30 in Quaternary deposits (alluvium) cemented by caliche. Similar values of Vs30 were obtained in Reno and Las Vegas, Nevada. This work constitutes the first attempt at understanding and

  9. Snow on the Seafloor? Methods to Detect Carbohydrates in Deep-sea Sediments Impacted by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincoln, S. A.; Freeman, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    ). (1) Valentine et al., 2014. PNAS 111, 15906-15911. (2) Romero et al., 2015. PLOS One 10(5): e0128371 (3) Passow et al., ERL 7, 035301. (4) Passow, 2014. Deep-Sea Res. II, http://dx.doi. org/10.1016/j.dsr2.2014.10.001i (5) White et al., 2012. PNAS 109(50), 20303-20308.

  10. Focused Weathering Control of Convex Waterfalls Along the Niobrara River in Cherry and Brown Counties, Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, L. J.; Pederson, D. T.; Goble, R. J.

    2004-12-01

    More than 200 waterfalls exist along the southern spring branch tributaries that feed an approximately twenty-five mile section of the Niobrara River, east of Valentine, Nebraska. Many of these waterfalls posses a convex shape in the horizontal plane and are buttressed. This morphology is controlled by focused, season-specific weathering along the escarpments adjacent to the waterfall face and a lack of stream erosion on the actual waterfall face. The waterfalls are composed of the Rosebud Formation, a poorly indurated siltstone that should be easily eroded by stream flow. The spring creeks are ineffective at significantly eroding the waterfall face mainly due to their relatively low discharge, three to five cubic feet per second, and low sediment load. The erosive power of the streams is further reduced at the site of the waterfall by the buttressed shape spreading the flow into a thin sheet. The buttressed shape of the waterfall develops in response to stress relief. The only areas of the waterfall face showing stream erosion and lack of diatom cover is where free falling water is impacting the waterfall face. Large, loose talus slopes at the base of the waterfall escarpments further support that the weathering processes operate at a faster rate than stream erosion. Observable groundwater seepage from the escarpments on either side of the waterfalls exposes the faces to season-specific weathering processes. The moisture content of the escarpments varies with exposure to sunlight and changes in air temperature. Cyclic differential expansion and contraction of clays and minerals as well as precipitation and hydration of salts operate on a daily and seasonal basis. These repeated stresses give the escarpments a flaky, shingle like appearance and can cause rapid deterioration of the escarpment. During the winter, the seeping groundwater and waterfall spray form large ice flows on either side of the waterfall face. Freeze-thaw processes operate on a seasonal and

  11. A unique SaeS allele overrides cell-density dependent expression of saeR and lukSF-PV in the ST30-SCCmecIV lineage of CA-MRSA.

    PubMed

    Ramundo, Mariana Severo; Beltrame, Cristiana Ossaille; Botelho, Ana Maria Nunes; Coelho, Leonardo Rocchetto; Silva-Carvalho, Maria Cicera; Ferreira-Carvalho, Bernadete Teixeira; Nicolás, Marisa Fabiana; Guedes, Isabella Alvim; Dardenne, Laurent Emmanuel; O'Gara, James; Figueiredo, Agnes Marie Sá

    2016-09-01

    ST30 (CC30)-SCCmec IV (USA1100) is one of the most common community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) lineages. ST30 isolates typically carry lukSF-PV genes encoding the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and are responsible for outbreaks of invasive infections worldwide. In this study, twenty CC30 isolates were analyzed. All were very susceptible to non-β-lactam antimicrobials, 18/20 harbored the lukSF-PV genes, only 1/20 exhibited agr-rnaIII dysfunction, and the majority was not able to form biofilm on inert surfaces. Analysis of lukSF-PV temporal regulation revealed that opposite to other CA-MRSA isolates, these genes were more highly expressed in early log phase than in stationary phase. This inverted lukSF-PV temporal expression was associated with a similar pattern of saeRS expression in the ST30 isolates, namely high level expression in log phase and reduced expression in stationary phase. Reduced saeRS expression in stationary phase was associated with low expression levels of the sae regulators, agr and agr-upregulator sarA, which activate the stationary phase sae-P1 promoter and overexpression of agr-RNAIII restored the levels of saeR and lukSF-PV trancripts in stationary phase. Altered SaeRS activity in the ST30 isolates was attributed to amino acid substitutions (N227S, E268K and S351T) in the HTPase_c domain of SaeS (termed SaeS(SKT)). Complementation of a USA300 saeS mutant with the saeS(SKT) and saeS alleles under the direction of the log phase sae-P3 promoter revealed that saeR and lukSF-PV transcription levels were more significantly activated by saeS(SKT) than saeS. In summary our data identify a unique saeS allele (saeS(SKT)) which appears to override cell-density dependent SaeR and PVL expression in ST30 CA-MRSA isolates. Further studies to determine the contribution of saeS(SKT) allele to the pathogenesis of infections caused by ST30 isolates are merited.

  12. Phenol-Soluble Modulins Contribute to Early Sepsis Dissemination Not Late Local USA300-Osteomyelitis Severity in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Davido, Benjamin; Saleh-Mghir, Azzam; Laurent, Frédéric; Danel, Claire; Couzon, Florence; Gatin, Laure; Vandenesch, François; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Crémieux, Anne-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In bone and joint infections (BJIs), bacterial toxins are major virulence factors: Panton—Valentine leukocidin (PVL) expression leads to severe local damage, including bone distortion and abscesses, while α-hemolysin (Hla) production is associated with severe sepsis-related mortality. Recently, other toxins, namely phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) expressed by community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strain USA300 (LAC WT) were shown to have ex vivo intracellular cytotoxic activity after S. aureus invasion of osteoblasts, but their in vivo contribution in a relatively PVL-sensitive osteomyelitis model remains poorly elucidated. Materials and Methods We compared the outcomes of experimental rabbit osteomyelitises induced with pvl+hla+psms+ LAC WT and its isogenic Δpsm derivatives (LAC Δpsmα and LAC Δpsmαβhld) using an inoculum of 3 × 108 CFUs. Mortality, hematogenous spread (blood culture, spleen and kidney), lung and bone involvements were assessed in two groups (non-survivors of severe sepsis and survivors sacrificed on day (D) 14). Results Severe sepsis-related mortality tended to be lower for Δpsm derivatives (Kaplan—Meier curves, P = .06). Non-survivors’ bone LAC-Δpsmα (6.9 log10 CFUs/g of bone, P = .04) or -Δpsmαβhld (6.86 log10 CFUs/g of bone, P = .014) densities were significantly higher than LAC WT (6.43 log10 CFUs/g of bone). Conversely, lung Δpsmαβhld CFUs were significantly lower than LAC WT (P = .04). LAC Δpsmα, Δpsmαβhld and WT induced similar bone damage in D14 survivors, with comparable bacterial densities (respectively: 5.89, 5.91, and 6.15 log10 CFUs/g of bone). Meanwhile, pulmonary histological scores of inflammation were significantly higher for LAC Δpsmα- and Δpsmαβhld-infected rabbits compared to LAC WT (P = .04 and .01, respectively) but with comparable lung bacterial densities. Conclusion Our experimental results showed that deactivating PSM peptides significantly

  13. Genotyping of community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) in a tertiary care centre in Mysore, South India: ST2371-SCCmec IV emerges as the major clone.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Vineeth; Schoenfelder, Sonja M K; Ziebuhr, Wilma; Gopal, Shubha

    2015-08-01

    The burden of community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is on the rise in population and clinical settings on account of the adaptability and virulence traits of this pathogen. We characterized 45 non-duplicate CA-MRSA strains implicated mainly in skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) in a tertiary care hospital in Mysore, South India. All the isolates were genotyped by staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, staphylococcal protein A (spa) typing, accessory gene regulator (agr) typing, and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Four sequence types (STs) belonging to three major clonal complexes (CCs) were identified among the isolates: CC22 (ST2371 and ST22), CC1 (ST772) and CC8 (ST8). The majority (53.3%) of the isolates was of the genotype ST2371-t852-SCCmec IV [sequence type-spa type-SCCmec type], followed by ST22-t852-SCCmec IV (22.2%), ST772-t657-SCCmec V (13.3%) and ST8-t008-SCCmec IV (11.1%). ST237I, a single locus variant of ST22 (EMRSA-15 clone), has not been reported previously from any of the Asian countries. Our study also documents for the first time, the appearance of ST8-SCCmec IV (USA300) strains in India. Representative strains of the STs were further analyzed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). agr typing detected type I or II alleles in the majority of the isolates. All the isolates were positive for the leukotoxin gene, pvl (Panton-Valentine leukocidin) and the staphylococcal enterotoxin gene cluster, egc. Interestingly, multidrug resistance (resistance to ⩾3 classes of non-beta-lactam antibiotics) was observed in 77.8% (n=35) of the isolates. The highest (75.5%) resistance was recorded for ciprofloxacin, followed by erythromycin (53.3%), and quinupristin-dalfopristin (51.1%). Inducible clindamycin-resistance was identified in 37.7% of the isolates and it was attributed to the presence of erm(A), erm(C) and a combination of erm(A) and erm(C) genes. Isolates which showed a phenotypic

  14. Antimicrobial resistance and population structure of Staphylococcus aureus recovered from pigs farms.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Laura E J; Argudín, M Angeles; Azadikhah, Sonya; Butaye, Patrick

    2015-10-22

    Staphylococcus aureus is a burden in human and veterinary medicine. During the last decade, an increasing number of studies reported the presence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (LA-MRSA) clonal complex (CC) 398 in pigs. During 2013, a survey was performed in pig farms (n=328) randomly selected over Belgium, to monitor the current epidemiological situation of LA-MRSA among asymptomatic pigs and compare with former data to determine possible evolutions. Per farm, nose swabs were taken from 20 animals and pooled. MRSA was detected in 215 farms. Most isolates belonged to CC398 (n=211), and the remaining were ST9/t337 (n=1), ST80/t044 (n=2) and ST239/t4150 (n=1). A large diversity (n=19) of spa-types was found in the CC398 isolates. More than 90% of the isolates were non-wild type (NWT) to tetracycline and trimethoprim. NWT isolates were also found for ciprofloxacin (61.1%), clindamycin (64.4%), erythromycin (57.8%), kanamycin (43.1%) and gentamicin (45.5%). Microarray analysis showed that most CC398 isolates carried genes encoding resistance to tetracycline [tet(M)], macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin group [erm(B), erm(C), lnu(A), vga(A)], aminoglycosides (aacA-aphD,aa dD, aphA3, sat) and/or phenicols (fexA). One CC398 isolate carried the multi-resistance gene cfr. The non-CC398 isolates carried virulence genes, as the egc-like cluster. The ST80 strain carried the Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene and corresponded to the community-acquired (CA-)MRSA ST80-IV European clone. The MRSA prevalence among pigs in Belgium remains similar to previous studies but a larger diversity in spa-types has been detected in this study. The recovery of CA-MRSA from livestock indicates that one should remain vigilant to the evolution of LA-MRSA in pigs.

  15. Modelling staphylococcal pneumonia in a human 3D lung tissue model system delineates toxin-mediated pathology

    PubMed Central

    Mairpady Shambat, Srikanth; Chen, Puran; Nguyen Hoang, Anh Thu; Bergsten, Helena; Vandenesch, Francois; Siemens, Nikolai; Lina, Gerard; Monk, Ian R.; Foster, Timothy J.; Arakere, Gayathri; Svensson, Mattias; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus necrotizing pneumonia is recognized as a toxin-mediated disease, yet the tissue-destructive events remain elusive, partly as a result of lack of mechanistic studies in human lung tissue. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) tissue model composed of human lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts was used to delineate the role of specific staphylococcal exotoxins in tissue pathology associated with severe pneumonia. To this end, the models were exposed to the mixture of exotoxins produced by S. aureus strains isolated from patients with varying severity of lung infection, namely necrotizing pneumonia or lung empyema, or to purified toxins. The necrotizing pneumonia strains secreted high levels of α-toxin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), and triggered high cytotoxicity, inflammation, necrosis and loss of E-cadherin from the lung epithelium. In contrast, the lung empyema strain produced moderate levels of PVL, but negligible amounts of α-toxin, and triggered limited tissue damage. α-toxin had a direct damaging effect on the epithelium, as verified using toxin-deficient mutants and pure α-toxin. Moreover, PVL contributed to pathology through the lysis of neutrophils. A combination of α-toxin and PVL resulted in the most severe epithelial injury. In addition, toxin-induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators from lung tissue models resulted in enhanced neutrophil migration. Using a collection of 31 strains from patients with staphylococcal pneumonia revealed that strains producing high levels of α-toxin and PVL were cytotoxic and associated with fatal outcome. Also, the strains that produced the highest toxin levels induced significantly greater epithelial disruption. Of importance, toxin-mediated lung epithelium destruction could be inhibited by polyspecific intravenous immunoglobulin containing antibodies against α-toxin and PVL. This study introduces a novel model system for study of staphylococcal pneumonia in a human

  16. Health care-associated Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Duncan; Chui, Linda; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Marrie, Thomas J

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION While Staphylococcus aureus is an uncommon but serious cause of traditional community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), it is a predominant cause of nosocomial pneumonia in addition to the unique clinical entity of health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP). A cohort of bacteremic S aureus pneumonia cases was reviewed to determine the role of HCAP among the cohort, and to assess for differences between CAP and HCAP. PATIENTS AND METHODS Bacteremic S aureus pneumonia cases were identified from a prospective study of all patients diagnosed with CAP who presented to hospitals in Edmonton, Alberta, between November 2000 and November 2002. These cases were subsequently reviewed retrospectively. Demographic, clinical and microbiological data were obtained, and patients were classified as having CAP or HCAP. Relatedness of isolates was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis in conjunction with epidemiological information. RESULTS There were 28 cases of bacteremic S aureus pneumonia identified. Fifty-seven per cent were reclassified as having HCAP, and 43% remained classified as having CAP. The CAP cohort was significantly younger than the HCAP cohort (mean age 49.0±23.7 years versus 67.8±18.6 years; P=0.035) with higher rates of intravenous drug use (50% versus 0%; P=0.002). Long-term care facility residence (44%) was common in the HCAP cohort. The HCAP cohort presented with more severe illness, having a higher mean pneumonia severity index score (143.1±41.1 versus 98.2±54.6; P=0.028), and despite fewer embolic complications, there was a trend toward a significantly higher mortality rate (31% versus 0%; P=0.052). Two community-acquired isolates cultured in the setting of intravenous drug use were methicillin-resistant, and no isolates were positive for Panton-Valentine leukocidin. There was evidence of relatedness involving 44% of the HCAP isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. CONCLUSION HCAP accounts for a significant number of

  17. Staphylococcus aureus in former Portuguese colonies from Africa and the Far East: missing data to help fill the world map.

    PubMed

    Conceição, T; Coelho, C; Silva, I Santos; de Lencastre, H; Aires-de-Sousa, M

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal carriage among patients and healthcare workers in Angola (ANG), São Tomé and Príncipe (STP), Cape Verde (CV) and East Timor (ET), and to characterize the antimicrobial susceptibility, virulence content and population structure of all S. aureus. Despite the importance of MRSA as a major human pathogen, data from these former Portuguese colonies in Africa and Asia are scarce. A total of 2065 nasal swabs recovered between 2010-14 were included in the study. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing and molecular characterization of S. aureus showed: (i) a very high MRSA prevalence in ANG (61.6%), moderate in STP (25.5%), low in CV (5.6%) and null in ET; (ii) a high prevalence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin in STP (36.8%), ET (29.2%) and CV (28.3%) contrasting with ANG (7.9%); (iii) ST5-SCCmecIVa, ST8-IV/V and ST5-VI were the major MRSA clones in ANG (65.2%), STP (44.8%) and CV (50%), respectively; (iv) a high resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in ANG (66.5%) and STP (50.9%), to rifampin in ANG (77.3%), and to tetracycline in STP (26.3%) and ET (20.8%); (v) three major methicillin-susceptible S. aureus clones (ST15, ST508, ST152) were present in all four countries. Age <18 years (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.24-3.31), previous surgery (OR 2.45, 95% CI 1.24-4.83), no smoking (OR 4.04, 95% CI 1.05-15.50), and longer hospitalization (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.49-4.28) were risk factors for MRSA carriage. This study provided the first comprehensive overview on MRSA in former Portuguese colonies in Africa and Asia, missing data in the world map. PMID:26003281

  18. Identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus using an integrated and modular microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Soper, Steven A

    2013-02-21

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of hospital-acquired (HA-MRSA) infection worldwide. As a result, the rapid and specific detection of MRSA is crucial not only for early prevention of disease spread, but also for the effective treatment of these infections. We report here an integrated modular-based microfluidic system for MRSA identification, which can carry out the multi-step assay used for MRSA identification in a single disposable fluidic cartridge. The multi-step assay included PCR amplification of the mecA gene harboring methicillin resistance loci that can provide information on drug susceptibility, ligase detection reaction (LDR) to generate fluorescent ligation products appended with a zip-code complement that directs the ligation product to a particular address on a universal array containing zip-code probes and a universal DNA array, which consisted of a planar waveguide for evanescent excitation. The fluidic cartridge design was based on a modular format, in which certain steps of the molecular processing pipeline were poised on a module made from a thermoplastic. The cartridge was comprised of a module interconnected to a fluidic motherboard configured in a 3-dimensional network; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and was used for PCR and LDR, while the module was made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA, and contained an air-embedded waveguide serving as the support for the universal array. Fluid handling, thermal management and optical readout hardware were situated off-chip and configured into a small footprint instrument. In this work, the cartridge was used to carry out a multiplexed PCR/LDR coupled with the universal array allowed for simultaneous detection of five genes that encode for 16S ribosomal RNA (SG16S), protein A (spa), the femA protein of S. epidermidis (femA), the virulence factor of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and the gene that confers methicillin resistance (mecA). Results

  19. PREFACE: Rusnanotech 2010 International Forum on Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazaryan, Konstantin

    2011-03-01

    Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia, Deputy Chairman of the Program CommitteeProf Alexander Aseev, AcademicianVice-president of Russian Academy of Sciences Director, A V Rzhanov-Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Sergey Bagaev, AcademicianDirector, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Alexander Gintsburg, Ademician, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesDirector Gamaleya Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, RussiaProf Anatoly Grigoryev, Academician, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesVice-president, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, RussiaProf Michael Kovalchuk, RAS Corresponding MemberDirector, Kurchatov Institute Russian Scientific Center, RussiaProf Valery Lunin, AcademicianDean, Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Valentin Parmon, Academician, DirectorBoreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Rem Petrov, AcademicianAdvisor, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Konstantin Skryabin, AcademicianDirector, Bioinzheneriya Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Vsevolod Tkachuk, Academician, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesDean, Faculty of Fundamental Medicine, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Vladimir Fortov, AcademicianDirector, Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Alexey Khokhlov, AcademicianVice Principal, Head of Innovation, Information and International Scientific Affairs Department, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Valery Bukhtiyarov, RAS Corresponding MemberDirector, Physicochemical Research Methods Dept., Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Anatoly Dvurechensky, RAS Corresponding Member

  20. GLORI (GLObal navigation satellite system Reflectometry Instrument): A New Airborne GNSS-R receiver for land surface applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motte, Erwan; Zribi, Mehrez; Fanise, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    collocated measurement of biomass and soil moisture ground truth in order to better characterize the instrument sensitivity to geophysical parameters. The instrument will be improved in the meanwhile including the optimization of data processing and the better integration of external data (GPS commercial receiver, Attitude) into the receiver. M.Martin-Neira. A Passive reflectometry and interferometry system (PARIS): Application to ocean altimetry. ESA J., 17:331-355, 1993 Hauser, D.; Caudal, G.; Le Gac, C.; Valentin, R.; Delaye, L.; Tison, C., "KuROS: A new airborne Ku-band Doppler radar for observation of the ocean surface," Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS), 2014 IEEE International , vol., no., pp.282,285, 13-18 July 2014 Egido, A.; Paloscia, S.; Motte, E.; Guerriero, L.; Pierdicca, N.; Caparrini, M.; Santi, E.; Fontanelli, G.; Floury, N., "Airborne GNSS-R Polarimetric Measurements for Soil Moisture and Above-Ground Biomass Estimation," Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing, IEEE Journal of , vol.7, no.5, pp.1522,1532, May 2014

  1. [Clinical aspects of streptococcal and staphylococcal toxinic diseases].

    PubMed

    Floret, D

    2001-09-01

    however, a cutaneous or soft tissue infection is at the origin. Necrotizing fasciitis complicating varicella is a classic cause in children. Bacteremia is often observed. The mortality rate is as high as 60%. The streptococcal strains involved in north america use to produce the toxin erythrogenic A, the european cases seem to be more related to strains secreting the B toxin with a dysregulation of the mechanisms which control the secretion of the toxin. Staphylococcus strains producing the Panton and Valentine leucocidin are responsible for chronic or relapsing furonculosis and above all for a very severe necrotizing pneumonia observed in children and young adults presenting as an acute respiratory distress syndrome with leucopenia, hemoptysis and shock carrying a heavy mortality rate. Besides these specific diseases, staphylococcal and streptococcal toxins may be involved in some syndromes of unknown origin, in which the intervention of superantigens seems very likely. Kawasaki syndrome is among them as strains producing staphylococcal and streptococcal toxins have been grown from patients with Kawasaki syndrome. In the same way, the intervention of toxins is suspected in the determination of sudden infant death syndrome and atopic eczema.

  2. Surface carbon transformations at a site of active continental serpentinization: the Tablelands, Newfoundland, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietze, A.; Szponar, N.; Lang, S. Q.; Kohl, L.; Morrill, P. L.

    2013-12-01

    region. However, this plot cannot be used as the sole diagnostic tool because the microbial methane in at least two studies of thermophilic methanogens (2, 3) would plot outside of the microbial field on this plot. The carbon isotope fractionation between inorganic carbon and methane (αCDIC-CH4) was within range of acetate fermentation (3) and the αCDIC-CH4 from putative abiogenic methane from the Precambrian (4). Further elucidation of methane source will require δ2H measurements of H2O and CH4. References: 1. Brazelton WJ, Nelson B, & Schrenk MO (2012) Frontiers in Microbiology 2:1-16. 2.House CH, Schopf JW, & Stetter KO (2003) Organic Geochemistry 34:345-356. 3.Valentine DL, Chidthaisong A, Rice R, Reeburgh WS, & Tyler SC (2004) Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 68(7):1571-1590. 4.Sherwood Lollar B, et al. (2008) Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 72(19):4778-4795.

  3. Pions to Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Laurie Mark; Dresden, Max; Hoddeson, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    neutrino Frederick Reines; 25. Recollections on the establishment of the weak-interaction notion Bruno M. Pontecorvo; 26. Symmetry and conservation laws in particle physics in the fifties Louis Michel; 27. A connection between the strong and weak interactions Sam B. Treiman; Part VII. Weak interactions and parity nonconservation; 29. The nondiscovery of parity nonconservation Allan Franklin; 30. K-meson decays and parity violation Richard H. Dalitz; 31. An Experimentalist's Perspective Val L. Fitch; 32. The early experiments leading to the V - A interaction Valentine L. Telegdi; 33. Midcentury adventures in particles physics E. C. G. Sudarshan; Part VIII. The particle physics community; 34. The postwar political economy of high-energy physics Robert Seidel; 35. The history of CERN during the early 1950s Edoardo Amaldi; 36. Arguments pro and contra the European laboratory in the participating countries Armin Hermann; 37. Physics and excellences of the life it brings Abdus Salam; 38. Social aspects of Japanese particle physics in the 1950s Michiji Konuma; Part IX. Theories of hadrons; 39. The early S-matrix theory and its propagation (1942-1952) Helmut Rechenberg; 40. From field theory to phenomenology: the history of dispersion relations Andy Pickering; 41. Particles as S-matrix poles: hadron democracy Geoffrey F. Chew; 42. The general theory of quantised fields in the 1950s Arthur S. Wrightman; 43. The classification and structure of hadrons Yuval Ne'eman; 44. Gauge principle, vector-meson dominance and spontaneous symmetry breaking Yoichiro Nambu; Part X. Personal overviews; 45. Scientific impact of the first decade of the Rochester conferences (1950-1960) Robert E. Marshak; 46. Some reflections on the history of particle physics in the 1950s Silvan S. Schweber; 47. Progress in elementary particle theory 1950-1964 Murray Gell-Mann.

  4. The dynamics of pyroclastic density currents on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, B. D.; Clarke, A. B.

    2010-12-01

    identical initial conditions, our models show that PDCs on Mars will out distance those on Earth by approximately 33%, primarily due to slower sedimentation rates. Although this general conclusion is consistent with previous studies, the difference between the Earth and Mars cases is much less than previously published. In addition, we find that when sedimentation of particles and entrainment of atmosphere are included, the runout distance becomes six times shorter than previous model results suggest (e.g., Crown, D. A., R. Greeley (1993), Volcanic geology of Hadriaca Patera and the eastern Hellas region of Mars, J. Geophys. Res., 98, 3431-3451). Additionally, we calculate the Rouse number and Brunt-Väisäla frequency to estimate the wavelength of internal gravity waves in the density stratified currents, which are thought be the primary control on deposit bedform wavelength and amplitude (Valentine, 1987). The model predicts realistic wavelengths on Earth (dunes from 20-200 m), whereas longer wavelengths are predicted on Mars. This difference likely reflects the fact that lower particle settling velocities on Mars result in density stratification over a greater vertical extent, and thus longer-wavelength standing waves.

  5. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cloaking and Transformation Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Smith, David R.

    2008-11-01

    coordinate transformations. If the coordinates they conjure up run backwards one gets negative refraction, if they exclude some region of space one makes anything inside invisible [4]. In physics, general relativity has honed the theoretical tools for understanding curved space and curved-coordinate transformations. In transformation optics, general relativity has become a theoretical tool for solving practical engineering problems [4]. What an unorthodox connection! This focus issue represents a snapshot of this rapidly developing research area. It is not restricted to optics or electromagnetism, though. Metamaterials for acoustics also exist and can be applied in ways similar to optical metamaterials. So transformation optics not only attracts an unusual mix of scientists, but also spans a range of applications in optics and beyond. Transformation optics has the potential to transform optics, for example by visualizing invisibility and making materials beyond materials—metamaterials. But before we transgress the boundaries to the hermeneutics of transformation optics [5], let the papers speak for themselves. References [1] Yao J, Liu Z, Liu Y, Wang Y, Sun C, Bartal G, Stacy A M and Zhang X 2008 Science 321 930 [2] Valentine J, Zhang S, Zentgraf T, Ulin-Avila E, Genov D A, Bartal G and Zhang X 2008 Nature 455 376 [3] Schurig D, Mock J J, Justice B J, Cummer S A, Pendry J B, Starr A F and Smith D R 2006 Science 314 977 [4] Leonhardt U and Philbin T G 2006 New J. Phys. 8 247 [5] Sokal A D 1996 Social Text 14(46/47) 217 Focus on Cloaking and Transformation Optics Contents Transformation optics for the full dielectric electromagnetic cloak and metal-dielectric planar hyperlens D P Gaillot, C Croënne, F Zhang and D Lippens Transmutation of singularities in optical instruments Tomáš Tyc and Ulf Leonhardt Electromagnetic cloaking with canonical spiral inclusions K Guven, E Saenz, R Gonzalo, E Ozbay and S Tretyakov Theory and potentials of multi-layered plasmonic covers for

  6. Do 'Planemos' Have Progeny?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-06-01

    Two new studies, based on observations made with ESO's telescopes, show that objects only a few times more massive than Jupiter are born with discs of dust and gas, the raw material for planet making. This suggests that miniature versions of the solar system may circle objects that are some 100 times less massive than our Sun. These findings are to be presented Monday, 5 June at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Calgary, Canada. Since a few years, it is known that many young brown dwarfs, 'failed stars' that weigh less than 8 percent the mass of the Sun, are surrounded by a disc of material. This may indicate these objects form the same way as did our Sun. The new findings confirm that the same appears to be true for their even punier cousins, sometimes called planetary mass objects or 'planemos'. These objects have masses similar to those of extra-solar planets, but they are not in orbit around stars - instead, they float freely through space. "Our findings, combined with previous work, suggest similar infancies for our Sun and objects that are some hundred times less massive", says Valentin D. Ivanov (ESO), co-author of the first study. ESO PR Photo 19a/06 ESO PR Photo 19a/06 Spectra of Candidate 'Planemos' "Now that we know of these planetary mass objects with their own little infant planetary systems, the definition of the word 'planet' has blurred even more," adds Ray Jayawardhana, from the University of Toronto (Canada) and lead author of the study. "In a way, the new discoveries are not too surprising - after all, Jupiter must have been born with its own disc, out of which its bigger moons formed." Unlike Jupiter, however, these planemos are not circling stars. In their study, Jayawardhana and Ivanov used two of ESO's telescopes - Antu, the 8.2-metre Unit Telescope no. 1 of the Very Large Telescope, and the 3.5-metre New Technology Telescope - to obtain optical spectra of six candidates identified recently by researchers at the University of Texas

  7. Soil nitrogen availability in the open steppe with Stipa tenacissima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novosadova, Irena; Damian Ruiz Sinoga, Jose; Záhora, Jaroslav

    2010-05-01

    Open steppes dominated by Stipa tenacissima L. constitute one of the most representative ecosystems of the semi-arid zones of Iberian Peninsula and show a higher degree of variability in composition and structure (Maestre et al., 2007). Vegetation patchiness, which are seen as mosaics including vegetated and non-vegetated components, is a common feature of such open steppes (Valentin et al., 1999). Ecosystem functioning is strongly related to the spatial pattern of grass tussocks. Soils beneath S. tenacissima grass show higher fertility and improved microclimatic conditions, favouring the formation of "resource islands" (Maestre et al., 2007). First, soil moisture is greater beneath the clumps, due to water harvesting through rainfall interception, uptake by roots from adjacent unvegetated areas and water redistribution from gaps to clumps (Bergkamp et al., 1999; Puigdefá bregas et al., 1999). Second, the canopy diminishes the intense solar radiation (Maestre et al., 2001) avoiding the sun-baking effect, which is an important factor for soil temperature change and physical disruption (Magid et al., 1999). Plant clumps either functioned as microbial hotspots where enhanced microbially driven ecosystem processes took place or as microbial banks capable of undergoing a burst of activity under favourable climatic conditions (Goberna et al., 2007). The competition for water and resources between plants and microorganisms is strong and mediated trough an enormous variety of exudates and resource depletion intended to regulate soil microbial communities in the rhizosphere, control herbivory, encourage beneficial symbioses, and change chemical and physical properties in soil (Pugnaire et Armas, 2008). On the other hand there exists experimental evidence of a non-patchy distribution of certain soil microbial properties in semi-arid Mediterranean patchy ecosystems (Goberna et al., 2007). The microbial nutrient release processes have a fundamental role in ecosystem

  8. PREFACE Spectral and transport properties of quantum systems: in memory of Pierre Duclos (1948-2010) Spectral and transport properties of quantum systems: in memory of Pierre Duclos (1948-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-11-01

    collaborators. Moreover, we are aware of several other works which their authors dedicated to Pierre's memory but which for some reason or another did not make it to this issue. A list of these papers can be found at the end of the preface. This multitude of memorial papers shows that Pierre was popular not only as a colleague, coauthor, and teacher, but also as a person. Those who had the good fortune to work with him will always recall his blend of hard-working habits, strong views, and human warmth, which made him so unique. He will be remembered with gratitude and admiration by all who knew him well. We will miss him a lot. Jean-Michel Combes, Université du Sud Toulon-Var and Centre de Physique Théorique, CNRS Marseille, France Pavel Exner, Doppler Institute and Department of Theoretical Physics, Nuclear Physics Institute, Czech Academy of Sciences Valentin A Zagrebnov, Université de la Mediterranée and Centre de Physique Théorique, CNRS Marseille, France Guest Editors Other works dedicated to Pierre's memory: Aschbacher W, Barbaroux J-M, Faupin J and Guillot J-C 2010 Spectral theory for a mathematical model of weak interactions: the decay of the intermediate bosons W+/-. II Annales Henri Poincaré at press Bellissard J and Palmer I 2009 The Jewett-Krieger construction for tilings arXiv:0906.2997 Gesztesy F and Zinchenko M 2010 Symmetrized perturbation determinants and applications to boundary data maps and Krein-type resolvent formulas arXiv:1007.4605 Kostrykin V, Potthoff J and Schrader R 2010 Brownian motions on metric graphs: Feller Brownian motions on intervals revisited arXiv:1008.3761 Stollmann P 2010 From uncertainty principles to Wegner estimates Math. Phys. Anal. Geom. 13 145-57

  9. Constraints from Magmas on the Upper Mantle beneath the Western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, T.; Tibbetts, A.; Smith, E. I.; Hauri, E.; Lee, C.; Forsyth, D. W.

    2008-12-01

    Lathrop Wells likely leave hydrated olivine in the mantle source, even after melt removal. Mantle melts with 2 - 4 wt% H2O would be in equilibrium with olivine with 30 - 60 ppm H2O or 500 - 100 molar H/Si (assuming a D of 0.0015 after [5]). Thus the source region of these basalts is not cold and dry lithospheric mantle, but warm and damp mantle more typical of asthenosphere. The mean pressures of melting may reflect conditions near the LAB, where upwelling would be impeded by the rheology contrast there. The major conundrum with this scenario, however, is the ancient chemical enrichment recorded in the basalts' Nd isotopic compositions (all negative epsilon [6-8]), more typically associated with lithosphere. Such conditions and sources may require thermal rejuvenation of old lithosphere during its extension and foundering. 1. Nicholis, M. and Rutherford, M., 2004, Geology. 2. Lee, C-T., et al. 2008 AGU and submitted. 3. Li, X., et al., 2007, GJI. 4. Yang, Y. and Forsyth , D., 2006, JGR. 5. Hauri, E., et al., 2006, EPSL. 6. Blondes, M., et al, 2008, EPSL. 7. Valentine, G. and Perry, F., 2007, EPSL. 8. Faust, 2005, UNLV thesis.

  10. Glass and mineral analyses from first deposits of Peach Spring Supereruption (SW USA) illuminate initial tapping of a zoned magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mccracken, R. G.; Miller, C. F.; Buesch, D.; Gualda, G. A.; Covey, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Peach Spring supereruption (18.78±0.02 Ma) was sourced from Silver Creek caldera in the southern Black Mountains, Arizona (Ferguson et al. in press). The resulting ignimbrite, the Peach Spring Tuff (PST), blanketed >32,000 km2 of Arizona, California, and Nevada (Buesch, 1993). Underlying the ignimbrite is a thin (≤ 1m thick) basal layered deposit that consists of texturally distinct layers 1a-e (Valentine et al. 1989) and is present up to ~100 km from the source caldera. Basal layered deposits contain the first material erupted during the PST supereruption, preceding the main eruption event. Petrography and geochemistry of minerals and pumice clasts from basal layered deposits collected ~15-100 km from the caldera, combined with a survey of glass and crystal compositions from both outflow and basal deposits, permit (1) comparisons with the overlying ignimbrite, and (2) insights into the initial stages of the supereruption and extraction of magma from the chamber. Pumice clasts from a pumice-rich layer (1a2) of the basal deposit were characterized by LA-ICPMS and SEM. Unaltered glass has a uniform high-Si rhyolite composition (76.7% SiO2, 13.0% Al2O3, 3.6% Na2O, 5.3% K2O, 0.6% FeO, <0.1% MgO, 0.6% CaO, 0.1% TiO2). Mildly altered glass is similar but has lower Na2O and higher K2O. Pumice clasts are relatively crystal poor (<10% phenocrysts) with an assemblage dominated by sanidine (~Or55Ab43An2), with lesser plagioclase (~Ab73An19Or8), minor hornblende and biotite, and accessory magnetite, sphene, zircon, chevkinite, and apatite; no quartz was identified. Initial LA-ICPMS results for glass reveal REE patterns with large negative Gd (0.21: i.e. U-shaped REE pattern) and Eu (0.31) anomalies, very low Ba and Sr (≤10 ppm), and high Rb (~250 ppm). These compositions are essentially identical to those of the most common pumice from distal outflow ignimbrite, but very different from crystal-rich (>30%) trachyte pumice that dominates the intracaldera fill and is

  11. Geochronology of the Franciscan Eastern Belt in the Yolla Bolly Area, Northern California, and the Nature of the South Fork Mountain Schist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, T. A.; Wright, J. E.; Wakabayashi, J.; Wooden, J. L.

    2006-12-01

    Using the SHRIMP-RG, we have determined U-Pb ages of 285 detrital zircon grains from 7 metagraywacke samples of the Franciscan Eastern Belt in the Yolla Bolly area. The youngest clusters of zircon ages place upper brackets on the depositional ages of the protoliths of the various Eastern Belt units at the specific sampled locations as follows: South Fork Mtn Schist (SFMS), <=135 Ma; Valentine Springs Fm (VSF), <=120 Ma; Yolla Bolly terrane (YBT), <=111 Ma. An Ar/Ar age of small sills farther SW indicates the YBT also contains protolith >= 119 Ma (Mertz et al., 2001). Ages of subsequent accretion and metamorphism must be younger. Three new step-heat Ar/Ar analyses on metamorphic white mica separates from the SFMS at Yolla Bolly clustered tightly at 121 Ma. Therefore the depositional age of at least part of the SFMS protolith is bracketed between 135 and c. 123 Ma. Small amounts of excess argon are apparent in two of these samples, but excellent isochron fits permit correction for this complication. About 38 Ar/Ar total gas (not step heat) and K-Ar total gas ages have previously been reported on whole rock samples from the SFMS proper and generally cluster around 120 Ma. However, some ages deviate markedly. These deviations show little correlation with location, structural position, etc. Reconsideration of these data in light of our new data strongly suggests that the entire 330-km-long outcrop belt of the SFMS is characterized by a single, strikingly consistent argon cooling age of approximately 121 Ma. Older SFMS argon ages appear to be unreliable, possibly due to excess argon in some cases. The total volume of exposed Franciscan rocks that are demonstrably older than the SFMS is exceedingly small (e.g., high-grade blocks, Ward Creek, Skaggs Spring schist), whereas the volume that is slightly younger is large (e.g., VSF, YBT, Diablo Range). This suggests that the accretion of the SFMS marks a transition from predominately nonaccretionary to accretionary conditions

  12. Understanding the Peach Spring supereruption through its basal layer deposits (Southwestern USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, R. G.; Miller, C. F.; Dufek, J.; Gualda, G. A.; Buesch, D.; Brooks, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Peach Spring Tuff (PST) supereruption occurred 18.8 Mya, depositing a thick ignimbrite over 32,000 km^2 of the NW Arizona, SE California, and S Nevada. At the base of the ignimbrite is a thin (≤1 m thick) layered unit that has been identified as a surge deposit (Valentine et al 1989, 1990; Wilson & Self 1989 offer a contrary interpretation) that extends 100 km east and 65 km west from its source, the Silver Creek caldera in the southern Black Mountains, AZ (Ferguson 2008). These deposits record the first material ejected from the PST magma body immediately before the main ignimbrite-forming event, and provide (1) samples of the first magma to be tapped and (2) evidence for the initial eruptive process and potentially eruption triggers. We are investigating textures and petrology of pumice clasts taken from an internally structureless layer within the basal unit. We have determined roundness of pumice clasts from six exposures located 22 to 96 km from the source caldera, using the approach of Manga et al (2011) (the first application of their metric to a putative surge deposit). Roundness (R) is defined as 4πA/P^2, where A is the cross-sectional area of a clast and P is its perimeter. Mean R values range from 0.76 to 0.80, showing no systematic change with distance from the caldera. Generally, the R values for samples show negatively skewed distributions, with the majority of the pumice clasts having values between 0.75 and 0.85 but with values as low as 0.60 and as high as 0.90; standard deviations also vary little from sample to sample. This relative uniformity suggests that pumice clasts may have reached a saturation roundness (beyond which they would round little) in the high-energy environment near the vent and early in the transport processes of the surge. The pumice clasts are relatively crystal-poor, with a phenocryst assemblage comprising abundant sanidine, lesser plagioclase, minor hornblende and biotite, and accessory magnetite, sphene, zircon

  13. Evidence of Multiple Virulence Subtypes in Nosocomial and Community-Associated MRSA Genotypes in Companion Animals from the Upper Midwestern and Northeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yihan; Barker, Emily; Kislow, Jennifer; Kaldhone, Pravin; Stemper, Mary E.; Pantrangi, Madhulatha; Moore, Frances M.; Hall, Matthew; Fritsche, Thomas R.; Novicki, Thomas; Foley, Steven L.; Shukla, Sanjay K.

    2011-01-01

    profiles of cats and dogs were more similar to each other than to those of horses. A Panton-Valentine leukocidin positive isolate with ST8:USA300 background was identified in a pig causing skin and soft infection. Conclusion: The presence of human MRSA clones in these animals suggests possible reverse zoonotic transmission. This study reports the first case of a USA300 genotype in a pig. Presence of multiple virulence profiles within a MRSA genotype in these animals suggests the potential of emergence of new MRSA clones by gaining or losing additional virulence genes. PMID:20739580

  14. [Epilepsy, eponyms and patron saints (history of Western civilization)].

    PubMed

    Janković, S M; Sokić, D V; Lević, Z M; Susić, V; Stojsavljević, N; Drulović, J

    1996-01-01

    From a historic point of view, epilepsy and its eponyms were in an ontogenetic symbiosis throughout their history. Epilepsy is a disease with a history of eponyms presenting the frame of mind of both streetwise as well as skilled "authors" about its origin and nature. From ancient times the names for epilepsy, archetypal Hippocratic disease, just as rich in number as varied in their implication, reflected the local folkways of thinking. In this article we briefly presented more than 50 eponyms and patrons of epilepsy. As the source of information we used both the apocryphal, canonical and hagiographic as well as heretic literature, legends and iconography from the Middle Ages of domestic and foreign origin. Pre- and post-Hippocratic era, apart from stemming from the oldest written medical sources, point to the position that the disease had organic origin located in the brain. The period of Rome adopted the attitudes set by Galen which remained en vogue throughout the emerging Middle Ages and Renaissance. These eras generated new eponyms which reflected a downfall in the manor, stating that the disease is the consequence of supernatural forces. In the "Age of darkness" eponyms for epilepsy reflected more the relation of men to the Nature than to the disease or a sick man; this is evidenced through the generation of number of patrons for the disease. The most famous patron of patients with epilepsy was St. Valentine (after conversion from pagandom he died in Rome as a martyr, c. 270). He was allotted a patronage either due to the phonic resemblance of his name with the (past participle of the) verb "fallen"-as Martin Luther claimed, or due to a cure of epilepsy of the son of a Roman rhetor who built for him a chapel in which he continued to cure the sick. The emergence of a flamboyant personality of Paracelsus on the historic scene of the XVI century represents a less successful attempt to revoke the way of thinking set by the old Greek doctors; however, it brought

  15. PLASMA-2013: International Conference on Research and Applications of Plasmas (Warsaw, Poland, 2-6 September 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadowski, Marek J.

    2014-05-01

    , Otwock, Poland—Chairman Dimitri Batani, Universite Bordeaux, France Sergio Ciattaglia, ITER, Cadarache, France Michael Dudeck, UPMC, Paris, France Igor E Garkusha, NSC KIPT, Kharkov, Ukraine Zbigniew Kłos, CBK PAN, Warsaw Giorgio Maddaluno, ENEA Frascati, Italy Andrea Murari, EFDA JET, Culham, UK Józef Musielok, University of Opole, Poland Svetlana Ratynskaia, RIT, Stockholm, Sweden Karel Rohlena, IP CAS, Prague, Czech Republic Valentin Smirnov, Rosatom, Moscow, Russia Francisco Tabares, CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain Lorenzo Torrisi, University of Messina, Messina, Italy Jerzy Wołowski, IFPiLM, Warsaw, Poland Urszula Woźnicka, IFJ PAN, Cracow, Poland Local Organizing Committee Jerzy Wołowski—Chairman Paweł Gąsior—Secretary Zofia Kalinowska Ewa Kowalska-Strzęciwilk Monika Kubkowska Anita Pokorska Ryszard Panfil Joanna Dziak-Beme Conference website: http://plasma2013.ipplm.pl/

  16. Episodic vs. Continuous Accretion in the Franciscan Accretionary Prism and Direct Plate Motion Controls vs. More Local Tectonic Controls on Prism Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, T. A.; Ernst, W. G.; Wakabayashi, J.

    2011-12-01

    Subduction at the Franciscan trench began ≈170-165 Ma and continues today off Oregon-Washington. Plate motion reconstructions, high-P metamorphic rocks, and the arc magmatic record suggest that convergence and thus subduction were continuous throughout this period, although data for 170 to 120 Ma are less definitive. About 25% of modern subduction zones are actively building an accretionary prism, whereas 75% are nonaccretionary, in which subduction erosion is gradually removing the prism and/or forearc basement. These contrasting behaviors in modern subduction zones suggest that the Franciscan probably fluctuated between accretionary and nonaccretionary modes at various times and places during its 170 million year lifespan. Accumulating geochronologic data are beginning to clarify certain accretionary vs. nonaccretionary intervals. (1) The oldest Franciscan rocks are high-P mafic blocks probably metamorphosed in a subophiolitic sole during initiation of subduction. They yield garnet Lu-Hf and hornblende Ar/Ar ages from ≈169 to 147 Ma. Their combined volume is extremely small and much of the Franciscan was probably in an essentially nonaccretionary mode during this period. (2) The South Fork Mountain Schist forms the structural top of the preserved wedge in northern California and thus was apparently the first genuinely large sedimentary body to accrete. This occurred at ≈123 Ma (Ar/Ar ages), suggesting major accretion was delayed a full ≈45 million years after the initiation of subduction. The underlying Valentine Spring Fm. accreted soon thereafter. This shift into an accretionary mode was nearly synchronous with the end of the Early Cretaceous magmatic lull and the beginning of the prolonged Cretaceous intensification of magmatism in the Sierra Nevada arc. (3) The Yolla Bolly terrane has generally been assigned a latest Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous age. Detrital zircon data confirm that some latest Jurassic sandstones are present, but they may be

  17. The 'Planemo' Twins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-08-01

    The cast of exoplanets has an extraordinary new member. Using ESO's telescopes, astronomers have discovered an approximately seven-Jupiter-mass companion to an object that is itself only twice as hefty. Both objects have masses similar to those of extra-solar giant planets, but they are not in orbit around a star - instead they appear to circle each other. The existence of such a double system puts strong constraints on formation theories of free-floating planetary mass objects. ESO PR Photo 29a/06 ESO PR Photo 29a/06 Double System of Planetary Mass Objects (Artist's View) Ray Jayawardhana of the University of Toronto (Canada) and Valentin D. Ivanov of ESO report the discovery in the August 3 issue of Science Express, the rapid online publication service of the journal Science. "This is a truly remarkable pair of twins - each having only about one percent the mass of our Sun," said Jayawardhana. "Its mere existence is a surprise, and its origin and fate a bit of a mystery." Roughly half of all Sun-like stars come in pairs. So do about a sixth of brown dwarfs, 'failed stars' that have less than 75 Jupiter masses and are unable to sustain nuclear fusion in their cores. During the past five years, astronomers have identified a few dozen of even smaller free-floating planetary mass objects, or planemos, in nearby star forming regions. Oph 162225-240515, or Oph1622 for short, is the first planemo found to be a double. The researchers discovered the companion candidate in an optical image taken with ESO's 3.5-m New Technology Telescope at La Silla, Chile. They decided to take optical spectra and infrared images of the pair with ESO's 8.2-m Very Large Telescope to make sure that it is a true companion, instead of a foreground or background star that happens to be in the same line of sight. These follow up observations indeed confirmed that both objects are young, at the same distance, and much too cool to be stars. This suggests the two are physically associated. ESO PR

  18. Hybrid Pyroclastic Deposits Accumulated From The Eruptive Transitional Regime of Plinian Eruptions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Muro, Andrea; Rosi, Mauro

    In the past 15 years sedimentological studies (Valentine and Giannetti, 1995; Wilson and Hildreth, 1997; Rosi et al., 2001), physical models (Neri et al., 1988; Veitch and Woods, 2000; Kaminski and Jaupart, 2001) and laboratory experiments (Carey et al., 1988) converge at defining a new eruptive regime transitional between the fully convective and the fully collapsing end -members. Buoyant columns and density currents are contemporaneously fed in the transitional dynamic regime and fall beds are intercalated with the density current deposits in the area invested by them. The sedimentological analysis of the well exposed 800yr B.P. plinian eruption of the volcano Quilotoa (Ecuador) enabled us to i) recognize a gradual evolution of the eruptive regime, ii) characterize the fall and density current deposits emplaced during the transitional regime. The eruptive activity began with at least two phreatic explosions and the effusion of a small volume lava dome. Eruptive behaviour then switched to explosive and fed a purely convective column that accumulated a reverse graded pumice fall while rising up to an height of 30 km. A small volume, diluted and slow density current (S1 current) was emplaced in the proximal SW sector just before the column reached its maximum height. Two group s of more voluminous and faster intra-plinian density currents (S2 and S3 currents) were subsequently emplaced contemporaneously with the accumulation of the lower and upper part respectively of a normal graded pumice fall bed. S2 and S3 currents were radially distributed around the crater and deposited bedded layers with facies of decreasing energy when moving away from the crater. Massive beds of small volume were emplaced only i) inside the proximal valley channel near the topography break in slope, ii) outside the valley channel in medial area where the currents impinged against relieves. A thick sequence of pyroclastic flow deposits (S4 currents) accumulated in the valley channels around

  19. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cloaking and Transformation Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Smith, David R.

    2008-11-01

    coordinate transformations. If the coordinates they conjure up run backwards one gets negative refraction, if they exclude some region of space one makes anything inside invisible [4]. In physics, general relativity has honed the theoretical tools for understanding curved space and curved-coordinate transformations. In transformation optics, general relativity has become a theoretical tool for solving practical engineering problems [4]. What an unorthodox connection! This focus issue represents a snapshot of this rapidly developing research area. It is not restricted to optics or electromagnetism, though. Metamaterials for acoustics also exist and can be applied in ways similar to optical metamaterials. So transformation optics not only attracts an unusual mix of scientists, but also spans a range of applications in optics and beyond. Transformation optics has the potential to transform optics, for example by visualizing invisibility and making materials beyond materials—metamaterials. But before we transgress the boundaries to the hermeneutics of transformation optics [5], let the papers speak for themselves. References [1] Yao J, Liu Z, Liu Y, Wang Y, Sun C, Bartal G, Stacy A M and Zhang X 2008 Science 321 930 [2] Valentine J, Zhang S, Zentgraf T, Ulin-Avila E, Genov D A, Bartal G and Zhang X 2008 Nature 455 376 [3] Schurig D, Mock J J, Justice B J, Cummer S A, Pendry J B, Starr A F and Smith D R 2006 Science 314 977 [4] Leonhardt U and Philbin T G 2006 New J. Phys. 8 247 [5] Sokal A D 1996 Social Text 14(46/47) 217 Focus on Cloaking and Transformation Optics Contents Transformation optics for the full dielectric electromagnetic cloak and metal-dielectric planar hyperlens D P Gaillot, C Croënne, F Zhang and D Lippens Transmutation of singularities in optical instruments Tomáš Tyc and Ulf Leonhardt Electromagnetic cloaking with canonical spiral inclusions K Guven, E Saenz, R Gonzalo, E Ozbay and S Tretyakov Theory and potentials of multi-layered plasmonic covers for

  20. The So-Called 'Face on Mars'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    -facing slopes. The presence of water ice in these layers is a likely possibility to account for their preservation only on the colder surfaces. Alternatively, these unique features could be the result of the slow downslope motion of the surface layer, possibly enhanced by the presence of ground ice. One argument against downslope motion is the observation that the uppermost rounded boundary of these layers typically occurs at approximately the same distance below the ridge crest. This would suggest the (seemingly) unlikely possibility that all of these layers had moved downslope the same amount regardless of where they are located. In either case, ground ice likely plays an important role in the formation and preservation of these deposits because they only occur on the cold slopes facing away from the Sun where ground ice is more stable and may still be present today. The Story Nature is an imaginative artist, creating all kinds of wonderful landforms, cloud shapes, and other patterned features that remind people of familiar things in our lives. We see a 'man in the moon' when it is full in the night sky, and dream of a dromedary-dotted desert when coming upon Arizona's Camelback Mountain or Colorado's 'Kissing Camels' in the 'Garden of the Gods.' Near Ludlow, California, a lonely prospector once noticed that the appealing outline of the mountains resembled a reclining woman, and named the place Sleeping Beauty. And this naming delight isn't limited to Earth. The Mars Pathfinder mission team couldn't help but name the rocks at the landing site, including a bear-headed-looking one named Yogi. Part of the fun of exploration is not just visiting a strange world, but relating to it in human terms. On Mars, we've already seen a valentine heart-shaped crater, a happy-faced crater, and even a murky and mysterious 'face' on Mars. This face (seen here about halfway down the image and to the right) is really just a hill with slopes and ridges that are shadowed in a way that can

  1. Rotten Egg Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    structure of such shocks for some time, previous observations have not been able to prove the theory.

    This new Hubble image used filters that only let through light from ionized hydrogen and nitrogen atoms. Astronomers were able to distinguish the warmest parts of the gas heated by the violent shocks and found that they form a complex double-bubble shape. The bright yellow-orange colors in the picture show how dense, high-speed gas is flowing from the star, like supersonic speeding bullets ripping through a medium in opposite directions. The central star itself is hidden in the dusty band at the center.

    Much of the gas flow observed today seems to stem from a sudden acceleration that took place only about 800 years ago. The astronomers believe that 1,000 years from now, the Calabash Nebula will become a fully developed planetary nebula, like a butterfly emerging from its cocoon.

    The Calabash Nebula is 1.4 light years (more than 8 trillion miles) long and located some 5,000 light years (2,900 trillion miles) from Earth in the constellation Puppis.

    The image was taken in December 2000 by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The image was originally released by the Hubble European Space Agency Information Centre, with a website at http://sci.esa.int/hubble. Additional information about the Hubble Space Telescope is online at http://www.stsci.edu . More information about the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 is at http://wfpc2.jpl.nasa.gov .

    Other scientists on the team include Valentin Bujarrabal and Javier Alcolea of Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, Spain, and Carmen Sanchez Contreras of JPL.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md., manages space operations for Hubble for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for NASA, under contract with the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of

  2. The So-Called 'Face on Mars'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    -facing slopes. The presence of water ice in these layers is a likely possibility to account for their preservation only on the colder surfaces. Alternatively, these unique features could be the result of the slow downslope motion of the surface layer, possibly enhanced by the presence of ground ice. One argument against downslope motion is the observation that the uppermost rounded boundary of these layers typically occurs at approximately the same distance below the ridge crest. This would suggest the (seemingly) unlikely possibility that all of these layers had moved downslope the same amount regardless of where they are located. In either case, ground ice likely plays an important role in the formation and preservation of these deposits because they only occur on the cold slopes facing away from the Sun where ground ice is more stable and may still be present today. The Story Nature is an imaginative artist, creating all kinds of wonderful landforms, cloud shapes, and other patterned features that remind people of familiar things in our lives. We see a 'man in the moon' when it is full in the night sky, and dream of a dromedary-dotted desert when coming upon Arizona's Camelback Mountain or Colorado's 'Kissing Camels' in the 'Garden of the Gods.' Near Ludlow, California, a lonely prospector once noticed that the appealing outline of the mountains resembled a reclining woman, and named the place Sleeping Beauty. And this naming delight isn't limited to Earth. The Mars Pathfinder mission team couldn't help but name the rocks at the landing site, including a bear-headed-looking one named Yogi. Part of the fun of exploration is not just visiting a strange world, but relating to it in human terms. On Mars, we've already seen a valentine heart-shaped crater, a happy-faced crater, and even a murky and mysterious 'face' on Mars. This face (seen here about halfway down the image and to the right) is really just a hill with slopes and ridges that are shadowed in a way that can

  3. PREFACE: ARENA 2006—Acoustic and Radio EeV Neutrino detection Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Lee

    2007-06-01

    , University College London, UK Vladimir Lyashuk, ITEP, Russia Radovan Milincic, University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA Rolf Nahnhauer, DESY, Zeuthen, Germany Christopher Naumann, University of Erlangen, Germany Valentin Niess, CPPM Jonathan Perkin, University of Sheffield, UK Steve Ralph, University of Sheffield, UK Christopher Rhodes, Imperial College London, UK Carsten Richardt, University of Erlangen, Germany Karsten Salomon, University of Erlangen, Germany Olaf Scholten, KVI/University of Groningen, Netherlands Terry Sloan, University of Lancaster, UK Pierre Sokolsky, University of Utah, USA Lee Thompson, University of Sheffield, UK Omar Veledar, Northumbria University, UK David Waters, UCL, USA Dawn Williams, Pennsylvania State University, USA Igor Zheleznykh, Institute for Nuclear Research, Russia Conference photograph

  4. Rainfall simulation experiments and Water Drop Penetration Time measurements shed light on the impact of water repellency on soils under organic farming management in Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, Artemi; González, Óscar; León, Javier; Jordán, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    ., Geißler, C., Gómez, J.A., Gómez-Macpherson, H., Kuhn, N.J., Lázaro, R., León, F.J., Martínez-Mena, M., Martínez-Murillo, J.F., Marzen, M., Mingorance, M.D., Ortigosa, L., Peters, P., Regüés, D., Ruiz-Sinoga, J.D., Scholten, T., Seeger, M., Solé-Benet, A., Wengel, R., Wirtz, S. 2013. European small portable rainfall simulators: a comparison of rainfall characteristics. Catena, 110, 100-112. Doi: 10.1016/j.catena.2013.05.013 Iserloh, T., Ries, J.B., Cerdà, A., Echeverría, M.T., Fister, W., Geißler, C., Kuhn, N.J., León, F.J., Peters, P., Schindewolf, M., Schmidt, J., Scholten, T., Seeger, M. (2012): Comparative measurements with seven rainfall simulators on uniform bare fallow land. Zeitschrift für Geomorphologie, 57, 193-201. DOI: 10.1127/0372-8854/2012/S-00118. Jiménez-Morillo, N. T., González-Pérez, J. A., Jordán, A., Zavala, L. M., Rosa, J. M., Jiménez-González, M. A., & González-Vila, F. J. (2014). Organic matter fractions controlling soil water repellency in Sandy soils from the Doñana National Park (Southwestern Spain). Land Degradation & Development.| DOI: 10.1002/ldr.2314 Jordán, A., García-Moreno, J., Gordillo-Rivero, Á. J., Zavala, L. M., Cerdà, A. 2014. Organic carbon, water repellency and soil stability to slaking under different crops and managements: a case study at aggregate and intra-aggregate scales. SOIL Discussions, 1(1), 295-325. Jordán, A., Zavala, L. M., Mataix-Solera, J., Doerr, S. H. 2013. Soil water repellency: origin, assessment and geomorphological consequences. Catena, 108, 1-5. Jordán, A., Zavala, L. M., Mataix-Solera, J., Nava, A. L., & Alanís, N. 2011. Effect of fire severity on water repellency and aggregate stability on Mexican volcanic soils. Catena, 84(3), 136-147. Jouquet, P., Janeau, J. L., Pisano, A., Sy, H. T., Orange, D., Minh, L. T. N., Valentin, C. 2012. Influence of earthworms and termites on runoff and erosion in a tropical steep slope fallow in Vietnam: A rainfall simulation experiment. Applied

  5. PREFACE: XIV International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifang

    2011-03-01

    H KAVATSYUK, MyroslavKVI, University of Groningen KHRAMOV, EvgenyJoint Institute for Nuclear Research KISTENEV, EdouardBrookhaven National Laboratory KUO, Chia MingNCU KWON, YoungilYonsei University LAKTINEH, ImadIPNL LECOQ, PaulCERN LI, ChengUniversity of Science and Technology of China LI, NingboNanJing Normal University & IHEP LI, WeidongIHEP LI, WeiguoIHEP LIU, ChunxiuIHEP LIU, LijiaoUniversity of Bergen, Norway LIVAN, MicheleDipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, University di Pavia , Italy LU, JunguangIHEP LUBRANO, PasqualeINFN Sezione di Perugia MACHIKHILIYAN, IrinaLAPP, Annecy, France MAVROMANOLAKIS, GeorgiosCERN MILLER, David WSLAC and Stanford University NECESAL, PetrInstitute of Physics AS CR, v.v.i. NEMECEK, StanislavFZU AVCR Praha NIESS, ValentinLPC, Clermont (CNRS/IN2P3) NOVOTNY, Rainer W2nd Physics Institute, University Giessen, Germany OBERLACK, HorstMPI für Physik, Munich PARA, AdamFermilab PARAMATTI, RiccardoINFN Rome & CERN PEPE, MonicaINFN Perugia POSPELOV, GennadyMax-Planck-Institut für Physik REPOND, JoseArgonne National Laboratory ROSSETTI, ValerioIFAE - Barcelona SCHACHT, PeterMPI/Munich SEFKOW, FelixDESY SFYRLA, AnnaCERN SGUAZZONI, GiacomoINFN Section of Florence SIMON, FrankMax-Planck-Institute for Physics SIMONYAN, MargarNiels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University SPADARO, TommasoLNF INFN SUN, XileiIHEP TAKESHITA, TohruShinshu University TANG, ZeboUniversity of Science and Technology of China TAPAN, IlhanUludag University THEOFILATOS, KonstantinosETH Zurich THOMSON, MarkUniversity of Cambridge TOKUNO, HisaoDepartment of Physics, Graduate School of Science and Engineering TRONCON, ClaraINFN UOZUMI SatoruKyungpook National University USAI, GiulioUniversity of Texas at Arlington VAZQUEZ GOMEZ, RicardoUniversitat de Barcelona VIDEAU, HenriLLR - Ecole polytechnique VOLOBOUEV, IgorTexas Tech University WAN, RenzhuoIOPP-CCNU, Wuhan, China & IPHC-CNRS, Strasbourg, France WANG, ZhengIHEP WANG, ZhigangIHEP WENZEL, HansFermilab WIGMANS, RichardTexas Tech

  6. Exciting Message from a Dying Monster Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-03-01

    . Plans for this are being elaborated in Australia with the Australia Telescope (a combination of many single radio telescopes like at Mopra), as well as within ESO. When more SiO masers in the LMC will have been discovered, we will be able to study how the mass loss differs from star to star. This will help us to learn how the mass loss depends on the overall characteristics of the star, for instance its brightness or its mass. Strangely enough, it is easier to do this type of study with stars in another galaxy, despite the fact that they are much more distant than the maser stars in the Milky Way. The main reason is that it is very difficult to measure distances to individual stars in our own galaxy. And if the distance to a star is not known, many other characteristics of the star will not be known either, e.g. its total energy production (intrinsic brightness) or its mass. However, as we know the distance to the LMC, about 170,000 light-years, we also know the distance to all the maser stars, which will be detected in this small galaxy. SiO masers are extremely powerful velocity indicators for celestial objects. We can therefore use them, not only to measure the motion of the molecules in the atmospheres of stars, but also to measure the velocities of the stars themselves. A study of the velocities of many SiO masers in the Milky Way indicates how the stars move through our galaxy. From this we gain a better understanding of how the Milky Way was formed; this is one of the great mysteries present-day astronomers are very eager to solve. And in the future, we may extend this type of study to other nearby galaxies. There is indeed a great potential for important new knowledge in this exciting area of modern astronomical research ! Notes: [1] The team consists of Jacco Th. van Loon and Albert A. Zijlstra (ESO/Garching), Lars-Ake Nyman (ESO/La Silla), and Valentin Bujarrabal (Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, Madrid, Spain). [2] Depending on the wavelength (and therefore