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Sample records for ramada inn clemson

  1. Investigation of the 1987 Indianapolis Airport Ramada Inn incident.

    PubMed

    Clark, M A; Hawley, D A; McClain, J L; Pless, J E; Marlin, D C; Standish, S M

    1994-05-01

    On October 20, 1987, a military reserve aircraft lost power during a transcontinental flight and attempted an emergency landing at The Indianapolis International Airport. The pilot ejected and the disabled and pilotless aircraft struck a bank building. It then skidded across the street and entered the lobby of The Airport Ramada Inn where it exploded. This incident was unusual in that the fatal injuries occurred in individuals on the ground and not in the occupant of the aircraft. Seven people were killed in the lobby area and two were trapped in a laundry where they died of smoke inhalation. A tenth person died of burns ten days later. Minor injuries were reported among four hotel guests, two firefighters and the Air Force pilot. A multiagency mass disaster-plan had been formulated and rehearsed in preparation for the Panamerican Games, which had been held in Indianapolis in August 1987. A number of volunteers arrived before a security perimeter was established. They began an undocumented removal of the bodies from the scene and were about to remove valuables for "safekeeping" when stopped by coroners' office personnel. Fatalities resulted from smoke inhalation, burns or a combination. Bodies were identified by a combination of dental records, personal effects and visual means within 24 hours. The problems encountered in managing this disaster scene will also be compared with previously reported incidents. PMID:8006612

  2. Clemson University Balances Growth with Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Colleges are fond of issuing proclamations filled with ambitious goals. So Clemson University was hardly charting new territory in 2001 when its Board of Trustees endorsed 27 goals to make it a top-20 public research university. Less than two years later, Clemson achieved one of those benchmarks by exceeding $100-million per year in research…

  3. Conference on New Processes for Braille Manufacture (Ramada Inn, Boston, Massachusetts, May 18-19, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge. Sensory Aids Evaluation and Development Center.

    Proceedings from a conference on braille production and services are summarized. Only equipment which is ready for use is considered. Specific methods of producing braille discussed include the following: use of plates from a stereograph, computer line printer, braille embossers or braille writers, continuous strip embossed tape from a teletype…

  4. 15. LOOKING WEST TOWARD OLD FAITHFUL INN. THE INN'S NAMESAKE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. LOOKING WEST TOWARD OLD FAITHFUL INN. THE INN'S NAMESAKE, OLD FAITHFUL GEYSER IS AT LEFT. - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  5. 76 FR 54690 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Clemson, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... E airspace at Clemson, SC (76 FR 38582) Docket No. FAA-2011-0394. Interested parties were invited to... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Clemson, SC AGENCY: Federal.... 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0...

  6. Implementing a Peer Mentoring Model in the Clemson Eportfolio Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ring, Gail L.

    2015-01-01

    Since the implementation of the ePortfolio Program in 2006, Clemson University has incorporated peer review for the formative feedback process. One of the challenges with this large-scale implementation has been ensuring that all work is reviewed and constructive feedback is provided in a timely manner. In this article, I discuss the strategies…

  7. Obstacles to the universal application of INNs.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    Anomalies in the international non-proprietary name (INN) nomenclature show that the international harmonisation of nonproprietary drug names has not been achieved. When pharmaceutical companies request a new INN, they try to obtain an INN that serves their interests, and then use it for promotional or anticompetitive purposes. Drug regulatory agencies are not fulfilling their duty to protect existing INNs, particularly with regard to biosimilars (copies of biotechnology-derived drugs), giving rise in particular to anomalous names. The independence of the World Health Organization INN programme must be safeguarded to ensure that the universal terminology it is responsible for developing is applied worldwide. PMID:25964979

  8. 76 FR 38582 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Clemson, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Clemson, SC AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E Airspace at Clemson, SC, as a runway extension requires amended Standard... continues to read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565,...

  9. A Study To Identify Factors That Contribute to Black Student Withdrawal at Clemson University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClung, Jacquetta J.; And Others

    This study identifies factors associated with black undergraduate students who graduated and those who withdrew from Clemson University (South Carolina), a predominantly white, rural university. The sample consisted of all (838) black undergraduates who had graduated or withdrawn from Clemson after 1979. The study examined student history data…

  10. Clemson final report: High temperature formulations for SRS soils

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, R.F.

    1997-03-11

    This study was undertaken to demonstrate the application of a DC arc melter to in-situ vitrification of SRS soils. The melter that was available at the DOE/Industrial Vitrification Laboratory at Clemson University was equipped with opposing solid electrodes. To simulate field conditions, two hollow electrode configurations were evaluated which allowed fluxes to be injected into the melter while the soils were being vitrified. the first 4 runs utilized pre-blended flux (two runs) and attempted flux injection (two runs). These runs were terminated prematurely due to offgas sampling problems and melt freezing. The remaining four runs utilized a different electrode geometry, and the runs were not interrupted to change out the offgas sampling apparatus. These runs were conducted successfully.

  11. How INNs are created. Making drug names safer by contributing to INN selection.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    The international nonproprietary names (INNs) of drugs proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO) are released for public consultation. These consultations provide an opportunity to identify any risks associated with INNs that could lead to confusion. Prescrire has submitted numerous comments since it began participating in the WHO's public consultations on proposed INNs in 2007. The WHO INN programme has occasionally taken our objections into account. It is easier to replace a proposed INN when a risk of confusion is identified early, before the drug is introduced to the market and the INN enters into use. Regular analysis of the INNs proposed by the WHO reveals some of the challenges of naming drugs and the influence exerted by pharmaceutical companies and the US drug nomenclature committee (USANC) in particular. The lack of an identifiable common stem in certain INNs, sometimes perceived as an obstacle to INN comprehensibility, is a consequence of the procedure for assigning INNs, because the INN programme wants to ensure that new common stems are not created prematurely. Critical analysis of proposed INNs during WHO public consultations offers an insight into the challenges involved in devising common stems. This analysis is useful for improving the quality and safety of INNs. PMID:26436175

  12. Alternative flood tide transport tactics in catadromous species: Anguilla anguilla, Liza ramada and Platichthys flesus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trancart, T.; Lambert, P.; Rochard, E.; Daverat, F.; Coustillas, J.; Roqueplo, C.

    2012-03-01

    Flood Tide Transport (FTT) was investigated using experimental annular flumes and analysed by Maximum Entropy Spectral Analysis (MESA) to compare 3 species which use FTT: thinlip mullet Liza ramada, European eel Anguilla anguilla and European flounder Platichthys flesus. Juvenile fishes were submitted to experimental conditions simulating estuarine conditions in order to induce a behavioural rhythm which can be deemed comparable to FTT. MESA highlighted several behavioural rhythms within the same time series. The three species exhibited tidal rhythms in relation to time of day of migration, social behaviour and behaviour during ebb-tides. We hypothesise that ecological and morphological traits could induce these behaviours and indicate that it is possible to predict FTT variations for all catadromous species using diet ecology and morphology.

  13. Colloids in the River Inn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In the light of an increasing number of technical applications using nanoparticles and reports of adverse effects of engineered nanoparticles, research on the occurrence and stability of particles in all compartments has to be intensified. Colloids in river water represent the geologic setting, environmental conditions, and the anthropogenic use in its catchment. The river not only acts as a sink for nanoparticles but also as the source term due to exchange in the hyporheic zone and in bank filtration setups. The concentration, size distribution and elemental composition of particles in the River Inn were studied from the source in the Swiss Alps to the river mouth at Passau from 2008 to 2014. Samples were collected after each tributary from a sub-catchment and filtered on site using a new filtration device for gentle filtration. The elemental composition was determined after acid digestion with ICP/MS. SEM/EDX analysis provided morphological and elemental information for single particles. A complementary chemical analysis of the river water was performed to assess the geochemical stability of individual particles. As presented at EGU 2014, particles in the upper, rural parts mainly reveal changes in the geological setting of the tributary catchments. Not unexpectedly, particles originating from crystalline rocks, were more stable than particles originating from calcareous rocks. Anthropogenic and industrial influences increase in the lower parts. This went together with a change of the size distribution, an increase of the number of organic particles, and a decrease of the microfauna. Interestingly, specific leisure activities in a sub-catchment, like extensive downhill skiing, manifest itself in the particle composition. This general setting was validated in last year's sampling campaigns. An interesting change in on site parameters and hydrochemical composition was seen during all sampling campaigns at an inflow from the valley Kaunertal, Austria. Therefore

  14. Konocti Harbon Inn, Kelseyville, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    Konocti Harbor is a large resort complex, located on the shore of Clear Lake, in Kelseyville, California. A number of buildings on the property, including a 25,000 square foot lodge, 101 motel units and 48 apartment units are heated by the large water-to-water heat pumps, using water from the lake as a heat source. Due to low winter occupancy rates, these machines are run at very low capacity. In addition, a number of buildings are operated on electric resistance and propane backup boilers. This mode of operation results in a relatively high cost compared to the actual heating requirements. Since these systems were originally designed for low temperature water (125/sup 0/F supply 10/sup 0/..delta..t), a low temperature geothermal resource could potentially displace some of the conventional fuel currently used. The potential for geothermal use at the Konocti Harbor Inn is explored.

  15. Colloids in the River Inn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Baumann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    In the light of an increasing number of technical applications using nanoparticles and reports of adverse effects of engineered nanoparticles, research on the occurrence and stability of particles in all compartments has to be intensified. Colloids in river water represent the geologic setting, environmental conditions, and the anthropogenic use in its catchment. The river not only acts as a sink for nanoparticles but also as the source term due to exchange in the hyporheic zone and in bank filtration setups. The concentration, size distribution and elemental composition of particles in the River Inn were studied from the source in the Swiss Alps to the river mouth at Passau. Samples were collected after each tributary from a sub-catchment and filtered on-site. The elemental composition was determined after acid digestion with ICP/MS. SEM/EDX analyses provided morphological and elemental information for single particles. A complementary chemical analysis of the river water was performed to assess the geochemical stability of indvidual particles. Particles in the upper, rural parts mainly reveal changes in the geological setting of the tributary catchments. Not unexpectedly, particles originating from crystalline rocks, were more stable than particles originating from calcareous rocks. Anthropogenic and industrial influences increase in the lower parts. This went together with a change of the size distribution, an increase of the number of organic particles, and a decrease of the microfauna. Interestingly, specific leisure activities in a sub-catchment, like extensive downhill skiing, manifest itself in the particle composition.

  16. 75 FR 43815 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Clemson, SC and Establishment of Class E Airspace: Pickens, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... amend Class E airspace at Clemson, SC and establish Class E airspace at Pickens, SC (75 FR 13697) Docket... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Clemson, SC and Establishment of Class E Airspace: Pickens, SC AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION:...

  17. Prospects for the Faculty Labor Market in the 1990s: A Clemson University Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulbrich, Holley

    Through a faculty retirement survey and a review of the literature, Clemson University, South Carolina, studied the future labor market for college faculty. The survey was administered to 1,250 faculty at the university in Fall, 1991. Fifty-six responded with data indicating that the College of Sciences, and the College of Agricultural Sciences…

  18. A Study of Grade Inflation in Ten Majors at Clemson University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamby, John V.; And Others

    Grades of 1982 Clemson graduates in various academic majors were studied. In addition to determining whether grade inflation occurs differentially across majors, the position of education majors was compared to that of other majors. The following 10 majors were assessed: early childhood education, elementary education, secondary education/science…

  19. Astronaut Joins Clemson to Promote the Value of Integrative STEM Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology and Engineering Teacher, 2013

    2013-01-01

    NASA and astronaut Patrick Forrester recently teamed up with Clemson University's College of Health Education and Human Development (HEHD) to promote STEM teaching and learning in the Upstate (SC) community. A goal of HEHD is to extend integrative STEM education opportunities to all teachers and their students in South Carolina. NASA space…

  20. Investigating the Use of Design Methods by Capstone Design Students at Clemson University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, W. Stuart; Summers, Joshua D.

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe a preliminary study to understand the attitude of engineering students regarding the use of design methods in projects to identify the factors either affecting or influencing the use of these methods by novice engineers. A senior undergraduate capstone design course at Clemson University, consisting of approximately fifty…

  1. Growth of InN hexagonal microdisks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen-Chi; Lo, Ikai; Hu, Chia-Hsuan; Huang, Hui-Chun; Chou, Mitch M. C.

    2016-08-01

    InN hexagonal thin wurtzite disks were grown on γ-LiAlO2 by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy at low temperature (470oC). The ( 000 1 ¯ ) InN thin disk was established with the capture of N atoms by the β ¯ -dangling bonds of most-outside In atoms, and then the lateral over-growth of the In atoms were caught by the β ¯ -dangling bonds of the N atoms. From the analyses of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, the lateral over-grown width was extended to three unit cells at [ 1 1 ¯ 00 ]InN direction for a unit step-layer, resulting in an oblique surface with 73o off c-axis.

  2. Metal partitioning and availability in estuarine surface sediments: Changes promoted by feeding activity of Scrobicularia plana and Liza ramada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Sílvia; Duarte, Bernardo; Reis, Givaldo; Pereira, Eduarda; Duarte, Armando C.; Costa, José Lino; Caçador, Isabel; Almeida, Pedro Raposo de

    2015-12-01

    Several works have evidenced in the past the importance and influence of plants and terrestrial invertebrates in metal availability in soils and sediments through changes in metal speciation. In contrast, the impact of estuarine invertebrates and fishes in this process has been poorly explored. The partition of metals in estuarine surface sediments was studied in a controlled environment according to four operationally defined fractions. Sediments were analyzed before and after the passage through the gut of two detritivorous species. Scrobicularia plana feeds on the bottom and suspended sediment particles through the inhalant siphon. Liza ramada is an interface feeder, filtering the superficial layer of the sediment and suspended particles in the water column. Cd, Cu and Ni bound to carbonates increased in the pellets of S. plana, compared with the ingested sediment, as did exchangeable Zn. Similarly, Cd and Zn bound to carbonates have also increased in the pellets of L. ramada; on the contrary, a decrease of Ni was observable in the pellets of this fish. The outcome of the controlled experiments pointed to a potential increase in some metals' availability in the estuarine environment, as a result of the more mobile metal forms in the excreted fecal pellets. This draws the attention to a relevant impact of the trophic activity of both species, alongside with the potential enhancement brought to it by the bioturbation promoted by them, in the role that the estuary itself has as a contaminants' buffer.

  3. Gonadal Disorder in the Thinlip Grey Mullet (Liza ramada, Risso 1827) as a Biomarker of Environmental Stress in Surface Waters

    PubMed Central

    Tancioni, Lorenzo; Caprioli, Riccardo; Dawood Al-Khafaji, Ayad Hantoosh; Mancini, Laura; Boglione, Clara; Ciccotti, Eleonora; Cataudella, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of gonadal alterations in the thinlip grey mullet (Liza ramada) as a biological indicator in assessing aquatic ecosystems health, with particular emphasis to river ecosystems exposed to sewage discharges. For this purpose, the reproductive status and the presence of gonadal alterations were studied in 206 mullets collected from two sites on the low course of the Tiber River, downstream of a large urban sewage treatment plant and in the estuarine area, and from an uncontaminated pond considered as reference site. Intersex and irregularly shaped gonads were observed in 20.8% of the mullets from the most polluted site, and intersex gonads in 10.3% of those from the estuarine area. No alterations were detected in the fish from the reference site, which also showed distinct stages of gonadal development. Conversely, unclear stages of testicular and ovary development were observed in the fish from the two polluted river sites. The results of this study suggest that L. ramada may represent a sentinel species in environmental risk assessment and support the use of gonadal alterations of this species as a bioindicator for extensive monitoring of pollution in lower stretches of rivers and estuarine areas. PMID:25664693

  4. Feeding ecology of Liza ramada (Risso, 1810) (Pisces, Mugilidae) in a south-western estuary of Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, P. R.

    2003-05-01

    The feeding activity of the Liza ramada population inhabiting the Mira estuary (Portugal) is reduced during the winter and summer months. At the beginning of the spawning migration (i.e. November) an increase in the amount of food ingested was noticed. In the upper estuary, the feeding behaviour is independent of the tidal cycle, although there is some evidence of a daily rhythm in the food consumption rate, with a reduction during the night. No significant correlation was found between the quantity of particulate organic matter and the concentration of microalgae present in the stomach contents, and it seems that the bulk of the organic matter ingested by the thin-lipped grey mullets comes from a different origin than planktonic or benthic microalgae. The L. ramada population showed a positive selection for sediment particles between 55 and 250 μm in diameter. In general, the diet composition of this species showed a low diversity of food items. A total of 52 food items were identified in the stomach contents, the Bacillariophyceae being the dominant group. The genera Melosira and Ciclotella were the most common and abundant food items, although the genera Navicula, Nitzschia and Surirella were also classified as preferential food items. It was found that the volume of ploughed sediment that resulted from the feeding activity of the thin-lipped grey mullets, and the correspondent disturbed area increased exponentially with the length of the fish.

  5. 16. LOOKING WEST AT OLD FAITHFUL INN, MOST OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. LOOKING WEST AT OLD FAITHFUL INN, MOST OF THE EAST WING IS VISIBLE TO THE LEFT. THE EAST WING ADDITION WAS BUILT BY THE INN'S ORIGINAL ARCHITECT, ROBERT C. REAMER IN 1913-14. - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  6. 3. View to southeast from hillside behind Inn. Roof of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View to southeast from hillside behind Inn. Roof of 'Big Sur Inn' Building (HABS-CA-2611-A) at lower center, State Highway 1 bridge across Castro Creek Canyon at upper center. - Deetjen's Big Sur Inn, East Side of State Highway 1, Big Sur, Monterey County, CA

  7. Taming transport in InN

    SciTech Connect

    Ager III, Joel W.; Miller, Nate R.

    2011-05-29

    The large electron affinity of InN, close to 6 eV and the largest of any III-V semiconductor, creates a strong driving force for native donor formation, both in the bulk and at surfaces and interfaces. Moreover, all InN surfaces, regardless of crystal orientation or doping, have been observed to have a surface accumulation layer of electrons, which interferes with standard electrical measurements. For these reasons, until recently, it was uncertain whether or not compensation by donor defects would prevent “real” p-type activity (i.e. existence of sufficiently shallow acceptors and mobile holes). A coordinated experimental approach using a combination of electrical (Hall effect) and electrothermal (Seebeck coefficient) measurements will be described that allows definitive evaluation of carrier transport in InN. In Mg-doped InN films, the sensitivity of thermopower to bulk hole conduction, combined with modeling of the parallel conducting layers (surface/bulk/interface), enables quantitative measurement of the free hole concentration and mobility. In undoped (n-type) material, combined Hall and thermopower measurements, along with a considering of the scattering mechanisms, leads to a quantitative understanding of the crucial role of charged line defects in limiting electron transport.

  8. Mg doped InN and confirmation of free holes in InN

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Miller, N.; Mayer, M. A.; Haller, E. E.; Iwamoto, R.; Araki, T.; Nanishi, Y.; Yu, K. M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager, J. W. III

    2011-01-24

    We report a systematic investigation on Mg doped InN epilayers grown by radio-frequency plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Electrolyte capacitance voltage (ECV) combined with thermopower measurements find p-type conduction over an Mg concentration range. For InN:Mg in this p-type 'window' the Seebeck coefficients dramatically change their signs from negative to positive when the thickness of undoped InN interlayer decreases to zero. This notable sign change of Seebeck coefficient explains the previous inconsistency between ECV and thermopower results and confirms the existence of mobile holes in the InN:Mg. Taking into account the undoped InN interlayer, the hole density and mobility are extracted.

  9. 1. View north from across State Highway 1 toward Inn. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View north from across State Highway 1 toward Inn. 'Big Sur Inn' Building (HABS-CA-2611-A) visible at left, 'Hayloft' Building (HABS-CA-2611-B at right center, and 'Antique' Building (HABS-CA-2611-C) and 'Champagne' Building (HABS-CA-2611-D) out of sight behind trees at right. - Deetjen's Big Sur Inn, East Side of State Highway 1, Big Sur, Monterey County, CA

  10. Investigation of gas sensing properties of InN nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Madapu, Kishore K. E-mail: dhara@igcar.gov.in; Prasad, A. K.; Tyagi, A. K.; Dhara, S. E-mail: dhara@igcar.gov.in

    2015-06-24

    InN nanoparticles were grown by chemical vapor deposition technique using In{sub 2}O{sub 3} as precursor material. Raman spectroscopic studies show the presence of the wurtzite phase of as-grown InN. Size of the nanoparticles were in range from quantum dot (<8 nm) to larger sized particles (100 nm). We studied the gas sensing properties of InN nanoparticles with CH{sub 4} gas. Sensors substrates were fabricated with interdigitated Au electrodes. InN nanoparticles show high response towards CH{sub 4} with minimum detectable concentration of 50 ppm at 200 °C.

  11. 21. REAR OF OLD FAITHFUL INN, LOOKING NORTH. SEMICIRCULAR SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. REAR OF OLD FAITHFUL INN, LOOKING NORTH. SEMI-CIRCULAR SIDE DINING ROOM, NOW CALLED THE BEAR PIT WAS ADDED IN 1927. (TAKEN FROM CHERRY-PICKER) - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  12. Solar Hot Water for Motor Inn--Texas City, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Final report describes solar domestic-hot-water heater installation at LaQuinta Motor Inn, Texas City, Texas which furnished 63% of total hot-water load of new 98-unit inn. Report presents a description of system, drawings and photographs of collectors, operations and maintenance instructions, manufacturers' specifications for pumps, and an engineer's report on performance.

  13. Research and education on fiber-based materials for nanofluidics at Clemson University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornev, Konstantin G.

    2007-11-01

    Advanced materials and the science and engineering related to their design, process, test and manufacture represents one of the fast growing sectors of the Materials Science and Engineering field. Awareness of existing process, performance, manufacturing or recycle-ability issues and limitations, often dictates the next generation of advances needed to improve existing or create new materials. To compete in this growing science and technology area, trained experts must possess strong academic skills in their discipline as well as advanced communication, networking and cultural teamwork experience. Clemson's School of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), is continuing to expand our program to focus on unique capabilities which support local, regional and national needs in advanced materials. Specifically, MSE at Clemson is evolving to highlight intrinsic strengths in research and education areas related to optical materials, advanced fibers and composites (based on inorganic, organic and natural fibers), biomaterials and devices, and architectural and restoration material science (including the conservation and preservation of maritime structures). Additionally, we continue to invest in our expertise in materials design and fabrication, which has historically supported our well known programs in ceramics and textiles. In addition to a brief review of the School's forward-looking challenges to remain competitive among strong southeast regional materials science programs, this presentation will also highlight recent technical advances in fiber-based materials for nanofluidic applications. Specifically we will present recent results on design of fiber-based nanofluidics for sensor applications and we will discuss some physical phenomena associated with liquid transport at nanoscale.

  14. Stabilize ash using Clemson`s sintering process (Part 1 -- Phase 1 results): Mixed waste fly ash stabilization. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-12-01

    Incineration of applicable Department of Energy (DOE) mixed wastes has produced a secondary waste stream of radioactive and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous fly ash that also requires treatment before land disposal. Unlike bottom ash, fly ash usually contains constituents making efficient stabilization difficult. For example, fly ash from the DOE Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) incinerator at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains volatile metals, metal salts, high concentrations of zinc, and unburned organic residues. All of these constituents can effect the stabilization process. The Department of Energy, and in particular the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) of EM-50, has stated the need for improved stabilization methods would accept a higher ash waste loading while meeting waste form disposal criteria. These alternative stabilization technologies should include delivery systems to minimize worker exposure and minimize secondary waste generation, while maximizing operational flexibility and radionuclide containment. Currently, the standard practice for stabilizing ash is mixing with Portland cement at room temperature. This standard practice produces a significant increase of waste material volume or has difficulty in adequately stabilizing the components in the fly ash to ensure regulatory requirements are consistently satisfied. To address these fly ash stabilization shortcomings, the MWFA, a DOE/EM-50 program, invested in the development of several fly ash stabilization alternatives, including the Clemson University sintering method.

  15. 75 FR 13697 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Clemson, SC and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Pickens, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Clemson, SC and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Pickens, SC AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION..., SC, to correct the airspace description and establish Class E airspace at Pickens, SC, to achieve...

  16. First multicharged ion irradiation results from the CUEBIT facility at Clemson University

    SciTech Connect

    Shyam, R.; Kulkarni, D. D.; Field, D. A.; Srinadhu, E. S.; Harriss, J. E.; Cutshall, D. B.; Harrell, W. R.; Sosolik, C. E.

    2015-01-09

    A new electron beam ion trap (EBIT) based ion source and beamline were recently commissioned at Clemson University to produce decelerated beams of multi- to highly-charged ions for surface and materials physics research. This user facility is the first installation of a DREEBIT-designed superconducting trap and ion source (EBIS-SC) in the U.S. and includes custom-designed target preparation and irradiation setups. An overview of the source, beamline, and other facilities as well as results from first measurements on irradiated targets are discussed here. Results include extracted charge state distributions and first data on a series of irradiated metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) device targets. For the MOS devices, we show that voltage-dependent capacitance can serve as a record of the electronic component of ion stopping power for an irradiated, encapsulated oxide target.

  17. First multicharged ion irradiation results from the CUEBIT facility at Clemson University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyam, R.; Kulkarni, D. D.; Field, D. A.; Srinadhu, E. S.; Cutshall, D. B.; Harrell, W. R.; Harriss, J. E.; Sosolik, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    A new electron beam ion trap (EBIT) based ion source and beamline were recently commissioned at Clemson University to produce decelerated beams of multi- to highly-charged ions for surface and materials physics research. This user facility is the first installation of a DREEBIT-designed superconducting trap and ion source (EBIS-SC) in the U.S. and includes custom-designed target preparation and irradiation setups. An overview of the source, beamline, and other facilities as well as results from first measurements on irradiated targets are discussed here. Results include extracted charge state distributions and first data on a series of irradiated metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) device targets. For the MOS devices, we show that voltage-dependent capacitance can serve as a record of the electronic component of ion stopping power for an irradiated, encapsulated oxide target.

  18. Nuclear Astrophysics Animations from the Nuclear Astrophysics Group at Clemson University

    DOE Data Explorer

    Meyer, Bradley; The, Lih-Sin

    The nuclear astrophysics group at Clemson University in South Carolina develops on-line tools and computer programs for astronomy, nuclear physics, and nuclear astrophysics. They have also done short animations that illustrate results from research with some of their tools. The animations are organized into three sections. The r-Process Movies demonstrate r-Process network calculations from the paper "Neutrino Capture and the R-Process" Meyer, McLaughlin, and Fuller, Phys. Rev. C, 58, 3696-3710 (1998). The Alpha-Rich Freezeout Movies are related to the reference: Standard alpha-rich freezeout calculation from The, Clayton, Jin, and Meyer 1998, Astrophysical Journal, "Reaction Rates Governing the Synthesis of 44Ti" At the current writing, the category for Low Metallicity s-Process Movies has only one item called n, p, 13C, 14N, 54Fe, and 88Sr Time evolution in convective zone.

  19. The INNs and outs of antibody nonproprietary names

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tim D.; Carter, Paul J.; Plückthun, Andreas; Vásquez, Max; Holgate, Robert G.E.; Hötzel, Isidro; Popplewell, Andrew G.; Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Enzelberger, Markus; Rademaker, Hendrik J.; Clark, Michael R.; Lowe, David C.; Dahiyat, Bassil I.; Smith, Victoria; Lambert, John M.; Wu, Herren; Reilly, Mary; Haurum, John S.; Dübel, Stefan; Huston, James S.; Schirrmann, Thomas; Janssen, Richard A.J.; Steegmaier, Martin; Gross, Jane A.; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.; Burton, Dennis R.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Chester, Kerry A.; Glennie, Martin J.; Davies, Julian; Walker, Adam; Martin, Steve; McCafferty, John; Baker, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    An important step in drug development is the assignment of an International Nonproprietary Name (INN) by the World Health Organization (WHO) that provides healthcare professionals with a unique and universally available designated name to identify each pharmaceutical substance. Monoclonal antibody INNs comprise a –mab suffix preceded by a substem indicating the antibody type, e.g., chimeric (-xi-), humanized (-zu-), or human (-u-). The WHO publishes INN definitions that specify how new monoclonal antibody therapeutics are categorized and adapts the definitions to new technologies. However, rapid progress in antibody technologies has blurred the boundaries between existing antibody categories and created a burgeoning array of new antibody formats. Thus, revising the INN system for antibodies is akin to aiming for a rapidly moving target. The WHO recently revised INN definitions for antibodies now to be based on amino acid sequence identity. These new definitions, however, are critically flawed as they are ambiguous and go against decades of scientific literature. A key concern is the imposition of an arbitrary threshold for identity against human germline antibody variable region sequences. This leads to inconsistent classification of somatically mutated human antibodies, humanized antibodies as well as antibodies derived from semi-synthetic/synthetic libraries and transgenic animals. Such sequence-based classification implies clear functional distinction between categories (e.g., immunogenicity). However, there is no scientific evidence to support this. Dialog between the WHO INN Expert Group and key stakeholders is needed to develop a new INN system for antibodies and to avoid confusion and miscommunication between researchers and clinicians prescribing antibodies. PMID:26716992

  20. Nanogenerators based on vertically aligned InN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guocheng; Zhao, Songrui; Henderson, Robert D E; Leonenko, Zoya; Abdel-Rahman, Eihab; Mi, Zetian; Ban, Dayan

    2016-01-28

    Piezoelectric nanogenerators (NGs) based on vertically aligned InN nanowires (NWs) are fabricated, characterized, and evaluated. In these NGs, arrays of p-type and intrinsic InN NWs prepared by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) demonstrate similar piezoelectric properties. The p-type NGs show 160% more output current and 70% more output power product than the intrinsic NGs. The features driving performance enhancement are reduced electrostatic losses due to better NW array morphology, improved electromechanical energy conversion efficiency due to smaller NW diameters, and the higher impedance of intrinsic NGs due to elevated NW surface charge levels. These findings highlight the potential of InN based NGs as a power source for self-powered systems and the importance of NW morphology and surface state in overall NG performance. PMID:26700694

  1. InN Quantum Dot Based Infra-Red Photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Arjun; Kumar, Mahesh; Roull, Basanta; Vinoy, K J; Krupanidhj, S B

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembled InN quantum dots (QDs) were grown on Si(111) substrate using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA-MBE). Single-crystalline wurtzite structure of InN QDs was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The dot densities were varied by varying the indium flux. Variation of dot density was confirmed by FESEM images. Interdigitated electrodes were fabricated using standard lithog- raphy steps to form metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetector devices. The devices show strong infrared response. It was found that the samples with higher density of InN QDs showed lower dark current and higher photo current. An explanation was provided for the observations and the experimental results were validated using Silvaco Atlas device simulator. PMID:27398511

  2. The Children's Inn at NIH turns 25 | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... a supportive environment, including therapeutic, educational, and recreational programming. Dalvin plays board games at The Inn's Woodmont ... Clinical Center. The Inn has a playroom, kids' computer room, bistro, game room, learning center, business center, ...

  3. The Children's Inn at NIH Anniversary Key Messages | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 37 sleeping rooms. The Inn opened a major expansion in May 2004, adding a new wing with ... Merck donated another $3.7 million for the expansion project. fast facts 1 The Children's Inn, located ...

  4. Optical properties of InN related to surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubina, T. V.; Leymarie, J.; Jmerik, V. N.; Toropov, A. A.; Vasson, A.; Amano, H.; Schaff, W. J.; Monemar, B.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2005-11-01

    We report on the complex nature of infrared luminescence and absorption in InN films, which cannot be entirely explained by the concept of a conventional narrow-gap semiconductor. In particular, it concerns the detection of peaks near absorption edges by both thermally detected optical absorption and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy and the observation of extraordinarily strong resonant enhancement of emission. To describe the experimental data a model is proposed, which takes into account surface plasmons in metal-like inclusions, modifying the optical properties of InN.

  5. Clemson University Science Master's Program in Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure: A program evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sell, Elizabeth Eberhart

    The Clemson University Science Master's Program (SMP) in Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure is a program which aims to link engineering, materials, construction, environment, architecture, business, and public policy to produce graduates with unique holistic perspective and expertise to immediately contribute to the workforce in the area of sustainable and resilient infrastructure. A program evaluation of the SMP has been performed to study the effectiveness of the SMP and identify areas where the goals and vision of the SMP are achieved and areas where improvements can be made. This was completed by analysis of trends within survey responses, review of Master's thesis reports, and review of courses taken. It was found that the SMP has facilitated new interdisciplinary research collaborations of faculty in different concentration areas within the Glenn Department of Civil Engineering, as well as collaboration with faculty in other departments. It is recommended that a course which provides instruction in all eight competency areas be required for all SMP students to provide a comprehensive overview and ensure all students are exposed to concepts of all competency areas. While all stakeholders are satisfied with the program and believe it has been successful thus far, efforts do need to be made as the program moves forward to address and improve some items that have been mentioned as needing improvement. The concerns about concentration courses, internship planning, and advising should be addressed. This evaluation provides benefits to prospective students, current SMP participants, and outside program supporters. The goal of this evaluation is to provide support that the SMP is an effective and worthwhile program for participating students, while attempting to identify any necessary program improvements and provide recommendations for achieving these improvements. This goal has been accomplished.

  6. Assessment of biological effects of environmental pollution in Mersin Bay (Turkey, northeastern Mediterranean Sea) using Mullus barbatus and Liza ramada as target organisms.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Doruk; Kalay, Mustafa; Dönmez, Erdem; Yılmaz, Nejat

    2016-01-01

    The increasing emphasis on the assessment and monitoring of marine ecosystems has revealed the need to use appropriate biological indicators for these areas. Enzyme activities and histopathology are increasingly being used as indicators of environmental stress since they provide a definite biological end-point of pollutant exposure. As part of an ecotoxicological assessment of Mersin Bay, EROD enzyme activity and histopathological response in selected organs and tissues of two species of fish, Mullus barbatus (red mullet) and Liza ramada (thinlip grey mullet), captured from area were examined. Pollutant (Organochlorines (OC), alkylphenols (APs) and BPA) levels and biomarker responses in tissue samples were evaluated together for their potential to alter the metabolism and cellular aspects in liver and gonad. Elevated induction of EROD activity and histopathological alterations in contaminated samples from Mersin Bay was observed compared to reference site indicating the exposure to potential pollutants.

  7. Hot Water for Motor Inn--Garland, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    35-page report describes solar collector system and its operation and presents projected system performance. Details calibration and maintenance procedures and lists and describes equipment that makes up system. System provides hot water for laundry, for showers and sinks in inn rooms.

  8. Solar Hot Water for a Motor Inn -- Las Vegas, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Solar hot-water installation at motor inn in Las Vegas, Nevada is described in report containing descriptions of design, philosophy, operation of system and problems and solutions. Provides drawings of solar roof plan, operator's instructions, manufacturers' brochures and copy of acceptance report.

  9. Melter performance during surrogate vitrification campaigns at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research at Clemson University

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J.C.; Overcamp, T.J.

    1995-10-05

    This report summarizes the results from seven melter campaigns performed at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research at Clemson University. A brief description of the EnVitco EV-16 Joule heated glass melter and the Stir-Melter WV-0.25 stirred melter are included for reference. The report discusses each waste stream examined, glass formulations developed and utilized, specifics relating to melter operation, and a synopsis of the results from the campaigns. A `lessons learned` section is included for each melter to emphasize repeated processing problems and identify parameters which are considered extremely important to successful melter operation

  10. Temperature switching of cavity modes in InN microcrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kazanov, D. R. Kaibyshev, V. H.; Davydov, V. Yu.; Smirnov, A. N.; Jmerik, V. N.; Kuznetsova, N. V.; Kopiev, P. S.; Ivanov, S. V.; Shubina, T. V.

    2015-11-15

    InN optical cavities supporting low-order whispering-gallery modes up to room temperature are formed by molecular-beam epitaxy on patterned substrates. The observed switching of the mode type with increasing temperature is explained in terms of changes in the optical parameters due to a shift of the absorption edge and modification of its shape. Modeling taking into account a variation in the refractive index reproduces the typical distributions of the electromagnetic-field intensity in the cavities.

  11. Genesis and Eruptive Dynamics of the Garnet-Bearing Rhyolites from the Ramadas Volcanic Centre (Altiplano-Puna Plateau, Central Andes, Argentina).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Astis, G.; Baez, W.; Bardelli, L.; Becchio, R.; Giordano, G.; Lucci, F.; Rossetti, F.; Viramonte, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Ramadas volcanic centre (6.6 Ma) is a monogenetic calderic depression, now largely obliterated, almost coeval with the Late Miocene outbreak of highly explosive silicic activity in the Altiplano-Puna plateau. Ramadas erupted a rather complex suite of garnet-bearing, rhyolitic pyroclastic rocks, dominated by a >35 km3 fall deposit and preceded by the emplacement of a lag breccia containing abundant metasedimentary lithics and garnet-tourmaline leucogranites. During the waning stage of the eruption, small volume phreatomagmatic deposits formed a small tuff-ring, followed by a lava coulée emplacement. Volcanological data together with textural features of typical tube pumice evidence a volatiles-rich, plinian eruption. Petrographic and textural studies on juveniles confirm the presence of euhedral garnet as dominant phase and identify micrometric metaigneous fragments (Qtz+Bt+Kfs+Mt+Tur). BSE imaging and microprobe analyses on glasses, garnets and accessory mineral phases (zircon and monazite) provide further data to understand the genesis and eruptive conditions of these atypical rhyolites, geochemically different from those outcropping in the same region. Garnets display a homogeneous, unzoned almandine-spessartine composition (Alm72-71Sps24-23Pyr0-1Grs4-3) and are contained in a glassy rhyolitic magma with peraluminous character, HREE depleted and relative LREE enriched. It's known that primary igneous garnets are rare and can only develop under restricted conditions. Additionally, the presence of Zr and Mnz is associated with both magmatic and high-T metamorphic processes. Although more data need to be collected, our study and preliminary modelling point to the occurrence of thermal metamorphism shifting to partial melting of Fe-MnO-rich metapelitic rocks (or even re-melting of older acid volcanics), with final extraction of volatiles-rich rhyolitic melts, able to produce a plinian eruption. Here, Alm-Sps garnet could represent the peritectic product of the

  12. Self-compensation in highly n-type InN

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, C.; Tuomisto, F.; King, P. D. C.; Veal, T. D.; Lu, H.; Schaff, W. J.

    2012-07-02

    Acceptor-type defects in highly n-type InN are probed using positron annihilation spectroscopy. Results are compared to Hall effect measurements and calculated electron mobilities. Based on this, self-compensation in n-type InN is studied, and the microscopic origin of compensating and scattering centers in irradiated and Si-doped InN is discussed. We find significant compensation through negatively charged indium vacancy complexes as well as additional acceptor-type defects with no or small effective open volume, which act as scattering centers in highly n-type InN samples.

  13. Convergence of valence bands for high thermoelectric performance for p-type InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-Zhu; Li, Ruo-Ping; Liu, Jun-Hui; Huang, Ming-Ju

    2015-12-01

    Band engineering to converge the bands to achieve high valley degeneracy is one of effective approaches for designing ideal thermoelectric materials. Convergence of many valleys in the valence band may lead to a high Seebeck coefficient, and induce promising thermoelectric performance of p-type InN. In the current work, we have systematically investigated the electronic structure and thermoelectric performance of wurtzite InN by using the density functional theory combined with semiclassical Boltzmann transport theory. Form the results, it can be found that intrinsic InN has a large Seebeck coefficient (254 μV/K) and the largest value of ZeT is 0.77. The transport properties of p-type InN are better than that of n-type one at the optimum carrier concentration, which mainly due to the large Seebeck coefficient for p-type InN, although the electrical conductivity of n-type InN is larger than that of p-type one. We found that the larger Seebeck coefficient for p-type InN may originate from the large valley degeneracy in the valence band. Moreover, the low minimum lattice thermal conductivity for InN is one key factor to become a good thermoelectric material. Therefore, p-type InN could be a potential material for further applications in the thermoelectric area.

  14. The Little Inn at the Crossroads: A Spiritual Approach to the Design of a Leadership Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bento, Regina F.

    2000-01-01

    A course on spiritual dimensions of leadership was designed using the metaphor of an inn at a crossroads. The inn included a virtual library of Web-based texts and studio space for creativity and self-expression. Seven workshops explored the following themes: language of leadership and change, personal leadership qualities, vision and mission,…

  15. The Children's Inn at NIH - Three Stories | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... and her family have come to consider The Children's Inn their "home away from home." "Staying at The Inn helps ... I love being a school nurse and helping children be successful in the school ... Dr. Brian Brooks uses a puppet during a young patient's eye exam ...

  16. The origin of an unusual tuff ring of perlitic rhyolite pyroclasts: The last explosive phase of the Ramadas Volcanic Centre, Andean Puna, Salta, NW Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, M. A.; Cas, R. A. F.; Viramonte, J. G.

    2009-05-01

    A thick sequence of bedded pyroclastic deposits, comprised largely of crystal poor, partially flow-banded perlite fragments defines the remains of a tuff ring around the eastern margin of the Miocene Ramadas Volcanic Centre (RVC), Central Andes, NW Argentina. In numerous quarry exposures, planar bed-forms dominate, but low-angle cross-stratification, lensoidal truncations and lateral pinching and swelling of cm-dm scale bed-forms occur, consistent with pyroclastic surge as the dominant transport and depositional mechanism. Intercalated are mantling, very fine grained, well-sorted, mm-cm scale planar ash layers that represent deposition from pyroclastic fall out and are most likely the products of co-surge ash clouds. Also observed are thick m-scale, laterally continuous, poorly-sorted horizons that are interpreted as pyroclastic flow deposits. Grainsize variations within the > 70 m thick succession range from fine ash to coarse lapilli, with occasional large blocks reaching 20 cm. Clast vesicularities are typically very low. The sequence constitutes a rhyolitic tuff ring around the proximal margins of the RVC. Stratigraphic relationships indicate that the tuff ring was developed following cessation of the major plinian eruption phase of the RVC. A series of pyroclastic density currents and associated ash clouds is inferred to have resulted in the construction of the rhyolitic tuff ring, with deposition focussed on the eastern and southern margins of the central vent. The fine-grained nature of the deposits and low clast vesicularity are consistent with some degree of magma:water interaction during fragmentation. Pervasive perlitic fracturing of clasts found within the tuff deposits also indicates hydration and an extended, post-depositional hydration of the pyroclastic sequence, due to the influence of meteoric water, is likely to have occurred, with deposit permeability, clast specific surface and climate influential in facilitating additional textural

  17. Geothermal heating facilities for Frontier Inn, Susanville, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-03-01

    A 38 unit motel composed of six major sections (coffee shop, A frame units, apartments, back units, two story units and office) was built over a number of years and exhibits widely varying types of construction. Space heating is provided by primarily electric resistance equipment with some propane use. Domestic hot water is provided primarily by propane with some electric resistance. The coffee shop uses fuel oil for both space and domestic hot water heating. A geothermal district heating system is being installed. Although the motel site is not located in the area of construction activity, it is expected that the pipeline will be extended. The potential of retrofitting the existing heating facilities at the inn to geothermal is studied.

  18. Photoluminescence properties of Mg-doped InN nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Songrui; Liu, Xuedong; Mi, Zetian

    2013-11-11

    In this work, photoluminescence (PL) properties of nearly defect-free Mg-doped InN nanowires were investigated in detail. The low-doped sample exhibits two PL emission peaks up to 152 K, which can be ascribed to the band-to-band recombination and the Mg-acceptor energy level related recombination, respectively. For the high-doped sample, the Mg-acceptor energy level related transition dominates. Detailed power dependent PL studies further indicate that the Mg-acceptor energy level related PL emission is due to the donor-acceptor pair recombination process, which subsequently evolves into the free-to-acceptor recombination with increasing temperature.

  19. Highly efficient potentiometric glucose biosensor based on functionalized InN quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvi, N. H.; Soto Rodriguez, P. E. D.; Gómez, V. J.; Kumar, Praveen; Amin, G.; Nur, O.; Willander, M.; Nötzel, R.

    2012-10-01

    We present a fast, highly sensitive, and efficient potentiometric glucose biosensor based on functionalized InN quantum-dots (QDs). The InN QDs are grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The InN QDs are bio-chemically functionalized through physical adsorption of glucose oxidase (GOD). GOD enzyme-coated InN QDs based biosensor exhibits excellent linear glucose concentration dependent electrochemical response against an Ag/AgCl reference electrode over a wide logarithmic glucose concentration range (1 × 10-5 M to 1 × 10-2 M) with a high sensitivity of 80 mV/decade. It exhibits a fast response time of less than 2 s with good stability and reusability and shows negligible response to common interferents such as ascorbic acid and uric acid. The fabricated biosensor has full potential to be an attractive candidate for blood sugar concentration detection in clinical diagnoses.

  20. Highly Sensitive and Fast Anion-Selective InN Quantum Dot Electrochemical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan Alvi, Naveed ul; Rodriguez, Paul E. D. Soto; Gómez, Victor J.; Kumar, Praveen; Willander, Magnus; Nötzel, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Epitaxial InN quantum dots (QDs) are demonstrated as ion-selective electrode for potentiometric anion concentration measurements. The sensor reveals high sensitivity above 90 mV/decade for the detection of chlorine and hydroxyl ions in sodium chloride (NaCl), calcium chloride (CaCl2), and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions. The response time is less than two seconds after which the signal is very stable and repeatable. The sensitivity for the InN QDs is about two times that for a reference InN thin film and the response time is about five times shorter. In pH buffer solutions the sensor reveals no clear response to cations. A model is presented for the high sensitivity, fast response, and ion selectivity based on the unique electronic properties of the InN surface together with the zero-dimensional nature of the QDs.

  1. InN Based Water Condensation Sensors on Glass and Flexible Plastic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Dumitru, Viorel; Costea, Stefan; Brezeanu, Mihai; Stan, George E.; Besleaga, Cristina; Galca, Aurelian C.; Ionescu, Gabriela; Ionescu, Octavian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report the realization and characterization of a condensation sensor based on indium nitride (InN) layers deposited by magnetron sputtering on glass and flexible plastic substrates, having fast response and using potentially low cost fabrication technology. The InN devices work as open gate thin film sensitive transistors. Condensed water droplets, formed on the open gate region of the sensors, deplete the electron accumulation layer on the surface of InN film, thus decreasing the current of the sensor. The current increases back to its initial value when water droplets evaporate from the exposed InN film surface. The response time is as low as 2 s.

  2. Two-dimensional electron gas in monolayer InN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W. E-mail: e.dimakis@hzdr.de; Wang, G. T.; Dimakis, E. E-mail: e.dimakis@hzdr.de; Moustakas, T. D.; Tsui, D. C.

    2014-11-24

    We report in this letter experimental results that confirm the two-dimensional nature of the electron systems in a superlattice structure of 40 InN quantum wells consisting of one monolayer of InN embedded between 10 nm GaN barriers. The electron density and mobility of the two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in these InN quantum wells are 5 × 10{sup 15 }cm{sup −2} (or 1.25 × 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2} per InN quantum well, assuming all the quantum wells are connected by diffused indium contacts) and 420 cm{sup 2}/Vs, respectively. Moreover, the diagonal resistance of the 2DES shows virtually no temperature dependence in a wide temperature range, indicating the topological nature of the 2DES.

  3. Polarity and microstructure in InN thin layers grown by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwano, N.; Nakahara, Y.; Amano, H.

    2006-06-01

    Microstructures in InN grown on sapphire (0001) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) (111) by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) were analyzed by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to clarify the growth process. Special attention was paid to the selectivity of the crystal polarity of InN. The InN thin films grown on sapphire after nitridation has a flat surface while those grown on YSZ has hillocks on the surface. The crystal polarity was determined by comparing the experimentally observed intensity distribution in convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) disks with those simulated by the Broch-wave method. It was found that the InN grown on the sapphire has a nitrogen-polarity and the one on YSZ has a mixture of In- and N-polarities. The effect of surface-nitridation of sapphire on the growth process is also discussed

  4. Accommodation mechanism of InN nanocolumns grown on Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Grandal, J.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E.; Luna, E.; Trampert, A.

    2007-07-09

    High quality InN nanocolumns have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on bare and AlN-buffered Si(111) substrates. The accommodation mechanism of the InN nanocolumns to the substrate was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Samples grown on AlN-buffered Si(111) show abrupt interfaces between the nanocolumns and the buffer layer, where an array of periodically spaced misfit dislocations develops. Samples grown on bare Si(111) exhibit a thin Si{sub x}N{sub y} at the InN nanocolumn/substrate interface because of Si nitridation. The Si{sub x}N{sub y} thickness and roughness may affect the nanocolumn relative alignment to the substrate. In all cases, InN nanocolumns grow strain- and defect-free.

  5. Mie Resonant Absorption and Infrared Emission in InN Related to Metallic Indium Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubina, T. V.; Ivanov, S. V.; Jmerik, V. N.; Solnyshkov, D. D.; Kop'ev, P. S.; Vasson, A.; Leymarie, J.; Kavokin, A.; Amano, H.; Kamiyama, S.; Iwaya, M.; Akasaki, I.; Lu, H.; Schaff, W. J.; Kasic, A.; Monemar, B.

    2005-06-01

    We demonstrate that resonant optical losses related to metallic In clusters can significantly modify absorption spectra of InN with any optical gap. Thermally detected absorption spectra with a pronounced Mie resonance are successfully simulated using a dielectric function of InN corresponding to the 1.2-1.4 eV optical gap. The resonance is observed in spectra of conventional absorption at low temperatures being smoothed out at room temperature.

  6. Growth of hexagonal and cubic InN nanowires using MOCVD with different growth temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Seok-Hyo; Ra, Yong-Ho; Lee, Young-Min; Song, Ki-Young; Cha, Jun-Ho; Lim, Hong-Chul; Kim, Dong-Wook; Suthan Kissinger, N. J.; Lee, Cheul-Ro

    2010-07-01

    We have performed a detailed investigation of the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth and characterization of InN nanowires formed on Si(1 1 1) substrates under nitrogen rich conditions. The growth of InN nanowires has been demonstrated by using an ion beam sputtered (˜10 nm) Au seeding layer prior to the initiation of growth. We tried to vary the growth temperature and pressure in order to obtain an optimum growth condition for InN nanowires. The InN nanowires were grown on the Au+In solid solution droplets caused by annealing in a nitrogen ambient at 700 °C. By applying this technique, we have achieved the formation of InN nanowires that are relatively free of dislocations and stacking faults. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed wires with diameters of 90-200 nm and lengths varying between 3 and 5 μm. Hexagonal and cubic structure is verified by high resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD) spectrum. Raman measurements show that these wurtzite InN nanowires have sharp peaks E2 (high) at 491 cm -1 and A 1 (LO) at 591 cm -1.

  7. Characterization of InN nanoparticles prepared by laser as photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khashan, Khawla S.; Abbas, Sarah F.

    2016-05-01

    Indium nitride (InN) nanoparticles (NPs) are a potentially important material for optoelectronic and high speed electronic devices. Using 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser, InN NPs suspension has been prepared by laser ablation of indium target submerged under ammonium hydroxide. FTIR determined the presence of In=N at 1114.8 cm‑1 symmetric stretching mode, and In-N bending vibration mode appears at 445.5 cm‑1. X-ray diffraction (XRD) observed the peaks (101), (110), and (220) as a reflection formation cubic InN, with an average size of 2 nm. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) image shows that the NPs have a spherical shape with particle size in the range 2-20 nm. The transmission spectra of InN NPs suspension have the maximum optical transmission edge at 1378 nm with the band gap energy of 1.2 eV. The current-voltage characteristics of InN/Si heterojunction have a good rectifying property with a spectral responsivity of about 0.797 A/W at 750 nm wavelength.

  8. Growth of very large InN microcrystals by molecular beam epitaxy using epitaxial lateral overgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Kamimura, J.; Kishino, K.; Kikuchi, A.

    2015-02-28

    Very thick InN (∼40 μm) was grown by molecular beam epitaxy using the epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) technique. In some regions, the ELO of InN was observed as expected, indicating an important step toward fabricating quasi-bulk InN substrates. Interestingly, most parts of the sample consist of large flat-topped microcrystals and well-faceted microstructures. This is likely due to local growth condition variations during ELO, which is supported by an experiment where ELO of InN was performed on a substrate with various stripe mask patterns. TEM characterization of a flat top InN microcrystal revealed few stacking faults and only related threading dislocations. Defect-free small faceted microcrystals were also observed. The thick InN crystals show a narrow photoluminescence spectrum with a peak at 0.679 eV and linewidth of 16.8 meV at 4 K.

  9. First-principles study of optical properties of InN nanosheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmazdeh, Masoud Majidiyan; Mendi, Roohallah Taghavi; Zelati, Amir; Boochani, Arash; Nofeli, Fariba

    2016-05-01

    Based on density functional theory (DFT), some optical properties of InN nanosheet, such as dielectric function, energy loss function, refractive index, reflectivity and absorption coefficient, have been calculated using the modified Becke-Johnson (mBJ) exchange-correlation potential and full potential-linearized augmented plane waves (FP-LAPW) method. The study of dielectric function show that optical properties of InN nanosheet are anisotropic and important energy range in the optical process is between low energies to 20 eV. The results indicate the plasmon energy of InN nanosheet occurs in the lower energy than bulk InN and in addition the plasmon energy in the in-plane direction is different from that perpendicular to the in-plane direction. The obtained optical gaps are 1.2 eV and 3.6 eV in perpendicular and parallel to c-axis, respectively. Study of refractive index and optical reflectivity shows that the superluminal phenomena occur in the several energy ranges for the InN nanosheet and this nanosheet has high transparency in a wide energy range. The results propose that the InN nanosheet is a good candidate for the optical communications applications, optoelectronics devices and transparent coatings.

  10. Heteroepitaxial growth of InN on GaN intermediate layer by PA-MOMBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Fang-I.; Kuo, Shou-Yi; Chen, Wei-Chun; Lin, Woei-Tyng; Wang, Wei-Lin; Chang, Li; Hsiao, Chien-Nan; Chiang, Chung-Hao

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, high-quality wurtzite indium nitride was epi-grown on sapphire substrates by plasma-assisted metal-organic molecule beam epitaxy system (PA-MOMBE). Structural and electrical properties of the InN films were significantly improved by employing a GaN buffer layer. In addition, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Hall Effect, Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy were carried out to characterize the effect of the growth temperature on structural and optoelectronic properties. It was found that highly c-axis oriented InN epilayer can be obtained by optimizing growth conditions. TEM images reveal that the epitaxially grown InN/GaN interface is sharp, and the spacing of the InN(0 0 0 2) lattice plane is about 0.57 nm. Raman spectra also show a sharp peak at 491 cm -1 attributed to the E 2(high) mode of wurtzite InN. These results indicate that the improvement of InN material quality can be achieved using heteroepitaxy on GaN/sapphire templates.

  11. Optical and structural properties of InN grown by HPCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buegler, M.; Alevli, M.; Atalay, R.; Durkaya, G.; Senevirathna, I.; Jamil, M.; Ferguson, I.; Dietz, N.

    2009-08-01

    The optical and structural properties of InN layers grown by 'High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition' (HPCVD) using a pulsed precursor approach have been studied. The study focuses on the effect of ammonia precursor exposure time and magnitude on the InN layer quality. The samples have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering, infra red reflectance spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Raman measurements and X-ray diffraction showed the grown layers to be single phase InN of high crystalline quality. The E2(high) Raman mode showed FWHM's as small as 9.2 cm-1. The FWHM's of the InN(0002) X-ray Bragg reflex in the 2Θ-Ω- scans were around 350 arcsec, with rocking curve values as low as 1152 arcsec Photoluminescence features have been observed down to 0.7 eV, where the low energy cutoff might be due to the detector limitation. The analysis of the IR reflectance spectra shows that the free carrier concentrations are as low as as 3.3•1018 cm-3 for InN layers grown on sapphire substrates.

  12. Large area InN terahertz emitters based on the lateral photo-Dember effect

    SciTech Connect

    Wallauer, Jan Grumber, Christian; Walther, Markus; Polyakov, Vladimir; Iannucci, Robert; Cimalla, Volker; Ambacher, Oliver

    2015-09-14

    Large area terahertz emitters based on the lateral photo-Dember effect in InN (indium nitride) are presented. The formation of lateral photo-Dember currents is induced by laser-illumination through a microstructured metal cover processed onto the InN substrate, causing an asymmetry in the lateral photogenerated charge carrier distribution. Our design uses simple metal structures, which are produced by conventional two-dimensional micro-structuring techniques. Having favoring properties as a photo-Dember material InN is particularly well-suited as a substrate for our emitters. We demonstrate that the emission intensity of the emitters can be significantly influenced by the structure of the metal cover leaving room for improvement by optimizing the masking structures.

  13. Formation and Temperature Effect of InN Nanodots by PA-MBE via Droplet Epitaxy Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hugo Juin-Yu; Yang, Dian-Long; Huang, Tseh-Wet; Yu, Ing-Song

    2016-05-01

    In this report, self-organized indium nitride nanodots have been grown on Si (111) by droplet epitaxy method and their density can reach as high as 2.83 × 1011 cm-2 for the growth at low temperature of 250 °C. Based on the in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction, the surface condition, indium droplets, and the formation of InN nanodots are identified during the epitaxy. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and photoluminescence measurements have shown the formation of InN nanodots as well. The growth mechanism of InN nanodots could be described via the characterizations of indium droplets and InN nanodots using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The density of the InN nanodots was less than that of the In droplets due to the surface diffusion and desorption of atoms during the nitridation and annealing process. The average size and density of InN nanodots can be controlled by the substrate temperatures during the growth. For the growth at lower temperature, we obtained the higher density and smaller average size of InN nanodots. To minimize the total surface energy, the coarsening and some preferred orientations of InN nanodots were observed for the growth at high temperature.

  14. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Tetragonal Distortion of InN Thin Films by RBS/Channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhi-Bo; Wu, Wei; Wang, Kun; Fa, Tao; Yao, Shu-De

    2009-08-01

    Rutherford backscattering and channeling spectrometry (RBS/C) are used to identify the crystalline quality (χ min = 4.87%) of an InN thin film as a function of depth, and make a non-destructive quantitative analysis of the structure, in order to analyze the tetragonal distortion of the InN thin film at the depth determined.

  15. Microstructures of InN film on 4H-SiC (0001) substrate grown by RF-MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jantawongrit, P.; Sanorpim, S.; Yaguchi, H.; Orihara, M.; Limsuwan, P.

    2015-08-01

    InN film was grown on 4H-SiC (0001) substrate by RF plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (RF-MBE). Prior to the growth of InN film, an InN buffer layer with a thickness of ∼5.5 nm was grown on the substrate. Surface morphology, microstructure and structural quality of InN film were investigated. Micro-structural defects, such as stacking faults and anti-phase domain in InN film were carefully investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that a high density of line contrasts, parallel to the growth direction (c-axis), was clearly observed in the grown InN film. Dark field TEM images recorded with diffraction vectors g=11\\bar{2}0 and g = 0002 revealed that such line contrasts evolved from a coalescence of the adjacent misoriented islands during the initial stage of the InN nucleation on the substrate surface. This InN nucleation also led to a generation of anti-phase domains. Project supported by the Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics (ThEP) and the King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi under The National Research University Project. One of the authors (S. Sanorpim) was supported by the National Research Council of Thailand (NRCT) and the Thai Government Stimulus Package 2 (TKK2555), under the Project for Establishment of Comprehensive Center for Innovative Food, Health Products and Agriculture.

  16. Electrical and electrothermal transport in InN: The roles of defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, N.; Ager, J. W.; Jones, R. E.; Smith, H. M.; Mayer, M. A.; Yu, K. M.; Hawkridge, M. E.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Haller, E. E.; Walukiewicz, W.; Schaff, W. J.; Gallinat, C.; Koblmüller, G.; Speck, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    The transport properties of Mg doped and undoped InN films are studied with capacitance-voltage, thermopower, and Hall mobility measurements. A positive Seebeck coefficient is observed for Mg doped InN confirming p-type conductivity, though high doping and structural defect density can lead to n-type films. Transport measurements of undoped films are analyzed employing Rode's iterative Boltzmann equation method. Observed thermopower, Hall mobility, and dislocation density data for undoped films are consistent with calculations including the effects of charged line defect (donor-type dislocation) scattering.

  17. Electrical and optical properties of p-type InN

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Marie A.; Choi, Soojeong; Bierwagen, Oliver; Smith, Holland M.; Haller, Eugene E.; Speck, James S.; Walukiewicz, Wladek

    2011-01-01

    We have performed comprehensive studies of optical, thermoelectric and electrical properties of Mg doped InN with varying Mg doping levels and sample thicknesses. Room temperature photoluminescence spectra show a Mg acceptor related emission and the thermopower provides clear evidence for the presence of mobile holes. Although the effects of the hole transport are clearly observed in the temperature dependent electrical properties, the sign of the apparent Hall coefficient remains negative in all samples. We show that the standard model of two electrically well connected layers (n-type surface electron accumulation and p-type bulk) does not properly describe Hall effect in p-type InN.

  18. Two-dimensional electron gas in monolayer InN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wei; Dimakis, Emmanouil; Wang, George T.; Moustakas, Theodore D.; Tsui, Daniel C.

    2014-11-24

    We report in this letter experimental results that confirm the two-dimensional nature of the electron systems in monolayer InN quantum wells embedded in GaN barriers. The electron density and mobility of the two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in these InN quantum wells are 5×1015 cm-2 and 420 cm2 /Vs, respectively. Moreover, the diagonal resistance of the 2DES shows virtually no temperature dependence in a wide temperature range, indicating the topological nature of the 2DES.

  19. Two-dimensional electron gas in monolayer InN quantum wells

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Wei; Dimakis, Emmanouil; Wang, George T.; Moustakas, Theodore D.; Tsui, Daniel C.

    2014-11-24

    We report in this letter experimental results that confirm the two-dimensional nature of the electron systems in monolayer InN quantum wells embedded in GaN barriers. The electron density and mobility of the two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in these InN quantum wells are 5×1015 cm-2 and 420 cm2 /Vs, respectively. Moreover, the diagonal resistance of the 2DES shows virtually no temperature dependence in a wide temperature range, indicating the topological nature of the 2DES.

  20. Growth mechanism and microstructure of low defect density InN (0001) In-face thin films on Si (111) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kehagias, Th.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Koukoula, T.; Komninou, Ph.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.; Tsagaraki, K.; Adikimenakis, A.

    2013-10-28

    Transmission electron microscopy has been employed to analyze the direct nucleation and growth, by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, of high quality InN (0001) In-face thin films on (111) Si substrates. Critical steps of the heteroepitaxial growth process are InN nucleation at low substrate temperature under excessively high N-flux conditions and subsequent growth of the main InN epilayer at the optimum conditions, namely, substrate temperature 400–450 °C and In/N flux ratio close to 1. InN nucleation occurs in the form of a very high density of three dimensional (3D) islands, which coalesce very fast into a low surface roughness InN film. The reduced reactivity of Si at low temperature and its fast coverage by InN limit the amount of unintentional Si nitridation by the excessively high nitrogen flux and good bonding/adhesion of the InN film directly on the Si substrate is achieved. The subsequent overgrowth of the main InN epilayer, in a layer-by-layer growth mode that enhances the lateral growth of InN, reduces significantly the crystal mosaicity and the density of threading dislocations is about an order of magnitude less compared to InN films grown using an AlN/GaN intermediate nucleation/buffer layer on Si. The InN films exhibit the In-face polarity and very smooth atomically stepped surfaces.

  1. Golf Tournament Drives in a Win for the Children’s Inn | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On September 23, golfers took to the Clustered Spires golf course in Frederick, Md., for a cause. The R&W Club Frederick hosted its inaugural golf tournament, with proceeds benefiting the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Children’s Inn.

  2. Effect of interfacial lattice mismatch on bulk carrier concentration and band gap of InN

    SciTech Connect

    Kuyyalil, Jithesh; Tangi, Malleswararao; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2012-10-15

    The issue of ambiguous values of the band gap (0.6 to 2 eV) of InN thin film in literature has been addressed by a careful experiment. We have grown wurtzite InN films by PA-MBE simultaneously on differently modified c-plane sapphire substrates and characterized by complementary structural and chemical probes. Our studies discount Mie resonances caused by metallic In segregation at grain boundaries as the reason for low band gap values ( Almost-Equal-To 0.6 eV) and also the formation of Indium oxides and oxynitrides as the cause for high band gap value ( Almost-Equal-To 2.0 eV). It is observed that polycrystallinity arising from azimuthal miss-orientation of c-oriented wurtzite InN crystals increases the carrier concentration and the band gap values. We have reviewed the band gap, carrier concentration, and effective mass of InN in literature and our own measurements, which show that the Moss-Burstein relation with a non-parabolic conduction band accounts for the observed variation of band gap with carrier concentration.

  3. Self-assembled InN micro-mushrooms by upside-down pendeoepitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, A. T. M. Golam; Yang, Fan; Esser, Bryan D.; Kent, Thomas F.; McComb, David W.; Myers, Roberto C.

    2016-06-01

    Self-assembly of hexagonal InN micro-mushrooms on Si (111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy is reported. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals hexagonal mushroom caps with smooth top surfaces and a step-like morphology at the bottom surface. A detailed growth study along with SEM measurements reveals that an upside-down pendeoepitaxy mechanism underlies the formation of these structures. Cryogenic temperature photoluminescence measurements on the InN disks show a dominant band-to-acceptor recombination peak at 0.68 eV. Cross-section annular bright field (ABF-) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) reveals that the growth of these structures occurs along the [ 000 1 bar ] crystallographic orientation (N-face). Plan-view high angle annular dark field (HAADF) STEM in the center of the micro-disks reveals a hexagonal lattice indicative of stacking faults. However, at the outskirt of the micro-disk, surprisingly, a honeycomb lattice is observed in plan view STEM indicating a perfect freestanding Wurtzite InN disk that is free of stacking faults. This result opens a pathway for realizing strain-free, freestanding InN substrates.

  4. Pressure-Induced Metallization and Superconductivity in InP and InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyakutti, K.; Rejila, V.; Rajarajeswari, M.; Nirmala Louis, C.; Mahalakshmi, S.

    The electronic band structure, structural phase transition, metallization and superconducting transition of cubic zinc blende-type indium phosphide (InP) and indium nitride (InN), under pressure, are studied using TB-LMTO method. These indium compounds become metals and superconductors under high pressure but before that they undergo structural phase transition from ZnS to NaCl structure. The ground-state properties and band gap values are compared with the experimental and previous theoretical results. From our analysis, it is found that the metallization pressure increases with increase of lattice constant. The superconducting transition temperatures (Tc) of InP and InN are obtained as a function of pressure for both the ZnS and NaCl structures and these compounds are identified as pressure-induced superconductors. When pressure is increased Tc increases in both the normal (ZnS) and high pressure (NaCl) structures. The dependence of Tc on electron-phonon mass enhancement factor λ shows that InP and InN are electron-phonon mediated superconductors. The non-occurrence of metallization, phase transition and onset of superconductivity simultaneously in InP and InN are confirmed.

  5. Nanostructural and electronic properties of polytypes in InN nanocolumns

    SciTech Connect

    Kioseoglou, J.; Koukoula, T.; Komninou, Ph.; Kehagias, Th.; Georgakilas, A.; Androulidaki, M.

    2013-08-21

    Transmission electron microscopy techniques and density functional theory calculations were employed to investigate the nanostructural and electronic properties of InN polytypes observed in InN nanocolumns, grown on Si(111) by molecular beam epitaxy. Moiré fringes and alternating hexagonal and cubic lattice stacking sequences along the c-axis, observed among the wurtzite layers, implied the presence of different structures embedded in the basic 2H structure of the nanocolumns. Quantitative electron diffraction analysis and high-resolution image simulations verified the coexistence of the wurtzite structure with the 4H, 6H, and the 3C zinc-blende structural polytypes. Total energies calculations established the 2H wurtzite structure as the most stable polytype. The band gap of all polytypes was found direct with the energies and the band gaps of the 4H (E{sub g} = 0.64 eV) and 6H (E{sub g} = 0.60 eV) structures calculated between the corresponding values of the 2H (E{sub g} = 0.75 eV) and 3C (E{sub g} = 0.49 eV) basic structures. Theoretical and experimental analysis showed that at the initial stages of growth InN nanocolumns were under tensile strain along both the basal plane and growth direction. Structural polytypes were then introduced in the form of embedded inclusions to accommodate the excess tensile strain along the growth direction, allowing the entire process of polymorphism to be the dominant strain relaxation mechanism of InN nanocolumns. Moreover, the lattice and energetic properties and band gap values of InN polytypes showed a linear dependence on hexagonality, while the presence of polytypes led to a characteristic broadening of the photoluminescence emission peak toward lower emission energies.

  6. Epitaxial growth of InN on nearly lattice-matched (Mn,Zn)Fe 2O 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, J.; Mitamura, K.; Kobayashi, A.; Honke, T.; Fujioka, H.; Oshima, M.

    2006-01-01

    We have grown InN films on nearly lattice-matched (Mn,Zn)Fe 2O 4 (111) substrates at low temperatures by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and investigated their structural properties. InN films grown at substrate temperatures above 400 °C show poor crystallinity, and their in-plane epitaxial relationship is [10-10]InN//[11-2](Mn,Zn)Fe 2O 4, which means that their lattice mismatch is quite large (11%). By contrast, high quality InN films with flat surfaces can be grown at growth temperatures lower than 150 °C with the ideal in-plane epitaxial relationship of [11-20]InN//[11-2](Mn,Zn)Fe 2O 4, which produces lattice mismatches of as low as 2.0%. X-ray reflectivity measurements have revealed that the thickness of the interfacial layer between the InN and the substrates is reduced from 14 to 8.4 nm when the growth temperature is decreased from 400 °C to room temperature. This suppression of the interface reactions by reducing the growth temperature is probably responsible for the improvement in crystalline quality. These results indicate that the use of (Mn,Zn)Fe 2O 4 (111) substrates at low growth temperatures allows us to achieve nearly lattice matched epitaxial growth of InN.

  7. Large-scale cubic InN nanocrystals by a combined solution- and vapor-phase method under silica confinement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo; Li, Yanan; Cao, Chuanbao; Zhao, Songrui; Fathololoumi, Saeed; Mi, Zetian; Xu, Xingyan

    2012-01-18

    Large-scale cubic InN nanocrystals were synthesized by a combined solution- and vapor-phase method under silica confinement. Nearly monodisperse cubic InN nanocrystals with uniform spherical shape were dispersed stably in various organic solvents after removal of the silica shells. The average size of InN nanocrystals is 5.7 ± 0.6 nm. Powder X-ray diffraction results indicate that the InN nanocrystals are of high crystallinity with a cubic phase. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy confirm that the nanocrystals are composed of In and N elements. The InN nanocrystals exhibit infrared photoluminescence at room temperature, with a peak energy of ~0.62 eV, which is smaller than that of high-quality wurtzite InN (~0.65-0.7 eV) and is in agreement with theoretical calculations. The small emission peak energy of InN nanocrystals, as compared to other low-cost solution or vapor methods, reveals the superior crystalline quality of our samples, with low or negligible defect density. This work will significantly promote InN-based applications in IR optoelectronic device and biology. PMID:22224725

  8. InN thin-film transistors fabricated on polymer sheets using pulsed sputtering deposition at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lye, Khe Shin; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ueno, Kohei; Ohta, Jitsuo; Fujioka, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Indium nitride (InN) is potentially suitable for the fabrication of high performance thin-film transistors (TFTs) because of its high electron mobility and peak electron velocity. However, InN is usually grown using a high temperature growth process, which is incompatible with large-area and lightweight TFT substrates. In this study, we report on the room temperature growth of InN films on flexible polyimide sheets using pulsed sputtering deposition. In addition, we report on the fabrication of InN-based TFTs on flexible polyimide sheets and the operation of these devices.

  9. Electrically injected near-infrared light emission from single InN nanowire p-i-n diode

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Binh Huy; Zhao, Songrui; Tran, Nhung Hong; Mi, Zetian

    2014-12-08

    We report on the achievement of electroluminescence emission of single InN p-i-n nanowire devices. InN p-i-n nanowire structures were grown directly on Si substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and subsequently transferred to foreign substrate for the fabrication of single nanowire light emitting diodes. Electroluminescence emission with a peak energy of 0.71 eV (1.75 μm) was observed at 77 K. The measurement of near-bandgap electroluminescence provides unambiguous evidence for the achievement of p-type conduction of InN.

  10. Growth of InN nanorods prepared by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy with varying Cr thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K. W.; Young, S. J.; Chang, S. J.; Hsueh, T. H.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chen, K. J.; Hung, H.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, Y. L.

    2012-05-01

    This study investigates how the thickness of Cr deposited on the Si substrate after the nitridation process influences the AIN buffer layer and the InN nanorods. Atomic force microscopy results reveal that different thicknesses of Cr form varying sizes of CrN nanoislands. The results of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction show that a Cr deposition thickness of 10 nm results in CrN nanoislands after the nitridation process, improving the quality and density of InN nanorods. A Cr layer that was too thick led to polycrystalline InN growth. The results of transmission electron microscopy indicate a baseball bat-like InN nanorod growth mechanism.

  11. R&W Club Frederick Raises $1,500 for The Children’s Inn at Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Forty-four government and contractor employees, along with their friends and family members, took to the Maryland National Golf Club course this fall for a cause. The R&W Club Frederick held its third annual golf tournament at the Middletown, Md., golf course on Sept. 14 to raise funds for The Children’s Inn at NIH, which celebrated its 25th anniversary this year. The Inn provides support and a home away from home for seriously ill children and their families receiving treatment at the NIH Clinical Center. Through the tournament, the club raised approximately $1,500 for The Children’s Inn, according to Tanya Ransom, biologist, NCI Center for Cancer Research, and secretary of the R&W Club Frederick. She also coordinated the golf tournament. After the tournament, a silent auction of sports memorabilia and collectibles, sponsored by Great Moments, Frederick, was held, and a portion of the proceeds also went to the Inn.

  12. Study of InN nanorods growth mechanism using ultrathin Au layer by plasma-assisted MBE on Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mahesh; Rajpalke, Mohana K.; Roul, Basanta; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N.; Krupanidhi, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    InN nanorods (NRs) were grown on Si(111) substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The growth of InN NRs has been demonstrated using an electron-beam evaporated (~2 nm) Au layer prior to the initiation of growth. The structure and morphology of as deposited Au film, annealed at 600 °C, and InN NRs were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Chemical characterization was performed with energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Single-crystalline wurtzite structure of InN NRs is verified by transmission electron microscopy. The formation process of NRs is investigated and a qualitative mechanism is proposed.

  13. Epitaxial relationship of semipolar s-plane (1101) InN grown on r-plane sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrakopulos, G. P.

    2012-07-02

    The heteroepitaxy of semipolar s-plane (1101) InN grown directly on r-plane sapphire by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy is studied using transmission electron microscopy techniques. The epitaxial relationship is determined to be (1101){sub InN} Parallel-To (1102){sub Al{sub 2O{sub 3}}}, [1120]{sub InN} Parallel-To [2021]{sub Al{sub 2O{sub 3}}}, [1102]{sub InN}{approx} Parallel-To [0221]{sub Al{sub 2O{sub 3}}}, which ensures a 0.7% misfit along [1120]{sub InN}. Two orientation variants are identified. Proposed geometrical factors contributing to the high density of basal stacking faults, partial dislocations, and sphalerite cubic pockets include the misfit accommodation and reduction, as well as the accommodation of lattice twist.

  14. Sulfur passivation of surface electrons in highly Mg-doped InN

    SciTech Connect

    Linhart, W. M.; Veal, T. D.; Chai, J.; McConville, C. F.; Durbin, S. M.

    2013-09-14

    Electron accumulation with a sheet density greater than 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} usually occurs at InN surfaces. Here, the effects of treatment with ammonium sulfide ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub x}) on the surface electronic properties of highly Mg-doped InN (>4×10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}) have been investigated with high resolution x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The valence band photoemission spectra show that the surface Fermi level decreases by approximately 0.08 eV with (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub x} treatment, resulting in a decrease of the downward band bending and up to a 70% reduction in the surface electron sheet density.

  15. Epitaxial growth, electrical and optical properties of a-plane InN on r-plane sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Ajagunna, A. O.; Iliopoulos, E.; Tsiakatouras, G.; Tsagaraki, K.; Androulidaki, M.; Georgakilas, A.

    2010-01-15

    The heteroepitaxy of a-plane (1120) InN films on r-plane (1102) sapphire substrates, by nitrogen radio frequency plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, has been investigated and compared to that of c-plane (0001) InN. The epitaxial growth of a-plane InN proceeded through the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of three-dimensional islands, resulting in surface roughness that increased monotonically with epilayer thickness. The full width at half maximum of (1120) x-ray diffraction rocking curves decreased significantly with increasing InN thickness, characteristic of structural improvement, and it reached the value of 24 arcmin for a 1 {mu}m thick film. Hall-effect measurements exhibited a similar dependence of electron concentration and mobility on thickness for both the a- and c-plane InN films. The analysis of the Hall-effect measurements, by considering the contribution of two conducting layers, indicates a similar accumulation of low mobility electrons with N{sub s}>10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} at the films' surface/interfacial region for both the a- and c-plane InN films. From optical transmittance measurements, the absorption edge of 0.768 eV was determined for the 1 {mu}m a-plane film, consistent with the expected Burstein-Moss effect. Photoluminescence spectra exhibited a lower energy peak at 0.631 eV, suggesting defect-related transitions.

  16. Crystallinity, Surface Morphology, and Photoelectrochemical Effects in Conical InP and InN Nanowires Grown on Silicon.

    PubMed

    Parameshwaran, Vijay; Xu, Xiaoqing; Clemens, Bruce

    2016-08-24

    The growth conditions of two types of indium-based III-V nanowires, InP and InN, are tailored such that instead of yielding conventional wire-type morphologies, single-crystal conical structures are formed with an enlarged diameter either near the base or near the tip. By using indium droplets as a growth catalyst, combined with an excess indium supply during growth, "ice cream cone" type structures are formed with a nanowire "cone" and an indium-based "ice cream" droplet on top for both InP and InN. Surface polycrystallinity and annihilation of the catalyst tip of the conical InP nanowires are observed when the indium supply is turned off during the growth process. This growth design technique is extended to create single-crystal InN nanowires with the same morphology. Conical InN nanowires with an enlarged base are obtained through the use of an excess combined Au-In growth catalyst. Electrochemical studies of the InP nanowires on silicon demonstrate a reduction photocurrent as a proof of photovolatic behavior and provide insight as to how the observed surface polycrystallinity and the resulting interface affect these device-level properties. Additionally, a photovoltage is induced in both types of conical InN nanowires on silicon, which is not replicated in epitaxial InN thin films. PMID:27455379

  17. Stability of Mg-incorporated InN surfaces: first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, T.; Nakamura, K.; Ito, T.; Song, J.-H.; Freeman, A. J.

    2009-03-01

    InN films are attractive materials for electronic and optelectronic applications. The growth of InN eptitaxial films with n-type and p-type conductivity has traditionally been performed along the polar <0001> directionootnotetextR.E. Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett, 96, 125505 (2006), which may result in large polarization fields along the growth direction, reducing the radiative efficiency of quantum-well light emitters. To overcome this drawback, the growth along nonpolar orientation such as (1010) and (1120) planes and its p-type doping have been recently carried out. We have addressed this issue by performing first-principles pseudopotential calculations for Mg-incorporated InN surfaces in various orientations, including (1010) and (1120) as well as (0001) and (0001) surfacesootnotetextJ.-H. Song et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 106803 (2008). The calculated surface energies demonstrate that qualitative trends in the stability of Mg-incorporated surfaces agree with those on GaN surfaces ootnotetextJ.E. Northrup, Appl. Phys. Lett. 86, 122108 (2005), although several surface reconstructions different from those on GaN surfaces are obtained. The effects of growth conditions on p-type doping are also discussed.

  18. Photoelectrochemical properties of InN nanowire photoelectrodes for solar water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, J.; Bogdanoff, P.; Ramsteiner, M.; Geelhaar, L.; Riechert, H.

    2016-07-01

    InN nanowires were grown on Si(111) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Raman spectroscopy showed that the nanowires were strain-free and allowed the deduction of a free carrier concentration of 1–2 × 1018 cm‑3. This value was confirmed by a Mott–Schottky analysis of electrolyte-based capacitance-voltage measurements. In addition, these measurements directly revealed the existence of a surface accumulation layer in the InN nanowires. In cyclic voltammetry measurements under irradiation from a Xe lamp with about 100 mW cm‑2, high photocurrents of about 4 and 11 mA cm‑2 were observed at 1.23 and 1.63 V bias potential versus reversible hydrogen electrode, respectively, using H2O2 as a hole scavenger. By comparing the photocurrent with and without H2O2, the main limiting factor in the performance of InN nanowire photoanodes was identified to be the poor catalytic efficiency for water oxidation at the surface, followed by parasitic bulk recombination.

  19. Photoelectrochemical properties of InN nanowire photoelectrodes for solar water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, J.; Bogdanoff, P.; Ramsteiner, M.; Geelhaar, L.; Riechert, H.

    2016-07-01

    InN nanowires were grown on Si(111) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Raman spectroscopy showed that the nanowires were strain-free and allowed the deduction of a free carrier concentration of 1-2 × 1018 cm-3. This value was confirmed by a Mott-Schottky analysis of electrolyte-based capacitance-voltage measurements. In addition, these measurements directly revealed the existence of a surface accumulation layer in the InN nanowires. In cyclic voltammetry measurements under irradiation from a Xe lamp with about 100 mW cm-2, high photocurrents of about 4 and 11 mA cm-2 were observed at 1.23 and 1.63 V bias potential versus reversible hydrogen electrode, respectively, using H2O2 as a hole scavenger. By comparing the photocurrent with and without H2O2, the main limiting factor in the performance of InN nanowire photoanodes was identified to be the poor catalytic efficiency for water oxidation at the surface, followed by parasitic bulk recombination.

  20. Preliminary Depositional and Provenance Records of Mesozoic Basin Evolution and Cenozoic Shortening in the High Andes, La Ramada Fold-Thrust Belt, Southern-Central Andes (32-33°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackaman-Lofland, C.; Horton, B. K.; Fuentes, F.; Constenius, K. N.; McKenzie, R.; Alvarado, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Argentinian Andes define key examples of retroarc shortening and basin evolution above a zone of active subduction. The La Ramada fold-thrust belt (RFTB) in the High Andes provides insights into the relative influence and temporal records of diverse convergent margin processes (e.g. flat-slab subduction, convergent wedge dynamics, structural inversion). The RFTB contains Mesozoic extensional basin strata deformed by later Andean shortening. New detrital zircon U-Pb analyses of Mesozoic rift sediments reveal: (1) a dominant Permo-Triassic age signature (220-280 Ma) associated with proximal sources of effective basement (Choiyoi Group) during Triassic synrift deposition; (2) upsection younging of maximum depositional ages from Late Triassic through Early Cretaceous (230 to 100 Ma) with the increasing influence of western Andean arc sources; and (3) a significant Late Cretaceous influx of Paleozoic (~350-550 Ma) and Proterozoic (~650-1300 Ma) populations during the earliest shift from back-arc post-extensional subsidence to upper-plate shortening. The Cenozoic detrital record of the Manantiales foreland basin (between the Frontal Cordillera and Precordillera) records RFTB deformation prior to flat-slab subduction. A Permo-Triassic Choiyoi age signature dominates the Miocene succession, consistent with sources in the proximal Espinacito range. Subordinate Mesozoic (~80-250 Ma) to Proterozoic (~850-1800 Ma) U-Pb populations record exhumation of the Andean magmatic arc and recycling of different structural levels in the RFTB during thrusting/inversion of Mesozoic rift basin strata and subjacent Paleozoic units. Whereas maximum depositional ages of sampled Manantiales units cluster at 18-20 Ma, the Estancia Uspallata basin (~50 km to the south) shows consistent upsection younging of Cenozoic populations attributed to proximal volcanic centers. Ongoing work will apply low-temperature thermochronology to pinpoint basin accumulation histories and thrust timing.

  1. InN nanorods prepared with CrN nanoislands by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kuang-Wei; Chang, Shoou-Jinn; Young, Sheng-Joue; Hsueh, Tao-Hung; Hung, Hung; Mai, Yu-Chun; Wang, Shih-Ming; Chen, Kuan-Jen; Wu, Ya-Ling; Chen, Yue-Zhang

    2011-07-01

    The authors report the influence of CrN nanoisland inserted on growth of baseball-bat InN nanorods by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under In-rich conditions. By inserting CrN nanoislands between AlN nucleation layer and the Si (111) substrate, it was found that we could reduce strain form Si by inserting CrN nanoisland, FWHM of the x-ray rocking curve measured from InN nanorods from 3,299 reduced to 2,115 arcsec. It is due to the larger strain from lattice miss-match of the film-like InN structure; however, the strain from lattice miss-match was obvious reduced owing to CrN nanoisland inserted. The TEM images confirmed the CrN structures and In droplets dissociation from InN, by these results, we can speculate the growth mechanism of baseball-bat-like InN nanorods.

  2. Self-Catalyzed Growth of Vertically Aligned InN Nanorods by Metal-Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Tessarek, C; Fladischer, S; Dieker, C; Sarau, G; Hoffmann, B; Bashouti, M; Göbelt, M; Heilmann, M; Latzel, M; Butzen, E; Figge, S; Gust, A; Höflich, K; Feichtner, T; Büchele, M; Schwarzburg, K; Spiecker, E; Christiansen, S

    2016-06-01

    Vertically aligned hexagonal InN nanorods were grown mask-free by conventional metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy without any foreign catalyst. The In droplets on top of the nanorods indicate a self-catalytic vapor-liquid-solid growth mode. A systematic study on important growth parameters has been carried out for the optimization of nanorod morphology. The nanorod N-polarity, induced by high temperature nitridation of the sapphire substrate, is necessary to achieve vertical growth. Hydrogen, usually inapplicable during InN growth due to formation of metallic indium, and silane are needed to enhance the aspect ratio and to reduce parasitic deposition beside the nanorods on the sapphire surface. The results reveal many similarities between InN and GaN nanorod growth showing that the process despite the large difference in growth temperature is similar. Transmission electron microscopy, spatially resolved energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy have been performed to analyze the structural properties. Spatially resolved cathodoluminescence investigations are carried out to verify the optical activity of the InN nanorods. The InN nanorods are expected to be the material of choice for high-efficiency hot carrier solar cells. PMID:27187840

  3. In-situ SiNx/InN structures for InN field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zervos, Ch.; Adikimenakis, A.; Beleniotis, P.; Kostopoulos, A.; Kayambaki, M.; Tsagaraki, K.; Konstantinidis, G.; Georgakilas, A.

    2016-04-01

    Critical aspects of InN channel field-effect transistors (FETs) have been investigated. SiNx dielectric layers were deposited in-situ, in the molecular beam epitaxy system, on the surface of 2 nm InN layers grown on GaN (0001) buffer layers. Metal-insulator-semiconductor Ni/SiNx/InN capacitors were analyzed by capacitance-voltage (C-V) and current-voltage measurements and were used as gates in InN FET transistors (MISFETs). Comparison of the experimental C-V results with self-consistent Schrödinger-Poisson calculations indicates the presence of a positive charge at the SiNx/InN interface of Qif ≈ 4.4 - 4.8 × 1013 cm-2, assuming complete InN strain relaxation. Operation of InN MISFETs was demonstrated, but their performance was limited by a catastrophic breakdown at drain-source voltages above 2.5-3.0 V, the low electron mobility, and high series resistances of the structures.

  4. InN nanorods prepared with CrN nanoislands by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuang-Wei; Chang, Shoou-Jinn; Young, Sheng-Joue; Hsueh, Tao-Hung; Hung, Hung; Mai, Yu-Chun; Wang, Shih-Ming; Chen, Kuan-Jen; Wu, Ya-Ling; Chen, Yue-Zhang

    2011-01-01

    The authors report the influence of CrN nanoisland inserted on growth of baseball-bat InN nanorods by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under In-rich conditions. By inserting CrN nanoislands between AlN nucleation layer and the Si (111) substrate, it was found that we could reduce strain form Si by inserting CrN nanoisland, FWHM of the x-ray rocking curve measured from InN nanorods from 3,299 reduced to 2,115 arcsec. It is due to the larger strain from lattice miss-match of the film-like InN structure; however, the strain from lattice miss-match was obvious reduced owing to CrN nanoisland inserted. The TEM images confirmed the CrN structures and In droplets dissociation from InN, by these results, we can speculate the growth mechanism of baseball-bat-like InN nanorods. PMID:21736722

  5. InN nanorods prepared with CrN nanoislands by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The authors report the influence of CrN nanoisland inserted on growth of baseball-bat InN nanorods by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under In-rich conditions. By inserting CrN nanoislands between AlN nucleation layer and the Si (111) substrate, it was found that we could reduce strain form Si by inserting CrN nanoisland, FWHM of the x-ray rocking curve measured from InN nanorods from 3,299 reduced to 2,115 arcsec. It is due to the larger strain from lattice miss-match of the film-like InN structure; however, the strain from lattice miss-match was obvious reduced owing to CrN nanoisland inserted. The TEM images confirmed the CrN structures and In droplets dissociation from InN, by these results, we can speculate the growth mechanism of baseball-bat-like InN nanorods. PMID:21736722

  6. InN nanorods prepared with CrN nanoislands by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuang-Wei; Chang, Shoou-Jinn; Young, Sheng-Joue; Hsueh, Tao-Hung; Hung, Hung; Mai, Yu-Chun; Wang, Shih-Ming; Chen, Kuan-Jen; Wu, Ya-Ling; Chen, Yue-Zhang

    2011-01-01

    The authors report the influence of CrN nanoisland inserted on growth of baseball-bat InN nanorods by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under In-rich conditions. By inserting CrN nanoislands between AlN nucleation layer and the Si (111) substrate, it was found that we could reduce strain form Si by inserting CrN nanoisland, FWHM of the x-ray rocking curve measured from InN nanorods from 3,299 reduced to 2,115 arcsec. It is due to the larger strain from lattice miss-match of the film-like InN structure; however, the strain from lattice miss-match was obvious reduced owing to CrN nanoisland inserted. The TEM images confirmed the CrN structures and In droplets dissociation from InN, by these results, we can speculate the growth mechanism of baseball-bat-like InN nanorods.

  7. Mie Resonances, Infrared Emission, and the Band Gap of InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubina, T. V.; Ivanov, S. V.; Jmerik, V. N.; Solnyshkov, D. D.; Vekshin, V. A.; Kop'ev, P. S.; Vasson, A.; Leymarie, J.; Kavokin, A.; Amano, H.; Shimono, K.; Kasic, A.; Monemar, B.

    2004-03-01

    Mie resonances due to scattering or absorption of light in InN-containing clusters of metallic In may have been erroneously interpreted as the infrared band gap absorption in tens of papers. Here we show by direct thermally detected optical absorption measurements that the true band gap of InN is markedly wider than the currently accepted 0.7eV. Microcathodoluminescence studies complemented by the imaging of metallic In have shown that bright infrared emission at 0.7 0.8eV arises in a close vicinity of In inclusions and is likely associated with surface states at the metal/InN interfaces.

  8. Growth of Well-Aligned InN Nanorods on Amorphous Glass Substrates.

    PubMed

    Li, Huijie; Zhao, Guijuan; Wei, Hongyuan; Wang, Lianshan; Chen, Zhen; Yang, Shaoyan

    2016-12-01

    The growth of well-aligned nanorods on amorphous substrates can pave the way to fabricate large-scale and low-cost devices. In this work, we successfully prepared vertically well-aligned c-axis InN nanorods on amorphous glass substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The products formed directly on bare glass are randomly oriented without preferential growth direction. By inserting a GaN/Ti interlayer, the nanowire alignment can be greatly improved as indicated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. PMID:27229517

  9. Near-infrared InN quantum dots on high-In composition InGaN

    SciTech Connect

    Soto Rodriguez, Paul E. D.; Gomez, Victor J.; Kumar, Praveen; Calleja, Enrique; Noetzel, Richard

    2013-04-01

    We report the growth of InN quantum dots (QDs) on thick InGaN layers with high In composition (>50%) by molecular beam epitaxy. Optimized growth conditions are identified for the InGaN layers at reduced growth temperature and increased active N flux resulting in minimized phase separation and defect generation. The InN QDs grown on top of the optimized InGaN layer exhibit small size, high density, and photoluminescence up to room temperature. The InN/InGaN QDs reveal excellent potential for intermediate band solar cells with the InGaN and InN QD bandgap energies tuned to the best match of absorption to the solar spectrum.

  10. Different evolutionary pathways from B4 to B1 phase in AlN and InN: metadynamics investigations.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yifeng; Qin, Lixia; Liu, Hanyu

    2016-05-25

    Pressure-induced B4-B1 phase transitions of AlN and InN at ambient temperature are systematically investigated using density functional-based metadynamics simulations. A homogeneous deformation path, which is energetically favorable, is through a hexagonal structure for AlN, and through a tetragonal structure for InN. Furthermore, the dynamical stability, instead of the mechanical stability, is crucial to determining the phase-transition paths: the intermediate hexagonal structure can remain stable, whereas the tetragonal structure is always unstable. The B4 phase always shows the direct band gap before the occurrence of structure transition, while the band gap of stable intermediate hexagonal phase is indirect for AlN. Finally, the band gap of the ultimate cubic phase is direct for AlN and indirect for InN, due to the strong p-d repulsion at the R point. PMID:27120439

  11. Low-temperature (≥400 °C) growth of InN by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy using an NH3 decomposition catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Akio; Kodama, Kazuki; Shigekawa, Naoteru; Matsuoka, Takashi; Kuzuhara, Masaaki

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we report the metalorganic vapor phase epitaxial (MOVPE) growth of InN using a NiO-based pellet-type NH3 decomposition catalyst. The use of the catalyst significantly changes the growth behavior of InN, which is dependent on the growth temperature (T g). Continuous InN films without the incorporation of metallic In and a cubic phase are grown at T g = 400–480 °C. An InN film grown at T g ≈ 450 °C has a full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of 376 arcsec in the X-ray rocking curve for InN(0002) reflection. At T g ≥ 500 °C, the deposition rate of InN rapidly decreases and the deposited films become discontinuous with large (ca. 1 µm) pyramidal grains of InN. Depositions are scarcely obtained at T g ≥ 600 °C. Such changes in the growth behavior of InN are governed by the NH3 decomposition.

  12. A Dance Class, a Drag King, & the Pedagogical Possibilities of Performative Hip-Hop: An Interview with Carmen Morrison & Alex U. Inn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schönfeldt-Aultman, Scott M.; Morrison, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Alex U. Inn is the co-founder and one of the two MCs of the hip-hop drag king group, Momma's Boyz. Momma's Boyz celebrated their tenth anniversary in 2014. Carmen Morrison is the offstage name of Alex U. Inn, though "Carmen" now goes by Alex offstage, as well. Within this interview, the names "Carmen" and "Alex" are…

  13. Growth of wurtzite InN on bulk In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Sadofev, Sergey; Cho, Yong Jin; Brandt, Oliver; Ramsteiner, Manfred; Calarco, Raffaella; Riechert, Henning; Erwin, Steven C.; Galazka, Zbigniew; Korytov, Maxym; Albrecht, Martin; Uecker, Reinhard; Fornari, Roberto

    2012-10-22

    A single phase InN epitaxial film is grown on a bulk In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) wafer by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The InN/In{sub 2}O{sub 3} orientation relationship is found to be (0001) parallel (111) and [1100] parallel [112]. High quality of the layer is confirmed by the small widths of the x-ray rocking curves, the sharp interfaces revealed by transmission electron microscopy, the narrow spectral width of the Raman E{sub 2}{sup h} vibrational mode, and the position of the photoluminescence band close to the fundamental band gap of InN.

  14. Resonant raman scattering and dispersion of polar optical and acoustic phonons in hexagonal inn

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, V. Yu. Klochikhin, A. A.; Smirnov, A. N.; Strashkova, I. Yu.; Krylov, A. S.; Lu Hai; Schaff, William J.; Lee, H.-M.; Hong, Y.-L.; Gwo, S.

    2010-02-15

    It is shown that a study of the dependence of impurity-related resonant first-order Raman scattering on the frequency of excitation light makes it possible to observe the dispersion of polar optical and acoustic branches of vibrational spectrum in hexagonal InN within a wide range of wave vectors. It is established that the wave vectors of excited phonons are uniquely related to the energy of excitation photon. Frequencies of longitudinal optical phonons E{sub 1}(LO) and A{sub 1}(LO) in hexagonal InN were measured in the range of excitation-photon energies from 2.81 to 1.17 eV and the frequencies of longitudinal acoustic phonons were measured in the range 2.81-1.83 eV of excitation-photon energies. The obtained dependences made it possible to extrapolate the dispersion of phonons A{sub 1}(LO) and E{sub 1}(LO) to as far as the point {Gamma} in the Brillouin zone and estimate the center-band energies of these phonons (these energies have not been uniquely determined so far).

  15. From Amateur Astronomer to Observatory Director: The Curious Case of R. T. A. Innes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, Wayne

    Robert Innes was one of a select band of amateur astronomers who made the transition to professional ranks towards the end of the nineteenth century. Initially he had a passion for mathematical astronomy, but after settling in Sydney he developed a taste for observational astronomy, specialising in the search for new double stars. He quickly became known for his success in this field and for his publications on solar system perturbations, and with John Tebbutt's patronage managed to secure a clerical position at the Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope. Once there he continued to observe in his spare time and to publish, and, with strong support from Sir David Gill, was appointed founding Director of the Transvaal Observatory. By the time he died in 1933, Innes had received an honorary D.Sc. from Leiden University, and had established an international reputation as a positional astronomer. This paper provides an interesting case study of a well-known `amateur-turned-professional', and an example of the ways in which patronage played a key role in nineteenth and early twentieth century Australian and South African astronomy.

  16. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: First-Principles Study on Native Defect Complexes in InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Feng-Qi; Shi, Jun-Jie; Yang, Mao

    2010-01-01

    We present first-principles calculations of the formation energy of different native defects and their complexes in wurtzite InN using density-functional theory and the pseudopotential plane-wave method. Our calculations are aimed in the three cases: N/In = 1, N/In > 1 (N-rich), and N/In < 1 (In-rich). Our results indicate that the antisite defect has the lowest formation energy under N/In = 1. The formation energy of nitrogen interstitial (nitrogen vacancy) defect is significantly low under the N-rich (In-rich) condition. Thus the antisite defect is an important defect if N/In = 1, and the nitrogen interstitial (nitrogen vacancy) defect is a vital defect under the N-rich (In-rich) condition. The atomic site relaxation around the nitrogen interstitial and vacancy is investigated. Our calculations show that the nitrogen vacancy cannot be observed although it is one of the most important defects in InN. Our results are confirmed by experiments.

  17. Initial exploration of growth of InN by electrochemical solution growth.

    SciTech Connect

    Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth

    2010-02-01

    This report summarizes a brief and unsuccessful attempt to grow indium nitride via the electrochemical solution growth method and a modification thereof. Described in this report is a brief effort using a $50,000 LDRD award to explore the possibilities of applying the Electrochemical Solution Growth (ESG) technique to the growth of indium nitride (InN). The ability to grow bulk InN would be exciting from a scientific perspective, and a commercial incentive lies in the potential of extending the ESG technique to grow homogeneous, bulk alloys of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N for light emitting diodes (LEDs) operating in the green region of the spectrum. Indium nitride is the most difficult of the III-nitrides to grow due to its very high equilibrium vapor pressure of nitrogen1. It is several orders of magnitude higher than for gallium nitride or aluminum nitride. InN has a bandgap energy of 0.7eV, and achieving its growth in bulk for large area, high quality substrates would permit the fabrication of LEDs operating in the infrared. By alloying with GaN and AlN, the bulk material used as substrates would enable high efficiency emission wavelengths that could be tailored all the way through the deep ultraviolet. In addition, InN has been shown to have very high electronic mobilities (2700 cm{sup 2}/V s), making it a promising material for transistors and even terahertz emitters. Several attempts at synthesizing InN have been made by several groups. It was shown that metallic indium does not interact with unactivated nitrogen even at very high temperatures. Thus sets up an incompatibility between the precursors in all growth methods: a tradeoff between thermally activating the nitrogen-containing precursor and the low decomposition temperature of solid InN. We have been working to develop a novel growth technique that circumvents the difficulties of other bulk growth techniques by precipitating the column III nitrides from a solvent, such as a molten chloride salt, that

  18. Elimination of surface band bending on N-polar InN with thin GaN capping

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmík, J. Haščík, Š.; Kučera, M.; Kúdela, R.; Dobročka, E.; Adikimenakis, A.; Mičušík, M.; Gregor, M.; Plecenik, A.; Georgakilas, A.

    2015-11-09

    0.5–1 μm thick InN (0001) films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy with N- or In-polarity are investigated for the presence of native oxide, surface energy band bending, and effects introduced by 2 to 4 monolayers of GaN capping. Ex situ angle-resolved x-ray photo-electron spectroscopy is used to construct near-surface (GaN)/InN energy profiles, which is combined with deconvolution of In3d signal to trace the presence of InN native oxide for different types of polarity and capping. Downwards surface energy band bending was observed on bare samples with native oxide, regardless of the polarity. It was found that the In-polar InN surface is most readily oxidized, however, with only slightly less band bending if compared with the N-polar sample. On the other hand, InN surface oxidation was effectively mitigated by GaN capping. Still, as confirmed by ultra-violet photo-electron spectroscopy and by energy band diagram calculations, thin GaN cap layer may provide negative piezoelectric polarization charge at the GaN/InN hetero-interface of the N-polar sample, in addition to the passivation effect. These effects raised the band diagram up by about 0.65 eV, reaching a flat-band profile.

  19. MBE Growth of InN/GaN(0001) and Shape Transitions of InN islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yongge; Xie, Maohai; Liu, Ying; Ng, Y. F.

    2003-03-01

    Plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxial growth of InN on GaN(0001) is investigated. Both layer-by-layer and Stranski-Krastanov (SK) growth modes are observed under different growth windows. Strain relaxation is studied by real-time recording of the in-plane lattice spacing evolutions on RHEED pattern, which suggest a gradual relaxation of the strain in InN film commenced during the first bilayer (BL) deposition and almost completed after 2-4 BLs. For SK growth, 3D islanding initiates after the strain has mostly been relieved, presumably by dislocations. Based on statistical analysis, the shape transitions of 3D islands are firstly observed in the III-nitrides system. The InN islands transform gradually from pyramids to platelets with increasing of In flux. Under In-rich growth condition, the reverse trend of island shape evolution dependence on volume size, compared with Equilibrium Crystal Shape (ECS) theory, is induced by the Indium self-surfactant effects, in which Indium adlayer on the top surface of InN islands will depress the thermodynamic driving force for the vertical growth of 3D islands. Lateral growth of 3D islands is not only the result of kinetic process but also favored by thermodynamics while Indium self-surfactant exist.

  20. Effect of Mg doping on the structural and free-charge carrier properties of InN films

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, M.-Y.; Ben Sedrine, N.; Hung, L.; Monemar, B.; Darakchieva, V.; Schöche, S.; Hofmann, T.; Schubert, M.; Wang, X.; Yoshikawa, A.; Wang, K.; Araki, T.; Nanishi, Y.

    2014-04-28

    We present a comprehensive study of free-charge carrier and structural properties of two sets of InN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy and systematically doped with Mg from 1.0 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} to 3.9 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup −3}. The free electron and hole concentration, mobility, and plasmon broadening parameters are determined by infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry. The lattice parameters, microstructure, and surface morphology are determined by high-resolution X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Consistent results on the free-charge carrier type are found in the two sets of InN films and it is inferred that p-type conductivity could be achieved for 1.0 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} ≲ [Mg] ≲ 9.0 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}. The systematic change of free-charge carrier properties with Mg concentration is discussed in relation to the evolution of extended defect density and growth mode. A comparison between the structural characteristics and free electron concentrations in the films provides insights in the role of extended and point defects for the n-type conductivity in InN. It further allows to suggest pathways for achieving compensated InN material with relatively high electron mobility and low defect densities. The critical values of Mg concentration for which polarity inversion and formation of zinc-blende InN occurred are determined. Finally, the effect of Mg doping on the lattice parameters is established and different contributions to the strain in the films are discussed.

  1. Strain Relief Analysis of InN Quantum Dots Grown on GaN

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    We present a study by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the strain state of individual InN quantum dots (QDs) grown on GaN substrates. Moiré fringe and high resolution TEM analyses showed that the QDs are almost fully relaxed due to the generation of a 60° misfit dislocation network at the InN/GaN interface. By applying the Geometric Phase Algorithm to plan-view high-resolution micrographs, we show that this network consists of three essentially non-interacting sets of misfit dislocations lying along the directions. Close to the edge of the QD, the dislocations curve to meet the surface and form a network of threading dislocations surrounding the system. PMID:21794190

  2. Inhomogeneous InGaN and InN with In-enriched Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubina, T. V.; Ivanov, S. V.; Jmerik, V. N.; Mizerov, A. M.; Leymarie, J.; Vasson, A.; Monemar, B.; Kop'ev, P. S.

    2007-04-01

    We present optical evidences for formation of In-enriched nanostructures in InxGa1-xN alloys (x=0.2-1.0) grown by MBE. Two-band photoluminescence (PL) has been recorded in several InxGa1-xN films (x⩾0.4), with the lowest line being in the infrared range. An additional absorption band has been revealed below the principal edge by thermally detected optical absorption studies even in perfect layers exhibiting exciton-like features in PL excitation spectra. A significant PL intensity increase along an InN layer is consistent with with the appearance of distinct In precipitates. These findings are discussed as related to extra optical losses and plasmon-induced PL enhancement.

  3. Solar hot water system installed at Quality Inn, Key West, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy hot water system installed in the Quality Inn, Key West, Florida, which consists of four buildings is described. Three buildings are low-rise, two-story buildings containing 100 rooms. The fourth is a four-story building with 48 rooms. The solar system was designed to provide approximately 50 percent of the energy required for the domestic hot water system. The solar system consists of approximately 1400 square feet of flat plate collector, two 500 gallon storage tanks, a circulating pump, and a controller. Operation of the system was begun in April 1978, and has continued to date with only three minor interruptions for pump repair. In the first year of operation, it was determined that the use of the solar facility resulted in forty percent fuel savings.

  4. Temperature dependences of the contact resistivity in ohmic contacts to n{sup +}-InN

    SciTech Connect

    Sachenko, A. V.; Belyaev, A. E.; Boltovets, N. S.; Brunkov, P. N.; Jmerik, V. N.; Ivanov, S. V.; Kapitanchuk, L. M.; Konakova, R. V. Klad’ko, V. P.; Romanets, P. N.; Saja, P. O.; Safryuk, N. V.; Sheremet, V. N.

    2015-04-15

    The temperature dependences of the contact resistivity (ρ{sub c}) of ohmic contacts based on the Au-Ti-Pd-InN system are measured at an InN doping level of 2 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} in the temperature range of 4.2–300 K. At temperatures T > 150 K, linearly increasing dependences ρ{sub c}(T) are obtained. The dependences are explained within the mechanism of thermionic current flow through metal shunts associated with dislocations. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental dependences is achieved assuming that the flowing current is limited by the total resistance of the metal shunts, and the density of conductive dislocations is ∼5 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}. Using the X-ray diffraction method, the density of screw and edge dislocations in the structure under study is measured: their total density exceeds 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}.

  5. Electron Accumulation Layers in InN Nanocolumns Studied by Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, E.; Lazic, S.; Calleja, J. M.; Agullo-Rueda, F.; Grandal, J.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E.

    2010-01-04

    Inelastic light scattering measurements on single crystal InN nanocolumns grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on both Si(001) and Si(111) substrates reveal the existence of a surface electron accumulation layer in the lateral non-polar sidewalls of the nanocolumns. Small and reversible electron density variations of this surface layer has been induced by chemical treatments of the nanocolumns, which can be accurately determined from the frequency of the LO phonon-plasmon coupled mode L{sub -}. The L{sub -} to E{sub 1}(LO) phonon intensity ratio dependence on the column diameter and the excitation wavelength is interpreted in terms of the inhomogeneous electron distribution in the nanocolumns volume and the presence of strong elastic light scattering by the nanocolumns. The TO modes fail to obey conventional selection rules, a fact that is also observed in GaN nanocolumns.

  6. Angular-dependent Raman study of a- and s-plane InN

    SciTech Connect

    Filintoglou, K.; Katsikini, M. Arvanitidis, J.; Lotsari, A.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Vouroutzis, N.; Ves, S.; Christofilos, D.; Kourouklis, G. A.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.; Zoumakis, N.

    2015-02-21

    Angular-dependent polarized Raman spectroscopy was utilized to study nonpolar a-plane (11{sup ¯}20) and semipolar s-plane (101{sup ¯}1) InN epilayers. The intensity dependence of the Raman peaks assigned to the vibrational modes A{sub 1}(TO), E{sub 1}(TO), and E{sub 2}{sup h} on the angle ψ that corresponds to rotation around the growth axis, is very well reproduced by using expressions taking into account the corresponding Raman tensors and the experimental geometry, providing thus a reliable technique towards assessing the sample quality. The s- and a-plane InN epilayers grown on nitridated r-plane sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) exhibit good crystalline quality as deduced from the excellent fitting of the experimental angle-dependent peak intensities to the theoretical expressions as well as from the small width of the Raman peaks. On the contrary, in the case of the s-plane epilayer grown on non-nitridated r-plane sapphire, fitting of the angular dependence is much worse and can be modeled only by considering the presence of two structural modifications, rotated so as their c-axes are almost perpendicular to each other. Although the presence of the second variant is verified by transmission electron and atomic force microscopies, angular dependent Raman spectroscopy offers a non-destructive and quick way for its quantification. Rapid thermal annealing of this sample did not affect the angular dependence of the peak intensities. The shift of the E{sub 1}(TO) and E{sub 2}{sup h} Raman peaks was used for the estimation of the strain state of the samples.

  7. Investigation of the near-surface structures of polar InN films by chemical-state-discriminated hard X-ray photoelectron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, A. L.; Yamashita, Y.; Kobata, M.; Yoshikawa, H.; Sakata, O.; Kobayashi, K.; Matsushita, T.; Pis, I.; Imura, M.; Yamaguchi, T.; Nanishi, Y.

    2013-01-21

    Near-surface structures of polar InN films were investigated by laboratory-based hard X-ray photoelectron diffraction (HXPD) with chemical-state-discrimination. HXPD patterns from In 3d{sub 5/2} and N 1s core levels of the In-polar and N-polar InN films were different from each other and compared with the simulation results using a multiple-scattering cluster model. It was found that the near-surface structure of the In-polar InN film was close to the ideal wurtzite structure. On the other hand, on the N-polar InN film, defects-rich surface was formed. In addition, the existence of the In-polar domains was observed in the HXPD patterns.

  8. Structural properties of InN films grown on O-face ZnO(0001) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yong Jin; Brandt, Oliver; Kaganer, Vladimir M.; Ramsteiner, Manfred; Riechert, Henning; Korytov, Maxim; Albrecht, Martin

    2012-04-09

    We study the impact of substrate temperature and layer thickness on the morphological and structural properties of InN films directly grown on O-face ZnO(0001) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. With increasing substrate temperature, an interfacial reaction between InN and ZnO takes place that eventually results in the formation of cubic In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and voids. The properties of the InN films, however, are found to be unaffected by this reaction for substrate temperatures less than 550 deg. C. In fact, both the morphological and the structural quality of InN improve with increasing substrate temperature in the range from 350 to 500 deg. C. High quality films with low threading dislocation densities are demonstrated.

  9. Correlation between switching to n-type conductivity and structural defects in highly Mg-doped InN

    SciTech Connect

    Khromov, S.; Persson, P. O. Å.; Monemar, B.; Rosen, J.; Janzén, E.; Darakchieva, V.; Wang, X.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2015-06-08

    The effect of Mg doping on the microstructure of InN epitaxial films in relation to their free-charge carrier properties has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and aberration corrected scanning TEM. We observe a direct correlation between Mg concentration and the formation of stacking faults. The threading dislocation density is found to be independent of Mg concentration. The critical Mg concentration for the on-set of stacking faults formation is determined and found to correlate with the switch from p- to n-type conductivity in InN. Potential mechanisms involving stacking faults and point defect complexes are invoked in order to explain the observed conductivity reversal. Finally, the stacking faults are structurally determined and their role in the reduction of the free electron mobility in highly doped InN:Mg is discussed.

  10. Optical properties of ultra-thin InN layer embedded in InGaN matrix for light emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Wu, Yi-Yang; Liu, Ning-Yang; Liu, Lei; Chen, Zhao; Hu, Xiao-Dong

    2013-04-01

    We theoretically investigate the optical properties of an ultra-thin InN layer embedded in InGaN matrix for light emitters. The peak emission wavelength extends from ultraviolet (374 nm) to green (536 nm) with InN quantum well thickness increasing from 1 monolayer to 2 monolayers, while the overlap of electron-hole wave function remains at a high level (larger than 90%). Increase of In content in InGaN matrix provides a better approach to longer wavelength emission, which only reduces the spontaneous emission rate slightly compared with the case of increasing In content of the conventional InGaN quantum well. Also, the transparency carrier density derived from gain spectrum is of the same order as that in the conventional blue laser diode. Our study provides skillful design on the development of novel structure InN-based light emitting diodes as well as laser diodes.

  11. Surface structure and surface kinetics of InN grown by plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy: A HREELS study

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Ananta R. E-mail: anantaach@gmail.com; Thoms, Brian D.; Nepal, Neeraj; Eddy, Charles R.

    2015-03-15

    The surface bonding configuration and kinetics of hydrogen desorption from InN grown by plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy have been investigated. High resolution electron energy loss spectra exhibited loss peaks assigned to a Fuchs–Kliewer surface phonon, N-N and N-H surface species. The surface N-N vibrations are attributed to surface defects. The observation of N-H but no In-H surface species suggested N-terminated InN. Isothermal desorption data were best fit by the first-order desorption kinetics with an activation energy of (0.88 ± 0.06) eV and pre-exponential factor of (1.5 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 5 }s{sup −1}.

  12. Polarity control and transport properties of Mg-doped (0001) InN by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Soojeong; Wu Feng; Bierwagen, Oliver; Speck, James S.

    2013-05-15

    The authors report on the plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy growth and carrier transport of Mg-doped In-face (0001) InN. The 1.2 {mu}m thick InN films were grown on GaN:Fe templates under metal rich conditions with Mg concentration from 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 3} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20}/cm{sup 3}. A morphological transition, associated with the formation of V-shape polarity inversion domains, was observed at Mg concentration over 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3} by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Seebeck measurements indicated p-type conductivity for Mg-concentrations from 9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 3} to 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3}, i.e., as it exceeded the compensating (unintentional) donor concentration.

  13. First-principles calculations for AlN, GaN, and InN: Bulk and alloy properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.F.; Nelson, J.S.

    1995-02-01

    First-principles density-functional calculations utilizing ab initio pseudopotentials and plane-wave expansions are used to determine lattice parameters, bulk moduli, and band structures for AlN, GaN and InN. It is found that large numbers of plane waves are necessary to resolve the nitrogen 2p wave functions and that explicit treatment of the gallium 3d and indium 4d electrons is important for an accurate description of GaN and InN. Several properties of ternary zinc-blende alloys are determined including their bond-length and bond-angle relaxation and their energy-gap bowing parameters. The similarity of the calculated zinc-blende and wurtzite direct gaps also allows estimates to be made of the energy gap versus composition for wurtzite alloys.

  14. Time-integrated photoluminescence and pump-probe reflection spectroscopy of Si doped InN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanta, Antaryami; Jang, Der-Jun Wang, Ming-Sung; Tu, L. W.

    2014-01-28

    Temperature and excitation power dependent time-integrated photoluminescence of Si doped InN thin films are investigated. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra at low temperatures are described by single emission peak ensued due to “free-to-bound” recombination; whereas PL spectra at higher temperatures above 150 K are characterized by both “band-to-band” and “free-to-bound” transition. Carrier dynamics of Si doped InN thin films is studied using pump-probe reflection spectroscopy at room temperature. The hot electron cooling process is well described by electron-electron scattering. The dependence of the hot electron cooling rate on total electron density shows sublinear to linear behavior with increase of background electron density. The variation of the carrier recombination lifetime with total electron density implicates the dominance of the defect-related nonradiative recombination channel over other recombination processes.

  15. X-ray diffraction study of A- plane non-polar InN epilayer grown by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moret, Matthieu; Briot, Olivier; Gil, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Strong polarisation-induced electric fields in C-plane oriented nitrides semiconductor layers reduce the performance of devices. Eliminating the polarization fields can be achieved by growing nitrides along non polar direction. We have grown non polar A-plane oriented InN on R-plane (1‾102) nitridated sapphire substrate by MOCVD. We have studied the structural anisotropy observed in these layers by analyzing High Resolution XRay Diffraction rocking curve (RC) experiments as a function of the in-plane beam orientation. A-plane InN epilayer have a unique epitaxial relationship on R-Plane sapphire and show a strong structural anisotropy. Full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the InN(11‾20) XRD RC values are contained between 44 and 81 Arcmin. FWHM is smaller when the diffraction occurs along the [0001] and the largest FWHM values, of the (11‾20) RC, are obtained when the diffraction occurs along the [1‾100] in-plane direction. Atomic Force Microscopy imaging revealed morphologies with well organized crystallites. The grains are structured along a unique crystallographic orientation of InN, leading to larger domains in this direction. This structural anisotropy can be, in first approximation, attributed to the difference in the domain sizes observed. XRD reciprocal space mappings (RSM) were performed in asymmetrical configuration on (13‾40) and (2‾202) diffraction plane. RSM are measured with a beam orientation corresponding to a maximal and a minimal width of the (11‾20) Rocking curves, respectively. A simple theoretical model is exposed to interpret the RSM. We concluded that the dominant contribution to the anisotropy is due to the scattering coherence length anisotropy present in our samples.

  16. R&W Club Frederick Hosts 4th Annual Golf Tournament Benefiting The Children’s Inn at NIH | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The R&W Club Frederick’s 4th Annual Golf Tournament to benefit the Children’s Inn at NIH teed off on time despite cloudy weather and scattered showers. Employees from NCI at Frederick, the main NIH campus, and Leidos Biomed, along with family and friends, came to enjoy an afternoon at the beautiful Maryland National Golf Club in Middletown and to support a wonderful charity.

  17. R&W Club Frederick Hosts Second Annual Golf Tourney for The Children’s Inn | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On Sept. 8, more than 40 NCI at Frederick and Leidos Biomedical Research employees, along with family and friends, swapped work clothes for golf gear at Maryland National Golf Club in Middletown. The golfers didn’t just play for fun; they participated in the second annual R&W Club Frederick Golf Tournament to support The Children’s Inn at NIH.

  18. Vertically integrated (Ga, In)N nanostructures for future single photon emitters operating in the telecommunication wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winden, A.; Mikulics, M.; Grützmacher, D.; Hardtdegen, H.

    2013-10-01

    Important technological steps are discussed and realized for future room-temperature operation of III-nitride single photon emitters. First, the growth technology of positioned single pyramidal InN nanostructures capped by Mg-doped GaN is presented. The optimization of their optical characteristics towards narrowband emission in the telecommunication wavelength range is demonstrated. In addition, a device concept and technology was developed so that the nanostructures became singularly addressable. It was found that the nanopyramids emit in the telecommunication wavelength range if their size is chosen appropriately. A p-GaN contacting layer was successfully produced as a cap to the InN pyramids and the top p-contact was achievable using an intrinsically conductive polymer PEDOT:PSS, allowing a 25% increase in light transmittance compared to standard Ni/Au contact technology. Single nanopyramids were successfully integrated into a high-frequency device layout. These decisive technology steps provide a promising route to electrically driven and room-temperature operating InN based single photon emitters in the telecommunication wavelength range.

  19. Superconductivity of Ca2 InN with a layered structure embedding an anionic indium chain array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sehoon; Matsuishi, Satoru; Lee, Kimoon; Toda, Yoshitake; Wng Kim, Sung; Hosono, Hideo

    2014-05-01

    We report the emergence of superconductivity in Ca2InN consisting of a two-dimensional (2D) array of zigzag indium chains embedded between Ca2N layers. A sudden drop of resistivity and a specific heat (Cp) jump attributed to the superconducting transition were observed at 0.6 K. The Sommerfeld coefficient γ = 4.24 mJ mol-1K-2 and Debye temperature ΘD = 322 K were determined from the Cp of the normal conducting state and the superconducting volume fraction was estimated to be ˜80% from the Cp jump, assuming a BCS-type weak coupling. Density functional theory calculations demonstrated that the electronic bands near the Fermi level (EF) are mainly derived from In 5p orbitals with π and σ bonding states and the Fermi surface is composed of cylindrical parts, corresponding to the quasi-2D electronic state of the In-chain array. By integrating the projected density of states of the In-p component up to EF, a valence electron population of ˜1.6 electrons/In was calculated, indicating that partially anionic state of In. The In 3d binding energies observed in Ca2InN by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy were negatively shifted from that in In metal. The superconductivity of Ca2InN is associated with the p-p bonding states of the anionic In layer.

  20. Current transport in W and WSI{sub x} ohmic contacts to InGaN and InN

    SciTech Connect

    Vartuli, C.B.; Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.

    1997-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the specific contact resistance of W and WSi{sub 0.44} contacts on n{sup +} In{sub 0.65}Ga{sub 0.35}N and InN was measured in the range -50 {degrees}C to 125 {degrees}C. The results were compared to theoretical values for different conduction mechanisms, to further elucidate the conduction mechanism in these contact schemes for all but as-deposited metal to InN where thermionic emission appears to be the dominant mechanism. The contacts were found to produce low specific resistance ohmic contacts to InGaN at room temperature, e{sup c} {approximately} 10{sup -7} {Omega} {center_dot} cm{sup 2} for W and e{sub c} of 4x 10{sup -7} {Omega} {center_dot} cm{sup 2} for WSi{sub x}. InN metallized with W produced ohmic contacts with e{sub c} {approximately} 10{sup -7} {Omega} {center_dot} cm{sup 2} and e{sub c} {approximately} 10{sup -6} {Omega} {center_dot} cm{sup 2} for WSi{sub x} at room temperature.

  1. Vertically integrated (Ga, In)N nanostructures for future single photon emitters operating in the telecommunication wavelength range.

    PubMed

    Winden, A; Mikulics, M; Grützmacher, D; Hardtdegen, H

    2013-10-11

    Important technological steps are discussed and realized for future room-temperature operation of III-nitride single photon emitters. First, the growth technology of positioned single pyramidal InN nanostructures capped by Mg-doped GaN is presented. The optimization of their optical characteristics towards narrowband emission in the telecommunication wavelength range is demonstrated. In addition, a device concept and technology was developed so that the nanostructures became singularly addressable. It was found that the nanopyramids emit in the telecommunication wavelength range if their size is chosen appropriately. A p-GaN contacting layer was successfully produced as a cap to the InN pyramids and the top p-contact was achievable using an intrinsically conductive polymer PEDOT:PSS, allowing a 25% increase in light transmittance compared to standard Ni/Au contact technology. Single nanopyramids were successfully integrated into a high-frequency device layout. These decisive technology steps provide a promising route to electrically driven and room-temperature operating InN based single photon emitters in the telecommunication wavelength range.

  2. High-quality cubic and hexagonal InN crystals studied by micro-Raman scattering and electron backscatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Jumpei; Ramsteiner, Manfred; Jahn, Uwe; Lu, Cheng-Ying James; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kishino, Katsumi; Riechert, Henning

    2016-04-01

    Large InN microcrystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy are investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). High-quality (phonon linewidths between 1.5 and 2 cm-1) cubic and hexagonal crystals are identified with Raman mapping by the observation of the respective characteristic phonon modes. The unexpected occurrence of metastable cubic InN crystals is confirmed by EBSD measurements. The cubic microcrystals are revealed by EBSD to be single-crystalline and to exhibit  <1 1 1>  orientation. The transverse (TO) and longitudinal-optical (LO) zone-center phonon frequencies of cubic InN are found to be 463 and 584 cm-1, respectively. The bulk carrier density in the microcrystals lies in the range of 2-3  ×  1017 cm-3 as determined by the analysis of LO phonon-plasmon-coupled modes in the Raman spectra.

  3. Elucidating the optical properties of MoTe2/InN heterostructures for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Alexandre; Villegas, Cesar E. P.

    2015-03-01

    Recently, two-dimensional (2D) atom-thick hexagonal crystals have drawn both experimental and theoretical interest due to their fundamental properties and potential applicability in electronics and optoelectronics. While most studies are focused on 2D crystals with gap in the visible electromagnetic spectrum, the ones with gaps in the near infrared region have not been explored yet. Motivated by this and considering the individual properties of transition metal dichalcogenides and group III-V compounds, we carry out density functional theory (DFT) calculations combine with the GW-Bethe-Salpeter (GW-BSE) methodology to study the optical properties and the power conversion efficiency of MoTe2/InN heterostructures. First, we study the geometric and electronic structure of three heterostructures based on different stacking. Secondly, we use the GW-BSE methodology to study the optical spectrum and estimate the power conversion efficiency of the device. Our results indicates that the photoexcited exciton are originated in the range of 1.12 to 1.5 eV. In addition, we estimate the exciton recombination time finding values in the nanosecond range. Finally, we estimated the short-circuit current and power conversion efficiency of the 2 nm thick device. The Authors thank FAPESP for financial support.

  4. Hole transport and photoluminescence in Mg-doped InN

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.; Ager III, J. W.; Smith III, H. M.; Mayer, M. A.; Yu, K. M.; Haller, E. E.; Walukiewicz, W.; Schaff, W. J.; Gallinat, C.; Koblmuller, G.; Speck, J. S.

    2010-03-24

    Hole conductivity and photoluminescence were studied in Mg-doped InN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Because surface electron accumulation interferes with carrier type determination by electrical measurements, the nature of the majority carriers in the bulk of the films was determined using thermopower measurements. Mg concentrations in a"window" from ca. 3 x 1017 to 1 x 1019 cm-3 produce hole-conducting, p-type films as evidenced by a positive Seebeck coecient. This conclusion is supported by electrolyte-based capacitance voltage measurements and by changes in the overall mobility observed by Hall effect, both of which are consistent with a change from surface accumulation on an n-type film to surface inversion on a p-type film. The observed Seebeck coefficients are understood in terms of a parallel conduction model with contributions from surface and bulk regions. In partially compensated films with Mg concentrations below the window region, two peaks are observed in photoluminescence at 672 meV and at 603 meV. They are attributed to band-to-band and band-to-acceptor transitions, respectively, and an acceptor binding energy of ~;;70 meV is deduced. In hole-conducting films with Mg concentrations in the window region, no photoluminescence is observed; this is attributed to electron trapping by deep states which are empty for Fermi levels close to the valence band edge.

  5. Electrical transport properties of single undoped and n-type doped InN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Richter, T; Lüth, H; Schäpers, Th; Meijers, R; Jeganathan, K; Estévez Hernández, S; Calarco, R; Marso, M

    2009-10-01

    Electrical transport properties of undoped and n-type doped InN nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy were studied by current-voltage and back-gate field-effect transistor measurements. The current-voltage characteristics show ohmic behavior in the temperature range between 4 and 300 K. Down to about 120 K a linear decrease in resistance with temperature is observed. The investigation of a large number of nanowires revealed for undoped as well as doped wires an approximately linear relation between the normalized conductance and diameter for wires with a diameter below 100 nm. This shows that the main conduction takes place in the tubular surface accumulation layer of the wires. In contrast, for doped wires with a diameter larger than 100 nm a quadratic dependence of conduction on the diameter was found, which is attributed to bulk conductance as the main contribution. The successful doping of the wires is confirmed by an enhanced conduction and by the results of the back-gate field-effect transistor measurements. PMID:19738304

  6. Evaluation of testing strategies for the radiation tolerant ATLAS n +-in-n pixel sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas M.; Atlas Pixel Collaboration

    2003-10-01

    The development of particle tracker systems for high fluence environments in new high-energy physics experiments raises new challenges for the development, manufacturing and reliable testing of radiation tolerant components. The ATLAS pixel detector for use at the LHC, CERN, is designed to cover an active sensor area of 1.8 m2 with 1.1×10 8 read-out channels usable for a particle fluence up to 10 15 cm-2 ( 1 MeV neutron equivalent) and an ionization dose up to 500 kGy of mainly charged hadron radiation. To cope with such a harsh environment the ATLAS Pixel Collaboration has developed a radiation hard n +-in-n silicon pixel cell design with a standard cell size of 50×400 μm2. Using this design on an oxygenated silicon substrate, sensor production has started in 2001. This contribution describes results gained during the development of testing procedures of the ATLAS pixel sensor and evaluates quality assurance procedures regarding their relevance for detector operation in the ATLAS experiment. The specific set of tests discussed in detail measures sensor depletion, interface generation velocity, p-spray dose and biasing by punch-through mechanism and is designed to give insights into effects of irradiation with ionizing particles.

  7. Molten salt-based growth of bulk GaN and InN for substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth

    2007-08-01

    An atmospheric pressure approach to growth of bulk group III-nitrides is outlined. Native III-nitride substrates for optoelectronic and high power, high frequency electronics are desirable to enhance performance and reliability of these devices; currently, these materials are available in research quantities only for GaN, and are unavailable in the case of InN. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions associated with traditional crystal growth techniques place these activities on the extreme edges of experimental physics. The novel techniques described herein rely on the production of the nitride precursor (N{sup 3-}) by chemical and/or electrochemical methods in a molten halide salt. This nitride ion is then reacted with group III metals in such a manner as to form the bulk nitride material. The work performed during the period of funding (February 2006-September 2006) focused on establishing that mass transport of GaN occurs in molten LiCl, the construction of a larger diameter electrochemical cell, the design, modification, and installation of a made-to-order glove box (required for handling very hygroscopic LiCl), and the feasibility of using room temperature molten salts to perform nitride chemistry experiments.

  8. Molten Salt-Based Growth of Bulk GaN and InN for Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth; Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2006-09-01

    An atmospheric pressure approach to growth of bulk group III-nitrides is outlined. Native III-nitride substrates for optoelectronic and high power, high frequency electronics are desirable to enhance performance and reliability of these devices; currently, these materials are available in research quantities only for GaN, and are unavailable in the case of InN. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions associated with traditional crystal growth techniques place these activities on the extreme edges of experimental physics. The technique described herein relies on the production of the nitride precursor (N3-) by chemical and/or electrochemical methods in a molten halide salt. This nitride ion is then reacted with group III metals in such a manner as to form the bulk nitride material. The work performed during the period of funding (July 2004-September 2005) focused on the initial measurement of the solubility of GaN in molten LiCl as a function of temperature, the construction of electrochemical cells, the modification of a commercial glove box (required for handling very hygroscopic LiCl), and on securing intellectual property for the technique.

  9. risk factor Inn (INNrisk) - transdisciplinary analysis of the 2005 flood in the province of Tyrol, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleewein, Klaus; Pfurtscheller, Clemens; Borsdorf, Axel

    2010-05-01

    The transdisciplinary project INNrisk, in collaboration with public risk and disaster management, investigates the severe floods of 22nd and 23rd of August, 2005, and their effects within the federal province of Tyrol. The inundation and accompanying processes (e.g. debris flows, log jams, underwashing of infrastructure) caused by the river Inn and its tributaries created a dangerous situation for Tyrol. The overall economic loss of direct assets is said to amount to ca. 500 million Euros. Climate change has basically been causing a statistical increase of damaging floods within the Alpine Space in recent decades while increasing vulnerability at the same time. The expansion of settlements is one factor in the threat to large numbers of people and growing economic losses. However, the disasters of the last decade provide an opportunity for analysing the flood process in terms of natural-science and geographical aspects as well as in terms of economic and statistical ones. This should lead to a better understanding of triggers and effects in those areas where humans are active and form the basis for mitigation and adaptation strategies. The results of such analyses represent valuable information for public risk and disaster management, particularly in presenting the effects on public and private households. The INNrisk project primarily aims to assess the framework conditions in systemic-legal terms and to analyse human actions during the floods in relation to various plans and the damage potentials resulting from them. The assessed losses depend to a great extent on the actions taken during the emergency and on flood operations by the public emergency management and local fire departments, which are in charge of floods and related processes in the case of Austria. Assessment will be carried out by analysing a database of series of human actions for the duration of the emergeny and increased risk. The project also strives to arrive at a macro- and mesoeconomic

  10. Beaulieu-Boycott-Innes syndrome: an intellectual disability syndrome with characteristic facies.

    PubMed

    Casey, Jillian; Jenkinson, Allan; Magee, Alex; Ennis, Sean; Monavari, Ahmad; Green, Andrew; Lynch, Sally A; Crushell, Ellen; Hughes, Joanne

    2016-10-01

    We report a female child from an Irish Traveller family presenting with severe intellectual disability, dysmorphic features, renal anomalies, dental caries and cyclical vomiting. Current health issues include global developmental delay, mild concentric left ventricular hypertrophy, dental malocclusion and caries and a single duplex left kidney. The proband and her mother also have multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. Whole-exome sequencing was performed to identify the underlying genetic cause. DNA from the proband was enriched with the Agilent Sure Select v5 Exon array and sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq. Rare homozygous variants were prioritized. Whole-exome sequencing identified three linked homozygous missense variants in THOC6 (c.298T>A, p.Trp100Arg; c.700G>C, p.Val234Leu; c.824G>A, p.Gly275Asp) as the likely cause of this child's intellectual disability syndrome, resulting in a molecular diagnosis of Beaulieu-Boycott-Innes syndrome (BBIS). This is the first report of BBIS in Europe. BBIS has been reported previously in two Hutterite families and one Saudi family. A review of all patients to date shows a relatively homogenous phenotype. Core clinical features include low birth weight with subsequent growth failure, short stature, intellectual disability with language delay, characteristic facies, renal anomalies and dental malocclusion with caries. Some patients also have cardiac defects. All patients show characteristic dysmorphic facial features including a tall forehead with high anterior hairline and deep-set eyes with upslanting palpebral fissures. The coexistence of intellectual disability together with these characteristic facies should provide a diagnostic clue for BBIS during patient evaluation. PMID:27295358

  11. Beaulieu-Boycott-Innes syndrome: an intellectual disability syndrome with characteristic facies.

    PubMed

    Casey, Jillian; Jenkinson, Allan; Magee, Alex; Ennis, Sean; Monavari, Ahmad; Green, Andrew; Lynch, Sally A; Crushell, Ellen; Hughes, Joanne

    2016-10-01

    We report a female child from an Irish Traveller family presenting with severe intellectual disability, dysmorphic features, renal anomalies, dental caries and cyclical vomiting. Current health issues include global developmental delay, mild concentric left ventricular hypertrophy, dental malocclusion and caries and a single duplex left kidney. The proband and her mother also have multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. Whole-exome sequencing was performed to identify the underlying genetic cause. DNA from the proband was enriched with the Agilent Sure Select v5 Exon array and sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq. Rare homozygous variants were prioritized. Whole-exome sequencing identified three linked homozygous missense variants in THOC6 (c.298T>A, p.Trp100Arg; c.700G>C, p.Val234Leu; c.824G>A, p.Gly275Asp) as the likely cause of this child's intellectual disability syndrome, resulting in a molecular diagnosis of Beaulieu-Boycott-Innes syndrome (BBIS). This is the first report of BBIS in Europe. BBIS has been reported previously in two Hutterite families and one Saudi family. A review of all patients to date shows a relatively homogenous phenotype. Core clinical features include low birth weight with subsequent growth failure, short stature, intellectual disability with language delay, characteristic facies, renal anomalies and dental malocclusion with caries. Some patients also have cardiac defects. All patients show characteristic dysmorphic facial features including a tall forehead with high anterior hairline and deep-set eyes with upslanting palpebral fissures. The coexistence of intellectual disability together with these characteristic facies should provide a diagnostic clue for BBIS during patient evaluation.

  12. Formation of InN atomic-size wires by simple N adsorption on the In/Si(111)-(4 × 1) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero-Sánchez, J.; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out first principles total energy calculations to study the formation of InN atomic-size wires on the In/Si(111)-(4 × 1) surface. In its most favorable adsorption site, a single N atom forms InN arrangements. The deposit of 0.25 monolayers (MLs) of N atoms, result in the breaking of one of the original In chains and the formation of an InN atomic size wire. Increasing the coverage up to 0.5 ML of N atoms results in the formation of two of those wires. Calculated surface formation energies show that for N-poor conditions the most stable configuration is the original In/Si(111)-(4 × 1) surface with no N atoms. Increasing the N content, and in a reduced range of chemical potential, the formation of an InN wire is energetically favorable. Instead, from intermediate to N-rich conditions, two InN atomic wires are more stable. Projected density of states calculations have shown a trend to form covalent bonds between the Insbnd p and Nsbnd p orbitals in these stable models.

  13. Enhancing structural transition by carrier and quantum confinement: Stabilization of cubic InN quantum dots by Mn incorporation

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xiuqing; Wu, Fengmin; Chen, Zhanghui; Li, Shu-Shen; Chen, Zhuo; Li, Jingbo E-mail: swei@nrel.gov; Wu, Junqiao; Wei, Su-Huai E-mail: swei@nrel.gov

    2013-12-16

    We demonstrate in this work controllable synthesis of cubic InN nanocrystals through Mn doping. We show that the pristine nanocrystal has the wurtzite structure, but can be converted into the zinc-blende (ZB) structure when it is doped with Mn. Our first-principles calculations show that the phase transition is caused by the stronger p-d coupling between the host p valence state and the impurity d level in the ZB structure, which makes the hole generation in the ZB structure easier. Quantum confinement in the nanocrystals further enhanced this effect. This observation lays an important foundation for defects control of crystal phases.

  14. Reduction of electron accumulation at InN(0001) surfaces via saturation of surface states by potassium and oxygen as donor- or acceptor-type adsorbates

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenhardt, A.; Reiß, S.; Krischok, S. Himmerlich, M.

    2014-01-28

    The influence of selected donor- and acceptor-type adsorbates on the electronic properties of InN(0001) surfaces is investigated implementing in-situ photoelectron spectroscopy. The changes in work function, surface band alignment, and chemical bond configurations are characterized during deposition of potassium and exposure to oxygen. Although an expected opponent charge transfer characteristic is observed with potassium donating its free electron to InN, while dissociated oxygen species extract partial charge from the substrate, a reduction of the surface electron accumulation occurs in both cases. This observation can be explained by adsorbate-induced saturation of free dangling bonds at the InN resulting in the disappearance of surface states, which initially pin the Fermi level and induce downward band bending.

  15. InGaN nanowires with high InN molar fraction: growth, structural and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Lourenço-Martins, Hugo; Meuret, Sophie; Kociak, Mathieu; Haas, Benedikt; Rouvière, Jean-Luc; Jouneau, Pierre-Henri; Bougerol, Catherine; Auzelle, T; Jalabert, D; Biquard, Xavier; Gayral, Bruno; Daudin, Bruno

    2016-05-13

    The structural and optical properties of axial GaN/InGaN/GaN nanowire heterostructures with high InN molar fractions grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been studied at the nanoscale by a combination of electron microscopy, extended x-ray absorption fine structure and nano-cathodoluminescence techniques. InN molar fractions up to 50% have been successfully incorporated without extended defects, as evidence of nanowire potentialities for practical device realisation in such a composition range. Taking advantage of the N-polarity of the self-nucleated GaN NWs grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111), the N-polar InGaN stability temperature diagram has been experimentally determined and found to extend to a higher temperature than its metal-polar counterpart. Furthermore, annealing of GaN-capped InGaN NWs up to 800 °C has been found to result in a 20 times increase of photoluminescence intensity, which is assigned to point defect curing.

  16. Wine Valley Inn: A mineral water spa in Calistoga, California. Geothermal-energy-system conceptual design and economic feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-26

    The purpose of this study is to determine the engineering and economic feasibility for utilizing geothermal energy for air conditioning and service water heating at the Wine Valley Inn, a mineral water spa in Calistoga, California. The study evaluates heating, ventilating, air conditioning and water heating systems suitable for direct heat geothermal application. Due to the excellent geothermal temperatures available at this site, the mechanics and economics of a geothermally powered chilled water cooling system are evaluated. The Wine Valley Inn has the resource potential to have one of the few totally geothermal powered air conditioning and water heating systems in the world. This total concept is completely developed. A water plan was prepared to determine the quantity of water required for fresh water well development based on the special requirements of the project. An economic evaluation of the system is included to justify the added capital investment needed to build the geothermally powered mineral spa. Energy payback calculations are presented. A thermal cascade system is proposed to direct the geothermal water through the energy system to first power the chiller, then the space heating system, domestic hot water, the two spas and finally to heat the swimming pool. The Energy Management strategy required to automatically control this cascade process using industrial quality micro-processor equipment is described. Energy Management controls are selected to keep equipment sizing at a minimum, pump only the amount of geothermal water needed and be self balancing.

  17. The daytime boundary layer in the Inn Valley - A model evaluation study with high-quality turbulence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goger, Brigitta; Rotach, Mathias W.; Gohm, Alexander; Fuhrer, Oliver; Stiperski, Ivana

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric processes associated with complex terrain include various phenomena on the meso- and microscale, which contribute significantly to the local weather in mountainous areas of the Earth. One of the most prominent and well-known boundary-layer phenomena in mountainous terrain is the daytime valley wind circulation, which is very pronounced on clear-sky days with weak synoptic forcing. We use several chosen "valley wind days" in the Inn Valley, Austria, as case studies for the evaluation of the performance of the NWP model COSMO on a horizontal resolution of 1.1 km with a focus on boundary-layer processes and turbulent exchange. The overall goal is to evaluate the model setup and to investigate whether the model's physics schemes (initially developed for horizontally homogeneous and flat surroundings) are suitable for truly complex terrain. We evaluate the model by using measurements from the so-called "i-Box" located in the Inn Valley. The i-Box consists of six core sites that are located at representative locations in the Inn Valley, and two remote sensing systems (wind Lidar and HATPRO passive T/RH profiler) in the city of Innsbruck. The long-term data set provides a data pool of high-resolution velocity variances, turbulence variables, radiation, soil moisture, and vertical profiles of temperature, humidity, and wind in the lower troposphere, which allows a process-oriented analysis. A special focus is laid on the daytime valley boundary layer and its interaction with the developing up-valley wind. Vertical cross-sections show that the valley wind has an asymmetric structure, hence, the i-Box stations show a high spatial variability. While the station on the valley bottom and on the south-facing slope are clearly under the strong influence of the valley wind, the two stations on the north-facing slope are rather dominated by slope flows. We find that the valley wind has a strong (indirect) influence on the development of the local turbulence kinetic

  18. Study of structural properties of cubic InN films on GaAs(001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy and migration enhanced epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Casallas-Moreno, Y. L.; Perez-Caro, M.; Gallardo-Hernandez, S.; Ramirez-Lopez, M.; Martinez-Velis, I.; Lopez-Lopez, M.; Escobosa-Echavarria, A.

    2013-06-07

    InN epitaxial films with cubic phase were grown by rf-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (RF-MBE) on GaAs(001) substrates employing two methods: migration-enhanced epitaxy (MEE) and conventional MBE technique. The films were synthesized at different growth temperatures ranging from 490 to 550 Degree-Sign C, and different In beam fluxes (BEP{sub In}) ranging from 5.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} to 9.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} Torr. We found the optimum conditions for the nucleation of the cubic phase of the InN using a buffer composed of several thin layers, according to reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns. Crystallographic analysis by high resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD) and RHEED confirmed the growth of c-InN by the two methods. We achieved with the MEE method a higher crystal quality and higher cubic phase purity. The ratio of cubic to hexagonal components in InN films was estimated from the ratio of the integrated X-ray diffraction intensities of the cubic (002) and hexagonal (1011) planes measured by X-ray reciprocal space mapping (RSM). For MEE samples, the cubic phase of InN increases employing higher In beam fluxes and higher growth temperatures. We have obtained a cubic purity phase of 96.4% for a film grown at 510 Degree-Sign C by MEE.

  19. Influence of In-N Clusters on Band Gap Energy of Dilute Nitride In x Ga1-x N y As1-y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chuan-Zhen; Guo, Heng-Fei; Chen, Li-Ying; Tang, Chun-Xiao; Lu, Ke-Qing

    2016-05-01

    The In-N clusters form in the dilute nitride InxGa1-xNyAs1-y alloys after annealing. It is found that the formation of the In-N clusters not only raises the N levels lying above the conduction band minimum (CBM) of InGaAs, but also raises the N levels below the CBM of InGaAs, leading to the variation of the impurity-host interaction. The blueshift of the band gap energy is relative to the variation of the impurity-host interaction. In order to describe the blueshift of the band gap energy due to the formation of the In-N clusters, a model is developed. It is found that the model can describe the blueshift of the band gap energy well. In addition, it is found the blueshift of the band gap energy due to the atom interdiffusion at the interface can be larger than that due to the formation of the In-N clusters. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 61504094, Tinjin Research Program of Application Foundation and Advanced Technology under No. 15JCYBJC16300, and Tianjin City High School Science and Technology Fund Planning Project No. 20120609

  20. Influence of In-N Clusters on Band Gap Energy of Dilute Nitride In x Ga1‑x N y As1‑y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chuan-Zhen; Guo, Heng-Fei; Chen, Li-Ying; Tang, Chun-Xiao; Lu, Ke-Qing

    2016-05-01

    The In-N clusters form in the dilute nitride InxGa1‑xNyAs1‑y alloys after annealing. It is found that the formation of the In-N clusters not only raises the N levels lying above the conduction band minimum (CBM) of InGaAs, but also raises the N levels below the CBM of InGaAs, leading to the variation of the impurity-host interaction. The blueshift of the band gap energy is relative to the variation of the impurity-host interaction. In order to describe the blueshift of the band gap energy due to the formation of the In-N clusters, a model is developed. It is found that the model can describe the blueshift of the band gap energy well. In addition, it is found the blueshift of the band gap energy due to the atom interdiffusion at the interface can be larger than that due to the formation of the In-N clusters. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 61504094, Tinjin Research Program of Application Foundation and Advanced Technology under No. 15JCYBJC16300, and Tianjin City High School Science and Technology Fund Planning Project No. 20120609

  1. Electronic and thermoelectric properties of InN studied using ab initio density functional theory and Boltzmann transport calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, P. D.; Scolfaro, L.

    2014-12-01

    The thermoelectric properties of indium nitride in the most stable wurtzite phase (w-InN) as a function of electron and hole concentrations and temperature were studied by solving the semiclassical Boltzmann transport equations in conjunction with ab initio electronic structure calculations, within Density Functional Theory. Based on maximally localized Wannier function basis set and the ab initio band energies, results for the Seebeck coefficient are presented and compared with available experimental data for n-type as well as p-type systems. Also, theoretical results for electric conductivity and power factor are presented. Most cases showed good agreement between the calculated properties and experimental data for w-InN unintentionally and p-type doped with magnesium. Our predictions for temperature and concentration dependences of electrical conductivity and power factor revealed a promising use of InN for intermediate and high temperature thermoelectric applications. The rigid band approach and constant scattering time approximation were utilized in the calculations.

  2. Comparison of dry-etch techniques for GaN, InN, and AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; Vawter, G.A.; Willison, C.G.; Bridges, M.M.; Lee, J.W.; Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.

    1997-12-01

    FABRICATION OF GROUP III NITRIDE DEVICES RELIES ON THE ABILITY TO PATTERN FEATURES TO DEPTHS RANGING FROM 1000 A TO {gt} 5 MICRONS WITH ANISOTROPIC PROFILES, SMOOTH MORPHOLOGIES, SELECTIVE ETCHING OF ONE MATERIAL OVER ANOTHER, AND A LOW DEGREE OF PLASMA INDUCED DAMAGE. IN THIS STUDY, GAN ETCH RATES AND ETCH PROFILES ARE COMPARED USING REACTIVE ION ETCH (RIE), REACTIVE ION BEAM ETCHING (RIBE), ELECTRON CYCLOTRON RESONANCE (ECR), AND INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA (ICP) ETCH SYSTEMS. RIE YIELDED THE SLOWEST ETCH RATES AND SLOPED ETCH PROFILES DESPITE DC-BIASES {gt} -900 V. ECR and ICP etching yielded the highest rates with anisotropic profiles due to their high plasma flux and the ability to control ion energies independently of plasma density. RIBE etch results also showed anisotropic profiles with slower etch rates than either ECR or ICP possibly due to lower ion flux. InN and AlN etch characteristics are also compared using ICP and RIBE.

  3. Electronic and thermoelectric properties of InN studied using ab initio density functional theory and Boltzmann transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Borges, P. D. E-mail: lscolfaro@txstate.edu; Scolfaro, L. E-mail: lscolfaro@txstate.edu

    2014-12-14

    The thermoelectric properties of indium nitride in the most stable wurtzite phase (w-InN) as a function of electron and hole concentrations and temperature were studied by solving the semiclassical Boltzmann transport equations in conjunction with ab initio electronic structure calculations, within Density Functional Theory. Based on maximally localized Wannier function basis set and the ab initio band energies, results for the Seebeck coefficient are presented and compared with available experimental data for n-type as well as p-type systems. Also, theoretical results for electric conductivity and power factor are presented. Most cases showed good agreement between the calculated properties and experimental data for w-InN unintentionally and p-type doped with magnesium. Our predictions for temperature and concentration dependences of electrical conductivity and power factor revealed a promising use of InN for intermediate and high temperature thermoelectric applications. The rigid band approach and constant scattering time approximation were utilized in the calculations.

  4. Individual electron and hole localization in submonolayer InN quantum sheets embedded in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feix, F.; Flissikowski, T.; Chèze, C.; Calarco, R.; Grahn, H. T.; Brandt, O.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate sub-monolayer InN quantum sheets embedded in GaN(0001) by temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy under both continuous-wave and pulsed excitation. Both the peak energy and the linewidth of the emission band associated with the quantum sheets exhibit an anomalous dependence on temperature indicative of carrier localization. Photoluminescence transients reveal a power law decay at low temperatures reflecting that the recombining electrons and holes occupy spatially separate, individual potential minima reminiscent of conventional (In,Ga)N(0001) quantum wells exhibiting the characteristic disorder of a random alloy. At elevated temperatures, carrier delocalization sets in and is accompanied by a thermally activated quenching of the emission. We ascribe the strong nonradiative recombination to extended states in the GaN barriers and confirm our assumption by a simple rate-equation model.

  5. Structural and electronic properties of InN nanowire network grown by vapor-liquid-solid method

    SciTech Connect

    Barick, B. K. E-mail: subho-dh@yahoo.co.in; Dhar, S. E-mail: subho-dh@yahoo.co.in; Rodríguez-Fernández, Carlos; Cantarero, Andres

    2015-05-15

    Growth of InN nanowires have been carried out on quartz substrates at different temperatures by vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) technique using different thicknesses of Au catalyst layer. It has been found that a narrow window of Au layer thickness and growth temperature leads to multi-nucleation, in which each site acts as the origin of several nanowires. In this multi-nucleation regime, several tens of micrometer long wires with diameter as small as 20 nm are found to grow along [112{sup -}0] direction (a-plane) to form a dense network. Structural and electronic properties of these wires are studied. As grown nanowires show degenerate n-type behavior. Furthermore, x-ray photoemission study reveals an accumulation of electrons on the surface of these nanowires. Interestingly, the wire network shows persistence of photoconductivity for several hours after switching off the photoexcitation.

  6. Pressure based first-principles study of the electronic, elastic, optic and phonon properties of zincblende InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Zahid; Cao, Chuanbao; Mahmood, Tariq

    2013-12-01

    Generalized gradient approximation proposed by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (GGA-PBE) is used to determine the effect of pressure on electronic, elastic, acoustic, optical and vibrational properties of zincblende InN along with the Ultra soft pseudopotential method. The structural properties show good consistency and stability at elevated pressures. The zincblende InN displays zero band gap and its metallicity maintains even at high pressures. The density of states appear in a quarterly divided region, where the contribution of different states have been discussed, and it is found that the peak positions are consistent with experimental L1, L3, K absorption and emission edges. The effect of pressure appears in strong hybridization due to which DOS above and below the Fermi level are shifting to the corresponding higher and lower energies due to p-d hybridization. The calculated elastic constants agree well with the literature. Except C44 and Cs, all others show an increasing trend with the pressure. Acoustic wave speeds have been calculated in [100], [110] and [111] directions with the help of elastic constants for the first time. For the optical properties, the main peaks of the imaginary part of dielectric function lie in close vicinity of experiment and shift to higher energies with a reduction in peak intensities when the pressure effects come into play. Similarly the absorption peaks are red shifted with respect to hydro-static pressure. The refractive index is maximum at lower energies and its magnitude reduces with pressure and the maximum value of energy loss function is obtained corresponding to minimum dielectric function. Phonon frequencies in high symmetry directions agree well with the only available first principle study. Except XTA, WTA, and LTA, all the other modes show an increase in phonon frequencies when pressure is exerted, this is further confirmed by Gruneisen parameters calculated for the first time.

  7. Characterization of high quality InN grown on production-style plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy system

    SciTech Connect

    Gherasoiu, I.; O'Steen, M.; Bird, T.; Gotthold, D.; Chandolu, A.; Song, D. Y.; Xu, S. X.; Holtz, M.; Nikishin, S. A.; Schaff, W. J.

    2008-05-15

    In this work, the authors report step-flow growth mode of InN on [0001] oriented GaN templates, using a production-style molecular beam epitaxy system, Veeco GEN200 registered , equipped with a plasma source. Using adaptive growth conditions, they have obtained a surface morphology that exhibits the step-flow features. The root mean squared roughness over an area of 5x5 {mu}m{sup 2} is 1.4 nm with monolayer height terrace steps (0.281 nm), based on atomic force microscopy. It has been found that the presence of In droplets leads to defective surface morphology. From x-ray diffraction, they estimate edge and screw dislocation densities. The former is dominant over the latter. Micro-Raman spectra reveal narrow E{sub 2}{sup 2} phonon lines consistent with excellent crystalline quality of the epitaxial layers. The Hall mobility of 1 {mu}m thick InN layers, grown in step-flow mode, is slightly higher than 1400 cm{sup 2}/V s, while for other growth conditions yielding a smooth surface with no well-defined steps, mobility as high as 1904 cm{sup 2}/V s at room temperature has been measured. The samples exhibit high intensity photoluminescence (PL) with a corresponding band edge that shifts with free carrier concentration. For the lowest carrier concentration of 5.6x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}, they observe PL emission at {approx}0.64 eV.

  8. Growth kinetics and structural perfection of (InN)1/(GaN)1-20 short-period superlattices on +c-GaN template in dynamic atomic layer epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Kazuhide; Hashimoto, Naoki; Itoi, Takaomi; Wang, Ke; Imai, Daichi; Yoshikawa, Akihiko

    2016-04-01

    The growth kinetics and structural perfection of (InN)1/(GaN)1-20 short-period superlattices (SPSs) were investigated with their application to ordered alloys in mind. The SPSs were grown on +c-GaN template at 650 °C by dynamic atomic layer epitaxy in conventional plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. It was found that coherent structured InN/GaN SPSs could be fabricated when the thickness of the GaN barrier was 4 ML or above. Below 3 ML, the formation of SPSs was quite difficult owing to the increased strain in the SPS structure caused by the use of GaN as a template. The effective or average In composition of the (InN)1/(GaN)4 SPSs was around 10%, and the corresponding InN coverage in the ˜1 ML-thick InN wells was 50%. It was found that the effective InN coverage in ˜1 ML-thick InN wells could be varied with the growth conditions. In fact, the effective In composition could be increased up to 13.5%, i.e., the corresponding effective InN coverage was about 68%, by improving the capping/freezing speed by increasing the growth rate of the GaN barrier layer.

  9. Extraordinary N atom tunneling in formation of InN shell layer on GaN nanorod m-plane sidewall.

    PubMed

    Cai, Duanjun; Lin, Na; Xu, Hongmei; Liao, Che-Hao; Yang, C C

    2014-12-12

    We report the extraordinary tunneling process that finds the lower cohesive energy route for stablizing InN shell layer on m-plane sidewall of GaN nanorod. The [0001] orientated GaN nanorod array is grown on sapphire substrate patterned with Ga nanoparticle by metal-organic vapor deposition method, based on which the simulation structures of c-plane top surface and m-plane sidewall surface is constructed for the first-principles calculations. The results show that the introduction of In wetting monolayer could effectively lower the cohesive energy of adalayers on non-polar GaN surfaces. Most importantly, it is revealed that there exists an extraordinary tunneling process in which the N atoms will drag out the In wetting atoms and tunnel through to form stable InN shell layer on the nanorod sidewall. PMID:25412649

  10. Effects of Ga on the growth of InN on O-face ZnO(0001) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yong Jin; Riechert, Henning; Brandt, Oliver; Korytov, Maxim; Albrecht, Martin

    2012-07-30

    We compare the structural properties of InN and In{sub 0.95}Ga{sub 0.05}N films grown on O-face ZnO(0001) substrates at different temperatures. The small amount of Ga results in dramatic changes in the morphology and structural properties of InN. In particular, inversion domains start to appear at higher temperatures in the In{sub 0.95}Ga{sub 0.05}N film. This process is a consequence of the chemical reaction of ZnO with Ga which can be prevented by choosing the substrate temperature to be 450{sup Degree-Sign }C or below.

  11. Real-Time Optical Monitoring and Simulations of Gas Phase Kinetics in InN Vapor Phase Epitaxy at High Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, Nikolaus; Woods, Vincent; McCall, Sonya D.; Bachmann, Klaus J.

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the kinetics of nucleation and coalescence of heteroepitaxial thin films is a crucial step in controlling a chemical vapor deposition process, since it defines the perfection of the heteroepitaxial film both in terms of extended defect formation and chemical integrity of the interface. The initial nucleation process also defines the film quality during the later stages of film growth. The growth of emerging new materials heterostructures such as InN or In-rich Ga(x)In(1-x)N require deposition methods operating at higher vapor densities due to the high thermal decomposition pressure in these materials. High nitrogen pressure has been demonstrated to suppress thermal decomposition of InN, but has not been applied yet in chemical vapor deposition or etching experiments. Because of the difficulty with maintaining stochiometry at elevated temperature, current knowledge regarding thermodynamic data for InN, e.g., its melting point, temperature-dependent heat capacity, heat and entropy of formation are known with far less accuracy than for InP, InAs and InSb. Also, no information exists regarding the partial pressures of nitrogen and phosphorus along the liquidus surfaces of mixed-anion alloys of InN, of which the InN(x)P(1-x) system is the most interesting option. A miscibility gap is expected for InN(x)P(1-x) pseudobinary solidus compositions, but its extent is not established at this point by experimental studies under near equilibrium conditions. The extension of chemical vapor deposition to elevated pressure is also necessary for retaining stoichiometric single phase surface composition for materials that are characterized by large thermal decomposition pressures at optimum processing temperatures.

  12. High-quality InN films on MgO (100) substrates: The key role of 30° in-plane rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Compeán García, V. D.; López Luna, E.; Rodríguez, A. G.; Vidal, M. A.; Orozco Hinostroza, I. E.; Escobosa Echavarría, A.

    2014-05-12

    High crystalline layers of InN were grown on MgO(100) substrates by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. Good quality films were obtained by means of an in-plane rotation process induced by the annealing of an InN buffer layer to minimize the misfit between InN and MgO. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction showed linear streaky patterns along the [011{sup ¯}0] azimuth and a superimposed diffraction along the [112{sup ¯}0] azimuth, which correspond to a 30° α-InN film rotation. This rotation reduces the mismatch at the MgO/InN interface from 19.5% to less than 3.5%, increasing the structural quality, which was analyzed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Only the (0002) c plane diffraction of α-InN was observed and was centered at 2θ = 31.4°. Raman spectroscopy showed two modes corresponding to the hexagonal phase: E1(LO) at 591 cm{sup −1} and E2(high) at 488 cm{sup −1}. Hall effect measurements showed a carrier density of 9 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} and an electron Hall mobility of 340 cm{sup 2}/(V s) for a film thickness of 140 nm.

  13. Reduced threading dislocation densities in high-T/N-rich grown InN films by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Loitsch, Bernhard; Schuster, Fabian; Stutzmann, Martin; Koblmueller, Gregor

    2013-02-04

    We explore the effect of growth kinetics on the structural properties of In-polar InN films on GaN templates grown near the thermal dissociation limit by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Unlike the common growth temperature limit (T Almost-Equal-To 500 Degree-Sign C) for In-polar InN grown under In-rich conditions, slightly N-rich conditions are demonstrated to shift the available growth temperature window to much higher temperatures (by >50 Degree-Sign C). InN films grown in this high-T/N-rich regime show significantly reduced off-axis X-ray diffraction rocking curve peak widths and record low threading dislocation densities (TDD {approx} 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}) even for film thicknesses <1 {mu}m, as compared to state of the art In-rich growth. The reduction of TDD is attributed to more effective TD inclination and annihilation under N-rich growth, delineating prospective routes for improved InN-based materials.

  14. Electron mobility of self-assembled and dislocation free InN nanorods grown on GaN nano wall network template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangi, Malleswararao; De, Arpan; Ghatak, Jay; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    A kinetically controlled two-step growth process for the formation of an array of dislocation free high mobility InN nanorods (NRs) on GaN nanowall network (NWN) by Molecular Beam Epitaxy is demonstrated here. The epitaxial GaN NWN is formed on c-sapphire under nitrogen rich conditions, and then changing the source from Ga to In at appropriate substrate temperature yields the nucleation of a self assembled spontaneous m-plane side faceted-InN NR. By HRTEM, the NRs are shown to be dislocation-free and have a low band gap value of 0.65 eV. Hall measurements are carried out on a single InN NR along with J-V measurements that yield mobility values as high as ≈4453 cm2/V s and the carrier concentration of ≈1.1 × 1017 cm-3, which are unprecedented in the literature for comparable InN NR diameters.

  15. Ultrahigh polarimetric image contrast enhancement for skin cancer diagnosis using InN plasmonic nanoparticles in the terahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ney, Michael; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    Mueller matrix imaging sensitivity, to delicate water content changes in tissue associated with early stages of skin cancer, is demonstrated by numerical modeling to be enhanced by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effects at the terahertz (THz) range when InN nanoparticles (NPs) coated with Parylene-C are introduced into the skin. A skin tissue model tailored for THz wavelengths is established for a Monte Carlo simulation of polarized light propagation and scattering, and a comparative study based on simulated Mueller matrices is presented considering different NPs' parameters and insertion into the skin methods. The insertion of NPs presenting LSPR in the THz is demonstrated to enable the application of polarization-based sample characterization techniques adopted from the scattering dominated visible wavelengths domain for the, otherwise, relatively low scattering THz domain, where such approach is irrelevant without the NPs. Through these Mueller polarimetry techniques, the detection of water content variations in the tissue is made possible and with high sensitivity. This study yields a limit of detection down to 0.0018% for relative changes in the water content based on linear degree of polarization-an improvement of an order of magnitude relative to the limit of detection without NPs calculated in a previous ellipsometric study.

  16. Ultrahigh polarimetric image contrast enhancement for skin cancer diagnosis using InN plasmonic nanoparticles in the terahertz range.

    PubMed

    Ney, Michael; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Mueller matrix imaging sensitivity, to delicate water content changes in tissue associated with early stages of skin cancer, is demonstrated by numerical modeling to be enhanced by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effects at the terahertz (THz) range when InN nanoparticles (NPs) coated with Parylene-C are introduced into the skin. A skin tissue model tailored for THz wavelengths is established for a Monte Carlo simulation of polarized light propagation and scattering, and a comparative study based on simulated Mueller matrices is presented considering different NPs’ parameters and insertion into the skin methods. The insertion of NPs presenting LSPR in the THz is demonstrated to enable the application of polarization-based sample characterization techniques adopted from the scattering dominated visible wavelengths domain for the, otherwise, relatively low scattering THz domain, where such approach is irrelevant without the NPs. Through these Mueller polarimetry techniques, the detection of water content variations in the tissue is made possible and with high sensitivity. This study yields a limit of detection down to 0.0018% for relative changes in the water content based on linear degree of polarization--an improvement of an order of magnitude relative to the limit of detection without NPs calculated in a previous ellipsometric study.

  17. Validation of a simple distributed sediment delivery approach in selected sub-basins of the River Inn catchment area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Lucas; Kittlaus, Steffen; Scherer, Ulrike

    2015-04-01

    For large areas without highly detailed data the empirical Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) is widely used to quantify soil loss. The problem though is usually the quantification of actual sediment influx into the rivers. As the USLE provides long-term mean soil loss rates, it is often combined with spatially lumped models to estimate the sediment delivery ratio (SDR). But it gets difficult with spatially lumped approaches in large catchment areas where the geographical properties have a wide variance. In this study we developed a simple but spatially distributed approach to quantify the sediment delivery ratio by considering the characteristics of the flow paths in the catchments. The sediment delivery ratio was determined using an empirical approach considering the slope, morphology and land use properties along the flow path as an estimation of travel time of the eroded particles. The model was tested against suspended solids measurements in selected sub-basins of the River Inn catchment area in Germany and Austria, ranging from the high alpine south to the Molasse basin in the northern part.

  18. A new perspective on soil erosion: exploring a thermodynamic approach in a small area of the River Inn catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Lucas; Scherer, Ulrike; Zehe, Erwin

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion modeling has always struggled with compensating for the difference in time and spatial scale between model, data and the actual processes involved. This is especially the case with non-event based long-term models based on the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE), yet USLE based soil erosion models are among the most common and widely used for they have rather low data requirements and can be applied to large areas. But the majority of mass from soil erosion is eroded within short periods of times during heavy rain events, often within minutes or hours. Advancements of the USLE (eg. the Modified Universal Soil Loss Equation, MUSLE) allow for a daily time step, but still apply the same empirical methods derived from the USLE. And to improve the actual quantification of sediment input into rivers soil erosion models are often combined with a Sediment Delivery Ratio (SDR) to get results within the range of measurements. This is still a viable approach for many applications, yet it leaves much to be desired in terms of understanding and reproducing the processes behind soil erosion and sediment input into rivers. That's why, instead of refining and retuning the existing methods, we explore a more comprehensive, physically consistent description on soil erosion. The idea is to describe soil erosion as a dissipative process (Kleidon et al., 2013) and test it in a small sub-basin of the River Inn catchment area in the pre-Alpine foothills. We then compare the results to sediment load measurements from the sub-basin and discuss the advantages and issues with the application of such an approach.

  19. Effects of the group V/III ratio and a gan inter-layer on the crystal quality of InN grown by using the hydride vapor-phase epitaxy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Ju-Hyung; Wang, Juan; Lee, Won-Jae; Choi, Young-Jun; Lee, Hae-Yong; Kim, Jung-Gon; Harima, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    The hydride vapor-phase epitaxy (HVPE) method was used to deposit high-quality InN layers on GaN inter-layer/sapphire (0001) structures that had been fabricated by using either the HVPE method or the metal-organic chemical-phase deposition (MOCVD) method. The effects of the group V/III ratio and different GaN inter-layers on the crystal quality of the InN layers were systemically investigated. The InN layer grown at a low Group V/III ratio revealed a high crystal quality with a two-dimensional (2D) growth mode. Also, the 110.7-nm-thick InN layer grown by using HVPE on a GaN inter-layer/sapphire (0001) substrate structure that had been fabricated by using MOCVD had a high crystal quality, with the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the InN X-ray diffraction (XRD) peak being about 844 arcsec, and a smooth surface with an atomic force microscopy (AFM) roughness of about 0.07 nm. On the other hand, the 145.7-nm-thick InN layer grown by using HVPE on a GaN inter-layer/sapphire (0001) substrate structure that had been fabricated by using the HVPE method had a lower crystal quality, a FWHM value for the InN (0002) peak of about 2772 arcsec, and a surface roughness of about 3.73 nm. In addition, the peak of the E2 (high) phonon mode for the 110.7-nm-thick InN layer grown by using HVPE on a GaN inter-layer/sapphire (0001) structure that had been fabricated by using MOCVD was detected at 491 cm -1 and had a FWHM of 9.9 cm-1. As a result, InN layers grown by using HVPE on GaN inter-layer/sapphire (0001) substrate structures fabricated by using MOCVD have a high crystal quality and a reduced Raman value, which agrees well with the results of the XRD analysis.

  20. Structural and electrical properties of reactively sputtered InN thin films on AlN-buffered (00.1) sapphire substrates: Dependence on buffer and film growth temperatures and thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistenmacher, T. J.; Ecelberger, S. A.; Bryden, W. A.

    1993-08-01

    An extensive investigation of InN overlayers on AlN-buffered (00.1) sapphire by reactive magnetron sputtering has been undertaken and the dependencies of several basic materials properties (film thickness, development and quality of heteroepitaxy, film morphology, and electrical transport) on such key deposition parameters such as the growth temperatures of the insulating AlN buffer layer and the InN overlayer and their thicknesses have been determined. Three prominent effects of the AlN buffer layer are (1) the stabilization of heteroepitaxial growth over a broad range of film and buffer layer growth temperatures; (2) the attainment of a higher Hall mobility (up to 60 cm2/V s) over much of the same range; and, (3) the retention of heteroepitaxial growth, higher Hall mobility, and pseudo-two-dimensional growth even in the limit of an InN layer of ˜40 Å. In the context of a structure-zone model, the AlN buffer layer is projected to effectively raise the growth temperature of the InN thin film. The increase in effective growth temperature is, however, insufficient to overcome low atomic and cluster mobility and to achieve single-crystal InN thin film growth.

  1. The effect of McInnes solution on enamel and the effect of Tooth mousse on bleached enamel: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Darshan, H E; Shashikiran, N D

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the effect of McInnes bleaching agent on the micro hardness of enamel before and after bleaching and to evaluate the effect of G C Tooth Mousse on the bleached enamel surface for its microhardness. Materials and Methods: McInnes bleaching solution, Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate CCP-ACP (G C Tooth mousse) artificial saliva (Dept of Oral Pathology, College of Dental Sciences, Davengere), deionized water, Vickers Micro Hardness tester (Zwick/ZHV, Germany), freshly extracted teeth, cold cure acrylic, Diamond disc (Horico - PFINGST New jersey USA, KAVO- Germany), straight handpiece (kavo peca reta) and plastic moulds (6.5 × 2 mm). The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare microhardness of the sound enamel surface by Vickers Hardness Number before and after bleaching with McInnes solution, and to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate (G C Tooth Mousse) on the bleached enamel surface for its microhardness. Statistical analysis: The data obtained from the test were subjected for statistical analysis and are presented as range, mean and standard deviation. P value of 0.05 or less was considered for statistical significance. The changes in microhardness at different times of assessment were analyzed using the paired ‘t’ test Results: All the samples showed decrease in the microhardness after two cycles of bleaching, though immediately after bleaching the decrease in the microhardness was not significant (P = 0.34). However, after the second cycles, it showed a significant decrease (P<0.01) in the microhardness. After application of remineralization solution (GC Tooth mousse), the samples showed a marginal increase in the microhardness (P<0.05) after seven days and a marked increase after fourteen days (P<0.001). Conclusion: McInnes bleaching agent does decrease the microhardness of enamel by causing enamel demineralization and GC Tooth mousse used in the study causes an increase in the

  2. Growth of high-quality InN thin films on InGaN buffer layer by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen-Chi; Lo, Ikai; Shih, Cheng-Hung; Hu, Chia-Hsuan; Wang, Ying-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Chiao; Tasi, Cheng-Da; You, Shuo-Ting

    2015-03-01

    Four samples were grown on 2 inch c-plane (0001) sapphire substrates with 4 μm-thick GaN template. The InN thin films were grown on InGaN buffer layer by low-temperature plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) system. These samples were grown under a varied temperature of InGaN buffer layers: 500°C, 540°C, 570°C, and 600°C. The structure properties of these samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The interference fringes of InN grown on the sample 1 (the growth temperature of InGaN buffer layer at 500°C) exhibit prominent oscillations, which indicates that the sample has a high quality and layer by layer epitaxial structure. The surface morphology and microstructure of samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We confirmed the smooth surface and high quality crystalline for the sample.

  3. SpaceInn hare-and-hounds exercise: Estimation of stellar properties using space-based asteroseismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, D. R.; Chaplin, W. J.; Davies, G. R.; Miglio, A.; Antia, H. M.; Ball, W. H.; Basu, S.; Buldgen, G.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Coelho, H. R.; Hekker, S.; Houdek, G.; Lebreton, Y.; Mazumdar, A.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Stello, D.; Verma, K.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Detailed oscillation spectra comprising individual frequencies for numerous solar-type stars and red giants are either currently available, e.g. courtesy of the CoRoT, Kepler, and K2 missions, or will become available with the upcoming NASA TESS and ESA PLATO 2.0 missions. The data can lead to a precise characterisation of these stars thereby improving our understanding of stellar evolution, exoplanetary systems, and the history of our galaxy. Aims: Our goal is to test and compare different methods for obtaining stellar properties from oscillation frequencies and spectroscopic constraints. Specifically, we would like to evaluate the accuracy of the results and reliability of the associated error bars, and to see where there is room for improvement. Methods: In the context of the SpaceInn network, we carried out a hare-and-hounds exercise in which one group, the hares, simulated observations of oscillation spectra for a set of ten artificial solar-type stars, and a number of hounds applied various methods for characterising these stars based on the data produced by the hares. Most of the hounds fell into two main groups. The first group used forward modelling (i.e. applied various search/optimisation algorithms in a stellar parameter space) whereas the second group relied on acoustic glitch signatures. Results: Results based on the forward modelling approach were accurate to 1.5% (radius), 3.9% (mass), 23% (age), 1.5% (surface gravity), and 1.8% (mean density), as based on the root mean square difference. Individual hounds reached different degrees of accuracy, some of which were substantially better than the above average values. For the two 1M⊙ stellar targets, the accuracy on the age is better than 10% thereby satisfying the requirements for the PLATO 2.0 mission. High stellar masses and atomic diffusion (which in our models does not include the effects of radiative accelerations) proved to be sources of difficulty. The average accuracies for the

  4. Annual Review of BPA-Funded Projects in Natural and Artificial Propagation of Salmonids, March 27-29, 1985, Holiday Inn Airport, Portland, Oregon.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-04-01

    The Fish and Wildlife Division of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) hosted a meeting for contractors to present the results of fiscal year 1984 research conducted to implement the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program. The meeting focused on those projects specifically related to natural and artificial propagation of salmonids. The presentations were held at the Holiday Inn Airport in Portland, Oregon, on March 27-29, 1985. This document contains abstracts of the presentations from that meeting. Section 1 contains abstracts on artificial propagation, fish health, and downstream migration, and Section 2 contains abstracts on natural propagation and habitat improvement. The abstracts are indexed by BPA Project Number and by Fish and Wildlife Program Measure. The registered attendees at the meeting are listed alphabetically in Appendix A and by affiliation in Appendix B.

  5. Impact of Mg concentration on energy-band-depth profile of Mg-doped InN epilayers analyzed by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Imura, M.; Tsuda, S.; Nagata, T.; Takeda, H.; Liao, M. Y.; Koide, Y.; Yang, A. L.; Yamashita, Y.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Kaneko, M.; Uematsu, N.; Wang, K.; Araki, T.; Nanishi, Y.

    2013-10-14

    The electronic structures of Mg-doped InN (Mg-InN) epilayers with the Mg concentration, [Mg], ranging from 1 × 10{sup 19} to 5 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} were systematically investigated by soft and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. The angle-resolved results on the core-level and valence band photoelectron spectra as a function of [Mg] revealed that the energy band of Mg-InN showed downward bending due to the n{sup +} surface electron accumulation and p type layers formed in the bulk. With an increase in [Mg], the energy-band changed from monotonic to two-step n{sup +}p homojunction structures. The oxygen concentration rapidly increased at the middle-bulk region (∼4.5 to ∼7.5 nm) from the surface, which was one of the reasons of the transformation of two-step energy band.

  6. High rate dry etching of GaN, AlN and InN in ECR Cl{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vartuli, C.B.; Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Shul, R.J.; Kilcoyne, S.P.; Crawford, M.H.; Howard, A.J.; Parmeter, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    Etch rates for binary nitrides in ECR Cl{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar are reported as a function of temperature, rf-bias, microwave power, pressure and relative gas proportions. GaN etch rates remain relatively constant from 30 to 125{degrees}C and then increase to a maximum of 2340 {angstrom}-min{sup {minus}1} at 170{degrees}C. The AlN etch rate decreases throughout the temperature range studied with a maximum of 960 {angstrom}-min{sup {minus}1} at 30{degrees}C. When CH{sub 4} is removed from the plasma chemistry, the GaN and InN etch rates are slightly lower, with less dramatic changes with temperature. The surface composition of the III-V nitrides remains unchanged over the temperatures studied. The GaN and InN rates increase significantly with rf power, and the fastest rates for all three binaries are obtained at 2 mTorr. Surface morphology is smooth for GaN over a wide range of conditions, whereas InN surfaces are more sensitive to plasma parameters.

  7. Point defects introduced by InN alloying into In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N probed using a monoenergetic positron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Uedono, A.; Tsutsui, T.; Watanabe, T.; Kimura, S.; Zhang, Y.; Lozac'h, M.; Sang, L. W.; Sumiya, M.; Ishibashi, S.

    2013-03-28

    Native defects in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (x = 0.06-0.14) grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition were studied using a monoenergetic positron beam. Measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation as a function of incident positron energy for In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N showed that vacancy-type defects were introduced with increasing InN composition, and the major defect species was identified as complexes between a cation vacancy and a nitrogen vacancy. The concentration of the divacancy, however, was found to be suppressed by Mg doping. The momentum distribution of electrons at the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN interface was close to that in defect-free GaN or In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N, which was attributed to localization of positrons at the interface due to the built-in electric field, and to suppression of positron trapping by vacancy-type defects. We have also shown that the diffusion property of positrons is sensitive to an electric field near the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN interface.

  8. InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well light-emitting diodes with a grading InN composition suppressing the Auger recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Ju, Zhengang; Tan, Swee Tiam; Ji, Yun; Kyaw, Zabu; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Liancheng; Sun, Xiao Wei E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org; Demir, Hilmi Volkan E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org

    2014-07-21

    In conventional InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), thin InGaN quantum wells are usually adopted to mitigate the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE), caused due to strong polarization induced electric field, through spatially confining electrons and holes in small recombination volumes. However, this inevitably increases the carrier density in quantum wells, which in turn aggravates the Auger recombination, since the Auger recombination scales with the third power of the carrier density. As a result, the efficiency droop of the Auger recombination severely limits the LED performance. Here, we proposed and showed wide InGaN quantum wells with the InN composition linearly grading along the growth orientation in LED structures suppressing the Auger recombination and the QCSE simultaneously. Theoretically, the physical mechanisms behind the Auger recombination suppression are also revealed. The proposed LED structure has experimentally demonstrated significant improvement in optical output power and efficiency droop, proving to be an effective solution to this important problem of Auger recombination.

  9. The effect of electrical properties for InGaN and InN by high-energy particle irradiation (notice of removal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shao-guang; Fan, Guang-han

    2008-03-01

    This paper (SPIE Paper 68411H) was removed from the SPIE Digital Library on 8 August 2008 upon discovery that the paper has substantially plagiarized the following two papers: R.E. Jones, S.X. Li, L. Hsu, K.M. Yu, W. Walukiewicz, Z. Liliental-Weber, J.W. Ager III, E.E. Haller, H. Lu, and W.J. Schaff, "Native-defect-controlled n-type conductivity in InN," Physica B 376-377 (2006) 436-439 and S.X. Li, K.M. Yu, J. Wu, R.E. Jones, W. Walukiewicz, J.W. Ager III, W. Shan, E.E. Haller, Hai Lu, and William J. Schaff, "Native defects in InxGa1-xN alloys," Physica B 376-377 (2006) 432-435. As stated in the SPIE Publication Ethics Guidelines, "SPIE defines plagiarism as the reuse of someone else's prior ideas, processes, results, or words without explicit attribution of the original author and source, or falsely representing someone else's work as one's own. Unauthorized use of another researcher's unpublished data or findings without permission is considered to be a form of plagiarism even if the source is attributed. SPIE considers plagiarism in any form, at any level, to be unacceptable and a serious breach of professional conduct." It is SPIE policy to remove such papers and to provide citations to original sources so that interested readers can obtain the information directly from those sources. One of the authors, Shao-guang Dong, accepts full responsibility and apologizes for this plagiarism and has absolved the second author, Guang-han Fan, of any prior knowledge of or professional misconduct in this matter. Guang-han Fan also states that he had not previously seen the paper or given permission to include his name as an author.

  10. Low Temperature Growth of In2O3and InN Nanocrystals on Si(111) via Chemical Vapour Deposition Based on the Sublimation of NH4Cl in In

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Indium oxide (In2O3) nanocrystals (NCs) have been obtained via atmospheric pressure, chemical vapour deposition (APCVD) on Si(111) via the direct oxidation of In with Ar:10% O2at 1000 °C but also at temperatures as low as 500 °C by the sublimation of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) which is incorporated into the In under a gas flow of nitrogen (N2). Similarly InN NCs have also been obtained using sublimation of NH4Cl in a gas flow of NH3. During oxidation of In under a flow of O2the transfer of In into the gas stream is inhibited by the formation of In2O3around the In powder which breaks up only at high temperatures, i.e.T > 900 °C, thereby releasing In into the gas stream which can then react with O2leading to a high yield formation of isolated 500 nm In2O3octahedrons but also chains of these nanostructures. No such NCs were obtained by direct oxidation forTG < 900 °C. The incorporation of NH4Cl in the In leads to the sublimation of NH4Cl into NH3and HCl at around 338 °C which in turn produces an efficient dispersion and transfer of the whole In into the gas stream of N2where it reacts with HCl forming primarily InCl. The latter adsorbs onto the Si(111) where it reacts with H2O and O2leading to the formation of In2O3nanopyramids on Si(111). The rest of the InCl is carried downstream, where it solidifies at lower temperatures, and rapidly breaks down into metallic In upon exposure to H2O in the air. Upon carrying out the reaction of In with NH4Cl at 600 °C under NH3as opposed to N2, we obtain InN nanoparticles on Si(111) with an average diameter of 300 nm. PMID:20596336

  11. International Atomic Energy Agency specialists meeting on experience in ageing, maintenance, and modernization of instrumentation and control systems for improving nuclear power plant availability

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the proceedings of the Specialist`s Meeting on Experience in Aging, Maintenance and Modernization of Instrumentation and Control Systems for Improving Nuclear Power Plant Availability that was held at the Ramada Inn in Rockville, Maryland on May 5--7, 1993. The Meeting was presented in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the International Atomic Energy Agency. There were approximately 65 participants from 13 countries at the Meeting. Individual reports have been cataloged separately.

  12. Career Orientations of Female Students Enrolling in Agricultural Curricula at Clemson University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettigrew, Nancy J.; Boyd, Virlyn A.

    The study determined the occupational values of 166 female home economics freshmen and 33 female agricultural freshmen at Winthrop College by asking the question: "In picking the job you would most like to have, how important are the following things about the job?" The freshmen rated by importance seven items: (1) high salary, (2) steady…

  13. High resolution meteorological modellingof the Inn Valley atmosphere, Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schicker, I.; Arnold, D.; Seibert, P.

    2009-09-01

    Orography and local meteorology play a major role in Alpine valleys, as they are linked with valley and slope wind systems, stagnation and recirculation, temperature inversions and turbulence. Thus, they have a strong influence of transport and dilution of pollutants in the valley, affecting human health, and sound propagation. Shallow stable layers at the valley floor and low wind speed conditions, especially in autumn and winter, trap pollutants and thus cause unfavourable dispersion conditions , possibly leading to exceedances of air pollution limits. Moreover, under certain synoptic conditions such as persistent high-pressure systems inversion conditions prevail for days. Emissions may accumulate in the valley from day to day and thus critical levels of pollutants may be reached. With the current computer capabilities, numerical meteorological models and particle dispersion models are powerful tools to investigate such situations and their impact on emission-side measures. However, alpine valleys and other complex topographical areas require very high resolutions to ensure accurate representation of the physical processes. Typically, the highest resolutions used nowadays in episodic simulations with models such as, e.g., RAMS, WRF, or MM5, are around 1 km. This still smooths the orography, cutting the peaks and raising the valley bottoms. In this work a comparison of the simulation of the valley atmosphere with two meteorological models, MM5 and WRF, with high horizontal (0.6 km to 0.2 km) and vertical resolutions (35 to 39 half-s levels) is carried out for selected scenarios in which levels of pollutants exceeded air pollution limits. For a better representation of the orography SRTM 3" topography data is used in MM5 for resolutions below 1 km (~ resolution of SRTM 30" data), WRF will be tested only with SRTM 30" due to computational time constraints. The evolution of the valley atmosphere is studied using different PBL schemes available in the models as well as land-use representations. Rawinsonde data of the Innsbruck airport station and observation data of Innsbruck University and Patscherkofel will be used for comparison. These high-resolution simulations are very demanding in computational terms. Therefore, an evaluation of the computer demands of each of the simulations is also carried out. In order to asses the influence of this high resolution meteorological modelling on air quality conditions, further work with a dispersion model/chemistry model will be carried out and compared to observations (see contribution by Arnold et al., this session).

  14. [SwapINN: analytic study about prescription swaps at pharmacies].

    PubMed

    Moutinho, Ana; Alexandra, Denise; Rodrigues, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Introdução: A prescrição obrigatória por DCI foi imposta em 2012, para redução de custos do SNS e motivou discussão entre as partes envolvidas. Estudámos, numa população real, a dinâmica prescrição-dispensa de medicamentos.Objetivos: Determinar a percentagem de prescrições substituídas; avaliar os fatores associados à substituição; identificar as respetivas justificações; quantificar os diferenciais dos custos para utente e Serviço Nacional de Saúde.Material e Métodos: Estudo analítico. Amostra de conveniência constituída pelos medicamentos prescritos de uma unidade de saúde, de 19 a 23 de Dezembro de 2011. Três dias depois, os utentes foram entrevistados telefonicamente. Software: Excel® e SPSS®. Testes: Qui-quadrado e Mann-Whitney; n.s. = 0,05.Resultados: Total de 255 prescrições. A maioria foi efetuada a mulheres (62%), idade média 52 anos, 4 anos de escolaridade (33%) e para situações agudas (53%). Foram substituídas 31% das prescrições, sem relação com idade, sexo ou escolaridade, nem com o médico prescritor ou farmácia. Os medicamentos prescritos para situações crónicas foram menos substituídos (p < 0,001), assim como as prescrições de marca (p < 0,001). Os anti-infeciosos e anti-alérgicos foram os grupos com mais substituições (p = 0,009). Os utentes não se aperceberam da substituição em 72% dos casos. Nos casos de substituição, o utente pagou, em média, mais 79% que o prescrito e o Serviço Nacional de Saúde 5%.Discussão/Conclusão: Verificou-se substituição de 31% das prescrições, com mais custos para utente e Serviço Nacional de Saúde. Consideramos possível viés de seleção, informação e registo. Sendo agora obrigatória a prescrição por DCI, sugerimos a análise regular, a nível nacional, com base nas aplicações informáticas em uso, da prescrição e respetiva dispensa.

  15. Places in Time: The Inns and Outhouses of Rhetoric

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mailloux, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Rhetoric is often about "good guys" and "bad guys." Even more basically, it concerns who is in and who is out, what is included and what is excluded, who is placed inside and who outside a cultural community, a political movement, a professional organization. These ins and outs concern both the commonplaces of rhetoric and the rhetoric of …

  16. No room at the inn: pregnancy and overcrowding.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Julianne

    2010-01-01

    The effects of poor housing conditions such as overcrowding cause pregnant women stress and are associated with adverse outcomes for the mother and risks to the child which may be long term for the child. The legal definition of overcrowding in England is complex. It dates from 1934 and needs modernising to take account of current standards and expectations. Approximately 3% of the population live in overcrowded conditions, with higher rates in rented accommodation and in London. Midwives' public health remit means that they need to be aware of housing needs among their clients and to seek solutions. Specialist midwives focusing on public health may be one solution to a challenging problem. The Family Nurse Partnership scheme and innovative public health assessment tools may also have a part to play in improving outcomes. So too will awareness of the organisations throughout the U.K. that assist people in housing need and campaign for better housing. Overall, it is a Government responsibility to ensure that as far as possible the needs of vulnerable families are met in all areas of the U.K. PMID:21053657

  17. A PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL, AND BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS IN LAKE HARTWELL, CLEMSON, NC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses significant challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to manage. Dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches for managing the contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how eff...

  18. PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL TOOLS FOR EVALUATING, MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS IN LAKE HARTWELL, CLEMSON, SC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses significant challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to
    manage. Dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches for managing the contaminated sediment risks.
    Understanding ho...

  19. A MULTI-ORD LAB AND REGIONAL ASSESSMENT OF MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS IN LAKE HARTWELL, CLEMSON, SC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses many challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to manage. Dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches for managing the contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how well the ...

  20. TTP SR1-6-WT-31, Milestone C.3-2 annual report on Clemson/INEEL melter work. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bickford, D.F.

    1999-12-17

    This work is performed in collaboration with RL37WT31-C and ID77WT31-B. During the first two years of radioactive operation of the DWPF process, several areas for improvement in melter design have been identified. The continuing scope of this task is to address performance limitations and deficiencies identified by the user. SRS will design and test several configurations of the melter pour spout and associated equipment to improve consistency of performance and recommend design improvements.

  1. Post-impact fatigue of cross-plied, through-the-thickness reinforced carbon/epoxy composites. M.S. Thesis - Clemson Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serdinak, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the post-impact fatigue response of integrally woven carbon/epoxy composites was conducted. Five different through-the-thickness (TTT) reinforcing fibers were used in an experimental textile process that produced an integrally woven (0/90/0/90/0/90/0/90/0)(sub T) ply layup with 21K AS4 carbon tow fiber. The resin was Hercules 3501-6, and the five TTT reinforcing fibers were Kevlar, Toray carbon, AS4 carbon, glass, and IM6 carbon. The purpose of this investigation was to study the post-impact fatigue response of these material systems and to identify the optimum TTT fiber. Samples were impacted with one half inch diameter aluminum balls with an average velocity of 543 ft/sec. Post-impact static compression and constant amplitude tension-compression fatigue tests were conducted. Fatigue tests were conducted with a loading ratio of R=-5, and frequency of 4 Hz. Damage growth was monitored using x-radiographic and sectioning techniques and by examining the stress-strain response (across the impact site) throughout the fatigue tests. The static compressive stress versus far-field strain response was nearly linear for all material groups. All the samples had a transverse shear failure mode. The average compressive modulus (from far-field strain) was about 10 Msi. The average post-impact static compressive strength was about 35.5 Ksi. The IM6 carbon sample had a strength of over 40 Ksi, more than 16 percent stronger than average. There was considerable scatter in the S-N data. However, the IM6 carbon samples clearly had the best fatigue response. The response of the other materials, while worse than IM6 carbon, could not be ranked definitively. The initial damage zones caused by the impact loading and damage growth from fatigue loading were similar for all five TTT reinforcing materials. The initial damage zones were circular and consisted of delaminations, matrix cracks and ply cracks. Post-impact fatigue loading caused delamination growth, ply cracking and fiber bundle failures, typically 45 deg from impact load direction. During the initial 97 percent of fatigue life, delaminations, ply cracks and fiber bundle failures primarily grew at and near the impact site. During the final 3 percent of life, damage grew rapidly transverse to the loading direction as a through-the-thickness transverse shear failure. The stress-strain response was typically linear during the initial 50 percent of life, and stiffness dropped about 20 percent during this period. During the next 47 percent of life, stiffness dropped about 34 percent, and the stress-strain response was no longer linear. The stiffness decreased about 23 percent during the final 3 percent of life. These trends were typical of all the materials tested. Therefore, by monitoring stiffness loss, fatigue failure could be accurately anticipated.

  2. No room at the inn: a snapshot of an American emergency room.

    PubMed

    Olson, E J

    1994-01-01

    The emergency rooms of American hospitals have frequently become the principal suppliers of nonurgent primary care to the under- and uninsured. Canvassing published reports and using original data obtained from a representative urban hospital, Erik Olson examines the demographics of the American emergency room and analyzes its finances. The costs of providing primary care are shifted, to the extent possible, to those who can pay. The result is escalating health care costs and a deterioration of quality of care due to overcrowding, leading some hospitals to close their emergency rooms and others to turn away ambulances or "dump" patients who still require critical care. Mr. Olson explains that state antidumping laws and the federal COBRA statute have been ineffective at stemming these practices in the face of severe economic pressure to continue them. Pointing out that emergency rooms are an excessively expensive method of treating uninsured nonemergency patients, he proposes a system of primary care clinics created through a public/private partnership between municipalities and existing private health care providers. The partnership is designed to maintain a high standard of care at the clinics. As an incentive to stimulate the appearance of such clinics, a tax would be imposed on private health care providers; the tax on a given provider would be reduced to the extent that provider subsidizes a local primary care clinic that offers universal coverage, regardless of insurance status. Because the existence of such clinics would reduce inefficient use of hospital emergency rooms, in the long run hospitals should find it less expensive to finance local primary care clinics than to continue to sustain unreimbursed expenses due to improper use of their emergency departments.

  3. Antioxidant potential of commercially available cumin (Cuminum cyminuml inn) in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, S Birjees; Iqbal, Shahid; Bhanger, M I

    2009-05-01

    Owing to increased safety concerns about synthetic antioxidants, exploitation of safer antioxidants based on natural origin is the focus of research nowadays. Cumin is a common spice and is used as a routine supportive cooking agent. Extracts of cumin were prepared in methanol, ethanol, dichloromethane and hexane by employing Soxhlet extraction apparatus. Determination of the total phenolic content, chelating activity, reducing power and free radical scavenging activity were taken as parameters for the assessment of antioxidant properties. The findings of this study suggest cumin to be a potent source of antioxidants. Results from the different parameters were in agreement with one another.

  4. Project EXCEL: Holiday Inn at Fisherman's Wharf, Housekeeping Department: Improving Customer Service, Module 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Career Resources Development Center, Inc., San Francisco, CA.

    Project EXCEL is a federally-funded workplace literacy program involving hotel enterprises in the San Francisco (California) Bay area. Its focus is on identification and instruction of literacy skills essential to job success for limited-English-proficient (LEP) workers. Training is intended to enable employees to understand written work orders,…

  5. Solar hot water system installed at Days Inn Motel, Dallas, Texas (Forrest Lane)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 65 percent of the total Domestic Hot Water (DHW) demand. The liquid flat plate (water) collector (1,000 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1,000 gallon steel storage tank located in the mechanical room when the pump is not running. Heat is transferred from the storage tank to DHW tanks through a tube and shell heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and the heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make DHW tank standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature.

  6. Solar hot water system installed at Days Inn Motel, Dallas, Texas (Forrest Lane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 65 percent of the total Domestic Hot Water (DHW) demand. The liquid flat plate (water) collector (1,000 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1,000 gallon steel storage tank located in the mechanical room when the pump is not running. Heat is transferred from the storage tank to DHW tanks through a tube and shell heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and the heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make DHW tank standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature.

  7. Solar hot water system installed at Day's Inn Motel, Dallas, Texas (Valley View)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 65 percent of the total domestic hot water (DHW) demand. A liquid (water) flat plate collector (1,000 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1,000 gallon steel storage tank when the solar pump is not running. Heat is transferred from the DHW tanks through a shell and tube heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make up standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature controllers.

  8. Solar hot water system installed at Day's Inn Motel, Dallas, Texas (Valley View)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 65 percent of the total domestic hot water (DHW) demand. A liquid (water) flat plate collector (1,000 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1,000 gallon steel storage tank when the solar pump is not running. Heat is transferred from the DHW tanks through a shell and tube heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make up standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature controllers.

  9. Long-term oxidization and phase transition of InN nanotextures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The long-term (6 months) oxidization of hcp-InN (wurtzite, InN-w) nanostructures (crystalline/amorphous) synthesized on Si [100] substrates is analyzed. The densely packed layers of InN-w nanostructures (5-40 nm) are shown to be oxidized by atmospheric oxygen via the formation of an intermediate amorphous In-Ox-Ny (indium oxynitride) phase to a final bi-phase hcp-InN/bcc-In2O3 nanotexture. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction are used to identify amorphous In-Ox-Ny oxynitride phase. When the oxidized area exceeds the critical size of 5 nm, the amorphous In-Ox-Ny phase eventually undergoes phase transition via a slow chemical reaction of atomic oxygen with the indium atoms, forming a single bcc In2O3 phase. PMID:21711908

  10. The Place Where Hope Lives: The Children's Inn Comforts Kids and Their Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... pointing to the name of NIH researcher Dr. William Gahl, a leader in the treatment of cystinosis. ... ll have her checkup. With Dr.Gahl: Dr. William Gahl (right) of the National Human Genome Research ...

  11. Solar hot water system installed at Day's Inn Motel, Savannah, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Solar System was designed to provide 50 percent of the total Domestic Hot Water (DHW) demand. Liquid Flat Plate Collectors (900 square feet) are used for the collector subsystem. The collector subsystem is closed loop, using 50 percent Ethylene Glycol solution antifreeze for freeze protection. The 1,000 gallon fiber glass storage tank contains two heat exchangers. One of the heat exchangers heats the storage tank with the collector solar energy. The other heat exchanger preheats the cold supply water as it passes through on the way to the Domestic Hot Water (DHW) tank heaters. Electrical energy supplements the solar energy for the DHW. The Collector Mounting System utilizes guy wires to structurally tie the collector array to the building.

  12. Sport Psychology Training in Counseling Psychology Programs: Is There Room at the Inn?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrie, Trent A.; Watkins, C. Edward, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Surveyed 53 counseling psychology programs about sport psychology training. Found that most respondents had students who were interested in sport psychology; counseling faculty were perceived to be receptive to their colleagues and graduate students having interests and pursuing research in sport psychology; and most program directors thought best…

  13. Solar hot water system installed at Days Inn Motel, Jacksonville, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 65 percent of the hot water demand. Water in the liquid flat plate collector (900 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1000 gallon lined and vented steel storage tank when the pump is not running. Heat is transferred from storage to Domestic Hot Water (DHW) tanks through a tube and shell heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make up DHW standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature.

  14. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (5th, Clemson, South Carolina, June 13-17, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.; And Others

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve the undergraduate biology laboratory experience by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains eight papers: "Bacterial Transformation" (M. J. Ernest & N. J. Rosenbaum);…

  15. Annual Review of BPA-Funded Anadromous Fish Projects, March 18-20, 1986, Holiday Inn Airport, Portland, Oregon.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-02-01

    This report contains descriptions of projects specifically related to anadromous salmonids. They include projects in the following categories: (1) fish and wildlife projects in western Montana; (2) fish health and physiology; (3) habitat enhancement and passage improvement - Oregon I; (4) passage improvement and natural propagation - Washington; (5) habitat enhancement and passage improvements - Oregon II; (6) future hydroelectric assessments; (7) habitat enhancement and passage improvement - Idaho; (8) downstream migration: flows and monitoring; (9) downstream migration: reservoir impacts; and (10) habitat evaluation and monitoring. (ACR)

  16. "Jus Fasque Esse in Rempublicam Litterariam Foeminas Adscribi" Gelehrt(inn) en-Enzyuklopadien Des 17 und 18 Janrhunderts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rang, Brita

    1992-01-01

    Discusses contributions to the sciences by women. Contends that, even though women were excluded from higher education in the nineteenth century, they participated in noninstitutional forms of higher learning. Describes encyclopedias developed by women during this period that indicate a high level of science understanding. (CFR)

  17. Making Room at the Inn: Implications of "Christian Legal Society v. Martinez" for Public College and University Housing Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waggoner, Michael D.; Russo, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    The supreme court's ruling in "Christian Legal Society v. Martinez", its most important case to date on student associational activities, upheld a policy at a public law school in California that required recognized student organizations (or clubs) to admit "all-comers" even if they disagreed with organizational goals and…

  18. 24 CFR 3280.802 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... not approved for branch circuit protection, such as a thermal cutout or motor overload protective... or structure means any awning, cabana, ramada, storage cabinet, carport, fence, windbreak or porch..., ice, dust, or temperature extremes, are not a factor....

  19. Curbing Alcohol-Related Problems at College Sports Events. E-Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The athletics season at colleges and universities is well under way, with college football games drawing millions of spectators. For example, Clemson University, with an enrollment of 17,000 students, is located in Clemson, S.C., with a population of approximately 12,000. But Clemson Memorial Stadium, which can seat more than 80,000 football fans,…

  20. Enhanced memory effect via quantum confinement in 16 nm InN nanoparticles embedded in ZnO charge trapping layer

    SciTech Connect

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar; Cimen, Furkan; Alkis, Sabri; Ortaç, Bülend; Alevli, Mustafa; Dietz, Nikolaus; Okyay, Ali K.

    2014-06-23

    In this work, the fabrication of charge trapping memory cells with laser-synthesized indium-nitride nanoparticles (InN-NPs) embedded in ZnO charge trapping layer is demonstrated. Atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers are used as tunnel and blocking oxides. The gate contacts are sputtered using a shadow mask which eliminates the need for any lithography steps. High frequency C-V{sub gate} measurements show that a memory effect is observed, due to the charging of the InN-NPs. With a low operating voltage of 4 V, the memory shows a noticeable threshold voltage (V{sub t}) shift of 2 V, which indicates that InN-NPs act as charge trapping centers. Without InN-NPs, the observed memory hysteresis is negligible. At higher programming voltages of 10 V, a memory window of 5 V is achieved and the V{sub t} shift direction indicates that electrons tunnel from channel to charge storage layer.

  1. Evaluation of interpolations of InN, AlN and GaN lattice and elastic constants for their ternary and quaternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, F. M.; Mánuel, J. M.; García, R.; Reuters, B.; Kalisch, H.; Vescan, A.

    2013-06-01

    Structural and compositional data were collected for several high-quality strained InGaN, InAlN, AlGaN and InAlGaN layers with various compositions. Based on these results, the InN/AlN/GaN molar fractions of every film were indirectly estimated by the application of Vegard's law (Vegard 1921 Z. Phys. 5 17) to lattice and elastic constants of the binaries and by an alternative approach proposed by (Williams et al 1978 J. Electron. Mater. 7 639) (even considering possible mistakes in its application). True compositions were independently assessed by x-ray spectroscopy or Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The results of both interpolation models are highlighted in utilizable contour and surface ternary plots of lattice constants and biaxial strain relaxation coefficients calculated for the whole compositional range. Calculated compositions from Vegard's law best fit the measured values. Finally, it is geometrically demonstrated that there are wrong assumptions in the Williams et al model, so that Vegard's law should only be used to successfully determine the compositions of ternary and quaternary III-N nitrides.

  2. No Room for the Inn. A Report on Local Opposition to Housing and Social Services Facilities for Homeless People in 36 United States Cities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty, Washington, DC.

    In December 1994 the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty published an analysis of antihomeless laws and policies in 42 American cities. This report draws on those findings to focus on attempts to shut down or exclude service providers. Searches of the media, telephone interviews with service providers and public interest groups and…

  3. Influence of temperature in thermal and oxidative stress responses in estuarine fish.

    PubMed

    Madeira, D; Narciso, L; Cabral, H N; Vinagre, C; Diniz, M S

    2013-10-01

    The influence of increasing temperatures in thermal and oxidative stress responses were studied in the muscle of several estuarine fish species (Diplodus vulgaris, Diplodus sargus, Dicentrarchus labrax, Gobius niger and Liza ramada). Selected fish were collected in July at the Tagus estuary (24±0.9°C; salinity of 30±4‰; pH=8). Fish were subjected to a temperature increase of 1°C.h(-1) until they reached their Critical Thermal Maximum (CTMax), starting at 24°C (control temperature). Muscle samples were collected during the trial and results showed that oxidative stress biomarkers are highly sensitive to temperature. Results from stress oxidative enzymes show alterations with increasing temperature in all tested species. Catalase (CAT; EC 1.11.1.6) activity significantly increased in L. ramada, D. labrax and decreased in D. vulgaris. Glutathione S-transferase (GST; EC 2.5.1.18) activity increased in L. ramada, D. sargus, D. vulgaris, and D. labrax. In G. niger it showed a cycle of increase-decrease. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) increased in L. ramada, D. sargus and D. labrax. With respect to correlation analysis (Pearson; Spearman r), the results showed that oxidation products and antioxidant defenses were correlated in L. ramada (LPO-CAT and LPO-GST, D. sargus (LPO-CAT), and D. labrax (LPO-CAT). Oxidative biomarkers were correlated with thermal stress biomarker (Hsp70) in L. ramada (CAT-Hsp70), D. vulgaris (LPO-Hsp70), D. labrax (GST-Hsp70) and G. niger (LPO-Hsp70). In conclusion, oxidative stress does occur with increasing temperatures and there seems to be a relation between thermal stress response and oxidative stress response. The results suggest that oxidative stress biomarkers should be applied with caution, particularly in field multi-species/multi-environment studies. PMID:23774589

  4. Environmental test program for superconducting materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haertling, Gene; Randolph, Henry; Hsi, Chi-Shiung; Verbelyi, Darren

    1992-01-01

    A systematic approach to obtaining real time, superconducting YBa2Cu30(7-x) materials is presented. The work was carried out under the overall direction of Clemson University with tasks being performed at both Clemson and Westinghouse (Aiken, SC). Clemson prepared the tapecast superconducting 123 material and fabricated in into substrate-supported, environmentally-protected conducting links. Following this, all of the elements were individually tested for resistance vs. temperature and Tc; and then a portion of them were kept at Clemson for further testing while a randomly selected group was delivered to Westinghouse for specialized testing and evaluation in their low temperature/high vacuum and radiation facilities. In addition, a number of control samples (12 ea.) were put on the shelf at Clemson for further reference at the end of the testing period. The specific tests conducted at Clemson and Westinghouse/SRC are presented with a summary of the results.

  5. Detail view of the east elevation to show gable end ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the east elevation to show gable end and exterior end chimeny; note; this is the end wall of the first floor parlor and the windows glazed with the nine-over-six light sash illuminate the Floride Lee Calhoun Memorial room on the second floor - Fort Hill, Clemson University Campus, Clemson, Pickens County, SC

  6. DNA sequences and composition from 12 BAC clones-derived MUSB SSR markers mapped to cotton (Gossypium Hirsutum L. x G. Barbadense L.)chromosomes 11 and 21

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To discover resistance (R) and/or pathogen-induced (PR) genes involved in disease response, 12 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from cv. Acala Maxxa (G. hirsutum) were sequenced at the Clemson University, Genomics Institute, Clemson, SC. These BACs derived MUSB single sequence repeat (SS...

  7. 78 FR 70529 - Notice of Availability for the Final Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding No Significant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Cotton Quality Research Station Land Transfer AGENCY: Agricultural Research... the Cotton Quality Research Station (CQRS) in Clemson, SC, to Clemson University. The FONSI document... transfer of approximately 10 acres of land and facilities at the Cotton Quality Research Station...

  8. Book review: Leaf and Seed Beetles of South Carolina (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae and Orsodacnidae), by J. C. Ciegler

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The book entitled Leaf and Seed Beetles of South Carolina (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae and Orsodacnidae), by J. C. Ciegler. (246 pages, 324 black and white illustrations, 8.5 “ x 11"; ISBN 0-9753471-8-7. Forty dollars, paperback. Biota of South Carolina. Volume 5. Clemson University, Clemson, S. ...

  9. Interior view, front entrance doors; note; double doors have a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view, front entrance doors; note; double doors have a box lock, sliding bolt locks into door head and sill as well as modern locks, butt hinges, slightly recessed panels, and five-ligh transom - Fort Hill, Clemson University Campus, Clemson, Pickens County, SC

  10. 39. DINING ROOM, LOOKING (NORTH) BACK TOWARD ENTRANCE. BEFORE 1907, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. DINING ROOM, LOOKING (NORTH) BACK TOWARD ENTRANCE. BEFORE 1907, GUESTS AT THE INN ATE FAMILY-STYLE AT LONG RECTANGULAR TABLES. - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  11. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF ROUTE 209 LOOKING NORTH SHOWING SLEEPING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF ROUTE 209 LOOKING NORTH SHOWING SLEEPING BEAR INN, SLEEPING BEAR INN GARAGE AND DORMITORY, D.H. DAY STORE, RESTROOM, AND GARAGE - Glen Haven Historic District, Route 209, Glen Arbor, Leelanau County, MI

  12. 77 FR 68764 - Parker Knoll Hydro, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare An Environmental Impact Statement and Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ...: Agency Scoping Meeting Date: December 11, 2012. Time: 10:00 a.m. (MST). Place: Holiday Inn Express....m. (MST). Place: Holiday Inn Express. Address: 20 West 1400 North, Richfield, Utah. Copies of...

  13. 18. Dining room at southwest corner of building, view to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Dining room at southwest corner of building, view to west. Scale stick visible against west wall, next to woman. - Deetjen's Big Sur Inn, Big Sur Inn Building, East Side of State Highway 1, Big Sur, Monterey County, CA

  14. Multicenter Phase II Study Evaluating Two Cycles of Docetaxel, Cisplatin and Cetuximab as Induction Regimen Prior to Surgery in Chemotherapy-Naive Patients with NSCLC Stage IB-IIIA (INN06-Study)

    PubMed Central

    Hilbe, Wolfgang; Pall, Georg; Kocher, Florian; Pircher, Andreas; Zabernigg, August; Schmid, Thomas; Schumacher, Michael; Jamnig, Herbert; Fiegl, Michael; Gächter, Anne; Freund, Martin; Kendler, Dorota; Manzl, Claudia; Zelger, Bettina; Popper, Helmut; Wöll, Ewald

    2015-01-01

    Background Different strategies for neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with early stage NSCLC have already been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tolerability and efficacy of a chemoimmunotherapy when limited to two cycles. Methods Between 01/2007 and 03/2010 41 patients with primarily resectable NSCLC stage IB to IIIA were included. Treatment consisted of two cycles cisplatin (40 mg/m2 d1+2) and docetaxel (75 mg/m2 d1) q3 weeks, accompanied by the administration of cetuximab (400 mg/m2 d1, then 250 mg weekly). The primary endpoint was radiological response according to RECIST. Results 40 patients were evaluable for toxicity, 39 for response. The main grade 3/4 toxicities were: neutropenia 25%, leucopenia 11%, febrile neutropenia 6%, nausea 8% and rash 8%. 20 patients achieved a partial response, 17 a stable disease, 2 were not evaluable. 37 patients (95%) underwent surgery and in three of them a complete pathological response was achieved. At a median follow-up of 44.2 months, 41% of the patients had died, median progression-free survival was 22.5 months. Conclusions Two cycles of cisplatin/ docetaxel/ cetuximab showed promising efficacy in the neoadjuvant treatment of early-stage NSCLC and rapid operation was possible in 95% of patients. Toxicities were manageable and as expected. Trial Registration EU Clinical Trials Register; Eudract-Nr: 2006-004639-31 PMID:26020783

  15. Satellite Instrument Calibration for Measuring Global Climate Change. Report of a Workshop at the University of Maryland Inn and Conference Center, College Park, MD. , November 12-14, 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohring, G.; Wielicki, B.; Spencer, R.; Emery, B.; Datla, R.

    2004-01-01

    Measuring the small changes associated with long-term global climate change from space is a daunting task. To address these problems and recommend directions for improvements in satellite instrument calibration some 75 scientists, including researchers who develop and analyze long-term data sets from satellites, experts in the field of satellite instrument calibration, and physicists working on state of the art calibration sources and standards met November 12 - 14, 2002 and discussed the issues. The workshop defined the absolute accuracies and long-term stabilities of global climate data sets that are needed to detect expected trends, translated these data set accuracies and stabilities to required satellite instrument accuracies and stabilities, and evaluated the ability of current observing systems to meet these requirements. The workshop's recommendations include a set of basic axioms or overarching principles that must guide high quality climate observations in general, and a roadmap for improving satellite instrument characterization, calibration, inter-calibration, and associated activities to meet the challenge of measuring global climate change. It is also recommended that a follow-up workshop be conducted to discuss implementation of the roadmap developed at this workshop.

  16. Growth, nitrogen vacancy reduction and solid solution formation in cubic GaN thin films and the subsequent fabrication of superlattice structures using AlN and inn. Final report, 1 June 1986-31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.F.

    1992-12-01

    An atomic layer epitaxy deposition system configured for the growth of thin films of the III-V nitrides of A1, Ga and In has been designed, constructed and commissioned. The system allows the introduction of up to 16 gases without mixing. Self-terminating growth of crystalline GaN films has been achieved on single crystal wafers of (0001) alpha(6H)-SiC. Results of analyses via Auger spectroscopy, electron microscopy and electron diffraction are described. Deposition of AIN and GaN via gas-source MBE was also continued during this period. The principal emphasis concerned the initial stages of growth of both compounds on the substrates of (00001) alpha(6H)-SiC and (0001) sapphire, as determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. An initial layer of silicon nitride formed on the surface of SiC prior to the deposition of either nitride. The deposition of GaN on sapphire followed the Stranski-Krastanov mode of nucleation and growth, while on SiC, characteristics of three-dimensional growth were evident. By contrast, AlN grew initially in a layer-by-layer mode. Deposition of GaN on vicinal (100) Beta-SiC during UV irradiation resulted in the formation of a new 4H polytype of this material. Deposition of BN via gas-source MBE on Cu(110) resulted in nanocrystalline cBN; films grown on (111) Cu resulted in h-BN (graphitic phase). Similar studies using Si(100) substrates also resulted in the occurrence of cBN. The occurrence of the cubic polytype was enhanced while that of h-BN was discouraged with the use of the UV light at 400-500 deg C.

  17. Technology Education Students Make a Difference through Service Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Kurt Y.

    2001-01-01

    Explains how technology education can be a vehicle for addressing social concerns via service learning. Describes the Tiny Tiger Toy project initiated by technology majors at Clemson University. (JOW)

  18. Making It Better: Research, Assessment, and Recursive Learning Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookover, Robert; Timmerman, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    This article provides case study examples of how assessment efforts led to and have been enhanced by the creation of integrated curriculum delivery models in parks, recreation, and tourism programs at Clemson University and the University of Utah.

  19. Spider-mediated flux of PCBs from contaminated sediments to terrestrial ecosystems and potential risks to arachnivorous birds

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated aquatic insect utilization and PCB exposure in riparian spiders at the Lake Hartwell superfund site (Clemson, SC , USA). We sampled sediments, adult chironomids, terrestrial insects, riparian spiders (Tetragnathidae, Araneidae, and Mecynogea lemniscata), and upla...

  20. Tectonic and unroofing history of Neogene Manantiales foreland basin deposits, Cordillera Frontal (32°30'S), San Juan Province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Daniel J.

    2001-12-01

    The Miocene Manantiales foreland basin is located in Cordillera Frontal of San Juan, between 32°30' and 33°S. The unroofing study of the synorogenic Miocene deposits provides information about the structural evolution of Cordón de La Ramada fold-and-thrust belt. These Tertiary deposits are represented by the Chinches Formation and comprise seven members (Tc0-Tc6). They are the result of the uplift of Mesozoic sequences that crop out in La Ramada fold-and-thrust belt of the Cordillera Principal. Quaternary deposits unconformably overlying the Chinches Formation are composed of granitic and rhyolitic blocks, and represent the final uplift of the Cordón del Espinacito and a series of out-of-sequence thrusts. The unroofing studies also provide sufficient information to establish the out-of-sequence timing of the deformation at this latitude. Initial deposition of the Tertiary deposits can be dated at about 20 Ma, or early Miocene. Andesitic lavas dated in 9.2±0.3, 10.7±0.7, and 12.7±0.7 Ma unconformably overlie the structure of La Ramada fold-and-thrust belt. These facts constrain the uplift of the High Andes between 20 and 10 Ma at this latitude. The unconformity between Tertiary and Quaternary deposits suggests final uplift during Pliocene-Pleistocene times.

  1. Windshear detection radar signal processing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This final report briefly summarizes research work at Clemson in the Radar Systems Laboratory under the NASA Langley Research Grant NAG-1-928 in support of the Antenna and Microwave Branch, Guidance and Control Division, program to develop airborne sensor technology for the detection of low altitude windshear. A bibliography of all publications generated by Clemson personnel is included. An appendix provides abstracts of all publications.

  2. III-Nitride Dry Etching - Comparison of Inductively Coupled Plasma Chemistries

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, C.R.; Cho, H.; Donovan, S.M.; Hahn, Y-B.; Han, J.; Hays, D.C.; MacKenzie, J.D.; Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-11-10

    A systematic study of the etch characteristics of GaN, AlN and InN has been performed with boron halides- (BI{sub 3} and BBr{sub 3}) and interhalogen- (ICl and IBr) based Inductively Coupled Plasmas. Maximum etch selectivities of -100:1 were achieved for InN over both GaN and AlN in the BI{sub 3} mixtures due to the relatively high volatility of the InN etch products and the lower bond strength of InN. Maximum selectivies of- 14 for InN over GaN and >25 for InN over AlN were obtained with ICl and IBr chemistries. The etched surface morphologies of GaN in these four mixtures are similar or better than those of the control sample.

  3. 77 FR 74675 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-17

    ... with the grant applications, the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of... Inn, 3001 Cameron Blvd., Durham, NC 27705. Contact Person: Ruth Grossman, DDS, Scientific...

  4. Environmental test program for superconducting materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haertling, Gene; Randolph, Henry; Hsi, Chi-Shiung; Verbelyi, Darren

    1991-01-01

    This report is divided into two parts. The first dealing with work involved with Clemson University and the second with the results from Westinghouse/Savannah River. Both areas of work involved low noise, low thermal conductivity superconducting grounding links used in the NASA-sponsored Spectroscopy of the Atmosphere using Far Infrared Emission (SAFIRE) Project. Clemson prepared the links from YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductor tape that was mounted on a printed circuit board and encapsulated with epoxy resin. The Clemson program includes temperature vs. resistance, liquid nitrogen immersion, water immersion, thermal cycling, humidity, and radiation testing. The evaluation of the links under a long term environmental test program is described. The Savannah River program includes gamma irradiation, vibration, and long-term evaluation. The progress made in these evaluations is discussed.

  5. Biomolecular interactions of emerging two-dimensional materials with aromatic amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallineni, Sai Sunil Kumar; Karakaya, Mehmet; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao

    The present work experimentally investigates the interaction of aromatic amino acids, viz., tyrosine, tryptophan, and phenylalanine with novel two-dimensional (2D) materials including graphene (G), graphene oxide (GO), and boron nitride (BN). Photoluminescence, micro-Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were employed to investigate the nature of interactions and possible charge transfer between 2D materials and amino acids. Consistent with previous theoretical studies, graphene and BN were observed to interact with amino acids through π- π interactions. Furthermore, we found that GO exhibits strong interactions with tryptophan and tyrosine as compared to graphene and BN, which we attribute to the formation of H-bonds between tryptophan and GO as shown theoretically in Ref. 2. On the other hand, phenylalanine did not exhibit much difference in interactions with G, GO, and BN. Clemson Nanomaterials Center, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA.

  6. Evaluation of sweet sorghum for fuel alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, W.L.; Monroe, G.E.; Nichols, R.L.; Gascho, G.J.

    1981-01-01

    Among 8 varieties of sweet sorghum grown in Tifton loamy sand, Keller, MN, 1500 and Ramada had similar yields of stalks, 41-44 t/ha, and fermentable sugars, 5.8-5.9 t/ha, that were significantly higher than for other varieties. For the 3 high-yielding varieties, a farm-scale 3-roll mill extracted 32% of stalk weight as juice that contained 43% of stalk sugar. Juice was fermented and ethanol distilled with 81% of theoretical yield. 8 refs.

  7. Size and mercury concentration relationship as contamination index

    SciTech Connect

    Rincon, F.; Zurera, G.; Pozo-Lora, R.

    1987-03-01

    The possible relationship which exists between size (as weight or length) and mercury concentration in muscle is used by some authors as evidence of the degree of mercury contamination present in aquatic environments. In this study, the level of mercury contamination present in populations of red crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and grey mullet (Liza ramada) of the Marshes of the River Guadalquivir, both of great interest as food in the Marshes surroundings, has been shown. At the same time, the validity of using the relationship between size (as weight or length) and mercury concentration in muscle, as evidence of the mercury contamination present in the aquatic environment investigated, is discussed.

  8. Plan for an Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bajura, R.A.; Webb, H.A.; Parks, W.P.

    1993-03-01

    A draft version of this paper was presented at the Clemson Clean, affordable, and reliable natural gas utilization technologies will play a growing role in meeting future power generation needs in the United States. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) National Energy Strategy projected that total demand for natural gas will rise from 18.5 trillion cubic feet (tcf) in 1990 to 24.2 tcf by the year 2000. Much of this increase is attributed to the increased use of natural gas as a fuel for electric power generation. Candidate technologies for gas fired power generation include gas turbine and fuel cell systems. The first workshop on research needs for advanced gas turbine systems for power generation was held on April 8-10, 1991 in Greenville, South Carolina. The goals of the Clemson-I Workshop were to identify research needs which would accelerate the development of advanced gas turbines and to consider new approaches to implement this research. The Clemson-I Workshop focused on advanced gas turbine systems which would have a lower cost of electricity or better environmental performance than systems currently under development. The workshop was cosponsored by the DOE`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Clemson University, and the South Carolina Energy Research and Development Center. The proceedings from the workshop have been published. The 75 participants in the Clemson-I Workshop represented a broad spectrum of the gas turbine Research & Development (R&D) community as well as potential users of advanced gas turbines. Gas turbine manufacturers, the electric utility industry, the university community, as well as government and private sector R&D sponsors were represented. Participants in the Clemson-I Workshop concluded that it is technically feasible to develop advanced turbine systems and that Government participation would accelerate the developmental effort. Advanced turbine systems could be operated on natural gas or adapted to coal or biomass firing.

  9. Plan for an Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bajura, R.A.; Webb, H.A. ); Parks, W.P. )

    1993-01-01

    A draft version of this paper was presented at the Clemson Clean, affordable, and reliable natural gas utilization technologies will play a growing role in meeting future power generation needs in the United States. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Strategy projected that total demand for natural gas will rise from 18.5 trillion cubic feet (tcf) in 1990 to 24.2 tcf by the year 2000. Much of this increase is attributed to the increased use of natural gas as a fuel for electric power generation. Candidate technologies for gas fired power generation include gas turbine and fuel cell systems. The first workshop on research needs for advanced gas turbine systems for power generation was held on April 8-10, 1991 in Greenville, South Carolina. The goals of the Clemson-I Workshop were to identify research needs which would accelerate the development of advanced gas turbines and to consider new approaches to implement this research. The Clemson-I Workshop focused on advanced gas turbine systems which would have a lower cost of electricity or better environmental performance than systems currently under development. The workshop was cosponsored by the DOE's Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Clemson University, and the South Carolina Energy Research and Development Center. The proceedings from the workshop have been published. The 75 participants in the Clemson-I Workshop represented a broad spectrum of the gas turbine Research Development (R D) community as well as potential users of advanced gas turbines. Gas turbine manufacturers, the electric utility industry, the university community, as well as government and private sector R D sponsors were represented. Participants in the Clemson-I Workshop concluded that it is technically feasible to develop advanced turbine systems and that Government participation would accelerate the developmental effort. Advanced turbine systems could be operated on natural gas or adapted to coal or biomass firing.

  10. Ultraviolet, Optical and near-infrared photometric follow up of the transient source Fermi J1654-1055 with GROND and Swift-UVOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, A.; Bolmer, J.; Greiner, J.; Rau, A.; Schady, P.; Ajello, M.; Hartmann, D. H.

    2016-02-01

    Ultraviolet, Optical and near-infrared photometric follow up of the transient source Fermi J1654-1055 with GROND and Swift-UVOT A. Kaur (Clemson University), J. Bolmer, J. Greiner, A. Rau, P. Schady (all MPE, Garching), M. Ajello, D. H. Hartmann (Clemson University) We report the ultraviolet, optical and near IR photometric observations of the new gamma-ray source Fermi J1654-1055/PMN J1632-1052 (RA = 248.20900 deg and Dec = -10.87578 deg) detected by Fermi during the week of February 08 and 15, 2016 (see ATel #8721).

  11. Insect community structure and function in Upper Three Runs, Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, J.C.; English, W.R.; Looney, B.B.

    1993-07-08

    A project to document the insect species in the upper reaches of Upper Three Runs at the Savannah River site was recently completed. This research was supported by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Research Park Program. The work was performed by the Department of Entomology at Clemson University in clemson, SC, by John C. Morse (principal investigator), William R. English and their colleagues. The major output from this study was the dissertation of Dr. William R. English entitled ``Ecosystem Dynamics of a South Carolina Sandhills Stream.`` He investigated selected environmental resources and determined their dynamics and the dynamics of the aquatic invertebrate community structure in response to them.

  12. 18. LOOKING SOUTH AT STEEPLY PITCHED, GABLED ROOF. THE UPPER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. LOOKING SOUTH AT STEEPLY PITCHED, GABLED ROOF. THE UPPER DORMERS PROVIDE LIGHT IN THE LOBBY AND THE LOWER DORMERS OPEN INTO SOME OF THE ORIGINAL GUEST ROOMS IN THE INN. (TAKEN FROM CHERRY- PICKER) - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  13. 2. Contextual view of building in setting, view to southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Contextual view of building in setting, view to southwest from slope above "Hayloft" Building (HABS-CA-2611-B), showing east side and north rear of building, State Highway 1 visible at left center. Scale stick visible on roof of building. - Deetjen's Big Sur Inn, Big Sur Inn Building, East Side of State Highway 1, Big Sur, Monterey County, CA

  14. Making everyday tasks easier - arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gabriel SE, McInnes IB, O'Dell JR, eds. Kelly's Textbook of Rheumatology . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... Gabriel SE, McInnes IB, O'Dell JR, eds. Kelly's Textbook of Rheumatology . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  15. 17. Dining area of lobby/dining room, view to southsoutheast. Scale ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Dining area of lobby/dining room, view to south-southeast. Scale stick visible at left against corner of pillar; 5'10" figure for additional scale reference. - Deetjen's Big Sur Inn, Big Sur Inn Building, East Side of State Highway 1, Big Sur, Monterey County, CA

  16. Clopidogrel Protects Endothelium by Hindering TNFα-Induced VCAM-1 Expression through CaMKKβ/AMPK/Nrf2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huabing; Zhao, Pengjun; Tian, Shiliu

    2016-01-01

    Clopidogrel (INN), an oral antiplatelet drug, has been revealed to have a number of biological properties, for instance, anti-inflammation and antioxidation. Oxidative stress plays an imperative role in inflammation, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, and cancer. In the present study, human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were employed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of INN. INN reduced TNFα-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and time-dependently prompted the expression and activity of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). Cellular glutathione (GSH) levels were augmented by INN. shHO-1 blocked the INN suppression of TNFα-induced HL-60 cell adhesion. The CaMKKβ/AMPK pathway and Nrf2 transcriptional factor were implicated in the induction of HO-1 by INN. Additionally, TNFα dramatically augmented VCAM-1 expression at protein and mRNA levels. INN treatment strikingly repressed TNFα-induced expression of VCAM-1 and HL-60 cell adhesion. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, and shNrf2 abolished TNFα-induced expression of VCAM-1 and HL-60 cell adhesion. Our data suggest that INN diminishes TNFα-stimulated VCAM-1 expression at least in part via HO-1 induction, which is CaMKKβ/AMPK pathway-dependent. PMID:26824050

  17. 26. LOBBY, LOOKING NORTH TOWARD MAIN ENTRANCE FROM SECOND FLOOR. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. LOBBY, LOOKING NORTH TOWARD MAIN ENTRANCE FROM SECOND FLOOR. LOCAL LODGEPOLE PINE WHICH WAS VALUED FOR ITS INVARIABLE DIAMETER WAS USED TO CONSTRUCT THE COLUMNS AND BEAMS OF THE INN WHILE GNARLED OR DISEASED LOGS WERE SELECTED FOR THE BRACES AND BALUSTERS. - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  18. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Copy of an eary photograph, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Copy of an eary photograph, courtesy of Montgomery County Historical Society, Norristown, Pa., THE KING OF PRUSSIA INN, c.1860-1870. - King of Prussia Inn, U.S. Route 202 (Upper Merion Township), King of Prussia, Montgomery County, PA

  19. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Copy of an eary photograph, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Copy of an eary photograph, courtesy of Montgomery County Historical Society, Norristown, Pa., THE KING OF PRUSSIA INN, c.1880. - King of Prussia Inn, U.S. Route 202 (Upper Merion Township), King of Prussia, Montgomery County, PA

  20. Clopidogrel Protects Endothelium by Hindering TNFα-Induced VCAM-1 Expression through CaMKKβ/AMPK/Nrf2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huabing; Zhao, Pengjun; Tian, Shiliu

    2016-01-01

    Clopidogrel (INN), an oral antiplatelet drug, has been revealed to have a number of biological properties, for instance, anti-inflammation and antioxidation. Oxidative stress plays an imperative role in inflammation, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, and cancer. In the present study, human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were employed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of INN. INN reduced TNFα-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and time-dependently prompted the expression and activity of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). Cellular glutathione (GSH) levels were augmented by INN. shHO-1 blocked the INN suppression of TNFα-induced HL-60 cell adhesion. The CaMKKβ/AMPK pathway and Nrf2 transcriptional factor were implicated in the induction of HO-1 by INN. Additionally, TNFα dramatically augmented VCAM-1 expression at protein and mRNA levels. INN treatment strikingly repressed TNFα-induced expression of VCAM-1 and HL-60 cell adhesion. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, and shNrf2 abolished TNFα-induced expression of VCAM-1 and HL-60 cell adhesion. Our data suggest that INN diminishes TNFα-stimulated VCAM-1 expression at least in part via HO-1 induction, which is CaMKKβ/AMPK pathway-dependent. PMID:26824050

  1. Something of Value: How Franchise Sellers Make Training Pay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Gladys

    1975-01-01

    Training can be the most important benefit included in the purchase of a franchise. Several of these training programs used by franchise sellers (Castro Convertibles, Roto-Rooter, H and R Block, Dunhill Personnel Systems Inc., Carvel, Holiday Inns, Sheraton Inns Inc., McDonald's) are discussed. (Author/BP)

  2. Generic drug names and social welfare.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Félix; Feldman, Roger

    2013-06-01

    This article studies how well International Nonproprietary Names (INNs), the "generic" names for pharmaceuticals, address the problems of imperfect information. Left in private hands, the identification of medicines leads to confusion and errors. Developed in the 1950s by the World Health Organization, INNs are a common, global, scientific nomenclature designed to overcome this failure. Taking stock after sixty years, we argue that the contribution of INNs to social welfare is paramount. They enhance public health by reducing errors and improving patient safety. They also contribute to economic efficiency by creating transparency as the foundation of competitive generic drug markets, reducing transaction costs, and favoring trade. The law in most countries requires manufacturers to designate pharmaceuticals with INNs in labeling and advertising. Generic substitution is also permitted or mandatory in many countries. But not all the benefits of INNs are fully realized because prescribers may not use them. We advocate strong incentives or even legally binding provisions to extend the use of INNs by prescribing physicians and dispensing pharmacists, but we do not recommend replacing brand names entirely with INNs. Instead, we propose dual use of brand names and INNs in prescribing, as in drug labeling.

  3. 34. THE CROW'S NEST. IN THE EARLY YEARS OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. THE CROW'S NEST. IN THE EARLY YEARS OF THE INN MUSICIANS SAT AND PLAYED FOR THE GUESTS IN THE LOBBY BELOW. THE EARTHQUAKE IN 1959 CAUSED SOME STRUCTURAL DAMAGE AND NOW THE CROW'S NEST IS NOT ACCESSIBLE TO THE PUBLIC. - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  4. Inductively Coupled Plasma Etching of III-Nitrides in Cl(2)/Xe,Cl(2)/Ar and Cl(2)/He

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, C.R.; Cho, H.; Donovan, S.M.; Hahn, Y.B.; Hays, D.C.; Jung, K.B.; Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-01-05

    The role of additive noble gases He, Ar and Xe to C&based Inductively Coupled Plasmas for etching of GaN, AIN and InN were examined. The etch rates were a strong function of chlorine concentration, rf chuck power and ICP source power. The highest etch rates for InN were obtained with C12/Xe, while the highest rates for AIN and GaN were obtained with C12/He. Efficient breaking of the 111-nitrogen bond is crucial for attaining high etch rates. The InN etching was dominated by physical sputtering, in contrast to GaN and AIN. In the latter cases, the etch rates were limited by initial breaking of the III-nitrogen bond. Maximum selectivities of -80 for InN to GaN and InN to AIN were obtained.

  5. PREVALENCE OF ANISAKID NEMATODE LARVAE INFECTING SOME MARINE FISHES FROM THE LIBYAN COAST.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Hamed H; Bowashi, Salem Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    This study examined eight hundred ninety six marine fishes belonging to nine different fish species; Synodus saurus; Merluccius merluccius; Trachurus mediterraneus; Serranus cabrilla; Mullus surmuletus; Diplodus annularis; Spicara maena; Siganus rirulatus and Liza ramada. The fishes were bought from fish markets at five different sites on Libyan coast, from January to December 2013, for study the anisakids larvae among them. The results showed that 344/896 fishes (38.4%) were infected with Anisakids larvae. S. saurus was the highly infected (80.9%), followed by T mediterraneus (77.5%) but, S. cabrilla, S. maena, M merluccius, M surmuletus, and D. annularis were least anisakid infected showed rates of 58.2%, 53.8%, 43.7%, 36.7% & 3.6%, respectively. No parasites were in S. rirulatus and L, ramada. Ten species of Anisakids larvae was detected during the present study. Two Pseudoterranova sp. Larvae, two types of Anisakis larvae, Anisakis simplex larva and Anisakis sp. Larva, two types of Contracaecum sp. Larvae and four Hysterothylacium larvae. Females showed higher prevalence than males. The number of anisakid larvae varied according to body length and weight of infected fish, without significant difference between prevalence and seasons, but, a significant difference was between prevalence and regions.

  6. PREVALENCE OF ANISAKID NEMATODE LARVAE INFECTING SOME MARINE FISHES FROM THE LIBYAN COAST.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Hamed H; Bowashi, Salem Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    This study examined eight hundred ninety six marine fishes belonging to nine different fish species; Synodus saurus; Merluccius merluccius; Trachurus mediterraneus; Serranus cabrilla; Mullus surmuletus; Diplodus annularis; Spicara maena; Siganus rirulatus and Liza ramada. The fishes were bought from fish markets at five different sites on Libyan coast, from January to December 2013, for study the anisakids larvae among them. The results showed that 344/896 fishes (38.4%) were infected with Anisakids larvae. S. saurus was the highly infected (80.9%), followed by T mediterraneus (77.5%) but, S. cabrilla, S. maena, M merluccius, M surmuletus, and D. annularis were least anisakid infected showed rates of 58.2%, 53.8%, 43.7%, 36.7% & 3.6%, respectively. No parasites were in S. rirulatus and L, ramada. Ten species of Anisakids larvae was detected during the present study. Two Pseudoterranova sp. Larvae, two types of Anisakis larvae, Anisakis simplex larva and Anisakis sp. Larva, two types of Contracaecum sp. Larvae and four Hysterothylacium larvae. Females showed higher prevalence than males. The number of anisakid larvae varied according to body length and weight of infected fish, without significant difference between prevalence and seasons, but, a significant difference was between prevalence and regions. PMID:26939239

  7. Development of a low-temperature, low-cost, black liquid solar collector. Phase II. Semi-annual report, September 1, 1979-February 29, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Landstrom, D. K.; Talbert, S. G.; McGinniss, V. D.

    1980-03-20

    The research efforts during these first 6 months of Phase II have been directed toward (1) evaluating the long-term durability of various plastic materials and solar collector designs, (2) obtaining sufficient outdoor performance data to design a full-scale demonstration of a black-liquid solar collector for a commercial application, (3) teaming with a company willing to commercialize black liquid plastic collectors, and (4) incorporating improved black liquids with the identified plastic collector designs. Besides conducting indoor weathering tests of various plastic materials, two outdoor automated test facilities have been built. One unit has been in use for about 2 winter months at Battelle in Columbus, Ohio, and the other unit is ready for testing in Phoenix, Arizona, by Ramada Energy Systems, Inc., a collector manufacturing company. Since Ramada Energy Systems has been working with extruded polycarbonate panels, Battelle has been working to date with extruded acrylic panel designs. Other potential plastics for solar collectors will be evaluated later in this program.

  8. Campus Shootings: A Prevention Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, James Alan

    2008-01-01

    New to the curriculum at many colleges this fall will be instruction for students in survival skills. The training material will not be like Clemson University's "College Survival Skills" Web site, which features useful advice on note taking, studying for exams, and dealing with professors. Rather, a new security DVD, Shots Fired on Campus:…

  9. Love and Marriage: A Modern Approach to Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinka, Margit M.

    1978-01-01

    In order to ensure personal involvement in and eagerness for verbal communication, the German intermediate conversational course at Clemson University centers on love, marriage, and family life. Student proficiency in German improves, and the course generates enthusiasm as well as self-awareness and awareness of others. (Author/SW)

  10. Collaborating with Users to Design Learning Spaces: Playing Nicely in the Sandbox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    What should a campus do when it needs more learning spaces but can't construct new buildings? Dr. Benjamin Sill's first task when he became the director of Clemson University's general engineering program was to find space for classrooms and for the advising program. His search ended in the old YMCA building (Holtzendorff Hall), where space was…

  11. Lunar fiberglass: Properties and process design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, Robert; Nichols, Todd

    1987-01-01

    A Clemson University ceramic engineering design for a lunar fiberglass plant is presented. The properties of glass fibers and metal-matrix composites are examined. Lunar geology is also discussed. A raw material and site are selected based on this information. A detailed plant design is presented, and summer experiments to be carried out at Johnson Space Center are reviewed.

  12. Improvements in a Micro Spinning Process

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Miniature Spinning System installed at the Cotton Quality Research Station, Clemson, SC has been examined to assess its capabilities for broader use, using available resources. Small procedural changes were made to improve efficiency at the card and drawframe. A more intensive effort with the sp...

  13. Merit-Based Scholarships and Student Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Julian, Rey

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-one states offer merit scholarships that require students to maintain a minimum grade point average (GPA). Using a comprehensive administrative database from Clemson University, this study estimates the relationship between the incentives created by a South Carolina merit scholarship (LIFE) and students' academic performance. I hypothesize…

  14. Videotex: A Campus Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duckenfield, Christopher; Nelson, Richard

    The purpose of videotex, its effect on the general consumer, and its use by Clemson University (South Carolina) are discussed. Videotex, a technology vehicle designed for the delivery of home information services, is not complicated. The simplicity of videotex makes it an ideal medium for the dissemination of information on a university campus…

  15. Registration of PD 06001 and PD 06078 germplasm lines of cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PD 06001 and PD 06078 are noncommercial breeding lines of cotton jointly released by the Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, the Clemson University Experiment Station, and Cotton Incorporated in 2014. PD 06001 is a breeding line selected from a cross of PD 93007 a...

  16. Registration of PD 05064, PD 05069, PD 05070, and PD 05071 germplasm lines of cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PD 05064, PD 05069, PD 05070, and PD 05071 are noncommercial breeding lines of cotton jointly released by the Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, the Clemson University Experiment Station, and Cotton Incorporated in 2014. PD 05064, PD 05069, PD 05070, and PD 05071...

  17. Rural Alaska Mentoring Project (RAMP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cash, Terry

    2011-01-01

    For over two years the National Dropout Prevention Center (NDPC) at Clemson University has been supporting the Lower Kuskokwim School District (LKSD) in NW Alaska with their efforts to reduce high school dropout in 23 remote Yup'ik Eskimo villages. The Rural Alaska Mentoring Project (RAMP) provides school-based E-mentoring services to 164…

  18. Project Blackbird: Deploying Condor in a Blackboard Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Sam

    2009-01-01

    Clemson University implemented Condor architecture on the Blackboard learning management system (LMS) application servers in order to gain higher throughput when processing Blackboard course archives. Condor has typically been used for high-throughput research computing, not applied to non-research problems involving long processing times. This…

  19. A Day in the Sandbox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskins, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Each year, the Association for Continuing Higher Education (ACHE) gives a "Creative Use of Technology" award for "innovative uses of instructional and distance learning technologies in lifelong learning." In November 2008, the award was presented to Clemson University for its Teaching with Technology Experimental Classroom--affectionately known as…

  20. Oxygen and nitrogen dyamics in split ponds vs. intensive and conventional catfish production ponds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Split Pond aquaculture system (SP) has captured the attention of catfish producers across the southern U.S. The SP represents a lower cost adaptation of Clemson University’s Partitioned Aquaculture System (PAS). The original PAS design relied on slowly rotating paddlewheels to move water throu...

  1. 2014 Pee Dee germplasm releases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PD 05035, PD 05041, PD 05064, PD 05069, PD 05070, PD 05071, PD 06001, and PD 06078 are noncommercial breeding lines of cotton jointly released by the Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Clemson University Experiment Station, and Cotton Incorporated in 2014. These ...

  2. Advanced GIS Exercise: Performing Error Analysis in ArcGIS ModelBuilder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Steven T.; Post, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of Geographic Information Systems is quickly becoming an integral part of the natural resource professionals' skill set. With the growing need of professionals with these skills, we created an advanced geographic information systems (GIS) exercise for students at Clemson University to introduce them to the concept of error analysis,…

  3. Teaching Business Japanese and Culture Using Authentic Materials: A Popular Television Drama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kishimoto, Toshiko

    In a Japanese business communication course taught at Clemson University (South Carolina), Japanese television drama is used to help language students understand the style of Japanese communication and improve their communicative ability. The course design was based on the following: (1) research on Japanese perceptions of the language needs for…

  4. Two Approaches to Using Client Projects in the College Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Lynne; Williams, Sean

    2004-01-01

    Client projects are an opportunity for universities to create long-lasting, mutually beneficial relationships with businesses through an academic consultancy service. This article discusses the rationale and logistics of two models for conducting such projects. One model, used at Clemson University, is a formal academic consultancy service in…

  5. Theobroma cacao: A genetically integrated physical map and genome-scale comparative synteny analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comprehensive integrated genomic framework is considered a centerpiece of genomic research. In collaboration with the USDA-ARS (SHRS) and Mars Inc., the Clemson University Genomics Institute (CUGI) has developed a genetically anchored physical map of the T. cacao genome. Three BAC libraries contai...

  6. Calculating Chemical Evolution on the Web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, B. S.; Denny, J. E.; Clayton, D. D.

    2001-01-01

    We have constructed an interactive web site that may be of interest to cosmochemists seeking to understand the evolution of isotopes in the Galaxy. The URL is http://photon.phys.clemson.edu/gce.html. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Laptops in Class: What Are They Good for? What Can You Do with Them?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Barbara E.; Nilson, Linda B.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter describes Clemson University's Laptop Faculty Development Program and its assessment, offering the program as one model for designing faculty development to successfully implement laptop mandates. The chapter also acquaints readers with the many types of in-class, laptop-based activities that meet best-practice criteria for effective…

  8. Professional Development Needs of State Extension Specialists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radhakrishna, Rama B.

    2001-01-01

    Responses from 47 of 78 Clemson University extension specialists identified three critical professional development needs: communicating program impact to key decision makers, communicating client problems to researchers, and viewing problems from different perspectives. They felt that their expertise in other areas was high. (Contains 16…

  9. Recovery of a PCB-Contaminated Creek Fish Community

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) from the Sangamo-Weston Superfund Site near Clemson, South Carolina, USA, were released into the Twelvemile Creek until the early 1990s. PCB concentrations in fish in this creek have remained elevated: levels in six target fish species are still a...

  10. Commercial cotton variety spinning study descriptive statistics and distributions of cotton fiber and yarn.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Cotton Quality Research Station (CQRS) of the USDA-ARS, located in Clemson, SC, has completed a comprehensive study of the relationship of cotton fiber properties to the quality of spun yarn. The five year study, began in 2001, utilized commercial variety cotton grown, harvested and ginned in e...

  11. COMMERCIAL COTTON VARIETY SPINNING STUDY DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS AND DISTRIBUTIONS OF COTTON FIBER AND YARN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Cotton Quality Research Station (CQRS) of the USDA-ARS, located in Clemson, SC has completed a comprehensive study of the relationship of cotton fiber properties to the quality of spun yarn. The five year study, began in 2001, utilized commercial variety cotton grown, harvested and ginned in ...

  12. Local Area Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullard, David

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of word processors, micro- and minicomputer systems, and other digital office equipment is causing major design changes in existing networks. Local Area Networks (LANs) which have adequately served terminal users in the past must now be redesigned. Implementation at Clemson is described. (MLW)

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF PCB BIOACCUMULATION IN THE LAKE HARTWELL FOODWEB USING THE AQUATOX MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    PCBs from the Sangamo-Weston Superfund Site near Clemson, South Carolina, USA, were released into the Twelvemile Creek arm of Lake Hartwell until the early 1990s. Monitoring data have shown that while PCB concentration in sediments declined since 1995, PCB concentrations in larg...

  14. The effects of color plastic mulches and row covers on the growth and yield of okra

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Okra [Abelmoschus esculentus (l.) Moench'Clemson Spineless'] was grown on an Orangeburg sandy loam soil in shorter, AL. Okra was direct seeded in single rows. The experiment consisted of twelve experimental treatments as follows: (1) Black plastic mulch (BPM) + spunbonded row cover (RC), (2) BPM, (3...

  15. Field evaluation of brassica lines for resistance to bacterial blight in Charleston, South Carolina, 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twelve leafy green Brassica entries (including turnip, mustard, and collard greens) were evaluated for response to inoculation with Pseudomonas syringae pv. alisalensis (Psa) in an experiment conducted at the Clemson University Coastal Research and Education Center in Charleston, SC. On 21 Septembe...

  16. Issues in Survey Assessments of STS Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Pamela E.; Campbell, Todd; Hashidah Abd-Hamid, Nor

    2008-01-01

    This study presents the circuitous route taken in an attempt to identify an assessment mechanism for evaluating the impact of STS courses. After initially developing a survey that faculty felt only allowed for the measurement of student opinions about the impact of required STS general education courses, the faculty at Clemson University…

  17. Revitalized Undergraduate Mathematics with Symbol Manipulating Graphics Calculators. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaTorre, Donald R.

    Clemson University's Revitalized Undergraduate Mathematics with Symbol Manipulating Graphics Calculators Project introduced Hewlett-Packard HP-48S graphing calculators into undergraduate mathematics instruction to demonstrate that calculators can be effectively integrated into the undergraduate mathematics curriculum. This document reports the…

  18. A Methodology and Linear Model for System Planning and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Richard W.

    1982-01-01

    The two-phase effort at Clemson University to design a comprehensive library automation program is reported. Phase one was based on a version of IBM's business system planning methodology, and the second was based on a linear model designed to compare existing program systems to the phase one design. (MLW)

  19. Designing a Children's Water Garden as an Outdoor Learning Lab for Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Renee K.; Haque, Mary Taylor; Tai, Lolly; McLellan, Gina K.; Knight, Erin Jordan

    2007-01-01

    A Clemson University introductory landscape design class collaborated with South Carolina Botanical Gardens (SCBG) staff and coordinators of Sprouting Wings to design an exploratory Children's Garden within the SCBG. Service learning provides students with invaluable real-world experiences solving problems and interacting with clients while…

  20. Efficacy of ProPhyt mixed with a low rate of Captec for control of peach scab in South Carolina, 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungicides were evaluated for control of scab in a mid-ripening experimental nectarine block (‘Redgold’) located at the Clemson University Research Station in Seneca, SC. Chemical formulations were applied with a handgun sprayer (200 gal/A spray volume) on 1 Apr (petal fall), 9 Apr (shuck split) and...

  1. ADAM: A Collaborative Effort To Prepare Future Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Michael D.; And Others

    ADAM (Administrative Development and Management), an administrator preparation partnership between Greenwood (South Carolina) School District 50 and Clemson University, is described in this paper. The program uses practicing administrators in collaboration with college faculty to train prospective school administrators. The purpose is to provide…

  2. A Study of Coordinated Service Provision and Administrative Procedures in Selected University Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Strom Thurmond Inst. of Government and Public Affairs.

    This study investigated the existence of coordinated/consolidated services between colleges and universities and their communities by surveying 27 university communities of similar size and/or characteristics to Clemson University (South Carolina). The report begins with the profiles of the universities selected: their size in acreage, enrollment,…

  3. The Architect as University President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Architecture blends the arts and sciences in a vigorous way--one well suited to a university presidency. In this article, the author shares how his architectural education and background prepared and helped him for his responsibility as president of Clemson University. A big part of his responsibility is to help plan, financially support, build,…

  4. Advanced Engineering Fibers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edie, Dan D.; Dunham, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Clemson University's Advanced Engineered Fibers Laboratory, which was established to provide national leadership and expertise in developing the processing equipment and advance fibers necessary for the chemical, fiber, and textile industries to enter the composite materials market. Discusses some of the laboratory's activities in…

  5. Popular Science Journalism: Facilitating Learning through Peer Review and Communication of Science News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuten, Holly; Temesvari, Lesly

    2013-01-01

    In a multisemester Popular Science Journalism course that met for 2 hours once a week at Clemson University, students produced science news articles for the university newspaper by using primary literature, the internet, and interviews with researchers. Short lectures were given on topic choice, story development, literature surveys, common…

  6. FORECASTS AND SENSITIVITY OF PCB BIOACCUMULATION IN FISH OF LAKE HARTWELL, SOUTH CAROLINA, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA aquatic ecosystem model AQUATOX was applied to the Twelvemile Creek arm of Lake Hartwell, which received 400,000 lbs of PCBs from the Sangamo-Weston Superfund Site near Clemson, South Carolina, USA, from 1955 until the early 1990s. AQUATOX was used to characterize food we...

  7. Institutionalizing Undergraduate Research for Geology Majors through Creative Inquiry Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, John R.; Bixler, Robert D.; Carraway, Elizabeth R.; Moysey, Stephen M.; Murdoch, Lawrence R.; Schlautman, Mark R.; Warner, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    The geology program at Clemson University has instituted a new, six-semester-long undergraduate research course sequence that requires student participation in ongoing departmental research projects from their sophomore through senior years. As a part of a university-wide initiative focusing on undergraduate research, termed Creative Inquiry at…

  8. Geology Museum-Based Learning in Soil Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikhailova, E. A.; Tennant, C. H.; Post, C. J.; Cicimurri, C.; Cicimurri, D.

    2013-01-01

    Museums provide unique learning opportunities in soil science. The Bob Campbell Geology Museum in Clemson, SC, features an exhibit of minerals and rocks common in the state and in its geologic history. We developed a hands-on laboratory exercise utilizing an exhibit that gives college students an opportunity to visualize regional minerals and…

  9. Building the "Alumni Habit:" A Round Up of Lively Student-Alumni Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purpura, Mary

    1980-01-01

    In order to have recent graduates respond to requests for funds and volunteer support, it is thought that the "alumni habit" should start with current students. Many institutions have organized alumni relations projects. Eight college and university student-alumni programs are described, including Clemson, Cornell, Northwestern, Yale, Michigan,…

  10. Implementing ePortfolios for the Assessment of General Education Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ring, Gail; Ramirez, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the Clemson ePortfolio Program initiated in 2006, where all undergraduate students are required to create an ePortfolio. Specifically, the program was designed as a mechanism through which to evaluate our recently revised general education program. In this program all undergraduates create and submit a digital portfolio as…

  11. FOODWEB MODELING FOR PCBS IN THE TWELVEMILE CREEK ARM OF LAKE HARTWELL, GA/SC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA is conducting a series of studies on the Sangamo-Weston Superfund Site near Clemson, SC, to examine the pollution of the Twelvemile Creek arm of Lake Hartwell by PCBs that were released from the site until the early 1990s. Monitoring data have shown that while PCB c...

  12. Mechanisms of 1D crystal growth in reactive vapor transport: indium nitride nanowires.

    PubMed

    Vaddiraju, Sreeram; Mohite, Aditya; Chin, Alan; Meyyappan, M; Sumanasekera, Gamini; Alphenaar, Bruce W; Sunkara, Mahendra K

    2005-08-01

    Indium nitride (InN) nanowire synthesis using indium (In) vapor transport in a dissociated ammonia environment (reactive vapor transport) is studied in detail to understand the nucleation and growth mechanisms involved with the so-called "self-catalysis" schemes. The results show that the nucleation of InN crystal occurs first on the substrate. Later, In droplets are formed on top of the InN crystals because of selective wetting of In onto InN crystals. Further growth via liquid-phase epitaxy through In droplets leads the growth in one dimension (1D), resulting in the formation of InN nanowires. The details about the nucleation and growth aspects within these self-catalysis schemes are rationalized further by demonstrating the growth of heteroepitaxially oriented nanowire arrays on single-crystal substrates and "tree-like" morphologies on a variety of substrates. However, the direct nitridation of In droplets using dissociated ammonia results in the spontaneous nucleation and basal growth of nanowires directly from the In melt surface, which is quite different from the above-mentioned nucleation mechanism with the reactive vapor transport case. The InN nanowires exhibit a band gap of 0.8 eV, whereas the mixed phase of InN and In(2)O(3) nanowires exhibit a peak at approximately 1.9 eV in addition to that at 0.8 eV.

  13. An InN/InGaN Quantum Dot Electrochemical Biosensor for Clinical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, Naveed ul Hassan; Gómez, Victor J.; Rodriguez, Paul E.D. Soto; Kumar, Praveen; Zaman, Saima; Willander, Magnus; Nötzel, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Low-dimensional InN/InGaN quantum dots (QDs) are demonstrated for realizing highly sensitive and efficient potentiometric biosensors owing to their unique electronic properties. The InN QDs are biochemically functionalized. The fabricated biosensor exhibits high sensitivity of 97 mV/decade with fast output response within two seconds for the detection of cholesterol in the logarithmic concentration range of 1 × 10−6 M to 1 × 10−3 M. The selectivity and reusability of the biosensor are excellent and it shows negligible response to common interferents such as uric acid and ascorbic acid. We also compare the biosensing properties of the InN QDs with those of an InN thin film having the same surface properties, i.e., high density of surface donor states, but different morphology and electronic properties. The sensitivity of the InN QDs-based biosensor is twice that of the InN thin film-based biosensor, the EMF is three times larger, and the response time is five times shorter. A bare InGaN layer does not produce a stable response. Hence, the superior biosensing properties of the InN QDs are governed by their unique surface properties together with the zero-dimensional electronic properties. Altogether, the InN QDs-based biosensor reveals great potential for clinical diagnosis applications. PMID:24132228

  14. Closely Spaced MEG Source Localization and Functional Connectivity Analysis Using a New Prewhitening Invariance of Noise Space Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junpeng; Cui, Yuan; Deng, Lihua; He, Ling; Zhang, Junran; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Qun; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposed a prewhitening invariance of noise space (PW-INN) as a new magnetoencephalography (MEG) source analysis method, which is particularly suitable for localizing closely spaced and highly correlated cortical sources under real MEG noise. Conventional source localization methods, such as sLORETA and beamformer, cannot distinguish closely spaced cortical sources, especially under strong intersource correlation. Our previous work proposed an invariance of noise space (INN) method to resolve closely spaced sources, but its performance is seriously degraded under correlated noise between MEG sensors. The proposed PW-INN method largely mitigates the adverse influence of correlated MEG noise by projecting MEG data to a new space defined by the orthogonal complement of dominant eigenvectors of correlated MEG noise. Simulation results showed that PW-INN is superior to INN, sLORETA, and beamformer in terms of localization accuracy for closely spaced and highly correlated sources. Lastly, source connectivity between closely spaced sources can be satisfactorily constructed from source time courses estimated by PW-INN but not from results of other conventional methods. Therefore, the proposed PW-INN method is a promising MEG source analysis to provide a high spatial-temporal characterization of cortical activity and connectivity, which is crucial for basic and clinical research of neural plasticity.

  15. Attitudes of physicians and pharmacists towards International Non-proprietary Name prescribing in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Van Bever, Elien; Elseviers, Monique; Plovie, Marijke; Vandeputte, Lieselot; Van Bortel, Luc; Vander Stichele, Robert

    2015-03-01

    International Non-proprietary Name (INN) prescribing is the use of the name of the active ingredient(s) instead of the brand name for prescribing. In Belgium, INN prescribing began in 2005 and a major policy change occurred in 2012. The aim was to explore the opinions of Dutch-speaking general practitioners (GPs) and pharmacists. An electronic questionnaire with 39 five-point Likert scale statements and one open question was administered in 2013. Multivariate analysis was performed with multiple linear regression on a sum score for benefit statements and for drawback statements. Answers to the open question were qualitatively analysed. We received 745 valid responses with a representable sample for both subgroups. Participants perceived the motives to introduce INN prescribing as purely economic (to reduce pharmaceutical expenditures for the government and the patient). Participants accepted the concept of INN prescribing, but 88% stressed the importance of guaranteed treatment continuity, especially in older, chronic patients, to prevent patient confusion, medication non-adherence and erroneous drug use. In conclusion, the current way in which INN prescribing is applied in Belgium leads to many concerns among primary health professionals about patient confusion and medication adherence. Slightly adapting the current concept of INN prescribing to these concerns can turn INN prescribing into one of the major policies in Belgium to reduce pharmaceutical expenditures and to stimulate rational drug prescribing. PMID:25155133

  16. Closely Spaced MEG Source Localization and Functional Connectivity Analysis Using a New Prewhitening Invariance of Noise Space Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junpeng; Cui, Yuan; Deng, Lihua; He, Ling; Zhang, Junran; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Qun; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposed a prewhitening invariance of noise space (PW-INN) as a new magnetoencephalography (MEG) source analysis method, which is particularly suitable for localizing closely spaced and highly correlated cortical sources under real MEG noise. Conventional source localization methods, such as sLORETA and beamformer, cannot distinguish closely spaced cortical sources, especially under strong intersource correlation. Our previous work proposed an invariance of noise space (INN) method to resolve closely spaced sources, but its performance is seriously degraded under correlated noise between MEG sensors. The proposed PW-INN method largely mitigates the adverse influence of correlated MEG noise by projecting MEG data to a new space defined by the orthogonal complement of dominant eigenvectors of correlated MEG noise. Simulation results showed that PW-INN is superior to INN, sLORETA, and beamformer in terms of localization accuracy for closely spaced and highly correlated sources. Lastly, source connectivity between closely spaced sources can be satisfactorily constructed from source time courses estimated by PW-INN but not from results of other conventional methods. Therefore, the proposed PW-INN method is a promising MEG source analysis to provide a high spatial-temporal characterization of cortical activity and connectivity, which is crucial for basic and clinical research of neural plasticity. PMID:26819768

  17. Thermally detected optical absorption in sophisticated nitride structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasson, A.; Shubina, T. V.; Leymarie, J.

    2005-02-01

    The thermally detected optical absorption (TDOA) is applied to elucidate peculiarities of absorption in nitride structures of unusual morphology like GaN nanocolumns or InN layers with various imperfections. A study of GaN structures permits us to establish position of an absorption edge in TDOA spectra. We demonstrate that the absorption edge is different in GaN regions of opposite polarities. In InN with metallic In inclusions, this technique enable separation of InN interband absorption and extinction related to the Mie resonances, if the latter are below the principal absorption edge.

  18. 28. LOBBY, LOOKING EAST FROM THE THIRD FLOOR. THE OBELISK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. LOBBY, LOOKING EAST FROM THE THIRD FLOOR. THE OBELISK SHAPED FIREPLACE IS FULLY VISIBLE AT THE RIGHT. - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  19. 78 FR 52505 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... will be held at the Inn at Henderson's Wharf, 1000 Fell Street, Baltimore, MD 21231; telephone: (410..., scup, and black sea bass fisheries. Multi-year ACTs and management measures, applicable to...

  20. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-21

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Holiday Inn, Ventura, California, 2/16-21/03. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  1. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept 16, 1940 (F) EXTERIOR, DETAIL OF OLD TAVERN SIGN (AMERICAN SIDE) EAGLE - Captain Arah Phelphs Inn, Colebrook, Litchfield County, CT

  2. Burn Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 & 15, 2016 RB Inn Golf Course & Del Mar Fairgrounds Firefighter Boot Drive March 2017 Across San ... Banquet May 2017 Demolition Derby June 2017 Del Mar Fairgrounds News Survivor Stories 2016 Firework Safety ALL ...

  3. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Robert W. Kerrigan, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Robert W. Kerrigan, Photographer August 24, 1936 INTERIOR DETAIL WEST WALL OF SOCIAL HALL - Trocadero Inn, Sigmund Stern Grove, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  4. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept 16, 1940 (D) INTERIOR, PANELED WALL IN OLD TAP ROOM, SHOWING BAR IN FURTHER CORNER - Captain Arah Phelphs Inn, Colebrook, Litchfield County, CT

  5. 76 FR 4895 - Workshop To Discuss Issues Related to the Potential Development of Multipollutant Science and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... Inn, 211 Pittsboro Street, Chapel Hill, NC 27516. The EPA contractor, ICF International, Inc., is... information, registration, and logistics for the workshop should be directed to Courtney Skuce at...

  6. Synovial fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    Joint fluid analysis; Joint fluid aspiration ... El-Gabalawy HS. Synovial fluid analysis, synovial biopsy, and synovial pathology. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Gabriel SE, McInnes IB, O'Dell JR, eds. Kelly's Textbook of ...

  7. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept 16, 1940 (G) EXTERIOR, DETAIL OF OLD TAVERN SIGN (ENGLISH SIDE) WITH PAINTED LION - Captain Arah Phelphs Inn, Colebrook, Litchfield County, CT

  8. 76 FR 30176 - Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... Marriott Inn and Conference Center, University of Maryland University College (UMUC), 3501 University Blvd... attendance of the public at its advisory committee meetings and will make every effort to accommodate...

  9. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. Baldwin, Photographers, April, 1960 SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION. - King of Prussia Inn, U.S. Route 202 (Upper Merion Township), King of Prussia, Montgomery County, PA

  10. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. Baldwin, Photographers, April, 1960 INTERIOR DETAIL, SOUTHEAST BEDROOM. - King of Prussia Inn, U.S. Route 202 (Upper Merion Township), King of Prussia, Montgomery County, PA

  11. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. Baldwin, Photographers, April, 1960 SOUTHWEST ELEVATION. - King of Prussia Inn, U.S. Route 202 (Upper Merion Township), King of Prussia, Montgomery County, PA

  12. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. Baldwin, Photographers, April, 1960 NORTHEAST ELEVATION. - King of Prussia Inn, U.S. Route 202 (Upper Merion Township), King of Prussia, Montgomery County, PA

  13. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. Baldwin, Photographers, April, 1960 MANTEL (NOT ORIGINAL) SOUTHEAST PARLOR. - King of Prussia Inn, U.S. Route 202 (Upper Merion Township), King of Prussia, Montgomery County, PA

  14. 38. DINING ROOM, THE CHIMNEY WAS SEVERELY DAMAGED BY AN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. DINING ROOM, THE CHIMNEY WAS SEVERELY DAMAGED BY AN EARTHQUAKE IN 1959 AND HAD TO BE RECONSTRUCTED. - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  15. 77 FR 41192 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ..., (Formerly Holiday inn Select), 8120 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814. Contact Person: David H. Weinberg..., 301-435-6973, David.Weinberg@nih.gov . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos....

  16. 77 FR 69638 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ...: The Holiday Inn Express, 1775 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person: David H. Weinberg..., 301-435-6973, David.Weinberg@nih.gov . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos....

  17. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. Oct. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. Oct. 1937. (h) Int- Old Bar in Basement Tap Room - Old Tavern Inn, Wareham Street (State Route 28), Middleboro, Plymouth County, MA

  18. View southwest of "New Room" taken from doorway; windows overlook ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southwest of "New Room" taken from doorway; windows overlook Castro Creek Canyon. Scale visible against end wall - Deetjen's Big Sur Inn, Antique Building, East Side of State Highway 1, Big Sur, Monterey County, CA

  19. 78 FR 58547 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... applications. Place: Holiday Inn Inner Harbor, 301 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201. Contact Person...-93.878, 93.892, 93.893, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: September 18, 2013. David...

  20. 10. GENERAL VIEW OF 'BIG RAILWAY' SHOWING CRADLE AND WINCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. GENERAL VIEW OF 'BIG RAILWAY' SHOWING CRADLE AND WINCH MANUFACTURED BY MEAD-MORRISON MANUFACTURING COMPANY, HAVING A 450 TON CAPACITY - Anderson-Christofani Shipyard, Innes Avenue & Griffith Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  1. 18. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local History Collection), photographer and date unknown. VIEW OF MISSION INN, SEVENTH STREET ENTRANCE - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  2. 75 FR 23288 - Notice of Public Meeting, Southwest Colorado Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ... will be held on June 4, 2010, in Dolores, Colorado; August 13, 2010, in Gunnison, Colorado; and October... 184, Dolores, Colorado 81323; August 13, 2010, at the Holiday Inn Express at 910 E. Tomichi,...

  3. 75 FR 54598 - Schedules for Atlantic Shark Identification Workshops and Protected Species Safe Handling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ...: Need for Correction In the Federal Register of May 28, 2010, in FR Doc. 2010-12919, on page 29992, in..., 2010, to be held at the same time and location, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Comfort Inn (UNC Wilmington), 151... 3. September 9, 2010, from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Comfort Inn (UNC- Wilmington), 151 South College...

  4. Brief History of Moot Court: Britain and U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachid, Mohamed; Knerr, Charles R.

    This document presents a history of moot court, defined as a mock court where hypothetical cases are tried for the training of law students. The first recorded reference to a moot court was in the year 997, and moots were common at the Inns of Court and Chancery in 14th century England. In 18th century England there were 4 greater Inns of Court…

  5. Solar hot water system installed at Las Vegas, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A solar energy hot water system installed in a motor inn at Las Vegas, Nevada is described. The inn is a three story building with a flat roof for installation of the solar panels. The system consists of 1,200 square feet of liquid flat plate collectors, a 2,500 gallon insulated vertical steel storage tank, two heat exchangers, and pumps and controls. The system was designed to supply approximately 74 percent of the total hot water load.

  6. The 13th Tihany Symposium on Radiation Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnárovits, László; Takács, Erzsébet

    2016-07-01

    The Symposium was held in Balatonalmádi, a beautiful city by the Lake Balaton, Hungary, between August 29 and September 3, 2015. This time - to meet the expectations of many colleagues and friends - a place close to the village Tihany was selected, where the first Tihany Symposium was organized in 1962. The participants beside the excellent lectures could also enjoy the panorama of the Lake from the rooms and from the terrace of Hotel Ramada. The number of participants was close to 170 from about 33 countries. The highest number of participants arrived from Poland (14), followed by France (11), Turkey (9) and China (9). The Symposium had 6-6 colleagues from Brazil, Israel, and Romania. Beside China, Asia was represented by a few scientists from the Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines and from Saudi Arabia.

  7. Parasitic diseases of marine fish: epidemiological and sanitary considerations.

    PubMed

    Fioravanti, M L; Caffara, M; Florio, D; Gustinelli, A; Marcer, F; Quaglio, F

    2006-06-01

    Over recent decades, parasitic diseases have been increasingly considered a sanitary and economic threat to Mediterranean aquaculture. In order to monitor the distribution of parasites in cultured marine fish from Italy and study their pathogenic effects on the host, a three-year survey based on parasitological and histopathological exams was carried out on 2141 subjects from eleven fish species and coming from different farming systems (extensive, intensive inland farms, inshore floating cages, offshore floating cages and submersible cages). A number of parasitic species was detected, mostly in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata), mullets (Chelon labrosus, Mugil cephalus, Liza ramada) and sharpsnout sea bream (Diplodus puntazzo), with distribution patterns and prevalence values varying in relation to the farming system, in-season period and size category. The epidemiology and pathological effects of the parasites found during the survey are discussed. PMID:16881387

  8. Resource Partitioning Among Planktivorous Fish Larvae and Fry in a Mediterranean Coastal Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisbert, E.; Cardona, L.; Castelló, F.

    1996-12-01

    Resource partioning among the planktivorous stages of eight fish species occurring in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon was studied. Five species were migratory mullets that spawned in the sea ( Liza ramada, L. aurata, L. saliens, Chelon labrosusand Mugil cephalus), while the other three species were resident and spawned in the lagoon ( Atherina boyeri, Cyprinus carpioand Gambusia holbrooki). Mullet fry exhibited similar diets, based on the consumption of zooplanktonic Crustacea such as copepods and cladocerans, although adult chironomids were also important. Gambusia holbrookiand A. boyerifed on small prey such as copepod nauplii, copepodites and rotifers, while C. carpioconsumed larger prey preferentially (cladocerans and copepods). According to the trophic overlap and niche width results, seven species pairs could be competing in the estuary, although further experimental evidence is still required.

  9. The morphology of saccular otoliths as a tool to identify different mugilid species from the Northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callicó Fortunato, Roberta; Benedito Durà, Vicent; Volpedo, Alejandra

    2014-06-01

    In the Northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea there are 8 species of the Mugilidae family: Mugil cephalus, Liza aurata, Liza ramada, Oedalechilus labeo, Chelon labrosus, Liza saliens, Liza carinata and Liza haematocheila. The identification of mugilids is very important for local fisheries management and regulations, but it is difficult using gross morphological characters. This work aims to contribute to the identification of mullets present in the Northeastern Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea using saccular otolith features of each species. Specimens of C. labrosus, L. aurata, L. ramada, L. saliens and M. cephalus were obtained from Delta del Ebro (40°38'N-0°44'E) in artisanal catches. For L. carinata and O. labeo photographs extracted from AFORO online database were used. L. haematocheila was not studied for lack of otolith samples. A general pattern of the saccular otoliths for this family was identified: the shape of the otoliths are rectangular to oblong with irregular margins; they present a heterosulcoid, ostial sulcus acusticus, with an open funnel-like ostium to the anterior margin and a closed, tubular cauda, ending towards the posterior ventral corner, always larger than the ostium. In the present study, the mugilid species could be recognized using their saccular otolith morphology. Here we give the first key to identify Northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean mullets. The distinctive features between the species were the position and centrality of the sulcus, the curvature of the cauda, the presence of areal depositions and plateaus, and the type of anterior and posterior regions. These features could be used not only to reinforce the identification keys through morphological and meristic characters of the species, but also to identify the species consumed by piscivores, being the otoliths the only identifiable remains of the individuals.

  10. On the holonomy of the Coulomb connection over manifolds with boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Gryc, William E.

    2008-06-15

    Narasimhan and Ramadas [Commun. Math. Phys. 67, 121 (1979)] showed that the restricted holonomy group of the Coulomb connection is dense in the connected component of the identity of the gauge group when one considers the product principal bundle S{sup 3}xSU(2){yields}S{sup 3}. Instead of a base manifold S{sup 3}, we consider here a base manifold of dimension n{>=}2 with a boundary and use Dirichlet boundary conditions on connections as defined by Marini [Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 45, 1015 (1992)]. A key step in the method of Narasimhan and Ramadas consisted in showing that the linear space spanned by the curvature form at one specially chosen connection is dense in the holonomy Lie algebra with respect to an appropriate Sobolev norm. Our objective is to explore the effect of the presence of a boundary on this construction of the holonomy Lie algebra. Fixing appropriate Sobolev norms, it will be shown that the space spanned, linearly, by the curvature form at any one connection is never dense in the holonomy Lie algebra. In contrast, the linear space spanned by the curvature form and its first commutators at the flat connection is dense and, in the C{sup {infinity}} category, is in fact the entire holonomy Lie algebra. The former, negative, theorem is proven for a general principle bundle over M, while the latter, positive, theorem is proven only for a product bundle over the closure of a bounded open subset of R{sup n}. Our technique for proving the absence of density consists in showing that the linear space spanned by the curvature form at one point is contained in the kernel of a linear map consisting of a third order differential operator, followed by a restriction operation at the boundary; this mapping is determined by the mean curvature of the boundary.

  11. Design and manufacture of solid ZrO2 electrolyte

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The following project assignment was given to the students: 'design and build a suitable YSZ solid electrolyte cell. Describe advantages of the design and fabrication method. Finally, to the limits of available resources, fabricate the design. Explain why it would be superior to other designs.' Clemson University students definitely benefitted from this experience with USRA/NASA. The challenge that this project gave the students was both exciting and attention-getting. Students spent far more time per credit hour on this project than on their other course. This project advanced the art of making efficient oxygen generators as well. Clemson students are now well on the way to designing a solid electrolyte with a large active surface area and comparatively small volume. Previous devices have had to endure the limitation of using only simple shapes such as tubes. The results of this project have demonstrated that better configurations are not only possible but practical.

  12. The PEAK experience in South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The PEAK Institute was developed to provide a linkage for formal (schoolteachers) and nonformal educators (extension agents) with agricultural scientists of Clemson University`s South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station System. The goal of the Institute was to enable teams of educators and researchers to develop and provide PEAK science and math learning experiences related to relevant agricultural and environmental issues of local communities for both classroom and 4-H Club experiences. The Peak Institute was conducted through a twenty day residential Institute held in June for middle school and high school teachers who were teamed with an Extension agent from their community. These educators participated in hands-on, minds-on sessions conducted by agricultural researchers and Clemson University Cooperative Extension specialists. Participants were given the opportunity to see frontier science being conducted by scientists from a variety of agricultural laboratories.

  13. The Abundances of Na, Mg, & Al in the Hyades: Giants, Dwarfs, and Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, Simon C.; King, J. R.; The, L.

    2006-12-01

    The abundances of Na, Mg, and Al in three giants and four dwarfs in the Hyades open cluster have been derived from high-resolution, McDonald 2.7-m echelle spectra. These data are compared to the expected changes in surface composition of the giants as predicted by a stellar model generated with the Clemson-American University of Beirut stellar evolution code in order to investigate if the Hyades giants have undergone non-standard mixing. The preliminary results of our analysis are presented. This work is supported by the NOAO Leo Goldberg Fellowship to S.C.S.; NOAO is operated by AURA under cooperative agreement with the NSF. Additional support was provided by the NSF through grants AST 00-86576 and AST 02-39518 to J.R.K. and by the Charles Curry Foundation through a generous grant to Clemson University.

  14. Environmental test program for superconducting materials and devices: Preliminary results of testing program at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, H. ); Verebelyi, D. Clemson Univ., SC )

    1991-05-30

    The properties of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} superconducting tapes designed and fabricated into SAFIRE-type, encapsulated, grounding links by the Ceramic Engineering Department at Clemson University are under investigation. Testing at the Savannah River Site will include gamma irradiation, vibration, and long-term evaluation. The gamma irradiation portion of testing has been completed. The long-term testing began in January and will continue. The vibration test has yet to be started.

  15. G-SESAME: web tools for GO-term-based gene similarity analysis and knowledge discovery

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhidian; Li, Lin; Chen, Chin-Fu; Yu, Philip S.; Wang, James Z.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a set of online tools for measuring the semantic similarities of Gene Ontology (GO) terms and the functional similarities of gene products, and for further discovering biomedical knowledge from the GO database. The tools have been used for about 6.9 million times by 417 institutions from 43 countries since October 2006. The online tools are available at: http://bioinformatics.clemson.edu/G-SESAME. PMID:19491312

  16. Diagnostic measurements of CUEBIT based on the dielectronic resonance process

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, E. Kimmel, T. D. Brandenburg, K. H. Wilson, R. K. Gall, A. C. Harriss, J. E. Sosolik, C. E.

    2015-01-09

    In this paper we report the first observation of x-ray radiation from the new Clemson University Electron Beam Ion Trap (CUEBIT). The analysis of the emitted dielectronic recombination x-ray photons from highly charged argon ions allowed us to probe parameters specific to the ion cloud inside the machine. Argon dielectronic resonances could provide a standard method to cross-compare the electron beam and ion cloud characteristics of different devices.

  17. G-SESAME: web tools for GO-term-based gene similarity analysis and knowledge discovery.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhidian; Li, Lin; Chen, Chin-Fu; Yu, Philip S; Wang, James Z

    2009-07-01

    We have developed a set of online tools for measuring the semantic similarities of Gene Ontology (GO) terms and the functional similarities of gene products, and for further discovering biomedical knowledge from the GO database. The tools have been used for about 6.9 million times by 417 institutions from 43 countries since October 2006. The online tools are available at: http://bioinformatics.clemson.edu/G-SESAME.

  18. A continuous emissions monitor for metals: Field demonstration of a prototype probe

    SciTech Connect

    Flower, W.; Peng, L.; Woods, C.

    1995-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories conducted field tests of a prototype continuous emissions monitor for metals at Clemson University, August 5-11, 1994, in cooperation with the joule-melter vitrification project at Clemson and Savannah River. The monitor is based on Laser Spark Spectroscopy, an established laboratory diagnostic technique that has been adapted for monitoring metal emissions from thermal waste treatment facilities. In the field tests described in this report, emissions were measured from a joule melter that was processing a surrogate waste-water treatment sludge from Oak Ridge. Data from this test provides the first insight into how emissions change (in real time) as operating parameters such as waste feed rate are changed. We detected all metals that were present above the estimated minimum detectability limits (in the parts-per-billion range for Clean Air Act metals), in addition to glass-making species such as calcium, boron, and silicon. This report summarizes the Clemson field tests, including design of the prototype probe, preparations leading up to the tests, the tests themselves, and analysis of results.

  19. ISOTT from the Beginning: A Tribute to Our Deceased Members (Icons).

    PubMed

    Bruley, Duane F; Thiessen, E E

    2016-01-01

    ISOTT was founded by Drs. Duane F. Bruley and Haim I. Bicher in the state of South Carolina, USA in 1973. The symposium was jointly held at Clemson University (Clemson, SC, USA) and the Medical College of South Carolina (Charleston, SC, USA), which are geographically located 260 miles apart. This venue resulted from Dr. Bruley's (Clemson University) wish to have a meeting on Oxygen Transport to Tissue and with it to honor the research collaboration between the two universities and Dr. Melvin H. Knisely's accomplishments on studies regarding "blood sludging" in the microcirculation. Because of the unexpected large response to the symposium, Drs. Bruley and Bicher decided to found an international society at this meeting (ISOTT). The purpose of this paper is to summarize the formalization of ISOTT and to honor important contributors to the society who have since passed away. The authors did their best to include a brief overview of our past icons who have excelled in leadership as well as science/engineering, and apologize if someone has been mistakenly left out or if data is inaccurate or incomplete. PMID:27526118

  20. Online Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer Jordan, Bradley, IV; The, Lih-Sin; Robbins, Stuart

    2004-05-01

    Nuclear-reaction network codes are important to astronomers seeking to explore nucleosynthetic implications of astrophysical models and to nuclear physicists seeking to understand the role of nuclear properties or reaction rates in element formation. However, many users do not have the time or inclination to download and compile the codes, to manage the requisite input files, or to explore the often complex output with their own graphics programs. To help make nucleosynthesis calculations more readily available, we have placed the Clemson Nucleosynthesis code on the world-wide web at http://www.ces.clemson.edu/physics/nucleo/nuclearNetwork At this web site, any Internet user may set his or her own reaction network, nuclear properties and reaction rates, and thermodynamic trajectories. The user then submits the nucleosynthesis calculation, which runs on a dedicated server professionally maintained at Clemson University. Once the calculation is completed, the user may explore the results through dynamically produced and downloadable tables and graphs. Online help guides the user through the necessary steps. We hope this web site will prove a user-friendly and helpful tool for professional scientists as well as for students seeking to explore element formation.

  1. AERIAL MEASUREMENTS OF CONVECTION CELL ELEMENTS IN HEATED LAKES

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Aleman, E; Saleem Salaymeh, S; Timothy Brown, T; Alfred Garrett, A; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Linda Nichols, L

    2007-12-19

    Power plant-heated lakes are characterized by a temperature gradient in the thermal plume originating at the discharge of the power plant and terminating at the water intake. The maximum water temperature discharged by the power plant into the lake depends on the power generated at the facility and environmental regulations on the temperature of the lake. Besides the observed thermal plume, cloud-like thermal cells (convection cell elements) are also observed on the water surface. The size, shape and temperature of the convection cell elements depends on several parameters such as the lake water temperature, wind speed, surfactants and the depth of the thermocline. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Clemson University are collaborating to determine the applicability of laboratory empirical correlations between surface heat flux and thermal convection intensity. Laboratory experiments at Clemson University have demonstrated a simple relationship between the surface heat flux and the standard deviation of temperature fluctuations. Similar results were observed in the aerial thermal imagery SRNL collected at different locations along the thermal plume and at different elevations. SRNL will present evidence that the results at Clemson University are applicable to cooling lakes.

  2. The NSF PAARE Projects at SC State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Donald K.; Brittain, Sean D.; Cash, Jennifer; Hartmann, Dieter; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Ho, Shirley; Howell, Steve B.; King, Jeremy R.; Leising, Mark D.; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Smith, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    We review our progress over the past 7.5 years and the path forward under the NSF program "Partnerships in Astronomy and Astrophysics Research and Education (PAARE)". Our first project, "A Partnership in Observational and Computational Astronomy (POCA)" was a part of the 2008 PAARE cohort which we finished on September 30, 2015. We will summarize the results of those years and look at our way forward under a second PAARE award made in August 2014 (POCA II). Our partnership under the second PAARE award includes South Carolina State University (a Historically Black College/University), Clemson University (a Ph.D. granting institution) as well as individual investigators at NASA Ames and Carnegie Mellon University. Our recent work on variable and peculiar stars, work with the Kepler Observatory and our educational products in cosmology for non-STEM majors will be presented as well as our success with undergraduate and graduate students. We will also discuss how we are sharing resources with Clemson through distance learning and undergraduate research projects. Our support includes NSF awards AST-0750814 and AST-1358913 to South Carolina State University as well as resources and support provided by Clemson University and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. Support for the Kepler observations is provided by NASA to South Carolina State University under awards NNX11AB82G and NNX13AC24G. Additional details can be found at: http://physics.scsu.edu/paare/

  3. DelPhi web server v2: incorporating atomic-style geometrical figures into the computational protocol

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nicholas; Witham, Shawn; Sarkar, Subhra; Zhang, Jie; Li, Lin; Li, Chuan; Alexov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    Summary: A new edition of the DelPhi web server, DelPhi web server v2, is released to include atomic presentation of geometrical figures. These geometrical objects can be used to model nano-size objects together with real biological macromolecules. The position and size of the object can be manipulated by the user in real time until desired results are achieved. The server fixes structural defects, adds hydrogen atoms and calculates electrostatic energies and the corresponding electrostatic potential and ionic distributions. Availability and implementation: The web server follows a client–server architecture built on PHP and HTML and utilizes DelPhi software. The computation is carried out on supercomputer cluster and results are given back to the user via http protocol, including the ability to visualize the structure and corresponding electrostatic potential via Jmol implementation. The DelPhi web server is available from http://compbio.clemson.edu/delphi_webserver. Contact: nsmith@clemson.edu, ealexov@clemson.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22531215

  4. Crystallographic analysis of human hemoglobin elucidates the structural basis of the potent and dual antisickling activity of pyridyl derivatives of vanillin

    SciTech Connect

    Abdulmalik, Osheiza; Ghatge, Mohini S.; Musayev, Faik N.; Parikh, Apurvasena; Chen, Qiukan; Yang, Jisheng; Nnamani, Ijeoma; Danso-Danquah, Richmond; Eseonu, Dorothy N.; Asakura, Toshio; Abraham, Donald J.; Venitz, Jurgen; Safo, Martin K.

    2011-11-01

    Pyridyl derivatives of vanillin increase the fraction of the more soluble oxygenated sickle hemoglobin and/or directly increase the solubility of deoxygenated sickle hemoglobin. Crystallographic analysis reveals the structural basis of the potent and dual antisickling activity of these derivatives. Vanillin has previously been studied clinically as an antisickling agent to treat sickle-cell disease. In vitro investigations with pyridyl derivatives of vanillin, including INN-312 and INN-298, showed as much as a 90-fold increase in antisickling activity compared with vanillin. The compounds preferentially bind to and modify sickle hemoglobin (Hb S) to increase the affinity of Hb for oxygen. INN-312 also led to a considerable increase in the solubility of deoxygenated Hb S under completely deoxygenated conditions. Crystallographic studies of normal human Hb with INN-312 and INN-298 showed that the compounds form Schiff-base adducts with the N-terminus of the α-subunits to constrain the liganded (or relaxed-state) Hb conformation relative to the unliganded (or tense-state) Hb conformation. Interestingly, while INN-298 binds and directs its meta-positioned pyridine-methoxy moiety (relative to the aldehyde moiety) further down the central water cavity of the protein, that of INN-312, which is ortho to the aldehyde, extends towards the surface of the protein. These studies suggest that these compounds may act to prevent sickling of SS cells by increasing the fraction of the soluble high-affinity Hb S and/or by stereospecific inhibition of deoxygenated Hb S polymerization.

  5. Field-effect transistors based on cubic indium nitride

    PubMed Central

    Oseki, Masaaki; Okubo, Kana; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ohta, Jitsuo; Fujioka, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Although the demand for high-speed telecommunications has increased in recent years, the performance of transistors fabricated with traditional semiconductors such as silicon, gallium arsenide, and gallium nitride have reached their physical performance limits. Therefore, new materials with high carrier velocities should be sought for the fabrication of next-generation, ultra-high-speed transistors. Indium nitride (InN) has attracted much attention for this purpose because of its high electron drift velocity under a high electric field. Thick InN films have been applied to the fabrication of field-effect transistors (FETs), but the performance of the thick InN transistors was discouraging, with no clear linear-saturation output characteristics and poor on/off current ratios. Here, we report the epitaxial deposition of ultrathin cubic InN on insulating oxide yttria-stabilized zirconia substrates and the first demonstration of ultrathin-InN-based FETs. The devices exhibit high on/off ratios and low off-current densities because of the high quality top and bottom interfaces between the ultrathin cubic InN and oxide insulators. This first demonstration of FETs using a ultrathin cubic indium nitride semiconductor will thus pave the way for the development of next-generation high-speed electronics. PMID:24492240

  6. Field-effect transistors based on cubic indium nitride.

    PubMed

    Oseki, Masaaki; Okubo, Kana; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ohta, Jitsuo; Fujioka, Hiroshi

    2014-02-04

    Although the demand for high-speed telecommunications has increased in recent years, the performance of transistors fabricated with traditional semiconductors such as silicon, gallium arsenide, and gallium nitride have reached their physical performance limits. Therefore, new materials with high carrier velocities should be sought for the fabrication of next-generation, ultra-high-speed transistors. Indium nitride (InN) has attracted much attention for this purpose because of its high electron drift velocity under a high electric field. Thick InN films have been applied to the fabrication of field-effect transistors (FETs), but the performance of the thick InN transistors was discouraging, with no clear linear-saturation output characteristics and poor on/off current ratios. Here, we report the epitaxial deposition of ultrathin cubic InN on insulating oxide yttria-stabilized zirconia substrates and the first demonstration of ultrathin-InN-based FETs. The devices exhibit high on/off ratios and low off-current densities because of the high quality top and bottom interfaces between the ultrathin cubic InN and oxide insulators. This first demonstration of FETs using a ultrathin cubic indium nitride semiconductor will thus pave the way for the development of next-generation high-speed electronics.

  7. III-V nitrides and performance of graphene on copper plasmonic biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Goutam; Sahoo, Bijaya Kumar

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, the influence of iii-v nitrides as well as Ge and Si on the sensitivity and performance of a graphene protected copper plasmonic biosensor has been investigated. These semiconductors have been used between copper (Cu) and graphene layers on a SF 10 glass prism. The sensitivity and performance of the biosensor has been computed for with and without semiconductors. III-V nitrides demonstrated high sensitivity and high figure of merit (FOM) in comparison to Si and Ge due to their superior electronic and optical properties. The enhancement of evanescent electric field due to Si, Ge, AlN, GaN and InN have been computed and found highest enhancement for InN. This happens due to high refractive index of InN than other semiconductors. Analysis shows that for a high sensitive imaging biosensor the required optimal thickness of copper, InN and graphene are respectively 32 nm, 13 nm and 0.34 nm for light of wavelength λ = 633 nm (red Hesbnd Ne laser). This study suggests that InN would be a better choice for fabrication of new imaging plasmonic biosensors for chemical and biological sensing.

  8. Growth mechanism, structure and IR photoluminescence studies of indium nitride nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Z. H.; Wang, W. M.; Sun, C. L.; Shi, S. C.; Hsu, C. W.; Chen, T. T.; Chen, K. H.; Chen, C. C.; Chen, Y. F.; Chen, L. C.

    2004-08-01

    High-quality single crystal indium nitride nanorods were grown on Si substrates by catalytic chemical vapor deposition. Both Raman and high resolution transmission electron microscopic analyses suggested that even a minute amount of oxygen, from the residual oxygen in the growth environment and/or native oxide on the Si, would effectively help the growth of InN nanorods. The In 2O 3 formed on Au nanoparticles helped dissolve nitrogen as a catalyst with the subsequent growth of InN nanorods. Variations in the apparent color and photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the InN nanorods were observed. For the optically brown InN nanorods that exhibited diameters in the range of 30-50 nm, the PL study showed a peak at 1.9 eV, the possible origins of which are discussed. In contrast, for the optically black InN nanorods that exhibited diameters in the range of 50-100 nm, the PL peak at approximately 0.766 eV measured at 20 K was attributed to band edge emission.

  9. Indium nitride: A narrow gap semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, K.M.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.; Lu, H.; Schaff, W.J.

    2002-08-14

    The optical properties of wurtzite InN grown on sapphire substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy have been characterized by optical absorption, photoluminescence, and photomodulated reflectance techniques. All these three characterization techniques show an energy gap for InN between 0.7 and 0.8 eV, much lower than the commonly accepted value of 1.9 eV. The photoluminescence peak energy is found to be sensitive to the free electron concentration of the sample. The peak energy exhibits a very weak hydrostatic pressure dependence and a small, anomalous blueshift with increasing temperature. The bandgap energies of In-rich InGaN alloys were found to be consistent with the narrow gap of InN. The bandgap bowing parameter was determined to be 1.43 eV in InGaN.

  10. Surface-plasmon resonances in indium nitride with metal-enriched nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubina, T. V.; Plotnikov, D. S.; Vasson, A.; Leymarie, J.; Larsson, M.; Holtz, P. O.; Monemar, B.; Lu, Hai; Schaff, W. J.; Kop'ev, P. S.

    2006-03-01

    Plasmonic resonances in In-enriched nano-particles, spontaneously formed during growth, can dramatically modify optical properties of InN. Experimental support for this is provided from detailed studies of absorption and infrared emission in InN. In particular, thermally detected optical absorption and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy reveal a peak below the region of strong absorption in InN. A higher-energy part of the infrared emission having a noticeable p-polarization is markedly enhanced with excitation along the surface. These peculiarities are discussed in terms of the Mie resonances, arising in metallic spheroids with different aspect ratio, and their coupling with recombining states, whose strength depends on energy separation between the states and the resonances.

  11. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-Pressure Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  12. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-pressure Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  13. Pressure dependence of the refractive index in wurtzite and rocksalt indium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Oliva, R.; Yamaguchi, T.; Nanishi, Y.

    2014-12-08

    We have performed high-pressure Fourier transform infrared reflectance measurements on a freestanding InN thin film to determine the refractive index of wurtzite InN and its high-pressure rocksalt phase as a function of hydrostatic pressure. From a fit to the experimental refractive-index curves including the effect of the high-energy optical gaps, phonons, free carriers, and the direct (fundamental) band-gap in the case of wurtzite InN, we obtain pressure coefficients for the low-frequency (electronic) dielectric constant ε{sub ∞}. Negative pressure coefficients of −8.8 × 10{sup −2 }GPa{sup −1} and −14.8 × 10{sup −2 }GPa{sup −1} are obtained for the wurtzite and rocksalt phases, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of the electronic band structure and the compressibility of both phases.

  14. [Development of the database on nonproprietary names of drugs].

    PubMed

    Hashiba, S; Takenaka, Y; Nakadate, M

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the outline of the database of nonproprietary names of drugs and the characteristics of its online search system. The database includes the records of officially authorized names by WHO, International Nonproprietary Names (INN), and those by Japanese Government, Japanese Accepted Names (JAN). The INN file is merged with the JAN file. The online retrieval system is designed to enable search for drugs by generic names adopted on an international level and a national level in both English and Japanese. It is operated with INQ (DBMS) in the NEC ACOS-6 computer. Data from INN are updated once a year, and those from JAN are added whenever the official announcement of newly approved drugs are published in Yakumu-Koho (official pharmaceutical gazette). PMID:2636918

  15. An analytical model of anisotropic low-field electron mobility in wurtzite indium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shulong; Liu, Hongxia; Song, Xin; Guo, Yulong; Yang, Zhaonian

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of anisotropic transport properties and develops an anisotropic low-field electron analytical mobility model for wurtzite indium nitride (InN). For the different effective masses in the Γ-A and Γ-M directions of the lowest valley, both the transient and steady state transport behaviors of wurtzite InN show different transport characteristics in the two directions. From the relationship between velocity and electric field, the difference is more obvious when the electric field is low in the two directions. To make an accurate description of the anisotropic transport properties under low field, for the first time, we present an analytical model of anisotropic low-field electron mobility in wurtzite InN. The effects of different ionized impurity scattering models on the low-field mobility calculated by Monte Carlo method (Conwell-Weisskopf and Brooks-Herring method) are also considered.

  16. Self-annihilation of inversion domains by high energy defects in III-Nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Koukoula, T.; Kioseoglou, J. Kehagias, Th.; Komninou, Ph.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.

    2014-04-07

    Low-defect density InN films were grown on Si(111) by molecular beam epitaxy over an ∼1 μm thick GaN/AlN buffer/nucleation layer. Electron microscopy observations revealed the presence of inverse polarity domains propagating across the GaN layer and terminating at the sharp GaN/InN (0001{sup ¯}) interface, whereas no inversion domains were detected in InN. The systematic annihilation of GaN inversion domains at the GaN/InN interface is explained in terms of indium incorporation on the Ga-terminated inversion domains forming a metal bonded In-Ga bilayer, a structural instability known as the basal inversion domain boundary, during the initial stages of InN growth on GaN.

  17. The Discovery of the Nearest Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, I. S.

    2007-07-01

    Proxima Centauri, the closest star to us after the Sun, is part of a triple system whose other two members constitute the double ? Centauri. In the 1830s, the latter was the subject of the first successful stellar parallax measure ments made in Cape Town by Thomas Henderson. Proxima was found in 1915, at the Union Observatory in Johannesburg by R T A Innes, as a faint star with a high proper motion similar to that of ? Cen. Its parallax was measured independently over the following two years by J G E G Vote at the Cape and by Innes himself, unknown to each other. Innes, on the basis of his rather rough result, declared it to be closer than ? and named it 'Proxima Centauri', but the truth of its proximity was only established rigorously in 1928 by H A Alden, based on observations at the Yale Southern Station in Johannesburg.

  18. Nanobranched porous palladium-tin intermetallics: One-step synthesis and their superior electrocatalysis towards formic acid oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dandan; Si, Ling; Fu, Gengtao; Liu, Chang; Sun, Dongmei; Chen, Yu; Tang, Yawen; Lu, Tianhong

    2015-04-01

    Nanocrystalline intermetallics in bulk with high surface area hold enormous promise as an efficient catalyst for real fuel cell applications due to their unique electrocatalytic properties. In this work, a novel three-dimensional (3D) porous Pd-Sn intermetallics in network nanostructures (Pd-Sn-INNs) has been fabricated at relatively low temperature for the first time by one-step ethylene glycol-assisted hydrothermal reduction method. The structure characteristics of the Pd-Sn-INNs are confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The as-prepared 3D Pd-Sn-INNs exhibit remarkably improved electrocatalytic activity and stability towards formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR) over commercially available Pd black.

  19. Patient Safety in Medication Nomenclature: Orthographic and Semantic Properties of International Nonproprietary Names

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Rachel; Aronson, Jeffrey K.; ten Hacken, Pius; Williams, Alison; Jordan, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Background Confusion between look-alike and sound-alike (LASA) medication names (such as mercaptamine and mercaptopurine) accounts for up to one in four medication errors, threatening patient safety. Error reduction strategies include computerized physician order entry interventions, and ‘Tall Man’ lettering. The purpose of this study is to explore the medication name designation process, to elucidate properties that may prime the risk of confusion. Methods and Findings We analysed the formal and semantic properties of 7,987 International Non-proprietary Names (INNs), in relation to naming guidelines of the World Health Organization (WHO) INN programme, and have identified potential for errors. We explored: their linguistic properties, the underlying taxonomy of stems to indicate pharmacological interrelationships, and similarities between INNs. We used Microsoft Excel for analysis, including calculation of Levenshtein edit distance (LED). Compliance with WHO naming guidelines was inconsistent. Since the 1970s there has been a trend towards compliance in formal properties, such as word length, but longer names published in the 1950s and 1960s are still in use. The stems used to show pharmacological interrelationships are not spelled consistently and the guidelines do not impose an unequivocal order on them, making the meanings of INNs difficult to understand. Pairs of INNs sharing a stem (appropriately or not) often have high levels of similarity (<5 LED), and thus have greater potential for confusion. Conclusions We have revealed a tension between WHO guidelines stipulating use of stems to denote meaning, and the aim of reducing similarities in nomenclature. To mitigate this tension and reduce the risk of confusion, the stem system should be made clear and well ordered, so as to avoid compounding the risk of confusion at the clinical level. The interplay between the different WHO INN naming principles should be further examined, to better understand their

  20. Solar domestic hot water system installed at Texas City, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This is the final technical report of the solar energy system located at LaQuinta Motor Inn, Texas City, Texas. The system was designed to supply 63 percent of the total hot water load for a new 98 unit motor inn. The solar energy system consists of a 2100 square feet Raypack liquid flat plate collector subsystem and a 2500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 3.67 x 10 to the 8th power Btu/year. Abstracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation, and maintenance instructions are included.

  1. Solar domestic hot water system installed at Texas City, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-12-01

    This is the final technical report of the solar energy system located at LaQuinta Motor Inn, Texas City, Texas. The system was designed to supply 63 percent of the total hot water load for a new 98 unit motor inn. The solar energy system consists of a 2100 square feet Raypack liquid flat plate collector subsystem and a 2500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 3.67 x 10 to the 8th power Btu/year. Abstracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation, and maintenance instructions are included.

  2. Near infrared electroluminescence from n-InN/p-NiO/GaN light-emitting diode fabricated by PAMBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Wang, Hui; Zhuang, Shiwei; Wu, Guoguang; Leng, Jiyan; Li, Wancheng; Gao, Fubin; Zhang, Baolin; Du, Guotong

    2016-07-01

    The n-InN/p-NiO/GaN heterojunction was fabricated by using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) combined with radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The device exhibited typical rectification characteristic with a turn-on voltage of ~1.5 V. Under forward bias, a dominant near infrared emission (NIR) peaked around 1565 nm was detected at room temperature. The NIR emission was attributed to the band-edge emission of InN film according to the photoluminescence spectrum of InN layer. Furthermore, the mechanism of the current transport and light emission was tentatively discussed in terms of the band diagrams of the heterojunction.

  3. A Five Year Summary of the NSF PAARE Project at SC State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Donald K.; Brittain, S. D.; Cash, J.; Hartmann, D.; Howell, S. B.; King, J. R.; Leising, M. D.; Mighell, K. J.; Smith, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    We summarize the progress made over five years of “A Partnership in Observational and Computational Astronomy (POCA)”. This NSF-funded project is part of the “Partnerships in Astronomy and Astrophysics Research and Education (PAARE)" program. Our partnership includes South Carolina State University (a Historically Black College/University), Clemson University (a Ph.D. granting institution) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. Graduate fellowships provided by POCA as well as recruitment efforts on the national level have resulted in enrolling a total of four underrepresented minorities into the Ph.D. program in astronomy at Clemson. One of these has completed her M.S. in astronomy, while the others continue on toward the doctorate. We summarize the success and challenges of recruiting students into the undergraduate physics major with astronomy option at SC State and the support POCA has provided for nearly two dozen of them. Our summer REU program under POCA includes underrepresented students from across the country conducting research at each of our three institutions. Their work can be found elsewhere at this conference (Hernandez et al., Kurgatt et al. and Pugh et al.) Examples are given of our inquiry-based, laboratory exercises and web- based activities related to cosmology that have been developed with PAARE funding. We discuss our ground-based photometric and spectroscopic study of RV Tauri and Semiregular variables as well as our successful Kepler Cycle 2 and Cycle 4 study of a dozen of these objects . Support for the POCA project is provided by the NSF PAARE program to South Carolina State University under award AST-0750814 as well as resources and support provided by Clemson University and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. Support for the Kepler observations is provided by NASA to South Carolina State University under award NNX11AB82G. Additional details can be found at: http://physics.scsu.edu/paare/

  4. Year 4 Of The NSF-funded PAARE Project At SC State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Donald K.; Brittain, S. D.; Cash, J. L.; Hartmann, D. H.; Howell, S. B.; King, J. R.; Leising, M. D.; Mayo, E. A.; Mighell, K. J.; Smith, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    We summarize the progress made through Year 4 of "A Partnership in Observational and Computational Astronomy (POCA)". This NSF-funded project is part of the "Partnerships in Astronomy and Astrophysics Research and Education (PAARE)" program. Our partnership includes South Carolina State University (a Historically Black College/University), Clemson University (a Ph.D. granting institution) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. Fellowships provided by POCA as well as recruitment efforts on the national level have resulted in enrolling a total of four underrepresented minorities into the Ph.D. program in astronomy at Clemson. We report on the success and challenges to recruiting students into the undergraduate physics major with astronomy option at SC State. Our summer REU program under POCA includes underrepresented students from across the country conducting research at each of our three institutions. Examples are given of our inquiry-based, laboratory exercises and web- based activities related to cosmology that have been developed with PAARE funding. We discuss our ground-based photometric and spectroscopic study of RV Tauri and Semi-Regular variables which has been expanded to include successful Cycle 2 Kepler observations of a dozen of these objects reported elsewhere at this conference (see D.K. Walter, et.al.). Support for the POCA project is provided by the NSF PAARE program to South Carolina State University under award AST-0750814 as well as resources and support provided by Clemson University and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. Support for the Kepler observations is provided by NASA to South Carolina State University under award NNX11AB82G.

  5. South Carolina DOE/EPSCoR energy-related graduate research traineeships. Final report and progress performance report, January 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Odom, J.D.; Little, T.S.

    1996-04-01

    The South Carolina DOE/EPSCoR Graduate Traineeship Program is currently supporting 20 graduate students through Clemson University, the Medical University of South Carolina, and the University of South Carolina. Research areas include lithium batteries, analytical chemistry, supercritical fluid extraction, multiphase flow remediation, estrogenic contaminants, robotic inspection systems, transuranics and beta emitters, organic waste disposal, fiber optic sensors, sediment computer modeling, groundwater geochemistry, effect of CO{sub 2} on plant/insect interactions, molecular structure of organophosphorus compounds, environmental geology, bioremediation, and stratigraphic modeling. Short summaries are given for each project.

  6. Charge Exchange with Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Jeremy; Ferri, Kevin; Schmitt, Jaclyn; Hanson, Joshua; Marler, Joan

    2016-05-01

    A detailed study of the physics of highly charged ions (HCIs) is critical for a deep understanding of observed phenomena resulting from interactions of HCIs with neutral atoms in astrophysical and fusion environments. Specifically the charge transfer rates and spectroscopy of the subsequent decay fluorescence are of great interest to these communities. Results from a laboratory based investigation of these rates will be presented. The experiment takes advantage of an energy and charge state selected beam of HCIs from the recently on-line Clemson University EBIT (CUEBIT). Progress towards an experimental apparatus for retrapping HCIs towards precision spectroscopy of HCIs will also be presented.

  7. FIBER-TEX 1991: The Fifth Conference on Advanced Engineering Fibers and Textile Structures for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at a joint NASA/North Carolina State University/DoD/Clemson University/Drexel University conference on Fibers, Textile Technology, and Composites Structures held at the College of Textiles Building on Centennial Campus of North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina on October 15-17, 1991. Conference papers presented information on advanced engineering fibers, textile processes and structures, structural fabric production, mechanics and characteristics of woven composites, pultruded composites, and the latest requirements for the use of textiles in the production of composite materials and structures.

  8. The changing face of public education: the process of "revisioning" elementary teacher preparation programs.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Smith, Deborah; Warner, Margaret; Padilla, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Three years ago the elementary education department at Clemson University recognized the need for curricular change in the way we prepare teachers. The current program was not reflective of the changing demographics of multilingual and multicultural students in the public/ private school population. The challenge from the university provost was to create an enhanced elementary curriculum that would be unique in training students to meet these new demands. The purpose of this article is to share the revisioning process that led to redesigning the teacher preparation program. Promoting positive conversations about the richness of viewing diversity through a new lens will provide deeper insights into these issues. PMID:25306841

  9. 2009 Analysis Platform Review Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, John

    2009-12-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Analysis platform review meeting, held on February 18, 2009, at the Marriott Residence Inn, National Harbor, Maryland.

  10. 37. DINING ROOM FROM BALCONY. THE DINING ROOM ROOF IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. DINING ROOM FROM BALCONY. THE DINING ROOM ROOF IS SUPPORTED BY A SCISSOR TRUSS SYSTEM REINFORCED WITH TURNBUCKLE IRON RODS AND GUSSET PLATES (NOTE: THIS SYSTEM DIFFERS FROM THE LOBBY). - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  11. Highly Accurate Antibody Assays for Early and Rapid Detection of Tuberculosis in African and Asian Elephants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB) in elephants is a re-emerging zoonotic disease caused primarily by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Current methods for screening and diagnosis rely on trunk wash culture, which has serious limitations due to low test sensitivity, slow turn-around time, and variable sample quality. Inn...

  12. Guiding Users to Unmediated Interlibrary Loan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Carolyn; Ressel, Margret J.; Silva, Erin S.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a practitioner's guide to marketing user-initiated borrowing at the point of need. By reviewing interlibrary loan book requests and manually transferring them to an INN-Reach consortial system, Link+, the University of Nevada, Reno Libraries were able to successfully market the service, deliver materials faster, and save…

  13. Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education. Proceedings of the Annual Conference (11th, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, May 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Maurice, Ed.; Bedard, Rene, Ed.

    Among 8 French and 54 English papers in this report are the following: "Marks on Paper" (Andruske); "A Multifaceted Approach to Program Evaluation" (Barabash-Pope et al.); "Marine Incidents and their Prevention through Education" (Boshier); "Exploring Needs of Adult Students in Postsecondary Institutions" (Bradley, Cleveland-Innes); "Emancipation…

  14. The River Talks: An Ecocritical "Korero" about Ecological Performance, Community Activism and "Slow Violence"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthewman, Sasha; Mullen, Molly; Patuwai, Tamati

    2015-01-01

    On 27 February 2013, Mad Ave staged "The River Talks," a collation of linked performances in and on the banks of the Omaru River in Glen Innes, Auckland, New Zealand. The event brought together artistic and discursive works that challenged a view of this local river as always and forever degraded. An example of committed ecological…

  15. Interpreting Letters and Reading Script: Evidence for Female Education and Literacy in Tudor England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daybell, James

    2005-01-01

    Attempts to write the history of female education are hampered by the relative informality of teaching provision for women in early modern England. Since most women were excluded from male centres of learning--the grammar schools, universities and Inns of Court--historians are deprived of institutional records, which so well elucidate the…

  16. 12. Oblique view northeast of south elevation at southwest corner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Oblique view northeast of south elevation at southwest corner of building. Door at center accesses storage area. Pedimented 'niche' at left center holds mosaic shown in HABS-CA-2611-B-14. Scale visible at left edge of open door. - Deetjen's Big Sur Inn, Hayloft Building, East Side of State Highway 1, Big Sur, Monterey County, CA

  17. Back to the Future: The Brownstone and FutureLink After-School Programs for Homeless Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homes for the Homeless, Inc., New York, NY.

    Homes for the Homeless initiated a family and community approach to learning at its American Family Inns (homeless shelters) via a customized, shelter-based, accelerated after-school program, Brownstone/FutureLink. The program helps improve students' grades, self-confidence, and academic potential. It requires parents, shelter staff, and public…

  18. 75 FR 28592 - Notice of Public Scoping Meetings for the Missouri River Authorized Purposes Study, Missouri...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... Rd., Billings, MT 59101. 29. Thursday, Aug. 19: Thermopolis, Wyoming, Days Inn Thermopolis Hot..., 225 North Roberts, Helena, MT 59620-1201. 10. Wednesday, August 18: Billings, Montana State University Billings, 1500 University Drive, Billings, MT 57101. 11. Thursday, August 19: Central Wyoming College,...

  19. 77 FR 13338 - Tribal Consultation Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... Avenue Phoenix, AZ 85021; Tuesday, April 3, 2012--Billings, Montana--Holiday Inn Grand Montana 5500 Midland Road, Billings, MT 59101. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Camille Loya, Acting Regional Program..., Arizona, and Billings, Montana, are being held in conjunction with the HHS 2012 Regional...

  20. 76 FR 41808 - Regional Tribal Consultations on Implementation of Indian Land Consolidation Program Under Cobell...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ........ Holiday Inn Grand Montana Hotel & Convention Center 5500 Midland Road Billings, MT 59101, (406) 248-7701... Settlement. The initial regional consultation meeting in Billings, Montana, was announced by a previous... consultation meeting will take place on Friday, July 15, 2011, in Billings, Montana. Additional...

  1. 76 FR 46217 - Implementation of the Amendments to the International Convention on Standards of Training...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ..., 1201 NW Le Jeune Road, Building A, Miami, FL 33126. Wednesday, August 24, 2011, Hilton Garden Inn Hotel..., Seattle, WA 98121. Wednesday, September 7, 2011 at United States Coast Guard Headquarters Building, Room... photo identification (for example, a driver's license) will be required for entrance to the...

  2. 2012 BATTERIES GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, MARCH 4-9, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Harris

    2012-03-09

    The Gordon Research Conference on BATTERIES was held at Four Points Sheraton / Holiday Inn Express, Ventura, California, March 4-9, 2012. The Conference was well-attended with 176 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

  3. 76 FR 11762 - Schedules for Atlantic Shark Identification Workshops and Protected Species Safe Handling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... each business listed under the shark dealer permit which first receives Atlantic sharks (71 FR 58057... permit (71 FR 58057; October 2, 2006). These certificate(s) are valid for 3 years. As such, vessel owners... Orange, FL 32127. 3. May 5, 2011, 12 p.m.-4 p.m., Comfort Inn, 4 Fisher Street, Foxborough, MA 02035....

  4. 75 FR 2467 - Hours of Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... Act Statement for the FDMS published in the Federal Register on January 17, 2008 (73 FR 3316), or you... (75 FR 285). FMCSA announces a fourth public listening session to solicit written and/or oral comments...: The January 28 meeting will be held in Davenport, Iowa, at the Comfort Inn Hotel and Suites,...

  5. The Great Libraries of Dublin: A Scholar's Delight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chepesiuk, Ronald

    1983-01-01

    Provides descriptions of prominent libraries in Dublin, Ireland, including Trinity College Library, National Library of Ireland, Chester Beatty Library, Marsh's Library (first public library), Kings Inn Law School Library, Steevens Hospital Library, Royal Irish Academy Library, Royal Dublin Society Library, religious libraries (Franciscan,,…

  6. Fulfilling Dreams: Transitions into an ECE Online Preservice Teacher Education Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Pauline

    2009-01-01

    There is increased attention on the first year experience at universities generally as a result of the Australian federal government's focus on increased accountability for universities and widening participation in further education (DEST, 2003; Jardine & Krause, 2005; Kift, 2005; Krause, Hartley, James & McInnes, 2005). However, these studies do…

  7. Gay Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, David

    2009-01-01

    The oldest of the baby boomers (boomers) were age 63 in 2009 and on the verge of retirement. This cohort has had a history of making societal changes throughout its life cycle, and it is unlikely that retirement, as we know it, will remain unscathed. This article highlights two events--the Stonewall Inn riots and two prominent professional…

  8. 75 FR 33629 - Developing Guidance on Naming, Labeling, and Packaging Practices to Reduce Medication Errors...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... day. ADDRESSES: The public workshop will be held at the Holiday Inn College Park, 10000 Baltimore Ave., College Park, MD 20740. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Colleen O'Malley, Center for Drug Evaluation...

  9. Columbine Author Speaks at Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Andrea J.

    2004-01-01

    Brooks Brown, the author of No Easy Answers: The Truth Behind Death at Columbine High School, spoke at the 11th annual Reclaiming Youth International No Disposable Kids conference at Rushmore Plaza Holiday Inn. Brown, who worked with Michael Moore on his Academy Award winning documentary, "Bowling for Columbine," said the letters he received from…

  10. 76 FR 40717 - Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    .... Hughesville Volunteer Fire Company, Social Hall, 10 South Railroad Street, Hughesville, PA 07456. Tuesday...), Bartonsville, PA 18321. Wednesday, July 20, 2011, 6 p.m. Holiday Inn Select, Regina Room, 111 EDT. West Main... gas to be moved through the system. ] Palmerton Loop--Installation of 3.2 miles of...

  11. 76 FR 52596 - Proposed Establishment of Class C Airspace for Long Beach, CA; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Establishment of Class C Airspace for Long Beach... airspace users and others, concerning a proposal to establish Class C airspace at Long Beach, CA. The... on or before December 12, 2011. ADDRESSES: The meetings will be held at the Holiday Inn Long...

  12. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, August, 1971 SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, August, 1971 SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATIONS OF CORNER OF UNITED STATES HOTEL (FAR LEFT), JUDGE AND NUNAN'S SADDLERY, P.J. RYAN'S FIRST BRICK STORE BUILDING (JACKSONVILLE INN). - P. J. Ryan's First Brick Store Building, 175 East California Street, Jacksonville, Jackson County, OR

  13. NIH Clinical Center: There’s No Other Hospital Like It | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... research to test a new drug, device, or intervention. There are many programs in place to ease the clinical research process for both patients and their families. Pediatric patients and their families stay at The Children’s Inn, a 24-hours-a-day, seven-days- ...

  14. Connect the Book. The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    The famous poem "The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (originally included in "Tales of a Wayside Inn" as "The Landlord's Tale") has been illustrated by a number of children's book artists over the years. One particular version of note was graved and painted by Christopher Bing and published by Handprint Books in 2001.…

  15. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, August, 1979 SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, August, 1979 SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATIONS OF CORNER OF UNITED STATES HOTEL (FAR LEFT), JUDGE AND NUNAN'S SADDLERY, P.J. RYAN'S FIRST BRICK STORE BUILDING (JACKSONVILLE INN). - Judge & Nunan's Saddlery, 165 East California Street, Jacksonville, Jackson County, OR

  16. 76 FR 18540 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico (known locally as the Northern New Mexico Citizens....m.-4 p.m. ADDRESSES: Holiday Inn Express and Suites, 60 Entrada Drive, Los Alamos, New Mexico...

  17. Technology in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speidel, Gisela E., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue contains 20 articles dealing with technology in the classroom. The articles are: (1) "Distance Learning and the Future of Kamehameha Schools Bishop Estate" (Henry E. Meyer); (2) "Technology and Multiple Intelligences" (Bette Savini); (3) "Technology Brings Voyagers into Classrooms" (Kristina Inn and others); (4) "Technologies Old…

  18. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. Baldwin, Photographers, April, 1960 STAIR DETAIL, SECOND FLOOR LEVEL (INSPECTION OF STAIR REVEALS PRESENCE OF A STRING OPPOSITE BANNISTER ORIGINALLY). - King of Prussia Inn, U.S. Route 202 (Upper Merion Township), King of Prussia, Montgomery County, PA

  19. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. Baldwin, Photographers, April, 1960 CLOSE-UP DETAIL OF CORNER FIREPLACE. - King of Prussia Inn, U.S. Route 202 (Upper Merion Township), King of Prussia, Montgomery County, PA

  20. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. Baldwin, Photographers, April, 1960 SOUTHWEST ROOM SHOWING ORIGINAL CORNER FIREPLACE, OPENING BEHIND BAR. - King of Prussia Inn, U.S. Route 202 (Upper Merion Township), King of Prussia, Montgomery County, PA

  1. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. Baldwin, Photographers, April, 1960 CLOSE-UP OF SMALL FRONT FIREPLACE, SOUTHWEST ROOM. - King of Prussia Inn, U.S. Route 202 (Upper Merion Township), King of Prussia, Montgomery County, PA

  2. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. Baldwin, Photographers, April, 1960 REEDING DETAIL OF MANTEL IN NORTHEAST PARLOR. - King of Prussia Inn, U.S. Route 202 (Upper Merion Township), King of Prussia, Montgomery County, PA

  3. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. Baldwin, Photographers, April, 1960 NORTHWEST ROOM SHOWING COOK FIREPLACE, ORIGINAL MANTEL, CRANE AND OPENING FOR BAKE OVEN. - King of Prussia Inn, U.S. Route 202 (Upper Merion Township), King of Prussia, Montgomery County, PA

  4. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Pierre LeBoutillier and Trusten M. Baldwin, Photographers, April, 1960 INTERIOR DETAIL, NORTHEAST AND SOUTHEAST PARLORS, ORIGINAL MANTEL (LEFT - RADIATOR COVERED). - King of Prussia Inn, U.S. Route 202 (Upper Merion Township), King of Prussia, Montgomery County, PA

  5. 7. Oblique view southeast of north end of building. Scale ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Oblique view southeast of north end of building. Scale visible adjacent to door at lower right. Compare to HABS-CA-2611-B-4. - Deetjen's Big Sur Inn, Hayloft Building, East Side of State Highway 1, Big Sur, Monterey County, CA

  6. Novel compound semiconductor devices based on III-V nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Ren, F.

    1995-10-01

    New developments in dry and wet etching, ohmic contacts and epitaxial growth of Ill-V nitrides are reported. These make possible devices such as microdisk laser structures and GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors with improved InN ohmic contacts.

  7. 76 FR 8351 - Meeting of the Defense Department Advisory Committee on Women in the Services (DACOWITS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... availability of space. DATES: March 4, 2011, from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. ADDRESSES: Residence Inn Marriott, 550 Army Navy Dr, Arlington, VA 22202. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: MSgt Robert Bowling, USAF, or DACOWITS, 4000 Defense Pentagon, Room 2C548A, Washington, DC 20301- 4000, E-mail:...

  8. 76 FR 24463 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA406 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public... held on May 24-25, 2011. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Hampton Inn Hotel, 6530 Isla...

  9. 78 FR 43860 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Scoping Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... plans (Spiny Lobster, Reef Fish, Coral and Queen Conch). The goal is to create management plans tailored... federal waters. Dates and Addresses: Due to the tropical storm Chantel the scoping meetings in these..., Mayag ez 00680, Puerto Rico. August 6, 2013--7 p.m.-10 p.m.--at the Holiday Inn Ponce & Tropical...

  10. 25. LOBBY FIREPLACE. NOTE THE GEYSER DECORATING THE FIREPLACE SCREEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. LOBBY FIREPLACE. NOTE THE GEYSER DECORATING THE FIREPLACE SCREEN AND THE WEIGHTS AND PENDULUM HANGING FROM THE CLOCK DESIGNED BY ARCHITECT ROBERT C. REAMER. - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  11. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ananda M. Chakrabarty

    2009-06-18

    This is the front matter for the 7th Biennial Symposium, International Society for Environmental Biotechnology, held at the Holiday Inn Chicago Mart Plaza, Chicago, Illinois on the dates of June 18-21, 2004. It contains a list of the symposium organizers, acknowledgements and the symposium overview.

  12. Another Look at the Wine Butler

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWeerd, Alan J.

    2007-01-01

    In a recent article, Iain MacInnes analyzed the static equilibrium of a system consisting of a wine bottle and a wine butler. After discussing that composite system, students can be asked to consider only the bottle (and its contents) as the system. An interesting challenge for them is to describe the forces on the bottle in static equilibrium.

  13. The Fashion Police: Never out of Fashion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Dudley

    2004-01-01

    Some readers will recall Newhart, Bob Newhart's television series from 1982 to 1990. In it, he played Dick Ludon, a New Yorker who moved to Vermont with his wife to run an inn. Stephanie Vanderkellen, a snotty, rich, young woman, worked there as a maid to appease her parents. Her boyfriend, Michael, was not rich but was as snobbish as she was.…

  14. 5. View to east of west elevation. Second story deck ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View to east of west elevation. Second story deck at right opens off 'Fireside' guest room; Helmuth Deetjen hand-carved the balusters. Scale just visible against first story wall at lower right. - Deetjen's Big Sur Inn, Hayloft Building, East Side of State Highway 1, Big Sur, Monterey County, CA

  15. The New Poverty: Homeless Families in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunez, Ralph da Costa

    This book discusses homeless families in the United States and advocates the efforts of residential educational and employment training centers--American Family Inns--which provide comprehensive services education, job training, and parenting and life skills to address the poverty-related conditions that contribute to homelessness. Chapters of the…

  16. View northeast of southwest end at south corner of building. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View northeast of southwest end at south corner of building. Castro Creek Canyon drops off sharply at right of picture, precluding photography of southeast side of building (see HABS-CA-2611-4 for reference.) - Deetjen's Big Sur Inn, Antique Building, East Side of State Highway 1, Big Sur, Monterey County, CA

  17. 7. View southwest of 'Chalet' room from doorway. Windows beyond ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View southwest of 'Chalet' room from doorway. Windows beyond bed are in southwest end of building, while those at left overlook Castro Creek Canyon. Scale visible against door frame near head of bed. - Deetjen's Big Sur Inn, Champagne Building, East Side of State Highway 1, Big Sur, Monterey County, CA

  18. 27. LOBBY, LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SECOND FLOOR. THE STRUCTURE IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. LOBBY, LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SECOND FLOOR. THE STRUCTURE IN UPPER LEFT HAND SIDE OF PHOTOGRAPH, A MUSICIANS' PLATFORM CALLED 'THE CROW'S NEST' WAS BUILT IN THE GABLE. - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  19. "Building the Natural Society of the Future": The Peckham Experiment (1943) as an Anarchist Account of Childhood and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charkin, Emily

    2014-01-01

    "The Peckham Experiment" (Innes H. Pearse and Lucy H. Crocker, Edinburgh: Scottish Academic Press, 1985) is a book about the Peckham Health Centre (1935-1950), which was a scientific experiment and community centre set up to identify and foster conditions of good health for local working-class families in South London. The book was…

  20. 2009 Infrastructure Platform Review Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, John

    2009-12-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the U.S. Department of Energy Biomass program‘s Infrastructure platform review meeting, held on February 19, 2009, at the Marriott Residence Inn, National Harbor, Maryland.

  1. 78 FR 46578 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Scoping Meetings Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The original notice published in the Federal Register on July 22, 2013 (78 FR 43860....-10 p.m.--Mayaguez Resort & Casino, Route 104, Km 0.3, Mayag ez 00680, Puerto Rico August 6, 2013--7 p.m.-10 p.m.--at the Holiday Inn Ponce & Tropical Casino, 3315 Ponce By Pass, Ponce, Puerto Rico....

  2. 77 FR 76011 - Defense Legal Policy Board; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... of the Secretary Defense Legal Policy Board; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY... committee meeting of the Defense Legal Policy Board. ADDRESSES: Holiday Inn Ballston, 4610 N. Fairfax Drive, Arlington, Virginia 22203. DATES: A meeting of the Defense Legal Policy Board (hereafter referred to...

  3. Possibilities and Potential Barriers: Learning to Plan for Differentiated Instruction in Elementary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Ruthanne; Tippett, Christine D.

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that differentiated practices enhance the likelihood of meeting the needs of students who find literacy learning challenging (Tobin & McInnes, 2008; Tomlinson, 2003). The aim of the professional development project described here was to leverage these findings and to build the foundation for future research exploring if…

  4. Diverse Pathways in Children's Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Beverley

    1996-01-01

    Used a Partially Ordered Scaling of Items method to analyze block construction play in a replication of Innes and King-Shaw's 1985 study. Found several developmental pathways for block play, illustrating the web-like nature of conceptual development. Results suggest a contextual developmental approach to better acknowledge individual diversity in…

  5. 75 FR 81642 - Long-Term North to South Water Transfer Program, Sacramento County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ..., Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and the San Luis & Delta-Mendota Water Authority propose to prepare a... water agencies south of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) and in the San Francisco Bay Area. The.... Sacramento at the Best Western Expo Inn & Suites, 1413 Howe Avenue. Los Banos at the San Luis &...

  6. Calling All Golfers | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Teams are forming for the third annual R&W Club Frederick Golf Tournament on Sept. 14. Last year’s tournament hosted more than 40 players and raised nearly $1,000 for the NIH Children’s Inn, Bethesda, Md.  The tournament will be held at Maryland National Golf Club in Middletown, Md. 

  7. 78 FR 16260 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ...-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site (78 FR 14088). This document makes a correction to that notice... Federal Register of March 4, 2013, in FR Doc. 2013-04875, on page 14088, please make the following... address is Hilton Garden Inn, 1065 Stevens Creek Road, Augusta, GA 30907. The reason for this change...

  8. Optical, structural, and transport properties of indium nitride, indium gallium nitride alloys grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Neelam

    InGaN based, blue and green light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been successfully produced over the past decade. But the progress of these LEDs is often limited by the fundamental problems of InGaN such as differences in lattice constants, thermal expansion coefficients and physical properties between InN and GaN. This difficulty could be addressed by studying pure InN and InxGa 1-xN alloys. In this context Ga-rich InxGa1-xN (x ≤ 0.4) epilayers were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements showed InxGa1-xN films with x= 0.37 had single phase. Phase separation occurred for x ˜ 0.4. To understand the issue of phase separation in Ga-rich InxGa 1-xN, studies on growth of pure InN and In-rich InxGa 1-xN alloys were carried out. InN and In-rich InxGa1-xN (x ˜ 0.97-0.40) epilayers were grown on AlN/Al2O3 templates. A Hall mobility of 1400 cm2/Vs with a carrier concentration of 7x1018cm -3 was observed for InN epilayers grown on AlN templates. Photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra revealed a band to band emission peak at ˜0.75 eV for InN. This peak shifted to 1.15 eV when In content was varied from 1.0 to 0.63 in In-rich InxGa1-xN epilayers. After growth parameter optimization of In-rich InxGa1-xN alloys with (x = 0.97-0.40) were successfully grown without phase separation. Effects of Mg doping on the PL properties of InN epilayers grown on GaN/Al 2O3 templates were investigated. An emission line at ˜ 0.76 eV, which was absent in undoped InN epilayers and was about 60 meV below the band edge emission peak at ˜ 0.82 eV, was observed to be the dominant emission in Mg-doped InN epilayers. PL peak position and the temperature dependent emission intensity corroborated each other and suggested that Mg acceptor level in InN is about 60 meV above the valance band maximum. Strain effects on the emission properties of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) were studied using a single blue LED wafer possessing a continuous

  9. Development of a Computational Chemical Vapor Deposition Model: Applications to Indium Nitride and Dicyanovinylaniline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    A computational chemical vapor deposition (CVD) model is presented, that couples chemical reaction mechanisms with fluid dynamic simulations for vapor deposition experiments. The chemical properties of the systems under investigation are evaluated using quantum, molecular and statistical mechanics models. The fluid dynamic computations are performed using the CFD-ACE program, which can simulate multispecies transport, heat and mass transfer, gas phase chemistry, chemistry of adsorbed species, pulsed reactant flow and variable gravity conditions. Two experimental setups are being studied, in order to fabricate films of: (a) indium nitride (InN) from the gas or surface phase reaction of trimethylindium and ammonia; and (b) 4-(1,1)dicyanovinyl-dimethylaminoaniline (DCVA) by vapor deposition. Modeling of these setups requires knowledge of three groups of properties: thermodynamic properties (heat capacity), transport properties (diffusion, viscosity, and thermal conductivity), and kinetic properties (rate constants for all possible elementary chemical reactions). These properties are evaluated using computational methods whenever experimental data is not available for the species or for the elementary reactions. The chemical vapor deposition model is applied to InN and DCVA. Several possible InN mechanisms are proposed and analyzed. The CVD model simulations of InN show that the deposition rate of InN is more efficient when pulsing chemistry is used under conditions of high pressure and microgravity. An analysis of the chemical properties of DCVA show that DCVA dimers may form under certain conditions of physical vapor transport. CVD simulations of the DCVA system suggest that deposition of the DCVA dimer may play a small role in the film and crystal growth processes.

  10. Biosecurity and Vector Behaviour: Evaluating the Potential Threat Posed by Anglers and Canoeists as Pathways for the Spread of Invasive Non-Native Species and Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Lucy G.; White, Piran C. L.; Stebbing, Paul D.; Stentiford, Grant D.; Dunn, Alison M.

    2014-01-01

    Invasive non-native species (INNS) endanger native biodiversity and are a major economic problem. The management of pathways to prevent their introduction and establishment is a key target in the Convention on Biological Diversity's Aichi biodiversity targets for 2020. Freshwater environments are particularly susceptible to invasions as they are exposed to multiple introduction pathways, including non-native fish stocking and the release of boat ballast water. Since many freshwater INNS and aquatic pathogens can survive for several days in damp environments, there is potential for transport between water catchments on the equipment used by recreational anglers and canoeists. To quantify this biosecurity risk, we conducted an online questionnaire with 960 anglers and 599 canoeists to investigate their locations of activity, equipment used, and how frequently equipment was cleaned and/or dried after use. Anglers were also asked about their use and disposal of live bait. Our results indicate that 64% of anglers and 78.5% of canoeists use their equipment/boat in more than one catchment within a fortnight, the survival time of many of the INNS and pathogens considered in this study and that 12% of anglers and 50% of canoeists do so without either cleaning or drying their kit between uses. Furthermore, 8% of anglers and 28% of canoeists had used their equipment overseas without cleaning or drying it after each use which could facilitate both the introduction and secondary spread of INNS in the UK. Our results provide a baseline against which to evaluate the effectiveness of future biosecurity awareness campaigns, and identify groups to target with biosecurity awareness information. Our results also indicate that the biosecurity practices of these groups must improve to reduce the likelihood of inadvertently spreading INNS and pathogens through these activities. PMID:24717714

  11. Can Thin-lipped Mullet Directly Exploit the Primary and Detritic Production of European Macrotidal Salt Marshes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laffaille, P.; Feunteun, E.; Lefebvre, C.; Radureau, A.; Sagan, G.; Lefeuvre, J.-C.

    2002-04-01

    Juveniles and adults (>100 mm) of Liza ramada colonize macrotidal salt marsh creeks of Mont Saint-Michel bay (France) between March and November, during spring tide floods (43% of the tides) and return to coastal waters during the ebb. This fish species actively feeds during its short stay in the creek (from 1 to 2 h). On average, each fish swallows sediment including living and inert organic matter, which amounts to 8% of its fresh body weight. Their diet is dominated by small benthic items (especially diatoms and salt marsh plant detritus), that correspond to the primary and detritic production of this macrotidal salt marsh creek. Despite very short submersion periods, mullets filter and ingest large quantities of sediment and concentrated organic matter (on average organic matter in stomach content is 31%) produced by these coastal wetlands. European salt marshes are thus shown to act as trophic areas for mullets, which are well adapted to this constraining habitat which is only flooded for short periods during spring tides.

  12. Comparative analysis of the food webs of two intertidal mudflats during two seasons using inverse modelling: Aiguillon Cove and Brouage Mudflat, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degré, Delphine; Leguerrier, Delphine; Armynot du Chatelet, Eric; Rzeznik, Jadwiga; Auguet, Jean-Christophe; Dupuy, Christine; Marquis, Elise; Fichet, Denis; Struski, Caroline; Joyeux, Emmanuel; Sauriau, Pierre-Guy; Niquil, Nathalie

    2006-08-01

    Inverse analysis was used to model the food webs of two intertidal mudflat ecosystems: Aiguillon Cove (AC) and Brouage Mudflat (BM) (south-western Atlantic coast, France). The aim of the present study is to describe and compare the functioning of these two ecosystems. The method of inverse analysis has been adapted in order to take into account, in a single calculation, two seasons: spring/summer (mid-March to mid-October) and autumn/winter (the rest of the year). Gathering all available data on the two sites, the most important gaps in knowledge were identified with the help of sensitivity analyses: they concerned mainly the exports of material by grazing fish (such as mullet Liza ramada), resuspension of microphytobenthos, and fluxes linked to microfauna which is poorly known for the two systems. The two sites presented the same overall type of functioning (net import of detritus, export of living organic material and higher faunal activity during spring/summer). In both ecosystems, primary production was dominated by the microphytobenthic production, of which a great part was exported via water-column advection and biotic vectors (grazing fish), while many secondary producers also used detritus as a food resource. Each system also had its own characteristics, one BM being much more seasonally driven than the other AC. It appeared essential to take the seasons into account, as variations in microphytobenthos production and in meiofauna, macrofauna and biotic vectors led to great differences in the food-web organisation.

  13. Long-term changes of fisheries landings in enclosed gulf lagoons (Amvrakikos gulf, W Greece): Influences of fishing and other human impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katselis, George N.; Moutopoulos, Dimitrios K.; Dimitriou, Evagelos N.; Koutsikopoulos, Constantin

    2013-10-01

    The present study analyses long-term annual fishery landings time series (1980-2007) for species derived from six lagoons (covering about 70 km2) around an important European wetland, the fjord-like Amvrakikos gulf. Landing trends for most abundant species revealed that typical lagoon fish species-groups, such as Mugilidae (Mugil cephalus, Chelon labrosus, Liza saliens, Liza aurata and Liza ramada), eels (Anguilla anguilla) and Gobies (mainly Zosteriosessor ophiocephalus) had largely decreased, while the landings of Sparus aurata increased during the entire study period. These trends led to a significant change in species composition during recent years that might be attributed to large-scale climatic changes as well as serious anthropogenic impacts that degraded the water quality and altered the hydrology within the gulf and lagoons, the increase of fishing exploitation in Amvrakikos gulf, the expansion of aquaculture activities within the gulf, the application of new fishing management practices in lagoons, and the increase of fish-eating sea-bird populations. The findings are needed for the implementation of an efficient and integrated management tool for the study of coastal systems.

  14. Isotopes reveal fluctuation in trophic levels of estuarine organisms, in space and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinagre, C.; Salgado, J. P.; Mendonça, V.; Cabral, H.; Costa, M. J.

    2012-08-01

    The estimation of the trophic level (TL) occupied by organisms in estuarine food webs, based on isotopic analysis, is generally done only for one season or averaged among seasons and sites. This does not allow the observation of possible alterations of TL in time and space. As estuaries are highly dynamic environments, it is plausible that the TLs of many of its organisms are not static, like usually portrayed in food web diagrams, but fluctuate in space and time. The TLs of marine juvenile fish, resident fish, shrimp, polychaetes, bivalves and amphipods were determined isotopically, in the Tagus estuary. Sampling was carried out in two nursery areas at each season. Significant changes in TL were observed, in space and time, for the vast majority of the organisms. A drop in TL in summer was observed for various species. The high availability of microalgae and macroalgae in summer may be the cause for this drop, which mainly affects low TL omnivores. These omnivores may opportunistically increase the proportion of primary producers in their diet, thus lowering their mean TL. Such an effect seems to cascade to secondary consumers, like Solea senegalensis and Pomatoschistus microps, which also presented a drop in TL in summer. This study also revealed that organisms that have been considered to be mainly primary consumers, like Liza ramada, and Scrobicularia plana, can actually assume considerably higher TLs seasonally, placing them as secondary consumers.

  15. Sixth national stakeholder workshop summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    On June 17--18, 1998, the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Worker and Community Transition convened its sixth National Stakeholder Workshop at the Ramada Plaza Hotel Old Town in Alexandria, Virginia. Approximately 325 stakeholders attended representing DOE headquarters and field offices, contractors, labor organizations, state and local government, education and community interest groups. The meeting addressed the progress made on the issues and challenges identified at the last stakeholder`s meeting in Oakland, California on April 9--11, 1997. Also discussed were the full range of the Department`s work force issues and creative solutions to the inherent challenges of simultaneously implementing the Department`s post Cold-War mission, work force restructuring guidance, contract reform objectives, asset disposition, performance-based management requirements, and business process improvement policies. The format of the Workshop included several plenary sessions and a number of small group discussion sessions. The small group sessions focused on topics related to labor issues, work force restructuring, work force planning, community transition, and employee concerns. The sessions provided a wide range of views on worker and community transition issues. The plenary sessions of the Workshop included presentations on the following topics: welcome and introductions; opening remarks; building a better labor-management relationship; keynote speech from Secretary of Energy Federico Pena; meeting tomorrow`s challenges (early site closures); harnessing the contracting process to encourage local growth; and, the British experience in economic conversion.

  16. EVALUATION OF REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR PLUTONIUM CONTAMINATED SOIL

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeffner, S. L.; Navratil, J. D.; Torrao, G.; Smalley, R.

    2002-02-25

    Soils contaminated with radionuclides are an environmental concern at most Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Clean up efforts at many of these sites are ongoing using conventional remediation techniques. These remediation techniques are often expensive and may not achieve desired soil volume reduction. Several studies using alternative remediation techniques have been performed on plutonium-contaminated soils from the Nevada Test Site. Results to date exhibit less than encouraging results, but these processes were often not fully optimized, and other approaches are possible. Clemson University and teaming partner Waste Policy Institute, through a cooperative agreement with the National Environmental Technologies Laboratory, are assisting the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in re-evaluating technologies that have the potential of reducing the volume of plutonium contaminated soil. This efforts includes (1) a through literature review and summary of (a) NTS soil characterization and (b) volume reduction treatment technologies applied to plutonium-contaminated NTS soils, (2) an interactive workshop for vendors, representatives from DOE sites and end-users, and (3) bench scale demonstration of applicable vendor technologies at the Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory.

  17. BION web server: predicting non-specifically bound surface ions

    PubMed Central

    Alexov, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Ions are essential component of the cell and frequently are found bound to various macromolecules, in particular to proteins. A binding of an ion to a protein greatly affects protein’s biophysical characteristics and needs to be taken into account in any modeling approach. However, ion’s bounded positions cannot be easily revealed experimentally, especially if they are loosely bound to macromolecular surface. Results: Here, we report a web server, the BION web server, which addresses the demand for tools of predicting surface bound ions, for which specific interactions are not crucial; thus, they are difficult to predict. The BION is easy to use web server that requires only coordinate file to be inputted, and the user is provided with various, but easy to navigate, options. The coordinate file with predicted bound ions is displayed on the output and is available for download. Availability: http://compbio.clemson.edu/bion_server/ Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Contact: ealexov@clemson.edu PMID:23380591

  18. Transportable vitrification system demonstration on mixed waste. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J.R.; Whitehouse, J.C.; Wilson, C.N.; Van Ryn, F.R.

    1998-04-22

    The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) is a large scale, fully integrated, vitrification system for the treatment of low-level and mixed wastes in the form of sludges, soils, incinerator ash, and many other waste streams. It was demonstrated on surrogate waste at Clemson University and at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) prior to treating actual mixed waste. Treatment of a combination of dried B and C Pond sludge and CNF sludge was successfully demonstrated at ORR in 1997. The demonstration produced 7,616 kg of glass from 7,328 kg of mixed wastes with a 60% reduction in volume. Glass formulations for the wastes treated were developed using a combination of laboratory crucible studies with the actual wastes and small melter studies at Clemson with both surrogate and actual wastes. Initial characterization of the B and C Pond sludge had not shown the presence of carbon or fluoride, which required a modified glass formulation be developed to maintain proper glass redox and viscosity. The CNF sludge challenges the glass formulations due to high levels of phosphate and iron. The demonstration was delayed several times by permitting problems, a glass leak, and electrical problems. The demonstration showed that the two wastes could be successfully vitrified, although the design glass production rate was not achieved. The glass produced met the Universal Treatment Standards and the emissions from the TVS were well within the allowable permit limits.

  19. The relationships between weather, mast production, and the breeding ecology of eastern wild turkeys in South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, William, D.

    2003-02-26

    Carlisle, W.D. 2003. The relationship between weather, mast production, and the breeding ecology of eastern wild turkeys. MS Thesis. Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina. 41 pp. From 1998 to 2001, 134 wild turkeys were captured, including 2 recaptures. Hens were fitted with radio transmitters to monitor nesting, brooding and movement activities. Of 37 known nests, including 6 renests, overall nest success was 28%. Causes of nest failure included abandonment, depredation, and fire. Mean clutch size was 11. Mean date of nest initiation was April 9 for first nests and May 14 for renests. Mean annual poult to hen ratios were determined for 1990 to 2000 from a South Carolina Department of Natural Resources roadside survey and ranged from 0.6 to 4.0 poults per hen. Soft mast and hard mast production data were provided by D.J. Levey, Univ. of Florida. Rainfall and temperature data were collected at 12 weather stations on Savannah River Site. Notable correlations were found between hard mast production and jake weight, and June rainfall and poult to hen ratio.

  20. Energy related investment decision analyses for railroads using LOTUS 1-2-3

    SciTech Connect

    Clipp, F.P.; Law, E.H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a project funded by the South Carolina Energy Research and Development Center (SCERDC). The SCERDC wanted to encourage the consideration of energy efficiency in railway management decisions. To facilitate this, a LOTUS 1-2-3 based program called CRIDA (Clemson Rail Investment Decision Analysis) was developed. CRIDA builds on the results of a completed project that yields information on energy consumption of railway vehicles using LOTUS 1-2-3. The project resulted in a LOTUS 1-2-3 based program called CRCEP (Clemson Rail Car Energy Program). CRCEP permits the estimation of energy usage of rail cars due to grades, aerodynamic losses, and energy lost across the wheel-rail interfaces during curving and negotiation of randomly irregular track. CRCEP is both route and car specific. The work reported in this paper expands the usefulness of that already reported by applying investment decision analysis tools that enable us to translate the energy consumption output into language understandable and usable by management decision makers. The tools implemented in CRIDA are not specific to use with CRCEP. Any analysis model or data from real trials can be input to CRIDA for analysis.

  1. Raman scattering and cathodoluminescence characterization of near lattice-matched InxAl1-xN epilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuscó, R.; Pastor, D.; Hernández, S.; Artús, L.; Martínez, O.; Jiménez, J.; Martin, R. W.; O'Donnell, K. P.; Watson, I. M.

    2008-10-01

    We present a Raman scattering and cathodoluminescence study of a set of InxAl1-xN/GaN epilayers with InN fractions around the lattice-matched composition. We observed the A1(LO) and InN-like E2 modes of the alloy, whose frequencies are in good agreement with theoretical predictions, but we were unable to detect the AlN-like E2 mode. The InN-like E2 mode did not exhibit noticeable frequency shifts in the studied samples. This is explained by the presence of residual strain in the pseudomorphic InxAl1-xN films. A luminescence peak that shifts to lower energies with an increasing InN fraction was observed at energies above the band edge of the GaN substrate. The cathodoluminescence peak energy is lower than expected, indicating a large band-gap bowing in these alloy layers.

  2. Auger recombination as the dominant recombination process in indium nitride at low temperatures during steady-state photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Seetoh, I. P.; Soh, C. B.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Chua, S. J.

    2013-03-11

    Auger recombination in InN films grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition was studied by steady-state photoluminescence at different laser excitation powers and sample temperatures. It was dominant over radiative recombination and Shockley-Read-Hall recombination at low temperatures, contributing to the sub-linear relationship between the integrated photoluminescence intensity and laser excitation power. Auger recombination rates increased gradually with temperature with an activation energy of 10-17 meV, in good agreement with values from transient photoluminescence reported in literature. As the Auger recombination rates were independent of material quality, they may form an upper limit to the luminous efficiency of InN.

  3. Decoupling single nanowire mobilities limited by surface scattering and bulk impurity scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Khanal, D. R.; Levander, A. X.; Wu, J.; Yu, K. M.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Walukiewicz, W.; Grandal, J.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E.

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate the isolation of two free carrier scattering mechanisms as a function of radial band bending in InN nanowires via universal mobility analysis, where effective carrier mobility is measured as a function of effective electric field in a nanowire field-effect transistor. Our results show that Coulomb scattering limits effective mobility at most effective fields, while surface roughness scattering only limits mobility under very high internal electric fields. High-energy {alpha} particle irradiation is used to vary the ionized donor concentration, and the observed decrease in mobility and increase in donor concentration are compared to Hall effect results of high-quality InN thin films. Our results show that for nanowires with relatively high doping and large diameters, controlling Coulomb scattering from ionized dopants should be given precedence over surface engineering when seeking to maximize nanowire mobility.

  4. Shared-savings cuts hotel's losses from EMS removal

    SciTech Connect

    Galvin, C.

    1982-11-08

    A shared-savings contract will minimize the Myrtle Beach, SC Downtown Holiday Inn's losses of replacing a poorly performing Energy Master energy-management system with Scientific Atlanta equipment. The contract with Energy Master Inc. (EMI), which saved Holiday Inn the $80,000 to $90,000 purchase price, also permitted removal (a year after installation) of the equipment when it failed to generate energy savings. A dispute between Associated Energy Consultants (AEC), which was to receive half the savings in exchange for arranging the equipment financing, is described. At $51,745, the 262-point Scientific Atlanta system should have a 1.7-year payback. The hotel's electric bills were $2000 a month lower during the first three months of operation. (DCK)

  5. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  6. Stranski-Krastanov InN/InGaN quantum dots grown directly on Si(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Soto Rodriguez, Paul E. D. Aseev, Pavel; Gómez, Victor J.; Kumar, Praveen; Ul Hassan Alvi, Naveed; Calleja, Enrique; Morales, Francisco M.; Senichev, Alexander; Lienau, Christoph; Nötzel, Richard

    2015-01-12

    The authors discuss and demonstrate the growth of InN surface quantum dots on a high-In-content In{sub 0.73}Ga{sub 0.27}N layer, directly on a Si(111) substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy reveal uniformly distributed quantum dots with diameters of 10–40 nm, heights of 2–4 nm, and a relatively low density of ∼7 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}. A thin InN wetting layer below the quantum dots proves the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. Near-field scanning optical microscopy shows distinct and spatially well localized near-infrared emission from single surface quantum dots. This holds promise for future telecommunication and sensing devices.

  7. Cl{sub 2}-based dry etching of the AlGaInN system in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hyun; Vartuli, C.B.; Abernathy, C.R.; Donovan, S.M.; Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.; Han, J.

    1997-12-01

    Cl{sub 2}-based Inductively Coupled Plasmas with low additional dc self- biases(-100V) produce convenient etch rates(500-1500 A /min) for GaN, AlN, InN, InAlN and InGaN. A systematic study of the effects of additive gas(Ar, N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}), discharge composition and ICP source power and chuck power on etch rate and surface morphology has been performed. The general trends are to go through a maximum in etch rate with percent Cl{sub 2} in the discharge for all three mixtures, and to have an increase(decrease) in etch rate with source power(pressure). Since the etching is strongly ion-assisted, anisotropic pattern transfer is readily achieved. Maximum etch selectivities of approximately 6 for InN over the other nitrides were obtained.

  8. The Discovery of the Nearest Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, I. S.

    2007-12-01

    In the 1830s, the double star α Centauri was the subject of the first successful stellar parallax measurement. For almost eighty years it remained the nearest star known. However, in 1915 at the Union Observatory in Johannesburg, R.T.A. Innes found a faint object near α Cen with a similar proper motion. Its parallax was measured over the following two years by J.G.E.G. Voûte at the Cape and by Innes himself. The latter, on the basis of inadequate data, declared it to be closer than α and named it 'Proxima Centaurus'. The first statistically significant data that implied it truly is the nearest star were published in 1928 by H.L. Alden, based on observations at the Yale Southern Station in Johannesburg. Discordant results continued however to appear until 1966. The measurements made by the Hipparcos astrometric satellite appear to have established its proximity beyond question.

  9. Solar hot water system installed at Anderson, South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of the solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., at Anderson, South Carolina. The building is a low-rise, two-story 114-room motel. The solar system was designed to provide 40 percent of the total hot water demand. The collector is a flat plate, liquid with an area of 750 square feet. Operation of this system was begun in November 1977, and has performed flawlessly for one year.

  10. Growth of gallium nitride and indium nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Ling, Yichuan; Wang, Gongming; Lu, Xihong; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2013-02-01

    We report a general strategy for synthesis of gallium nitride (GaN) and indium nitride (InN) nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates. GaN and InN nanowires were prepared via a nanocluster-mediated growth method using a home built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system with Ga and In metals as group III precursors and ammonia as a group V precursor. Electron microscopy studies reveal that the group III-nitride nanowires are single crystalline wurtzite structures. The morphology, density and growth mechanism of these nanowires are determined by the growth temperature. Importantly, a photoelectrode fabricated by contacting the GaN nanowires through a carbon cloth substrate shows pronounced photoactivity for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. The ability to synthesize group III-nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible substrates should open up new opportunities for nanoscale photonic, electronic and electrochemical devices.We report a general strategy for synthesis of gallium nitride (GaN) and indium nitride (InN) nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates. GaN and InN nanowires were prepared via a nanocluster-mediated growth method using a home built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system with Ga and In metals as group III precursors and ammonia as a group V precursor. Electron microscopy studies reveal that the group III-nitride nanowires are single crystalline wurtzite structures. The morphology, density and growth mechanism of these nanowires are determined by the growth temperature. Importantly, a photoelectrode fabricated by contacting the GaN nanowires through a carbon cloth substrate shows pronounced photoactivity for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. The ability to synthesize group III-nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible substrates should open up new opportunities for nanoscale photonic, electronic and electrochemical devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr

  11. International Workshop on Vibration Isolation Technology for Microgravity Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubomski, Joseph F. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The International Workshop on Vibration Isolation Technology for Microgravity Science Applications was held on April 23-25, 1991 at the Holiday Inn in Middleburg Heights, Ohio. The main objective of the conference was to explore vibration isolation requirements of space experiments and what level of vibration isolation could be provided both by present and planned systems on the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom and by state of the art vibration isolation technology.

  12. 4. Contextual oblique view southeast showing building in landscaped and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Contextual oblique view southeast showing building in landscaped and natural setting. Scale visible adjacent to storage area door at lower right center. Stairs to second floor guest rooms out of sight at center, next to small sign. Open door at lower left center is small, one-story storage building on north side of 'Hayloft' stairs. - Deetjen's Big Sur Inn, Hayloft Building, East Side of State Highway 1, Big Sur, Monterey County, CA

  13. A Novel Quantitative Approach to Concept Analysis: The Internomological Network

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Paul F.; Larsen, Kai R.; Sakraida, Teresa J.; Pedro, Leli

    2012-01-01

    Background When a construct such as patients’ transition to self-management of chronic illness is studied by researchers across multiple disciplines, the meaning of key terms can become confused. This results from inherent problems in language where a term can have multiple meanings (polysemy) and different words can mean the same thing (synonymy). Objectives To test a novel quantitative method for clarifying the meaning of constructs by examining the similarity of published contexts in which they are used. Method Published terms related to the concept transition to self-management of chronic illness were analyzed using the internomological network (INN), a type of latent semantic analysis to calculate the mathematical relationships between constructs based on the contexts in which researchers use each term. This novel approach was tested by comparing results to those from concept analysis, a best-practice qualitative approach to clarifying meanings of terms. By comparing results of the two methods, the best synonyms of transition to self-management, as well as key antecedent, attribute, and consequence terms, were identified. Results Results from INN analysis were consistent with those from concept analysis. The potential synonyms self-management, transition, and adaptation had the greatest utility. Adaptation was the clearest overall synonym, but had lower cross-disciplinary use. The terms coping and readiness had more circumscribed meanings. The INN analysis confirmed key features of transition to self-management, and suggested related concepts not found by the previous review. Discussion The INN analysis is a promising novel methodology that allows researchers to quantify the semantic relationships between constructs. The method works across disciplinary boundaries, and may help to integrate the diverse literature on self-management of chronic illness. PMID:22592387

  14. Structure-based rational design of peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors to target tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme as potential therapeutics for hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Gu, Qiuhong; Zhao, Ning; Xia, Fei; Li, Zhiwei

    2015-12-01

    The human tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE) has recently been raised as a new and promising therapeutic target of hepatitis and other inflammatory diseases. Here, we reported a successful application of the solved crystal structure of TACE complex with a peptide-like ligand INN for rational design of novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors with high potency and selectivity to target and inhibit TACE. First, the intermolecular interactions between TACE catalytic domain and INN were characterized through an integrated bioinformatics approach, with which the key substructures of INN that dominate ligand binding were identified. Subsequently, the INN molecular structure was simplified to a chemical sketch of peptide hydroxamic acid compound, which can be regarded as a linear tripeptide capped by a N-terminal carboxybenzyl group (chemically protective group) and a C-terminal hydroxamate moiety (coordinated to the Zn(2+) at TACE active site). Based on the sketch, a virtual combinatorial library containing 180 peptide hydroxamic acids was generated, from which seven samples were identified as promising candidates by using a knowledge-based protein-peptide affinity predictor and were then tested in vitro with a standard TACE activity assay protocol. Consequently, three designed peptide hydroxamic acids, i.e. Cbz-Pro-Ile-Gln-hydroxamic acid, Cbz-Leu-Ile-Val-hydroxamic acid and Cbz-Phe-Val-Met-hydroxamic acid, exhibited moderate or high inhibitory activity against TACE, with inhibition constants Ki of 36 ± 5, 510 ± 46 and 320 ± 26 nM, respectively. We also examined the structural basis and non-bonded profile of TACE interaction with a designed peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitor, and found that the inhibitor ligand is tightly buried in the active pocket of TACE, forming a number of hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic forces and van der Waals contacts at the interaction interface, conferring both stability and specificity for TACE-inhibitor complex

  15. 33 CFR 110.72aa - Elizabeth River Spectator Vessel Anchorage Areas, between Norfolk and Portsmouth, Virginia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... line drawn between Hospital Point at latitude Latitude 36°50′50.5″ North, longitude 76°18′09.0″ West, and the tip of the channelside pier at the Holiday Inn Marina at latitude 36°50′29.5″ North, longitude... the Elizabeth River, bounded by the shore and a line drawn between Hospital Point at latitude...

  16. 33 CFR 110.72aa - Elizabeth River Spectator Vessel Anchorage Areas, between Norfolk and Portsmouth, Virginia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... line drawn between Hospital Point at latitude Latitude 36°50′50.5″ North, longitude 76°18′09.0″ West, and the tip of the channelside pier at the Holiday Inn Marina at latitude 36°50′29.5″ North, longitude... the Elizabeth River, bounded by the shore and a line drawn between Hospital Point at latitude...

  17. 33 CFR 110.72aa - Elizabeth River Spectator Vessel Anchorage Areas, between Norfolk and Portsmouth, Virginia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... line drawn between Hospital Point at latitude Latitude 36°50′50.5″ North, longitude 76°18′09.0″ West, and the tip of the channelside pier at the Holiday Inn Marina at latitude 36°50′29.5″ North, longitude... the Elizabeth River, bounded by the shore and a line drawn between Hospital Point at latitude...

  18. Powder-XRD and (14) N magic angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy of some metal nitrides.

    PubMed

    Kempgens, Pierre; Britton, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Some metal nitrides (TiN, ZrN, InN, GaN, Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 ) have been studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and (14) N magic angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 , no (14) N NMR signal was observed. Low speed (νr  = 2 kHz for TiN, ZrN, and GaN; νr  = 1 kHz for InN) and 'high speed' (νr  = 15 kHz for TiN; νr  = 5 kHz for ZrN; νr  = 10 kHz for InN and GaN) MAS NMR experiments were performed. For TiN, ZrN, InN, and GaN, powder-XRD was used to identify the phases present in each sample. The number of peaks observed for each sample in their (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectrum matches perfectly well with the number of nitrogen-containing phases identified by powder-XRD. The (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectra are symmetric and dominated by the quadrupolar interaction. The envelopes of the spinning sidebands manifold are Lorentzian, and it is concluded that there is a distribution of the quadrupolar coupling constants Qcc 's arising from structural defects in the compounds studied.

  19. RocKeTeria restaurant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    When StenniSphere at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., opened in May 2000, it introduced the RocKeTeria, a new 1960s-style, space-themed restaurant located in the newly expanded visitor center. The restaurant, operated by the owners of Mary's Drive Inn of Biloxi, features an extensive collection of space-related photos from that era, as well as a full menu of home-style cooking.

  20. 4. View to northwest from within Castro Creek Canyon, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View to northwest from within Castro Creek Canyon, looking up at 'Antique' Building (HABS-CA-2611-C) at left and center, 'Champagne' Building (HABS-CA-2611-D) at right behind redwood trees. View gives indication of steepness of canyon, siting of these two buildings at canyon's edge. - Deetjen's Big Sur Inn, East Side of State Highway 1, Big Sur, Monterey County, CA

  1. Solar heating and hot water system installed at Cherry Hill, New Jersey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The solar heating and hot water system installed in existing buildings at the Cherry Hill Inn in Cherry Hill, New Jersey is described in detail. The system is expected to furnish 31.5% of the overall heating load and 29.8% of the hot water load. The collectors are liquid evacuated tube type. The storage system is an above ground insulated steel water tank with a capacity of 7,500 gallons.

  2. An interview with Enrico Coen.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Catarina

    2016-07-15

    Enrico Coen CBE FRS is a Project Leader at the John Innes Centre in Norwich, UK, who uses a variety of approaches to study patterning and morphogenesis in plants. We met with Enrico at the Spring Meeting of the British Society for Developmental Biology, where he was awarded the Waddington Medal, to ask him more about his career and his passion for art and book-writing. PMID:27436037

  3. Solar-Heated Water at a Motel--Mobile, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Solar-assisted hot-water system for a new 122-unit motor inn in Mobile, Alabama, generates more than half the energy needed for hot-water heating at motel each year. System consists of 93 flat-plate collectors, 2,500 gallon (9,500 1) insulated storage tank located outdoors, heat exchangers and controls. Electronic thermometers, measuring the temperatures at 22 locations monitor system performance.

  4. The immiscibility of InAlN ternary alloy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guijuan; Xu, Xiaoqing; Li, Huijie; Wei, Hongyuan; Han, Dongyue; Ji, Zesheng; Meng, Yulin; Wang, Lianshan; Yang, Shaoyan

    2016-01-01

    We have used two models based on the valence force field and the regular solution model to study the immiscibility of InAlN ternary alloy, and have got the spinodal and binodal curves of InAlN. Analyzing the spinodal decomposition curves, we obtain the appropriate concentration region for the epitaxial growth of the InN-AlN pseudobinary alloy. At a temperature most common for the epitaxial growth of InAlN (1000 K), the solubility of InN is about 10%. Then we introduce the mismatch strain item into the Gibbs free energy, and the effect of different substrates is taken into consideration. Considering Si, Al2O3, InN, GaN, AlN as a substrate respectively, it is found that all the five systems are stabilized with the upper critical solution temperature largely reduced. Finally, InN and GaN are potential substrates for In-rich InAlN, while AlN and GaN substrates are recommended in the Al-rich region. Si and Al2O3 may be ideal substrates for thin InAlN film. PMID:27221345

  5. Lattice-Polarity-Driven Epitaxy of Hexagonal Semiconductor Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Yuan, Ying; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Xinqiang; Zheng, Xiantong; Rong, Xin; Wang, Tao; Sheng, Bowen; Wang, Qingxiao; Zhang, Yongqiang; Bian, Lifeng; Yang, Xuelin; Xu, Fujun; Qin, Zhixin; Li, Xinzheng; Zhang, Xixiang; Shen, Bo

    2016-02-10

    Lattice-polarity-driven epitaxy of hexagonal semiconductor nanowires (NWs) is demonstrated on InN NWs. In-polarity InN NWs form typical hexagonal structure with pyramidal growth front, whereas N-polarity InN NWs slowly turn to the shape of hexagonal pyramid and then convert to an inverted pyramid growth, forming diagonal pyramids with flat surfaces and finally coalescence with each other. This contrary growth behavior driven by lattice-polarity is most likely due to the relatively lower growth rate of the (0001̅) plane, which results from the fact that the diffusion barriers of In and N adatoms on the (0001) plane (0.18 and 1.0 eV, respectively) are about 2-fold larger in magnitude than those on the (0001̅) plane (0.07 and 0.52 eV), as calculated by first-principles density functional theory (DFT). The formation of diagonal pyramids for the N-polarity hexagonal NWs affords a novel way to locate quantum dot in the kink position, suggesting a new recipe for the fabrication of dot-based devices.

  6. The macroscopic polarization effect on thermal conductivity of binary nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, S. K.; Sahoo, B. K.; Sahoo, S.

    2013-10-01

    We theoretically investigate the effect of macroscopic polarization on phonon thermal conductivity of wurtzite (WZ) binary nitrides (AlN, GaN and InN). Our results show that macroscopic polarization contributes to the effective elastic constant of the wurtzite nitrides and modifies the phonon group velocity, Debye frequency, and Debye temperature. Using revised phonon velocity and Debye temperature, different phonon scattering rates and combined scattering rate are calculated as functions of the phonon frequency at room temperature. We estimate phonon thermal conductivity of binary nitrides using these modified parameters. The theoretical analysis shows that up to a certain temperature (different for AlN, GaN, and InN) the polarization effect acts as ill effect and reduces the thermal conductivity. However, after this temperature, the thermal conductivity is significantly enhanced by the polarization effect. The revised thermal conductivity at room temperature is found to be increased by 12% in GaN, 18% in InN and 20% in case of AlN due to macroscopic polarization, i.e., maximum polarization effect is observed in AlN and minimum in GaN. The method we have developed can be used for calculation of thermal energy in the active region of nitride optoelectronic devices.

  7. InN/InGaN multiple quantum wells emitting at 1.5 {mu}m grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Grandal, J.; Pereiro, J.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Munoz, E.; Calleja, E.

    2011-02-07

    This work reports on the growth by molecular beam epitaxy and characterization of InN/InGaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) emitting at 1.5 {mu}m. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra show satellite peaks up to the second order. Estimated values of well (3 nm) and barrier (9 nm) thicknesses were derived from transmission electron microscopy and the fit between experimental data and simulated XRD spectra. Transmission electron microscopy and XRD simulations also confirmed that the InGaN barriers are relaxed with respect to the GaN template, while the InN MQWs grew under biaxial compression on the InGaN barriers. Low temperature (14 K) photoluminescence measurements reveal an emission from the InN MQWs at 1.5 {mu}m. Measurements as a function of temperature indicate the existence of localized states, probably due to InN quantum wells' thickness fluctuations as observed by transmission electron microscopy.

  8. [What are the reasons for patient dropout in nursing home residents in an intervention study. An analysis of unit nonresponders in 12 German nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Budnick, Andrea; Jordan, Laura-Maria; Könner, Franziska; Hannemann, Bianca; Wulff, Ines; Kalinowski, Sonja; Kreutz, Reinhold; Dräger, Dagmar

    2015-02-01

    Hintergrund: Nonresponse verursacht zweifelsohne ein Bias in Studienergebnissen. Ausfallursachen in Studien mit Pflegeheimbewohner(inne)n sind bisher unzureichend untersucht. Ziel und Methode: Ziel dieser Studie war es, nach dem Prozessmodell induktiver Kategorienbildung nach Mayring (2010) reliable und valide Kategorien zu entwickeln, welche detailliert Ausfallgründe von Pflegeheimbewohner(inne)n abbilden. Zudem wurden Charakteristika der Unit-Nonresponder und der Responder verglichen. Ergebnisse: Die Kategorisierung der Ausfallgründe erfolgte im Längsschnitt mit insgesamt 522 Pflegeheimbewohner(inne)n. Identifiziert wurden vier Oberkategorien («generelle Ablehnung», «gesundheitliche Aspekte», «Erreichbarkeit», «Überforderung») sowie 17 Subkategorien. Unit-Nonresponder und Responder unterscheiden sich hinsichtlich Alter und Geschlecht nicht; jedoch zeigten sich Unterschiede im Follow-up bei Familienstand, Berufsabschluss und kognitivem Status. Schlussfolgerungen: Das vorgelegte Kategorienschema kann zukünftig zur Erfassung von Ausfallgründen im Setting Pflegeheim verwendet werden. Die detaillierte Erfassung der Ausfallursachen kann zur Optimierung der Responserate beitragen.

  9. Near surface characteristics of foehn winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiperski, Ivana

    2015-04-01

    Downslope windstorms occur commonly in mountainous regions around the world. Their importance is particularly great for air traffic, as well as wind energy, air pollution but also for ice shelf stability in the Antarctica, or deep water formation of the mountainous coasts. In this work we will focus on the foehn type of downslope windstorms and examine it's near surface turbulence characteristics in the Inn Valley, Austria. The foehn in the Inn Valley has been extensively studied throughout the past century, especially in several intensive campaigns. However, the smaller scale turbulence characteristics have only received limited attention. Here we present results from foehn episodes spanning over a year of data. The turbulence measurements at 5 stations within the Inn Valley, Austria as part of the i-Box project are used for the analysis. The general near surface turbulence characteristics of these events are examined and the characteristic scales of dominant transport are determined. Their dependence to horizontal heterogeneity is investigated both on the mesoscale and sub-mesoscale. Special focus is places on the question of energy balance closure during foehn episodes and the influence of advection.

  10. Infrared study of the absorption edge of {beta}-InN films grown on GaN/MgO structures

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Caro, M.; Rodriguez, A. G.; Vidal, M. A.; Navarro-Contreras, H.

    2010-07-15

    Infrared optical studies were carried out in a group of cubic InN samples grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy on MgO (001) substrates. Room temperature (RT) reflectance and low-temperature (LT) transmittance measurements were performed by using fast Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. Reflectance fittings allowed to establish that {beta}-InN films have large free-carrier concentrations present (>10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}), a result that is corroborated by Hall effect measurements. Each sample explored exhibited a different optical absorption edge. The Varshni parameters that describe adequately the optical absorption edge responses with temperature are obtained for the set of samples studied. The observed temperatures changes, from LT to RT, are the lowest reported for III-V semiconductor binary compounds. The temperature coefficient of the conduction band depends on the strength of the electron-phonon interaction (e-ph-i), as well as on the thermal expansion. It has been predicted that cubic InN has one of the smallest e-ph-i of all III-V compounds, which is corroborated by these results. The variation in values of absorption edges is clearly consistent with the Burstein-Moss and band renormalization effects, produced by high free electron concentrations. It is shown that the conduction band in {beta}-InN, analogous to wurtzite InN, follows a nonparabolic behavior.

  11. Determination of fish trophic levels in an estuarine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquaud, S.; Pillet, M.; David, V.; Sautour, B.; Elie, P.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of trophic level is particularly relevant in order to improve knowledge of the structure and the functioning of an ecosystem. A precise estimation of fish trophic levels based on nitrogen isotopic signatures in environments as complex and fluctuant as estuaries requires a good description of the pelagic and benthic trophic chains and a knowledge of organic matter sources at the bottom. In this study these points are considered in the case of the Gironde estuary (south west France, Europe). To obtain a good picture of the food web, fish stomach content analyses and a bibliographic synthesis of the prey feeding ecology were carried out. Fish trophic levels were calculated from these results and δ 15N data. The feeding link investigation enabled us to identify qualitatively and quantitatively the different preys consumed by each fish group studied, to distinguish the prey feeding on benthos from those feeding on pelagos and to characterize the different nutritive pools at the base of the system. Among the species studied, only Liza ramada and the flatfish ( Platichthys flesus and Solea solea) depend mainly on benthic trophic compartments. All the other fish groups depend on several trophic (benthic and/or pelagic) sources. These results enabled us to correct the calculation of fish trophic levels which are coherent with their feeding ecology data obtained from the nitrogen isotopic integrative period. The present work shows that trophic positions are linked with the feeding ecology of fish species and vary according to individual size. Ecological data also allow the correction of the isotopic data by eliminating absurd results and showing the complementarity of the two methods. This work is the first to consider source variability in the fish food web. This is an indispensable step for trophic studies in a dynamic environment. The investigation of matter fluxes and recycling processes at the food web base would provide a useful improvement in future

  12. Composition of Fish Communities in a European Macrotidal Salt Marsh (the Mont Saint-Michel Bay, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laffaille, P.; Feunteun, E.; Lefeuvre, J.-C.

    2000-10-01

    At least 100 fish species are known to be present in the intertidal areas (estuaries, mudflats and salt marshes) of Mont Saint-Michel Bay. These and other comparable shallow marine coastal waters, such as estuaries and lagoons, play a nursery role for many fish species. However, in Europe little attention has been paid to the value of tidal salt marshes for fishes. Between March 1996 and April 1999, 120 tides were sampled in a tidal creek. A total of 31 species were caught. This community was largely dominated by mullets ( Liza ramada represent 87% of the total biomass) and sand gobies ( Pomatoschistus minutus and P. lozanoi represent 82% of the total numbers). These species and also Gasterosteus aculeatus , Syngnathus rostellatus, Dicentrarchus labrax, Mugil spp., Liza aurata and Sprattus sprattus were the most frequent species (>50% of monthly frequency of occurrence). In Europe, salt marshes and their creeks are flooded only during high spring tides. So, fishes only invade this environment during short immersion periods, and no species can be considered as marsh resident. But, the salt marsh was colonized by fish every time the tide reached the creek, and during the short time of flood, dominant fishes fed actively and exploited the high productivity. Nevertheless, this study shows that there is little interannual variation in the fish community and there are three ' seasons ' in the fish fauna of the marsh. Marine straggler and marine estuarine dependent species colonize marshes between spring (recruitment period in the bay) and autumn before returning into deeper adjacent waters. Estuarine fishes are present all year round with maximum abundances in the end of summer. The presence of fishes confirms that this kind of wetland plays an important trophic and nursery role for these species. Differences in densities and stages distribution of these species into Mont Saint-Michel systems (tidal mudflats, estuaries and tidal salt marshes) can reduce the trophic

  13. Joule Heating Effects on Electrokinetic Flow Instabilities in Ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumme, Christian; Shaw, Ryan; Zhou, Yilong; Prabhakaran, Rama; Xuan, Xiangchun

    We have demonstrated in our earlier work that the application of a tangential electric field can draw fluid instabilities at the interface of a ferrofluid/water co-flow. These electrokinetic flow instabilities are produced primarily by the mismatch of electric conductivities of the two fluids. We demonstrate in this talk that the Joule heating induced fluid temperature rises and gradients can significantly suppress the electrokinetic flow instabilities. We also develop a two-dimensional depth-averaged numerical model to predict the fluid temperature, flow and concentration fields in the two-fluid system with the goal to understand the Joule heating effects on electric field-driven ferrofluid flow instabilities. This work was supported by the Honors and Creative Inquiry programs at Clemson University.

  14. SRNL RADIONUCLIDE FIELD LYSIMETER EXPERIMENT: BASELINE CONSTRUCTION AND IMPLEMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.; Bagwell, L.; Powell, B.; Almond, P.; Emerson, H.; Hixon, A.; Jablonski, J.; Buchanan, C.; Waterhouse, T.

    2012-10-17

    The purpose of this document is to compile information regarding experimental design, facility design, construction, radionuclide source preparation, and path forward for the ten year Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Radionuclide Field Lysimeter Experiment at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This is a collaborative effort by researchers at SRNL and Clemson University. The scientific objectives of this study are to: Study long-term radionuclide transport under conditions more representative of vadose zone conditions than laboratory experiments; Provide more realistic quantification of radionuclide transport and geochemistry in the vadose zone, providing better information pertinent to radioactive waste storage solutions than presently exists; Reduce uncertainty and improve justification for geochemical models such as those used in performance assessments and composite analyses.

  15. Modeling Gas Distribution in Protoplanetary Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberg, Martin; Lewis, Josiah; Brittain, Sean

    2010-07-01

    Protoplanetary accretion disks are disks of dust and gas which surround and feed material onto a forming star in the earliest stages of its evolution. One of the most useful methods for studying these disks is near infrared spectroscopy of rovibrational CO emission. This paper presents the methods in which synthetically generated spectra are modeled and fit to spectral data gathered from protoplanetary disks. This paper also discussed the methods in which this code can be improved by modifying the code to run a Monte Carlo analysis of best fit across the CONDOR cluster at Clemson University, thereby allowing for the creation of a catalog of protoplanetary disks with detailed information about them as gathered from the model.

  16. Endocardial fibroelastosis in a quarterhorse mare.

    PubMed

    Cushing, T L

    2013-01-01

    A 4-year-old crossbred Quarterhorse mare was submitted to the Clemson Veterinary Diagnostic Center for necropsy examination with a chronic history of inappetence, weight loss and lethargy. Prior to death the horse had developed mild diarrhoea and began showing evidence of colic. Necropsy examination revealed a markedly enlarged heart due predominantly to marked dilation of the right atrium, tortuous congested mesenteric blood vessels, marked ascites, pleural effusion and pulmonary oedema. Further examination of the heart showed the endocardium of the left side of the heart, including the mitral valve leaflets, to be diffusely thickened. Microscopically, the endocardial thickening was due to deposition of fibrous connective tissue and elastin fibres. These findings are consistent with a diagnosis of endocardial fibroelastosis. PMID:23651694

  17. Analysis of CRRES PHA Data for Low-Energy-Deposition Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNulty, P. J.; Hardage, Donna

    2004-01-01

    This effort analyzed the low-energy deposition Pulse Height Analyzer (PHA) data from the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). The high-energy deposition data had been previously analyzed and shown to be in agreement with spallation reactions predicted by the Clemson University Proton Interactions in Devices (CUPID) simulation model and existing environmental and orbit positioning models (AP-8 with USAF B-L coordinates). The scope of this project was to develop and improve the CUPID model by increasing its range to lower incident particle energies, and to expand the modeling to include contributions from elastic interactions. Before making changes, it was necessary to identify experimental data suitable for benchmarking the codes; then, the models to the CRRES PHA data could be applied. It was also planned to test the model against available low-energy proton or neutron SEU data obtained with mono-energetic beams.

  18. Online Tools for Astronomy and Cosmochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, B. S.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past year, the Webnucleo Group at Clemson University has been developing a web site with a number of interactive online tools for astronomy and cosmochemistry applications. The site uses SHP (Simplified Hypertext Preprocessor), which, because of its flexibility, allows us to embed almost any computer language into our web pages. For a description of SHP, please see http://www.joeldenny.com/ At our web site, an internet user may mine large and complex data sets, such as our stellar evolution models, and make graphs or tables of the results. The user may also run some of our detailed nuclear physics and astrophysics codes, such as our nuclear statistical equilibrium code, which is written in fortran and C. Again, the user may make graphs and tables and download the results.

  19. Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis for Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, Russell M.; Freeman, H. JoAnne

    1999-01-01

    Multidisciplinary design and analysis (MDA) has become the normal mode of operation within most aerospace companies, but the impact of these changes have largely not been reflected at many universities. On an effort to determine if the emergence of multidisciplinary design concepts should influence engineering curricula, NASA has asked several universities (Virginia Tech, Georgia Tech, Clemson, BYU, and Cal Poly) to investigate the practicality of introducing MDA concepts within their undergraduate curricula. A multidisciplinary team of faculty, students, and industry partners evaluated the aeronautical engineering curriculum at Cal Poly. A variety of ways were found to introduce MDA themes into the curriculum without adding courses or units to the existing program. Both analytic and educational tools for multidisciplinary design of aircraft have been developed and implemented.

  20. Glass Formulation Development for INEEL Sodium -Bearing Waste (FY2001 WM-180)

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.K.

    2001-09-21

    A systematic study was undertaken to develop a glass composition to demonstrate the vitrification flowsheet of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's sodium bearing waste (SBW) using the latest WM-180 tank composition. Although the previous study did not restrict waste loadings (WLs) based on the potential to form a segregated salt layer, avoiding its development in a melter is beneficial and was the primary focus from the glass-formulation perspective. The testing results described in this report were aimed at providing a candidate glass composition for use in a scaled melter demonstration of direct vitrification of WM-180 in the Research Scale Melter (RSM) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the EV-16 melter at the Clemson Environmental Technology Laboratory.