Science.gov

Sample records for ralstonia eutropha class

  1. A putative monofunctional glycosyltransferase is expressed in Ralstonia eutropha.

    PubMed Central

    Paik, J; Jendrossek, D; Hakenbeck, R

    1997-01-01

    A gene, mgt, encoding a protein homologous to the N-terminal module of class A high-molecular-mass penicillin-binding proteins was identified in Ralstonia eutropha. By using specific antibodies, the corresponding Mgt protein was detected in association with the membrane, confirming that the N-terminal hydrophobic segment functioned as a membrane anchor. A derivative in which the hydrophobic sequence was deleted was overexpressed as a maltose-binding fusion protein in Escherichia coli. Cleavage of the product resulted in substantial amounts of soluble Mgt derivative, indicating that folding occurs independently on other proteins or on homologous domains of penicillin-binding proteins. PMID:9190828

  2. Mobilization of Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) in Ralstonia eutropha

    PubMed Central

    Handrick, René; Reinhardt, Simone; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2000-01-01

    Ralstonia eutropha H16 degraded (mobilized) previously accumulated poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) in the absence of an exogenous carbon source and used the degradation products for growth and survival. Isolated native PHB granules of mobilized R. eutropha cells released 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) at a threefold higher rate than did control granules of nonmobilized bacteria. No 3HB was released by native PHB granules of recombinant Escherichia coli expressing the PHB biosynthetic genes. Native PHB granules isolated from chromosomal knockout mutants of an intracellular PHB (i-PHB) depolymerase gene of R. eutropha H16 and HF210 showed a reduced but not completely eliminated activity of 3HB release and indicated the presence of i-PHB depolymerase isoenzymes. PMID:11004196

  3. Growth and polyhydroxybutyrate production by Ralstonia eutropha in emulsified plant oil medium.

    PubMed

    Budde, Charles F; Riedel, Sebastian L; Hübner, Florian; Risch, Stefan; Popović, Milan K; Rha, ChoKyun; Sinskey, Anthony J

    2011-03-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are natural polyesters synthesized by bacteria for carbon and energy storage that also have commercial potential as bioplastics. One promising class of carbon feedstocks for industrial PHA production is plant oils, due to the high carbon content of these compounds. The bacterium Ralstonia eutropha accumulates high levels of PHA and can effectively utilize plant oil. Growth experiments that include plant oil, however, are difficult to conduct in a quantitative and reproducible manner due to the heterogeneity of the two-phase medium. In order to overcome this obstacle, a new culture method was developed in which palm oil was emulsified in growth medium using the glycoprotein gum arabic as the emulsifying agent. Gum arabic did not influence R. eutropha growth and could not be used as a nutrient source by the bacteria. R. eutropha was grown in the emulsified oil medium and PHA production was measured over time. Additionally, an extraction method was developed to monitor oil consumption. The new method described in this study allows quantitative, reproducible R. eutropha experiments to be performed with plant oils. The method may also prove useful for studying growth of different bacteria on plant oils and other hydrophobic carbon sources. PMID:21279345

  4. Multiple beta-ketothiolases mediate poly(beta-hydroxyalkanoate) copolymer synthesis in Ralstonia eutropha.

    PubMed

    Slater, S; Houmiel, K L; Tran, M; Mitsky, T A; Taylor, N B; Padgette, S R; Gruys, K J

    1998-04-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are a class of carbon and energy storage polymers produced by numerous bacteria in response to environmental limitation. The type of polymer produced depends on the carbon sources available, the flexibility of the organism's intermediary metabolism, and the substrate specificity of the PHA biosynthetic enzymes. Ralstonia eutropha produces both the homopolymer poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and, when provided with the appropriate substrate, the copolymer poly(beta-hydroxybutyrate-co-beta-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV). A required step in production of the hydroxyvalerate moiety of PHBV is the condensation of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and propionyl-CoA to form beta-ketovaleryl-CoA. This activity has generally been attributed to the beta-ketothiolase encoded by R. eutropha phbA. However, we have determined that PhbA does not significantly contribute to catalyzing this condensation reaction. Here we report the cloning and genetic analysis of bktB, which encodes a beta-ketothiolase from R. eutropha that is capable of forming beta-ketovaleryl-CoA. Genetic analyses determined that BktB is the primary condensation enzyme leading to production of beta-hydroxyvalerate derived from propionyl-CoA. We also report an additional beta-ketothiolase, designated BktC, that probably serves as a secondary route toward beta-hydroxyvalerate production.

  5. Multiple β-Ketothiolases Mediate Poly(β-Hydroxyalkanoate) Copolymer Synthesis in Ralstonia eutropha

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Steven; Houmiel, Kathryn L.; Tran, Minhtien; Mitsky, Timothy A.; Taylor, Nancy B.; Padgette, Stephen R.; Gruys, Kenneth J.

    1998-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are a class of carbon and energy storage polymers produced by numerous bacteria in response to environmental limitation. The type of polymer produced depends on the carbon sources available, the flexibility of the organism’s intermediary metabolism, and the substrate specificity of the PHA biosynthetic enzymes. Ralstonia eutropha produces both the homopolymer poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and, when provided with the appropriate substrate, the copolymer poly(β-hydroxybutyrate-co-β-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV). A required step in production of the hydroxyvalerate moiety of PHBV is the condensation of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and propionyl-CoA to form β-ketovaleryl-CoA. This activity has generally been attributed to the β-ketothiolase encoded by R. eutropha phbA. However, we have determined that PhbA does not significantly contribute to catalyzing this condensation reaction. Here we report the cloning and genetic analysis of bktB, which encodes a β-ketothiolase from R. eutropha that is capable of forming β-ketovaleryl-CoA. Genetic analyses determined that BktB is the primary condensation enzyme leading to production of β-hydroxyvalerate derived from propionyl-CoA. We also report an additional β-ketothiolase, designated BktC, that probably serves as a secondary route toward β-hydroxyvalerate production. PMID:9555876

  6. Formaldehyde degradation by Ralstonia eutropha in an immobilized cell bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Alireza; Vahabzadeh, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    The formaldehyde (FA) degradation ability of the loofa-immobilized Ralstonia eutropha cells in a packed bed reactor was modeled using a statistically based design of the experiment (DOE) considering application of response surface methodology (RSM). The simultaneous effects of four operative test factors on the cells performance in terms of FA degradation rate and extent of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were monitored. The combination of factors at initial FA concentration of 629.7 mg L(-1)h(-1), recycling substrate flow rate of 4.4 mL min(-1), aeration rate of 1.05 vvm, and the system's temperature of 28.8°C resulted the optimal conditions for the FA biodegradation rate and COD removal efficiency. Loofa porous structure was found to be a protective environment for the cells in exposing to the toxic substances and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images revealed extensive cells penetration within this support. Oxygen transfer analysis in the form of evaluating K la value was also carried out and at the optimum conditions of the DOE was equaled to 9.96 h(-1)and oxygen uptake rate was 35.6 mg L(-1)h(-1).

  7. Metabolic engineering of Ralstonia eutropha for the biosynthesis of 2-hydroxyacid-containing polyhydroxyalkanoates.

    PubMed

    Park, Si Jae; Jang, Young-Ah; Lee, Hyuk; Park, A-Reum; Yang, Jung Eun; Shin, Jihoon; Oh, Young Hoon; Song, Bong Keun; Jegal, Jonggeon; Lee, Seung Hwan; Lee, Sang Yup

    2013-11-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are bio-based and biodegradable polyesters synthesized by numerous microorganisms. PHAs containing 2-hydroxyacids as monomer units have attracted much attention, but their production has not been efficient. Here, we metabolically engineered Ralstonia eutropha strains for the in vivo synthesis of PHAs containing 2-hydroxyacids as monomers. This was accomplished by replacing the R. eutropha phaC gene in the chromosome with either the R. eutropha phaC S506G A510K gene, which contains two point mutations, or the Pseudomonas sp. MBEL 6-19 phaC1437 gene. In addition, the R. eutropha phaAB genes in the chromosome were replaced with the Clostridium propionicum pct540 gene. All of the engineered R. eutropha strains produced PHAs containing 2-hydroxyacid monomers, including lactate and 2-hydroxybutyrate (2HB), along with 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) and/or 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV), when they were cultured in nitrogen-free medium containing 5 g/L lactate or 4 g/L 2HB and 20 g/L glucose as carbon sources. Expression of the Escherichia coli ldhA gene in engineered R. eutropha strains allowed production of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-lactate) [P(3HB-co-LA)] from glucose as the sole carbon source. This is the first report on the production of 2-hydroxyacid-containing PHAs by metabolically engineered R. eutropha.

  8. Functional Analysis by Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the NAD+-Reducing Hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha

    PubMed Central

    Burgdorf, Tanja; De Lacey, Antonio L.; Friedrich, Bärbel

    2002-01-01

    The tetrameric cytoplasmic [NiFe] hydrogenase (SH) of Ralstonia eutropha couples the oxidation of hydrogen to the reduction of NAD+ under aerobic conditions. In the catalytic subunit HoxH, all six conserved motifs surrounding the [NiFe] site are present. Five of these motifs were altered by site-directed mutagenesis in order to dissect the molecular mechanism of hydrogen activation. Based on phenotypic characterizations, 27 mutants were grouped into four different classes. Mutants of the major class, class I, failed to grow on hydrogen and were devoid of H2-oxidizing activity. In one of these isolates (HoxH I64A), H2 binding was impaired. Class II mutants revealed a high D2/H+ exchange rate relative to a low H2-oxidizing activity. A representative (HoxH H16L) displayed D2/H+ exchange but had lost electron acceptor-reducing activity. Both activities were equally affected in class III mutants. Mutants forming class IV showed a particularly interesting phenotype. They displayed O2-sensitive growth on hydrogen due to an O2-sensitive SH protein. PMID:12399498

  9. Genome sequence of the bioplastic-producing "Knallgas" bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Pohlmann, Anne; Fricke, Wolfgang Florian; Reinecke, Frank; Kusian, Bernhard; Liesegang, Heiko; Cramm, Rainer; Eitinger, Thomas; Ewering, Christian; Pötter, Markus; Schwartz, Edward; Strittmatter, Axel; Voss, Ingo; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Steinbüchel, Alexander; Friedrich, Bärbel; Bowien, Botho

    2006-10-01

    The H(2)-oxidizing lithoautotrophic bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 is a metabolically versatile organism capable of subsisting, in the absence of organic growth substrates, on H(2) and CO(2) as its sole sources of energy and carbon. R. eutropha H16 first attracted biotechnological interest nearly 50 years ago with the realization that the organism's ability to produce and store large amounts of poly[R-(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate] and other polyesters could be harnessed to make biodegradable plastics. Here we report the complete genome sequence of the two chromosomes of R. eutropha H16. Together, chromosome 1 (4,052,032 base pairs (bp)) and chromosome 2 (2,912,490 bp) encode 6,116 putative genes. Analysis of the genome sequence offers the genetic basis for exploiting the biotechnological potential of this organism and provides insights into its remarkable metabolic versatility.

  10. Metabolic engineering of Ralstonia eutropha for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates from sucrose.

    PubMed

    Park, Si Jae; Jang, Young-Ah; Noh, Won; Oh, Young Hoon; Lee, Hyuk; David, Yokimiko; Baylon, Mary Grace; Shin, Jihoon; Yang, Jung Eun; Choi, So Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-03-01

    A sucrose utilization pathway was established in Ralstonia eutropha NCIMB11599 and R. eutropha 437-540 by introducing the Mannheimia succiniciproducens MBEL55E sacC gene that encodes β-fructofuranosidase. These engineered strains were examined for the production of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)] and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-lactate) [P(3HB-co-LA)], respectively, from sucrose as a carbon source. It was found that β-fructofuranosidase excreted into the culture medium could hydrolyze sucrose to glucose and fructose, which were efficiently used as carbon sources by recombinant R. eutropha strains. When R. eutropha NCIMB11599 expressing the sacC gene was cultured in nitrogen-free chemically defined medium containing 20 g/L of sucrose, a high P(3HB) content of 73.2 wt% could be obtained. In addition, R. eutropha 437-540 expressing the Pseudomonas sp. MBEL 6-19 phaC1437 gene and the Clostridium propionicum pct540 gene accumulated P(3HB-co-21.5 mol% LA) to a polymer content of 19.5 wt% from sucrose by the expression of the sacC gene and the Escherichia coli ldhA gene. The molecular weights of P(3HB) and P(3HB-co-21.5 mol%LA) synthesized in R. eutropha using sucrose as a carbon source were 3.52 × 10(5) (Mn ) and 2.19 × 10(4) (Mn ), respectively. The engineered R. eutropha strains reported here will be useful for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) from sucrose, one of the most abundant and relatively inexpensive carbon sources.

  11. Studies on the production of branched-chain alcohols in engineered Ralstonia eutropha

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, JN; Brigham, CJ; Gai, CS; Sinskey, AJ

    2012-08-04

    Wild-type Ralstonia eutropha H16 produces polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) as an intracellular carbon storage material during nutrient stress in the presence of excess carbon. In this study, the excess carbon was redirected in engineered strains from PHB storage to the production of isobutanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol (branched-chain higher alcohols). These branched-chain higher alcohols can directly substitute for fossil-based fuels and be employed within the current infrastructure. Various mutant strains of R. eutropha with isobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase activity, in combination with the overexpression of plasmid-borne, native branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis pathway genes and the overexpression of heterologous ketoisovalerate decarboxylase gene, were employed for the biosynthesis of isobutanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol. Production of these branched-chain alcohols was initiated during nitrogen or phosphorus limitation in the engineered R. eutropha. One mutant strain not only produced over 180 mg/L branched-chain alcohols in flask culture, but also was significantly more tolerant of isobutanol toxicity than wild-type R. eutropha. After the elimination of genes encoding three potential carbon sinks (ilvE, bkdAB, and aceE), the production titer improved to 270 mg/L isobutanol and 40 mg/L 3-methyl-1-butanol. Semicontinuous flask cultivation was utilized to minimize the toxicity caused by isobutanol while supplying cells with sufficient nutrients. Under this semicontinuous flask cultivation, the R. eutropha mutant grew and produced more than 14 g/L branched-chain alcohols over the duration of 50 days. These results demonstrate that R. eutropha carbon flux can be redirected from PHB to branched-chain alcohols and that engineered R. eutropha can be cultivated over prolonged periods of time for product biosynthesis.

  12. Genomic Plasticity in Ralstonia eutropha and Ralstonia pickettii: Evidence for Rapid Genomic Change and Adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Terence L. MArsh

    2007-06-27

    The proposed foci of our investigations were on Ralstonia eutropha and Rasltonia pickettii. We have 18 derived lineages of the former as well as their progenitor and eleven isolates of the latter. Our goal was to measure the level of plasticity in these strains and attempt to derive a mechanistic understanding of how genomic plasticity formed. Extensive attempts to reproducibly induce conformational changes in the genome of R. eutropha were unsuccessful. We thought that we had a reasonable lead on this inasmuch as we had shown that the ancestral strain along with many of the derivative lineages exhibited “temperature induced mutation and mortality akin to R. metallodurans. However we were unable to get subtractive hybridization working to the degree that it revealed differences between the lineages. During this time the R. pickettii analysis was proving quite fruitful and so we concentrated our efforts on our analyses of R. pickettii. These strains were isolated from a copper-contaminated lake sediment and were resistant to copper at 800 µg/ml (CuSO4). Our results in the investigation of R. pickettii permitted a view into the adaptation of a beta-proteobacteria to an extreme environment. Our worked revealed that within the same ecosystem two genomovars with structurally different genomes and genome sizes were present and apparently filling similar if not identical niches. The genomovars were detected with REP & BOX-PCR, pulse field gel electrophoresis, and DNA:DNA hybridizations. Moreover there were different metal resistance patterns associated with the different genomovars, one showing resistance to Zn and Cd while the other had resistance to Ni. Five of the isolates had a high-copy number extrachromosomal element that was identified as the replicative form of a filamentous phage. Mature virions were isolated from culture broth using PEG precipitation and CsCl density centrifugation. The DNA associated with the filamentous particles was single stranded and had

  13. Versatile and stable vectors for efficient gene expression in Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Steffen; Hagen, Jeremias; Schwab, Helmut; Koefinger, Petra

    2014-09-30

    The Gram-negative β-proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 is primarily known for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production and its ability to grow chemolithoautotrophically by using CO2 and H2 as sole carbon and energy sources. The majority of metabolic engineering and heterologous expression studies conducted so far rely on a small number of suitable expression systems. Particularly the plasmid based expression systems already developed for the use in R. eutropha H16 suffer from high segregational instability and plasmid loss after a short time of fermentation. In order to develop efficient and highly stable plasmid expression vectors for the use in R. eutropha H16, a new plasmid design was created including the RP4 partitioning system, as well as various promoters and origins of replication. The application of minireplicons derived from broad-host-range plasmids RSF1010, pBBR1, RP4 and pSa for the construction of expression vectors and the use of numerous, versatile promoters extend the range of feasible expression levels considerably. In particular, the use of promoters derived from the bacteriophage T5 was described for the first time in this work, characterizing the j5 promoter as the strongest promoter yet to be applied in R. eutropha H16. Moreover, the implementation of the RP4 partition sequence in plasmid design increased plasmid stability significantly and enables fermentations with marginal plasmid loss of recombinant R. eutropha H16 for at least 96 h. The utility of the new vector family in R. eutropha H16 is demonstrated by providing expression data with different model proteins and consequently further raises the value of this organism as cell factory for biotechnological applications including protein and metabolite production.

  14. Reprint of "versatile and stable vectors for efficient gene expression in Ralstonia eutropha H16".

    PubMed

    Gruber, Steffen; Hagen, Jeremias; Schwab, Helmut; Koefinger, Petra

    2014-12-20

    The Gram-negative β-proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 is primarily known for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production and its ability to grow chemolithoautotrophically by using CO2 and H2 as sole carbon and energy sources. The majority of metabolic engineering and heterologous expression studies conducted so far rely on a small number of suitable expression systems. Particularly the plasmid based expression systems already developed for the use in R. eutropha H16 suffer from high segregational instability and plasmid loss after a short time of fermentation. In order to develop efficient and highly stable plasmid expression vectors for the use in R. eutropha H16, a new plasmid design was created including the RP4 partitioning system, as well as various promoters and origins of replication. The application of minireplicons derived from broad-host-range plasmids RSF1010, pBBR1, RP4 and pSa for the construction of expression vectors and the use of numerous, versatile promoters extend the range of feasible expression levels considerably. In particular, the use of promoters derived from the bacteriophage T5 was described for the first time in this work, characterizing the j5 promoter as the strongest promoter yet to be applied in R. eutropha H16. Moreover, the implementation of the RP4 partition sequence in plasmid design increased plasmid stability significantly and enables fermentations with marginal plasmid loss of recombinant R. eutropha H16 for at least 96h. The utility of the new vector family in R. eutropha H16 is demonstrated by providing expression data with different model proteins and consequently further raises the value of this organism as cell factory for biotechnological applications including protein and metabolite production.

  15. Engineering of Ralstonia eutropha H16 for Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Production of Methyl Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jana; MacEachran, Daniel; Burd, Helcio; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Bi, Changhao; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Lee, Taek Soon; Hillson, Nathan J.; Chhabra, Swapnil R.; Singer, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    Ralstonia eutropha is a facultatively chemolithoautotrophic bacterium able to grow with organic substrates or H2 and CO2 under aerobic conditions. Under conditions of nutrient imbalance, R. eutropha produces copious amounts of poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB). Its ability to utilize CO2 as a sole carbon source renders it an interesting new candidate host for the production of renewable liquid transportation fuels. We engineered R. eutropha for the production of fatty acid-derived, diesel-range methyl ketones. Modifications engineered in R. eutropha included overexpression of a cytoplasmic version of the TesA thioesterase, which led to a substantial (>150-fold) increase in fatty acid titer under certain conditions. In addition, deletion of two putative β-oxidation operons and heterologous expression of three genes (the acyl coenzyme A oxidase gene from Micrococcus luteus and fadB and fadM from Escherichia coli) led to the production of 50 to 65 mg/liter of diesel-range methyl ketones under heterotrophic growth conditions and 50 to 180 mg/liter under chemolithoautotrophic growth conditions (with CO2 and H2 as the sole carbon source and electron donor, respectively). Induction of the methyl ketone pathway diverted substantial carbon flux away from PHB biosynthesis and appeared to enhance carbon flux through the pathway for biosynthesis of fatty acids, which are the precursors of methyl ketones. PMID:23686271

  16. Cloning and Expression of a Ralstonia eutropha HF39 Gene Mediating Indigo Formation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Drewlo, Sascha; Brämer, Christian O.; Madkour, Mohamed; Mayer, Frank; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    On complex medium Escherichia coli strains carrying hybrid plasmid pBEC/EE:11.0, pSKBEC/BE:9.0, pSKBEC/PP:3.3, or pSKBEC/PP:2.4 harboring genomic DNA of Ralstonia eutropha HF39 produced a blue pigment characterized as indigo by several chemical and spectroscopic methods. A 1,251-bp open reading frame (bec) was cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of bec showed only weak similarities to short-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenases, and the gene product catalyzed formation of indoxyl, a reactive preliminary stage for production of indigo. PMID:11282658

  17. Development of a broad-host synthetic biology toolbox for ralstonia eutropha and its application to engineering hydrocarbon biofuel production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The chemoautotrophic bacterium Ralstonia eutropha can utilize H2/CO2 for growth under aerobic conditions. While this microbial host has great potential to be engineered to produce desired compounds (beyond polyhydroxybutyrate) directly from CO2, little work has been done to develop genetic part libraries to enable such endeavors. Results We report the development of a toolbox for the metabolic engineering of Ralstonia eutropha H16. We have constructed a set of broad-host-range plasmids bearing a variety of origins of replication, promoters, 5’ mRNA stem-loop structures, and ribosomal binding sites. Specifically, we analyzed the origins of replication pCM62 (IncP), pBBR1, pKT (IncQ), and their variants. We tested the promoters PBAD, T7, Pxyls/PM, PlacUV5, and variants thereof for inducible expression. We also evaluated a T7 mRNA stem-loop structure sequence and compared a set of ribosomal binding site (RBS) sequences derived from Escherichia coli, R. eutropha, and a computational RBS design tool. Finally, we employed the toolbox to optimize hydrocarbon production in R. eutropha and demonstrated a 6-fold titer improvement using the appropriate combination of parts. Conclusion We constructed and evaluated a versatile synthetic biology toolbox for Ralstonia eutropha metabolic engineering that could apply to other microbial hosts as well. PMID:24219429

  18. Production of Poly (3-Hydroxybutyric Acid) by Ralstonia eutropha in a Biocalorimeter and its Thermokinetic Studies.

    PubMed

    Anusha, Subramanian Mohanakrishnan; Leelaram, Santharam; Surianarayanan, Mahadevan

    2016-07-01

    Bioplastic production from microbial sources is an emerging area which provides opportunities even to convert the wastes into bioplastics. Poly (3-hydroxybutyric acid), commonly called as PHB, is a bioplastic, which is stored as intracellular cytoplasmic inclusions in microorganisms. The objectives of this study are to calorimetrically monitor the PHB production and evaluate the thermokinetic data in a bioreaction calorimeter (BioRC1e). Thus, a well-known PHB-producing bacteria Ralstonia eutropha was selected for batch process in a bioreaction calorimeter. The metabolic heat generated was found to be correlated with the biomass, substrate consumption, oxygen uptake rate (OUR), carbon dioxide evolution rate (CER) and PHB production. The OUR pattern explained the oxidative metabolism of the strain R. eutropha. The heat yields due to biomass and glucose consumption during PHB production were found to be 12.56 and 13.56 kJ/g, respectively. The oxycalorific value obtained for the PHB production was 443.80 kJ/mol of O2. The concentration of PHB obtained in BioRC1e was 4.33 g/L with a production rate of 0.09 g/L/h. The chemical structure of the extracted PHB by R. eutropha was confirmed using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis.

  19. Polyhydroxyalkanoates production with Ralstonia eutropha from low quality waste animal fats.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Sebastian L; Jahns, Stefan; Koenig, Steven; Bock, Martina C E; Brigham, Christopher J; Bader, Johannes; Stahl, Ulf

    2015-11-20

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable and biocompatible polyesters considered as alternatives to petroleum-based plastics. Ralstonia eutropha is a model organism for PHA production. Utilizing industrially rendered waste animal fats as inexpensive carbon feedstocks for PHA production is demonstrated here. An emulsification strategy, without any mechanical or chemical pre-treatment, was developed to increase the bioavailability of solid, poorly-consumable fats. Wild type R. eutropha strain H16 produced 79-82% (w/w) polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) per cell dry weight (CDW) when cultivated on various fats. A productivity of 0.3g PHB/(L × h) with a total PHB production of 24 g/L was achieved using tallow as carbon source. Using a recombinant strain of R. eutropha that produces poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyhexanoate) [P(HB-co-HHx)], 49-72% (w/w) of PHA per CDW with a HHx content of 16-27 mol% were produced in shaking flask experiments. The recombinant strain was grown on waste animal fat of the lowest quality available at lab fermenter scale, resulting in 45 g/L CDW with 60% (w/w) PHA per CDW and a productivity of 0.4 g PHA/(L × h). The final HHx content of the polymer was 19 mol%. The use of low quality waste animal fats as an inexpensive carbon feedstock exhibits a high potential to accelerate the commercialization of PHAs.

  20. Production of Poly (3-Hydroxybutyric Acid) by Ralstonia eutropha in a Biocalorimeter and its Thermokinetic Studies.

    PubMed

    Anusha, Subramanian Mohanakrishnan; Leelaram, Santharam; Surianarayanan, Mahadevan

    2016-07-01

    Bioplastic production from microbial sources is an emerging area which provides opportunities even to convert the wastes into bioplastics. Poly (3-hydroxybutyric acid), commonly called as PHB, is a bioplastic, which is stored as intracellular cytoplasmic inclusions in microorganisms. The objectives of this study are to calorimetrically monitor the PHB production and evaluate the thermokinetic data in a bioreaction calorimeter (BioRC1e). Thus, a well-known PHB-producing bacteria Ralstonia eutropha was selected for batch process in a bioreaction calorimeter. The metabolic heat generated was found to be correlated with the biomass, substrate consumption, oxygen uptake rate (OUR), carbon dioxide evolution rate (CER) and PHB production. The OUR pattern explained the oxidative metabolism of the strain R. eutropha. The heat yields due to biomass and glucose consumption during PHB production were found to be 12.56 and 13.56 kJ/g, respectively. The oxycalorific value obtained for the PHB production was 443.80 kJ/mol of O2. The concentration of PHB obtained in BioRC1e was 4.33 g/L with a production rate of 0.09 g/L/h. The chemical structure of the extracted PHB by R. eutropha was confirmed using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. PMID:27003281

  1. Polyhydroxyalkanoates production with Ralstonia eutropha from low quality waste animal fats.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Sebastian L; Jahns, Stefan; Koenig, Steven; Bock, Martina C E; Brigham, Christopher J; Bader, Johannes; Stahl, Ulf

    2015-11-20

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable and biocompatible polyesters considered as alternatives to petroleum-based plastics. Ralstonia eutropha is a model organism for PHA production. Utilizing industrially rendered waste animal fats as inexpensive carbon feedstocks for PHA production is demonstrated here. An emulsification strategy, without any mechanical or chemical pre-treatment, was developed to increase the bioavailability of solid, poorly-consumable fats. Wild type R. eutropha strain H16 produced 79-82% (w/w) polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) per cell dry weight (CDW) when cultivated on various fats. A productivity of 0.3g PHB/(L × h) with a total PHB production of 24 g/L was achieved using tallow as carbon source. Using a recombinant strain of R. eutropha that produces poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyhexanoate) [P(HB-co-HHx)], 49-72% (w/w) of PHA per CDW with a HHx content of 16-27 mol% were produced in shaking flask experiments. The recombinant strain was grown on waste animal fat of the lowest quality available at lab fermenter scale, resulting in 45 g/L CDW with 60% (w/w) PHA per CDW and a productivity of 0.4 g PHA/(L × h). The final HHx content of the polymer was 19 mol%. The use of low quality waste animal fats as an inexpensive carbon feedstock exhibits a high potential to accelerate the commercialization of PHAs. PMID:26428087

  2. Enhancement of glycerol utilization ability of Ralstonia eutropha H16 for production of polyhydroxyalkanoates.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Toshiaki; Mukoyama, Masaharu; Orita, Izumi; Nakamura, Satoshi

    2014-09-01

    Ralstonia eutropha H16 is a well-studied bacterium with respect to biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), which has attracted attentions as biodegradable bio-based plastics. However, this strain shows quite poor growth on glycerol of which bulk supply has been increasing as a major by-product of biodiesel industries. This study examined enhancement of glycerol assimilation ability of R. eutropha H16 by introduction of the genes of aquaglyceroporin (glpF) and glycerol kinase (glpK) from Escherichia coli. Although introduction of glpFK Ec into the strain H16 using a multi-copy vector was not successful, a recombinant strain possessing glpFK Ec within the chromosome showed much faster growth on glycerol than H16. Further analyses clarified that weak expression of glpK Ec alone allowed to establish efficient glycerol assimilation pathway, indicating that the poor growth of H16 on glycerol was caused by insufficient kination activity to glycerol, as well as this strain had a potential ability for uptake of extracellular glycerol. The engineered strains expressing glpFK Ec or glpK Ec produced large amounts of poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] [P(3HB)] from glycerol with much higher productivity than H16. Unlike other glycerol-utilizable wild strains of R. eutropha, the H16-derived engineered strains accumulated P(3HB) with no significant decrease in molecular weights on glycerol, and the polydispersity index of the glycerol-based P(3HB) synthesized by the strains expressing glpFK Ec was lower than those by the parent strains. The present study demonstrated possibility of R. eutropha H16-based platform for production of useful compounds from inexpensive glycerol.

  3. Large scale extraction of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) from Ralstonia eutropha H16 using sodium hypochlorite

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Isolation of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) from bacterial cell matter is a critical step in order to achieve a profitable production of the polymer. Therefore, an extraction method must lead to a high recovery of a pure product at low costs. This study presents a simplified method for large scale poly(3-hydroxybutyrate), poly(3HB), extraction using sodium hypochlorite. Poly(3HB) was extracted from cells of Ralstonia eutropha H16 at almost 96% purity. At different extraction volumes, a maximum recovery rate of 91.32% was obtained. At the largest extraction volume of 50 L, poly(3HB) with an average purity of 93.32% ± 4.62% was extracted with a maximum recovery of 87.03% of the initial poly(3HB) content. This process is easy to handle and requires less efforts than previously described processes. PMID:23164136

  4. Substrate and Cofactor Range Differences of Two Cysteine Dioxygenases from Ralstonia eutropha H16

    PubMed Central

    Wenning, Leonie; Stöveken, Nadine; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenases (Cdos), which catalyze the sulfoxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid (CSA), have been extensively studied in eukaryotes because of their roles in several diseases. In contrast, only a few prokaryotic enzymes of this type have been investigated. In Ralstonia eutropha H16, two Cdo homologues (CdoA and CdoB) have been identified previously. In vivo studies showed that Escherichia coli cells expressing CdoA could convert 3-mercaptopropionate (3MP) to 3-sulfinopropionate (3SP), whereas no 3SP could be detected in cells expressing CdoB. The objective of this study was to confirm these findings and to study both enzymes in detail by performing an in vitro characterization. The proteins were heterologously expressed and purified to apparent homogeneity by immobilized metal chelate affinity chromatography (IMAC). Subsequent analysis of the enzyme activities revealed striking differences with regard to their substrate ranges and their specificities for the transition metal cofactor, e.g., CdoA catalyzed the sulfoxidation of 3MP to a 3-fold-greater extent than the sulfoxidation of cysteine, whereas CdoB converted only cysteine. Moreover, the dependency of the activities of the Cdos from R. eutropha H16 on the metal cofactor in the active center could be demonstrated. The importance of CdoA for the metabolism of the sulfur compounds 3,3′-thiodipropionic acid (TDP) and 3,3′-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP) by further converting their degradation product, 3MP, was confirmed. Since 3MP can also function as a precursor for polythioester (PTE) synthesis in R. eutropha H16, deletion of cdoA might enable increased synthesis of PTEs. PMID:26590284

  5. Metabolic carbon fluxes and biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates in Ralstonia eutropha on short chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian; Si, Yingtao

    2004-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids such as acetic, propionic, and butyric acids can be synthesized into polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) by Ralstonia eutropha. Metabolic carbon fluxes of the acids in living cells have significant effect on the yield, composition, and thermomechanical properties of PHA bioplastics. Based on the general knowledge of central metabolism pathways and the unusual metabolic pathways in R. eutropha, a metabolic network of 41 bioreactions is constructed to analyze the carbon fluxes on utilization of the short chain fatty acids. In fed-batch cultures with constant feeding of acid media, carbon metabolism and distribution in R. eutropha were measured involving CO2, PHA biopolymers, and residual cell mass. As the cells underwent unsteady state metabolism and PHA biosynthesis under nitrogen-limited conditions, accumulative carbon balance was applied for pseudo-steady-state analysis of the metabolic carbon fluxes. Cofactor NADP/NADPH balanced between PHA synthesis and the C3/C4 pathway provided an independent constraint for solution of the underdetermined metabolic network. A major portion of propionyl-CoA was directed to pyruvate via the 2-methylcitrate cycle and further decarboxylated to acetyl-CoA. Only a small amount of propionate carbon (<15% carbon) was directly condensed with acetyl-CoA for 3-hydroxyvalerate. The ratio of glyoxylate shunt to TCA cycle varies from 0 to 0.25, depending on the intracellular acetyl-CoA level and acetic acid in the medium. Malate is the node of the C3/C4 pathway and TCA cycle and its decarboxylation to dehydrogenation ranges from 0.33 to 1.28 in response to the demands on NADPH and oxaloacetate for short chain fatty acids utilization. PMID:15296425

  6. Catalytic and Molecular Properties of the Quinohemoprotein Tetrahydrofurfuryl Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha Strain Bo

    PubMed Central

    Zarnt, Grit; Schräder, Thomas; Andreesen, Jan R.

    2001-01-01

    The quinohemoprotein tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol dehydrogenase (THFA-DH) from Ralstonia eutropha strain Bo was investigated for its catalytic properties. The apparent kcat/Km and Ki values for several substrates were determined using ferricyanide as an artificial electron acceptor. The highest catalytic efficiency was obtained with n-pentanol exhibiting a kcat/Km value of 788 × 104 M−1 s−1. The enzyme showed substrate inhibition kinetics for most of the alcohols and aldehydes investigated. A stereoselective oxidation of chiral alcohols with a varying enantiomeric preference was observed. Initial rate studies using ethanol and acetaldehyde as substrates revealed that a ping-pong mechanism can be assumed for in vitro catalysis of THFA-DH. The gene encoding THFA-DH from R. eutropha strain Bo (tfaA) has been cloned and sequenced. The derived amino acid sequence showed an identity of up to 67% to the sequence of various quinoprotein and quinohemoprotein dehydrogenases. A comparison of the deduced sequence with the N-terminal amino acid sequence previously determined by Edman degradation analysis suggested the presence of a signal sequence of 27 residues. The primary structure of TfaA indicated that the protein has a tertiary structure quite similar to those of other quinoprotein dehydrogenases. PMID:11222593

  7. Characterization of an extracellular lipase and its chaperone from Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingnan; Brigham, Christopher J; Rha, Chokyun; Sinskey, Anthony J

    2013-03-01

    Lipase enzymes catalyze the reversible hydrolysis of triacylglycerol to fatty acids and glycerol at the lipid-water interface. The metabolically versatile Ralstonia eutropha strain H16 is capable of utilizing various molecules containing long carbon chains such as plant oil, organic acids, or Tween as its sole carbon source for growth. Global gene expression analysis revealed an upregulation of two putative lipase genes during growth on trioleate. Through analysis of growth and activity using strains with gene deletions and complementations, the extracellular lipase (encoded by the lipA gene, locus tag H16_A1322) and lipase-specific chaperone (encoded by the lipB gene, locus tag H16_A1323) produced by R. eutropha H16 was identified. Increase in gene dosage of lipA not only resulted in an increase of the extracellular lipase activity, but also reduced the lag phase during growth on palm oil. LipA is a non-specific lipase that can completely hydrolyze triacylglycerol into its corresponding free fatty acids and glycerol. Although LipA is active over a temperature range from 10 °C to 70 °C, it exhibited optimal activity at 50 °C. While R. eutropha H16 prefers a growth pH of 6.8, its extracellular lipase LipA is most active between pH 7 and 8. Cofactors are not required for lipase activity; however, EDTA and EGTA inhibited LipA activity by 83 %. Metal ions Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Mn(2+) were found to stimulate LipA activity and relieve chelator inhibition. Certain detergents are found to improve solubility of the lipid substrate or increase lipase-lipid aggregation, as a result SDS and Triton X-100 were able to increase lipase activity by 20 % to 500 %. R. eutropha extracellular LipA activity can be hyper-increased, making the overexpression strain a potential candidate for commercial lipase production or in fermentations using plant oils as the sole carbon source.

  8. Characterization and modification of enzymes in the 2-ketoisovalerate biosynthesis pathway of Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingnan; Brigham, Christopher J; Plassmeier, Jens K; Sinskey, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    2-Ketoisovalerate is an important cellular intermediate for the synthesis of branched-chain amino acids as well as other important molecules, such as pantothenate, coenzyme A, and glucosinolate. This ketoacid can also serve as a precursor molecule for the production of biofuels, pharmaceutical agents, and flavor agents in engineered organisms, such as the betaproteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha. The biosynthesis of 2-ketoisovalerate from pyruvate is carried out by three enzymes: acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS, encoded by ilvBH), acetohydroxyacid isomeroreductase (AHAIR, encoded by ilvC), and dihydroxyacid dehydratase (DHAD, encoded by ilvD). In this study, enzymatic activities and kinetic parameters were determined for each of the three R. eutropha enzymes as heterologously purified proteins. AHAS, which serves as a gatekeeper for the biosynthesis of all three branched-chain amino acids, demonstrated the tightest regulation through feedback inhibition by L-valine (IC50=1.2 mM), L-isoleucine (IC50=2.3 mM), and L-leucine (IC50=5.4 mM). Intermediates in the valine biosynthesis pathway also exhibit feedback inhibitory control of the AHAS enzyme. In addition, AHAS has a very weak affinity for pyruvate (KM=10.5 μM) and is highly selective towards 2-ketobutyrate (R=140) as a second substrate. AHAIR and DHAD are also inhibited by the branched-chain amino acids, although to a lesser extent when compared to AHAS. Experimental evolution and rational site-directed mutagenesis revealed mutants of the regulatory subunit of AHAS (IlvH) (N11S, T34I, A36V, T104S, N11F, G14E, and N29H), which, when reconstituted with wild-type IlvB, lead to AHAS having reduced valine, leucine, and isoleucine sensitivity. The study of the kinetics and inhibition mechanisms of R. eutropha AHAS, AHAIR, and DHAD has shed light on interactions between these enzymes and the products they produce; it, therefore, can be used to engineer R. eutropha strains with optimal production of 2-ketoisovalerate for

  9. Characterization and modification of enzymes in the 2-ketoisovalerate biosynthesis pathway of Ralstonia eutropha H16

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, JN; Brigham, CJ; Plassmeier, JK; Sinskey, AJ

    2014-08-01

    2-Ketoisovalerate is an important cellular intermediate for the synthesis of branched-chain amino acids as well as other important molecules, such as pantothenate, coenzyme A, and glucosinolate. This ketoacid can also serve as a precursor molecule for the production of biofuels, pharmaceutical agents, and flavor agents in engineered organisms, such as the betaproteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha. The biosynthesis of 2-ketoisovalerate from pyruvate is carried out by three enzymes: acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS, encoded by ilvBH), acetohydroxyacid isomeroreductase (AHAIR, encoded by ilvC), and dihydroxyacid dehydratase (DHAD, encoded by ilvD). In this study, enzymatic activities and kinetic parameters were determined for each of the three R. eutropha enzymes as heterologously purified proteins. AHAS, which serves as a gatekeeper for the biosynthesis of all three branched-chain amino acids, demonstrated the tightest regulation through feedback inhibition by l-valine (IC50 = 1.2 mM), l-isoleucine (IC50 = 2.3 mM), and l-leucine (IC50 = 5.4 mM). Intermediates in the valine biosynthesis pathway also exhibit feedback inhibitory control of the AHAS enzyme. In addition, AHAS has a very weak affinity for pyruvate (K-M = 10.5 mu M) and is highly selective towards 2-ketobutyrate (R = 140) as a second substrate. AHAIR and DHAD are also inhibited by the branched-chain amino acids, although to a lesser extent when compared to AHAS. Experimental evolution and rational site-directed mutagenesis revealed mutants of the regulatory subunit of AHAS (IlvH) (N11S, T34I, A36V, T104S, N11F, G14E, and N29H), which, when reconstituted with wild-type IlvB, lead to AHAS having reduced valine, leucine, and isoleucine sensitivity. The study of the kinetics and inhibition mechanisms of R. eutropha AHAS, AHAIR, and DHAD has shed light on interactions between these enzymes and the products they produce; it, therefore, can be used to engineer R. eutropha strains with optimal production of 2

  10. NAD(P)-Dependent Aldehyde Dehydrogenases Induced during Growth of Ralstonia eutropha Strain Bo on Tetrahydrofurfuryl Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Schräder, Thomas; Zarnt, Grit; Andreesen, Jan R.

    2001-01-01

    Different aldehyde dehydrogenases (AlDHs) were formed during growth of Ralstonia eutropha Bo on tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). One of these enzymes, AlDH 4, was purified and characterized as a homodimer containing no prosthetic groups, showing a strong substrate inhibition, and having an N-terminal sequence similar to those of various NAD(P)-dependent AlDHs. The conversion rate of THFA by the quinohemoprotein THFA dehydrogenase was increased by AlDH 4. PMID:11717302

  11. Production of branched-chain alcohols by recombinant Ralstonia eutropha in fed-batch cultivation

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Q; Brigham, CJ; Lu, JN; Fu, RZ; Sinskey, AJ

    2013-09-01

    Branched-chain alcohols are considered promising green energy sources due to their compatibility with existing infrastructure and their high energy density. We utilized a strain of Ralstonia eutropha capable of producing branched-chain alcohols and examined its production in flask cultures. In order to increase isobutanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol (isoamyl alcohol) productivity in the engineered strain, batch, fed-batch, and two-stage fed-batch cultures were carried out in this work. The effects of nitrogen source concentration on branched-chain alcohol production were investigated under four different initial concentrations in fermenters. A maximum 380 g m(-3) of branched-chain alcohol production was observed with 2 kg m(-3) initial NH4Cl concentration in batch cultures. A pH-stat control strategy was utilized to investigate the optimum carbon source amount fed during fed-batch cultures for higher cell density. In cultures of R. eutropha strains that did not produce polyhydroxyalkanoate or branched-chain alcohols, a maximum cell dry weight of 36 kg m(-3) was observed using a fed-batch strategy, when 10 kg m(-3) carbon source was fed into culture medium. Finally, a total branched-chain alcohol titer of 790 g m(-3), the highest branched-chain alcohol yield of 0.03 g g(-1), and the maximum branched-chain alcohol productivity of 8.23 g m(-3) h(-1) were obtained from the engineered strain Re2410/pJL26 in a two-stage fed-batch culture system with pH-stat control. Isobutanol made up over 95% (mass fraction) of the total branched-chain alcohols titer produced in this study. (C) 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Phosphotransferase protein EIIANtr interacts with SpoT, a key enzyme of the stringent response, in Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Karstens, Katja; Zschiedrich, Christopher P; Bowien, Botho; Stülke, Jörg; Görke, Boris

    2014-04-01

    EIIA(Ntr) is a member of a truncated phosphotransferase (PTS) system that serves regulatory functions and exists in many Proteobacteria in addition to the sugar transport PTS. In Escherichia coli, EIIA(Ntr) regulates K(+) homeostasis through interaction with the K(+) transporter TrkA and sensor kinase KdpD. In the β-Proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16, EIIA(Ntr) influences formation of the industrially important bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB). PHB accumulation is controlled by the stringent response and induced under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. Knockout of EIIA(Ntr) increases the PHB content. In contrast, absence of enzyme I or HPr, which deliver phosphoryl groups to EIIA(Ntr), has the opposite effect. To clarify the role of EIIA(Ntr) in PHB formation, we screened for interacting proteins that co-purify with Strep-tagged EIIA(Ntr) from R. eutropha cells. This approach identified the bifunctional ppGpp synthase/hydrolase SpoT1, a key enzyme of the stringent response. Two-hybrid and far-Western analyses confirmed the interaction and indicated that only non-phosphorylated EIIA(Ntr) interacts with SpoT1. Interestingly, this interaction does not occur between the corresponding proteins of E. coli. Vice versa, interaction of EIIA(Ntr) with KdpD appears to be absent in R. eutropha, although R. eutropha EIIA(Ntr) can perfectly substitute its homologue in E. coli in regulation of KdpD activity. Thus, interaction with KdpD might be an evolutionary 'ancient' task of EIIA(Ntr) that was subsequently replaced by interaction with SpoT1 in R. eutropha. In conclusion, EIIA(Ntr) might integrate information about nutritional status, as reflected by its phosphorylation state, into the stringent response, thereby controlling cellular PHB content in R. eutropha. PMID:24515609

  13. Crystal structure of (R)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase PhaB from Ralstonia eutropha.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jieun; Chang, Jeong Ho; Kim, Eun-Jung; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2014-01-17

    (R)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase PhaB from Ralstonia eutropha H16 (RePhaB) is an enzyme that catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of acetoacetyl-CoA, an intermediate of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) synthetic pathways. Polymeric PHA is used to make bioplastics, implant biomaterials, and biofuels. Here, we report the crystal structures of RePhaB apoenzyme and in complex with either NADP(+) or acetoacetyl-CoA, which provide the catalytic mechanism of the protein. RePhaB contains a Rossmann fold and a Clamp domain for binding of NADP(+) and acetoacetyl-CoA, respectively. The NADP(+)-bound form of RePhaB structure reveals that the protein has a unique cofactor binding mode. Interestingly, in the RePhaB structure in complex with acetoacetyl-CoA, the conformation of the Clamp domain, especially the Clamp-lid, undergoes a large structural change about 4.6 Å leading to formation of the substrate pocket. These structural observations, along with the biochemical experiments, suggest that movement of the Clamp-lid enables the substrate binding and ensures the acetoacetyl moiety is located near to the nicotinamide ring of NADP(+). PMID:24211201

  14. Production and purification of a soluble hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha H16 for potential hydrogen fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Jugder, Bat-Erdene; Lebhar, Helene; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois; Marquis, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    The soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha H16 is a promising candidate enzyme for H2-based biofuel application as it favours H2 oxidation and is relatively oxygen-tolerant. In this report, bioprocess development studies undertaken to produce and purify an active SH are described, based on the methods previously reported [1], [2], [3], [4]. Our modifications are: •Upstream method optimizations were undertaken on heterotrophic growth media and cell lysis involving ultrasonication.•Two anion exchangers (Q Sepharose and RESOURCE Q) and size exclusion chromatographic (Superdex 200) matrices were successfully employed for purification of a hexameric SH from R. eutropha.•The H2 oxidizing activity of the SH was demonstrated spectrophotometrically in solution and also immobilized on an EPG electrode using cyclic voltammetry. PMID:27077052

  15. Production of fatty acids in Ralstonia eutropha H16 by engineering β-oxidation and carbon storage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Janice S.; Colón, Brendan; Dusel, Brendon; Ziesack, Marika; Torella, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia eutropha H16 is a facultatively autotrophic hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium capable of producing polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB)-based bioplastics. As PHB’s physical properties may be improved by incorporation of medium-chain-length fatty acids (MCFAs), and MCFAs are valuable on their own as fuel and chemical intermediates, we engineered R. eutropha for MCFA production. Expression of UcFatB2, a medium-chain-length-specific acyl-ACP thioesterase, resulted in production of 14 mg/L laurate in wild-type R. eutropha. Total fatty acid production (22 mg/L) could be increased up to 2.5-fold by knocking out PHB synthesis, a major sink for acetyl-CoA, or by knocking out the acyl-CoA ligase fadD3, an entry point for fatty acids into β-oxidation. As ΔfadD3 mutants still consumed laurate, and because the R. eutropha genome is predicted to encode over 50 acyl-CoA ligases, we employed RNA-Seq to identify acyl-CoA ligases upregulated during growth on laurate. Knockouts of the three most highly upregulated acyl-CoA ligases increased fatty acid yield significantly, with one strain (ΔA2794) producing up to 62 mg/L free fatty acid. This study demonstrates that homologous β-oxidation systems can be rationally engineered to enhance fatty acid production, a strategy that may be employed to increase yield for a range of fuels, chemicals, and PHB derivatives in R. eutropha. PMID:26664804

  16. Production of fatty acids in Ralstonia eutropha H16 by engineering β-oxidation and carbon storage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Janice S; Colón, Brendan; Dusel, Brendon; Ziesack, Marika; Way, Jeffrey C; Torella, Joseph P

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia eutropha H16 is a facultatively autotrophic hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium capable of producing polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB)-based bioplastics. As PHB's physical properties may be improved by incorporation of medium-chain-length fatty acids (MCFAs), and MCFAs are valuable on their own as fuel and chemical intermediates, we engineered R. eutropha for MCFA production. Expression of UcFatB2, a medium-chain-length-specific acyl-ACP thioesterase, resulted in production of 14 mg/L laurate in wild-type R. eutropha. Total fatty acid production (22 mg/L) could be increased up to 2.5-fold by knocking out PHB synthesis, a major sink for acetyl-CoA, or by knocking out the acyl-CoA ligase fadD3, an entry point for fatty acids into β-oxidation. As ΔfadD3 mutants still consumed laurate, and because the R. eutropha genome is predicted to encode over 50 acyl-CoA ligases, we employed RNA-Seq to identify acyl-CoA ligases upregulated during growth on laurate. Knockouts of the three most highly upregulated acyl-CoA ligases increased fatty acid yield significantly, with one strain (ΔA2794) producing up to 62 mg/L free fatty acid. This study demonstrates that homologous β-oxidation systems can be rationally engineered to enhance fatty acid production, a strategy that may be employed to increase yield for a range of fuels, chemicals, and PHB derivatives in R. eutropha. PMID:26664804

  17. Phasin proteins activate Aeromonas caviae polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase but not Ralstonia eutropha PHA synthase.

    PubMed

    Ushimaru, Kazunori; Motoda, Yoko; Numata, Keiji; Tsuge, Takeharu

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we performed in vitro and in vivo activity assays of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases (PhaCs) in the presence of phasin proteins (PhaPs), which revealed that PhaPs are activators of PhaC derived from Aeromonas caviae (PhaCAc). In in vitro assays, among the three PhaCs tested, PhaCAc was significantly activated when PhaPs were added at the beginning of polymerization (prepolymerization PhaCAc), whereas the prepolymerization PhaCRe (derived from Ralstonia eutropha) and PhaCDa (Delftia acidovorans) showed reduced activity with PhaPs. The PhaP-activated PhaCAc showed a slight shift of substrate preference toward 3-hydroxyhexanoyl-CoA (C6). PhaPAc also activated PhaCAc when it was added during polymerization (polymer-elongating PhaCAc), while this effect was not observed for PhaCRe. In an in vivo assay using Escherichia coli TOP10 as the host strain, the effect of PhaPAc expression on PHA synthesis by PhaCAc or PhaCRe was examined. As PhaPAc expression increased, PHA production was increased by up to 2.3-fold in the PhaCAc-expressing strain, whereas it was slightly increased in the PhaCRe-expressing strain. Taken together, this study provides evidence that PhaPs function as activators for PhaCAc both in vitro and in vivo but do not activate PhaCRe. This activating effect may be attributed to the new role of PhaPs in the polymerization reaction by PhaCAc.

  18. Regulation of the cnr Cobalt and Nickel Resistance Determinant of Ralstonia eutropha (Alcaligenes eutrophus) CH34

    PubMed Central

    Tibazarwa, C.; Wuertz, S.; Mergeay, M.; Wyns, L.; van der Lelie, D.

    2000-01-01

    The linked resistance to nickel and cobalt of Ralstonia eutropha-like strain CH34 (Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34) is encoded by the cnr operon, which is localized on the megaplasmid pMOL28. The regulatory genes cnrYXH have been cloned, overexpressed, and purified in Escherichia coli. CnrY fractionated as a 10.7-kDa protein in in vitro translation assays. CnrX, a periplasmic protein of 16.5 kDa, was overproduced and purified as a histidine-tagged fusion protein in E. coli. His-CnrX was found to posses a secondary structure content rich in alpha-helical and beta-sheet structures. CnrH, a sigma factor of the extracytoplasmic function family, was purified as an N-terminally histidine-tagged fusion. In gel shift mobility assays, His-CnrH, in the presence of E. coli core RNA polymerase enzyme, could retard at least two different promoter DNA targets, cnrYp and cnrHp, localized within the cnrYXH locus. These promoters and their transcription start sites were confirmed by primer extension. Purified His-CnrX did not inhibit the DNA-binding activity of His-CnrH and is therefore unlikely to be an anti-sigma factor, as previously hypothesized (EMBL M91650 description entry). To study the transcriptional response of the regulatory locus to metals and to probe promoter regions, transcriptional fusions were constructed between fragments of cnrYXH and the luxCDABE, luciferase reporter genes. Nickel and cobalt specifically induced the cnrYXH-luxCDABE fusion at optimal concentrations of 0.3 mM Ni2+ and 2.0 mM Co2+ in a noncomplexing medium for metals. The two promoter regions PY (upstream cnrY) and PH (upstream cnrH) were probed and characterized using this vector and were found to control the nickel-inducible regulatory response of the cnr operon. The cnrHp promoter was responsible for full transcription of the cnrCBA structural resistance genes, while the cnrYp promoter was necessary to obtain metal-inducible transcription from the cnrHp promoter. The zinc resistance phenotype (Zin

  19. Whole-cell kinetics of trichloroethylene degradation by phenol hydroxylase in a Ralstonia eutropha JMP134 derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Ayoubi, P.J.; Harker, A.R.

    1998-11-01

    The rate, progress, and limits of trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation by Ralstonia eutropha AEK301/pYK3021 whole cells were examined in the absence of aromatic induction. At TCE concentrations up to 800 {micro}M, degradation rates were sustained until TCE was no longer detectable. The K{sub s} and V{sub max} for TCE degradation by AEK301/pYK3021 whole cells were determined to be 630 {micro}M and 22.6 nmol/min/mg of total protein, respectively. The sustained linear rates of TCE degradation by AEK301/pYK3021 up to a concentration of 800 {micro}M TCE suggest that solvent effects are limited during the degradation of TCE and that this construct is little affected by the formation of toxic intermediates at the TCE levels and assay duration tested. TCE degradation by this strain is subject to carbon catabolite repression.

  20. Whole-cell kinetics of trichloroethylene degradation by phenol hydroxylase in a ralstonia eutropha JMP134 derivative

    PubMed

    Ayoubi; Harker

    1998-11-01

    The rate, progress, and limits of trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation by Ralstonia eutropha AEK301/pYK3021 whole cells were examined in the absence of aromatic induction. At TCE concentrations up to 800 &mgr;M, degradation rates were sustained until TCE was no longer detectable. The Ks and Vmax for TCE degradation by AEK301/pYK3021 whole cells were determined to be 630 &mgr;M and 22.6 nmol/min/mg of total protein, respectively. The sustained linear rates of TCE degradation by AEK301/pYK3021 up to a concentration of 800 &mgr;M TCE suggest that solvent effects are limited during the degradation of TCE and that this construct is little affected by the formation of toxic intermediates at the TCE levels and assay duration tested. TCE degradation by this strain is subject to carbon catabolite repression. PMID:9797289

  1. Whole-Cell Kinetics of Trichloroethylene Degradation by Phenol Hydroxylase in a Ralstonia eutropha JMP134 Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Ayoubi, Patricia J.; Harker, Alan R.

    1998-01-01

    The rate, progress, and limits of trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation by Ralstonia eutropha AEK301/pYK3021 whole cells were examined in the absence of aromatic induction. At TCE concentrations up to 800 μM, degradation rates were sustained until TCE was no longer detectable. The Ks and Vmax for TCE degradation by AEK301/pYK3021 whole cells were determined to be 630 μM and 22.6 nmol/min/mg of total protein, respectively. The sustained linear rates of TCE degradation by AEK301/pYK3021 up to a concentration of 800 μM TCE suggest that solvent effects are limited during the degradation of TCE and that this construct is little affected by the formation of toxic intermediates at the TCE levels and assay duration tested. TCE degradation by this strain is subject to carbon catabolite repression. PMID:9797289

  2. Liquid Fuel From Bacteria: Engineering Ralstonia eutropha for Production of Isobutanol (IBT) Motor Fuel from CO2, Hydrogen, and Oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-15

    Electrofuels Project: MIT is using solar-derived hydrogen and common soil bacteria called Ralstonia eutropha to turn carbon dioxide (CO2) directly into biofuel. This bacteria already has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. MIT is engineering the bacteria to use hydrogen to convert CO2 directly into liquid transportation fuels. Hydrogen is a flammable gas, so the MIT team is building an innovative reactor system that will safely house the bacteria and gas mixture during the fuel-creation process. The system will pump in precise mixtures of hydrogen, oxygen, and CO2, and the online fuel-recovery system will continuously capture and remove the biofuel product.

  3. Enhanced Oxygen-Tolerance of the Full Heterotrimeric Membrane-Bound [NiFe]-Hydrogenase of Ralstonia eutropha

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogenases are oxygen-sensitive enzymes that catalyze the conversion between protons and hydrogen. Water-soluble subcomplexes of membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenases (MBH) have been extensively studied for applications in hydrogen–oxygen fuel cells as they are relatively tolerant to oxygen, although even these catalysts are still inactivated in oxidative conditions. Here, the full heterotrimeric MBH of Ralstonia eutropha, including the membrane-integral cytochrome b subunit, was investigated electrochemically using electrodes modified with planar tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLM). Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry experiments show that MBH, in equilibrium with the quinone pool in the tBLM, does not anaerobically inactivate under oxidative redox conditions. In aerobic environments, the MBH is reversibly inactivated by O2, but reactivation was found to be fast even under oxidative redox conditions. This enhanced resistance to inactivation is ascribed to the oligomeric state of MBH in the lipid membrane. PMID:24866391

  4. Genome-Based Analysis and Gene Dosage Studies Provide New Insight into 3-Hydroxy-4-Methylvalerate Biosynthesis in Ralstonia eutropha

    PubMed Central

    Ushimaru, Kazunori; Mizuno, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant Ralstonia eutropha strain PHB−4 expressing the broad-substrate-specificity polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase 1 from Pseudomonas sp. strain 61-3 (PhaC1Ps) synthesizes a PHA copolymer containing the branched side-chain unit 3-hydroxy-4-methylvalerate (3H4MV), which has a carbon backbone identical to that of leucine. Mutant strain 1F2 was derived from R. eutropha strain PHB−4 by chemical mutagenesis and shows higher levels of 3H4MV production than does the parent strain. In this study, to understand the mechanisms underlying the enhanced production of 3H4MV, whole-genome sequencing of strain 1F2 was performed, and the draft genome sequence was compared to that of parent strain PHB−4. This analysis uncovered four point mutations in the 1F2 genome. One point mutation was found in the ilvH gene at amino acid position 36 (A36T) of IlvH. ilvH encodes a subunit protein that regulates acetohydroxy acid synthase III (AHAS III). AHAS catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to 2-acetolactate, which is the first reaction in the biosynthesis of branched amino acids such as leucine and valine. Thus, the A36T IlvH mutation may show AHAS tolerance to feedback inhibition by branched amino acids, thereby increasing carbon flux toward branched amino acid and 3H4MV biosynthesis. Furthermore, a gene dosage study and an isotope tracer study were conducted to investigate the 3H4MV biosynthesis pathway. Based on the observations in these studies, we propose a 3H4MV biosynthesis pathway in R. eutropha that involves a condensation reaction between isobutyryl coenzyme A (isobutyryl-CoA) and acetyl-CoA to form the 3H4MV carbon backbone. PMID:25645560

  5. Production of Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate-co-3-Hydroxyhexanoate) from Plant Oil by Engineered Ralstonia eutropha Strains▿†

    PubMed Central

    Budde, Charles F.; Riedel, Sebastian L.; Willis, Laura B.; Rha, ChoKyun; Sinskey, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    The polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) copolymer poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) [P(HB-co-HHx)] has been shown to have potential to serve as a commercial bioplastic. Synthesis of P(HB-co-HHx) from plant oil has been demonstrated with recombinant Ralstonia eutropha strains expressing heterologous PHA synthases capable of incorporating HB and HHx into the polymer. With these strains, however, short-chain-length fatty acids had to be included in the medium to generate PHA with high HHx content. Our group has engineered two R. eutropha strains that accumulate high levels of P(HB-co-HHx) with significant HHx content directly from palm oil, one of the world's most abundant plant oils. The strains express a newly characterized PHA synthase gene from the bacterium Rhodococcus aetherivorans I24. Expression of an enoyl coenzyme A (enoyl-CoA) hydratase gene (phaJ) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was shown to increase PHA accumulation. Furthermore, varying the activity of acetoacetyl-CoA reductase (encoded by phaB) altered the level of HHx in the polymer. The strains with the highest PHA titers utilized plasmids for recombinant gene expression, so an R. eutropha plasmid stability system was developed. In this system, the essential pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase gene proC was deleted from strain genomes and expressed from a plasmid, making the plasmid necessary for growth in minimal media. This study resulted in two engineered strains for production of P(HB-co-HHx) from palm oil. In palm oil fermentations, one strain accumulated 71% of its cell dry weight as PHA with 17 mol% HHx, while the other strain accumulated 66% of its cell dry weight as PHA with 30 mol% HHx. PMID:21398488

  6. Impact of Ralstonia eutropha's Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) Depolymerases and Phasins on PHB Storage in Recombinant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Eggers, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    The model organism for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) biosynthesis, Ralstonia eutropha H16, possesses multiple isoenzymes of granules coating phasins as well as of PHB depolymerases, which degrade accumulated PHB under conditions of carbon limitation. In this study, recombinant Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains were used to study the impact of selected PHB depolymerases of R. eutropha H16 on the growth behavior and on the amount of accumulated PHB in the absence or presence of phasins. For this purpose, 20 recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3) strains were constructed, which harbored a plasmid carrying the phaCAB operon from R. eutropha H16 to ensure PHB synthesis and a second plasmid carrying different combinations of the genes encoding a phasin and a PHB depolymerase from R. eutropha H16. It is shown in this study that the growth behavior of the respective recombinant E. coli strains was barely affected by the overexpression of the phasin and PHB depolymerase genes. However, the impact on the PHB contents was significantly greater. The strains expressing the genes of the PHB depolymerases PhaZ1, PhaZ2, PhaZ3, and PhaZ7 showed 35% to 94% lower PHB contents after 30 h of cultivation than the control strain. The strain harboring phaZ7 reached by far the lowest content of accumulated PHB (only 2.0% [wt/wt] PHB of cell dry weight). Furthermore, coexpression of phasins in addition to the PHB depolymerases influenced the amount of PHB stored in cells of the respective strains. It was shown that the phasins PhaP1, PhaP2, and PhaP4 are not substitutable without an impact on the amount of stored PHB. In particular, the phasins PhaP2 and PhaP4 seemed to limit the degradation of PHB by the PHB depolymerases PhaZ2, PhaZ3, and PhaZ7, whereas almost no influence of the different phasins was observed if phaZ1 was coexpressed. This study represents an extensive analysis of the impact of PHB depolymerases and phasins on PHB accumulation and provides a deeper insight into the complex interplay

  7. Impact of Ralstonia eutropha's poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) Depolymerases and Phasins on PHB storage in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Jessica; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    The model organism for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) biosynthesis, Ralstonia eutropha H16, possesses multiple isoenzymes of granules coating phasins as well as of PHB depolymerases, which degrade accumulated PHB under conditions of carbon limitation. In this study, recombinant Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains were used to study the impact of selected PHB depolymerases of R. eutropha H16 on the growth behavior and on the amount of accumulated PHB in the absence or presence of phasins. For this purpose, 20 recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3) strains were constructed, which harbored a plasmid carrying the phaCAB operon from R. eutropha H16 to ensure PHB synthesis and a second plasmid carrying different combinations of the genes encoding a phasin and a PHB depolymerase from R. eutropha H16. It is shown in this study that the growth behavior of the respective recombinant E. coli strains was barely affected by the overexpression of the phasin and PHB depolymerase genes. However, the impact on the PHB contents was significantly greater. The strains expressing the genes of the PHB depolymerases PhaZ1, PhaZ2, PhaZ3, and PhaZ7 showed 35% to 94% lower PHB contents after 30 h of cultivation than the control strain. The strain harboring phaZ7 reached by far the lowest content of accumulated PHB (only 2.0% [wt/wt] PHB of cell dry weight). Furthermore, coexpression of phasins in addition to the PHB depolymerases influenced the amount of PHB stored in cells of the respective strains. It was shown that the phasins PhaP1, PhaP2, and PhaP4 are not substitutable without an impact on the amount of stored PHB. In particular, the phasins PhaP2 and PhaP4 seemed to limit the degradation of PHB by the PHB depolymerases PhaZ2, PhaZ3, and PhaZ7, whereas almost no influence of the different phasins was observed if phaZ1 was coexpressed. This study represents an extensive analysis of the impact of PHB depolymerases and phasins on PHB accumulation and provides a deeper insight into the complex interplay

  8. Degradation of formaldehyde at high concentrations by phenol-adapted Ralstonia eutropha closely related to pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophs.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Alireza; Vahabzadeh, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    The ability of the phenol-adapted Ralstonia eutropha to utilize formaldehyde (FD) as the sole source of carbon and energy was studied. Adaptation to FD was accomplished by substituting FD for glucose in a stepwise manner. The bacterium in the liquid test culture could tolerate concentrations of FD up to 900 mg L(-1). Degradation of FD was complete in 528 h at 30°C with shaking at 150 rpm (r = 1.67 mg L(-1) h(-1)), q = 0.035 g(FD) g(cell) (-1) h(-1). Substrate inhibition kinetics (Haldane and Luong equations) are used to describe the experimental data. At non-inhibitory concentrations of FD, the Monod equation was used. According to the Luong model, the values of the maximum specific growth rate (μ(max)), half-saturation coefficient (k(S)), the maximum allowable formaldehyde concentration (S(m)), and the shape factor (n) were 0.117 h(-1), 47.6 mg L(-1), 900 mg L(-1), and 2.2, respectively. The growth response of the test bacterium to consecutive FD feedings was examined, and the FD-adapted R. eutropha cells were able to degrade 1000 mg L(-1) FD in 150 h through 4 cycles of FD feeds. During FD degradation, formic acid metabolite was formed. Assimilation of FD, methanol, formic acid, and oxalate by the test bacterium was accompanied by the formation of a pink pigment. The carotenoid nature of the cellular pigment has been confirmed and the test bacterium appeared to be closely related to pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophs (PPFM). The extent of harm to soil exposed to biotreated wastewaters containing FD may be moderated due to the association between methylotrophic/oxalotrophic bacteria and plants.

  9. Engineering Ralstonia eutropha for Production of Isobutanol (IBT) Motor Fuel from Carbon Dioxide, Hydrogen, and Oxygen Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sinskey, Anthony J.; Worden, Robert Mark; Brigham, Christopher; Lu, Jingnan; Quimby, John Westlake; Gai, Claudia; Speth, Daan; Elliott, Sean; Fei, John Qiang; Bernardi, Amanda; Li, Sophia; Grunwald, Stephan; Grousseau, Estelle; Maiti, Soumen; Liu, Chole

    2013-12-16

    This research project is a collaboration between the Sinskey laboratory at MIT and the Worden laboratory at Michigan State University. The goal of the project is to produce Isobutanol (IBT), a branched-chain alcohol that can serve as a drop-in transportation fuel, through the engineered microbial biosynthesis of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrogen, and Oxygen using a novel bioreactor. This final technical report presents the findings of both the biological engineering work at MIT that extended the native branched-chain amino acid pathway of the wild type Ralstonia eutropha H16 to perform this biosynthesis, as well as the unique design, modeling, and construction of a bioreactor for incompatible gasses at Michigan State that enabled the operational testing of the complete system. This 105 page technical report summarizing the three years of research includes 72 figures and 11 tables of findings. Ralstonia eutropha (also known as Cupriavidus necator) is a Gram-negative, facultatively chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. It has been the principle organism used for the study of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) polymer biosynthesis. The wild-type Ralstonia eutropha H16 produces PHB as an intracellular carbon storage material while under nutrient stress in the presence of excess carbon. Under this stress, it can accumulate approximately 80 % of its cell dry weight (CDW) as this intracellular polymer. With the restoration of the required nutrients, the cells are then able to catabolize this polymer. If extracted from the cell, this PHB polymer can be processed into biodegradable and biocompatible plastics, however for this research, it is the efficient metabolic pathway channeling the captured carbon that is of interest. R. eutropha is further unique in that it contains two carbon-fixation Calvin–Benson–Bassham cycle operons, two oxygen-tolerant hydrogenases, and several formate dehydrogenases. It has also been much studied for its ability in the presence of oxygen, to fix carbon dioxide

  10. Crystal structure and biochemical characterization of beta-keto thiolase B from polyhydroxyalkanoate-producing bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-Jung; Son, Hyeoncheol Francis; Kim, Sangwoo; Ahn, Jae-Woo; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • We determined a crystal structure of β-keto thiolase from Ralstonia eutropha H16 (ReBktB). • Distinct substrate binding mode ReBktB was elucidated. • Enzymatic kinetic parameters of ReBktB were revealed. - Abstract: ReBktB is a β-keto thiolase from Ralstonia eutropha H16 that catalyzes condensation reactions between acetyl-CoA with acyl-CoA molecules that contains different numbers of carbon atoms, such as acetyl-CoA, propionyl-CoA, and butyryl-CoA, to produce valuable bioproducts, such as polyhydroxybutyrate, polyhydroxybutyrate-hydroxyvalerate, and hexanoate. We solved a crystal structure of ReBktB at 2.3 Å, and the overall structure has a similar fold to that of type II biosynthetic thiolases, such as PhbA from Zoogloea ramigera (ZrPhbA). The superposition of this structure with that of ZrPhbA complexed with CoA revealed the residues that comprise the catalytic and substrate binding sites of ReBktB. The catalytic site of ReBktB contains three conserved residues, Cys90, His350, and Cys380, which may function as a covalent nucleophile, a general base, and second nucleophile, respectively. For substrate binding, ReBktB stabilized the ADP moiety of CoA in a distinct way compared to ZrPhbA with His219, Arg221, and Asp228 residues, whereas the stabilization of β-mercaptoethyamine and pantothenic acid moieties of CoA was quite similar between these two enzymes. Kinetic study of ReBktB revealed that K{sub m}, V{sub max}, and K{sub cat} values of 11.58 μM, 1.5 μmol/min, and 102.18 s{sup −1}, respectively, and the catalytic and substrate binding sites of ReBktB were further confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis experiments.

  11. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis of β-ketothiolase B from Ralstonia eutropha H16

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Jung; Son, Hyeoncheol Francis; Chang, Jeong Ho; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates are linear polyesters that are produced by bacterial fermentation and are used as biodegradable bioplastics. β-Ketothiolase B (BktB) from Ralstonia eutropha (ReBktB) is a key enzyme for the production of various types of copolymers by catalyzing the condensation reactions of acetyl-CoA with propionyl-CoA and butyryl-CoA. The ReBktB protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of 25% polyethylene glycol 3350, 0.1 M bis-tris pH 6.5, 0.2 M lithium sulfate at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 2.3 Å on a synchrotron beamline. The crystal belonged to space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 106.95, b = 107.24, c = 144.14 Å. With two molecules per asymmetric unit, the crystal volume per unit protein weight (V M) is 2.54 Å3 Da−1, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 51.5%. The structure was solved by the molecular-replacement method and refinement of the structure is in progress. PMID:24598917

  12. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis of β-ketothiolase B from Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Jung; Son, Hyeoncheol Francis; Chang, Jeong Ho; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2014-03-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates are linear polyesters that are produced by bacterial fermentation and are used as biodegradable bioplastics. β-Ketothiolase B (BktB) from Ralstonia eutropha (ReBktB) is a key enzyme for the production of various types of copolymers by catalyzing the condensation reactions of acetyl-CoA with propionyl-CoA and butyryl-CoA. The ReBktB protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of 25% polyethylene glycol 3350, 0.1 M bis-tris pH 6.5, 0.2 M lithium sulfate at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 2.3 Å on a synchrotron beamline. The crystal belonged to space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 106.95, b = 107.24, c = 144.14 Å. With two molecules per asymmetric unit, the crystal volume per unit protein weight (VM) is 2.54 Å(3) Da(-1), which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 51.5%. The structure was solved by the molecular-replacement method and refinement of the structure is in progress. PMID:24598917

  13. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis of PhaA from Ralstonia eutropha.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Jung; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2014-11-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a biopolymer that is in the spotlight because of its broad applications in bioplastics, fine chemicals, implant biomaterials and biofuels. PhaA from Ralstonia eutropha (RePhaA) is the first enzyme in the PHB biosynthetic pathway and catalyzes the condensation reaction of two acetyl-CoA molecules to give acetoacetyl-CoA. RePhaA was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of 20% polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether 2K, 0.1 M Tris-HCl pH 8.5 and 0.2 M trimethylamine N-oxide dihydrate at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 1.96 Å on a synchrotron beamline. The crystal belonged to space group P2₁, with unit-cell parameters a=68.38, b=105.47, c=106.91 Å, α=γ=90, β=106.18°. With four subunits per asymmetric unit, the crystal volume per unit protein weight (VM) is 2.3 Å3 Da(-1), which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 46.2%. The structure was solved by the molecular-replacement method and refinement of the structure is in progress. PMID:25372833

  14. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis of PhaA from Ralstonia eutropha

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Jung; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a biopolymer that is in the spotlight because of its broad applications in bioplastics, fine chemicals, implant biomaterials and biofuels. PhaA from Ralstonia eutropha (RePhaA) is the first enzyme in the PHB biosynthetic pathway and catalyzes the condensation reaction of two acetyl-CoA molecules to give acetoacetyl-CoA. RePhaA was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of 20% polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether 2K, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.5 and 0.2 M trimethylamine N-oxide dihydrate at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 1.96 Å on a synchrotron beamline. The crystal belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.38, b = 105.47, c = 106.91 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 106.18°. With four subunits per asymmetric unit, the crystal volume per unit protein weight (V M) is 2.3 Å3 Da−1, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 46.2%. The structure was solved by the molecular-replacement method and refinement of the structure is in progress. PMID:25372833

  15. Spectroscopic and Kinetic Properties of the Molybdenum-containing, NAD+-dependent Formate Dehydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha.

    PubMed

    Niks, Dimitri; Duvvuru, Jayant; Escalona, Miguel; Hille, Russ

    2016-01-15

    We have examined the rapid reaction kinetics and spectroscopic properties of the molybdenum-containing, NAD(+)-dependent FdsABG formate dehydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha. We confirm previous steady-state studies of the enzyme and extend its characterization to a rapid kinetic study of the reductive half-reaction (the reaction of formate with oxidized enzyme). We have also characterized the electron paramagnetic resonance signal of the molybdenum center in its Mo(V) state and demonstrated the direct transfer of the substrate Cα hydrogen to the molybdenum center in the course of the reaction. Varying temperature, microwave power, and level of enzyme reduction, we are able to clearly identify the electron paramagnetic resonance signals for four of the iron/sulfur clusters of the enzyme and find suggestive evidence for two others; we observe a magnetic interaction between the molybdenum center and one of the iron/sulfur centers, permitting assignment of this signal to a specific iron/sulfur cluster in the enzyme. In light of recent advances in our understanding of the structure of the molybdenum center, we propose a reaction mechanism involving direct hydride transfer from formate to a molybdenum-sulfur group of the molybdenum center.

  16. Expression and activity of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle transcriptional regulator CbbR from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans in Ralstonia eutropha.

    PubMed

    Esparza, Mario; Jedlicki, Eugenia; Dopson, Mark; Holmes, David S

    2015-08-01

    Autotrophic fixation of carbon dioxide into cellular carbon occurs via several pathways but quantitatively, the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle is the most important. CbbR regulates the expression of the cbb genes involved in CO2 fixation via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle in a number of autotrophic bacteria. A gene potentially encoding CbbR (cbbR(AF)) has been predicted in the genome of the chemolithoautotrophic, extreme acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. However, this microorganism is recalcitrant to genetic manipulation impeding the experimental validation of bioinformatic predictions. Two novel functional assays were devised to advance our understanding of cbbR(AF) function using the mutated facultative autotroph Ralstonia eutropha H14 ΔcbbR as a surrogate host to test gene function: (i) cbbR(AF) was expressed in R. eutropha and was able to complement ΔcbbR; and (ii) CbbR(AF) was able to regulate the in vivo activity of four A. ferrooxidans cbb operon promoters in R. eutropha. These results open up the use of R. eutropha as a surrogate host to explore cbbR(AF) activity.

  17. A Closer Look on the Polyhydroxybutyrate- (PHB-) Negative Phenotype of Ralstonia eutropha PHB-4

    PubMed Central

    Raberg, Matthias; Voigt, Birgit; Hecker, Michael; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The undefined poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)- (PHB-) negative mutant R. eutropha PHB-4 was generated in 1970 by 1-nitroso-3-nitro-1-methylguanidine (NMG) treatment. Although being scientific relevant, its genotype remained unknown since its isolation except a recent first investigation. In this study, the mutation causing the PHA-negative phenotype of R. eutropha PHB-4 was confirmed independently: sequence analysis of the phaCAB operon identified a G320A mutation in phaC yielding a stop codon, leading to a massively truncated PhaC protein of 106 amino acids (AS) in R. eutropha PHB-4 instead of 589 AS in the wild type. No other mutations were observed within the phaCAB operon. As further mutations probably occurred in the genome of mutant PHB-4 potentially causing secondary effects on the cells' metabolism, the main focus of the study was to perform a 2D PAGE-based proteome analysis in order to identify differences in the proteomes of the wild type and mutant PHB-4. A total of 20 differentially expressed proteins were identified which provide valuable insights in the metabolomic changes of mutant PHB-4. Besides excretion of pyruvate, mutant PHB-4 encounters the accumulation of intermediates such as pyruvate and acetyl-CoA by enhanced expression of the observed protein species: (i) ThiJ supports biosynthesis of cofactor TPP and thereby reinforces the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes as PDHC, ADHC and OGDHC in order to convert pyruvate at a higher rate and the (ii) 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase LeuB3 apparently directs pyruvate to synthesis of several amino acids. Different (iii) acylCoA-transferases enable transfer reactions between organic acid intermediates, and (iv) citrate lyase CitE4 regenerates oxaloacetate from citrate for conversion with acetyl-CoA in the TCC in an anaplerotic reaction. Substantial amounts of reduction equivalents generated in the TCC are countered by (v) synthesis of more ubiquinones due to enhanced synthesis of MenG2 and MenG3, thereby

  18. Genome-scale reconstruction and in silico analysis of the Ralstonia eutropha H16 for polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis, lithoautotrophic growth, and 2-methyl citric acid production

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ralstonia eutropha H16, found in both soil and water, is a Gram-negative lithoautotrophic bacterium that can utillize CO2 and H2 as its sources of carbon and energy in the absence of organic substrates. R. eutropha H16 can reach high cell densities either under lithoautotrophic or heterotrophic conditions, which makes it suitable for a number of biotechnological applications. It is the best known and most promising producer of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) from various carbon substrates and is an environmentally important bacterium that can degrade aromatic compounds. In order to make R. eutropha H16 a more efficient and robust biofactory, system-wide metabolic engineering to improve its metabolic performance is essential. Thus, it is necessary to analyze its metabolic characteristics systematically and optimize the entire metabolic network at systems level. Results We present the lithoautotrophic genome-scale metabolic model of R. eutropha H16 based on the annotated genome with biochemical and physiological information. The stoichiometic model, RehMBEL1391, is composed of 1391 reactions including 229 transport reactions and 1171 metabolites. Constraints-based flux analyses were performed to refine and validate the genome-scale metabolic model under environmental and genetic perturbations. First, the lithoautotrophic growth characteristics of R. eutropha H16 were investigated under varying feeding ratios of gas mixture. Second, the genome-scale metabolic model was used to design the strategies for the production of poly[R-(-)-3hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) under different pH values and carbon/nitrogen source uptake ratios. It was also used to analyze the metabolic characteristics of R. eutropha when the phosphofructokinase gene was expressed. Finally, in silico gene knockout simulations were performed to identify targets for metabolic engineering essential for the production of 2-methylcitric acid in R. eutropha H16. Conclusion The genome-scale metabolic model

  19. Stable Carbon Isotope Discrimination by Form IC Rubisco Enzymes of the Extremely Metabolically Versatile Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Ralstonia eutropha}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P. J.; Boller, A. J.; Zhao, Z.; Tabita, F. R.; Cavanaugh, C. M.; Scott, K. M.

    2006-12-01

    Variations in the relative amounts of 12C and 13C in microbial biomass can be used to infer the pathway(s) autotrophs use to fix and assimilate dissolved inorganic carbon. Discrimination against 13C by the enzymes catalyzing autotrophic carbon fixation is a major factor dictating biomass stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C = {[13C/12Csample/13C/12Cstandard] - 1} × 1000). Five different forms of RubisCO (IA, IB, IC, ID, and II) are utilized by algae and autotrophic bacteria reliant on the Calvin-Benson cycle for carbon fixation. To date, isotope discrimination has been measured for form IA, IB, and II RubisCOs, and their ɛ values (={[12k/13k] - 1} × 1000; 12k and 13k = rates of 12C and 13C fixation) range from 18 to 29‰, explaining the variation in biomass δ13C values of autotrophs utilizing these enzymes. Isotope discrimination by form IC RubisCO has not been measured, despite the presence of this enzyme in many proteobacteria of ecological interest, including marine manganese-oxidizing bacteria, some nitrifying and nitrogen-fixing bacteria, and extremely metabolically versatile organisms such as Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Ralstonia eutropha. The purpose of this work was to determine the ɛ values for form IC RubisCO enzymes from R. sphaeroides and R. eutropha. Recombinant form IC RubisCOs were purified by conventional column chromatography procedures. Assay conditions (pH, dissolved inorganic carbon concentration) were tested to determine which parameters were conducive to the high rates of carbon fixation necessary for ɛ determination. Under standard conditions (pH 8.5 and 5 mM DIC), form IC RubisCO activities were sufficient for ɛ determination. Experiments are currently being conducted to measure the ɛ values of these enzymes. Sampling the full phylogenetic breadth of RubisCO enzymes for isotopic discrimination makes it possible to constrain the range of δ13C values of organisms fixing carbon via the Calvin-Benson cycle. These results are

  20. Formation of Polyphosphate by Polyphosphate Kinases and Its Relationship to Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) Accumulation in Ralstonia eutropha Strain H16

    PubMed Central

    Tumlirsch, Tony; Sznajder, Anna

    2015-01-01

    A protein (PhaX) that interacted with poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) depolymerase PhaZa1 and with PHB granule-associated phasin protein PhaP2 was identified by two-hybrid analysis. Deletion of phaX resulted in an increase in the level of polyphosphate (polyP) granule formation and in impairment of PHB utilization in nutrient broth-gluconate cultures. A procedure for enrichment of polyP granules from cell extracts was developed. Twenty-seven proteins that were absent in other cell fractions were identified in the polyP granule fraction by proteome analysis. One protein (A2437) harbored motifs characteristic of type 1 polyphosphate kinases (PPK1s), and two proteins (A1212, A1271) had PPK2 motifs. In vivo colocalization with polyP granules was confirmed by expression of C- and N-terminal fusions of enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) with the three polyphosphate kinases (PPKs). Screening of the genome DNA sequence for additional proteins with PPK motifs revealed one protein with PPK1 motifs and three proteins with PPK2 motifs. Construction and subsequent expression of C- and N-terminal fusions of the four new PPK candidates with eYFP showed that only A1979 (PPK2 motif) colocalized with polyP granules. The other three proteins formed fluorescent foci near the cell pole (apart from polyP) (A0997, B1019) or were soluble (A0226). Expression of the Ralstonia eutropha ppk (ppkReu) genes in an Escherichia coli Δppk background and construction of a set of single and multiple chromosomal deletions revealed that both A2437 (PPK1a) and A1212 (PPK2c) contributed to polyP granule formation. Mutants with deletion of both genes were unable to produce polyP granules. The formation and utilization of PHB and polyP granules were investigated in different chromosomal backgrounds. PMID:26407880

  1. Comparative Proteome Analysis Reveals Four Novel Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) Granule-Associated Proteins in Ralstonia eutropha H16

    PubMed Central

    Sznajder, Anna; Pfeiffer, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Identification of proteins that were present in a polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granule fraction isolated from Ralstonia eutropha but absent in the soluble, membrane, and membrane-associated fractions revealed the presence of only 12 polypeptides with PHB-specific locations plus 4 previously known PHB-associated proteins with multiple locations. None of the previously postulated PHB depolymerase isoenzymes (PhaZa2 to PhaZa5, PhaZd1, and PhaZd2) and none of the two known 3-hydroxybutyrate oligomer hydrolases (PhaZb and PhaZc) were significantly present in isolated PHB granules. Four polypeptides were found that had not yet been identified in PHB granules. Three of the novel proteins are putative α/β-hydrolases, and two of those (A0671 and B1632) have a PHB synthase/depolymerase signature. The third novel protein (A0225) is a patatin-like phospholipase, a type of enzyme that has not been described for PHB granules of any PHB-accumulating species. No function has been ascribed to the fourth protein (A2001), but its encoding gene forms an operon with phaB2 (acetoacetyl-coenzyme A [CoA] reductase) and phaC2 (PHB synthase), and this is in line with a putative function in PHB metabolism. The localization of the four new proteins at the PHB granule surface was confirmed in vivo by fluorescence microscopy of constructed fusion proteins with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP). Deletion of A0671 and B1632 had a minor but detectable effect on the PHB mobilization ability in the stationary growth phase of nutrient broth (NB)-gluconate cells, confirming the functional involvement of both proteins in PHB metabolism. PMID:25548058

  2. Efficient biological conversion of carbon monoxide (CO) to carbon dioxide (CO2) and for utilization in bioplastic production by Ralstonia eutropha through the display of an enzyme complex on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Hyeon, Jeong Eun; Kim, Seung Wook; Park, Chulhwan; Han, Sung Ok

    2015-06-25

    An enzyme complex for biological conversion of CO to CO2 was anchored on the cell surface of the CO2-utilizing Ralstonia eutropha and successfully resulted in a 3.3-fold increase in conversion efficiency. These results suggest that this complexed system may be a promising strategy for CO2 utilization as a biological tool for the production of bioplastics. PMID:26017299

  3. Efficient biological conversion of carbon monoxide (CO) to carbon dioxide (CO2) and for utilization in bioplastic production by Ralstonia eutropha through the display of an enzyme complex on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Hyeon, Jeong Eun; Kim, Seung Wook; Park, Chulhwan; Han, Sung Ok

    2015-06-25

    An enzyme complex for biological conversion of CO to CO2 was anchored on the cell surface of the CO2-utilizing Ralstonia eutropha and successfully resulted in a 3.3-fold increase in conversion efficiency. These results suggest that this complexed system may be a promising strategy for CO2 utilization as a biological tool for the production of bioplastics.

  4. Whole-Genome Microarray and Gene Deletion Studies Reveal Regulation of the Polyhydroxyalkanoate Production Cycle by the Stringent Response in Ralstonia eutropha H16

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham, CJ; Speth, DR; Rha, C; Sinskey, AJ

    2012-10-22

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) production and mobilization in Ralstonia eutropha are well studied, but in only a few instances has PHB production been explored in relation to other cellular processes. We examined the global gene expression of wild-type R. eutropha throughout the PHB cycle: growth on fructose, PHB production using fructose following ammonium depletion, and PHB utilization in the absence of exogenous carbon after ammonium was resupplied. Our results confirm or lend support to previously reported results regarding the expression of PHB-related genes and enzymes. Additionally, genes for many different cellular processes, such as DNA replication, cell division, and translation, are selectively repressed during PHB production. In contrast, the expression levels of genes under the control of the alternative sigma factor sigma(54) increase sharply during PHB production and are repressed again during PHB utilization. Global gene regulation during PHB production is strongly reminiscent of the gene expression pattern observed during the stringent response in other species. Furthermore, a ppGpp synthase deletion mutant did not show an accumulation of PHB, and the chemical induction of the stringent response with DL-norvaline caused an increased accumulation of PHB in the presence of ammonium. These results indicate that the stringent response is required for PHB accumulation in R. eutropha, helping to elucidate a thus-far-unknown physiological basis for this process.

  5. Recovery of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) from Ralstonia eutropha cultures with non-halogenated solvents.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Sebastian L; Brigham, Christopher J; Budde, Charles F; Bader, Johannes; Rha, Chokyun; Stahl, Ulf; Sinskey, Anthony J

    2013-02-01

    Reduced downstream costs, together with high purity recovery of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA), will accelerate the commercialization of high quality PHA-based products. In this work, a process was designed for effective recovery of the copolymer poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyhexanoate) (P(HB-co-HHx)) containing high levels of HHx (>15 mol%) from Ralstonia eutropha biomass using non-halogenated solvents. Several non-halogenated solvents (methyl isobutyl ketone, methyl ethyl ketone, and butyl acetate and ethyl acetate) were found to effectively dissolve the polymer. Isoamyl alcohol was found to be not suitable for extraction of polymer. All PHA extractions were performed from both dry and wet cells at volumes ranging from 2 mL to 3 L using a PHA to solvent ratio of 2% (w/v). Ethyl acetate showed both high recovery levels and high product purities (up to 99%) when using dry cells as starting material. Recovery from wet cells, however, eliminates a biomass drying step during the downstream process, potentially saving time and cost. When wet cells were used, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) was shown to be the most favorable solvent for PHA recovery. Purities of up to 99% and total recovery yields of up to 84% from wet cells were reached. During polymer recovery with either MIBK or butyl acetate, fractionation of the extracted PHA occurred, based on the HHx content of the polymer. PHA with higher HHx content (17-30 mol%) remained completely in solution, while polymer with a lower HHx content (11-16 mol%) formed a gel-like phase. All PHA in solution could be precipitated by addition of threefold volumes of n-hexane or n-heptane to unfiltered PHA solutions. Effective recycling of the solvents in this system is predicted due to the large differences in the boiling points between solvent and precipitant. Our findings show that two non-halogenated solvents are good candidates to replace halogenated solvents like chloroform for recovery of high quality PHA. PMID:22903730

  6. Characterization of a Second tfd Gene Cluster for Chlorophenol and Chlorocatechol Metabolism on Plasmid pJP4 in Ralstonia eutropha JMP134(pJP4)

    PubMed Central

    Laemmli, Caroline M.; Leveau, Johan H. J.; Zehnder, Alexander J. B.; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2000-01-01

    Within the 5.9-kb DNA region between the tfdR and tfdK genes on the 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) catabolic plasmid pJP4 from Ralstonia eutropha JMP134, we identified five open reading frames (ORFs) with significant homology to the genes for chlorocatechol and chlorophenol metabolism (tfdCDEF and tfdB) already present elsewhere on pJP4. The five ORFs were organized and assigned as follows: tfdDIICIIEIIFII and tfdBII (in short, the tfdII cluster), by analogy to tfdCDEF and tfdB (the tfdI cluster). Primer extension analysis of mRNA isolated from 2,4-D-grown R. eutropha JMP134 identified a single transcription start site in front of the first gene of the cluster, tfdDII, suggesting an operon-like organization for the tfdII genes. By expressing each ORF in Escherichia coli, we confirmed that tfdDII coded for a chloromuconate cycloisomerase, tfdCII coded for a chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase, tfdEII coded for a dienelactone hydrolase, tfdFII coded for a maleylacetate reductase, and tfdBII coded for a chlorophenol hydroxylase. Dot blot hybridizations of mRNA isolated from R. eutropha JMP134 showed that both tfdI and tfdII genes are transcribed upon induction with 2,4-D. Thus, the functions encoded by the tfdII genes seem to be redundant with respect to those of the tfdI cluster. One reason why the tfdII genes do not disappear from plasmid pJP4 might be the necessity for keeping the regulatory genes for the 2,4-D pathway expression tfdR and tfdS. PMID:10894723

  7. Impact of the core components of the phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase system, HPr and EI, on differential protein expression in Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Kaddor, Chlud; Voigt, Birgit; Hecker, Michael; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    In Ralstonia eutropha H16, seven genes encoding proteins being involved in the phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS) were identified. In order to provide more insights into the poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)-leaky phenotype of the HPr/EI deletion mutants H16ΔptsH, H16ΔptsI, and H16ΔptsHI when grown on the non-PTS substrate gluconate, parallel fermentations for comparison of their growth behavior were performed. Samples from the exponential, the early stationary, and late stationary growth phases were investigated by microscopy, gas chromatography and (phospho-) proteome analysis. A total of 71 differentially expressed proteins were identified using 2D-PAGE, Pro-Q Diamond and Coomassie staining, and MALDI-TOF analysis. Detected proteins were classified into five major functional groups: carbon metabolism, energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, translation, and membrane transport/outer membrane proteins. Proteome analyses revealed enhanced expression of proteins involved in the Entner-Doudoroff pathway and in subsequent reactions in cells of strain H16 compared to the mutant H16ΔptsHI. Furthermore, proteins involved in PHB accumulation showed increased abundance in the wild-type. This expression pattern allowed us to identify proteins affecting carbon metabolism/PHB biosynthesis in strain H16 and translation/amino acid metabolism in strain H16ΔptsHI, and to gain insight into the molecular response of R. eutropha to the deletion of HPr/EI. PMID:22630130

  8. Improved artificial pathway for biosynthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) with high C6-monomer composition from fructose in Ralstonia eutropha.

    PubMed

    Insomphun, Chayatip; Xie, Huan; Mifune, Jun; Kawashima, Yui; Orita, Izumi; Nakamura, Satoshi; Fukui, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Poly((R)-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-(R)-3-hydroxyhexanoate) [P(3HB-co-3HHx)], a flexible and practical kind of polyhydroxyalkanoates, is generally produced from plant oils and fatty acids by several wild and recombinant bacteria. This study established an improved artificial pathway for the biosynthesis of P(3HB-co-3HHx) with high 3HHx composition from structurally unrelated fructose in Ralstonia eutropha. Depression of (R)-specific reduction of acetoacetyl-CoA by the deletion of phaB1 was an effective modification for formation of the C6-monomer unit from fructose driven by crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase (Ccr). Co-overexpression of phaJ4a, which encodes medium-chain-length (R)-enoyl-CoA hydratase, with ccr promoted the incorporation of both 3HB and 3HHx units. Further introduction of emdMm, a synthetic gene encoding ethylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylase derived from mouse, was remarkably effective for P(3HB-co-3HHx) biosynthesis, probably by converting ethylmalonyl-CoA generated by the reductive carboxylase activity of Ccr back into butyryl-CoA. A high cellular content of P(3HB-co-3HHx) composed of 22mol% 3HHx could be produced from fructose by the engineered strain of R. eutropha with ΔphaB1 genotype expressing ccr, phaJ4a, and emd. PMID:25446974

  9. Modification of β-oxidation pathway in Ralstonia eutropha for production of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) from soybean oil.

    PubMed

    Insomphun, Chayatip; Mifune, Jun; Orita, Izumi; Numata, Keiji; Nakamura, Satoshi; Fukui, Toshiaki

    2014-02-01

    Ralstonia eutropha H16 is a useful platform for metabolic engineering aiming at efficient production of polyhydroxyalkanaotes being attracted as practical bioplastics. This study focused on bifunctional (S)-specific 2-enoyl-CoA hydratase/(S)-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase encoded by fadB to obtain information regarding β-oxidation in this bacterium and to achieve compositional regulation of poly((R)-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-(R)-3-hydroxyhexanoate) [P(3HB-co-3HHx)] synthesized from soybean oil. In addition to two FadB homologs (FadB1 and FadB') encoded within the previously identified β-oxidation gene clusters on the chromosome 1, a gene of third homolog (FadB2) was found on chromosome 2 of R. eutropha. The fadB homologs were disrupted in R. eutropha strain NSDG expressing a mutant gene of PHA synthase from Aeromonas caviae. The gene disruptions affected neither growth nor PHA production on fructose. On soybean oil, fadB' deletion led to reduction of PHA quantity attributed to decrease of 3HB unit, while fadB1 deletion slightly increased 3HHx composition without serious negative impact on both cell growth and PHA biosynthesis. Double deletion of fadB1 and fadB' significantly impaired the cell growth and PHA biosynthesis, indicating the major roles of fadB1 and fadB' in β-oxidation. When fadB1 was deleted in several engineered strains of R. eutropha possessing additional (R)-enoyl-CoA hydratase gene(s), the net amounts of 3HHx unit in the PHA fractions showed 6-21% increase probably due to slightly enhanced supply of medium-chain-length 2-enoyl-CoAs through the partially impaired β-oxidation. These results demonstrated that modification of β-oxidation by fadB1 deletion was effective for increasing 3HHx composition in the copolyesters produced from soybean oil. PMID:23999062

  10. Polythioester synthesis in Ralstonia eutropha H16: novel insights into 3,3'-thiodipropionic acid and 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid catabolism.

    PubMed

    Doberstein, Christina; Grote, Jessica; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2014-08-20

    Ralstonia eutropha H16 is capable of utilizing 3,3'-thiodipropionic acid (TDP) and 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP) as precursor substrates for biosynthesis of a polythioester (PTE) heteropolymer consisting of 3-hydroxybutyric acid (3HB) and 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3MP). To elucidate the hitherto unknown catabolic pathways of TDP and DTDP in R. eutropha H16, 19 defined deletion mutants were generated based on extensive functional genome analyses. Deletions of two ABC-type transporter clusters (H16_A0357-0359, H16_A3658-3660) resulted in an alteration of poly(3HB-co-3MP) composition with TDP as precursor to only 10.2±1.9mol% 3MP in comparison to 15.1±5.5mol% in the wild type. A mutant strain of H16 lacking Bordetella uptake gene-like substrate binding proteins (H16_A2779, H16_A0337) incorporated only 7.4±3.8mol% 3MP into PTE heteropolymers with DTDP as precursor in comparison to 24.5±14.5mol% in the wild type. Therefore, both gene products are probably involved in transport processes of this compound into the cells. However, the most significant reduction in 3MP contents of the heteropolymers with DTDP as precursor occurred upon the deletion of a gene encoding the putative thiol-disulfide interchange protein DsbD (H16_A3455, 3.9±2.6mol% 3MP). DsbD is proposed to be involved in the reduction of DTDP into two molecules of 3MP, the common cleavage product of TDP and DTDP.

  11. Implications of various phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase system mutations on glycerol utilization and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) accumulation in Ralstonia eutropha H16

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The enhanced global biodiesel production is also yielding increased quantities of glycerol as main coproduct. An effective application of glycerol, for example, as low-cost substrate for microbial growth in industrial fermentation processes to specific products will reduce the production costs for biodiesel. Our study focuses on the utilization of glycerol as a cheap carbon source during cultivation of the thermoplastic producing bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16, and on the investigation of carbohydrate transport proteins involved herein. Seven open reading frames were identified in the genome of strain H16 to encode for putative proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS). Although the core components of PEP-PTS, enzyme I (ptsI) and histidine phosphocarrier protein (ptsH), are available in strain H16, a complete PTS-mediated carbohydrate transport is lacking. Growth experiments employing several PEP-PTS mutants indicate that the putative ptsMHI operon, comprising ptsM (a fructose-specific EIIA component of PTS), ptsH, and ptsI, is responsible for limited cell growth and reduced PHB accumulation (53%, w/w, less PHB than the wild type) of this strain in media containing glycerol as a sole carbon source. Otherwise, the deletion of gene H16_A0384 (ptsN, nitrogen regulatory EIIA component of PTS) seemed to largely compensate the effect of the deleted ptsMHI operon (49%, w/w, PHB). The involvement of the PTS homologous proteins on the utilization of the non-PTS sugar alcohol glycerol and its effect on cell growth as well as PHB and carbon metabolism of R. eutropha will be discussed. PMID:21906371

  12. Genetic organization of the catabolic plasmid pJP4 from Ralstonia eutropha JMP134 (pJP4) reveals mechanisms of adaptation to chloroaromatic pollutants and evolution of specialized chloroaromatic degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Trefault, N; De la Iglesia, R; Molina, A M; Manzano, M; Ledger, T; Pérez-Pantoja, D; Sánchez, M A; Stuardo, M; González, B

    2004-07-01

    Ralstonia eutropha JMP134 (pJP4) is a useful model for the study of bacterial degradation of substituted aromatic pollutants. Several key degrading capabilities, encoded by tfd genes, are located in the 88 kb, self-transmissible, IncP-1 beta plasmid pJP4. The complete sequence of the 87,688 nucleotides of pJP4, encoding 83 open reading frames (ORFs), is reported. Most of the coding sequence corresponds to a well-conserved IncP-1 beta backbone and the previously reported tfd genes. In addition, we found hypothetical proteins putatively involved in the transport of aromatic compounds and short-chain fatty acid oxidation. ORFs related to mobile elements, including the Tn501-encoded mercury resistance determinants, an IS1071-based composite transposon and a cryptic class II transposon, are also present in pJP4. These mobile elements are inefficient in transposition and are located in two regions of pJP4 that are rich in remnants of lateral gene transfer events. pJP4 plasmid was able to capture chromosomal genes and form hybrid plasmids with the IncP-1 alpha plasmid RP4. These observations are integrated into a model for the evolution of pJP4, which reveals mechanisms of bacterial adaptation to degrade pollutants. PMID:15186344

  13. Electrochemical and Infrared Spectroscopic Studies Provide Insight into Reactions of the NiFe Regulatory Hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha with O2 and CO.

    PubMed

    Ash, Philip A; Liu, Juan; Coutard, Nathan; Heidary, Nina; Horch, Marius; Gudim, Ingvild; Simler, Thomas; Zebger, Ingo; Lenz, Oliver; Vincent, Kylie A

    2015-10-29

    The regulatory hydrogenase (RH) from Ralstonia eutropha acts as the H2-sensing unit of a two-component system that regulates biosynthesis of the energy conserving hydrogenases of the organism according to the availability of H2. The H2 oxidation activity, which was so far determined in vitro with artificial electron acceptors, has been considered to be insensitive to O2 and CO. It is assumed that bulky isoleucine and phenylalanine amino acid residues close to the NiFe active site "gate" gas access, preventing molecules larger than H2 interacting with the active site. We have carried out sensitive electrochemical measurements to demonstrate that O2 is in fact an inhibitor of H2 oxidation by the RH, and that both H(+) reduction and H2 oxidation are inhibited by CO. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of O2 arises due to interaction of O2 with the active site. Using protein film infrared electrochemistry (PFIRE) under H2 oxidation conditions, in conjunction with solution infrared measurements, we have identified previously unreported oxidized inactive and catalytically active reduced states of the RH active site. These findings suggest that the RH has a rich active site chemistry similar to that of other NiFe hydrogenases. PMID:26115011

  14. Directed evolution and structural analysis of NADPH-dependent Acetoacetyl Coenzyme A (Acetoacetyl-CoA) reductase from Ralstonia eutropha reveals two mutations responsible for enhanced kinetics.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken'ichiro; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Motohashi, Ren; Ikeda, Koji; Tobitani, Kota; Yao, Min; Tanaka, Isao; Taguchi, Seiichi

    2013-10-01

    NADPH-dependent acetoacetyl-coenzyme A (acetoacetyl-CoA) reductase (PhaB) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)], along with β-ketothiolase (PhaA) and polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase (PhaC). In this study, PhaB from Ralstonia eutropha was engineered by means of directed evolution consisting of an error-prone PCR-mediated mutagenesis and a P(3HB) accumulation-based in vivo screening system using Escherichia coli. From approximately 20,000 mutants, we obtained two mutant candidates bearing Gln47Leu (Q47L) and Thr173Ser (T173S) substitutions. The mutants exhibited kcat values that were 2.4-fold and 3.5-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme, respectively. In fact, the PhaB mutants did exhibit enhanced activity and P(3HB) accumulation when expressed in recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum. Comparative three-dimensional structural analysis of wild-type PhaB and highly active PhaB mutants revealed that the beneficial mutations affected the flexibility around the active site, which in turn played an important role in substrate recognition. Furthermore, both the kinetic analysis and crystal structure data supported the conclusion that PhaB forms a ternary complex with NADPH and acetoacetyl-CoA. These results suggest that the mutations affected the interaction with substrates, resulting in the acquirement of enhanced activity.

  15. Characterization of two novel alcohol short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases from Ralstonia eutropha H16 capable of stereoselective conversion of bulky substrates.

    PubMed

    Magomedova, Zalina; Grecu, Andreea; Sensen, Christoph W; Schwab, Helmut; Heidinger, Petra

    2016-03-10

    Biocatalysis has significant advantages over organic synthesis in the field of chiral molecule production and several types of stereoselective enzymes are already in use in industrial biotechnology. However, there is still a high demand for new enzymes capable of transforming bulky molecules with sufficient operability. In order to reveal novel high-potential biocatalysts, the complete genome of the β-proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 was screened for potential short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs). We were able to identify two (S)-enantioselective SDRs named A5 and B3. These showed clear preference towards long-chain and aromatic secondary alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, with diaryl diketone benzil as one of the best substrates. In addition the phylogenetic analysis of all enzyme types, which are known to facilitate benzil reduction, revealed at least two separate evolutionary clusters. Our results indicate the biotechnological potential of SDRs A5 and B3 for the production of chiral compounds with potential commercial value.

  16. Use of a packed-bed airlift reactor with net draft tube to study kinetics of naphthalene degradation by Ralstonia eutropha.

    PubMed

    Jalilnejad, Elham; Vahabzadeh, Farzaneh

    2014-03-01

    Biodegradation of naphthalene by Ralstonia eutropha (also known as Cupriavidus necator) in a packed-bed airlift reactor with net draft tube (PBALR-nd) was studied; the Kissiris pieces were the packing material. The reactor hydrodynamics has been characterized under abiotic conditions and the dependencies of the superficial gas velocity (U G) on the gas holdup (εG), liquid mixing time, and mass transfer coefficient were determined. The improving role of the net draft tube in this small column reactor (height 42 cm, ID 5 cm) was confirmed. The flow regime was described using the εG α U G (n) expression, and bubbly flow was observed in PBALR-nd at U G < 2.83 cm/s. In the second step of the present work, the kinetics of biodegradation was modeled using the Haldane and Aiba equations. The fitting of the experimental results to the models were done according to the nonlinear least square regression technique. The biokinetic constants (q m, K s, and K i) were estimated and q m as the specific biodegradation rate was equaled to 0.415 and 0.24 mgnaph./mgcell h for the Haldane and Aiba equations, respectively. The goodness of fit reported as R (2) and root-mean-square error (RMSE) showed the adequate fitness of the Haldane and Aiba models in predicting naphthalene biodegradation kinetics. On the basis of the HPLC results, a hypothetical pathway for the biodegradation was presented.

  17. (S)-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase/enoyl-CoA hydratase (FadB’) from fatty acid degradation operon of Ralstonia eutropha H16

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study (S)-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase/enoyl-CoA hydratase (H16_A0461/FadB’, gene ID: 4247876) from one of two active fatty acid degradation operons of Ralstonia eutropha H16 has been heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, purified as protein possessing a His-Tag and initially characterized. FadB’ is an enzyme with two catalytic domains exhibiting a single monomeric structure and possessing a molecular weight of 86 kDa. The C-terminal part of the enzyme harbors enoyl-CoA hydratase activity and is able to convert trans-crotonyl-CoA to 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA. The N-terminal part of FadB’ comprises an NAD+ binding site and is responsible for 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity converting (S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA to acetoacetyl-CoA. Enoyl-CoA hydratase activity was detected spectrophotometrically with trans-crotonyl-CoA. (S)-3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity was measured in both directions with acetoacetyl-CoA and 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA. FadB’ was found to be strictly stereospecific to (S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA and to prefer NAD+. The Km value for acetoacetyl-CoA was 48 μM and Vmax 149 μmol mg−1 min−1. NADP(H) was utilized at a rate of less than 10% in comparison to activity with NAD(H). FadB’ exhibited optimal activity at pH 6–7 and the activity decreased at alkaline and acidic pH values. Acetyl-CoA, propionyl-CoA and CoA were found to have an inhibitory effect on FadB’. This study is a first report on biochemical properties of purified (S)-stereospecific 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase/enoyl-CoA hydratase with the inverted domain order from R. eutropha H16. In addition to fundamental information about FadB’ and fatty acid metabolism, FadB’ might be also interesting for biotechnological applications. PMID:25401070

  18. Cometabolic degradation of ethyl mercaptan by phenol-utilizing Ralstonia eutropha in suspended growth and gas-recycling trickle-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Sedighi, Mahsa; Zamir, Seyed Morteza; Vahabzadeh, Farzaneh

    2016-01-01

    The degradability of ethyl mercaptan (EM), by phenol-utilizing cells of Ralstonia eutropha, in both suspended and immobilized culture systems, was investigated in the present study. Free-cells experiments conducted at EM concentrations ranging from 1.25 to 14.42 mg/l, showed almost complete removal of EM at concentrations below 10.08 mg/l, which is much higher than the maximum biodegradable EM concentration obtained in experiments that did not utilize phenol as the primary substrate, i.e. 2.5 mg/l. The first-order kinetic rate constant (kSKS) for EM biodegradation by the phenol-utilizing cells (1.7 l/g biomass/h) was about 10 times higher than by cells without phenol utilization. Immobilized-cells experiments performed in a gas recycling trickle-bed reactor packed with kissiris particles at EM concentrations ranging from 1.6 to 36.9 mg/l, showed complete removal at all tested concentrations in a much shorter time, compared with free cells. The first-order kinetic rate constant (rmaxKs) for EM utilization was 0.04 l/h for the immobilized system compared to 0.06 for the suspended-growth culture, due to external mass transfer diffusion. Diffusion limitation was decreased by increasing the recycling-liquid flow rate from 25 to 65 ml/min. The removed EM was almost completely mineralized according to TOC and sulfate measurements. Shut down and starvation experiments revealed that the reactor could effectively handle the starving conditions and was reliable for full-scale application.

  19. Physiological conditions conducive to high cell density and high cyanophycin content in Ralstonia eutropha strain H16 possessing a KDPG aldolase gene-dependent addiction system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaichien; Elbahloul, Yasser; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2012-03-01

    The recombinant strain of Ralstonia eutropha H16-PHB(-)4-∆eda (pBBR1MCS-2::cphA (6308)/eda (H16)) presenting a 2-keto-3-desoxy-phosphogluconate (KDPG) aldolase (eda) gene-dependent catabolic addiction system for plasmid maintenance when using gluconate or fructose as sole carbon source was used in this study. The effects of the initial pH, the nitrogen-to-carbon ratio, the inorganic components of medium, the oxygen supply, and the different carbon and nitrogen sources on the cell dry matter (CDM) and the cyanophycin granule polypeptide (CGP) content of the cells were studied in a mineral salts medium (MSM) without any additional amino acids or CGP precursor substrates. The experiments were designed to systematically find out the optimal conditions for growth of cells to high densities and for high CGP contents of the cells. Maximum contents of water-insoluble CGP and water-soluble CGP, contributing to 47.5% and 5.8% (w/w) of CDM, respectively, were obtained at the 30-L scale cultivation when cells were cultivated in MSM medium containing sufficient supplements of fructose, NH(3), K(2)SO(4), MgSO(4)[Symbol: see text]7H(2)O, Fe(Ш)NH(4)-citrate, CaCl(2)[Symbol: see text]2H(2)O, and trace elements (SL6). The molecular masses of water-insoluble and water-soluble CGP ranged from 25 to 31 kDa and from 15 to 21 kDa, respectively. High cell densities of up to 82.8 g CDM/L containing up to 37.8% (w/w) water-insoluble CGP at the 30-L scale cultivation were also obtained. This is by far the best combination of high cell density and high cellular CGP contents ever reported, and it showed that efficient production of CGP at the industrial scale in white biotechnology could be achieved. PMID:22080348

  20. To Be or Not To Be a Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) Depolymerase: PhaZd1 (PhaZ6) and PhaZd2 (PhaZ7) of Ralstonia eutropha, Highly Active PHB Depolymerases with No Detectable Role in Mobilization of Accumulated PHB

    PubMed Central

    Sznajder, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The putative physiological functions of two related intracellular poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) depolymerases, PhaZd1 and PhaZd2, of Ralstonia eutropha H16 were investigated. Purified PhaZd1 and PhaZd2 were active with native PHB granules in vitro. Partial removal of the proteinaceous surface layer of native PHB granules by trypsin treatment or the use of PHB granules isolated from ΔphaP1 or ΔphaP1-phaP5 mutant strains resulted in increased specific PHB depolymerase activity, especially for PhaZd2. Constitutive expression of PhaZd1 or PhaZd2 reduced or even prevented the accumulation of PHB under PHB-permissive conditions in vivo. Expression of translational fusions of enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) with PhaZd1 and PhaZd2 in which the active-site serines (S190 and Ser193) were replaced with alanine resulted in the colocalization of only PhaZd1 fusions with PHB granules. C-terminal fusions of inactive PhaZd2(S193A) with EYFP revealed the presence of spindle-like structures, and no colocalization with PHB granules was observed. Chromosomal deletion of phaZd1, phaZd2, or both depolymerase genes had no significant effect on PHB accumulation and mobilization during growth in nutrient broth (NB) or NB-gluconate medium. Moreover, neither proteome analysis of purified native PHB granules nor lacZ fusion studies gave any indication that PhaZd1 or PhaZd2 was detectably present in the PHB granule fraction or expressed at all during growth on NB-gluconate medium. In conclusion, PhaZd1 and PhaZd2 are two PHB depolymerases with a high capacity to degrade PHB when artificially expressed but are apparently not involved in PHB mobilization in the wild type. The true in vivo functions of PhaZd1 and PhaZd2 remain obscure. PMID:24907326

  1. Phylogenomic analysis of the genus Ralstonia based on 686 single-copy genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yucheng; Qiu, Sai

    2016-01-01

    The genus Ralstonia contains species that are devastating plant pathogens, opportunistic human pathogens, and/or important degraders of xenobiotic and recalcitrant compounds. However, significant nomenclature problems exist, especially for the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex which consists of four phylotypes. Phylogenomics of the Ralstonia genus was investigated via a comprehensive analysis of 39 Ralstonia genomes as well as four genomes of Cupriavidus necator (more commonly known by its previous name Ralstonia eutropha). These data revealed 686 single-copy orthologs that could be extracted from the Ralstonia core-genome and used to reconstruct the phylogeny of the genus Ralstonia. The generated tree has strong bootstrap support for almost all branches. We also estimated the in silico DNA-DNA hybridization (isDDH) and the average nucleotide identity (ANI) values between each genome. Our data confirmed that whole genome sequence data provides a powerful tool to resolve the complex taxonomic questions of the genus Ralstonia, e.g. strains of Ralstonia solanacearum phylotype IIA and IIB may represent two subspecies of R. solanacearum, and strains of R. solanacearum phylotype I and III may be classified into two subspecies of Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum. Recently, strains of R. solanacearum phylotype IV were proposed to be reclassified into different subspecies of Ralstonia syzygii; our study, however, showed that phylotype IV strains had high isDDH values (83.8-96.1 %), indicating it may be not appropriate to classify these closely related strains into different subspecies. We also evaluated the performance of six chromosomal housekeeping genes (gdhA, mutS, adk, leuS, rplB and gyrB) used in Ralstonia phylogenetic inference. The multilocus sequence analysis of these six marker genes was able to reliably infer the phylogenetic relationships of the genus Ralstonia. PMID:26494208

  2. Targeted Enhancement of H2 and CO2 Uptake for Autotrophic Production of Biodiesel in the Lithoautotrophic Bacterium Ralsonia Eutropha

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C. A.; Sullivan, R.; Johnson, C.; Yu, J.; Maness, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    CO2 and H2 are promising feedstocks for production of valuable biocompounds. Ralstonia eutropha utilizes these feedstocks to generate energy (ATP) and reductant (NAD(P)H) via oxidation of H2 by a membrane-bound (MBH) and a soluble hydrogenase (SH) for CO2 fixation by the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle. Increased expression of the enzyme that fixes CO2 (RubisCO) resulted in 6-fold activity improvement in vitro, while increased expression of the MBH operon or the SH operon plus MBH operon maturation factors necessary for activity resulted in a 10-fold enhancement. Current research involves genetic manipulation of two endogenous cbb operons for increased expression, analysis of expression and activity of CBB/MBH/SH, cofactor ratios, and downstream products during autotrophic growth in control versus enhanced strains, and development of strategies for long-term, optimal overexpression. These studies will improve our understanding of autotrophic metabolism and provide a chassis strain for autotrophic production of biodiesel and other valuable carbon biocompounds.

  3. Production of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) by Ralstonia eutropha JMP 134 with volatile fatty acids from palm oil mill effluent as precursors.

    PubMed

    Setiadi, Tjandra; Aznury, Martha; Trianto, Azis; Pancoro, Adi

    2015-01-01

    The highest volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentration from palm oil mill effluent (POME) treated by anaerobic fermentation was achieved for a 1-day process when the main acids used were acetic, propionic and butyric acids. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production with VFAs from POME as precursors in the fed-batch mode has advantages over batch mode, both in terms of its productivity and 3HV (3-hydroxyvalerate) composition in the produced polymer. With the fed batch, the productivity increased to 343% and contained more 3HV than those of the batch. The structures of the PHA were identified by different methods and they supported each other; the resulting products consisted of functional groups of 3HB (3-hydroxybutyrate) and 3HV. PMID:26606081

  4. Improved biovar test for Ralstonia solanacearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Race 3, biovar 2 strains of Ralstonia solanacearum are quarantined pathogens in Europe and Canada and Select Agent pathogens in the United States. The biovar classification of R. solanacearum strains is based on their biochemical abilities to utilize a carbohydrate panel. The standard biovar test us...

  5. [Phytotoxic properties of Ralstonia solanacearum lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Hrytsaĭ, R V; Iakovleva, L M; Varbanets', L D

    2014-01-01

    The study is dedicated to research of phytotoxic properties of Ralstonia solanacearum lipopolysaccharides. This causative agent is one of the most dangerous among potato bacterial diseases. It is revealed that the inhibitory effect of LPS solution on seedlings germination is more noticeable on crops susceptible to brown rot. Maximal total phytotoxic properties have been shown by LPS from strains 35, 52b, TX1 and TS3, which were characterized by relatively low rhamnose content. Relative to the control plants LPS may diminish and some ones--increase the root length, height and weight of seedlings, subject to particular strain. But the stimulation revealed is minor.

  6. Engineering of chimeric class II polyhydroxyalkanoate synthases.

    PubMed

    Niamsiri, Nuttawee; Delamarre, Soazig C; Kim, Young-Rok; Batt, Carl A

    2004-11-01

    PHA synthase is a key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). Using a combinatorial genetic strategy to create unique chimeric class II PHA synthases, we have obtained a number of novel chimeras which display improved catalytic properties. To engineer the chimeric PHA synthases, we constructed a synthetic phaC gene from Pseudomonas oleovorans (phaC1Po) that was devoid of an internal 540-bp fragment. Randomly amplified PCR products (created with primers based on conserved phaC sequences flanking the deleted internal fragment) were generated using genomic DNA isolated from soil and were substituted for the 540-bp internal region. The chimeric genes were expressed in a PHA-negative strain of Ralstonia eutropha, PHB(-)4 (DSM 541). Out of 1,478 recombinant clones screened for PHA production, we obtained five different chimeric phaC1Po genes that produced more PHA than the native phaC1Po. Chimeras S1-71, S4-8, S5-58, S3-69, and S3-44 exhibited 1.3-, 1.4-, 2.0-, 2.1-, and 3.0-fold-increased levels of in vivo activity, respectively. All of the mutants mediated the synthesis of PHAs with a slightly increased molar fraction of 3-hydroxyoctanoate; however, the weight-average molecular weights (Mw) of the PHAs in all cases remained almost the same. Based upon DNA sequence analyses, the various phaC fragments appear to have originated from Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aureofaciens. The amino acid sequence analyses showed that the chimeric proteins had 17 to 20 amino acid differences from the wild-type phaC1Po, and these differences were clustered in the same positions in the five chimeric clones. A threading model of PhaC1Po, developed based on homology of the enzyme to the Burkholderia glumae lipase, suggested that the amino acid substitutions found in the active chimeras were located mostly on the protein model surface. Thus, our combinatorial genetic engineering strategy proved to be broadly useful for improving the catalytic

  7. Breeding for resistances to Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Huet, Gaëlle

    2014-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the most devastating bacterial plant pathogens due to its large host range, worldwide geographic distribution and persistence in fields. This soilborne pathogen is the causal agent of bacterial wilt and it can infect major agricultural crops thereby reducing significantly their yield. To favor infection, the bacterium delivers, through the type three secretion system, effectors that manipulate plant immunity. In this review, the relative efficiency of control strategies and existing resistances to R. solanacearum will be presented. Then, the genetic and molecular insights gained from the study of bacterial wilt in model plants will be described. Finally, I will explore how the knowledge gathered from unraveling avirulence and virulence mechanisms of R. solanacearum effectors could help to develop more durable resistances in crop plants toward this destructive pathogen. PMID:25566289

  8. Metabolism of Thioamides by Ralstonia pickettii TA▿

    PubMed Central

    Dodge, Anthony G.; Richman, Jack E.; Johnson, Gilbert; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2006-01-01

    Information on bacterial thioamide metabolism has focused on transformation of the antituberculosis drug ethionamide and related compounds by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. To study this metabolism more generally, a bacterium that grew using thioacetamide as the sole nitrogen source was isolated via enrichment culture. The bacterium was identified as Ralstonia pickettii and designated strain TA. Cells grown on thioacetamide also transformed other thioamide compounds. Transformation of the thioamides tested was dependent on oxygen. During thioamide degradation, sulfur was detected in the medium at the oxidation level of sulfite, further suggesting an oxygenase mechanism. R. pickettii TA did not grow on thiobenzamide as a nitrogen source, but resting cells converted thiobenzamide to benzamide, with thiobenzamide S-oxide and benzonitrile detected as intermediates. Thioacetamide S-oxide was detected as an intermediate during thioacetamide degradation, but the only accumulating metabolite of thioacetamide was identified as 3,5-dimethyl-1,2,4-thiadiazole, a compound shown to derive from spontaneous reaction of thioacetamide and oxygenated thioacetamide species. This dead-end metabolite accounted for only ca. 12% of the metabolized thioacetamide. Neither acetonitrile nor acetamide was detected during thioacetamide degradation, but R. pickettii grew on both compounds as nitrogen and carbon sources. It is proposed that R. pickettii TA degrades thioamides via a mechanism involving consecutive oxygenations of the thioamide sulfur atom. PMID:16997975

  9. Complete genome sequence of the potato pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum UY031.

    PubMed

    Guarischi-Sousa, Rodrigo; Puigvert, Marina; Coll, Núria S; Siri, María Inés; Pianzzola, María Julia; Valls, Marc; Setubal, João C

    2016-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is the causative agent of bacterial wilt of potato. Ralstonia solanacearum strain UY031 belongs to the American phylotype IIB, sequevar 1, also classified as race 3 biovar 2. Here we report the completely sequenced genome of this strain, the first complete genome for phylotype IIB, sequevar 1, and the fourth for the R. solanacearum species complex. In addition to standard genome annotation, we have carried out a curated annotation of type III effector genes, an important pathogenicity-related class of genes for this organism. We identified 60 effector genes, and observed that this effector repertoire is distinct when compared to those from other phylotype IIB strains. Eleven of the effectors appear to be nonfunctional due to disruptive mutations. We also report a methylome analysis of this genome, the first for a R. solanacearum strain. This analysis helped us note the presence of a toxin gene within a region of probable phage origin, raising the hypothesis that this gene may play a role in this strain's virulence. PMID:26779304

  10. Complete genome sequence of the potato pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum UY031.

    PubMed

    Guarischi-Sousa, Rodrigo; Puigvert, Marina; Coll, Núria S; Siri, María Inés; Pianzzola, María Julia; Valls, Marc; Setubal, João C

    2016-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is the causative agent of bacterial wilt of potato. Ralstonia solanacearum strain UY031 belongs to the American phylotype IIB, sequevar 1, also classified as race 3 biovar 2. Here we report the completely sequenced genome of this strain, the first complete genome for phylotype IIB, sequevar 1, and the fourth for the R. solanacearum species complex. In addition to standard genome annotation, we have carried out a curated annotation of type III effector genes, an important pathogenicity-related class of genes for this organism. We identified 60 effector genes, and observed that this effector repertoire is distinct when compared to those from other phylotype IIB strains. Eleven of the effectors appear to be nonfunctional due to disruptive mutations. We also report a methylome analysis of this genome, the first for a R. solanacearum strain. This analysis helped us note the presence of a toxin gene within a region of probable phage origin, raising the hypothesis that this gene may play a role in this strain's virulence.

  11. Polyphenol Oxidase Activity Expression in Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Romero, Diana; Solano, Francisco; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Sequencing of the genome of Ralstonia solanacearum revealed several genes that putatively code for polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). To study the actual expression of these genes, we looked for and detected all kinds of PPO activities, including laccase, cresolase, and catechol oxidase activities, in cellular extracts of this microorganism. The conditions for the PPO assays were optimized for the phenolic substrate, pH, and sodium dodecyl sulfate concentration used. It was demonstrated that three different PPOs are expressed. The genes coding for the enzymes were unambiguously correlated with the enzymatic activities detected by generation of null mutations in the genes by using insertional mutagenesis with a suicide plasmid and estimating the changes in the levels of enzymatic activities compared to the levels in the wild-type strain. The protein encoded by the RSp1530 locus is a multicopper protein with laccase activity. Two other genes, RSc0337 and RSc1501, code for nonblue copper proteins exhibiting homology to tyrosinases. The product of RSc0337 has strong tyrosine hydroxylase activity, and it has been shown that this enzyme is involved in melanin synthesis by R. solanacearum. The product of the RSc1501 gene is an enzyme that shows a clear preference for oxidation of o-diphenols. Preliminary characterization of the mutants obtained indicated that PPOs expressed by R. solanacearum may participate in resistance to phenolic compounds since the mutants exhibited higher sensitivity to l-tyrosine than the wild-type strain. These results suggest a possible role in the pathogenic process to avoid plant resistance mechanisms involving the participation of phenolic compounds. PMID:16269713

  12. Susceptibility of Geranium Cultivars (Pelargonium spp.) to Ralstonia solanacearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixty-one cultivars of geraniums including zonal, regal, ivy, and scented were tested for susceptibility to three strains of Ralstonia solanacearum: a Race 1 Biovar 1 (R1B1) strain P597 isolated from tomato in Florida, a R1B1 strain P673 obtained from pothos originating in Costa Rica, and a Race 3 B...

  13. Polyphasic taxonomic revision of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex: proposal to emend the descriptions of Ralstonia solanacearum and Ralstonia syzygii and reclassify current R. syzygii strains as Ralstonia syzygii subsp. syzygii subsp. nov., R. solanacearum phylotype IV strains as Ralstonia syzygii subsp. indonesiensis subsp. nov., banana blood disease bacterium strains as Ralstonia syzygii subsp. celebesensis subsp. nov. and R. solanacearum phylotype I and III strains as Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Safni, Irda; Cleenwerck, Ilse; De Vos, Paul; Fegan, Mark; Sly, Lindsay; Kappler, Ulrike

    2014-09-01

    The Ralstonia solanacearum species complex has long been recognized as a group of phenotypically diverse strains that can be subdivided into four phylotypes. Using a polyphasic taxonomic approach on an extensive set of strains, this study provides evidence for a taxonomic and nomenclatural revision of members of this complex. Data obtained from phylogenetic analysis of 16S-23S rRNA ITS gene sequences, 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer (ITS) region sequences and partial endoglucanase (egl) gene sequences and DNA-DNA hybridizations demonstrate that the R. solanacearum species complex comprises three genospecies. One of these includes the type strain of Ralstonia solanacearum and consists of strains of R. solanacearum phylotype II only. The second genospecies includes the type strain of Ralstonia syzygii and contains only phylotype IV strains. This genospecies is subdivided into three distinct groups, namely R. syzygii, the causal agent of Sumatra disease on clove trees in Indonesia, R. solanacearum phylotype IV strains isolated from different host plants mostly from Indonesia, and strains of the blood disease bacterium (BDB), the causal agent of the banana blood disease, a bacterial wilt disease in Indonesia that affects bananas and plantains. The last genospecies is composed of R. solanacearum strains that belong to phylotypes I and III. As these genospecies are also supported by phenotypic data that allow the differentiation of the three genospecies, the following taxonomic proposals are made: emendation of the descriptions of Ralstonia solanacearum and Ralstonia syzygii and descriptions of Ralstonia syzygii subsp. nov. (type strain R 001(T) = LMG 10661(T) = DSM 7385(T)) for the current R. syzygii strains, Ralstonia syzygii subsp. indonesiensis subsp. nov. (type strain UQRS 464(T) = LMG 27703(T) = DSM 27478(T)) for the current R. solanacearum phylotype IV strains, Ralstonia syzygii subsp. celebesensis subsp. nov. (type strain UQRS 627(T

  14. Studies on the biosynthesis of ralfuranones in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Kai, Kenji; Ohnishi, Hideyuki; Kiba, Akinori; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2016-01-01

    Ralfuranones, aryl-furanone secondary metabolites, are involved in the virulence of Ralstonia solanacearum in solanaceous plants. Ralfuranone I (6) has been suggested as a biosynthetic precursor for other ralfuranones; however, this conversion has not been confirmed. We herein investigate the biosynthesis of ralfuranones using feeding experiments with ralfuranone I (6) and its putative metabolite, ralfuranone B (2). The results obtained demonstrated that the biosynthesis of ralfuranones proceeded in enzymatic and non-enzymatic manners. PMID:26645956

  15. Studies on the biosynthesis of ralfuranones in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Kai, Kenji; Ohnishi, Hideyuki; Kiba, Akinori; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2016-01-01

    Ralfuranones, aryl-furanone secondary metabolites, are involved in the virulence of Ralstonia solanacearum in solanaceous plants. Ralfuranone I (6) has been suggested as a biosynthetic precursor for other ralfuranones; however, this conversion has not been confirmed. We herein investigate the biosynthesis of ralfuranones using feeding experiments with ralfuranone I (6) and its putative metabolite, ralfuranone B (2). The results obtained demonstrated that the biosynthesis of ralfuranones proceeded in enzymatic and non-enzymatic manners.

  16. Native Valve Endocarditis due to Ralstonia pickettii: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Orme, Joseph; Rivera-Bonilla, Tomas; Loli, Akil; Blattman, Negin N

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia pickettii is a rare pathogen and even more rare in healthy individuals. Here we report a case of R. pickettii bacteremia leading to aortic valve abscess and complete heart block. To our knowledge this is the first case report of Ralstonia species causing infective endocarditis with perivalvular abscess. PMID:25648998

  17. Native Valve Endocarditis due to Ralstonia pickettii: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Orme, Joseph; Rivera-Bonilla, Tomas; Loli, Akil; Blattman, Negin N

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia pickettii is a rare pathogen and even more rare in healthy individuals. Here we report a case of R. pickettii bacteremia leading to aortic valve abscess and complete heart block. To our knowledge this is the first case report of Ralstonia species causing infective endocarditis with perivalvular abscess.

  18. Native Valve Endocarditis due to Ralstonia pickettii: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Orme, Joseph; Rivera-Bonilla, Tomas; Loli, Akil; Blattman, Negin N.

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia pickettii is a rare pathogen and even more rare in healthy individuals. Here we report a case of R. pickettii bacteremia leading to aortic valve abscess and complete heart block. To our knowledge this is the first case report of Ralstonia species causing infective endocarditis with perivalvular abscess. PMID:25648998

  19. Ralfuranone thioether production by the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Julia; Spiteller, Dieter; Linz, Jeanine; Jacobs, Jonathan; Allen, Caitilyn; Nett, Markus; Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2013-11-01

    Ralfuranones are aryl-substituted furanone secondary metabolites of the Gram-negative plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. New sulfur-containing ralfuranone derivatives were identified, including the methyl thioether-containing ralfuranone D. Isotopic labeling in vivo, as well as headspace analyses of volatiles from R. solanacearum liquid cultures, established a mechanism for the transfer of an intact methylthio group from L-methionine or α-keto-γ-methylthiobutyric acid. The methylthio acceptor molecule ralfuranone I, a previously postulated biosynthetic intermediate in ralfuranone biosynthesis, was isolated and characterized by NMR. The highly reactive Michael acceptor system of this intermediate readily reacts with various thiols, including glutathione.

  20. Genome sequence of the tobacco bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Li, Zefeng; Wu, Sanling; Bai, Xuefei; Liu, Yun; Lu, Jianfei; Liu, Yong; Xiao, Bingguang; Lu, Xiuping; Fan, Longjiang

    2011-11-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a causal agent of plant bacterial wilt with thousands of distinct strains in a heterogeneous species complex. Here we report the genome sequence of a phylotype IB strain, Y45, isolated from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) in China. Compared with the published genomes of eight strains which were isolated from other hosts and habitats, 794 specific genes and many rearrangements/inversion events were identified in the tobacco strain, demonstrating that this strain represents an important node within the R. solanacearum complex. PMID:21994922

  1. Genome sequence of the tobacco bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Li, Zefeng; Wu, Sanling; Bai, Xuefei; Liu, Yun; Lu, Jianfei; Liu, Yong; Xiao, Bingguang; Lu, Xiuping; Fan, Longjiang

    2011-11-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a causal agent of plant bacterial wilt with thousands of distinct strains in a heterogeneous species complex. Here we report the genome sequence of a phylotype IB strain, Y45, isolated from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) in China. Compared with the published genomes of eight strains which were isolated from other hosts and habitats, 794 specific genes and many rearrangements/inversion events were identified in the tobacco strain, demonstrating that this strain represents an important node within the R. solanacearum complex.

  2. Ralstonia solanacearum: secrets of a major pathogen unveiled by analysis of its genome.

    PubMed

    Genin, Stéphane; Boucher, Christian

    2002-05-01

    Summary Ralstonia solanacearum Taxonomy: Bacteria; Proteobacteria; beta subdivision; Ralstonia group; genus Ralstonia Microbiological properties: Gram-negative, aerobic, motile rod. Disease symptoms: Agent of bacterial wilt of solanaceous plants, which appears as a sudden wilt. Typically, stem cross-sections ooze a whitish bacterial exudate. R. solanacearum is also the agent of the Moko disease of banana and brown rot of potato. Disease control: Pathogen-free seed and transplants. Few resistant and tolerant plant lines. Sanitation and cultural rotations. Useful web sites: http://ibws.nexenservices.com/;http://sequence.toulouse.inra.fr/R.solanacearum.html.

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of Ralstonia pickettii Strains SSH4 and CW2, Isolated from Space Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Monsieurs, Pieter; Mijnendonckx, Kristel; Provoost, Ann; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Ott, C. Mark; Leys, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Ralstonia pickettii SSH4 and CW2 were isolated from space equipment. Here, we report their draft genome sequences with the aim of gaining insight into their potential to adapt to these environments. PMID:25189592

  4. TALE-Like Effectors Are an Ancestral Feature of the Ralstonia solanacearum Species Complex and Converge in DNA Targeting Specificity.

    PubMed

    Schandry, Niklas; de Lange, Orlando; Prior, Philippe; Lahaye, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, a species complex of bacterial plant pathogens divided into four monophyletic phylotypes, causes plant diseases in tropical climates around the world. Some strains exhibit a broad host range on solanaceous hosts, while others are highly host-specific as for example some banana-pathogenic strains. Previous studies showed that transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors from Ralstonia, termed RipTALs, are capable of activating reporter genes in planta, if these are preceded by a matching effector binding element (EBE). RipTALs target DNA via their central repeat domain (CRD), where one repeat pairs with one DNA-base of the given EBE. The repeat variable diresidue dictates base repeat specificity in a predictable fashion, known as the TALE code. In this work, we analyze RipTALs across all phylotypes of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex. We find that RipTALs are prevalent in phylotypes I and IV but absent from most phylotype III and II strains (10/12, 8/14, 1/24, and 1/5 strains contained a RipTAL, respectively). RipTALs originating from strains of the same phylotype show high levels of sequence similarity (>98%) in the N-terminal and C-terminal regions, while RipTALs isolated from different phylotypes show 47-91% sequence similarity in those regions, giving rise to four RipTAL classes. We show that, despite sequence divergence, the base preference for guanine, mediated by the N-terminal region, is conserved across RipTALs of all classes. Using the number and order of repeats found in the CRD, we functionally sub-classify RipTALs, introduce a new simple nomenclature, and predict matching EBEs for all seven distinct RipTALs identified. We experimentally study RipTAL EBEs and uncover that some RipTALs are able to target the EBEs of other RipTALs, referred to as cross-reactivity. In particular, RipTALs from strains with a broad host range on solanaceous hosts cross-react on each other's EBEs. Investigation of sequence divergence between

  5. TALE-Like Effectors Are an Ancestral Feature of the Ralstonia solanacearum Species Complex and Converge in DNA Targeting Specificity.

    PubMed

    Schandry, Niklas; de Lange, Orlando; Prior, Philippe; Lahaye, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, a species complex of bacterial plant pathogens divided into four monophyletic phylotypes, causes plant diseases in tropical climates around the world. Some strains exhibit a broad host range on solanaceous hosts, while others are highly host-specific as for example some banana-pathogenic strains. Previous studies showed that transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors from Ralstonia, termed RipTALs, are capable of activating reporter genes in planta, if these are preceded by a matching effector binding element (EBE). RipTALs target DNA via their central repeat domain (CRD), where one repeat pairs with one DNA-base of the given EBE. The repeat variable diresidue dictates base repeat specificity in a predictable fashion, known as the TALE code. In this work, we analyze RipTALs across all phylotypes of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex. We find that RipTALs are prevalent in phylotypes I and IV but absent from most phylotype III and II strains (10/12, 8/14, 1/24, and 1/5 strains contained a RipTAL, respectively). RipTALs originating from strains of the same phylotype show high levels of sequence similarity (>98%) in the N-terminal and C-terminal regions, while RipTALs isolated from different phylotypes show 47-91% sequence similarity in those regions, giving rise to four RipTAL classes. We show that, despite sequence divergence, the base preference for guanine, mediated by the N-terminal region, is conserved across RipTALs of all classes. Using the number and order of repeats found in the CRD, we functionally sub-classify RipTALs, introduce a new simple nomenclature, and predict matching EBEs for all seven distinct RipTALs identified. We experimentally study RipTAL EBEs and uncover that some RipTALs are able to target the EBEs of other RipTALs, referred to as cross-reactivity. In particular, RipTALs from strains with a broad host range on solanaceous hosts cross-react on each other's EBEs. Investigation of sequence divergence between

  6. TALE-Like Effectors Are an Ancestral Feature of the Ralstonia solanacearum Species Complex and Converge in DNA Targeting Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Schandry, Niklas; de Lange, Orlando; Prior, Philippe; Lahaye, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, a species complex of bacterial plant pathogens divided into four monophyletic phylotypes, causes plant diseases in tropical climates around the world. Some strains exhibit a broad host range on solanaceous hosts, while others are highly host-specific as for example some banana-pathogenic strains. Previous studies showed that transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors from Ralstonia, termed RipTALs, are capable of activating reporter genes in planta, if these are preceded by a matching effector binding element (EBE). RipTALs target DNA via their central repeat domain (CRD), where one repeat pairs with one DNA-base of the given EBE. The repeat variable diresidue dictates base repeat specificity in a predictable fashion, known as the TALE code. In this work, we analyze RipTALs across all phylotypes of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex. We find that RipTALs are prevalent in phylotypes I and IV but absent from most phylotype III and II strains (10/12, 8/14, 1/24, and 1/5 strains contained a RipTAL, respectively). RipTALs originating from strains of the same phylotype show high levels of sequence similarity (>98%) in the N-terminal and C-terminal regions, while RipTALs isolated from different phylotypes show 47–91% sequence similarity in those regions, giving rise to four RipTAL classes. We show that, despite sequence divergence, the base preference for guanine, mediated by the N-terminal region, is conserved across RipTALs of all classes. Using the number and order of repeats found in the CRD, we functionally sub-classify RipTALs, introduce a new simple nomenclature, and predict matching EBEs for all seven distinct RipTALs identified. We experimentally study RipTAL EBEs and uncover that some RipTALs are able to target the EBEs of other RipTALs, referred to as cross-reactivity. In particular, RipTALs from strains with a broad host range on solanaceous hosts cross-react on each other’s EBEs. Investigation of sequence divergence

  7. Mobilization of Selenite by Ralstonia metallidurans CH34

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Murielle; Sarret, Géraldine; Pignot-Paintrand, Isabelle; Fontecave, Marc; Coves, Jacques

    2001-01-01

    Ralstonia metallidurans CH34 (formerly Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34) is a soil bacterium characteristic of metal-contaminated biotopes, as it is able to grow in the presence of a variety of heavy metals. R. metallidurans CH34 is reported now to resist up to 6 mM selenite and to reduce selenite to elemental red selenium as shown by extended X-ray absorption fine-structure analysis. Growth kinetics analysis suggests an adaptation of the cells to the selenite stress during the lag-phase period. Depending on the culture conditions, the medium can be completely depleted of selenite. Selenium accumulates essentially in the cytoplasm as judged from electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Elemental selenium, highly insoluble, represents a nontoxic storage form for the bacterium. The ability of R. metallidurans CH34 to reduce large amounts of selenite may be of interest for bioremediation processes targeting selenite-polluted sites. PMID:11157242

  8. Deciphering phenotypic diversity of Ralstonia solanacearum strains pathogenic to potato.

    PubMed

    Cellier, G; Prior, P

    2010-11-01

    Based on the phylotype classification, we questioned how genetically and phenotypically diverse strains of Ralstonia solanacearum pathogenic to potato may be. We studied 129 European and Mediterranean strains along with 57 reference strains known to cover genetic diversity in this species. Phylogeny analysis was done on endoglucanase gene sequences. Pathogenicity to potato, tomato, and eggplant was established at 24 to 30°C and 15 to 24°C, whereas tests on banana were conducted at 24 to 30°C. The ability to cause wilt on species of Solanaceae was shared by strains in all four phylotypes. Brown rot phylotypes IIB-1 and IIB-2 and phylotype IIB-27 established latent infections in banana, and Moko disease-causing phylotypes IIA-6, IIB-3, and IIB-4 were virulent to susceptible potato and tomato, addressing the question of host adaptation mechanisms, which may have undergone a similar bottleneck evolution. Cold-tolerance ability is only shared on species of Solanaceae among brown rot phylotype IIB-1, which gathered the majority of European and Mediterranean strains. We surveyed strain LNPV24.25 as the first report of an emerging phylotype IIB-4NPB strain in France. These findings showed that pathogenicity traits of genetically identified strains still need to be understood, especially in the perspective of post-genomics comparative analysis, to understand bacterial speciation in the R. solanacearum species complex.

  9. Genome sequence of the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Salanoubat, M; Genin, S; Artiguenave, F; Gouzy, J; Mangenot, S; Arlat, M; Billault, A; Brottier, P; Camus, J C; Cattolico, L; Chandler, M; Choisne, N; Claudel-Renard, C; Cunnac, S; Demange, N; Gaspin, C; Lavie, M; Moisan, A; Robert, C; Saurin, W; Schiex, T; Siguier, P; Thébault, P; Whalen, M; Wincker, P; Levy, M; Weissenbach, J; Boucher, C A

    2002-01-31

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a devastating, soil-borne plant pathogen with a global distribution and an unusually wide host range. It is a model system for the dissection of molecular determinants governing pathogenicity. We present here the complete genome sequence and its analysis of strain GMI1000. The 5.8-megabase (Mb) genome is organized into two replicons: a 3.7-Mb chromosome and a 2.1-Mb megaplasmid. Both replicons have a mosaic structure providing evidence for the acquisition of genes through horizontal gene transfer. Regions containing genetically mobile elements associated with the percentage of G+C bias may have an important function in genome evolution. The genome encodes many proteins potentially associated with a role in pathogenicity. In particular, many putative attachment factors were identified. The complete repertoire of type III secreted effector proteins can be studied. Over 40 candidates were identified. Comparison with other genomes suggests that bacterial plant pathogens and animal pathogens harbour distinct arrays of specialized type III-dependent effectors. PMID:11823852

  10. Roles of different forms of lipopolysaccharides in Ralstonia solanacearum pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chien-Hui; Wang, Kuan-Chung; Hong, Yu-Hau; Chu, Tai-Hsiang; Chu, Yu-Ju; Chou, I-Chun; Lu, Der-Kang; Chen, Chiao-Yen; Yang, Wen-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Mei; Cheng, Chiu-Ping

    2014-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are critical components for the fitness of most gram-negative bacteria. Ralstonia solanacearum causes a deadly wilting disease in many crops; however, the pathogenic roles of different forms of LPS and their pathways of biogenesis remain unknown. By screening for phage-resistant mutants of R. solanacearum Pss4, whose genome sequence is unavailable, mutants with various types of structural defects in LPS were isolated. Pathogenesis assays of the mutants revealed that production of rough LPS (R-LPS), which does not contain O-polysaccharides, was sufficient to cause necrosis on Nicotiana benthamiana and induce the hypersensitive response on N. tabacum. However, biosynthesis of smooth LPS (S-LPS), which contains O-polysaccharides, was required for bacterial proliferation at infection sites on N. benthamiana leaves and for proliferation and causing wilt on tomato. Complementation tests confirmed the involvement of the previously unidentified cluster RSc2201 to RSc2204 in the formation of R. solanacearum S-LPS. With these data and the availability of the annotated genomic sequence of strain GMI1000, certain loci involved in key steps of R. solanacearum LPS biosynthesis were identified. The strategy of this work could be useful for similar studies in other bacteria without available genome sequences.

  11. Molecular Diversity of Ralstonia solanacearum Isolated from Ginger in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Yu, Q; Alvarez, A M; Moore, P H; Zee, F; Kim, M S; de Silva, A; Hepperly, P R; Ming, R

    2003-09-01

    ABSTRACT The genetic diversity of Ralstonia solanacearum strains isolated from ginger (Zingiber officinale) growing on the island of Hawaii was determined by analysis of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). Initially 28 strains of R. solanacearum collected from five host plant species worldwide were analyzed by AFLP. A second analysis was conducted on 55 R. solanacearum strains collected from three ginger farms along the Hamakua Coast of Hawaii, the principle area of ginger cultivation in the state. From the initial analysis, R. solanacearum strains from ginger in Hawaii showed a high degree of similarity at 0.853. In contrast, the average genetic similarity between R. solanacearum strains from heliconia and ginger was only 0.165, and strains from ginger showed little similarity with strains from all other hosts. The second analysis of 55 strains from ginger on different Hawaiian farms confirmed that they were distinct from race 1 strains from tomato. Strains from ginger also showed greater diversity among themselves in the second analysis, and the greatest diversity occurred among strains from a farm where ginger is frequently imported and maintained. Our results provide evidence that R. solanacearum strains from ginger in Hawaii are genetically distinct from local strains from tomato (race 1) and heliconia (race 2).

  12. Genetic Diversity of Japanese Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Horita, M; Tsuchiya, K

    2001-04-01

    ABSTRACT The genetic diversity of 74 Japanese strains of Ralstonia solanacearum was assessed by pathogenicity tests and the repetitive sequencebased polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) fingerprint method. Based on their genomic fingerprints, biovar N2 strains were divided into two distinct groups, one consisting of potato isolates belonging to race 3, and the other consisting of tomato, eggplant, pepper, and tobacco isolates belonging to race 1. Biovar 3 strains had low average similarity and were divided into five groups that differed in original host or pathogenicity. Biovar 4 strains consisted of only one group at the 80% similarity level. Comparative analysis of the rep-PCR fingerprints of 78 strains, including six biovars from Japan and various countries, revealed two main clusters. Cluster 1 comprised all biovar 3, 4, and 5 strains, biovar 1 strains from Reunion, and some biovar N2 strains from Japan. Cluster 2 included most of the biovar 1, 2, and N2 strains. The fingerprints showed low average similarity with biovar N2 strains from Japan and Brazil. PMID:18943853

  13. Genomic characterization of Ralstonia solanacearum phage ϕRS138 of the family Siphoviridae.

    PubMed

    Van Truong Thi, Bich; Pham Khanh, Nguyen Huan; Namikawa, Ryuta; Miki, Kaito; Kondo, Akihiro; Dang Thi, Phuong Thao; Kamei, Kaeko

    2016-02-01

    ϕRS138, a bacteriophage of the family Siphoviridae that lyses Ralstonia solanacearum, was isolated. The genomic DNA of ϕRS138 was 41,941 bp long with a GC content of 65.1 % and contained 56 putative open reading frames. The ϕRS138 genome could be divided into three regions based on similarities to other genomes: (1) a region containing genes encoding a putative transcriptional regulator and an integrase, similar to the prophage genes in Ralstonia solanacearum K60-1; (2) a region encoding proteins related to structural modules and virion morphogenesis, similar to genes in the Pseudomonas phages of the family Siphoviridae; and (3) a region highly similar to the genomes of other Ralstonia solanacearum strains. PMID:26526151

  14. Genomic characterization of Ralstonia solanacearum phage ϕRS138 of the family Siphoviridae.

    PubMed

    Van Truong Thi, Bich; Pham Khanh, Nguyen Huan; Namikawa, Ryuta; Miki, Kaito; Kondo, Akihiro; Dang Thi, Phuong Thao; Kamei, Kaeko

    2016-02-01

    ϕRS138, a bacteriophage of the family Siphoviridae that lyses Ralstonia solanacearum, was isolated. The genomic DNA of ϕRS138 was 41,941 bp long with a GC content of 65.1 % and contained 56 putative open reading frames. The ϕRS138 genome could be divided into three regions based on similarities to other genomes: (1) a region containing genes encoding a putative transcriptional regulator and an integrase, similar to the prophage genes in Ralstonia solanacearum K60-1; (2) a region encoding proteins related to structural modules and virion morphogenesis, similar to genes in the Pseudomonas phages of the family Siphoviridae; and (3) a region highly similar to the genomes of other Ralstonia solanacearum strains.

  15. Complete genome sequence of a filamentous bacteriophage, RS611, that infects the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Van, Truong Thi Bich; Yoshida, Shohei; Miki, Kaito; Kondo, Akihiro; Kamei, Kaeko

    2015-03-01

    Filamentous bacteriophage RS611 (ϕRS611), which infects the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum, had a circular single-stranded DNA genome that was characterized as an Ff-type phage belonging to the family Inoviridae. The ϕRS611 genome was composed of 6386 bases with a G + C content of 62.1 % and contained 11 putative open reading frames. The ϕRS611 genome showed high similarity to those of Ralstonia phages RSS0 and RSS1. However, approximately 900-nucleotide deletions were found in the region corresponding to open reading frames 10 and 11 of ϕRSS0 and ϕRSS1.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of the Plant Pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum Strain Po82 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin; Zheng, Hua-jun; Liu, Lei; Pan, Zhe-chao; Prior, Philippe; Tang, Biao; Xu, Jing-sheng; Zhang, Hao; Tian, Qian; Zhang, Li-qing; Feng, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum strain Po82, a phylotype IIB/sequevar 4 strain, was found to be pathogenic to both solanaceous plants and banana. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Po82 and its comparison with seven published R. solanacearum genomes. PMID:21685279

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Nine Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum Differing in Virulence to Eggplant (Solanum melongena).

    PubMed

    Guinard, Jérémy; Vinatzer, Boris A; Poussier, Stéphane; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Wicker, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum displays variability in its virulence to solanaceous crops. We report here the draft genome sequences of eight phylotype I strains and one phylotype III strain differing in virulence to the resistant eggplant genotype AG91-25. These data will allow the identification of virulence- and avirulence-related genes. PMID:26823572

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Nine Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum Differing in Virulence to Eggplant (Solanum melongena)

    PubMed Central

    Guinard, Jérémy; Vinatzer, Boris A.; Poussier, Stéphane; Lefeuvre, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum displays variability in its virulence to solanaceous crops. We report here the draft genome sequences of eight phylotype I strains and one phylotype III strain differing in virulence to the resistant eggplant genotype AG91-25. These data will allow the identification of virulence- and avirulence-related genes. PMID:26823572

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Nine Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum Differing in Virulence to Eggplant (Solanum melongena).

    PubMed

    Guinard, Jérémy; Vinatzer, Boris A; Poussier, Stéphane; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Wicker, Emmanuel

    2016-01-28

    Ralstonia solanacearum displays variability in its virulence to solanaceous crops. We report here the draft genome sequences of eight phylotype I strains and one phylotype III strain differing in virulence to the resistant eggplant genotype AG91-25. These data will allow the identification of virulence- and avirulence-related genes.

  20. A multiplex PCR assay to detect and differentiate select agent strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ralstonia solanacearum causes bacterial wilt in a variety of cash crops. R. solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains are considered select agents by the U.S. Government because they are not endemic to the U.S. and have the potential to cause brown rot disease in our potato production fields. Simple and...

  1. Antagonistic activity and mechanisms of Bacillus subtilis SB1 against Ralstonia solanacearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A potential biocontrol agent of bacterial wilt, Bacillus subtilis SB1, showed a broad-spectrum of antimicrobial activity in vitro experiments. In addition to Ralstonia solanacearum, strain SB1 inhibited the growth of many other plant pathogens, including Fusarium oxysporum, Botrytis cinerea, Phytoph...

  2. Genetic diversity and host range variation of Ralstonia solanacearum strains entering the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Each year, large volumes of plant propagative stock are imported into the United States; occasionally, Ralstonia solanacearum is found systemically infecting this plant material. In this study, 106 R. solanacearum strains were collected over a 10-year period from imported ornamental propagative sto...

  3. Effect of plant essential oils on Ralstonia solanacearum race 4 causing bacterial wilt of edible ginger

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Palmarosa (Cymbopogon martini), lemongrass (C. citratus) and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) oils were investigated for their effects on Ralstonia solanacearum race 4, and their potential use as bio-fumigants for treating pathogen- infested edible ginger (Zingiber officinale R.) fields. Three conce...

  4. Isolation, identification and characterization of a novel Ralstonia sp. FD-1, capable of degrading 4-fluoroaniline.

    PubMed

    Song, Erxi; Wang, Meizhen; Shen, Dongsheng

    2014-02-01

    A gram-negative strain, designated as FD-1, isolated from aerobic activated sludge was capable of metabolizing 4-fluoroaniline (4-FA) as its sole carbon and nitrogen source and energy supply. According to the Biolog GNIII detection method 17 of 71 carbon substrates were easily utilized, while 12 of 23 substrates did not inhibit strain FD-1. The 16S rDNA sequence from strain FD-1 was 99 % similar to Ralstonia sp., suggesting that it belonged to the genus Ralstonia. The optimal conditions for growth and 4-FA degradation were pH 7 and 30 °C. The tolerance to 4-FA were 1,250 mg/L, while the tolerance to salinity was 15 g/L. Catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity was detected and degradation intermediates were analyzed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry leading to a proposed degradation pathway and suggesting that extradiol cleavage was involved in 4-FA degradation. This is the first report on the degradation of 4-FA by a bacterium from the Ralstonia genus.

  5. Root-associated bacterial endophytes from Ralstonia solanacearum resistant and susceptible tomato cultivars and their pathogen antagonistic effects.

    PubMed

    Upreti, Reshmi; Thomas, Pious

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess if the root-associated native bacterial endophytes in tomato have any bearing in governing the host resistance to the wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. Internal colonization of roots by bacterial endophytes was confirmed through confocal imaging after SYTO-9 staining. Endophytes were isolated from surface-sterilized roots of 4-weeks-old seedlings of known wilt resistant (R) tomato cultivar Arka Abha and susceptible (S) cv. Arka Vikas on nutrient agar after plating the tissue homogenate. Arka Abha displayed more diversity with nine distinct organisms while Arka Vikas showed five species with two common organisms (Pseudomonas oleovorans and Agrobacterium tumefaciens). Screening for general indicators of biocontrol potential showed more isolates from Arka Abha positive for siderophore, HCN and antibiotic biosynthesis than from Arka Vikas. Direct challenge against the pathogen indicated strong antagonism by three Arka Abha isolates (P. oleovorans, Pantoea ananatis, and Enterobacter cloacae) and moderate activity by three others, while just one isolate from Arka Vikas (P. oleovorans) showed strong antagonism. Validation for the presence of bacterial endophytes on three R cultivars (Arka Alok, Arka Ananya, Arka Samrat) showed 8-9 antagonistic bacteria in them in comparison with four species in the three S cultivars (Arka Ashish, Arka Meghali, Arka Saurabhav). Altogether 34 isolates belonging to five classes, 16 genera and 27 species with 23 of them exhibiting pathogen antagonism were isolated from the four R cultivars against 17 isolates under three classes, seven genera and 13 species from the four S cultivars with eight isolates displaying antagonistic effects. The prevalence of higher endophytic bacterial diversity and more antagonistic organisms associated with the seedling roots of resistant cultivars over susceptible genotypes suggest a possible role by the root-associated endophytes in natural defense against the pathogen

  6. Root-associated bacterial endophytes from Ralstonia solanacearum resistant and susceptible tomato cultivars and their pathogen antagonistic effects.

    PubMed

    Upreti, Reshmi; Thomas, Pious

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess if the root-associated native bacterial endophytes in tomato have any bearing in governing the host resistance to the wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. Internal colonization of roots by bacterial endophytes was confirmed through confocal imaging after SYTO-9 staining. Endophytes were isolated from surface-sterilized roots of 4-weeks-old seedlings of known wilt resistant (R) tomato cultivar Arka Abha and susceptible (S) cv. Arka Vikas on nutrient agar after plating the tissue homogenate. Arka Abha displayed more diversity with nine distinct organisms while Arka Vikas showed five species with two common organisms (Pseudomonas oleovorans and Agrobacterium tumefaciens). Screening for general indicators of biocontrol potential showed more isolates from Arka Abha positive for siderophore, HCN and antibiotic biosynthesis than from Arka Vikas. Direct challenge against the pathogen indicated strong antagonism by three Arka Abha isolates (P. oleovorans, Pantoea ananatis, and Enterobacter cloacae) and moderate activity by three others, while just one isolate from Arka Vikas (P. oleovorans) showed strong antagonism. Validation for the presence of bacterial endophytes on three R cultivars (Arka Alok, Arka Ananya, Arka Samrat) showed 8-9 antagonistic bacteria in them in comparison with four species in the three S cultivars (Arka Ashish, Arka Meghali, Arka Saurabhav). Altogether 34 isolates belonging to five classes, 16 genera and 27 species with 23 of them exhibiting pathogen antagonism were isolated from the four R cultivars against 17 isolates under three classes, seven genera and 13 species from the four S cultivars with eight isolates displaying antagonistic effects. The prevalence of higher endophytic bacterial diversity and more antagonistic organisms associated with the seedling roots of resistant cultivars over susceptible genotypes suggest a possible role by the root-associated endophytes in natural defense against the pathogen.

  7. Root-associated bacterial endophytes from Ralstonia solanacearum resistant and susceptible tomato cultivars and their pathogen antagonistic effects

    PubMed Central

    Upreti, Reshmi; Thomas, Pious

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess if the root-associated native bacterial endophytes in tomato have any bearing in governing the host resistance to the wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. Internal colonization of roots by bacterial endophytes was confirmed through confocal imaging after SYTO-9 staining. Endophytes were isolated from surface-sterilized roots of 4-weeks-old seedlings of known wilt resistant (R) tomato cultivar Arka Abha and susceptible (S) cv. Arka Vikas on nutrient agar after plating the tissue homogenate. Arka Abha displayed more diversity with nine distinct organisms while Arka Vikas showed five species with two common organisms (Pseudomonas oleovorans and Agrobacterium tumefaciens). Screening for general indicators of biocontrol potential showed more isolates from Arka Abha positive for siderophore, HCN and antibiotic biosynthesis than from Arka Vikas. Direct challenge against the pathogen indicated strong antagonism by three Arka Abha isolates (P. oleovorans, Pantoea ananatis, and Enterobacter cloacae) and moderate activity by three others, while just one isolate from Arka Vikas (P. oleovorans) showed strong antagonism. Validation for the presence of bacterial endophytes on three R cultivars (Arka Alok, Arka Ananya, Arka Samrat) showed 8–9 antagonistic bacteria in them in comparison with four species in the three S cultivars (Arka Ashish, Arka Meghali, Arka Saurabhav). Altogether 34 isolates belonging to five classes, 16 genera and 27 species with 23 of them exhibiting pathogen antagonism were isolated from the four R cultivars against 17 isolates under three classes, seven genera and 13 species from the four S cultivars with eight isolates displaying antagonistic effects. The prevalence of higher endophytic bacterial diversity and more antagonistic organisms associated with the seedling roots of resistant cultivars over susceptible genotypes suggest a possible role by the root-associated endophytes in natural defense against the pathogen

  8. Genome sequences of Ralstonia insidiosa type strain ATCC 49129 and strain FC1138, a strong biofilm producer isolated from a fresh-cut produce-processing plant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ralstonia insidiosa FC1138 is a strong biofilm producer, isolated from a local fresh-cut produce processing plant. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Ralstonia insidiosa FC1138 which includes two circular chromosomes and a plasmid. To our knowledge, this is the first reported complete ...

  9. Genomic characterization of ϕRS603, a filamentous bacteriophage that is infectious to the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Van, Truong Thi Bich; Yoshida, Shohei; Miki, Kaito; Kondo, Akihiro; Kamei, Kaeko

    2014-12-01

    A filamentous bacteriophage (ϕ), ϕRS603, which is infectious to the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum was isolated. ϕRS603 was found to have a circular single-stranded DNA genome composed of 7679 nucleotides and to contain 13 putative open reading frames (ORFs). The ϕRS603 genome showed strong similarity with those of Ralstonia phages ϕRSM1 and ϕRSM3, as reported by Askora et al. The ϕRS603 genome had no ORFs corresponding to ORFs 2, 3, 13 and 14 (integrase) of ϕRSM3. ϕRS603 had an ORF that was homologous to other Ralstonia phages ϕRSS0 and ϕRSS1; however, ϕRSM1 and ϕRSM3 did not.

  10. [Advances in studies of the type III secretion system in Ralstonia solanacearum--A review].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Muyuan; Luo, Feng

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the most devastating plant diseases worldwide. The syringe-like type III secretion system (T3SS) plays a crucial role in its pathogenicity. R. solanacearum uses the T3SS to inject effector proteins (Type III effectors) into the cytoplasm of host cells, causing diseases in susceptible plants or triggering the hypersensitive response in resistant plants. In this article we review recent advances in studies of R. solanacearum T3SS and highlight their unique features. PMID:26562991

  11. [Advances in studies of the type III secretion system in Ralstonia solanacearum--A review].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Muyuan; Luo, Feng

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the most devastating plant diseases worldwide. The syringe-like type III secretion system (T3SS) plays a crucial role in its pathogenicity. R. solanacearum uses the T3SS to inject effector proteins (Type III effectors) into the cytoplasm of host cells, causing diseases in susceptible plants or triggering the hypersensitive response in resistant plants. In this article we review recent advances in studies of R. solanacearum T3SS and highlight their unique features.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Ralstonia sp. MD27, a Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate)-Degrading Bacterium, Isolated from Compost

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Morgan; McCully, Lucy M.; Silby, Mark W.; Charles-Ogan, Tamunonengiyeofori I.

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia sp. strain MD27, a novel biopolymer-degrading betaproteobacterium, was isolated from compost samples. This organism has been shown to utilize the biopolymer poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)] as a carbon source for growth. We report the draft genome sequence of MD27 with an estimated total sequence length of 5.9 Mb. PMID:26450738

  13. Evaluation of Chloropicrin as a Soil Fumigant against Ralstonia solanacarum in Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) Production in China

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Taotao; Liu, Pengfei; Shen, Jin; Li, Yuan; Ouyang, Canbin; Guo, Meixia; Cao, Aocheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Chloropicrin (Pic) offers a potential alternative to methyl bromide (MB) against Ralstonia solanacarum in ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) production. MB is scheduled to be withdrawn from routine use by 2015 in developing countries. Methods Pic treatments were evaluated in a laboratory study and in three commercial ginger fields. Results Laboratory studies showed that the EC50 value and EC80 value of Pic were 2.7 and 3.7 mg a.i. kg−1 soil, respectively. Field trials in highly infested soil revealed that treatments of Pic at the dose of 50 g m−2 covered with totally impermeable film (TIF) or polyethylene film (PE) sharply reduced Ralstonia solanacarum and maintained high ginger yields. Both of the Pic treatments provided results similar to, or in some cases slightly lower than, MB with respect to Ralstonia solanacarum control, plant survival, plant growth and yield. All of the fumigant treatments were significantly better than the non-treated control. Conclusions The present study confirms that the Pic is a promising alternative with good efficacy against Ralstonia solanacarum for ginger production and could be used in integrated pest management programs in China. PMID:24618853

  14. Ralstonia insidiosa serves as bridges in biofilm formation by foodborne pathogens Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica, and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces in fresh produce processing facilities might play a role in foodborne outbreaks by providing protective microniches for pathogenic bacteria. Our previous study showed that a strain of Ralstonia insidiosa isolated from a fresh produce processing plant could enhan...

  15. Ralstonia mannitolilytica-Induced Septicemia and Homology Analysis in Infected Patients: 3 Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cai-Xia; Yan, Chun; Zhang, Pan; Li, Fang-Qu; Yang, Jing-Hong; Li, Xiang-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background Ralstonia mannitolilytica is an emerging opportunistic pathogen. Hospital outbreaks of Ralstonia spp. are mainly associated with contaminated treatment water or auxiliary instruments. Objectives In this report, we summarize the clinical infection characteristics of R. mannitolilytica, the drug-susceptibility testing of the bacterial strains, and the results of related infection investigations. Patients and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical information of 3 patients with R. mannitolilytica. Results The patients’ primary-onset symptoms were chills and fever. The disease progressed rapidly and septic shock symptoms developed. Laboratory tests indicated progressively decreased white blood cells and platelets, as well as significant increases in certain inflammation indicators. The effect of treatment with Tazocin was good. The growth period of R. mannitolilytica in sterile distilled water was > 6 months. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) results revealed that the infectious strains from these 3 patients were not the same clonal strain. This bacterium was not detected in the nosocomial infection samples. Conclusions Our results suggest that R. mannitolilytica-induced septicemia had an acute disease onset and rapid progression. The preferred empirical antibiotic was Tazocin. In these 3 cases, the R. mannitolilytica-induced septicemia was not due to clonal transmission. PMID:27679705

  16. Ralstonia mannitolilytica-Induced Septicemia and Homology Analysis in Infected Patients: 3 Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cai-Xia; Yan, Chun; Zhang, Pan; Li, Fang-Qu; Yang, Jing-Hong; Li, Xiang-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background Ralstonia mannitolilytica is an emerging opportunistic pathogen. Hospital outbreaks of Ralstonia spp. are mainly associated with contaminated treatment water or auxiliary instruments. Objectives In this report, we summarize the clinical infection characteristics of R. mannitolilytica, the drug-susceptibility testing of the bacterial strains, and the results of related infection investigations. Patients and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical information of 3 patients with R. mannitolilytica. Results The patients’ primary-onset symptoms were chills and fever. The disease progressed rapidly and septic shock symptoms developed. Laboratory tests indicated progressively decreased white blood cells and platelets, as well as significant increases in certain inflammation indicators. The effect of treatment with Tazocin was good. The growth period of R. mannitolilytica in sterile distilled water was > 6 months. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) results revealed that the infectious strains from these 3 patients were not the same clonal strain. This bacterium was not detected in the nosocomial infection samples. Conclusions Our results suggest that R. mannitolilytica-induced septicemia had an acute disease onset and rapid progression. The preferred empirical antibiotic was Tazocin. In these 3 cases, the R. mannitolilytica-induced septicemia was not due to clonal transmission.

  17. Antibacterial enzymes from the functional screening of metagenomic libraries hosted in Ralstonia metallidurans

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Hala A.; Craig, Jeffrey W.; Brady, Sean F.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotype-based screening of bacterial metagenomic libraries provides an avenue for the discovery of novel genes, enzymes and metabolites that have a variety of potential clinical and industrial uses. Here we report the identification of a functionally diverse collection of antibacterially active enzymes from the phenotypic screening of 700,000 cosmid clones prepared from Arizona soil DNA and hosted in Ralstonia metallidurans. Environmental DNA clones surrounded by zones of growth inhibition in a bacterial overlay assay were found, through bioinformatics and functional analyses, to encode enzymes with predicted peptidase, lipase and glycolytic activities conferring antibiosis. The antibacterial activities observed in our R. metallidurans-based assay could not be replicated with the same clones in screens using Escherichia coli as a heterologous host, suggesting that the large-scale screening of metagenomic libraries for antibiosis using phylogenetically diverse hosts should be a productive strategy for identifying enzymes with functionally diverse antibacterial activities. PMID:24661178

  18. Involvement of ralfuranone production in the virulence of Ralstonia solanacearum OE1-1.

    PubMed

    Kai, Kenji; Ohnishi, Hideyuki; Mori, Yuka; Kiba, Akinori; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2014-11-24

    Ralstonia solanacearum causes a destructive disease called "bacterial wilt" in numerous plant species. Its virulence is controlled by the transcriptional regulator PhcA, the activity of which is, in turn, regulated in a cell-density dependent manner, termed quorum sensing. We herein described the identification and characterization of ralfuranones J-L, new PhcA-regulated secondary metabolites, and the known derivatives, ralfuranones A and B, from R. solanacearum strain OE1-1. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic and chemical methods. These ralfuranones were also detected in vascular exudates from host plants infected with OE1-1. Deletion of ralA, which encodes an enzyme for ralfuranone biosynthesis, reduced the virulence of OE1-1 in tomato plants. Virulence was restored by complementation of the ralA gene. The results suggest that ralfuranones play important roles in the virulence of OE1-1.

  19. Opening the Ralstonia solanacearum type III effector tool box: insights into host cell subversion mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Deslandes, Laurent; Genin, Stephane

    2014-08-01

    Effectors delivered to host cells by the Type III secretion system are essential to Ralstonia solanacearum pathogenicity, as in several other plant pathogenic bacteria. The establishment of exhaustive effector repertoires in multiple R. solanacearum strains drew a first picture of the evolutionary dynamics of the pathogen effector suites. Effector repertoires are diversified, with a core of 20-30 effectors present in most of the strains and the obtention of mutants lacking one or more effector genes revealed the functional overlap among this effector network. Recent functional studies have provided insights into the ability of single effectors to manipulate the host proteasome, elicit cell death, trigger the expression of plant genes, and/or display biochemical activities on plant protein targets.

  20. Comparison between Solanum torvum Sw. and S. melongena L. after Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation.

    PubMed

    Aribaud, M; Noirot, M; Fock-Bastide, I; Vaniet, S; Kodja, H

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial wilt, caused by Ralstonia solanacearum, is one of the most devastating plant diseases, affecting some economically important Solanaceae crops. In contrast, Solanum torvum, also known as wild eggplant, does not wilt when infested with R. solanacearum. In order to describe the mechanism underlying the response of S. torvum, it was compared with the cultivated eggplant, S. melongena, when both were infected with the same R. solanacearum strain. No wilting occurred in S. torvum, although the bacteria colonised roots and stems in both species within the first 24 h. There were marked differences beyond 24 h, consisting of high bacterial mortality in S. torvum. Using the calli model, our investigations revealed an increase in cell wall monoamine oxidase activity in S. torvum after R. solanacearum inoculation, which did not occur in S. melongena.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Ralstonia solanacearum Strain Rs-T02, Which Represents the Most Prevalent Phylotype in Guangxi, China.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chengwu; Wang, Kaihao; Meng, Jiaorong; Yuan, Gaoqing; Lin, Wei; Peng, Haowen; Li, Qiqin

    2016-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearumstrain Rs-T02 was originally isolated from a bacterial wilt of tomato plant in Nanning City of Guangxi Province, China. It represents the most prevalent phylotype in Guangxi. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of this strain, which comprises 5,225 genes and 5,976,011 nucleotides with an average G+C content of 66.79%. There are 968 different genes between this isolate and the previously reported genome sequence ofRalstonia solanacearumGMl l000 (race l, biovar 3, phylotype I), and the genome sequence information of this isolate may be useful for comparative genomic studies to determine the genetic diversity in this species. PMID:27081126

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Ralstonia solanacearum Strain Rs-T02, Which Represents the Most Prevalent Phylotype in Guangxi, China

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Chengwu; Wang, Kaihao; Meng, Jiaorong; Yuan, Gaoqing; Lin, Wei; Peng, Haowen

    2016-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum strain Rs-T02 was originally isolated from a bacterial wilt of tomato plant in Nanning City of Guangxi Province, China. It represents the most prevalent phylotype in Guangxi. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of this strain, which comprises 5,225 genes and 5,976,011 nucleotides with an average G+C content of 66.79%. There are 968 different genes between this isolate and the previously reported genome sequence of Ralstonia solanacearum GMl l000 (race l, biovar 3, phylotype I), and the genome sequence information of this isolate may be useful for comparative genomic studies to determine the genetic diversity in this species. PMID:27081126

  3. Cleaning-resistant Cupriavidus and Ralstonia bacteria contaminating spacecrafts and the ultra clean rooms they are assembled in.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leys, N.; Dams, A.; Bossus, A.; Provoost, A.; Venkateswaran, K.; Mergeay, M.

    Background Planetary Protection is preventing microbial contamination of both the target planet and the Earth when sending spacecrafts on interplanetary space mission It is important to preserve the natural conditions of other planets and to not bring with robots earthly microbes forward contamination when looking for spores of extra terrestrial life Spacecrafts and the ultra clean rooms they are assembled in are routinely monitored for microbial contamination It was shown that the floor air and surfaces of such spacecraft assembly rooms often contain Cupriavidu s and Ralstonia bacteria These bacteria not only contaminated the clean rooms but have also been found prior-to-flight on surfaces of space robots such as the Mars Odyssey Orbiter La Duc et al 2003 and even in-flight in ISS cooling water and Shuttle drinking water unpublished Aim In this study several Cupriavidus and Ralstonia strains isolated from space craft assembling rooms and spacecrafts were characterized and analysed in detail Results The analysis showed that all the Cupriavidus and Ralstonia clean-room isolates are able to use a wide variety of substrates as carbon sources including ethanol and acetone In addition they all have accumulated moderate resistances to an extraordinary collection of physical and chemical antimicrobial agents Some of the test strains were able to form biofilms on plastic and metal materials used for space robots a nutritional and

  4. Characterization of the survival ability of Cupriavidus metallidurans and Ralstonia pickettii from space-related environments.

    PubMed

    Mijnendonckx, K; Provoost, A; Ott, C M; Venkateswaran, K; Mahillon, J; Leys, N; Van Houdt, R

    2013-02-01

    Four Cupriavidus metallidurans and eight Ralstonia pickettii isolates from the space industry and the International Space Station (ISS) were characterized in detail. Nine of the 12 isolates were able to form a biofilm on plastics and all were resistant to several antibiotics. R. pickettii isolates from the surface of the Mars Orbiter prior to flight were 2.5 times more resistant to UV-C(254nm) radiation compared to the R. pickettii type strain. All isolates showed moderate to high tolerance against at least seven different metal ions. They were tolerant to medium to high silver concentrations (0.5-4 μM), which are higher than the ionic silver disinfectant concentrations measured regularly in the drinking water aboard the ISS. Furthermore, all isolates survived a 23-month exposure to 2 μM AgNO(3) in drinking water. These resistance properties are putatively encoded by their endogenous megaplasmids. This study demonstrated that extreme resistance is not required to withstand the disinfection and sterilization procedures implemented in the ISS and space industry. All isolates acquired moderate to high tolerance against several stressors and can grow in oligotrophic conditions, enabling them to persist in these environments.

  5. Contrasting recombination patterns and demographic histories of the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum inferred from MLSA

    PubMed Central

    Wicker, Emmanuel; Lefeuvre, Pierre; de Cambiaire, Jean-Charles; Lemaire, Christophe; Poussier, Stéphane; Prior, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    We used multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) on a worldwide collection of the plant pathogenic Ralstonia solanacearum (Betaproteobacteria) to retrace its complex evolutionary history. Using genetic imprints left during R. solanacearum evolution, we were able to delineate distinct evolutionary complex displaying contrasting dynamics. Among the phylotypes already described (I, IIA, IIB, III, IV), eight groups of strains with distinct evolutionary patterns, named clades, were identified. From our recombination analysis, we identified 21 recombination events that occurred within and across these lineages. Although appearing the most divergent and ancestral phylotype, phylotype IV was inferred as a gene donor for the majority of the recombination events that we detected. Whereas this phylotype apparently fuelled the species diversity, ongoing diversification was mainly detected within phylotype I, IIA and III. These three groups presented a recent expanding population structure, a high level of homologous recombination and evidences of long-distance migrations. Factors such as adaptation to a specific host or intense trading of infected crops may have promoted this diversification. Whether R. solanacearum lineages will eventually evolve in distinct species remains an open question. The intensification of cropping and increase of geographical dispersion may favour situations of phylotype sympatry and promote higher exchange of key factors for host adaptation from their common genetic pool. PMID:22094345

  6. Ralstonia solanacearum lipopeptide induces chlamydospore development in fungi and facilitates bacterial entry into fungal tissues.

    PubMed

    Spraker, Joseph E; Sanchez, Laura M; Lowe, Tiffany M; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Keller, Nancy P

    2016-09-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a globally distributed soil-borne plant pathogenic bacterium, which shares a broad ecological range with many plant- and soil-associated fungi. We sought to determine if R. solanacearum chemical communication directs symbiotic development of polymicrobial consortia. R. solanacearum produced a diffusible metabolite that induced conserved morphological differentiation in 34 species of fungi across three diverse taxa (Ascomycetes, Basidiomycetes and Zygomycetes). Fungi exposed to this metabolite formed chlamydospores, survival structures with thickened cell walls. Some chlamydospores internally harbored R. solanacearum, indicating a newly described endofungal lifestyle for this important plant pathogen. Using imaging mass spectrometry and peptidogenomics, we identified an undescribed lipopeptide, ralsolamycin, produced by an R. solanacearum non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase hybrid. Inactivation of the hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase gene, rmyA, abolished ralsolamycin synthesis. R. solanacearum mutants lacking ralsolamycin no longer induced chlamydospore development in fungal coculture and invaded fungal hyphae less well than wild-type. We propose that ralsolamycin contributes to the invasion of fungal hyphae and that the formation of chlamydospores may provide not only a specific niche for bacterial colonization but also enhanced survival for the partnering fungus. PMID:26943626

  7. Oleanolic Acid Induces the Type III Secretion System of Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dousheng; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xuejiao; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of bacterial wilt, can naturally infect a wide range of host plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a major virulence determinant in this bacterium. Studies have shown that plant-derived compounds are able to inhibit or induce the T3SS in some plant pathogenic bacteria, though no specific T3SS inhibitor or inducer has yet been identified in R. solanacearum. In this study, a total of 50 different compounds were screened and almost half of them (22 of 50) significantly inhibited or induced the T3SS expression of R. solanacearum. Based on the strong induction activity on T3SS, the T3SS inducer oleanolic acid (OA) was chosen for further study. We found that OA induced the expression of T3SS through the HrpG-HrpB pathway. Some type III effector genes were induced in T3SS inducing medium supplemented with OA. In addition, OA targeted only the T3SS and did not affect other virulence determinants. Finally, we observed that induction of T3SS by OA accelerated disease progress on tobacco. Overall our results suggest that plant-derived compounds are an abundant source of R. solanacearum T3SS regulators, which could prove useful as tools to interrogate the regulation of this key virulence pathway. PMID:26732647

  8. Proteome Analysis of Disease Resistance against Ralstonia solanacearum in Potato Cultivar CT206-10.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangryeol; Gupta, Ravi; Krishna, R; Kim, Sun Tae; Lee, Dong Yeol; Hwang, Duk-Ju; Bae, Shin-Chul; Ahn, Il-Pyung

    2016-02-01

    Potato is one of the most important crops worldwide. Its commercial cultivars are highly susceptible to many fungal and bacterial diseases. Among these, bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum causes significant yield loss. In the present study, integrated proteomics and genomics approaches were used in order to identify bacterial wilt resistant genes from Rs resistance potato cultivar CT-206-10. 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS analysis identified eight differentially abundant proteins including glycine-rich RNA binding protein (GRP), tomato stress induced-1 (TSI-1) protein, pathogenesis-related (STH-2) protein and pentatricopeptide repeat containing (PPR) protein in response to Rs infection. Further, semi-quantitative RT-PCR identified up-regulation in transcript levels of all these genes upon Rs infection. Taken together, our results showed the involvement of the identified proteins in the Rs stress tolerance in potato. In the future, it would be interesting to raise the transgenic plants to further validate their involvement in resistance against Rs in potato. PMID:26889112

  9. Evaluation of Resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum in Tomato Genetic Resources at Seedling Stage.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Gyu; Hur, On-Sook; Ro, Na-Young; Ko, Ho-Cheol; Rhee, Ju-Hee; Sung, Jung Sook; Ryu, Kyoung-Yul; Lee, Sok-Young; Baek, Hyung Jin

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial wilt of tomatoes caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is a devastating disease that limits the production of tomato in Korea. The best way to control this disease is using genetically resistant tomato plant. The resistance degree to R. solanacearum was evaluated for 285 tomato accessions conserved in the National Agrobiodiversity Center of Rural Development Administration. These accessions of tomato were originated from 23 countries. Disease severity of tomato accessions was investigated from 7 days to 14 days at an interval of 7 days after inoculation of R. solanacearum under greenhouse conditions. A total of 279 accessions of tomato germplasm were susceptible to R. solanacearum, resulting in wilt and death in 70 to 90% of these plants. Two tomato accessions were moderately resistant to R. solanacearum. Only four accessions showed high resistance against R. solanacearum. No distinct symptom of bacterial wilt appeared on the resistant tomato germplasms for up to 14 days after inoculation of R. solanacearum. Microscopy of resistant tomato stems infected with R. solanacearum revealed limited bacterial spread with thickening of pit membrane and gum production. Therefore, these four resistant tomato germplasms could be used in tomato breeding program against bacterial wilt. PMID:26889116

  10. Protein O-linked glycosylation in the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Elhenawy, Wael; Scott, Nichollas E; Tondo, M Laura; Orellano, Elena G; Foster, Leonard J; Feldman, Mario F

    2016-03-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the most lethal phytopathogens in the world. Due to its broad host range, it can cause wilting disease in many plant species of economic interest. In this work, we identified the O-oligosaccharyltransferase (O-OTase) responsible for protein O-glycosylation in R. solanacearum. An analysis of the glycoproteome revealed that 20 proteins, including type IV pilins are substrates of this general glycosylation system. Although multiple glycan forms were identified, the majority of the glycopeptides were modified with a pentasaccharide composed of HexNAc-(Pen)-dHex(3), similar to the O antigen subunit present in the lipopolysaccharide of multiple R. solanacearum strains. Disruption of the O-OTase led to the total loss of protein glycosylation, together with a defect in biofilm formation and reduced pathogenicity towards tomato plants. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed that the loss of glycosylation is not associated with widespread proteome changes. Only the levels of a single glycoprotein, the type IV pilin, were diminished in the absence of glycosylation. In parallel, disruption of glycosylation triggered an increase in the levels of a surface lectin homologous to Pseudomonas PA-IIL. These results reveal the important role of glycosylation in the pathogenesis of R. solanacearum. PMID:26531228

  11. Genomic diversity of large-plaque-forming podoviruses infecting the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takeru; Narulita, Erlia; Matsunami, Minaho; Ishikawa, Hiroki; Shimizu, Mio; Fujie, Makoto; Bhunchoth, Anjana; Phironrit, Namthip; Chatchawankanphanich, Orawan; Yamada, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    The genome organization, gene structure, and host range of five podoviruses that infect Ralstonia solanacearum, the causative agent of bacterial wilt disease were characterized. The phages fell into two distinctive groups based on the genome position of the RNA polymerase gene (i.e., T7-type and ϕKMV-type). One-step growth experiments revealed that ϕRSB2 (a T7-like phage) lysed host cells more efficiently with a shorter infection cycle (ca. 60 min corresponding to half the doubling time of the host) than ϕKMV-like phages such as ϕRSB1 (with an infection cycle of ca. 180 min). Co-infection experiments with ϕRSB1 and ϕRSB2 showed that ϕRSB2 always predominated in the phage progeny independent of host strains. Most phages had wide host-ranges and the phage particles usually did not attach to the resistant strains; when occasionally some did, the phage genome was injected into the resistant strain's cytoplasm, as revealed by fluorescence microscopy with SYBR Gold-labeled phage particles. PMID:26901487

  12. Detection of Quorum Sensing Molecules and Biofilm Formation in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Kumar, J Shiva; Umesha, S; Prasad, K Shiva; Niranjana, P

    2016-03-01

    Many bacteria use small diffusible signaling molecules to communicate each other termed as quorum sensing (QS). Most Gram-negative bacteria use acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) as QS signal molecules. Using these signaling molecules, bacteria are able to express specific genes in response to population density. This work aimed to detect the production of QS signal molecules and biofilm formation in Ralstonia solanacearum isolated from various diseased tomato plants with symptoms of bacterial wilt. A total of 30 R. solanacearum strains were investigated for the production of QS signal molecules using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens NT1 (pZLR4) biosensor systems. All 30 bacterial isolates from various bacterial wilt-affected tomato plants produced AHL molecules that induced the biosensor. The microtiter plate assay demonstrated that of the 30 bacterial isolates, 60 % formed biofilm, among which four isolates exhibited a higher degree of biofilm formation. The biofilm-inducing factor was purified from these four culture supernatants. The structure of the responsible molecule was solved using nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy and was determined to be 2-hydroxy-4-((methylamino)(phenyl)methyl) cyclopentanone (HMCP), which was confirmed by chemical synthesis and NMR. The Confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis showed well-developed biofilm architecture of bacteria when treated with HMCP. The knowledge we obtained from this study will be useful for further researcher on the role of HMCP molecule in biofilm formation. PMID:26620535

  13. New Insights into the Antibacterial Activity of Hydroxycoumarins against Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Ding, Wei; Xu, Yuquan; Wu, Dousheng; Li, Shili; Chen, Juanni; Guo, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Coumarins are important plant-derived natural products with wide-ranging bioactivities and extensive applications. In this study, we evaluated for the first time the antibacterial activity and mechanisms of action of coumarins against the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum, and investigated the effect of functional group substitution. We first tested the antibacterial activity of 18 plant-derived coumarins with different substitution patterns, and found that daphnetin, esculetin, xanthotol, and umbelliferone significantly inhibited the growth of R. solanacearum. Daphnetin showed the strongest antibacterial activity, followed by esculetin and umbelliferone, with MICs of 64, 192, and 256 mg/L, respectively, better than the archetypal coumarin with 384 mg/L. We further demonstrated that the hydroxylation of coumarins at the C-6, C-7 or C-8 position significantly enhanced the antibacterial activity against R. solanacearum. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and fluorescence microscopy images showed that hydroxycoumarins may interact with the pathogen by mechanically destroying the cell membrane and inhibiting biofilm formation. The antibiofilm effect of hydroxycoumarins may relate to the repression of flagellar genes fliA and flhC. These physiological changes in R. solanacearum caused by hydroxycoumarins can provide information for integral pathogen control. The present findings demonstrated that hydroxycoumarins have superior antibacterial activity against the phytopathogen R. solanacearum, and thus have the potential to be applied for controlling plant bacterial wilt. PMID:27070570

  14. Arsenite oxidase from Ralstonia sp. 22: characterization of the enzyme and its interaction with soluble cytochromes.

    PubMed

    Lieutaud, Aurélie; van Lis, Robert; Duval, Simon; Capowiez, Line; Muller, Daniel; Lebrun, Régine; Lignon, Sabrina; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Lett, Marie-Claire; Nitschke, Wolfgang; Schoepp-Cothenet, Barbara

    2010-07-01

    We characterized the aro arsenite oxidation system in the novel strain Ralstonia sp. 22, a beta-proteobacterium isolated from soil samples of the Salsigne mine in southern France. The inducible aro system consists of a heterodimeric membrane-associated enzyme reacting with a dedicated soluble cytochrome c(554). Our biochemical results suggest that the weak association of the enzyme to the membrane probably arises from a still unknown interaction partner. Analysis of the phylogeny of the aro gene cluster revealed that it results from a lateral gene transfer from a species closely related to Achromobacter sp. SY8. This constitutes the first clear cut case of such a transfer in the Aro phylogeny. The biochemical study of the enzyme demonstrates that it can accommodate in vitro various cytochromes, two of which, c(552) and c(554,) are from the parent species. Cytochrome c(552) belongs to the sox and not the aro system. Kinetic studies furthermore established that sulfite and sulfide, substrates of the sox system, are both inhibitors of Aro activity. These results reinforce the idea that sulfur and arsenic metabolism are linked.

  15. Oleanolic Acid Induces the Type III Secretion System of Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dousheng; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xuejiao; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of bacterial wilt, can naturally infect a wide range of host plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a major virulence determinant in this bacterium. Studies have shown that plant-derived compounds are able to inhibit or induce the T3SS in some plant pathogenic bacteria, though no specific T3SS inhibitor or inducer has yet been identified in R. solanacearum. In this study, a total of 50 different compounds were screened and almost half of them (22 of 50) significantly inhibited or induced the T3SS expression of R. solanacearum. Based on the strong induction activity on T3SS, the T3SS inducer oleanolic acid (OA) was chosen for further study. We found that OA induced the expression of T3SS through the HrpG-HrpB pathway. Some type III effector genes were induced in T3SS inducing medium supplemented with OA. In addition, OA targeted only the T3SS and did not affect other virulence determinants. Finally, we observed that induction of T3SS by OA accelerated disease progress on tobacco. Overall our results suggest that plant-derived compounds are an abundant source of R. solanacearum T3SS regulators, which could prove useful as tools to interrogate the regulation of this key virulence pathway. PMID:26732647

  16. Evaluation of Resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum in Tomato Genetic Resources at Seedling Stage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Gyu; Hur, On-Sook; Ro, Na-Young; Ko, Ho-Cheol; Rhee, Ju-Hee; Sung, Jung Sook; Ryu, Kyoung-Yul; Lee, Sok-Young; Baek, Hyung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial wilt of tomatoes caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is a devastating disease that limits the production of tomato in Korea. The best way to control this disease is using genetically resistant tomato plant. The resistance degree to R. solanacearum was evaluated for 285 tomato accessions conserved in the National Agrobiodiversity Center of Rural Development Administration. These accessions of tomato were originated from 23 countries. Disease severity of tomato accessions was investigated from 7 days to 14 days at an interval of 7 days after inoculation of R. solanacearum under greenhouse conditions. A total of 279 accessions of tomato germplasm were susceptible to R. solanacearum, resulting in wilt and death in 70 to 90% of these plants. Two tomato accessions were moderately resistant to R. solanacearum. Only four accessions showed high resistance against R. solanacearum. No distinct symptom of bacterial wilt appeared on the resistant tomato germplasms for up to 14 days after inoculation of R. solanacearum. Microscopy of resistant tomato stems infected with R. solanacearum revealed limited bacterial spread with thickening of pit membrane and gum production. Therefore, these four resistant tomato germplasms could be used in tomato breeding program against bacterial wilt. PMID:26889116

  17. Evaluation of Resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum in Tomato Genetic Resources at Seedling Stage.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Gyu; Hur, On-Sook; Ro, Na-Young; Ko, Ho-Cheol; Rhee, Ju-Hee; Sung, Jung Sook; Ryu, Kyoung-Yul; Lee, Sok-Young; Baek, Hyung Jin

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial wilt of tomatoes caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is a devastating disease that limits the production of tomato in Korea. The best way to control this disease is using genetically resistant tomato plant. The resistance degree to R. solanacearum was evaluated for 285 tomato accessions conserved in the National Agrobiodiversity Center of Rural Development Administration. These accessions of tomato were originated from 23 countries. Disease severity of tomato accessions was investigated from 7 days to 14 days at an interval of 7 days after inoculation of R. solanacearum under greenhouse conditions. A total of 279 accessions of tomato germplasm were susceptible to R. solanacearum, resulting in wilt and death in 70 to 90% of these plants. Two tomato accessions were moderately resistant to R. solanacearum. Only four accessions showed high resistance against R. solanacearum. No distinct symptom of bacterial wilt appeared on the resistant tomato germplasms for up to 14 days after inoculation of R. solanacearum. Microscopy of resistant tomato stems infected with R. solanacearum revealed limited bacterial spread with thickening of pit membrane and gum production. Therefore, these four resistant tomato germplasms could be used in tomato breeding program against bacterial wilt.

  18. Cloning and functional analysis of the pbr lead resistance determinant of Ralstonia metallidurans CH34.

    PubMed

    Borremans, B; Hobman, J L; Provoost, A; Brown, N L; van Der Lelie, D

    2001-10-01

    The lead resistance operon, pbr, of Ralstonia metallidurans (formerly Alcaligenes eutrophus) strain CH34 is unique, as it combines functions involved in uptake, efflux, and accumulation of Pb(II). The pbr lead resistance locus contains the following structural resistance genes: (i) pbrT, which encodes a Pb(II) uptake protein; (ii) pbrA, which encodes a P-type Pb(II) efflux ATPase; (iii) pbrB, which encodes a predicted integral membrane protein of unknown function; and (iv) pbrC, which encodes a predicted prolipoprotein signal peptidase. Downstream of pbrC, the pbrD gene, encoding a Pb(II)-binding protein, was identified in a region of DNA, which was essential for functional lead sequestration. Pb(II)-dependent inducible transcription of pbrABCD from the PpbrA promoter is regulated by PbrR, which belongs to the MerR family of metal ion-sensing regulatory proteins. This is the first report of a mechanism for specific lead resistance in any bacterial genus.

  19. Recent trends in control methods for bacterial wilt diseases caused by Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Yuliar; Nion, Yanetri Asi; Toyota, Koki

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have described the development of control methods against bacterial wilt diseases caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. This review focused on recent advances in control measures, such as biological, physical, chemical, cultural, and integral measures, as well as biocontrol efficacy and suppression mechanisms. Biological control agents (BCAs) have been dominated by bacteria (90%) and fungi (10%). Avirulent strains of R. solanacearum, Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus spp., and Streptomyces spp. are well-known BCAs. New or uncommon BCAs have also been identified such as Acinetobacter sp., Burkholderia sp., and Paenibacillus sp. Inoculation methods for BCAs affect biocontrol efficacy, such as pouring or drenching soil, dipping of roots, and seed coatings. The amendment of different organic matter, such as plant residue, animal waste, and simple organic compounds, have frequently been reported to suppress bacterial wilt diseases. The combined application of BCAs and their substrates was shown to more effectively suppress bacterial wilt in the tomato. Suppression mechanisms are typically attributed to the antibacterial metabolites produced by BCAs or those present in natural products; however, the number of studies related to host resistance to the pathogen is increasing. Enhanced/modified soil microbial communities are also indirectly involved in disease suppression. New promising types of control measures include biological soil disinfection using substrates that release volatile compounds. This review described recent advances in different control measures. We focused on the importance of integrated pest management (IPM) for bacterial wilt diseases. PMID:25762345

  20. Ethanedisulfonate is degraded via sulfoacetaldehyde in Ralstonia sp. strain EDS1.

    PubMed

    Denger, K; Cook, A M

    2001-07-01

    Aerobic enrichment cultures (11) yielded three cultures able to utilise ethane-1,2-disulfonate as sole source of carbon and energy in salts medium. Two pure cultures were obtained and we worked with strain EDS1, which was assigned to the genus Ralstonia on the basis of its 16S rDNA sequence and simple taxonomic tests. Strain EDS1 utilised at least seven alkane(di)sulfonates, ethane-1,2-disulfonate, taurine, isethionate, sulfoacetate, sulfoacetaldehyde and propane-1,3-disulfonate, as well as methanesulfonate and formate. Growth with ethanedisulfonate was concomitant with substrate disappearance and the formation of 2 mol sulfate per mol substrate. The growth yield, 7 g protein (mol C)(-1), indicated quantitative utilisation of the substrate. Ethanedisulfonate-dependent oxygen uptake of whole cells during growth rose to a maximum before the end of growth and then sank rapidly; this was interpreted as evidence for an inducible desulfonative oxygenase that was not active in cell extracts. Inducible sulfoacetaldehyde sulfo-lyase was detected at high activity. Inducible degradation of taurine or isethionate or sulfoacetate via sulfoacetaldehyde sulfo-lyase is interpreted from the data.

  1. Quantitative Immunofluorescence of Regulated eps Gene Expression in Single Cells of Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yaowei; Saile, Elke; Schell, Mark A.; Denny, Timothy P.

    1999-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, a phytopathogenic bacterium, uses an environmentally sensitive and complex regulatory network to control expression of multiple virulence genes. Part of this network is an unusual autoregulatory system that produces and senses 3-hydroxypalmitic acid methyl ester. In culture, this autoregulatory system ensures that expression of virulence genes, such as those of the eps operon encoding biosynthesis of the acidic extracellular polysaccharide, occurs only at high cell density (>107 cells/ml). To determine if regulation follows a similar pattern within tomato plants, we first developed a quantitative immunofluorescence (QIF) method that measures the relative amount of a target protein within individual bacterial cells. For R. solanacearum, QIF was used to determine the amount of β-galactosidase protein within wild-type cells containing a stable eps-lacZ reporter allele. When cultured cells were examined to test the method, QIF accurately detected both low and high levels of eps gene expression. QIF analysis of R. solanacearum cells recovered from stems of infected tomato plants showed that expression of eps during pathogenesis was similar to that in culture. These results suggest that there are no special signals or conditions within plants that override or short-circuit the regulatory processes observed in R. solanacearum in culture. Because QIF is a robust, relatively simple procedure that uses generally accessible equipment, it should be useful in many situations where gene expression in single bacterial cells must be determined. PMID:10347013

  2. Transcriptome Analysis of Quantitative Resistance-Specific Response upon Ralstonia solanacearum Infection in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, Takeaki; Mitsuhara, Ichiro; Takahashi, Hideki; Nakaho, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial wilt, caused by the soil-borne bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum, is a lethal disease of tomato, but the molecular mechanisms of the host resistance responses to R. solanacearum remain unclear. In this study, we report the first work describing the transcriptome of cultivar resistance and susceptible tomato cultivar after inoculation with R. solanacearum. To elucidate the characteristics of resistance early in the interaction, we analyzed microarrays for resistant cultivar LS-89 and susceptible cultivar Ponderosa 1 day after stem inoculation. No change in gene expression was detected for Ponderosa, but expression levels of over 140 genes, including pathogenesis-related, hormone signaling and lignin biosynthesis genes, increased in LS-89. Expression of β-1,3-glucanase genes increased substantially. In an immunohistochemical study, glucanase in LS-89 accumulated in the xylem and pith tissues surrounding xylem vessels filled with R. solanacearum. The expression of these genes also increased in four other resistant cultivars, but changed little in four susceptible cultivars in response to R. solanacearum, suggesting that similar reactions occur in other cultivars. These gene expression profiles will serve as fundamental information to elucidate the molecular mechanisms in the resistance response to R. solanacearum in tomato. PMID:23071630

  3. Towards the Identification of Type III Effectors Associated with Ralstonia solanacearum Virulence on Tomato and Eggplant.

    PubMed

    Pensec, Flora; Lebeau, Aurore; Daunay, M C; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Guidot, Alice; Wicker, Emmanuel

    2015-12-01

    For the development of pathogen-informed breeding strategies, identifying the microbial genes involved in interactions with the plant is a critical step. To identify type III effector (T3E) repertoires associated with virulence of the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum on Solanaceous crops, we used an original association genetics approach combining DNA microarray data and pathogenicity data on resistant eggplant, pepper, and tomato accessions. From this first screen, 25 T3Es were further full-length polymerase chain reaction-amplified within a 35-strain field collection, to assess their distribution and allelic diversity. Six T3E repertoire groups were identified, within which 11 representative strains were chosen to challenge the bacterial wilt-resistant egg plants 'Dingras multiple Purple' and 'AG91-25', and tomato Hawaii 7996. The virulence or avirulence phenotypes could not be explained by specific T3E repertoires, but rather by individual T3E genes. We identified seven highly avirulence-associated genes, among which ripP2, primarily referenced as conferring avirulence to Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, no T3E was associated with avirulence to both egg-plants. Highly virulence-associated genes were also identified: ripA5_2, ripU, and ripV2. This study should be regarded as a first step toward investigating both avirulence and virulence function of the highlighted genes, but also their evolutionary dynamics in natural R. solanacearum populations. PMID:26368514

  4. Towards the Identification of Type III Effectors Associated with Ralstonia solanacearum Virulence on Tomato and Eggplant.

    PubMed

    Pensec, Flora; Lebeau, Aurore; Daunay, M C; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Guidot, Alice; Wicker, Emmanuel

    2015-12-01

    For the development of pathogen-informed breeding strategies, identifying the microbial genes involved in interactions with the plant is a critical step. To identify type III effector (T3E) repertoires associated with virulence of the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum on Solanaceous crops, we used an original association genetics approach combining DNA microarray data and pathogenicity data on resistant eggplant, pepper, and tomato accessions. From this first screen, 25 T3Es were further full-length polymerase chain reaction-amplified within a 35-strain field collection, to assess their distribution and allelic diversity. Six T3E repertoire groups were identified, within which 11 representative strains were chosen to challenge the bacterial wilt-resistant egg plants 'Dingras multiple Purple' and 'AG91-25', and tomato Hawaii 7996. The virulence or avirulence phenotypes could not be explained by specific T3E repertoires, but rather by individual T3E genes. We identified seven highly avirulence-associated genes, among which ripP2, primarily referenced as conferring avirulence to Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, no T3E was associated with avirulence to both egg-plants. Highly virulence-associated genes were also identified: ripA5_2, ripU, and ripV2. This study should be regarded as a first step toward investigating both avirulence and virulence function of the highlighted genes, but also their evolutionary dynamics in natural R. solanacearum populations.

  5. Protein O-linked glycosylation in the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Elhenawy, Wael; Scott, Nichollas E; Tondo, M Laura; Orellano, Elena G; Foster, Leonard J; Feldman, Mario F

    2016-03-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the most lethal phytopathogens in the world. Due to its broad host range, it can cause wilting disease in many plant species of economic interest. In this work, we identified the O-oligosaccharyltransferase (O-OTase) responsible for protein O-glycosylation in R. solanacearum. An analysis of the glycoproteome revealed that 20 proteins, including type IV pilins are substrates of this general glycosylation system. Although multiple glycan forms were identified, the majority of the glycopeptides were modified with a pentasaccharide composed of HexNAc-(Pen)-dHex(3), similar to the O antigen subunit present in the lipopolysaccharide of multiple R. solanacearum strains. Disruption of the O-OTase led to the total loss of protein glycosylation, together with a defect in biofilm formation and reduced pathogenicity towards tomato plants. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed that the loss of glycosylation is not associated with widespread proteome changes. Only the levels of a single glycoprotein, the type IV pilin, were diminished in the absence of glycosylation. In parallel, disruption of glycosylation triggered an increase in the levels of a surface lectin homologous to Pseudomonas PA-IIL. These results reveal the important role of glycosylation in the pathogenesis of R. solanacearum.

  6. Proteome Analysis of Disease Resistance against Ralstonia solanacearum in Potato Cultivar CT206-10.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangryeol; Gupta, Ravi; Krishna, R; Kim, Sun Tae; Lee, Dong Yeol; Hwang, Duk-Ju; Bae, Shin-Chul; Ahn, Il-Pyung

    2016-02-01

    Potato is one of the most important crops worldwide. Its commercial cultivars are highly susceptible to many fungal and bacterial diseases. Among these, bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum causes significant yield loss. In the present study, integrated proteomics and genomics approaches were used in order to identify bacterial wilt resistant genes from Rs resistance potato cultivar CT-206-10. 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS analysis identified eight differentially abundant proteins including glycine-rich RNA binding protein (GRP), tomato stress induced-1 (TSI-1) protein, pathogenesis-related (STH-2) protein and pentatricopeptide repeat containing (PPR) protein in response to Rs infection. Further, semi-quantitative RT-PCR identified up-regulation in transcript levels of all these genes upon Rs infection. Taken together, our results showed the involvement of the identified proteins in the Rs stress tolerance in potato. In the future, it would be interesting to raise the transgenic plants to further validate their involvement in resistance against Rs in potato.

  7. Ralstonia solanacearum lipopeptide induces chlamydospore development in fungi and facilitates bacterial entry into fungal tissues.

    PubMed

    Spraker, Joseph E; Sanchez, Laura M; Lowe, Tiffany M; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Keller, Nancy P

    2016-09-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a globally distributed soil-borne plant pathogenic bacterium, which shares a broad ecological range with many plant- and soil-associated fungi. We sought to determine if R. solanacearum chemical communication directs symbiotic development of polymicrobial consortia. R. solanacearum produced a diffusible metabolite that induced conserved morphological differentiation in 34 species of fungi across three diverse taxa (Ascomycetes, Basidiomycetes and Zygomycetes). Fungi exposed to this metabolite formed chlamydospores, survival structures with thickened cell walls. Some chlamydospores internally harbored R. solanacearum, indicating a newly described endofungal lifestyle for this important plant pathogen. Using imaging mass spectrometry and peptidogenomics, we identified an undescribed lipopeptide, ralsolamycin, produced by an R. solanacearum non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase hybrid. Inactivation of the hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase gene, rmyA, abolished ralsolamycin synthesis. R. solanacearum mutants lacking ralsolamycin no longer induced chlamydospore development in fungal coculture and invaded fungal hyphae less well than wild-type. We propose that ralsolamycin contributes to the invasion of fungal hyphae and that the formation of chlamydospores may provide not only a specific niche for bacterial colonization but also enhanced survival for the partnering fungus.

  8. Genomic diversity of large-plaque-forming podoviruses infecting the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takeru; Narulita, Erlia; Matsunami, Minaho; Ishikawa, Hiroki; Shimizu, Mio; Fujie, Makoto; Bhunchoth, Anjana; Phironrit, Namthip; Chatchawankanphanich, Orawan; Yamada, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    The genome organization, gene structure, and host range of five podoviruses that infect Ralstonia solanacearum, the causative agent of bacterial wilt disease were characterized. The phages fell into two distinctive groups based on the genome position of the RNA polymerase gene (i.e., T7-type and ϕKMV-type). One-step growth experiments revealed that ϕRSB2 (a T7-like phage) lysed host cells more efficiently with a shorter infection cycle (ca. 60 min corresponding to half the doubling time of the host) than ϕKMV-like phages such as ϕRSB1 (with an infection cycle of ca. 180 min). Co-infection experiments with ϕRSB1 and ϕRSB2 showed that ϕRSB2 always predominated in the phage progeny independent of host strains. Most phages had wide host-ranges and the phage particles usually did not attach to the resistant strains; when occasionally some did, the phage genome was injected into the resistant strain's cytoplasm, as revealed by fluorescence microscopy with SYBR Gold-labeled phage particles.

  9. Antibacterial activity of Lansiumamide B to tobacco bacterial wilt (Ralstonia solanacearum).

    PubMed

    Li, Lichun; Feng, Xiujie; Tang, Ming; Hao, Wenbo; Han, Yun; Zhang, Guobin; Wan, Shuqing

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the most serious diseases of tobacco in the area of tobacco cultivation. As there is no effective control method for tobacco bacterial wilt diseases, developing new antibacterial agents in tobacco will make great practical sense. The antibacterial activity against R. solanacearum of Lansiumamide B which is isolated from the seeds of Clausena lansium is reported in this paper for the first time. The bioassay results indicate that Lansiumamide B could completely inhibit the growth of R. solanacearum at the concentration of 125 mg/L in vitro, the EC50 and EC90 are 48.82 mg/L and 86.26 mg/L, respectively. The result of pot experiments indicates that the control efficiency of the Lansiumamide B on tobacco bacterial wilt are 95.84%, 91.67% and 86.38% at 7 days, 14 days and 21 days after treatment at the concentration of 100mg/kg, respectively, nearly 40 times higher than Streptomycin, a special fungicide to the disease, at 21 days after treatment with root irrigation method. These results suggest that Lansiumamide B has the potential of developing as a new type of plant-type fungicide on controlling the diseases of tobacco bacterial wilt.

  10. New Insights into the Antibacterial Activity of Hydroxycoumarins against Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Ding, Wei; Xu, Yuquan; Wu, Dousheng; Li, Shili; Chen, Juanni; Guo, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Coumarins are important plant-derived natural products with wide-ranging bioactivities and extensive applications. In this study, we evaluated for the first time the antibacterial activity and mechanisms of action of coumarins against the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum, and investigated the effect of functional group substitution. We first tested the antibacterial activity of 18 plant-derived coumarins with different substitution patterns, and found that daphnetin, esculetin, xanthotol, and umbelliferone significantly inhibited the growth of R. solanacearum. Daphnetin showed the strongest antibacterial activity, followed by esculetin and umbelliferone, with MICs of 64, 192, and 256 mg/L, respectively, better than the archetypal coumarin with 384 mg/L. We further demonstrated that the hydroxylation of coumarins at the C-6, C-7 or C-8 position significantly enhanced the antibacterial activity against R. solanacearum. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and fluorescence microscopy images showed that hydroxycoumarins may interact with the pathogen by mechanically destroying the cell membrane and inhibiting biofilm formation. The antibiofilm effect of hydroxycoumarins may relate to the repression of flagellar genes fliA and flhC. These physiological changes in R. solanacearum caused by hydroxycoumarins can provide information for integral pathogen control. The present findings demonstrated that hydroxycoumarins have superior antibacterial activity against the phytopathogen R. solanacearum, and thus have the potential to be applied for controlling plant bacterial wilt.

  11. Diversity of Ralstonia solanacearum in French Guiana expands knowledge of the "emerging ecotype".

    PubMed

    Deberdt, P; Guyot, J; Coranson-Beaudu, R; Launay, J; Noreskal, M; Rivière, P; Vigné, F; Laplace, D; Lebreton, L; Wicker, E

    2014-06-01

    Although bacterial wilt remains a major plant disease throughout South America and the Caribbean, the diversity of prevalent Ralstonia solanacearum populations is largely unknown. The genetic and phenotypic diversity of R. solanacearum strains in French Guiana was assessed using diagnostic polymerase chain reactions and sequence-based (egl and mutS) genotyping on a 239-strain collection sampled on the families Solanaceae and Cucurbitaceae, revealing an unexpectedly high diversity. Strains were distributed within phylotypes I (46.9%), IIA (26.8%), and IIB (26.3%), with one new endoglucanase sequence type (egl ST) found within each group. Phylotype IIB strains consisted mostly (97%) of strains with the emerging ecotype (IIB/sequevar 4NPB). Host range of IIB/4NPB strains from French Guiana matched the original emerging reference strain from Martinique. They were virulent on cucumber; virulent and highly aggressive on tomato, including the resistant reference Hawaii 7996; and only controlled by eggplant SM6 and Surya accessions. The emerging ecotype IIB/4NPB is fully established in French Guiana in both cultivated fields and uncultivated forest, rendering the hypothesis of introduction via ornamental or banana cuttings unlikely. Thus, this ecotype may have originated from the Amazonian region and spread throughout the Caribbean region.

  12. Recent trends in control methods for bacterial wilt diseases caused by Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Yuliar; Nion, Yanetri Asi; Toyota, Koki

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have described the development of control methods against bacterial wilt diseases caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. This review focused on recent advances in control measures, such as biological, physical, chemical, cultural, and integral measures, as well as biocontrol efficacy and suppression mechanisms. Biological control agents (BCAs) have been dominated by bacteria (90%) and fungi (10%). Avirulent strains of R. solanacearum, Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus spp., and Streptomyces spp. are well-known BCAs. New or uncommon BCAs have also been identified such as Acinetobacter sp., Burkholderia sp., and Paenibacillus sp. Inoculation methods for BCAs affect biocontrol efficacy, such as pouring or drenching soil, dipping of roots, and seed coatings. The amendment of different organic matter, such as plant residue, animal waste, and simple organic compounds, have frequently been reported to suppress bacterial wilt diseases. The combined application of BCAs and their substrates was shown to more effectively suppress bacterial wilt in the tomato. Suppression mechanisms are typically attributed to the antibacterial metabolites produced by BCAs or those present in natural products; however, the number of studies related to host resistance to the pathogen is increasing. Enhanced/modified soil microbial communities are also indirectly involved in disease suppression. New promising types of control measures include biological soil disinfection using substrates that release volatile compounds. This review described recent advances in different control measures. We focused on the importance of integrated pest management (IPM) for bacterial wilt diseases.

  13. Proteome Analysis of Disease Resistance against Ralstonia solanacearum in Potato Cultivar CT206-10

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sangryeol; Gupta, Ravi; Krishna, R.; Kim, Sun Tae; Lee, Dong Yeol; Hwang, Duk-ju; Bae, Shin-Chul; Ahn, Il-Pyung

    2016-01-01

    Potato is one of the most important crops worldwide. Its commercial cultivars are highly susceptible to many fungal and bacterial diseases. Among these, bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum causes significant yield loss. In the present study, integrated proteomics and genomics approaches were used in order to identify bacterial wilt resistant genes from Rs resistance potato cultivar CT-206-10. 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS analysis identified eight differentially abundant proteins including glycine-rich RNA binding protein (GRP), tomato stress induced-1 (TSI-1) protein, pathogenesis-related (STH-2) protein and pentatricopeptide repeat containing (PPR) protein in response to Rs infection. Further, semi-quantitative RT-PCR identified up-regulation in transcript levels of all these genes upon Rs infection. Taken together, our results showed the involvement of the identified proteins in the Rs stress tolerance in potato. In the future, it would be interesting to raise the transgenic plants to further validate their involvement in resistance against Rs in potato. PMID:26889112

  14. Recent Trends in Control Methods for Bacterial Wilt Diseases Caused by Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Yuliar; Nion, Yanetri Asi; Toyota, Koki

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have described the development of control methods against bacterial wilt diseases caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. This review focused on recent advances in control measures, such as biological, physical, chemical, cultural, and integral measures, as well as biocontrol efficacy and suppression mechanisms. Biological control agents (BCAs) have been dominated by bacteria (90%) and fungi (10%). Avirulent strains of R. solanacearum, Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus spp., and Streptomyces spp. are well-known BCAs. New or uncommon BCAs have also been identified such as Acinetobacter sp., Burkholderia sp., and Paenibacillus sp. Inoculation methods for BCAs affect biocontrol efficacy, such as pouring or drenching soil, dipping of roots, and seed coatings. The amendment of different organic matter, such as plant residue, animal waste, and simple organic compounds, have frequently been reported to suppress bacterial wilt diseases. The combined application of BCAs and their substrates was shown to more effectively suppress bacterial wilt in the tomato. Suppression mechanisms are typically attributed to the antibacterial metabolites produced by BCAs or those present in natural products; however, the number of studies related to host resistance to the pathogen is increasing. Enhanced/modified soil microbial communities are also indirectly involved in disease suppression. New promising types of control measures include biological soil disinfection using substrates that release volatile compounds. This review described recent advances in different control measures. We focused on the importance of integrated pest management (IPM) for bacterial wilt diseases. PMID:25762345

  15. Elicitor-Induced Defense Responses in Solanum lycopersicum against Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Itishree; Mukherjee, Arup K.; Acharya, Priyambada

    2013-01-01

    We investigated on important parameters of induced resistance in hydroponic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) against Ralstonia solanacearum using the elicitors chitosan (CHT), salicylic acid (SA), and jasmonic acid (JA). The increase in total phenolic content of roots by the elicitors was significantly higher than control. Most pronounced increase in lignin synthesis was triggered by SA followed by CHT. At 24 h post-elicitation (hpe), the activity of phenylalanine ammonia lyase was 4.5 times higher than control elicited by CHT. The peroxidase activity was about 86 nkat/mg protein at 24 hpe in case of SA and 78 nkat/mg protein in case of CHT. The activity of polyphenol oxidase increased several folds by the elicitors. Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity increased to the maximum at 48 hpe under the influence of CHT. The results indicate that the elicitors SA and CHT induced effective defense responses in tomato plants against R. solanacearum. This was evident from reduced vascular browning and wilting symptoms of tomato plants treated with SA and CHT and challenged subsequently with R. solanacearum. This reduced disease incidence in tomato by SA and CHT may be a result of cell wall strengthening through deposition of lignin and the coincident induction of defense enzymes. PMID:24187521

  16. Methyl 3-Hydroxymyristate, a Diffusible Signal Mediating phc Quorum Sensing in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Kai, Kenji; Ohnishi, Hideyuki; Shimatani, Mika; Ishikawa, Shiho; Mori, Yuka; Kiba, Akinori; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2015-11-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, a plant pathogenic bacterium causing "bacterial wilt" on crops, uses a quorum sensing (QS) system consisting of phc regulatory elements to control its virulence. Methyl 3-hydroxypalmitate (3-OH PAME) was previously identified as the QS signal in strain AW1. However, 3-OH PAME has not been reportedly detected from any other strains, and this suggests that they produce another unknown QS signal. Here we identify (R)-methyl 3-hydroxymyristate [(R)-3-OH MAME] as a new QS signal that regulates the production of virulence factors and secondary metabolites. (R)-3-OH MAME was synthesized by the methyltransferase PhcB and sensed by the histidine kinase PhcS. The phylogenetic trees of these proteins from R. solanacearum strains were divided into two groups, according to their QS signal types--(R)-3-OH MAME or (R)-3-OH PAME. These results demonstrate that (R)-3-OH MAME is another crucial QS signal and highlight the unique evolution of QS systems in R. solanacearum.

  17. Ralstonia solanacearum lipopeptide induces chlamydospore development in fungi and facilitates bacterial entry into fungal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Spraker, Joseph E; Sanchez, Laura M; Lowe, Tiffany M; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Keller, Nancy P

    2016-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a globally distributed soil-borne plant pathogenic bacterium, which shares a broad ecological range with many plant- and soil-associated fungi. We sought to determine if R. solanacearum chemical communication directs symbiotic development of polymicrobial consortia. R. solanacearum produced a diffusible metabolite that induced conserved morphological differentiation in 34 species of fungi across three diverse taxa (Ascomycetes, Basidiomycetes and Zygomycetes). Fungi exposed to this metabolite formed chlamydospores, survival structures with thickened cell walls. Some chlamydospores internally harbored R. solanacearum, indicating a newly described endofungal lifestyle for this important plant pathogen. Using imaging mass spectrometry and peptidogenomics, we identified an undescribed lipopeptide, ralsolamycin, produced by an R. solanacearum non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase hybrid. Inactivation of the hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase gene, rmyA, abolished ralsolamycin synthesis. R. solanacearum mutants lacking ralsolamycin no longer induced chlamydospore development in fungal coculture and invaded fungal hyphae less well than wild-type. We propose that ralsolamycin contributes to the invasion of fungal hyphae and that the formation of chlamydospores may provide not only a specific niche for bacterial colonization but also enhanced survival for the partnering fungus. PMID:26943626

  18. "Racializing" Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatt-Echeverria, Beth; Urrieta, Luis, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    In an effort to explore how racial and class oppressions intersect, the authors use their autobiographical narratives to depict cultural and experiential continuity and discontinuity in growing up white working class versus Chicano working class. They specifically focus on "racializing class" due to the ways class is often used as a copout by…

  19. In Vivo Detection of the Cyclic Osmoregulated Periplasmic Glucan of Ralstonia solanacearum by High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieruszeski, J.-M.; Bohin, A.; Bohin, J.-P.; Lippens, G.

    2001-07-01

    We investigate the mobility of the osmoregulated periplasmic glucans of Ralstonia solanacearum in the bacterial periplasm through the use of high-resolution (HR) NMR spectroscopy under static and magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. Because the nature of periplasm is far from an isotropic aqueous solution, the molecules could be freely diffusing or rather associated to a periplasmic protein, a membrane protein, a lipid, or the peptidoglycan. HR MAS NMR spectroscopy leads to more reproducible results and allows the in vivo detection and characterization of the complex molecule.

  20. In planta comparative transcriptomics of host-adapted strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Ailloud, Florent; Lowe, Tiffany M.; Robène, Isabelle; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Allen, Caitilyn

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ralstonia solanacearum is an economically important plant pathogen with an unusually large host range. The Moko (banana) and NPB (not pathogenic to banana) strain groups are closely related but are adapted to distinct hosts. Previous comparative genomics studies uncovered very few differences that could account for the host range difference between these pathotypes. To better understand the basis of this host specificity, we used RNAseq to profile the transcriptomes of an R. solanacearum Moko strain and an NPB strain under in vitro and in planta conditions. Results. RNAs were sequenced from bacteria grown in rich and minimal media, and from bacteria extracted from mid-stage infected tomato, banana and melon plants. We computed differential expression between each pair of conditions to identify constitutive and host-specific gene expression differences between Moko and NPB. We found that type III secreted effectors were globally up-regulated upon plant cell contact in the NPB strain compared with the Moko strain. Genes encoding siderophore biosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation genes were highly up-regulated in the NPB strain during melon pathogenesis, while denitrification genes were up-regulated in the Moko strain during banana pathogenesis. The relatively lower expression of oxidases and the denitrification pathway during banana pathogenesis suggests that R. solanacearum experiences higher oxygen levels in banana pseudostems than in tomato or melon xylem. Conclusions. This study provides the first report of differential gene expression associated with host range variation. Despite minimal genomic divergence, the pathogenesis of Moko and NPB strains is characterized by striking differences in expression of virulence- and metabolism-related genes. PMID:26788428

  1. Ralstonia solanacearum Strains from Martinique (French West Indies) Exhibiting a New Pathogenic Potential▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wicker, Emmanuel; Grassart, Laurence; Coranson-Beaudu, Régine; Mian, Danièle; Guilbaud, Caroline; Fegan, Mark; Prior, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    We investigated a destructive pathogenic variant of the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum that was consistently isolated in Martinique (French West Indies). Since the 1960s, bacterial wilt of solanaceous crops in Martinique has been caused primarily by strains of R. solanacearum that belong to either phylotype I or phylotype II. Since 1999, anthurium shade houses have been dramatically affected by uncharacterized phylotype II strains that also affected a wide range of species, such as Heliconia caribea, cucurbitaceous crops, and weeds. From 1989 to 2003, a total of 224 R. solanacearum isolates were collected and compared to 6 strains isolated in Martinique in the 1980s. The genetic diversity and phylogenetic position of selected strains from Martinique were assessed (multiplex PCRs, mutS and egl DNA sequence analysis) and compared to the genetic diversity and phylogenetic position of 32 reference strains covering the known diversity within the R. solanacearum species complex. Twenty-four representative isolates were tested for pathogenicity to Musa species (banana) and tomato, eggplant, and sweet pepper. Based upon both PCR and sequence analysis, 119 Martinique isolates from anthurium, members of the family Cucurbitaceae, Heliconia, and tomato, were determined to belong to a group termed phylotype II/sequevar 4 (II/4). While these strains cluster with the Moko disease-causing strains, they were not pathogenic to banana (NPB). The strains belonging to phylotype II/4NPB were highly pathogenic to tomato, eggplant, and pepper, were able to wilt the resistant tomato variety Hawaii7996, and may latently infect cooking banana. Phylotype II/4NPB constitutes a new pathogenic variant of R. solanacearum that has recently appeared in Martinique and may be latently prevalent throughout Caribbean and Central/South America. PMID:17720825

  2. S-glycoprotein-like protein regulates defense responses in Nicotiana plants against Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Maimbo, Milimo; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Kiba, Akinori

    2010-04-01

    RsRGA4 (for Ralstonia solanacearum-responsive gene A4) encodes a polypeptide similar to S-locus glycoprotein (SGP) from Brassica rapa and SGP-like proteins from Ipomoea trifida and Medicago truncatula. Therefore, we designated RsRGA4 as NtSGLP (for Nicotiana tabacum SGP-like protein) and NbSGLP (its Nicotiana benthamiana ortholog). NbSGLP is expressed in root, leaf, petal, gynoecium, and stamen. Expression of NbSGLP was strongly induced by inoculation with an avirulent strain of R. solanacearum (Rs8107) and slightly enhanced by inoculation with virulent R. solanacearum (RsOE1-1). Expression of NbSGLP was induced by inoculation with an hrpY-deficient mutant of RsOE1-1 and Rs8107. Expression was also induced by aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid and salicylic acid. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbSGLP enhanced the growth of Rs8107. Growth of RsOE1-1 and appearance of wilt symptoms were also accelerated in silenced plants. Expression of PR-1a and EREBP was reduced, and markers for basal defense, such as callose deposition and reduced vascular flow, were compromised in NbSGLP-silenced plants. Moreover, growth of Pseudomonas cichorii, Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci, and P. syringae pv mellea was also enhanced in the silenced plants. On the other hand, silencing of NbSGLP did not interfere with the appearance of the hypersensitive response. NbSGLP was secreted in a signal peptide-dependent manner. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated expression of NbSGLP induced PR-1a and EREBP expression, callose deposition, and reduced vascular flow. NbSGLP-induced callose deposition and reduced vascular flow were not observed in salicylic acid-deficient N. benthamiana NahG plants. Taken together, SGLP might have a role in the induction of basal defense in Nicotiana plants.

  3. Genetic Determinants for Pyomelanin Production and Its Protective Effect against Oxidative Stress in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shabir; Lee, Seung Yeup; Kong, Hyun Gi; Jo, Eun Jeong; Choi, Hye Kyung; Khan, Raees; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne plant pathogen that infects more than 200 plant species. Its broad host range and long-term survival under different environmental stress conditions suggest that it uses a variety of mechanisms to protect itself against various types of biotic and abiotic stress. R. solanacearum produces a melanin-like brown pigment in the stationary phase when grown in minimal medium containing tyrosine. To gain deeper insight into the genetic determinants involved in melanin production, transposon-inserted mutants of R. solanacearum strain SL341 were screened for strains with defective melanin-producing capability. In addition to one mutant already known to be involved in pyomelanin production (viz., strain SL341D, with disruption of the hydroxphenylpyruvate dioxygenase gene), we identified three other mutants with disruption in the regulatory genes rpoS, hrpG, and oxyR, respectively. Wild-type SL341 produced pyomelanin in minimal medium containing tyrosine whereas the mutant strains did not. Likewise, homogentisate, a major precursor of pyomelanin, was detected in the culture filtrate of the wild-type strain but not in those of the mutant strains. A gene encoding hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase exhibited a significant high expression in wild type SL341 compared to other mutant strains, suggesting that pyomelanin production is regulated by three different regulatory proteins. However, analysis of the gene encoding homogentisate dioxygenase revealed no significant difference in its relative expression over time in the wild-type SL341 and mutant strains, except for SL341D, at 72 h incubation. The pigmented SL341 strain also exhibited a high tolerance to hydrogen peroxide stress compared with the non-pigmented SL341D strain. Our study suggests that pyomelanin production is controlled by several regulatory factors in R. solanacearum to confer protection under oxidative stress. PMID:27513990

  4. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Cool Virulence Factors of Ralstonia solanacearum Race 3 Biovar 2.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanhong; Babujee, Lavanya; Jacobs, Jonathan M; Allen, Caitilyn

    2015-01-01

    While most strains of the plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum are tropical, the race 3 biovar 2 (R3bv2) subgroup attacks plants in cooler climates. To identify mechanisms underlying this trait, we compared the transcriptional profiles of R. solanacearum R3bv2 strain UW551 and tropical strain GMI1000 at 20°C and 28°C, both in culture and during tomato pathogenesis. 4.2% of the ORFs in the UW551 genome and 7.9% of the GMI1000 ORFs were differentially expressed by temperature in planta. The two strains had distinct transcriptional responses to temperature change. GMI1000 up-regulated several stress response genes at 20°C, apparently struggling to cope with plant defenses. At the cooler temperature, R3bv2 strain UW551 up-regulated a cluster encoding a mannose-fucose binding lectin, LecM; a quorum sensing-dependent protein, AidA; and a related hypothetical protein, AidC. The last two genes are absent from the GMI1000 genome. In UW551, all three genes were positively regulated by the adjacent SolI/R quorum sensing system. These temperature-responsive genes were required for full virulence in R3bv2. Mutants lacking lecM, aidA, or aidC were each significantly more reduced in virulence on tomato at 20°C than at 28°C in both a naturalistic soil soak inoculation assay and when they were inoculated directly into tomato stems. The lecM and aidC mutants also survived poorly in potato tubers at the seed tuber storage temperature of 4°C, and the lecM mutant was defective in biofilm formation in vitro. Together, these results suggest novel mechanisms, including a lectin, are involved in the unique temperate epidemiology of R3bv2. PMID:26445498

  5. In planta comparative transcriptomics of host-adapted strains of Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Ailloud, Florent; Lowe, Tiffany M; Robène, Isabelle; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Allen, Caitilyn; Prior, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ralstonia solanacearum is an economically important plant pathogen with an unusually large host range. The Moko (banana) and NPB (not pathogenic to banana) strain groups are closely related but are adapted to distinct hosts. Previous comparative genomics studies uncovered very few differences that could account for the host range difference between these pathotypes. To better understand the basis of this host specificity, we used RNAseq to profile the transcriptomes of an R. solanacearum Moko strain and an NPB strain under in vitro and in planta conditions. Results. RNAs were sequenced from bacteria grown in rich and minimal media, and from bacteria extracted from mid-stage infected tomato, banana and melon plants. We computed differential expression between each pair of conditions to identify constitutive and host-specific gene expression differences between Moko and NPB. We found that type III secreted effectors were globally up-regulated upon plant cell contact in the NPB strain compared with the Moko strain. Genes encoding siderophore biosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation genes were highly up-regulated in the NPB strain during melon pathogenesis, while denitrification genes were up-regulated in the Moko strain during banana pathogenesis. The relatively lower expression of oxidases and the denitrification pathway during banana pathogenesis suggests that R. solanacearum experiences higher oxygen levels in banana pseudostems than in tomato or melon xylem. Conclusions. This study provides the first report of differential gene expression associated with host range variation. Despite minimal genomic divergence, the pathogenesis of Moko and NPB strains is characterized by striking differences in expression of virulence- and metabolism-related genes. PMID:26788428

  6. Chemotaxis is required for virulence and competitive fitness of the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jian; Allen, Caitilyn

    2006-05-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, a soilborne plant pathogen of considerable economic importance, invades host plant roots from the soil. Qualitative and quantitative chemotaxis assays revealed that this bacterium is specifically attracted to diverse amino acids and organic acids, and especially to root exudates from the host plant tomato. Exudates from rice, a nonhost plant, were less attractive. Eight different strains from this heterogeneous species complex varied significantly in their attraction to a panel of carbohydrate stimuli, raising the possibility that chemotactic responses may be differentially selected traits that confer adaptation to various hosts or ecological conditions. Previous studies found that an aflagellate mutant lacking swimming motility is significantly reduced in virulence, but the role of directed motility mediated by the chemotaxis system was not known. Two site-directed R. solanacearum mutants lacking either CheA or CheW, which are core chemotaxis signal transduction proteins, were completely nonchemotactic but retained normal swimming motility. In biologically realistic soil soak virulence assays on tomato plants, both nonchemotactic mutants had significantly reduced virulence indistinguishable from that of a nonmotile mutant, demonstrating that directed motility, not simply random motion, is required for full virulence. In contrast, nontactic strains were as virulent as the wild-type strain was when bacteria were introduced directly into the plant stem through a cut petiole, indicating that taxis makes its contribution to virulence in the early stages of host invasion and colonization. When inoculated individually by soaking the soil, both nontactic mutants reached the same population sizes as the wild type did in the stems of tomato plants just beginning to wilt. However, when tomato plants were coinoculated with a 1:1 mixture of a nontactic mutant and its wild-type parent, the wild-type strain outcompeted both nontactic mutants by 100-fold

  7. A duplex PCR assay for the detection of Ralstonia solanacearum phylotype II strains in Musa spp.

    PubMed

    Cellier, Gilles; Moreau, Aurélie; Chabirand, Aude; Hostachy, Bruno; Ailloud, Florent; Prior, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Banana wilt outbreaks that are attributable to Moko disease-causing strains of the pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum (Rs) remain a social and economic burden for both multinational corporations and subsistence farmers. All known Moko strains belong to the phylotype II lineage, which has been previously recognized for its broad genetic basis. Moko strains are paraphyletic and are distributed among seven related but distinct phylogenetic clusters (sequevars) that are potentially major threats to Musaceae, Solanaceae, and ornamental crops in many countries. Although clustered within the Moko IIB-4 sequevar, strains of the epidemiologically variant IIB-4NPB do not cause wilt on Cavendish or plantain bananas; instead, they establish a latent infection in the vascular tissues of plantains and demonstrate an expanded host range and high aggressiveness toward Solanaceae and Cucurbitaceae. Although most molecular diagnostic methods focus on strains that wilt Solanaceae (particularly potato), no relevant protocol has been described that universally detects strains of the Musaceae-infecting Rs phylotype II. Thus, a duplex PCR assay targeting Moko and IIB-4NPB variant strains was developed, and its performance was assessed using an extensive collection of 111 strains representing the known diversity of Rs Moko-related strains and IIB-4NPB variant strains along with certain related strains and families. The proposed diagnostic protocol demonstrated both high accuracy (inclusivity and exclusivity) and high repeatability, detected targets on either pure culture or spiked plant extracts. Although they did not belong to the Moko clusters described at the time of the study, recently discovered banana-infecting strains from Brazil were also detected. According to our comprehensive evaluation, this duplex PCR assay appears suitable for both research and diagnostic laboratories and provides reliable detection of phylotype II Rs strains that infect Musaceae. PMID:25811378

  8. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Cool Virulence Factors of Ralstonia solanacearum Race 3 Biovar 2

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanhong; Babujee, Lavanya; Jacobs, Jonathan M.; Allen, Caitilyn

    2015-01-01

    While most strains of the plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum are tropical, the race 3 biovar 2 (R3bv2) subgroup attacks plants in cooler climates. To identify mechanisms underlying this trait, we compared the transcriptional profiles of R. solanacearum R3bv2 strain UW551 and tropical strain GMI1000 at 20°C and 28°C, both in culture and during tomato pathogenesis. 4.2% of the ORFs in the UW551 genome and 7.9% of the GMI1000 ORFs were differentially expressed by temperature in planta. The two strains had distinct transcriptional responses to temperature change. GMI1000 up-regulated several stress response genes at 20°C, apparently struggling to cope with plant defenses. At the cooler temperature, R3bv2 strain UW551 up-regulated a cluster encoding a mannose-fucose binding lectin, LecM; a quorum sensing-dependent protein, AidA; and a related hypothetical protein, AidC. The last two genes are absent from the GMI1000 genome. In UW551, all three genes were positively regulated by the adjacent SolI/R quorum sensing system. These temperature-responsive genes were required for full virulence in R3bv2. Mutants lacking lecM, aidA, or aidC were each significantly more reduced in virulence on tomato at 20°C than at 28°C in both a naturalistic soil soak inoculation assay and when they were inoculated directly into tomato stems. The lecM and aidC mutants also survived poorly in potato tubers at the seed tuber storage temperature of 4°C, and the lecM mutant was defective in biofilm formation in vitro. Together, these results suggest novel mechanisms, including a lectin, are involved in the unique temperate epidemiology of R3bv2. PMID:26445498

  9. S-glycoprotein-like protein regulates defense responses in Nicotiana plants against Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Maimbo, Milimo; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Kiba, Akinori

    2010-04-01

    RsRGA4 (for Ralstonia solanacearum-responsive gene A4) encodes a polypeptide similar to S-locus glycoprotein (SGP) from Brassica rapa and SGP-like proteins from Ipomoea trifida and Medicago truncatula. Therefore, we designated RsRGA4 as NtSGLP (for Nicotiana tabacum SGP-like protein) and NbSGLP (its Nicotiana benthamiana ortholog). NbSGLP is expressed in root, leaf, petal, gynoecium, and stamen. Expression of NbSGLP was strongly induced by inoculation with an avirulent strain of R. solanacearum (Rs8107) and slightly enhanced by inoculation with virulent R. solanacearum (RsOE1-1). Expression of NbSGLP was induced by inoculation with an hrpY-deficient mutant of RsOE1-1 and Rs8107. Expression was also induced by aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid and salicylic acid. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbSGLP enhanced the growth of Rs8107. Growth of RsOE1-1 and appearance of wilt symptoms were also accelerated in silenced plants. Expression of PR-1a and EREBP was reduced, and markers for basal defense, such as callose deposition and reduced vascular flow, were compromised in NbSGLP-silenced plants. Moreover, growth of Pseudomonas cichorii, Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci, and P. syringae pv mellea was also enhanced in the silenced plants. On the other hand, silencing of NbSGLP did not interfere with the appearance of the hypersensitive response. NbSGLP was secreted in a signal peptide-dependent manner. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated expression of NbSGLP induced PR-1a and EREBP expression, callose deposition, and reduced vascular flow. NbSGLP-induced callose deposition and reduced vascular flow were not observed in salicylic acid-deficient N. benthamiana NahG plants. Taken together, SGLP might have a role in the induction of basal defense in Nicotiana plants. PMID:20118275

  10. Nitrate Assimilation Contributes to Ralstonia solanacearum Root Attachment, Stem Colonization, and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Dalsing, Beth L.

    2014-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, an economically important plant pathogen, must attach, grow, and produce virulence factors to colonize plant xylem vessels and cause disease. Little is known about the bacterial metabolism that drives these processes. Nitrate is present in both tomato xylem fluid and agricultural soils, and the bacterium's gene expression profile suggests that it assimilates nitrate during pathogenesis. A nasA mutant, which lacks the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of R. solanacearum's sole assimilatory nitrate reductase, did not grow on nitrate as a sole nitrogen source. This nasA mutant exhibited reduced virulence and delayed stem colonization after soil soak inoculation of tomato plants. The nasA virulence defect was more severe following a period of soil survival between hosts. Unexpectedly, once bacteria reached xylem tissue, nitrate assimilation was dispensable for growth, virulence, and competitive fitness. However, nasA-dependent nitrate assimilation was required for normal production of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS), a major virulence factor. Quantitative analyses revealed that EPS production was significantly influenced by nitrate assimilation when nitrate was not required for growth. The plant colonization delay of the nasA mutant was externally complemented by coinoculation with wild-type bacteria but not by coinoculation with an EPS-deficient epsB mutant. The nasA mutant and epsB mutant did not attach to tomato roots as well as wild-type strain UW551. However, adding either wild-type cells or cell-free EPS improved the root attachment of these mutants. These data collectively suggest that nitrate assimilation promotes R. solanacearum virulence by enhancing root attachment, the initial stage of infection, possibly by modulating EPS production. PMID:24363343

  11. Molecular characterization influencing metal resistance in the Cupriavidus/Ralstonia genomes.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Pratim; Banerjee, Rachana; Roy, Ayan; Mandal, Sunanda; Mukhopadhyay, Subhasish

    2015-01-01

    Our environment is stressed with a load of heavy and toxic metals. Microbes, abundant in our environment, are found to adapt well to this metal-stressed condition. A comparative study among five Cupriavidus/Ralstonia genomes can offer a better perception of their evolutionary mechanisms to adapt to these conditions. We have studied codon usage among 1051 genes common to all these organisms and identified 15 optimal codons frequently used in highly expressed genes present within 1051 genes. We found the core genes of Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 have a different optimal codon choice for arginine, glycine and alanine in comparison with the other four bacteria. We also found that the synonymous codon usage bias within these 1051 core genes is highly correlated with their gene expression. This supports that translational selection drives synonymous codon usage in the core genes of these genomes. Synonymous codon usage is highly conserved in the core genes of these five genomes. The only exception among them is C. metallidurans CH34. This genomewide shift in synonymous codon choice in C. metallidurans CH34 may have taken place due to the insertion of new genes in its genomes facilitating them to survive in heavy metal containing environment and the co-evolution of the other genes in its genome to achieve a balance in gene expression. Structural studies indicated the presence of a longer N-terminal region containing a copper-binding domain in the cupC proteins of C. metallidurans CH3 that helps it to attain higher binding efficacy with copper in comparison with its orthologs.

  12. A duplex PCR assay for the detection of Ralstonia solanacearum phylotype II strains in Musa spp.

    PubMed

    Cellier, Gilles; Moreau, Aurélie; Chabirand, Aude; Hostachy, Bruno; Ailloud, Florent; Prior, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Banana wilt outbreaks that are attributable to Moko disease-causing strains of the pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum (Rs) remain a social and economic burden for both multinational corporations and subsistence farmers. All known Moko strains belong to the phylotype II lineage, which has been previously recognized for its broad genetic basis. Moko strains are paraphyletic and are distributed among seven related but distinct phylogenetic clusters (sequevars) that are potentially major threats to Musaceae, Solanaceae, and ornamental crops in many countries. Although clustered within the Moko IIB-4 sequevar, strains of the epidemiologically variant IIB-4NPB do not cause wilt on Cavendish or plantain bananas; instead, they establish a latent infection in the vascular tissues of plantains and demonstrate an expanded host range and high aggressiveness toward Solanaceae and Cucurbitaceae. Although most molecular diagnostic methods focus on strains that wilt Solanaceae (particularly potato), no relevant protocol has been described that universally detects strains of the Musaceae-infecting Rs phylotype II. Thus, a duplex PCR assay targeting Moko and IIB-4NPB variant strains was developed, and its performance was assessed using an extensive collection of 111 strains representing the known diversity of Rs Moko-related strains and IIB-4NPB variant strains along with certain related strains and families. The proposed diagnostic protocol demonstrated both high accuracy (inclusivity and exclusivity) and high repeatability, detected targets on either pure culture or spiked plant extracts. Although they did not belong to the Moko clusters described at the time of the study, recently discovered banana-infecting strains from Brazil were also detected. According to our comprehensive evaluation, this duplex PCR assay appears suitable for both research and diagnostic laboratories and provides reliable detection of phylotype II Rs strains that infect Musaceae.

  13. Genetic Determinants for Pyomelanin Production and Its Protective Effect against Oxidative Stress in Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Hyun Gi; Jo, Eun Jeong; Choi, Hye Kyung; Khan, Raees; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne plant pathogen that infects more than 200 plant species. Its broad host range and long-term survival under different environmental stress conditions suggest that it uses a variety of mechanisms to protect itself against various types of biotic and abiotic stress. R. solanacearum produces a melanin-like brown pigment in the stationary phase when grown in minimal medium containing tyrosine. To gain deeper insight into the genetic determinants involved in melanin production, transposon-inserted mutants of R. solanacearum strain SL341 were screened for strains with defective melanin-producing capability. In addition to one mutant already known to be involved in pyomelanin production (viz., strain SL341D, with disruption of the hydroxphenylpyruvate dioxygenase gene), we identified three other mutants with disruption in the regulatory genes rpoS, hrpG, and oxyR, respectively. Wild-type SL341 produced pyomelanin in minimal medium containing tyrosine whereas the mutant strains did not. Likewise, homogentisate, a major precursor of pyomelanin, was detected in the culture filtrate of the wild-type strain but not in those of the mutant strains. A gene encoding hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase exhibited a significant high expression in wild type SL341 compared to other mutant strains, suggesting that pyomelanin production is regulated by three different regulatory proteins. However, analysis of the gene encoding homogentisate dioxygenase revealed no significant difference in its relative expression over time in the wild-type SL341 and mutant strains, except for SL341D, at 72 h incubation. The pigmented SL341 strain also exhibited a high tolerance to hydrogen peroxide stress compared with the non-pigmented SL341D strain. Our study suggests that pyomelanin production is controlled by several regulatory factors in R. solanacearum to confer protection under oxidative stress. PMID:27513990

  14. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Cool Virulence Factors of Ralstonia solanacearum Race 3 Biovar 2.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanhong; Babujee, Lavanya; Jacobs, Jonathan M; Allen, Caitilyn

    2015-01-01

    While most strains of the plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum are tropical, the race 3 biovar 2 (R3bv2) subgroup attacks plants in cooler climates. To identify mechanisms underlying this trait, we compared the transcriptional profiles of R. solanacearum R3bv2 strain UW551 and tropical strain GMI1000 at 20°C and 28°C, both in culture and during tomato pathogenesis. 4.2% of the ORFs in the UW551 genome and 7.9% of the GMI1000 ORFs were differentially expressed by temperature in planta. The two strains had distinct transcriptional responses to temperature change. GMI1000 up-regulated several stress response genes at 20°C, apparently struggling to cope with plant defenses. At the cooler temperature, R3bv2 strain UW551 up-regulated a cluster encoding a mannose-fucose binding lectin, LecM; a quorum sensing-dependent protein, AidA; and a related hypothetical protein, AidC. The last two genes are absent from the GMI1000 genome. In UW551, all three genes were positively regulated by the adjacent SolI/R quorum sensing system. These temperature-responsive genes were required for full virulence in R3bv2. Mutants lacking lecM, aidA, or aidC were each significantly more reduced in virulence on tomato at 20°C than at 28°C in both a naturalistic soil soak inoculation assay and when they were inoculated directly into tomato stems. The lecM and aidC mutants also survived poorly in potato tubers at the seed tuber storage temperature of 4°C, and the lecM mutant was defective in biofilm formation in vitro. Together, these results suggest novel mechanisms, including a lectin, are involved in the unique temperate epidemiology of R3bv2.

  15. Ralstonia solanacearum RSp0194 Encodes a Novel 3-Keto-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase III.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ya-Hui; Ma, Jin-Cheng; Li, Feng; Hu, Zhe; Wang, Hai-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis (FAS), a primary metabolic pathway, is essential for survival of bacteria. Ralstonia solanacearum, a β-proteobacteria member, causes a bacterial wilt affecting more than 200 plant species, including many economically important plants. However, thus far, the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway of R. solanacearum has not been well studied. In this study, we characterized two forms of 3-keto-ACP synthase III, RsFabH and RsFabW, in R. solanacearum. RsFabH, the homologue of Escherichia coli FabH, encoded by the chromosomal RSc1050 gene, catalyzes the condensation of acetyl-CoA with malonyl-ACP in the initiation steps of fatty acid biosynthesis in vitro. The RsfabH mutant lost de novo fatty acid synthetic ability, and grows in medium containing free fatty acids. RsFabW, a homologue of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA3286, encoded by a megaplasmid gene, RSp0194, condenses acyl-CoA (C2-CoA to C10-CoA) with malonyl-ACP to produce 3-keto-acyl-ACP in vitro. Although the RsfabW mutant was viable, RsfabW was responsible for RsfabH mutant growth on medium containing free fatty acids. Our results also showed that RsFabW could condense acyl-ACP (C4-ACP to C8-ACP) with malonyl-ACP, to produce 3-keto-acyl-ACP in vitro, which implies that RsFabW plays a special role in fatty acid synthesis of R. solanacearum. All of these data confirm that R. solanacearum not only utilizes acetyl-CoA, but also, utilizes medium-chain acyl-CoAs or acyl-ACPs as primers to initiate fatty acid synthesis.

  16. Multihost experimental evolution of the pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum unveils genes involved in adaptation to plants.

    PubMed

    Guidot, Alice; Jiang, Wei; Ferdy, Jean-Baptiste; Thébaud, Christophe; Barberis, Patrick; Gouzy, Jérôme; Genin, Stéphane

    2014-11-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of a lethal bacterial wilt plant disease, infects an unusually wide range of hosts. These hosts can further be split into plants where R. solanacearum is known to cause disease (original hosts) and those where this bacterium can grow asymptomatically (distant hosts). Moreover, this pathogen is able to adapt to many plants as supported by field observations reporting emergence of strains with enlarged pathogenic properties. To investigate the genetic bases of host adaptation, we conducted evolution experiments by serial passages of a single clone of the pathogen on three original and two distant hosts over 300 bacterial generations and then analyzed the whole-genome of nine evolved clones. Phenotypic analysis of the evolved clones showed that the pathogen can increase its fitness on both original and distant hosts although the magnitude of fitness increase was greater on distant hosts. Only few genomic modifications were detected in evolved clones compared with the ancestor but parallel evolutionary changes in two genes were observed in independent evolved populations. Independent mutations in the regulatory gene efpR were selected for in three populations evolved on beans, a distant host. Reverse genetic approaches confirmed that these mutations were associated with fitness gain on bean plants. This work provides a first step toward understanding the within-host evolutionary dynamics of R. solanacearum during infection and identifying bacterial genes subjected to in planta selection. The discovery of EfpR as a determinant conditioning host adaptation of the pathogen illustrates how experimental evolution coupled with whole-genome sequencing is a potent tool to identify novel molecular players involved in central life-history traits.

  17. Tropical strains of Ralstonia solanacearum Outcompete race 3 biovar 2 strains at lowland tropical temperatures.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Alejandra I; Milling, Annett; Allen, Caitilyn

    2015-05-15

    Bacterial wilt, caused by members of the heterogenous Ralstonia solanacearum species complex, is an economically important vascular disease affecting many crops. Human activity has widely disseminated R. solanacearum strains, increasing their global agricultural impact. However, tropical highland race 3 biovar 2 (R3bv2) strains do not cause disease in tropical lowlands, even though they are virulent at warm temperatures. We tested the hypothesis that differences in temperature adaptation and competitive fitness explain the uneven geographic distribution of R. solanacearum strains. Using three phylogenetically and ecologically distinct strains, we measured competitive fitness at two temperatures following paired-strain inoculations of their shared host, tomato. Lowland tropical strain GMI1000 was only weakly virulent on tomato under temperate conditions (24°C for day and 19°C for night [24/19°C]), but highland tropical R3bv2 strain UW551 and U.S. warm temperate strain K60 were highly virulent at both 24/19°C and 28°C. Strain K60 was significantly more competitive than both GMI1000 and UW551 in tomato rhizospheres and stems at 28°C, and GMI1000 also outcompeted UW551 at 28°C. The results were reversed at cooler temperatures, at which highland strain UW551 generally outcompeted GMI1000 and K60 in planta. The superior competitive index of UW551 at 24/19°C suggests that adaptation to cool temperatures could explain why only R3bv2 strains threaten highland agriculture. Strains K60 and GMI1000 each produced different bacteriocins that inhibited growth of UW551 in culture. Such interstrain inhibition could explain why R3bv2 strains do not cause disease in tropical lowlands.

  18. Genetic Determinants for Pyomelanin Production and Its Protective Effect against Oxidative Stress in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shabir; Lee, Seung Yeup; Kong, Hyun Gi; Jo, Eun Jeong; Choi, Hye Kyung; Khan, Raees; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne plant pathogen that infects more than 200 plant species. Its broad host range and long-term survival under different environmental stress conditions suggest that it uses a variety of mechanisms to protect itself against various types of biotic and abiotic stress. R. solanacearum produces a melanin-like brown pigment in the stationary phase when grown in minimal medium containing tyrosine. To gain deeper insight into the genetic determinants involved in melanin production, transposon-inserted mutants of R. solanacearum strain SL341 were screened for strains with defective melanin-producing capability. In addition to one mutant already known to be involved in pyomelanin production (viz., strain SL341D, with disruption of the hydroxphenylpyruvate dioxygenase gene), we identified three other mutants with disruption in the regulatory genes rpoS, hrpG, and oxyR, respectively. Wild-type SL341 produced pyomelanin in minimal medium containing tyrosine whereas the mutant strains did not. Likewise, homogentisate, a major precursor of pyomelanin, was detected in the culture filtrate of the wild-type strain but not in those of the mutant strains. A gene encoding hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase exhibited a significant high expression in wild type SL341 compared to other mutant strains, suggesting that pyomelanin production is regulated by three different regulatory proteins. However, analysis of the gene encoding homogentisate dioxygenase revealed no significant difference in its relative expression over time in the wild-type SL341 and mutant strains, except for SL341D, at 72 h incubation. The pigmented SL341 strain also exhibited a high tolerance to hydrogen peroxide stress compared with the non-pigmented SL341D strain. Our study suggests that pyomelanin production is controlled by several regulatory factors in R. solanacearum to confer protection under oxidative stress.

  19. In planta comparative transcriptomics of host-adapted strains of Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Ailloud, Florent; Lowe, Tiffany M; Robène, Isabelle; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Allen, Caitilyn; Prior, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ralstonia solanacearum is an economically important plant pathogen with an unusually large host range. The Moko (banana) and NPB (not pathogenic to banana) strain groups are closely related but are adapted to distinct hosts. Previous comparative genomics studies uncovered very few differences that could account for the host range difference between these pathotypes. To better understand the basis of this host specificity, we used RNAseq to profile the transcriptomes of an R. solanacearum Moko strain and an NPB strain under in vitro and in planta conditions. Results. RNAs were sequenced from bacteria grown in rich and minimal media, and from bacteria extracted from mid-stage infected tomato, banana and melon plants. We computed differential expression between each pair of conditions to identify constitutive and host-specific gene expression differences between Moko and NPB. We found that type III secreted effectors were globally up-regulated upon plant cell contact in the NPB strain compared with the Moko strain. Genes encoding siderophore biosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation genes were highly up-regulated in the NPB strain during melon pathogenesis, while denitrification genes were up-regulated in the Moko strain during banana pathogenesis. The relatively lower expression of oxidases and the denitrification pathway during banana pathogenesis suggests that R. solanacearum experiences higher oxygen levels in banana pseudostems than in tomato or melon xylem. Conclusions. This study provides the first report of differential gene expression associated with host range variation. Despite minimal genomic divergence, the pathogenesis of Moko and NPB strains is characterized by striking differences in expression of virulence- and metabolism-related genes.

  20. Potential Interactions between Salmonella enterica and Ralstonia solanacearum in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Stephanie; Barak, Jeri; Boyer, Renee; Reiter, Mark; Gu, Ganyu; Rideout, Steven

    2014-02-01

    Over the past decade, the Eastern Shore of Virginia (ESV) has been implicated in at least four outbreaks of salmonellosis associated with tomato, all originating from the same serovar, Salmonella enterica serovar Newport. In addition to Salmonella Newport contamination, the devastating plant disease bacterial wilt, caused by the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum, threatens the sustainability of ESV tomato production. Bacterial wilt is present in most ESV tomato fields and causes devastating yield losses each year. Although the connection between bacterial wilt and tomato-related salmonellosis outbreaks in ESV is of interest, the relationship between the two pathogens has never been investigated. In this study, tomato plants were root dip inoculated with one of four treatments: (i) 8 log CFU of Salmonella Newport per ml, (ii) 5 log CFU of R. solanacearum per ml, (iii) a coinoculation of 8 log CFU of Salmonella Newport per ml plus 5 log CFU of R. solanacearum per ml, and (iv) sterile water as control. Leaf, stem, and fruit samples were collected at the early-green-fruit stage, and S. enterica contamination in the internal tissues was detected. S. enterica was recovered in 1.4 and 2.9% of leaf samples from plants inoculated with Salmonella Newport only and from plants coinoculated with Salmonella Newport plus R. solanacearum, respectively. S. enterica was recovered from 1.7 and 3.5% of fruit samples from plants inoculated with Salmonella Newport only and from plants coinoculated with Salmonella Newport plus R. solanacearum, respectively. There were significantly more stem samples from plants coinoculated with Salmonella Newport plus R. solanacearum that were positive for S. enterica (18.6%) than stem samples collected from plants inoculated with Salmonella Newport only (5.7%). Results suggested that R. solanacearum could influence S. enterica survival and transportation throughout the internal tissues of tomato plants.

  1. Ralstonia solanacearum strains from Martinique (French West Indies) exhibiting a new pathogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Wicker, Emmanuel; Grassart, Laurence; Coranson-Beaudu, Régine; Mian, Danièle; Guilbaud, Caroline; Fegan, Mark; Prior, Philippe

    2007-11-01

    We investigated a destructive pathogenic variant of the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum that was consistently isolated in Martinique (French West Indies). Since the 1960s, bacterial wilt of solanaceous crops in Martinique has been caused primarily by strains of R. solanacearum that belong to either phylotype I or phylotype II. Since 1999, anthurium shade houses have been dramatically affected by uncharacterized phylotype II strains that also affected a wide range of species, such as Heliconia caribea, cucurbitaceous crops, and weeds. From 1989 to 2003, a total of 224 R. solanacearum isolates were collected and compared to 6 strains isolated in Martinique in the 1980s. The genetic diversity and phylogenetic position of selected strains from Martinique were assessed (multiplex PCRs, mutS and egl DNA sequence analysis) and compared to the genetic diversity and phylogenetic position of 32 reference strains covering the known diversity within the R. solanacearum species complex. Twenty-four representative isolates were tested for pathogenicity to Musa species (banana) and tomato, eggplant, and sweet pepper. Based upon both PCR and sequence analysis, 119 Martinique isolates from anthurium, members of the family Cucurbitaceae, Heliconia, and tomato, were determined to belong to a group termed phylotype II/sequevar 4 (II/4). While these strains cluster with the Moko disease-causing strains, they were not pathogenic to banana (NPB). The strains belonging to phylotype II/4NPB were highly pathogenic to tomato, eggplant, and pepper, were able to wilt the resistant tomato variety Hawaii7996, and may latently infect cooking banana. Phylotype II/4NPB constitutes a new pathogenic variant of R. solanacearum that has recently appeared in Martinique and may be latently prevalent throughout Caribbean and Central/South America.

  2. Tropical Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum Outcompete Race 3 Biovar 2 Strains at Lowland Tropical Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Huerta, Alejandra I.; Milling, Annett

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial wilt, caused by members of the heterogenous Ralstonia solanacearum species complex, is an economically important vascular disease affecting many crops. Human activity has widely disseminated R. solanacearum strains, increasing their global agricultural impact. However, tropical highland race 3 biovar 2 (R3bv2) strains do not cause disease in tropical lowlands, even though they are virulent at warm temperatures. We tested the hypothesis that differences in temperature adaptation and competitive fitness explain the uneven geographic distribution of R. solanacearum strains. Using three phylogenetically and ecologically distinct strains, we measured competitive fitness at two temperatures following paired-strain inoculations of their shared host, tomato. Lowland tropical strain GMI1000 was only weakly virulent on tomato under temperate conditions (24°C for day and 19°C for night [24/19°C]), but highland tropical R3bv2 strain UW551 and U.S. warm temperate strain K60 were highly virulent at both 24/19°C and 28°C. Strain K60 was significantly more competitive than both GMI1000 and UW551 in tomato rhizospheres and stems at 28°C, and GMI1000 also outcompeted UW551 at 28°C. The results were reversed at cooler temperatures, at which highland strain UW551 generally outcompeted GMI1000 and K60 in planta. The superior competitive index of UW551 at 24/19°C suggests that adaptation to cool temperatures could explain why only R3bv2 strains threaten highland agriculture. Strains K60 and GMI1000 each produced different bacteriocins that inhibited growth of UW551 in culture. Such interstrain inhibition could explain why R3bv2 strains do not cause disease in tropical lowlands. PMID:25769835

  3. The Ralstonia solanacearum pathogenicity regulator HrpB induces 3-hydroxy-oxindole synthesis.

    PubMed

    Delaspre, Fabien; Nieto Peñalver, Carlos G; Saurel, Olivier; Kiefer, Patrick; Gras, Emmanuel; Milon, Alain; Boucher, Christian; Genin, Stéphane; Vorholt, Julia A

    2007-10-01

    The transcriptional activator HrpB of the bacterial wilt causing betaproteobacterium Ralstonia solanacearum represents a key regulator for pathogenicity. In particular, it drives expression of hrp genes encoding a type III secretion system (T3SS) as well as effector molecules for delivery into the host cytosol to promote disease. However, the HrpB regulon extends beyond this T3SS. We describe here an HrpB-activated operon of six genes that is responsible for the synthesis of a fluorescent isatin derivative of 149 Amu that we named HDF for HrpB-dependent factor and that we purified from culture supernatants. The structure of the labile molecule was solved by using NMR and CD spectroscopy to be (3S)-3-hydroxy-indolin-2-one and confirmed by its chemical synthesis and MS spectrometry. HDF was found to be present at 20 nM in wild-type cultures grown on minimal medium, and its synthesis increased 15-fold upon overproduction of HrpB, confirming that HrpB activates HDF synthesis. The addition of tryptophan significantly stimulated HDF biosynthesis and was shown to represent the precursor molecule for HDF synthesis. A search for the biological function of the molecule revealed that HDF induces acyl-homoserine lactone receptor-mediated reporter activity of the well studied LuxR transcriptional regulator of Vibrio fischeri. Thus, our results provide evidence that the specificity of acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) receptors is clearly broader than previously considered. The failure to detect induction by HDF of the described endogenous quorum-sensing circuits of the pathogen points to a role in interfering with cell-cell signaling of rivalling bacteria. PMID:17890323

  4. Ralstonia solanacearum strains from Martinique (French West Indies) exhibiting a new pathogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Wicker, Emmanuel; Grassart, Laurence; Coranson-Beaudu, Régine; Mian, Danièle; Guilbaud, Caroline; Fegan, Mark; Prior, Philippe

    2007-11-01

    We investigated a destructive pathogenic variant of the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum that was consistently isolated in Martinique (French West Indies). Since the 1960s, bacterial wilt of solanaceous crops in Martinique has been caused primarily by strains of R. solanacearum that belong to either phylotype I or phylotype II. Since 1999, anthurium shade houses have been dramatically affected by uncharacterized phylotype II strains that also affected a wide range of species, such as Heliconia caribea, cucurbitaceous crops, and weeds. From 1989 to 2003, a total of 224 R. solanacearum isolates were collected and compared to 6 strains isolated in Martinique in the 1980s. The genetic diversity and phylogenetic position of selected strains from Martinique were assessed (multiplex PCRs, mutS and egl DNA sequence analysis) and compared to the genetic diversity and phylogenetic position of 32 reference strains covering the known diversity within the R. solanacearum species complex. Twenty-four representative isolates were tested for pathogenicity to Musa species (banana) and tomato, eggplant, and sweet pepper. Based upon both PCR and sequence analysis, 119 Martinique isolates from anthurium, members of the family Cucurbitaceae, Heliconia, and tomato, were determined to belong to a group termed phylotype II/sequevar 4 (II/4). While these strains cluster with the Moko disease-causing strains, they were not pathogenic to banana (NPB). The strains belonging to phylotype II/4NPB were highly pathogenic to tomato, eggplant, and pepper, were able to wilt the resistant tomato variety Hawaii7996, and may latently infect cooking banana. Phylotype II/4NPB constitutes a new pathogenic variant of R. solanacearum that has recently appeared in Martinique and may be latently prevalent throughout Caribbean and Central/South America. PMID:17720825

  5. Nitrate assimilation contributes to Ralstonia solanacearum root attachment, stem colonization, and virulence.

    PubMed

    Dalsing, Beth L; Allen, Caitilyn

    2014-03-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, an economically important plant pathogen, must attach, grow, and produce virulence factors to colonize plant xylem vessels and cause disease. Little is known about the bacterial metabolism that drives these processes. Nitrate is present in both tomato xylem fluid and agricultural soils, and the bacterium's gene expression profile suggests that it assimilates nitrate during pathogenesis. A nasA mutant, which lacks the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of R. solanacearum's sole assimilatory nitrate reductase, did not grow on nitrate as a sole nitrogen source. This nasA mutant exhibited reduced virulence and delayed stem colonization after soil soak inoculation of tomato plants. The nasA virulence defect was more severe following a period of soil survival between hosts. Unexpectedly, once bacteria reached xylem tissue, nitrate assimilation was dispensable for growth, virulence, and competitive fitness. However, nasA-dependent nitrate assimilation was required for normal production of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS), a major virulence factor. Quantitative analyses revealed that EPS production was significantly influenced by nitrate assimilation when nitrate was not required for growth. The plant colonization delay of the nasA mutant was externally complemented by coinoculation with wild-type bacteria but not by coinoculation with an EPS-deficient epsB mutant. The nasA mutant and epsB mutant did not attach to tomato roots as well as wild-type strain UW551. However, adding either wild-type cells or cell-free EPS improved the root attachment of these mutants. These data collectively suggest that nitrate assimilation promotes R. solanacearum virulence by enhancing root attachment, the initial stage of infection, possibly by modulating EPS production.

  6. Aerobic mineralization of 2,6-dichlorophenol by Ralstonia sp. strain RK1

    SciTech Connect

    Steinle, P.; Stucki, G.; Stettler, R.; Hanselmann, K.W.

    1998-07-01

    A new aerobic bacterium was isolated from the sediment of a freshwater pond close to a contaminated site at Amponville (France). It was enriched in a fixed-bed reactor fed with 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP) as the sole carbon and energy source at pH 7.5 and room temperature. The degradation of 2,6-DCP followed Monod kinetics at low initial concentrations. At concentrations above 300 {micro}M, 2,6-DCP increasingly inhibited its own degradation. The base sequence of the 16S ribosomal DNA allowed us to assign the bacterium to the genus Ralstonia (formerly Alcaligenes). The substrate spectrum of the bacterium includes toluene, benzene, chlorobenzene, phenol, and all four ortho- and para-substituted mono- and dichlorophenol isomers. Substituents other than chlorine prevented degradation. The capacity to degrade 2,6-DCP was examined in two fixed-bed reactors. The microbial population grew on and completely mineralized 2,6-DCP at 2,6-DCP concentrations up to 740 {micro}M in continuous reactor culture supplied with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as an oxygen source. Lack of peroxide completely stopped further degradation of 2,6-DCP. Lowering the acid-neutralizing capacity of the medium to 1/10th the original capacity led to a decrease in the pH of the effluent from 7 to 6 and to a significant reduction in the degradation activity. A second fixed-bed reactor successfully removed low chlorophenol concentrations with hydraulic residence times of 8 to 30 min.

  7. Characterization of biofumigated Ralstonia solanacearum cells using micro-Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Paret, Mathews L; Sharma, Shiv K; Alvarez, Anne M

    2012-01-01

    Essential oils of palmarosa, lemongrass, and eucalyptus have shown promise as biofumigants for control of the bacterial wilt disease of edible ginger (Zingiber officinale) caused by Ralstonia solanacearum race 4 in previous potting medium studies. Biochemical changes in R. solanacearum cells were evaluated with micro-Raman spectroscopy following treatment with essential oils at different concentrations (0.04, 0.07, and 0.14% [vol/vol] of culture medium) and changes in cell structure were observed using electron microscopy. All treatments except palmarosa oil at 0.04% caused significant reductions in levels of amino acids, purine and pyrimidine bases of nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids, as indicated by significant reduction in Raman peak heights at 621, 1,003, and 1,031 inverse centimeters (cm(-1)) (phenylalanine); 643, 827, 852, 1,158, and 1,172 cm(-1) (tyrosine); 758 cm(-1) (tryptophan); 725, 782, 1,337, and 1,578 cm(-1) (adenine, cytosine plus uracil, adenine, and adenine plus guanine, respectively); 1,097 cm(-1) (carbohydrates); and 1,127, 1,450, and 2,932 cm(-1) (lipids) compared with untreated controls. Lemongrass oil treatments were the most effective in degrading cellular components. Scanning electron microscopy of palmarosa and lemongrass-oil-treated cells showed rupture of cell walls and cell debris but no degradation was noted for eucalyptus-oil-treated cells. Palmarosa- and lemongrass-oil-treated cells were positively stained with uranyl acetate when viewed by transmission electron microscopy whereas controls and eucalyptus-oil-treated cells were negatively stained, indicating that the cell membranes were intact. The viability of eucalyptus-oil-treated cells was confirmed by cell culture following treatment. Micro-Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool which can be further employed to better understand effects of fumigants and other bactericides on bacterial cells.

  8. A Duplex PCR Assay for the Detection of Ralstonia solanacearum Phylotype II Strains in Musa spp.

    PubMed Central

    Cellier, Gilles; Moreau, Aurélie; Chabirand, Aude; Hostachy, Bruno; Ailloud, Florent; Prior, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Banana wilt outbreaks that are attributable to Moko disease-causing strains of the pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum (Rs) remain a social and economic burden for both multinational corporations and subsistence farmers. All known Moko strains belong to the phylotype II lineage, which has been previously recognized for its broad genetic basis. Moko strains are paraphyletic and are distributed among seven related but distinct phylogenetic clusters (sequevars) that are potentially major threats to Musaceae, Solanaceae, and ornamental crops in many countries. Although clustered within the Moko IIB-4 sequevar, strains of the epidemiologically variant IIB-4NPB do not cause wilt on Cavendish or plantain bananas; instead, they establish a latent infection in the vascular tissues of plantains and demonstrate an expanded host range and high aggressiveness toward Solanaceae and Cucurbitaceae. Although most molecular diagnostic methods focus on strains that wilt Solanaceae (particularly potato), no relevant protocol has been described that universally detects strains of the Musaceae-infecting Rs phylotype II. Thus, a duplex PCR assay targeting Moko and IIB-4NPB variant strains was developed, and its performance was assessed using an extensive collection of 111 strains representing the known diversity of Rs Moko-related strains and IIB-4NPB variant strains along with certain related strains and families. The proposed diagnostic protocol demonstrated both high accuracy (inclusivity and exclusivity) and high repeatability, detected targets on either pure culture or spiked plant extracts. Although they did not belong to the Moko clusters described at the time of the study, recently discovered banana-infecting strains from Brazil were also detected. According to our comprehensive evaluation, this duplex PCR assay appears suitable for both research and diagnostic laboratories and provides reliable detection of phylotype II Rs strains that infect Musaceae. PMID:25811378

  9. Biocontrol of Ralstonia solanacearum by Treatment with Lytic Bacteriophages ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Akiko; Fujisawa, Mariko; Hamasaki, Ryosuke; Kawasaki, Takeru; Fujie, Makoto; Yamada, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a Gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of bacterial wilt in many important crops. We treated R. solanacearum with three lytic phages: φRSA1, φRSB1, and φRSL1. Infection with φRSA1 and φRSB1, either alone or in combination with the other phages, resulted in a rapid decrease in the host bacterial cell density. Cells that were resistant to infection by these phages became evident approximately 30 h after phage addition to the culture. On the other hand, cells infected solely with φRSL1 in a batch culture were maintained at a lower cell density (1/3 of control) over a long period. Pretreatment of tomato seedlings with φRSL1 drastically limited penetration, growth, and movement of root-inoculated bacterial cells. All φRSL1-treated tomato plants showed no symptoms of wilting during the experimental period, whereas all untreated plants had wilted by 18 days postinfection. φRSL1 was shown to be relatively stable in soil, especially at higher temperatures (37 to 50°C). Active φRSL1 particles were recovered from the roots of treated plants and from soil 4 months postinfection. Based on these observations, we propose an alternative biocontrol method using a unique phage, such as φRSL1, instead of a phage cocktail with highly virulent phages. Using this method, φRSL1 killed some but not all bacterial cells. The coexistence of bacterial cells and the phage resulted in effective prevention of wilting. PMID:21498752

  10. Inventorying the molecular potential of Cupriavidus and Ralstonia strains surviving harsh space-related environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijnendonckx, Kristel; van Houdt, Rob; Provoost, Ann; Bossus, Albert; Ott, C. Mark; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Leys, Natalie

    The craving of modern man to explore life beyond earth presents a lot of challenges. The control of microbial contamination of the confined manned spacecraft is an important aspect that has to be taken into account in this journey. Because the human body contains a huge amount of microorganisms, the crew itself is the most important contamination source. But contamination can also originate from residing environmental microorganisms or from materials that are supplied from the Earth. These microbial contaminations can cause problems for the astronauts -well documented to have a decreased immunity -and the infrastructure of the space station. In this study, 14 different Cupriavidus metallidurans and Ralstonia pickettii strains, isolated from such space-related environments, where characterised in detail. These unique strains were isolated from drinking water that returned from ISS (3), from the cooling water system of the American ISS segment (4), from a swab sample of the Mars Odyssey Orbitor surface prior to flight (4), and from an air sample taken in the space assembly facility PHSF during Mars exploration Rover assembly (3). Their resistance to heavy metals and antibiotics was screened. The C. metallidurans isolates were more resistant to Zn2+ and Hg+ but more sensitive to Ni2+ than the R. pickettii strains. The MIC values for Cu2+ ranged from 1,5mM to 12mM, for Co2+ from 1,58mM to 12,63mM and for Cd2+ from 0,25mM to 1mM. For Ni2+ , the MIC values were between 2 and 8mM, except for the strain C. metallidurans IV (0502478) that was able to grow on Ni+2 concentrations up to 48mM. A metal of special interest was Ag+ because it is used to sanitize ISS drinking water. The strains isolated from air and surface samples showed a MIC value ranging from 0,35µM to 4µM. The isolates from the water samples had MIC values from 0,3µM to 2µM, which is lower than (or comparable with) the lowest limit of the silver concentration used in the ISS (1,9µM -4,6µM). However, all

  11. Genome Sequencing of Ralstonia solanacearum Biovar 3, Phylotype I, Strains Rs-09-161 and Rs-10-244, Isolated from Eggplant and Chili in India.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Raman; Gaitonde, Sapna; Achari, Gauri; Asolkar, Trupti; Singh, Narendra Pratap; Carrere, Sebastien; Genin, Stephane; Peeters, Nemo

    2014-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum Indian strains Rs-09-161 and Rs-10-244 were isolated from the coastal region of Goa and from the Andaman Islands. We report the draft genome sequences of these representative isolates infecting solanaceous vegetables in India. PMID:24874667

  12. A computer program for fast and easy typing of partial endoglucanase gene sequence into phylotypes and sequevars 1&2 (select agents) of Ralstonia solanacearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is a species complex that contains a subset of strains that are quarantined or select agent pathogens. An unidentified R. solanacearum strain is considered a select agent in the US until proven otherwise, which can be done by phylogenetic analysis of a partia...

  13. A TaqMan-based multiplex qPCR assay and DNA extraction method for phylotype IIB sequevars 1&2 (select agent) strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains have the ability to cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of the potential risk they pose to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated...

  14. Cold Tolerance of some Ralstonia solanacearum strains, including Race3 Biovar2, is conferred in part by variation in cold shock gene cspD3.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 (R3B2) strains are one of only 10 USDA Select Agents, a category of quarantined pathogens reserved for the most serious threats to U.S. plant industry. The threat of R3B2 strains was not considered to be likely due to race (these are poorly defined) or biovar ...

  15. Ralstonia solanacearum type III secretion system effector Rip36 induces a hypersensitive response in the nonhost wild eggplant Solanum torvum.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Kamrun; Matsumoto, Iyo; Taguchi, Fumiko; Inagaki, Yoshishige; Yamamoto, Mikihiro; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Ichinose, Yuki; Mukaihara, Takafumi

    2014-04-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a Gram-negative soil-borne bacterium that causes bacterial wilt disease in more than 200 plant species, including economically important Solanaceae species. In R. solanacearum, the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (Hrp) type III secretion system is required for both the ability to induce the hypersensitive response (HR) in nonhost plants and pathogenicity in host plants. Recently, 72 effector genes, called rip (Ralstonia protein injected into plant cells), have been identified in R. solanacearum RS1000. RS1002, a spontaneous nalixidic acid-resistant derivative of RS1000, induced strong HR in the nonhost wild eggplant Solanum torvum in an Hrp-dependent manner. An Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression system revealed that Rip36, a putative Zn-dependent protease effector of R. solanacearum, induced HR in S. torvum. A mutation in the putative Zn-binding motif (E149A) completely abolished the ability to induce HR. In agreement with this result, the RS1002-derived Δrip36 and rip36E149A mutants lost the ability to induce HR in S. torvum. An E149A mutation had no effect on the translocation of Rip36 into plant cells. These results indicate that Rip36 is an avirulent factor that induces HR in S. torvum and that a putative Zn-dependent protease motif is essential for this activity.

  16. Genetic diversity of the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum using a RAPD marker.

    PubMed

    Nishat, Sayeda; Hamim, Islam; Khalil, M Ibrahim; Ali, Md Ayub; Hossain, Muhammed Ali; Meah, M Bahadur; Islam, Md Rashidul

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is a destructive disease of many economically important crop species. A significant variation in wilt incidence and severity in eggplant and potato was observed among the growing areas surveyed. R. solanacearum isolates obtained both from eggplant and potato belong to biovar III, while isolates from eggplant belong to race 1 and isolates obtained from potato belong to race 3. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique was used as a tool for assessing genetic variation and relationship among seven isolate groups of R. solanacearum viz., RsB-1, RsB-2, RsB-3, RsP-1, RsP-2, RsP-3 and RsP-4, consisting in a total of 28 isolates. Out of the RAPD markers used, amplification with four decamer primers produced 70 bands with sizes ranging from 100 to 1400 bp. Out of 70 bands, 68 bands (97.06%) were polymorphic and two bands (2.94%) were monomorphic amongst the seven R. solanacearum isolates group. The Unweighted Pair Group Method of Arithmetic Means (UPGMA) dendrogram constructed from Nei's genetic distance produced two main clusters of the seven isolates of R. solanacearum. The isolates RsB-1, RsB-2, RsB-3 and R-4 grouped in cluster І, while RsP-2, RsP-3 and RsP-4 grouped in cluster ІІ. The highest intra-variety similarity index (Si) was found in RsB-1 isolate (86.35%) and the lowest one in RsP-2 (56.59%). The results indicated that relatively higher and lower levels of genetic variation were found in RsP-3 and RsB-3, respectively. The coefficient of gene differentiation (G(st)) was 0.5487, reflecting the existence of a high level of genetic variations among seven isolates of R. solanacearum. Comparatively higher genetic distance (0.4293) and lower genetic identity (0.6510) were observed between RsB-2 and RsP-4 combinations. The lowest genetic distance (0.0357) and highest genetic identity (0.9650) were found in RsB-1 vs. RsB-2 pair. Thus, RAPD offers a potentially simple, rapid and reliable method to evaluate

  17. Genomes of three tomato pathogens within the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex reveal significant evolutionary divergence

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Ralstonia solanacearum species complex includes thousands of strains pathogenic to an unusually wide range of plant species. These globally dispersed and heterogeneous strains cause bacterial wilt diseases, which have major socio-economic impacts. Pathogenicity is an ancestral trait in R. solanacearum and strains with high genetic variation can be subdivided into four phylotypes, correlating to isolates from Asia (phylotype I), the Americas (phylotype IIA and IIB), Africa (phylotype III) and Indonesia (phylotype IV). Comparison of genome sequences strains representative of this phylogenetic diversity can help determine which traits allow this bacterium to be such a pathogen of so many different plant species and how the bacteria survive in many different habitats. Results The genomes of three tomato bacterial wilt pathogens, CFBP2957 (phy. IIA), CMR15 (phy. III) and PSI07 (phy. IV) were sequenced and manually annotated. These genomes were compared with those of three previously sequenced R. solanacearum strains: GMI1000 (tomato, phy. I), IPO1609 (potato, phy. IIB), and Molk2 (banana, phy. IIB). The major genomic features (size, G+C content, number of genes) were conserved across all of the six sequenced strains. Despite relatively high genetic distances (calculated from average nucleotide identity) and many genomic rearrangements, more than 60% of the genes of the megaplasmid and 70% of those on the chromosome are syntenic. The three new genomic sequences revealed the presence of several previously unknown traits, probably acquired by horizontal transfers, within the genomes of R. solanacearum, including a type IV secretion system, a rhi-type anti-mitotic toxin and two small plasmids. Genes involved in virulence appear to be evolving at a faster rate than the genome as a whole. Conclusions Comparative analysis of genome sequences and gene content confirmed the differentiation of R. solanacearum species complex strains into four phylotypes. Genetic

  18. Genetic diversity of the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum using a RAPD marker.

    PubMed

    Nishat, Sayeda; Hamim, Islam; Khalil, M Ibrahim; Ali, Md Ayub; Hossain, Muhammed Ali; Meah, M Bahadur; Islam, Md Rashidul

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is a destructive disease of many economically important crop species. A significant variation in wilt incidence and severity in eggplant and potato was observed among the growing areas surveyed. R. solanacearum isolates obtained both from eggplant and potato belong to biovar III, while isolates from eggplant belong to race 1 and isolates obtained from potato belong to race 3. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique was used as a tool for assessing genetic variation and relationship among seven isolate groups of R. solanacearum viz., RsB-1, RsB-2, RsB-3, RsP-1, RsP-2, RsP-3 and RsP-4, consisting in a total of 28 isolates. Out of the RAPD markers used, amplification with four decamer primers produced 70 bands with sizes ranging from 100 to 1400 bp. Out of 70 bands, 68 bands (97.06%) were polymorphic and two bands (2.94%) were monomorphic amongst the seven R. solanacearum isolates group. The Unweighted Pair Group Method of Arithmetic Means (UPGMA) dendrogram constructed from Nei's genetic distance produced two main clusters of the seven isolates of R. solanacearum. The isolates RsB-1, RsB-2, RsB-3 and R-4 grouped in cluster І, while RsP-2, RsP-3 and RsP-4 grouped in cluster ІІ. The highest intra-variety similarity index (Si) was found in RsB-1 isolate (86.35%) and the lowest one in RsP-2 (56.59%). The results indicated that relatively higher and lower levels of genetic variation were found in RsP-3 and RsB-3, respectively. The coefficient of gene differentiation (G(st)) was 0.5487, reflecting the existence of a high level of genetic variations among seven isolates of R. solanacearum. Comparatively higher genetic distance (0.4293) and lower genetic identity (0.6510) were observed between RsB-2 and RsP-4 combinations. The lowest genetic distance (0.0357) and highest genetic identity (0.9650) were found in RsB-1 vs. RsB-2 pair. Thus, RAPD offers a potentially simple, rapid and reliable method to evaluate

  19. Class Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Thomas I.

    1985-01-01

    After a brief introduction identifying current issues and trends in research on class size, this brochure reviews five recent studies bearing on the relationship of class size to educational effectiveness. Part 1 is a review of two interrelated and highly controversial "meta-analyses" or statistical integrations of research findings on class size,…

  20. Class Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdata, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Ever since George Washington opted for the title of president rather than king, Americans have been uncomfortable with the idea of class distinctions. This article presents an interview with Dr. Janet Galligani Casey regarding the idea of class distinctions. Galligani Casey, who grew up in a working-class neighborhood in Somerville, Massachusetts,…

  1. [Genetic variability of the bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum (Burkholderiales: Burholderiaceae) in the banana-growing region of Uraba (Colombia)].

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Carolina; Rodríguez, Paola; Cotes, José Miguel; Marín, Mauricio

    2010-03-01

    The banana moko disease, caused by the bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum, is one of the most important phytopathological problems of the banana agribusiness in tropical countries. In Uraba and Magdalena (Colombia), the main exporting regions of banana in Colombia, this disease causes a destruction estimated in 16.5 ha/year. The bacterium presents an extremely high level of genetic variation that affects control measures. This is the first study of its variation in Colombia and was done with AFLP molecular markers on a population of 100 isolates from banana plants, soils and "weeds". The high level of genetic diversity, with Nei and Shannon indexes of h=0.32 and I=0.48, respectively, and the AMOVA, showed that this population is subestructured (Fst=0.66): the host is the main factor of differentiation. Even so, previous tests show that all varieties have pathogenicity on Musa.

  2. Biosynthesis of a Complex Yersiniabactin-Like Natural Product via the mic Locus in Phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum▿†

    PubMed Central

    Kreutzer, Martin F.; Kage, Hirokazu; Gebhardt, Peter; Wackler, Barbara; Saluz, Hans P.; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Nett, Markus

    2011-01-01

    A genome mining study in the plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum GMI1000 unveiled a polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene cluster putatively involved in siderophore biosynthesis. Insertional mutagenesis confirmed the respective locus to be operational under iron-deficient conditions and spurred the isolation of the associated natural product. Bioinformatic analyses of the gene cluster facilitated the structural characterization of this compound, which was subsequently identified as the antimycoplasma agent micacocidin. The metal-chelating properties of micacocidin were evaluated in competition experiments, and the cellular uptake of gallium-micacocidin complexes was demonstrated in R. solanacearum GMI1000, indicating a possible siderophore role. Comparative genomics revealed a conservation of the micacocidin gene cluster in defined, but globally dispersed phylotypes of R. solanacearum. PMID:21724891

  3. First Report of Bacterial Wilt Caused by Ralstonia solanacearum Biovar 2 Race 1 on Tomato in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Seleim, Mohamed A. A.; Abo-Elyousr, Kamal A. M.; Abd-El-Moneem, Kenawy M.; Saead, Farag A.

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to isolate and identify the causal pathogen of tomato bacterial wilt in Egypt. In 2008, tomato plants showing typical symptoms of bacterial wilt disease with no foliar yellowing were observed in Minia, Assiut and Sohag governorates, Egypt. When cut stems of symptomatic plants were submerged in water, whitish ooze was evident and longitudinal sections showed a brown discoloration in the vascular tissues. Bacteria were isolated on triphenyl tetrazolium chloride medium and fifteen isolates shown typical morphological and cultural characteristics were confirmed as Ralstonia solanacearum biovar 2 race 1. Pathogenicity tests showed that all isolates proved to be pathogenic to tomato plants, varied from 52 to 97% wilting. This is the first report of R. solanacearum biovar 2 race 1 causing bacterial wilt in tomato crop in Egypt. PMID:25289016

  4. Déjà vu: Ralstonia mannitolilytica infection associated with a humidifying respiratory therapy device, Israel, June to July 2011.

    PubMed

    Block, C; Ergaz-Shaltiel, Z; Valinsky, L; Temper, V; Hidalgo-Grass, C; Minster, N; Weissman, C; Benenson, S; Jaffe, J; Moses, A E; Bar-Oz, B

    2013-05-02

    Following a bloodstream infection in June 2011 with Ralstonia mannitolilytica in a premature infant treated with a humidifying respiratory therapy device, an investigation was initiated at the Hadassah Medical Centres in Jerusalem. The device delivers a warmed and humidified mixture of air and oxygen to patients by nasal cannula. The investigation revealed colonisation with R. mannitolilytica of two of 15 patients and contamination of components of five of six devices deployed in the premature units of the Hadassah hospitals. Ten isolates from the investigation were highly related and indistinguishable from isolates described in an outbreak in 2005 in the United States (US). Measures successful in containing the US outbreak were not included in user instructions provided to our hospitals by the distributor of the device.

  5. A real-time PCR assay for the quantitative detection of Ralstonia solanacearum in the horticultural soil and plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Zhang, Wen-Zhi; Liu, Xin; Ma, Zhong-Hua; Li, Bo; Allen, Caitilyn; Guo, Jian-Hua

    2010-01-01

    A specific and rapid real-time PCR assay for detecting Ralstonia solanacearum in the horticultural soil and plant tissues was developed in this study. The specific primers RSF/RSR were designed based on the upstream region of UDP-3-O-acyl-GlcNAc deacetylase gene from R. solanacearum, and a PCR product of 159 bp was amplified specifically from 28 strains of R. solanacearum, which represent all genetically diverse AluI types and all 6 biovars, but not from any other nontarget species. The detection limit of 102 CFU/g tomato stem and horticultural soil was achieved in this real-time PCR assay. The high sensitivity and specificity observed with filed samples as well as with artificially infected samples suggested that this method might be a useful tool for detection and quantification of R. solanacearum in precise forecast and diagnosis.

  6. Genome Sequences of Ralstonia insidiosa Type Strain ATCC 49129 and Strain FC1138, a Strong Biofilm Producer Isolated from a Fresh-Cut Produce-Processing Plant

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunfeng; Nagy, Attila; Yan, Xianghe; Haley, Bradd J.; Kim, Seon Woo; Liu, Nancy T.

    2016-01-01

    Ralstonia insidiosa is an opportunistic pathogen and a strong biofilm producer. Here, we present the complete genome sequences of R. insidiosa FC1138 and ATCC 49129. Both strains have two circular chromosomes of approximately 3.9 and 1.9 Mb and a 50-kb plasmid. ATCC 49129 also possesses a megaplasmid of approximately 318 kb. PMID:27540070

  7. A computer program for fast and easy typing of a partial endoglucanase gene sequence into genospecies and sequevars 1&2 of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex.

    PubMed

    Stulberg, Michael J; Huang, Qi

    2016-04-01

    The phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is a species complex that contains race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB sequevars 1 and 2 that are quarantined or select agent pathogens. Recently, the R. solanacearum species complex strains have been reclassified into three genospecies: R. solanacearum, Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum and Ralstonia syzygii. An unidentified R. solanacearum strain is considered a select agent in the US until proven to be a non-race 3 biovar 2 (non-phylotype IIB sequevars 1&2). Currently, sequevars of R. solanacearum species complex strains can only be determined by phylogenetic analysis of a partial endoglucanase (egl) sequence of approximately 700-bp in length. Such analysis, however, requires expert knowledge to properly trim the sequence, to include the correct reference strains, and to interpret the results. By comparing GenBank egl sequences of representative R. solanacearum species-complex strains, we identified genospecies- and sequevar 1 and 2-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We also designed primers to amplify a shorter, 526-bp, egl fragment from R. solanacearum species complex strains for easy sequencing of the amplicon, and to facilitate direct and specific amplification of egl from R. solanacearum-infected plant samples without the need of bacterial isolation. We wrote a computer program (Ralstonia solanacearum typing program) that analyzes a minimum 400-bp user-input egl sequence from a R. solanacearum strain for egl homology and SNP content to determine 1) whether it belongs to the R. solanacearum species complex, 2) if so, to which genospecies, and 3) whether it is of the sequevar type (sequevars 1 and 2) associated with the select agent/quarantined R. solanacearum strain. The program correctly typed all 371 tested egl sequences with known sequevars, obtained either from GenBank or through personal communication. Additionally, the program successfully typed 25 R. solanacearum strains in our

  8. A computer program for fast and easy typing of a partial endoglucanase gene sequence into genospecies and sequevars 1&2 of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex.

    PubMed

    Stulberg, Michael J; Huang, Qi

    2016-04-01

    The phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is a species complex that contains race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB sequevars 1 and 2 that are quarantined or select agent pathogens. Recently, the R. solanacearum species complex strains have been reclassified into three genospecies: R. solanacearum, Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum and Ralstonia syzygii. An unidentified R. solanacearum strain is considered a select agent in the US until proven to be a non-race 3 biovar 2 (non-phylotype IIB sequevars 1&2). Currently, sequevars of R. solanacearum species complex strains can only be determined by phylogenetic analysis of a partial endoglucanase (egl) sequence of approximately 700-bp in length. Such analysis, however, requires expert knowledge to properly trim the sequence, to include the correct reference strains, and to interpret the results. By comparing GenBank egl sequences of representative R. solanacearum species-complex strains, we identified genospecies- and sequevar 1 and 2-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We also designed primers to amplify a shorter, 526-bp, egl fragment from R. solanacearum species complex strains for easy sequencing of the amplicon, and to facilitate direct and specific amplification of egl from R. solanacearum-infected plant samples without the need of bacterial isolation. We wrote a computer program (Ralstonia solanacearum typing program) that analyzes a minimum 400-bp user-input egl sequence from a R. solanacearum strain for egl homology and SNP content to determine 1) whether it belongs to the R. solanacearum species complex, 2) if so, to which genospecies, and 3) whether it is of the sequevar type (sequevars 1 and 2) associated with the select agent/quarantined R. solanacearum strain. The program correctly typed all 371 tested egl sequences with known sequevars, obtained either from GenBank or through personal communication. Additionally, the program successfully typed 25 R. solanacearum strains in our

  9. Cloning and characterization of PR5 gene from Curcuma amada and Zingiber officinale in response to Ralstonia solanacearum infection.

    PubMed

    Prasath, D; El-Sharkawy, I; Sherif, S; Tiwary, K S; Jayasankar, S

    2011-10-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe), is an important spice crop that is badly affected by Ralstonia solanacearum wilt. Ginger does not set seed and sexual recombination has never been reported. In spite of extensive search in its habitats, no resistance source to Ralstonia induced bacterial wilt, could be located in ginger. Curcuma amada Roxb. is a potential donor for bacterial wilt resistance to Z. officinale, if the exact mechanism of resistance is understood. Pathogenesis-related (PR)-5 proteins are a family of proteins that are induced by different phytopathogens in many plants and share significant sequence similarity with thaumatin. Two putative PR5 genes, CaPR5 and ZoPR5, were amplified from C. amada and ginger, which encode precursor proteins of 227 and 224 amino acid residues, respectively, and share high homology with a number of other PR5 genes. The secondary and three-dimensional structure comparison did not reveal any striking differences between these two proteins. The expression of Ca and ZoPR5s under R. solanacearum inoculation was analyzed at different time points using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Our results reveal that CaPR5 is readily induced by the bacterium in C. amada, while ZoPR5 induction was very weak and slow in ginger. These results suggest that the CaPR5 could play a role in the molecular defense response of C. amada to pathogen attack. This is the first report of the isolation of PR5 gene from the C. amada and Z. officinale. Promoter analysis indicates the presence of a silencing element binding factor in ZoPR5-promoter, but not in CaPR5. Prospective promoter elements, such as GT-1 box and TGTCA, implicated as being positive regulatory elements for expression of PR proteins, occur in the 5'-flanking sequences of the CaPR5. Transient GUS expression study confirms its action with a weaker GUS expression in ginger, indicating that the PR5 expression may be controlled in the promoter. PMID:21594675

  10. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification of Specific Endoglucanase Gene Sequence for Detection of the Bacterial Wilt Pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Pirc, Manca; Llop, Pablo; Ravnikar, Maja; Dreo, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    The increased globalization of crops production and processing industries also promotes the side-effects of more rapid and efficient spread of plant pathogens. To prevent the associated economic losses, and particularly those related to bacterial diseases where their management relies on removal of the infected material from production, simple, easy-to-perform, rapid and cost-effective tests are needed. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays that target 16S rRNA, fliC and egl genes were compared and evaluated as on-site applications. The assay with the best performance was that targeted to the egl gene, which shows high analytical specificity for diverse strains of the betaproteobacterium Ralstonia solanacearum, including its non-European and non-race 3 biovar 2 strains. The additional melting curve analysis provides confirmation of the test results. According to our extensive assessment, the egl LAMP assay requires minimum sample preparation (a few minutes of boiling) for the identification of pure cultures and ooze from symptomatic material, and it can also be used in a high-throughput format in the laboratory. This provides sensitive and reliable detection of R. solanacearum strains of different phylotypes. PMID:24763488

  11. The effector AWR5 from the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is an inhibitor of the TOR signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Popa, Crina; Li, Liang; Gil, Sergio; Tatjer, Laura; Hashii, Keisuke; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Coll, Núria S; Ariño, Joaquín; Valls, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens possess complex type III effector (T3E) repertoires that are translocated inside the host cells to cause disease. However, only a minor proportion of these effectors have been assigned a function. Here, we show that the T3E AWR5 from the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is an inhibitor of TOR, a central regulator in eukaryotes that controls the switch between cell growth and stress responses in response to nutrient availability. Heterologous expression of AWR5 in yeast caused growth inhibition and autophagy induction coupled to massive transcriptomic changes, unmistakably reminiscent of TOR inhibition by rapamycin or nitrogen starvation. Detailed genetic analysis of these phenotypes in yeast, including suppression of AWR5-induced toxicity by mutation of CDC55 and TPD3, encoding regulatory subunits of the PP2A phosphatase, indicated that AWR5 might exert its function by directly or indirectly inhibiting the TOR pathway upstream PP2A. We present evidence in planta that this T3E caused a decrease in TOR-regulated plant nitrate reductase activity and also that normal levels of TOR and the Cdc55 homologues in plants are required for R. solanacearum virulence. Our results suggest that the TOR pathway is a bona fide T3E target and further prove that yeast is a useful platform for T3E function characterisation. PMID:27257085

  12. The involvement of the PilQ secretin of type IV pili in phage infection in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Narulita, Erlia; Addy, Hardian Susilo; Kawasaki, Takeru; Fujie, Makoto; Yamada, Takashi

    2016-01-22

    PilQ is a member of the secretin family of outer membrane proteins and specifically involved in type IV secretion. Here we report the effects of pilQ mutation in Ralstonia solanacearum on the host physiology including susceptibility to several phage types (Inoviridae, Podoviridae and Myoviridae). With three lines of cells, namely wild type, ΔpilQ and pilQ-complemented cells, the cell surface proteins, twitching motility and sensitivity to phages were compared. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the major TFP pilin (PilA) was specifically lost in pilQ mutants and was recovered in the complemented cells. Drastically inactivated twitching motility in pilQ mutants was recovered to the wild type level in the complemented cells. Several phages of different types including those of Inoviridae, Podoviridae, and Myoviridae that infect wild type cells could not form plaques on pilQ mutants but showed infectivity to pilQ-complemented cells. These results indicate that PilQ function is generally required for phage infection in R. solanacearum. PMID:26718404

  13. Development of the sensitive lateral flow immunoassay with silver enhancement for the detection of Ralstonia solanacearum in potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Panferov, Vasily G; Safenkova, Irina V; Varitsev, Yury A; Drenova, Natalia V; Kornev, Konstantin P; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2016-05-15

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a dangerous and economically important pathogen of potatoes and other agricultural crops. Therefore, rapid and sensitive methods for its routine diagnostics are necessary. The aim of this study was to develop a rapid control method for R. solanacearum with a low limit of detection (LOD) based on a lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) with silver enhancement. To minimize the LOD, the membrane type, antibody amount for conjugation with gold nanoparticles, conjugate concentration and antibody concentration in the analytical zone were optimized. Silver enhancement was used to decrease the LOD of the LFIA. For silver enhancement, release fiberglass membranes with pre-absorbed silver lactate and hydroquinone were placed on the analytical zone, and a drop of silver lactate was added. The LFIA with silver enhancement was found to be 10-fold more sensitive (LOD 2×10(2) CFU/mL; 20 min) in comparison with the common analysis (LOD 2×10(3) CFU/mL; 10 min). The specificity of the developed LFIA was studied using different strains of R. solanacearum (54 samples) and other widespread bacterial pathogens (18 samples). The LFIA detected all tested strains, whereas non-specific reactions were not observed. The developed tests were used for the control of bacteria in extracts of infected and non-infected potato tubers, and the quantitative analysis results (based on the densitometry of line colouration) were confirmed by ELISA with a correlation coefficient equal to 0.965. PMID:26992550

  14. l-Histidine Induces Resistance in Plants to the Bacterial Pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum Partially Through the Activation of Ethylene Signaling.

    PubMed

    Seo, Shigemi; Nakaho, Kazuhiro; Hong, Si Won; Takahashi, Hideki; Shigemori, Hideyuki; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2016-09-01

    Wilt disease in plants, which is caused by the soil-borne bacterial pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum, is one of the most devastating plant diseases. We previously detected bacterial wilt disease-inhibiting activity in an extract from yeast cells. In the present study, we purified this activity and identified one of the substances responsible for the activity as the amino acid histidine. The exogenous application of l-histidine, but not d-histidine, inhibited wilt disease in tomato and Arabidopsis plants without exhibiting any antibacterial activity. l-Histidine induced the expression of genes related to ethylene (ET) biosynthesis and signaling as well as the production of ET in tomato and Arabidopsis plants. l-Histidine-induced resistance to R. solanacearum was partially abolished in ein3-1, an ET-insensitive Arabidopsis mutant line. Resistance to the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, which is known to require ET biosynthesis or signaling, was also induced by exogenously applied l-histidine. These results suggest that l-histidine induces resistance to R. solanacearum and B. cinerea partially through the activation of ET signaling in plants. PMID:27335353

  15. Volatile organic compounds produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens WR-1 restrict the growth and virulence traits of Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Raza, Waseem; Ling, Ning; Liu, Dongyang; Wei, Zhong; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-11-01

    The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by soil microbes have a significant role in the control of plant diseases and plant growth promotion. In this study, we examined the effect of VOCs produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain WR-1 on the growth and virulence traits of tomato wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. The VOCs produced by P. fluorescens WR-1 exhibited concentration dependent bacteriostatic effect on the growth of R. solanacearum on agar medium and in infested soil. The VOCs of P. fluorescens WR-1 also significantly inhibited the virulence traits of R. solanacearum. The proteomics analysis showed that the VOCs of P. fluorescens WR-1 downregulated cellular proteins of R. solanacearum related to the antioxidant activity, virulence, inclusion body proteins, carbohydrate and amino acid synthesis and metabolism, protein folding and translation, methylation and energy transfer, while the proteins involved in the ABC transporter system, detoxification of aldehydes and ketones, protein folding and translation were upregulated. This study revealed the significance of VOCs of P. fluorescens WR-1 to control the tomato wilt pathogen R. solanacearum. Investigation of the modes of action of biocontrol agents is important to better comprehend the interactions mediated by VOCs in nature to design better control strategies for plant pathogens. PMID:27664728

  16. Heavy metal-resistant bacteria as extremophiles: molecular physiology and biotechnological use of Ralstonia sp. CH34.

    PubMed

    Nies, D H

    2000-04-01

    In contrast to thermophilic or psychrophilic organisms, heavy metal-resistant bacteria do not supply enzymes that are active under harsh conditions, but are themselves tools for the evaluation and remediation of heavy metal-contaminated environments. Ralstonia sp. CH34 is a gram-negative bacterium with a remarkable set of resistance determinants, allowing this bacterium to live in extreme environments that are heavily contaminated with toxic metal ions. These heavy metal ions are mostly detoxified by inducible ion efflux systems that reduce the intracellular concentration of a given ion by active export. Because all metal resistance determinants in this bacterium are inducible, their regulatory systems can be used to develop biosensors that measure the biologically important concentrations of heavy metals in an environment. Resistance based on metal ion efflux detoxifies only the cytoplasm of the respective cell. Therefore, this resistance mechanism cannot be used directly to develop biotechnological procedures; however, metal ion efflux can protect a cell in a metal-contaminated environment. Thus, the cell can be enabled to mediate biochemical reactions such as precipitation of heavy metals with the carbon dioxide produced during growth or degradation of xenobiotics.

  17. l-Histidine Induces Resistance in Plants to the Bacterial Pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum Partially Through the Activation of Ethylene Signaling.

    PubMed

    Seo, Shigemi; Nakaho, Kazuhiro; Hong, Si Won; Takahashi, Hideki; Shigemori, Hideyuki; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2016-09-01

    Wilt disease in plants, which is caused by the soil-borne bacterial pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum, is one of the most devastating plant diseases. We previously detected bacterial wilt disease-inhibiting activity in an extract from yeast cells. In the present study, we purified this activity and identified one of the substances responsible for the activity as the amino acid histidine. The exogenous application of l-histidine, but not d-histidine, inhibited wilt disease in tomato and Arabidopsis plants without exhibiting any antibacterial activity. l-Histidine induced the expression of genes related to ethylene (ET) biosynthesis and signaling as well as the production of ET in tomato and Arabidopsis plants. l-Histidine-induced resistance to R. solanacearum was partially abolished in ein3-1, an ET-insensitive Arabidopsis mutant line. Resistance to the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, which is known to require ET biosynthesis or signaling, was also induced by exogenously applied l-histidine. These results suggest that l-histidine induces resistance to R. solanacearum and B. cinerea partially through the activation of ET signaling in plants.

  18. PIRIN2 stabilizes cysteine protease XCP2 and increases susceptibility to the vascular pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Tremousaygue, Dominique; Denancé, Nicolas; van Esse, H Peter; Hörger, Anja C; Dabos, Patrick; Goffner, Deborah; Thomma, Bart P H J; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Tuominen, Hannele

    2014-01-01

    PIRIN (PRN) is a member of the functionally diverse cupin protein superfamily. There are four members of the Arabidopsis thaliana PRN family, but the roles of these proteins are largely unknown. Here we describe a function of the Arabidopsis PIRIN2 (PRN2) that is related to susceptibility to the bacterial plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. Two prn2 mutant alleles displayed decreased disease development and bacterial growth in response to R.  solanacearum infection. We elucidated the underlying molecular mechanism by analyzing PRN2 interactions with the papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCPs) XCP2, RD21A, and RD21B, all of which bound to PRN2 in yeast two-hybrid assays and in Arabidopsis protoplast co-immunoprecipitation assays. We show that XCP2 is stabilized by PRN2 through inhibition of its autolysis on the basis of PLCP activity profiling assays and enzymatic assays with recombinant protein. The stabilization of XCP2 by PRN2 was also confirmed in planta. Like prn2 mutants, an xcp2 single knockout mutant and xcp2 prn2 double knockout mutant displayed decreased susceptibility to R. solanacearum, suggesting that stabilization of XCP2 by PRN2 underlies susceptibility to R. solanacearum in Arabidopsis. PMID:24947605

  19. Insights into the diversity of φRSM phages infecting strains of the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum complex: regulation and evolution.

    PubMed

    Askora, Ahmed; Kawasaki, Takeru; Fujie, Makoto; Yamada, Takashi

    2014-08-01

    The filamentous φRSM phages (φRSM1 and φRSM3) have integration/excision capabilities in the phytopathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum. In the present study, we further investigated φRSM-like sequences present in the genomes of R. solanacearum strains belonging to the four major evolutionary lineages (phylotypes I-IV). Based on bioinformatics and comparative genomic analyses, we found that φRSM homologs are highly diverse in R. solanacearum complex strains. We detected an open reading frame (ORF)15 located upstream of the gene for φRSM integrase, which exhibited amino acid sequence similarity to phage repressor proteins. ORF15-encoded protein (a putative repressor) was found to encode a 104-residue polypeptide containing a DNA-binding (helix-turn-helix) domain and was expressed in R. solanacearum lysogenic strains. This suggested that φRSM3-ORF15 might be involved in the establishment and maintenance of a lysogenic state, as well as in phage immunity. Comparison of the putative repressor proteins and their binding sites within φRSM-related prophages provides insights into how these regulatory systems of filamentous phages have evolved and diverged in the R. solanacearum complex. In conclusion, φRSM phages represent a unique group of filamentous phages that are equipped with innate integration/excision (ORF14) and regulatory systems (ORF15). PMID:24619102

  20. The Viable But Nonculturable State of Ralstonia solanacearum May Be Involved in Long-Term Survival and Plant Infection

    PubMed Central

    Grey, Brian E.; Steck, Todd R.

    2001-01-01

    The role of the dormant-like viable but nonculturable (VBNC) condition in the etiology of bacterial infection was examined using a plant system. The plant-pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum was first shown to enter into the VBNC state both in response to cupric sulfate when in a saline solution and when placed in autoclaved soil. To determine if the VBNC condition is related to pathogenesis, the physiological status of bacteria recovered from different regions of inoculated tomato plants was determined at different stages of infection. The fraction of in planta bacteria that were VBNC increased during infection and became greater than 99% by the late stage of disease. The possibility that soil-dwelling VBNC bacteria may resuscitate and infect plants was also examined. When tomato seeds were germinated in sterile soil that contained VBNC but no detectable culturable forms of R. solanacearum cells, resuscitation was observed to occur in soil adjacent to plant roots; these resuscitated bacteria were able to infect plants. This is the first report of R. solanacearum entering the VBNC state and of resuscitation of any VBNC plant-pathogenic bacteria and provides evidence that the VBNC state may be involved in explaining the persistent nature of some infections. PMID:11525979

  1. Phylogeny and population structure of brown rot- and Moko disease-causing strains of Ralstonia solanacearum phylotype II.

    PubMed

    Cellier, G; Remenant, B; Chiroleu, F; Lefeuvre, P; Prior, P

    2012-04-01

    The ancient soilborne plant vascular pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum has evolved and adapted to cause severe damage in an unusually wide range of plants. In order to better describe and understand these adaptations, strains with very similar lifestyles and host specializations are grouped into ecotypes. We used comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to investigate three particular ecotypes in the American phylotype II group: (i) brown rot strains from phylotypes IIB-1 and IIB-2, historically known as race 3 biovar 2 and clonal; (ii) new pathogenic variants from phylotype IIB-4NPB that lack pathogenicity for banana but can infect many other plant species; and (iii) Moko disease-causing strains from phylotypes IIB-3, IIB-4, and IIA-6, historically known as race 2, that cause wilt on banana, plantain, and Heliconia spp. We compared the genomes of 72 R. solanacearum strains, mainly from the three major ecotypes of phylotype II, using a newly developed pangenomic microarray to decipher their population structure and gain clues about the epidemiology of these ecotypes. Strain phylogeny and population structure were reconstructed. The results revealed a phylogeographic structure within brown rot strains, allowing us to distinguish European outbreak strains of Andean and African origins. The pangenomic CGH data also demonstrated that Moko ecotype IIB-4 is phylogenetically distinct from the emerging IIB-4NPB strains. These findings improved our understanding of the epidemiology of important ecotypes in phylotype II and will be useful for evolutionary analyses and the development of new DNA-based diagnostic tools. PMID:22286995

  2. The effector AWR5 from the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is an inhibitor of the TOR signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Crina; Li, Liang; Gil, Sergio; Tatjer, Laura; Hashii, Keisuke; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Coll, Núria S.; Ariño, Joaquín; Valls, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens possess complex type III effector (T3E) repertoires that are translocated inside the host cells to cause disease. However, only a minor proportion of these effectors have been assigned a function. Here, we show that the T3E AWR5 from the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is an inhibitor of TOR, a central regulator in eukaryotes that controls the switch between cell growth and stress responses in response to nutrient availability. Heterologous expression of AWR5 in yeast caused growth inhibition and autophagy induction coupled to massive transcriptomic changes, unmistakably reminiscent of TOR inhibition by rapamycin or nitrogen starvation. Detailed genetic analysis of these phenotypes in yeast, including suppression of AWR5-induced toxicity by mutation of CDC55 and TPD3, encoding regulatory subunits of the PP2A phosphatase, indicated that AWR5 might exert its function by directly or indirectly inhibiting the TOR pathway upstream PP2A. We present evidence in planta that this T3E caused a decrease in TOR-regulated plant nitrate reductase activity and also that normal levels of TOR and the Cdc55 homologues in plants are required for R. solanacearum virulence. Our results suggest that the TOR pathway is a bona fide T3E target and further prove that yeast is a useful platform for T3E function characterisation. PMID:27257085

  3. Control Efficacy of an Endophytic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Strain BZ6-1 against Peanut Bacterial Wilt, Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Guobin

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to isolate and identify endophytic bacteria that might have efficacy against peanut bacterial wilt (BW) caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. Thirty-seven endophytic strains were isolated from healthy peanut plants in R. solanacearum-infested fields and eight showed antagonistic effects against R. solanacearum. Strain BZ6-1 with the highest antimicrobial activity was identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens based on morphology, biochemistry, and 16S rRNA analysis. Culture conditions of BZ6-1 were optimized using orthogonal test method and inhibitory zone diameter in dual culture plate assay reached 34.2 mm. Furthermore, main antimicrobial substances of surfactin and fengycin A homologues produced by BZ6-1 were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Finally, pot experiments were adopted to test the control efficiency of BZ6-1 against peanut BW. Disease incidence decreased significantly from 84.5% in the control to 12.1% with addition of 15 mL (108 cfu mL−1) culture broth for each seedling, suggesting the feasibility of strain BZ6-1 in the biological control of peanut plants BW. PMID:24527448

  4. Phylogeny and Population Structure of Brown Rot- and Moko Disease-Causing Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum Phylotype II

    PubMed Central

    Remenant, B.; Chiroleu, F.; Lefeuvre, P.; Prior, P.

    2012-01-01

    The ancient soilborne plant vascular pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum has evolved and adapted to cause severe damage in an unusually wide range of plants. In order to better describe and understand these adaptations, strains with very similar lifestyles and host specializations are grouped into ecotypes. We used comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to investigate three particular ecotypes in the American phylotype II group: (i) brown rot strains from phylotypes IIB-1 and IIB-2, historically known as race 3 biovar 2 and clonal; (ii) new pathogenic variants from phylotype IIB-4NPB that lack pathogenicity for banana but can infect many other plant species; and (iii) Moko disease-causing strains from phylotypes IIB-3, IIB-4, and IIA-6, historically known as race 2, that cause wilt on banana, plantain, and Heliconia spp. We compared the genomes of 72 R. solanacearum strains, mainly from the three major ecotypes of phylotype II, using a newly developed pangenomic microarray to decipher their population structure and gain clues about the epidemiology of these ecotypes. Strain phylogeny and population structure were reconstructed. The results revealed a phylogeographic structure within brown rot strains, allowing us to distinguish European outbreak strains of Andean and African origins. The pangenomic CGH data also demonstrated that Moko ecotype IIB-4 is phylogenetically distinct from the emerging IIB-4NPB strains. These findings improved our understanding of the epidemiology of important ecotypes in phylotype II and will be useful for evolutionary analyses and the development of new DNA-based diagnostic tools. PMID:22286995

  5. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification of specific endoglucanase gene sequence for detection of the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Lenarčič, Rok; Morisset, Dany; Pirc, Manca; Llop, Pablo; Ravnikar, Maja; Dreo, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    The increased globalization of crops production and processing industries also promotes the side-effects of more rapid and efficient spread of plant pathogens. To prevent the associated economic losses, and particularly those related to bacterial diseases where their management relies on removal of the infected material from production, simple, easy-to-perform, rapid and cost-effective tests are needed. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays that target 16S rRNA, fliC and egl genes were compared and evaluated as on-site applications. The assay with the best performance was that targeted to the egl gene, which shows high analytical specificity for diverse strains of the betaproteobacterium Ralstonia solanacearum, including its non-European and non-race 3 biovar 2 strains. The additional melting curve analysis provides confirmation of the test results. According to our extensive assessment, the egl LAMP assay requires minimum sample preparation (a few minutes of boiling) for the identification of pure cultures and ooze from symptomatic material, and it can also be used in a high-throughput format in the laboratory. This provides sensitive and reliable detection of R. solanacearum strains of different phylotypes. PMID:24763488

  6. The effector AWR5 from the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is an inhibitor of the TOR signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Popa, Crina; Li, Liang; Gil, Sergio; Tatjer, Laura; Hashii, Keisuke; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Coll, Núria S; Ariño, Joaquín; Valls, Marc

    2016-06-03

    Bacterial pathogens possess complex type III effector (T3E) repertoires that are translocated inside the host cells to cause disease. However, only a minor proportion of these effectors have been assigned a function. Here, we show that the T3E AWR5 from the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is an inhibitor of TOR, a central regulator in eukaryotes that controls the switch between cell growth and stress responses in response to nutrient availability. Heterologous expression of AWR5 in yeast caused growth inhibition and autophagy induction coupled to massive transcriptomic changes, unmistakably reminiscent of TOR inhibition by rapamycin or nitrogen starvation. Detailed genetic analysis of these phenotypes in yeast, including suppression of AWR5-induced toxicity by mutation of CDC55 and TPD3, encoding regulatory subunits of the PP2A phosphatase, indicated that AWR5 might exert its function by directly or indirectly inhibiting the TOR pathway upstream PP2A. We present evidence in planta that this T3E caused a decrease in TOR-regulated plant nitrate reductase activity and also that normal levels of TOR and the Cdc55 homologues in plants are required for R. solanacearum virulence. Our results suggest that the TOR pathway is a bona fide T3E target and further prove that yeast is a useful platform for T3E function characterisation.

  7. Insights into the diversity of φRSM phages infecting strains of the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum complex: regulation and evolution.

    PubMed

    Askora, Ahmed; Kawasaki, Takeru; Fujie, Makoto; Yamada, Takashi

    2014-08-01

    The filamentous φRSM phages (φRSM1 and φRSM3) have integration/excision capabilities in the phytopathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum. In the present study, we further investigated φRSM-like sequences present in the genomes of R. solanacearum strains belonging to the four major evolutionary lineages (phylotypes I-IV). Based on bioinformatics and comparative genomic analyses, we found that φRSM homologs are highly diverse in R. solanacearum complex strains. We detected an open reading frame (ORF)15 located upstream of the gene for φRSM integrase, which exhibited amino acid sequence similarity to phage repressor proteins. ORF15-encoded protein (a putative repressor) was found to encode a 104-residue polypeptide containing a DNA-binding (helix-turn-helix) domain and was expressed in R. solanacearum lysogenic strains. This suggested that φRSM3-ORF15 might be involved in the establishment and maintenance of a lysogenic state, as well as in phage immunity. Comparison of the putative repressor proteins and their binding sites within φRSM-related prophages provides insights into how these regulatory systems of filamentous phages have evolved and diverged in the R. solanacearum complex. In conclusion, φRSM phages represent a unique group of filamentous phages that are equipped with innate integration/excision (ORF14) and regulatory systems (ORF15).

  8. Volatile organic compounds produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens WR-1 restrict the growth and virulence traits of Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Raza, Waseem; Ling, Ning; Liu, Dongyang; Wei, Zhong; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-11-01

    The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by soil microbes have a significant role in the control of plant diseases and plant growth promotion. In this study, we examined the effect of VOCs produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain WR-1 on the growth and virulence traits of tomato wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. The VOCs produced by P. fluorescens WR-1 exhibited concentration dependent bacteriostatic effect on the growth of R. solanacearum on agar medium and in infested soil. The VOCs of P. fluorescens WR-1 also significantly inhibited the virulence traits of R. solanacearum. The proteomics analysis showed that the VOCs of P. fluorescens WR-1 downregulated cellular proteins of R. solanacearum related to the antioxidant activity, virulence, inclusion body proteins, carbohydrate and amino acid synthesis and metabolism, protein folding and translation, methylation and energy transfer, while the proteins involved in the ABC transporter system, detoxification of aldehydes and ketones, protein folding and translation were upregulated. This study revealed the significance of VOCs of P. fluorescens WR-1 to control the tomato wilt pathogen R. solanacearum. Investigation of the modes of action of biocontrol agents is important to better comprehend the interactions mediated by VOCs in nature to design better control strategies for plant pathogens.

  9. TssB is essential for virulence and required for type VI secretion system in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqing; Xu, Jingsheng; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Hao; He, Liyuan; Feng, Jie

    2014-09-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is recently discovered machinery in Gram-negative bacteria for translocation of proteins and also is required for full virulence. TssB is a highly conserved protein among the T6SSs, and indispensable for composition and function of T6S. The plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum also harbours T6SS gene clusters, and a homologue of TssB, hereafter designated as TssBRS, but up to date its characterization and function remain unclear. In this study, we showed that TssBRS of R. solanacearum was required for secretion of Hcp, the haemolysin coregulated protein and a hallmark of T6S pathway. Deletion of tssBRS in R. solanacearum GMI1000 strain resulted in defect of biofilm formation, and the expression of the flagella operon is decreased, leading to decreased motility. More importantly, tssBRS mutant strain had significantly attenuated its virulence on tomato plants. TssB is essential for virulence and required for type VI secretion system in R. solanacearum.

  10. PIRIN2 stabilizes cysteine protease XCP2 and increases susceptibility to the vascular pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Tremousaygue, Dominique; Denancé, Nicolas; van Esse, H Peter; Hörger, Anja C; Dabos, Patrick; Goffner, Deborah; Thomma, Bart P H J; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Tuominen, Hannele

    2014-09-01

    PIRIN (PRN) is a member of the functionally diverse cupin protein superfamily. There are four members of the Arabidopsis thaliana PRN family, but the roles of these proteins are largely unknown. Here we describe a function of the Arabidopsis PIRIN2 (PRN2) that is related to susceptibility to the bacterial plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. Two prn2 mutant alleles displayed decreased disease development and bacterial growth in response to R.  solanacearum infection. We elucidated the underlying molecular mechanism by analyzing PRN2 interactions with the papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCPs) XCP2, RD21A, and RD21B, all of which bound to PRN2 in yeast two-hybrid assays and in Arabidopsis protoplast co-immunoprecipitation assays. We show that XCP2 is stabilized by PRN2 through inhibition of its autolysis on the basis of PLCP activity profiling assays and enzymatic assays with recombinant protein. The stabilization of XCP2 by PRN2 was also confirmed in planta. Like prn2 mutants, an xcp2 single knockout mutant and xcp2 prn2 double knockout mutant displayed decreased susceptibility to R. solanacearum, suggesting that stabilization of XCP2 by PRN2 underlies susceptibility to R. solanacearum in Arabidopsis.

  11. The involvement of the PilQ secretin of type IV pili in phage infection in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Narulita, Erlia; Addy, Hardian Susilo; Kawasaki, Takeru; Fujie, Makoto; Yamada, Takashi

    2016-01-22

    PilQ is a member of the secretin family of outer membrane proteins and specifically involved in type IV secretion. Here we report the effects of pilQ mutation in Ralstonia solanacearum on the host physiology including susceptibility to several phage types (Inoviridae, Podoviridae and Myoviridae). With three lines of cells, namely wild type, ΔpilQ and pilQ-complemented cells, the cell surface proteins, twitching motility and sensitivity to phages were compared. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the major TFP pilin (PilA) was specifically lost in pilQ mutants and was recovered in the complemented cells. Drastically inactivated twitching motility in pilQ mutants was recovered to the wild type level in the complemented cells. Several phages of different types including those of Inoviridae, Podoviridae, and Myoviridae that infect wild type cells could not form plaques on pilQ mutants but showed infectivity to pilQ-complemented cells. These results indicate that PilQ function is generally required for phage infection in R. solanacearum.

  12. A novel, sensitive method to evaluate potato germplasm for bacterial wilt resistance using a luminescent Ralstonia solanacearum reporter strain.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Andrea Paola Zuluaga; Ferreira, Virginia; Pianzzola, María Julia; Siri, María Inés; Coll, Núria S; Valls, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Several breeding programs are under way to introduce resistance to bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum in solanaceous crops. The lack of screening methods allowing easy measurement of pathogen colonization and the inability to detect latent (i.e., symptomless) infections are major limitations when evaluating resistance to this disease in plant germplasm. We describe a new method to study the interaction between R. solanacearum and potato germplasm that overcomes these restrictions. The R. solanacearum UY031 was genetically modified to constitutively generate light from a synthetic luxCDABE operon stably inserted in its chromosome. Colonization of this reporter strain on different potato accessions was followed using life imaging. Bacterial detection in planta by this nondisruptive system correlated with the development of wilting symptoms. In addition, we demonstrated that quantitative detection of the recombinant strain using a luminometer can identify latent infections on symptomless potato plants. We have developed a novel, unsophisticated, and accurate method for high-throughput evaluation of pathogen colonization in plant populations. We applied this method to compare the behavior of potato accessions with contrasting resistance to R. solanacearum. This new system will be especially useful to detect latency in symptomless parental lines before their inclusion in long-term breeding programs for disease resistance.

  13. Development of the sensitive lateral flow immunoassay with silver enhancement for the detection of Ralstonia solanacearum in potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Panferov, Vasily G; Safenkova, Irina V; Varitsev, Yury A; Drenova, Natalia V; Kornev, Konstantin P; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2016-05-15

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a dangerous and economically important pathogen of potatoes and other agricultural crops. Therefore, rapid and sensitive methods for its routine diagnostics are necessary. The aim of this study was to develop a rapid control method for R. solanacearum with a low limit of detection (LOD) based on a lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) with silver enhancement. To minimize the LOD, the membrane type, antibody amount for conjugation with gold nanoparticles, conjugate concentration and antibody concentration in the analytical zone were optimized. Silver enhancement was used to decrease the LOD of the LFIA. For silver enhancement, release fiberglass membranes with pre-absorbed silver lactate and hydroquinone were placed on the analytical zone, and a drop of silver lactate was added. The LFIA with silver enhancement was found to be 10-fold more sensitive (LOD 2×10(2) CFU/mL; 20 min) in comparison with the common analysis (LOD 2×10(3) CFU/mL; 10 min). The specificity of the developed LFIA was studied using different strains of R. solanacearum (54 samples) and other widespread bacterial pathogens (18 samples). The LFIA detected all tested strains, whereas non-specific reactions were not observed. The developed tests were used for the control of bacteria in extracts of infected and non-infected potato tubers, and the quantitative analysis results (based on the densitometry of line colouration) were confirmed by ELISA with a correlation coefficient equal to 0.965.

  14. Mutations in Ralstonia solanacearum loci involved in lipopolysaccharide biogenesis, phospholipid trafficking and peptidoglycan recycling render bacteriophage infection.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yu-Hau; Huang, Chi; Wang, Kuan-Chung; Chu, Tai-Hsiang; Li, Chien-Hui; Chu, Yu-Ju; Cheng, Chiu-Ping

    2014-09-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum causes deadly wilting on many crops worldwide. However, the information on its components important for cell integrity and interactions with phages is limited. By systematically characterizing mutants resistant to a T7-like phage, we showed that the biosynthesis of rough lipopolysaccharides (R-LPS) was crucial for maintaining the membrane integrity, while the production of smooth LPS (S-LPS) was required for the resistance to polymyxin B and phage adsorption. Furthermore, RSc0154/ampG disruption did not affect LPS production and phage adsorption but may have caused aberrant release of peptidoglycan fragments, thus hindering phage DNA injection into or virion release from the cell. Mutations in the RSc2958-RSc2962/mla cluster, although not affecting LPS production, may have caused elevated phospholipid level in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane, consequently sheltering the mutants from phage adsorption on the O-antigen. These results specify important roles of the biogenesis and homeogenesis of envelope components for R. solanacearum-phage interaction.

  15. The C-terminal extension of PrhG impairs its activation of hrp expression and virulence in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Luo, Feng; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Kiba, Akinori; Yasuo, Igarashi; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    2015-04-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is the second most destructive bacterial plant pathogens worldwide and HrpG is the master regulator of its pathogenicity. PrhG is a close paralogue of HrpG and both belong to OmpR/PhoB family of two-component response regulators. Despite a high similarity (72% global identity and 96% similarity in helix-loop-helix domain), they display distinct roles in pathogenicity. HrpG is necessary for the bacterial growth in planta and pathogenicity, while PrhG is dispensable for bacterial growth in planta and contributes little to pathogenicity. The main difference between HrpG and PrhG is the 50-amino-acid-long C-terminal extension in PrhG (amino-acid residues 230-283), which is absent in HrpG. When this extension is deleted, truncated PrhGs (under the control of its native promoter) allowed complete recovery of bacterial growth in planta and wild-type virulence of hrpG mutant. This novel finding demonstrates that the extension region in PrhG is responsible for the functional difference between HrpG and PrhG, which may block the binding of PrhG to target promoters and result in impaired activation of hrp expression by PrhG and reduced virulence of R. solanacearum.

  16. Non-Instrumented Nucleic Acid Amplification (NINA) for Rapid Detection of Ralstonia solanacearum Race 3 Biovar 2

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Ryo; LaBarre, Paul; Singleton, Jered; Beddoe, Andy; Weigl, Bernhard H.; Alvarez, Anne M.; Jenkins, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the use of a non-instrumented device for the implementation of a loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) based assay for the select-agent bacterial-wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2. Heat energy is generated within the device by the exothermic hydration of calcium oxide, and the reaction temperature is regulated by storing latent energy at the melting temperature of a renewable lipid-based engineered phase-change material. Endpoint detection of the LAMP reaction is achieved without opening the reaction tube by observing the fluorescence of an innovative FRET-based hybridization probe with a simple custom fluorometer. Non-instrumented devices could maintain reactions near the design temperature of 63°C for at least an hour. Using this approach DNA extracted from the pathogen could be detected at fewer than ten copies within a 25 μL reaction mix, illustrating the potential of these technologies for simple, powerful agricultural diagnostics in the field. Furthermore, the assay was just as reliable when implemented in a tropical environment at 31°C as it was when implemented in an air-conditioned lab maintained at 22°C, illustrating the potential value of the technology for field conditions in the tropics and subtropics. PMID:25485176

  17. Moko Disease-Causing Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum from Brazil Extend Known Diversity in Paraphyletic Phylotype II.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Greecy M R; Santos, Liliana A; Felix, Kátia C S; Rollemberg, Christtianno L; Silva, Adriano M F; Souza, Elineide B; Cellier, Gilles; Prior, Philippe; Mariano, Rosa L R

    2014-11-01

    The epidemic situation of Moko disease-causing strains in Latin America and Brazil is unclear. Thirty-seven Ralstonia solanacearum strains from Brazil that cause the Moko disease on banana and heliconia plants were sampled and phylogenetically typed using the endoglucanase (egl) and DNA repair (mutS) genes according to the phylotype and sequevar classification. All of the strains belonged to phylotype II and a portion of the strains was typed as the Moko disease-related sequevars IIA-6 and IIA-24. Nevertheless, two unsuspected sequevars also harbored the Moko disease-causing strains IIA-41 and IIB-25, and a new sequevar was described and named IIA-53. All of the strains were pathogenic to banana and some of the strains of sequevars IIA-6, IIA-24, and IIA-41 were also pathogenic to tomato. The Moko disease-causing strains from sequevar IIB-25 were pathogenic to potato but not to tomato. These results highlight the high diversity of strains of Moko in Brazil, reinforce the efficiency of the egl gene to reveal relationships among these strains, and contribute to a better understanding of the diversity of paraphyletic Moko disease-causing strains of the R. solanacearum species complex, where the following seven distinct genetic clusters have been described: IIA-6, IIA-24, IIA-41, IIA-53, IIB-3, IIB-4, and IIB-25.

  18. Phylogeny and population structure of brown rot- and Moko disease-causing strains of Ralstonia solanacearum phylotype II.

    PubMed

    Cellier, G; Remenant, B; Chiroleu, F; Lefeuvre, P; Prior, P

    2012-04-01

    The ancient soilborne plant vascular pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum has evolved and adapted to cause severe damage in an unusually wide range of plants. In order to better describe and understand these adaptations, strains with very similar lifestyles and host specializations are grouped into ecotypes. We used comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to investigate three particular ecotypes in the American phylotype II group: (i) brown rot strains from phylotypes IIB-1 and IIB-2, historically known as race 3 biovar 2 and clonal; (ii) new pathogenic variants from phylotype IIB-4NPB that lack pathogenicity for banana but can infect many other plant species; and (iii) Moko disease-causing strains from phylotypes IIB-3, IIB-4, and IIA-6, historically known as race 2, that cause wilt on banana, plantain, and Heliconia spp. We compared the genomes of 72 R. solanacearum strains, mainly from the three major ecotypes of phylotype II, using a newly developed pangenomic microarray to decipher their population structure and gain clues about the epidemiology of these ecotypes. Strain phylogeny and population structure were reconstructed. The results revealed a phylogeographic structure within brown rot strains, allowing us to distinguish European outbreak strains of Andean and African origins. The pangenomic CGH data also demonstrated that Moko ecotype IIB-4 is phylogenetically distinct from the emerging IIB-4NPB strains. These findings improved our understanding of the epidemiology of important ecotypes in phylotype II and will be useful for evolutionary analyses and the development of new DNA-based diagnostic tools.

  19. Ralstonia solanacearum Extracellular Polysaccharide Is a Specific Elicitor of Defense Responses in Wilt-Resistant Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Milling, Annett; Babujee, Lavanya; Allen, Caitilyn

    2011-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, which causes bacterial wilt of diverse plants, produces copious extracellular polysaccharide (EPS), a major virulence factor. The function of EPS in wilt disease is uncertain. Leading hypotheses are that EPS physically obstructs plant water transport, or that EPS cloaks the bacterium from host plant recognition and subsequent defense. Tomato plants infected with R. solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strain UW551 and tropical strain GMI1000 upregulated genes in both the ethylene (ET) and salicylic acid (SA) defense signal transduction pathways. The horizontally wilt-resistant tomato line Hawaii7996 activated expression of these defense genes faster and to a greater degree in response to R. solanacearum infection than did susceptible cultivar Bonny Best. However, EPS played different roles in resistant and susceptible host responses to R. solanacearum. In susceptible plants the wild-type and eps− mutant strains induced generally similar defense responses. But in resistant Hawaii7996 tomato plants, the wild-type pathogens induced significantly greater defense responses than the eps− mutants, suggesting that the resistant host recognizes R. solanacearum EPS. Consistent with this idea, purified EPS triggered significant SA pathway defense gene expression in resistant, but not in susceptible, tomato plants. In addition, the eps− mutant triggered noticeably less production of defense-associated reactive oxygen species in resistant tomato stems and leaves, despite attaining similar cell densities in planta. Collectively, these data suggest that bacterial wilt-resistant plants can specifically recognize EPS from R. solanacearum. PMID:21253019

  20. Bacterial wilt resistance in tomato, pepper, and eggplant: genetic resources respond to diverse strains in the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex.

    PubMed

    Lebeau, A; Daunay, M-C; Frary, A; Palloix, A; Wang, J-F; Dintinger, J; Chiroleu, F; Wicker, E; Prior, P

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial wilt, caused by strains belonging to the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex, inflicts severe economic losses in many crops worldwide. Host resistance remains the most effective control strategy against this disease. However, wilt resistance is often overcome due to the considerable variation among pathogen strains. To help breeders circumvent this problem, we assembled a worldwide collection of 30 accessions of tomato, eggplant and pepper (Core-TEP), most of which are commonly used as sources of resistance to R. solanacearum or for mapping quantitative trait loci. The Core-TEP lines were challenged with a core collection of 12 pathogen strains (Core-Rs2) representing the phylogenetic diversity of R. solanacearum. We observed six interaction phenotypes, from highly susceptible to highly resistant. Intermediate phenotypes resulted from the plants' ability to tolerate latent infections (i.e., bacterial colonization of vascular elements with limited or no wilting). The Core-Rs2 strains partitioned into three pathotypes on pepper accessions, five on tomato, and six on eggplant. A "pathoprofile" concept was developed to characterize the strain clusters, which displayed six virulence patterns on the whole set of Core-TEP host accessions. Neither pathotypes nor pathoprofiles were phylotype specific. Pathoprofiles with high aggressiveness were mainly found in strains from phylotypes I, IIB, and III. One pathoprofile included a strain that overcame almost all resistance sources. PMID:20795852

  1. Class Trash.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents a classroom activity in which students calculate the amount and types of trash thrown out by their class at school to investigate how much trash is generated, where it goes, and speculate about alternatives. Students need to be familiar with the concepts of weight, volume, and numbers. (MCO)

  2. Class distinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. Catherine

    Typical 101 courses discourage many students from pursuing higher level science and math courses. Introductory classes in science and math serve largely as a filter, screening out all but the most promising students, and leaving the majority of college graduates—including most prospective teachers—with little understanding of how science works, according to a study conducted for the National Science Foundation. Because few teachers, particularly at the elementary level, experience any collegiate science teaching that stresses skills of inquiry and investigation, they simply never learn to use those methods in their teaching, the report states.

  3. Ralstonia syzygii, the Blood Disease Bacterium and Some Asian R. solanacearum Strains Form a Single Genomic Species Despite Divergent Lifestyles

    PubMed Central

    Cellier, Gilles; Jacobs, Jonathan M.; Mangenot, Sophie; Barbe, Valérie; Lajus, Aurélie; Vallenet, David; Medigue, Claudine; Fegan, Mark; Allen, Caitilyn; Prior, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The Ralstonia solanacearum species complex includes R. solanacearum, R. syzygii, and the Blood Disease Bacterium (BDB). All colonize plant xylem vessels and cause wilt diseases, but with significant biological differences. R. solanacearum is a soilborne bacterium that infects the roots of a broad range of plants. R. syzygii causes Sumatra disease of clove trees and is actively transmitted by cercopoid insects. BDB is also pathogenic to a single host, banana, and is transmitted by pollinating insects. Sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization studies indicated that despite their phenotypic differences, these three plant pathogens are actually very closely related, falling into the Phylotype IV subgroup of the R. solanacearum species complex. To better understand the relationships among these bacteria, we sequenced and annotated the genomes of R. syzygii strain R24 and BDB strain R229. These genomes were compared to strain PSI07, a closely related Phylotype IV tomato isolate of R. solanacearum, and to five additional R. solanacearum genomes. Whole-genome comparisons confirmed previous phylogenetic results: the three phylotype IV strains share more and larger syntenic regions with each other than with other R. solanacearum strains. Furthermore, the genetic distances between strains, assessed by an in-silico equivalent of DNA-DNA hybridization, unambiguously showed that phylotype IV strains of BDB, R. syzygii and R. solanacearum form one genomic species. Based on these comprehensive data we propose a revision of the taxonomy of the R. solanacearum species complex. The BDB and R. syzygii genomes encoded no obvious unique metabolic capacities and contained no evidence of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria occupying similar niches. Genes specific to R. syzygii and BDB were almost all of unknown function or extrachromosomal origin. Thus, the pathogenic life-styles of these organisms are more probably due to ecological adaptation and genomic convergence during vertical

  4. Escaping Underground Nets: Extracellular DNases Degrade Plant Extracellular Traps and Contribute to Virulence of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tuan Minh; MacIntyre, April; Hawes, Martha; Allen, Caitilyn

    2016-06-01

    Plant root border cells have been recently recognized as an important physical defense against soil-borne pathogens. Root border cells produce an extracellular matrix of protein, polysaccharide and DNA that functions like animal neutrophil extracellular traps to immobilize pathogens. Exposing pea root border cells to the root-infecting bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum triggered release of DNA-containing extracellular traps in a flagellin-dependent manner. These traps rapidly immobilized the pathogen and killed some cells, but most of the entangled bacteria eventually escaped. The R. solanacearum genome encodes two putative extracellular DNases (exDNases) that are expressed during pathogenesis, suggesting that these exDNases contribute to bacterial virulence by enabling the bacterium to degrade and escape root border cell traps. We tested this hypothesis with R. solanacearum deletion mutants lacking one or both of these nucleases, named NucA and NucB. Functional studies with purified proteins revealed that NucA and NucB are non-specific endonucleases and that NucA is membrane-associated and cation-dependent. Single ΔnucA and ΔnucB mutants and the ΔnucA/B double mutant all had reduced virulence on wilt-susceptible tomato plants in a naturalistic soil-soak inoculation assay. The ΔnucA/B mutant was out-competed by the wild-type strain in planta and was less able to stunt root growth or colonize plant stems. Further, the double nuclease mutant could not escape from root border cells in vitro and was defective in attachment to pea roots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that extracellular DNases are novel virulence factors that help R. solanacearum successfully overcome plant defenses to infect plant roots and cause bacterial wilt disease. PMID:27336156

  5. A stereoselective carbon-nitrogen lyase from Ralstonia sp. SLRS7 cleaves two of three isomers of iminodisuccinate.

    PubMed

    Cokesa, Zeljko; Lakner, Silvia; Knackmuss, Hans-Joachim; Rieger, Paul-Gerhard

    2004-08-01

    Following biodegradation tests according to the OECD guidelines for testing of chemicals 301F different degradation rates were observed for the three stereoisomers of iminodisuccinate (IDS). A strain was isolated from activated sludge, which used two of three isomers, R,S-IDS and S,S-IDS, as sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. The isolated strain was identified by 16S-rDNA and referred to as Ralstonia sp. SLRS7. An IDS-degrading lyase was isolated from the cell-free extract. The enzyme was purified by three chromatographic steps, which included anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography and gel filtration. The lyase catalysed the non-hydrolytic cleavage of IDS without requirement of any cofactors. Cleavage of S,S-IDS led to the formation of fumaric acid and L-aspartic acid. Interestingly R,S-IDS yielded only D-aspartic acid besides fumaric acid. R,R-IDS was not transformed. Thus, the IDS-degrading enzyme is a carbon-nitrogen lyase attacking only the asymmetric carbon atom exhibiting the S-configuration. Besides S,S-IDS and R,S-IDS cleavage, the lyase catalysed also the transformation of certain S,S-IDS metal complexes, namely Ca(2+)-, Mg(2+)- and Mn(2+)-IDS. The maximum enzyme activity was found at pH 8.0-8.5 and 35 degrees C. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed a single 57-kDa protein band. The native enzyme was estimated to be around 240 kDa indicating a homotetramer enzyme.

  6. Effect of Seed Treatment by Cold Plasma on the Resistance of Tomato to Ralstonia solanacearum (Bacterial Wilt)

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jiafeng; Lu, Yufang; Li, Jiangang; Li, Ling; He, Xin; Shao, Hanliang; Dong, Yuanhua

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of cold plasma seed treatment on tomato bacterial wilt, caused by Ralstonia solanacearum (R. solanacearum), and the regulation of resistance mechanisms. The effect of cold plasma of 80W on seed germination, plant growth, nutrient uptake, disease severity, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration and activities of peroxidase (POD; EC 1.11.1.7), polyphenol oxidase (PPO; EC 1.10.3.2) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.1.5) were examined in tomato plants. Plasma treatment increased tomato resistance to R. solanacearum with an efficacy of 25.0%. Plasma treatment significantly increased both germination and plant growth in comparison with the control treatment, and plasma-treated plants absorbed more calcium and boron than the controls. In addition, H2O2 levels in treated plants rose faster and reached a higher peak, at 2.579 µM gFW−1, 140% greater than that of the control. Activities of POD (421.3 U gFW−1), PPO (508.8 U gFW−1) and PAL (707.3 U gFW−1) were also greater in the treated plants than in the controls (103.0 U gFW−1, 166.0 U gFW−1 and 309.4 U gFW−1, respectively). These results suggest that plasma treatment affects the regulation of plant growth, H2O2 concentration, and POD, PPO and PAL activity in tomato, resulting in an improved resistance to R. solanacearum. Consequently, cold plasma seed treatment has the potential to control tomato bacterial wilt caused by R. solanacearum. PMID:24840508

  7. Effect of seed treatment by cold plasma on the resistance of tomato to Ralstonia solanacearum (Bacterial Wilt).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiafeng; Lu, Yufang; Li, Jiangang; Li, Ling; He, Xin; Shao, Hanliang; Dong, Yuanhua

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of cold plasma seed treatment on tomato bacterial wilt, caused by Ralstonia solanacearum (R. solanacearum), and the regulation of resistance mechanisms. The effect of cold plasma of 80W on seed germination, plant growth, nutrient uptake, disease severity, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration and activities of peroxidase (POD; EC 1.11.1.7), polyphenol oxidase (PPO; EC 1.10.3.2) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.1.5) were examined in tomato plants. Plasma treatment increased tomato resistance to R. solanacearum with an efficacy of 25.0%. Plasma treatment significantly increased both germination and plant growth in comparison with the control treatment, and plasma-treated plants absorbed more calcium and boron than the controls. In addition, H2O2 levels in treated plants rose faster and reached a higher peak, at 2.579 µM gFW-1, 140% greater than that of the control. Activities of POD (421.3 U gFW-1), PPO (508.8 U gFW-1) and PAL (707.3 U gFW-1) were also greater in the treated plants than in the controls (103.0 U gFW-1, 166.0 U gFW-1 and 309.4 U gFW-1, respectively). These results suggest that plasma treatment affects the regulation of plant growth, H2O2 concentration, and POD, PPO and PAL activity in tomato, resulting in an improved resistance to R. solanacearum. Consequently, cold plasma seed treatment has the potential to control tomato bacterial wilt caused by R. solanacearum. PMID:24840508

  8. PopW of Ralstonia solanacearum, a new two-domain harpin targeting the plant cell wall.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Gang; Liu, Hong-Xia; Cao, Jing; Chen, Li-Feng; Gu, Chun; Allen, Caitilyn; Guo, Jian-Hua

    2010-05-01

    Harpins are extracellular glycine-rich proteins eliciting a hypersensitive response (HR). In this study, we identified a new harpin, PopW, from Ralstonia solanacearum strain ZJ3721. This 380-amino-acid protein is acidic, rich in glycine and serine, and lacks cysteine. When infiltrated into the leaves of tobacco (non-host), PopW induced a rapid tissue collapse via a heat-stable but protease-sensitive HR-eliciting activity. PopW has an N-terminal harpin domain (residues 1-159) and a C-terminal pectate lyase (PL) domain (residues 160-366); its HR-eliciting activity depends on its N-terminal domain. Analyses of subcellular localization and plasmolysis demonstrated that PopW targeted the onion cell wall. This was further confirmed by its ability to specifically bind to calcium pectate, a major component of the plant cell wall. However, PopW had no detectable PL activity. Western blotting revealed that PopW was secreted by the type III secretion system in an hrpB-dependent manner. Gene sequencing indicated that popW is conserved among 20 diverse strains of R. solanacearum. A popW-deficient mutant retained the ability of wild-type strain ZJ3721 to elicit HR in tobacco and to cause wilt disease in tomato (a host). We conclude that PopW is a new cell wall-associated, hrpB-dependent, two-domain harpin that is conserved across the R. solanacearum species complex. PMID:20447285

  9. Escaping Underground Nets: Extracellular DNases Degrade Plant Extracellular Traps and Contribute to Virulence of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tuan Minh; MacIntyre, April; Hawes, Martha; Allen, Caitilyn

    2016-06-01

    Plant root border cells have been recently recognized as an important physical defense against soil-borne pathogens. Root border cells produce an extracellular matrix of protein, polysaccharide and DNA that functions like animal neutrophil extracellular traps to immobilize pathogens. Exposing pea root border cells to the root-infecting bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum triggered release of DNA-containing extracellular traps in a flagellin-dependent manner. These traps rapidly immobilized the pathogen and killed some cells, but most of the entangled bacteria eventually escaped. The R. solanacearum genome encodes two putative extracellular DNases (exDNases) that are expressed during pathogenesis, suggesting that these exDNases contribute to bacterial virulence by enabling the bacterium to degrade and escape root border cell traps. We tested this hypothesis with R. solanacearum deletion mutants lacking one or both of these nucleases, named NucA and NucB. Functional studies with purified proteins revealed that NucA and NucB are non-specific endonucleases and that NucA is membrane-associated and cation-dependent. Single ΔnucA and ΔnucB mutants and the ΔnucA/B double mutant all had reduced virulence on wilt-susceptible tomato plants in a naturalistic soil-soak inoculation assay. The ΔnucA/B mutant was out-competed by the wild-type strain in planta and was less able to stunt root growth or colonize plant stems. Further, the double nuclease mutant could not escape from root border cells in vitro and was defective in attachment to pea roots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that extracellular DNases are novel virulence factors that help R. solanacearum successfully overcome plant defenses to infect plant roots and cause bacterial wilt disease.

  10. Ralstonia solanacearum Uses Inorganic Nitrogen Metabolism for Virulence, ATP Production, and Detoxification in the Oxygen-Limited Host Xylem Environment

    PubMed Central

    Dalsing, Beth L.; Truchon, Alicia N.; Gonzalez-Orta, Enid T.; Milling, Annett S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genomic data predict that, in addition to oxygen, the bacterial plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum can use nitrate (NO3−), nitrite (NO2−), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrous oxide (N2O) as terminal electron acceptors (TEAs). Genes encoding inorganic nitrogen reduction were highly expressed during tomato bacterial wilt disease, when the pathogen grows in xylem vessels. Direct measurements found that tomato xylem fluid was low in oxygen, especially in plants infected by R. solanacearum. Xylem fluid contained ~25 mM NO3−, corresponding to R. solanacearum’s optimal NO3− concentration for anaerobic growth in vitro. We tested the hypothesis that R. solanacearum uses inorganic nitrogen species to respire and grow during pathogenesis by making deletion mutants that each lacked a step in nitrate respiration (ΔnarG), denitrification (ΔaniA, ΔnorB, and ΔnosZ), or NO detoxification (ΔhmpX). The ΔnarG, ΔaniA, and ΔnorB mutants grew poorly on NO3− compared to the wild type, and they had reduced adenylate energy charge levels under anaerobiosis. While NarG-dependent NO3− respiration directly enhanced growth, AniA-dependent NO2− reduction did not. NO2− and NO inhibited growth in culture, and their removal depended on denitrification and NO detoxification. Thus, NO3− acts as a TEA, but the resulting NO2− and NO likely do not. None of the mutants grew as well as the wild type in planta, and strains lacking AniA (NO2− reductase) or HmpX (NO detoxification) had reduced virulence on tomato. Thus, R. solanacearum exploits host NO3− to respire, grow, and cause disease. Degradation of NO2− and NO is also important for successful infection and depends on denitrification and NO detoxification systems. PMID:25784703

  11. Escaping Underground Nets: Extracellular DNases Degrade Plant Extracellular Traps and Contribute to Virulence of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Tuan Minh; MacIntyre, April; Hawes, Martha; Allen, Caitilyn

    2016-01-01

    Plant root border cells have been recently recognized as an important physical defense against soil-borne pathogens. Root border cells produce an extracellular matrix of protein, polysaccharide and DNA that functions like animal neutrophil extracellular traps to immobilize pathogens. Exposing pea root border cells to the root-infecting bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum triggered release of DNA-containing extracellular traps in a flagellin-dependent manner. These traps rapidly immobilized the pathogen and killed some cells, but most of the entangled bacteria eventually escaped. The R. solanacearum genome encodes two putative extracellular DNases (exDNases) that are expressed during pathogenesis, suggesting that these exDNases contribute to bacterial virulence by enabling the bacterium to degrade and escape root border cell traps. We tested this hypothesis with R. solanacearum deletion mutants lacking one or both of these nucleases, named NucA and NucB. Functional studies with purified proteins revealed that NucA and NucB are non-specific endonucleases and that NucA is membrane-associated and cation-dependent. Single ΔnucA and ΔnucB mutants and the ΔnucA/B double mutant all had reduced virulence on wilt-susceptible tomato plants in a naturalistic soil-soak inoculation assay. The ΔnucA/B mutant was out-competed by the wild-type strain in planta and was less able to stunt root growth or colonize plant stems. Further, the double nuclease mutant could not escape from root border cells in vitro and was defective in attachment to pea roots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that extracellular DNases are novel virulence factors that help R. solanacearum successfully overcome plant defenses to infect plant roots and cause bacterial wilt disease. PMID:27336156

  12. The Ectopic Expression of CaRop1 Modulates the Response of Tobacco Plants to Ralstonia solanacearum and Aphids.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ailian; Liu, Zhiqin; Li, Jiazhi; Chen, Yanshen; Guan, Deyi; He, Shuilin

    2016-01-01

    In plants, Rho-related GTPases (Rops) are versatile molecular switches that regulate various biological processes, although their exact roles are not fully understood. Herein, we provide evidence that the ectopic expression of a Rop derived from Capsicum annuum, designated CaRop1, in tobacco plants modulates the response of these plants to Ralstonia solanacearum or aphid attack. The deduced amino acid sequence of CaRop1 harbors a conserved Rho domain and is highly homologous to Rops of other plant species. Transient expression of a CaRop1-GFP fusion protein in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermal cells revealed localization of the GFP signal to the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus. Overexpression (OE) of the wild-type CaRop1 or its dominant-negative mutant (DN-CaRop1) conferred substantial resistance to R. solanacearum infection and aphid attack, and this effect was accompanied by enhanced transcriptional expression of the hypersensitive-reaction marker gene HSR201; the jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive PR1b and LOX1; the insect resistance-associated NtPI-I, NtPI-II, and NtTPI; the ethylene (ET) production-associated NtACS1; and NPK1, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) that interferes with N-, Bs2-, and Rx-mediated disease resistance. In contrast, OE of the constitutively active mutant of CaRop1(CA-CaRop1) enhanced susceptibility of the transgenic tobacco plants to R. solanacearum infection and aphid attack and downregulated or sustained the expression of HSR201, PR1b, NPK1, NtACS1, NtPI-I, NtPI-II, and NtTPI. These results collectively suggest that CaRop1 acts as a signaling switch in the crosstalk between Solanaceaes's response to R. solanacearum infection and aphid attack possibly via JA/ET-mediated signaling machinery. PMID:27551287

  13. The Ectopic Expression of CaRop1 Modulates the Response of Tobacco Plants to Ralstonia solanacearum and Aphids.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ailian; Liu, Zhiqin; Li, Jiazhi; Chen, Yanshen; Guan, Deyi; He, Shuilin

    2016-01-01

    In plants, Rho-related GTPases (Rops) are versatile molecular switches that regulate various biological processes, although their exact roles are not fully understood. Herein, we provide evidence that the ectopic expression of a Rop derived from Capsicum annuum, designated CaRop1, in tobacco plants modulates the response of these plants to Ralstonia solanacearum or aphid attack. The deduced amino acid sequence of CaRop1 harbors a conserved Rho domain and is highly homologous to Rops of other plant species. Transient expression of a CaRop1-GFP fusion protein in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermal cells revealed localization of the GFP signal to the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus. Overexpression (OE) of the wild-type CaRop1 or its dominant-negative mutant (DN-CaRop1) conferred substantial resistance to R. solanacearum infection and aphid attack, and this effect was accompanied by enhanced transcriptional expression of the hypersensitive-reaction marker gene HSR201; the jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive PR1b and LOX1; the insect resistance-associated NtPI-I, NtPI-II, and NtTPI; the ethylene (ET) production-associated NtACS1; and NPK1, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) that interferes with N-, Bs2-, and Rx-mediated disease resistance. In contrast, OE of the constitutively active mutant of CaRop1(CA-CaRop1) enhanced susceptibility of the transgenic tobacco plants to R. solanacearum infection and aphid attack and downregulated or sustained the expression of HSR201, PR1b, NPK1, NtACS1, NtPI-I, NtPI-II, and NtTPI. These results collectively suggest that CaRop1 acts as a signaling switch in the crosstalk between Solanaceaes's response to R. solanacearum infection and aphid attack possibly via JA/ET-mediated signaling machinery.

  14. Effect of seed treatment by cold plasma on the resistance of tomato to Ralstonia solanacearum (Bacterial Wilt).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiafeng; Lu, Yufang; Li, Jiangang; Li, Ling; He, Xin; Shao, Hanliang; Dong, Yuanhua

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of cold plasma seed treatment on tomato bacterial wilt, caused by Ralstonia solanacearum (R. solanacearum), and the regulation of resistance mechanisms. The effect of cold plasma of 80W on seed germination, plant growth, nutrient uptake, disease severity, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration and activities of peroxidase (POD; EC 1.11.1.7), polyphenol oxidase (PPO; EC 1.10.3.2) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.1.5) were examined in tomato plants. Plasma treatment increased tomato resistance to R. solanacearum with an efficacy of 25.0%. Plasma treatment significantly increased both germination and plant growth in comparison with the control treatment, and plasma-treated plants absorbed more calcium and boron than the controls. In addition, H2O2 levels in treated plants rose faster and reached a higher peak, at 2.579 µM gFW-1, 140% greater than that of the control. Activities of POD (421.3 U gFW-1), PPO (508.8 U gFW-1) and PAL (707.3 U gFW-1) were also greater in the treated plants than in the controls (103.0 U gFW-1, 166.0 U gFW-1 and 309.4 U gFW-1, respectively). These results suggest that plasma treatment affects the regulation of plant growth, H2O2 concentration, and POD, PPO and PAL activity in tomato, resulting in an improved resistance to R. solanacearum. Consequently, cold plasma seed treatment has the potential to control tomato bacterial wilt caused by R. solanacearum.

  15. Functional assignment to positively selected sites in the core type III effector RipG7 from Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Keke; Remigi, Philippe; Anisimova, Maria; Lonjon, Fabien; Kars, Ilona; Kajava, Andrey; Li, Chien-Hui; Cheng, Chiu-Ping; Vailleau, Fabienne; Genin, Stéphane; Peeters, Nemo

    2016-05-01

    The soil-borne pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum causes bacterial wilt in a broad range of plants. The main virulence determinants of R. solanacearum are the type III secretion system (T3SS) and its associated type III effectors (T3Es), translocated into the host cells. Of the conserved T3Es among R. solanacearum strains, the Fbox protein RipG7 is required for R. solanacearum pathogenesis on Medicago truncatula. In this work, we describe the natural ripG7 variability existing in the R. solanacearum species complex. We show that eight representative ripG7 orthologues have different contributions to pathogenicity on M. truncatula: only ripG7 from Asian or African strains can complement the absence of ripG7 in GMI1000 (Asian reference strain). Nonetheless, RipG7 proteins from American and Indonesian strains can still interact with M. truncatula SKP1-like/MSKa protein, essential for the function of RipG7 in virulence. This indicates that the absence of complementation is most likely a result of the variability in the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain of RipG7. We identified 11 sites under positive selection in the LRR domains of RipG7. By studying the functional impact of these 11 sites, we show the contribution of five positively selected sites for the function of RipG7CMR15 in M. truncatula colonization. This work reveals the genetic and functional variation of the essential core T3E RipG7 from R. solanacearum. This analysis is the first of its kind on an essential disease-controlling T3E, and sheds light on the co-evolutionary arms race between the bacterium and its hosts.

  16. Necessity of OxyR for the hydrogen peroxide stress response and full virulence in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Flores-Cruz, Zomary; Allen, Caitilyn

    2011-09-01

    The plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum, which causes bacterial wilt disease, is exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS) during tomato infection and expresses diverse oxidative stress response (OSR) genes during midstage disease on tomato. The R. solanacearum genome predicts that the bacterium produces multiple and redundant ROS-scavenging enzymes but only one known oxidative stress response regulator, OxyR. An R. solanacearum oxyR mutant had no detectable catalase activity, did not grow in the presence of 250 μM hydrogen peroxide, and grew poorly in the oxidative environment of solid rich media. This phenotype was rescued by the addition of exogenous catalase, suggesting that oxyR is essential for the hydrogen peroxide stress response. Unexpectedly, the oxyR mutant strain grew better than the wild type in the presence of the superoxide generator paraquat. Gene expression studies indicated that katE, kaG, ahpC1, grxC, and oxyR itself were each differentially expressed in the oxyR mutant background and in response to hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that oxyR is necessary for hydrogen peroxide-inducible gene expression. Additional OSR genes were differentially regulated in response to hydrogen peroxide alone. The virulence of the oxyR mutant strain was significantly reduced in both tomato and tobacco host plants, demonstrating that R. solanacearum is exposed to inhibitory concentrations of ROS in planta and that OxyR-mediated responses to ROS during plant pathogenesis are important for R. solanacearum host adaptation and virulence.

  17. The Ectopic Expression of CaRop1 Modulates the Response of Tobacco Plants to Ralstonia solanacearum and Aphids

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ailian; Liu, Zhiqin; Li, Jiazhi; Chen, Yanshen; Guan, Deyi; He, Shuilin

    2016-01-01

    In plants, Rho-related GTPases (Rops) are versatile molecular switches that regulate various biological processes, although their exact roles are not fully understood. Herein, we provide evidence that the ectopic expression of a Rop derived from Capsicum annuum, designated CaRop1, in tobacco plants modulates the response of these plants to Ralstonia solanacearum or aphid attack. The deduced amino acid sequence of CaRop1 harbors a conserved Rho domain and is highly homologous to Rops of other plant species. Transient expression of a CaRop1-GFP fusion protein in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermal cells revealed localization of the GFP signal to the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus. Overexpression (OE) of the wild-type CaRop1 or its dominant-negative mutant (DN-CaRop1) conferred substantial resistance to R. solanacearum infection and aphid attack, and this effect was accompanied by enhanced transcriptional expression of the hypersensitive-reaction marker gene HSR201; the jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive PR1b and LOX1; the insect resistance-associated NtPI-I, NtPI-II, and NtTPI; the ethylene (ET) production-associated NtACS1; and NPK1, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) that interferes with N-, Bs2-, and Rx-mediated disease resistance. In contrast, OE of the constitutively active mutant of CaRop1(CA-CaRop1) enhanced susceptibility of the transgenic tobacco plants to R. solanacearum infection and aphid attack and downregulated or sustained the expression of HSR201, PR1b, NPK1, NtACS1, NtPI-I, NtPI-II, and NtTPI. These results collectively suggest that CaRop1 acts as a signaling switch in the crosstalk between Solanaceaes’s response to R. solanacearum infection and aphid attack possibly via JA/ET-mediated signaling machinery. PMID:27551287

  18. Degradation of the Plant Defense Signal Salicylic Acid Protects Ralstonia solanacearum from Toxicity and Enhances Virulence on Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Lowe-Power, Tiffany M.; Jacobs, Jonathan M.; Ailloud, Florent; Fochs, Brianna; Prior, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plants use the signaling molecule salicylic acid (SA) to trigger defenses against diverse pathogens, including the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. SA can also inhibit microbial growth. Most sequenced strains of the heterogeneous R. solanacearum species complex can degrade SA via gentisic acid to pyruvate and fumarate. R. solanacearum strain GMI1000 expresses this SA degradation pathway during tomato pathogenesis. Transcriptional analysis revealed that subinhibitory SA levels induced expression of the SA degradation pathway, toxin efflux pumps, and some general stress responses. Interestingly, SA treatment repressed expression of virulence factors, including the type III secretion system, suggesting that this pathogen may suppress virulence functions when stressed. A GMI1000 mutant lacking SA degradation activity was much more susceptible to SA toxicity but retained the wild-type colonization ability and virulence on tomato. This may be because SA is less important than gentisic acid in tomato defense signaling. However, another host, tobacco, responds strongly to SA. To test the hypothesis that SA degradation contributes to virulence on tobacco, we measured the effect of adding this pathway to the tobacco-pathogenic R. solanacearum strain K60, which lacks SA degradation genes. Ectopic addition of the GMI1000 SA degradation locus, including adjacent genes encoding two porins and a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, significantly increased the virulence of strain K60 on tobacco. Together, these results suggest that R. solanacearum degrades plant SA to protect itself from inhibitory levels of this compound and also to enhance its virulence on plant hosts like tobacco that use SA as a defense signal molecule. PMID:27329752

  19. Expression of a wheat MYB gene in transgenic tobacco enhances resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum, and to drought and salt stresses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongxia; Zhou, Xianyao; Dong, Na; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Huaiyu; Zhang, Zengyan

    2011-09-01

    MYB transcription factors play diverse roles in plant growth, developmental processes and stress responses. A full-length cDNA sequence of a MYB gene, namely TaPIMP1, was isolated from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The TaPIMP1 transcript level was significantly up-regulated by inoculation with a fungal pathogen Bipolaris sorokiniana and by drought treatment. TaPIMP1 encodes the MYB protein TaPIMP1 consisting of 323 amino acids. TaPIMP1 contains two MYB DNA binding domains (R2, R3), two putative nuclear localization sites and two putative transcription activation domains. TaPIMP1 is a new member of the R2R3-MYB transcription factor subfamily. Transient expression in onion epidermal cells of GFP fused with TaPIMP1 proved that subcellular localization of TaPIMP1 occurred in the nucleus. The TaPIMP1 gene was transferred into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cultivar W38 by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. After screening through PCR and RT-PCR analyses, transgenic tobacco lines expressing TaPIMP1 were identified and evaluated for pathogen resistance, and drought and salt tolerance. Compared to untransformed tobacco host plants, TaPIMP1 expressing plants displayed significantly enhanced resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum and exhibited improved tolerances to drought and salt stresses. In these transgenic lines, the activities of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were significantly increased relative to wild-type tobacco plants. The results suggested that the wheat R2R3-MYB transcription factor plays an important role in modulating responses to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  20. Expression of a wheat MYB gene in transgenic tobacco enhances resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum, and to drought and salt stresses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongxia; Zhou, Xianyao; Dong, Na; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Huaiyu; Zhang, Zengyan

    2011-09-01

    MYB transcription factors play diverse roles in plant growth, developmental processes and stress responses. A full-length cDNA sequence of a MYB gene, namely TaPIMP1, was isolated from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The TaPIMP1 transcript level was significantly up-regulated by inoculation with a fungal pathogen Bipolaris sorokiniana and by drought treatment. TaPIMP1 encodes the MYB protein TaPIMP1 consisting of 323 amino acids. TaPIMP1 contains two MYB DNA binding domains (R2, R3), two putative nuclear localization sites and two putative transcription activation domains. TaPIMP1 is a new member of the R2R3-MYB transcription factor subfamily. Transient expression in onion epidermal cells of GFP fused with TaPIMP1 proved that subcellular localization of TaPIMP1 occurred in the nucleus. The TaPIMP1 gene was transferred into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cultivar W38 by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. After screening through PCR and RT-PCR analyses, transgenic tobacco lines expressing TaPIMP1 were identified and evaluated for pathogen resistance, and drought and salt tolerance. Compared to untransformed tobacco host plants, TaPIMP1 expressing plants displayed significantly enhanced resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum and exhibited improved tolerances to drought and salt stresses. In these transgenic lines, the activities of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were significantly increased relative to wild-type tobacco plants. The results suggested that the wheat R2R3-MYB transcription factor plays an important role in modulating responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:21597961

  1. Effects of environmental parameters on the dual-species biofilms formed by Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Ralstonia insidiosa, a strong biofilm producer isolated from a fresh-cut processing plant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofilm forming bacteria resident to food processing facilities are a food safety concern due to the potential of biofilms to harbor foodborne bacterial pathogens. When cultured together, Ralstonia insidiosa, a strong biofilm former frequently isolated from produce processing environments, has been ...

  2. Rapid differentiation of Ralstonia solanacearum avirulent and virulent strains by cell fractioning of an isolate using high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuefang; Zhu, Yujing; Liu, Bo; Yu, Qian; Lin, Naiquan

    2016-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the most destructive plant bacterial pathogens worldwide. The population dynamics and genetic stability are important issues, especially when an avirulent strain is used for biocontrol. In this study, we developed a rapid method to differentiate the virulent and avirulent strains of R. solanacearum and to predict the biocontrol efficiency of an avirulent strain using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Three chromatographic peaks P1, P2 and P3 were observed on the HPLC spectra among 68 avirulent and 28 virulent R. solanacearum strains. Based on the HPLC peaks, 96 strains total were assigned to three categories. For avirulent strains, the intense peak is P1, while for virulent strains, P3 is the majority. Based on the HLPC spectra of R. solanacearum strains, a chromatography titer index (CTI) was established as CTIi = Si/(S1+S2+S3) × 100% (i represents an individual HPLC peak; S1, S2 and S3 represent peak areas of P1, P2 and P3, respectively). The avirulent strains had high values of CTI1 ranging from 63.6 to 100.0%, while the virulent strains displayed high values of CTI3 ranging from 90.2 to 100.0%. Biological inoculation studies of 68 avirulent strains revealed that the biocontrol efficacy was the best when CTI1 = 100%. The purity and genetic stability of R. solanacearum strains were confirmed in the P1 fraction of avirulent strain FJAT-1957 and P3 fraction of virulent strain FJAT-1925 after 30 generations of consecutive subculture. These results confirmed that fractioning by HPLC and their deduced CTI can be used for rapid and efficient evaluation and prediction of an isolate of R. solanacearum. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that HPLC fractioning can be used for rapid differentiation of virulent and avirulent strains of R. solanacearum. PMID:26606869

  3. Quick adaptation of Ralstonia Solanacearum to copper stress to recover culturability and growth in water and soil

    PubMed Central

    Ascarrunz, Sergio Daniel Moreira; Natsuaki, Tomohide; Honjo, Hitoshi; Fukui, Ryo

    2011-01-01

    Cells of Ralstonia solanacearum were exposed to Cu in distilled water, and the resulting Cu-stressed non-culturable cells were inoculated to natural (non-pasteurized) and pasteurized soils in order to examine their culturability and recovery. Exposing the cells to 20 μM CuSO4 produced transitory non-culturable cells, which exhibited a remarkable recovery in culturability after incubation in the solution for 36 h, reaching a density near the initial level by 108 h. To determine whether such non-culturable cells actually “resuscitated” or multiplied after adapting to Cu toxicity, growth curves were constructed in order to contrast the rates of increase in culturable cell numbers between Cu-stressed or non-stressed inocula. Additionally, fresh non-stressed cells were exposed to CuSO4 in the presence of nalidixic acid by adding the antibiotic at different times after the onset of Cu stress to verify any cell multiplication during the population increase. The results revealed that the non-culturable cells surviving Cu toxicity adapted very quickly to Cu and began multiplying within 12 h, because only the Cu-stressed cells that were increasing in the exponential growth phase, but not those in the stationary phase, were killed by the antibiotic. Such cells exhibited an apparent tolerance to this metal when inoculated to a freshly prepared solution of CuSO4, and also detoxified the ion in the solution in which they grew. The presence of nutrients greatly counteracted the effect of Cu in water microcosms, since culturable cells were detected and increased in number even when exposed to 40 μM CuSO4. In contrast, when inoculated to non-pasteurized soil, Cu-stressed cells showed no such recoveries. However, when the soil was pasteurized before inoculation or added with nutrients, culturable cells were recovered and increased in number. This indicates that increased nutrient availability in soil allows Cu-stressed cells to quickly overcome the stress and increase in

  4. Rapid differentiation of Ralstonia solanacearum avirulent and virulent strains by cell fractioning of an isolate using high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuefang; Zhu, Yujing; Liu, Bo; Yu, Qian; Lin, Naiquan

    2016-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the most destructive plant bacterial pathogens worldwide. The population dynamics and genetic stability are important issues, especially when an avirulent strain is used for biocontrol. In this study, we developed a rapid method to differentiate the virulent and avirulent strains of R. solanacearum and to predict the biocontrol efficiency of an avirulent strain using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Three chromatographic peaks P1, P2 and P3 were observed on the HPLC spectra among 68 avirulent and 28 virulent R. solanacearum strains. Based on the HPLC peaks, 96 strains total were assigned to three categories. For avirulent strains, the intense peak is P1, while for virulent strains, P3 is the majority. Based on the HLPC spectra of R. solanacearum strains, a chromatography titer index (CTI) was established as CTIi = Si/(S1+S2+S3) × 100% (i represents an individual HPLC peak; S1, S2 and S3 represent peak areas of P1, P2 and P3, respectively). The avirulent strains had high values of CTI1 ranging from 63.6 to 100.0%, while the virulent strains displayed high values of CTI3 ranging from 90.2 to 100.0%. Biological inoculation studies of 68 avirulent strains revealed that the biocontrol efficacy was the best when CTI1 = 100%. The purity and genetic stability of R. solanacearum strains were confirmed in the P1 fraction of avirulent strain FJAT-1957 and P3 fraction of virulent strain FJAT-1925 after 30 generations of consecutive subculture. These results confirmed that fractioning by HPLC and their deduced CTI can be used for rapid and efficient evaluation and prediction of an isolate of R. solanacearum. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that HPLC fractioning can be used for rapid differentiation of virulent and avirulent strains of R. solanacearum.

  5. A novel class of self-sufficient cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    De Mot, René; Parret, Annabel H A

    2002-11-01

    The Bacillus cytochrome P450 BM3 integrates an entire P450 system in one polypeptide and represents a convenient prokaryotic model for microsomal P450s. This self-sufficient class II P450 is also present in actinomycetes and fungi. By genome analysis we have identified additional homologues in the pathogenic species Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus, and in Ralstonia metallidurans. This analysis also revealed a novel class of putative self-sufficient P450s, P450 PFOR, comprising a class I P450 that is related to Rhodococcus erythropolis CYP116, and a phthalate family oxygenase reductase (PFOR) module. P450 PFOR genes are found in a Rhodococcus strain, three pathogenic Burkholderia species and in the R. metallidurans strain that possesses a P450 BM3 homologue. Co-evolution of P450 and reductase domains is apparent in both types of self-sufficient enzymes. The new class of P450 enzymes is of potential interest for various biotechnological applications. PMID:12419614

  6. Molecular chaperons and co-chaperons, Hsp90, RAR1, and SGT1 negatively regulate bacterial wilt disease caused by Ralstonia solanacearum in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ito, Makoto; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Kiba, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is the causal agent of bacterial wilt disease. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in interaction between Nicotiana benthamiana and R. solanacearum, we focused on Hsp90, RAR1 and SGT1. Appearances of wilt symptom were significantly suppressed in Hsp90, RAR1 and SGT1-silenced plants compared with control plants. In RAR1-silenced plants, population of R. solanacearum increased in a similar manner to control plants. In contrast, multiplication of R. solanacearum was significantly suppressed in Hsp90 and SGT1-silenced plants. In addition, expression of PR genes were increased in Hsp90 and SGT1-silenced plants challenged with R. solanacearum. Therefore, RAR1 might be required for disease development or suppression of disease tolerance. These results also suggested that Hsp90 and/or SGT1 might play an important role in suppression of plant defenses leading to disease susceptibility and disease development.

  7. Diazinon degradation by a novel strain Ralstonia sp. DI-3 and X-ray crystal structure determination of the metabolite of diazinon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangli; Liu, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Diazinon is a widely used organophosphorus insecticide often detected in the environment. A highly effective diazinon-degrading Ralstonia sp. strain DI-3 was isolated from agricultural soil. Strain DI-3 can utilize dimethoate as its sole carbon source for growth and degrade an initial concentration of 100 mg L-1 diazinon to non-detectable levels within 60 h in liquid culture. A small amount of second carbon source as co-substrate could slightly enhance the biodegradation of diazinon. In addition, a less toxic metabolic intermediate formed during the degradation of diazinon mediated by strain DI-3 was purified using thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and identified based on single-crystal Xray diffraction analysis, allowing a degradation pathway for diazinon by pure culture to be proposed. Finally, this is the first providing authentic evidence to describe the metabolite. PMID:27581928

  8. Meta-analysis Reveals That the Genus Pseudomonas Can Be a Better Choice of Biological Control Agent against Bacterial Wilt Disease Caused by Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Murugesan; Subramanian, Dharaneedharan; Yoon, Ee; Kwon, Taehoon; Chun, Se-Chul

    2016-06-01

    Biological control agents (BCAs) from different microbial taxa are increasingly used to control bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. However, a quantitative research synthesis has not been conducted on the role of BCAs in disease suppression. Therefore, the present study aimed to meta-analyze the impacts of BCAs on both Ralstonia wilt disease suppression and plant (host) growth promotion. The analysis showed that the extent of disease suppression by BCAs varied widely among studies, with effect size (log response ratio) ranging from -2.84 to 2.13. The disease incidence and severity were significantly decreased on average by 53.7% and 49.3%, respectively. BCAs inoculation also significantly increased fresh and dry weight by 34.4% and 36.1%, respectively on average. Also, BCAs inoculation significantly increased plant yield by 66%. Mean effect sizes for genus Pseudomonas sp. as BCAs were higher than for genus Bacillus spp. Among antagonists tested, P. fluorescens, P. putida, B. cereus, B. subtilis and B. amyloliquefaciens were found to be more effective in general for disease reduction. Across studies, highest disease control was found for P. fluorescens, annual plants, co-inoculation with more than one BCA, soil drench and greenhouse condition were found to be essential in understanding plant responses to R. solanacearum. Our results suggest that more efforts should be devoted to harnessing the potential beneficial effects of these antagonists, not just for plant growth promoting traits but also in mode of applications, BCAs formulations and their field studies should be considered in the future for R. solanacearum wilt disease suppression. PMID:27298597

  9. Meta-analysis Reveals That the Genus Pseudomonas Can Be a Better Choice of Biological Control Agent against Bacterial Wilt Disease Caused by Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Murugesan; Subramanian, Dharaneedharan; Yoon, Ee; Kwon, Taehoon; Chun, Se-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Biological control agents (BCAs) from different microbial taxa are increasingly used to control bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. However, a quantitative research synthesis has not been conducted on the role of BCAs in disease suppression. Therefore, the present study aimed to meta-analyze the impacts of BCAs on both Ralstonia wilt disease suppression and plant (host) growth promotion. The analysis showed that the extent of disease suppression by BCAs varied widely among studies, with effect size (log response ratio) ranging from −2.84 to 2.13. The disease incidence and severity were significantly decreased on average by 53.7% and 49.3%, respectively. BCAs inoculation also significantly increased fresh and dry weight by 34.4% and 36.1%, respectively on average. Also, BCAs inoculation significantly increased plant yield by 66%. Mean effect sizes for genus Pseudomonas sp. as BCAs were higher than for genus Bacillus spp. Among antagonists tested, P. fluorescens, P. putida, B. cereus, B. subtilis and B. amyloliquefaciens were found to be more effective in general for disease reduction. Across studies, highest disease control was found for P. fluorescens, annual plants, co-inoculation with more than one BCA, soil drench and greenhouse condition were found to be essential in understanding plant responses to R. solanacearum. Our results suggest that more efforts should be devoted to harnessing the potential beneficial effects of these antagonists, not just for plant growth promoting traits but also in mode of applications, BCAs formulations and their field studies should be considered in the future for R. solanacearum wilt disease suppression. PMID:27298597

  10. Comparative Secretome Analysis of Ralstonia solanacearum Type 3 Secretion-Associated Mutants Reveals a Fine Control of Effector Delivery, Essential for Bacterial Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Lonjon, Fabien; Turner, Marie; Henry, Céline; Rengel, David; Lohou, David; van de Kerkhove, Quitterie; Cazalé, Anne-Claire; Peeters, Nemo; Genin, Stéphane; Vailleau, Fabienne

    2016-02-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of bacterial wilt, exerts its pathogenicity through more than a hundred secreted proteins, many of them depending directly on the functionality of a type 3 secretion system. To date, only few type 3 effectors have been identified as required for bacterial pathogenicity, notably because of redundancy among the large R. solanacearum effector repertoire. In order to identify groups of effectors collectively promoting disease on susceptible hosts, we investigated the role of putative post-translational regulators in the control of type 3 secretion. A shotgun secretome analysis with label-free quantification using tandem mass spectrometry was performed on the R. solanacearum GMI1000 strain. There were 228 proteins identified, among which a large proportion of type 3 effectors, called Rip (Ralstonia injected proteins). Thanks to this proteomic approach, RipBJ was identified as a new effector specifically secreted through type 3 secretion system and translocated into plant cells. A focused Rip secretome analysis using hpa (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity associated) mutants revealed a fine secretion regulation and specific subsets of Rips with different secretion patterns. We showed that a set of Rips (RipF1, RipW, RipX, RipAB, and RipAM) are secreted in an Hpa-independent manner. We hypothesize that these Rips could be preferentially involved in the first stages of type 3 secretion. In addition, the secretion of about thirty other Rips is controlled by HpaB and HpaG. HpaB, a candidate chaperone was shown to positively control secretion of numerous Rips, whereas HpaG was shown to act as a negative regulator of secretion. To evaluate the impact of altered type 3 effectors secretion on plant pathogenesis, the hpa mutants were assayed on several host plants. HpaB was required for bacterial pathogenicity on multiple hosts whereas HpaG was found to be specifically required for full R. solanacearum pathogenicity on the legume

  11. Meta-analysis Reveals That the Genus Pseudomonas Can Be a Better Choice of Biological Control Agent against Bacterial Wilt Disease Caused by Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Murugesan; Subramanian, Dharaneedharan; Yoon, Ee; Kwon, Taehoon; Chun, Se-Chul

    2016-06-01

    Biological control agents (BCAs) from different microbial taxa are increasingly used to control bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. However, a quantitative research synthesis has not been conducted on the role of BCAs in disease suppression. Therefore, the present study aimed to meta-analyze the impacts of BCAs on both Ralstonia wilt disease suppression and plant (host) growth promotion. The analysis showed that the extent of disease suppression by BCAs varied widely among studies, with effect size (log response ratio) ranging from -2.84 to 2.13. The disease incidence and severity were significantly decreased on average by 53.7% and 49.3%, respectively. BCAs inoculation also significantly increased fresh and dry weight by 34.4% and 36.1%, respectively on average. Also, BCAs inoculation significantly increased plant yield by 66%. Mean effect sizes for genus Pseudomonas sp. as BCAs were higher than for genus Bacillus spp. Among antagonists tested, P. fluorescens, P. putida, B. cereus, B. subtilis and B. amyloliquefaciens were found to be more effective in general for disease reduction. Across studies, highest disease control was found for P. fluorescens, annual plants, co-inoculation with more than one BCA, soil drench and greenhouse condition were found to be essential in understanding plant responses to R. solanacearum. Our results suggest that more efforts should be devoted to harnessing the potential beneficial effects of these antagonists, not just for plant growth promoting traits but also in mode of applications, BCAs formulations and their field studies should be considered in the future for R. solanacearum wilt disease suppression.

  12. Does Class Size Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Brewer, Dominic J.; Gamoran, Adam; Willms, J. Douglas

    2001-01-01

    Reports on the significance of class size to student learning. Includes an overview of class size in various countries, the importance of teacher adaptability, and the Asian paradox of large classes allied to high test scores. (MM)

  13. Comparative Secretome Analysis of Ralstonia solanacearum Type 3 Secretion-Associated Mutants Reveals a Fine Control of Effector Delivery, Essential for Bacterial Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Lonjon, Fabien; Turner, Marie; Henry, Céline; Rengel, David; Lohou, David; van de Kerkhove, Quitterie; Cazalé, Anne-Claire; Peeters, Nemo; Genin, Stéphane; Vailleau, Fabienne

    2016-02-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of bacterial wilt, exerts its pathogenicity through more than a hundred secreted proteins, many of them depending directly on the functionality of a type 3 secretion system. To date, only few type 3 effectors have been identified as required for bacterial pathogenicity, notably because of redundancy among the large R. solanacearum effector repertoire. In order to identify groups of effectors collectively promoting disease on susceptible hosts, we investigated the role of putative post-translational regulators in the control of type 3 secretion. A shotgun secretome analysis with label-free quantification using tandem mass spectrometry was performed on the R. solanacearum GMI1000 strain. There were 228 proteins identified, among which a large proportion of type 3 effectors, called Rip (Ralstonia injected proteins). Thanks to this proteomic approach, RipBJ was identified as a new effector specifically secreted through type 3 secretion system and translocated into plant cells. A focused Rip secretome analysis using hpa (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity associated) mutants revealed a fine secretion regulation and specific subsets of Rips with different secretion patterns. We showed that a set of Rips (RipF1, RipW, RipX, RipAB, and RipAM) are secreted in an Hpa-independent manner. We hypothesize that these Rips could be preferentially involved in the first stages of type 3 secretion. In addition, the secretion of about thirty other Rips is controlled by HpaB and HpaG. HpaB, a candidate chaperone was shown to positively control secretion of numerous Rips, whereas HpaG was shown to act as a negative regulator of secretion. To evaluate the impact of altered type 3 effectors secretion on plant pathogenesis, the hpa mutants were assayed on several host plants. HpaB was required for bacterial pathogenicity on multiple hosts whereas HpaG was found to be specifically required for full R. solanacearum pathogenicity on the legume

  14. Altering the substrate specificity of polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase 1 derived from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 by localized semirandom mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Der-Shyan; Lee, Chia-Yin

    2004-07-01

    The substrate specificity of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase 1 (PhaC1(Pp), class II) from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 (formerly known as Pseudomonas oleovorans GPo1) was successfully altered by localized semirandom mutagenesis. The enzyme evolution system introduces multiple point mutations, designed on the basis of the conserved regions of the PHA synthase family, by using PCR-based gene fragmentation with degenerate primers and a reassembly PCR. According to the opaqueness of the colony, indicating the accumulation of large amounts of PHA granules in the cells, 13 PHA-accumulating candidates were screened from a mutant library, with Pseudomonas putida GPp104 PHA- as the host. The in vivo substrate specificity of five candidates, L1-6, D7-47, PS-A2, PS-C2, and PS-E1, was evaluated by the heterologous expression in Ralstonia eutropha PHB(-)4 supplemented with octanoate. Notably, the amount of 3-hydroxybutyrate (short-chain-length [SCL] 3-hydroxyalkanoate [3-HA] unit) was drastically increased in recombinants that expressed evolved mutant enzymes L1-6, PS-A2, PS-C2, and PS-E1 (up to 60, 36, 50, and 49 mol%, respectively), relative to the amount in the wild type (12 mol%). Evolved enzyme PS-E1, in which 14 amino acids had been changed and which was heterologously expressed in R. eutropha PHB(-)4, not only exhibited broad substrate specificity (49 mol% SCL 3-HA and 51 mol% medium-chain-length [MCL] 3-HA) but also conferred the highest PHA production (45% dry weight) among the candidates. The 3-HA and MCL 3-HA units of the PHA produced by R. eutropha PHB(-)4/pPS-E1 were randomly copolymerized in a single polymer chain, as analytically confirmed by acetone fractionation and the 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum. PMID:15205419

  15. Development of variable number of tandem repeats typing schemes for Ralstonia solanacearum, the agent of bacterial wilt, banana Moko disease and potato brown rot.

    PubMed

    N'guessan, Carine Aya; Brisse, Sylvain; Le Roux-Nio, Anne-Claire; Poussier, Stéphane; Koné, Daouda; Wicker, Emmanuel

    2013-03-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is an important soil borne bacterial plant pathogen causing bacterial wilt on many important crops. To better monitor epidemics, efficient tools that can identify and discriminate populations are needed. In this study, we assessed variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) genotyping as a new tool for epidemiological surveillance of R. solanacearum phylotypes, and more specifically for the monitoring of the monomorphic ecotypes "Moko" (banana-pathogenic) and "brown rot" (potato-pathogenic under cool conditions). Screening of six R. solanacearum genome sequences lead to select 36 VNTR loci that were preliminarily amplified on 24 strains. From this step, 26 single-locus primer pairs were multiplexed, and applied to a worldwide collection of 337 strains encompassing the whole phylogenetic diversity, with revelation on a capillary-electrophoresis genotype. Four loci were monomorphic within all phylotypes and were not retained; the other loci were highly polymorphic but displayed a clear phylotype-specificity. Phylotype-specific MLVA schemes were thus defined, based on 13 loci for phylotype I, 12 loci for phylotype II, 11 loci for phylotype III and 6 for phylotype IV. MLVA typing was significantly more discriminative than egl-based sequevar typing, particularly on monomorphic "brown rot" ecotype (phylotype IIB/sequevar 1) and "Moko disease" clade 4 (Phylotype IIB/sequevar 4). Our results raise promising prospects for studies of population genetic structures and epidemiological monitoring.

  16. Response of tomato wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum to the volatile organic compounds produced by a biocontrol strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR-9

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Waseem; Ling, Ning; Yang, Liudong; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    It is important to study the response of plant pathogens to the antibiosis traits of biocontrol microbes to design the efficient biocontrol strategies. In this study, we evaluated the role of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by a biocontrol strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR-9 on the growth and virulence traits of tomato wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum (RS). The VOCs of SQR-9 significantly inhibited the growth of RS on agar medium and in soil. In addition, the VOCs significantly inhibited the motility traits, production of antioxidant enzymes and exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation and tomato root colonization by RS. The strain SQR-9 produced 22 VOCs, but only nine VOCs showed 1–11% antibacterial activity against RS in their corresponding amounts; however, the consortium of all VOCs showed 70% growth inhibition of RS. The proteomics analysis showed that the VOCs of SQR-9 downregulated RS proteins related to the antioxidant activity, virulence, carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, protein folding and translation, while the proteins involved in the ABC transporter system, amino acid synthesis, detoxification of aldehydes and ketones, methylation, protein translation and folding, and energy transfer were upregulated. This study describes the significance and effectiveness of VOCs produced by a biocontrol strain against tomato wilt pathogen. PMID:27103342

  17. Arabidopsis CLAVATA1 and CLAVATA2 receptors contribute to Ralstonia solanacearum pathogenicity through a miR169-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Hanemian, Mathieu; Barlet, Xavier; Sorin, Céline; Yadeta, Koste A; Keller, Harald; Favery, Bruno; Simon, Rüdiger; Thomma, Bart P H J; Hartmann, Caroline; Crespi, Martin; Marco, Yves; Tremousaygue, Dominique; Deslandes, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the most destructive bacterial plant diseases. Although many molecular determinants involved in R. solanacearum adaptation to hosts and pathogenesis have been described, host components required for disease establishment remain poorly characterized. Phenotypical analysis of Arabidopsis mutants for leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-receptor-like proteins revealed that mutations in the CLAVATA1 (CLV1) and CLAVATA2 (CLV2) genes confer enhanced disease resistance to bacterial wilt. We further investigated the underlying mechanisms using genetic, transcriptomic and molecular approaches. The enhanced resistance of both clv1 and clv2 mutants to the bacteria did not require the well characterized CLV signalling modules involved in shoot meristem homeostasis, and was conditioned by neither salicylic acid nor ethylene defence-related hormones. Gene expression microarray analysis performed on clv1 and clv2 revealed deregulation of genes encoding nuclear transcription factor Y subunit alpha (NF-YA) transcription factors whose post-transcriptional regulation is known to involve microRNAs from the miR169 family. Both clv mutants showed a defect in miR169 accumulation. Conversely, overexpression of miR169 abrogated the resistance phenotype of clv mutants. We propose that CLV1 and CLV2, two receptors involved in CLV3 perception during plant development, contribute to bacterial wilt through a signalling pathway involving the miR169/NF-YA module. PMID:26990325

  18. Response of tomato wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum to the volatile organic compounds produced by a biocontrol strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR-9.

    PubMed

    Raza, Waseem; Ling, Ning; Yang, Liudong; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    It is important to study the response of plant pathogens to the antibiosis traits of biocontrol microbes to design the efficient biocontrol strategies. In this study, we evaluated the role of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by a biocontrol strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR-9 on the growth and virulence traits of tomato wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum (RS). The VOCs of SQR-9 significantly inhibited the growth of RS on agar medium and in soil. In addition, the VOCs significantly inhibited the motility traits, production of antioxidant enzymes and exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation and tomato root colonization by RS. The strain SQR-9 produced 22 VOCs, but only nine VOCs showed 1-11% antibacterial activity against RS in their corresponding amounts; however, the consortium of all VOCs showed 70% growth inhibition of RS. The proteomics analysis showed that the VOCs of SQR-9 downregulated RS proteins related to the antioxidant activity, virulence, carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, protein folding and translation, while the proteins involved in the ABC transporter system, amino acid synthesis, detoxification of aldehydes and ketones, methylation, protein translation and folding, and energy transfer were upregulated. This study describes the significance and effectiveness of VOCs produced by a biocontrol strain against tomato wilt pathogen. PMID:27103342

  19. Two asian jumbo phages, ϕRSL2 and ϕRSF1, infect Ralstonia solanacearum and show common features of ϕKZ-related phages.

    PubMed

    Bhunchoth, Anjana; Blanc-Mathieu, Romain; Mihara, Tomoko; Nishimura, Yosuke; Askora, Ahmed; Phironrit, Namthip; Leksomboon, Chalida; Chatchawankanphanich, Orawan; Kawasaki, Takeru; Nakano, Miyako; Fujie, Makoto; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Jumbo phages infecting Ralstonia solanacearum were isolated in Thailand (ϕRSL2) and Japan (ϕRSF1). They were similar regarding virion morphology, genomic arrangement, and host range. Phylogenetic and proteomic tree analyses demonstrate that the ϕRSL2 and ϕRSF1 belong to a group of evolutionary related phages, including Pseudomonas phages ϕKZ, 201ϕ2-1 and all previously described ϕKZ-related phages. Despite conserved genomic co-linearity between the ϕRSL2 and ϕRSF1, they differ in protein separation patterns. A major difference was seen in the detection of virion-associated-RNA polymerase subunits. All β- and β'-subunits were detected in ϕRSF1, but one β'-subunit was undetected in ϕRSL2. Furthermore, ϕRSF1 infected host cells faster (latent period: 60 and 150min for ϕRSF1 and ϕRSL2, respectively) and more efficiently than ϕRSL2. Therefore, the difference in virion-associated-RNA polymerase may affect infection efficiency. Finally, we show that ϕRSF1 is able to inhibit bacterial wilt progression in tomato plants. PMID:27081857

  20. Bacillus thuringiensis Suppresses Bacterial wilt Disease Caused by Ralstonia solanacearum with Systemic Induction of Defense-Related Gene Expression in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Hyakumachi, Mitsuro; Nishimura, Mitsuyoshi; Arakawa, Tatsuyuki; Asano, Shinichiro; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Tsushima, Seiya; Takahashi, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a naturally abundant Gram-positive bacterium and a well-known, effective bio-insecticide. Recently, B. thuringiensis has attracted considerable attention as a potential biological control agent for the suppression of plant diseases. In this study, the bacterial wilt disease-suppressing activity of B. thuringiensis was examined in tomato plants. Treatment of tomato roots with B. thuringiensis culture followed by challenge inoculation with Ralstonia solanacearum suppressed the development of wilt symptoms to less than one third of the control. This disease suppression in tomato plants was reproduced by pretreating their roots with a cell-free filtrate (CF) that had been fractionated from B. thuringiensis culture by centrifugation and filtration. In tomato plants challenge-inoculated with R. solanacearum after pretreatment with CF, the growth of R. solanacearum in stem tissues clearly decreased, and expression of defense-related genes such as PR-1, acidic chitinase, and β-1,3-glucanase was induced in stem and leaf tissues. Furthermore, the stem tissues of tomato plants with their roots were pretreated with CF exhibited resistance against direct inoculation with R. solanacearum. Taken together, these results suggest that treatment of tomato roots with the CF of B. thuringiensis systemically suppresses bacterial wilt through systemic activation of the plant defense system. PMID:23257909

  1. Comparative large-scale analysis of interactions between several crop species and the effector repertoires from multiple pathovars of Pseudomonas and Ralstonia.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Caldwell, Katherine S; Piskurewicz, Urszula; Cavanaugh, Keri A; Xu, Huaqin; Kozik, Alexander; Ochoa, Oswaldo; McHale, Leah K; Lahre, Kirsten; Jelenska, Joanna; Castillo, Jose A; Blumenthal, Daniel; Vinatzer, Boris A; Greenberg, Jean T; Michelmore, Richard W

    2009-08-01

    Bacterial plant pathogens manipulate their hosts by injection of numerous effector proteins into host cells via type III secretion systems. Recognition of these effectors by the host plant leads to the induction of a defense reaction that often culminates in a hypersensitive response manifested as cell death. Genes encoding effector proteins can be exchanged between different strains of bacteria via horizontal transfer, and often individual strains are capable of infecting multiple hosts. Host plant species express diverse repertoires of resistance proteins that mediate direct or indirect recognition of bacterial effectors. As a result, plants and their bacterial pathogens should be considered as two extensive coevolving groups rather than as individual host species coevolving with single pathovars. To dissect the complexity of this coevolution, we cloned 171 effector-encoding genes from several pathovars of Pseudomonas and Ralstonia. We used Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient assays to test the ability of each effector to induce a necrotic phenotype on 59 plant genotypes belonging to four plant families, including numerous diverse accessions of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Known defense-inducing effectors (avirulence factors) and their homologs commonly induced extensive necrosis in many different plant species. Nonhost species reacted to multiple effector proteins from an individual pathovar more frequently and more intensely than host species. Both homologous and sequence-unrelated effectors could elicit necrosis in a similar spectrum of plants, suggesting common effector targets or targeting of the same pathways in the plant cell. PMID:19571308

  2. Comparative Large-Scale Analysis of Interactions between Several Crop Species and the Effector Repertoires from Multiple Pathovars of Pseudomonas and Ralstonia1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Caldwell, Katherine S.; Piskurewicz, Urszula; Cavanaugh, Keri A.; Xu, Huaqin; Kozik, Alexander; Ochoa, Oswaldo; McHale, Leah K.; Lahre, Kirsten; Jelenska, Joanna; Castillo, Jose A.; Blumenthal, Daniel; Vinatzer, Boris A.; Greenberg, Jean T.; Michelmore, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial plant pathogens manipulate their hosts by injection of numerous effector proteins into host cells via type III secretion systems. Recognition of these effectors by the host plant leads to the induction of a defense reaction that often culminates in a hypersensitive response manifested as cell death. Genes encoding effector proteins can be exchanged between different strains of bacteria via horizontal transfer, and often individual strains are capable of infecting multiple hosts. Host plant species express diverse repertoires of resistance proteins that mediate direct or indirect recognition of bacterial effectors. As a result, plants and their bacterial pathogens should be considered as two extensive coevolving groups rather than as individual host species coevolving with single pathovars. To dissect the complexity of this coevolution, we cloned 171 effector-encoding genes from several pathovars of Pseudomonas and Ralstonia. We used Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient assays to test the ability of each effector to induce a necrotic phenotype on 59 plant genotypes belonging to four plant families, including numerous diverse accessions of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Known defense-inducing effectors (avirulence factors) and their homologs commonly induced extensive necrosis in many different plant species. Nonhost species reacted to multiple effector proteins from an individual pathovar more frequently and more intensely than host species. Both homologous and sequence-unrelated effectors could elicit necrosis in a similar spectrum of plants, suggesting common effector targets or targeting of the same pathways in the plant cell. PMID:19571308

  3. Two asian jumbo phages, ϕRSL2 and ϕRSF1, infect Ralstonia solanacearum and show common features of ϕKZ-related phages.

    PubMed

    Bhunchoth, Anjana; Blanc-Mathieu, Romain; Mihara, Tomoko; Nishimura, Yosuke; Askora, Ahmed; Phironrit, Namthip; Leksomboon, Chalida; Chatchawankanphanich, Orawan; Kawasaki, Takeru; Nakano, Miyako; Fujie, Makoto; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Jumbo phages infecting Ralstonia solanacearum were isolated in Thailand (ϕRSL2) and Japan (ϕRSF1). They were similar regarding virion morphology, genomic arrangement, and host range. Phylogenetic and proteomic tree analyses demonstrate that the ϕRSL2 and ϕRSF1 belong to a group of evolutionary related phages, including Pseudomonas phages ϕKZ, 201ϕ2-1 and all previously described ϕKZ-related phages. Despite conserved genomic co-linearity between the ϕRSL2 and ϕRSF1, they differ in protein separation patterns. A major difference was seen in the detection of virion-associated-RNA polymerase subunits. All β- and β'-subunits were detected in ϕRSF1, but one β'-subunit was undetected in ϕRSL2. Furthermore, ϕRSF1 infected host cells faster (latent period: 60 and 150min for ϕRSF1 and ϕRSL2, respectively) and more efficiently than ϕRSL2. Therefore, the difference in virion-associated-RNA polymerase may affect infection efficiency. Finally, we show that ϕRSF1 is able to inhibit bacterial wilt progression in tomato plants.

  4. The symbiotic transcription factor MtEFD and cytokinins are positively acting in the Medicago truncatula and Ralstonia solanacearum pathogenic interaction.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Sandra; Fromentin, Justine; Vailleau, Fabienne; Vernié, Tatiana; Huguet, Stéphanie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Frugier, Florian; Gamas, Pascal; Jardinaud, Marie-Françoise

    2014-03-01

    • A plant-microbe dual biological system was set up involving the model legume Medicago truncatula and two bacteria, the soil-borne root pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum and the beneficial symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti. • Comparison of transcriptomes under symbiotic and pathogenic conditions highlighted the transcription factor MtEFD (Ethylene response Factor required for nodule Differentiation) as being upregulated in both interactions, together with a set of cytokinin-related transcripts involved in metabolism, signaling and response. MtRR4 (Response Regulator), a cytokinin primary response gene negatively regulating cytokinin signaling and known as a target of MtEFD in nodulation processes, was retrieved in this set of transcripts. • Refined studies of MtEFD and MtRR4 expression during M. truncatula and R. solanacearum interaction indicated differential kinetics of induction and requirement of central regulators of bacterial pathogenicity, HrpG and HrpB. Similar to MtRR4, MtEFD upregulation during the pathogenic interaction was dependent on cytokinin perception mediated by the MtCRE1 (Cytokinin REsponse 1) receptor. • The use of M. truncatula efd-1 and cre1-1 mutants evidenced MtEFD and cytokinin perception as positive factors for bacterial wilt development. These factors therefore play an important role in both root nodulation and root disease development.

  5. Arabidopsis CLAVATA1 and CLAVATA2 receptors contribute to Ralstonia solanacearum pathogenicity through a miR169-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Hanemian, Mathieu; Barlet, Xavier; Sorin, Céline; Yadeta, Koste A; Keller, Harald; Favery, Bruno; Simon, Rüdiger; Thomma, Bart P H J; Hartmann, Caroline; Crespi, Martin; Marco, Yves; Tremousaygue, Dominique; Deslandes, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the most destructive bacterial plant diseases. Although many molecular determinants involved in R. solanacearum adaptation to hosts and pathogenesis have been described, host components required for disease establishment remain poorly characterized. Phenotypical analysis of Arabidopsis mutants for leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-receptor-like proteins revealed that mutations in the CLAVATA1 (CLV1) and CLAVATA2 (CLV2) genes confer enhanced disease resistance to bacterial wilt. We further investigated the underlying mechanisms using genetic, transcriptomic and molecular approaches. The enhanced resistance of both clv1 and clv2 mutants to the bacteria did not require the well characterized CLV signalling modules involved in shoot meristem homeostasis, and was conditioned by neither salicylic acid nor ethylene defence-related hormones. Gene expression microarray analysis performed on clv1 and clv2 revealed deregulation of genes encoding nuclear transcription factor Y subunit alpha (NF-YA) transcription factors whose post-transcriptional regulation is known to involve microRNAs from the miR169 family. Both clv mutants showed a defect in miR169 accumulation. Conversely, overexpression of miR169 abrogated the resistance phenotype of clv mutants. We propose that CLV1 and CLV2, two receptors involved in CLV3 perception during plant development, contribute to bacterial wilt through a signalling pathway involving the miR169/NF-YA module.

  6. Genome-Enabled Phylogeographic Investigation of the Quarantine Pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum Race 3 Biovar 2 and Screening for Sources of Resistance Against Its Core Effectors.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Christopher R; Studholme, David J; Hayes, Byron; Runde, Brendan; Weisberg, Alexandra; Cai, Rongman; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Daunay, Marie-Christine; Wicker, Emmanuel; Castillo, Jose A; Vinatzer, Boris A

    2015-05-01

    Phylogeographic studies inform about routes of pathogen dissemination and are instrumental for improving import/export controls. Genomes of 17 isolates of the bacterial wilt and potato brown rot pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 (R3bv2), a Select Agent in the United States, were thus analyzed to get insight into the phylogeography of this pathogen. Thirteen of fourteen isolates from Europe, Africa, and Asia were found to belong to a single clonal lineage while isolates from South America were genetically diverse and tended to carry ancestral alleles at the analyzed genomic loci consistent with a South American origin of R3bv2. The R3bv2 isolates share a core repertoire of 31 type III-secreted effector genes representing excellent candidates to be targeted with resistance genes in breeding programs to develop durable disease resistance. Toward this goal, 27 R3bv2 effectors were tested in eggplant, tomato, pepper, tobacco, and lettuce for induction of a hypersensitive-like response indicative of recognition by cognate resistance receptors. Fifteen effectors, eight of them core effectors, triggered a response in one or more plant species. These genotypes may harbor resistance genes that could be identified and mapped, cloned, and expressed in tomato or potato, for which sources of genetic resistance to R3bv2 are extremely limited.

  7. Hydroxycinnamic acid degradation, a broadly conserved trait, protects Ralstonia solanacearum from chemical plant defenses and contributes to root colonization and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Tiffany M.; Ailloud, Florent; Allen, Caitilyn

    2014-01-01

    Plants produce hydroxycinnamic acid defense compounds (HCAs) to combat pathogens, such as the bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum. We showed that an HCA degradation pathway is genetically and functionally conserved across diverse R. solanacearum strains. Further, a Δfcs (feruloyl-CoA synthetase) mutant that cannot degrade HCAs was less virulent on tomato plants. To understand the role of HCA degradation in bacterial wilt disease, we tested the following hypotheses: HCA degradation helps the pathogen (1) grow, as a carbon source; (2) spread, by reducing physical barriers HCA-derived; and (3) survive plant antimicrobial compounds. Although HCA degradation enabled R. solanacearum growth on HCAs in vitro, HCA degradation was dispensable for growth in xylem sap and root exudate, suggesting that HCAs are not significant carbon sources in planta. Acetyl-bromide quantification of lignin demonstrated that R. solanacearum infections did not affect the gross quantity or distribution of stem lignin. However, the Δfcs mutant was significantly more susceptible to inhibition by two HCAs: caffeate and p-coumarate. Finally, plant colonization assays suggested that HCA degradation facilitates early stages of infection and root colonization. Together, these results indicated that ability to degrade HCAs contributes to bacterial wilt virulence by facilitating root entry and by protecting the pathogen from HCA toxicity. PMID:25423265

  8. Arabidopsis wat1 (walls are thin1)-mediated resistance to the bacterial vascular pathogen, Ralstonia solanacearum, is accompanied by cross-regulation of salicylic acid and tryptophan metabolism.

    PubMed

    Denancé, Nicolas; Ranocha, Philippe; Oria, Nicolas; Barlet, Xavier; Rivière, Marie-Pierre; Yadeta, Koste A; Hoffmann, Laurent; Perreau, François; Clément, Gilles; Maia-Grondard, Alessandra; van den Berg, Grardy C M; Savelli, Bruno; Fournier, Sylvie; Aubert, Yann; Pelletier, Sandra; Thomma, Bart P H J; Molina, Antonio; Jouanin, Lise; Marco, Yves; Goffner, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Inactivation of Arabidopsis WAT1 (Walls Are Thin1), a gene required for secondary cell-wall deposition, conferred broad-spectrum resistance to vascular pathogens, including the bacteria Ralstonia solanacearum and Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, and the fungi Verticillium dahliae and Verticillium albo-atrum. Introduction of NahG, the bacterial salicylic acid (SA)-degrading salicylate hydroxylase gene, into the wat1 mutant restored full susceptibility to both R. solanacearum and X. campestris pv. campestris. Moreover, SA content was constitutively higher in wat1 roots, further supporting a role for SA in wat1-mediated resistance to vascular pathogens. By combining transcriptomic and metabolomic data, we demonstrated a general repression of indole metabolism in wat1-1 roots as shown by constitutive down-regulation of several genes encoding proteins of the indole glucosinolate biosynthetic pathway and reduced amounts of tryptophan (Trp), indole-3-acetic acid and neoglucobrassicin, the major form of indole glucosinolate in roots. Furthermore, the susceptibility of the wat1 mutant to R. solanacearum was partially restored when crossed with either the trp5 mutant, an over-accumulator of Trp, or Pro35S:AFB1-myc, in which indole-3-acetic acid signaling is constitutively activated. Our original hypothesis placed cell-wall modifications at the heart of the wat1 resistance phenotype. However, the results presented here suggest a mechanism involving root-localized metabolic channeling away from indole metabolites to SA as a central feature of wat1 resistance to R. solanacearum.

  9. Hydroxycinnamic Acid Degradation, a Broadly Conserved Trait, Protects Ralstonia solanacearum from Chemical Plant Defenses and Contributes to Root Colonization and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Tiffany M; Ailloud, Florent; Allen, Caitilyn

    2015-03-01

    Plants produce hydroxycinnamic acid (HCA) defense compounds to combat pathogens, such as the bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum. We showed that an HCA degradation pathway is genetically and functionally conserved across diverse R. solanacearum strains. Further, a feruloyl-CoA synthetase (Δfcs) mutant that cannot degrade HCA was less virulent on tomato plants. To understand the role of HCA degradation in bacterial wilt disease, we tested the following hypotheses: HCA degradation helps the pathogen i) grow, as a carbon source; ii) spread, by reducing HCA-derived physical barriers; and iii) survive plant antimicrobial compounds. Although HCA degradation enabled R. solanacearum growth on HCA in vitro, HCA degradation was dispensable for growth in xylem sap and root exudate, suggesting that HCA are not significant carbon sources in planta. Acetyl-bromide quantification of lignin demonstrated that R. solanacearum infections did not affect the gross quantity or distribution of stem lignin. However, the Δfcs mutant was significantly more susceptible to inhibition by two HCA, namely, caffeate and p-coumarate. Finally, plant colonization assays suggested that HCA degradation facilitates early stages of infection and root colonization. Together, these results indicated that ability to degrade HCA contributes to bacterial wilt virulence by facilitating root entry and by protecting the pathogen from HCA toxicity.

  10. Pilot Class Testing: Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle. Washington Foreign Language Program.

    Statistics derived from test score data from the pilot classes participating in the Washington Foreign Language Program are presented in tables in this report. An index accompanies the tables, itemizing the classes by level (FLES, middle, and high school), grade test, language skill, and school. MLA-Coop test performances for each class were…

  11. First-Class Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesser, Kathi; Buck, Gayle; Dopp, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    In the activity described in this article, students will explore how variables in a first-class lever, specifically arm length, position of the fulcrum, and placement of the load, affect the effort needed to lift the load. To begin the lesson, demonstrate to the class how a first-class lever works and review what is meant by the terms fulcrum,…

  12. Girls' Class, Infinite Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ost, Nancy

    1999-01-01

    The co-director of a small independent school describes Girls' Class, which she created in order to have a special time together with the girls in grades 6 through 8. The class provides guidance and celebrates spirituality and the beginning of menses for the young women. To end the class, each person says a positive self-affirmation and gives…

  13. Class network routing

    DOEpatents

    Bhanot, Gyan; Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2009-09-08

    Class network routing is implemented in a network such as a computer network comprising a plurality of parallel compute processors at nodes thereof. Class network routing allows a compute processor to broadcast a message to a range (one or more) of other compute processors in the computer network, such as processors in a column or a row. Normally this type of operation requires a separate message to be sent to each processor. With class network routing pursuant to the invention, a single message is sufficient, which generally reduces the total number of messages in the network as well as the latency to do a broadcast. Class network routing is also applied to dense matrix inversion algorithms on distributed memory parallel supercomputers with hardware class function (multicast) capability. This is achieved by exploiting the fact that the communication patterns of dense matrix inversion can be served by hardware class functions, which results in faster execution times.

  14. Class and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Mechthild

    2005-01-01

    Everyone is dependent on caring labor. Because women's labor is financially beneficial to global capitalism, gender is inseparable from class, regardless of the specific national or cultural contexts.

  15. Online, Bigger Classes May Be Better Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, Marc

    2010-01-01

    In his work as a professor, Stephen Downes used to feel that he was helping those who least needed it. His students at places like the University of Alberta already had a leg up in life and could afford the tuition. When a colleague suggested they co-teach an online class in learning theory at the University of Manitoba, in 2008, Downes welcomed…

  16. A novel multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis typing scheme for African phylotype III strains of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex

    PubMed Central

    Ravelomanantsoa, Santatra; Robène, Isabelle; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Guérin, Fabien; Poussier, Stéphane; Pruvost, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Background. Reliable genotyping that provides an accurate description of diversity in the context of pathogen emergence is required for the establishment of strategies to improve disease management. MultiLocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) is a valuable genotyping method. It can be performed at small evolutionary scales where high discriminatory power is needed. Strains of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex (RSSC) are highly genetically diverse. These destructive pathogens are the causative agent of bacterial wilt on an unusually broad range of host plants worldwide. In this study, we developed an MLVA scheme for genotyping the African RSSC phylotype III. Methods. We selected different publicly available tandem repeat (TR) loci and additional TR loci from the genome of strain CMR15 as markers. Based on these loci, a new phylotype III-MLVA scheme is presented. MLVA and multiLocus sequence typing (MLST) were compared at the global, regional, and local scales. Different populations of epidemiologically related and unrelated RSSC phylotype III strains were used. Results and Discussion. Sixteen polymorphic TR loci, which included seven microsatellites and nine minisatellites, were selected. These TR loci were distributed throughout the genome (chromosome and megaplasmid) and located in both coding and intergenic regions. The newly developed RS3-MLVA16 scheme was more discriminative than MLST. RS3-MLVA16 showed good ability in differentiating strains at global, regional, and local scales, and it especially highlighted epidemiological links between closely related strains at the local scale. RS3-MLVA16 also underlines genetic variability within the same MLST-type and clonal complex, and gives a first overview of population structure. Overall, RS3-MLVA16 is a promising genotyping method for outbreak investigation at a fine scale, and it could be used for outbreak investigation as a first-line, low-cost assay for the routine screening of RSSC

  17. CaWRKY6 transcriptionally activates CaWRKY40, regulates Ralstonia solanacearum resistance, and confers high-temperature and high-humidity tolerance in pepper.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hanyang; Yang, Sheng; Yan, Yan; Xiao, Zhuoli; Cheng, Junbin; Wu, Ji; Qiu, Ailian; Lai, Yan; Mou, Shaoliang; Guan, Deyi; Huang, Ronghua; He, Shuilin

    2015-06-01

    High temperature (HT), high humidity (HH), and pathogen infection often co-occur and negatively affect plant growth. However, these stress factors and plant responses are generally studied in isolation. The mechanisms of synergistic responses to combined stresses are poorly understood. We isolated the subgroup IIb WRKY family member CaWRKY6 from Capsicum annuum and performed quantitative real-time PCR analysis. CaWRKY6 expression was upregulated by individual or simultaneous treatment with HT, HH, combined HT and HH (HTHH), and Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation, and responded to exogenous application of jasmonic acid (JA), ethephon, and abscisic acid (ABA). Virus-induced gene silencing of CaWRKY6 enhanced pepper plant susceptibility to R. solanacearum and HTHH, and downregulated the hypersensitive response (HR), JA-, ethylene (ET)-, and ABA-induced marker gene expression, and thermotolerance-associated expression of CaHSP24, ER-small CaSHP, and Chl-small CaHSP. CaWRKY6 overexpression in pepper attenuated the HTHH-induced suppression of resistance to R. solanacearum infection. CaWRKY6 bound to and activated the CaWRKY40 promoter in planta, which is a pepper WRKY that regulates heat-stress tolerance and R. solanacearum resistance. CaWRKY40 silencing significantly blocked HR-induced cell death and reduced transcriptional expression of CaWRKY40. These data suggest that CaWRKY6 is a positive regulator of R. solanacearum resistance and heat-stress tolerance, which occurs in part by activating CaWRKY40.

  18. CaWRKY58, encoding a group I WRKY transcription factor of Capsicum annuum, negatively regulates resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuna; Dang, Fengfeng; Liu, Zhiqin; Wang, Xu; Eulgem, Thomas; Lai, Yan; Yu, Lu; She, Jianju; Shi, Youliang; Lin, Jinhui; Chen, Chengcong; Guan, Deyi; Qiu, Ailian; He, Shuilin

    2013-02-01

    WRKY transcription factors are encoded by large gene families across the plant kingdom. So far, their biological and molecular functions in nonmodel plants, including pepper (Capsicum annuum) and other Solanaceae, remain poorly understood. Here, we report on the functional characterization of a new group I WRKY protein from pepper, termed CaWRKY58. Our data indicate that CaWRKY58 can be localized to the nucleus and can activate the transcription of the reporter β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene driven by the 35S core promoter with two copies of the W-box in its proximal upstream region. In pepper plants infected with the bacterial pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum, CaWRKY58 transcript levels showed a biphasic response, manifested in an early/transient down-regulation and late up-regulation. CaWRKY58 transcripts were suppressed by treatment with methyl jasmonate and abscisic acid. Tobacco plants overexpressing CaWRKY58 did not show any obvious morphological phenotypes, but exhibited disease symptoms of greater severity than did wild-type plants. The enhanced susceptibility of CaWRKY58-overexpressing tobacco plants correlated with the decreased expression of hypersensitive response marker genes, as well as various defence-associated genes. Consistently, CaWRKY58 pepper plants silenced by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) displayed enhanced resistance to the highly virulent R. solanacearum strain FJC100301, and this was correlated with enhanced transcripts of defence-related pepper genes. Our results suggest that CaWRKY58 acts as a transcriptional activator of negative regulators in the resistance of pepper to R. solanacearum infection.

  19. Overexpression of CaWRKY27, a subgroup IIe WRKY transcription factor of Capsicum annuum, positively regulates tobacco resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum infection.

    PubMed

    Dang, Fengfeng; Wang, Yuna; She, Jianju; Lei, Yufen; Liu, Zhiqin; Eulgem, Thomas; Lai, Yan; Lin, Jing; Yu, Lu; Lei, Dan; Guan, Deyi; Li, Xia; Yuan, Qian; He, Shuilin

    2014-03-01

    WRKY proteins are encoded by a large gene family and are linked to many biological processes across a range of plant species. The functions and underlying mechanisms of WRKY proteins have been investigated primarily in model plants such as Arabidopsis and rice. The roles of these transcription factors in non-model plants, including pepper and other Solanaceae, are poorly understood. Here, we characterize the expression and function of a subgroup IIe WRKY protein from pepper (Capsicum annuum), denoted as CaWRKY27. The protein localized to nuclei and activated the transcription of a reporter GUS gene construct driven by the 35S promoter that contained two copies of the W-box in its proximal upstream region. Inoculation of pepper cultivars with Ralstonia solanacearum induced the expression of CaWRKY27 transcript in 76a, a bacterial wilt-resistant pepper cultivar, whereas it downregulated the expression of CaWRKY27 transcript in Gui-1-3, a bacterial wilt-susceptible pepper cultivar. CaWRKY27 transcript levels were also increased by treatments with salicylic acid (SA), methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and ethephon (ETH). Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing CaWRKY27 exhibited resistance to R. solanacearum infection compared to that of wild-type plants. This resistance was coupled with increased transcript levels in a number of marker genes, including hypersensitive response genes, and SA-, JA- and ET-associated genes. By contrast, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaWRKY27 increased the susceptibility of pepper plants to R. solanacearum infection. These results suggest that CaWRKY27 acts as a positive regulator in tobacco resistance responses to R. solanacearum infection through modulation of SA-, JA- and ET-mediated signaling pathways.

  20. Application of Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Typing To Discriminate Ralstonia solanacearum Strains Associated with English Watercourses and Disease Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Ruth; Bew, Janice; Conyers, Christine; Stones, Robert; Alcock, Michael; Elphinstone, John

    2013-01-01

    Variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis was used for high-resolution discrimination among Ralstonia solanacearum phylotype IIB sequevar 1 (PIIB-1) isolates and further evaluated for use in source tracing. Five tandem-repeat-containing loci (comprising six tandem repeats) discriminated 17 different VNTR profiles among 75 isolates from potato, geranium, bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara), tomato, and the environment. R. solanacearum isolates from crops at three unrelated outbreak sites where river water had been used for irrigation had distinct VNTR profiles that were shared with PIIB-1 isolates from infected bittersweet growing upriver of each site. The VNTR profiling results supported the implication that the source of R. solanacearum at each outbreak was contaminated river water. Analysis of 51 isolates from bittersweet growing in river water at different locations provided a means to evaluate the technique for studying the epidemiology of the pathogen in the environment. Ten different VNTR profiles were identified among bittersweet PIIB-1 isolates from the River Thames. Repeated findings of contiguous river stretches that produced isolates that shared single VNTR profiles supported the hypothesis that the pathogen had disseminated from infected bittersweet plants located upriver. VNTR profiles shared between bittersweet isolates from two widely separated Thames tributaries (River Ray and River Colne) suggested they were independently contaminated with the same clonal type. Some bittersweet isolates had VNTR profiles that were shared with potato isolates collected outside the United Kingdom. It was concluded that VNTR profiling could contribute to further understanding of R. solanacearum epidemiology and assist in control of future disease outbreaks. PMID:23892739

  1. Deciphering the route of Ralstonia solanacearum colonization in Arabidopsis thaliana roots during a compatible interaction: focus at the plant cell wall.

    PubMed

    Digonnet, Catherine; Martinez, Yves; Denancé, Nicolas; Chasseray, Marine; Dabos, Patrick; Ranocha, Philippe; Marco, Yves; Jauneau, Alain; Goffner, Deborah

    2012-11-01

    The compatible interaction between the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, and the GMI1000 strain of the phytopathogenic bacterium, Ralstonia solanacearum, was investigated in an in vitro pathosystem. We describe the progression of the bacteria in the root from penetration at the root surface to the xylem vessels and the cell type-specific, cell wall-associated modifications that accompanies bacterial colonization. Within 6 days post inoculation, R. solanacearum provoked a rapid plasmolysis of the epidermal, cortical, and endodermal cells, including those not directly in contact with the bacteria. Plasmolysis was accompanied by a global degradation of pectic homogalacturonanes as shown by the loss of JIM7 and JIM5 antibody signal in the cell wall of these cell types. As indicated by immunolabeling with Rsol-I antibodies that specifically recognize R. solanacearum, the bacteria progresses through the root in a highly directed, centripetal manner to the xylem poles, without extensive multiplication in the intercellular spaces along its path. Entry into the vascular cylinder was facilitated by cell collapse of the two pericycle cells located at the xylem poles. Once the bacteria reached the xylem vessels, they multiplied abundantly and moved from vessel to vessel by digesting the pit membrane between adjacent vessels. The degradation of the secondary walls of xylem vessels was not a prerequisite for vessel colonization as LM10 antibodies strongly labeled xylem cell walls, even at very late stages in disease development. Finally, the capacity of R. solanacearum to specifically degrade certain cell wall components and not others could be correlated with the arsenal of cell wall hydrolytic enzymes identified in the bacterial genome.

  2. A novel multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis typing scheme for African phylotype III strains of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex.

    PubMed

    Ravelomanantsoa, Santatra; Robène, Isabelle; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Guérin, Fabien; Poussier, Stéphane; Pruvost, Olivier; Prior, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background. Reliable genotyping that provides an accurate description of diversity in the context of pathogen emergence is required for the establishment of strategies to improve disease management. MultiLocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) is a valuable genotyping method. It can be performed at small evolutionary scales where high discriminatory power is needed. Strains of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex (RSSC) are highly genetically diverse. These destructive pathogens are the causative agent of bacterial wilt on an unusually broad range of host plants worldwide. In this study, we developed an MLVA scheme for genotyping the African RSSC phylotype III. Methods. We selected different publicly available tandem repeat (TR) loci and additional TR loci from the genome of strain CMR15 as markers. Based on these loci, a new phylotype III-MLVA scheme is presented. MLVA and multiLocus sequence typing (MLST) were compared at the global, regional, and local scales. Different populations of epidemiologically related and unrelated RSSC phylotype III strains were used. Results and Discussion. Sixteen polymorphic TR loci, which included seven microsatellites and nine minisatellites, were selected. These TR loci were distributed throughout the genome (chromosome and megaplasmid) and located in both coding and intergenic regions. The newly developed RS3-MLVA16 scheme was more discriminative than MLST. RS3-MLVA16 showed good ability in differentiating strains at global, regional, and local scales, and it especially highlighted epidemiological links between closely related strains at the local scale. RS3-MLVA16 also underlines genetic variability within the same MLST-type and clonal complex, and gives a first overview of population structure. Overall, RS3-MLVA16 is a promising genotyping method for outbreak investigation at a fine scale, and it could be used for outbreak investigation as a first-line, low-cost assay for the routine screening of RSSC

  3. The vascular plant-pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum produces biofilms required for its virulence on the surfaces of tomato cells adjacent to intercellular spaces.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yuka; Inoue, Kanako; Ikeda, Kenichi; Nakayashiki, Hitoshi; Higashimoto, Chikaki; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Kiba, Akinori; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of colonization of intercellular spaces by the soil-borne and vascular plant-pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum strain OE1-1 after invasion into host plants remains unclear. To analyse the behaviour of OE1-1 cells in intercellular spaces, tomato leaves with the lower epidermis layers excised after infiltration with OE1-1 were observed under a scanning electron microscope. OE1-1 cells formed microcolonies on the surfaces of tomato cells adjacent to intercellular spaces, and then aggregated surrounded by an extracellular matrix, forming mature biofilm structures. Furthermore, OE1-1 cells produced mushroom-type biofilms when incubated in fluids of apoplasts including intercellular spaces, but not xylem fluids from tomato plants. This is the first report of biofilm formation by R. solanacearum on host plant cells after invasion into intercellular spaces and mushroom-type biofilms produced by R. solanacearum in vitro. Sugar application led to enhanced biofilm formation by OE1-1. Mutation of lecM encoding a lectin, RS-IIL, which reportedly exhibits affinity for these sugars, led to a significant decrease in biofilm formation. Colonization in intercellular spaces was significantly decreased in the lecM mutant, leading to a loss of virulence on tomato plants. Complementation of the lecM mutant with native lecM resulted in the recovery of mushroom-type biofilms and virulence on tomato plants. Together, our findings indicate that OE1-1 produces mature biofilms on the surfaces of tomato cells after invasion into intercellular spaces. RS-IIL may contribute to biofilm formation by OE1-1, which is required for OE1-1 virulence. PMID:26609568

  4. CaCDPK15 positively regulates pepper responses to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation and forms a positive-feedback loop with CaWRKY40 to amplify defense signaling.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lei; Yang, Sheng; Yang, Tong; Liang, Jiaqi; Cheng, Wei; Wen, Jiayu; Liu, Yanyan; Li, Jiazhi; Shi, Lanping; Tang, Qian; Shi, Wei; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Mou, Shaoliang; Liu, Zhiqin; Cai, Hanyang; He, Li; Guan, Deyi; Wu, Yang; He, Shuilin

    2016-01-01

    CaWRKY40 is a positive regulator of pepper (Capsicum annum) response to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation (RSI), but the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we functionally characterize CaCDPK15 in the defense signaling mediated by CaWRKY40. Pathogen-responsive TGA, W, and ERE boxes were identified in the CaCDPK15 promoter (pCaCDPK15), and pCaCDPK15-driven GUS expression was significantly enhanced in response to RSI and exogenously applied salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, abscisic acid, and ethephon. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaCDPK15 significantly increased the susceptibility of pepper to RSI and downregulated the immunity-associated markers CaNPR1, CaPR1, and CaDEF1. By contrast, transient CaCDPK15 overexpression significantly activated hypersensitive response associated cell death, upregulated the immunity-associated marker genes, upregulated CaWRKY40 expression, and enriched CaWRKY40 at the promoters of its targets genes. Although CaCDPK15 failed to interact with CaWRKY40, the direct binding of CaWRKY40 to pCaCDPK15 was detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation, which was significantly potentiated by RSI in pepper plants. These combined results suggest that RSI in pepper induces CaCDPK15 and indirectly activates downstream CaWRKY40, which in turn potentiates CaCDPK15 expression. This positive-feedback loop would amplify defense signaling against RSI and efficiently activate strong plant immunity. PMID:26928570

  5. Ralstonia solanacearum ΔPGI-1 strain KZR-5 is affected in growth, response to cold stress and invasion of tomato.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Patricia; van Overbeek, Leonard Simon; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The survival and persistence of Ralstonia solanacearum biovar 2 in temperate climates is still poorly understood. To assess whether genomic variants of the organism show adaptation to local conditions, we compared the behaviour of environmental strain KZR-5, which underwent a deletion of the 17.6 kb genomic island PGI-1, with that of environmental strain KZR-1 and potato-derived strains 1609 and 715. PGI-1 harbours two genes of potential ecological relevance, i.e. one encoding a hypothetical protein with a RelA/SpoT domain and one a putative cellobiohydrolase. We thus assessed bacterial fate under conditions of amino acid starvation, during growth, upon incubation at low temperature and invasion of tomato plants. In contrast to the other strains, environmental strain KZR-5 did not grow on media that induce amino acid starvation. In addition, its maximum growth rate at 28°C in rich medium was significantly reduced. On the other hand, long-term survival at 4°C was significantly enhanced as compared to that of strains 1609, 715 and KZR-1. Although strain KZR-5 showed growth rates (at 28°C) in two different media, which were similar to those of strains 1609 and 715, its ability to compete with these strains under these conditions was reduced. In singly inoculated tomato plants, no significant differences in invasiveness were observed among strains KZR-5, KZR-1, 1609 and 715. However, reduced competitiveness of strain KZR-5 was found in experiments on tomato plant colonisation and wilting when using 1:1 or 5:1 mixtures of strains. The potential role of PGI-1 in plant invasion, response to stress and growth in competition at high and moderate temperatures is discussed.

  6. Ralstonia solanacearum Type III Effector RipAY Is a Glutathione-Degrading Enzyme That Is Activated by Plant Cytosolic Thioredoxins and Suppresses Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hatanaka, Tadashi; Nakano, Masahito; Oda, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum uses a large repertoire of type III effector proteins to succeed in infection. To clarify the function of effector proteins in host eukaryote cells, we expressed effectors in yeast cells and identified seven effector proteins that interfere with yeast growth. One of the effector proteins, RipAY, was found to share homology with the ChaC family proteins that function as γ-glutamyl cyclotransferases, which degrade glutathione (GSH), a tripeptide that plays important roles in the plant immune system. RipAY significantly inhibited yeast growth and simultaneously induced rapid GSH depletion when expressed in yeast cells. The in vitro GSH degradation activity of RipAY is specifically activated by eukaryotic factors in the yeast and plant extracts. Biochemical purification of the yeast protein identified that RipAY is activated by thioredoxin TRX2. On the other hand, RipAY was not activated by bacterial thioredoxins. Interestingly, RipAY was activated by plant h-type thioredoxins that exist in large amounts in the plant cytosol, but not by chloroplastic m-, f-, x-, y- and z-type thioredoxins, in a thiol-independent manner. The transient expression of RipAY decreased the GSH level in plant cells and affected the flg22-triggered production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and expression of pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) marker genes in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. These results indicate that RipAY is activated by host cytosolic thioredoxins and degrades GSH specifically in plant cells to suppress plant immunity. PMID:27073091

  7. An evaluation of the wilt-causing bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum as a potential biological control agent for the alien Kahili ginger (Hedychium gardnerianum) in Hawaiian forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1999-01-01

    Kahili ginger (Hedychium gardnerianum) is an invasive weed in tropical forests in Hawaii and elsewhere. Bacterial wilt caused by the ginger strain of Ralstonia(=Pseudomonas) solanacearum systemically infects edible ginger (Zingiber officinale) and ornamental gingers (Hedychium spp.), causing wilt in infected plants. The suitability of R. solanacearum as a biological control agent for kahili ginger was investigated by inoculating seedlings and rooted cuttings of native forest plants, ornamental ginger, and solanaceous species to confirm host specificity. Inoculation via stem injection or root wounding with a bacterial–water suspension was followed by observation for 8 weeks. Inoculations on H. gardnerianum were then carried out in ohia-lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) wet forests of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park to determine the bacterium's efficacy in the field. No native forest or solanaceous species developed wilt or other symptoms during the study. The bacterium caused limited infection near the inoculation site on H. coronarium, Z. zerumbet, Heliconia latispatha, and Musa sapientum. However, infection did not become systemic in any of these species, and normal growth resumed following appearance of initial symptoms. All inoculated H. gardnerianum plants developed irreversible chlorosis and severe wilting 3–4 weeks following inoculation. Systemic infection also caused death and decay of rhizomes. Most plants were completely dead 16–20 weeks following inoculation. The destructiveness of the ginger strain of R. solanacearum to edible ginger has raised questions regarding its use for biological control. However, because locations of kahili ginger infestations are often remote, the risk of contaminating edible ginger plantings is unlikely. The ability of this bacterium to cause severe disease in H. gardnerianum in the field, together with its lack of virulence in other ginger species, contributes to its potential as a biological control agent.

  8. CaCDPK15 positively regulates pepper responses to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation and forms a positive-feedback loop with CaWRKY40 to amplify defense signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lei; Yang, Sheng; Yang, Tong; Liang, Jiaqi; Cheng, Wei; Wen, Jiayu; Liu, Yanyan; Li, Jiazhi; Shi, Lanping; Tang, Qian; Shi, Wei; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Mou, Shaoliang; Liu, Zhiqin; Cai, Hanyang; He, Li; Guan, Deyi; Wu, Yang; He, Shuilin

    2016-01-01

    CaWRKY40 is a positive regulator of pepper (Capsicum annum) response to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation (RSI), but the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we functionally characterize CaCDPK15 in the defense signaling mediated by CaWRKY40. Pathogen-responsive TGA, W, and ERE boxes were identified in the CaCDPK15 promoter (pCaCDPK15), and pCaCDPK15-driven GUS expression was significantly enhanced in response to RSI and exogenously applied salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, abscisic acid, and ethephon. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaCDPK15 significantly increased the susceptibility of pepper to RSI and downregulated the immunity-associated markers CaNPR1, CaPR1, and CaDEF1. By contrast, transient CaCDPK15 overexpression significantly activated hypersensitive response associated cell death, upregulated the immunity-associated marker genes, upregulated CaWRKY40 expression, and enriched CaWRKY40 at the promoters of its targets genes. Although CaCDPK15 failed to interact with CaWRKY40, the direct binding of CaWRKY40 to pCaCDPK15 was detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation, which was significantly potentiated by RSI in pepper plants. These combined results suggest that RSI in pepper induces CaCDPK15 and indirectly activates downstream CaWRKY40, which in turn potentiates CaCDPK15 expression. This positive-feedback loop would amplify defense signaling against RSI and efficiently activate strong plant immunity. PMID:26928570

  9. Deciphering the route of Ralstonia solanacearum colonization in Arabidopsis thaliana roots during a compatible interaction: focus at the plant cell wall.

    PubMed

    Digonnet, Catherine; Martinez, Yves; Denancé, Nicolas; Chasseray, Marine; Dabos, Patrick; Ranocha, Philippe; Marco, Yves; Jauneau, Alain; Goffner, Deborah

    2012-11-01

    The compatible interaction between the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, and the GMI1000 strain of the phytopathogenic bacterium, Ralstonia solanacearum, was investigated in an in vitro pathosystem. We describe the progression of the bacteria in the root from penetration at the root surface to the xylem vessels and the cell type-specific, cell wall-associated modifications that accompanies bacterial colonization. Within 6 days post inoculation, R. solanacearum provoked a rapid plasmolysis of the epidermal, cortical, and endodermal cells, including those not directly in contact with the bacteria. Plasmolysis was accompanied by a global degradation of pectic homogalacturonanes as shown by the loss of JIM7 and JIM5 antibody signal in the cell wall of these cell types. As indicated by immunolabeling with Rsol-I antibodies that specifically recognize R. solanacearum, the bacteria progresses through the root in a highly directed, centripetal manner to the xylem poles, without extensive multiplication in the intercellular spaces along its path. Entry into the vascular cylinder was facilitated by cell collapse of the two pericycle cells located at the xylem poles. Once the bacteria reached the xylem vessels, they multiplied abundantly and moved from vessel to vessel by digesting the pit membrane between adjacent vessels. The degradation of the secondary walls of xylem vessels was not a prerequisite for vessel colonization as LM10 antibodies strongly labeled xylem cell walls, even at very late stages in disease development. Finally, the capacity of R. solanacearum to specifically degrade certain cell wall components and not others could be correlated with the arsenal of cell wall hydrolytic enzymes identified in the bacterial genome. PMID:22729825

  10. PrhN, a putative marR family transcriptional regulator, is involved in positive regulation of type III secretion system and full virulence of Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Luo, Feng; Wu, Dousheng; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Kiba, Akinori; Igarashi, Yasuo; Ding, Wei; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    2015-01-01

    The MarR-family of transcriptional regulators are involved in various cellular processes, including resistance to multiple antibiotics and other toxic chemicals, adaptation to different environments and pathogenesis in many plant and animal pathogens. Here, we reported a new MarR regulator PrhN, which was involved in the pathogenesis of Ralstonia solanacearum. prhN mutant exhibited significantly reduced virulence and stem colonization compared to that of wild type in tomato plants. prhN mutant caused identical hypersensitive response (HR) on resistant plants to the wild type. Deletion of prhN gene substantially reduced the expression of type III secretion system (T3SS) in vitro and in planta (mainly in tomato plants), which is essential for pathogenicity of R. solanacearum, and the complemented PrhN could restore its virulence and T3SS expression to that of wild type. T3SS is directly controlled by AraC-type transcriptional regulator HrpB, and the transcription of hrpB is activated by HrpG and PrhG. HrpG and PrhG are homologs but are regulated by the PhcA positively and negatively, respectively. Deletion of prhN gene also abolished the expression of hrpB and prhG, but didn't change the expression of hrpG and phcA. Together, these results indicated that PrhN positively regulates T3SS expression through PrhG and HrpB. PrhN and PhcA should regulate prhG expression in a parallel way. This is the first report on the pathogenesis of MarR regulator in R. solanacearum, and this new finding will improve our understanding on the various biological functions of MarR regulator and the complex regulatory network on hrp regulon in R. solanacearum. PMID:25972849

  11. Effects of volatile organic compounds produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens on the growth and virulence traits of tomato bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Raza, Waseem; Wang, Jichen; Wu, Yuncheng; Ling, Ning; Wei, Zhong; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-09-01

    The production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by microbes is an important characteristic for their selection as biocontrol agents against plant pathogens. In this study, we identified the VOCs produced by the biocontrol strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens T-5 and evaluated their impact on the growth and virulence traits of tomato bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. The results showed that the VOCs of strain T-5 significantly inhibited the growth of R. solanacearum in agar medium and in soil. In addition, VOCs significantly inhibited the motility traits, root colonization, biofilm formation, and production of antioxidant enzymes and exopolysaccharides by R. solanacearum. However, no effect of VOCs on the production of hydrolytic enzymes by R. solanacearum was observed. The strain T-5 produced VOCs, including benzenes, ketones, aldehydes, alkanes, acids, and one furan and naphthalene compound; among those, 13 VOCs showed 1-10 % antibacterial activity against R. solanacearum in their produced amounts by T-5; however, the consortium of all VOCs produced on agar medium, in sterilized soil, and in natural soil showed 75, 62, and 85 % growth inhibition of R. solanacearum, respectively. The real-time PCR analysis further confirmed the results when the expression of different virulence- and metabolism-related genes in R. solanacearum cells was decreased after exposure to the VOCs of strain T-5. The results of this study clearly revealed the significance of VOCs in the control of plant pathogens. This information would help to better comprehend the microbial interactions mediated by VOCs in nature and to develop safer strategies to control plant disease. PMID:27183998

  12. Two Host-Induced Ralstonia solanacearum Genes, acrA and dinF, Encode Multidrug Efflux Pumps and Contribute to Bacterial Wilt Virulence▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Darby G.; Swanson, Jill K.; Allen, Caitilyn

    2007-01-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps (MDRs) are hypothesized to protect pathogenic bacteria from toxic host defense compounds. We created mutations in the Ralstonia solanacearum acrA and dinF genes, which encode putative MDRs in the broad-host-range plant pathogen. Both mutations reduced the ability of R. solanacearum to grow in the presence of various toxic compounds, including antibiotics, phytoalexins, and detergents. Both acrAB and dinF mutants were significantly less virulent on the tomato plant than the wild-type strain. Complementation restored near-wild-type levels of virulence to both mutants. Addition of either dinF or acrAB to Escherichia coli MDR mutants KAM3 and KAM32 restored the resistance of these strains to several toxins, demonstrating that the R. solanacearum genes can function heterologously to complement known MDR mutations. Toxic and DNA-damaging compounds induced expression of acrA and dinF, as did growth in both susceptible and resistant tomato plants. Carbon limitation also increased expression of acrA and dinF, while the stress-related sigma factor RpoS was required at a high cell density (>107 CFU/ml) to obtain wild-type levels of acrA expression both in minimal medium and in planta. The type III secretion system regulator HrpB negatively regulated dinF expression in culture at high cell densities. Together, these results show that acrAB and dinF encode MDRs in R. solanacearum and that they contribute to the overall aggressiveness of this phytopathogen, probably by protecting the bacterium from the toxic effects of host antimicrobial compounds. PMID:17337552

  13. Defining the Metabolic Functions and Roles in Virulence of the rpoN1 and rpoN2 Genes in Ralstonia solanacearum GMI1000

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, Benjamin R.; Connolly, Morgan P.; Choudhary, Pratibha; Brookins-Little, Tiffany S.; Chatterjee, Snigdha; Raina, Ramesh; Nomura, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    The alternative sigma factor RpoN is a unique regulator found among bacteria. It controls numerous processes that range from basic metabolism to more complex functions such as motility and nitrogen fixation. Our current understanding of RpoN function is largely derived from studies on prototypical bacteria such as Escherichia coli. Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida. Although the extent and necessity of RpoN-dependent functions differ radically between these model organisms, each bacterium depends on a single chromosomal rpoN gene to meet the cellular demands of RpoN regulation. The bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum is often recognized for being the causative agent of wilt disease in crops, including banana, peanut and potato. However, this plant pathogen is also one of the few bacterial species whose genome possesses dual rpoN genes. To determine if the rpoN genes in this bacterium are genetically redundant and interchangeable, we constructed and characterized ΔrpoN1, ΔrpoN2 and ΔrpoN1 ΔrpoN2 mutants of R. solanacearum GMI1000. It was found that growth on a small range of metabolites, including dicarboxylates, ethanol, nitrate, ornithine, proline and xanthine, were dependent on only the rpoN1 gene. Furthermore, the rpoN1 gene was required for wilt disease on tomato whereas rpoN2 had no observable role in virulence or metabolism in R. solanacearum GMI1000. Interestingly, plasmid-based expression of rpoN2 did not fully rescue the metabolic deficiencies of the ΔrpoN1 mutants; full recovery was specific to rpoN1. In comparison, only rpoN2 was able to genetically complement a ΔrpoN E. coli mutant. These results demonstrate that the RpoN1 and RpoN2 proteins are not functionally equivalent or interchangeable in R. solanacearum GMI1000. PMID:26659655

  14. Development and Comparison of TaqMan-Based Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection and Differentiation of Ralstonia solanacearum strains.

    PubMed

    Stulberg, Michael J; Rascoe, John; Li, Wenbin; Yan, Zonghe; Nakhla, Mark K; Huang, Qi

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is destructive to many plant species worldwide. The race 3 biovar 2 (r3b2) strains of R. solanacearum infect potatoes in temperate climates and are listed as select agents by the U.S. government. TaqMan-based real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) is commonly used in federal and state diagnostic laboratories over conventional PCR due to its speed and sensitivity. We developed the Rs16S primers and probe set and compared it with a widely used set (RS) for detecting R. solanacearum species complex strains. We also developed the RsSA3 primers and probe set and compared it with the previously published B2 and RsSA2 sets for specific detection of r3b2 strains. Both comparisons were done under standardized qPCR master mix and cycling conditions. The Rs16S and RS assays detected all 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains and none of the five outgroups, but the former was more sensitive than the latter. For r3b2 strain detection, the RsSA2 and RsSA3 sets specifically detected the 34 r3b2 strains and none of the 56 R. solanacearum non-r3b2 strains or out-group strains. The B2 set, however, detected five non-r3b2 R. solanacearum strains and was less sensitive than the other two sets under the same testing conditions. We conclude that the Rs16S, RsSA2, and RsSA3 sets are best suited under the standardized conditions for the detection of R. solanacearum species complex and r3b2 strains by TaqMan-based qPCR assays. PMID:27402488

  15. Induction of a small heat shock protein and its functional roles in Nicotiana plants in the defense response against Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Maimbo, Milimo; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Kiba, Akinori

    2007-12-01

    In tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), Ralstonia solanacearum OE1-1 (RsOE1-1) is pathogenic, whereas R. solanacearum 8107 (Rs8107) is nonpathogenic and induces the hypersensitive response (HR). To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of plant-R. solanacearum interactions, we used differential display to isolate a cDNA fragment, A6, regulated in tobacco by inoculation with RsOE1-1. The deduced amino acid sequence predicted from full-length A6-cDNA showed similarity to small heat shock proteins from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; hypothetical protein), Medicago truncatula, and Cucumis melo; we therefore designated A6 to correspond to Ntshsp17 (for tobacco small heat shock protein 17). Recombinant Ntshsp17 overproduced in Escherichia coli exhibited molecular chaperone function. Expression of Ntshsp17 was increased in tobacco leaves inoculated with both RsOE1-1 and Rs8107. Expression was induced by heat treatment and by treatment with aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid, hydrogen peroxide, methyl jasmonate, and salicylic acid. Ntshsp17 expression was induced by inoculation with a HR and pathogenicity gene mutant of Rs8107 that does not induce the HR, but not by Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression of INF1, an HR elicitor. In Nbshsp17-silenced plants (an Ntshsp17 ortholog in Nicotiana benthamiana), expression of ETHYLENE-RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN, PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1a (PR1a), and PR4 genes was compromised, but expression of ELONGATION FACTOR1alpha was scarcely affected. Appearance of the HR was not affected in the silenced plants. In the silenced plants, growth of Rs8107 was accelerated. Bacterial growth and wilt symptoms elicited by RsOE1-1 were also accelerated in the silenced plants. These results indicate that this small heat shock protein might have a role in HR-independent defenses in Nicotiana plants. PMID:17965181

  16. The vascular plant-pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum produces biofilms required for its virulence on the surfaces of tomato cells adjacent to intercellular spaces.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yuka; Inoue, Kanako; Ikeda, Kenichi; Nakayashiki, Hitoshi; Higashimoto, Chikaki; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Kiba, Akinori; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of colonization of intercellular spaces by the soil-borne and vascular plant-pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum strain OE1-1 after invasion into host plants remains unclear. To analyse the behaviour of OE1-1 cells in intercellular spaces, tomato leaves with the lower epidermis layers excised after infiltration with OE1-1 were observed under a scanning electron microscope. OE1-1 cells formed microcolonies on the surfaces of tomato cells adjacent to intercellular spaces, and then aggregated surrounded by an extracellular matrix, forming mature biofilm structures. Furthermore, OE1-1 cells produced mushroom-type biofilms when incubated in fluids of apoplasts including intercellular spaces, but not xylem fluids from tomato plants. This is the first report of biofilm formation by R. solanacearum on host plant cells after invasion into intercellular spaces and mushroom-type biofilms produced by R. solanacearum in vitro. Sugar application led to enhanced biofilm formation by OE1-1. Mutation of lecM encoding a lectin, RS-IIL, which reportedly exhibits affinity for these sugars, led to a significant decrease in biofilm formation. Colonization in intercellular spaces was significantly decreased in the lecM mutant, leading to a loss of virulence on tomato plants. Complementation of the lecM mutant with native lecM resulted in the recovery of mushroom-type biofilms and virulence on tomato plants. Together, our findings indicate that OE1-1 produces mature biofilms on the surfaces of tomato cells after invasion into intercellular spaces. RS-IIL may contribute to biofilm formation by OE1-1, which is required for OE1-1 virulence.

  17. Moderate temperature fluctuations rapidly reduce the viability of Ralstonia solanacearum race 3, biovar 2, in infected geranium, tomato, and potato plants.

    PubMed

    Scherf, Jacob M; Milling, Annett; Allen, Caitilyn

    2010-11-01

    Most Ralstonia solanacearum strains are tropical plant pathogens, but race 3, biovar 2 (R3bv2), strains can cause bacterial wilt in temperate zones or tropical highlands where other strains cannot. R3bv2 is a quarantine pathogen in North America and Europe because of its potential to damage the potato industry in cooler climates. However, R3bv2 will not become established if it cannot survive temperate winters. Previous experiments showed that in water at 4°C, R3bv2 does not survive as long as native U.S. strains, but R3bv2 remains viable longer than U.S. strains in potato tubers at 4°C. To further investigate the effects of temperature on this high-concern pathogen, we assessed the ability of R3bv2 and a native U.S. strain to survive typical temperate winter temperature cycles of 2 days at 5°C followed by 2 days at -10°C. We measured pathogen survival in infected tomato and geranium plants, in infected potato tubers, and in sterile water. The population sizes of both strains declined rapidly under these conditions in all three plant hosts and in sterile water, and no culturable R. solanacearum cells were detected after five to seven temperature cycles in plant tissue. The fluctuations played a critical role in loss of bacterial viability, since at a constant temperature of -20°C, both strains could survive in infected geranium tissue for at least 6 months. These results suggest that even when sheltered in infected plant tissue, R3bv2 is unlikely to survive the temperature fluctuations typical of a northern temperate winter.

  18. Effects of volatile organic compounds produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens on the growth and virulence traits of tomato bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Raza, Waseem; Wang, Jichen; Wu, Yuncheng; Ling, Ning; Wei, Zhong; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-09-01

    The production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by microbes is an important characteristic for their selection as biocontrol agents against plant pathogens. In this study, we identified the VOCs produced by the biocontrol strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens T-5 and evaluated their impact on the growth and virulence traits of tomato bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. The results showed that the VOCs of strain T-5 significantly inhibited the growth of R. solanacearum in agar medium and in soil. In addition, VOCs significantly inhibited the motility traits, root colonization, biofilm formation, and production of antioxidant enzymes and exopolysaccharides by R. solanacearum. However, no effect of VOCs on the production of hydrolytic enzymes by R. solanacearum was observed. The strain T-5 produced VOCs, including benzenes, ketones, aldehydes, alkanes, acids, and one furan and naphthalene compound; among those, 13 VOCs showed 1-10 % antibacterial activity against R. solanacearum in their produced amounts by T-5; however, the consortium of all VOCs produced on agar medium, in sterilized soil, and in natural soil showed 75, 62, and 85 % growth inhibition of R. solanacearum, respectively. The real-time PCR analysis further confirmed the results when the expression of different virulence- and metabolism-related genes in R. solanacearum cells was decreased after exposure to the VOCs of strain T-5. The results of this study clearly revealed the significance of VOCs in the control of plant pathogens. This information would help to better comprehend the microbial interactions mediated by VOCs in nature and to develop safer strategies to control plant disease.

  19. Development and Comparison of TaqMan-Based Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection and Differentiation of Ralstonia solanacearum strains.

    PubMed

    Stulberg, Michael J; Rascoe, John; Li, Wenbin; Yan, Zonghe; Nakhla, Mark K; Huang, Qi

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is destructive to many plant species worldwide. The race 3 biovar 2 (r3b2) strains of R. solanacearum infect potatoes in temperate climates and are listed as select agents by the U.S. government. TaqMan-based real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) is commonly used in federal and state diagnostic laboratories over conventional PCR due to its speed and sensitivity. We developed the Rs16S primers and probe set and compared it with a widely used set (RS) for detecting R. solanacearum species complex strains. We also developed the RsSA3 primers and probe set and compared it with the previously published B2 and RsSA2 sets for specific detection of r3b2 strains. Both comparisons were done under standardized qPCR master mix and cycling conditions. The Rs16S and RS assays detected all 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains and none of the five outgroups, but the former was more sensitive than the latter. For r3b2 strain detection, the RsSA2 and RsSA3 sets specifically detected the 34 r3b2 strains and none of the 56 R. solanacearum non-r3b2 strains or out-group strains. The B2 set, however, detected five non-r3b2 R. solanacearum strains and was less sensitive than the other two sets under the same testing conditions. We conclude that the Rs16S, RsSA2, and RsSA3 sets are best suited under the standardized conditions for the detection of R. solanacearum species complex and r3b2 strains by TaqMan-based qPCR assays.

  20. Application of variable-number tandem-repeat typing to discriminate Ralstonia solanacearum strains associated with English watercourses and disease outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Neil; Bryant, Ruth; Bew, Janice; Conyers, Christine; Stones, Robert; Alcock, Michael; Elphinstone, John

    2013-10-01

    Variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis was used for high-resolution discrimination among Ralstonia solanacearum phylotype IIB sequevar 1 (PIIB-1) isolates and further evaluated for use in source tracing. Five tandem-repeat-containing loci (comprising six tandem repeats) discriminated 17 different VNTR profiles among 75 isolates from potato, geranium, bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara), tomato, and the environment. R. solanacearum isolates from crops at three unrelated outbreak sites where river water had been used for irrigation had distinct VNTR profiles that were shared with PIIB-1 isolates from infected bittersweet growing upriver of each site. The VNTR profiling results supported the implication that the source of R. solanacearum at each outbreak was contaminated river water. Analysis of 51 isolates from bittersweet growing in river water at different locations provided a means to evaluate the technique for studying the epidemiology of the pathogen in the environment. Ten different VNTR profiles were identified among bittersweet PIIB-1 isolates from the River Thames. Repeated findings of contiguous river stretches that produced isolates that shared single VNTR profiles supported the hypothesis that the pathogen had disseminated from infected bittersweet plants located upriver. VNTR profiles shared between bittersweet isolates from two widely separated Thames tributaries (River Ray and River Colne) suggested they were independently contaminated with the same clonal type. Some bittersweet isolates had VNTR profiles that were shared with potato isolates collected outside the United Kingdom. It was concluded that VNTR profiling could contribute to further understanding of R. solanacearum epidemiology and assist in control of future disease outbreaks.

  1. Induction of the viable but nonculturable state of Ralstonia solanacearum by low temperature in the soil microcosm and its resuscitation by catalase.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hyun Gi; Bae, Ju Young; Lee, Hyoung Ju; Joo, Hae Jin; Jung, Eun Joo; Chung, Eunsook; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is the causal agent of bacterial wilt on a wide variety of plants, and enters a viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state under stress conditions in soil and water. Here, we adopted an artificial soil microcosm (ASM) to investigate the VBNC state of R. solanacearum induced by low temperature. The culturability of R. solanacearum strains SL341 and GMI1000 rapidly decreased at 4°C in modified ASM (mASM), while it was stably maintained at 25°C in mASM. We hypothesized that bacterial cells at 4°C in mASM are viable but nonculturable. Total protein profiles of SL341 cells at 4°C in mASM did not differ from those of SL341 culturable cells at 25°C in mASM. Moreover, the VBNC cells maintained in the mASM retained respiration activity. Catalase treatment effectively restored the culturability of nonculturable cells in mASM, while temperature increase or other treatments used for resuscitation of other bacteria were not effective. The resuscitated R. solanacearum from VBNC state displayed normal level of bacterial virulence on tomato plants compared with its original culturable bacteria. Expression of omp, oxyR, rpoS, dps, and the 16S rRNA gene quantified by RT-qPCR did not differ significantly between the culturable and VBNC states of R. solanacearum. Our results suggested that the VBNC bacterial cells in mASM induced by low temperature exist in a physiologically unique state.

  2. HpaP modulates type III effector secretion in Ralstonia solanacearum and harbours a substrate specificity switch domain essential for virulence.

    PubMed

    Lohou, David; Turner, Marie; Lonjon, Fabien; Cazalé, Anne-Claire; Peeters, Nemo; Genin, Stéphane; Vailleau, Fabienne

    2014-08-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria have evolved a type III secretion system (T3SS) to successfully invade their host. This extracellular apparatus allows the translocation of proteins, called type III effectors (T3Es), directly into the host cells. T3Es are virulence factors that have been shown to interfere with the host's immunity or to provide nutrients from the host to the bacteria. The Gram-negative bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum is a worldwide major crop pest whose virulence strongly relies on the T3SS. In R. solanacearum, transcriptional regulation has been extensively studied. However, very few data are available concerning the role played by type III-associated regulators, such as type III chaperones and T3SS control proteins. Here, we characterized HpaP, a putative type III secretion substrate specificity switch (T3S4) protein of R. solanacearum which is not secreted by the bacterium or translocated in the plant cells. HpaP self-interacts and interacts with the PopP1 T3E. HpaP modulates the secretion of early (HrpY pilin) and late (AvrA and PopP1 T3Es) type III substrates. HpaP is dispensable for the translocation of T3Es into the host cells. Finally, we identified two regions of five amino acids in the T3S4 domain that are essential for efficient PopP1 secretion and for HpaP's role in virulence on tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana, but not required for HpaP-HpaP and HpaP-PopP1 interactions. Taken together, our results indicate that HpaP is a putative R. solanacearum T3S4 protein important for full pathogenicity on several hosts, acting as a helper for PopP1 secretion, and repressing AvrA and HrpY secretion.

  3. Defining the Metabolic Functions and Roles in Virulence of the rpoN1 and rpoN2 Genes in Ralstonia solanacearum GMI1000.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Benjamin R; Connolly, Morgan P; Choudhary, Pratibha; Brookins-Little, Tiffany S; Chatterjee, Snigdha; Raina, Ramesh; Nomura, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    The alternative sigma factor RpoN is a unique regulator found among bacteria. It controls numerous processes that range from basic metabolism to more complex functions such as motility and nitrogen fixation. Our current understanding of RpoN function is largely derived from studies on prototypical bacteria such as Escherichia coli. Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida. Although the extent and necessity of RpoN-dependent functions differ radically between these model organisms, each bacterium depends on a single chromosomal rpoN gene to meet the cellular demands of RpoN regulation. The bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum is often recognized for being the causative agent of wilt disease in crops, including banana, peanut and potato. However, this plant pathogen is also one of the few bacterial species whose genome possesses dual rpoN genes. To determine if the rpoN genes in this bacterium are genetically redundant and interchangeable, we constructed and characterized ΔrpoN1, ΔrpoN2 and ΔrpoN1 ΔrpoN2 mutants of R. solanacearum GMI1000. It was found that growth on a small range of metabolites, including dicarboxylates, ethanol, nitrate, ornithine, proline and xanthine, were dependent on only the rpoN1 gene. Furthermore, the rpoN1 gene was required for wilt disease on tomato whereas rpoN2 had no observable role in virulence or metabolism in R. solanacearum GMI1000. Interestingly, plasmid-based expression of rpoN2 did not fully rescue the metabolic deficiencies of the ΔrpoN1 mutants; full recovery was specific to rpoN1. In comparison, only rpoN2 was able to genetically complement a ΔrpoN E. coli mutant. These results demonstrate that the RpoN1 and RpoN2 proteins are not functionally equivalent or interchangeable in R. solanacearum GMI1000.

  4. Sensitive quantitative detection of Ralstonia solanacearum in soil by the most probable number-polymerase chain reaction (MPN-PCR) method.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Nakaho, Kazuhiro

    2014-05-01

    We developed a sensitive quantitative assay for detecting Ralstonia solanacearum in soil by most probable number (MPN) analysis based on bio-PCR results. For development of the detection method, we optimized an elution buffer containing 5 g/L skim milk for extracting bacteria from soil and reducing contamination of polymerase inhibitors in soil extracts. Because R. solanacearum can grow in water without any added nutrients, we used a cultivation buffer in the culture step of the bio-PCR that contained only the buffer and antibiotics to suppress the growth of other soil microorganisms. To quantify the bacterial population in soil, the elution buffer was added to 10 g soil on a dry weight basis so that the combined weight of buffer, soil, and soil-water was 50 g; 5 mL of soil extract was assumed to originate from 1 g of soil. The soil extract was divided into triplicate aliquots each of 5 mL and 500, 50, and 5 μL. Each aliquot was diluted with the cultivation buffer and incubated at 35 °C for about 24 h. After incubation, 5 μL of culture was directly used for nested PCR. The number of aliquots showing positive results was collectively checked against the MPN table. The method could quantify bacterial populations in soil down to 3 cfu/10 g dried soil and was successfully applied to several types of soil. We applied the method for the quantitative detection of R. solanacearum in horticultural soils, which could quantitatively detect small populations (9.3 cfu/g), but the semiselective media were not able to detect the bacteria.

  5. So near and yet so far: the specific case of Ralstonia Solanacearum populations from Côte d'Ivoire in Africa.

    PubMed

    N'guessan, C A; Abo, K; Fondio, L; Chiroleu, F; Lebeau, A; Poussier, S; Wicker, E; Koné, D

    2012-08-01

    The genetic and phenotypic diversity of Côte d'Ivoire Ralstonia solanacearum strains was assessed on a 168-strain collection sampled on Solanaceae both in the southern lowlands and western highlands. Phylotypes I, II, and III were prevalent, though at unexpected frequencies. Phylotype I strains (87.5%) were genetically diverse and overrepresented in all agroecological areas, including highlands (AEZ III). Phylotype II strains (10.7%) only belonged to one tropical lowland-adapted broad host range lineage (IIA-35), whereas no highland-adapted potato brown rot (IIB-1) or Moko strains were detected. African phylotype III strains were rare (1.8%). They originated from a single Burkina Faso lineage (III-23) and were only found in lowlands. Three phylotype I strains were found harboring pRSC35, a plasmid identified in phylotype III strains in Cameroon. From pathogenicity tests performed on commercial varieties and tomato/eggplant/pepper references, the virulence diversity observed was high, with five pathoprofiles described. Eggplant accessions MM152 and EG203 and tomato HW7996 displayed the largest resistance spectrum and highest level. Two highly virulent phylotype I strains were able to bypass resistance of HW7996 and the eggplant reference AG91-25. Collectively, these points lead to the conclusion that the situation in Côte d'Ivoire is specific towards other African countries, and specifically from the Cameroon reference, and that within phylotype I can exist a high virulence diversity. This calls for similar studies in neighboring West African countries, linking R. solanacearum pathogen genetic diversity to strain virulence at the regional level, for the rationalization of regional resistance deployment strategies and future resistance durability studies. PMID:22533876

  6. Defining the Metabolic Functions and Roles in Virulence of the rpoN1 and rpoN2 Genes in Ralstonia solanacearum GMI1000.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Benjamin R; Connolly, Morgan P; Choudhary, Pratibha; Brookins-Little, Tiffany S; Chatterjee, Snigdha; Raina, Ramesh; Nomura, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    The alternative sigma factor RpoN is a unique regulator found among bacteria. It controls numerous processes that range from basic metabolism to more complex functions such as motility and nitrogen fixation. Our current understanding of RpoN function is largely derived from studies on prototypical bacteria such as Escherichia coli. Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida. Although the extent and necessity of RpoN-dependent functions differ radically between these model organisms, each bacterium depends on a single chromosomal rpoN gene to meet the cellular demands of RpoN regulation. The bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum is often recognized for being the causative agent of wilt disease in crops, including banana, peanut and potato. However, this plant pathogen is also one of the few bacterial species whose genome possesses dual rpoN genes. To determine if the rpoN genes in this bacterium are genetically redundant and interchangeable, we constructed and characterized ΔrpoN1, ΔrpoN2 and ΔrpoN1 ΔrpoN2 mutants of R. solanacearum GMI1000. It was found that growth on a small range of metabolites, including dicarboxylates, ethanol, nitrate, ornithine, proline and xanthine, were dependent on only the rpoN1 gene. Furthermore, the rpoN1 gene was required for wilt disease on tomato whereas rpoN2 had no observable role in virulence or metabolism in R. solanacearum GMI1000. Interestingly, plasmid-based expression of rpoN2 did not fully rescue the metabolic deficiencies of the ΔrpoN1 mutants; full recovery was specific to rpoN1. In comparison, only rpoN2 was able to genetically complement a ΔrpoN E. coli mutant. These results demonstrate that the RpoN1 and RpoN2 proteins are not functionally equivalent or interchangeable in R. solanacearum GMI1000. PMID:26659655

  7. A novel multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis typing scheme for African phylotype III strains of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex.

    PubMed

    Ravelomanantsoa, Santatra; Robène, Isabelle; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Guérin, Fabien; Poussier, Stéphane; Pruvost, Olivier; Prior, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background. Reliable genotyping that provides an accurate description of diversity in the context of pathogen emergence is required for the establishment of strategies to improve disease management. MultiLocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) is a valuable genotyping method. It can be performed at small evolutionary scales where high discriminatory power is needed. Strains of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex (RSSC) are highly genetically diverse. These destructive pathogens are the causative agent of bacterial wilt on an unusually broad range of host plants worldwide. In this study, we developed an MLVA scheme for genotyping the African RSSC phylotype III. Methods. We selected different publicly available tandem repeat (TR) loci and additional TR loci from the genome of strain CMR15 as markers. Based on these loci, a new phylotype III-MLVA scheme is presented. MLVA and multiLocus sequence typing (MLST) were compared at the global, regional, and local scales. Different populations of epidemiologically related and unrelated RSSC phylotype III strains were used. Results and Discussion. Sixteen polymorphic TR loci, which included seven microsatellites and nine minisatellites, were selected. These TR loci were distributed throughout the genome (chromosome and megaplasmid) and located in both coding and intergenic regions. The newly developed RS3-MLVA16 scheme was more discriminative than MLST. RS3-MLVA16 showed good ability in differentiating strains at global, regional, and local scales, and it especially highlighted epidemiological links between closely related strains at the local scale. RS3-MLVA16 also underlines genetic variability within the same MLST-type and clonal complex, and gives a first overview of population structure. Overall, RS3-MLVA16 is a promising genotyping method for outbreak investigation at a fine scale, and it could be used for outbreak investigation as a first-line, low-cost assay for the routine screening of RSSC

  8. Detection of Ralstonia solanacearum from asymptomatic tomato plants, irrigation water, and soil through non-selective enrichment medium with hrp gene-based bio-PCR.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dinesh; Sinha, Shweta; Yadav, D K; Chaudhary, Garima

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial wilt of tomato caused by Ralstonia solanacearum (Smith) Yabuuchi et al. (Microbiol Immunol 39:897-904, 1995) is a serious disease, which causes losses up to 60 % depending on environmental conditions, soil property, and cultivars. In present investigation, nucleotide sequences of virulence, hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) gene were used to design a pair of primer (Hrp_rs 2F: 5'-AGAGGTCGACGCGATACAGT-3' and Hrp_rs 2R: 5'-CATGAGCAAGGACGAAGTCA-3') for amplification of bacterial genome. The genomic DNA of 27 isolates of R. solanacearum race 1 biovar 3 & 4 was amplified at 323 bp. The specificity of primer was tested on 13 strains of R. solanacearum with other group of bacteria such as Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, X. campestris pv. campestris, and X. citri subsp. citri. Primer amplified DNA fragment of R. solanacearum at 323 bp. The sensitivity of the primer was 200 cfu/ml and improved further detection level by using non-specific enrichment medium casamino acids-pepton-glucose broth followed by PCR (BIO-PCR). Out of 130 samples of asymptomatic tomato plants, irrigation water, and soil collected from bacterial wilt infested field in different agro-climatic regions of India, R. solanacearum was detected from 86.9, 88.5, and 90.9 per cents samples using BIO-PCR, respectively. The primer was found specific for detecting viable and virulent strains of R. solanacearum and useful for the diagnosis of R. solanacearum in tomato seedlings and monitoring of pathogen in irrigation water and soil.

  9. Genomic characterization of Ralstonia solanacearum phage phiRSA1 and its related prophage (phiRSX) in strain GMI1000.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Akiko; Kawasaki, Takeru; Usami, Shoji; Fujie, Makoto; Yamada, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    PhiRSA1 is a wide-host-range bacteriophage isolated from Ralstonia solanacearum. In this study, the complete nucleotide sequence of the phiRSA1 genomic DNA was determined. The genome was 38,760 bp of double-stranded DNA (65.3% G+C) with 19-bp 5'-extruding cohesive ends (cos) and contained 51 open reading frames (ORFs). Two-thirds of the phiRSA1 genomic region encodes the phage structural modules, and they are very similar to those reported for coliphage P2 and P2-like phages. A phiRSA1 minireplicon with an 8.2-kbp early-expressing region was constructed. A late-expression promoter sequence motif was predicted for these phiRSA1 genes as 5' TGTTGT-(X)13-ACAACA. The genomic sequence similarity between phiRSA1 and related phages phi52237 and phiCTX was interrupted by three AT islands, one of which contained an insertion sequence element, suggesting that they were recombinational hot spots. phiRSA1 was found to be integrated into at least three different strains of R. solanacearum, and the chromosomal integration site (attB) was identified as the 3' portion of the arginine tRNA(CCG) gene. In the light of the phiRSA1 gene arrangement, one possible prophage sequence previously detected on the chromosome of R. solanacearum strain GMI1000 was characterized as a phiRSA1-related prophage (designated phiRSX). phiRSX was found to be integrated at the serine tRNA (GGA) gene as an att site, and its size was determined to be 40,713 bp. phiRSX ORFs shared very high amino acid identity with their phiRSA1 counterparts. The relationships and evolution of these P2-like phages are discussed.

  10. Limits to Open Class Performance?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the limits to open class performance. The contents include: 1) Standard Class; 2) 15m/Racing Class; 3) Open Class; and 4) Design Solutions associated with assumptions, limiting parameters, airfoil performance, current trends, and analysis.

  11. The Last Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhl, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    The last class of the semester is like a goodbye. It can be cold and perfunctory or warm and heartfelt. For many years, I erred on the side of "cold and perfunctory." No more. Now my last classes are a time of celebration and ritual as I invite students to focus on qualities such as acceptance and gratitude.

  12. The Conversation Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Acy L.

    2012-01-01

    The conversation class occupies a unique place in the process of learning English as a second or foreign language. From the author's own experience in conducting special conversation classes with Persian-speaking adults, he has drawn up a number of simple but important guidelines, some of which he hopes may provide helpful suggestions for the…

  13. Teaching Large Evening Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wambuguh, Oscar

    2008-01-01

    High enrollments, conflicting student work schedules, and the sheer convenience of once-a-week classes are pushing many colleges to schedule evening courses. Held from 6 to 9 pm or 7 to 10 pm, these classes are typically packed, sometimes with more than 150 students in a large lecture theater. How can faculty effectively teach, control, or even…

  14. The Class Size Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishel, Lawrence, Ed.; Rothstein, Richard, Ed.

    This collection of papers debates the merits of smaller class sizes and research methods used to evaluate the efficacy of this education reform measure. Four chapters focus on (1) "Understanding the Magnitude and Effect of Class Size on Student Achievement" (Alan B. Krueger), which discusses expenditures per student and economic criterion; (2)…

  15. Teaching Social Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tablante, Courtney B.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    Discussing socioeconomic status in college classes can be challenging. Both teachers and students feel uncomfortable, yet social class matters more than ever. This is especially true, given increased income inequality in the United States and indications that higher education does not reduce this inequality as much as many people hope. Resources…

  16. Social Class Dialogues and the Fostering of Class Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    How do critical pedagogies promote undergraduate students' awareness of social class, social class identity, and social class inequalities in education? How do undergraduate students experience class consciousness-raising in the intergroup dialogue classroom? This qualitative study explores undergraduate students' class consciousness-raising in an…

  17. Venture Class Launch Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Provide an introduction to the Launch Services Program, and specifically the strategic initiative that drove the Venture Class Launch Services contracts. Provide information from the VCLS request for proposals, as well as the Agency's CubeSat Launch Initiative.

  18. Class, health and justice.

    PubMed

    Marchand, S; Wikler, D; Landesman, B

    1998-01-01

    Class inequalities in health are intuitively unjust. Although the link between social class and health status has been fully documented, the precise nature of the injustice has not been made clear. Four alternative views are presented, corresponding to four goals: (1) maximizing the sum total of health; (2) equalizing the health status of higher and lower social classes; (3) maximizing the health status of the lowest social class; and (4) maximizing the health status of the sickest individuals in society. The nature of the injustice is further obscured by several theoretical and empirical questions, like the degree and significance of personal responsibility for illness and the relation of the degree of economic inequality to sum total of health.

  19. Aerobic Conditioning Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Neil R.

    1980-01-01

    An aerobic exercise class that focuses on the conditioning of the cardiovascular and muscular systems is presented. Students complete data cards on heart rate, pulse, and exercises to be completed during the forty minute course. (CJ)

  20. Teaching Heterogeneous Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millrood, Radislav

    2002-01-01

    Discusses an approach to teaching heterogeneous English-as-a-Second/Foreign-Language classes. Draws on classroom research data to describe the features of a success-building lesson context. (Author/VWL)

  1. Universality classes of inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Roest, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    We investigate all single-field, slow-roll inflationary models whose slow-roll parameters scale as 1/N in the limit of a large number of e-folds N. We proof that all such models belong to two universality classes, characterised by a single parameter. One class contains small field models like hilltop inflation, while the other class consists of large field models like chaotic inflation. We give the leading expressions for the spectral index and tensor-to-scalar ratio r, which are universal for each class, plus subleading corrections for a number of models. This predicts r either to be unobservably small, r < 0.01, or close to the present observational limit, r ≈ 0.07.

  2. A class in astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airieau, S. A.

    1999-09-01

    The goal of this class is to provide basic astrobiology knowledge to upper division science students. The scope is broad and in-depth coverage is not possible in this introductory course. Instead, science students from various branches of academia can acquire a broad basis and understanding of the other fields: astronomy, biology, geology, biochemistry, planetary and space sciences. The class is highly modular and allows instructors to concentrate on or eliminate topics according to their priorities and preferences.

  3. Hierarchical autoinduction in Ralstonia solanacearum: control of acyl-homoserine lactone production by a novel autoregulatory system responsive to 3-hydroxypalmitic acid methyl ester.

    PubMed Central

    Flavier, A B; Ganova-Raeva, L M; Schell, M A; Denny, T P

    1997-01-01

    Bacteria employ autoinduction systems to sense the onset of appropriate cell density for expression of developmental genes. In many gram-negative bacteria, autoinduction involves the production of and response to diffusible acylated-homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs) and is mediated by members of the LuxR and LuxI families. Ralstonia (Pseudomonas) solanacearum, a phytopathogenic bacterium that appears to autoregulate its virulence genes, produces compounds that promote expression of several heterologous acyl-HSL-responsive reporter gene constructs. High-pressure liquid chromatography of highly concentrated ethyl acetate extracts revealed that culture supernatants of strain AW1 contained two compounds with retention times similar to N-hexanoyl- and N-octanoyl-HSL. To investigate the role of these acyl-HSLs in R. solanacearum virulence gene expression, transposon mutants that were deficient for inducing an acyl-HSL-responsive reporter in Agrobacterium tumefaciens were generated. Three loci involved in normal acyl-HSL production were identified, one of which was shown to contain the divergently transcribed solR and solI genes, the luxR and luxI homologs, respectively. A 4.1-kb fragment containing solR and solI enabled all of the mutants (regardless of the locus inactivated) and a naturally acyl-HSL-defective strain of R. solanacearum to produce acyl-HSLs. Inactivation of solI abolished production of all detectable acyl-HSLs but affected neither the expression of virulence genes in culture nor the ability to wilt tomato plants. AW1 has a functional autoinduction system, because (i) expression of solI required SolR and acyl-HSL and (ii) expression of a gene linked to solR and solI, designated aidA, was acyl-HSL dependent. Because AidA has no homologs in the protein databases, its discovery provided no clues as to the role of acyl-HSLs in R. solanacearum gene regulation. However, expression of solR and solI required the global LysR-type virulence regulator PhcA, and both

  4. A TaqMan-Based Multiplex qPCR Assay and DNA Extraction Method for Phylotype IIB Sequevars 1&2 (Select Agent) Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regions of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Furthermore, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum. PMID:26426354

  5. A TaqMan-based multiplex qPCR assay and DNA extraction method for phylotype IIB sequevars 1&2 (select agent) strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2015-10-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regionsmore » of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Moreover, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum.« less

  6. A TaqMan-Based Multiplex qPCR Assay and DNA Extraction Method for Phylotype IIB Sequevars 1&2 (Select Agent) Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Stulberg, Michael J; Huang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regions of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Furthermore, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum.

  7. Identification of the mcpA and mcpM genes, encoding methyl-accepting proteins involved in amino acid and l-malate chemotaxis, and involvement of McpM-mediated chemotaxis in plant infection by Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum (formerly Ralstonia solanacearum phylotypes I and III).

    PubMed

    Hida, Akiko; Oku, Shota; Kawasaki, Takeru; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi

    2015-11-01

    Sequence analysis has revealed the presence of 22 putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (mcp) genes in the Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum GMI1000 genome. PCR analysis and DNA sequencing showed that the highly motile R. pseudosolanacearum strain Ps29 possesses homologs of all 22 R. pseudosolanacearum GMI1000 mcp genes. We constructed a complete collection of single mcp gene deletion mutants of R. pseudosolanacearum Ps29 by unmarked gene deletion. Screening of the mutant collection revealed that R. pseudosolanacearum Ps29 mutants of RSp0507 and RSc0606 homologs were defective in chemotaxis to l-malate and amino acids, respectively. RSp0507 and RSc0606 homologs were designated mcpM and mcpA. While wild-type R. pseudosolanacearum strain Ps29 displayed attraction to 16 amino acids, the mcpA mutant showed no response to 12 of these amino acids and decreased responses to 4 amino acids. We constructed mcpA and mcpM deletion mutants of highly virulent R. pseudosolanacearum strain MAFF106611 to investigate the contribution of chemotaxis to l-malate and amino acids to tomato plant infection. Neither single mutant exhibited altered virulence for tomato plants when tested by root dip inoculation assays. In contrast, the mcpM mutant (but not the mcpA mutant) was significantly less infectious than the wild type when tested by a sand soak inoculation assay, which requires bacteria to locate and invade host roots from sand. Thus, McpM-mediated chemotaxis, possibly reflecting chemotaxis to l-malate, facilitates R. pseudosolanacearum motility to tomato roots in sand.

  8. Coming out in Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinnon, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This article shares how the author explained her trans status to her students. Everyone has been extremely supportive of her decision to come out in class and to completely mask the male secondary-sex characteristics, especially in the workplace. The department chair and the faculty in general have been willing to do whatever they can to assist…

  9. Shrinking Your Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herron-Thorpe, Farren L.; Olson, Jo Clay; Davis, Denny

    2010-01-01

    Toys in the classroom was the result of a National Science Foundation grant that brought two engineering graduate students to a middle school math class. The graduate students and teachers collaborated in an effort to enhance students' mathematical learning. An engineering context was theorized as a way to further develop students' understanding…

  10. IQ and Social Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischbein, Siv

    1980-01-01

    Swedish longitudinal studies of twins support Scarr-Salapatek's explanation of nature-nurture influences on intelligence. This model predicts more genetic variance in test results for advantaged than disadvantaged groups. Jensen's work, however, suggests equal amounts of variance among different social classes. (Author/CP)

  11. Financing Class Size Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, C. M.

    2005-01-01

    Class size reduction has been shown to, among other things, improve academic achievement for all students and particularly for low-income and minority students. With the No Child Left Behind Act's heavy emphasis on scientifically based research, adequate yearly progress, and disaggregated results, one wonders why all children aren't enrolled in…

  12. Virtual Classes, Real Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beem, Kate

    2010-01-01

    As Internet technology encroached on the public school classroom about a decade ago, Kim Ross, superintendent of the Houston School District in Houston, Minnesota, saw an opportunity. At first, he and his administrative team simply wanted to offer students in the district of 1,300 access to more classes via the web than what a district that size…

  13. Class D sucker rods

    SciTech Connect

    Woodings, R. T.

    1984-10-23

    It has been found that API Class D sucker rods can be made inexpensively from low-alloy, low-cost steel by following a suitable induction-normalizing process and using a suitable steel to which there has been added 0.07 to 0.15 percent of vanadium.

  14. Openers for Biology Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gridley, C. Robert R.

    This teaching guide contains 200 activities that are suitable for openers and demonstrations in biology classes. Details are provided regarding the use of these activities. Some of the broad topics under which the activities are organized include algae, amphibians, bacteria, biologists, crustaceans, dinosaurs, ecology, evolution, flowering plants,…

  15. Microarrays for Undergraduate Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Dale; Nguyen, Lisa L.; Denyer, Gareth S.; Johnston, Jill M.

    2006-01-01

    A microarray experiment is presented that, in six laboratory sessions, takes undergraduate students from the tissue sample right through to data analysis. The model chosen, the murine erythroleukemia cell line, can be easily cultured in sufficient quantities for class use. Large changes in gene expression can be induced in these cells by…

  16. Class Attitudes among Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, James F.; Lancaster, Diana M.

    Class attitudes among dental students were studied at Louisiana State University in spring 1986, with attention to attitudes toward leadership, faculty and administration, study habits, labs and clinics, information acquisition, social life, and class unification. Class attitudes became more uniform and deeply held as the classes progressed…

  17. Economy class syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sahiar, F; Mohler, S R

    1994-10-01

    A recent case of the "Economy Class Syndrome" is presented, emphasizing the syndrome's aeromedical implications and prevention. The clinical presentation, current modes of prophylaxis and therapy, plus a brief but pertinent historical background, are described. The syndrome is potentially fatal, and the authors stress that the condition needs to be recognized as a preventable hazard of air travel. Adoption of the preventive measures described herein can assist in promoting healthy air travel.

  18. Class Participation: Promoting In-Class Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Kevin J.

    2013-01-01

    Class participation has long been valued by faculty members interested in engaging students in the learning process. This paper discusses class participation and shares participation techniques that promote active student engagement during class meetings. Emphasis is placed on techniques that invite a larger number of students into a course's…

  19. Class prediction for high-dimensional class-imbalanced data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The goal of class prediction studies is to develop rules to accurately predict the class membership of new samples. The rules are derived using the values of the variables available for each subject: the main characteristic of high-dimensional data is that the number of variables greatly exceeds the number of samples. Frequently the classifiers are developed using class-imbalanced data, i.e., data sets where the number of samples in each class is not equal. Standard classification methods used on class-imbalanced data often produce classifiers that do not accurately predict the minority class; the prediction is biased towards the majority class. In this paper we investigate if the high-dimensionality poses additional challenges when dealing with class-imbalanced prediction. We evaluate the performance of six types of classifiers on class-imbalanced data, using simulated data and a publicly available data set from a breast cancer gene-expression microarray study. We also investigate the effectiveness of some strategies that are available to overcome the effect of class imbalance. Results Our results show that the evaluated classifiers are highly sensitive to class imbalance and that variable selection introduces an additional bias towards classification into the majority class. Most new samples are assigned to the majority class from the training set, unless the difference between the classes is very large. As a consequence, the class-specific predictive accuracies differ considerably. When the class imbalance is not too severe, down-sizing and asymmetric bagging embedding variable selection work well, while over-sampling does not. Variable normalization can further worsen the performance of the classifiers. Conclusions Our results show that matching the prevalence of the classes in training and test set does not guarantee good performance of classifiers and that the problems related to classification with class-imbalanced data are exacerbated when

  20. The Class of '34

    PubMed Central

    Cairney, Richard

    1995-01-01

    The Great Depression raged, governments were beleaguered, the unemployment rate stood at 30%, scurvy stalked the poor and no one was immune to contagious diseases such as scarlet fever, polio and measles when the University of Alberta School of Medicine's Class of '34 graduated. For four alumni who recently gathered in Edmonton—Drs. Morley Hodgson, Melvin Gaudin, John McLurg and Edmund Cairns—their 60th-anniversary reunion was a time to recall the changes they have witnessed in medicine, including the arrival of antibiotic drugs and the medicare system. Imagesp558-a

  1. Combination Classes and Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jaime L.

    2012-01-01

    Using the ECLS-K and considering first graders in single-grade and K-1 and 1-2 combination classes, I discuss the mechanisms underlying the combination-class effect and address the systematic school-, teacher-, and student-level differences that confound estimates of this effect. I find evidence for positive selection into 1-2 classes, but using a…

  2. A Class Traitor in Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benton, Thomas H.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on his feelings as a working-class transplant into academic culture and the middle class. He draws on his feelings of alienation from the people who surround him and his observations of the cultural subordination necessary to succeed in the middle class world to explain his desire to do more to help other…

  3. Team Learning in Large Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, Suanne D., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Information and suggestions are provided on the use of team learning in large college classes. Introductory material discusses the negative cycle of student-teacher interaction that may be provoked by large classes, and the use of permanent, heterogeneous, six- or seven-member student learning groups as the central focus of class activity as a…

  4. Multimethod latent class analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nussbeck, Fridtjof W.; Eid, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Correct and, hence, valid classifications of individuals are of high importance in the social sciences as these classifications are the basis for diagnoses and/or the assignment to a treatment. The via regia to inspect the validity of psychological ratings is the multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) approach. First, a latent variable model for the analysis of rater agreement (latent rater agreement model) will be presented that allows for the analysis of convergent validity between different measurement approaches (e.g., raters). Models of rater agreement are transferred to the level of latent variables. Second, the latent rater agreement model will be extended to a more informative MTMM latent class model. This model allows for estimating (i) the convergence of ratings, (ii) method biases in terms of differential latent distributions of raters and differential associations of categorizations within raters (specific rater bias), and (iii) the distinguishability of categories indicating if categories are satisfyingly distinct from each other. Finally, an empirical application is presented to exemplify the interpretation of the MTMM latent class model. PMID:26441714

  5. Functional classes and equivalence relations

    PubMed Central

    Sidman, Murray; Wynne, Constance K.; Maguire, Russell W.; Barnes, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    Three adult subjects were taught a set of two-choice simultaneous discriminations, with three positive and three negative stimuli; all possible combinations of positive and negative stimuli yielded nine different pairs. The discriminations were repeatedly reversed and rereversed, the former positive stimuli becoming negative and the former negative stimuli becoming positive. With all subjects, a reversal of the contingencies for one pair of stimuli became sufficient to change their responses to all of the other pairs. The reversals had produced functional stimulus classes. Then, all subjects showed conditional discriminations emerging between members of a functional class; given a sample from one class and comparisons from both classes, they selected the comparison that was in the same class as the sample. Next, 2 of the subjects showed that the within-class conditional relations possessed the symmetric and transitive properties of equivalence relations; after having been taught to relate new stimuli to existing class members, the subjects then matched other class members to the new stimuli. Subsequent tests of two-choice discriminations showed that the conditional discriminations had transferred functional class membership to the new stimuli. The 3rd subject, who did not show equivalence relations among functional class members, was also found to have lost the within-class conditional relations after the equivalence tests. PMID:16812597

  6. Class Differences in Cohabitation Processes

    PubMed Central

    Sassler, Sharon; Miller, Amanda J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the burgeoning cohabitation literature, research has failed to examine social class variation in processes of forming and advancing such unions. Drawing upon in-depth interviews with 122 working- and middle-class cohabitors, we examine the duration between dating and moving in together, reasons for cohabiting, and subsequent plans. Transitions to cohabitation are more rapid among the working class. Respondents often cohabited for practical reasons—out of financial necessity, because it was convenient, or to meet a housing need. Regardless of social class status, few couples move in together as a “trial marriage.” Nonetheless, middle-class cohabitors were more likely to have become engaged than their working-class counterparts. Our findings indicate the need to reassess common beliefs regarding the role served by cohabitation and suggest that cohabitation has become another location where family outcomes are diverging by social class. PMID:23504506

  7. Class Differences in Cohabitation Processes.

    PubMed

    Sassler, Sharon; Miller, Amanda J

    2011-04-01

    Despite the burgeoning cohabitation literature, research has failed to examine social class variation in processes of forming and advancing such unions. Drawing upon in-depth interviews with 122 working- and middle-class cohabitors, we examine the duration between dating and moving in together, reasons for cohabiting, and subsequent plans. Transitions to cohabitation are more rapid among the working class. Respondents often cohabited for practical reasons-out of financial necessity, because it was convenient, or to meet a housing need. Regardless of social class status, few couples move in together as a "trial marriage." Nonetheless, middle-class cohabitors were more likely to have become engaged than their working-class counterparts. Our findings indicate the need to reassess common beliefs regarding the role served by cohabitation and suggest that cohabitation has become another location where family outcomes are diverging by social class.

  8. Pseudo Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance “modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow,” some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month. PMID:27052290

  9. Network Class Superposition Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Carl A. B.; Zeng, Chen; Simha, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Networks are often used to understand a whole system by modeling the interactions among its pieces. Examples include biomolecules in a cell interacting to provide some primary function, or species in an environment forming a stable community. However, these interactions are often unknown; instead, the pieces' dynamic states are known, and network structure must be inferred. Because observed function may be explained by many different networks (e.g., for the yeast cell cycle process [1]), considering dynamics beyond this primary function means picking a single network or suitable sample: measuring over all networks exhibiting the primary function is computationally infeasible. We circumvent that obstacle by calculating the network class ensemble. We represent the ensemble by a stochastic matrix , which is a transition-by-transition superposition of the system dynamics for each member of the class. We present concrete results for derived from Boolean time series dynamics on networks obeying the Strong Inhibition rule, by applying to several traditional questions about network dynamics. We show that the distribution of the number of point attractors can be accurately estimated with . We show how to generate Derrida plots based on . We show that -based Shannon entropy outperforms other methods at selecting experiments to further narrow the network structure. We also outline an experimental test of predictions based on . We motivate all of these results in terms of a popular molecular biology Boolean network model for the yeast cell cycle, but the methods and analyses we introduce are general. We conclude with open questions for , for example, application to other models, computational considerations when scaling up to larger systems, and other potential analyses. PMID:23565141

  10. Network class superposition analyses.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Carl A B; Zeng, Chen; Simha, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Networks are often used to understand a whole system by modeling the interactions among its pieces. Examples include biomolecules in a cell interacting to provide some primary function, or species in an environment forming a stable community. However, these interactions are often unknown; instead, the pieces' dynamic states are known, and network structure must be inferred. Because observed function may be explained by many different networks (e.g., ≈ 10(30) for the yeast cell cycle process), considering dynamics beyond this primary function means picking a single network or suitable sample: measuring over all networks exhibiting the primary function is computationally infeasible. We circumvent that obstacle by calculating the network class ensemble. We represent the ensemble by a stochastic matrix T, which is a transition-by-transition superposition of the system dynamics for each member of the class. We present concrete results for T derived from boolean time series dynamics on networks obeying the Strong Inhibition rule, by applying T to several traditional questions about network dynamics. We show that the distribution of the number of point attractors can be accurately estimated with T. We show how to generate Derrida plots based on T. We show that T-based Shannon entropy outperforms other methods at selecting experiments to further narrow the network structure. We also outline an experimental test of predictions based on T. We motivate all of these results in terms of a popular molecular biology boolean network model for the yeast cell cycle, but the methods and analyses we introduce are general. We conclude with open questions for T, for example, application to other models, computational considerations when scaling up to larger systems, and other potential analyses. PMID:23565141

  11. Exploring social class: voices of inter-class couples.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Teresa; Melendez-Rhodes, Tatiana; Althusius, Erin; Hergic, Sara; Sleeman, Gillian; Ton, Nicky Kieu My; Zimpfer-Bak, A J

    2013-01-01

    Social class is not often discussed or examined in-depth in couple and family therapy research and literature even though social class shapes familial relationships and is considered an important variable in marital satisfaction. In this qualitative study, we explored the perceptions of eight couples who made lasting commitments across class lines by asking them about the impact of their social class backgrounds on their relationships. Three categories of themes emerged including: (a) differences and similarities in values and attitudes toward education, work, money, and class awareness/classism, (b) relationship issues involving families of origin, friends, and class-based couple conflict, and (c) differences in economic resources, social capital and privileges/opportunities. Implications for assessment and treatment of couples are included. PMID:25073843

  12. Effects of environmental parameters on the dual-species biofilms formed by Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Ralstonia insidiosa, a strong biofilm producer isolated from a fresh-cut produce processing plant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nancy T; Nou, Xiangwu; Bauchan, Gary R; Murphy, Charles; Lefcourt, Alan M; Shelton, Daniel R; Lo, Y Martin

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm-forming bacteria resident to food processing facilities are a food safety concern due to the potential of biofilms to harbor foodborne bacterial pathogens. When cultured together, Ralstonia insidiosa, a strong biofilm former frequently isolated from produce processing environments, has been shown to promote the incorporation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 into dual-species biofilms. In this study, interactions between E. coli O157:H7 and R. insidiosa were examined under different incubating conditions. Under static culture conditions, the incorporation of E. coli O157:H7 into biofilms with R. insidiosa was not significantly affected by either low incubating temperature (10°C) or by limited nutrient availability. Greater enhancement of E. coli O157:H7 incorporation in dual-species biofilms was observed by using a continuous culture system with limited nutrient availability. Under the continuous culture conditions used in this study, E coli O157:H7 cells showed a strong tendency of colocalizing with R. insidiosa on a glass surface at the early stage of biofilm formation. As the biofilms matured, E coli O157:H7 cells were mostly found at the bottom layer of the dual-species biofilms, suggesting an effective protection by R. insidiosa in the mature biofilms.

  13. 47 CFR 80.1053 - Prohibition on certification, manufacture, importation, sale or use of Class A, Class B, Class S...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prohibition on certification, manufacture... certification, manufacture, importation, sale or use of Class A, Class B, Class S, and INMARSAT-E EPIRBs. The manufacture, importation, or sale in the United States of Class A, Class B, Class S, or INMARSAT-E EPIRBs...

  14. Class Matters in the Interview Setting? Positionality, Situatedness and Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellor, Jody; Ingram, Nicola; Abrahams, Jessie; Beedell, Phoebe

    2014-01-01

    In this article we argue that despite methodological and analytical advancements in the field of social class research, these developments have not led to a wholehearted discussion about class positionality and situatedness in relation to interviewer-participant dynamics. Despite--or perhaps due to--this methodological gap, there remains an…

  15. Class Counts: Education, Inequality, and the Shrinking Middle Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornstein, Allan

    2007-01-01

    Class differences and class warfare have existed since the beginning of western civilization, but the gap in income and wealth between the rich (top 10 percent) and the rest has increased steadily in the last twenty-five years. The U.S. is heading for a financial oligarchy much worse than the aristocratic old world that our Founding Fathers feared…

  16. CAPEOPEN.NET CLASS LIBRARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cape-Open for .Net class library is a collection of classes that implement the Cape-Open v.1.0 interfaces in the .Net framework. This is a tool to aid process modeling component (PMC) developers in producing CAPE-OPEN compliant objects using the latest version of the Visual S...

  17. Automatic discovery of optimal classes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheeseman, Peter; Stutz, John; Freeman, Don; Self, Matthew

    1986-01-01

    A criterion, based on Bayes' theorem, is described that defines the optimal set of classes (a classification) for a given set of examples. This criterion is transformed into an equivalent minimum message length criterion with an intuitive information interpretation. This criterion does not require that the number of classes be specified in advance, this is determined by the data. The minimum message length criterion includes the message length required to describe the classes, so there is a built in bias against adding new classes unless they lead to a reduction in the message length required to describe the data. Unfortunately, the search space of possible classifications is too large to search exhaustively, so heuristic search methods, such as simulated annealing, are applied. Tutored learning and probabilistic prediction in particular cases are an important indirect result of optimal class discovery. Extensions to the basic class induction program include the ability to combine category and real value data, hierarchical classes, independent classifications and deciding for each class which attributes are relevant.

  18. Class and SLA: Making Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, David

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how class might be brought to the fore as an identity inscription in studies of second language learning, alongside other identity inscriptions such as gender, ethnicity and national identity, which have been the focus of rather more research. It begins by clarifying what is meant by class through a brief discussion of the…

  19. [Modified Class II tunnel preparation].

    PubMed

    Rimondini, L; Baroni, C

    1991-05-15

    Tunnel preparations for restoration of Class II carious lesions in primary molars preserve the marginal ridge and minimize sacrifice of healthy tooth substructure. Materials with improved bonding to tooth structure and increase potential for fluoride release allow Class II restorations without "extension for prevention". PMID:1864420

  20. Visions of the Special Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safford, Philip L.; Safford, Elizabeth J.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how the advent of public school special day-classes for children with disabilities marked a major shift in the service model in the direction of educational and societal inclusion. The different visions of the classes as cluster, clinic, and clearinghouse are explained. (Author/CR)

  1. A Touch of...Class!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netten, Joan W., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    A collection of ideas for class activities in elementary and secondary language classes includes a vocabulary review exercise and games of memory, counting, vocabulary, flashcard tic-tac-toe, dice, trashcans, questioning, and spelling. Some are designed specifically for French. (MSE)

  2. Eustace Tilley Comes to Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arin, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Of all the reasons to use "The New Yorker" in a college writing class, the most compelling may be that its articles go beyond--well beyond--the five-paragraph model. Why, oh why, did that paradigm become such a fixture in composition courses? Students in the author's writing classes invariably suppose they can compose a quick introduction, add…

  3. Class Differences in Cohabitation Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sassler, Sharon; Miller, Amanda J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the burgeoning cohabitation literature, research has failed to examine social class variation in processes of forming and advancing such unions. Drawing upon in-depth interviews with 122 working- and middle-class cohabitors, we examine the duration between dating and moving in together, reasons for cohabiting, and subsequent plans.…

  4. Tucker2 Hierarchical Classes Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceulemans, Eva; Van Mechelen, Iven

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a new hierarchical classes model, called Tucker2-HICLAS, for binary three-way three-mode data. As any three-way hierarchical classes model, the Tucker2-HICLAS model includes a representation of the association relation among the three modes and a hierarchical classification of the elements of each mode. A distinctive feature of…

  5. Translanguaging in a Reading Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaish, Viniti; Subhan, Aidil

    2015-01-01

    Using translanguaging as a theoretical foundation, this paper analyses findings from a Grade 2 reading class for low achieving students, where Malay was used as a scaffold to teach English. Data come from one class in one school in Singapore and its Learning Support Programme (LSP), which is part of a larger research project on biliteracy. The LSP…

  6. Class, Identity, and Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Galen, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the possibilities of working with White, working-class teacher education students to explore the "complex social trajectory" (Reay in Women's Stud Int Forum 20(2):225-233, 1997a, p. 19) of class border crossing as they progress through college. Through analysis of a course that I have developed, "Education and the American…

  7. Student Engagement and Marketing Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Steven A.; Hunter, Gary L.; Melton, Horace; Goodwin, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    A study is reported that investigates the goals underlying undergraduate students' engagement in their major classes, nonmajor classes, and in extracurricular activities. The qualitative study employs both focus groups and goal-mapping exercises. The results suggest that students tend to focus on utilitarian, attribute-level considerations mainly…

  8. Notes on the Comparison Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solt, Stephanie

    This paper investigates the role of comparison classes in the semantics of gradable adjectives in the positive form, focusing on the case where the comparison class is expressed overtly via a for-phrase (e.g. John is tall for a jockey). Two central questions are addressed: what information does the comparison class provide, and how is this information integrated compositionally? It is shown that the standard of comparison invoked by the positive form can be analyzed as a range of values whose width is based on the degree of dispersion in the comparison class. Compositionally, the comparison class can be analyzed as an argument of a null positive morpheme (contra Kennedy [13]), in parallel to recent proposals for the superlative (e.g. Heim [9]). The implications of the analysis for the choice between degree- and delineation-based analyses of gradable adjectives are discussed.

  9. Control Class Summaries and Control Class IV from April 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-02-22

    The D0 cryogenic control system is a complicated system with many facets. Because of the large number and variety of features in the system, a series of ongoing control system training seminars, or control classes, were created in order to keep people up to date on the operation of the system. As of the writing of this engineering note, there have been four classes. The original lecture notes from each class can be found in the cryogenic control room at the D0 Assembly Building, or in the Co-op office. This note provides a summary of the first three control classes, and it includes the entire set of notes from the fourth class, which was held in April of 1990. This class was taught by Jeff Wendlandt and Dan Markley. Dan should be consulted for more complete explanations than those given in the notes. The notes are, in fact, more of a reference for someone who has some experience with the system, than they are a training manual. Most of the pages include pictures and printouts of different menus and functions, useful for finding details without searching through the actual program. In general, this note serves as a pointer to the existence of the control class lecture notes, and as an explanation of their overall contents and purpose.

  10. Mapping Lunar Chemistry with CLASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekumar, P.

    2012-07-01

    The Chandrayaan-2 Large Area Soft x-ray Spectrometer (CLASS) is planned to be flown on the second Indian lunar mission Chandrayaan-2. It aims to map elemental abundance on the lunar surface by measuring X-ray Fluorescence emission when solar x-rays are incident. The primary objective of CLASS is to quantitatively estimate the abundance of the major elements Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti and Fe on the lunar surface at a spatial resolution of 25 km. CLASS will be able to detect Mg, Al and Si signatures at this scale even during a low intensity A-class solar flare, quantify abundance from B-class flares and above, and obtain high Z elemental abundance during brighter flares (C-class and above). This instrument is a follow up to C1XS payload flown earlier on Chandrayaan-1, but with enhanced sensitivity and finer spatial resolution. CLASS will also study particle-induced x-ray emission in the lunar orbit. We will discuss the instrument configuration and developmental status.

  11. Simplified Design Equations for Class-E Neural Prosthesis Transmitters

    PubMed Central

    Troyk, Philip; Hu, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Extreme miniaturization of implantable electronic devices is recognized as essential for the next generation of neural prostheses, owing to the need for minimizing the damage and disruption of the surrounding neural tissue. Transcutaneous power and data transmission via a magnetic link remains the most effective means of powering and controlling implanted neural prostheses. Reduction in the size of the coil, within the neural prosthesis, demands the generation of a high-intensity radio frequency magnetic field from the extracoporeal transmitter. The Class-E power amplifier circuit topology has been recognized as a highly effective means of producing large radio frequency currents within the transmitter coil. Unfortunately, design of a Class-E circuit is most often fraught by the need to solve a complex set of equations so as to implement both the zero-voltage-switching and zero-voltage-derivative-switching conditions that are required for efficient operation. This paper presents simple explicit design equations for designing the Class-E circuit topology. Numerical design examples are presented to illustrate the design procedure. PMID:23292784

  12. 7 CFR 1006.51 - Class I differential, adjustments to Class I prices, and Class I price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... MILK IN THE FLORIDA MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Class Prices § 1006.51 Class I... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Class I differential, adjustments to Class I prices, and Class I price. 1006.51 Section 1006.51 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of...

  13. Consumer Education in Any Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingo, Rosetta F.

    1977-01-01

    Examples are offered of how the classroom teacher can blend consumer education into typewriting, business English, business math, and other classes by intentionally focusing on principles and concepts or by including it incidentally when the opportunity arises. (TA)

  14. Integrals of the Ising Class

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Crandall, Richard E.

    2006-06-01

    From an experimental-mathematical perspective we analyze"Ising-class" integrals. Our experimental results involvedextreme-precision, multidimensional quadrature on intricate integrands;thus, highly parallel computation was required.

  15. Wildflower Collecting: A Class Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Sheila V.

    1976-01-01

    Advocates wildflower collecting as a class project, citing instances of interest in studies of soil composition, growing wildflowers, and increased student motivation toward the subject of botany as basis for the activity. (CP)

  16. Class Sizes and Dissadvantaged Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, David

    1978-01-01

    Describes a program in which smaller class groups for socially and culturally deprived children resulted in enhanced social attitudes and more responsive, mature behavior in interaction with both adults and peers. (Author/IRT)

  17. Statistical Descriptors of School Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohnes, Paul R.

    1972-01-01

    It may be useful in evaluation research to employ the class as the unit of analysis, assessing its syntality by a vector of distribution cumulants or indices for each of several input tests administered. (Author)

  18. Whole Class Laboratories: More Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouh, Minjoon

    2016-03-01

    Typically, introductory physics courses are taught with a combination of lectures and laboratories in which students have opportunities to discover the natural laws through hands-on activities in small groups. This article reports the use of Google Drive, a free online document-sharing tool, in physics laboratories for pooling experimental data from the whole class. This pedagogical method was reported earlier, and the present article offers a few more examples of such "whole class" laboratories.

  19. Less than a Class Set

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Kristin Redington

    2012-01-01

    The iPad holds amazing potential for classroom use. Just a few--or even only one--is enough to get results. Having a class set promotes traditional, whole-class instruction, but fewer iPads facilitate individualized and tailored instruction. In this article, the author discusses the potential of the iPad and suggests ways to put the iPad to use in…

  20. Two classes of speculative peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2001-10-01

    Speculation not only occurs in financial markets but also in numerous other markets, e.g. commodities, real estate, collectibles, and so on. Such speculative movements result in price peaks which share many common characteristics: same order of magnitude of duration with respect to amplitude, same shape (the so-called sharp-peak pattern). Such similarities suggest (at least as a first approximation) a common speculative behavior. However, a closer examination shows that in fact there are (at least) two distinct classes of speculative peaks. For the first, referred to as class U, (i) the amplitude of the peak is negatively correlated with the price at the start of the peak (ii) the ensemble coefficient of variation exhibits a trough. Opposite results are observed for the second class that we refer to as class S. Once these empirical observations have been made we try to understand how they should be interpreted. First, we show that the two properties are in fact related in the sense that the second is a consequence of the first. Secondly, by listing a number of cases belonging to each class we observe that the markets in the S-class offer collection of items from which investors can select those they prefer. On the contrary, U-markets consist of undifferentiated products for which a selection cannot be made in the same way. All prices considered in the paper are real (i.e., deflated) prices.

  1. School Class Size: Research and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Gene V.; And Others

    This book synthesizes research evidence to demonstrate that 1) class size is strongly related to pupil achievement; 2) smaller classes are more conducive to improved pupil performance than larger classes; 3) smaller classes provide more opportunities to adapt learning programs to individual needs; 4) pupils in smaller classes have more interest in…

  2. Persistence to antihypertensive drug classes

    PubMed Central

    Qvarnström, Miriam; Kahan, Thomas; Kieler, Helle; Brandt, Lena; Hasselström, Jan; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Manhem, Karin; Hjerpe, Per; Wettermark, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim was to study persistence to, and switching between, antihypertensive drug classes and to determine factors associated with poor persistence. This was an observational cohort study. The Swedish Primary Care Cardiovascular Database includes data from medical records, socioeconomic data, filled prescriptions, and hospitalizations from national registries for 75,000 patients with hypertension. Patients included in the study were initiated on antihypertensive drug treatment in primary healthcare in 2006 to 2007. We defined class persistence as the proportion remaining on the initial drug class, including 30 days of gap. Patients with a filled prescription of another antihypertensive drug class after discontinuation of the initial drug, including 30 days of gap, were classified as switchers. Persistence to the various drug classes were compared with that for diuretics. We identified 4997 patients (mean age 60 ± 12 years in men and 63 ± 13 years in women). Out of these, 95 (2%) filled their first prescription for fixed combination therapy and 4902 (98%) for monotherapy, including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (37%), angiotensin receptor blockers (4%), beta blockers (21%), calcium channel blockers (8%), and diuretics (28%). Persistence to the initial drug class was 57% after 1 year and 43% after 2 years. There were no differences in persistence between diuretics and any of the other antihypertensive drug classes, after adjustment for confounders. Discontinuation (all adjusted) was more common in men (P = 0.004), younger patients (P < 0.001), those with mild systolic blood pressure elevation (P < 0.001), and patients born outside the Nordic countries (P < 0.001). Among 1295 patients who switched drug class after their first prescription, only 21% had a blood pressure recorded before the switch occurred; and out them 69% still had high blood pressures. In conclusion, there appears to be no difference in drug class

  3. Poly(beta-hydroxybutyrate) production in oilseed leukoplasts of brassica napus

    PubMed

    Houmiel; Slater; Broyles; Casagrande; Colburn; Gonzalez; Mitsky; Reiser; Shah; Taylor; Tran; Valentin; Gruys

    1999-10-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) comprise a class of biodegradable polymers which offer an environmentally sustainable alternative to petroleum-based plastics. Production of PHAs in plants is attractive since current fermentation technology is prohibitively expensive. The PHA homopolymer poly(beta-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) has previously been produced in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (Nawrath et al., 1994, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 91: 12760-12764). However, Brassica napus oilseed may provide a better system for PHB production because acetyl-CoA, the substrate required in the first step of PHB biosynthesis, is prevalent during fatty acid biosynthesis. Three enzymatic activities are needed to synthesize PHB: a beta-ketothiolase, an acetoacetyl-CoA reductase and a PHB synthase. Genes from the bacterium Ralstonia eutropha encoding these enzymes were independently engineered behind the seed-specific Lesquerella fendleri oleate 12-hydroxylase promoter in a modular fashion. The gene cassettes were sequentially transferred into a single, multi-gene vector which was used to transform B. napus. Poly(beta-hydroxybutyrate) accumulated in leukoplasts to levels as high as 7.7% fresh seed weight of mature seeds. Electron-microscopy analyses indicated that leukoplasts from these plants were distorted, yet intact, and appeared to expand in response to polymer accumulation.

  4. Microstructure synthesis control of biological polyhydroxyalkanoates with mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pederson, Erik Norman

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA's) are a class of biologically produced polymers, or plastic, that is synthesized by various microorganisms. PHA's are made from biorenewable resources and are fully biodegradable and biocompatible, making them an environmentally friendly green polymer. A method of incorporating polymer microstructure into the PHA synthesized in Ralstonia eutropha was developed. These microstructures were synthesized with polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) as the polymer domains. To synthesize the PHB V copolymer, the additional presence of valerate was required. To control valerate substrate additions to the bioreactor, an off-gas mass spectrometry (MS) feedback control system was developed. Important process information including the cell physiology, growth kinetics, and product formation kinetics in the bioreactor was obtained with MS and used to control microstructure synthesis. The two polymer microstructures synthesized were core-shell granules and block copolymers. Block copolymers control the structure of the individual polymer chains while core-shell granules control the organization of many polymer chains. Both these microstructures result in properties unattainable by blending the two polymers together. The core-shell structures were synthesized with controlled domain thickness based on a developed model. Different block copolymers compositions were synthesized by varying the switching time of the substrate pulses responsible for block copolymer synthesis. The block copolymers were tested to determine their chemical properties and cast into films to determine the materials properties. These block copolymer films possessed new properties not achieved by copolymers or blends of the two polymers.

  5. Cloning and Expression of Poly 3-Hydroxybutyrate Operon Into Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jari, Maryam; Khatami, Saeid Reza; Galehdari, Hamid; Shafiei, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Poly 3-Hydroxybutyrate (PHB), a class of Poly Hydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), is a group of bacterial storage polymers, produced by various microorganisms in response to nutrient limitation. PHAs are biodegradable polymers which could be a good substitute for current petrochemical plastics. PHB has been synthesized during three enzymatic steps including three genes. Objectives: Our aim was PHB production from recombinant bacteria. Materials and Methods: Ralstonia eutropha was cultured and its genomic DNA was extracted. The phbCAB operon was amplified using designed primers. The fragment was cloned into pET-28a expression vector and then transformed into Escherichia coli BL21. Sudan black staining was used to show the production of PHB. Results: The extracted recombinant plasmid was digested with restriction enzymes. Separation of the desired fragment from the vector was performed to prove the correct insertion of the PCR products into the vector. The colony PCR and sequencing results confirmed the successful transformation. The production of PHB was confirmed by Sudan Black B staining under a light microscope. Conclusions: Various metabolic and fermentation methods have been used in some bacterial strains for PHB production. The use of a recombinant system harboring PHB synthesis genes can produce PHB in higher concentrations compare to natural PHA-producing bacteria. The present study was one of the most important and basic steps of designing a recombinant E. coli that can produce PHB. PMID:25834710

  6. Limits to Open Class Performance?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation discusses open or unlimited class aircraft performance limitations and design solutions. Limitations in this class of aircraft include slow climbing flight which requires low wing loading, high cruise speed which requires high wing loading, gains in induced or viscous drag alone which result in only half the gain overall and other structural problems (yaw inertia and spins, flutter and static loads integrity). Design solutions include introducing minimum induced drag for a given span (elliptical span load or winglets) and introducing minimum induced drag for a bell shaped span load. It is concluded that open class performance limits (under current rules and technologies) is very close to absolute limits, though some gains remain to be made from unexplored areas and new technologies.

  7. Universality class in conformal inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei E-mail: alinde@stanford.edu

    2013-07-01

    We develop a new class of chaotic inflation models with spontaneously broken conformal invariance. Observational consequences of a broad class of such models are stable with respect to strong deformations of the scalar potential. This universality is a critical phenomenon near the point of enhanced symmetry, SO(1,1), in case of conformal inflation. It appears because of the exponential stretching of the moduli space and the resulting exponential flattening of scalar potentials upon switching from the Jordan frame to the Einstein frame in this class of models. This result resembles stretching and flattening of inhomogeneities during inflationary expansion. It has a simple interpretation in terms of velocity versus rapidity near the Kähler cone in the moduli space, similar to the light cone of special theory of relativity. This effect makes inflation possible even in the models with very steep potentials. We describe conformal and superconformal versions of this cosmological attractor mechanism.

  8. 47 CFR 74.708 - Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class A TV and digital Class A TV station... SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.708 Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection. (a) The Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protected contours are specified...

  9. 47 CFR 74.708 - Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class A TV and digital Class A TV station... SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.708 Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection. (a) The Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protected contours are specified...

  10. 47 CFR 74.708 - Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class A TV and digital Class A TV station... SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.708 Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection. (a) The Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protected contours are specified...

  11. 47 CFR 74.708 - Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class A TV and digital Class A TV station... SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.708 Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection. (a) The Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protected contours are specified...

  12. 77 FR 17362 - Proposed Modification of Class D and Class E Airspace and Revocation of Class E Airspace...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... an extension to a Class D or E surface area at Bellingham International Airport. This action... airspace and Class E airspace designated as surface area to meet current standards for IFR departures and... Class E airspace designated as an extension to a Class D or E surface area, and, therefore, would...

  13. 76 FR 64233 - Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Casper, WY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ..., published on August 25, 2011 (76 FR 53048), amends Class D airspace, Class E surface airspace, Class E..., the Class E airspace descriptions as published in the Federal Register of August 25, 2011 (76 FR 53048) (FR Doc. 2011-21663) for Natrona County International Airport, Casper, WY, is corrected under...

  14. Teaching a Large Undergraduate Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trowbridge, Norma

    1975-01-01

    A professor describes how she teaches large undergraduate classes by dividing the group into smaller groups and including: weekly films or audiovisual aids, weekly sessions with smaller groups, definite reading material, independent study, and a multiple evaluation system. (Author/PG)

  15. Soviet KIROV class strike cruiser

    SciTech Connect

    Kehoe, J.W.; Brower, K.S.; Meier, H.A.

    1981-04-01

    The major design concepts and basic characteristics of the Soviet KIROV Class ship, an impressive nuclear-powered Strike Cruiser which recently appeared while undergoing sea trials in the Baltic Sea and the North Sea, are discussed. Highlights are presented of the KIROV's hull form, the weapons, electronics and aviation systems, machinery, as well as the cruiser's speed and range.

  16. "Green" Classes Flourish in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2009-01-01

    Courses focused on renewable and alternative energy are taking hold across the country as educators seek to channel students' concerns about the environment and conservation into classroom lessons. This article talks about the rising interest in "green" curriculum. Here, the author describes the Green Tech class that introduces students to the…

  17. The class analysis of poverty.

    PubMed

    Wright, E O

    1995-01-01

    To understand more fully the nature of poverty it must be viewed as the result, in part, of inherent features of the social system. The author describes four general approaches to explaining poverty: poverty as a result of inherent individual attributes, as the by-product of contingent individual characteristics, as a by-product of social causes, and as a result of inherent properties of the social system. He then elaborates a class exploitation analysis of poverty by explaining how economic oppression, economic exploitation, and class generate a social system in which poverty plays a crucial functional role. The general problem of poverty must be broken down into two subproblems: poverty generated inside exploitative relations (the working poor) and poverty generated by nonexploitative oppression (the underclass). A class analysis of poverty argues that significant numbers of privileged people have a strong, positive material interest in maintaining poverty. Poverty can be reduced in the United States only through popular mobilization of pressure that challenges the power of the dominant classes.

  18. Emerging Scholars: Class of 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Valerie; Oguntoyinbo, Lekan; Davis, Crystal D.; Hawkins, B. Denise; Lum, Lydia; Cooper, Kenneth; Pluviose, David; Pember, Mary Annette; Watson, Jamal Eric; Nealy, Michelle J.; Hernandez, Christina

    2011-01-01

    This article presents "Diverse"'s 2011 Emerging Scholars. This year's class of award-winning academics consists of twelve gifted and passionate scholars who make their mark with relevant, impactful scholarship. The 2011 Emerging Scholars are: (1) Dr. Guillermina G. Nunez-Mchiri; (2) Dr. Ashlesh Murthy; (3) Charles O. Anderson; (4) Chekesha M.…

  19. A Touch of...Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtel, Claudine, Ed.; Amyot, Denise, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    A series of class activities for French instruction includes uses of the telephone book, tape recordings, advertising, word and pattern games, and creation of a radio program. Suggestions for instruction of Canadian natives include games for animal, body, and clothing vocabulary. (MSE)

  20. Exploring Class-Based Intersectionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, David; Corona, Victor

    2014-01-01

    This paper argues that language, culture and identity researchers need to take the intersectionality of identity inscriptions seriously and, further to this, that an intersectional approach which emanates from an interest in social class provides a productive way to examine the lives and experience of individuals living in multicultural societies.…

  1. ALTERNATIVES FOR CLASS A BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation reviews the pathogenic microorganisms that may be found in sewage sludge and commonly employed Class A processes for controlling them including advanced digestion, alkaline treatment and heat drying. How extensively the processes are used as well as issues and co...

  2. Linguistics in the English Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Robert C., Jr.

    Designed for secondary school English teachers who want to help their students develop enthusiasm for words, their histories, and the way language structures words to produce meaning, this paper offers suggestions for a program of study employing dictionary projects and personal experience. The paper describes making a class dictionary of teen…

  3. Social Class and School Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Vincent C.

    2012-01-01

    This article takes a practical look at social class in school music by exploring the manifestations and impact of three of its dimensions: financial resources, cultural practices, and social networks. Three suggestions are discussed: provide a free and equal music education for all students, understand and respect each student's cultural…

  4. Creating Presentations on ICT Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchis, Iuliana

    2010-01-01

    The article focuses on the creation of presentations on ICT classes. The first part highlights the most important steps when creating a presentation. The main idea is, that the computer presentation shouldn't consist only from the technological part, i.e. the editing of the presentation in a computer program. There are many steps before and after…

  5. Communication Repair and Response Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadan, Hedda; Halle, James W.

    2004-01-01

    A communicative repair has been defined as the ability to persist in communication and to modify, repeat, or revise a signal when the initial communication attempt failed. From an operant perspective, initial communicative acts and communicative repairs can be considered members of a response class in which each response produces the same outcome.…

  6. Social Class Differences in Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Frederick

    "Language and Poverty," a volume published in 1970 that dealt with various topics concerning language and social class differences, argued that in educational programs for the children of the poor it is important not to confuse differences with deficits. It indicated that poor children had adequate language structures and skills for their…

  7. Class Meetings in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, Linda

    2004-01-01

    Physical educators are often frustrated when a student behaves in a way that compromises the learning environment for the entire group. Inappropriate behavior may vary from kicking a ball across the room rather than returning it under the net, to consistent wisecracking during class. When such behavior is limited to one or two students, individual…

  8. Multiple Functions in Equivalence Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVeigh, Brian; Keenan, Mickey

    2009-01-01

    Four experiments examined the effects of training a "drawing" response to each of three stimuli in a 5-member equivalence class. In Experiment 1 the stimuli were an arbitrary word, a shape, or a mathematical symbol. Subjects then were trained to draw a separate component of a stickman at each of the 3 stimuli. Subsequent tests for function…

  9. The Hidden Injuries of Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sennett, Richard; Cobb, Jonathan

    The book examines the effect of class barriers on blue collar workers by mirroring occupational/ethnic backgrounds of the white manual-laboring population in the Boston area through urban anthropological observations as well as 150 in-depth interviews conducted in 1969-70. It mainly reflects the experience of middle-aged, third generation American…

  10. Class Struggle in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clawson, Dan; Leiblum, Mishy

    2008-01-01

    Public higher education has undergone a process similar to that in the national polity: a one-sided struggle by those with power to shape the institution to be more market driven, more focused on what will generate (non-state) revenues, more dominated by top administrators, and less concerned about the working class and people of color. This…

  11. Defendants challenge class action certification.

    PubMed

    Dubin, C S; Wadleigh, J

    1995-04-01

    The National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF) and the manufacturers of Anti-Hemophilia Factor Concentrates (AHF) are being sued in a class action case for ignoring and downplaying risks of HIV infection from AHF in order to enhance their financial gain. The defendants in the case, however, have challenged the class action certification. Their Petition for a Writ of Mandamus argues that a class action lawsuit is not an appropriate legal vehicle for this type of case because, among other reasons, it will place an entire industry's survival in the hands of a single jury decision. The two primary challenges to certification by the petition are that 1) it would complicate hemophilia/AIDS litigation and not simplify it, and 2) there is no common definition of negligence throughout state law. With certification in question, it is conceivable, according to attorney David Shrager, "that hundreds or even thousands of additional claims will now be filed in state and Federal courts throughout the country." Essentially, the defense against the Writ argues that the defendants knew in the 1960s of the high risk from known and new viruses in the plasma pools, that they had a duty to reduce such risk, and that they not only failed to withdraw their products from the market, they downplayed the harm done to persons who used contaminated AHF by making misleading statements. The class action trial is scheduled to begin October 2, 1995. PMID:11362336

  12. Genomic analysis reveals widespread occurrence of new classes of copper nitrite reductases.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Mark J; Grossmann, J Günter; Eady, Robert R; Hasnain, S Samar

    2007-11-01

    Recently, the structure of a Cu-containing nitrite reductase (NiR) from Hyphomicrobium denitrificans (HdNiR) has been reported, establishing the existence of a new family of Cu-NiR where an additional type 1 Cu (T1Cu) containing cupredoxin domain is located at the N-terminus (Nojiri et al. in Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 104:4315-4320, 2007). HdNiR retains the well-characterised coupled T1Cu-type 2 Cu (T2Cu) core, where the T2Cu catalytic site is also built utilising ligands from neighbouring monomers. We have undertaken a genome analysis and found the wide occurrence of these NiRs, with members clustering in two groups, one showing an amino acid sequence similarity of around 80% with HdNiR, and a second group, including the NiR from the extremophile Acidothermus cellulolyticus, clustering around 50% similarity to HdNiR. This is reminiscent of the difference observed between the blue (Alcaligenes xylosoxidans) and green (Achromobacter cycloclastes and Alcaligenes faecalis) NiRs which have been extensively studied and may indicate that these also form two distinct subclasses of the new family. Genome analysis also showed the presence of Cu-NiRs with a C-terminal extension of 160-190 residues containing a class I cytochrome c domain with a characteristic beta-sheet extension. Currently no structural information exists for any member of this family. Genome analysis suggests the widespread occurrence of these novel NiRs with representatives in the alpha, beta and gamma subclasses of the Proteobacteria and in two species of the fungus Aspergillus. We selected the enzyme from Ralstonia pickettii for comparative modelling and produced a plausible structure highlighting an electron transfer mode in which the cytochrome c haem at the C-terminus can come within 16-A reach of the T1Cu centre of the T1Cu-T2Cu core. PMID:17712582

  13. Class Action Suits against Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesibov, Laurie

    1984-01-01

    If a suit is brought as a class action, either plaintiff or defendant may move to uphold or challenge class certification. If neither does so, the court decides whether the action may be maintained as a class suit. Prerequisites for class certification from Rule 23 (Federal Rules of Civil Procedure) are explained. (TE)

  14. SOCIAL CLASS AND CHILD-REARING PRACTICES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHESS, STELLA; AND OTHERS

    THE BEHAVIORAL NORMS OF LOWER CLASS DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN ARE DIFFERENT FROM CHILDREN IN MORE MIDDLE CLASS GROUPS. THE BEHAVIOR OF LOWER CLASS CHILDREN IS INFLUENCED NOT ONLY BY GENERAL SOCIAL CLASS AND CULTURAL BACKGROUND BUT ALSO BY SUCH SPECIFIC INTRACLASS VARIABLES AS FAMILY ENVIRONMENT. THE PRESENT ABSENCE IN THE LITERATURE AND IN PRACTICE…

  15. Gender and the Construction of Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acker, Joan

    Only by recognizing that class is not gender neutral can the processes of class formation and reproduction be understood. Class is defined as a process in which human beings take an active part, rather than a structure of categories into which individuals may be inserted. Gender organizes or structures class in many different ways. For example,…

  16. Class-Size Effects in Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krassel, Karl Fritjof; Heinesen, Eskil

    2014-01-01

    We analyze class-size effects on academic achievement in secondary school in Denmark exploiting an institutional setting where pupils cannot predict class size prior to enrollment, and where post-enrollment responses aimed at affecting realized class size are unlikely. We identify class-size effects combining a regression discontinuity design with…

  17. Making the Introductory Journalism Class Tick.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorway, Tim

    2003-01-01

    Proposes that beginning journalism classes teach multiple skills, including law, decision-making, interpersonal communication, interviewing, and critical thinking. Outlines how to convince administrators of the need for beginning journalism classes, and how to develop an effective class. Lists philosophy and course goals for one such class. (PM)

  18. Class E/F switching power amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor); Rutledge, David B. (Inventor); Kee, Scott David (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention discloses a new family of switching amplifier classes called class E/F amplifiers. These amplifiers are generally characterized by their use of the zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) phase correction technique to eliminate of the loss normally associated with the inherent capacitance of the switching device as utilized in class-E amplifiers, together with a load network for improved voltage and current wave-shaping by presenting class-F.sup.-1 impedances at selected overtones and class-E impedances at the remaining overtones. The present invention discloses a several topologies and specific circuit implementations for achieving such performance.

  19. Pepper CabZIP63 acts as a positive regulator during Ralstonia solanacearum or high temperature–high humidity challenge in a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lei; Liu, Zhiqin; Yang, Sheng; Yang, Tong; Liang, Jiaqi; Wen, Jiayu; Liu, Yanyan; Li, Jiazhi; Shi, Lanping; Tang, Qian; Shi, Wei; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Lin, Wei; Wang, Rongzhang; Yu, Huanxin; Mou, Shaoliang; Hussain, Ansar; Cheng, Wei; Cai, Hanyang; He, Li; Guan, Deyi; Wu, Yang; He, Shuilin

    2016-01-01

    CaWRKY40 is known to act as a positive regulator in the response of pepper (Capsicum annuum) to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation (RSI) or high temperature–high humidity (HTHH), but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Herein, we report that CabZIP63, a pepper bZIP family member, participates in this process by regulating the expression of CaWRKY40. CabZIP63 was found to localize in the nuclei, be up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, bind to promoters of both CabZIP63 (pCabZIP63) and CaWRKY40 (pCaWRKY40), and activate pCabZIP63- and pCaWRKY40-driven β-glucuronidase expression in a C- or G-box-dependent manner. Silencing of CabZIP63 by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in pepper plants significantly attenuated their resistance to RSI and tolerance to HTHH, accompanied by down-regulation of immunity- or thermotolerance-associated CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1, and CaHSP24. Hypersensitive response-mediated cell death and expression of the tested immunity- and thermotolerance-associated marker genes were induced by transient overexpression (TOE) of CabZIP63, but decreased by that of CabZIP63-SRDX. Additionally, binding of CabZIP63 to pCaWRKY40 was up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, and the transcript level of CaWRKY40 and binding of CaWRKY40 to the promoters of CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1 and CaHSP24 were up-regulated by TOE of CabZIP63. On the other hand, CabZIP63 was also up-regulated transcriptionally by TOE of CaWRKY40. The data suggest collectively that CabZIP63 directly or indirectly regulates the expression of CaWRKY40 at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level, forming a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40 during pepper’s response to RSI or HTHH. Altogether, our data will help to elucidate the underlying mechanism of crosstalk between pepper’s response to RSI and HTHH. PMID:26936828

  20. Pepper CabZIP63 acts as a positive regulator during Ralstonia solanacearum or high temperature-high humidity challenge in a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lei; Liu, Zhiqin; Yang, Sheng; Yang, Tong; Liang, Jiaqi; Wen, Jiayu; Liu, Yanyan; Li, Jiazhi; Shi, Lanping; Tang, Qian; Shi, Wei; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Lin, Wei; Wang, Rongzhang; Yu, Huanxin; Mou, Shaoliang; Hussain, Ansar; Cheng, Wei; Cai, Hanyang; He, Li; Guan, Deyi; Wu, Yang; He, Shuilin

    2016-04-01

    CaWRKY40 is known to act as a positive regulator in the response of pepper (Capsicum annuum) to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation (RSI) or high temperature-high humidity (HTHH), but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Herein, we report that CabZIP63, a pepper bZIP family member, participates in this process by regulating the expression of CaWRKY40. CabZIP63 was found to localize in the nuclei, be up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, bind to promoters of both CabZIP63(pCabZIP63) and CaWRKY40(pCaWRKY40), and activate pCabZIP63- and pCaWRKY40-driven β-glucuronidase expression in a C- or G-box-dependent manner. Silencing of CabZIP63 by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in pepper plants significantly attenuated their resistance to RSI and tolerance to HTHH, accompanied by down-regulation of immunity- or thermotolerance-associated CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1, and CaHSP24. Hypersensitive response-mediated cell death and expression of the tested immunity- and thermotolerance-associated marker genes were induced by transient overexpression (TOE) of CabZIP63, but decreased by that of CabZIP63-SRDX. Additionally, binding of CabZIP63 to pCaWRKY40 was up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, and the transcript level of CaWRKY40 and binding of CaWRKY40 to the promoters of CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1 and CaHSP24 were up-regulated by TOE of CabZIP63. On the other hand, CabZIP63 was also up-regulated transcriptionally by TOE of CaWRKY40. The data suggest collectively that CabZIP63 directly or indirectly regulates the expression of CaWRKY40 at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level, forming a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40 during pepper's response to RSI or HTHH. Altogether, our data will help to elucidate the underlying mechanism of crosstalk between pepper's response to RSI and HTHH. PMID:26936828

  1. A TaqMan-based multiplex qPCR assay and DNA extraction method for phylotype IIB sequevars 1&2 (select agent) strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    SciTech Connect

    Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2015-10-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regions of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Moreover, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum.

  2. Pepper CabZIP63 acts as a positive regulator during Ralstonia solanacearum or high temperature-high humidity challenge in a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lei; Liu, Zhiqin; Yang, Sheng; Yang, Tong; Liang, Jiaqi; Wen, Jiayu; Liu, Yanyan; Li, Jiazhi; Shi, Lanping; Tang, Qian; Shi, Wei; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Lin, Wei; Wang, Rongzhang; Yu, Huanxin; Mou, Shaoliang; Hussain, Ansar; Cheng, Wei; Cai, Hanyang; He, Li; Guan, Deyi; Wu, Yang; He, Shuilin

    2016-04-01

    CaWRKY40 is known to act as a positive regulator in the response of pepper (Capsicum annuum) to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation (RSI) or high temperature-high humidity (HTHH), but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Herein, we report that CabZIP63, a pepper bZIP family member, participates in this process by regulating the expression of CaWRKY40. CabZIP63 was found to localize in the nuclei, be up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, bind to promoters of both CabZIP63(pCabZIP63) and CaWRKY40(pCaWRKY40), and activate pCabZIP63- and pCaWRKY40-driven β-glucuronidase expression in a C- or G-box-dependent manner. Silencing of CabZIP63 by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in pepper plants significantly attenuated their resistance to RSI and tolerance to HTHH, accompanied by down-regulation of immunity- or thermotolerance-associated CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1, and CaHSP24. Hypersensitive response-mediated cell death and expression of the tested immunity- and thermotolerance-associated marker genes were induced by transient overexpression (TOE) of CabZIP63, but decreased by that of CabZIP63-SRDX. Additionally, binding of CabZIP63 to pCaWRKY40 was up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, and the transcript level of CaWRKY40 and binding of CaWRKY40 to the promoters of CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1 and CaHSP24 were up-regulated by TOE of CabZIP63. On the other hand, CabZIP63 was also up-regulated transcriptionally by TOE of CaWRKY40. The data suggest collectively that CabZIP63 directly or indirectly regulates the expression of CaWRKY40 at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level, forming a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40 during pepper's response to RSI or HTHH. Altogether, our data will help to elucidate the underlying mechanism of crosstalk between pepper's response to RSI and HTHH.

  3. Oxidation of benzene to phenol, catechol, and 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene by toluene 4-monooxygenase of Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 and toluene 3-monooxygenase of Ralstonia pickettii PKO1.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ying; Fishman, Ayelet; Bentley, William E; Wood, Thomas K

    2004-07-01

    Aromatic hydroxylations are important bacterial metabolic processes but are difficult to perform using traditional chemical synthesis, so to use a biological catalyst to convert the priority pollutant benzene into industrially relevant intermediates, benzene oxidation was investigated. It was discovered that toluene 4-monooxygenase (T4MO) of Pseudomonas mendocina KR1, toluene 3-monooxygenase (T3MO) of Ralstonia pickettii PKO1, and toluene ortho-monooxygenase (TOM) of Burkholderia cepacia G4 convert benzene to phenol, catechol, and 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene by successive hydroxylations. At a concentration of 165 microM and under the control of a constitutive lac promoter, Escherichia coli TG1/pBS(Kan)T4MO expressing T4MO formed phenol from benzene at 19 +/- 1.6 nmol/min/mg of protein, catechol from phenol at 13.6 +/- 0.3 nmol/min/mg of protein, and 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene from catechol at 2.5 +/- 0.5nmol/min/mg of protein. The catechol and 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene products were identified by both high-pressure liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. When analogous plasmid constructs were used, E. coli TG1/pBS(Kan)T3MO expressing T3MO formed phenol, catechol, and 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene at rates of 3 +/- 1, 3.1 +/- 0.3, and 0.26 +/- 0.09 nmol/min/mg of protein, respectively, and E. coli TG1/pBS(Kan)TOM expressing TOM formed 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene at a rate of 1.7 +/- 0.3 nmol/min/mg of protein (phenol and catechol formation rates were 0.89 +/- 0.07 and 1.5 +/- 0.3 nmol/min/mg of protein, respectively). Hence, the rates of synthesis of catechol by both T3MO and T4MO and the 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene formation rate by TOM were found to be comparable to the rates of oxidation of the natural substrate toluene for these enzymes (10.0 +/- 0.8, 4.0 +/- 0.6, and 2.4 +/- 0.3 nmol/min/mg of protein for T4MO, T3MO, and TOM, respectively, at a toluene concentration of 165 microM). PMID:15240250

  4. 47 CFR 73.25 - Clear channels; Class A, Class B and Class D stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Class A station may be assigned, operating with power of 50 kW: 640, 650, 660, 670, 700, 720, 750, 760, 770, 780, 820, 830, 840, 870, 880, 890, 1020, 1030, 1040, 1100, 1120, 1160, 1180, 1200, and 1210 kHz..., 1530, 1540, 1550, and 1560 kHz. Note: Until superseded by a new agreement, protection of the...

  5. FDM Video Classe: Modes d'emploi pour la classe (FDM Video Class: Classroom Uses).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beacco, Marcella Di Giura

    1996-01-01

    Content and design of the videotape series FDM Video Classe, produced by the journal "Le francais dans le monde," are described and classroom uses suggested. The materials are from authentic television programs, selected to illustrate aspects of French culture. It is suggested that the teacher also provide students with supporting materials that…

  6. The formation of linked perceptual classes.

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Lanny; Matneja, Priya; Varelas, Antonios; Belanich, James; Fitzer, Adrienne; Shamoun, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Multiple-exemplar training with stimuli in four domains induced two new fill-based (A1' and A2') and satellite-image-based (B1' and B2') perceptual classes. Conditional discriminations were established between the endpoints of the A1' and B1' classes as well as the A2' and B2' classes. The emergence of linked perceptual classes was evaluated by the performances occasioned by nine cross-class probes that contained fill variants as samples and satellite variants as comparisons, along with nine other cross-class probes that consisted of satellite variants as samples and fill variants as comparisons. The 18 probes were first presented serially and then concurrently. Class-consistent responding indicated the emergence of linked perceptual classes. Of the linked perceptual classes, 70% emerged during the initial serial test. An additional 20% of the linked perceptual classes emerged during the subsequently presented concurrent test block. Thus, linked perceptual classes emerged on an immediate or delayed basis. Linked perceptual classes, then, share structural and fuctional similarities with equivalence classes, generalized equivalence classes, cross-modal classes, and complex maturally occurring categories, and may clarify processes such as intersensory perception. PMID:12507004

  7. The formation of linked perceptual classes.

    PubMed

    Fields, Lanny; Matneja, Priya; Varelas, Antonios; Belanich, James; Fitzer, Adrienne; Shamoun, Kim

    2002-11-01

    Multiple-exemplar training with stimuli in four domains induced two new fill-based (A1' and A2') and satellite-image-based (B1' and B2') perceptual classes. Conditional discriminations were established between the endpoints of the A1' and B1' classes as well as the A2' and B2' classes. The emergence of linked perceptual classes was evaluated by the performances occasioned by nine cross-class probes that contained fill variants as samples and satellite variants as comparisons, along with nine other cross-class probes that consisted of satellite variants as samples and fill variants as comparisons. The 18 probes were first presented serially and then concurrently. Class-consistent responding indicated the emergence of linked perceptual classes. Of the linked perceptual classes, 70% emerged during the initial serial test. An additional 20% of the linked perceptual classes emerged during the subsequently presented concurrent test block. Thus, linked perceptual classes emerged on an immediate or delayed basis. Linked perceptual classes, then, share structural and fuctional similarities with equivalence classes, generalized equivalence classes, cross-modal classes, and complex maturally occurring categories, and may clarify processes such as intersensory perception.

  8. Growing a strong middle class.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Martin

    2009-01-01

    An important mission for the country is achieving sustainability while strengthening the middle class. American leadership and innovation can play a critical role in defining the interconnectedness of our economy and environment-and in unlocking, harnessing, and advancing green technologies. The State of Maryland has launched a Green Jobs Initiative focused on attracting green businesses, working with existing businesses to adopt sustainable practices, promoting clean energy research and use, and training the work force for ne, green-collar jobs. PMID:19608500

  9. Luminosity class of neutron reflectometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleshanov, N. K.

    2016-10-01

    The formulas that relate neutron fluxes at reflectometers with differing q-resolutions are derived. The reference luminosity is defined as a maximum flux for measurements with a standard resolution. The methods of assessing the reference luminosity of neutron reflectometers are presented for monochromatic and white beams, which are collimated with either double diaphragm or small angle Soller systems. The values of the reference luminosity for unified parameters define luminosity class of reflectometers. The luminosity class characterizes (each operation mode of) the instrument by one number and can be used to classify operating reflectometers and optimize designed reflectometers. As an example the luminosity class of the neutron reflectometer NR-4M (reactor WWR-M, Gatchina) is found for four operation modes: 2.1 (monochromatic non-polarized beam), 1.9 (monochromatic polarized beam), 1.5 (white non-polarized beam), 1.1 (white polarized beam); it is shown that optimization of measurements may increase the flux at the sample up to two orders of magnitude with monochromatic beams and up to one order of magnitude with white beams. A fan beam reflectometry scheme with monochromatic neutrons is suggested, and the expected increase in luminosity is evaluated. A tuned-phase chopper with a variable TOF resolution is recommended for reflectometry with white beams.

  10. Class Construction: White Working-Class Student Identity in the New Millennium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freie, Carrie

    2007-01-01

    "Class Construction" explores class, racial, and gender identity construction among white, working-class students. Delving into River City High School, Freie asks what happens to the adolescent children of working-class families when economic changes such as globalization and technological advancements have altered the face of working-class jobs.…

  11. 49 CFR 173.2 - Hazardous materials classes and index to hazard class definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Division No. (if any) Name of class or division 49 CFR reference for definitions None Forbidden materials... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hazardous materials classes and index to hazard... classes and index to hazard class definitions. The hazard class of a hazardous material is...

  12. 77 FR 32895 - Modification of Class D and Class E Airspace and Revocation of Class E Airspace; Bellingham, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... Regulations (14 CFR) Part 71 by modifying Class D airspace and Class E airspace designated as surface area to... or E surface area. This action is necessary for the safety and management of aircraft departing and.../Facility Directory. Paragraph 6002 Class E airspace designated as surface areas. * * * * * ANM WA...

  13. 78 FR 62498 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace, Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... Class E airspace designated as surface area. The geographic coordinates of the airport also would be... extension to Class D surface area would be modified from the 4.3-mile radius of the airport to 8 miles... modification eliminates the need for Class E airspace designated as surface area, and, therefore, would...

  14. Three classes of Martian rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this portion of the 360-degree color gallery pan, looking to the northeast, the colors have been exaggerated to highlight the differences between rocks and soils. Visible are the downwind sides of rocks, not exposed to wind scouring like Barnacle Bill (which faces upwind). There is a close correspondence between the shapes and colors of the rocks. Three general classes of rocks are recognized: large rounded rocks with weathered coatings, small gray angular rocks lacking weathered coatings, and flat white rocks. The large rounded rocks in the distance, marked by the red arrows, are comparable to Yogi. Spectral properties show that these rocks have a highly weathered coating in addition to a distinctive shape. A second population of smaller, angular rocks (blue arrows) in the foreground have unweathered surfaces even on the downwind side, except where covered on their tops by drift. These are comparable to Barnacle Bill. They may have been emplaced at the site relatively recently, perhaps as ejecta from an impact crater, so they have not had time to weather as extensively as the larger older rocks. The third kind of rock (white arrows) is white and flat, and includes Scooby Doo in the foreground and a large deposit in the background called Baker's Bank. The age of the white rock relative to the other two classes is still being debated. One representative rock of each class (Yogi, Barnacle Bill, and Scooby Doo) has been measured by the rover.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  15. A class of integrable metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anabalón, Andrés; Batista, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    In four dimensions, the most general metric admitting two commuting Killing vectors and a rank-two Killing tensor can be parametrized by ten arbitrary functions of a single variable. We show that picking a special vierbein, reducing the system to eight functions, implies the existence of two geodesic and share-free, null congruences, generated by two principal null directions of the Weyl tensor. Thus, if the spacetime is an Einstein manifold, the Goldberg-Sachs theorem implies it is Petrov type D, and by explicit construction, is in the Carter class. Hence, our analysis provides a straightforward connection between the most general integrable structure and the Carter family of spacetimes.

  16. Development of rice bran treatment process and its use for the synthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates from rice bran hydrolysate solution.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Hoon; Lee, Seung Hwan; Jang, Young-Ah; Choi, Jae Woo; Hong, Kyung Sik; Yu, Ju Hyun; Shin, Jihoon; Song, Bong Keun; Mastan, Shaik G; David, Yokimiko; Baylon, Mary Grace; Lee, Sang Yup; Park, Si Jae

    2015-04-01

    Rice bran treatment process for the production of 43.7 kg of hydrolysate solution containing 24.41 g/L of glucose and small amount of fructose from 5 kg of rice bran was developed and employed to produce polyhydroxyalkanoates in recombinant Escherichia coli and Ralstonia eutropha strains. Recombinant E. coli XL1-Blue expressing R. eutropha phaCAB genes and R. eutropha NCIMB11599 could produce poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) with the polymer contents of 90.1 wt% and 97.2 wt%, respectively, when they were cultured in chemically defined MR medium and chemically defined nitrogen free MR medium containing 10 mL/L of rice bran hydrolysate solution, respectively. Also, recombinant E. coli XL1-Blue and recombinant R. eutropha 437-540, both of which express the Pseudomonas sp. phaC1437 gene and the Clostridium propionicum pct540 gene could produce poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-lactate) from rice bran hydrolysate solution. These results suggest that rice bran may be a good renewable resource for the production of biomass-based polymers by recombinant microorganisms.

  17. The multifunctional isopropyl alcohol dehydrogenase of Phytomonas sp. could be the result of a horizontal gene transfer from a bacterium to the trypanosomatid lineage.

    PubMed

    Molinas, Sara M; Altabe, Silvia G; Opperdoes, Fred R; Rider, Mark H; Michels, Paul A M; Uttaro, Antonio D

    2003-09-19

    Isopropyl alcohol dehydrogenase (iPDH) is a dimeric mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), so far detected within the Trypanosomatidae only in the genus Phytomonas. The cloning, sequencing, and heterologous expression of the two gene alleles of the enzyme revealed that it is a zinc-dependent medium-chain ADH. Both polypeptides have 361 amino acids. A mitochondrial targeting sequence was identified. The mature proteins each have 348 amino acids and a calculated molecular mass of 37 kDa. They differ only in one amino acid, which can explain the three isoenzymes and their respective isoelectric points previously found. A phylogenetic analysis locates iPDH within a cluster with fermentative ADHs from bacteria, sharing 74% similarity and 60% identity with Ralstonia eutropha ADH. The characterization of the two bacterially expressed Phytomonas enzymes and the comparison of their kinetic properties with those of the wild-type iPDH and of the R. eutropha ADH strongly support the idea of a horizontal gene transfer event from a bacterium to a trypanosomatid to explain the origin of the iPDH in Phytomonas. Phytomonas iPDH and R. eutropha ADH are able to use a wide range of substrates with similar Km values such as primary and secondary alcohols, diols, and aldehydes, as well as ketones such as acetone, diacetyl, and acetoin. We speculate that, as for R. eutropha ADH, Phytomonas iPDH acts as a safety valve for the release of excess reducing power. PMID:12853449

  18. 48 CFR 401.404 - Class deviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Deviations From the FAR and AGAR 401.404 Class deviations. Where deviations from the FAR or AGAR are considered necessary for classes of contracts, requests for authority to...

  19. 48 CFR 401.404 - Class deviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Deviations From the FAR and AGAR 401.404 Class deviations. Where deviations from the FAR or AGAR are considered necessary for classes of contracts, requests for authority to...

  20. Does Class Size Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Gene V.; Down, A. Graham

    1979-01-01

    Argues that study findings indicate that lowered class size increases student achievement and improves school attitudes. Counter argument indicates there is little educational payoff and great monetary expense in small reductions in class size. (RH)

  1. "Middle Class Aura" in Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Charles; Bennett, Carson

    1977-01-01

    Selected perceptions of college educational psychology students toward middle class values evident during their secondary education experience, called by Charnovsky the "middle class aura", are presented, along with their own attitudes toward those values. (MJB)

  2. 7 CFR 30.5 - Class.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.5 Class... by differences in varieties, soil and climatic conditions, and the methods of cultivation,...

  3. 7 CFR 30.5 - Class.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.5 Class... by differences in varieties, soil and climatic conditions, and the methods of cultivation,...

  4. 7 CFR 30.5 - Class.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.5 Class... by differences in varieties, soil and climatic conditions, and the methods of cultivation,...

  5. Social Movements, Class, and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Shirley

    2005-01-01

    Social movements in South Africa, often organized around class-related issues, provide rich material to illustrate how class, intertwined with other social categories, shapes organizational and educational practices.

  6. Modelling Symmetry Classes 233 and 432.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutch, Steven I.

    1986-01-01

    Offers instructions and geometrical data for constructing solids of the enantiomorphous symmetry classes 233 and 432. Provides background information for each class and highlights symmetrical relationships and construction patterns. (ML)

  7. 7 CFR 30.5 - Class.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.5 Class. One of the major divisions of leaf tobacco based on the distinct characteristics of the tobacco...

  8. FDA Bolsters Warnings about Class of Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160078.html FDA Bolsters Warnings About Class of Antibiotics Fluoroquinolones such as Cipro, Levaquin should be reserved ... it's strengthening label warnings on a class of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones because the drugs can lead to ...

  9. 16 CFR 1025.18 - Class actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... parties on behalf of all respondents if: (1) The class is so numerous or geographically dispersed that..., and the difficulties likely to be encountered in the management of a class action, as well as...

  10. 16 CFR 1025.18 - Class actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... parties on behalf of all respondents if: (1) The class is so numerous or geographically dispersed that..., and the difficulties likely to be encountered in the management of a class action, as well as...

  11. 16 CFR 1025.18 - Class actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... parties on behalf of all respondents if: (1) The class is so numerous or geographically dispersed that..., and the difficulties likely to be encountered in the management of a class action, as well as...

  12. 16 CFR 1025.18 - Class actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... parties on behalf of all respondents if: (1) The class is so numerous or geographically dispersed that..., and the difficulties likely to be encountered in the management of a class action, as well as...

  13. 16 CFR 1025.18 - Class actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... parties on behalf of all respondents if: (1) The class is so numerous or geographically dispersed that..., and the difficulties likely to be encountered in the management of a class action, as well as...

  14. 48 CFR 1501.404 - Class deviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Class deviations. 1501.404 Section 1501.404 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL GENERAL Deviations 1501.404 Class deviations. Requests for class deviations to the FAR and the EPAAR shall...

  15. Do Class Size Effects Differ across Grades?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nandrup, Anne Brink

    2016-01-01

    This paper contributes to the class size literature by analysing whether short-run class size effects are constant across grade levels in compulsory school. Results are based on administrative data on all pupils enrolled in Danish public schools. Identification is based on a government-imposed class size cap that creates exogenous variation in…

  16. 48 CFR 501.404 - Class deviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HCA to GSA's SPE for approval. Prior to approving a class deviation to the FAR, the SPE will consult...). (2) A class deviation to the GSAR must be forwarded by the cognizant HCA to GSA's SPE for approval. (3) When an HCA knows that a proposed class deviation will be required on a permanent basis, the...

  17. 48 CFR 501.404 - Class deviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HCA to GSA's SPE for approval. Prior to approving a class deviation to the FAR, the SPE will consult...). (2) A class deviation to the GSAR must be forwarded by the cognizant HCA to GSA's SPE for approval. (3) When an HCA knows that a proposed class deviation will be required on a permanent basis, the...

  18. Predicting Latent Class Scores for Subsequent Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Janne; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Budtz-Jorgensen, Esben; Larsen, Klaus Groes

    2012-01-01

    Latent class regression models relate covariates and latent constructs such as psychiatric disorders. Though full maximum likelihood estimation is available, estimation is often in three steps: (i) a latent class model is fitted without covariates; (ii) latent class scores are predicted; and (iii) the scores are regressed on covariates. We propose…

  19. Encouraging Undergraduate Class Participation: A Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Nichole S.; Gragg, Marcia N.; Cramer, Kenneth M.

    2009-01-01

    Undergraduate classes typically involve a professor lecturing to 100 or more students. Too often, this results in minimal opportunities for student participation. Positive reinforcement was used to promote student participation (i.e., defined as relevant comments or questions) in a second-year psychology class (N = 97). Class participation was…

  20. The Social Psychology of Class and Classism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Bernice

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, one is born into a family that can be identified as working class, middle class, or affluent--divisions that denote status and power, as defined by access to resources. This article explores the relationships between social class membership and a wide array of personal and social daily life experiences. It concludes with a…