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Sample records for rand corporation study

  1. RAND's Impact in the Middle East. Corporate Publication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RAND Corporation, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The RAND Corporation works throughout the Middle East to analyze complex policy problems and help policymakers create enduring solutions. RAND's work in the Middle East focuses on the issues that drive economic development. This brief report provides an overview of RAND's impact in the Middle East in the areas of supporting youth, health and…

  2. 77 FR 6156 - Rand Capital Corporation, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... venture capital investments in small, early-stage and developing enterprises. Rand's principal objective... COMMISSION Rand Capital Corporation, et al.; Notice of Application February 1, 2012. AGENCY: Securities and... Act'') granting an exemption from section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. Applicants: Rand...

  3. A Case Study of MEDCANGRO Relative to RAND Conceptual Framework.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alvin; Hogan, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The 2010 Department of Defense (DoD) Instruction 6000.16, Military Health Support for Stability Operations, established medical stability operations as a core military mission. National military leaders appreciated that to better manage risks for US military personnel operating in far forward locations, reduce cost and footprint requirements for operations, and aid partner nations with providing service to relevant populations in underserviced/undergoverned the US military would need to be employed strategically in efforts to build partner nation medical capacity. Medical Stability Operations has evolved into Global Health Engagement in the lexicon of planners but the goal is still the same. This article used a technical report authored by the RAND Corporation as the basis of a case study of a Special Operations Command Africa (SOCAF) Mission to the country of Niger to build a casualty evacuation capability. The case study evaluates the utility of a hypothetical framework developed by the RAND researchers relative to the actual events and outcomes of an actual mission. The principal finding is that the RAND technical report is of value to planners, Operators, and trainers as a systematic approach to successful building partner capacity in health (BPC-H) missions. The article also offers several examples of metrics that aid leadership in making better decisions as to when corrective actions might be required. PMID:26125176

  4. Rand Corporation

    MedlinePlus

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  5. Middle School: Lessons from the Rand Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunting, Carolyn E.

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on a recent study by the Rand Corporation that concluded that there is cause for middle schools to worry. Commissioned by the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation, one of four major philanthropies supporting the middle school movement, the Rand investigation is clear in its assessment: The American middle school leaves adolescents…

  6. Organizing complexity: the hopeful dreams and harsh realities of interdisciplinary collaboration at the rand corporation in the early cold war.

    PubMed

    Bessner, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Historians argue that in the early Cold War an interdisciplinary research culture defined the RAND Corporation. However, a significant epistemological gap divided the members of RAND's Social Science Division (SSD) from the rest of the organization. While the social scientists used qualitative methods, most RAND researchers embraced quantified approaches and derided the social sciences as unscientific. This encouraged RAND's social scientists to develop a political-military simulation that embraced everything-politics, culture, and psychology-that RAND's other analysts largely ignored. Yet the fact that the SSD embraced gaming, a heuristic practiced throughout RAND, suggests that the political simulation was nonetheless inspired by social scientists' engagement with their colleagues. This indicates that the concept of interdisciplinarity should move beyond its implication of collaboration to incorporate instances in which research agendas are defined against but also shaped by colleagues in other disciplines. Such a rethinking of the term may make it possible to trace how varieties of interdisciplinary interaction historically informed knowledge production.

  7. Organizing complexity: the hopeful dreams and harsh realities of interdisciplinary collaboration at the rand corporation in the early cold war.

    PubMed

    Bessner, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Historians argue that in the early Cold War an interdisciplinary research culture defined the RAND Corporation. However, a significant epistemological gap divided the members of RAND's Social Science Division (SSD) from the rest of the organization. While the social scientists used qualitative methods, most RAND researchers embraced quantified approaches and derided the social sciences as unscientific. This encouraged RAND's social scientists to develop a political-military simulation that embraced everything-politics, culture, and psychology-that RAND's other analysts largely ignored. Yet the fact that the SSD embraced gaming, a heuristic practiced throughout RAND, suggests that the political simulation was nonetheless inspired by social scientists' engagement with their colleagues. This indicates that the concept of interdisciplinarity should move beyond its implication of collaboration to incorporate instances in which research agendas are defined against but also shaped by colleagues in other disciplines. Such a rethinking of the term may make it possible to trace how varieties of interdisciplinary interaction historically informed knowledge production. PMID:25418794

  8. Recent Contributions of Information Sciences Research at RAND to Modeling- and Simulation-Based Policy Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, G. L.; And Others

    This report presents examples of Rand's current research in the information sciences and illustrates the application of information science tools to specific policy studies. The projects discussed depict Rand's success with using corporate seed money to bridge the gap between the research and development of new information science tools and…

  9. Domestic Research at Rand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rand Corp., Santa Monica, CA.

    This third descriptive inventory of the Rand Corporation's domestic non-military research covers all projects since 1972, as well as its special 1969-1975 program for New York City. For each of over 300 research projects in nine program areas, brief summaries identify the project title and sponsor, beginning and ending dates, person-years of work…

  10. The Social Cognition Psychometric Evaluation Study: Results of the Expert Survey and RAND Panel

    PubMed Central

    Pinkham, Amy E.; Penn, David L.; Green, Michael F.; Buck, Benjamin; Healey, Kristin; Harvey, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In schizophrenia, social cognition is strongly linked to functional outcome and is increasingly seen as a viable treatment target. The goal of the Social Cognition Psychometric Evaluation (SCOPE) study is to identify and improve the best existing measures of social cognition so they can be suitably applied in large-scale treatment studies. Initial phases of this project sought to (1) develop consensus on critical domains of social cognition and (2) identify the best existing measures of social cognition for use in treatment studies. Methods: Experts in social cognition were invited to nominate key domains of social cognition and the best measures of those domains. Nominations for measures were reduced according to set criteria, and all available psychometric information about these measures was summarized and provided to RAND panelists. Panelists rated the quality of each measure on multiple criteria, and diverging ratings were discussed at the in-person meeting to obtain consensus. Results: Expert surveys identified 4 core domains of social cognition—emotion processing, social perception, theory of mind/mental state attribution, and attributional style/bias. Using RAND panel consensus ratings, the following measures were selected for further evaluation: Ambiguous Intentions Hostility Questionnaire, Bell Lysaker Emotion Recognition Task, Penn Emotion Recognition Test, Relationships Across Domains, Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test, The Awareness of Social Inferences Test, Hinting Task, and Trustworthiness Task. Discussion: While it was possible to establish consensus, only a limited amount of psychometric information is currently available for the candidate measures, which underscores the need for well-validated and standardized measures in this area. PMID:23728248

  11. Teaching Generic Skills for the Workplace. RAND Education & Human Resources Program. Policy Brief. Issue Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rand Corp., Santa Monica, CA.

    Studies conducted by Rand Corporation suggested that students did not need to be taught generic skills and work-related attitudes in actual workplaces. Such instruction could occur effectively at schools in traditional stand alone classrooms. To develop an instructional model for teaching generic skills, researchers used ethnographic methods to…

  12. RAND's Rose-Colored Glasses: How RAND's Report on U.S. Competitiveness in Science and Technology Gets It Wrong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ezell, Stephen J.; Atkinson, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years a number of reports have raised alarm over the deteriorating state of U.S. science and technology (S&T) competitiveness. But a recent report by the RAND Corporation, "U.S. Competitiveness in Science and Technology," argues that the U.S. continues to lead the world. RAND's report has been interpreted to suggest that the "clarion…

  13. Making an Impact in the Kurdistan Region--Iraq. Summary of Four Studies to Assess the Present and Future Labor Market, Improve Technical Vocational Education and Training, Reform the Health Sector, and Build Data Collection Capacity. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, C. Ross; Constant, Louay; Culbertson, Shelby; Click, Peter; Kumar, Krishna B.; Meili, Robin C.; Moore, Melinda; Shatz, Howard J.; Vernez, Georges

    2015-01-01

    This executive summary describes key results from four studies carried out by the RAND Corporation as part of Phase II of its work for the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG). The KRG asked RAND to undertake several studies aimed at improving the economic and social development of the Kurdistan Region--Iraq (KRI). RAND's work is intended to help…

  14. A simulation based approach to optimize inventory replenishment with RAND algorithm: An extended study of corrected demand using Holt's method for textile industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed, Mohammad Sarwar; Kamal, Mostafa Mashnoon; Khan, Somaiya Islam

    2016-07-01

    Inventory has been a major concern in supply chain and numerous researches have been done lately on inventory control which brought forth a number of methods that efficiently manage inventory and related overheads by reducing cost of replenishment. This research is aimed towards providing a better replenishment policy in case of multi-product, single supplier situations for chemical raw materials of textile industries in Bangladesh. It is assumed that industries currently pursue individual replenishment system. The purpose is to find out the optimum ideal cycle time and individual replenishment cycle time of each product for replenishment that will cause lowest annual holding and ordering cost, and also find the optimum ordering quantity. In this paper indirect grouping strategy has been used. It is suggested that indirect grouping Strategy outperforms direct grouping strategy when major cost is high. An algorithm by Kaspi and Rosenblatt (1991) called RAND is exercised for its simplicity and ease of application. RAND provides an ideal cycle time (T) for replenishment and integer multiplier (ki) for individual items. Thus the replenishment cycle time for each product is found as T×ki. Firstly, based on data, a comparison between currently prevailing (individual) process and RAND is provided that uses the actual demands which presents 49% improvement in total cost of replenishment. Secondly, discrepancies in demand is corrected by using Holt's method. However, demands can only be forecasted one or two months into the future because of the demand pattern of the industry under consideration. Evidently, application of RAND with corrected demand display even greater improvement. The results of this study demonstrates that cost of replenishment can be significantly reduced by applying RAND algorithm and exponential smoothing models.

  15. Middle Miocene Displacement Along the Rand Detachment Fault, Rand Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulaker, D. Z.; Grove, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Laramide flat-slab subduction extinguished Sierra Nevada pluton emplacement in southern California by ca. 85 Ma as trench-derived sediments were underthrust and accreted beneath arc basement. These relationships are well illustrated in the Rand Mountains, situated just south of the Garlock fault in the northwestern Mojave Desert. Here, accreted rocks within the Rand Mountains are referred to as Rand Schist. The Rand Detachment fault juxtaposes Rand Schist beneath 87 Ma Sierran granitoids. New zircon (U-Th)/He age results from schist and basement juxtaposed across the Rand Detachment fault are 15 ± 3 Ma and 30 ± 5 Ma, respectively. When considered within the context of previously reported thermochronology from the Rand Mountains, our data shows that the Rand Detachment fault in the Rand Mountains is a middle Miocene fault that facilitated extension of the northwest Mojave Desert. This timing is in temporal and spatial agreement with regional extension throughout the Mojave triggered by northern migration of the slab window after collision of the Mendocino Triple Junction with the southern California margin. Further evidence of slab-window-related magmatism in the easternmost Rand Mountains is provided by the 19 Ma Yellow Aster pluton and 19 Ma rhyolite porphyry. It is possible that Miocene extension re-activated an older structure within the Rand Mountains. For example, a similar low-angle fault juxtaposing schist and basement present in the San Emigdio Mountains is believed to have accommodated large scale Late Cretaceous displacement, exhuming Rand Schist and overlying deepest Sierran basement to shallow crustal levels by 77 Ma [1]. However, 68-72 Ma phengite cooling ages and other thermochronology from the Rand Mountains indicates that any pre-Miocene extension in this area must postdate that in the San Emigdio Mountains. [1] Chapman et al., 2012. Geosphere, 8, 314-341.

  16. Limiting Nonresponse in Longitudinal Research: Three Strategies for School-Based Studies. A RAND Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellickson, Phyllis L.

    Longitudinal studies conducted with children typically experience non-response problems that can make substantial inroads on sample size and introduce bias into the analysis. Three methods for limiting non-response in school-based research programs were assessed: (1) asking parents to return consent forms only if they do not want their children to…

  17. RAND Report on Charter Schools and Vouchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins-Gough, Deborah

    2002-01-01

    Highlights some of the major findings of the December 2001 RAND report on charter schools and vouchers prepared by Brain P. Gill, P. Michael Timpane, Karen E. Ross, and Dominic J. Brewer. The report can be ordered from RAND at www.rand.org/publications. (PKP)

  18. Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act. RAND Quarterly Report, October 2008. TR-621-LACPD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Terry; Turner, Susan; Ridgeway, Greg

    2008-01-01

    In July 2008, RAND Corporation staff conducted Correctional Program Checklist (CPC) assessments of five home-based programs (Asian Youth Center, Communities in Schools, Inter-Agency Drug Abuse Recovery Programs, Soledad Enrichment Action, and Stars Behavioral Health Group) as part of its ongoing evaluation of Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act…

  19. Designing an Effective Prevention Program: Principles Underlying the Rand Smoking and Drug Prevention Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellickson, Phyllis L.

    This paper describes the Project ALERT program (Adolescent Learning Experiences in Resistance Training) which was established by the Rand Corporation to prevent smoking and drug use among seventh graders. The program is based on the social influence model of drug use initiation. Curriculum features are described including motivation to resist and…

  20. Hopf bifurcation of a generalized Moon-Rand system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llibre, Jaume; Valls, Clàudia

    2015-03-01

    We study the Hopf bifurcation from the equilibrium point at the origin of a generalized Moon-Rand system. We prove that the Hopf bifurcation can produce 8 limit cycles. The main tool for proving these results is the averaging theory of fourth order. The computations are not difficult, but very big and have been done with the help of Mathematica and Mapple.

  1. Who in the World Is Ayn Rand?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsell, Rhodena; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to underscore the importance of reading the works of author Ayn Rand. Special focus will be placed on her novella, "The Anthem" (1938). A main idea questioning strategy will be used to reveal Rand's philosophy and determine the most salient points for ethical administrators. Focus will be placed on the following…

  2. The RAND Health Insurance Experiment, Three Decades Later*

    PubMed Central

    Aron-Dine, Aviva; Einav, Liran; Finkelstein, Amy

    2013-01-01

    We re-present and re-examine the analysis from the famous RAND Health Insurance Experiment from the 1970s on the impact of consumer cost sharing in health insurance on medical spending. We begin by summarizing the experiment and its core findings in a manner that would be standard in the current age. We then examine potential threats to the validity of a causal interpretation of the experimental treatment effects stemming from different study participation and differential reporting of outcomes across treatment arms. Finally, we re-consider the famous RAND estimate that the elasticity of medical spending with respect to its out-of-pocket price is −0.2, emphasizing the challenges associated with summarizing the experimental treatment effects from non-linear health insurance contracts using a single price elasticity. PMID:24610973

  3. [Corporal Punishment. Three Works:] The Influence of Corporal Punishment on Learning: A Statistical Study. The Bible and the Rod. 1001 Alternatives to Corporal Punishment, Volume One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Adah; Wallerstein, James S.

    Arguments against the use of corporal punishment in schools are presented in the three publications collected here. "The Influence of Corporal Punishment on Learning: A Statistical Study," by Adah Maurer and James S. Wallerstein, examines the relationship between rates of corporal punishment use and noncompletion of high school in the 50 states.…

  4. Foreign Languages and Corporate Study: A Successful Marriage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halvorson, Glenn; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The Multi-National Corporate Studies Program at Upsala College integrates foreign language study with international business studies. The program, which culminates in domestic and foreign internships, is described. (SW)

  5. PR Students, Teachers Welcome Corporate Case Study Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broom, Glen M.; Ferguson-De Thorne, Mary Ann

    1978-01-01

    Reports on an actual public relations problem that was used to introduce students to the practice of corporate public relations. Shows both positive and negative reaction to use of the case study in college classes. (RL)

  6. Development and validation of the RAND Asthma Control Measure.

    PubMed

    Lara, Marielena; Edelen, Maria Orlando; Eberhart, Nicole K; Stucky, Brian D; Sherbourne, Cathy D

    2014-11-01

    Patient-based measures for asthma control are important in assessing the worldwide impact of this highly prevalent chronic illness. We sought to refine an asthma symptom scale that RAND had previously developed to shorten it and validate it further, as well as reflect updated international expert definitions of asthma control. We conducted rigorous psychometric testing of new and adapted self-administered survey items in a sample of 2032 adults with asthma. The reliability and preliminary validity of the resulting measure, henceforth referred to as the RAND Asthma Control Measure (RAND-ACM), matched or exceeded that of the original RAND measure and others in the literature. RAND-ACM scores for worse asthma control were significantly associated with worse asthma-related quality of life, increased asthma-related healthcare use, Hispanic ethnicity and lower educational level. Evidence for internal consistency was strong with a Cronbach's α of 0.84. We also found adequate concordance between the RAND-ACM and the Global Initiative for Asthma categories of "uncontrolled", "partly controlled" and "controlled" asthma. The RAND-ACM, a five-item self-reported asthma control survey measure, performs well in a large ethnically-diverse sample of US adults with asthma and provides a cost-free alternative to other asthma control measures currently available.

  7. A Study of Alternatives in American Education, Vol. IV: Family Choice in Schooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, R. Gary; Blackman, Julie

    Originating in the Rand Corporation's evaluation of the voucher demonstration project in the Alum Rock Union School District (California), this study of family choice in schooling focuses on these questions: Are parents motivated and competent to make intelligent choices among competing educational alternatives? What kinds of schools do parents…

  8. User Design: A Case Study on Corporate Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastore, Raymond S.; Carr-Chellman, Alison A.; Lohmann, Neal

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of implementing user design strategies within the corporate culture. Using a case study design approach, this article explores the change process within a "Fortune" 100 company in which users were given significant decision-making powers. The main focus is on the unique nature of user design in…

  9. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Marvin Rand, Photographer August 1971 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Marvin Rand, Photographer August 1971 FIRST FLOOR: MUSIC ROOM (Stained Glass Windows Designed by Shepard) - Villa Montezuma, 1925 K Street, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  10. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Marvin Rand, Photographer September 1965 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Marvin Rand, Photographer September 1965 EAST ELEVATION (Showing Upper Balcony) - Drum Barracks Officers' Quarters, 1053-1955 Cary Avenue, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Marvin Rand, Photographer September 1971 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Marvin Rand, Photographer September 1971 STAINED GLASS WINDOW WITH BRACKETS FOR TRUSSES - St. Matthew's Episcopal Church, 521 East Eighth Street, National City, San Diego County, CA

  12. 20. Photocopy of photograph (From Frances Rand Smith Collection, California ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopy of photograph (From Frances Rand Smith Collection, California Historical Society) Photographer unknown, Date unknown VIEW OF CHURCH FROM REAR - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  13. 16. Photocopy of photograph (from Frances Rand Smith Collection, California ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of photograph (from Frances Rand Smith Collection, California Historical Society, 1900) Photographer unknown, Date unknown FRONT VIEW OF MISSION, c. 1900 - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  14. The Management of Training in Multinational Corporations: Comparative Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Case studies of British and Australian multinational corporations in the food and drink industry investigated how training and development are managed. Competency-based education and industry boards are important elements in both countries. Lack of a training culture in the industry and little innovation in training were observed. (SK)

  15. An Exploratory Study of Corporate Universities in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sham, Clare

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this paper is to examine the empirical status of corporate universities (CUs) in China. An a priori CU framework was employed in an attempt to describe the key functions that an ideal type of CU in China should perform. Design/methodology/approach: Three case studies were conducted to test the relevance of this…

  16. Semiconductor Research Corporation: A Case Study in Cooperative Innovation Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logar, Nathaniel; Anadon, Laura Diaz; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    In the study of innovation institutions, it is important to consider how different institutional models can affect a research organization in conducting or funding successful work. As an industry collaborative, Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) provides an example of a privately funded institution that leverages the inputs of several member…

  17. From Data to Bonuses: A Case Study of the Issues Related to Awarding Teachers Pay on the Basis of Their Students' Progress. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Performance Incentives, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In "From Data to Bonuses: A Case Study of the Issues Related to Awarding Teachers Pay on the Basis of their Students' Progress"--a paper presented at the National Center on Performance Incentives research to policy conference in February--Daniel McCaffrey, Bing Han, and J.R. Lockwood of the RAND Corporation discuss the complex process of designing…

  18. Reading "The Fountainhead": The Missing Self in Ayn Rand's Ethical Individualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fand, Roxanne J.

    2009-01-01

    Ayn Rand's novel "The Fountainhead" can be a useful text in an undergraduate English class, helping students think through issues of individualism. Rand's own concept of the self, however, ignores its social dimensions. (Contains 7 notes.)

  19. Reducing Energy Cost and Greenhouse Gas Emission in the Corporate Sector, a Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Maxim L.

    2013-01-01

    The study is titled "Reducing energy cost and GreenHouse Gas emission in the corporate sector, A Delphi Study". The study applied the Delphi methodology and focused on the Green IT solutions that can help the modern corporate organizations with less than 1000 employees to decrease their energy costs and GHG emissions. The study presents…

  20. Comprehensive Renewable Energy Feasibility Study for Sealaska Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Lynette; John Wade: Larry Coupe

    2006-06-30

    The purposes of this project were: (1) to conduct a comprehensive feasibility study to determine the potential sustainability of wind and/or small hydroelectric power plants on Southeast Alaska native village lands, and (2) to provide the villages with an understanding of the requirements, costs, and benefits of developing and operating wind or small hydroelectric power plants. The program was sponsored by the Tribal Energy program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US Department of Energy. The Contractor was Sealaska Corporation, the Regional Native Corporation for Southeast Alaska that includes 12 village/urban corporations. Most villages are isolated from any central electric transmission and use diesel-electric systems for power generation, making them prime candidates for deploying renewable energy sources. Wind Energy - A database was assembled for all of the candidate sites in SE Alaska, including location, demographics, electricity supply and demand, existing and planned transmission interties with central generation, topographical maps, macro wind data, and contact personnel. Field trips were conducted at the five candidate villages that were deemed most likely to have viable wind resources. Meetings were held with local village and utility leaders and the requirements, costs, and benefits of having local renewable energy facilities were discussed. Two sites were selected for anemometry based on their needs and the probability of having viable wind resources – Yakutat and Hoonah. Anemometry was installed at both sites and at least one year of wind resource data was collected from the sites. This data was compared to long-term data from the closest weather stations. Reports were prepared by meteorologist John Wade that contains the details of the measured wind resources and energy production projections. Preliminary financial analysis of hypothetical wind power stations were prepared to gauge the economic viability of installing such

  1. Wiki as a Corporate Learning Tool: Case Study for Software Development Company

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milovanovic, Milos; Minovic, Miroslav; Stavljanin, Velimir; Savkovic, Marko; Starcevic, Dusan

    2012-01-01

    In our study, we attempted to further investigate how Web 2.0 technologies influence workplace learning. Our particular interest was on using Wiki as a tool for corporate exchange of knowledge with the focus on informal learning. In this study, we collaborated with a multinational software development company that uses Wiki as a corporate tool…

  2. 3M corporate incinerator environmental monitoring study and risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, J.B.; Elnabarawy, M.T.; Pilney, J.

    1998-12-31

    A one-year multi-media environmental monitoring study was performed around the 3M Cottage Grove Facility. Particulate metals from the 3M Corporate hazardous waste incinerator were the focus of the study. Two environmental media were of primary interest: area soil sampling was conducted to investigate the impact of past incinerator emissions on the environment, and ambient air monitoring was conducted to address current impacts. Over 180 soil samples were taken from both agricultural and forested land in the vicinity of the Facility. More than 25 chemical parameters were then quantified in the samples. The potential impacts of past emissions from the incinerator were assessed by comparing chemical concentrations from locations where incinerator impacts were expected to be greatest (based on air dispersion modeling) to chemical concentrations in matched samples from sites expected to be least impacted. The ambient air monitoring network consisted of six stations. Source-receptor modeling was used to determine the most likely contribution of the incinerator and six additional major area sources for the air monitoring (i.e. filter) data at each station. The model provided a best-fit analysis regarding the likely contributions of each source to the sample results. The results of these evaluations lead to the conclusion that the current emissions from this Facility do not present an unacceptable risk to human health.

  3. Secondary School Teachers' Perception of Corporal Punishment: A Case Study in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheruvalath, Reena; Tripathi, Medha

    2015-01-01

    This article examines secondary school teachers' perceptions of corporal punishment in India. Although it has been banned in Indian schools, various types of corporal punishment are still used by teachers. It has been mainly used as a mechanism for controlling disciplinary problems in schools. Based on a pilot study of 160 secondary teachers, the…

  4. Designing a Master's Program in Corporate Communication at an Urban University: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Margaret Jones

    To assess how an urban university can take advantage of its setting to design a master's program in corporate communication, a 1987 study of the master's program in corporate communication at Duquesne University of Pittsburgh was conducted. Data were obtained through a survey of 590 local communication professionals, of whom 270 responded (a…

  5. Tutoring: Guided Learning by Doing. RAND Reprints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Douglas C.; And Others

    Individualized instruction significantly improves students' pedagogical and motivational outcomes. The study described here sought to characterize tutorial behaviors that could lead to these benefits and to consider why these behaviors should be pedagogically useful. The experiment studied 16 undergraduate and graduate university students learning…

  6. Food, Drugs, and TV: The Social Study of Corporate Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleifer, David; Penders, Bart

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the contributions in this special issue, which brings together contributions that explore the varied ways in which science is practiced, managed, contested, and abandoned in corporate settings. From these empirical contributions, the authors aim to provoke reflection on the usefulness of the demarcations between for-profit…

  7. A Study on Corporate Security Awareness and Compliance Behavior Intent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Christine Y.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the drivers to encourage employees' security compliance behavior is increasingly important in today's highly networked environment to protect computer and information assets of the company. The traditional approach for corporations to implement technology-based controls, to prevent security breaches is no longer sufficient.…

  8. Corporal punishment, maternal warmth, and child adjustment: a longitudinal study in eight countries.

    PubMed

    Lansford, Jennifer E; Sharma, Chinmayi; Malone, Patrick S; Woodlief, Darren; Dodge, Kenneth A; Oburu, Paul; Pastorelli, Concetta; Skinner, Ann T; Sorbring, Emma; Tapanya, Sombat; Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe; Zelli, Arnaldo; Al-Hassan, Suha M; Alampay, Liane Peña; Bacchini, Dario; Bombi, Anna Silvia; Bornstein, Marc H; Chang, Lei; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Di Giunta, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Two key tasks facing parents across cultures are managing children's behaviors (and misbehaviors) and conveying love and affection. Previous research has found that corporal punishment generally is related to worse child adjustment, whereas parental warmth is related to better child adjustment. This study examined whether the association between corporal punishment and child adjustment problems (anxiety and aggression) is moderated by maternal warmth in a diverse set of countries that vary in a number of sociodemographic and psychological ways. Interviews were conducted with 7- to 10-year-old children (N = 1,196; 51% girls) and their mothers in 8 countries: China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Thailand, and the United States. Follow-up interviews were conducted 1 and 2 years later. Corporal punishment was related to increases, and maternal warmth was related to decreases, in children's anxiety and aggression over time; however, these associations varied somewhat across groups. Maternal warmth moderated the effect of corporal punishment in some countries, with increases in anxiety over time for children whose mothers were high in both warmth and corporal punishment. The findings illustrate the overall association between corporal punishment and child anxiety and aggression as well as patterns specific to particular countries. Results suggest that clinicians across countries should advise parents against using corporal punishment, even in the context of parent-child relationships that are otherwise warm, and should assist parents in finding other ways to manage children's behaviors.

  9. Corporal Punishment, Maternal Warmth, and Child Adjustment: A Longitudinal Study in Eight Countries

    PubMed Central

    Lansford, Jennifer E.; Sharma, Chinmayi; Malone, Patrick S.; Woodlief, Darren; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Oburu, Paul; Pastorelli, Concetta; Skinner, Ann T.; Sorbring, Emma; Tapanya, Sombat; Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe; Zelli, Arnaldo; Al-Hassan, Suha M.; Alampay, Liane Peña; Bacchini, Dario; Bombi, Anna Silvia; Bornstein, Marc H.; Chang, Lei; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Di Giunta, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Objective Two key tasks facing parents across cultures are managing children’s behaviors (and misbehaviors) and conveying love and affection. Previous research has found that corporal punishment generally is related to worse child adjustment, whereas parental warmth is related to better child adjustment. This study examined whether the association between corporal punishment and child adjustment problems (anxiety and aggression) is moderated by maternal warmth in a diverse set of countries that vary in a number of sociodemographic and psychological ways. Method Interviews were conducted with 7- to 10-year-old children (N = 1,196; 51% girls) and their mothers in eight countries: China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Thailand, and the United States. Follow-up interviews were conducted one and two years later. Results Corporal punishment was related to increases, and maternal warmth was related to decreases, in children’s anxiety and aggression over time; however, these associations varied somewhat across groups. Maternal warmth moderated the effect of corporal punishment in some countries, with increases in anxiety over time for children whose mothers were high in both warmth and corporal punishment. Conclusions The findings illustrate the overall association between corporal punishment and child anxiety and aggression as well as patterns specific to particular countries. Results suggest that clinicians across countries should advise parents against using corporal punishment, even in the context of parent-child relationships that are otherwise warm, and should assist parents in finding other ways to manage children’s behaviors. PMID:24885184

  10. The quest to make accessibility a corporate article of faith at Microsoft: case study of corporate culture and human resource dimensions.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Leonard A; Blanck, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This case study examines efforts by Microsoft Corporation to enhance the diversity of its workforce and improve the accessibility and usability of its products and services for persons with disabilities. The research explores the relation among the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, corporate leadership, attitudes and behaviors towards individuals with disabilities, and dynamics that shape organizational culture at Microsoft. Implications for Microsoft, other employers, researchers, and the disability community are discussed.

  11. The quest to make accessibility a corporate article of faith at Microsoft: case study of corporate culture and human resource dimensions.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Leonard A; Blanck, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This case study examines efforts by Microsoft Corporation to enhance the diversity of its workforce and improve the accessibility and usability of its products and services for persons with disabilities. The research explores the relation among the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, corporate leadership, attitudes and behaviors towards individuals with disabilities, and dynamics that shape organizational culture at Microsoft. Implications for Microsoft, other employers, researchers, and the disability community are discussed. PMID:15706606

  12. Central and South West Corporation`s avian activity study - preconstruction phase

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, J.; Randell, S.; Bouchard, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    A pre-construction avian activity study at the CSW wind farm site is underway. Resident and migratory avian species are being monitored with special emphasis on the incidence of birds passing over or through the wind turbine line and within the circumference of the turbine blades. Diurnal activity is monitored by unaided visual and field glass observation, while nocturnal activity is monitored with marine radar and image intensifying optics. This report reviews the study`s design, methodology, and preliminary data. A total of 872 birds were seen in 194 hours from December 1993 to November 1994. The turkey vulture, vesper sparrow, American kestrel, golden eagle, and white-throated swift were the species most frequently observed flying through wind turbine blade space. Monitoring will continue after construction. This is one of few studies we know of that looks at pre- and post-construction avian activity.

  13. RandAgiamo™, a Pilot Project Increasing Adoptability of Shelter Dogs in the Umbria Region (Italy)

    PubMed Central

    Menchetti, Laura; Mancini, Stefania; Catalani, Maria Chiara; Boccini, Beatrice; Diverio, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary In Italy, dog shelters are overcrowded because the rate of dog adoption is lower than that of abandonment. A project called “RandAgiamo” was implemented in a rescue shelter in central Italy. RandAgiamo provides training, socialization and advertising of adult shelter dogs. Official data of the Umbria regional health authorities from the year 2014 showed a higher rate of adoption in shelters involved in the project. RandAgiamo dogs had triple odds of being adopted compared to others housed in shelters of the same province. The increase in adoption rate can be beneficial for both dog welfare and shelter management. Abstract Current Italian legislation does not permit euthanasia of dogs, unless they are ill or dangerous. Despite good intentions and ethical benefits, this “no-kill policy” has caused a progressive overpopulation of dogs in shelters, due to abandonment rates being higher than adoption rates. Shelter overcrowding has negative implications for dog welfare and increases public costs. The aim of this paper is to describe the pilot project “RandAgiamo” implemented in a rescue shelter in the Umbria Region and to evaluate its effectiveness on the rate of dog adoption using official data. RandAgiamo aimed to increase adult shelter dogs’ adoptability by a standard training and socialization programme. It also promoted dogs’ visibility by publicizing them through social media and participation in events. We analysed the official data of the Umbria regional health authorities regarding dog shelters of the Perugia province of the year 2014. In the RandAgiamo shelter, the dog adoption rate was 27.5% higher than that of dogs housed in other shelters located in the same geographical area (p < 0.001). The RandAgiamo project could be beneficial for the dogs’ welfare, owner satisfaction, shelter management, and public perception of shelter dogs. However, staff were required to provide dog training and related activities. PMID:26479385

  14. Corporal Punishment and Physical Maltreatment against Children: A Community Study on Chinese Parents in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Catherine So-kum

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine rates and associated factors of parent-to-child corporal punishment and physical maltreatment in Hong Kong Chinese families. Method: Cross-sectional and randomized household interviews were conducted with 1,662 Chinese parents to collect information on demographic characteristics of parents and children,…

  15. Case studies in corporate compliance: putting the rubber to the road.

    PubMed

    Shah, Udayan K; Schmidt, Richard J; Hussain, S S Musheer; Cook, Steven P; Smith, Gina M; Ziv, Barbara E; Reilly, James S

    2009-08-01

    An interdisciplinary, proactive perspective allows providers to engage in productive, long-term collaborative relationships with corporations, while 1) maintaining patient care improvements; 2) maintaining legality; 3) enhancing technical and clinical innovation; and 4) providing fair compensation for work done. The case study approach is used to demonstrate an effective approach to compliant behavior.

  16. A Phenomenological Study on the Potential Impact of Implementing Information Systems in Midsize Corporations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khatib, Eid

    2010-01-01

    In spite of enormous investment and remarkable advancement in information system technology (IST) corporations, human integration remains the dominant factor in their success. While 10% of the failure can be attributed to technique failures, 90% are due to human issues. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to capture the…

  17. American Business and the Public School: Case Studies of Corporate Involvement in Public Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Marsha, Ed.; Trachtman, Roberta, Ed.

    This document provides case studies, written by the people involved, of the following private sector/public school collaborations: (1) Honeywell; (2) Metropolitan Life Insurance and the American Educator; (3) Burger King Corporation; (4) Murray Bergtraum High School for Business Careers; (5) The Public Education Fund; (6) The Boston Compact; and…

  18. Application of Universal Design for Learning in Corporate Technical Training Design: A Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irbe, Aina G.

    2016-01-01

    With the rise of a globalized economy and an overall increase in online learning, corporate organizations have increased training through the online environment at a rapid pace. Providing effective training the employee can immediately apply to the job has driven a need to improve online training programs. Numerous studies have identified that the…

  19. A Qualitative Study on the Obstacles Preventing the Successful Implementation of Web 2.0 in Corporate Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Luis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the obstacles to the adoption of Web 2.0 technologies as part of corporate learning solutions and strategies. The study followed a qualitative inquiry approach. The sample consisted of 20 corporate learning professionals who are members of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD) social…

  20. Corporal punishment and children's externalizing problems: a cross-sectional study of Tanzanian primary school aged children.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Tobias; Hermenau, Katharin; Isele, Dorothea; Elbert, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The adverse effect of harsh corporal punishment on mental health and psychosocial functioning in children has been repeatedly suggested by studies in industrialized countries. Nevertheless, corporal punishment has remained common practice not only in many homes, but is also regularly practiced in schools, particularly in low-income countries, as a measure to maintain discipline. Proponents of corporal punishment have argued that the differences in culture and industrial development might also be reflected in a positive relationship between the use of corporal punishment and improving behavioral problems in low-income nations. In the present study we assessed the occurrence of corporal punishment at home and in school in Tanzanian primary school students. We also examined the association between corporal punishment and externalizing problems. The 409 children (52% boys) from grade 2 to 7 had a mean age of 10.49 (SD=1.89) years. Nearly all children had experienced corporal punishment at some point during their lifetime both in family and school contexts. Half of the respondents reported having experienced corporal punishment within the last year from a family member. A multiple sequential regression analysis revealed that corporal punishment by parents or by caregivers was positively related to children's externalizing problems. The present study provides evidence that Tanzanian children of primary school age are frequently exposed to extreme levels of corporal punishment, with detrimental consequences for externalizing behavior. Our findings emphasize the need to inform parents, teachers and governmental organizations, especially in low-income countries, about the adverse consequences of using corporal punishment be it at home or at school.

  1. Transforming the Corporate Training Function through Developing a Training Strategy and Advisory Board: A Longitudinal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Howard K.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined use of a strategic planning process to reinvent a corporate training department. The naturalistic case describes how the corporate training function gained credibility and influence with senior management, developed alignment with organizational goals, and began transforming the function into a performance improvement…

  2. The Social Study of Corporate Science: A Research Manifesto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penders, Bart; Verbakel, John M. A.; Nelis, Annemiek

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory ethnographies have provided valuable insights in the workings of contemporary science and technology and about facts in the making. Nearly all these ethnographic studies have been conducted at nonprofit research institutes. In this article, the authors argue that it is time for science and technology studies (STS) ethnography to direct…

  3. Case Study: eCoaching in a Corporate Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Teri L. C.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative particularistic case study was an exploration and evaluation of an online, asynchronous, non-human coaching system called an "eCoaching system." Developed by the researcher, the eCoaching system combined performance coaching with the latest technologies in eLearning. The coaching was based on the appreciative inquiry approach, and…

  4. The relationship between corporate environmental performance and environmental disclosure: an empirical study in China.

    PubMed

    Meng, X H; Zeng, S X; Shi, Jonathan J; Qi, G Y; Zhang, Z B

    2014-12-01

    Based on a content analysis of 533 Chinese listed companies, this study examines how corporate environmental performance affects not only the level of detail of a company's environmental disclosures, but also what information is disclosed. The results show that (1) both poor and good performers have more disclosure than the median (i.e., "mixed") performers, which provides empirical evidence to support a nonlinear relationship between corporate environmental performance and environmental disclosure; (2) poor performers disclose more soft information on environmental performance than good performers, and good performers disclose more solid information; and (3) although poor performers increase disclosure after being exposed as environmental violators, they avoid disclosing negative environmental information, such as the violation and the associated penalties. This study provides additional evidence for a nonlinear relationship between environmental performance and disclosure in emerging markets, and suggests environmental disclosure may not be a valid signal to differentiate good performers from poor performers in contemporary China.

  5. A MOLA-controlled RAND-USGS Control Network for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archinal, B. A.; Colvin, T. R.; Davies, M. E.; Kirk, R. L.; Duxbury, T. C.; Lee, E. M.; Cook, D.; Gitlin, A. R.

    2002-01-01

    We are undertaking, in support of the Mars Digital Image Mosaic (MDIM) 2.1, many improvements in the RAND-USGS photogrammetric control network for Mars, primarily involving the use of Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA)-derived radii and DIMs to improve control point absolute radii and horizontal positions. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. RandAgiamo™, a Pilot Project Increasing Adoptability of Shelter Dogs in the Umbria Region (Italy).

    PubMed

    Menchetti, Laura; Mancini, Stefania; Catalani, Maria Chiara; Boccini, Beatrice; Diverio, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Current Italian legislation does not permit euthanasia of dogs, unless they are ill or dangerous. Despite good intentions and ethical benefits, this 'no-kill policy' has caused a progressive overpopulation of dogs in shelters, due to abandonment rates being higher than adoption rates. Shelter overcrowding has negative implications for dog welfare and increases public costs. The aim of this paper is to describe the pilot project "RandAgiamo" implemented in a rescue shelter in the Umbria Region and to evaluate its effectiveness on the rate of dog adoption using official data. RandAgiamo aimed to increase adult shelter dogs' adoptability by a standard training and socialization programme. It also promoted dogs' visibility by publicizing them through social media and participation in events. We analysed the official data of the Umbria regional health authorities regarding dog shelters of the Perugia province of the year 2014. In the RandAgiamo shelter, the dog adoption rate was 27.5% higher than that of dogs housed in other shelters located in the same geographical area (P < 0.001). The RandAgiamo project could be beneficial for the dogs' welfare, owner satisfaction, shelter management, and public perception of shelter dogs. However, staff were required to provide dog training and related activities. PMID:26479385

  7. 58. View of high pressure IngersollRand dehumidifier/dessicator and compressor system ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. View of high pressure Ingersoll-Rand dehumidifier/dessicator and compressor system to supply dry pressurized air to waveguides. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  8. Selected Research Publications in Cognitive Science by Rand Staff: 1978-1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, R. H.; And Others

    This selective bibliography of recent publications by Rand researchers in the Information Processing Systems research program includes only those papers concerned with the broad range of topics in cognitive science. These topics include the modeling of complex human behavior, the construction of intelligent computer systems, and the representation…

  9. Living on the edge: timing of Rand Flora disjunctions congruent with ongoing aridification in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Pokorny, Lisa; Riina, Ricarda; Mairal, Mario; Meseguer, Andrea S.; Culshaw, Victoria; Cendoya, Jon; Serrano, Miguel; Carbajal, Rodrigo; Ortiz, Santiago; Heuertz, Myriam; Sanmartín, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    The Rand Flora is a well-known floristic pattern in which unrelated plant lineages show similar disjunct distributions in the continental margins of Africa and adjacent islands—Macaronesia-northwest Africa, Horn of Africa-Southern Arabia, Eastern Africa, and Southern Africa. These lineages are now separated by environmental barriers such as the arid regions of the Sahara and Kalahari Deserts or the tropical lowlands of Central Africa. Alternative explanations for the Rand Flora pattern range from vicariance and climate-driven extinction of a widespread pan-African flora to independent dispersal events and speciation in situ. To provide a temporal framework for this pattern, we used published data from nuclear and chloroplast DNA to estimate the age of disjunction of 17 lineages that span 12 families and nine orders of angiosperms. We further used these estimates to infer diversification rates for Rand Flora disjunct clades in relation to their higher-level encompassing lineages. Our results indicate that most disjunctions fall within the Miocene and Pliocene periods, coinciding with the onset of a major aridification trend, still ongoing, in Africa. Age of disjunctions seemed to be related to the climatic affinities of each Rand Flora lineage, with sub-humid taxa dated earlier (e.g., Sideroxylon) and those with more xeric affinities (e.g., Campylanthus) diverging later. We did not find support for significant decreases in diversification rates in most groups, with the exception of older subtropical lineages (e.g., Sideroxylon, Hypericum, or Canarina), but some lineages (e.g., Cicer, Campylanthus) showed a long temporal gap between stem and crown ages, suggestive of extinction. In all, the Rand Flora pattern seems to fit the definition of biogeographic pseudocongruence, with the pattern arising at different times in response to the increasing aridity of the African continent, with interspersed periods of humidity allowing range expansions. PMID:25983742

  10. Living on the edge: timing of Rand Flora disjunctions congruent with ongoing aridification in Africa.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, Lisa; Riina, Ricarda; Mairal, Mario; Meseguer, Andrea S; Culshaw, Victoria; Cendoya, Jon; Serrano, Miguel; Carbajal, Rodrigo; Ortiz, Santiago; Heuertz, Myriam; Sanmartín, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    The Rand Flora is a well-known floristic pattern in which unrelated plant lineages show similar disjunct distributions in the continental margins of Africa and adjacent islands-Macaronesia-northwest Africa, Horn of Africa-Southern Arabia, Eastern Africa, and Southern Africa. These lineages are now separated by environmental barriers such as the arid regions of the Sahara and Kalahari Deserts or the tropical lowlands of Central Africa. Alternative explanations for the Rand Flora pattern range from vicariance and climate-driven extinction of a widespread pan-African flora to independent dispersal events and speciation in situ. To provide a temporal framework for this pattern, we used published data from nuclear and chloroplast DNA to estimate the age of disjunction of 17 lineages that span 12 families and nine orders of angiosperms. We further used these estimates to infer diversification rates for Rand Flora disjunct clades in relation to their higher-level encompassing lineages. Our results indicate that most disjunctions fall within the Miocene and Pliocene periods, coinciding with the onset of a major aridification trend, still ongoing, in Africa. Age of disjunctions seemed to be related to the climatic affinities of each Rand Flora lineage, with sub-humid taxa dated earlier (e.g., Sideroxylon) and those with more xeric affinities (e.g., Campylanthus) diverging later. We did not find support for significant decreases in diversification rates in most groups, with the exception of older subtropical lineages (e.g., Sideroxylon, Hypericum, or Canarina), but some lineages (e.g., Cicer, Campylanthus) showed a long temporal gap between stem and crown ages, suggestive of extinction. In all, the Rand Flora pattern seems to fit the definition of biogeographic pseudocongruence, with the pattern arising at different times in response to the increasing aridity of the African continent, with interspersed periods of humidity allowing range expansions.

  11. Living on the edge: timing of Rand Flora disjunctions congruent with ongoing aridification in Africa.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, Lisa; Riina, Ricarda; Mairal, Mario; Meseguer, Andrea S; Culshaw, Victoria; Cendoya, Jon; Serrano, Miguel; Carbajal, Rodrigo; Ortiz, Santiago; Heuertz, Myriam; Sanmartín, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    The Rand Flora is a well-known floristic pattern in which unrelated plant lineages show similar disjunct distributions in the continental margins of Africa and adjacent islands-Macaronesia-northwest Africa, Horn of Africa-Southern Arabia, Eastern Africa, and Southern Africa. These lineages are now separated by environmental barriers such as the arid regions of the Sahara and Kalahari Deserts or the tropical lowlands of Central Africa. Alternative explanations for the Rand Flora pattern range from vicariance and climate-driven extinction of a widespread pan-African flora to independent dispersal events and speciation in situ. To provide a temporal framework for this pattern, we used published data from nuclear and chloroplast DNA to estimate the age of disjunction of 17 lineages that span 12 families and nine orders of angiosperms. We further used these estimates to infer diversification rates for Rand Flora disjunct clades in relation to their higher-level encompassing lineages. Our results indicate that most disjunctions fall within the Miocene and Pliocene periods, coinciding with the onset of a major aridification trend, still ongoing, in Africa. Age of disjunctions seemed to be related to the climatic affinities of each Rand Flora lineage, with sub-humid taxa dated earlier (e.g., Sideroxylon) and those with more xeric affinities (e.g., Campylanthus) diverging later. We did not find support for significant decreases in diversification rates in most groups, with the exception of older subtropical lineages (e.g., Sideroxylon, Hypericum, or Canarina), but some lineages (e.g., Cicer, Campylanthus) showed a long temporal gap between stem and crown ages, suggestive of extinction. In all, the Rand Flora pattern seems to fit the definition of biogeographic pseudocongruence, with the pattern arising at different times in response to the increasing aridity of the African continent, with interspersed periods of humidity allowing range expansions. PMID:25983742

  12. A Study on the Models for Corporate Social Responsibility of Small and Medium Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun

    The role of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in corporate social responsibility (CSR) has attracted increasing attention and interest in recent years. The purpose of this study is to build some relevant models of CSR which are the foundations of empirical study later. The paper begins by an overview of the CSR literature in the context of seven step model for CSR and differences between corporate and small businesses. Noting the general lack of theoretical framework in the literature, the paper then presents relevant theoretical models of CSR that could be useful in conducting further research on CSR and SMEs. The study is qualitative in nature, capitalizing on a comparative research design to highlight differences in CSR orientations between SMEs and MNCs. The research is presented and implications are drawn regarding the peculiar relational attributes of SMEs in the context of CSR generally, and developing countries more specifically, and how this inclination can be further nurtured and leveraged. Further research can seek to highlight how to leverage this natural affinity to CSR among SMEs detected in this study in pursuit of more systematic engagement and more benefits.

  13. A case study of infant health promotion and corporate marketing of milk substitutes.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Roger Lee

    2012-06-01

    The mismatch between the demand for, and supply of, health products has led to the increasing involvement of courts worldwide in health promotion and marketing. This study critically examines the implementation of one country's Milk Code within the framework of the International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes, and the efficacy of the judicial process in balancing corporate marketing and state regulatory objectives. Drawing upon the Philippine experience with its own Milk Code, it evaluates the capacities of courts to determine policy costs and risks against the benefits of delineating and containing corporate marketing strategies for milk substitutes and supplements. The study finds that the methodological and information-based challenges faced by courts in resolving multi-dimensional health issues may not be overcome without serious questions concerning the legitimacy of the judicial process itself. Despite the deficiencies of litigation and adjudication, the study notes the catalytic potential of a judicial decision in opening up vital policy space for future renegotiations among rival parties and interests. Third-party intervention is explored relative to this catalytic function.

  14. Children's experiences of corporal punishment: A qualitative study in an urban township of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Breen, Alison; Daniels, Karen; Tomlinson, Mark

    2015-10-01

    Exposure to violence is a serious mental and public health issue. In particular, children exposed to violence are at risk for poor developmental outcomes and physical and mental health problems. One area that has been shown to increase the risk for poor outcomes is the use of corporal punishment as a discipline method. While researchers are starting to ask children directly about their experiences of violence, there is limited research with children about their perspectives on physical punishment, particularly in low-and middle-income countries (LMIC). This paper begins to address this gap by reporting on the spontaneous data that emerged during 24 qualitative interviews that were conducted with children, aged 8-12 in South Africa. The themes that emerged indicated that corporal punishment is an everyday experience, that it has negative emotional and behavioral consequences, and that it plays a role in how children resolve interpersonal conflicts. The study highlights the challenges for violence prevention interventions in under-resourced contexts.

  15. The corporate impact of addressing social issues: a financial case study of a project in Peru.

    PubMed

    Dabbs, Alan; Bateson, Matthew

    2002-05-01

    Large, multinational resource development projects can affect many aspects, including social, economic and ecological realities, in the regions where they operate. Social and environmental issues that are usually ignored in such projects are increasingly affecting the financial future of multinational corporations in negative ways. In this article, we advance the argument that corporations can successfully manage these issues and that if they choose to view these management efforts as an investment rather than an expense, they may well acquire a competitive advantage over companies that do not. We describe as a case study the Camisea natural gas and condensates development project in Peru, operated by Shell Prospecting and Development Peru (SPDP). Camisea is one of the first projects anywhere in the world to conduct a detailed analysis of key industry-related social issues and the processes, required investment and financial impact of managing them. The Camisea example supports the argument that addressing social and environmental concerns makes financial sense. In present value terms, the benefit of managing these concerns was expected to surpass the cost investment by approximately US$50 million. PMID:12125747

  16. The corporate impact of addressing social issues: a financial case study of a project in Peru.

    PubMed

    Dabbs, Alan; Bateson, Matthew

    2002-05-01

    Large, multinational resource development projects can affect many aspects, including social, economic and ecological realities, in the regions where they operate. Social and environmental issues that are usually ignored in such projects are increasingly affecting the financial future of multinational corporations in negative ways. In this article, we advance the argument that corporations can successfully manage these issues and that if they choose to view these management efforts as an investment rather than an expense, they may well acquire a competitive advantage over companies that do not. We describe as a case study the Camisea natural gas and condensates development project in Peru, operated by Shell Prospecting and Development Peru (SPDP). Camisea is one of the first projects anywhere in the world to conduct a detailed analysis of key industry-related social issues and the processes, required investment and financial impact of managing them. The Camisea example supports the argument that addressing social and environmental concerns makes financial sense. In present value terms, the benefit of managing these concerns was expected to surpass the cost investment by approximately US$50 million.

  17. Study on corporate social responsibility evaluation system based on stakeholder theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Deng, Liming

    2011-10-01

    The issue of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has been attracting the attention from many disciplines such as economics, management, laws, sociality and philosophy since last century. The purpose of this study is to explore the impact of CSR on performance and develop a CSR evaluation system. Building on the definition of CSR and Stakeholder theory, this article built a path-relationship model of CSR and business operation performance. The paper also constructed CSR evaluation system based on KLD index, GRJ report, CSR accounting account, SA8000, ISO14000 etc. The research provides a basis for future studies about the relationship between CSR and business performance and shed some light on the evaluation of CSR practices.

  18. Creating corporate advantage.

    PubMed

    Collis, D J; Montgomery, C A

    1998-01-01

    What differentiates truly great corporate strategies from the merely adequate? How can executives at the corporate level create tangible advantage for their businesses that makes the whole more than the sum of the parts? This article presents a comprehensive framework for value creation in the multibusiness company. It addresses the most fundamental questions of corporate strategy: What businesses should a company be in? How should it coordinate activities across businesses? What role should the corporate office play? How should the corporation measure and control performance? Through detailed case studies of Tyco International, Sharp, the Newell Company, and Saatchi and Saatchi, the authors demonstrate that the answers to all those questions are driven largely by the nature of a company's special resources--its assets, skills, and capabilities. These range along a continuum from the highly specialized at one end to the very general at the other. A corporation's location on the continuum constrains the set of businesses it should compete in and limits its choices about the design of its organization. Applying the framework, the authors point out the common mistakes that result from misaligned corporate strategies. Companies mistakenly enter businesses based on similarities in products rather than the resources that contribute to competitive advantage in each business. Instead of tailoring organizational structures and systems to the needs of a particular strategy, they create plain-vanilla corporate offices and infrastructures. The company examples demonstrate that one size does not fit all. One can find great corporate strategies all along the continuum.

  19. Creating corporate advantage.

    PubMed

    Collis, D J; Montgomery, C A

    1998-01-01

    What differentiates truly great corporate strategies from the merely adequate? How can executives at the corporate level create tangible advantage for their businesses that makes the whole more than the sum of the parts? This article presents a comprehensive framework for value creation in the multibusiness company. It addresses the most fundamental questions of corporate strategy: What businesses should a company be in? How should it coordinate activities across businesses? What role should the corporate office play? How should the corporation measure and control performance? Through detailed case studies of Tyco International, Sharp, the Newell Company, and Saatchi and Saatchi, the authors demonstrate that the answers to all those questions are driven largely by the nature of a company's special resources--its assets, skills, and capabilities. These range along a continuum from the highly specialized at one end to the very general at the other. A corporation's location on the continuum constrains the set of businesses it should compete in and limits its choices about the design of its organization. Applying the framework, the authors point out the common mistakes that result from misaligned corporate strategies. Companies mistakenly enter businesses based on similarities in products rather than the resources that contribute to competitive advantage in each business. Instead of tailoring organizational structures and systems to the needs of a particular strategy, they create plain-vanilla corporate offices and infrastructures. The company examples demonstrate that one size does not fit all. One can find great corporate strategies all along the continuum. PMID:10179655

  20. Corporate Social Responsibility: Case Study of Community Expectations and the Administrative Systems, Niger Delta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogula, David

    2012-01-01

    Poor community-company relations in the Niger Delta have drawn attention to the practice of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the region. Since the 1960s, transnational oil corporations operating in the Niger Delta have adopted various CSR strategies, yet community-company relations remain adversarial. This article examines community…

  1. Ethics, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Sustainability Education in AACSB Undergraduate and Graduate Marketing Curricula: A Benchmark Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, Jeananne; Hair, Joseph F., Jr.; Ragland, Charles B.; Schimmel, Kurt E.

    2013-01-01

    AACSB International advocates integration of ethics, corporate social responsibility, and sustainability in all business school disciplines. This study provides an overview of the implementation of these three topics in teaching initiatives and assessment in business schools accredited by AACSB International. Since no comprehensive studies have…

  2. What Kind of Employee Wants to Use Corporate E-Learning: An Empirical Case Study in the Financial Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luor, Tainyi; Lu, Hsi-Peng; Lin, Judy Chuan-Chuan; Yu, Hueiju

    2014-01-01

    Despite the plethora of previous studies on the various uses of e-learning, there is a dearth of research on employees' action to use corporate e-learning (ACE). The present study attempts to address this lack in literature by investigating whether individual factors such as self-esteem and need for cognition, and job factors such as job…

  3. An Exploratory Study of Advancing Mobilization in the Life Insurance Industry: The Case of Taiwan's Nan Shan Life Insurance Corporation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luarn, Pin; Lin, Tom M. Y.; Lo, Peter K. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Employs a case study method, using in-depth interviews of 29 corporate managers and experts, to understand the current state of mobilization in the life insurance industry. Suggests a conceptual framework and formulates possible research propositions incorporating several variables. Suggests 10 key success factors for implementing mobilization in…

  4. The design of a corporate identity for a department of medical illustration: a case study.

    PubMed

    Thompson, G

    2001-06-01

    This paper outlines the author's attempt to design and introduce a corporate identity into the Department of Medical Illustration at the South Buckinghamshire NHS Trust. It is intended to furnish the reader with an insight into the process of designing a corporate identity and to relate one department's experience. This may be useful for those who wish to develop a corporate identity of their own or contribute, as a department, towards an identity for their own Trust or other institution. A major change in government policy about the identity of NHS Trusts has meant that use of the department's new logo has had to be abandoned in favour of the new NHS corporate identity.

  5. Comparative study of an externship program versus a corporate-academic cooperation program for enhancing nursing competence of graduating students

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background New graduates report intense stress during the transition from school to their first work settings. Managing this transition is important to reduce turnover rates. This study compared the effects of an externship program and a corporate-academic cooperation program on enhancing junior college students’ nursing competence and retention rates in the first 3 months and 1 year of initial employment. Methods This two-phase study adopted a pretest and posttest quasi-experimental design. All participants were graduating students drawn from a 5-year junior nursing college in Taiwan. There were 19 and 24 students who participated in the phase I externship program and phase II corporate-academic cooperation program, respectively. The nursing competence of the students had to be evaluated by mentors within 48 hours of practicum training and after practicum training. The retention rate was also surveyed at 3 months and 1 year after beginning employment. Results Students who participated in the corporate-academic cooperation program achieved a statistically significant improvement in nursing competence and retention rates relative to those who participated in the externship program (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively). Conclusions The corporate-academic cooperation program facilitates the transition of junior college nursing students into independent staff nurses, enhances their nursing competence, and boosts retention rates. PMID:23945287

  6. On Free-Form Gaming. A Rand Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, William M.

    Free-form games are applicable to a range of problem-solving situations. This document discusses gaming as a procedure for organized study of the complex problems entailed in confrontations and crises. The major focus of the booklet is on the various forms of this game type, the kinds of problems to which it is best adapted, and some approaches to…

  7. Sectors and Jobs in Metropolitan Economies. A Rand Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurwitz, Aaron

    A study assessed the potential development of service sectors in different cities throughout the country and compared the results of growth in these and other sectors with respect to their effects on (1) total employment; (2) the geographic dispersion of metropolitan employment; (3) central city fiscal capacity; (4) metropolitan cyclical…

  8. An empirical study on the driving mechanism of proactive corporate environmental management in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianbing; Liu, Beibei; Shishime, Tomohiro; Yu, Qinqin; Bi, Jun; Fujitsuka, Tetsuro

    2010-08-01

    Environmentalism in China is under transformation from the traditional command and control model to emphasize the advantages of economic tools and encourage the participation of the public. Firms are much more aware of the importance of environmental issues, and some of them have practiced environmental activities beyond compliance. In order to help understand the driving mechanism of proactive corporate environmental behaviors from the firm's perspective, this paper identifies the drivers affecting the proactive environmental management level (EML(p)) based on the institutional theory, and gives an empirical study on the firms based in Changshu city of Jiangsu Province, China. The usable data, collected from the 117 valid respondents in a questionnaire survey, indicates that EML(p) is still moderately low currently. Less than 10% of the samples are practicing all the six categorized types of voluntary environmental activities. The econometric exercise confirms a significantly positive effect of the externally mimetic pressure on EML(p), which may attribute to a higher sensitivity of Chinese companies to the market factors. However, the roles of the general public and industrial associations are not significant, showing the marginal power of selected normative pressures. Regarding internal factors, firms, which view environmental issues as opportunities and often arrange internal environmental training, are more likely to adopt proactive environmental activities. More concerns from the general public like neighborhood communities and mass media shall be addressed to enhance the normative power to improve EML(p) in China from the future perspective.

  9. An empirical study on the driving mechanism of proactive corporate environmental management in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianbing; Liu, Beibei; Shishime, Tomohiro; Yu, Qinqin; Bi, Jun; Fujitsuka, Tetsuro

    2010-08-01

    Environmentalism in China is under transformation from the traditional command and control model to emphasize the advantages of economic tools and encourage the participation of the public. Firms are much more aware of the importance of environmental issues, and some of them have practiced environmental activities beyond compliance. In order to help understand the driving mechanism of proactive corporate environmental behaviors from the firm's perspective, this paper identifies the drivers affecting the proactive environmental management level (EML(p)) based on the institutional theory, and gives an empirical study on the firms based in Changshu city of Jiangsu Province, China. The usable data, collected from the 117 valid respondents in a questionnaire survey, indicates that EML(p) is still moderately low currently. Less than 10% of the samples are practicing all the six categorized types of voluntary environmental activities. The econometric exercise confirms a significantly positive effect of the externally mimetic pressure on EML(p), which may attribute to a higher sensitivity of Chinese companies to the market factors. However, the roles of the general public and industrial associations are not significant, showing the marginal power of selected normative pressures. Regarding internal factors, firms, which view environmental issues as opportunities and often arrange internal environmental training, are more likely to adopt proactive environmental activities. More concerns from the general public like neighborhood communities and mass media shall be addressed to enhance the normative power to improve EML(p) in China from the future perspective. PMID:20399552

  10. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity. RAND's Drug Policy Research Center.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Peter; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Caulkins, Jonathan P

    2011-02-01

    In September 1989, amid an emotional and ideological debate regarding problematic drug use in the United States and the 'war on drugs', RAND's Drug Policy Research Center (DPRC) was created through private foundation funds. The purpose of this new research center was to provide objective empirical analysis on which to base sound drug policy. Twenty years later, RAND's DPRC continues its work, drawing on a broad range of analytical expertise to evaluate, compare and assess the effectiveness of a similarly broad range of drug policies. More than 60 affiliated researchers in the United States and Europe make up the Center, which attempts to provide objective empirical analyses to better inform drug policies within the United States and abroad. This paper provides a look back at the creation, evolution and growth of the Center. It then describes how the Center operates today and how it has maintained its clear identity and focus by drawing on the analytical capabilities of a talented group of researchers from a broad range of academic disciplines.

  11. Final Project Report, Bristol Bay Native Corporation Wind and Hydroelectric Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vaught, Douglas J.

    2007-03-31

    The Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC) grant project focused on conducting nine wind resource studies in eight communities in the Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska and was administered as a collaborative effort between BBNC, the Alaska Energy Authority, Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Nushagak Electric Cooperative (NEC), Naknek Electric Association (NEA), and several individual village utilities in the region. BBNC’s technical contact and the project manager for this study was Douglas Vaught, P.E., of V3 Energy, LLC, in Eagle River, Alaska. The Bristol Bay region of Alaska is comprised of 29 communities ranging in size from the hub community of Dillingham with a population of approximately 3,000 people, to a few Native Alaska villages that have a few tens of residents. Communities chosen for inclusion in this project were Dillingham, Naknek, Togiak, New Stuyahok, Kokhanok, Perryville, Clark’s Point, and Koliganek. Selection criteria for conduction of wind resource assessments in these communities included population and commercial activity, utility interest, predicted Class 3 or better wind resource, absence of other sources of renewable energy, and geographical coverage of the region. Beginning with the first meteorological tower installation in October 2003, wind resource studies were completed at all sites with at least one year, and as much as two and a half years, of data. In general, the study results are very promising for wind power development in the region with Class 6 winds measured in Kokhanok; Class 4 winds in New Stuyahok, Clark’s Point, and Koliganek; Class 3 winds in Dillingham, Naknek, and Togiak; and Class 2 winds in Perryville. Measured annual average wind speeds and wind power densities at the 30 meter level varied from a high of 7.87 meters per second and 702 watts per square meter in Kokhanok (Class 6 winds), to a low of 4.60 meters per second and 185 watts per square meter in Perryville (Class 2 winds).

  12. Errant corporations, diffuse responsibilities, and the environment: ethical issues in the Orica case study.

    PubMed

    Grace, Damian

    2009-04-01

    The papers in this volume deal with various aspects of the HCB legacy at the Orica plant at Botany. Whether explicitly or implicitly, they are concerned with questions of ethics; with the just distribution of burdens and benefits; with just processes for disposing of dangerous industrial waste; and with a just custodianship of the Botany environment. These ethical issues illustrate the difficulty of securing corporate accountability, and the elusiveness of responsibility within organisations. This paper reflects on some of the issues for ethics raised by the Orica case and their significance for corporate ethics.

  13. Errant corporations, diffuse responsibilities, and the environment: ethical issues in the Orica case study.

    PubMed

    Grace, Damian

    2009-04-01

    The papers in this volume deal with various aspects of the HCB legacy at the Orica plant at Botany. Whether explicitly or implicitly, they are concerned with questions of ethics; with the just distribution of burdens and benefits; with just processes for disposing of dangerous industrial waste; and with a just custodianship of the Botany environment. These ethical issues illustrate the difficulty of securing corporate accountability, and the elusiveness of responsibility within organisations. This paper reflects on some of the issues for ethics raised by the Orica case and their significance for corporate ethics. PMID:18762363

  14. Corporal punishment.

    PubMed

    Zolotor, Adam J

    2014-10-01

    Corporal punishment is used for discipline in most homes in the United States. It is also associated with a long list of adverse developmental, behavioral, and health-related consequences. Primary care providers, as trusted sources for parenting information, have an opportunity to engage parents in discussions about discipline as early as infancy. These discussions should focus on building parents' skills in the use of other behavioral techniques, limiting (or eliminating) the use of corporal punishment and identifying additional resources as needed.

  15. How Is Corporate Social Responsibility Addressed by Biotech Firms? a Case Study Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pérez-Bustamante, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the biotech high-tech sector as a way to achieve competitive advantages. After presenting the importance of science for high-tech firms, the paper focuses on the social and economic role of CSR. Next, the primary reasons for firms' engagement in CSR activities are presented,…

  16. The Engaged Organization: Corporate Employee Environmental Education Survey and Case Study Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullo, Krista; Haygood, Leah

    2009-01-01

    When the modern U.S. environmental movement began in the 1970s, it relied largely on regulation to reduce negative environmental impacts. Companies responded by creating centers of environmental expertise within their organizations. The major focus of a second wave of corporate environmentalism, which began during the late 1980s, was on…

  17. Systematic Strategic Planning at a State University: A Case Study of Adapting Corporate Planning Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aggarwal, Raj

    1987-01-01

    The adaptation of a typical corporate strategic planning process to a midwestern state university is discussed. The university found that an ongoing planning process with a yearly cycle offers several advantages not available with prior approaches, and that strategic planning is a culture that takes time before it becomes pervasive in any…

  18. Business Speaks: A Study of the Themes in Speeches by America's Corporate Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Robert J.; Kessler, Martha Stout

    1980-01-01

    Identifies the issues concerning the American business community as reflected in speeches by corporate leaders on government regulation, energy, capital investment, inflation, the public image of business, and international business. Strategies for dealing with these issues include increased social responsibility, influencing government policy,…

  19. Enabling Customization through Web Development: An Iterative Study of the Dell Computer Corporation Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chang; Mackie, Brian G.

    2008-01-01

    Throughout the last decade, companies have increased their investment in electronic commerce (EC) by developing and implementing Web-based applications on the Internet. This paper describes a class project to develop a customized computer website which is similar to Dell Computer Corporation's (Dell) website. The objective of this project is to…

  20. Case Studies of Reading in a High Technology Corporation. Reading Competencies and Practices. Technical Report #2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirsch, Irwin; Guthrie, John

    Individuals in 14 job categories at the Analytical Instrument Division of the Hewlett-Packard Corporation were observed and interviewed for six months to determine their reading practices at work and in leisure settings. The individuals ranged from a research chemist and a printed circuit designer, to a quality assurance inspector and a mechanical…

  1. Corporate Training and Development Policies and Practices: A Cross-National Study of India and Britain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yadapadithaya, P. S.; Stewart, Jim

    2003-01-01

    A survey of training and development (T&D) policies and practices in 252 Indian and 174 British companies found significant differences in key T&D responsibility, corporate commitment, needs analysis, and evaluation design. There were similarities in causes/drivers of T&D; aims, levels, and timing of evaluation; instruments used; and challenges.…

  2. CVE and the Corporate Market: A Case Study of the Experience of Warwick Business School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonazzi, Leoni

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the promotion and practice of continuing vocational education (CVE) at Warwick Business School (United Kingdom) for executives within the corporate sector. Highlights include relationship management, brand building, an MBA (Masters in Business Education) refresher course, a strategic management refresher course, and future developments.…

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT-INGERSOLL-RAND ENERGY SYSTEMS IR POWERWORKS(TM) 70 KW MICROTURBINE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the IR PowerWorks 70kW Microturbine System manufactured by Ingersoll-Rand Energy Systems. This system is a 70 kW electrical generator that puts out 480 v AC at 60 Hz and that is driven by...

  4. An Analysis of the Objectivist Ethics in Educational Leadership through Ayn Rand's "The Virtues of Selfishness" (1964)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Karen Dupre; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2007-01-01

    Educational leadership is vital to sustain quality educational institutions. It is the role of the school leader to indoctrinate stakeholders with the objectivist ethics-embracing egoism and relinquishing altruistic ideals when it comes to invigorating the system with sustainable change. Ayn Rand's timeless piece of literature "The Virtue of…

  5. Jane Addams Resource Corporation: A Case Study of a Sectoral Employment Development Approach. Sectoral Employment Development Learning Project Case Studies Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasmeier, Amy K.; Nelson, Candace; Thompson, Jeffery W.

    This case study on the Jane Addams Resource Corporation (JARC) is the third of six sectoral studies to provide an in-depth look at individual sectoral employment development programs and their interaction within distinct economic and industry environments. It explores a community-based organization that developed specialized metalworking and…

  6. Attitudes Justifying Domestic Violence Predict Endorsement of Corporal Punishment and Physical and Psychological Aggression towards Children: A Study in 25 Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Lansford, Jennifer E.; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Bornstein, Marc H.; Putnick, Diane L.; Bradley, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Convention on the Rights of the Child has prompted countries to protect children from abuse and exploitation. Exposure to domestic violence and corporal punishment are risk factors in children’s development. This study investigated how women’s attitudes about domestic violence are related to attitudes about corporal punishment, and harsh behaviors toward children, and whether country-wide norms regarding domestic violence and corporal punishment are related to psychological aggression and physical violence toward children. Study design Data were drawn from the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey, a nationally representative and internationally comparable household survey developed by UNICEF. Measures of domestic violence and discipline were completed by 85,999 female caregivers of children between the ages of 2 and 14 years from families in 25 low- and middle-income countries. Results Mothers who believed that husbands were justified in hitting their wives were more likely to believe that corporal punishment is necessary to rear children, and, in turn, were justified in hitting their wives and that corporal punishment is necessary to rear children were more likely to report that their child had experienced psychological aggression and physical violence. Countrywide norms regarding the acceptability of husbands hitting wives and advisability of corporal punishment moderated the links between mothers’ attitudes and their behaviors toward children. Conclusions Pediatricians can address parents’ psychological aggression and physical violence toward children by discussing parents’ attitudes and behaviors within a framework that incorporates social norms regarding the acceptability of domestic violence and corporal punishment. PMID:24412139

  7. Spacecraft materials studies on the Aerospace Corporation tray on EOIM-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuckey, Wayne K.; Hemminger, Carol S.; Steckel, Gary L.; Hills, Malina M.; Hilton, Michael R.

    1995-01-01

    A passive tray was flown on the Effects of Oxygen Interaction with Materials experiment on STS-46 (EOIM-3) with 82 samples from The Aerospace Corporation. A variety of advanced materials related to potential uses on future spacecraft were included for evaluation representing optical coatings, lubricants, polymers, composites, carbon-carbon composite protective coatings, graphite protective coatings, thermal-control materials, and some samples of current materials. An overview of the available results from the investigations of these materials is presented.

  8. Tools for measuring patient safety in primary care settings using the RAND/UCLA appropriateness method

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of patient contacts occur in general practice but general practice patient safety has been poorly described and under-researched to date compared to hospital settings. Our objective was to produce a set of patient safety tools and indicators that can be used in general practices in any healthcare setting and develop a ‘toolkit’ of feasible patient safety measures for general practices in England. Methods A RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method exercise was conducted with a panel of international experts in general practice patient safety. Statements were developed from an extensive systematic literature review of patient safety in general practice. We used standard RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method rating methods to identify necessary items for assessing patient safety in general practice, framed in terms of the Structure-Process-Outcome taxonomy. Items were included in the toolkit if they received an overall panel median score of ≥7 with agreement (no more than two panel members rating the statement outside a 3-point distribution around the median). Results Of 205 identified statements, the panel rated 101 as necessary for assessing the safety of general practices. Of these 101 statements, 73 covered structures or organisational issues, 22 addressed processes and 6 focused on outcomes. Conclusions We developed and tested tools that can lead to interventions to improve safety outcomes in general practice. This paper reports the first attempt to systematically develop a patient safety toolkit for general practice, which has the potential to improve safety, cost effectiveness and patient experience, in any healthcare system. PMID:24902490

  9. Corporate culture assessments in integrative oncology: a qualitative case study of two integrative oncology centers.

    PubMed

    Mittring, Nadine; Pérard, Marion; Witt, Claudia M

    2013-01-01

    The offer of "integrative oncology" is one option for clinics to provide safe and evidence-based complementary medicine treatments to cancer patients. As known from merger theories, corporate culture and integration models have a strong influence on the success of such integration. To identify relevant corporate culture aspects that might influence the success in two highly visible integrative oncology clinics, we interviewed physicians, nurses, practitioners, and managers. All interviews (11 in a German breast cancer clinic and 9 in an integrative medicine cancer service in the USA) were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed with content analysis. According to the theoretical framework of mergers, each clinic selected a different integration type ("best of both worlds" and "linking"). Nonetheless, each developed a similar corporate culture that has a strong focus on research and safe and evidence-based treatments, and fosters a holistic and patient-centered approach. Structured communication within the team and with other departments had high relevance. Research was highlighted as a way to open doors and to facilitate a more general acceptance within the hospital. Conventional physicians felt unburdened by the provision of integrative medicine service but also saw problems in the time required for scheduled treatments, which often resulted in long waiting lists.

  10. Corporate culture assessments in integrative oncology: a qualitative case study of two integrative oncology centers.

    PubMed

    Mittring, Nadine; Pérard, Marion; Witt, Claudia M

    2013-01-01

    The offer of "integrative oncology" is one option for clinics to provide safe and evidence-based complementary medicine treatments to cancer patients. As known from merger theories, corporate culture and integration models have a strong influence on the success of such integration. To identify relevant corporate culture aspects that might influence the success in two highly visible integrative oncology clinics, we interviewed physicians, nurses, practitioners, and managers. All interviews (11 in a German breast cancer clinic and 9 in an integrative medicine cancer service in the USA) were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed with content analysis. According to the theoretical framework of mergers, each clinic selected a different integration type ("best of both worlds" and "linking"). Nonetheless, each developed a similar corporate culture that has a strong focus on research and safe and evidence-based treatments, and fosters a holistic and patient-centered approach. Structured communication within the team and with other departments had high relevance. Research was highlighted as a way to open doors and to facilitate a more general acceptance within the hospital. Conventional physicians felt unburdened by the provision of integrative medicine service but also saw problems in the time required for scheduled treatments, which often resulted in long waiting lists. PMID:23818923

  11. Development of evidence-based Australian medication-related indicators of potentially preventable hospitalisations: a modified RAND appropriateness method

    PubMed Central

    Caughey, Gillian E; Kalisch Ellett, Lisa M; Wong, Te Ying

    2014-01-01

    Objective Indicators of potentially preventable hospitalisations have been adopted internationally as a measure of health system performance; however, few assess appropriate processes of care around medication use, that if followed may prevent hospitalisation. The aim of this study was to develop and validate evidence-based medication-related indicators of potentially preventable hospitalisations. Setting Australian primary healthcare. Participants Medical specialists, general practitioners and pharmacists. A modified RAND appropriateness method was used for the development of medication-related indicators of potentially preventable hospitalisations, which included a literature review, assessment of the strength of the supporting evidence base, an initial face and content validity by an expert panel, followed by an independent assessment of indicators by an expert clinical panel across various disciplines, using an online survey. Primary outcome measure Analysis of ratings was performed on the four key elements of preventability; the medication-related problem must be recognisable, the adverse outcomes foreseeable and the causes and outcomes identifiable and controllable. Results A total of 48 potential indicators across all major disease groupings were developed based on level III evidence or greater, that were independently assessed by 78 expert clinicians (22.1% response rate). The expert panel considered 29 of these (60.4%) sufficiently valid. Of these, 21 (72.4%) were based on level I evidence. Conclusions This study provides a set of face and content validated indicators of medication-related potentially preventable hospitalisations, linking suboptimal processes of care and medication use with subsequent hospitalisation. Further analysis is required to establish operational validity in a population-based sample, using an administrative health database. Implementation of these indicators within routine monitoring of healthcare systems will highlight those

  12. Tectonic record, magmatic history and hydrothermal alteration in the Hercynian Guérande leucogranite, Armorican Massif, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballouard, C.; Boulvais, P.; Poujol, M.; Gapais, D.; Yamato, P.; Tartèse, R.; Cuney, M.

    2015-04-01

    The Guérande peraluminous leucogranite was emplaced at the end of the Carboniferous in the southern part of the Armorican Massif. At the scale of the intrusion, this granite displays structural heterogeneities with a weak deformation in the southwestern part, whereas the northwestern part is marked by the occurrence of S/C and mylonitic extensional fabrics. Quartz veins and pegmatite dykes orientations as well as lineations directions in the granite and its country rocks demonstrate both E-W and N-S stretching. Therefore, during its emplacement in an extensional tectonic regime, the syntectonic Guérande granite has probably experienced some partitioning of the deformation. The southwestern part is characterized by a muscovite-biotite assemblage, the presence of restites and migmatitic enclaves, and a low abundance of quartz veins compared to pegmatite dykes. In contrast, the northwestern part is characterized by a muscovite-tourmaline assemblage, evidence of albitization and gresenization and a larger amount of quartz veins. The southwestern part is thus interpreted as the feeding zone of the intrusion whereas the northwestern part corresponds to its apical zone. The granite samples display continuous compositional evolutions in the range of 69.8-75.3 wt.% SiO2. High initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios and low εNd(T) values suggest that the peraluminous Guérande granite (A/CNK > 1.1) was formed by partial melting of metasedimentary formations. Magmatic evolution was controlled primarily by fractional crystallization of K-feldspar, biotite and plagioclase (An20). The samples from the apical zone show evidence of secondary muscovitization. They are also characterized by a high content in incompatible elements such as Cs and Sn, as well as low Nb/Ta and K/Rb ratios. The apical zone of the Guérande granite underwent a pervasive hydrothermal alteration during or soon after its emplacement. U-Th-Pb dating on zircon and monazite revealed that the Guérande granite was emplaced

  13. A Comparative Study of the Administrative and Leadership Styles of Corporate Presidents and School Superintendents As Chief Executive Officers (CEOs).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Guy R.

    This paper compares the managerial, administrative, and leadership styles of public-school superintendents and presidents of public corporations. Data were derived from questionnaires mailed to eight superintendents and seven corporate presidents. Findings show that superintendents and corporate presidents used similar leadership…

  14. Case Study in Corporate Memory Recovery: Hanford Tank Farms Miscellaneous Underground Waste Storage Tanks - 15344

    SciTech Connect

    Washenfelder, D. J.; Johnson, J. M.; Turknett, J. C.; Barnes, T. J.; Duncan, K. G.

    2015-01-07

    In addition to managing the 177 underground waste storage tanks containing 212,000 m3 (56 million gal) of radioactive waste at the U. S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site 200 Area Tank Farms, Washington River Protection Solutions LLC is responsible for managing numerous small catch tanks and special surveillance facilities. These are collectively known as “MUSTs” - Miscellaneous Underground Storage Tanks. The MUSTs typically collected drainage and flushes during waste transfer system piping changes; special surveillance facilities supported Tank Farm processes including post-World War II uranium recovery and later fission product recovery from tank wastes. Most were removed from service following deactivation of the single-shell tank system in 1980 and stabilized by pumping the remaining liquids from them. The MUSTs were isolated by blanking connecting transfer lines and adding weatherproofing to prevent rainwater entry. Over the next 30 years MUST operating records were dispersed into large electronic databases or transferred to the National Archives Regional Center in Seattle, Washington. During 2014 an effort to reacquire the historical bases for the MUSTs’ published waste volumes was undertaken. Corporate Memory Recovery from a variety of record sources allowed waste volumes to be initially determined for 21 MUSTs, and waste volumes to be adjusted for 37 others. Precursors and symptoms of Corporate Memory Loss were identified in the context of MUST records recovery.

  15. Cooperation and tensions in multiethnic corporate societies using Teotihuacan, Central Mexico, as a case study.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla, Linda R

    2015-07-28

    In this paper, I address the case of a corporate society in Central Mexico. After volcanic eruptions triggered population displacements in the southern Basin of Mexico during the first and fourth centuries A.D., Teotihuacan became a multiethnic settlement. Groups from different backgrounds settled primarily on the periphery of the metropolis; nevertheless, around the core, intermediate elites actively fostered the movement of sumptuary goods and the arrival of workers from diverse homelands for a range of specialized tasks. Some of these skilled craftsmen acquired status and perhaps economic power as a result of the dynamic competition among neighborhoods to display the most lavish sumptuary goods, as well as to manufacture specific symbols of identity that distinguished one neighborhood from another, such as elaborate garments and headdresses. Cotton attire worn by the Teotihuacan elite may have been one of the goods that granted economic importance to neighborhood centers such as Teopancazco, a compound that displayed strong ties to the Gulf Coast where cotton cloth was made. The ruling elite controlled raw materials that came from afar whereas the intermediate elite may have been more active in providing other sumptuary goods: pigments, cosmetics, slate, greenstone, travertine, and foreign pottery. The contrast between the corporate organization at the base and top of Teotihuacan society and the exclusionary organization of the neighborhoods headed by the highly competitive intermediate elite introduced tensions that set the stage for Teotihuacan's collapse. PMID:25775567

  16. Cooperation and tensions in multiethnic corporate societies using Teotihuacan, Central Mexico, as a case study.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla, Linda R

    2015-07-28

    In this paper, I address the case of a corporate society in Central Mexico. After volcanic eruptions triggered population displacements in the southern Basin of Mexico during the first and fourth centuries A.D., Teotihuacan became a multiethnic settlement. Groups from different backgrounds settled primarily on the periphery of the metropolis; nevertheless, around the core, intermediate elites actively fostered the movement of sumptuary goods and the arrival of workers from diverse homelands for a range of specialized tasks. Some of these skilled craftsmen acquired status and perhaps economic power as a result of the dynamic competition among neighborhoods to display the most lavish sumptuary goods, as well as to manufacture specific symbols of identity that distinguished one neighborhood from another, such as elaborate garments and headdresses. Cotton attire worn by the Teotihuacan elite may have been one of the goods that granted economic importance to neighborhood centers such as Teopancazco, a compound that displayed strong ties to the Gulf Coast where cotton cloth was made. The ruling elite controlled raw materials that came from afar whereas the intermediate elite may have been more active in providing other sumptuary goods: pigments, cosmetics, slate, greenstone, travertine, and foreign pottery. The contrast between the corporate organization at the base and top of Teotihuacan society and the exclusionary organization of the neighborhoods headed by the highly competitive intermediate elite introduced tensions that set the stage for Teotihuacan's collapse.

  17. Cooperation and tensions in multiethnic corporate societies using Teotihuacan, Central Mexico, as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Manzanilla, Linda R.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I address the case of a corporate society in Central Mexico. After volcanic eruptions triggered population displacements in the southern Basin of Mexico during the first and fourth centuries A.D., Teotihuacan became a multiethnic settlement. Groups from different backgrounds settled primarily on the periphery of the metropolis; nevertheless, around the core, intermediate elites actively fostered the movement of sumptuary goods and the arrival of workers from diverse homelands for a range of specialized tasks. Some of these skilled craftsmen acquired status and perhaps economic power as a result of the dynamic competition among neighborhoods to display the most lavish sumptuary goods, as well as to manufacture specific symbols of identity that distinguished one neighborhood from another, such as elaborate garments and headdresses. Cotton attire worn by the Teotihuacan elite may have been one of the goods that granted economic importance to neighborhood centers such as Teopancazco, a compound that displayed strong ties to the Gulf Coast where cotton cloth was made. The ruling elite controlled raw materials that came from afar whereas the intermediate elite may have been more active in providing other sumptuary goods: pigments, cosmetics, slate, greenstone, travertine, and foreign pottery. The contrast between the corporate organization at the base and top of Teotihuacan society and the exclusionary organization of the neighborhoods headed by the highly competitive intermediate elite introduced tensions that set the stage for Teotihuacan’s collapse. PMID:25775567

  18. Assessing the Validity of the RAND Negative Impact of Asthma on Quality of Life Short-Forms

    PubMed Central

    Sherbourne, Cathy D.; Stucky, Brian D.; Edelen, Maria Orlando; Eberhart, Nicole K.; Kleerup, Eric; Lara, Marielena

    2014-01-01

    Background In response to recommendations from the 2010 NIH Asthma Outcomes Workshop, we developed a system for measuring the negative impact of asthma on Quality of Life (QoL), referred to as the RAND Negative Impact of Asthma on Quality of Life (RAND-IAQL) item bank. The bank contains 65 items that focus on the patient’s perception of the impact or bother of asthma on his or her life. Objective Evidence for the validity of two short-forms, The RAND-IAQL-4 and 12, from the bank is presented. Methods Using a sample of 2032 adults with asthma, we validated our short-forms against the Marks Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (M-AQLQ); The Asthma Control Test; and generic measures of QoL developed by PROMIS®. Discriminant validity was examined by comparing scores of respondents who differed according to multiple health indicators. Results Our sample ranged in age from 18–99 (mean of 43), 14% of whom were Hispanic, 11% Asian, 19% African American and 56% non-Hispanic White. Men had significantly worse impact of asthma on QoL than women. Impact of asthma on QoL was greatest in African Americans and Hispanics compared to non-Hispanic Whites. Our measures correlated highly with Marks AQLQ and more strongly with the PROMIS® global physical than mental scale. They differentiated between adults with asthma according to their perceived severity, level of control, presence or absence of exacerbations and physical comorbidity. Conclusion The RAND-IAQL item bank, measuring the impact of asthma on QoL, will complement other patient-reported outcomes such as measures of asthma symptoms, functioning and control. PMID:24746752

  19. Corporal Punishment and Child Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aucoin, Katherine J.; Frick, Paul J.; Bodin, S. Doug

    2006-01-01

    The association between corporal punishment and children's emotional and behavioral functioning was studied in a sample of 98 non-referred children with a mean age of 12.35 (SD=1.72) recruited from two school systems in the southeastern United States. Children were divided into those who had experienced no corporal punishment over approximately a…

  20. A Profile of Corporate Contributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Hayden W.

    The extent and distribution of charitable contributions by corporations were studied. In addition to a history of giving from 1936 to 1981, information is presented on corporate contributions in 1977 in terms of the distribution of companies (1) by size of contributions, (2) by contributions as percentage of net income, (3) by industry, and (4) by…

  1. Children’s experiences of corporal punishment: A qualitative study in an urban township of South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Alison; Daniels, Karen; Tomlinson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to violence is a serious mental and public health issue. In particular, children exposed to violence are at risk for poor developmental outcomes and physical and mental health problems. One area that has been shown to increase the risk for poor outcomes is the use of corporal punishment as a discipline method. While researchers are starting to ask children directly abouttheir experiences of violence, there is limited research with children about their perspectives on physical punishment, particularly in low-and middle-income countries (LMIC). This paper begins to address this gap by reporting on the spontaneous data that emerged during 24 qualitative interviews that were conducted with children, aged 8–12 in South Africa. The themes that emerged indicated that corporal punishment is an everyday experience, that it has negative emotional and behavioral consequences, and that it plays a role in how children resolve interpersonal conflicts. The study highlights the challenges for violence prevention interventions in under-resourced contexts. PMID:26094159

  2. Bayesian island biogeography in a continental setting: the Rand Flora case.

    PubMed

    Sanmartín, Isabel; Anderson, Cajsa Lisa; Alarcon, Marisa; Ronquist, Fredrik; Aldasoro, Juan José

    2010-10-23

    We here explore the use of a Bayesian approach to island biogeography for disentangling the evolutionary origins of a continental-scale floristic pattern, the enigmatic 'Rand Flora'. The existence of disjunct distributions across many plant lineages between Macaronesia-northwest Africa, Horn of Africa-southern Arabia and east-south Africa has long intrigued botanists, but only now can we start analysing it within a statistical framework. Phylogenetic and distributional data from 13 plant lineages exhibiting this disjunct distribution were analysed to estimate area carrying capacities and historical rates of biotic exchange between areas. The results indicate that there has been little exchange between southern Africa and the northern African region, and that this exchange occurred via east Africa. Northwest Africa-Macaronesia shows the smallest carrying capacity but highest dispersal rate with other regions, suggesting that its flora was built up by immigration of lineages, probably from the Mediterranean region and western Asia. In contrast, southern Africa shows the highest carrying capacity and lowest dispersal rate, suggesting a flora formed by in situ diversification. We discuss further improvements of the method for addressing more complex hypotheses, such as asymmetric dispersal between regions or repeated cyclical events.

  3. The production of corporate research to manufacture doubt about the health hazards of products: an overview of the Exponent Bakelite™ simulation study.

    PubMed

    Egilman, David S

    2016-01-01

    Although corporate sponsorship of research does not necessarily lead to biased results, in some industries it has resulted in the publication of inaccurate and misleading information. Some companies have hired scientific consulting firms to retrospectively calculate exposures to products that are no longer manufactured or sold. As an example, this paper reviews one such study - a litigation-engendered study of Union Carbide Corporation's asbestos-containing product, Bakelite™. This analysis is based on previously secret documents produced as a result of litigation. The study published asbestos fiber exposure measurements that underestimated actual exposures to create doubt about the hazards associated with the manufacture and manipulation of Bakelite™. PMID:27128626

  4. The production of corporate research to manufacture doubt about the health hazards of products: an overview of the Exponent Bakelite™ simulation study.

    PubMed

    Egilman, David S

    2016-01-01

    Although corporate sponsorship of research does not necessarily lead to biased results, in some industries it has resulted in the publication of inaccurate and misleading information. Some companies have hired scientific consulting firms to retrospectively calculate exposures to products that are no longer manufactured or sold. As an example, this paper reviews one such study - a litigation-engendered study of Union Carbide Corporation's asbestos-containing product, Bakelite™. This analysis is based on previously secret documents produced as a result of litigation. The study published asbestos fiber exposure measurements that underestimated actual exposures to create doubt about the hazards associated with the manufacture and manipulation of Bakelite™.

  5. The Knowledge-Productive Corporate University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansink, Femke; Kwakman, Kitty; Streumer, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: In this paper the concept of knowledge production is used as a framework to study Dutch corporate universities. Knowledge production serves not simply as a desirable aim of corporate universities, as the concept also offers guidelines for the design of corporate universities. The purpose is to clarify the extent to which corporate…

  6. Emerging technologies and corporate culture at Microsoft: a methodological note.

    PubMed

    Klein, David; Schmeling, James; Blanck, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This article explores factors important in the study and examination of corporate culture and change. The particular focus is on the technological methods used to conduct a study of accessible technology and corporate culture at Microsoft Corporation. Reasons for particular approaches are explained. Advantages and challenges of emerging technologies that store and retrieve information in the study of corporate culture are reviewed.

  7. "Mind the Gap": An Empirical Study of the Gap between Intention and Actual Usage of Corporate E-Learning Programmes in the Financial Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luor, Tainyi; Hu, Changya; Lu, His-Peng

    2009-01-01

    While numerous previous studies have focused on the use of some corporate e-learning programmes (CELP), little is known about the difference between users' pre-installation reactions to CELP and user's post-installation reactions to CELP. This study narrows the above gap with two investigations into a financial company's CELP. In the…

  8. Corporate e-Learning: Justification for Implementation and Evaluation of Benefits. A Study Examining the Views of Training Managers and Training Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Robert; Doonga, Nitin

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the experience and perceptions of training managers and training suppliers with respect to provision of e-training to corporate clients--a rapidly growing area of commercial activity. In particular the study explores the justification for implementing e-training and the consequent benefits which are anticipated by training…

  9. Assessment of management approaches in a public water utility: A case study of the Namibia water corporation (NAMWATER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndokosho, Johnson; Hoko, Zvikomborero; Makurira, Hodson

    More than 90% of urban water supply and sanitation services in developing countries are provided by public organizations. However, public provision of services has been inherently inefficient. As a result a number of initiatives have emerged in recent years with a common goal to improve service delivery. In Namibia, the water sector reform resulted in the creation of a public utility called the Namibia Water Corporation (NAMWATER) which is responsible for bulk water supply countrywide. Since its inception in 1998, NAMWATER has been experiencing poor financial performance. This paper presents the findings of a case study that compared the management approaches of NAMWATER to the New Public Management (NPM) paradigm. The focus of the NPM approach is for the public water sector to mirror private sector methods of management so that public utilities can accrue the benefits of effectiveness, efficiency and flexibility often associated with private sector. The study tools used were a combination of literature review, interviews and questionnaires. It was found out that NAMWATER has a high degree of autonomy in its operations, albeit government approved tariffs and sourcing of external financing. The utility reports to government annually to account for results. The utility embraces a notion of good corporate culture and adheres to sound management practices. NAMWATER demonstrated a strong market-orientation indicated by the outsourcing of non-core functions but benchmarking was poorly done. NAMWATER’s customer-orientation is poor as evidenced by the lack of customer care facilities. NAMWATER’s senior management delegated operational authority to lower management to facilitate flexibility and eliminate bottlenecks. The lower management is in turn held accountable for performance by the senior management. There are no robust methods of ensuring sufficient accountability indicated by absence of performance contracts or service level agreements. It was concluded that

  10. Validation of prescribing appropriateness criteria for older Australians using the RAND/UCLA appropriateness method

    PubMed Central

    Basger, Benjamin Joseph; Chen, Timothy Frank; Moles, Rebekah Jane

    2012-01-01

    Objective To further develop and validate previously published national prescribing appropriateness criteria to assist in identifying drug-related problems (DRPs) for commonly occurring medications and medical conditions in older (≥65 years old) Australians. Design RAND/UCLA appropriateness method. Participants A panel of medication management experts were identified consisting of geriatricians/pharmacologists, clinical pharmacists and disease management advisors to organisations that produce Australian evidence-based therapeutic publications. This resulted in a round-one panel of 15 members, and a round-two panel of 12 members. Main outcome measure Agreement on all criteria. Results Forty-eight prescribing criteria were rated. In the first rating round via email, there was disagreement regarding 17 of the criteria according to median panel ratings. During a face-to-face second round meeting, discussion resulted in retention of 25 criteria after amendments, agreement for 14 criteria with no changes required and deletion of 9 criteria. Two new criteria were added, resulting in a final validated list of 41 prescribing appropriateness criteria. Agreement after round two was reached for all 41 criteria, measured by median panel ratings and the amount of dispersion of panel ratings, based on the interpercentile range. Conclusions A set of 41 Australian prescribing appropriateness criteria were validated by an expert panel. Use of these criteria, together with clinical judgement and other medication review processes such as patient interview, is intended to assist in improving patient care by efficiently detecting potential DRPs related to commonly occurring medicines and medical conditions in older Australians. These criteria may also contribute to the medication management education of healthcare professionals. PMID:22983875

  11. Corporate visual identity: a case in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Alkibay, Sanem; Ozdogan, F Bahar; Ermec, Aysegul

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to present a perspective to better understand corporate identity through examining the perceptions of Turkish patients and develop a corporate visual identity scale. While there is no study related to corporate identity research on hospitals in Turkey as a developing country, understanding consumer's perceptions about corporate identity efforts of hospitals could provide different perspectives for recruiters. When the hospitals are considered in two different groups as university and state hospitals, the priority of the characteristics of corporate visual identity may change, whereas the top five characteristics remain the same for all the hospitals.

  12. Corporate social responsibility in public health: A case-study on HIV/AIDS epidemic by Johnson & Johnson company in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Chattu, Vijay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has claimed millions of lives in the global workforce and continues to remain a threat to many businesses. An estimated 36.5 million of working people are living with HIV; the global workforce has lost 28 million people from AIDS since the beginning of the epidemic. In the absence of access to treatment, this number could grow to 74 million by 2015. The epidemic continues to affect the working population through absenteeism, sickness and death. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is an obligation that corporates have toward their employees, community and society. A review and documentation of one such CSR by Johnson & Johnson (a multinational company) for HIV/AIDS in Africa is presented here. Johnson & Johnson Company is involved in numerous projects around the world to combat the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The company is working to fight the spread of the disease and improve the quality of life for those living with the illness through various donations of its products and sponsorship of local programs. This case study also highlights different categories of CSR activities such as Cause Promotion, Cause related Marketing, Corporate Philanthropy, Corporate Social Marketing, Corporate Volunteering and Socially responsible business practices, which are discussed with specific examples from different countries in Africa. Conclusions: CSR of any business encompasses the economic, legal, ethical & discretionary expectation placed on the organization by society at a given point of time. CSR is therefore the obligation that corporations have toward their stakeholders and society in general which horizons beyond what is prescribed by law or union contracts. Johnson & Johnson has a proved history of being committed to caring for people and a good example of a company with a long history of citizenship and sustainability. PMID:25810667

  13. Case Study of East Mississippi Community College's Plan to Assist the Sara Lee Corporation Employees Due to Plant Closing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Bruce J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim or purpose of this study was to statistically determine whether there were significant differences in obtaining employment and wages after training provided by East Mississippi Community College (EMCC). The training was specifically provided to employees of Sara Lee Corporation, LLC, after the massive layoff when the company closed its…

  14. Spanking, corporal punishment and negative long-term outcomes: a meta-analytic review of longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Christopher J

    2013-02-01

    Social scientists continue to debate the impact of spanking and corporal punishment (CP) on negative child outcomes including externalizing and internalizing behavior problems and cognitive performance. Previous meta-analytic reviews have mixed long- and short-term studies and relied on bivariate r, which may inflate effect sizes. The current meta-analysis focused on longitudinal studies, and compared effects using bivariate r and better controlled partial r coefficients controlling for time-1 outcome variables. Consistent with previous findings, results based on bivariate r found small but non-trivial long-term relationships between spanking/CP use and negative outcomes. Spanking and CP correlated .14 and .18 respectively with externalizing problems, .12 and .21 with internalizing problems and -.09 and -.18 with cognitive performance. However, when better controlled partial r coefficients (pr) were examined, results were statistically significant but trivial (at or below pr = .10) for externalizing (.07 for spanking, .08 for CP) and internalizing behaviors (.10 for spanking, insufficient studies for CP) and near the threshold of trivial for cognitive performance (-.11 for CP, insufficient studies for spanking). It is concluded that the impact of spanking and CP on the negative outcomes evaluated here (externalizing, internalizing behaviors and low cognitive performance) are minimal. It is advised that psychologists take a more nuanced approach in discussing the effects of spanking/CP with the general public, consistent with the size as well as the significance of their longitudinal associations with adverse outcomes.

  15. Complexity Studies and Security in the Complex World: An Epistemological Framework of Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesjasz, Czeslaw

    The impact of systems thinking can be found in numerous security-oriented research, beginning from the early works on international system: Pitrim Sorokin, Quincy Wright, first models of military conflict and war: Frederick Lanchester, Lewis F. Richardson, national and military security (origins of RAND Corporation), through development of game theory-based conflict studies, International Relations, classical security studies of Morton A. Kaplan, Karl W. Deutsch [Mesjasz 1988], and ending with contemporary ideas of broadened concepts of security proposed by the Copenhagen School [Buzan et al 1998]. At present it may be even stated that the new military and non-military threats to contemporary complex society, such as low-intensity conflicts, regional conflicts, terrorism, environmental disturbances, etc. cannot be embraced without ideas taken from modern complex systems studies.

  16. SOLVENT-BASED TO WATERBASED ADHESIVE-COATED SUBSTRATE RETROFIT - VOLUME III: LABEL MANUFACTURING CASE STUDY: NASHUA CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This volume discusses Nashua Corporation's Omaha facility, a label and label stock manufacturing facility that no longer uses solvent-based adhesives. Information obtained includes issues related to the technical, economic, and environmental barriers and opportunities associated ...

  17. Information and Corporate Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Miriam A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper defines "corporate culture" (set of values and beliefs shared by people working in an organization which represents employees' collective judgments about future) and discusses importance of corporate culture, nature of corporate cultures in business and academia, and role of information in shaping present and future corporate cultures.…

  18. Corporal punishment in Tanzania's schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinstein, Sheryl; Mwahombela, Lucas

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this survey was to acquire descriptive information regarding corporal punishment in Tanzania's O-level secondary schools. 448 individuals participated in the study: 254 teachers and 194 students, all from government or private secondary schools in the Iringa Region of Tanzania. In addition, 14 students and 14 teachers were interviewed. It was found that corporal punishment was the most common form of punishment in secondary schools. The majority of teachers supported its continued use, but believed in moderation. The majority of students and teachers were unaware of national laws to restrict corporal punishment. There was agreement between students and teachers that corporal punishment was used for major and minor student offences such as misbehaviour and tardiness. Students reported disliking the practice and believed it was ineffective and resulted in emotional, as well as physical, distress.

  19. Motivational Design Quality, Internal Benchmarking and Statistical Analysis of Corporate Information Materials: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cap, Ihor

    This paper reports on an exploratory pilot study at Network South Enterprises (NSE) (Manitoba), a non-profit, community-based organization with the purpose of providing employment services for adults with mental disabilities. The study used a focus group, an open-ended questionnaire, and a 36-item InfoMMS scale to determine the motivational appeal…

  20. Cartesian and Corporeal Agency: Women's Studies Students' Reflections on Body Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liimakka, Satu

    2011-01-01

    This article explores young women's agency in relation to the body and the possible role of women's studies in interpreting body experiences and constructing agency. The article is based on written accounts of one's body experience written by Finnish students of women's studies. The young women's accounts manifested two types of agency: the…

  1. Feasibility study for the United Nuclear Corporation Disposal Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    In July 1990, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) directed the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations to comply with Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements for the remediation of the United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) Disposal Site located at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. EPA, Waste Management Branch, had approved a closure plan in December 1989 for the UNC Disposal Site. This feasibility study (FS) is a fully satisfy the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Contingency Plan (NCP) requirements for support of the selection of a remedial response for closure of the UNC Disposal Site. For two years the UNC Disposal Site accepted and disposed of waste from the decommissioning of a UNC uranium recovery facility in Wood River Junction, Rhode Island. Between June 1982 and November 1984, the UNC Disposal Site received 11,000 55-gal drums of sludge fixed in cement, 18,000 drums of contaminated soil, and 288 wooden boxes of contaminated building and process demolition materials. The FS assembles a wide range of remedial technologies so the most appropriate actions could be selected to remediate potential contamination to below MCLs and/or to below the maximum level of acceptable risk. Technologies were evaluated based on technical effectiveness, ease of implementation, and costs. Applicable technologies were then selected for alternative development. 33 refs., 9 figs., 27 tabs.

  2. The Federal Interest in Financing Schooling. A Rand Educational Policy Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timpane, Michael, Ed.

    This book contains papers first presented at the September 1976 Symposium on the Federal Interest in Financing Schooling. Participants responded to three questions. First, given what we know about federal goals in education, how appropriate are the areas in which federal involvement is currently concentrated? Second, how effective are existing…

  3. Studies in the History of Early 20th Century Delinquency Prevention. A Rand Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlossman, Steven

    An overview is presented of select research performed under a project entitled "Education, Delinquency Prevention, and the Search for Youth Policy: An Historical Inquiry." This overview contains two discrete essays that synthesize the main findings of seven key writers in the field of juvenile delinquency between 1900 and 1930 and examine state…

  4. On-site effluent toxicity studies at the Goodyear Atomic Corporation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrante, J.G.; Bean, D.J.

    1986-04-01

    Acute on-site, flow-through bioassays were conducted with effluents from outfalls 001 and 002 at the Goodyear Atomic facility in Piketon, Ohio. Data collected during this study indicate that the effluents were not toxic to the two species of fish (creek chub and fathead minnow) and one species of invertebrates (crayfish) used as test organisms. The only evidence of an adverse effect was observed in the response of Daphnia magna to effluent 001, which produced a ''ballooning'' effect in laboratory studies while dilution and laboratory water failed to elicit the same response.

  5. Navy Career Counseling Research: Navy Wives Study. System Development Corporation Technical Report No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Gloria L.; And Others

    This report: (1) validates results of a previous survey of attitudes of wives of Navy enlisted personnel designed to determine impact of Navy use in dissemination of pertinent information to enlisted men's wives early in their association with the Navy. Survey data in this study were analyzed on the basis of wives' willingness for their husbands…

  6. Virtual Golden Foods Corporation: Generic Skills in a Virtual Crisis Environment (A Pilot Study)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godat, Meredith

    2007-01-01

    Workplace learning in a crisis-rich environment is often difficult if not impossible to integrate into programs so that students are able to experience and apply crisis management practices and principles. This study presents the results of a pilot project that examined the effective use of a virtual reality (VR) environment as a tool to teach…

  7. Japanese Approaches to Organizational Internationalization of Universities: A Case Study of Three National University Corporations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watabe, Yuki

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to develop an understanding of the internationalization processes at universities in Japan by exploring a strategic model in internationally oriented universities. Universities in Japan have experienced university reform since the 1990s. The role and system of Japanese universities have been re-examined due to an emerging global…

  8. Polaroid Corporation's Tuition Assistance Plan: A Case Study. Worker Education and Training Policies Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Kathleen

    A study was conducted to determine the factors that account for the sustained and unusually high rate of participation in tuition-assisted education by Polaroid employees. Information was gathered by interviews with Polaroid management officials in the Human Resources Development Group; staff of the Education and Career Planning Department; and…

  9. Moving beyond the Wall(s): Theorizing Corporate Identity for Global Cultural Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elavsky, C. Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the set of research considerations that went into investigating the relationship between the Bertelsmann Music Group (BMG) and Czech music culture as a means of exploring alternative avenues and frameworks for understanding and doing global cultural studies. Outlining the theoretical and methodological trajectories, as well…

  10. Managing Uncertainty during a Corporate Acquisition: A Longitudinal Study of Communication During an Airline Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Michael W.; Dougherty, Debbie S.; Pierce, Tamyra A.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined pilots' (N at T1 = 140; N at T2 = 126; N at T3 = 104) reactions to communication and uncertainty during the acquisition of their airline by another airline. Quantitative results indicate that communication helped to reduce uncertainty and was predictive of affective responses to the acquisition. However, contrary to…

  11. The Informal Curriculum: A Case Study on Tutor Reflexivity, Corporate Agency and Medical Professionalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Professionalism is a focus for student learning in many disciplines. It is known, furthermore, that interpersonal interactions between staff and students constitute an informal curriculum that has a significant influence on students. But the origins of this informal curriculum are not fully apparent. This article offers a multiple case study that…

  12. DOE ZERH Case Study: United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation, Patchogue, NY

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning affordable home in the mixed-humid climate that got HERS 40 without PV, -3 with PV, with 2x4 16: on center walls with R-13.5 dense packed cellulose and 1.5” polyiso rigid; basement with 2.5: polyiso on interior; unvented attic with R-48 ocsf under roof deck; ERV tied to wall hung boiler with hydro coil.

  13. From Cottages to Corporations: A Case Study in American History. Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Procter and Gamble Educational Services, Cincinnati, OH.

    This study unit, one in a series of eight, gives students examples of: (1) how a major business began in the mid-nineteenth century; (2) why and how individuals joined in financing and sharing in the growth of such a firm; and (3) how trademarks and brand names were adopted as a symbol that a firm stood behind and took pride in its goods and…

  14. Corporate crime: why we cannot trust industry-derived safety studies.

    PubMed

    Epstein, S S

    1990-01-01

    The control of pesticides, as of all synthetic chemicals, in most industrialized countries relies heavily or even entirely on safety data supplied by the manufacturers. Such a regulatory system can only be effective if the companies conducting and reporting the studies honestly disclose any adverse findings. The record shows, however, that all too often company executives and their scientists knowingly suppress or manipulate information that could affect the licensing and sale of their products. A case in point is the gross manipulation of health and related data on the pesticides heptachlor and chlordane by the U.S. chemical company, Velsicol. PMID:2384287

  15. Research Papers Sponsored by the Commission on Private Philanthropy and Public Needs. Volume III: Special Behavioral Studies, Foundations, and Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Treasury, Washington, DC.

    Survey data and background information about foundations and corporations are presented. The report, which contains 19 papers, is Volume III in a series examining the relationship between nonprofit institutions and their donors. In the first part of this volume, past and present activities of private foundations are surveyed. A comparative…

  16. How Employees with Different National Identities Experience a Geocentric Organizational Culture of a Global Corporation: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plakhotnik, Maria S.

    2010-01-01

    A global corporation values both profitability and social acceptance; its units mutually negotiate governance and represent a highly interdependent network where centers of excellence and high-potential employees are identified regardless of geographic locations. These companies try to build geocentric, or "world oriented" (Marquardt, 1999, p.…

  17. From Corporate Social Responsibility, through Entrepreneurial Orientation, to Knowledge Sharing: A Study in Cai Luong (Renovated Theatre) Theatre Companies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuan, Luu Trong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the role of antecedents such as corporate social responsibility (CSR) and entrepreneurial orientation in the chain effect to knowledge sharing among members of Cai Luong theatre companies in the Vietnamese context. Knowledge sharing contributes to the depth of the knowledge pool of both the individuals and the…

  18. Climbing the Value Chain: A Case Study in Rethinking the Corporate Library Function and Developing High Performance Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemon, Nancy; Blinn, Carla K.

    1996-01-01

    In response to marketplace and organizational changes, Owens Corning Corporate Library developed a strategic plan to secure its function within the organization. Describes outsourcing transactional services, creating an Intranet/Internet tool for users, redefining the library as a knowledge resource center, and achieving team commitment. A sidebar…

  19. Designing Email Messages for Corporate Readers: A Case Study of Effective and Ineffective Rhetorical Strategies at a "Fortune" 100 Company

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKay, Sam H.

    2010-01-01

    Within the last 12 years, email has emerged as the most commonly used form of written communication in the corporate workplace. Several factors have contributed to the widespread use of email. This form of communication is generally rapid, is more economical than distributing or mailing printed documents, and permits simultaneous communication…

  20. Study of International Mentoring and Coaching Practices and Their Constructive Application in the Russian System of Corporate Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masalimova, Alfiya R.; Shaidullina, Almira R.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research stems from dissimilarities between domestic and foreign experiences of mentoring and coaching in corporate education and training related to the methods and techniques aimed not only at transmitting mentor's professional experience to young professionals but also at identifying and developing mentees' potential, and…

  1. A Survey of Employment Opportunities for Graduates with a Master's in Corporate and Professional Communication: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, Michael; Hall, Payson

    An employer survey was designed and conducted to assess the availability of employment opportunities for individuals holding a master's degree in Corporate and Professional Communication within the primary geographic area of Radford University, Virginia. Surveys were mailed to 5,004 companies and organizations categorized as follows: (1)…

  2. Reduction of VOC emissions from metal dip coating applications -- Canam Steel Corporation Point of Rocks, MD case study

    SciTech Connect

    Monfet, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    The reduction of VOC emissions from metal dip coating applications is not an environmental constraint, it is an economic opportunity. This case study shows how the industry can reap economic benefits from VOC reductions while improving air quality. The Canam Steel Corporation plant located in Point of Rocks, MD operates dip tanks for primer application on fabricated steel joists and joist girders. This process is presently subject to a regulation that limits the paint VOC content to 3.5 pounds per gallon of coating less water. As a result of the high paint viscosity associated with that regulation, the paint thickness of the dipped steel is thicker than the customers` specifications. Most of the VOC emissions can therefore be associated with the excess of paint applied to the products rather than to the required thickness of the coating. The higher paint usage rate has more than environmental consequences, it increases the cost of the applied coating. The project is to reduce the paint usage by controlling the viscosity of the coating in the tank. Experimental results as well as actual mass balance calculations show that using a higher VOC content paint would reduce the overall VOC emissions. The author explained the project to the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) Air and Radiation Management Administration. First, the MDE agreed to develop a new RACT determination for fabricated steel dipping operations. The new regulation would limit the amount of VOC than can be emitted to dip coat a ton of fabricated steel. Second, the MDE agreed to allow experimentation of the higher VOC content paint as a pilot project for the new regulation. This paper demonstrates the need for a RACT determination specific to fabricated steel dipping operations.

  3. Corporations and Library Fundraising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMattia, Susan S.

    1984-01-01

    Examination of corporate donations of cash, products, service, and expertise to libraries highlights industry contributions in 1980; why corporations give; examples of corporate donations to various libraries (Brooklyn Public, New York Public, Altoona Area Public, Boston Public); planning fund-raising compaigns; and seven strategic planning…

  4. Scaling the Corporate Heights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Bebe Moore

    1983-01-01

    Reviews "Black Life in Corporate America" (Davis and Watson), "Women at Work: A Psychologist's Secrets to Getting Ahead in Business" (Senter), and "The Black Manager, Making It in the Corporate World" (Dickens and Dickens). All three books address general issues confronting Black/female managers, and two offer guidance to corporate newcomers. (CMG)

  5. Reinventing Corporate Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toth, Elizabeth L.; Trujillo, Nick

    1987-01-01

    Urges a "re-inventing" of corporate communications in today's organizations, and provides information about how corporations can change in new and positive ways during the current "information age." Discusses specific public relations and organizational communication concepts essential for a comprehensive understanding of corporate communications…

  6. Development and validation of Australian aphasia rehabilitation best practice statements using the RAND/UCLA appropriateness method

    PubMed Central

    Power, Emma; Thomas, Emma; Worrall, Linda; Rose, Miranda; Togher, Leanne; Nickels, Lyndsey; Hersh, Deborah; Godecke, Erin; O'Halloran, Robyn; Lamont, Sue; O'Connor, Claire; Clarke, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To develop and validate a national set of best practice statements for use in post-stroke aphasia rehabilitation. Design Literature review and statement validation using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method (RAM). Participants A national Community of Practice of over 250 speech pathologists, researchers, consumers and policymakers developed a framework consisting of eight areas of care in aphasia rehabilitation. This framework provided the structure for the development of a care pathway containing aphasia rehabilitation best practice statements. Nine speech pathologists with expertise in aphasia rehabilitation participated in two rounds of RAND/UCLA appropriateness ratings of the statements. Panellists consisted of researchers, service managers, clinicians and policymakers. Main outcome measures Statements that achieved a high level of agreement and an overall median score of 7–9 on a nine-point scale were rated as ‘appropriate’. Results 74 best practice statements were extracted from the literature and rated across eight areas of care (eg, receiving the right referrals, providing intervention). At the end of Round 1, 71 of the 74 statements were rated as appropriate, no statements were rated as inappropriate, and three statements were rated as uncertain. All 74 statements were then rated again in the face-to-face second round. 16 statements were added through splitting existing items or adding new statements. Seven statements were deleted leaving 83 statements. Agreement was reached for 82 of the final 83 statements. Conclusions This national set of 82 best practice statements across eight care areas for the rehabilitation of people with aphasia is the first to be validated by an expert panel. These statements form a crucial component of the Australian Aphasia Rehabilitation Pathway (AARP) (http://www.aphasiapathway.com.au) and provide the basis for more consistent implementation of evidence-based practice in stroke rehabilitation. PMID:26137883

  7. The over-optimistic portrayal of life-supporting treatments in newspapers and on the Internet: a cross-sectional study using extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation as an example

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation has been introduced to clinical practice for several decades. It is unclear how internet and newspapers portray the use of extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation. This study were: (1) to quantify the coverage of extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation use in newspapers and on the Internet; (2) to describe the characteristics of extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation users presented in newspaper articles and the Internet web pages in comparison with those shown in extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation studies in Taiwan; and (3) to examine the survival rates of extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation users presented in newspaper articles and the Internet web pages in comparison with those in Taiwan and in the Extracorporeal Life Support Registry Report International Summary for January 2014. Methods All issues of Taiwan’s four major newspapers from 2006 to 2010 were reviewed. In October 2011, a search of Internet web pages was performed based on the subjects of “yeh-ko-mo” (extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation in Traditional Chinese), “ECMO”, and “extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation.” All the Internet web pages and newspaper articles recounting the use of extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation were reviewed. The information, such as patient characteristic and the status at hospital discharge, was collected. Results The survival rate of extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation use shown on the Internet (83.97%) was significantly higher than all the survival rates reported in Taiwan’s literature (p < .01) and in the Extracorporeal Life Support Registry Report International Summary for January 2014 (p < .01). In addition, the survival rate of extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation use shown in newspapers (61.54%) was significantly higher than the average survival rate (43%) reported in Taiwan’s literature, the pediatric average survival rate (51%), and the adult average survival rate (47%) in the Extracorporeal

  8. Multilevel corporate environmental responsibility.

    PubMed

    Karassin, Orr; Bar-Haim, Aviad

    2016-12-01

    The multilevel empirical study of the antecedents of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been identified as "the first knowledge gap" in CSR research. Based on an extensive literature review, the present study outlines a conceptual multilevel model of CSR, then designs and empirically validates an operational multilevel model of the principal driving factors affecting corporate environmental responsibility (CER), as a measure of CSR. Both conceptual and operational models incorporate three levels of analysis: institutional, organizational, and individual. The multilevel nature of the design allows for the assessment of the relative importance of the levels and of their components in the achievement of CER. Unweighted least squares (ULS) regression analysis reveals that the institutional-level variables have medium relationships with CER, some variables having a negative effect. The organizational level is revealed as having strong and positive significant relationships with CER, with organizational culture and managers' attitudes and behaviors as significant driving forces. The study demonstrates the importance of multilevel analysis in improving the understanding of CSR drivers, relative to single level models, even if the significance of specific drivers and levels may vary by context.

  9. Multilevel corporate environmental responsibility.

    PubMed

    Karassin, Orr; Bar-Haim, Aviad

    2016-12-01

    The multilevel empirical study of the antecedents of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been identified as "the first knowledge gap" in CSR research. Based on an extensive literature review, the present study outlines a conceptual multilevel model of CSR, then designs and empirically validates an operational multilevel model of the principal driving factors affecting corporate environmental responsibility (CER), as a measure of CSR. Both conceptual and operational models incorporate three levels of analysis: institutional, organizational, and individual. The multilevel nature of the design allows for the assessment of the relative importance of the levels and of their components in the achievement of CER. Unweighted least squares (ULS) regression analysis reveals that the institutional-level variables have medium relationships with CER, some variables having a negative effect. The organizational level is revealed as having strong and positive significant relationships with CER, with organizational culture and managers' attitudes and behaviors as significant driving forces. The study demonstrates the importance of multilevel analysis in improving the understanding of CSR drivers, relative to single level models, even if the significance of specific drivers and levels may vary by context. PMID:27595527

  10. Industrial-hygiene walk-through survey report of Copolymer Rubber and Chemical Corporation, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Industrywide study

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.R.; Krishnan, E.R.

    1986-06-01

    A walk through survey was conducted at the Copolymer Rubber and Chemical Corporation, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The facility produces 465 million pounds of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) and 15 million pounds of nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) annually, requiring 120 million pounds of 1,3-butadiene. Of 470 employees, 143 were directly involved in reaction, recovery, and finishing operations, and were potentially exposed to 1,3-butadiene 8 hours per day.

  11. Ancient vicariance and climate-driven extinction continental-wide disjunctions in Africa: the case of the Rand Flora genus Canarina (Campanulaceae).

    PubMed

    Mairal, M; Pokorny, L; Aldasoro, J J; Alarcón, M; Sanmartín, I

    2015-03-01

    Transoceanic distributions have attracted the interest of scientists for centuries. Less attention has been paid to the evolutionary origins of 'continent-wide' disjunctions, in which related taxa are distributed across isolated regions within the same continent. A prime example is the 'Rand Flora' pattern, which shows sister taxa disjunctly distributed in the continental margins of Africa. Here, we explore the evolutionary origins of this pattern using the genus Canarina, with three species: C. canariensis, associated with the Canarian laurisilva, and C. eminii and C. abyssinica, endemic to the Afromontane region in East Africa, as case study. We infer phylogenetic relationships, divergence times and the history of migration events within Canarina using Bayesian inference on a large sample of chloroplast and nuclear sequences. Ecological niche modelling was employed to infer the climatic niche of Canarina through time. Dating was performed with a novel nested approach to solve the problem of using deep time calibration points within a molecular dataset comprising both above-species and population-level sampling. Results show C. abyssinica as sister to a clade formed by disjunct C. eminii and C. canariensis. Miocene divergences were inferred among species, whereas infraspecific divergences fell within the Pleistocene-Holocene periods. Although C. eminii and C. canariensis showed a strong genetic geographic structure, among-population divergences were older in the former than in the latter. Our results suggest that Canarina originated in East Africa and later migrated across North Africa, with vicariance and aridification-driven extinction explaining the 7000 km/7 million year divergence between the Canarian and East African endemics. PMID:25688489

  12. Corporate interests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellette, Jennifer

    2008-10-01

    In 1931 a scientist at the fledgling Bell Laboratories named Karl Jansky was assigned to study the causes of static on long-distance short-wave communications, following the company's interest in exploiting radio waves for a transatlantic telephone service. Jansky spent several months recording radio signals from all directions with a small antenna mounted on a turntable that could rotate and locate the direction of any radio signal it received. Colleagues dubbed it "Jansky's merry-go-round".

  13. Career Decision-Making and Corporate Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sainty, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    This paper seeks to investigate the extent of influence of corporate (or organisational) responsibility on university students' career decision-making. It reports on a pilot study conducted at the University of Sydney which aims to: explore students' ethical, professional and social understanding regarding corporate responsibility; determine the…

  14. Necessary Competencies for Corporate Wellness Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Dean R.; And Others

    A research study attempted to identify necessary components of a strong corporate wellness training program and to establish a sound research base from which valid curricular decisions could be made concerning program design. Responses from a 52-item questionnaire were received from 248 corporate wellness professionals. Results indicated that the…

  15. Corporal Punishment in Tanzania's Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinstein, Sheryl; Mwahombela, Lucas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to acquire descriptive information regarding corporal punishment in Tanzania's O-level secondary schools. 448 individuals participated in the study: 254 teachers and 194 students, all from government or private secondary schools in the Iringa Region of Tanzania. In addition, 14 students and 14 teachers were…

  16. Perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gavin, James F.; Maynard, William S.

    1975-01-01

    This study investigated the possible implications of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) for employee expectations and satisfactions. Specifically, interest centered on the question of how perceptions of an organization's involvement in the resolution of current societal problems might relate to members' expectations of equitable job rewards and…

  17. Black Managers in White Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, John P.

    The study examines the major determinants of the career patterns of black managers in white businesses and the effects of corporations on their black managers' identities and relationships to the black community. Analyzed were occupational mobility theories; white and black managers' career patterns, goals, and related factors; company employment…

  18. Knowledge discovery based on experiential learning corporate culture management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Kai-Jan

    2014-10-01

    A good corporate culture based on humanistic theory can make the enterprise's management very effective, all enterprise's members have strong cohesion and centripetal force. With experiential learning model, the enterprise can establish an enthusiastic learning spirit corporate culture, have innovation ability to gain the positive knowledge growth effect, and to meet the fierce global marketing competition. A case study on Trend's corporate culture can offer the proof of industry knowledge growth rate equation as the contribution to experiential learning corporate culture management.

  19. The Effect of Corporal Punishment on Antisocial Behavior in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effect of corporal punishment on antisocial behavior of children using stronger statistical controls than earlier literature in this area; to examine whether the effect of corporal punishment on antisocial behavior is nonlinear; and to investigate whether the effects of corporal punishment on antisocial…

  20. Corporate Universities in China: Processes, Issues and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiao, June Xuejun

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study is intended to investigate the current status of corporate universities in China. It aims to explore the processes and practices of corporate universities in China, and discover the issues and challenges involved in building and running a corporate university in China. Design/methodology/approach: The heads of 11 well-known…

  1. Global Competition and Learning Organizations: Goals and Motivations of Corporate Leaders and Employees Who Participate in Corporate/University Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zolfo, Elana; Mann, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine executive and employee attitudes regarding benefits and difficulties accruing to employees and their corporations who participate in on-site MBA programs for 11 corporate partners. Because so many corporations embrace partnerships with colleges to advance the knowledge base of their employees, it seems…

  2. Corporal Punishment Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, John

    2002-01-01

    Lists arguments for using corporal punishment in educational institutions and considers some advantages of its use. Asks when it should be used, who should be empowered to administer it, and why there are increasingly strong feelings against corporal punishment in some societies while others continue to use it. (BT)

  3. Understanding Corporate Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cluff, Gary A.

    1988-01-01

    Considers concept of corporate culture and discusses several values which can be considered when assessing corporate culture, and the "compatibility scales" used to measure them. Included are discussions of employee attitudes, work atmosphere, internal communications, management style, employment opportunity, stability, business ethics, corporate…

  4. Making the Corporate Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornforth, Suzanne; Simpson, Kristen

    1999-01-01

    Corporate sponsorship is a marketing strategy by which companies communicate about their products or services by affiliating with events or institutions valued by targeted customer groups. Increasingly, campus communicators are seeking to establish corporate sponsorships but first must resolve legal and ethical concerns. Various types of…

  5. Entering the Corporate Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenshields, Garry W.

    This seminar guide was designed for use with a series of slides in training administrators to market an educational program or service to corporations. The seminar explains the following eight stages in planning entry into the corporate market: identifying appropriate publics; researching the market (analyzing supply and demand, collecting data,…

  6. 'Syncing' Up with the Quinn-Rand-Strogatz Constant: Hurwitz-ZetaFunctions in Non-Linear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Durgin, Natalie J.; Garcia, Sofia M.; Flournoy, Tamara; Bailey,David H.

    2007-12-01

    This work extends the analytical and computationalinvestigation of the Quinn-Rand-Strogatz (QRS) constants from non-linearphysics. The QRS constants (c1, c2, ..., cN) are found in a Winfreeoscillator mean-field system used to examine the transition of coupledoscillators as they lose synchronization. The constants are part of anasymptotic expansion of a function related to the oscillatorsynchronization. Previous work used high-precision software packages toevaluate c1 to 42 decimal-digits, which made it possible to recognize andprove that c1 was the root of a certain Hurwitz-zeta function. Thisallowed a value of c2 to beconjectured in terms of c1. Therefore thereis interest in determining the exact values of these constants to highprecision in the hope that general relationships can be establishedbetween the constants and the zeta functions. Here, we compute the valuesof the higher order constants (c3, c4) to more than 42-digit precision byextending an algorithm developed by D.H. Bailey, J.M. Borwein and R.E.Crandall. Several methods for speeding up the computation are exploredand an alternate proof that c1 is the root of a Hurwitz-zeta function isattempted.

  7. The Garment Industry Development Corporation: A Case Study of a Sectoral Employment Development Approach. Sectoral Employment Development Learning Project Case Studies Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Maureen

    The Garment Industry Development Corporation (GIDC) was founded in 1984 by a 3-member partnership that included the local union, industry associations, and local government. GIDC's goal was to support New York City's garment industry, which had been steadily losing jobs. GIDC exhibits the following characteristics of sectoral initiatives: it…

  8. Causal factors of corporate crime in Taiwan: qualitative and quantitative findings.

    PubMed

    Mon, Wei-Teh

    2002-04-01

    Street crimes are a primary concern of most criminologists in Taiwan. In recent years, however, crimes committed by corporations have increased greatly in this country. Employing the empirical approach to collect data about causal factors of corporate crime, the research presented in this article is the first systematic empirical study concerning corporate crime in Taiwan. The research sample was selected from a corporation with a criminal record of pollution caused by the release of toxic chemicals into the environment and a corporation with no criminal record. Questionnaire survey and interviews of corporate employees and managers were conducted, and secondary data were collected from official agencies. This research indicated the causal factors of corporate crime as follows: the failure of government regulation, lack of corporate self-regulation, lack of public concern about corporate crime, corporate mechanistic structure, and the low self-control tendency of corporate managers.

  9. Seismic anisotropy and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) in the Pelona-Orocopia-Rand schist in the Mojave region of southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownlee, S. J.; Hacker, B. R.; Feinberg, J. M.; Chapman, A. D.; Saleeby, J.; Seward, G. G.

    2013-12-01

    Our current interpretation of the composition and elastic properties of the middle and lower crust depends strongly on seismic observations. Advances in seismic methods are leading to more studies focused on seismic anisotropy in the lower crust. With increasing observations of lower crustal anisotropy, the need for a more comprehensive characterization of the seismic properties of candidate lower crustal materials is growing. In addition, links between seismic anisotropy and other geophysical parameters need to be investigated. This work combines measurements of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)-based calculations of seismic anisotropy in samples of the Pelona-Orocopia-Rand (POR) schist from the Mojave region of southern California. The POR schist is thought to comprise much of the lower crust of southern California, and is one of the archetypes for understanding shallow slab subduction and subduction erosion. The goals of this study are to characterize the: 1) seismic anisotropy of the POR schist and its relationship to observed crustal anisotropy in the region, and 2) relationship between seismic anisotropy and AMS. Velocity anisotropy in individual samples of the POR schist ranges from ~2-11% in VP and ~3-15% in VS, which is consistent with results of Porter et al. (2011) for lower crustal anisotropy in southern California from analysis of receiver functions. When all schist samples are averaged together to approximate the bulk schist, the velocity anisotropy is significantly reduced to ~6% in Vs and ~8% in Vs, lower than the average values inferred by Porter et al. (2011). AMS results indicate that the directions of maximum and minimum susceptibility are subparallel to Vp-max and Vp-min, respectively (Figure 1). The magnitude of anisotropy in AMS does not show as strong a correlation with magnitude of seismic anisotropy, and may have a stronger dependence on magnetic mineralogy. These results indicate that

  10. Influence of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) Character on the Distribution of Chlorinated and Chloraminated Disinfection By-Products (DBPs) at Rand Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, Savia S.; Ncube, Esper J.; Haarhoff, Johannes; Msagati, Titus AM; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Nkambule, Thabo I.

    2016-04-01

    Certain disinfection by-products (DBPs) are likely human carcinogens or present mutagenic effects while many DBPs are unidentified. Considering the possibility of DBPs being harmful to human health and the fact that trihalomethanes (THMs) are the only regulated DBP in the South African National Standard (SANS:241) for drinking water, special interest in the precursors to these DBPs' formation is created. It is essential to understand the reactivity and character of the precursors responsible for the formation of DBPs in order to enhance precursor removal strategies during the treatment of drinking water. In this study the character of NOM within surface water and the subsequent distribution of THMs formed in the drinking water from Rand Waters' full scale treatment plant were investigated. Molecular size distribution (MSD) of NOM within the surface water was determined by high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). Specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) and UV254 measurements formed part of the NOM character study as they provide an indication of the aromaticity of organic matter. The four THMs; bromoform, chloroform, dibromochloromethane (DBCM) and bromodichloromethane (BDCM)were measured by gas chromatography. The sum of these four THMs was expressed as total trihalomethane (TTHM). On average the chloroform constituted 76.2% of the total TTHM, BDCM 22.5% while DBCM and bromoform measured below the detection limit. THM speciation after chlorination and chloramination concentrations increased in the sequence bromoform < DBCM < BDCM < chloroform. Results of the MSD showed a significant correlation between NOM of high molecular size (peak I) and TTHM formation specifically during the summer months (R2= 0.971, p < 0.05). High molecular weight (HMW) NOM also related well to chloroform formation (R2 = 0.963, p < 0.05) however, the formation of BDCM was not due to HWM fraction as indicated by weak regression coefficient. A positive correlation existed between

  11. Four Star School Awards: Key Factors that Predict High Performance among Indiana School Corporations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veracco, Lawrence H.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the Four Star status of Indiana school corporations in order to determine if certain variables currently existing among school corporations could be predictive of Four Star status. Differences in Four Star status were examined with respect to school corporation size, school corporation average teacher…

  12. Access to Corporate Information Systems: Datafiles, Classified Documents, and Information Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Kurt O.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Three articles discuss aspects of corporate information systems: (1) "Packet Switching Networks: Worldwide Access to Corporate Datafiles" (Kurt O. Baumgartner); "Classified Documents in the Corporate Library" (Patricia M. Shores); and "From Library to Information Center: Case Studies in the Evolution of Corporate Information Resources" (Eva M.…

  13. Corporate Involvement in C AI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Justine C.

    1978-01-01

    Historic perspective of computer manufacturers and their contribution to CAI. Corporate CAI products and services are mentioned, as is a forecast for educational involvement by computer corporations. A chart of major computer corporations shows gross sales, net earnings, products and services offered, and other corporate information. (RAO)

  14. Corporate Teaching Help Drops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, David E.

    1985-01-01

    Electronics, pharmaceuticals, and other industry programs to loan corporate employees to colleges and universities for short-term teaching assignments are discussed, including the advantages to both industry and the institutions and the conflicts in demand for specialists. (MSE)

  15. [Indication of magnetic resonance imaging in cases of headaches in adults: results following the RAND/UCLA appropriateness method].

    PubMed

    Millán-Ortuondo, Eduardo; Cabrera-Zubizarreta, Alberto; Muniz-Saitua, Jaime; Sola-Sarabia, Carlos; Zubia-Arratibel, J

    2013-09-16

    INTRODUCTION. The number of requests for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in healthcare systems is continually on the rise. An MRI scan of the head is one of the most frequent locations, which if used inappropriately entails a loss of resources. Consequently, guidelines are needed to help the physician make decisions and allow better management of resources. AIM. To establish the key indications of MRI scans in cases of adults with headache. MATERIALS AND METHODS. The RAND/UCLA appropriateness method was used, that is, following a systematic review, a list of possible indications of MRI in cases of headache was drawn up. This list was then assessed by a panel of experts and given a score between 1 ('totally inappropriate') and 9 ('totally appropriate'). An initial round of scoring was carried out online, the results were then discussed at a face-to-face meeting of the experts and finally another online round was undertaken. MRI was considered appropriate in each indication if the mean score was 6.5 or higher and there was agreement among the experts (using the IPRAS index). RESULTS. MRI scanning was considered appropriate in cases of: new headache, new headache in immunodeficient patients, sudden intense headache, headache with focal neurological symptoms, postural headache, headache due to physical effort or Valsalva manoeuvres, suspected thrombosis in the venous sinuses, systemic involvement, progressive headache, headache in pregnancy, autonomic trigeminal headache or severe cranial traumatic injury with focus. CONCLUSIONS. It seems that indication can be summed up in headaches with a suspected secondary pathology. The methodology employed makes it possible to establish MRI indications that can be useful both in clinical practice and for healthcare management practitioners.

  16. 1993 corporate profiles.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    Some of the companies in this year's Corporate Profiles section you know and use; some may seem familiar; but all of the companies are important to you as healthcare supply managers. This detailed overview of the history, sales and service, product lines, new technology and future plans of each corporation is brought to you as a service from JHMM, to be used as a review, an update and a resource throughout the year. PMID:10130626

  17. The Marriott Philosophy at Work: A Study of Corporate Success with the Handicapped. Project TROPHY. Transition Research on Problems of Handicapped Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Charles; Zhu, Guangli

    This monograph examines the Marriott Corporation, which has won numerous awards for its involvement in creating employment situations for the handicapped. Part 1 examines the Marriott Corporation in its wider economic, political, and religious contexts, including its founding by a Mormon family. Part 2 addresses central features of the Marriott…

  18. Corporate psychopathy: Talking the walk.

    PubMed

    Babiak, Paul; Neumann, Craig S; Hare, Robert D

    2010-01-01

    There is a very large literature on the important role of psychopathy in the criminal justice system. We know much less about corporate psychopathy and its implications, in large part because of the difficulty in obtaining the active cooperation of business organizations. This has left us with only a few small-sample studies, anecdotes, and speculation. In this study, we had a unique opportunity to examine psychopathy and its correlates in a sample of 203 corporate professionals selected by their companies to participate in management development programs. The correlates included demographic and status variables, as well as in-house 360 degrees assessments and performance ratings. The prevalence of psychopathic traits-as measured by the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) and a Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL: SV) "equivalent"-was higher than that found in community samples. The results of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modeling (SEM) indicated that the underlying latent structure of psychopathy in our corporate sample was consistent with that model found in community and offender studies. Psychopathy was positively associated with in-house ratings of charisma/presentation style (creativity, good strategic thinking and communication skills) but negatively associated with ratings of responsibility/performance (being a team player, management skills, and overall accomplishments).

  19. Strategies and Models for Promoting Adolescent Vaccination for Low-Income Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Katherine M.; Martin, Laurie T.; Lurie, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, Sanofi Pasteur asked RAND Health, a division of the RAND Corporation, to study the current climate for adolescent immunization in the United States, to recommend broad strategies for immunizing low-income adolescents (through age 18), and to identify promising "on the ground" practices consistent with the proposed strategic framework. To…

  20. Guidelines for sinkhole and subsidence rehabilitation based on generic geological models of a dolomite environment on the East Rand, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinhans, Ilse; Van Rooy, J. Louis

    2016-05-01

    A sound understanding of the various factors influencing and associated with the formation of sinkholes or subsidences on dolomite land is essential for the selection of appropriate rehabilitation methods. The investigation and rehabilitation of numerous sinkholes and subsidences located on dolomite in the East Rand of South Africa, created an opportunity to develop a broad based understanding of different karst environments, their susceptibility to sinkhole and subsidence formation and best practice rehabilitation methods. This paper is based on the guidelines developed whereby the geological model of the sinkhole or subsidence is used to recommend an appropriate rehabilitation method. Nine typical geological models with recommended rehabilitation methods are presented in this paper.

  1. Potential for Military Recruiting from Two-Year Colleges and Postsecondary Vocational Schools. A Rand Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shavelson, Richard J.; And Others

    With the military's requirements for high-quality recruits expected to increase over the next decade, a study was conducted to evaluate the recruiting potential of two-year post-secondary institutions. Specifically, the study sought to ascertain the characteristics of two-year colleges, whether sufficient numbers of potential recruits existed in…

  2. Mortality of container-grown blueberry plants inoculated with Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We conducted four studies to evaluate the effect of Phytophthora cinnamomi isolates and inoculum delivery methods on root rot development and mortality of container-grown blueberry plants. Phytophthora cinnamomi isolates were obtained from the root zone of symptomatic blueberry plants and identifie...

  3. Vocational Education and the Work Establishment of Youth: Equity and Effectiveness Issues. A Rand Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berryman, Sue E.

    A study examined data from literature and from three surveys of high school students to analyze the equity of the way in which high schools assign students to the vocational track and the effectiveness of vocational education in preparing students for work. Data revealed that while students' junior high abilities, achievement, and curricular…

  4. Baseline Nonresponse in Project ALERT: Does It Matter? A Rand Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Robert M.; And Others

    The impact of non-response (NR) in baseline data collection on the ability to analyze treatment effects in Project ALERT (Adolescent Experiences in Resistance Training) was studied. Project ALERT is a multisite, multiyear test of a smoking and drug prevention program for seventh and eighth graders. Questionnaires about drug use and related topics…

  5. Corporate dentistry in 2032?

    PubMed

    Watson, Michael

    2012-07-01

    During the last 20 years, there has been considerable growth in the number of dental practices owned by corporate bodies. At present, well over 800 practices are owned by such bodies and they employ over 3000 dentists. This paper describes the factors that have led to this growth and explores the advantages and disadvantages of 'corporate' dentistry for patients, dentists, and the dental team. It then considers how and why dental practice may change over the next 20 years and concludes that by 2032 the small one-dentist practice may well be in the past. It is likely that smaller practices will have to work in some form of association if they are to survive. Although their current model is unstable, corporates are likely to adapt to a changing environment. By 2032, in some cases, dentistry may well be taken out of its conventional setting, into supermarkets or a school environment. PMID:23073159

  6. 25 CFR 226.8 - Corporation and corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... RESERVATION LANDS FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Leasing Procedure, Rental and Royalty § 226.8 Corporation and... compliance with the corporation laws thereof. (b) Whenever deemed advisable the Superintendent may require...

  7. The objective vocal quality, vocal risk factors, vocal complaints, and corporal pain in Dutch female students training to be speech-language pathologists during the 4 years of study.

    PubMed

    Van Lierde, Kristiane M; D'haeseleer, Evelien; Wuyts, Floris L; De Ley, Sophia; Geldof, Ruben; De Vuyst, Julie; Sofie, Claeys

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the present cross-sectional study was to determine the objective vocal quality and the vocal characteristics (vocal risk factors, vocal and corporal complaints) in 197 female students in speech-language pathology during the 4 years of study. The objective vocal quality was measured by means of the Dysphonia Severity Index (DSI). Perceptual voice assessment, the Voice Handicap Index (VHI), questionnaires addressing vocal risks, and vocal and corporal complaints during and/or after voice usage were performed. Speech-language pathology (SLP) students have a borderline vocal quality corresponding to a DSI% of 68. The analysis of variance revealed no significant change of the objective vocal quality between the first bachelor year and the master year. No psychosocial handicapping effect of the voice was observed by means of the VHI total, though there was an effect at the functional VHI level in addition to some vocal complaints. Ninety-three percent of the student SLPs reported the presence of corporal pain during and/or after speaking. In particular, sore throat and headache were mentioned as the prevalent corporal pain symptoms. A longitudinal study of the objective vocal quality of the same subjects during their career as an SLP might provide new insights.

  8. 25 CFR 226.8 - Corporation and corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corporation and corporate information. 226.8 Section 226.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Leasing Procedure, Rental and Royalty § 226.8 Corporation...

  9. Corporal Punishment and Youth Externalizing Behavior in Santiago, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Julie; Han, Yoonsun; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Delva, Jorge; Castillo, Marcela

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Corporal punishment is still widely practiced around the globe, despite the large body of child development research that substantiates its short- and long-term consequences. Within this context, this paper examined the relationship between parental use of corporal punishment and youth externalizing behavior with a Chilean sample to add to the growing empirical evidence concerning the potential relationship between increased corporal punishment and undesirable youth outcomes across cultures. Methods Analysis was based on 919 adolescents in Santiago, Chile. Descriptive and multivariate analyses were conducted to examine the extent to which parents’ use of corporal punishment and positive family measures were associated with youth externalizing behavior. Furthermore, the associations between self-reported externalizing behavior and infrequent, as well as frequent, use of corporal punishment were investigated to contribute to understanding how varying levels of parental use of corporal punishment were differently related to youth outcomes. Results Both mother’s and father’s use of corporal punishment were associated with greater youth externalizing behavior. Additionally, increases in positive parenting practices, such as parental warmth and family involvement, were met with decreases in youth externalizing behavior when controlling for youth demographics, family socioeconomic status, and parents’ use of corporal punishment. Finally, both infrequent and frequent use of corporal punishment were positively associated with higher youth problem behaviors, though frequent corporal punishment had a stronger relationship with externalizing behavior than did infrequent corporal punishment. Conclusions Parental use of corporal punishment, even on an occasional basis, is associated with greater externalizing behavior for youth while a warm and involving family environment may protect youth from serious problem behaviors. Therefore, findings of this study add

  10. Of Corporate Bondage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgeway, James

    1975-01-01

    "While it is entirely possible that the university will continue to function as an essential arm of the giant agribusiness and energy corporations, there are, nevertheless, a wealth of opportunities for it to direct its energies to more useful purposes." The author traces universities' past involvement noting alternatives in energy and agriculture…

  11. The corporate trustee evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, B.A.; Ross, M.D.

    1994-03-01

    Trustees have an increasing role in the public debt market for project finance. With the responsibility comes the need for clearly defined guidelines. This article examines the need for public financing of power projects, and the role and responsibilities of corporate trustees in this environment.

  12. Lessons from Enlightened Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankstein, Alan M.

    1992-01-01

    The formula for improving U.S. schools can be found in the philosophy that helped transform Japanese industry and in Deming's 14 principles, emulated by many corporations. Deming's arguments against appraising individual performance through quotas or numerical goals call into question schools' current grading and merit pay practices. (12…

  13. Corporate Boss, College President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alden, Vernon R.

    1978-01-01

    Differences between the roles of a corporate administrator and a college president are reviewed and related to the role of an effective trustee. It is noted that accountability demands affect institutional autonomy and that trustees must become more involved in policy-making to protect the academic freedom of colleges and universities in the…

  14. Corporate Training in Museums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Causey, Adera

    2011-01-01

    Museums often court corporate audiences through special event rentals and development and promotional partnerships. But we rarely approach them as potential adult learners. In overlooking them, we miss the potential of reaching a large number of often novice museum participants who can gain from gallery learning and develop a relationship with our…

  15. Corporate information management guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Information Management (IM) Council, IM representatives from nearly all Headquarters (HQ) organizations have been meeting over the past year as the Corporate Guidance Group (CGG) to develop useful and sound corporate information management (IM) guidance. The ability of the Department`s IM community to develop such unified guidance continues to be critical to the success of future Departmental IM planning processes and the establishment of a well-coordinated IM environment between Headquarters and field organizations. This report, with 26 specific corporate IM guidance items documented and unanimously agreed to, as well as 12 items recommended for further development and 3 items deferred for future consideration, represents a highly successful effort by the IM community. The effort has proven that the diverse DOE organizations can put aside individual preferences and work together towards a common and mutually beneficial goal. In examining most areas and issues associated with information management in the Department, they have developed specific, far-reaching, and useful guidance. The IM representatives recommend that the documented guidance items provided in this report and approved by the DOE IM Council be followed by all IM organizations. The representatives also strongly recommend that the guidance process developed by the CGG be the single process for developing corporate IM guidance.

  16. A corporate supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Randall; Seebass, Richard

    1996-01-01

    This talk address the market and technology for a corporate supersonic transport. It describes a candidate configuration. There seems to be a sufficient market for such an aircraft, even if restricted to supersonic operation over water. The candidate configuration's sonic boom overpressure may be small enough to allow overland operation as well.

  17. 1991 corporate profiles.

    PubMed

    1991-01-01

    We feel a very important part of the career development of any healthcare supply manager is knowing the companies you do business with. The following Corporate Profiles, which contain information about the mission, structure, background and products of leading companies in the healthcare field, are an excellent way to achieve this knowledge.

  18. The Corporate Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenger, Richard S.

    1991-01-01

    In many states, schools use programs developed by industry to teach about environmental issues. Corporate-sponsored curricula appear to expose children to knowledge about nature, energy use, solid waste, and recycling, but they often actually display an incomplete and self-serving picture that is raising concern among environmentalists and…

  19. Corporal Punishment and the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Gordon B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    In order to understand and evaluate the continued prevalence of corporal punishment in school systems, this article reviews the following topics: (1) historical issues; (2) current demographics and correlates; (3) the effectiveness of corporal punishment in school settings; (4) myths; (5) alternatives to corporal punishment; and (6) social policy.…

  20. Constructive Engagement with the Corporation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Many of the gravest concerns that critics of corporate culture have about the consequences of academic-corporate relationships are built on little more than ill-informed speculation, fueled by a lack of direct engagement with corporations. The solution to knowledge gap--and the key to liberation from fears of "creeping corporatization"--may…

  1. The Corporate CIO Model and the Higher Education CIO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lineman, Jeffrey P.

    2007-01-01

    To date, most CIO studies have looked at the corporate model without regard to the unique demands of the academic arena. Despite many similarities between the skills, responsibilities, and roles of corporate and higher education CIOs, enough differences exist in their working environments and applications to warrant more study specifically…

  2. Religious Beliefs, Sociopolitical Ideology, and Attitudes toward Corporal Punishment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Christopher G.; Bradshaw, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The use of corporal punishment to discipline children remains a perennial focus of controversy. Several studies published in the 1990s linked support for, and use of, corporal punishment with religious factors, particularly core doctrines of conservative (i.e., evangelical and fundamentalist) Protestantism. This study reexamines the relationships…

  3. Training Corporate Managers to Adopt a More Autonomy-Supportive Motivating Style toward Employees: An Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardre, Patricia L.; Reeve, Johnmarshall

    2009-01-01

    Management style is treated in a variety of ways across the training and development literature. Yet few studies have tested the training-based malleability of management style in a for-profit, authentic work context. The present research tested whether or not training intervention would help managers adopt a more autonomy-supportive motivating…

  4. The Awareness of Knowledge and Skill of Self-Defined Instructional Technologists in the Corporate Environment: An Interpretive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutson, Patricia Evonne

    2013-01-01

    The description of the self-defined expert instructional technologist is unclear. Technologists in the field are identified in various ways. To determine the characteristics and competencies of self-defined expert instructional technologists, an interpretive field study consisting of interviews was conducted. The results revealed three core…

  5. 76 FR 68160 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Models To Advance Voluntary Corporate Notification...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... FR 58466.) The Department of Commerce announces that the closing deadline for submission of comments.... Rand Beers, Under Secretary, National Protection and Programs Directorate, Department of...

  6. Industrial Analytics Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Industrial Analytics Corporation

    2004-01-30

    The lost foam casting process is sensitive to the properties of the EPS patterns used for the casting operation. In this project Industrial Analytics Corporation (IAC) has developed a new low voltage x-ray instrument for x-ray radiography of very low mass EPS patterns. IAC has also developed a transmitted visible light method for characterizing the properties of EPS patterns. The systems developed are also applicable to other low density materials including graphite foams.

  7. The Demographics of Corporal Punishment in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examined the student discipline policies of 1,025 Texas school districts, as well as data from the Texas Education Agency's Academic Excellence Indicator System in order to identify demographic patterns regarding corporal punishment policies in Texas schools. The study also studied the relationship between a district's…

  8. Designing Corporate Databases to Support Technology Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gultz, Michael Jarett

    2012-01-01

    Based on a review of the existing literature on database design, this study proposed a unified database model to support corporate technology innovation. This study assessed potential support for the model based on the opinions of 200 technology industry executives, including Chief Information Officers, Chief Knowledge Officers and Chief Learning…

  9. Assessing Innovation in Corporate and Government Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeeman, Deane; Jones, Rebecca; Dysart, Jane

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on the results of interviews conducted in December 2009 and January 2010 to identify innovative service trends in library and information services in the government and corporate arenas. The study was undertaken as part of a Library and Archives Canada (LAC) research project to inform the Government of Canada Assistant Deputy…

  10. Gendering Corporal Punishment: Beyond the Discourse of Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Sara

    2008-01-01

    In the last few years the Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children has been gathering momentum, with a submission to "The United Nations Secretary General's study on violence against children" the most recent addition to the cause. Nevertheless, corporal punishment in schools is still condoned in many countries and its practice…

  11. Corporal Punishment and Student Outcomes in Rural Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Seunghee

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of corporal punishment on student outcomes in rural schools by analyzing 1,067 samples from the School Survey on Crime and Safety 2007-2008. Results of descriptive statistics and multivariate regression analyses indicated that schools with corporal punishment may decrease students' violent behaviors and…

  12. The Predictors of Parental Use of Corporal Punishment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Otis, Melanie D.

    2007-01-01

    Corporal punishment has been the focus of considerable study over the past decade. Some recent research suggesting that the use of corporal punishment may have significant long-term negative effects on children has prompted increasing exploration and interest in the issue. We used tobit regression analysis and data from the 2000 National…

  13. Are Children's Competitive Team Sports Socializing Agents for Corporate America?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlage, Gai Ingham

    In a study of the similarities between childrens' competitive team sports and the typical corporate or business environment, two research questions were posed: (1) Does the structural organization of childrens' soccer and ice hockey organizations resemble that of American corporations?; and (2) Are the values of childrens' competitive sports…

  14. Opinions about Child Corporal Punishment and Influencing Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Tessa; Romano, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    The use of corporal punishment has been linked to negative developmental outcomes for children. Despite this finding, Section 43 of the Canadian Criminal Code permits the use of corporal punishment by parents for children 2 to 12 years of age. Therefore, this study's first objective is to investigate opinions toward Section 43 and spanking more…

  15. Reputation Management: The New Face of Corporate Public Relations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutton, James G.; Goodman, Michael B.; Alexander, Jill B.; Genest, Christina M.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an empirical study of the Fortune 500 companies suggesting that "reputation management" is gaining ground as a driving philosophy behind corporate public relations. Finds some interesting correlations between reputation and specific categories of spending. Concludes that if reputation management is the new face of corporate public…

  16. Global Preparedness and Human Resources: College and Corporate Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bikson, T. K.; Law, S. A.

    A research study explored the human resource implications of the emerging economic globalism, including the following questions: How is globalism understood by corporations and colleges in the United States? What are the perceived human resource implications of globalism? and What are corporations and colleges doing today to meet these human…

  17. Corporate Universities versus Traditional Universities: Comparison through Published Organisation Documentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, John S.; Martin, Michele C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper is a part of an ongoing empirical, multi-modal comparative investigation into corporate universities in the US and the UK, the first stage of which was reported in Walton and Martin (2000). This second stage consists of an in-depth comparative study of the aims and objectives of corporate universities in the UK and US compared to…

  18. Corporate Environmentalism in Developing Countries: A Tale of Three Multinationals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Allen L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Multinational corporations bring both economic opportunities and technological hazards to developing countries. Discusses the trade-offs between the profit and development objectives and the environmental, health, and safety objectives as seen in three case studies involving Occidental Chemical and Du Pont corporations in Thailand, and Xerox…

  19. Corporate information systems in health organisations.

    PubMed

    Smith, J

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the nature of corporate information systems and their applications in health organisations. It emphasises the importance of financial and human resource information in the creation of a corporate data model. The paper summarises the main features of finance and human resource systems as they are used in health organisations. It looks at a series of case studies carried out in health organisations, which were selected on the basis of their representation of different aspects of service delivery. It also discusses the theoretical and practical perspectives of the systems themselves, their roles in information management, executive and decision support, and in planning and forecasting. PMID:10173702

  20. The network of global corporate control.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Stefania; Glattfelder, James B; Battiston, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the control network of transnational corporations affects global market competition and financial stability. So far, only small national samples were studied and there was no appropriate methodology to assess control globally. We present the first investigation of the architecture of the international ownership network, along with the computation of the control held by each global player. We find that transnational corporations form a giant bow-tie structure and that a large portion of control flows to a small tightly-knit core of financial institutions. This core can be seen as an economic "super-entity" that raises new important issues both for researchers and policy makers.

  1. The Impact of Baby Boomer Retirement and Reverse Migration That Results in Corporate Brain Drain in Corporation in Developed Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner-Parker, Bobbie J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to identify whether the corporate brain drain that results as baby boomers retire and highly educated skilled immigrants return to their nations of origin, or to other developing nations, impact corporations in developed countries; and identify effective solutions firms are using to address the void of…

  2. Perceptions of Student Misconduct, Perceived Respect for Teachers, and Support for Corporal Punishment among School Teachers in South Korea: An Exploratory Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ben

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of survey data on perceptions of student misconduct, perceived respect for teachers, and support for corporal punishment among school teachers in South Korea. The data were gathered from a survey of 110 middle and high school teachers in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea. Descriptive, chi square, logistic regression,…

  3. Corporate Associate Partnerships: Practitioners' Involvement in the Delivery of an Auditing Course Based on a Case-Study: A Teaching Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slack, Richard; Loughran, Jan; Abrahams, Kirsty

    2014-01-01

    This Teaching Resource outlines and reflects upon the use of an innovative corporate associate partnership scheme as part of the delivery of an Auditing course to final year undergraduate Accounting students at a university in the UK. It outlines the motivations behind a practitioner's involvement in teaching delivery, along with the formulation,…

  4. Corporate interests, philanthropies, and the peace movement.

    PubMed

    Wright, T; Rodriguez, F; Waitzkin, H

    1986-01-01

    Corporate and philanthropic involvement in the peace movement is growing. In considering medical peace groups as examples, we have studied the ways that corporate and philanthropic funding have shaped the course of activism. Our methods have included: review of the Foundations Grant Index from 1974-1983; analysis of corporations' and foundations' criteria for grants in the categories of peace, arms control, and disarmament; interviews with leaders of activist organizations and with foundation officials; and our own experiences in the peace movement. Corporate interests in preventing nuclear war stem from a concern for global stability in which world markets may expand, and from a hope to frame issues posed by the peace movement in a way that will not challenge basic structures of power and finance. Several general features make peace groups respectable and attractive to philanthropies; an uncritical stance toward corporate participation in the arms race; a viewpoint that the main danger of nuclear war stems from a profound, bilateral conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union; and a single-issue focus that does not deal with the many related problems reflecting the injustices of capitalism. The two major medical groups working for peace, Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR) and International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW), have accomplished many goals; however, their adherence to subtle criteria of respectability and their dependence on philanthropic funding have limited the scope of their activism. The struggle for peace can not succeed without fundamental changes in the corporate system that initiates, maintains, and promotes the arms race.

  5. Corporate interests, philanthropies, and the peace movement.

    PubMed

    Wright, T; Rodriguez, F; Waitzkin, H

    1986-01-01

    Corporate and philanthropic involvement in the peace movement is growing. In considering medical peace groups as examples, we have studied the ways that corporate and philanthropic funding have shaped the course of activism. Our methods have included: review of the Foundations Grant Index from 1974-1983; analysis of corporations' and foundations' criteria for grants in the categories of peace, arms control, and disarmament; interviews with leaders of activist organizations and with foundation officials; and our own experiences in the peace movement. Corporate interests in preventing nuclear war stem from a concern for global stability in which world markets may expand, and from a hope to frame issues posed by the peace movement in a way that will not challenge basic structures of power and finance. Several general features make peace groups respectable and attractive to philanthropies; an uncritical stance toward corporate participation in the arms race; a viewpoint that the main danger of nuclear war stems from a profound, bilateral conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union; and a single-issue focus that does not deal with the many related problems reflecting the injustices of capitalism. The two major medical groups working for peace, Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR) and International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW), have accomplished many goals; however, their adherence to subtle criteria of respectability and their dependence on philanthropic funding have limited the scope of their activism. The struggle for peace can not succeed without fundamental changes in the corporate system that initiates, maintains, and promotes the arms race. PMID:3957511

  6. Corporate Strategy and Industrial Training. Contract Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Robert R.

    Using a brief series of extended interviews, a study gathered information on how corporate competitive strategies affect, and are affected by, worker training requirements. It focused on training activities involving plant-level personnel and first-level supervisors. Interviews were conducted with general manufacturing executives and training…

  7. Corporate Recruiters Survey, 2011. Survey Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgington, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    In this report, the Graduate Management Admission Council[R] (GMAC[R]) presents the results from the 2011 Corporate Recruiters Survey. Conducted annually since 2001, this survey examines the job outlook for recent graduate business students as well as employer needs and expectations. The objectives of this study are to obtain a picture of the…

  8. 2012 Corporate Recruiters Survey. Survey Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results from the 2012 Corporate Recruiters Survey conducted by the Graduate Management Admission Council[R] (GMAC[R]). Conducted annually since 2001, this survey examines the job outlook for recent graduate business students as well as employer needs and expectations. The objectives of this study are to obtain a picture of…

  9. Business Students' Perceptions of Corporate Ethical Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Philip; And Others

    Business students' observations of corporate ethical behavior and social responsibility were studied. The research objective was to examine the contention that the education of business managers should include courses in business and society because such courses would heighten student perceptions of the ethical and social dimensions of managerial…

  10. Time Series Trends in Corporate Team Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priest, Simon; Lesperance, Mary Ann

    1994-01-01

    In two studies, the Team Development Indicator was repeatedly administered to intact work groups participating in intensive 48-hour residential corporate adventure training (CAT) and various follow-up procedures. CAT significantly improved team behaviors in all training groups, but improvements were maintained or increased only in groups that…

  11. Corporate Recruiters Survey: 2011 General Data Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graduate Management Admission Council, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In this report, the Graduate Management Admission Council[R] (GMAC[R]), in cooperation with MBA Career Services Council and EFMD, presents the results of the 2011 Corporate Recruiters Survey, the tenth annual survey of business graduates' employers. The primary purposes of this study are to examine the job market for graduates from MBA and other…

  12. 27 CFR 41.234 - Corporate documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporate documents. 41... Processed Tobacco § 41.234 Corporate documents. Every corporation that files an application for a permit as....231 a true copy of the corporate charter or a certificate of corporate existence or...

  13. 27 CFR 40.494 - Corporate documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporate documents. 40... Processed Tobacco § 40.494 Corporate documents. Every corporation that files an application for a permit as... § 40.492 a true copy of the corporate charter or a certificate of corporate existence or...

  14. 12 CFR 5.42 - Corporate title.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporate title. 5.42 Section 5.42 Banks and... CORPORATE ACTIVITIES Other Changes in Activities and Operations § 5.42 Corporate title. (a) Authority. 12 U... change its corporate title. (c) Standards. A national bank may change its corporate title provided...

  15. The intergenerational transmission of corporal punishment: a comparison of social learning and temperament models.

    PubMed

    Muller, R T; Hunter, J E; Stollak, G

    1995-11-01

    This family study examined two models regarding the intergenerational transmission of corporal punishment. The model based on social learning assumptions asserted that corporal punishment influences aggressive child behavior. The model based on temperament theory suggested that aggressive child behavior impacts upon parental use of corporal punishment. Participants were 1,536 parents of 983 college students. Corporal punishment was assessed from father, mother, and child perspectives. Path analyses revealed that the social learning model was most consistent with the data.

  16. Higher Education and Corporate Education: From Cold War to Detente to Active Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Badi G.

    1986-01-01

    Provides an overview of the relations between higher education and business and industry, focusing on the development of corporate training/education programs and recent improvements in higher education-corporate education relations. Offers a case study of a collaborative arrangement between the AEtna Institute for Corporate Education and the…

  17. 26 CFR 1.971-1 - Definitions with respect to export trade corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... engineering, technical, and financial studies required by N Corporation in the preparation of bids to supply... consummated. Corporation N does not receive a contract from country Y on its bid to supply equipment. Income... contract, A Corporation hires a skilled crew to carry out the contract and utilizes equipment and...

  18. Corporate Culture and the Use of Written English Within British Subsidiaries in the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Catherine

    1998-01-01

    A study investigated communication patterns in written English and the prevalent corporate culture, the relationship between a British corporate office and its subsidiary in the Netherlands. Survey respondents were senior-level employees at 107 companies. Results indicate corporate culture plays an important role in the level of English skills…

  19. Corporate Schooling Meets Corporate Media: Standards, Testing, and Technophilia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltman, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Educational publishing corporations and media corporations in the United States have been converging, especially through the promotion of standardization, testing, and for-profit educational technologies. Media and technology companies--including News Corp, Apple, and Microsoft--have significantly expanded their presence in public schools to sell…

  20. The effects of corporate restructuring on hospital policymaking.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J A; Morlock, L L; Gifford, B D

    1988-01-01

    Hospital corporate restructuring is the segmentation of assets or functions of the hospital into separate corporations. While these functions are almost always legally separated from the hospital, their impact on hospital policymaking may be far more direct. This study examines the effects of corporate restructuring by community hospitals on the structure, composition, and activity of hospital governing boards. In general, we expect that the policymaking function of the hospital will change to adapt to the multicorporate structure implemented under corporate restructuring, as well as the overlapping boards and diversified business responsibilities of the new corporate entity. Specifically, we hypothesize that the hospital board under corporate restructuring will conform more to the "corporate" model found in the business/industrial sector and less to the "philanthropic" model common to most community hospitals to date. Analysis of survey data from 1,037 hospitals undergoing corporate restructuring from 1979-1985 and a comparison group of 1,883 noncorporately restructured hospitals suggests general support for this hypothesis. Implications for health care governance and research are discussed. PMID:3384671

  1. Exposure to intimate partner violence reduces the protective effect that women’s high education has on children’s corporal punishment: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Mariano; Dahlblom, Kjerstin; Solórzano, Lucia; Herrera, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that women's education is protective against corporal punishment (CP) of children. However, the effect that women's exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV) has on the association between women's education and children's CP has not been studied. Objective To understand how the interaction between women's exposure to IPV and their education level influences the occurrence of children's CP at the household level. Methods We selected 10,156 women who had at least one child less than 16 years old from cross-sectional data from the 2006–2007 Nicaraguan Demographic and Health Survey. Children's CP was defined as the punishment of children by slapping them, hitting them with a fist, or hitting them with a rope, belt, stick, or other object. IPV was measured by using a conflict tactic scale. The WHO Self-Reporting Questionnaire 20 (SRQ-20) was used to assess the women's mental health. We computed adjusted risk ratios (ARR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using Poisson regression with a robust variance estimator. Results Women's exposure to IPV was associated with a 10–17% increase in the risk of children's CP. IPV and children's CP were associated with impaired women's mental health. Women's lifetime exposure to emotional IPV and controlling behavior by a partner significantly decreased the protective effect from women's high education level on children's CP. When women were exposed to emotional IPV, the protective effect from having a college education decreased from ARR=0.61 (95% CI 0.47–0.80) to ARR=0.98 (95% CI 0.80–1.19). A similar pattern was found among women exposed to controlling behavior by a partner, the protective effect decreased from ARR=0.71 (95% CI 0.53–0.90) to ARR=0.86 (95% CI 0.70–1.06). Conclusion This study shows how significant gains in one positive social determinant of children's well-being can be undermined when it interacts with men's violence toward women. Policies that aim to end children

  2. Business Development Corporation, Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    Jasek, S.

    1995-12-31

    Business Development Corporation, Inc., is a company specializing in opportunity seeking and business development activities in the {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} post communist Central and Eastern Europe, with particular emphasis on the Republics of Poland and Slovakia. The company currently focuses its expertise on strategic investing and business development between Central Europe and the United States of America. In Poland and Slovakia, the company specializes in developing large scale energy and environmental {open_quotes}infrastructure{close_quotes} development projects on the federal, state, and local level. In addition, the company assists large state owned industries in the transformation and privatization process. Business Development Corporation has assisted and continues to assist in projects of national importance. The staff of experts advise numerous large Polish and Slovak companies, most owned or in the process of privatization, on matters of restructuring, finance, capital structure, strategic parternships or investors, mergers, acquisitions and joint ventures with U.S. based firms. The company also assists and advises on a variety of environmental and energy matters in the public and private sector.

  3. Corporate citizenship: Statoil.

    PubMed

    Fjell, Olav

    2003-01-01

    Open markets alone do not guarantee equitable and sustainable development. Income disparities are growing both within and between countries to the extent that the marginalization of the poor has become a key challenge of globalization. To meet this challenge, the global community must address the governance gap between global finance/economics and local or national politics in world affairs. This article discusses how globalization is shaping Statoil's approach to corporate citizenship. The Norwegian firm, with 17,000 workers in some 25 countries, is one of the major net sellers of crude oil and supplies Europe with natural gas. Statoil maintains that corporations can contribute to global governance by conducting business in a manner that is ethical, economically viable, environmentally sound, and socially responsible. This contribution can be achieved through development partnerships with national governments, multilateral institutions, and nongovernmental organizations. Norway's Statoil ASA is one of the world's largest net sellers of crude oil and a major supplier of natural gas to Europe. It is the leading Scandinavian retailer of petroleum and other oil products. Statoil employs approximately 17,000 workers and operates in 25 countries. PMID:17208716

  4. Corporate citizenship: Statoil.

    PubMed

    Fjell, Olav

    2003-01-01

    Open markets alone do not guarantee equitable and sustainable development. Income disparities are growing both within and between countries to the extent that the marginalization of the poor has become a key challenge of globalization. To meet this challenge, the global community must address the governance gap between global finance/economics and local or national politics in world affairs. This article discusses how globalization is shaping Statoil's approach to corporate citizenship. The Norwegian firm, with 17,000 workers in some 25 countries, is one of the major net sellers of crude oil and supplies Europe with natural gas. Statoil maintains that corporations can contribute to global governance by conducting business in a manner that is ethical, economically viable, environmentally sound, and socially responsible. This contribution can be achieved through development partnerships with national governments, multilateral institutions, and nongovernmental organizations. Norway's Statoil ASA is one of the world's largest net sellers of crude oil and a major supplier of natural gas to Europe. It is the leading Scandinavian retailer of petroleum and other oil products. Statoil employs approximately 17,000 workers and operates in 25 countries.

  5. Corporate U. Takes the Job Training Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Discusses corporations such as Sears, Motorola, Saturn, and Intel that have created their own corporate universities to train and retrain their workers. Highlights Motorola, the largest of the corporate universities. (JOW)

  6. Corporate Support of Education: Some Strings Attached

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malott, Robert H.

    1978-01-01

    Corporate self-interest should guide corporate giving. Managers of publicly held corporations have the right, the capability, and the obligation to establish a philosophical screen to use in determining how shareholders' money is to be donated. (Author/MLF)

  7. The Changing Shape of Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, June G.

    2003-01-01

    This newsletter contains two articles dealing with the changing shape of corporations. The article "Trends in Business Culture" argues that Wal-Mart's emergence as the largest corporation in the United States reflects the larger economic shift in the U.S. economy from production of goods to provision of abstract goods such as services and…

  8. Corporate Support of Education, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Aid to Education, New York, NY.

    This document was published by the Council for Aid to Education, the only national nonprofit organization that focuses on education and private giving, particularly corporate giving. The first part presents national estimates for corporate contributions made during 1993. Preliminary data for 1994 indicate little if any growth, though the outlook…

  9. Theory "W": The Corporate Warrior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, David J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Describes power structure of corporations functioning under Theory W in which single leaders, in partnership with trusted followers, achieve corporate success. Basis of this industrial structure is attributed to social and developmental structures of prehistoric man and city states. Dimensions of W, X, Y, and Z theories are discussed. (MBR)

  10. The Solar Development Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.E.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a proposed stand alone company, the Solar Development Corporation (SDC), to be a business development and financing entity for photovoltaic operations with the potential to be commercially sustainable. SDC will have a fully integrated policy advocacy link to the World Bank. SDC will define target countries where the potential exists for significant early market expansion. In those countries it will provide: market and business development services that will accelerate the growth of private firms and deepen the penetration of Solar Home Systems (SHS) and other rural PV applications in the market; and access to pre-commercial and parallel financing for private firms to (1) expand their capability in PV distribution businesses, and (2) strengthen their ability to provide credit to end users. SDC itself will not engage in direct financing of the final consumer. It is intended that as far as possible SDC`s finance will be provided in parallel with financing from Financial Intermediaries.

  11. Functions and Positions of Corporate Occupational Health Managers in Company-Wide Occupational Health Management.

    PubMed

    Mori, Koji; Nagata, Tomohisa; Kajiki, Shigeyuki; Hino, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Masako

    2013-08-21

    Objectives: It has become necessary for Japanese corporations to manage occupational health (OH) programs consistently throughout their organizations. Corporations need to clarify their health policies, develop standardized programs, assign OH staff, and ensure that they communicate with each other. To realize such conditions, many occupational physicians (OPs), who have the skills to lead corporation-wide OH activities, are now being assigned to head offices of corporations and referred to as corporate OH managers. However, there has been no research to date in Japan on their actual situation and function. We conducted an interview study of corporate OH managers to clarify their functions and positions in corporations. Subjects and Methods: We conducted semi-structural interviews with 14 corporate OH managers in large corporations employing more than 5,000 workers and multiple OPs. Interview scripts were coded to identify their functions as corporate OH managers and the context of their positions within corporate-wide OH management systems. Results: Five contexts were suggested. 1) Corporate OH managers played central roles in developing corporate health policies, standards and plans. 2) Head office department managers who supervised the sites distributed the policies and standards, and corporate OH managers instructed site OPs and OH staff. 3) In some corporations, corporate OH managers participated in the evaluation process of OH programs as part of occupational safety and health management systems or business audits. 4) Corporate OH managers led communications among OPs and OH staff by facilitating corporate OH meetings, and provided technical training. 5) Corporate OH managers in positions that enabled them to report directly or indirectly to decision makers (i.e., directors in charge) on human resource issues. Discussion: The results of this study suggest that companies that promote consistent company-wide OH programs also utilized the professional knowledge

  12. Parental use of corporal punishment in Europe: intersection between public health and policy.

    PubMed

    duRivage, Nathalie; Keyes, Katherine; Leray, Emmanuelle; Pez, Ondine; Bitfoi, Adina; Koç, Ceren; Goelitz, Dietmar; Kuijpers, Rowella; Lesinskiene, Sigita; Mihova, Zlatka; Otten, Roy; Fermanian, Christophe; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane

    2015-01-01

    Studies have linked the use of corporal punishment of children to the development of mental health disorders. Despite the recommendation of international governing bodies for a complete ban of the practice, there is little European data available on the effects of corporal punishment on mental health and the influence of laws banning corporal punishment. Using data from the School Children Mental Health Europe survey, the objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the prevalence and legal status of corporal punishment across six European countries and to evaluate the association between parental use of corporal punishment and children's mental health. The study found that odds of having parents who reported using occasional to frequent corporal punishment were 1.7 times higher in countries where its use is legal, controlling for socio-demographic factors. Children with parents who reported using corporal punishment had higher rates of both externalized and internalized mental health disorders.

  13. Parental Use of Corporal Punishment in Europe: Intersection between Public Health and Policy

    PubMed Central

    duRivage, Nathalie; Keyes, Katherine; Leray, Emmanuelle; Pez, Ondine; Bitfoi, Adina; Koç, Ceren; Goelitz, Dietmar; Kuijpers, Rowella; Lesinskiene, Sigita; Mihova, Zlatka; Otten, Roy; Fermanian, Christophe; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane

    2015-01-01

    Studies have linked the use of corporal punishment of children to the development of mental health disorders. Despite the recommendation of international governing bodies for a complete ban of the practice, there is little European data available on the effects of corporal punishment on mental health and the influence of laws banning corporal punishment. Using data from the School Children Mental Health Europe survey, the objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the prevalence and legal status of corporal punishment across six European countries and to evaluate the association between parental use of corporal punishment and children’s mental health. The study found that odds of having parents who reported using occasional to frequent corporal punishment were 1.7 times higher in countries where its use is legal, controlling for socio-demographic factors. Children with parents who reported using corporal punishment had higher rates of both externalized and internalized mental health disorders. PMID:25674788

  14. Parental use of corporal punishment in Europe: intersection between public health and policy.

    PubMed

    duRivage, Nathalie; Keyes, Katherine; Leray, Emmanuelle; Pez, Ondine; Bitfoi, Adina; Koç, Ceren; Goelitz, Dietmar; Kuijpers, Rowella; Lesinskiene, Sigita; Mihova, Zlatka; Otten, Roy; Fermanian, Christophe; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane

    2015-01-01

    Studies have linked the use of corporal punishment of children to the development of mental health disorders. Despite the recommendation of international governing bodies for a complete ban of the practice, there is little European data available on the effects of corporal punishment on mental health and the influence of laws banning corporal punishment. Using data from the School Children Mental Health Europe survey, the objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the prevalence and legal status of corporal punishment across six European countries and to evaluate the association between parental use of corporal punishment and children's mental health. The study found that odds of having parents who reported using occasional to frequent corporal punishment were 1.7 times higher in countries where its use is legal, controlling for socio-demographic factors. Children with parents who reported using corporal punishment had higher rates of both externalized and internalized mental health disorders. PMID:25674788

  15. Corporate social responsibility of future radiology professionals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K; Collins, Kevin S

    2011-01-01

    Plagued by difficult economic times, many radiology managers may find themselves faced with ethical dilemmas surrounding ongoing organizational pressures to maintain high levels of productivity with restricted resources. This often times tests the level of moral resilience and corporate social consciousness of even the most experienced radiology professionals. A study was conducted to determine what Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) orientation and viewpoint future radiology professionals may have. The results of the study indicate that these study participants may initially consider patient care more important than profit maximization. Study results indicate that these specific future radiology professionals will not need laws, legal sanctions, and intensified rules to force them to act ethically. However,they may need ongoing training as to the necessity of profit maximization if they seek the highest quality of care possible for their patients.

  16. The Role of Corporations in Ensuring Biodiversity

    PubMed

    KELLY; HODGE

    1996-11-01

    / Corporations own approximately 25% of all private land in the United States and, therefore, play an essential role in protecting biodiversity and maintaining natural habitats. The Wildlife Habitat Council (WHC) is a unique joint venture between conservation organizations and corporations to utilize corporate lands for ensuring biodiversity. The following case studies demonstrate how corporations have helped ensure healthy ecosystems and provided critical leadership in regional efforts. Amoco Chemical Company's Cooper River Plant has been instrumental in developing a cooperative project that involves numerous corporations, plantation owners, private citizens, nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and community groups to develop a comprehensive, ecosystem-based management plan for part of the Cooper River in Charleston, South Carolina, USA. The second case focuses on the Morie Company, a national sand quarry operator headquartered in southern New Jersey, USA. Morie Company is working with WHC, community groups, the Pinelands Commission, and other state regulatory agencies to explore sustainable development opportunities for companies within the Pinelands regulations. The third case takes us to DuPont Company's Asturias, Spain, site. A win-win success story of improved habitat and cost savings is the result of DuPont's concern for the environment, ability to work with a variety of groups, and willingness to consider innovative restoration techniques. The fourth case discusses Consumers Power Company's Campbell Plant in West Olive, Michigan, USA. In addition to implementing projects that contribute to biodiversity, Consumers Power has developed an environmental education field station to teach others about the importance of natural habitats. The final case highlights Baltimore Gas & Electric Company's efforts to maintain habitat for endangered species at their Calvert Cliffs site in Maryland.KEY WORDS: Partnerships; Stewardship; International; Habitats

  17. The role of corporations in ensuring biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Joyce M.; Hodge, Michael R.

    1996-11-01

    Corporations own approximately 25% of all private land in the United States and, therefore, play an essential role in protecting biodiversity and maintaining natural habitats. The Wildlife Habitat Council (WHC) is a unique joint venture between conservation organizations and corporations to utilize corporate lands for ensuring biodiversity. The following case studies demonstrate how corporations have helped ensure healthy ecosystems and provided critical leadership in regional efforts. Amoco Chemical Company's Cooper River Plant has been instrumental in developing a cooperative project that involves numerous corporations, plantation owners, private citizens, nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and community groups to develop a comprehensive, ecosystem-based management plan for part of the Cooper River in Charleston, South Carolina, USA. The second case focuses on the Morie Company, a national sand quarry operator headquartered in southern New Jersey, USA. Morie Company is working with WHC, community groups, the Pinelands Commission, and other state regulatory agencies to explore sustainable development opportunities for companies within the Pinelands regulations. The third case takes us to DuPont Company's Asturias, Spain, site. A win—win success story of improved habitat and cost savings is the result of DuPont's concern for the environment, ability to work with a variety of groups, and willingness to consider innovative restoration techniques. The fourth case discusses Consumers Power Company's Campbell Plant in West Olive, Michigan, USA. In addition to implementing projects that contribute to biodiversity, Consumers Power has developed an environmental education field station to teach others about the importance of natural habitats. The final case highlights Baltimore Gas & Electric Company's efforts to maintain habitat for endangered species at their Calvert Cliffs site in Maryland.

  18. The Role of Corporations in Ensuring Biodiversity

    PubMed

    KELLY; HODGE

    1996-11-01

    / Corporations own approximately 25% of all private land in the United States and, therefore, play an essential role in protecting biodiversity and maintaining natural habitats. The Wildlife Habitat Council (WHC) is a unique joint venture between conservation organizations and corporations to utilize corporate lands for ensuring biodiversity. The following case studies demonstrate how corporations have helped ensure healthy ecosystems and provided critical leadership in regional efforts. Amoco Chemical Company's Cooper River Plant has been instrumental in developing a cooperative project that involves numerous corporations, plantation owners, private citizens, nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and community groups to develop a comprehensive, ecosystem-based management plan for part of the Cooper River in Charleston, South Carolina, USA. The second case focuses on the Morie Company, a national sand quarry operator headquartered in southern New Jersey, USA. Morie Company is working with WHC, community groups, the Pinelands Commission, and other state regulatory agencies to explore sustainable development opportunities for companies within the Pinelands regulations. The third case takes us to DuPont Company's Asturias, Spain, site. A win-win success story of improved habitat and cost savings is the result of DuPont's concern for the environment, ability to work with a variety of groups, and willingness to consider innovative restoration techniques. The fourth case discusses Consumers Power Company's Campbell Plant in West Olive, Michigan, USA. In addition to implementing projects that contribute to biodiversity, Consumers Power has developed an environmental education field station to teach others about the importance of natural habitats. The final case highlights Baltimore Gas & Electric Company's efforts to maintain habitat for endangered species at their Calvert Cliffs site in Maryland.KEY WORDS: Partnerships; Stewardship; International; Habitats

  19. Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility and Governance on Its Credit Ratings

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-young

    2014-01-01

    This study reviews the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate governance on its credit rating. The result of regression analysis to credit ratings with relevant primary independent variables shows that both factors have significant effects on it. As we have predicted, the signs of both regression coefficients have a positive sign (+) proving that corporates with excellent CSR and governance index (CGI) scores have higher credit ratings and vice versa. The results show nonfinancial information also may have effects on corporate credit rating. The investment on personal data protection could be an example of CSR/CGI activities which have positive effects on corporate credit ratings. PMID:25401134

  20. Effects of corporate social responsibility and governance on its credit ratings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-young; Kim, JeongYeon

    2014-01-01

    This study reviews the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate governance on its credit rating. The result of regression analysis to credit ratings with relevant primary independent variables shows that both factors have significant effects on it. As we have predicted, the signs of both regression coefficients have a positive sign (+) proving that corporates with excellent CSR and governance index (CGI) scores have higher credit ratings and vice versa. The results show nonfinancial information also may have effects on corporate credit rating. The investment on personal data protection could be an example of CSR/CGI activities which have positive effects on corporate credit ratings. PMID:25401134

  1. Effects of corporate social responsibility and governance on its credit ratings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-young; Kim, JeongYeon

    2014-01-01

    This study reviews the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate governance on its credit rating. The result of regression analysis to credit ratings with relevant primary independent variables shows that both factors have significant effects on it. As we have predicted, the signs of both regression coefficients have a positive sign (+) proving that corporates with excellent CSR and governance index (CGI) scores have higher credit ratings and vice versa. The results show nonfinancial information also may have effects on corporate credit rating. The investment on personal data protection could be an example of CSR/CGI activities which have positive effects on corporate credit ratings.

  2. Corporation-induced Diseases, Upstream Epidemiologic Surveillance, and Urban Health

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Corporation-induced diseases are defined as diseases of consumers, workers, or community residents who have been exposed to disease agents contained in corporate products. To study the epidemiology and to guide expanded surveillance of these diseases, a new analytical framework is proposed. This framework is based on the agent–host–environment model and the upstream multilevel epidemiologic approach and posits an epidemiologic cascade starting with government-sanctioned corporate profit making and ending in a social cost, i.e., harm to population health. Each of the framework’s levels addresses a specific level of analysis, including government, corporations, corporate conduits, the environment of the host, and the host. The explained variable at one level is also the explanatory variable at the next lower level. In this way, a causal chain can be followed along the epidemiologic cascade from the site of societal power down to the host. The framework thus describes the pathways by which corporate decisions filter down to disease production in the host and identifies opportunities for epidemiologic surveillance. Since the environment of city dwellers is strongly shaped by corporations that are far upstream and several levels away, the framework has relevance for the study of urban health. Corporations that influence the health of urban populations include developers and financial corporations that determine growth or decay of urban neighborhoods, as well as companies that use strategies based on neighborhood characteristics to sell products that harm consumer health. Epidemiological inquiry and surveillance are necessary at all levels to provide the knowledge needed for action to protect the health of the population. To achieve optimal inquiry and surveillance at the uppermost levels, epidemiologists will have to work with political scientists and other social scientists and to utilize novel sources of information. PMID:18437580

  3. 27 CFR 31.123 - New corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false New corporation. 31.123... Requiring Registration As A New Business § 31.123 New corporation. Where a new corporation is formed to take over and conduct the business of one or more corporations that have registered under this part, the...

  4. 27 CFR 31.123 - New corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false New corporation. 31.123... Requiring Registration As A New Business § 31.123 New corporation. Where a new corporation is formed to take over and conduct the business of one or more corporations that have registered under this part, the...

  5. 27 CFR 41.193 - Corporate documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporate documents. 41..., AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Tobacco Products Importers § 41.193 Corporate documents. Every corporation... permit, required by § 41.191, a true copy of the corporate charter or a certificate of...

  6. 75 FR 64785 - Corporate Credit Unions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... changes to the structure of the corporate credit union (corporate) system were warranted. 74 FR 6004 (Feb... related rule provisions. 74 FR 65210 (Dec. 9, 2009). The proposed revisions covered corporate capital... corporate's directors be representatives of NPCUs. +36 months. 704.15 Audit requirements..... No N/A....

  7. The Pilot Training Study: Personnel Flow and the PILOT Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooz, W. E.

    The results of the Rand study of pilot flows and the computer-operated decision model, called the PILOT model, are described. The flows of pilots within the Air Force are caused by policies that require the career-development rotation of pilots from cockpit jobs to desk jobs, the maintenance of a supplement of pilots in excess of cockpit-related…

  8. Corporate Characteristics, Political Embeddedness and Environmental Pollution by Large U.S. Corporations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prechel, Harland; Zheng, Lu

    2012-01-01

    Organizational and environmental sociology contain surprisingly few studies of the corporation as one of the sources of environmental pollution. To fill this gap, we focus on the parent company as the unit of analysis and elaborate environmental theories that focus on the organizational and political-legal causes of pollution. Using a compiled…

  9. Hot on the Corporate Trail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truelson, Judith A.

    1976-01-01

    The key sources for public company information are annual reports, company reports published by Moody's Investors Service and Standard and Poor's Corporation, industry surveys, and periodical indexes. (Author/PF)

  10. Computers, Networks and the Corporation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Thomas W.; Rockart, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The ways in which computer networks are forging new kinds of markets and new ways to manage organizations are described. Discussed are the results of these innovations, which include changes in corporate structure and management style. (KR)

  11. Successful Corporate ID Project Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Chaoyun Chaucer; Schwen, Thomas M.

    1999-01-01

    Provides a literature review on project management related to corporate instructional design activities. Highlights include project integration, strategic planning, resource allocation, optimizing performance and quality, constructing a project team, generating a productive working climate, and implementation strategies. (LRW)

  12. Transnational corporations and health: a research agenda.

    PubMed

    Baum, Frances Elaine; Margaret Anaf, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Transnational corporations (TNCs) are part of an economic system of global capitalism that operates under a neoliberal regime underpinned by strong support from international organisations such as the World Trade Organization, World Bank, and most nation states. Although TNCs have grown in power and influence and have had a significant impact on population health over the past three decades, public health has not developed an integrated research agenda to study them. This article outlines the shape of such an agenda and argues that it is vital that research into the public health impact of TNCs be pursued and funded as a matter of priority. The four areas of the agenda are: assessing the health and equity impacts of TNCs; evaluating the effectiveness of government regulation to mitigate health and equity impacts of TNCs; studying the work of activist groups and networks that highlight adverse impacts of TNCs; and considering how regulation of capitalism could better promote a healthier and more equitable corporate sector.

  13. Making corporate compliance programs work.

    PubMed

    Chibbaro, M J; Colyer, C

    2000-05-01

    Healthcare organizations have created corporate compliance programs in an effort to adhere to Federal government recommendations, minimize the risk of wrongful behavior, and possibly reduce fines that may result from a government investigation. Compliance programs may have undetected weaknesses. Corporate compliance officers, executives, and board members need to be certain that their organization's program has sufficient infrastructure, oversight, and resources; effective education and training; an effective mechanism (hotline) to receive reports of compliance problems; and ongoing auditing and monitoring capabilities.

  14. The Network of Global Corporate Control

    PubMed Central

    Vitali, Stefania; Glattfelder, James B.; Battiston, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the control network of transnational corporations affects global market competition and financial stability. So far, only small national samples were studied and there was no appropriate methodology to assess control globally. We present the first investigation of the architecture of the international ownership network, along with the computation of the control held by each global player. We find that transnational corporations form a giant bow-tie structure and that a large portion of control flows to a small tightly-knit core of financial institutions. This core can be seen as an economic “super-entity” that raises new important issues both for researchers and policy makers. PMID:22046252

  15. Corporate solutions to caseload management -- an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, Robert; Gow, Ann; McDowell, Joan

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes an evaluation of a change in health visiting service delivery from GP caseload management to corporate caseload working, in one inner city health centre located in a deprived area of Glasgow. The aim of the study was to identify if moving to corporate caseload working provides the reported benefits cited in the limited literature available. A purposive sample consisting of ten health visitors, one GP, one manager and three clients volunteered to participate in this mixed methods evaluation study. Data were collected by means of a stress questionnaire, public health nursing diary, focus groups and semi-structured interviews. Findings show that immediate improvements were seen in team working, staff communication, sharing practice, enhanced clinical reflection and standards of documentation. However, corporate caseload working did not appear to reduce staff stress levels, increase public health nursing activity or improve quality of client service. Further research conducted over a longer time period with a full staffing complement is needed to validate these findings.

  16. 78 FR 60375 - Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation-Corporate Family Transaction Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation--Corporate Family Transaction Exemption Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation (Rogue Valley),\\1\\ a Class III rail carrier... White City Terminal & Utility Co. (WCTU) and was indirectly controlled by Berkshire Hathaway...

  17. 77 FR 41808 - General Dynamics Itronix Corporation, a Subsidiary of General Dynamics Corporation, Including...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ... Employment and Training Administration General Dynamics Itronix Corporation, a Subsidiary of General Dynamics... Adjustment Assistance (TAA) applicable to workers and former workers of General Dynamics Itronix Corporation, a subsidiary of General Dynamics Corporation, Sunrise, Florida. The determination was issued on...

  18. The consequences of metric production for small manufacturers. Volume 2: Case studies of large business-small business interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchcock, H. H.; Coates, J. F.; Canavan, M. M.; Prillaman, G. H.; Nettles, M. S.

    1982-02-01

    Over the last decade, controversy, concern, and conjecture have surrounded the effects of metric conversion on small business. Enthusiasts for metric argue that conversion would benefit small businesses in two ways. It would expand their markets, especially export markets. It would also improve business by making production processes more rational. Dissenters argue that conversion is unnecessary and possibly harmful to the majority of the nation's small businesses. Against this backdrop, the U.S. Metric Board is fulfilling its statutory mission to find out what happens to small businesses that convert to metric. The first phase of the project was a search for small businesses that had made substantial investments in converting to metric. That search showed that small businesses were most likely to invest in metric production in response to large corporations' needs for metric parts and products. The second phase of the research consisted of three case studies of the effects of large companies' conversion on small business suppliers. The team studied how the conversion of a General Electric Company department, two Ford Motor Company product lines, and three divisions of Ingersoll-Rand affected their small business suppliers.

  19. Attitudes and opinions on corporal punishment among urban Israeli Jews.

    PubMed

    Gofin, Rosa; Levav, Itzhak; Kohn, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Corporal punishment of children constitutes a human rights violation and has mental health consequences, yet it is frequently practiced in many countries. The objectives of this study were to identify attitudes and opinions with regard to corporal punishment among urban Jewish Israelis. Corporal punishment was defined as the means to discipline children by the use of physical force. A short battery of questions exploring attitudes and opinions on the use of corporal punishment of children was added to a periodic survey conducted by a private polling organization. The sample included 1,000 urban Jewish Israeli community residents. Most respondents did not endorse corporal punishment. However, when confronted with a question tapping the readiness of adults to comply with a ruling by the Supreme Court that prohibits the use of corporal punishment at home, most respondents expressed skepticism that the public will comply. Forty percent thought that most parents would agree to undergo training in the use of alternative means of discipline. Fifty-seven percent experienced physical punishment when growing up, a variable which was associated with all responses favoring its use as a means of discipline. The results of the study provide the bases for public health action, including training programs on alternative methods of discipline. Further research targeting other population groups not yet explored is needed.

  20. The management of iron deficiency in inflammatory bowel disease – an online tool developed by the RAND/UCLA appropriateness method

    PubMed Central

    Reinisch, W; Chowers, Y; Danese, S; Dignass, A; Gomollón, F; Haagen Nielsen, O; Lakatos, P L; Lees, C W; Lindgren, S; Lukas, M; Mantzaris, G J; Michetti, P; Moum, B; Peyrin-Biroulet, L; Toruner, M; Woude, J; Weiss, G; Stoevelaar, H

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundIron deficiency is a common and undertreated problem in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). AimTo develop an online tool to support treatment choice at the patient-specific level. MethodsUsing the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method (RUAM), a European expert panel assessed the appropriateness of treatment regimens for a variety of clinical scenarios in patients with non-anaemic iron deficiency (NAID) and iron deficiency anaemia (IDA). Treatment options included adjustment of IBD medication only, oral iron supplementation, high-/low-dose intravenous (IV) regimens, IV iron plus erythropoietin-stimulating agent (ESA), and blood transfusion. The panel process consisted of two individual rating rounds (1148 treatment indications; 9-point scale) and three plenary discussion meetings. ResultsThe panel reached agreement on 71% of treatment indications. ‘No treatment’ was never considered appropriate, and repeat treatment after previous failure was generally discouraged. For 98% of scenarios, at least one treatment was appropriate. Adjustment of IBD medication was deemed appropriate in all patients with active disease. Use of oral iron was mainly considered an option in NAID and mildly anaemic patients without disease activity. IV regimens were often judged appropriate, with high-dose IV iron being the preferred option in 77% of IDA scenarios. Blood transfusion and IV+ESA were indicated in exceptional cases only. ConclusionsThe RUAM revealed high agreement amongst experts on the management of iron deficiency in patients with IBD. High-dose IV iron was more often considered appropriate than other options. To facilitate dissemination of the recommendations, panel outcomes were embedded in an online tool, accessible via http://ferroscope.com/. PMID:24099472

  1. Corporate compliance and voluntary disclosure.

    PubMed

    Schiff, A B

    1995-09-01

    In any event, the decision to institute a corporate compliance program is a relatively simple one. In view of the ambiguity surrounding certain fraud and abuse provisions, and the corporate "death sentence" that may result from program exclusion, a compliance program is always sound corporate policy. To be sure, if the compliance program is administered improperly, it can actually increase the likelihood of whistleblower actions and create a body of potentially hurtful documentation. But these dangers can be minimized by structuring the program to protect the self-evaluative process through relevant privileges. The risks also pale in comparison to the exposure to criminal or exclusionary sanctions when improper conduct goes undetected by an organization. PMID:10144892

  2. Corporate compliance and voluntary disclosure.

    PubMed

    Schiff, A B

    1995-09-01

    In any event, the decision to institute a corporate compliance program is a relatively simple one. In view of the ambiguity surrounding certain fraud and abuse provisions, and the corporate "death sentence" that may result from program exclusion, a compliance program is always sound corporate policy. To be sure, if the compliance program is administered improperly, it can actually increase the likelihood of whistleblower actions and create a body of potentially hurtful documentation. But these dangers can be minimized by structuring the program to protect the self-evaluative process through relevant privileges. The risks also pale in comparison to the exposure to criminal or exclusionary sanctions when improper conduct goes undetected by an organization.

  3. Unmuzzling America's Corporations: Corporate Speech and the First Amendment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overbeck, Wayne

    Under the "commercial speech doctrine," corporations were restricted for many years from speaking out on public issues or engaging in certain advertising practices. This "doctrine" was based on a case from the 1940s, in which the court ruled that purely commercial advertising had no constitutional protection from government restraint. Since 1975,…

  4. The psychology of corporate rights: Perception of corporate versus individual rights to religious liberty, privacy, and free speech.

    PubMed

    Mentovich, Avital; Huq, Aziz; Cerf, Moran

    2016-04-01

    The U.S. Supreme Court has increasingly expanded the scope of constitutional rights granted to corporations and other collective entities. Although this tendency receives widespread public and media attention, little empirical research examines how people ascribe rights, commonly thought to belong to natural persons, to corporations. This article explores this issue in 3 studies focusing on different rights (religious liberty, privacy, and free speech). We examined participants' willingness to grant a given right while manipulating the type of entity at stake (from small businesses, to larger corporations, to for-profit and nonprofit companies), and the identity of the right holder (from employees, to owners, to the company itself as a separate entity). We further examined the role of political ideology in perceptions of rights. Results indicated a significant decline in the degree of recognition of entities' rights (the company itself) in comparison to natural persons' rights (owners and employees). Results also demonstrated an effect of the type of entity at stake: Larger, for-profit businesses were less likely to be viewed as rights holders compared with nonprofit entities. Although both tendencies persisted across the ideological spectrum, ideological differences emerged in the relations between corporate and individual rights: these were positively related among conservatives but negatively related among liberals. Finally, we found that the desire to protect citizens (compared with businesses) underlies individuals' willingness to grant rights to companies. These findings show that people (rather than corporations) are more appropriate recipients of rights, and can explain public backlash to judicial expansions of corporate rights.

  5. Mercury-control technology-assessment study: Troy Chemical Corporation, Newark, New Jersey. Preliminary survey report for the site visit of October 15, 1981. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-21

    An on-site visit was made to the Troy Chemical Corporation, Newark, New Jersey to evaluate control methods in place to reduce hazards to workers involved with mercury (7439976). Products included antiskin agents, bactericides, bodying agents, defoamers, dryers, mildewcides, preservatives, and wetting agents. Process descriptions were offered for raw mercury handling, mercuric/mercurous chloride production, mercuric oxide production, organomercurial production, and mercury reclamation. Control methods described included mercury vapor control through the use of mercury vapor adsorbers, exhaust hoods, and condenser/adsorber systems. The oxide grinding and packaging system, PMA grinding exhaust system, and spill protection pallets were used. Cyclones and filter bags were installed for reducing mercury particulate concentrations in the areas of potential exposure. Personal protective equipment, work practices, biological monitoring, and air-contaminant monitoring programs were described. The use of a sauna for removing mercury from the workers was a new approach that may reduce mercury levels in the body. It is suggested that the company investigate the ventilation of oven doors on the retorts in the mercury-reclamation facility. An in-depth survey is not recommended as adequate information was obtained.

  6. Save Money with a Corporate Style Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Paul R.

    1995-01-01

    Argues that corporate style guides create consistency in documents, promote a professional image, train new employees, and define document generation. Describes how to develop a corporate style guide. (SR)

  7. Beyond Compliance: Integrating Nonproliferation into Corporate Sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Hund, Gretchen; Kurzrok, Andrew J.

    2013-06-01

    This paper investigates nonproliferation as a potential corporate sustainability value. It reviews the history of corporate sustainability, builds the case for nonproliferation as a sustainability value, and develops recommendations for the integration of nonproliferation into the frameworks of sustainability.

  8. Developing a nursing corporate compliance program.

    PubMed

    Bartis, Janice A; Sullivan, Trent

    2002-09-01

    This article presents the process that a large urban tertiary care hospital engaged in when developing a corporate compliance program for nursing. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how nurse executives can successfully implement a comprehensive and practical nursing corporate compliance program. This article describes in detail the 5 steps the hospital took to develop its nursing corporate compliance program and provides examples of tools to guide you in developing a nursing corporate compliance program.

  9. Corporation Schools: 1900-1930.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Colleen A.

    Because of the increased need for a trained labor force to work in growing industries and because the public schools had failed to provide such workers, many corporations conducted their own training programs during the period 1900-1930. Departing from the older methods of training foremen and having them train the workers, these schools provided…

  10. Power, ethics, and corporate dentistry.

    PubMed

    Parker, M Alec; Parker, M Alec

    2013-01-01

    The North Carolina Dental Association recently sought to place clear statutory limits on the influence of corporate, nondental interests over dentists practices' decision-making. This report describes the two-year legislative battle with well-funded and politically connected parties that ultimately resulted in laws that protect patients' rights to be treated by a dentist free of outside commercial interests.

  11. Canonical considerations in corporate restructuring.

    PubMed

    Holland, S

    1985-03-01

    Religious institutes sponsoring Catholic health facilities face competitive economic pressures that impel them to seek corporate restructuring and joint ventures to fulfill their mission to the poor. They especially must look to the Church's Code of Canon Law to protect ecclesiastical goods and maintain their Catholic identity when entering such ventures. The U.S. bishops directives also assist in guaranteeing patient expectations that the health facility will observe the Church's ethical principles. Institutes first must ensure that subsidiaries will operate according to Catholic mission and philosophy. The canons delineate proper protection of assets and identify ends toward which the religious must apply temporal goods, such as supporting clergy and performing charitable works. Alienation, or conveyance of goods, is a critical consideration in such financial transactions; canons specify the institute's administrative limits and require superiors' written permission along with their councils' consent. All involved must be "thoroughly informed concerning the economic situation," show "just cause" for the transaction, and obtain expert estimates of property values. Religious administrators retain certain faith and executive obligations, such as amending the charter, appointing the board, and merging or dissolving the corporation. With the canons they help to ensure that collaborative efforts preserve the institute's corporate mission and allow religious to carry out their responsibility for ecclesiastical goods. Though alternatives to corporate ventures may be limited, options regarding how to structure and with whom to affiliate do exist. Sponsoring bodies dedicated to providing high-quality care must explore these options

  12. Corporal Punishment Foes Strike Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaar, Karen

    1977-01-01

    Discussion of U.S. Supreme Court decision (Ingrahm V. Wright) asserting that the Constitution's Eighth Amendment does not protect school children against cruel and unusual punishment and that the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment does not require notice and a hearing prior to the imposition of corporal punishment in the public…

  13. Business Web: Discovering Corporate Links

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakshminarayanan, Sambhavi; Rain, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Business education requires students to have knowledge about corporations and the relationships between them. Sometimes students, in particular non-traditional ones, may not have either this knowledge or the skills required to obtain it. The Business Web guides students in acquiring information about businesses and understanding their…

  14. 12 CFR 704.11 - Corporate Credit Union Service Organizations (Corporate CUSOs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporate Credit Union Service Organizations (Corporate CUSOs). 704.11 Section 704.11 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS CORPORATE CREDIT UNIONS § 704.11 Corporate Credit Union Service...

  15. 27 CFR 31.123 - New corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false New corporation. 31.123 Section 31.123 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Requiring Registration As A New Business § 31.123 New corporation. Where a new corporation is formed to...

  16. Corporal Punishment: Legalities, Realities, and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinchey, Patricia H.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a quiz that will help readers determine the reliability of their own perceptions relating to corporal punishment in schools. Discusses U.S. Courts and corporal punishment, worldwide and nationwide legality, and the realities of corporal punishment in the United States. Discusses implications for what teachers can do to address corporal…

  17. 12 CFR 583.8 - Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporation. 583.8 Section 583.8 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY DEFINITIONS FOR REGULATIONS AFFECTING SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.8 Corporation. The term Corporation means the Federal...

  18. 25 CFR 214.3 - Corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corporate information. 214.3 Section 214.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.3 Corporate information. A corporation shall file with...

  19. 25 CFR 214.3 - Corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Corporate information. 214.3 Section 214.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.3 Corporate information. A corporation shall file with...

  20. 12 CFR 563.201 - Corporate opportunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-OPERATIONS Reporting and Bonding § 563.201 Corporate opportunity. (a) If you are a director or officer of a... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporate opportunity. 563.201 Section 563.201... duty to a savings association, you must not take advantage of corporate opportunities belonging to...

  1. 76 FR 10209 - Corporate Credit Unions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... recently finalized changes to its Corporate Credit Union Rule, 12 CFR part 704. 75 FR 64786 (October 20... requirements and process for chartering corporate Federal credit unions (FCUs). 75 FR 60651 (October 1, 2010... requisite skills--including leadership--to make the proposed corporate a success. One commenter...

  2. 22 CFR 96.31 - Corporate structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corporate structure. 96.31 Section 96.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND APPROVAL OF... Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.31 Corporate structure. (a) The agency qualifies...

  3. 22 CFR 96.31 - Corporate structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corporate structure. 96.31 Section 96.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND APPROVAL OF... Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.31 Corporate structure. (a) The agency qualifies...

  4. 22 CFR 96.31 - Corporate structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corporate structure. 96.31 Section 96.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND APPROVAL OF... Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.31 Corporate structure. (a) The agency qualifies...

  5. 22 CFR 96.31 - Corporate structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Corporate structure. 96.31 Section 96.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND APPROVAL OF... Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.31 Corporate structure. (a) The agency qualifies...

  6. 25 CFR 214.3 - Corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corporate information. 214.3 Section 214.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.3 Corporate information. A corporation shall file with...

  7. 27 CFR 40.63 - Corporate documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporate documents. 40.63... PROCESSED TOBACCO Qualification Requirements for Manufacturers of Tobacco Products § 40.63 Corporate... furnish with its application for permit, required by § 40.62, a true copy of the corporate charter or...

  8. 27 CFR 44.83 - Corporate documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporate documents. 44.83... Proprietors § 44.83 Corporate documents. Every corporation, before commencing business as an export warehouse proprietor, shall furnish with its application for permit required by § 44.82, a true copy of the...

  9. 46 CFR 67.39 - Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.39 Corporation. (a) For the purpose of obtaining a registry or a recreational endorsement, a corporation meets citizenship requirements if: (1) It is... purpose of obtaining a fishery endorsement, a corporation meets citizenship requirements if: (1) It...

  10. 46 CFR 67.39 - Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.39 Corporation. (a) For the purpose of obtaining a registry or a recreational endorsement, a corporation meets citizenship requirements if: (1) It is... purpose of obtaining a fishery endorsement, a corporation meets citizenship requirements if: (1) It...

  11. Corporate Support of Higher Education, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Financial Aid to Education, New York, NY.

    Some of the results of the fourth Annual Survey of Corporate Contributions are presented in this report on corporate support of higher education for 1977. Usable questionnaires were returned by 816 companies. A discussion of national trends considers corporate support of higher education vs. college and university expenditures, increased student…

  12. Efficiency, Corporate Power, and the Bigness Complex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Walter; Brock, James W.

    1990-01-01

    Concludes that (1) the current infatuation with corporate bigness is void of credible empirical support; (2) disproportionate corporate size and industry concentration are incompatible with and destructive to good economic performance; and (3) structurally oriented antitrust policy must be revitalized to combat the burdens of corporate bigness.…

  13. Managing corporate knowledge can yield significant dividends.

    PubMed

    Sauer, S D

    1996-12-01

    Integrated delivery systems (IDSs) that track projects, initiatives, and task force undertakings system-wide are better able to effectively manage their corporate knowledge. IDS executives must understand how valuable corporate knowledge is, and should manage their organizations' corporate knowledge as carefully as their capital investments. PMID:10163001

  14. 22 CFR 96.31 - Corporate structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.31 Corporate structure. (a) The agency qualifies for... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporate structure. 96.31 Section 96.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND APPROVAL...

  15. 12 CFR 619.9185 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 619.9185 Section 619.9185 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9185 Funding Corporation. The term Funding Corporation refers to the Federal Farm Credit Banks Funding...

  16. 12 CFR 619.9185 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 619.9185 Section 619.9185 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9185 Funding Corporation. The term Funding Corporation refers to the Federal Farm Credit Banks Funding...

  17. 12 CFR 619.9185 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 619.9185 Section 619.9185 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9185 Funding Corporation. The term Funding Corporation refers to the Federal Farm Credit Banks Funding...

  18. 12 CFR 619.9185 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 619.9185 Section 619.9185 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9185 Funding Corporation. The term Funding Corporation refers to the Federal Farm Credit Banks Funding...

  19. 12 CFR 619.9185 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 619.9185 Section 619.9185 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9185 Funding Corporation. The term Funding Corporation refers to the Federal Farm Credit Banks Funding...

  20. 25 CFR 214.3 - Corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corporate information. 214.3 Section 214.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.3 Corporate information. A corporation shall file with...

  1. The path to corporate responsibility.

    PubMed

    Zadek, Simon

    2004-12-01

    Nike's tagline,"Just do it," is an inspirational call to action for the millions who wear the company's athletic gear. But in terms of corporate responsibility, Nike didn't always follow its own advice. In the 1990s, protesters railed against sweatshop conditions at some of its overseas suppliers and made Nike the global poster child for corporate ethical fecklessness. The intense pressure that activists exerted on the athletic apparel giant forced it to take a long, hard look at corporate responsibility--sooner than it might have otherwise. In this article, Simon Zadek, CEO of the UK-based institute AccountAbility, describes the bumpy route Nike has traveled to get to a better ethical place, one that cultivates and champions responsible business practices. Organizations learn in unique ways, Zadek contends, but they inevitably pass through five stages of corporate responsibility, from defensive ("It's not our fault") to compliance ("We'll do only what we have to") to managerial ("It's the business") to strategic ("It gives us a competitive edge") and, finally, to civil ("We need to make sure everybody does it"). He details Nike's arduous trek through these stages-from the company's initial defensive stance, when accusations about working conditions arose, all the way to its engagement today in the international debate about business's role in society and in public policy. As he outlines this evolution, Zadek offers valuable insights to executives grappling with the challenge of managing responsible business practices. Beyond just getting their own houses in order, the author argues, companies need to stay abreast of the public's evolving ideas about corporate roles and responsibilities. Organizations that do both will engage in what he calls"civil learning".

  2. The path to corporate responsibility.

    PubMed

    Zadek, Simon

    2004-12-01

    Nike's tagline,"Just do it," is an inspirational call to action for the millions who wear the company's athletic gear. But in terms of corporate responsibility, Nike didn't always follow its own advice. In the 1990s, protesters railed against sweatshop conditions at some of its overseas suppliers and made Nike the global poster child for corporate ethical fecklessness. The intense pressure that activists exerted on the athletic apparel giant forced it to take a long, hard look at corporate responsibility--sooner than it might have otherwise. In this article, Simon Zadek, CEO of the UK-based institute AccountAbility, describes the bumpy route Nike has traveled to get to a better ethical place, one that cultivates and champions responsible business practices. Organizations learn in unique ways, Zadek contends, but they inevitably pass through five stages of corporate responsibility, from defensive ("It's not our fault") to compliance ("We'll do only what we have to") to managerial ("It's the business") to strategic ("It gives us a competitive edge") and, finally, to civil ("We need to make sure everybody does it"). He details Nike's arduous trek through these stages-from the company's initial defensive stance, when accusations about working conditions arose, all the way to its engagement today in the international debate about business's role in society and in public policy. As he outlines this evolution, Zadek offers valuable insights to executives grappling with the challenge of managing responsible business practices. Beyond just getting their own houses in order, the author argues, companies need to stay abreast of the public's evolving ideas about corporate roles and responsibilities. Organizations that do both will engage in what he calls"civil learning". PMID:15605571

  3. The Impact of Japanese Corporate Transnationalism on Men's Involvement in Family Life and Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasuike, Akiko

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the ways in which Japanese corporate transnationalism affects husbands' involvement in family life and marital relationships primarily from a perspective of wives. It is based on interviews with 22 Japanese wives and 4 husbands. Studies of Japanese corporate transnationalism treat men as mere supervisors to local workers or…

  4. The Utilization of Training Program Evaluation in Corporate Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bober, Christopher F.; Bartlett, Kenneth R.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the use of training program evaluation results in corporate universities. Specifically, the study attempted to determine which organizational members use evaluation data, and for what purposes, and identify the factors that are related to the use of evaluation results. The study was designed to test the appropriateness of the…

  5. Modulation of behavior by the histaminergic system: lessons from H(1)R-and H(2)R-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Erich H; Neumann, Detlef; Seifert, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Besides acting in the immune system, histamine is also a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. The H1R causes central side effects, e.g. of first generation antihistamines, antidepressants or antipsychotics and represents the component of the central histaminergic system most extensively studied in behavior experiments with knock-out mice. Central effects of H2R are similar, but only few behavioral results from knockout models are available. We summarize the behavior phenotype of H1R- and H2R-deficient mice, revealing histaminergic modulation of behaviors like locomotor activity, cognition, emotional states, arousal, sleep and wakefulness, circadian rhythm, pain perception, food intake and energy consumption, respiration and susceptibility to seizures. Knock-out models demonstrate several central effects of H1R and H2R that are not clinically and therapeutically exploited to date. We critically discuss problems and pitfalls of both the knock-out mouse technique and the pharmacological approach with receptor-selective ligands. The behavioral characterization of Hrh1(-/-)- and Hrh2(-/-)-mice is crucial, because many pharmacological agents lack the required selectivity to unequivocally address the functions of a single histamine receptor subtype.

  6. Is the corporate transformation of hospitals creating a new hybrid health care space? A case study of the impact of co-location of public and private hospitals in Australia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Laurie; Barnett, J Ross

    2004-01-01

    A common feature of health reforms in western nations has been the transformation or (re)construction of health and health care as both a commodity and product. In the hospital sector, this transformation has become increasingly evident in the growth of for-profit involvement in service delivery. Investor-owned hospitals are now prominent providers of hospital care in Australia. This paper examines the changing nature of health care space through the changing portrayal and meaning of hospitals as represented by and encoded in the built environment. Public hospitals once occupied 'pride of place'. In contrast, up to the early 1980s, the private sector was seen as a cottage industry. However, increased levels of state subsidisation and government incentives and pro-market policies, combined with market-based opportunities for profit generation, have seen the emergence of large private hospital chains with a new corporate image to hospital care and the blurring of 'public' and 'private'. A significant factor in the reconstruction of hospital space in Australia has been the co-location of private and public hospitals. Co-location is a popular strategy proffered by State governments and one that has been quickly acted on by corporate providers. Using Mayne Health Ltd, Australia's largest for-profit hospital chain, and four specific case studies, this paper explores four variants of co-location. Each of these examples represent a different public and private hospital space. The growth of for-profit hospital chains signifies a new phase in the delivery of health care in Australia but also importantly the creation of a new hybridised 'health care' space. This space is neither private nor public but a reflection of the economic, political and social processes underlying this transformation. PMID:14604626

  7. Is the corporate transformation of hospitals creating a new hybrid health care space? A case study of the impact of co-location of public and private hospitals in Australia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Laurie; Barnett, J Ross

    2004-01-01

    A common feature of health reforms in western nations has been the transformation or (re)construction of health and health care as both a commodity and product. In the hospital sector, this transformation has become increasingly evident in the growth of for-profit involvement in service delivery. Investor-owned hospitals are now prominent providers of hospital care in Australia. This paper examines the changing nature of health care space through the changing portrayal and meaning of hospitals as represented by and encoded in the built environment. Public hospitals once occupied 'pride of place'. In contrast, up to the early 1980s, the private sector was seen as a cottage industry. However, increased levels of state subsidisation and government incentives and pro-market policies, combined with market-based opportunities for profit generation, have seen the emergence of large private hospital chains with a new corporate image to hospital care and the blurring of 'public' and 'private'. A significant factor in the reconstruction of hospital space in Australia has been the co-location of private and public hospitals. Co-location is a popular strategy proffered by State governments and one that has been quickly acted on by corporate providers. Using Mayne Health Ltd, Australia's largest for-profit hospital chain, and four specific case studies, this paper explores four variants of co-location. Each of these examples represent a different public and private hospital space. The growth of for-profit hospital chains signifies a new phase in the delivery of health care in Australia but also importantly the creation of a new hybridised 'health care' space. This space is neither private nor public but a reflection of the economic, political and social processes underlying this transformation.

  8. 26 CFR 1.902-1 - Credit for domestic corporate shareholder of a foreign corporation for foreign income taxes paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... second-tier corporation in the third-tier corporation. (ii) Fourth-, fifth-, or sixth-tier corporation. In the case of dividends paid to a third-, fourth-, or fifth-tier corporation by a foreign corporation in a taxable year beginning after August 5, 1997, the foreign corporation is a fourth-, fifth-,...

  9. 26 CFR 1.902-1 - Credit for domestic corporate shareholder of a foreign corporation for foreign income taxes paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... second-tier corporation in the third-tier corporation. (ii) Fourth-, fifth-, or sixth-tier corporation. In the case of dividends paid to a third-, fourth-, or fifth-tier corporation by a foreign corporation in a taxable year beginning after August 5, 1997, the foreign corporation is a fourth-, fifth-,...

  10. Effective health care corporate compliance.

    PubMed

    Saum, T B; Byassee, J

    2000-01-01

    The pace and intensity of oversight and investigation of health care organizations has greatly increased at all levels. Well run organizations with ethical management committed to following all laws and regulations are still at risk for compliance violations and punitive penalties. Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, organizations with an "effective" corporate compliance program may receive reduced penalties. The seven components of an effective program as defined in the guidelines are: (1) Standards and procedures; (2) oversight responsibilities; (3) employee training; (4) monitoring and auditing; (5) reporting systems; (6) enforcement and discipline; and (7) response and prevention. Lack of a compliance program needlessly exposes the organization to an avoidable risk of damage from non-compliance--whether intentional or not. Moreover, an effective program can contribute to the efficient operation of the organization and be a key piece of its corporate culture. PMID:10947465

  11. A look at Bodies Corporate.

    PubMed

    Chope, J

    1997-10-11

    One of the most exclusive clubs in the dental world comprises the 27 members who can call themselves Dental Bodies Corporate (DBCs). Among this elite are well-known names such as Dental World, Dencare, Whitecross, Benedent and also Oakley, which is owned by Denplan. In the UK only dentists and DBCs are permitted to carry on the business of dentistry. DBCs are simply companies whose directors (the majority of whom must be dentists) are protected by the laws of limited liability, with the purpose of encouraging investment by shareholders (who need not be dentists). This article outlines the story of how this select band of Corporate Bodies gained their exclusive status which goes back to the very earliest days of our profession.

  12. Effective health care corporate compliance.

    PubMed

    Saum, T B; Byassee, J

    2000-01-01

    The pace and intensity of oversight and investigation of health care organizations has greatly increased at all levels. Well run organizations with ethical management committed to following all laws and regulations are still at risk for compliance violations and punitive penalties. Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, organizations with an "effective" corporate compliance program may receive reduced penalties. The seven components of an effective program as defined in the guidelines are: (1) Standards and procedures; (2) oversight responsibilities; (3) employee training; (4) monitoring and auditing; (5) reporting systems; (6) enforcement and discipline; and (7) response and prevention. Lack of a compliance program needlessly exposes the organization to an avoidable risk of damage from non-compliance--whether intentional or not. Moreover, an effective program can contribute to the efficient operation of the organization and be a key piece of its corporate culture.

  13. A survey of parental opinions on corporal punishment in schools.

    PubMed

    Kelly, P C; Weir, M R; Fearnow, R G

    1985-06-01

    Forty-three states permit corporal punishment in schools. This practice continues despite the universal opposition of professional organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics. This study determines parental attitudes concerning the use of physical punishment in schools. The surveyed sample is drawn from parents of military dependents who brought their children to this clinic for routine physical examinations. One hundred and twenty-nine of 132 questionnaires were returned for a 98% response rate. Fifty-one percent of the parents supported the use of corporal punishment in schools, 37% disagreed (77% of these strongly), 11% had no opinion, and 1% did not respond to the question. Analysis of the responses displayed a relationship between parental attitudes on the use of corporal punishment and opinion of the positive effects of physical punishment on children's behavior (p less than 0.0001). No relationship was found between position on corporal punishment and the respondent (mother, father, or both), the age of parents, the military rank of the sponsor (the individual whose military service makes the child eligible for military medical care, i.e., father, mother, guardian, etc.), the sex of the children, the marital status of the parents, or the schools attended by the children (public or private). Thirty-four percent of parents believed corporal punishment would improve behavior, and 20% of parents felt that physical punishment would improve their child's academic performance.

  14. Inside the Corporate Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarlane, Bruce

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of client-based management education courses reports on an interview study of management lecturers at two British university business schools. Lecturers were concerned with four issues: whether student participation was voluntary, the insularity of the learning process within client-based programs, the impact of organizational politics…

  15. Corporal Punishment in Private Schools: The Case of Kathmandu, Nepal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khanal, Jeevan; Park, Sae-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elaborate the situation of corporal punishment which is being practiced in Nepalese schools going against new policies that promote the non-violence teaching. It was based on original qualitative study of one private school of Kathmandu (the capital city of Nepal) having more than 2000 students and 100 teachers.…

  16. Corporate environmentalism and environmental innovation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Hsing; Sam, Abdoul G

    2015-04-15

    Several papers have explored the effect of tighter environmental standards on environmental innovation. While mandatory regulation remains the central tenet of US environmental policy, the regulatory landscape has changed since the early 1990s with the increased recourse by federal and state agencies to corporate environmentalism--voluntary pollution prevention (P2) by firms--to achieve environmental improvements. We therefore estimate the effects of voluntary P2 activities on the patenting of environmental technologies by a sample of manufacturing firms. With our panel data of 352 firms over the 1991-2000 period, we adopt an instrumental variable Poisson framework to account for the count nature of patents and the endogeneity of the P2 adoption decision. Our results indicate that the adoption of voluntary P2 activities in the manufacturing sector has led to a statistically and economically significant increase in the number of environmental patents, suggesting that corporate environmentalism can act as a catalyst for investments in cleaner technologies. Our findings are internationally relevant given the increasing ubiquity of corporate environmentalism in both developed and developing economies.

  17. Corporate environmentalism and environmental innovation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Hsing; Sam, Abdoul G

    2015-04-15

    Several papers have explored the effect of tighter environmental standards on environmental innovation. While mandatory regulation remains the central tenet of US environmental policy, the regulatory landscape has changed since the early 1990s with the increased recourse by federal and state agencies to corporate environmentalism--voluntary pollution prevention (P2) by firms--to achieve environmental improvements. We therefore estimate the effects of voluntary P2 activities on the patenting of environmental technologies by a sample of manufacturing firms. With our panel data of 352 firms over the 1991-2000 period, we adopt an instrumental variable Poisson framework to account for the count nature of patents and the endogeneity of the P2 adoption decision. Our results indicate that the adoption of voluntary P2 activities in the manufacturing sector has led to a statistically and economically significant increase in the number of environmental patents, suggesting that corporate environmentalism can act as a catalyst for investments in cleaner technologies. Our findings are internationally relevant given the increasing ubiquity of corporate environmentalism in both developed and developing economies. PMID:25687809

  18. Transnational corporations and health: a research agenda.

    PubMed

    Baum, Frances Elaine; Margaret Anaf, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Transnational corporations (TNCs) are part of an economic system of global capitalism that operates under a neoliberal regime underpinned by strong support from international organisations such as the World Trade Organization, World Bank, and most nation states. Although TNCs have grown in power and influence and have had a significant impact on population health over the past three decades, public health has not developed an integrated research agenda to study them. This article outlines the shape of such an agenda and argues that it is vital that research into the public health impact of TNCs be pursued and funded as a matter of priority. The four areas of the agenda are: assessing the health and equity impacts of TNCs; evaluating the effectiveness of government regulation to mitigate health and equity impacts of TNCs; studying the work of activist groups and networks that highlight adverse impacts of TNCs; and considering how regulation of capitalism could better promote a healthier and more equitable corporate sector. PMID:25674798

  19. The Effect of Social Dominance Orientation on Perceptions of Corporal Punishment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Chelsie A.; Gray, Jennifer M.; Nunez, Narina L.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has suggested the use of corporal punishment is widely endorsed in our society (Straus, 2000; Straus & Stewart, 1999). Furthermore, perceptions of what constitutes corporal punishment vary. The present study examined social dominance orientation (SDO) and age of child as potential factors that may influence perceptions of what is…

  20. Organizational Support in Online Learning Environments: Examination of Support Factors in Corporate Online Learning Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Thomas L.; Correia, Ana-Paula

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the role of different types of support in corporate online learning programs. Most research has not specifically focused on all of the support factors required to provide a corporate online learning program, although many research studies address several in regards to the research outcome. An effort was made in this article…

  1. Different Preferences in Learning between American and French Learners in a Multinational Corporate Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossi, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    The way training is delivered in a corporate environment has a tremendous effect on its results. This study investigated the role of culture in the learning styles of adult French and American learners working in an international corporate setting. The assumption was that Americans prefer to learn from action-oriented methods and are more…

  2. Does Gender Matter? Collaborative Learning in a Virtual Corporate Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomcsik, Rachel E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how gender identity construction in virtuality and actuality affect collaborative learning in a corporate community of practice. As part of a virtual ethnographic design, participants were employees from a major American corporation who were interested specifically in social networking applications. The…

  3. Exploring the Link between Corporal Punishment and Children's Cruelty to Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Clifton P.

    1999-01-01

    Study of college undergraduates (N=267) examined the relationship between corporal punishment inflicted by parents and perpetration of animal abuse. Analyses showed that the association between fathers' corporal punishment and sons' childhood animal cruelty persisted after controlling for child abuse, father-to-mother violence, and father's…

  4. Learner Cultures and Corporate Cultural Differences in E-Learning Behaviors in the IT Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swierczek, Fredric William; Bechter, Clemens; Chankiew, Jeerawan

    2012-01-01

    Corporate cultural values have a major influence on learning. For learning to be effective it must be adapted to the cultural context in which it takes place. E-learning neither eliminates cultural differences nor is it culture free. This study focuses on two major Indian IT companies with different Corporate Cultures sharing the same expected…

  5. Educating a Globally Prepared Workforce: New Research on College and Corporate Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bikson, Tora A.

    1996-01-01

    A study investigated what "globalism" means to 16 higher education institutions, public and private, and 16 corporations in 4 areas of the United States. Definitions of globalism, human resource implications, what corporations are looking for in recruits, the meaning of multicultural competence, and the adequacy of response of both the academic…

  6. The Current Status and Future Prospects of Corporate e-Learning in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Cheolil

    2007-01-01

    Corporate e-Learning in Korea has grown rapidly over the previous six years (2000-2005). This study argues that the main cause of this heightened interest in corporate e-Learning in Korea was not that companies needed to provide high-quality training programs through the Internet, but rather that the government took initiative to transform the…

  7. Corporate Publics and Rhetorical Strategies: The Case of Union Carbide's Bhopal Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ice, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Examines the role of rhetorical strategies in repairing damaged corporate relationships. Demonstrates the utility of an integrated model (multiple-publics concept and strategies of apologia) to corporate public relations through a case study of Union Carbide's justification of the Bhopal gas leak. (KEH)

  8. 78 FR 44557 - Turnagain Arm Tidal Energy Corporation; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Turnagain Arm Tidal Energy Corporation; Notice of Preliminary Permit... February 1, 2013, the Turnagain Arm Tidal Energy Corporation, filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act (FPA), proposing to study the feasibility of...

  9. Exploring the Corporate University Phenomenon: Development and Implementation of a Comprehensive Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Amy Lui; Li, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    This study explores and advances the understanding of the corporate university phenomenon. In order to do that, a three-step approach was taken. First, a comprehensive review of the literature was undertaken to develop an aggregated view of corporate university literature. Second, a survey was developed based on the result of literature review.…

  10. Agents of Change: Exemplary Corporate Policies and Practices To Improve Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentworth, Eric

    Major U.S. corporations are committed to enlarging their investments in systematic educational reforms. This publication describes some innovative company policies and presents four case studies (Hewlett Packard, Eastman Kodak, Coopers & Lybrand, and Fannie Mae) to illustrate full corporate commitment, which means more than vast expenditures. True…

  11. Give the Employee What He Wants in the Corporate Newspaper: Improve Employee Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surlin, Stuart H.; Walker, Barry

    Undertaken to isolate employee characteristics and to determine how they relate to several aspects of employee attitudes toward the corporate newspaper, this study measured the characteristics of employee tenure, job rank, and perceived "self-newspaper" agreement on the manner in which topics were handled within corporate publications. The random…

  12. Harsh Corporal Punishment versus Quality of Parental Involvement as an Explanation of Adolescent Maladjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Ronald L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes investigation utilizing data from panel study of 332 midwestern families to examine impact of harsh corporal punishment and quality of parental involvement on adolescent outcomes of aggressiveness, delinquency, and psychological well-being. Suggests that corporal punishment was not related to adolescent outcomes when effect of parental…

  13. Corporate Philanthropy in American Higher Education: An Investigation of Attitudes towards Giving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuth, Elsbeth F.

    This study investigated corporate attitudes toward giving to American higher education in order to contribute insight into corporate philanthropy and to facilitate better understanding and improve university and college fund raising strategies. The research design used was ex post facto. A survey instrument was developed to collect attitudinal and…

  14. Corporate moral responsibility in health care.

    PubMed

    Wilmot, S

    2000-01-01

    The question of corporate moral responsibility--of whether it makes sense to hold an organisation corporately morally responsible for its actions, rather than holding responsible the individuals who contributed to that action--has been debated over a number of years in the business ethics literature. However, it has had little attention in the world of health care ethics. Health care in the United Kingdom (UK) is becoming an increasingly corporate responsibility, so the issue is increasingly relevant in the health care context, and it is worth considering whether the specific nature of health care raises special questions around corporate moral responsibility. For instance, corporate responsibility has usually been considered in the context of private corporations, and the organisations of health care in the UK are mainly state bodies. However, there is enough similarity in relevant respects between state organisations and private corporations, for the question of corporate responsibility to be equally applicable. Also, health care is characterised by professions with their own systems of ethical regulation. However, this feature does not seriously diminish the importance of the corporate responsibility issue, and the importance of the latter is enhanced by recent developments. But there is one major area of difference. Health care, as an activity with an intrinsically moral goal, differs importantly from commercial activities that are essentially amoral, in that it narrows the range of opportunities for corporate wrongdoing, and also makes such organisations more difficult to punish.

  15. Physician views on practicing professionalism in the corporate age.

    PubMed

    Castellani, B; Wear, D

    2000-07-01

    Arnold Relman argues that medical education does not prepare students and residents to practice their profession in today's corporate health care system. Corporate health care administrators agree: Physicians enter the workforce unskilled in contract negotiation, evidence-based medicine, navigating bureaucratic systems, and so forth. What about practicing physicians? Do they agree as well? According to this study, they do. Feeling like decentered double agents and unprepared, physicians find themselves professionally lost, struggling to balance issues of cost and care and expressing lots of negativity toward the cultures of medicine and managed care. However, physicians are resilient. A group of physicians, who may be called proactive, are meeting the professional demands of corporate health care by becoming sophisticated about its bureaucratic organization and the ways in which their professional and personal commitments fit within the system. Following the lead of proactive physicians, the authors support Relman's thesis and education for both students and physicians requires a major overhaul.

  16. Learning to Construct Meaning from Text: A Case Study of the Relationship between a Tutor and an English Learner within a Response to Intervention Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Elizabeth L.

    2015-01-01

    This case study describes the ways in which Sam, an English learner with weak comprehension, grew as a reader, student, and friend during his fourth grade year. Using the Interactive Model of Reading (Dis)ability and the RAND model of comprehension as a frame, Sam's experience in a Tier 2/3 tutorial program is examined. Over time, Sam (1) engaged…

  17. Change in Corporal Punishment Over Time in a Representative Sample of Canadian Parents.

    PubMed

    Fréchette, Sabrina; Romano, Elisa

    2015-08-01

    Corporal punishment is a controversial form of discipline. Although its prevalence appears high, legal reforms and public education efforts to limit corporal punishment may be resulting in a decrease in its prevalence and frequency of use. This study drew on Canadian nationally representative data to understand the social change that might be happening and to characterize parents who continue to use corporal punishment. The study relied on cross-sectional data from Cycles 1 (1994) to 8 (2008) of the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth to examine parental reports of corporal punishment for children ages 2–11 years. Analyses were conducted separately for 2- to 5-, 6- to 9-, and 10- to 11-year-olds, and sociodemographics associated with corporal punishment were examined. A significant decrease in the prevalence and frequency of corporal punishment use was observed across time for all age groups. Child sex, parent age, employment status, family structure, household size, immigration status, ethnicity, and religion significantly distinguished parents who use corporal punishment from those who do not, but there was variability across the age groups. Effect sizes question the relevance of the observed decrease in corporal punishment from an applied perspective. Approximately 25% of Canadian parents still use corporal punishment with children ages 2–11 years; therefore, it remains an issue that merits continued attention. Certain child, parent, and family characteristics seem to characterize parents who use corporal punishment, but other more dynamic variables may be important to consider, such as parental stress and their attitudes toward corporal punishment.

  18. Childhood experiences with, and current attitudes toward, corporal punishment.

    PubMed

    Ateah, Christine A; Parkin, C Melanie

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine, in a Canadian sample, the extent to which corporal or physical punishment use continues, personal experiences, and current attitudes. Of the 436 participants, 75% reported receiving physical punishment as children. Approximately 40% of participants agreed that corporal punishment is necessary as a means of discipline. Since parental attitude toward physical punishment has been determined to be an important predictor in its use with children, the authors recommend that parent education programming must include information related to its risks.

  19. Opinions about child corporal punishment and influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Bell, Tessa; Romano, Elisa

    2012-07-01

    The use of corporal punishment has been linked to negative developmental outcomes for children. Despite this finding, Section 43 of the Canadian Criminal Code permits the use of corporal punishment by parents for children 2 to 12 years of age. Therefore, this study's first objective is to investigate opinions toward Section 43 and spanking more generally. The second objective is to investigate predictors of opinions toward Section 43 and spanking more generally. The sample consists of 818 nonparents (70.7% female, 29.0% male) who completed an online study. Results indicate that 38.6% were favorable toward upholding Section 43. However, this decreases to 25.8% when a condition is included, stating that parents would not be prosecuted for mild slaps or spankings. For attitudes toward spanking more generally, results reveal that 16.7% of the participants held favorable attitudes. Hierarchical regression analyses reveal that planning to use corporal punishment upon becoming a parent predicted having a more favorable attitude toward Section 43 as well as toward spanking more generally (after controlling for sociodemographics). In contrast, having experienced violence during one's childhood predicts having less favorable attitudes toward Section 43 and spanking more generally. Significant interactions are found between childhood experiences of corporal punishment and perceptions of parental warmth/support and impulsiveness during discipline in predicting attitudes toward spanking. Those who report experiencing more corporal punishment during childhood but also more parental warmth/support hold more favorable attitudes toward spanking and those who report experiencing more corporal punishment during childhood and also more parental impulsiveness hold less favorable attitudes toward spanking. Findings indicate that examining opinions toward Section 43 and spanking separately is important because these concepts are not synonymous. In addition, both more immediate factors

  20. [Risk communication during health crises: results of a cross-sectional study to evaluate the effectiveness of adopted corporate communication strategies during the H1N1 influenza pandemic in Italy and on the training needs of health professionals].

    PubMed

    De Giusti, Maria; Mannocci, Alice; Miccoli, Silvia; Palazzo, Caterina; Di Thiene, Domitilla; Scalmato, Valeria; Ursillo, Paolo; Monteduro, Maria Antonietta; Turri, Alberto; Mazzoli, Pier Giovanni; Boccia, Antonio; La Torre, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of corporate communication activities carried out during the A(H1N1) pandemic influenza in Italy and to identify educational needs of health professionals with regards to crisis communication. The study compared two samples representing respectively the general population and health professionals, living in different regions of northern, central and southern Italy. A self-administered questionnaire was used, with questions on knowledge about preventive measures during a pandemic and on satisfaction with the adopted communication campaigns. Study results highlight that both samples had very little knowledge of appropriate preventive behaviors to be adopted during a pandemic. The sample of health professionals received a greater amount of information about the pandemic with respect to the general population and showed a strong interest toward the problem of receiving adequate training in risk communication. The degree of knowledge about preventive measures is directly proportional to the existence of institutional communication activities and to having consulted a health professional.

  1. The effect of social dominance orientation on perceptions of corporal punishment.

    PubMed

    Hess, Chelsie A; Gray, Jennifer M; Nunez, Narina L

    2012-09-01

    Previous research has suggested the use of corporal punishment is widely endorsed in our society (Straus, 2000; Straus & Stewart, 1999). Furthermore, perceptions of what constitutes corporal punishment vary. The present study examined social dominance orientation (SDO) and age of child as potential factors that may influence perceptions of what is viewed as corporal punishment versus physical abuse. The sample consisted of 206 undergraduate students enrolled at a Rocky Mountain University. A series of regressions were used to examine the relationships between SDO and six forms of punishment. Findings suggest, higher levels of SDO are significantly related to more ratings of physical punishment versus physical abuse. The primary findings of the present study showed SDO was significantly related to how an individual perceives corporal punishment. These results have important implications by serving as a stepping-stone into further understanding what factors may have an influence on perceptions of corporal punishment.

  2. The ethics of corporate social responsibility.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Stanley M; Vernillo, Anthony T

    2014-01-01

    Corporations as well as individual professionals have an ethical obligation to help those in need. There is a sound tradition in American business for companies including social outreach as part of business strategy. This approach works best when corporations and community and professional experts work in partnership. Henry Schein's Corporate Social Responsibility program contributes expertise, logistics, connections, and funds to these partnerships in the United States and worldwide. PMID:25080670

  3. The ethics of corporate social responsibility.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Stanley M; Vernillo, Anthony T

    2014-01-01

    Corporations as well as individual professionals have an ethical obligation to help those in need. There is a sound tradition in American business for companies including social outreach as part of business strategy. This approach works best when corporations and community and professional experts work in partnership. Henry Schein's Corporate Social Responsibility program contributes expertise, logistics, connections, and funds to these partnerships in the United States and worldwide.

  4. 78 FR 52982 - Experian, Experian US Headquarters: Corporate Departments (Finance, HRMD, Contracts, Corporate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ..., Business Information Services, Corporate Marketing, Credit Services, Data ] Management, Decision Analytics..., Global Corporate Systems, Legal & Regulatory, Risk Management, Strategic Business Development and... & Regulatory, Risk Management, Strategic Business Development and Investor Relations), Credit Services,...

  5. 26 CFR 1.972-1 - Consolidation of group of export trade corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... owns 20 percent of the stock of C Corporation. Domestic corporations N and R own 30 percent and 10... indirectly owned (through F Corporation) interest in C Corporation. Either N Corporation or R Corporation, or..., neither N Corporation nor R Corporation may elect to consolidate the “A” chain unless M Corporation...

  6. Human Resource Development and the Corporate Mission Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Teresa M.

    Two research projects examined the extent to which corporate commitment to human resource development is reflected in mission statements. In the first study, a questionnaire designed to elicit training data was sent to 333 Fortune 500 manufacturing and service firms; 81 completed questionnaires were returned. Sixty-nine percent of the respondents…

  7. Perspective reports of corporal punishment by pupils in Lesotho schools.

    PubMed

    Monyooe, L A

    1993-10-01

    This study surveyed reports of practices of corporal punishment at secondary schools in Lesotho by 60 randomly selected pupils. There were 34 males and 26 females, whose mean age was 21 years, with a range between 14 and 29 years. Responses to a questionnaire confirmed that punishment was associated with pupils' reports of academic impairment, psychological damage, and physical injury.

  8. Integrated Communications at America's Leading Total Quality Management Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gronstedt, Anders

    1996-01-01

    Examines how to create organizational processes that allow communication professionals with a variety of expertise to support each other through coordination and integration. Studies eight of America's leading total quality management corporations, including AT&T, Federal Express, Saturn, and Xerox. Explores how various total quality management…

  9. The Payoff of Corporate Portal Usage in an Academic Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Busaidi, Kamla Ali

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess the payoffs of a corporate portal in an academic institution in Oman and its impacts on business processes and employees. Design/methodology/approach: The study included 100 employees, mostly instructors, in an academic institution. The questionnaire included indicators related to the…

  10. Predictors of Adult Attitudes toward Corporal Punishment of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagne, Marie-Helene; Tourigny, Marc; Joly, Jacques; Pouliot-Lapointe, Joelle

    2007-01-01

    This study identifies predictors of favorable attitudes toward spanking. Analyses were performed with survey data collected from a representative sample of 1,000 adults from Quebec, Canada. According to this survey, a majority of respondents endorsed spanking, despite their recognition of potential harm associated with corporal punishment (CP) of…

  11. How to Defend Ourselves Against Corporate Image and Ideology Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, James R.

    Since teachers have been encouraged to give attention to advertising, product advertising has been the subject of study, but because of the large amount of money spent on them, two other aspects of advertising need special attention: corporate-sponsored image (which deals with characteristics and image of the company rather than with products or…

  12. Community Development Corporations and Welfare Reform: Linkages, Roles, and Impacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, David J.; Ellen, Ingrid Gould; Schill, Michael H.

    This study examined the impact of welfare reform on housing owned by community development corporations (CDCs), investigating how early implementation of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) affected the financial status of CDCs' affordable housing developments. Five types of financial impacts were…

  13. Achieving Integrated Performance Management with the Corporate University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dealtry, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to deliver synoptic perspectives on the evolution taking place in corporate university management best practice. Design/methodology/approach: The insights are based on the author's co-creative client experience in the design, management and impact studies of this business and organisation development intervention. The…

  14. Corporate Child Care: The Wellness Initiative Whose Time Has Come.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanus, Robin Darst

    Day care for children of working parents in the United States is labeled a "market failure" where supply and demand meet at a level that is substandard to almost all consumers. In this study of the issue of corporate child care, barriers to entry are discussed and a list is given of the range of service firms could consider. Among the barriers…

  15. Corporate imagination and expeditionary marketing.

    PubMed

    Hamel, G; Prahalad, C K

    1991-01-01

    In the 1980s, competitive success came mostly from achieving cost and quality advantages over rivals in existing markets. In the 1990s, it will come from building and dominating fundamentally new markets. Core competencies are one prerequisite for creating new markets. Corporate imagination and expeditionary marketing are the keys that unlock them. McKinsey Award winners Gary Hamel and C.K. Prahalad argue that corporate imagination quickens when companies escape the tyranny of their served markets. (Motorola, for example, sees itself as a leader in wireless communications, not just as a maker of beepers and mobile phones). Think about needs and functionalities instead of marketing's more conventional customer-product grid. Overturn traditional price/performance assumptions. (Fidelity Investments unlocked a vast new market by packaging sophisticated investment vehicles for middle-income investors.) And lead customers rather than simply follow them. Creating new markets is a risky business, however--a lot like shooting arrows into the mist. Imaginative companies minimize the risk not by being fast followers but through the process the authors call expeditionary marketing: low-cost, fast-paced market incursions designed to bring the target quickly into view. Toshiba introduced laptop computers to the market at such a blistering pace that it could explore every conceivable niche--and afford an occasional failure without compromising its credibility with customers. To stimulate corporate imagination, top management needs to redefine failure and develop new time- and risk-adjusted yardsticks for managerial performance. Managers must be encouraged to stretch their company's opportunity horizon well beyond the boundaries of its current businesses. PMID:10112922

  16. The end of corporate imperialism.

    PubMed

    Prahalad, C K; Lieberthal, Kenneth

    2003-08-01

    As they search for growth, multinational corporations will have no choice but to compete in the big emerging markets of China, India, Indonesia, and Brazil. But while it is still common to question how such corporations will change life in those markets, Western executives would be smart to turn the question around and ask how multinationals themselves will be transformed by these markets. To be successful, MNCs will have to rethink every element of their business models, the authors assert in this seminal HBR article from 1998. During the first wave of market entry in the 1980s, multinationals operated with what might be termed an imperialist mind-set, assuming that the emerging markets would merely be new markets for their old products. But this mind-set limited their success: What is truly big and emerging in countries like China and India is a new consumer base comprising hundreds of millions of people. To tap into this huge opportunity, MNCs need to ask themselves five basic questions: Who is in the emerging middle class in these countries? How do the distribution networks operate? What mix of local and global leadership do you need to foster business opportunities? Should you adopt a consistent strategy for all of your business units within one country? Should you take on local partners? The transformation that multinational corporations must undergo is not cosmetic--simply developing greater sensitivity to local cultures will not do the trick, the authors say. To compete in the big emerging markets, multinationals must reconfigure their resources, rethink their cost structures, redesign their product development processes, and challenge their assumptions about who their top-level managers should be.

  17. The end of corporate imperialism.

    PubMed

    Prahalad, C K; Lieberthal, Kenneth

    2003-08-01

    As they search for growth, multinational corporations will have no choice but to compete in the big emerging markets of China, India, Indonesia, and Brazil. But while it is still common to question how such corporations will change life in those markets, Western executives would be smart to turn the question around and ask how multinationals themselves will be transformed by these markets. To be successful, MNCs will have to rethink every element of their business models, the authors assert in this seminal HBR article from 1998. During the first wave of market entry in the 1980s, multinationals operated with what might be termed an imperialist mind-set, assuming that the emerging markets would merely be new markets for their old products. But this mind-set limited their success: What is truly big and emerging in countries like China and India is a new consumer base comprising hundreds of millions of people. To tap into this huge opportunity, MNCs need to ask themselves five basic questions: Who is in the emerging middle class in these countries? How do the distribution networks operate? What mix of local and global leadership do you need to foster business opportunities? Should you adopt a consistent strategy for all of your business units within one country? Should you take on local partners? The transformation that multinational corporations must undergo is not cosmetic--simply developing greater sensitivity to local cultures will not do the trick, the authors say. To compete in the big emerging markets, multinationals must reconfigure their resources, rethink their cost structures, redesign their product development processes, and challenge their assumptions about who their top-level managers should be. PMID:12884671

  18. 12 CFR 1710.10 - Law applicable to corporate governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Law applicable to corporate governance. 1710.10... AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.10 Law applicable to corporate governance. (a) General. The corporate governance practices...

  19. 12 CFR 1710.10 - Law applicable to corporate governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Law applicable to corporate governance. 1710.10... AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.10 Law applicable to corporate governance. (a) General. The corporate governance practices...

  20. 12 CFR 1710.10 - Law applicable to corporate governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Law applicable to corporate governance. 1710.10... AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.10 Law applicable to corporate governance. (a) General. The corporate governance practices...

  1. 12 CFR 1710.10 - Law applicable to corporate governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Law applicable to corporate governance. 1710... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.10 Law applicable to corporate governance. (a) General. The corporate governance practices...

  2. 12 CFR 1710.10 - Law applicable to corporate governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Law applicable to corporate governance. 1710.10... AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.10 Law applicable to corporate governance. (a) General. The corporate governance practices...

  3. Familial violence socialization in childhood and later life approval of corporal punishment: a cross-cultural perspective.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Emily M

    2006-01-01

    The use of corporal punishment has been associated with several negative outcomes for children. As a result, scholars have begun to study factors that are associated with the approval of corporal punishment. Using data from the International Dating Violence Study, the author implemented analysis of covariance and multilevel modeling analyses to determine that there were significant associations among culture, personal and group experiences of familial violence socialization, and attitudes about corporal punishment.

  4. 12 CFR 704.11 - Corporate Credit Union Service Organizations (Corporate CUSOs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Corporate Credit Union Service Organizations... AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS CORPORATE CREDIT UNIONS § 704.11 Corporate Credit Union Service Organizations... union; (2) Primarily serves credit unions; (3) Restricts its services to those related to the...

  5. Transnational Corporations and Corporate Citizenship: Analyzing New Roles of Organization Development Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolz, Ingo Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Research shows that too few transnational corporations (TNCs) have the organizational capacity to manage corporate citizenship. Evidence exists that ever more TNCs adopt programs of corporate citizenship development in order to increase this capacity. However, both in academic and practical literature, there is a general lack of a strategic…

  6. The psychology of corporate rights: Perception of corporate versus individual rights to religious liberty, privacy, and free speech.

    PubMed

    Mentovich, Avital; Huq, Aziz; Cerf, Moran

    2016-04-01

    The U.S. Supreme Court has increasingly expanded the scope of constitutional rights granted to corporations and other collective entities. Although this tendency receives widespread public and media attention, little empirical research examines how people ascribe rights, commonly thought to belong to natural persons, to corporations. This article explores this issue in 3 studies focusing on different rights (religious liberty, privacy, and free speech). We examined participants' willingness to grant a given right while manipulating the type of entity at stake (from small businesses, to larger corporations, to for-profit and nonprofit companies), and the identity of the right holder (from employees, to owners, to the company itself as a separate entity). We further examined the role of political ideology in perceptions of rights. Results indicated a significant decline in the degree of recognition of entities' rights (the company itself) in comparison to natural persons' rights (owners and employees). Results also demonstrated an effect of the type of entity at stake: Larger, for-profit businesses were less likely to be viewed as rights holders compared with nonprofit entities. Although both tendencies persisted across the ideological spectrum, ideological differences emerged in the relations between corporate and individual rights: these were positively related among conservatives but negatively related among liberals. Finally, we found that the desire to protect citizens (compared with businesses) underlies individuals' willingness to grant rights to companies. These findings show that people (rather than corporations) are more appropriate recipients of rights, and can explain public backlash to judicial expansions of corporate rights. PMID:26502001

  7. Corporate Strategy an Evolutionary Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellman, Philip V.

    As Richard Rumelt indicates in his book, "Fundamental Issues in Strategy: A Research Agenda", corporate strategy is a relatively recent discipline. While pioneers in the field like B.H. Liddell Hart and Bruce Henderson (later to found the Boston Consulting Group and creator of the famous BCG Growth-Share Matrix) began their research during the Second World War, the modern field of business strategy as an academic discipline, taught in schools and colleges of business emerged rather later. Rumelt provides an interesting chronicle in the introduction to his volume by noting that historically corporate strategy, even when taught as a capstone course, was not really an organized discipline. Typically, depending on the school's location and resources, the course would either be taught by the senior most professor in the department or by an outside lecturer from industry. The agenda tended to be very much instructor specific and idiosyncratic rather than drawing in any systematized fashion upon the subject matter of an organized discipline.

  8. Chldren's rights and corporal punishment in Assendabo town and the surrounding area, South West Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Admassu, Fisseha; Nida, Hailu; Belachew, Tefera; Haileamlak, Abraham

    2006-01-01

    Corporal punishment of children has been used as a disciplinary measure to modify undesirable behavior of children worldwide. This study was conducted with the aim of determining the knowledge, attitudes and the extent that corporal punishment is practiced in the study area. A cross-sectional study was conducted among the residents of Assendabo town and its surroundings area form January 8-12, 2003. A total of 368 residents with at least one child living with them were selected and interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS for windows version 11.0. The study revealed 310 (87.6%) of the parents employed child corporal punishment as a method of disciplining out of which nearly half of them claimed their action was for the ultimate benefit of their children. Only 12 (3.5%) of the parents reported infliction of trauma while punishing their children. There was no significant parental difference both in attitude and practice of child corporal punishment. Family income is found to affect both attitude and practice of corporal punishment. From this study it is concluded that the knowledge about the existence of a legal framework which protects a child from any form of abuse is low. The attitude towards avoidance of child corporal punishment is unfavorable and there is a high prevalence of child corporal punishment practiced.

  9. Final project report, staff exchange with Finnigan Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, C.G.

    1993-08-01

    The objective of the exchange between Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Finnigan Corporation is a transfer of expertise and technology for the design and operation of efficient and sensitive atmospheric pressure/vacuum electrospray ionization (ESI) sources. The development of such ion sources will permit wider application of mass spectrometry instrumentation in applied studies in a variety of disciplines including clinical, forensic, biochemical, biotechnical, and environmental studies where sensitivity is a paramount concern. Two meetings were held between representatives of Finnigan Corporation (led by Dr. Ian Jardine, Director for Marketing, Finnigan Corporation) and PNL staff members. During these meetings, Finnigan and PNL staff surveyed the existing technology for atmosphere/vacuum interface of mass spectrometry to ESI. The representatives from Finnigan viewed demonstrations of recent developments that increased efficiency and sensitivity for ESI mass spectrometry. During these meetings, knowledge and expertise were shared in the development of instrumentation, methods, and applications of ESI mass spectrometry with particular emphasis on current and planned Finnigan instrumentation. With the objective of more effective and competitive products for Finnigan Corporation, concepts for a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were directed toward the development and commercialization of advanced high efficiency and sensitivity ESI technology. A detailed proposal and work plan for the cooperative project was developed and is included in this report.

  10. 26 CFR 1.672(f)-2 - Certain foreign corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... corporation, passive foreign investment company, or foreign personal holding company has made a gratuitous..., the controlled foreign corporation, passive foreign investment company, or foreign personal holding... gratuitous transfer to a United States person, the controlled foreign corporation, passive foreign...

  11. The Corporate University Landscape in Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andresen, Maike; Lichtenberger, Bianka

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper seeks first to present an overview of the corporate university landscape in Germany contrasting it with the US-American corporate university market and, second, to outline the development in Germany during the last 15 years and to have a look at future trends such as learning alliances. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  12. Against the Corporal Punishment of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, John

    2004-01-01

    John Wilson suggests there are six advantages for corporal punishment: cheap and easy to administer, effective deterrent, effective reform, adjustable pain, fair because of similar dislike of pain, no permanent damage. None of these survive close scrutiny. An alternative, deontological argument against corporal punishment is proposed building on…

  13. Special Libraries and the Corporate Political Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Herbert S.

    1984-01-01

    This examination of the position of the special library and its services in the corporate setting highlights reasons why libraries are often taken for granted, library's role in corporate financial calculations, generalizations concerning librarian characteristics, and situations that may indicate trouble for a library that is not serving its…

  14. Corporate Support of Higher Education 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Financial Aid to Education, New York, NY.

    Results of an annual survey of corporate giving to higher education show corporate support continuing to advance, both in dollar amounts and in relation to several important indicators. Among the highlights are these: national estimates show education support at a new high of $870 million, a 17.6 percent rise over 1978 and almost double the 1975…

  15. Virtual Libraries: Meeting the Corporate Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMattia, Susan S.; Blumenstein, Lynn C.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses virtual libraries in corporate settings from the viewpoint of five special librarians. Highlights include competitive advantage, space and related collection issues, the use of technology, corporate culture, information overload, library vulnerability and downsizing, and the importance of service over format. (LRW)

  16. A Methodology for Distributing the Corporate Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Fred R.

    The trend to distributed processing is being fueled by numerous forces, including advances in technology, corporate downsizing, increasing user sophistication, and acquisitions and mergers. Increasingly, the trend in corporate information systems (IS) departments is toward sharing resources over a network of multiple types of processors, operating…

  17. Going Corporate: Teaching English in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayflich, Faith

    1998-01-01

    The accelerated globalization of business is one factor causing the growth of corporate English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) in North America (which provides increased opportunities for ESL teachers). This paper discusses challenges and changes in teaching ESL within corporations; creative class scheduling; instructional settings; diverse students,…

  18. When Corporate Restructuring Meets Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Robert N.; Jerome, Robert T.

    1996-01-01

    Despite ambiguous results of corporate restructuring efforts, higher education has adopted many of the methods used in hostile corporate takeovers and leveraged buyouts, affecting "ownership" of the educational process by faculty and the relationship between faculty and administration. A common element in successful restructuring is the…

  19. 78 FR 29366 - Green Mountain Power Corporation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Green Mountain Power Corporation Notice of Filing Take notice that on May 2, 2013, Green Mountain Power Corporation filed additional information in support of its request...

  20. 25 CFR 214.3 - Corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.3 Corporate information. A corporation shall file with its... office addresses, and showing the number of shares of capital stock held by each; together with a sworn statement of its proper officer showing: (a) The total number of shares of the capital stock actually...

  1. Societal Perceptions of Corporal Punishment in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burmeister, Klaus H.

    The reform movement to abolish corporal punishment in Canadian schools has been stymied by the new conservative political movement. The public mood, troubled by political and economic disturbances, is no longer inclined to substitute expensive rehabilitative programs for traditional disciplining. Retention of corporal punishment is also encouraged…

  2. The Corporate Value and Social Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilly, Edward R.

    In the past two decades, corporate social responsibility has become a controversial issue which is usually responded to according to the management style of individual corporations. Three concepts of management style have developed. Profit maximization considers that money and wealth are most important, labor is a commodity to be bought and sold,…

  3. The Corporate Stake in Social Cohesion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oketch, Moses O.

    2005-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is a function that transcends, but includes, making profits, creating jobs, and producing goods and services. The effectiveness with which corporations perform this function determines their contribution (or lack of contribution) to social cohesion. This article therefore presents a discussion of some of the…

  4. 12 CFR 543.1 - Corporate title.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-INCORPORATION, ORGANIZATION, AND CONVERSION § 543.1 Corporate title. (a) General. A Federal savings association...) Title change. Prior to changing its corporate title, an association must file with the OTS a written notice indicating the intended change. The OTS, shall provide to the association a timely...

  5. Nonprofit Communications from a Corporate Communications Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Ava

    2006-01-01

    Nonprofit organizations, such as social service agencies, charities, and hospitals, plan and prepare communications that are vital to their missions. Although not corporations, these organizations produce news releases, newsletters, and annual reports that are similar to those created in the corporate sector. In this research project for a course…

  6. Capital's Daisy Chain: Exposing Chicago's Corporate Coalition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrastia, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    This article uses the global city of Chicago as an urban exemplar of a thirty-year worldwide economic shift toward public (state) private (corporate) partnerships. Advanced by racialized youth-development discourses in Chicago, private corporations, public education, and social housing are in alliance to transform "the problems of urban America."…

  7. Corporate Learning in a Virtual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Anne; Berge, Zane L.

    2009-01-01

    Corporate training professionals led the explosion of e-learning solutions in the 1990s. Yet in 2008, as new generations of technology-savvy, computer games-oriented employees are entering the workforce, corporate training departments are far behind universities in exploring the use of virtual worlds like Second Life or Protosphere as platforms…

  8. 19 CFR 113.37 - Corporate sureties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Government Financial Operations Regulations (31 CFR 223.11). (b) Name of corporation on the bond. The name of... on the bond. (d) Social security number of agent or attorney on the bond. In the appropriate place on... place his/her social security number, as it appears on the corporate surety power of attorney....

  9. 19 CFR 113.37 - Corporate sureties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Government Financial Operations Regulations (31 CFR 223.11). (b) Name of corporation on the bond. The name of... on the bond. (d) Social security number of agent or attorney on the bond. In the appropriate place on... place his/her social security number, as it appears on the corporate surety power of attorney....

  10. 19 CFR 113.37 - Corporate sureties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Government Financial Operations Regulations (31 CFR 223.11). (b) Name of corporation on the bond. The name of... on the bond. (d) Social security number of agent or attorney on the bond. In the appropriate place on... place his/her social security number, as it appears on the corporate surety power of attorney....

  11. 19 CFR 113.37 - Corporate sureties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Government Financial Operations Regulations (31 CFR 223.11). (b) Name of corporation on the bond. The name of... on the bond. (d) Social security number of agent or attorney on the bond. In the appropriate place on... place his/her social security number, as it appears on the corporate surety power of attorney....

  12. 19 CFR 113.37 - Corporate sureties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Government Financial Operations Regulations (31 CFR 223.11). (b) Name of corporation on the bond. The name of... on the bond. (d) Social security number of agent or attorney on the bond. In the appropriate place on... place his/her social security number, as it appears on the corporate surety power of attorney....

  13. Corporate Philanthropy: Philosophy, Management, Trends, Future, Background.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Foundations, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Major policy considerations and the management of corporate philanthropy, along with new directions and future prospects of corporate philanthropy, are addressed in 40 articles written by chief executive officers, lawyers, economists, and other leading analysts. In addition, a list of resource materials, a glossary, and a list of organizations…

  14. A Convergence of Corporate and Academic Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, Gordon

    2006-01-01

    One of the particular gifts in history for the present generation, is the increasingly large opportunity afforded to universities and corporations to be mutually supportive, not exploitative, of one another. As the federal Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 has imposed new challenges on management of all stripes, this anti-corporate-fraud law also has…

  15. Corporate Learning: A Knowledge Management Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocetti, Clara

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between learning and knowledge management in corporate training which forms the framework for the development of an effective learning management system (LMS). Highlights include a theoretical analysis; examples of how training issues are connected to other processes; corporate universities; and the functionalities that…

  16. Corporate Support of Higher Education, 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Financial Aid to Education, New York, NY.

    Results of the Council for Financial Aid to Education's 1981 survey of 789 companies providing financial support to higher education are summarized. Attention is directed to: national trends in corporate pretax net income and contributions; inflation; corporate support in relation to total voluntary support and institutional expenditures; the…

  17. Higher Education and the Corporate Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetar, Joseph M.

    Most of the people who are involved in higher education recognize that corporate interest in developing significant, job-related educational opportunities is growing. The motivation to provide corporate educational programs ranges from the need to improve skills to an interest in responding to legal and social responsibilities by expanding…

  18. 12 CFR 615.5010 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 615.5010 Section 615.5010 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Funding § 615.5010 Funding Corporation. (a) The...

  19. 12 CFR 615.5010 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 615.5010 Section 615.5010 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Funding § 615.5010 Funding Corporation. (a) The...

  20. 12 CFR 615.5010 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 615.5010 Section 615.5010 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Funding § 615.5010 Funding Corporation. (a) The...

  1. 12 CFR 615.5010 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 615.5010 Section 615.5010 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Funding § 615.5010 Funding Corporation. (a) The...

  2. 12 CFR 615.5010 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 615.5010 Section 615.5010 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Funding § 615.5010 Funding Corporation. (a) The...

  3. Employment of the Disabled in Large Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabby, Rami

    1983-01-01

    Large corporations are in a unique position to employ the disabled, but they sometimes lack the motivation to do so. The author discusses elements of a corporate policy for the disabled, ways of formulating and disseminating it, assignment of responsibility, changes in management attitudes, and the special case of the multinational company.…

  4. Corporate Universities: Driving Force of Knowledge Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rademakers, Martijn

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explain the rapid emergence of corporate universities on the basis of fundamental developments presently shaping the economy and society on a world-wide scale. Design/methodology/approach: Four key forms of innovation are identified and combined with the corporate university concept. The paper explains why corporate…

  5. 19 CFR 141.38 - Resident corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resident corporations. 141.38 Section 141.38 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.38 Resident corporations. A power...

  6. 19 CFR 141.38 - Resident corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resident corporations. 141.38 Section 141.38 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.38 Resident corporations. A power...

  7. 19 CFR 141.38 - Resident corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resident corporations. 141.38 Section 141.38 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.38 Resident corporations. A power...

  8. 19 CFR 141.38 - Resident corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resident corporations. 141.38 Section 141.38 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.38 Resident corporations. A power...

  9. 12 CFR 543.1 - Corporate title.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporate title. 543.1 Section 543.1 Banks and...-INCORPORATION, ORGANIZATION, AND CONVERSION § 543.1 Corporate title. (a) General. A Federal savings association shall not adopt a title that misrepresents the nature of the institution or the services it offers....

  10. Marketing the Corporate University or Enterprise Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eccles, Gavin

    2004-01-01

    This article considers solutions to the one of the areas of greatest weakness in corporate university management, that of the marketing of its purpose and benefits. It draws upon a stakeholder framework to define the different relational perspectives which have to be managed for success in establishing the corporate university brand as having the…

  11. The Corporate University: Global or Local Phenomenon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This article considers the extent to which a corporate university transcends national boundaries through an examination of the operation of Motorola University in China. The aim is to extend understanding of the role and function of a corporate university and the human resource management (HRM) convergence/divergence debate within an…

  12. The Changing Shape of Corporate Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baucus, David; Baucus, Melissa

    2005-01-01

    About seven years ago, technological innovation gave rise to the e-learning industry and the growth of corporate universities. Early in the evolution of the industry, corporate universities represented a reasonable deployment of learning technologies. They enabled companies to deliver the right content to target markets (e.g., employees, partners,…

  13. Corporal Punishment and Child Behavioural and Cognitive Outcomes through 5?Years of Age: Evidence from a Contemporary Urban Birth Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Michael J.; Nicklas, Eric; Waldfogel, Jane; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence and determinants of spanking of children at 3?years of age and the associations between spanking and externalizing behaviour and receptive verbal ability at age 5?years. Overall, we find maternal spanking rates of 55.2% and paternal rates of 43.2% at age 3?years. Mothers facing greater stress and those who…

  14. Reengineering the corporate culture of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J; Billingsley, M

    1997-01-01

    As we move closer to the turn of the century, the American health care system continues to provide management experts with a wealth of case studies describing the winners and losers in today's business environment. Winners in this cost-conscious era of institutional reengineering, said Senge in his best-selling book The Fifth Discipline (1990), are those organizations that bind together around a common identity, a sense of destiny, and a shared commitment to reconciling the existing threats to their survival. Senge suggests that the organizations that are able to tap people's commitment and capacity to learn at all levels of the structure will overcome the type of maladaptation to business threats so commonly seen in corporate failures today.

  15. Structure Enables Corporations with a Conscience

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, Alison L.

    2012-11-10

    November Economic Diversity column for the Tri-City Herald - Topic: Social Purpose Corporations - Excerpt below: On March 31, Governor Chris Gregoire made history when she signed HB2239 and created Washington’s first alternative for-profit corporate structure, the social purpose corporation, or SPC. The new structure allows for-profit entities to formally strive toward creation of social and environmental good as their top corporate priority. This significantly contrasts with the expectation that traditional companies must put creation of shareholder value first. It signals that Washington State believes corporate leadership should have the flexibility and legal backing to make decisions based on the company’s impact on all of its stakeholders rather than on the ability to maximize profits.

  16. Standard spacecraft procurement analysis: A case study in NASA-DoD coordination in space programs. Ph.D. Thesis - Rand Graduate Inst.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, E. D.

    1980-01-01

    The Space Test Program Standard Satellite (STPSS), a design proposed by the Air Force, and two NASA candidates, the Applications Explorer Mission spacecraft (AEM) and the Multimission Modular Spacecraft (MMS), were considered during the first phase. During the second phase, a fourth candidate was introduced, a larger, more capable AEM (L-AEM), configured by the Boeing Company under NASA sponsorship to meet the specifications jointly agreed upon by NASA and the Air Force. Total program costs for a variety of procurement options, each of which is capable of performing all of the Air Force Space Test Program missions during the 1980-1990 time period, were used as the principal measure for distinguishing among procurement options. Program cost does not provide a basis for choosing among the AEM, STPSS, and MMS spacecraft, given their present designs. The availability of the L-AEM spacecraft, or some very similar design, would provide a basis for minimizing the cost of the Air Force Space Test Program.

  17. Corporal punishment in elementary education: views of Barbadian schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Anderson, S; Payne, M A

    1994-04-01

    Most previous research has suggested that children often express little unconditional disapproval of the use of corporal punishment in schools. However, this might be expected to change when pupils become aware that such treatment is no longer permitted in many countries, or hear it labelled as "abuse." This paper reports on research conducted in elementary schools in the Caribbean island of Barbados, where head teachers (or their authorized deputies) are still permitted by law to use corporal punishment. Findings indicated that approximately three-quarters of pupils surveyed still approved use of corporal punishment with their own age group, although their comments also suggested that a considerable amount of routine (and illegal) "flogging" or "lashing" by regular classroom teachers occurred, which many wished to see stopped. The growing risk of clashes between parents and schools was also identified. While this and other recent studies in Barbados provide little evidence of support for the total abolition of corporal punishment within the educational system, it is hoped that research may have some role to play in exerting pressure on schools to eliminate some of their more ritualized and pedagogically counterproductive practices.

  18. The network of corporate clients: customer attrition at commercial banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lublóy, Á.; Szenes, M.

    2008-12-01

    Commercial banks might profit from the adoption of methods widely used in network theory. A decision making process might become biased if one disregards network effects within the corporate client portfolio. This paper models the phenomenon of customer attrition by generating a weighted and directed network of corporate clients linked by financial transactions. During the numerical study of the agent-based toy model we demonstrate that multiple steady states may exist. The statistical properties of the distinct steady states show similarities. We show that most companies of the same community choose the same bank in the steady state. In contrast to the case for the steady state of the Barabási-Albert network, market shares in this model equalize by network size. When modeling customer attrition in the network of 3 × 105 corporate clients, none of the companies followed the behavior of the initial switcher in three quarters of the simulations. The number of switchers exceeded 20 in 1% of the cases. In the worst-case scenario a total of 688 companies chose a competitor bank. Significant network effects have been discovered; high correlation prevailed between the degree of the initial switcher and the severity of the avalanche effect. This suggests that the position of the corporate client in the network might be much more important than the underlying properties (industry, size, profitability, etc) of the company.

  19. Digit ratio (2D:4D), sex differences, allometry, and finger length of 12-30-year olds: evidence from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) Internet study.

    PubMed

    Manning, John T

    2010-01-01

    Many studies have reported digit ratio (2D:4D) to be sexually dimorphic, (males lower 2D:4D than females). However, Kratochvíl and Flegr ([2009]: Biol Lett 5:643-646) have suggested that 2D regressed on 4D has an allometric regression line with nonzero Y-intercept that is shared by males and females. Thus, 2D is shorter than expected when 4D is long, and males have lower 2D:4D than females because they have longer fingers. In this study, it is shown that this suggestion may be incorrect because sex differences in slope were not considered. Participants were recruited in an Internet study and had an age range of 12-30 years. The expected sex difference in 2D:4D was found, and the regression of 2D on 4D showed a significant sex difference in slope (males lower than females). A comparison of 10 age groups (12 years, 13 years..., 21-30 years) showed that sexual dimorphism for fingers was age dependent, varying from monomorphic to very dimorphic. Changes in sexual dimorphism of 2D:4D were much less marked, but there was a significant reduction in mean 2D:4D with age. The tendency for slopes of 2D regressed on 4D to be lower in males compared with females was significant in eight age groups. Sex difference in 2D:4D varied across the age groups and was positively related to the magnitude of the difference in female and male slopes. In contrast to the report of Kratochvíl and Flegr, it was found that the regression of 2D on 4D showed sex differences in slope, and such differences gave rise to the sexual dimorphism in 2D:4D.

  20. Attitudes Toward Domestic Violence and Corporal Punishment Among Former Soviet Union Immigrants in Israel.

    PubMed

    Enosh, Guy; Leshem, Elazar; Buchbinder, Eli

    2016-10-01

    The study regards attitudes of Russian immigrants in Israel toward wife abuse and corporal punishment. The sample consisted of 1,028 participants, based on a multistage cluster sampling. The study used a questionnaire related to immigration, acculturation, and attitudinal issues. The findings indicate a dual-causal model, in which corporal punishment attitudes contribute to wife abuse attitudes and vice versa. However, the effect of attitudes supporting corporal punishment was stronger than the effect of wife abuse attitudes, indicating that the attitudinal system as a precursor of violent behavior is already merging the two types of violence.

  1. Attitudes Toward Domestic Violence and Corporal Punishment Among Former Soviet Union Immigrants in Israel.

    PubMed

    Enosh, Guy; Leshem, Elazar; Buchbinder, Eli

    2016-10-01

    The study regards attitudes of Russian immigrants in Israel toward wife abuse and corporal punishment. The sample consisted of 1,028 participants, based on a multistage cluster sampling. The study used a questionnaire related to immigration, acculturation, and attitudinal issues. The findings indicate a dual-causal model, in which corporal punishment attitudes contribute to wife abuse attitudes and vice versa. However, the effect of attitudes supporting corporal punishment was stronger than the effect of wife abuse attitudes, indicating that the attitudinal system as a precursor of violent behavior is already merging the two types of violence. PMID:26834146

  2. Strategic philanthropy: an opportunity for partnership between corporations and health/human service agencies.

    PubMed

    Marx, J D

    1996-01-01

    The study is a national survey of corporate philanthropy programs. The original problem underlying the study is the long-term decline in the percentage of total corporate contributions to health and human services. A questionnaire, mailed in May of 1993, was used to investigate the impact of strategic philanthropy on the relationship between corporations and health/human service organizations. Corporations strategically prioritizing their philanthropic support were expected to create new opportunities for partnerships between business and health/human service agencies. The survey resulted in a sample of 226 corporations. The results showed statistically significant support for the hypothesis that highly strategic philanthropy programs will be more likely to enter into a health/human service partnership than less strategic programs. The multiple regression analysis method was used to control for the effects of corporate size, industry type, the (corporate) contributions management organization, and United Way credibility. Based upon the results of the study, United Way is recommended to consider new roles for itself as a facilitator of partnerships between business and health/human service organizations. PMID:10160410

  3. Corporate Social Responsibility in Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Edwin D.

    2006-01-01

    The dialog within aviation management education regarding ethics is incomplete without a discussion of corporate social responsibility (CSR). CSR research requires discussion involving: (a) the current emphasis on CSR in business in general and aviation specifically; (b) business and educational theory that provide a basis for aviation companies to engage in socially responsible actions; (c) techniques used by aviation and aerospace companies to fulfill this responsibility; and (d) a glimpse of teaching approaches used in university aviation management classes. The summary of this research suggests educators explain CSR theory and practice to students in industry and collegiate aviation management programs. Doing so extends the discussion of ethical behavior and matches the current high level of interest and activity within the aviation industry toward CSR.

  4. Corporate and philanthropic models of hospital governance: a taxonomic evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, B J; Alexander, J A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We assess the theoretical integrity and practical utility of the corporate-philanthropic governance typology frequently invoked in debates about the appropriate form of governance for nonprofit hospitals operating in increasingly competitive health care environments. DATA SOURCES. Data were obtained from a 1985 national mailed survey of nonprofit hospitals conducted by the American Hospital Association (AHA) and the Hospital Research and Educational Trust (HRET). STUDY DESIGN. A sample 1,577 nonprofit community hospitals were selected for study. Representativeness was assessed by comparing the sample with the population of non-profit community hospitals on the dimensions of bed size, ownership type, urban-rural location, multihospital system membership, and census region. DATA COLLECTION. Measurement of governance types was based on hospital governance attributes conforming to those cited in the literature as distinguishing corporate from philanthropic models and classified into six central dimensions of governance: (1) size, (2) committee structure and activity, (3) board member selection, (4) board composition, (5) CEO power and influence, and (6) bylaws and activities. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Cluster analysis and ANCOVA indicated that hospital board forms adhered only partially to corporate and philanthropic governance models. Further, board forms varied systematically by specific organizational and environmental conditions. Boards exhibiting more corporate governance forms were more likely to be large, privately owned, urban, and operating in competitive markets than were hospitals showing more philanthropic governance forms. CONCLUSIONS. Findings suggest that the corporate-philanthropic governance distinction must be seen as an ideal rather than an actual depiction of hospital governance forms. Implications for health care governance are discussed. PMID:8344823

  5. The making of a corporate athlete.

    PubMed

    Loehr, J; Schwartz, T

    2001-01-01

    Management theorists have long sought to identify precisely what makes some people flourish under pressure and others fold. But they have come up with only partial answers: rich material rewards, the right culture, management by objectives. The problem with most approaches is that they deal with people only from the neck up, connecting high performance primarily with cognitive capacity. Authors Loehr and Schwartz argue that a successful approach to sustained high performance must consider the person as a whole. Executives are, in effect, "corporate athletes." If they are to perform at high levels over the long haul, they must train in the systematic, multilevel way that athletes do. Rooted in two decades of work with world-class atheletes, the integrated theory of performance management addresses the body, the emotions, the mind, and the spirit through a model the authors call the performance pyramid. At its foundation is physical well-being. Above that rest emotional health, then mental acuity, and, finally, a spiritual purpose. Each level profoundly influences the others, and all must be addressed together to avoid compromising performance. Rigorous exercise, for instance, can produce a sense of emotional well-being, clearing the way for peak mental performance. Rituals that promote oscillation--the rhythmic expenditure and recovery of energy-link the levels of the pyramid and lead to the ideal performance state. The authors offer case studies of executives who have used the model to increase professional performance and improve the quality of their lives. In a corporate environment that is changing at warp speed, performing consistently at high levels is more necessary than ever. Companies can't afford to address employees' cognitive capacities while ignoring their physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being.

  6. Corporal punishment and child behavioral and cognitive outcomes through 5 years-of-age: Evidence from a contemporary urban birth cohort study.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Michael J; Nicklas, Eric; Waldfogel, Jane; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence and determinants of spanking of children at 3 years-of-age, and the associations between spanking and externalizing behavior and receptive verbal ability at age 5. Overall, we find maternal spanking rates of 55.2% and paternal rates of 43.2% at age 3. Mothers facing greater stress and those who spanked earlier are more likely to spank at age 3, whereas those who report a supportive partner during pregnancy and those who were not U.S. born were less likely to spank. Mothers and fathers in communities where spanking was more normative were more likely to spank. Fathers were less likely to spank daughters at age 3. Frequent maternal spanking at age 3 was associated with externalizing behavior and receptive vocabulary at age 5, controlling for an array of ecological risks, earlier behavior, and verbal capacity. Taking advantage of the large and diverse sample we explored potential interactions and found no evidence that race, parental warmth, normativeness, or child gender moderated the association between spanking and externalizing or receptive vocabulary. These findings add to the literature on negative consequences associated with a widely endorsed parenting practice, and highlight the need for research that explores alternative effective discipline practices and addresses parent questions of what else they could, or even should, be doing.

  7. Prevalence and risk factors associated with the presence of Soil-Transmitted Helminths in children studying in Municipal Corporation of Delhi Schools of Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Sobhana; Passi, Santosh Jain; Singh, Som Nath

    2015-09-01

    To determine the type, prevalence, intensity and the potential risk factors for helminths infection harboured by primary school aged children from selected schools of Delhi, India. Stool samples collected from 347 boys and girls studying in grades I-IV (aged 5-15 years) were examined by the semi-quantitative Kato-Katz method for presence of eggs of soil-transmitted helminths. Questionnaire data on the potential risk factors, associated variables and consequences of infection were categorized as individual, household, hygiene/sanitation related and behavioural factors. Associations between infection and these factors were assessed by multiple logistic regressions. The overall prevalence of infection with any of the helminths was 29.7 %. The prevalence of single infection with Ascaris lumbricoides was 8.1 % while that of hookworm and Trichuris trichiura was 3.7 % each. Strongest predictors for the helminths presence were never deworming (OR = 1.76; 95 % CI: 1.05, 2.95), no facility for defection (OR = 4.31; 95 % CI: 1.22, 15.22), using left hand for cleaning anal region (OR = 2.01; 95 % CI: 1.18, 3.43) and not reporting pain in stomach (OR = 1.93; 95 % CI: 1.14, 3.26). Though the infection intensities were low, we highlighted some of the potential risk factors that increase the susceptibility to these infections. Periodic deworming along with improvement in hygiene and sanitation practices through concerted efforts, not only from the school infrastructure but also the community at large, will help prevent helminths transmission and reinfection.

  8. Participation Willingness in Web Surveys: Exploring Effect of Sponsoring Corporation's and Survey Provider's Reputation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chao; Pavur, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Prior research involving response rates in Web-based surveys has not adequately addressed the effect of the reputation of a sponsoring corporation that contracts with a survey provider. This study investigates the effect of two factors, namely, the reputation of a survey's provider and the reputation of a survey's sponsoring corporation, on the willingness of potential respondents to participate in a Web survey. Results of an experimental design with these two factors reveal that the sponsoring corporation's and the survey provider's strong reputations can induce potential respondents to participate in a Web survey. A sponsoring corporation's reputation has a greater effect on the participation willingness of potential respondents of a Web survey than the reputation of the survey provider. A sponsoring corporation with a weak reputation who contracts with a survey provider having a strong reputation results in increased participation willingness from potential respondents if the identity of the sponsoring corporation is disguised in a survey. This study identifies the most effective strategy to increase participation willingness for a Web-based survey by considering both the reputations of the sponsoring corporation and survey provider and whether to reveal their identities. PMID:22304457

  9. Wexco Corporation: Assessment Uncovers $53,000 in Energy Efficiency Opportunities at Plastic Extrusion Cylinder Manufacturer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-09-01

    Industrial Technologies Program's BestPractices case study based on a comprehensive plant assessment conducted at Wexco Corporation by ITP's Industrial Assessment Center in conjunction with The Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc.

  10. National Plastics Corporation: Energy Assessment Helps Automotive Plastic Parts Maker Save $34,000 Per Year

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-09-01

    Industrial Technologies Program's BestPractices case study based on a comprehensive plant assessment conducted at National Plastics Corporation by ITP's Industrial Assessment Center in conjunction with The Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc.

  11. Long-Term Effects of Child Corporal Punishment on Depressive Symptoms in Young Adults: Potential Moderators and Mediators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Heather A.; Muller, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    Based on a sample of 649 students from 3 New England colleges, this study examined the long-term effects of childhood corporal punishment on symptoms of depression and considered factors that may moderate or mediate the association. Similar to national studies, approximately 40% of the sample reported experiencing some level of corporal punishment…

  12. Corporate Takeovers: Assessment of Resulting Training Needs. Training and Development Research Center Project Number Thirty-Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjorkquist, David C.

    This document reports on a study of the training needs that result from actual or impending corporate takeovers, based on needs assessments at three corporations conducted by students as part of a university class over a period of 10 weeks. The first section describes the study's background and methodology. The qualitative research methodology…

  13. An Analysis of the Treatment of Corporate Influence on Government by United States History and American Government High School Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation to explore the possibility that ideology might be expressed in the treatment of corporate influence on federal government by social studies textbooks. Two textbooks were examined in the study--United States history and American government. Corporate influence involves activities that affect election and…

  14. [Can tobacco companies be good corporate citizens?].

    PubMed

    Palazzo, G; Mena, S

    2009-07-01

    Tobacco companies have jumped on the Corporate social responsibility (CSR) bandwagon as a tentative to be societally accepted as responsible actors and good corporate citizens. This is however not possible for two reasons. First, the product they sell is lethal and thus not compatible with the precondition of doing no harm to be a good corporate citizen. Second, the behavior of tobacco firms is not responsible, being illustrated by four examples: junk science versus sound science strategy, seducing young smokers, political lobbying and getting customers on new markets. To conclude, three implications for regulating the activities of the tobacco industry are given.

  15. Quantifiable outcomes from corporate and higher education learning collaborations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, Thomas G.

    The study investigated the existence of measurable learning outcomes that emerged out of the shared strengths of collaborating sponsors. The study identified quantifiable learning outcomes that confirm corporate, academic and learner participation in learning collaborations. Each of the three hypotheses and the synergy indicator quantitatively and qualitatively confirmed learning outcomes benefiting participants. The academic-indicator quantitatively confirmed that learning outcomes attract learners to the institution. The corporate-indicator confirmed that learning outcomes include knowledge exchange and enhanced workforce talents for careers in the energy-utility industry. The learner-indicator confirmed that learning outcomes provide professional development opportunities for employment. The synergy-indicator confirmed that best learning practices in learning collaborations emanate out of the sponsors' shared strengths, and that partnerships can be elevated to strategic alliances, going beyond response to the desires of sponsors to create learner-centered cultures. The synergy-indicator confirmed the value of organizational processes that elevate sponsors' interactions to sharing strength, to create a learner-centered culture. The study's series of qualitative questions confirmed prior success factors, while verifying the hypothesis results and providing insight not available from quantitative data. The direct benefactors of the study are the energy-utility learning-collaboration participants of the study, and corporation, academic institutions, and learners of the collaboration. The indirect benefactors are the stakeholders of future learning collaborations, through improved knowledge of the existence or absence of quantifiable learning outcomes.

  16. 27 CFR 40.93 - Change in corporate name.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Change in corporate name... Changes in Name § 40.93 Change in corporate name. Where there is a change in the name of a corporate... to establish that the corporate name has been changed. (72 Stat. 1421; 26 U.S.C. 5712) Changes...

  17. 27 CFR 40.93 - Change in corporate name.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Change in corporate name... Changes in Name § 40.93 Change in corporate name. Where there is a change in the name of a corporate... necessary to establish that the corporate name has been changed. (72 Stat. 1421; 26 U.S.C. 5712) Changes...

  18. 26 CFR 1.48-5 - Electing small business corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Electing small business corporations. 1.48-5... business corporations. (a) In general. (1) In the case of an electing small business corporation (as... business corporation. The bases of all new section 38 properties which have a useful life falling within...

  19. 26 CFR 1.47-4 - Electing small business corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Electing small business corporation. 1.47-4... business corporation. (a) In general—(1) Disposition or cessation in hands of corporation. If an electing small business corporation (as defined in section 1371(b)) or a former electing small...

  20. 26 CFR 1.58-4 - Electing small business corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Electing small business corporations. 1.58-4... TAXES Tax Preference Regulations § 1.58-4 Electing small business corporations. (a) In general. Section... business corporation among the shareholders of such corporation. Section 58(d)(2) provides rules for...

  1. 12 CFR 704.3 - Corporate credit union capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporate credit union capital. 704.3 Section... CORPORATE CREDIT UNIONS § 704.3 Corporate credit union capital. (a) Capital plan. A corporate credit union... strategies which provide for the building of capital consistent with regulatory requirements, the...

  2. 26 CFR 1.537-3 - Business of the corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Business of the corporation. 1.537-3 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Corporations Used to Avoid Income Tax on Shareholders § 1.537-3 Business of the corporation. (a) The business of a corporation is not merely that which it has...

  3. 26 CFR 1.537-3 - Business of the corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Business of the corporation. 1.537-3 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Corporations Used to Avoid Income Tax on Shareholders § 1.537-3 Business of the corporation. (a) The business of a corporation is not merely that which it has...

  4. 7 CFR 4279.71 - Public bodies and nonprofit corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public bodies and nonprofit corporations. 4279.71... § 4279.71 Public bodies and nonprofit corporations. Any public body or nonprofit corporation that... by a public body or nonprofit corporation in compliance with OMB Circulars A-128 or A-133 or...

  5. 7 CFR 4279.71 - Public bodies and nonprofit corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Public bodies and nonprofit corporations. 4279.71... § 4279.71 Public bodies and nonprofit corporations. Any public body or nonprofit corporation that... by a public body or nonprofit corporation in compliance with OMB Circulars A-128 or A-133 or...

  6. 24 CFR 964.120 - Resident management corporation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... § 964.120 Resident management corporation requirements. A resident management corporation must consist... resident management corporation and the resident council, so long as the corporation meets the requirements... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resident management...

  7. 12 CFR 7.2000 - Corporate governance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporate governance procedures. 7.2000 Section... OPERATIONS Corporate Practices § 7.2000 Corporate governance procedures. (a) General. A national bank proposing to engage in a corporate governance procedure shall comply with applicable Federal...

  8. 19 CFR 113.33 - Corporations as principals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corporations as principals. 113.33 Section 113.33... TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Principals and Sureties § 113.33 Corporations as principals. (a) Name of corporation on the bonds. The name of a corporation executing a Customs bond as a principal, may be printed...

  9. 19 CFR 113.33 - Corporations as principals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corporations as principals. 113.33 Section 113.33... TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Principals and Sureties § 113.33 Corporations as principals. (a) Name of corporation on the bonds. The name of a corporation executing a Customs bond as a principal, may be printed...

  10. 19 CFR 113.33 - Corporations as principals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Corporations as principals. 113.33 Section 113.33... TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Principals and Sureties § 113.33 Corporations as principals. (a) Name of corporation on the bonds. The name of a corporation executing a Customs bond as a principal, may be printed...

  11. 19 CFR 113.33 - Corporations as principals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corporations as principals. 113.33 Section 113.33... TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Principals and Sureties § 113.33 Corporations as principals. (a) Name of corporation on the bonds. The name of a corporation executing a Customs bond as a principal, may be printed...

  12. 12 CFR 7.2000 - Corporate governance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Corporate governance procedures. 7.2000 Section... OPERATIONS Corporate Practices § 7.2000 Corporate governance procedures. (a) General. A national bank proposing to engage in a corporate governance procedure shall comply with applicable Federal...

  13. 12 CFR 7.2000 - Corporate governance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Corporate governance procedures. 7.2000 Section... OPERATIONS Corporate Practices § 7.2000 Corporate governance procedures. (a) General. A national bank proposing to engage in a corporate governance procedure shall comply with applicable Federal...

  14. 12 CFR 7.2000 - Corporate governance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Corporate governance procedures. 7.2000 Section... OPERATIONS Corporate Practices § 7.2000 Corporate governance procedures. (a) General. A national bank proposing to engage in a corporate governance procedure shall comply with applicable Federal...

  15. 12 CFR 7.2000 - Corporate governance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Corporate governance procedures. 7.2000 Section... OPERATIONS Corporate Practices § 7.2000 Corporate governance procedures. (a) General. A national bank proposing to engage in a corporate governance procedure shall comply with applicable Federal...

  16. Corporal and capital punishment of juveniles.

    PubMed

    Frazier, H C

    1990-01-01

    There is a previously unobserved connection between corporal punishment of public school children and capital punishment of juveniles. Both are barometers of acceptable levels of violent punishment and their elimination is a hallmark of a maturing and decent society. Within a majority of the eighteen states where school authorities most frequently strike children are housed 25 of the nation's 28 juvenile death row inmates. On average, the homicide rates of these jurisdictions are two and a half times greater than those that have abolished both state-sanctioned corporal and capital punishment or limit death sentences to those age eighteen and older at the time of their crime(s). Most of the eighteen state abolitions of corporal punishment occurred in the 1980's. The US Supreme Court has ruled both corporal and capital punishment of juveniles constitutional. Additional state legislative abolition of both is anticipated in the 1990s.

  17. A Corporate Communication Major for Clarke College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turney, Michael L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a program in which students are specifically trained in corporate communication. Lists courses required for completion of the program and tells about students' involvement in operating a communication agency simulation. (TJ)

  18. Corporate Support of Education: No Strings Attached

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabot, Louis W.

    1978-01-01

    Nothing is better calculated to drive a wedge between the corporate community and our universities than efforts on the part of business to dictate to a community of scholars how it shall fulfill its mission. (Author)

  19. Developing a corporate drug testing program

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrath, D.A. )

    1990-10-01

    Management reaction to employee drug abuse at a gas distribution company resulted in the development and implementation of a corporate drug testing program before DOT mandated drug testing. The author explains the background, planning, operation and communication work involved.

  20. Corporal and capital punishment of juveniles.

    PubMed

    Frazier, H C

    1990-01-01

    There is a previously unobserved connection between corporal punishment of public school children and capital punishment of juveniles. Both are barometers of acceptable levels of violent punishment and their elimination is a hallmark of a maturing and decent society. Within a majority of the eighteen states where school authorities most frequently strike children are housed 25 of the nation's 28 juvenile death row inmates. On average, the homicide rates of these jurisdictions are two and a half times greater than those that have abolished both state-sanctioned corporal and capital punishment or limit death sentences to those age eighteen and older at the time of their crime(s). Most of the eighteen state abolitions of corporal punishment occurred in the 1980's. The US Supreme Court has ruled both corporal and capital punishment of juveniles constitutional. Additional state legislative abolition of both is anticipated in the 1990s. PMID:2122167