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Sample records for rainbow trout gills

  1. Influence of surfactants on gill physiology and cadmium uptake in perfused rainbow trout gills

    SciTech Connect

    Paert, P.S.; Svanberg, O.; Bergstroem, E.

    1985-04-01

    Cadmium transfer through and the retention of metal in perfused gills from rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) has been studied in the presence of two detergents, LAS (linear alkylaryl sulphonate) and NP-10EO (nonylphenol ethoxylate). Accordingly, the effects of the metal and the surfactants on gill viability (vascular resistance, oxygen diffusion capacity, sodium net flux) was measured. Cd had no effect on gill viability either at 0.008 or at 9.0 mumol/liter during a 60-min perfusion period. The viability of the gills deteriorated markedly during 60 min of exposure to 100 mumol/liter LAS and to NP-10EO, or to a mixture of 100 mumol/liter surfactant + 8.1-8.3 mumol/liter Cd. LAS, 100 mumol/liter, reduced Cd transfer, whereas NP-10EO had no effect. NP-10EO increased Cd retention in gill tissue. LAS more than doubled Cd transfer through the gills when tested in concentrations expected to be found in a polluted recipient (0.9 micrograms/liter Cd + 0.05 mg/liter LAS). NP-10EO had no effect on the transfer when tested under these environmentally relevant conditions.

  2. Zooplankton size selection relative to gill raker spacing in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Budy, P.; Haddix, T.; Schneidervin, R.

    2005-01-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss are one of the most widely stocked salmonids worldwide, often based on the assumption that they will effectively utilize abundant invertebrate food resources. We evaluated the potential for feeding morphology to affect prey selection by rainbow trout using a combination of laboratory feeding experiments and field observations in Flaming Gorge Reservoir, Utah-Wyoming. For rainbow trout collected from the reservoir, inter-gill raker spacing averaged 1.09 mm and there was low variation among fish overall (SD = 0.28). Ninety-seven percent of all zooplankton observed in the diets of rainbow trout collected in the reservoir were larger than the interraker spacing, while only 29% of the zooplankton found in the environment were larger than the interraker spacing. Over the size range of rainbow trout evaluated here (200-475 mm), interraker spacing increased moderately with increasing fish length; however, the size of zooplankton found in the diet did not increase with increasing fish length. In laboratory experiments, rainbow trout consumed the largest zooplankton available; the mean size of zooplankton observed in the diets was significantly larger than the mean size of zooplankton available. Electivity indices for both laboratory and field observations indicated strong selection for larger-sized zooplankton. The size threshold at which electivity switched from selection against smaller-sized zooplankton to selection for larger-sized zooplankton closely corresponded to the mean interraker spacing for both groups (???1-1.2 mm). The combination of results observed here indicates that rainbow trout morphology limits the retention of different-sized zooplankton prey and reinforces the importance of understanding how effectively rainbow trout can utilize the type and sizes of different prey available in a given system. These considerations may improve our ability to predict the potential for growth and survival of rainbow trout within and

  3. Ammonia-containing industrial effluents, lethal to rainbow trout, induce vacuolisation and Neutral Red uptake in the rainbow trout gill cell line, RTgill-W1.

    PubMed

    Dayeh, Vivian R; Schirmer, Kristin; Bols, Niels C

    2009-02-01

    Nine samples of whole effluent from the operation of an industrial plant over the course of one year, were tested on rainbow trout for lethality and on the rainbow trout gill cell line, RTgill-W1, for metabolic activity, plasma membrane integrity, and lysosomal activity, as measured by using the alamar Blue (AB), 5-carboxyfluorescein diacetate acetoxymethyl (CFDA-AM), and neutral red (NR) assays, respectively. None of the nine samples caused a loss of plasma membrane integrity, and only two caused a transitory decline in metabolism. Three samples caused massive vacuolisation in RTgill-W1 cells, which was accompanied by increased uptake of NR, and only these three samples were lethal to the rainbow trout. The addition of ammonia to RTgill-W1 cultures also induced vacuolisation and NR uptake, with little change in plasma membrane integrity or metabolism. Subsequently, the effluent source was identified as a nitrogen product producer, and variable levels of ammonia were found in the nine samples. Three of the four samples with the highest non-ionised ammonia levels were those which were toxic to rainbow trout and which caused vacuoles in RTgill-W1 cells. The close correlation between rainbow trout-killing and RTgill-W1 vacuolisation by the effluents, suggests that vacuolisation of RTgill-W1 cells could be used to indicate effluents which would be toxic to rainbow trout as a result of their ammonia content.

  4. Histological evaluation of sodium percarbonate exposure on the gills of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Forwood, James M; Harris, James O; Landos, Matt; Deveney, Marty R

    2015-06-03

    Ichthyophthirius multifiliis is a recurring problem in Australian rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss farms and requires strategically timed, repeat treatments for effective management. Sodium percarbonate (SPC) is permitted for use in Australia, with host safety margins based on the toxicity of acute exposures to hydrogen peroxide (HP), the active product released when SPC is added to water. The effects of exposure to HP released by SPC, of repeated doses and of doses exceeding 100 mg l-1 on rainbow trout are unknown. We exposed juvenile rainbow trout (mean weight: 30.5 ± 9 g) to repeated doses of 50, 150 and 250 mg l-1 SPC for 1 h on Days 1, 2, 7 and 8 of a treatment regime. The effect of SPC was assessed by histological evaluation of structural changes in gill tissue. Survival was 100% in all groups, but some fish exposed to 250 mg l-1 SPC displayed impaired swimming performance, and on Day 9 after the final treatment, oedema was present in 9.8% of lamella, which was significantly higher than the mean occurrence of 1.7, 4.2 and 1.3% in fish treated with 0, 50 and 150 mg l-1 SPC, respectively. These changes resolved within 24 h of the cessation of treatment. We conclude that SPC is safe to use on rainbow trout in doses of ≤150 mg l-1 at 17°C, however caution is advised at doses approaching 250 mg l-1. Water temperature, fish age, fish size and maturity, intensity of parasite infection and stocking density could alter the sensitivity of rainbow trout to SPC treatments.

  5. Copper binding affinity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) gills: Implications for assessing bioavailable metal

    SciTech Connect

    MacRae, R.K.; Smith, D.E.; Swoboda-Colberg, N.; Meyer, J.S.; Bergman, H.L. . Dept. of Zoology and Physiology)

    1999-06-01

    In this study, the authors determined the conditional stability constant (log K[prime]) of copper for the gills of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss; RBT) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis; BT). Using toxicity-based complexation bioassays, which measure the effect of competing organic ligands on copper toxicity, the RBT gill copper log K[prime] range was 6.4 to 7.2. Using a Scatchard analysis of gill Cu accumulation, the RBT log K[prime] was 7.50 and the BT log K[prime] was 7.25. The close agreement in RBT log K[prime] values between these two methods suggests that measurement of gill copper accumulation is an acceptable alternative for determining a toxicity-based gill copper binding affinity. The results also suggest that there is either a single gill copper binding component or, more realistically, multiple components with similar binding properties that function collectively to define a single toxicologically relevant copper conditional stability constant. These results suggest analytical approaches to measuring bioavailable metal concentrations, such as geochemical modeling where biological ligands are included in speciation calculations, may adequately simulate complex biological ligands. A method to convert gill copper accumulation to a bioavailable water criterion is also discussed.

  6. Ibuprofen metabolism in the liver and gill of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Gomez, C F; Constantine, L; Moen, M; Vaz, A; Wang, W; Huggett, Duane B

    2011-03-01

    The presence of pharmaceuticals in the environment has become an important topic of discussion with respect to pharmaceutical absorption, metabolism and elimination in fish. This study investigates the metabolism of ibuprofen by rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In vitro metabolic loss of parent compound was measured in gill and liver S9 and microsomal fractions. Metabolite analysis found 2-hydroxy-ibuprofen as the major metabolite in uninduced S9 fractions. Supplementing S9 fractions with UDPGA did not significantly enhance metabolism. Additionally, assays involving the induction and inhibition of specific CYP isozymes support CYP1A2 as a possible metabolic pathway in fish.

  7. Immunolocalization of proton pumps (H+-ATPase) in pavement cells of rainbow trout gill

    PubMed

    Sullivan; Fryer; Perry

    1995-01-01

    The expression of the V-type proton ATPase (H+-ATPase) was examined in the gill of the freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) using immunocytochemistry in concert with laser scanning confocal or electron microscopy. A synthetic peptide consisting of the carboxy-terminal region of the 31 kDa subunit of the bovine renal H+-ATPase was used to generate an antiserum in rabbits, and its suitability for use in trout gill was confirmed by western blotting. Gill epithelial cells demonstrated specific immunoreactivity, the intensity of which was increased markedly after 18 h of exposure to hypercapnia (1 % CO2 in air). The increased intensity of H+-ATPase immunoreactivity was associated with elevated branchial net acid excretion. In the hypercapnic fish, the specific immunoreactivity was associated with both the apical membrane and cytoplasm. Electron microscopy revealed that specific immunoreactivity was localized to the pavement cells and was particularly associated with the apical membrane and subapical cytoplasmic vesicles. The increased H+-ATPase immunoreactivity in the epithelial cells of hypercapnic fish and the increased intensity of the immunoreactive bands in western blots from hypercapnic fish demonstrate an 'up-regulation' of this protein in response to respiratory acidosis. The results are discussed with reference to current models of acid­base and ion regulation in the gill of freshwater fish.

  8. Recurrent amoebic gill infestation in rainbow trout cultured in a semiclosed water recirculation system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, A.C.; Herman, R.L.; Noga, E.J.; Bullock, G.L.

    1997-01-01

    Five lots of commercially purchased juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (17-44 g) stocked in a continuous-production water recirculation system became infested with gilt amoebae. The amoebae were introduced into the recirculation system, as evidenced by their presence on gills of fish held in quarantine tanks. Based on their morphology, as seen in histological sections and by electron microscopy, the amoebae appeared to be more closely related to the family Cochliopodiidae than to other taxa of free living amoebae. Attempts to culture the amoebae in different media, at different temperatures of incubation, and in fish cell culture were not successful. Initial treatment of the recirculation system with formalin at 167 parts per million (ppm) for 1 h eliminated amoebae from the gills. Subsequent treatments of the entire system with formalin at 50-167 ppm reduced the intensity of further infestations.

  9. Cortisol stimulates calcium transport across cultured gill epithelia from freshwater rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Scott P; Wood, Chris M

    2008-01-01

    The effect of cortisol on calcium (Ca(2+)) transport across cultured rainbow trout gill epithelia composed of both pavement cells (PVCs) and mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs) was examined. Under symmetrical culture conditions (L15 media apical/L15 media basolateral), cortisol had subtle effects on gill epithelial preparations. Both control and cortisol treated epithelia exhibited Ca(2+) influx and efflux rates (measured radioisotopically using (45)Ca) that were approximately balanced, with a slight inwardly directed net Ca(2+) flux. Ussing flux ratio analysis indicated active Ca(2+) transport in the inward direction across epithelia bathed symmetrically regardless of hormone treatment. In contrast, under asymmetrical conditions (freshwater apical/L15 media basolateral) control epithelia exhibited active Ca(2+) transport in the outward direction (basolateral to apical) throughout experiments conducted over a 24-h period, whereas cortisol-treated preparations exhibited active transport in the inward direction (apical to basolateral) during the early stages of an asymmetrical culture period (e.g., T0-6 h) and passive transport during the later stages (e.g., T18-24 h). When soft freshwater (with tenfold lower [Ca(2+)]) was used for asymmetrical culture instead of freshwater, control epithelia developed outwardly directed active Ca(2+) transport properties, whereas cortisol-treated preparations did not. The results of this study support a hypercalcemic role for cortisol in rainbow trout and demonstrate that treating cultured gill epithelia composed of both PVCs and MRCs with cortisol can stimulate active Ca(2+) uptake under circumstances that more closely resemble natural conditions for fish gills (i.e., freshwater bathing the apical side of the epithelium).

  10. Characterization of rainbow trout gonad, brain and gill deep cDNA repertoires using a Roche 454-Titanium sequencing approach.

    PubMed

    Le Cam, Aurélie; Bobe, Julien; Bouchez, Olivier; Cabau, Cédric; Kah, Olivier; Klopp, Christophe; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques; Le Guen, Isabelle; Lluch, Jérôme; Montfort, Jérôme; Moreews, Francois; Nicol, Barbara; Prunet, Patrick; Rescan, Pierre-Yves; Servili, Arianna; Guiguen, Yann

    2012-05-25

    Rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, is an important aquaculture species worldwide and, in addition to being of commercial interest, it is also a research model organism of considerable scientific importance. Because of the lack of a whole genome sequence in that species, transcriptomic analyses of this species have often been hindered. Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, we sought to fill these informational gaps. Here, using Roche 454-Titanium technology, we provide new tissue-specific cDNA repertoires from several rainbow trout tissues. Non-normalized cDNA libraries were constructed from testis, ovary, brain and gill rainbow trout tissue samples, and these different libraries were sequenced in 10 separate half-runs of 454-Titanium. Overall, we produced a total of 3million quality sequences with an average size of 328bp, representing more than 1Gb of expressed sequence information. These sequences have been combined with all publicly available rainbow trout sequences, resulting in a total of 242,187 clusters of putative transcript groups and 22,373 singletons. To identify the predominantly expressed genes in different tissues of interest, we developed a Digital Differential Display (DDD) approach. This approach allowed us to characterize the genes that are predominantly expressed within each tissue of interest. Of these genes, some were already known to be tissue-specific, thereby validating our approach. Many others, however, were novel candidates, demonstrating the usefulness of our strategy and of such tissue-specific resources. This new sequence information, acquired using NGS 454-Titanium technology, deeply enriched our current knowledge of the expressed genes in rainbow trout through the identification of an increased number of tissue-specific sequences. This identification allowed a precise cDNA tissue repertoire to be characterized in several important rainbow trout tissues. The rainbow trout contig browser can be accessed at the following

  11. Transcriptomic responses in rainbow trout gills upon infection with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV).

    PubMed

    Aquilino, Carolina; Castro, Rosario; Fischer, Uwe; Tafalla, Carolina

    2014-05-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that even though the fin bases constitute the main portal of entry of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), an important number of chemokine genes are up-regulated in the gills upon bath exposure to the virus. Because chemokines mediate the recruitment of leukocytes through the action of specific chemokine receptors, in the current study, we have studied the transcription of several immune genes in response to a VHSV bath infection in the gills, focusing both on chemokine receptor genes and on genes characteristic of distinct leukocyte populations such as IgM, IgD, IgT, CD4, CD8, perforin and MHC-II. We have studied the response to the virus in naïve fish as well as in fish that had been previously intramuscularly (i.m.) injected with a VHSV DNA vaccine. Additionally, we have sorted both IgM(+) and CD8(+) cells from the gills of naïve and infected animals to study some of these up-regulated genes in specific leukocyte populations. Our results indicate that despite the low replication level, VHSV provokes an up-regulation of IgM, IgT, CD3 and perforin transcription together with the up-regulation of CCR7, CCR9, CXCR3B and CXCR4 mRNA levels. Interestingly, MHC-II mRNA was up-regulated and CCR7 was down-modulated in IgM(+) cells from infected gills, whereas perforin, CCR7 and CXCR4 mRNA levels were higher in sorted CD8(+) cells from infected animals. Surprisingly, when fish had been previously injected with either the empty plasmid or the VHSV DNA vaccine, these up-regulations in immune gene transcription were no longer observed. Our results point to the gills as an important site for innate and acquired viral defense.

  12. Effects of iron on rainbow trout gill cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Leguen, Isabelle; Peron, Sandrine; Prunet, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of iron in the form of iron sulphate (FeSO(4)·7H(2)O), over the range 0.01-1 mM on rainbow trout primary gill cells cultured on semi-permeable membranes. The endpoints measured were cell proliferation, mucous cell numbers, area of mucus in mucous cells, ultrastructural analysis and transepithelial resistance. Regardless of the concentration, FeSO(4) did not modify the apical surface of pavement cells (microridge) and mucous cells. However, at 1 mM, this metal reduced cell numbers, by inhibiting cell proliferation and causing cell death, and induced a decrease in transepithelial resistance. It is interesting to note that cell numbers were also reduced in the presence of 0.5 mM iron salt, although this reduction did not modify transepithelial resistance. FeSO(4) reduced mucous cell number but did not change mucus area in mucous cells suggesting that this metal could induce a discharge of mucous cells, but mucus secretion would be total and not partial. In conclusion, our in vitro model has allowed to study some toxic effect but also resistance of gill epithelium in presence of iron. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  13. Natural mineral particles are cytotoxic to rainbow trout gill epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christian; Herzog, Simon; de Capitani, Christian; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia; Pietsch, Constanze

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide increases in fluvial fine sediment are a threat to aquatic animal health. Fluvial fine sediment is always a mixture of particles whose mineralogical composition differs depending on the sediment source and catchment area geology. Nonetheless, whether particle impact in aquatic organisms differs between mineral species remains to be investigated. This study applied an in vitro approach to evaluate cytotoxicity and uptake of four common fluvial mineral particles (quartz, feldspar, mica, and kaolin; concentrations: 10, 50, 250 mg L(-1)) in the rainbow trout epithelial gill cell line RTgill-W1. Cells were exposed for 24, 48, 72, and 96 h. Cytotoxicity assays for cell membrane integrity (propidium iodide assay), oxidative stress (H2DCF-DA assay), and metabolic activity (MTT assay) were applied. These assays were complemented with cell counts and transmission electron microscopy. Regardless of mineral species, particles ≤ 2 µm in diameter were taken up by the cells, suggesting that particles of all mineral species came into contact and interacted with the cells. Not all particles, however, caused strong cytotoxicity: Among all assays the tectosilicates quartz and feldspar caused sporadic maximum changes of 0.8-1.2-fold compared to controls. In contrast, cytotoxicity of the clay particles was distinctly stronger and even differed between the two particle types: mica induced concentration-dependent increases in free radicals, with consistent 1.6-1.8-fold-changes at the 250 mg L(-1) concentration, and a dilated endoplasmic reticulum. Kaolin caused concentration-dependent increases in cell membrane damage, with consistent 1.3-1.6-fold increases at the 250 mg L(-1) concentration. All effects occurred in the presence or absence of 10% fetal bovine serum. Cell numbers per se were marginally affected. Results indicate that (i.) natural mineral particles can be cytotoxic to gill epithelial cells, (ii.) their cytotoxic potential differs between mineral species, with

  14. Is gill cortisol concentration a good acute stress indicator in fish? A study in rainbow trout and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Gesto, Manuel; Hernández, Juan; López-Patiño, Marcos A; Soengas, José L; Míguez, Jesús M

    2015-10-01

    Cortisol is the main biomarker of physiological stress in fish. It is usually measured in plasma, which requires blood collection. Though cortisol is produced in the anterior kidney, it can diffuse easily through cell membranes due to its lipophilic nature. Taking advantage of that, some non-invasive techniques have been developed to measure cortisol directly in the water from fish-holding tanks, in skin mucus or in scales. In this study, we explored the possibility to analyze fish cortisol from gill filaments as a reliable acute stress marker. Our results show that gill cortisol levels correlate well with plasma cortisol levels in both rainbow trout and zebrafish exposed or not to an acute stress protocol. Measuring cortisol in gill filaments increases the available possibilities for stress assessment in fish. Although this approach should yet be tested for its use with other stressors, it has several advantages: In relatively large fish (i.e. above 30 g) gill cortisol levels could be measured in vivo. Sampling of gill biopsies is very fast and easy, and the procedure does not induce stress if properly performed, making it an ideal option for in vivo stress assessment. In small fish, the use of gill tissue to measure cortisol has important technical advantages with respect to the current methods using whole-body homogenates. Gill homogenates could be used directly for ELISA cortisol analysis, avoiding the need of tedious and expensive cortisol extraction protocols, and, since no organic solvent is required, contributing for a more environmentally friendly analysis.

  15. Natural Mineral Particles Are Cytotoxic to Rainbow Trout Gill Epithelial Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    de Capitani, Christian; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia; Pietsch, Constanze

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide increases in fluvial fine sediment are a threat to aquatic animal health. Fluvial fine sediment is always a mixture of particles whose mineralogical composition differs depending on the sediment source and catchment area geology. Nonetheless, whether particle impact in aquatic organisms differs between mineral species remains to be investigated. This study applied an in vitro approach to evaluate cytotoxicity and uptake of four common fluvial mineral particles (quartz, feldspar, mica, and kaolin; concentrations: 10, 50, 250 mg L−1) in the rainbow trout epithelial gill cell line RTgill-W1. Cells were exposed for 24, 48, 72, and 96 h. Cytotoxicity assays for cell membrane integrity (propidium iodide assay), oxidative stress (H2DCF-DA assay), and metabolic activity (MTT assay) were applied. These assays were complemented with cell counts and transmission electron microscopy. Regardless of mineral species, particles ≤2 µm in diameter were taken up by the cells, suggesting that particles of all mineral species came into contact and interacted with the cells. Not all particles, however, caused strong cytotoxicity: Among all assays the tectosilicates quartz and feldspar caused sporadic maximum changes of 0.8–1.2-fold compared to controls. In contrast, cytotoxicity of the clay particles was distinctly stronger and even differed between the two particle types: mica induced concentration-dependent increases in free radicals, with consistent 1.6–1.8-fold-changes at the 250 mg L−1 concentration, and a dilated endoplasmic reticulum. Kaolin caused concentration-dependent increases in cell membrane damage, with consistent 1.3–1.6-fold increases at the 250 mg L−1 concentration. All effects occurred in the presence or absence of 10% fetal bovine serum. Cell numbers per se were marginally affected. Results indicate that (i.) natural mineral particles can be cytotoxic to gill epithelial cells, (ii.) their cytotoxic potential differs between mineral species

  16. Phosphorylated intermediate of the ouabain-insensitive, Na(+)-stimulated ATPase in rat kidney cortex and rainbow trout gills.

    PubMed

    Ventrella, V; Elvir, J R; Borgatti, A R; Trigari, G; Proverbio, T; Pagliarani, A; Trombetti, F; Pirini, M; Marín, R; Proverbio, F

    2010-02-01

    Several tissues from different animals, including the rat kidney and the freshwater rainbow trout gills, show an ouabain-insensitive, furosemide-sensitive, Na(+)-stimulated ATPase activity, which has been associated with the active control of the cell volume. This Na-ATPase is Mg(2+) dependent and it is inhibited by vanadate, which can be taken as an indication that this enzyme is a P-type ATPase. The P-type ATPases are known to form a phosphorylated intermediate during their catalytic cycle, where the phosphate binds an aspartyl residue at the enzyme's substrate site. In the current study, we partially characterized the phosphorylated intermediate of the ouabain-insensitive Na-ATPase of rat kidney cortex homogenates and that of gill microsomes from freshwater rainbow trout. While the kidney cortex homogenates, under our assay conditions, show both Na- and Na,K-ATPase activities, the gill microsomes, when assayed at pH 5.2, only show Na-ATPase activity. Both preparations showed a Mg(2+)-dependent, Na(+)-stimulated phosphorylated intermediate, which is enhanced by furosemide. Incubation of the phosphorylated enzyme with 0.6 N hydroxylamine (NH(2)OH) showed that it is acid-stable and sensitive to hydroxylamine, either when phosphorylated in the presence or absence of furosemide. Addition of ADP to the incubation medium drives the reaction cycle of the enzyme backward, diminishing its phosphorylation. Na(+) seems to stimulate both the phosphorylation and the dephosphorylation of the enzyme, at least for the Na-ATPase from gill microsomes. In a E1-E2 reaction cycle of the Na-ATPase, furosemide seems to be blocking the transition step from Na.E1 approximately P to Na.E2-P. 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of didecyldimethylammonium chloride on the biochemistry, swimming performance, gill histology and disease resistance of juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, B.D.; Wood, A.W.; Farrell, A.P.; Kennedy, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    The acute lethal and sublethal toxicity of the antisapstain didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) to juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was investigated. The 96-h LC{sub 50} value in a flow-through exposure system was 0.4 mg-1{sup {minus}1}. Plasma cortisol, glucose and lactate levels were significantly elevated after an acute 24-h exposure to 0.4 mg-1{sup {minus}1}. Values for hepato-somatic index (HSI), haematocit, leucocrit, plasma haemoglobin, and liver glycogen remained unchanged. Swimming performance decreased significantly after exposure to 0.2 mg-1{sup {minus}1} for exposure durations of 12-h and 24-h and to 0.4 mg{sup {minus}1} for exposure durations of 12-h, 24-h, and 48-h. Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed no gross lesions in gill epithelia as a result of toxicant exposure. In disease challenge experiments, exposure to sublethal concentrations of DDAC for 24-h did not effect the susceptibility of rainbow trout to the pathogen Vibrio anguilarum. Of a suite of toxicity tests, specific biochemical markers were unsatisfactory in revealing sublethal toxic effects. These were best revealed by an integrative measure of performance, namely swimming performance, but not disease resistance.

  18. Evidence for facilitated diffusion of urea across the gill basolateral membrane of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    McDonald, M Danielle; Wood, Chris M

    2004-05-27

    Recent in vivo evidence suggests that the mechanism of branchial urea excretion in the ammoniotelic rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is carrier-mediated. Further characterization of this proposed mechanism was achieved by using an in vitro isolated basolateral membrane vesicle (BLMV) preparation in which isolated gill membranes were used to determine a variety of physiological properties of the transporter. BLMV demonstrated two components of urea uptake, a linear component at concentrations up to 17.5 mmol x l(-1) and a saturable component (K(0.5)=0.35+/-0.01 mmol x l(-1); V(max)=0.14+/-0.02 micromol mg protein(-1) h(-1)) with a Hill constant of 1.35+/-0.18 at low, physiologically relevant urea concentrations (<2 mmol x l(-1)). Saturable uptake of urea at 1 mmol x l(-1) by BLMV was reduced by 88.5% when incubated with 0.25 mmol x l(-1) phloretin, a potent blocker of UT-type facilitated diffusion urea transport mechanisms. BLMV also demonstrated differential handling of urea versus urea analogues at 1 mmol x l(-1) concentrations and total analogue/total urea uptake ratios were 32% for acetamide and 84% for thiourea. Saturable urea uptake at 1 mmol x l(-1) was significantly reduced by almost 100% in the presence of 5 mmol x l(-1) thiourea but was not affected by 5 mmol x l(-1) acetamide or 5 mmol x l(-1) N-methylurea. Lastly, total urea uptake at 1 mmol x l(-1) by BLMV was sensitive to temperatures above and below the temperature of acclimation with a Q(10)>2 suggesting a protein carrier-mediated process. Combined, this evidence indicates that a facilitated diffusion urea transport mechanism is likely present in the basolateral membrane of the rainbow trout gill.

  19. Exotic "Gill Lice" Species (Copepoda: Lernaeopodidae: Salmincola SPP.) Infect Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in the Southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Carlos F; Rash, Jacob M; Besler, Doug A; Roberts, Jackson R; Warren, Micah B; Arias, Cova R; Bullard, Stephen A

    2017-08-01

    Salmincola californiensis infected 25 of 31 (prevalence 0.8; intensity 2-35 [mean 6.6 ± standard deviation 7.7; n = 25]) rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, from a private trout farm connected to the Watauga River, North Carolina. Salmincola edwardsii infected all of 9 (1.0; 2-43 [9.3 ± 13.0; 9]) brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, from Big Norton Prong, a tributary of the Little Tennessee River, North Carolina. Both lernaeopodids are well-known salmonid pathogens, but neither is native to, nor has been previously taxonomically confirmed from, the southeastern United States. Herein, we (1) use light and scanning electron microscopy to identify and provide supplemental morphological observations of these lernaeopodids, (2) furnish complementary molecular sequence data from the 28S rDNA (28S), and (3) document the pathological effects of gill infections. We identified and differentiated these lernaeopodids by the second antenna (exopod tip with large [S. californiensis] vs. slender [S. edwardsii] spines; endopod terminal segment with subequal ventral processes shorter than [S. californiensis] vs. longer than or equal to [S. edwardsii] dorsal hook), maxilliped palp (length typically ≤1/3 [S. californiensis] vs. 1/3-1/2 [S. edwardsii] subchela length exclusive of claw), and bulla (sub-circular and concave on manubrium's side [S. californiensis] vs. non-stellate [S. edwardsii]). Analysis of the 28S rDNA sequences confirmed our taxonomic assignments as demonstrated by 100% sequence similarity among the sympatric, morphologically-conspecific isolates. Histopathology revealed focal gill epithelial hyperplasia, obstruction of interlamellar water channels, lamellar fusion, and crypting of gill filaments. High intensity infections by either lernaeopodid are surveillance-worthy because they are potentially pathogenic to trout in the southeastern United States.

  20. Apolipoprotein AI could be a significant determinant of epithelial integrity in rainbow trout gill cell cultures: a study in functional proteomics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard W; Wood, Chris M; Cash, Phil; Diao, Linda; Pärt, Peter

    2005-05-20

    The freshwater fish gill forms a barrier against an external hypotonic environment. By culturing rainbow trout gill cells on permeable supports, as intact epithelia, this study investigates barrier property mechanisms. Under symmetrical conditions the apical and basolateral epithelial surfaces contact cell culture media. Replacing apical media with water, to generate asymmetrical conditions (i.e. the situation encountered by the freshwater gill), rapidly increases transepithelial resistance (TER). Proteomic analysis revealed that this is associated with enhanced expression of pre-apolipoprotein AI (pre-apoAI). To test the physiological relevance, gill cells were treated with a dose of 50 microg ml(-1) human apolipoprotein (apoAI). This was found to elevate TER in those epithelia which displayed a lower TER prior to apoAI treatment. These results demonstrate the action of apoAI and provide evidence that the rainbow trout gill may be a site of apoAI synthesis. TER does not differentiate between the trans-cellular (via the cell membrane) and para-cellular (via intercellular tight junctions) pathways. However, despite the apoAI-induced changes in TER, para-cellular permeability (measured by polyethylene glycol efflux) remained unaltered suggesting apoAI specifically reduces trans-cellular permeability. This investigation combines proteomics with functional measurements to show how a proteome change may be associated with freshwater gill function.

  1. Different mechanisms of Na(+) uptake and ammonia excretion by the gill and yolk sac epithelium of early life stage rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Alex M; Wilson, Jonathan M; Wright, Patricia A; Hiroi, Junya; Wood, Chris M

    2017-03-01

    In rainbow trout, the dominant site of Na(+) uptake (JNa,in) and ammonia excretion (Jamm) shifts from the skin to the gills over development. Post-hatch (PH; 7 days post-hatch) larvae utilize the yolk sac skin for physiological exchange, whereas by complete yolk sac absorption (CYA; 30 days post-hatch), the gill is the dominant site. At the gills, JNa,in and Jamm occur via loose Na(+)/NH4(+) exchange, but this exchange has not been examined in the skin of larval trout. Based on previous work, we hypothesized that, contrary to the gill model, JNa,in by the yolk sac skin of PH trout occurs independently of Jamm Following a 12 h exposure to high environmental ammonia (HEA; 0.5 mmol l(-1) NH4HCO3; 600 µmol l(-1) Na(+); pH 8), Jamm by the gills of CYA trout and the yolk sac skin of PH larvae, which were isolated using divided chambers, increased significantly. However, this was coupled to an increase in JNa,in across the gills only, supporting our hypothesis. Moreover, gene expression of proteins involved in JNa,in [Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger-2 (NHE2) and H(+)-ATPase] increased in response to HEA only in the CYA gills. We further identified expression of the apical Rhesus (Rh) proteins Rhcg2 in putative pavement cells and Rhcg1 (co-localized with apical NHE2 and NHE3b and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase) in putative peanut lectin agglutinin-positive (PNA(+)) ionocytes in gill sections. Similar Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase-positive cells expressing Rhcg1 and NHE3b, but not NHE2, were identified in the yolk sac epithelium. Overall, our findings suggest that the mechanisms of JNa,in and Jamm by the dominant exchange epithelium at two distinct stages of early development are fundamentally different.

  2. ANALYTICAL METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PHENYLGLUCURONIDE IN RAINBOW TROUT GILL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phenylglucuronide (PG), a primary phase II metabolite of phenol, can be excreted by fish through urine and feces, similar to mammals. In addition, it may also be possible to eliminate it through a fish's gills. In order to assess the significance of gill water elimination, analyt...

  3. ANALYTICAL METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PHENYLGLUCURONIDE IN RAINBOW TROUT GILL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phenylglucuronide (PG), a primary phase II metabolite of phenol, can be excreted by fish through urine and feces, similar to mammals. In addition, it may also be possible to eliminate it through a fish's gills. In order to assess the significance of gill water elimination, analyt...

  4. Cortisol affects tight junction morphology between pavement cells of rainbow trout gills in single-seeded insert culture.

    PubMed

    Sandbichler, Adolf Michael; Farkas, Julia; Salvenmoser, Willi; Pelster, Bernd

    2011-12-01

    A primary culture system of rainbow trout gill pavement cells grown on permeable support (single-seeded insert, SSI) was used to examine histological and physiological changes induced by the addition of the corticosteroid hormone cortisol. Pavement cell epithelia were cultured under symmetrical conditions (L15 apical/L15 basolateral) and developed a high transepithelial resistance (TER, 6.84 ± 1.99 kΩ cm(2), mean ± SEM) with a low phenol red diffusion rate (PRD, 0.15 ± 0.03 μmol l(-1)/day). Addition of cortisol to the basolateral compartment increased TER twofold and reduced PRD threefold over a 5-day period. A similar increase in TER could be seen after 24 h apical freshwater (FW) in control cultures. In cortisol-treated cultures FW exposure did not change TER, but PRD increased significantly. Histochemical staining of the cytoskeleton of cells in SSI culture revealed a morphological partitioning into a single mucosal layer of polarized, polygonal cells featuring cortical F-actin rings which were comparable to F-actin rings of epithelial cells on the lamellar and filamental surface, and several unorganized serosal layers of cells with F-actin stress fibers. Addition of cortisol increased cell density by 18% and in the mucosal layer it led to smaller, less polygonal cells with increased height and increased cell contact area. In transmission electron microscopic images two pairs of cytoplasmatic electron-dense structures confining the zonula occludens apically and basally toward the zonula adhaerens were found. Addition of cortisol increased the distance between those paired structures, hence led to deeper tight junctions. The cortisol-induced increase in barrier properties, therefore, involves a structural fortification of the tight junctions which was not generally modified by a short 24-h apical freshwater stress. These results identify cortisol as a regulator of tight junction morphology between pavement cells of euryhaline fish such as the

  5. High yield and rapid growth of Neoparamoeba pemaquidensis in co-culture with a rainbow trout gill-derived cell line RTgill-W1.

    PubMed

    Lee, L E J; Van Es, S J; Walsh, S K; Rainnie, D J; Donay, N; Summerfield, R; Cawthorn, R J

    2006-08-01

    Neoparamoeba pemaquidensis is an ubiquitous amphizoic marine protozoan and has been implicated as the causative agent for several diseases in marine organisms, most notably amoebic gill disease (AGD) in Atlantic salmon. Despite several reports on the pathology of AGD, relatively little is known about the protozoan and its relationship to host cells. In this study, an in vitro approach using monolayers of a rainbow trout gill cell line (RTgill-W1, ATCC CRL-2523) was used to rapidly grow large numbers of N. pemaquidensis (ATCC 50172) and investigate cell-pathogen interactions. Established cell lines derived from other tissues of rainbow trout and other fish species were also evaluated for amoeba growth support. The amoebae showed preference and highest yield when grown with RTgill-W1 over nine other tested fish cell lines. Amoeba yields could reach as high as 5 x 10(5) cells mL(-1) within 3 days of growth on the gill cell monolayers. The amoebae caused visible focal lesions in RTgill-W1 monolayers within 24 h of exposure and rapidly proliferated and spread with cytopathic effects destroying the neighbouring pavement-like cells within 48-72 h after initial exposure in media above 700 mOsm kg(-1). Disruption of the integrity of the gill cell monolayers could be noted within 30 min of exposure to the amoeba suspensions by changes in transepithelial resistance (TER) compared with control cell monolayers maintained in the exposure media. This was significantly different by 2 h (P < 0.05) compared with control cells and remained significantly different (P < 0.01) for the remaining 72 h that the TER was monitored. The RTgill-W1 cell line is thus a convenient model for growing N. pemaquidensis and for studying host-pathogen interactions in AGD.

  6. Measurement of total Zn and Zn isotope ratios by quadrupole ICP-MS for evaluation of Zn uptake in gills of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, R.E.; Todd, A.S.; Brinkman, S.; Lamothe, P.J.; Smith, K.S.; Ranville, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates the potential use of stable zinc isotopes in toxicity studies measuring zinc uptake by the gills of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The use of stable isotopes in such studies has several advantages over the use of radioisotopes, including cost, ease of handling, elimination of permit requirements, and waste disposal. A pilot study using brown trout was performed to evaluate sample preparation methods and the ability of a quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) system to successfully measure changes in the 67Zn/66Zn ratios for planned exposure levels and duration. After completion of the pilot study, a full-scale zinc exposure study using rainbow trout was performed. The results of these studies indicate that there are several factors that affect the precision of the measured 67Zn/66Zn ratios in the sample digests, including variations in sample size, endogenous zinc levels, and zinc uptake rates by individual fish. However, since these factors were incorporated in the calculation of the total zinc accumulated by the gills during the exposures, the data obtained were adequate for their intended use in calculating zinc binding and evaluating the influences of differences in water quality parameters.

  7. Measurement of total Zn and Zn isotope ratios by quadrupole ICP-MS for evaluation of Zn uptake in gills of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Wolf, Ruth E; Todd, Andrew S; Brinkman, Steve; Lamothe, Paul J; Smith, Kathleen S; Ranville, James F

    2009-12-15

    This study evaluates the potential use of stable zinc isotopes in toxicity studies measuring zinc uptake by the gills of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The use of stable isotopes in such studies has several advantages over the use of radioisotopes, including cost, ease of handling, elimination of permit requirements, and waste disposal. A pilot study using brown trout was performed to evaluate sample preparation methods and the ability of a quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) system to successfully measure changes in the (67)Zn/(66)Zn ratios for planned exposure levels and duration. After completion of the pilot study, a full-scale zinc exposure study using rainbow trout was performed. The results of these studies indicate that there are several factors that affect the precision of the measured (67)Zn/(66)Zn ratios in the sample digests, including variations in sample size, endogenous zinc levels, and zinc uptake rates by individual fish. However, since these factors were incorporated in the calculation of the total zinc accumulated by the gills during the exposures, the data obtained were adequate for their intended use in calculating zinc binding and evaluating the influences of differences in water quality parameters.

  8. Tissue carboxylesterase activity of rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, M.G.; Charron, K.A.; Stott, W.T.; Duvall, S.E.

    1999-11-01

    The activity of carboxylesterase (CaE), a class of nonspecific serine hydrolases, was evaluated in vitro in tissues and microsomes of rainbow trout and compared to esterase activity in rats, other fish species, and embryo to adult life stages of trout. Trout gill and liver microsomes exhibited substantial CaE activity and limited variation over the range of 2 to 40 C, with a temperature optimum of approximately 22 C. Trout sera and rat liver microsomes exhibited a temperature optimum of approximately 35 to 40 C. The CaE of trout liver (maximum reaction rate [V{sub max}] = 672 nmol/min/mg microsomal protein) was four times less than in rats. Apparent Michaelis constant (K{sub m}) values ranged from 28 (trout liver) to 214 (trout sera) {micro}M. Values of V{sub max}/K{sub m} suggested that in vivo CaE activity of trout liver would be about three times higher than serum, 135 times higher than gill, and three times lower than rat liver. The CaE activity in whole rainbow trout homogenates significantly increased 300% per gram of tissue to 1,200% per milligram of protein between the yolk-sac and juvenile stages. The CaE activity of whole fish homogenates was not significantly different in juvenile rainbow trout, channel catfish, fathead minnows, and bluegill. The results demonstrate that rainbow trout had high esterase activity over a broad range of temperatures, the CaE activity significantly increased between the yolk-sac and juvenile life stages, and that variation between the CaE activity in trout and three other families of freshwater fish was limited. The CaE activity in fish is expected to substantially influence the accumulation and toxicity of pesticides and other esters entering the aquatic environment.

  9. An enriched stable-isotope approach to determine the gill-zinc binding properties of juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during acute zinc exposures in hard and soft waters.

    PubMed

    Todd, Andrew S; Brinkman, Stephen; Wolf, Ruth E; Lamothe, Paul J; Smith, Kathleen S; Ranville, James E

    2009-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to employ an enriched stable-isotope approach to characterize Zn uptake in the gills of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during acute Zn exposures in hard water (approximately 140 mg/L as CaCO3) and soft water (approximately 30 mg/L as CaCO3). Juvenile rainbow trout were acclimated to the test hardnesses and then exposed for up to 72 h in static exposures to a range of Zn concentrations in hard water (0-1000 microg/L) and soft water (0-250 microg/L). To facilitate detection of new gill Zn from endogenous gill Zn, the exposure media was significantly enriched with 67Zn stable isotope (89.60% vs. 4.1% natural abundance). Additionally, acute Zn toxicity thresholds (96-h median lethal concentration [LC50]) were determined experimentally through traditional, flow-through toxicity tests in hard water (580 microg/L) and soft water (110 microg/L). Following short-term (< or =3 h) exposures, significant differences in gill accumulation of Zn between hard and soft water treatments were observed at the three common concentrations (75, 150, and 250 microg/L), with soft water gills accumulating more Zn than hard water gills. Short-term gill Zn accumulation at hard and soft water LCS0s (45-min median lethal accumulation) was similar (0.27 and 0.20 microg/g wet wt, respectively). Finally, comparison of experimental gill Zn accumulation, with accumulation predicted by the biotic ligand model, demonstrated that model output reflected short-term (<1 h) experimental gill Zn accumulation and predicted observed differences in accumulation between hard and soft water rainbow trout gills. Our results indicate that measurable differences exist in short-term gill Zn accumulation following acclimation and exposure in different water hardnesses and that short-term Zn accumulation appears to be predictive of Zn acute toxicity thresholds (96-h LC50s).

  10. An enriched stable-isotope approach to determine the gill-zinc binding properties of juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during acute zinc exposures in hard and soft waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, A.S.; Brinkman, S.; Wolf, R.E.; Lamothe, P.J.; Smith, K.S.; Ranville, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to employ an enriched stable-isotope approach to characterize Zn uptake in the gills of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during acute Zn exposures in hard water (???140 mg/L as CaCO 3) and soft water (???30 mg/L as CaCO3). Juvenile rainbow trout were acclimated to the test hardnesses and then exposed for up to 72 h in static exposures to a range of Zn concentrations in hard water (0-1,000 ??g/L) and soft water (0-250 ??g/L). To facilitate detection of new gill Zn from endogenous gill Zn, the exposure media was significantly enriched with 67Zn stable isotope (89.60% vs 4.1% natural abundance). Additionally, acute Zn toxicity thresholds (96-h median lethal concentration [LC50]) were determined experimentally through traditional, flow-through toxicity tests in hard water (580 ??g/L) and soft water (110 ??g/L). Following short-term (???3 h) exposures, significant differences in gill accumulation of Zn between hard and soft water treatments were observed at the three common concentrations (75, 150, and 250 ??g/L), with soft water gills accumulating more Zn than hard water gills. Short-term gill Zn accumulation at hard and soft water LC50s (45-min median lethal accumulation) was similar (0.27 and 0.20 ??g/g wet wt, respectively). Finally, comparison of experimental gill Zn accumulation, with accumulation predicted by the biotic ligand model, demonstrated that model output reflected short-term (<1 h) experimental gill Zn accumulation and predicted observed differences in accumulation between hard and soft water rainbow trout gills. Our results indicate that measurable differences exist in short-term gill Zn accumulation following acclimation and exposure in different water hardnesses and that short-term Zn accumulation appears to be predictive of Zn acute toxicity thresholds (96-h LC50s). ?? 2009 SETAC.

  11. Immunohistochemical localization of rainbow trout ladderlectin and intelectin in healthy and infected rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Russell, S; Hayes, M A; Lumsden, J S

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, the pattern of immuno-reactive ladderlectin and intelectin in healthy rainbow trout is compared to rainbow trout infected with a variety of infectious agents. In healthy rainbow trout, both proteins were localized to individual epithelial cells of the gill and intestine and both proteins were clearly demonstrated within cytoplasmic granules of polymorphonuclear leucocytes and macrophages/monocytes found in blood vessels, hepatic sinusoids, renal interstitium, mucosal epithelium and submucosa of normal intestine. In tissue from infected rainbow trout, there was an overall relative increase in both lectins compared to healthy fish and both proteins were detected in extra-cellular spaces surrounding bacteria, fungi and protozoa. Increased distribution and density of both RTLL and RTInt was demonstrated along mucosal surfaces and within inflammatory leucocytes in infected tissues and immune related organs. These findings represent one of the few examples of in vivo association of defence lectins and infectious agents.

  12. The effect of pH on the toxicity of fatty acids and fatty acid amides to rainbow trout gill cells.

    PubMed

    Bertin, Matthew J; Voronca, Delia C; Chapman, Robert W; Moeller, Peter D R

    2014-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) expose aquatic organisms to multiple physical and chemical stressors during an acute time period. Algal toxins themselves may be altered by water chemistry parameters affecting their bioavailability and resultant toxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of two abiotic parameters (pH, inorganic metal salts) on the toxicity of fatty acid amides and fatty acids, two classes of lipids produced by harmful algae, including the golden alga, Prymnesium parvum, that are toxic to aquatic organisms. Rainbow trout gill cells were used as a model of the fish gill and exposed to single compounds and mixtures of compounds along with variations in pH level and concentration of inorganic metal salts. We employed artificial neural networks (ANNs) and standard ANOVA statistical analysis to examine and predict the effects of these abiotic parameters on the toxicity of fatty acid amides and fatty acids. Our results demonstrate that increasing pH levels increases the toxicity of fatty acid amides and inhibits the toxicity of fatty acids. This phenomenon is reversed at lower pH levels. Exposing gill cells to complex mixtures of chemical factors resulted in dramatic increases in toxicity compared to tests of single compounds for both the fatty acid amides and fatty acids. These findings highlight the potential of physicochemical factors to affect the toxicity of chemicals released during algal blooms and demonstrate drastic differences in the effect of pH on fatty acid amides and fatty acids.

  13. Interactive effects of waterborne metals in binary mixtures on short-term gill-metal binding and ion uptake in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Niyogi, Som; Nadella, Sunita R; Wood, Chris M

    2015-08-01

    Metal binding to fish gills forms the basis of the biotic ligand model (BLM) approach, which has emerged as a useful tool for conducting site-specific water quality assessments for metals. The current BLMs are designed to assess the toxicity of individual metals, and cannot account for the interactive effects of metal mixtures to aquatic organisms including fish. The present study was designed mainly to examine the interactive effects of waterborne metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ag, and Ni) in specific binary combinations on short-term (3h) gill-metal binding and essential ion (Ca(2+) and Na(+)) uptake (a physiological index of toxicity) in fish, using juvenile freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) as the model species. We hypothesized that binary mixtures of metals that share a common mode of uptake and toxicity (e.g., Cd and Zn - Ca(2+) antagonists, Cu and Ag - Na(+) antagonists) would reduce the gill binding of each other via competitive interactions and induce less than additive effects on ion transport. In addition, the mixture of metals that have different modes of uptake and toxicity (e.g., Cd and Cu, or Cd and Ni) would not exhibit any interactive effects either on gill-metal binding or ion transport. We found that both Zn and Cu reduced gill-Cd binding and vice versa, however, Ni did not influence gill-Cd binding in fish. Surprisingly, Ag was found to stimulate gill-Cu binding especially at high exposure concentrations, whereas, Cu had no effect on gill-Ag binding. The inhibitory effect of Cd and Zn in mixture on branchial Ca(2+) uptake was significantly greater than that of Cd or Zn alone. Similarly, the inhibitory effect of Cu and Ag in mixture on branchial Na(+) uptake was significantly greater than that of Cu or Ag alone. The inhibitory effects of Cd and Zn mixture on Ca(2+) uptake as well as Cu and Ag mixture on Na(+) uptake were found to follow the principles of simple additivity. In contrast, no significant additive effect on either Ca(2+) or Na

  14. Costs of chronic waterborne zinc exposure and the consequences of zinc acclimation on the gill/zinc interactions of rainbow trout in hard and soft water

    SciTech Connect

    Alsop, D.H.; McGeer, J.C.; McDonald, D.G.; Wood, C.M.

    1999-05-01

    Juvenile rainbow trout were exposed to zinc in both moderately hard water and soft water for 30 d. Only the 450 {micro}g/L zinc-exposed fish experienced significant mortality. Zinc exposure caused no effect on growth rate, but growth affected tissue zinc levels. Whole body zinc levels were elevated, but gill sand liver showed no consistent increases relative to controls over the 30 d. Therefore, tissue zinc residues were not a good indicator of chronic zinc exposure. After the 30-d exposure, physiological function tests were performed. Zinc was 5.4 times more toxic in soft water. All zinc-exposed trout had acclimated to the metal, as seen by an increase in the LC50 of 2.2 to 3.9 times over that seen in control fish. Physiological costs related to acclimation appeared to be few. Zinc exposure had no effect on whole body Ca{sup 2+} or Na{sup +} levels, on resting or routine metabolic rates, or on fixed velocity sprint performance. However, critical swimming speed (U{sub Crit}) was significantly reduced in zinc-exposed fish, an effect that persisted in zinc-free water. Using radioisotopic techniques to distinguish new zinc incorporation, the gills were found to possess two zinc pools: a fast turnover pool and a slow turnover pool. The fast pool was much larger in soft water than in hard water, but at most it accounted for < 3.5% of the zinc content of the gills. The size of the slow pool was unknown, but its loading rate was faster in soft water. Chronic zinc exposure was found to increase the size of the fast pool and to increase the loading rate of the slow pool.

  15. The effect of hydraulic flowback and produced water on gill morphology, oxidative stress and antioxidant response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewett, Tamzin A.; Weinrauch, Alyssa M.; Delompré, Perrine L. M.; Goss, Greg G.

    2017-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing fluid are complex mixtures containing high concentrations of salts (up to 330,000 ppm), organic, and metal contaminants. However, little data exist on the potential mechanisms of toxicity of these flowback and produced wastewaters (FPW) on aquatic biota. Juvenile rainbow trout were exposed to either control, FPW (2.5 or 7.5%), FPW that had been treated with activated charcoal (AC), or a custom salt-matched control (SW; replicating only the salt content of FPW) for 48 hours. Gill histology revealed decreases in interlamellar cell mass (ILCM) and mean lamellar length in all treatments (FPW, AC and SW) compared to control, indicative of hyperosmotic stress. Liver CYP1A1 activity was significantly elevated by 7.5-fold in the FPW 7.5% treatment only, indicative of Phase I metabolism. Superoxide dismutase activity significantly decreased in the gills to all treatments with the lowest activity occurring in the 7.5% FPW group. Catalase activity increased in liver with the highest values noted in fish exposed to 7.5% FPW. No changes were observed with respect to glutathione-S-transferase, while increased lipid peroxidation was only observed in both FPW treatments (2.5, 7.5%). These data suggest a characteristic signature of FPW impact which may help in risk assessment and biomonitoring of FPW spills.

  16. The effect of hydraulic flowback and produced water on gill morphology, oxidative stress and antioxidant response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Blewett, Tamzin A.; Weinrauch, Alyssa M.; Delompré, Perrine L. M.; Goss, Greg G.

    2017-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing fluid are complex mixtures containing high concentrations of salts (up to 330,000 ppm), organic, and metal contaminants. However, little data exist on the potential mechanisms of toxicity of these flowback and produced wastewaters (FPW) on aquatic biota. Juvenile rainbow trout were exposed to either control, FPW (2.5 or 7.5%), FPW that had been treated with activated charcoal (AC), or a custom salt-matched control (SW; replicating only the salt content of FPW) for 48 hours. Gill histology revealed decreases in interlamellar cell mass (ILCM) and mean lamellar length in all treatments (FPW, AC and SW) compared to control, indicative of hyperosmotic stress. Liver CYP1A1 activity was significantly elevated by 7.5-fold in the FPW 7.5% treatment only, indicative of Phase I metabolism. Superoxide dismutase activity significantly decreased in the gills to all treatments with the lowest activity occurring in the 7.5% FPW group. Catalase activity increased in liver with the highest values noted in fish exposed to 7.5% FPW. No changes were observed with respect to glutathione-S-transferase, while increased lipid peroxidation was only observed in both FPW treatments (2.5, 7.5%). These data suggest a characteristic signature of FPW impact which may help in risk assessment and biomonitoring of FPW spills. PMID:28425455

  17. Differential effects of viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) genotypes IVa and IVb on gill epithelial and spleen macrophage cell lines from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Pham, P H; Lumsden, J S; Tafalla, C; Dixon, B; Bols, N C

    2013-02-01

    The two most prominent genotypes of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) are -I in the Northeastern Atlantic region and -IV in North America, but much more is known about the cellular pathogenesis of genotype -I than -IV. VHSV genotype -IV is divided into -IVa from the Northeast Pacific Ocean and -IVb from the Great Lakes and both of which are less virulent to rainbow trout than genotype -I. In this work, infections of VHSV-IVa and -IVb have been studied in two rainbow trout cell lines, RTgill-W1 from the gill epithelium, and RTS11 from spleen macrophages. RTgill-W1 produced infectious progeny of both VHSV-IVa and -IVb. However, VHSV-IVa was more infectious than -IVb toward RTgill-W1: -IVa caused cytopathic effect (CPE) at a lower viral titre, elicited CPE earlier, and yielded higher titres. By contrast, no CPE and no increase in viral titre were observed in RTS11 cultures infected with either genotype. Yet in RTS11 all six VHSV genes were expressed and antiviral genes, Mx2 and Mx3, were up regulated by VHSV-IVb and -IVa. However, replication appeared to terminate at the translational stage as viral N protein, presumably the most abundant of the VSHV proteins, was not detected in either infected RTS11 cultures. In RTgill-W1, Mx2 and Mx3 were up regulated to similar levels by both viral genotypes, while VHSV-IVa induced higher levels of IFN1, IFN2 and LGP2A than VHSV-IVb. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cytochrome P4501A induction in rainbow trout gills and liver following exposure to waterborne indigo, benzo[a]pyrene and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, E Maria; Abrahamson, Alexandra; Brunström, Björn; Brandt, Ingvar

    2006-09-12

    We have developed a gill-filament based ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) assay to be used as a tool to monitor cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) induction in caged fish. The present study aimed to compare temporal patterns of EROD induction in gills and liver of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed in the laboratory to readily metabolized and persistent CYP1A inducers, i.e. indigo, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB#126). Branchial and hepatic EROD activities were examined in fish exposed for 6, 12, or 24h and in fish exposed for 24h and then held in clean water for 2 or 14 days. Furthermore, branchial CYP1A protein expression was localized by immunohistochemistry. All compounds strongly induced branchial EROD activity within 6h. The highest EROD inductions observed for indigo, BaP, and PCB#126 were roughly similar in gills (52-, 76-, and 74-fold), but differed considerably in liver (11-, 78-, and 200-fold). In indigo- and BaP-exposed fish, both hepatic and branchial EROD activities decreased rapidly in clean water. In PCB#126-exposed fish, decreased branchial and increased hepatic EROD activities were observed following transfer to clean water. The substances gave rise to immunostaining for CYP1A at different cellular sites. All inducers increased the CYP1A-immunostaining in the gill filament secondary lamellae, but PCB#126 also induced a pronounced CYP1A immunoreactivity in cells near the basal membrane of the epithelium of the primary lamellae. The observation that the low BaP and indigo concentrations induced EROD activity markedly in the gills but only slightly or not at all in the liver, supports the contention that readily metabolized AhR agonists may escape detection when hepatic EROD activity is used for environmental monitoring. The results show that gill filament EROD activity is a sensitive biomarker both for persistent and readily metabolized AhR agonists in polluted water.

  19. Phthalate biotransformation by rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, M.G.; Hayton, W.L.

    1994-12-31

    The biotransformation of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) was studied in rainbow trout because DEHP bioconcentration is limited by metabolism. Biological fluids were collected following intravascular administration. Methylesterified metabolites were identified using rodent-derived standards and nonlinear gradient elution HPLC; metabolites were confirmed by gas chromatography. Similarities between the biotransformation of DEHP by rainbow trout and mammalian species included: (1) mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP) appeared to be the obligatory first step in DEHP metabolism; (2) the phthalate ring was not oxidized; (3) phthalic acid was a minor metabolite; and (4) several metabolites contained multiple oxidations of the 2-ethylhexyl moiety of MEHP. No metabolites unique to rainbow trout were identified. However, fewer oxidized metabolites were identified in rainbow trout than in mammalian species, possibly due to limited mitochondrial metabolism of MEHP in rainbow trout. The amount of biliary MEHP glucuronide after intravascular administration of DEHP was substantially less than reported in rainbow trout exposed to DEHP via the water. The results confirmed that DEHP metabolism in rainbow trout proceeds by initial rapid formation of MEHP, followed by excretion or extensive oxidation by microsomal P450.

  20. Behavioral and histological effects of acrylamide in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, D.W.; Cooper, K.R.; Friedman, M.A.; Lech, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    A histological and behavioral study was used to assess whether acrylamide produced neurotoxic effects in rainbow trout. Swimming performance of trout exposed to 0, 12.5, or 25 mg/liter acrylamide for 15 days was unaffected. Swimming performance of animals exposed to 50 mg/liter acrylamide for a similar time period was compromised by morbidity and mortality of the animals in this treatment group. The absence of dose-related histological lesions in central neurons, peripheral neurons or muscle suggested that the observed deficit in swimming performance was due to a generalized toxic response. Acrylamide treatment produced dose-related lesions in the gill and liver of rainbow trout.

  1. Agglomeration of tungsten carbide nanoparticles in exposure medium does not prevent uptake and toxicity toward a rainbow trout gill cell line.

    PubMed

    Kühnel, Dana; Busch, Wibke; Meissner, Tobias; Springer, Armin; Potthoff, Annegret; Richter, Volkmar; Gelinsky, Michael; Scholz, Stefan; Schirmer, Kristin

    2009-06-28

    Due to their increased production and use, engineered nanoparticles are expected to be released into the aquatic environment where particles may agglomerate. The aim of this study was to explore the role of agglomeration of nanoparticles in the uptake and expression of toxicity in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gill cell line, RTgill-W1. This cell line was chosen as model because it is known to be amenable to culture in complete as well as greatly simplified exposure media. Nano-sized tungsten carbide (WC) with or without cobalt doping (WC-Co), two materials relevant in the heavy metal industry, were applied as model particles. These particles were suspended in culture media with decreasing complexity from L15 with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) to L15 to L15/ex, containing only salts, galactose and pyruvate of the complete medium L15. Whereas the serum supplement in L15 retained primary nanoparticle suspensions, agglomerates were formed quickly in L15 and L15/ex. Nevertheless, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) elemental analysis revealed an uptake of both WC and WC-Co nanoparticles into RTgill-W1 cells irrespective of the state of agglomeration of nanoparticles. The localisation seemed to be restricted to the cytoplasm, as no particles were observed in the nucleus of cells. Moreover, reduction in cell viability between 10 and 50% compared to controls were observed upon particle exposure in all media although the pattern of impact varied depending on the medium and exposure time. Short-term exposure of cells led to significant cytotoxicity at the highest nominal particle concentrations, irrespective of the particle type or exposure medium. In contrast, long-term exposures led to preferential toxicity in the simplest medium, L15/ex, and an enhanced toxicity by the cobalt-containing WC nanoparticles in all exposure media. The composition of the exposure media also influenced the toxicity of the cobalt ions, which may

  2. Rainbow Trout Innate Immunity against Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum infection is associated with significant loss of rainbow trout production in the U.S. and other parts of the world. In 2005, a selective breeding program was initiated at the National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture to improve rainbow trout innate resistance ...

  3. Gyrodactylid Ectoparasites in a Population of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Rachel L; Hansen, Adam G; Chan, Maia M; Sanders, George E

    2014-01-01

    A colony of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in a decentralized aquatic animal facility was noted to have an increase in morbidity and mortality (from 4 or 5 fish each month to 3 or 4 fish daily) approximately 2 wk after experimental procedures began. The primary clinical signs were erratic swimming behavior and ‘flashing’ of fish against surfaces within housing enclosures. Moribund and normal rainbow trout were presented alive for diagnostic evaluation; samples of water from housing enclosures were provided for water quality assessment. The trout were determined to be infected with gyrodactylids, a common monogenean ectoparasite of the skin and gills in both marine and freshwater fish. This case report describes the diagnosis, pathology, and treatment of gyrodactylids and husbandry modifications associated with the resolution of this clinical aquatic-animal case. PMID:24411786

  4. Adult Triploids in a Rainbow Trout Family

    PubMed Central

    Thorgaard, Gary H.; Gall, Graham A. E.

    1979-01-01

    Six triploid individuals were found in a full-sib family of 11 adult rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) from a domesticated hatchery stock. The triploid individuals were normal in size and external appearance, had underdeveloped gonads, and showed no evidence of 3n/2n chimerism or mosaicism. XXY triploids were males, suggesting that the Y chromosome is male determining in trout. Because they may avoid production losses associated with sexual maturation in normal fish, triploid trout and salmon could potentially be useful in fish culture. PMID:546676

  5. Proteomic identification of rainbow trout sperm proteins.

    PubMed

    Nynca, Joanna; Arnold, Georg J; Fröhlich, Thomas; Otte, Kathrin; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2014-06-01

    Proteomics represents a powerful tool for the analysis of fish spermatozoa, since these cells are transcriptionally inactive. The aim of the present study was to generate an inventory of the most prominent rainbow trout sperm proteins by SDS-PAGE prefractionation combined with nano-LC-MS/MS based identification. This study provides the first in-depth analysis of the rainbow trout sperm proteome, with a total of 206 identified proteins. We found that rainbow trout spermatozoa are equipped with functionally diverse proteins related to energetic metabolism, signal transduction, protein turnover, transport, cytoskeleton, oxidative injuries, and stress and reproduction. The availability of a catalog of rainbow trout sperm proteins provides a crucial tool for the understanding of fundamental molecular processes in fish spermatozoa, for the ongoing development of novel markers of sperm quality and for the optimization of short- and long-term sperm preservation procedures. The MS data are available at ProteomeXchange with the dataset identifier PXD000355 and DOI 10.6019/PXD000355. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Importance for absorption of Na+ from freshwater of lysine, valine and serine substitutions in the alpha1a-isoform of Na,K-ATPase in the gills of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Peter Leth

    2008-05-01

    In the gills of rainbow trout and Atlantic salmon, the alpha1a- and alpha1b-isoforms of Na,K-ATPase are expressed reciprocally during salt acclimation. The alpha1a-isoform is important for Na(+) uptake in freshwater, but the molecular basis for the functional differences between the two isoforms is not known. Here, three amino acid substitutions are identified in transmembrane segment 5 (TM5), TM8 and TM9 of the alpha1a-isoform compared to the alpha1b-isoform, and the functional consequences are examined by mutagenesis and molecular modeling on the crystal structures of Ca-ATPase or porcine kidney Na,K-ATPase. In TM5 of the alpha1a-isoform, a lysine substitution, Asn783 --> Lys, inserts the epsilon-amino group in cation site 1 in the E(1) form to reduce the Na(+)/ATP ratio. In the E(2) form the epsilon-amino group approaches cation site 2 to force ejection of Na(+) to the blood phase and to interfere with binding of K(+). In TM8, a Asp933 --> Val substitution further reduces K(+) binding, while a Glu961 --> Ser substitution in TM9 can prevent interaction of FXYD peptides with TM9 and alter Na(+) or K(+) affinities. Together, the three substitutions in the alpha1a-isoform of Na,K-ATPase act to promote binding of Na(+) over K(+) from the cytoplasm, to reduce the Na(+)/ATP ratio and the work done in one Na,K pump cycle of active Na(+) transport against the steep gradient from freshwater (10-100 microM: Na(+)) to blood (160 mM: Na(+)) and to inhibit binding of K(+) to allow Na(+)/H(+) rather than Na(+)/K(+) exchange.

  7. Use of behavioral responses of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in identifying sublethal exposure to hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Svecevicius, Gintaras

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted in a flow-through apparatus on 1-year-old rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to evaluate the sensitivity of a number of their behavioral responses to hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)). Test fish were exposed to Cr(6+) concentrations corresponding to 0.001-1 parts of the rainbow trout 96-h LC50 (0.029-28.5 mg Cr/L, respectively) in short-term (15 min) tests. Sensitivity parameter responses could be arranged into the following sequence: latent period of detection response = locomotor activity > gill ventilation frequency > coughing rate. All the rainbow trout responses were sensitive behavioral indicators of sublethal exposure. Behavioral responses meet the criteria as rapid tools for bioassay testing and could be easily standardized using Cr(6+) as a reference toxicant.

  8. Physiological response to hooking stress in hatchery and wild rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wydoski, R.S.; Wedemeyer, G.A.; Nelson, N. C.

    1976-01-01

    This study evaluated the physiological response of rainbow trout to hooking stress after being played under standardized conditions (0–5 min) and estimated the time needed for recovery (to 72 h). Plasma osmolality and chloride measurements were used to evaluate osmoregulatory disturbances and gill ion-exchange function, and plasma glucose was used as an index of the generalized nonspecific physiological stress response. Hooking stress caused more severe blood chemistry differences in hatchery fish than in wild trout. Also, hooking stress imposed a greater stress on larger than on smaller hatchery rainbow trout. Higher water temperatures aggravated the delayed hyperglycemia and hyperchloremia in both hatchery and wild trout but only about 3 days were needed for recovery at 4, 10, or 20 C.

  9. Heterochrony and the development of the escape response: prehatching movements in the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Alice C; Liu, Corina; Swanson, Brook O

    2007-10-01

    Teleost fishes produce coordinated escape responses (C-starts) at hatching. This implies that essential swimming morphologies and motor behaviors develop during the incubation interval while the embryo is in the chorion. We examined prehatching motor behaviors in rainbow trout Oncorhycus mykiss (considered morphologically mature at hatching) and compared this species with zebrafish Danio rerio (considered morphologically immature) and assessed two hypotheses concerning the development of escape behavior. (1) Escape behavior is associated with the formation of key elements of the musculoskeletal and nervous systems; thus, the escape response appears early in ontogeny, when these elements form. (2) Escape behavior is not directly associated with the formation of underlying morphological elements; instead, it appears at hatching (i.e. when needed). We find that rainbow trout, like zebrafish, respond to touch early in the incubation interval, but do not demonstrate a complete C-start (including the second, propulsive stage) until shortly before hatching. At hatching, rainbow trout and zebrafish are similar in the degree of development of the chondocranium, paired fins and visceral arches (which comprise the larval jaw and gill support); however, rainbow trout have incipient rays in their unpaired fins (dorsal, anal and caudal), whereas zebrafish retain the embryonic fin fold. Although rainbow trout are more mature in axial swimming morphology at hatching, the essential neural and musculoskeletal systems that produce a coordinated escape response are functional at hatching in both species. This finding supports the evolutionary hypothesis that an effective escape response is critical for the survival of newly hatched teleost fishes.

  10. Avoidance of aluminum by rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Exley, C.

    2000-04-01

    Aluminum is the principal toxicant in fish in acid waters. The ability to avoid Al, particularly at low concentrations, would confer a considerable ecological advantage, but previous research into avoidance of Al has produced mixed results. The author used a cylindrical perspex tank, 150 cm in length, to study avoidance of Al by rainbow trout fry. The fish avoided Al, and their response was dependent on pH. Avoidance that was demonstrated at pHs of 5.00, 5.50, 5.50, and 5.75 was abolished at a pH of 6.00. Fry avoided very low Al concentrations being sensitive to [Al] > 1.00 {micro}mol L{sup {minus}1} at a pH of 5.00. This unequivocal demonstration of avoidance by rainbow trout fry of Al may have important implications for the ecology of indigenous fish populations in surface waters impacted by acidic deposition.

  11. Tetrazolium Oxidase Polymorphism in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Cederbaum, Stephen D.; Yoshida, Akira

    1972-01-01

    Tetrazolium oxidase from the blood and liver of rainbow trout was found to be genetically polymorphic. The inheritance pattern of the liver enzyme was compatible only with a one locus-two allele hypothesis. The enzymes in the blood while having an electrophoretically identical polymorphism could differ genotypically from that of the liver in a given fish. The significance of these findings to the understanding of the evolution of the salmonid genome is discussed. PMID:4675090

  12. Comprehensive and comparative transcription analyses of the complement pathway in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Köbis, Judith M; Rebl, Alexander; Kühn, Carsten; Korytář, Tomáš; Köllner, Bernd; Goldammer, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is one of the most ancient and most essential innate immune cascades throughout the animal kingdom. Survival of aquatic animals, such as rainbow trout, depends on this early inducible, efficient immune cascade. Despite increasing research on genes coding for complement components in bony fish, some complement-related genes are still unknown in salmonid fish. In the present study, we characterize the genes encoding complement factor D (CFD), CD93 molecule (CD93), and C-type lectin domain family 4, member M (CLEC4M) from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Subsequently, we performed comprehensive and comparative expression analyses of 36 complement genes including CFD, CD93, and CLEC4M and further putative complement-associated genes to obtain general information about the functional gene interaction within the complement pathway in fish. These quantification analyses were conducted in liver, spleen and gills of healthy fish of two rainbow trout strains, selected for survival (strain BORN) and growth (Import strain), respectively. The present expression study clearly confirms for rainbow trout that liver represents the primary site of complement expression. Spleen and gills also express most complement genes, although the mean transcript levels were generally lower than in liver. The transcription data suggest a contribution of spleen and gills to complement activity. The comparison of the two rainbow trout strains revealed a generally similar complement gene expression. However, a significantly lower expression of numerous genes especially in spleen seems characteristic for the BORN strain. This suggests a strain-specific complement pathway regulation under the selected rearing conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanisms of fenthion activation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to hypersaline environments

    SciTech Connect

    Lavado, Ramon Rimoldi, John M.; Schlenk, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies in rainbow trout have shown that acclimation to hypersaline environments enhances the toxicity to thioether organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. In order to determine the role of biotransformation in this process, the metabolism of the thioether organophosphate biocide, fenthion was evaluated in microsomes from gills, liver and olfactory tissues in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to freshwater and 17 per mille salinity. Hypersalinity acclimation increased the formation of fenoxon and fenoxon sulfoxide from fenthion in liver microsomes from rainbow trout, but not in gills or in olfactory tissues. NADPH-dependent and independent hydrolysis was observed in all tissues, but only NADPH-dependent fenthion cleavage was differentially modulated by hypersalinity in liver (inhibited) and gills (induced). Enantiomers of fenthion sulfoxide (65% and 35% R- and S-fenthion sulfoxide, respectively) were formed in liver and gills. The predominant pathway of fenthion activation in freshwater appears to be initiated through initial formation of fenoxon which may be subsequently converted to the most toxic metabolite fenoxon R-sulfoxide. However, in hypersaline conditions both fenoxon and fenthion sulfoxide formation may precede fenoxon sulfoxide formation. Stereochemical evaluation of sulfoxide formation, cytochrome P450 inhibition studies with ketoconazole and immunoblots indicated that CYP3A27 was primarily involved in the enhancement of fenthion activation in hypersaline-acclimated fish with limited contribution of FMO to initial sulfoxidation.

  14. Progress of the rainbow trout reference genome assembly project

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rainbow trout are the most widely cultivated cold freshwater fish in the world and an important model species for many research areas. Despite this importance, the complex nature of the rainbow trout genome (pseudotetraploid and high repeat content) has hindered the production of a high-quality refe...

  15. Status of the rainbow trout genome reference sequence assembly

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are the most cultivated cold water fish in the U.S. In addition to interests associated with aquaculture and sport fisheries, the rainbow trout serves as a model research organism for studies related to carcinogenesis, toxicology, comparative immunology, disease ...

  16. Formation of chromosome aberrations in androgenetic rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Ocalewicz, K; Dobosz, S; Kuzminski, H; Goryczko, K

    2009-12-01

    Residues of maternal nuclear DNA in the form of chromosome fragments were observed in the healthy and morphologically normal androgenetic rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. A hypothetical model for formation of chromosome re-arrangements caused by the incomplete maternal nuclear DNA inactivation in the androgenetic rainbow trout was proposed in the present paper.

  17. Ammonia excretion in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): evidence for Rh glycoprotein and H+-ATPase involvement.

    PubMed

    Nawata, C Michele; Hung, Carrie C Y; Tsui, Tommy K N; Wilson, Jonathan M; Wright, Patricia A; Wood, Chris M

    2007-11-14

    Branchial ammonia transport in freshwater teleosts is not well understood. Most studies conclude that NH(3) diffuses out of the gill and becomes protonated to NH(4)(+) in an acidified gill boundary layer. Rhesus (Rh) proteins are new members of the ammonia transporter superfamily and rainbow trout possess genes encoding for Rh30-like1 and Rhcg2. We identified seven additional full-length trout Rh cDNA sequences: one Rhag and two each of Rhbg, Rhcg1, and Rh30-like. The mRNA expression of Rhbg, Rhcg1, and Rhcg2 was examined in trout tissues (blood, brain, eye, gill, heart, intestine, kidney, liver, muscle, skin, spleen) exposed to high external ammonia (HEA; 1.5 mmol/l NH(4)HCO(3), pH 7.95, 15 degrees C). Rhbg was expressed in all tissues, Rhcg1 was expressed in brain, gill, liver, and skin, and Rhcg2 was expressed in gill and skin. Brain Rhbg and Rhcg1 were downregulated, blood Rh30-like and Rhag were downregulated, and skin Rhbg and Rhcg2 were upregulated with HEA. After an initial uptake of ammonia into the fish during HEA, excretion was reestablished, coinciding with upregulations of gill Rh mRNA in the pavement cell fraction: Rhcg2 at 12 and 48 h, and Rhbg at 48 h. NHE2 expression remained unchanged, but upregulated H(+)-ATPase (V-type, B-subunit) and downregulated carbonic anhydrase (CA2) expression and activity were noted in the gill and again expression changes occurred in pavement cells, and not in mitochondria-rich cells. Together, these results indicate Rh glycoprotein involvement in ammonia transport and excretion in the rainbow trout while underscoring the significance of gill boundary layer acidification by H(+)-ATPase.

  18. Microsatellite analyses of San Franciscuito Creek rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, Jennifer L.

    2000-01-01

    Microsatellite genetic diversity found in San Francisquito Creek rainbow trout support a close genetic relationship with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from another tributary of San Francisco Bay, Alameda Creek, and coastal trout found in Lagunitas Creek, Marin County, California. Fish collected for this study from San Francisquito Creek showed a closer genetic relationship to fish from the north-central California steelhead ESU than for any other listed group of O. mykiss. No significant genotypic or allelic frequency associations could be drawn between San Francisquito Creek trout and fish collected from the four primary rainbow trout hatchery strains in use in California, i.e. Whitney, Mount Shasta, Coleman, and Hot Creek hatchery fish. Indeed, genetic distance analyses (δµ2) supported separation between San Francisquito Creek trout and all hatchery trout with 68% bootstrap values in 1000 replicate neighbor-joining trees. Not surprisingly, California hatchery rainbow trout showed their closest evolutionary relationships with contemporary stocks derived from the Sacramento River. Wild collections of rainbow trout from the Sacramento-San Joaquin basin in the Central Valley were also clearly separable from San Francisquito Creek fish supporting separate, independent ESUs for two groups of O. mykiss (one coastal and one Central Valley) with potentially overlapping life histories in San Francisco Bay. These data support the implementation of management and conservation programs for rainbow trout in the San Francisquito Creek drainage as part of the central California coastal steelhead ESU.

  19. Fate of the isoprenoid hydrocarbon, pristane, in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bon, A.M.; Cravedi, J.P.; Tulliez, J.

    1987-06-01

    The excretion routes and tissue distribution of (/sup 3/H)pristane were measured in rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri, after a single intragastric dose (0.1 mg). This branched-alkane was quickly and largely absorbed. The balance study showed that the major routes of excretion were fecal (40.4% of the dose) and branchial (39.6%). In feces radioactivity was exclusively due to (/sup 3/H)pristane, whereas /sup 3/H resulting from gill excretion was principally associated with tritiated water. Only 2.6% of the radioactivity was cleared via the kidneys and found in the urine as metabolites. After 48 hr, no hydrocarbon accumulation was observed in gall bladder, while in liver and fat, respectively, 69 and 34% of the radioactivity originated from pristane, the rest of the labeling being mostly associated with lipid components.

  20. Effects of some pesticides on the vital organs of juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Capkin, Erol; Terzi, Ertugrul; Boran, Halis; Yandi, Ilhan; Altinok, Ilhan

    2010-12-01

    Gill, trunk kidney, spleen, and liver of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were examined after exposure to different sublethal concentrations of carbosulfan (25, 50 and 200 μgL(-1)), propineb (3, 6 and 24 mgL(-1)), and benomyl (2, 5 and 20 mgL(-1)) for 14 days. Lesions were observed in gill, trunk kidney, spleen, and liver of rainbow trout exposed to either concentration of pesticides. The most important lesions were determined in the highest concentrations of pesticides. Lamellar fusion, lamellar hyperplasia, epithelial lifting, vacuolization of epithelial tissue, epithelial necrosis, hypertrophy and sloughing of epithelium were observed on fish exposed to carbosulfan, propineb and benomyl. Fish had cell necrosis, degeneration and oedemas in liver, trunk kidney and spleen. None of these lesions were seen in control fish.

  1. Growth, morphology, and developmental instability of rainbow trout, Yellowstone cutthroat trout, and four hybrid generations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostberg, C.O.; Duda, J.J.; Graham, J.H.; Zhang, S.; Haywood, K. P.; Miller, B.; Lerud, T.L.

    2011-01-01

    Hybridization of cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii with nonindigenous rainbow trout O. mykiss contributes to the decline of cutthroat trout subspecies throughout their native range. Introgression by rainbow trout can swamp the gene pools of cutthroat trout populations, especially if there is little selection against hybrids. We used rainbow trout, Yellowstone cutthroat trout O. clarkii bouvieri, and rainbow trout × Yellowstone cutthroat trout F1 hybrids as parents to construct seven different line crosses: F1 hybrids (both reciprocal crosses), F2 hybrids, first-generation backcrosses (both rainbow trout and Yellowstone cutthroat trout), and both parental taxa. We compared growth, morphology, and developmental instability among these seven crosses reared at two different temperatures. Growth was related to the proportion of rainbow trout genome present within the crosses. Meristic traits were influenced by maternal, additive, dominant, overdominant, and (probably) epistatic genetic effects. Developmental stability, however, was not disturbed in F1 hybrids, F2 hybrids, or backcrosses. Backcrosses were morphologically similar to their recurrent parent. The lack of developmental instability in hybrids suggests that there are few genetic incompatibilities preventing introgression. Our findings suggest that hybrids are not equal: that is, growth, development, character traits, and morphology differ depending on the genomic contribution from each parental species as well as the hybrid generation.

  2. Isolation and distribution of bacterial flora in farmed rainbow trout from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Miranda, Celene; Palomares, Elizabeth; Jurado, Mirsam; Marín, Aída; Vega, Fernando; Soriano-Vargas, Edgardo

    2010-12-01

    Trout farming is a growing aquaculture industry in Mexico, with stock mainly supplied by the importation of eyed eggs. The aim of the present study was to determine the frequency of bacterial isolations in farmed rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss from Mexico. Sixty-five farms distributed among seven states of Mexico were included in the study. Individual samples from gills, liver, spleen, intestine, and kidney were obtained from 563 apparently healthy fish. In total, 371 bacterial isolates were recovered from sampled fish; isolates of the genera Aeromonas, Edwardsiella, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Klebsiella, Plesiomonas, Pseudomonas, and Yersinia were identified. Aeromonads were the most frequently isolated bacteria. Renibacterium salmoninarum was not isolated from any of the sampled fish. Our results showed the presence of bacteria that are potential pathogens of both rainbow trout and humans.

  3. The cutthroat trout Y chromosome is conserved with that of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Alfaqih, M A; Phillips, R B; Wheeler, P A; Thorgaard, G H

    2008-01-01

    Five genetic markers previously shown to be located on the sex chromosomes of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were tested for linkage with the sex locus of Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri) in a genetic cross created from a rainbow x cutthroat male hybrid. We show that the sex locus of both rainbow and cutthroat trout is on the same homologous linkage group. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a probe for the microsatellite marker Omm1665, which maps close to the sex locus of Yellowstone cutthroat trout, was used to identify the Y chromosome of cutthroat trout in the hybrid. The Y chromosome of cutthroat trout is sub-telocentric and lacks a DAPI band found on the short arm of the Y chromosome of some rainbow trout males.

  4. Embryotoxicity of an extract from Great Lakes lake trout to rainbow trout and lake trout

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.J.; Tillitt, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    Aquatic ecosystems such as the Great Lakes are known to be contaminated with chemicals that are toxic to fish. However, the role of these contaminants in reproductive failures of fishes, such as lake trout recruitment, has remained controvertible. It was the objective to evaluate dioxin-like embryotoxicity of a complex mixture of chemicals and predict their potential to cause the lack of recruitment in Great Lakes lake trout. Graded doses of a complex environmental extract were injected into eggs of both rainbow trout and lake trout. The extract was obtained from whole adult lake trout collected from Lake Michigan in 1988. The extract was embryotoxic in rainbow trout, with LD50 values for Arlee strain and Erwin strain of 33 eggEQ and 14 eggEQ respectively. The LOAEL for hemorrhaging, yolk-sac edema, and craniofacial deformities in rainbow trout were 2, 2, and 4 eggEQ, respectively. Subsequent injections of the extract into lake trout eggs were likewise embryotoxic, with an LD50 value of 7 eggEQ. The LOAEL values for the extract in lake trout for hemorrhaging, yolk-sac edema, and craniofacial deformities were 0.1, 1, and 2 eggEQ, respectively. The current levels of contaminants in lake trout eggs are above the threshold for hemorrhaging and yolk-sac edema. The results also support the use of an additive model of toxicity to quantify PCDDs, PCDFs, Non-o-PCBs, and Mono-o-PCBs in relation to early life stage mortality in Lake Michigan lake trout.

  5. Biotransformation of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate by rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, M.G.; Hayton, W.L.

    1995-05-01

    The biotransformation of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) was studied in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) following intravascular administration. Methyl-esterified metabolites were identified using rodent-derived standards and non-linear gradient elution HPLC; metabolites were confirmed by gas chromatography. Similarities between the biotransformation of DEHP by rainbow trout and mammalian species included (a) mono-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP) appeared to be the obligatory first step in DEHP metabolism; (b) the phthalate ring was not oxidized; (c) phthalic acid was a minor metabolite; and (d) several metabolites contained multiple oxidations of the 2-ethylhexyl moiety of MEHP. No metabolites unique to rainbow trout were identified. However, fewer oxidized metabolites were identified in rainbow trout than in mammalian species, possibly due to limited mitochondrial metabolism of MEHP in rainbow trout. The amount of biliary MEHP glucuronide after intravascular administration of DEHP was substantially less than reported in rainbow trout exposed to DEHP via the water. Results confirmed that DEHP metabolism in rainbow trout proceeds by initial rapid formation of MEHP, followed by excretion or extensive oxidation by microsomal P450.

  6. An obscure disease of rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rucker, R.R.; Yasutake, W.T.; Wedemeyer, G.

    1970-01-01

    An annul mortality among Rainbow Trout (Salmo gairdneri) has plagued the Shelton Hatchery of the Washington State Department of Game for the last several years. No infectious agent could be isolated from the moribund fish, but histopathologica1 changes in the liver of 1-month-old fish suggested the presence of a toxic substance. Scoliosis in 3-month-old fish suggested a possible deficiency in vitamin C. With this background in mind, we designed studies to determine the nature and source of possible toxicants and the role of vitamin C deficiency in the etiology of this disease.

  7. Nutritionally induced hepatomagenesis of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1967-01-01

    Hepatoma in commercially reared rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) was first seen at this laboratory in April of 1960. The subsequent discovery of it in near epizootic proportions in other hatchery-reared rainbow trout and cutthroat trout (S. clarki) populations throughout the United States precipitated extensive research by numerous agencies. Although the liver neoplasm in trout had been previously noted here (Haddow and Blake, 1933; Nigrelli, 1954; Nigrelli and Jakowska, 1955) and abroad (Cudkowicz and Scolari, 1955) occurrences of it in such proportions had not been reported previously in this country.

  8. The stress of Formalin treatments in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary

    1971-01-01

    Changes in gill function, acid–base balance and pituitary activation occurring during standard 200 ppm formalin treatments of juvenile rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) were compared. Plasma Cl−, Ca++, total CO2, and interrenal vitamin C in the trout declined continuously and in proportion to the exposure time, but the salmon were able to maintain these metabolic parameters at approximately initial levels. Blood pH and alkaline reserve regulation of the salmon was also less affected by formalin treatments, especially during prolonged exposures. The oxygen consumption of both species was depressed, but substantially more so in the trout than could be accounted for by decreased ventilation rates. Little frank hemolysis occurred in either species, but there was a significant bilirubinemia in the trout.

  9. Microsatellite analyses of Alameda Creek Rainbow/Steelhead trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Fountain, Monique C.

    1999-01-01

    Microsatellite genetic diversity found in Alameda Creek rainbow trout support a close genetic relationship with coastal trout found in Lagunitas Creek, Marin County, California. No significant genotypic or allelic frequencies associations could be drawn among Alameda Creek trout and fish collected from the four primary rainbow trout hatchery strains in use in California, Whitney, Mount Shasta, Coleman, and Hot Creek strains, indeed, genetic distance analyses (δμ2) supported genetic separation among Alameda Creek trout and hatchery trout with greater than 50% bootstrap values in 1000 replicate neighbor-joining trees. Fish collected for this study from Palo Seco and Sheppard Creeks shared allelic frequencies with both the fish in Alameda Creek and those found in Scott Creek in Santa Cruz County. Fish collected in Horseshoe Creek or San Lorenzo Creek (Alameda County) did not share this unique genetic relationship between Alameda Creek fish and putative wild coastal trout. These two streams had allelic frequencies similar to some hatchery trout strains and to wild trout captured in the Central Valley. These data suggest that there are two possible steelhead ESUs using the tributaries of San Francisco Bay (one coastal and one Central Valley) or that hatchery trout supplementation has impacted some, but not all streams with a subsequent loss of locally adapted genetic characteristics. These data support the implementation of conservation management of rainbow trout in the Alameda Creek drainage as part of the central California coastal steelhead ESU.

  10. Use of an annular chamber for testing thermal preference of westslope cutthroat trout and rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, T.E.; Bear, E.A.; Zale, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    Remaining populations of westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi) in western North America are primarily confined to cold headwaters whereas nonnative rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) predominate in warmer, lower elevation stream sections historically occupied by westslope cutthroat trout. We tested whether differing thermal preferences could account for the spatial segregation observed in the field. Thermal preferences of age-1 westslope cutthroat trout and rainbow trout (125 to 150 mm total length) were assessed in the laboratory using a modified annular preference chamber at acclimation temperatures of 10, 12, 14, and 16??C Final preferred temperature of westslope cutthroat trout (14.9??C) was similar to that of rainbow trout (14.8??C) when tested in a thermal gradient of 11-17??C The high degree of overlap in thermal preference indicates the two species have similar thermal niches and a high potential for competition. We suggest several modifications to the annular preference chamber to improve performance in future studies.

  11. Cadmium affects the social behaviour of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Sloman, Katherine A; Scott, Graham R; Diao, Zhongyu; Rouleau, Claude; Wood, Chris M; McDonald, D Gord

    2003-10-29

    The present study investigated both the effects of cadmium on the social interactions of rainbow trout and the differential accumulation of waterborne cadmium among social ranks of fish. Fish exposed to waterborne cadmium concentrations of 2 microg l(-1) for 24 h, followed by a 1, 2 or 3 day depuration period in clean water, had a decreased ability to compete with non-exposed fish. However, the competitive ability of exposed fish given a 5 day depuration period was not significantly impaired. Cadmium accumulated in the olfactory apparatus of fish exposed to waterborne cadmium for 24 h and decreased significantly only after 5 days depuration in clean water. Among groups of ten fish held in stream tanks, where all fish were exposed to cadmium, there were significant effects on social behaviour and growth rate. Dominance hierarchies formed faster among fish exposed to cadmium than among control fish, and overall growth rates were higher in the cadmium treatment. In groups of ten fish, social status also affected tissue accumulation of cadmium during waterborne exposure, with dominant fish accumulating more cadmium at the gill. In conclusion, exposure to low levels of cadmium, affects the social behaviour of fish, in part due to accumulation in the olfactory apparatus, and dominant fish accumulate more gill cadmium than subordinates during chronic waterborne exposure.

  12. Virulence of Flavobacterium columnare genomovars in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, Jason P; LaFrentz, Benjamin R

    2016-08-09

    Flavobacterium columnare is the causative agent of columnaris disease and is responsible for significant economic losses in aquaculture. F. columnare is a Gram-negative bacterium, and 5 genetic types or genomovars have been described based on restriction fragment length polymorphism of the 16S rRNA gene. Previous research has suggested that genomovar II isolates are more virulent than genomovar I isolates to multiple species of fish, including rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. In addition, improved genotyping methods have shown that some isolates previously classified as genomovar I, and used in challenge experiments, were in fact genomovar III. Our objective was to confirm previous results with respect to genomovar II virulence, and to determine the susceptibility of rainbow trout to other genomovars. The virulence of 8 genomovar I, 4 genomovar II, 3 genomovar II-B, and 5 genomovar III isolates originating from various sources was determined through 3 independent challenges in rainbow trout using an immersion challenge model. Mean cumulative percent mortality (CPM) of ~49% for genomovar I isolates, ~1% for genomovar II, ~5% for the II-B isolates, and ~7% for the III isolates was observed. The inability of genomovar II isolates to produce mortalities in rainbow trout was unanticipated based on previous studies, but may be due to a number of factors including rainbow trout source and water chemistry. The source of fish and/or the presence of sub-optimal environment may influence the susceptibility of rainbow trout to different F. columnare genomovars.

  13. Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) stocking and Contracaecum spp.

    PubMed

    Dick, T A; Papst, M H; Paul, H C

    1987-04-01

    A stocking program with rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) at High Rock Lake, Manitoba failed due to infections with large numbers of Contracaecum spp. larvae. Nematode larvae in the intestinal tract, body cavity and musculature made the fish unmarketable. A combination of experimental infections of rainbow trout and pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos), observations on the behavior of fish-eating birds, and numbers of larval Contracaecum spp. in minnow species led to the following conclusions. The introduction of rainbow trout attracted large numbers of fish-eating birds, particularly pelicans. Concurrent predation by rainbow trout on fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), five-spined sticklebacks (Culaea inconstans), and nine-spined sticklebacks (Pungitius pungitius), concentrated the parasites. The combined increase in densities of the introduced fish host and fish-eating birds, and the short life cycle of the parasite, increased the numbers of parasites in rainbow trout over a season and in the indigenous minnow species between years. Numbers of larvae in the indigenous minnow species declined when stocking of rainbow trout was stopped and use of the lake by fish-eating birds, particularly pelicans, returned to normal levels.

  14. Patterns of hybridization among cutthroat trout and rainbow trout in northern Rocky Mountain streams.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Kevin S; Young, Michael K; Wilcox, Taylor M; Bingham, Daniel M; Pilgrim, Kristine L; Schwartz, Michael K

    2016-02-01

    Introgressive hybridization between native and introduced species is a growing conservation concern. For native cutthroat trout and introduced rainbow trout in western North America, this process is thought to lead to the formation of hybrid swarms and the loss of monophyletic evolutionary lineages. Previous studies of this phenomenon, however, indicated that hybrid swarms were rare except when native and introduced forms of cutthroat trout co-occurred. We used a panel of 86 diagnostic, single nucleotide polymorphisms to evaluate the genetic composition of 3865 fish captured in 188 locations on 129 streams distributed across western Montana and northern Idaho. Although introgression was common and only 37% of the sites were occupied solely by parental westslope cutthroat trout, levels of hybridization were generally low. Of the 188 sites sampled, 73% contained ≤5% rainbow trout alleles and 58% had ≤1% rainbow trout alleles. Overall, 72% of specimens were nonadmixed westslope cutthroat trout, and an additional 3.5% were nonadmixed rainbow trout. Samples from seven sites met our criteria for hybrid swarms, that is, an absence of nonadmixed individuals and a random distribution of alleles within the sample; most (6/7) were associated with introgression by Yellowstone cutthroat trout. In streams with multiple sites, upstream locations exhibited less introgression than downstream locations. We conclude that although the widespread introduction of nonnative trout within the historical range of westslope cutthroat trout has increased the incidence of introgression, sites containing nonadmixed populations of this taxon are common and broadly distributed.

  15. Determination of benzocaine in rainbow trout plasma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bernardy, Jeffery A.; Coleman, K.S.; Stehly, G.R.; Gingerich, William H.

    1996-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic method is described for analysis of benzocaine (BZ), a proposed fish anesthetic, in rainbow trout plasma, Mean recoveries of BZ from plasma samples fortified at 44-10 100 ng/mL were 96-100%. The method detection limit is 10 ng/mL, and the limit of quantitation is 37 ng/mL. Acetylation of BZ occurs in whole blood after storage at room temperature (i.e., 21 degrees C) for 10 min. However, no acetylation of BZ was detected in plasma samples held at room temperature for 4 h, Mean method precision for plasma samples with incurred BZ residue is similar to that for fortified samples in the same concentration range (relative standard deviations of 0.9 and 1.2%, respectively).

  16. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raleigh, Robert F.; Hickman, Terry; Solomon, R. Charles; Nelson, Patrick C.

    1984-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop riverine and lacustrine habitat models for rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), a freshwater species. The models are scaled to produce an index of habitat suitability between 0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1 (optimally suitable habitat) for freshwater areas of the continental United States. Other habitat suitability models found in the literature are also included. Habitat suitability indexes (HSI's) are designed for use with the habitat evaluation procedures developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Also included are discussions of Suitability Index (SI) curves as used in the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) and SI curves available for an IFIM analysis of Fallfish habitat.

  17. Behavioral avoidance of a metals mixture by rainbow trout and brown trout

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.A.; Bergman, H.L.; Woodward, D.F.; Little, E.E.; Deloney, A.J.

    1994-12-31

    Behavioral avoidance responses by rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) were determined in the laboratory to predict the effect of mixtures of copper, cadmium, lead, and zinc on the spatial distribution of fishes in the Clark fork River (CFR), Montana. The typical ambient concentration of these metals (in {micro}g/l) in the CFR was 12 Cu, 1.1 Cd, 3.2 Pb, and 50 Zn. Laboratory tests were conducted in an opposing-flow avoidance chamber using metals concentrations ranging from 10% to 1,000% of this CFR ambient concentration. Rainbow trout avoided all metals concentrations tested from 10% to 1,000% of ambient. Brown trout failed to avoid the 10% metals concentration but did avoid all concentrations higher than 50%. In a further experiment, both species were acclimated to pH 8.0 water and avoided all changes in acidity. However, the avoidance of metals was not altered by acidity additions in brown trout and only slightly altered in rainbow trout. In all experiments, brown trout were less sensitive than rainbow trout, which was consistent with observed species distributions within the river. Behavior avoidance of this metals mixture by rainbow and brown trout in the laboratory indicates metals may have contributed to reduced abundance and altered distribution of salmonids in the CFR.

  18. Tissue distribution and residue depletion of metronidazole in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Mitrowska, Kamila; Pekala, Agnieszka; Posyniak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Tissue distribution and residue depletion of metronidazole (MNZ) was studied in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) following oral administration of MNZ in feed at the average dose of 25 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for 7 days at 11 ± 2°C. The MNZ concentration in feed was 0.25% while daily feed intake was 1% of body weight. The concentrations of MNZ and its main metabolite, hydroxymetronidazole (MNZOH), in fish tissues were determined by LC-MS/MS. The drug was well distributed in tissues with maximum concentrations on day 1 post-administration. At this time, the mean MNZ concentrations in muscle, skin, kidney, liver and gill were 14,999, 20,269, 15,070, 10,102 and 16,467 µg kg(-1) respectively. MNZ was converted into MNZOH with the ratio of MNZOH:MNZ up to 7% in all fish tissues throughout the withdrawal period. This shows that MNZ itself is the main residue in rainbow trout. MNZ was detected at the level close to the decision limit (0.20 µg kg(-1)) in muscle, skin and muscle with adhering skin up to 42 days, while in kidney, liver and gill it was up to 28 days post-administration. MNZOH was eliminated more rapidly from fish tissues and it was present in muscle alone up to 21 days. The elimination half-lives of MNZ and MNZOH in rainbow trout tissues were 1.83-2.53 and 1.24-2.12 days, respectively. When muscle without skin was analysed, higher MNZ and MNZOH concentrations were detected, and for a longer period of time, than in muscle with adhering skin. Thus muscle alone could be more appropriate for the effective residue control of MNZ in rainbow trout. For the same reason, it is also essential to ensure direct cooling immediately after sampling, since MNZ and its metabolite degrade in fish muscle and skin stored in non-freezing conditions.

  19. Improved husbandry to control an outbreak of rainbow trout fry syndrome caused by infection with Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bebak, J.A.; Welch, T.J.; Starliper, C.E.; Baya, A.M.; Garner, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Case Description - A cohort of 35,200, 13-week-old, female rainbow trout at a fish farm was evaluated because of a 2-week history of anorexia and lethargy and a mortality rate of approximately 100 fish/d. Clinical Findings - Affected fish were lethargic and thin and had disequilibrium, bilateral exophthalmia, pale red gills and kidneys, red-tinged coelomic fluid, and pale brown livers. Some fish were differentially pigmented bilaterally. The presumptive diagnosis was bacterial or viral septicemia. The definitive diagnosis was rainbow trout fry syndrome caused by infection with Flavobacterium psychrophilum. Treatment and Outcome - A strategy for controlling the outbreak based on reducing pathogen numbers in affected tanks and reducing pathogen spread among tanks was developed. The option of treating with antimicrobial-medicated feed was discussed with the farmer, but was declined. After changes were made, mortality rate declined quickly, with no more deaths within 10 days after the initial farm visit. Clinical Relevance - Bacterial coldwater disease is the most common manifestation of infection with F psychrophilum in fingerling and adult rainbow trout. However, the organism can also cause rainbow trout fry syndrome. This condition should be included on a list of differential diagnoses for septicemia in hatchery-reared rainbow trout fry.

  20. Hybridization dynamics between Colorado's native cutthroat trout and introduced rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Jessica L; Siegle, Matthew R; Martin, Andrew P

    2008-01-01

    Newly formed hybrid populations provide an opportunity to examine the initial consequences of secondary contact between species and identify genetic patterns that may be important early in the evolution of hybrid inviability. Widespread introductions of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) into watersheds with native cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) have resulted in hybridization. These introductions have contributed to the decline of native cutthroat trout populations. Here, we examine the pattern of hybridization between introduced rainbow trout and 2 populations of cutthroat trout native to Colorado. For this study, we utilized 7 diagnostic, codominant nuclear markers and a diagnostic mitochondrial marker to investigate hybridization in a population of greenback cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii stomias) and a population of Colorado River cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii pleuriticus). We infer that cutthroat-rainbow trout hybrid swarms have formed in both populations. Although a mixture of hybrid genotypes was present, not all genotype combinations were detected at expected frequencies. We found evidence that mitochondrial DNA introgression in hybrids is asymmetric and more likely from rainbow trout than from cutthroat trout. A difference in spawning time of the 2 species or differences in the fitness between the reciprocal crosses may explain the asymmetry. Additionally, the presence of intraspecific cytonuclear associations found in both populations is concordant with current hypotheses regarding coevolution of mitochondrial and nuclear genomes.

  1. Absence of developmental incompatibility in hybrids between rainbow trout and two subspecies of cutthroat trout.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, M M; Danzmann, R G; Allendorf, F W

    1985-08-01

    We examined the developmental rate of hybrids between rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and two subspecies of cutthroat trout: westslope cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki lewisi) and Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki bouvieri). These taxa show considerable genetic divergence at 42 structural loci encoding enzymes; the mean Nei's D between the rainbow trout and the two species of cutthroat trout is 0.22. We used four measures of developmental rate: time of hatching and yolk resorption, rate of increase in activity of four enzymes, and time of initial detection of seven isozyme loci. The two cutthroat trout subspecies reached hatching and yolk resorption earlier than rainbow trout. Cutthroat trout had higher relative enzyme activities than rainbow trout from deposition of eye pigment to hatching. There was no difference in the rate of increase in enzyme activity or time of initial expression of these loci between these species. Hybrids showed developmental rates intermediate or similar to that of the parental species using all measures. Our results indicate an absence of regulatory and developmental incompatibility between these taxa.

  2. A rainbow trout lectin with multimeric structure.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L E; Thiel, S; Petersen, T E; Jensenius, J C

    1997-04-01

    A novel lectin has been identified in rainbow trout serum and plasma. The lectin binds to Sepharose (an agarose polymer) in a calcium-dependent manner. Glucose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, mannose, N-acetyl-mannosamine, L-fucose, maltose and alpha-methyl-mannoside are good inhibitors of this binding, whereas glucosamine and D-fucose inhibits to a lesser degree and mannosamine and galactose do not inhibit the binding to Sepharose. When analysed by SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions, the lectin appears as a characteristic ladder of bands with approximately 16 kDa between consecutive bands. Upon reduction, the lectin appears as a 16-kDa band. On size-exclusion chromatography of trout serum and plasma, the protein emerges over a broad range corresponding to sizes from about 2000 kDa to less than 200 kDa. The NH2-terminal sequence (AAENRNQXPPG) shows no significant homology with known proteins. Because of the characteristic appearance in non-reducing SDS-PAGE and the lectin activity, we propose to name the protein "ladderlectin."

  3. Toxicokinetics of perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) in rainbow trout ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are widely used as stain resistant coatings for cloth, paper, and leather, and as surfactants, fire-fighting foams, and photographic developers. Individual PFAAs have been shown to accumulate in fish and wildlife; however, the extent of this accumulation varies widely. In general, the tendency of individual PFAAs to accumulate in fish is directly related to the length of a compound’s fluorinated carbon chain as well as the identity of the terminal group (sulfonate or carboxylate) which confers to the molecule its amphipathic character. Presently, however the mechanisms that underly these observations remain poorly understood. In the present study we investigated the kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in rainbow trout. PFOA is not accumulated by fish. We also know that it is eliminated by mammals in urine. Our hypothesis, therefore, was that renal elimination of PFOA limits its accumulation in fish. Trout injected with an intra-arterial dose of PFOA were sampled to obtain concentration time-course data for plasma, urine, and expired water. The data were then analyzed by compartmental modeling to estimate rates of renal and branchial clearance. Averaged across all animals, the renal clearance rate was about ten times higher than the branchial clearance rate, confirming our hypothesis. The results of this effort provide a clear explanation for the observed absence of PFOA accumulation in fish. Moreover, these results suggest th

  4. Characterization of proflavine metabolites in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Yu, Z; Hayton, W L; Chan, K K

    1997-04-01

    Proflavine (3,6-diaminoacridine) has potential for use as an antiinfective in fish, and its metabolism by rainbow trout was therefore studied. Fourteen hours after intraarterial bolus administration of 10 mg/kg of proflavine, three metabolites were found in liver and bile, and one metabolite was found in plasma using reversed-phase HPLC with UV detection at 262 nm. Treatment with hydrochloric acid converted the three metabolites to proflavine, which suggested that the metabolites were proflavine conjugates. Treatment with beta-glucuronidase and saccharic acid 1,4-lactone, a specific beta-glucuronidase inhibitor, revealed that two metabolites were proflavine glucuronides. For determination of UV-VIS absorption and mass spectra, HPLC-purified metabolites were isolated from liver. Data from these experiments suggested that the proflavine metabolites were 3-N-glucuronosyl proflavine (PG), 3-N-glucuronosyl,6-N-acetyl proflavine (APG), and 3-N-acetylproflavine (AP). The identities of the metabolites were verified by chemical synthesis. When synthetic PG and AP were compared with the two metabolites isolated from trout, they had the same molecular weight as determined by matrix-assisted, laser desorption ionization, time-of-flight MS. In addition, they coeluted on HPLC under different mobile phase conditions. Finally, the in vitro incubation with liver subcellular preparations confirmed this characterization and provided the evidence that APG can be formed by glucuronidation of AP or acetylation of PG.

  5. Introgression and susceptibility to disease in a wild population of rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Currens, K.P.; Hemmingsen, A.R.; French, R.A.; Buchanan, D.V.; Schreck, C.B.; Li, H.W.

    1997-01-01

    We examined susceptibility of wild rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss from the Metolius River, a tributary of the Deschutes River, Oregon, to genetic introgression and ceratomyxosis as a result of stocking nonnative hatchery rainbow trout. Ceratomyxa shasta, an enzootic myxosporean parasite that can be lethal to nonnative hatchery rainbow trout, might have been limiting the interbreeding of hatchery and wild rainbow trout in the river. However, rainbow trout from the Metolius River had allozyme frequencies intermediate between those of wild and hatchery fish at LDH-B2* and sSOD-1*, two diagnostic genetic loci that allow the inland subspecies of rainbow trout to be distinguished from hatchery strains of coastal origin. They also had notable frequencies of ADA-1*85, an allele documented in hatchery rainbow trout but rarely seen in wild populations. We also found that rainbow trout in the Metolius River averaged 138.9 scales in the lateral series, intermediate between the counts for 9 coastal or nonnative hatchery populations, which always had fewer than 140 scales, and 10 inland populations, which always had more than 140 scales. Disease challenges revealed that rainbow trout from the Metolius River had much greater susceptibility to C. shasta than rainbow trout from the Deschutes River, which have genetic resistance to the lethal disease. Based on these data, we concluded that introgression with nonnative hatchery rainbow trout has reduced the abilities of wild rainbow trout in the Metolius River to survive when conditions for ceratomyxosis infection occur.

  6. NITRO MUSK ADDUCTS OF RAINBOW TROUT ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Rainbow trout and other fish species can serve as 'sentinel' species for the assessment of ecological status and the presence of certain environmental contaminants. As such they act as bioindicators of exposure. Here we present seminal data regarding dose-response and toxicokinetics of trout hemoglobin adduct formation from exposure to nitro musks that are frequently used as fragrance ingredients in formulations of personal care products. Hemoglobin adducts serve as biomarkers of exposure of the sentinel species as we have shown in previous studies of hemoglobin adducts formed in trout and environmental carp exposed to musk xylene (MX) and musk ketone (MK). Gas chromatography-electron capture negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (GC-NICI-MS) employing selected ion monitoring is used to measure 4-amino-MX (4-AMX), 2-amino-MX (2-AMX), and 2-amino-MK (2-AMK) released by alkaline hydrolysis from the sulfinamide adducts of hemoglobin. Dose-response and toxicokinetics were investigated using this sensitive method for analysis of these metabolites. In the dose-response investigation, the concentrations of 4-AMX and 2-2AMX are observed to pass through a maximum at 0.10 mg/g. In the case of 2-AMK, the adduct concentration is almost the same at dosages in the range of 0.030 to 0.10 mg/g. For toxicokinetics, the concentration of the metabolites in the Hb reaches a maximum in the 3-day sample after administration of MX or MK. Further elimination of the metabo

  7. Erosion of interspecific reproductive barriers resulting from hatchery supplementation of rainbow trout sympatric with cutthroat trout.

    PubMed

    Docker, Margaret F; Dale, Angie; Heath, Daniel D

    2003-12-01

    The frequency of hybridization between cutthroat (Onchorhynchus clarki clarki) and rainbow (O. mykiss irideus) trout from coastal habitats in British Columbia, Canada, was examined in seven populations where the two species are sympatric with no history of rainbow trout stocking and compared with areas where native rainbow trout populations have been supplemented with hatchery fish (three populations). Four nuclear markers were used to identify each species and interspecific hybrids and one mitochondrial marker showed the direction of gene exchange between species. The frequency of hybrids was significantly higher (Fisher exact test, P < 0.001) in river systems where hatchery rainbow trout have been introduced (50.6% hybrids) than in populations where the two species naturally co-occur without supplementation (9.9% hybrids).

  8. Patterns of hybridization of nonnative cutthroat trout and hatchery rainbow trout with native redband trout in the Boise River, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neville, Helen M.; Dunham, Jason B.

    2011-01-01

    Hybridization is one of the greatest threats to native fishes. Threats from hybridization are particularly important for native trout species as stocking of nonnative trout has been widespread within the ranges of native species, thus increasing the potential for hybridization. While many studies have documented hybridization between native cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii and nonnative rainbow trout O. mykiss, fewer have focused on this issue in native rainbow trout despite widespread threats from introductions of both nonnative cutthroat trout and hatchery rainbow trout. Here, we describe the current genetic (i.e., hybridization) status of native redband trout O. mykiss gairdneri populations in the upper Boise River, Idaho. Interspecific hybridization was widespread (detected at 14 of the 41 sampled locations), but high levels of hybridization between nonnative cutthroat trout and redband trout were detected in only a few streams. Intraspecific hybridization was considerably more widespread (almost 40% of sampled locations), and several local populations of native redband trout have been almost completely replaced with hatchery coastal rainbow trout O. mykiss irideus; other populations exist as hybrid swarms, some are in the process of being actively invaded, and some are maintaining genetic characteristics of native populations. The persistence of some redband trout populations with high genetic integrity provides some opportunity to conserve native genomes, but our findings also highlight the complex decisions facing managers today. Effective management strategies in this system may include analysis of the specific attributes of each site and population to evaluate the relative risks posed by isolation versus maintaining connectivity, identifying potential sites for control or eradication of nonnative trout, and long-term monitoring of the genetic integrity of remaining redband trout populations to track changes in their status.

  9. Ontogenetic taurine biosynthesis ability in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Huihui

    2015-07-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethane sulfonic acid) plays important roles in multiple physiological processes including osmoregulation, bile salt conjugation and membrane protection. It is known that taurine biosynthesis varies in different fish species. However, its ontogenetic regulation has not been clear. In the present study, we found that the hepatic concentrations of taurine increased marginally with rainbow trout growth. The mRNA expression, protein levels and enzyme activities of key enzymes involved in taurine biosynthesis, cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase (CSD), were analyzed. Our results showed that the mRNA levels and protein abundances of CSD increased dramatically with the development of rainbow trout stages while the enzyme activities showed a slight improvement. However, the expression and activities of CDO decreased with rainbow trout growth. These results provide valuable information on defining the exact supplementation of taurine in diets for different stages of rainbow trout and give new insights into elucidating the regulation of taurine metabolism in rainbow trout. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigations : Rainbow Trout Recruitment : Period Covered: 1997.

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, Chris

    1999-02-02

    The objective of this study was to determine if juvenile production is limiting the population of rainbow trout Oncorbynchus mykiss in the Idaho reach of the Kootenai River. We used snorkeling and electrofishing techniques to estimate juvenile rainbow trout abundance in, and outmigration from, the Deep, Boulder, and Myrtle creek drainages in Idaho. The total population estimates for the three drainages estimated in 1997 were 30,023; 763; and 235; respectively. A rotary-screw trap was utilized to capture juvenile outmigrants for quantification of age at outmigration and total outmigration from the Deep Creek drainage to the Kootenai River. The total outmigrant estimate for 1997 from the Deep Creek drainage was 38,206 juvenile rainbow trout. Age determination based largely on scales suggests that most juvenile rainbow trout outmigration from the Deep Creek drainage occurs at age-l, during the spring runoff period. Forty-three adult rainbow trout captured in the Deep Creek drainage were tagged with $10.00 reward T-bar anchor tags in 1997. A total of three of these fish were harvested, all in Kootenay Lake, British Columbia. This suggests the possibility of an adfluvial component in the spawning population of the Deep Creek drainage.

  11. Creatine metabolism differs between mammals and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Borchel, Andreas; Verleih, Marieke; Rebl, Alexander; Kühn, Carsten; Goldammer, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Creatine plays an important role in the cell as an energy buffer. As the energy system is a basic element of the organism it may possibly contribute to differences between rainbow trout strains selected for the traits growth and robustness, respectively. The cDNA sequences of creatine-related genes encoding glycine amidinotransferase (GATM), guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase (GAMT), creatine kinase muscle-type (CKM) and creatine transporter 1 (CT1, encoded by gene solute carrier family 6, member 8 (SLC6A8)) were characterized in rainbow trout. Transcripts of the respective genes were quantified in kidney, liver, brain and skeletal muscle in both trout strains that had been acclimated to different temperatures. Several differences between the compared trout strains were found as well as between temperatures indicating that the energy system may contribute to differences between both strains. In addition to that, the expression data showed clear differences between the creatine system in rainbow trout and mammals, as the spatial distribution of the enzyme-encoding gene expression was clearly different from the patterns described for mammals. In rainbow trout, creatine synthesis seems to take place to a big extent in the skeletal muscle.

  12. Brown Trout removal effects on short-term survival and movement of Myxobolus cerebralis-resistant rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fetherman, Eric R.; Winkelman, Dana L.; Bailey, Larissa L.; Schisler, George J.; Davies, K.

    2015-01-01

    Following establishment of Myxobolus cerebralis (the parasite responsible for salmonid whirling disease) in Colorado, populations of Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykissexperienced significant declines, whereas Brown Trout Salmo trutta densities increased in many locations across the state, potentially influencing the success of M. cerebralis-resistant Rainbow Trout reintroductions. We examined the effects of Brown Trout removal on the short-term (3-month) survival and movement of two crosses of reintroduced, M. cerebralis-resistant Rainbow Trout in the Cache la Poudre River, Colorado. Radio frequency identification passive integrated transponder tags and antennas were used to track movements of wild Brown Trout and stocked Rainbow Trout in reaches where Brown Trout had or had not been removed. Multistate mark–recapture models were used to estimate tagged fish apparent survival and movement in these sections 3 months following Brown Trout removal. A cross between the German Rainbow Trout and Colorado River Rainbow Trout strains exhibited similar survival and movement probabilities in the reaches, suggesting that the presence of Brown Trout did not affect its survival or movement. However, a cross between the German Rainbow Trout and Harrison Lake Rainbow Trout exhibited less movement from the reach in which Brown Trout had been removed. Despite this, the overall short-term benefits of the removal were equivocal, suggesting that Brown Trout removal may not be beneficial for the reintroduction of Rainbow Trout. Additionally, the logistical constraints of conducting removals in large river systems are substantial and may not be a viable management option in many rivers.

  13. Refrigeration of rainbow trout gametes and embryos.

    PubMed

    Babiak, Igor; Dabrowski, Konrad

    2003-12-01

    Prolonged access to early embryos composed of undifferentiated, totipotent blastomeres is desirable in situations when multiple collections of gametes are not possible. The objective of the present study is to examine whether the refrigeration of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss gametes and early embryos would be a suitable, reliable, and efficient tool for prolonging the availability of early developmental stages up to the advanced blastula stage. The study was conducted continuously during fall, winter, and spring spawning seasons. In all, more than 500 experimental variants were performed involving individual samples from 26 females and 33 males derived from three strains. These strains represented three possible circumstances. In optimal one, gametes from good quality donors were obtained soon after ovulation. In the two non-optimal sources, either donors were of poor genetic quality or gametes were collected from a distant location and transported as unfertilized gametes. A highly significant effect of variability of individual sample quality on efficiency of gamete and embryo refrigeration was revealed. The source of gametes significantly affected viability of refrigerated oocytes and embryos, but not spermatozoa. On average, oocytes from optimal source retained full fertilization viability for seven days of chilled storage, significantly longer than from non-optimal sources. Spermatozoa, regardless of storage method, retained full fertilization ability for the first week of storage. Refrigeration of embryos at 1.4+/-0.4 degrees C significantly slowed the development. Two- week-old embryos were still in blastula stage. Average survival rate of embryos refrigerated for 10 days and then transferred to regular incubation temperatures of 9-14 degrees C was 92% in optimal and 51 and 71% in non-optimal source variants. No effect of gamete and embryo refrigeration on the occurrence of developmental abnormalities was observed. Cumulative refrigeration of oocytes and

  14. Tissue distribution and elimination of rotenone in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    The fate of a single i.v. dose (120 μg/kg) of the piscicide [14C]rotenone was evaluated in rainbow trout for periods up to 72 h after dosing. Rotenone was rapidly cleared from the plasma; less than 2% of the dose remained in the plasma compartment after 20 min. The highest concentrations of rotenone residues (% dose/g tissue) were in the hepatobiliary system, bile, intestine, and in heart, lateral line swimming muscle, and posterior kidney; tissues that are highly dependent on oxidative metabolism. Although rotenone activity was present in all cell fractions examined, greater than 40% was associated with the mitochondrial fraction of liver, kidney, and muscle. More than 85% of the activity extracted from these tissues, except the liver, was parent rotenone. Elimination from whole body and major tissue depots conformed to simple first-order kinetics; the estimated half-life from whole body was 68.5 h. Branchial elimination accounted for 5% of the injected dose over a 4-h period, and urinary elimination was less than 2% over a 48-h period. Rotenone was eliminated essentially unchanged across the gills; however, parent rotenone was not found in either urine or bile. More than 80% of the activity in both urine and bile eluted from HPLC chromatographs as a highly polar fraction that was not hydrolyzed by incubation with either β-glucuronidase or sulfatase. The results imply that hepatobiliary excretion is the major route of elimination for rotenone residues in the trout and that metabolism to a more polar form is a prerequisite for elimination in both the bile and the urine

  15. Patterns of hybridization among cutthroat trout and rainbow trout in northern Rocky Mountain streams

    Treesearch

    Kevin S. McKelvey; Michael K. Young; Taylor M. Wilcox; Daniel M. Bingham; Kristine L. Pilgrim; Michael K. Schwartz

    2016-01-01

    Introgressive hybridization between native and introduced species is a growing conservation concern. For native cutthroat trout and introduced rainbow trout in western North America, this process is thought to lead to the formation of hybrid swarms and the loss of monophyletic evolutionary lineages. Previous studies of this phenomenon, however, indicated that...

  16. Uptake, disposition, and elimination of acrylamide in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, D.W.; Kleinow, K.M.; Kraska, R.C.; Lech, J.J.

    1985-08-01

    The uptake, disposition, and elimination of (2,3-/sup 14/C)acrylamide was studied in fingerling rainbow trout exposed to 0.388 and 0.710 mg/liter (2,3-/sup 14/C)acrylamide at 12 degrees C under static water conditions for 72 hr. /sup 14/C in carcass and viscera was determined at times ranging from 4 to 72 hr after the beginning of the exposure period and 4 to 96 hr after transfer of the fish to fresh flowing water for the elimination studies. Uptake of /sup 14/C was initially rapid and plateaued after 72 hr of acrylamide exposure. No appreciable bioaccumulation occurred in carcass or viscera at either exposure concentration and /sup 14/C distributed approximately equally to all tissues studied. Elimination of /sup 14/C from carcass and viscera was biphasic with a terminal half-life of approximately 7 days. /sup 14/C elimination was not uniform in all tissues studied with the most rapid elimination occurring in blood and gill and the slowest elimination occurring in muscle and intestine. In addition, 10 to 15% of the initial total /sup 14/C in carcass or viscera was nonextractable and was associated with the protein fraction of the sample at all time points in the depuration period. Approximately 20% of an ip administered dose of (/sup 14/C)acrylamide was eliminated via the gills, 7% via the urine, and less than 1% via the bile in 2 hr. At least three biliary metabolites were isolated by HPLC.

  17. Identification of a novel cathelicidin gene in the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-I; Pleguezuelos, Olga; Zhang, Yong-An; Zou, Jun; Secombes, Christopher J

    2005-08-01

    We report the cloning of a novel antimicrobial peptide gene, termed rtCATH_1, found in the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The predicted 216-residue rtCATH_1 prepropeptide consists of three domains: a 22-residue signal peptide, a 128-residue cathelin-like region containing two identifiable cathelicidin family signatures, and a predicted 66-residue C-terminal cationic antimicrobial peptide. This predicted mature peptide was unique in possessing features of different known (mammalian) cathelicidin subgroups, such as the cysteine-bridged family and the specific amino-acid-rich family. The rtCATH_1 gene comprises four exons, as seen in all known mammalian cathelicidin genes, and several transcription factor binding sites known to be of relevance to host defenses were identified in the 5' flanking region. By Northern blot analysis, the expression of rtCATH_1 was detected in gill, head kidney, and spleen of bacterially challenged fish. Primary cultures of head kidney leukocytes from rainbow trout stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or poly(I x C) also expressed rtCATH_1. A 36-residue peptide corresponding to the core part of the fish cathelicidin was chemically synthesized and shown to exhibit potent antimicrobial activity and a low hemolytic effect. Thus, rtCATH_1 represents a novel antimicrobial peptide gene belonging to the cathelicidin family and may play an important role in the innate immunity of rainbow trout.

  18. A first generation integrated map of the rainbow trout genome.

    PubMed

    Palti, Yniv; Genet, Carine; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Charlet, Aurélie; Gao, Guangtu; Hu, Yuqin; Castaño-Sánchez, Cecilia; Tabet-Canale, Kamila; Krieg, Francine; Yao, Jianbo; Vallejo, Roger L; Rexroad, Caird E

    2011-04-07

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are the most-widely cultivated cold freshwater fish in the world and an important model species for many research areas. Coupling great interest in this species as a research model with the need for genetic improvement of aquaculture production efficiency traits justifies the continued development of genomics research resources. Many quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been identified for production and life-history traits in rainbow trout. An integrated physical and genetic map is needed to facilitate fine mapping of QTL and the selection of positional candidate genes for incorporation in marker-assisted selection (MAS) programs for improving rainbow trout aquaculture production. The first generation integrated map of the rainbow trout genome is composed of 238 BAC contigs anchored to chromosomes of the genetic map. It covers more than 10% of the genome across segments from all 29 chromosomes. Anchoring of 203 contigs to chromosomes of the National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture (NCCCWA) genetic map was achieved through mapping of 288 genetic markers derived from BAC end sequences (BES), screening of the BAC library with previously mapped markers and matching of SNPs with BES reads. In addition, 35 contigs were anchored to linkage groups of the INRA (French National Institute of Agricultural Research) genetic map through markers that were not informative for linkage analysis in the NCCCWA mapping panel. The ratio of physical to genetic linkage distances varied substantially among chromosomes and BAC contigs with an average of 3,033 Kb/cM. The integrated map described here provides a framework for a robust composite genome map for rainbow trout. This resource is needed for genomic analyses in this research model and economically important species and will facilitate comparative genome mapping with other salmonids and with model fish species. This resource will also facilitate efforts to assemble a whole

  19. A first generation integrated map of the rainbow trout genome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are the most-widely cultivated cold freshwater fish in the world and an important model species for many research areas. Coupling great interest in this species as a research model with the need for genetic improvement of aquaculture production efficiency traits justifies the continued development of genomics research resources. Many quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been identified for production and life-history traits in rainbow trout. An integrated physical and genetic map is needed to facilitate fine mapping of QTL and the selection of positional candidate genes for incorporation in marker-assisted selection (MAS) programs for improving rainbow trout aquaculture production. Results The first generation integrated map of the rainbow trout genome is composed of 238 BAC contigs anchored to chromosomes of the genetic map. It covers more than 10% of the genome across segments from all 29 chromosomes. Anchoring of 203 contigs to chromosomes of the National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture (NCCCWA) genetic map was achieved through mapping of 288 genetic markers derived from BAC end sequences (BES), screening of the BAC library with previously mapped markers and matching of SNPs with BES reads. In addition, 35 contigs were anchored to linkage groups of the INRA (French National Institute of Agricultural Research) genetic map through markers that were not informative for linkage analysis in the NCCCWA mapping panel. The ratio of physical to genetic linkage distances varied substantially among chromosomes and BAC contigs with an average of 3,033 Kb/cM. Conclusions The integrated map described here provides a framework for a robust composite genome map for rainbow trout. This resource is needed for genomic analyses in this research model and economically important species and will facilitate comparative genome mapping with other salmonids and with model fish species. This resource will also facilitate efforts to

  20. Residues of oxytetracycline in cultured rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Sharafati-Chaleshtori, R; Mardani, G; Rafieian-Kopaei, M; Sharafati-Chaleshtori, A; Drees, F

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, antibiotics are widely used in aquatic animals to control and treatment of infections or as food supplement for growth increase and animal output. With increasing use of veterinary drugs in food production, there is global consideration about the consumption of antimicrobial residues in aquatic foods and their effects on human health. This study was aimed to evaluate the Oxytetracycline (OTC) residues in Rainbow trout meat in Shahre-kord (Iran) markets before and after frying. After randomized collection of 50 samples of fish in Shahre-kord markets in a six months period were examined. The prepared samples were examined for OTC residues using HPLC analytical method before and after frying. Results showed that 3 (6%) of the samples before frying and 12 (24%) after frying were having lower than Maximum residual limits (MRLs) in Codex alimentarius. However, mean OTC residues before and after frying samples were above MRLs. The mean amounts of OTC were 2260 +/- 1090 and 1110 +/- 930 ng g(-1) before and after frying, respectively. These findings show that the frying of fish reduces OTC residual. Nevertheless, the usage of OTC should be reduced to an acceptable level in fishery industry.

  1. Toxicity of hydrogen peroxide treatments to rainbow trout eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaikowski, M.P.; Rach, J.J.; Olson, J.J.; Ramsay, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide treatments of 0, 500, 1,000, and 3,000 I?L/L, concentrations that were multiples of the Low Regulatory Priority limit of 500 I?L/L, were administered for 15 min every weekday (Mondaya??Friday) to eggs of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and steelhead (anadromous rainbow trout) to determine the margin of safety existing for standard egg treatments. All untreated and treated eggs remained free of fungal infection throughout incubation. Hydrogen peroxide treatment reduced the mean percent hatch of rainbow trout eggs by 1.4a??5.9% among those treated at 500 I?L/L, 6.8a??15.4% among those treated at 1,000 I?L/L, and 13.2a??25.3% among those treated at 3,000 I?L/L. Mean percent hatch of rainbow trout eggs treated at 1,000 I?L H2O2/L was 7% lower than that for eggs treated at 500 I?L H2O2/L. Mean percent hatch of Skamania strain steelhead was significantly reduced by hydrogen peroxide treatment, whereas the mean percent hatch of Ganaraska strain steelhead was similar to the mean percent hatch of rainbow trout eggs. Daily percent mortality of rainbow trout eggs increased significantly from day 6 to day 10 (78a??135 daily temperature units, DTUsA?C) of incubation. Discontinuing hydrogen peroxide treatments to Skamania strain steelhead eggs from day 7 to day 11 (78a??105 DTUsA?C) of incubation significantly increased the probability of eggs reaching the eyed egg stage. The mean percent hatch of rainbow trout eggs treated with hydrogen peroxide at concentrations up to 1,000 I?L/L may be increased if no treatments are administered between 70 and 140 DTUsA?C. Mortality of sac fry was not observed at hydrogen peroxide concentrations of 1,000 I?L/L or lower. Fish culturists should be aware that other species or strains may be more sensitive than rainbow trout. Other species and strains should be initially treated with hydrogen peroxide at 500 I?L/L until monitoring of egg mortality identifies the presence or absence of a sensitive period.

  2. Chemical composition of rainbow trout urine following acute hypoxic stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunn, Joseph B.

    1969-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdnerii) were anesthetized with MS-222, catheterized, and introduced into urine collecting chambers. Twenty-four hours after introduction, a 4-hour accumulation of urine was collected to serve as the control. Water flow to the chambers was then discontinued for 30 minutes during which the oxygen content of the water exiting in the chamber dropped from 4.9 to 2.8 mg/l. Following this hypoxic stress fresh water was restored and accumulated urine samples were taken for analysis at 1, 4, and 20 hours post-hypoxic stress. Rainbow trout excrete abnormally high concentrations of Na, K, Mg, Cl, and inorganic PO4 following hypoxia.

  3. Relative sensitivity of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to acute copper toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James A; Lipton, Josh; Welsh, Paul G

    2002-03-01

    Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) were recently listed as threatened in the United States under the federal Endangered Species Act. Past and present habitat for this species includes waterways contaminated with heavy metals released from mining activities. Because the sensitivity of this species to copper was previously unknown, we conducted acute copper toxicity tests with bull and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in side-by-side comparison tests. Bioassays were conducted using water at two temperatures (8 degrees C and 16 degrees C) and two hardness levels (100 and 220 mg/L as CaCO3). At a water hardness of 100 mg/L, both species were less sensitive to copper when tested at 16 degrees C compared to 8 degrees C. The two species had similar sensitivity to copper in 100-mg/ L hardness water, but bull trout were 2.5 to 4 times less sensitive than rainbow trout in 220-mg/L hardness water. However, when our results were viewed in the context of the broader literature on rainbow trout sensitivity to copper, the sensitivities of the two species appeared similar. This suggests that adoption of toxicity thresholds that are protective of rainbow trout would be protective of bull trout; however, an additional safety factor may be warranted because of the additional level of protection necessary for this federally threatened species.

  4. Rainbow trout versus brook trout biomass and production under varied climate regimes in small southern Appalachian streams

    Treesearch

    Bonnie. J.E. Myers; C. Andrew Dolloff; Andrew L. Rypel

    2014-01-01

    Many Appalachian streams historically dominated by Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis have experienced shifts towards fish communities dominated by Rainbow Trout Onchorhynchus mykiss. We used empirical estimates of biomass and secondary production of trout conspecifics to evaluate species success under varied thermal regimes. Trout...

  5. Molecular characterization of PRR13 and its tissue-specific expression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Verleih, Marieke; Rebl, Alexander; Köllner, Bernd; Korytář, Tomáš; Kotterba, Günter; Anders, Eckhard; Wimmers, Klaus; Goldammer, Tom

    2010-12-01

    The proline-rich protein 13 (PRR13) is reported to be a key regulator of the resistance to cytostatica by decreasing the copy number of the proapoptotic gene thrombospondin-1. We isolated and characterized the complete PRR13 gene sequence of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The gene comprises four exons and three introns, the latter of comparatively short lengths (100-811 bp). The full-length PRR13 cDNA consists of 1,101 nucleotides, including an open reading frame of 563 bp, which is predicted to encode a 187 amino acid protein with a molecular mass of 18.8 kDa. A continuous stretch of ten serine residues at the C-terminus is highly conserved and characteristic for vertebrate PRR13, but not for other known proline-rich proteins. Phylogenetic analyses suggest a clear separation of teleostean PRR13 proteins and those from mammalian and reptilian species. Comparison of the tissue-specific PRR13 mRNA abundance in two strains of the rainbow trout coastal form (TCO Steelhead II-WA vs. BORN Steelhead II-Germany) revealed an increased expression in the BORN trout in nearly all examined tissues. The major expression differences were detected in gill (2.29-fold) and in liver tissue (2.16-fold). Hence, the increased PRR13 expression in BORN trout might cause improved protection from natural cytostatica and therefore support our assumption that PRR13 is a candidate gene possibly involved in the varying ability of the two rainbow trout strains to handle environmental stress under local conditions of the Southern Baltic.

  6. Innocent until proven guilty? Stable coexistence of alien rainbow trout and native marble trout in a Slovenian stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenzi, Simone; Crivelli, Alain J.; Jesensek, Dusan; Rossi, Gianluigi; de Leo, Giulio A.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the consequences of the invasion of the nonnative rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss on the native marble trout Salmo marmoratus, we compared two distinct headwater sectors where marble trout occur in allopatry (MTa) or sympatry (MTs) with rainbow trout (RTs) in the Idrijca River (Slovenia). Using data from field surveys from 2002 to 2009, with biannual (June and September) sampling and tagging from June 2004 onwards, we analyzed body growth and survival probabilities of marble trout in each stream sector. Density of age-0 in September over the study period was greater for MTs than MTa and very similar between MTs and RTs, while density of trout ≥age-1 was similar for MTa and MTs and greater than density of RTs. Monthly apparent survival probabilities were slightly higher in MTa than in MTs, while RTs showed a lower survival than MTs. Mean weight of marble and rainbow trout aged 0+ in September was negatively related to cohort density for both marble and rainbow trout, but the relationship was not significantly different between MTs and MTa. No clear depression of body growth of sympatric marble trout between sampling intervals was observed. Despite a later emergence, mean weight of RTs cohorts at age 0+ in September was significantly higher than weight of both MTs and MTa. The establishment of a self-sustaining population of rainbow trout does not have a significant impact on body growth and survival probabilities of sympatric marble trout. The numerical dominance of rainbow trout in streams at lower altitudes seem to suggest that while the low summer flow pattern of Slovenian streams is favorable for rainbow trout invasion, the adaptation of marble trout to headwater environments may limit the invasion success of rainbow trout in headwaters.

  7. Innocent until proven guilty? Stable coexistence of alien rainbow trout and native marble trout in a Slovenian stream.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Simone; Crivelli, Alain J; Jesensek, Dusan; Rossi, Gianluigi; De Leo, Giulio A

    2011-01-01

    To understand the consequences of the invasion of the nonnative rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss on the native marble trout Salmo marmoratus, we compared two distinct headwater sectors where marble trout occur in allopatry (MTa) or sympatry (MTs) with rainbow trout (RTs) in the Idrijca River (Slovenia). Using data from field surveys from 2002 to 2009, with biannual (June and September) sampling and tagging from June 2004 onwards, we analyzed body growth and survival probabilities of marble trout in each stream sector. Density of age-0 in September over the study period was greater for MTs than MTa and very similar between MTs and RTs, while density of trout ≥age-1 was similar for MTa and MTs and greater than density of RTs. Monthly apparent survival probabilities were slightly higher in MTa than in MTs, while RTs showed a lower survival than MTs. Mean weight of marble and rainbow trout aged 0+ in September was negatively related to cohort density for both marble and rainbow trout, but the relationship was not significantly different between MTs and MTa. No clear depression of body growth of sympatric marble trout between sampling intervals was observed. Despite a later emergence, mean weight of RTs cohorts at age 0+ in September was significantly higher than weight of both MTs and MTa. The establishment of a self-sustaining population of rainbow trout does not have a significant impact on body growth and survival probabilities of sympatric marble trout. The numerical dominance of rainbow trout in streams at lower altitudes seem to suggest that while the low summer flow pattern of Slovenian streams is favorable for rainbow trout invasion, the adaptation of marble trout to headwater environments may limit the invasion success of rainbow trout in headwaters.

  8. Sensitivity of ventilation and brain metabolism to ammonia exposure in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Nawata, C Michele; Wood, Chris M

    2013-11-01

    Ammonia has been documented as a respiratory gas that stimulates ventilation, and is sensed by peripheral neuroepithelial cells (NECs) in the gills in ammoniotelic rainbow trout. However, the hyperventilatory response is abolished in trout chronically exposed (1+ months) to high environmental ammonia [HEA; 250 μmol l(-1) (NH4)2SO4]. This study investigates whether the brain is involved in the acute sensitivity of ventilation to ammonia, and whether changes in brain metabolism are related to the loss of hyperventilatory responses in trout chronically exposed to HEA ('HEA trout'). Hyperventilation (via increased ventilatory amplitude rather than rate) and increased total ammonia concentration ([TAmm]) in brain tissue were induced in parallel by acute HEA exposure in control trout in a concentration-series experiment [500, 750 and 1000 μmol l(-1) (NH4)2SO4], but these inductions were abolished in HEA trout. Ventilation was correlated more closely to [TAmm] in brain rather than to [TAmm] in plasma or cerebrospinal fluid. The close correlation of hyperventilation and increased brain [TAmm] also occurred in control trout acutely exposed to HEA in a time-series analysis [500 μmol l(-1) (NH4)2SO4; 15, 30, 45 and 60 min], as well as in a methionine sulfoxamine (MSOX) pre-injection experiment [to inhibit glutamine synthetase (GSase)]. These correlations consistently suggest that brain [TAmm] is involved in the hyperventilatory responses to ammonia in trout. The MSOX treatments, together with measurements of GSase activity, TAmm, glutamine and glutamate concentrations in brain tissue, were conducted in both the control and HEA trout. These experiments revealed that GSase plays an important role in transferring ammonia to glutamate to make glutamine in trout brain, thereby attenuating the elevation of brain [TAmm] following HEA exposure, and that glutamate concentration is reduced in HEA trout. The mRNAs for the ammonia channel proteins Rhbg, Rhcg1 and Rhcg2 were expressed

  9. Toxicokinetics of perfluorooctane sulfonate in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) confined to respirometer-metabolism chambers were dosed with perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) by intra-arterial injection and sampled to obtain concentration time-course data for plasma, and either urine or expired water. The data were then an...

  10. Toxicokinetics of perfluorooctane sulfonate in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) confined to respirometer-metabolism chambers were dosed with perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) by intra-arterial injection and sampled to obtain concentration time-course data for plasma, and either urine or expired water. The data were then an...

  11. Weissellosis: An Emerging Disease Of Farmed Rainbow Trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Weissella ceti is a gram positive bacterium associated with Weissellosis, an emerging disease of farmed rainbow trout. This disease can result in high mortality in large fish (0.5-1.0 kg) and hence can cause significant economic loss. In the summer of 2011, severe Weissellosis outbreaks were identif...

  12. A second generation genetic map for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background Genetic maps characterizing the inheritance patterns of traits and markers have been developed for a wide range of species and used to study questions in biomedicine, agriculture, ecology and evolutionary biology. The status of rainbow trout genetic maps has progressed significantly over...

  13. UPTAKE AND ELIMINATION OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID BY RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a by-product of drinking water chlorination and is a hepatocarcinogen in rodents. Preliminary results of a chronic testing effort with Japanese medaka suggest the possibility of similar effects is fish. Adult rainbow trout were cannulated from the dor...

  14. UPTAKE AND ELIMINATION OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID BY RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a by-product of drinking water chlorination and is a hepatocarcinogen in rodents. Preliminary results of a chronic testing effort with Japanese medaka suggest the possibility of similar effects is fish. Adult rainbow trout were cannulated from the dor...

  15. A new rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) reference genome assembly

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In an effort to improve the rainbow trout reference genome assembly, we have re-sequenced the doubled-haploid Swanson line using the longest available reads from the Illumina technology. Overall we generated over 510 million 260nt paired-end shotgun reads, and 1 billion 160nt mate-pair reads from f...

  16. Identification of commercial rainbow trout strains using a SNP panel

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Assessment of population genetic differentiation is critical for selective breeding of rainbow trout, and identification of fish strains is often required to address production issues arising on fish farms. The objectives of this study were: (1) to characterize the genetic differentiation of the eig...

  17. Metabolism of 2-acetylaminofluorene by Shasta rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, H.C.; Elmarakaby, S.A.; Steward, R.; Maslanka, R.; Shappell, N.; Kumar, S.; Devanaboyina, U.; Gupta, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    In contrast to several mammalian species, Shasta strain rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), is resistant to the hepatocarcinogenic effects of 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF). In order to understand the mechanism underlying this resistance, the authors have investigated the in vitro metabolism of AAF by trout liver and examined the formation of AAF-DNA adducts in the liver of Shasta trout treated with AAF. The major AAF metabolites produced by trout liver microsomes were 7-hydroxy-AAF and 5-hydroxy-AAF which accounted for more than 95% of the total AAF metabolites. N-hydroxy-AAF was a minor metabolite representing about 1% of total AAF metabolites. The levels of N-hydroxy-AAF sulfotransferase and N-hydroxy-AAF acyltransferase, the cytosolic enzymes implicated in the metabolic activation of N-hydroxy-AAF to reactive intermediates capable of binding to cellular macromolecules were extremely low in trout liver. AAF exhibited a low degree of binding to the liver DNA of trout treated with 15 mg AAF/kg body wt. The total AAF-DNA adduct level reached a maximum 24 hours after treatment, persisted until 11 days and declined to nearly 20% of the maximum level after 18 days. N-deoxyguanosin-8-yl-2-aminofluorene was the major AAF-DNA adduct in the trout liver. The ability of trout liver to form relatively large amounts of detoxification products of AAF with little formation of activation products may partly explain the resistance of Shasta trout to AAF-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

  18. Immunocytochemical localization of carbonic anhydrase in the pseudobranch tissue of the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    PubMed Central

    Rahim, S. M.; Mazlan, A. G.; Simon, K. D.; Delaunoy, J. P.; Laurent, P.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudobranch function has long interested scientists, but its role has yet to be elucidated. Several studies have suggested that pseudobranchs serve respiratory, osmoregulatory, and sensory functions. This work investigated the immunolocalization of pseudobranch carbonic anhydrase (CA) in the teleost fish species rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to clarify its physiological function. CA was purified from rainbow trout gills O. mykiss and specific antibodies were raised. Immunoblotting between tissue homogenates of pseudobranch and gill CA antibodies showed specific immunostaining with only one band corresponding to CA in the pseudobranch homogenate. Results of immunohistochemical technique revealed that CA was distributed within pseudobranch cells and more precisely in the apical parts (anti-vascular) of cells. The basal (vascular) parts of cells, tubular system, blood capillaries, and pillar cells were not immunostained. Immunocytochemistry confirmed these results and showed that some CA enzyme was cytoplasmic and the remainder was linked to membranous structures. The results also showed that the lacunar tissue layers did not display immunoperoxidase activity. Our results indicated that pseudobranch CA may have a function related to the extracellular medium wherein CA intervenes with the mechanism of stimulation of afferent nerve fibers. PMID:24510712

  19. Magnetic Discrimination Learning in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugh, Cordula V.; Walker, Michael M.

    Although conditioning techniques are the most powerful way to study behavioural responses by animals to external stimuli, the magnetic sense has proved surprisingly resistant to conditioning approaches. This study demonstrated learned discrimination of magnetic field intensity stimuli by a new species, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In a unitary conditioned discrimination technique, four juvenile rainbow trout were trained to strike a target at the end of a response bar in anticipation of food. In successive experiments, the trout failed to discriminate the presence and absence of a vibration stimulus, but subsequently learned to discriminate the presence and absence of a magnetic field intensity anomaly (peak intensity of 75 μTesla). The authors conclude that the necessary conditions for training animals to magnetic intensity are the use of spatially distinctive stimuli and of a conditioned response that requires movement.

  20. Na+, K+-activated-ATPase inhibition in rainbow trout: A site for organochlorine pesticide toxicity?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Paul W.; Wedemeyer, Gary A.

    1971-01-01

    1. The Na+, K+-activated, Mg2+-dependent-ATPase enzyme system in a heavy microsomal fraction of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) brain was inhibited in vitro by chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides.2. T50 (concentration at 50 per cent inhibition) values for dicofol, endosulfan and DDT were 5 × 10−6, 3 × 10−5 and 1 × 10−4 M respectively. Similar inhibition by these pesticides occurred in kidney and gill ATPase preparations.3. An unexpected finding was a failure of the classic inhibitor, ouabain, to block the Na+, K+-activated component of ATPase activity in the gill.4. It is suggested that inhibition of ATPase activity may be a causal factor in the toxic effects of organochlorine pesticides in fishes.

  1. Characterization of the Rainbow Trout Egg MicroRNA Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hao; Hostuttler, Mark; Wei, Hairong; Rexroad, Caird E.; Yao, Jianbo

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate post-transcriptional expression of target genes and play important roles in animal development. The objectives of this study were to characterize the egg miRNA transcriptome and identify novel egg-predominant miRNAs in rainbow trout. Small RNAs isolated from mature unfertilized rainbow trout eggs were subjected to deep sequencing using an Illumina Genome Analyzer. The massive sequencing produced 24,621,741 quality reads, among which, 266 known miRNAs were identified and 230 putatively novel miRNAs were predicted. The most abundantly known miRNAs are let-7 and miR-21, accounting for 24.06% and 18.71% of the known miRNAs, respectively. Other known miRNAs which are abundantly present in eggs include miR-24, miR-202, miR-148, miR-30, miR-10, miR-146, miR-25, and miR-143. Real time PCR analysis using cDNAs derived from 10 tissues validated 87 out of 90 selected putative miRNAs and identified three novel miRNAs predominantly expressed in rainbow trout eggs. Each of these novel egg-predominant miRNAs is predicted to target a significant number of genes, most of which are significantly down-regulated in naturally ovulated rainbow trout eggs based on analysis of publicly available microarray data sets. Quantitative real time PCR analysis also demonstrated low expression of a selected number of target genes in eggs relative to liver and muscle tissues. This study represents the first complete survey of miRNAs in fish eggs and provides a starting point for future studies aimed at understanding the roles of miRNAs in controlling egg quality and early embryogenesis in rainbow trout. PMID:22761856

  2. Diel resource partitioning among juvenile Atlantic Salmon, Brown Trout, and Rainbow Trout during summer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; McKenna, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Interspecific partitioning of food and habitat resources has been widely studied in stream salmonids. Most studies have examined resource partitioning between two native species or between a native species and one that has been introduced. In this study we examine the diel feeding ecology and habitat use of three species of juvenile salmonids (i.e., Atlantic Salmon Salmo salar, Brown Trout Salmo trutta, and Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss) in a tributary of Skaneateles Lake, New York. Subyearling Brown Trout and Rainbow Trout fed more heavily from the drift than the benthos, whereas subyearling Atlantic Salmon fed more from the benthos than either species of trout. Feeding activity of Atlantic Salmon and Rainbow Trout was similar, with both species increasing feeding at dusk, whereas Brown Trout had no discernable feeding peak or trough. Habitat availability was important in determining site-specific habitat use by juvenile salmonids. Habitat selection was greater during the day than at night. The intrastream, diel, intraspecific, and interspecific variation we observed in salmonid habitat use in Grout Brook illustrates the difficulty of acquiring habitat use information for widespread management applications.

  3. Diel resource partitioning among juvenile Atlantic Salmon, Brown Trout, and Rainbow Trout during summer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; McKenna, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Interspecific partitioning of food and habitat resources has been widely studied in stream salmonids. Most studies have examined resource partitioning between two native species or between a native species and one that has been introduced. In this study we examine the diel feeding ecology and habitat use of three species of juvenile salmonids (i.e., Atlantic Salmon Salmo salar, Brown Trout Salmo trutta, and Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss) in a tributary of Skaneateles Lake, New York. Subyearling Brown Trout and Rainbow Trout fed more heavily from the drift than the benthos, whereas subyearling Atlantic Salmon fed more from the benthos than either species of trout. Feeding activity of Atlantic Salmon and Rainbow Trout was similar, with both species increasing feeding at dusk, whereas Brown Trout had no discernable feeding peak or trough. Habitat availability was important in determining site-specific habitat use by juvenile salmonids. Habitat selection was greater during the day than at night. The intrastream, diel, intraspecific, and interspecific variation we observed in salmonid habitat use in Grout Brook illustrates the difficulty of acquiring habitat use information for widespread management applications.

  4. Modelling competition and hybridization between native cutthroat trout and nonnative rainbow and hybrid trout.

    PubMed

    Van Kirk, Robert W; Battle, Laurie; Schrader, William C

    2010-03-01

    Native salmonid fish have been displaced worldwide by nonnatives through hybridization, competition, and predation, but the dynamics of these factors are poorly understood. We apply stochastic Lotka-Volterra models to the displacement of cutthroat trout by rainbow/hybrid trout in the Snake River, Idaho, USA. Cutthroat trout are susceptible to hybridization in the river but are reproductively isolated in tributaries via removal of migratory rainbow/hybrid spawners at weirs. Based on information-theoretic analysis, population data provide evidence that hybridization was the primary mechanism for cutthroat trout displacement in the first 17 years of the invasion. However, under some parameter values, the data provide evidence for a model in which interaction occurs among fish from both river and tributary subpopulations. This situation is likely to occur when tributary-spawned cutthroat trout out-migrate to the river as fry. The resulting competition with rainbow/hybrid trout can result in the extinction of cutthroat trout even when reproductive segregation is maintained.

  5. Fate of Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae (Myxozoa) after infection of brown trout Salmo trutta and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gokhlesh; Abd-Elfattah, Ahmed; Saleh, Mona; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae (Myxozoa) is the causative agent of proliferative kidney disease in salmonids. We assessed differences in intensity of T. bryosalmonae infection between brown trout Salmo trutta and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss from the clinical phase of infection onwards. Specific pathogen-free fish were exposed to T. bryosalmonae spores under controlled laboratory conditions and sampled at 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 17 wk post exposure (wpe), and the transmission of T. bryosalmonae from infected fish to the bryozoan Fredericella sultana was observed. Parasite load was determined in fish kidneys by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), and parasite stages were detected in kidney, liver, and spleen tissues at different time points by immunohistochemistry. T. bryosalmonae was successfully transmitted from infected brown trout to F. sultana colonies but not from infected rainbow trout. Body length and weight of infected brown trout did not differ significantly from control brown trout during all time points, while length and weight of infected rainbow trout differed significantly compared to controls from 10 to 17 wpe. qRT-PCR revealed that parasite load was significantly higher in kidneys of brown trout compared with rainbow trout. Immunohistochemistry showed high numbers of intra-luminal stages (sporogonic stages) in kidneys of brown trout with low numbers of pre-sporogonic stages. Sporogonic stages were not seen in kidneys of rainbow trout; only high numbers of pre-sporogonic stages were detected. Numbers of pre-sporogonic stages were low in the spleen and liver of brown trout but high in rainbow trout. These data confirmed that there are differences in the development and infection progress of T. bryosalmonae between brown trout and rainbow trout. PMID:24270019

  6. Fate of Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae (Myxozoa) after infection of brown trout Salmo trutta and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gokhlesh; Abd-Elfattah, Ahmed; Saleh, Mona; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2013-11-25

    Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae (Myxozoa) is the causative agent of proliferative kidney disease in salmonids. We assessed differences in intensity of T. bryosalmonae infection between brown trout Salmo trutta and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss from the clinical phase of infection onwards. Specific pathogen-free fish were exposed to T. bryosalmonae spores under controlled laboratory conditions and sampled at 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 17 wk post exposure (wpe), and the transmission of T. bryosalmonae from infected fish to the bryozoan Fredericella sultana was observed. Parasite load was determined in fish kidneys by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), and parasite stages were detected in kidney, liver, and spleen tissues at different time points by immunohistochemistry. T. bryosalmonae was successfully transmitted from infected brown trout to F. sultana colonies but not from infected rainbow trout. Body length and weight of infected brown trout did not differ significantly from control brown trout during all time points, while length and weight of infected rainbow trout differed significantly compared to controls from 10 to 17 wpe. qRT-PCR revealed that parasite load was significantly higher in kidneys of brown trout compared with rainbow trout. Immunohistochemistry showed high numbers of intra-luminal stages (sporogonic stages) in kidneys of brown trout with low numbers of pre-sporogonic stages. Sporogonic stages were not seen in kidneys of rainbow trout; only high numbers of pre-sporogonic stages were detected. Numbers of pre-sporogonic stages were low in the spleen and liver of brown trout but high in rainbow trout. These data confirmed that there are differences in the development and infection progress of T. bryosalmonae between brown trout and rainbow trout.

  7. Yakima River Radio-Telemetry Study, Rainbow Trout, 1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hockersmith, Eric E.

    1995-04-01

    Rainbow trout populations in the upper Yakima River Basin have increased due to reduced competition from declining populations of steelhead, chinook salmon, and coho salmon. Changing population abundances have increased the potential for interactions between rainbow trout and steelhead. In 1993, NMFS, in cooperation with WDW, proposed a 1-year radio-telemetry study to determine the spawning distribution, timing, and behavior of rainbow trout in the upper Yakima River Basin. Specific objectives were to: (1) Determine the spatial and temporal spawning distributions of rainbow trout in the upper Yakima River Basin. (2) Describe post-spawning behavior of rainbow trout in the upper Yakima River Basin. (3) Determine the magnitude and causes of mortalities to rainbow trout that were radio- tagged.

  8. Diet overlap of introduced rainbow trout and three native fishes in an Ozark stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenner, D.B.; Walsh, M.G.; Winkelman, D.L.

    2005-01-01

    Private angling groups in Oklahoma have requested permission to stock rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss into streams of northeastern Oklahoma although little is known regarding interactions between introduced rainbow trout and native fishes in these systems. Our study objectives were to assess diet overlap between introduced rainbow trout and native smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu, shadow bass Ambloplites ariommus, and bluegill sunfish Lepomis macrochirus in Brush Creek, Oklahoma, a small spring-fed Ozark stream. Rainbow trout diet composition differed from that of all three native fishes in the 2 months of comparison (March and May 2001), and rainbow trout diets contained relatively low numbers of prey. It is unlikely that exploitative competition for food resources occurred between rainbow trout and these three native fishes. ?? 2004 by the American Fisheries Society.

  9. Intracellular diffusion restrictions in isolated cardiomyocytes from rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Niina; Vendelin, Marko; Birkedal, Rikke

    2009-12-17

    Restriction of intracellular diffusion of adenine nucleotides has been studied intensively on adult rat cardiomyocytes. However, their cause and role in vivo is still uncertain. Intracellular membrane structures have been suggested to play a role. We therefore chose to study cardiomyocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), which are thinner and have fewer intracellular membrane structures than adult rat cardiomyocytes. Previous studies suggest that trout permeabilized cardiac fibers also have diffusion restrictions. However, results from fibers may be affected by incomplete separation of the cells. This is avoided when studying permeabilized, isolated cardiomyocytes. The aim of this study was to verify the existence of diffusion restrictions in trout cardiomyocytes by comparing ADP-kinetics of mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized fibers, permeabilized cardiomyocytes and isolated mitochondria from rainbow trout heart. Experiments were performed at 10, 15 and 20 degrees C in the absence and presence of creatine. Trout cardiomyocytes hypercontracted in the solutions used for mammalian cardiomyocytes. We developed a new solution in which they retained their shape and showed stable steady state respiration rates throughout an experiment. The apparent ADP-affinity of permeabilized cardiomyocytes was different from that of fibers. It was higher, independent of temperature and not increased by creatine. However, it was still about ten times lower than in isolated mitochondria. The differences between fibers and cardiomyocytes suggest that results from trout heart fibers were affected by incomplete separation of the cells. However, the lower ADP-affinity of cardiomyocytes compared to isolated mitochondria indicate that intracellular diffusion restrictions are still present in trout cardiomyocytes despite their lower density of intracellular membrane structures. The lack of a creatine effect indicates that trout heart lacks mitochondrial creatine kinase tightly

  10. Cortisol regulates nitric oxide synthase in freshwater and seawater acclimated rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Lucie; Madsen, Steffen S; Jensen, Frank B

    2017-02-01

    Cortisol and nitric oxide (NO) are regulators of ion transport and metabolic functions in fish. In the gill, they show opposite effects on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activity: cortisol stimulates NKA activity while NO inhibits NKA activity. We hypothesized that cortisol may impact NO production in osmoregulatory tissues by regulating NO synthase (NOS) expression. We evaluated the influence of cortisol treatment on mRNA expression of Nos1 and Nos2 in gill, kidney and middle intestine of both freshwater (FW) and seawater (SW) acclimated rainbow trout and found both tissue- and salinity-dependent effects. Nos2 expression was down-regulated in the gill by cortisol injection in both FW and SW trout. This was substantiated by incubating gill tissue with cortisol ex vivo. Similarly, cortisol injection significantly down-regulated Nos2 expression in kidney of SW fish but not in FW fish. In the middle intestine, Nos2 expression was up-regulated by cortisol injection in FW but unchanged in SW fish. Nos1 expression was up-regulated by cortisol injection in FW kidney and down-regulated in SW kidney, whereas it was unaffected in gill and middle intestine of FW and SW fish. Our data provide the first evidence that cortisol may influence NO production in fish by regulating Nos expression. Indeed, the down-regulation of Nos2 expression by cortisol in the gill may prevent the inhibitory effect of NO on NKA activity thereby furthering the stimulatory effect of cortisol on ion-transport. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphisms for identifying westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi), Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, S T; Novak, B J; Drinan, D P; Jennings, R deM; Vu, N V

    2011-03-01

    We describe 12 diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays for use in species identification among rainbow and cutthroat trout: five of these loci have alleles unique to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), three unique to westslope cutthroat trout (O. clarkii lewisi) and four unique to Yellowstone cutthroat trout (O. clarkii bouvieri). These diagnostic assays were identified using a total of 489 individuals from 26 populations and five fish hatchery strains.

  12. Stocking and hooking mortality of planted rainbow trout in Jocassee Reservoir, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barwick, D. Hugh

    1985-01-01

    Attempts to establish a 'put-grow-and-take' fishery for rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) in Jocassee Reservoir, South Carolina failed despite plantings of 200,000 fish in 1972-1979 because few of the stocked fish survived to legal size. At the same time, a fishery for brown trout (Salmo trutta) was established successfully by planting far fewer fish. Experiments were conducted to determine if stress at stocking and injuries and stress associated with catch and release of fish by shoreline anglers were responsible for the poor survival of rainbow trout. Only 1 of the 606 rainbow trout stocked in floating wire cages anchored in the reservoir died during the first 3 days, and fewer rainbow trout than brown trout died as a result of catch-and-release fishing during the first 11 days after stocking. Thus, these factors were not responsible for the lack of success in establishing a rainbow trout fishery in this reservoir.

  13. Experimental evaluation of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss predation on longnose dace Rhinichthys cataractae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turek, Kelly C.; Pegg, Mark A.; Pope, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory and in-stream enclosure experiments were used to determine whether rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss influence survival of longnose dace Rhinichthys cataractae. In the laboratory, adult rainbow trout preyed on longnose dace in 42% of trials and juvenile rainbow trout did not prey on longnose dace during the first 6 h after rainbow trout introduction. Survival of longnose dace did not differ in the presence of adult rainbow trout previously exposed to active prey and those not previously exposed to active prey ( = 0.28, P = 0.60). In field enclosures, the number of longnose dace decreased at a faster rate in the presence of rainbow trout relative to controls within the first 72 h, but did not differ between moderate and high densities of rainbow trout (F2,258.9 = 3.73, P = 0.03). Additionally, longnose dace were found in 7% of rainbow trout stomachs after 72 h in enclosures. Rainbow trout acclimated to the stream for longer periods had a greater initial influence on the number of longnose dace remaining in enclosures relative to those acclimated for shorter periods regardless of rainbow trout density treatment (F4,148.5 = 2.50, P = 0.04). More research is needed to determine how predation rates will change in natural environments, under differing amounts of habitat and food resources and in the context of whole assemblages. However, if rainbow trout are introduced into the habitat of longnose dace, some predation on longnose dace is expected, even when rainbow trout have no previous experience with active prey.

  14. Swimming endurance of bull trout, lake trout, arctic char, and rainbow trout following challenge with Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, D.T.; Moffitt, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    We tested the swimming endurance of juvenile bull trout Salvelinus confluentus, lake trout S. namaycush, Arctic char S. alpinus, and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss at 9??C and 15??C to determine whether sublethal infection from a moderate challenge of Renibacterium salmoninarum administered months before testing affected the length of time fish could maintain a swimming speed of 5-6 body lengths per second in an experimental flume. Rainbow trout and Arctic char swam longer in trials than did bull trout or lake trout, regardless of challenge treatment. When we tested fish 14-23 weeks postchallenge, we found no measurable effect of R. salmoninarum on the swimming endurance of the study species except for bull trout, which showed a mixed response. We conducted additional trials with bull trout 5-8 weeks postchallenge to determine whether increasing the challenge dose would affect swimming endurance and hematocrit. In those tests, bull trout with clinical signs of disease and those exposed to the highest challenge doses had significantly reduced swimming endurance compared with unchallenged control fish. Fish hematocrit levels measured at the end of all swimming endurance tests varied among species and between test temperatures, and patterns were not always consistent between challenged and control fish.

  15. Movement and survival of brown trout and rainbow trout in an ozark tailwater river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinn, J.W.; Kwak, T.J.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the movement of adult brown trout Salmo trutta and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in relation to a catch-andrelease area in the White River downstream from Beaver Dam, Arkansas. Nine fish of each species were implanted with radio transmitters and monitored from July 1996 to July 1997. The 1.5- km river length of a catch-and-release area (closed to angler harvest) was greater than the total linear range of 72% of the trout (13 of 18 fish), but it did not include two brown trout spawning riffles, suggesting that it effectively protects resident fish within the catch-and-release area except during spawning. The total detected linear range of movement varied from 172 to 3,559 m for brown trout and from 205 to 3,023mfor rainbow trout. The movements of both species appeared to be generally similar to that in unregulated river systems. The annual apparent survival of both trout species was less than 0.40, and exploitation was 44%.Management to protect fish on spawning riffles may be considered if management for wild brown trout becomes a priority. ?? American Fisheries Society 2011.

  16. Cadmium accumulation and protein binding patterns in tissues of the rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri.

    PubMed Central

    Kay, J; Thomas, D G; Brown, M W; Cryer, A; Shurben, D; Solbe, J F; Garvey, J S

    1986-01-01

    Rainbow trout were exposed to defined levels of cadmium in their aquarium water for differing periods at a variety of near-lethal concentrations that ensured the survival of the majority of the fish. The gills, liver and kidney together accounted for 99% of the accumulated load of body cadmium in the fish under these conditions. Although the proportion of total cadmium present in the liver remained relatively constant throughout, the distribution of the remainder between gill and kidney altered with the time of exposure. The cadmium in all three organs was bound by two low molecular weight proteins distinct in character from metallothionein. The isoforms of metallothionein were also present but were found to bind only zinc and copper. By contrast, when trout were injected with cadmium intraperitoneally, most of the metal accumulated in the liver where it was sequestered by the two isoforms of metallothionein. Pre-exposure of the trout to either a low concentration of cadmium (for several months) or to an elevated concentration of zinc (for 5 days) allowed the animals to survive a subsequent exposure to a high, otherwise lethal concentration of cadmium. The proteins responsible for sequestration of the two metals were identified, but two different mechanisms seemed to be involved in the protection of the animals. The significance of these observations in terms of the induction of proteins and the prevention of the toxic effects of cadmium is considered. PMID:3709433

  17. Physiological changes and tissue metal accumulation in rainbow trout exposed to foodborne and waterborne metals

    SciTech Connect

    Farag, A.A.; Boese, C.J.; Bergman, H.L. . Dept. of Zoology and Physiology); Woodward, D.F. )

    1994-12-01

    Sublethal physiological effects and metal residue accumulation in tissues were measured in adult and juvenile rainbow trout fed a metal-contaminated diet and/or exposed to waterborne metals for 21 d. The consumption of metal-contaminated invertebrates from the Clark Fork River, Montana, significantly affected scale loss and metal accumulation in gut tissue of adult trout. Survival, scale loss, and metal accumulation in gill and kidney tissue were affected by exposure to a waterborne mixture of Cd, Cu, and Pb at twice the acceptable levels and Zn at the maximum acceptable level established by the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of aquatic wildlife. A combination of dietary and waterborne metals also caused lipid peroxidation in the kidney of adult fish and decreased whole-body potassium of juvenile trout. In general, metal accumulation in tissues was higher in gill and kidney with waterborne exposures and was higher in stomach and pyloric caeca with dietary exposure. And metal concentrations in juvenile whole-body tissues accumulated significantly with a combination of waterborne and dietary metals. Although some physiological changes were noted (scale loss, lipid peroxidation of kidney), an exposure time longer than 21 d is probably needed to observe more extensive physiological changes. Regardless, results from this study suggest that a full assessment of metal exposure to fish populations in natural systems must include evaluation of dietary as well as waterborne metal contamination.

  18. Organochlorine insecticide, herbicide and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) inhibition of NaK-ATPase in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Paul W.; Friedhoff, Jacqueline M.; Wedemeyer, Gary A.

    1972-01-01

    The current widespread presence of chlorinated insecticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) and herbicides in world waterways has elicited much interest in the mechanisms of their toxicity in fishes. Inhibition of Na+,K+-activated adenosinetriphosphatase (NaK-ATPase) and Mg++-dependent ATPase (Mg-ATPase) by DDT, endosulfan and dicofol has been demonstrated in gill, brain and kidney microsomes of rainbow trout (1,2). Intestinal and gill ATPases in marine teleosts were recently reported to be sensitive to organochlorines (3). CutkonTp et al (4) noted inhibition of NaK-ATPase and Mg-ATPase in bluegill brain, liver, muscle and kidney by DDT and related chlorinated hydrocarbons. Inhibition of ATPases by PCB's has been recently shown in bluegill kidney, brain and liver (5). In the present study, we have further examined the NaK-ATPase enzyme system in trout gill as a site for the possible toxicity of selected organopolychlors, i.e., chlorinated insecticides, herbicides and PCB's.

  19. Energy cost of NaCl transport in isolated gills of cutthroat trout.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J D; Iwama, G K

    1999-09-01

    Few studies have made direct estimates of the energy required for ion transport in gills of freshwater (FW) and seawater (SW) fish. Oxygen consumption was measured in excised gill tissue of FW-adapted cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki clarki) to estimate the energy cost of NaCl transport in that osmoregulatory organ. Ouabain (0.5 mM) and bafilomycin A1 (1 microM) were used to inhibit the Na+-K+ and H+ pumps, respectively. Both inhibitors significantly decreased gill tissue oxygen consumption, accounting for 37% of total tissue respiration. On a whole mass basis, the cost of NaCl uptake in the FW trout gill was estimated to be 1.8% of whole animal oxygen uptake. An isolated, saline-perfused gill arch preparation was also used to compare gill energetics in FW- and SW-adapted trout. The oxygen consumption of FW gills was significantly (33%) higher than SW gills. On a whole animal basis, total gill oxygen consumption in FW and SW trout accounted for 3.9 and 2.4% of resting metabolic rate, respectively. The results of both experiments suggest that the energy cost of NaCl transport in FW and SW trout gills represents a relatively small (<4%) portion of the animal's total energy budget.

  20. Transcriptomic Analysis of Trout Gill Ionocytes in Fresh Water and Sea Water Using Laser Capture Microdissection Combined with Microarray Analysis.

    PubMed

    Leguen, Isabelle; Le Cam, Aurélie; Montfort, Jérôme; Peron, Sandrine; Fautrel, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Fish gills represent a complex organ composed of several cell types that perform multiple physiological functions. Among these cells, ionocytes are implicated in the maintenance of ion homeostasis. However, because the ionocyte represents only a small percent of whole gill tissue, its specific transcriptome can be overlooked among the numerous cell types included in the gill. The objective of this study is to better understand ionocyte functions by comparing the RNA expression of this cell type in freshwater and seawater acclimated rainbow trout. To realize this objective, ionocytes were captured from gill cryosections using laser capture microdissection after immunohistochemistry. Then, transcriptome analyses were performed on an Agilent trout oligonucleotide microarray. Gene expression analysis identified 108 unique annotated genes differentially expressed between freshwater and seawater ionocytes, with a fold change higher than 3. Most of these genes were up-regulated in freshwater cells. Interestingly, several genes implicated in ion transport, extracellular matrix and structural cellular proteins appeared up-regulated in freshwater ionocytes. Among them, several ion transporters, such as CIC2, SLC26A6, and NBC, were validated by qPCR and/or in situ hybridization. The latter technique allowed us to localize the transcripts of these ion transporters in only ionocytes and more particularly in the freshwater cells. Genes involved in metabolism and also several genes implicated in transcriptional regulation, cell signaling and the cell cycle were also enhanced in freshwater ionocytes. In conclusion, laser capture microdissection combined with microarray analysis allowed for the determination of the transcriptional signature of scarce cells in fish gills, such as ionocytes, and aided characterization of the transcriptome of these cells in freshwater and seawater acclimated trout.

  1. Residue dynamics of quinaldine and TFM in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunn, J.B.; Allen, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    Study of the residue dynamics of 2-methylquinoline (quinaldine) and 3- trifluoromethy1-4-nitrophenol (TFM) in rainbow trout yielded the following findings: (1) Uptake and distribution of TFM by trout was influenced by the biotransformation of the lipid-soluble free phenol. No such effect was observed with quinaldine. (2) Disappearance of quinaldine and TFM from gallbladder bile was slower than from plasma or muscle during 24 hr of withdrawal in fresh water. (3) The conc of TFM conjugate may exceed that of free TFM in bile by a factor of 10 Super(3).

  2. Rainbow trout embryotoxicity of a complex contaminant mixture extracted from Lake Michigan lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, P.J.; Tillitt, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    Persistent Hydrophobic contaminants such as poly chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans and biphenyl congeners are present in aquatic systems, and are known to produce adverse effects in fish. Reproductive failure in fish populations has been observed in aquatic systems contaminated with persistent hydrophobic compounds. In order to mimic maternal transfer of environmental contaminants to newly fertilized fish eggs, a complex environmental extract was tested for embryotoxicity in a nanoinjection bioassay with embryos of rainbow trout. The extract was obtained from whole adult lake trout collected from Lake Michigan in 1988. The tissue extraction involved blending and dehydration with sodium sulfate, column extraction, dialysis separation, reactive cleanup and, finally, high-performance gel permeation chromatography. Egg gram-equivalent doses (g tissue/g egg normalized for egg % lipid) of the final extract (0.02, 0.10, 0.20, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 10.0, 20.0 eggEQ) were injected into newly fertilized rainbow trout eggs using triolein as the vehicle. The extract of the lake trout was embryotoxic to rainbow trout, with an LD50 of 35 eggEQ, based on total cumulative mortality. Gross physical abnormalities characteristic of dioxin exposure, such as hemorrhaging, yolk-sac edema and craniofacial deformities, were observed and showed significant dose-related increases. Sublethal effects in the rainbow trout, such as delayed time to hatch, mild hemorrhaging and moderate yolk-sac edema, resulted from estimated total PCB exposure as low as 8.8 ng/g, and this may have significant implications on Great Lakes lake trout fry and juvenile mortality.

  3. Cellular mechanisms of Cl− transport in trout gill mitochondrion-rich cells

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Scott K.; Tresguerres, Martin; Goss, Greg G.

    2009-01-01

    We have studied Cl− transport mechanisms in freshwater rainbow trout gill mitochondrion-rich (MR) cells using intracellular pH (pHi) imaging. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated maintenance of cellular polarity in isolated MR cells. MR cell subtypes were identified by Na+ introduction to the bath, and Cl− transport mechanisms were subsequently examined. Cl−-free exposure resulted in an alkalinization of pHi in both MR cell subtypes, which was dependent on HCO3− in the bath and inhibited by 1 mM DIDS. Recovery of pHi from an acidified state in Na+-free conditions was also DIDS sensitive. These results are the first functional evidence for Cl−/HCO3− exchangers in fish gill MR cells. A direct switch from NaCl to Cl−-free conditions caused a pHi acidification in a subset of MR cells, which was enhanced in the absence of HCO3−. The acidification was replaced by an alkalinization when Cl− removal was performed in the presence of NPPB (500 μM) or EIPA (500 μM). Finally, we found that the Na+-induced alkalinization of pHi found in a previous study is inhibited by EIPA. This inhibitor profile's results suggest the presence of a Cl−-dependent Na+/H+ exchange mechanism. PMID:19211727

  4. Cellular mechanisms of Cl- transport in trout gill mitochondrion-rich cells.

    PubMed

    Parks, Scott K; Tresguerres, Martin; Goss, Greg G

    2009-04-01

    We have studied Cl(-) transport mechanisms in freshwater rainbow trout gill mitochondrion-rich (MR) cells using intracellular pH (pH(i)) imaging. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated maintenance of cellular polarity in isolated MR cells. MR cell subtypes were identified by Na(+) introduction to the bath, and Cl(-) transport mechanisms were subsequently examined. Cl(-)-free exposure resulted in an alkalinization of pH(i) in both MR cell subtypes, which was dependent on HCO(3)(-) in the bath and inhibited by 1 mM DIDS. Recovery of pH(i) from an acidified state in Na(+)-free conditions was also DIDS sensitive. These results are the first functional evidence for Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchangers in fish gill MR cells. A direct switch from NaCl to Cl(-)-free conditions caused a pH(i) acidification in a subset of MR cells, which was enhanced in the absence of HCO(3)(-). The acidification was replaced by an alkalinization when Cl(-) removal was performed in the presence of NPPB (500 microM) or EIPA (500 microM). Finally, we found that the Na(+)-induced alkalinization of pH(i) found in a previous study is inhibited by EIPA. This inhibitor profile's results suggest the presence of a Cl(-)-dependent Na(+)/H(+) exchange mechanism.

  5. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigations; Rainbow and Bull Trout Recruitment, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Jody P.

    2004-01-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss provide the most important sport fishery in the Kootenai River, Idaho, but densities and catch rates are low. Low recruitment is one possible factor limiting the rainbow trout population. Bull trout Salvelinus confluentus also exist in the Kootenai River, but little is known about this population. Research reported here addresses the following objectives for the Kootenai River, Idaho: increase rainbow trout recruitment, identify rainbow and bull trout spawning tributaries and migration timing, establish baseline data on bull trout redd numbers in tributaries, and improve the rainbow trout population size structure. Six adult rainbow trout were moved to spawning habitat upstream of a potential migration barrier on Caboose Creek, but numbers of redds and age-0 out-migrants did not appear to increase relative to a reference stream. Measurements taken on the Moyie River indicated the gradient is inadequate to deliver suitable flows to a proposed rainbow trout spawning channel. Summer water temperatures measured in the Deep Creek drainage sometimes exceeded 24 C, higher than those reported as suitable for rainbow trout. Radio-tagged rainbow trout were located in Boulder Creek during the spring spawning season, and bull trout were located in the Moyie River and O'Brien Creek, Montana in the fall. Bull trout spawning migration timing was related to increases in Kootenai River flows. Bull trout redd surveys documented 19 redds on Boulder Creek and North and South Callahan creeks. Fall 2002 electrofishing showed that the Kootenai River rainbow trout proportional stock density was 54, higher than prior years when more liberal fishing regulations were in effect. Boulder Creek produces the highest number of age-0 rainbow trout out-migrants upstream of Bonners Ferry, but the survival rate of these out-migrants upon reaching the Kootenai River is unknown. Determining juvenile survival rates and sources of mortality could aid management efforts

  6. 3D Visualization of the Initial Yersinia ruckeri Infection Route in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by Optical Projection Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Maki; Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Strøm, Helene Kragelund; Raida, Martin Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that enteric redmouth disease (ERM) in farmed rainbow trout is one of the most devastating disease problems, little is known about the initial route of infection and pathogenicity of the aetiological agent, Yersinia ruckeri. In order to determine the initially infected organs, optical projection tomography (OPT), a novel three-dimensional (3D) bio-imaging technique, was applied. OPT not only enables the visualization of Y. ruckeri on mucosal surfaces but also the 3D spatial distribution in whole organs, without sectioning. Rainbow trout were infected by bath challenge exposure to 1×108 CFU/ml of Y. ruckeri O1 for 1 hour. Three fish were sampled for OPT and immunohistochemistry (IHC) 1, 10 and 30 minutes, 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours, as well as 2, 3, 7 and 21 days after the start of the infection period. Y. ruckeri was re-isolated from the blood of infected fish as early as 1 minute post infection. Both OPT and IHC analysis confirmed that the secondary gill lamellae were the only tissues infected at this early time point, indicating that Y. ruckeri initially infects gill epithelial cells. The experimentally induced infection caused septicemia, and Y. ruckeri was found in all examined organs 7 days post infection including the brain, which correlated with the peak in mortality. To the best of our knowledge this is the first description of Y. ruckeri infection in the brain, which is likely to cause encephalitis. This in part could explain the lethality of ERM in rainbow trout. Using OPT scanning it was possible to visualize the initial route of entry, as well as secondary infection routes along with the proliferation and spread of Y. ruckeri, ultimately causing significant mortality in the exposed rainbow trout. These results demonstrate that OPT is a state-of-the-art technique capable of visualizing pathogenesis at high resolution. PMID:24586953

  7. Healing Rate of Swim Bladders in Rainbow Trout

    SciTech Connect

    Bellgraph, Brian J.; Brown, Richard S.; Stephenson, John R.; Welch, Abigail E.; Deters, Katherine A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    The swimbladders of juvenile rainbow trout Onchorhynchus mykiss were ruptured and subsequently observed for 28 days to identify healing patterns of swimbladder wounds and the effects of swimbladder rupture on direct mortality. Healing began within seven days, wounds were completely closed after 14 days, and no mortalities occurred. The healing process followed a pattern in which tissue first thickened around the opening (7 to 14 days), followed by scarring of the ruptured area, and disappearance of any evidence of the wound (21 to 28 days). The healing observed in juvenile rainbow trout swimbladders suggests that swimbladder rupture does not result in direct mortality as was hypothesized; however, the indirect effects of swimbladder injury (e.g., a decreased ability to swim efficiently) may lead to mortality by predation or other natural phenomena that were not observable in this study.

  8. Global 3D Imaging of Yersinia ruckeri Bacterin Uptake in Rainbow Trout Fry

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Maki; Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Raida, Martin Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia ruckeri is the causative agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM) in rainbow trout, and the first commercially available fish vaccine was an immersion vaccine against ERM consisting of Y. ruckeri bacterin. The ERM immersion vaccine has been successfully used in aquaculture farming of salmonids for more than 35 years. The gills and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are believed to be the portals of antigen uptake during waterborne vaccination against ERM; however, the actual sites of bacterin uptake are only partly understood. In order to obtain insight into bacterin uptake during waterborne vaccination, optical projection tomography (OPT) together with immunohistochemistry (IHC) was applied to visualize bacterin uptake and processing in whole rainbow trout fry. Visualization by OPT revealed that the bacterin was initially taken up via gill lamellae from within 30 seconds post vaccination. Later, bacterin uptake was detected on other mucosal surfaces such as skin and olfactory bulb from 5 to 30 minutes post vaccination. The GI tract was found to be filled with a complex of bacterin and mucus at 3 hours post vaccination and the bacterin remained in the GI tract for at least 24 hours. Large amounts of bacterin were present in the blood, and an accumulation of bacterin was found in filtering lymphoid organs such as spleen and trunk kidney where the bacterin accumulates 24 hours post vaccination as demonstrated by OPT and IHC. These results suggest that bacterin is taken up via the gill epithelium in the earliest phases of the bath exposure and from the GI tract in the later phase. The bacterin then enters the blood circulatory system, after which it is filtered by spleen and trunk kidney, before finally accumulating in lymphoid organs where adaptive immunity against ERM is likely to develop. PMID:25658600

  9. A second generation genetic map for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Rexroad, Caird E; Palti, Yniv; Gahr, Scott A; Vallejo, Roger L

    2008-11-19

    Genetic maps characterizing the inheritance patterns of traits and markers have been developed for a wide range of species and used to study questions in biomedicine, agriculture, ecology and evolutionary biology. The status of rainbow trout genetic maps has progressed significantly over the last decade due to interest in this species in aquaculture and sport fisheries, and as a model research organism for studies related to carcinogenesis, toxicology, comparative immunology, disease ecology, physiology and nutrition. We constructed a second generation genetic map for rainbow trout using microsatellite markers to facilitate the identification of quantitative trait loci for traits affecting aquaculture production efficiency and the extraction of comparative information from the genome sequences of model fish species. A genetic map ordering 1124 microsatellite loci spanning a sex-averaged distance of 2927.10 cM (Kosambi) and having 2.6 cM resolution was constructed by genotyping 10 parents and 150 offspring from the National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture (NCCCWA) reference family mapping panel. Microsatellite markers, representing pairs of loci resulting from an evolutionarily recent whole genome duplication event, identified 180 duplicated regions within the rainbow trout genome. Microsatellites associated with genes through expressed sequence tags or bacterial artificial chromosomes produced comparative assignments with tetraodon, zebrafish, fugu, and medaka resulting in assignments of homology for 199 loci. The second generation NCCCWA genetic map provides an increased microsatellite marker density and quantifies differences in recombination rate between the sexes in outbred populations. It has the potential to integrate with cytogenetic and other physical maps, identifying paralogous regions of the rainbow trout genome arising from the evolutionarily recent genome duplication event, and anchoring a comparative map with the zebrafish, medaka

  10. Transcriptional Heterogeneity of IgM+ Cells in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Abós, Beatriz; Castro, Rosario; Pignatelli, Jaime; Luque, Alfonso; González, Lucia; Tafalla, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Two major classes of B lymphocytes have been described to date in rainbow trout: IgM+ and IgT+ cells. IgM+ cells are mainly localized in the spleen, peripheral blood and kidney but are also found in other tissues. However, differences among IgM+ cell populations attending to its location are poorly defined in fish. Thus, the aim of this work was to characterize the expression of different immune molecules such as chemokine receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and transcription factors on sorted IgM+ lymphocytes from different rainbow trout tissues. IgM+ populations from blood, spleen, kidney, gills, intestine and liver were isolated by cell sorting and the constitutive levels of transcription of these genes evaluated by real-time PCR. To further characterize B cells, we identified an MS4A sequence. In humans, the MS4A family includes several genes with immune functions, such as the B cell marker CD20 or FcRβ. Subsequently, we have also evaluated the mRNA levels of this MS4A gene in the different IgM+ populations. The relevant differences in transcriptional patterns observed for each of these IgM+ populations analyzed, point to the presence of functionally different tissue-specific B cell populations in rainbow trout. The data shown provides a pattern of genes transcribed in IgM+ B cells not previously revealed in teleost fish. Furthermore, the constitutive expression of all the TLR genes analyzed in IgM+ cells suggests an important role for these cells in innate immunity. PMID:24324826

  11. Case Report: Strawberry Disease in Farmed Chilean Rainbow Trout.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Carlos; Infante, Jorge; Abad, Jessica; Ferguson, Hugh W; Paredes, Enrique; Valdebenito, Samuel; Yáñez, Alejandro J; Ilardi, Pedro; Avendaño-Herrera, Ruben

    2016-03-01

    Strawberry disease is a chronic, nonlethal skin condition that affects Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in the United States and several European countries, where it is also known as red-mark syndrome. We provide the first identification and characterization of three strawberry disease outbreaks occurring at two aquaculture farms in southern Chile. Clinically affected fish weighing an average of 400 g presented multiple bright-red, usually raised, skin lesions on the flank, ventral surface, and dorsal surface. A PCR using Rickettsia-like-organism (RLO)-specific primers was performed on nine affected fish, and all skin samples were positive for the RLO 16S ribosomal RNA sequence. All PCR results for Flavobacterium psychrophilum and other bacterial and viral pathogens were negative. Histopathological examination of the skin lesions revealed extensive dermatitis, with severe lymphocytic infiltration in advanced cases. This report is the first to describe strawberry disease in farmed Chilean Rainbow Trout. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the risk for Rainbow Trout culture; fish challenge experiments should be performed to fulfill Koch's postulates and to demonstrate that RLO is the cause of this disease. Received December 27, 2014; accepted October 23, 2015.

  12. The sensitivity of rainbow trout and other fish to carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Bailey, G S; Hendricks, J D; Nixon, J E; Pawlowski, N E

    1984-01-01

    Systematic design of replacement chemicals with reduced toxicities will require knowledge of mechanisms of action of parent compounds, especially in species which occupy the environment of most likely exposure. For aquatic systems, the rainbow trout has proven a valuable model for studying mechanisms of carcinogenicity. By comparison, small aquarium species show great potential as in situ field monitors of aquatic contamination by toxic chemicals but are less developed for mechanism studies. Fish species, especially rainbow trout, have also proven useful alternatives to traditional rodent models for comparative studies on mechanisms of action of nonaquatic carcinogens. These kinds of comparative studies form an essential basis for extrapolation of animal studies to man. Carcinogenicity testing of individual compounds and their replacements can provide only limited information on the expected impact of such chemicals on natural populations, since these populations are unavoidably exposed to potent modulators of the carcinogenic response. Hence any program which aims at redesign of commercial chemicals with reduced toxicities must have as a prior aim the full understanding of the mechanisms of joint carcinogen-inhibitor-promotor interactions. Because of their high sensitivity, low cost per individual, and low background tumor incidences, fish models such as the rainbow trout may be the only vertebrate models in which it is economically practical to initiate such complex studies.

  13. The physiological consequences of exposure to chronic, sublethal waterborne nickel in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): exercise vs resting physiology.

    PubMed

    Pane, Eric F; Haque, Aziz; Goss, Greg G; Wood, Chris M

    2004-03-01

    In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), following chronic (42 day) exposure to both 384 microg Ni l(-1) and 2034 microg Ni l(-1), Ni accumulation was greatest in the gill, kidney and plasma, with the plasma as the main sink for Ni. Indeed, trapped plasma analysis revealed that extensive loading of Ni in the plasma accounted for substantial percentages of accumulated Ni in several tissues including the liver and heart. Accumulated Ni in the gill and kidney was less dependent on plasma Ni concentration, suggesting a more intracellular accumulation of Ni in these tissues. We present evidence for a clear, persistent cost of acclimation to chronic, sublethal Ni exposure. Chronic (40-99 day) exposure to sublethal waterborne Ni (243-394 microg Ni l(-1); approximately 1% of the 96 h LC(50)) impaired the exercise physiology, but not the resting physiology, of rainbow trout. Ni acted as a limiting stressor, decreasing maximal rates of oxygen consumption (MO2,max) during strenuous exercise in trout exposed for 34 days to sublethal Ni. This drop in high-performance gas exchange was attributed mainly to a reduction in relative branchial diffusing capacity (D(rel)) caused by thickening of secondary lamellae. Morphometric analysis of the gills of chronically exposed fish revealed overall swelling of secondary lamellae, as well as hypertrophic respiratory epithelia within secondary lamellae. Additionally, contraction of the lamellar blood pillar system and narrowing of interlamellar water channels occurred, possibly contributing to decreased high-performance gas exchange. Decreased aerobic capacity persisted in fish previously exposed to nickel despite a clean-water exposure period of 38 days and an almost complete depuration of gill Ni, suggesting that extrabranchial mechanisms of chronic Ni toxicity may also be important. Chronic impairment of such a dynamically active and critical organ as the gill may depress the overall fitness of a fish by impairing predator avoidance, prey

  14. Impacts of Northern Pike on stocked Rainbow Trout in Pactola Reservoir, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheibel, Natalie C.; Dembkowski, Daniel J.; Davis, Jacob L.; Chipps, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Establishment of nonnative Northern Pike Esox lucius in Pactola Reservoir, South Dakota, has prompted concern among biologists about the influence of this species on the lake’s intensively managed salmonid fisheries. Ancedotal information suggests that catch rates of Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss have declined while mean size and abundance of Northern Pike has increased, although quantitative information on diet and growth of the Northern Pike population is lacking. To address potential interactions between Northern Pike and Rainbow Trout, we assessed size-dependent predation by Northern Pike on Rainbow Trout and determined the relative energetic contribution of stocked Rainbow Trout to Northern Pike growth using bioenergetics modeling. Stable isotopes combined with traditional diet analyses revealed that smaller Northern Pike (<600 mm TL) consumed primarily centrarchids and Rainbow Smelt Osmerus mordax, and Rainbow Trout contributed less than 10% to their annual energy consumption. In contrast, larger Northern Pike (≥600 mm TL) consumed primarily Rainbow Trout, which accounted for 56% of their annual energy consumption. Combining estimates of Northern Pike predation with production costs of catchable-size Rainbow Trout revealed that annual economic losses ranged from US$15,259 to $24,801 per year. Over its lifespan, an age-10 Northern Pike was estimated to consume ~117 Rainbow Trout worth approximately $340. Thus, Northern Pike predation substantially influences salmonid management initiatives and is likely a primary factor contributing to reduced Rainbow Trout abundance and return to anglers in Pactola Reservoir. Strategies for reducing Northern Pike predation on Rainbow Trout include increasing the size of stocked fish or altering the timing and spatial distribution of stocking events.

  15. A trial of two trouts: Comparing the impacts of rainbow and brown trout on a native galaxiid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, K.A.; Dunham, J.B.; Stephenson, J.F.; Terreau, A.; Thailly, A.F.; Gajardo, G.; de Leaniz, C. G.

    2010-01-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and brown trout Salmo trutta are the world's two most widespread exotic fishes, dominate the fish communities of most cold-temperate waters in the southern hemisphere and are implicated in the decline and extirpation of native fish species. Here, we provide the first direct comparison of the impacts of rainbow and brown trout on populations of a native fish by quantifying three components of exotic species impact: range, abundance and effect. We surveyed 54 small streams on the island of Chilo?? in Chilean Patagonia and found that the rainbow trout has colonized significantly more streams and has a wider geographic range than brown trout. The two species had similar post-yearling abundances in allopatry and sympatry, and their abundances depended similarly on reach-level variation in the physical habitat. The species appeared to have dramatically different effects on native drift-feeding Aplochiton spp., which were virtually absent from streams invaded by brown trout but shared a broad sympatric range with rainbow trout. Within this range, the species' post-yearling abundances varied independently before and after controlling for variation in the physical habitat. In the north of the island, Aplochiton spp. inhabited streams uninvaded by exotic trouts. Our results provide a context for investigating the mechanisms responsible for apparent differences in rainbow and brown trout invasion biology and can help inform conservation strategies for native fishes in Chilo?? and elsewhere. ?? 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation ?? 2010 The Zoological Society of London.

  16. Effects of acid rock drainage on stocked rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): an in-situ, caged fish experiment.

    PubMed

    Todd, Andrew S; McKnight, Diane M; Jaros, Chris L; Marchitto, Thomas M

    2007-07-01

    In-situ caged rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) studies reveal significant fish toxicity and fish stress in a river impacted by headwater acid rock drainage (ARD). Stocked trout survival and aqueous water chemistry were monitored for 10 days at 3 study sites in the Snake River watershed, Colorado, U.S.A. Trout mortality was positively correlated with concentrations of metals calculated to be approaching or exceeding conservative toxicity thresholds (Zn, Mn, Cu, Cd). Significant metal accumulation on the gills of fish stocked at ARD impacted study sites support an association between elevated metals and fish mortality. Observations of feeding behavior and significant differences in fish relative weights between study site and feeding treatment indicate feeding and metals-related fish stress. Together, these results demonstrate the utility of in-situ exposure studies for stream stakeholders in quantifying the relative role of aqueous contaminant exposures in limiting stocked fish survival.

  17. Embryotoxicity of Great Lakes lake trout extracts to developing rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Peggy J.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    1999-01-01

    Planar halogenated hydrocarbons (PHHs), such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, and biphenyls are present in aquatic systems, and are known to produce adverse effects in fish. This study investigated the embryotoxicity of PHH mixtures through the nanoinjection of environmental extracts into newly fertilized eggs from two strains of rainbow trout. Organic extracts were obtained from whole adult lake trout collected from Lake Michigan in 1988 and Lake Superior in 1994. The graded doses of the final extracts used for injection were quantified as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin toxic-equivalents (TEQs) based on the concentrations of dioxins, furans and non-o-PCBs in each, and as equivalent amounts found in the eggs of the original lake trout (eggEQ). Total TEQs in the lake trout were 14.7 pg TEQ/g in the Lake Michigan sample and 7.3 pg TEQ/g in the Lake Superior sample. The extract of the Lake Michigan lake trout was embryotoxic to rainbow trout; LD50 values were 35 eggEQ (15–90, 95% F.L.) in the Arlee strain and 14 eggEQ (5–99, 95% F.L.) in the Erwin strain of rainbow trout. The LD50 values of the Lake Michigan extract in either of these strains of rainbow trout fall within the actual range of TCDD LD50values based on TEQs. This indicates that an additive model of toxicity is appropriate to quantify PHHs in relation to early life stage mortality in fish. Gross lesions characteristic of exposure to PHHs (i.e. yolk-sac edema, craniofacial deformities, and hemorrhaging) increased in a dose-related manner. The lowest observable adverse effect concentrations (LOAEC) for these gross lesions and cumulative mortalities suggests that current concentrations of PHHs in lake trout from Lake Michigan are above a threshold for adverse effects and these compounds may have implications on the lack of recruitment in certain Great Lakes lake trout populations.

  18. Induction of peroxisome proliferation in rainbow trout exposed to ciprofibrate.

    PubMed

    Yang, J H; Kostecki, P T; Calabrese, E J; Baldwin, L A

    1990-07-01

    Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), average body weight of 450 g, were treated with 15, 25, or 35 mg/kg of ciprofibrate via intraperitoneal injection every other day for 2 to 3 weeks. The effects on hepatic peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase, polypeptide PPA-80, catalase, and liver weight were measured. The treatment of trout with ciprofibrate showed significant dose-related increases in peroxisomal acyl-CoA activity, polypeptide PPA-80, and catalase after 3 weeks of exposure. Peroxisomal oxidase activity showed a significant (p = 0.0008) increase (78%) at 35 mg/kg and a marginal (p = 0.1) increase (27%) at 25 mg/kg after 3 weeks of exposure. Densitometric analysis of polypeptide PPA-80 and catalase showed increases up to 48 and 236% at 35 mg/kg, respectively. Morphometric analysis on livers of trout administered 35 mg/kg for 3 weeks showed a 2.3-fold increase of peroxisomal volume density, as compared to control. This study demonstrates the induction of peroxisome proliferation in rainbow trout administered ciprofibrate, a known peroxisome proliferator in rodents.

  19. Glucokinase and hexokinase expression and activities in rainbow trout tissues: changes with food deprivation and refeeding.

    PubMed

    Soengas, José L; Polakof, Sergio; Chen, Xi; Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Moon, Thomas W

    2006-09-01

    The expression and activities of glucokinase (GK) and hexokinase (HK) were assessed in different tissues of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) under different feeding conditions (fed, fasted for 14 days, and refed for 7 days). Two different HK-I cDNAs were identified with different tissue distributions. One transcript named heart or H-HK-I was observed in the four brain regions assessed, white muscle, kidney, and gills but not in liver or erythrocytes. A second transcript named liver or L-HK-I was found in all tissues surveyed. GK mRNA was identified only in liver and the four brain regions. GK expression was altered by feeding conditions, especially in liver and hypothalamus where food deprivation decreased and re-feeding increased expression; changes in expression reflected activity changes and changes in tissue glycogen levels. In contrast, feeding conditions did not alter expression of either HK-I transcript but did alter tissue HK activities. The reduced phosphorylating capacity noted with food deprivation correlates primarily with changes in tissue HK, whereas increased capacity, as with refeeding, was associated with changes in GK; these changes fit with the different K(m) values of the GK and HK enzymes. These results provide evidence for the hypothalamus acting as a glucosensor in trout, as hyperglycemia produced increased GK expression and activity, as well as increased glycogen levels. Thus, even though trout use glucose poorly, none of the parameters tested here relate to this inability to use glucose and suggest that, at least, rainbow trout, if given an appropriate carbohydrate diet, could metabolically adjust to such a diet.

  20. Environmental levels of the antidepressant venlafaxine impact the metabolic capacity of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Best, Carol; Melnyk-Lamont, Nataliya; Gesto, Manuel; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2014-10-01

    The antidepressant venlafaxine is detected at parts per billion levels in tertiary-treated municipal wastewater effluent. However, the impact of this serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) on non-target aquatic animals is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that environmentally relevant levels of venlafaxine disrupt the highly conserved cortisol and glucose response to stress in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Juvenile trout were exposed to venlafaxine (0, 0.2 and 1.0 μg/L) in a static system with daily renewal for seven days. The fish were then subjected to an acute handling disturbance and sampled either prior to (0 h) or 1, 4 and 24h after stressor exposure. Venlafaxine exposure did not affect the handling disturbance-mediated transient elevation in plasma cortisol levels or target tissue glucocorticoid receptor expression. The drug exposure disrupted the interrenal steroidogenic capacity, including altered handling stressor-mediated changes in mRNA abundances of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage. The handling stressor-induced transient elevations in plasma glucose levels were significantly reduced in the venlafaxine-exposed fish. This was not accompanied by changes in liver glycogen content, glucose transporter 2 mRNA abundance or the glycolytic capacity, whereas the capacity for gluconeogenesis and amino acid catabolism were enhanced. Venlafaxine also brought about changes in the gill of trout, including enhanced lactate dehydrogenase activity and Na(+)-K(+) ATPase protein expression, while the Na(+)-K(+) ATPase enzyme activity was reduced. Collectively, our results demonstrate that venlafaxine at levels detected in the aquatic environment impacts tissue metabolic capacities and may compromise the adaptive responses to an acute stressor in rainbow trout. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of phytoestrogens on growth-related and lipogenic genes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of the current study was to determine whether estradiol (E2) or the primary soy phytoestrogens genistein and daidzein regulate expression of growth-related and lipogenic genes in rainbow trout. Juvenile rainbow trout (5 mon, 65.8 ± 1.8 g) received intraperitoneal injections of E2, gen...

  2. Assessment of genetic differentiation and genetic assignment of commercial rainbow trout strains using a SNP panel

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is the most widely cultured cold freshwater fish in the world, with production on every continent except Antarctica. Troutlodge, Inc., one of the largest commercial rainbow trout egg producers in the world, has developed four strains (February, May, August and Nov...

  3. Fatty acid partitioning varies across fillet regions during sexual maturation in female rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are commonly reared as diploids (2N, two sets of chromosomes) or triploids (3N, three sets of chromosomes). Sexual maturation in 2N has negative effects on production efficiency, nutrient retention, and fillet quality. On the other hand, 3N female rainbow trout ...

  4. Virulence and molecular variation of Flavobacterium columnare affecting rainbow trout in ID, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Columnaris disease is an emerging problem in the rainbow trout (Oncorhychus mykiss) aquaculture industry of Idaho. The epidemiology of this pathogen in the area, and for rainbow trout, is all isolates taken from disease outbreaks are genomovar I and similar based on basic typing protocols. Virulence...

  5. Effects of cooking techniques on fatty acid and oxylipin content of farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rainbow trout is an excellent source of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) which have beneficial health effects. We determined the fatty acid and oxylipin content of 2-year old rainbow trout fillets that were raw, baked, broiled, microwaved, or pan-fried in corn (CO), canola (CaO...

  6. Development of a 37K high-density oligo-nucleotide microarray for rainbow trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have constructed a rainbow trout high-density oligonucleotide microarray by using all the available tentative consensus (TC) sequences from the Rainbow Trout Gene Index database (The Computational Biology and Functional Genomics Lab., Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard School of Public Heal...

  7. The physiological stress response and oxidative stress biomarkers in rainbow trout and brook trout from selenium-impacted streams in a coal mining region.

    PubMed

    Miller, L L; Rasmussen, J B; Palace, V P; Hontela, A

    2009-11-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential element that can be toxic at concentrations slightly greater than those required for homeostasis. The main chronic toxic effects of Se in fish are teratogenic deformities, but Se can also activate the physiological stress response and redox cycle with reduced glutathione causing oxidative damage. Rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, appear to be more sensitive to Se than brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis. The objective of this study was to compare the physiological stress response (plasma cortisol, glucose, triiodothyronine, thyroxine, gill Na+/K+ ATPase, cortisol secretory capacity, K and liver somatic index) and oxidative stress biomarkers (liver GSH, GPx, lipid peroxidation, vitamin A and vitamin E) in rainbow trout (RNTR) and brook trout (BKTR) collected from reference and Se-exposed streams. The physiological stress response was not impaired (cortisol secretory capacity unchanged); although there were species differences in plasma cortisol and plasma glucose levels. Liver GSH, GPx and vitamin levels were higher in RNTR than BKTR, but lipid peroxidation levels were not different. The elevated GSH reserves may make RNTR more sensitive to Se-induced lipid peroxidation, but this may be offset by the RNTR's higher antioxidant (GPx and vitamin) levels. Species-specific biochemical differences may mediate differences in Se sensitivity and be used in aquatic Se risk assessments.

  8. Kinetics and effects of dichloroacetic acid in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimmons, Patrick N; Hoffman, Alex D; Lien, Gregory J; Hammermeister, Dean E; Nichols, John W

    2009-09-14

    Halogenated acetic acids (HAAs) produced by chlorine disinfection of municipal drinking water represent a potentially important class of environmental contaminants. Little is known, however, about their potential to adversely impact fish and other aquatic life. In this study we examined the kinetics and effects of dichloroacetic acid (DCA) in rainbow trout. Branchial uptake was measured in fish confined to respirometer-metabolism chambers. Branchial uptake efficiency was <5%, suggesting passive diffusion through aqueous channels in the gill epithelium. DCA concentrations in tissues following prolonged (72, 168, or 336 h) waterborne exposures were expressed as tissue:plasma concentration ratios. Concentration ratios for the kidney and muscle at 168 and 336 h were consistent with the suggestion that DCA distributes primarily to tissue water. Reduced concentration ratios for the liver, particularly at 72 h, indicated that DCA was highly metabolized by this tissue. Routes and rates of elimination were characterized by injecting chambered animals with a high (5.0mg/kg) or low (50 microg/kg) bolus dose. DCA was rapidly cleared by naïve animals resulting in elimination half-lives (t(1/2)) of less than 4h. Waterborne pre-treatment of fish with DCA increased the persistence of a subsequently injected dose. In high dose animals, pre-treatment caused a 4-fold decrease in whole-body clearance (CL(B)) and corresponding increases in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (extrapolated to infinity; AUC(0-->infinity)) and t(1/2). Qualitatively similar results were obtained in low dose fish, although the magnitude of the pre-treatment effect ( approximately 2.5-fold) was reduced. Renal and branchial clearance contributed little (combined, <3% of CL(B)) to the elimination of DCA. Biliary elimination of DCA was also negligible. The steady-state volume of distribution (V(SS)) did not vary among treatment groups and was consistent with results of the tissue distribution

  9. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigations; Rainbow and Bull Trout Recruitment, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Jody P.; Downs, Christopher C.

    2001-08-01

    Our 1999 objectives were to determine sources of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and bull trout Salvelinus confluentus spawning and recruitment in the Idaho reach of the Kootenai River. We used a rotary-screw trap to capture juvenile trout to determine age at out-migration and to estimate total out-migration from the Boundary Creek drainage to the Kootenai River. The out-migrant estimate for March through August 1999 was 1,574 (95% C. I. = 825-3,283) juvenile rainbow trout. Most juveniles out-migrated at age-2 and age-3. No out-migrating bull trout were caught. Five of 17 rainbow trout radio-tagged in Idaho migrated upstream into Montana waters during the spawning season. Five bull trout originally radio-tagged in O'Brien Creek, Montana in early October moved downstream into Idaho and British Columbia by mid-October. Annual angler exploitation for the rainbow trout population upstream of Bonners Ferry, Idaho was estimated to be 58%. Multi-pass depletion estimates for index reaches of Caboose, Curley, and Debt creeks showed 0.20, 0.01, and 0.13 rainbow trout juveniles/m{sup 2}, respectively. We estimated rainbow trout (180-415 mm TL) standing stock of 1.6 kg/ha for the Hemlock Bar reach (29.4 ha) of the Kootenai River, similar to the 1998 estimate. Recruitment of juvenile rainbow and bull trout from Idaho tributaries is not sufficient to be the sole source of subsequent older fish in the mainstem Kootenai River. These populations are at least partly dependent on recruitment from Montana waters. The low recruitment and high exploitation rate may be indicators of a rainbow trout population in danger of further decline.

  10. Acute and chronic toxicity studies with monochlorobenzene in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dahlich, G.M.; Larson, R.E.; Gingerich, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    The toxicity of monochlorobenzene (CB) was investigated in rainbow trout following acute intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration and chronic exposure via the water in a continuously flowing system for 15 or 30 days. In the acute study overt toxicity and hepatotoxicity were monitored over a 96-h time period. Variables measured to assess toxicity included weight changes, liver weight to body weight ratios, behavioral changes, alanine aminotransferase activity (GPT), sulfobromophthalein (BSP) retention, total plasma protein concentration and liver histopathology. In the chronic study the same measures of toxicity were followed as well as food consumption and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity. Upon acute i.p. exposure the toxicant (9.8 mmol/kg) caused behavioral changes in the fish which were consistent with the known anesthetic properties of CB in mammals. Elevations in BSP retention and GPT activity, and histopathology indicated that CB was hepatotoxic in fish. The LC50 of CB in trout exposed via the water for 96 h was 4.7 mg/l. Chronic exposure of trout to 2 or 3 mg/l CB resulted in similar behavioral changes as seen in the acute study. Liver toxicity was evident from elevations in GPT activity. BSP retention and AP activity appeared to be affected by the nutritional status of the trout as much as by the CB treatment. After 30 days of exposure to 3 mg/l CB, trout appeared to have developed some tolerance to the toxic effects.

  11. Rainbow trout responses to water temperature and dissolved oxygen stress in two southern California stream pools

    Treesearch

    K.R. Matthews; N.H. Berg

    1997-01-01

    Habitat use by rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss is described for a southern California stream where the summer water temperatures typically exceed the lethal limits for trout (>25) C). During August 1994, water temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), and trout distribution were monitored in two adjacent pools in Sespe Creek, Ventura County, where summer water...

  12. IN VIVO MEASUREMENT OF PHENYLGLUCUCURONIDE IN RAINBOW TROUT BY ON-LINE INJECTION MICRODIALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phenylglucuronide (PG) was measured in vivo in arterial blood of rainbow trout using on-line injection microdialysis. A microdialysis probe was surgically implanted in the dorsal aorta of spinally-transected trout. The trout were dosed continuously with PG for 24 h using a ventra...

  13. IN VIVO MEASUREMENT OF PHENYLGLUCUCURONIDE IN RAINBOW TROUT BY ON-LINE INJECTION MICRODIALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phenylglucuronide (PG) was measured in vivo in arterial blood of rainbow trout using on-line injection microdialysis. A microdialysis probe was surgically implanted in the dorsal aorta of spinally-transected trout. The trout were dosed continuously with PG for 24 h using a ventra...

  14. Promotion of Hepatocarcinogenesis by Perfluoroalkyl Acids in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Benninghoff, Abby D.; Orner, Gayle A.; Buchner, Clarissa H.; Hendricks, Jerry D.; Duffy, Aaron M.; Williams, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we reported that perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) promotes liver cancer in a manner similar to that of 17β-estradiol (E2) in rainbow trout. Also, other perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are weakly estrogenic in trout and bind the trout liver estrogen receptor. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether multiple PFAAs enhance hepatic tumorigenesis in trout, an animal model that represents human insensitivity to peroxisome proliferation. A two-stage chemical carcinogenesis model was employed in trout to evaluate PFOA, perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), and 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol (8:2FtOH) as complete carcinogens or promoters of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1)- and/or N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induced liver cancer. A custom trout DNA microarray was used to assess hepatic transcriptional response to these dietary treatments in comparison with E2 and the classic peroxisome proliferator, clofibrate (CLOF). Incidence, multiplicity, and size of liver tumors in trout fed diets containing E2, PFOA, PFNA, and PFDA were significantly higher compared with AFB1-initiated animals fed control diet, whereas PFOS caused a minor increase in liver tumor incidence. E2 and PFOA also enhanced MNNG-initiated hepatocarcinogenesis. Pearson correlation analyses, unsupervised hierarchical clustering, and principal components analyses showed that the hepatic gene expression profiles for E2 and PFOA, PFNA, PFDA, and PFOS were overall highly similar, though distinct patterns of gene expression were evident for each treatment, particularly for PFNA. Overall, these data suggest that multiple PFAAs can promote liver cancer and that the mechanism of promotion may be similar to that of E2. PMID:21984479

  15. Promotion of hepatocarcinogenesis by perfluoroalkyl acids in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Benninghoff, Abby D; Orner, Gayle A; Buchner, Clarissa H; Hendricks, Jerry D; Duffy, Aaron M; Williams, David E

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we reported that perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) promotes liver cancer in a manner similar to that of 17β-estradiol (E2) in rainbow trout. Also, other perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are weakly estrogenic in trout and bind the trout liver estrogen receptor. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether multiple PFAAs enhance hepatic tumorigenesis in trout, an animal model that represents human insensitivity to peroxisome proliferation. A two-stage chemical carcinogenesis model was employed in trout to evaluate PFOA, perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), and 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol (8:2FtOH) as complete carcinogens or promoters of aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1))- and/or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induced liver cancer. A custom trout DNA microarray was used to assess hepatic transcriptional response to these dietary treatments in comparison with E2 and the classic peroxisome proliferator, clofibrate (CLOF). Incidence, multiplicity, and size of liver tumors in trout fed diets containing E2, PFOA, PFNA, and PFDA were significantly higher compared with AFB(1)-initiated animals fed control diet, whereas PFOS caused a minor increase in liver tumor incidence. E2 and PFOA also enhanced MNNG-initiated hepatocarcinogenesis. Pearson correlation analyses, unsupervised hierarchical clustering, and principal components analyses showed that the hepatic gene expression profiles for E2 and PFOA, PFNA, PFDA, and PFOS were overall highly similar, though distinct patterns of gene expression were evident for each treatment, particularly for PFNA. Overall, these data suggest that multiple PFAAs can promote liver cancer and that the mechanism of promotion may be similar to that of E2.

  16. MicroTrout: A comprehensive, genome-wide miRNA target prediction framework for rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Mennigen, Jan A; Zhang, Dapeng

    2016-12-01

    Rainbow trout represent an important teleost research model and aquaculture species. As such, rainbow trout are employed in diverse areas of biological research, including basic biological disciplines such as comparative physiology, toxicology, and, since rainbow trout have undergone both teleost- and salmonid-specific rounds of genome duplication, molecular evolution. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs, small non-protein coding RNAs) have emerged as important posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression in animals. Given the increasingly recognized importance of miRNAs as an additional layer in the regulation of gene expression and hence biological function, recent efforts using RNA- and genome sequencing approaches have resulted in the creation of several resources for the construction of a comprehensive repertoire of rainbow trout miRNAs and isomiRs (variant miRNA sequences that all appear to derive from the same gene but vary in sequence due to post-transcriptional processing). Importantly, through the recent publication of the rainbow trout genome (Berthelot et al., 2014), mRNA 3'UTR information has become available, allowing for the first time the genome-wide prediction of miRNA-target RNA relationships in this species. We here report the creation of the microtrout database, a comprehensive resource for rainbow trout miRNA and annotated 3'UTRs. The comprehensive database was used to implement an algorithm to predict genome-wide rainbow trout-specific miRNA-mRNA target relationships, generating an improved predictive framework over previously published approaches. This work will serve as a useful framework and sequence resource to experimentally address the role of miRNAs in several research areas using the rainbow trout model, examples of which are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A hematopoietic virus disease of rainbow trout and sockeye salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amend, Donald F.; Yasutake, William T.; Mead, Robert W.

    1969-01-01

    A previously undescribed virus disease epizootic of hatchery rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) in British Columbia, Canada is presented. In the same locality, a similar virus disease was experienced among hatchery sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). Typical symptoms included flashing, fecal casts, hemorrhagic areas at the base of fins, and petechial hemorrhages on the visceral fat and membranes in the abdominal cavity. Histopathologic changes were typified by extensive degeneration and necrosis in the hematopoietic tissues of the kidney and spleen. A virus was isolated from both species of fish on tissue culture and the viruses showed cross-infectivity. Based upon the pathological changes in the hematopoietic tissue and the demonstration of a vital infection, a tentative descriptive name was designated Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis. The isolated viruses were distinctly different from the infectious pancreatic necrosis or viral hemorrhagic septicemia viruses of trout, but did show similarities to the Oregon sockeye and Sacramento River chinook viruses. Positive identification awaits further tests. The significance of these observations is the reporting of a new viral disease of rainbow trout and the extension of the geographic range of sockeye salmon viruses.

  18. TISSUE-SPECIFIC CADMIUM ACCUMULATION, METALLOTHIONEIN INDUCTION, AND TISSUE ZINC AND COPPER LEVELS DURING CHRONIC SUBLETHAL CADMIUM EXPOSURE IN JUVENILE RAINBOW TROUT. (R826104)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Juvenile rainbow trout, on 3% of body weight daily ration, were exposed to 0 (control) or 3 mug/L Cd (as Cd(NO3)(2) . 4H(2)O) in moderately hard (140 mg/L as CaCO3), alkaline (95 mg/L as CaCO3, pH 8.0) water for 30 days. Particular attention focused on Cd burden in tissues (gills...

  19. TISSUE-SPECIFIC CADMIUM ACCUMULATION, METALLOTHIONEIN INDUCTION, AND TISSUE ZINC AND COPPER LEVELS DURING CHRONIC SUBLETHAL CADMIUM EXPOSURE IN JUVENILE RAINBOW TROUT. (R826104)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Juvenile rainbow trout, on 3% of body weight daily ration, were exposed to 0 (control) or 3 mug/L Cd (as Cd(NO3)(2) . 4H(2)O) in moderately hard (140 mg/L as CaCO3), alkaline (95 mg/L as CaCO3, pH 8.0) water for 30 days. Particular attention focused on Cd burden in tissues (gills...

  20. Fish models for environmental carcinogenesis: the rainbow trout.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, G S; Williams, D E; Hendricks, J D

    1996-01-01

    Progress over the past 30 years has revealed many strengths of the rainbow trout as an alternative model for environmental carcinogenesis research. These include low rearing costs, an early life-stage ultrasensitive bioassay, sensitivity to many classes of carcinogen, a well-described tumor pathology, responsiveness to tumor promoters and inhibitors, and a mechanistically informative nonmammalian comparative status. Low-cost husbandry, for example, has permitted statistically challenging tumor study designs with up to 10,000 trout to investigate the quantitative interrelationships among carcinogen dose, anticarcinogen dose, DNA adduct formation, and final tumor outcome. The basic elements of the trout carcinogen bioassay include multiple exposure routes, carcinogen response, husbandry requirements, and pathology. The principal known neoplasms occur in liver (mixed hepatocellular/cholangiocellular adenoma and carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma), kidney (nephroblastoma), swim bladder (adenopapilloma), and stomach (adenopapilloma). Trout possess a complex but incompletely characterized array of cytochromes P450, transferases, and other enzymic systems for phase I and phase II procarcinogen metabolism. In general, trout exhibit only limited capacity for DNA repair, especially for removal of bulky DNA adducts. This factor, together with a high capacity for P450 bioactivation and negligible glutathione transferase-mediated detoxication of the epoxide, accounts for the exceptional sensitivity of trout to aflatoxin B1 carcinogenesis. At the gene level, all trout tumors except nephroblastoma exhibit variable and often high incidences of oncogenic Ki-ras gene mutations. Mutations in the trout p53 tumor suppressor gene have yet to be described. There are many aspects of the trout model, especially the lack of complete organ homology, that limit its application as a surrogate for human cancer research. Within these limitations, however, it is apparent that trout and other

  1. Tissue deposition and residue depletion in rainbow trout following continuous voluntary feeding with various levels of melamine or a blend of melamine and cyanuric acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyan; Xue, Min; Wang, Jia; Qiu, Jing; Wu, Xiufeng; Zheng, Yinhua; Li, Junguo; Qin, Yuchang

    2014-11-01

    This study determined the deposition and depletion in rainbow trout after continuous administration of melamine (MEL) alone or a blend of MEL and cyanuric acid (CYA). The plasma, muscles, kidneys, liver and gills were sampled at 0, 3, 7, 13, 21, 28 and 42d. After the final sampling at 42d, fish from the MEL0.05, MEL20 and MCA groups were fed the control diet (MEL0) for the depletion test. Co-administration with cyanuric acid accelerated the deposition time to the Css for melamine; during the withdrawal phrase, the melamine and CYA concentrations in the tissues decreased exponentially. Compared to the t(½) for single oral administration, the t(½) for melamine and cyanuric acid after 42d continuous feeding was prolonged. The presence of trace CYA in the plasma and kidneys of trout was detected in the MEL20 group, indicating that MEL can convert into CYA in rainbow trout.

  2. Genetic characterization of hybridization and introgression between anadromous rainbow trout (oncorhynchus mykiss irideus) and coastal cutthroat trout (o. clarki clarki)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, W.P.; Ostberg, C.O.; Keim, P.; Thorgaard, G.H.

    2001-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization represents a dynamic evolutionary phenomenon and major conservation problem in salmonid fishes. In this study we used amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers to describe the extent and characterize the pattern of hybridization and introgression between coastal rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss irideus) and coastal cutthroat trout (O. clarki clarki). Hybrid individuals were initially identified using principle coordinate analysis of 133 polymorphic AFLP markers. Subsequent analysis using 23 diagnostic AFLP markers revealed the presence of F1, rainbow trout backcross, cutthroat trout backcross and later-generation hybrids. mtDNA analysis demonstrated equal numbers of F1 hybrids with rainbow and cutthroat trout mtDNA indicating reciprocal mating of the parental types. In contrast, rainbow and cutthroat trout backcross hybrids always exhibited the mtDNA from the recurrent parent, indicating a male hybrid mating with a pure female. This study illustrates the usefulness of the AFLP technique for generating large numbers of species diagnostic markers. The pattern of hybridization raises many questions concerning the existence and action of reproductive isolating mechanisms between these two species. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that introgression between anadromous populations of coastal rainbow and coastal cutthroat trout is limited by an environment-dependent reduction in hybrid fitness.

  3. Genetic characterization of hybridization and introgression between anadromous rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss irideus) and coastal cutthroat trout (O. clarki clarki).

    PubMed

    Young, W P; Ostberg, C O; Keim, P; Thorgaard, G H

    2001-04-01

    Interspecific hybridization represents a dynamic evolutionary phenomenon and major conservation problem in salmonid fishes. In this study we used amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers to describe the extent and characterize the pattern of hybridization and introgression between coastal rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss irideus) and coastal cutthroat trout (O. clarki clarki). Hybrid individuals were initially identified using principle coordinate analysis of 133 polymorphic AFLP markers. Subsequent analysis using 23 diagnostic AFLP markers revealed the presence of F1, rainbow trout backcross, cutthroat trout backcross and later-generation hybrids. mtDNA analysis demonstrated equal numbers of F1 hybrids with rainbow and cutthroat trout mtDNA indicating reciprocal mating of the parental types. In contrast, rainbow and cutthroat trout backcross hybrids always exhibited the mtDNA from the recurrent parent, indicating a male hybrid mating with a pure female. This study illustrates the usefulness of the AFLP technique for generating large numbers of species diagnostic markers. The pattern of hybridization raises many questions concerning the existence and action of reproductive isolating mechanisms between these two species. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that introgression between anadromous populations of coastal rainbow and coastal cutthroat trout is limited by an environment-dependent reduction in hybrid fitness.

  4. Glycated hemoglobin is not an accurate indicator of glycemia in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Santin, A E; Searle, A J; Winston, V D; Powell, M S; Hardy, R W; Rodnick, K J

    2013-07-01

    Glycation occurs when glucose reacts non-enzymatically with proteins. This reaction depends upon time, ambient glucose concentration, and the molecular conformation of reactive amino acids. Little is known about protein glycation in fishes and the main objective of this study was to measure glycated hemoglobin (GHb) in rainbow trout, a glucose-intolerant species, under normoglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions. We also identified GHb isoforms in vivo and analyzed the structural environment surrounding potential glycation sites. Despite similar glycemia to healthy humans, GHb was an order of magnitude lower in rainbow trout (0.6%) compared with humans (6%) and was not affected by long-term hyperglycemia. Species differences in GHb appear to be related to differences in erythrocyte glucose, and differential expression and glycation of hemoglobin (Hb) isoforms may explain intraspecific differences in rainbow trout GHb. Computer analysis of glucose isomers (ringed-open and α- and β-pyranoses) interacting with the β-chain of rainbow trout HbI and HbIV, and human HbA did not reveal structural or energetic constraints for glucose binding (the initial step of glycation) for rainbow trout Hbs. Overall, there are significant differences between Hb glycation in humans and rainbow trout, and GHb does not appear to be an accurate indicator of glycemia over time in rainbow trout. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of electric barrier on passage and physical condition of juvenile and adult rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Layhee, Megan J.; Sepulveda, Adam; Shaw, Amy; Smuckall, Matthew; Kapperman, Kevin; Reyes, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Electric barriers can inhibit passage and injure fish. Few data exist on electric barrier parameters that minimize these impacts and on how body size affects susceptibility, especially to nontarget fish species. The goal of this study was to determine electric barrier voltage and pulse-width settings that inhibit passage of larger bodied rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (215–410 mm fork length) while allowing passage of smaller bodied juvenile rainbow trout (52–126 mm) in a static laboratory setting. We exposed rainbow trout to 30-Hz pulsed-direct current voltage gradients (0.00–0.45 V cm−1) and pulse widths (0.0–0.7 ms) and recorded their movement, injury incidence, and mortality. No settings tested allowed all juveniles to pass while impeding all adult passage. Juvenile and adult rainbow trout avoided the barrier at higher pulse widths, and fewer rainbow trout passed the barrier at 0.7-ms pulse width compared to 0.1 ms and when the barrier was turned off. We found no effect of voltage gradient on fish passage. No mortality occurred, and we observed external bruising in 5 (7%) juvenile rainbow trout and 15 (21%) adult rainbow trout. This study may aid managers in selecting barrier settings that allow for increased juvenile passage.

  6. Enhanced Aeromonas salmonicida bacterin uptake and side effects caused by low frequency sonophoresis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Cobo, Cristóbal; Makosch, Katarzyna; Jung, Rainer; Kohlmann, Klaus; Knopf, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    Low frequency sonophoresis (LFS) has been recognized as one of the most advanced technologies in transdermal delivery of substances, due to the modification of the stratum corneum lipid bilayer, in focal skin applications in mammals. Based on these findings, LFS has been suggested as a potential technology to be used for enhancement in immersion fish vaccination. In contrast to mammals where LFS is applied to discrete regions of the skin, in fish the whole individual needs to be exposed for practical purposes. The current study evaluated the impact of LFS at 37 kHz on the uptake of an Aeromonas salmonicida bacterin and side effects of the treatment in rainbow trout. Quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) and immunohistochemistry were used to examine the bacterin uptake into skin and gill tissue. Side effects were assessed by behavioural examination, histology and blood serum analysis. The sonication intensity of 171 mW/cm² was enough for increasing skin permeability, but caused heavy erratic swimming and gill haemorrhages. Sonication intensities as low as 105 mW/cm² did not modify skin permeability and enhanced the bacterin uptake into the gill tissue by factor 15 compared to conventional immersion. Following sonication, the gill permeability for the bacterin decreased after 20 min and 120 min by factor 3 and 2, respectively. However, during sonication, erratic swimming of the fish raised some concerns. Further reduction of the sonication intensity to 57 mW/cm² did not induce erratic swimming, and the bacterin uptake into the gill tissue was still increased by factor 3. In addition, a decreasing albumin-globulin ratio in the serum of the rainbow trout within 40 min revealed that LFS leads to an inflammatory response. Consequently, based on both increased bacterin uptake and the inflammatory response, low intensity LFS has the potential to enhance vaccine immunity without significant side effects.

  7. Triploidy in rainbow trout determined by computer-assisted analysis.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Emilio; Josa, Agustín; Gil, Lidia; Martí, José Ignacio

    2005-11-01

    This study was designed to assess the use of a computer-assisted system based on erythrocyte measurements as a possible alternative to flow cytometry for identifying triploid rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Blood smears were prepared from 26 triploid and 26 diploid specimens, as determined by flow cytometry after staining blood cells with propidium iodide. The cell and nucleus lengths of 10 erythrocytes were determined in each fish. This was followed by discriminatory analysis to distinguish between diploids and triploids based on their score profiles. Triploid trout showed significantly larger erythrocyte cell and nucleus measurements than their diploid counterparts (N=52; P<0.0001). Erythrocyte length correctly identified 100% of the fish specimens as diploid or triploid, while nucleus length was a less accurate predictor of the level of ploidy. Our findings validate the potential use of computer-assisted analysis for this purpose.

  8. Histochemistry of leucine aminoaphthylamidase (LAN) in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouck, Gerald R.

    1979-01-01

    The histochemistry of leucine aminonaphthylamidase (LAN) was studied in frozen tissue sections of rainbow trout both in yearling and adult fish. Age of fish had relatively little effect upon the results. The most intense LAN color production was in epithelial cells of midgut, pyloric ceca, hindgut, and in some segments of kidney tubules. Lower levels of LAN were evident in liver cells of Kupffer, and still lower or slight levels of LAN activity were found in blood cells, muscle, nerve, connective tissue, gonad, and pancreas. The results indicate that LAN might be useful in assessing histotoxicity to LAN-rich areas of the body.

  9. Histochemistry of leucine aminonaphthylamidase (LAN) in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouck, Gerald R.

    1979-01-01

    The histochemistry of leucine aminonaphthylamidase (LAN) was studied in frozen tissue sections of rainbow trout both in yearling and adult fish. Age of fish had relatively little effect upon the results. The most intense LAN color production was in epithelial cells of midgut, pyloric ceca, hindgut, and in some segments of kidney tubules. Lower levels of LAN were evident in liver cells of Kupffer, and still lower or slight levels of LAN activity were found in blood cells, muscle, nerve, connective tissue, gonad, and pancreas. The results indicate that LAN might be useful in assessing histotoxicity to LAN-rich areas of the body.

  10. Optimal isolation conditions for rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) hepatic ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Orvos, D R; Sellers, C M; Garrison, N E

    1987-01-01

    1. Isolation conditions for rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) liver ribosomes were optimized. 2. Optimal initial buffer (Buffer I) concentrations were 250 mM sucrose, 50 mM Tris (pH 7.6, 25 degrees C), 75 mM KCl, and 5 mM MgSO4.7H2O. 3. Optimal concentrations for post-105 supernatant buffer (Buffer III) were 25 mM Tris (pH 7.6, 25 degrees C), 75 mM KCl, and 8 mM MgSO4.7H2O.

  11. Effects of water temperature and fish size on predation vulnerability of juvenile humpback chub to rainbow trout and brown trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, David L.; Morton-Starner, Rylan

    2015-01-01

    Predation on juvenile native fish by introduced Rainbow Trout and Brown Trout is considered a significant threat to the persistence of endangered Humpback Chub Gila cypha in the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. Diet studies of Rainbow Trout and Brown Trout in Glen and Grand canyons indicate that these species do eat native fish, but impacts are difficult to assess because predation vulnerability is highly variable, depending on prey size, predator size, and the water temperatures under which the predation interactions take place. We conducted laboratory experiments to evaluate how short-term predation vulnerability of juvenile native fish changes in response to fish size and water temperature using captivity-reared Humpback Chub, Bonytail, and Roundtail Chub. Juvenile chub 45–90 mm total length (TL) were exposed to adult Rainbow and Brown trouts at 10, 15, and 20°C to measure predation vulnerability as a function of water temperature and fish size. A 1°C increase in water temperature decreased short-term predation vulnerability of Humpback Chub to Rainbow Trout by about 5%, although the relationship is not linear. Brown Trout were highly piscivorous in the laboratory at any size > 220 mm TL and at all water temperatures we tested. Understanding the effects of predation by trout on endangered Humpback Chub is critical in evaluating management options aimed at preserving native fishes in Grand Canyon National Park.

  12. Metals-contaminated benthic invertebrates in the Clark Fork River, Montana: Effects on age-0 brown trout and rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodward, Daniel F.; Farag, Aïda M.; Bergman, Harold L.; Delonay, Aaron J.; Little, Edward E.; Smiths, Charlie E.; Barrows, Frederic T.

    1995-01-01

    Benthic organisms in the upper Clark Fork River have recently been implicated as a dietary source of metals that may be a chronic problem for young-of-the-year rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In this present study, early life stage brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout were exposed for 88 d to simulated Clark Fork River water and a diet of benthic invertebrates collected from the river. These exposures resulted in reduced growth and elevated levels of metals in the whole body of both species. Concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, and Pb increased in whole brown trout; in rainbow trout, As and Cd increased in whole fish, and As also increased in liver. Brown trout on the metals-contaminated diets exhibited constipation, gut impaction, increased cell membrane damage (lipid peroxidation), decreased digestive enzyme production (zymogen), and a sloughing of intestinal mucosal epithelial cells. Rainbow trout fed the contaminated diets exhibited constipation and reduced feeding activity. We believe that the reduced standing crop of trout in the Clark Fork River results partly from chronic effects of metals contamination in benthic invertebrates that are important as food for young-of-the-year fish.

  13. Determining vaccination frequency in farmed rainbow trout using Vibrio anguillarum O1 specific serum antibody measurements.

    PubMed

    Holten-Andersen, Lars; Dalsgaard, Inger; Nylén, Jørgen; Lorenzen, Niels; Buchmann, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Despite vaccination with a commercial vaccine with a documented protective effect against Vibrio anguillarum O1 disease outbreaks caused by this bacterium have been registered among rainbow trout at Danish fish farms. The present study examined specific serum antibody levels as a valid marker for assessing vaccination status in a fish population. For this purpose a highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed and used to evaluate sera from farmed rainbow trout vaccinated against V. anguillarum O1. Immune sera from rainbow trout immunised with an experimental vaccine based on inactivated V. anguillarum O1 bacterin in Freund's incomplete adjuvant were used for ELISA optimisation. Subsequently, sera from farmed rainbow trout vaccinated with a commercial vaccine against V. anguillarum were analysed with the ELISA. The measured serum antibody levels were compared with the vaccine status of the fish (vaccinated/unvaccinated) as evaluated through visual examination. Repeated immunisation with the experimental vaccine lead to increasing levels of specific serum antibodies in the vaccinated rainbow trout. The farmed rainbow trout responded with high antibody levels to a single injection with the commercial vaccine. However, the diversity in responses was more pronounced in the farmed fish. Primary visual examinations for vaccine status in rainbow trout from the commercial farm revealed a large pool of unvaccinated specimens (vaccination failure rate=20%) among the otherwise vaccinated fish. Through serum analyses using the ELISA in a blinded set-up it was possible to separate samples collected from the farmed rainbow trout into vaccinated and unvaccinated fish. Much attention has been devoted to development of new and more effective vaccines. Here we present a case from a Danish rainbow trout farm indicating that attention should also be directed to the vaccination procedure in order to secure high vaccination frequencies necessary for optimal

  14. Central melatonin binding sites in rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Davies, B; Hannah, L T; Randall, C F; Bromage, N; Williams, L M

    1994-10-01

    A combination of in vitro autoradiography and membrane homogenate receptor assays has been used to localize and characterized 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding sites in the brain of the rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss). Specific 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding, defined as that displaced by 1 microM melatonin, increased linearly with increasing protein concentration in membrane homogenates of whole trout brain. Specific binding was both time and temperature dependent and reversible in the presence of 1 microM melatonin. Binding was saturable at between 100-150 pM 2-[125I]iodomelatonin and Scatchard analysis of saturation isotherms revealed a dissociation constant (Kd) of 15.00 +/- 0.95 pM and a maximum receptor number (Bmax) of 42.35 +/- 2.70 fm/mg protein (n = 16). Addition of 10(-4) M GTP gamma S (an analogue of guanosine triphosphate) to saturation isotherms apparently reduced the Bmax by 75% on average with no apparent change in the affinity of the binding. Scatchard analysis of saturation isotherms generated from whole brain membrane homogenates of trout kept on long days (15 hr light:9 hr dark) and killed either during the midlight or middark phase showed no significant differences in either the Kd or the Bmax of 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding, although a robust rhythm in melatonin concentration was confirmed in these fish. Displacement of 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding with increasing concentrations of competing ligands gave an order of potency of 2-iodomelatonin > melatonin > 5-HT. Localization of specific central 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding in the rainbow trout showed high levels of binding associated with neuronal areas involved in the processing of visual signals, particularly the optic tectum and nucleus rotundus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Estrogen receptor mRNA in mineralized tissues of rainbow trout: calcium mobilization by estrogen.

    PubMed

    Armour, K J; Lehane, D B; Pakdel, F; Valotaire, Y; Graham, R; Russell, R G; Henderson, I W

    1997-07-07

    RT-PCR was undertaken on total RNA extracts from bone and scales of the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The rainbow trout estrogen receptor (ER)-specific primers used amplified a single product of expected size from each tissue which, using Southern blotting, strongly hybridized with a 32P-labelled rtER probe under stringent conditions. These data provide the first in vivo evidence of ER mRNA in bone and scale tissues of rainbow trout and suggest that the effects of estrogen observed in this study (increased bone mineral and decreased scale mineral contents, respectively) may be mediated directly through ER.

  16. Comparison of heavy metal levels of farmed and escaped farmed rainbow trout and health risk assessment associated with their consumption.

    PubMed

    Varol, Memet; Sünbül, Muhammet Raşit

    2017-08-21

    In this study, levels of ten metals (arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, lead, and zinc) in muscles of farmed and escaped farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Keban Dam Reservoir (Turkey) were determined. Also, human health risks associated with their consumption were assessed. Of ten metals, only Co and Fe levels in escaped rainbow trout were significantly higher than those in farmed rainbow trout. The metal levels in farmed and escaped rainbow trout were below the maximum permissible limits. The estimated daily intake (EDI) of each metal in both farmed and escaped farmed rainbow trout was much lower than the respective tolerable daily intake (TDI). The target hazard quotient (THQ) values for individual metal and the total THQ values for combined metals were lower than 1 in both farmed and escaped rainbow trout, indicating no health risk for humans. The cancer risk (CR) values estimated for inorganic As in both farmed and escaped rainbow trout indicated low carcinogenic risk to the consumers. According to the maximum allowable monthly consumption limits (CRmm), adults may safely consume 24 meals of farmed rainbow trout per month or 39 meals of escaped rainbow trout per month, with minimal adverse carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic health effects. This study revealed that the risk from consuming farmed and escaped farmed rainbow trout in the Keban Dam Reservoir due to these trace elements is minimal.

  17. Novel molecular markers differentiate Oncorhynchus mykiss (rainbow trout and steelhead) and the O. clarki (cutthroat trout) subspecies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostberg, C.O.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    A suite of 26 PCR-based markers was developed that differentiates rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and coastal cutthroat trout (O. clarki clarki). The markers also differentiated rainbow from other cutthroat trout subspecies (O. clarki), and several of the markers differentiated between cutthroat trout subspecies. This system has numerous positive attributes, including: nonlethal sampling, high species-specificity and products that are easily identified and scored using agarose gel electrophoresis. The methodology described for developing the markers can be applied to virtually any system in which numerous markers are desired for identifying or differentiating species or subspecies.

  18. Molecular analysis of population genetic structure and recolonization of rainbow trout following the Cantara spill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, J.L.; Heine, Erika L.; Gan, Christina A.; Fountain, Monique C.

    2000-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence and allelic frequency data for 12 microsatellite loci were used to analyze population genetic structure and recolonization by rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, following the 1991 Cantara spill on the upper Sacramento River, California. Genetic analyses were performed on 1,016 wild rainbow trout collected between 1993 and 1996 from the mainstem and in 8 tributaries. Wild trout genotypes were compared to genotypes for 79 Mount Shasta Hatchery rainbow trout. No genetic heterogeneity was found 2 years after the spill (1993) between tributary populations and geographically proximate mainstem fish, suggesting recolonization of the upper mainstem directly from adjacent tributaries. Trout collections made in 1996 showed significant year-class genetic variation for mtDNA and microsatellites when compared to fish from the same locations in 1993. Five years after the spill, mainstem populations appeared genetically mixed with no significant allelic frequency differences between mainstem populations and geographically proximate tributary trout. In our 1996 samples, we found no significant genetic differences due to season of capture (summer or fall) or sampling technique used to capture rainbow trout, with the exception of trout collected by electrofishing and hook and line near Prospect Avenue. Haplotype and allelic frequencies in wild rainbow trout populations captured in the upper Sacramento River and its tributaries were found to differ genetically from Mount Shasta Hatchery trout for both years, with the notable exception of trout collected in the lower mainstem river near Shasta Lake, where mtDNA and microsatellite data both suggested upstream colonization by hatchery fish from the reservoir. These data suggest that the chemical spill in the upper Sacramento River produced significant effects over time on the genetic population structure of rainbow trout throughout the entire upper river basin.

  19. Gill net saturation by lake trout in Michigan waters of Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Michael J.; Schorfhaar, Richard G.; Selgeby, James H.

    1998-01-01

    We conducted experimental fishing for lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in Michigan waters of Lake Superior to determine the importance of soak time on catch per effort (CPE) in numbers per kilometer of standard gill net. We modeled CPE as a nonlinear function of the number of nights between setting and lifting (soak time), in which the nets fill at a certain rate toward some maximum after which the nets cannot hold more fish. We found that lake trout CPE increased with soak time at a rate that varied with lake trout density toward a saturation level that was independent of lake trout density. The CPE values of nets soaked 2–5 nights divided by the CPE of nets soaked 1 night were significantly lower than would be expected had CPE increased as a linear function of the number of nights soaked. We derived a means for correcting gill-net CPE values for differing soak times to a common base of 1 night soaked. We concluded that it is inappropriate to assume lake trout catches in gill nets will increase in direct proportion to the number of nights soaked and recommend that CPE of lake trout in gill nets be corrected for soak time.

  20. A suite of twelve single nucleotide polymorphism markers for detecting introgression between cutthroat and rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Andrew S; Phillips, Ruth B

    2011-03-01

    A suite of 12 subspecies and species-specific single nucleotide polymorphism (species-specific SNP) markers was developed to distinguish rainbow trout (RT) Oncorhynchus mykiss from the four major subspecies of cutthroat trout: westslope cutthroat trout (WCT) Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi, Yellowstone cutthroat trout (YCT) Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri, coastal cutthroat trout (CCT) Oncorhynchus clarki clarki, Lahontan cutthroat trout (LCT) Oncorhynchus clarki henshawi, and their hybrids. Several of the markers were linked to help strengthen hybrid determinations, and sex-specific species-specific SNP assays were also developed.

  1. Genetics of Growth Reaction Norms in Farmed Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Sae-Lim, Panya; Mulder, Han; Gjerde, Bjarne; Koskinen, Heikki; Lillehammer, Marie; Kause, Antti

    2015-01-01

    Rainbow trout is farmed globally under diverse uncontrollable environments. Fish with low macroenvironmental sensitivity (ES) of growth is important to thrive and grow under these uncontrollable environments. The ES may evolve as a correlated response to selection for growth in one environment when the genetic correlation between ES and growth is nonzero. The aims of this study were to quantify additive genetic variance for ES of body weight (BW), defined as the slope of reaction norm across breeding environment (BE) and production environment (PE), and to estimate the genetic correlation (rg(int, sl)) between BW and ES. To estimate heritable variance of ES, the coheritability of ES was derived using selection index theory. The BW records from 43,040 rainbow trout performing either in freshwater or seawater were analysed using a reaction norm model. High additive genetic variance for ES (9584) was observed, inferring that genetic changes in ES can be expected. The coheritability for ES was either -0.06 (intercept at PE) or -0.08 (intercept at BE), suggesting that BW observation in either PE or BE results in low accuracy of selection for ES. Yet, the rg(int, sl) was negative (-0.41 to -0.33) indicating that selection for BW in one environment is expected to result in more sensitive fish. To avoid an increase of ES while selecting for BW, it is possible to have equal genetic gain in BW in both environments so that ES is maintained stable. PMID:26267268

  2. Genetics of Growth Reaction Norms in Farmed Rainbow Trout.

    PubMed

    Sae-Lim, Panya; Mulder, Han; Gjerde, Bjarne; Koskinen, Heikki; Lillehammer, Marie; Kause, Antti

    2015-01-01

    Rainbow trout is farmed globally under diverse uncontrollable environments. Fish with low macroenvironmental sensitivity (ES) of growth is important to thrive and grow under these uncontrollable environments. The ES may evolve as a correlated response to selection for growth in one environment when the genetic correlation between ES and growth is nonzero. The aims of this study were to quantify additive genetic variance for ES of body weight (BW), defined as the slope of reaction norm across breeding environment (BE) and production environment (PE), and to estimate the genetic correlation (rg(int, sl)) between BW and ES. To estimate heritable variance of ES, the coheritability of ES was derived using selection index theory. The BW records from 43,040 rainbow trout performing either in freshwater or seawater were analysed using a reaction norm model. High additive genetic variance for ES (9584) was observed, inferring that genetic changes in ES can be expected. The coheritability for ES was either -0.06 (intercept at PE) or -0.08 (intercept at BE), suggesting that BW observation in either PE or BE results in low accuracy of selection for ES. Yet, the rg(int, sl) was negative (-0.41 to -0.33) indicating that selection for BW in one environment is expected to result in more sensitive fish. To avoid an increase of ES while selecting for BW, it is possible to have equal genetic gain in BW in both environments so that ES is maintained stable.

  3. Status and opportunities for genomics research with rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorgaard, G.H.; Bailey, G.S.; Williams, D.; Buhler, D.R.; Kaattari, S.L.; Ristow, S.S.; Hansen, J.D.; Winton, J.R.; Bartholomew, J.L.; Nagler, J.J.; Walsh, P.J.; Vijayan, M.M.; Devlin, R.H.; Hardy, R.W.; Overturf, K.E.; Young, W.P.; Robison, B.D.; Rexroad, C.; Palti, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is one of the most widely studied of model fish species. Extensive basic biological information has been collected for this species, which because of their large size relative to other model fish species are particularly suitable for studies requiring ample quantities of specific cells and tissue types. Rainbow trout have been widely utilized for research in carcinogenesis, toxicology, comparative immunology, disease ecology, physiology and nutrition. They are distinctive in having evolved from a relatively recent tetraploid event, resulting in a high incidence of duplicated genes. Natural populations are available and have been well characterized for chromosomal, protein, molecular and quantitative genetic variation. Their ease of culture, and experimental and aquacultural significance has led to the development of clonal lines and the widespread application of transgenic technology to this species. Numerous microsatellites have been isolated and two relatively detailed genetic maps have been developed. Extensive sequencing of expressed sequence tags has begun and four BAC libraries have been developed. The development and analysis of additional genomic sequence data will provide distinctive opportunities to address problems in areas such as evolution of the immune system and duplicate genes. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Experimental infection of rainbow trout with Saprolegnia parasitica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howe, George E.; Stehly, Guy R.

    1998-01-01

    A method was developed to experimentally induce saprolegniasis in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. The development of a reliable method to produce infected fish is essential to efforts to determine the efficacy of various antifungal treatments. Three methods for inducing saprolegniasis were evaluated in waters containing known concentrations of Saprolegnia parasitica zoospores. These methods included application of the following stressors to fish: (1) abrasion and dewatering, (2) water temperature increase, and (3) a combination of abrasion, dewatering, and temperature increase. Neither physical abrasion nor temperature increase stress alone was effective for inducing saprolegniasis. Only 25.9% of fish stressed by abrasion and dewatering alone became infected. Application of both abrasion and temperature stress, however, induced saprolegniasis in 77.8% of fish tested. Most of these fish became infected after 5 d of stress treatments. No fish became infected or died in the positive control group (not stressed but exposed to S. parasitica zoospores) or the negative control group (not stressed or challenged). This method should enable researchers to induce saprolegniasis in rainbow trout to study its pathogenesis or to test the efficacy of antifungal treatments. In conducting efficacy studies, it is important that therapeutic treatments begin promptly after the first signs of saprolegniasis are observed because the disease can progress very quickly and often results in mortality.

  5. Rubber additives induce oxidative stress in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Stephensen, Eiríkur; Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha; Hulander, Mats; Parkkonen, Jari; Förlin, Lars

    2005-10-15

    Several studies have demonstrated the toxicity of rubber leachate, mainly from rubber tires, to aquatic organisms. In the present study rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to water provided to aquaria through a rubber hose. Increased hepatic ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, and glutathione reductase (GR) activity were observed in the exposed fish. Two common rubber additives, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) and diphenylamine (DPA) and structurally related compounds, were identified by chemical analyses of water samples as were hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Metabolites of these compounds were also detected in the bile of exposed fish, as were some of the parent compounds. In a following experiment, we injected rainbow trout with DPA or MBT. Both compounds affected total glutathione (tGSH) concentration in liver and MBT caused an increase in hepatic GR and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity as well. In DPA injected fish, hydroxylated DPA was the main metabolite in the bile. Our results indicate that rubber chemicals may leach into the water surroundings where they can be taken up and metabolised by fish. Some of these chemicals can lead to up-regulation of antioxidant defences as demonstrated with DPA and MBT injections.

  6. Chromosome rearrangements and survival of androgenetic rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Ocalewicz, K; Dobosz, S; Kuzminski, H; Nowosad, J; Goryczko, K

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to quantify the impact of spontaneous and X-radiation-induced chromosome rearrangements on survival rate of androgenetic rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Various doses of X irradiation (50, 150, 250, 350 Gy) were used for inactivation of nuclear DNA in oocytes. After the irradiation, eggs were inseminated with normal sperm from 4 males derived from a strain characterized by Robertsonian rearrangements and length polymorphism of the Y chromosome. The haploid zygotes were exposed to a high hydrostatic pressure (7000 psi) to duplicate the paternal DNA. Neither Robertsonian chromosome polymorphism nor the Y chromosome morphology impaired the viability of the androgenetic embryos and alevins. Moreover, survival of eyed embryos of the androgenetic rainbow trout increased significantly with increasing doses of oocyte X irradiation. After 6 months of rearing, only specimens from the 250 and 350 Gy variants survived. The number of fingerlings with remnants of the maternal genome in the forms of chromosome fragments was higher in the 250 Gy group. Intraindividual variation of chromosome fragment number was observed, and some individuals exhibited haploid/diploid mosaicism and body malformations. Individuals irradiated with less than 250 Gy died, presumably because of the conflict between intact paternally derived chromosomes and the residues of maternal genome in the form of chromosome fragments.

  7. Secondary immune response of rainbow trout following repeated immersion vaccination.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, R M; Al-Jubury, A; Chettri, J K; Dalsgaard, I; Kania, P W; Buchmann, K

    2017-07-14

    Teleosts are able to raise a protective immune response, comprising both innate and adaptive elements, against various pathogens. This is the basis for a widespread use of vaccines, administered as injection or immersion, in the aquaculture industry. It has been described that repeated injection vaccination of fish raises a secondary immune response, consisting of rapid, accelerated and increased antibody reaction. This study reports how rainbow trout responds to repeated immersion vaccination against yersiniosis (ERM) caused by the bacterial pathogen Yersinia ruckeri. It was found that rainbow trout does not raise a classical secondary response following repeated immersion vaccination. Serum antibody titres were merely slightly increased even after three immunizations, using 30-s immersion into a bacterin consisting of formalin-inactivated Y. ruckeri (serotype O1, biotypes 1 and 2), performed over a 3-month period. The densities of IgM-positive lymphocytes in spleen of fish immunized three times were increased compared to control fish, but no general trend for an increase with the number of immunizations was noted. The lack of a classical secondary response following repeated immersion vaccination may partly be explained by limited uptake of antigen by immersion compared to injection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Gyrodactylus salmonis infection impairs the olfactory system of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Lari, E; Pyle, G G

    2017-01-20

    Monogenean worms are ectoparasites that are known to be infectious to a wide variety of fish. Few species of monogenean parasites have been reported in the olfactory chamber of fish in current peer-reviewed literature. However, the impacts of these parasites on the olfactory system are not well understood. In this study, the effects of Gyrodactylus salmonis on the olfactory system structure and performance were investigated in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The olfactory performance of the infected fish was examined using an electro-olfactography (EOG) technique, while the ultrastructure of the olfactory rosette was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and light microscopy (LM). The infected rainbow trout displayed reduced responses to two standard olfactory cues (L-alanine and TCA). The SEM micrographs revealed that many regions of the olfactory epithelium in the infected fish were heavily pitted and the LM examination of the olfactory epithelium showed local proliferation of mucous cells in the sensory regions as compared to the control group. The results of this study demonstrated that G. salmonis causes physical damage to the olfactory system of fish that lead to olfactory impairment.

  9. Estimates of plasma, packed cell and total blood volume in tissues of the rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, W.H.; Pityer, R.A.; Rach, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    1. Total blood volume and relative blood volumes in selected tissues were determined in non-anesthetized, confined rainbow trout by using 51Cr-labelled trout erythrocytes as a vascular space marker.2. Mean total blood volume was estimated to be 4.09 ± 0.55 ml/100 g, or about 75% of that estimated with the commonly used plasma space marker Evans blue dye.3. Relative tissue blood volumes were greatest in highly perfused tissues such as kidney, gills, brain and liver and least in mosaic muscle.4. Estimates of tissue vascular spaces, made using radiolabelled erythrocytes, were only 25–50% of those based on plasma space markers.5. The consistently smaller vascular volumes obtained with labelled erythrocytes could be explained by assuming that commonly used plasma space markers diffuse from the vascular compartment.

  10. Estimates of plasma, packed cell and total blood volume in tissues of the rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri )

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, W.H.; Pityer, R.A.; Rach, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Total blood volume and relative blood volumes in selected tissues were determined in non-anesthetized, confined rainbow trout by using super(51)Cr-labelled trout erythrocytes as a vascular space marker. Mean total blood volume was estimated to be 4.09 plus or minus 0.55 ml/100 g, or about 75% of that estimated with the commonly used plasma space marker Evans blue dye. Relative tissue blood volumes were greatest in highly perfused tissues such as kidney, gills, brain and liver and least in mosaic muscle. Estimates of tissue vascular spaces, made using radiolabelled erythrocytes, were only 25-50% of those based on plasma space markers. The consistently smaller vascular volumes obtained with labelled erythrocytes could be explained by assuming that commonly used plasma space markers diffuse from the vascular compartment.

  11. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigations; Rainbow and Bull Trout Recruitment, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Jody P.

    2005-08-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss provide the most important sport fishery in the Kootenai River, Idaho, but densities and catch rates are low. Low recruitment is one possible factor limiting the rainbow trout population. Bull trout Salvelinus confluentus also exist in the Kootenai River, but little is known about this population. Research reported here addresses the following objectives for the Kootenai River, Idaho: identify sources of rainbow and bull trout recruitment, monitor the rainbow trout population size structure to evaluate regulation changes initiated in 2002, and identify factors potentially limiting rainbow trout recruitment. A screw trap was used to estimate juvenile redband and bull trout out-migration from the Callahan Creek drainage, and electrofishing was conducted to estimate summer densities of bull trout rearing in the Idaho portion of the drainage. An estimated 1,132 juvenile redband trout and 68 juvenile bull trout out-migrated from Callahan Creek to the Kootenai River from April 7 through July 15, 2003. Densities of bull trout {ge} age-1 in North and South Callahan creeks ranged from 1.6 to 7.7 fish/100m{sup 2} in August. Bull trout redd surveys were conducted in North and South Callahan creeks, Boulder Creek, and Myrtle Creek. Thirty-two bull trout redds were located in North Callahan Creek, while 10 redds were found in South Callahan Creek. No redds were found in the other two streams. Modeling of culverts in the Deep Creek drainage identified two as upstream migration barriers, preventing rainbow trout from reaching spawning and rearing habitat. Water temperature monitoring in Deep Creek identified two sites where maximum temperatures exceeded those suitable for rainbow trout. Boulder Creek produces the most rainbow trout recruits to the Kootenai River in Idaho upstream of Deep Creek, but may be below carrying capacity for rearing rainbow trout due to nutrient limitations. Monthly water samples indicate Boulder Creek is nutrient limited

  12. Initiation, promotion, and inhibition of carcinogenesis in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, G.; Selivonchick, D.; Hendricks, J.

    1987-04-01

    The identification of etiological agents in feral fish neoplasia epizootics has been hampered in part by the lack of suitable fish models, and complicated by the likely existence of environmental agents which can act to stimulate or reduce population responses to genotoxin insult. The response of fish to tumor inhibitors and promoters, and the underlying mechanisms of modulation, have been studied in the rainbow trout model. Dietary treatment of trout with the compounds indole-3-carbinol (I3C), ..beta..-napthroflavone (BNF), or the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) complex Aroclor 1254, before and during exposure to aflatoxin B/sub 1/ (AFB1), was shown to reduce the final incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma after 12 months, compared to fish receiving AFB1 only. By contrast, treatment of trout with BNF or I3C following AFB1 initiation led to a significant enhancement of ultimate tumor response, Similarly, simultaneous treatment of trout with PCB and the carcinogen N-nitrosodiethylamine led to syncarcinogenic enhancement, rather than inhibition, of tumor response. Mechanisms of inhibition of AFB1 carcinogenesis by PCB, BNF, and I3C were investigated. PCB and BNF, but not I3C, are known to be strong inducers of trout cytochrome P448 and associated activities. Dietary induction by BNF or PCB was shown to be accompanied in solvated hepatocytes by considerably altered AFB1 metabolism, and by significantly reduced rates of DNA adduct formation for all three agents. All agents differentially altered in vivo AFB1 pharmacokinetics, enhanced bile elimination of AFB1 as the aflatoxicol-M1 glucuronide, and significantly reduced peak levels of liver DNA adduct formation.

  13. Antimicrobial agents, triclosan, chloroxylenol, methylisothiazolinone and borax, used in cleaning had genotoxic and histopathologic effects on rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Capkin, Erol; Ozcelep, Tuna; Kayis, Sevki; Altinok, Ilhan

    2017-09-01

    Triclosan (TRC), chloroxylenol (PCMX) and methylisothiazolinone (MIT) have been commonly used as an antimicrobial in soaps while borax (BRX) is used in household cleaning. After using these chemicals, they are washed down drains and getting into the aquatic ecosystem in which they may affect aquatic living organisms. In the present study, the chronic effects of TRC, PCMX, MIT and BRX on genotoxicity, gene expression and histopathology of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were evaluated for 40 days under semi static condition. The comet assay results indicated that MIT, TRC and PCMX caused significant DNA damage to erythrocytes of the fish. Transcription of SOD, GPX1, GPX2, GSTA, HSP90BB, HSP90BA, CAT, and HSC70A genes were significantly regulated as a result of TRC, PCMX, MIT, and BRX exposure except PCMX exposed GSTA gene. Histological lesions were detected in gills, spleen liver, and trunk kidney of the fish. Lamellar fusion, hyperplasia and epithelial necrosis in gills, melanomacrophage centers and splenic necrosis in spleen, pyknotic nucleus, fat vacuoles, necrotic hepatocytes in liver, cloudy swelling in the tubules, renal tubule epithelial cells degeneration, glomerular capillaries dilation and glomerulus degeneration in kidney, were observed. Our study demonstrates the chronic toxic effect of TRC, PCMX, MIT, and BRX is high in rainbow trout. Therefore, we should be more careful when using these chemicals for cleaning in order to protect aquatic environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Effects of Acute Waterborne Exposure to Sublethal Concentrations of Molybdenum on the Stress Response in Rainbow Trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    PubMed Central

    Ricketts, Chelsea D.; Bates, William R.; Reid, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    To determine if molybdenum (Mo) is a chemical stressor, fingerling and juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to waterborne sodium molybdate (0, 2, 20, or 1,000 mg l-1 of Mo) and components of the physiological (plasma cortisol, blood glucose, and hematocrit) and cellular (heat shock protein [hsp] 72, hsp73, and hsp90 in the liver, gills, heart, and erythrocytes and metallothionein [MT] in the liver and gills) stress responses were measured prior to initiation of exposure and at 8, 24, and 96 h. During the acute exposure, plasma cortisol, blood glucose, and hematocrit levels remained unchanged in all treatments. Heat shock protein 72 was not induced as a result of exposure and there were no detectable changes in total hsp70 (72 and 73), hsp90, and MT levels in any of the tissues relative to controls. Both fingerling and juvenile fish responded with similar lack of apparent sensitivity to Mo exposure. These experiments demonstrate that exposure to waterborne Mo of up to 1,000 mg l-1 did not activate a physiological or cellular stress response in fish. Information from this study suggests that Mo water quality guidelines for the protection of aquatic life are highly protective of freshwater fish, namely rainbow trout. PMID:25629693

  15. Fate of silver nanoparticles in wastewater and immunotoxic effects on rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Bruneau, A; Turcotte, P; Pilote, M; Gagné, F; Gagnon, C

    2016-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are currently used in technology, medicine and consumer products, even though the fate and the ecotoxicological risks on aquatic organisms of these new materials are not well known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the fate, bioavailability of AgNPs and their effects on fish in presence of municipal effluents. Juvenile rainbow trout were exposed for 96h to 40μg/L of AgNPs or 4μg/L of dissolved silver (AgNO3) in diluted (10%) municipal wastewater. Silver (Ag) concentrations were measured both on water samples and fish tissues (liver and gills). Toxicity was investigated by following immunological parameters in the pronephros (viability, phagocytosis) and biomarkers in liver and gills (cyclooxygenase activity, lipid peroxidation, glutathione-S-transferase, metallothioneins, DNA strand breaks and labile zinc). Results indicated that AgNPs appeared as small non-charged aggregates in wastewaters (11.7±1.4nm). In gills, the exposure to AgNPs induced morphological modifications without visible nanoparticle bioaccumulation. Dissolved Ag(+) was bioavailable in diluted effluent and induced oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation), labile zinc and a marginal decrease in superoxide dismutase in fish gills. Ag(+) also increased significantly metallothionein levels and inhibited the DNA repair activity in the liver. Finally, the two silver forms were found in liver and induced immunosuppression and inflammation (increase in cyclooxygenase activity). This study demonstrated that both forms of Ag produced harmful effects and AgNPs in wastewater were bioavailable to fish despite of their formation of aggregates.

  16. Dietary uptake of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carline, Robert F.; Barry, Patrick M.; Ketola, H. George

    2004-01-01

    The presence of detectable levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in commercially produced fish feed has raised a concern about the degree of biomagnification of these contaminants in hatchery-reared trout. Our objectives were to (1) define the relationship between concentrations of PCBs in fish feed and in fish tissue and (2) estimate the relative contributions of feed and hatchery supply water to PCB concentrations in fish. We conducted a 6-month feeding trial with fingerling rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss fed commercial diets with four concentrations of PCBs: a low-PCB diet (69 ng/g); a typical commercial diet (126 ng/g); and the typical diet spiked with PCBs at two levels (220 and 280 ng/g). The concentrations of PCBs in fillets after 1 month were commensurate with those in the feeds and remained relatively stable for the next 5 months; mean PCB concentrations in fillets ranged from 54 to 94 ng/g. Low levels of PCBs were detected in the hatchery supply water. We used the concentrations of PCBs in the feeds, absorption rates of PCBs, and two different rates of PCB depuration to estimate the potential uptake of PCBs from supply water. When we used a low depuration rate (half-life = 219 d), the computed body burdens of PCBs could be entirely attributed to the feeds. When a high depuration rate (half-life = 66 d) was used, some uptake of PCBs from the supply water was likely, but most of the total body burden originated from the feeds. We concluded that rainbow trout fed a diet with 126 ng/g PCBs would have a PCB concentration of about 60 ng/g in their fillets, which is high enough to warrant issuance of a consumption advisory (no more than one meal of fish per week) under a protocol adopted by some Great Lakes states.

  17. Mechanisms of Cl(-) uptake in rainbow trout: cloning and expression of slc26a6, a prospective Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchanger.

    PubMed

    Boyle, David; Clifford, Alexander M; Orr, Elizabeth; Chamot, Danuta; Goss, Greg G

    2015-02-01

    In fresh waters, fishes continuously acquire ions to offset diffusive losses to a more dilute ambient environment and to maintain acid-base status. The objectives of the present study were to clone slc26a6, a prospective Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchanger from rainbow trout, investigate its expression patterns in various tissues, at different developmental stages and after differential salinity exposure, and probe the mechanisms of Cl(-) uptake in rainbow trout embryos during development using a pharmacological inhibitor approach combined with (36)Cl(-) unidirectional fluxes. Results showed that the cloned gene encoded a 783 amino acid protein with conserved domains characteristic of the SLC26a family of anion exchange proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of this sequence against all subfamilies of the SLC26a family demonstrated that this translated protein shared a common ancestor with other actinopterygii and mammalian SLC26a6 isoforms and thus confirmed the identity of the cloned gene. Expression of slc26a6 was detected in all tissues and developmental stages assayed but was highest in the gill of juvenile trout. In trout embryos, Cl(-) uptake increased significantly post-hatch and was demonstrated to be mediated via an anion exchanger specific (DIDS sensitive) pathway that was also sensitive to hypercapnia. This parallels well with the predicted function of slc26a6, and the detection of the transcript in embryos and tissues of trout. In conclusion, this study is the first report of slc26a6 in rainbow trout and functional and expression analyses indicate its likely involvement in Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange in two life stages of rainbow trout. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of angler effort and harvest of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Lake Scanewa, Washington, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liedtke, Theresa L.; Kock, Tobias J.; Ekstrom, Brian K.; Tomka, Ryan G.; Rondorf, Dennis W.

    2011-01-01

    A creel evaluation was conducted in Lake Scanewa, a reservoir on the Cowlitz River, to monitor catch rates of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and determine if the trout fishery was having negative impacts on juvenile anadromous salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) in the system. The trout fishery, which is supported by releases of 20,000 fish (2 fish per pound) per year from June to August, was developed to mitigate for the construction of the Cowlitz Falls Dam in 1994. The trout fishery has a target catch rate of at least 0.50 fish per hour. Interviews with 1,214 anglers during the creel evaluation found that most anglers targeted rainbow trout (52 percent) or Chinook and coho salmon (48 percent). The interviewed anglers caught a total of 1,866 fish, most of which were rainbow trout (1,213 fish; 78 percent) or coho salmon (311 fish; 20 percent). We estimated that anglers spent 17,365 hours fishing in Lake Scanewa from June to November 2010. Catch rates for boat anglers (1.39 fish per hour) exceeded the 0.50 fish per hour target, whereas catch rates for shore anglers (0.35 fish per hour) fell short of the goal. The combined catch rates for all trout anglers in the reservoir were 0.96 fish per hour. We estimated that anglers harvested 7,584 (95 percent confidence interval = 2,795-12,372 fish) rainbow trout during the study period and boat anglers caught more fish than shore anglers (5,975 and 1,609 fish, respectively). This estimate suggests that more than 12,000 of the 20,000 rainbow trout released into Lake Scanewa during 2010 were not harvested, and could negatively impact juvenile salmon in the reservoir through predation or competition. We examined 1,236 stomach samples from rainbow trout and found that 2.1 percent (26 fish) of these samples contained juvenile fish. Large trout (greater than 300 millimeters) had a higher incidence of predation than small trout (less than 300 millimeters; 8.50 and 0.06 percent, respectively). A total of 39 fish were found in rainbow

  19. Determination of metabolic stability using cryopreserved hepatocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard protocols for isolating, cryopreserving, and thawing rainbow trout hepatocytes are described, along with procedures for using fresh or cryopreserved hepatocytes to assess chemical metabolic stability in fish by means of a substrate depletion approach. Variations on thes...

  20. BRANCHIAL ELIMINATION OF SUPERHYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The branchial elimination of pentachloroethane and four congeneric polychlorinated bephenyls by rainbow trout was measured using a fish respirometer-metabolism chamber and an adsorption resin column. Branchial elimination was characterized by calculating a set of apparent in vivo...

  1. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphism markers associated with cortisol response to crowding in Rainbow Trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding stress responses is essential for improving animal welfare and increasing agriculture production efficiency. Previously, we reported microsatellite markers associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting plasma cortisol response to crowding in rainbow trout. Our main objectives...

  2. Feeding periodicity, diet composition, and food consumption of subyearling rainbow trout in winter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; Chalupnicki, Marc; Abbett, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Although winter is a critically important period for stream salmonids, aspects of the ecology of several species are poorly understood. Consequently, we examined the diel feeding ecology of subyearling rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during winter in a central New York stream. Rainbow trout diet was significantly different during each 4-h interval and also differed from the drift and benthos. Feeding was significantly greater during darkness (i.e. 20:00 h – 04:00 h) than during daylight hours (i.e. 08:00 h – 16:00 h), peaking at 20:00 h. Daily food consumption (1.9 mg) and daily ration (3.4 %) during winter were substantially lower than previously reported for subyearling rainbow trout in the same stream during summer. These findings provide important new insights into the winter feeding ecology of juvenile rainbow trout in streams.

  3. Estrogenic Activity of Perfluoroalkyl Acids in Juvenile Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential estrogenic activity of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) was determined using separate screening and dose response studies with juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Results of this study indicate that some PFAAs may act as estrogens in fish.

  4. Inheritance of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss spleen size and correlation with bacterial cold water disease resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infectious disease causes substantial loss in aquaculture and selective breeding for increased innate resistance offers an attractive strategy for controlling disease. In 2005, the NCCCWA implemented a selective breeding program to increase rainbow trout survival following challenge with Flavobacte...

  5. Characterization of the rainbow trout transcriptome using Sanger and 454-Pyrosequencing approaches

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BACKGROUND: Rainbow trout is an important fish species for aquaculture and a model species for research investigations associated with carcinogenesis, comparative immunology, toxicology and the evolutionary biology. However, to date there is no genome reference sequence to facilitate the development...

  6. Characterization of the rainbow trout transcriptome using Sanger and 454-pyrosequencing approaches

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Rainbow trout is an important fish for aquaculture and recreational fisheries and serves as a model species for research investigations associated with carcinogenesis, comparative immunology, toxicology and the evolutionary biology. However, to date there is no genome reference sequence...

  7. Immunization of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum) with a crude lipopolysaccharide extract from Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Control methods for Flavobacterium psychrophilum, the etiologic agent of bacterial coldwater disease (CWD) and rainbow trout fry syndrome, are limited and oftentimes ineffective; hence, research efforts have focused on vaccine development. This study tested the hypothesis that a crude lipopolysacch...

  8. Effects of maturation, diet, and estradiol on indices of protein degradation in rainbow trout (Oncorhychus mykiss)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sexual maturation in salmonids requires mobilization of proteins from muscle tissue as evidenced by increased expression of proteolytic genes and decreased muscle protein content. However, it is unknown how ration level affects this proteolytic response. Female diploid rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus ...

  9. Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss ladderlectin, but not intelectin, binds viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus IVb.

    PubMed

    Reid, A; Young, K M; Lumsden, J S

    2011-06-16

    The innate immune system of fish is critical for rapid detection and immediate response to infection, as well as to orchestrate the adaptive branch of the immune system. Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss ladderlectin and intelectin are plasma pattern recognition receptors (PRR) for bacterial and fungal pathogens of rainbow trout, but their role as PRRs for virus is unknown. Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) IVb is a recently described fish pathogen in the Great Lakes, and rainbow trout can be experimentally infected. Using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, rainbow trout plasma ladderlectin significantly (p < 0.05) bound purified VHSV while intelectin did not. In addition, plasma ladderlectin but not intelectin was eluted from a VHSV-conjugated Toyopearl column using EDTA. Protein identification was confirmed with polyclonal antiserum used with slot immunoblot, 1-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide electrophoresis, and Western immunoblot.

  10. Characterization of the rainbow trout spleen transcriptome and identification of immune-related genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Disease susceptibility affects production efficiency and profitability in rainbow trout aquaculture. There is limited information available regarding the functions and mechanisms of teleost immune pathways. Immunogenomics provides powerful approaches to identify disease resistance genes/gene pathway...

  11. Detection of quantitative trait loci affecting response to crowding stress in rainbow trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aquaculture environmental stressors such as handling, overcrowding, sub-optimal water quality parameters and social interactions negatively impact growth, feed intake, feed efficiency, disease resistance, flesh quality and reproductive performance in rainbow trout. To identify QTL affecting response...

  12. Estrogenic Activity of Perfluoroalkyl Acids in Juvenile Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential estrogenic activity of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) was determined using separate screening and dose response studies with juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Results of this study indicate that some PFAAs may act as estrogens in fish.

  13. Determination of metabolic stability using cryopreserved hepatocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard protocols for isolating, cryopreserving, and thawing rainbow trout hepatocytes are described, along with procedures for using fresh or cryopreserved hepatocytes to assess chemical metabolic stability in fish by means of a substrate depletion approach. Variations on thes...

  14. Toxicity, silver accumulation and metallothionein induction in freshwater rainbow trout during exposure to different silver salts

    SciTech Connect

    Hogstrand, C.; Galvez, F.; Wood, C.M.

    1996-07-01

    Static-renewal 168-h toxicity tests of silver nitrate (AgNO{sub 3}), silver chloride (AgCl{sub n}), and silver thiosulfate (Ag(S{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub n}) with juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhyncus mykiss) were performed by standard methods. Because of low solubility of AgCl(s), bioassays for AgCl{sub n} were performed in two separate ways. In one test series, AgCl(s) was added to freshwater and in another, AgCl{sub n}(aq) was generated by adding AgNO{sub 3} to freshwater supplemented with 50 mM NaCl. Concentrations of Ag and metallothionein (MT) were analyzed in gills and livers of fish that survived the exposures. Although Ag added as AgNO{sub 3} was found to be highly toxic to rainbow trout (168-h LC50 = 9.1 {micro}g Ag L{sup {minus}1}), the toxicities of the other Ag salts were low. The 168-h LC50 for Ag(S{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub n} was 137,000 {micro}g Ag L{sup {minus}1} and no mortality was observed in AgCl{sub n} (100,000 {micro}g Ag L{sup {minus}1}). Exposure to AgNO{sub 3}, Ag(S{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub n}, or AgCl{sub n} caused accumulation of Ag and induction of MT. Highest Ag levels were found in livers of trout exposed to 164,000 {micro}g Ag L{sup {minus}1} as Ag(S{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub n}. In these fish, the hepatic Ag concentration was increased 335 times from the control value. The MT levels in gills and liver increased with the water Ag concentration and the highest level of MT was found in liver of fish exposed to Ag(S{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub n}.

  15. Systemic and mucosal immune response of rainbow trout to immunization with an attenuated Flavobacterium psychrophilum vaccine strain by different routes.

    PubMed

    Makesh, M; Sudheesh, Ponnerassery S; Cain, Kenneth D

    2015-05-01

    Teleosts possess three immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain isotypes viz., IgM, IgT and IgD and all three isotypes are reported in rainbow trout. The expression of these Ig isotypes in response to different immunization routes was investigated and results provide a better understanding of the role these Igs in different tissues. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were immunized with an attenuated Flavobacterium psychrophilum strain, 259-93-B.17 grown under iron limiting conditions, by intraperitoneal, anal intubation and immersion routes. Serum, gill mucus, skin mucus and intestinal mucus samples were collected at 0, 3, 7, 14, 28, 42 and 56 days post immunization by sacrificing four fish from each treatment group and the unimmunized control group, and the IgM levels were estimated by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, blood, gill, skin and intestinal tissue samples were collected for Ig gene expression studies. The secretory IgM, IgD and IgT gene expression levels in these tissues were estimated by reverse transcription quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR). Levels of IgM in serum, gill and skin mucus increased significantly by 28 days after immunization in the intraperitoneally immunized group, while no significant increase in IgM level was observed in fish groups immunized by other routes. Secretory IgD and IgT expression levels were significantly upregulated in gills of fish immunized by the immersion route. Similarly, secretory IgT and IgD were upregulated in intestines of fish immunized by anal intubation route. The results confirm mucosal association of IgT and suggest that IgD may also be specialized in mucosal immunity and contribute to immediate protection to the fish at mucosal surfaces. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The origin and metabolism of vitamin D in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Pierens, S L; Fraser, D R

    2015-01-01

    An explanation for the origin and the high concentration of vitamin D (cholecalciferol) in some species of fish is still not apparent. Because fish may live in deep water and may, thus, not be exposed to solar ultraviolet (UV) light, it is commonly assumed that vitamin D found in their livers and adipose tissue has been derived from a food chain, originating in zooplankton exposed to UV light at the water surface. To investigate the metabolism and possible origin of vitamin D in fish, rainbow trout were reared from eggs, in the absence of light, and were fed a vitamin D-free diet. When small quantities of radioactively-labelled vitamin D were injected or fed to these trout, much of the radioactivity was found as excreted metabolites in bile. Hence, even when they are vitamin D deficient, trout vigorously catabolise and excrete exogenous vitamin D. The main vitamin D metabolite found in plasma of non-deficient trout was 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol [1,25(OH)2D3]. This was produced in the liver by an enzyme process that was strongly stimulated in vitamin D deficiency. When vitamin D was fed for several weeks to vitamin D-deficient trout, plasma 1,25(OH)2D3 levels rose to 180 pg/ml and the fish became hypercacemic. When vitamin D-deficient fish were inadvertently exposed to 60 W incandescent light for 24h, they became moribund and died. It was subsequently found that vitamin D-deficient trout can produce vitamin D in skin when exposed to blue light at wavelengths between 380 and 480 nm. It is concluded that trout, like terrestrial vertebrates, produce 1,25(OH)2D3 as the functional form of vitamin D and that this has an effect on calcium homeostasis. Furthermore, vitamin D is formed in the skin of these fish by the photochemical action of visible light on 7-dehydrocholesterol. Elucidation of the physicochemical mechanism of this process requires further research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential expression of subunits of 20β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase during gametogenesis in rainbow trout (Oncorhychus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Vazirzadeh, Arya; Guiguen, Yann

    2017-09-01

    The patterns of expression of two subunits of 20β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20β-HSD), key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis and activation of steroid hormones, were examined in rainbow trout by using a combination of quantitative real-time PCR and in-situ hybridization. The expression of targeted genes was examined in mRNA extracted from different tissues at different gonadal stages in male and female trout. Both subunits of 20β-HSD were found to be widely distributed in tissues. The highest expression of 20β-HSD A was found in intestine followed by skin, stomach, liver and gills, whereas, the highest expression of 20β-HSD B was observed in stomach followed by head kidney, ovary - at late vitellogenesis stage- and trunk kidney. In ovarian tissue 20β-HSD A was highly expressed in mature oocytes, and the highest expression of 20β-HSD B was in ovary at late vitellogenesis stage. There were no differences in the level of expression of either subunit among groups of rainbow trout at different stages of maturational competence. In male fish, 20β-HSD A was highly expressed in testis stage I in contrast to 20β-HSD B which was highly expressed in testis stage VIII. In situ- hybridization results showed that the 20β-HSD gene was highly expressed in gastrointestinal organs, while only slightly expressed in the gonadal tissue of fish at stage 62day-post-fertilization (dpf). Overall, the results confirm the ubiquitous presence of 20β-HSD among tissues in rainbow trout with relatively minor fluctuations in expression associated with reproductive cycles which collectively suggests a wider metabolic role of these enzymes than just an association with the synthesis of control hormones for reproduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Virulence of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) genotype III in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takafumi; Kurita, Jun; Mori, Koh-ichiro; Olesen, Niels J

    2016-01-08

    In general, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) isolates from marine fish species in European waters (genotypes GIb, GII and GIII) are non- to low virulent in rainbow trout. However, a VHSV isolation was made in 2007 from a disease outbreak in sea farmed rainbow trout in Norway. The isolate, named NO-2007-50-385, was demonstrated to belong to GIII. This isolate has attracted attention to assess which of the viral genome/proteins might be associated with the virulence in rainbow trout. In this study, we describe the difference of virulence in rainbow trout between the NO-2007-50-385 and 4p168 isolates as representatives of virulent and non-virulent GIII isolates, respectively. Rainbow trout were bath challenged with VHSV NO-2007-50-385 for 1 and 6 h, resulting in cumulative mortalities of 5 and 35%, respectively. No mortality was observed in the rainbow trout groups immersed with the genotype III VHSV isolate 4p168 for 1 and 6 h. The viral titre in organs from fish challenged with NO-2007-50-385 for 6 h increased more rapidly than those exposed for 1 h. By in vitro studies it was demonstrated that the final titres of VHSV DK-3592B (GI), NO-2007-50-385 and 4p168 inoculated on EPC cells were very similar, whereas when inoculated on the rainbow trout cell line RTG-2 the titre of the non-virulent 4p168 isolate was 3-4 logs below the two other VHSV isolates. Based on a comparative analysis of the entire genome of the genotype III isolates, we suggest that substitutions of amino acids in positions 118-123 of the nucleo-protein are candidates for being related to virulence of VHSV GIII in rainbow trout.

  19. Physiological and biochemical aspects of ozone toxicity to rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary A.; Nelson, Nancy C.; Yasutake, William T.

    1979-01-01

    An acute toxicity curve for dissolved ozone (O3) in soft water at 10 °C, using 10–13-cm rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) as the test species was calculated. The 96-h LC50 (95%, confidence interval) was 9.3 (8.1–10.6) μg/L. The lethal threshold level was about 8 μg/L mandating that a conservative margin of safety be used if ozone is employed as a fish disease control agent. Death apparently results from massive destruction of the gill lamellar epithelium together with a severe hydromineral imbalance. In partial chronic (3-mo) testing, 2 μg/L caused no significant biological damage while 5 μg/L caused some gill pathological changes and reduced feeding behavior. Accordingly, 2 μg/L is suggested as a provisional maximum safe exposure level, pending completion of life cycle studies. Thus, if ozone-treated water is discharged into the environment, dissolved O3 should be reduced to at least the 2 μg/L level to minimize adverse impacts on salmonids in receiving waters.

  20. Histopathological changes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) after exposure to sublethal composite nitrogen fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Capkin, Erol; Birincioglu, Serap; Altinok, Ilhan

    2009-10-01

    Subchronic toxicity of composite inorganic fertilizers such as ammonium sulfate [fertilizer A; (NH(4))(2)SO(4); 21% NH(4)-N)], composite fertilizer 15-15-15 (fertilizer B; commercial formulation: 15% NH(4)-N, 15% phosphorus, and 15% potassium oxide), and composite fertilizer 25-5-10 (fertilizer C; commercial formulation: 25% NH(4)-N, 5% phosphorus, and 10% potassium oxide) on the skin, liver, kidney, pancreas, and gills of the juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was studied in two-week toxicity tests under static-renewal test conditions. Fish exposed to sublethal concentrations of fertilizers did not show any behavioral abnormality compared to control groups. Histological lesions were observed in skin, gills, liver, pancreas, and trunk kidney of the fish. In the epidermis, degenerated/vacuolated epithelial cells, microcystic dilatations, and intracellular edema of mucus cell were observed. Liver had swollen and degenerated hepatocytes without losing adenoid structure. Hematopoietic tissues had necrosis and vacuolar degeneration on proximal tubules of the kidney. In order, the most affected organs were skin, liver, and kidney.

  1. Effects of gill-net trauma, barotrauma, and deep release on postrelease mortality of Lake Trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ng, Elizabeth L.; Fredericks, Jim P.; Quist, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Unaccounted postrelease mortality violates assumptions of many fisheries studies, thereby biasing parameter estimates and reducing efficiency. We evaluated effects of gill-net trauma, barotrauma, and deep-release treatment on postrelease mortality of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush. Lake trout were captured at depths up to 65 m with gill nets in Priest Lake, Idaho, and held in a large enclosure for 10–12 d. Postrelease mortality was the same for surface-release–and deep-release–treated fish (41%). Mixed-effects logistic regression models were used to evaluate effects of intrinsic and environmental factors on the probability of mortality. Presence of gill-net trauma and degree of barotrauma were associated with increased probability of postrelease mortality. Smaller fish were also more likely to suffer postrelease mortality. On average, deep-release treatment did not reduce postrelease mortality, but effectiveness of treatment increased with fish length. Of the environmental factors evaluated, only elapsed time between lifting the first and last anchors of a gill-net gang (i.e., lift time) was significantly related to postrelease mortality. Longer lift times, which may allow ascending lake trout to acclimate to depressurization, were associated with lower postrelease mortality rates. Our study suggests that postrelease mortality may be higher than previously assumed for lake trout because mortality continues after 48 h. In future studies, postrelease mortality could be reduced by increasing gill-net lift times and increasing mesh size used to increase length of fish captured.

  2. Effect of swimming activity on relative weight and body composition of juvenile rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpkins, D.G.; Hubert, W.A.; Del Rio, C.M.; Rule, D.C.

    2003-01-01

    Fisheries managers often assess body condition using relative weight (Wr) because it provides a comparative measure of fish plumpness among individuals and populations. However, it is not known whether the morphological information that Wr summarizes reflects physiological measures, such as relative lipid reserves, in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. The purpose of this study was to determine whether swimming activity affects either the Wr or proximate body composition of juvenile (total length, 170-260 mm) rainbow trout. When rainbow trout from a hatchery were fed ad libitum for 147 d, inactive (no current) and active (15 cm/s current velocity) fish did not differ in Wr However, inactive rainbow trout maintained relatively constant lipid levels, whereas active fish declined in lipid content. Relative weight may provide a comparable measure of body form, but it is not an accurate index of lipid content between active and inactive rainbow trout fed an excess ration. For assessing the physiological condition of rainbow trout, measurement of proximate body composition appears to be more accurate than indices based on length and weight.

  3. Lack of selection for resistance to whirling disease among progeny of Colorado River rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryce, E.K.N.; Zale, A.V.; Nehring, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    We compared the resistance to whirling disease of two groups of Colorado River rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and a domestic strain of rainbow trout in a controlled laboratory challenge. These three groups represented the progeny of wild rainbow trout known to have recruited (1) during the early years of infestation by Myxobolus cerebralis of the Colorado River or (2) before the presence of M. cerebralis in the system and (3) the Erwin strain of rainbow trout. The severity of whirling disease in each group was dependent on the dose of triactinomyxons of M. cerebralis to which the fish were exposed. Microscopic lesions and spore counts both increased with increasing parasite dose. Survival of the progeny of Colorado fish that recruited before the presence of M. cerebralis in the system was significantly less than was that of the domestic fish exposed to 0 and 1,000 triactinomyxons/fish. The parents that recruited to the system before the presence of M. cerebralis were considerably older than were those used for our domestic strain; this difference in parent age probably resulted in the difference in survival because egg quality decreases with age in rainbow trout. There was no difference in microscopic lesions, spore counts, or swimming performance among the three groups of rainbow trout when exposed at the same parasite level, indicating that there was no difference in resistance to whirling disease among these groups of fish.

  4. Comparative susceptibility of Atlantic salmon, lake trout and rainbow trout to Myxobolus cerebralis in controlled laboratory exposures.

    PubMed

    Blazer, V S; Densmore, C L; Schill, W B; Cartwright, D D; Page, S J

    2004-01-28

    The susceptibility of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and Atlantic salmon Salmo salar to Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease, was compared in controlled laboratory exposures. A total of 450 (225 for each dose) fry for each species were exposed to a low (200 spores per fish) or high (2000 spores per fish) dose of the infective triactinomyxon. At 22 wk post-exposure, 60 fish from each group, as well as controls for each species, were examined for clinical signs (whirling behavior, blacktail, deformed heads and skeletal deformities), microscopic lesions, and presence of spores. Rainbow trout were highly susceptible to infection, with 100% being positive for spores and with microscopic pathological changes in both exposure groups. Rainbow trout were the only species to show whirling behavior and blacktail. Atlantic salmon were less susceptible, with only 44 and 61% being positive for spores, respectively, in the low and high dose groups, while 68 and 75%, respectively, had microscopic pathology associated with cartilage damage. Rainbow trout heads contained mean spore concentrations of 2.2 (low dose) or 4.0 (high dose) x 10(6) spores g tissue(-1). The means for positive Atlantic salmon (not including zero values) were 1.7 (low) and 7.4 (high) x 10(4) spores g tissue(-1). Lake trout showed no clinical signs of infection, were negative for spores in both groups and showed no histopathological signs of M. cerebralis infection.

  5. Comparative susceptibility of Atlantic salmon, lake trout and rainbow trout to Myxobolus cerebralis in controlled laboratory exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blazer, V.S.; Densmore, Christine L.; Schill, W.B.; Cartwright, Deborah D.; Page, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    The susceptibility of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and Atlantic salmon Salmo salar to Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease, was compared in controlled laboratory exposures. A total of 450 (225 for each dose) fry for each species were exposed to a low (200 spores per fish) or high (2000 spores per fish) dose of the infective triactinomyxon. At 22 wk post-exposure, 60 fish from each group, as well as controls for each species, were examined for clinical signs (whirling behavior, blacktail, deformed heads and skeletal deformities), microscopic lesions, and presence of spores. Rainbow trout were highly susceptible to infection, with 100% being positive for spores and with microscopic pathological changes in both exposure groups. Rainbow trout were the only species to show whirling behavior and blacktail. Atlantic salmon were less susceptible, with only 44 and 61% being positive for spores, respectively, in the low and high dose groups, while 68 and 75%, respectively, had microscopic pathology associated with cartilage damage. Rainbow trout heads contained mean spore concentrations of 2.2 (low dose) or 4.0 (high dose) ?? 106 spores g tissue-1. The means for positive Atlantic salmon (not including zero values) were 1.7 (low) and 7.4 (high) ?? 104 spores g tissue-1. Lake trout showed no clinical signs of infection, were negative for spores in both groups and showed no histopathological signs of M. cerebralis infection.

  6. Movement of resident rainbow trout transplanted below a barrier to anadromy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilzbach, Margaret A.; Ashenfelter, Mark J.; Ricker, Seth J.

    2012-01-01

    We tracked the movement of resident coastal rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss irideus that were experimentally transplanted below a migration barrier in a northern California stream. In 2005 and 2006, age-1 and older rainbow trout were captured above a 5-m-high waterfall in Freshwater Creek and individually marked with passive integrated transponder tags. Otolith microchemistry confirmed that the above-barrier trout were the progeny of resident rather than anadromous parents, and genetic analysis indicated that the rainbow trout were introgressed with cutthroat trout O. clarkii. At each of three sampling events, half of the tagged individuals (n = 22 and 43 trout in 2005 and 2006, respectively) were released 5 km downstream from the waterfall (approximately 10 km upstream from tidewater), and an equal number of tagged individuals were released above the barrier. Tagged individuals were subsequently relocated with stationary and mobile antennae or recaptured in downstream migrant traps, or both, until tracking ceased in October 2007. Most transplanted individuals remained within a few hundred meters of their release location. Three individuals, including one rainbow trout released above the waterfall, were last detected in the tidally influenced lower creek. Two additional tagged individuals released above the barrier were found alive in below-barrier reaches and had presumably washed over the falls. Two of seven tagged rainbow trout captured in downstream migrant traps had smolted and one was a presmolt. The smoltification of at least some individuals, coupled with above-barrier "leakage" of fish downstream, suggests that above-barrier resident trout have the potential to exhibit migratory behavior and to enter breeding populations of steelhead (anadromous rainbow trout) within the basin.

  7. Tissue-specific metabolic changes in response to an acute handling disturbance in juvenile rainbow trout exposed to municipal wastewater effluent.

    PubMed

    Ings, Jennifer S; Vijayan, Mathilakath M; Servos, Mark R

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of municipal wastewater effluent (MWWE) exposure on aspects of both organismal and cellular stress response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Juvenile rainbow trout were exposed for 14 d (2-d static renewal) to tertiary-treated MWWE at concentrations of 0%, 20% and 90%. Following the MWWE exposure, fish were subjected to an acute handling stress and sampled at 1, 4 and 24 h post-stressor, to evaluate the fish performance to additional stressors. Organismal stress response evaluation included measuring plasma cortisol, glucose and lactate concentrations, and tissue metabolic capacity, including gluconeogenic (liver) and glycolytic enzyme activities in the liver, brain, heart and gill. No significant differences between treatments were seen in plasma cortisol, glucose or lactate concentrations after 14 d exposure to MWWE. However, MWWE exposure significantly affected plasma cortisol and glucose response to the acute secondary stressor. Acute handling disturbance enhanced liver gluconeogenic capacity in the control group, but this response was altered in the MWWE exposed groups. MWWE exposure did not affect the acute stressor-mediated enhancement of brain or gill glycolytic capacity, but significantly reduced the glycolytic capacity of liver and heart in response to a secondary stressor compared to the control group. Altogether, chronic exposure to MWWE impacts the metabolic performances to a secondary stressor challenge and this includes disruptions in tissue-specific gluconeogenic and glycolytic capacities in rainbow trout. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Toxicokinetics of perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Consoer, Daniel M; Hoffman, Alex D; Fitzsimmons, Patrick N; Kosian, Patricia A; Nichols, John W

    2014-11-01

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) confined to respirometer-metabolism chambers were dosed with perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) by intra-arterial (i.a.) injection and sampled to obtain concentration time-course data for plasma, urine, and expired water. The data were then analyzed by compartmental modeling to estimate rates of renal and branchial clearance. Averaged across all animals, the renal clearance rate (1.35mL/h/kg) was more than ten times greater than the branchial clearance rate (0.12mL/h/kg). The average whole-body elimination half-life was 12.6d, which is somewhat longer than values obtained in previous studies with smaller trout. The tissue distribution of PFOA was assessed by collecting tissues at the end of chambered exposures and in a separate tissue time-course experiment. From the time-course study it appeared that an internal steady-state was established within 24h of i.a. injection. Consistent with previous studies, the rank order of PFOA concentration in tissues at steady state was: plasma>liver>kidney>muscle. In a second set of chambered experiments, fish were exposed to PFOA in water to determine the rate of branchial uptake. Branchial uptake rates were too low to assess directly by measuring PFOA concentrations in inspired and expired water. Uptake rate constants (mean 0.19L/d/kg; 0.1% uptake efficiency) were therefore estimated by compartmental modeling using plasma concentration time-course data and model parameters derived from the elimination experiments. It is clear from this effort that elimination of PFOA by trout occurs primarily via the renal route. This finding is consistent with numerous studies of mammals and suggests that trout possess membrane transporters that facilitate the movement of PFOA from plasma to urine. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Differential physiological and endocrine responses of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, transferred from fresh water to ion-poor or salt water.

    PubMed

    Flores, Anne-Marie; Mark Shrimpton, J

    2012-01-15

    To understand the physiological and molecular endocrine changes that occur in response to a salinity challenge, we transferred rainbow trout from fresh water to an ion-poor or 24‰ saltwater treatment for 14 days. An increase in gill Na(+), K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activity in salt water was associated with higher mRNA expression for the NKA α1b subunit. In contrast, there was little change in gill NKA activity following transfer to ion-poor water, but the mRNA expression of NKA α1a was significantly elevated. Endocrine signals were assessed by measuring plasma cortisol concentrations and by quantifying changes in mRNA extracted from the gill for glucocorticoid receptors 1 and 2 (GR1 and GR2), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), growth hormone receptor (GHR1), and prolactin receptor (PrlR). Cortisol increased after transfer to ion-poor and salt water, but both GR and MR mRNA in the gill showed little change. PrlR mRNA was significantly higher when fish were transferred to the ion-poor water and GHR1 mRNA was elevated during the saltwater challenge. This study demonstrated an increase in gill PrlR mRNA that parallels the changes in gill NKA α1a when rainbow trout were transferred to a lower salinity level. Furthermore, the increase in gill GHR1 mRNA supports the importance of GH for seawater acclimation as there is a corresponding increase in the expression of gill NKA α1b, the saltwater isoform. GH and Prl, therefore, may differentially determine the function of cortisol in both fresh- and saltwater ionoregulation.

  10. Field evaluation of rainbow trout selectively bred for resistance to bacterial cold water disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) is a frequent cause of elevated mortality in rainbow trout and the development of effective control strategies is a priority within the U.S. Since 2005, the NCCCWA has implemented a selective breeding program and has created three genetic lines of outbred rainbow...

  11. Renal responses to acute lead waterborne exposure in the freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Patel, Monika; Rogers, Joseph T; Pane, Eric F; Wood, Chris M

    2006-12-30

    some of the associated disturbances in systemic physiology. Lead-induced ionoregulatory toxicity in rainbow trout, particularly the disturbance of Ca2+ homeostasis, is not exclusively a branchial phenomenon, but is in part a result of disruption of ionoregulatory mechanisms at the kidney. This action of lead outside the gills is critical to consider when developing guidelines for water quality.

  12. Identification and expression analysis of an IL-18 homologue and its alternatively spliced form in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Zou, Jun; Bird, Steve; Truckle, Jonathan; Bols, Niels; Horne, Mike; Secombes, Chris

    2004-05-01

    A homologue of interleukin 18 has been identified from rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The trout IL-18 gene spans 3.7 kb and consists of six exons and five introns, sharing the same gene organization with its human counterpart. The putative translated protein is 199 amino acids in length with no predicted signal peptide. Analysis of the multiple sequence alignment reveals a conserved ICE cut site, resulting in a mature peptide of 162 amino acids. The trout IL-18 shares 41-45% similarity with known IL-18 molecules and contains an IL-1 family signature motif. It is constitutively expressed in a wide range of tissues including brain, gill, gut, heart, kidney, liver, muscle, skin and spleen. Transcription is not modulated by lipopolysaccharide, poly(I:C) or trout recombinant IL-1beta in primary head kidney leucocyte cultures and RTS-11 cells, a macrophage cell line. However, expression is downregulated by lipopolysaccharide and rIL-1beta in RTG-2 cells, a fibroblast-like cell line. An alternatively spliced form of IL-18 mRNA has also been found and translates into a 182 amino acid protein with a 17 amino acid deletion in the precursor region of the authentic form. This alternatively spliced form is also widely expressed although much lower than the authentic form. Interestingly, its expression is upregulated by lipopolysaccharide and poly(I:C), but is not affected by rIL-1beta in RTG-2 cells. The present study suggests that alternative splicing may play an important role in regulating IL-18 activities in rainbow trout.

  13. Bioaccumulation potential of dietary arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, and selenium in organs and tissues of rainbow trout (Oncorhyncus mykiss) as a function of fish growth.

    PubMed

    Ciardullo, Silvia; Aureli, Federica; Coni, Ettore; Guandalini, Emilio; Iosi, Francesca; Raggi, Andrea; Rufo, Giovanna; Cubadda, Francesco

    2008-04-09

    The distribution and potential bioaccumulation of dietary arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, and selenium in organs and tissues of rainbow trout (Oncorhyncus mykiss Walbaum, 1792), a major aquaculture species, was studied in relation to fish growth over a period of >3 years. Fish were reared under normal farming conditions, that is, fed a standard fish food and exposed to negligible levels of waterborne trace elements. The age-related variations in the content of each trace element in gills, kidney, liver, muscle, and skin were studied through nonparametric regression analysis. A buildup of all elements in all tissues and organs was observed, but due to dilution with growth, the concentrations did not increase, except in a few cases such as cadmium and mercury in liver and kidney. In muscle tissue, the concentrations of mercury, lead, and selenium did not alter significantly with growth, whereas cadmium increased but remained at exceedingly low levels. The concentration of arsenic in muscle tissue peaked at 14 months and then decreased in adult specimens. Arsenic speciation by high-performance liquid chromatography--inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry revealed that arsenic in muscle was almost exclusively present in the form of nontoxic arsenobetaine. Application of a mercury mass balance model gave predicted concentrations in agreement with measured ones and showed that in farmed rainbow trout the ratio of mercury concentrations in feed and in fish is about 1:1. Therefore, rainbow trout does not approach the limits established for human consumption even when reared with feed at the maximum permitted levels. These findings highlight the low bioaccumulation potential of toxic trace elements such as cadmium, lead, and mercury in rainbow trout following dietary exposure. On the other hand, selenium concentrations in muscle (about 0.2 microg g (-1) of fresh weight) show that rainbow trout may be a good source of this essential element.

  14. DIETARY UPTAKE KINETICS OF 2,2', 5, 5'-TETRACHLOROBIPHENYL IN RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disposition of 2,2',5,5'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was studied in dietary exposures with live prey. Trout were fed TCB-dosed fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas; 4% of body wt) containing whole-body residues of 244 (low dose) or 1663 (h...

  15. Assessment of metabolic stability using the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver S9 fraction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard protocols are given for assessing metabolic stability in rainbow trout using the liver S9 fraction. These protocols describe the isolation of S9 fractions from trout livers, evaluation of metabolic stability using a substrate depletion approach, and expression of the res...

  16. Sensory analysis of rainbow trout, oncorhynchus mykiss, fed enriched black soldier fly prepupae, hermetia illucens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A growth trial and fillet sensory analysis were conducted to examine the effects of replacing dietary fish meal with black soldier fly (BSF) prepupae, Hermetia illucens, in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. A practical-type trout diet was formulated to contain 45% protein; four test diets were dev...

  17. Assessment of metabolic stability using the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver S9 fraction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard protocols are given for assessing metabolic stability in rainbow trout using the liver S9 fraction. These protocols describe the isolation of S9 fractions from trout livers, evaluation of metabolic stability using a substrate depletion approach, and expression of the res...

  18. DIETARY UPTAKE KINETICS OF 2,2', 5, 5'-TETRACHLOROBIPHENYL IN RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disposition of 2,2',5,5'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was studied in dietary exposures with live prey. Trout were fed TCB-dosed fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas; 4% of body wt) containing whole-body residues of 244 (low dose) or 1663 (h...

  19. Factors influencing thiocyanate toxicity in rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri

    SciTech Connect

    Heming, T.A.; Blumhagen, K.A. )

    1989-09-01

    The toxicity of thiocyanate (SCN{sup {minus}}) to fish is influenced by the level of fish activity. This is evidenced most dramatically when fish are forced to perform short bouts of strenuous swimming, such as occurs during capture avoidance. Strenuous exercise of SCN{sup {minus}}-exposed fish results in sudden death syndrome, characterized by the immediate onset of convulsions, loss of equilibrium and buoyancy, flaring of the operculum, darkening of the skin epithelium and, within minutes, cessation of ventilation and extreme rigor. The present study was undertaken to examine the accumulation and toxicity of SCN{sup {minus}} in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), in relation to exercise stress and ambient water quality. The effect of a single bout of exercise on blood SCN{sup {minus}} concentration was measured. In addition, effects of water hardness and Cl{sup {minus}} concentration on the accumulation of SCN{sup {minus}} in blood were determined.

  20. Amplification of rainbow trout microsatellites in Brachymystax lenok.

    PubMed

    Jia, Z Y; Zhang, Y Y; Shi, L Y; Bai, Q L; Jin, S B; Mou, Z B

    2008-11-01

    Brachymystax lenok is a cold freshwater fish accustomed to inhabit relatively high concentration of dissolved oxygen and clean upper streams. Here we present 13 polymorphic microsatellite primer pairs from rainbow trout to amplify in 32 B. lenok individuals from Ussuri River of China. The number of alleles ranged from two to seven with an average of 3.9 per locus. Observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.0625 to 0.9677. One locus showed significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. These 13 loci will provide a good basis for investigation of B. lenok population structure and genetic diversity in different distribution region. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Some blood chemistry values for the Rainbow Trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary; Chatterton, K.

    1970-01-01

    Normal distribution curves were graphically fitted to approximately 1400 clinical test values obtained from the plasma or kidney tissue of more than 200 yearling rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri). Estimated normal ranges were ascorbate, 102–214 μg/g; blood urea nitrogen (BUN), 0.9–4.5 mg/100 ml; chloride, 84–132 mEq/liter; cholesterol, 161–365 mg/100 ml; cortisol, 1.5–18.5 μg/100 ml; glucose, 41–151 mg/100 ml; and total protein, 2–6 g/100 ml.

  2. Response of rainbow trout transcriptome to model chemical contaminants.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Heikki; Pehkonen, Petri; Vehniäinen, Eeva; Krasnov, Aleksei; Rexroad, Caird; Afanasyev, Sergey; Mölsa, Hannu; Oikari, Aimo

    2004-07-30

    We used high-density cDNA microarray in studies of responses of rainbow trout fry at sublethal ranges of beta-naphthoflavone, cadmium, carbon tetrachloride, and pyrene. The differentially expressed genes were grouped by the functional categories of Gene Ontology. Significantly different response to the studied compounds was shown by a number of classes, such as cell cycle, apoptosis, signal transduction, oxidative stress, subcellular and extracellular structures, protein biosynthesis, and modification. Cluster analysis separated responses to the contaminants at low and medium doses, whereas at high levels the adaptive reactions were masked with general unspecific response to toxicity. We found enhanced expression of many mitochondrial proteins as well as genes involved in metabolism of metal ions and protein biosynthesis. In parallel, genes related to stress and immune response, signal transduction, and nucleotide metabolism were down-regulated. We performed computer-assisted analyses of Medline abstracts retrieved for each compound, which helped us to indicate the expected and novel findings.

  3. Risks associated with commodity trade: transmission of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) to rainbow trout fry from VHSV-carrying tissue-homogenates.

    PubMed

    Oidtmann, B; Joiner, C; Reese, R A; Stone, D; Dodge, M; Dixon, P

    2011-06-01

    Movements of commodity fish present a potential risk of transferring pathogens. Within a study to estimate the risk from imported rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss carcases, fry were exposed to tissue homogenates from market size rainbow trout infected experimentally with viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) by waterborne exposure to VHS virus (VHSV, isolate of genotype Ia). Tissues were collected from fish that showed clinical signs and from recent mortalities. Homogenates of (i) internal organs, (ii) brain/gills and (iii) muscle tissue were prepared and added to tanks holding the fry. Virus transmission occurred from all tissues tested, causing high mortality of the fry. The results underline the potential risk of introduction of VHSV through the trade of fish products.

  4. Thiamine status of Cayuga Lake rainbow trout and its influence on spawning migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ketola, H. George; Chiotti, Thomas L.; Rathman, Robert S.; Fitzsimons, John D.; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Van Dusen, Peter J.; Lewis, Graham E.

    2005-01-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in Cayuga Lake, New York, appear to be suffering from a thiamine deficiency because their progeny develop general weakness, loss of equilibrium, and increased mortality, which are prevented by treatment with thiamine. Thiamine status and its effect on adults are unknown. In 2000 and 2002, we captured, tagged, and released 64 and 189 prespawning rainbow trout, respectively, in Cayuga Inlet at a collection weir to evaluate their thiamine status and the effect of thiamine injection (150 nmol/g) on instream migration. Half of the rainbow trout in each year (32 in 2000 and 95 in 2002) were injected with thiamine and half were uninjected; all rainbow trout were released above the weir to continue their upstream migration. By means of electrofishing in 2000, we recaptured significantly more thiamine-injected (N = 7) than uninjected (N = 0) rainbow trout approximately 7.0–9.3 river kilometers upstream from the weir. In 2002, the concentration of thiamine in the muscle of rainbow trout collected above a 1.8-m cascade was significantly higher (mean ± SD = 5.47 ± 5.04 nmol/g; range = 1.0– 13.8 nmol/g; N = 8) than that of rainbow trout collected either above a 1.0-m cascade (1.36 ± 0.71 nmol/g; range = 0.6–3.3 nmol/g; N = 16) or below the cascades (1.20 ± 0.46 nmol/g; range = 0.7–1.9 nmol/g; N = 5). The lowest concentration of thiamine observed in the muscle of rainbow trout collected upstream of the 1.8-m cascade was 1.0 nmol/g, suggesting that the threshold concentration required for rainbow trout to ascend the cascade was no more than that. Analyses of thiamine in the muscle of 26 untagged rainbow trout captured in Cayuga Inlet in 2002 showed that 16 fish (62%) had at least 1.0 nmol/g, which was apparently sufficient to support vigorous migration.

  5. Effect on tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) on hematocrit values in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinitz, G.L.; Rix, J.

    1977-01-01

    1. Anesthesia of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) with 70 ppm tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) for 3-9 min resulted in a linear increase in hematocrit.2. Handling of unanesthetized trout caused a higher and more variable hematocrit reading than did exposure to MS-222 for up to 3 min.3. The range and standard error of hematocrit readings was smallest in trout treated with MS-222 for 1 min.

  6. Procedures for the preparation and culture of 'reconstructed' rainbow trout branchial epithelia.

    PubMed

    Kelly, S P; Fletcher, M; Pärt, P; Wood, C M

    2000-01-01

    Techniques for the in vitro 'reconstruction' of freshwater rainbow trout branchial epithelia using the primary culture of gill cells on permeable polyethylene terephthalate cell culture filter supports are described. Representing models of the freshwater fish gill, epithelia grown by two separate techniques are composed of branchial pavement cells with or without the inclusion of mitochondria-rich (MR) cells. The generation of epithelia consisting of pavement cells only (via a method called single seeded inserts = SSI) involves an initial period of flask culture during which time MR cells, that appear unable to attach to the culture flask base, are excluded from the general cell populace. Alternately, the generation of a heterogeneous epithelia consisting of both pavement cells and MR cells (via a method called double seeded inserts = DSI) is facilitated by the direct seeding of cells into cell culture filter inserts. Critical to this second procedure is the repeat seeding of filter inserts over a two day period. Repeat seeding appears to allow MR cells to nest amongst the attached cell layer generated by the first day's seeding. The use of cell culture filter supports allows free access to both the apical and basolateral compartment of the epithelium and is ideal for experimental manipulation. Cells are grown under symmetrical conditions (apical media/basolateral media) and epithelium growth is measured as a function of transepithelial resistance (TER). When the epithelia exhibit a plateau in growth they can be subjected to asymmetrical conditions (freshwater apical/media basolateral) in order to assess gill cell function as in vivo.

  7. A comparative molecular study of the presence of "Candidatus arthromitus" in the digestive system of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), healthy and affected with rainbow trout gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Del-Pozo, J; Turnbull, J; Ferguson, H; Crumlish, M

    2010-03-01

    Observations were made using histopathological techniques in conjunction with a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol for the specific detection of "Candidatus arthromitus" on DNA extracted from wax-embedded tissues and fresh digestive contents of rainbow trout. Samples positive for "Candidatus arthromitus" DNA included fish with rainbow trout gastroenteritis (RTGE), clinically normal cohabiting fish, and apparently healthy controls from RTGE positive and RTGE negative sites. The results obtained from the PCR were confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. "Candidatus arthromitus" DNA was found in distal intestine as well as in sections of pyloric caeca, suggesting that both these locations are appropriate for molecular detection of "Candidatus arthromitus" DNA in trout. Furthermore, rainbow trout fry distal intestinal samples from two different hatcheries where RTGE had not been reported were also positive. Differences in "Candidatus arthromitus" DNA detection between paraffin wax-embedded and fresh digestive content samples from the same fish suggested that it may be predominantly epithelium-associated in healthy trout. Parallel histopathological observations indicated that pyloric caeca are the preferred site for visualizing segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) in trout with RTGE. The results of this study showed that the presence of SFB was not invariably associated with clinical disease and that more information is required to understand the role of these organisms.

  8. Micronuclei and other nuclear lesions as genotoxicity indicators in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Ayllón, F; Garcia-Vazquez, E

    2001-07-01

    The induction of micronuclei and other nuclear abnormalities in renal erythrocytes of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss by six genotoxic compounds is evaluated. Colchicine, mitomycin, cyclophosphamide, acrylamide, methyl-methanesulfonate, and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea were intraperitoneally injected in trout. Our results show that cyclophosphamide induces the formation of micronuclei and also the other nuclear abnormalities; N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, acrylamide, and colchicine induce only micronuclei; mitomycin-C induces only other nuclear abnormalities but not micronuclei. Methyl-methanesulfonate does not induce nuclear abnormalities in rainbow trout at the dose assayed in this work. The possible genotoxic origin for the different nuclear abnormalities is discussed. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  9. Population control of exotic rainbow trout in streams of a natural area park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Stephen E.; Larson, Gary L.; Ridley, Bromfield

    1986-03-01

    Expansion of the distribution of exotic rainbow trout is thought to be a leading cause for the decline of native brook trout since the 1930s in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, USA. An experimental rehabilitation project was conducted from 1976 to 1981 using backpack electrofish shockers on four remnant brook trout populations sympatric with rainbow trout. The objectives were to evaluate the effectiveness of the technique to remove the exotic rainbow trout, to determine the population responses by native brook trout, and to evaluate the usefulness of the technique for trout management in the park. Rainbow trout populations were greatly reduced in density after up to six years of electrofishing, but were not eradicated. Rainbow trout recruitment, however, was essentially eliminated. Brook trout populations responded by increasing in density (including young-of-the-year), but rates of recovery differed among streams. The maximum observed densities ir each stream occurred at the end of the project. The findings suggest that electrofishing had a major negative impact on the exotic species, which was followed by positive responses from the native species in the second and third order study streams. The technique would probably be less effective in larger (fourth-order) park streams, but as an eradication tool the technique may have its highest potential in small first order streams. Nonetheless, the technique appears useful for population control without causing undue impacts on native aquatic species, although it is labor intensive, and capture efficiency is greatly influenced by fish size and stream morphology. To completely remove the exotic fish from selected streams, different technologies will have to be explored and developed.

  10. Cloning of two chemokine receptor homologs (CXC-R4 and CC-R7) in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Daniels, G D; Zou, J; Charlemagne, J; Partula, S; Cunningham, C; Secombes, C J

    1999-05-01

    Two rainbow trout chemokine receptors have been sequenced, with homology to CXC-R4 and CC-R7 molecules. The CXC-R4 sequence consisted of 1681 nucleotides, which translated into a mature protein of 357 amino acids, with 80.7% similarity to human CXC-R4. The CC-R7 sequence consisted of 2287 nucleotides, which translated into a 368-amino acid mature protein with 64.5% similarity to human CC-R7. Both sequences contained seven hydrophobic regions, representing the seven transmembrane domains (TM) typical of G-protein-coupled receptors. Extracellular cysteines, transmembrane prolines, and the DRY motif immediately following TM3 were conserved. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed a tight clustering of trout CXC-R4 with CXC-R3-5 genes. Trout CC-R7 clustered with CC-R6-7 and CXC-R1-2. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated a wide tissue distribution of CXC-R4 and CC-R7 message in trout, being present in head-kidney leukocytes, blood, gill, brain, spleen, and liver.

  11. RESPIRATORY-CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY AND XENOBIOTIC GILL FLUX IN THE LAKE TROUT (SALVELINUS NAMAYCUSH)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An in vivo respirometer-metabolism chamber was used to obtain respiratory-cardiovascular physiology under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, and xenobiotic gill absorption (flux) data on adult lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) over a 48-h exposure period at 11? 1?C.

  12. RESPIRATORY-CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY AND XENOBIOTIC GILL FLUX IN THE LAKE TROUT (SALVELINUS NAMAYCUSH)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An in vivo respirometer-metabolism chamber was used to obtain respiratory-cardiovascular physiology under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, and xenobiotic gill absorption (flux) data on adult lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) over a 48-h exposure period at 11? 1?C.

  13. The chronic effects of dietary lead in freshwater juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed elevated calcium diets.

    PubMed

    Alves, Lara C; Wood, Chris M

    2006-06-30

    This study examined the impact of elevated dietary Ca(2+) on the responses to chronic dietary Pb exposure in juvenile rainbow trout. Trout were fed reference (0.3microgPb/g, approximately 20mgCa(2+)/g) and Pb-enriched diets ( approximately 50 or 500microgPb/g) in the presence of background Ca(2+) ( approximately 20mgCa(2+)/g) or ( approximately 60mgCa(2+)/g) of added Ca(2+) (as CaCO(3)) for 42 days. The quantitative order of Pb accumulation in tissues reflected the exposure pathway of Pb via the diet (per tissue wet weight): gut>bone>kidney>liver>spleen>gill>carcass>brain>white muscle. The anterior intestine accumulated the most Pb per tissue wet weight, while the bone accumulated the most Pb per fish weight. Pb concentrations were much higher in the posterior kidney than the anterior kidney. Simultaneous addition of Ca(2+) to the diet had an overall protective effect in all the tissues analysed in reducing Pb accumulation. The RBCs accumulated 100 times more Pb when compared to the plasma, while the whole blood delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase was inhibited in the high treatment group without added Ca(2+), by the end of the exposure. Neither plasma Cl(-), K(+), Mg(2+) nor Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activities in the gills, mid- and posterior intestine were affected. However, there were mild disruptions in plasma Na(+) and Ca(2+) levels in the elevated Pb and Ca(2+) treatment groups, and a significant up-regulation in Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity at the anterior intestine in fish fed the high Pb diets with background or added Ca(2+). By day 42, Pb levels in most tissues had either stabilized or started to decrease, indicating some capacity for regulation of accumulated loads. We conclude that elevated dietary Ca(2+) levels will be protective in reducing Pb burdens in freshwater juvenile rainbow trout exposed to environments contaminated with waterborne Pb.

  14. Chromosome rearrangements, recombination suppression, and limited segregation distortion in hybrids between Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss).

    PubMed

    Ostberg, Carl O; Hauser, Lorenz; Pritchard, Victoria L; Garza, John C; Naish, Kerry A

    2013-08-22

    Introgressive hybridization is an important evolutionary process that can lead to the creation of novel genome structures and thus potentially new genetic variation for selection to act upon. On the other hand, hybridization with introduced species can threaten native species, such as cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) following the introduction of rainbow trout (O. mykiss). Neither the evolutionary consequences nor conservation implications of rainbow trout introgression in cutthroat trout is well understood. Therefore, we generated a genetic linkage map for rainbow-Yellowstone cutthroat trout (O. clarkii bouvieri) hybrids to evaluate genome processes that may help explain how introgression affects hybrid genome evolution. The hybrid map closely aligned with the rainbow trout map (a cutthroat trout map does not exist), sharing all but one linkage group. This linkage group (RYHyb20) represented a fusion between an acrocentric (Omy28) and a metacentric chromosome (Omy20) in rainbow trout. Additional mapping in Yellowstone cutthroat trout indicated the two rainbow trout homologues were fused in the Yellowstone genome. Variation in the number of hybrid linkage groups (28 or 29) likely depended on a Robertsonian rearrangement polymorphism within the rainbow trout stock. Comparison between the female-merged F₁ map and a female consensus rainbow trout map revealed that introgression suppressed recombination across large genomic regions in 5 hybrid linkage groups. Two of these linkage groups (RYHyb20 and RYHyb25_29) contained confirmed chromosome rearrangements between rainbow and Yellowstone cutthroat trout indicating that rearrangements may suppress recombination. The frequency of allelic and genotypic segregation distortion varied among parents and families, suggesting few incompatibilities exist between rainbow and Yellowstone cutthroat trout genomes. Chromosome rearrangements suppressed recombination in the hybrids. This result supports several previous

  15. Chromosome rearrangements, recombination suppression, and limited segregation distortion in hybrids between Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Introgressive hybridization is an important evolutionary process that can lead to the creation of novel genome structures and thus potentially new genetic variation for selection to act upon. On the other hand, hybridization with introduced species can threaten native species, such as cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) following the introduction of rainbow trout (O. mykiss). Neither the evolutionary consequences nor conservation implications of rainbow trout introgression in cutthroat trout is well understood. Therefore, we generated a genetic linkage map for rainbow-Yellowstone cutthroat trout (O. clarkii bouvieri) hybrids to evaluate genome processes that may help explain how introgression affects hybrid genome evolution. Results The hybrid map closely aligned with the rainbow trout map (a cutthroat trout map does not exist), sharing all but one linkage group. This linkage group (RYHyb20) represented a fusion between an acrocentric (Omy28) and a metacentric chromosome (Omy20) in rainbow trout. Additional mapping in Yellowstone cutthroat trout indicated the two rainbow trout homologues were fused in the Yellowstone genome. Variation in the number of hybrid linkage groups (28 or 29) likely depended on a Robertsonian rearrangement polymorphism within the rainbow trout stock. Comparison between the female-merged F1 map and a female consensus rainbow trout map revealed that introgression suppressed recombination across large genomic regions in 5 hybrid linkage groups. Two of these linkage groups (RYHyb20 and RYHyb25_29) contained confirmed chromosome rearrangements between rainbow and Yellowstone cutthroat trout indicating that rearrangements may suppress recombination. The frequency of allelic and genotypic segregation distortion varied among parents and families, suggesting few incompatibilities exist between rainbow and Yellowstone cutthroat trout genomes. Conclusions Chromosome rearrangements suppressed recombination in the hybrids. This result

  16. Fish assemblage structure in an Oklahoma Ozark stream before and after rainbow trout introduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, M.G.; Winkelman, D.L.

    2005-01-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss have been widely stocked throughout the United States as a popular sport fish. Our study was initiated to evaluate potential effects of rainbow trout introduction on native fishes to inform future decisions about trout stocking in northeastern Oklahoma streams. We sampled fish assemblages in pools, glides, and riffles in Brush Creek, Delaware County, Oklahoma, from February 2000 to September 2002, and experimentally stocked rainbow trout into the stream from November 2000 to March 2001 and November 2001 to March 2002. We used a combination of multivariate analyses to evaluate seasonal and habitat effects on native fish assemblages and to compare assemblage structure between prestocking, the first year of stocking, and the second year of stocking. Mesohabitat type significantly affected assemblage structure among years, whereas we did not detect an effect of season. We did not detect differences in assemblage structure among years in glide or riffle habitats. Native fish assemblage structure in pool habitats before rainbow trout introduction differed from assemblage structure in both the first and second year of stocking. Declines in seven species, including two native game fish (smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu and bluegill Lepomis machrochirus), contributed to assemblage dissimilarity in pool habitats between prestocking conditions and the second year of stocking. Our results indicate that stocking rainbow trout may cause local disruption in assemblage structure in pool habitats. ?? 2004 by the American Fisheries Society.

  17. Staphylococcus warneri, a resident skin commensal of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) with pathobiont characteristics.

    PubMed

    Musharrafieh, Rami; Tacchi, Luca; Trujeque, Joshua; LaPatra, Scott; Salinas, Irene

    2014-02-21

    Commensal microorganisms live in association with the mucosal surfaces of all vertebrates. The skin of teleost fish is known to harbor commensals. In this study we report for the first time the presence of an intracellular Gram positive bacteria, Staphylococcus warneri that resides in the skin epidermis of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). S. warneri was isolated from healthy hatchery trout skin epithelial cells. In situ hybridization confirmed the intracellular nature of the bacterium. Skin explants exposed in vitro to S. warneri or the extracellular pathogen Vibrio anguillarum show that S. warneri is able to induce an anti-inflammatory cytokine status via TGF-β1b compared to the pro-inflammatory responses (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-∝) elicited by V. anguillarum. In vivo experiments showed that S. warneri is not pathogenic to rainbow trout when injected intraperitoneally at high concentrations. However, S. warneri is able to stimulate V. anguillarum growth and biofilm formation on rainbow trout scales. Our results demonstrate that rainbow trout skin commensals such as S. warneri have the potential to become indirect pathobionts by enhancing growth and biofilm formation of pathogens such as V. anguillarum. These results show that fish farming practices (i.e. handling and other manipulations) can alter the skin microbiota and compromise the skin health of rainbow trout. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Staphylococcus warneri, a resident skin commensal of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) with pathobiont characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Rami, Musharrafieh; Luca, Tacchi; Joshua, Trujeque; Scott, LaPatra; Irene, Salinas

    2014-01-01

    Commensal microorganisms live in association with the mucosal surfaces of all vertebrates. The skin of teleost fish is known to harbor commensals. In this study we report for the first time the presence of an intracellular Gram positive bacteria, Staphylococcus warneri that resides in the skin epidermis of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). S. warneri was isolated from healthy hatchery trout skin epithelial cells. In situ hybridization confirmed the intracellular nature of the bacterium. Skin explants exposed in vitro to S. warneri or the extracellular pathogen Vibrio anguillarum show that S. warneri is able to induce an anti-inflammatory cytokine status via TGF-β 1b compared to the pro-inflammatory responses (IL-1β , IL-6 and TNF-α) elicited by V. anguillarum. In vivo experiments showed that S. warneri is not pathogenic to rainbow trout when injected intraperitoneally at high concentrations. However, S. warneri is able to stimulate V. anguillarum growth and biofilm formation on rainbow trout scales. Our results demonstrate that rainbow trout skin commensals such as S. warneri have the potential to become indirect pathobionts by enhancing growth and biofilm formation of pathogens such as V. anguillarum. These results show that fish farming practices (i.e. handling and other manipulations) can alter the skin microbiota and compromise the skin health of rainbow trout. PMID:24438987

  19. Sex-specific vitellogenin production in immature rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, D.B.; Williams, D.E.

    1999-10-01

    Many xenobiotics interact with hormone systems of animals, potentially leading to a phenomenon commonly called endocrine disruption. Much attention has focused on steroid hormone systems and corresponding receptor proteins, particularly estrogens. Vitellogenin (Vg) was measured in sexually immature rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) in the diet. Mixed-sex populations of trout aged 3, 6, 12, or 18 months were maintained separately and fed E{sub 2} at 0.05 or 2.5 mg/kg for 7d. Females fed E{sub 2} at 0.05 mg/kg consistently produced three- to fourfold greater amounts of Vg than similarly aged males. Age- and sex-matched fish fed E{sub 2} at 2.5 mg/kg produced equivalent amounts of Vg. Sex differences in Vg production were apparent only at a dose of E{sub 2} (0.05 mg/kg) that results in submaximal Vg induction. Their results document the importance of considering the sex of juvenile fish when using Vg production as a marker of xenoestrogen exposure.

  20. Characterization of an extensive rainbow trout miRNA transcriptome by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Juanchich, Amelie; Bardou, Philippe; Rué, Olivier; Gabillard, Jean-Charles; Gaspin, Christine; Bobe, Julien; Guiguen, Yann

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in a wide variety of physiological processes. They can control both temporal and spatial gene expression and are believed to regulate 30 to 70% of the genes. Data are however limited for fish species, with only 9 out of the 30,000 fish species present in miRBase. The aim of the current study was to discover and characterize rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) miRNAs in a large number of tissues using next-generation sequencing in order to provide an extensive repertoire of rainbow trout miRNAs. A total of 38 different samples corresponding to 16 different tissues or organs were individually sequenced and analyzed independently in order to identify a large number of miRNAs with high confidence. This led to the identification of 2946 miRNA loci in the rainbow trout genome, including 445 already known miRNAs. Differential expression analysis was performed in order to identify miRNAs exhibiting specific or preferential expression among the 16 analyzed tissues. In most cases, miRNAs exhibit a specific pattern of expression in only a few tissues. The expression data from sRNA sequencing were confirmed by RT-qPCR. In addition, novel miRNAs are described in rainbow trout that had not been previously reported in other species. This study represents the first characterization of rainbow trout miRNA transcriptome from a wide variety of tissue and sets an extensive repertoire of rainbow trout miRNAs. It provides a starting point for future studies aimed at understanding the roles of miRNAs in major physiological process such as growth, reproduction or adaptation to stress. These rainbow trout miRNAs repertoire provide a novel resource to advance genomic research in salmonid species.

  1. Serotonin-induced brain glycogenolysis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Maceira, Jorge J; Mancebo, María J; Aldegunde, Manuel

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we evaluated the serotonin-mediated control of cerebral glycogen levels in the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of serotonin (5-HT) to normoglycemic trout (time and dose response) decreased glycogen levels in the brain and increased brain glycogen phosphorylase activity (time response). In hypoglycemic fish (that had been fasted for 5 and 10 days), there was a time-dependent decrease in brain glycogen levels; under these conditions, i.c.v. administration of 5-HT also reduced the brain glycogen content in fish that had been fasted for 5 days. In fish with local cerebral hypoglycemia (induced by 2-DG administration), the glycogen levels decreased and, as above, i.c.v. administration of 5-HT also lowered the glycogen content. In hyperglycemic fish, 5-HT did not affect glycogen levels. Administration of receptor agonists 5-HT1A (8-OH-DPAT), 5-HT1B (anpirtoline and CP93129) or 5-HT2 (α-m-5-HT) decreased the brain glycogen levels. This effect was antagonized by the administration of receptor antagonists 5-HT1A (WAY100135 and NAN190), 5-HT1B (NAS181) and 5-HT2B/C (SB206553). Administration of the receptor agonists (±)-DOI (5-HT2A/2C), m-CPP (5-HT2B/2C), BW723C86 (5-HT2B) and WAY 161503 (5-HT2C) led to decreases in the levels of brain glycogen. We found that 5-HT is involved in the modulation of brain glycogen homeostasis in the rainbow trout, causing a glycogenolytic effect when fish are in a normoglycemic or hypoglycemic state, but not when they are in a hyperglycemic state. 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5HT2B and 5-HT2C-like receptors appeared to be involved in the glycogenolytic action of 5-HT, although the effect mediated by 5-HT1A or 5-HT1B was apparently stronger.

  2. Effects of hybridization between nonnative Rainbow Trout and native Westslope Cutthroat Trout on fitness-related traits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drinan, Daniel P.; Webb, Molly A. H.; Naish, Kerry A.; Kalinowski, Steven T.; Boyer, Matthew C.; Steed, Amber C.; Shepard, Bradley B.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization between introduced and native fauna is a risk to native species and may threaten the long-term persistence of numerous taxa. Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss has been one of the most widely introduced species around the globe and often hybridizes with native Cutthroat Trout O. clarkii in the Rocky Mountains. Previous work has shown that hybridization negatively affects reproductive success, but identification of the traits contributing to that reduction has been elusive. In this study, we used a combination of field and laboratory techniques to assess how hybridization with Rainbow Trout affects seven traits during several stages of Westslope Cutthroat Trout development: embryonic survival, ova size, ova energy concentration, sperm motility, juvenile weight, juvenile survival, and burst swimming endurance. Rainbow Trout admixture was correlated with an increase in embryonic survival and ova energy concentration but with a decrease in juvenile weight and burst swimming endurance. These correlations differed from previously observed patterns of reproductive success and likely do not explain the declines in reproductive success associated with admixture. Future investigation of additional, unstudied traits and the use of different environments may shed light on the traits responsible for reproductive success in admixed Cutthroat Trout.

  3. The effects of the lampricide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) on fuel stores and ion balance in a non-target fish, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Birceanu, Oana; Sorensen, Lisa A; Henry, Matthew; McClelland, Grant B; Wang, Yuxiang S; Wilkie, Michael P

    2014-03-01

    The pesticide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) is used to control sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) populations in the Great Lakes through its application to nursery streams containing larval sea lampreys. TFM uncouples oxidative phosphorylation, impairing mitochondrial ATP production in sea lampreys and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). However, little else is known about its sub-lethal effects on non-target aquatic species. The present study tested the hypotheses that TFM exposure in hard water leads to (i) marked depletion of energy stores in metabolically active tissues (brain, muscle, kidney, liver) and (ii) disruption of active ion transport across the gill, adversely affecting electrolyte homeostasis in trout. Exposure of trout to 11.0mgl(-1) TFM (12-h LC50) led to increases in muscle TFM and TFM-glucuronide concentrations, peaking at 9h and 12h, respectively. Muscle and brain glycogen was reduced by 50%, while kidney and muscle lactate increased with TFM exposure. Kidney ATP and phosphocreatine decreased by 50% and 70%, respectively. TFM exposure caused no changes in whole body ion (Na(+), Cl(-), Ca(2+), K(+)) concentrations, gill Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity, or unidirectional Na(+) movements across the gills. We conclude that TFM causes a mismatch between ATP supply and demand in trout, leading to increased reliance on glycolysis, but it does not have physiologically relevant effects on ion balance in hard water.

  4. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) 7-day survival and growth test method.

    PubMed

    Lazorchak, James M; Smith, Mark E

    2007-10-01

    A short-term method was developed in this study for conducting subchronic survival and growth renewal toxicity tests with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). Previously published early life-stage methods for various salmonid species involve test durations of 30 to 90 days. This trout method, however, follows a previously published 7-day fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) growth method. The tests performed in this study measured subchronic growth and survival effects using standard reference toxicants (ammonium chloride, potassium chloride, phenol, and zinc sulfate), receiving water, and effluent samples. The test results were compared with performance criteria and results for 7-day survival and growth tests with P. promelas to determine the level of comparability between the two species. The results from tests with both salmonid species indicated that this 7-day survival and growth test method using O. mykiss and S. fontinalis provides reproducible results with various reference toxicant materials and can be used successfully to detect potential toxicity in environmental samples.

  5. Comparison of biochemical parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) reared in two different trout farms'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatas, Tayfun

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare biochemical parameters of cultured rainbow trouts (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum, 1972) reared in two different trout farms' (Agri and Erzurum). The average weights of fish were 150±10gr for first station (Agri), 230±10gr for second station (Erzurum). Fishes used in research were randomly caught from pools, and fifteen pieces were used for each group. Fishes were fed with commercial trout feed with 45-50% crude protein twice a day. The levels of AST, ALT, LDL, total cholesterol and triglyceride in the second station (Erzurum) were found to be higher (p<0.05) than that of first station (Agri). Whereas, the levels of HDL in the second station (Erzurum) were found to be lower (p<0.05) than that of first station (Agri). Differences in the levels of total cholesterol and AST, ALT, HDL, LDL, triglyceride may be associated with size, sex, sexual maturity and environmental conditions (temperature, pH, hardness and dissolved oxygen).

  6. Factors affecting competitive dominance of rainbow trout over brook trout in southern Appalachian streams: Implications of an individual-based model

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, M.E.; Rose, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    We used an individual-based model to examine possible explanations for the dominance of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss over brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis in southern Appalachian streams. Model simulations were used to quantify the effects on interspecific competition of (1) competitive advantage for feeding sites by rainbow trout, (2) latitudinal differences in stream temperatures, flows, and daylight, (3) year-class failures, (4) lower fecundity of brook trout, and (5) reductions in spawning habitat. The model tracks the daily spawning, growth, and survival of individuals of both species throughout their lifetime in a series of connected stream habitat units (pools, runs, or riffles). Average densities of each species based on 100-year simulations were compared for several levels of each of the five factors and for sympatric and allopatric conditions. Based on model results and empirical information, we conclude that more frequent year-class failures and the lower fecundity of brook trout are both possible and likely explanations for rainbow trout dominance, that warmer temperatures due to latitude and limited spawning habitat are possible but unlikely explanations, and that competitive advantage for feeding sites by rainbow trout is an unlikely explanation. Additional field work should focus on comparative studies of the reproductive success and the early life stage mortalities of brook and rainbow trout among Appalachian streams with varying rainbow trout dominance. 53 refs., 11 figs.

  7. Bi-parentally inherited species-specific markers identify hybridization between rainbow trout and cutthroat trout subspecies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostberg, C.O.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Eight polymerase chain reaction primer sets amplifying bi-parentally inherited species-specific markers were developed that differentiate between rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and various cutthroat trout (O. clarki) subspecies. The primers were tested within known F1 and first generation hybrid backcrosses and were shown to amplify codominantly within hybrids. Heterozygous individuals also amplified a slower migrating band that was a heteroduplex, caused by the annealing of polymerase chain reaction products from both species. These primer sets have numerous advantages for native cutthroat trout conservation including statistical genetic analyses of known crosses and simple hybrid identification.

  8. Differences in growth, fillet quality, and fatty acid metabolism-related gene expression between juvenile male and female rainbow trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sexual maturation occurs at the expense of stored energy and nutrients, including lipids; however, little is known regarding gender effects on nutrient regulatory mechanisms in rainbow trout prior to maturity. Thirty-two, 14 month old, male and female rainbow trout were sampled for growth, carcass ...

  9. Evidence of major genes affecting stress response in rainbow trout using Bayesian methods of complex segregation analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As a first step towards the genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting stress response variation in rainbow trout, we performed complex segregation analyses (CSA) fitting mixed inheritance models of plasma cortisol using Bayesian methods in large full-sib families of rainbow trout. ...

  10. Fish life histories, wildfire, and resilience - A case study of rainbow trout in the Boise River, Idaho

    Treesearch

    Amanda E. Rosenberger; Jason B. Dunham; Helen. Neville

    2012-01-01

    In this short piece we address the question of how aquatic ecosystems and species can change in response to disturbances, such as those related to the influence of wildfire on stream ecosystems. Our focal species is rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Boise River, Idaho. Rainbow trout in this system have persisted in the face of widespread and often severe...

  11. Effects of triploidy on growth and protein degradation during the recovery from feed deprivation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Identifying physiological differences between diploid and triploid rainbow trout will help define how ploidy affects mechanisms that impact growth and nutrient utilization. In this study juvenile diploid and triploid female rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were either continually fed or fasted f...

  12. Effects of frying in various cooking oils on fatty acid content of farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our goal was to describe the effects of frying with various oils on the fatty acid content of rainbow trout. Four different oils were evaluated (peanut oil, high oleic sunflower oil, corn oil, and canola oil). Farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fillets were sliced into three portions and eac...

  13. The effects of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) on the use of spatial resources and behavior of rosyside dace (Clinostomus funduloides)

    Treesearch

    Pedro A. Rincón; Gary D. Grossman

    1998-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and rosyside dace (Clinostomus fitnduloides) exhibit substantial overlap in microhabitat use in Coweeta Creek, North Carolina, USA. We conducted a replicated experiment in an artificial stream to assess the effects of both the presence of rainbow trout and dace density on: 1) microhabitat use, 2...

  14. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) resistance to columnaris disease is heritable and favorably correlated with bacterial cold water disease resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Columnaris disease (CD), caused by Flabobacterium columnare, is an emerging disease affecting rainbow trout aquaculture. Objectives of this study were to 1) estimate heritability of innate CD resistance in a rainbow trout line (ARS-Fp-R) previously selected four generations for improved bacterial co...

  15. Succinate dehydrogenase mutant of Listonella anguillarum protects rainbow trout against vibriosis.

    PubMed

    Altinok, Ilhan; Capkin, Erol; Karsi, Attila

    2015-10-13

    Listonella anguillarum is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobic rod causing hemorrhagic septicemia in marine and rarely in freshwater fish. Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) plays an important role in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle by oxidizing succinate to fumarate while reducing ubiquinone to ubiquinol. Recent studies indicate that central metabolic pathways, including the TCA cycle, contribute to bacterial virulence. However, the role of SDH in L. anguillarum virulence has not been studied. Here, we report in-frame deletion of the succinate dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein (SDHB) and its role in L. anguillarum virulence in rainbow trout. To accomplish this goal, upstream and downstream regions of the L. anguillarum sdhB gene were amplified in-frame and cloned into a suicide plasmid. The chromosomal sdhB gene of L. anguillarum was deleted by homologous recombination. Virulence and immunogenicity of the L. anguillarum ΔsdhB mutant (LaΔsdhB) were determined in rainbow trout. Results show that LaΔsdhB was highly attenuated in rainbow trout, and fish immunized with LaΔsdhB displayed high relative survival rate after exposure to wild type L. anguillarum. These findings indicate SDH is important in L. anguillarum virulence in rainbow trout, and LaΔsdhB could be used as an immersion, oral, or injection vaccine to protect rainbow trout against vibriosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Quality assessment of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fillets during super chilling and chilled storage.

    PubMed

    Shen, Song; Jiang, Yan; Liu, Xiaochang; Luo, Yongkang; Gao, Liang

    2015-08-01

    In order to evaluate the effect of super chilling (-3 °C) and chilled (3 °C) storage on the quality of rainbow trout fillets, total volatile base nitrogen (TVB-N), drip loss, pH, electric conductivity (EC), total aerobic count (TAC), K and related values, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and related compounds, color and sensory score were determined and correlation between these indicators were analyzed. According to the comprehensive evaluation of TAC, K value and sensory score, the limit for acceptability of rainbow trout fillets was 5 days at 3 °C and 11 days at -3 °C. Additionally, the correlation coefficients between TVB-N and other freshness indicators (TAC, K value, sensory score) were relatively low. TVB-N may be inadequate for evaluating freshness changes of rainbow trout fillets compared with other indicators. Among the K and related values, H value was a better freshness indicator in rainbow trout fillets during chilled and super chilling storage for its better correlation coefficients with other freshness indicators. Super chilling storage could extend the shelf life of rainbow trout fillets by 6 days compared to chilled storage.

  17. Reproducible challenge model to investigate the virulence of Flavobacterium columnare genomovars in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Lafrentz, B R; Lapatra, S E; Shoemaker, C A; Klesius, P H

    2012-11-08

    Flavobacterium columnare is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes columnaris disease and has significant economic impacts on aquaculture production worldwide. Molecular analyses have demonstrated that there is genetic diversity among F. columnare isolates. A review of the published literature that used restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that all isolates typed from salmonids were Genomovar I. Our objective was to develop a laboratory challenge model for F. columnare in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum) and use the model to determine the virulence of Genomovar I and II isolates. Six F. columnare isolates were obtained from rainbow trout experiencing losses due to columnaris disease and were determined to be Genomovar I. Three of these were chosen for a preliminary assessment of virulence, and isolate 051-10-S5 was chosen for additional experiments to determine the reproducibility of the waterborne challenge model. In 2 independent experiments, cumulative percent mortalities (CPM) were 49 ± 10% and 50 ± 19%. Challenge of rainbow trout with Genomovar I and II isolates demonstrated a difference in the CPM, with the Genomovar II isolates inducing significantly higher CPM. This reproducible waterborne challenge model for columnaris disease in rainbow trout will be useful to investigate host-pathogen interactions, vaccine development, and other potential control strategies. This research also provides a basis for further defining the molecular diversity and virulence associated with F. columnare genomovars in rainbow trout and other salmonid species.

  18. Inhibition of fish pathogens by the microbiota from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) and rearing environment.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Carlos; Muñoz-Atienza, Estefanía; Nahuelquín, Yanina; Poeta, Patrícia; Igrejas, Gilberto; Hernández, Pablo E; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M

    2015-04-01

    This work reports the isolation and taxonomic identification of the cultivable total microbiota (TM) and Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) and rearing environment from selected stages of the life-cycle, and the evaluation of the LAB antimicrobial activity against the main fish pathogens. TM and LAB isolates were randomly selected and identified by 16S rRNA and/or superoxide dismutase gene sequencing. Although a great diversity in the TM was observed, Enterobacteriaceae and Aeromonadaceae were clearly prevalent, while the genus Lactococcus was the predominant LAB. From a total of 1620 randomly selected LAB, 1159 isolates (71.5%) showed antimicrobial activity. From these, 248 isolates (21.4%) selected for their activity against, at least, four fish pathogens, were taxonomically identified, being Lactococcus lactis the most common species (164 isolates, 66.1%). Interestingly, 88 isolates (35.5%), including 55 L. lactis isolates, exerted activity against four strains of the rainbow trout pathogen Lactococcus garvieae. Our results demonstrate that rainbow trout and rearing environment are potential sources for the isolation of LAB, mainly lactococci, active against L. garvieae and other fish pathogens. Moreover, this is the first study describing the cultivable TM and LAB from rainbow trout intestine and rearing environment along the fish life-cycle. The host-derived LAB active against fish pathogens comprise potential candidates as probiotics in rainbow trout farming as an alternative or complementary strategy to antibiotics and vaccines for disease prevention.

  19. Some Antioxidants and Malondialdehyde Levels in the Flesh of Rainbow Trout, (Oncorhynchus mykiss W., 1792) from Various Feeding Habitats.

    PubMed

    Ural, M S; Karatas, F; Calta, M

    2015-11-08

    The present study was aimed to find the effect of feeding habitats on the amounts of some antioxidants (vitamin A, E, C, ß-carotene and selenium) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the flesh of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). For this purpose, vitamins (A, C and E), β-carotene amounts and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were determined by HPLC and selenium amount was determined by fluorometric method in the flesh of rainbow trout obtained from various feeding habitats. The highest amounts of vitamins (A, C and E), β-carotene and selenium were found in the flesh of wild rainbow trout (WRT), followed by cage reared rainbow trout (CRRT) and pond reared rainbow trout (PRRT). However, the levels of MDA in the flesh of PRRT were the highest, followed by CRRT and the lowest in WRT.

  20. Characterisation of a low pathogenic form of Gyrodactylus salaris from rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Thomas R; Larsen, Thomas B; Jørgensen, Louise G; Bresciani, José; Kania, Per W; Buchmann, Kurt

    2007-01-18

    Gyrodactylus salaris was isolated from rainbow trout in a Danish freshwater trout farm, and a laboratory population of this particular parasite form was established on rainbow trout. Challenge infections were performed using different salmonid strains and species, including East Atlantic salmon Salmo salar (from the Danish River Skjernå), Baltic salmon S. salar (from the Swedish River Ume Alv) and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (from the Danish rainbow trout farm Fousing). These were compared to infection studies on the Norwegian Laerdalselva parasite form kept under exactly the same conditions in the laboratory. The Danish G. salaris form had low virulence towards both Atlantic and Baltic salmon, whereas rainbow trout proved susceptible to the parasite. The Danish G. salaris form was able to maintain a very low infection on East Atlantic salmon, but not on the Baltic salmon, which eliminated the infection within 2 wk. Rainbow trout developed infection intensities ranging up to several hundred parasites per host. The host colonization patterns of the parasite differed clearly from those of previous studies on microhabitats of the Norwegian form of G. salaris. A comparative study on morphological characters (opisthaptoral hard parts) from the Danish parasite form and Norwegian G. salaris showed no significant differences. Selected genes comprising internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 (ITS), ribosomal RNA intergenic spacer (IGS) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) regions were cloned and sequenced. Five sequenced ITS clones from 5 individuals of the Danish strain consistently revealed a single base substitution compared to ITS sequences from all other known species and strains of Gyrodactylus. Mitochondrial COI gene sequences demonstrated that the Danish G. salaris form is closely similar to the Laerdalselva parasite form found in Norway. The IGS sequences were highly variable, but very similar to those obtained from German isolates of G. salaris.

  1. Relative sensitivity of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to acute exposures of cadmium and zinc.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James A; Welsh, Paul G; Lipton, Josh; Cacela, Dave; Dailey, Anne D

    2002-01-01

    Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) were recently listed as threatened in the United States under the federal Endangered Species Act. Present and historical habitat of this species includes waterways that have been impacted by metals released from mining and mineral processing activities. We conducted paired bioassays with bull trout and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to examine the relative sensitivity of each species to Cd and Zn independently and as a mixture. A total of 15 pairs of acute toxicity bioassays were completed to evaluate the effects of different water hardness (30 or 90 mg/L as CaCO3), pH (6.5 or 7.5), and temperature (8 or 12 degrees C) on Cd and Zn toxicity. For both species, the acute toxicity of both Cd and Zn was greater than previously observed in laboratory studies. Bull trout were about twice as tolerant of Cd and about 50% more tolerant of Zn than were rainbow trout. Higher hardness and lower pH water produced lower toxicity and slower rates of toxicity in both species. Elevated temperature significantly increased the sensitivity of bull trout to Zn but decreased the sensitivity (not significantly) of rainbow trout to Zn. At a hardness of 30 mg/L, the toxicity values (i.e., median lethal concentration; 120-h LC50) for both species were lower than the current U.S. national water quality criteria for protection of aquatic life, indicating that current national criteria may not be protective of sensitive salmonids--including the threatened bull trout--in low calcium waters.

  2. Viral surveillance of cultured Rainbow Trout in the eastern Black Sea, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ogut, H; Altuntas, C; Parlak, R

    2013-03-01

    To study the presence and spread of viral fish pathogens in Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in the eastern Black Sea region of Turkey, 172 pooled samples (seven fish per pool) of Rainbow Trout fry from 28 hatcheries were examined from December 2006 to July 2007. Forty-three pools (seven broodfish per pool) of seminal and ovarian fluids from 182 female and 119 male brood Rainbow Trout were also sampled during spawning. Moreover, reproductive fluids (22 pools) of wild trout (Salmo trutta labrax, S. t. caspius, S. t. abanticus, and S. t. macrostigma), captured by electroshocking in the rivers in and around the region, were sampled. Triplicate groups of 40 or 80 Rainbow Trout fry was also challenged with two similar isolates to determine their virulence on trout fry. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed on the samples producing cytopathic effect on CHSE-214 cells. The positive results were confirmed with a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay. Neither infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) nor viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) was detected during the survey. Of the 28 hatcheries sampled in the Black Sea region, 15 from six provinces tested positive for infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) in trout fry. Unexpectedly, all reproductive fluids from both male and female cultured and wild broodstock tested negative for IPNV. Nucleotide sequences of the VP2/NS region of IPNV showed that all isolates collected (n = 38) in the region and surrounding areas belonged to the genogroup III. The findings strongly suggest that IPNV is endemic in the fry of farmed Rainbow Trout within the region. Virus prevention measures should be taken to prevent in-farm spread of these highly contagious, low-virulence isolates.

  3. Ultrastructural changes in the hepatocytes of juvenile rainbow trout and mature brown trout exposed to copper or zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leland, H.V.

    1983-01-01

    Morphological changes in hepatocytes of mature brown trout (Salmo trutta Linnaeus) and juvenile rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri Richardson), accompanying chronic exposures to copper and zinc, were examined by transmission electron microscopy. At a concentration of copper not inhibitory to the final stages of gonadal development or spawning of brown trout, structural alterations included contraction of mitochondria and a tendency for nuclei to be slightly enlarged. Concentrations of copper or zinc lethal to a small fraction (10% and 4%, respectively) of a population of juvenile rainbow trout exposed for 42 d during larval and early juvenile development caused hepatocyte changes in survivors indicative of a reduction in ability to maintain intracellular water and cation balance and possible intranuclear metal sequestering. Specific structural alterations included increased vesiculation of rough endoplasmic reticulum, an increase in the abundance of electron-dense particles in the nucleus, increases in the numbers of multilaminar and globular inclusions, pooling of glycogen, increased autophagocytic activity and an increase in the number of necrotic cells. At advanced stages of toxicosis (concentrations of copper or zinc lethal to approximately 50% of the juveniles exposed for 42 d during development), loss in integrity of mitochondrial membranes, rupturing of plasma and nuclear membranes, separation of granular and fibrillar nuclear components, fragmentation of endoplasmic reticulum, and extensive autophagic vacuolization were significant features of hepatocytes of surviving juvenile rainbow trout. ?? 1983.

  4. Muscle wound healing in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J G; Andersen, E W; Ersbøll, B K; Nielsen, M E

    2016-01-01

    We followed the progression of healing of deep excisional biopsy punch wounds over the course of 365 days in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by monitoring visual wound healing and gene expression in the healing muscle at regular intervals (1, 3, 7, 14, 38 and 100 days post-wounding). In addition, we performed muscle texture analysis one year after wound infliction. The selected genes have all previously been investigated in relation to vertebrate wound healing, but only few specifically in fish. The selected genes were interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and -β3, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -9 and -13, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), fibronectin (FN), tenascin-C (TN-C), prolyl 4-hydroxylase α1-chain (P4Hα1), lysyl oxidase (LOX), collagen type I α1-chain (ColIα1), CD41 and CD163. Wound healing progressed slowly in the presented study, which is at least partially due to the low temperature of about 8.5 °C during the first 100 days. The inflammation phase lasted more than 14 days, and the genes relating to production and remodeling of new extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibited a delayed but prolonged upregulation starting 1-2 weeks post-wounding and lasting until at least 100 days post-wounding. The gene expression patterns and histology reveal limited capacity for muscle regeneration in rainbow trout, and muscle texture analyses one year after wound infliction confirm that wounds heal with fibrosis. At 100 dpw epidermis had fully regenerated, and dermis partially regenerated. Scales had not regenerated even after one year. CD163 is a marker of "wound healing"-type M2c macrophages in mammals. M2 macrophage markers are as yet poorly described in fish. The pattern of CD163 expression in the present study is consistent with the expected timing of presence of M2c macrophages in the wound. CD163 may thus potentially prove a valuable marker of M2 macrophages - or a subset hereof - in fish. We subjected a group of fish to

  5. Comprehensive gene expression profiling following DNA vaccination of rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Nichols, Krista M.; Winton, James R.; Kurath, Gael; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Wheeler, Paul; Hansen, John D.; Herwig, Russell P.; Park, Linda K.

    2006-01-01

    The DNA vaccine based on the glycoprotein gene of Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus induces a non-specific anti-viral immune response and long-term specific immunity against IHNV. This study characterized gene expression responses associated with the early anti-viral response. Homozygous rainbow trout were injected intra-muscularly (I.M.) with vector DNA or the IHNV DNA vaccine. Gene expression in muscle tissue (I.M. site) was evaluated using a 16,008 feature salmon cDNA microarray. Eighty different genes were significantly modulated in the vector DNA group while 910 genes were modulated in the IHNV DNA vaccinate group relative to control group. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR was used to examine expression of selected immune genes at the I.M. site and in other secondary tissues. In the localized response (I.M. site), the magnitudes of gene expression changes were much greater in the vaccinate group relative to the vector DNA group for the majority of genes analyzed. At secondary systemic sites (e.g. gill, kidney and spleen), type I IFN-related genes were up-regulated in only the IHNV DNA vaccinated group. The results presented here suggest that the IHNV DNA vaccine induces up-regulation of the type I IFN system across multiple tissues, which is the functional basis of early anti-viral immunity.

  6. Effect of nanosilver on metabolism in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): An investigation using different respirometric approaches.

    PubMed

    Murray, Laura; Rennie, Michael D; Svendsen, Jon C; Enders, Eva C

    2017-10-01

    Nanosilver (nAg) has been incorporated into many consumer products, including clothing and washing machines, because of its antimicrobial properties. Consequently, the potential for its release into aquatic environments is of significant concern. Documented toxic effects on fish include altered gene expression, gill damage, and impaired gas exchange, as well as mortality at high nAg concentrations. The present study reports the effects of nAg on the metabolism of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Fish were exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations (0.28 ± 0.02 μg/L) and higher (47.60 ± 5.13 μg/L) for 28 d, after which their standard metabolic rate (SMR), forced maximum metabolic rate (MMRf ), and spontaneous maximum metabolic rate (MMRs ) were measured. There was no effect observed in SMR, MMRf , or MMRs , suggesting that nAg is unlikely to directly affect fish metabolism. On average, MMRs tended to be greater than MMRf , and most MMRs occurred when room lighting increased. The timing of MMRf chase protocols was found to affect both MMRf and SMR estimates, in that chasing fish before respirometric experiments caused higher MMRf estimates and lower SMR estimates. Although compounded effects involving nAg and other environmental stressors remain unknown, the present study indicates that the tested range of nAg is unlikely to constrain fish metabolism. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2722-2729. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  7. Metabolism and elimination of benzocaine by rainbow-trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meinertz, J.R.; Gingerich, W.H.; Allen, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    1. Branchial and urinary elimination of benzocaine residues was evaluated in adult rainbow trout, oncorhynchus mykiss, given a single dorsal aortic dose of c-14-benzocaine hydrochloride.^2. Branchial elimination of benzocaine residues was rapid and accounted for 59.2% Of the dose during the first 3 h after dosing. Renal elimination of radioactivity was considerably slower; the kidney excreted 2.7% Dose within 3 h and 9.0% Within 24 h. Gallbladder bile contained 2.0% Dose 24 h after injection.^3. Of the radioactivity in radiochromatograms from water taken 3 min after injection, 87.3% Was benzocaine and 12.7% Was n-acetylated benzocaine. After 60 min, 32.7% Was benzocaine and 67.3% Was n-acetylated benzocaine.^4. Of the radioactivity in radiochromatograms from urine taken 1 h after dosing, 7.6% Was para-aminobenzoic acid, 59.7% Was n-acetylated para-aminobenzoic acid, 19.5% Was benzocaine, and 8.0% Was n-acetylated benzocaine. The proportion of the radioactivity in urine changed with time so that by 20 h, 1.0% Was para-aminobenzoic acid and 96.6% Was n-acetylated para-aminobenzoic acid.^5. Benzocaine and a more hydrophobic metabolite, n-acetylated benzocaine, were eliminated primarily through the gills; renal and biliary pathways were less significant elimination routes for benzocaine residues.

  8. The fibrate drug gemfibrozil disrupts lipoprotein metabolism in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Prindiville, John S. Mennigen, Jan A.; Zamora, Jake M.; Moon, Thomas W.; Weber, Jean-Michel

    2011-03-15

    Gemfibrozil (GEM) is a fibrate drug consistently found in effluents from sewage treatment plants. This study characterizes the pharmacological effects of GEM on the plasma lipoproteins of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Our goals were to quantify the impact of the drug on: 1) lipid constituents of lipoproteins (phospholipids (PL), triacylglycerol (TAG), and cholesterol), 2) lipoprotein classes (high, low and very low density lipoproteins), and 3) fatty acid composition of lipoproteins. Potential mechanisms of GEM action were investigated by measuring lipoprotein lipase activity (LPL) and the hepatic gene expression of LPL and of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} isoforms. GEM treatment resulted in decreased plasma lipoprotein levels (- 29%) and a reduced size of all lipoprotein classes (lower PL:TAG ratios). However, the increase in HDL-cholesterol elicited by GEM in humans failed to be observed in trout. Therefore, HDL-cholesterol cannot be used to assess the impact of the drug on fish. GEM also modified lipoprotein composition by reducing the abundance of long-chain n-3 fatty acids, thereby potentially reducing the nutritional quality of exposed fish. The relative gene expression of LPL was increased, but the activity of the enzyme was not, and we found no evidence for the activation of PPAR pathways. The depressing effects of GEM on fish lipoproteins demonstrated here may be a concern in view of the widespread presence of fibrates in aquatic environments. Work is needed to test whether exposure to environmental concentrations of these drugs jeopardizes the capacity of fish for reproduction, temperature acclimation or migratory behaviors.

  9. Purification and characterization of calpain and calpastatin from rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masataka; Li, Hongqi; Thompson, Valery F; Kunisaki, Naomichi; Goll, Darrel E

    2007-04-01

    Although the calpain system has been studied extensively in mammalian animals, much less is known about the properties of mu-calpain, m-calpain, and calpastatin in lower vertebrates such as fish. These three proteins were isolated and partly characterized from rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, muscle. Trout m-calpain contains an 80-kDa large subunit, but the approximately 26-kDa small subunit from trout m-calpain is smaller than the 28-kDa small subunit from mammalian calpains. Trout mu-calpain and calpastatin were only partly purified; identity of trout mu-calpain was confirmed by labeling with antibodies to bovine skeletal muscle mu-calpain, and identity of trout calpastatin was confirmed by specific inhibition of bovine skeletal muscle mu- and m-calpain. Trout mu-calpain requires 4.4+/-2.8 microM and trout m-calpain requires 585+/-51 microM Ca(2+) for half-maximal activity, similar to the Ca(2+) requirements of mu- and m-calpain from mammalian tissues. Sequencing tryptic peptides indicated that the amino acid sequence of trout calpastatin shares little homology with the amino acid sequences of mammalian calpastatins. Screening a rainbow trout cDNA library identified three cDNAs encoding for the large subunit of a putative m-calpain. The amino acid sequence predicted by trout m-calpain cDNA was 65% identical to the human 80-kDa m-calpain sequence. Gene duplication and polyploidy occur in fish, and the amino acid sequence of the trout m-calpain 80-kDa subunit identified in this study was 83% identical to the sequence of a trout m-calpain 80-kDa subunit described earlier. This is the first report of two isoforms of m-calpain in a single species.

  10. The effect of peptidoglycan enriched diets on antimicrobial peptide gene expression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Casadei, Elisa; Bird, Steve; Vecino, Jose L González; Wadsworth, Simon; Secombes, Christopher J

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of feeding rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) peptidoglycan (PG) enriched diets on antimicrobial peptide (AMP) gene expression. Fish were divided into 5 groups and fed diets containing 0, 5, 10, 50 and 100 mg PG/Kg, and sampled 1, 7 and 14 days later. The expression of eight AMP genes (four defensins, two cathelicidins and two liver expressed AMPs) was determined in skin, gill, gut and liver, tissues important for first lines of defence or production of acute phase proteins. Up-regulation of many AMPs was found after feeding the PG enriched diets, with sequential expression seen over the time course studied, where defensins were typically expressed early and cathelicidins and LEAPs later on. A number of clear differences in AMP responsiveness between the tissues examined were also apparent. Of the four PG concentrations used, 5 mg PG/Kg did not always elicit AMP gene induction or to the same degree as seen with the other diets. The three higher dose groups generally showed similar trends although differences in fold change were more pronounced in the 50 and 100 mg PG/Kg groups. Curiously several AMPs were down-regulated after 14 days of feeding in gills, gut and liver. Nevertheless, overall the PG enriched diets had a positive effect on AMP expression. Further investigations now need to be undertaken to confirm whether this higher AMP gene expression correlates with protection against common bacterial diseases and if PG enriched diets have value as a means to temporarily boost the piscine immune system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Detection of viruses in farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Korea by RT-LAMP assay.

    PubMed

    Suebsing, Rungkarn; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Seok Ryel; Park, Myung-Ae; Oh, Myung-Joo

    2011-10-01

    The viral diseases have been the serious problem in salmonid farming, and rainbow trout is not an exception. In this study, routine surveys were conducted for detecting of viruses in farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Korea during 2009-2010. Head kidneys from individual fish were employed for virus detection by using a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay. Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) were the target viruses in this study. 53.5% (46/86) were found to be IPNV-positive, while IHNV and VHSV showed RT-LAMP negative during examination for 2 years. Ten IPNV-positive samples were randomly selected for viral isolation and the cells showing CPEs were subjected to RT-LAMP, RT-PCR, and direct sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the rainbow trout isolate has high similarity homologies with the VR-299 strain, as previously described.

  12. Occurrence and morphogenetic characteristics of Gyrodactylus (Monogenea: Gyrodactylidae) from a rainbow trout farm (Lake Ladoga, Russia).

    PubMed

    Ieshko, Evgeny; Barskaya, Yulia; Parshukov, Aleksey; Lumme, Jaakko; Khlunov, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    Gyrodactylus parasite infected juveniles on rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum, 1792) from a fish farm in Lake Ladoga were investigated. The observed cases of infection in fish featured a high prevalence, when almost all of the fish were infected. However, if an outbreak of the monogenean infection is observed in spring, the intensity of the infection may be low, and when the infection occurs in the ice-covered period (late autumn - winter), the number of parasites on the fins of a single fish may exceed 3000 specimens. Molecular identification of the parasite demonstrated that the infecting clone was identical with rainbow trout specific strain of Gyrodactylus salaris RBT widely spread in Northern Europe, but a small proportion of the parasites were the hybrid clone Gyrodactylus pomeraniae x G. lavareti. Morphological variations of hooks and other opisthaptor parts in the monogenean Gyrodactylus depending on the intensity of infection in rainbow trout were demonstrated.

  13. Dietary effects of Spirulina platensis on hematological and serum biochemical parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Yeganeh, Sakineh; Teimouri, Mahdi; Amirkolaie, Abdolsamad Keramat

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of diets containing 0, 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10% of Spirulina platensis on hematological and serum biochemical parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Fish (n=180; 101±8 g) were randomly divided into fifteen 300 L fiberglass tanks in triplicates for a period of ten weeks. The RBC, WBC, hemoglobin, total protein and albumin levels increased significantly in the groups supplemented with S. platensis. Dietary inclusion of S. platensis had no significant effects on hematocrit, cholesterol, triglyceride and lactate of the blood. HDL-cholesterol was larger in rainbow trout fed 10% S. platensis in comparison with the other diets, whereas LDL-cholesterol significantly decreased with increasing of S. platensis inclusion. Cortisol and glucose significantly decreased with increasing of S. platensis inclusion. The present results demonstrate that inclusion of 10% S. platensis can be introduced as an immunostimulant in rainbow trout diets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An outbreak of listeriosis suspected to have been caused by rainbow trout.

    PubMed Central

    Ericsson, H; Eklöw, A; Danielsson-Tham, M L; Loncarevic, S; Mentzing, L O; Persson, I; Unnerstad, H; Tham, W

    1997-01-01

    An outbreak of listeriosis in Sweden, consisting of nine cases, was investigated by means of molecular typing of strains from patients and strains isolated from suspected foodstuffs, together with interviews of the patients. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from six of the patients, and all isolates were of the same clonal type. This clonal type was also isolated from a "gravad" rainbow trout, made by producer Y, found in the refrigerator of one of the patients. Unopened packages obtained from producer Y were also found to contain the same clonal type of L. monocytogenes. Based on the interview results and the bacteriological typing, we suspect that at least six of the nine cases were caused by gravad or cold-smoked rainbow trout made by producer Y. To our knowledge, this is the first rainbow trout-borne outbreak of listeriosis ever reported. PMID:9350756

  15. Effects of temperature, food deprivation and salinity on growth, RNA/DNA ratio and certain enzyme activities in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri Richardson).

    PubMed

    Jürss, K; Bittorf, T; Vökler, T; Wacke, R

    1987-01-01

    1. The connection between feeding regime (food deprivation and restricted diet) and thermal acclimation (1-2, 6, 11 and 16 degrees C) was studied in rainbow trout held in diluted seawater (20% S). 2. At 1 degree C, food deprivation effects on all parameters are slight, and on RNA and certain enzymes they are masked by thermal acclimation effects. 3. At a salinity of 20% rainbow trout on a restricted diet and held at 11 degrees C have the highest growth rate. 4. Owing to increasing RNA levels, the RNA/DNA quotient is significantly higher than normal in rainbow trout held at 1 degree C although the fishes do not grow at this temperature. 5. Temperature and feeding both affect the enzymes we studied (liver: G1DH, AspT, arginase, G6PDH, and 6PGDH; kidney: G1DH, AspT, arginase, and Na/K-ATPase; white muscle: AspT and A1T; gill: Na/K-ATPase) differently. Interactions between these two factors also occur in some cases.

  16. Effect of stocking sub-yearling Atlantic salmon on the habitat use of sub-yearling rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) restoration in the Lake Ontario watershed may depend on the species' ability to compete with naturalized non-native salmonids, including rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Ontario tributaries. This study examined interspecific habitat associations between sub-yearling Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout as well as the effect of salmon stocking on trout habitat in two streams in the Lake Ontario watershed. In sympatry, Atlantic salmon occupied significantly faster velocities and deeper areas than rainbow trout. However, when examining the habitat use of rainbow trout at all allopatric and sympatric sites in both streams, trout habitat use was more diverse at the sympatric sites with an orientation for increased cover and larger substrate. In Grout Brook, where available habitat remained constant, there was evidence suggesting that trout may have shifted to slower and shallower water in the presence of salmon. The ability of sub-yearling Atlantic salmon to affect a habitat shift in rainbow trout may be due to their larger body size and/or larger pectoral fin size. Future studies examining competitive interactions between these species during their first year of stream residence should consider the size advantage that earlier emerging Atlantic salmon will have over rainbow trout.

  17. Identification of single-nucleotide polymorphism markers associated with cortisol response to crowding in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sixin; Vallejo, Roger L; Gao, Guangtu; Palti, Yniv; Weber, Gregory M; Hernandez, Alvaro; Rexroad, Caird E

    2015-06-01

    Understanding stress responses is essential for improving animal welfare and increasing agriculture production efficiency. Previously, we reported microsatellite markers associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting plasma cortisol response to crowding in rainbow trout. In this study, our main objectives were to identify single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers associated with cortisol response to crowding in rainbow trout using both GWAS (genome-wide association studies) and QTL mapping methods and to employ rapidly expanding genomic resources for rainbow trout toward the identification of candidate genes affecting this trait. A three-generation F2 mapping family (2008052) was genotyped using RAD-seq (restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing) to identify 4874 informative SNPs. GWAS identified 26 SNPs associated with cortisol response to crowding whereas QTL mapping revealed two significant QTL on chromosomes Omy8 and Omy12, respectively. Positional candidate genes were identified using marker sequences to search the draft genome assembly of rainbow trout. One of the genes in the QTL interval on Omy12 is a putative serine/threonine protein kinase gene that was differentially expressed in the liver in response to handling and confinement stress in our previous study. A homologue of this gene was differentially expressed in zebrafish embryos exposed to diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and an environmental toxicant. NSAIDs have been shown to affect the cortisol response in rainbow trout; therefore, this gene is a good candidate based on its physical position and expression. However, the reference genome resources currently available for rainbow trout require continued improvement as demonstrated by the unmapped SNPs and the putative assembly errors detected in this study.

  18. Infection experiments with novel Piscine orthoreovirus from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in salmonids

    PubMed Central

    Taksdal, Torunn; Olsen, Anne Berit; Wessel, Øystein; Mikkelsen, Susie Sommer; Alencar, Anna Luiza Farias; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    A new disease in farmed rainbow trout (Onchorhyncus mykiss) was described in Norway in 2013. The disease mainly affected the heart and resembled heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). HSMI is associated with Piscine orthoreovirus (PRV), and a search for a similar virus in the diseased rainbow trout led to detection of a sequence with 85% similarity to PRV. This finding called for a targeted effort to assess the risk the new PRV-variant pose on farmed rainbow trout and Atlantic salmon by studying infection and disease pathogenesis, aiming to provide more diagnostic knowledge. Based on the genetic relationship to PRV, the novel virus is referred to as PRV-Oncorhynchus mykiss (PRV-Om) in contrast to PRV-Salmo salar (PRV-Ss). In experimental trials, intraperitoneally injected PRV-Om was shown to replicate in blood in both salmonid species, but more effectively in rainbow trout. In rainbow trout, the virus levels peaked in blood and heart of cohabitants 6 weeks post challenge, along with increased expression of antiviral genes (Mx and viperin) in the spleen, with 80–100% of the cohabitants infected. Heart inflammation was diagnosed in all cohabitants examined 8 weeks post challenge. In contrast, less than 50% of the Atlantic salmon cohabitants were infected between 8 and 16 weeks post challenge and the antiviral response in these fish was very low. From 12 weeks post challenge and onwards, mild focal myocarditis was demonstrated in a few virus-positive salmon. In conclusion, PRV-Om infects both salmonid species, but faster transmission, more notable antiviral response and more prominent heart pathology were observed in rainbow trout. PMID:28678799

  19. Infection experiments with novel Piscine orthoreovirus from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in salmonids.

    PubMed

    Hauge, Helena; Vendramin, Niccolo; Taksdal, Torunn; Olsen, Anne Berit; Wessel, Øystein; Mikkelsen, Susie Sommer; Alencar, Anna Luiza Farias; Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Dahle, Maria Krudtaa

    2017-01-01

    A new disease in farmed rainbow trout (Onchorhyncus mykiss) was described in Norway in 2013. The disease mainly affected the heart and resembled heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). HSMI is associated with Piscine orthoreovirus (PRV), and a search for a similar virus in the diseased rainbow trout led to detection of a sequence with 85% similarity to PRV. This finding called for a targeted effort to assess the risk the new PRV-variant pose on farmed rainbow trout and Atlantic salmon by studying infection and disease pathogenesis, aiming to provide more diagnostic knowledge. Based on the genetic relationship to PRV, the novel virus is referred to as PRV-Oncorhynchus mykiss (PRV-Om) in contrast to PRV-Salmo salar (PRV-Ss). In experimental trials, intraperitoneally injected PRV-Om was shown to replicate in blood in both salmonid species, but more effectively in rainbow trout. In rainbow trout, the virus levels peaked in blood and heart of cohabitants 6 weeks post challenge, along with increased expression of antiviral genes (Mx and viperin) in the spleen, with 80-100% of the cohabitants infected. Heart inflammation was diagnosed in all cohabitants examined 8 weeks post challenge. In contrast, less than 50% of the Atlantic salmon cohabitants were infected between 8 and 16 weeks post challenge and the antiviral response in these fish was very low. From 12 weeks post challenge and onwards, mild focal myocarditis was demonstrated in a few virus-positive salmon. In conclusion, PRV-Om infects both salmonid species, but faster transmission, more notable antiviral response and more prominent heart pathology were observed in rainbow trout.

  20. Comparative efficacy of 16 anesthetic chemicals on rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilderhus, P.A.; Marking, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    Presently there are no legally registered fish anesthetics that allow for the release of fish or use of the fish for food soon after they have been anesthetized. MS-222 (tricaine), the only anesthetic registered for use on fish in the United States, cannot be used within 21 d of harvesting the fish for food. As the start in a search for an anesthetic that can be used with little or no withdrawal period, we tested the efficacy of 16 chemicals as anesthetics on rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri. Efficacy was defined by the fish (1) becoming handleable (quiet enough to be manipulated and handled readily) in 3 min or less, (2) recovering in 10 min or less, and (3) showing no mortality after 15 min in the anesthetic solution. Four chemicals--MS-222, quinaldine sulfate, benzocaine, and 2-phenoxyethanol--met these criteria for efficacy. Chemicals that yielded excessive induction or recovery times or caused excessive mortality were methylpentynol, chlorobutanol, etomidate, metomidate, Piscaine, propanidid, carbon dioxide, nicotine, salt, Halothane, Metofane, and Biotal. Because carbon dioxide leaves no residues and requires no withdrawal period, it may be an acceptable alternative for fishery workers who can tolerate somewhat shallower anesthesia and longer induction and recovery times.

  1. Comparative toxicity of two Iodophors to rainbow trout eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amend, Donald F.

    1974-01-01

    Toxicity of Wescodyne(R) and Betadine(R) to eyed eggs was not adversely affected by water hardness (as calcium and magnesium) or by exposure periods up to 60 min. Both iodophors were much more toxic below pH 6.0 than at pH 8.0. In general Wescodyne was slightly more toxic than Betadine. Significant egg loss occurred if freshly fertilized eggs were water-hardened in either iodophor at 100 ppm of iodine, but egg loss at 25 ppm of iodine or at 100 ppm if the eggs were disinfected 30 min after water hardening was comparable to the control. Also, there was no effect on the egg mortality or fry development following single or multiple exposures after eggs were water hardened. At pH 6.0 and above, Wescodyne and Betadine at 100 ppm iodine in a 15-min dip would be safe to use on rainbow trout eggs at any stage of development after water hardening. Recommendations and precautions for hatchery use are given.

  2. Behavioral indicators of sublethal toxicity in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Little, Edward E.; Archeski, Richard D.; Flerov, Boris A.; Kozlovskaya, Vera I.

    1990-01-01

    Four measures of behavior-spontaneous swimming activity, swimming capacity, feeding behavior, and vulnerability to predation-were assessed as indicators of sublethal toxicity in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in 96-hr exposures to sublethal concentrations of six agricultural chemicals: carbaryl, chlordane, dimethylamine salt of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-DMA), tributyl phosphorotrithioate (DBF 1), methyl parathion, and pentachlorophenol. After exposures, behavioral changes consistently demonstrated sublethal toxicity, but effects on specific behaviors varied with contaminants and their concentrations were altered by the water quality criterion concentration for chlordane (2 μg/L), and at a concentration of DEF (5 μg/L) that had previously been shown to inhibit growth and survival after a 90-day exposure. Feeding behavior was inhibited most by exposure to DEF, 2,4-DMA, and methyl parathion. Vulnerability to predation was heightened most by exposure to carbaryl and pentachlorophenol. Although all chemicals inhibited spontaneous swimming activity, only carbaryl, DEF, and 2,4-DMA influenced swimming capacity.

  3. Physiological and molecular ontogeny of branchial and extra-branchial urea excretion in posthatch rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Chris M.

    2015-01-01

    All teleost fish produce ammonia as a metabolic waste product. In embryos, ammonia excretion is limited by the chorion, and fish must detoxify ammonia by synthesizing urea via the ornithine urea cycle (OUC). Although urea is produced by embryos and larvae, urea excretion (Jurea) is typically low until yolk sac absorption, increasing thereafter. The aim of this study was to determine the physiological and molecular characteristics of Jurea by posthatch rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Following hatch, whole body urea concentration decreased over time, while Jurea increased following yolk sac absorption. From 12 to 40 days posthatch (dph), extra-branchial routes of excretion accounted for the majority of Jurea, while the gills became the dominant site for Jurea only after 55 dph. This represents the most delayed branchial ontogeny of any process studied to date. Urea transporter (UT) gene expression in the gills and skin increased over development, consistent with increases in branchial and extra-branchial Jurea. Following exposure to 25 mmol/l urea, the accumulation and subsequent elimination of exogenous urea was much greater at 55 dph than 12 dph, consistent with increased UT expression. Notably, UT gene expression in the gills of 55 dph larvae increased in response to high urea. In summary, there is a clear increase in urea transport capacity over posthatch development, despite a decrease in OUC activity. PMID:26608657

  4. Physiological and molecular ontogeny of branchial and extra-branchial urea excretion in posthatch rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Alex M; Wood, Chris M

    2016-02-01

    All teleost fish produce ammonia as a metabolic waste product. In embryos, ammonia excretion is limited by the chorion, and fish must detoxify ammonia by synthesizing urea via the ornithine urea cycle (OUC). Although urea is produced by embryos and larvae, urea excretion (J(urea)) is typically low until yolk sac absorption, increasing thereafter. The aim of this study was to determine the physiological and molecular characteristics of J(urea) by posthatch rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Following hatch, whole body urea concentration decreased over time, while J(urea) increased following yolk sac absorption. From 12 to 40 days posthatch (dph), extra-branchial routes of excretion accounted for the majority of J(urea), while the gills became the dominant site for J(urea) only after 55 dph. This represents the most delayed branchial ontogeny of any process studied to date. Urea transporter (UT) gene expression in the gills and skin increased over development, consistent with increases in branchial and extra-branchial J(urea). Following exposure to 25 mmol/l urea, the accumulation and subsequent elimination of exogenous urea was much greater at 55 dph than 12 dph, consistent with increased UT expression. Notably, UT gene expression in the gills of 55 dph larvae increased in response to high urea. In summary, there is a clear increase in urea transport capacity over posthatch development, despite a decrease in OUC activity. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Identification of differentially expressed genes of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in response to Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae (Myxozoa).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gokhlesh; Abd-Elfattah, Ahmed; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2015-03-01

    Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae Canning et al., 1999 (Myxozoa) is the causative agent of proliferative kidney disease in various species of salmonids in Europe and North America. We have shown previously that the development and distribution of the European strain of T. bryosalmonae differs in the kidney of brown trout (Salmo trutta) Linnaeus, 1758 and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Walbaum, 1792, and that intra-luminal sporogonic stages were found in brown trout but not in rainbow trout. We have now compared transcriptomes from kidneys of brown trout and rainbow trout infected with T. bryosalmonae using suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH). The differentially expressed transcripts produced by SSH were cloned, transformed, and tested by colony PCR. Differential expression screening of PCR products was validated using dot blot, and positive clones having different signal intensities were sequenced. Differential screening and a subsequent NCBI-BLAST analysis of expressed sequence tags revealed nine clones expressed differently between both fish species. These differentially expressed genes were validated by quantitative real-time PCR of kidney samples from both fish species at different time points of infection. Expression of anti-inflammatory (TSC22 domain family protein 3) and cell proliferation (Prothymin alpha) genes were upregulated significantly in brown trout but downregulated in rainbow trout. The expression of humoral immune response (immunoglobulin mu) and endocytic pathway (Ras-related protein Rab-11b) genes were significantly upregulated in rainbow trout but downregulated in brown trout. This study suggests that differential expression of host anti-inflammatory, humoral immune and endocytic pathway responses, cell proliferation, and cell growth processes do not inhibit the development of intra-luminal sporogonic stages of the European strain of T. bryosalmonae in brown trout but may suppress it in rainbow trout.

  6. Hybridization and cytonuclear associations among native westslope cutthroat trout, introduced rainbow trout, and their hybrids within the Stehekin River drainage, North Cascades National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostberg, C.O.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Historic introductions of nonnative rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss into the native habitats of cutthroat trout O. clarkii have impacted cutthroat trout populations through introgressive hybridization, creating challenges and concerns for cutthroat trout conservation. We examined the effects of rainbow trout introductions on the native westslope cutthroat trout O. c. lewisii within the Stehekin River drainage, North Cascades National Park, Washington, by analyzing 1,763 salmonid DNA samples from 18 locations with nine diagnostic nuclear DNA markers and one diagnostic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) marker. Pure westslope cutthroat trout populations only occurred above upstream migration barriers in the Stehekin River and Park Creek. Two categories of rainbow trout admixture were observed: (1) less than 10% within the Stehekin River drainage above the Bridge Creek confluence and the middle and upper Bridge Creek drainage and (2) greater than 30% within the Stehekin River below the Bridge Creek confluence and in lower Bridge Creek. Hybrid indices and multilocus genotypes revealed an absence of rainbow trout and reduced hybrid diversity within the Stehekin River above the Bridge Creek confluence relative to hybrid diversity in the Stehekin River below the confluence and within lower Bridge Creek. Cytonuclear disequilibrium statistics revealed assortative mating between westslope cutthroat and rainbow trout but not among hybrids within the same locations. This suggests that a randomly mating hybrid swarm does not currently exist. However, continual migration of parental genotypes into the study location could also create significant cytonuclear disequilibria. The Stehekin River represents a novel and unique example of a dynamic hybridization zone where the invasion of rainbow trout alleles into the Stehekin River westslope cutthroat trout population above the Bridge Creek confluence appears to be impeded, suggesting that divergent ecological or evolutionary mechanisms

  7. Effects of whirling disease on selected hematological parameters in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, Christine L.; Blazer, V.S.; Waldrop, T.B.; Pooler, P.S.

    2001-01-01

    Hematological responses to whirling disease in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were investigated. Two-mo-old fingerling rainbow trout were exposed to cultured triactinomyxon spores of Myxobolus cerebralis at 9,000 spores/fish in December, 1997. Twenty-four wks post-exposure, fish were taken from infected and uninfected groups for peripheral blood and cranial tissue sampling. Histological observations on cranial tissues confirmed M. cerebralis infection in all exposed fish. Differences in hematological parameters between the two groups included significantly lower total leukocyte and small lymphocyte counts for the infected fish. No effects on hematocrit, plasma protein concentration, or other differential leukocyte counts were noted.

  8. First isolation of Pseudocohnilembus persalinus (Ciliophora: Scuticociliatida) from freshwater-reared rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Jones, Simon R M; Prosperi-Porta, Gina; LaPatra, Scott E

    2010-10-01

    Ciliated protists were isolated from the ovarian fluid of apparently healthy adult rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) maintained in freshwater. The organism was identified as Pseudocohnilembus persalinus based on morphometric and morphological analysis of silver-stained specimens obtained from culture and on analysis of ribosomal RNA gene sequences. The cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene sequence of this organism also was characterized. This ciliate has been reported previously as free living only in saline environments and as an endosymbiont in a marine teleost, the olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus). A cyst-like stage may have facilitated the novel occurrence of this organism as an endosymbiont in rainbow trout.

  9. Histopathological findings in farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) naturally infected with 3 different Aeromonas species

    PubMed Central

    Zepeda-Velázquez, Andrea Paloma; Vega-Sánchez, Vicente; Salgado-Miranda, Celene; Soriano-Vargas, Edgardo

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the macroscopic and microscopic lesions in farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) naturally infected with genetically identified Aeromonas salmonicida, A. hydrophila, and A. veronii species. The genus Aeromonas includes bacteria that naturally inhabit both waterways and organisms. At least 27 Aeromonas species have been identified to date, some of which can cause significant economic losses in aquaculture. As up to 68.8% of Aeromonas isolates may be misidentified in routine biochemical and phenotypic tests, however, reported cases of Aeromonas infection in fish may be wrongly identified. Our findings confirmed that the 3 Aeromonas species studied are associated with septicemia and dermal lesions in rainbow trout. PMID:26130859

  10. Factors affecting swimming performance of fasted rainbow trout with implications of exhaustive exercise on overwinter mortality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpkins, D.G.; Hubert, W.A.; Del Rio, C.M.; Rule, D.C.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of body size, water temperature, and sustained swimming activity on swimming performance and the effects of exhaustive exercise on mortality of fasted juvenile rainbow trout. Fasting caused swimming performance to decline more rapidly for small fish than large fish, and warmer water temperatures and sustained swimming activity further decreased swimming performance. Exhaustive exercise increased mortality among fasted fish. Our observations suggest that juvenile rainbow trout with little or no food intake during winter can swim for long periods of time with little effect on mortality, but swimming to exhaustion can enhance mortality, especially among the smallest juveniles.

  11. Histopathological findings in farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) naturally infected with 3 different Aeromonas species.

    PubMed

    Zepeda-Velázquez, Andrea Paloma; Vega-Sánchez, Vicente; Salgado-Miranda, Celene; Soriano-Vargas, Edgardo

    2015-07-01

    This study describes the macroscopic and microscopic lesions in farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) naturally infected with genetically identified Aeromonas salmonicida, A. hydrophila, and A. veronii species. The genus Aeromonas includes bacteria that naturally inhabit both waterways and organisms. At least 27 Aeromonas species have been identified to date, some of which can cause significant economic losses in aquaculture. As up to 68.8% of Aeromonas isolates may be misidentified in routine biochemical and phenotypic tests, however, reported cases of Aeromonas infection in fish may be wrongly identified. Our findings confirmed that the 3 Aeromonas species studied are associated with septicemia and dermal lesions in rainbow trout.

  12. Sequence analysis of a rainbow trout cDNA library and creation of a gene index.

    PubMed

    Rexroad, C E; Lee, Y; Keele, J W; Karamycheva, S; Brown, G; Koop, B; Gahr, S A; Palti, Y; Quackenbush, J

    2003-01-01

    Expressed sequence tag (EST) projects have produced extremely valuable resources for identifying genes affecting phenotypes of interest. A large-scale EST sequencing project for rainbow trout was initiated to identify and functionally annotate as many unique transcripts as possible. Over 45,000 5' ESTs were obtained by sequencing clones from a single normalized library constructed using mRNA from six tissues. The production of this sequence data and creation of a rainbow trout Gene Index eliminating redundancy and providing annotation for these sequences will facilitate research in this species.

  13. The fishing and natural mortality of large, piscivorous Bull Trout and Rainbow Trout in Kootenay Lake, British Columbia (2008-2013).

    PubMed

    Thorley, Joseph L; Andrusak, Greg F

    2017-01-01

    Estimates of fishing and natural mortality are important for understanding, and ultimately managing, commercial and recreational fisheries. High reward tags with fixed station acoustic telemetry provides a promising approach to monitoring mortality rates in large lake recreational fisheries. Kootenay Lake is a large lake which supports an important recreational fishery for large Bull Trout and Rainbow Trout. Between 2008 and 2013, 88 large (≥500 mm) Bull Trout and 149 large (≥500 mm) Rainbow Trout were marked with an acoustic transmitter and/or high reward ($100) anchor tags in Kootenay Lake. The subsequent detections and angler recaptures were analysed using a Bayesian individual state-space Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) survival model with indicator variable selection. The final CJS survival model estimated that the annual interval probability of being recaptured by an angler was 0.17 (95% CRI [0.11-0.23]) for Bull Trout and 0.14 (95% CRI [0.09-0.19]) for Rainbow Trout. The annual interval survival probability for Bull Trout was estimated to have declined from 0.91 (95% CRI [0.76-0.97]) in 2009 to just 0.46 (95% CRI [0.24-0.76]) in 2013. Rainbow Trout survival was most strongly affected by spawning. The annual interval survival probability was 0.77 (95% CRI [0.68-0.85]) for a non-spawning Rainbow Trout compared to 0.41 (95% CRI [0.30-0.53]) for a spawner. The probability of spawning increased with the fork length for both species and decreased over the course of the study for Rainbow Trout. Fishing mortality was relatively low and constant while natural mortality was relatively high and variable. The results indicate that angler effort is not the primary driver of short-term population fluctations in the Rainbow Trout abundance. Variation in the probability of Rainbow Trout spawning suggests that the spring escapement at the outflow of Trout Lake may be a less reliable index of abundance than previously assumed. Multi-species stock assessment models need to

  14. The fishing and natural mortality of large, piscivorous Bull Trout and Rainbow Trout in Kootenay Lake, British Columbia (2008–2013)

    PubMed Central

    Andrusak, Greg F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Estimates of fishing and natural mortality are important for understanding, and ultimately managing, commercial and recreational fisheries. High reward tags with fixed station acoustic telemetry provides a promising approach to monitoring mortality rates in large lake recreational fisheries. Kootenay Lake is a large lake which supports an important recreational fishery for large Bull Trout and Rainbow Trout. Methods Between 2008 and 2013, 88 large (≥500 mm) Bull Trout and 149 large (≥500 mm) Rainbow Trout were marked with an acoustic transmitter and/or high reward ($100) anchor tags in Kootenay Lake. The subsequent detections and angler recaptures were analysed using a Bayesian individual state-space Cormack–Jolly–Seber (CJS) survival model with indicator variable selection. Results The final CJS survival model estimated that the annual interval probability of being recaptured by an angler was 0.17 (95% CRI [0.11–0.23]) for Bull Trout and 0.14 (95% CRI [0.09–0.19]) for Rainbow Trout. The annual interval survival probability for Bull Trout was estimated to have declined from 0.91 (95% CRI [0.76–0.97]) in 2009 to just 0.46 (95% CRI [0.24–0.76]) in 2013. Rainbow Trout survival was most strongly affected by spawning. The annual interval survival probability was 0.77 (95% CRI [0.68–0.85]) for a non-spawning Rainbow Trout compared to 0.41 (95% CRI [0.30–0.53]) for a spawner. The probability of spawning increased with the fork length for both species and decreased over the course of the study for Rainbow Trout. Discussion Fishing mortality was relatively low and constant while natural mortality was relatively high and variable. The results indicate that angler effort is not the primary driver of short-term population fluctations in the Rainbow Trout abundance. Variation in the probability of Rainbow Trout spawning suggests that the spring escapement at the outflow of Trout Lake may be a less reliable index of abundance than previously

  15. Distribution of Mercury in Rainbow Trout Tissues at Embryo-Larval and Juvenile Stages

    PubMed Central

    Kenšová, Renáta; Kružíková, Kamila; Havránek, Jan; Haruštiaková, Danka; Svobodová, Zdeňka

    2012-01-01

    The aims of the study were to determine total mercury concentrations in “rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum)” at their embryo-larval and juvenile stages and to assess mercury concentration dynamics in individual tissues. Samples of rainbow trout were collected at two-month intervals over a period of 18 months (one stock production cycle) at the Velká Losenice trout farm. Feedstuff samples were collected at the same time and analyzed for mercury concentrations. Tissue mercury concentrations were determined in muscle, liver, and kidneys. Analyses were performed using the AMA 254 atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The lowest mercury concentration was found in 14-day-old embryos (hard roe), and the highest concentrations in muscle tissue, liver, and kidneys at the end of monitoring, that is, in rainbow trout aged 18 months. The amount of mercury in feedstuffs showed an increasing trend and ranged between 0.0126 and 0.0859 mgkg−1. A significant effect (P < 0.001) of mercury intake on mercury concentrations in muscle tissue, liver, and kidneys was demonstrated. Muscle mercury concentrations in 18-month-old market-ready rainbow trout of 0.128 ± 0.048 mgkg−1 met the criteria for fish meat hygiene. PMID:22645443

  16. Effects of turbidity on predation vulnerability of juvenile humpback chub to rainbow and brown trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, David L.; Morton-Starner, Rylan; Vaage, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    Predation on juvenile native fish by introduced rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and brown trout Salmo trutta is considered a significant threat to the persistence of endangered humpback chub Gila cypha in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. Diet studies of rainbow and brown trout in Glen and Grand canyons indicate that these species eat native fish, but impacts are difficult to assess because predation vulnerability is highly variable depending on the physical conditions under which the predation interactions take place. We conducted laboratory experiments to evaluate how short-term predation vulnerability of juvenile humpback chub changes in response to changes in turbidity. In overnight laboratory trials, we exposed hatchery-reared juvenile humpback chub and bonytail Gila elegans (a surrogate for humpback chub) to adult rainbow and brown trout at turbidities ranging from 0 to 1,000 formazin nephlometric units. We found that turbidity as low as 25 formazin nephlometric units significantly reduced predation vulnerability of bonytail to rainbow trout and led to a 36% mean increase in survival (24–60%, 95% CI) compared to trials conducted in clear water. Predation vulnerability of bonytail to brown trout at 25 formazin nephlometric units also decreased with increasing turbidity and resulted in a 25% increase in survival on average (17–32%, 95% CI). Understanding the effects of predation by trout on endangered humpback chub is important when evaluating management options aimed at preservation of native fishes in Grand Canyon National Park. This research suggests that relatively small changes in turbidity may be sufficient to alter predation dynamics of trout on humpback chub in the mainstem Colorado River and that turbidity manipulation may warrant further investigation as a fisheries management tool.

  17. Depletion of the chloramine-T marker residue, para-toluenesulfonamide, from skin-on fillet tissue of hybrid striped bass, rainbow trout, and yellow perch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meinertz, J.R.; Stehly, G.R.; Greseth, Shari L.; Gaikowski, M.P.; Gingerich, W.H.

    2004-01-01

    Waterborne exposure to n-sodium-n-chloro-p-toluenesulfonamide (chloramine-T) is an effective treatment for controlling fish mortalities caused by bacterial gill disease (BGD). Currently, data are being generated to gain United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for the use of chloramine-T in aquaculture. As part of the data required for an approval, depletion of the chloramine-T marker residue (para-toluenesulfonamide [p-TSA]) from the edible fillet tissue of exposed fish must be determined. Hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis??Morone chrysops; mean weight 357 g), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss; mean weight 457 g), and yellow perch (Perca flavescens; mean weight 144 g) were exposed to 20 mg/l of chloramine-T for 60 min on 4 consecutive days (the most aggressive treatment expected for approved use in the United States). Groups of fish (n=15 or 19) were sampled immediately after the last treatment and periodically through 48 or 168 h after the treatment phase. Duplicate subsamples of skin-on fillet tissue from each fish were analyzed for p-TSA. Mean p-TSA concentrations in fillet tissue from fish sampled immediately after the last treatment were 142 ng/g (hybrid striped bass), 97 ng/g (rainbow trout), and 150 ng/g (yellow perch). Mean p-TSA concentrations at terminal sample times were 94 (168 h; hybrid striped bass), 74 (48 h; rainbow trout), and 35 ng/g (168 h; yellow perch). The half-lives of p-TSA in fillet tissue from fish near or at market size were 11.4 (hybrid striped bass), 4.3 (rainbow trout), and 3.2 days (yellow perch).

  18. Survival and hepatic metallothionein in developing rainbow trout exposed to a mixture of zinc, copper, and cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Roch, M.; McCarter, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) in Buttle Lake on Vancouver Island, B.C. are exposed to metal contamination originating from a copper and zinc mining operation at Myra Falls near the head of the lake. In order to properly assess the risk to a population of rainbow trout in Buttle Lake, the authors initiated a long-term exposure of rainbow trout from hatch including the swim-up stage. Copper, zinc or cadmium are known to induce metallothionein in mammals and as a mixture of metals, induce hepatic metallothionein in rainbow trout. Investigation of hepatic metallothionein concentrations in wild rainbow trout from Buttle Lake and in lakes of the Campbell River downstream showed a correlation with metal concentrations in the water. Rainbow trout held in situ for 4 weeks showed the same correlation. In this report they determined whether or not the degree of contamination was correlated with concentrations of metallothionein in the livers of rainbow trout exposed to the mixture of metals during the early life stages.

  19. Review of potential interactions between stocked rainbow trout and listed Snake River sockeye salmon in Pettit Lake Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Teuscher, D.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if hatchery rainbow trout compete with or prey on juvenile Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka in Pettit Lake, Idaho. In 1995, a total of 8,570 age-0 sockeye and 4,000 hatchery rainbow trout were released in Pettit Lake. After releasing the fish, gillnets were set in the pelagic and littoral zones to collected diet and spatial distribution data. Interactions were assessed monthly from June 1995 through March 1996. Competition for food was discounted based on extremely low diet overlap results observed throughout the sample period. Conversely, predation interactions were more significant. A total of 119 rainbow trout stomachs were analyzed, two contained O. nerka. The predation was limited to one sample period, but when extrapolated to the whole rainbow trout populations results in significant losses. Total consumption of O. nerka by rainbow trout ranged from an estimated 10 to 23% of initial stocking numbers. Predation results contradict earlier findings that stocked rainbow trout do not prey on wild kokanee or sockeye in the Sawtooth Lakes. The contradiction may be explained by a combination of poorly adapted hatchery sockeye and a littoral release site that forced spatial overlap that was not occurring in the wild populations. Releasing sockeye in the pelagic zone may have reduced or eliminated predation losses to rainbow trout.

  20. Tissue-specific effects of acute aluminium exposure on the radiation-induced bystander effect in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum).

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard W; Seymour, Colin B; Moccia, Richard D; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2015-01-01

    To investigate if aluminium (Al) modifies the rainbow trout response to radiation exposure and/or the induction of a radiation-induced bystander effect. Rainbow trout were exposed to 100 or 200 μg l(-1) Al (for 3 h), a 0.5 Gy X-ray dose or Al followed immediately by irradiation. The exposed fish were then swum with completely untreated bystander fish. A human reporter cell clonogenic assay was used to determine whether Al exposure modified the effects of irradiation on the skin and gills from directly exposed fish and also the radiation-induced bystander effect in untreated fish. Al exposure did not modify the response to direct irradiation by the skin, or the gill. Al did not modify the bystander effect in the skin. However Al did modify the bystander effect in the gill. Gills of bystander fish swum with fish exposed to 200 μg l(-1) Al, followed by irradiation, caused a greater reduction in HPV-G cell survival than was caused by irradiation only. Interestingly Al exposure only also caused a bystander effect (reduced HPV-G survival) in the gill. This study shows that, in a multiple stressor scenario, the communication of radiation-induced stress signals is modified on a tissue-specific basis by acute Al exposure. Aside from the implications this has for radiological protection this response may also have potential for environmental monitoring where detection of the bystander effect could act as an indicator of radiation exposure when direct exposure responses are not evident.

  1. Comparison of hatchery and field performance between a whirling-disease-resistant strain and the Ten Sleep strain of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Eric J; Bartley, Matt; Arndt, Ronney; Oplinger, Randall W; Routledge, M Douglas

    2012-06-01

    A whirling-disease-resistant strain of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (GRHL strain) derived from a backcross of an F1 hybrid of two strains (German strain x Harrison Lake strain) with German strain females, was compared with the Ten Sleep (TS) strain of rainbow trout. The GRHL strain had consistently superior growth and feed conversion in two consecutive hatchery trials. Hatching and mortality rates were similar between strains. Both strains were stocked into two Utah reservoirs (Hyrum, Porcupine), and a third, Causey Reservoir, was monitored as a control for seasonal variation in prevalence of Myxobolus cerebralis. A total of 1,323 salmonids captured by gill net in spring and fall sampling between 2006 and 2008 were tested for M. cerebralis via pepsin-trypsin digest methods. Only eight of these (< 1% per species) had clinical signs consistent with whirling disease. In both reservoirs, GRHL survived better than the TS and had higher growth rates. The prevalence of M. cerebralis was significantly lower for GRHL (18.1%) than TS (50.0%) in Porcupine Reservoir. In Hyrum Reservoir the trend was similar, but prevalence was lower and did not significantly differ between GRHL (9.6%) and TS (23.1%). For infected fish, no significant differences were observed between strains in myxospore counts in either Hyrum (GRHL = 911-28,244 spores/fish [spf], TS = 1,822-155,800 spf) or Porcupine (GRHL = 333-426,667spf, TS = 333-230,511 spf) reservoirs. Unmarked rainbow trout in both reservoirs had significantly higher myxospore counts than stocked fish of either strain. There were significant differences in M. cerebralis prevalence and myxospore loads among other naturally reproducing salmonids in the reservoirs. The trend in susceptibility was cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii > kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka > brown trout Salmo trutta. The GRHL performed well in both hatchery and field settings and is recommended for stocking programs.

  2. Alterations in gill epithelial morphology of yearling Sunapee trout exposed to acute acid stress

    SciTech Connect

    Jagoe, C.H.; Haines, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine gill filaments of hatchery-reared yearling Sunapee trout Salvelinus alpinus oquassa that had been exposed to acute acid stress in static-water bioassays. Fish exposed to acidified water at pH levels above those that caused acute mortality showed little alteration in gill morphology. Exposure to acutely lethal levels of acidity caused considerable damage to gill epithelia, including primary lamellar swelling, increasingly rugose secondary lamellar surfaces, increased mucus production, and fusion of adjacent secondary lamellae. Additionally, the loss of microridge patterns on the epithelia of the secondary lamellae become more severe with decreasing pH. Such alterations may decrease the surface area available for gas exchange and contribute to the anoxia that appears to be an important source of mortality at very low pH.

  3. Chronic nickel bioaccumulation and sub-cellular fractionation in two freshwater teleosts, the round goby and the rainbow trout, exposed simultaneously to waterborne and dietborne nickel.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Erin M; Banerjee, Upasana; D'Silva, Joshua J; Wood, Chris M

    2014-09-01

    Rainbow trout and round goby were exposed for 30 days to waterborne and dietary Ni in combination at two waterborne concentration ranges (6.2-12 μmol/L, 68-86 μmol/L), the lower of which is typical of contaminated environments. The prey (black worms; Lumbriculus variegatus) were exposed for 48 h in the effluent of the fish exposure tanks before being fed to the fish (ration=2% body weight/day). Ni in gills, gut, and prey was fractionated into biologically inactive metal [BIM=metal-rich granules (MRG) and metallothionein-like proteins (MT)] and biologically active metal [BAM=organelles (ORG) and heat-denaturable proteins (HDP)]. Gobies were more sensitive than trout to chronic Ni exposure. Possibly, this greater sensitivity may have been due to the goby's pre-exposure to pollutants at their collection site, as evidenced by ∼2-fold greater initial Ni concentrations in both gills and gut relative to trout. However, this was followed by ∼2-16× larger bioaccumulation in both the gills and the gut during the experimental exposure. On a subcellular level, ∼3-40× more Ni was associated with the BAM fraction of goby in comparison to trout. Comparison of the fractional distribution of Ni in the prey versus the gut tissue of the predators suggested that round goby were more efficient than rainbow trout in detoxifying Ni taken up from the diet. Assessing sub-cellular distribution of Ni in the gills and gut of two fish of different habitat and lifestyles revealed two different strategies of Ni bioaccumulation and sub-cellular distribution. On the one hand, trout exhibited an ability to regulate gill Ni bioaccumulation and maintain the majority of the Ni in the MT fraction of the BIM. In contrast goby exhibited large Ni spillovers to both the HDP and ORG fractions of the BAM in the gill. However, the same trend was not observed in the gut, where the potential acclimation of goby to pollutants from their collection site may have aided their ability to regulate Ni

  4. Biomagnification and tissue distribution of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in market-size rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Goeritz, Ina; Falk, Sandy; Stahl, Thorsten; Schäfers, Christoph; Schlechtriem, Christian

    2013-09-01

    The present study investigated the biomagnification potential as well as the substance and tissue-specific distribution of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in market-size rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Rainbow trout with an average body weight of 314 ± 21 g were exposed to perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) in the diet for 28 d. The accumulation phase was followed by a 28-d depuration phase, in which the test animals were fed with nonspiked trout feed. On days 0, 7, 14, 28, 31, 35, 42, and 56 of the present study, fish were sampled from the test basin for PFAS analysis. Biomagnification factors (BMFs) for all test compounds were determined based on a kinetic approach. Distribution factors were calculated for each test compound to illustrate the disposition of PFASs in rainbow trout after 28 d of exposure. Dietary exposure of market-size rainbow trout to PFASs did not result in biomagnification; BMF values were calculated as 0.42 for PFOS, >0.23 for PFNA, >0.18 for PFHxS, >0.04 for PFOA, and >0.02 for PFBS, which are below the biomagnification threshold of 1. Liver, blood, kidney, and skin were identified as the main target tissues for PFASs in market-size rainbow trout. Evidence was shown that despite relative low PFAS contamination, the edible parts of the fish (the fillet and skin) can significantly contribute to the whole-body burden. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  5. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigations; Chapter 3 : Mainstem Habitat Use and Recruitment Estimates of Rainbow Trout, 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Fredericks, James P.; Hendricks, Steve

    1997-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if recruitment is limiting the population of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in the mainstem Kootenai River. The authors used snorkeling and electrofishing techniques to estimate juvenile rainbow trout density and total numbers in Idaho tributaries, and they trapped juvenile outmigrants to identify the age at which juvenile trout migrate from tributaries to the Kootenai River. The authors radio and reward-tagged post-spawn adult rainbow trout captured in Deep Creek to identify river reach and habitat used by those fish spawning and rearing in the Deep Creek drainage. They also conducted redd surveys in the Kootenai River to determine the extent of mainstem spawning. Based on the amount of available habitat and juvenile rainbow trout densities, the Deep Creek drainage was the most important area for juvenile production. Population estimates of age 0, age 1+, and age 2+ rainbow trout indicated moderate to high densities in several streams in the Deep Creek drainage whereas other streams, such as Deep Creek, had very low densities of juvenile trout. The total number of age 0, age 1+, and age 2+ rainbow trout in Deep Creek drainage in 1996 was estimated to be 63,743, 12,095, and 3,095, respectively. Radio telemetry efforts were hindered by the limited range of the transmitters, but movements of a radio-tagged trout and a returned reward tag indicated that at least a portion of the trout utilizing the Deep Creek drainage migrated downriver from the mouth of Deep Creek to the meandering section of river. They found no evidence of mainstem spawning by rainbow trout, but redd counting efforts were hindered by high flows from mid-April through June.

  6. Six diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism markers for detecting introgression between cutthroat and rainbow trouts.

    PubMed

    Finger, Amanda J; Stephens, Molly R; Clipperton, Neil W; May, Bernie

    2009-05-01

    Ten primer pairs were screened to develop single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) TaqMan assays that will distinguish California golden trout and some rainbow trouts (Oncorhynchus mykiss sspp., O. m. aguabonita) from the Paiute and Lahontan cutthroat trouts (Oncorhynchus clarkii seleniris, O. c. henshawi). From these 10 primer pairs, one mitochondrial and five nuclear fixed SNP differences were discovered and developed into TaqMan assays. These six assays will be useful for characterizing and monitoring hybridization between these groups. Additional Oncorhynchus clarkii sspp. and Oncorhynchus mykiss sspp. were assayed to determine if these assays are useful in closely related species.

  7. Thymocyte plasma membrane of the rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri: Associated immunoglobulin and heteroantigens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warr, G.W.; DeLuca, D.; Anderson, D.P.

    1983-01-01

    1. Thymic lymphocytes of the rainbow trout, S. gairdneri were disrupted and a plasma membrane containing fraction isolated by differential and buoyant density centrifugation.2. Radioiodine introduced into the membrane by the lactoperoxidase catalyzed reaction and immunoglobulin (identified by radioimmunoassay with monoclonal antibody) both copurified in the plasma membrane fraction.3. Rabbit antibody raised to the plasma membrane fraction showed a strong reaction with trout lymphocytes in immunofluorescence, was mitogenic for trout lymphocytes, and recognized lymphocyte membrane heteroantigens of molecular weight > 70,000 in the thymus and 45,000–95,000 in the head kidney.

  8. Stress does not inhibit induced vitellogenesis in juvenile rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwindt, A.R.; Feist, G.W.; Schreck, C.B.

    2007-01-01

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) is a widely used biomarker for xenoestrogen exposure in male fishes. In female fishes Vtg can be negatively affected by stress independent of declines in estrogen. However, few data are available on the effect of stress in male fish abnormally producing Vtg, such as when exposed to xenoestrogens. The objective for these studies was to determine the effects of stress on fish forced to produce Vtg. Three weeks prior to the experiment immature juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, were acclimated to the experimental tanks and fed a maintenance ration. We induced Vtg synthesis by injecting 17??-estradiol (E2) 7 days prior to experimentation. Treatments in duplicate tanks were: (1) no stressor; (2) stressor; (3) E 2; (4) E2 and stressor. Plasma was collected at time = 0 for baseline measurements from eight fish per tank and Vtg was significantly elevated in treated fish compared to uninjected controls. Water was drained from the stressor tanks then refilled to a level that just covered the backs of the fish. Eight fish were sampled again at 4 and 9 h, and 1, 7, and 14 days of continuous stress. Stressor tanks were refilled with water to pre-stress levels and the fish were sampled after another 2 weeks. Cortisol was significantly elevated from the unstressed fish at 4 h; however, plasma Vtg in the E 2-stimulated fish was not affected by the stressor at any timepoint. These results indicate that fish capture procedures employed in the field or caging experiments likely do not lead to false negative results when plasma Vtg is used as a biomarker for xenoestrogen exposure. It also suggests that the energetic load induced by stress is insufficient to cause a reduction in Vtg, during a continuous E2 administration, at least within the timepoints examined in this study. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  9. Rainbow Trout Sleeping Disease Virus Is an Atypical Alphavirus

    PubMed Central

    Villoing, Stéphane; Béarzotti, Monique; Chilmonczyk, Stefan; Castric, Jeannette; Brémont, Michel

    2000-01-01

    Sleeping disease (SD) is currently a matter of concern for salmonid fish farmers in most parts of the world. A viral etiology of SD has recently been suspected, since virus-like particles have been observed in infected rainbow trout cells. In salmonid-derived cell lines, the maximal rate of virus production was observed at 10°C, while little virus was produced at 14°C. Through biochemical, physicochemical, and morphological studies, SD virus (SDV) was shown to be an enveloped virus of roughly 60 nm in diameter. The genome consists of 12 kb of RNA, with the appearance of a 26S subgenomic RNA during the time course of SDV replication. The screening of a random-primed cDNA library constructed from the genomic RNA of semipurified virions facilitated the identification of a specific SDV cDNA clone having an open reading frame related to the alphavirus E2 glycoproteins. To extend the comparison between SDV structural proteins and the alphavirus protein counterparts, the nucleotide sequence of the total 4.1-kb subgenomic RNA has been determined. The 26S RNA encodes a 1,324-amino-acid polyprotein exhibiting typical alphavirus structural protein organization. SDV structural proteins showed several remarkable features compared to other alphaviruses: (i) unusually large individual proteins, (ii) very low homology (ranging from 30 to 34%) (iii) an unglycosylated E3 protein, and (iv) and E1 fusion domain sharing mutations implicated in the pH threshold. Although phylogenetically related to the Semliki Forest virus group of alphaviruses, SDV should be considered an atypical member, able to naturally replicate in lower vertebrates. PMID:10590104

  10. Unsteady turbulent boundary layers in swimming rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Yanase, Kazutaka; Saarenrinne, Pentti

    2015-05-01

    The boundary layers of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, swimming at 1.02±0.09 L s(-1) (mean±s.d., N=4), were measured by the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique at a Reynolds number of 4×10(5). The boundary layer profile showed unsteadiness, oscillating above and beneath the classical logarithmic law of the wall with body motion. Across the entire surface regions that were measured, local Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness, which is the distance that is perpendicular to the fish surface through which the boundary layer momentum flows at free-stream velocity, were greater than the critical value of 320 for the laminar-to-turbulent transition. The skin friction was dampened on the convex surface while the surface was moving towards a free-stream flow and increased on the concave surface while retreating. These observations contradict the result of a previous study using different species swimming by different methods. Boundary layer compression accompanied by an increase in local skin friction was not observed. Thus, the overall results may not support absolutely the Bone-Lighthill boundary layer thinning hypothesis that the undulatory motions of swimming fish cause a large increase in their friction drag because of the compression of the boundary layer. In some cases, marginal flow separation occurred on the convex surface in the relatively anterior surface region, but the separated flow reattached to the fish surface immediately downstream. Therefore, we believe that a severe impact due to induced drag components (i.e. pressure drag) on the swimming performance, an inevitable consequence of flow separation, was avoided.

  11. Leucine and isoleucine reduce protein degradation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) primary myoblast cultures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Myogenic precursor cells were isolated from rainbow trout skeletal muscle and incubated in media containing 10% fetal bovine serum for 7 days, thereby differentiating into myoblasts. Rates of protein degradation were determined in response to minimal essential media (MEM) of various amino acid (AA)...

  12. Use of streambed substrate as refuge by steelhead or rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss during simulated freshets

    Treesearch

    F. K. Ligon; Rodney Nakamoto; Bret Harvey; P. F. Baker

    2016-01-01

    A flume was used to estimate the carrying capacity of streambed substrates for juvenile steelhead or rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss seeking refuge from simulated freshets. The simulated freshets had mean water column velocities of c. 1·1 m s−1. The number of O. mykiss finding cover...

  13. Response of steelhead/rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations to debris flows

    Treesearch

    Jason L. White; Bret C. Harvey

    2017-01-01

    To better understand the effects of debris flows on salmonid populations, we studied juvenile steelhead/rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations in six streams in the Klamath Mountains of northern California: three affected by debris flows on 01 January 1997 and three that experienced elevated streamflows but no debris flows. We surveyed...

  14. Determination of bacterial disease map for rainbow trout farms in Van province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabaci, Muhammed; Önalan, Şükrü

    2016-04-01

    Lactococcosis, yersiniosis, listenollosis and cold water disease agents are frequently observed in Turkey as bacterial fish pathogens. Bacterial fish pathogens have high mortality prognosis, causing significant economic losses for the businesses. Use of molecular methods in substantiation of disease factors became prevalent in recent years. These methods have a significant role in fast diagnosis and early treatment of fish diseases. In the present study, 8 rainbow trout samples were obtained from each of 19 rainbow trout farms located in Van province, Turkey and registered with Food, Agriculture and Livestock Ministry. Total genomic DNAs were isolated from kidney tissues of sampled rainbow trout. Obtained DNAs were analyzed with real-time PCR there is/not (+/-) analysis using disease specific primer pairs for each disease. Molecular diagnosis of lactococcosis pathogen in 4 farms out of 19 rainbow trout farms active in Van province, and yersiniosis pathogen in 1 farm were made as a result real-time PCR analysis. Listenollosis and cold water pathogens were not molecularly observed. Results of the present study demonstrated that the region was safe for bacterial fish pathogens of cold water disease and listenollosis, which are observed frequently in Turkey, and there were deficiencies in preventive measures against lactococcosis and yersiniosis and fish transfer was a significant reason for the prevalence these diseases.

  15. Effects of incubation temperatures on embryonic and larval survival in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Incubation temperature is commonly used by hatcheries to manipulate hatch date in salmonids including rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Target dates for hatching often change during the incubation period and require a sudden adjustment in temperature. Although there are many studies charac...

  16. Response to five generations of selection for growth performance traits in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A pedigreed rainbow trout population (~100 families per generation) was selected for five generations to improve growth performance to the standard ~500-gram US market weight and beyond (greater than 1 kg). Body weights (BW) were recorded each generation at 5, 8, 10, and 13 months post-hatch. Selec...

  17. Estradiol regulates expression of miRNAs associated with myogenesis in rainbow trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    17-Estradiol (E2) is a steroid hormone that negatively affects muscle growth in rainbow trout, but the mechanism associated with this response is not fully understood. To better characterize the effects of E2 on muscle, we identified differentially regulated microRNAs (miRNAs) and muscle atrophy-rel...

  18. Dietary Arsenic Toxicity in Subadult Rainbow Trout: Growth Effects, Nutrient Absorption, and Tissue Bioaccumulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dietary arsenic toxicity in subadult (~200 g.) rainbow trout was evaluated in a 70 day test using arsenic-spiked pellet diets containing 50, 104 and 162 ppm arsenite. All organisms in all treatments survived the exposure. Dose dependent effects on percent weight gain, with comm...

  19. Observations on side-swimming rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in water recirculation aquaculture systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During a controlled 6-month study using six replicated water recirculation aquaculture systems (WRAS), it was observed that rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in all WRAS exhibited a higher-than-normal prevalence of side-swimming (i.e. controlled, forward swimming, but with misaligned orientation suc...

  20. Comparison of techniques for stabilizing hemoglobins of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) during frozen storage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinitz, G.L.

    1976-01-01

    1. The stability of hemoglobin of rainbow trout under frozen conditions in oxyform, carboxyform, and cyanometform was examined.2. Carboxyhemoglobin retained its original electrophoretic banding pattern after 14 days of frozen storage, whereas oxyform and cyanometform hemoglobins did not.3. Banding patterns changed in some samples in all treatment groups after 21 days of storage.

  1. THE EFFECT OF DIETARY ARSENIC ON SWIM-UP RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two 30-day toxicity tests were conducted in which swim-up rainbow trout were fed live diets of oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) containing elevated arsenic. Arsenic was incorporated into the diet by exposing oligochaetes to waterborne arsenate (test one) and waterborne ars...

  2. A first generation integrated physical and genetic map of the rainbow trout genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The rainbow trout physical map was previously constructed from DNA fingerprinting of 192,096 BAC clones using the 4-color high-information content fingerprinting (HICF) method. The clones were assembled into physical map contigs using the finger-printing contig (FPC) program. The map is composed of ...

  3. Effects of phytoestrogens on protein turnover in rainbow trout primary myocytes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean-derived ingredients used in aquaculture feeds may contain phytoestrogens, but it is unknown if these compounds can mimic the catabolic effects of estradiol in fish muscle. Six day-old rainbow trout primary myocytes were exposed to increasing concentrations (10 nM – 100 µM) of either geniste...

  4. Androgenetic development of X- and Y-chromosome bearing haploid rainbow trout embryos.

    PubMed

    Michalik, Oliwia; Kowalski, Radosław K; Judycka, Sylwia; Rożyński, Rafał; Dobosz, Stefan; Ocalewicz, Konrad

    2016-09-01

    Haploid fish embryos are important in studies regarding role of the recessive traits during early ontogeny. In fish species with the male heterogamety, androgenetic haploid embryos might be also useful tool in studies concerning role of the sex chromosomes during an embryonic development. Morphologically differentiated X and Y chromosomes have been found in a limited number of fish species including rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum 1792). To evaluate role of the sex chromosomes during rainbow trout embryonic development, survival of the androgenetic haploids in the presence of X or Y sex chromosomes has been examined. Androgenetic haploid rainbow trout were produced by fertilization of X-irradiated eggs with spermatozoa derived from the normal males (XY) and neomales, that is, sex-reversed females (XX) to produce X- and Y-bearing haploids, and all X-bearing haploids, respectively. Survival rates of the androgenetic progenies of normal males and neomales examined during embryogenesis and at hatching did not differ significantly. However, all haploids died within next few days after hatching. Cytogenetic analysis of the androgenetic embryos confirmed their haploid status. Moreover, apart from the intact paternal chromosomes, residues of the irradiated maternal chromosomes observed as chromosome fragments were identified in some of the haploids. Provided results suggested that rainbow trout X and Y chromosomes despite morphological and genetic differences are at the early stage of differentiation and still share genetic information responsible for the proper embryonic development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Co-localization of growth QTL with differentially expressed candidate genes in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Kocmarek, Andrea L; Ferguson, Moira M; Danzmann, Roy G

    2015-09-01

    We tested whether genes differentially expressed between large and small rainbow trout co-localized with familial QTL regions for body size. Eleven chromosomes, known from previous work to house QTL for weight and length in rainbow trout, were examined for QTL in half-sibling families produced in September (1 XY male and 1 XX neomale) and December (1 XY male). In previous studies, we identified 108 candidate genes for growth expressed in the liver and white muscle in a subset of the fish used in this study. These gene sequences were BLASTN aligned against the rainbow trout and stickleback genomes to determine their location (rainbow trout) and inferred location based on synteny with the stickleback genome. Across the progeny of all three males used in the study, 63.9% of the genes with differential expression appear to co-localize with the QTL regions on 6 of the 11 chromosomes tested in these males. Genes that co-localized with QTL in the mixed-sex offspring of the two XY males primarily showed up-regulation in the muscle of large fish and were related to muscle growth, metabolism, and the stress response.

  6. Metabolic Adjustments to Short-Term Diurnal Temperature Fluctuation in the Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Neal Ingraham; Tunnah, Louise; Currie, Suzanne; MacCormack, Tyson James

    In rainbow trout, warmer temperatures increase metabolic rate, which can be energetically stressful. Diel fluctuations in water temperatures are common in rivers, raising the question of whether fish experience metabolic preconditioning with repeated heat stress. In this study, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum, 1792) were subjected to three temperature treatments consisting of either a constant exposure to 16°C, a single exposure to 24°C, or three cycles between 16° and 24°C. Metabolic responses were investigated, including patterns of regulation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and its substrates, key metabolic enzymes, and several relevant metabolites. In liver and, to a lesser extent, in heart, patterns of signal transduction suggest an increasingly anabolic phenotype with successive heat cycles. Inhibition of Raptor in the heart suggests lowered gross protein synthesis after multiple heat cycles. Fish also showed recovery of glycogen stores and lipid synthesis after multiple thermal cycles, while they maintained baseline plasma glucose levels. The animals showed no evidence of hypoxemia, and our results suggest rainbow trout exposed to repeated thermal cycles were not at risk of metabolic substrate depletion. Collectively, our data indicate that, when exposed to fluctuating but noncritical thermal cycles, rainbow trout may adopt a new metabolic phenotype to sequester readily accessible metabolic substrates in the liver in preparation for more severe or sustained thermal exposures.

  7. Expression patterns of gdnf and gfrα1 in rainbow trout testis.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Satoshi; Hayashi, Makoto; Kouguchi, Tomomi; Yamaguchi, Kazuma; Miwa, Misako; Yoshizaki, Goro

    2014-03-01

    In mice, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is essential for normal spermatogenesis and in vitro culture of spermatogonial stem cells. In murine testes, GDNF acts as paracrine factor; Sertoli cells secrete it to a subset of spermatogonial cells expressing its receptor, GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1). However, in fish, it is unclear what types of cells express gdnf and gfrα1. In this study, we isolated the rainbow trout orthologues of these genes and analyzed their expression patterns during spermatogenesis. In rainbow trout testes, gdnf and gfrα1 were expressed in almost all type A spermatogonia (ASG). Noticeably, unlike in mice, the expression of gdnf was not observed in Sertoli cells in rainbow trout. During spermatogenesis, the expression levels of these genes changed synchronously; gdnf and gfrα1 showed high expression in ASG and decreased dramatically in subsequent developmental stages. These results suggested that GDNF most likely acts as an autocrine factor in rainbow trout testes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential regulation of taurine biosynthesis in rainbow trout and Japanese flounder

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Huihui

    2016-01-01

    Animals have varied taurine biosynthesis capability, which was determined by activities of key enzymes including cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase (CSD). However, whether CDO and CSD are differentially regulated across species remains unexplored. In the present study, we examined the regulations of CDO and CSD in rainbow trout and Japanese flounder, the two fish species with high and low taurine biosynthesis ability respectively. Our results showed that the expression of CDO was lower in rainbow trout but more responsive to cysteine stimulation compared to that in Japanese flounder. On the other hand, both the expression and catalytic efficiency (kcat) of CSD were higher in rainbow trout than those of Japanese flounder. A three-residue substrate recognition motif in rainbow trout CSD with sequence of F126/S146/Y148 was identified to be responsible for high kcat, while that with sequence of F88/N108/F110 in Japanese flounder led to low kcat, as suggested by site-directed mutagenesis studies. In summary, our results determined new aspects of taurine biosynthesis regulation across species. PMID:26880478

  9. Treatment of diplomonad intestinal parasites with magnesium sulphate at a commercial rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) facility

    PubMed Central

    St-Hilaire, Sophie; Price, Derek; Taylor, Shawna; Groman, David

    2015-01-01

    Rainbow trout (average weight of 2 g) in fresh water experienced high mortality and were infected with a diplomonad intestinal parasite. Tanks of fish experienced an immediate reduction in mortality after an in-feed treatment with 3% Epsom salts for 2 d. Treatments had to be applied several times, but in each case there was a similar reduction in mortality. PMID:26246637

  10. BIOACCUMULATION AND BIOTRANSFORMATION OF CHIRAL TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES IN RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are very little data on the bioaccumulation and biotransformation of current-use pesticides (CUPs) despite the fact that such data are critical in assessing their fate and potential toxic effects in aquatic organisms. To help address this issue, juvenile rainbow trout (Onco...

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF SEX CHROMOSOME MOLECULAR MARKERS USING RAPDS AND FLUORESCENT IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION IN RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this work is to identify molecular markers associated with the sex chromosomes in rainbow trout to study the mode of sex determination mechanisms in this species. Using the RAPD assay and bulked segregant analysis, two markers were identified that generated polymorphi...

  12. Dietary Arsenic Toxicity in Subadult Rainbow Trout: Growth Effects, Nutrient Absorption, and Tissue Bioaccumulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dietary arsenic toxicity in subadult (~200 g.) rainbow trout was evaluated in a 70 day test using arsenic-spiked pellet diets containing 50, 104 and 162 ppm arsenite. All organisms in all treatments survived the exposure. Dose dependent effects on percent weight gain, with comm...

  13. Chronic bioassays of rainbow trout fry with compounds representative of contaminants in Great Lakes fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Passino-Reader, Dora R.; Berlin, William H.; Hickey, James P.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the hazard of organic compounds detected in Great Lakes fish by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, we tested compounds representative of heterocyclic nitrogen compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and cyclic alkanes and alkenes. Sixty-day bioassays on the effects of nicotine, phenanthrene, pinane, and pinene on the behavior, growth, and survival of rainbow trout fry, Oncorhynchus mykiss, were conducted in a large, constant-flow, temperature-controlled water system. The following 60-day LCSO's were determined (mg/L): nicotine 5.0, phenanthrene 0.2, pinane 0.8, and pinene 1.2. Values of lowest observed effects level (LOEL) and no observed effects level (NOEL) showed that growth was generally as sensitive an endpoint as behavior and was more sensitive than time of swim-up. The 60-day LC50 values for rainbow trout were compared with earlier acute bioassays with Daphnia pulexand rainbow trout and chronic bioassays with D.pulex conducted at the Great Lakes Science Center. Rainbow trout fry were less sensitive than daphnids in all tests, indicating that toxicity tests with daphnids should be protective of salmonid fry for these types of compounds. The results for representative compounds indicate that these classes of compounds should be included in aquatic risk assessments at sites in the Great Lakes.

  14. Growth enhancement of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by passive immunisation against somatostatin-14

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were passively immunised against somatostatin-14 (SS-14) using an antibody originating from egg laying chicken (Gallus domesticus). Fish were immunised weekly (0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 d) with chicken egg yolk derived immunoglobulin (IgY) against SS-14 (1:25 ...

  15. Generation of BAC-end sequences for rainbow trout genome analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For non-sequenced genomes, BAC end sequences (BES) provide a valuable sample of repetitive elements and gene content. Here we report the results of BAC end sequencing of just over half of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Swanson HindIII library. We sequenced 177,860 BAC ends that generated 17...

  16. Relationship of secreted mucus to copper and acid toxicity in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T.G.; MacKay, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of lethal concentrations of copper and hydrogen ion on mucus secretin by rainbow trout and to examine the effect of pH change on the ability of mucus to bind Cu/sup + +/.

  17. Short-term feeding cessation prior to harvest does not affect fillet yield in rainbow trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Current practice in commercial, freshwater rainbow trout operations in the USA is to feed until the day prior to harvest. However, from what is known about fish growth and metabolism during periods of starvation, this may not be the best economic practice, since growth and macronutrient deposition a...

  18. Investigation of the effects of dietary protein source on copper and zinc bioavailability in rainbow trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Limited research has examined the effects that dietary protein sources have on copper (Cu) and Zinc (Zn) absorption, interactions and utilization in rainbow trout. Therefore, the objective of the first trial was to determine what effect protein source (plant vs. animal based), Cu source (complex vs....

  19. Effects of sex steroids on indices of protein turnover in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) white muscle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Effects of 17-estradiol (E2), testosterone, and 5a-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on protein turnover and proteolytic gene expression were determined in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) primary myocytes and white muscle tissue. E2 reduced rates of protein synthesis and increased rates of protein degr...

  20. Genome Sequence of the Fish Pathogen Yersinia ruckeri Strain 150, Isolated from Diseased Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Cascales, Desirée; Guijarro, José A.; Reimundo, Pilar; García-Torrico, Ana I.

    2016-01-01

    We present here the draft genome of a pathogenic Yersinia ruckeri strain, isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) affected by enteric redmouth disease. The chromosome has 3,826,775 bp, a GC content of 46.88%, and is predicted to contain 3,538 coding sequences. The data will be useful for comparative pathogenicity studies. PMID:27908991

  1. Field evaluation of rainbow trout selectively bred for resistance to bacterial cold water disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) is a frequent cause of elevated mortality in rainbow trout and the development of effective control strategies is a priority within the U.S. Since 2005, the NCCCWA has implemented a selective breeding program designed to increase survival following BCWD exposure....

  2. Treatment of diplomonad intestinal parasites with magnesium sulphate at a commercial rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) facility.

    PubMed

    St-Hilaire, Sophie; Price, Derek; Taylor, Shawna; Groman, David

    2015-08-01

    Rainbow trout (average weight of 2 g) in fresh water experienced high mortality and were infected with a diplomonad intestinal parasite. Tanks of fish experienced an immediate reduction in mortality after an in-feed treatment with 3% Epsom salts for 2 d. Treatments had to be applied several times, but in each case there was a similar reduction in mortality.

  3. Should I stay or should I go? Understanding the shapeshifting rainbow trout/steelhead

    Treesearch

    Geoff Koch; Gordon Reeves

    2015-01-01

    Steelhead are the sea-going form of Oncorhynchus mykiss. Rainbow trout,also O. mykiss, remain in freshwater. Each form, or life-history, can produce offspring of the other, but the mechanism for this and potential effects that climate change may have on the species are poorly understood.Forest...

  4. Diagnostic tools for rapid detection and quantification of Weissella ceti NC36 infections in rainbow trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Weissellosis in rainbow trout is caused by the gram-positive bacteria Weissella ceti and has been reported in China, Brazil and the United States. This disease can result in high mortality in market-sized fish and thus causes significant losses. Thus far, phenotypic characterization and 16S rRNA seq...

  5. IDENTIFICATION OF SEX CHROMOSOME MOLECULAR MARKERS USING RAPDS AND FLUORESCENT IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION IN RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this work is to identify molecular markers associated with the sex chromosomes in rainbow trout to study the mode of sex determination mechanisms in this species. Using the RAPD assay and bulked segregant analysis, two markers were identified that generated polymorphi...

  6. RNA-Seq identifies SNPs associated with muscle yield and quality in rainbow trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is one of the top five sport fish species in North America and the second most widely cultivated fish species for food. Quality attributes of fish flesh are important determinants of profitability for the food fish aquaculture industry. Single nucleotide polymorph...

  7. Effect of sexual maturation on muscle gene expression of rainbow trout: RNA-Seq approach

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Muscle degradation occurs as a response to various pathological states that are regulated by specific molecular mechanisms. Previously, we characterized the metabolic changes of muscle deterioration of the female rainbow trout at full sexual maturity and spawning. Muscle deterioration signs of thi...

  8. Characterization of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) spleen transcriptome and identification of immune-related genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Resistance against specific diseases is affecting profitability in fish production systems including rainbow trout. Limited information is known about functions and mechanisms of the immune gene pathways in teleosts. Immunogenomics are powerful tools to determine immune-related genes/gene pathways a...

  9. New in-depth rainbow trout transcriptome reference and digital atlas of gene expression

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sequencing the rainbow trout genome is underway and a transcriptome reference sequence is required to help in genome assembly and gene discovery. Previously, we reported a transcriptome reference sequence using a 19X coverage of 454-pyrosequencing data. Although this work added a great wealth of ann...

  10. Role of long non-coding RNAs in bacterial cold water disease pathogenesis in rainbow trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) caused by Flavobacterium psychrophilum is one of the major causes of mortality in salmonids. Three genetic lines of rainbow trout designated as ARS-Fp-R (resistant), ARS-Fp-C (control) and ARS-Fp-S (susceptible) have significant differences in survival rate follow...

  11. Transcriptome assembly, gene annotation and tissue gene expression atlas of the rainbow trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Efforts to obtain a comprehensive genome sequence for rainbow trout are ongoing and will be complimented by transcriptome information that will enhance genome assembly and annotation. Previously, we reported a transcriptome reference sequence using a 19X coverage of Sanger and 454-pyrosequencing dat...

  12. BIOACCUMULATION AND BIOTRANSFORMATION OF CHIRAL TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES IN RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are very little data on the bioaccumulation and biotransformation of current-use pesticides (CUPs) despite the fact that such data are critical in assessing their fate and potential toxic effects in aquatic organisms. To help address this issue, juvenile rainbow trout (Onco...

  13. Individual condition and stream temperature influences early maturation of rainbow and steelhead trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Treesearch

    John R. McMillan; Jason B. Dunham; Gordon H. Reeves; Justin S. Mills; Chris E. Jordan

    2012-01-01

    Alternative male phenotypes in salmonine fishes arise from individuals that mature as larger and older anadromous marine-migrants or as smaller and younger freshwater residents. To better understand the processes influencing the expression of these phenotypes we examined the influences of growth in length (fork length) and whole body lipid content in rainbow trout (...

  14. Carnosine supplementation to an all-plant protein diet for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fishmeal may contain “unknown growth factors” that have yet to be identified for their physiological role. As fishmeal levels in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) feeds are reduced, the dietary loss of these compounds may contribute to growth reductions. One such compound, identified in fishmeal...

  15. Toxicity of formalin, malachite green, and the mixture to four life stages of rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bills, Terry D.; Advised by: Hosler, Charles F.; Cumming, Kenneth B.; Nord, Richard P.; Senff, Robert E.

    1974-01-01

    Formalin, malachite green, or a mixture of them are utilized in fish culture for control of external parasites of fish and control of fungus on fish and fish eggs. Very little information is available concerning the toxicity of these compounds to fish under laboratory test conditions or the differences in sensitivity to these chemicals at various life stages. This study was designed to 1) determine the toxicity of formalin, malachite green and the mixture to four life stages of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) under various laboratory test conditions, 2) determine the degradation of formalin and malachite green in water, 3) determine the effect of additive toxicity, and 4) determine the differences in sensitivity of two different lots of eggs to the chemicals. The 96-hour LC50 (lethal concentration required to produce 50% mortality) for formalin against rainbow trout in soft water ranged from 580 micrograms/liter for the eyed egg stage to 134 micrograms/liter for the fingerling stage. The 96-hour LC50 for malachite green against rainbow trout in soft water ranged from 2.00 mg/L for the eyed egg stage to 0.0224 mg/L for the fingerling stage. The additive indices for formalin and malachite green when applied in combination show strictly additive toxicity as the ranges overlap zero in all tests. Deactivation indices for formalin and malachite green show essentially no change in toxicity of the solutions to rainbow trout when aged for periods of 1, 2, and 3 weeks.

  16. Juvenile rainbow trout production in New York tributaries of Lake Ontario: implications for Atlantic salmon restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenna, James E.; Johnson, James H.

    2005-01-01

    Three Pacific salmonid species Onchorynchus spp. have replaced the extirpated Atlantic salmon Salmo salar as the main migratory salmonid in the Lake Ontario drainage. One of those species, the nonnative rainbow trout O. mykiss, has become widely distributed within the historical Atlantic salmon habitat, occupying an ecological niche similar to that of juvenile Atlantic salmon. Consequently, both a tributary's carrying capacity for Atlantic salmon and competition from established nonnative species are important when considering the feasibility of Atlantic salmon restoration. Estimation of juvenile rainbow trout production will help evaluate the capacity of tributaries to produce salmonids that occupy similar niches. Geostatistical methods were applied to standardized and efficiency-corrected electrofishing data from three of New York's best salmonid-producing streams to precisely estimate juvenile rainbow trout populations. Results indicated that each study stream could produce 20,000–40,000 age-0 and 4,000–10,000 age-1 and older rainbow trout per year. Statistical interpolation indicated areas of significantly different production potential and points of significant changes in productivity. Closer examination of the niche similarity and competitive potential of these two species is needed to properly interpret these estimates with regard to Atlantic salmon restoration.

  17. Intestinal immune gene response to bacterial challenge in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mucosal immune system of fish is poorly understood and defined models for studying this system are lacking. The objective of this study was to evaluate different challenge paradigms and pathogens to examine the magnitude of change in intestinal immune gene expression. Rainbow trout were expos...

  18. Response to selection for bacterial cold water disease resistance in rainbow trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A family-based selection program was initiated at the National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture in 2005 to improve resistance to bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) in rainbow trout. The objective of this study was to estimate response to 2 generations of selection. A total of 14,841 juven...

  19. Characterization of a rainbow trout matrix metalloproteinase capable of degrading type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Sato, K; Kunisaki, N; Kimura, S

    2000-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are widely distributed in vertebrate tissues and form a large family consisting of at least four distinct subfamilies. Higher vertebrate MMP-13 is well-known as collagenase-3, which represents the third member of a collagenase subfamily. In this study, we cloned cDNA coding for a unique fish homologue of human MMP-13 from a rainbow trout fibroblast cDNA library. The cDNA was 2.1 kb long and contained an open reading frame encoding a protein of 475 amino acids. The catalytic domain of the protein was 66% identical to the human counterpart with the greatest degree of identity occurring in the zinc binding site. In addition, it possessed three amino-acid residues (Tyr122, Asp233 and Gly235) characteristic of the collagenase subfamily, together with a six residue insertion which did not occur in the collagenase subfamily. Then the isolated cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli and the recombinant protein was found to degrade gelatin and skin type I collagen. It is worth noting that rainbow trout type I collagen was more susceptible to proteolysis with the recombinant protein when compared with the calf one. It appeared that the recombinant protein also cleaved the nonhelical regions of rainbow trout muscle type V collagen. These results have revealed that the cDNA encodes a unique MMP-13 of rainbow trout. This is the first report of cDNA coding for fish MMP capable of degrading type I collagen.

  20. Genetic line by environment interaction on rainbow trout growth and processing traits

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic line-by-environment (GxE) interactions were determined for growth and processing traits of five genetic lines of rainbow trout reared in four environments. Genetic lines included 1) mixed pool of 109 families selectively bred for improved growth (Growth Line) at the USDA National Center fo...

  1. Tryptophan affects both gastrointestinal melatonin production and interrenal activity in stressed and nonstressed rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Lepage, Olivier; Larson, Earl T; Mayer, Ian; Winberg, Svante

    2005-05-01

    The present experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that elevated dietary levels of l-tryptophan (Trp) result in elevated plasma levels of melatonin and that this increase in plasma melatonin concentration is caused by elevated melatonin production and secretion by the gastro-intestinal-tract (GIT). Feeding juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Trp-supplemented feed for 7 days resulted in elevated daytime plasma levels of melatonin and reduced poststress plasma cortisol concentrations. Nighttime plasma melatonin concentrations were, however, not affected by elevated dietary Trp. Moreover, stress caused a reduction in daytime plasma levels of melatonin in fish fed Trp-supplemented feed, an effect that was counteracted by treatment with an alpha-receptor antagonist. These results clearly suggest that elevated dietary intake of Trp results in an increase in the GIT production of melatonin in rainbow trout. A suggestion that was further supported by the results from an in vitro experiment demonstrating that addition of Trp to the incubation medium stimulates melatonin production and release by incubated rainbow trout GIT. The results from this study led us to suggest a possible mechanism for melatonin in mediating the effects of elevated dietary Trp on poststress plasma cortisol concentrations and aggressive behavior in rainbow trout.

  2. A New and Improved Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Reference Genome Assembly

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In an effort to improve the rainbow trout reference genome assembly, we re-sequenced the doubled-haploid Swanson line using the longest available reads from the Illumina technology; generating over 510 million paired-end shotgun reads (2x260nt), and 1 billion mate-pair reads (2x160nt) from four sequ...

  3. Pathogenic infection confounds induction of the estrogenic biomarker vitellogenin in rainbow trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To examine the behavior of the estrogenic biomarker vitellogenin (VTG) under the combined impact of estrogens and pathogens, parasite-infected or noninfected rainbow trout were exposed to two doses of 17 beta-estradiol (E2). Infected and E2-exposed fish showed significantly lower hepatic VTG mRNA le...

  4. Estimates of linkage disequilibrium and effective population size in rainbow trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of molecular genetic technologies for broodstock management and selective breeding of aquaculture species is becoming increasingly more common with the continued development of genome tools and reagents. Several laboratories have produced genetic maps for rainbow trout to aid in the identif...

  5. Characterizing the Genetic Diversity of Rainbow Trout in Support of Broodstock Development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of molecular genetic technologies for broodstock management and selective breeding of aquaculture species is becoming increasingly more common with the continued development of species-specific genome tools and reagents. Rainbow trout are the most widely produced salmonid in the US, attract...

  6. Exploring mechanisms of survival in rainbow trout selectively bred for increased resistance to Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A challenge for selective breeding programs is to better understand how artificial selection alters host pathophysiologic and immunologic response following pathogen exposure. The National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture is exploring this in rainbow trout bred for increased survival (ARS...

  7. Effect of genetics and feeding strategies on growth of rainbow trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of both selective breeding for increased growth and feeding strategy on growth performance and indices of protein degradation were determined in rainbow trout. For 24 weeks, control and growth-selected fish were fed either to satiation or limit-fed at 90-95% of the feeding rate required...

  8. An ecological risk assessment of the acute and chronic toxicity of the herbicide picloram to the threatened bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and the rainbow trout (Onchorhyncus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Fairchild, J F; Feltz, K P; Sappington, L C; Allert, A L; Nelson, K J; Valle, J

    2009-05-01

    We conducted acute and chronic toxicity studies of the effects of picloram acid on the threatened bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and the standard coldwater surrogate rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Juvenile fish were chronically exposed for 30 days in a proportional flow-through diluter to measured concentrations of 0, 0.30, 0.60, 1.18, 2.37, and 4.75 mg/L picloram. No mortality of either species was observed at the highest concentration. Bull trout were twofold more sensitive to picloram (30-day maximum acceptable toxic concentration of 0.80 mg/L) compared to rainbow trout (30-day maximum acceptable toxic concentration of 1.67 mg/L) based on the endpoint of growth. Picloram was acutely toxic to rainbow trout at 36 mg/L (96-h ALC50). The acute:chronic ratio for rainbow trout exposed to picloram was 22. The chronic toxicity of picloram was compared to modeled and measured environmental exposure concentrations (EECs) using a four-tiered system. The Tier 1, worst-case exposure estimate, based on a direct application of the current maximum use rate (1.1 kg/ha picloram) to a standardized aquatic ecosystem (water body of 1-ha area and 1-m depth), resulted in an EEC of 0.73 mg/L picloram and chronic risk quotients of 0.91 and 0.44 for bull trout and rainbow trout, respectively. Higher-tiered exposure estimates reduced chronic risk quotients 10-fold. Results of this study indicate that picloram, if properly applied according to the manufacturer's label, poses little risk to the threatened bull trout or rainbow trout in northwestern rangeland environments on either an acute or a chronic basis.

  9. An ecological risk assessment of the acute and chronic toxicity of the herbicide picloram to the threatened bull trout (salvelinus confluentus) and the rainbow trout (onchorhyncus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, J.F.; Feltz, K.P.; Sappington, L.C.; Allert, A.L.; Nelson, K.J.; Valle, J.

    2009-01-01

    We conducted acute and chronic toxicity studies of the effects of picloram acid on the threatened bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and the standard coldwater surrogate rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Juvenile fish were chronically exposed for 30 days in a proportional flow-through diluter to measured concentrations of 0, 0.30, 0.60, 1.18, 2.37, and 4.75 mg/L picloram. No mortality of either species was observed at the highest concentration. Bull trout were twofold more sensitive to picloram (30-day maximum acceptable toxic concentration of 0.80 mg/L) compared to rainbow trout (30-day maximum acceptable toxic concentration of 1.67 mg/L) based on the endpoint of growth. Picloram was acutely toxic to rainbow trout at 36 mg/L (96-h ALC50). The acute:chronic ratio for rainbow trout exposed to picloram was 22. The chronic toxicity of picloram was compared to modeled and measured environmental exposure concentrations (EECs) using a four-tiered system. The Tier 1, worst-case exposure estimate, based on a direct application of the current maximum use rate (1.1 kg/ha picloram) to a standardized aquatic ecosystem (water body of 1-ha area and 1-m depth), resulted in an EEC of 0.73 mg/L picloram and chronic risk quotients of 0.91 and 0.44 for bull trout and rainbow trout, respectively. Higher-tiered exposure estimates reduced chronic risk quotients 10-fold. Results of this study indicate that picloram, if properly applied according to the manufacturer's label, poses little risk to the threatened bull trout or rainbow trout in northwestern rangeland environments on either an acute or a chronic basis. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  10. Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in rainbow trout by deep sequencing of a reduced representation library.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Cecilia Castaño; Smith, Timothy P L; Wiedmann, Ralph T; Vallejo, Roger L; Salem, Mohamed; Yao, Jianbo; Rexroad, Caird E

    2009-11-25

    To enhance capabilities for genomic analyses in rainbow trout, such as genomic selection, a large suite of polymorphic markers that are amenable to high-throughput genotyping protocols must be identified. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) have been used for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery in salmonids. In those strategies, the salmonid semi-tetraploid genomes often led to assemblies of paralogous sequences and therefore resulted in a high rate of false positive SNP identification. Sequencing genomic DNA using primers identified from ESTs proved to be an effective but time consuming methodology of SNP identification in rainbow trout, therefore not suitable for high throughput SNP discovery. In this study, we employed a high-throughput strategy that used pyrosequencing technology to generate data from a reduced representation library constructed with genomic DNA pooled from 96 unrelated rainbow trout that represent the National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture (NCCCWA) broodstock population. The reduced representation library consisted of 440 bp fragments resulting from complete digestion with the restriction enzyme HaeIII; sequencing produced 2,000,000 reads providing an average 6 fold coverage of the estimated 150,000 unique genomic restriction fragments (300,000 fragment ends). Three independent data analyses identified 22,022 to 47,128 putative SNPs on 13,140 to 24,627 independent contigs. A set of 384 putative SNPs, randomly selected from the sets produced by the three analyses were genotyped on individual fish to determine the validation rate of putative SNPs among analyses, distinguish apparent SNPs that actually represent paralogous loci in the tetraploid genome, examine Mendelian segregation, and place the validated SNPs on the rainbow trout linkage map. Approximately 48% (183) of the putative SNPs were validated; 167 markers were successfully incorporated into the rainbow trout linkage map. In addition, 2% of the sequences from the

  11. The relative efficiency of nylon and cotton gill nets for taking lake trout in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pycha, Richard L.

    1962-01-01

    The change from cotton to nylon twine for gill nets in 1949–52 resulted in a sharp increase in the efficiency of the most important gear used for taking lake trout in Lake Superior, and, consequently, biased estimates of fishing intensity and abundance severely.From early May to the end of September 1961, short gangs (2000 or 4000 linear feet) of cotton and nylon nets were fished in parallel sets for lake trout. A total of 343,000 feet of gill netting was lifted. Nylon nets were 2.25 times as efficient as cotton nets for taking legal-sized fish and 2.8 times as efficient for undersized lake trout. The average lengths of legal, undersized, and all lake trout taken in nets of the two materials did not differ greatly. The percentage of the catch which was undersized (less than 1.25 lb, dressed weight) was 20.8 in nylon nets and 17.7 in cotton. The relative efficiency of cotton and nylon nets showed no trend during the season. The efficiency ratio determined in this study was closely similar to that obtained by earlier workers.Correction of estimates of fishing intensity and abundance for the greater efficiency of the nylon nets used since 1951 has not been attempted. The drastic decline of the lake trout fishery has forced fishermen to make changes in fishing practices in the past few years that cause new bias of an unknown extent to estimates of fishing intensity.

  12. Quantitative evaluation of macrophage aggregates in brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwindt, Adam R.; Truelove, Nathan; Schreck, Carl B.; Fournie, John W.; Landers, Dixon H.; Kent, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    Macrophage aggregates (MAs) occur in various organs of fishes, especially the kidney, liver and spleen, and contain melanin, ceroid/lipofuscin and hemosiderin pigments. They have been used as indicators of a number of natural and anthropogenic stressors. Macrophage aggregates occur in salmonids but are poorly organized, irregularly shaped, and are generally smaller than those in derived teleosts. These features complicate quantification, and thus these fishes have seldom been used in studies correlating MAs with environmental stressors. To alleviate these complications, we developed color filtering algorithms for use with the software package ImagePro Plus® (Media Cybernetics) that select and quantify pigmented area (i.e. colors ranging from gold to brown to black) in tissue sections. Image analysis results compared well with subjective scoring when tested on brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss captured from high-elevation lakes or hatcheries. Macrophage aggregate pigments correlated positively with age and negatively with condition factor. Within individual fish, pigmentation correlated positively among organs, suggesting that the kidney, liver or spleen are suitable indicator organs. In age-matched fishes, MA pigments were not different between hatcheries and lakes in the organs examined. Between lakes, differences in pigments were observed in the kidney and spleen, but were not explained by age, condition factor, sex or maturation state. Our results indicate that quantification of the area occupied by MA pigments is an efficient and accurate means of evaluating MAs in salmonid organs and that organ pigmentation correlates with age and condition factor, as seen in studies with more derived fishes. 

  13. Ultraviolet-B radiation and the immune response of rainbow trout: Chapter 18

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fabacher, David L.; Little, Edward E.; Jones, S.B.; DeFabo, E.C.; Webber, L.J.; Stolen, Joanne S.; Fletcher, Thelma C.

    1994-01-01

    As part of a larger study on global climate change and ozone depletion we are investigating the effects of ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation on fishes. We conducted a number of experiments to explore the possible effects of UVB radiation on the immune response of juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. In one study, the fish developed sunburn and fungal infection on the dorsal skin after exposure to levels of UVB that simulated ambient solar UVB levels observed at mid-latitudes. In a separate study, UVB-exposed rainbow trout with surgically administered dorsal lesions developed fungal infection on the lesions and surrounding skin. Many of these fish subsequently died within a 9 day exposure period. Fish with surgical lesions, but not exposed to UVB radiation, did not develop fungal infection and did not die. In mammals, UVB-induced immunosuppression is thought to occur through the isomerization of urocanic acid or the formation of DNA pyrimidine dimers, or through some interaction between the two. We found a substance that appeared, upon HPLC detection, to be trans-urocanic acid in the skin of UVB-exposed and unexposed rainbow trout. Neurotransmitter stimulation of adrenoceptors may be involved in changes in pigmentation observed in UVB-exposed fishes. We measured adrenoceptors in skin membranes from rainbow trout exposed to UVB and found a decrease in cz2-adrenoceptors compared with fish not exposed to UVB. Results of our study indicate that prolonged exposure of juvenile rainbow trout to mid-latitude levels of solar UVB may play an important role in the initiation of certain disease outbreaks and may decrease survival of fish that have lesions on the dorsal skin.

  14. Protection of rainbow trout against yersiniosis by lpxD mutant Yersinia ruckeri.

    PubMed

    Altinok, Ilhan; Ozturk, Rafet C; Kahraman, Umit C; Capkin, Erol

    2016-08-01

    Yersinia ruckeri is a Gram negative bacteria causing yersiniosis in freshwater and marine fish. Lipid A, important for pathogenesis of Gram negative bacteria, biosynthesis pathway requires nine enzyme catalyzed steps. Although there are nine genes encoding lipid A biosynthesis in bacteria, biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharides relies on lpxD gene that encodes the third pathway enzyme. The roles of LpxD in Y. ruckeri virulence have not been studied. In the present study, in-frameshift deletion of lpxD gene and their role in Y. ruckeri virulence in rainbow trout were determined. For this purpose, 92% of the Y. ruckeri lpxD genes were deleted by homologous recombination. After running in SDS-PAGE and staining with silver stain, no LPS was detectable in the Y. ruckeri ΔlpxD mutant. Virulence and immunogenicity of the Y. ruckeri ΔlpxD mutant (YrΔlpxD) were determined in rainbow trout. Rainbow trout immunized with YrΔlpxD with immersion, or intraperitoneal injection method displayed superior protection (relative percentage survival ≥ 84%) after exposure to wild type Y. ruckeri. In conclusion, our results indicated that deletion of the lpxD gene causes significant attenuation of Y. ruckeri in rainbow trout, and LPS deficient YrΔlpxD could be used as a live attenuated vaccine against Y. ruckeri in rainbow trout. This vaccine can protect fish and it can be applied to fish with different methods such as immersion or injection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Genomic structure and expression of uncoupling protein 2 genes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Coulibaly, Issa; Gahr, Scott A; Palti, Yniv; Yao, Jianbo; Rexroad, Caird E

    2006-08-09

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) belongs to the superfamily of mitochondrial anion carriers that dissociate the respiratory chain from ATP synthesis. It has been determined that UCP2 plays a role in several physiological processes such as energy expenditure, body weight control and fatty acid metabolism in several vertebrate species. We report the first characterization of UCP2s in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Two UCP2 genes were identified in the rainbow trout genome, UCP2A and UCP2B. These genes are 93% similar in their predicted amino acid sequences and display the same genomic structure as other vertebrates (8 exons and 7 introns) spanning 4.2 kb and 3.2 kb, respectively. UCP2A and UCP2B were widely expressed in all tissues of the study with a predominant level in macrophage-rich tissues and reproductive organs. In fry muscle we observed an increase in UCP2B expression in response to fasting and a decrease after refeeding in agreement with previous studies in human, mouse, rat, and marsupials. The converse expression pattern was observed for UCP2A mRNA which decreased during fasting, suggesting different metabolic roles for UCP2A and UCP2B in rainbow trout muscle. Phylogenetic analysis including other genes from the UCP core family located rainbow trout UCP2A and UCP2B with their orthologs and suggested an early divergence of vertebrate UCPs from a common ancestor gene. We characterized two UCP2 genes in rainbow trout with similar genomic structures, amino acid sequences and distribution profiles. These genes appeared to be differentially regulated in response to fasting and refeeding in fry muscle. The genomic organization and phylogeny analysis support the hypothesis of a common ancestry between the vertebrate UCPs.

  16. A first generation BAC-based physical map of the rainbow trout genome.

    PubMed

    Palti, Yniv; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Hu, Yuqin; Genet, Carine; You, Frank M; Vallejo, Roger L; Thorgaard, Gary H; Wheeler, Paul A; Rexroad, Caird E

    2009-10-08

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are the most-widely cultivated cold freshwater fish in the world and an important model species for many research areas. Coupling great interest in this species as a research model with the need for genetic improvement of aquaculture production efficiency traits justifies the continued development of genomics research resources. Many quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been identified for production and life-history traits in rainbow trout. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) physical map is needed to facilitate fine mapping of QTL and the selection of positional candidate genes for incorporation in marker-assisted selection (MAS) for improving rainbow trout aquaculture production. This resource will also facilitate efforts to obtain and assemble a whole-genome reference sequence for this species. The physical map was constructed from DNA fingerprinting of 192,096 BAC clones using the 4-color high-information content fingerprinting (HICF) method. The clones were assembled into physical map contigs using the finger-printing contig (FPC) program. The map is composed of 4,173 contigs and 9,379 singletons. The total number of unique fingerprinting fragments (consensus bands) in contigs is 1,185,157, which corresponds to an estimated physical length of 2.0 Gb. The map assembly was validated by 1) comparison with probe hybridization results and agarose gel fingerprinting contigs; and 2) anchoring large contigs to the microsatellite-based genetic linkage map. The production and validation of the first BAC physical map of the rainbow trout genome is described in this paper. We are currently integrating this map with the NCCCWA genetic map using more than 200 microsatellites isolated from BAC end sequences and by identifying BACs that harbor more than 300 previously mapped markers. The availability of an integrated physical and genetic map will enable detailed comparative genome analyses, fine mapping of QTL, positional cloning

  17. Detection of Yersinia ruckeri in rainbow trout blood by use of the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Altinok, I; Grizzle, J M; Liu, Z

    2001-01-26

    We evaluated a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for detecting Yersinia ruckeri, the bacterial pathogen causing enteric redmouth disease (ERM), in blood of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Identification of the PCR product was confirmed by Southern blot hybridization with a 32P-labeled oligonucleotide probe matching a sequence within the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene of Y. ruckeri. Following a 1 h immersion of rainbow trout in water with 4.5 x 10(6) colony-forming units of Y. ruckeri l(-1), the PCR was positive for all blood samples from 1 h (first sample) to 5 d and was negative from 9 to 30 d (last sample). Fish in this experiment did not show signs of disease, probably because they had been vaccinated against Y. ruckeri. To test this method with naturally infected fish, 42 rainbow trout from hatcheries were examined. Four of these fish had clinical signs of ERM and were infected with Y. ruckeri based on bacteriological culture. The PCR method detected Y. ruckeri in blood, intestine, liver, and trunk kidney from the 4 fish with ERM and from 5 additional rainbow trout that were bacteriologically negative for Y. ruckeri. Three of 5 rainbow trout from streams receiving effluent from hatcheries were positive for Y. ruckeri when tested with PCR, although there was no growth of Y. ruckeri on culture plates inoculated with the same samples. Samples were successfully stored for 1 wk in lysis buffer at 25 degrees C. This study demonstrated that a non-lethal blood sample can be used with PCR to detect Y. ruckeri.

  18. Transcriptome assembly, gene annotation and tissue gene expression atlas of the rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Salem, Mohamed; Paneru, Bam; Al-Tobasei, Rafet; Abdouni, Fatima; Thorgaard, Gary H; Rexroad, Caird E; Yao, Jianbo

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to obtain a comprehensive genome sequence for rainbow trout are ongoing and will be complemented by transcriptome information that will enhance genome assembly and annotation. Previously, transcriptome reference sequences were reported using data from different sources. Although the previous work added a great wealth of sequences, a complete and well-annotated transcriptome is still needed. In addition, gene expression in different tissues was not completely addressed in the previous studies. In this study, non-normalized cDNA libraries were sequenced from 13 different tissues of a single doubled haploid rainbow trout from the same source used for the rainbow trout genome sequence. A total of ~1.167 billion paired-end reads were de novo assembled using the Trinity RNA-Seq assembler yielding 474,524 contigs > 500 base-pairs. Of them, 287,593 had homologies to the NCBI non-redundant protein database. The longest contig of each cluster was selected as a reference, yielding 44,990 representative contigs. A total of 4,146 contigs (9.2%), including 710 full-length sequences, did not match any mRNA sequences in the current rainbow trout genome reference. Mapping reads to the reference genome identified an additional 11,843 transcripts not annotated in the genome. A digital gene expression atlas revealed 7,678 housekeeping and 4,021 tissue-specific genes. Expression of about 16,000-32,000 genes (35-71% of the identified genes) accounted for basic and specialized functions of each tissue. White muscle and stomach had the least complex transcriptomes, with high percentages of their total mRNA contributed by a small number of genes. Brain, testis and intestine, in contrast, had complex transcriptomes, with a large numbers of genes involved in their expression patterns. This study provides comprehensive de novo transcriptome information that is suitable for functional and comparative genomics studies in rainbow trout, including annotation of the genome.

  19. Effects of waterborne copper nanoparticles and copper sulphate on rainbow trout, (Oncorhynchus mykiss): physiology and accumulation.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Benjamin J; Al-Bairuty, Genan; Handy, Richard D

    2012-07-15

    Emerging data suggests that some types of nanoparticles (NPs) are toxic to fish, and given the well-known toxicity of dissolved metals, there are also concerns about whether metal-containing NPs present a similar or different hazard to metal salts. In this study, juvenile rainbow trout were exposed in triplicate to either a control, 20 or 100 μg l⁻¹ of either Cu as CuSO₄ or Cu-NPs (mean primary particle size, 87±27 nm) in a semi-static aqueous exposure regime. Fish were sampled at days 0, 4, and 10 for tissue trace elements, haematology, and biochemistry. By day 4, fish from the 100 μg l⁻¹ Cu as CuSO₄ treatment showed 85% mortality (treatment subsequently terminated) compared to 14% in the 100 μg l⁻¹ Cu-NP exposed fish. Mortality at day 10 was 4, 17, 10, and 19% in the control, 20 μg l⁻¹ Cu as CuSO₄, 20 and 100 μg l⁻¹ Cu-NP treatments, respectively. Copper accumulation was seen in the gills of fish from all Cu treatments, and was statistically significant in both CuSO₄ treatments at day 4 and all Cu treatments at day 10 compared to controls. No statistically significant Cu accumulation was seen in the spleen, brain or muscle of fish from any treatment, although an elevation in intestinal Cu was seen in the high Cu-NP treatment throughout. There were some transient changes in haematology and depletion of plasma Na⁺ that was treatment-related, with some differences between the nano form and metal salt, but Cu-NPs were not overtly haemolytic. A 6-fold decrease in branchial Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase activity in all Cu treatments (compared to controls), depletion of plasma and carcass ion concentrations suggest that Cu-NPs are an ionoregulatory toxicant to rainbow trout. Statistically significant decreases in Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase activity were also seen in the brains and intestine, and whilst there was no material-type effect in the former, this was only observed in the gut of fish exposed to 100 μg l⁻¹ Cu-NPs. There were material

  20. The Relative Importance of Waterborne and Dietborne Arsenic Exposure on Survival and Growth of Juvenile Rainbow Trout

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated toxicity to rainbow trout fed oligochaetes contaminated with arsenic via waterborne exposure. While this demonstrated the potential hazard of dietborne exposure, it did not address the relative and combined potency of waterborne and d...

  1. Effect of sexual maturation on muscle gene expression of rainbow trout on a high nutritional plane: RNA-Seq approach

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Muscle degradation occurs as a response to various physiological and pathological conditions regulated by specific molecular mechanisms. Previously, we characterized the physiological and metabolic changes of muscle deterioration associated with the female sexual maturation in rainbow trout. Most of...

  2. Evolution of interleukin-1 receptor-like 1 and its role in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) resistance to Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rainbow trout exhibit extensive phenotypic variation in innate disease resistance and we have divergently selected lines with either increased or reduced survival following exposure to the gram-negative bacterium, Flavobacterium psychrophilum (Fp). Following five generations of selection, gene expr...

  3. Identification of differentially expressed protective genes in liver of two rainbow trout strains.

    PubMed

    Rebl, Alexander; Verleih, Marieke; Korytář, Thomáš; Kühn, Carsten; Wimmers, Klaus; Köllner, Bernd; Goldammer, Tom

    2012-01-15

    Since 1975, the rainbow trout strain BORN (Germany) has been bred in brackish water from a coastal form imported from Denmark. Accompanying phenotypic monitoring of the adapted BORN trout until now revealed that this selection strain manifested a generally elevated resistance towards high stress and pathogenic challenge including lower susceptibility towards Aeromonas salmonicida infections in comparison to other trout strains in local aqua farms. We focus on the elucidation of both, genetic background and immunological basis for the increased survivorship to infections. A first comparison of gene expression profiles in liver tissue of healthy rainbow trout from the local selection strain BORN and imported trout using a GRASP 16K cDNA microarray revealed six differentially expressed genes evoking pathogen and wounding responses, LEAP2A (encoding for liver-expressed antimicrobial peptide), SERPINA1 (alpha-1 antitrypsin), FTH1 (middle subunit of ferritin), FGL2 (fibroleukin), CLEC4E (macrophage-inducible C-type lectin), and SERPINF2 (alpha-2 antiplasmin). Since the latter gene is not described in salmonid species so far, our first aim was to characterize the respective sequence in rainbow trout. Two trout SERPINF2 genes were identified, which share only 48% identical amino acid residues and a characteristic SERPIN domain. Second, we aimed to analyse the expression of those genes after temperature challenge (8 °C and 23 °C). Only FTH1 was upregulated in BORN and import trout after increase of temperature, while SERPINA1 and FGL2 were only elevated in import trout. Third, the expression of all named genes was analyzed after pathogen challenge with A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida. As a main finding, we detected a comparably faster regeneration of LEAP2A mRNA abundance in BORN trout following bacterial infection. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis suggested a functional interplay among the mentioned factors and the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF, whose stronger expression

  4. Evaluation of glutamic acid and glycine as sources of nonessential amino acids for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) and rainbow trout (Salmo gairdnerii).

    PubMed

    Hughes, S G

    1985-01-01

    A semi-purified test diet which contained either glutamic acid or glycine as the major source of nonessential amino acids (NEAA) was fed to lake and rainbow trout. Trout fed the diet containing glutamic acid consistently showed better growth and feed conversion efficiencies than those fed the diets containing glycine. The data indicate that these trout utilize glutamic acid more efficiently than glycine when no other major sources of NEAA are present.

  5. Alternative splice variants of the rainbow trout leptin receptor encode multiple circulating leptin-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ningping; Einarsdottir, Ingibjörg E; Johansson, Marcus; Björnsson, Björn Thrandur

    2013-07-01

    In mammals, leptin (Lep) binding proteins (LepBPs) derived from Lep receptor (LepR) gene or protein bind most of the circulating Lep, but to date, information on LepBPs in nonmammalian vertebrate classes is lacking. This study details the characterization of multiple LepBPs in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), an early poikilothermic vertebrate, and presents the complete coding sequences for 3 of them. Size-exclusion chromatography and cross-linking assay identified plasma proteins bound to Lep ranging from 70 to 100 kDa. LepBPs were isolated from plasma by affinity chromatography, and their binding specificity was assessed by a competitive binding assay. A RIA for LepBPs indicates that plasma LepBP levels decline after fasting for 3 weeks. Immunoblotting of LepBPs using antibodies against different LepR epitopes shows that the LepBPs are indeed LepR isoforms. The alternatively spliced LepR transcripts (LepR(S1-3)) that include only the extracellular segment transcribe the 90-kDa LepBP1, the 80-kDa LepBP2, and the 70-kDa LepBP3, respectively. LepR(S1) generally has lower expression than the long-form LepR in most tissues. LepR(S2) is primarily expressed in adipose tissue, whereas LepR(S3) is expressed abundantly in brain and spleen, and moderately in liver and gills. The mRNA levels of hepatic LepR(S3) increase after 2 weeks of fasting. This study demonstrates a mechanism in fish for the generation of LepBPs that differs from that seen in mammals and indicates that the physiologic action of Lep in these poikilothermic vertebrates can be modulated, both centrally and peripherally, by the differentiated, tissue-specific expression of multiple LepBPs.

  6. Generation of a reference transcriptome for evaluating rainbow trout responses to various stressors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fish under intensive culture conditions are exposed to a variety of acute and chronic stressors, including high rearing densities, sub-optimal water quality, and severe thermal fluctuations. Such stressors are inherent in aquaculture production and can induce physiological responses with adverse effects on traits important to producers and consumers, including those associated with growth, nutrition, reproduction, immune response, and fillet quality. Understanding and monitoring the biological mechanisms underlying stress responses will facilitate alleviating their negative effects through selective breeding and changes in management practices, resulting in improved animal welfare and production efficiency. Results Physiological responses to five treatments associated with stress were characterized by measuring plasma lysozyme activity, glucose, lactate, chloride, and cortisol concentrations, in addition to stress-associated transcripts by quantitative PCR. Results indicate that the fish had significant stressor-specific changes in their physiological conditions. Sequencing of a pooled normalized transcriptome library created from gill, brain, liver, spleen, kidney and muscle RNA of control and stressed fish produced 3,160,306 expressed sequence tags which were assembled and annotated. SNP discovery resulted in identification of ~58,000 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms including 24,479 which were predicted to fall within exons. Of these, 4907 were predicted to occupy the first position of a codon and 4110 the second, increasing the probability to impact amino acid sequence variation and potentially gene function. Conclusion We have generated and characterized a reference transcriptome for rainbow trout that represents multiple tissues responding to multiple stressors common to aquaculture production environments. This resource compliments existing public transcriptome data and will facilitate approaches aiming to evaluate gene expression

  7. Distribution of T Cells in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Skin and Responsiveness to Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Esther; Granja, Aitor G.; Zarza, Carlos; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Although the skin constitutes the first line of defense against waterborne pathogens, there is a great lack of information regarding the skin associated lymphoid tissue (SALT) and whether immune components of the skin are homogeneously distributed through the surface of the fish is still unknown. In the current work, we have analyzed the transcription of several immune genes throughout different rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) skin areas. We found that immunoglobulin and chemokine gene transcription levels were higher in a skin area close to the gills. Furthermore, this skin area as well as other anterior sections also transcribed significantly higher levels of many different immune genes related to T cell immunity such as T cell receptor α (TCRα), TCRγ, CD3, CD4, CD8, perforin, GATA3, Tbet, FoxP3, interferon γ (IFNγ), CD40L and Eomes in comparison to posterior skin sections. In agreement with these results, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that anterior skin areas had a higher concentration of CD3+ T cells and flow cytometry analysis confirmed that the percentage of CD8+ T lymphocytes was also higher in anterior skin sections. These results demonstrate for the first time that T cells are not homogeneously distributed throughout the teleost skin. Additionally, we studied the transcriptional regulation of these and additional T cell markers in response to a bath infection with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). We found that VHSV regulated the transcription of several of these T cell markers in both the skin and the spleen; with some differences between anterior and posterior skin sections. Altogether, our results point to skin T cells as major players of teleost skin immunity in response to waterborne viral infections. PMID:26808410

  8. Gene expression and pathologic alterations in juvenile rainbow trout due to chronic dietary TCDD exposure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Rise, Matthew L.; Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Hori, Tiago S.; Mieritz, Mark; Geis, Steven; McGraw, Joseph E.; Goetz, Giles; Larson, Jeremy; Hutz, Reinhold J.; Carvan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project was to use functional genomic methods to identify molecular biomarkers as indicators of the impact of TCDD exposure in rainbow trout. Specifically, we investigated the effects of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on whole juvenile rainbow trout global gene expression associated with histopathological analysis. Juvenile rainbow trout were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb (ng TCDD / g food), and fish were sampled from each group at 7, 14, 28 and 42 days (d) after initiation of feeding. 100 ppb TCDD caused 100% mortality at 39 d. Fish fed with 100 ppb TCDD food had TCDD accumulation of 47.37 ppb (ng TCDD / g fish) in whole fish at 28 d. Histological analysis from TCDD-treated trout sampled from 28 d and 42 d revealed that obvious lesions were found in skin, oropharynx, liver, gas bladder, intestine, pancreas, nose and kidney. In addition, TCDD caused anemia in peripheral blood, decreases in abdominal fat, increases of remodeling of fin rays, edema in pericardium and retrobulbar hemorrhage in the 100 ppb TCDD-treated rainbow trout compared to the control group at 28 d. Dose- and time-dependent global gene expression analyses were performed using the cGRASP 16,000 (16K) cDNA microarray. TCDD-responsive whole body transcripts identified in the microarray experiments have putative functions involved in various biological processes including growth, cell proliferation, metabolic process, and immune system processes. Nine microarray-identified genes were selected for QPCR validation. CYP1A3 and CYP1A1 were common up-regulated genes and HBB1 was a common down-regulated gene among each group based on microarray data, and their QPCR validations are consistent with microarray data for the 10 and 100 ppb TCDD treatment groups after 28-d exposure (p< 0.05). In addition, in the 100 ppb group at 28d, expression of complement component C3-1 and trypsin-1 precursor have a more than 10-fold induction from the microarray experiments

  9. Gene expression and pathologic alterations in juvenile rainbow trout due to chronic dietary TCDD exposure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Rise, Matthew L; Spitsbergen, Jan M; Hori, Tiago S; Mieritz, Mark; Geis, Steven; McGraw, Joseph E; Goetz, Giles; Larson, Jeremy; Hutz, Reinhold J; Carvan, Michael J

    2013-09-15

    The goal of this project was to use functional genomic methods to identify molecular biomarkers as indicators of the impact of TCDD exposure in rainbow trout. Specifically, we investigated the effects of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on whole juvenile rainbow trout global gene expression associated with histopathological analysis. Juvenile rainbow trout were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb (ngTCDD/g food), and fish were sampled from each group at 7, 14, 28 and 42 days after initiation of feeding. 100 ppb TCDD caused 100% mortality at 39 days. Fish fed with 100 ppb TCDD food had TCDD accumulation of 47.37 ppb (ngTCDD/g fish) in whole fish at 28 days. Histological analysis from TCDD-treated trout sampled from 28 and 42 days revealed that obvious lesions were found in skin, oropharynx, liver, gas bladder, intestine, pancreas, nose and kidney. In addition, TCDD caused anemia in peripheral blood, decreases in abdominal fat, increases of remodeling of fin rays, edema in pericardium and retrobulbar hemorrhage in the 100 ppb TCDD-treated rainbow trout compared to the control group at 28 days. Dose- and time-dependent global gene expression analyses were performed using the cGRASP 16,000 (16K) cDNA microarray. TCDD-responsive whole body transcripts identified in the microarray experiments have putative functions involved in various biological processes including growth, cell proliferation, metabolic process, and immune system processes. Nine microarray-identified genes were selected for QPCR validation. CYP1A3 and CYP1A1 were common up-regulated genes and HBB1 was a common down-regulated gene among each group based on microarray data, and their QPCR validations are consistent with microarray data for the 10 and 100 ppb TCDD treatment groups after 28 days exposure (p<0.05). In addition, in the 100 ppb group at 28 days, expression of complement component C3-1 and trypsin-1 precursor have a more than 10-fold induction from the microarray

  10. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) pro-oxidant and genotoxic responses following acute and chronic exposure to the antibiotic oxytetracycline.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Sara; Antunes, Sara C; Correia, Alberto T; Nunes, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Oxytetracycline (OTC), an antibacterial agent, is extensively used in aquaculture practices all over the world, but also in human and veterinary medicines. Because of its intensive use, low rates of absorption by treated animals, inadequate disposal, and low efficiency of removal in wastewater treatment plants, the potential harmful effects on aquatic organisms are of great concern. This work aimed to assess the effects of this antibiotic in rainbow trout, following both acute and chronic exposures. Catalase (CAT), total glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GRed) activities and lipid peroxidation (TBARS levels) were quantified as oxidative stress biomarkers, in gills and liver. Genotoxic endpoints, reflecting different types of genetic damage in blood cells, were also determined, by analysis of genetic damage (determination of the genetic damage index, GDI, measured by comet assay) and erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENAs). The obtained results showed a mild pattern of antioxidant response, with modifications in CAT and GPx activities in gills, and lipid peroxidation in liver. These results suggest that despite the occurrence of oxidative effects, a full scenario of oxidative stress is not likely. However, exposure to OTC resulted in the establishment of genotoxic alterations with the induction of DNA strand breaks in blood cells (increase of GDI), and of chromosome breakage and/or segregational abnormalities (increase of ENAs). Considering that the oxidative response was not totally devisable, other mechanisms may be involved in the genotoxic effects reported.

  11. Topographical Mapping of the Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Microbiome Reveals a Diverse Bacterial Community with Antifungal Properties in the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Lowrey, Liam; Woodhams, Douglas C.; Tacchi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The mucosal surfaces of wild and farmed aquatic vertebrates face the threat of many aquatic pathogens, including fungi. These surfaces are colonized by diverse symbiotic bacterial communities that may contribute to fight infection. Whereas the gut microbiome of teleosts has been extensively studied using pyrosequencing, this tool has rarely been employed to study the compositions of the bacterial communities present on other teleost mucosal surfaces. Here we provide a topographical map of the mucosal microbiome of an aquatic vertebrate, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing, we revealed novel bacterial diversity at each of the five body sites sampled and showed that body site is a strong predictor of community composition. The skin exhibited the highest diversity, followed by the olfactory organ, gills, and gut. Flectobacillus was highly represented within skin and gill communities. Principal coordinate analysis and plots revealed clustering of external sites apart from internal sites. A highly diverse community was present within the epithelium, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy and pyrosequencing. Using in vitro assays, we demonstrated that two Arthrobacter sp. skin isolates, a Psychrobacter sp. strain, and a combined skin aerobic bacterial sample inhibit the growth of Saprolegnia australis and Mucor hiemalis, two important aquatic fungal pathogens. These results underscore the importance of symbiotic bacterial communities of fish and their potential role for the control of aquatic fungal diseases. PMID:26209676

  12. Multiplication of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in rainbow trout following immersion infection: whole-body assay and immunohistochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamamoto, T.; Batts, W.N.; Arakawa, C.K.; Winton, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The sites of replication of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in infected tissues were detected in fingerling rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss by in situ histologic techniques following immersion infection. Virus antigens in tissues were detected by a neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibody and a one-step anti-mouse biotin-streptavidin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase. The efficiency of infection and virulence of the virus determined by mortality rates showed high virulence of the selected IHNV isolates, and viral replication in individual fish showed that virus content of the fish increased rapidly from the second day to the seventh day postinfection. The earliest viral lesions following infection were detected in the epidermis of the pectoral fins, opercula, and ventral surface of the body. Virus lesions became evident in kidneys on the third day. By the fifth day, when there was a significant increase in virus titer, foci of viral replication were detected in gill tissue and in the anterior internal tissues below the epidermis. Subsequently, extensive virus replication and tissue destruction were observed in the spleen, dorsal adipose tissues, ventricle, and pseudobranch. Replication in the liver, the muscularis layers of the digestive tract, and the general body musculature followed later. These infection experiments indicated that the epidermis and gills of fish constitute important sites of early IHNV replication.

  13. Effects of Pb plus Cd mixtures on toxicity, and internal electrolyte and osmotic balance in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Clemow, Yvonne H; Wilkie, Michael P

    2015-04-01

    The physiological and toxicological effects of Cd and Pb have been thoroughly studied, but relatively little work has been done to determine how mixtures of these metals affect fishes in soft (<100 μmol L(-1)Ca(2+)) slightly acidic (pH ∼6) waters typical of many lakes in the Canadian Shield and other regions. Recently, it has been suggested that acute exposure to Cd plus Pb mixtures (3h) had greater than additive effects on both Ca(2+) and Na(+) influx, which could potentially exacerbate disturbances to ion balance and result in greater toxicity in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The goal of the present study was to test this hypothesis by assessing the physiological and toxicological effects of Cd plus Pb mixtures over longer time periods (3-5 days), but at relatively low, more environmentally relevant concentrations of these metals. Accordingly, toxicity and measurements of blood acid-base regulation (PaO2, pHa), hematology (Ht, Hb, MCHC, and Protein), ionic composition (body ions and plasma Ca(2+), Na(+), Cl(-), osmolality), unidirectional Na(+) fluxes and branchial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity were measured in rainbow trout exposed to Cd plus Pb mixtures. Experiments on rainbow trout, implanted with dorsal aortic catheters for repetitive blood sampling, demonstrated that exposure to Pb alone (26 nmol PbL(-1)) was less toxic than Cd alone (6 nmol CdL(-1)), which was much less toxic to the fish than a Cd plus Pb mixture (7 nmol CdL(-1) plus 45 nmol PbL(-1)), which led to greater than additive 80% mortality by 5d. Both Cd and Pb inhibited Na(+) influx over 3d exposure to the metals, which was partially offset by decreases in the diffusive efflux (outflux) of Na(+) across the gill. Despite an absence of detectable effects of Pb alone on plasma ion balance, Cd plus Pb mixtures exacerbated Cd-induced reductions in plasma Ca(2+) concentration, and resulted in pronounced reductions in plasma Na(+), Cl(-), and osmolality. No effects on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity

  14. Consecutive emamectin benzoate and deltamethrin treatments affect the expressions and activities of detoxification enzymes in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Cárcamo, Juan Guillermo; Aguilar, Marcelo N; Carreño, Constanza F; Vera, Tamara; Arias-Darraz, Luis; Figueroa, Jaime E; Romero, Alex P; Alvarez, Marco; Yañez, Alejandro J

    2017-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) subjected to three consecutive, alternating treatments with emamectin benzoate (EMB) and deltamethrin (DM) during outbreaks of Caligus rogercresseyi in a farm located in southern Chile (Hornopiren, Chiloé), were studied to determine the effects of these treatments on the protein and enzymatic activity levels of cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A), flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) in different tissues. Consecutive and alternating EMB/DM treatments resulted in a 10-fold increase and 3-fold decrease of CYP1A protein levels in the intestine and gills, respectively. Notably, CYP1A activity levels decreased in most of the analyzed tissues. FMO protein and activity levels markedly increased in the kidney and the intestine. GST was up-regulated in all tissues, either as protein or enzyme activity. When comparing consecutive EMB/DM treatments against previous studies of EMB treatment alone, CYP1A activity levels were similarly diminished, except in muscle. Likewise, FMO activity levels were increased in most of the analyzed tissues, particularly in the muscle, kidney, and intestine. The increases observed for GST were essentially unchanged between consecutive EMB/DM and EMB only treatments. These results indicate that consecutive EMB/DM treatments in rainbow trout induce the expression and activity of FMO and GST enzymes and decrease CYP1A activity. These altered activities of detoxification enzymes could generate imbalances in metabolic processes, synthesis, degradation of hormones and complications associated with drug interactions. It is especially important when analyzing possible effects of consecutive antiparasitic treatments on withholding periods and salmon farming yields.

  15. Evidence of major genes affecting stress response in rainbow trout using Bayesian methods of complex segregation analysis.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, R L; Rexroad, C E; Silverstein, J T; Janss, L L G; Weber, G M

    2009-11-01

    As a first step toward the genetic mapping of QTL affecting stress response variation in rainbow trout, we performed complex segregation analyses (CSA) fitting mixed inheritance models of plasma cortisol by using Bayesian methods in large full-sib families of rainbow trout. To date, no studies have been conducted to determine the mode of inheritance of stress response as measured by plasma cortisol response when using a crowding stress paradigm and CSA in rainbow trout. The main objective of this study was to determine the mode of inheritance of plasma cortisol after a crowding stress. The results from fitting mixed inheritance models with Bayesian CSA suggest that 1 or more major genes with dominant cortisol-decreasing alleles and small additive genetic effects of a large number of independent genes likely underlie the genetic variation of plasma cortisol in the rainbow trout families evaluated. Plasma cortisol is genetically determined, with heritabilities of 0.22 to 0.39. Furthermore, a major gene with an additive effect of -42 ng/mL (approximately 1.0 genetic SD) is segregating in this rainbow trout broodstock population. These findings provide a basis for designing and executing genome-wide linkage studies to identify QTL for stress response in rainbow trout broodstock and markers for selective breeding.

  16. Identification of two Isoforms of Vitelline Envelope Protein as Complementary Biomarkers to Vitellogenin in the Plasma of Rainbow Trout Exposed to 17beta-estradiol

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the present study, protein markers of estrogenic exposure in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were isolated and identified using innovative sample preparation techniques followed by advanced MS and bioinformatics approaches. Juvenile trout were administered 17ß-estradiol t...

  17. Identification of two Isoforms of Vitelline Envelope Protein as Complementary Biomarkers to Vitellogenin in the Plasma of Rainbow Trout Exposed to 17beta-estradiol

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the present study, protein markers of estrogenic exposure in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were isolated and identified using innovative sample preparation techniques followed by advanced MS and bioinformatics approaches. Juvenile trout were administered 17ß-estradiol t...

  18. Non-electrolyte permeability of trout gills: effect of temperature and adrenaline

    PubMed Central

    Isaia, J.

    1979-01-01

    1. The gill permeability to various non-electrolytes (Ps) was measured in fresh-water and sea-water adapted trout (Salmo gairdneri). This study was performed in vitro using a `head-perfused' preparation. The influence of temperature and adrenaline (10-6 M) on permeability to non-electrolytes was also investigated. 2. During salt adaptation Pbutanol and Pwater decrease, Pmannitol rises and Pdextran stays constant. In view of recently acquired morphological data these results back up the hypothesis of different pathways across the gill epithelium (transcellular, vesicular and paracellular) according to the physico-chemical characteristics of the molecules. The low selectivity of the gill epithelium as a function of the liposolubility of the molecules used testifies to the hydrophilic nature of diffusion across this epithelium, a feature becoming more pronounced during salt adaptation. 3. The activation energies are about 4 kcal/mol, an energy comparable to diffusion in water for most of the substances tested, exceptions being butanol for fresh-water adapted gills and water for fresh-water and sea-water adapted gills. Arrhenius plots for butanol in fresh water gills show a transition temperature at 15 °C, suggesting an increased membrane lipid fluidity above this temperature. 4. Adrenaline has no effect on Pmannitol and Pdextran, but increases Pbutanol and Pwater selectively according to the adaptation medium (+ 160% and + 100% in fresh water and + 25% and + 20% in sea water respectively). These results point to an effect of this catecholamine on the membrane lipid fluidity. PMID:439031

  19. Intra-strain dioxin sensitivity and morphometric effects in swim-up rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carvalho, Paulo S. M.; Noltie, Douglas B.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2004-01-01

    Inter and intra-specific differences in sensitivity of early life stage salmonids to 2,3,7,8-TCDD exposure have been reported, but intra-strain differences have not been found in the literature. Our results indicate that intra-strain variability in terms of embryo mortality (LD50) is small in Eagle Lake strain of rainbow trout, LD50 values ranging from 285 to 457 pg TCDD egg g-1. These results confirm Eagle Lake as a less sensitive strain within rainbow trout, and do not indicate overlap with reported LD50 values for brook or lake trout. Our results also demonstrate that although generalized edema in regions including the yolk-sac are frequently associated with mortality following dioxin exposure, not all edematous fish die. We detected dose-dependent decreases in cranial length, eye diameter, mass, and total length (P<0.05) in viable swim-up rainbow trout. These effects are presumed to indicate more subtle dose-dependent disruptions of the viteline vein vasculature and, therefore, in access to energy sources. A tendency for dose-dependent decrease in liver glycogen reserves concurred with previous results on salmonids and with the well described TCDD-induced alterations in intermediate metabolism of rats and chicken embryos (wasting syndrome). This syndrome could be contributing to the reduced growth that we observed. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of Estrogen-responsive Vitelline Envelope Protein Fragments from Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Plasma Using Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasma protein biomarkers associated with exposure of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to 17β-estradiol were isolated and identified using novel sample preparation techniques and state-of-the-art mass spectrometry and bioinformatics approaches. Juvenile male and female trout ...

  1. Loss reduction in a rainbow trout recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) by periodical disinfection with peracetic acid (PAA)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In a research rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) RAS, two different sized raceways were operated with one common biofilter unit. The larger raceway was stocked with food fish, while the smaller raceway was stocked with juvenile trout. After removal of the food fish, juveniles were moved into free s...

  2. Identification of Estrogen-responsive Vitelline Envelope Protein Fragments from Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Plasma Using Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasma protein biomarkers associated with exposure of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to 17β-estradiol were isolated and identified using novel sample preparation techniques and state-of-the-art mass spectrometry and bioinformatics approaches. Juvenile male and female trout ...

  3. Acute exposure to waterborne copper inhibits both the excretion and uptake of ammonia in freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Lim, Michael Yu-Ting; Zimmer, Alex M; Wood, Chris M

    2015-02-01

    In freshwater fish, exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of waterborne copper (Cu) results in inhibitions of ammonia excretion (Jamm) and Na(+) uptake (J(Na)in), yet the mechanisms by which these occur are not fully understood. In the present study, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fry exposed to 50μg/l Cu for 24h displayed a sustained 40% decrease in Jamm and a transient 60% decrease in J(Na)in. Previously, these effects have been attributed to inhibitions of gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and/or carbonic anhydrase (CA) activities by Cu. Trout fry did not display significant reductions in the branchial activities of these enzymes or H(+)-ATPase over 24h Cu exposure. Recently, Rhesus (Rh) glycoproteins, bi-directional NH3 gas channels, have been implicated in the mechanism of Cu toxicity. Juvenile trout were exposed to nominal 0, 50, and 200μg/l Cu for 3-6h under control conditions (ammonia-free water) followed by 6h exposure to high environmental ammonia (HEA; 1.5mmol/l NH4HCO3). HEA led to significant ammonia uptake in control fish (0μg/l Cu), and exposure to 50 and 200μg/l Cu resulted in significant reductions of ammonia uptake during HEA exposure. This is the first evidence that Cu inhibits both the excretion and uptake of ammonia, implicating bi-directional Rh glycoproteins as a target for Cu toxicity. We propose a model whereby Rh blockade by Cu causes the sustained inhibition of Jamm and transient inhibition of J(Na)in, with H(+)-ATPase potentially aiding in J(Na)in recovery. More work is needed to elucidate the role of Rh proteins in sub-lethal Cu toxicity.

  4. Chronic toxicity of Clark Fork River invertebrates to rainbow trout when administered via the diet

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, A.; Cohen, A.; Stubblefield, W.

    1995-12-31

    A 46-day exposure examined the effects of metals contamination in a live natural freshwater diet on rainbow trout fry. Survival, growth, and whole-body tissue metals were compared among groups of trout fed live planktonic invertebrates (primarily Daphnia pulex) collected from the Clark Fork River (CFR), Montana and trout fed live laboratory-reared D. pulex. Metals of interest in the diets were As, Cu, Cd, Pb, and Zn. In addition to dietary exposure, treatments included simultaneous exposure to a mixture of waterborne metals (Cu, Cd, Pb, and Zn) at sublethal concentrations. Trout showed no statistically significant effects on survival or growth from mean CFR invertebrate metal concentrations of 20.1 mg As/kg dwt, 60.7 mg Cu/kg dwt, 4.0 mg Cd/kg dwt, 4.9 mg Pb/kg dwt, and 249 mg Zn/kg dwt. Waterborne and dietary Cd and Pb appeared to result in increased tissue concentrations of these metals, while only dietary As resulted in increased tissue As. Neither dietary nor waterborne copper or zinc had a substantial effect on tissue levels of these metals. Results were consistent, in terms of the lack of statistically significant growth and survival effects, with those of previous in-house studies exposing rainbow trout to metals-enriched Artemia sp. (brine shrimp) diets.

  5. A nose-to-nose comparison of the physiological and molecular responses of rainbow trout to high environmental ammonia in seawater versus freshwater.

    PubMed

    Wood, Chris M; Nawata, C Michele

    2011-11-01

    Steelhead rainbow trout acclimated to either freshwater (FW) or seawater (SW) were exposed to high environmental ammonia (HEA, 1000 μmol l(-1) NH(4)HCO(3), pH 7.8-8.0) for 24 h. SW trout restored ammonia excretion more rapidly (3-6 h versus 9-12 h in FW), despite higher production rates and lower plasma pH. Plasma total ammonia levels stabilized at comparable levels below the external HEA concentration, and blood acid-base disturbances were small at both salinities. The electrochemical gradients for NH(4)(+) entry (F(NH(4))(+)) were the same in the two salinities, but only because FW trout allowed their transepithelial potential to rise by ∼15 mV during HEA exposure. Elevation of plasma [cortisol] during HEA exposure was more prolonged in SW fish. Plasma [glucose] increased in SW, but decreased in FW trout. Plasma [urea-N] also decreased in FW, in concert with elevated urea transporter (UT) mRNA expression in the gills. Of 13 branchial transporters, baseline mRNA expression levels were higher for Rhcg1, NHE2, NKCC1a and UT, and lower for NBC1 and NKA-α1a in SW trout, whereas NKA-α1b, NHE3, CA2, H(+)-ATPase, Rhag, Rhbg and Rhcg2 did not differ. Of the Rh glycoprotein mRNAs responding to HEA, Rhcg2 was greatly upregulated in both FW and SW, Rhag decreased only in SW and Rhcg1 decreased only in FW. H(+)-ATPase mRNA increased in FW whereas NHE2 mRNA increased in SW; NHE3 did not respond, and V-type H(+)-ATPase activity declined in SW during HEA exposure. Branchial Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity was much higher in SW gills, but could not be activated by NH(4)(+). Overall, the more effective response of SW trout was explained by differences in physical chemistry between SW and FW, which greatly reduced the plasma NH(3) tension gradient for NH(3) entry, as well as by the higher [Na(+)] in SW, which favoured Na(+)-coupled excretion mechanisms. At a molecular level, responses in SW trout showed subtle differences from those in FW trout, but were very different than in the

  6. Contaminant levels in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and their diets from Missouri coldwater hatcheries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, M.J.; Kromrey, G.B.; May, T.W.; Orazio, C.E.

    2008-01-01

    Organochlorine and metal contaminants often occur in commercial fish diets and can accumulate in fish to levels of concern for human consumption. Contaminant levels were investigated in diet and rainbow trout fillets from Missouri coldwater hatcheries used in 'put and take' fisheries. The average fillet:diet ratio was <0.1 for lead and cadmium, 0.4-0.6 for organochlorine compounds, and about 0.8 for mercury. Trout fillet concentrations for all contaminants were low (<50 ng/g) and below Missouri's fish consumption advisory trigger levels. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  7. Contaminant levels in rainbow trout, oncorhynchus mykiss, and their diets from Missouri coldwater hatcheries.

    PubMed

    McKee, Michael J; Kromrey, George B; May, Thomas W; Orazio, Carl E

    2008-05-01

    Organochlorine and metal contaminants often occur in commercial fish diets and can accumulate in fish to levels of concern for human consumption. Contaminant levels were investigated in diet and rainbow trout fillets from Missouri coldwater hatcheries used in "put and take" fisheries. The average fillet:diet ratio was <0.1 for lead and cadmium, 0.4-0.6 for organochlorine compounds, and about 0.8 for mercury. Trout fillet concentrations for all contaminants were low (<50 ng/g) and below Missouri's fish consumption advisory trigger levels.

  8. Dietary Factors and Hepatoma in Rainbow Trout (Salmo gairdneri). I. Aflatoxins in Vegetable Protein Feedstuffs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sinnhuber, R.O.; Wales, J.H.; Ayers, J.L.; Engebrecht, R.H.; Amend, D.F.

    1968-01-01

    Aflatoxins (toxic metabolites of the mold Aspergillus flavus) were present in a commercial trout ration causing hepatoma in rainbow trout. Cottonseed meal and solvent extracts of cottonseed meal and of rations containing cottonseed meal and peanut meal were found by chemical assay and confirmed by duckling assay to contain aflatoxins. Diets containing these materials and a purified test diet to which aflatoxins had been added produced microscopic tumors in 6 months and gross lesions of hepatocarcinoma in 9 months. Similar diets without aflatoxin were negative.

  9. Involvement of rainbow trout leucocytes in the pathogenesis of infectious hematopoietic necrosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chilmonczyk, S.; Winton, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus myluss leucocytes were tested for their ability to support replication of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Viral replication occurred in vitro uslng leucocytes cultured from peripheral blood, kidney, and thymus where viral titers peaked at 2 to 4 d post-inoculation. Leucocytes collected from trout following waterborne challenge with IHNV were cocultured on EPC cell monolayers. These assays detected IHNV in leucocytes infected in vivo as early as 6 h post-exposure before the challenge virus had undergone replication. These data showed that leucocyte populations could serve as target cells in the initial phase of IHNV infection.

  10. The influence of social status on hepatic glucose metabolism in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, Kathleen M; Kirkpatrick, Sheryn; Massarsky, Andrey; Pearce, Brenda; Saliba, Sarah; Stephany, Céleste-Élise; Moon, Thomas W

    2012-01-01

    The effects of chronic social stress on hepatic glycogen metabolism were examined in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss by comparing hepatocyte glucose production, liver glycogen phosphorylase (GP) activity, and liver β-adrenergic receptors in dominant, subordinate, control, fasted, and cortisol-treated fish. Hepatocyte glucose production in subordinate fish was approximately half that of dominant fish, reflecting hepatocyte glycogen stores in subordinate trout that were just 16% of those in dominant fish. Fasting and/or chronic elevation of cortisol likely contributed to these differences based on similarities among subordinate, fasted, and cortisol-treated fish. However, calculation of the "glycogen gap"--the difference between glycogen stores used and glucose produced--suggested an enhanced gluconeogenic potential in subordinate fish that was not present in fasted or cortisol-treated trout. Subordinate, fasted, and cortisol-treated trout also exhibited similar GP activities (both total activity and that of the active or a form), and these activities were in all cases significantly lower than those in control trout, perhaps reflecting an attempt to protect liver glycogen stores or a modified capacity to activate GP. Dominant trout exhibited the lowest GP activities (20%-24% of the values in control trout). Low GP activities, presumably in conjunction with incoming energy from feeding, allowed dominant fish to achieve the highest liver glycogen concentrations (double the value in control trout). Liver membrane β-adrenoceptor numbers (assessed as the number of (3)H-CGP binding sites) were significantly lower in subordinate than in dominant trout, although this difference did not translate into attenuated adrenergic responsiveness in hepatocyte glucose production in vitro. Transcriptional regulation, likely as a result of fasting, was indicated by significantly lower β(2)-adrenoceptor relative mRNA levels in subordinate and fasted trout. Collectively, the data

  11. Environmental estrogens inhibit growth of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by modulating the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor system.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrea M; Kittilson, Jeffrey D; Martin, Lincoln E; Sheridan, Mark A

    2014-01-15

    Although environmental estrogens (EE) have been found to disrupt a wide variety of developmental and reproductive processes in vertebrates, there is a paucity of information concerning their effects on organismal growth, particularly postembryonic growth. In this study, we exposed juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to 17β-estradiol (E2) β-sitosterol (βS), or 4-n-nonylphenol (NP) to assess the effects of EE on overall organismal growth and on the growth hormone-insulin-like-growth factor (GH-IGF) system. EE treatment significantly reduced food conversion, body condition, and body growth. EE-inhibited growth resulted from alterations in peripheral elements of the GH-IGF system, which includes multiple GH receptors (GHRs), IGFs, and IGF receptors (IGFRs). In general, E2, βS, and NP reduced the expression of GHRs, IGFs, and IGFRs; however, the effects varied in an EE-, tissue-, element type-specific manner. For example, in liver, E2 was more efficacious than either βS, and NP in reducing GHR expression, and the effect of E2 was greater on GHR 1 than GHR2 mRNA. By contrast, in gill, all EEs affected GHR expression in a similar manner and there was no difference in the effect on GHR1 and GHR 2 mRNA. With regard to IGF expression, all EEs reduced hepatic IGF1 and IGF2 mRNA levels, whereas as in gill, only E2 and NP significantly reduced IGF1 and IGF2 expression. Lastly, E2 and NP reduced the expression of IGFR1A and IGFR1B mRNA expression similarly in gill and red and white muscle, whereas βS had no effect on expression of IGFR mRNAs. These findings indicate that EEs disrupt post-embryonic growth by reducing GH sensitivity, IGF production, and IGF sensitivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Chronic Effects of Chlorination By-Products on Rainbow Trout, Salmo gairdneri

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    1980-11-01

    Rainbow trout were exposed to by-products of low-level water chlorination for several months in two separate experiments. In each test 2400 juvenile rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) were reared under chlorination conditions designed to simulate those of a power plant. Objectives were to determine effects of long term exposure to provide samples for tissue analysis of chlorination byroducts. No significant difference in fish condition factors was found between the test groups and controls, neither was there an apparent effect on mortality. Background levels of chloroform were found in all fish, but there was no evidence of an increased amount of chloroform or other chlorination by-products resulting from chronic low level exposure to chlorination by-products.

  13. Effects of five diets on sensitivity of rainbow trout to eleven chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Marking, L.L.; Bills, T.D.; Crowther, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    This study evaluated the acute toxicity of 11 chemicals to rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) fry (average weight 1 g) that had been reared for about 8 weeks on one of five diets: (1) Silver Cup, (2) a purified diet (H440, National Research Council), (3) SD-9 starter diet of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, (4) ground beef liver, and (5) brine shrimp (Artemia). Chemicals tested against the fish were antimycin, carbaryl, chlorine, copper, sulfate, sodium cyanide, formalin, malathion, Noxfish, permethrin, salicylanilide 1, and the lampricide 3-trifluoromethyl 4-nitrophenol (TFM). Responses of the fish to the chemicals were consistent in all five groups. No group demonstrated superior resistance to these chemicals. Diet appears to have little influence on the sensitivity of young rainbow trout to chemicals in acute toxicity tests. 13 references, 3 tables.

  14. Effect of capture stress on plasma enzyme activities in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouck, G.R.; Cairns, M. A.; Christian, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    Four capture methods were used to collect domesticated rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri): angling, electroshocking, seining, and direct netting (control). Blood was sampled rapidly upon capture, usually within 2 min. No significant differences were noted within the time frame of the experiment between the four capture groups for plasma protein concentration, lactate dehydrogenase activity, or leucine aminonaphthylamidase activity. Creatine phosphokinase activity was elevated among electroshocked fish. Acid phosphatase activity was too low for accurate measurement. Hematocrits were significantly elevated by capture struggles. These results indicate that these capture methods do not preclude the use of plasma enzyme levels for investigating the health of wild fish. Key words: plasma enzyme, capture stress, physiology, plasma protein, rainbow trout, lactate dehydrogenase, leucine aminonaphthylamidase, creatine phosphokinase

  15. Long-term effects of propolis on serum biochemical parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Beyraghdar Kashkooli, Omid; Ebrahimi Dorcheh, Eisa; Mahboobi-Soofiani, Nasrollah; Samie, Abdolhossein

    2011-03-01

    Long-term effects of propolis administration on serum biochemical parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were investigated. To determine the possible toxicity and side effects of propolis, fish were fed on diets containing 0, 0.5, 1.5, 4.5 and 9 g propolis/kg diet for 8 weeks. At the end of the experiment, various seric biochemical parameters were determined. Our results showed that all dosages induced no significant alterations in growth parameters and the seric levels of total protein, albumin, globulin, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides and activities of glutamic pyruvic transaminase, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase, when compared to the control group. On the basis of our findings, propolis is a non-toxic substance for rainbow trout and its long-term administration might not have any side effects. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fast genomic biomarker responses of retene and pyrene in liver of juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Kati; Arsiola, Tiina; Oikari, Aimo

    2012-10-01

    We studied the transcriptive effects of two PAHs, retene (RET) and pyrene (PYR), in three equimolar sublethal concentrations (0.9-10 μg/L) in the liver of juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. After 24 h of in vivo exposure, expressions of selected genes (CYP1A, Hsp30, Hsp70, Grp78, Sep15, GP1) were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). These PAHs changed the studied gene transcriptions differently, but not significantly, except for CYP1A, which was induced only by RET. RET induced CYP1A gene expression even at low, environmentally realistic concentrations in the liver of juvenile rainbow trout.

  17. Predicting the Toxicokinetics of Trifluralin in Rainbow Trout Using Clearance-Volume Pharmacokinetic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Irv R. ); Hayton, William L.; David J.Smith, William H.Gingerich, Maria G.Barker

    1999-10-13

    Trifluralin (TF) is a lipophilic, pre-emergent herbicide widely used in agriculture and known to bioconcentrate in fish. We have characterized the accumulation of TF in rainbow trout under a variety of experimental conditions. Our approach has been to use static water exposure systems and intra-vascular dosing in combination with clearance-volume pharmacokinetic (CV-PK) models to obtain quantitative estimates of uptake clearance, apparent volume of distribution and elimination due to xenobiotic metabolism. This paper will briefly discuss pertinent physicochemical data for TF and review the toxicokinetics of TF in rainbow trout. Emphasis will be placed on physiological interpretations of TF model parameters and practical aspects of modeling TF toxicokinetics with CV-PK models.

  18. Mechanism of sodium uptake in PNA negative MR cells from rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss as revealed by silver and copper inhibition.

    PubMed

    Goss, Greg; Gilmour, Kathleen; Hawkings, Guy; Brumbach, Jonathan H; Huynh, Maily; Galvez, Fernando

    2011-07-01

    The rate of acid-stimulated and phenamil-sensitive sodium (Na(+)) uptake was measured in three different cell lineages: pavement cells (PVC), total mitochondrion-rich (MR) cell populations, and peanut lectin agglutinin-negative mitochondrion-rich cells (PNA(-) MR) isolated from the rainbow trout gill epithelium. Despite the presence of basal levels of Na(+) uptake in PVC, this transport was not enhanced by acidification, nor was it inhibited by independent treatment with bafilomycin (i.e., a V-type H(+)-ATPase inhibitor), phenamil (i.e., a specific inhibitor of ENaC), or Ag (a specific inhibitor of active Na(+) transport in fish). In contrast, Na(+) uptake in PNA(-) MR cells was increased by ~220% above basal levels following acidification of near 0.4 pH units in the presence of 1.0 mM external Na(+). Acid-stimulated Na(+) transport was entirely inhibited by both phenamil and bafilomycin. Silver (Ag) and copper (Cu), which are known to interfere with active Na(+) transport in fish, were also responsible for inhibiting acid stimulated Na(+) uptake in PNA(-) MR cells, but by themselves had no effect on basal Na(+) transport. Thus, we demonstrate that Ag specifically prevented acid-stimulated Na(+) uptake in PNA(-) MR cells in a dose-dependent manner. We also demonstrate rapid (<1 min) and significant inhibition of carbonic anhydrase (CA) by Ag in PNA(-) MR cells, but not in PVC. These data lend further support to the idea of a PNA(-) MR cell type as the primary site for Na(+) uptake in the freshwater (FW) gill phenotype of rainbow trout. Moreover, these findings provide support for the importance of intracellular protons in regulating the movement of Na(+) across the apical surface of the fish gill.

  19. Summer-autumn habitat use of yearling rainbow trout in two streams in the Lake Ontario watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; McKenna, James E.; Chalupnicki, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the habitat requirements of salmonids in streams is an important component of fisheries management. We examined the summer and autumn habitat use of yearling Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in relation to available habitat in two streams in the Lake Ontario watershed. Little interstream variation in trout habitat use was observed; the variation that did occur was largely due to differences between streams in available habitat in the autumn. In both streams, yearling Rainbow Trout utilized pool habitat and during periods of high stream discharge were associated with larger substrate that may provide a velocity barrier. These findings may assist resource managers in their efforts to protect and restore habitat for migratory Rainbow Trout in the Lake Ontario watershed.

  20. Oral immunization of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) against an etiologic agent of "redmouth disease"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1965-01-01

    Rainbow trout were fed a pelleted diet containing killed cells of the etiologic agent of a bacterial disease, redmouth. These fish in addition to appropriate controls were subsequently challenged with virulent homologous organisms. Ninety per cent of the redmouth immunized fish survived the basic challenge using virulent organisms in contrast to 20% survival for the controls. Multiple challenge doses at increased levels also are discussed.

  1. Ghrelin does not affect gastrointestinal contractility in rainbow trout and goldfish in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Takio; Itoh, Kentaro; Yaosaka, Noriko; Maruyama, Keisuke; Matsuda, Kouhei; Teraoka, Hiroki; Kaiya, Hiroyuki

    2012-09-15

    Ghrelin has been identified in rainbow trout and goldfish, and it has been shown to regulate growth hormone release and food intake in these species as seen in mammals. The aim of this study was to investigate the functional role of ghrelin in regulation of gastrointestinal contractility in both fishes. Neither rainbow trout ghrelin nor rat ghrelin affected the contractility of gastrointestinal strips of rainbow trout. Similarly, goldfish ghrelin-17 and rat ghrelin did not cause marked contraction in the goldfish intestinal bulb. Detail examinations using the goldfish intestine revealed that human neurotensin, substance-P, goldfish neuromedine-U and carbachol showed apparent contractile activities in the intestinal strips. Electrical field stimulation (EFS, 1-20 Hz) caused a frequency-dependent contraction of the intestinal bulb. Atropine partially inhibited and tetrodotoxin abolished the EFS-induced contraction. Pretreatments with goldfish ghrelin-17 and rat ghrelin did not modify the EFS-induced contraction. The mRNAs of two types of growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), GHS-R1a-1 and GHS-R1a-2, were detected in the goldfish intestine, and the expression level of GHS-R1a-2 was 4-times higher than that of GHS-R1a-1. The expression levels of GHS-R1a-1 and GHS-R1a-2 in four regions of the goldfish intestine (intestinal bulb, intestine-1, intestine-2 and intestine-3) were almost the same. In conclusion, ghrelin does not affect gastrointestinal contractility of the rainbow trout and goldfish, although GHSR-like receptor/GHS-R1a is expressed entire intestine. These results suggest diversity of ghrelin function in vertebrates.

  2. Seasonal movements and habitat use of Potamodromous Rainbow Trout across a complex Alaska riverscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fraley, Kevin M.; Falke, Jeffrey A.; Yanusz, Richard; Ivey, Sam S.

    2016-01-01

    Potamodromous Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss are an important ecological and recreational resource in freshwater ecosystems of Alaska, and increased human development, hydroelectric projects, and reduced escapement of Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha may threaten their populations. We used aerial and on-the-ground telemetry tracking, a digital landscape model, and resource selection functions to characterize seasonal movements and habitat use of 232 adult (>400 mm FL) Rainbow Trout across the complex, large (31,221 km2) Susitna River basin of south-central Alaska during 2003–2004 and 2013–2014. We found that fish overwintered in main-stem habitats near tributary mouths from November to April. After ice-out in May, fish ascended tributaries up to 51 km to spawn and afterward moved downstream to lower tributary reaches, assumedly to intercept egg and flesh subsidies provided by spawning salmonids in July and August. Fish transitioned back to main-stem overwintering habitats at the onset of autumn when salmonid spawning waned. Fidelity to tributaries where fish were initially tagged varied across seasons but was high (>0.75) in three out of four drainages. Model-averaged resource selection functions suggested that Rainbow Trout habitat use varied seasonally; fish selected low-gradient, sinuous, main-stem stream reaches in the winter, reaches with suitably sized substrate during spawning, larger reaches during the feeding season prior to the arrival of spawning salmonids, and reaches with high Chinook Salmon spawning habitat potential following the arrival of adult fish. We found little difference in movement patterns between males and females among a subset of fish for which sex was determined using genetic analysis. As most Rainbow Trout undertake extensive movements within and among tributaries and make use of a variety of seasonal habitats to complete their life histories, it will be critical to take a basinwide approach to their management (i

  3. Sensitivity of early life stages of white sturgeon, rainbow trout, and fathead minnow to copper.

    PubMed

    Vardy, David W; Oellers, Johanna; Doering, Jon A; Hollert, Henner; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Populations of white sturgeon (WS; Acipenser transmontanus) are in decline in several parts of the United States and Canada, attributed primarily to poor recruitment caused by degradation of habitats, including pollution with contaminants such as metals. Little is known about sensitivity of WS to contaminants or metals such as copper (Cu). Here, acute (96 h) mortalities of WS early life stages due to exposure to Cu under laboratory conditions are reported. Two standard test species, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), were exposed in parallel to determine relative sensitivity among species. Swim-up larvae [15 days post-hatch (dph)] and early juveniles (40-45 dph) of WS were more sensitive to Cu (LC(50) = 10 and 9-17 μg/L, respectively) than were yolksac larvae (8 dph; LC(50) = 22 μg/L) and the later juvenile life stage (100 dph; LC(50) = 54 μg/L). WS were more sensitive to Cu than rainbow trout and fathead minnow at all comparable life stages tested. Yolksac larvae of rainbow trout and fathead minnow were 1.8 and 4.6 times, respectively, more tolerant than WS, while swim-up and juvenile life stages of rainbow trout were between 1.4- and 2.4-times more tolerant than WS. When plotted in a species sensitivity distribution with other fishes, the mean acute toxicity value for early life stage WS was ranked between the 1st and 2nd centile. The WS life stage of greatest Cu sensitivity coincides with the beginning of active feeding and close association with sediment, possibly increasing risk. WS early life stages are sensitive to aqueous copper exposure and site-specific water quality guidelines and criteria should be evaluated closely to ensure adequate protection.

  4. Proteomic analysis of muscle tissue from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed dietary β-glucan.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, Gh; Keyvanshokooh, S; Mohammadi Azarm, H; Akhlaghi, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the changes in muscle proteome of the rainbow trout fed dietary β-glucan. The experimental diets contained 0 (control), 0.1% and 0.2% β-1,3/1,6 yeast glucan. First, feeding larvae were fed to apparent satiation nine times per day with their respective diets over two months. The percentage of body weight gain and feed efficiency of fish fed 0.2% diet was significantly higher than those of fish fed the control and 0.1% diets. Fish fed the control and 0.2% diets were subjected to proteomic analysis. Proteins of the muscle tissue were analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Spots that were found to differ significantly in abundance between control and β-glucan fed fish were selected for identification. Out of 8 protein spots showing differential expression, 7 spots were successfully identified. Two protein spots that were found to be increased in abundance in the β-glucan treated rainbow trout corresponded to tropomyosin alpha-1 chain (spot 1) and slow myotomal muscle tropomyosin (spot 2). The five spots that were down-regulated with dietary β-glucan supplementation were identified as different forms of myosin: myosin light polypeptide 3-2 (spot 3), myosin light chain 1 (spots 4 and 5), fast myosin light chain 2 (spot 6) and myosin heavy chain (spot 7). The altered expression of structural proteins in fish fed β-glucan may be related to higher growth rate in rainbow trout. These findings provide basic information to understand possible mechanisms of dietary β-glucan contribution to better growth in rainbow trout.

  5. Techniques of chromosome manipulation in rainbow trout: a new evaluation with karyology.

    PubMed

    Chourrout, D

    1986-08-01

    Experiments, supported by extensive karyology, were carried out to evaluate the different techniques used for chromosome manipulation in rainbow trout. Eggs, when subjected to early heat shocks, changed from haploidy to diploidy and from diploidy to triploidy. In this respect heat shocks differ from pressure shocks which induce gradual transitions between successive ploidy levels. Sperm treatment with dimethylsulphate yields haploid embryos containing residual sperm chromatin fragments, in contrast to treatment with ultraviolet rays.

  6. Characterization of a new BAC library for rainbow trout: evidence for multi-locus duplication.

    PubMed

    Palti, Y; Gahr, S A; Hansen, J D; Rexroad, C E

    2004-04-01

    A 10X rainbow trout bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was constructed to aid in the physical and genetic mapping efforts of the rainbow trout genome. The library was derived from the Swanson clonal line (YY male) and consists of 184,704 clones with an average insert size of 137,500 bp (PFGE) or 118,700 bp (DNA fingerprinting). The clones were gridded onto 10 large nylon membranes to produce high-density arrays for screening the library by hybridization. The library was probed with 11 cDNAs from the NCCCWA EST project chosen because of interest in their homology to known gene sequences, seven known genes, and a Y-specific sex marker. Putative positive clones identified by hybridization were re-arrayed and gridded for secondary confirmation. FPC analysis of HindIII and EcoRV DNA fingerprinting was used to estimate the level of redundancy in the library, to construct BAC contigs and to detect duplicated loci in the semi-duplicated rainbow trout genome. A good correlation (R2 = 0.7) was found between the number of hits per probe and the number of contigs that were assembled from the positive BACs. The average number of BACs per contig was 9.6, which is in good agreement with 10X genome coverage of the library. Two-thirds of the loci screened were predicted to be duplicated as the positive BACs for those genes were assembled into two or three different contigs, which suggests that most of the rainbow trout genome is duplicated.

  7. Role of intestinal microflora in the degradation of DDT by rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, G.

    1968-01-01

    Though liver homogenates show apparent microsomal enzyme DDT-dehydrochlorinase activity, in the intact fish the intestinal microflora play a major role in DDT detoxication. Since the presence of this microflora in fish depends on the recent intake of food (12), the rate of detoxication and hence the toxicity of ingested DDT to the rainbow trout will probably depend somewhat on the available food supply.

  8. Precipitating antibody against Aeromonas salmonicida in serums of inbred albino Rainbow Trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Douglas P.; Klontz, George W.

    1970-01-01

    Precipitins in albino rainbow trout serums were demonstrated by gel diffusion after a single parenteral exposure to the soluble antigens of Aeromonas salmonicida. The fraction of the serum containing antibody activity against the presented antigens was shown by immunoelectrophoresis to be in the nonmigrating region. This corresponded to the beta-2 fraction of rabbit serum. An antibody-containing component comparable with rabbit gamma globulin was not detected.

  9. Effect of dietary vitamin E supplementation and refrigerated storage on quality of rainbow trout fillets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rainbow trout were fed a low vitamin E (200 mg/kg; LVE) or a high vitamin E (5000 mg/kg; HVE) diet for 9 wk to characterize the effect of vitamin E supplementation at 5000 mg/kg on fillet quality. Fish were sampled at 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and 9 wk of the trial. Fillets were stored at 2 degrees C for 0, 7,...

  10. Genome Sequence of the Fish Pathogen Yersinia ruckeri Strain 150, Isolated from Diseased Rainbow Trout.

    PubMed

    Cascales, Desirée; Guijarro, José A; Reimundo, Pilar; García-Torrico, Ana I; Méndez, Jessica

    2016-12-01

    We present here the draft genome of a pathogenic Yersinia ruckeri strain, isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) affected by enteric redmouth disease. The chromosome has 3,826,775 bp, a GC content of 46.88%, and is predicted to contain 3,538 coding sequences. The data will be useful for comparative pathogenicity studies. Copyright © 2016 Cascales et al.

  11. Proteomic analysis of muscle tissue from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed dietary β-glucan

    PubMed Central

    Ghaedi, Gh.; Keyvanshokooh, S.; Mohammadi Azarm, H.; Akhlaghi, M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the changes in muscle proteome of the rainbow trout fed dietary β-glucan. The experimental diets contained 0 (control), 0.1% and 0.2% β-1,3/1,6 yeast glucan. First, feeding larvae were fed to apparent satiation nine times per day with their respective diets over two months. The percentage of body weight gain and feed efficiency of fish fed 0.2% diet was significantly higher than those of fish fed the control and 0.1% diets. Fish fed the control and 0.2% diets were subjected to proteomic analysis. Proteins of the muscle tissue were analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Spots that were found to differ significantly in abundance between control and β-glucan fed fish were selected for identification. Out of 8 protein spots showing differential expression, 7 spots were successfully identified. Two protein spots that were found to be increased in abundance in the β-glucan treated rainbow trout corresponded to tropomyosin alpha-1 chain (spot 1) and slow myotomal muscle tropomyosin (spot 2). The five spots that were down-regulated with dietary β-glucan supplementation were identified as different forms of myosin: myosin light polypeptide 3-2 (spot 3), myosin light chain 1 (spots 4 and 5), fast myosin light chain 2 (spot 6) and myosin heavy chain (spot 7). The altered expression of structural proteins in fish fed β-glucan may be related to higher growth rate in rainbow trout. These findings provide basic information to understand possible mechanisms of dietary β-glucan contribution to better growth in rainbow trout. PMID:27822248

  12. Characterization of the rainbow trout spleen transcriptome and identification of immune-related genes

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ali; Rexroad, Caird E.; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Yao, Jianbo; Salem, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Resistance against diseases affects profitability of rainbow trout. Limited information is available about functions and mechanisms of teleost immune pathways. Immunogenomics provides powerful tools to determine disease resistance genes/gene pathways and develop genetic markers for genomic selection. RNA-Seq sequencing of the rainbow trout spleen yielded 93,532,200 reads (100 bp). High quality reads were assembled into 43,047 contigs. 26,333 (61.17%) of the contigs had hits to the NR protein database and 7024 (16.32%) had hits to the KEGG database. Gene ontology showed significant percentages of transcripts assigned to binding (51%), signaling (7%), response to stimuli (9%) and receptor activity (4%) suggesting existence of many immune-related genes. KEGG annotation revealed 2825 sequences belonging to “organismal systems” with the highest number of sequences, 842 (29.81%), assigned to immune system. A number of sequences were identified for the first time in rainbow trout belonging to Toll-like receptor signaling (35), B cell receptor signaling pathway (44), T cell receptor signaling pathway (56), chemokine signaling pathway (73), Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis (52), leukocyte transendothelial migration (60) and NK cell mediated cytotoxicity (42). In addition, 51 transcripts were identified as spleen-specific genes. The list includes 277 full-length cDNAs. The presence of a large number of immune-related genes and pathways similar to other vertebrates suggests that innate and adaptive immunity in fish are conserved. This study provides deep-sequence data of rainbow trout spleen transcriptome and identifies many new immune-related genes and full-length cDNAs. This data will help identify allelic variations suitable for genomic selection and genetic manipulation in aquaculture. PMID:25352861

  13. Effects of aquaculture production noise on hearing, growth, and disease resistance of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wysocki, L.E.; Davidson, J. W.; Smith, M.E.; Frankel, A.S.; Ellison, W.T.; Mazik, P.M.; Popper, A.N.; Bebak, J.

    2007-01-01

    Intensive aquaculture production often utilizes equipment (e.g., aerators, air and water pumps, harvesters, blowers, filtration systems, and maintenance machinery) that increases noise levels in fish culture tanks. Consequently, chronic exposure to elevated noise levels in tanks could negatively impact cultured species. Possible effects include impairment of the auditory system, increased stress, and reduced growth rates. The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of sound exposure on the hearing sensitivity, growth, and survival of cultured rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Two cohorts of rainbow trout were cultured for 8??months in replicated tanks consisting of three sound treatments: 115, 130, or 150 decibels referenced at 1 micropascal (dB re 1????Pa root mean square [RMS]) levels. Auditory evoked potential (AEP) recordings revealed no significant differences in hearing thresholds resulting from exposure to increased ambient sound levels. Although there was no evident noise-induced hearing loss, there were significant differences in hearing thresholds between the two fish cohorts examined. No statistical effect of sound treatment was found for growth rate and mortality within each fish cohort. There was no significant difference in mortality between sound treatments when fish were exposed to the pathogen Yersinia ruckeri, but there was significantly different mortality between cohorts. This study indicated that rainbow trout hearing sensitivity, growth, survival, stress, and disease susceptibility were not negatively impacted by noise levels common to recirculating aquaculture systems. These findings should not be generalized to all cultured fish species, however, because many species, including catfish and cyprinids, have much greater hearing sensitivity than rainbow trout and could be affected differently by noise. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Discovery and characterization of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in steelhead/rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Abadía-Cardoso, Alicia; Clemento, Anthony J; Garza, John Carlos

    2011-03-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have several advantages over other genetic markers, including lower mutation and genotyping error rates, ease of inter-laboratory standardization, and the prospect of high-throughput, low-cost genotyping. Nevertheless, their development and use has only recently moved beyond model organisms to groups such as salmonid fishes. Oncorhynchus mykiss is a salmonid native to the North Pacific rim that has now been introduced throughout the world for fisheries and aquaculture. The anadromous form of the species is known as steelhead. Native steelhead populations on the west coast of the United States have declined and many now have protected status. The nonanadromous, or resident, form of the species is termed rainbow, redband or golden trout. Additional life history and morphological variation, and interactions between the forms, make the species challenging to study, monitor and evaluate. Here, we describe the discovery, characterization and assay development for 139 SNP loci in steelhead/rainbow trout. We used EST sequences from existing genomic databases to design primers for 480 genes. Sanger-sequencing products from these genes provided 130 KB of consensus sequence in which variation was surveyed for 22 individuals from steelhead, rainbow and redband trout groups. The resulting TaqMan assays were surveyed in five steelhead populations and three rainbow trout stocks, where they had a mean minor allele frequency of 0.15-0.26 and observed heterozygosity of 0.18-0.35. Mean F(ST) was 0.204. The development of SNPs for O. mykiss will help to provide highly informative genetic tools for individual and stock identification, pedigree reconstruction, phylogeography and ecological investigation. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Stress of anesthesia with M.S. 222 and Benzocaine in Rainbow Trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary

    1970-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) anesthetized with M.S. 222 for periods up to 12 min experience interrenal ascorbate depletion, uremia, and moderate hypercholesterolemia. Anesthesia with neutralized M.S. 222 (pH 7) or benzocaine prevented these changes and significantly reduced the variability in plasma glucose, cholesterol, and cortisol, indicating that the stress of anesthesia with M.S. 222 is due to the low pK of the sulfonic acid moiety.

  16. Risk of Myxobolus cerebralis infection to rainbow trout in the Madison River, Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krueger, R.C.; Kerans, B.L.; Vincent, E.R.; Rasmussen, C.

    2006-01-01

    Myxobolus cerebralis, the parasite that causes salmonid whirling disease, has had detrimental effects on several salmonid populations in the Intermountain West, including the rainbow trout in the Madison River, Montana, USA. The goal of this study was to examine relationships among characteristics of the environment, Tubifex tubifex (the alternate host) populations, and rainbow trout whirling disease risk in the Madison River. Environmental characteristics were measured in side channels of the Madison River, and differences were described with a principal components analysis. The density of T. tubifex, the prevalence of infection in T. tubifex, and the density of infected T. tubifex were determined for the side channels using benthic core samples and examination of live tubificids for infection. The site-specific contribution to whirling disease risk in the side channels was determined using in situ exposures of sentinel rainbow trout. Regression analyses were used to determine correlations among these characteristics. Side channels differed in site-specific contribution to rainbow trout whirling disease risk, which was positively correlated to the density of infected T. tubifex. Side channels with fine sediments and lower water temperatures made greater site-specific contribution to whirling disease risk and had higher densities of infected T. tubifex than side channels with coarser sediments and higher temperatures. The ability to characterize areas of high whirling disease risk is essential for improving our understanding of the dynamics of M. cerebralis such that appropriate management strategies can be implemented. In addition, this study provides a model of how the disease ecology of complex aquatic parasites can be examined when the influential processes operate on different spatial scales. ?? 2006 by the Ecological Society of America.

  17. A Computational Model of the Rainbow Trout Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Ovary-Liver Axis

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Kendall; Krone, Stephen M.; Nagler, James J.; Schultz, Irvin R.

    2016-01-01

    Reproduction in fishes and other vertebrates represents the timely coordination of many endocrine factors that culminate in the production of mature, viable gametes. In recent years there has been rapid growth in understanding fish reproductive biology, which has been motivated in part by recognition of the potential effects that climate change, habitat destruction and contaminant exposure can have on natural and cultured fish populations. New approaches to understanding the impacts of these stressors are being developed that require a systems biology approach with more biologically accurate and detailed mathematical models. We have developed a multi-scale mathematical model of the female rainbow trout hypothalamus-pituitary-ovary-liver axis to use as a tool to help understand the functioning of the system and for extrapolation of laboratory findings of stressor impacts on specific components of the axis. The model describes the essential endocrine components of the female rainbow trout reproductive axis. The model also describes the stage specific growth of maturing oocytes within the ovary and permits the presence of sub-populations of oocytes at different stages of development. Model formulation and parametrization was largely based on previously published in vivo and in vitro data in rainbow trout and new data on the synthesis of gonadotropins in the pituitary. Model predictions were validated against several previously published data sets for annual changes in gonadotropins and estradiol in rainbow trout. Estimates of select model parameters can be obtained from in vitro assays using either quantitative (direct estimation of rate constants) or qualitative (relative change from control values) approaches. This is an important aspect of mathematical models as in vitro, cell-based assays are expected to provide the bulk of experimental data for future risk assessments and will require quantitative physiological models to extrapolate across biological scales. PMID

  18. Comparative analysis of innate immune responses to Streptococcus phocae strains in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Salazar, Soraya; Oliver, Cristian; Yáñez, Alejandro J; Avendaño-Herrera, Ruben

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus phocae subsp. salmonis is a Gram-positive bacterium that causes mortality only in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) farmed in Chile, even when this species is co-cultured with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). This susceptibility could be determined by innate immune response components and their responses to bacterial infection. This fish pathogen shares subspecies status with Streptococcus phocae subsp. phocae isolated from seals. The present study compared innate immune system mechanisms in Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout when challenged with different S. phocae, including two isolates from Atlantic salmon (LM-08-Sp and LM-13-Sp) and two from seal (ATCC 51973(T) and P23). Streptococcus phocae growth was evaluated in the mucus and serum of both species, with rainbow trout samples evidencing inhibitory effects. Lysozyme activity supported this observation, with significantly higher (p < 0.01) expression in rainbow trout serum and mucus as compared to Atlantic salmon. No differences were found in phagocytic capacity between fish species when stimulated with ATCC 51973(T) and P23. Against all S. phocae strains, rainbow trout and Atlantic salmon showed up to two-fold increased bactericidal activity, and rainbow trout demonstrated up to three-fold greater reactive oxygen species production in macrophages. In conclusion, the non-specific humoral and cellular barriers of Atlantic salmon were immunologically insufficient against S. phocae subsp. salmonis, thereby facilitating streptococcosis. Moreover, the more robust response of rainbow trout to S. phocae could not be attributed to any specific component of the innate immune system, but was rather the consequence of a combined response by the evaluated components.

  19. Phylogenetic and functional characterization of the distal intestinal microbiome of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss from both farm and aquarium settings.

    PubMed

    Lyons, P P; Turnbull, J F; Dawson, K A; Crumlish, M

    2017-02-01

    This study focused on comparing the phylogenetic composition and functional potential of the intestinal microbiome of rainbow trout sourced from both farm and aquarium settings. Samples of distal intestinal contents were collected from fish and subjected to high throughput 16S rRNA sequencing, to accurately determine the composition of the intestinal microbiome. The predominant phyla identified from both groups were Tenericutes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Spirochaetae and Bacteroidetes. A novel metagenomic tool, PICRUSt, was used to determine the functional potential of the bacterial communities present in the rainbow trout intestine. Pathways concerning membrane transport activity were dominant in the intestinal microbiome of all fish samples. Furthermore, this analysis revealed that gene pathways relating to metabolism, and in particular amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism, were upregulated in the rainbow trout intestinal microbiome. The results suggest that the structure of the intestinal microbiome in farmed rainbow trout may be similar regardless of where the fish are located and hence could be shaped by host factors. Differences were, however, noted in the microbial community membership within the intestine of both fish populations, suggesting that more sporadic taxa could be unique to each environment and may have the ability to colonize the rainbow trout gastrointestinal tract. Finally, the functional analysis provides evidence that the microbiome of rainbow trout contains genes that could contribute to the metabolism of dietary ingredients and therefore may actively influence the digestive process in these fish. To better understand and exploit the intestinal microbiome and its impact on fish health, it is vital to determine its structure, diversity and potential functional capacity. This study improves our knowledge of these areas and suggests that the intestinal microbiome of rainbow trout may play an important role in the digestive physiology of

  20. Role of the GH-IGF-1 system in Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout postsmolts at elevated water temperature.

    PubMed

    Hevrøy, Ernst M; Tipsmark, Christian K; Remø, Sofie C; Hansen, Tom; Fukuda, Miki; Torgersen, Thomas; Vikeså, Vibeke; Olsvik, Pål A; Waagbø, Rune; Shimizu, Munetaka

    2015-10-01

    A comparative experiment with Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) postsmolts was conducted over 35 days to provide insight into how growth, respiration, energy metabolism and the growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) system are regulated at elevated sea temperatures. Rainbow trout grew better than Atlantic salmon, and did not show reduced growth at 19 °C. Rainbow trout kept at 19 °C had increased blood hemoglobin concentration compared to rainbow trout kept at 13 °C, while salmon did not show the same hemoglobin response due to increased temperature. Both species showed reduced length growth and decreased muscle glycogen stores at 19 °C. Circulating IGF-1 concentration was higher in rainbow trout than in Atlantic salmon, but was not affected by temperature in either species. Plasma IGF-binding protein 1b (IGFBP-1b) concentration was reduced in Atlantic salmon reared at 19 °C after 15 days but increased in rainbow trout at 19 °C after 35 days. The igfbp1b mRNA level in liver showed a positive correlation to plasma concentrations of glucose and IGFBP-1b, suggesting involvement of this binding protein in carbohydrate metabolism at 19 °C. At this temperature muscle igfbp1a mRNA was down-regulated in both species. The muscle expression of this b