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Sample records for raman scattering imaging

  1. Stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Wei; Freudiger, Christian W.; Lu, Sijia; He, Chengwei; Kang, Jing X.; Xie, X. Sunney

    2009-02-01

    Label-free chemical contrast is highly desirable in biomedical imaging. Spontaneous Raman microscopy provides specific vibrational signatures of chemical bonds, but is often hindered by low sensitivity. Here we report a 3D multi-photon vibrational imaging technique based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). The sensitivity of SRS is significantly greater than that of spontaneous Raman scattering, and is further enhanced by high-frequency (MHz) phase-sensitive detection. SRS microscopy has a major advantage over previous coherent Raman techniques in that it offers background-free and easily interpretable chemical contrast. We show a variety of biomedical applications, such as differentiating distributions of omega-3 fatty acids and saturated lipids in living cells, imaging of brain and skin tissues based on intrinsic lipid contrast.

  2. Hyperspectral imaging with stimulated Raman scattering by chirped femtosecond lasers.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dan; Holtom, Gary; Freudiger, Christian; Zhang, Xu; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    2013-04-25

    Raman microscopy is a quantitative, label-free, and noninvasive optical imaging technique for studying inhomogeneous systems. However, the feebleness of Raman scattering significantly limits the use of Raman microscopy to low time resolutions and primarily static samples. Recent developments in narrowband stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy have significantly increased the acquisition speed of Raman based label-free imaging by a few orders of magnitude, at the expense of reduced spectroscopic information. On the basis of a spectral focusing approach, we present a fast SRS hyperspectral imaging system using chirped femtosecond lasers to achieve rapid Raman spectra acquisition while retaining the full speed and image quality of narrowband SRS imaging. We demonstrate that quantitative concentration determination of cholesterol in the presence of interfering chemical species can be achieved with sensitivity down to 4 mM. For imaging purposes, hyperspectral imaging data in the C-H stretching region is obtained within a minute. We show that mammalian cell SRS hyperspectral imaging reveals the spatially inhomogeneous distribution of saturated lipids, unsaturated lipids, cholesterol, and protein. The combination of fast spectroscopy and label-free chemical imaging will enable new applications in studying biological systems and material systems.

  3. Coherent Raman Scattering: Methods Towards Imaging with High Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachler, Brandon Richard

    Coherent Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for molecular identification. For imaging applications, Raman spectroscopy techniques have offered a way of achieving endogenous chemical contrast without the need for fluorescent labeling. Increasing the sensitivity of Raman scattering microscopy is vital to performing high speed, chemically selective imaging. This thesis presents three experiments with the ultimate goal of increasing the sensitivity and quantifying limitations of different Raman techniques. The first experiment is a comparison of spontaneous and coherent Raman signal strengths under biological imaging conditions. While it is commonly stated in the literature that coherent Raman techniques provide orders of magnitude higher signal than spontaneous Raman, such a comparison has not been done under the low concentration, low excitation power conditions relevant for biological imaging. We determine a critical power above which coherent Raman methods provide higher signal and below which spontaneous Raman methods provide higher sensitivity. Contrary to what is commonly stated in the literature, spontaneous Raman can provide higher signal levels under common biological imaging conditions. The second experiment is a demonstration of the first multiplexed Raman-induced Kerr effect (BIKES) microscopy setup to date. We compare the signal-to-noise ratios between femtosecond stimulated Raman (FSRS) and RIKES for spectroscopy applications in solution and for microscopy applications with polystyrene beads. We find that for our samples, RIKES consistently provides a higher signal-to-noise ratio than FSRS for both applications. We also use RIKES microscopy to map out the distribution of cytoplasm in onion cells. Finally, a surface-enhanced Raman experiment is performed to observe and compare highly enhanced signals for spontaneous and coherent Raman spectroscopy. We use a commercial SERS substrate and observe significantly enhanced spontaneous Raman signals from

  4. Biological imaging with coherent Raman scattering microscopy: a tutorial

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso-García, Alba; Mittal, Richa; Lee, Eun Seong; Potma, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy is gaining acceptance as a valuable addition to the imaging toolset of biological researchers. Optimal use of this label-free imaging technique benefits from a basic understanding of the physical principles and technical merits of the CRS microscope. This tutorial offers qualitative explanations of the principles behind CRS microscopy and provides information about the applicability of this nonlinear optical imaging approach for biological research. PMID:24615671

  5. Dental caries imaging using hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Jian, Lin; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    We report the development of a polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging technique based on a picosecond (ps) laser-pumped optical parametric oscillator system for label-free imaging of dental caries. In our imaging system, hyperspectral SRS images (512×512 pixels) in both fingerprint region (800-1800 cm-1) and high-wavenumber region (2800-3600 cm-1) are acquired in minutes by scanning the wavelength of OPO output, which is a thousand times faster than conventional confocal micro Raman imaging. SRS spectra variations from normal enamel to caries obtained from the hyperspectral SRS images show the loss of phosphate and carbonate in the carious region. While polarization-resolved SRS images at 959 cm-1 demonstrate that the caries has higher depolarization ratio. Our results demonstrate that the polarization resolved-hyperspectral SRS imaging technique developed allows for rapid identification of the biochemical and structural changes of dental caries.

  6. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging under ambient light

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yinxin; Liao, Chien-Sheng; Hong, Weili; Huang, Kai-Chih; Yang, Huaidong; Jin, Guofan; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate ambient light coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (AL-CARS) microscopy that allows CARS imaging to be operated under environment light for field use. CARS signal is modulated at megahertz frequency and detected by a photodiode equipped with a lab-built resonant amplifier, then extracted through a lock-in amplifier. Filters in both spectral domain and frequency domain effectively blocked room light contamination of the CARS image. In situ hyperspectral CARS imaging of tumor tissue under ambient light is demonstrated. PMID:27519113

  7. Live-cell stimulated Raman scattering imaging of alkyne-tagged biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Hong, Senlian; Chen, Tao; Zhu, Yuntao; Li, Ang; Huang, Yanyi; Chen, Xing

    2014-06-02

    Alkynes can be metabolically incorporated into biomolecules including nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and glycans. In addition to the clickable chemical reactivity, alkynes possess a unique Raman scattering within the Raman-silent region of a cell. Coupling this spectroscopic signature with Raman microscopy yields a new imaging modality beyond fluorescence and label-free microscopies. The bioorthogonal Raman imaging of various biomolecules tagged with an alkyne by a state-of-the-art Raman imaging technique, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, is reported. This imaging method affords non-invasiveness, high sensitivity, and molecular specificity and therefore should find broad applications in live-cell imaging.

  8. Fiber-delivered picosecond source for coherent Raman scattering imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke; Xu, Chris

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a two-color, fiber-delivered picosecond source for coherent Raman scattering (CRS) imaging. The wavelength-tunable picosecond pump is generated by nonlinear spectral compression of a prechirped femtosecond pulse from a mode-locked titanium:sapphire (Ti:S) laser. The 1064 nm picosecond Stokes pulse is generated by an all-fiber time-lens source that is synchronized to the Ti:S laser. The pump and Stokes beams are combined in an optical fiber coupler, which serves not only as the delivery fiber but also as the nonlinear medium for spectral compression of the femtosecond pulse. CRS imaging of mouse skin is performed to demonstrate the practicality of this source. PMID:22048375

  9. Subcellular chemical and morphological analysis by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy and image analysis techniques

    PubMed Central

    D’Arco, Annalisa; Brancati, Nadia; Ferrara, Maria Antonietta; Indolfi, Maurizio; Frucci, Maria; Sirleto, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The visualization of heterogeneous morphology, segmentation and quantification of image features is a crucial point for nonlinear optics microscopy applications, spanning from imaging of living cells or tissues to biomedical diagnostic. In this paper, a methodology combining stimulated Raman scattering microscopy and image analysis technique is presented. The basic idea is to join the potential of vibrational contrast of stimulated Raman scattering and the strength of imaging analysis technique in order to delineate subcellular morphology with chemical specificity. Validation tests on label free imaging of polystyrene-beads and of adipocyte cells are reported and discussed. PMID:27231626

  10. Direct imaging of molecular symmetry by coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Cleff, Carsten; Gasecka, Alicja; Ferrand, Patrick; Rigneault, Hervé; Brasselet, Sophie; Duboisset, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear optical methods, such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and stimulated Raman scattering, are able to perform label-free imaging, with chemical bonds specificity. Here we demonstrate that the use of circularly polarized light allows to retrieve not only the chemical nature but also the symmetry of the probed sample, in a single measurement. Our symmetry-resolved scheme offers simple access to the local organization of vibrational bonds and as a result provides enhanced image contrast for anisotropic samples, as well as an improved chemical selectivity. We quantify the local organization of vibrational bonds on crystalline and biological samples, thus providing information not accessible by spontaneous Raman and stimulated Raman scattering techniques. This work stands for a symmetry-resolved contrast in vibrational microscopy, with potential application in biological diagnostic. PMID:27189667

  11. Spectrometer-free vibrational imaging by retrieving stimulated Raman signal from highly scattered photons

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chien-Sheng; Wang, Pu; Wang, Ping; Li, Junjie; Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Eakins, Gregory; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-01-01

    In vivo vibrational spectroscopic imaging is inhibited by relatively slow spectral acquisition on the second scale and low photon collection efficiency for a highly scattering system. Recently developed multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and stimulated Raman scattering techniques have improved the spectral acquisition time down to microsecond scale. These methods using a spectrometer setting are not suitable for turbid systems in which nearly all photons are scattered. We demonstrate vibrational imaging by spatial frequency multiplexing of incident photons and single photodiode detection of a stimulated Raman spectrum within 60 μs. Compared to the spectrometer setting, our method improved the photon collection efficiency by two orders of magnitude for highly scattering specimens. We demonstrated in vivo imaging of vitamin E distribution on mouse skin and in situ imaging of human breast cancerous tissues. The reported work opens new opportunities for spectroscopic imaging in a surgical room and for development of deep-tissue Raman spectroscopy toward molecular level diagnosis. PMID:26601311

  12. Hyperspectral imaging with in-line interferometric femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dobner, Sven; Fallnich, Carsten

    2014-02-28

    We present the hyperspectral imaging capabilities of in-line interferometric femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering. The beneficial features of this method, namely, the improved signal-to-background ratio compared to other applicable broadband stimulated Raman scattering methods and the simple experimental implementation, allow for a rather fast acquisition of three-dimensional raster-scanned hyperspectral data-sets, which is shown for PMMA beads and a lipid droplet in water as a demonstration. A subsequent application of a principle component analysis displays the chemical selectivity of the method.

  13. Label-free imaging of lipid dynamics using Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) and Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Folick, Andrew; Min, Wei; Wang, Meng C.

    2011-01-01

    The recently developed Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy and Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy have provided new methods to visualize the localization and regulation of biological molecules without the use of invasive and potentially perturbative labels. They allow rapid imaging of specific molecules with high resolution and sensitivity. These tools have been effectively applied to the study of lipid metabolism using Caenorhabditis elegans as a genetic model, unraveling new lipid storage phenotypes and their regulatory mechanisms. Here we review the underlying principle of CARS and SRS microscopy, as well as their recent applications in lipid biology research in C. elegans. PMID:21945002

  14. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering hyperspectral tissue imaging with a wavelength-swept system

    PubMed Central

    Bégin, Steve; Burgoyne, Bryan; Mercier, Vincent; Villeneuve, Alain; Vallée, Réal; Côté, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We present a wavelength-swept coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (WS-CARS) spectroscopy system for hyperspectral imaging in thick tissue. We use a strategy where the Raman lines are excited sequentially, circumventing the need for a spectrometer. This fibre laser system, consisting of a pump laser synchronized with a rapidly tunable programmable laser (PL), can access Raman lines over a significant fraction of the high wavenumber region (2700–2950 cm−1) at rates of up to 10,000 spectral points per second. To demonstrate its capabilities, we have acquired WS-CARS spectra of several samples as well as images and hyperspectral images (HSI) of thick tissue both in forward and epi-detection. This instrument should be especially useful in providing local biochemical information with surrounding context supplied by imaging. PMID:21559141

  15. Broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS): a potential tool for atherosclerosis diagnostic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, J.-F.; Ko, A.; Choo-Smith, L.-P.; Werner, J.; Kohlenberg, E.; Hewko, M.; Fréchette, J.; Fortin, M.; Noiseux, I.; Bouchard, J. P.; Gay, David; Desroches, P.; Roy-Moisan, Francois; Bourgault, Marie-Eve; Sowa, M. G.; Vernon, M. L.

    2007-02-01

    Nonlinear optical imaging technologies offer some intriguing medical diagnostic applications. Examples include fast imaging of elastin and collagen distributions in diseased tissues using two-photon fluorescence (TPF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), respectively. The 3D sectioning capabilities and biochemical specificity that enable fast imaging in highly scattering biological media lie at the heart of the appeal of these nonlinear approaches for medical applications. One of these promising nonlinear techniques relies on the resonance enhancement of the third order nonlinear susceptibility by a vibrational mode of a molecule. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) can provide similar vibrational information as a spontaneous Raman spectrum. The technique has been shown to be orders of magnitude more sensitive than spontaneous Raman, with video rate imaging demonstrated recently. In this work, we investigate the potential use of broadband CARS spectroscopy and CARS imaging for biochemical analysis of arterial tissue. Biochemical imaging data from broadband CARS is compared with spontaneous Raman microspectroscopy. The broadband CARS system comprised of a single femtosecond-laser is presented in detail. Issues related to data analysis, the advantages and current limitations of the CARS technique in biodiagnostics are discussed.

  16. Raman spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging: prospective tools for monitoring skeletal cells and skeletal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Catarina Costa; Tare, Rahul S.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    The use of skeletal stem cells (SSCs) for cell-based therapies is currently one of the most promising areas for skeletal disease treatment and skeletal tissue repair. The ability for controlled modification of SSCs could provide significant therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine, with the prospect to permanently repopulate a host with stem cells and their progeny. Currently, SSC differentiation into the stromal lineages of bone, fat and cartilage is assessed using different approaches that typically require cell fixation or lysis, which are invasive or even destructive. Raman spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy present an exciting alternative for studying biological systems in their natural state, without any perturbation. Here we review the applications of Raman spectroscopy and CARS imaging in stem-cell research, and discuss the potential of these two techniques for evaluating SSCs, skeletal tissues and skeletal regeneration as an exemplar. PMID:27170652

  17. Giant Raman scattering from J-aggregated dyes inside carbon nanotubes for multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaufrès, E.; Tang, N. Y.-Wa; Lapointe, F.; Cabana, J.; Nadon, M.-A.; Cottenye, N.; Raymond, F.; Szkopek, T.; Martel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy uses visible light to acquire vibrational fingerprints of molecules, thus making it a powerful tool for chemical analysis in a wide range of media. However, its potential for optical imaging at high resolution is severely limited by the fact that the Raman effect is weak. Here, we report the discovery of a giant Raman scattering effect from encapsulated and aggregated dye molecules inside single-walled carbon nanotubes. Measurements performed on rod-like dyes such as α-sexithiophene and β-carotene, assembled inside single-walled carbon nanotubes as highly polarizable J-aggregates, indicate a resonant Raman cross-section of (3 +/- 2) × 10-21 cm2 sr-1, which is well above the cross-section required for detecting individual aggregates at the highest optical resolution. Free from fluorescence background and photobleaching, this giant Raman effect allows the realization of a library of functionalized nanoprobe labels for Raman imaging with robust detection using multispectral analysis.

  18. Label-free DNA imaging in vivo with stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fa-Ke; Basu, Srinjan; Igras, Vivien; Hoang, Mai P.; Ji, Minbiao; Fu, Dan; Holtom, Gary R.; Neel, Victor A.; Freudiger, Christian W.; Fisher, David E.; Xie, X. Sunney

    2015-01-01

    Label-free DNA imaging is highly desirable in biology and medicine to perform live imaging without affecting cell function and to obtain instant histological tissue examination during surgical procedures. Here we show a label-free DNA imaging method with stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy for visualization of the cell nuclei in live animals and intact fresh human tissues with subcellular resolution. Relying on the distinct Raman spectral features of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in DNA, the distribution of DNA is retrieved from the strong background of proteins and lipids by linear decomposition of SRS images at three optimally selected Raman shifts. Based on changes on DNA condensation in the nucleus, we were able to capture chromosome dynamics during cell division both in vitro and in vivo. We tracked mouse skin cell proliferation, induced by drug treatment, through in vivo counting of the mitotic rate. Furthermore, we demonstrated a label-free histology method for human skin cancer diagnosis that provides comparable results to other conventional tissue staining methods such as H&E. Our approach exhibits higher sensitivity than SRS imaging of DNA in the fingerprint spectral region. Compared with spontaneous Raman imaging of DNA, our approach is three orders of magnitude faster, allowing both chromatin dynamic studies and label-free optical histology in real time. PMID:26324899

  19. Effects of tissue fixation on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering images of brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Roberta; Uckermann, Ortrud; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias; Steiner, Gerald

    2014-07-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is an emerging multiphoton technique for the label-free histopathology of the central nervous system, by imaging the lipid content within the tissue. In order to apply the technique on standard histology sections, it is important to know the effects of tissue fixation on the CARS image. Here, we report the effects of two common fixation methods, namely with formalin and methanol-acetone, on mouse brain and human glioblastoma tissue. The variations induced by fixation on the CARS contrast and intensity were compared and interpreted using Raman microspectroscopy. The results show that, whenever unfixed cryosections cannot be used, fixation with formalin constitutes an alternative which does not deteriorate substantially the contrast generated by the different brain structures in the CARS image. Fixation with methanol-acetone strongly modifies the tissue lipid content and is therefore incompatible with the CARS imaging.

  20. Lock-in-detection-free line-scan stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for near video-rate Raman imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-09-01

    We report on the development of a unique lock-in-detection-free line-scan stimulated Raman scattering microscopy technique based on a linear detector with a large full well capacity controlled by a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) for near video-rate Raman imaging. With the use of parallel excitation and detection scheme, the line-scan SRS imaging at 20 frames per second can be acquired with a ∼5-fold lower excitation power density, compared to conventional point-scan SRS imaging. The rapid data communication between the FPGA and the linear detector allows a high line-scanning rate to boost the SRS imaging speed without the need for lock-in detection. We demonstrate this lock-in-detection-free line-scan SRS imaging technique using the 0.5 μm polystyrene and 1.0 μm poly(methyl methacrylate) beads mixed in water, as well as living gastric cancer cells.

  1. Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering Nanostars for High Precision Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Harmsen, Stefan; Huang, Ruimin; Wall, Matthew A.; Karabeber, Hazem; Samii, Jason M.; Spaliviero, Massimiliano; White, Julie R.; Monette, Sébastien; O’Connor, Rachael; Pitter, Kenneth L.; Sastra, Stephen A.; Saborowski, Michael; Holland, Eric C.; Singer, Samuel; Olive, Kenneth P.; Lowe, Scott W.; Blasberg, Ronald G.; Kircher, Moritz F.

    2015-01-01

    The inability to visualize the true extent of cancers represents a significant challenge in many areas of oncology. The margins of most cancer types are not well demarcated because the cancer diffusely infiltrates the surrounding tissues. Furthermore, cancers may be multifocal and characterized by the presence of microscopic satellite lesions. Such microscopic foci represent a major reason for persistence of cancer, local recurrences, and metastatic spread and are usually impossible to visualize with currently available imaging technologies. An imaging method to reveal the tumor extent is desired clinically and surgically. Here we show the precise visualization of tumor margins, microscopic tumor invasion, and multifocal loco-regional tumor spread using a new generation of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) nanoparticles, which are termed here SERRS-nanostars. The SERRS-nanostars feature a star-shaped gold core, a Raman reporter resonant in the near-infrared spectrum, and a primer-free silication method. In mouse models of pancreatic cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, and sarcoma, SERRS-nanostars enabled accurate detection of macroscopic malignant lesions as well as microscopic disease, without the need for a targeting moiety. Moreover, the sensitivity (1.5 femtomolar limit of detection under in vivo Raman imaging conditions) of SERRS-nanostars allowed imaging of premalignant lesions of pancreatic and prostatic neoplasias. High sensitivity and broad applicability, in conjunction with their inert gold-silica composition, render SERRS-nanostars a promising imaging agent for more precise cancer imaging and resection. PMID:25609167

  2. Microcavity Enhanced Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrak, Benjamin J.

    Raman scattering can accurately identify molecules by their intrinsic vibrational frequencies, but its notoriously weak scattering efficiency for gases presents a major obstacle to its practical application in gas sensing and analysis. This work explores the use of high finesse (≈50 000) Fabry-Perot microcavities as a means to enhance Raman scattering from gases. A recently demonstrated laser ablation method, which carves out a micromirror template on fused silica--either on a fiber tip or bulk substrates-- was implemented, characterized, and optimized to fabricate concave micromirror templates ˜10 mum diameter and radius of curvature. The fabricated templates were coated with a high-reflectivity dielectric coating by ion-beam sputtering and were assembled into microcavities ˜10 mum long and with a mode volume ˜100 mum 3. A novel gas sensing technique that we refer to as Purcell enhanced Raman scattering (PERS) was demonstrated using the assembled microcavities. PERS works by enhancing the pump laser's intensity through resonant recirculation at one longitudinal mode, while simultaneously, at a second mode at the Stokes frequency, the Purcell effect increases the rate of spontaneous Raman scattering by a change to the intra-cavity photon density of states. PERS was shown to enhance the rate of spontaneous Raman scattering by a factor of 107 compared to the same volume of sample gas in free space scattered into the same solid angle subtended by the cavity. PERS was also shown capable of resolving several Raman bands from different isotopes of CO2 gas for application to isotopic analysis. Finally, the use of the microcavity to enhance coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) from CO2 gas was demonstrated.

  3. Time-lens Based Hyperspectral Stimulated Raman Scattering Imaging and Quantitative Spectral Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke; Zhang, Delong; Charan, Kriti; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Wang, Ping; Xu, Chris; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscope through spectral-transformed excitation. The 1064-nm Stokes pulse was from a synchronized time-lens source, generated through time-domain phase modulation of a continuous wave (CW) laser. The tunable pump pulse was from linear spectral filtering of a femtosecond laser output with an intra-pulse spectral scanning pulse shaper. By electronically modulating the time-lens source at 2.29 MHz, hyperspectral stimulated Raman loss (SRL) images were obtained on a laser-scanning microscope. Using this microscope, DMSO in aqueous solution with a concentration down to 28 mM could be detected at 2 μs time constant. Hyper-spectral SRL images of prostate cancer cells were obtained. Multivariate curve resolution analysis was further applied to decompose the SRL images into concentration maps of CH2 and CH3 bonds. This method offers exciting potential in label-free imaging of live cells using fingerprint Raman bands. Hyperspectral SRS microscopy using a synchronized time-lens source allows mapping of different cellular contents. PMID:23840041

  4. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering for label-free biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Imran I.; Steuwe, Christian; Reichelt, Stefanie; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2013-09-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) has established itself as an imaging technique capable of providing video-rate imaging of biological specimens through vibrational coherence of endogenous molecules. Current techniques predominantly involve the application of costly, invasive and potentially non-specific dyes or labels for imaging biomolecules. CARS microscopy can however provide a high-resolution and non-invasive alternative for imaging biomolecules of interest without the need for exogenous labels. Here we provide an overview of CARS including the technique and common instrumentation as well as its applications in biomedical imaging. We discuss the major biomedical areas where CARS has been applied such as in evaluating liver disease, progression of atherosclerosis, tumour classification and tracking drug delivery, whilst also assessing the future challenges for clinical translation.

  5. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoparticles as Optical Labels for Imaging Cell Surface Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaughlin, Christina M.

    Assaying the expression of cell surface proteins has widespread application for characterizing cell type, developmental stage, and monitoring disease transformation. Immunophenotyping is conducted by treating cells with labelled targeting moieties that have high affinity for relevant surface protein(s). The sensitivity and specificity of immunophenotyping is defined by the choice of contrast agent and therefore, the number of resolvable signals that can be used to simultaneously label cells. Narrow band width surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles are proposed as optical labels for multiplexed immunophenotying. Two types of surface coatings were investigated to passivate the gold nanoparticles, incorporate SERS functionality, and to facilitate attachment of targeting antibodies. Thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) forms dative bonds with the gold surface and is compatible with multiple physisorbed Raman-active reporter molecules. Ternary lipid bilayers are used to encapsulate the gold nanoparticles particles, and incorporate three different classes of Raman reporters. TEM, UV-Visible absorbance spectroscopy, DLS, and electrophoretic light scattering were used characterize the particle coating. Colourimetric protein assay, and secondary antibody labelling were used to quantify the antibody conjugation. Three different in vitromodels were used to investigate the binding efficacy and specificity of SERS labels for their biomarker targets. Primary human CLL cells, LY10 B lymphoma, and A549 adenocarcinoma lines were targeted. Dark field imaging was used to visualize the colocalization of SERS labels with cells, and evidence of receptor clustering was obtained based on colour shifts of the particles' Rayleigh scattering. Widefield, and spatially-resolved Raman spectra were used to detect labels singly, and in combination from labelled cells. Fluorescence flow cytometry was used to test the particles' binding specificity, and SERS from labelled cells was also

  6. Raman scattering enhanced by plasmonic clusters and its application to single-molecule imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuike, Tomokazu; Nobusada, Katsuyuki

    2015-12-31

    The optical response of the linear Au{sub 8} cluster is investigated by the linear response theory based on the density functional theory. It is revealed that the observed many peaks in the visible region originate from the interaction of the ideal plasmonic excitation along the molecular axis with the background d-electron excitations, i.e., the Landau damping. In spite of the existence of the damping, the Raman scattering is shown to be enhanced remarkably by the incident light resonant to the visible excitations. The novel imaging experiment with the atomic resolution is proposed by utilizing a plasmonic cluster as the probing tip.

  7. Microsecond Scale Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging by Multiplex Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chien-Sheng; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Wang, Ping; Li, Junjie; Lee, Seung-Young; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Real-time vibrational spectroscopic imaging is desired for monitoring cellular states and cellular processes in a label-free manner. Raman spectroscopic imaging of highly dynamic systems is inhibited by relatively slow spectral acquisition on millisecond to second scale. Here, we report microsecond scale vibrational spectroscopic imaging by lock-in free parallel detection of spectrally dispersed stimulated Raman scattering signal. Using a homebuilt tuned amplifier array, our method enables Raman spectral acquisition, within the window defined by the broadband pulse, at the speed of 32 microseconds and with close to shot-noise limited detection sensitivity. Incorporated with multivariate curve resolution analysis, our platform allows compositional mapping of lipid droplets in single live cells, observation of intracellular retinoid metabolism, discrimination of fat droplets from protein-rich organelles in Caenorhabditis elegans, spectral detection of fast flowing tumor cells, and monitoring drug diffusion through skin tissue in vivo. The reported technique opens new opportunities for compositional analysis of cellular compartment in a microscope setting and high-throughput spectral profiling of single cells in a flow cytometer setting. PMID:26167336

  8. Label-free biomedical imaging of lipids by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Prasanna V; Mutlu, Ayse Sena; Wang, Meng C

    2015-01-05

    Advances in modern optical microscopy have provided unparalleled tools to study intracellular structure and function, yet visualizing lipid molecules within a cell remains challenging. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy is a recently developed imaging modality that addresses this challenge. By selectively imaging the vibration of chemical moieties enriched in lipids, this technique allows for rapid imaging of lipid molecules in vivo without the need for perturbative extrinsic labels. SRS microscopy has been effectively employed in the study of fat metabolism, helping uncover novel regulators of lipid storage. This unit provides a brief introduction to the principle of SRS microscopy, and describes methods for its use in imaging lipids in cells, tissues, and whole organisms.

  9. Delivery of picosecond lasers in multimode fibers for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyong; Yang, Yaliang; Luo, Pengfei; Gao, Liang; Wong, Kelvin K; Wong, Stephen T C

    2010-06-07

    We investigated the possibility of using standard commercial multimode fibers (MMF), Corning SMF28 fibers, to deliver picosecond excitation lasers for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging. We theoretically and/or experimentally analyzed issues associated with the fiber delivery, such as dispersion length, walk-off length, nonlinear length, average threshold power for self-phase modulations, and four-wave mixing (FWM). These analyses can also be applied to other types of fibers. We found that FWM signals are generated in MMF, but they can be filtered out using a long-pass filter for CARS imaging. Finally, we demonstrated that MMF can be used for delivery of picosecond excitation lasers in the CARS imaging system without any degradation of image quality.

  10. Simultaneous stimulated Raman scattering and higher harmonic generation imaging for liver disease diagnosis without labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-02-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy (e.g., higher harmonic (second-/third- harmonic) generation (HHG), simulated Raman scattering (SRS)) has high diagnostic sensitivity and chemical specificity, making it a promising tool for label-free tissue and cell imaging. In this work, we report a development of a simultaneous SRS and HHG imaging technique for characterization of liver disease in a bile-duct-ligation rat-modal. HHG visualizes collagens formation and reveals the cell morphologic changes associated with liver fibrosis; whereas SRS identifies the distributions of hepatic fat cells formed in steatosis liver tissue. This work shows that the co-registration of SRS and HHG images can be an effective means for label-free diagnosis and characterization of liver steatosis/fibrosis at the cellular and molecular levels.

  11. Monitoring peripheral nerve degeneration in ALS by label-free stimulated Raman scattering imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Feng; Yang, Wenlong; Mordes, Daniel A.; Wang, Jin-Yuan; Salameh, Johnny S.; Mok, Joanie; Chew, Jeannie; Sharma, Aarti; Leno-Duran, Ester; Suzuki-Uematsu, Satomi; Suzuki, Naoki; Han, Steve S.; Lu, Fa-Ke; Ji, Minbiao; Zhang, Rosanna; Liu, Yue; Strominger, Jack; Shneider, Neil A.; Petrucelli, Leonard; Xie, X. Sunney; Eggan, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    The study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and potential interventions would be facilitated if motor axon degeneration could be more readily visualized. Here we demonstrate that stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy could be used to sensitively monitor peripheral nerve degeneration in ALS mouse models and ALS autopsy materials. Three-dimensional imaging of pre-symptomatic SOD1 mouse models and data processing by a correlation-based algorithm revealed that significant degeneration of peripheral nerves could be detected coincidentally with the earliest detectable signs of muscle denervation and preceded physiologically measurable motor function decline. We also found that peripheral degeneration was an early event in FUS as well as C9ORF72 repeat expansion models of ALS, and that serial imaging allowed long-term observation of disease progression and drug effects in living animals. Our study demonstrates that SRS imaging is a sensitive and quantitative means of measuring disease progression, greatly facilitating future studies of disease mechanisms and candidate therapeutics.

  12. A CMOS image sensor using high-speed lock-in pixels for stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lioe, DeXing; Mars, Kamel; Takasawa, Taishi; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Kawahito, Shoji

    2016-03-01

    A CMOS image sensor using high-speed lock-in pixels for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectroscopy is presented in this paper. The effective SRS signal from the stimulated emission of SRS mechanism is very small in contrast to the offset of a probing laser source, which is in the ratio of 10-4 to 10-5. In order to extract this signal, the common offset component is removed, and the small difference component is sampled using switched-capacitor integrator with a fully differential amplifier. The sampling is performed over many integration cycles to achieve appropriate amplification. The lock-in pixels utilizes high-speed lateral electric field charge modulator (LEFM) to demodulate the SRS signal which is modulated at high-frequency of 20MHz. A prototype chip is implemented using 0.11μm CMOS image sensor technology.

  13. Quantitative chemical imaging and unsupervised analysis using hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Masia, Francesco; Glen, Adam; Stephens, Phil; Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2013-11-19

    In this work, we report a method to acquire and analyze hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy images of organic materials and biological samples resulting in an unbiased quantitative chemical analysis. The method employs singular value decomposition on the square root of the CARS intensity, providing an automatic determination of the components above noise, which are retained. Complex CARS susceptibility spectra, which are linear in the chemical composition, are retrieved from the CARS intensity spectra using the causality of the susceptibility by two methods, and their performance is evaluated by comparison with Raman spectra. We use non-negative matrix factorization applied to the imaginary part and the nonresonant real part of the susceptibility with an additional concentration constraint to obtain absolute susceptibility spectra of independently varying chemical components and their absolute concentration. We demonstrate the ability of the method to provide quantitative chemical analysis on known lipid mixtures. We then show the relevance of the method by imaging lipid-rich stem-cell-derived mouse adipocytes as well as differentiated embryonic stem cells with a low density of lipids. We retrieve and visualize the most significant chemical components with spectra given by water, lipid, and proteins segmenting the image into the cell surrounding, lipid droplets, cytosol, and the nucleus, and we reveal the chemical structure of the cells, with details visualized by the projection of the chemical contrast into a few relevant channels.

  14. Label-free imaging of human breast tissues using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yaliang; Gao, Liang; Wang, Zhiyong; Thrall, Michael J.; Luo, Pengfei; Wong, Kelvin K.; Wong, Stephen T.

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is a common disease in women. Current imaging and diagnostic methods for breast cancer confront several limitations, like time-consuming, invasive and with a high cost. Alternative strategies are in high demand to alleviate patients' trauma and lower medical expenses. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging technique offers many advantages, including label-free, sub-wavelength spatial resolution and video-rate imaging speed. Therefore, it has been demonstrated as a powerful tool for various biomedical applications. In this study, we present a label-free fast imaging method to identify breast cancer and its subtypes using CARS microscopy. Human breast tissues, including normal, benign and invasive carcinomas, were imaged ex vivo using a custom-built CARS microscope. Compared with results from corresponding hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stains, the CARS technique has demonstrated its capability in identifying morphological features in a similar way as in H&E stain. These features can be used to distinguish breast cancer from normal and benign tissues, and further separate cancer subtypes from each other. Our pilot study suggests that CARS microscopy could be used as a routine examination tool to characterize breast cancer ex vivo. Moreover, its label-free and fast imaging properties render this technique as a promising approach for in vivo and real-time imaging and diagnosis of breast cancer.

  15. Vibrationally resonant imaging of a single living cell by supercontinuum-based multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Hideaki; Hamaguchi, Hiro-O.

    2005-02-01

    Supercontinuum-based multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy has been applied to vibrational imaging of a living fission yeast cell. We have successfully extracted only a vibrationally resonant CARS image from a characteristic spectral profile in the C-H stretching vibrational region. Using our simple but sensitive analysis, the vibrational contrast is significantly improved in comparison with a CARS imaging at a fixed Raman shift. The CARS image of a living yeast cell indicates several areas at which the signal is remarkably strong. They are considered to arise from mitochondria.

  16. Label-free chemically specific imaging in planta with stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Jessica C; Littlejohn, George R; Seymour, Mark P; Lind, Rob J; Perfect, Sarah; Moger, Julian

    2013-05-21

    The growing world population puts ever-increasing demands on the agricultural and agrochemical industries to increase agricultural yields. This can only be achieved by investing in fundamental plant and agrochemical research and in the development of improved analytical tools to support research in these areas. There is currently a lack of analytical tools that provide noninvasive structural and chemical analysis of plant tissues at the cellular scale. Imaging techniques such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy provide label-free chemically specific image contrast based on vibrational spectroscopy. Over the past decade, these techniques have been shown to offer clear advantages for a vast range of biomedical research applications. The intrinsic vibrational contrast provides label-free quantitative functional analysis, it does not suffer from photobleaching, and it allows near real-time imaging in 3D with submicrometer spatial resolution. However, due to the susceptibility of current detection schemes to optical absorption and fluorescence from pigments (such as chlorophyll), the plant science and agrochemical research communities have not been able to benefit from these techniques and their application in plant research has remained virtually unexplored. In this paper, we explore the effect of chlorophyll fluorescence and absorption in CARS and SRS microscopy. We show that with the latter it is possible to use phase-sensitive detection to separate the vibrational signal from the (electronic) absorption processes. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of SRS for a range of in planta applications by presenting in situ chemical analysis of plant cell wall components, epicuticular waxes, and the deposition of agrochemical formulations onto the leaf surface.

  17. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering hyperspectral imaging of cartilage aiming for state discrimination of cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozawa, Manabu; Shirai, Masataka; Izumisawa, Junko; Tanabe, Maiko; Watanabe, Koich

    2016-07-01

    Noninvasive cell analyses are increasingly important in the medical field. A coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscope is the noninvasive imaging equipment and enables to obtain images indicating molecular distribution. However, due to low-signal intensity, it is still challenging to obtain images of the fingerprint region, in which many spectrum peaks correspond to compositions of a cell. Here, to identify cell differentiation by using multiplex CARS, we investigated hyperspectral imaging of the fingerprint region of living cells. To perform multiplex CARS, we used a prototype of a compact light source generating both pump light and broadband Stokes light. Assuming application to regenerative medicine, we chose a cartilage cell, whose differentiation is difficult to be identified by change of the cell morphology. Because one of the major components of cartilage is collagen, we focused on distribution of proline, which accounts for approximately 20% of collagen. The spectrum quality was improved by optical adjustments of the power branching ratio and divergence of Stokes light. Periphery of a cartilage cell was highlighted in a CARS image of proline, and this result suggests correspondence with collagen generated as an extracellular matrix. The possibility of noninvasive analyses by using CARS hyperspectral imaging was indicated.

  18. Alkyne-Modulated Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering-Palette for Optical Interference-Free and Multiplex Cellular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Ren, Jia-Qiang; Zhang, Xia-Guang; Wu, De-Yin; Shen, Ai-Guo; Hu, Ji-Ming

    2016-06-21

    The alkyne tags possess unique interference-free Raman emissions but are still hindered for further application in the field of biochemical labels due to its extremely weak spontaneous Raman scattering. With the aid of computational chemistry, herein, an alkyne-modulated surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) palette is constructed based on rationally designed 4-ethynylbenzenethiol derivatives for spectroscopic signature, Au@Ag core for optical enhancement and an encapsulating polyallylamine shell for protection and conjugation. Even for the pigment rich plant cell (e.g., pollen), the alkyne-coded SERS tag can be highly discerned on two-dimension distribution impervious to strong organic interferences originating from resonance-enhanced Raman scattering or autofluorescence. In addition, the alkynyl-containing Raman reporters contribute especially narrow emission, band shift-tunable (2100-2300 cm(-1)) and tremendously enhanced Raman signals when the alkynyl group locates at para position of mercaptobenzene ring. Depending on only single Raman band, the suggested alkyne-modulated SERS-palette potentially provides a more effective solution for multiplex cellular imaging with vibrant colors, when the hyperspectral and fairly intense optical noises originating from lower wavenumber region (<1800 cm(-1)) are inevitable under complex ambient conditions.

  19. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) Microscopy: A Novel Technique for Imaging the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Masihzadeh, Omid; Ammar, David A.; Kahook, Malik Y.; Lei, Tim C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To image the cellular and noncellular structures of the retina in an intact mouse eye without the application of exogenous fluorescent labels using noninvasive, nondestructive techniques. Methods. Freshly enucleated mouse eyes were imaged using two nonlinear optical techniques: coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and two-photon autofluorescence (TPAF). Cross sectional transverse sections and sequential flat (en face) sagittal sections were collected from a region of sclera approximately midway between the limbus and optic nerve. Imaging proceeded from the surface of the sclera to a depth of ∼60 μm. Results. The fluorescent signal from collagen fibers within the sclera was evident in the TPAF channel; the scleral collagen fibers showed no organization and appeared randomly packed. The sclera contained regions lacking TPAF and CARS fluorescence of ∼3 to 15 μm in diameter that could represent small vessels or scleral fibroblasts. Intense punctate CARS signals from the retinal pigment epithelial layer were of a size and shape of retinyl storage esters. Rod outer segments could be identified by the CARS signal from their lipid-rich plasma membranes. Conclusions. CARS microscopy can be used to image the outer regions of the mammalian retina without the use of a fluorescent dye or exogenously expressed recombinant protein. With technical advancements, CARS/TPAF may represent a new avenue for noninvasively imaging the retina and might complement modalities currently used in clinical practice. PMID:23580484

  20. Hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering and multiphoton imaging for digital pathology of colonic disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Jian; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    Histopathology examinations of H&E stained biopsied tissues is the golden standard for colonic diseases (e.g., polyps, adenoma, and adenocarcinoma) diagnosis. However, staining effect of sample and doctor's expertise degree may greatly influence the diagnosis results. The information provided by the H&E stained sample is also limited to the morphological and PH information and no quantative information is available. In this paper, we report the development of a unique multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy (i.e., hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (hsSRS), second-harmonic generation (SHG), third-harmonic generation (THG), two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF)) platform for the diagnosis and characterization of colonic diseases. HsSRS in both fingerprint (800-1800 cm-1) and high-wavenumber (2800-3600 cm-1) regions allows us to discriminate different constituents with tiny difference in the Raman spectra. The increase of proteins and reduction of lipids could be observed with the progress of colonic cancer. SHG shows the distribution of collagen, which is found to aggregate for adenocarcinoma. TPEF provides the cell morphological and can reflect the damage inside glands caused by the diseases. THG shows the increase of optical heterogeneity related to cancer process. This work shows that the integrated hsSRS and TPEF/SHG/THG imaging technique can be an effective method for digital pathology of colonic diseases at the molecular and sub-cellular levels.

  1. Stimulated Raman scattering: old physics, new applications

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Petrov, Georgi I.; Zhang, Hao F.; Noojin, Gary D.; Denton, Michael L.; Thomas, Robert J.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2009-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering as a promising way of expanding the tunability of ultrafast lasers and as an exciting new biomedical imaging modality capable of selective excitation and chemically-specific diagnostics of molecular species. PMID:20354585

  2. Monitoring peripheral nerve degeneration in ALS by label-free stimulated Raman scattering imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Feng; Yang, Wenlong; Mordes, Daniel A.; Wang, Jin-Yuan; Salameh, Johnny S.; Mok, Joanie; Chew, Jeannie; Sharma, Aarti; Leno-Duran, Ester; Suzuki-Uematsu, Satomi; Suzuki, Naoki; Han, Steve S.; Lu, Fa-Ke; Ji, Minbiao; Zhang, Rosanna; Liu, Yue; Strominger, Jack; Shneider, Neil A.; Petrucelli, Leonard; Xie, X. Sunney; Eggan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and potential interventions would be facilitated if motor axon degeneration could be more readily visualized. Here we demonstrate that stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy could be used to sensitively monitor peripheral nerve degeneration in ALS mouse models and ALS autopsy materials. Three-dimensional imaging of pre-symptomatic SOD1 mouse models and data processing by a correlation-based algorithm revealed that significant degeneration of peripheral nerves could be detected coincidentally with the earliest detectable signs of muscle denervation and preceded physiologically measurable motor function decline. We also found that peripheral degeneration was an early event in FUS as well as C9ORF72 repeat expansion models of ALS, and that serial imaging allowed long-term observation of disease progression and drug effects in living animals. Our study demonstrates that SRS imaging is a sensitive and quantitative means of measuring disease progression, greatly facilitating future studies of disease mechanisms and candidate therapeutics. PMID:27796305

  3. Imaging Complex Protein Metabolism in Live Organisms by Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy with Isotope Labeling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein metabolism, consisting of both synthesis and degradation, is highly complex, playing an indispensable regulatory role throughout physiological and pathological processes. Over recent decades, extensive efforts, using approaches such as autoradiography, mass spectrometry, and fluorescence microscopy, have been devoted to the study of protein metabolism. However, noninvasive and global visualization of protein metabolism has proven to be highly challenging, especially in live systems. Recently, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy coupled with metabolic labeling of deuterated amino acids (D-AAs) was demonstrated for use in imaging newly synthesized proteins in cultured cell lines. Herein, we significantly generalize this notion to develop a comprehensive labeling and imaging platform for live visualization of complex protein metabolism, including synthesis, degradation, and pulse–chase analysis of two temporally defined populations. First, the deuterium labeling efficiency was optimized, allowing time-lapse imaging of protein synthesis dynamics within individual live cells with high spatial–temporal resolution. Second, by tracking the methyl group (CH3) distribution attributed to pre-existing proteins, this platform also enables us to map protein degradation inside live cells. Third, using two subsets of structurally and spectroscopically distinct D-AAs, we achieved two-color pulse–chase imaging, as demonstrated by observing aggregate formation of mutant hungtingtin proteins. Finally, going beyond simple cell lines, we demonstrated the imaging ability of protein synthesis in brain tissues, zebrafish, and mice in vivo. Hence, the presented labeling and imaging platform would be a valuable tool to study complex protein metabolism with high sensitivity, resolution, and biocompatibility for a broad spectrum of systems ranging from cells to model animals and possibly to humans. PMID:25560305

  4. Bioorthogonal chemical imaging of metabolic activities in live mammalian hippocampal tissues with stimulated Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fanghao; Lamprecht, Michael R.; Wei, Lu; Morrison, Barclay; Min, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Brain is an immensely complex system displaying dynamic and heterogeneous metabolic activities. Visualizing cellular metabolism of nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids in brain with chemical specificity has been a long-standing challenge. Recent development in metabolic labeling of small biomolecules allows the study of these metabolisms at the global level. However, these techniques generally require nonphysiological sample preparation for either destructive mass spectrometry imaging or secondary labeling with relatively bulky fluorescent labels. In this study, we have demonstrated bioorthogonal chemical imaging of DNA, RNA, protein and lipid metabolism in live rat brain hippocampal tissues by coupling stimulated Raman scattering microscopy with integrated deuterium and alkyne labeling. Heterogeneous metabolic incorporations for different molecular species and neurogenesis with newly-incorporated DNA were observed in the dentate gyrus of hippocampus at the single cell level. We further applied this platform to study metabolic responses to traumatic brain injury in hippocampal slice cultures, and observed marked upregulation of protein and lipid metabolism particularly in the hilus region of the hippocampus within days of mechanical injury. Thus, our method paves the way for the study of complex metabolic profiles in live brain tissue under both physiological and pathological conditions with single-cell resolution and minimal perturbation. PMID:28000773

  5. Bioorthogonal chemical imaging of metabolic activities in live mammalian hippocampal tissues with stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fanghao; Lamprecht, Michael R.; Wei, Lu; Morrison, Barclay; Min, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Brain is an immensely complex system displaying dynamic and heterogeneous metabolic activities. Visualizing cellular metabolism of nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids in brain with chemical specificity has been a long-standing challenge. Recent development in metabolic labeling of small biomolecules allows the study of these metabolisms at the global level. However, these techniques generally require nonphysiological sample preparation for either destructive mass spectrometry imaging or secondary labeling with relatively bulky fluorescent labels. In this study, we have demonstrated bioorthogonal chemical imaging of DNA, RNA, protein and lipid metabolism in live rat brain hippocampal tissues by coupling stimulated Raman scattering microscopy with integrated deuterium and alkyne labeling. Heterogeneous metabolic incorporations for different molecular species and neurogenesis with newly-incorporated DNA were observed in the dentate gyrus of hippocampus at the single cell level. We further applied this platform to study metabolic responses to traumatic brain injury in hippocampal slice cultures, and observed marked upregulation of protein and lipid metabolism particularly in the hilus region of the hippocampus within days of mechanical injury. Thus, our method paves the way for the study of complex metabolic profiles in live brain tissue under both physiological and pathological conditions with single-cell resolution and minimal perturbation.

  6. Molded plasmonic crystals for detecting and spatially imaging surface bound species by surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, A. J.; Truong, T. T.; Cambrea, L. R.; Montgomery, J. M.; Abdula, D.; Banks, T. R.; Yao, J.; Nuzzo, R. G.; Gray, S. K.; Rogers, J. A.

    2009-06-24

    This report introduces a type of plasmonic crystal that consists of metal coated nanostructures of relief molded on a polymer film as a substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Such crystals exhibit SERS enhancement factors of {approx} 10{sup 5}, over large areas and with sufficiently high levels of uniformity for precise two-dimensional Raman mapping of surface bound monolayers. The ease of fabrication together with the high sensitivities and spatial resolution that can be achieved suggests an attractive route to SERS substrates for portable chemical warfare agent detection, environmental monitors, noninvasive imaging of biomolecules, and other applications.

  7. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging with a laser source delivered by a photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haifeng; Huff, Terry B; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2006-05-15

    We demonstrate laser-scanning coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging with two excitation laser beams delivered by a large-mode-area photonic crystal fiber. The group-velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation effects are largely suppressed due to the large mode area of the fiber and the use of picosecond pulses. The fiber delivery preserves the signal level and image spatial resolution well. High-quality images of live spinal cord tissues are acquired using the fiber-delivered laser source. Our method provides a basic platform for developing a flexible and compact CARS imaging system.

  8. Noble metal coated single-walled carbon nanotubes for applications in surface enhanced Raman scattering imaging and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojing; Wang, Chao; Cheng, Liang; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Liu, Zhuang

    2012-05-02

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with various unique optical properties are interesting nanoprobes widely explored in biomedical imaging and phototherapies. Herein, DNA-functionalized SWNTs are modified with noble metal (Ag or Au) nanoparticles via an in situ solution phase synthesis method comprised of seed attachment, seeded growth, and surface modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG), yielding SWNT-Ag-PEG and SWNT-Au-PEG nanocomposites stable in physiological environments. With gold or silver nanoparticles decorated on the surface, the SWNT-metal nanocomposites gain an excellent concentration and excitation-source dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. Using a near-infrared (NIR) laser as the excitation source, targeted Raman imaging of cancer cells labeled with folic acid (FA) conjugated SWNT-Au nanocomposite (SWNT-Au-PEG-FA) is realized, with images acquired in significantly shortened periods of time as compared to that of using nonenhanced SWNT Raman probes. Owing to the strong surface plasmon resonance absorption contributed by the gold shell, the SWNTs-Au-PEG-FA nanocomposite also offers remarkably improved photothermal cancer cell killing efficacy. This work presents a facile approach to synthesize water-soluble noble metal coated SWNTs with a strong SERS effect suitable for labeling and fast Raman spectroscopic imaging of biological samples, which has been rarely realized before. The SWNT-Au-PEG nanocomposite developed here may thus be an interesting optical theranostic probe for cancer imaging and therapy.

  9. Comparative Study of Breast Normal and Cancer Cells Using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microspectroscopy Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jang Hyuk; Cho, Eun Hee; Shin, Sang-Mo; Oh, Myoung-kyu; Ko, Do-Kyeong

    2012-08-01

    A coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy imaging system was developed using a femtosecond laser and a photonic crystal fiber (PCF). We separated resonant and non-resonant CARS signals in the time domain by the chirp of the PCF, and applied this system to compare live human breast normal and cancer cells. The CARS image and spectrum at C-H stretch vibration in lipid droplets could subsequently be used to differentiate cancer cells from normal cells, thereby confirming the potential of the CARS microspectroscopy imaging system as a diagnostic tool that allows the high-sensitivity, high-resolution, and fast detection of breast cancer.

  10. Polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for label-free biomolecular imaging of the tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Hsu, Chin-Ying Stephen; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    We report the development and implementation of a rapid polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy technique for label-free biomolecular imaging of the tooth. The hyperspectral SRS imaging technique developed covers both fingerprint (800-1800 cm-1) and high-wavenumber (2800-3600 cm-1) regions for tooth Raman imaging without fluorescence background interference with an imaging speed of <0.3 s per frame of 512 × 512 pixels (˜1 μs per pixel), that is, >106 faster than confocal Raman imaging. Significant differences of hyperspectral SRS spectra among different tooth locations (e.g., dentin, enamel, and dentin-enamel junction) are observed, revealing the biochemical distribution differences across the tooth. Further polarization-resolved SRS imaging shows different polarization dependences related to the molecular orientation differences of various tooth locations. This work demonstrates the potential of polarization-resolved hyperspectral SRS imaging technique developed in rapidly characterizing biochemical structures and compositions as well as biomolecule organizations/orientations of the tooth without labeling.

  11. New imaging-based biomarkers for melanoma diagnosis using coherent Raman Scattering microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hequn; Osseiran, Sam; Roider, Elisabeth; Fisher, David E.; Evans, Conor L.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, pheomelanin has been found to play a critical role in melanoma progression given its pro-oxidant chemical properties as well as its marked presence in pre-cancerous and malignant melanoma lesions, even in the absence of ultraviolet radiation. In addition, epidemiological evidence indicates a strong correlation between melanoma incidence and skin type, with the highest incidence occurring in individuals of the red-haired/fair-skinned phenotype. Interestingly, nevus count correlates well with melanoma incidence and skin type, except in the population most prone to developing melanoma, where nevus count strikingly drops. As such, a current hypothesis proposes that fair-skinned red-haired individuals, who are unable to stimulate production of eumelanin due to a mutation in MC1R in melanocytes, may actually harbor numerous "invisible", pheomelanin-rich nevi that evade clinical detection, supporting the high incidence of melanoma in that population. Here, we show for the very first time that melanocytes extracted from genetically modified MC1R-mutant, red-haired mice displayed bright perinuclear distributions of signal within the cells under coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Changes in pheomelanin production in siRNA knockdowns of cultured human melanoma cells were also sensed. We then successfully imaged pheomelanin distributions in both ex vivo and in vivo mouse ear skin. Finally, melanosomes within amelanotic melanoma patient tissue sections were found to show bright pheomelanin signals. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that pheomelanin has been found spatially localized in a human amelanotic melanoma sample. These pheomelanotic CARS features may be used as potential biomarkers for melanoma detection, especially for amelanotic melanomas.

  12. Stimulated Raman photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Zhang, Hao F.; Noojin, Gary D.; Denton, Michael L.; Thomas, Robert J.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2010-01-01

    Achieving label-free, molecular-specific imaging with high spatial resolution in deep tissue is often considered the grand challenge of optical imaging. To accomplish this goal, significant optical scattering in tissues has to be overcome while achieving molecular specificity without resorting to extrinsic labeling. We demonstrate the feasibility of developing such an optical imaging modality by combining the molecularly specific stimulated Raman excitation with the photoacoustic detection. By employing two ultrashort excitation laser pulses, separated in frequency by the vibrational frequency of a targeted molecule, only the specific vibrational level of the target molecules in the illuminated tissue volume is excited. This targeted optical absorption generates ultrasonic waves (referred to as stimulated Raman photoacoustic waves) which are detected using a traditional ultrasonic transducer to form an image following the design of the established photoacoustic microscopy. PMID:21059930

  13. Assessing Cholesterol Storage in Live Cells and C. elegans by Stimulated Raman Scattering Imaging of Phenyl-Diyne Cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Zhang, Wandi; Zhang, Delong; Yang, Yang; Liu, Bin; Barker, Eric L.; Buhman, Kimberly K.; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V.; Dai, Mingji; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-01-01

    We report a cholesterol imaging method using rationally synthesized phenyl-diyne cholesterol (PhDY-Chol) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscope. The phenyl-diyne group is biologically inert and provides a Raman scattering cross section that is 88 times larger than the endogenous C = O stretching mode. SRS microscopy offers an imaging speed that is faster than spontaneous Raman microscopy by three orders of magnitude, and a detection sensitivity of 31 μM PhDY-Chol (~1,800 molecules in the excitation volume). Inside living CHO cells, PhDY-Chol mimics the behavior of cholesterol, including membrane incorporation and esterification. In a cellular model of Niemann-Pick type C disease, PhDY-Chol reflects the lysosomal accumulation of cholesterol, and shows relocation to lipid droplets after HPβCD treatment. In live C. elegans, PhDY-Chol mimics cholesterol uptake by intestinal cells and reflects cholesterol storage. Together, our work demonstrates an enabling platform for study of cholesterol storage and trafficking in living cells and vital organisms.

  14. Radially polarized tip-enhanced near-field coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy for vibrational nano-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Zi Jian Er, Kenneth; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-08-01

    We report a radially polarized tip-enhanced near-field coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (RP-TE-CARS) microscopy technique for high-contrast vibrational imaging of subcellular organelles at nano-scale resolutions. The radially polarized pump and Stokes laser beams are tightly focused onto the sample while a gold-coated metallic probe is placed at the upper surface of the sample to enhance the electric field and CARS signals. The back-scattered CARS signal is measured with the gold-coated nano-tip being stationary at the focal region of laser beams. The RP-TE-CARS signal is ˜6-fold higher than that using linearly polarized laser excitation. We demonstrate the good performance of the RP-TE-CARS technique developed by imaging sub-micron polystyrene beads and mitochondria at nano-scale resolutions.

  15. Broadband hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy for stain-free histological imaging with principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingjiang; Guo, Baoshan; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2014-02-01

    Routine procedures in standard histopathology involve laborious steps of tissue processing and staining for final examination. New techniques which can bypass these procedures and thus minimize the tissue handling error would be of great clinical value. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is an attractive tool for label-free biochemical-specific characterization of biological specimen. However, a vast majority of prior works on CARS (or stimulated Raman scattering (SRS)) bioimaging restricted analyses on a narrowband or well-distinctive Raman spectral signatures. Although hyperspectral SRS/CARS imaging has recently emerged as a better solution to access wider-band spectral information in the image, studies mostly focused on a limited spectral range, e.g. CH-stretching vibration of lipids, or non-biological samples. Hyperspectral image information in the congested fingerprint spectrum generally remains untapped for biological samples. In this regard, we further explore ultrabroadband hyperspectral multiplex (HM-CARS) to perform chemoselective histological imaging with the goal of exploring its utility in stain-free clinical histopathology. Using the supercontinuum Stokes, our system can access the CARS spectral window as wide as >2000cm-1. In order to unravel the congested CARS spectra particularly in the fingerprint region, we first employ a spectral phase-retrieval algorithm based on Kramers-Kronig (KK) transform to minimize the non-resonant background in the CARS spectrum. We then apply principal component analysis (PCA) to identify and map the spatial distribution of different biochemical components in the tissues. We demonstrate chemoselective HM-CARS imaging of a colon tissue section which displays the key cellular structures that correspond well with standard stained-tissue observation.

  16. Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering Imaging of Two-Dimensional Tungsten Disulfide with Optimized Tip Fabrication Process

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chanwoo; Kim, Sung Tae; Jeong, Byeong Geun; Yun, Seok Joon; Song, Young Jae; Lee, Young Hee; Park, Doo Jae; Jeong, Mun Seok

    2017-01-01

    We successfully achieve the tip-enhanced nano Raman scattering images of a tungsten disulfide monolayer with optimizing a fabrication method of gold nanotip by controlling the concentration of etchant in an electrochemical etching process. By applying a square-wave voltage supplied from an arbitrary waveform generator to a gold wire, which is immersed in a hydrochloric acid solution diluted with ethanol at various ratios, we find that both the conical angle and radius of curvature of the tip apex can be varied by changing the ratio of hydrochloric acid and ethanol. We also suggest a model to explain the origin of these variations in the tip shape. From the systematic study, we find an optimal condition for achieving the yield of ~60% with the radius of ~34 nm and the cone angle of ~35°. Using representative tips fabricated under the optimal etching condition, we demonstrate the tip-enhanced Raman scattering experiment of tungsten disulfide monolayer grown by a chemical vapor deposition method with a spatial resolution of ~40 nm and a Raman enhancement factor of ~4,760. PMID:28084466

  17. Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering Imaging of Two-Dimensional Tungsten Disulfide with Optimized Tip Fabrication Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chanwoo; Kim, Sung Tae; Jeong, Byeong Geun; Yun, Seok Joon; Song, Young Jae; Lee, Young Hee; Park, Doo Jae; Jeong, Mun Seok

    2017-01-01

    We successfully achieve the tip-enhanced nano Raman scattering images of a tungsten disulfide monolayer with optimizing a fabrication method of gold nanotip by controlling the concentration of etchant in an electrochemical etching process. By applying a square-wave voltage supplied from an arbitrary waveform generator to a gold wire, which is immersed in a hydrochloric acid solution diluted with ethanol at various ratios, we find that both the conical angle and radius of curvature of the tip apex can be varied by changing the ratio of hydrochloric acid and ethanol. We also suggest a model to explain the origin of these variations in the tip shape. From the systematic study, we find an optimal condition for achieving the yield of ~60% with the radius of ~34 nm and the cone angle of ~35°. Using representative tips fabricated under the optimal etching condition, we demonstrate the tip-enhanced Raman scattering experiment of tungsten disulfide monolayer grown by a chemical vapor deposition method with a spatial resolution of ~40 nm and a Raman enhancement factor of ~4,760.

  18. An optimized electroporation method for delivering nanoparticles into living cells for surface-enhanced Raman scattering imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yun; Wang, Jing; Lin, Juqiang; Lin, Duo; Chen, Weiwei; Feng, Shangyuan; Huang, Zufang; Li, Yongzeng; Huang, Hao; Shi, Hong; Chen, Rong

    2016-04-01

    The existing electroporation method can rapidly deliver nanoparticles (NPs) into living cells for intracellular surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging. Unfortunately, the cellular SERS signals are major from molecules located near the two poles of the cell facing toward to the electrodes because most NPs enter cells through these two poles and easily happen to aggregate there. Here, we present an optimized electroporation method for transferring NPs into living cells to obtain a uniform NPs distribution. The distribution of intracellular NPs was monitored by the SERS signal of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid, which is sandwiched between the Au-Ag core-shell and validated by TEM images. In addition, based on this uniform distribution of NPs, we then detected the distribution of cellular molecules like phenylalanine and lipid via SERS imaging. Results demonstrate the great potential for the optimized electroporation-based SERS imaging in cellular study.

  19. Multi-focus excitation coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy and its applications for real-time imaging.

    PubMed

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Fujita, Katsumasa; Kawata, Satoshi; Araki, Tsutomu

    2009-06-08

    We developed a multi-focus excitation coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscope using a microlens array scanner for real-time molecular imaging. Parallel exposure of a specimen with light from two highly controlled picosecond mode-locked lasers (jitter of 30 fs through an electronic low-pass filter with 150 Hz bandwidth, point-by-point wavelength scan within 300 ms) and parallel detection with an image sensor enabled real-time imaging. We demonstrated real-time CARS imaging of polystyrene beads (frame rate of 30 fps), a giant multi-lamellar vesicle of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (frame rate of 10 fps), and living HeLa cells (frame rate of 10 fps).

  20. Nonlinear optical interference of two successive coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering signals for biological imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Seong; Lee, Jae Yong; Yoo, Yong Shim

    2007-01-01

    The nonlinear optical interference of two successively generated coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signals from two different samples placed in series is demonstrated for the imaging performance, in which a collinear phase matching geometry is used. The relative phase of two CARS signals is controlled by a phase-shifting unit made of dispersive glass materials of which the thickness can be precisely varied. The clear interference fringes are observed as the thickness of the phase-shifting unit changes. The interference effect is then utilized to achieve a better quality CARS image of a biological tissue taken from a mouse skin. Placing the tissue in the second sample position and performing raster scans of the laser beams on it, we can acquire a CARS image of higher contrast compared to the normal image obtained without interferometric implementation.

  1. Integrated coherent Raman scattering and multiphoton microscopy for label-free imaging of the dentin in the tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Jian; Hsu, Chin-Ying; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-02-01

    We report the implementation of a unique multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy (i.e., coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation (THG) and two photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF)) platform for label-free imaging of dentin. A picosecond tunable laser together with an OPO is used as the excitation source for simultaneously multimodal imaging. CARS shows similar information as TPEF in dentin, but it has a higher sectioning performance than TPEF and thus it is a good alternative for TPEF. Microtubule structure is revealed nearby dentin enamel junction (DEJ) from the multimodal images. This work demonstrates that combining different nonlinear optical imaging modalities can provide new insights into the understanding of morphological structures and biochemical/biomolecular distributions of the dentine without the need of labeling.

  2. Longitudinal in vivo coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging of demyelination and remyelination in injured spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunzhou; Zhang, Delong; Huff, Terry B.; Wang, Xiaofei; Shi, Riyi; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2011-10-01

    In vivo imaging of white matter is important for the mechanistic understanding of demyelination and evaluation of remyelination therapies. Although white matter can be visualized by a strong coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signal from axonal myelin, in vivo repetitive CARS imaging of the spinal cord remains a challenge due to complexities induced by the laminectomy surgery. We present a careful experimental design that enabled longitudinal CARS imaging of de- and remyelination at single axon level in live rats. In vivo CARS imaging of secretory phospholipase A2 induced myelin vesiculation, macrophage uptake of myelin debris, and spontaneous remyelination by Schwann cells are sequentially monitored over a 3 week period. Longitudinal visualization of de- and remyelination at a single axon level provides a novel platform for rational design of therapies aimed at promoting myelin plasticity and repair.

  3. In situ label-free imaging of hemicellulose in plant cell walls using stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Zeng, Yining; Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; ...

    2016-11-22

    Plant hemicellulose (largely xylan) is an excellent feedstock for renewable energy production and second only to cellulose in abundance. Beyond a source of fermentable sugars, xylan constitutes a critical polymer in the plant cell wall, where its precise role in wall assembly, maturation, and deconstruction remains primarily hypothetical. Effective detection of xylan, particularly by in situ imaging of xylan in the presence of other biopolymers, would provide critical information for tackling the challenges of understanding the assembly and enhancing the liberation of xylan from plant materials. Raman-based imaging techniques, especially the highly sensitive stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, have provenmore » to be valuable tools for label-free imaging. However, due to the complex nature of plant materials, especially those same chemical groups shared between xylan and cellulose, the utility of specific Raman vibrational modes that are unique to xylan have been debated. Here, we report a novel approach based on combining spectroscopic analysis and chemical/enzymatic xylan removal from corn stover cell walls, to make progress in meeting this analytical challenge. We have identified several Raman peaks associated with xylan content in cell walls for label-free in situ imaging xylan in plant cell wall. We demonstrated that xylan can be resolved from cellulose and lignin in situ using enzymatic digestion and label-free SRS microscopy in both 2D and 3D. As a result, we believe that this novel approach can be used to map xylan in plant cell walls and that this ability will enhance our understanding of the role played by xylan in cell wall biosynthesis and deconstruction.« less

  4. In situ label-free imaging of hemicellulose in plant cell walls using stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Yining; Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; Tucker, Melvin P.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Decker, Stephen R.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-11-22

    Plant hemicellulose (largely xylan) is an excellent feedstock for renewable energy production and second only to cellulose in abundance. Beyond a source of fermentable sugars, xylan constitutes a critical polymer in the plant cell wall, where its precise role in wall assembly, maturation, and deconstruction remains primarily hypothetical. Effective detection of xylan, particularly by in situ imaging of xylan in the presence of other biopolymers, would provide critical information for tackling the challenges of understanding the assembly and enhancing the liberation of xylan from plant materials. Raman-based imaging techniques, especially the highly sensitive stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, have proven to be valuable tools for label-free imaging. However, due to the complex nature of plant materials, especially those same chemical groups shared between xylan and cellulose, the utility of specific Raman vibrational modes that are unique to xylan have been debated. Here, we report a novel approach based on combining spectroscopic analysis and chemical/enzymatic xylan removal from corn stover cell walls, to make progress in meeting this analytical challenge. We have identified several Raman peaks associated with xylan content in cell walls for label-free in situ imaging xylan in plant cell wall. We demonstrated that xylan can be resolved from cellulose and lignin in situ using enzymatic digestion and label-free SRS microscopy in both 2D and 3D. As a result, we believe that this novel approach can be used to map xylan in plant cell walls and that this ability will enhance our understanding of the role played by xylan in cell wall biosynthesis and deconstruction.

  5. A Real-Time Clinical Endoscopic System for Intraluminal, Multiplexed Imaging of Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Garai, Ellis; Loewke, Nathan O.; Rogalla, Stephan; Mandella, Michael J.; Felt, Stephen A.; Friedland, Shai; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Contag, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    The detection of biomarker-targeting surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles (NPs) in the human gastrointestinal tract has the potential to improve early cancer detection; however, a clinically relevant device with rapid Raman-imaging capability has not been described. Here we report the design and in vivo demonstration of a miniature, non-contact, opto-electro-mechanical Raman device as an accessory to clinical endoscopes that can provide multiplexed molecular data via a panel of SERS NPs. This device enables rapid circumferential scanning of topologically complex luminal surfaces of hollow organs (e.g., colon and esophagus) and produces quantitative images of the relative concentrations of SERS NPs that are present. Human and swine studies have demonstrated the speed and simplicity of this technique. This approach also offers unparalleled multiplexing capabilities by simultaneously detecting the unique spectral fingerprints of multiple SERS NPs. Therefore, this new screening strategy has the potential to improve diagnosis and to guide therapy by enabling sensitive quantitative molecular detection of small and otherwise hard-to-detect lesions in the context of white-light endoscopy. PMID:25923788

  6. Increasing the imaging depth of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy with a miniature microscope objective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haifeng; Huff, Terry B.; Fu, Yan; Jia, Kevin Y.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2007-08-01

    A miniature objective lens with a tip diameter of 1.3 mm was used for extending the penetration depth of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Its axial and lateral focal widths were determined to be 11.4 and 0.86 μm, respectively, by two-photon excitation fluorescence imaging of 200 nm beads at a 735 nm excitation wavelength. By inserting the lens tip into a soft gel sample, CARS images of 2 μm polystyrene beads 5 mm deep from the surface were acquired. The miniature objective was applied to CARS imaging of rat spinal cord white matter with a minimal requirement for surgery.

  7. Chemical imaging of tissue in vivo with video-rate coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Conor L.; Potma, Eric O.; Puoris'haag, Mehron; Côté, Daniel; Lin, Charles P.; Xie, X. Sunney

    2005-11-01

    Imaging living organisms with molecular selectivity typically requires the introduction of specific labels. Many applications in biology and medicine, however, would significantly benefit from a noninvasive imaging technique that circumvents such exogenous probes. In vivo microscopy based on vibrational spectroscopic contrast offers a unique approach for visualizing tissue architecture with molecular specificity. We have developed a sensitive technique for vibrational imaging of tissues by combining coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) with video-rate microscopy. Backscattering of the intense forward-propagating CARS radiation in tissue gives rise to a strong epi-CARS signal that makes in vivo imaging possible. This substantially large signal allows for real-time monitoring of dynamic processes, such as the diffusion of chemical compounds, in tissues. By tuning into the CH2 stretching vibrational band, we demonstrate CARS imaging and spectroscopy of lipid-rich tissue structures in the skin of a live mouse, including sebaceous glands, corneocytes, and adipocytes, with unprecedented contrast at subcellular resolution. nonlinear microscopy | vibrational imaging | back scattering

  8. Plasmon Mapping in Metallic Nanostructures and its Application to Single Molecule Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering: Imaging Electromagnetic Hot-Spots and Analyte Location

    SciTech Connect

    Camden, Jon P

    2013-07-16

    A major component of this proposal is to elucidate the connection between optical and electron excitation of plasmon modes in metallic nanostructures. These accomplishments are reported: developed a routine protocol for obtaining spatially resolved, low energy EELS spectra, and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra from the same nanostructures.; correlated optical scattering spectra and plasmon maps obtained using STEM/EELS.; and imaged electromagnetic hot spots responsible for single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SMSERS).

  9. Raman Scattering from Tin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    semiconductor and tin metallic allotropes, and we are developing a fundamental understanding of the spectra. The research has identified that BaF2 is an...semiconductor and tin metallic allotropes, and we are developing a fundamental understanding of the spectra. The research has identified that BaF2 is an...deposited on SiO2 .........................................5 Fig. 6 Raman spectrum from the metallic Sn lump at 300 K ...........................6 Fig

  10. Characterization of conductive nanobiomaterials derived from viral assemblies by low-voltage STEM imaging and Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Carreño-Fuentes, Liliana; Bahena, Daniel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Palomares, Laura A.; Ramírez, Octavio T.

    2014-09-01

    New technologies require the development of novel nanomaterials that need to be fully characterized to achieve their potential. High-resolution low-voltage scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has proven to be a very powerful technique in nanotechnology, but its use for the characterization of nanobiomaterials has been limited. Rotavirus VP6 self-assembles into nanotubular assemblies that possess an intrinsic affinity for Au ions. This property was exploited to produce hybrid nanobiomaterials by the in situ functionalization of recombinant VP6 nanotubes with gold nanoparticles. In this work, Raman spectroscopy and advanced analytical electron microscopy imaging with spherical aberration-corrected (Cs) STEM and nanodiffraction at low-voltage doses were employed to characterize nanobiomaterials. STEM imaging revealed the precise structure and arrangement of the protein templates, as well as the nanostructure and atomic arrangement of gold nanoparticles with high spatial sub-Angstrom resolution and avoided radiation damage. The imaging was coupled with backscattered electron imaging, ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy and x-ray spectroscopy. The hybrid nanobiomaterials that were obtained showed unique properties as bioelectronic conductive devices and showed enhanced Raman scattering by their precise arrangement into superlattices, displaying the utility of viral assemblies as functional integrative self-assembled nanomaterials for novel applications.

  11. Rayleigh, Raman and particulate scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of the visible and near infrared spectra of planetary atmospheres and the multiple scattering of photons within the atmosphere are discussed. Photons detected within the spectral region are solar photons which were scattered by the gas and particles in the planetary atmosphere. An example is given for the incident and emitted fluxes for a hypothetical planet with an effective temperature of 100 K. The absorption spectrum of the planetary atmosphere is discussed in terms of the various scattering processes photons undergo within the atmosphere. Three different physical processes are considered. Rayleigh scattering and Raman scattering by the gas molecules, and scattering by any cloud or dust aerosol particles in the atmosphere. The physics of each of these processes is examined.

  12. Chemical imaging by single pulse interferometric coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sang-Hyun; Caster, Allison G; Nicolet, Olivier; Leone, Stephen R

    2006-03-23

    A single pulse interferometric coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS) spectroscopy method is used to obtain broadband CARS spectra and microscopy images of liquid and polymer samples. The pump, Stokes, and probe pulses are all selected inside a single broadband ultrafast pulse by a phase- and polarization-controlled pulse shaping technique and used to generate two spectral interference CARS signals simultaneously. The normalized difference of these two signals provides an amplified background-free broadband resonant CARS spectrum over the 400-1500 cm(-1) range with 35 cm(-1) spectral resolution. Chemically selective microscopy images of multicomponent polymer and liquid samples are investigated with this new CARS method. Multiplex CARS spectra at 10,000 spatial points are measured within a few minutes, and used to construct chemically selective microscopy images with a spatial resolution of 400 nm. The spectral bandwidth limits, sensitivity, homodyne amplification advantages, spatial resolution, depolarization, chromatic aberration, and chemical imaging aspects of this new technique are discussed in detail.

  13. Hyperspectral-stimulated Raman scattering imaging of cholesteryl ester accumulation: new avenue to diagnosis of human prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jun; Wang, Ping; Yue, Shuhua

    2016-10-01

    Most prostate cancers (PCa) are slowly growing, and only the aggressive ones require early diagnosis and effective treatment. The current standard for PCa diagnosis remains histopathology. Nonetheless, for the differentiation between Gleason score 6 (low-risk PCa), which can be left without treatment, and Gleason score 7 (high-risk PCa), which requires active treatment, the inter-observer discordance can be up to 40%. Our previous study reveals that cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation induced by PI3K/AKT activation underlies human PCa aggressiveness. However, Raman spectromicroscopy used in this study could only provide compositional information of certain lipid droplets (LDs) selected by the observer, which overlooked cell-to-cell variation and hindered translation to accurate automated diagnosis. Here, we demonstrated quantitative mapping of CE level in human prostate tissues using hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy that renders compositional information for every pixel in the image. Specifically, hundreds of SRS images at Raman shift between 1620-1800 cm-1 were taken, and multivariate curve resolution algorism was used to retrieve concentration images of acyl C=C bond, sterol C=C bond, and ester C=O bond. Given that the ratio between images of sterol C=C and ester C=O (sterol C=C/C=O) is nonlinearly proportional to CE percentage out of total lipid, we were able to quantitatively map CE level. Our data showed that CE level was significantly greater in high Gleason grade compared to low Gleason grade, and could be a factor that significantly contributed to cancer recurrence. Our study provides an opportunity towards more accurate PCa diagnosis and prediction of aggressiveness.

  14. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy driving the future of loaded mesoporous silica imaging.

    PubMed

    Fussell, Andrew L; Mah, Pei Ting; Offerhaus, Herman; Niemi, Sanna-Mari; Salonen, Jarno; Santos, Hélder A; Strachan, Clare

    2014-11-01

    This study reports the use of variants of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy as a novel method for improved physicochemical characterization of drug-loaded silica particles. Ordered mesoporous silica is a biomaterial that can be loaded to carry a number of biochemicals, including poorly water-soluble drugs, by allowing the incorporation of drug into nanometer-sized pores. In this work, the loading of two poorly water-soluble model drugs, itraconazole and griseofulvin, in MCM-41 silica microparticles is characterized qualitatively, using the novel approach of CARS microscopy, which has advantages over other analytical approaches used to date and is non-destructive, rapid, label free, confocal and has chemical and physical specificity. The study investigated the effect of two solvent-based loading methods, namely immersion and rotary evaporation, and microparticle size on the three-dimensional (3-D) distribution of the two loaded drugs. Additionally, hyperspectral CARS microscopy was used to confirm the amorphous nature of the loaded drugs. Z-stacked CARS microscopy suggested that the drug, but not the loading method or particle size range, affected 3-D drug distribution. Hyperspectral CARS confirmed that the drug loaded in the MCM-41 silica microparticles was in an amorphous form. The results show that CARS microscopy and hyperspectral CARS microscopy can be used to provide further insights into the structural nature of loaded mesoporous silica microparticles as biomaterials.

  15. Penetration of silver nanoparticles into porcine skin ex vivo using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, Raman microscopy, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongjian; Choe, Chun-Sik; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Meinke, Martina C; Alexiev, Ulrike; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the penetration depth of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) inside the skin, porcine ears treated with Ag NPs are measured by two-photon tomography with a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (TPT-FLIM) technique, confocal Raman microscopy (CRM), and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) microscopy. Ag NPs are coated with poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone and dispersed in pure water solutions. After the application of Ag NPs, porcine ears are stored in the incubator for 24 h at a temperature of 37°C. The TPT-FLIM measurement results show a dramatic decrease of the Ag NPs' signal intensity from the skin surface to a depth of 4 μm. Below 4 μm, the Ag NPs' signal continues to decline, having completely disappeared at 12 to 14 μm depth. CRM shows that the penetration depth of Ag NPs is 11.1 ± 2.1 μm. The penetration depth measured with a highly sensitive SERS microscopy reaches 15.6 ± 8.3 μm. Several results obtained with SERS show that the penetration depth of Ag NPs can exceed the stratum corneum (SC) thickness, which can be explained by both penetration of trace amounts of Ag NPs through the SC barrier and by the measurements inside the hair follicle, which cannot be excluded in the experiment.

  16. Penetration of silver nanoparticles into porcine skin ex vivo using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, Raman microscopy, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yongjian; Choe, Chun-Sik; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Meinke, Martina C.; Alexiev, Ulrike; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E.

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the penetration depth of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) inside the skin, porcine ears treated with Ag NPs are measured by two-photon tomography with a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (TPT-FLIM) technique, confocal Raman microscopy (CRM), and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) microscopy. Ag NPs are coated with poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone and dispersed in pure water solutions. After the application of Ag NPs, porcine ears are stored in the incubator for 24 h at a temperature of 37°C. The TPT-FLIM measurement results show a dramatic decrease of the Ag NPs' signal intensity from the skin surface to a depth of 4 μm. Below 4 μm, the Ag NPs' signal continues to decline, having completely disappeared at 12 to 14 μm depth. CRM shows that the penetration depth of Ag NPs is 11.1±2.1 μm. The penetration depth measured with a highly sensitive SERS microscopy reaches 15.6±8.3 μm. Several results obtained with SERS show that the penetration depth of Ag NPs can exceed the stratum corneum (SC) thickness, which can be explained by both penetration of trace amounts of Ag NPs through the SC barrier and by the measurements inside the hair follicle, which cannot be excluded in the experiment.

  17. Imaging of Lipids in Microalgae with Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cavonius, Lillie; Fink, Helen; Kiskis, Juris; Albers, Eva; Undeland, Ingrid; Enejder, Annika

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae have great prospects as a sustainable resource of lipids for refinement into nutraceuticals and biodiesel, which increases the need for detailed insights into their intracellular lipid synthesis/storage mechanisms. As an alternative strategy to solvent- and label-based lipid quantification techniques, we introduce time-gated coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy for monitoring lipid contents in living algae, despite strong autofluorescence from the chloroplasts, at approximately picogram and subcellular levels by probing inherent molecular vibrations. Intracellular lipid droplet synthesis was followed in Phaeodactylum tricornutum algae grown under (1) light/nutrient-replete (control [Ctrl]), (2) light-limited (LL), and (3) nitrogen-starved (NS) conditions. Good correlation (r2 = 0.924) was found between lipid volume data yielded by CARS microscopy and total fatty acid content obtained from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. In Ctrl and LL cells, micron-sized lipid droplets were found to increase in number throughout the growth phases, particularly in the stationary phase. During more excessive lipid accumulation, as observed in NS cells, promising commercial harvest as biofuels and nutritional lipids, several micron-sized droplets were present already initially during cultivation, which then fused into a single giant droplet toward stationary phase alongside with new droplets emerging. CARS microspectroscopy further indicated lower lipid fluidity in NS cells than in Ctrl and LL cells, potentially due to higher fatty acid saturation. This agreed with the fatty acid profiles gathered by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. CARS microscopy could thus provide quantitative and semiqualitative data at the single-cell level along with important insights into lipid-accumulating mechanisms, here revealing two different modes for normal and excessive lipid accumulation. PMID:25583924

  18. A stimulated Raman scattering imager using high-speed lateral electric field modulator and lock-in pixels amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mars, Kamel; Guseul, Beak; Han, Sang Man; Takasawa, Taishi; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Kawahito, Shoji

    2014-03-01

    A high speed Lateral Electric Field Modulator (LEFM) and lock-in pixels amplifiers for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS)imager is presented. Since the generated signal from the SRS process is very small compared to the offset signal, a technique suitable for extracting and amplifying the SRS signal is needed. The offset can be canceled by tuning the phase delay between the demodulated pixel output signal and the sampling clock. The small SRS signal in large offset is amplified by the differential integration. The proposed technique has been investigated with an implementation of 64x8 pixels array using a pinned photodiode LEFM an lock-in pixels amplifiers. Very small signal can be extracted from large offset signal. A ratio of the detected small SRS to offset signal of less 10-5 is achieved.

  19. Detection and imaging of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm communities by surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodelón, Gustavo; Montes-García, Verónica; López-Puente, Vanesa; Hill, Eric H.; Hamon, Cyrille; Sanz-Ortiz, Marta N.; Rodal-Cedeira, Sergio; Costas, Celina; Celiksoy, Sirin; Pérez-Juste, Ignacio; Scarabelli, Leonardo; La Porta, Andrea; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel; Liz-Marzán, Luis M.

    2016-11-01

    Most bacteria in nature exist as biofilms, which support intercellular signalling processes such as quorum sensing (QS), a cell-to-cell communication mechanism that allows bacteria to monitor and respond to cell density and changes in the environment. As QS and biofilms are involved in the ability of bacteria to cause disease, there is a need for the development of methods for the non-invasive analysis of QS in natural bacterial populations. Here, by using surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering spectroscopy, we report rationally designed nanostructured plasmonic substrates for the in situ, label-free detection of a QS signalling metabolite in growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and microcolonies. The in situ, non-invasive plasmonic imaging of QS in biofilms provides a powerful analytical approach for studying intercellular communication on the basis of secreted molecules as signals.

  20. Detection and imaging of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm communities by surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Bodelón, Gustavo; Montes-García, Verónica; López-Puente, Vanesa; Hill, Eric H.; Hamon, Cyrille; Sanz-Ortiz, Marta N.; Rodal-Cedeira, Sergio; Costas, Celina; Celiksoy, Sirin; Pérez-Juste, Ignacio; Scarabelli, Leonardo; Porta, Andrea La; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Most bacteria in nature exist as biofilms, which support intercellular signaling processes such as quorum sensing (QS), a cell-to-cell communication mechanism that allows bacteria to monitor and respond to cell density and changes in the environment. Because QS and biofilms are involved in the ability of bacteria to cause disease, there is a need for the development of methods for the non-invasive analysis of QS in natural bacterial populations. Here, by using surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering spectroscopy, we report rationally designed nanostructured plasmonic substrates for the in-situ, label-free detection of a QS signaling metabolite in growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and microcolonies. The in situ, non-invasive plasmonic imaging of QS in biofilms provides a powerful analytical approach for studying intercellular communication on the basis of secreted molecules as signals. PMID:27500808

  1. Integrated femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering and two-photon fluorescence imaging of subcellular lipid and vesicular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuesong; Lam, Wen Jiun; Cao, Zhe; Hao, Yan; Sun, Qiqi; He, Sicong; Mak, Ho Yi; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2015-11-01

    The primary goal of this study is to demonstrate that stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) as a new imaging modality can be integrated into a femtosecond (fs) nonlinear optical (NLO) microscope system. The fs sources of high pulse peak power are routinely used in multimodal nonlinear microscopy to enable efficient excitation of multiple NLO signals. However, with fs excitations, the SRS imaging of subcellular lipid and vesicular structures encounters significant interference from proteins due to poor spectral resolution and a lack of chemical specificity, respectively. We developed a unique NLO microscope of fs excitation that enables rapid acquisition of SRS and multiple two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signals. In the in vivo imaging of transgenic C. elegans animals, we discovered that by cross-filtering false positive lipid signals based on the TPEF signals from tryptophan-bearing endogenous proteins and lysosome-related organelles, the imaging system produced highly accurate assignment of SRS signals to lipid. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the multimodal NLO microscope system could sequentially image lipid structure/content and organelles, such as mitochondria, lysosomes, and the endoplasmic reticulum, which are intricately linked to lipid metabolism.

  2. Integrated femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering and two-photon fluorescence imaging of subcellular lipid and vesicular structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuesong; Lam, Wen Jiun; Cao, Zhe; Hao, Yan; Sun, Qiqi; He, Sicong; Mak, Ho Yi; Qu, Jianan Y

    2015-11-01

    The primary goal of this study is to demonstrate that stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) as a new imaging modality can be integrated into a femtosecond (fs) nonlinear optical (NLO) microscope system. The fs sources of high pulse peak power are routinely used in multimodal nonlinear microscopy to enable efficient excitation of multiple NLO signals. However, with fs excitations, the SRS imaging of subcellular lipid and vesicular structures encounters significant interference from proteins due to poor spectral resolution and a lack of chemical specificity, respectively. We developed a unique NLO microscope of fs excitation that enables rapid acquisition of SRS and multiple two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signals. In the in vivo imaging of transgenic C. elegans animals, we discovered that by cross-filtering false positive lipid signals based on the TPEF signals from tryptophan-bearing endogenous proteins and lysosome-related organelles, the imaging system produced highly accurate assignment of SRS signals to lipid. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the multimodal NLO microscope system could sequentially image lipid structure/content and organelles, such as mitochondria, lysosomes, and the endoplasmic reticulum, which are intricately linked to lipid metabolism.

  3. Application of coherent antistokes Raman scattering (CARS) to imaging mammalian cells: a means for gaining molecular selectivity in multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtom, Gary R.; Thrall, Brian; Weber, Thomas; Zhu, Leyun; Hopkins, Derek; Parkinson, Christopher; Colson, Steven; Price, John M.; Chin, Beek Yoke; Choi, Augustine; Risby, Terence

    2001-04-01

    Virtually all laser based microscopy imaging methods involve a single laser, with ultrafast lasers emerging as the enabling tool for a variety of methods. Two-photon fluorescence is a high sensitivity method with selectivity depending on a chromophore that is either added or produced by genetic engineering. While there are fundamental advantages over white light or other fluorescence microscopies, there are unavoidable limitations such as bleaching, photoinduced damage to the cell, and the inability to label some major constituents of the cell, particularly the abundant species. Raman imaging affords chemical selectivity but application is limited due particularly to its low sensitivity and unavoidable fluorescence background. Adding a second laser beam, shifted from the first laser by a molecular vibrational frequency, increases the detected Raman signal by many orders of magnitude and in addition shifts the detected signal to the high energy (blue) side of both lasers, removing fluorescence artifacts. Signal levels sufficient to acquire high signal-to-noise ratio images of 200 by 200 pixels in one minute requires sub-nanojoule pulse energy. A convenient, tunable source of the Stokes-shifted beam is provided by an Optical Parametric Amplifier (OPA), which requires an amplified laser. 250-kHz sources have ample energy and in addition keep the average sample power on the order of 0.1 mW, a level that even sensitive biological systems tolerate at the focal spot diameter of 0.3 micrometers . Long-term viability of mammalian cells has been demonstrated during dozens of scans in a single plane. Two-photon fluorescence provides a useful complimentary data channel that is acquired simultaneously with the Raman image. Several dyes and green fluorescence protein have been used for this purpose. Interpretation of images, acquiring three dimensional images, and identification of cellular features are ongoing activities.

  4. Label-free imaging of trabecular meshwork cells using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Tim C.; Ammar, David A.; Masihzadeh, Omid; Gibson, Emily A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To image the human trabecular meshwork (TM) using a non-invasive, non-destructive technique without the application of exogenous label. Methods Flat-mounted TM samples from a human cadaver eye were imaged using two nonlinear optical techniques: coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and two-photon autofluorescence (TPAF). In TPAF, two optical photons are simultaneously absorbed and excite molecules in the sample that then emit a higher energy photon. The signal is predominately from collagen and elastin. The CARS technique uses two laser frequencies to specifically excite carbon-hydrogen bonds, allowing the visualization of lipid-rich cell membranes. Multiple images were taken along an axis perpendicular to the surface of the TM for subsequent analysis. Results Analysis of multiple TPAF images of the TM reveals the characteristic overlapping bundles of collagen of various sizes. Simultaneous CARS imaging revealed elliptical structures of ~7×10 µm in diameter populating the meshwork which were consistent with TM cells. Irregularly shaped objects of ~4 µm diameter appeared in both the TPAF and CARS channels, and are consistent with melanin granules. Conclusions CARS techniques were successful in imaging live TM cells in freshly isolated human TM samples. Similar images have been obtained with standard histological techniques, however the method described here has the advantage of being performed on unprocessed, unfixed tissue free from the potential distortions of the fine tissue morphology that can occur due to infusion of fixatives and treatment with alcohols. CARS imaging of the TM represents a new avenue for exploring details of aqueous outflow and TM cell physiology. PMID:22025898

  5. Snapshot Raman Spectral Imager

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-31

    5 P. J. Treado, M. P. Nelson, R. Schweitzer, C. Gardner, and R. Wentworth, "Standoff Raman Hyperspectral Imaging Detection of...cope with target signatures in a wide variety of backgrounds. While the majority of Raman systems available are point-based, having imaging...for the proposed Phase I architecture. ................................................................................... 16 Figure 6: (a) Target

  6. Vibrational imaging of glucose uptake activity in live cells and tissues by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fanghao; Chen, Zhixing; Zhang, Luyuan; Shen, Yihui; Wei, Lu; Min, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Glucose is consumed as an energy source by virtually all living organisms, from bacteria to humans. Its uptake activity closely reflects the cellular metabolic status in various pathophysiological transformations, such as diabetes and cancer. Extensive efforts such as positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence microscopy have been made to specifically image glucose uptake activity but all with technical limitations. Here, we report a new platform to visualize glucose uptake activity in live cells and tissues with subcellular resolution and minimal perturbation. A novel glucose analogue with a small alkyne tag (carbon-carbon triple bond) is developed to mimic natural glucose for cellular uptake, which can be imaged with high sensitivity and specificity by targeting the strong and characteristic alkyne vibration on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscope to generate a quantitative three dimensional concentration map. Cancer cells with differing metabolic characteristics can be distinguished. Heterogeneous uptake patterns are observed in tumor xenograft tissues, neuronal culture and mouse brain tissues with clear cell-cell variations. Therefore, by offering the distinct advantage of optical resolution but without the undesirable influence of bulky fluorophores, our method of coupling SRS with alkyne labeled glucose will be an attractive tool to study energy demands of living systems at the single cell level.

  7. Assessment of liver steatosis and fibrosis in rats using integrated coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and multiphoton imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Lu, Fake; Zheng, Wei; Xu, Shuoyu; Tai, Dean; Yu, Hanry; Huang, Zhiwei

    2011-11-01

    We report the implementation of a unique integrated coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second-harmonic generation (SHG), and two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy imaging technique developed for label-free monitoring of the progression of liver steatosis and fibrosis generated in a bile duct ligation (BDL) rat model. Among the 21 adult rats used in this study, 18 rats were performed with BDL surgery and sacrificed each week from weeks 1 to 6 (n = 3 per week), respectively; whereas 3 rats as control were sacrificed at week 0. Colocalized imaging of the aggregated hepatic fats, collagen fibrils, and hepatocyte morphologies in liver tissue is realized by using the integrated CARS, SHG, and TPEF technique. The results show that there are significant accumulations of hepatic lipid droplets and collagen fibrils associated with severe hepatocyte necrosis in BDL rat liver as compared to a normal liver tissue. The volume of normal hepatocytes keeps decreasing and the fiber collagen content in BDL rat liver follows a growing trend until week 6; whereas the hepatic fat content reaches a maximum in week 4 and then appears to stop growing in week 6, indicating that liver steatosis and fibrosis induced in a BDL rat liver model may develop at different rates. This work demonstrates that the integrated CARS and multiphoton microscopy imaging technique has the potential to provide an effective means for early diagnosis and detection of liver steatosis and fibrosis without labeling.

  8. Multifunctional superparamagnetic nanoshells: combining two-photon luminescence imaging, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiulong; Li, Haiyan; Wang, Shanshan; Kong, Ni; Xu, Hong; Fu, Qihua; Gu, Hongchen; Ye, Jian

    2014-11-06

    With the increasing need for multi-purpose analysis in the biomedical field, traditional single diagnosis methods cannot meet the requirements. Therefore new multifunctional technologies and materials for the integration of sample collection, sensing and imaging are in great demand. Core-shell nanoparticles offer a unique platform to combine multifunctions in a single particle. In this work, we have constructed a novel type of core-shell superparamagnetic nanoshell (Fe₃O₄@SiO₂@Au), composed of a Fe₃O₄ cluster core, a thin Au shell and a SiO₂ layer in between. The obtained multifunctional nanoparticles combine the magnetic properties and plasmonic optical properties effectively, which were well investigated by a number of experimental characterization methods and theoretical simulations. We have demonstrated that Fe₃O₄@SiO₂@Au nanoparticles can be utilized for two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman scattering (NIR SERS) and cell collection by magnetic separation. The TPL intensity could be further greatly enhanced through the plasmon coupling effect in the self-assembled nanoparticle chains, which were triggered by an external magnetic field. In addition, Fe₃O₄@SiO₂@Au nanoparticles may have great potential applications such as enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photo-thermotherapy. Successful combination of multifunctions including magnetic response, biosensing and bioimaging in single nanoparticles allows further manipulation, real-time tracking, and intracellular molecule analysis of live cells at a single-cell level.

  9. Gate dependent electronic Raman scattering in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, E.; Méasson, M.-A.; Kazayous, M.; Sacuto, A.; Gallais, Y.; Spectroscopy Of Quasi-Particles (Squap) Team

    We report the direct observation of polarization resolved electronic Raman scattering in a gated monolayer graphene device. The evolution of the electronic Raman scattering spectra with gate voltage and its polarization dependence are in full agreement with theoretical expectations for non-resonant Raman processes involving interband electron-hole excitations across the Dirac cone. We further show that the spectral dependence of the electronic Raman scattering signal can be simply described by the dynamical polarizability of graphene in the long wavelength limit. The possibility to directly observe Dirac fermion excitations in graphene opens the way to promising Raman investigations of electronic properties of graphene and other 2D materials.

  10. Gate dependent electronic Raman scattering in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, E.; Méasson, M.-A.; Kazayous, M.; Sacuto, A.; Gallais, Y.; Spectroscopy Of Quasi-Particles (Squap) Team

    We report the direct observation of polarization resolved electronic Raman scattering in a gated monolayer graphene device. The evolution of the electronic Raman scattering spectra with gate voltage and its polarization dependence are in full agreement with theoretical expectations for non-resonant Raman processes involving interband electron-hole excitations across the Dirac cone [1]. We further show that the spectral dependence of the electronic Raman scattering signal can be simply described by the dynamical polarizability of graphene in the long wavelength limit [2]. The possibility to directly observe Dirac fermion excitations in graphene opens the way to promising Raman investigations of electronic properties of graphene and other 2D materials.

  11. Imaging the Effects of Prostaglandin Analogues on Cultured Trabecular Meshwork Cells by Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Tim C.; Masihzadeh, Omid; Kahook, Malik Y.; Ammar, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to nondestructively monitor morphological changes to the lipid membranes of primary cultures of living human trabecular meshwork cells (hTMC) without the application of exogenous label. Methods. Live hTMC were imaged using two nonlinear optical techniques: coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and two-photon autofluorescence (TPAF). The hTMC were treated with a commercial formulation of latanoprost (0.5 μg/mL) for 24 hours before imaging. Untreated cells and cells treated with vehicle containing the preservative benzalkonium chloride (BAK; 2 μg/mL) were imaged as controls. After CARS/TPAF imaging, hTMC were fixed, stained with the fluorescent lipid dye Nile Red, and imaged by conventional confocal microscopy to verify lipid membrane structures. Results. Analysis of CARS/TPAF images of hTMC treated with latanoprost revealed multiple intracellular lipid membranes absent from untreated or BAK-treated hTMC. Treatment of hTMC with sodium fluoride or ouabain, agents shown to cause morphological changes to hTMC, also did not induce formation of intracellular lipid membranes. Conclusions. CARS microscopy detected changes in living hTMC morphology that were validated by subsequent histological stain. Prostaglandin-induced changes to hTMC involved rearrangement of lipid membranes within these cells. These in vitro results identify a novel biological response to a class of antiglaucoma drugs, and further experiments are needed to establish how this effect is involved in the hypotensive action of prostaglandin analogues in vivo. PMID:23900606

  12. Integrated Raman and angular scattering microscopy (IRAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Zachary J.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2008-02-01

    A microscope system has been constructed that allows simultaneous acquisition of Raman scattering spectra and elastic scattering Fourier-plane data. The Raman scattering channel reports on chemical composition of the microscopic sample while the elastic scattering channel reports on morphological information about the sample. The system has been validated by acquiring data from single polystyrene beads and analyzing the elastic scattering signal using Generalized Lorenz-Mie Theory while comparing the Raman scattering signature to other polystyrene spectra from the literature. Monocytes and neutrophils, two immune cell types, have also been studied and show clear chemical and morphological differences between cell types.

  13. Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy with a Robust Fibre Laser Source

    PubMed Central

    Freudiger, Christian W.; Yang, Wenlong; Holtom, Gary R.; Peyghambarian, Nasser; Xie, X. Sunney; Kieu, Khanh Q.

    2014-01-01

    Stimulated Raman Scattering microscopy allows label-free chemical imaging and has enabled exciting applications in biology, material science, and medicine. It provides a major advantage in imaging speed over spontaneous Raman scattering and has improved image contrast and spectral fidelity compared to coherent anti-Stokes Raman. Wider adoption of the technique has, however, been hindered by the need for a costly and environmentally sensitive tunable ultra-fast dual-wavelength source. We present the development of an optimized all-fibre laser system based on the optical synchronization of two picosecond power amplifiers. To circumvent the high-frequency laser noise intrinsic to amplified fibre lasers, we have further developed a high-speed noise cancellation system based on voltage-subtraction autobalanced detection. We demonstrate uncompromised imaging performance of our fibre-laser based stimulated Raman scattering microscope with shot-noise limited sensitivity and an imaging speed up to 1 frame/s. PMID:25313312

  14. Nonperturbative Chemical Imaging of Organelle Transport in Living Cells with Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Xiaolin; Potma, Eric O.; Xie, X. Sunney

    2006-01-01

    Nonperturbative monitoring of intracellular organelle transport in unstained living cells was achieved with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. To avoid possible interference with the organelle transport introduced by laser radiation, we first examined different illumination conditions. Using a new photodamage criterion based on morphological changes of the cells, we determined the threshold values of both pulse energy and average power at relevant wavelengths. Under excitation conditions much milder than the threshold levels, we were able to monitor the motions of lipid droplet (LD) organelles in steroidogenic mouse adrenal cortical (Y-1) cells with CARS microscopy in real time without perturbations to the cells. Particle tracking analyses revealed subdiffusion as well as active transport of LDs along microtubules. Interestingly, LD active transport is only present in Y-1 cells that rounded up in culture, a morphological change associated with steroidogenesis, suggesting possible involvements of LD active transport in the latter. Simultaneous imaging of LDs and mitochondria with CARS and two-photon fluorescence microscopy clearly showed that interactions between the two organelles could be facilitated by high LD motility. These observations demonstrate CARS microscopy as a powerful noninvasive imaging tool for studying dynamic processes in living cells. PMID:16632501

  15. Surface enhanced Raman scattering on Tardigrada--towards monitoring and imaging molecular structures in live cryptobiotic organisms.

    PubMed

    Kneipp, Harald; Møbjerg, Nadja; Jørgensen, Aslak; Bohr, Henrik G; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus; Kneipp, Janina; Kneipp, Katrin

    2013-10-01

    Tardigrades are microscopic metazoans which are able to survive extreme physical and chemical conditions by entering a stress tolerant state called cryptobiosis. At present, the molecular mechanisms behind cryptobiosis are still poorly understood. We show that surface enhanced Raman scattering supported by plasmonic gold nanoparticles can measure molecular constituents and their local distribution in live tardigrades. Surface enhanced Raman signatures allow to differentiate between two species and indicate molecular structural differences between tardigrades in water and in a dry state. This opens new avenues for exploring cryptobiosis by studying molecular changes in live cryptobiotic organisms.

  16. Multifunctional superparamagnetic nanoshells: combining two-photon luminescence imaging, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and magnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiulong; Li, Haiyan; Wang, Shanshan; Kong, Ni; Xu, Hong; Fu, Qihua; Gu, Hongchen; Ye, Jian

    2014-11-01

    With the increasing need for multi-purpose analysis in the biomedical field, traditional single diagnosis methods cannot meet the requirements. Therefore new multifunctional technologies and materials for the integration of sample collection, sensing and imaging are in great demand. Core-shell nanoparticles offer a unique platform to combine multifunctions in a single particle. In this work, we have constructed a novel type of core-shell superparamagnetic nanoshell (Fe3O4@SiO2@Au), composed of a Fe3O4 cluster core, a thin Au shell and a SiO2 layer in between. The obtained multifunctional nanoparticles combine the magnetic properties and plasmonic optical properties effectively, which were well investigated by a number of experimental characterization methods and theoretical simulations. We have demonstrated that Fe3O4@SiO2@Au nanoparticles can be utilized for two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman scattering (NIR SERS) and cell collection by magnetic separation. The TPL intensity could be further greatly enhanced through the plasmon coupling effect in the self-assembled nanoparticle chains, which were triggered by an external magnetic field. In addition, Fe3O4@SiO2@Au nanoparticles may have great potential applications such as enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photo-thermotherapy. Successful combination of multifunctions including magnetic response, biosensing and bioimaging in single nanoparticles allows further manipulation, real-time tracking, and intracellular molecule analysis of live cells at a single-cell level.With the increasing need for multi-purpose analysis in the biomedical field, traditional single diagnosis methods cannot meet the requirements. Therefore new multifunctional technologies and materials for the integration of sample collection, sensing and imaging are in great demand. Core-shell nanoparticles offer a unique platform to combine multifunctions in a single particle. In this work, we have

  17. Differential two-signal picosecond-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging microscopy by using a dual-mode optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yong Shim; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Cho, Hyuck

    2007-11-15

    We propose and demonstrate a novel differential two-signal technique of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging microscopy using a picosecond (ps) optical parametric oscillator (OPO). By adjusting a Lyot filter inside the cavity, we operated the OPO oscillating in two stable modes separated by a few nanometers. The CARS images generated by the two modes are separated by a spectrograph behind the microscope setup, and their differential image is directly obtained by balanced lock-in detection. The feasibility of the technique is experimentally verified by imaging micrometer-sized polystyrene beads immersed in water.

  18. Imaging the intracellular distribution of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in living cells with quantitative hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Dan; Zhou, Jing; Zhu, Wenjing Suzanne; Manley, Paul W.; Wang, Y. Karen; Hood, Tami; Wylie, Andrew; Xie, X. Sunney

    2014-07-01

    ABL1 tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKI) are front-line therapy for chronic myelogenous leukaemia and are among the best-known examples of targeted cancer therapeutics. However, the dynamic uptake into cells of TKIs of low molecular weight and their intracellular behaviour is unknown because of the difficulty of observing non-fluorescent small molecules at subcellular resolution. Here we report the direct label-free visualization and quantification of two TKI drugs (imatinib and nilotinib) inside living cells using hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering imaging. Concentrations of both drugs were enriched over 1,000-fold in lysosomes as a result of their lysosomotropic properties. In addition, low solubility appeared to contribute significantly to the surprisingly large accumulation of nilotinib. We further show that the lysosomal trapping of imatinib was reduced more than tenfold when chloroquine is used simultaneously, which suggests that chloroquine may increase the efficacy of TKIs through lysosome-mediated drug-drug interaction in addition to the commonly proposed autophagy-inhibition mechanism.

  19. Dispersive Fourier transformation femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobner, Sven; Fallnich, Carsten

    2016-11-01

    We present the first proof-of-principle spectroscopic measurements with purely passive dispersive Fourier transformation femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering. In femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering, the full Raman scattering spectrum is efficiently obtained, as all Raman transitions are coherently excited with the combination of a narrow-bandwidth and a broad-bandwidth (femtosecond) pulse at once. Currently, the detection speed of the spectra is limited by the read-out time of classical, comparably slow CCD-based spectrometers. We show a reduction in the acquisition time of Raman signatures by applying the dispersive Fourier transformation, a method employing wavelength-to-time transformation, in order to record the spectral composition of a single pulse with a single fast photodiode. This arrangement leads to an acquisition time of Raman signatures, scaling inversely with the repetition frequency of the applied laser system, which in our case corresponds to the order of microseconds.

  20. Label-free real-time imaging of myelination in the Xenopus laevis tadpole by in vivo stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chun-Rui; Zhang, Delong; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Hu, Bing

    2014-08-01

    The myelin sheath plays an important role as the axon in the functioning of the neural system, and myelin degradation is a hallmark pathology of multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Electron microscopy, fluorescent microscopy, and magnetic resonance imaging are three major techniques used for myelin visualization. However, microscopic observation of myelin in living organisms remains a challenge. Using a newly developed stimulated Raman scattering microscopy approach, we report noninvasive, label-free, real-time in vivo imaging of myelination by a single-Schwann cell, maturation of a single node of Ranvier, and myelin degradation in the transparent body of the Xenopus laevis tadpole.

  1. Label-free real-time imaging of myelination in the Xenopus laevis tadpole by in vivo stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chun-Rui; Zhang, Delong; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Hu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The myelin sheath plays an important role as the axon in the functioning of the neural system, and myelin degradation is a hallmark pathology of multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Electron microscopy, fluorescent microscopy, and magnetic resonance imaging are three major techniques used for myelin visualization. However, microscopic observation of myelin in living organisms remains a challenge. Using a newly developed stimulated Raman scattering microscopy approach, we report noninvasive, label-free, real-time in vivo imaging of myelination by a single-Schwann cell, maturation of a single node of Ranvier, and myelin degradation in the transparent body of the Xenopus laevis tadpole. PMID:25104411

  2. Super-Spatial- and -Spectral-Resolution in Vibrational Imaging via Saturated Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemaru, Yasuo; Palonpon, Almar F.; Kawano, Shogo; Smith, Nicholas I.; Kawata, Satoshi; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a vibrational microscopy technique with subdiffraction spatial resolution by the use of saturation of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). The saturated CARS signals effectively produce a reduced point-spread function at harmonic frequencies, which is extracted by temporal modulation of the pump beam and demodulation of the CARS signal. An increase in spectral resolution and suppression of the nonresonant background signal accompany the spatial- resolution enhancement. Our simple, enhanced CARS technique promises to be useful in studying molecules in gas and liquid phases as well as soft condensed-matter systems.

  3. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and spontaneous Raman scattering diagnostics of nonequilibrium plasmas and flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempert, Walter R.; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2014-10-01

    The paper provides an overview of the use of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and spontaneous Raman scattering for diagnostics of low-temperature nonequilibrium plasmas and nonequilibrium high-enthalpy flows. A brief review of the theoretical background of CARS, four-wave mixing and Raman scattering, as well as a discussion of experimental techniques and data reduction, are included. The experimental results reviewed include measurements of vibrational level populations, rotational/translational temperature, electric fields in a quasi-steady-state and transient molecular plasmas and afterglow, in nonequilibrium expansion flows, and behind strong shock waves. Insight into the kinetics of vibrational energy transfer, energy thermalization mechanisms and dynamics of the pulse discharge development, provided by these experiments, is discussed. Availability of short pulse duration, high peak power lasers, as well as broadband dye lasers, makes possible the use of these diagnostics at relatively low pressures, potentially with a sub-nanosecond time resolution, as well as obtaining single laser shot, high signal-to-noise spectra at higher pressures. Possibilities for the development of single-shot 2D CARS imaging and spectroscopy, using picosecond and femtosecond lasers, as well as novel phase matching and detection techniques, are discussed.

  4. Electride Mediated Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An electride may provide surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The electride, a compound where the electrons serve as anions, may be a ceramic electride, such as a conductive ceramic derived from mayenite, or an organic electride, for example. The textured electride surface or electride particles may strongly enhance the Raman scattering of organic or other Raman active analytes. This may also provide a sensitive method for monitoring the chemistry and electronic environment at the electride surface. The results are evidence of a new class of polariton (i.e., a surface electride-polariton resonance mechanism) that is analogous to the surface plasmon-polariton resonance that mediates conventional SERS.

  5. Hyperspectral imaging and characterization of live cells by broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy with singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis.

    PubMed

    Khmaladze, Alexander; Jasensky, Joshua; Price, Erika; Zhang, Chi; Boughton, Andrew; Han, Xiaofeng; Seeley, Emily; Liu, Xinran; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Chen, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy can be used as a powerful imaging technique to identify chemical compositions of complex samples in biology, biophysics, medicine, and materials science. In this work we developed a CARS microscopic system capable of hyperspectral imaging. By employing an ultrafast laser source, a photonic crystal fiber, and a scanning laser microscope together with spectral detection by a highly sensitive back-illuminated cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, we were able to rapidly acquire and process hyperspectral images of live cells with chemical selectivity. We discuss various aspects of hyperspectral CARS image analysis and demonstrate the use of singular value decomposition methods to characterize the cellular lipid content.

  6. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    thick films of an acrylic adhesive spin-coated onto silver were identical to normal Raman spectra of salts , 20. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY OF ABSTRACT 21...spectra obtained from thick films of an acrylic adhesive sin-coated onto silver were identical to normal Raman spectra of salts of saccharin, a...the sodium salt of o-benzoic sulfimide (saccharin) were also obtained from Aldrich. A model acrylic adhesive system consisting of the monomer

  7. Imaging receptor-mediated endocytosis with a polymeric nanoparticle-based coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering probe.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ling; Lu, Yanhui; Lee, Robert J; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2007-08-23

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy was used to visualize receptor-mediated endocytosis and intracellular trafficking with the aid of a CARS probe. The probe was made of 200-nm polystyrene particles encapsulated in folate-targeted liposomes. By tuning (omega(p) - omega(s)) to 3045 cm(-1), which corresponds to the aromatic C-H stretching vibration, the polystyrene nanoparticles with a high density of aromatic C-H bonds were detected with a high signal-to-noise ratio, while the epi-detected CARS signal from cellular organelles was cancelled by the destructive interference between the resonant contribution from the aliphatic C-H vibration and the nonresonant contribution. Without any photobleaching, the CARS probe allowed single-particle tracking analysis of intracellular endosome transport. No photodamage to cells was observed under the current experimental conditions. These results show the advantages and potential of using a CARS probe to study cellular processes.

  8. Noise autocorrelation spectroscopy with coherent Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoji G.; Konorov, Stanislav O.; Hepburn, John W.; Milner, Valery

    2008-02-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) with femtosecond laser pulses has become a widespread method in nonlinear optical spectroscopy and microscopy. As a third-order nonlinear process, femtosecond CARS exhibits high efficiency at low average laser power. High sensitivity to molecular structure enables detection of small quantities of complex molecules and non-invasive biological imaging. Temporal and spectral resolution of CARS is typically limited by the duration of the excitation pulses and their frequency bandwidth, respectively. Broadband femtosecond pulses are advantageous for time-resolved CARS spectroscopy, but offer poor spectral resolution. The latter can be improved by invoking optical or quantum interference at the expense of increasing complexity of instrumentation and susceptibility to noise. Here, we present a new approach to coherent Raman spectroscopy in which high resolution is achieved by means of deliberately introduced noise. The proposed method combines the efficiency of a coherent process with the robustness of incoherent light. It does require averaging over different noise realizations, but no temporal scanning or spectral pulse shaping as commonly used by frequency-resolved spectroscopic methods with ultrashort pulses.

  9. Random number generation from spontaneous Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, M. J.; Clark, A. S.; Xiong, C.; Mägi, E.; Steel, M. J.; Eggleton, B. J.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the generation of random numbers via the quantum process of spontaneous Raman scattering. Spontaneous Raman photons are produced by illuminating a highly nonlinear chalcogenide glass ( As 2 S 3 ) fiber with a CW laser at a power well below the stimulated Raman threshold. Single Raman photons are collected and separated into two discrete wavelength detuning bins of equal scattering probability. The sequence of photon detection clicks is converted into a random bit stream. Postprocessing is applied to remove detector bias, resulting in a final bit rate of ˜650 kb/s. The collected random bit-sequences pass the NIST statistical test suite for one hundred 1 Mb samples, with the significance level set to α = 0.01 . The fiber is stable, robust and the high nonlinearity (compared to silica) allows for a short fiber length and low pump power favourable for real world application.

  10. Temperature dependence of sapphire fiber Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bo; Yu, Zhihao; Tian, Zhipeng; Homa, Daniel; Hill, Cary; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary

    2015-04-27

    Anti-Stokes Raman scattering in sapphire fiber has been observed for the first time. Temperature dependence of Raman peaks’ intensity, frequency shift, and linewidth were also measured. Three anti-Stokes Raman peaks were observed at temperatures higher than 300°C in a 0.72-m-long sapphire fiber excited by a second-harmonic Nd YAG laser. The intensity of anti-Stokes peaks are comparable to that of Stokes peaks when the temperature increases to 1033°C. We foresee the combination of sapphire fiber Stokes and anti-Stokes measurement in use as a mechanism for ultrahigh temperature sensing.

  11. Optimizing coherent Raman scattering with plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronine, Dmitri; Hua, Xia; Sinyukov, Alexander; Ballmann, Charles; Sokolov, Alexei; Scully, Marlan

    2013-03-01

    Two commonly used techniques that provide species-specific spectroscopic signals in the form of vibrational fingerprints are surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopies. In order to enhance the signal, SERS takes advantage of the electromagnetic near-field enhancement while CARS employs molecular coherence. We have combined these two techniques to achieve best-of-both-worlds maximum signal enhancement by using optimized laser pulse shaping and time-resolved detection. We applied this new time-resolved surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (tr-SECARS) technique to investigate various molecular complexes in a vicinity of gold nanoparticles. While large signal enhancement has previously been achieved in SERS, surfaced-enhanced coherent signals have shown lower values. We investigate the mechanisms of these effects by analyzing the spatial dependence of the coherent Raman spectra for different hot spots in aggregated plasmonic nanoparticles. Understanding coherence effects in surface-enhanced Raman scattering may lead to improved nanoscale sensors.

  12. Raman scattering studies of pollutant systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwiesow, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    Results and techniques for laboratory measurements of Raman scattering cross sections and depolarization ratios of atmospheric gases as a function of the incident photon energy are discussed. Referred to N2, the cross section of H2O changes by a factor of 2 as the incident photon energy is changed by 5%. Less striking results are obtained for SO2, NO and other atmospheric gases. Tentative results are given for spectral features of scattering from polluted air-water interfaces. Raman lidar is assessed as a potentially useful aid in remote sensing of atmospheric and water-borne pollution distributions at least in near-source concentrations.

  13. Integrated Raman and angular scattering of single biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Zachary J.

    2009-12-01

    Raman, or inelastic, scattering and angle-resolved elastic scattering are two optical processes that have found wide use in the study of biological systems. Raman scattering quantitatively reports on the chemical composition of a sample by probing molecular vibrations, while elastic scattering reports on the morphology of a sample by detecting structure-induced coherent interference between incident and scattered light. We present the construction of a multimodal microscope platform capable of gathering both elastically and inelastically scattered light from a 38 mum2 region in both epi- and trans-illumination geometries. Simultaneous monitoring of elastic and inelastic scattering from a microscopic region allows noninvasive characterization of a living sample without the need for exogenous dyes or labels. A sample is illuminated either from above or below with a focused 785 nm TEM00 mode laser beam, with elastic and inelastic scattering collected by two separate measurement arms. The measurements may be made either simultaneously, if identical illumination geometries are used, or sequentially, if the two modalities utilize opposing illumination paths. In the inelastic arm, Stokes-shifted light is dispersed by a spectrograph onto a CCD array. In the elastic scattering collection arm, a relay system images the microscope's back aperture onto a CCD detector array to yield an angle-resolved elastic scattering pattern. Post-processing of the inelastic scattering to remove fluorescence signals yields high quality Raman spectra that report on the sample's chemical makeup. Comparison of the elastically scattered pupil images to generalized Lorenz-Mie theory yields estimated size distributions of scatterers within the sample. In this thesis we will present validations of the IRAM instrument through measurements performed on single beads of a few microns in size, as well as on ensembles of sub-micron particles of known size distributions. The benefits and drawbacks of the

  14. Fiber bundle based endomicroscopy prototype with two collection channels for simultaneous coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and second harmonic generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengfan; Satira, Zachary A.; Wang, Xi; Xu, Xiaoyun; Chen, Xu; Wong, Kelvin; Chen, Shufen; Xin, Jianguo; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2014-02-01

    Label-free multiphoton imaging is promising for replacing biopsy and could offer new strategies for intraoperative or surgical applications. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging could provide lipid-band contrast, and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging is useful for imaging collagen, tendon and muscle fibers. A combination of these two imaging modalities could provide rich information and this combination has been studied by researchers to investigate diseases through microscopy imaging. The combination of these two imaging modalities in endomicroscopy imaging has been rarely investigated. In this research, a fiber bundle consisted of one excitation fiber and 18 collection fibers was developed in our endomicroscopy prototype. The 18 collection fibers were divided into two collection channels with 9 fibers in each channel. These two channels could be used together as one channel for effective signal collection or used separately for simplifying detection part of the system. Differences of collection pattern of these two channels were investigated. Collection difference of central excitation fiber and surrounding 18 fibers was also investigated, which reveals the potential ability of this system to measure forward to backward (F/B) ratio in SHG imaging. CARS imaging of mouse adipocyte and SHG imaging of mouse tail tendon were performed to demonstrate the CARS and SHG tissue imaging performance of this system. Simultaneous CARS and SHG imaging ability of this system was demonstrated by mouse tail imaging. This fiber bundle based endomicroscopy imaging prototype, offers a promising platform for constructing efficient fiber-based CARS and SHG multimodal endomicroscopes for label free intraoperative imaging applications.

  15. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  16. Quantitative chemical imaging with background-free multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by dual-soliton Stokes pulses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun; Wu, Tao; Wei, Haoyun; Zhou, Tian; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman microscopy (CARS) is a quantitative, chemically specific, and label-free optical imaging technique for studying inhomogeneous systems. However, the complicating influence of the nonresonant response on the CARS signal severely limits its sensitivity and specificity and especially limits the extent to which CARS microscopy has been used as a fully quantitative imaging technique. On the basis of spectral focusing mechanism, we establish a dual-soliton Stokes based CARS microspectroscopy and microscopy scheme capable of quantifying the spatial information of densities and chemical composition within inhomogeneous samples, using a single fiber laser. Dual-soliton Stokes scheme not only removes the nonresonant background but also allows robust acquisition of multiple characteristic vibrational frequencies. This all-fiber based laser source can cover the entire fingerprint (800-2200 cm−1) region with a spectral resolution of 15 cm−1. We demonstrate that quantitative degree determination of lipid-chain unsaturation in the fatty acids mixture can be achieved by the characterization of C = C stretching and CH2 deformation vibrations. For microscopy purposes, we show that the spatially inhomogeneous distribution of lipid droplets can be further quantitatively visualized using this quantified degree of lipid unsaturation in the acyl chain for contrast in the hyperspectral CARS images. The combination of compact excitation source and background-free capability to facilitate extraction of quantitative composition information with multiplex spectral peaks will enable wider applications of quantitative chemical imaging in studying biological and material systems. PMID:27867704

  17. Nonlinear kinetic modeling of stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benisti, Didier

    2011-10-01

    Despite its importance for many applications, such as or Raman amplification or inertial confinement fusion, deriving a nonlinear estimate of Raman reflectivity in a plasma has remained quite a challenge for decades. This is mainly due to the nonlinear modification of the electron distribution function induced by the plasma wave (EPW), which, in turn, modifies the propagation of this wave. In this paper is derived an envelope equation for the EPW valid in 3D and which accounts for the nonlinear change of its collisionless (Landau-like) damping rate, group velocity, coupling to the electromagnetic drive, frequency and wave number. Our theoretical predictions for each of these terms are carefully compared against results from Vlasov simulations of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), as well as with other theories. Moreover, our envelope model shows to be as accurate as a Vlasov code in predicting Raman threshold in 1D. Making comparisons with experimental results nevertheless requires including transverse dimensions and letting Raman start from noise. To this end, we performed a completely new derivation of the electrostatic fluctuations in a plasma, which accounts nonlinear effects. Moreover, based on our Multi-D simulations of Raman scattering with our envelope code BRAMA, we discuss the effect on SRS of wave front bowing, transverse detrapping and of a completely new defocussing effect due to the local change in the direction of the EPW group velocity induced by the nonlinear decrease of Landau damping.

  18. (Hadamard Raman imaging)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    We have used newly developed holographic notch filters for obtaining both Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman images. The filters can be used as close as {plus minus}70 cm{sup {minus}1} from the Rayleigh line. We have demonstrated that they are insensitive to polarization, have 80% transmission across their clear apertures and block laser light by 10{sup 4}. The devices now have replaced sharp-cut glass filters on our microscope. We have successfully developed multispectral control and display software for the microscope. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  19. [Raman scattering study of DL-alanine].

    PubMed

    Gong, Yan; Wang, Wen-qing

    2006-01-01

    Studies of Raman vibration spectra are useful to obtaining information on biomolecular crystals. The cell dimensions of the L- and DL-alanine crystals are nearly identical, and both structures belong to the orthorhombic system, but the space group is P2(1) 2(1) 2(1) for the L-isomer, and Pna2(1) for the racemate crystal. The Raman spectrum of L-alanine has been measured by many authors. The present work is focusing on the Raman scattering study of DL-alanine powder. Based on the analysis of the differences between DL-alanine and L-alanine Raman spectra, the authors obtained indispensable information on hydrogen bond and the motion of the molecular conformation in alanine crystals.

  20. Stimulated Electronic X-Ray Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weninger, Clemens; Purvis, Michael; Ryan, Duncan; London, Richard A.; Bozek, John D.; Bostedt, Christoph; Graf, Alexander; Brown, Gregory; Rocca, Jorge J.; Rohringer, Nina

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate strong stimulated inelastic x-ray scattering by resonantly exciting a dense gas target of neon with femtosecond, high-intensity x-ray pulses from an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL). A small number of lower energy XFEL seed photons drive an avalanche of stimulated resonant inelastic x-ray scattering processes that amplify the Raman scattering signal by several orders of magnitude until it reaches saturation. Despite the large overall spectral width, the internal spiky structure of the XFEL spectrum determines the energy resolution of the scattering process in a statistical sense. This is demonstrated by observing a stochastic line shift of the inelastically scattered x-ray radiation. In conjunction with statistical methods, XFELs can be used for stimulated resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, with spectral resolution smaller than the natural width of the core-excited, intermediate state.

  1. Real-time imaging of laser-induced membrane disruption of a living cell observed with multifocus coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Niioka, Hirohiko; Araki, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate the real-time imaging of laser-induced disruption of the cellular membrane in a living HeLa cell and its cellular response with a multifocus coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscope. A near-infrared pulsed laser beam tightly focused on the cellular membrane of a living cell induces ablation at the focal point causing a local disruption of the cellular membrane. After the membrane disruption a dark spot decreasing CARS intensity of 2840 cm(-1) Raman shift at the disrupted site appears. This dark spot immediately disappears and a strong CARS signal is observed around the disrupted site. This increase of the CARS signal might be caused by resealing of the disrupted site via aggregation of the patch lipid vesicles in the cytoplasm. The accumulation of lipids around the disrupted site is also confirmed with three-dimensional CARS images of a cell before and after membrane disruption. The temporal behavior of the CARS signal at the disrupted site is observed to detect the fusion dynamics of patch vesicles.

  2. Raman scattering in the atmospheres of the major planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, W. D.; Trafton, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    A technique is developed to calculate the detailed effects of Raman scattering in an inhomogeneous anisotropically scattering atmosphere. The technique is applied to evaluations of Raman scattering by H2 in the atmosphere of the major planets. It is noted that Raman scattering produces an insufficient decrease in the blue and ultraviolet regions to explain the albedos of all planets investigated. For all major planets, the filling-in of solar line cores and the generation of the Raman-shifted ghosts of the Fraunhofer spectrum are observed. With regard to Uranus and Neptune, Raman scattering is seen to exert a major influence on the formation and profile of strong red and near infrared CH4 bands, and Raman scattering by H2 explains the residual intensity in the cores of these bands. Raman scattering by H2 must also be taken into account in the scattering of photons into the cores of saturated absorption bands.

  3. Raman Scattering in HIGH-Tc Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Christian; Cardona, Manuel

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * Theory * Light scattering by phonons * Electronic scattering * Instrumentation * VIBRATIONAL ANALYSIS AND LATTICE DYNAMICS * Optical Modes of RBa2Cu3O7-δ * Symmetry analysis of the ěc{k} = 0 modes * Lattice dynamical calculation for RBa2Cu3O7 and RBa2Cu3O6 * The Bismuth and Thallium Compounds * The Zurich Superconductors * EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS ON RBa2Cu3O7-δ * Raman Scattering by Phonons * Single crystals of YBa2Cu3O7-δ * Ceramic materials, impurity phases, and thin films * Oxygen deficiency * Isotope effect * Electronic scattering and the gap problem * Scattering by magnons * Bismuth and CuO2-Based Materials: Single-Crystal Spectra and Phonon Assignments * Thallium and CuO2 Based Materials * The Zurich Oxides * BRIEF COMPARISON WITH IR DATA * CONSEQUENCES CONCERNING THE MECHANISM OF HIGH-TC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND CONCLUSIONS * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  4. In planta imaging of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid in Cannabis sativa L. with hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacik, Erik T.; Korai, Roza P.; Frater, Eric H.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Otto, Cees; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2013-04-01

    Nature has developed many pathways to produce medicinal products of extraordinary potency and specificity with significantly higher efficiencies than current synthetic methods can achieve. Identification of these mechanisms and their precise locations within plants could substantially increase the yield of a number of natural pharmaceutics. We report label-free imaging of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCa) in Cannabis sativa L. using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. In line with previous observations we find high concentrations of THCa in pistillate flowering bodies and relatively low amounts within flowering bracts. Surprisingly, we find differences in the local morphologies of the THCa-containing bodies: organelles within bracts are large, diffuse, and spheroidal, whereas in pistillate flowers they are generally compact, dense, and have heterogeneous structures. We have also identified two distinct vibrational signatures associated with THCa, both in pure crystalline form and within Cannabis plants; at present the exact natures of these spectra remain an open question.

  5. In planta imaging of Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid in Cannabis sativa L. with hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Garbacik, Erik T; Korai, Roza P; Frater, Eric H; Korterik, Jeroen P; Otto, Cees; Offerhaus, Herman L

    2013-04-01

    Nature has developed many pathways to produce medicinal products of extraordinary potency and specificity with significantly higher efficiencies than current synthetic methods can achieve. Identification of these mechanisms and their precise locations within plants could substantially increase the yield of a number of natural pharmaceutics. We report label-free imaging of Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCa) in Cannabis sativa L. using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. In line with previous observations we find high concentrations of THCa in pistillate flowering bodies and relatively low amounts within flowering bracts. Surprisingly, we find differences in the local morphologies of the THCa-containing bodies: organelles within bracts are large, diffuse, and spheroidal, whereas in pistillate flowers they are generally compact, dense, and have heterogeneous structures. We have also identified two distinct vibrational signatures associated with THCa, both in pure crystalline form and within Cannabis plants; at present the exact natures of these spectra remain an open question.

  6. Stimulated Cerenkov-Raman Scattering.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-14

    Dokl. Akad. Nauk. SSSR 3,253. 11. Coleman, P., and Enderby, C. (1960). J. AppI. Phys. 31, 1695. 12. Danos , M. ( 1953 ). J. Appl. Phys. 26,2. *1f 13...made by Coleman, by Danos , by Lashinsky,13 and by Ulrich.14 In these experiments, no provision was made for feeding back the emitted radia- I tion on...latio e ted ltiple Scattering’ * Pts. Is.; Vol. 8I(2), pp. 245-248. Jan. 11, 19S2. d . Jelly, J. V., Cerefo U diation nd its A liti rgqam sess, 1953

  7. Raman Reporter-Coupled Ag(core)@Au(shell) Nanostars for in Vivo Improved Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Imaging and Near-infrared-Triggered Photothermal Therapy in Breast Cancers.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Leyong; Pan, Yuanwei; Wang, Shouju; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Xinmei; Ren, Wenzhi; Lu, Guangming; Wu, Aiguo

    2015-08-05

    Noble-metal nanomaterials were widely investigated as theranostic systems for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging, and also for photothermal therapy (PTT) of cancers. However, it was still a major challenge to explore multifunctional nanoprobes with high performance, high stability, and low toxicity. In this work, Raman reporter (DTTC)-coupled Agcore@Aushell nanostars (Ag@Au-DTTC) were synthesized and investigated for in vivo improved SERS imaging and near-infrared (NIR)-triggered PTT of breast cancers. By the two-step coupling of DTTC, the SERS signal was improved obviously, and the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles was also decreased by coating Au nanostars onto Ag nanoparticles. The as-prepared Ag@Au-DTTC nanostars showed high photostability and excellent photothermal performance, in which the photothermal conversion efficiency was up to 79.01% under the irradiation of an 808 nm laser. The in vitro and in vivo SERS measurements of Ag@Au-DTTC nanostars showed that the many sharp and narrow Raman peaks located at 508, 782, 844, 1135, 1242, 1331, 1464, 1510, and 1580 cm(-1) could be obviously observed in MCF-7 cells and in MCF-7 tumor-bearing nude mice, compared with that in pure DTTC. In 14-day treatments, the tumor volume of MCF-7 tumor-bearing nude mice injected with Ag@Au-DTTC nanostars and irradiated by an 808 nm laser almost disappeared. This study demonstrated that the as-prepared Ag@Au-DTTC nanostars could be excellent multifunctional agents for improved SERS imaging and NIR-triggered PTT of breast cancers with low risk.

  8. Raman Scattering in Carbon Nanosystems: Solving Polyacetylene.

    PubMed

    Heller, Eric J; Yang, Yuan; Kocia, Lucas

    2015-03-25

    Polyacetylene has been a paradigm conjugated organic conductor since well before other conjugated carbon systems such as nanotubes and graphene became front and center. It is widely acknowledged that Raman spectroscopy of these systems is extremely important to characterize them and understand their internal quantum behavior. Here we show, for the first time, what information the Raman spectrum of polyacetylene contains, by solving the 35-year-old mystery of its spectrum. Our methods have immediate and clear implications for other conjugated carbon systems. By relaxing the nearly universal approximation of ignoring the nuclear coordinate dependence of the transition moment (Condon approximation), we find the reasons for its unusual spectroscopic features. When the Kramers-Heisenberg-Dirac Raman scattering theory is fully applied, incorporating this nuclear coordinate dependence, and also the energy and momentum dependence of the electronic and phonon band structure, then unusual line shapes, growth, and dispersion of the bands are explained and very well matched by theory.

  9. Raman Scattering in Carbon Nanosystems: Solving Polyacetylene

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polyacetylene has been a paradigm conjugated organic conductor since well before other conjugated carbon systems such as nanotubes and graphene became front and center. It is widely acknowledged that Raman spectroscopy of these systems is extremely important to characterize them and understand their internal quantum behavior. Here we show, for the first time, what information the Raman spectrum of polyacetylene contains, by solving the 35-year-old mystery of its spectrum. Our methods have immediate and clear implications for other conjugated carbon systems. By relaxing the nearly universal approximation of ignoring the nuclear coordinate dependence of the transition moment (Condon approximation), we find the reasons for its unusual spectroscopic features. When the Kramers–Heisenberg–Dirac Raman scattering theory is fully applied, incorporating this nuclear coordinate dependence, and also the energy and momentum dependence of the electronic and phonon band structure, then unusual line shapes, growth, and dispersion of the bands are explained and very well matched by theory. PMID:27162945

  10. Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy in Biology and Medicine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Delong; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy have enabled label-free visualization and analysis of functional, endogenous biomolecules in living systems. When compared with spontaneous Raman microscopy, a key advantage of CRS microscopy is the dramatic improvement in imaging speed, which gives rise to real-time vibrational imaging of live biological samples. Using molecular vibrational signatures, recently developed hyperspectral CRS microscopy has improved the readout of chemical information available from CRS images. In this article, we review recent achievements in CRS microscopy, focusing on the theory of the CRS signal-to-noise ratio, imaging speed, technical developments, and applications of CRS imaging in bioscience and clinical settings. In addition, we present possible future directions that the use of this technology may take.

  11. Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy in Biology and Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Delong; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Advancements in coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy have enabled label-free visualization and analysis of functional, endogenous biomolecules in living systems. When compared with spontaneous Raman microscopy, a key advantage of CRS microscopy is the dramatic improvement in imaging speed, which gives rise to real-time vibrational imaging of live biological samples. Using molecular vibrational signatures, recently developed hyperspectral CRS microscopy has improved the readout of chemical information available from CRS images. In this article, we review recent achievements in CRS microscopy, focusing on the theory of the CRS signal-to-noise ratio, imaging speed, technical developments, and applications of CRS imaging in bioscience and clinical settings. In addition, we present possible future directions that the use of this technology may take. PMID:26514285

  12. Measurement of spin coherence using Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z.; Delteil, A.; Faelt, S.; Imamoǧlu, A.

    2016-06-01

    Ramsey interferometry provides a natural way to determine the coherence time of most qubit systems. Recent experiments on quantum dots, however, demonstrated that dynamical nuclear spin polarization can strongly influence the measurement process, making it difficult to extract the T2* coherence time using standard optical Ramsey pulses. Here, we demonstrate an alternative method for spin coherence measurement that is based on first-order coherence of photons generated in spin-flip Raman scattering. We show that if a quantum emitter is driven by a weak monochromatic laser, Raman coherence is determined exclusively by spin coherence, allowing for a direct determination of spin T2* time. When combined with coherence measurements on Rayleigh scattered photons, our technique enables us to identify coherent and incoherent contributions to resonance fluorescence, and to minimize the latter. We verify the validity of our technique by comparing our results to those determined from Ramsey interferometry for electron and heavy-hole spins.

  13. Raman Forward Scattering in Plasma Channels

    SciTech Connect

    G. Shvets; X. Li

    2000-11-14

    Raman scattering instability of an intense laser pulse in a plasma channel proceeds differently than in a homogeneous plasma: the growth rate is reduced and the scaling with the laser intensity modified. These differences, significant even for shallow plasma channels, arise because of the radial shear of the plasma frequency and the existence of the weakly damped hybrid (electrostatic/electromagnetic) modes of the radially inhomogeneous plasma. The interplay of these two effects produces double-peaked spectra for the direct forward scattering in a channel.

  14. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope with a high-signal-to-noise ratio, high stability, and high-speed imaging for live cell observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Takimoto, Shinichi; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2007-02-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, which can produce images of specific molecules without staining, has attracted the attention of researchers, as it matches the need for molecular imaging and pathway analysis of live cells. In particular, there have been an increasing number of CARS experimental results regarding lipids in live cells, which cannot be fluorescently tagged while keeping the cells alive. One of the important applications of lipid research is for the metabolic syndrome. Since the metabolic syndrome is said to be related to the lipids in lipocytes, blood, arterial vessels, and so on, the CARS technique is expected to find application in this field. However, CARS microscopy requires a pair of picosecond laser pulses, which overlap both temporally and spatially. This makes the optical adjustments of a CARS microscope challenging. The authors developed a CARS unit that includes optics for easy and stable adjustment of the overlap of these laser pulses. Adding the CARS unit to a laser scanning microscope provides CARS images of a high signal-to-noise ratio, with an acquisition rate as high as 2 microseconds per pixel. Thus, images of fast-moving lipid droplets in Hela cells were obtained.

  15. Nano-Raman Scattering Microscopy: Resolution and Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Satoshi; Ichimura, Taro; Taguchi, Atsushi; Kumamoto, Yasuaki

    2017-03-24

    Raman scattering microscopy is becoming one of the hot topics in analytical microscopy as a tool for analyzing advanced nanomaterials, such as biomolecules in a live cell for the study of cellular dynamics, semiconductor devices for characterizing strain distribution and contamination, and nanocarbons and nano-2D materials. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the development of Raman scattering microscopy from the viewpoint of spatial resolution and scattering efficiency. To overcome the extremely small cross section of Raman scattering, we discuss three approaches for the enhancement of scattering efficiency and show that the scattering enhancement synergistically increases the spatial resolution. We discuss the mechanisms of tip-enhanced Raman scattering, deep-UV resonant Raman scattering, and coherent nonlinear Raman scattering for micro- and nanoscope applications. The combinations of these three approaches are also shown as nanometer-resolution Raman scattering microscopy. The critical issues of the structures, materials, and reproducibility of tips and three-dimensionality for TERS; photodegradation for resonant Raman scattering; and laser availability for coherent nonlinear Raman scattering are also discussed.

  16. Tip enhanced Raman scattering: plasmonic enhancements for nanoscale chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Zachary D.; Marr, James M.; Wang, Hao

    2014-04-01

    Tip enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) is an emerging technique that uses a metalized scanning probe microscope tip to spatially localize electric fields that enhances Raman scattering enabling chemical imaging on nanometer dimensions. Arising from the same principles as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), TERS offers unique advantages associated with controling the size, shape, and location of the enhancing nanostructure. In this article we discuss the correlations between current understanding of SERS and how this relates to TERS, as well as how TERS provides new understanding and insights. The relationship between plasmon resonances and Raman enhancements is emphasized as the key to obtaining optimal TERS results. Applications of TERS, including chemical analysis of carbon nanotubes, organic molecules, inorganic crystals, nucleic acids, proteins, cells and organisms, are used to illustrate the information that can be gained. Under ideal conditions TERS is capable of single molecule sensitivity and sub-nanometer spatial resolution. The ability to control plasmonic enhancements for chemical analysis suggests new experiments and opportunities to understand molecular composition and interactions on the nanoscale.

  17. Label-free imaging of Drosophila in vivo by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and two-photon excitation autofluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Wei-Wen; Wu, June-Tai; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2011-01-01

    Drosophila is one of the most valuable model organisms for studying genetics and developmental biology. The fat body in Drosophila, which is analogous to the liver and adipose tissue in human, stores lipids that act as an energy source during its development. At the early stages of metamorphosis, the fat body remodeling occurs involving the dissociation of the fat body into individual fat cells. Here we introduce a combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and two-photon excitation autofluorescence (TPE-F) microscopy to achieve label-free imaging of Drosophila in vivo at larval and pupal stages. The strong CARS signal from lipids allows direct imaging of the larval fat body and pupal fat cells. In addition, the use of TPE-F microscopy allows the observation of other internal organs in the larva and autofluorescent globules in fat cells. During the dissociation of the fat body, the findings of the degradation of lipid droplets and an increase in autofluorescent globules indicate the consumption of lipids and the recruitment of proteins in fat cells. Through in vivo imaging and direct monitoring, CARS microscopy may help elucidate how metamorphosis is regulated and study the lipid metabolism in Drosophila.

  18. Applications of coherent Raman scattering microscopies to clinical and biological studies.

    PubMed

    Schie, Iwan W; Krafft, Christoph; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-06-21

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy are two nonlinear optical imaging modalities that are at the frontier of label-free and chemical specific biological and clinical diagnostics. The applications of coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopies are multifold, ranging from investigation of basic aspects of cell biology to the label-free detection of pathologies. This review summarizes recent progress of biological and clinical applications of CRS between 2008 and 2014, covering applications such as lipid droplet research, single cell analysis, tissue imaging and multiphoton histopathology of atherosclerosis, myelin sheaths, skin, hair, pharmaceutics, and cancer and surgical margin detection.

  19. Raman tags: Novel optical probes for intracellular sensing and imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuee; Wang, Zhong; Mu, Xijiao; Ma, Aning; Guo, Shu

    Optical labels are needed for probing specific target molecules in complex biological systems. As a newly emerging category of tags for molecular imaging in live cells, the Raman label attracts much attention because of the rich information obtained from targeted and untargeted molecules by detecting molecular vibrations. Here, we list three types of Raman probes based on different mechanisms: Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) probes, bioorthogonal Raman probes, and Resonance Raman (RR) probes. We review how these Raman probes work for detecting and imaging proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other biomolecules in vitro, within cells, or in vivo. We also summarize recent noteworthy studies, expound on the construction of every type of Raman probe and operating principle, sum up in tables typically targeting molecules for specific binding, and provide merits, drawbacks, and future prospects for the three Raman probes.

  20. In-line interferometric femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dobner, Sven; Groß, Petra; Fallnich, Carsten

    2013-06-28

    We present in-line interferometric femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (II-FSRS), a new method to measure the spectral Raman intensity and phase over a broad spectral range, potentially in a single shot. An analytic model is developed, that excellently reproduces the measured spectra. Additionally, the performance of II-FSRS is directly compared in experiments to two established techniques, namely femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering and femtosecond Raman induced Kerr-effect spectroscopy.

  1. Raman scattering investigation of skutterudite compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogita, N.; Kondo, T.; Hasegawa, T.; Takasu, Y.; Udagawa, M.; Takeda, N.; Ishikawa, K.; Sugawara, H.; Kikuchi, D.; Sato, H.; Sekine, C.; Shirotani, I.

    2006-08-01

    Raman scattering spectra of filled skutterudite RT4X12 (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm and Y, T=Fe, Ru and Os, and X=Sb and P) and unfilled skutterudite CoP3 have been measured. All first-order Raman active phonons, which are due to the vibration of pnictogens, are observed. In addition, the crystal field excitations in PrRu4P12 spectra and the second-order phonons including rare-earth vibrations in SmRu4P12 and ROs4Sb12 are also observed. The second-order phonons can be observed for the sample with the larger cage space. The peak intensity of the second-order phonons decreases with decreasing temperature and vanishes at low temperature. Such a temperature dependence suggests that the second-order phonons are thermally excited and due to independent vibrations of the rare-earth ions, that is rattler motion.

  2. Gate-Dependent Electronic Raman Scattering in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, E.; Méasson, M.-A.; Cazayous, M.; Sacuto, A.; Gallais, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We report the direct observation of polarization resolved electronic Raman scattering in a gated monolayer graphene device. The evolution of the electronic Raman scattering spectra with gate voltage and its polarization dependence are in full agreement with theoretical expectations for nonresonant Raman processes involving interband electron-hole excitations across the Dirac cone. We further show that the spectral dependence of the electronic Raman scattering signal can be simply described by the dynamical polarizability of graphene in the long wavelength limit. The possibility to directly observe Dirac fermion excitations in graphene opens the way to promising Raman investigations of electronic properties of graphene and other 2D crystals.

  3. Raman scattering in a whispering mode optical waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Kurnit, Norman A.

    1982-01-01

    A device and method for Raman scattering in a whispering mode optical waveguide. Both a helical ribbon and cylinder are disclosed which incorporate an additional curvature .rho. p for confining the beam to increase intensity. A Raman scattering medium is disposed in the optical path of the beam as it propagates along the waveguide. Raman scattering is enhanced by the high intensities of the beam and long interaction path lengths which are achieved in a small volume.

  4. Enhanced Raman scattering at dielectric surfaces. 2. Molecular orientations from polarized surface Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, D.J.; Bohn, P.W. )

    1990-03-08

    The ability to obtain polarized Raman scattering for monolayer adsorbates deposited on oxide covered noble-metal island film structures has been closely examined. The relationship of the relative intensities of the in-plane enhanced electric field components to the depolarization ratios of the totally symmetric Raman vibrational modes of p-nitrobenzoic acid and phthalazine was found to indicate a constant depolarization of the in-plane electric field components induced by the island film particles themselves. With this information and with polarized Raman scattering information from nontotally symmetric phthalazine vibrations, we report a quantitative determination of the average surface molecular orientation of phthalazine monolayers at sputtered SiO{sub 2} surfaces.

  5. Stimulated Raman scattering microscopy: an emerging tool for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Tipping, W. J.; Lee, M.; Serrels, A.; Brunton, V. G.

    2016-01-01

    Optical microscopy techniques have emerged as a cornerstone of biomedical research, capable of probing the cellular functions of a vast range of substrates, whilst being minimally invasive to the cells or tissues of interest. Incorporating biological imaging into the early stages of the drug discovery process can provide invaluable information about drug activity within complex disease models. Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy has been widely used as a platform for the study of cells and their components based on chemical composition; but slow acquisition rates, poor resolution and a lack of sensitivity have hampered further development. A new generation of stimulated Raman techniques is emerging which allows the imaging of cells, tissues and organisms at faster acquisition speeds, and with greater resolution and sensitivity than previously possible. This review focuses on the development of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), and covers the use of bioorthogonal tags to enhance sample detection, and recent applications of both spontaneous Raman and SRS as novel imaging platforms to facilitate the drug discovery process. PMID:26839248

  6. Surface Raman scattering from effervescent magnetic peroxyborates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walrafen, G. E.; Krishnan, P. N.; Hokmabadi, M.; Griscom, D. L.; Munro, R. G.

    1982-10-01

    Surface Raman scattering using a spinning technique was investigated for solid NaBO3ṡ4H2O and NaBO3ṡH2O, as well as for electron bombarded peroxyborates, for peroxyborates heated for various times and at temperatures for 110-180 °C, and for solid Na2O2 and BaO2. The Raman spectra indicate that the breakdown of peroxy groups is accompanied by the formation of trapped molecular O2. Quantitative Raman intensity data were also obtained as functions of heating time at 115 °C for the 1556 cm-1 line from O2 and for the 890 and 705 cm-1 lines whose intensities scale with the peroxy concentration. These intensity data were treated by logistics theory, and they were found to be consistent with a second-order autocatalyzed forward reaction dependent on the product of the peroxy and O2 concentrations, plus a first-order reverse reaction dependent only on the O2 concentration.

  7. Surface Raman scattering from effervescent magnetic peroxyborates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walrafen, G. E.; Krishnan, P. N.; Griscom, D. L.; Munro, R.

    1982-06-01

    Surface Raman scattering using a spinning technique was investigated for solid NaBO3.4H2O and NaBO3.H2O as well as for electron bombarded peroxyborates heated for various times and at temperatures form 110-180 deg C, and for solid Na2O2 and BaO2. The Raman spectra indicate that the breakdown of peroxy groups is accompanied by the formation of trapped molecular O2. Quantitative Raman intensity data were also obtained as functions of heating time at 115 deg C for the 1556 cm-1 line from O2 and for the 890 and 705 cm-1 lines whose intensities scale with the peroxy concentration. These intensity data were treated by logistics theory, and they were found to be consistent with a second-order auto-catalyzed forward reaction dependent on the product of the peroxy and O2 concentrations, plus a first-order reverse reaction dependent only on the O2 concentration.

  8. Enhanced Raman scattering of biological molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Joseph R.

    The results presented in this thesis, originate from the aspiration to develop an identification algorithm for Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis (S. enterica), Escherichia coli (E. coli), Bacillus globigii ( B. globigii), and Bacillus megaterium ( B. megaterium) using "enhanced" Raman scattering. We realized our goal, with a method utilizing an immunoassay process in a spectroscopic technique, and the direct use of the enhanced spectral response due to bacterial surface elements. The enhanced Raman signal originates from Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) and/or Morphological Dependent Resonances (MDR's). We utilized a modified Lee-Meisel colloidal production method to produce a SERS active substrate, which was applied to a SERS application for the amino acid Glycine. The comparison indicates that the SERS/FRACTAL/MDR process can produce an increase of 107 times more signal than the bulk Raman signal from Glycine. In the extension of the Glycine results, we studied the use of SERS related to S. enterica, where we have shown that the aromatic amino acid contribution from Phenylalanine, Tyrosine, and Tryptophan produces a SERS response that can be used to identify the associated SERS vibrational modes of a S. enterica one or two antibody complexes. The "fingerprint" associated with the spectral signature in conjunction with an enhanced Raman signal allows conclusions to be made: (1) about the orientation of the secondary structure on the metal; (2) whether bound/unbound antibody can be neglected; (3) whether we can lower the detection limit. We have lowered the detection limit of S. enterica to 106 bacteria/ml. We also show a profound difference between S. enterica and E. coli SERS spectra even when there exists non-specific binding on E. coli indicating a protein conformation change induced by the addition of the antigen S. enterica. We confirm TEM imagery data, indicating that the source of the aromatic amino acid SERS response is originating from

  9. Raman scattering in the Jovian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, W. D.; Trafton, L.; Macy, W., Jr.; Woodman, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    On December 8 and 9, 1976, the 1024 channel Reticon silicon photodiode array detector in the coude spectrograph of a 2.7 m telescope was used to obtain spectra of Jupiter and the moon. Three separate data sets were obtained, including one of the Jovian equatorial region, one of the Jovian north polar cap, and one of Mare Serenetatis on the moon. A correlation analysis was conducted. The autocorrelation function of the Jovian spectrum was calculated and the autocorrelation function of the lunar spectrum was subtracted from it. The analysis made it possible to detect Raman scattering by H2 in the atmosphere of Jupiter. The pure rotational H2 S(0) and S(1) lines were detected. The ratio of the relative number of Raman scattered photons in the S(0) and S(1) features indicate that the H2 in the Jovian atmosphere is in the equilibrium, rather than the normal state. Therefore some sort of nonradiative process is responsible for transitions between the ortho and para states of H2.

  10. Longitudinal, 3D in vivo imaging of sebaceous glands by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy –normal function and response to cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yookyung; Tam, Joshua; Jalian, H. Ray; Anderson, R. Rox; Evans, Conor L.

    2014-01-01

    Sebaceous glands perform complex functions, and are centrally involved in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. Current techniques for studying sebaceous glands are mostly static in nature, whereas the gland’s main function – excretion of sebum via the holocrine mechanism – can only be evaluated over time. We present a longitudinal, real-time alternative – the in vivo, label-free imaging of sebaceous glands using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy, which is used to selectively visualize lipids. In mouse ears, CARS microscopy revealed dynamic changes in sebaceous glands during the holocrine secretion process, as well as in response to damage to the glands caused by cooling. Detailed gland structure, plus the active migration of individual sebocytes and cohorts of sebocytes were measured. Cooling produced characteristic changes in sebocyte structure and migration. This study demonstrates that CARS microscopy is a promising tool for studying the sebaceous gland and its associated disorders in three-dimensions in vivo. PMID:25026458

  11. Raman imaging with a fiber-coupled multichannel spectrograph.

    PubMed

    Schmälzlin, Elmar; Moralejo, Benito; Rutowska, Monika; Monreal-Ibero, Ana; Sandin, Christer; Tarcea, Nicolae; Popp, Jürgen; Roth, Martin M

    2014-11-20

    Until now, spatially resolved Raman Spectroscopy has required to scan a sample under investigation in a time-consuming step-by-step procedure. Here, we present a technique that allows the capture of an entire Raman image with only one single exposure. The Raman scattering arising from the sample was collected with a fiber-coupled high-performance astronomy spectrograph. The probe head consisting of an array of 20 × 20 multimode fibers was linked to the camera port of a microscope. To demonstrate the high potential of this new concept, Raman images of reference samples were recorded. Entire chemical maps were received without the need for a scanning procedure.

  12. Quantum theory of (femtosecond) time-resolved stimulated Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhigang; Lu, J; Zhang, Dong H; Lee, Soo-Y

    2008-04-14

    We present a complete perturbation theory of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), which includes the new experimental technique of femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (FSRS), where a picosecond Raman pump pulse and a femtosecond probe pulse simultaneously act on a stationary or nonstationary vibrational state. It is shown that eight terms in perturbation theory are required to account for SRS, with observation along the probe pulse direction, and they can be grouped into four nonlinear processes which are labeled as stimulated Raman scattering or inverse Raman scattering (IRS): SRS(I), SRS(II), IRS(I), and IRS(II). Previous FSRS theories have used only the SRS(I) process or only the "resonance Raman scattering" term in SRS(I). Each process can be represented by an overlap between a wave packet in the initial electronic state and a wave packet in the excited Raman electronic state. Calculations were performed with Gaussian Raman pump and probe pulses on displaced harmonic potentials to illustrate various features of FSRS, such as high time and frequency resolution; Raman gain for the Stokes line, Raman loss for the anti-Stokes line, and absence of the Rayleigh line in off-resonance FSRS from a stationary or decaying v=0 state; dispersive line shapes in resonance FSRS; and the possibility of observing vibrational wave packet motion with off-resonance FSRS.

  13. Surface-enhanced coherent Raman scattering (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potma, Eric O.; Fast, Alex; Syme, Christropher D.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a coherent Raman scattering microscope that combines total internal reflection illumination with surface plasmon resonance. The excitation geometry is based on an objective-type Kretschmann configuration, which allows widefield excitation of surface plasmon polariton modes in a thin gold film on a glass substrate. The surface plasmon fields enhance the excitation efficiency, enabling image acquisition at 10 frames/s. Since the evanescent field extends only over a length scale of ~100 nm, structures close the substrate surface are observed while bulk contributions are suppressed. We discuss the operational principles of this microscope in detail and point out its applications in cell biology.

  14. Raman Scattering Investigation of Skutterudite Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogita, N.; Kondo, T.; Hasegawa, T.; Udagawa, M.; Sugawara, H.; Sato, H.; Sekine, C.; Shirotani, I.

    2006-09-01

    Raman scattering spectra have been measured for the unfilled skutterudite CoP3 and for the filled skutterudites RT4X12 (R= La, Ce, Pr and Nd, T=Fe and Os, and X=Sb and P). For the P-skutterudite, the energies of two Ag phonons and one Eg phonon decrease with rare-earth filling, while, for the Sb-skutterudite, the energies of the observed phonons do not change significantly. In order to clarify this filling effect microscopically, a normal mode analysis has been performed using a GF matrix method. The following differences due to the filling effect have been found for the P- and Sb-skutterudites: the interaction between pnictogens on the cage becomes weaker for the P-skutterudite, while it does not change significantly for the Sb case.

  15. Mapping Chemical and Structural Composition of Pharmaceutical and Biological Samples by Raman, Surface-Enhanced Raman and Fluorescence Spectral Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chourpa, Igor; Cohen-Jonathan, Simone; Dubois, Pierre

    Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique recognised for its structural and conformational specificity. The efficient discrimination of molecular species by Raman is particularly potent for multidimensional microscopic imaging of complex biological environment, as demonstrated in the present book. The commonly admitted problem of Raman, low sensitivity, can often be circumvented due to high output instruments and via approaches like RRS (resonance Raman scattering), SERS (surface-enhanced Raman scattering), TERS (tip-enhanced Raman scattering) or CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering). In contrast to the latter, RRS and SERS are realizable with less sophisticated set-up based on common Raman systems. Although more invasive than RRS, SERS provides better sensitivity and quenching of fluorescence. SERRS (surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering) spectroscopy can be used in coupling with fluorescence and competes in selectivity and sensitivity with spectrofluorimetry. In the chapter below, we use recent applications made in our group to illustrate the use of Raman and SERRS spectral imaging for characterization of biological samples (animal subcutaneous tissue, human cancer cells) and pharmaceutical samples (microparticles for drug delivery, fibres for wound dressing). After a brief description of experimental details on spectral imaging, the chapter will focus on results concerning (i) biocompatible pharmaceutical materials made of alginates and (ii) anticancer drugs in pharmaceutical forms and in biological systems.

  16. Detection of latent prints by Raman imaging

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Linda Anne [Andersonville, TN; Connatser, Raynella Magdalene [Knoxville, TN; Lewis, Sr., Samuel Arthur

    2011-01-11

    The present invention relates to a method for detecting a print on a surface, the method comprising: (a) contacting the print with a Raman surface-enhancing agent to produce a Raman-enhanced print; and (b) detecting the Raman-enhanced print using a Raman spectroscopic method. The invention is particularly directed to the imaging of latent fingerprints.

  17. Continuous-wave stimulated Raman scattering (cwSRS) microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2013-08-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy is a powerful tool for chemically sensitive non-invasive optical imaging. However, ultrafast laser sources, which are currently employed, are still expensive and require substantial maintenance to provide temporal overlap and spectral tuning. SRS imaging, which utilizes continuous-wave laser sources, has a major advantage, as it eliminates the cell damage due to exposure to the high-intensity light radiation, while substantially reducing the cost and complexity of the setup. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate microscopic imaging of dimethyl sulfoxide using two independent, commonly used lasers, a diode-pumped, intracavity doubled 532-nm laser and a He-Ne laser operating at 632.8-nm.

  18. Ultraviolet Raman scattering from persistent chemical warfare agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullander, Fredrik; Wästerby, Pär.; Landström, Lars

    2016-05-01

    Laser induced Raman scattering at excitation wavelengths in the middle ultraviolet was examined using a pulsed tunable laser based spectrometer system. Droplets of chemical warfare agents, with a volume of 2 μl, were placed on a silicon surface and irradiated with sequences of laser pulses. The Raman scattering from V-series nerve agents, Tabun (GA) and Mustard gas (HD) was studied with the aim of finding the optimum parameters and the requirements for a detection system. A particular emphasis was put on V-agents that have been previously shown to yield relatively weak Raman scattering in this excitation band.

  19. Raman Scattering by Molecular Hydrogen and Nitrogen in Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oklopčić, Antonija; Hirata, Christopher M.; Heng, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    An important source of opacity in exoplanet atmospheres at short visible and near-UV wavelengths is Rayleigh scattering of light on molecules. It is accompanied by a related, albeit weaker process—Raman scattering. We analyze the signatures of Raman scattering imprinted in the reflected light and the geometric albedo of exoplanets, which could provide information about atmospheric properties. Raman scattering affects the geometric albedo spectra of planets in the following ways. First, it causes filling-in of strong absorption lines in the incident radiation, thus producing sharp peaks in the albedo. Second, it shifts the wavelengths of spectral features in the reflected light causing the so-called Raman ghost lines. Raman scattering can also cause a broadband reduction of the albedo due to wavelength shifting of a stellar spectrum with red spectral index. Observing the Raman peaks in the albedo could be used to measure the column density of gas, thus providing constraints on the presence of clouds in the atmosphere. Observing the Raman ghost lines could be used to spectroscopically identify the main scatterer in the atmosphere, even molecules like H2 or N2, which do not have prominent spectral signatures in the optical wavelength range. If detected, ghost lines could also provide information about the temperature of the atmosphere. In this paper, we investigate the effects of Raman scattering in hydrogen- and nitrogen-dominated atmospheres. We analyze the feasibility of detecting the signatures of Raman scattering with the existing and future observational facilities, and of using these signatures as probes of exoplanetary atmospheres.

  20. Schwinger-Keldysh canonical formalism for electronic Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuehua

    2016-03-01

    Inelastic low-energy Raman and high-energy X-ray scatterings have made great progress in instrumentation to investigate the strong electronic correlations in matter. However, theoretical study of the relevant scattering spectrum is still a challenge. In this paper, we present a Schwinger-Keldysh canonical perturbation formalism for the electronic Raman scattering, where all the resonant, non-resonant and mixed responses are considered uniformly. We show how to use this formalism to evaluate the cross section of the electronic Raman scattering off an one-band superconductor. All the two-photon scattering processes from electrons, the non-resonant charge density response, the elastic Rayleigh scattering, the fluorescence, the intrinsic energy-shift Raman scattering and the mixed response, are included. In the mean-field superconducting state, Cooper pairs contribute only to the non-resonant response. All the other responses are dominated by the single-particle excitations and are strongly suppressed due to the opening of the superconducting gap. Our formalism for the electronic Raman scattering can be easily extended to study the high-energy resonant inelastic X-ray scattering.

  1. Cascade correlation-enhanced Raman scattering in atomic vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hong-Mei; Chen, Li-Qing; Yuan, Chun-Hua

    2016-12-01

    A new Raman process can be used to realize efficient Raman frequency conversion by coherent feedback at low light intensity [Chen B, Zhang K, Bian C L, Qiu C, Yuan C H, Chen L Q, Ou Z Y, and Zhang W P 2013 Opt. Express 21, 10490]. We present a theoretical model to describe this enhanced Raman process, termed as cascade correlation-enhanced Raman scattering, which is a Raman process injected by a seeded light field. It is correlated with the initially prepared atomic spin excitation and driven by the quasi-standing-wave pump fields, and the processes are repeated until the Stokes intensities are saturated. Such an enhanced Raman scattering may find applications in quantum information, nonlinear optics, and optical metrology due to its simplicity. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474095, 11274118, and 91536114).

  2. Spontaneous vs. Coherent Raman Scattering: A Comparison Under Biologically Relevant Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Sarah R.; Bachler, Brandon R.; Cui, Meng; Ogilvie, Jennifer P.

    2009-05-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy has become an active field of research due to the intrinsic molecular contrast it provides. Coherent signals such as CARS have been shown to be orders of magnitude larger than those obtained with spontaneous Raman scattering under certain conditions. However, under conditions appropriate for biological imaging, there has been a lack of systematic comparison between spontaneous and coherent Raman scattering signals. We perform such a comparison imaging study on polystyrene beads and find comparable signal levels for coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS) and spontaneous Stokes scattering, contrary to many reports in the CARS microscopy literature. We present calculations to support the measurements, and discuss the implications for biological imaging. The advantages provided by coherent methods are mitigated in biological samples by the low incident power (˜1mW), short interaction lengths, and low concentrations. The nature of the sample and the necessary imaging conditions must be considered when choosing between coherent and spontaneous Raman methods.

  3. Nanopillars array for surface enhanced Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    S.P. Chang, A; Bora, M; Nguyen, H T; Behymer, E M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Carter, J C; Bond, T C

    2011-04-14

    The authors present a new class of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. Two types of nanopillars within this class are discussed: vertical pillars and tapered pillars. For the vertical pillars, the gap between each pair of nanopillars is small enough (< 50 nm) such that highly confined plasmonic cavity resonances are supported between the pillars when light is incident upon them, and the anti-nodes of these resonances act as three-dimensional hotspots for SERS. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of 1,2 bis-(4-pyridyl)-ethylene (BPE), benzenethiol (BT) monolayer and toluene vapor. The results show that SERS enhancement factor of over 0.5 x 10{sup 9} can be achieved, and BPE can be detected down to femto-molar concentration level. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors such as volatile organic compounds.

  4. Comparison of Raman Scattering Methods for Combustion Dynamics Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    CM PENNEY, and S WARSHAW F49620-77-C-0094 S. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. AREA...OPTICAL DIAGNOSTICS RAMAN SCATTERING LUMINOSITY TEMPERATURE CARS (CO!ERENT ANTI-STOKES SOOT DENSITY RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY) 20. ABSTRACT (Continue an...OF THIS PA*E (SMn .. L.. # SMCUWITY CLASIFICATION OF THIS PAOC(3Wsm Datae. CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman spect~9sopy!) to Aiimp),q, f.0U*5. l and

  5. Tip-enhanced Raman scattering of bacillus subtilis spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusciano, G.; Zito, G.; Pesce, G.; Sasso, A.; Isticato, R.; Ricca, E.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding of the complex interactions of molecules at biological interfaces is a fundamental issue in biochemistry, biotechnology as well as biomedicine. A plethora of biological processes are ruled by the molecular texture of cellular membrane: cellular communications, drug transportations and cellular recognition are just a few examples of such chemically-mediated processes. Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering (TERS) is a novel, Raman-based technique which is ideally suited for this purpose. TERS relies on the combination of scanning probe microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The basic idea is the use of a metalled tip as a sort of optical nano-antenna, which gives place to SERS effect close to the tip end. Herein, we present the application of TERS to analyze the surface of Bacillus subtilis spores. The choice of this biological systems is related to the fact that a number of reasons support the use of spores as a mucosal delivery system. The remarkable and well-documented resistance of spores to various environmental and toxic effects make them clear potentials as a novel, surface-display system. Our experimental outcomes demonstrate that TERS is able to provide a nano-scale chemical imaging of spore surface. Moreover, we demonstrate that TERS allows differentiation between wilde-type spore and genetically modified strains. These results hold promise for the characterization and optimization of spore surface for drug-delivery applications.

  6. Enhanced spontaneous Raman scattering using a photonic crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Buric, M.P.; Falk, J.; Chen, K.; Woodruff, S.D.

    2008-07-22

    The output power from spontaneous gas-phase Raman scattering is enhanced using a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber for the gas cell and Stokes light collector, yielding >100 times enhancement over a free-space configuration.

  7. Raman scattering from rapid thermally annealed tungsten silicide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dasgupta, Samhita; Jackson, Howard E.; Boyd, Joseph T.

    1987-01-01

    Raman scattering as a technique for studying the formation of tungsten silicide is presented. The tungsten silicide films have been formed by rapid thermal annealing of thin tungsten films sputter deposited on silicon substrates. The Raman data are interpreted by using data from resistivity measurements, Auger and Rutherford backscattering measurements, and scanning electron microscopy.

  8. Evidence for nonisochronism of material vibrations in stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Valeri I.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence is found for a decrease of the Raman shift in stimulated Raman scattering with an increase of the pump intensity, which is interpreted as a manifestation of vibrations’ nonisochronism. It is shown that the nonisochronism corresponds to a saturation-type nonlinearity of material vibrations in fused silica and to a Kerr-like nonlinearity in BK-7 glass.

  9. Ponderomotive potential and backward Raman scattering in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Son, S.

    2014-03-15

    The backward Raman scattering is studied in dense quantum plasmas. The coefficients in the backward Raman scattering is found to be underestimated (overestimated) in the classical theory if the excited Langmuir wave has low-wave vector (high-wave vector). The second-order quantum perturbation theory shows that the second harmonic of the ponderomotive potential arises naturally even in a single particle motion contrary to the classical prediction.

  10. Dynamic Volume Holography and Optical Information Processing by Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Dodin,I.Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2002-09-05

    A method of producing holograms of three-dimensional optical pulses is proposed. It is shown that both the amplitude and the phase profile of three-dimensional optical pulse can be stored in dynamic perturbations of a Raman medium, such as plasma. By employing Raman scattering in a nonlinear medium, information carried by a laser pulse can be captured in the form of a slowly propagating low-frequency wave that persists for a time large compared with the pulse duration. If such a hologram is then probed with a short laser pulse, the information stored in the medium can be retrieved in a second scattered electromagnetic wave. The recording and retrieving processes can conserve robustly the pulse shape, thus enabling the recording and retrieving with fidelity of information stored in optical signals. While storing or reading the pulse structure, the optical information can be processed as an analogue or digital signal, which allows simultaneous transformation of three-dimensional continuous images or computing discrete arrays of binary data. By adjusting the phase fronts of the reference pulses, one can also perform focusing, redirecting, and other types of transformation of the output pulses.

  11. Raman Scattering of Azafullerene C48N12

    SciTech Connect

    Manaa, M R

    2004-09-22

    Raman scattering activities and Raman-active frequencies are reported for the minimum energy structure of azafullerene C{sub 48}N{sub 12} at the B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory. Analysis of the vibrational spectrum shows that the most intense IR and Raman bands are those associated with C-C vibrations, and that strong IR and Raman C-N vibrations occur below 1400 cm{sup -1}. Together with the recently reported infrared, optical absorption and x-ray spectroscopies, a complete identification of this cluster should now be feasible.

  12. Development of a Technique for Separating Raman Scattering Signals from Background Emission with Single-Shot Measurement Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Dobson, Chris; Eskridge, Richard; Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.

    1997-01-01

    A novel technique for extracting Q-branch Raman signals scattered by a diatomic species from the emission spectrum resulting from the irradiation of combustion products using a broadband excimer laser has been developed. This technique is based on the polarization characteristics of vibrational Raman scattering and can be used for both single-shot Raman extraction and time-averaged data collection. The Q-branch Raman signal has a unique set of polarization characteristics which depend on the direction of the scattering while fluorescence signals are unpolarized. For the present work, a calcite crystal is used to separate the horizonal component of a collected signal from the vertical component. The two components are then sent through a UV spectrometer and imaged onto an intensified CCD camera separately. The vertical component contains both the Raman signal and the interfering fluorescence signal. The horizontal component contains the fluorescence signal and a very weak component of the Raman signal; hence, the Raman scatter can be extracted by taking the difference between the two signals. The separation of the Raman scatter from interfering fluorescence signals is critically important to the interpretation of the Raman for cases in which a broadband ultraviolet (UV) laser is used as an excitation source in a hydrogen-oxygen flame and in all hydrocarbon flames. The present work provides a demonstration of the separation of the Raman scatter from the fluorescence background in real time.

  13. Label-Free Molecular Imaging of Biological Cells and Tissues by Linear and Nonlinear Raman Spectroscopic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Krafft, Christoph; Schmitt, Michael; Schie, Iwan W; Cialla-May, Dana; Matthäus, Christian; Bocklitz, Thomas; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-11-15

    Raman spectroscopy is an emerging technique in bioanalysis and imaging of biomaterials owing to its unique capability of generating spectroscopic fingerprints. Imaging cells and tissues by Raman microspectroscopy represents a nondestructive and label-free approach. All components of cells or tissues contribute to the Raman signals, giving rise to complex spectral signatures. Resonance Raman scattering and surface-enhanced Raman scattering can be used to enhance the signals and reduce the spectral complexity. Raman-active labels can be introduced to increase specificity and multimodality. In addition, nonlinear coherent Raman scattering methods offer higher sensitivities, which enable the rapid imaging of larger sampling areas. Finally, fiber-based imaging techniques pave the way towards in vivo applications of Raman spectroscopy. This Review summarizes the basic principles behind medical Raman imaging and its progress since 2012.

  14. The Use of Spontaneous Raman Scattering for Hydrogen Leak Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroot, Wim A.

    1994-01-01

    A fiber optic probe has been built and demonstrated that utilizes back scattered spontaneous Raman spectroscopy to detect and identify gaseous species. The small probe, coupled to the laser and data acquisition equipment with optical fibers, has applications in gaseous leak detection and process monitoring. The probe design and data acquisition system are described. Raman scattering theory has been reviewed and the results of intensity calculations of hydrogen and nitrogen Raman scattering are given. Because the device is in its developmental stage, only preliminary experimental results are presented here. Intensity scans across the rotational-vibrational Raman lines of nitrogen and hydrogen are presented. Nitrogen at a partial pressure of 0.077 MPa was detected. Hydrogen at a partial pressure of 2 kPa approached the lower limit of detectability with the present apparatus. Potential instrument improvements that would allow more sensitive and rapid hydrogen detection are identified.

  15. Guiding brain tumor resection using surface-enhanced Raman scattering nanoparticles and a hand-held Raman scanner.

    PubMed

    Karabeber, Hazem; Huang, Ruimin; Iacono, Pasquale; Samii, Jason M; Pitter, Ken; Holland, Eric C; Kircher, Moritz F

    2014-10-28

    The current difficulty in visualizing the true extent of malignant brain tumors during surgical resection represents one of the major reasons for the poor prognosis of brain tumor patients. Here, we evaluated the ability of a hand-held Raman scanner, guided by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles, to identify the microscopic tumor extent in a genetically engineered RCAS/tv-a glioblastoma mouse model. In a simulated intraoperative scenario, we tested both a static Raman imaging device and a mobile, hand-held Raman scanner. We show that SERS image-guided resection is more accurate than resection using white light visualization alone. Both methods complemented each other, and correlation with histology showed that SERS nanoparticles accurately outlined the extent of the tumors. Importantly, the hand-held Raman probe not only allowed near real-time scanning, but also detected additional microscopic foci of cancer in the resection bed that were not seen on static SERS images and would otherwise have been missed. This technology has a strong potential for clinical translation because it uses inert gold-silica SERS nanoparticles and a hand-held Raman scanner that can guide brain tumor resection in the operating room.

  16. Quantitative coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy.

    PubMed

    Day, James P R; Domke, Katrin F; Rago, Gianluca; Kano, Hideaki; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o; Vartiainen, Erik M; Bonn, Mischa

    2011-06-23

    The ability to observe samples qualitatively at the microscopic scale has greatly enhanced our understanding of the physical and biological world throughout the 400 year history of microscopic imaging, but there are relatively few techniques that can truly claim the ability to quantify the local concentration and composition of a sample. We review coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) as a quantitative, chemically specific, and label-free microscopy. We discuss the complicating influence of the nonresonant response on the CARS signal and the various experimental and mathematical approaches that can be adopted to extract quantitative information from CARS. We also review the uses to which CARS has been employed as a quantitative microscopy to solve challenges in material and biological science.

  17. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of single nanodiamonds

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Iestyn; Payne, Lukas; Zoriniants, George; Thomas, Evan; Williams, Oliver; Watson, Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted enormous attention for biomedical applications as optical labels, drug delivery vehicles, and contrast agents in vivo. In the quest for superior photostability and bio-compatibility, nanodiamonds (NDs) are considered one of the best choices due to their unique structural, chemical, mechanical, and optical properties. So far, mainly fluorescent NDs have been utilized for cell imaging. However, their use is limited by the efficiency and costs in reliably producing fluorescent defect centers with stable optical properties. Here, we show that single non-fluorescing NDs exhibit strong coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) at the sp3 vibrational resonance of diamond. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, the relationship between CARS signal strength and ND size is quantified. The calibrated CARS signal in turn enables the analysis of the number and size of NDs internalized in living cells in situ, which opens the exciting prospect of following complex cellular trafficking pathways quantitatively. PMID:25305746

  18. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of single nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Iestyn; Payne, Lukas; Zoriniants, George; Thomas, Evan; Williams, Oliver; Watson, Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted enormous attention for biomedical applications as optical labels, drug-delivery vehicles and contrast agents in vivo. In the quest for superior photostability and biocompatibility, nanodiamonds are considered one of the best choices due to their unique structural, chemical, mechanical and optical properties. So far, mainly fluorescent nanodiamonds have been utilized for cell imaging. However, their use is limited by the efficiency and costs in reliably producing fluorescent defect centres with stable optical properties. Here, we show that single non-fluorescing nanodiamonds exhibit strong coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) at the sp3 vibrational resonance of diamond. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, the relationship between CARS signal strength and nanodiamond size is quantified. The calibrated CARS signal in turn enables the analysis of the number and size of nanodiamonds internalized in living cells in situ, which opens the exciting prospect of following complex cellular trafficking pathways quantitatively.

  19. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of single nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Pope, Iestyn; Payne, Lukas; Zoriniants, George; Thomas, Evan; Williams, Oliver; Watson, Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted enormous attention for biomedical applications as optical labels, drug-delivery vehicles and contrast agents in vivo. In the quest for superior photostability and biocompatibility, nanodiamonds are considered one of the best choices due to their unique structural, chemical, mechanical and optical properties. So far, mainly fluorescent nanodiamonds have been utilized for cell imaging. However, their use is limited by the efficiency and costs in reliably producing fluorescent defect centres with stable optical properties. Here, we show that single non-fluorescing nanodiamonds exhibit strong coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) at the sp(3) vibrational resonance of diamond. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, the relationship between CARS signal strength and nanodiamond size is quantified. The calibrated CARS signal in turn enables the analysis of the number and size of nanodiamonds internalized in living cells in situ, which opens the exciting prospect of following complex cellular trafficking pathways quantitatively.

  20. Ocean Raman Scattering in Satellite Backscatter UV Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasilkov, Alexander P.; Joiner, Joanna; Gleason, James; Bhartia, Pawan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ocean Raman scattering significantly contributes to the filling-in of solar Fraunhofer lines measured by satellite backscatter ultraviolet (buy) instruments in the cloudless atmosphere over clear ocean waters. A model accounting for this effect in buy measurements is developed and compared with observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GONE). The model extends existing models for ocean Raman scattering to the UV spectral range. Ocean Raman scattering radiance is propagated through the atmosphere using a concept of the Lambert equivalent reflectively and an accurate radiative transfer model for Rayleigh scattering. The model and observations can be used to evaluate laboratory measurements of pure water absorption in the UV. The good agreement between model and observations suggests that buy instruments may be useful for estimating chlorophyll content.

  1. Coherent Scatter Imaging Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ur Rehman, Mahboob

    In conventional radiography, anatomical information of the patients can be obtained, distinguishing different tissue types, e.g. bone and soft tissue. However, it is difficult to obtain appreciable contrast between two different types of soft tissues. Instead, coherent x-ray scattering can be utilized to obtain images which can differentiate between normal and cancerous cells of breast. An x-ray system using a conventional source and simple slot apertures was tested. Materials with scatter signatures that mimic breast cancer were buried in layers of fat of increasing thickness and imaged. The result showed that the contrast and signal to noise ratio (SNR) remained high even with added fat layers and short scan times.

  2. Dephasing and resonance electronic Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koningstein, J. A.

    1988-05-01

    The intensity of the resonance electronic Raman spectrum of terbium aluminum garnet is discussed in terms of radiative, non-radiative and pure electronic dephasing processes which govern the width of the resonating excited electronic state. As a result of fast electronic dephasing in comparison to the other processes, the enhancement of the intensity of the electronic Raman band of the terbium ion is suppressed.

  3. Development and integration of Raman imaging capabilities to Sandia National Laboratories hyperspectral fluorescence imaging instrument.

    SciTech Connect

    Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Nieman, Linda T.

    2005-11-01

    Raman spectroscopic imaging is a powerful technique for visualizing chemical differences within a variety of samples based on the interaction of a substance's molecular vibrations with laser light. While Raman imaging can provide a unique view of samples such as residual stress within silicon devices, chemical degradation, material aging, and sample heterogeneity, the Raman scattering process is often weak and thus requires very sensitive collection optics and detectors. Many commercial instruments (including ones owned here at Sandia National Laboratories) generate Raman images by raster scanning a point focused laser beam across a sample--a process which can expose a sample to extreme levels of laser light and requires lengthy acquisition times. Our previous research efforts have led to the development of a state-of-the-art two-dimensional hyperspectral imager for fluorescence imaging applications such as microarray scanning. This report details the design, integration, and characterization of a line-scan Raman imaging module added to this efficient hyperspectral fluorescence microscope. The original hyperspectral fluorescence instrument serves as the framework for excitation and sample manipulation for the Raman imaging system, while a more appropriate axial transmissive Raman imaging spectrometer and detector are utilized for collection of the Raman scatter. The result is a unique and flexible dual-modality fluorescence and Raman imaging system capable of high-speed imaging at high spatial and spectral resolutions. Care was taken throughout the design and integration process not to hinder any of the fluorescence imaging capabilities. For example, an operator can switch between the fluorescence and Raman modalities without need for extensive optical realignment. The instrument performance has been characterized and sample data is presented.

  4. Raman Imaging in Cell Membranes, Lipid-Rich Organelles, and Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Syed, Aleem; Smith, Emily A

    2017-03-15

    Raman-based optical imaging is a promising analytical tool for noninvasive, label-free chemical imaging of lipid bilayers and cellular membranes. Imaging using spontaneous Raman scattering suffers from a low intensity that hinders its use in some cellular applications. However, developments in coherent Raman imaging, surface-enhanced Raman imaging, and tip-enhanced Raman imaging have enabled video-rate imaging, excellent detection limits, and nanometer spatial resolution, respectively. After a brief introduction to these commonly used Raman imaging techniques for cell membrane studies, this review discusses selected applications of these modalities for chemical imaging of membrane proteins and lipids. Finally, recent developments in chemical tags for Raman imaging and their applications in the analysis of selected cell membrane components are summarized. Ongoing developments toward improving the temporal and spatial resolution of Raman imaging and small-molecule tags with strong Raman scattering cross sections continue to expand the utility of Raman imaging for diverse cell membrane studies. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry Volume 10 is June 12, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  5. High-speed coherent Raman fingerprint imaging of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Charles H., Jr.; Lee, Young Jong; Heddleston, John M.; Hartshorn, Christopher M.; Walker, Angela R. Hight; Rich, Jeremy N.; Lathia, Justin D.; Cicerone, Marcus T.

    2014-08-01

    An imaging platform based on broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering has been developed that provides an advantageous combination of speed, sensitivity and spectral breadth. The system utilizes a configuration of laser sources that probes the entire biologically relevant Raman window (500-3,500 cm-1) with high resolution (<10 cm-1). It strongly and efficiently stimulates Raman transitions within the typically weak ‘fingerprint’ region using intrapulse three-colour excitation, and utilizes the non-resonant background to heterodyne-amplify weak Raman signals. We demonstrate high-speed chemical imaging in two- and three-dimensional views of healthy murine liver and pancreas tissues as well as interfaces between xenograft brain tumours and the surrounding healthy brain matter.

  6. Raman Imaging with a Fiber-Coupled Multichannel Spectrograph

    PubMed Central

    Schmälzlin, Elmar; Moralejo, Benito; Rutowska, Monika; Monreal-Ibero, Ana; Sandin, Christer; Tarcea, Nicolae; Popp, Jürgen; Roth, Martin M.

    2014-01-01

    Until now, spatially resolved Raman Spectroscopy has required to scan a sample under investigation in a time-consuming step-by-step procedure. Here, we present a technique that allows the capture of an entire Raman image with only one single exposure. The Raman scattering arising from the sample was collected with a fiber-coupled high-performance astronomy spectrograph. The probe head consisting of an array of 20 × 20 multimode fibers was linked to the camera port of a microscope. To demonstrate the high potential of this new concept, Raman images of reference samples were recorded. Entire chemical maps were received without the need for a scanning procedure. PMID:25420149

  7. Remote sensing of subsurface water temperature by Raman scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, D. A.; Caputo, B.; Hoge, F. E.

    1979-01-01

    The application of Raman scattering to remote sensing of subsurface water temperature and salinity is considered, and both theoretical and experimental aspects of the technique are discussed. Recent experimental field measurements obtained in coastal waters and on a trans-Atlantic/Mediterranean research cruise are correlated with theoretical expectations. It is concluded that the Raman technique for remote sensing of subsurface water temperature has been brought from theoretical and laboratory stages to the point where practical utilization can now be developed.

  8. Raman Scattering at Plasmonic Junctions Shorted by Conductive Molecular Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Apkarian, V. Ara; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-04-10

    Intensity spikes in Raman scattering, accompanied by switching between line spectra and band spectra, can be assigned to shorting the junction plasmon through molecular conductive bridges. This is demonstrated through Raman trajectories recorded at a plasmonic junction formed by a gold AFM tip in contact with a silver surface coated either with biphenyl-4,4’-dithiol or biphenyl-4-thiol. The fluctuations are absent in the monothiol. In effect, the making and breaking of chemical bonds is tracked.

  9. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dosimeter and probe

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1995-01-01

    A dosimeter and probe for measuring exposure to chemical and biological compounds is disclosed. The dosimeter or probe includes a collector which may be analyzed by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The collector comprises a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active material having a coating applied thereto to improve the adsorption properties of the collector. The collector may also be used in automated sequential devises, in probe array devices.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dosimeter and probe

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1995-03-21

    A dosimeter and probe for measuring exposure to chemical and biological compounds is disclosed. The dosimeter or probe includes a collector which may be analyzed by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The collector comprises a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active material having a coating applied thereto to improve the adsorption properties of the collector. The collector may also be used in automated sequential devices, in probe array devices. 10 figures.

  11. Femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering picosecond molecular thermometry in condensed phases.

    PubMed

    Dang, N C; Bolme, C A; Moore, D S; McGrane, S D

    2011-07-22

    We demonstrate the capability of femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (FSRS) data to measure the temperature of condensed matter at the molecular vibrational level. We report the temperature dependence of Raman loss to Raman gain ratios for low frequency modes (<300  cm(-1)) in a CaCO3 single crystal from cryogenic to room temperature, which is shown to be in agreement with theoretical predictions. We also report the measurements of nonequilibrium time evolution of mode specific vibrational temperatures in the CaCO3 single crystal to demonstrate that FSRS can measure temperature on picosecond time scales. Finally, we point out the unique origin of this temperature dependent anti-Stokes to Stokes ratio in stimulated Raman, which is not present in other coherent Raman spectroscopies. These measurements require no material dependent parameters or prior calibration.

  12. Chemical Contribution to Surface-Enahanced Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, Bo Nils J; Zhao, Ke; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2006-01-01

    We present a new mechanism for the chemical contribution to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The theory considers the modulation of the polarizability of a metal nanocluster or a flat metal surface by the vibrational motion of an adsorbed molecule. The modulated polarization of the substrate coupled with the incident light will contribute to the Raman scattering enhancement. We show that for a metal cluster and for a flat metal surface this new chemical contribution may enhance the Raman scattering intensity by a factor of {approx} 10{sup 2} and {approx}10{sup 4}, respectively. The new SERS process is determined by the electric field parallel to the surface of the metal substrate at the molecular binding site.

  13. Spontaneous Raman Scattering Diagnostics for High-pressure Gaseous Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Jun; Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Reddy, D. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A high-pressure (up to 60 atm) gaseous burner facility with optical access that provides steady, reproducible flames with high precision, and the ability to use multiple fuel/oxidizer combinations has been developed. In addition, a high-performance spontaneous Raman scattering system for use in the above facility has also been developed. Together, the two systems will be used to acquire and establish a comprehensive Raman scattering spectral database for use as a quantitative high-pressure calibration of single-shot Raman scattering measurements in high-pressure combustion systems. Using these facilities, the Raman spectra of H2-Air flames were successfully measured at pressures up to 20 atm. The spectra demonstrated clear rotational and ro-vibrational Raman features of H2, N2, and H2O. theoretical Raman spectra of pure rotational H2, vibrational H2, and vibrational N2 were calculated using a classical harmonic-oscillator model with pressure broadening effects and fitted to the data. At a gas temperature of 1889 K for a phi = 1.34 H2-Air flame, the model and the data showed good agreement, confirming a ro-vibrational equilibrium temperature.

  14. Plasmonic Nanogap-Enhanced Raman Scattering with Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jwa-Min; Oh, Jeong-Wook; Lee, Haemi; Suh, Yung Doug

    2016-12-20

    Plasmonic coupling-based electromagnetic field localization and enhancement are becoming increasingly important in chemistry, nanoscience, materials science, physics, and engineering over the past decade, generating a number of new concepts and applications. Among the plasmonically coupled nanostructures, metal nanostructures with nanogaps have been of special interest due to their ultrastrong electromagnetic fields and controllable optical properties that can be useful for a variety of signal enhancements such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The Raman scattering process is highly inefficient, with a very small cross-section, and Raman signals are often poorly reproducible, meaning that very strong, controllable SERS is needed to obtain reliable Raman signals with metallic nanostructures and thus open up new avenues for a variety of Raman-based applications. More specifically, plasmonically coupled metallic nanostructures with ultrasmall (∼1 nm or smaller) nanogaps can generate very strong and tunable electromagnetic fields that can generate strong SERS signals from Raman dyes in the gap, and plasmonic nanogap-enhanced Raman scattering can be defined as Raman signal enhancement from plasmonic nanogap particles with ∼1 nm gaps. However, these promising nanostructures with extraordinarily strong optical signals have shown limited use for practical applications, largely due to the lack of design principles, high-yield synthetic strategies with nanometer-level structural control and reproducibility, and systematic, reliable single-molecule/single-particle-level studies on their optical properties. All these are extremely important challenges because even small changes (<1 nm) in the structure of the coupled plasmonic nanogaps can significantly affect the plasmon mode and signal intensity. In this Account, we examine and summarize recent breakthroughs and advances in plasmonic nanogap-enhanced Raman scattering with metal nanogap particles with respect

  15. Remote measurements of the atmosphere using Raman scattering.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melfi, S. H.

    1972-01-01

    Raman optical radar measurements of the atmosphere demonstrate that the technique may be used to obtain quantitative measurements of the spatial distribution of individual atmospheric molecular trace constituents (in particular water vapor) and of the major constituents. It is shown that monitoring Raman signals from atmospheric nitrogen aids in interpreting elastic scattering measurements by eliminating attenuation effects. In general, the experimental results show good agreement with independent meteorological measurements. Finally, experimental data are utilized to estimate the Raman backscatter cross section for water vapor excited at 3471.5 A.

  16. Raman scattering for food quality and safety assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growing interests in both academia and industry have driven a rapid advance in Raman spectroscopy and spectral imaging technologies during the last decade. Novel Raman measurement techniques are constantly emerging to create new detection possibilities that cannot be achieved by existing methods. Im...

  17. Confocal Raman imaging of crystalline an glassy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, N.L.; Morris, M.D.

    1995-12-31

    Spatial distribution of materials components can be measured by confocal Raman imaging. We describe a confocal line-imaging system in which the spectrograph entrance slit functions as a spatial filter. The instrument uses a scanning galvanometer mirror to generate uniform intensity line illumination. A flexure mount with better than 0.1 micrometer positioning accuracy moves the sample under the fixed optical system. The Raman scatter is collected and projected along the entrance slit of an axial transmissive spectrograph. A CCD collects spatially resolved spectra.

  18. Resonance electronic Raman scattering in rare earth crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.M.

    1988-11-10

    The intensities of Raman scattering transitions between electronic energy levels of trivalent rare earth ions doped into transparent crystals were measured and compared to theory. A particle emphasis was placed on the examination of the effect of intermediate state resonances on the Raman scattering intensities. Two specific systems were studied: Ce/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 1/) in single crystals of LuPO/sub 4/ and Er/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 11/) in single crystals of ErPO/sub 4/. 134 refs., 92 figs., 33 tabs.

  19. Molecular alignment and orientation with a hybrid Raman scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustard, Philip J.; Lausten, R.; Sussman, Benjamin J.

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate a scheme for the preparation of molecular alignment and angular momentum orientation using a hybrid combination of two limits of Raman scattering. First a weak, impulsive pump pulse initializes the system via the nonresonant dynamic Stark effect. Then, having overcome the influence of the vacuum fluctuations, an amplification pulse selectively enhances the initial coherences by transient stimulated Raman scattering, generating alignment and angular momentum orientation of molecular hydrogen. The amplitude and phase of the resulting coherent dynamics are experimentally probed, indicating an amplification factor of 4.5. An analytic theory is developed to model the dynamics.

  20. Standoff detection of trace compounds enabled by continuum pulse shaping and coherent Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, Marshall T.; Yue, Orin; Lozovoy, Vadim V.; Dantus, Marcos

    2012-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy has long been pursued as means to detect hazards from a safe distance. This approach promises high chemical specificity, but is limited in sensitivity because of the very small Raman cross-section. We recently demonstrated detection of trace quantities using a non-linear counterpart, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), which offers large signal enhancement over spontaneous Raman due to coherent signal addition. Utilizing a pulse shaper and the bandwidth inherent in a 5fs laser pulse, CARS spectra were acquired from an explosive simulant dissolved within thin polymer films. Further, the pulse shaper offers total control of the non-linear process, including selective excitation of particular vibrational modes, enabling single channel detection and associated opportunities for rapid chemical imaging. We will present standoff chemical images and associated CARS spectra acquired in a standoff configuration, demonstrating the applicability of the new spectroscopy in a realistic environment.

  1. Quantitative multi-image analysis for biomedical Raman spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Martin A B; Bergholt, Mads S; Stevens, Molly M

    2016-05-01

    Imaging by Raman spectroscopy enables unparalleled label-free insights into cell and tissue composition at the molecular level. With established approaches limited to single image analysis, there are currently no general guidelines or consensus on how to quantify biochemical components across multiple Raman images. Here, we describe a broadly applicable methodology for the combination of multiple Raman images into a single image for analysis. This is achieved by removing image specific background interference, unfolding the series of Raman images into a single dataset, and normalisation of each Raman spectrum to render comparable Raman images. Multivariate image analysis is finally applied to derive the contributing 'pure' biochemical spectra for relative quantification. We present our methodology using four independently measured Raman images of control cells and four images of cells treated with strontium ions from substituted bioactive glass. We show that the relative biochemical distribution per area of the cells can be quantified. In addition, using k-means clustering, we are able to discriminate between the two cell types over multiple Raman images. This study shows a streamlined quantitative multi-image analysis tool for improving cell/tissue characterisation and opens new avenues in biomedical Raman spectroscopic imaging.

  2. A fiber-laser-based stimulated Raman scattering spectral microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nose, Keisuke; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Kishi, Tatsuya; Sumimura, Kazuhiko; Kanematsu, Yasuo; Itoh, Kazuyoshi

    2013-02-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectral microscopy is a powerful technique for label-free biological imaging because it allows us to distinguish chemical species with overlapping Raman bands. Here we present an SRS spectral microscope based only on fiber lasers (FL's), which offer the possibilities of downsizing and simplification of the system. A femtosecond figure-8 Er-FL at a repetition rate of 54.4 MHz is used to generate pump pulses. After amplified by an Er doped fiber amplifier, Er-FL pulses are spectrally compressed to 2-ps second harmonic pulses. For generating Stokes pulses, a femtosecond Yb-FL pulses at a repetition rate of 27.2 MHz is used. Then these lasers are synchronized by a phase locked loop, which consists of a two-photon absorption photodetector, a loop filter, a phase modulator in the Er- FL cavity, and a piezo electric transducer in the Yb-FL cavity. The intensity noise of pump pulses is reduced by the collinear balanced detection (CBD) technique based on delay-and-add fiber lines. Experimentally, we confirmed that the intensity noise level of probe pulses was close to the shot noise limit. The Stokes pulses are introduced to a wavelength tunable band pass filter (BPF), which consists of a galvanomirror scanner, a 4-f optical system, a reflection grating, and a collimator. This system is able to scan the wavenumber from 2850 cm-1 to 3100 cm-1 by tuning the BPF. We succeeded in the spectral imaging of a mixture of polystyrene beads and poly(methyl methacrylate) beads.

  3. Raman scattering and in-water ocean optical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Bruce R.; Smith, Raymond C.

    1990-01-01

    Inelastic (transpectral) scattering may contribute significantly to the in-water light field. Major mechanisms for inelastic scattering include Raman scattering, which is important in clear ocean waters, and fluorescence from a variety of sources, which may be important in more turbid waters. The Raman cross section for liquid water is found to be 8.2 x 10 to the -30th sq cm/sr molecule, which is in agreement with the lower range of published values. Inelastic scattering has important ramifications for several aspects of marine biooptics, including the determination of in-water spectral absorption, the estimation of clear-water ocean optical properties, and possibly various aspects of algal photobiology.

  4. Simultaneous observation of rotational coherent Stokes Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering in air and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, J. B.; Chang, R. K.; Zheng, J. B.; Leipertz, A.

    1983-01-01

    Rotational coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) in air and in nitrogen were observed simultaneously by using broadband generation and detection. In the broadband technique used, the entire CARS and CSRS spectrum was generated in a single laser pulse; the CSRS and CARS signals were dispersed by a spectrograph and detected simultaneously by an optical multichannel analyzer. A three-dimensional phase-matching geometry was used to achieve spatial resolution of the CSRS and CARS beams from the input beams. Under resonant conditions, similar experiments may provide a means of investigating the possible interaction between the CSRS and CARS processes in driving the rotational levels.

  5. Raman scattering of IrTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alexander; Thorsmolle, Verner; Artyukhin, Sergey; Yang, Jun; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Blumberg, Girsh

    2014-03-01

    IrTe2 presents a layered compound with a triangular lattice. It is known to exhibit a first order structural phase transition at approximately 260 K which is of a first order, corresponding to a formation of a superstructure with a period of five unit cells. Using polarized Raman spectroscopy we have studied the temperature dependence of 14 observed Raman allowed phononic modes. These phonons couple strongly to this transition and one additional first order transition at approximately 170 K. In the high-temperature phase only 3 modes are observed, while below approximately 280 K all 14 modes become visible. Below approximately 170 K only 11 modes are observed. Our results shed light on the possible mechanism driving the transitions. ACL, VKT and GB acknowledge support by NSF DMR-1104884.

  6. Silicon nanoparticles as Raman scattering enhancers.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, I; Shi, L; Lu, X; Korgel, B A; Alvarez-Puebla, R A; Meseguer, F

    2014-06-07

    In this communication we demonstrate the large amplification values of the Raman signal of organic molecules attached to silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs). Light induced Mie resonances of high refractive index particles generate strong evanescent electromagnetic (EM) fields, thus boosting the Raman signal of species attached to the nanoparticles. The interest of this process is justified by the wide range of experimental configurations that can be implemented including photonic crystals, the sharp spectral resonances easily tuneable with the particle size, the biocompatibility and biodegradability of silicon, and the possibility of direct analysis of molecules that do not contain functional groups with high affinity for gold and silver. Additionally, silicon nanoparticles present stronger field enhancement due to Mie resonances at larger sizes than gold.

  7. Silicon nanoparticles as Raman scattering enhancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, I.; Shi, L.; Lu, X.; Korgel, B. A.; Alvarez-Puebla, R. A.; Meseguer, F.

    2014-05-01

    In this communication we demonstrate the large amplification values of the Raman signal of organic molecules attached to silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs). Light induced Mie resonances of high refractive index particles generate strong evanescent electromagnetic (EM) fields, thus boosting the Raman signal of species attached to the nanoparticles. The interest of this process is justified by the wide range of experimental configurations that can be implemented including photonic crystals, the sharp spectral resonances easily tuneable with the particle size, the biocompatibility and biodegradability of silicon, and the possibility of direct analysis of molecules that do not contain functional groups with high affinity for gold and silver. Additionally, silicon nanoparticles present stronger field enhancement due to Mie resonances at larger sizes than gold.In this communication we demonstrate the large amplification values of the Raman signal of organic molecules attached to silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs). Light induced Mie resonances of high refractive index particles generate strong evanescent electromagnetic (EM) fields, thus boosting the Raman signal of species attached to the nanoparticles. The interest of this process is justified by the wide range of experimental configurations that can be implemented including photonic crystals, the sharp spectral resonances easily tuneable with the particle size, the biocompatibility and biodegradability of silicon, and the possibility of direct analysis of molecules that do not contain functional groups with high affinity for gold and silver. Additionally, silicon nanoparticles present stronger field enhancement due to Mie resonances at larger sizes than gold. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00593g

  8. Using Raman scattering for water areas monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, E. V.; Timchenko, P. E.; Platonov, I. A.; Tregub, N. V.; Asadova, A. A.; Mukhanova, I. M.

    2016-04-01

    The results of studies on the effects of heavy metals on aquatic plants using the method of Raman spectroscopy (RS). Introduced optical coefficient, reflecting changes in chlorophyll and carotinoids in relation to the hemicellulose under the influence of heavy metals, defined as the ratio of the intensities of the RS on the wavenumbers 1547 cm-1, 1522 cm-1 to the intensity of the line 1734 cm-1. Was monitored waters of the Samara region on the basis of this coefficient.

  9. Raman scattering and luminescence of yttria nanopowders and ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, V. V.; Solomonov, V. I.; Spirina, A. V.; Vovkotrub, E. G.; Strekalovskii, V. N.

    2014-06-01

    We have studied Raman scattering in yttria nanopowders and ceramics that was excited by radiation at wavelengths of 514.5 and 632.8 nm. We show that, in undoped nanopowders and cubic phase of doped yttria ceramics, only the Raman scattering by phonons is observed, with no other Raman scattering centers having been revealed. In nanopowders of the monoclinic phase, we have observed an additional Raman line with a Raman shift of 1093 ± 4 cm-1. If all the objects under investigation are excited by the radiation at a wavelength of 514.5 nm, their spectra exhibit four series of photoluminescence lines, two of which (at λ = 521-523 and 538-564 nm) are emitted by Er3+ ions, "impurity" dopants, while the other two lines (at λ = 607-635 and 644-684 nm) are emitted by intrinsic centers. Under excitation by the radiation at a wavelength of 632.8 nm, only a series of bands at λ = 644-684 nm is emitted. In addition to these photoluminescence bands, neodymium-doped ceramics show photoluminescence bands of Nd3+ ions. We have shown that intrinsic luminescence centers, which occur in all the examined specimens, are capable of acting as acceptors with respect to neodymium ions excited to the upper laser level.

  10. Optical parametric oscillator-based light source for coherent Raman scattering microscopy: practical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brustlein, Sophie; Ferrand, Patrick; Walther, Nico; Brasselet, Sophie; Billaudeau, Cyrille; Marguet, Didier; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-02-01

    We present the assets and constraints of using optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) to perform point scanning nonlinear microscopy and spectroscopy with special emphasis on coherent Raman spectroscopy. The difterent possible configurations starting with one OPO and two OPOs are described in detail and with comments that are intended to be practically useful for the user. Explicit examples on test samples such as nonlinear organic crystal, polystyrene beads, and fresh mouse tissues are given. Special emphasis is given to background-free coherent Raman anti-Stokes scattering (CARS) imaging, including CARS hyperspectral imaging in a fully automated mode with commercial OPOs.

  11. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOEpatents

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-07-22

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  12. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOEpatents

    Bond, Tiziana C; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-11-03

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  13. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOEpatents

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-07-14

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  14. Standoff ultraviolet raman scattering detection of trace levels of explosives.

    SciTech Connect

    Kulp, Thomas J.; Bisson, Scott E.; Reichardt, Thomas A.

    2011-10-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) Raman scattering with a 244-nm laser is evaluated for standoff detection of explosive compounds. The measured Raman scattering albedo is incorporated into a performance model that focused on standoff detection of trace levels of explosives. This model shows that detection at {approx}100 m would likely require tens of seconds, discouraging application at such ranges, and prohibiting search-mode detection, while leaving open the possibility of short-range point-and-stare detection. UV Raman spectra are also acquired for a number of anticipated background surfaces: tile, concrete, aluminum, cloth, and two different car paints (black and silver). While these spectra contained features in the same spectral range as those for TNT, we do not observe any spectra similar to that of TNT.

  15. Effects of Raman scattering on the water-leaving radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, Kirk J.

    1995-01-01

    The contribution of Raman scattering to the water-leaving radiance is examined using Monte Carlo simulations. Exit angle information is retained, allowing a comparison of different satellite viewing directions. Chlorophyll values of 0.0, 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mg Chl/cu m are simulated. Little directional variability is found, with the exception of the direct solar backscatter direction. The wavelength variability is greatest for low chlorophyll concentrations and is negligible for 1.0 mg Chl/cu m. At 550 nm the Raman contribution ranges from approximately 18% of the total water-leaving radiance for pure water to 3% for 1.0 mg Chl/cu m. At 440 nm the range is from 6% to 2%, indicating that Raman scattering will impact radiance ratios for ocean color satellite algorithms.

  16. Symmetry analysis of Raman scattering mediated by neighboring molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mathew D.; Bradshaw, David S.; Andrews, David L.

    2016-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a key technique for the identification and structural interrogation of molecules. It generally exploits changes in vibrational state within individual molecules which produce, in the scattered light, frequencies that are absent in the incident light. Considered as a quantum optical process, each Raman scattering event involves the concurrent annihilation and creation of photons of two differing radiation modes, accompanying vibrational excitation or decay. For molecules of sufficiently high symmetry, certain transitions may be forbidden by the two-photon selection rules, such that corresponding frequency shifts may not appear in the scattered light. By further developing the theory on a formal basis detailed in other recent work [M. D. Williams et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 174304 (2016)], the present analysis now addresses cases in which expected selection rule limitations are removed as a result of the electronic interactions between neighboring molecules. In consequence, new vibrational lines may appear—even some odd parity (ungerade) vibrations may then participate in the Raman process. Subtle differences arise according to whether the input and output photon events occur at either the same or different molecules, mediated by intermolecular interactions. For closely neighboring molecules, within near-field displacement distances, it emerges that the radiant intensity of Raman scattering can have various inverse-power dependences on separation distance. A focus is given here to the newly permitted symmetries, and the results include an extended list of irreducible representations for each point group in which such behavior can arise.

  17. Temperature Dependence of Raman Scattering in ZnO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-06

    Callahan 5e. TASK NUMBER HC 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 01 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) * Consell Superior d’Investigacions...dependence of Raman scattering in ZnO Ramon Cuscó, Esther Alarcón-Lladó, Jordi Ibáñez, and Luis Artús Institut Jaume Almera, Consell Superior

  18. In vivo characterization of protein uptake by yeast cell envelope: single cell AFM imaging and μ-tip-enhanced Raman scattering study.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Denys; Snitka, Valentinas; Serviene, Elena; Bruzaite, Ingrida; Snopok, Boris

    2013-09-21

    Direct detection of biological transformations of single living cells in vivo has been performed by the advanced combination of local topographic imaging by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and label-free sub-surface chemical characterization using new μ-Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (μ-TERS). The enhancing mechanism for μ-TERS tips with micrometre range radius differs significantly to that of the conventional tapered structures terminated by a sharp apex and conditioned by the effects of propagating instead of localizing surface plasmon resonance phenomena. Sub-wavelength light confinement in the form of a nonradiative evanescent wave near the tip surface with penetration depth in the sub-micrometre range opens the way for monitoring of subsurface processes near or within the cell wall, inaccessible by other methods. The efficiency of the approach has been demonstrated by the analysis of the cell envelope of genetically modified (by glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) gene bearing Kluyveromyces lactis toxin signal sequence) yeast cells enriched by GDH protein. The presence of trans-membrane fragments in GDH together with the tendency to form active dimers and tetramers causes the accumulation of the proteins within the periplasmic space. These results demonstrate that the advanced combination of AFM imaging and subsurface chemical characterization by the novel μ-TERS technique provides a new analytical tool for the investigation of single living cells in vivo.

  19. Enhancement of Raman scattering from molecules placed near metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbiellini, B.

    2017-01-01

    Large Raman scattering cross sections from molecules on surfaces of metallic nanoparticles are described within a renormalization-group theory. In this approach the valence electrons of the molecules are embedded in an effective medium described by a dielectric function, which integrates out the effect of the plasmonic excitations of the metallic nanoparticles. The source of the enhanced photon inelastic scattering is produced by the resonant excitation of surface plasmons at the metallic nanoparticles. A similar theory has been successfully used to explain the resonant x-ray inelastic scattering and the behavior of nonlinear susceptibilities at the x-ray edges.

  20. Detection of melamine on fractals of unmodified gold nanoparticles by surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Roy, Pradip Kumar; Huang, Yi-Fan; Chattopadhyay, Surojit

    2014-01-01

    A simple way of detecting melamine in raw milk is demonstrated via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) using fractals of bare and nonfunctionalized ~30 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNP) distributed on a solid support. The technique demonstrates the formation of AuNP fractals, from a random distribution, upon exposure to melamine, that enhance the Raman scattering cross-section to enable detection by SERS. The agglomeration, which is pronounced at higher melamine concentrations, is demonstrated directly through imaging, and the red-shift of the plasmon absorption peak of the AuNP fractal away from 530 nm by finite difference time domain (FDTD) calculations. The agglomeration results in a strong plasmon field, shown by FDTD, over the interparticle sites that enhances the Raman scattering cross-section of melamine and ensures unambiguous detection. Limit of detection of 100 ppb could be achieved reproducibly.

  1. Improving sensitivity in nonlinear Raman microspectroscopy imaging and sensing

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Rajan; Petrov, Georgi I.; Liu, Jian; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear Raman microspectroscopy based on a broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering is an emerging technique for noninvasive, chemically specific, microscopic analysis of tissues and large population of cells and particles. The sensitivity of this imaging is a critical aspect of a number of the proposed biomedical application. It is shown that the incident laser power is the major parameter controlling this sensitivity. By careful optimizing the laser system, the high-quality vibrational spectra acquisition at the multi-kHz rate becomes feasible. PMID:21361677

  2. AROTEL Temperature Retrievals Within PSC's Using Raman Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burris, John; McGee, Thomas; Hoegy, Walt; Heaps, William; Twigg, Larry; Sumnicht, Grant; Hostetler, Chris; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Airborne Raman Ozone Temperature Lidar (AROTEL) made temperature retrievals within Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) on several flights during the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) campaign. The location of the PSCs was confirmed using simultaneously acquired data from the NASA Langley Aerosol lidar. Retrievals were made on flight dates 991207, 991210 and 000127 from just above the aircraft to 25 kilometers geometric altitude. Raman temperature retrievals are, to first order, insensitive to Mie interference because the Raman signals are red shifted by 2331 cm(exp -1) from the initial laser wavelength. Backscattering from clouds and aerosols is consequently not observed by the detector; however, extinction does impact the measurement and limits retrievals to optically thin clouds. Comparisons between retrievals employing Rayleigh and Raman scattering show the Raman temperatures to be significantly warmer than those employing Rayleigh scattering. Uncertainties are a function of altitude: at 25 km they were approximately 3 K. Temperature profiles could not be retrieved for optically thick clouds.

  3. Surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopic waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Lascola, Robert J; McWhorter, Christopher S; Murph, Simona H

    2015-04-14

    A waveguide for use with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is provided that includes a base structure with an inner surface that defines a cavity and that has an axis. Multiple molecules of an analyte are capable of being located within the cavity at the same time. A base layer is located on the inner surface of the base structure. The base layer extends in an axial direction along an axial length of an excitation section. Nanoparticles are carried by the base layer and may be uniformly distributed along the entire axial length of the excitation section. A flow cell for introducing analyte and excitation light into the waveguide and a method of applying nanoparticles may also be provided.

  4. Raman Scattering in a New Carbon Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, O. A.; Street, K. W., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Samples of a new carbon material, Diamonite-B, were fabricated under high pressure from a commercial carbon black--identified as mixed fullerenes. The new material is neither graphite-like nor diamond-like, but exhibits electrical properties close to graphite and mechanical properties close to diamond. The use of Raman spectroscopy to investigate the vibrational dynamics of this new carbon material and to provide structural characterization of its short-, medium- and long-range order is reported. We also provide the results of investigations of these samples by high-resolution electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Hardness, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and other properties of this new material are compared with synthetic graphite-like and diamond-like materials, two other phases of synthetic bulk carbon.

  5. Raman hyperspectral imaging of iron transport across membranes in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Anupam; Costa, Xavier Felipe; Khmaladze, Alexander; Barroso, Margarida; Sharikova, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Raman scattering microscopy is a powerful imaging technique used to identify chemical composition, structural and conformational state of molecules of complex samples in biology, biophysics, medicine and materials science. In this work, we have shown that Raman techniques allow the measurement of the iron content in protein mixtures and cells. Since the mechanisms of iron acquisition, storage, and excretion by cells are not completely understood, improved knowledge of iron metabolism can offer insight into many diseases in which iron plays a role in the pathogenic process, such as diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and metabolic syndrome. Understanding of the processes involved in cellular iron metabolism will improve our knowledge of cell functioning. It will also have a big impact on treatment of diseases caused by iron deficiency (anemias) and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis). Previously, Raman studies have shown substantial differences in spectra of transferrin with and without bound iron, thus proving that it is an appropriate technique to determine the levels of bound iron in the protein mixture. We have extended these studies to obtain hyperspectral images of transferrin in cells. By employing a Raman scanning microscope together with spectral detection by a highly sensitive back-illuminated cooled CCD camera, we were able to rapidly acquire and process images of fixed cells with chemical selectivity. We discuss and compare various methods of hyperspectral Raman image analysis and demonstrate the use of these methods to characterize cellular iron content without the need for dye labeling.

  6. Decreasing Brillouin and Raman scattering by alternating-polarization light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. J.; Zheng, C. Y.; Cao, L. H.; Li, B.; Xiang, J.; Hao, L.

    2017-03-01

    A new method to reduce the scattering levels of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin (SBS) scattering is proposed using alternating-polarization light. The effect of the new technique is related to the alternating time. If the alternating time is smaller than the growth time, the scattering level of SRS or SBS can be decreased. The SBS process is simulated by the fluid method, and the SRS process is verified by the particle-in-cell method. This method is also compared with the spike trains of uneven duration and delay (STUD) technique. Combining STUD pulses with alternating-polarization light is also discussed. Under proper alternating-polarization parameters, the scattering level of SRS and SBS can be dramatically reduced by more than one order of magnitude.

  7. Raman scattering study of glass crystallization kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkanski, M.; Haro, E.; Espinosa, G. P.; Phillips, J. C.

    1984-08-01

    Laser induced glass-crystalline transition is studied by light scattering. Three significant effects are observed depending on the incident laser energy density: (i) Spectral band narrowing indicating cluster enlargement constitutes a precursor effect, (ii) an intensity increase effect indicates a rapid rise of the density of clusters attaining microcrystalline size and (iii) a dynamical reversal effect indicative of glass-crystalline instability. Cluster volume and crystallization appear as separate but related threshold phenomena.

  8. Graphene-Enhanced Raman Scattering from the Adenine Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, Leonid; Pidhirnyi, Denys; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Lebedieva, Tetiana; Kiisk, Valter; Heinsalu, Siim; Lange, Sven; Jaaniso, Raivo; Sildos, Ilmo

    2016-04-01

    An enhanced Raman scattering from a thin layer of adenine molecules deposited on graphene substrate was detected. The value of enhancement depends on the photon energy of the exciting light. The benzene ring in the structure of adenine molecule suggests π-stacking of adenine molecule on top of graphene. So, it is proposed that the enhancement in the adenine Raman signal is explained by the resonance electron transfer from the Fermi level of graphene to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of adenine.

  9. Interferometric background reduction for femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dobner, Sven; Cleff, Carsten; Fallnich, Carsten; Groß, Petra

    2012-11-07

    We present a purely optical method for background suppression in nonlinear spectroscopy based on linear interferometry. Employing an unbalanced Sagnac interferometer, an unprecedented background reduction of 17  dB over a broad bandwidth of 60  THz (2000  cm(-1)) is achieved and its application to femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering loss spectroscopy is demonstrated. Apart from raising the signal-to-background ratio in the measurement of the Raman intensity spectrum, this interferometric method grants access to the spectral phase of the resonant χ(3) contribution. The spectral phase becomes apparent as a dispersive lineshape and is reproduced numerically with a simple oscillator model.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering on colloidal nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Aroca, R F; Alvarez-Puebla, R A; Pieczonka, N; Sanchez-Cortez, S; Garcia-Ramos, J V

    2005-11-30

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering combines extremely high sensitivity, due to enhanced Raman cross-sections comparable or even better than fluorescence, with the observation of vibrational spectra of adsorbed species, providing one of the most incisive analytical methods for chemical and biochemical detection and analysis. SERS spectra are observed from a molecule-nanostructure enhancing system. This symbiosis molecule-nanostructure is a fertile ground for theoretical developments and a realm of applications from single molecule detection to biomedical diagnostic and techniques for nanostructure characterization.

  11. Dynamic Thomson Scattering from Nonlinear Electron Plasma Waves in a Raman Plasma Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A.; Katz, J.; Bucht, S.; Haberberger, D.; Bromage, J.; Zuegel, J. D.; Froula, D. H.; Trines, R.; Bingham, R.; Sadler, J.; Norreys, P. A.

    2016-10-01

    Electron plasma waves (EPW's) can be used to transfer significant energy from a long-pulse laser to a short-pulse seed laser through the Raman scattering instability. Successful implementation of Raman amplification could open an avenue to producing high-intensity pulses beyond the capabilities of current laser technology ( 1022 W / cm 2). This three-wave interaction takes advantage of the plasma's ability to sustain large-amplitude plasma waves. Having complete knowledge of the EPW amplitude is essential to establishing optimal parameters for high-efficiency Raman amplification. A dynamic Thomson-scattering diagnostic is being developed to spatially and temporally resolve the amplitude of the driven and thermal EPW's. By imaging the scattered probe light onto a novel pulse-front tilt compensated streaked optical spectrometer, the diffraction efficiency of this plasma wave can be measured as a function of space and time. These data will be used in conjunction with particle-in-cell simulations to determine the EPW's spatial and temporal profile. This will allow the effect of the EPW profile on Raman scattering to be experimentally determined. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  12. Mapping biological tissues with hyperspectral coherent Raman scattering microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potma, Eric O.; Alfonso Garcia, Alba

    2016-03-01

    We discuss the implementation of wavelength-swept coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy for the rapid acquisition of hyperspectral datacubes. We highlight two multivariate analysis approaches for efficiently generating spectroscopic maps from the acquired data: principal component analysis (PCA), which is a popular method for extracting information from multidimensional datasets, and vertex component analysis (VCA), which has previously been successfully used for the analysis of spontaneous Raman microscopy data. Through several biomedical imaging examples, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches for CRS microscopy.

  13. Broadly tunable dual-wavelength light source for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ganikhanov, Feruz; Carrasco, Silvia; Sunney Xie, X; Katz, Mordechai; Seitz, Wolfgang; Kopf, Daniel

    2006-05-01

    The signal and idler beams from a picosecond, synchronously pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO) provide the two colors necessary for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. The OPO provides a continuously tunable frequency difference between the two beams over a broad range of Raman shifts (100-3700 cm(-1)) by varying the temperature of a single nonlinear crystal. The near-infrared output (900-1300 nm) allows for deep penetration into thick samples and reduced nonlinear photodamage. Applications of this light source to in vivo cell and ex vivo tissue imaging are demonstrated.

  14. Semi-quantification of surface-enhanced Raman scattering using a handheld Raman spectrometer: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jinkai; Pang, Shintaro; Labuza, Theodore P; He, Lili

    2013-12-07

    The feasibility of utilizing a handheld Raman spectrometer for surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection was evaluated on the pesticide ferbam. A layman's "answer box" was established for semi-quantifying the risk level of ferbam. This study advanced the application of a handheld Raman spectrometer to on-site evaluation of trace amounts of analytes.

  15. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy: overcoming technical barriers for clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Tu, Haohua; Boppart, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Clinical translation of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy is of great interest because of the advantages of noninvasive label-free imaging, high sensitivity, and chemical specificity. For this to happen, we have identified and review the technical barriers that must be overcome. Prior investigations have developed advanced techniques (features), each of which can be used to effectively overcome one particular technical barrier. However, the implementation of one or a small number of these advanced features in previous attempts for clinical translation has often introduced more tradeoffs than benefits. In this review, we outline a strategy that would integrate multiple advanced features to overcome all the technical barriers simultaneously, effectively reduce tradeoffs, and synergistically optimize CARS microscopy for clinical translation. The operation of the envisioned system incorporates coherent Raman micro-spectroscopy for identifying vibrational biomolecular markers of disease and single-frequency (or hyperspectral) Raman imaging of these specific biomarkers for real-time in vivo diagnostics and monitoring.

  16. Transient Effects And Pump Depletion In Stimulated Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsten, J. L.; Wenzel, R. G...; Druhl, K.

    1983-11-01

    Stimulated rotational Raman scattering in a 300-K multipass cell filled with para-H2 with a single-mode CO2-pumped laser is studied using a frequency-narrowed optical parametric oscillator (OPO) as a probe laser at the Stokes frequency for the So(0) transition. Amplification and pump depletion are examined as a function of incident pump energy. The pump depletion shows clear evidence of transient behavior. A theoretical treatment of transient stimulated Raman scattering, including effects of both pump depletion and medium saturation is presented. In a first approximation, diffraction effects are neglected, and only plane-wave interactions are considered. The theoretical results are compared to the experimental pulse shapes.

  17. Electron-phonon coupling in perovskites studied by Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathe, V. G.; Tyagi, S.; Sharma, G.

    2016-10-01

    Raman scattering is an unique technique for characterization and quantification of electron-phonon, spin-phonon and spin-lattice coupling in many of the currently prominent compounds like multiferroics and manganites. In manganites, it is understood now that a phase separated landscape with coexisting metallic and insulating regions exist in most of the compounds and application of small external perturbation causes an alteration in this landscape. In such scenario, local metallic regions grow suddenly at the expense of insulating regions below the magnetic ordering temperature. Such regions can be characterized effectively using Raman scattering measurements where delocalized electrons couple with the adjacent phonon peaks giving a Fano resonance in the form of asymmetric line shape.

  18. Raman scattering with strongly coupled vibron-polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strashko, Artem; Keeling, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Strong coupling between cavity photons and molecular vibrations can lead to the formation of vibron-polaritons. In a recent experiment with PVAc molecules in a metal-metal microcavity [Shalabney et al., Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 54, 7971 (2015), 10.1002/anie.201502979], such a coupling was observed to enhance the Raman scattering probability by several orders of magnitude. Inspired by this, we theoretically analyze the effect of strong photon-vibron coupling on the Raman scattering amplitude of organic molecules. This problem has recently been addressed by del Pino, Feist, and Garcia-Vidal [J. Phys. Chem. C 119, 29132 (2015), 10.1021/acs.jpcc.5b11654] using exact numerics for a small number of molecules. In this paper we derive compact analytic results for any number of molecules, also including the ultrastrong-coupling regime. Our calculations predict a division of the Raman signal into upper and lower polariton modes, with some enhancement to the lower polariton Raman amplitude due to the mode softening under strong coupling.

  19. Vlasov Simulations of Trapping and Inhomogeneity in Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Strozzi, D; Shoucri, M M; Williams, E A; Langdon, A B

    2005-08-09

    We study stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in laser-fusion conditions with the Eulerian Vlasov code ELVIS. Back SRS from homogeneous plasmas occurs in subpicosecond bursts and far exceeds linear theory. Forward SRS and re-scatter of back SRS are also observed. The plasma wave frequency downshifts from the linear dispersion curve, and the electron distribution shows flattening. This is consistent with trapping and reduces the Landau damping. There is some acoustic ({omega} {proportional_to} {kappa}) activity and possibly electron acoustic scatter. Kinetic ions do not affect SRS for early times but suppress it later on. SRS from inhomogeneous plasmas exhibits a kinetic enhancement for long density scale lengths. More scattering results when the pump propagates to higher as opposed to lower density.

  20. Fundamental Studies of Electric-Field-Induced Coherent Raman Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-07

    mechanisms of nanosecond- pulsed dielectric barrier discharges generated in open air. Our experimental observations have revealed that, in the pre...dynamics in nanosecond- pulsed discharges . a) Electric-field-induced coherent Raman scattering (E-CRS) In this section, I describe the...the electric field in hydrogen. With E-CRS method, our group has revealed very fast discharge dynamics in repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharges [4

  1. High directivity optical antenna substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongxing; Zhu, Wenqi; Chu, Yizhuo; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2012-08-22

    A two-dimensional array of gold optical antennas integrated with a one-dimensional array of gold strips and mirrors is introduced and fabricated. The experimental results show that this design achieves average surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factors as high as 1.2 × 10(10) , which is more than two orders of magnitude larger than optical antennas without the gold strips and gold mirror.

  2. Enhanced Raman Scattering on In-plane Anisotropic Layered Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Liang, Liangbo; Meunier, Vincent; Sumpter, Bobby G.; ...

    2015-11-19

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on two-dimensional (2D) layered materials has provided a unique platform to study the chemical mechanism (CM) of the enhancement due to its natural separation from electromagnetic enhancement. The CM stems from the basic charge interactions between the substrate and molecules. Despite the extensive studies of the energy alignment between 2D materials and molecules, an understanding of how the electronic properties of the substrate are explicitly involved in the charge interaction is still unclear. Lately, a new group of 2D layered materials with anisotropic structure, including orthorhombic black phosphorus (BP) and triclinic rhenium disulphide (ReS2), has attractedmore » great interest due to their unique anisotropic electrical and optical properties. Herein, we report a unique anisotropic Raman enhancement on few-layered BP and ReS2 using copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules as a Raman probe, which is absent on isotropic graphene and h-BN. According to detailed Raman tensor analysis and density functional theory calculations, anisotropic charge interactions due to the anisotropic carrier mobilities of the 2D materials are responsible for the angular dependence of the Raman enhancement. Our findings not only provide new insights into the CM process in SERS, but also open up new avenues for the exploration and application of the electronic properties of anisotropic 2D layered materials.« less

  3. Enhanced Raman Scattering on In-plane Anisotropic Layered Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Liangbo; Meunier, Vincent; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Ling, Xi; Lin, Jingjing; Zhang, Shuqing; Mao, Nannan; Zhang, Na; Tong, Lianming; Zhang, Jin

    2015-11-19

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on two-dimensional (2D) layered materials has provided a unique platform to study the chemical mechanism (CM) of the enhancement due to its natural separation from electromagnetic enhancement. The CM stems from the basic charge interactions between the substrate and molecules. Despite the extensive studies of the energy alignment between 2D materials and molecules, an understanding of how the electronic properties of the substrate are explicitly involved in the charge interaction is still unclear. Lately, a new group of 2D layered materials with anisotropic structure, including orthorhombic black phosphorus (BP) and triclinic rhenium disulphide (ReS2), has attracted great interest due to their unique anisotropic electrical and optical properties. Herein, we report a unique anisotropic Raman enhancement on few-layered BP and ReS2 using copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules as a Raman probe, which is absent on isotropic graphene and h-BN. According to detailed Raman tensor analysis and density functional theory calculations, anisotropic charge interactions due to the anisotropic carrier mobilities of the 2D materials are responsible for the angular dependence of the Raman enhancement. Our findings not only provide new insights into the CM process in SERS, but also open up new avenues for the exploration and application of the electronic properties of anisotropic 2D layered materials.

  4. Raman optical activity spectroscopy by visible-excited coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Kotaro; Leproux, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Nagata, Takashi; Kano, Hideaki

    2015-09-01

    We developed a Raman optical activity (ROA) spectroscopic system with visible-excited coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). A supercontinuum within the visible region was generated with a photonic crystal fiber pumped with both 532 and 1064 nm excitation, generating a multiplexed CARS-ROA spectrum covering the whole fingerprint region. In visible excitation, the CARS-ROA spectrum of (-)-β-pinene shows a higher contrast ratio of the chirality-induced signal to the achiral background than that of the previously reported near-infrared CARS-ROA spectrum.

  5. Hyperspectral image analysis for CARS, SRS, and Raman data

    PubMed Central

    Karuna, Arnica; Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have significantly enhanced the capabilities of the hyperspectral image analysis (HIA) first developed by Masia et al. 1 The HIA introduced a method to factorize the hyperspectral data into the product of component concentrations and spectra for quantitative analysis of the chemical composition of the sample. The enhancements shown here comprise (1) a spatial weighting to reduce the spatial variation of the spectral error, which improves the retrieval of the chemical components with significant local but small global concentrations; (2) a new selection criterion for the spectra used when applying sparse sampling2 to speed up sequential hyperspectral imaging; and (3) a filter for outliers in the data using singular value decomposition, suited e.g. to suppress motion artifacts. We demonstrate the enhancements on coherent anti‐Stokes Raman scattering, stimulated Raman scattering, and spontaneous Raman data. We provide the HIA software as executable for public use. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Raman Spectroscopy published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27478301

  6. Hyperspectral image analysis for CARS, SRS, and Raman data.

    PubMed

    Masia, Francesco; Karuna, Arnica; Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we have significantly enhanced the capabilities of the hyperspectral image analysis (HIA) first developed by Masia et al. 1 The HIA introduced a method to factorize the hyperspectral data into the product of component concentrations and spectra for quantitative analysis of the chemical composition of the sample. The enhancements shown here comprise (1) a spatial weighting to reduce the spatial variation of the spectral error, which improves the retrieval of the chemical components with significant local but small global concentrations; (2) a new selection criterion for the spectra used when applying sparse sampling2 to speed up sequential hyperspectral imaging; and (3) a filter for outliers in the data using singular value decomposition, suited e.g. to suppress motion artifacts. We demonstrate the enhancements on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, stimulated Raman scattering, and spontaneous Raman data. We provide the HIA software as executable for public use. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Raman Spectroscopy published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Raman Hyperspectral Imaging of Microfossils: Potential Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Olcott Marshall, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Initially, Raman spectroscopy was a specialized technique used by vibrational spectroscopists; however, due to rapid advancements in instrumentation and imaging techniques over the last few decades, Raman spectrometers are widely available at many institutions, allowing Raman spectroscopy to become a widespread analytical tool in mineralogy and other geological sciences. Hyperspectral imaging, in particular, has become popular due to the fact that Raman spectroscopy can quickly delineate crystallographic and compositional differences in 2-D and 3-D at the micron scale. Although this rapid growth of applications to the Earth sciences has provided great insight across the geological sciences, the ease of application as the instruments become increasingly automated combined with nonspecialists using this techique has resulted in the propagation of errors and misunderstandings throughout the field. For example, the literature now includes misassigned vibration modes, inappropriate spectral processing techniques, confocal depth of laser penetration incorrectly estimated into opaque crystalline solids, and a misconstrued understanding of the anisotropic nature of sp2 carbons. Key Words: Raman spectroscopy—Raman imaging—Confocal Raman spectroscopy—Disordered sp2 carbons—Hematite—Microfossils. Astrobiology 13, 920–931. PMID:24088070

  8. SERS imaging of cell-surface biomolecules metabolically labeled with bioorthogonal Raman reporters.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ming; Lin, Liang; Li, Zefan; Liu, Jie; Hong, Senlian; Li, Yaya; Zheng, Meiling; Duan, Xuanming; Chen, Xing

    2014-08-01

    Live imaging of biomolecules with high specificity and sensitivity as well as minimal perturbation is essential for studying cellular processes. Here, we report the development of a bioorthogonal surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging approach that exploits small Raman reporters for visualizing cell-surface biomolecules. The cells were cultured and imaged by SERS microscopy on arrays of Raman-enhancing nanoparticles coated on silicon wafers or glass slides. The Raman reporters including azides, alkynes, and carbondeuterium bonds are small in size and spectroscopically bioorthogonal (background-free). We demonstrated that various cell-surface biomolecules including proteins, glycans, and lipids were metabolically incorporated with the corresponding precursors bearing a Raman reporter and visualized by SERS microscopy. The coupling of SERS microscopy with bioorthogonal Raman reporters expands the capabilities of live-cell microscopy beyond the modalities of fluorescence and label-free imaging.

  9. IR spectroscopy vs. Raman scattering by measurement of glucose concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, O.; Hansmann, J.; Bolz, A.; Mertsching, H.

    2010-11-01

    By developing a non-invasive device for glucose concentration measurement, two promising methods were compared for that aim. The Raman scattering using Laser at the wavelength 785 nm and the light scattering in R- and IR-range are demonstrated. An easy accessible and low-cost method for glucose concentration monitoring and management to avoid its complications will be a great help for diabetic patients. Raman Scattering is a promising method for noninvasively measuring of glucose and for the diagnostic of pathological tissue variations. Despite the power and the time of measurement can be reduced using enhanced Raman scattering, it will be difficult to develop a compatible device with low power Laser and low price for a non-invasive method for home monitoring. As using IR-spectroscopy at wavelengths slightly below 10000 nm, the absorption of glucose can be well discriminated from that of water, LED`s or LD's at these wavelengths are very expensive for this purpose. At wavelengths about 6250 and 7700 glucose has a less light absorption than water. Also slightly above 3000 nm glucose has a high absorption. There are also possibilities for the measurement in the NIR at wavelengths between 1400 nm and 1670 nm. Scattering measurements at wavelengths below 900 nm and our measurements with the wavelength about 640 nm give reproducible glucose dependence on the reflected light from a glucose solution at a constant temperature. A multi-sensor with different wavelengths and temperature sensor will be a good choice for in-vivo glucose monitoring.

  10. Resonant Raman Scattering Studies of Iii-V Semiconductor Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, Malcolm Emil

    1991-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy, an inelastic light scattering technique, explores III-V semiconductors by conveying crystal lattice structural information and by probing carrier dynamics both directly and via the electron-phonon interaction. We have examined three physical systems accentuating three aspects of Raman utility. Al_{rm x}Ga_{rm 1-x} As alloy work emphasizes electronic behavior, migration enhanced epitaxy (MEE) studies highlight structural results, and a phonon-assisted lasing project underscores electron -phonon interaction. The disorder-induced frequency difference between the dipole-forbidden and dipole-allowed longitudinal optic (LO) modes in Al_{rm x} Ga_{rm 1-x}As alloys has been investigated as a function of laser photon energy, aluminum mole fraction x, and the indirect versus direct nature of the electronic band gap. For the indirect gap alloy, the intermediate resonant state is an X-valley electron effectively localized because of its short inelastic lifetime. Raman scattering via this state is described by a calculation of the Raman susceptibility that considers the random alloy potential generated by local concentration fluctuations. MEE is a new growth technology that can order these materials in two spatial directions. In a GaSb/AlSb system we show Raman evidence of this ordering via observation of zone folded acoustic modes and compare to AlAs/GaAs results. In other work resonant Raman documents the effects on the dipole-forbidden interface mode of a periodic corrugation introduced in AlAs barrier GaAs single quantum wells. Finally, we investigate "phonon-assisted" lasing in photopumped quantum well heterostructure lasers. Resonant Raman is the natural choice to probe this system purported to have an enhanced electron-phonon interaction. For both the AlGaAs/GaAs and AlGaAs/GaAs/InGaAs structures examined, we provide evidence that indicates first order "phonon -assisted" lasing is actually renormalized band gap luminescence filtered by absorption from

  11. A novel non-imaging optics based Raman spectroscopy device for transdermal blood analyte measurement

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Chae-Ryon; Barman, Ishan; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Kang, Jeon Woong; Galindo, Luis; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Due to its high chemical specificity, Raman spectroscopy has been considered to be a promising technique for non-invasive disease diagnosis. However, during Raman excitation, less than one out of a million photons undergo spontaneous Raman scattering and such weakness in Raman scattered light often require highly efficient collection of Raman scattered light for the analysis of biological tissues. We present a novel non-imaging optics based portable Raman spectroscopy instrument designed for enhanced light collection. While the instrument was demonstrated on transdermal blood glucose measurement, it can also be used for detection of other clinically relevant blood analytes such as creatinine, urea and cholesterol, as well as other tissue diagnosis applications. For enhanced light collection, a non-imaging optical element called compound hyperbolic concentrator (CHC) converts the wide angular range of scattered photons (numerical aperture (NA) of 1.0) from the tissue into a limited range of angles accommodated by the acceptance angles of the collection system (e.g., an optical fiber with NA of 0.22). A CHC enables collimation of scattered light directions to within extremely narrow range of angles while also maintaining practical physical dimensions. Such a design allows for the development of a very efficient and compact spectroscopy system for analyzing highly scattering biological tissues. Using the CHC-based portable Raman instrument in a clinical research setting, we demonstrate successful transdermal blood glucose predictions in human subjects undergoing oral glucose tolerance tests. PMID:22125761

  12. A novel non-imaging optics based Raman spectroscopy device for transdermal blood analyte measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Chae-Ryon; Barman, Ishan; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Kang, Jeon Woong; Galindo, Luis; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2011-09-01

    Due to its high chemical specificity, Raman spectroscopy has been considered to be a promising technique for non-invasive disease diagnosis. However, during Raman excitation, less than one out of a million photons undergo spontaneous Raman scattering and such weakness in Raman scattered light often require highly efficient collection of Raman scattered light for the analysis of biological tissues. We present a novel non-imaging optics based portable Raman spectroscopy instrument designed for enhanced light collection. While the instrument was demonstrated on transdermal blood glucose measurement, it can also be used for detection of other clinically relevant blood analytes such as creatinine, urea and cholesterol, as well as other tissue diagnosis applications. For enhanced light collection, a non-imaging optical element called compound hyperbolic concentrator (CHC) converts the wide angular range of scattered photons (numerical aperture (NA) of 1.0) from the tissue into a limited range of angles accommodated by the acceptance angles of the collection system (e.g., an optical fiber with NA of 0.22). A CHC enables collimation of scattered light directions to within extremely narrow range of angles while also maintaining practical physical dimensions. Such a design allows for the development of a very efficient and compact spectroscopy system for analyzing highly scattering biological tissues. Using the CHC-based portable Raman instrument in a clinical research setting, we demonstrate successful transdermal blood glucose predictions in human subjects undergoing oral glucose tolerance tests.

  13. Measurements of Raman scattering in the middle ultraviolet band from persistent chemical warfare agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullander, Fredrik; Landström, Lars; Lundén, Hampus; Mohammed, Abdesalam; Olofsson, Göran; Wästerby, Pär.

    2014-05-01

    The very low Raman scattering cross section and the fluorescence background limit the measuring range of Raman based instruments operating in the visible or infrared band. We are exploring if laser excitation in the middle ultraviolet (UV) band between 200 and 300 nm is useful and advantageous for detection of persistent chemical warfare agents (CWA) on various kinds of surfaces. The UV Raman scattering from tabun, mustard gas, VX and relevant simulants in the form of liquid surface contaminations has been measured using a laboratory experimental setup with a short standoff distance around 1 meter. Droplets having a volume of 1 μl were irradiated with a tunable pulsed laser swept within the middle UV band. A general trend is that the signal strength moves through an optimum when the laser excitation wavelength is swept between 240 and 300 nm. The signal from tabun reaches a maximum around 265 nm, the signal from mustard gas around 275 nm. The Raman signal from VX is comparably weak. Raman imaging by the use of a narrow bandpass UV filter is also demonstrated.

  14. Denoising Stimulated Raman Spectroscopic Images by Total Variation Minimization

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chien-Sheng; Choi, Joon Hee; Zhang, Delong; Chan, Stanley H.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-01-01

    High-speed coherent Raman scattering imaging is opening a new avenue to unveiling the cellular machinery by visualizing the spatio-temporal dynamics of target molecules or intracellular organelles. By extracting signals from the laser at MHz modulation frequency, current stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy has reached shot noise limited detection sensitivity. The laser-based local oscillator in SRS microscopy not only generates high levels of signal, but also delivers a large shot noise which degrades image quality and spectral fidelity. Here, we demonstrate a denoising algorithm that removes the noise in both spatial and spectral domains by total variation minimization. The signal-to-noise ratio of SRS spectroscopic images was improved by up to 57 times for diluted dimethyl sulfoxide solutions and by 15 times for biological tissues. Weak Raman peaks of target molecules originally buried in the noise were unraveled. Coupling the denoising algorithm with multivariate curve resolution allowed discrimination of fat stores from protein-rich organelles in C. elegans. Together, our method significantly improved detection sensitivity without frame averaging, which can be useful for in vivo spectroscopic imaging. PMID:26955400

  15. Relativistic Electron Beams, Forward Thomson Scattering, and ``Raman'' Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A.

    1999-11-01

    Experiments at LLE (see abstract by D. Hicks at this meeting) show that surprisingly high potentials (+0.5 to 2.0 MV) develop in plasmas irradiated by high-energy lasers. The highly conducting plasma will be a near equipotential and should attract return-current electrons in a radial beam-like distribution, especially in the outer low-density regions. This will initiate the BOT instability, creating large plasma waves with phase velocities close to c. Coherent Thomson scattering of the interaction beam from these waves must occur primarily in the forward direction. This will appear to be ``backward SRS'' upon reflection from a critical surface. We will show that the resulting spectrum is fairly broad and at short wavelengths. Collisional absorption of the scattered EM wave limits the reflectivity to low values (depending on the density scale length). Thus, a distinct difference exists between the spectrum for thick targets (nc surface present) and thin targets (gasbags, etc., from which primarily a narrow absolute-SRS backward emission occurs, at the peak density). The thick-target, reflected-wave angular distribution will be concentrated in the backward direction. The corresponding plasma-wave k-vector will be a fraction of k_0. The variation of the spectrum with potential and angle will be discussed. Comparison will be made with recent results at LLE and LLNL. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, UR, and NYSERDA.

  16. Enhanced Raman Microprobe Imaging of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadjiev, V. G.; Arepalli, S.; Nikolaev, P.; Jandl, S.; Yowell, L.

    2003-01-01

    We explore Raman microprobe capabilities to visualize single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Although this technique is limited to a micron scale, we demonstrate that images of individual SWCNTs, bundles or their agglomerates can be generated by mapping Raman active elementary excitations. We measured the Raman response from carbon vibrations in SWCNTs excited by confocal scanning of a focused laser beam. Carbon vibrations reveal key characteristics of SWCNTs as nanotube diameter distribution (radial breathing modes, RBM, 100-300 cm(exp -1)), presence of defects and functional groups (D-mode, 1300-1350 cm(exp -1)), strain and oxidation states of SWCNTs, as well as metallic or semiconducting character of the tubes encoded in the lineshape of the G-modes at 1520-1600 cm(exp - 1). In addition, SWCNTs are highly anisotropic scatterers. The Raman response from a SWCNT is maximal for incident light polarization parallel to the tube axis and vanishing for perpendicular directions. We show that the SWCNT bundle shape or direction can be determined, with some limitations, from a set of Raman images taken at two orthogonal directions of the incident light polarization.

  17. Raman spectroscopy and imaging: promising optical diagnostic tools in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Beleites, C; Bonifacio, A; Codrich, D; Krafft, C; Sergo, V

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the use of Raman spectroscopy, an analytical technique based on the inelastic scattering of harmless laser light with biological tissues, as an innovative diagnostic tool in pediatrics. After a brief introduction to explain the fundamental concepts behind Raman spectroscopy and imaging, a short summary is given of the most important and common issues arising when handling spectral data with multivariate statistics. Then, the most relevant papers in which Raman spectroscopy or imaging has been applied with diagnostic purposes to pediatric patients are reviewed, and grouped according to the type of pathology: neoplastic, inflammatory, allergic, malformative as well as other kinds. Raman spectroscopy has been used both in vivo, mostly using optical fibers for tissue illumination, as well as on ex vivo tissue sections in a microscopic imaging approach defined as "spectral histopathology". According to the results reported so far, this technique showed a huge potential for mini- or non-invasive real-time, bedside and intra-operatory diagnosis, as well as for an ex vivo imaging tool in support to pathologists. Despite many studies are limited by the small sample size, this technique is extremely promising in terms of sensitivity and specificity.

  18. Polarization imaging through scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Stephen P.; Khong, Manping; Somekh, Michael G.

    1995-12-01

    The imaging resolution in turbid media is severely degraded by light scattering. Resolution can be improved by extracting the unscattered or weakly scattered light. In this paper the state of polarization of the emerging light is used to discriminate photon pathlength, the more weakly scattered photons maintaining their original polarization state. It is experimentally demonstrated that over a wide range of scatterer concentrations, different particle sizes possess different characteristics. Three distinct regimes are described in detail along with the techniques to improve resolution within these regimes.

  19. Focused, multiple-pass cell for Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Hill, R A; Hartley, D L

    1974-01-01

    A simple optical system is described that makes use of a unique property of ellipsoidal mirrors, viz., light brought to one focus will be reflected alternately through the two foci and collapse to the major axis. This system consists of an on-axis ellipsoidal mirror facing a coaxial flat-spherical mirror assembly that is positioned at the minor axis. Calculations indicate that gains of the order of 500 in the light flux at the point of observation should be attainable with low-eccentricity ellipsoids. Raman-scattered light from atmospheric N(2) was obtained with a system employing a 0.2 eccentricity ellipsoid. An experimental gain of 93 was determined by the ratio of the scattering with the system to the scattering obtained with one beam. This result is in good agreement with the theory.

  20. Raman scattering enhancement characteristic of Nb-doped silica fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Chen, Zhenyi; Chen, Na; Guo, Qiang; Bai, Hua; Pang, Fufei; Wang, Tingyun

    2010-12-01

    Raman scattering enhancement characteristic of a new kind of Nb-doped silica fiber has been studied in this paper. This Nb-doped special silica optical fiber is fabricated on Modified Chemical Vapor Deposition (MCVD) (which is the traditional fiber preform fabrication technologies) combined with Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Meanwhile, Raman spectrum of different length Nb-doped special silica optical fiber samples has been measured with the 785nm exciting light. Then, it develops the measurement comparison between Nb-doped special silica optical fiber and conventional single-mode optical fiber in the wavelength range from 820nm to 920nm. The measuring results indicate that the new Nb-doped special silica optical fiber shows higher Raman scattering intensity compared with conventional single-mode optical fiber. On the other hand, the inferred spectrum of the new Nb-doped special silica optical fiber is also measured, and its measurement wavenumber range is from 400 cm-1 to 4000 cm-1. Finally, the loss spectrum of the Nb-doped special silica optical fiber is measured and its loss at 1550nm is 0.01dB/m.

  1. Alkyne-tag Raman imaging for visualization of mobile small molecules in live cells.

    PubMed

    Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Dodo, Kosuke; Palonpon, Almar; Ando, Jun; Fujita, Katsumasa; Kawata, Satoshi; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2012-12-26

    Alkyne has a unique Raman band that does not overlap with Raman scattering from any endogenous molecule in live cells. Here, we show that alkyne-tag Raman imaging (ATRI) is a promising approach for visualizing nonimmobilized small molecules in live cells. An examination of structure-Raman shift/intensity relationships revealed that alkynes conjugated to an aromatic ring and/or to a second alkyne (conjugated diynes) have strong Raman signals in the cellular silent region and can be excellent tags. Using these design guidelines, we synthesized and imaged a series of alkyne-tagged coenzyme Q (CoQ) analogues in live cells. Cellular concentrations of diyne-tagged CoQ analogues could be semiquantitatively estimated. Finally, simultaneous imaging of two small molecules, 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) and a CoQ analogue, with distinct Raman tags was demonstrated.

  2. Raman scattering or fluorescence emission? Raman spectroscopy study on lime-based building and conservation materials.

    PubMed

    Kaszowska, Zofia; Malek, Kamilla; Staniszewska-Slezak, Emilia; Niedzielska, Karina

    2016-12-05

    This work presents an in-depth study on Raman spectra excited with 1064 and 532nm lasers of lime binders employed in the past as building materials and revealed today as valuable conservation materials. We focus our interest on the bands of strong intensity, which are present in the spectra of all binders acquired with laser excitation at 1064nm, but absent in the corresponding spectra acquired with laser excitation at 532nm. We suggest, that the first group of spectra represents fluorescence phenomena of unknown origin and the second true Raman scattering. In our studies, we also include two other phases of lime cycle, i.e. calcium carbonate (a few samples of calcite of various origins) and calcium oxide (quicklime) to assess how structural and chemical transformations of lime phases affect the NIR-Raman spectral profile. Furthermore, we analyse a set of carbonated limewashes and lime binders derived from old plasters to give an insight into their spectral characteristics after excitation with the 1064nm laser line. NIR-Raman micro-mapping results are also presented to reveal the spatial distribution of building materials and fluorescent species in the cross-section of plaster samples taken from a 15th century chapel. Our study shows that the Raman analysis can help identify lime-based building and conservation materials, however, a caution is advised in the interpretation of the spectra acquired using 1064nm excitation.

  3. Raman scattering or fluorescence emission? Raman spectroscopy study on lime-based building and conservation materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaszowska, Zofia; Malek, Kamilla; Staniszewska-Slezak, Emilia; Niedzielska, Karina

    2016-12-01

    This work presents an in-depth study on Raman spectra excited with 1064 and 532 nm lasers of lime binders employed in the past as building materials and revealed today as valuable conservation materials. We focus our interest on the bands of strong intensity, which are present in the spectra of all binders acquired with laser excitation at 1064 nm, but absent in the corresponding spectra acquired with laser excitation at 532 nm. We suggest, that the first group of spectra represents fluorescence phenomena of unknown origin and the second true Raman scattering. In our studies, we also include two other phases of lime cycle, i.e. calcium carbonate (a few samples of calcite of various origins) and calcium oxide (quicklime) to assess how structural and chemical transformations of lime phases affect the NIR-Raman spectral profile. Furthermore, we analyse a set of carbonated limewashes and lime binders derived from old plasters to give an insight into their spectral characteristics after excitation with the 1064 nm laser line. NIR-Raman micro-mapping results are also presented to reveal the spatial distribution of building materials and fluorescent species in the cross-section of plaster samples taken from a 15th century chapel. Our study shows that the Raman analysis can help identify lime-based building and conservation materials, however, a caution is advised in the interpretation of the spectra acquired using 1064 nm excitation.

  4. In Situ and In Vivo Molecular Analysis by Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chien-Sheng; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2017-01-01

    Coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy is a high-speed vibrational imaging platform with the ability to visualize the chemical content of a living specimen by using molecular vibrational fingerprints. We review technical advances and biological applications of CRS microscopy. The basic theory of CRS and the state-of-the-art instrumentation of a CRS microscope are presented. We further summarize and compare the algorithms that are used to separate the Raman signal from the nonresonant background, to denoise a CRS image, and to decompose a hyperspectral CRS image into concentration maps of principal components. Important applications of single-frequency and hyperspectral CRS microscopy are highlighted. Potential directions of CRS microscopy are discussed. PMID:27306307

  5. Design, operation and applications of a visible-light confocal scanning Fourier transform Raman microscope for volumetric Raman spectrochemical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenan, Colin John Herbert

    A new type of confocal Raman microscope called a Fourier transform confocal Raman microscope (FT-CRM) was designed, built and characterized with respect to its spatio-spectral imaging properties. Several different applications of the FT-CRM are presented that take advantage of its unique spectral and spatial imaging characteristics. The instrument combines focused illumination with spatially-filtered detection in a confocal optical configuration to collect photons scattered from a diffraction-limited volume in the sample (typically [<]5×10-18/ m3) and reject photons from outside that region. The molecular vibrational information encoded in the inelastic, or Raman, spectral component of light scattered from the confocal volume is measured with a visible light Fourier transform Raman spectrometer. By scanning the sample relative to the confocal volume, a volumetric Raman spectrochemical image of the sample can be constructed. Raman scattering is an inherently inefficient process; hence an optimal radius pinhole must be found that balances the FT-CRM optical throughput against the microscope spatial resolution and image contrast. Detailed experimental measurements mapped out the FT-CRM spatial response (axial and lateral), optical throughput and image signal-to-background and signal-to-noise ratios as a function of pinhole radius. Excellent agreement was found between these measurements and the predictions of a theoretical microscope model also developed as part of this thesis. Several applications of the FT-CRM included volumetric compositional imaging of three-dimensional chemically inhomogeneous materials such as cellulose and polyester fibers in water or two immiscible optically- similar liquids, water and trichloroehthylene, in a porous quartz sandstone matrix. The potential of the FT- CRM for non-invasive spectrochemical detection and imaging through a turbid tissue-like medium was demonstrated and a new spectral estimator, Fast Orthogonal Search, was evaluated

  6. Collection optics for a Raman spectrometer based on the 90° geometry of scattered light collection.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Dmitry V; Matrosov, Ivan I; Sedinkin, Danila O

    2016-10-10

    In the present work, efficiency of classical lens, mirror-lens, and pure mirror variants of the collection optics for a Raman spectrometer based on 90° geometry of scattered light collection is investigated. It is experimentally established that, despite a smaller collection angle, in the case of a relatively narrow input slit of the spectrometer (<100  μm), the lens optics with corrected off-axis and chromatic aberrations allows larger signal intensities to be registered. However, the low f/# mirror collection optics described in the work provide a more stable adjustment and can be used to increase the Raman signal intensities in cases when the image of the scattering volume formed by them is commensurable with the sizes of the input slit of the spectrometer.

  7. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra of tomato epidermis on gold/ silver sol active substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Zhenyi; Chen, Na; Hu, Ling; Zhu, Hongfei; Liu, Shupeng; Guo, Qiang

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, tomato epidermis' surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra were measured on gold and silver active substrates and analyzed. Preparing and using gold sol and silver sol in similar particle diameters (about 50-60nm), three comparable Raman spectra were obtained. Silver sol and gold sol can both increase Raman scattering signal of tomato epidermis. Through the Raman spectra, silver sol has greater enhancement ability than gold sol to tomato epidermis.

  8. Phase-cycling coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering using shaped femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Li, Baolei; Warren, Warren S; Fischer, Martin C

    2010-12-06

    We demonstrate a homodyne coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) technique based on femtosecond laser pulse shaping. This technique utilizes fast phase cycling to extract nonlinear Raman signatures with a self-generated reference signal acting as a local oscillator. The local oscillator is generated at the focus and is intrinsically stable relative to the Raman signal even in highly scattering samples. We can therefore retrieve phase information from the Raman signal and can suppress the ubiquitous non-resonant background.

  9. Directional surface enhanced Raman scattering on gold nano-gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillibert, Raymond; Sarkar, Mitradeep; Bryche, Jean-François; Yasukuni, Ryohei; Moreau, Julien; Besbes, Mondher; Barbillon, Grégory; Bartenlian, Bernard; Canva, Michael; Lamy de la Chapelle, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Directional plasmon excitation and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) emission were demonstrated for 1D and 2D gold nanostructure arrays deposited on a flat gold layer. The extinction spectrum of both arrays exhibits intense resonance bands that are redshifted when the incident angle is increased. Systematic extinction analysis of different grating periods revealed that this band can be assigned to a propagated surface plasmon of the flat gold surface that fulfills the Bragg condition of the arrays (Bragg mode). Directional SERS measurements demonstrated that the SERS intensity can be improved by one order of magnitude when the Bragg mode positions are matched with either the excitation or the Raman wavelengths. Hybridized numerical calculations with the finite element method and Fourier modal method also proved the presence of the Bragg mode plasmon and illustrated that the enhanced electric field of the Bragg mode is particularly localized on the nanostructures regardless of their size.

  10. Determination of nicotine by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, T.E.; List, M.S.; Haas, J.W. III; Wachter, E.A. )

    1994-11-01

    The analytical application of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to the determination of nicotine is demonstrated. A simple spectroelectrochemical method using a copper or silver electrode as the SERS substrate has been developed, consisting of three steps: polishing a working electrode to a mirror finish; roughening the electrode in an electrolyte solution; and, finally, depositing the nicotine analyte onto the roughened electrode after immersion in a sample solution. During the reduction cycle, a large enhancement in nicotine Raman scattering is observed at the electrode surface. The intensity of the SERS signal on a silver electrode is linear with concentration from 10 to 900 ppb, with an estimated detection limit of 7 ppb. The total analysis time per sample is approximately five minutes. This procedure has been used to analyze the extract from a cigarette side-stream smoke sample (environmental tobacco smoke); the SERS results agree well with those of conventional gas chromatographic analysis.

  11. Raman scattering from molecular conduction junctions: Charge transfer mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oren, Michal; Galperin, Michael; Nitzan, Abraham

    2012-03-01

    We present a model for the charge transfer contribution to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) in a molecular junction. The model is a generalization of the equilibrium scheme for SERS of a molecule adsorbed on a metal surface [B. N. J. Persson. Chem. Phys. Lett.CHPLBC0009-261410.1016/0009-2614(81)85441-3 82, 561 (1981)]. We extend the same physical consideration to a nonequilibrium situation in a biased molecular junction and to nonzero temperatures. Two approaches are considered and compared: a semiclassical approach appropriate for nonresonance Raman scattering, and a quantum approach based on the nonequilibrium Green's function method. Nonequilibrium effects on this contribution to SERS are demonstrated with numerical examples. It is shown that the semiclassical approach provides an excellent approximation to the full quantum calculation as long as the molecular electronic state is outside the Fermi window, that is, as long as the field-induced charge transfer is small.

  12. Complete analytic anharmonic hyper-Raman scattering spectra.

    PubMed

    Cornaton, Yann; Ringholm, Magnus; Ruud, Kenneth

    2016-08-10

    We present the first computational treatment of the complete second-order vibrational perturbation theory applied to hyper-Raman scattering spectroscopy. The required molecular properties are calculated in a fully analytic manner using a recently developed program [Ringholm, Jonsson and Ruud, J. Comp. Chem., 2014, 35, 622] that utilizes recursive routines. For some of the properties, these calculations are the first analytic calculations of their kind at their respective levels of theory. We apply this approach to the calculation of the hyper-Raman spectra of methane, ethane and ethylene and compare these to available experimental data. We show that the anharmonic corrections have a larger effect on the vibrational frequencies than on the spectral intensities, but that the inclusion of combination and overtone bands in the anharmonic treatment can improve the agreement with the experimental data, although the quality of available experimental data limits a detailed comparison.

  13. Portable fiber sensors based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuan; Tanaka, Zuki; Newhouse, Rebecca; Xu, Qiao; Chen, Bin; Chen, Shaowei; Zhang, Jin Z; Gu, Claire

    2010-12-01

    Two portable molecular sensing systems based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) have been experimentally demonstrated using either a tip-coated multimode fiber (TCMMF) or a liquid core photonic crystal fiber (LCPCF) as the SERS probe. With Rhodamine 6G as a test molecule, the TCMMF-portable SERS system achieved 2-3 times better sensitivity than direct sampling (focusing the laser light directly into the sample without the fiber probe), and a highly sensitive LCPCF-portable SERS system reached a sensitivity up to 59 times that of direct sampling, comparable to the sensitivity enhancement achieved using fiber probes in the bulky Renishaw system. These fiber SERS probes integrated with a portable Raman spectrometer provide a promising scheme for a compact and flexible molecular sensing system with high sensitivity and portability.

  14. Vibronic Raman Scattering at the Quantum Limit of Plasmons

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-07-09

    We record sequences of Raman spectra at a plasmonic junction formed by a gold AFM tip in contact with a silver surface coated with 4,4’-dimercaptostilbene (DMS). A 2D correlation analysis of the recorded trajectories reveals that the observable vibrational states can be divided into sub-sets. The first set comprises the totally symmetric vibrations of DMS (ag) that are neither correlated with each other nor to the fluctuating background, which is assigned to the signature of charge transfer plasmons tunneling through DMS. The second set consists of bu vibrations, which are correlated both with each other and with the continuum. Our findings are rationalized on the basis of the charge-transfer theory of Raman scattering, and illustrate how the tunneling plasmons modulate the vibronic coupling term from which the intensities of the bu states are derived.

  15. Raman scattering characterization of space solar cell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintairov, Alexander M.; Khvostikov, V. P.; Paleeva, E. V.; Sorokina, S. V.

    1995-01-01

    A contactless method for the determination of the free-carrier density and the composition distribution across the thickness of 3-5 multi-layer solar cell structures, using the Raman scattering method, is developed. The method includes a step analysis of Raman spectra from optical phonons and phonon-plasmon modes of different layers. The method provides simultaneous measurements of the element composition and the thickness of the structure's layers together with the free-carrier density. The results of measurements of the free-carrier density composition distributions of the liquid phase epitaxy grown AlGaAs/GaAs and GaSb solar cell structures are presented and discussed.

  16. Deep-UV resonance Raman imaging of a cell (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumamoto, Yasuaki

    2016-09-01

    Raman microscopy enables a sensitive, label-free molecular imaging of cells. Employing deep-UV (DUV) light for Raman excitation allows selective measurement of nucleotide bases and aromatic amino acids in a cell, without spectral overlapping of components with a large quantity (i.e. lipid, peptide), because their Raman scattering are specifically enhanced due to the resonance effect. To implement DUV resonance Raman imaging of cells, I previously established a home-built Raman microscope equipped with a DUV laser (λ = 257.2 nm). Raman image representing the distribution of cellular nucleic acid can be reconstructed with the intensity of a Raman band selectively assigned to adenine and guanine. Unfortunately, DUV resonance Raman imaging of cells is severely hindered by molecular photodegradation that occurs after a molecule absorbs DUV light during Raman measurement, precluding a high signal-to-noise ratio and repetitive measurement. To address this issue, I developed a technique for molecular protection under DUV exposure; the trivalent ions of lanthanide group including terbium, europium, and thulium could significantly suppress the molecular photodegradation by relaxing the DUV-excited molecules. The buffer solution containing any of these lanthanide ions with the concentration of 100 µM or higher could provide less destruction of the cellular structures, including nucleotide bases, than the one without the ions, under DUV exposure. Utilizing such protective effects of the lanthanide ions, I successfully achieved a twice higher signal-to-noise ratio and repetitive DUV Raman imaging of cells.

  17. Stimulated Raman scattering of laser dye mixtures dissolved in multiple scattering media

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, V P; Komyshan, A O; Tikhonov, E A; Olkhovyk, L A

    2014-10-31

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of a mixture of rhodamine 6G and pyrromethene 605 laser dyes in vesicular films is studied. It is shown that a peculiar interaction of dyes occurs under conditions of multiple scattering of light from vesicles. This interaction manifests itself as SRS excitation of one of the dyes by random lasing of the other dye, provided that the random lasing spectrum overlaps the Stokes lines of the first dye. In addition, there is energy transfer between molecules of these dyes if their luminescence and absorption spectra overlap. The results obtained confirm that the mechanism of SRS from laser dyes in multiple scattering media is similar to that in coherent-active Raman spectroscopy. These results extend the possibility of determining the vibrational spectrum of dye molecules from their secondary radiation in these media. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  18. Vlasov simulations of Raman scattering from homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, D. J.; Williams, E. A.

    2005-10-01

    We have performed kinetic simulations of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) using the 1-D Vlasov code ELVIS [D. J. Strozzi et al., Comput. Phys. Comm. 164, 156 (2003)]. For electron plasma waves (EPWs) with kλD> 0.3 electron trapping increases the backward SRS reflectivity over linear values, as reported by others [H. X. Vu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 86, 4306 (2001)]. The enhancement takes place for both mobile or fixed ions. The electric field (k,φ) spectrum shows the plasma waves are down-shifted in φ from the linear dispersion curve. This downshift is correlated with large EPW amplitude and phase-space vortices in the electron distribution, and is likely due to trapping. The scattered light comes in temporal bursts. Finite-extent pulses of plasma waves are generated near the laser entrance and propagate in the direction of the laser. Forward SRS and Raman re-scatter of back SRS also occur. In an inhomogeneous plasma, the damping reduction due to trapping allows the plasma waves to propagate along the density gradient, rather than developing only near the resonance point. The detuning due to inhomogeneity does not prevent high reflectivity once trapping occurs. ^*Work at LLNL performed under auspices of U.S. Dept. of Energy by University of California, LLNL contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  19. Smart surface-enhanced Raman scattering traceable drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Tang, Yonghong; Dai, Sheng; Kleitz, Freddy; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-06-01

    A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells.A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03869g

  20. Signal enhancement of surface enhanced Raman scattering and surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering using in situ colloidal synthesis in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rab; Bowden, Stephen A; Parnell, John; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate the enhanced analytical sensitivity of both surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) responses, resulting from the in situ synthesis of silver colloid in a microfluidic flow structure, where both mixing and optical interrogation were integrated on-chip. The chip-based sensor was characterized with a model Raman active label, rhodamine-6G (R6G), and had a limit of detection (LOD) of ca. 50 fM (equivalent to single molecule detection). The device was also used for the determination of the natural pigment, scytonemin, from cyanobacteria (as an analogue for extraterrestrial life existing in extreme environments). The observed LOD of approximately 10 pM (ca. <400 molecules) demonstrated the analytical advantages of working with freshly synthesized colloid in such a flow system. In both cases, sensitivities were between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude greater in the microfluidic system than those measured using the same experimental parameters, with colloid synthesized off-chip, under quiescent conditions.

  1. Kinetic Enhancement of Raman Backscatter, and Electron Acoustic Thomson Scatter

    SciTech Connect

    Strozzi, D J; Williams, E A; Langdon, A B; Bers, A

    2006-09-01

    1-D Eulerian Vlasov-Maxwell simulations are presented which show kinetic enhancement of stimulated Raman backscatter (SRBS) due to electron trapping in regimes of heavy linear Landau damping. The conventional Raman Langmuir wave is transformed into a set of beam acoustic modes [L. Yin et al., Phys. Rev. E 73, 025401 (2006)]. For the first time, a low phase velocity electron acoustic wave (EAW) is seen developing from the self-consistent Raman physics. Backscatter of the pump laser off the EAW fluctuations is reported and referred to as electron acoustic Thomson scatter. This light is similar in wavelength to, although much lower in amplitude than, the reflected light between the pump and SRBS wavelengths observed in single hot spot experiments, and previously interpreted as stimulated electron acoustic scatter [D. S. Montgomery et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 155001 (2001)]. The EAW observed in our simulations is strongest well below the phase-matched frequency for electron acoustic scatter, and therefore the EAW is not produced by it. The beating of different beam acoustic modes is proposed as the EAW excitation mechanism, and is called beam acoustic decay. Supporting evidence for this process, including bispectral analysis, is presented. The linear electrostatic modes, found by projecting the numerical distribution function onto a Gauss-Hermite basis, include beam acoustic modes (some of which are unstable even without parametric coupling to light waves) and a strongly-damped EAW similar to the observed one. This linear EAW results from non-Maxwellian features in the electron distribution, rather than nonlinearity due to electron trapping.

  2. Return Current Electron Beams and Their Generation of "Raman" Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A.

    1998-11-01

    For some years, we(A. Simon and R. W. Short, Phys. Rev. Lett. 53), 1912 (1984). have proposed that the only reasonable explanation for many of the observations of "Raman" scattering is the presence of an electron beam in the plasma. (The beam creates a bump-on-tail instability.) Two major objections to this picture have been observation of Raman when no n_c/4 surface was present, with no likely source for the electron beam, and the necessity for the initially outward directed beam to bounce once to create the proper waves. Now new observations on LLE's OMEGA(R. Petrasso et al), this conference. and at LULI(C. Labaune et al)., Phys. Plasma 5, 234 (1998). have suggested a new origin for the electron beam. This new scenario answers the previous objections, maintains electron beams as the explanation of the older experiments, and may clear up puzzling observations that have remained unexplained. The new scenario is based on two assumptions: (1) High positive potentials develop in target plasmas during their creation. (2) A high-intensity laser beam initiates spark discharges from nearby surfaces to the target plasma. The resulting return current of electrons should be much more delta-like, is initially inwardly directed, and no longer requires the continued presence of a n_c/4 surface. Scattering of the interaction beam from the BOT waves yields the observed Raman signal. Experimental observations that support this picture will be cited. ``Pulsation'' of the scattering and broadband ``flashes'' are a natural part of this scenario. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  3. Observations of stimulated Raman scattering using simultaneous Thomson scattering, fast electron spectroscopy, and infrared diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, G.; Meyer, J.; Yazhou, Z.

    1986-10-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a CO/sub 2/ laser(lambda/sub 0/ -- 10.6 ..mu..m) produced plasma has been studied experimentally. The enhanced electron plasma wave (epw) fluctuations observed with ruby laser Thomson scattering have been compared with the scattered infrared (IR) spectra and the high-energy (near 100 keV) electrons. No scattered IR light in the range 1.5lambda/sub 0/ scattered wave vector spectra.

  4. Raman scattering in layer indium selenide under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahverdi, K.; Babaev, S.; Ellialtioǧlu, Ş.; Ismailov, A.

    1993-08-01

    Experimental results of Raman scattering spectra of ɛ-InSe crystals are presented at 300 K and pressures up to 10.2 kbar. Values of the mode-Grüneisen parameters were calculated using frequency-pressure dependences for five observed phonons. Changes of the shear force constants under pressure were analysed using linear-chain model both for ɛ-InSe and ɛ-GaSe crystals. The decrease of the shear force constants between metallic planes with increasing pressure are explained qualitatively by charge transfer from intralayer to interlayer space.

  5. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from silver-coated opals.

    PubMed

    Mu, Weiqiang; Hwang, Dae-Kue; Chang, Robert P H; Sukharev, Maxim; Tice, Daniel B; Ketterson, John B

    2011-03-28

    We describe surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements from a benzenethiol monolayer adsorbed on a silver-coated film that is, in turn, deposited on an artificial opal, where the latter is a close-packed three-dimensional dielectric lattice formed from polystyrene spheres. Data for a range of sphere sizes, silver film thicknesses, and laser excitation wavelengths are obtained. Enhancement factors can be in the range of 10(7). To partially explain these large enhancements, we have performed model finite-difference time domain simulations of the position-dependent electric fields generated at the opal surfaces for several experimentally studied laser wavelengths and sphere diameters.

  6. Resonant impulsive-stimulated Raman scattering on malachite green

    SciTech Connect

    Chesnoy, J.; Mokhtari, A.

    1988-10-01

    We have studied in the femtosecond regime the transient dynamics of dichroism (anisotropic absorption), birefringence, and frequency shift induced by an intense femtosecond pump beam in the dye malachite green in solution. Vibrational quantum beats were observed superimposed on the saturated absorption and dispersion signals and quantitatively explained in terms of impulsive-stimulated Raman scattering close to an electronic resonance. The selectivity for observation of the vibrations in the two electronic states is described for the different experimental schemes. We discuss the access to vibrational and electronic dynamics in both ground and excited electronic states and compare the possibilities to those of previous techniques.

  7. Multibeam Stimulated Raman Scattering in Inertial Confinement Fusion Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, P.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Milovich, J. L.; Hohenberger, M.; Jones, O. S.; Hopkins, L. Berzak; Berger, R. L.; Kruer, W. L.; Moody, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering from multiple laser beams arranged in a cone sharing a common daughter wave is investigated for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions in a inhomogeneous plasma. It is found that the shared electron plasma wave (EPW) process, where the lasers collectively drive the same EPW, can lead to an absolute instability when the electron density reaches a matching condition dependent on the cone angle of the laser beams. This mechanism could explain recent experimental observations of hot electrons at early times in ICF experiments, at densities well below quarter critical when two plasmon decay is not expected to occur.

  8. Multibeam Stimulated Raman Scattering in Inertial Confinement Fusion Conditions.

    PubMed

    Michel, P; Divol, L; Dewald, E L; Milovich, J L; Hohenberger, M; Jones, O S; Hopkins, L Berzak; Berger, R L; Kruer, W L; Moody, J D

    2015-07-31

    Stimulated Raman scattering from multiple laser beams arranged in a cone sharing a common daughter wave is investigated for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions in a inhomogeneous plasma. It is found that the shared electron plasma wave (EPW) process, where the lasers collectively drive the same EPW, can lead to an absolute instability when the electron density reaches a matching condition dependent on the cone angle of the laser beams. This mechanism could explain recent experimental observations of hot electrons at early times in ICF experiments, at densities well below quarter critical when two plasmon decay is not expected to occur.

  9. Monitoring lipid accumulation in the green microalga Botryococcus braunii with frequency-modulated stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Chandrappa, Dayananda; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Moger, Julian

    2015-03-01

    The potential of microalgae as a source of renewable energy has received considerable interest because they can produce lipids (fatty acids and isoprenoids) that can be readily converted into biofuels. However, significant research in this area is required to increase yields to make this a viable renewable source of energy. An analytical tool that could provide quantitative in situ spectroscopic analysis of lipids synthesis in individual microalgae would significantly enhance our capability to understand the synthesis process at the cellular level and lead to the development of strategies for increasing yield. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy has great potential in this area however, the pump-probe signal from two-color two-photon absorption of pigments (chlorophyll and carotenoids) overwhelm the SRS signal and prevent its application. Clearly, the development of a background suppression technique is of significant value for this important research area. To overcome the limitation of SRS in pigmented specimens, we establish a frequency-modulated stimulated Raman scattering (FM-SRS) microscopy that eliminates the non-Raman background by rapidly toggling on-and-off the targeted Raman resonance. Moreover, we perform the background-free imaging and analysis of intracellular lipid droplets and extracellular hydrocarbons in a green microalga with FM-SRS microscopy. We believe that FM-SRS microscopy demonstrates the potential for many applications in pigmented cells and provides the opportunity for improved selective visualization of the chemical composition of algae and plants

  10. Confocal Raman imaging for cancer cell classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Evelien; Van Dorpe, Pol; Stakenborg, Tim; Liu, Chengxun; Lagae, Liesbet

    2014-05-01

    We propose confocal Raman imaging as a label-free single cell characterization method that can be used as an alternative for conventional cell identification techniques that typically require labels, long incubation times and complex sample preparation. In this study it is investigated whether cancer and blood cells can be distinguished based on their Raman spectra. 2D Raman scans are recorded of 114 single cells, i.e. 60 breast (MCF-7), 5 cervix (HeLa) and 39 prostate (LNCaP) cancer cells and 10 monocytes (from healthy donors). For each cell an average spectrum is calculated and principal component analysis is performed on all average cell spectra. The main features of these principal components indicate that the information for cell identification based on Raman spectra mainly comes from the fatty acid composition in the cell. Based on the second and third principal component, blood cells could be distinguished from cancer cells; and prostate cancer cells could be distinguished from breast and cervix cancer cells. However, it was not possible to distinguish breast and cervix cancer cells. The results obtained in this study, demonstrate the potential of confocal Raman imaging for cell type classification and identification purposes.

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering as a higher-order Raman process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Niclas S.; Heeg, Sebastian; Reich, Stephanie

    2016-08-01

    We propose to understand surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) as a higher-order Raman process that contains the plasmonic excitation. The SERS amplitudes are calculated with third- and fourth-order perturbation theory. Treating the plasmonic excitation as a quasiparticle, we derive analytic expressions for all coupling matrix elements. This leads to a general theory of plasmonic enhancement in SERS that can be applied to arbitrary plasmonic nanostructures. We obtain the plasmon eigenvectors of a gold nanosphere and a nanosphere dimer. They are used to calculate the enhancement of the Raman cross section of a molecule coupled to the dipole plasmon mode. The enhancement of the cross section is up to three orders of magnitude stronger than predicted by the theory of electromagnetic enhancement. The difference is most pronounced in vacuum and decreases with increasing dielectric constant of the embedding medium. The predictions from understanding SERS as a higher-order Raman process agree well with recent experiments; they highlight the dominance of plasmonic enhancement in SERS.

  12. Theoretical calculation (DFT), Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study of ponceau 4R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yunfei; Li, Yan; Sun, Yingying; Wang, Heya; Qian, He; Yao, Weirong

    2012-10-01

    Ponceau 4R is used as a coloring agent in many different products, such as food, drinks, medicines, cosmetics and tobacco. However, ponceau 4R also shows carcinogenic, teratogenic and mutagenic behavior in high doses. In this work, standard Raman, theoretical Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra have been used to investigate ponceau 4R. More specifically, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been used to calculate the optimized Raman spectrum of ponceau 4R at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. This has provided a better understanding of the optimized geometry and vibrational frequencies of this dye. In addition, the experimental spectrum of ponceau 4R has been compared with the theoretical spectrum; good agreement was obtained. Finally, it has shown that using SERS the detection limit of the ponceau 4R solution can be as low as 5 μg/mL. This has been achieved by SERS measurements of ponceau 4R on a substrate of gold nanoparticles. The SERS peaks at 1030, 1236, 1356 and 1502 cm-1 were chosen as index for semi-quantitative analysis, showing that the SERS technique provided a useful ultrasensitive method for the detection of ponceau 4R.

  13. The Inclusion of Raman Scattering Effects in the Combined Ocean-Atmosphere Radiative Transfer Model MOMO to Estimate the Influence of Raman Scattering in Case 1 Waters on Satellite Ocean Remote Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bismarck, J.; Fischer, J.

    2011-12-01

    source, the MOMO program structure allows the inclusion of other elastic and inelastic sources, e.g. fluorescence effects. To estimate the influence of Raman scattered light from case 1 waters on satellite remote sensing applications, tables with Raman fractions where computed for water-leaving and top-of-atmosphere radiances for the spectral channels of the OLCI imaging spectrometer on the upcoming ESA remote sensing satellite SENTINEL-3. The tables where generated for different chlorophyll concentrations, incorporating a bio optical model, and accounting for possible variations of salinity (0 - 40 PSU) and temperature (5° - 30° C) of the water. These results, also pointing out the importance of the inclusion of clear Water Raman scattering contributions in ocean and atmosphere remote sensing applications, are presented.

  14. Raman chemical imaging system for food safety and quality inspection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raman chemical imaging technique combines Raman spectroscopy and digital imaging to visualize composition and structure of a target, and it offers great potential for food safety and quality research. In this study, a laboratory-based Raman chemical imaging platform was designed and developed. The i...

  15. Dispersion-based stimulated Raman scattering spectroscopy, holography, and optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Francisco E.; Fischer, Martin C.; Warren, Warren S.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) enables fast, high resolution imaging of chemical constituents important to biological structures and functional processes, both in a label-free manner and using exogenous biomarkers. While this technology has shown remarkable potential, it is currently limited to point scanning and can only probe a few Raman bands at a time (most often, only one). In this work we take a fundamentally different approach to detecting the small nonlinear signals based on dispersion effects that accompany the loss/gain processes in SRS. In this proof of concept, we demonstrate that the dispersive measurements are more robust to noise compared to amplitude-based measurements, which then permit spectral or spatial multiplexing (potentially both, simultaneously). Finally, we illustrate how this method may enable different strategies for biochemical imaging using phase microscopy and optical coherence tomography. PMID:26832279

  16. Magnetic-Polaron-Induced Enhancement of Surface Raman Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qi; Liao, Fan; Ruotolo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The studies of the effects of magnetic field on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) have been so far limited to the case of ferromagnetic/noble-metal, core/shell nano-particles, where the influence was always found to be negative. In this work, we investigate the influence of magnetic field on a diluted magnetic semiconductor/metal SERS system. Guided by three dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations, a high efficient SERS substrate was obtained by diluting Mn into Au-capped ZnO, which results in an increase of the dielectric constant and, therefore, an enhancement of Raman signals. More remarkably, an increase of intensities as well as a reduction of the relative standard deviation (RSD) of Raman signals have been observed as a function of the external magnetic strength. We ascribe these positive influences to magnetic-field induced nucleation of bound magnetic polarons in the Mn doped ZnO. The combination of diluted magnetic semiconductors and SERS may open a new avenue for future magneto-optical applications. PMID:26754049

  17. Rapid surface enhanced Raman scattering detection method for chloramphenicol residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Yao, Weirong

    2015-06-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP) is a widely used amide alcohol antibiotics, which has been banned from using in food producing animals in many countries. In this study, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) coupled with gold colloidal nanoparticles was used for the rapid analysis of CAP. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were conducted with Gaussian 03 at the B3LYP level using the 3-21G(d) and 6-31G(d) basis sets to analyze the assignment of vibrations. Affirmatively, the theoretical Raman spectrum of CAP was in complete agreement with the experimental spectrum. They both exhibited three strong peaks characteristic of CAP at 1104 cm-1, 1344 cm-1, 1596 cm-1, which were used for rapid qualitative analysis of CAP residues in food samples. The use of SERS as a method for the measurements of CAP was explored by comparing use of different solvents, gold colloidal nanoparticles concentration and absorption time. The method of the detection limit was determined as 0.1 μg/mL using optimum conditions. The Raman peak at 1344 cm-1 was used as the index for quantitative analysis of CAP in food samples, with a linear correlation of R2 = 0.9802. Quantitative analysis of CAP residues in foods revealed that the SERS technique with gold colloidal nanoparticles was sensitive and of a good stability and linear correlation, and suited for rapid analysis of CAP residue in a variety of food samples.

  18. Probing ultrafast processes by fifth order Stimulated Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumero, G.; Batignani, G.; Dorfman, K. E.; Mukamel, S.; Scopigno, T.

    2016-02-01

    We present the full diagrammatic description of non-resonant impulsive femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy in a multimode model system. In this technique the pump-probe scheme is exploited to study the vibrational structure of the sample via stimulated Raman scattering. We apply closed-time-path-loop diagrams to calculate the complete response of the system at the relevant perturbation order. We show that, in presence of low-frequency modes, coherences created by the impulsive pump modify the resulting Raman signal, which oscillates from gain to loss features, depending on the time delay between the pump and probe pulses. This leads to a redistribution of photons among the fields involved in the process and, consequently, the energy flows between fields and matter. Moreover, through this formalism, we address the case of extremely short delays in which the pump and probe fields overlap in time. We find that, even in absence of photo-induced dynamics due to absorption of the pump pulse, the overlap condition can generate time dependent features, arising from additional diagrams, which offer no contribution for well separated pulses.

  19. Applications of Raman and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering to the Analysis of Eukaryotic Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Franziska; Joseph, Virginia; Panne, Ulrich; Kneipp, Janina

    In this chapter, we discuss Raman scattering and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the analysis of cellular samples of plant and animal origin which are several tens to hundreds of microns in size. As was shown in the past several years, the favorable properties of noble metal nanostructures can be used to generate SERS signals in very complex biological samples such as cells, and result in an improved sensitivity and spatial resolution. Pollen grains, the physiological containers that produce the male gametes of seed plants, consist of a few vegetative cells and one generative cell, surrounded by a biopolymer shell. Their chemical composition has been a subject of research of plant physiologists, biochemists [1, 2], and lately even materials scientists [3, 4] for various reasons. In spite of a multitude of applied analytical approaches it could not be elucidated in its entirety yet. Animal cells from cell cultures have been a subject of intense studies due to their application in virtually all fields of biomedical research, ranging from studies of basic biological mechanisms to models for pharmaceutical and diagnostic research. Many aspects of all kinds of cellular processes including signalling, transport, and gene regulation have been elucidated, but many more facts about cell biology will need to be understood in order to efficiently address issues such as cancer, viral infection or genetic disorder. Using the information from spectroscopic methods, in particular combining normal Raman spectroscopy and SERS may open up new perspectives on cellular biochemistry. New sensitive Raman-based tools are being developed for the biochemical analysis of cellular processes [5-8].

  20. Development of fiber lasers and devices for coherent Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Erin Stranford

    As ultrafast laser technology has found expanding application in machining, spectroscopy, microscopy, surgery, and numerous other areas, the desire for inexpensive and robust laser sources has grown. Until recently, nonlinear effects in fiber systems due to the tight confinement of the light in the core have limited their performance. However, with advances in managing nonlinearity through pulse propagation physics and the use of large core fibers, the performance of fiber lasers can compete with that of their solid-state counterparts. As specific applications, such as coherent Raman scattering microscopy, emerge that stand to benefit from fiber technology, new performance challenges in areas such as laser noise are anticipated. This thesis studies nonlinear pulse propagation in fiber lasers and fiber parametric devices. Applications of dissipative solitons and self-similar pulse propagation to low-repetition rate oscillators that have the potential to simplify short-pulse amplification schemes will be examined. The rest of this thesis focuses on topics relevant to fiber laser development for coherent Raman scattering microscopy sources. Coherent pulse division and recombination inside the laser cavity will be introduced as an energy-scaling mechanism and demonstrated for a fiber soliton laser. The relative intensity noise properties of mode-locked fiber lasers, with a particular emphasis on normal dispersion lasers, will be explored in simulation and experiment. A fiber optical parametric oscillator will be studied in detail for low noise frequency conversion of picosecond pulses, and its utility for coherent Raman imaging will be demonstrated. Spectral compression of femtosecond pulses is used to generate picosecond pulses to pump this device, and this technique provides a route to future noise reduction in the system. Furthermore, this device forms a multimodal source capable of providing the picosecond pulses for coherent Raman scattering microscopy and the

  1. Coupled effect of stimulated Raman scattering and random lasing of dyes in multiple scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashchuk, Vasil P.

    2015-07-01

    Random lasing (RL) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of dye in multiple scattering media (MSM) appears simultaneously and each couple with other. This coupling has considerable influence on the SRS regularities of dye in MSM. The main feature of this impact is that RL radiation promotes the Raman lines revealing in the RL spectrum range as part of total radiation. SRS initiation occurs owing to the CARS-like mechanism provided by the two component pump: incident monochromatic radiation (laser pump) and RL radiation arising inside the MSM. It leads to important consequences: the RL spectrum must overlap with the spectral region of the possible Stokes lines of the dye; only those Stokes lines appear which are in a range of the RL spectrum; all conditions which promote RL assist SRS also. It is shown MSM promotes the best conditions for SRS and RL coupling due to optimal matching of RL localization regions and pump radiation.

  2. In vivo chemical and structural analysis of plant cuticular waxes using stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, George R; Mansfield, Jessica C; Parker, David; Lind, Rob; Perfect, Sarah; Seymour, Mark; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Love, John; Moger, Julian

    2015-05-01

    The cuticle is a ubiquitous, predominantly waxy layer on the aerial parts of higher plants that fulfils a number of essential physiological roles, including regulating evapotranspiration, light reflection, and heat tolerance, control of development, and providing an essential barrier between the organism and environmental agents such as chemicals or some pathogens. The structure and composition of the cuticle are closely associated but are typically investigated separately using a combination of structural imaging and biochemical analysis of extracted waxes. Recently, techniques that combine stain-free imaging and biochemical analysis, including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy microscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy microscopy, have been used to investigate the cuticle, but the detection sensitivity is severely limited by the background signals from plant pigments. We present a new method for label-free, in vivo structural and biochemical analysis of plant cuticles based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy. As a proof of principle, we used SRS microscopy to analyze the cuticles from a variety of plants at different times in development. We demonstrate that the SRS virtually eliminates the background interference compared with coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy imaging and results in label-free, chemically specific confocal images of cuticle architecture with simultaneous characterization of cuticle composition. This innovative use of the SRS spectroscopy may find applications in agrochemical research and development or in studies of wax deposition during leaf development and, as such, represents an important step in the study of higher plant cuticles.

  3. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Spectroscopy of Single Molecules in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sunney Xie, Wei Min, Chris Freudiger, Sijia Lu

    2012-01-18

    During this funding period, we have developed two breakthrough techniques. The first is stimulated Raman scattering microscopy, providing label-free chemical contrast for chemical and biomedical imaging based on vibrational spectroscopy. Spontaneous Raman microscopy provides specific vibrational signatures of chemical bonds, but is often hindered by low sensitivity. We developed a three-dimensional multiphoton vibrational imaging technique based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). The sensitivity of SRS imaging is significantly greater than that of spontaneous Raman microscopy, which is achieved by implementing high-frequency (megahertz) phase-sensitive detection. SRS microscopy has a major advantage over previous coherent Raman techniques in that it offers background-free and readily interpretable chemical contrast. We demonstrated a variety of biomedical applications, such as differentiating distributions of omega-3 fatty acids and saturated lipids in living cells, imaging of brain and skin tissues based on intrinsic lipid contrast, and monitoring drug delivery through the epidermis. This technology offers exciting prospect for medical imaging. The second technology we developed is stimulated emission microscopy. Many chromophores, such as haemoglobin and cytochromes, absorb but have undetectable fluorescence because the spontaneous emission is dominated by their fast non-radiative decay. Yet the detection of their absorption is difficult under a microscope. We use stimulated emission, which competes effectively with the nonradiative decay, to make the chromophores detectable, as a new contrast mechanism for optical microscopy. We demonstrate a variety of applications of stimulated emission microscopy, such as visualizing chromoproteins, non-fluorescent variants of the green fluorescent protein, monitoring lacZ gene expression with a chromogenic reporter, mapping transdermal drug distribu- tions without histological sectioning, and label-free microvascular

  4. Raman scattering method and apparatus for measuring isotope ratios and isotopic abundances

    DOEpatents

    Harney, Robert C.; Bloom, Stewart D.

    1978-01-01

    Raman scattering is used to measure isotope ratios and/or isotopic abundances. A beam of quasi-monochromatic photons is directed onto the sample to be analyzed, and the resulting Raman-scattered photons are detected and counted for each isotopic species of interest. These photon counts are treated mathematically to yield the desired isotope ratios or isotopic abundances.

  5. Beam-Scanning for Rapid Coherent Raman Hyperspectral Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ian Seungwan; Camp, Charles H.; Jin, Ying; Cicerone, Marcus T.; Lee, Young Jong

    2016-01-01

    Coherent Raman imaging requires high peak power laser pulses to maximize the nonlinear multiphoton signal generation, but accompanying photo-induced sample damage often poses a challenge to microscopic imaging studies. We demonstrate that beam-scanning by a 3.5-kHz resonant mirror in a broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (BCARS) imaging system can reduce photo-induced damage without compromising the signal intensity. Additionally, beam-scanning enables slit-acquisition, in which spectra from a thin line of sample illumination are acquired in parallel during a single charge-coupled device (CCD) exposure. Reflective mirrors are employed in the beam-scanning assembly to minimize chromatic aberration and temporal dispersion. The combined approach of beam-scanning and slitacquisition is compared with the sample-scanning mode in terms of spatial resolution, photo-induced damage, and imaging speed at the maximum laser power below the sample damage threshold. We show that the beam-scanning BCARS imaging method can reduce photodamage probability in biological cells and tissues, enabling faster imaging speed by using higher excitation laser power than could be achieved without the beam-scanning. PMID:26670522

  6. Raman chemical imaging technology for food safety and quality evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raman chemical imaging combines Raman spectroscopy and digital imaging to visualize composition and morphology of a target. This technique offers great potential for food safety and quality research. Most commercial Raman instruments perform measurement at microscopic level, and the spatial range ca...

  7. Structural analysis of molybdo-zinc-phosphate glasses: Neutron scattering, FTIR, Raman scattering, MAS NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renuka, C.; Shinde, A. B.; Krishna, P. S. R.; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2016-08-01

    Vitreous samples were prepared in the xMoO3-17ZnO-(83-x) NaPO3 with 35 ≥ x ≥ 55 glass forming system by energy efficient microwave heating method. Structural evolution of the vitreous network was monitored as a function of composition by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman scattering, Magic Angle Spin Nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) and Neutron scattering. Addition of MoO3 to the ZnO-NaPO3 glass leads to a pronounced increase in glass transition temperature (Tg) suggesting a significant increase in network connectivity and strength. In order to analyze FTIR and Raman scattering, a simple structural model is presented to rationalize the experimental observations. A number of structural units are formed due to network modification, and the resulting glass may be characterized by a network polyhedral with different numbers of unshared corners. 31P MAS NMR confirms a clear distinction between structural species having 3, 2, 1, 0 bridging oxygens (BOs). Further, Neutron scattering studies were used to probe the structure of these glasses. The result suggests that all the investigated glasses have structures based on chains of four coordinated phosphate and six coordinated molybdate units, besides, two different lengths of P-O bonds in tetrahedral phosphate units that are assigned to bonds of the P-atom with terminal and bridging oxygen atoms.

  8. Angle-resolved surface-enhanced Raman scattering on metallic nanostructured plasmonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Baumberg, Jeremy J; Kelf, Timothy A; Sugawara, Yoshihiro; Cintra, Suzanne; Abdelsalam, Mamdouh E; Bartlett, Phillip N; Russell, Andrea E

    2005-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering is an ideal tool for identifying molecules from the "fingerprint" of their molecular bonds; unfortunately, this process lacks a full microscopic understanding and, practically, is plagued with irreproducibility. Using nanostructured metal surfaces, we demonstrate strong correlations between plasmon resonances and Raman enhancements. Evidence for simultaneous ingoing and outgoing resonances in wavelength and angle sheds new light on the Raman enhancement process, allowing optimization of a new generation of reproducible Raman substrates.

  9. Stimulated Brillouin Scattering Microscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ballmann, Charles W.; Thompson, Jonathan V.; Traverso, Andrew J.; Meng, Zhaokai; Scully, Marlan O.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional stimulated Brillouin scattering microscopy is demonstrated for the first time using low power continuous-wave lasers tunable around 780 nm. Spontaneous Brillouin spectroscopy has much potential for probing viscoelastic properties remotely and non-invasively on a microscopic scale. Nonlinear Brillouin scattering spectroscopy and microscopy may provide a way to tremendously accelerate the data aquisition and improve spatial resolution. This general imaging setup can be easily adapted for specific applications in biology and material science. The low power and optical wavelengths in the water transparency window used in this setup provide a powerful bioimaging technique for probing the mechanical properties of hard and soft tissue. PMID:26691398

  10. Biomedical applications of a new portable Raman imaging probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hidetoshi; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Ikeda, Teruki; Wada, Satoshi; Tashiro, Hideo; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2001-10-01

    This article reports the outline of a new portable Raman imaging probe and its applications. This probe may be the smallest and lightest Raman imaging probe in the world. It is equipped with an interchangeable long-working distance microscope objective lens. The irradiation area is about 45 and 90 μm and the spatial resolution is 1 μm. In the present study, the Raman imaging probe was used to obtain a Raman image of diamond particles and a Raman mapping of carotenoid in Euglena.

  11. Characterization of the Electrochemical Interface by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Dipankar

    The electronic and structural properties of an enhanced raman sensitive interface are investigated. As a model system, the Ag (polycrystalline) electrode/electrolyte interface is chosen. Electrochemical control of the interface is used to establish and influence the conditions for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The molecule and site specific electronic component of SERS is studied under experimental control. This resonance is responsible for enhancement beyond that caused by electromagnetic effects at the surface and is promoted by the presence of the so -called "SERS active sites" (surface defect sites of atomic scale roughness). The results suggest that, these sites are positively charged, resonant Raman active Ag clusters, most likely with the identity of Ag(,4)('+). A partial contribution to the observed electronic enhancement comes from the intrinsic resonance of the clusters. At a given SERS sensitive Ag electrode, this contribution is superimposed on that from the photon driven charge transfer excitation (CTE) resonance, provided the latter is operative in that particular case. In SERS of Cl('-) (a prototypical probe) on Ag, the internal resonance of Ag(,4)('+) appears to be the primary source of the electronic enhancement detected. By noting the known importance of Ag(,4)('+) in silver-halide photography, it is possible to explain the "photoactivation effect" in SERS in terms of the Ag(,4)('+) identity of SERS active sites. These observations indicate how, by SERS, it may be possible to bridge the gap between the catalytic and optical aspects of small metal clusters. The chemisorbed anions which coexist with the active sites at a SERS sensitive interface, are tested for their effects in SERS from Cl('-) and I('-) on Ag. Evidence is presented for mutual "depolarization" effect of the adsorbates. Under voltage control of these interfaces, this depolarization process dominates the Stark effect and bond perturbation. The results point out how the

  12. Raman spectroscopic imaging of the whole Ciona intestinalis embryo during development.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsuru J; Hotta, Kohji; Oka, Kotaro

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular composition and the distribution of bio-molecules play central roles in the specification of cell fates and morphogenesis during embryogenesis. Consequently, investigation of changes in the expression and distribution of bio-molecules, especially mRNAs and proteins, is an important challenge in developmental biology. Raman spectroscopic imaging, a non-invasive and label-free technique, allows simultaneous imaging of the intracellular composition and distribution of multiple bio-molecules. In this study, we explored the application of Raman spectroscopic imaging in the whole Ciona intestinalis embryo during development. Analysis of Raman spectra scattered from C. intestinalis embryos revealed a number of localized patterns of high Raman intensity within the embryo. Based on the observed distribution of bio-molecules, we succeeded in identifying the location and structure of differentiated muscle and endoderm within the whole embryo, up to the tailbud stage, in a label-free manner. Furthermore, during cell differentiation, we detected significant differences in cell state between muscle/endoderm daughter cells and daughter cells with other fates that had divided from the same mother cells; this was achieved by focusing on the Raman intensity of single Raman bands at 1002 or 1526 cm(-1), respectively. This study reports the first application of Raman spectroscopic imaging to the study of identifying and characterizing differentiating tissues in a whole chordate embryo. Our results suggest that Raman spectroscopic imaging is a feasible label-free technique for investigating the developmental process of the whole embryo of C. intestinalis.

  13. Fiber optical parametric oscillator for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Erin S; Lefrancois, Simon; Ji, Minbiao; Wadsworth, William J; Xie, X Sunney; Wise, Frank W

    2013-10-15

    We present a synchronously pumped fiber optical parametric oscillator for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. Pulses from a 1 μm Yb-doped fiber laser are amplified and frequency converted to 779-808 nm through normal dispersion four-wave mixing in a photonic crystal fiber. The idler frequency is resonant in the oscillator cavity, and we find that bandpass filtering the feedback is essential for stable, narrow-bandwidth output. Experimental results agree quite well with numerical simulations of the device. Transform-limited 2 ps pulses with energy up to 4 nJ can be generated at the signal wavelength. The average power is 180 mW, and the relative-intensity noise is much lower than that of a similar parametric amplifier. High-quality coherent Raman images of mouse tissues recorded with this source are presented.

  14. Breaking the diffraction limit by saturation in stimulated-Raman-scattering microscopy: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Li; Wang, Haifeng

    2014-07-01

    We present a theoretical investigation on the saturation of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and propose an application of it to break the diffraction limit in SRS microscopy. In our proposed scheme, a donut-shaped Stokes beam is used to saturate SRS at the rim of a focused Gaussian pump beam; thus the addition of another Gaussian Stokes beam can only induce additional stimulated Raman loss to the pump beam in a small area inside the donut-shaped beam. Resembling stimulated-emission-depletion microscopy, this method can significantly improve the lateral imaging resolution. Compared with the diffraction-limited resolution, theoretical simulations show that it may be possible to double the spatial resolution with a few TW/cm2 of laser intensity. Such super-resolution could greatly enhance the advantage of SRS microscopy for potential applications.

  15. Fiber sensors for molecular detection using Raman and surface enhanced raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xuan

    In this dissertation, highly sensitive optical fiber sensors based on Raman spectroscopy (RS) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) are studied with focus on applications in various chemical and biological detections. In particular, two main categories of optical fibers have been used as the sensing platforms: one is the conventional multimode optical fiber and the other is the hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF). For the conventional multimode optical fiber, we've developed two types of probes using SERS techniques: the first is based on a double substrate "sandwich" structure with colloidal metal nanoparticles, and the second is based on interference lithography-defined nanopillar array structure on the fiber facet with the metal film deposition. For the HCPCF, the photonic bandgap guiding mechanism provides an ideal sensing platform because the confinement of both light and sample inside the fiber enables direct interaction between the propagating wave and the analyte. We demonstrate that by filling up the air channel(s) of the fiber with gas or liquid samples, it can significantly increase the sensitivity of the sensors in either regular Raman or SERS applications. For RS applications, these fiber sensors were tested with ambient gases, organic vapors, and biomedically important glucose molecule. For SERS application, these fiber sensors were evaluated with Rhodamine 6G, trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)-ethylene, toluene vapor, 2,4-dinitrotoluene vapor, proteins and bacteria. We also demonstrate that these fiber sensors can be integrated with the portable Raman spectrometer in order to make it practical for out-of-laboratory applications. The techniques developed in this study are expected to have significant impact in chemical, biological, environmental, national security, and other applications.

  16. Q-branch Raman scattering and modern kinetic thoery

    SciTech Connect

    Monchick, L.

    1993-12-01

    The program is an extension of previous APL work whose general aim was to calculate line shapes of nearly resonant isolated line transitions with solutions of a popular quantum kinetic equation-the Waldmann-Snider equation-using well known advanced solution techniques developed for the classical Boltzmann equation. The advanced techniques explored have been a BGK type approximation, which is termed the Generalized Hess Method (GHM), and conversion of the collision operator to a block diagonal matrix of symmetric collision kernels which then can be approximated by discrete ordinate methods. The latter method, which is termed the Collision Kernel method (CC), is capable of the highest accuracy and has been used quite successfully for Q-branch Raman scattering. The GHM method, not quite as accurate, is applicable over a wider range of pressures and has proven quite useful.

  17. Rhombohedral Multilayer Graphene: A Magneto-Raman Scattering Study.

    PubMed

    Henni, Younes; Ojeda Collado, Hector Pablo; Nogajewski, Karol; Molas, Maciej R; Usaj, Gonzalo; Balseiro, Carlos A; Orlita, Milan; Potemski, Marek; Faugeras, Clement

    2016-06-08

    Graphene layers are known to stack in two stable configurations, namely, ABA or ABC stacking, with drastically distinct electronic properties. Unlike the ABA stacking, little has been done to experimentally investigate the electronic properties of ABC graphene multilayers. Here, we report on the first magneto optical study of a large ABC domain in a graphene multilayer flake, with ABC sequences exceeding 17 graphene sheets. ABC-stacked multilayers can be fingerprinted with a characteristic electronic Raman scattering response, which persists even at room temperatures. Tracing the magnetic field evolution of the inter Landau level excitations from this domain gives strong evidence for the existence of a dispersionless electronic band near the Fermi level, characteristic of such stacking. Our findings present a simple yet powerful approach to probe ABC stacking in graphene multilayer flakes, where this highly degenerated band appears as an appealing candidate to host strongly correlated states.

  18. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering in art and archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leona, Marco

    2005-11-01

    The identification of natural dyes found in archaeological objects and in works of art as textile dyes and lake pigments is a demanding analytical task. To address the problems raised by the very low dye content of dyed fibers and lake pigments, and by the requirement to remove only microscopic samples, surface enhanced Raman scattering techniques were investigated for application to museum objects. SERS gives excellent results with the majority of natural dyes, including: alizarin, purpurin, laccaic acid, carminic acid, kermesic acid, shikonin, juglone, lawsone, brazilin and brazilein, haematoxylin and haematein, fisetin, quercitrin, quercetin, rutin, and morin. In this study, limits of detection were determined for representative dyes and different SERS supports such as citrate reduced Ag colloid and silver nanoisland films. SERS was successfully used to identify natural madder in a microscopic fragment from a severely degraded 11th Century Byzantine textile recently excavated in Amorium, Turkey.

  19. Vortex structure in stimulated Raman scattering beam profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drampyan, Raphael K.

    2000-02-01

    The beam profile of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a Kerr medium pumped by multimode radiation with regular structure having nearly four-fold azimuthal symmetry was studied. The SRS was excited near the threshold of generation by nanosecond pulses of laser radiation at wavelength 530 nm. The profile of output pump beam had a uniform intensity distribution, whereas the SRS beam profile showed kaleidoscopic change from shot to shot, while the energies of input pulses were kept stable. The circularly distributed speckle pattern, as well as interference fringe structure in the profile of the beam of SRS I Stokes components was observed. The interference fringes showed the number of points with origination and vanishing of fringes. Such behavior, which is the vortex signature, allows to suppose that SRS waves, generated from quantum noise, carry the screw dislocations. The origin of dislocations is analogous to one described for a speckle field and discussed for SRS.

  20. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Stimulated Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winjum, B. J.; Fahlen, J.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.; Hinkel, D. E.; Langdon, A. B.

    2006-10-01

    Using the full-PIC code OSIRIS, we have studied stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) over a wide range of parameters relevant to NIF. The role of beat-wave damping as a saturation mechanism is explored, as well as its relationship to other nonlinear effects which have previously been used to explain SRS behavior in NIF-relevant plasmas. Vu et al., have proposed that a nonlinear frequency shift due to the trapped particles detunes the instability, Brunner and Valeo argue that the trapped-particle instability is one of the dominant saturation mechanisms, while L. Yin et al., claim that electron beam acoustic modes are important. We will discuss the role played by each of these effects in OSIRIS simulations, as well as the importance of plasma wave convection on the recurrence of SRS reflectivity. We will also discuss how SRS behavior changes as the electron density and temperature are varied.

  1. Identification of biological agents using surface enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxon, Tracy L.; Duthie, R. Scott; Renko, Casey; Burns, Andrew A.; Lesaicherre, Marie L.; Mondello, Frank J.

    2011-05-01

    GE Global Research Center, in collaboration with Morpho Detection, Inc. has developed an assay scheme for the identification of biological agents using Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS). Specifically, unique spectroscopic signatures are generated using SERS tags consisting of individual glass-encapsulated gold nanoparticles and surfacebound reporter molecules. These SERS tags are modified with a capture moiety specific to the antigen of interest, and serve as a spectroscopic label in a bead-based sandwich assay. Assays are being developed for a variety of pathogens and this paper will focus on aspects of assay development, optimization, stabilization and validation. Results on the development of an assay to detect Ricin toxin will be presented, and preliminary feasibility studies for the detection of additional pathogens will be discussed.

  2. Quantum random bit generation using stimulated Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Philip J; Moffatt, Doug; Lausten, Rune; Wu, Guorong; Walmsley, Ian A; Sussman, Benjamin J

    2011-12-05

    Random number sequences are a critical resource in a wide variety of information systems, including applications in cryptography, simulation, and data sampling. We introduce a quantum random number generator based on the phase measurement of Stokes light generated by amplification of zero-point vacuum fluctuations using stimulated Raman scattering. This is an example of quantum noise amplification using the most noise-free process possible: near unitary quantum evolution. The use of phase offers robustness to classical pump noise and the ability to generate multiple bits per measurement. The Stokes light is generated with high intensity and as a result, fast detectors with high signal-to-noise ratios can be used for measurement, eliminating the need for single-photon sensitive devices. The demonstrated implementation uses optical phonons in bulk diamond.

  3. Fingerprinting CBRNE materials using surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertone, Jane F.; Spencer, Kevin M.; Sylvia, James M.

    2008-04-01

    One approach to CBRNE detection is analytical monitoring with portable spectroscopy systems. Such a technique needs to work in adverse environments, be amenable to use by field operators, and, given the sensitive nature of the target materials, should have an extremely rapid response time with no false negatives. This research demonstrates that surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is capable of detecting ppb levels of CBRNE materials with high sensitivity and no false positives. We present reproducible and selective detection using novel SERS structures that exhibit an inherently uniform surface morphology, leading to rapid, reproducible manufacturing. Our work includes receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curves for the detection of both conventional and improvised nitro explosives at low signal-to-noise ratios. We also present the detection of added CBRNE materials including chemical and biological agents as well as nuclear enriching materials. Our expertise extends to instrumentation of portable, robust Raman spectrographs that can be packaged with our sensors for a versatile security tool with applications extending from points of entry to points of production, from people to objects and freight.

  4. Electron-phonon interaction and Raman scattering in nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimin, S. N.; Pokatilov, E. P.; Fomin, V. M.; Devreese, J. T.; Gladilin, V. N.; Balaban, S. N.

    1997-03-01

    The vibrational eigenmodes of a nanocrystal are derived by diagonalization of the equations of motion for the ionic displacement taking into account a non-parabolic dispersion with electrostatic and mechanical boundary conditions. A finite width of the Brillouin zone leads automatically to a finite basis of vibrational modes. The developed method can be applicable to nanostructures of an arbitrary geometry. For a spherical nanocrystal, a dispersion equation contains the effective multimode dielectric function. The resulting eigenmodes are mixed bulk-like and interface waves, especially in the short-wavelength region. Using the obtained Hamiltonian, the one-phonon and two-phonon resonant Raman scattering spectra are calculated for a spherical CdSe nanocrystal in the borosilicate glass. The valence band mixing dramatically enhances relative intensities of the two-phonon peaks and makes the adiabatic approximation inapplicable. Hence, the Huang-Rhys parameter is not an adequate characteristic of the optical spectra. Using a direct expansion of the evolution operator, a good agreement has been achieved between the calculated and the experimentally observed [1] Raman spectra. [1] M. C. Klein, F. Hache, D. Ricard, and C. Flytzanis, Phys. Rev. B 42, 11123 (1990).

  5. Assessing Telomere Length Using Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Shenfei; Wang, Zhuyuan; Chen, Hui; Cui, Yiping

    2014-11-01

    Telomere length can provide valuable insight into telomeres and telomerase related diseases, including cancer. Here, we present a brand-new optical telomere length measurement protocol using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this protocol, two single strand DNA are used as SERS probes. They are labeled with two different Raman molecules and can specifically hybridize with telomeres and centromere, respectively. First, genome DNA is extracted from cells. Then the telomere and centromere SERS probes are added into the genome DNA. After hybridization with genome DNA, excess SERS probes are removed by magnetic capturing nanoparticles. Finally, the genome DNA with SERS probes attached is dropped onto a SERS substrate and subjected to SERS measurement. Longer telomeres result in more attached telomere probes, thus a stronger SERS signal. Consequently, SERS signal can be used as an indicator of telomere length. Centromere is used as the inner control. By calibrating the SERS intensity of telomere probe with that of the centromere probe, SERS based telomere measurement is realized. This protocol does not require polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or electrophoresis procedures, which greatly simplifies the detection process. We anticipate that this easy-operation and cost-effective protocol is a fine alternative for the assessment of telomere length.

  6. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Hydroxyproline in Gold Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Ariel R.; Aroca, Ricardo F.

    2010-08-01

    Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) of amino acids has proven a challenging task. The SERS of biomolecules and the formation of a reliable SERS data-base for medical application has shown to be a very challenging task for two reasons: first, the functional groups in proteins, lipid and sugars do not usually include aromatic moieties or chromophores absorbing in the visible (with intrinsic very large cross sections), and therefore, large enhancement factors are needed for ultrasensitive analysis. Second, the biomolecule-metal surface interaction leads to active surface photochemistry, photoisomerization or photodissociation, thus hindering the reproducibility of the experiment. In this work, we have employed hydroxyproline (Hyp) as our problem molecule, and tackled the problem of reproducibility by employing gold colloids instead of the usual silver to achieve SERS. We slightly modified the procedure described by Lee and Meisel to obtain the colloid, and concentrated the gold particles by centrifuging the colloid at 14000 rpm by 7 minutes. The SERS spectra show distinctive bands of Hyp, assigned by comparison to normal Raman spectra and DFT calculations. Repeated measurements using this procedure showed no significant variation in the spectra obtained.

  7. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering under electric field stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitaine, Erwan; Ould Moussa, Nawel; Louot, Christophe; Lefort, Claire; Pagnoux, Dominique; Duclère, Jean-René; Kaneyasu, Junya F.; Kano, Hideaki; Duponchel, Ludovic; Couderc, Vincent; Leproux, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    We introduce an experiment using electro-CARS, an electro-optical method based on the combination of ultrabroadband multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (M-CARS) spectroscopy and electric field stimulation. We demonstrate that this method can effectively discriminate the resonant CARS signal from the nonresonant background owing to a phenomenon of molecular orientation in the sample medium. Such molecular orientation is intrinsically related to the induction of an electric dipole moment by the applied static electric field. Evidence of the electro-CARS effect is obtained with a solution of n -alkanes (CnH2 n +2 , 15 ≤n ≤40 ), for which an enhancement of the CARS signal-to-noise ratio is achieved in the case of CH2 and CH3 symmetric/asymmetric stretching vibrations. Additionally, an electric-field-induced second-harmonic generation experiment is performed in order to corroborate the orientational organization of molecules due to the electric field excitation. Finally, we use a simple mathematical approach to compare the vibrational information extracted from electro-CARS measurements with spontaneous Raman data and to highlight the impact of electric stimulation on the vibrational signal.

  8. Fast spectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy with high-speed tunable picosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Cahyadi, Harsono; Iwatsuka, Junichi; Minamikawa, Takeo; Niioka, Hirohiko; Araki, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2013-09-01

    We develop a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy system equipped with a tunable picosecond laser for high-speed wavelength scanning. An acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) is integrated in the laser cavity to enable wavelength scanning by varying the radio frequency waves applied to the AOTF crystal. An end mirror attached on a piezoelectric actuator and a pair of parallel plates driven by galvanometer motors are also introduced into the cavity to compensate for changes in the cavity length during wavelength scanning to allow synchronization with another picosecond laser. We demonstrate fast spectral imaging of 3T3-L1 adipocytes every 5  cm-1 in the Raman spectral region around 2850  cm-1 with an image acquisition time of 120 ms. We also demonstrate fast switching of Raman shifts between 2100 and 2850  cm-1, corresponding to CD2 symmetric stretching and CH2 symmetric stretching vibrations, respectively. The fast-switching CARS images reveal different locations of recrystallized deuterated and nondeuterated stearic acid.

  9. Raman scattering from the CaC6 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mialitsin, A.; Kim, J.; Kremer, R.; Blumberg, G.

    2008-03-01

    Phys. Rev. B Phys. Rev. Lett. Phys. Lett. A Phys. Rev. 2MgB2 -1cm-1,-1cm-1/T,2gE2g 1gA1g 2DS2δS^E 2δL^E 2DA2Â 02δ0 6CaC6 A polarized Raman scattering study has been performed on bulk 1st stage intercalated graphite CaC6 crystals at sub-Tc temperatures. We identify all three Raman active Eg bands expected for the Rm6 space group of CaC6 at 440, 1120 and 1508,-1 and find them to be in agreement with zone center modes predicted by first principles calculations of phonon dispersion.^1 In addition the equivalents of the graphite D and G bands are observed at respective frequencies. Inherent to the disorder induced double resonant scattering process^2 the D band shifts from 1308,-1 to 1332,-1 upon the change of the excitation laser wavelength from 647,m to 476 ,m. Assuming linear dependence of the D band peak position as a function of excitation energy this translates to the frequency shift of 35,-1/,V. By comparing the integrated intensity of the G band at 1582,-1 in 6 to the one in kish graphite the relative fraction of higher stage domains to the 1st stage intercalation is estimated to be less then 0.2%. Finally upon the superconducting phase transition we observe a 2δ peak with the frequency of 24,-1 at 5,K. With temperature increase this peak persists shortly up to the SC phase transition at 11.6,and shows temperature dependence consistent with the strong coupling regime. ^1M. Calandra and F. Mauri, PRL 95, 237002 (2005). ^2C. Thomson and S. Reich, PRL 85, 5214 (2000).

  10. Ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection in common fluids

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shikuan; Dai, Xianming; Stogin, Birgitt Boschitsch; Wong, Tak-Sing

    2016-01-01

    Detecting target analytes with high specificity and sensitivity in any fluid is of fundamental importance to analytical science and technology. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has proven to be capable of detecting single molecules with high specificity, but achieving single-molecule sensitivity in any highly diluted solutions remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate a universal platform that allows for the enrichment and delivery of analytes into the SERS-sensitive sites in both aqueous and nonaqueous fluids, and its subsequent quantitative detection of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) down to ∼75 fM level (10−15 mol⋅L−1). Our platform, termed slippery liquid-infused porous surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SLIPSERS), is based on a slippery, omniphobic substrate that enables the complete concentration of analytes and SERS substrates (e.g., Au nanoparticles) within an evaporating liquid droplet. Combining our SLIPSERS platform with a SERS mapping technique, we have systematically quantified the probability, p(c), of detecting R6G molecules at concentrations c ranging from 750 fM (p > 90%) down to 75 aM (10−18 mol⋅L−1) levels (p ≤ 1.4%). The ability to detect analytes down to attomolar level is the lowest limit of detection for any SERS-based detection reported thus far. We have shown that analytes present in liquid, solid, or air phases can be extracted using a suitable liquid solvent and subsequently detected through SLIPSERS. Based on this platform, we have further demonstrated ultrasensitive detection of chemical and biological molecules as well as environmental contaminants within a broad range of common fluids for potential applications related to analytical chemistry, molecular diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and national security. PMID:26719413

  11. Raman Scattering from few-layer Graphene Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, A.; Joshi, P.; Srinivas, T.; Eklund, Peter

    2006-03-01

    Few layer-graphene sheet (nGL's) films, where n is the number of graphene layers, are new two-dimensional sp^2 carbon systems that have been shown to produce exciting Fractional Quantum Hall phenomena. We report here on the first Raman scattering (RS) results of nGLs. nGLs with lateral dimensions of ˜1-3 μm were prepared by chemical delamination of graphite flake or HOPG and then transferred from solution onto substrates (mica, pyrex,In/pyrex and Au/pyrex). RS spectra have been collected on nGL's with n=1, 2, 3 and compared with the graphite. Graphite exhibits two E2g interlayer modes at 42 cm-1 and 1582 cm-1. The Raman spectra of (n=1-3) nGLs were found to exhibit peaks at 1350 cm-1 and 1620 cm-1, i.e., near frequencies associated with high phonon density of states. The high frequency E2g band is found to split into two bands when the nGL is supported on metallic substrates (In,Au). In both these cases, we observe bands at 1583 cm-1, ˜1592 cm-1 rather than one band at 1581 cm-1 when the nGL is on insulating pyrex. The splitting of the interlayer band when on metallic substrates is identified with charge transfer between the nGL and the substrate. The phonon density of states scattering observed does not appear to be due to disorder in the basal plane.

  12. Simultaneous laser-induced fluorescence and Raman imaging inside a hydrogen engine.

    PubMed

    Engel, Sascha Ronald; Koch, Peter; Braeuer, Andreas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2009-12-10

    We report on the simultaneous and two-dimensional measurement of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and Raman scattering (Ramanography) applied inside a hydrogen internal combustion (IC) engine. Two different LIF tracer molecules, triethylamine (TEA) and trimethylamine (TMA), were used for the LIF experiments. The LIF and Raman results were found to be in very good agreement. The simultaneous application of Ramanography and LIF imaging indicated that TMA is the more suitable LIF tracer molecule, compared to TEA.

  13. Polarization modulated background-free hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houle, Marie-Andrée.; Andreana, Marco; Ridsdale, Andrew; Moffatt, Doug; Lausten, Rune; Légaré, François; Stolow, Albert

    2016-03-01

    Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy is a nonlinear microscopy technique based on Raman vibrational resonances determined by the frequency difference between Pump and Stokes laser pulses. Modulation of one laser beam transfers the modulation to the other, as either a gain in Stokes (SRG) or a loss in Pump power (SRL). SRS microscopy does not exhibit the four-wave mixing nonresonant background characteristic of CARS microscopy. However, other background signals due to two-photon absorption, thermal lensing or cross-phase modulation (XPM) do reduce the detection sensitivity and can distort the hyperspectral scans. Phase sensitive lock-in detection can reduce contributions from two-photon absorption, which is out-of-phase for the SRG case. However, the background signal due to XPM, which can be in-phase with SRS, can reduce the detection sensitivity. We present a novel polarization modulation (PM) scheme in SRS microscopy which greatly reduces the nonresonant XPM background, demonstrated here for the SRL case. Since many Raman vibrational transitions are parallel polarized, the SRS signal is maximum (minimum) when the polarizations of the pump and the Stokes beams are parallel (perpendicular). However, in both parallel and perpendicular Pump-Stokes geometries, XPM is non-zero in many media. Therefore, PM can remove the XPM background without significantly reducing the SRS signal. Our results show that the PM-SRS successfully removes the nonresonant signal due to XPM. High imaging contrast is observed, concomitant with high sensitivity at very low analyte concentrations and undistorted Raman spectra.

  14. ``Bloch wave'' modification of stimulated Raman by stimulated Brillouin scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, E. S.; Vu, H. X.; DuBois, D. F.; Bezzerides, B.

    2013-03-01

    Using the reduced-description particle-in-cell (RPIC) method, we study the coupling of backward stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS) and backward stimulated Brillouin scattering (BSBS) in regimes where the reflectivity involves the nonlinear behavior of particles trapped in the daughter plasma waves. The temporal envelope of a Langmuir wave (LW) obeys a Schrödinger equation where the potential is the periodic electron density fluctuation resulting from an ion-acoustic wave (IAW). The BSRS-driven LWs in this case have a Bloch wave structure and a modified dispersion due to the BSBS-driven spatially periodic IAW, which includes frequency band gaps at kLW˜kIAW/2˜k0 (kLW, kIAW, and k0 are the wave number of the LW, IAW, and incident pump electromagnetic wave, respectively). This band structure and the associated Bloch wave harmonic components are distinctly observed in RPIC calculations of the electron density fluctuation spectra and this structure may be observable in Thomson scatter. Bloch wave components grow up in the LW spectrum, and are not the result of isolated BSRS. Self-Thomson scattered light from these Bloch wave components can have forward scattering components. The distortion of the LW dispersion curve implies that the usual relationship connecting the frequency shift of the BSRS-scattered light and the density of origin of this light may become inaccurate. The modified LW frequency results in a time-dependent frequency shift that increases as the IAW grows, detunes the BSRS frequency matching condition, and reduces BSRS growth. A dependence of the BSRS reflectivity on the IAW Landau damping results because this damping determines the levels of IAWs. The time-dependent reflectivity in our simulations is characterized by bursts of sub-picosecond pulses of BSRS alternating with multi-ps pulses of BSBS, and BSRS is observed to decline precipitously as soon as SBS begins to grow from low levels. In strong BSBS regimes, the Bloch wave effects in BSRS are

  15. Simulations of Stimulated Raman Scattering in One and Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winjum, B. J.; Langdon, A. B.

    2005-10-01

    Using the full-PIC code OSIRIS, we have studied stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) over a wide range of parameters relevant to NIF. In previous one-dimensional simulation studies using reduced PIC, Vlasov, or full PIC models, the modification of the electron distribution function and electron trapping effects are believed to play the dominant role in explaining the recurring behavior of SRS reflectivity. Vu et al., have proposed that a nonlinear frequency shift due to the trapped particles detunes the instability, Brunner and Valeo argue that the trapped-particle instability is the dominant saturation mechanism, while L. Yin et al., claim that electron beam acoustic modes are important. We will discuss the role played by each of these effects in OSIRIS simulations, as well as the importance of plasma wave convection on the recurrence of SRS reflectivity. In extending the simulations to two dimensions, we will discuss side-scattering and electron trapping by both forward and backward SRS. When the laser intensity is near-threshold for SRS and the laser is focused to a finite width, we find that the physics remains rather one-dimensional. On the other hand, for plane-wave lasers, as well as for higher-intensity lasers, the physics becomes multi-dimensional. Simulations performed on the Dawson Cluster under support of NSF grant NSF Phy-0321345. Work also supported by DE-FG02-03-NA00065.

  16. Resonance Raman Scattering Studies of Gallium - - Aluminum-Arsenide Superlattices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gant, Thomas Andrew

    We have made resonance Raman scattering studies of folded LA phonons and quantized LO phonons in several GaAs-AlAs superlattices. The motivation for this work was to study the electronic structure and the electron -phonon interaction in these structures. The samples were not intentionally doped. The Raman spectra of optic phonons were usually taken at a temperature of 10 K or less. The folded acoustic phonon work was taken at temperatures ranging from 200-300 K in order to enhance the scattering by the thermal factor. Two samples in particular have received very close attention: sample 2292 (50 A GaAs- 20 A AlAs) and sample 3250 (20 A GaAs- 50 A AlAs). In sample 2292 we have made resonance studies of the folded LA phonons and the GaAs -like confined LO_2 mode near the second heavy hole exciton. The results on the folded acoustic phonons show a very strong resonance enhancement for the second order folded phonons, but very little for the first order. An interference between two different scattering channels (the n = 1 light hole and the n = 2 heavy hole subbands) seems to be responsible for this effect. The resonance profile for the LO_2 confined optic phonon in sample 2292 shows 4 peaks in the region from 1.8 eV to 2.05 eV. We have studied the dependence of this resonance profile on the power density. A higher power density was achieved by using the same laser power with a tighter focus. At the higher power density the peak at 1.93 eV (formerly the strongest peak present) vanished. This "bleaching" effect is related to screening due to the higher carrier density. In sample 3250 we have studied the polarization dependence of the resonance profiles of four peaks (LO _2, LO_4, LO_6, and an interface mode) near the lowest direct gap. The A_1 symmetry confined LO modes are seen in both polarized and depolarized geometries, in violation of the usual selection rule (polarized). A mechanism is proposed to explain this result, which has been previously observed by other

  17. In vitro colocalization of plasmonic nano-biolabels and biomolecules using plasmonic and Raman scattering microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Kamalesh; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2015-04-01

    An insight into the intracellular fate of theranostics is important for improving their potential in biological applications. In vivo efficacy of plasmonic theranostics depends on our ability to monitor temporal changes in their size, shape, and state of aggregation, and the identification of molecules adsorbed on their surfaces. We develop a technique which combines plasmonic and Raman scattering microspectroscopy to colocalize plasmonic scattering from metallic nanoparticles with the Raman signatures of biomolecules adsorbed on the surface of the former. Using this technique, we have colocalized biomolecules with the plasmonic scattering from silver nanoparticles in the vicinity of Escherichia coli bacteria. To prove the applicability of this setup for the measurements on mammalian cells, imaging of HEK293 cells treated with gold nanoparticles was performed. We discuss the importance of such correlated measurements over individual techniques, although the latter may lead to misinterpretation of results. Finally, with the above-mentioned examples, we have given criteria to improve the specificity of theranostics. We believe that this methodology will be considered as a prime development in the assessment of theranostics.

  18. Coded-aperture Raman imaging for standoff explosive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCain, Scott T.; Guenther, B. D.; Brady, David J.; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the design of a deep-UV Raman imaging spectrometer operating with an excitation wavelength of 228 nm. The designed system will provide the ability to detect explosives (both traditional military explosives and home-made explosives) from standoff distances of 1-10 meters with an interrogation area of 1 mm x 1 mm to 200 mm x 200 mm. This excitation wavelength provides resonant enhancement of many common explosives, no background fluorescence, and an enhanced cross-section due to the inverse wavelength scaling of Raman scattering. A coded-aperture spectrograph combined with compressive imaging algorithms will allow for wide-area interrogation with fast acquisition rates. Coded-aperture spectral imaging exploits the compressibility of hyperspectral data-cubes to greatly reduce the amount of acquired data needed to interrogate an area. The resultant systems are able to cover wider areas much faster than traditional push-broom and tunable filter systems. The full system design will be presented along with initial data from the instrument. Estimates for area scanning rates and chemical sensitivity will be presented. The system components include a solid-state deep-UV laser operating at 228 nm, a spectrograph consisting of well-corrected refractive imaging optics and a reflective grating, an intensified solar-blind CCD camera, and a high-efficiency collection optic.

  19. In vivo Coherent Raman Imaging for Neuroscience Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Daniel

    2010-08-01

    The use of coherent Raman imaging is described for applications in neuroscience. Myelin imaging of the spinal cord can be performed with Raman imaging through the use of the vibration in carbon-hydrogen bonds, dominant in lipids. First, we demonstrate in vivo histomorphometry in live animal for characterization of myelin-related nervous system pathologies. This is used to characterize spinal cord health during multiple sclerosis. Second, Raman spectroscopy of tissue is discussed. We discuss the challenges that live animal imaging brings, together with important aspects of coherent Raman imaging in tissue.

  20. Raman scattering study of rare-earth hexaboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogita, N.; Nagai, S.; Udagawa, M.; Iga, F.; Sera, M.; Oguchi, T.; Akimitsu, J.; Kunii, S.

    2005-04-01

    The excitation-energy, polarization, pressure, and temperature dependences of Raman scattering spectra have been measured for the RB6 crystals ( R=Ca, La, Ce, Pr, Sm, Gd, Dy, and Yb). In the Raman spectra, the extra peaks have been clearly observed at around 200 cm-1, except for the Raman-active phonons and CEF excitations. The extra peaks show anomalous behavior in the temperature, polarization, and lattice parameter dependences. These anomalous behaviors originate from the vibration of the rare-earth ions in octahedral B 6 cage, and the extra peaks can be assigned as the second-order Raman excitations of T 1u[3]. To check the validity of our assignment, we have measured the pressure dependence. In this paper, the results of the “ extra peaks” at about 200 cm -1, and pressure dependence of SmB 6 are presented. The sample preparation and experimental details are explained in our previous report [3]. The Pm3m symmetry of RB 6 gives us the phonon numbers at Brilloiun zone center; Γ=A1g+Eg+T1g+T2g+3T1u+T2u. The Raman-active phonons are A1g, Eg, and T2g, which are the vibration of boron octahedra. In cubic symmetry, all Raman-active phonons appear in the (x+y,x+y) polarization geometry. In the notation of (x,y), x and y denote the polarization directions of incident and scattered light, respectively. x and y correspond to the crystal axes of [1 0 0] and [0 1 0], respectively. Fig. 1 shows the Raman spectra of trivalent RB6 at room temperature in the energy region below T2g phonons ( ≃700 cm-1). Each spectrum is depicted in the order of the decreasing lattice parameters from top to bottom. As shown in Fig. 1, the energy of T2g phonon decreases with increasing lattice parameter, and this is normal dependence. However, the extra peaks (arrows) show an anti-trend for T2g phonon's. Focusing on the size of cage space consisting of surrounding borons for rare earth ion a-rR( a and rR are lattice parameter and ionic radius, respectively), the energy of the peaks is

  1. Measurements of density field in a swirling flame by 2D spontaneous Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharaborin, D. K.; Dulin, V. M.; Lobasov, A. S.; Markovich, D. M.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the density distribution in swirling turbulent premixed flames. The measurement principle is based on registration of spontaneous Raman scattering, when the reacting gas flow is illuminated by a laser sheet. Evaluation of 1D and 2D distributions of density and temperature were performed in a laminar Bunsen flame as a test case for validation of experimental technique. Time-averaged 2D images of the scattering during rovibronic transitions of nitrogen molecules were captured in turbulent premixed low-swirl and high-swirl (Re = 5000) propane-air flames in a wide range of equivalence ratio. The obtained density fields are useful for better understanding of heat and mass transfer in swirl-stabilized turbulent flames and for validation of CFD results.

  2. A Raman-based endoscopic strategy for multiplexed molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Zavaleta, Cristina L; Garai, Ellis; Liu, Jonathan T C; Sensarn, Steven; Mandella, Michael J; Van de Sompel, Dominique; Friedland, Shai; Van Dam, Jacques; Contag, Christopher H; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2013-06-18

    Endoscopic imaging is an invaluable diagnostic tool allowing minimally invasive access to tissues deep within the body. It has played a key role in screening colon cancer and is credited with preventing deaths through the detection and removal of precancerous polyps. However, conventional white-light endoscopy offers physicians structural information without the biochemical information that would be advantageous for early detection and is essential for molecular typing. To address this unmet need, we have developed a unique accessory, noncontact, fiber optic-based Raman spectroscopy device that has the potential to provide real-time, multiplexed functional information during routine endoscopy. This device is ideally suited for detection of functionalized surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles as molecular imaging contrast agents. This device was designed for insertion through a clinical endoscope and has the potential to detect and quantify the presence of a multiplexed panel of tumor-targeting SERS nanoparticles. Characterization of the Raman instrument was performed with SERS particles on excised human tissue samples, and it has shown unsurpassed sensitivity and multiplexing capabilities, detecting 326-fM concentrations of SERS nanoparticles and unmixing 10 variations of colocalized SERS nanoparticles. Another unique feature of our noncontact Raman endoscope is that it has been designed for efficient use over a wide range of working distances from 1 to 10 mm. This is necessary to accommodate for imperfect centering during endoscopy and the nonuniform surface topology of human tissue. Using this endoscope as a key part of a multiplexed detection approach could allow endoscopists to distinguish between normal and precancerous tissues rapidly and to identify flat lesions that are otherwise missed.

  3. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of light by ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milekhin, A. G.; Yeryukov, N. A.; Sveshnikova, L. L.; Duda, T. A.; Zenkevich, E. I.; Kosolobov, S. S.; Latyshev, A. V.; Himcinski, C.; Surovtsev, N. V.; Adichtchev, S. V.; Feng, Zhe Chuan; Wu, Chia Cheng; Wuu, Dong Sing; Zahn, D. R. T.

    2011-12-01

    Raman scattering (including nonresonant, resonant, and surface enhanced scattering) of light by optical and surface phonons of ZnO nanocrystals and nanorods has been investigated. It has been found that the nonresonant and resonant Raman scattering spectra of the nanostructures exhibit typical vibrational modes, E 2(high) and A 1(LO), respectively, which are allowed by the selection rules. The deposition of silver nanoclusters on the surface of nanostructures leads either to an abrupt increase in the intensity (by a factor of 103) of Raman scattering of light by surface optical phonons or to the appearance of new surface modes, which indicates the observation of the phenomenon of surface enhanced Raman light scattering. It has been demonstrated that the frequencies of surface optical phonon modes of the studied nanostructures are in good agreement with the theoretical values obtained from calculations performed within the effective dielectric function model.

  4. High Sensitivity Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Detection of Tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandakkathara, Archana

    Raman spectroscopy has the capability of providing detailed information about molecular structure, but the extremely small cross section of Raman scattering prevents this technique from applications requiring high sensitivity. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on the other hand provides strongly increased Raman signal from molecules attached to metallic nanostructures. SERS is thus a promising technique for high sensitivity analytical applications. One particular area of interest is the application of such techniques for the analysis of the composition of biological cells. However, there are issues which have to be addressed in order to make SERS a reliable technique such as the optimization of conditions for any given analyte, understanding the kinetic processes of binding of the target molecules to the nanostructures and understanding the evolution and coagulation of the nanostructures, in the case of colloidal solutions. The latter processes introduce a delay time for the observation of maximum enhancement factors which must be taken into account for any given implementation of SERS. In the present thesis the goal was to develop very sensitive SERS techniques for the measurement of biomolecules of interest for analysis of the contents of cells. The techniques explored could be eventually be applicable to microfluidic systems with the ultimate goal of analyzing the molecular constituents of single cells. SERS study of different amino acids and organic dyes were performed during the course of this thesis. A high sensitivity detection system based on SERS has been developed and spectrum from tryptophan (Trp) amino acid at very low concentration (10-8 M) has been detected. The concentration at which good quality SERS spectra could be detected from Trp is 4 orders of magnitude smaller than that previously reported in literature. It has shown that at such low concentrations the SERS spectra of Trp are qualitatively distinct from the spectra commonly reported in

  5. Raman scattering by H2 and N2 in the atmospheres of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oklopcic, Antonija; Hirata, Christopher M.; Heng, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    Rayleigh scattering is an important source of opacity in the atmospheres of exoplanets at short optical and near-UV wavelengths. Raman scattering is an inelastic process related to Rayleigh scattering, but with a weaker cross section. We analyze the signatures of Raman scattering imprinted in the reflected light and the geometric albedo of exoplanets. Raman scattering causes filling-in of absorption lines in the incident spectrum, thus producing sharp enhancements in the geometric albedo. It also shifts the wavelengths of spectral features in the reflected light causing the Raman ghost lines. Observing the albedo enhancements could be used to measure the column density of the scattering molecule and provide constrains on the presence of clouds and hazes in the atmosphere. Observing the Raman ghost lines could be used to spectroscopically identify the main scatterer in the atmosphere -- molecules like H2 or N2 which do not show prominent spectral signatures in the optical wavelength range. If detected, ghost lines could also provide information about the temperature of the atmosphere. Here we present how these signatures of Raman scattering in hydrogen- and nitrogen-dominated atmospheres can be used as probes of atmospheric pressure, temperature and composition. We analyze the feasibility of detecting these features in the albedo spectra of nearby exoplanets with the existing and future observational facilities.

  6. First Results from the OMI Rotational Raman Scattering Cloud Pressure Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Vasilkov, Alexander P.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm to retrieve scattering cloud pressures and other cloud properties with the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). The scattering cloud pressure is retrieved using the effects of rotational Raman scattering (RRS). It is defined as the pressure of a Lambertian surface that would produce the observed amount of RRS consistent with the derived reflectivity of that surface. The independent pixel approximation is used in conjunction with the Lambertian-equivalent reflectivity model to provide an effective radiative cloud fraction and scattering pressure in the presence of broken or thin cloud. The derived cloud pressures will enable accurate retrievals of trace gas mixing ratios, including ozone, in the troposphere within and above clouds. We describe details of the algorithm that will be used for the first release of these products. We compare our scattering cloud pressures with cloud-top pressures and other cloud properties from the Aqua Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument. OMI and MODIS are part of the so-called A-train satellites flying in formation within 30 min of each other. Differences between OMI and MODIS are expected because the MODIS observations in the thermal infrared are more sensitive to the cloud top whereas the backscattered photons in the ultraviolet can penetrate deeper into clouds. Radiative transfer calculations are consistent with the observed differences. The OMI cloud pressures are shown to be correlated with the cirrus reflectance. This relationship indicates that OMI can probe through thin or moderately thick cirrus to lower lying water clouds.

  7. Raman scattering studies and charge transport in polyfluorenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Mohammad Ali Iftekhar

    Organic semiconductors, such as short-chain oligomers and long-chain polymers, are now a core constituent in numerous organic and organic-inorganic hybrid technologies. Blue-emitting polyfluorenes (PFs) have emerged as especially attractive pi conjugated polymers (CP) due to their high luminescence efficiency and excellent electronic properties and thus great prospects for device applications. The performance of devices based on these polymers depends on side chain conformations, overall crystalline structure, and charge transport processes at the microscopic level. This project entails detailed Raman scattering studies and charge transport properties of two side chain substituted PFs: Poly(2,7-[9,9'-bis(2-ethylhexyl)] fluorene) (PF2/6) and Poly(9,9-(di-n,n-octyl) fluorene) (PF8). The structural properties of PFs are extremely sensitive to the choice of functionalizing side chains. PF8 adopts metastable structures that depend upon the thermal history and choice of solvents used in film forming conditions. Raman scattering techniques as a function of thermal cycling are used to monitor the changes in the backbone and side chain morphology of PF8. These studies establish a correlation between the conformational isomers and the side and main chain morphology. Theoretical modeling of the vibrational spectra of single chain oligomers in conjunction with the experimental results demonstrate the incompatibility of the beta phase, a low energy emitting chromophore, with the overall crystalline phase in PF8. Further, electroluminescence and photoluminescence measurements from PF-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are presented and discussed in terms of the crystalline phases and chain morphologies in the PFs. Charge carrier injection and transport properties of PF-based LEDs are presented using current-voltage (I--V) characteristic which is modeled by a space-charge-limited conduction (SCLC) for discrete and continuous traps. PF2/6 with a high level of molecular disorder is

  8. Chip-Scale Bioassays Based on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering: Fundamentals and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hye-Young

    2005-01-01

    This work explores the development and application of chip-scale bioassays based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for high throughput and high sensitivity analysis of biomolecules. The size effect of gold nanoparticles on the intensity of SERS is first presented. A sandwich immunoassay was performed using Raman-labeled immunogold nanoparticles with various sizes. The SERS responses were correlated to particle densities, which were obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The response of individual particles was also investigated using Raman-microscope and an array of gold islands on a silicon substrate. The location and the size of individual particles were mapped using AFM. The next study describes a low-level detection of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and simulants of biological warfare agents in a sandwich immunoassay format using SERS labels, which have been termed Extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs). A new ERL scheme based on a mixed monolayer is also introduced. The mixed monolayer ERLs were created by covering the gold nanoparticles with a mixture of two thiolates, one thiolate for covalently binding antibody to the particle and the other thiolate for producing a strong Raman signal. An assay platform based on mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold is then presented. The mixed SAMs were prepared from dithiobis(succinimidyl undecanoate) (DSU) to covalently bind antibodies on gold substrate and oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated thiol to prevent nonspecific adsorption of antibodies. After the mixed SAMs surfaces, formed from various mole fraction of DSU were incubated with antibodies, AFM was used to image individual antibodies on the surface. The final study presents a collaborative work on the single molecule adsorption of YOYO-I labeled {lambda}-DNA at compositionally patterned SAMs using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The role of solution pH, {lambda}-DNA concentration, and domain size was investigated. This work also revealed

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Raman scattering cross sections for H2 (Oklopcic+,

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oklopcic, A.; Hirata, C. M.; Heng, K.

    2017-02-01

    An important source of opacity in exoplanet atmospheres at short visible and near-UV wavelengths is Rayleigh scattering of light on molecules. It is accompanied by a related, albeit weaker process-Raman scattering. We analyze the signatures of Raman scattering imprinted in the reflected light and the geometric albedo of exoplanets, which could provide information about atmospheric properties. Raman scattering affects the geometric albedo spectra of planets in the following ways. First, it causes filling-in of strong absorption lines in the incident radiation, thus producing sharp peaks in the albedo. Second, it shifts the wavelengths of spectral features in the reflected light causing the so-called Raman ghost lines. Raman scattering can also cause a broadband reduction of the albedo due to wavelength shifting of a stellar spectrum with red spectral index. Observing the Raman peaks in the albedo could be used to measure the column density of gas, thus providing constraints on the presence of clouds in the atmosphere. Observing the Raman ghost lines could be used to spectroscopically identify the main scatterer in the atmosphere, even molecules like H2 or N2, which do not have prominent spectral signatures in the optical wavelength range. If detected, ghost lines could also provide information about the temperature of the atmosphere. In this paper, we investigate the effects of Raman scattering in hydrogen- and nitrogen-dominated atmospheres. We analyze the feasibility of detecting the signatures of Raman scattering with the existing and future observational facilities, and of using these signatures as probes of exoplanetary atmospheres. (1 data file).

  10. In-Vivo functional optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy with stimulated Raman scattering fiber-laser source.

    PubMed

    Hajireza, Parsin; Forbrich, Alexander; Zemp, Roger

    2014-02-01

    In this paper a multi-wavelength optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) system using stimulated Raman scattering is demonstrated for both phantom and in vivo imaging. A 1-ns pulse width ytterbium-doped fiber laser is coupled into a single-mode polarization maintaining fiber. Discrete Raman-shifted wavelength peaks extending to nearly 800 nm are generated with pulse energies sufficient for OR-PAM imaging. Bandpass filters are used to select imaging wavelengths. A dual-mirror galvanometer system was used to scan the focused outputs across samples of carbon fiber networks, 200μm dye-filled tubes, and Swiss Webster mouse ears. Photoacoustic signals were collected in transmission mode and used to create maximum amplitude projection C-scan images. Double dye experiments and in vivo oxygen saturation estimation confirmed functional imaging potential.

  11. Dispersion-based stimulated Raman scattering spectroscopy, holography, and optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles, Francisco E.; Fischer, Martin C.; Warren, Warren S.

    2016-03-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) enables fast, high resolution imaging of chemical constituents important to biological structures and functional processes. While this technology has shown remarkable potential, it is currently limited to point scanning and can only probe a few Raman bands at a time. In this work we take a fundamentally different approach to detecting the small nonlinear signals based on dispersion effects that accompany the loss/gain processes in SRS. We use a modified pump-probe system (pulses with duration of ~0.5 ps and 75 fs, respectively) with interferometric detection in the Fourier-domain to demonstrate that the dispersive measurements are more robust to noise (e.g., laser noise) compared to conventional amplitude measurements, which in turn permits facile spectral and spatial multiplexing. Results show that it is possible to assess a broadband dispersion spectrum (currently limited to ~400 cm-1) with a single laser shot or spectrometer acquisition (20-50 µs). For molecular imaging with broadband spectral information, we achieve spatial pixel rates of 2.5 kHz, and will discuss how this can be further improved to 20-50 kHz. We also combine SRS with optical coherence tomography (OCT) (molecular and structural information are rendered from the same data), which enables axial multiplexing by coherence gating and paves the way for volumetric biochemical imaging. The approach is tested on a thin water-and-oil phantom, a thick scattering polystyrene bead phantom, and thick freshly excised human adipose tissue. Finally, we will outline other opportunities for spatial multiplexing using wide-field holography and spectroscopic-OCT, which would massively parallelize the spatial and spectral information. The combination of dispersion-based SRS and phase imaging has the potential to enable faster wide-area and volumetric molecular imaging. Such methods would be valuable in a clinical setting for many applications.

  12. Silicon nanohybrid-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Houyu; Jiang, Xiangxu; Lee, Shuit-Tong; He, Yao

    2014-11-01

    Nanomaterial-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors are highly promising analytical tools, capable of ultrasensitive, multiplex, and nondestructive detection of chemical and biological species. Extensive efforts have been made to design various silicon nanohybrid-based SERS substrates such as gold/silver nanoparticle (NP)-decorated silicon nanowires, Au/Ag NP-decorated silicon wafers (AuNP@Si), and so forth. In comparison to free AuNP- and AgNP-based SERS sensors, the silicon nanohybrid-based SERS sensors feature higher enhancement factors (EFs) and excellent reproducibility, since SERS hot spots are efficiently coupled and stabilized through interconnection to the semiconducting silicon substrates. Consequently, in the past decade, giant advancements in the development of silicon nanohybrid-based SERS sensors have been witnessed for myriad sensing applications. In this review, the representative achievements related to the design of high-performance silicon nanohybrid-based SERS sensors and their use for chemical and biological analysis are reviewed in a detailed way. Furthermore, the major opportunities and challenges in this field are discussed from a broad perspective and possible future directions.

  13. Raman Scattering from Atmospheric Nitrogen in the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvey, M. J.; Kent, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    The Mark II laser radar system at Kingston, Jamaica, has been used to make observations on the Raman shifted line from atmospheric nitrogen at 828.5 nm. The size of the system makes it possible to detect signals from heights of up to 40 kilometres. The effects of aerosol scattering observed using a single wavelength are almost eliminated, and a profile of nitrogen density may be obtained. Assuming a constant mixing ratio, this may be interpreted as a profile of atmospheric density whose accuracy is comparable to that obtained from routine meteorological soundings. In order to obtain an accurate profile several interfering effects have had to be examined and, where necessary, eliminated. These include: 1) Fluorescence in optical components 2) Leakage of signal at 694.3 nm. 3) Overload effects and non-linearities in the receiving and counting electronics. Most of these effects have been carefully examined and comparisons are being made between the observed atmospheric density profiles and local meteorological radio-sonde measurements. Good agreement has been obtained over the region of overlap (15 - 30 KID), discrepancies being of the same order as the experimental accuracy (1-10%), depending on height and length of period of observation.

  14. Mitigating Stimulated Raman Scattering in Hohlraum Plasmas Using Magnetic Insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, D. S.; Albright, B. J.; Kline, J. L.; Yin, L.; Chang, P. Y.; Davies, J. R.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D. H.; Betti, R.; MacDonald, M. J.

    2013-10-01

    Controlling stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in hohlraum plasmas is important for achieving high-gain inertial fusion using indirect drive. Experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) suggest that coronal electron temperatures in NIF hohlraums may be cooler than initially thought due to efficient thermal conduction from the under dense low-Z plasma to the dense high-Z hohlraum wall. This leads to weaker Landau damping and stronger growth of SRS. Magnetic insulation of the heat conducting electrons can occur when the Hall parameter ωceτei >> 1, where ωce is the electron-cyclotron frequency, and τei is the electron-ion collision time. For NIF laser-plasma conditions, it is shown that a 10-T external magnetic field may substantially reduce cross-field transport and may increase coronal plasma temperatures, thus increasing linear Landau damping and mitigating SRS. We will present calculations and simulations supporting this concept, and will present initial results from Omega experiments using gas-filled hohlraums with external B-fields up to 10-T. Work performed under the auspices of DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  15. On the saturation of stimulated Raman scattering in laser amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, E. S.; Ren, J.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Schmitt, M. J.

    2012-10-01

    The use of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in plasmas has been proposed as an alternative to the CPA technique for laser pulse amplification and compression [1]. Initial experiments demonstrated the amplification and compression of laser pulses in plasma to an unfocused intensity of ˜10^16 W/cm^2 [2], however the amplification was saturated at this level and was accompanied by deleterious spatial and temporal incoherence. The reasons for this incoherence have not been well understood. A physical picture has been developed with results from PIC simulations using the LSP code where spontaneous SRS in the pump modifies the plasma conditions, and which in turn significantly weakens the coupling strength for seed amplification. This led to the development of a novel experimental method to significantly increase the amplified power in the short-pulses via SRS.[4pt] [1] G. Shvets, N. J. Fisch, A. Pukhov, and J. Meyer-ter-Vehn, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81 4879 (1998).[0pt] [2] J. Ren, W.-F. Cheng, S.-L Li, and S. Suckewer, Nat. Phys. 3 732 (2007). LA-UR-12-22734

  16. Combined laser ultrasonics, laser heating, and Raman scattering in diamond anvil cell system.

    PubMed

    Zinin, Pavel V; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Burgess, Katherine; Odake, Shoko; Chigarev, Nikolay; Sharma, Shiv K

    2016-12-01

    We developed a multi-functional in situ measurement system under high pressure equipped with a laser ultrasonics (LU) system, Raman device, and laser heating system (LU-LH) in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). The system consists of four components: (1) a LU-DAC system (probe and pump lasers, photodetector, and oscilloscope) and DAC; (2) a fiber laser, which is designed to allow precise control of the total power in the range from 2 to 100 W by changing the diode current, for heating samples; (3) a spectrometer for measuring the temperature of the sample (using black body radiation), fluorescence spectrum (spectrum of the ruby for pressure measurement), and Raman scattering measurements inside a DAC under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) conditions; and (4) an optical system to focus laser beams on the sample and image it in the DAC. The system is unique and allows us to do the following: (a) measure the shear and longitudinal velocities of non-transparent materials under HPHT; (b) measure temperature in a DAC under HPHT conditions using Planck's law; (c) measure pressure in a DAC using a Raman signal; and (d) measure acoustical properties of small flat specimens removed from the DAC after HPHT treatment. In this report, we demonstrate that the LU-LH-DAC system allows measurements of velocities of the skimming waves in iron at 2580 K and 22 GPa.

  17. Computer simulation of surface-enhanced Raman scattering in nanostructured metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarintsev, S. O.; Sarychev, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    The simulation of local field fluctuations and surface-enhanced Raman scattering in percolation systems at the percolation threshold is described. An approximate real-space renormalization group method was used in the simulation. It allows one to radically reduce the computation time compared to an exact calculation and to obtain detailed information about the electromagnetic field. The local fields in real macroscopic systems can be calculated by using this approximation. A computer simulation of the local fields in metal island (percolation) films has been performed by the developed method. The calculation has confirmed the existence of giant local field fluctuations. In turn, the local electric field excites Raman scattering. The local fields of surface-enhanced Raman scattering have been calculated for the first time. The dependence of the Raman scattering enhancement factor on the reference frequency and Stokes shift has been derived. An experimental observation of this dependence could be considered as a confirmation of the electromagnetic nature of the enhancement.

  18. Laboratory Studies of Perchlorate Deliquescence and Water Adsorption at the Surface of Mars with Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakakos, G.; Whiteway, J. A.

    2016-09-01

    Laser Raman scattering has been applied in order to experimentally study the exchange of water between the surface and atmosphere on Mars. Results show that both deliquescence of salts and adsorption by minerals are likely currently active processes.

  19. A large-solid-angle X-ray Raman scattering spectrometer at ID20 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility.

    PubMed

    Huotari, S; Sahle, Ch J; Henriquet, Ch; Al-Zein, A; Martel, K; Simonelli, L; Verbeni, R; Gonzalez, H; Lagier, M C; Ponchut, C; Moretti Sala, M; Krisch, M; Monaco, G

    2017-03-01

    An end-station for X-ray Raman scattering spectroscopy at beamline ID20 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility is described. This end-station is dedicated to the study of shallow core electronic excitations using non-resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. The spectrometer has 72 spherically bent analyzer crystals arranged in six modular groups of 12 analyzer crystals each for a combined maximum flexibility and large solid angle of detection. Each of the six analyzer modules houses one pixelated area detector allowing for X-ray Raman scattering based imaging and efficient separation of the desired signal from the sample and spurious scattering from the often used complicated sample environments. This new end-station provides an unprecedented instrument for X-ray Raman scattering, which is a spectroscopic tool of great interest for the study of low-energy X-ray absorption spectra in materials under in situ conditions, such as in operando batteries and fuel cells, in situ catalytic reactions, and extreme pressure and temperature conditions.

  20. Strongly enhanced Raman scattering of Cu-phthalocyanine sandwiched between graphene and Au(111).

    PubMed

    Lin, Wan-Ing; Gholami, Mohammad Fardin; Beyer, Paul; Severin, Nikolai; Shao, Feng; Zenobi, Renato; Rabe, Jürgen P

    2017-01-05

    Graphene and flat gold have both been argued to enhance Raman scattering of molecular adsorbates through a chemical mechanism. Here we show that these two effects can add to each other. For Cu-phthalocyanine in between graphene and Au(111) on mica a Raman enhancement up to 68-fold has been observed.

  1. Influence of stimulated Raman scattering on the conversion efficiency in four wave mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderlich, R.; Moore, M.A.; Garrett, W.R.; Payne, M.G.

    1988-01-01

    Secondary nonlinear optical effects following parametric four wave mixing in sodium vapor are investigated. The generated ultraviolet radiation induces stimulated Raman scattering and other four wave mixing process. Population transfer due to Raman transitions strongly influences the phase matching conditions for the primary mixing process. Pulse shortening and a reduction in conversion efficiency are observed. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Stimulated backward Raman scattering excited in the picosecond range: high efficiency conversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, R.; Sokolovskaia, A.; Tcherniega, N.; Rivoire, G.

    1991-04-01

    Stimulated backward Raman scattering (SBRS) excited by picosecond laser pulses is produced with high efficiency conversion in materials displaying large Raman gain and small Kerr constants. A constant energy efficiency of 40% is obtained in aceton for a wide range of the exciting laser energy. The spatial, spectral and temporal structure of the backscattering beam is studied.

  3. Stimulated Raman scattering of light absorbing media excited by ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchevskiy, F. N.; Strizhevskiy, V. L.; Feshchenko, V. P.

    1985-01-01

    The fluctuation-dissipation theory of spontaneous and stimulated vibration Raman scattering is worked out taking into account the dissipation losses at frequencies of laser pump and scattering radiation. General expressions are found, which describe the absolute intensities and shape, energy and duration of scattered pulses in terms of the parameters of the medium and the the input laser pulses. The general regularities are analyzed in detail. Conditions are found for the realization of spontaneous or stimulated Raman scattering and its dependence on absorption, pulse duration and other parameters of the problem.

  4. Electron and donor-impurity-related Raman scattering and Raman gain in triangular quantum dots under an applied electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiutiunnyk, Anton; Akimov, Volodymyr; Tulupenko, Viktor; Mora-Ramos, Miguel E.; Kasapoglu, Esin; Morales, Alvaro L.; Duque, Carlos Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The differential cross-section of electron Raman scattering and the Raman gain are calculated and analysed in the case of prismatic quantum dots with equilateral triangle base shape. The study takes into account their dependencies on the size of the triangle, the influence of externally applied electric field as well as the presence of an ionized donor center located at the triangle's orthocenter. The calculations are made within the effective mass and parabolic band approximations, with a diagonalization scheme being applied to obtain the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the x- y Hamiltonian. The incident and secondary (scattered) radiation have been considered linearly-polarized along the y-direction, coinciding with the direction of the applied electric field. For the case with an impurity center, Raman scattering with the intermediate state energy below the initial state one has been found to show maximum differential cross-section more than by an order of magnitude bigger than that resulting from the scheme with lower intermediate state energy. The Raman gain has maximum magnitude around 35 nm dot size and electric field of 40 kV/cm for the case without impurity and at maximum considered values of the input parameters for the case with impurity. Values of Raman gain of the order of up to 104cm-1 are predicted in both cases.

  5. A new class of nontoxic nanoparticle tags based on surface enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, X.-M.; Ansari, D.; Nie, Shuming

    2007-02-01

    The advance of nanotechnology has boosted the development of ultra-sensitive biosensors for biomedical applications. Most recently, optical detection based biosensors have been demonstrated in medical imaging and diagnosis employing nanocrystals such as fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) and plasmon resonant metal nanoparticles to achieve femto-molar detection. An intriguing but far less explored approach for biological diagnostics relies on an emerging ultrasensitive technology -- surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. We have developed a stable SERS nano-tag by grafting hydrophilic polymer to gold nanoparticle-dye molecule complexes to preserve the spectral signature and fully control the aggregation states. The light-emitting power and scattered light of both QDs and SERS nano-tags have been recorded under the same experimental conditions using dark field microscope, fluorometer, and Raman instrument. A comparison in brightness, sensitivity level, and quantum efficiency between SERS nano-tags and near infrared (NIR) QDs has been assessed on both bulk colloidal solution and single particle measurements. Well-designed SERS nano-tags exhibit excellent advantages over NIR QDs.

  6. Wide-Field Raman Imaging of Dental Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shan; Li, Bolan; Akkus, Anna; Akkus, Ozan; Lang, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Detection of dental caries at the onset remains as a great challenge in dentistry. Raman spectroscopy could be successfully applied towards detecting caries since it is sensitive to the amount of the Raman active mineral crystals, the most abundant component of enamel. Effective diagnosis requires full examination of a tooth surface via a Raman mapping. Point-scan Raman mapping is not clinically relevant (feasible) due to lengthy data acquisition time. In this work, a wide-field Raman imaging system was assembled based on a high-sensitivity 2D CCD camera for imaging the mineralization status of teeth with lesions. Wide-field images indicated some lesions to be hypomineralized and others to be hypermineralized. The observations of wide-field Raman imaging were in agreement with point-scan Raman mapping. Therefore, sound enamel and lesions can be discriminated by Raman imaging of the mineral content. In conclusion, wide-field Raman imaging is a potentially useful tool for visualization of dental lesions in the clinic. PMID:24781363

  7. Optical diagnosis and characterization of dental caries with polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Hsu, Stephen Chin-Ying; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    We report the utility of a rapid polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging technique developed for optical diagnosis and characterization of dental caries in the tooth. Hyperspectral SRS images (512 × 512 pixels) of the tooth covering both the fingerprint (800-1800 cm−1) and high-wavenumber (2800-3600 cm−1) regions can be acquired within 15 minutes, which is at least 103 faster in imaging speed than confocal Raman mapping. Hyperspectral SRS imaging uncovers the biochemical distributions and variations across the carious enamel in the tooth. SRS imaging shows that compared to the sound enamel, the mineral content in the body of lesion decreases by 55%; while increasing up to 110% in the surface zone, indicating the formation of a hyper-mineralized layer due to the remineralization process. Further polarized SRS imaging shows that the depolarization ratios of hydroxyapatite crystals (ν1-PO43- of SRS at 959 cm−1) of the tooth in the sound enamel, translucent zone, body of lesion and the surface zone are 0.035 ± 0.01, 0.052 ± 0.02, 0.314 ± 0.1, 0.038 ± 0.02, respectively, providing a new diagnostic criterion for discriminating carious lesions from sound enamel in the teeth. This work demonstrates for the first time that the polarization-resolved hyperspectral SRS imaging technique can be used for quantitatively determining tooth mineralization levels and discriminating carious lesions from sound enamel in a rapid fashion, proving its promising potential of early detection and diagnosis of dental caries without labeling. PMID:27446654

  8. Molecular diffusion in the human nail measured by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Wing Sin; Belsey, Natalie A; Garrett, Natalie L; Moger, Julian; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña; Guy, Richard H

    2015-06-23

    The effective treatment of diseases of the nail remains an important unmet medical need, primarily because of poor drug delivery. To address this challenge, the diffusion, in real time, of topically applied chemicals into the human nail has been visualized and characterized using stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy. Deuterated water (D2O), propylene glycol (PG-d8), and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO-d6) were separately applied to the dorsal surface of human nail samples. SRS microscopy was used to image D2O, PG-d8/DMSO-d6, and the nail through the O-D, -CD2, and -CH2 bond stretching Raman signals, respectively. Signal intensities obtained were measured as functions of time and of depth into the nail. It was observed that the diffusion of D2O was more than an order of magnitude faster than that of PG-d8 and DMSO-d6. Normalization of the Raman signals, to correct in part for scattering and absorption, permitted semiquantitative analysis of the permeation profiles and strongly suggested that solvent diffusion diverged from classical behavior and that derived diffusivities may be concentration dependent. It appeared that the uptake of solvent progressively undermined the integrity of the nail. This previously unreported application of SRS has permitted, therefore, direct visualization and semiquantitation of solvent penetration into the human nail. The kinetics of uptake of the three chemicals studied demonstrated that each altered its own diffusion in the nail in an apparently concentration-dependent fashion. The scale of the unexpected behavior observed may prove beneficial in the design and optimization of drug formulations to treat recalcitrant nail disease.

  9. Molecular diffusion in the human nail measured by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Wing Sin; Belsey, Natalie A.; Garrett, Natalie L.; Moger, Julian; Delgado-Charro, M. Begoña; Guy, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    The effective treatment of diseases of the nail remains an important unmet medical need, primarily because of poor drug delivery. To address this challenge, the diffusion, in real time, of topically applied chemicals into the human nail has been visualized and characterized using stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy. Deuterated water (D2O), propylene glycol (PG-d8), and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO-d6) were separately applied to the dorsal surface of human nail samples. SRS microscopy was used to image D2O, PG-d8/DMSO-d6, and the nail through the O-D, -CD2, and -CH2 bond stretching Raman signals, respectively. Signal intensities obtained were measured as functions of time and of depth into the nail. It was observed that the diffusion of D2O was more than an order of magnitude faster than that of PG-d8 and DMSO-d6. Normalization of the Raman signals, to correct in part for scattering and absorption, permitted semiquantitative analysis of the permeation profiles and strongly suggested that solvent diffusion diverged from classical behavior and that derived diffusivities may be concentration dependent. It appeared that the uptake of solvent progressively undermined the integrity of the nail. This previously unreported application of SRS has permitted, therefore, direct visualization and semiquantitation of solvent penetration into the human nail. The kinetics of uptake of the three chemicals studied demonstrated that each altered its own diffusion in the nail in an apparently concentration-dependent fashion. The scale of the unexpected behavior observed may prove beneficial in the design and optimization of drug formulations to treat recalcitrant nail disease. PMID:26056283

  10. Enhancement of the Raman scattering signal due to a nanolens effect.

    PubMed

    Desmedt, A; Talaga, D; Bruneel, J L

    2007-06-01

    The Raman scattering signal of a substrate is investigated using a polystyrene nanolens of a few hundred nanometers inserted within the light path of a confocal microspectrometer. As observed in solid immersion microscopy, the nanolens is at the origin of the improvement of the spatial resolution. Furthermore, enhancement of the Raman scattering signal of the substrate is observed when measuring through the polystyrene bead. The enhancement factors have been measured for silicon, highly ordered pyrolytic graphite, and gallium arsenide substrates. This setup provides a new way of enhancing the Raman signal by means of a nanolens.

  11. Impulsive rotational Raman scattering of N2 by a remote "air laser" in femtosecond laser filament.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jielei; Chu, Wei; Zhang, Haisu; Zeng, Bin; Yao, Jinping; Qiao, Lingling; Li, Guihua; Jing, Chenrui; Xie, Hongqiang; Xu, Huailiang; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2014-04-15

    We report on experimental realization of impulsive rotational Raman scattering from neutral nitrogen molecules in a femtosecond laser filament using an intense self-induced white-light seeding "air laser" generated during the filamentation of an 800 nm Ti:sapphire laser in nitrogen gas. The impulsive rotational Raman fingerprint signals are observed with a maximum conversion efficiency of ∼0.8%. Our observation provides a promising way of remote identification and location of chemical species in the atmosphere by a rotational Raman scattering of molecules.

  12. Detailed Characterization of Electron Plasma Waves Produced by Stimulated Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Renard, N.; Labaune, C.; Baldis, H.A.; Bauer, B.S.; Quesnel, B.; Schifano, E.; Michard, A.; Seka, W.; Estabrook, K.G.

    1996-10-01

    Time-resolved spectra and location of electron plasma waves (EPW) produced by stimulated Raman scattering in back and in side directions have been measured using Thomson scattering of a short wavelength probe beam. Significant Raman sidescattering was observed for angles as large as 40{degree} from the laser axis. The Raman growth is larger and starts earlier in the front part of the density profile than at the summit. Simultaneous measurements at multiple places in the plasma provided an indication of the coherence length of the EPW. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. Observation of phonons in multiferroic BiFeO3 single crystals by Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, H.; Matsui, S.; Harima, H.; Takahashi, T.; Itoh, T.; Kisoda, K.; Tamada, M.; Noguchi, Y.; Miyayama, M.

    2007-09-01

    We have grown BiFeO3 bulk single crystals by a flux method and characterized the phonon spectra in detail by Raman scattering in the temperature range 4-1100 K. All the 13 Raman-active phonon modes predicted by group theory, 4A1+9E, were observed at low temperature and successfully assigned by a polarized Raman measurement. Moreover, drastic spectral changes in the Raman spectra were observed at temperatures 600-700 K and 1000-1100 K. These features are discussed from the viewpoint of phonon coupling with the magnetic ordering and the structural phase transition, respectively.

  14. Image-guided Raman spectroscopic recovery of canine cortical bone contrast in situ

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Subhadra; Schulmerich, Matthew; Cole, Jacqueline H.; Dooley, Kathryn A.; Kreider, Jaclynn M.; Pogue, Brian W.; Morris, Michael D.; Goldstein, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    Raman scattering provides valuable biochemical and molecular markers for studying bone tissue composition with use in predicting fracture risk in osteoporosis. Raman tomography can image through a few centimeters of tissue but is limited by low spatial resolution. X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging can provide high-resolution image-guidance of the Raman spectroscopic characterization, which enhances the quantitative recovery of the Raman signals, and this technique provides additional information to standard imaging methods. This hypothesis was tested in data measured from Teflon® tissue phantoms and from a canine limb. Image-guided Raman spectroscopy (IG-RS) of the canine limb using CT images of the tissue to guide the recovery recovered a contrast of 145:1 between the cortical bone and background. Considerably less contrast was found without the CT image to guide recovery. This study presents the first known IG-RS results from tissue and indicates that intrinsically high contrasts (on the order of a hundred fold) are available. PMID:18679495

  15. Raman Scattered He II 4332 and Photoionization Model in the Symbiotic Star V1016 Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.-W.; Heo, J.-E.; Lee, B.-C.

    2014-08-01

    Symbiotic stars are wide binary systems of a white dwarf and a mass losing giant. They exhibit unique Raman scattered features as a result of inelastic scattering of far UV line photons by atomic hydrogen. Co-existence of a far UV He II emission region and a thick H I region in symbiotic stars is necessary for the formation of Raman-scattered features blueward of hydrogen Balmer emission lines. Being a single electron atom, He II has the same atomic structure as the hydrogen atom and hence emits far UV emission lines that are slightly blueward of hydrogen Lyman lines. These far UV He II emission lines can be Raman scattered to appear blueward of hydrogen Balmer lines. In particular, the symbiotic star V1016 Cyg is found to exhibit Raman scattered He II 4332 feature in the BOES high resolution spectrum. Our profile fitting of Raman scattered He II 4332 is consistent with the mass loss geometry proposed by Jung & Lee (2004). We use the photoionization code ‘ CLOUDY' to estimate the far UV He II emission lines and make comparisons with the observed Raman scattered He II 4332 blueward of Hγ in the high resolution echelle V1016 Cyg. The emission nebula is assumed to be of uniform density of 108 cm-3 that is illuminated by a black body characterized by its temperature and total luminosity. With our comparisons we conclude that the Raman scattered He II features are consistent with the existence of a photoionized nebula by a hot black body source with temperature 7-8× 104 K with a luminosity 1038erg s-1.

  16. Coupled wave equations theory of surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    McAnally, Michael O; McMahon, Jeffrey M; Van Duyne, Richard P; Schatz, George C

    2016-09-07

    We present a coupled wave semiclassical theory to describe plasmonic enhancement effects in surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (SE-FSRS). A key result is that the plasmon enhanced fields which drive the vibrational equation of motion for each normal mode results in dispersive lineshapes in the SE-FSRS spectrum. This result, which reproduces experimental lineshapes, demonstrates that plasmon-enhanced stimulated Raman methods provide unique sensitivity to a plasmonic response. Our derived SE-FSRS theory shows a plasmonic enhancement of |gpu|(2)ImχR(ω)gst (2)/ImχR(ω), where |gpu|(2) is the absolute square of the plasmonic enhancement from the Raman pump, χR(ω) is the Raman susceptibility, and gst is the plasmonic enhancement of the Stokes field in SE-FSRS. We conclude with a discussion on potential future experimental and theoretical directions for the field of plasmonically enhanced coherent Raman scattering.

  17. Coupled wave equations theory of surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAnally, Michael O.; McMahon, Jeffrey M.; Van Duyne, Richard P.; Schatz, George C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a coupled wave semiclassical theory to describe plasmonic enhancement effects in surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (SE-FSRS). A key result is that the plasmon enhanced fields which drive the vibrational equation of motion for each normal mode results in dispersive lineshapes in the SE-FSRS spectrum. This result, which reproduces experimental lineshapes, demonstrates that plasmon-enhanced stimulated Raman methods provide unique sensitivity to a plasmonic response. Our derived SE-FSRS theory shows a plasmonic enhancement of |gp u|2I m {" separators="χR(ω ) gst 2 }/I m {" separators="χR(ω ) }, where |gpu|2 is the absolute square of the plasmonic enhancement from the Raman pump, χR(ω) is the Raman susceptibility, and gst is the plasmonic enhancement of the Stokes field in SE-FSRS. We conclude with a discussion on potential future experimental and theoretical directions for the field of plasmonically enhanced coherent Raman scattering.

  18. Intraocular scattering compensation in retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Christaras, Dimitrios; Ginis, Harilaos; Pennos, Alexandros; Artal, Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Intraocular scattering affects fundus imaging in a similar way that affects vision; it causes a decrease in contrast which depends on both the intrinsic scattering of the eye but also on the dynamic range of the image. Consequently, in cases where the absolute intensity in the fundus image is important, scattering can lead to a wrong estimation. In this paper, a setup capable of acquiring fundus images and estimating objectively intraocular scattering was built, and the acquired images were then used for scattering compensation in fundus imaging. The method consists of two parts: first, reconstruct the individual's wide-angle Point Spread Function (PSF) at a specific wavelength to be used within an enhancement algorithm on an acquired fundus image to compensate for scattering. As a proof of concept, a single pass measurement with a scatter filter was carried out first and the complete algorithm of the PSF reconstruction and the scattering compensation was applied. The advantage of the single pass test is that one can compare the reconstructed image with the original one and see the validity, thus testing the efficiency of the method. Following the test, the algorithm was applied in actual fundus images in human eyes and the effect on the contrast of the image before and after the compensation was compared. The comparison showed that depending on the wavelength, contrast can be reduced by 8.6% under certain conditions.

  19. Intraocular scattering compensation in retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Christaras, Dimitrios; Ginis, Harilaos; Pennos, Alexandros; Artal, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Intraocular scattering affects fundus imaging in a similar way that affects vision; it causes a decrease in contrast which depends on both the intrinsic scattering of the eye but also on the dynamic range of the image. Consequently, in cases where the absolute intensity in the fundus image is important, scattering can lead to a wrong estimation. In this paper, a setup capable of acquiring fundus images and estimating objectively intraocular scattering was built, and the acquired images were then used for scattering compensation in fundus imaging. The method consists of two parts: first, reconstruct the individual’s wide-angle Point Spread Function (PSF) at a specific wavelength to be used within an enhancement algorithm on an acquired fundus image to compensate for scattering. As a proof of concept, a single pass measurement with a scatter filter was carried out first and the complete algorithm of the PSF reconstruction and the scattering compensation was applied. The advantage of the single pass test is that one can compare the reconstructed image with the original one and see the validity, thus testing the efficiency of the method. Following the test, the algorithm was applied in actual fundus images in human eyes and the effect on the contrast of the image before and after the compensation was compared. The comparison showed that depending on the wavelength, contrast can be reduced by 8.6% under certain conditions. PMID:27867710

  20. Nanostructured Ag surface fabricated by femtosecond laser for surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Chang, Han-Wei; Tsai, Yu-Chen; Cheng, Chung-Wei; Lin, Cen-Ying; Lin, Yen-Wen; Wu, Tzong-Ming

    2011-08-01

    Femtosecond laser was employed to fabricate nanostructured Ag surface for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) application. The prepared nanostructured Ag surface was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The FESEM images demonstrate the formation of nanostructure-covered femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure, also termed as ripples, on the Ag surface. The AFM images indicate that the surface roughness of the produced nanostructured Ag substrate is larger than the untreated Ag substrate. The XRD and XPS of the nanostructured Ag surface fabricated by femtosecond laser show a face centered cubic phase of metallic Ag and no impurities of Ag oxide species. The application of the produced nanostructured Ag surface in SERS was investigated by using rhodamine 6G (R6G) as a reference chemical. The SERS intensity of R6G in aqueous solution at the prepared nanostructured Ag surface is 15 times greater than that of an untreated Ag substrate. The Raman intensities vary linearly with the concentrations of R6G in the range of 10(-8)-10(-4)M. The present methodology demonstrates that the nanostructured Ag surface fabricated by femtosecond laser is potential for qualification and quantification of low concentration molecules.

  1. Raman imaging of pharmaceutical materials: refractive index effects on contrast at buried interfaces.

    PubMed

    Mecker-Pogue, Laura C; Kauffman, John F

    2015-02-01

    Resolution targets composed of bilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) devices with buried polyethylene glycol (PEG) channels have been fabricated using traditional photolithographic and micromolding techniques to develop resolution targets that mimic pharmaceutical materials. Raman chemical images of the resulting PEG-in-PDMS devices composed of varying parallel line widths were investigated by imaging the PEG lines through a thin overlayer of PDMS. Additionally, a scattering agent, Al2O3, was introduced at varying concentrations to each layer of the device to explore the effects of scattering materials on Raman images. Features in the resulting chemical images of the PEG lines suggest that reflection at the PEG/PDMS interface contributes to the Raman signal. A model based on geometric optics was developed to simulate the observed image functions of the targets. The results emphasize the influence of refractive index discontinuities at the PEG/PDMS interface on the apparent size and shape of the PEG features. Such findings have an impact on interpretation of Raman images of nonabsorbing, opaque pharmaceutical samples.

  2. Revealing silent vibration modes of nanomaterials by detecting anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jianhua; Chen, Lei; Dai, Qiaofeng; Lan, Sheng; Tie, Shaolong

    2016-01-21

    We proposed a scheme in which normal Raman scattering is coupled with hyper-Raman scattering for generating a strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering in nanomaterials by using femtosecond laser pulses. The proposal was experimentally demonstrated by using a single-layer MoS2 on a SiO2/Si substrate, a 17 nm-thick MoS2 on an Au/SiO2 substrate and a 9 nm-thick MoS2 on a SiO2-SnO2/Ag/SiO2 substrate which were confirmed to be highly efficient for second harmonic generation. A strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering was also observed in other nanomaterials possessing large second-order susceptibilities, such as silicon quantum dots self-assembled into "coffee" rings and tubular Cu-doped ZnO nanorods. In all the cases, many Raman inactive vibration modes were clearly revealed in the anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering. Apart from the strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering, Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with small Raman shifts was detected during the ablation process of thick MoS2 layers. It was also observed by slightly defocusing the excitation light. The detection of anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering may serve as a new technique for studying the Raman inactive vibration modes in nanomaterials.

  3. Stimulated low frequency Raman scattering in cupric oxide nanoparticles water suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averyushkin, A. S.; Baranov, A. N.; Bulychev, N. A.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Kudryavtseva, A. D.; Strokov, M. A.; Tcherniega, N. V.; Zemskov, K. I.

    2017-04-01

    Cupric oxide nanoparticles with average size of 213.2 nm, were synthesized in acoustoplasma discharge for investigating their vibrational properties. The low-frequency acoustic mode in cupric oxide (CuO) nanoparticles has been studied by stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering (SLFRS). SLFRS conversion efficiency, threshold and frequency shift of the scattered light are measured.

  4. A New Way to Measure Cirrus Ice Water Content by Using Ice Raman Scatter with Raman Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhien; Whiteman, David N.; Demoz, Belay; Veselovskii, Igor

    2004-01-01

    High and cold cirrus clouds mainly contain irregular ice crystals, such as, columns, hexagonal plates, bullet rosettes, and dendrites, and have different impacts on the climate system than low-level clouds, such as stratus, stratocumulus, and cumulus. The radiative effects of cirrus clouds on the current and future climate depend strongly on cirrus cloud microphysical properties including ice water content (IWC) and ice crystal sizes, which are mostly an unknown aspect of cinus clouds. Because of the natural complexity of cirrus clouds and their high locations, it is a challenging task to get them accurately by both remote sensing and in situ sampling. This study presents a new method to remotely sense cirrus microphysical properties by using ice Raman scatter with a Raman lidar. The intensity of Raman scattering is fundamentally proportional to the number of molecules involved. Therefore, ice Raman scattering signal provides a more direct way to measure IWC than other remote sensing methods. Case studies show that this method has the potential to provide essential information of cirrus microphysical properties to study cloud physical processes in cirrus clouds.

  5. Ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering flow detector using hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Negri, Pierre; Jacobs, Kevin T; Dada, Oluwatosin O; Schultz, Zachary D

    2013-11-05

    Label-free, chemical specific detection in flow is important for high throughput characterization of analytes in applications such as flow injection analysis, electrophoresis, and chromatography. We have developed a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) flow detector capable of ultrasensitive optical detection on the millisecond time scale. The device employs hydrodynamic focusing to improve SERS detection in a flow channel where a sheath flow confines analyte molecules eluted from a fused silica capillary over a planar SERS-active substrate. Increased analyte interactions with the SERS substrate significantly improve detection sensitivity. The performance of this flow detector was investigated using a combination of finite element simulations, fluorescence imaging, and Raman experiments. Computational fluid dynamics based on finite element analysis was used to optimize the flow conditions. The modeling indicates that a number of factors, such as the capillary dimensions and the ratio of the sheath flow to analyte flow rates, are critical for obtaining optimal results. Sample confinement resulting from the flow dynamics was confirmed using wide-field fluorescence imaging of rhodamine 6G (R6G). Raman experiments at different sheath flow rates showed increased sensitivity compared with the modeling predictions, suggesting increased adsorption. Using a 50 ms acquisition, a sheath flow rate of 180 μL/min, and a sample flow rate of 5 μL/min, a linear dynamic range from nanomolar to micromolar concentrations of R6G with a limit of detection (LOD) of 1 nM is observed. At low analyte concentrations, rapid analyte desorption is observed, enabling repeated and high-throughput SERS detection. The flow detector offers substantial advantages over conventional SERS-based assays such as minimal sample volumes and high detection efficiency.

  6. Quantitative, comparable coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy: correcting errors in phase retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Charles H., Jr.; Lee, Young Jong; Cicerone, Marcus T.

    2016-04-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy has demonstrated significant potential for biological and materials imaging. To date, however, the primary mechanism of disseminating CARS spectroscopic information is through pseudocolor imagery, which explicitly neglects a vast majority of the hyperspectral data. Furthermore, current paradigms in CARS spectral processing do not lend themselves to quantitative sample-to-sample comparability. The primary limitation stems from the need to accurately measure the so-called nonresonant background (NRB) that is used to extract the chemically-sensitive Raman information from the raw spectra. Measurement of the NRB on a pixel-by-pixel basis is a nontrivial task; thus, reference NRB from glass or water are typically utilized, resulting in error between the actual and estimated amplitude and phase. In this manuscript, we present a new methodology for extracting the Raman spectral features that significantly suppresses these errors through phase detrending and scaling. Classic methods of error-correction, such as baseline detrending, are demonstrated to be inaccurate and to simply mask the underlying errors. The theoretical justification is presented by re-developing the theory of phase retrieval via the Kramers-Kronig relation, and we demonstrate that these results are also applicable to maximum entropy method-based phase retrieval. This new error-correction approach is experimentally applied to glycerol spectra and tissue images, demonstrating marked consistency between spectra obtained using different NRB estimates, and between spectra obtained on different instruments. Additionally, in order to facilitate implementation of these approaches, we have made many of the tools described herein available free for download.

  7. Air stable colloidal copper nanoparticles: Synthesis, characterization and their surface-enhanced Raman scattering properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani, Thekkathu; Leon Prasanth, K.; Sreedhar, Bojja

    2016-03-01

    Air stable colloidal copper nanoparticles are synthesized by a simple chemical reduction method using octadecylsilane as a reducing agent and octadecylamine as a stabilizing agent in toluene without any inert gas. The formation of nanosized copper was confirmed by its characteristic surface plasmon absorption peaks in UV-visible spectra. The transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images show that the resulting copper nanoparticles are distributed uniformly with a narrow size distribution. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) demonstrated that the obtained copper nanoparticles are single crystalline nanoparticles. Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopic data suggested that the silane Si-H is responsible for the reduction of copper ions. And also the resulting colloidal copper nanoparticles exhibit large surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals.

  8. Selective resonance enhancement of Raman scattering intensity in photoinduced nonradiative charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairamov, B. Kh.

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports on the formation of complexes consisting of isolated free-standing crystalline semiconductor quantum dots, for example, nc-Si/SiO2, functionalized by short oligonucleotides, for example, the single-stranded system d(20G, 20T). Here, d are deoxyribonucleotides, G and T are guanine and thymine nucleotides, respectively. It has been found that these complexes are unique objects for the elucidation of the specific features in the manifestation of new quantum-size effects in biomacromolecules. It has been demonstrated that the possibility exists of detecting and recording, in such complexes of biomacromolecules, spectrally selective resonance enhancement of Raman scattering intensity in fluctuations of nucleotide molecules due to coherent nonradiative transfer of a photoexcited electron and a hole at the interface of the complex. This dynamic optical imaging of spectral responses can be of applied interest for the development of nanobiophotonic technologies.

  9. Automated identification of subcellular organelles by coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    El-Mashtoly, Samir F; Niedieker, Daniel; Petersen, Dennis; Krauss, Sascha D; Freier, Erik; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Mosig, Axel; Hahn, Stephan; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2014-05-06

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is an emerging tool for label-free characterization of living cells. Here, unsupervised multivariate analysis of CARS datasets was used to visualize the subcellular compartments. In addition, a supervised learning algorithm based on the "random forest" ensemble learning method as a classifier, was trained with CARS spectra using immunofluorescence images as a reference. The supervised classifier was then used, to our knowledge for the first time, to automatically identify lipid droplets, nucleus, nucleoli, and endoplasmic reticulum in datasets that are not used for training. These four subcellular components were simultaneously and label-free monitored instead of using several fluorescent labels. These results open new avenues for label-free time-resolved investigation of subcellular components in different cells, especially cancer cells.

  10. Effect of Energetic Electrons Produced by Raman Scattering on Hohlraum Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, D. J.; Bailey, D. S.; Doeppner, T.; Divol, L.; Harte, J. A.; Michel, P.; Thomas, C. A.

    2016-10-01

    A reduced model of laser-plasma interactions, namely crossed-beam energy transfer and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), has recently been implemented in a self-consistent or ``inline'' way in radiation-hydrodynamics codes. We extend this work to treat the energetic electrons produced by Langmuir waves (LWs) from SRS by a suprathermal, multigroup diffusion model. This gives less spatially localized heating than depositing the LW energy into the local electron fluid. We compare the resulting hard x-ray production to imaging data on the National Ignition Facility, which indicate significant emission around the laser entrance hole. We assess the effects of energetic electrons, as well as background electron heat flow, on hohlraum dynamics and capsule implosion symmetry. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Optoelectrofluidic sandwich immunoassays for detection of human tumor marker using surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyundoo; Chon, Hyangah; Choo, Jaebum; Park, Je-Kyun

    2010-09-15

    A sandwich immunoassay is a powerful tool for identifying a specific substance in a biological sample. However, its heterogeneous strategy always requires repetitive liquid handlings and long processing time. Here an optoelectrofluidic immunoassay platform for simple, fast, and automated detection of human tumor marker based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been developed. By using a conventional optoelectrofluidic device and a liquid crystal display module, simple and quantitative detection of human tumor marker, alpha-fetoprotein, in a ∼500 nL sample droplet has been automatically conducted with lower detection limit of about 0.1 ng/mL within 5 min. This study depicts the first practical application, for protein detection, of the optoelectrofluidic manipulation technology. This image-driven immunoassay platform opens a new way for simple, fast, automated, and highly sensitive detection of antigens.

  12. Microscopic Imaging and Spectroscopy with Scattered Light

    PubMed Central

    Boustany, Nada N.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Backman, Vadim

    2012-01-01

    Optical contrast based on elastic scattering interactions between light and matter can be used to probe cellular structure and dynamics, and image tissue architecture. The quantitative nature and high sensitivity of light scattering signals to subtle alterations in tissue morphology, as well as the ability to visualize unstained tissue in vivo, has recently generated significant interest in optical scatter based biosensing and imaging. Here we review the fundamental methodologies used to acquire and interpret optical scatter data. We report on recent findings in this field and present current advances in optical scatter techniques and computational methods. Cellular and tissue data enabled by current advances in optical scatter spectroscopy and imaging stand to impact a variety of biomedical applications including clinical tissue diagnosis, in vivo imaging, drug discovery and basic cell biology. PMID:20617940

  13. Simulation of stimulated Brillouin scattering and stimulated Raman scattering in shock ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, L.; Li, J.; Liu, W. D.; Yan, R.; Ren, C.

    2016-04-01

    We study stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in shock ignition by comparing fluid and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Under typical parameters for the OMEGA experiments [Theobald et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 102706 (2012)], a series of 1D fluid simulations with laser intensities ranging between 2 × 1015 and 2 × 1016 W/cm2 finds that SBS is the dominant instability, which increases significantly with the incident intensity. Strong pump depletion caused by SBS and SRS limits the transmitted intensity at the 0.17nc to be less than 3.5 × 1015 W/cm2. The PIC simulations show similar physics but with higher saturation levels for SBS and SRS convective modes and stronger pump depletion due to higher seed levels for the electromagnetic fields in PIC codes. Plasma flow profiles are found to be important in proper modeling of SBS and limiting its reflectivity in both the fluid and PIC simulations.

  14. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and spontaneous Raman spectroscopy and microscopy of microalgae with nitrogen depletion.

    PubMed

    He, X N; Allen, J; Black, P N; Baldacchini, T; Huang, X; Huang, H; Jiang, L; Lu, Y F

    2012-11-01

    Microalgae are extensively researched as potential feedstocks for biofuel production. Energy-rich compounds in microalgae, such as lipids, require efficient characterization techniques to investigate the metabolic pathways and the environmental factors influencing their accumulation. The model green alga Coccomyxa accumulates significant amounts of triacylglycerols (TAGs) under nitrogen depletion (N-depletion). To monitor the growth of TAGs (lipid) in microalgal cells, a study of microalgal cells (Coccomyxa sp. C169) using both spontaneous Raman and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy and microscopy were carried out. Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy was conducted to analyze the components in the algal cells, while CARS was carried out to monitor the distribution of lipid droplets in the cells. Raman signals of carotenoid are greater in control microalgae compared to N-depleted cells. Raman signals of lipid droplets appear after N-depletion and its distribution can be clearly observed in the CARS microscopy. Both spontaneous Raman spectroscopy and CARS microscopy were found to be suitable analysis tools for microalgae.

  15. Raman scattering test of single-wall carbon nanotube composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjiev, V. G.; Iliev, M. N.; Arepalli, S.; Nikolaev, P.; Files, B. S.

    2001-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to infer elastic properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in composites. This letter presents strain-induced frequency shift of tangential Raman active modes of SWNTs embedded in epoxy resin subjected to bending. Epoxy curing and sample extension in the tensile strength test are found to create residual strains on the SWNT ropes. We demonstrate that specimen compression in combination with the Raman microprobe technique provides a means for determining of these strains and hence load transfer effectiveness.

  16. Toward digital staining using stimulated Raman scattering and statistical machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanji, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Satoh, S.; Hashimoto, H.; Ozeki, Y.; Itoh, Kazuyoshi

    2014-03-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectral microscopy is a promising imaging method, based on vibrational spectroscopy, which can visualize biological tissues with chemical specificity. SRS spectral microscopy has been used to obtain two-dimensional spectral images of rat liver tissue, three-dimensional images of a vessel in rat liver, and in vivo spectral images of mouse ear skin. Various multivariate analysis techniques, such as principal component analysis and independent component analysis, have been used to obtain spectral images. In this study, we propose a digital staining method. This method uses SRS spectra and statistical machine learning that makes use of prior knowledge of spectral peaks and their two-dimensional distributional patterns corresponding to the composition of tissue samples. The method selects spectral peaks on the basis of Mahalanobis distance, which is defined as the ratio of inter-group variation to intragroup variation. We also make use of higher-order local autocorrelations as feature values for two-dimensional distributional patterns. This combination of techniques allows groups corresponding to different intracellular structures to be clearly discriminated in the multidimensional feature space. We investigate the performance of our method on mouse liver tissue samples and show that the proposed method can digitally stain each intracellular structure such as cell nuclei, cytoplasm, and erythrocytes separately and clearly without time-consuming chemical staining processes. We anticipate that our method could be applied to computer-aided pathological diagnosis.

  17. RAMAN SCATTERED He II {lambda}4332 IN THE SYMBIOTIC STAR V1016 CYGNI

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hee-Won

    2012-05-10

    Raman scattering of He II line photons with atomic hydrogen is important in studying the mass loss processes in many symbiotic stars and a number of young planetary nebulae. We calculate the scattering cross sections and branching ratios associated with the Raman scattered He II {lambda}4332 feature formed through inelastic scattering of He II {lambda}949 with a hydrogen atom. At the line center of He II {lambda}949, the total scattering cross section is computed to be {sigma}{sub tot} = 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -22} cm{sup 2}, and the branching ratio into the level 2s is 0.12. We also present a high-resolution spectrum of the symbiotic star V1016 Cygni obtained with the 1.8 m telescope at Mt. Bohyun to investigate the Raman scattering origin of the broad feature blueward of He II {lambda}4338. Based on the atomic calculation, we perform Monte Carlo calculations for the line formation. The scattering region is assumed to be a part of a uniform spherical shell that subtends a solid angle {Delta}{Omega} = {pi} steradian with a neutral column density N{sub HI} = 1.0 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}. By adding a far-UV continuum around He II {lambda}949 normalized by the equivalent width of He II {lambda}949 to be 2.3 Angstrom-Sign , we obtain a good fit for both the Raman scattered He II {lambda}4332 and the broad wings around H{gamma}. Our analysis of the Raman feature blueward of H{gamma} in V1016 Cyg is consistent with the previous study of the Raman features blueward of H{alpha} and H{beta} by Jung and Lee.

  18. Raman and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy studies of changes in lipid content and composition in hormone-treated breast and prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Potcoava, Mariana C.; Futia, Gregory L.; Aughenbaugh, Jessica; Schlaepfer, Isabel R.; Gibson, Emily A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Increasing interest in the role of lipids in cancer cell proliferation and resistance to drug therapies has motivated the need to develop better tools for cellular lipid analysis. Quantification of lipids in cells is typically done by destructive chromatography protocols that do not provide spatial information on lipid distribution and prevent dynamic live cell studies. Methods that allow the analysis of lipid content in live cells are therefore of great importance. Using micro-Raman spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, we generated a lipid profile for breast (T47D, MDA-MB-231) and prostate (LNCaP, PC3) cancer cells upon exposure to medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and synthetic androgen R1881. Combining Raman spectra with CARS imaging, we can study the process of hormone-mediated lipogenesis. Our results show that hormone-treated cancer cells T47D and LNCaP have an increased number and size of intracellular lipid droplets and higher degree of saturation than untreated cells. MDA-MB-231 and PC3 cancer cells showed no significant changes upon treatment. Principal component analysis with linear discriminant analysis of the Raman spectra was able to differentiate between cancer cells that were treated with MPA, R1881, and untreated. PMID:24933682

  19. Eliminating Rayleigh and Raman Scattering in Three-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectroscopy by Kriging Interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sh.; Xiao, X.; Xu, G.

    2016-11-01

    In order to effectively eliminate Rayleigh and Raman scattering, a method based on Kriging interpolation is proposed, in which both the distance and the correlation between the scattering region and the nonscattering region are considered. The experimental results show that an unbiased estimation of the scattering region is achieved by this Kriging interpolation. Compared with other interpolation methods that use only the neighboring points, the performance of this method for eliminating the scattering region is much less sensitive to the scattering range that we set.

  20. Molecular species-sensitive optical coherence tomography using coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Daniel L.; Bredfeldt, Jeremy; Hambir, Selezion; Dlott, Dana D.; Kitchell, Barbara; Gruebele, Martin; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2003-07-01

    We present our progress in developing a novel technique and instrument that images specific molecular species in biological tissues using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Standard OCT instruments measure only the scattering from structural features, such as refractive index changes. We utilize Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) Spectroscopy, a nonlinear optics technique that can selectively stimulate molecular groups, to gather compositional information from the sample. Being a coherent process, our instrument will produce interference between the nonlinear anti-Stokes signal produced in the sample and a reference molecular sample to both exclude background and nonresonant signals and range features in the tissue. Because of this, we will also gain the benefits of sensitivity that interferometry can provide. By utilizing the tunability of an optical parametric oscillator, we can address a range of molecular resonances from 1500 cm-1 to 3500 cm-1. This frequency range offers the possibility of measuring the distributions and densities of proteins, lipids, and nuclear material that we believe will be useful for determining the early presence of epithelial carcinomas. We demonstrate the principle of this imaging method by producing interference between two separately produced CARS signals from the same probe and Stokes beams.

  1. Radially polarized tip-enhanced near-field coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy for bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Er, Kenneth; Huang, Zhiwei

    2012-03-01

    CARS is meritorious in its ability to perform chemical selective imaging, but its spatial resolution is limited by the diffraction limit of light; however, this limit can be broken by combining CARS and near-field scanning microscope. In this work, we report a novel radially polarized near-field coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy (RP-NF-CARS), which uses radially polarized light as excitation to enhance the electric field enhancement under a metallic tip, and improves the signal to background ratio compared with that using linearly polarized excitations. We applied RP-NF-CARS to image nano-scale polystyrene beads and biological system.

  2. Surface enhanced Raman scattering for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrift, Will; Bhattacharjee, Arunima; Darvishzadeh-Varcheie, Mahsa; Lu, Ying; Hochbaum, Allon; Capolino, Filippo; Whiteson, Katrine; Ragan, Regina

    2015-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), a biofilm forming bacterium, commonly affects cystic fibrosis, burn victims, and immunocompromised patients. PA produces pyocyanin, an aromatic, redox active, secondary metabolite as part of its quorum sensing signaling system activated during biofilm formation. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors composed of Au nanospheres chemically assembled into clusters on diblock copolymer templates were fabricated and the ability to detect pyocyanin to monitor biofilm formation was investigated. Electromagnetic full wave simulations of clusters observed in scanning electron microcopy images show that the localized surface plasmon resonance wavelength is 696 nm for a dimer with a gap spacing of 1 nm in an average dielectric environment of the polymer and analyte; the local electric field enhancement is on the order of 400 at resonance, relative to free space. SERS data acquired at 785 nm excitation from a monolayer of benzenethiol on fabricated samples was compared with Raman data of pure benzenethiol and enhancement factors as large as 8×109 were calculated that are consistent with simulated field enhancements. Using this system, the limit of detection of pyocyanin in pure gradients was determined to be 10 parts per billion. In SERS data of the supernatant from the time dependent growth of PA shaking cultures, pyocyanin vibrational modes were clearly observable during the logarithmic growth phase corresponding to activation of genes related to biofilm formation. These results pave the way for the use of SERS sensors for the early detection of biofilm formation, leading to reduced healthcare costs and better patient outcomes.

  3. Raman Scattering at Resonant or Near-Resonant Conditions: A Generalized Short-Time Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Abdelsalam; Sun, Yu-Ping; Miao, Quan; Ågren, Hans; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the dynamics of resonant Raman scattering in the course of the frequency detuning. The dephasing in the time domain makes the scattering fast when the photon energy is tuned from the absorption resonance. This makes frequency detuning to act as a camera shutter with a regulated scattering duration and provides a practical tool of controlling the scattering time in ordinary stationary measurements. The theory is applied to resonant Raman spectra of a couple of few-mode model systems and to trans-1,3,5-hexatriene and guanine-cytosine (G-C) Watson-Crick base pairs (DNA) molecules. Besides some particular physical effects, the regime of fast scattering leads to a simplification of the spectrum as well as to the scattering theory itself. Strong overtones appear in the Raman spectra when the photon frequency is tuned in the resonant region, while in the mode of fast scattering, the overtones are gradually quenched when the photon frequency is tuned more than one vibrational quantum below the first absorption resonance. The detuning from the resonant region thus leads to a strong purification of the Raman spectrum from the contamination by higher overtones and soft modes and purifies the spectrum also in terms of avoidance of dissociation and interfering fluorescence decay of the resonant state. This makes frequency detuning a very useful practical tool in the analysis of the resonant Raman spectra of complex systems and considerably improves the prospects for using the Raman effect for detection of foreign substances at ultra-low concentrations.

  4. Intrinsic BWF-lineshape Observed by Raman Scattering in Isolated Metallic Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maultzsch, Janina; Wu, Yang; Knoesel, Ernst; Chandra, Bhupesh; Huang, Mingyuan; Sfeir, Matt; Brus, Louis; Hone, James; Heinz, Tony

    2007-03-01

    Broadened and asymmetric lineshapes for Raman scattering in the high-energy (or G) modes of metallic carbon nanotubes have been reported for many years. There remains, however, controversy about whether this behavior is an intrinsic feature of metallic nanotubes or is induced by perturbations. To address this issue, we have examined isolated metallic nanotubes suspended in air, with chiral indices determined independently by Rayleigh scattering and Raman measurements of the radial breathing mode. Our data show that strong broadening (to FWHM > 50/cm) and weak asymmetry are typical of the high-energy Raman modes, with lineshapes describable by a Breit-Wigner-Fano (BWF) form. Significant variation in peak width and Raman shift is, however, observed as a function of the nanotube chiral index. Indeed, some metallic nanotubes have lineshapes and widths that are very similar to those of semiconducting nanotubes. We will discuss the observed variation and the origin of the BWF lineshape.

  5. Enhanced Raman scattering of single nanoparticles in a high-Q whispering-gallery microresonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rui-Shan; Jin, Wei-Liang; Yu, Xiao-Chong; Liu, Yong-Chun; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2015-04-01

    We study Raman scattering of single nanoparticles coupled to a high-Q whispering-gallery microresonator. It is found that cavity resonances greatly enhance the Raman signal, and the enhancement factor is as high as 108. Unlike the noncavity case, the signal power exhibits a nonmonotonic dependence on particle size, and it reaches the maximum when the Rayleigh scattering loss and the cavity intrinsic loss are comparable. We further analyze how the Raman signal intensity is influenced by different parameters including cavity quality factors and taper-cavity coupling strength. The detection limit of observing single-nanoparticle Raman signal is discussed finally. As a potential application, this mechanism may provide an alternative way to detect specific biological targets without the need of precovered biorecognitions.

  6. Raman scattering efficiency in LiTaO3 and LiNbO3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, S.; Neufeld, S.; Rüsing, M.; Berth, G.; Zrenner, A.; Schmidt, W. G.

    2015-06-01

    LiTaO3 and LiNbO3 crystals are investigated here in a combined experimental and theoretical study that uses Raman spectroscopy in a complete set of scattering geometries and corresponding density-functional theory calculations to provide microscopic information on their vibrational properties. The Raman scattering efficiency is computed from first principles in order to univocally assign the measured Raman peaks to the calculated eigenvectors. Measured and calculated Raman spectra are shown to be in qualitative agreement and confirm the mode assignment by Margueron et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 111, 104105 (2012), 10.1063/1.4716001], thus finally settling a long debate. While the two crystals show rather similar vibrational properties overall, the E-TO9 mode is markedly different in the two oxides. The deviations are explained by a different anion-cation bond type in LiTaO3 and LiNbO3 crystals.

  7. Layer filtering for seafloor scatterers imaging.

    PubMed

    Pinson, S; Holland, C W

    2015-05-01

    The image source method in acoustics is well known to simulate reverberation. It has also been recently used for characterization of seafloor sound-speed structure. The idea is to detect image sources by imaging techniques to obtain information about the environment. In this paper, the idea is to use the detection of image sources to remove reflections from plane interfaces in recorded signals and perform imaging with this filtered signal. This imaging process highlights scatterers because their wave front shapes are different than those from plane interfaces. Applications can be in seafloor buried object detection or scattering analysis from interface roughnesses or volume heterogeneities.

  8. Macrophages interaction with pulmonary surfactant using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo, Minette; Telesford, Dana Marie; Allen, Heather

    2012-04-01

    Alveolar pulmonary surfactant, composed mostly of phospholipids, is essential for maintenance of normal lung function. However, increased production of lung surfactant can lead to many pulmonary inflammatory disorders. Alveolar macrophages are responsible for the degradation of the surfactant and exhibit increased lipid uptake in inflamated lungs. Owing to their limited clearance capability, excessive accumulation of surfactant may impair their phagocytic function. In this study, the interaction of the macrophages with different lipid components was studied using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. CARS microscopy, a nonlinear vibrational technique which combines spectroscopy and microscopy, allows noninvasive characterization and imaging of chemical species without preparation or labeling. A monolayer of THP-1 macrophages and palmitic acid-d31 on phosphate buffer solution was transferred to a coverslip using the Langmuir-Blodgett method and then imaged using CARS by mapping the CH2 stretch signal of the lipid membrane of the macrophage and C-D stretch signal from palmitic acid-d31. Preliminary results showed CARS images of the macrophage on the solid substrate and thermal degradation of the sample due to long exposure to high laser power. A contrast image is expected to be observed by mapping the CH2 and C-D signals, which can show the lipid interaction and phagocytosis of the macrophage.

  9. Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy for Evaluation of Head and Neck Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hoesli, Rebecca C; Orringer, Daniel A; McHugh, Jonathan B; Spector, Matthew E

    2017-04-01

    Objective We aim to describe a novel, label-free, real-time imaging technique, coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy, for histopathological evaluation of head and neck cancer. We evaluated the ability of CRS microscopy to delineate between tumor and nonneoplastic tissue in tissue samples from patients with head and neck cancer. Study Design Prospective case series. Setting Tertiary care medical center. Subjects and Methods Patients eligible were surgical candidates with biopsy-proven, previously untreated head and neck carcinoma and were consented preoperatively for participation in this study. Tissue was collected from 50 patients, and after confirmation of tumor and normal specimens by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), there were 42 tumor samples and 42 normal adjacent controls. Results There were 42 confirmed carcinoma specimens on H&E, and CRS microscopy identified 37 as carcinoma. Of the 42 normal specimens, CRS microscopy identified 40 as normal. This resulted in a sensitivity of 88.1% and specificity of 95.2% in distinguishing between neoplastic and nonneoplastic images. Conclusion CRS microscopy is a unique label-free imaging technique that can provide rapid, high-resolution images and can accurately determine the presence of head and neck carcinoma. This holds potential for implementation into standard practice, allowing frozen margin evaluation even at institutions without a histopathology laboratory.

  10. Electroless Gold-Modified Diatoms as Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Supports.

    PubMed

    Pannico, Marianna; Rea, Ilaria; Chandrasekaran, Soundarrajan; Musto, Pellegrino; Voelcker, Nicolas H; De Stefano, Luca

    2016-12-01

    Porous biosilica from diatom frustules is well known for its peculiar optical and mechanical properties. In this work, gold-coated diatom frustules are used as low-cost, ready available, functional support for surface-enhanced Raman scattering. Due to the morphology of the nanostructured surface and the smoothness of gold deposition via an electroless process, an enhancement factor for the p-mercaptoaniline Raman signal of the order of 10(5) is obtained.

  11. Electroless Gold-Modified Diatoms as Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannico, Marianna; Rea, Ilaria; Chandrasekaran, Soundarrajan; Musto, Pellegrino; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; De Stefano, Luca

    2016-06-01

    Porous biosilica from diatom frustules is well known for its peculiar optical and mechanical properties. In this work, gold-coated diatom frustules are used as low-cost, ready available, functional support for surface-enhanced Raman scattering. Due to the morphology of the nanostructured surface and the smoothness of gold deposition via an electroless process, an enhancement factor for the p-mercaptoaniline Raman signal of the order of 105 is obtained.

  12. A needle probe to detect surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) within solid specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Srismrita; Hou, Hsuan-Chao; Biswas, Debsmita; Maulik, Subhodip; Daniels-Race, Theda; Lopez, Mandi; Mathis, Michael; Feldman, Martin

    2017-02-01

    A needle probe has been developed to obtain surface enhanced Raman scattering data from within a solid specimen located remotely from the spectrometer. It produces the high signal strength of a single mode optical fiber but with a negligible fiber induced background. The observed Raman signal strength is comparable to that obtained with a microscope objective of the same numerical aperture in a conventional spectrometer arrangement and many times larger than that of probes using two fibers.

  13. Dual Raman-Brillouin microscope for chemical and mechanical characterization and imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2016-03-01

    We present a unique confocal microscope capable of measuring the Raman and Brillouin spectra simultaneously from a single spatial location. Raman and Brillouin scattering offer complementary information about a material's chemical and mechanical structure, respectively, and concurrent monitoring of both of these spectra would set a new standard for material characterization. We achieve this by applying recent innovations in Brillouin spectroscopy that reduce the necessary acquisition times to durations comparable to conventional Raman spectroscopy while attaining a high level of spectral accuracy. To demonstrate the potential of the system, we apply this system for imaging melanoma, arteriosclerotic plaque, embryonic development, bones and biomaterials. The developed instrument has the potential for very diverse analytical applications in basic biomedical science and biomedical diagnostics and imaging.

  14. Biophotonics of skin: method for correction of deep Raman spectra distorted by elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, Blandine; Koenig, Anne; Perraut, François; Piot, Olivier; Gobinet, Cyril; Manfait, Michel; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2015-03-01

    Confocal Raman microspectroscopy allows in-depth molecular and conformational characterization of biological tissues non-invasively. Unfortunately, spectral distortions occur due to elastic scattering. Our objective is to correct the attenuation of in-depth Raman peaks intensity by considering this phenomenon, enabling thus quantitative diagnosis. In this purpose, we developed PDMS phantoms mimicking skin optical properties used as tools for instrument calibration and data processing method validation. An optical system based on a fibers bundle has been previously developed for in vivo skin characterization with Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS). Used on our phantoms, this technique allows checking their optical properties: the targeted ones were retrieved. Raman microspectroscopy was performed using a commercial confocal microscope. Depth profiles were constructed from integrated intensity of some specific PDMS Raman vibrations. Acquired on monolayer phantoms, they display a decline which is increasing with the scattering coefficient. Furthermore, when acquiring Raman spectra on multilayered phantoms, the signal attenuation through each single layer is directly dependent on its own scattering property. Therefore, determining the optical properties of any biological sample, obtained with DRS for example, is crucial to correct properly Raman depth profiles. A model, inspired from S.L. Jacques's expression for Confocal Reflectance Microscopy and modified at some points, is proposed and tested to fit the depth profiles obtained on the phantoms as function of the reduced scattering coefficient. Consequently, once the optical properties of a biological sample are known, the intensity of deep Raman spectra distorted by elastic scattering can be corrected with our reliable model, permitting thus to consider quantitative studies for purposes of characterization or diagnosis.

  15. Stimulated Raman scattering in the presence of suprathermal ion acoustic fluctuations in inhomogeneous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, H. C.; Boyd, T. J. M.; Lukyanov, A. V.

    2000-03-01

    In this report a complex Raman scattering event against a background of nonthermal ion coustic waves in an inhomogenous plasma is considered. The complex Raman process is a five-wave interaction in which three-wave stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is accompanied by the decay of the Raman Langmuir wave into either a second Langmuir wave (LD) or a second scattered light wave (ED) and an ion acoustic wave. An extension of Stokes’ theory is used to obtain expressions for the gain in the Raman Langmuir and scattered waves. It is shown that only very modest levels of ion waves are needed to produce duce a significant effect on the net Raman convective gain which proves to be sensitive to the source levels of the amplifying waves. For LD the gain from the Raman Langmuir wave source is suppressed while that from the secondary Langmuir wave is enhanced such that the net gain is increased or decreased depending on which of the two sources is greater. When the source levels of both Langmuir waves are at thermal levels, opposing effects mean no net change in the gain factor irrespective of the ion acoustic wave amplitude. For ED the gain is invariably suppressed for any source distributions. Two possible regimes of an enhanced effect have been identified: exact sidescattering for ED and the supersonic point vicinity for LD(ED). The theory thus provides a possible explanation for a variety of the observed effects in the interplay between SRS and stimulated Brillouin scattering, both of concern in laser fusion schemes.

  16. Multi-wavelength Raman scattering of nanostructured Al-doped zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, V.; Ghidelli, M.; Gondoni, P.

    2014-02-21

    In this work we present a detailed Raman scattering investigation of zinc oxide and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films characterized by a variety of nanoscale structures and morphologies and synthesized by pulsed laser deposition under different oxygen pressure conditions. The comparison of Raman spectra for pure ZnO and AZO films with similar morphology at the nano/mesoscale allows to investigate the relation between Raman features (peak or band positions, width, relative intensity) and material properties such as local structural order, stoichiometry, and doping. Moreover Raman measurements with three different excitation lines (532, 457, and 325 nm) point out a strong correlation between vibrational and electronic properties. This observation confirms the relevance of a multi-wavelength Raman investigation to obtain a complete structural characterization of advanced doped oxide materials.

  17. Orthorhombic boron oxide under pressure: In situ study by X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherednichenko, Kirill A.; Le Godec, Yann; Kalinko, Aleksandr; Mezouar, Mohamed; Solozhenko, Vladimir L.

    2016-11-01

    High-pressure phase of boron oxide, orthorhombic β-B2O3, has been studied in situ by synchrotron X-ray diffraction to 22 GPa and Raman scattering to 46 GPa at room temperature. The bulk modulus of β-B2O3 has been found to be 169(3) GPa that is in good agreement with our ab initio calculations. Raman and IR spectra of β-B2O3 have been measured at ambient pressure; all experimentally observed bands have been attributed to the theoretically calculated ones, and the mode assignment has been performed. Based on the data on Raman shift as a function of pressure, combined with equation-of-state data, the Grüneisen parameters of all experimentally observed Raman bands have been calculated. β-B2O3 enriched by 10B isotope has been synthesized, and the effect of boron isotopic substitution on Raman spectra has been studied.

  18. Directional Raman scattering from single molecules in the feed gaps of optical antennas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongxing; Zhu, Wenqi; Best, Michael D; Camden, Jon P; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2013-05-08

    Controlling light from single emitters is an overarching theme of nano-optics. Antennas are routinely used to modify the angular emission patterns of radio wave sources. "Optical antennas" translate these principles to visible and infrared wavelengths and have been recently used to modify fluorescence from single quantum dots and single molecules. Understanding the properties of single molecules, however, would be advanced were one able to observe their vibrational spectra through Raman scattering in a very reproducible manner but it is a hugely challenging task, as Raman scattering cross sections are very weak. Here we measure for the first time the highly directional emission patterns of Raman scattering from single molecules in the feed gaps of optical antennas fabricated on a chip. More than a thousand single molecule events are observed, revealing that an unprecedented near-unity fraction of optical antennas have single molecule sensitivity.

  19. The effects of Raman scattering accompanied by the soliton excitation occurring in molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, X. F.

    2001-06-01

    A theoretical research is made for the effects of Raman scattering caused by the soliton excitation occurring in the organic molecular crystals, e.g., acetanilide, on the basis of vibration model of amide-I. The energy gap between the soliton state and the vibron state have been found by partial diagonalized method in second quantized representation, which is 18.1-33 cm -1. This result is approximately consistent with the red shift value obtained from the experiments, 16 cm -1. The differential cross-section of the Raman scattering, arising from the soliton excitation, has also been obtained. Finally, we derive some properties of the Raman scattering in such a case. This result establishes spectral signatures of the soliton in the molecular crystals, which may be observed in the experiment.

  20. Resonance Raman Spectra of Hemoglobin and Cytochrome c: Inverse Polarization and Vibronic Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Spiro, Thomas G.; Strekas, Thomas C.

    1972-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of hemoglobin and cytochrome c in dilute solution contain prominent bands that exhibit inverse polarization, i.e., the polarization vector of the incident radiation is rotated through 90° for 90° scattering, giving infinite depolarization ratios. This phenomenon is shown to require an antisymmetric molecular-scattering tensor. The antisymmetry, which is characteristic of resonance scattering, is associated with the form of a particular class of vibrations, A20, of the tetragonal heme chromophores. The dependence of the resonance Raman spectra on the wavelength of the exciting radiation, as well as their polarization properties, demonstrates that the prominent bands correspond to vibronically active modes of the first electronic transition of the heme proteins, and provide confirmation of Albrecht's vibronic theory of Raman intensities. PMID:4506783

  1. NONLINEAR OPTICS: Stimulated resonant hyper-Raman scattering of light by polaritons in alkali metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galaĭchuk, Yu A.; Yashkir, Yu N.

    1989-12-01

    A theory is developed for the calculation of the gain g due to stimulated resonant hyper-Raman scattering of light by polaritons in gaseous media. It is shown that throughout the tuning range of the pump frequency (including one- and two-photon resonances) a maximum of g corresponds to a dispersion curve of polaritons plotted ignoring attenuation. Theoretical results are used to analyze characteristics of hyper-Raman scattering in sodium vapor. It is shown that under normal experimental conditions the splitting of polariton branches is considerable (amounting to tens of reciprocal centimeters on the frequency scale and several angular degrees). The value of g is estimated for two-photon resonances in the case when the pump frequency is tunable in a wide range. The optimal conditions for stimulated hyper-Raman scattering are identified.

  2. Preliminary micro-Raman images of normal and malignant human skin cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Michael A.; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David I.; Zeng, Haishan; Chen, Michael X.

    2006-02-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy covering a frequency range from 200 to 4000 cm -1 was used to image human skin melanocytes and keratinocytes with a spatial resolution of 0.5 μm. The cells were either cultivated on glass microscope slides or were located within thin sections of skin biopsies mounted on low fluorescence BaF II. A commercially available system was used to obtain the spectra utilizing a x100 long working distance objective with a numerical aperture of 0.8, and a cooled CCD. Both 633 and 515 nm excitations were tried, although the latter proved to be more effcient at producing Raman emission mostly due to the 1/λ 4 dependence in light scattering. Fluorescence emission from the cells was surprisingly low. The excitation power at the sample was kept below about 2 mW to avoid damaging the cells; this was the limiting factor on how quickly a Raman image could be obtained. Despite this diffculty we were able to obtain Raman images with rich information about the spectroscopic and structural features within the cytoplasm and cell nuclei. Differences were observed between the Raman images of normal and malignant cells. Spectra from purified DNA, RNA, lipids, proteins and melanin were obtained and these spectra were compared with the skin cell spectra with the aim of understanding how they are distributed over a cell and how the distribution changes between different cells.

  3. Enhanced Raman scattering of graphene by silver nanoparticles with different densities and locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hai-Bin; Fu, Can; Xia, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Chong-Wu; Du, Jiang-Hui; Yang, Wen-Chao; Guo, Peng-Fei; Xu, Jun-Qi; Wang, Chun-Lei; Jia, Yong-Lei; Liu, Jiang-Feng

    2017-02-01

    Graphene–metal nanoparticle heterojunctions greatly improve the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by strong light–graphene interactions. In this work, to enhance the Raman scattering, Ag nanoparticles (NPs) underneath and on top of the graphene were used. Then, Raman scattering of graphene is significantly enhanced approximately 67-fold, and the enhancement factor of the graphene G peak increases with the Ag NP density at the same location. In addition, an obvious red-shift and broadening of the resonance peak of Ag NPs is presented, which may be correlated to the strength of Raman enhancement, the coupling of the deposited Ag NPs and the graphene. Further, graphene–Ag NP heterojunctions can be used as SERS substrates to obtain the strongest Raman signals of the rhodamine (R6G) molecules and the weakest photoluminescence (PL) background from the Ag NPs. Based on the tunable Raman enhancement, graphene–Ag NPs offer a promising platform for engineering SERS substrates to obtain highly sensitive detection of trace levels of analyte molecules.

  4. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of aged graphene: Effects of annealing in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yingying; Li Aizhi; Qu Shiliang; Ni Zhenhua; Zafar, Zainab; Qiu Teng; Zhang Yan; Ni Zhonghua; Yu Ting; Shen Zexiang

    2011-12-05

    In this paper, we report a simple method to recover the surface enhanced Raman scattering activity of aged graphene. The Raman signals of Rhodamine molecules absorbed on aged graphene are dramatically increased after vacuum annealing and comparable to those on fresh graphene. Atomic force microscopy measurements indicate that residues on aged graphene surface can efficiently be removed by vacuum annealing, which makes target molecule closely contact with graphene. We also find that the hole doping in graphene will facilitate charge transfer between graphene and molecule. These results confirm the strong Raman enhancement of target molecule absorbed on graphene is due to the charge transfer mechanism.

  5. Polarized multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering using a picosecond laser and a fiber supercontinuum.

    PubMed

    Michel, Sébastien; Courjaud, Antoine; Mottay, Eric; Finot, Christophe; Dudley, John; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-02-01

    We perform multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) micro-spectroscopy with a picosecond pulsed laser and a broadband supercontinuum (SC) generated in photonic crystal fiber. CARS signal stability is achieved using an active fiber coupler that avoids thermal and mechanical drifts. We obtain multiplex CARS spectra for test liquids in the 600-2000 cm(-1) spectral range. In addition we investigate the polarization dependence of the CARS spectra when rotating the pump beam linear polarization state relative to the linearly polarized broad stokes SC. From these polarization measurements we deduce the Raman depolarization ratio, the resonant versus nonresonant contribution, the Raman resonance frequency, and the linewidth.

  6. Transverse chemical interface detection with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brustlein, Sophie; Gachet, David; Billard, Franck; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-08-01

    Transverse ``chemical'' interfaces are revealed with a conventional two beam narrowband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy setup in a collinear configuration. The exciting ``pump'' and ``Stokes'' beams are focused on the sample in two opposite directions. The subtraction of the two generated anti-Stokes signals gives rise to a signal that is directly proportional to the pure Raman spectrum of the resonant medium. This property is used to highlight an interface between glass and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and recover the pure Raman spectrum of DMF around its 1408 cm-1 vibrational band.

  7. Polarized multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering using a picosecond laser and a fiber supercontinuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Sébastien; Courjaud, Antoine; Mottay, Eric; Finot, Christophe; Dudley, John; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-02-01

    We perform multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) micro-spectroscopy with a picosecond pulsed laser and a broadband supercontinuum (SC) generated in photonic crystal fiber. CARS signal stability is achieved using an active fiber coupler that avoids thermal and mechanical drifts. We obtain multiplex CARS spectra for test liquids in the 600-2000 cm-1 spectral range. In addition we investigate the polarization dependence of the CARS spectra when rotating the pump beam linear polarization state relative to the linearly polarized broad stokes SC. From these polarization measurements we deduce the Raman depolarization ratio, the resonant versus nonresonant contribution, the Raman resonance frequency, and the linewidth.

  8. Enhancement of electric field and Raman scattering by Ag coated Ni nanotips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dexian; Mutisya, Stephen; Bertino, Massimo

    2011-08-01

    Localization and enhancement of electric field by Ag-coated vertical Ni nanotip arrays were studied by using finite-different time domain calculations. With the 30 nm thick Ag coating, the nanotips can localize and enhance the electric field to more than 103 times under the excitation of TE-polarized light with a 532 nm wavelength. Nanotip-enhanced Raman scattering of cytochrome-c protein was demonstrated in a confocal Raman microscope. Significant enhancement of Raman spectrum was achieved at 1 × 10-9 mol/l concentration of the proteins.

  9. High-sensitivity pesticide detection using particle-enhanced resonant Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Bikas; Saito, Yuika; Verma, Prabhat

    2016-03-01

    The use of pesticides in agriculture has raised concerns, as even a small residual of pesticide on food can be harmful. It is therefore of great importance to develop a robust technique to detect tiny amounts of pesticides. Although Raman spectroscopy is frequently used for chemical identification, it is not suitable for extremely low molecular concentrations. We propose a technique called particle-enhanced resonant Raman spectroscopy to detect extremely low concentrations of pesticides, where gold nanoparticles of desired plasmonic resonance are synthesized to match the resonance in Raman scattering. We successfully demonstrated the detection of extremely low amounts of pesticides on oranges.

  10. Scattered Radiation Emission Imaging: Principles and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, M. K.; Truong, T. T.; Morvidone, M.; Zaidi, H.

    2011-01-01

    Imaging processes built on the Compton scattering effect have been under continuing investigation since it was first suggested in the 50s. However, despite many innovative contributions, there are still formidable theoretical and technical challenges to overcome. In this paper, we review the state-of-the-art principles of the so-called scattered radiation emission imaging. Basically, it consists of using the cleverly collected scattered radiation from a radiating object to reconstruct its inner structure. Image formation is based on the mathematical concept of compounded conical projection. It entails a Radon transform defined on circular cone surfaces in order to express the scattered radiation flux density on a detecting pixel. We discuss in particular invertible cases of such conical Radon transforms which form a mathematical basis for image reconstruction methods. Numerical simulations performed in two and three space dimensions speak in favor of the viability of this imaging principle and its potential applications in various fields. PMID:21747823

  11. Temperature dependent Raman scattering in YCrO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Mall, A. K. Sharma, Y.; Mukherjee, S.; Garg, A.; Gupta, R.

    2014-04-24

    High quality polycrystalline YCrO{sub 3} samples were synthesized using solid-state-reaction method. The samples were subsequently characterized using X-ray diffraction and magnetometry. Further, temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy over a spectral range from 100 to 800 cm{sup −1} was used to examine the variation of phonons as a function of temperature from 90 to 300 K. In the low temperature ferroelectric phase of YCrO{sub 3}, the observed phonon spectra showed softening of some Raman modes below the magnetic ordering temperature (T{sub N} ∼ 142K), suggesting a coupling between the spin and phonon degrees of freedom.

  12. Lowering of stimulated Raman scattering threshold as a result of light capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Negriyko, A. M.; Orlovich, V. A.; Sverbil, P. P.; Tcherniega, N. V.; Vodchits, A. I.; Voinov, Y. P.; Zlobina, L. I.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated Raman Scattering in globular photonic crystals and globular photonic glasses at different diameters of globules (250 - 400 nm) with embedded molecular liquids is studied under excitation by nanosecond or picoseconds laser pulses. Substantial decrease of Stimulated Raman Scattering threshold was observed. Such phenomenon was explained as the result of laser radiation field increase in globular photonic structures due to photonic density of states enhancement near the edges of photonic stop bands of photonic crystals and due to Mie resonance or whispering gallery modes effect revealing in photonic glasses. Stimulated Raman Scattering threshold lowering as a result of light capture in globular photonic crystals and photonic glasses opens the way to new efficient laser sources created on the base of composite globular photonic structures. Experimental data on spectra of Stimulated Raman Scattering in light and heavy waters are presented. As sources of exciting light the powerful ultra short solid state laser pulses with 532.0 nm wavelength and giant pulses of Ruby laser (694.3 nm) have been used. Several Stokes and anti-Stokes satellites were observed. Libration modes have been excited and resulted in some additional Raman bands at low frequency region and also as combining tones.

  13. Learning-based imaging through scattering media.

    PubMed

    Horisaki, Ryoichi; Takagi, Ryosuke; Tanida, Jun

    2016-06-27

    We present a machine-learning-based method for single-shot imaging through scattering media. The inverse scattering process was calculated based on a nonlinear regression algorithm by learning a number of training object-speckle pairs. In the experimental demonstration, multilayer phase objects between scattering plates were reconstructed from intensity measurements. Our approach enables model-free sensing, where it is not necessary to know the sensing processes/models.

  14. Note: A portable Raman analyzer for microfluidic chips based on a dichroic beam splitter for integration of imaging and signal collection light paths

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Yijia; Xu, Shuping; Xu, Weiqing; Chen, Lei; Chen, Gang; Bi, Wenbin; Cui, Haining

    2015-05-15

    An integrated and portable Raman analyzer featuring an inverted probe fixed on a motor-driving adjustable optical module was designed for the combination of a microfluidic system. It possesses a micro-imaging function. The inverted configuration is advantageous to locate and focus microfluidic channels. Different from commercial micro-imaging Raman spectrometers using manual switchable light path, this analyzer adopts a dichroic beam splitter for both imaging and signal collection light paths, which avoids movable parts and improves the integration and stability of optics. Combined with surface-enhanced Raman scattering technique, this portable Raman micro-analyzer is promising as a powerful tool for microfluidic analytics.

  15. Quantum Mechanical Description of Raman Scattering from Molecules in Plasmonic Cavities.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Mikolaj K; Esteban, Ruben; González-Tudela, Alejandro; Giedke, Geza; Aizpurua, Javier

    2016-06-28

    Plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering can push single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy beyond a regime addressable by classical electrodynamics. We employ a quantum electrodynamics (QED) description of the coherent interaction of plasmons and molecular vibrations that reveal the emergence of nonlinearities in the inelastic response of the system. For realistic situations, we predict the onset of phonon-stimulated Raman scattering and a counterintuitive dependence of the anti-Stokes emission on the frequency of excitation. We further show that this QED framework opens a venue to analyze the correlations of photons emitted from a plasmonic cavity.

  16. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering from methylviologen at a silver electrode: Evidence for two distinct adsorption interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Qiao; Yue, W.; Cotton, T.M. )

    1990-03-08

    The electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectra of methylviologen radical cation (MV{sup {sm bullet}+}) and fully reduced methylviologen (MV{sup 0}) have been characterized. The enhancement of Raman and resonance Raman (RR) scattering from the dication and its reduction products at polished and roughened silver electrodes was also investigated.

  17. Asphaltene detection using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS).

    PubMed

    Alabi, O O; Edilbi, A N F; Brolly, C; Muirhead, D; Parnell, J; Stacey, R; Bowden, S A

    2015-04-28

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy using a gold substrate and excitation at 514 nm can detect sub parts per million quantities of asphaltene and thereby petroleum. This simple format and sensitivity make it transformative for applications including sample triage, flow assurance, environmental protection and analysis of unique one of a kind materials.

  18. Raman scattering evidence of hydrohalite formation on frozen yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Okotrub, K A; Surovtsev, N V

    2013-02-01

    We studied yeast cells in physiological solution during freezing by Raman microspectroscopy technique. The purpose was to find out the origin of a sharp peak near ∼3430cm(-1) in Raman spectrum of frozen mammalian cells, observed earlier (J. Dong et al., Biophys. J. 99 (2010) 2453), which presumably could be used as an indicator of intracellar ice appearance. We have shown that this line (actually doublet of 3408 and 3425cm(-1)) corresponds to Raman spectrum of hydrohalite (NaCl⋅2H(2)O), which is formed as the result of the eutectic crystallization of the liquid solution around the cells. We also show that the spatial distribution of hydrohalite in the sample significantly depends on the cooling rate. At lower cooling rate (1°C/min), products of eutectic crystallization form layer on the cell surface which thickness varies for different cells and can reach ∼1μm in thickness. At higher cooling rate (20°C/min), the hydrohalite distribution appears more homogeneous, in the sample, and the eutectic crystallization layer around the cells was estimated to be less than ∼20nm. These experimental results are consistent with scenarios predicted by the two-factor hypothesis for freezing induced cell injury. This work demonstrates a potential of Raman microspectroscopy to study peculiarities of the eutectic crystallization around single cells in vivo with the high spatial resolution.

  19. Effect of laser beam filamentation on coexisting stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R. P.; Vyas, Ashish; Kishor Singh, Ram

    2013-10-15

    This paper presents the study of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) when both of these processes are coexisting and pump laser beam initial power is more than filamentation threshold. On account of the ponderomotive nonlinearity, the pump laser beam gets filamented, and both the scattering processes (SRS and SBS) get affected. Simultaneous presence of SRS and SBS (five wave interaction case) also affect the pump filamentation process due to pump depletion. Both the scattering processes (SRS and SBS) are enhanced due to filamentation of laser beam. Results are also compared with the three wave interaction case (either SRS or SBS) with and without filamentation.

  20. Multifocus optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using stimulated Raman scattering and chromatic aberration.

    PubMed

    Hajireza, Parsin; Forbrich, Alexander; Zemp, Roger J

    2013-08-01

    In this Letter, multifocus optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy is demonstrated using wavelength tuning and chromatic aberration for depth scanning. Discrete focal zones at several depth locations were created by refocusing light from a polarization-maintaining single-mode fiber pumped by a nanosecond fiber laser. The fiber and laser parameters were chosen to take advantage of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in the fiber to create a multiwavelength output that could then be bandpass filtered. The collimator lens and objective lens are chosen to take advantage of chromatic aberration in which each generated SRS wavelength peak focuses at a slightly different depth. The maximum amplitude of photoacoustic signals is mapped to form C-scan images. Additionally, all wavelength peaks fired simultaneously offers improved depth-of-field structural imaging at the cost of slight degradation of mainlobe-to-sidelobe ratios. Wavelength-tuned depth scanning over more than 440 μm is demonstrated, significantly greater than the ~100 μm depth of field predicted from our focused Gaussian beams. The improved depth of focus could be valuable for structural imaging of microvascular morphology without the need for mechanical scanning in the depth direction.

  1. In Vivo Chemical and Structural Analysis of Plant Cuticular Waxes Using Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Jessica C.; Perfect, Sarah; Seymour, Mark; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Love, John; Moger, Julian

    2015-01-01

    The cuticle is a ubiquitous, predominantly waxy layer on the aerial parts of higher plants that fulfils a number of essential physiological roles, including regulating evapotranspiration, light reflection, and heat tolerance, control of development, and providing an essential barrier between the organism and environmental agents such as chemicals or some pathogens. The structure and composition of the cuticle are closely associated but are typically investigated separately using a combination of structural imaging and biochemical analysis of extracted waxes. Recently, techniques that combine stain-free imaging and biochemical analysis, including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy microscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy microscopy, have been used to investigate the cuticle, but the detection sensitivity is severely limited by the background signals from plant pigments. We present a new method for label-free, in vivo structural and biochemical analysis of plant cuticles based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy. As a proof of principle, we used SRS microscopy to analyze the cuticles from a variety of plants at different times in development. We demonstrate that the SRS virtually eliminates the background interference compared with coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy imaging and results in label-free, chemically specific confocal images of cuticle architecture with simultaneous characterization of cuticle composition. This innovative use of the SRS spectroscopy may find applications in agrochemical research and development or in studies of wax deposition during leaf development and, as such, represents an important step in the study of higher plant cuticles. PMID:25783412

  2. Two-Dimensional Heterostructure as a Platform for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yang; Ma, Linan; Gao, Zhibin; Chen, Ming; Chen, Feng

    2017-03-30

    Raman enhancement on a flat nonmetallic surface has attracted increasing attention, ever since the discovery of graphene enhanced Raman scattering. Recently, diverse two-dimensional layered materials have been applied as a flat surface for the Raman enhancement, attributed to different mechanisms. Looking beyond these isolated materials, atomic layers can be reassembled to design a heterostructure stacked layer by layer with an arbitrary chosen sequence, which allows the flow of charge carriers between neighboring layers and offers novel functionalities. Here, we demonstrate the heterostructure as a novel Raman enhancement platform. The WSe2 (W) monolayer and graphene (G) were stacked together to form a heterostructure with an area of 10 mm × 10 mm. Heterostructures with different stacked structuress are used as platforms for the enhanced Raman scattering, including G/W, W/G, G/W/G/W, and W/G/G/W. On the surface of the heterostructure, the intensity of the Raman scattering is much stronger compared with isolated layers, using the copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecule as a probe. It is found that the Raman enhancement effect on heterostructures depends on stacked methods. Phonon modes of CuPc have the strongest enhancement on G/W. W/G and W/G/G/W have a stronger enhancement than that on the isolated WSe2 monolayer, while lower than the graphene monolayer. The G/W/G/W/substrate demonstrated a comparable Raman enhancement effect than the G/W/substrate. These differences are due to the different interlayer couplings in heterostructures related to electron transition probability rates, which are further proved by first-principle calculations and probe-pump measurements.

  3. Time-lapse Raman imaging of osteoblast differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Aya; Yamaguchi, Yoshinori; Chiu, Liang-Da; Morimoto, Chiaki; Fujita, Katsumasa; Takedachi, Masahide; Kawata, Satoshi; Murakami, Shinya; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2015-07-01

    Osteoblastic mineralization occurs during the early stages of bone formation. During this mineralization, hydroxyapatite (HA), a major component of bone, is synthesized, generating hard tissue. Many of the mechanisms driving biomineralization remain unclear because the traditional biochemical assays used to investigate them are destructive techniques incompatible with viable cells. To determine the temporal changes in mineralization-related biomolecules at mineralization spots, we performed time-lapse Raman imaging of mouse osteoblasts at a subcellular resolution throughout the mineralization process. Raman imaging enabled us to analyze the dynamics of the related biomolecules at mineralization spots throughout the entire process of mineralization. Here, we stimulated KUSA-A1 cells to differentiate into osteoblasts and conducted time-lapse Raman imaging on them every 4 hours for 24 hours, beginning 5 days after the stimulation. The HA and cytochrome c Raman bands were used as markers for osteoblastic mineralization and apoptosis. From the Raman images successfully acquired throughout the mineralization process, we found that β-carotene acts as a biomarker that indicates the initiation of osteoblastic mineralization. A fluctuation of cytochrome c concentration, which indicates cell apoptosis, was also observed during mineralization. We expect time-lapse Raman imaging to help us to further elucidate osteoblastic mineralization mechanisms that have previously been unobservable.

  4. Resonant Raman scattering theory for Kitaev models and their Majorana fermion boundary modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perreault, Brent; Knolle, Johannes; Perkins, Natalia B.; Burnell, F. J.

    2016-09-01

    We study the inelastic light scattering response in two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Kitaev spin-liquid models with Majorana spinon band structures in the symmetry classes BDI and D leading to protected gapless surface modes. We present a detailed calculation of the resonant Raman/Brillouin scattering vertex relevant to iridate and ruthenate compounds whose low-energy physics is believed to be proximate to these spin-liquid phases. In the symmetry class BDI, we find that while the resonant scattering on thin films can detect the gapless boundary modes of spin liquids, the nonresonant processes do not couple to them. For the symmetry class D, however, we find that the coupling between both types of light-scattering processes and the low-energy surface states is strongly suppressed. Additionally, we describe the effect of weak time-reversal symmetry breaking perturbations on the bulk Raman response of these systems.

  5. Surface-Enhanced Raman and Surface-Enhanced Hyper-Raman Scattering of Thiol-Functionalized Carotene

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A thiol-modified carotene, 7′-apo-7′-(4-mercaptomethylphenyl)-β-carotene, was used to obtain nonresonant surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of carotene at an excitation wavelength of 1064 nm, which were compared with resonant SERS spectra at an excitation wavelength of 532 nm. These spectra and surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering (SEHRS) spectra of the functionalized carotene were compared with the spectra of nonmodified β-carotene. Using SERS, normal Raman, and SEHRS spectra, all obtained for the resonant case, the interaction of the carotene molecules with silver nanoparticles, as well as the influence of the resonance enhancement and the SERS enhancement on the spectra, were investigated. The interaction with the silver surface occurs for both functionalized and nonfunctionalized β-carotene, but only the stronger functionalization-induced interaction enables the acquisition of nonresonant SERS spectra of β-carotene at low concentrations. The resonant SEHRS and SERS spectra are very similar. Nevertheless, the SEHRS spectra contain additional bands of infrared-active modes of carotene. Increased contributions from bands that experience low resonance enhancement point to a strong interaction between silver nanoparticles and electronic levels of the molecules, thereby giving rise to a decrease in the resonance enhancement in SERS and SEHRS. PMID:28077983

  6. Improved Intrapulse Raman Scattering Control via Asymmetric Airy Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yi; Tehranchi, Amirhossein; Wabnitz, Stefan; Kashyap, Raman; Chen, Zhigang; Morandotti, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the possibility of tuning the frequency of a laser pulse via the use of an Airy pulse-seeded soliton self-frequency shift. The intrinsically asymmetric nature of Airy pulses, typically featured by either leading or trailing oscillatory tails (relatively to the main lobe), is revealed through the nonlinear generation of both a primary and a secondary Raman soliton self-frequency shift, a phenomenon which is driven by the soliton fission processes. The resulting frequency shift can be carefully controlled by using time-reversed Airy pulses or, alternatively, by applying an offset to the cubic phase modulation used to generate the pulses. When compared with the use of conventional chirped Gaussian pulses, our technique brings about unique advantages in terms of both efficient frequency tuning and feasibility, along with the generation and control of multicolor Raman solitons with enhanced tunability. Our theoretical analysis agrees well with our experimental observations.

  7. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering from Model Acrylic Adhesive Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    temperature by a redox mechanism in the presence of certain metals. The metal ions in the salts are undoubtedly oxidized while the hydroperoxide is... hydroperoxide were similar to SERS spectra of saccharin and to normal Raman spectra of the sodium salt of saccharin. When saccharin was replaced by...spectra of the sodium salt of saccharin. When saccharin was replaced in the curing system by benzoic acid, SERS spectra of the adhesive were similar to

  8. Onset of stimulated Raman scattering of a laser in a plasma in the presence of hot drifting electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, D. N. Yadav, Pinki; Avinash, K.; Jang, D. G.; Suk, H.; Hur, M. S.

    2015-05-15

    Stimulated Raman scattering of a laser in plasmas with energetic drifting electrons was investigated by analyzing the growth of interacting waves during the Raman scattering process. The Langmuir wave and scattered electromagnetic sideband wave grow initially and are dampened after attaining a maximum level that indicates a periodic exchange of energy between the pump wave and the daughter waves. The presence of energetic drifting electrons in the laser-produced plasma influences the stimulated Raman scattering process. The plasma wave generated by Raman scattering may be influenced by the energetic electrons, which enhance the growth rate of the instability. Our results show that the presence of energetic (hot) drifting electrons in a plasma has an important effect on the evolution of the interacting waves. This phenomenon is modeled via two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the propagation and interaction of the laser under Raman instability.

  9. Hyperspectral Raman imaging of bone growth and regrowth chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzuti, Jerilyn A.; Morris, Michael D.; Bonadio, Jeffrey F.; Goldstein, Steven A.

    1998-06-01

    Hyperspectral Raman microscopic imaging of carbonated hydroxyapatite (HAP) is used to follow the chemistry of bone growth and regrowth. Deep red excitation is employed to minimize protein fluorescence interference. A passive line generator based on Powell lens optics and a motorized translation stage provide the imaging capabilities. Raman image contrast is generated from several lines of the HAP Raman spectrum, primarily the PO4-3. Factor analysis is used to minimize the integration time needed for acceptable contrast and to explore the chemical species within the bone. Bone age is visualized as variations in image intensity. High definition, high resolution images of newly formed bone and mature bone are compared qualitatively. The technique is currently under evaluation for study of experimental therapies for fracture repair.

  10. The use of surface-enhanced Raman scattering for detecting molecular evidence of life in rocks, sediments, and sedimentary deposits.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Stephen A; Wilson, Rab; Cooper, Jonathan M; Parnell, John

    2010-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a versatile analytical technique capable of characterizing the composition of both inorganic and organic materials. Consequently, it is frequently suggested as a payload on many planetary landers. Only approximately 1 in every 10(6) photons are Raman scattered; therefore, the detection of trace quantities of an analyte dispersed in a sample matrix can be much harder to achieve. To overcome this, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) both provide greatly enhanced signals (enhancements between 10(5) and 10(9)) through the analyte's interaction with the locally generated surface plasmons, which occur at a "roughened" or nanostructured metallic surface (e.g., Cu, Au, and Ag). Both SERS and SERRS may therefore provide a viable technique for trace analysis of samples. In this paper, we describe the development of SERS assays for analyzing trace amounts of compounds present in the solvent extracts of sedimentary deposits. These assays were used to detect biological pigments present in an Arctic microoasis (a small locale of elevated biological productivity) and its detrital regolith, characterize the pigmentation of microbial mats around hydrothermal springs, and detect fossil organic matter in hydrothermal deposits. These field study examples demonstrate that SERS technology is sufficiently mature to be applied to many astrobiological analog studies on Earth. Many current and proposed imaging systems intended for remote deployment already posses the instrumental components needed for SERS. The addition of wet chemistry sample processing facilities to these instruments could yield field-deployable analytical instruments with a broadened analytical window for detecting organic compounds with a biological or geological origin.

  11. All Photons Imaging Through Volumetric Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Satat, Guy; Heshmat, Barmak; Raviv, Dan; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Imaging through thick highly scattering media (sample thickness ≫ mean free path) can realize broad applications in biomedical and industrial imaging as well as remote sensing. Here we propose a computational “All Photons Imaging” (API) framework that utilizes time-resolved measurement for imaging through thick volumetric scattering by using both early arrived (non-scattered) and diffused photons. As opposed to other methods which aim to lock on specific photons (coherent, ballistic, acoustically modulated, etc.), this framework aims to use all of the optical signal. Compared to conventional early photon measurements for imaging through a 15 mm tissue phantom, our method shows a two fold improvement in spatial resolution (4db increase in Peak SNR). This all optical, calibration-free framework enables widefield imaging through thick turbid media, and opens new avenues in non-invasive testing, analysis, and diagnosis. PMID:27683065

  12. All Photons Imaging Through Volumetric Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satat, Guy; Heshmat, Barmak; Raviv, Dan; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-09-01

    Imaging through thick highly scattering media (sample thickness ≫ mean free path) can realize broad applications in biomedical and industrial imaging as well as remote sensing. Here we propose a computational “All Photons Imaging” (API) framework that utilizes time-resolved measurement for imaging through thick volumetric scattering by using both early arrived (non-scattered) and diffused photons. As opposed to other methods which aim to lock on specific photons (coherent, ballistic, acoustically modulated, etc.), this framework aims to use all of the optical signal. Compared to conventional early photon measurements for imaging through a 15 mm tissue phantom, our method shows a two fold improvement in spatial resolution (4db increase in Peak SNR). This all optical, calibration-free framework enables widefield imaging through thick turbid media, and opens new avenues in non-invasive testing, analysis, and diagnosis.

  13. Using Raman Spectroscopy and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering to Identify Colorants in Art: An Experiment for an Upper-Division Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayhew, Hannah E.; Frano, Kristen A.; Svoboda, Shelley A.; Wustholz, Kristin L.

    2015-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of art represent an attractive way to introduce undergraduate students to concepts in nanoscience, vibrational spectroscopy, and instrumental analysis. Here, we present an undergraduate analytical or physical chemistry laboratory wherein a combination of normal Raman and SERS spectroscopy is used to…

  14. Raman-based imaging uncovers the effects of alginate hydrogel implants in spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Roberta; Tamosaityte, Sandra; Koch, Maria; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim H.; Later, Robert; Uckermann, Ortrud; Beiermeister, Rudolf; Gelinsky, Michael; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias; Koch, Edmund; Steiner, Gerald

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of spinal cord injury by using implants that provide a permissive environment for axonal growth is in the focus of the research for regenerative therapies. Here, Raman-based label-free techniques were applied for the characterization of morphochemical properties of surgically induced spinal cord injury in the rat that received an implant of soft unfunctionalized alginate hydrogel. Raman microspectroscopy followed by chemometrics allowed mapping the different degenerative areas, while multimodal multiphoton microscopy (e.g. the combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), endogenous two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation on the same platform) enabled to address the morphochemistry of the tissue at cellular level. The regions of injury, characterized by demyelination and scarring, were retrieved and the distribution of key tissue components was evaluated by Raman mapping. The alginate hydrogel was detected in the lesion up to six months after implantation and had positive effects on the nervous tissue. For instance, multimodal multiphoton microscopy complemented the results of Raman mapping, providing the micromorphology of lipid-rich tissue structures by CARS and enabling to discern lipid-rich regions that contained myelinated axons from degenerative regions characterized by myelin fragmentation and presence of foam cells. These findings demonstrate that Raman-based imaging methods provide useful information for the evaluation of alginate implant effects and have therefore the potential to contribute to new strategies for monitoring degenerative and regenerative processes induced in SCI, thereby improving the effectiveness of therapies.

  15. Measurement of the Raman scattering cross section of the breathing mode in KDP and DKDP crystals.

    PubMed

    Demos, Stavros G; Raman, Rajesh N; Yang, Steven T; Negres, Raluca A; Schaffers, Kathleen I; Henesian, Mark A

    2011-10-10

    The spontaneous Raman scattering cross sections of the main peaks (related to the A1 vibrational mode) in rapid and conventional grown potassium dihydrogen phosphate and deuterated crystals are measured at 532 nm, 355 nm, and 266 nm. The measurement involves the use of the Raman line of water centered at 3400 cm-1 as a reference to obtain relative values of the cross sections which are subsequently normalized against the known absolute value for water as a function of excitation wavelength. This measurement enables the estimation of the transverse stimulated Raman scattering gain of these nonlinear optical materials in various configurations suitable for frequency conversion and beam control in high-power, large-aperture laser systems.

  16. Fiber-optic apparatus and method for measurement of luminescence and raman scattering

    DOEpatents

    Myrick, Michael L.; Angel, Stanley M.

    1993-01-01

    A dual fiber forward scattering optrode for Raman spectroscopy with the remote ends of the fibers in opposed, spaced relationship to each other to form a analyte sampling space therebetween and the method of measuring Raman spectra utilizing same. One optical fiber is for sending an exciting signal to the remote sampling space and, at its remote end, has a collimating microlens and an optical filter for filtering out background emissions generated in the fiber. The other optical fiber is for collecting the Raman scattering signal at the remote sampling space and, at its remote end, has a collimating microlens and an optical filter to prevent the exciting signal from the exciting fiber from entering the collection fiber and to thereby prevent the generation of background emissions in the collecting fiber.

  17. Fiber-optic apparatus and method for measurement of luminescence and Raman scattering

    DOEpatents

    Myrick, M.L.; Angel, S.M.

    1993-03-16

    A dual fiber forward scattering optrode for Raman spectroscopy with the remote ends of the fibers in opposed, spaced relationship to each other to form a analyte sampling space therebetween and the method of measuring Raman spectra utilizing same are described. One optical fiber is for sending an exciting signal to the remote sampling space and, at its remote end, has a collimating microlens and an optical filter for filtering out background emissions generated in the fiber. The other optical fiber is for collecting the Raman scattering signal at the remote sampling space and, at its remote end, has a collimating microlens and an optical filter to prevent the exciting signal from the exciting fiber from entering the collection fiber and to thereby prevent the generation of background emissions in the collecting fiber.

  18. Enhanced Raman scattering assisted by ultrahigh order modes of the double metal cladding waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tian; Huang, Liming; Jin, Yonglong; Fang, Jinghuai E-mail: fjhuai@ntu.edu.cn; Yin, Cheng E-mail: fjhuai@ntu.edu.cn; Huang, Meizhen

    2014-10-20

    Distinguished from the usual strategy to enhance the Raman scattering such as creating hot spots in the surface-enhanced Raman scattering, this paper takes a quite different approach based on the double metal cladding waveguide. The target analyte is located in the guiding layer of sub-millimeter scale, where several ultrahigh order modes with high intensity are simultaneously excited via a focused laser beam. The experimental setup is simple, and both simulation and experimental results confirm the enhancement mechanism of these oscillating modes. Other appealing features include the large detection area and the ability to excite guided modes via both polarizations. This scheme can be applied to large molecules detection and readily integrated with other Raman enhancement techniques.

  19. Precise control of state-selective excitation in stimulated Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shian; Zhang Hui; Jia Tianqing; Wang Zugeng; Sun Zhenrong; Shi Junhui

    2010-10-15

    Multiphoton transitions can be manipulated by tailoring the ultrashort laser pulse. In this paper, we propose two schemes for achieving precise control of the selective excitation between two excited states in stimulated Raman-scattering process. We theoretically demonstrate that by properly designing the spectral phase distribution, the stimulated Raman transition probability for one excited state is kept at zero or a maximal value, while that for the other excited state can be continuously tuned over a wide range. Furthermore, the influence of the spectral bandwidth on the tunable range by the two schemes is discussed. We conclude that these schemes have significant application to the selective excitation of femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering.

  20. Raman scattering of rare earth sesquioxide Ho₂O₃: A pressure and temperature dependent study

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Sugandha Dogra; Samanta, K.; Singh, Jasveer; Sharma, Nita Dilawar; Bandyopadhyay, A. K.

    2014-10-07

    Pressure and temperature dependent Raman scattering studies on Ho₂O₃ have been carried out to investigate the structural transition and the anharmonic behavior of the phonons. Ho₂O₃ undergoes a transition from cubic to monoclinic phase above 15.5 GPa, which is partially reversible on decompression. The anharmonic behavior of the phonon modes of Ho₂O₃ from 80 K to 440 K has been investigated. We find an anomalous line-width change with temperature. The mode Grüneisen parameter of bulk Ho₂O₃ was estimated from high pressure Raman investigation up to 29 GPa. Furthermore, the anharmonic components were calculated from the temperature dependent Raman scattering.

  1. Heterodyne coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by the phase control of its intrinsic background

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xi; Wang Kai; Welch, George R.; Sokolov, Alexei V.

    2011-08-15

    We demonstrate the use of femtosecond laser pulse shaping for precise control of the interference between the coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signal and the coherent nonresonant background generated within the same sample volume. Our technique is similar to heterodyne detection with the coherent background playing the role of the local oscillator field. In our experiment, we first apply two ultrashort (near-transform-limited) femtosecond pump and Stokes laser pulses to excite coherent molecular oscillations within a sample. After a short and controllable delay, we then apply a laser pulse that scatters off of these oscillations to produce the CARS signal. By making fine adjustments to the probe field spectral profile, we vary the relative phase between the Raman-resonant signal and the nonresonant background, and we observe a varying spectral interference pattern. These controlled variations of the measured pattern reveal the phase information within the Raman spectrum.

  2. Coherent Scattering Imaging Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Laila Abdulgalil Rafik

    Conventional mammography has poor contrast between healthy and cancerous tissues due to the small difference in attenuation properties. Coherent scatter potentially provides more information because interference of coherently scattered radiation depends on the average intermolecular spacing, and can be used to characterize tissue types. However, typical coherent scatter analysis techniques are not compatible with rapid low dose screening techniques. Coherent scatter slot scan imaging is a novel imaging technique which provides new information with higher contrast. In this work a simulation of coherent scatter was performed for slot scan imaging to assess its performance and provide system optimization. In coherent scatter imaging, the coherent scatter is exploited using a conventional slot scan mammography system with anti-scatter grids tilted at the characteristic angle of cancerous tissues. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to simulate the coherent scatter imaging. System optimization was performed across several parameters, including source voltage, tilt angle, grid distances, grid ratio, and shielding geometry. The contrast increased as the grid tilt angle increased beyond the characteristic angle for the modeled carcinoma. A grid tilt angle of 16 degrees yielded the highest contrast and signal to noise ratio (SNR). Also, contrast increased as the source voltage increased. Increasing grid ratio improved contrast at the expense of decreasing SNR. A grid ratio of 10:1 was sufficient to give a good contrast without reducing the intensity to a noise level. The optimal source to sample distance was determined to be such that the source should be located at the focal distance of the grid. A carcinoma lump of 0.5x0.5x0.5 cm3 in size was detectable which is reasonable considering the high noise due to the usage of relatively small number of incident photons for computational reasons. A further study is needed to study the effect of breast density and breast thickness

  3. Stable silver/biopolymer hybrid plasmonic nanostructures for high performance surface enhanced raman scattering (SERS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silver/biopolymer nanoparticles were prepared by adding 100 mg silver nitrate to 2% polyvinyl alcohol solution and reduced the silver nitrate into silver ion using 2 % trisodium citrate for high performance Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrates. Optical properties of nanoparticle were ...

  4. System and method for linearly amplifying optical analog signals by backward Raman scattering

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Cheng-Heui

    1988-01-01

    A system for linearly amplifying an optical analog signal by backward stimulated Raman scattering comprises a laser source for generating a pump pulse; and an optic fiber having two opposed apertures, a first aperture for receiving the pump pulse and a second aperture for receiving the optical analog signal, wherein the optical analog signal is linearly amplified to an amplified optical analog signal.

  5. Three-phonon stimulated Raman scattering in an orthorhombic LuAlO3 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminskii, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    High-order stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) has been revealed in a LuAlO3 crystal upon stationary picosecond laser excitation. All recorded Stokes and anti-Stokes χ(3)-nonlinear laser components are attributed to three SRS-promoting A g vibrational modes of its octahedral anionic units (AlO3)-3.

  6. System and method for linearly amplifying optical analog signals by backward Raman scattering

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Cheng-Heui

    1988-07-05

    A system for linearly amplifying an optical analog signal by backward stimulated Raman scattering comprises a laser source for generating a pump pulse; and an optic fiber having two opposed apertures, a first aperture for receiving the pump pulse and a second aperture for receiving the optical analog signal, wherein the optical analog signal is linearly amplified to an amplified optical analog signal.

  7. Ag coated microneedle based surface enhanced Raman scattering probe for intradermal measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2013-06-01

    We propose a silver coated microneedle to detect test molecules, including R6G and glucose, positioned at a depth of more than 700 μm below a skin phantom surface for mimicking intradermal surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements.

  8. Detection and differentiation of Salmonella serotypes using Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) technique.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) can detect pathogens rapidly and accurately. The metal surface for the SERS spectroscopy was a silver nano-particle encapsulated biopolymer polyvinyl alcohol nano-colloid deposited on a stainless steel plate. Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis...

  9. Intermolecular and low-frequency intramolecular Raman scattering study of racemic ibuprofen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarević, J. J.; Uskoković-Marković, S.; Jelikić-Stankov, M.; Radonjić, M.; Tanasković, D.; Lazarević, N.; Popović, Z. V.

    We report the low-temperature Raman scattering study of racemic ibuprofen. Detailed analysis of the racemic ibuprofen crystal symmetry, related to the vibrational properties of the system, has been presented. The first principle calculations of a single ibuprofen molecule dynamical properties are compered with experimental data. Nineteen, out of 26 modes expected for the spectral region below 200 cm-1, have been observed.

  10. Broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy in supercontinuum optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Kebin; Li, Peng; Liu, Zhiwen

    2007-04-01

    The authors report on a supercontinuum tweezer which combines tweezing with broadband (˜3000cm-1) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy by taking advantage of the high spatial coherence and broad bandwidth of pulsed supercontinuum generated in a nonlinear photonic crystal fiber. Polarization-discriminated and time-resolved CARS is investigated to suppress the nonresonant four-wave-mixing background.

  11. Enhanced Raman scattering from cesium suboxides on silver particles and the structure of S-1 photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, C. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An explanation is given for the results of recent enhanced Raman scattering studies of photomultiplier tubes with S-1 photocathode surfaces which indicated the presence of Cs11O3 but not Cs2O. The reason for the discrepancy between the currently accepted model of the S-1 and this recent result is discussed.

  12. Anisotropic collision-induced Raman scattering by the Kr:Xe gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Dixneuf, S; Chrysos, M; Rachet, F

    2009-08-21

    We report anisotropic collision-induced Raman scattering intensities by the Kr-Xe atomic pair recorded in a gas mixture of Kr and Xe at room temperature. We compare them to quantum-mechanical calculations on the basis of modern incremental polarizability models of either ab initio post-Hartree-Fock or density functional theory methods.

  13. Quantitative Raman imaging investigations of mixing phenomena in high-pressure cryogenic jets.

    PubMed

    Decker, M; Schik, A; Meier, U E; Stricker, W

    1998-08-20

    A two-dimensional Raman technique was used to investigate mixing phenomena of cryogenic jets under both supercritical and transcritical conditions. The aim of this study was to enlarge the experimental data basis for modeling purposes and to provide quantitative information to help to improve the design of injectors for high-pressure rocket engine combustion chambers. Cryogenic nitrogen, which served as substitute for liquid O(2), was injected into N(2) at room temperature at pressures up to 6.0 MPa. The liquid N(2) jet could be atomized by a coaxial H(2) flow. Raman scattering was generated with a XeF excimer laser. The resulting signal images were discriminated against background by spectral filtering and preferential detection of light with a polarization corresponding to the polarization of the laser, thus making use of the conserved polarization of the Raman-scattered light. The Raman images were converted into density distributions of N(2) and H(2), respectively, as well as into temperature distributions for a variety of experimental conditions.

  14. Quantitative Raman Imaging Investigations of Mixing Phenomena in High-Pressure Cryogenic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Michael; Schik, Axel; Meier, Ulrich E.; Stricker, Winfried

    1998-08-01

    A two-dimensional Raman technique was used to investigate mixing phenomena of cryogenic jets under both supercritical and transcritical conditions. The aim of this study was to enlarge the experimental data basis for modeling purposes and to provide quantitative information to help to improve the design of injectors for high-pressure rocket engine combustion chambers. Cryogenic nitrogen, which served as substitute for liquid O 2 , was injected into N 2 at room temperature at pressures up to 6.0 MPa. The liquid N 2 jet could be atomized by a coaxial H 2 flow. Raman scattering was generated with a XeF excimer laser. The resulting signal images were discriminated against background by spectral filtering and preferential detection of light with a polarization corresponding to the polarization of the laser, thus making use of the conserved polarization of the Raman-scattered light. The Raman images were converted into density distributions of N 2 and H 2 , respectively, as well as into temperature distributions for a variety of experimental conditions.

  15. Rapid detection of benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour by using Raman scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Juan; Peng, Yankun; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Dhakal, Sagar; Xu, Tianfeng

    2015-05-01

    Benzoyl peroxide is a common flour additive that improves the whiteness of flour and the storage properties of flour products. However, benzoyl peroxide adversely affects the nutritional content of flour, and excess consumption causes nausea, dizziness, other poisoning, and serious liver damage. This study was focus on detection of the benzoyl peroxide added in wheat flour. A Raman scattering spectroscopy system was used to acquire spectral signal from sample data and identify benzoyl peroxide based on Raman spectral peak position. The optical devices consisted of Raman spectrometer and CCD camera, 785 nm laser module, optical fiber, prober, and a translation stage to develop a real-time, nondestructive detection system. Pure flour, pure benzoyl peroxide and different concentrations of benzoyl peroxide mixed with flour were prepared as three sets samples to measure the Raman spectrum. These samples were placed in the same type of petri dish to maintain a fixed distance between the Raman CCD and petri dish during spectral collection. The mixed samples were worked by pretreatment of homogenization and collected multiple sets of data of each mixture. The exposure time of this experiment was set at 0.5s. The Savitzky Golay (S-G) algorithm and polynomial curve-fitting method was applied to remove the fluorescence background from the Raman spectrum. The Raman spectral peaks at 619 cm-1, 848 cm-1, 890 cm-1, 1001 cm-1, 1234 cm-1, 1603cm-1, 1777cm-1 were identified as the Raman fingerprint of benzoyl peroxide. Based on the relationship between the Raman intensity of the most prominent peak at around 1001 cm-1 and log values of benzoyl peroxide concentrations, the chemical concentration prediction model was developed. This research demonstrated that Raman detection system could effectively and rapidly identify benzoyl peroxide adulteration in wheat flour. The experimental result is promising and the system with further modification can be applicable for more products in near

  16. Revealing silent vibration modes of nanomaterials by detecting anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jianhua; Chen, Lei; Dai, Qiaofeng; Lan, Sheng; Tie, Shaolong

    2016-01-01

    We proposed a scheme in which normal Raman scattering is coupled with hyper-Raman scattering for generating a strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering in nanomaterials by using femtosecond laser pulses. The proposal was experimentally demonstrated by using a single-layer MoS2 on a SiO2/Si substrate, a 17 nm-thick MoS2 on an Au/SiO2 substrate and a 9 nm-thick MoS2 on a SiO2-SnO2/Ag/SiO2 substrate which were confirmed to be highly efficient for second harmonic generation. A strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering was also observed in other nanomaterials possessing large second-order susceptibilities, such as silicon quantum dots self-assembled into ``coffee'' rings and tubular Cu-doped ZnO nanorods. In all the cases, many Raman inactive vibration modes were clearly revealed in the anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering. Apart from the strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering, Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with small Raman shifts was detected during the ablation process of thick MoS2 layers. It was also observed by slightly defocusing the excitation light. The detection of anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering may serve as a new technique for studying the Raman inactive vibration modes in nanomaterials.We proposed a scheme in which normal Raman scattering is coupled with hyper-Raman scattering for generating a strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering in nanomaterials by using femtosecond laser pulses. The proposal was experimentally demonstrated by using a single-layer MoS2 on a SiO2/Si substrate, a 17 nm-thick MoS2 on an Au/SiO2 substrate and a 9 nm-thick MoS2 on a SiO2-SnO2/Ag/SiO2 substrate which were confirmed to be highly efficient for second harmonic generation. A strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering was also observed in other nanomaterials possessing large second-order susceptibilities, such as silicon quantum dots self-assembled into ``coffee'' rings and tubular Cu-doped ZnO nanorods. In all the cases, many Raman inactive vibration modes were clearly

  17. RAMAN spectroscopy imaging improves the diagnosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Julietta V.; Graziani, Valerio; Fosca, Marco; Taffon, Chiara; Rocchia, Massimiliano; Crucitti, Pierfilippo; Pozzilli, Paolo; Onetti Muda, Andrea; Caricato, Marco; Crescenzi, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Recent investigations strongly suggest that Raman spectroscopy (RS) can be used as a clinical tool in cancer diagnosis to improve diagnostic accuracy. In this study, we evaluated the efficiency of Raman imaging microscopy to discriminate between healthy and neoplastic thyroid tissue, by analyzing main variants of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (PTC), the most common type of thyroid cancer. We performed Raman imaging of large tissue areas (from 100 × 100 μm2 up to 1 × 1 mm2), collecting 38 maps containing about 9000 Raman spectra. Multivariate statistical methods, including Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), were applied to translate Raman spectra differences between healthy and PTC tissues into diagnostically useful information for a reliable tissue classification. Our study is the first demonstration of specific biochemical features of the PTC profile, characterized by significant presence of carotenoids with respect to the healthy tissue. Moreover, this is the first evidence of Raman spectra differentiation between classical and follicular variant of PTC, discriminated by LDA with high efficiency. The combined histological and Raman microscopy analyses allow clear-cut integration of morphological and biochemical observations, with dramatic improvement of efficiency and reliability in the differential diagnosis of neoplastic thyroid nodules, paving the way to integrative findings for tumorigenesis and novel therapeutic strategies.

  18. RAMAN spectroscopy imaging improves the diagnosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Julietta V.; Graziani, Valerio; Fosca, Marco; Taffon, Chiara; Rocchia, Massimiliano; Crucitti, Pierfilippo; Pozzilli, Paolo; Onetti Muda, Andrea; Caricato, Marco; Crescenzi, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent investigations strongly suggest that Raman spectroscopy (RS) can be used as a clinical tool in cancer diagnosis to improve diagnostic accuracy. In this study, we evaluated the efficiency of Raman imaging microscopy to discriminate between healthy and neoplastic thyroid tissue, by analyzing main variants of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (PTC), the most common type of thyroid cancer. We performed Raman imaging of large tissue areas (from 100 × 100 μm2 up to 1 × 1 mm2), collecting 38 maps containing about 9000 Raman spectra. Multivariate statistical methods, including Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), were applied to translate Raman spectra differences between healthy and PTC tissues into diagnostically useful information for a reliable tissue classification. Our study is the first demonstration of specific biochemical features of the PTC profile, characterized by significant presence of carotenoids with respect to the healthy tissue. Moreover, this is the first evidence of Raman spectra differentiation between classical and follicular variant of PTC, discriminated by LDA with high efficiency. The combined histological and Raman microscopy analyses allow clear-cut integration of morphological and biochemical observations, with dramatic improvement of efficiency and reliability in the differential diagnosis of neoplastic thyroid nodules, paving the way to integrative findings for tumorigenesis and novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:27725756

  19. Tip Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and Imaging: an Apical Illumination Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Zachary D.; Stranick, Stephan J.; Levin, Ira W.

    2009-01-01

    Results are presented illustrating the use of tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy and imaging in a top-illumination geometry. A radially polarized beam is used to generate an electric field component in the direction of beam propagation, normal to the surface, resulting in a 5× increased enhancement compared to a linearly polarized beam. This multiplicative enhancement facilitates a discrimination of the near field signal from the far field Raman background. The top illumination configuration facilitates the application of TERS for investigating molecules on a variety of surfaces, such as Au, glass, and Si. The near field Raman spectrum is presented of Si(100), rhodamine B, brilliant cresyl blue, and single wall carbon nanotubes. Sufficient enhancement is obtained to permit a sub-diffraction limited resolution Raman imaging of the surface distribution of large bundles of carbon nanotubes of various diameters. PMID:19007457

  20. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of a lipid Langmuir monolayer at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Mangeney, C; Dupres, V; Roche, Y; Felidj, N; Levi, G; Aubard, J; Bernard, S

    Surface enhanced Raman spectra were recorded from a phospholipid monolayer directly at the air-water interface. We used an organized monolayer of negatively charged tetramyristoyl cardiolipins as a template for the electrochemical generation of silver deposits. This two-dimensional electrodeposition of silver under potentiostatic control was the substrate for enhancement of Raman spectra. We report the optimized conditions for the Raman enhancement, the microscopic observations of the deposits, and their characterization by atomic force microscopy. Laser excitation at 514.5 nm leads to intense and reproducible surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra recorded in situ from one monolayer of cardiolipin, using 0.5 mol % of 10N nonyl acridine orange or 5 mol % of acridine in the film, and demonstrates the possibility of estimating the pH at the metal/phospholipidic film interface.

  1. Development and applications of tunable, narrow band lasers and stimulated Raman scattering devices for atmospheric lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, Thomas D.

    1993-01-01

    The main thrust of the program was the study of stimulated Raman processes for application to atmospheric lidar measurements. This has involved the development of tunable lasers, the detailed study of stimulated Raman scattering, and the use of the Raman-shifted light for new measurements of molecular line strengths and line widths. The principal spectral region explored in this work was the visible and near-IR wavelengths between 500 nm and 1.5 microns. Recent alexandrite ring laser experiments are reported. The experiments involved diode injection-locking, Raman shifting, and frequency-doubling. The experiments succeeded in producing tunable light at 577 and 937 nm with line widths in the range 80-160 MHz.

  2. Two Mechanisms of Tip Enhancement of Raman Scattering by Protein Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Sereda, Valentin; Lednev, Igor K

    2017-01-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is a powerful tool for probing the surface of biological species with nanometer spatial resolution. Here, we report the TER spectra of an individual insulin fibril, the protein cast film and a short peptide (LVEALYL) microcrystal mimicking the fibril core. Two different types of TER spectra were acquired depending on the "roughness" of the probed surface at the molecular level. A fully reproducible, low-intensity, normal Raman-type spectrum was characteristic of the top flat surface of the microcrystal while highly variable, higher intensity TER spectra were obtained for the edges of the microcrystal, cast film, and fibril. As a result, two tip enhancement mechanisms of Raman scattering, long- and short-range, were proposed by analogy with the physical and chemical enhancement mechanisms, respectively, known for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

  3. Infrared absorption and Raman scattering spectra of water under pressure via first principles molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Takashi

    2014-07-28

    From both the polarized and depolarized Raman scattering spectra of supercritical water a peak located at around 1600 cm(-1), attributed normally to bending mode of water molecules, was experimentally observed to vanish, whereas the corresponding peak remains clearly visible in the measured infrared (IR) absorption spectrum. In this computational study a theoretical formulation for analyzing the IR and Raman spectra is developed via first principles molecular dynamics combined with the modern polarization theory. We demonstrate that the experimentally observed peculiar behavior of the IR and Raman spectra for water are well reproduced in our computational scheme. We discuss the origins of a feature observed at 1600 cm(-1) in Raman spectra of ambient water.

  4. Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with quantitative stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Minbiao; Lewis, Spencer; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Snuderl, Matija; Venneti, Sriram; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda; Garrard, Mia; Fu, Dan; Wang, Anthony C; Heth, Jason A; Maher, Cormac O; Sanai, Nader; Johnson, Timothy D; Freudiger, Christian W; Sagher, Oren; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A

    2015-10-14

    Differentiating tumor from normal brain is a major barrier to achieving optimal outcome in brain tumor surgery. New imaging techniques for visualizing tumor margins during surgery are needed to improve surgical results. We recently demonstrated the ability of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a nondestructive, label-free optical method, to reveal glioma infiltration in animal models. We show that SRS reveals human brain tumor infiltration in fresh, unprocessed surgical specimens from 22 neurosurgical patients. SRS detects tumor infiltration in near-perfect agreement with standard hematoxylin and eosin light microscopy (κ = 0.86). The unique chemical contrast specific to SRS microscopy enables tumor detection by revealing quantifiable alterations in tissue cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in tumor-infiltrated tissues. To ensure that SRS microscopic data can be easily used in brain tumor surgery, without the need for expert interpretation, we created a classifier based on cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in SRS images capable of detecting tumor infiltration with 97.5% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity. Quantitative SRS microscopy detects the spread of tumor cells, even in brain tissue surrounding a tumor that appears grossly normal. By accurately revealing tumor infiltration, quantitative SRS microscopy holds potential for improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery.

  5. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of human smooth muscle cells in bioengineered tissue scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackmann, Christian; Esguerra, Maricris; Olausson, Daniel; Delbro, Dick; Krettek, Alexandra; Gatenholm, Paul; Enejder, Annika

    2011-02-01

    The integration of living, human smooth muscle cells in biosynthesized cellulose scaffolds was monitored by nonlinear microscopy toward contractile artificial blood vessels. Combined coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy was applied for studies of the cell interaction with the biopolymer network. CARS microscopy probing CH2-groups at 2845 cm-1 permitted three-dimensional imaging of the cells with high contrast for lipid-rich intracellular structures. SHG microscopy visualized the fibers of the cellulose scaffold, together with a small signal obtained from the cytoplasmic myosin of the muscle cells. From the overlay images we conclude a close interaction between cells and cellulose fibers. We followed the cell migration into the three-dimensional structure, illustrating that while the cells submerge into the scaffold they extrude filopodia on top of the surface. A comparison between compact and porous scaffolds reveals a migration depth of <10 μm for the former, whereas the porous type shows cells further submerged into the cellulose. Thus, the scaffold architecture determines the degree of cell integration. We conclude that the unique ability of nonlinear microscopy to visualize the three-dimensional composition of living, soft matter makes it an ideal instrument within tissue engineering.

  6. Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with quantitative stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Minbiao; Lewis, Spencer; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Snuderl, Matija; Venneti, Sriram; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda; Garrard, Mia; Fu, Dan; Wang, Anthony C.; Heth, Jason A.; Maher, Cormac O.; Sanai, Nader; Johnson, Timothy D.; Freudiger, Christian W.; Sagher, Oren; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating tumor from normal brain is a major barrier to achieving optimal outcome in brain tumor surgery. New imaging techniques for visualizing tumor margins during surgery are needed to improve surgical results. We recently demonstrated the ability of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a non-destructive, label-free optical method, to reveal glioma infiltration in animal models. Here we show that SRS reveals human brain tumor infiltration in fresh, unprocessed surgical specimens from 22 neurosurgical patients. SRS detects tumor infiltration in near-perfect agreement with standard hematoxylin and eosin light microscopy (κ=0.86). The unique chemical contrast specific to SRS microscopy enables tumor detection by revealing quantifiable alterations in tissue cellularity, axonal density and protein:lipid ratio in tumor-infiltrated tissues. To ensure that SRS microscopic data can be easily used in brain tumor surgery, without the need for expert interpretation, we created a classifier based on cellularity, axonal density and protein:lipid ratio in SRS images capable of detecting tumor infiltration with 97.5% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity. Importantly, quantitative SRS microscopy detects the spread of tumor cells, even in brain tissue surrounding a tumor that appears grossly normal. By accurately revealing tumor infiltration, quantitative SRS microscopy holds potential for improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26468325

  7. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy visualizes pharmaceutical tablets during dissolution.

    PubMed

    Fussell, Andrew L; Kleinebudde, Peter; Herek, Jennifer; Strachan, Clare J; Offerhaus, Herman L

    2014-07-04

    Traditional pharmaceutical dissolution tests determine the amount of drug dissolved over time by measuring drug content in the dissolution medium. This method provides little direct information about what is happening on the surface of the dissolving tablet. As the tablet surface composition and structure can change during dissolution, it is essential to monitor it during dissolution testing. In this work coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy is used to image the surface of tablets during dissolution while UV absorption spectroscopy is simultaneously providing inline analysis of dissolved drug concentration for tablets containing a 50% mixture of theophylline anhydrate and ethyl cellulose. The measurements showed that in situ CARS microscopy is capable of imaging selectively theophylline in the presence of ethyl cellulose. Additionally, the theophylline anhydrate converted to theophylline monohydrate during dissolution, with needle-shaped crystals growing on the tablet surface during dissolution. The conversion of theophylline anhydrate to monohydrate, combined with reduced exposure of the drug to the flowing dissolution medium resulted in decreased dissolution rates. Our results show that in situ CARS microscopy combined with inline UV absorption spectroscopy is capable of monitoring pharmaceutical tablet dissolution and correlating surface changes with changes in dissolution rate.

  8. Templated green synthesis of plasmonic silver nanoparticles in onion epidermal cells suitable for surface-enhanced Raman and hyper-Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Espina Palanco, Marta; Bo Mogensen, Klaus; Gühlke, Marina; Heiner, Zsuzsanna; Kneipp, Janina; Kneipp, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    We report fast and simple green synthesis of plasmonic silver nanoparticles in the epidermal cells of onions after incubation with AgNO3 solution. The biological environment supports the generation of silver nanostructures in two ways. The plant tissue delivers reducing chemicals for the initial formation of small silver clusters and their following conversion to plasmonic particles. Additionally, the natural morphological structures of the onion layers, in particular the extracellular matrix provides a biological template for the growth of plasmonic nanostructures. This is indicated by red glowing images of extracellular spaces in dark field microscopy of onion layers a few hours after AgNO3 exposure due to the formation of silver nanoparticles. Silver nanostructures generated in the extracellular space of onion layers and within the epidermal cell walls can serve as enhancing plasmonic structures for one- and two-photon-excited spectroscopy such as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface enhanced hyper-Raman scattering (SEHRS). Our studies demonstrate a templated green preparation of enhancing plasmonic nanoparticles and suggest a new route to deliver silver nanoparticles as basic building blocks of plasmonic nanosensors to plants by the uptake of solutions of metal salts.

  9. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy: A New Modality for Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Chrysafis; Kishore, Sirish A.; Kircher, Moritz F.

    2015-01-01

    While surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy has traditionally been employed as an in vitro analytical tool, in the past few years the first reports of the feasibility of in vivo imaging of cancer with biocompatible SERS probes have emerged. SERS imaging has great potential in the field of medical imaging because it offers several major theoretical advantages over other molecular imaging methods. Medical imaging using SERS nanoprobes can yield higher sensitivity and higher signal specificity than other imaging modalities while also offering multiplexing capabilities that allow for unique applications. This review article explains the principles of SERS and highlights recent advances for in vivo cancer imaging. In order to present the abilities of the method as accurate as possible, the discussion is limited to studies in which the imaging data were confirmed by histological correlation. PMID:26182971

  10. Excitation energy-dependent nature of Raman scattering spectrum in GaInNAs/GaAs quantum well structures.

    PubMed

    Erol, Ayse; Akalin, Elif; Sarcan, Fahrettin; Donmez, Omer; Akyuz, Sevim; Arikan, Cetin M; Puustinen, Janne; Guina, Mircea

    2012-11-28

    The excitation energy-dependent nature of Raman scattering spectrum, vibration, electronic or both, has been studied using different excitation sources on as-grown and annealed n- and p-type modulation-doped Ga1 - xInxNyAs1 - y/GaAs quantum well structures. The samples were grown by molecular beam technique with different N concentrations (y = 0%, 0.9%, 1.2%, 1.7%) at the same In concentration of 32%. Micro-Raman measurements have been carried out using 532 and 758 nm lines of diode lasers, and the 1064 nm line of the Nd-YAG laser has been used for Fourier transform-Raman scattering measurements. Raman scattering measurements with different excitation sources have revealed that the excitation energy is the decisive mechanism on the nature of the Raman scattering spectrum. When the excitation energy is close to the electronic band gap energy of any constituent semiconductor materials in the sample, electronic transition dominates the spectrum, leading to a very broad peak. In the condition that the excitation energy is much higher than the band gap energy, only vibrational modes contribute to the Raman scattering spectrum of the samples. Line shapes of the Raman scattering spectrum with the 785 and 1064 nm lines of lasers have been observed to be very broad peaks, whose absolute peak energy values are in good agreement with the ones obtained from photoluminescence measurements. On the other hand, Raman scattering spectrum with the 532 nm line has exhibited only vibrational modes. As a complementary tool of Raman scattering measurements with the excitation source of 532 nm, which shows weak vibrational transitions, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy has been also carried out. The results exhibited that the nature of the Raman scattering spectrum is strongly excitation energy-dependent, and with suitable excitation energy, electronic and/or vibrational transitions can be investigated.

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study of anthocyanidins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaffino, Chiara; Russo, Bianca; Bruni, Silvia

    2015-10-01

    Anthocyanins are an important class of natural compounds responsible for the red, purple and blue colors in a large number of flowers, fruits and cereal grains. They are polyhydroxy- and polymethoxy-derivatives of 2-phenylbenzopyrylium (flavylium) salts, which are present in nature as glycosylated molecules. The aim of the present study is to assess the identification of anthocyanidins, i.e. anthocyanins without the glycosidic moiety, by means of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), a very chemically-specific technique which is moreover sensitive to subtle changes in molecular structures. These features can lead to elect SERS, among the spectroscopic tools currently at disposal of scientists, as a technique of choice for the identification of anthocyanidins, since: (1) anthocyanidins structurally present the same benzopyrylium moiety and differentiate only for the substitution pattern on their phenyl ring, (2) different species are present in aqueous solution depending on the pH. It will be demonstrated that, while resonance Raman spectra of anthocyanidins are very similar to one another, SER spectra show greater differences, leading to a further step in the identification of such important compounds in diluted solutions by means of vibrational spectroscopy. Moreover, the dependence on the pH of the six most common anthocyanidins, i.e. cyanidin, delphinidin, pelargonidin, peonidin, malvidin and petunidin, is studied. To the best of the authors' knowledge, a complete SERS study of such important molecules is reported in the present work for the first time.

  12. Two-stage electron acceleration by simultaneous stimulated Raman backward and forward scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, P.; Ghizzo, A.; Karttunen, S.J.; Paettikangas, T.J.H.; Salomaa, R.R.E.; Shoucri, M.

    1995-08-01

    The coexistence of stimulated Raman forward and backward scattering of intense electromagnetic radiation, which can occur, for instance, in laser fusion plasmas, is investigated. The simultaneous Raman forward and backward scattering is shown to create an electrostatic field structure which is exceptionally efficient in producing highly relativistic electrons. The mechanism of the electron acceleration is analyzed both by Vlasov--Maxwell simulations with self-consistent fields and by test particle calculations with prescribed electrostatic fields. The Vlasov--Maxwell simulations reveal that the two plasma waves generated by the backward and forward scattering are spatially separated, and thus form a two-stage electron ``accelerator.`` {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  13. Analysis of Raman scattered Ly-alpha emissions from the atmosphere of Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelle, R. V.; Doose, L. R.; Tomasko, M. G.; Strobel, D. F.

    1987-05-01

    A line at 1280 Å, due to Raman scattering of solar Lyman alpha in the atmosphere of Uranus, has been detected by the Voyager Ultraviolet Spectrometer. The measured intensity of 40±20 R implies that 200 R to 500 R of the measured 1500 R Ly-α intensity at the sub-solar point is due to Rayleigh scattering of the solar line. The presence of Rayleigh and Raman scattering at 1216 Å suggests that the Uranian atmosphere is largely devoid of absorbing hydrocarbons above the 0.5 mbar level. The most natural explanation of this depletion is very weak vertical mixing equivalent to an eddy coefficient on the order of 200 cm2s-1 between 0.5 mbar and 100 mbar.

  14. Nonadiabaticity in a Jahn-Teller system probed by absorption and resonance Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Pae, K; Hizhnyakov, V

    2013-03-14

    A theory of absorption and resonance Raman scattering of impurity centers in crystals with E⊗e-type Jahn-Teller effect in the excited state is presented. The vibronic interaction with non-totally symmetric local or pseudolocal modes and with a continuum of bath modes (phonons) is considered. A number of specific quantum effects, such as the nonadiabaticity-induced enhancement of the Raman scattering at high-energy excitation, the size effect of the final state, the interference of different channels of scattering, the Fermi resonances in the conical intersection, and others, were shown to become apparent in the calculated spectra. The vibronic interaction with phonons essentially determines the structure of the spectra.

  15. Synchronized time-lens source for coherent Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke; Freudiger, Christian W.; Lee, Jennifer H.; Saar, Brian G.; Xie, X. Sunney; Xu, Chris

    2010-01-01

    We use the time-lens concept to demonstrate a new scheme for synchronization of two pulsed light sources for biological imaging. An all fiber, 1064 nm time-lens source is synchronized to a picosecond solid-state Ti: Sapphire mode-locked laser by using the mode-locked laser pulses as the clock. We demonstrate the application of this synchronized source for CARS and SRS imaging by imaging mouse tissues. Synchronized two wavelength pulsed source is an important technical difficulty for CARS and SRS imaging. The time-lens source demonstrated here may provide an all fiber, user friendly alternative for future SRS imaging. PMID:21164749

  16. Enhanced Raman Scattering from InSb Nanodots; Temperature and Laser-Power Dependent Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Noboru; Takayama, Haruki; Morohashi, Satoshi

    2010-03-01

    InSb nanodots were uniquely fabricated by vapor-transport on a Si substrate which had previously been bombarded by FBI Ga ions. The InSb nanodots were then examined by spatially-resolved Raman scattering using an Ar-ion laser (λ= 514.5 and 488 nm with P=1˜15 mW) with an optical microscope and CCD detector. In addition to the TO and LO peaks of InSb observed at ˜180 and 191 cm-1 respectively, two peaks were observed at ˜110 and 150 cm-1. Those Raman peaks were tentatively attributed to the 2TA and TO-TA second-order Raman processes. Those two peak intensities appeared to grow at the expense of the TO and LO Raman peak intensities with increasing the sample temperature from 10 K to 450 K. Also, the two-phonon peak intensities increased non-linearly with the probing laser power used. Hot carriers and their interactions with phonons in the restricted regions will be discussed together with Raman scattering results obtained from single-crystal InSb.

  17. Chemical mechanism of surface-enhanced Raman scattering via charge transfer in fluorenone-Ag complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Li, Yafei; Wu, Shiwei; Song, Peng; Xia, Lixin

    2016-06-01

    The intermolecular interaction between fluorenone (FN) and silver surfaces was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The structural, electronic and optical properties of the FN-Ag complex indicate that the carbonyl group O atom in FN molecules is the adsorbed position site to attach the silver substrate through the weak bond O…Ag. The analysis of vibrational modes and Raman activity of the largely enhanced Raman peaks using two FN-Ag4-x (x  =  l, s) complex models reveals that only the a1 vibrational modes with C 2v symmetry are selectively enhanced, from the point view of the change of dipole moment and polarizability induced by the interaction between FN and Ag4 substrate. Furthermore, the direct visualized evidence of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) chemical enhancement mechanism for the FN-Ag complex is presented. The results reveal that only the intermolecular charge transfer with π-π transition characterization between FN and an Ag4 cluster facilitates the resonance Raman process and is directly responsible for chemical enhancement of Raman scattering of the FN-Ag complex.

  18. Resonant enhancement of Raman scattering in metamaterials with hybrid electromagnetic and plasmonic resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guddala, Sriram; Narayana Rao, D.; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2016-06-01

    A tri-layer metamaterial perfect absorber of light, consisting of (Al/ZnS/Al) films with the top aluminum layer patterned as an array of circular disk nanoantennas, is investigated for resonantly enhancing Raman scattering from C60 fullerene molecules deposited on the metamaterial. The metamaterial is designed to have resonant bands due to plasmonic and electromagnetic resonances at the Raman pump frequency (725 nm) as well as Stokes emission bands. The Raman scattering from C60 on the metamaterial with resonantly matched bands is measured to be enhanced by an order of magnitude more than C60 on metamaterials with off-resonant absorption bands peaking at 1090 nm. The Raman pump is significantly enhanced due to the resonance with a propagating surface plasmon band, while the highly impedance-matched electromagnetic resonance is expected to couple out the Raman emission efficiently. The nature and hybridization of the plasmonic and electromagnetic resonances to form compound resonances are investigated by numerical simulations.

  19. Fiber array based hyperspectral Raman imaging for chemical selective analysis of malaria-infected red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Michael; Becker, Katja; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-09-24

    A new setup for Raman spectroscopic wide-field imaging is presented. It combines the advantages of a fiber array based spectral translator with a tailor-made laser illumination system for high-quality Raman chemical imaging of sensitive biological samples. The Gaussian-like intensity distribution of the illuminating laser beam is shaped by a square-core optical multimode fiber to a top-hat profile with very homogeneous intensity distribution to fulfill the conditions of Koehler. The 30 m long optical fiber and an additional vibrator efficiently destroy the polarization and coherence of the illuminating light. This homogeneous, incoherent illumination is an essential prerequisite for stable quantitative imaging of complex biological samples. The fiber array translates the two-dimensional lateral information of the Raman stray light into separated spectral channels with very high contrast. The Raman image can be correlated with a corresponding white light microscopic image of the sample. The new setup enables simultaneous quantification of all Raman spectra across the whole spatial area with very good spectral resolution and thus outperforms other Raman imaging approaches based on scanning and tunable filters. The unique capabilities of the setup for fast, gentle, sensitive, and selective chemical imaging of biological samples were applied for automated hemozoin analysis. A special algorithm was developed to generate Raman images based on the hemozoin distribution in red blood cells without any influence from other Raman scattering. The new imaging setup in combination with the robust algorithm provides a novel, elegant way for chemical selective analysis of the malaria pigment hemozoin in early ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes.

  20. Biomedical Applications of Micro-Raman and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    1266, 1270 + + Amide III α-helix, lipid =CH deformation41 1320, 1323 + + C, CH deformation41 1338 + + + A, G, CH deformation41 1447 + + + protein C...Abbreviations: (p) protein ; (l) lipid ; and (d) DNA/RNA. 25 The Raman spectra of DU 145 in Fig. 15 show close resemblance to each other. These...The difference in the intensities of the Amide I bands indicate that the proteins to lipids content of the cells in set A is higher than those in