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Sample records for random channel kinetics

  1. Simulating complex ion channel kinetics with IonChannelLab

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Manuel; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Jorge E; Perez-Cornejo, Patricia; Arreola, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    In-silico simulation based on Markov chains is a powerful way to describe and predict the activity of many transport proteins including ion channels. However, modeling and simulation using realistic models of voltage- or ligand-gated ion channels exposed to a wide range of experimental conditions require building complex kinetic schemes and solving complicated differential equations. To circumvent these problems, we developed IonChannelLab a software tool that includes a user-friendly Graphical User Interface and a simulation library. This program supports channels with Ohmic or Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz behavior and can simulate the time-course of ionic and gating currents, single channel behavior and steady-state conditions. The program allows the simulation of experiments where voltage, ligand and ionic concentration are varied independently or simultaneously. PMID:20935453

  2. Wave kinetics of random fibre lasers

    PubMed Central

    Churkin, D V.; Kolokolov, I V.; Podivilov, E V.; Vatnik, I D.; Nikulin, M A.; Vergeles, S S.; Terekhov, I S.; Lebedev, V V.; Falkovich, G.; Babin, S A.; Turitsyn, S K.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional wave kinetics describes the slow evolution of systems with many degrees of freedom to equilibrium via numerous weak non-linear interactions and fails for very important class of dissipative (active) optical systems with cyclic gain and losses, such as lasers with non-linear intracavity dynamics. Here we introduce a conceptually new class of cyclic wave systems, characterized by non-uniform double-scale dynamics with strong periodic changes of the energy spectrum and slow evolution from cycle to cycle to a statistically steady state. Taking a practically important example—random fibre laser—we show that a model describing such a system is close to integrable non-linear Schrödinger equation and needs a new formalism of wave kinetics, developed here. We derive a non-linear kinetic theory of the laser spectrum, generalizing the seminal linear model of Schawlow and Townes. Experimental results agree with our theory. The work has implications for describing kinetics of cyclical systems beyond photonics. PMID:25645177

  3. Kinetic Models with Randomly Perturbed Binary Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassetti, Federico; Ladelli, Lucia; Toscani, Giuseppe

    2011-02-01

    We introduce a class of Kac-like kinetic equations on the real line, with general random collisional rules which, in some special cases, identify models for granular gases with a background heat bath (Carrillo et al. in Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst. 24(1):59-81, 2009), and models for wealth redistribution in an agent-based market (Bisi et al. in Commun. Math. Sci. 7:901-916, 2009). Conditions on these collisional rules which guarantee both the existence and uniqueness of equilibrium profiles and their main properties are found. The characterization of these stationary states is of independent interest, since we show that they are stationary solutions of different evolution problems, both in the kinetic theory of rarefied gases (Cercignani et al. in J. Stat. Phys. 105:337-352, 2001; Villani in J. Stat. Phys. 124:781-822, 2006) and in the econophysical context (Bisi et al. in Commun. Math. Sci. 7:901-916, 2009).

  4. Kinetics of gravity-driven water channels under steady rainfall.

    PubMed

    Cejas, Cesare M; Wei, Yuli; Barrois, Remi; Frétigny, Christian; Durian, Douglas J; Dreyfus, Rémi

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the formation of fingered flow in dry granular media under simulated rainfall using a quasi-two-dimensional experimental setup composed of a random close packing of monodisperse glass beads. Using controlled experiments, we analyze the finger instabilities that develop from the wetting front as a function of fundamental granular (particle size) and fluid properties (rainfall, viscosity). These finger instabilities act as precursors for water channels, which serve as outlets for water drainage. We look into the characteristics of the homogeneous wetting front and channel size as well as estimate relevant time scales involved in the instability formation and the velocity of the channel fingertip. We compare our experimental results with that of the well-known prediction developed by Parlange and Hill [D. E. Hill and J. Y. Parlange, Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 36, 697 (1972)]. This model is based on linear stability analysis of the growth of perturbations arising at the interface between two immiscible fluids. Results show that, in terms of morphology, experiments agree with the proposed model. However, in terms of kinetics we nevertheless account for another term that describes the homogenization of the wetting front. This result shows that the manner we introduce the fluid to a porous medium can also influence the formation of finger instabilities. The results also help us to calculate the ideal flow rate needed for homogeneous distribution of water in the soil and minimization of runoff, given the grain size, fluid density, and fluid viscosity. This could have applications in optimizing use of irrigation water.

  5. Kinetics of gravity-driven water channels under steady rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cejas, Cesare M.; Wei, Yuli; Barrois, Remi; Frétigny, Christian; Durian, Douglas J.; Dreyfus, Rémi

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the formation of fingered flow in dry granular media under simulated rainfall using a quasi-two-dimensional experimental setup composed of a random close packing of monodisperse glass beads. Using controlled experiments, we analyze the finger instabilities that develop from the wetting front as a function of fundamental granular (particle size) and fluid properties (rainfall, viscosity). These finger instabilities act as precursors for water channels, which serve as outlets for water drainage. We look into the characteristics of the homogeneous wetting front and channel size as well as estimate relevant time scales involved in the instability formation and the velocity of the channel fingertip. We compare our experimental results with that of the well-known prediction developed by Parlange and Hill [D. E. Hill and J. Y. Parlange, Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 36, 697 (1972), 10.2136/sssaj1972.03615995003600050010x]. This model is based on linear stability analysis of the growth of perturbations arising at the interface between two immiscible fluids. Results show that, in terms of morphology, experiments agree with the proposed model. However, in terms of kinetics we nevertheless account for another term that describes the homogenization of the wetting front. This result shows that the manner we introduce the fluid to a porous medium can also influence the formation of finger instabilities. The results also help us to calculate the ideal flow rate needed for homogeneous distribution of water in the soil and minimization of runoff, given the grain size, fluid density, and fluid viscosity. This could have applications in optimizing use of irrigation water.

  6. Emergence of ion channel modal gating from independent subunit kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Bicknell, Brendan A.

    2016-01-01

    Many ion channels exhibit a slow stochastic switching between distinct modes of gating activity. This feature of channel behavior has pronounced implications for the dynamics of ionic currents and the signaling pathways that they regulate. A canonical example is the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) channel, whose regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration is essential for numerous cellular processes. However, the underlying biophysical mechanisms that give rise to modal gating in this and most other channels remain unknown. Although ion channels are composed of protein subunits, previous mathematical models of modal gating are coarse grained at the level of whole-channel states, limiting further dialogue between theory and experiment. Here we propose an origin for modal gating, by modeling the kinetics of ligand binding and conformational change in the IP3R at the subunit level. We find good agreement with experimental data over a wide range of ligand concentrations, accounting for equilibrium channel properties, transient responses to changing ligand conditions, and modal gating statistics. We show how this can be understood within a simple analytical framework and confirm our results with stochastic simulations. The model assumes that channel subunits are independent, demonstrating that cooperative binding or concerted conformational changes are not required for modal gating. Moreover, the model embodies a generally applicable principle: If a timescale separation exists in the kinetics of individual subunits, then modal gating can arise as an emergent property of channel behavior. PMID:27551100

  7. Gating Kinetics and Ion Transfer in Channels of Nerve Membrane.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-21

    and sea hare ( Aplysia ). In the classical squid axon preparation a detailed comparison between estimates of the relaxation time obtained via Hodgkin...Mrra nr . r -W, ,.r w -. r- _ ,,- Fishman, H.M. N00014-87-K-0055 Inward K Rectifier Channel Kinetics from Analysis of Complex Conductances in Aplysia ...Neuronal Membrane. The inward K rectifier in Aplysia neuron and Ba* blockade of the recti- fication process were studied by rapid measurement of

  8. [Kinetics of ligand binding to nucleic acids at random fillings].

    PubMed

    Arakelian, V B; Babaian, S Iu; Tairian, V I; Arakelian, A V; Parsadanian, M A; Vardevanian, P O

    2006-01-01

    Ligand binding with nucleic acids is described in frames of the theory of random processes. It is shown that the probabilistic description of binding of a ligand to nucleic acid allows one to describe not only the kinetics of changes in the number of bound ligands at arbitrary fillings but also to calculate stationary values of the number of bound ligands and its dispersion. A general analysis of absorption isotherms and the kinetics of ligand binding with nucleic acids allows one to determine the rate constants of formation and decomposition of the ligand-nucleic acid complex. A comparison of the results obtained with the case of low fillings is conducted.

  9. Kinetics of 9-aminoacridine block of single Na channels

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of 9-aminoacridine (9-AA) block of single Na channels in neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells were studied using the gigohm seal, patch clamp technique, under the condition in which the Na current inactivation had been eliminated by treatment with N-bromoacetamide (NBA). Following NBA treatment, the current flowing through individual Na channels was manifested by square-wave open events lasting from several to tens of milliseconds. When 9-AA was applied to the cytoplasmic face of Na channels at concentrations ranging from 30 to 100 microM, it caused repetitive rapid transitions (flickering) between open and blocked states within single openings of Na channels, without affecting the amplitude of the single channel current. The histograms for the duration of blocked states and the histograms for the duration of open states could be fitted with a single-exponential function. The mean open time (tau o) became shorter as the drug concentration was increased, while the mean blocked time (tau b) was concentration independent. The association (blocking) rate constant, kappa, calculated from the slope of the curve relating the reciprocal mean open time to 9-AA concentration, showed little voltage dependence, the rate constant being on the order of 1 X 10(7) M-1s-1. The dissociation (unblocking) rate constant, l, calculated from the mean blocked time, was strongly voltage dependent, the mean rate constant being 214 s-1 at 0 mV and becoming larger as the membrane being hyperpolarized. The voltage dependence suggests that a first-order blocking site is located at least 63% of the way through the membrane field from the cytoplasmic surface. The equilibrium dissociation constant for 9-AA to block the Na channel, defined by the relation of l/kappa, was calculated to be 21 microM at 0 mV. Both tau -1o and tau -1b had a Q10 of 1.3, which suggests that binding reaction was diffusion controlled. The burst time in the presence of 9-AA, which is the sum of open times and blocked

  10. A kinetic model of NMDA ion channel under varying noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rubin; Chen, Hao; Zhang, Zhikang

    2004-05-01

    It is well known that when transmitters are applied to the postsynaptic membrane, the resulting depolarization is noisy that is due to the random opening and closing of the ion channels activated by the transmitters[1]. In other words, the energy of noise is associated with changes in ion channels. On the base of these ideas, we explore a model of relationship between NMDA (n-methyl-D-aspartate) ion channels and LTP (long-term synaptic potentiation). We have proved that NMDA ion channel and calcium-dependent protein kinases, which are the triggers for the inducement of LTP, could be regarded as "molecular machines". In this system all of these molecules require energy and the energy of the system is supplied from the random motion of water molecules generated through heat energy of ATP hydrolysis[2]. So the appropriate framework to describe them comes from bioenergetics. Models of LTP previously reported are all on the macroscopic level [3-7]. Instead, we research a model at the molecular level by applying energy parameters [8].

  11. Fractional kinetics emerging from ergodicity breaking in random media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-García, Daniel; Pham, Tuan Minh; Paradisi, Paolo; Manzo, Carlo; Pagnini, Gianni

    2016-11-01

    We present a modeling approach for diffusion in a complex medium characterized by a random length scale. The resulting stochastic process shows subdiffusion with a behavior in qualitative agreement with single-particle tracking experiments in living cells, such as ergodicity breaking, p variation, and aging. In particular, this approach recapitulates characteristic features previously described in part by the fractional Brownian motion and in part by the continuous-time random walk. Moreover, for a proper distribution of the length scale, a single parameter controls the ergodic-to-nonergodic transition and, remarkably, also drives the transition of the diffusion equation of the process from nonfractional to fractional, thus demonstrating that fractional kinetics emerges from ergodicity breaking.

  12. Macroscopic kinetics of pentameric ligand gated ion channels: comparisons between two prokaryotic channels and one eukaryotic channel.

    PubMed

    Laha, Kurt T; Ghosh, Borna; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical signaling in the brain depends on pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs). Recently, crystal structures of prokaryotic pLGIC homologues from Erwinia chrysanthemi (ELIC) and Gloeobacter violaceus (GLIC) in presumed closed and open channel states have been solved, which provide insight into the structural mechanisms underlying channel activation. Although structural studies involving both ELIC and GLIC have become numerous, thorough functional characterizations of these channels are still needed to establish a reliable foundation for comparing kinetic properties. Here, we examined the kinetics of ELIC and GLIC current activation, desensitization, and deactivation and compared them to the GABAA receptor, a prototypic eukaryotic pLGIC. Outside-out patch-clamp recordings were performed with HEK-293T cells expressing ELIC, GLIC, or α1β2γ2L GABAA receptors, and ultra-fast ligand application was used. In response to saturating agonist concentrations, we found both ELIC and GLIC current activation were two to three orders of magnitude slower than GABAA receptor current activation. The prokaryotic channels also had slower current desensitization on a timescale of seconds. ELIC and GLIC current deactivation following 25 s pulses of agonist (cysteamine and pH 4.0 buffer, respectively) were relatively fast with time constants of 24.9 ± 5.1 ms and 1.2 ± 0.2 ms, respectively. Surprisingly, ELIC currents evoked by GABA activated very slowly with a time constant of 1.3 ± 0.3 s and deactivated even slower with a time constant of 4.6 ± 1.2 s. We conclude that the prokaryotic pLGICs undergo similar agonist-mediated gating transitions to open and desensitized states as eukaryotic pLGICs, supporting their use as experimental models. Their uncharacteristic slow activation, slow desensitization and rapid deactivation time courses are likely due to differences in specific structural elements, whose future identification may help uncover mechanisms underlying p

  13. Kinetics of random sequential adsorption on disordered substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Woo

    1996-01-01

    The kinetics of the random sequential adsorption of line segments has been studied on a disordered substrate occupied with point impurities. The coverage of the surface and the jamming limits are calculated by a Monte Carlo method. The coverage 0305-4470/29/1/007/img1 has an asymptotically exponential behaviour at low concentration of the impurities. The jamming limits depend on the concentration of the impurities p. At 0305-4470/29/1/007/img2 the jamming limits decrease as p increases. At 0305-4470/29/1/007/img3 the jamming limits increase as p increases. The one-dimensional results are in good agreement with Ben-Naim and Krapivsky's analytic results. The coverage and the jamming limits on a two-dimensional disordered lattice are similar to the one-dimensional cases. The jamming limits decrease monotonically as the length of line segments increases. The minimum locations of the jamming limits for both one and two dimensions are on the same values for a given length of the k-mer.

  14. Modified kinetics and selectivity of sodium channels in frog skeletal muscle fibers treated with aconitine

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The effect of the plant alkaloid aconitine on sodium channel kinetics, ionic selectivity, and blockage by protons and tetrodotoxin (TTX) has been studied in frog skeletal muscle. Treatment with 0.25 or 0.3 mM aconitine alters sodium channels so that the threshold of activation is shifted 40-50 mV in the hyperpolarized direction. In contrast to previous results in frog nerve, inactivation is complete for depolarizations beyond about -60 mV. After aconitine treatment, the steady state level of inactivation is shifted approximately 20 mV in the hyperpolarizing direction. Concomitant with changes in channel kinetics, the relative permeability of the sodium channel to NH4,K, and Cs is increased. This altered selectivity is not accompanied by altered block by protons or TTX. The results suggest that sites other than those involved in channel block by protons and TTX are important in determining sodium channel selectivity. PMID:6294221

  15. Kinetics of veratridine action on Na channels of skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sutro, JB

    1986-01-01

    Veratridine bath-applied to frog muscle makes inactivation of INa incomplete during a depolarizing voltage-clamp pulse and leads to a persistent veratridine-induced Na tail current. During repetitive depolarizations, the size of successive tail currents grows to a plateau and then gradually decreases. When pulsing is stopped, the tail current declines to zero with a time constant of approximately 3 s. Higher rates of stimulation result in a faster build-up of the tail current and a larger maximum value. I propose that veratridine binds only to open channels and, when bound, prevents normal fast inactivation and rapid shutting of the channel on return to rest. Veratridine-modified channels are also subject to a "slow" inactivation during long depolarizations or extended pulse trains. At rest, veratridine unbinds with a time constant of approximately 3 s. Three tests confirm these hypotheses: (a) the time course of the development of veratridine-induced tail currents parallels a running time integral of gNa during the pulse; (b) inactivating prepulses reduce the ability to evoke tails, and the voltage dependence of this reduction parallels the voltage dependence of h infinity; (c) chloramine-T, N-bromoacetamide, and scorpion toxin, agents that decrease inactivation in Na channels, each greatly enhance the tail currents and alter the time course of the appearance of the tails as predicted by the hypothesis. Veratridine-modified channels shut during hyperpolarizations from -90 mV and reopen on repolarization to -90 mV, a process that resembles normal activation gating. Veratridine appears to bind more rapidly during larger depolarizations. PMID:2419478

  16. Kinetic Limited Water Evaporation in Hydrophilic Nanofluidic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinxiao; Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Duan, Chuanhua

    2015-11-01

    Capillary evaporation is one of the most efficient approaches for heat and mass transfer, but the interfacial resistance in capillary evaporation governed by the kinetic theory has remained poorly understood. Here we report experimental studies of the kinetic-limited water capillary evaporation in 2-D hydrophilic nanochannels. A novel hybrid nanochannel design is employed to guarantee sufficient water supply to the liquid/vapor evaporation interface and to enable precise evaporation rate measurements. We study the effects of confinement (16 ~ 105nm), temperature (20 ~ 40 °C), and relative humidity (0% ~ 60%) on the evaporation rate and the evaporation coefficient. A maximum evaporation flux of 21287 micron/s is obtained in 16-nm nanochannels at 40°C and RH =0%, which corresponds to a heat flux of 4804 W/cm°. The evaporation coefficient is found to be independent on geometrical confinement, but shows a clear dependence on temperature, decreasing from 0.55 at 20°C to 0.5 at 40 °C. These findings have implications for understanding heat and mass transport in nanofluidic devices and porous media, and shed light on further development of evaporation-based technologies for thermal management, membrane purification and lab-on-a-chip devices. The work is supported by the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund (ACS PRF # 54118-DNI7) and the Faculty Startup Fund (Boston University, USA).

  17. Light transmission channels in random scattering media (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Recently it has been shown that shaping the wavefront of an incident laser beam can significantly enhance the total transmission of light through strong scattering media [1]. This is done by coupling light to high transmission channels. However, optical absorption would modify such transmission channels. In a disordered system with uniform absorption, the maximal transmission channel changes from diffusive to ballistic-like transport [2]. This ballistic-like transport may enable new modes of imaging in absorbing media. If the absorption is distributed non-uniformly in space, the high transmission channels redirect the energy flows to circumvent the absorbing regions to minimize loss. Thus the attenuation of high transmission channels by inhomogeneous absorption becomes lower than that by homogeneous absorption [3]. Since the maximum transmission channel is the most efficient in bypassing the absorbing region, the ratio of its transmittance to the average transmittance increases with absorption, eventually exceeds the ratio without absorption. The finding that inhomogeneous absorption may have a weaker impact on open channels than homogeneous absorption is promising for practical applications. [1] S. M. Popoff, A. Goetschy, S. F. Liew, A. D. Stone, and H. Cao. Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 133903 (2014). [2] S. F. Liew, S. M. Popoff, A. P. Mosk, W. L. Vos, and H. Cao. Phys. Rev. B 89, 224202 (2014). [3] S. F. Liew and H. Cao. Opt. Express 23, 11043 (2015).

  18. Phenol derivatives accelerate inactivation kinetics in one inactivation-deficient mutant human skeletal muscle Na(+) channel.

    PubMed

    Haeseler, G; Piepenbrink, A; Bufler, J; Dengler, R; Hecker, H; Aronson, J; Piepenbrock, S; Leuwer, M

    2001-03-23

    Altered inactivation kinetics in skeletal muscle Na(+) channels due to mutations in the encoding gene are causal for the alterations in muscle excitability in nondystrophic myotonia. Na(+) channel blockers like lidocaine and mexiletine, suggested for therapy of myotonia, do not reconstitute inactivation in channels with defective inactivation in vitro. We examined the effects of four methylated and/or halogenated phenol derivatives on one heterologously expressed inactivation-deficient Paramyotonia congenita-mutant (R1448H) muscle Na(+) channel in vitro. All these compounds accelerated delayed inactivation of R1448H-whole-cell currents during a depolarization and delayed accelerated recovery from inactivation. The potency of these effects paralleled the potency of the drugs to block the peak current amplitude. We conclude that the investigated phenol derivatives affect inactivation-deficient Na(+) channels more specifically than lidocaine and mexiletine. However, for all compounds, the effect on inactivation was accompanied by a substantial block of the peak current amplitude.

  19. Steady-state kinetics of solitary batrachotoxin-treated sodium channels. Kinetics on a bounded continuum of polymer conformations.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinson, K A

    1992-01-01

    The underlying principles of the kinetics and equilibrium of a solitary sodium channel in the steady state are examined. Both the open and closed kinetics are postulated to result from round-trip excursions from a transition region that separates the openable and closed forms. Exponential behavior of the kinetics can have origins different from small-molecule systems. These differences suggest that the probability density functions (PDFs) that describe the time dependences of the open and closed forms arise from a distribution of rate constants. The distribution is likely to arise from a thermal modulation of the channel structure, and this provides a physical basis for the following three-variable equation: [formula; see text] Here, A0 is a scaling term, k is the mean rate constant, and sigma quantifies the Gaussian spread for the contributions of a range of effective rate constants. The maximum contribution is made by k, with rates faster and slower contributing less. (When sigma, the standard deviation of the spread, goes to zero, then p(f) = A0 e-kt.) The equation is applied to the single-channel steady-state probability density functions for batrachotoxin-treated sodium channels (1986. Keller et al. J. Gen. Physiol. 88: 1-23). The following characteristics are found: (a) The data for both open and closed forms of the channel are fit well with the above equation, which represents a Gaussian distribution of first-order rate processes. (b) The simple relationship [formula; see text] holds for the mean effective rat constants. Or, equivalently stated, the values of P open calculated from the k values closely agree with the P open values found directly from the PDF data. (c) In agreement with the known behavior of voltage-dependent rate constants, the voltage dependences of the mean effective rate constants for the opening and closing of the channel are equal and opposite over the voltage range studied. That is, [formula; see text] "Bursts" are related to the well

  20. Rectified motion in an asymmetrically structured channel due to induced-charge electrokinetic and thermo-kinetic phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2016-02-15

    It would be advantageous to move fluid by the gradient of random thermal noises that are omnipresent in the natural world. To achieve this motion, we propose a rectifier that uses a thermal noise along with induced-charge electroosmosis and electrophoresis (ICEO and ICEP) around a metal post cylinder in an asymmetrically structured channel and numerically examine its rectification performance. By the boundary element method combined with the thin double layer approximation, we find that rectified motion occurs in the asymmetrically structured channel due to ICEO and ICEP. Further, by thermodynamical and equivalent circuit methods, we discuss a thermal voltage that drives a rectifier consisting of a fluidic channel of an electrolyte and an impedance as a noise source. Our calculations show that fluid can be moved in the asymmetrically structured channel by the fluctuation of electric fields due to a thermal noise only when there is a temperature difference. In addition, our simple noise argument provides a different perspective for the thermo-kinetic phenomena (around a metal post) which was predicted based on the electrolyte Seebeck effect in our previous paper [H. Sugioka, “Nonlinear thermokinetic phenomena due to the Seebeck effect,” Langmuir 30, 8621 (2014)].

  1. Distributed reservation control protocols for random access broadcasting channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, E. P.; Ephremides, A.

    1981-05-01

    Attention is given to a communication network consisting of an arbitrary number of nodes which can communicate with each other via a time-division multiple access (TDMA) broadcast channel. The reported investigation is concerned with the development of efficient distributed multiple access protocols for traffic consisting primarily of single packet messages in a datagram mode of operation. The motivation for the design of the protocols came from the consideration of efficient multiple access utilization of moderate to high bandwidth (4-40 Mbit/s capacity) communication satellite channels used for the transmission of short (1000-10,000 bits) fixed length packets. Under these circumstances, the ratio of roundtrip propagation time to packet transmission time is between 100 to 10,000. It is shown how a TDMA channel can be adaptively shared by datagram traffic and constant bandwidth users such as in digital voice applications. The distributed reservation control protocols described are a hybrid between contention and reservation protocols.

  2. Distributed reservation control protocols for random access broadcasting channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, E. P.; Ephremides, A.

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to a communication network consisting of an arbitrary number of nodes which can communicate with each other via a time-division multiple access (TDMA) broadcast channel. The reported investigation is concerned with the development of efficient distributed multiple access protocols for traffic consisting primarily of single packet messages in a datagram mode of operation. The motivation for the design of the protocols came from the consideration of efficient multiple access utilization of moderate to high bandwidth (4-40 Mbit/s capacity) communication satellite channels used for the transmission of short (1000-10,000 bits) fixed length packets. Under these circumstances, the ratio of roundtrip propagation time to packet transmission time is between 100 to 10,000. It is shown how a TDMA channel can be adaptively shared by datagram traffic and constant bandwidth users such as in digital voice applications. The distributed reservation control protocols described are a hybrid between contention and reservation protocols.

  3. Phosphatidic acid stimulates cardiac KATP channels like phosphatidylinositols, but with novel gating kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zheng; Gao, Lizhi; Wang, Wenxia

    2003-01-01

    Membrane-bound anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylinositols have the capacity to modulate ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels through a mechanism involving long-range electrostatic interaction between the lipid headgroup and channel. However, it has not yet been determined whether the multiple effects of phosphatidylinositols reported in the literature all result from this general electrostatic interaction or require a specific headgroup structure. The present study investigated whether phosphatidic acid (PA), an anionic phospholipid substantially different in structure from phosphatidylinositols, evokes effects similar to phosphatidylinositols on native K(ATP) channels of rat heart and heterogeneous Kir6.2/SUR2A channels. Channels treated with PA (0.2-1 mg/ml applied to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane) exhibited higher activity, lower sensitivity to ATP inhibition, less Mg(2+)-dependent nucleotide stimulation, and poor sulfonylurea inhibition. These effects match the spectrum of phosphatidylinositols' effects, but, in addition, PA also induced a novel pattern in gating kinetics, represented by a decreased mean open time (from 12.2 +/- 2.0 to 3.3 +/- 0.7 ms). This impact on gating kinetics clearly distinguishes PA's effects from those of phosphatidylinositols. Results indicate that multiple effects of anionic phospholipids on K(ATP) channels are related phenomena and can likely be attributed to a common mechanism, but additional specific effects due to other mechanisms may also coincide.

  4. Kinetic effects of quaternary lidocaine block of cardiac sodium channels: a gating current study

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The interaction of antiarrhythmic drugs with ion channels is often described within the context of the modulated receptor hypothesis, which explains the action of drugs by proposing that the binding site has a variable affinity for drugs, depending upon whether the channel is closed, open, or inactivated. Lack of direct evidence for altered gating of cardiac Na channels allowed for the suggestion of an alternative model for drug interaction with cardiac channels, which postulated a fixed affinity receptor with access limited by the conformation of the channel (guarded receptor hypothesis). We report measurement of the gating currents of Na channels in canine cardiac Purkinje cells in the absence and presence of QX-222, a quaternary derivative of lidocaine, applied intracellularly, and benzocaine, a neutral local anesthetic. These data demonstrate that the cardiac Na channel behaves as a modulated rather than a guarded receptor in that drug-bound channels gate with altered kinetics. In addition, the results suggest a new interpretation of the modulated receptor hypothesis whereby drug occupancy reduces the overall voltage- dependence of gating, preventing full movement of the voltage sensor. PMID:8169596

  5. Classical-quantum arbitrarily varying wiretap channel: common randomness assisted code and continuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boche, Holger; Cai, Minglai; Deppe, Christian; Nötzel, Janis

    2017-01-01

    We determine the secrecy capacities under common randomness assisted coding of arbitrarily varying classical-quantum wiretap channels. Furthermore, we determine the secrecy capacity of a mixed channel model which is compound from the sender to the legitimate receiver and varies arbitrarily from the sender to the eavesdropper. We examine when the secrecy capacity is a continuous function of the system parameters as an application and show that resources, e.g., having access to a perfect copy of the outcome of a random experiment, can guarantee continuity of the capacity function of arbitrarily varying classical-quantum wiretap channels.

  6. Hidden Markov modeling for single channel kinetics with filtering and correlated noise.

    PubMed Central

    Qin, F; Auerbach, A; Sachs, F

    2000-01-01

    Hidden Markov modeling (HMM) can be applied to extract single channel kinetics at signal-to-noise ratios that are too low for conventional analysis. There are two general HMM approaches: traditional Baum's reestimation and direct optimization. The optimization approach has the advantage that it optimizes the rate constants directly. This allows setting constraints on the rate constants, fitting multiple data sets across different experimental conditions, and handling nonstationary channels where the starting probability of the channel depends on the unknown kinetics. We present here an extension of this approach that addresses the additional issues of low-pass filtering and correlated noise. The filtering is modeled using a finite impulse response (FIR) filter applied to the underlying signal, and the noise correlation is accounted for using an autoregressive (AR) process. In addition to correlated background noise, the algorithm allows for excess open channel noise that can be white or correlated. To maximize the efficiency of the algorithm, we derive the analytical derivatives of the likelihood function with respect to all unknown model parameters. The search of the likelihood space is performed using a variable metric method. Extension of the algorithm to data containing multiple channels is described. Examples are presented that demonstrate the applicability and effectiveness of the algorithm. Practical issues such as the selection of appropriate noise AR orders are also discussed through examples. PMID:11023898

  7. Modification of sodium and potassium channel gating kinetics by ether and halothane

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, B.P.; Shrager, P.; Goldstein, D.A.

    1981-03-01

    The effects of ether and halothane on the kinetics of sodium and potassium currents were investigated in the crayfish giant axon. Both general anesthetics produced a reversible, dose-dependent speeding up of sodium current inactivation at all membrane potentials, with no change in the rising phase of the currents. Double-pulse inactivation experiments with ether also showed faster inactivation, but the rate of recovery from inactivation at negative potentials was not affected. Ether shifted the midpoint of the steady-state fast inactivation curve in the hyperpolarizing direction and made the curve steeper. The activation of potassium currents was faster with ether present, with no change in the voltage dependence of steady-state potassium currents. Ether and halothane are known to perturb the structure of lipid bilayer membranes; the alterations in sodium and potassium channel gating kinetics are consistent with the hypothesis that the rats of the gating processes of the channels can be affected by the state of the lipids surrounding the channels, but a direct effect of ether and halothane on the protein part of the channels cannot be ruled out.

  8. Kinetic properties and functional dynamics of sodium channels during repetitive spiking in a slow pacemaker neuron

    PubMed Central

    Milescu, Lorin S.; Yamanishi, Tadashi; Ptak, Krzysztof; Smith, Jeffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the kinetic properties of voltage-gated Na+ channels and their contribution to the repetitive spiking activity of medullary raphé neurons, which exhibit slow pacemaking and strong spiking adaptation. The study is based on a combination of whole-cell patch clamp, modeling and real-time computation. Na+ currents were recorded from neurons in brain slices obtained from male and female neonatal rats, using voltage-clamp protocols designed to reduce space-clamp artifacts and to emphasize functionally relevant kinetic features. A detailed kinetic model was formulated to explain the broad range of transient and stationary voltage-dependent properties exhibited by Na+ currents. The model was tested by injecting via dynamic clamp a model-based current as a substitute for the native TTX-sensitive Na+ currents, which were pharmacologically blocked. The model-based current reproduced well the native spike shape and spiking frequency. The dynamics of Na+ channels during repetitive spiking were indirectly examined through this model. By comparing the spiking activities generated with different kinetic models in dynamic clamp experiments, we determined that state-dependent slow inactivation contributes significantly to spiking adaptation. Through real-time manipulation of the model-based current, we established that suprathreshold Na+ current mainly controls spike shape, whereas subthreshold Na+ current modulates spiking frequency and contributes to the pacemaking mechanism. Since the model-based current was injected in the soma, the results also suggest that somatic Na+ channels are sufficient to establish the essential spiking properties of raphé neurons in vitro. PMID:20826674

  9. In vitro characterization of HCN channel kinetics and frequency dependence in myocytes predicts biological pacemaker functionality

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Bucchi, Annalisa; Oren, Ronit V; Kryukova, Yelena; Dun, Wen; Clancy, Colleen E; Robinson, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    The pacemaker current, mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, contributes to the initiation and regulation of cardiac rhythm. Previous experiments creating HCN-based biological pacemakers in vivo found that an engineered HCN2/HCN1 chimeric channel (HCN212) resulted in significantly faster rates than HCN2, interrupted by 1–5 s pauses. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the differences in HCN212 and HCN2 in vivo functionality as biological pacemakers, we studied newborn rat ventricular myocytes over-expressing either HCN2 or HCN212 channels. The HCN2- and HCN212-over-expressing myocytes manifest similar voltage dependence, current density and sensitivity to saturating cAMP concentrations, but HCN212 has faster activation/deactivation kinetics. Compared with HCN2, myocytes expressing HCN212 exhibit a faster spontaneous rate and greater incidence of irregular rhythms (i.e. periods of rapid spontaneous rate followed by pauses). To explore these rhythm differences further, we imposed consecutive pacing and found that activation kinetics of the two channels are slower at faster pacing frequencies. As a result, time-dependent HCN current flowing during diastole decreases for both constructs during a train of stimuli at a rapid frequency, with the effect more pronounced for HCN2. In addition, the slower deactivation kinetics of HCN2 contributes to more pronounced instantaneous current at a slower frequency. As a result of the frequency dependence of both instantaneous and time-dependent current, HCN2 exhibits more robust negative feedback than HCN212, contributing to the maintenance of a stable pacing rhythm. These results illustrate the benefit of screening HCN constructs in spontaneously active myocyte cultures and may provide the basis for future optimization of HCN-based biological pacemakers. PMID:19171659

  10. Autonomic control of cardiac action potentials: role of potassium channel kinetics in response to sympathetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Terrenoire, Cecile; Clancy, Colleen E; Cormier, Joseph W; Sampson, Kevin J; Kass, Robert S

    2005-03-18

    I(Ks), the slowly activating component of the delayed rectifier current, plays a major role in repolarization of the cardiac action potential (AP). Genetic mutations in the alpha- (KCNQ1) and beta- (KCNE1) subunits of I(Ks) underlie Long QT Syndrome type 1 and 5 (LQT-1 and LQT-5), respectively, and predispose carriers to the development of polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. beta-adrenergic stimulation increases I(Ks) and results in rate dependent AP shortening, a control system that can be disrupted by some mutations linked to LQT-1 and LQT-5. The mechanisms by which I(Ks) regulates action potential duration (APD) during beta-adrenergic stimulation at different heart rates are not known, nor are the consequences of mutation induced disruption of this regulation. Here we develop a complementary experimental and theoretical approach to address these questions. We reconstituted I(Ks) in CHO cells (ie, KCNQ1 coexpressed with KCNE1 and the adaptator protein Yotiao) and quantitatively examined the effects of beta-adrenergic stimulation on channel kinetics. We then developed theoretical models of I(Ks) in the absence and presence of beta-adrenergic stimulation. We simulated the effects of sympathetic stimulation on channel activation (speeding) and deactivation (slowing) kinetics on the whole cell action potential under different pacing conditions. The model suggests these kinetic effects are critically important in rate-dependent control of action potential duration. We also investigate the effects of two LQT-5 mutations that alter kinetics and impair sympathetic stimulation of I(Ks) and show the likely mechanism by which they lead to tachyarrhythmias and indicate a distinct role of I(KS) kinetics in this electrical dysfunction. The full text of this article is available online at http://circres.ahajournals.org.

  11. A Conserved Residue Cluster That Governs Kinetics of ATP-dependent Gating of Kir6.2 Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Roger S; Wright, Jordan D; Pless, Stephan A; Nunez, John-Jose; Kim, Robin Y; Li, Jenny B W; Yang, Runying; Ahern, Christopher A; Kurata, Harley T

    2015-06-19

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are heteromultimeric complexes of an inwardly rectifying Kir channel (Kir6.x) and sulfonylurea receptors. Their regulation by intracellular ATP and ADP generates electrical signals in response to changes in cellular metabolism. We investigated channel elements that control the kinetics of ATP-dependent regulation of KATP (Kir6.2 + SUR1) channels using rapid concentration jumps. WT Kir6.2 channels re-open after rapid washout of ATP with a time constant of ∼60 ms. Extending similar kinetic measurements to numerous mutants revealed fairly modest effects on gating kinetics despite significant changes in ATP sensitivity and open probability. However, we identified a pair of highly conserved neighboring amino acids (Trp-68 and Lys-170) that control the rate of channel opening and inhibition in response to ATP. Paradoxically, mutations of Trp-68 or Lys-170 markedly slow the kinetics of channel opening (500 and 700 ms for W68L and K170N, respectively), while increasing channel open probability. Examining the functional effects of these residues using φ value analysis revealed a steep negative slope. This finding implies that these residues play a role in lowering the transition state energy barrier between open and closed channel states. Using unnatural amino acid incorporation, we demonstrate the requirement for a planar amino acid at Kir6.2 position 68 for normal channel gating, which is potentially necessary to localize the ϵ-amine of Lys-170 in the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-binding site. Overall, our findings identify a discrete pair of highly conserved residues with an essential role for controlling gating kinetics of Kir channels.

  12. Multiple kinetic components of sodium channel inactivation in rabbit Schwann cells.

    PubMed Central

    Howe, J R; Ritchie, J M

    1992-01-01

    steady-state amount of slow inactivation. 5. Records of single-channel sodium currents tended to cluster into records which either did, or did not, contain openings. This apparently non-random behaviour depended on membrane potential, and on the frequency at which the test steps were repeated, in the way expected if it resulted from slow inactivation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1336556

  13. The onset of sediment transport in vegetated channels predicted by turbulent kinetic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. Q.; Chung, H.; Nepf, H. M.

    2016-11-01

    This laboratory study advances our understanding of sediment transport in vegetated regions, by describing the impact of stem density on the critical velocity, Ucrit, at which sediment motion is initiated. Sparse emergent vegetation was modeled with rigid cylinders arranged in staggered arrays of different stem densities. The sediment transport rate, Qs, was measured over a range of current speeds using digital imaging, and the critical velocity was selected as the condition at which the magnitude of Qs crossed the noise threshold. For both grain sizes considered here (0.6-0.85 mm and 1.7-2 mm), Ucrit decreased with increasing stem density. This dependence can be explained by a threshold condition based on turbulent kinetic energy, kt, suggesting that near-bed turbulence intensity may be a more important control than bed shear stress on the initiation of sediment motion. The turbulent kinetic energy model unified the bare bed and vegetated channel measurements.

  14. Universality of Poisson indicator and Fano factor of transport event statistics in ion channels and enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Srabanti; Cao, Jianshu; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A

    2013-01-17

    We consider a generic stochastic model of ion transport through a single channel with arbitrary internal structure and kinetic rates of transitions between internal states. This model is also applicable to describe kinetics of a class of enzymes in which turnover events correspond to conversion of substrate into product by a single enzyme molecule. We show that measurement of statistics of single molecule transition time through the channel contains only restricted information about internal structure of the channel. In particular, the most accessible flux fluctuation characteristics, such as the Poisson indicator (P) and the Fano factor (F) as function of solute concentration, depend only on three parameters in addition to the parameters of the Michaelis-Menten curve that characterizes average current through the channel. Nevertheless, measurement of Poisson indicator or Fano factor for such renewal processes can discriminate reactions with multiple intermediate steps as well as provide valuable information about the internal kinetic rates.

  15. Wanderlust kinetics and variable Ca(2+)-sensitivity of Drosophila, a large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channel, expressed in oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Silberberg, S D; Lagrutta, A; Adelman, J P; Magleby, K L

    1996-01-01

    Cloned large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels (BK or maxi-K+ channels) from Drosophila (dSlo) were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and studied in excised membrane patches with the patch-clamp technique. Both a natural variant and a mutant that eliminated a putative cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site exhibited large, slow fluctuations in open probability with time. These fluctuations, termed "wanderlust kinetics," occurred with a time course of tens of seconds to minutes and had kinetic properties inconsistent with simple gating models. Wanderlust kinetics was still observed in the presence of 5 mM caffeine or 50 nM thapsigargin, or when the Ca2+ buffering capacity of the solution was increased by the addition of 5 mM HEDTA, suggesting that the wanderlust kinetics did not arise from Ca2+ release from caffeine and thapsigargin sensitive internal stores in the excised patch. The slow changes in kinetics associated with wanderlust kinetics could be generated with a discrete-state Markov model with transitions among three or more kinetic modes with different levels of open probability. To average out the wanderlust kinetics, large amounts of data were analyzed and demonstrated up to a threefold difference in the [Ca2+]i required for an open probability of 0.5 among channels expressed from the same injected mRNA. These findings indicate that cloned dSlo channels in excised patches from Xenopus oocytes can exhibit large variability in gating properties, both within a single channel and among channels. PMID:8744301

  16. Two pacemaker channels from human heart with profoundly different activation kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, A; Zong, X; Stieber, J; Hullin, R; Hofmann, F; Biel, M

    1999-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaking is produced by the slow diastolic depolarization phase of the action potential. The hyperpolarization-activated cation current (If) forms an important part of the pacemaker depolarization and consists of two kinetic components (fast and slow). Recently, three full-length cDNAs encoding hyperpolarization-activated and cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channels (HCN1-3) have been cloned from mouse brain. To elucidate the molecular identity of cardiac pacemaker channels, we screened a human heart cDNA library using a highly conserved neuronal HCN channel segment and identified two cDNAs encoding HCN channels. The hHCN2 cDNA codes for a protein of 889 amino acids. The HCN2 gene is localized on human chromosome 19p13.3 and contains eight exons spanning approximately 27 kb. The second cDNA, designated hHCN4, codes for a protein of 1203 amino acids. Northern blot and PCR analyses showed that both hHCN2 and hHCN4 are expressed in heart ventricle and atrium. When expressed in HEK 293 cells, either cDNA gives rise to hyperpolarization-activated cation currents with the hallmark features of native If. hHCN2 and hHCN4 currents differ profoundly from each other in their activation kinetics, being fast and slow, respectively. We thus conclude that hHCN2 and hHCN4 may underlie the fast and slow component of cardiac If, respectively. PMID:10228147

  17. Permeant ion effects on the gating kinetics of the type L potassium channel in mouse lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Permeant ion species was found to profoundly affect the gating kinetics of type l K+ currents in mouse T lymphocytes studied with the whole- cell or on-cell patch gigaohm-seal techniques. Replacing external K+ with Rb+ (as the sole monovalent cation, at 160 mM) shifted the peak conductance voltage (g-V) relation by approximately 20 mV to more negative potentials, while NH4+ shifted the g-V curve by 15 mV to more positive potentials. Deactivation (the tail current time constant, tau tail) was slowed by an average of 14-fold at -70 mV in external Rb+, by approximately 8-fold in Cs+, and by a factor of two to three in NH4+. Changing the external K+ concentration, [K+]o, from 4.5 to 160 mM or [Rb+]o from 10 to 160 mM had no effect on tau tail. With all the internal K+ replaced by Rb+ or Cs+ and either isotonic Rb+ or K+ in the bath, tau tail was indistinguishable from that with K+ in the cell. With the exception of NH4+, activation time constants were insensitive to permeant ion species. These results indicate that external permeant ions have stronger effects than internal permeant ions, suggesting an external modulatory site that influences K+ channel gating. However, in bi-ionic experiments with reduced external permeant ion concentrations, tau tail was sensitive to the direction of current flow, indicating that the modulatory site is either within the permeation pathway or in the outer vestibule of the channel. The latter interpretation implies that outward current through an open type l K+ channel significantly alters local ion concentrations at the modulatory site in the outer vestibule, and consequently at the mouth of the channel. Experiments with mixtures of K+ and Rb+ in the external solution reveal that deactivation kinetics are minimally affected by addition of Rb+ until the Rb+ mole fraction approaches unity. This relationship between mole fraction and tau tail, together with the concentration independence of tau tail, was hard to reconcile with simple

  18. Method for Evaluation of Outage Probability on Random Access Channel in Mobile Communication Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollár, Martin

    2012-05-01

    In order to access the cell in all mobile communication technologies a so called random-access procedure is used. For example in GSM this is represented by sending the CHANNEL REQUEST message from Mobile Station (MS) to Base Transceiver Station (BTS) which is consequently forwarded as an CHANNEL REQUIRED message to the Base Station Controller (BSC). If the BTS decodes some noise on the Random Access Channel (RACH) as random access by mistake (so- called ‘phantom RACH') then it is a question of pure coincidence which èstablishment cause’ the BTS thinks to have recognized. A typical invalid channel access request or phantom RACH is characterized by an IMMEDIATE ASSIGNMENT procedure (assignment of an SDCCH or TCH) which is not followed by sending an ESTABLISH INDICATION from MS to BTS. In this paper a mathematical model for evaluation of the Power RACH Busy Threshold (RACHBT) in order to guaranty in advance determined outage probability on RACH is described and discussed as well. It focuses on Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) however the obtained results can be generalized on remaining mobile technologies (ie WCDMA and LTE).

  19. Nonequilibrium phase transitions in lattice systems with random-field competing kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Lacomba, A. I.; Marro, J.

    1992-10-01

    We study a class of lattice interacting-spin systems evolving stochastically under the simultaneous operation of several spin-flip mechanisms, each acting independently and responding to a different applied magnetic field. This induces an extra randomness which may occur in real systems, e.g., a magnetic system under the action of a field varying with a much shorter period than the mean time between successive transitions. Such a situation-in which one may say in some sense that frustration has a dynamical origin- may also be viewed as a nonequilibrium version of the random-field Ising model. By following a method of investigating stationary probability distributions in systems with competing kinetics [P. L. Garrido and J. Marro, Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 1929 (1989)], we solve one-dimensional lattices supporting different field distributions and transition rates for the elementary kinetical processes, thus revealing a rich variety of phase transitions and critical phenomena. Some exact results for lattices of arbitrary dimension, and comparisons with the standard quenched and annealed random-field models, and with a nonequilibrium diluted antiferromagnetic system, are also reported.

  20. Kinetic modeling of ion conduction in KcsA potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Mafé, Salvador; Pellicer, Julio; Cervera, Javier

    2005-05-22

    KcsA constitutes a potassium channel of known structure that shows both high conduction rates and selectivity among monovalent cations. A kinetic model for ion conduction through this channel that assumes rapid ion transport within the filter has recently been presented by Nelson. In a recent, brief communication, we used the model to provide preliminary explanations to the experimental current-voltage J-V and conductance-concentration g-S curves obtained for a series of monovalent ions (K(+),Tl(+), and Rb(+)). We did not assume rapid ion transport in the calculations, since ion transport within the selectivity filter could be rate limiting for ions other than native K(+). This previous work is now significantly extended to the following experimental problems. First, the outward rectification of the J-V curves in K(+) symmetrical solutions is analyzed using a generalized kinetic model. Second, the J-V and g-S curves for NH(4) (+) are obtained and compared with those of other ions (the NH(4) (+) J-V curve is qualitatively different from those of Rb(+) and Tl(+)). Third, the effects of Na(+) block on K(+) and Rb(+) currents through single KcsA channels are studied and the different blocking behavior is related to the values of the translocation rate constants characteristic of ion transport within the filter. Finally, the significantly decreased K(+) conductance caused by mutation of the wild-type channel is also explained in terms of this rate constant. In order to keep the number of model parameters to a minimum, we do not allow the electrical distance (an empirical parameter of kinetic models that controls the exponential voltage dependence of the dissociation rate) to vary with the ionic species. Without introducing the relatively high number of adjustable parameters of more comprehensive site-based models, we show that ion association to the filter is rate controlling at low concentrations, but ion dissociation from the filter and ion transport within the filter

  1. Gating Kinetics of the Cyclic-GMP-Activated Channel of Retinal Rods: Flash Photolysis and Voltage-Jump Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpen, Jeffrey W.; Zimmerman, Anita L.; Stryer, Lubert; Baylor, Denis A.

    1988-02-01

    The gating kinetics of the cGMP-activated cation channel of salamander retinal rods have been studied in excised membrane patches. Relaxations in patch current were observed after two kinds of perturbation: (i) fast jumps of cGMP concentration, generated by laser flash photolysis of a cGMP ester (``caged'' cGMP), and (ii) membrane voltage jumps, which perturb activation of the channel by cGMP. In both methods the speed of activation increased with the final cGMP concentration. The results are explained by a simple kinetic model in which activation involves three sequential cGMP binding steps with bimolecular rate constants close to the diffusion-controlled limit; fully liganded channels undergo rapid open-closed transitions. Voltage perturbs activation by changing the rate constant for channel closing, which increases with hyperpolarization. Intramolecular transitions of the fully liganded channel limit the kinetics of activation at high cGMP concentrations (>50 μ M), whereas at physiological cGMP concentrations (<5 μ M), the kinetics of activation are limited by the third cGMP binding step. The channel appears to be optimized for rapid responses to changes in cytoplasmic cGMP concentration.

  2. Characterizing channel change along a multithread gravel-bed river using random forest image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overstreet, B. T.; Legleiter, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Snake River in Grand Teton National Park is a dam-regulated but highly dynamic gravel-bed river that alternates between a single thread and a multithread planform. Identifying key drivers of channel change on this river could improve our understanding of 1) how flow regulation at Jackson Lake Dam has altered the character of the river over time; 2) how changes in the distribution of various types of vegetation impacts river dynamics; and 3) how the Snake River will respond to future human and climate driven disturbances. Despite the importance of monitoring planform changes over time, automated channel extraction and understanding the physical drivers contributing to channel change continue to be challenging yet critical steps in the remote sensing of riverine environments. In this study we use the random forest statistical technique to first classify land cover within the Snake River corridor and then extract channel features from a sequence of high-resolution multispectral images of the Snake River spanning the period from 2006 to 2012, which encompasses both exceptionally dry years and near-record runoff in 2011. We show that the random forest technique can be used to classify images with as few as four spectral bands with far greater accuracy than traditional single-tree classification approaches. Secondly, we couple random forest derived land cover maps with LiDAR derived topography, bathymetry, and canopy height to explore physical drivers contributing to observed channel changes on the Snake River. In conclusion we show that the random forest technique is a powerful tool for classifying multispectral images of rivers. Moreover, we hypothesize that with sufficient data for calculating spatially distributed metrics of channel form and more frequent channel monitoring, this tool can also be used to identify areas with high probabilities of channel change. Land cover maps of a portion of the Snake River produced from digital aerial photography from 2010 and

  3. Neurosteroid prolongs GABAA channel deactivation by altering kinetics of desensitized states.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W J; Vicini, S

    1997-06-01

    Fast applications of GABA (1 mM) to nucleated and outside-out patches excised from granule neurons in cerebellar slices from developing rats evoked currents with a double exponential time course reminiscent of that of IPSCs. A neurosteroid 3alpha, 21dihydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-20-one (THDOC) remarkably increased the slow deactivation time constant and slowed down recovery from desensitization, as estimated by paired-pulse GABA applications. THDOC also reduced the amplitude of GABA currents, whereas it failed to affect the fast deactivation component and its relative contribution to peak amplitude. The effects of THDOC on slow deactivation were greater in rats younger than postnatal day 13 (P13) as compared with rats at P30-P35. THDOC failed to alter deactivation of short responses induced by a less-potent agonist taurine at saturating doses. These responses had deactivation kinetics described by a fast single exponential decay, little desensitization, and quick recovery. However, THDOC slowed deactivation if taurine responses were long enough to allow consistent desensitization, suggesting that desensitized states are required for the neurosteroid to modulate GABA responses. In outside-out patches, just as desensitized states prolonged GABA responses by producing reopening of channels activated by brief GABA pulses, THDOC increased the channel open probability by further increasing the number of late channel openings, resulting in a prolongation of the slow deactivation. Our data suggest that neurosteroid potentiates the inhibitory postsynaptic transmission via the prolongation of the slow deactivation and that the alteration of kinetics of entry and exit from desensitized states underlies the allosteric modification of GABAA receptors by neurosteroids.

  4. Cosmic rays in a random magnetic field: Breakdown of the quasilinear derivation of the kinetic equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, T. B.; Jones, F. C.; Birmingham, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of deriving a kinetic equation for the cosmic ray distribution function in a random magnetic field is considered. A model is adopted which is mathematically simple but which contains the essential physics. The perturbation expansion upon which the quasi-linear treatment is based is investigated. The existence of resonant particles causes the breakdown of the adiabatic approximation frequently used in this theory. Resonant particles cause a general secular growth of higher order terms in the expansion which invalidates the entire perturbative approach.

  5. Random alloy diffusion kinetics for the application to multicomponent alloy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, T. R.; Belova, I. V.; Murch, G. E.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, extensive Monte Carlo simulation results are reported on tracer and collective diffusion correlation effects in the random ternary alloy, as an example of a multicomponent alloy system. The problem of analytically describing both collective and tracer diffusion kinetics is also addressed for the random multicomponent alloy by application of a combination of the Manning theory and Holdsworth and Elliott theory. It is found that the overall results from the combined theory agree reasonably well with Monte Carlo results. This combined approach is much more accurate than Manning's approach itself and much more manageable than the almost exact, but unfortunately difficult to use, self-consistent theory of Moleko, Allnatt and Allnatt. Some relations between the Onsager phenomenological coefficients and tracer diffusion coefficients are derived and are tested with our Monte Carlo data. Good agreement is found.

  6. Estimating the number of channels in patch-clamp recordings: application to kinetic analysis of multichannel data from voltage-operated channels.

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, W; Hohenthanner, K; Höfer, G F; Groschner, K; Romanin, C

    1997-01-01

    Important kinetic information of voltage-operated ion channels can be obtained by estimating the open probability, the availability, and the first latency, and by applying run analysis. In the case of multichannel patches, estimation of the number of available channels is a prerequisite for the above analysis. Here we describe a method for calculation of the a posteriori probability of the number of available channels in each sweep by using the Bayes formula. This probability serves as a measure for the number of channels and allows for first latency determination and run analysis. The methods described were applied to simulated and experimental data obtained from L-type Ca2+ channel recordings. PMID:9138562

  7. The random energy model in a magnetic field and joint source channel coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merhav, Neri

    2008-09-01

    We demonstrate that there is an intimate relationship between the magnetic properties of Derrida’s random energy model (REM) of spin glasses and the problem of joint source-channel coding in Information Theory. In particular, typical patterns of erroneously decoded messages in the coding problem have “magnetization” properties that are analogous to those of the REM in certain phases, where the non-uniformity of the distribution of the source in the coding problem plays the role of an external magnetic field applied to the REM. We also relate the ensemble performance (random coding exponents) of joint source-channel codes to the free energy of the REM in its different phases.

  8. Degradation kinetics and pathways of three calcium channel blockers under UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bing; Zonja, Bozo; Gonzalez, Oscar; Sans, Carme; Pérez, Sandra; Barceló, Damia; Esplugas, Santiago; Xu, Ke; Qiang, Zhimin

    2015-12-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are a group of pharmaceuticals widely prescribed to lower blood pressure and treat heart diseases. They have been frequently detected in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents and downstream river waters, thus inducing a potential risk to aquatic ecosystems. However, little is known about the behavior and fate of CCBs under UV irradiation, which has been adopted as a primary disinfection method for WWTP effluents. This study investigated the degradation kinetics and pathways of three commonly-used CCBs, including amlodipine (AML), diltiazem (DIL), and verapamil (VER), under UV (254 nm) irradiation. The chemical structures of transformation byproducts (TBPs) were first identified to assess the potential ecological hazards. On that basis, a generic solid-phase extraction method, which simultaneously used four different cartridges, was adopted to extract and enrich the TBPs. Thereafter, the photo-degradation of target CCBs was performed under UV fluences typical for WWTP effluent disinfection. The degradation of all three CCBs conformed to the pseudo-first-order kinetics, with rate constants of 0.031, 0.044 and 0.011 min(-1) for AML, DIL and VER, respectively. By comparing the MS(2) fragments and the evolution (i.e., formation or decay) trends of identified TBPs, the degradation pathways were proposed. In the WWTP effluent, although the target CCBs could be degraded, several TBPs still contained the functional pharmacophores and reached peak concentrations under UV fluences of 40-100 mJ cm(-2).

  9. Gating kinetics of batrachotoxin-modified Na+ channels in the squid giant axon. Voltage and temperature effects.

    PubMed Central

    Correa, A M; Bezanilla, F; Latorre, R

    1992-01-01

    The gating kinetics of batrachotoxin-modified Na+ channels were studied in outside-out patches of axolemma from the squid giant axon by means of the cut-open axon technique. Single channel kinetics were characterized at different membrane voltages and temperatures. The probability of channel opening (Po) as a function of voltage was well described by a Boltzmann distribution with an equivalent number of gating particles of 3.58. The voltage at which the channel was open 50% of the time was a function of [Na+] and temperature. A decrease in the internal [Na+] induced a shift to the right of the Po vs. V curve, suggesting the presence of an integral negative fixed charge near the activation gate. An increase in temperature decreased Po, indicating a stabilization of the closed configuration of the channel and also a decrease in entropy upon channel opening. Probability density analysis of dwell times in the closed and open states of the channel at 0 degrees C revealed the presence of three closed and three open states. The slowest open kinetic component constituted only a small fraction of the total number of transitions and became negligible at voltages greater than -65 mV. Adjacent interval analysis showed that there is no correlation in the duration of successive open and closed events. Consistent with this analysis, maximum likelihood estimation of the rate constants for nine different single-channel models produced a preferred model (model 1) having a linear sequence of closed states and two open states emerging from the last closed state. The effect of temperature on the rate constants of model 1 was studied. An increase in temperature increased all rate constants; the shift in Po would be the result of an increase in the closing rates predominant over the change in the opening rates. The temperature study also provided the basis for building an energy diagram for the transitions between channel states. PMID:1318096

  10. Reaction Kinetics of HBr with HO2: A New Channel for Isotope Scrambling Reactions.

    PubMed

    Church, Jonathan R; Skodje, Rex T

    2016-11-03

    The gas phase reaction kinetics of HBr with the HO2 radical are investigated over the temperature range of T = 200-1500 K using a theoretical approach based on transition state theory. The parameters for the potential energy surface are computed using density functional theory with the M11 exchange functional. The rate coefficient for the HBr + HO2 → Br + H2O2 abstraction channel is found to be somewhat larger than previous estimates at low temperatures due to quantum tunneling. The present study reveals the existence of a novel exchange pathway, HBr + H'O2 → H'Br + HO2, which exhibits a much lower reaction barrier than does the abstraction route. The transition state for this process is a symmetrical planar five-membered-ring-shaped structure. At low temperatures, this concerted double hydrogen transfer reaction is several orders of magnitude faster than the abstraction channel. The exchange process may be observed using isotope scrambling reactions; such reactions may contribute to observed isotope abundances in the atmosphere. The rate coefficients for the isotopically labeled reactions are computed.

  11. Numerical analysis of ultrafast physical random number generator using dual-channel optical chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsonbaty, Amr; Hegazy, Salem F.; Obayya, Salah S. A.

    2016-09-01

    Fast physical random number generators (PRNGs) are essential elements in the development of many modern applications. We numerically demonstrate an extraction scheme to establish an ultrafast PRNG using dual-channel optical-chaos source. Simultaneous suppression of time-delay signature in all observables of the output is verified using autocorrelation-function method. The proposed technique compares the level of the chaotic signal at time t with M levels of its delayed version. The comparators [1-bit analog-to-digital converters (ADCs)] are triggered using a clock subject to an incremental delay. All the delays of the chaotic signal before the ADCs and the relative delays of the clock are mutually incommensurable. The outputs of the ADCs are then combined using parity-check logic to produce physically true random numbers. The randomness quality of the generated random bits is evaluated by the statistical tests of National Institute of Standards and Technology Special Publication 800-22. The results verify that all tests are passed from M=1 to M=39 at sampling rate up to 34.5 GHz, which indicates that the maximum generation rate of random bits is 2.691 Tb/s without employing any preprocessing techniques. This rate, to the best of our knowledge, is higher than any previously reported PRNG.

  12. Dual-channel in-line digital holographic double random phase encryption.

    PubMed

    Das, Bhargab; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S; Rao, D V G L N

    2012-10-01

    We present a robust encryption method for the encoding of 2D/3D objects using digital holography and virtual optics. Using our recently developed dual-plane in-line digital holography technique, two in-line digital holograms are recorded at two different planes and are encrypted using two different double random phase encryption configurations, independently. The process of using two mutually exclusive encryption channels makes the system more robust against attacks since both the channels should be decrypted accurately in order to get a recognizable reconstruction. Results show that the reconstructed object is unrecognizable even when the portion of the correct phase keys used during decryption is close to 75%. The system is verified against blind decryptions by evaluating the SNR and MSE. Validation of the proposed method and sensitivities of the associated parameters are quantitatively analyzed and illustrated.

  13. Entanglement in correlated random spin chains, RNA folding and kinetic roughening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Laguna, Javier; Santalla, Silvia N.; Ramírez, Giovanni; Sierra, Germán

    2016-07-01

    Average block entanglement in the 1D XX-model with uncorrelated random couplings is known to grow as the logarithm of the block size, in similarity to conformal systems. In this work we study random spin chains whose couplings present long range correlations, generated as gaussian fields with a power-law spectral function. Ground states are always planar valence bond states, and their statistical ensembles are characterized in terms of their block entropy and their bond-length distribution, which follow power-laws. We conjecture the existence of a critical value for the spectral exponent, below which the system behavior is identical to the case of uncorrelated couplings. Above that critical value, the entanglement entropy violates the area law and grows as a power law of the block size, with an exponent which increases from zero to one. Interestingly, we show that XXZ models with positive anisotropy present the opposite behavior, and strong correlations in the couplings lead to lower entropies. Similar planar bond structures are also found in statistical models of RNA folding and kinetic roughening, and we trace an analogy between them and quantum valence bond states. Using an inverse renormalization procedure we determine the optimal spin-chain couplings which give rise to a given planar bond structure, and study the statistical properties of the couplings whose bond structures mimic those found in RNA folding.

  14. TARP-associated AMPA receptors display an increased maximum channel conductance and multiple kinetically distinct open states.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Chris; Farrant, Mark; Cull-Candy, Stuart G

    2012-11-15

    Fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS is mediated mainly by AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs), whose biophysical properties are dramatically modulated by the presence of transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs). To help construct a kinetic model that will realistically describe native AMPAR/TARP function, we have examined the single-channel properties of homomeric GluA1 AMPARs in combination with the TARPs, γ-2, γ-4 and γ-5. In a saturating concentration of agonist, each of these AMPAR/TARP combinations gave rise to single-channel currents with multiple conductance levels that appeared intrinsic to the receptor-channel complex, and showed long-lived subconductance states. The open time and burst length distributions of the receptor complexes displayed multiple dwell-time components. In the case of γ-2- and γ-4-associated receptors, these distributions included a long-lived component lasting tens of milliseconds that was absent from both GluA1 alone and γ-5-associated receptors. The open time distributions for each conductance level required two dwell-time components, indicating that at each conductance level the channel occupies a minimum of two kinetically distinct open states. We have explored how these data place novel constraints on possible kinetic models of TARP-associated AMPARs that may be used to define AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission.

  15. Influence of channel subunit composition on L-type Ca2+ current kinetics and cardiac wave stability.

    PubMed

    Gudzenko, Vadim; Shiferaw, Yohannes; Savalli, Nicoletta; Vyas, Roshni; Weiss, James N; Olcese, Riccardo

    2007-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the slope of the function relating the action potential duration (APD) and the diastolic interval, known as the APD restitution curve, plays an important role in the initiation and maintenance of ventricular fibrillation. Since the APD restitution slope critically depends on the kinetics of the L-type Ca(2+) current, we hypothesized that manipulation of the subunit composition of these channels may represent a powerful strategy to control cardiac arrhythmias. We studied the kinetic properties of the human L-type Ca(2+) channel (Ca(v)1.2) coexpressed with the alpha(2)delta-subunit alone (alpha(1C) + alpha(2)delta) or in combination with beta(2a), beta(2b), or beta(3) subunits (alpha(1C) + alpha(2)delta + beta), using Ca(2+) as the charge carrier. We then incorporated the kinetic properties observed experimentally into the L-type Ca(2+) current mathematical model of the cardiac action potential to demonstrate that the APD restitution slope can be selectively controlled by altering the subunit composition of the Ca(2+) channel. Assuming that beta(2b) most closely resembles the native cardiac L-type Ca(2+) current, the absence of beta, as well as the coexpression of beta(2a), was found to flatten restitution slope and stabilize spiral waves. These results imply that subunit modification of L-type Ca(2+) channels can potentially be used as an antifibrillatory strategy.

  16. A multichannel Markov random field approach for automated segmentation of breast cancer tumor in DCE-MRI data using kinetic observation model.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Ahmed B; Gavenonis, Sara; Daye, Dania; Mies, Carolyn; Feldman, Michael; Rosen, Mark; Kontos, Despina

    2011-01-01

    We present a multichannel extension of Markov random fields (MRFs) for incorporating multiple feature streams in the MRF model. We prove that for making inference queries, any multichannel MRF can be reduced to a single channel MRF provided features in different channels are conditionally independent given the hidden variable, Using this result we incorporate kinetic feature maps derived from breast DCE MRI into the observation model of MRF for tumor segmentation. Our algorithm achieves an ROC AUC of 0.97 for tumor segmentation, We present a comparison against the commonly used approach of fuzzy C-means (FCM) and the more recent method of running FCM on enhancement variance features (FCM-VES). These previous methods give a lower AUC of 0.86 and 0.60 respectively, indicating the superiority of our algorithm. Finally, we investigate the effect of superior segmentation on predicting breast cancer recurrence using kinetic DCE MRI features from the segmented tumor regions. A linear prediction model shows significant prediction improvement when segmenting the tumor using the proposed method, yielding a correlation coefficient r = 0.78 (p < 0.05) to validated cancer recurrence probabilities, compared to 0.63 and 0.45 when using FCM and FCM-VES respectively.

  17. Investigations on Physical Random Access Channel Structure in Evolved UTRA Uplink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishiyama, Yoshihisa; Higuchi, Kenichi; Sawahashi, Mamoru

    This paper presents the optimum physical random access channel (PRACH) structure in terms of the number of control signaling bits accommodated and the transmission bandwidth based on the link budget in order to satisfy the coverage requirement for the single-carrier (SC)-FDMA based E-UTRA uplink. First, we present the design concept of the PRACH structure considering the purposes of the random access procedure in the E-UTRA. Simulation evaluations including a system-level simulation show that a PRACH comprising a 0.5-msec preamble sequence can convey a 6-bit control signal at the cell edge when the inter-site distance (ISD) is 500m under full channel load conditions with one-cell frequency reuse. It is also shown, however, that a PRACH longer than one-sub-frame, e.g., 1.0msec, is necessary to support the ISD of 1732m assuming the same conditions. We also show that the best transmission bandwidth for the PRACH is approximately 1.08-4.5MHz from the viewpoint of the misdetection probability, and a 1.08-MHz transmission bandwidth is suitable considering other aspects such as flexible resource assignment in the time domain and a small number of options in the transmission bandwidth.

  18. Comparative analysis of the kinetic characteristics of L-type calcium channels in cardiac cells of hibernators.

    PubMed Central

    Alekseev, A E; Markevich, N I; Korystova, A F; Terzic, A; Kokoz, Y M

    1996-01-01

    An undefined property of L-type Ca2+ channels is believed to underlie the unique phenotype of hibernating hearts. Therefore, L-type Ca2+ channels in single cardiomyocytes isolated from hibernating versus awake ground-squirrels (Citellus undulatus) were compared using the perforated mode of the patch-clamp technique, and interpreted by way of a kinetic model of Ca2+ channel behavior based upon the concept of independence of the activation and inactivation processes. We find that, in hibernating ground-squirrels, the cardiac L-type Ca2+ current is lower in magnitude when compared to awake animals. Both in the awake or hibernating states, kinetics of L-type Ca2+ channels could be described by a d2f1(2)f2 model with an activation and two inactivation processes. The activation (or d) process relates to the movement of the gating charge. The slow (or f1) inactivation is associated with movement of gating charge and is current-dependent. The rapid (or f2) inactivation is a complex process which cannot be represented as a single-step conformational transition induced by the gating charge movement, and is regulated by beta-adrenoceptor stimulation. When compared to awake animals, the kinetic properties of Ca2+ channels from hibernating ground-squirrels differed in the following parameters: (1) pronounced shift (15-20 mV) toward depolarization in the normalized conductance of both inactivation components, and moderate shift in the activation component; (2) 1.5-2-fold greater time constants; and (3) two-fold greater activation gating charge. Thus, L-type Ca2+ channels apparently switch their phenotype during the hibernating transition. Stimulation of beta-adrenoceptors by isoproterenol, reversed the hibernating kinetic- (but not amplitude-) phenotype toward the awake type. Therefore, an aberrance in the beta-adrenergic system can not fully explain the observed changes in the L-type Ca2+ current. This suggests that during hibernation additional mechanisms may reduce the single

  19. A self-adaptive method for creating high efficiency communication channels through random scattering media

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiang; Martin-Rouault, Laure; Cui, Meng

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the propagation of electromagnetic waves is important to a broad range of applications. Recent advances in controlling wave propagation in random scattering media have enabled optical focusing and imaging inside random scattering media. In this work, we propose and demonstrate a new method to deliver optical power more efficiently through scattering media. Drastically different from the random matrix characterization approach, our method can rapidly establish high efficiency communication channels using just a few measurements, regardless of the number of optical modes, and provides a practical and robust solution to boost the signal levels in optical or short wave communications. We experimentally demonstrated analog and digital signal transmission through highly scattering media with greatly improved performance. Besides scattering, our method can also reduce the loss of signal due to absorption. Experimentally, we observed that our method forced light to go around absorbers, leading to even higher signal improvement than in the case of purely scattering media. Interestingly, the resulting signal improvement is highly directional, which provides a new means against eavesdropping. PMID:25070592

  20. Bupivacaine Blocks N-Type Inactivating Kv Channels in the Open State: No Allosteric Effect on Inactivation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Johanna; Madeja, Michael; Elinder, Fredrik; Århem, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Local anesthetics bind to ion channels in a state-dependent manner. For noninactivating voltage-gated K channels the binding mainly occurs in the open state, while for voltage-gated inactivating Na channels it is assumed to occur mainly in inactivated states, leading to an allosterically caused increase in the inactivation probability, reflected in a negative shift of the steady-state inactivation curve, prolonged recovery from inactivation, and a frequency-dependent block. How local anesthetics bind to N-type inactivating K channels is less explored. In this study, we have compared bupivacaine effects on inactivating (Shaker and Kv3.4) and noninactivating (Shaker-IR and Kv3.2) channels, expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Bupivacaine was found to block these channels time-dependently without shifting the steady-state inactivation curve markedly, without a prolonged recovery from inactivation, and without a frequency-dependent block. An analysis, including computational testing of kinetic models, suggests binding to the channel mainly in the open state, with affinities close to those estimated for corresponding noninactivating channels (300 and 280 μM for Shaker and Shaker-IR, and 60 and 90 μM for Kv3.4 and Kv3.2). The similar magnitudes of Kd, as well as of blocking and unblocking rate constants for inactivating and noninactivating Shaker channels, most likely exclude allosteric interactions between the inactivation mechanism and the binding site. The relevance of these results for understanding the action of local anesthetics on Na channels is discussed. PMID:18790854

  1. Effects of unsaturated fatty acids on the kinetics of voltage‐gated proton channels heterologously expressed in cultured cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawanabe, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Key points Arachidonic acid (AA) greatly enhances the activity of the voltage‐gated proton (Hv) channel, although its mechanism of action and physiological function remain unclear.In the present study, we analysed the effects of AA on proton currents through Hv channels heterologously expressed in HEK293T cells.The dramatic increase in proton current amplitude elicited by AA was accompanied by accelerated activation kinetics and a leftward shift in the voltage‐dependence of activation.Mutagenesis studies suggest the two aforementioned effects of AA reflect two distinct structural mechanisms.Application of phospholipase A2, which liberates AA from phospholipids in the membrane, also enhances Hv channel activity, supporting the idea that AA modulates Hv channel activity within physiological contexts. Abstract Unsaturated fatty acids are key components of the biological membranes of all cells, and precursors of mediators for cell signalling. Arachidonic acid (AA) is an unsaturated fatty acid known to modulate the activities of various ion channels, including the voltage‐gated proton (Hv) channel, which supports the rapid production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in phagocytes through regulation of pH and membrane potential. However, the molecular mechanisms and physiological functions of the effects of AA on Hv channels remain unclear. In the present study, we report an electrophysiological analysis of the effects of AA on the mouse Hv channel (mHv1) heterologously expressed in HEK293T cells. Application of AA to excised inside‐out patch membranes rapidly induced a robust increase in the amplitude of the proton current through mHv1. The current increase was accompanied by accelerated activation kinetics and a small leftward shift of the current–voltage relationship. In monomeric channels lacking the coiled‐coil region of the channel protein, the shift in the current–voltage relationship was diminished but activation and deactivation remained

  2. Voltage gating by molecular subunits of Na+ and K+ ion channels: higher-dimensional cubic kinetics, rate constants, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Fohlmeister, Jürgen F

    2015-06-01

    The structural similarity between the primary molecules of voltage-gated Na and K channels (alpha subunits) and activation gating in the Hodgkin-Huxley model is brought into full agreement by increasing the model's sodium kinetics to fourth order (m(3) → m(4)). Both structures then virtually imply activation gating by four independent subprocesses acting in parallel. The kinetics coalesce in four-dimensional (4D) cubic diagrams (16 states, 32 reversible transitions) that show the structure to be highly failure resistant against significant partial loss of gating function. Rate constants, as fitted in phase plot data of retinal ganglion cell excitation, reflect the molecular nature of the gating transitions. Additional dimensions (6D cubic diagrams) accommodate kinetically coupled sodium inactivation and gating processes associated with beta subunits. The gating transitions of coupled sodium inactivation appear to be thermodynamically irreversible; response to dielectric surface charges (capacitive displacement) provides a potential energy source for those transitions and yields highly energy-efficient excitation. A comparison of temperature responses of the squid giant axon (apparently Arrhenius) and mammalian channel gating yields kinetic Q10 = 2.2 for alpha unit gating, whose transitions are rate-limiting at mammalian temperatures; beta unit kinetic Q10 = 14 reproduces the observed non-Arrhenius deviation of mammalian gating at low temperatures; the Q10 of sodium inactivation gating matches the rate-limiting component of activation gating at all temperatures. The model kinetics reproduce the physiologically large frequency range for repetitive firing in ganglion cells and the physiologically observed strong temperature dependence of recovery from inactivation.

  3. Voltage gating by molecular subunits of Na+ and K+ ion channels: higher-dimensional cubic kinetics, rate constants, and temperature

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The structural similarity between the primary molecules of voltage-gated Na and K channels (alpha subunits) and activation gating in the Hodgkin-Huxley model is brought into full agreement by increasing the model's sodium kinetics to fourth order (m3 → m4). Both structures then virtually imply activation gating by four independent subprocesses acting in parallel. The kinetics coalesce in four-dimensional (4D) cubic diagrams (16 states, 32 reversible transitions) that show the structure to be highly failure resistant against significant partial loss of gating function. Rate constants, as fitted in phase plot data of retinal ganglion cell excitation, reflect the molecular nature of the gating transitions. Additional dimensions (6D cubic diagrams) accommodate kinetically coupled sodium inactivation and gating processes associated with beta subunits. The gating transitions of coupled sodium inactivation appear to be thermodynamically irreversible; response to dielectric surface charges (capacitive displacement) provides a potential energy source for those transitions and yields highly energy-efficient excitation. A comparison of temperature responses of the squid giant axon (apparently Arrhenius) and mammalian channel gating yields kinetic Q10 = 2.2 for alpha unit gating, whose transitions are rate-limiting at mammalian temperatures; beta unit kinetic Q10 = 14 reproduces the observed non-Arrhenius deviation of mammalian gating at low temperatures; the Q10 of sodium inactivation gating matches the rate-limiting component of activation gating at all temperatures. The model kinetics reproduce the physiologically large frequency range for repetitive firing in ganglion cells and the physiologically observed strong temperature dependence of recovery from inactivation. PMID:25867741

  4. Revealing the activation pathway for TMEM16A chloride channels from macroscopic currents and kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Vite, Juan A; Cruz-Rangel, Silvia; De Jesús-Pérez, José J; Figueroa, Iván A Aréchiga; Rodríguez-Menchaca, Aldo A; Pérez-Cornejo, Patricia; Hartzell, H Criss; Arreola, Jorge

    2016-07-01

    TMEM16A (ANO1), the pore-forming subunit of calcium-activated chloride channels, regulates several physiological and pathophysiological processes such as smooth muscle contraction, cardiac and neuronal excitability, salivary secretion, tumour growth and cancer progression. Gating of TMEM16A is complex because it involves the interplay between increases in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), membrane depolarization, extracellular Cl(-) or permeant anions and intracellular protons. Our goal here was to understand how these variables regulate TMEM16A gating and to explain four observations. (a) TMEM16A is activated by voltage in the absence of intracellular Ca(2+). (b) The Cl(-) conductance is decreased after reducing extracellular Cl(-) concentration ([Cl(-)]o). (c) ICl is regulated by physiological concentrations of [Cl(-)]o. (d) In cells dialyzed with 0.2 μM [Ca(2+)]i, Cl(-) has a bimodal effect: at [Cl(-)]o <30 mM TMEM16A current activates with a monoexponential time course, but above 30 mM, [Cl(-)]o ICl activation displays fast and slow kinetics. To explain the contribution of Vm, Ca(2+) and Cl(-) to gating, we developed a 12-state Markov chain model. This model explains TMEM16A activation as a sequential, direct, and Vm-dependent binding of two Ca(2+) ions coupled to a Vm-dependent binding of an external Cl(-) ion, with Vm-dependent transitions between states. Our model predicts that extracellular Cl(-) does not alter the apparent Ca(2+) affinity of TMEM16A, which we corroborated experimentally. Rather, extracellular Cl(-) acts by stabilizing the open configuration induced by Ca(2+) and by contributing to the Vm dependence of activation.

  5. Voltage-dependent modulation of single N-Type Ca2+ channel kinetics by receptor agonists in IMR32 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Carabelli, V; Lovallo, M; Magnelli, V; Zucker, H; Carbone, E

    1996-01-01

    The voltage-dependent inhibition of single N-type Ca(2+) channels by noradrenaline (NA) and the delta-opioid agonist D-Pen(2)-D-Pen (5)-enkephalin (DPDPE) was investigated in cell-attached patches of human neuroblastoma IMR32 cells with 100 mM Ba(2+) and 5 microM nifedipine to block L-type channels. In 70% of patches, addition of 20 microM NA + 1 microM DPDPE delayed markedly the first channel openings, causing a four- to fivefold increase of the first latency at +20 mV. The two agonists or NA alone decreased also by 35% the open probability (P(o)), prolonged partially the mean closed time, and increased the number of null sweeps. In contrast, NA + DPDPE had little action on the single-channel conductance (19 versus 19.2 pS) and minor effects on the mean open time. Similarly to macroscopic Ba(2+) currents, the ensemble currents were fast activating at control but slowly activating and depressed with the two agonists. Inhibition of single N-type channels was effectively removed (facilitated) by short and large depolarizations. Facilitatory pre-pulses increased P(o) significantly and decreased fourfold the first latency. Ensemble currents were small and slowly activating before pre-pulses and became threefold larger and fast decaying after facilitation. Our data suggest that slowdown of Ca(2+) channel activation by transmitters is mostly due to delayed transitions from a modified to a normal (facilitated) gating mode. This single-channel gating modulation could be well simulated by a Monte Carlo method using previously proposed kinetic models predicting marked prolongation of first channel openings. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 7 PMID:9172738

  6. A prospective randomized comparison of early embryo cleavage kinetics between two media culture systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huan; Zheng, Yi; Wu, Yonggen; Ye, Danna; Huang, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether early embryo cleavage kinetics were affected by type of culture media. Methods: In this prospective sibling-split study, 620 oocytes from 37 patients were randomly allocated into two groups: Cook group and Vitrolife group. Oocytes/embryos in Cook group, would be cultured with Cook sequential culture medium, while oocytes/embryos in Vitrolife group, would be cultured with Vitrolife sequential culture medium. Time-lapse imaging technology was used to calculate exact timing of early embryo cleavage events which included time to 2PN breakdown, cleavage to 2-, 3-, 4-, 5- cell and the time duration in the 2-,3-cell stage. Then these timing of early embryo cleavage events were compared between Cook group and Vitrolife group. Moreover, fertilization rate, cleavage rate, high quality embryo rate, usable blastocyst rate, pregnancy rate and implantation rate of these two groups were also analyzed. Results: The results showed there were no differences in all timing of early embryo cleavage events between the two groups. In addition, the two groups were similar in fertilization rate (Cook 71.0% vs. Vitrolife 71.3%, P>0.05), cleavage rate (Cook 98.1% vs. Vitrolife 98.2%, P>0.05), high quality embryo rate (Cook 52.1% vs. Vitrolife 52.7%, P>0.05), usable blastocyst rate (Cook 29.7% vs. Vitrolife 28.0%, P>0.05), pregnancy rate (Cook 46.7% VS. Vitrolife 50.0%, P>0.05) and implantation rate (Cook 30.3% VS. Vitrolife 29.0%, P>0.05). Conclusions: Morphokinetics used for embryo selection are not affected by the two different culture media. PMID:28083029

  7. In silico screening of the impact of hERG channel kinetic abnormalities on channel block and susceptibility to acquired long QT syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Lucia; Trenor, Beatriz; Yang, Pei-Chi; Saiz, Javier; Clancy, Colleen E.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of predisposition to long QT syndrome is crucial for reducing the risk of cardiac arrhythmias. In recent years, drug-induced provocative tests have proved useful to unmask some latent mutations linked to cardiac arrhythmias. In this study we expanded this concept by developing a prototype for a computational provocative screening test to reveal genetic predisposition to acquired Long-QT Syndrome (aLTQS). We developed a computational approach to reveal the pharmacological properties of IKr blocking drugs that are most likely to cause aLQTS in the setting of subtle alterations in IKr channel gating that would be expected to result from benign genetic variants. We used the model to predict the most potentially lethal combinations of kinetic anomalies and drug properties. In doing so, we also implicitly predicted ideal inverse therapeutic properties of K channel openers that would be expected to remedy a specific defect. We systematically performed “in silico mutagenesis” by altering discrete kinetic transition rates of the Fink et al. Markov model of human IKr channels, corresponding to activation, inactivation, deactivation and recovery from inactivation of IKr channels. We then screened and identified the properties of IKr blockers that caused acquired Long QT and therefore unmasked mutant phenotypes for mild, moderate and severe variants. Mutant IKr channels were incorporated into the O’Hara et al. human ventricular action potential (AP) model and subjected to simulated application of a wide variety of IKr-drug interactions in order to identify the characteristics that selectively exacerbate the AP duration (APD) differences between wild-type and IKr mutated cells. Our results show that drugs with disparate affinities to conformation states of the IKr channel are key to amplify variants underlying susceptibility to acquired Long QT Syndrome, an effect that is especially pronounced at slow frequencies. Finally, we developed a mathematical

  8. In silico screening of the impact of hERG channel kinetic abnormalities on channel block and susceptibility to acquired long QT syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Lucia; Trenor, Beatriz; Yang, Pei-Chi; Saiz, Javier; Clancy, Colleen E.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of predisposition to long QT syndrome is crucial for reducing the risk of cardiac arrhythmias. In recent years, drug-induced provocative tests have proved useful to unmask some latent mutations linked to cardiac arrhythmias. In this study we expanded this concept by developing a prototype for a computational provocative screening test to reveal genetic predisposition to acquired long-QT syndrome (aLQTS). We developed a computational approach to reveal the pharmacological properties of IKr blocking drugs that are most likely to cause aLQTS in the setting of subtle alterations in IKr channel gating that would be expected to result from benign genetic variants. We used the model to predict the most potentially lethal combinations of kinetic anomalies and drug properties. In doing so, we also implicitly predicted ideal inverse therapeutic properties of K channel openers that would be expected to remedy a specific defect. We systematically performed “in silico mutagenesis” by altering discrete kinetic transition rates of the Fink et al. Markov model of human IKr channels, corresponding to activation, inactivation, deactivation and recovery from inactivation of IKr channels. We then screened and identified the properties of IKr blockers that caused acquired long QT and therefore unmasked mutant phenotypes for mild, moderate and severe variants. Mutant IKr channels were incorporated into the O'Hara et al. human ventricular action potential (AP) model and subjected to simulated application of a wide variety of IKr–drug interactions in order to identify the characteristics that selectively exacerbate the AP duration (APD) differences between wild-type and IKr mutated cells. Our results show that drugs with disparate affinities to conformation states of the IKr channel are key to amplify variants underlying susceptibility to acquired long QT syndrome, an effect that is especially pronounced at slow frequencies. Finally, we developed a mathematical

  9. In silico screening of the impact of hERG channel kinetic abnormalities on channel block and susceptibility to acquired long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Romero, Lucia; Trenor, Beatriz; Yang, Pei-Chi; Saiz, Javier; Clancy, Colleen E

    2015-10-01

    Accurate diagnosis of predisposition to long QT syndrome is crucial for reducing the risk of cardiac arrhythmias. In recent years, drug-induced provocative tests have proved useful to unmask some latent mutations linked to cardiac arrhythmias. In this study we expanded this concept by developing a prototype for a computational provocative screening test to reveal genetic predisposition to acquired long-QT syndrome (aLQTS). We developed a computational approach to reveal the pharmacological properties of I(Kr) blocking drugs that are most likely to cause aLQTS in the setting of subtle alterations in I(Kr) channel gating that would be expected to result from benign genetic variants.Weused themodel to predict themost potentially lethal combinations of kinetic anomalies and drug properties. In doing so, we also implicitly predicted ideal inverse therapeutic properties of K channel openers that would be expected to remedy a specific defect. We systematically performed “in silico mutagenesis” by altering discrete kinetic transition rates of the Fink et al. Markov model of human I(Kr) channels, corresponding to activation, inactivation, deactivation and recovery from inactivation of I(Kr) channels. We then screened and identified the properties of I(Kr) blockers that caused acquired long QT and therefore unmasked mutant phenotypes formild,moderate and severe variants. Mutant I(Kr) channels were incorporated into the O'Hara et al. human ventricular action potential (AP) model and subjected to simulated application of a wide variety of I(Kr)-drug interactions in order to identify the characteristics that selectively exacerbate the AP duration (APD) differences between wild-type and I(Kr) mutated cells. Our results show that drugs with disparate affinities to conformation states of the I(Kr) channel are key to amplify variants underlying susceptibility to acquired long QT syndrome, an effect that is especially pronounced at slow frequencies. Finally, we developed a

  10. In silico screening of the impact of hERG channel kinetic abnormalities on channel block and susceptibility to acquired long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Romero, Lucia; Trenor, Beatriz; Yang, Pei-Chi; Saiz, Javier; Clancy, Colleen E

    2014-07-01

    Accurate diagnosis of predisposition to long QT syndrome is crucial for reducing the risk of cardiac arrhythmias. In recent years, drug-induced provocative tests have proved useful to unmask some latent mutations linked to cardiac arrhythmias. In this study we expanded this concept by developing a prototype for a computational provocative screening test to reveal genetic predisposition to acquired long-QT syndrome (aLQTS). We developed a computational approach to reveal the pharmacological properties of IKr blocking drugs that are most likely to cause aLQTS in the setting of subtle alterations in IKr channel gating that would be expected to result from benign genetic variants. We used the model to predict the most potentially lethal combinations of kinetic anomalies and drug properties. In doing so, we also implicitly predicted ideal inverse therapeutic properties of K channel openers that would be expected to remedy a specific defect. We systematically performed "in silico mutagenesis" by altering discrete kinetic transition rates of the Fink et al. Markov model of human IKr channels, corresponding to activation, inactivation, deactivation and recovery from inactivation of IKr channels. We then screened and identified the properties of IKr blockers that caused acquired long QT and therefore unmasked mutant phenotypes for mild, moderate and severe variants. Mutant IKr channels were incorporated into the O'Hara et al. human ventricular action potential (AP) model and subjected to simulated application of a wide variety of IKr-drug interactions in order to identify the characteristics that selectively exacerbate the AP duration (APD) differences between wild-type and IKr mutated cells. Our results show that drugs with disparate affinities to conformation states of the IKr channel are key to amplify variants underlying susceptibility to acquired long QT syndrome, an effect that is especially pronounced at slow frequencies. Finally, we developed a mathematical

  11. Connectivity, permeability, and channeling in randomly distributed and kinematically defined discrete fracture network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillot, J.; Davy, P.; Le Goc, R.; Darcel, C.; de Dreuzy, J. R.

    2016-11-01

    A major use of DFN models for industrial applications is to evaluate permeability and flow structure in hardrock aquifers from geological observations of fracture networks. The relationship between the statistical fracture density distributions and permeability has been extensively studied, but there has been little interest in the spatial structure of DFN models, which is generally assumed to be spatially random (i.e., Poisson). In this paper, we compare the predictions of Poisson DFNs to new DFN models where fractures result from a growth process defined by simplified kinematic rules for nucleation, growth, and fracture arrest. This so-called "kinematic fracture model" is characterized by a large proportion of T intersections, and a smaller number of intersections per fracture. Several kinematic models were tested and compared with Poisson DFN models with the same density, length, and orientation distributions. Connectivity, permeability, and flow distribution were calculated for 3-D networks with a self-similar power law fracture length distribution. For the same statistical properties in orientation and density, the permeability is systematically and significantly smaller by a factor of 1.5-10 for kinematic than for Poisson models. In both cases, the permeability is well described by a linear relationship with the areal density p32, but the threshold of kinematic models is 50% larger than of Poisson models. Flow channeling is also enhanced in kinematic DFN models. This analysis demonstrates the importance of choosing an appropriate DFN organization for predicting flow properties from fracture network parameters.

  12. Scaling of flow distance in random self-similar channel networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, B.M.

    2005-01-01

    Natural river channel networks have been shown in empirical studies to exhibit power-law scaling behavior characteristic of self-similar and self-affine structures. Of particular interest is to describe how the distribution of distance to the outlet changes as a function of network size. In this paper, networks are modeled as random self-similar rooted tree graphs and scaling of distance to the root is studied using methods in stochastic branching theory. In particular, the asymptotic expectation of the width function (number of nodes as a function of distance to the outlet) is derived under conditions on the replacement generators. It is demonstrated further that the branching number describing rate of growth of node distance to the outlet is identical to the length ratio under a Horton-Strahler ordering scheme as order gets large, again under certain restrictions on the generators. These results are discussed in relation to drainage basin allometry and an application to an actual drainage network is presented. ?? World Scientific Publishing Company.

  13. Wanderlust kinetics and variable Ca(2+)-sensitivity of dSlo [correction of Drosophila], a large conductance CA(2+)-activated K+ channel, expressed in oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Silberberg, S D; Lagrutta, A; Adelman, J P; Magleby, K L

    1996-01-01

    Cloned large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK or maxi-K+ channels) from Drosophila (dSlo) were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and studied in excised membrane patches with the patch-clamp technique. Both a natural variant and a mutant that eliminated a putative cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site exhibited large, slow fluctuations in open probability with time. These fluctuations, termed "wanderlust kinetics," occurred with a time course of tens of seconds to minutes and had kinetic properties inconsistent with simple gating models. Wanderlust kinetics was still observed in the presence of 5mM caffeine or 50 nM thapsigargin, or when the Ca2+ buffering capacity of the solution was increased by the addition of 5 mM HEDTA, suggesting that the wanderlust kinetics did not arise from Ca2+ release from caffeine and thapsigargin sensitive internal stores in the excised patch. The slow changes in kinetics associated with wanderlust kinetics could be generated with a discrete-state Markov model with transitions among three or more kinetic modes with different levels of open probability. To average out the wanderlust kinetics, large amounts of data were analyzed and demonstrated up to a threefold difference in the [Ca2+]i required for an open probability of 0.5 among channels expressed from the same injected mRNA. These findings indicate that cloned dSlo channels in excised patches from Xenopus oocytes can exhibit large variability in gating properties, both within a single channel and among channels. PMID:9643949

  14. 980-nm infrared laser modulation of sodium channel kinetics in a neuron cell linearly mediated by photothermal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinyu; Liu, Jia; Liang, Shanshan; Sun, Changsen

    2014-10-01

    Photothermal effect (PE) plays a major role in the near-infrared laser interaction with biological tissue. But, quite few interactions can be quantitatively depicted. Here, a two-step model is proposed to describe a 980-nm infrared laser interaction with neuron cell in vitro. First, the laser-induced temperature rises in the cell surrounding area were measured by using an open pipette method and also calculated by solving the heat conduction equation. Second, we recorded the modifications on sodium (Na) channel current in neuron cells directly by using a patch clamp to synchronize the 980-nm laser irradiation and obtained how the electrophysiological function of neuron cells respond to the temperature rise. Then, the activation time constants, τm, were extracted by fitting the sodium currents with the Hodgkin-Huxley model. The infrared laser modulation effect on sodium currents kinetics was examined by taking a ratio between the time constants with and without the laser irradiations. The analysis revealed that the averaged ratio at a specific laser exposure could be well related to the temperature properties of the Na channel protein. These results proved that the modulation of sodium current kinetics of a neuron cell in vitro by 980-nm laser with different-irradiation levels was linearly mediated corresponding to the laser-induced PE.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide release kinetics into saliva from different whitening products: a double-blind, randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Marques, Duarte Nuno da Silva; da Mata, António Duarte Sola Pereira; Silveira, João Miguel Lourenço; Marques, Joana Rita Oliveira Faria; Amaral, João Pedro de Almeida Rato; Guilherme, Nuno Filipe Rito Parada Marques

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study is to compare salivary hydrogen peroxide (HP) release kinetics and potential toxicity of systemic exposure of four different whitening products. A double-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted in a Portuguese dental faculty clinic. Two hundred forty volunteers were randomized to eight intervention groups. Participants were randomly assigned to receive active or placebo applications of one of four different products: Opalescence 10% PF™ (OPL), Vivastyle® 10%™ (VS10%), Vivadent Paint On Plus™ (PO+), and Trés White Supreme™ (TWS). Saliva collection was obtained by established methods at different times. The HP salivary content was determined by a photometric method. Salivary HP variations, total amount of salivary HP, and counts of subjects above the safe daily HP dose were the main outcome measures. All whitening systems significantly released HP to the saliva when compared to placebo, and all showed different release kinetics. The adaptable tray system (TWS) presented a risk increase of 37% [20-54%, 95% confidence interval] when compared to the other systems. The use of an adaptable tray whitening system with higher concentration of HP increases the toxicity potential.

  16. Kinetic model of Nav1.5 channel provides a subtle insight into slow inactivation associated excitability in cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Zhao, Zhiwen; Liu, Yongfeng; Wang, Wei; Wu, Ying; Ding, Jiuping

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.5 has been linked to the cardiac cell excitability and a variety of arrhythmic syndromes including long QT, Brugada, and conduction abnormalities. Nav1.5 exhibits a slow inactivation, corresponding to a duration-dependent bi-exponential recovery, which is often associated with various arrhythmia syndromes. However, the gating mechanism of Nav1.5 and the physiological role of slow inactivation in cardiac cells remain elusive. Here a 12-state two-step inactivation Markov model was successfully developed to depict the gating kinetics of Nav1.5. This model can simulate the Nav1.5 channel in not only steady state processes, but also various transient processes. Compared with the simpler 8-state model, this 12-state model is well-behaved in simulating and explaining the processes of slow inactivation and slow recovery. This model provides a good framework for further studying the gating mechanism and physiological role of sodium channel in excitable cells.

  17. Ion conduction in the KcsA potassium channel analyzed with a minimal kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Mafé, Salvador; Pellicer, Julio

    2005-02-01

    We use a model by Nelson to study the current-voltage and conductance-concentration curves of bacterial potassium channel KcsA without assuming rapid ion translocation. Ion association to the channel filter is rate controlling at low concentrations, but dissociation and transport in the filter can limit conduction at high concentration for ions other than K+. The absolute values of the effective rate constants are tentative but the relative changes in these constants needed to qualitatively explain the experiments should be of significance.

  18. Activation of α7 nicotinic receptors by orthosteric and allosteric agonists: influence on single-channel kinetics and conductance.

    PubMed

    Pałczyńska, Magda M; Jindrichova, Marie; Gibb, Alasdair J; Millar, Neil S

    2012-11-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are oligomeric transmembrane proteins in which five subunits coassemble to form a central ion channel pore. Conventional agonists, such as acetylcholine (ACh), bind to an orthosteric site, located at subunit interfaces in the extracellular domain. More recently, it has been demonstrated that nAChRs can also be activated by ligands binding to an allosteric transmembrane site. In the case of α7 nAChRs, ACh causes rapid activation and almost complete desensitization. In contrast, allosteric agonists such as 4-(4-bromophenyl)-3a,4,5,9b-tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c] quin oline-8-sulfonamide (4BP-TQS) activate α7 nAChRs more slowly and cause only low levels of apparent desensitization. In the present study, single-channel patch-clamp recording has been used to investigate differences in the mechanism of activation of α7 nAChRs by ACh and 4BP-TQS. The most striking difference between activation by ACh and 4BP-TQS is in single-channel kinetics. In comparison with activation by ACh, single-channel open times and burst lengths are substantially longer (~160-800-fold, respectively), and shut times are shorter (~8-fold) when activated by 4BP-TQS. In addition, coapplication of ACh and 4BP-TQS results in a further increase in single-channel burst lengths. Mean burst lengths seen when the two agonists are coapplied (3099 ± 754 ms) are ~2.5-fold longer than with 4BP-TQS alone and ∼370-fold longer than with ACh alone. Intriguingly, the main single-channel conductance of α7 nAChRs, was significantly larger when activated by 4BP-TQS (100.3 ± 2.4 pS) than when activated by ACh (90.0 ± 2.7 pS), providing evidence that activation by allosteric and orthosteric agonists results in different α7 nAChRs open-channel conformations.

  19. Activation of α7 Nicotinic Receptors by Orthosteric and Allosteric Agonists: Influence on Single-Channel Kinetics and Conductance

    PubMed Central

    Pałczyńska, Magda M.; Jindrichova, Marie; Gibb, Alasdair J.

    2012-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are oligomeric transmembrane proteins in which five subunits coassemble to form a central ion channel pore. Conventional agonists, such as acetylcholine (ACh), bind to an orthosteric site, located at subunit interfaces in the extracellular domain. More recently, it has been demonstrated that nAChRs can also be activated by ligands binding to an allosteric transmembrane site. In the case of α7 nAChRs, ACh causes rapid activation and almost complete desensitization. In contrast, allosteric agonists such as 4-(4-bromophenyl)-3a,4,5,9b-tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c] quin oline-8-sulfonamide (4BP-TQS) activate α7 nAChRs more slowly and cause only low levels of apparent desensitization. In the present study, single-channel patch-clamp recording has been used to investigate differences in the mechanism of activation of α7 nAChRs by ACh and 4BP-TQS. The most striking difference between activation by ACh and 4BP-TQS is in single-channel kinetics. In comparison with activation by ACh, single-channel open times and burst lengths are substantially longer (∼160–800-fold, respectively), and shut times are shorter (∼8-fold) when activated by 4BP-TQS. In addition, coapplication of ACh and 4BP-TQS results in a further increase in single-channel burst lengths. Mean burst lengths seen when the two agonists are coapplied (3099 ± 754 ms) are ∼2.5-fold longer than with 4BP-TQS alone and ∼370-fold longer than with ACh alone. Intriguingly, the main single-channel conductance of α7 nAChRs, was significantly larger when activated by 4BP-TQS (100.3 ± 2.4 pS) than when activated by ACh (90.0 ± 2.7 pS), providing evidence that activation by allosteric and orthosteric agonists results in different α7 nAChRs open-channel conformations. PMID:22874415

  20. Ion-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon collisions: kinetic energy releases for specific fragmentation channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitsma, G.; Zettergren, H.; Boschman, L.; Bodewits, E.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2013-12-01

    We report on 30 keV He2 + collisions with naphthalene (C10H8) molecules, which leads to very extensive fragmentation. To unravel such complex fragmentation patterns, we designed and constructed an experimental setup, which allows for the determination of the full momentum vector by measuring charged collision products in coincidence in a recoil ion momentum spectrometer type of detection scheme. The determination of fragment kinetic energies is found to be considerably more accurate than for the case of mere coincidence time-of-flight spectrometers. In fission reactions involving two cationic fragments, typically kinetic energy releases of 2-3 eV are observed. The results are interpreted by means of density functional theory calculations of the reverse barriers. It is concluded that naphthalene fragmentation by collisions with keV ions clearly is much more violent than the corresponding photofragmentation with energetic photons. The ion-induced naphthalene fragmentation provides a feedstock of various small hydrocarbonic species of different charge states and kinetic energy, which could influence several molecule formation processes in the cold interstellar medium and facilitates growth of small hydrocarbon species on pre-existing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  1. Kinetic Structure of Large-Conductance Ca2+-activated K+ Channels Suggests that the Gating Includes Transitions through Intermediate or Secondary States

    PubMed Central

    Rothberg, Brad S.; Magleby, Karl L.

    1998-01-01

    Mechanisms for the Ca2+-dependent gating of single large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels from cultured rat skeletal muscle were developed using two-dimensional analysis of single-channel currents recorded with the patch clamp technique. To extract and display the essential kinetic information, the kinetic structure, from the single channel currents, adjacent open and closed intervals were binned as pairs and plotted as two-dimensional dwell-time distributions, and the excesses and deficits of the interval pairs over that expected for independent pairing were plotted as dependency plots. The basic features of the kinetic structure were generally the same among single large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, but channel-specific differences were readily apparent, suggesting heterogeneities in the gating. Simple gating schemes drawn from the Monod- Wyman-Changeux (MWC) model for allosteric proteins could approximate the basic features of the Ca2+ dependence of the kinetic structure. However, consistent differences between the observed and predicted dependency plots suggested that additional brief lifetime closed states not included in MWC-type models were involved in the gating. Adding these additional brief closed states to the MWC-type models, either beyond the activation pathway (secondary closed states) or within the activation pathway (intermediate closed states), improved the description of the Ca2+ dependence of the kinetic structure. Secondary closed states are consistent with the closing of secondary gates or channel block. Intermediate closed states are consistent with mechanisms in which the channel activates by passing through a series of intermediate conformations between the more stable open and closed states. It is the added secondary or intermediate closed states that give rise to the majority of the brief closings (flickers) in the gating. PMID:9607935

  2. Dielectric function beyond the random-phase approximation: kinetic theory versus linear response theory.

    PubMed

    Reinholz, H; Röpke, G

    2012-03-01

    Calculating the frequency-dependent dielectric function for strongly coupled plasmas, the relations within kinetic theory and linear response theory are derived and discussed in comparison. In this context, we give a proof that the Kohler variational principle can be extended to arbitrary frequencies. It is shown to be a special case of the Zubarev method for the construction of a nonequilibrium statistical operator from the principle of the extremum of entropy production. Within kinetic theory, the commonly used energy-dependent relaxation time approach is strictly valid only for the Lorentz plasma in the static case. It is compared with the result from linear response theory that includes electron-electron interactions and applies for arbitrary frequencies, including bremsstrahlung emission. It is shown how a general approach to linear response encompasses the different approximations and opens options for systematic improvements.

  3. Osmotic stress regulates the strength and kinetics of sugar binding to the maltoporin channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnev, Philip A.; Harries, Daniel; Parsegian, V. Adrian; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2010-11-01

    We study the effect of osmotic stress, exerted by salts, on carbohydrate binding to the sugar-specific bacterial channel maltoporin. When the channel is reconstituted into planar lipid bilayers, single events of its occlusion by sugar are seen as transient interruptions in the flow of small ions. We find that, for most salts, changes in the free energy of maltoporin-sugar binding vary linearly with solution osmotic pressure. Such a change in binding with solution osmolarity indicates that for each salt a constant number of salt-excluding water molecules is released upon sugar-maltoporin association at all salt concentrations. We find that larger numbers of water molecules are released upon binding of the cyclic carbohydrate β-cyclodextrin (CD) than upon binding of the corresponding linear homologue maltoheptaose (m7). Remarkably, the extent to which salts affect the binding constants and rates depends sensitively on the type of salt; dehydration in solutions of different anions corresponds to the Hofmeister series. In sodium sulfate solutions, CD and m7 respectively release about 120 and 35 salt-excluding water molecules; in sodium chloride solutions, 35 and 15 waters. No water release is observed with sodium bromide. Finally, by adding adamantane, known to form an inclusion complex with CD, we can infer that CD not only dehydrates but also undergoes a conformational change upon binding to the channel. As a practical outcome, our results also demonstrate how osmotic stress can improve single-molecule detection of different solutes using protein-based nanopores.

  4. Kinetic analysis of strontium and potassium sorption onto sands and gravels in a natural channel.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bencala, K.E.; Jackman, A.P.; Kennedy, V.C.; Avanzino, R.J.; Zellweger, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    A kinetic, first-order mass transfer model was used to describe the sorption of strontium onto sand-and gravel-sized streambed sediments. Rate parameters, empirically determined for strontium, allowed for the prediction of potassium sorption with moderate success. The model parameters varied significantly with particle size. The sorption data were collected during an experimental injection of several elements into a small mountain pool-and- riffle stream. The sorption process onto sand- and gravel-sized sediment was relatively slow compared to changes in the dissolved concentrations. -Authors

  5. Real-time reliable determination of binding kinetics of DNA hybridization using a multi-channel graphene biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shicai; Zhan, Jian; Man, Baoyuan; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yue, Weiwei; Gao, Shoubao; Guo, Chengang; Liu, Hanping; Li, Zhenhua; Wang, Jihua; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2017-01-01

    Reliable determination of binding kinetics and affinity of DNA hybridization and single-base mismatches plays an essential role in systems biology, personalized and precision medicine. The standard tools are optical-based sensors that are difficult to operate in low cost and to miniaturize for high-throughput measurement. Biosensors based on nanowire field-effect transistors have been developed, but reliable and cost-effective fabrication remains a challenge. Here, we demonstrate that a graphene single-crystal domain patterned into multiple channels can measure time- and concentration-dependent DNA hybridization kinetics and affinity reliably and sensitively, with a detection limit of 10 pM for DNA. It can distinguish single-base mutations quantitatively in real time. An analytical model is developed to estimate probe density, efficiency of hybridization and the maximum sensor response. The results suggest a promising future for cost-effective, high-throughput screening of drug candidates, genetic variations and disease biomarkers by using an integrated, miniaturized, all-electrical multiplexed, graphene-based DNA array. PMID:28322227

  6. Real-time reliable determination of binding kinetics of DNA hybridization using a multi-channel graphene biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shicai; Zhan, Jian; Man, Baoyuan; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yue, Weiwei; Gao, Shoubao; Guo, Chengang; Liu, Hanping; Li, Zhenhua; Wang, Jihua; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2017-03-01

    Reliable determination of binding kinetics and affinity of DNA hybridization and single-base mismatches plays an essential role in systems biology, personalized and precision medicine. The standard tools are optical-based sensors that are difficult to operate in low cost and to miniaturize for high-throughput measurement. Biosensors based on nanowire field-effect transistors have been developed, but reliable and cost-effective fabrication remains a challenge. Here, we demonstrate that a graphene single-crystal domain patterned into multiple channels can measure time- and concentration-dependent DNA hybridization kinetics and affinity reliably and sensitively, with a detection limit of 10 pM for DNA. It can distinguish single-base mutations quantitatively in real time. An analytical model is developed to estimate probe density, efficiency of hybridization and the maximum sensor response. The results suggest a promising future for cost-effective, high-throughput screening of drug candidates, genetic variations and disease biomarkers by using an integrated, miniaturized, all-electrical multiplexed, graphene-based DNA array.

  7. The classical-quantum channel with random state parameters known to the sender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boche, Holger; Cai, Ning; Nötzel, Janis

    2016-05-01

    We study an analog of the well-known Gel’fand Pinsker channel which uses quantum states for the transmission of the data. We consider the case where both the sender’s inputs to the channel and the channel states are to be taken from a finite set (the cq-channel with state information at the sender). We distinguish between causal and non-causal channel state information input by the sender. The receiver remains ignorant, throughout. We give a single-letter description of the capacity in the first case. In the second case we present two different regularized expressions for the capacity. It is an astonishing and unexpected result of our work that a simple change from causal to non-causal channel state information by the encoder causes the complexity of a numerical computation of the capacity formula to change from trivial to seemingly difficult. Still, even the non-single letter formula allows one to draw nontrivial conclusions, for example regarding the continuity of the capacity with respect to changes in the system parameters. The direct parts of both coding theorems are based on a special class of positive operator valued measurements (POVMs) which are derived from orthogonal projections onto certain representations of the symmetric groups. This approach supports a reasoning that is inspired by the classical method of types. In combination with the non-commutative union bound these POVMs yield an elegant method of proof for the direct part of the coding theorem in the first case.

  8. Slag condensation kinetics in the channel of an MHD generator: Explosive condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukhovitskii, D.I.; Khrapak, A.G.; Yakubov, I.T.

    1983-09-01

    A study has been made of the bulk condensation of the inorganic part of combustion products in the channel of an MHD generator. An analytic solution has been obtained to the equations describing the process. A physical interpretation is given for the various stages. It is known that the condensation consists of several slightly overlapping stages. First there is the explosive formation of nuclei, which then grow rapidly, and a quasistationary stage of condensation sets in. A calculation is performed for particular conditions in an MHD generator.

  9. Kinetic study of the heterogeneous photocatalysis of porous nanocrystalline TiO₂ assemblies using a continuous random walk simulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoshun; Zhao, Xiujian

    2014-10-28

    The continuous time random walk (CTRW) simulation was used to study the photocatalytic kinetics of nanocrystalline (nc)-TiO2 assemblies in this research. nc-TiO2 assemblies, such as nc-TiO2 porous films and nc-TiO2 hierarchical structures, are now widely used in photocatalysis. The nc-TiO2 assemblies have quasi-disordered networks consisting of many tiny nanoparticles, so the charge transport within them can be studied by CTRW simulation. We considered the experimental facts that the holes can be quickly trapped and transferred to organic species just after photogeneration, and the electrons transfer to O2 slowly and accumulate in the conduction band of TiO2, which is believed to be the rate-limiting process of the photocatalysis under low light intensity and low organic concentration. Due to the existence of numerous traps, the electron transport within the nc-TiO2 assemblies follows a multi-trapping (MT) mechanism, which significantly limits the electron diffusion speed. The electrons need to undergo several steps of MT transport before transferring to oxygen, so it is highly important that the electron transport in nc-TiO2 networks is determined for standard photocatalytic reactions. Based on the MT transport model, the transient decays of photocurrents during the photocatalytic oxidation of formic acid were studied by CTRW simulation, and are in good accordance with experiments. The steady state photocatalysis was also simulated. The effects of organic concentration, light intensity, temperature, and nc-TiO2 crystallinity on the photocatalytic kinetics were investigated, and were also consistent with the experimental results. Due to the agreement between the simulation and the experiments for both the transient and the steady state photocatalysis, the MT charge transport should be an important mechanism that controls the kinetics of recombination and photocatalysis in nc-TiO2 assemblies. Also, our research provides a new methodology to study the photocatalytic

  10. Carvacrol modulates voltage-gated sodium channels kinetics in dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Joca, Humberto Cavalcante; Vieira, Daiana Cardoso Oliveira; Vasconcelos, Aliny Perreira; Araújo, Demetrius Antônio Machado; Cruz, Jader Santos

    2015-06-05

    Recent studies have shown that many of plant-derived compounds interact with specific ion channels and thereby modulate many sensing mechanisms, such as nociception. The monoterpenoid carvacrol (5-isopropyl-2-methylphenol) has an anti-nociceptive effect related to a reduction in neuronal excitability and voltage-gated Na(+) channels (NaV) inhibition in peripheral neurons. However, the detailed mechanisms of carvacrol-induced inhibition of neuronal NaV remain elusive. This study explores the interaction between carvacrol and NaV in isolated dorsal root ganglia neurons. Carvacrol reduced the total voltage-gated Na(+) current and tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) current component in a concentration-dependent manner. Carvacrol accelerates current inactivation and induced a negative-shift in voltage-dependence of steady-state fast inactivation in total and TTX-R Na(+) current. Furthermore, carvacrol slowed the recovery from inactivation. Carvacrol provoked a leftward shift in both the voltage-dependence of steady-state inactivation and activation of the TTX-R Na(+) current component. In addition, carvacrol-induced inhibition of TTX-R Na(+) current was enhanced by an increase in stimulation frequency and when neurons were pre-conditioned with long depolarization pulse (5s at -50 mV). Taken all results together, we herein demonstrated that carvacrol affects NaV gating properties. The present findings would help to explain the mechanisms underlying the analgesic activity of carvacrol.

  11. Kinetic approach with ab initio MO method on ionic selectivity and size in sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Tani, S; Imamura, A; Kanda, K

    1989-10-23

    Three kinds of models for ionic selectivity and size of the filter in sodium channel have been treated by using ab initio molecular orbital (MO) calculations with MINI-3 and MIDI-3* basis sets. A three-components system, HCO2M-H2O (M = Li+, Na+ or K+), is acceptable for describing experimental facts well. Thermochemical parameters obtained from harmonic vibrational analysis with MINI-3 basis sets, for the translocation of the permeant metal cations in the HCO2M-H2O system, are that the activation enthalpies for Li+, Na+ and K+ are 7.0, 6.4 and 23.4 kJ/mol, and also the free energies of activation are 10.6, 1.5 and 19.0 kJ/mol, respectively. These results are qualitatively in good correspondence with experimental facts of the ion selectivity of the channel. One of water molecule was found to have a key role in the translocation of the permeant cations.

  12. Luminescent oxygen channeling immunoassay: measurement of particle binding kinetics by chemiluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, E F; Kirakossian, H; Singh, S; Wu, Z P; Irvin, B R; Pease, J S; Switchenko, A C; Irvine, J D; Dafforn, A; Skold, C N

    1994-01-01

    A method for monitoring formation of latex particle pairs by chemiluminescence is described. Molecular oxygen is excited by a photosensitizer and an antenna dye that are dissolved in one of the particles. 1 delta gO2 diffuses to the second particle and initiates a high quantum yield chemiluminescent reaction of an olefin that is dissolved in it. The efficiency of 1 delta gO2 transfer between particles is approximately 3.5%. The technique permits real-time measurement of particle binding kinetics. Second-order rate constants increase with the number of receptor binding sites on the particles and approach diffusion control. By using antibody-coated particles, a homogeneous immunoassay capable of detecting approximately 4 amol of thyroid-stimulating hormone in 12 min was demonstrated. Single molecules of analyte produce particle heterodimers that are detected even when no larger aggregates are formed. PMID:8202502

  13. Kinetics and Mechanism of the CIO + CIO Reaction: Pressure and Temperature Dependences of the Bimolecular and Termolecular Channels andThermal Decomposition of Chlorine Peroxide, CIOOCI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickolaisen, Scott L.; Friedl, Randall R.; Sander, Stanley P.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the CIO + CIO reaction and the thermal decomposition of CIOOCI were studied using the flash photolysis/long path ultraviolet absorption technique. Pressure and temperature dependences were determined for the rate coefficients for the bimolecular and termolecular reaction channels, and for the thermal decompositon of CIOOCI.

  14. Silicide/Silicon Heterointerfaces, Reaction Kinetics and Ultra-short Channel Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wei

    Nickel silicide is one of the electrical contact materials widely used on very large scale integration (VLSI) of Si devices in microelectronic industry. This is because the silicide/silicon interface can be formed in a highly controlled manner to ensure reproducibility of optimal structural and electrical properties of the metal-Si contacts. These advantages can be inherited to Si nanowire (NW) field-effect transistors (FET) device. Due to the technological importance of nickel silicides, fundamental materials science of nickel silicides formation (Ni-Si reaction), especially in nanoscale, has raised wide interest and stimulate new insights and understandings. In this dissertation, in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with FET device characterization will be demonstrated as useful tools in nano-device fabrication as well as in gaining insights into the process of nickel silicide formation. The shortest transistor channel length (17 nm) fabricated on a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) grown silicon nanowire (NW) has been demonstrated by controlled reaction with Ni leads on an in-situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) heating stage at a moderate temperature of 400 ºC. NiSi2 is the leading phase, and the silicide-silicon interface is an atomically sharp type-A interface. At such channel lengths, high maximum on-currents of 890 (microA/microm) and a maximum transconductance of 430 (microS/microm) were obtained, which pushes forward the performance of bottom-up Si NW Schottky barrier field-effect transistors (SB-FETs). Through accurate control over the silicidation reaction, we provide a systematic study of channel length dependent carrier transport in a large number of SB-FETs with channel lengths in the range of (17 nm -- 3.6 microm). Our device results corroborate with our transport simulations and reveal a characteristic type of short channel effects in SB-FETs, both in on- and off-state, which is different from that in conventional MOSFETs

  15. Kinetic bottleneck to the self-organization of bidisperse hard disk monolayers formed by random sequential adsorption.

    PubMed

    Doty, R Christopher; Bonnecaze, Roger T; Korgel, Brian A

    2002-06-01

    We study the self-organization of bidisperse mixtures of hard spheres in two dimensions by simulating random sequential adsorption (RSA) of tethered hard disks that undergo limited Monte Carlo surface diffusion. The tethers place a control on the local entropy of the disks by constraining their movement within a specified distance from their original adsorption positions. By tuning the tether length, from zero (the pure RSA process) to infinity (near-equilibrium conditions), the kinetic pathway to monolayer formation can be varied. Previously [J. J. Gray et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 4430 (2000); Langmuir 17, 2317 (2001)], we generated nonequilibrium phase diagrams for size-monodisperse and size-polydisperse hard disks as a function of surface coverage, size distribution, and tether length to reveal the occurrence of hexagonal close-packed, hexatic, and disordered phases. Bidisperse hard disks potentially offer increasingly diverse phase diagrams, with the possible occurrence of spatially and compositionally organized superlattices. Geometric packing calculations anticipate the formation of close-packed lattices in two dimensions for particle size ratios sigma=R(S)/R(L)=0.53, 0.414, and 0.155. The simulations of these systems presented here, however, reveal that RSA kinetics frustrate superlattice ordering, even for infinite tethers. The calculated jamming limits fall well below the minimum surface coverages necessary for stable ordering, as determined by melting simulations.

  16. Kinetics of water filling the hydrophobic channels of narrow carbon nanotubes studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kefei; Zhou, Bo; Xiu, Peng; Qi, Wenpeng; Wan, Rongzheng; Fang, Haiping

    2010-11-01

    The kinetics of water filling narrow single-walled carbon nanotubes was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The time required to fully fill a nanotube was linear with respect to the tube length. We observed that water molecules could enter into nanotubes of different lengths, either from one end or from both ends. The probability of having a nanotube filled completely from both ends increased exponentially with the tube length. For short tubes, filling usually proceeded from only one end. For long tubes, filling generally proceeded from both tube ends over three stages, i.e., filling from one end, filling from both ends, and filling from both ends with the dipole reorientation of water molecules to give a concerted ordering within the fully filled tube. The water molecules in the partially filled nanotube were hydrogen bonded similarly to those in the fully filled nanotube. Simulations for the reference Lennard-Jones fluid without hydrogen bonds were also performed and showed that the filling behavior of water molecules can be attributed to strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding.

  17. Modification of light transmission channels by inhomogeneous absorption in random media.

    PubMed

    Liew, Seng Fatt; Cao, Hui

    2015-05-04

    Optical absorption is omnipresent and often distributed non-uniformly in space. We present a numerical study on the effects of inhomogeneous absorption on transmission eigenchannels of light in highly scattering media. In the weak absorption regime, the spatial profile of a transmission channel remains similar to that without absorption, and the effect of inhomogeneous absorption can be stronger or weaker than homogeneous absorption depending on the spatial overlap of the localized absorbing region with the field intensity maximum of the channel. In the strong absorption regime, the high transmission channels redirect the energy flows to circumvent the absorbing regions to minimize loss. The attenuation of high transmission channels by inhomogeneous absorption is lower than that by homogeneous absorption, regardless of the location of the absorbing region. The statistical distribution of transmission eigenvalues in the former becomes broader than that in the latter, due to a longer tail at high transmission. The maximum enhancement factor of total transmission increases with absorption, eventually exceeds that without absorption.

  18. Variational perturbation and extended Plefka approaches to dynamics on random networks: the case of the kinetic Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachschmid-Romano, L.; Battistin, C.; Opper, M.; Roudi, Y.

    2016-10-01

    We describe and analyze some novel approaches for studying the dynamics of Ising spin glass models. We first briefly consider the variational approach based on minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between independent trajectories and the real ones and note that this approach only coincides with the mean field equations from the saddle point approximation to the generating functional when the dynamics is defined through a logistic link function, which is the case for the kinetic Ising model with parallel update. We then spend the rest of the paper developing two ways of going beyond the saddle point approximation to the generating functional. In the first one, we develop a variational perturbative approximation to the generating functional by expanding the action around a quadratic function of the local fields and conjugate local fields whose parameters are optimized. We derive analytical expressions for the optimal parameters and show that when the optimization is suitably restricted, we recover the mean field equations that are exact for the fully asymmetric random couplings (Mézard and Sakellariou 2011 J. Stat. Mech. 2011 L07001). However, without this restriction the results are different. We also describe an extended Plefka expansion in which in addition to the magnetization, we also fix the correlation and response functions. Finally, we numerically study the performance of these approximations for Sherrington-Kirkpatrick type couplings for various coupling strengths and the degrees of coupling symmetry, for both temporally constant but random, as well as time varying external fields. We show that the dynamical equations derived from the extended Plefka expansion outperform the others in all regimes, although it is computationally more demanding. The unconstrained variational approach does not perform well in the small coupling regime, while it approaches dynamical TAP equations of (Roudi and Hertz 2011 J. Stat. Mech. 2011 P03031) for strong couplings.

  19. Integration of biological kinetics and computational fluid dynamics to model the growth of Nannochloropsis salina in an open channel raceway.

    PubMed

    Park, Stephen; Li, Yebo

    2015-05-01

    Microalgal growth and systemic productivity is not only affected by environmental conditions such as temperature, irradiance, and nutrient concentrations, but also by physical processes such as fluid flow and particulate sedimentation. Modeling and simulating the system is a cost-effective way to predict the growth behavior under various environmental and physical conditions while determining effective engineering approaches to maximize productivity. Many mathematical models have been proposed to describe microalgal growth, while computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been used to model the behavior of many fluid systems. Integrating the growth kinetics into a CFD model can help researchers understand the impact of a variety of parameters and determine what measures can be taken to overcome some obstacles in the aquaculture industry--self-shading, biomass sedimentation, and contamination--which prevent the production of high biomass yields. The aim of this study was to integrate physical and environmental effects to predict space- and time-dependent algal growth in industrial scale raceways. A commercial CFD software, ANSYS-Fluent 14.5, was used to solve the proposed models in regards to fluid flow, heat transfer, and nutrient balance. User-defined functions written in C language were used to incorporate the kinetic equations into a three-dimensional standard k-ε turbulence model of an open channel raceway system driven by a single paddlewheel. Simulated results were compared with light intensity, temperature, nutrient concentration, and algal biomass data acquired for 56 day from an industrial scale raceway pond constructed for the growth of Nannochloropsis salina and were observed to be in good agreement with one another. There was up to a 17.6% increase in simulated productivity when the incoming CO2 concentration was increased from 0.0006 to 0.150 g L(-1), while the effect of paddlewheel velocity was not significant. Sensitivity analysis showed that the model

  20. Channel-opening kinetic mechanism for human wild-type GluK2 and the M867I mutant kainate receptor.

    PubMed

    Han, Yan; Wang, Congzhou; Park, Jae Seon; Niu, Li

    2010-11-02

    GluK2 is a kainate receptor subunit that is alternatively spliced at the C-terminus. Previous studies implicated GluK2 in autism. In particular, the methionine-to-isoleucine replacement at amino acid residue 867 (M867I) that can only occur in the longest isoform of the human GluK2 (hGluK2), as the disease (autism) mutation, is thought to cause gain-of-function. However, the kinetic properties of the wild-type hGluK2 and the functional consequence of this gain-of-function mutation at the molecular level are not well understood. To investigate whether the M867I mutation affects the channel properties of the human GluK2 kainate receptor, we have systematically characterized the rate and the equilibrium constants pertinent to channel opening and channel desensitization for this mutant and the wild-type hGluK2 receptor, along with the wild-type rat GluK2 kainate receptor (rGluK2) as the control. Our results show that the M867I mutation does not affect either the rate or the equilibrium constants of the channel opening but does slow down the channel desensitization rate by ~1.6-fold at saturating glutamate concentrations. It is possible that a consequence of this mutation on the desensitization rate is linked to facilitating the receptor trafficking and membrane expression, given the close proximity of M867 to the forward trafficking motif in the C-terminal sequence. By comparing the kinetic data of the wild-type human and rat GluK2 receptors, we also find that the human GluK2 has a ~3-fold smaller channel-opening rate constant but an identical channel-closing rate constant and thus a channel-opening probability of 0.85 vs 0.96 for rGluK2. Furthermore, the intrinsic equilibrium dissociation constant K(1) for hGluK2, like the EC(50) value, is ~2-fold lower than rGluK2. Our results therefore suggest that the human GluK2 is relatively a slowly activating channel but more sensitive to glutamate, as compared to the rat ortholog, despite the fact that the human and rat forms

  1. Conformational Changes in Alamethicin Associated with Substitution of Its α-Methylalanines with Leucines: A FTIR Spectroscopic Analysis and Correlation with Channel Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Haris, Parvez I.; Molle, Gérard; Duclohier, Hervé

    2004-01-01

    Alamethicin, a 20 residue-long peptaibol remains a favorite high voltage-dependent channel-forming peptide. However, the structural significance of its abundant noncoded residues (α-methylalanine or Aib) for its ion channel activity remains unknown, although a previous study showed that replacement of all Aib residues with leucines preserved the essential channel behavior except for much faster single-channel events. To correlate these functional properties with structural data, here we compare the secondary structures of an alamethicin derivative where all the eight Aibs were replaced by leucines and the native alamethicin. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of these peptides were recorded in methanol and in aqueous phospholipid membranes. Results obtained show a significant conformational change in alamethicin upon substitution of its Aib residues with Leu. The amide I band occurs at a lower frequency for the Leu-derivative indicating that its α-helices are involved in stronger hydrogen-bonding. In addition, the structure of the Leu-derivative is quite sensitive to membrane fluidity changes. The amide I band shifts to higher frequencies when the lipids are in the fluid phase. This indicates either a decreased solvation due to a more complete peptide insertion or a peptide stretching to match the full thickness of the bilayer. These results contribute to explain the fast single-channel kinetics displayed by the Leu-derivative. PMID:14695266

  2. Kinetics of PIP2 metabolism and KCNQ2/3 channel regulation studied with a voltage-sensitive phosphatase in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Falkenburger, Björn H.; Jensen, Jill B.

    2010-01-01

    The signaling phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is synthesized in two steps from phosphatidylinositol by lipid kinases. It then interacts with KCNQ channels and with pleckstrin homology (PH) domains among many other physiological protein targets. We measured and developed a quantitative description of these metabolic and protein interaction steps by perturbing the PIP2 pool with a voltage-sensitive phosphatase (VSP). VSP can remove the 5-phosphate of PIP2 with a time constant of τ <300 ms and fully inhibits KCNQ currents in a similar time. PIP2 was then resynthesized from phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP) quickly, τ = 11 s. In contrast, resynthesis of PIP2 after activation of phospholipase C by muscarinic receptors took ∼130 s. These kinetic experiments showed that (1) PIP2 activation of KCNQ channels obeys a cooperative square law, (2) the PIP2 residence time on channels is <10 ms and the exchange time on PH domains is similarly fast, and (3) the step synthesizing PIP2 by PIP 5-kinase is fast and limited primarily by a step(s) that replenishes the pool of plasma membrane PI(4)P. We extend the kinetic model for signaling from M1 muscarinic receptors, presented in our companion paper in this issue (Falkenburger et al. 2010. J. Gen. Physiol. doi:10.1085/jgp.200910344), with this new information on PIP2 synthesis and KCNQ interaction. PMID:20100891

  3. Gβ₂ mimics activation kinetic slowing of CaV2.2 channels by noradrenaline in rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Castellanos, Juan M; Vivas, Oscar; Garduño, Julieta; De la Cruz, Lizbeth; Arenas, Isabel; Elías-Viñas, David; Mackie, Ken; García, David E

    2014-02-28

    Several neurotransmitters and hormones acting through G protein-coupled receptors elicit a voltage-dependent regulation of CaV2.2 channels, having profound effects on cell function and the organism. It has been hypothesized that protein-protein interactions define specificity in signal transduction. Yet it is unknown how the molecular interactions in an intracellular signaling cascade determine the specificity of the voltage-dependent regulation induced by a specific neurotransmitter. It has been suspected that specific effector regions on the Gβ subunits of the G proteins are responsible for voltage-dependent regulation. The present study examines whether a neurotransmitter's specificity can be revealed by simple ion-current kinetic analysis likely resulting from interactions between Gβ subunits and the channel-molecule. Noradrenaline is a neurotransmitter that induces voltage-dependent regulation. By using biochemical and patch-clamp methods in rat sympathetic neurons we examined calcium current modulation induced by each of the five Gβ subunits and found that Gβ2 mimics activation kinetic slowing of CaV2.2 channels by noradrenaline. Furthermore, overexpression of the Gβ2 isoform reproduces the effect of noradrenaline in the willing-reluctant model. These results advance our understanding on the mechanisms by which signals conveying from a variety of membrane receptors are able to display precise homeostatic responses.

  4. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics – Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-01-01

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle’s Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas. PMID:27160346

  5. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics - Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-05-10

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle's Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas.

  6. Transcranial random noise stimulation-induced plasticity is NMDA-receptor independent but sodium-channel blocker and benzodiazepines sensitive

    PubMed Central

    Chaieb, Leila; Antal, Andrea; Paulus, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Background: Application of transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) between 0.1 and 640 Hz of the primary motor cortex (M1) for 10 min induces a persistent excitability increase lasting for at least 60 min. However, the mechanism of tRNS-induced cortical excitability alterations is not yet fully understood. Objective: The main aim of this study was to get first efficacy data with regard to the possible neuronal effect of tRNS. Methods: Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to measure levels of cortical excitability before and after combined application of tRNS at an intensity of 1 mA for 10 min stimulation duration and a pharmacological agent (or sham) on eight healthy male participants. Results: The sodium channel blocker carbamazepine showed a tendency toward inhibiting MEPs 5–60 min poststimulation. The GABAA agonist lorazepam suppressed tRNS-induced cortical excitability increases at 0–20 and 60 min time points. The partial NMDA receptor agonist D-cycloserine, the NMDA receptor antagonist dextromethorphan and the D2/D3 receptor agonist ropinirole had no significant effects on the excitability increases seen with tRNS. Conclusions: In contrast to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), aftereffects of tRNS are seem to be not NMDA receptor dependent and can be suppressed by benzodiazepines suggesting that tDCS and tRNS depend upon different mechanisms. PMID:25914617

  7. Two distinct voltage-sensing domains control voltage sensitivity and kinetics of current activation in CaV1.1 calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Tuluc, Petronel; Benedetti, Bruno; Coste de Bagneaux, Pierre; Grabner, Manfred; Flucher, Bernhard E

    2016-06-01

    Alternative splicing of the skeletal muscle CaV1.1 voltage-gated calcium channel gives rise to two channel variants with very different gating properties. The currents of both channels activate slowly; however, insertion of exon 29 in the adult splice variant CaV1.1a causes an ∼30-mV right shift in the voltage dependence of activation. Existing evidence suggests that the S3-S4 linker in repeat IV (containing exon 29) regulates voltage sensitivity in this voltage-sensing domain (VSD) by modulating interactions between the adjacent transmembrane segments IVS3 and IVS4. However, activation kinetics are thought to be determined by corresponding structures in repeat I. Here, we use patch-clamp analysis of dysgenic (CaV1.1 null) myotubes reconstituted with CaV1.1 mutants and chimeras to identify the specific roles of these regions in regulating channel gating properties. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the structure and/or hydrophobicity of the IVS3-S4 linker is critical for regulating voltage sensitivity in the IV VSD, but by itself cannot modulate voltage sensitivity in the I VSD. Swapping sequence domains between the I and the IV VSDs reveals that IVS4 plus the IVS3-S4 linker is sufficient to confer CaV1.1a-like voltage dependence to the I VSD and that the IS3-S4 linker plus IS4 is sufficient to transfer CaV1.1e-like voltage dependence to the IV VSD. Any mismatch of transmembrane helices S3 and S4 from the I and IV VSDs causes a right shift of voltage sensitivity, indicating that regulation of voltage sensitivity by the IVS3-S4 linker requires specific interaction of IVS4 with its corresponding IVS3 segment. In contrast, slow current kinetics are perturbed by any heterologous sequences inserted into the I VSD and cannot be transferred by moving VSD I sequences to VSD IV. Thus, CaV1.1 calcium channels are organized in a modular manner, and control of voltage sensitivity and activation kinetics is accomplished by specific molecular mechanisms

  8. Combinations of olmesartan and a calcium channel blocker or a diuretic in elderly hypertensive patients: a randomized, controlled trial1

    PubMed Central

    Ogihara, Toshio; Saruta, Takao; Rakugi, Hiromi; Saito, Ikuo; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Matsuoka, Hiroaki; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Ito, Sadayoshi; Horiuchi, Masatsugu; Imaizumi, Tsutomu; Takishita, Shuichi; Higaki, Jitsuo; Katayama, Shigehiro; Kimura, Genjiroh; Umemura, Satoshi; Ura, Nobuyuki; Hayashi, Koichi; Odawara, Masato; Tanahashi, Norio; Ishimitsu, Toshihiko; Kashihara, Naoki; Morita, Satoshi; Teramukai, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare the cardiovascular effects of olmesartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker, combined with a calcium channel blocker (CCB) or a diuretic, in a prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded endpoint trial. Methods: Japanese hypertensive patients aged at least 65 to less than 85 years with SBP at least 140 mmHg and/or DBP at least 90 mmHg with antihypertensive treatment, or SBP at least 160 mmHg and/or DBP at least 100 mmHg without antihypertensive treatment were randomized to receive olmesartan with either a dihydropyridine CCB or a low-dose diuretic. If SBP and/or DBP remained at least 140 and/or at least 90 mmHg, the other antihypertensive drug was added. The primary endpoint was a composite of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events. The median follow-up time was 3.3 years. Results: Blood pressure decreased similarly in both groups. The primary endpoint occurred in 116/2568 patients (4.5%) in the olmesartan plus CCB group and in 135/2573 patients (5.3%) in the olmesartan plus diuretic group [hazard ratio 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.65–1.07, P = 0.16]. Rates of all-cause death and cardiovascular deaths were similar. Among patients aged at least 75 years, the incidence of stroke tended to be lower in the olmesartan plus CCB group than in the olmesartan plus diuretic group (hazard ratio 0.63, 95% CI 0.38–1.02, P = 0.059, interaction P = 0.019). Fewer patients in the olmesartan plus CCB group (8.2%, 211/2568) than in the olmesartan plus diuretic group (9.8%, 253/2573; P = 0.046) experienced serious adverse events. Conclusion: Despite no significant difference in cardiovascular events, the different safety profiles suggest that the combination of olmesartan and CCB may be preferable to that of olmesartan and diuretic. PMID:24999799

  9. Kv3.1/Kv3.2 channel positive modulators enable faster activating kinetics and increase firing frequency in fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Boddum, Kim; Hougaard, Charlotte; Xiao-Ying Lin, Julie; von Schoubye, Nadia Lybøl; Jensen, Henrik Sindal; Grunnet, Morten; Jespersen, Thomas

    2017-02-24

    Due to their fast kinetic properties, Kv3.1 voltage gated potassium channels are important in setting and controlling firing frequency in neurons and pivotal in generating high frequency firing of interneurons. Pharmacological activation of Kv3.1 channels may possess therapeutic potential for treatment of epilepsy, hearing disorders, schizophrenia and cognitive impairments. Here we thoroughly investigate the selectivity and positive modulation of the two small molecules, EX15 and RE01, on Kv3 channels. Selectivity studies, conducted in Xenopus laevis oocytes confirmed a positive modulatory effect of the two compounds on Kv3.1 and to a minor extent on Kv3.2 channels. RE01 had no effect on the Kv3.3 and Kv3.4 channels, whereas EX15 had an inhibitory impact on the Kv3.4 mediated current. Voltage-clamp experiments in monoclonal hKv3.1b/HEK293 cells (34 °C) revealed that the two compounds indeed induced larger currents and faster activation kinetics. They also decrease the speed of deactivation and shifted the voltage dependence of activation, to a more negative activation threshold. Application of action potential clamping and repetitive stimulation protocols of hKv3.1b expressing HEK293 cells revealed that EX15 and RE01 significantly increased peak amplitude, half width and decay time of Kv3.1 mediated currents, even during high-frequency action potential clamping (250 Hz). In rat hippocampal slices, EX15 and RE01 increased neuronal excitability in fast-spiking interneurons in dentate gyrus. Action potential frequency was prominently increased at minor depolarizing steps, whereas more marginal effects of EX15 and RE01 were observed after stronger depolarizations. In conclusion, our results suggest that EX15 and RE01 positive modulation of Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 currents facilitate increased firing frequency in fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons.

  10. A tapered channel microfluidic device for comprehensive cell adhesion analysis, using measurements of detachment kinetics and shear stress-dependent motion.

    PubMed

    Rupprecht, Peter; Golé, Laurent; Rieu, Jean-Paul; Vézy, Cyrille; Ferrigno, Rosaria; Mertani, Hichem C; Rivière, Charlotte

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a method for studying cellular adhesion by using a custom-designed microfluidic device with parallel non-connected tapered channels. The design enables investigation of cellular responses to a large range of shear stress (ratio of 25) with a single input flow-rate. For each shear stress, a large number of cells are analyzed (500-1500 cells), providing statistically relevant data within a single experiment. Besides adhesion strength measurements, the microsystem presented in this paper enables in-depth analysis of cell detachment kinetics by real-time videomicroscopy. It offers the possibility to analyze adhesion-associated processes, such as migration or cell shape change, within the same experiment. To show the versatility of our device, we examined quantitatively cell adhesion by analyzing kinetics, adhesive strength and migration behaviour or cell shape modifications of the unicellular model cell organism Dictyostelium discoideum at 21 °C and of the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 at 37 °C. For both cell types, we found that the threshold stresses, which are necessary to detach the cells, follow lognormal distributions, and that the detachment process follows first order kinetics. In addition, for particular conditions' cells are found to exhibit similar adhesion threshold stresses, but very different detachment kinetics, revealing the importance of dynamics analysis to fully describe cell adhesion. With its rapid implementation and potential for parallel sample processing, such microsystem offers a highly controllable platform for exploring cell adhesion characteristics in a large set of environmental conditions and cell types, and could have wide applications across cell biology, tissue engineering, and cell screening.

  11. Fuzzy [Formula: see text] output-feedback control for the discrete-time system with channel fadings, sector nonlinearities, and randomly occurring interval delays and nonlinearities.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaozheng; Wang, Yan; Hu, Manfeng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the fuzzy [Formula: see text] output-feedback control problem is investigated for a class of discrete-time T-S fuzzy systems with channel fadings, sector nonlinearities, randomly occurring interval delays (ROIDs) and randomly occurring nonlinearities (RONs). A series of variables of the randomly occurring phenomena obeying the Bernoulli distribution is used to govern ROIDs and RONs. Meanwhile, the measurement outputs are subject to the sector nonlinearities (i.e. the sensor saturations) and we assume the system output is [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]. The Lth-order Rice model is utilized to describe the phenomenon of channel fadings by setting different values of the channel coefficients. The aim of this work is to deal with the problem of designing a full-order dynamic fuzzy [Formula: see text] output-feedback controller such that the fuzzy closed-loop system is exponentially mean-square stable and the [Formula: see text] performance constraint is satisfied, by means of a combination of Lyapunov stability theory and stochastic analysis along with LMI methods. The proposed fuzzy controller parameters are derived by solving a convex optimization problem via the semidefinite programming technique. Finally, a numerical simulation is given to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed design technique.

  12. A stochastic study of electron transfer kinetics in nano-particulate photocatalysis: a comparison of the quasi-equilibrium approximation with a random walking model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoshun; Zhao, Xiujian; Yu, Jiaguo; Fujishima, Akira; Nakata, Kazuya

    2016-11-23

    In the photocatalysis of porous nano-crystalline materials, the transfer of electrons to O2 plays an important role, which includes the electron transport to photocatalytic active centers and successive interfacial transfer to O2. The slowest of them will determine the overall speed of electron transfer in the photocatalysis reaction. Considering the photocatalysis of porous nano-crystalline TiO2 as an example, although some experimental results have shown that the electron kinetics are limited by the interfacial transfer, we still lack the depth of understanding the microscopic mechanism from a theoretical viewpoint. In the present research, a stochastic quasi-equilibrium (QE) theoretical model and a stochastic random walking (RW) model were established to discuss the electron transport and electron interfacial transfer by taking the electron multi-trapping transport and electron interfacial transfer from the photocatalytic active centers to O2 into consideration. By carefully investigating the effect of the electron Fermi level (EF) and the photocatalytic center number on electron transport, we showed that the time taken for an electron to transport to a photocatalytic center predicated by the stochastic RW model was much lower than that predicted by the stochastic QE model, indicating that the electrons cannot reach a QE state during their transport to photocatalytic centers. The stochastic QE model predicted that the electron kinetics of a real photocatalysis for porous nano-crystalline TiO2 should be limited by electron transport, whereas the stochastic RW model showed that the electron kinetics of a real photocatalysis can be limited by the interfacial transfer. Our simulation results show that the stochastic RW model was more in line with the real electron kinetics that have been observed in experiments, therefore it is concluded that the photoinduced electrons cannot reach a QE state before transferring to O2.

  13. Kinetics of binding of dihydropyridine calcium channel ligands to skeletal muscle membranes: Evidence for low-affinity sites and for the involvement of G proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, S.M.J.; Bladen, C. )

    1991-06-11

    Detailed kinetic studies of the binding of the calcium channel antagonist (+)-({sup 3}H)PN200-110 to membrane preparations form rabbit skeletal muscle have demonstrated that, in addition to the high-affinity sites that are readily measured in equilibrium and kinetic experiments, there are also dihydropyridine binding sites with much lower affinities. These sites were detected by the ability of micromolar concentrations of several dihydropyridines to accelerate the rate of dissociation of (+)-({sup 3}H)PN200-110 from its high-affinity sites. The observed increase in rate was dependent on the concentration of competing ligand, and half-maximal effects occurred at approximately 10 {mu}M for the agonist ({plus minus})-Bay K8644 and for the antagonists nifedipine, ({plus minus})-nitrendipine, and (+)-PN200-110. The low-affinity sites appear to be stereospecific since ({minus})-PN200-110 (1-200 {mu}M) did not affect the dissociation rate. The possible involvement of guanine nucleotide binding proteins in dihydropyridine binding has been investigated by studying the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP{gamma}S) and guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP{beta}S) on binding parameters. GTP{gamma}S did increase the ability of ({plus minus})-({sup 3}H)PN200-110. These results suggest that skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptors have low-affinity binding sites that may be involved in the regulation of calcium channel function and that activation of a guanine nucleotide binding protein may modulate the binding of agonists but not of antagonists to these sites.

  14. Mechanistic insights from resolving ligand-dependent kinetics of conformational changes at ATP-gated P2X1R ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Fryatt, Alistair G.; Dayl, Sudad; Cullis, Paul M.; Schmid, Ralf; Evans, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Structural studies of P2X receptors show a novel U shaped ATP orientation following binding. We used voltage clamp fluorometry (VCF) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate agonist action. For VCF the P2X1 receptor (P2X1R) K190C mutant (adjacent to the agonist binding pocket) was labelled with the fluorophore MTS-TAMRA and changes in fluorescence on agonist treatment provided a real time measure of conformational changes. Studies with heteromeric channels incorporating a key lysine mutation (K68A) in the ATP binding site demonstrate that normally three molecules of ATP activate the receptor. The time-course of VCF responses to ATP, 2′-deoxy ATP, 3′-deoxy ATP, Ap5A and αβmeATP were agonist dependent. Comparing the properties of the deoxy forms of ATP demonstrated the importance of the 2′ hydroxyl group on the ribose ring in determining agonist efficacy consistent with MD simulations showing that it forms a hydrogen bond with the γ-phosphate oxygen stabilizing the U-shaped conformation. Comparison of the recovery of fluorescence on agonist washout, with channel activation to a second agonist application for the partial agonists Ap5A and αβmeATP, showed a complex relationship between conformational change and desensitization. These results highlight that different agonists induce distinct conformational changes, kinetics and recovery from desensitization at P2X1Rs. PMID:27616669

  15. An ab initio/rice--Ramsperger--Kassel--Marcus study of the reactions of propenols with OH. Mechanism and kinetics of H abstraction channels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Mebel, Alexander M; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2009-10-08

    Propenols have been found to be common intermediates in the hydrocarbon combustion and they are present in substantial concentrations in a wide range of flames. However, the kinetics properties of these species in combustion flames have not received much attention. In this work, the mechanism and kinetics of the OH hydrogen abstraction from propenols are investigated. Three stable conformations of propenols, (E)-1-propenol, (Z)-1-propenol, and syn-propen-2-ol, are taken into consideration. The potential energy profiles for the three reaction systems have been first investigated by the CCSD(T) method. The geometric parameters and relative energies of the reactants, reactant complexes, transition states, product complexes, and products have been investigated theoretically. The rate constants are calculated in the temperature range of 200-3000 K by the Variflex code based on the weak collision master equation/microcanonical variational RRKM theory. For all considered reactions, our results support a stepwise mechanism involving the formation of a reactant complex in the entrance channel and a product complex in the exit channel. In the reaction of OH with (E)-1-propenol, the hydrogen abstractions from the -CH(3) and -OH sites are dominant and competitive with each other in the temperature range from 500 to 2000 K. Above 2000 K, the hydrogen abstraction from the -CH group bonded to O atom becomes dominant with a relative yield of 51.1% at 3000 K. In the reaction of OH with (Z)-1-propenol, the hydrogen abstractions from -CH(3), -CH bonded to O atom, and -OH are preferable in the temperature range from 500 to 1800 K, with the first two channels being competitive with each other. Above 1800 K, the hydrogen abstraction reaction from the CH group bonded to the CH(3) group becomes dominant with the branching ratio of 90.3% at 3000 K. In the reaction of OH with syn-propen-2-ol, the abstractions from the -CH(3) and -OH sites are competitive with each other when the temperature

  16. PKA phosphorylation reshapes the pharmacological kinetics of BmK AS, a unique site-4 sodium channel-specific modulator

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Z. R.; Zhang, H.; Wu, J. Q.; Zhou, J. J.; Ji, Y. H.

    2014-01-01

    Although modulation of the activity of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) by protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation has been investigated in multiple preparations, the pharmacological sensitivity of VGSCs to scorpion toxins after PKA phosphorylation has rarely been approached. In this study, the effects of BmK AS, a sodium channel-specific modulator from Chinese scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, on the voltage-dependent activation and inactivation of Nav1.2 were examined before and after PKA activation. After PKA phosphorylation, the pattern of dose-dependent modulation of BmK AS, on both Nav1.2α and Nav1.2 (α + β1) was reshaped. Meanwhile, the shifts in voltage-dependency of activation and inactivation induced by BmK AS were attenuated. The results suggested that PKA might play a role in different patterns how β-like toxins such as BmK AS modulate gating properties and peak currents of VGSCs. PMID:24430351

  17. Isotope partitioning for NAD-malic enzyme from Ascaris suum confirms a steady-state random kinetic mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.Y.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F.

    1988-01-12

    Isotope partitioning studies beginning with E-(/sup 14/C)NAD, E-(/sup 14/C) malate, E-(/sup 14/C) NAD-Mg/sup 2 +/, and E-Mg-(/sup 14/C)malate suggest a steady-state random mechanism for the NAD-malic enzyme. Isotope trapping beginning with E-(/sup 14/C)NAD and with varying concentrations of Mg/sup 2 +/ and malate in the chase solution indicates that Mg/sup 2 +/ is added in rapid equilibrium and must be added prior to malate for productive ternary complex formation. Equal percentage trapping from E-(/sup 14/C)NAD-Mg and E-Mg-(/sup 14/C) malate indicates the mechanism is steady-state random with equal off-rates for NAD and malate from E-NAD-Mg-malate. The off-rates for both do not change significantly in the ternary E-Mg-malate and E-NAD-Mg complexes, nor does the off-rate change for NAD from E-NAD. No trapping of malate was obtained from E-(/sup 14/C) malate, suggesting that this complex is nonproductive. A quantitative analysis of the data allows an estimation of values for a number of the rate constants along the reaction pathway.

  18. Random Dopant Threshold Voltage Fluctuations in 50 nm Epitaxial Channel MOSFETs: A 3D 'Atomoc' Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asenov, Asen

    2000-01-01

    3D 'atomistic' simulations are used to study random dopant related threshold voltage fluctuations in 50 nm MOSFETs. Comparisons are made between conventionally doped transistors and transistors with thin epitaxial silicon layers on heavily doped silicon. Issues related to both the optimum threshold voltage control and the suppression of the threshold voltage dispersion are addressed.

  19. Effects of a T-type calcium channel blocker, ABT-639, on spontaneous activity in C-nociceptors in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Serra, Jordi; Duan, W Rachel; Locke, Charles; Solà, Romà; Liu, Wei; Nothaft, Wolfram

    2015-11-01

    T-type calcium channels are a potential novel target for treatment of neuropathic pain such as painful diabetic neuropathy. ABT-639 is a peripherally acting highly selective T-type Ca(v)3.2 calcium channel blocker that has demonstrated analgesic efficacy in preclinical models and may have the potential to reduce spontaneous fiber activity. Microneurography is a unique technique that directly assesses the function of peripheral sensory afferents and measures abnormal spontaneous activity in single peripheral nociceptive C fibers. Abnormal spontaneous activity in C-nociceptors functions as a marker for spontaneous pain, as reduction of this activity could indicate analgesic efficacy. This randomized, double-blind controlled study evaluated the effects of a single 100-mg oral dose of ABT-639, compared with placebo, on abnormal spontaneous activity in peripheral C-nociceptors, measured for the first time by microneurography in adult patients with painful diabetic neuropathy. Lidocaine was included in this study and compared with placebo. Pharmacokinetics and safety of ABT-639 were evaluated. Thirty-nine patients were randomized, and a total of 56 analyzable C-nociceptors with spontaneous activity were identified in 34 patients. There were no significant differences in C-nociceptor activities after ABT-639 treatment vs placebo. Similar findings were observed for lidocaine vs placebo. There were no clinically significant findings in the safety of ABT-639. Further research of T-type Ca(v)3.2 calcium channels as potential treatment targets for painful diabetic neuropathy is warranted. The utilization of microneurography as a means to measure abnormal activity in C-nociceptors in human clinical studies opens new possibilities for future studies of compounds targeting peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01589432.

  20. Random field Ising model with conserved kinetics: Super-universality violation, logarithmic growth law and the generalized Tomita sum rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Banerjee, Varsha; Puri, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    We perform comprehensive Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to study ordering dynamics in the random field Ising model with conserved order parameter (C-RFIM) in d=2,3 . The observations from this study are: a) For a fixed value of the disorder Δ, the correlation function C(r,t;Δ) exhibits dynamical scaling. b) The scaling function is not robust with respect to Δ, i.e., super-universality (SU) is violated by C(r,t;Δ) . c) At early times, the domains follow the algebraic growth with a disorder-dependent exponent: L(t,Δ)∼ t1/\\bar{z(Δ)} . At late times, there is a crossover to logarithmic growth: L(t,Δ) ∼ (\\ln t)1/\\varphi , where φ is a disorder-independent exponent. d) The small-r behavior of the correlation function exhibits a cusp singularity: 1-C(r) ∼ rα(Δ) , where α is the cusp exponent signifying rough fractal interfaces. e) The corresponding structure factor exhibits a non-Porod tail: S(k,t;Δ)∼ k-(d+α) , and obeys a generalized Tomita sum rule \\int_0^∞ {d}p p1-α≤ft[pd+αf(p)-C\\right]=0 , where f(p) is the appropriate scaling function, and C is a constant.

  1. Effects of negative air ions on oxygen uptake kinetics, recovery and performance in exercise: a randomized, double-blinded study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmerichter, Alfred; Holdhaus, Johann; Mehnen, Lars; Vidotto, Claudia; Loidl, Markus; Barker, Alan R.

    2014-09-01

    Limited research has suggested that acute exposure to negatively charged ions may enhance cardio-respiratory function, aerobic metabolism and recovery following exercise. To test the physiological effects of negatively charged air ions, 14 trained males (age: 32 ± 7 years; : 57 ± 7 mL min-1 kg-1) were exposed for 20 min to either a high-concentration of air ions (ION: 220 ± 30 × 103 ions cm-3) or normal room conditions (PLA: 0.1 ± 0.06 × 103 ions cm-3) in an ionization chamber in a double-blinded, randomized order, prior to performing: (1) a bout of severe-intensity cycling exercise for determining the time constant of the phase II response ( τ) and the magnitude of the slow component (SC); and (2) a 30-s Wingate test that was preceded by three 30-s Wingate tests to measure plasma [adrenaline] (ADR), [nor-adrenaline] (N-ADR) and blood [lactate] (BLac) over 20 min during recovery in the ionization chamber. There was no difference between ION and PLA for the phase II τ (32 ± 14 s vs. 32 ± 14 s; P = 0.7) or SC (404 ± 214 mL vs 482 ± 217 mL; P = 0.17). No differences between ION and PLA were observed at any time-point for ADR, N-ADR and BLac as well as on peak and mean power output during the Wingate tests (all P > 0.05). A high-concentration of negatively charged air ions had no effect on aerobic metabolism during severe-intensity exercise or on performance or the recovery of the adrenergic and metabolic responses after repeated-sprint exercise in trained athletes.

  2. Phase transitions in a three-dimensional kinetic spin-1/2 Ising model with random field: effective-field-theory study.

    PubMed

    Costabile, Emanuel; de Sousa, J Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The dynamical phase transitions of the kinetic Ising model in the presence of a random magnetic field with a bimodal probability distribution is studied by using effective-field theory (EFT) with correlations. We have used a Glauber-type stochastic dynamic to describe the time evolution of the system, where the system strongly depends on the H≡√(c) root mean square deviation of the magnetic field. The EFT dynamic equation is given for the simple cubic lattice (z=6), and the dynamic order parameter is calculated. The system presents ferromagnetic and paramagnetic states for low and high temperatures, respectively. Our results predict first-order transitions at low temperatures and large disorder strengths, which corresponds to the existence of a nonequilibrium tricritical point (TCP) in a phase diagram in the T-H plane. We compare the results with the equilibrium phase diagram, where only the first-order line is different. Our qualitative results are compatible with recent Monte Carlo simulations.

  3. Effects of TRP channel agonist ingestion on metabolism and autonomic nervous system in a randomized clinical trial of healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Michlig, Stéphanie; Merlini, Jenny Meylan; Beaumont, Maurice; Ledda, Mirko; Tavenard, Aude; Mukherjee, Rajat; Camacho, Susana; le Coutre, Johannes

    2016-02-17

    Various lines of published evidence have already demonstrated the impact of TRPV1 agonists on energetic metabolism through the stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). This study presents a trial investigating if stimulation of the two related sensory receptors TRPA1 and TRPM8 could also stimulate the SNS and impact the energetic metabolism of healthy subjects. The trial was designed to be double-blinded, randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled with healthy subjects and the impact on the energetic metabolism and the autonomic nervous system (ANS) of cinnamaldehyde, capsaicin and a cooling flavor was measured during the 90 min after ingestion. Energy expenditure and substrate oxidation were measured by indirect calorimetry. An exploratory method to measure ANS activity was by facial thermography and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability using ECG was also used. Following cinnamaldehyde ingestion, energy expenditure was increased as compared to placebo. Furthermore, postprandial fat oxidation was maintained higher compared to placebo after cinnamaldehyde and capsaicin ingestion. Similar peripheral thermoregulation was observed after capsaicin and cinnamaldehyde ingestion. Unlike capsaicin, the dose of cinnamaldehyde was not judged to be sensorially 'too intense' by participants suggesting that Cinnamaldehyde would be a more tolerable solution to improve thermogenesis via spicy ingredients as compared to capsaicin.

  4. Effects of TRP channel agonist ingestion on metabolism and autonomic nervous system in a randomized clinical trial of healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Michlig, Stéphanie; Merlini, Jenny Meylan; Beaumont, Maurice; Ledda, Mirko; Tavenard, Aude; Mukherjee, Rajat; Camacho, Susana; le Coutre, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Various lines of published evidence have already demonstrated the impact of TRPV1 agonists on energetic metabolism through the stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). This study presents a trial investigating if stimulation of the two related sensory receptors TRPA1 and TRPM8 could also stimulate the SNS and impact the energetic metabolism of healthy subjects. The trial was designed to be double-blinded, randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled with healthy subjects and the impact on the energetic metabolism and the autonomic nervous system (ANS) of cinnamaldehyde, capsaicin and a cooling flavor was measured during the 90 min after ingestion. Energy expenditure and substrate oxidation were measured by indirect calorimetry. An exploratory method to measure ANS activity was by facial thermography and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability using ECG was also used. Following cinnamaldehyde ingestion, energy expenditure was increased as compared to placebo. Furthermore, postprandial fat oxidation was maintained higher compared to placebo after cinnamaldehyde and capsaicin ingestion. Similar peripheral thermoregulation was observed after capsaicin and cinnamaldehyde ingestion. Unlike capsaicin, the dose of cinnamaldehyde was not judged to be sensorially ‘too intense’ by participants suggesting that Cinnamaldehyde would be a more tolerable solution to improve thermogenesis via spicy ingredients as compared to capsaicin. PMID:26883089

  5. Renoprotective effect of calcium channel blockers in combination with an angiotensin receptor blocker in elderly patients with hypertension. A randomized crossover trial between benidipine and amlodipine.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Koichi; Dohi, Yasuaki; Nakazawa, Ai; Sugiura, Tomonori; Yamashita, Sumiyo; Sato, Koichi; Kimura, Genjiro

    2010-01-01

    Anti-hypertensive medication with an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) is effective in slowing the progression of chronic kidney disease. The present study was designed to investigate whether calcium channel blockers (CCBs) in combination with an ARB differentially affect kidney function. Elderly hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease (n = 17, 72 +/- 6 years old) were instructed to self-measure blood pressure. They were randomly assigned to receive either benidipine (4-8 mg/day) or amlodipine (5-10 mg/day) combined with olmesartan (10 mg/day). After 3 months, CCBs were switched in each patient and the same protocol was applied for another 3 months. At baseline, significant correlation was obtained between urine albumin (22.8 +/- 16.7 (median +/- median absolute deviation) mg/g creatinine) and self-measured blood pressure (170 +/- 23/87 +/- 10 (mean +/- SD) mmHg, r = 0.65, p < 0.01). Both regimens reduced blood pressure to a similar extent (139 +/- 22/75 +/- 11 mmHg and 133 +/- 17/72 +/- 10 mmHg, respectively; both p < 0.001), while urine albumin decreased only after combination therapy including benidipine (11.7 +/- 6.1 mg/g creatinine, p < 0.05). Benidipine, but not amlodipine, in combination with olmesartan, reduced urinary albumin excretion in elderly hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease. The results suggest the importance of selecting medications used in combination with ARB in hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease.

  6. Effect of mastication on lipid bioaccessibility of almonds in a randomized human study and its implications for digestion kinetics, metabolizable energy, and postprandial lipemia1234

    PubMed Central

    Grundy, Myriam ML; Grassby, Terri; Mandalari, Giuseppina; Waldron, Keith W; Butterworth, Peter J; Berry, Sarah EE

    2015-01-01

    Background: The particle size and structure of masticated almonds have a significant impact on nutrient release (bioaccessibility) and digestion kinetics. Objectives: The goals of this study were to quantify the effects of mastication on the bioaccessibility of intracellular lipid of almond tissue and examine microstructural characteristics of masticated almonds. Design: In a randomized, subject-blind, crossover trial, 17 healthy subjects chewed natural almonds (NAs) or roasted almonds (RAs) in 4 separate mastication sessions. Particle size distributions (PSDs) of the expectorated boluses were measured by using mechanical sieving and laser diffraction (primary outcome). The microstructure of masticated almonds, including the structural integrity of the cell walls (i.e., dietary fiber), was examined with microscopy. Lipid bioaccessibility was predicted by using a theoretical model, based on almond particle size and cell dimensions, and then compared with empirically derived release data. Results: Intersubject variations (n = 15; 2 subjects withdrew) in PSDs of both NA and RA samples were small (e.g., laser diffraction; CV: 12% and 9%, respectively). Significant differences in PSDs were found between these 2 almond forms (P < 0.05). A small proportion of lipid was released from ruptured cells on fractured surfaces of masticated particles, as predicted by using the mathematical model (8.5% and 11.3% for NAs and RAs, respectively). This low percentage of lipid bioaccessibility is attributable to the high proportion (35–40%) of large particles (>500 μm) in masticated almonds. Microstructural examination of the almonds indicated that most intracellular lipid remained undisturbed in intact cells after mastication. No adverse events were recorded. Conclusions: Following mastication, most of the almond cells remained intact with lipid encapsulated by cell walls. Thus, most of the lipid in masticated almonds is not immediately bioaccessible and remains unavailable for

  7. Sigma-1 receptor alters the kinetics of Kv1.3 voltage gated potassium channels but not the sensitivity to receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Maho; Matsuoka, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Takeshi; Mirrielees, Jennifer; Yang, Jay

    2012-05-03

    Sigma1 receptors (Sigma1R) are intracellular chaperone proteins that bind psychotropic drugs and also clinically used drugs such as ketamine and haloperidol. Co-expression of the Sigma1R has been reported to enhance the sensitivity of several voltage-gated ion channels to Sigma1R ligands. Kv1.3 is the predominant voltage-gated potassium channel expressed in T lymphocytes with a documented role in immune activation. To gain a better understanding of Sigma1R modulation of Kv ion channels, we investigated the effects of Sigma1R co-expression on Kv1.3 physiology and pharmacology in ion channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. We also explored the protein domains of Kv1.3 necessary for protein:protein interaction between Kv1.3 and Sigma1R through co-immunoprecipitation studies. Slowly inactivating outward-going currents consistent with Kv1.3 expression were elicited on step depolarizations. The current characterized by E(rev), V(1/2), and slope factor remained unchanged when co-expressed with Sigma1R. Analysis of inactivation time constant revealed a faster Kv1.3 current decay when co-expressed with Sigma1R. However the sensitivity to Sigma1R ligands remained unaltered when co-expressed with the Sigma1R in contrast to the previously reported modulation of ligand sensitivity in closely related Kv1.4 and Kv1.5 voltage gated potassium channels. Co-immunoprecipitation assays of various Kv1.3 truncation constructs indicated that the transmembrane domain of the Kv1.3 protein was responsible for the protein:protein interaction with the Sigma1R. Sigma1R likely interacts with different domains of Kv ion channel family proteins resulting in distinct modulation of different channels.

  8. Biochemical engineering of the N-acyl side chain of sialic acids alters the kinetics of a glycosylated potassium channel Kv3.1.

    PubMed

    Hall, M Kristen; Reutter, Werner; Lindhorst, Thisbe; Schwalbe, Ruth A

    2011-10-20

    The sialic acid of complex N-glycans can be biochemically engineered by substituting the physiological precursor N-acetylmannosamine with non-natural N-acylmannosamines. The Kv3.1 glycoprotein, a neuronal voltage-gated potassium channel, contains sialic acid. Western blots of the Kv3.1 glycoprotein isolated from transfected B35 neuroblastoma cells incubated with N-acylmannosamines verified sialylated N-glycans attached to the Kv3.1 glycoprotein. Outward ionic currents of Kv3.1 transfected B35 cells treated with N-pentanoylmannosamine or N-propanoylmannosamine had slower activation and inactivation rates than those of untreated cells. Therefore, the N-acyl side chain of sialic acid is intimately connected with the activation and inactivation rates of this glycosylated potassium channel.

  9. Anthrax Toxin Protective Antigen: Inhibition of Channel Function by Chloroquine and Related Compounds and Study of Binding Kinetics Using the Current Noise Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Orlik, Frank; Schiffler, Bettina; Benz, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA) of the tripartite anthrax toxin binds to a cell surface receptor and mediates the transport of two enzymatic components, edema factor and lethal factor, into the cytosol of host cells. Here recombinant PA63 from Bacillus anthracis was reconstituted into artificial lipid bilayer membranes and formed ion permeable channels. The heptameric PA63-channel contains a binding site for 4-aminoquinolones, which block ion transport through PA in vitro. This result allowed a detailed investigation of ligand binding and the stability constants for the binding of chloroquine, fluphenazine, and quinacrine to the binding site inside the PA63-channel were determined using titration experiments. Open PA63-channels exhibit 1/f noise in the frequency range between 1 and 100 Hz, whereas the spectral density of the ligand-induced current noise was of Lorentzian type. The analysis of the power density spectra allowed the evaluation of the on- and off-rate constants (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}k_{1}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}k_{-1}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) of ligand binding. The on-rate constants of ligand binding were between 106 and 108 M−1 s−1 and were dependent on the ionic strength of the aqueous phase, sidedness of ligand addition, as well as the orientation and intensity of the applied electric field. The off-rates varied between ∼10 s−1 and 2600 s−1 and depended mainly on the structure of the ligand. PMID:15596516

  10. Cholesterol and Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Irena; Fang, Yun; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia; Romanenko, Victor

    2010-01-01

    A variety of ion channels, including members of all major ion channel families, have been shown to be regulated by changes in the level of membrane cholesterol and partition into cholesterol-rich membrane domains. In general, several types of cholesterol effects have been described. The most common effect is suppression of channel activity by an increase in membrane cholesterol, an effect that was described for several types of inwardly-rectifying K+ channels, voltage-gated K+ channels, Ca+2 sensitive K+ channels, voltage-gated Na+ channels, N-type voltage-gated Ca+2 channels and volume-regulated anion channels. In contrast, several types of ion channels, such as epithelial amiloride-sensitive Na+ channels and Transient Receptor Potential channels, as well as some of the types of inwardly-rectifying and voltage-gated K+ channels were shown to be inhibited by cholesterol depletion. Cholesterol was also shown to alter the kinetic properties and current-voltage dependence of several voltage-gated channels. Finally, maintaining membrane cholesterol level is required for coupling ion channels to signalling cascades. In terms of the mechanisms, three general mechanisms have been proposed: (i) specific interactions between cholesterol and the channel protein, (ii) changes in the physical properties of the membrane bilayer and (iii) maintaining the scaffolds for protein-protein interactions. The goal of this review is to describe systematically the role of cholesterol in regulation of the major types of ion channels and to discuss these effects in the context of the models proposed. PMID:20213557

  11. Rainwater Channelization and Infiltration in Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cejas, Cesare; Wei, Yuli; Barrois, Remi; Durian, Douglas; Dreyfus, Remi; Compass Team

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the formation of fingered flow in dry granular media under simulated rainfall using a quasi-2D experimental set-up composed of a random close packing of mono-disperse glass beads. We determine effects of grain diameter and surface wetting properties on the formation and infiltration of water channels. For hydrophilic granular media, rainwater initially infiltrates a shallow top layer of soil creating a uniform horizontal wetting front before instabilities occur and grow to form water channels. For hydrophobic media, rainwater ponds on the soil surface rather than infiltrates and water channels may still occur at a later time when the hydraulic pressure of the ponding water exceeds the capillary repellency of the soil. We probe the kinetics of the fingering instabilities that serve as precursors for the growth and drainage of water channels. We also examine the effects of several different methods on improving rainwater channelization such as varying the level of pre-saturation, modifying the soil surface flatness, and adding superabsorbent hydrogel particles.

  12. Accuracy of enthalpy and entropy determination using the kinetic method: are we approaching a consensus?

    PubMed

    Drahos, László; Peltz, Csaba; Vékey, Károly

    2004-09-01

    There is an emerging consensus regarding the applicability of the kinetic method. All parties acknowledge that it is an approximate quantitative technique, capable of yielding not only enthalpy, but also entropy values. Opinions differ mainly on the accuracy of the results but it is agreed that the energy (effective temperature) dependence of kinetic method plots needs to be checked in all but the simplest of cases. When the 'apparent basicity' is found to depend on collision energy (and hence effective temperature), the extended kinetic method must be used. We have performed a large-scale modeling study, involving thousands of randomly selected molecular systems and a variety of experimental conditions, using exact calculations and realistic data sets. The results show that when the measured entropy difference between the two competing reaction channels is less than approximately 35 J mol(-1) K(-1), overall errors (standard deviations) of DeltaH(298) determined by the kinetic method are +/-5 kJ mol(-1); those of DeltaS(298) are +/-10 J mol(-1) K(-1). These include not only inherent errors of the kinetic method, but also errors in ion abundance measurement (5%) and inaccurate knowledge of reference compound thermochemistry (+/-2 kJ mol(-1), on average). We recommend, in general, that these errors be reported in kinetic method studies. When the measured entropy difference between the two competing fragmentation channels is large (>35 J mol(-1) K(-1)), it is likely to be significantly underestimated and errors of the kinetic method increase significantly.

  13. The Impact of Classroom Physical Activity Breaks on Middle School Students' Health-Related Fitness: An Xbox One Kinetic Delivered 4-Week Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yli-Piipari, S.; Layne, T.; McCollins, T.; Knox, T.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effect of a 4-week classroom physical activity break intervention on middle school students' health-related physical fitness. The study was a randomized controlled trial with students assigned to the experiment and control conditions. A convenience sample comprised 94 adolescents (experiment group n = 52;…

  14. Kinetic description of a free electron laser with an electromagnetic-wave wiggler and ion-channel guiding by using the Einstein coefficient technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdian, H.; AbasiRostami, S.; Hasanbeigi, A.

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical study of electron trajectories and gain in a free electron laser (FEL) with an electromagnetic-wave wiggler and ion-channel guiding is presented based on the Einstein coefficient method. The laser gain in the low-gain regime is obtained for the case of a cold tenuous relativistic electron beam, where the beam plasma frequency is much less than the radiation frequency propagating in this configuration. The resulting gain equation is analyzed numerically over a wide range of system parameters.

  15. Kinetics of xylem loading, membrane potential maintenance, and sensitivity of K(+) -permeable channels to reactive oxygen species: physiological traits that differentiate salinity tolerance between pea and barley.

    PubMed

    Bose, Jayakumar; Shabala, Lana; Pottosin, Igor; Zeng, Fanrong; Velarde-Buendía, Ana-Maria; Massart, Amandine; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Hariadi, Yuda; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-03-01

    Salt sensitive (pea) and salt tolerant (barley) species were used to understand the physiological basis of differential salinity tolerance in crops. Pea plants were much more efficient in restoring otherwise depolarized membrane potential thereby effectively decreasing K(+) efflux through depolarization-activated outward rectifying potassium channels. At the same time, pea root apex was 10-fold more sensitive to physiologically relevant H2 O2 concentration and accumulated larger amounts of H2 O2 under saline conditions. This resulted in a rapid loss of cell viability in the pea root apex. Barley plants rapidly loaded Na(+) into the xylem; this increase was only transient, and xylem and leaf Na(+) concentration remained at a steady level for weeks. On the contrary, pea plants restricted xylem Na(+) loading during the first few days of treatment but failed to prevent shoot Na(+) elevation in the long term. It is concluded that superior salinity tolerance of barley plants compared with pea is conferred by at least three different mechanisms: (1) efficient control of xylem Na(+) loading; (2) efficient control of H2 O2 accumulation and reduced sensitivity of non-selective cation channels to H2 O2 in the root apex; and (3) higher energy saving efficiency, with less ATP spent to maintain membrane potential under saline conditions.

  16. Dynamic State Transitions in the Nervous System: From Ion Channels to Neurons to Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Århem, Peter; Braun, Hans A.; Huber, Martin T.; Liljenström, Hans

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Ion channels: The microscopic scale * The variety of ion channels * Channel kinetics * Neurons: The mesoscopic scale * The feedback loops between membrane potential and ion currents * Neuron models: Concepts and examples * Impulse pattern modulation by ion channel densities * Oscillatory patterns * Irregular patterns * Impulse pattern modulation by subthreshold oscillations * The cold receptor model * Deterministic patterns and noise induced state-transitions on temperature scaling * Neuronal networks: The oscopic scale * Random channel events cause network state transitions * A hippocampal neural network model * Simulating noise-induced state transitions * Functional significance of oscopic neurodynamics * Conclusions * Appendix A: Computation of the neuron models * Hippocampal neuron model * The cold receptor model * Appendix B: Neural network model * References

  17. 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol changes the transition kinetics and subunit interactions in the small bacterial mechanosensitive channel MscS.

    PubMed

    Akitake, Bradley; Spelbrink, Robin E J; Anishkin, Andriy; Killian, J Antoinette; de Kruijff, Ben; Sukharev, Sergei

    2007-04-15

    2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol (TFE), a low-dielectric solvent, has recently been used as a promising tool to probe the strength of intersubunit interactions in membrane proteins. An analysis of inner membrane proteins of Escherichia coli has identified several SDS-resistant protein complexes that separate into subunits upon exposure to TFE. One of these was the homo-heptameric stretch-activated mechanosensitive channel of small conductance (MscS), a ubiquitous component of the bacterial turgor-regulation system. Here we show that a substantial fraction of MscS retains its oligomeric state in cold lithium-dodecyl-sulfate gel electrophoresis. Exposure of MscS complexes to 10-15 vol % TFE in native membranes or nonionic detergent micelles before lithium-dodecyl-sulfate electrophoresis results in a complete dissociation into monomers, suggesting that at these concentrations TFE by itself disrupts or critically compromises intersubunit interactions. Patch-clamp analysis of giant E. coli spheroplasts expressing MscS shows that exposure to TFE in lower concentrations (0.5-5.0 vol %) causes leftward shifts of the dose-response curves when applied extracellularly, and rightward shifts when added from the cytoplasmic side. In the latter case, TFE increases the rate of tension-dependent inactivation and lengthens the process of recovery to the resting state. MscS responses to pressure ramps of different speeds indicate that in the presence of TFE most channels reside in the resting state and only at tensions near the activation threshold does TFE dramatically speed up inactivation. The effect of TFE is reversible as normal channel activity returns 15-30 min after a TFE washout. We interpret the observed midpoint shifts in terms of asymmetric partitioning of TFE into the membrane and distortion of the bilayer lateral pressure profile. We also relate the increased rate of inactivation and subunit separation with the capacity of TFE to perturb buried interhelical contacts in proteins

  18. Kinetic Analysis of Membrane Potential Dye Response to NaV1.7 Channel Activation Identifies Antagonists with Pharmacological Selectivity against NaV1.5.

    PubMed

    Finley, Michael; Cassaday, Jason; Kreamer, Tony; Li, Xinnian; Solly, Kelli; O'Donnell, Greg; Clements, Michelle; Converso, Antonella; Cook, Sean; Daley, Chris; Kraus, Richard; Lai, Ming-Tain; Layton, Mark; Lemaire, Wei; Staas, Donnette; Wang, Jixin

    2016-06-01

    The NaV1.7 voltage-gated sodium channel is a highly valued target for the treatment of neuropathic pain due to its expression in pain-sensing neurons and human genetic mutations in the gene encoding NaV1.7, resulting in either loss-of-function (e.g., congenital analgesia) or gain-of-function (e.g., paroxysmal extreme pain disorder) pain phenotypes. We exploited existing technologies in a novel manner to identify selective antagonists of NaV1.7. A full-deck high-throughput screen was developed for both NaV1.7 and cardiac NaV1.5 channels using a cell-based membrane potential dye FLIPR assay. In assay development, known local anesthetic site inhibitors produced a decrease in maximal response; however, a subset of compounds exhibited a concentration-dependent delay in the onset of the response with little change in the peak of the response at any concentration. Therefore, two methods of analysis were employed for the screen: one to measure peak response and another to measure area under the curve, which would capture the delay-to-onset phenotype. Although a number of compounds were identified by a selective reduction in peak response in NaV1.7 relative to 1.5, the AUC measurement and a subsequent refinement of this measurement were able to differentiate compounds with NaV1.7 pharmacological selectivity over NaV1.5 as confirmed in electrophysiology.

  19. Binding and dissociation kinetics using fractals: an analysis of electrostatic effects and randomly coupled and oriented coupled receptors on biosensor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Butala, Harshala D; Sadana, Ajit

    2004-03-15

    A fractal analysis is used to analyze the influence of: (a) electrostatic interactions on binding and dissociation rate coefficients for antibodies HH8, HH10, and HH26 in solution to hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL) immobilized on a sensor chip surface [Biophys. J. 83 (2002) 2946]; and (b) the binding and dissociation of recombinant Fab in solution to random NHS-coupled Cys-HEL and oriented thiol-coupled Cys-HEL immobilized on a sensor chip surface [Methods 20 (2000) 310]. Single- and dual-fractal models were employed to fit the data. Values of the binding and the dissociation rate coefficient(s) and the fractal dimensions were obtained from a regression analysis provided by Corel Quattro Pro 8.0 (Corel Corporation Limited, Ottawa, Canada. 1997). The binding rate coefficients are quite sensitive to the degree of heterogeneity on the sensor chip surface. It is of interest to compare the results obtained by the fractal analysis with that of the original analysis [Biophys. J. 83 (2002) 2946]. For example, as one goes from the binding of 21 nM HH10/HEL to the binding of 640 nM HH10/HEL(K97A), Sinha et al. [Biophys. J. 83 (2002) 29461 indicate that the enhancement of diffusional encounter rates may be due to 'electrostatic steering' (a long-range interaction). Our analysis indicates that there is an increase in the value of the fractal dimension, Df1 by a factor of 1.12 from a value of 2.133-2.385. This increase in the degree of heterogeneity on the surface leads to an increase in the binding rate coefficient, k1 by a factor of 1.59 from 12.92 to 20.57. The fractal analysis of binding and dissociation of recombinant Fab in solution to random NHS-coupled Cys-HEL and oriented thiol-coupled Cys-HEL immobilized on a sensor chip [Methods 20 (2000) 310] surface are consistent with the degree of heterogeneity present on the sensor chip surface for the random and the oriented case. As expected, the random case will exhibit a higher degree of heterogeneity than the oriented case

  20. Biased Brownian motion in narrow channels with asymmetry and anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zheng; To, Kiwing

    2016-08-01

    We study Brownian motion of a single millimeter size bead confined in a quasi-two-dimensional horizontal channel with built-in anisotropy and asymmetry. Channel asymmetry is implemented by ratchet walls while anisotropy is introduced using a channel base that is grooved along the channel axis so that a bead can acquire a horizontal impulse perpendicular to the longitudinal direction when it collides with the base. When energy is injected to the channel by vertical vibration, the combination of asymmetric walls and anisotropic base induces an effective force which drives the bead into biased diffusive motion along the channel axis with diffusivity and drift velocity increase with vibration strength. The magnitude of this driving force, which can be measured in experiments on a tilted channel, is found to be consistent with those obtained from dynamic mobility and position probability distribution measurements. These results are explained by a simple collision model that suggests the random kinetic energy transfer between different translational degrees of freedom may be turned into useful work in the presence of asymmetry and anisotropy.

  1. Biased Brownian motion in narrow channels with asymmetry and anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, Kiwing; Peng, Zheng

    2016-11-01

    We study Brownian motion of a single millimeter size bead confined in a quasi-two-dimensional horizontal channel with built-in anisotropy and asymmetry. Channel asymmetry is implemented by ratchet walls while anisotropy is introduced using a channel base that is grooved along the channel axis so that a bead can acquire a horizontal impulse perpendicular to the longitudinal direction when it collides with the base. When energy is injected to the channel by vertical vibration, the combination of asymmetric walls and anisotropic base induces an effective force which drives the bead into biased diffusive motion along the channel axis with diffusivity and drift velocity increase with vibration strength. The magnitude of this driving force, which can be measured in experiments of tilted channel, is found to be consistent to those obtained from dynamic mobility and position probability distribution measurements. These results are explained by a simple collision model that suggests the random kinetic energies transfer between different translational degrees of freedom may be turned into useful work in the presence of asymmetry and anisotropy.

  2. Channel Flow Cell Studies of the Inhibiting Action of Gypsum on the Dissolution Kinetics of Calcite: A Laboratory Approach with Implications for Field Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Shelley J.; Compton, Richard G.; Taylor, Mark A.; Viles, Heather A.

    2001-04-15

    The rate of dissolution of surface-treated calcite crystals in aqueous acidic solution has been studied using an adaptation of the channel flow cell method with microdisc electrode detection. Surface treatments of calcite with sulfuric acid lead to the nucleation of gypsum overgrowths, which reduce the rate of dissolution of calcite. Rate constants for untreated calcite and calcite pretreated with sulfuric acid conditions of 0.01 M for 1 h, 0.05 M for 5 h, and 0.1 M for 21 h are found to be 0.035, 0.018, 0.006, and 0.004 cm s(-1), respectively. Deterioration of calcite materials caused by acid deposition was investigated by field exposure of untreated and sulfate pretreated calcite rocks under urban conditions for 12 months. The rate constant for both pretreated and untreated calcite exposed to weathering is 0.003 cm s(-1). This suggests that calcite self-passivates the surface from further reaction when exposed to acid deposition. However, surface studies indicate that the surface undergoes erosion and dissolution before passivation. Pretreatment of the surface with sulfate protects the surface from acid deposition so it remains less reactive toward acid compared with untreated calcite. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  3. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  4. Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Owen; Cornelius, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Conveys an appreciation of enzyme kinetic analysis by using a practical and intuitive approach. Discusses enzyme assays, kinetic models and rate laws, the kinetic constants (V, velocity, and Km, Michaels constant), evaluation of V and Km from experimental data, and enzyme inhibition. (CW)

  5. Interaction of tetanus toxin with lipid vesicles. Effects of pH, surface charge, and transmembrane potential on the kinetics of channel formation.

    PubMed Central

    Menestrina, G; Forti, S; Gambale, F

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the interaction of tetanus toxin with small unilamellar vesicles composed of different phospholipids as a function of pH, toxin concentration, temperature, and ionic strength of the solution. Tetanus toxin increased the permeability of the vesicles to fluorescent markers of molecular weight up to 700. The time course of the permeabilization was described as the sum of two exponential components of which the faster accounts for more than 70% of the total effect. Both time constants decreased when the pH of the solution was lowered and when vesicles contained negative lipids. These results can be explained in terms of a phenomenological model based on reaction rate theory. The model assumes that tetanus toxin, after equilibrating with the local pH existing at the surface of the vesicles, inserts into the lipid bilayer forming an ionic channel through which solutes can diffuse. Trigger event for the insertion of the toxin is the protonation, and consequent neutralization of one charged group which makes the molecule more hydrophobic. The intrinsic pK of this group was found to be 3.4 +/- 0.2, suggesting that it may be a carboxyl group. Since the toxin equilibrates with the local pH, the enhancing effect of acidic phospholipids is merely explained by the creation of a negative surface potential which increases the local proton concentration. This was confirmed by the inhibitory effect of high Na+ concentration which reduced the surface charge by screening and specific binding. We found still small differences between the lipids tested and the following order of sensitivity to the action of the toxin: phosphatidylinositol greater than phosphatidylserine greater than phosphatidylcholine approximately cholesterol. The activation energy for the two time constants was found to be 19.8 and 14.8 kcal/mol, fast and slow component, respectively, i.e., slightly larger than that for pure diffusion through the bilayer. The permeabilization induced by tetanus toxin

  6. An open-label, randomized, controlled, 4-week comparative clinical trial of barnidipine hydrochloride, a calcium-channel blocker, and benazepril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, in Chinese patients with renal parenchymal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Zheng, F; Chen, P; Tang, L; Wei, R; Yu, Y; Su, Y; Kikkawa, T; Yamamoto, M

    2006-01-01

    This study compared barnidipine, a calcium-channel blocker, and benazepril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, in 85 Chinese patients with renal parenchymal hypertension (diastolic blood pressure range 95 - 110 mmHg). Patients were randomly assigned to receive either 10 mg barnidipine or 10 mg benazepril orally daily for 4 weeks. In patients with diastolic blood pressure > 90 mmHg after 2 weeks of treatment, the dose of barnidipine or benazepril was increased by 5 or 10 mg, respectively. Both the barnidipine-treated group (n = 43) and the benazepril-treated group (n = 42) showed significant mean reductions from baseline in sitting systolic and diastolic blood pressures. The decrease in diastolic blood pressure with benazepril was significantly greater than with barnidipine treatment. Sitting heart rate was not changed by either drug. There was no significant difference in adverse events between the two groups. Barnidipine is similar to benazepril for the treatment of renal parenchymal hypertension.

  7. On the Evolution of Voltage Gated Ion Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Michael

    2006-03-01

    This talk summarizes some ideas, calculations and data analysis/collection surrounding the structure and evolution of ion channels, in particular voltage gated sodium channels. The great advantage of ion channels is that they are individual proteins whose function has long been known and is readily inferred through voltage measurements. Their evolution can be tracked through the growing data base of sequences. Kinetic data is readily available, showing important differences between nearly identical channels. I will discuss our efforts to collate available functional data on voltage gated sodium channels into an 'ion channel property space' . We then use this dataset to infer underlying kinetic models, and to create evolutionary trees based on the function of the channels. Finally, I will discuss our endeavors to how ion channels evolved to be the way they are: Examples of questions we would like to answer include: to what extent do design principles dictate the details of the kinetic schemes of ion channels, such as (a) the symmetry of the sodium and potassium channels (or lack thereof), as reflected in their kinetic schemes ; (b) the coupling of sodium channel kinetics to potassium channel kinetics; or (c) activation/inactivation of the channels themselves.

  8. On anti-portfolio effects in science and technology with application to reaction kinetics, chemical synthesis, and molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Vlad, Marcel O; Corlan, Alexandru Dan; Popa, Vlad T; Ross, John

    2007-11-20

    The portfolio effect is the increase of the stability of a system to random fluctuations with the increase of the number of random state variables due to spreading the risk among these variables; many examples exist in various areas of science and technology. We report the existence of an opposite effect, the decrease of stability to random fluctuations due to an increase of the number of random state variables. For successive industrial or biochemical processes of independent, random efficiencies, the stability of the total efficiency decreases with the increase of the number of processes. Depending on the variables considered, the same process may display both a portfolio as well as an anti-portfolio behavior. In disordered kinetics, the activation energy of a reaction or transport process is the result of a sum of random components. Although the total activation energy displays a portfolio effect, the rate coefficient displays an anti-portfolio effect. For random-channel kinetics, the stability of the total rate coefficient increases with the average number of reaction pathways, whereas the stability of the survival function has an opposite behavior: it decreases exponentially with the increase of the average number of reaction pathways (anti-portfolio effect). In molecular biology, the total rate of a nucleotide substitution displays a portfolio effect, whereas the probability that no substitutions occur displays an anti-portfolio effect, resulting in faster evolutionary processes due to fluctuations. The anti-portfolio effect emerges for products of random variables or equations involving multiplicative convolution products.

  9. Random matrix techniques in quantum information theory

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Benoît; Nechita, Ion

    2016-01-15

    The purpose of this review is to present some of the latest developments using random techniques, and in particular, random matrix techniques in quantum information theory. Our review is a blend of a rather exhaustive review and of more detailed examples—coming mainly from research projects in which the authors were involved. We focus on two main topics, random quantum states and random quantum channels. We present results related to entropic quantities, entanglement of typical states, entanglement thresholds, the output set of quantum channels, and violations of the minimum output entropy of random channels.

  10. Optofluidic random laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivakiran Bhaktha, B. N.; Bachelard, Nicolas; Noblin, Xavier; Sebbah, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    Random lasing is reported in a dye-circulated structured polymeric microfluidic channel. The role of disorder, which results from limited accuracy of photolithographic process, is demonstrated by the variation of the emission spectrum with local-pump position and by the extreme sensitivity to a local perturbation of the structure. Thresholds comparable to those of conventional microfluidic lasers are achieved, without the hurdle of state-of-the-art cavity fabrication. Potential applications of optofluidic random lasers for on-chip sensors are discussed. Introduction of random lasers in the field of optofluidics is a promising alternative to on-chip laser integration with light and fluidic functionalities.

  11. Two classes of alamethicin transmembrane channels: molecular models from single-channel properties.

    PubMed

    Mak, D O; Webb, W W

    1995-12-01

    Molecular structures of transmembrane channels formed by alamethicin polypeptide aggregates were analyzed by measuring open-channel conductances and state-transition kinetics using voltage-clamp technique with artificial phospholipid bilayers isolated onto micropipettes by a novel solvent-free tip-dip method. Two distinct classes of alamethicin channels, each with a unique set of conductance states and kinetic properties, were identified. Alamethicin Rf50 at low temperatures forms mostly nonpersistent channels with lifetimes of < 1 min. Long-lasting persistent channels are formed by alamethicin Rf30 at all temperatures and by alamethicin Rf50 at room temperature. In the "modified barrel-stave" model for persistent channels based on the crystalline alamethicin secondary structure, the aqueous pore of the channel surrounded by parallel alamethicin monomers has a constriction generated by amino acid side chains protruding from the alamethicin helices into the pore. The model explains quantitatively the nonohmic channel conductance at high applied voltages and the conductance values and ion selectivities of various persistent channel states. The kinetic properties of nonpersistent channels are explained qualitatively by the "reversed-molecule" model in which nonpersistent channels differ from persistent channels by having one of the channel-forming alamethicin monomers oriented antiparallel to the others.

  12. Two classes of alamethicin transmembrane channels: molecular models from single-channel properties.

    PubMed Central

    Mak, D O; Webb, W W

    1995-01-01

    Molecular structures of transmembrane channels formed by alamethicin polypeptide aggregates were analyzed by measuring open-channel conductances and state-transition kinetics using voltage-clamp technique with artificial phospholipid bilayers isolated onto micropipettes by a novel solvent-free tip-dip method. Two distinct classes of alamethicin channels, each with a unique set of conductance states and kinetic properties, were identified. Alamethicin Rf50 at low temperatures forms mostly nonpersistent channels with lifetimes of < 1 min. Long-lasting persistent channels are formed by alamethicin Rf30 at all temperatures and by alamethicin Rf50 at room temperature. In the "modified barrel-stave" model for persistent channels based on the crystalline alamethicin secondary structure, the aqueous pore of the channel surrounded by parallel alamethicin monomers has a constriction generated by amino acid side chains protruding from the alamethicin helices into the pore. The model explains quantitatively the nonohmic channel conductance at high applied voltages and the conductance values and ion selectivities of various persistent channel states. The kinetic properties of nonpersistent channels are explained qualitatively by the "reversed-molecule" model in which nonpersistent channels differ from persistent channels by having one of the channel-forming alamethicin monomers oriented antiparallel to the others. PMID:8599639

  13. TRP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Venkatachalam, Kartik; Montell, Craig

    2011-01-01

    The TRP (Transient Receptor Potential) superfamily of cation channels is remarkable in that it displays greater diversity in activation mechanisms and selectivities than any other group of ion channels. The domain organizations of some TRP proteins are also unusual, as they consist of linked channel and enzyme domains. A unifying theme in this group is that TRP proteins play critical roles in sensory physiology, which include contributions to vision, taste, olfaction, hearing, touch, and thermo- and osmosensation. In addition, TRP channels enable individual cells to sense changes in their local environment. Many TRP channels are activated by a variety of different stimuli and function as signal integrators. The TRP superfamily is divided into seven subfamilies: the five group 1 TRPs (TRPC, TRPV, TRPM, TRPN, and TRPA) and two group 2 subfamilies (TRPP and TRPML). TRP channels are important for human health as mutations in at least four TRP channels underlie disease. PMID:17579562

  14. Diffusion in random networks

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Duan Z.; Padrino, Juan C.

    2017-06-01

    The ensemble averaging technique is applied to model mass transport by diffusion in random networks. The system consists of an ensemble of random networks, where each network is made of pockets connected by tortuous channels. Inside a channel, fluid transport is assumed to be governed by the one-dimensional diffusion equation. Mass balance leads to an integro-differential equation for the pocket mass density. The so-called dual-porosity model is found to be equivalent to the leading order approximation of the integration kernel when the diffusion time scale inside the channels is small compared to the macroscopic time scale. As a test problem,more » we consider the one-dimensional mass diffusion in a semi-infinite domain. Because of the required time to establish the linear concentration profile inside a channel, for early times the similarity variable is xt$-$1/4 rather than xt$-$1/2 as in the traditional theory. We found this early time similarity can be explained by random walk theory through the network.« less

  15. TRP Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voets, Thomas; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Nilius, Bernd

    The TRP superfamily represents a highly diverse group of cation-permeable ion channels related to the product of the Drosophila trp (transient receptor potential) gene. The cloning and characterization of members of this cation channel family has experienced a remarkable growth during the last decade, uncovering a wealth of information concerning the role of TRP channels in a variety of cell types, tissues, and species. Initially, TRP channels were mainly considered as phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent and/or store-operated Ca2+-permeable cation channels. More recent research has highlighted the sensitivity of TRP channels to a broad array of chemical and physical stimuli, allowing them to function as dedicated biological sensors involved in processes ranging from vision to taste, tactile sensation, and hearing. Moreover, the tailored selectivity of certain TRP channels enables them to play key roles in the cellular uptake and/or transepithelial transport of Ca2+, Mg2+, and trace metal ions. In this chapter we give a brief overview of the TRP channel superfamily followed by a survey of current knowledge concerning their structure and activation mechanisms.

  16. Ionic Channels in Thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losseva, T. V.; Fomenko, A. S.; Nemtchinov, I. V.

    2007-12-01

    We proceed to study the formation and propagation of ionic channels in thunderclouds in the framework of the model of the corona discharge wave propagation (Fomenko A.S., Losseva T.V., Nemtchinov I.V. The corona discharge waves in thunderclouds and formation of ionic channels // 2004 Fall Meeting. EOS Trans. AGU. 2004. V. 85. ¹ 47. Suppl. Abstract AE23A-0835.). In this model we proposed a hypothesis that the structure of a thundercloud becomes nonuniform due to corona discharge on the drops and ice particles and formation of ionic channels with higher conductivity than the surrounding air. When the onset strength of corona discharge becomes smaller than the electric field strength the corona discharge increases concentrations of ions in a small part of the cloud (a hot spot). An additional charge at opposite ends of the hot spot forms due to polarization process. The increased electric field initiates corona discharge in other parts of the cloud on ice particles and water drops with smaller sizes. The corona discharge front moves as a wave with the velocity of the order of ion drift and formes a highly conductive channel. We model this non-stationary problem with Poisson equation which is solved simultaneously with a simplified set of kinetic equations for ions, small charged particles and electrons (at high electric fields), including ionization due to electronic impact, attachment and formation of positive ions. By applying 3D numerical simulations we obtain the parameters of formed ionic channels with respect to onset electric fields both from large particles (in hot spot) and from small particles (surrounding hot spot), microscopic currents from particles with different sizes and the external electric field in the cloud. The interaction of ionic channels is also investigated. This work was supported by Russian Foundation of Basic Research (Project No 07-05-00998-à).

  17. [Amphotericin B channel conductance inactivation].

    PubMed

    Ibragimova, V Kh; Alieva, I N; Aliev, D I

    2003-01-01

    Effects induced in bilayer lipid membranes by amphotericin B and its alkyl derivatives was analysed. Inactivation of the antibiotic-dependent multichannel membrane conductance was discovered. Kinetics of membrane conductivity was shown to depend on the antibiotic concentration in the membrane. At concentrations between 10(-8) and 10(-7) M, the resulting conductance appeared to the transient. We suggest that the phenomenon of biphasic kinetics of membrane conductance is the result of a consecutive transformation of polyene channels in the membrane: half-pores are assembled on either side of membrane-nonconducting 1; two half-pores combine to build up a conducting channels-conducting 2, and the conducting channels are disassemled to monomers and nonconducting self-associated forms inside the membrane-disassembled state (nonconducting 3). To explain the transient characteristics of the induced conductance, it is proposed that the antibiotic, present in the solution under self-associated form, binds the membrane and forms pores, then dissociates in the bilayer in a non-active monomeric form. The existence of definite monomers and nonconducting self-associated forms of amphotericin B molecules inside the membrane was estimated from the dependence of kinetic conductance of lipid membranes of amphotericin B and its alkyl derivatives, when the antibiotics are washed out from aqueous medium. Equilibrium between different antibiotic assemblies inside the membrane was demonstrated by the kinetics of conductance decrease following washing the antibiotic. Using circular dichroism measurements, we observed that amphotericin B alkyl derivatives were in self-associated form being susceptible to form pores across cholesterol-containing membranes. The phenomenon of biophasic kinetics was observed only in the cholesterol-containing membrane. The substitution of membrane cholesterol for ergosterol provides monotonic kinetics of membrane conductance at any antibiotic concentration.

  18. Tolrestat kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D.R.; Kraml, M.; Cayen, M.N.; Dubuc, J.; Ryder, S.; Dvornik, D.

    1984-10-01

    The kinetics of tolrestat, a potent inhibitor of aldose reductase, were examined. Serum concentrations of tolrestat and of total /sup 14/C were measured after dosing normal subjects and subjects with diabetes with /sup 14/C-labeled tolrestat. In normal subjects, tolrestat was rapidly absorbed and disappearance from serum was biphasic. Distribution and elimination t 1/2s were approximately 2 and 10 to 12 hr, respectively, after single and multiple doses. Unchanged tolrestat accounted for the major portion of /sup 14/C in serum. Radioactivity was rapidly and completely excreted in urine and feces in an approximate ratio of 2:1. Findings were much the same in subjects with diabetes. In normal subjects, the kinetics of oral tolrestat were independent of dose in the 10 to 800 mg range. Repetitive dosing did not result in unexpected cumulation. Tolrestat was more than 99% bound to serum protein; it did not compete with warfarin for binding sites but was displaced to some extent by high concentrations of tolbutamide or salicylate.

  19. Channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter provides a comprehensive overview of channel catfish aquaculture. Sections include fish biology; commercial culture; culture facilities; production practices; water quality management; nutrition, feeding and feed formulation; infectious diseases; harvesting and processing; and the...

  20. Mechanosensitive Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinac, Boris

    Living cells are exposed to a variety of mechanical stimuli acting throughout the biosphere. The range of the stimuli extends from thermal molecular agitation to potentially destructive cell swelling caused by osmotic pressure gradients. Cellular membranes present a major target for these stimuli. To detect mechanical forces acting upon them cell membranes are equipped with mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels. Functioning as molecular mechanoelectrical transducers of mechanical forces into electrical and/or chemical intracellular signals these channels play a critical role in the physiology of mechanotransduction. Studies of prokaryotic MS channels and recent work on MS channels of eukaryotes have significantly increased our understanding of their gating mechanism, physiological functions, and evolutionary origins as well as their role in the pathology of disease.

  1. Random potentials and cosmological attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, Andrei

    2017-02-01

    I show that the problem of realizing inflation in theories with random potentials of a limited number of fields can be solved, and agreement with the observational data can be naturally achieved if at least one of these fields has a non-minimal kinetic term of the type used in the theory of cosmological α-attractors.

  2. Kinetic buffers.

    PubMed

    Alibrandi, Giuseppe; Fabbrizzi, Luigi; Licchelli, Maurizio; Puglisi, Antonio

    2015-01-12

    This paper proposes a new type of molecular device that is able to act as an inverse proton sponge to slowly decrease the pH inside a reaction vessel. This makes the automatic monitoring of the concentration of pH-sensitive systems possible. The device is a composite formed of an alkyl chloride, which kinetically produces acidity, and a buffer that thermodynamically modulates the variation in pH value. Profiles of pH versus time (pH-t plots) have been generated under various experimental conditions by computer simulation, and the device has been tested by carrying out automatic spectrophotometric titrations, without using an autoburette. To underline the wide variety of possible applications, this new system has been used to realize and monitor HCl uptake by a di-copper(II) bistren complex in a single run, in a completely automatic experiment.

  3. Random sequential adsorption on fractals.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-28

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions.

  4. Substrate channeling in proline metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Arentson, Benjamin W.; Sanyal, Nikhilesh; Becker, Donald F.

    2012-01-01

    Proline metabolism is an important pathway that has relevance in several cellular functions such as redox balance, apoptosis, and cell survival. Results from different groups have indicated that substrate channeling of proline metabolic intermediates may be a critical mechanism. One intermediate is pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C), which upon hydrolysis opens to glutamic semialdehyde (GSA). Recent structural and kinetic evidence indicate substrate channeling of P5C/GSA occurs in the proline catabolic pathway between the proline dehydrogenase and P5C dehydrogenase active sites of bifunctional proline utilization A (PutA). Substrate channeling in PutA is proposed to facilitate the hydrolysis of P5C to GSA which is unfavorable at physiological pH. The second intermediate, gamma-glutamyl phosphate, is part of the proline biosynthetic pathway and is extremely labile. Substrate channeling of gamma-glutamyl phosphate is thought to be necessary to protect it from bulk solvent. Because of the unfavorable equilibrium of P5C/GSA and the reactivity of gamma-glutamyl phosphate, substrate channeling likely improves the efficiency of proline metabolism. Here, we outline general strategies for testing substrate channeling and review the evidence for channeling in proline metabolism. PMID:22201749

  5. Integral kinetic equation in dechanneling problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, V.

    1989-11-01

    A version of dechanneling theory, based on using an integral kinetic equation in both the phase and transverse energy space, is described. It is derived from the binary collision model and it takes into account consistently the thermal multiple and single scattering of axial and planar channeled particles. The connection between the method developed and that of Oshiyama and of Gartner is discussed.

  6. English Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The cloud covered earthscape of Northern Europe demonstrates the difficulty of photographing this elusive subject from space. The English Channel (51.0N, 1.5E) separating the British Islands from Europe is in the center of the scene. The white cliffs of Dover on the SE coast of the UK, the Thames River estuary and a partial view of the city of London can be seen on the north side of the Channel while the Normandy coast of France is to the south.

  7. Chromatic effects in long periodic transport channels

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko V. N.; Hao, Y.; Jing, Y.

    2015-05-03

    Long periodic transport channels are frequently used in accelerator complexes and suggested for using in high-energy ERLs for electron-hadron colliders. Without proper chromaticity compensation, such transport channels exhibit high sensitivity to the random orbit errors causing significant emittance growth. Such emittance growth can come from both the correlated and the uncorrelated energy spread. In this paper we present results of our theoretical and numerical studies of such effects and develop a criteria for acceptable chromaticity in such channels.

  8. Enhancing conjugation rate of antibodies to carboxylates: Numerical modeling of conjugation kinetics in microfluidic channels and characterization of chemical over-exposure in conventional protocols by quartz crystal microbalance

    PubMed Central

    Asiaei, Sasan; Smith, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    This research reports an improved conjugation process for immobilization of antibodies on carboxyl ended self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The kinetics of antibody/SAM binding in microfluidic heterogeneous immunoassays has been studied through numerical simulation and experiments. Through numerical simulations, the mass transport of reacting species, namely, antibodies and crosslinking reagent, is related to the available surface concentration of carboxyl ended SAMs in a microchannel. In the bulk flow, the mass transport equation (diffusion and convection) is coupled to the surface reaction between the antibodies and SAM. The model developed is employed to study the effect of the flow rate, conjugating reagents concentration, and height of the microchannel. Dimensionless groups, such as the Damköhler number, are used to compare the reaction and fluidic phenomena present and justify the kinetic trends observed. Based on the model predictions, the conventional conjugation protocol is modified to increase the yield of conjugation reaction. A quartz crystal microbalance device is implemented to examine the resulting surface density of antibodies. As a result, an increase in surface density from 321 ng/cm2, in the conventional protocol, to 617 ng/cm2 in the modified protocol is observed, which is quite promising for (bio-) sensing applications. PMID:26697125

  9. Randomization Strategies.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K

    2017-04-01

    An understanding of randomization is important both for study design and to assist medical professionals in evaluating the medical literature. Simple randomization can be done through a variety of techniques, but carries a risk of unequal distribution of subjects into treatment groups. Block randomization can be used to overcome this limitation by ensuring that small subgroups are distributed evenly between treatment groups. Finally, techniques can be used to evenly distribute subjects between treatment groups while accounting for confounding variables, so as to not skew results when there is a high index of suspicion that a particular variable will influence outcome.

  10. Slow inactivation in human cardiac sodium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, J E; Featherstone, D E; Hartmann, H A; Ruben, P C

    1998-01-01

    The available pool of sodium channels, and thus cell excitability, is regulated by both fast and slow inactivation. In cardiac tissue, the requirement for sustained firing of long-duration action potentials suggests that slow inactivation in cardiac sodium channels may differ from slow inactivation in skeletal muscle sodium channels. To test this hypothesis, we used the macropatch technique to characterize slow inactivation in human cardiac sodium channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Slow inactivation was isolated from fast inactivation kinetically (by selectively recovering channels from fast inactivation before measurement of slow inactivation) and structurally (by modification of fast inactivation by mutation of IFM1488QQQ). Time constants of slow inactivation in cardiac sodium channels were larger than previously reported for skeletal muscle sodium channels. In addition, steady-state slow inactivation was only 40% complete in cardiac sodium channels, compared to 80% in skeletal muscle channels. These results suggest that cardiac sodium channel slow inactivation is adapted for the sustained depolarizations found in normally functioning cardiac tissue. Complete slow inactivation in the fast inactivation modified IFM1488QQQ cardiac channel mutant suggests that this impairment of slow inactivation may result from an interaction between fast and slow inactivation. PMID:9635748

  11. Reconstruction of Cell Surface Densities of Ion Pumps, Exchangers, and Channels from mRNA Expression, Conductance Kinetics, Whole-Cell Calcium, and Current-Clamp Voltage Recordings, with an Application to Human Uterine Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Atia, Jolene; McCloskey, Conor; Shmygol, Anatoly S; Rand, David A; van den Berg, Hugo A; Blanks, Andrew M

    2016-04-01

    Uterine smooth muscle cells remain quiescent throughout most of gestation, only generating spontaneous action potentials immediately prior to, and during, labor. This study presents a method that combines transcriptomics with biophysical recordings to characterise the conductance repertoire of these cells, the 'conductance repertoire' being the total complement of ion channels and transporters expressed by an electrically active cell. Transcriptomic analysis provides a set of potential electrogenic entities, of which the conductance repertoire is a subset. Each entity within the conductance repertoire was modeled independently and its gating parameter values were fixed using the available biophysical data. The only remaining free parameters were the surface densities for each entity. We characterise the space of combinations of surface densities (density vectors) consistent with experimentally observed membrane potential and calcium waveforms. This yields insights on the functional redundancy of the system as well as its behavioral versatility. Our approach couples high-throughput transcriptomic data with physiological behaviors in health and disease, and provides a formal method to link genotype to phenotype in excitable systems. We accurately predict current densities and chart functional redundancy. For example, we find that to evoke the observed voltage waveform, the BK channel is functionally redundant whereas hERG is essential. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that activation of calcium-activated chloride conductances by intracellular calcium release is the key factor underlying spontaneous depolarisations.

  12. Reconstruction of Cell Surface Densities of Ion Pumps, Exchangers, and Channels from mRNA Expression, Conductance Kinetics, Whole-Cell Calcium, and Current-Clamp Voltage Recordings, with an Application to Human Uterine Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Atia, Jolene; McCloskey, Conor; Shmygol, Anatoly S.; Rand, David A.; van den Berg, Hugo A.; Blanks, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Uterine smooth muscle cells remain quiescent throughout most of gestation, only generating spontaneous action potentials immediately prior to, and during, labor. This study presents a method that combines transcriptomics with biophysical recordings to characterise the conductance repertoire of these cells, the ‘conductance repertoire’ being the total complement of ion channels and transporters expressed by an electrically active cell. Transcriptomic analysis provides a set of potential electrogenic entities, of which the conductance repertoire is a subset. Each entity within the conductance repertoire was modeled independently and its gating parameter values were fixed using the available biophysical data. The only remaining free parameters were the surface densities for each entity. We characterise the space of combinations of surface densities (density vectors) consistent with experimentally observed membrane potential and calcium waveforms. This yields insights on the functional redundancy of the system as well as its behavioral versatility. Our approach couples high-throughput transcriptomic data with physiological behaviors in health and disease, and provides a formal method to link genotype to phenotype in excitable systems. We accurately predict current densities and chart functional redundancy. For example, we find that to evoke the observed voltage waveform, the BK channel is functionally redundant whereas hERG is essential. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that activation of calcium-activated chloride conductances by intracellular calcium release is the key factor underlying spontaneous depolarisations. PMID:27105427

  13. Random thoughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ajansen; kwhitefoot; panteltje1; edprochak; sudhakar, the

    2014-07-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com news story “How to make a quantum random-number generator from a mobile phone” (16 May, http://ow.ly/xFiYc, see also p5), which describes a way of delivering random numbers by counting the number of photons that impinge on each of the individual pixels in the camera of a Nokia N9 smartphone.

  14. The channels of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Victor R.

    1988-01-01

    The geomorphology of Mars is discussed, focusing on the Martian channels. The great flood channels of Mars, the processes of channel erosion, and dendritic channel networks, are examined. The topography of the Channeled Scabland region of the northwestern U.S. is described and compared to the Martian channels. The importance of water in the evolution of the channel systems is considered.

  15. Modeling interactions between voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and KCa1.1 channels

    PubMed Central

    Engbers, Jordan DT; Zamponi, Gerald W; Turner, Ray W

    2013-01-01

    High voltage-activated (HVA) Cav channels form complexes with KCa1.1 channels, allowing reliable activation of KCa1.1 current through a nanodomain interaction. We recently found that low voltage-activated Cav3 calcium channels also create KCa1.1-Cav3 complexes. While coimmunoprecipitation studies again supported a nanodomain interaction, the sensitivity to calcium chelating agents was instead consistent with a microdomain interaction. A computational model of the KCa1.1-Cav3 complex suggested that multiple Cav3 channels were necessary to activate KCa1.1 channels, potentially causing the KCa1.1-Cav3 complex to be more susceptible to calcium chelators. Here, we expanded the model and compared it to a KCa1.1-Cav2.2 model to examine the role of Cav channel conductance and kinetics on KCa1.1 activation. As found for direct recordings, the voltage-dependent and kinetic properties of Cav3 channels were reflected in the activation of KCa1.1 current, including transient activation from lower voltages than other KCa1.1-Cav complexes. Substantial activation of KCa1.1 channels required the concerted activity of several Cav3.2 channels. Combined with the effect of EGTA, these results suggest that the Ca2+ domains of several KCa1.1-Cav3 complexes need to cooperate to generate sufficient [Ca2+]i, despite the physical association between KCa1.1 and Cav3 channels. By comparison, Cav2.2 channels were twice as effective at activating KCa1.1 channels and a single KCa1.1-Cav2.2 complex would be self-sufficient. However, even though Cav3 channels generate small, transient currents, the regulation of KCa1.1 activity by Cav3 channels is possible if multiple complexes cooperate through microdomain interactions. PMID:23928916

  16. Starburst Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Translucent carbon dioxide ice covers the polar regions of Mars seasonally. It is warmed and sublimates (evaporates) from below, and escaping gas carves a numerous channel morphologies.

    In this example (figure 1) the channels form a 'starburst' pattern, radiating out into feathery extensions. The center of the pattern is being buried with dust and new darker dust fans ring the outer edges. This may be an example of an expanding morphology, where new channels are formed as the older ones fill and are no longer efficiently channeling the subliming gas out.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003443_0980 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 21-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -81.8 degrees latitude, 76.2 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 247.1 km (154.4 miles). At this distance the image scale is 24.7 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 74 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 04:52 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 71 degrees, thus the sun was about 19 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 223.4 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  17. Nonlinear channelizer.

    PubMed

    In, Visarath; Longhini, Patrick; Kho, Andy; Neff, Joseph D; Leung, Daniel; Liu, Norman; Meadows, Brian K; Gordon, Frank; Bulsara, Adi R; Palacios, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    The nonlinear channelizer is an integrated circuit made up of large parallel arrays of analog nonlinear oscillators, which, collectively, serve as a broad-spectrum analyzer with the ability to receive complex signals containing multiple frequencies and instantaneously lock-on or respond to a received signal in a few oscillation cycles. The concept is based on the generation of internal oscillations in coupled nonlinear systems that do not normally oscillate in the absence of coupling. In particular, the system consists of unidirectionally coupled bistable nonlinear elements, where the frequency and other dynamical characteristics of the emergent oscillations depend on the system's internal parameters and the received signal. These properties and characteristics are being employed to develop a system capable of locking onto any arbitrary input radio frequency signal. The system is efficient by eliminating the need for high-speed, high-accuracy analog-to-digital converters, and compact by making use of nonlinear coupled systems to act as a channelizer (frequency binning and channeling), a low noise amplifier, and a frequency down-converter in a single step which, in turn, will reduce the size, weight, power, and cost of the entire communication system. This paper covers the theory, numerical simulations, and some engineering details that validate the concept at the frequency band of 1-4 GHz.

  18. [Synopsis about the hypothesis of "information channel" of channel-collateral system].

    PubMed

    Chang, Xi-Lang

    2008-10-01

    The author of the present paper founded a theorem about the "incompleteness of single channel structure" (nerve, blood vessel, lymphatic, interspace, aperture, etc.) through quantitative and qualitative analysis about the economic information channel in the human body, which eliminates the probability of single channel structure in the information channel of channel (meridian)-collateral system. After comprehensive analysis on the current researches, the author puts forward a neodoxy, i.e., the body "information channel" structure of the channel-collateral system, mainly follows the distribution regularity of systemic statistics, and is not a single specific entity; various layers of the information channel in the main stems of the channel-collaterals are composed of optimized structure tissues. Hence, the structure of this information channel of channel-collateral system is an overall-optimized, sequential and compatible systemic structure. From this neodoxy, the author brings forward a working principle of channel-collaterals, which is supported theoretically by bio-auxology. The longitudinal distribution of the main stems of meridian-collaterals is considered to result from that in the process of the animal evolution, in the animals moving forward, the microscopic complicated movement of intracorporeal information and energy molecules is related to the forward macroscopic and non-uniform movement of organism in trans-measure. Its impulse and kinetic momentum forms a main vector in the longitudinal direction of the body (the direction of the main stem of channel-collaterals). In order to adapt to and utilize natural regularities, the main stems of the channel-collaterals gradually differentiate and evolve in the living organism, forming a whole system. The "hypothesis of biological origin of channel-collateral system" and "that of information channel of the channel-collaterals in the body" constitute a relatively complete theoretical system framework.

  19. Ion channeling revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Corona, Aldo; Nguyen, Anh

    2014-09-01

    A MS Excel program has been written that calculates accidental, or unintentional, ion channeling in cubic bcc, fcc and diamond lattice crystals or polycrystalline materials. This becomes an important issue when simulating the creation by energetic neutrons of point displacement damage and extended defects using beams of ions. All of the tables and graphs in the three Ion Beam Analysis Handbooks that previously had to be manually looked up and read from were programed into Excel in handy lookup tables, or parameterized, for the case of the graphs, using rather simple exponential functions with different powers of the argument. The program then offers an extremely convenient way to calculate axial and planar half-angles and minimum yield or dechanneling probabilities, effects on half-angles of amorphous overlayers, accidental channeling probabilities for randomly oriented crystals or crystallites, and finally a way to automatically generate stereographic projections of axial and planar channeling half-angles. The program can generate these projections and calculate these probabilities for axes and [hkl] planes up to (555).

  20. Superposition properties of interacting ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Keleshian, A M; Yeo, G F; Edeson, R O; Madsen, B W

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of patch clamp data is widely based on stochastic models of single-channel kinetics. Membrane patches often contain more than one active channel of a given type, and it is usually assumed that these behave independently in order to interpret the record and infer individual channel properties. However, recent studies suggest there are significant channel interactions in some systems. We examine a model of dependence in a system of two identical channels, each modeled by a continuous-time Markov chain in which specified transition rates are dependent on the conductance state of the other channel, changing instantaneously when the other channel opens or closes. Each channel then has, e.g., a closed time density that is conditional on the other channel being open or closed, these being identical under independence. We relate the two densities by a convolution function that embodies information about, and serves to quantify, dependence in the closed class. Distributions of observable (superposition) sojourn times are given in terms of these conditional densities. The behavior of two channel systems based on two- and three-state Markov models is examined by simulation. Optimized fitting of simulated data using reasonable parameters values and sample size indicates that both positive and negative cooperativity can be distinguished from independence. PMID:7524711

  1. Improvements in haemolysis and indicators of erythrocyte survival do not correlate with acute vaso-occlusive crises in patients with sickle cell disease: a phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study of the Gardos channel blocker senicapoc (ICA-17043).

    PubMed

    Ataga, Kenneth I; Reid, Marvin; Ballas, Samir K; Yasin, Zahida; Bigelow, Carolyn; James, Luther St; Smith, Wally R; Galacteros, Frederic; Kutlar, Abdullah; Hull, James H; Stocker, Jonathan W

    2011-04-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) hydration is regulated in part by the Ca(2+) -activated K(+) efflux (Gardos) channel. Senicapoc selectively blocks potassium efflux through the Gardos channel, reducing RBC dehydration and haemolysis, and increasing haemoglobin levels in sickle cell disease (SCD). This randomized, placebo-controlled trial was designed to determine the safety and clinical efficacy of senicapoc in SCD patients. One hundred and forty-five patients were randomized to receive senicapoc and 144 patients to receive placebo for 52 weeks. Consistent with a previous study, patients in the senicapoc group had significantly increased haematocrit, haemoglobin, and decreased numbers of both dense erythrocytes and reticulocytes when compared to the placebo group. The unblinded Data Monitoring Committee terminated this study early due to a lack of efficacy when it determined that, despite improvements in anaemia and haemolysis, no significant improvement in the rate of sickle cell painful crises was observed in patients treated with senicapoc compared to those on placebo (0·38 vs. 0·31, respectively). Comparisons of the times to first, second and third crises between the senicapoc and placebo groups were not statistically significant. Nausea and urinary tract infections occurred more frequently in the senicapoc group than placebo. Serious adverse events were similar in the two groups.

  2. Mitigation of Control Channel Jamming under Node Capture Attacks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    9] to randomly hop away from jammed channels and re-synchronize on available channels and the use of wormholes [10] to create a channel for reports or...Apr. 2007, pp. 499–508. [10] M. C̆agalj, S. C̆apkun, and J.-P. Hubaux, “ Wormhole -based an- tijamming techniques in sensor networks,” IEEE Transactions

  3. Low and moderate-fat plant sterol fortified soymilk in modulation of plasma lipids and cholesterol kinetics in subjects with normal to high cholesterol concentrations: report on two randomized crossover studies

    PubMed Central

    Rideout, Todd C; Chan, Yen-Ming; Harding, Scott V; Jones, Peter JH

    2009-01-01

    Background Although consumption of various plant sterol (PS)-enriched beverages is effective in lowering plasma cholesterol, the lipid-lowering potential of PS in a soymilk format has not been investigated thoroughly. Therefore, to evaluate the efficacy of PS-enriched soy beverages on plasma lipids and cholesterol kinetics, we conducted two separate 28 d dietary controlled cross-over studies. In study 1, the cholesterol-lowering efficacy of a low-fat (2 g/serving) PS enriched soy beverage was examined in 33 normal cholesterolemic subjects in comparison with 1% dairy milk. In study 2, we investigated the efficacy of a moderate-fat (3.5 g/serving) PS-enriched soy beverage on plasma cholesterol concentrations and cholesterol kinetic responses in 23 hypercholesterolemic subjects compared with 1% dairy milk. Both the low and moderate-fat PS-enriched soymilk varieties provided 1.95 g PS/d. Endpoint plasma variables were analyzed by repeated-measures ANOVA using baseline values as covariates for plasma lipid measurements. Results In comparison with the 1% dairy milk control, the low-fat soy beverage reduced (P < 0.05) total and LDL-cholesterol by 10 and 13%, respectively. Consumption of the moderate-fat PS-enriched soy beverage reduced (P < 0.05) plasma total and LDL-cholesterol by 12 and 15% respectively. Fasting triglycerides were reduced by 9.4% following consumption of the moderate-fat soy beverage in comparison with the 1% dairy milk. Both low and moderate-fat PS-enriched soy varieties reduced (P < 0.05) LDL:HDL and TC:HDL ratios compared with the 1% dairy milk control. Consumption of the moderate-fat PS-enriched soymilk reduced (P < 0.05) cholesterol absorption by 27%, but did not alter cholesterol synthesis in comparison with 1% dairy milk. Conclusion We conclude that, compared to 1% dairy milk, consumption of low and moderate-fat PS-enriched soy beverages represents an effective dietary strategy to reduce circulating lipid concentrations in normal to

  4. Molecular random tilings as glasses

    PubMed Central

    Garrahan, Juan P.; Stannard, Andrew; Blunt, Matthew O.; Beton, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that p-terphenyl-3,5,3′,5′-tetracarboxylic acid adsorbed on graphite self-assembles into a two-dimensional rhombus random tiling. This tiling is close to ideal, displaying long-range correlations punctuated by sparse localized tiling defects. In this article we explore the analogy between dynamic arrest in this type of random tilings and that of structural glasses. We show that the structural relaxation of these systems is via the propagation–reaction of tiling defects, giving rise to dynamic heterogeneity. We study the scaling properties of the dynamics and discuss connections with kinetically constrained models of glasses. PMID:19720990

  5. Dynamic Channel Allocation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    7 1 . Fixed Channel Allocation (FCA) ........................................................7 2. Dynamic Channel ...19 7. CSMA/CD-Based Multiple Network Lines .....................................20 8. Hybrid Channel Allocation in Wireless Networks...28 1 . Channel Allocation

  6. Kinetics of Deliquescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, R. L.; Lewis, E.

    2009-12-01

    We examine deliquescence phase transformation for inorganic salt particles ranging from bulk down to several nanometers in size. Thermodynamic properties of the particles, coated with aqueous solution layers of varying thickness and surrounded by vapor, are analyzed. A thin layer criterion is introduced to define a limiting deliquescence relative humidity (DRH). Nano-size particles are predicted to deliquesce at relative humidity just below the DRH on crossing a nucleation barrier, located at a critical solution layer thickness. This barrier vanishes precisely at the DRH defined by the criterion. For a population of particles, the inherent random nature of the nucleation process is predicted to result in a distribution of RH values over which deliquescence will be seen to occur. Measurement of this (apparent) non-abrupt deliquescence of the population should provide both a validation of the nucleation mechanism and a quantitative determination of nucleation rate. This paper presents calculations of crossing (i.e. deliquescence) rate using the theory of mean first passage times (MFPT). MFPT theory is shown to provide a generalization of Becker-Döring nucleation kinetics especially useful for barrier heights much lower than those typically encountered in vapor-liquid nucleation. Barrier heights for deliquescence depend on the concentration of pre-deliquesced particles and observation time, but are typically in the 5-15kT range. Calculations use the tandem nano-differential mobility analyzer setup of Biskos et al. [1] as a model framework. In their experiment, a concentration of dry salt particles is subject to a higher RH for some observation time, after which is measured the (well-separated) populations of un-deliquesced particles and those that have deliquesced. Theoretical estimates for the conversion kinetics are presented as a function of dry particle size, DRH, and salt properties. [1] G. Biskos, A. Malinowski, L. M. Russell, P. R. Buseck, and S. T. Martin

  7. Kinetics of Propargyl Radical Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Klippenstein, Stephen J; Miller, James A; Jasper, Ahren W

    2015-07-16

    Due to the prominent role of the propargyl radical for hydrocarbon growth within combustion environments, it is important to understand the kinetics of its formation and loss. The ab initio transition state theory-based master equation method is used to obtain theoretical kinetic predictions for the temperature and pressure dependence of the thermal decomposition of propargyl, which may be its primary loss channel under some conditions. The potential energy surface for the decomposition of propargyl is first mapped at a high level of theory with a combination of coupled cluster and multireference perturbation calculations. Variational transition state theory is then used to predict the microcanonical rate coefficients, which are subsequently implemented within the multiple-well multiple-channel master equation. A variety of energy transfer parameters are considered, and the sensitivity of the thermal rate predictions to these parameters is explored. The predictions for the thermal decomposition rate coefficient are found to be in good agreement with the limited experimental data. Modified Arrhenius representations of the rate constants are reported for utility in combustion modeling.

  8. Modeling ion channels: Past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels are membrane-bound enzymes whose catalytic sites are ion-conducting pores that open and close (gate) in response to specific environmental stimuli. Ion channels are important contributors to cell signaling and homeostasis. Our current understanding of gating is the product of 60 plus years of voltage-clamp recording augmented by intervention in the form of environmental, chemical, and mutational perturbations. The need for good phenomenological models of gating has evolved in parallel with the sophistication of experimental technique. The goal of modeling is to develop realistic schemes that not only describe data, but also accurately reflect mechanisms of action. This review covers three areas that have contributed to the understanding of ion channels: traditional Eyring kinetic theory, molecular dynamics analysis, and statistical thermodynamics. Although the primary emphasis is on voltage-dependent channels, the methods discussed here are easily generalized to other stimuli and could be applied to any ion channel and indeed any macromolecule. PMID:24935742

  9. Random Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messaro. Semma; Harrison, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Ares I Zonal Random vibration environments due to acoustic impingement and combustion processes are develop for liftoff, ascent and reentry. Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components are developed by enveloping the applicable zonal environments where each component is located. Random vibration tests will be conducted to assure that these components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments. Methodology: Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components were desired that would envelope all the applicable environments where each component was located. Applicable Ares I Vehicle drawings and design information needed to be assessed to determine the location(s) for each component on the Ares I Upper Stage. Design and test criteria needed to be developed by plotting and enveloping the applicable environments using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software and documenting them in a report Using Microsoft Word Processing Software. Conclusion: Random vibration liftoff, ascent, and green run design & test criteria for the Upper Stage Pyrotechnic Components were developed by using Microsoft Excel to envelope zonal environments applicable to each component. Results were transferred from Excel into a report using Microsoft Word. After the report is reviewed and edited by my mentor it will be submitted for publication as an attachment to a memorandum. Pyrotechnic component designers will extract criteria from my report for incorporation into the design and test specifications for components. Eventually the hardware will be tested to the environments I developed to assure that the components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments.

  10. Chemical and Biological Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel', N. M.

    1981-10-01

    Examples of the application of the methods and ideas of chemical kinetics in various branches of chemistry and biology are considered and the results of studies on the kinetics and mechanisms of autoxidation and inhibited and catalysed oxidation of organic substances in the liquid phase are surveyed. Problems of the kinetics of the ageing of polymers and the principles of their stabilisation are discussed and certain trends in biological kinetics (kinetics of tumour growth, kinetic criteria of the effectiveness of chemotherapy, problems of gerontology, etc.) are considered. The bibliography includes 281 references.

  11. Generalized random sequential adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarjus, G.; Schaaf, P.; Talbot, J.

    1990-12-01

    Adsorption of hard spherical particles onto a flat uniform surface is analyzed by using generalized random sequential adsorption (RSA) models. These models are defined by releasing the condition of immobility present in the usual RSA rules to allow for desorption or surface diffusion. Contrary to the simple RSA case, generalized RSA processes are no longer irreversible and the system formed by the adsorbed particles on the surface may reach an equilibrium state. We show by using a distribution function approach that the kinetics of such processes can be described by means of an exact infinite hierarchy of equations reminiscent of the Kirkwood-Salsburg hierarchy for systems at equilibrium. We illustrate the way in which the systems produced by adsorption/desorption and by adsorption/diffusion evolve between the two limits represented by ``simple RSA'' and ``equilibrium'' by considering approximate solutions in terms of truncated density expansions.

  12. Fractional randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  13. Kinetic Transport in Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marklof, Jens

    2010-03-01

    One of the central challenges in kinetic theory is the derivation of macroscopic evolution equations--describing, for example, the dynamics of an electron gas--from the underlying fundamental microscopic laws of classical or quantum mechanics. An iconic mathematical model in this research area is the Lorentz gas, which describes an ensemble of non-interacting point particles in an infinite array of spherical scatterers. In the case of a disordered scatterer configuration, the classical results by Gallavotti, Spohn and Boldrighini-Bunimovich-Sinai show that the time evolution of a macroscopic particle cloud is governed, in the limit of small scatterer density (Boltzmann-Grad limit), by the linear Boltzmann equation. In this lecture I will discuss the recent discovery that for a periodic configuration of scatterers the linear Boltzmann equation fails, and the random flight process that emerges in the Boltzmann-Grad limit is substantially more complicated. The key ingredient in the description of the limiting stochastic process is the renormalization dynamics on the space of lattices, a powerful technique that has recently been successfully applied also to other open problems in mathematical physics, including KAM theory and quantum chaos. This lecture is based on joint work with Andreas Strömbergsson, Uppsala.

  14. Fractal analysis of a voltage-dependent potassium channel from cultured mouse hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Liebovitch, L S; Sullivan, J M

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of ion channels have been widely modeled as a Markov process. In these models it is assumed that the channel protein has a small number of discrete conformational states and the kinetic rate constants connecting these states are constant. In the alternative fractal model the spontaneous fluctuations of the channel protein at many different time scales are represented by a kinetic rate constant k = At1-D, where A is the kinetic setpoint and D the fractal dimension. Single-channel currents were recorded at 146 mM external K+ from an inwardly rectifying, 120 pS, K+ selective, voltage-sensitive channel in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. The kinetics of these channels were found to be statistically self-similar at different time scales as predicted by the fractal model. The fractal dimensions were approximately 2 for the closed times and approximately 1 for the open times and did not depend on voltage. For both the open and closed times the logarithm of the kinetic setpoint was found to be proportional to the applied voltage, which indicates that the gating of this channel involves the net inward movement of approximately one negative charge when this channel opens. Thus, the open and closed times and the voltage dependence of the gating of this channel are well described by the fractal model. PMID:2447974

  15. Fiber channel services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavalli, Kumar

    1993-02-01

    There exists an increasing need, in the user environment, for a computer interconnect scheme with higher speed, higher performance and longer reach than the presently available alternatives. There is also a great demand for a multidirectional networking to provide high bandwidth on demand, high distribution capability, random access and high transport flexibility. The users expect low access delay, low transfer delay, high data integrity and a definable quality of service from their networks. All these requirements, however, have to be met with the preservation of the existing software in which a lot of user investment has already been made. In answer to the demands, there has been an emergence of a new network to interconnect heterogeneous systems at very high cost performance ratio. This new network is based on Fiber Channel Standard, blessed by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).

  16. Tortuosity of lightning return stroke channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.; Gilson, B.

    1984-01-01

    Data obtained from photographs of lightning are presented on the tortuosity of return stroke channels. The data were obtained by making piecewise linear fits to the channels, and recording the cartesian coordinates of the ends of each linear segment. The mean change between ends of the segments was nearly zero in the horizontal direction and was about eight meters in the vertical direction. Histograms of these changes are presented. These data were used to create model lightning channels and to predict the electric fields radiated during return strokes. This was done using a computer generated random walk in which linear segments were placed end-to-end to form a piecewise linear representation of the channel. The computer selected random numbers for the ends of the segments assuming a normal distribution with the measured statistics. Once the channels were simulated, the electric fields radiated during a return stroke were predicted using a transmission line model on each segment. It was found that realistic channels are obtained with this procedure, but only if the model includes two scales of tortuosity: fine scale irregularities corresponding to the local channel tortuosity which are superimposed on large scale horizontal drifts. The two scales of tortuosity are also necessary to obtain agreement between the electric fields computed mathematically from the simulated channels and the electric fields radiated from real return strokes. Without large scale drifts, the computed electric fields do not have the undulations characteristics of the data.

  17. Hippocampal hypoglycaemia-activated K+ channels: single-channel analysis of glucose and voltage dependence.

    PubMed

    Tromba, C; Salvaggio, A; Racagni, G; Volterra, A

    1994-11-01

    The effect of glucose on kinetics and the voltage-dependent characteristics of glucose-sensitive channels in hippocampal neurons were examined with the cell-attached mode of the patch-clamp technique. Recordings of a 100-pS K+ channel in the presence or absence of glucose demonstrate that the increase in channel open state probability (Po) induced by glucose deprivation (40- to 400-times the control in high-glucose medium) was largely due to a decrease in the global amount of time spent by the channel in a long-lived closed state. The Po value of the same 100-pS channel was also found to increase (by approx. 80-times) following a depolarization of 40 mV from rest, the main factor responsible for this being a dramatic shortening of the long closed-times on depolarization. Another glucose-sensitive channel of smaller conductance (approx. 10 pS) showed a similar dependence of Po on glucose, but different dependence on voltage, with long openings at the same hyperpolarized potentials where the 100-pS channel was almost always closed. Our results indicate that the action of glucose on the kinetics of hippocampal channels closely resembles that of ATP-sensitive channels in pancreatic beta-cells. Furthermore, they indicate that the two types of glucose-sensitive channels found in hippocampal neurons, differing not only in their single-channel conductance but also in the dependence on voltage, could play different roles in the responses of these cells to modified energetic supply.

  18. Random grammars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshev, V. A.

    1998-04-01

    Contents § 1. Definitions1.1. Grammars1.2. Random grammars and L-systems1.3. Semigroup representations § 2. Infinite string dynamics2.1. Cluster expansion2.2. Cluster dynamics2.3. Local observer § 3. Large time behaviour: small perturbations3.1. Invariant measures3.2. Classification § 4. Large time behaviour: context free case4.1. Invariant measures for grammars4.2. L-systems4.3. Fractal correlation functions4.4. Measures on languages Bibliography

  19. Eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels.

    PubMed

    Arnadóttir, Jóhanna; Chalfie, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Mechanosensitive ion channels are gated directly by physical stimuli and transduce these stimuli into electrical signals. Several criteria must apply for a channel to be considered mechanically gated. Mechanosensitive channels from bacterial systems have met these criteria, but few eukaryotic channels have been confirmed by the same standards. Recent work has suggested or confirmed that diverse types of channels, including TRP channels, K(2P) channels, MscS-like proteins, and DEG/ENaC channels, are mechanically gated. Several studies point to the importance of the plasma membrane for channel gating, but intracellular and/or extracellular structures may also be required.

  20. Computational model for Halorhodopsin photocurrent kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Jaime; Stefanescu, Roxana; Talathi, Sachin

    2013-03-01

    Optogenetics is a rapidly developing novel optical stimulation technique that employs light activated ion channels to excite (using channelrhodopsin (ChR)) or suppress (using halorhodopsin (HR)) impulse activity in neurons with high temporal and spatial resolution. This technique holds enormous potential to externally control activity states in neuronal networks. The channel kinetics of ChR and HR are well understood and amenable for mathematical modeling. Significant progress has been made in recent years to develop models for ChR channel kinetics. To date however, there is no model to mimic photocurrents produced by HR. Here, we report the first model developed for HR photocurrents based on a four-state model of the HR photocurrent kinetics. The model provides an excellent fit (root-mean-square error of 3.1862x10-4, to an empirical profile of experimentally measured HR photocurrents. In combination, mathematical models for ChR and HR photocurrents can provide effective means to design test light based control systems to regulate neural activity, which in turn may have implications for the development of novel light based stimulation paradigms for brain disease control. I would like to thank the University of Florida and the Physics Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program, funded through NSF DMR-1156737. This research was also supported through start-up funds provided to Dr. Sachin Talathi

  1. Random distributed feedback fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turitsyn, Sergei K.; Babin, Sergey A.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Vatnik, Ilya D.; Nikulin, Maxim; Podivilov, Evgenii V.

    2014-09-01

    of a stationary near-Gaussian beam with a narrow spectrum. A random distributed feedback fibre laser has efficiency and performance that are comparable to and even exceed those of similar conventional fibre lasers. The key features of the generated radiation of random distributed feedback fibre lasers include: a stationary narrow-band continuous modeless spectrum that is free of mode competition, nonlinear power broadening, and an output beam with a Gaussian profile in the fundamental transverse mode (generated both in single mode and multi-mode fibres). This review presents the current status of research in the field of random fibre lasers and shows their potential and perspectives. We start with an introductory overview of conventional distributed feedback lasers and traditional random lasers to set the stage for discussion of random fibre lasers. We then present a theoretical analysis and experimental studies of various random fibre laser configurations, including widely tunable, multi-wavelength, narrow-band generation, and random fibre lasers operating in different spectral bands in the 1-1.6 μm range. Then we discuss existing and future applications of random fibre lasers, including telecommunication and distributed long reach sensor systems. A theoretical description of random lasers is very challenging and is strongly linked with the theory of disordered systems and kinetic theory. We outline two key models governing the generation of random fibre lasers: the average power balance model and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation based model. Recently invented random distributed feedback fibre lasers represent a new and exciting field of research that brings together such diverse areas of science as laser physics, the theory of disordered systems, fibre optics and nonlinear science. Stable random generation in optical fibre opens up new possibilities for research on wave transport and localization in disordered media. We hope that this review will provide

  2. Two spatial light modulator system for laboratory simulation of random beam propagation in random media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Toselli, Italo; Korotkova, Olga

    2016-02-10

    An optical system consisting of a laser source and two independent consecutive phase-only spatial light modulators (SLMs) is shown to accurately simulate a generated random beam (first SLM) after interaction with a stationary random medium (second SLM). To illustrate the range of possibilities, a recently introduced class of random optical frames is examined on propagation in free space and several weak turbulent channels with Kolmogorov and non-Kolmogorov statistics.

  3. Is random access memory random?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Most software is contructed on the assumption that the programs and data are stored in random access memory (RAM). Physical limitations on the relative speeds of processor and memory elements lead to a variety of memory organizations that match processor addressing rate with memory service rate. These include interleaved and cached memory. A very high fraction of a processor's address requests can be satified from the cache without reference to the main memory. The cache requests information from main memory in blocks that can be transferred at the full memory speed. Programmers who organize algorithms for locality can realize the highest performance from these computers.

  4. Digital data communications over microwave radio channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salz, J.

    1984-10-01

    A major contribution to system outage in a terrestrial digital radio channel is deep fading of the frequency transfer characteristic, which in addition to causing a precipitous drop in received signal-to-noise ratio also causes signal dispersion that can result in severe intersymbol interference. Because the temporal variation of the channel is slow compared to the signaling rate, the information theoretic channel capacity and the efficiency index in bits/cycle can be viewed as random processes. Based on an established mathematical model for fading channels, the probability distribution of channel capacity and the distribution of efficiency indices for different communications techniques are estimated. A crucial obstacle to achieving these rates is the nonlinear distortion introduced by power amplifiers. A method for coping with this nonlinear distortion is also described.

  5. Pair creation in heavy ion channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, N. A.; Harman, Z.

    2016-04-01

    Heavy ions channeled through crystals with multi-GeV kinetic energies can create electron-positron pairs. In the framework of the ion, the energy of virtual photons arising from the periodic crystal potential may exceed the threshold 2mec2. The repeated periodic collisions with the crystal ions yield high pair production rates. When the virtual photon frequency matches a nuclear transition in the ion, the production rate can be resonantly increased. In this two-step excitation-pair conversion scheme, the excitation rates are coherently enhanced, and scale approximately quadratically with the number of crystal sites along the channel.

  6. Probability density functions in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinavahi, Surya P. G.

    1992-01-01

    The probability density functions (pdf's) of the fluctuating velocity components, as well as their first and second derivatives, are calculated using data from the direct numerical simulations (DNS) of fully developed turbulent channel flow. It is observed that, beyond the buffer region, the pdf of each of these quantities is independent of the distance from the channel wall. It is further observed that, beyond the buffer region, the pdf's for all the first derivatives collapse onto a single universal curve and those of the second derivatives also collapse onto another universal curve, irrespective of the distance from the wall. The kinetic-energy dissipation rate exhibits log normal behavior.

  7. Modeling a Ca2+ Channel/BKCa Channel Complex at the Single-Complex Level

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    BKCa-channel activity often affects the firing properties of neurons, the shapes of neuronal action potentials (APs), and in some cases the extent of neurotransmitter release. It has become clear that BKCa channels often form complexes with voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (CaV channels) such that when a CaV channel is activated, the ensuing influx of Ca2+ activates its closely associated BKCa channel. Thus, in modeling the electrical properties of neurons, it would be useful to have quantitative models of CaV/BKCa complexes. Furthermore, in a population of CaV/BKCa complexes, all BKCa channels are not exposed to the same Ca2+ concentration at the same time. Thus, stochastic rather than deterministic models are required. To date, however, no such models have been described. Here, however, I present a stochastic model of a CaV2.1/BKCa(α-only) complex, as might be found in a central nerve terminal. The CaV2.1/BKCa model is based on kinetic modeling of its two component channels at physiological temperature. Surprisingly, The CaV2.1/BKCa model predicts that although the CaV channel will open nearly every time during a typical cortical AP, its associated BKCa channel is expected to open in only 30% of trials, and this percentage is very sensitive to the duration of the AP, the distance between the two channels in the complex, and the presence of fast internal Ca2+ buffers. Also, the model predicts that the kinetics of the BKCa currents of a population of CaV2.1/BKCa complexes will not be limited by the kinetics of the CaV2.1 channel, and during a train of APs, the current response of the complex is expected to faithfully follow even very rapid trains. Aside from providing insight into how these complexes are likely to behave in vivo, the models presented here could also be of use more generally as components of higher-level models of neural function. PMID:25517147

  8. The Psychology of Channeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corey, Michael A.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretically analyzes phenomenon of channeling from perspective of C. G. Jung's analytic psychology. Hypothesizes that contact with otherworldly spiritual beings claimed by channelers is actually projected contact with contents of channeler's own unconscious mind. Suggests that channelers seek more constructive ways of contacting their…

  9. Mitochondrial chloride channels: electrophysiological characterization and pH induction of channel pore dilation.

    PubMed

    Misak, Anton; Grman, Marian; Malekova, Lubica; Novotova, Marta; Markova, Jana; Krizanova, Olga; Ondrias, Karol; Tomaskova, Zuzana

    2013-09-01

    Physiological and pathological functions of mitochondria are highly dependent on the properties and regulation of mitochondrial ion channels. There is still no clear understanding of the molecular identity, regulation, and properties of anion mitochondrial channels. The inner membrane anion channel (IMAC) was assumed to be equivalent to mitochondrial centum picosiemens (mCS). However, the different properties of IMAC and mCS channels challenges this opinion. In our study, we characterized the single-channel anion selectivity and pH regulation of chloride channels from purified cardiac mitochondria. We observed that channel conductance decreased in the order: Cl⁻ > Br⁻ > I⁻ > chlorate ≈ formate > acetate, and that gluconate did not permeate under control conditions. The selectivity sequence was Br⁻ ≥ chlorate ≥ I⁻ ≥ Cl⁻ ≥ formate ≈ acetate. Measurement of the concentration dependence of chloride conductance revealed altered channel gating kinetics, which was demonstrated by prolonged mean open time value with increasing chloride concentration. The observed mitochondrial chloride channels were in many respects similar to those of mCS, but not those of IMAC. Surprisingly, we observed that acidic pH increased channel conductance and that an increase of pH from 7.4 to 8.5 reduced it. The gluconate current appeared and gradually increased when pH decreased from pH 7.0 to 5.6. Our results indicate that pH regulates the channel pore diameter in such a way that dilation increases with more acidic pH. We assume this newly observed pH-dependent anion channel property may be involved in pH regulation of anion distribution in different mitochondrial compartments.

  10. Kinetic properties of fractal stellar media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumak, O. V.; Rastorguev, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic processes in fractal stellar media are analysed in terms of the approach developed in our earlier paper involving a generalization of the nearest neighbour and random force distributions to fractal media. Diffusion is investigated in the approximation of scale-dependent conditional density based on an analysis of the solutions of the corresponding Langevin equations. It is shown that kinetic parameters (time-scales, coefficients of dynamic friction, diffusion, etc.) for fractal stellar media can differ significantly both qualitatively and quantitatively from the corresponding parameters for a quasi-uniform random media with limited fluctuations. The most important difference is that in the fractal case, kinetic parameters depend on spatial scalelength and fractal dimension of the medium studied. A generalized kinetic equation for stellar media (fundamental equation of stellar dynamics) is derived in the Fokker-Planck approximation with the allowance for the fractal properties of the spatial stellar density distribution. Also derived are its limit forms that can be used to describe small departures of fractal gravitating medium from equilibrium.

  11. Mean first-passage times of non-Markovian random walkers in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérin, T.; Levernier, N.; Bénichou, O.; Voituriez, R.

    2016-06-01

    The first-passage time, defined as the time a random walker takes to reach a target point in a confining domain, is a key quantity in the theory of stochastic processes. Its importance comes from its crucial role in quantifying the efficiency of processes as varied as diffusion-limited reactions, target search processes or the spread of diseases. Most methods of determining the properties of first-passage time in confined domains have been limited to Markovian (memoryless) processes. However, as soon as the random walker interacts with its environment, memory effects cannot be neglected: that is, the future motion of the random walker does not depend only on its current position, but also on its past trajectory. Examples of non-Markovian dynamics include single-file diffusion in narrow channels, or the motion of a tracer particle either attached to a polymeric chain or diffusing in simple or complex fluids such as nematics, dense soft colloids or viscoelastic solutions. Here we introduce an analytical approach to calculate, in the limit of a large confining volume, the mean first-passage time of a Gaussian non-Markovian random walker to a target. The non-Markovian features of the dynamics are encompassed by determining the statistical properties of the fictitious trajectory that the random walker would follow after the first-passage event takes place, which are shown to govern the first-passage time kinetics. This analysis is applicable to a broad range of stochastic processes, which may be correlated at long times. Our theoretical predictions are confirmed by numerical simulations for several examples of non-Markovian processes, including the case of fractional Brownian motion in one and higher dimensions. These results reveal, on the basis of Gaussian processes, the importance of memory effects in first-passage statistics of non-Markovian random walkers in confinement.

  12. Channel nut tool

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Marvin

    2016-01-12

    A method, system, and apparatus for installing channel nuts includes a shank, a handle formed on a first end of a shank, and an end piece with a threaded shaft configured to receive a channel nut formed on the second end of the shaft. The tool can be used to insert or remove a channel nut in a channel framing system and then removed from the channel nut.

  13. Src Tyrosine Kinase Alters Gating of Hyperpolarization-Activated HCN4 Pacemaker Channel through Tyr531

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen-Hong; Zhang, Qi; Teng, Bunyen; Mustafa, S. Jamal; Huang, Jian-Ying; Yu, Han-Gang

    2009-01-01

    We recently discovered that the constitutively active Src tyrosine kinase can enhance the HCN4 channel activity by binding to the channel protein. To investigate the mechanism of modulation by Src of HCN channels, we studied the effects of a selective inhibitor of Src tyrosine kinase, PP2, on HCN4 and its mutant channels ex pressed in HEK293 cells using whole-cell patch clamp technique. We found that PP2 can inhibit HCN4 currents by negatively shifting the voltage dependence of channel activation, decreasing the whole-cell channel conductance, and slowing activation and deactivation kinetics. Screening putative tyrosine residues subject to phosphorylation yielded two candidates: Tyr531 and Tyr554. Substituting HCN4-Tyr531 with phenylalanine largely abolished the effects of PP2 on HCN4 channels. Replacing HCN4-Tyr554 by phenylalanine did not abolish the effects of PP2 on voltage-dependent activation, but did eliminate PP2-induced slowing of channel kinetics. The inhibitory effects of HCN channels associated with reduced Src tyrosine activity is confirmed in HL-1 cardiomyocytes. Finally, we found that PP2 can decrease the heart rate in a mouse model. These results demonstrate that Src tyrosine kinase enhances HCN4 currents by shifting their activation to more positive potentials and increasing the whole-cell channel conductance as well as speeding the channel kinetics. The tyrosine residue that mediates most of Src actions on HCN4 channels is Tyr531. PMID:17977941

  14. A new derivation of the randomness parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongyun

    2007-10-01

    For a stochastic stepper that can only step forward, there are two randomnesses: (1) the randomness in the cycle time and (2) the randomness in the number of steps (cycles) over long time. The equivalence between these two randomnesses was previously established using the approach of Laplace transform [M. J. Schnitzer and S. M. Block, "Statistical kinetics of processive enzymes," Cold Spring Harbor Symp. Quant. Biol. 60, 793 (1995)]. In this study, we first discuss the problems of this approach when the cycle time distribution has a discrete component, and then present a new derivation based on the framework of semi-Markov processes with age structure. We also show that the equivalence between the two randomnesses depends on the existence of the first moment of the waiting time for completing the first cycle, which is strongly affected by the initial age distribution. Therefore, any derivation that concludes the equivalence categorically regardless of the initial age distribution is mathematically questionable.

  15. Visual alchemy: stereoscopic adaptation produces kinetic depth from random noise.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, M; Blake, R

    1993-01-01

    Observers perceive incoherent motion and no hint of depth when viewing stochastic motion, in which stimulus elements move in all possible directions. As earlier work has shown, depth can be specified by introducing a brief interocular delay between the presentation of corresponding animation frames of this 'noise' to the left and right eyes. A study is reported in which observers were adapted to a stereoscopic display consisting of coherent planes of motion at different depths. This stereoscopic adaptation caused incoherent depthless motion to take on the qualities of structure and depth, and it could nullify the depth induced by interocular delay. The findings are interpreted within the context of a neural model consisting of units selectively responsive to different directions of motion at different planes of depth.

  16. Multiple channel programmable coincidence counter

    DOEpatents

    Arnone, Gaetano J.

    1990-01-01

    A programmable digital coincidence counter having multiple channels and featuring minimal dead time. Neutron detectors supply electrical pulses to a synchronizing circuit which in turn inputs derandomized pulses to an adding circuit. A random access memory circuit connected as a programmable length shift register receives and shifts the sum of the pulses, and outputs to a serializer. A counter is input by the adding circuit and downcounted by the seralizer, one pulse at a time. The decoded contents of the counter after each decrement is output to scalers.

  17. Microfluidic channel fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Don W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2001-01-01

    A new channel structure for microfluidic systems and process for fabricating this structure. In contrast to the conventional practice of fabricating fluid channels as trenches or grooves in a substrate, fluid channels are fabricated as thin walled raised structures on a substrate. Microfluidic devices produced in accordance with the invention are a hybrid assembly generally consisting of three layers: 1) a substrate that can or cannot be an electrical insulator; 2) a middle layer, that is an electrically conducting material and preferably silicon, forms the channel walls whose height defines the channel height, joined to and extending from the substrate; and 3) a top layer, joined to the top of the channels, that forms a cover for the channels. The channels can be defined by photolithographic techniques and are produced by etching away the material around the channel walls.

  18. Capillary wave measurements on helically-supported capillary channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandurwala, Fahim; Thiessen, David

    2010-10-01

    NASA is considering power generation by the Rankine cycle to save weight on long-duration manned missions to the moon or Mars. Phase separation technology is critical to this process in microgravity. Arrays of capillary channels might be useful for filtering liquid drops from a flowing vapor. The efficiency of droplet capture by a helically-supported capillary channel is being studied. A droplet impinging on the channel launches capillary waves that propagate down the channel helping to dissipate some of the drop's kinetic energy. High-speed video of the channel combined with image processing allows for measurement of the amplitude and speed of the wave packets. Increasing the pitch of the support structure decreases the wave speed. An understanding of the dynamic response of the channel to drop impact is a first step in predicting drop-capture efficiency.

  19. Studying mechanosensitive ion channels with an automated patch clamp.

    PubMed

    Barthmes, Maria; Jose, Mac Donald F; Birkner, Jan Peter; Brüggemann, Andrea; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Koçer, Armağan

    2014-03-01

    Patch clamp electrophysiology is the main technique to study mechanosensitive ion channels (MSCs), however, conventional patch clamping is laborious and success and output depends on the skills of the operator. Even though automated patch systems solve these problems for other ion channels, they could not be applied to MSCs. Here, we report on activation and single channel analysis of a bacterial mechanosensitive ion channel using an automated patch clamp system. With the automated system, we could patch not only giant unilamellar liposomes but also giant Escherichia coli (E. coli) spheroplasts. The tension sensitivity and channel kinetics data obtained in the automated system were in good agreement with that obtained from the conventional patch clamp. The findings will pave the way to high throughput fundamental and drug screening studies on mechanosensitive ion channels.

  20. Fast activation of dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels of skeletal muscle. Multiple pathways of channel gating

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Dihydropyridine (DHP) receptors of the transverse tubule membrane play two roles in excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle: (a) they function as the voltage sensor which undergoes fast transition to control release of calcium from sarcoplasmic reticulum, and (b) they provide the conducting unit of a slowly activating L-type calcium channel. To understand this dual function of the DHP receptor, we studied the effect of depolarizing conditioning pulse on the activation kinetics of the skeletal muscle DHP-sensitive calcium channels reconstituted into lipid bilayer membranes. Activation of the incorporated calcium channel was imposed by depolarizing test pulses from a holding potential of -80 mV. The gating kinetics of the channel was studied with ensemble averages of repeated episodes. Based on a first latency analysis, two distinct classes of channel openings occurred after depolarization: most had delayed latencies, distributed with a mode of 70 ms (slow gating); a small number of openings had short first latencies, < 12 ms (fast gating). A depolarizing conditioning pulse to +20 mV placed 200 ms before the test pulse (-10 mV), led to a significant increase in the activation rate of the ensemble averaged-current; the time constant of activation went from tau m = 110 ms (reference) to tau m = 45 ms after conditioning. This enhanced activation by the conditioning pulse was due to the increase in frequency of fast open events, which was a steep function of the intermediate voltage and the interval between the conditioning pulse and the test pulse. Additional analysis demonstrated that fast gating is the property of the same individual channels that normally gate slowly and that the channels adopt this property after a sojourn in the open state. The rapid secondary activation seen after depolarizing prepulses is not compatible with a linear activation model for the calcium channel, but is highly consistent with a cyclical model. A six- state cyclical model is

  1. Characteristic eddy decomposition of turbulence in a channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, Parviz; Moser, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    The proper orthogonal decomposition technique (Lumley's decomposition) is applied to the turbulent flow in a channel to extract coherent structures by decomposing the velocity field into characteristic eddies with random coefficients. In the homogeneous spatial directions, a generaliztion of the shot-noise expansion is used to determine the characteristic eddies. In this expansion, the Fourier coefficients of the characteristic eddy cannot be obtained from the second-order statistics. Three different techniques are used to determine the phases of these coefficients. They are based on: (1) the bispectrum, (2) a spatial compactness requirement, and (3) a functional continuity argument. Results from these three techniques are found to be similar in most respects. The implications of these techniques and the shot-noise expansion are discussed. The dominant eddy is found to contribute as much as 76 percent to the turbulent kinetic energy. In both 2D and 3D, the characteristic eddies consist of an ejection region straddled by streamwise vortices that leave the wall in the very short streamwise distance of about 100 wall units.

  2. Message passing with queues and channels

    DOEpatents

    Dozsa, Gabor J; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Ratterman, Joseph D; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Wisniewski, Robert W

    2013-09-24

    In an embodiment, a send thread receives an identifier that identifies a destination node and a pointer to data. The send thread creates a first send request in response to the receipt of the identifier and the data pointer. The send thread selects a selected channel from among a plurality of channels. The selected channel comprises a selected hand-off queue and an identification of a selected message unit. Each of the channels identifies a different message unit. The selected hand-off queue is randomly accessible. If the selected hand-off queue contains an available entry, the send thread adds the first send request to the selected hand-off queue. If the selected hand-off queue does not contain an available entry, the send thread removes a second send request from the selected hand-off queue and sends the second send request to the selected message unit.

  3. Chemical Kinetic Characterization of Combustion Toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Seiser, R; Bozzelli, J W; Da Costa, I; Fournet, R; Billaud, F; Battin-Leclerc, F; Seshadri, K; Westbrook, C K

    2001-03-20

    A study is performed to elucidate the chemical kinetic mechanism of combustion of toluene. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for toluene was improved by adding a more accurate description of the phenyl + O{sub 2} reaction channels. Results of the chemical kinetic mechanism are compared with experimental data obtained from premixed and nonpremixed systems. Under premixed conditions, predicted ignition delay times are compared with new experimental data obtained in shock tube. Also, calculated species concentration histories are compared to experimental flow reactor data from the literature. Critical conditions of extinction and ignition were measured in strained laminar flows under nonpremixed conditions in the counterflow configuration. Numerical calculations are performed using the chemical kinetic mechanism at conditions corresponding to those in the experiments. Critical conditions of extinction and ignition are predicted and compared with the experimental data. For both premixed and nonpremixed systems, sensitivity analysis was used to identify the reaction rate constants that control the overall rate of oxidation in each of the systems considered.

  4. Fading channel simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.E.; Fitzgerald, T.J.

    1991-12-31

    This invention relates to high frequency (HF) radio signal propagation through fading channels and, more particularly, to simulation of fading channels in order to characterize HF radio system performance in transmitting and receiving signals through such fading channels. Fading channel effects on a transmitted communication signal are simulated with both frequency and time variations using a channel scattering function to affect the transmitted signal. A conventional channel scattering function is converted to a series of channel realizations by multiplying the square root of the channel scattering function by a complex number of which the real and imaginary parts are each independent variables. The two-dimensional inverse-FFT of this complex-valued channel realization yields a matrix of channel coefficients that provide a complete frequency-time description of the channel. The transmitted radio signal is segmented to provide a series of transmitted signal and each segment is subject to FFT to generate a series of signal coefficient matrices. The channel coefficient matrices and signal coefficient matrices are then multiplied and subjected to inverse-FFT to output a signal representing the received affected radio signal. A variety of channel scattering functions can be used to characterize the response of a transmitter-receiver system to such atmospheric effects.

  5. Kinetics of proton release and uptake by channelrhodopsin-2.

    PubMed

    Nack, Melanie; Radu, Ionela; Schultz, Bernd-Joachim; Resler, Tom; Schlesinger, Ramona; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; del Val, Coral; Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Viappiani, Cristiano; Bamann, Christian; Bamberg, Ernst; Heberle, Joachim

    2012-05-07

    Electrophysiological experiments showed that the light-activated cation channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) pumps protons in the absence of a membrane potential. We determined here the kinetics of transient pH change using a water-soluble pH-indicator. It is shown that ChR2 released protons prior to uptake with a stoichiometry of 0.3 protons per ChR2. Comparison to the photocycle kinetics revealed that proton release and uptake match rise and decay of the P(3)(520) intermediate. As the P(3)(520) state also represents the conductive state of cation channeling, the concurrence of proton pumping and channel gating implies an intimate mechanistic link of the two functional modes. Studies on the E123T and S245E mutants show that these residues are not critically involved in proton translocation.

  6. Chemical Kinetics Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 17 NIST Chemical Kinetics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Chemical Kinetics Database includes essentially all reported kinetics results for thermal gas-phase chemical reactions. The database is designed to be searched for kinetics data based on the specific reactants involved, for reactions resulting in specified products, for all the reactions of a particular species, or for various combinations of these. In addition, the bibliography can be searched by author name or combination of names. The database contains in excess of 38,000 separate reaction records for over 11,700 distinct reactant pairs. These data have been abstracted from over 12,000 papers with literature coverage through early 2000.

  7. A "Stationery" Kinetics Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, L.; Goberdhansingh, A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a simple redox reaction that occurs between potassium permanganate and oxalic acid that can be used to prepare an interesting disappearing ink for demonstrating kinetics for introductory chemistry. Discusses laboratory procedures and factors that influence disappearance times. (CW)

  8. Thermal kinetic inductance detector

    DOEpatents

    Cecil, Thomas; Gades, Lisa; Miceli, Antonio; Quaranta, Orlando

    2016-12-20

    A microcalorimeter for radiation detection that uses superconducting kinetic inductance resonators as the thermometers. The detector is frequency-multiplexed which enables detector systems with a large number of pixels.

  9. Single Na+ channels activated by veratridine and batrachotoxin

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Voltage-sensitive Na+ channels from rat skeletal muscle plasma membrane vesicles were inserted into planar lipid bilayers in the presence of either of the alkaloid toxins veratridine (VT) or batrachotoxin (BTX). Both of these toxins are known to cause persistent activation of Na+ channels. With BTX as the channel activator, single channels remain open nearly all the time. Channels activated with VT open and close on a time scale of 1-10 s. Increasing the VT concentration enhances the probability of channel opening, primarily by increasing the rate constant of opening. The kinetics and voltage dependence of channel block by 21-sulfo-11-alpha-hydroxysaxitoxin are identical for VT and BTX, as is the ionic selectivity sequence determined by bi-ionic reversal potential (Na+ approximately Li+ greater than K+ greater than Rb+ greater than Cs+). However, there are striking quantitative differences in open channel conduction for channels in the presence of the two activators. Under symmetrical solution conditions, the single channel conductance for Na+ is about twice as high with BTX as with VT. Furthermore, the symmetrical solution single channel conductances show a different selectivity for BTX (Na+ greater than Li+ greater than K+) than for VT (Na+ greater than K+ greater than Li+). Open channel current-voltage curves in symmetrical Na+ and Li+ are roughly linear, while those in symmetrical K+ are inwardly rectifying. Na+ currents are blocked asymmetrically by K+ with both BTX and VT, but the voltage dependence of K+ block is stronger with BTX than with VT. The results show that the alkaloid neurotoxins not only alter the gating process of the Na+ channel, but also affect the structure of the open channel. We further conclude that the rate-determining step for conduction by Na+ does not occur at the channel's "selectivity filter," where poorly permeating ions like K+ are excluded. PMID:2435846

  10. Spectroscopy and reaction kinetics of HCO

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yili

    1989-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared spectrum of the C-H stretching fundamental of HCO has been studied by means of infrared flash kinetic spectroscopy. HCO was generated by flash photolysis of acetaldehyde or formaldehyde using a 308 nm (XeCl) excimer laser. The transient absorption was probed with an infrared difference frequency laser system. The high resolution spectra obtained were assigned and fitted with rotational, spin-rotational, and centrifugal distortion constants. The ..nu../sub 1/ band origin is 2434.48 cm/sup /minus/1/. New ground state constants have been derived from a least-squares fit combining the ..nu../sub 1/ data with previous microwave and FIR LMR measurements. A new set of spectroscopic constants for the (1, 0, 0) state, the equilibrium rotational constants, and the orientation of the transition dipole moment are also reported. The kinetics and product branching ratios of the HCO + NO/sub 2/ reaction have been studied using visible and infrared laser flash kinetic spectroscopy. The rate constant for the disappearance of HCO radical at 296 K is (5.7 +- 0.9) /times/ 10/sup /minus/11/ cm/sup 3/ molec/sup /minus/1/ sec/sup /minus/1/, and it is independent of the pressure of SF/sub 6/ buffer gas up to 700 torr. Less than 10% of the reaction goes through the most exothermic product channel, HNO + CO/sub 2/. The product channel, H + CO/sub 2/ + NO, is responsible for 52% of the reaction. HONO has been observed, though not quantitatively, as a reaction product corresponding to the HONO + CO channel. 51 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. Fundamentals of enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Seibert, Eleanore; Tracy, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides a general introduction to the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions, with a focus on drug-metabolizing enzymes. A prerequisite to understanding enzyme kinetics is having a clear grasp of the meanings of "enzyme" and "catalysis." Catalysts are reagents that can increase the rate of a chemical reaction without being consumed in the reaction. Enzymes are proteins that form a subset of catalysts. These concepts are further explored below.

  12. Epithelial Sodium and Chloride Channels and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To focus on the asthmatic pathogenesis and clinical manifestations related to epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)/chlorine ion channel. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review were the English articles from 1980 to 2015 from journal databases, primarily PubMed and Google Scholar. The terms used in the literature search were: (1) ENaCs; cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR); asthma/asthmatic, (2) ENaC/sodium salt; CF; asthma/asthmatic, (3) CFTR/chlorine ion channels; asthma/asthmatic, (4) ENaC/sodium channel/scnn1a/scnn1b/scnn1g/scnn1d/amiloride-sensitive/amiloride-inhibtable sodium channels/sodium salt; asthma/asthmatic, lung/pulmonary/respiratory/tracheal/alveolar, and (5) CFTR; CF; asthma/asthmatic (ti). Study Selection: These studies included randomized controlled trials or studies covering asthma pathogenesis and clinical manifestations related to ENaC/chlorine ion channels within the last 25 years (from 1990 to 2015). The data involving chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and CF obtained from individual studies were also reviewed by the authors. Results: Airway surface liquid dehydration can cause airway inflammation and obstruction. ENaC and CFTR are closely related to the airway mucociliary clearance. Ion transporters may play a critical role in pathogenesis of asthmatic exacerbations. Conclusions: Ion channels have been the center of many studies aiming to understand asthmatic pathophysiological mechanisms or to identify therapeutic targets for better control of the disease. PMID:26265620

  13. Quasi-Anonymous Channels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    QUASI- ANONYMOUS CHANNELS Ira S. Moskowitz Center for High Assurance Computer Systems - Code 5540 Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC...Assurance Computer Systems - Code 5540 Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA Abstract Although both anonymity and covert...channels are part of the larger topic of information hiding, there also exists an intrinsic linkage between anonymity and covert channels. This linkage

  14. Quantum steganography with noisy quantum channels

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Bilal A.; Brun, Todd A.

    2011-02-15

    Steganography is the technique of hiding secret information by embedding it in a seemingly ''innocent'' message. We present protocols for hiding quantum information by disguising it as noise in a codeword of a quantum error-correcting code. The sender (Alice) swaps quantum information into the codeword and applies a random choice of unitary operation, drawing on a secret random key she shares with the receiver (Bob). Using the key, Bob can retrieve the information, but an eavesdropper (Eve) with the power to monitor the channel, but without the secret key, cannot distinguish the message from channel noise. We consider two types of protocols: one in which the hidden quantum information is stored locally in the codeword, and another in which it is embedded in the space of error syndromes. We analyze how difficult it is for Eve to detect the presence of secret messages, and estimate rates of steganographic communication and secret key consumption for specific protocols and examples of error channels. We consider both the case where there is no actual noise in the channel (so that all errors in the codeword result from the deliberate actions of Alice), and the case where the channel is noisy and not controlled by Alice and Bob.

  15. Ion channels in plants

    PubMed Central

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In his recent opus magnum review paper published in the October issue of Physiology Reviews, Rainer Hedrich summarized the field of plant ion channels.1 He started from the earliest electric recordings initiated by Charles Darwin of carnivorous Dionaea muscipula,1,2 known as Venus flytrap, and covered the topic extensively up to the most recent discoveries on Shaker-type potassium channels, anion channels of SLAC/SLAH families, and ligand-activated channels of glutamate receptor-like type (GLR) and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGC).1 PMID:23221742

  16. Cardiac ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Birgit T; McDermott, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels are critical for all aspects of cardiac function, including rhythmicity and contractility. Consequently, ion channels are key targets for therapeutics aimed at cardiac pathophysiologies such as atrial fibrillation or angina. At the same time, off-target interactions of drugs with cardiac ion channels can be the cause of unwanted side effects. This manuscript aims to review the physiology and pharmacology of key cardiac ion channels. The intent is to highlight recent developments for therapeutic development, as well as elucidate potential mechanisms for drug-induced cardiac side effects, rather than present an in-depth review of each channel subtype. PMID:26556552

  17. Incompatibility of quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Miyadera, Takayuki

    2017-03-01

    Two quantum channels are called compatible if they can be obtained as marginals from a single broadcasting channel; otherwise they are incompatible. We derive a characterization of the compatibility relation in terms of concatenation and conjugation, and we show that all pairs of sufficiently noisy quantum channels are compatible. The complement relation of incompatibility can be seen as a unifying aspect for several important quantum features, such as impossibility of universal broadcasting and unavoidable measurement disturbance. We show that the concepts of entanglement breaking channel and antidegradable channel can be completely characterized in terms compatibility.

  18. On 1-qubit channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlmann, Armin

    2001-09-01

    The entropy HT (ρ) of a state with respect to a channel T and the Holevo capacity of the channel require the solution of difficult variational problems. For a class of 1-qubit channels, which contains all the extremal ones, the problem can be significantly simplified by attaching a unique Hermitian antilinear operator ϑ to every channel of the considered class. The channel's concurrence CT can be expressed by ϑ and turns out to be a flat roof. This allows to write down an explicit expression for HT. Its maximum would give the Holevo (one-shot) capacity.

  19. Quantum circuit design for accurate simulation of qudit channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; Sanders, Barry C.

    2015-04-01

    We construct a classical algorithm that designs quantum circuits for algorithmic quantum simulation of arbitrary qudit channels on fault-tolerant quantum computers within a pre-specified error tolerance with respect to diamond-norm distance. The classical algorithm is constructed by decomposing a quantum channel into a convex combination of generalized extreme channels by convex optimization of a set of nonlinear coupled algebraïc equations. The resultant circuit is a randomly chosen generalized extreme channel circuit whose run-time is logarithmic with respect to the error tolerance and quadratic with respect to Hilbert space dimension, which requires only a single ancillary qudit plus classical dits.

  20. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Sanjeev S.; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is an essential component of numerous physiological processes including not only conscious senses of touch and hearing, but also unconscious senses such as blood pressure regulation. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels. PMID:26402601

  1. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Sanjeev S; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-09-23

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is essential for various physiological processes such as the conscious sensations of touch and hearing, and the unconscious sensation of blood flow. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels.

  2. Large fraction of crystal directions leads to ion channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordlund, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Hobler, G.

    2016-12-01

    It is well established that when energetic ions are moving in crystals, they may penetrate much deeper if they happen to be directed in some specific crystal directions. This `channeling' effect is utilized for instance in certain ion beam analysis methods and has been described by analytical theories and atomistic computer simulations. However, there have been very few systematic studies of channeling in directions other than the principal low-index ones. We present here a molecular dynamics-based approach to calculate ion channeling systematically over all crystal directions, providing ion `channeling maps' that easily show in which directions channeling is expected. The results show that channeling effects can be quite significant even at energies below 1 keV, and that in many cases, significant planar channeling occurs also in a wide range of crystal directions between the low-index principal ones. In all of the cases studied, a large fraction (˜20 -60 % ) of all crystal directions show channeling. A practical implication of this is that modern experiments on randomly oriented nanostructures will have a large probability of channeling. It also means that when ion irradiations are carried out on polycrystalline samples, channeling effects on the results cannot a priori be assumed to be negligible. The maps allow for easy selection of good `nonchanneling' directions in experiments or alternatively finding wide channels for beneficial uses of channeling. We implement channeling theory to also give the fraction of channeling directions in a manner directly comparable to the simulations. The comparison shows good qualitative agreement. In particular, channeling theory is very good at predicting which channels are active at a given energy. This is true down to sub-keV energies, provided the penetration depth is not too small.

  3. Robust vector quantization for noisy channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarca, J. R. B.; Farvardin, N.; Jayant, N. S.; Shoham, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The paper briefly discusses techniques for making vector quantizers more tolerant to tranmsission errors. Two algorithms are presented for obtaining an efficient binary word assignment to the vector quantizer codewords without increasing the transmission rate. It is shown that about 4.5 dB gain over random assignment can be achieved with these algorithms. It is also proposed to reduce the effects of error propagation in vector-predictive quantizers by appropriately constraining the response of the predictive loop. The constrained system is shown to have about 4 dB of SNR gain over an unconstrained system in a noisy channel, with a small loss of clean-channel performance.

  4. Multiple alternative substrate kinetics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Vernon E

    2015-11-01

    The specificity of enzymes for their respective substrates has been a focal point of enzyme kinetics since the initial characterization of metabolic chemistry. Various processes to quantify an enzyme's specificity using kinetics have been utilized over the decades. Fersht's definition of the ratio kcat/Km for two different substrates as the "specificity constant" (ref [7]), based on the premise that the important specificity existed when the substrates were competing in the same reaction, has become a consensus standard for enzymes obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The expansion of the theory for the determination of the relative specificity constants for a very large number of competing substrates, e.g. those present in a combinatorial library, in a single reaction mixture has been developed in this contribution. The ratio of kcat/Km for isotopologs has also become a standard in mechanistic enzymology where kinetic isotope effects have been measured by the development of internal competition experiments with extreme precision. This contribution extends the theory of kinetic isotope effects to internal competition between three isotopologs present at non-tracer concentrations in the same reaction mix. This article is part of a special issue titled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment.

  5. Random broadcast on random geometric graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Elsasser, Robert; Friedrich, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we consider the random broadcast time on random geometric graphs (RGGs). The classic random broadcast model, also known as push algorithm, is defined as: starting with one informed node, in each succeeding round every informed node chooses one of its neighbors uniformly at random and informs it. We consider the random broadcast time on RGGs, when with high probability: (i) RGG is connected, (ii) when there exists the giant component in RGG. We show that the random broadcast time is bounded by {Omicron}({radical} n + diam(component)), where diam(component) is a diameter of the entire graph, or the giant component, for the regimes (i), or (ii), respectively. In other words, for both regimes, we derive the broadcast time to be {Theta}(diam(G)), which is asymptotically optimal.

  6. Continuum quasiparticle random-phase approximation for astrophysical direct neutron capture reactions on neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Masayuki

    2015-03-01

    I formulate a many-body theory to calculate the cross section of direct radiative neutron capture reaction by means of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mean-field model and the continuum quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA). A focus is put on very-neutron-rich nuclei and low-energy neutron kinetic energy in the range from 1 keV to several MeV, which is relevant to the rapid neutron capture process of nucleosynthesis. I begin with the photoabsorption cross section and the E 1 strength function. Next, in order to apply the reciprocity theorem, I decompose the cross section into partial cross sections corresponding to different channels of one- and two-neutron emission decays of photo-excited states. A numerical example is shown for the photo-absorption of 142Sn and the neutron capture of 141Sn .

  7. Modeling the Influence of Ion Channels on Neuron Dynamics in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Sandra D.; Crook, Sharon M.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage gated ion channels play a major role in determining a neuron's firing behavior, resulting in the specific processing of synaptic input patterns. Drosophila and other invertebrates provide valuable model systems for investigating ion channel kinetics and their impact on firing properties. Despite the increasing importance of Drosophila as a model system, few computational models of its ion channel kinetics have been developed. In this study, experimentally observed biophysical properties of voltage gated ion channels from the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster are used to develop a minimal, conductance based neuron model. We investigate the impact of the densities of these channels on the excitability of the model neuron. Changing the channel densities reproduces different in situ observed firing patterns and induces a switch from integrator to resonator properties. Further, we analyze the preference to input frequency and how it depends on the channel densities and the resulting bifurcation type the system undergoes. An extension to a three dimensional model demonstrates that the inactivation kinetics of the sodium channels play an important role, allowing for firing patterns with a delayed first spike and subsequent high frequency firing as often observed in invertebrates, without altering the kinetics of the delayed rectifier current. PMID:26635592

  8. Modeling the Influence of Ion Channels on Neuron Dynamics in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sandra D; Crook, Sharon M

    2015-01-01

    Voltage gated ion channels play a major role in determining a neuron's firing behavior, resulting in the specific processing of synaptic input patterns. Drosophila and other invertebrates provide valuable model systems for investigating ion channel kinetics and their impact on firing properties. Despite the increasing importance of Drosophila as a model system, few computational models of its ion channel kinetics have been developed. In this study, experimentally observed biophysical properties of voltage gated ion channels from the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster are used to develop a minimal, conductance based neuron model. We investigate the impact of the densities of these channels on the excitability of the model neuron. Changing the channel densities reproduces different in situ observed firing patterns and induces a switch from integrator to resonator properties. Further, we analyze the preference to input frequency and how it depends on the channel densities and the resulting bifurcation type the system undergoes. An extension to a three dimensional model demonstrates that the inactivation kinetics of the sodium channels play an important role, allowing for firing patterns with a delayed first spike and subsequent high frequency firing as often observed in invertebrates, without altering the kinetics of the delayed rectifier current.

  9. Relativistic Chiral Kinetic Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephanov, Mikhail

    2016-12-01

    This very brief review of the recent progress in chiral kinetic theory is based on the results of Refs. [J.-Y. Chen, D. T. Son, M. A. Stephanov, H.-U. Yee, Y. Yin, Lorentz Invariance in Chiral Kinetic Theory, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 (18) (2014) 182302. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.182302; J.-Y. Chen, D. T. Son, M. A. Stephanov, Collisions in Chiral Kinetic Theory, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115 (2) (2015) 021601. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.021601; M. A. Stephanov, H.-U. Yee, The no-drag frame for anomalous chiral fluid, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 (12) (2016) 122302. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.122302].

  10. How random is a random vector?

    SciTech Connect

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2015-12-15

    Over 80 years ago Samuel Wilks proposed that the “generalized variance” of a random vector is the determinant of its covariance matrix. To date, the notion and use of the generalized variance is confined only to very specific niches in statistics. In this paper we establish that the “Wilks standard deviation” –the square root of the generalized variance–is indeed the standard deviation of a random vector. We further establish that the “uncorrelation index” –a derivative of the Wilks standard deviation–is a measure of the overall correlation between the components of a random vector. Both the Wilks standard deviation and the uncorrelation index are, respectively, special cases of two general notions that we introduce: “randomness measures” and “independence indices” of random vectors. In turn, these general notions give rise to “randomness diagrams”—tangible planar visualizations that answer the question: How random is a random vector? The notion of “independence indices” yields a novel measure of correlation for Lévy laws. In general, the concepts and results presented in this paper are applicable to any field of science and engineering with random-vectors empirical data.

  11. Calcium Channels in Planar Lipid Bilayers: Insights into Mechanisms of Ion Permeation and Gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Robert L.; Hess, Peter; Reeves, John P.; Smilowitz, Henry; Tsien, Richard W.

    1986-03-01

    Electrophysiological recordings were used to analyze single calcium channels in planar lipid bilayers after membranes from bovine cardiac sarcolemmal vesicles had been incorporated into the bilayer. In these cell-free conditions, channels in the bilayer showed unitary barium or calcium conductances, gating kinetics, and pharmacological responses that were similar to dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels in intact cells. The open channel current varied in a nonlinear manner with voltage under asymmetric (that is, physiological) ionic conditions. However, with identical solutions on both sides of the bilayer, the current-voltage relation was linear. In matched experiments, calcium channels from skeletal muscle T-tubules differed significantly from cardiac calcium channels in their conductance properties and gating kinetics.

  12. Cholesterol and Kir channels

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Irena

    2009-01-01

    To date, most of the major types of Kir channels, Kir2s, Kir3s, Kir4s and Kir6s, have been found to partition into cholesterol-rich membrane domains and/or to be regulated by changes in the level of membrane cholesterol. Surprisingly, however, in spite of the structural similarities between different Kirs, effects of cholesterol on different types of Kir channels vary from cholesterol-induced decrease in the current density (Kir2 channels) to the loss of channel activity by cholesterol depletion (Kir4 channels) and loss of channel coupling by different mediators (Kir3 and Kir6 channels). Recently, we have gained initial insights into the mechanisms responsible for cholesterol-induced suppression Kir2 channels, but mechanisms underlying cholesterol sensitivity of other Kir channels are mostly unknown. The goal of this review is to present a summary of the current knowledge of the distinct effects of cholesterol on different types of Kir channels in vitro and in vivo. PMID:19548316

  13. Fading channel simulator

    DOEpatents

    Argo, Paul E.; Fitzgerald, T. Joseph

    1993-01-01

    Fading channel effects on a transmitted communication signal are simulated with both frequency and time variations using a channel scattering function to affect the transmitted signal. A conventional channel scattering function is converted to a series of channel realizations by multiplying the square root of the channel scattering function by a complex number of which the real and imaginary parts are each independent variables. The two-dimensional inverse-FFT of this complex-valued channel realization yields a matrix of channel coefficients that provide a complete frequency-time description of the channel. The transmitted radio signal is segmented to provide a series of transmitted signal and each segment is subject to FFT to generate a series of signal coefficient matrices. The channel coefficient matrices and signal coefficient matrices are then multiplied and subjected to inverse-FFT to output a signal representing the received affected radio signal. A variety of channel scattering functions can be used to characterize the response of a transmitter-receiver system to such atmospheric effects.

  14. Linear kinetic theory and particle transport in stochastic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Pomraning, G.C.

    1995-12-31

    We consider the formulation of linear transport and kinetic theory describing energy and particle flow in a random mixture of two or more immiscible materials. Following an introduction, we summarize early and fundamental work in this area, and we conclude with a brief discussion of recent results.

  15. A Gas Kinetic Explanation of Simple Thermodynamic Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waite, Boyd A.

    1985-01-01

    Heat is defined as a random or nondirected internal energy transfer between different bodies at different temperatures. Work is defined as oriented or nonrandom internal energy transfer. Both heat and work are demonstrated to lead to increases in temperature via interpretations from gas kinetic theory. (JN)

  16. Bio-inspired voltage-dependent calcium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tingting; He, Lin-Ling; Chen, Ming; Fang, Kun; Colecraft, Henry M

    2013-01-01

    Ca(2+) influx via voltage-dependent CaV1/CaV2 channels couples electrical signals to biological responses in excitable cells. CaV1/CaV2 channel blockers have broad biotechnological and therapeutic applications. Here we report a general method for developing novel genetically encoded calcium channel blockers inspired by Rem, a small G-protein that constitutively inhibits CaV1/CaV2 channels. We show that diverse cytosolic proteins (CaVβ, 14-3-3, calmodulin and CaMKII) that bind pore-forming α1-subunits can be converted into calcium channel blockers with tunable selectivity, kinetics and potency, simply by anchoring them to the plasma membrane. We term this method 'channel inactivation induced by membrane-tethering of an associated protein' (ChIMP). ChIMP is potentially extendable to small-molecule drug discovery, as engineering FK506-binding protein into intracellular sites within CaV1.2-α1C permits heterodimerization-initiated channel inhibition with rapamycin. The results reveal a universal method for developing novel calcium channel blockers that may be extended to develop probes for a broad cohort of unrelated ion channels.

  17. R type anion channel

    PubMed Central

    Diatloff, Eugene; Peyronnet, Rémi; Colcombet, Jean; Thomine, Sébastien; Barbier-Brygoo, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    Plant genomes code for channels involved in the transport of cations, anions and uncharged molecules through membranes. Although the molecular identity of channels for cations and uncharged molecules has progressed rapidly in the recent years, the molecular identity of anion channels has lagged behind. Electrophysiological studies have identified S-type (slow) and R-type (rapid) anion channels. In this brief review, we summarize the proposed functions of the R-type anion channels which, like the S-type, were first characterized by electrophysiology over 20 years ago, but unlike the S-type, have still yet to be cloned. We show that the R-type channel can play multiple roles. PMID:21051946

  18. Directed random walk with random restarts: The Sisyphus random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, Miquel; Villarroel, Javier

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we consider a particular version of the random walk with restarts: random reset events which suddenly bring the system to the starting value. We analyze its relevant statistical properties, like the transition probability, and show how an equilibrium state appears. Formulas for the first-passage time, high-water marks, and other extreme statistics are also derived; we consider counting problems naturally associated with the system. Finally we indicate feasible generalizations useful for interpreting different physical effects.

  19. Directed random walk with random restarts: The Sisyphus random walk.

    PubMed

    Montero, Miquel; Villarroel, Javier

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we consider a particular version of the random walk with restarts: random reset events which suddenly bring the system to the starting value. We analyze its relevant statistical properties, like the transition probability, and show how an equilibrium state appears. Formulas for the first-passage time, high-water marks, and other extreme statistics are also derived; we consider counting problems naturally associated with the system. Finally we indicate feasible generalizations useful for interpreting different physical effects.

  20. Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L. (Inventor); Stowe, Raymond P. (Inventor); Koeing, David W. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method for conducting an in vitro cell assay using a tetrazolium indicator is disclosed. The indicator includes a nonionic detergent which solubilizes a tetrazolium reduction product in vitro and has low toxicity for the cells. The incubation of test cells in the presence of zolium bromide and octoxynol (TRITON X-100) permits kinetics of the cell metabolism to be determined.

  1. Applications of kinetic theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gidaspow, D.

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of this investigation is to develop experimentally verified models for circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustors. This report presents the author's derivation of analytical solutions useful in understanding the operation of a CFB. The report is in a form of a chapter that reviews the kinetic theory applications.

  2. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  3. Oxidative desulfurization: kinetic modelling.

    PubMed

    Dhir, S; Uppaluri, R; Purkait, M K

    2009-01-30

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H(2)O(2) over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel.

  4. Caged Naloxone Reveals Opioid Signaling Deactivation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Banghart, Matthew R.; Shah, Ruchir C.; Lavis, Luke D.

    2013-01-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of opioid signaling in the brain remain poorly defined. Photoactivatable opioid ligands provide a means to quantitatively measure these dynamics and their underlying mechanisms in brain tissue. Although activation kinetics can be assessed using caged agonists, deactivation kinetics are obscured by slow clearance of agonist in tissue. To reveal deactivation kinetics of opioid signaling we developed a caged competitive antagonist that can be quickly photoreleased in sufficient concentrations to render agonist dissociation effectively irreversible. Carboxynitroveratryl-naloxone (CNV-NLX), a caged analog of the competitive opioid antagonist NLX, was readily synthesized from commercially available NLX in good yield and found to be devoid of antagonist activity at heterologously expressed opioid receptors. Photolysis in slices of rat locus coeruleus produced a rapid inhibition of the ionic currents evoked by multiple agonists of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR), but not of α-adrenergic receptors, which activate the same pool of ion channels. Using the high-affinity peptide agonist dermorphin, we established conditions under which light-driven deactivation rates are independent of agonist concentration and thus intrinsic to the agonist-receptor complex. Under these conditions, some MOR agonists yielded deactivation rates that are limited by G protein signaling, whereas others appeared limited by agonist dissociation. Therefore, the choice of agonist determines which feature of receptor signaling is unmasked by CNV-NLX photolysis. PMID:23960100

  5. Switchable topological phonon channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süsstrunk, Roman; Zimmermann, Philipp; Huber, Sebastian D.

    2017-01-01

    Guiding energy deliberately is one of the central elements in engineering and information processing. It is often achieved by designing specific transport channels in a suitable material. Topological metamaterials offer a way to construct stable and efficient channels of unprecedented versatility. However, due to their stability it can be tricky to terminate them or to temporarily shut them off without changing the material properties massively. While a lot of effort was put into realizing mechanical topological metamaterials, almost no works deal with manipulating their edge channels in sight of applications. Here, we take a step in this direction, by taking advantage of local symmetry breaking potentials to build a switchable topological phonon channel.

  6. Selfcomplementary Quantum Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaczyński, Marek; Roga, Wojciech; Życzkowski, Karol

    2016-10-01

    Selfcomplementary quantum channels are characterized by such an interaction between the principal quantum system and the environment that leads to the same output states of both interacting systems. These maps can describe approximate quantum copy machines, as perfect copying of an unknown quantum state is not possible due to the celebrated no-cloning theorem. We provide here a parametrization of a large class of selfcomplementary channels and analyze their properties. Selfcomplementary channels preserve some residual coherences and residual entanglement. Investigating some measures of non-Markovianity, we show that time evolution under selfcomplementary channels is highly non-Markovian.

  7. Ion channels in asthma.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Miguel A; Cantero-Recasens, Gerard; Garcia-Elias, Anna; Jung, Carole; Carreras-Sureda, Amado; Vicente, Rubén

    2011-09-23

    Ion channels are specialized transmembrane proteins that permit the passive flow of ions following their electrochemical gradients. In the airways, ion channels participate in the production of epithelium-based hydroelectrolytic secretions and in the control of intracellular Ca(2+) levels that will ultimately activate almost all lung cells, either resident or circulating. Thus, ion channels have been the center of many studies aiming to understand asthma pathophysiological mechanisms or to identify therapeutic targets for better control of the disease. In this minireview, we focus on molecular, genetic, and animal model studies associating ion channels with asthma.

  8. Wealth redistribution in conservative linear kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toscani, G.

    2009-10-01

    We introduce and discuss kinetic models for wealth distribution which include both taxation and uniform redistribution. The evolution of the continuous density of wealth obeys a linear Boltzmann equation where the background density represents the action of an external subject on the taxation mechanism. The case in which the mean wealth is conserved is analyzed in full details, by recovering the analytical form of the steady states. These states are probability distributions of convergent random series of a special structure, called perpetuities. Among others, Gibbs distribution appears as steady state in case of total taxation and uniform redistribution.

  9. Data Processing for NASA's TDRSS DAMA Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Christopher C.; Horan, Stephen

    1996-01-01

    A concept for the addition of a Demand Assignment Multiple Access (DAMA) service to NASA's current Space Network (SN) is developed. Specifically, the design of a receiver for the DAMA channel is outlined. Also, an outline of the procedures taken to process the received service request is presented. The modifications to the (SN) system are minimal. The post reception processing is accomplished using standard commercial off the shelf (COTS) packages. The result is a random access system capable of receiving requests for service.

  10. Faster voltage-dependent activation of Na+ channels in growth cones versus somata of neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J; Loew, L M; Davidson, R M

    1996-01-01

    Kinetics of voltage-gated ionic channels fundamentally reflect the response of the channels to local electric fields. In this report cell-attached patch-clamp studies reveal that the voltage-dependent activation rate of sodium channels residing in the growth cone membrane differs from that of soma sodium channels in differentiating N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells. Because other electrophysiological properties of these channels do not differ, this finding may be a reflection of the difference in intramembrane electric field in these two regions of the cell. This represents a new mechanism for channels to attain a range of activities both within and between cells. PMID:8913589

  11. Residual Defect Density in Random Disks Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Topic, Nikola; Pöschel, Thorsten; Gallas, Jason A. C.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the residual distribution of structural defects in very tall packings of disks deposited randomly in large channels. By performing simulations involving the sedimentation of up to 50 × 109 particles we find all deposits to consistently show a non-zero residual density of defects obeying a characteristic power-law as a function of the channel width. This remarkable finding corrects the widespread belief that the density of defects should vanish algebraically with growing height. A non-zero residual density of defects implies a type of long-range spatial order in the packing, as opposed to only local ordering. In addition, we find deposits of particles to involve considerably less randomness than generally presumed. PMID:26235809

  12. A linearization of quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowder, Tanner

    2015-06-01

    Because the quantum channels form a compact, convex set, we can express any quantum channel as a convex combination of extremal channels. We give a Euclidean representation for the channels whose inverses are also valid channels; these are a subset of the extreme points. They form a compact, connected Lie group, and we calculate its Lie algebra. Lastly, we calculate a maximal torus for the group and provide a constructive approach to decomposing any invertible channel into a product of elementary channels.

  13. Ion channels in toxicology.

    PubMed

    Restrepo-Angulo, Iván; De Vizcaya-Ruiz, Andrea; Camacho, Javier

    2010-08-01

    Ion channels play essential roles in human physiology and toxicology. Cardiac contraction, neural transmission, temperature sensing, insulin release, regulation of apoptosis, cellular pH and oxidative stress, as well as detection of active compounds from chilli, are some of the processes in which ion channels have an important role. Regulation of ion channels by several chemicals including those found in air, water and soil represents an interesting potential link between environmental pollution and human diseases; for instance, de novo expression of ion channels in response to exposure to carcinogens is being considered as a potential tool for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Non-specific binding of several drugs to ion channels is responsible for a huge number of undesirable side-effects, and testing guidelines for several drugs now require ion channel screening for pharmaceutical safety. Animal toxins targeting human ion channels have serious effects on the population and have also provided a remarkable tool to study the molecular structure and function of ion channels. In this review, we will summarize the participation of ion channels in biological processes extensively used in toxicological studies, including cardiac function, apoptosis and cell proliferation. Major findings on the adverse effects of drugs on ion channels as well as the regulation of these proteins by different chemicals, including some pesticides, are also reviewed. Association of ion channels and toxicology in several biological processes strongly suggests these proteins to be excellent candidates to follow the toxic effects of xenobiotics, and as potential early indicators of life-threatening situations including chronic degenerative diseases.

  14. Atom location by electron channeling analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S.J.

    1984-07-01

    For many years the orientation dependence of the characteristic x-ray emission close to a Bragg reflection has been regarded as a hindrance to accurate microanalysis, and a random incident beam direction has always been recommended for accurate composition analysis. However, this orientation dependence can be put to use to extract information on the lattice location of foreign atoms within the crystalline matrix. Here a generalization of the technique is described which is applicable to any crystal structure including monatomic crystals, and can quantitatively determine substitutional fractions of impurities. The technique was referred to as electron channeling analysis, by analogy with the closely related and widely used bulk technique of ion channeling analysis, and was developed for lattice location studies of dopants in semiconductors at high spatial resolution. Only two spectra are required for each channeling analysis, one in each of the channeling conditions described above. If the matrix and dopant x-ray yields vary identically between the two orientations then the dopant necessarily lies within the reflecting matrix planes. If the dopant x-ray yield does not vary the dopant atoms are randomly located with respect to the matrix planes. 10 references, 2 figures.

  15. Surfaces and boundaries in the mechanosensitive channel gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukharev, Sergei

    2009-03-01

    Mechanosensitive (MS) channels are gated by tension transmitted through the surrounding lipid bilayer. Inorganic ions or amphipathic modifiers that interact with the bilayer surface alter the packing of lipids and perturb the lateral pressure. We describe the effects of lanthanide ions, fluorinated alcohols and esters of parabenzoic acid as potent modifiers of MS channel gating. The other boundary that plays a critical role in channel gating is the water-vapor interface resulting from capillary dewetting of the hydrophobic gate. Molecular simulations predict two alternate positions for this boundary in the pore of the mechanosensitive channel MscS. We approached this problem experimentally by hydrophilizing the outer segment of the pore to resolve if it is `dry' in the closed state. We observed a reduction in activating tension, substantial changes in MscS kinetics and complete removal of gating hysteresis. The kinetic treatment of channel traces recorded in response to steps of tension suggested the sequence of events that leads to the channel opening implying that pore hydration and dewetting are the rate-limiting steps in MscS transitions.

  16. Mechanism of gating of T-type calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    We have analyzed the gating kinetics of T-type Ca channels in 3T3 fibroblasts. Our results show that channel closing, inactivation, and recovery from inactivation each include a voltage-independent step which becomes rate limiting at extreme potentials. The data require a cyclic model with a minimum of two closed, one open, and two inactivated states. Such a model can produce good fits to our data even if the transitions between closed states are the only voltage-dependent steps in the activating pathway leading from closed to inactivated states. Our analysis suggests that the channel inactivation step, as well as the direct opening and closing transitions, are not intrinsically voltage sensitive. Single-channel recordings are consistent with this scheme. As expected, each channel produces a single burst per opening and then inactivates. Comparison of the kinetics of T-type Ca current in fibroblasts and neuronal cells reveals significant differences which suggest that different subtypes of T-type Ca channels are expressed differentially in a tissue specific manner. PMID:2172443

  17. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  18. Basaltic Lava Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.; Griffiths, R. W.; Kerr, R. C.

    2004-12-01

    In Hawaii, the mode of lava transport - through open channels or through insulating lava tubes - determines the thermal, rheological, and emplacement history of a lava flow. Most Hawaiian lavas are erupted at near-liquidus temperatures and are therefore crystal-poor; lava transport through open channels allows rapid cooling and consequent rapid increases in lava crystallinity. Solidified aa flows resulting from channelized flow are typically fine-grained throughout their thickness, indicating cooling of the entire flow thickness during transport. In contrast, transport of lava through insulating tubes permits flow over long distances with little cooling. Flows emerging from such tubes typically have pahoehoe flow surfaces with glassy crusts. Groundmass textures that coarsen from the flow rind to the interior reflect rates of post-emplacement, rather than syn-emplacement, cooling. To distinguish eruption conditions that result in lava channels from those that allow formation of lava tubes, we have performed a series of laboratory experiments involving injection of PEG 600 (a wax with a Newtonian rheology and freezing temperature of 19ºC) into cold water through both uniform and non-uniform sloping channels. In uniform channels, tube formation can be distinguished from open channel flow using a dimensionless parameter based on a solidification time scale, an advection time scale, and a Rayleigh number that describes convection by heat loss from crust-free shear zones. Theoretical analysis predicts that in the open channel regime, the width of the crust (dc) will vary with the channel width (W) as dc = W5/3. Crustal coverage of non-uniform channels in both laboratory experiments and field examples from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, is consistent with this prediction. However, experiments in non-uniform channels illustrate additional controls on the surface coverage of lava channels. Most important is crustal extension resulting from flow acceleration through constrictions

  19. Kinetic Modelling of Transcription Elongation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Maoileidigh, Daibhid; Tadigotla, Vasisht; Sengupta, Anirvan; Epshtein, Vitaly; Ebright, Richard; Nudler, Evgeny; Ruckenstein, Andrei

    2006-03-01

    Transcription is the first step in gene expression and it is at this stage that most of genetic regulation occurs. The enzyme RNA polymerase (RNAP) walks along DNA creating an RNA transcript at a highly non-uniform rate. We discuss how many non-intuitive features of the system may be experimentally and physically motivated and present first a model, which agrees qualitatively with a host of experimental evidence. We also examine intrinsic pauses where it is thought that the RNAP will move backwards along the DNA template without changing the length of the RNA transcript. We describe a simplified kinetic scheme for the recovery of intrinsic pauses with the same degree of predictive power as our thermodynamic model (presented separately). The separation of timescales between the movement of the RNAP and global changes in the RNA secondary structure is seen to be crucial for the function of RNAP. This is essentially a model of a Brownian ratchet where RNAP executes a 1D random walk in a sequence dependent potential over a range determined by the co-transcriptional RNA fold for each transcript length

  20. Spectroscopy with Random and Displaced Random Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez, V.; Zuker, A. P.

    2002-02-01

    Because of the time reversal invariance of the angular momentum operator J2, the average energies and variances at fixed J for random two-body Hamiltonians exhibit odd-even- J staggering that may be especially strong for J = 0. It is shown that upon ensemble averaging over random runs, this behavior is reflected in the yrast states. Displaced (attractive) random ensembles lead to rotational spectra with strongly enhanced B(E2) transitions for a certain class of model spaces. It is explained how to generalize these results to other forms of collectivity.

  1. TEA- and apamin-resistant KCa channels in guinea-pig myenteric neurons: slow AHP channels

    PubMed Central

    Vogalis, Fivos; Harvey, John R; Furness, John B

    2002-01-01

    The patch-clamp technique was used to record from intact ganglia of the guinea-pig duodenum in order to characterize the K+ channels that underlie the slow afterhyperpolarization (slow AHP) of myenteric neurons. Cell-attached patch recordings from slow AHP-generating (AH) neurons revealed an increased open probability (Po) of TEA-resistant K+ channels following action potentials. The Po increased from < 0.06 before action potentials to 0.33 in the 2 s following action potential firing. The ensemble averaged current had a similar time course to the current underlying the slow AHP. TEA- and apamin-resistant Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa) channels were present in inside-out patches excised from AH neurons. The Po of these channels increased from < 0.03 to approximately 0.5 upon increasing cytoplasmic [Ca2+] from < 10 nm to either 500 nm or 10 μm. Po was insensitive to changes in transpatch potential. The unitary conductance of these TEA- and apamin-resistant KCa channels measured approximately 60 pS under symmetric K+ concentrations between −60 mV and +60 mV, but decreased outside this range. Under asymmetrical [K+], the open channel current showed outward rectification and had a limiting slope conductance of about 40 pS. Activation of the TEA- and apamin-resistant KCa channels by internal Ca2+ in excised patches was not reversed by washing out the Ca2+-containing solution and replacing it with nominally Ca2+-free physiological solution. Kinetic analysis of the single channel recordings of the TEA- and apamin-resistant KCa channels was consistent with their having a single open state of about 2 ms (open dwell time distribution was fitted with a single exponential) and at least two closed states (two exponential functions were required to adequately fit the closed dwell time distribution). The Ca2+ dependence of the activation of TEA- and apamin-resistant KCa channels resides in the long-lived closed state which decreased from > 100 ms in the absence of Ca2+ to about 7 ms

  2. An Introductory Level Kinetics Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarvey, J. E. B.; Knipe, A. C.

    1980-01-01

    Provides a list of the reactions commonly used for introductory kinetics studies. These reactions illustrate the kinetics concepts of rate law, rate constant, and reaction order. Describes a kinetic study of the hydrolysis of 3-bromo-3-phenylpropanoic acid which offers many educational advantages. (CS)

  3. Ion channels in microbes

    PubMed Central

    Martinac, Boris; Saimi, Yoshiro; Kung, Ching

    2008-01-01

    Summary Studies of ion channels have for long been dominated by the animalcentric, if not anthropocentric view of physiology. The structures and activities of ion channels had, however, evolved long before the appearance of complex multicellular organisms on Earth. The diversity of ion channels existing in cellular membranes of prokaryotes is a good example. Though at first it may appear as a paradox that most of what we know about the structure of eukaryotic ion channels is based on the structure of bacterial channels, this should not be surprising given the evolutionary relatedness of all living organisms and suitability of microbial cells for structural studies of biological macromolecules in a laboratory environment. Genome sequences of the human as well as various microbial, plant and animal organisms unambiguously established the evolutionary links, whereas crystallographic studies of the structures of major types of ion channels published over the last decade clearly demonstrated the advantage of using microbes as experimental organisms. The purpose of this review is not only to provide an account of acquired knowledge on microbial ion channels but also to show that the study of microbes and their ion channels may also hold a key to solving unresolved molecular mysteries in the future. PMID:18923187

  4. On Gaussian random supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Thomas C.

    2014-04-01

    We study the distribution of metastable vacua and the likelihood of slow roll inflation in high dimensional random landscapes. We consider two examples of landscapes: a Gaussian random potential and an effective supergravity potential defined via a Gaussian random superpotential and a trivial Kähler potential. To examine these landscapes we introduce a random matrix model that describes the correlations between various derivatives and we propose an efficient algorithm that allows for a numerical study of high dimensional random fields. Using these novel tools, we find that the vast majority of metastable critical points in N dimensional random supergravities are either approximately supersymmetric with | F| ≪ M susy or supersymmetric. Such approximately supersymmetric points are dynamical attractors in the landscape and the probability that a randomly chosen critical point is metastable scales as log( P ) ∝ - N. We argue that random supergravities lead to potentially interesting inflationary dynamics.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of a superficially porous particle with unique, elongated pore channels normal to the surface.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ta-Chen; Mack, Anne; Chen, Wu; Liu, Jia; Dittmann, Monika; Wang, Xiaoli; Barber, William E

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, superficially porous particles (SPPs) have drawn great interest because of their special particle characteristics and improvement in separation efficiency. Superficially porous particles are currently manufactured by adding silica nanoparticles onto solid cores using either a multistep multilayer process or one-step coacervation process. The pore size is mainly controlled by the size of the silica nanoparticles and the tortuous pore channel geometry is determined by how those nanoparticles randomly aggregate. Such tortuous pore structure is also similar to that of all totally porous particles used in HPLC today. In this article, we report on the development of a next generation superficially porous particle with a unique pore structure that includes a thinner shell thickness and ordered pore channels oriented normal to the particle surface. The method of making the new superficially porous particles is a process called pseudomorphic transformation (PMT), which is a form of micelle templating. Porosity is no longer controlled by randomly aggregated nanoparticles but rather by micelles that have an ordered liquid crystal structure. The new particle possesses many advantages such as a narrower particle size distribution, thinner porous layer with high surface area and, most importantly, highly ordered, non-tortuous pore channels oriented normal to the particle surface. This PMT process has been applied to make 1.8-5.1μm SPPs with pore size controlled around 75Å and surface area around 100m(2)/g. All particles with different sizes show the same unique pore structure with tunable pore size and shell thickness. The impact of the novel pore structure on the performance of these particles is characterized by measuring van Deemter curves and constructing kinetic plots. Reduced plate heights as low as 1.0 have been achieved on conventional LC instruments. This indicates higher efficiency of such particles compared to conventional totally porous and

  6. Athermalized channeled spectropolarimeter enhancement.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Julia Craven; Way, Brandyn Michael; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Hunt, Jeffery P.

    2013-09-01

    Channeled spectropolarimetry can measure the complete polarization state of light as a function of wavelength. Typically, a channeled spectropolarimeter uses high order retarders made of uniaxial crystal to amplitude modulate the measured spectrum with the spectrally-dependent Stokes polarization information. A primary limitation of conventional channeled spectropolarimeters is related to the thermal variability of the retarders. Thermal variation often forces frequent system recalibration, particularly for field deployed systems. However, implementing thermally stable retarders, made of biaxial crystal, results in an athermal channeled spectropolarimeter that relieves the need for frequent recalibration. This report presents experimental results for an anthermalized channeled spectropolarimeter prototype produced using potassium titanyl phosphate. The results of this prototype are compared to the current thermal stabilization state of the art. Finally, the application of the technique to the thermal infrared is studied, and the athermalization concept is applied to an infrared imaging spectropolarimeter design.

  7. The channels of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, V. R.

    1982-01-01

    Early observations of Mars conducted by means of telescopes are considered. Secchi introduced the Italian word 'canale' ('channel') in 1869 to describe apparent lines on the planet's surface. Between 1877 and 1888 Schiaparelli mapped a profusion of 'canali'. Schiaparelli's work led to famous controversies about Mars. This book attempts to investigate the puzzle posed by the Martian channels, taking into account also the results of the studies conducted with the aid of the two orbiting Viking spacecraft which have produced a total number of nearly 60,000 pictures. The channel types are discussed along with questions regarding the distribution, the ages, and the proposed origins of the channels. Attention is given to the geomorphology of Mars, the patterns and networks of Martian valleys, ice and the Martian surface, the outflow channels, catastrophic flood processes, questions of analogy between terrestrial and Martian geographic features, and Martian phenomena associated with water liquid or water ice.

  8. Random numbers spring from alpha decay

    SciTech Connect

    Frigerio, N.A.; Sanathanan, L.P.; Morley, M.; Clark, N.A.; Tyler, S.A.

    1980-05-01

    Congruential random number generators, which are widely used in Monte Carlo simulations, are deficient in that the number they generate are concentrated in a relatively small number of hyperplanes. While this deficiency may not be a limitation in small Monte Carlo studies involving a few variables, it introduces a significant bias in large simulations requiring high resolution. This bias was recognized and assessed during preparations for an accident analysis study of nuclear power plants. This report describes a random number device based on the radioactive decay of alpha particles from a /sup 235/U source in a high-resolution gas proportional counter. The signals were fed to a 4096-channel analyzer and for each channel the frequency of signals registered in a 20,000-microsecond interval was recorded. The parity bits of these frequency counts (0 for an even count and 1 for an odd count) were then assembled in sequence to form 31-bit binary random numbers and transcribed to a magnetic tape. This cycle was repeated as many times as were necessary to create 3 million random numbers. The frequency distribution of counts from the present device conforms to the Brockwell-Moyal distribution, which takes into account the dead time of the counter (both the dead time and decay constant of the underlying Poisson process were estimated). Analysis of the count data and tests of randomness on a sample set of the 31-bit binary numbers indicate that this random number device is a highly reliable source of truly random numbers. Its use is, therefore, recommended in Monte Carlo simulations for which the congruential pseudorandom number generators are found to be inadequate. 6 figures, 5 tables.

  9. Kinetic Tetrazolium Microtiter Assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond; Koenig, David

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay (KTMA) involves use of tetrazolium salts and Triton X-100 (or equivalent), nontoxic, in vitro color developer solubilizing colored metabolite formazan without injuring or killing metabolizing cells. Provides for continuous measurement of metabolism and makes possible to determine rate of action of antimicrobial agent in real time as well as determines effective inhibitory concentrations. Used to monitor growth after addition of stimulatory compounds. Provides for kinetic determination of efficacy of biocide, greatly increasing reliability and precision of results. Also used to determine relative effectiveness of antimicrobial agent as function of time. Capability of generating results on day of test extremely important in treatment of water and waste, disinfection of hospital rooms, and in pharmaceutical, agricultural, and food-processing industries. Assay also used in many aspects of cell biology.

  10. Kinetic Theory of Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The theory, developed in the nineteenth century, notably by Rudolf Clausius (1822-88) and James Clerk Maxwell (1831-79), that the properties of a gas (temperature, pressure, etc) could be described in terms of the motions (and kinetic energy) of the molecules comprising the gases. The theory has wide implications in astrophysics. In particular, the perfect gas law, which relates the pressure, vol...

  11. Conductance of Ion Channels - Theory vs. Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael; Mijajlovic, Milan

    2013-01-01

    Transmembrane ion channels mediate a number of essential physiological processes in a cell ranging from regulating osmotic pressure to transmission of neural signals. Kinetics and selectivity of ion transport is of critical importance to a cell and, not surprisingly, it is a subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies. In this presentation we will analyze in detail computer simulations of two simple channels from fungi - antiamoebin and trichotoxin. Each of these channels is made of an alpha-helical bundle of small, nongenomically synthesized peptides containing a number of rare amino acids and exhibits strong antimicrobial activity. We will focus on calculating ionic conductance defined as the ratio of ionic current through the channel to applied voltage. From molecular dynamics simulations, conductance can be calculated in at least two ways, each involving different approximations. Specifically, the current, given as the number of charges transferred through the channel per unit of time, can be obtained from the number of events in which ions cross the channel during the simulation. This method works well for large currents (high conductance values and/or applied voltages). If the number of crossing events is small, reliable estimates of current are difficult to achieve. Alternatively, conductance can be estimated assuming that ion transport can be well approximated as diffusion in the external potential given by the free energy profile. Then, the current can be calculated by solving the one-dimensional diffusion equation in this external potential and applied voltage (the generalized Nernst-Planck equation). To do so three ingredients are needed: the free energy profile, the position-dependent diffusion coefficient and the diffusive flux of ions into the channel. All these quantities can be obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. An important advantage of this method is that it can be used equally well to estimating large and small currents

  12. Homogeneous nucleation kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, D. H.; Appleby, M. R.; Leedom, G. L.; Babu, S. V.; Naumann, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Homogeneous nucleation kinetics are rederived in a manner fundamentally similar to the approach of classical nucleation theory with the following modifications and improvements. First, the cluster is a parent phase cluster and does not require energization to the parent state. Second, the thermodynamic potential used to describe phase stability is a continuous function along the pathway of phase decomposition. Third, the kinetics of clustering corresponds directly to the diffusional flux of monomers through the cluster distribution and are formally similar to classical theory with the resulting kinetic equation modified by two terms in the preexponential factor. These terms correct for the influence of a supersaturation dependent clustering within the parent phase and for the influence of an asymmetrical cluster concentration as a function of cluster size at the critical cluster size. Fourth, the supersaturation dependence of the nucleation rate is of the same form as that given by classical nucleation theory. This supersaturation dependence must however be interpreted in terms of a size dependent surface tension. Finally, there are two scaling laws which describe supersaturation to either constant nucleation rate or to the thermodynamically determined physical spinodal.

  13. Kinetic and structural characterization of tunnel-perturbing mutants in Bradyrhizobium japonicum proline utilization A.

    PubMed

    Arentson, Benjamin W; Luo, Min; Pemberton, Travis A; Tanner, John J; Becker, Donald F

    2014-08-12

    Proline utilization A from Bradyrhizobium japonicum (BjPutA) is a bifunctional flavoenzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of proline to glutamate using fused proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH) domains. Recent crystal structures and kinetic data suggest an intramolecular channel connects the two active sites, promoting substrate channeling of the intermediate Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate/glutamate-γ-semialdehyde (P5C/GSA). In this work, the structure of the channel was explored by inserting large side chain residues at four positions along the channel in BjPutA. Kinetic analysis of the different mutants revealed replacement of D779 with Tyr (D779Y) or Trp (D779W) significantly decreased the overall rate of the PRODH-P5CDH channeling reaction. X-ray crystal structures of D779Y and D779W revealed that the large side chains caused a constriction in the central section of the tunnel, thus likely impeding the travel of P5C/GSA in the channel. The D779Y and D779W mutants have PRODH activity similar to that of wild-type BjPutA but exhibit significantly lower P5CDH activity, suggesting that exogenous P5C/GSA enters the channel upstream of Asp779. Replacement of nearby Asp778 with Tyr (D778Y) did not impact BjPutA channeling activity. Consistent with the kinetic results, the X-ray crystal structure of D778Y shows that the main channel pathway is not impacted; however, an off-cavity pathway is closed off from the channel. These findings provide evidence that the off-cavity pathway is not essential for substrate channeling in BjPutA.

  14. Random access to mobile networks with advanced error correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dippold, Michael

    1990-01-01

    A random access scheme for unreliable data channels is investigated in conjunction with an adaptive Hybrid-II Automatic Repeat Request (ARQ) scheme using Rate Compatible Punctured Codes (RCPC) Forward Error Correction (FEC). A simple scheme with fixed frame length and equal slot sizes is chosen and reservation is implicit by the first packet transmitted randomly in a free slot, similar to Reservation Aloha. This allows the further transmission of redundancy if the last decoding attempt failed. Results show that a high channel utilization and superior throughput can be achieved with this scheme that shows a quite low implementation complexity. For the example of an interleaved Rayleigh channel and soft decision utilization and mean delay are calculated. A utilization of 40 percent may be achieved for a frame with the number of slots being equal to half the station number under high traffic load. The effects of feedback channel errors and some countermeasures are discussed.

  15. Random access to mobile networks with advanced error correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dippold, Michael

    A random access scheme for unreliable data channels is investigated in conjunction with an adaptive Hybrid-II Automatic Repeat Request (ARQ) scheme using Rate Compatible Punctured Codes (RCPC) Forward Error Correction (FEC). A simple scheme with fixed frame length and equal slot sizes is chosen and reservation is implicit by the first packet transmitted randomly in a free slot, similar to Reservation Aloha. This allows the further transmission of redundancy if the last decoding attempt failed. Results show that a high channel utilization and superior throughput can be achieved with this scheme that shows a quite low implementation complexity. For the example of an interleaved Rayleigh channel and soft decision utilization and mean delay are calculated. A utilization of 40 percent may be achieved for a frame with the number of slots being equal to half the station number under high traffic load. The effects of feedback channel errors and some countermeasures are discussed.

  16. Sodium channel inactivation in the crayfish giant axon. Must channels open before inactivating

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, B.P.

    1981-09-01

    Experiments on sodium channel inactivation kinetics were performed on voltage-clamped crayfish giant axons. The primary goals was to investigate whether channels must open before activating. Voltage-clamp artifacts were minimized by the use of low-sodium solutions and full series resistance compensation, and the spatial uniformity of the currents was checked with a closely spaced pair of electrodes used to measure local current densities. For membrane potentials between -40 and +40 mV, sodium currents decay to zero with a single exponential time-course. The time constant for decay is a steep function of membrane potential. The time-course of inactivation measured with the double-pulse method is very similar to the decay of current at the same potential. Steady-state inactivation curves measured with different test pulses are identical. The time-course of doubling pulse inactivation shows a lag that roughly correlates with the opening of sodium channels, but it is not strictly necessary for channels to open before inactivating. Measurements of the potential dependence of the integral of sodium conductance are also inconsistent with the simplest cases of models in which channels must open before activating.

  17. Kinetic model of excitatory synaptic transmission to cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Marienhagen, J; Keller, B U; Zippelius, A

    1997-09-21

    We present a minimal kinetic model for excitatory synaptic transmission to cerebellar Purkinje cells. The main components are a kinetic model for a single glutamate receptor, which is calibrated with the help of patch clamp data, and a mean field approximation for the dynamics of a population of channels, which generate an EPSC. The resulting minimal model of the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse is used to estimate the dynamics of glutamate in the synaptic cleft and to clarify the role of receptor desensitization in synaptic transmission. We also apply the model to different aspects of synaptic modulation, like long-term depression and potentiation by pharmacological application of ampakines. In the framework of the minimal model these effects can be understood as the result of modified receptor kinetics.

  18. Assay for calcium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Glossmann, H.; Ferry, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter focuses on biochemical assays for Ca/sup 2 +/-selective channels in electrically excitable membranes which are blocked in electrophysiological and pharmacological experiments by verapamil, 1,4-dihydropyridines, diltiazen (and various other drugs), as well as inorganic di- or trivalent cations. The strategy employed is to use radiolabeled 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives which block calcium channels with ED/sub 50/ values in the nanomolar range. Although tritiated d-cis-diltiazem and verapamil can be used to label calcium channels, the 1,4-dihydropyridines offer numerous advantages. The various sections cover tissue specificity of channel labeling, the complex interactions of divalent cations with the (/sup 3/H)nimodipine-labeled calcium channels, and the allosteric regulation of (/sup 3/H)nimodipine binding by the optically pure enantiomers of phenylalkylamine and benzothiazepine calcium channel blockers. A comparison of the properties of different tritiated 1,4-dihydropyridine radioligands and the iodinated channel probe (/sup 125/I)iodipine is given.

  19. Fine Channel Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A color image of fine channel networks on Mars; north toward top. The scene shows heavily cratered highlands dissected by dendritic open channel networks that dissect steep slopes of impact crater walls. This image is a composite of Viking high-resolution images in black and white and low-resolution images in color. The image extends from latitude 9 degrees S. to 5 degrees S. and from longitude 312 degrees to 320 degrees; Mercator projection. The dendritic pattern of the fine channels and their location on steep slopes leads to the interpretation that these are runoff channels. The restriction of these types of channels to ancient highland rocks suggests that these channels are old and date from a time on Mars when conditions existed for precipitation to actively erode rocks. After the channels reach a low plain, they appear to end. Termination may have resulted from burial by younger deposits or perhaps the flows percolated into the surface materials and continued underground.

  20. Quantum random number generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Zhang, Zhen; Qi, Bing

    2016-06-28

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness -- coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a high speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.

  1. Quantum random number generation

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; ...

    2016-06-28

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness -- coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a highmore » speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.« less

  2. Quantum random number generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Qi, Bing; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which have important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness—coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. On the basis of the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a high speed by properly modelling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, in which verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category that provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.

  3. Effective gating charges per channel in voltage-dependent K+ and Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    In voltage-dependent ion channels, the gating of the channels is determined by the movement of the voltage sensor. This movement reflects the rearrangement of the protein in response to a voltage stimulus, and it can be thought of as a net displacement of elementary charges (e0) through the membrane (z: effective number of elementary charges). In this paper, we measured z in Shaker IR (inactivation removed) K+ channels, neuronal alpha 1E and alpha 1A, and cardiac alpha 1C Ca2+ channels using two methods: (a) limiting slope analysis of the conductance-voltage relationship and (b) variance analysis, to evaluate the number of active channels in a patch, combined with the measurement of charge movement in the same patch. We found that in Shaker IR K+ channels the two methods agreed with a z congruent to 13. This suggests that all the channels that gate can open and that all the measured charge is coupled to pore opening in a strictly sequential kinetic model. For all Ca2+ channels the limiting slope method gave consistent results regardless of the presence or type of beta subunit tested (z = 8.6). However, as seen with alpha 1E, the variance analysis gave different results depending on the beta subunit used. alpha 1E and alpha 1E beta 1a gave higher z values (z = 14.77 and z = 15.13 respectively) than alpha 1E beta 2a (z = 9.50, which is similar to the limiting slope results). Both the beta 1a and beta 2a subunits, coexpressed with alpha 1E Ca2+ channels facilitated channel opening by shifting the activation curve to more negative potentials, but only the beta 2a subunit increased the maximum open probability. The higher z using variance analysis in alpha 1E and alpha 1E beta 1a can be explained by a set of charges not coupled to pore opening. This set of charges moves in transitions leading to nulls thus not contributing to the ionic current fluctuations but eliciting gating currents. Coexpression of the beta 2a subunit would minimize the fraction of nulls leading to

  4. Integrated voice/data protocols for satellite channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Cheng-Shong; Li, Victor O. K.

    1988-01-01

    Several integrated voice/data protocols for satellite channels are studied. The system consists of two types of traffic: voice calls which are blocked-calls-cleared and the data packets which may be stored when no channel is available. The voice calls are operated under a demand assignment protocol. Three different data protocols for data packets are introduced. Under Random Access Data (RAD), the Aloha random access scheme is used. Due to the nature of random access, the channel utilization is low. Under Demand Assignment Data (DAD), a demand assignment protocol is used to improve channel utilization. Since a satellite channel has long propagation delay, DAD may perform worse than RAD. The two protocols are combined to obtain a new protocol called Hybrid Data (HD). The proposed protocols are fully distributed and no central controller is required. Numerical results show that HD enjoys a lower delay than DAD and provides a much higher channel capacity than RAD. The effects of fixed and movable boundaries are compared in partitioning the total frequency band to voice and data users.

  5. Channel Access in Erlang

    SciTech Connect

    Nicklaus, Dennis J.

    2013-10-13

    We have developed an Erlang language implementation of the Channel Access protocol. Included are low-level functions for encoding and decoding Channel Access protocol network packets as well as higher level functions for monitoring or setting EPICS process variables. This provides access to EPICS process variables for the Fermilab Acnet control system via our Erlang-based front-end architecture without having to interface to C/C++ programs and libraries. Erlang is a functional programming language originally developed for real-time telecommunications applications. Its network programming features and list management functions make it particularly well-suited for the task of managing multiple Channel Access circuits and PV monitors.

  6. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynscronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board.

  7. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Anderson, G.A.

    1994-08-23

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynchronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board. 9 figs.

  8. Src tyrosine kinase alters gating of hyperpolarization-activated HCN4 pacemaker channel through Tyr531.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen-Hong; Zhang, Qi; Teng, Bunyen; Mustafa, S Jamal; Huang, Jian-Ying; Yu, Han-Gang

    2008-01-01

    We recently discovered that the constitutively active Src tyrosine kinase can enhance hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) 4 channel activity by binding to the channel protein. To investigate the mechanism of modulation by Src of HCN channels, we studied the effects of a selective inhibitor of Src tyrosine kinase, 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP2), on HCN4 and its mutant channels expressed in HEK 293 cells by using a whole cell patch-clamp technique. We found that PP2 can inhibit HCN4 currents by negatively shifting the voltage dependence of channel activation, decreasing the whole cell channel conductance, and slowing activation and deactivation kinetics. Screening putative tyrosine residues subject to phosphorylation yielded two candidates: Tyr(531) and Tyr(554). Substituting HCN4-Tyr(531) with phenylalanine largely abolished the effects of PP2 on HCN4 channels. Replacing HCN4-Tyr(554) with phenylalanine did not abolish the effects of PP2 on voltage-dependent activation but did eliminate PP2-induced slowing of channel kinetics. The inhibitory effects of HCN channels associated with reduced Src tyrosine activity is confirmed in HL-1 cardiomyocytes. Finally, we found that PP2 can decrease the heart rate in a mouse model. These results demonstrate that Src tyrosine kinase enhances HCN4 currents by shifting their activation to more positive potentials and increasing the whole cell channel conductance as well as speeding the channel kinetics. The tyrosine residue that mediates most of Src's actions on HCN4 channels is Tyr(531).

  9. Allosteric Gating of a Large Conductance Ca-activated K+ Channel

    PubMed Central

    Cox, D.H.; Cui, J.; Aldrich, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca-activated potassium channels (BK channels) are uniquely sensitive to both membrane potential and intracellular Ca2+. Recent work has demonstrated that in the gating of these channels there are voltage-sensitive steps that are separate from Ca2+ binding steps. Based on this result and the macroscopic steady state and kinetic properties of the cloned BK channel mslo, we have recently proposed a general kinetic scheme to describe the interaction between voltage and Ca2+ in the gating of the mslo channel (Cui, J., D.H. Cox, and R.W. Aldrich. 1997. J. Gen. Physiol. In press.). This scheme supposes that the channel exists in two main conformations, closed and open. The conformational change between closed and open is voltage dependent. Ca2+ binds to both the closed and open conformations, but on average binds more tightly to the open conformation and thereby promotes channel opening. Here we describe the basic properties of models of this form and test their ability to mimic mslo macroscopic steady state and kinetic behavior. The simplest form of this scheme corresponds to a voltage-dependent version of the Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) model of allosteric proteins. The success of voltage-dependent MWC models in describing many aspects of mslo gating suggests that these channels may share a common molecular mechanism with other allosteric proteins whose behaviors have been modeled using the MWC formalism. We also demonstrate how this scheme can arise as a simplification of a more complex scheme that is based on the premise that the channel is a homotetramer with a single Ca2+ binding site and a single voltage sensor in each subunit. Aspects of the mslo data not well fitted by the simplified scheme will likely be better accounted for by this more general scheme. The kinetic schemes discussed in this paper may be useful in interpreting the effects of BK channel modifications or mutations. PMID:9276753

  10. Cooperative gating between ion channels.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kee-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative gating between ion channels, i.e. the gating of one channel directly coupled to the gating of neighboring channels, has been observed in diverse channel types at the single-channel level. Positively coupled gating could enhance channel-mediated signaling while negative coupling may effectively reduce channel gating noise. Indeed, the physiological significance of cooperative channel gating in signal transduction has been recognized in several in vivo studies. Moreover, coupled gating of ion channels was reported to be associated with some human disease states. In this review, physiological roles for channel cooperativity and channel clustering observed in vitro and in vivo are introduced, and stimulation-induced channel clustering and direct channel cross linking are suggested as the physical mechanisms of channel assembly. Along with physical clustering, several molecular mechanisms proposed as the molecular basis for functional coupling of neighboring channels are covered: permeant ions as a channel coupling mediator, concerted channel activation through the membrane, and allosteric mechanisms. Also, single-channel analysis methods for cooperative gating such as the binomial analysis, the variance analysis, the conditional dwell time density analysis, and the maximum likelihood fitting analysis are reviewed and discussed.

  11. Ion Channels in Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Lawrence G.

    Ion channels in epithelial cells serve to move ions, and in some cases fluid, between compartments of the body. This function of the transfer of material is fundamentally different from that of the transfer of information, which is the main job of most channels in excitable cells. Nevertheless the basic construction of the channels is similar in many respects in the two tissue types. This chapter reviews the nature of channels in epithelia and discusses how their functions have evolved to accomplish the basic tasks for which they are responsible. I will focus on three channel types: epithelial Na+ channels, inward-rectifier K+ channels, and CFTR Cl- channels.

  12. The KCNQ1 channel – remarkable flexibility in gating allows for functional versatility

    PubMed Central

    Liin, Sara I; Barro-Soria, Rene; Larsson, H Peter

    2015-01-01

    The KCNQ1 channel (also called Kv7.1 or KvLQT1) belongs to the superfamily of voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels. KCNQ1 shares several general features with other Kv channels but also displays a fascinating flexibility in terms of the mechanism of channel gating, which allows KCNQ1 to play different physiological roles in different tissues. This flexibility allows KCNQ1 channels to function as voltage-independent channels in epithelial tissues, whereas KCNQ1 function as voltage-activated channels with very slow kinetics in cardiac tissues. This flexibility is in part provided by the association of KCNQ1 with different accessory KCNE β-subunits and different modulators, but also seems like an integral part of KCNQ1 itself. The aim of this review is to describe the main mechanisms underlying KCNQ1 flexibility. PMID:25653179

  13. 28-Channel rotary transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1981-01-01

    Transformer transmits power and digital data across rotating interface. Array has many parallel data channels, each with potential l megabaud data rate. Ferrite-cored transformers are spaced along rotor; airgap between them reduces crosstalk.

  14. A Simple Water Channel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, A. S.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a simple water channel, for use with an overhead projector. It is run from a water tap and may be used for flow visualization experiments, including the effect of streamlining and elementary building aerodynamics. (MLH)

  15. Chondrocyte channel transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; May, Hannah; Mobasheri, Ali; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    To date, a range of ion channels have been identified in chondrocytes using a number of different techniques, predominantly electrophysiological and/or biomolecular; each of these has its advantages and disadvantages. Here we aim to compare and contrast the data available from biophysical and microarray experiments. This letter analyses recent transcriptomics datasets from chondrocytes, accessible from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI). We discuss whether such bioinformatic analysis of microarray datasets can potentially accelerate identification and discovery of ion channels in chondrocytes. The ion channels which appear most frequently across these microarray datasets are discussed, along with their possible functions. We discuss whether functional or protein data exist which support the microarray data. A microarray experiment comparing gene expression in osteoarthritis and healthy cartilage is also discussed and we verify the differential expression of 2 of these genes, namely the genes encoding large calcium-activated potassium (BK) and aquaporin channels. PMID:23995703

  16. Calcium Channel Blockers

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as high blood pressure, chest pain and Raynaud's disease. Find out more about this class of medication. ... Irregular heartbeats (arrhythmia) Some circulatory conditions, such as Raynaud's disease For black people and older people, calcium channel ...

  17. Proton channel models

    PubMed Central

    Pupo, Amaury; Baez-Nieto, David; Martínez, Agustín; Latorre, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels are integral membrane proteins with the capacity to permeate elementary particles in a voltage and pH dependent manner. These proteins have been found in several species and are involved in various physiological processes. Although their primary topology is known, lack of details regarding their structures in the open conformation has limited analyses toward a deeper understanding of the molecular determinants of their function and regulation. Consequently, the function-structure relationships have been inferred based on homology models. In the present work, we review the existing proton channel models, their assumptions, predictions and the experimental facts that support them. Modeling proton channels is not a trivial task due to the lack of a close homolog template. Hence, there are important differences between published models. This work attempts to critically review existing proton channel models toward the aim of contributing to a better understanding of the structural features of these proteins. PMID:24755912

  18. Kinetics of stress fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachowiak, Matthew R.; O'Shaughnessy, Ben

    2008-02-01

    Stress fibers are contractile cytoskeletal structures, tensile actomyosin bundles which allow sensing and production of force, provide cells with adjustable rigidity and participate in various processes such as wound healing. The stress fiber is possibly the best characterized and most accessible multiprotein cellular contractile machine. Here we develop a quantitative model of the structure and relaxation kinetics of stress fibers. The principal experimentally known features are incorporated. The fiber has a periodic sarcomeric structure similar to muscle fibers with myosin motor proteins exerting contractile force by pulling on actin filaments. In addition the fiber contains the giant spring-like protein titin. Actin is continuously renewed by exchange with the cytosol leading to a turnover time of several minutes. In order that steady state be possible, turnover must be regulated. Our model invokes simple turnover and regulation mechanisms: actin association and dissociation occur at filament ends, while actin filament overlap above a certain threshold in the myosin-containing regions augments depolymerization rates. We use the model to study stress fiber relaxation kinetics after stimulation, as observed in a recent experimental study where some fiber regions were contractile and others expansive. We find that two distinct episodes ensue after stimulation: the turnover-overlap system relaxes rapidly in seconds, followed by the slow relaxation of sarcomere lengths in minutes. For parameter values as they have been characterized experimentally, we find the long time relaxation of sarcomere length is set by the rate at which actin filaments can grow or shrink in response to the forces exerted by the elastic and contractile elements. Consequently, the stress fiber relaxation time scales inversely with both titin spring constant and the intrinsic actin turnover rate. The model's predicted sarcomere velocities and contraction-expansion kinetics are in good

  19. CT detector evaluation with complex random backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Helen; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2012-02-01

    Modern computed tomography (CT) uses detector arrays consisting of large numbers of photodiodes with scintil- lator crystals. The number of pixels in the array can play an important role in system performance. Considerable research has been performed on signal detection in flat backgrounds under various conditions, but little has been done with complex, random backgrounds in CT; our work investigates in particular the effect of the number of detector elements on signal detection by a channelized Hotelling observer in a complex background. For this project, a simulated three-dimensional phantom is generated with its attenuation equal to that of water. The phantom contains a smaller central section with random variations to simulate random anatomical structures. Cone-beam projections of the phantom are acquired at different angles and used to calculate the covariance matrix of the raw projection data. Laguerre-Gauss channels are used to reduce the dimensionality of each 2D projection and hence the size of the covariance matrix, but the covariance is still a function of two projection angles. A strong cross-channel correlation is observed as a function of the difference between the angles. A signal with known location and size is used, and the performance of the observer is calculated from the channel outputs at multiple projection angles. A contrast-detail diagram is computed for different variables such as signal size, number of incident x-ray photons, pixel size, etc. At a fixed observer signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the contrast required to detect a signal increases dramatically as the signal size decreases.

  20. Theory of a random fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kolokolov, I. V. Lebedev, V. V.; Podivilov, E. V.; Vergeles, S. S.

    2014-12-15

    We develop the theory explaining the role of nonlinearity in generation of radiation in a fiber laser that is pumped by external light. The pumping energy is converted into the generating signal due to the Raman scattering supplying an effective gain for the signal. The signal is generated with frequencies near the one corresponding to the maximum value of the gain. Generation conditions and spectral properties of the generated signal are examined. We focus mainly on the case of a random laser where reflection of the signal occurs on impurities of the fiber. From the theoretical standpoint, kinetics of a wave system close to an integrable one are investigated. We demonstrate that in this case, the perturbation expansion in the kinetic equation has to use the closeness to the integrable case.

  1. Chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.

    1993-12-01

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  2. Analysis of Crystallization Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, Kenneth F.

    1997-01-01

    A realistic computer model for polymorphic crystallization (i.e., initial and final phases with identical compositions), which includes time-dependent nucleation and cluster-size-dependent growth rates, is developed and tested by fits to experimental data. Model calculations are used to assess the validity of two of the more common approaches for the analysis of crystallization data. The effects of particle size on transformation kinetics, important for the crystallization of many systems of limited dimension including thin films, fine powders, and nanoparticles, are examined.

  3. Molecular motors: thermodynamics and the random walk.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, N.; Imafuku, Y.; Tawada, K.

    2001-01-01

    The biochemical cycle of a molecular motor provides the essential link between its thermodynamics and kinetics. The thermodynamics of the cycle determine the motor's ability to perform mechanical work, whilst the kinetics of the cycle govern its stochastic behaviour. We concentrate here on tightly coupled, processive molecular motors, such as kinesin and myosin V, which hydrolyse one molecule of ATP per forward step. Thermodynamics require that, when such a motor pulls against a constant load f, the ratio of the forward and backward products of the rate constants for its cycle is exp [-(DeltaG + u(0)f)/kT], where -DeltaG is the free energy available from ATP hydrolysis and u(0) is the motor's step size. A hypothetical one-state motor can therefore act as a chemically driven ratchet executing a biased random walk. Treating this random walk as a diffusion problem, we calculate the forward velocity v and the diffusion coefficient D and we find that its randomness parameter r is determined solely by thermodynamics. However, real molecular motors pass through several states at each attachment site. They satisfy a modified diffusion equation that follows directly from the rate equations for the biochemical cycle and their effective diffusion coefficient is reduced to D-v(2)tau, where tau is the time-constant for the motor to reach the steady state. Hence, the randomness of multistate motors is reduced compared with the one-state case and can be used for determining tau. Our analysis therefore demonstrates the intimate relationship between the biochemical cycle, the force-velocity relation and the random motion of molecular motors. PMID:11600075

  4. Single channel currents induced by complement in antibody-coated cell membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, M B; Stephens, C L; Lecar, H

    1981-01-01

    An extracellular patch electrode was used to record ionic currents from individual complement-induced channels in the membranes of antibody-coated skeletal muscle. The amplitude of the single-channel currents leads to an estimate of 90 pS for the unit conductance. The kinetics of channel opening and closing show marked variability and complexity. Channels flicker open and closed repeatedly, indicating that once these lesions form, they undergo rapid structural transitions between discrete conducting and nonconducting states. Images PMID:6273870

  5. Fracture channel waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nihei, Kurt T.; Yi, Weidong; Myer, Larry R.; Cook, Neville G. W.; Schoenberg, Michael

    1999-03-01

    The properties of guided waves which propagate between two parallel fractures are examined. Plane wave analysis is used to obtain a dispersion equation for the velocities of fracture channel waves. Analysis of this equation demonstrates that parallel fractures form an elastic waveguide that supports two symmetric and two antisymmetric dispersive Rayleigh channel waves, each with particle motions and velocities that are sensitive to the normal and tangential stiffnesses of the fractures. These fracture channel waves degenerate to shear waves when the fracture stiffnesses are large, to Rayleigh waves and Rayleigh-Lamb plate waves when the fracture stiffnesses are low, and to fracture interface waves when the fractures are either very closely spaced or widely separated. For intermediate fracture stiffnesses typical of fractured rock masses, fracture channel waves are dispersive and exhibit moderate to strong localization of guided wave energy between the fractures. The existence of these waves is examined using laboratory acoustic measurements on a fractured marble plate. This experiment confirms the distinct particle motion of the fundamental antisymmetric fracture channel wave (A0 mode) and demonstrates the ease with which a fracture channel wave can be generated and detected.

  6. Cl(-) channels in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Ousingsawat, Jiraporn; Sirianant, Lalida; MacAulay, Nanna; Schreiber, Rainer; Kunzelmann, Karl

    2016-10-01

    A remarkable feature of apoptosis is the initial massive cell shrinkage, which requires opening of ion channels to allow release of K(+), Cl(-), and organic osmolytes to drive osmotic water movement and cell shrinkage. This article focuses on the role of the Cl(-) channels LRRC8, TMEM16/anoctamin, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in cellular apoptosis. LRRC8A-E has been identified as a volume-regulated anion channel expressed in many cell types. It was shown to be required for regulatory and apoptotic volume decrease (RVD, AVD) in cultured cell lines. Its presence also determines sensitivity towards cytostatic drugs such as cisplatin. Recent data point to a molecular and functional relationship of LRRC8A and anoctamins (ANOs). ANO6, 9, and 10 (TMEM16F, J, and K) augment apoptotic Cl(-) currents and AVD, but it remains unclear whether these anoctamins operate as Cl(-) channels or as regulators of other apoptotic Cl(-) channels, such as LRRC8. CFTR has been known for its proapoptotic effects for some time, and this effect may be based on glutathione release from the cell and increase in cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although we find that CFTR is activated by cell swelling, it is possible that CFTR serves RVD/AVD through accumulation of ROS and activation of independent membrane channels such as ANO6. Thus activation of ANO6 will support cell shrinkage and induce additional apoptotic events, such as membrane phospholipid scrambling.

  7. Control with a random access protocol and packet dropouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liyuan; Guo, Ge

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates networked control systems whose actuators communicate with the controller via a limited number of unreliable channels. The access to the channels is decided by a so-called group random access protocol, which is modelled as a binary Markov sequence. Data packet dropouts in the channels are modelled as independent Bernoulli processes. For such systems, a systematic characterisation for controller synthesis is established and stated in terms of the transition probabilities of the Markov protocol and the packet dropout probabilities. The results are illustrated via a numerical example.

  8. Weak randomness seriously limits the security of quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouda, Jan; Pivoluska, Matej; Plesch, Martin; Wilmott, Colin

    2012-12-01

    In usual security proofs of quantum protocols the adversary (Eve) is expected to have full control over any quantum communication between any communicating parties (Alice and Bob). Eve is also expected to have full access to an authenticated classical channel between Alice and Bob. Unconditional security against any attack by Eve can be proved even in the realistic setting of device and channel imperfection. In this paper we show that the security of quantum key distribution protocols is ruined if one allows Eve to possess a very limited access to the random sources used by Alice. Such knowledge should always be expected in realistic experimental conditions via different side channels.

  9. Quantum random number generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Collantes, Miguel; Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Random numbers are a fundamental resource in science and engineering with important applications in simulation and cryptography. The inherent randomness at the core of quantum mechanics makes quantum systems a perfect source of entropy. Quantum random number generation is one of the most mature quantum technologies with many alternative generation methods. This review discusses the different technologies in quantum random number generation from the early devices based on radioactive decay to the multiple ways to use the quantum states of light to gather entropy from a quantum origin. Randomness extraction and amplification and the notable possibility of generating trusted random numbers even with untrusted hardware using device-independent generation protocols are also discussed.

  10. Invitation to Random Tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurau, Razvan

    2016-09-01

    This article is preface to the SIGMA special issue ''Tensor Models, Formalism and Applications'', http://www.emis.de/journals/SIGMA/Tensor_Models.html. The issue is a collection of eight excellent, up to date reviews on random tensor models. The reviews combine pedagogical introductions meant for a general audience with presentations of the most recent developments in the field. This preface aims to give a condensed panoramic overview of random tensors as the natural generalization of random matrices to higher dimensions.

  11. Open-channel block by the cytoplasmic tail of sodium channel beta4 as a mechanism for resurgent sodium current.

    PubMed

    Grieco, Tina M; Malhotra, Jyoti D; Chen, Chunling; Isom, Lori L; Raman, Indira M

    2005-01-20

    Voltage-gated sodium channels with "resurgent" kinetics are specialized for high-frequency firing. The alpha subunits interact with a blocking protein that binds open channels upon depolarization and unbinds upon repolarization, producing resurgent sodium current. By limiting classical inactivation, the cycle of block and unblock shortens refractory periods. To characterize the blocker in Purkinje neurons, we briefly exposed inside-out patches to substrate-specific proteases. Trypsin and chymotrypsin each removed resurgent current, consistent with established roles for positively charged and hydrophobic/aromatic groups in blocking sodium channels. In Purkinje cells, the only known sodium channel-associated subunit that has a cytoplasmic sequence with several positive charges and clustered hydrophobic/aromatic residues is beta4 (KKLITFILKKTREK; beta4(154-167)). After enzymatic removal of block, beta4(154-167) fully reconstituted resurgent current, whereas scrambled or point-mutated peptides were ineffective. In CA3 pyramidal neurons, which lack beta4 and endogenous block, beta4(154-167) generated resurgent current. Thus, beta4 may be the endogenous open-channel blocker responsible for resurgent kinetics.

  12. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  13. Kinetics of fiber solidification

    PubMed Central

    Mercader, C.; Lucas, A.; Derré, A.; Zakri, C.; Moisan, S.; Maugey, M.; Poulin, P.

    2010-01-01

    Many synthetic or natural fibers are produced via the transformation of a liquid solution into a solid filament, which allows the wet processing of high molecular weight polymers, proteins, or inorganic particles. Synthetic wet-spun fibers are used in our everyday life from clothing to composite reinforcement applications. Spun fibers are also common in nature. Silk solidification results from the coagulation of protein solutions. The chemical phenomena involved in the formation of all these classes of fibers can be quite different but they all share the same fundamental transformation from a liquid to a solid state. The solidification process is critical because it governs the production rate and the strength that fibers can sustain to be drawn and wound. An approach is proposed in this work to investigate the kinetics of fiber solidification. This approach consists in circulating solidifying fibers in the extensional flow of a surrounding liquid. Such as polymers in extensional flows, the fibers break if resultant drag forces exceed the fiber tensile strength. The solidification kinetics of nanotube composite fibers serves as a validation example of this approach. The method could be extended to other systems and advance thereby the science and technology of fiber and textile materials. It is also a way to directly visualize the scission of chain-like systems in extensional flows. PMID:20937910

  14. Kinetics of coal pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Seery, D.J.; Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M. ); Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.; Hsu, J.; Hajaligol, M.; Sarofim, A. ); Jenkins, R.; Mallin, J.; Espindola-Merin, B. ); Essenhigh, R.; Misra, M.K. )

    1989-07-01

    This report contains results of a coordinated, multi-laboratory investigation of coal devolatilization. Data is reported pertaining to the devolatilization for bituminous coals over three orders of magnitude in apparent heating rate (100 to 100,000 + {degree}C/sec), over two orders of magnitude in particle size (20 to 700 microns), final particle temperatures from 400 to 1600{degree}C, heat transfer modes ranging from convection to radiative, ambient pressure ranging from near vacuum to one atmosphere pressure. The heat transfer characteristics of the reactors are reported in detail. It is assumed the experimental results are to form the basis of a devolatilization data base. Empirical rate expressions are developed for each phase of devolatilization which, when coupled to an awareness of the heat transfer rate potential of a particular devolatilization reactor, indicate the kinetics emphasized by a particular system reactor plus coal sample. The analysis indicates the particular phase of devolatilization that will be emphasized by a particular reactor type and, thereby, the kinetic expressions appropriate to that devolatilization system. Engineering rate expressions are developed from the empirical rate expressions in the context of a fundamental understanding of coal devolatilization developed in the course of the investigation. 164 refs., 223 figs., 44 tabs.

  15. Randomized SUSAN edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Ping; Gao, Ying-Hui; Wang, Peng

    2011-11-01

    A speed up technique for the SUSAN edge detector based on random sampling is proposed. Instead of sliding the mask pixel by pixel on an image as the SUSAN edge detector does, the proposed scheme places the mask randomly on pixels to find edges in the image; we hereby name it randomized SUSAN edge detector (R-SUSAN). Specifically, the R-SUSAN edge detector adopts three approaches in the framework of random sampling to accelerate a SUSAN edge detector: procedure integration of response computation and nonmaxima suppression, reduction of unnecessary processing for obvious nonedge pixels, and early termination. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. Random Packing and Random Covering Sequences.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-24

    obtained by appeain~g to a result due to Marsaglia [39, and de Finetti [8]. Their result states that if (XI. X2 .. X,) is a random point on the simplex {X E...to sequeil~ coverage problems. J. App). Prob. 11. 281-293. [81 de Finetti . B. (1964). Alcune ossevazioni in tema de "suddivisione casuale." Giornale I

  17. Improving flow distribution in influent channels using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Park, No-Suk; Yoon, Sukmin; Jeong, Woochang; Lee, Seungjae

    2016-10-01

    Although the flow distribution in an influent channel where the inflow is split into each treatment process in a wastewater treatment plant greatly affects the efficiency of the process, and a weir is the typical structure for the flow distribution, to the authors' knowledge, there is a paucity of research on the flow distribution in an open channel with a weir. In this study, the influent channel of a real-scale wastewater treatment plant was used, installing a suppressed rectangular weir that has a horizontal crest to cross the full channel width. The flow distribution in the influent channel was analyzed using a validated computational fluid dynamics model to investigate (1) the comparison of single-phase and two-phase simulation, (2) the improved procedure of the prototype channel, and (3) the effect of the inflow rate on flow distribution. The results show that two-phase simulation is more reliable due to the description of the free-surface fluctuations. It should first be considered for improving flow distribution to prevent a short-circuit flow, and the difference in the kinetic energy with the inflow rate makes flow distribution trends different. The authors believe that this case study is helpful for improving flow distribution in an influent channel.

  18. Hysteresis of ligand binding in CNGA2 ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Nache, Vasilica; Eick, Thomas; Schulz, Eckhard; Schmauder, Ralf; Benndorf, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Tetrameric cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels mediate receptor potentials in olfaction and vision. The channels are activated by the binding of cyclic nucleotides to a binding domain embedded in the C terminus of each subunit. Here using a fluorescent cGMP derivative (fcGMP), we show for homotetrameric CNGA2 channels that ligand unbinding is ~50 times faster at saturating than at subsaturating fcGMP. Analysis with complex Markovian models reveals two pathways for ligand unbinding; the partially liganded open channel unbinds its ligands from closed states only, whereas the fully liganded channel reaches a different open state from which it unbinds all four ligands rapidly. Consequently, the transition pathways for ligand binding and activation of a fully liganded CNGA2 channel differ from that of ligand unbinding and deactivation, resulting in pronounced hysteresis of the gating mechanism. This concentration-dependent gating mechanism allows the channels to respond to changes in the cyclic nucleotide concentration with different kinetics. PMID:24287615

  19. Scorpion venom components that affect ion-channels function

    PubMed Central

    Quintero-Hernández, V.; Jiménez-Vargas, J.M.; Gurrola, G.B.; Valdivia, H.H.F.; Possani, L.D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The number and types of venom components that affect ion-channel function are reviewed. These are the most important venom components responsible for human intoxication, deserving medical attention, often requiring the use of specific anti-venoms. Special emphasis is given to peptides that recognize Na+-, K+- and Ca++-channels of excitable cells. Knowledge generated by direct isolation of peptides from venom and components deduced from cloned genes, whose amino acid sequences are deposited into databanks are now adays in the order of 1.5 thousands, out of an estimate biodiversity closed to 300,000. Here the diversity of components is briefly reviewed with mention to specific references. Structural characteristic are discussed with examples taken from published work. The principal mechanisms of action of the three different types of peptides are also reviewed. Na+-channel specific venom components usually are modifier of the open and closing kinetic mechanisms of the ion-channels, whereas peptides affecting K+-channels are normally pore blocking agents. The Ryanodine Ca++-channel specific peptides are known for causing sub-conducting stages of the channels conductance and some were shown to be able to internalize penetrating inside the muscle cells. PMID:23891887

  20. Inhibition of Kir4.1 potassium channels by quinacrine.

    PubMed

    Marmolejo-Murillo, Leticia G; Aréchiga-Figueroa, Iván A; Cui, Meng; Moreno-Galindo, Eloy G; Navarro-Polanco, Ricardo A; Sánchez-Chapula, José A; Ferrer, Tania; Rodríguez-Menchaca, Aldo A

    2017-05-15

    Inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels are expressed in many cell types and contribute to a wide range of physiological processes. Particularly, Kir4.1 channels are involved in the astroglial spatial potassium buffering. In this work, we examined the effects of the cationic amphiphilic drug quinacrine on Kir4.1 channels heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells, employing the patch clamp technique. Quinacrine inhibited the currents of Kir4.1 channels in a concentration and voltage dependent manner. In inside-out patches, quinacrine inhibited Kir4.1 channels with an IC50 value of 1.8±0.3μM and with extremely slow blocking and unblocking kinetics. Molecular modeling combined with mutagenesis studies suggested that quinacrine blocks Kir4.1 by plugging the central cavity of the channels, stabilized by the residues E158 and T128. Overall, this study shows that quinacrine blocks Kir4.1 channels, which would be expected to impact the potassium transport in several tissues.

  1. Mechanism of β4 Subunit Modulation of BK Channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Rothberg, Brad S.; Brenner, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Large-conductance (BK-type) Ca2+-activated potassium channels are activated by membrane depolarization and cytoplasmic Ca2+. BK channels are expressed in a broad variety of cells and have a corresponding diversity in properties. Underlying much of the functional diversity is a family of four tissue-specific accessory subunits (β1–β4). Biophysical characterization has shown that the β4 subunit confers properties of the so-called “type II” BK channel isotypes seen in brain. These properties include slow gating kinetics and resistance to iberiotoxin and charybdotoxin blockade. In addition, the β4 subunit reduces the apparent voltage sensitivity of channel activation and has complex effects on apparent Ca2+ sensitivity. Specifically, channel activity at low Ca2+ is inhibited, while at high Ca2+, activity is enhanced. The goal of this study is to understand the mechanism underlying β4 subunit action in the context of a dual allosteric model for BK channel gating. We observed that β4's most profound effect is a decrease in Po (at least 11-fold) in the absence of calcium binding and voltage sensor activation. However, β4 promotes channel opening by increasing voltage dependence of Po-V relations at negative membrane potentials. In the context of the dual allosteric model for BK channels, we find these properties are explained by distinct and opposing actions of β4 on BK channels. β4 reduces channel opening by decreasing the intrinsic gating equilibrium (L0), and decreasing the allosteric coupling between calcium binding and voltage sensor activation (E). However, β4 has a compensatory effect on channel opening following depolarization by shifting open channel voltage sensor activation (Vho) to more negative membrane potentials. The consequence is that β4 causes a net positive shift of the G-V relationship (relative to α subunit alone) at low calcium. At higher calcium, the contribution by Vho and an increase in allosteric coupling to Ca2+ binding (C

  2. Stochastic Kinetics of Nascent RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Heng; Skinner, Samuel O.; Sokac, Anna Marie; Golding, Ido

    2016-09-01

    The stochastic kinetics of transcription is typically inferred from the distribution of RNA numbers in individual cells. However, cellular RNA reflects additional processes downstream of transcription, hampering this analysis. In contrast, nascent (actively transcribed) RNA closely reflects the kinetics of transcription. We present a theoretical model for the stochastic kinetics of nascent RNA, which we solve to obtain the probability distribution of nascent RNA per gene. The model allows us to evaluate the kinetic parameters of transcription from single-cell measurements of nascent RNA. The model also predicts surprising discontinuities in the distribution of nascent RNA, a feature which we verify experimentally.

  3. Chemical kinetics on extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Moses, Julianne I

    2014-04-28

    Chemical kinetics plays an important role in controlling the atmospheric composition of all planetary atmospheres, including those of extrasolar planets. For the hottest exoplanets, the composition can closely follow thermochemical-equilibrium predictions, at least in the visible and infrared photosphere at dayside (eclipse) conditions. However, for atmospheric temperatures approximately <2000K, and in the uppermost atmosphere at any temperature, chemical kinetics matters. The two key mechanisms by which kinetic processes drive an exoplanet atmosphere out of equilibrium are photochemistry and transport-induced quenching. I review these disequilibrium processes in detail, discuss observational consequences and examine some of the current evidence for kinetic processes on extrasolar planets.

  4. Optical Communications Channel Combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Quirk, Kevin J.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    NASA has identified deep-space optical communications links as an integral part of a unified space communication network in order to provide data rates in excess of 100 Mb/s. The distances and limited power inherent in a deep-space optical downlink necessitate the use of photon-counting detectors and a power-efficient modulation such as pulse position modulation (PPM). For the output of each photodetector, whether from a separate telescope or a portion of the detection area, a communication receiver estimates a log-likelihood ratio for each PPM slot. To realize the full effective aperture of these receivers, their outputs must be combined prior to information decoding. A channel combiner was developed to synchronize the log-likelihood ratio (LLR) sequences of multiple receivers, and then combines these into a single LLR sequence for information decoding. The channel combiner synchronizes the LLR sequences of up to three receivers and then combines these into a single LLR sequence for output. The channel combiner has three channel inputs, each of which takes as input a sequence of four-bit LLRs for each PPM slot in a codeword via a XAUI 10 Gb/s quad optical fiber interface. The cross-correlation between the channels LLR time series are calculated and used to synchronize the sequences prior to combining. The output of the channel combiner is a sequence of four-bit LLRs for each PPM slot in a codeword via a XAUI 10 Gb/s quad optical fiber interface. The unit is controlled through a 1 Gb/s Ethernet UDP/IP interface. A deep-space optical communication link has not yet been demonstrated. This ground-station channel combiner was developed to demonstrate this capability and is unique in its ability to process such a signal.

  5. Simultaneous modifications of sodium channel gating by two scorpion toxins.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G K; Strichartz, G

    1982-01-01

    The effects of purified scorpion toxins from two different species on the kinetics of sodium currents were evaluated in amphibian myelinated nerves under voltage clamp. A toxin from Leiurus quinquestriatus slowed and prevented sodium channel inactivation, exclusively, and a toxin from Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing reduced transient sodium currents during a maintained depolarization, and induced a novel inward current that appeared following repolarization, as previously reported by Cahalan (1975, J. Physiol. [Lond.]. 244:511-534) for the crude scorpion venom. Both of these effects were observed in fibers treated with both of these toxins, and the kinetics of the induced current were modified in a way that showed that the same sodium channels were modified simultaneously by both toxins. Although the toxins can act on different sites, the time course of the action of C. sculpturatus toxin was accelerated in the presence of the L. quinquestriatus toxin, indicating some form of interaction between the two toxin binding sites. PMID:6293596

  6. Modeling channel interference in an orbital angular momentum-multiplexed laser link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguita, Jaime A.; Neifeld, Mark A.; Vasic, Bane V.

    2009-08-01

    We study the effects of optical turbulence on the energy crosstalk among constituent orbital angular momentum (OAM) states in a vortex-based multi-channel laser communication link and determine channel interference in terms of turbulence strength and OAM state separation. We characterize the channel interference as a function of C2n and transmit OAM state, and propose probability models to predict the random fluctuations in the received signals for such architecture. Simulations indicate that turbulence-induced channel interference is mutually correlated across receive channels.

  7. Micro mold filling kinetics of metallic glasses in supercooled liquid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Huo, L. S.; Zhao, D. Q.; Wang, W. H.

    2013-03-01

    The unique thermoplastic forming ability of metallic glasses in their supercooled liquid state makes them the ideal embossing materials for miniature fabrication. However, the understanding and controlling of micro filling process that is crucial for miniature fabrication and their applications remain fundamental, yet presently unresolved issues. Here, the mold filling kinetics of a model Pd-based metallic glass in supercooled liquid state is studied using different Si micro molds with different channels. A universal kinetic equation, which can describe the filling kinetics of viscous metallic supercooled liquid in micro molds with irregular shapes, is obtained.

  8. Guiding of 4 MeV C+ and C4+ ion beams using cylindrical glass channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motohashi, Kenji; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Saitoh, Yuichi; Narumi, Kazumasa; Matoba, Shiro

    2017-04-01

    To investigate how the initial charge state affects the transmission of 4 MeV C+ and C4+ ion beams through a channel, we measured the transmission probability and kinetic energy of atoms and ions that pass through a cylindrical channel in glass, such as a narrow gap between a cylindrical convex glass surface and a cylindrical concave glass surface. Kinetic energy distributions were measured at three typical observation angles φ with the cylindrical glass channel tilted at angles θ = ‑3, ‑2, ‑1, 0, 1, 2, and 3° with respect to the incident ion beam. The ion beam is guided in both initial charge states; that is, the transmission maintains the initial kinetic energy at tilt angles greater than the geometric limit. However, no marked difference in transmission appears between the two initial charge states.

  9. Effect of N-bromoacetamide on single sodium channel currents in excised membrane patches

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the effect of N-bromoacetamide (NBA) on the behavior of single sodium channel currents in excised patches of rat myotube membrane at 10 degree C. Inward sodium currents were activated by voltage steps from holding potentials of about -100 mV to test potentials of -40 mV. The cytoplasmic-face solution was isotonic CsF. Application of NBA or pronase to the cytoplasmic face of the membrane irreversibly removed sodium channel inactivation, as determined by averaged single-channel records. Teh lifetime of the open channel at - 40 mV was increased about 10-fold by NBA treatment without affecting the amplitude of single-channel currents. A binomial analysis was used both before and after treatment to determine the number of channels within the excised patch. NBA was shown to have little effect on activation kinetics, as determined by an examination of both the rising phase of averaged currents and measurements f the delay between the start of the pulse and the first channel opening. Our data support a kinetic model of sodium channel activation in which the rate constant leading back from the open state to the last closed state is slower than expected from a strict Hodgkin-Huxley model. The data also suggest that the normal open-channel lifetime is primarily determined by the inactivation process in the voltage range we have examined. PMID:6281357

  10. On the pertinence to Physics of random walks induced by random dynamical systems: a survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petritis, Dimitri

    2016-08-01

    Let be an abstract space and a denumerable (finite or infinite) alphabet. Suppose that is a family of functions such that for all we have and a family of transformations . The pair ((Sa)a , (pa)a ) is termed an iterated function system with place dependent probabilities. Such systems can be thought as generalisations of random dynamical systems. As a matter of fact, suppose we start from a given ; we pick then randomly, with probability pa (x), the transformation Sa and evolve to Sa (x). We are interested in the behaviour of the system when the iteration continues indefinitely. Random walks of the above type are omnipresent in both classical and quantum Physics. To give a small sample of occurrences we mention: random walks on the affine group, random walks on Penrose lattices, random walks on partially directed lattices, evolution of density matrices induced by repeated quantum measurements, quantum channels, quantum random walks, etc. In this article, we review some basic properties of such systems and provide with a pathfinder in the extensive bibliography (both on mathematical and physical sides) where the main results have been originally published.

  11. Application of a hybrid kinetic-continuum solver to the near wall modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovenskaya, O.; Croce, G.

    2014-11-01

    A hybrid method dynamically coupling the direct numerical solution of the S-model kinetic equation and Navier-Stokes equations is applied to a numerical simulation of the flow through the channel of a finite length due to arbitrarily pressure ratios and for a wide range of Knudsen number. The decomposition of the physical domain into kinetic and hydrodynamic sub-domains is updated at each time step. The solution is advanced in time simultaneously in both kinetic and hydrodynamic domains: the coupling is achieved by matching half fluxes at the interface of the kinetic and Navier-Stokes domains, thus taking care of the conservation of momentum, energy and mass through the interface. Solver efficiency is increased via MPI (Message Passing Interface) parallelization. Accuracy and reliability of the method, for different decomposition criteria, are assessed via comparison with a pure kinetic solution.

  12. TRP channels and analgesia.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Louis S; Abooj, Mruvil

    2013-03-19

    Since cloning and characterizing the first nociceptive ion channel Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), other TRP channels involved in nociception have been cloned and characterized, which include TRP Vanilloid 2 (TRPV2), TRP Vanilloid 3 (TRPV3), TRP Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), TRP Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and TRP Melastatin 8 (TRPM8), more recently TRP Canonical 1, 5, 6 (TRPC1, 5, 6), TRP Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) and TRP Melastatin 3 (TRPM3). These channels are predominantly expressed in C and Aδ nociceptors and transmit noxious thermal, mechanical and chemical sensitivities. TRP channels are modulated by pro-inflammatory mediators, neuropeptides and cytokines. Significant advances have been made targeting these receptors either by antagonists or agonists to treat painful conditions. In this review, we will discuss TRP channels as targets for next generation analgesics and the side effects that may ensue as a result of blocking/activating these receptors, because they are also involved in physiological functions such as release of vasoactive neuropeptides and regulation of vascular tone, maintenance of the body temperature, gastrointestinal motility, urinary bladder control, etc.

  13. TRP Channels and Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Premkumar, Louis S.; Abooj, Mruvil

    2013-01-01

    Since cloning and characterizing the first nociceptive ion channel Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), other TRP channels involved in nociception have been cloned and characterized, which include TRP Vanilloid 2 (TRPV2), TRP Vanilloid 3 (TRPV3), TRP Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), TRP Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and TRP Melastatin 8 (TRPM8), more recently TRP Canonical 1, 5, 6 (TRPC1, 5, 6), TRP Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) and TRP Melastatin 3 (TRPM3). These channels are predominantly expressed in C and Aδ nociceptors and transmit noxious thermal, mechanical and chemical sensitivities. TRP channels are modulated by pro-inflammatory mediators, neuropeptides and cytokines. Significant advances have been made targeting these receptors either by antagonists or agonists to treat painful conditions. In this review, we will discuss TRP channels as targets for next generation analgesics and the side effects that may ensue as a result of blocking/activating these receptors, because they are also involved in physiological functions such as release of vasoactive neuropeptides and regulation of vascular tone, maintenance of the body temperature, gastrointestinal motility, urinary bladder control etc. PMID:22910182

  14. Calcium channels and migraine.

    PubMed

    Pietrobon, Daniela

    2013-07-01

    Missense mutations in CACNA1A, the gene that encodes the pore-forming α1 subunit of human voltage-gated Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channels, cause a rare form of migraine with aura (familial hemiplegic migraine type 1: FHM1). Migraine is a common disabling brain disorder whose key manifestations are recurrent attacks of unilateral headache that may be preceded by transient neurological aura symptoms. This review, first, briefly summarizes current understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms that are believed to underlie migraine headache, migraine aura and the onset of a migraine attack, and briefly describes the localization and function of neuronal Ca(V)2.1 channels in the brain regions that have been implicated in migraine pathogenesis. Then, the review describes and discusses i) the functional consequences of FHM1 mutations on the biophysical properties of recombinant human Ca(V)2.1 channels and native Ca(V)2.1 channels in neurons of knockin mouse models carrying the mild R192Q or severe S218L mutations in the orthologous gene, and ii) the functional consequences of these mutations on neurophysiological processes in the cerebral cortex and trigeminovascular system thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of migraine, and the insights into migraine mechanisms obtained from the functional analysis of these processes in FHM1 knockin mice. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium channels.

  15. Mitochondrial Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Brian

    2009-01-01

    In work spanning more than a century, mitochondria have been recognized for their multifunctional roles in metabolism, energy transduction, ion transport, inheritance, signaling, and cell death. Foremost among these tasks is the continuous production of ATP through oxidative phosphorylation, which requires a large electrochemical driving force for protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This process requires a membrane with relatively low permeability to ions to minimize energy dissipation. However, a wealth of evidence now indicates that both selective and nonselective ion channels are present in the mitochondrial inner membrane, along with several known channels on the outer membrane. Some of these channels are active under physiological conditions, and others may be activated under pathophysiological conditions to act as the major determinants of cell life and death. This review summarizes research on mitochondrial ion channels and efforts to identify their molecular correlates. Except in a few cases, our understanding of the structure of mitochondrial ion channels is limited, indicating the need for focused discovery in this area. PMID:17059356

  16. Channel Identification Machines

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Aurel A.; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B.

    2012-01-01

    We present a formal methodology for identifying a channel in a system consisting of a communication channel in cascade with an asynchronous sampler. The channel is modeled as a multidimensional filter, while models of asynchronous samplers are taken from neuroscience and communications and include integrate-and-fire neurons, asynchronous sigma/delta modulators and general oscillators in cascade with zero-crossing detectors. We devise channel identification algorithms that recover a projection of the filter(s) onto a space of input signals loss-free for both scalar and vector-valued test signals. The test signals are modeled as elements of a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) with a Dirichlet kernel. Under appropriate limiting conditions on the bandwidth and the order of the test signal space, the filter projection converges to the impulse response of the filter. We show that our results hold for a wide class of RKHSs, including the space of finite-energy bandlimited signals. We also extend our channel identification results to noisy circuits. PMID:23227035

  17. MEMS in microfluidic channels.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Okandan, Murat; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2004-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) comprise a new class of devices that include various forms of sensors and actuators. Recent studies have shown that microscale cantilever structures are able to detect a wide range of chemicals, biomolecules or even single bacterial cells. In this approach, cantilever deflection replaces optical fluorescence detection thereby eliminating complex chemical tagging steps that are difficult to achieve with chip-based architectures. A key challenge to utilizing this new detection scheme is the incorporation of functionalized MEMS structures within complex microfluidic channel architectures. The ability to accomplish this integration is currently limited by the processing approaches used to seal lids on pre-etched microfluidic channels. This report describes Sandia's first construction of MEMS instrumented microfluidic chips, which were fabricated by combining our leading capabilities in MEMS processing with our low-temperature photolithographic method for fabricating microfluidic channels. We have explored in-situ cantilevers and other similar passive MEMS devices as a new approach to directly sense fluid transport, and have successfully monitored local flow rates and viscosities within microfluidic channels. Actuated MEMS structures have also been incorporated into microfluidic channels, and the electrical requirements for actuation in liquids have been quantified with an elegant theory. Electrostatic actuation in water has been accomplished, and a novel technique for monitoring local electrical conductivities has been invented.

  18. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, Richard J.; Crowell, Shannon L.

    1998-01-01

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface.

  19. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, R.J.; Crowell, S.L.

    1998-01-13

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface. 15 figs.

  20. Quantum random number generator

    DOEpatents

    Pooser, Raphael C.

    2016-05-10

    A quantum random number generator (QRNG) and a photon generator for a QRNG are provided. The photon generator may be operated in a spontaneous mode below a lasing threshold to emit photons. Photons emitted from the photon generator may have at least one random characteristic, which may be monitored by the QRNG to generate a random number. In one embodiment, the photon generator may include a photon emitter and an amplifier coupled to the photon emitter. The amplifier may enable the photon generator to be used in the QRNG without introducing significant bias in the random number and may enable multiplexing of multiple random numbers. The amplifier may also desensitize the photon generator to fluctuations in power supplied thereto while operating in the spontaneous mode. In one embodiment, the photon emitter and amplifier may be a tapered diode amplifier.

  1. Randomness: Quantum versus classical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Recent tremendous development of quantum information theory has led to a number of quantum technological projects, e.g. quantum random generators. This development had stimulated a new wave of interest in quantum foundations. One of the most intriguing problems of quantum foundations is the elaboration of a consistent and commonly accepted interpretation of a quantum state. Closely related problem is the clarification of the notion of quantum randomness and its interrelation with classical randomness. In this short review, we shall discuss basics of classical theory of randomness (which by itself is very complex and characterized by diversity of approaches) and compare it with irreducible quantum randomness. We also discuss briefly “digital philosophy”, its role in physics (classical and quantum) and its coupling to the information interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM).

  2. A kinetic study of rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ainsworth, Stanley; Macfarlane, Neil

    1973-01-01

    The paper reports a study of the kinetics of the reaction between phosphoenolpyruvate, ADP and Mg2+ catalysed by rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase. The experimental results indicate that the reaction mechanism is equilibrium random-order in type, that the substrates and products are phosphoenolpyruvate, ADP, Mg2+, pyruvate and MgATP, and that dead-end complexes, between pyruvate, ADP and Mg2+, form randomly and exist in equilibrium with themselves and other substrate complexes. Values were determined for the Michaelis, dissociation and inhibition constants of the reaction and are compared with values ascertained by previous workers. PMID:4737316

  3. Kinetics of Social Contagion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Zhongyuan; Iñiguez, Gerardo; Karsai, Márton; Kertész, János

    2015-11-01

    Diffusion of information, behavioral patterns or innovations follows diverse pathways depending on a number of conditions, including the structure of the underlying social network, the sensitivity to peer pressure and the influence of media. Here we study analytically and by simulations a general model that incorporates threshold mechanism capturing sensitivity to peer pressure, the effect of "immune" nodes who never adopt, and a perpetual flow of external information. While any constant, nonzero rate of dynamically introduced spontaneous adopters leads to global spreading, the kinetics by which the asymptotic state is approached shows rich behavior. In particular, we find that, as a function of the immune node density, there is a transition from fast to slow spreading governed by entirely different mechanisms. This transition happens below the percolation threshold of network fragmentation, and has its origin in the competition between cascading behavior induced by adopters and blocking due to immune nodes. This change is accompanied by a percolation transition of the induced clusters.

  4. Kinetic inductance magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Luomahaara, Juho; Vesterinen, Visa; Grönberg, Leif; Hassel, Juha

    2014-09-10

    Sensing ultra-low magnetic fields has various applications in the fields of science, medicine and industry. There is a growing need for a sensor that can be operated in ambient environments where magnetic shielding is limited or magnetic field manipulation is involved. To this end, here we demonstrate a new magnetometer with high sensitivity and wide dynamic range. The device is based on the current nonlinearity of superconducting material stemming from kinetic inductance. A further benefit of our approach is of extreme simplicity: the device is fabricated from a single layer of niobium nitride. Moreover, radio frequency multiplexing techniques can be applied, enabling the simultaneous readout of multiple sensors, for example, in biomagnetic measurements requiring data from large sensor arrays.

  5. SHAPING OF ACTION POTENTIALS BY TYPE I AND TYPE II BK CHANNELS

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, David B.; Wang, Bin; Brenner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The BK channel is a Ca2+ and voltage-gated conductance responsible for shaping action potential waveforms in many types of neurons. Type II BK channels are differentiated from type I channels by their pharmacology and slow gating kinetics. The β4 accessory subunit confers type II properties on BK α subunits. Empirically derived properties of BK channels, with and without the β4 accessory subunit, were obtained using a heterologous expression system under physiological ionic conditions. These data were then used to study how BK channels alone (type I) and with the accessory β4 subunit (type II) modulate action potential properties in biophysical neuron models. Overall, the models support the hypothesis that it is the slower kinetics provided by the β4 subunit that endows the BK channel with type II properties, which leads to broadening of action potentials and, secondarily, to greater recruitment of SK channels reducing neuronal excitability. Two regions of parameter space distinguished type II and type I effects; one where the range of BK-activating Ca2+ was high (>20 µM) and the other where BK-activating Ca2+ was low (~0.4–1.2 µM). The latter required an elevated BK channel density, possibly beyond a likely physiological range. BK-mediated sharpening of the spike waveform associated with the lack of the β4 subunit was sensitive to the properties of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels due to electrogenic effects on spike duration. We also found that depending on Ca2+ dynamics, type II BK channels may have the ability to contribute to the medium AHP, a property not generally ascribed to BK channels, influencing the frequency-current relationship. Finally, we show how the broadening of action potentials conferred by type II BK channels can also indirectly increase the recruitment of SK-type channels decreasing the excitability of the neuron. PMID:21723921

  6. Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloulian, George K.; Woo, Simon S.; Chow, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Net-centric networking environments are often faced with limited resources and must utilize bandwidth as efficiently as possible. In networking environments that span wide areas, the data transmission has to be efficient without any redundant or exuberant metadata. The Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer software provides an extra level of security on top of existing data encryption methods. Randomizing the data s byte stream adds an extra layer to existing data protection methods, thus making it harder for an attacker to decrypt protected data. Based on a generated crypto-graphically secure random seed, a random sequence of numbers is used to intelligently and efficiently swap the organization of bytes in data using the unbiased and memory-efficient in-place Fisher-Yates shuffle method. Swapping bytes and reorganizing the crucial structure of the byte data renders the data file unreadable and leaves the data in a deconstructed state. This deconstruction adds an extra level of security requiring the byte stream to be reconstructed with the random seed in order to be readable. Once the data byte stream has been randomized, the software enables the data to be distributed to N nodes in an environment. Each piece of the data in randomized and distributed form is a separate entity unreadable on its own right, but when combined with all N pieces, is able to be reconstructed back to one. Reconstruction requires possession of the key used for randomizing the bytes, leading to the generation of the same cryptographically secure random sequence of numbers used to randomize the data. This software is a cornerstone capability possessing the ability to generate the same cryptographically secure sequence on different machines and time intervals, thus allowing this software to be used more heavily in net-centric environments where data transfer bandwidth is limited.

  7. Chaos in quantum channels

    DOE PAGES

    Hosur, Pavan; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Roberts, Daniel A.; ...

    2016-02-01

    For this research, we study chaos and scrambling in unitary channels by considering their entanglement properties as states. Using out-of-time-order correlation functions to diagnose chaos, we characterize the ability of a channel to process quantum information. We show that the generic decay of such correlators implies that any input subsystem must have near vanishing mutual information with almost all partitions of the output. Additionally, we propose the negativity of the tripartite information of the channel as a general diagnostic of scrambling. This measures the delocalization of information and is closely related to the decay of out-of-time-order correlators. We back upmore » our results with numerics in two non-integrable models and analytic results in a perfect tensor network model of chaotic time evolution. In conclusion, these results show that the butterfly effect in quantum systems implies the information-theoretic definition of scrambling.« less

  8. Chaos in quantum channels

    SciTech Connect

    Hosur, Pavan; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Roberts, Daniel A.; Yoshida, Beni

    2016-02-01

    For this research, we study chaos and scrambling in unitary channels by considering their entanglement properties as states. Using out-of-time-order correlation functions to diagnose chaos, we characterize the ability of a channel to process quantum information. We show that the generic decay of such correlators implies that any input subsystem must have near vanishing mutual information with almost all partitions of the output. Additionally, we propose the negativity of the tripartite information of the channel as a general diagnostic of scrambling. This measures the delocalization of information and is closely related to the decay of out-of-time-order correlators. We back up our results with numerics in two non-integrable models and analytic results in a perfect tensor network model of chaotic time evolution. In conclusion, these results show that the butterfly effect in quantum systems implies the information-theoretic definition of scrambling.

  9. TRP channels and pain.

    PubMed

    Julius, David

    2013-01-01

    Nociception is the process whereby primary afferent nerve fibers of the somatosensory system detect noxious stimuli. Pungent irritants from pepper, mint, and mustard plants have served as powerful pharmacological tools for identifying molecules and mechanisms underlying this initial step of pain sensation. These natural products have revealed three members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family--TRPV1, TRPM8, and TRPA1--as molecular detectors of thermal and chemical stimuli that activate sensory neurons to produce acute or persistent pain. Analysis of TRP channel function and expression has validated the existence of nociceptors as a specialized group of somatosensory neurons devoted to the detection of noxious stimuli. These studies are also providing insight into the coding logic of nociception and how specification of nociceptor subtypes underlies behavioral discrimination of noxious thermal, chemical, and mechanical stimuli. Biophysical and pharmacological characterization of these channels has provided the intellectual and technical foundation for developing new classes of analgesic drugs.

  10. A hot-atom reaction kinetic model for H abstraction from solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammler, Th.; Kolovos-Vellianitis, D.; Küppers, J.

    2000-07-01

    Measurements of the abstraction reaction kinetics in the interaction of gaseous H atoms with D adsorbed on metal and semiconductor surfaces, H(g)+D(ad)/S→ products, have shown that the kinetics of the HD products are at variance with the expectations drawn from the operation of Eley-Rideal mechanisms. Furthermore, in addition to HD product molecules, D 2 products were observed which are not expected in an Eley-Rideal scenario. Products and kinetics of abstraction reactions on Ni(100), Pt(111), and Cu(111) surfaces were recently explained by a random-walk model based solely on the operation of hot-atom mechanistic steps. Based on the same reaction scenario, the present work provides numerical solutions of the appropriate kinetic equations in the limit of the steady-state approximation for hot-atom species. It is shown that the HD and D 2 product kinetics derived from global kinetic rate constants are the same as those obtained from local probabilities in the random walk model. The rate constants of the hot-atom kinetics provide a background for the interpretation of measured data, which was missing up to now. Assuming that reconstruction affects the competition between hot-atom sticking and hot-atom reaction, the application of the present model at D abstraction from Cu(100) surfaces reproduces the essential characteristics of the experimentally determined kinetics.

  11. Channel simulation for direct-detection optical communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tycz, M.; Fitzmaurice, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described for simulating the random modulation imposed by atmospheric scintillation and transmitter pointing jitter on a direct-detection optical communication system. The system is capable of providing signal fading statistics which obey log-normal, beta, Rayleigh, Ricean, or chi-square density functions. Experimental tests of the performance of the channel simulator are presented.

  12. Channel simulation for direct detection optical communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tycz, M.; Fitzmaurice, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described for simulating the random modulation imposed by atmospheric scintillation and transmitter pointing jitter on a direct detection optical communication system. The system is capable of providing signal fading statistics which obey log normal, beta, Rayleigh, Ricean or chi-squared density functions. Experimental tests of the performance of the Channel Simulator are presented.

  13. Essential oils increase weight gain in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the effects of matrix encapsulated essential oils (Biomin® P.E.P. MGE) on weight gain, specific growth rate (SGR), feed conversion ratio (FCR), and survival of channel catfish. Five hundred catfish (32.4 ± 1.7 g/fish) were randomly assigned to two treatments with five replicate tanks/tre...

  14. The neutron channeling phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Khanouchi, A; Sabir, A; Boulkheir, M; Ichaoui, R; Ghassoun, J; Jehouani, A

    1997-01-01

    Shields, used for protection against radiation, are often pierced with vacuum channels for passing cables and other instruments for measurements. The neutron transmission through these shields is an unavoidable phenomenon. In this work we study and discuss the effect of channels on neutron transmission through shields. We consider an infinite homogeneous slab, with a fixed thickness (20 lambda, with lambda the mean free path of the neutron in the slab), which contains a vacuum channel. This slab is irradiated with an infinite source of neutrons on the left side and on the other side (right side) many detectors with windows equal to 2 lambda are placed in order to evaluate the neutron transmission probabilities (Khanouchi, A., Aboubekr, A., Ghassoun, J. and Jehouani, A. (1994) Rencontre Nationale des Jeunes Chercheurs en Physique. Casa Blanca Maroc; Khanouchi, A., Sabir, A., Ghassoun, J. and Jehouani, A. (1995) Premier Congré International des Intéractions Rayonnements Matière. Eljadida Maroc). The neutron history within the slab is simulated by the Monte Carlo method (Booth, T. E. and Hendricks, J. S. (1994) Nuclear Technology 5) and using the exponential biasing technique in order to improve the Monte Carlo calculation (Levitt, L. B. (1968) Nuclear Science and Engineering 31, 500-504; Jehouani, A., Ghassoun, J. and Aboubker, A. (1994) In Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Radiation Physics, Rabat, Morocco). Then different geometries of the vacuum channel have been studied. For each geometry we have determined the detector response and calculated the neutron transmission probability for different detector positions. This neutron transmission probability presents a peak for the detectors placed in front of the vacuum channel. This study allowed us to clearly identify the neutron channeling phenomenon. One application of our study is to detect vacuum defects in materials.

  15. Chryse Outflow Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A color image of the south Chryse basin Valles Marineris outflow channels on Mars; north toward top. The scene shows on the southwest corner the chaotic terrain of the east part of Valles Marineris and two of its related canyons: Eos and Capri Chasmata (south to north). Ganges Chasma lies directly north. The chaos in the southern part of the image gives rise to several outflow channels, Shalbatana, Simud, Tiu, and Ares Valles (left to right), that drained north into the Chryse basin. The mouth of Ares Valles is the site of the Mars Pathfinder lander.

    This image is a composite of Viking medium-resolution images in black and white and low-resolution images in color. The image extends from latitude 20 degrees S. to 20 degrees N. and from longitude 15 degrees to 53 degrees; Mercator projection.

    The south Chryse outflow channels are cut an average of 1 km into the cratered highland terrain. This terrain is about 9 km above datum near Valles Marineris and steadily decreases in elevation to 1 km below datum in the Chryse basin. Shalbatana is relatively narrow (10 km wide) but can reach 3 km in depth. The channel begins at a 2- to 3-km-deep circular depression within a large impact crater, whose floor is partly covered by a chaotic material, and ends in Simud Valles. Tiu and Simud Valles consist of a complex of connected channel floors and chaotic terrain and extend as far south as and connect to eastern Valles Marineris. Ares Vallis originates from discontinuous patches of chaotic terrain within large craters. In the Chryse basin the Ares channel forks; one branch continues northwest into central Chryse Planitia (Latin for plain) and the other extends north into eastern Chryse Planitia.

  16. Generalized kinetic theory of ensembles with variable charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivlev, A. V.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Klumov, B. A.; Morfill, G. E.

    2005-09-01

    A generalized kinetic theory of gaseous ensembles of particles with variable charges is proposed. The evolution of the ensembles due to the mutual particle collisions is investigated. The cases of inhomogeneous and randomly fluctuating charges are studied. It is shown that the particle temperature in such ensembles increases with time, and in some cases can grow by orders of magnitude. The theory is compared with the molecular-dynamics simulations, the relevance to typical experimental conditions is analyzed, and astrophysical implications are discussed.

  17. Sodium channel activation mechanisms. Insights from deuterium oxide substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Alicata, D.A.; Rayner, M.D.; Starkus, J.G. )

    1990-04-01

    Schauf and Bullock, using Myxicola giant axons, demonstrated that solvent substitution with deuterium oxide (D2O) significantly affects both sodium channel activation and inactivation kinetics without corresponding changes in gating current or tail current rates. They concluded that (a) no significant component of gating current derives from the final channel opening step, and (b) channels must deactivate (during tail currents) by a different pathway from that used in channel opening. By contrast, Oxford found in squid axons that when a depolarizing pulse is interrupted by a brief (approximately 100 microseconds) return to holding potential, subsequent reactivation (secondary activation) is very rapid and shows almost monoexponential kinetics. Increasing the interpulse interval resulted in secondary activation rate returning towards control, sigmoid (primary activation) kinetics. He concluded that channels open and close (deactivate) via the same pathway. We have repeated both sets of observations in crayfish axons, confirming the results obtained in both previous studies, despite the apparently contradictory conclusions reached by these authors. On the other hand, we find that secondary activation after a brief interpulse interval (50 microseconds) is insensitive to D2O, although reactivation after longer interpulse intervals (approximately 400 microseconds) returns towards a D2O sensitivity similar to that of primary activation. We conclude that D2O-sensitive primary activation and D2O-insensitive tail current deactivation involve separate pathways. However, D2O-insensitive secondary activation involves reversal of the D2O-insensitive deactivation step. These conclusions are consistent with parallel gate models, provided that one gating particle has a substantially reduced effective valence.

  18. Evolution of Enzyme Kinetic Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ulusu, Nuriye Nuray

    2015-06-01

    This review paper discusses the reciprocal kinetic behaviours of enzymes and the evolution of structure-function dichotomy. Kinetic mechanisms have evolved in response to alterations in ecological and metabolic conditions. The kinetic mechanisms of single-substrate mono-substrate enzyme reactions are easier to understand and much simpler than those of bi-bi substrate enzyme reactions. The increasing complexities of kinetic mechanisms, as well as the increasing number of enzyme subunits, can be used to shed light on the evolution of kinetic mechanisms. Enzymes with heterogeneous kinetic mechanisms attempt to achieve specific products to subsist. In many organisms, kinetic mechanisms have evolved to aid survival in response to changing environmental factors. Enzyme promiscuity is defined as adaptation to changing environmental conditions, such as the introduction of a toxin or a new carbon source. Enzyme promiscuity is defined as adaptation to changing environmental conditions, such as the introduction of a toxin or a new carbon source. Enzymes with broad substrate specificity and promiscuous properties are believed to be more evolved than single-substrate enzymes. This group of enzymes can adapt to changing environmental substrate conditions and adjust catalysing mechanisms according to the substrate's properties, and their kinetic mechanisms have evolved in response to substrate variability.

  19. Alluvial channel hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackers, Peter

    1988-07-01

    The development and utilisation of water resources for irrigation, hydropower and public supply can be severely affected by sediment. Where there is a mature and well vegetated landscape, sediment problems may be relatively minor; but where slopes are steep and vegetation sparse, the yield of sediment from the catchment gives high concentrations in the rivers. In utilising these resources, for whatever purpose, an understanding of the hydraulics of alluvial channels is vital. The regime of any conveyance channel in alluvium depends on the interrelationships of sediment transport, channel resistance and bank stability. The regime concept was originally based on empirical relations obtained from observations from canal systems in the Indian subcontinent, and for many years was surrounded by a certain degree of mystique and much scepticism from academics. In more recent years the unabashed empiricism of the original method has been replaced by process-based methods, which have also served as broad confirmation of the classic regime formulae, including their extension to natural channels and meandering channels. The empirical approach to the hydraulics of alluvial channels has thus been updated by physically based formulae for sediment transport and resistance, though there remains some uncertainty about the third function to complete the definition of slope and geometry. Latest thoughts in this respect are that the channel seeks a natural optimum state. Physical modelling using scaled down representations of rivers and estuaries has been used for almost a century, but it requires the correct simulation of the relevant processes. The coming of a better understanding of the physics of sediment transport and the complexity of alluvial channel roughness leads to the conclusion that only in very restricted circumstances can scale models simulate closely the full-size condition. However, the quantification of these processes has been instrumental in the development of

  20. Zeolites: Exploring Molecular Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Arslan, Ilke; Derewinski, Mirek

    2015-05-22

    Synthetic zeolites contain microscopic channels, sort of like a sponge. They have many uses, such as helping laundry detergent lather, absorbing liquid in kitty litter, and as catalysts to produce fuel. Of the hundreds of types of zeolites, only about 15 are used for catalysis. PNNL catalysis scientists Ilke Arslan and Mirek Derewinksi are studying these zeolites to understand what make them special. By exploring the mystery of these microscopic channels, their fundamental findings will help design better catalysts for applications such as biofuel production.

  1. Zeolites: Exploring Molecular Channels

    ScienceCinema

    Arslan, Ilke; Derewinski, Mirek

    2016-07-12

    Synthetic zeolites contain microscopic channels, sort of like a sponge. They have many uses, such as helping laundry detergent lather, absorbing liquid in kitty litter, and as catalysts to produce fuel. Of the hundreds of types of zeolites, only about 15 are used for catalysis. PNNL catalysis scientists Ilke Arslan and Mirek Derewinksi are studying these zeolites to understand what make them special. By exploring the mystery of these microscopic channels, their fundamental findings will help design better catalysts for applications such as biofuel production.

  2. Two blocking sites of amino-adamantane derivatives in open N-methyl-D-aspartate channels.

    PubMed Central

    Sobolevsky, A; Koshelev, S

    1998-01-01

    Using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques, we studied the blockade of open N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) channels by amino-adamantane derivatives (AADs) in rat hippocampal neurons acutely isolated by the vibrodissociation method. The rapid concentration-jump technique was used to replace superfusion solutions. A kinetic analysis of the interaction of AAD with open NMDA channels revealed fast and slow components of their blockade and recovery. Mathematical modeling showed that these kinetic components are evidence for two distinct blocking sites of AADs in open NMDA channels. A comparative analysis of different simplest models led us to conclude that these AAD blocking sites can be simultaneously occupied by two blocker molecules. The voltage dependence of the AAD block suggested that both sites were located deep in the channel pore. PMID:9512028

  3. Structure of a CLC chloride ion channel by cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunyong; Campbell, Ernest B; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2017-01-26

    CLC proteins transport chloride (Cl(-)) ions across cellular membranes to regulate muscle excitability, electrolyte movement across epithelia, and acidification of intracellular organelles. Some CLC proteins are channels that conduct Cl(-) ions passively, whereas others are secondary active transporters that exchange two Cl(-) ions for one H(+). The structural basis underlying these distinctive transport mechanisms is puzzling because CLC channels and transporters are expected to share the same architecture on the basis of sequence homology. Here we determined the structure of a bovine CLC channel (CLC-K) using cryo-electron microscopy. A conserved loop in the Cl(-) transport pathway shows a structure markedly different from that of CLC transporters. Consequently, the cytosolic constriction for Cl(-) passage is widened in CLC-K such that the kinetic barrier previously postulated for Cl(-)/H(+) transporter function would be reduced. Thus, reduction of a kinetic barrier in CLC channels enables fast flow of Cl(-) down its electrochemical gradient.

  4. Kinetic distance and kinetic maps from molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Noé, Frank; Clementi, Cecilia

    2015-10-13

    Characterizing macromolecular kinetics from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations requires a distance metric that can distinguish slowly interconverting states. Here, we build upon diffusion map theory and define a kinetic distance metric for irreducible Markov processes that quantifies how slowly molecular conformations interconvert. The kinetic distance can be computed given a model that approximates the eigenvalues and eigenvectors (reaction coordinates) of the MD Markov operator. Here, we employ the time-lagged independent component analysis (TICA). The TICA components can be scaled to provide a kinetic map in which the Euclidean distance corresponds to the kinetic distance. As a result, the question of how many TICA dimensions should be kept in a dimensionality reduction approach becomes obsolete, and one parameter less needs to be specified in the kinetic model construction. We demonstrate the approach using TICA and Markov state model (MSM) analyses for illustrative models, protein conformation dynamics in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and protein-inhibitor association in trypsin and benzamidine. We find that the total kinetic variance (TKV) is an excellent indicator of model quality and can be used to rank different input feature sets.

  5. External barium affects the gating of KCNQ1 potassium channels and produces a pore block via two discrete sites.

    PubMed

    Gibor, Gilad; Yakubovich, Daniel; Peretz, Asher; Attali, Bernard

    2004-07-01

    The pore properties and the reciprocal interactions between permeant ions and the gating of KCNQ channels are poorly understood. Here we used external barium to investigate the permeation characteristics of homomeric KCNQ1 channels. We assessed the Ba(2+) binding kinetics and the concentration and voltage dependence of Ba(2+) steady-state block. Our results indicate that extracellular Ba(2+) exerts a series of complex effects, including a voltage-dependent pore blockade as well as unique gating alterations. External barium interacts with the permeation pathway of KCNQ1 at two discrete and nonsequential sites. (a) A slow deep Ba(2+) site that occludes the channel pore and could be simulated by a model of voltage-dependent block. (b) A fast superficial Ba(2+) site that barely contributes to channel block and mostly affects channel gating by shifting rightward the voltage dependence of activation, slowing activation, speeding up deactivation kinetics, and inhibiting channel inactivation. A model of voltage-dependent block cannot predict the complex impact of Ba(2+) on channel gating in low external K(+) solutions. Ba(2+) binding to this superficial site likely modifies the gating transitions states of KCNQ1. Both sites appear to reside in the permeation pathway as high external K(+) attenuates Ba(2+) inhibition of channel conductance and abolishes its impact on channel gating. Our data suggest that despite the high degree of homology of the pore region among the various K(+) channels, KCNQ1 channels display significant structural and functional uniqueness.

  6. Characterization of single potassium channels in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, A; Schulz, I

    1995-01-01

    1. Single K(+)-selective channels with a conductance of about 48 pS (pipette, 145 mM KCl; bath, 140 mM NaCl + 4.7 mM KCl) were recorded in the patch-clamp whole-cell configuration in isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells. 2. Neither application of the secretagogues acetylcholine (second messenger, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) or secretin (second messenger, cAMP), nor addition of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A to the pipette solution changed the activity of the 48 pS K+ channel. 3. Intracellular acidification with sodium propionate (20 mM) diminished activity of the 48 pS channel, whereas channel open probability was increased by cytosolic alkalization with 20 mM NH4Cl. 4. BaCl2 (5 mM), TEA (10 mM) or apamin (1 microM) added to the bath solution had no obvious effect on the kinetics of the 48 pS channel. Similarly, glibenclamide and diazoxide failed to influence the channel activity. 5. When extracellular NaCl was replaced by KCl, whole-cell recordings revealed an inwardly rectifying K+ current carried by a 17 pS K+ channel. 6. The inwardly rectifying K+ current was not pH dependent and could largely be blocked by Ba2+ but not by TEA. 7. Since the 48 pS K+ channel is neither Ca2+ nor cAMP regulated, we suggest that this channel could play a role in the maintenance of the negative cell resting potential. PMID:7623283

  7. Noradrenaline upregulates T-type calcium channels in rat pinealocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haijie; Seo, Jong Bae; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Koh, Duk-Su; Hille, Bertil

    2015-01-01

    Our basic hypothesis is that mammalian pinealocytes have cycling electrical excitability and Ca2+ signalling that may contribute to the circadian rhythm of pineal melatonin secretion. This study asked whether the functional expression of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (CaV channels) in rat pinealocytes is changed by culturing them in noradrenaline (NA) as a surrogate for the night signal. Channel activity was assayed as ionic currents under patch clamp and as optical signals from a Ca2+-sensitive dye. Channel mRNAs were assayed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Cultured without NA, pinealocytes showed only non-inactivating L-type dihydropyridine-sensitive Ca2+ current. After 24 h in NA, additional low-voltage activated transient Ca2+ current developed whose pharmacology and kinetics corresponded to a T-type CaV3.1 channel. This change was initiated by β-adrenergic receptors, cyclic AMP and protein kinase A as revealed by pharmacological experiments. mRNA for CaV3.1 T-type channels became significantly elevated, but mRNA for another T-type channel and for the major L-type channel did not change. After only 8 h of NA treatment, the CaV3.1 mRNA was already elevated, but the transient Ca2+ current was not. Even a 16 h wait without NA following the 8 h NA treatment induced little additional transient current. However, these cells were somehow primed to make transient current as a second NA exposure for only 60 min sufficed to induce large T-type currents. The NA-induced T-type channel mediated an increased Ca2+ entry during short depolarizations and supported modest transient electrical responses to depolarizing stimuli. Such experiments reveal the potential for circadian regulation of excitability. PMID:25504572

  8. Lack of conventional ATPase properties in CFTR chloride channel gating.

    PubMed

    Schultz, B D; Bridges, R J; Frizzell, R A

    1996-05-01

    CFTR shares structural homology with the ABC transporter superfamily of proteins which hydrolyze ATP to effect the transport of compounds across cell membranes. Some superfamily members are characterized as P-type ATPases because ATP-dependent transport is sensitive to the presence of vanadate. It has been widely postulated that CFTR hydrolyzes ATP to gate its chloride channel. However, direct evidence of CFTR hydrolytic activity in channel gating is lacking and existing circumstantial evidence is contradictory. Therefore, we evaluated CFTR chloride channel activity under conditions known to inhibit the activity of ATPases; i.e., in the absence of divalent cations and in the presence of a variety of ATPase inhibitors. Removal of the cytosolic cofactor, Mg2+, reduced both the opening and closing rates of CFTR suggesting that Mg2+ plays a modulatory role in channel gating. However, channels continued to both open and close showing that Mg2+ is not an absolute requirement for channel activity. The nonselective P-type ATPase inhibitor, vanadate, did not alter the gating of CFTR when used at concentrations which completely inhibit the activity of other ABC transporters (1 mM). Higher concentrations of vanadate (10 mM) blocked the closing of CFTR, but did not affect the opening of the channel. As expected, more selective P-type (Sch28080, ouabain), V-type (bafilomycin A1, SCN-) and F-type (oligomycin) ATPase inhibitors did not affect either the opening or closing of CFTR. Thus, CFTR does not share a pharmacological inhibition profile with other ATPases and channel gating occurs in the apparent absence of hydrolysis, although with altered kinetics. Vanadate inhibition of channel closure might suggest that a hydrolytic step is involved although the requirement for a high concentration raises the possibility of previously uncharacterized effects of this compound. Most conservatively, the requirement for high concentrations of vanadate demonstrates that the binding site for

  9. Altered ion channel conductance and ionic selectivity induced by large imposed membrane potential pulse.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W; Lee, R C

    1994-01-01

    The effects of large magnitude transmembrane potential pulses on voltage-gated Na and K channel behavior in frog skeletal muscle membrane were studied using a modified double vaseline-gap voltage clamp. The effects of electroconformational damage to ionic channels were separated from damage to lipid bilayer (electroporation). A 4 ms transmembrane potential pulse of -600 mV resulted in a reduction of both Na and K channel conductivities. The supraphysiologic pulses also reduced ionic selectivity of the K channels against Na+ ions, resulting in a depolarization of the membrane resting potential. However, TTX and TEA binding effects were unaltered. The kinetics of spontaneous reversal of the electroconformational damage of channel proteins was found to be dependent on the magnitude of imposed membrane potential pulse. These results suggest that muscle and nerve dysfunction after electrical shock may be in part caused by electroconformational damage to voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:7948676

  10. Mapping the function of neuronal ion channels in model and experiment

    PubMed Central

    Podlaski, William F; Seeholzer, Alexander; Groschner, Lukas N; Miesenböck, Gero; Ranjan, Rajnish; Vogels, Tim P

    2017-01-01

    Ion channel models are the building blocks of computational neuron models. Their biological fidelity is therefore crucial for the interpretation of simulations. However, the number of published models, and the lack of standardization, make the comparison of ion channel models with one another and with experimental data difficult. Here, we present a framework for the automated large-scale classification of ion channel models. Using annotated metadata and responses to a set of voltage-clamp protocols, we assigned 2378 models of voltage- and calcium-gated ion channels coded in NEURON to 211 clusters. The IonChannelGenealogy (ICGenealogy) web interface provides an interactive resource for the categorization of new and existing models and experimental recordings. It enables quantitative comparisons of simulated and/or measured ion channel kinetics, and facilitates field-wide standardization of experimentally-constrained modeling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22152.001 PMID:28267430

  11. Mapping the function of neuronal ion channels in model and experiment.

    PubMed

    Podlaski, William F; Seeholzer, Alexander; Groschner, Lukas N; Miesenböck, Gero; Ranjan, Rajnish; Vogels, Tim P

    2017-03-06

    Ion channel models are the building blocks of computational neuron models. Their biological fidelity is therefore crucial for the interpretation of simulations. However, the number of published models, and the lack of standardization, make the comparison of ion channel models with one another and with experimental data difficult. Here, we present a framework for the automated large-scale classification of ion channel models. Using annotated metadata and responses to a set of voltage-clamp protocols, we assigned 2378 models of voltage- and calcium-gated ion channels coded in NEURON to 211 clusters. The IonChannelGenealogy (ICGenealogy) web interface provides an interactive resource for the categorization of new and existing models and experimental recordings. It enables quantitative comparisons of simulated and/or measured ion channel kinetics, and facilitates field-wide standardization of experimentally-constrained modeling.

  12. The random walk of tracers through river catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-08-01

    River catchments play critical roles in regional economies and in the global economy. In addition, rivers carry large volumes of nutrients, pollutants, and several other forms of tracers into the ocean. An intricate system of pathways and channels, both on the surface and in the subsurface of catchments, allows rivers to carry large volumes of tracers. However, scientists do not yet fully understand how pollutants and other tracers travel through the intricate web of channels in the catchment areas of rivers. In a new study, Cvetkovic et al show that the travel path of tracers through channels can be modeled as a random walk, which is mathematically similar to the path an animal would trace when foraging. Previous studies have applied the random walk approach to understand the behavior of fluids flowing through aquifers and soils but not to model the transport mechanism of tracers that travel passively with water flowing through catchments.

  13. Growth morphology with anisotropic surface kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiao, Rong-Fu; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Rosenberger, Franz

    1990-01-01

    The morphological evolution of crystals growing from an incongruent vapor phase is studied using a Monte Carlo model, and the full range of growth morphologies is recovered. The diffusion in the bulk nutrient and the anisotropy in the interface kinetics are morphologically destabilizing and stabilizing, respectively. For a given set of simulation parameters and lattice symmetries there is a critical size, which scales linearly with the mean free path in the vapor, beyond which a crystal cannot retain its stable, macroscopically faceted growth shape. Surface diffusion stabilizes faceted growth on the shorter scale of the mean surface diffusion length. In simulations with a uniform drift superimposed on the random walk nutrient transport, crystal faces oriented toward the drift show enhanced morphological stability compared to the purely diffusive situation. Rotational drifts with periodic reversal of direction are morphologically stabilizing for all crystal facets.

  14. Covert Channels within IRC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-24

    Distribution ~NA maintain primary management responsibility and Statement "A" - unclassifed, unlimited distribution ? authority to release all...AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED... DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT/GCE/ENG/11-04 COVERT CHANNELS WITHIN IRC Wayne C. Henry, BSCE Captain, USAF Approved

  15. Learning in Tactile Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gescheider, George A.; Wright, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrotactile intensity-discrimination thresholds for sinusoidal stimuli applied to the thenar eminence of the hand declined as a function of practice. However, improvement was confined to the tactile information-processing channel in which learning had occurred. Specifically, improvements in performance with training within the Pacinian-corpuscle…

  16. Developments in relativistic channeling

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    The possibility of using channeling as a tool for high energy accelerator applications and particle physics has now been extensively investigated. Bent crystals have been used for accelerator extraction and for particle deflection. Applications as accelerating devices have been discussed but have not yet been tried. 61 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Sodium channel auxiliary subunits.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Tsai-Tien; McMahon, Allison M; Johnson, Victoria T; Mangubat, Erwin Z; Zahm, Robert J; Pacold, Mary E; Jakobsson, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are well known for their functional roles in excitable tissues. Excitable tissues rely on voltage-gated ion channels and their auxiliary subunits to achieve concerted electrical activity in living cells. Auxiliary subunits are also known to provide functional diversity towards the transport and biogenesis properties of the principal subunits. Recent interests in pharmacological properties of these auxiliary subunits have prompted significant amounts of efforts in understanding their physiological roles. Some auxiliary subunits can potentially serve as drug targets for novel analgesics. Three families of sodium channel auxiliary subunits are described here: beta1 and beta3, beta2 and beta4, and temperature-induced paralytic E (TipE). While sodium channel beta-subunits are encoded in many animal genomes, TipE has only been found exclusively in insects. In this review, we present phylogenetic analyses, discuss potential evolutionary origins and functional data available for each of these subunits. For each family, we also correlate the functional specificity with the history of evolution for the individual auxiliary subunits.

  18. Channels of Propaganda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sproule, J. Michael

    Defining propaganda as "efforts by special interests to win over the public covertly by infiltrating messages into various channels of public expression ordinarily viewed as politically neutral," this book argues that propaganda has become pervasive in American life. Pointing out that the 1990s society is inundated with propaganda from…

  19. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  20. Ion channels in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Eisenhut, Michael; Wallace, Helen

    2011-04-01

    Most physical illness in vertebrates involves inflammation. Inflammation causes disease by fluid shifts across cell membranes and cell layers, changes in muscle function and generation of pain. These disease processes can be explained by changes in numbers or function of ion channels. Changes in ion channels have been detected in diarrhoeal illnesses, pyelonephritis, allergy, acute lung injury and systemic inflammatory response syndromes involving septic shock. The key role played by changes in ion transport is directly evident in inflammation-induced pain. Expression or function of all major categories of ion channels like sodium, chloride, calcium, potassium, transient receptor potential, purinergic receptor and acid-sensing ion channels can be influenced by cyto- and chemokines, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, histamine, ATP, reactive oxygen species and protons released in inflammation. Key pathways in this interaction are cyclic nucleotide, phosphoinositide and mitogen-activated protein kinase-mediated signalling, direct modification by reactive oxygen species like nitric oxide, ATP or protons and disruption of the cytoskeleton. Therapeutic interventions to modulate the adverse and overlapping effects of the numerous different inflammatory mediators on each ion transport system need to target adversely affected ion transport systems directly and locally.

  1. Channeling through Bent Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Stephanie; /Ottawa U. /SLAC

    2012-09-07

    Bent crystals have demonstrated potential for use in beam collimation. A process called channeling is when accelerated particle beams are trapped by the nuclear potentials in the atomic planes within a crystal lattice. If the crystal is bent then the particles can follow the bending angle of the crystal. There are several different effects that are observed when particles travel through a bent crystal including dechanneling, volume capture, volume reflection and channeling. With a crystal placed at the edge of a particle beam, part of the fringe of the beam can be deflected away towards a detector or beam dump, thus helping collimate the beam. There is currently FORTRAN code by Igor Yazynin that has been used to model the passage of particles through a bent crystal. Using this code, the effects mentioned were explored for beam energy that would be seen at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at a range of crystal orientations with respect to the incoming beam. After propagating 5 meters in vacuum space past the crystal the channeled particles were observed to separate from most of the beam with some noise due to dechanneled particles. Progressively smaller bending radii, with corresponding shorter crystal lengths, were compared and it was seen that multiple scattering decreases with the length of the crystal therefore allowing for cleaner detection of the channeled particles. The input beam was then modified and only a portion of the beam sent through the crystal. With the majority of the beam not affected by the crystal, most particles were not deflected and after propagation the channeled particles were seen to be deflected approximately 5mm. After a portion of the beam travels through the crystal, the entire beam was then sent through a quadrupole magnet, which increased the separation of the channeled particles from the remainder of the beam to a distance of around 20mm. A different code, which was developed at SLAC, was used to

  2. Physiologic and pathophysiologic consequences of altered sialylation and glycosylation on ion channel function.

    PubMed

    Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Gottschalk, Allan; Jacobson, Elena; Mai, Sunny; Wolozny, Daniel; Zhang, Hui; Krag, Sharon S; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2014-10-17

    Voltage-gated ion channels are transmembrane proteins that regulate electrical excitability in cells and are essential components of the electrically active tissues of nerves, muscle and the heart. Potassium channels are one of the largest subfamilies of voltage sensitive channels and are among the most-studied of the voltage-gated ion channels. Voltage-gated channels can be glycosylated and changes in the glycosylation pattern can affect ion channel function, leading to neurological and neuromuscular disorders and congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). Alterations in glycosylation can also be acquired and appear to play a role in development and aging. Recent studies have focused on the impact of glycosylation and sialylation on ion channels, particularly for voltage-gated potassium and sodium channels. The terminal step of sialylation often affects channel activation and inactivation kinetics. The presence of sialic acids on O or N-glycans can alter the gating mechanism and cause conformational changes in the voltage-sensing domains due to sialic acid's negative charges. This manuscript will provide an overview of sialic acids, potassium and sodium channel function, and the impact of sialylation on channel activation and deactivation.

  3. A discriminant block among K+ channel types by phenytoin in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Nobile, M; Lagostena, L

    1998-01-01

    The action of the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin on K+ channels was investigated in neuroblastoma cells (N2A) by using the single-channel patch-clamp technique. N2A cells expressed three types of delayed rectifier K+ channels, which were found to have a conductance of 10–20 pS in a `physiological' K+ gradient. When added to the external solution at concentrations ranging between 1 and 200 μM, phenytoin decreased single channel activity, whereas the unitary current amplitude was unaffected in all three types of channels. The open probability of the biggest channel decreased, according to an exponential distribution of open and closed times, from 40% in control conditions to 10% in the presence of 50 μM phenytoin (Vm=40 mv). The reduction in the open-channel probability was concentration-dependent with a IC50=27.2±0.9 μM. A transient type of K+ channel was identified that was affected by cumulative inactivation and had a conductance of a mean value equal to 26 pS. Finally, a voltage-and Ca2+-dependent K+ channel with a unitary conductance of 95 pS was recorded. Both the channel's amplitude and kinetics were unaffected by phenytoin. These results confirm the phenytoin effect on K+ currents and suggest that the drug may be considered a selective blocker of delayed rectifier K+ channels. PMID:9756386

  4. Predicting chemical kinetics with computational chemistry: is QOO&(H)rarr;HOQO important in fuel ignition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, William H.; Wijaya, Catherina D.; Yelvington, Paul E.; Sumathi, R.

    An overview of predictive chemical kinetics is presented, with an application to the simulation and design of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines. The engine simulations are sensitive to the details of hydroperoxyalkyl (QOOH) radical chemistry, which are only partially understood, and there is a significant discrepancy between the simulations and experiment that limits the usefulness of the simulations. One possible explanation is that QOOH decomposes by other channels not considered in existing combustion chemistry models. Rate constants for one of these neglected channels, the intramolecular radical attack on the QOOH peroxide linkage to form hydroxyalkoxyl (HOQO) radicals, are predicted using quantum chemistry (CBS-QB3), to test whether or not this proposed channel can explain the observed discrepancies in the engine simulations. Although this channel has a significant rate, the competing attack on the other O atom in the peroxide to form a cyclic ether+OH is computed to be an order of magnitude faster, so the HOQO channel does not appear to be fast enough to explain the discrepancy. Definitive judgement on the importance of this reaction channel will require a careful reconsideration of all the coupled chemically activated QOOH reaction channels using modern predictive chemical kinetics software.

  5. Flame front propagation in a channel with porous walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovastov, S. V.; Bivol, G. Yu

    2016-11-01

    Propagation of the detonation front in hydrogen-air mixture was investigated in rectangular cross-section channels with sound-absorbing boundaries. The front of luminescence was detected in a channel with acoustically absorbing walls as opposed to a channel with solid walls. Flame dynamics was recorded using a high-speed camera. The flame was observed to have a V-shaped profile in the acoustically absorbing section. The possible reason for the formation of the V-shaped flame front is friction under the surface due to open pores. In these shear flows, the kinetic energy of the flow on the surface can be easily converted into heat. A relatively small disturbance may eventually lead to significant local stretching of the flame front surface. Trajectories of the flame front along the axis and the boundary are presented for solid and porous surfaces.

  6. Mechanism of allosteric activation of TMEM16A/ANO1 channels by a commonly used chloride channel blocker

    PubMed Central

    Ta, Chau M; Adomaviciene, Aiste; Rorsman, Nils J G; Garnett, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Calcium‐activated chloride channels (CaCCs) play varied physiological roles and constitute potential therapeutic targets for conditions such as asthma and hypertension. TMEM16A encodes a CaCC. CaCC pharmacology is restricted to compounds with relatively low potency and poorly defined selectivity. Anthracene‐9‐carboxylic acid (A9C), an inhibitor of various chloride channel types, exhibits complex effects on native CaCCs and cloned TMEM16A channels providing both activation and inhibition. The mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully defined. Experimental Approach Patch‐clamp electrophysiology in conjunction with concentration jump experiments was employed to define the mode of interaction of A9C with TMEM16A channels. Key Results In the presence of high intracellular Ca2+, A9C inhibited TMEM16A currents in a voltage‐dependent manner by entering the channel from the outside. A9C activation, revealed in the presence of submaximal intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, was also voltage‐dependent. The electric distance of A9C inhibiting and activating binding site was ~0.6 in each case. Inhibition occurred according to an open‐channel block mechanism. Activation was due to a dramatic leftward shift in the steady‐state activation curve and slowed deactivation kinetics. Extracellular A9C competed with extracellular Cl−, suggesting that A9C binds deep in the channel's pore to exert both inhibiting and activating effects. Conclusions and Implications A9C is an open TMEM16A channel blocker and gating modifier. These effects require A9C to bind to a region within the pore that is accessible from the extracellular side of the membrane. These data will aid the future drug design of compounds that selectively activate or inhibit TMEM16A channels. PMID:26562072

  7. Relativistic Random Phase Approximation At Finite Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Y. F.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.; Meng, J.

    2009-08-26

    The fully self-consistent finite temperature relativistic random phase approximation (FTRRPA) has been established in the single-nucleon basis of the temperature dependent Dirac-Hartree model (FTDH) based on effective Lagrangian with density dependent meson-nucleon couplings. Illustrative calculations in the FTRRPA framework show the evolution of multipole responses of {sup 132}Sn with temperature. With increased temperature, in both monopole and dipole strength distributions additional transitions appear in the low energy region due to the new opened particle-particle and hole-hole transition channels.

  8. Random array grid collimator

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-08-22

    A hexagonally shaped quasi-random no-two-holes touching grid collimator. The quasi-random array grid collimator eliminates contamination from small angle off-axis rays by using a no-two-holes-touching pattern which simultaneously provides for a self-supporting array increasng throughput by elimination of a substrate. The presentation invention also provides maximum throughput using hexagonally shaped holes in a hexagonal lattice pattern for diffraction limited applications. Mosaicking is also disclosed for reducing fabrication effort.

  9. Kinetics of dibenzothiophene hydrodesulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.C.; Sobel, J.E. )

    1991-04-01

    Hydrotreating is a process in which organically bound sulfur and nitrogen compounds are removed from petroleum feedstocks to produce processible, stable, and environmentally acceptable liquid fuels or lubes. Essentially two types of catalysts, which differ in composition, are in use in current refineries: one is sulfided CoO-MoO{sub 3}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the other sulfided NiO-MoO{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The selection of these catalysts depends largely on the processing objectives and the nature of the feedstocks. Generally speaking, the NiMo catalysts are used for hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatization (HDA), while the CoMo catalysts are used for hydrodesulfurization (HDS). HDS of dibenzothiophene (DBT) is a useful model reaction for HDS of commercial middle distillate feedstocks. In a previous study, Ho et al. quantified the interactions between HDN and HDA on a commercial NiMo catalyst by using a feed mixture containing 2,4-dimethyl pyridine and 2-methylnaphthalene. With the same catalyst, here we determine the kinetics of DBT HDS. Another reason for undertaking the present study is that relatively little attention has been paid to DBT HDS on NiMo catalysts. Most published DBT HDS studies have been done on CoMo catalysts.

  10. Chemical Looping Combustion Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Eyring; Gabor Konya

    2009-03-31

    One of the most promising methods of capturing CO{sub 2} emitted by coal-fired power plants for subsequent sequestration is chemical looping combustion (CLC). A powdered metal oxide such as NiO transfers oxygen directly to a fuel in a fuel reactor at high temperatures with no air present. Heat, water, and CO{sub 2} are released, and after H{sub 2}O condensation the CO{sub 2} (undiluted by N{sub 2}) is ready for sequestration, whereas the nickel metal is ready for reoxidation in the air reactor. In principle, these processes can be repeated endlessly with the original nickel metal/nickel oxide participating in a loop that admits fuel and rejects ash, heat, and water. Our project accumulated kinetic rate data at high temperatures and elevated pressures for the metal oxide reduction step and for the metal reoxidation step. These data will be used in computational modeling of CLC on the laboratory scale and presumably later on the plant scale. The oxygen carrier on which the research at Utah is focused is CuO/Cu{sub 2}O rather than nickel oxide because the copper system lends itself to use with solid fuels in an alternative to CLC called 'chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling' (CLOU).

  11. Tabu search method with random moves for globally optimal design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Nanfang

    1992-09-01

    Optimum engineering design problems are usually formulated as non-convex optimization problems of continuous variables. Because of the absence of convexity structure, they can have multiple minima, and global optimization becomes difficult. Traditional methods of optimization, such as penalty methods, can often be trapped at a local optimum. The tabu search method with random moves to solve approximately these problems is introduced. Its reliability and efficiency are examined with the help of standard test functions. By the analysis of the implementations, it is seen that this method is easy to use, and no derivative information is necessary. It outperforms the random search method and composite genetic algorithm. In particular, it is applied to minimum weight design examples of a three-bar truss, coil springs, a Z-section and a channel section. For the channel section, the optimal design using the tabu search method with random moves saved 26.14 percent over the weight of the SUMT method.

  12. On the relationships between Michaelis–Menten kinetics, reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics, Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics and quadratic kinetics

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, J. Y.

    2015-09-03

    The Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics are two popular mathematical formulations used in many land biogeochemical models to describe how microbes and plants would respond to changes in substrate abundance. However, the criteria of when to use which of the two are often ambiguous. Here I show that these two kinetics are special approximations to the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics, which is the first order approximation to the quadratic kinetics that solves the equation of enzyme-substrate complex exactly for a single enzyme single substrate biogeochemical reaction with the law of mass action and the assumption of quasi-steady-state formore » the enzyme-substrate complex and that the product genesis from enzyme-substrate complex is much slower than the equilibration between enzyme-substrate complexes, substrates and enzymes. In particular, I showed that the derivation of the Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the substrate, and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the enzyme, whereas both of these constraints are taken into account in the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics. By benchmarking against predictions from the quadratic kinetics for a wide range of substrate and enzyme concentrations, the Michaelis–Menten kinetics was found to persistently under-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k2+ of the reaction velocity v with respect to the maximum product genesis rate k2+, persistently over-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k1+ of v with respect to the intrinsic substrate affinity k1+, persistently over-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [ E ]T of v with respect the total enzyme concentration [ E ]T and persistently under-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [ S ]T of v with respect to the total substrate concentration [ S ]T. Meanwhile, the

  13. Learning Channels and Verbal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Fan-Yu; Kubina, Richard M., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the basics of learning channels and how specification of stimuli can help enhance verbal behavior. This article will define learning channels and the role of the ability matrix in training verbal behavior.

  14. Kv1 channels selectively prevent dendritic hyperexcitability in rat Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Khavandgar, Simin; Walter, Joy T; Sageser, Kristin; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2005-01-01

    Purkinje cells, the sole output of the cerebellar cortex, encode the timing signals required for motor coordination in their firing rate and activity pattern. Dendrites of Purkinje cells express a high density of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels and fire dendritic calcium spikes. Here we show that dendritic subthreshold Kv1.2 subunit-containing Kv1 potassium channels prevent generation of random spontaneous calcium spikes. With Kv1 channels blocked, dendritic calcium spikes drive bursts of somatic sodium spikes and prevent the cell from faithfully encoding motor timing signals. The selective dendritic function of Kv1 channels in Purkinje cells allows them to effectively suppress dendritic hyperexcitability without hindering the generation of somatic action potentials. Further, we show that Kv1 channels also contribute to dendritic integration of parallel fibre synaptic input. Kv1 channels are often targeted to soma and axon and the data presented support a major dendritic function for these channels. PMID:16210348

  15. Transition of energy transfer from MHD turbulence to kinetic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan; Matthaeus, William; Parashar, Tulasi; Shi, Yipeng; Wan, Minping; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-11-01

    The classical energy cascade scenario is of great importance in explaining the heating of corona and solar wind. One can envision that energy residing in large-scale fluctuations is transported to smaller scales where dissipation occurs and finally drives kinetic processes that absorb the energy flux and energize charged particles. Here we inquire how the cascade operates in a compressible plasma, and how the characteristics of energy transfer vary going from MHD to kinetic scales. When filtering MHD equations, we can get an apparent inertial range over which the conservative energy cascade occurs and the scale locality of energy transfer is similar to the cases of incompressible MHD turbulence. Pervasive shocks not only make a significant difference on energy cascade and magnetic amplification, but can also introduce considerable pressure dilation, a complement of viscous and ohmic dissipation that can trigger an alternative channel of the conversion between kinetic and internal energy. The procedure can also be applied to the Vlasov equation and kinetic simulation, in comparison with MHD turbulence, and is a good candidate to investigate the energy cascade process and the analogous role of the (tensor) pressure dilation in collisionless plasma.

  16. Radar channel balancing with commutation

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-02-01

    When multiple channels are employed in a pulse-Doppler radar, achieving and maintaining balance between the channels is problematic. In some circumstances the channels may be commutated to achieve adequate balance. Commutation is the switching, trading, toggling, or multiplexing of the channels between signal paths. Commutation allows modulating the imbalance energy away from the balanced energy in Doppler, where it can be mitigated with filtering.

  17. Meander properties of Venusian channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komatsu, G.; Baker, V. R.

    1993-01-01

    Venusian lava channels have meander dimensions that relate to their mode of formation. Their meander properties generally follow terrestrial river trends of wavelength (L) to width (W) ratios, suggesting an equilibrium adjustment of channel form. Slightly higher L/W for many Venusian channels in comparison to terrestrial rivers may relate to nonaqueous flow processes. The unusually low L/W values for some Venusian and lunar sinuous rilles probably indicate modification of original meander patterns by lava-erosional channel widening.

  18. Universality of receptor channel responses.

    PubMed

    Kardos, J; Nyikos, L

    2001-12-01

    Rate parameters estimated for neurotransmitter-gated receptor channel opening and receptor desensitization are classified according to their dependence on the temporal resolution of the techniques applied in the measurements. Because allosteric proteins constituting receptor channels impose restrictions on the types of model suitable to describe the dynamic response of channels to neurotransmitters, Markovian, non-linear or fractal dynamic models and their possible extension to receptor channel response in excitable membranes are discussed.

  19. Fast Kinetics of Calcium Signaling and Sensor Design

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shen; Reddish, Florence; Zhuo, You; Yang, Jenny J.

    2015-01-01

    Fast calcium signaling is regulated by numerous calcium channels exhibiting high spatiotemporal profiles which are currently measured by fluorescent calcium sensors. There is still a strong need to improve the kinetics of genetically encoded calcium indicators (sensors) to capture calcium dynamics in the millisecond time frame. In this review, we summarize several major fast calcium signaling pathways and discuss the recent developments and application of genetically encoded calcium indicators to detect these pathways. A new class of genetically encoded calcium indicators designed with site-directed mutagenesis on the surface of beta-barrel fluorescent proteins to form a pentagonal bipyramidal-like calcium binding domain dramatically accelerates calcium binding kinetics. Furthermore, novel genetically encoded calcium indicators with significantly increased fluorescent lifetime change are advantageous in deep-field imaging with high light-scattering and notable morphology change. PMID:26151819

  20. Degradation Kinetics of VX

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold

    2010-12-01

    O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl)phosphonothiolate (VX) is the most toxic of the conventional chemical warfare agents. It is a persistent compound, an attribute derived from its relative involatility and slow rates of hydrolysis. These properties suggest that VX can linger in an exposed environment for extended periods of time long after the air has cleared. Concern over prolonged risk from VX exposure is exacerbated by the fact that it poses a dermal contact hazard. Hence a detailed understanding of volatilization rates, and degradation pathways and rates occurring in various environments is needed. Historically, volatilization has not been considered to be an important mechanism for VX depletion, but recent studies have shown that a significant fraction of VX may volatilize, depending on the matrix. A significant body of research has been conducted over the years to unravel VX degradation reaction pathways and to quantify the rates at which they proceed. Rigorous measurement of degradation rates is frequently difficult, and thus in many cases the degradation of VX has been described in terms of half lives, while in fewer instances rate constants have been measured. This variable approach to describing degradation kinetics reflects uncertainty regarding the exact nature of the degradation mechanisms. In this review, rates of VX degradation are compared on the basis of pseudo-first order rate constants, in order to provide a basis for assessing likelihood of VX persistence in a given environment. An issue of specific concern is that one VX degradation pathway produces S-2-(diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioic acid (known as EA2192), which is a degradation product that retains much of the original toxicity of VX. Consequently degradation pathways and rates for EA2192 are also discussed.

  1. ``Just Another Distribution Channel?''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemstra, Wolter; de Leeuw, Gerd-Jan; van de Kar, Els; Brand, Paul

    The telecommunications-centric business model of mobile operators is under attack due to technological convergence in the communication and content industries. This has resulted in a plethora of academic contributions on the design of new business models and service platform architectures. However, a discussion of the challenges that operators are facing in adopting these models is lacking. We assess these challenges by considering the mobile network as part of the value system of the content industry. We will argue that from the perspective of a content provider the mobile network is ‘just another’ distribution channel. Strategic options available for the mobile communication operators are to deliver an excellent distribution channel for content delivery or to move upwards in the value chain by becoming a content aggregator. To become a mobile content aggregator operators will have to develop or acquire complementary resources and capabilities. Whether this strategic option is sustainable remains open.

  2. Geysering in boiling channels

    SciTech Connect

    Aritomi, Masanori; Takemoto, Takatoshi; Chiang, Jing-Hsien

    1995-09-01

    A concept of natural circulation BWRs such as the SBWR has been proposed and seems to be promising in that the primary cooling system can be simplified. The authors have been investigating thermo-hydraulic instabilities which may appear during the start-up in natural circulation BWRs. In our previous works, geysering was investigated in parallel boiling channels for both natural and forced circulations, and its driving mechanism and the effect of system pressure on geysering occurrence were made clear. In this paper, geysering is investigated in a vertical column and a U-shaped vertical column heated in the lower parts. It is clarified from the results that the occurrence mechanism of geysering and the dependence of system pressure on geysering occurrence coincide between parallel boiling channels in circulation systems and vertical columns in non-circulation systems.

  3. Nanochannels: biological channel analogues.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, H; Rajanikant, G K

    2012-06-01

    The flux of ions across the biological membrane is a central activity to many cellular processes, from conduction of nerve impulse to the apoptosis. Traffic of ions or molecules across the membrane and organelles is governed by natural machines of great precision; ion channels, a special class of proteins, reside in the biological membranes. Recent studies in the field of nanoscience have concentrated on to precisely mimic the physical and chemical properties of these pores that make them increasingly attractive in this field. Synthetic nanoporous materials have a great deal of medical applications, including biosensing, biosorting, immune-isolation and drug delivery. In this review, the authors briefly describe the interesting synthetic channels that are extensively studied, and also attempt to furnish a precise overview of recent advances in this arena.

  4. Lightning energetics: Estimates of energy dissipation in channels, channel radii, and channel-heating risetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, J.E.

    1998-05-01

    In this report, several lightning-channel parameters are calculated with the aid of an electrodynamic model of lightning. The electrodynamic model describes dart leaders and return strokes as electromagnetic waves that are guided along conducting lightning channels. According to the model, electrostatic energy is delivered to the channel by a leader, where it is stored around the outside of the channel; subsequently, the return stroke dissipates this locally stored energy. In this report this lightning-energy-flow scenario is developed further. Then the energy dissipated per unit length in lightning channels is calculated, where this quantity is now related to the linear charge density on the channel, not to the cloud-to-ground electrostatic potential difference. Energy conservation is then used to calculate the radii of lightning channels: their initial radii at the onset of return strokes and their final radii after the channels have pressure expanded. Finally, the risetimes for channel heating during return strokes are calculated by defining an energy-storage radius around the channel and by estimating the radial velocity of energy flow toward the channel during a return stroke. In three appendices, values for the linear charge densities on lightning channels are calculated, estimates of the total length of branch channels are obtained, and values for the cloud-to-ground electrostatic potential difference are estimated. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  5. Kinetic Magnetorotational Turbulence and Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Matthew; Stone, James; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-10-01

    Low-luminosity black-hole accretion flows, such as that at the Galactic center, are collisionless. A kinetic approach is thus necessary to understand the transport of heat and angular momentum, the acceleration of particles, and the growth and structure of the magnetic field in these systems. We present results from the first 6D kinetic numerical simulation of magnetorotational turbulence and dynamo, using the local shearing-box model. Special attention will be paid to the enhanced transport of angular momentum by field-aligned pressure anisotropies, as well as to the ion-Larmor-scale kinetic instabilities (firehose, mirror, ion-cyclotron) which regulate those anisotropies. Energy spectra and phase-space evolution will be discussed. Time permitting, dedicated nonlinear studies of firehose and mirror instabilities in a shearing plasma will also be presented as a complement to the study of the magnetorotational instability. The profits, perils, and price of using a kinetic approach will be briefly mentioned.

  6. Kinetic Equations for Economic Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M.; Brugna, C.

    2010-04-01

    We discuss, both from the analytical and the numerical point of view, a kinetic model for wealth distribution in a simple market economy which models, besides binary trade interactions, also taxation and redistribution of collected wealth.

  7. Discrete Kinetic Models for Molecular Motors: Asymptotic Velocity and Gaussian Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggionato, Alessandra; Silvestri, Vittoria

    2014-12-01

    We consider random walks on quasi one dimensional lattices, as introduced in Faggionato and Silvestri (Random Walks on Quasi One Dimensional Lattices: Large Deviations and Fluctuation Theorems, 2014). This mathematical setting covers a large class of discrete kinetic models for non-cooperative molecular motors on periodic tracks. We derive general formulas for the asymptotic velocity and diffusion coefficient, and we show how to reduce their computation to suitable linear systems of the same degree of a single fundamental cell, with possible linear chain removals. We apply the above results to special families of kinetic models, also catching some errors in the biophysics literature.

  8. Stream Channel Stability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    geometry of the stilling basin and appurtenances for optimum energy dissipation. The hydraulic design, based on a 100-year return period design storm...cases the only viable alternative based on present technology is to let the channel seek its oa equilibrium, but attempt to minimize total losses by...are degrading, resulting in bank caving, land loss , and damage to highway bridges. Many streams have enlarged to the extent that 50 to 100-year runoff

  9. Umbellulone modulates TRP channels.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jian; Minassi, Alberto; Prenen, Jean; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Appendino, Giovanni; Nilius, Bernd

    2011-12-01

    Inhalation of umbellulone (UMB), the offensive principle of the so-called "headache tree" (California bay laurel, Umbellularia californica Nutt.), causes a painful cold sensation. We therefore studied the action of UMB and some derivatives devoid of thiol-trapping properties on the "cold" transient receptor potential cation channels TRPA1 and TRPM8. UMB activated TRPA1 in a dose-dependent manner that was attenuated by cysteine-to-serine isosteric mutation in TRPA1 (C622S), while channel block was observed at higher concentration. However, although activation by mustard oil was completely prevented in these mutants, UMB still retained activating properties, indicating that it acts on TRPA1 only as a partial electrophilic agonist. UMB also activated TRPM8, but to a lower extent than TRPA1. Removing Michael acceptor properties of UMB (reduction or nucleophilic trapping) was detrimental for the activation of TRPA1, but increased the blocking potency. This was, however, attenuated by acetylation of the hydroxylated analogs. All UMB derivatives, except the acetylated derivatives, were also TRPM8 activators. They acted, however, in a bimodal manner, inhibiting the channel more potently than UMB, and with tetrahydro-UMB being the most potent TRPM8 activator. In conclusion, UMB is a bimodal activator of TRPA1 and a weak activator of TRPM8. Non-electrophilic derivatives of UMB are better TRPM8 activators than the natural product and also potent blockers of this channel as well as of TRPA1. The lack of effects of the acetylated UMB derivatives suggests that steric hindrance may prevent access to the recognition site for the bicyclic monoterpene pharmacophore on TRPA1 and TRPM8.

  10. Athermal channeled spectropolarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Julia Craven

    2015-12-08

    A temperature insensitive (athermal) channeled spectropolarimeter (CSP) is described. The athermal CSP includes a crystal retarder formed of a biaxial crystal. The crystal retarder has three crystal axes, wherein each axis has its own distinct index of refraction. The axes are oriented in a particular manner, causing an amplitude modulating carrier frequency induced by the crystal retarder to be thermally invariant. Accordingly, a calibration beam technique can be used over a relatively wide range of ambient temperatures, with a common calibration data set.

  11. Ion channels in the RPE.

    PubMed

    Wimmers, Sönke; Karl, Mike O; Strauss, Olaf

    2007-05-01

    In close interaction with photoreceptors, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an essential role for visual function. The analysis of RPE functions, specifically ion channel functions, provides a basis to understand many degenerative diseases of the retina. The invention of the patch-clamp technique significantly improved the knowledge of ion channel structure and function, which enabled a new understanding of cell physiology and patho-physiology of many diseases. In this review, ion channels identified in the RPE will be described in terms of their specific functional role in RPE physiology. The RPE expresses voltage- and ligand-gated K(+), Cl(-), and Ca(2+)-conducting channels. K(+) and Cl(-) channels are involved in transepithelial ion transport and volume regulation. Voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels act as regulators of secretory activity, and ligand-gated cation channels contribute to RPE function by providing driving forces for ion transport or by influencing intracellular Ca(2+) homoeostasis. Collectively, activity of these ion channels determines the physiology of the RPE and its interaction with photoreceptors. Furthermore, changes in ion channel function, such as mutations in ion channel genes or a changed regulation of ion channel activity, have been shown to lead to degenerative diseases of the retina. Increasing knowledge about the properties of RPE ion channels has not only provided a new understanding of RPE function but has also provided greater understanding of RPE function in health and disease.

  12. Cascading blockages in channel bundles.

    PubMed

    Barré, C; Talbot, J

    2015-11-01

    Flow in channel networks may involve a redistribution of flux following the blockage or failure of an individual link. Here we consider a simplified model consisting of N(c) parallel channels conveying a particulate flux. Particles enter these channels according to a homogeneous Poisson process and an individual channel blocks if more than N particles are simultaneously present. The behavior of the composite system depends strongly on how the flux of entering particles is redistributed following a blockage. We consider two cases. In the first, the intensity on each open channel remains constant while in the second the total intensity is evenly redistributed over the open channels. We obtain exact results for arbitrary N(c) and N for a system of independent channels and for arbitrary N(c) and N=1 for coupled channels. For N>1 we present approximate analytical as well as numerical results. Independent channels block at a decreasing rate due to a simple combinatorial effect, while for coupled channels the interval between successive blockages remains constant for N=1 but decreases for N>1. This accelerating cascade is due to the nonlinear dependence of the mean blocking time of a single channel on the entering particle flux that more than compensates for the decrease in the number of active channels.

  13. Cascading blockages in channel bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barré, C.; Talbot, J.

    2015-11-01

    Flow in channel networks may involve a redistribution of flux following the blockage or failure of an individual link. Here we consider a simplified model consisting of Nc parallel channels conveying a particulate flux. Particles enter these channels according to a homogeneous Poisson process and an individual channel blocks if more than N particles are simultaneously present. The behavior of the composite system depends strongly on how the flux of entering particles is redistributed following a blockage. We consider two cases. In the first, the intensity on each open channel remains constant while in the second the total intensity is evenly redistributed over the open channels. We obtain exact results for arbitrary Nc and N for a system of independent channels and for arbitrary Nc and N =1 for coupled channels. For N >1 we present approximate analytical as well as numerical results. Independent channels block at a decreasing rate due to a simple combinatorial effect, while for coupled channels the interval between successive blockages remains constant for N =1 but decreases for N >1 . This accelerating cascade is due to the nonlinear dependence of the mean blocking time of a single channel on the entering particle flux that more than compensates for the decrease in the number of active channels.

  14. Micro-channel plate detector

    DOEpatents

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Lee, Seon W.; Wang, Hsien -Hau; Pellin, Michael J.; Byrum, Karen; Frisch, Henry J.

    2015-09-22

    A method and system for providing a micro-channel plate detector. An anodized aluminum oxide membrane is provided and includes a plurality of nanopores which have an Al coating and a thin layer of an emissive oxide material responsive to incident radiation, thereby providing a plurality of radiation sensitive channels for the micro-channel plate detector.

  15. Volume transport and property distributions of the Mozambique Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiMarco, Steven F.; Chapman, Piers; Nowlin, Worth D.; Hacker, Peter; Donohue, Kathleen; Luther, Mark; Johnson, Gregory C.; Toole, John

    We summarize previous estimates of volume transport and property distributions through the Mozambique Channel and offer additional estimates and measurements based on recently acquired hydrographic and float data. Previously published property distributions are consistent with southward spreading through the Channel. Waters of the Mozambique Channel are characterized by shallow and intermediate oxygen minima separated by a relative maximum. Based on hydrographic sections, the intermediate maximum in dissolved oxygen is seen to decrease in value as it spreads southward. The highest values are found in the westward flow of the South Equatorial Current just north of Madagascar and within the western 200 km of the Channel. Similarly, oxygen concentrations at the intermediate oxygen minimum, which derives from the Arabian Sea, increase southwards, while its depth increases from 900 to 1100 m, supporting previous studies and indicating southward spreading and mixing along the Mozambique Channel. Historical transports based on hydrographic data in the Channel vary from 5 Sv northward to 26 Sv southward depending on reference level and time of the year. Balancing transport below 2500 m (the sill depth in the Channel), we estimate the net southward transports above this depth to be 29.1 and 5.9 Sv for the northern and southern sections, respectively—the difference is presumably related to seasonality and eddy variability superimposed on the mean flow. Individual deep float trajectories show the presence of many eddies, but the overall flow in the channel is southward, and broadly consistent with hydrography. Model outputs also show mean southward transport with considerable seasonal variability. Satellite data show high variability in sea surface height anomalies and high eddy kinetic energy associated with eddy activity. Although the geostrophic transport values are consistent with the historical limits, the lowered ADCP measurements suggest a substantial barotropic

  16. The alpha channeling effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-10

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  17. Kinetics Modeling of Cancer Immunology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-09

    CANCER IMMUNOLOGY -1 DTICS ELECTED SEP 9 8 UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND V ,1986 %,e docment ha le approved for public A." I and sale...1986 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED KINETICS MODELING OF CANCER IMMUNOLOGY Final: 1985/1986 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...137 (1986) "Kinetics Modeling of Cancer Immunology " A Trident Scholar Project Report by Midn I/C Scott Helmers, Class of 1986 United States Naval

  18. Multiscale modeling and computation of nano-electronic transistors and transmembrane proton channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Duan

    The miniaturization of nano-scale electronic transistors, such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), has given rise to a pressing demand in the new theoretical understanding and practical tactic for dealing with quantum mechanical effects in integrated circuits. In biology, proton dynamics and transport across membrane proteins are of paramount importance to the normal function of living cells. Similar physical characteristics are behind the two subjects, and model simulations share common mathematical interests/challenges. In this thesis work, multiscale and multiphysical models are proposed to study the mechanisms of nanotransistors and proton transport in transmembrane at the atomic level. For nano-electronic transistors, we introduce a unified two-scale energy functional to describe the electrons and the continuum electrostatic potential. This framework enables us to put microscopic and macroscopic descriptions on an equal footing at nano-scale. Additionally, this model includes layered structures and random doping effect of nano-transistors. For transmembrane proton channels, we describe proton dynamics quantum mechanically via a density functional approach while implicitly treat numerous solvent molecules as a dielectric continuum. The densities of all other ions in the solvent are assumed to obey the Boltzmann distribution. The impact of protein molecular structure and its charge polarization on the proton transport is considered in atomic details. We formulate a total free energy functional to include kinetic and potential energies of protons, as well as electrostatic energy of all other ions on an equal footing. For both nano-transistors and proton channels systems, the variational principle is employed to derive nonlinear governing equations. The Poisson-Kohn-Sham equations are derived for nano-transistors while the generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation and Kohn-Sham equation are obtained for proton channels. Related numerical

  19. Impaired stretch modulation in potentially lethal cardiac sodium channel mutants.

    PubMed

    Banderali, Umberto; Juranka, Peter F; Clark, Robert B; Giles, Wayne R; Morris, Catherine E

    2010-01-01

    The presence of two slowly inactivating mutants of the cardiac sodium channel (hNa(V)1.5), R1623Q and R1626P, associate with sporadic Long-QT3 (LQT3) syndrome, and may contribute to ventricular tachyarrhythmias and/or lethal ventricular disturbances. Cardiac mechanoelectric feedback is considered a factor in such sporadic arrhythmias. Since stretch and shear forces modulate hNa(V)1.5 gating, detailed electrophysiological study of LQT-Na(V)1.5 mutant channel alpha subunit(s) might provide insights. We compared recombinant R1623Q and WT currents in control vs. stretched membrane of cell-attached patches of Xenopus oocytes. Macroscopic current was monitored before, during, and after stretch induced by pipette suction. In either mutant Na(+) channel, peak current at small depolarizations could be more than doubled by stretch. As in WT, R1623Q showed reversible and stretch intensity dependent acceleration of current onset and decay at all voltages, with kinetic coupling between these two processes retained during stretch. These two Na(V)1.5 channel alpha subunits differed in the absolute extent of kinetic acceleration for a given stretch intensity; over a range of intensities, R1623Q inactivation speed increased significantly less than did WT. The LQT3 mutant R1626P also retained its kinetic coupling during stretch. Whereas WT stretch-difference currents (I(Na)(V,t) without stretch minus I(Na)(V,t) with stretch) were mostly inhibitory (equivalent to outward current), they were substantially (R1623Q) or entirely (R1626P) excitatory for the LQT3 mutants. If stretch-modulated Na(V)1.5 current (i.e., brief excitation followed by accelerated current decay) routinely contributes to cardiac mechanoelectric feedback, then during hemodynamic load variations, the abnormal stretch-modulated components of R1623Q and R1626P current could be pro-arrhythmic.

  20. Characterization of Ca(2+) channels in rat subthalamic nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Song, W J; Baba, Y; Otsuka, T; Murakami, F

    2000-11-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) plays a key role in motor control. Although previous studies have suggested that Ca(2+) conductances may be involved in regulating the activity of STN neurons, Ca(2+) channels in this region have not yet been characterized. We have therefore investigated the subtypes and functional characteristics of Ca(2+) conductances in STN neurons, in both acutely isolated and slice preparations. Acutely isolated STN cells were identified by retrograde filling with the fluorescent dye, Fluoro-Gold. In acutely isolated STN neurons, Cd(2+)-sensitive, depolarization-activated Ba(2+) currents were observed in all cells studied. The current-voltage relationship and current kinetics were characteristic of high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels. The steady-state voltage-dependent activation curves and inactivation curves could both be fitted with a single Boltzmann function. Currents evoked with a prolonged pulse, however, inactivated with multiple time constants, suggesting either the presence of more than one Ca(2+) channel subtype or multiple inactivation processes with a single channel type in STN neurons. Experiments using organic Ca(2+) channel blockers revealed that on average, 21% of the current was nifedipine sensitive, 52% was sensitive to omega-conotoxin GVIA, 16% was blocked by a high concentration of omega-agatoxin IVA (200 nM), and the remainder of the current (9%) was resistant to the co-application of all blockers. These currents had similar voltage dependencies, but the nifedipine-sensitive current and the resistant current activated at slightly lower voltages. omega-Agatoxin IVA at 20 nM was ineffective in blocking the current. Together, the above results suggest that acutely isolated STN neurons have all subtypes of high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels except for P-type, but have no low-voltage-activated channels. Although acutely isolated neurons provide a good preparation for whole cell voltage-clamp study, dendritic processes are

  1. Kinetic parameters from thermogravimetric analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    High performance polymeric materials are finding increased use in aerospace applications. Proposed high speed aircraft will require materials to withstand high temperatures in an oxidative atmosphere for long periods of time. It is essential that accurate estimates be made of the performance of these materials at the given conditions of temperature and time. Temperatures of 350 F (177 C) and times of 60,000 to 100,000 hours are anticipated. In order to survey a large number of high performance polymeric materials on a reasonable time scale, some form of accelerated testing must be performed. A knowledge of the rate of a process can be used to predict the lifetime of that process. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) has frequently been used to determine kinetic information for degradation reactions in polymeric materials. Flynn and Wall studied a number of methods for using TGA experiments to determine kinetic information in polymer reactions. Kinetic parameters, such as the apparent activation energy and the frequency factor, can be determined in such experiments. Recently, researchers at the McDonnell Douglas Research Laboratory suggested that a graph of the logarithm of the frequency factor against the apparent activation energy can be used to predict long-term thermo-oxidative stability for polymeric materials. Such a graph has been called a kinetic map. In this study, thermogravimetric analyses were performed in air to study the thermo-oxidative degradation of several high performance polymers and to plot their kinetic parameters on a kinetic map.

  2. A scaling law for random walks on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Theodore J.; Foxall, Eric; Glass, Leon; Edwards, Roderick

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of many natural and artificial systems are well described as random walks on a network: the stochastic behaviour of molecules, traffic patterns on the internet, fluctuations in stock prices and so on. The vast literature on random walks provides many tools for computing properties such as steady-state probabilities or expected hitting times. Previously, however, there has been no general theory describing the distribution of possible paths followed by a random walk. Here, we show that for any random walk on a finite network, there are precisely three mutually exclusive possibilities for the form of the path distribution: finite, stretched exponential and power law. The form of the distribution depends only on the structure of the network, while the stepping probabilities control the parameters of the distribution. We use our theory to explain path distributions in domains such as sports, music, nonlinear dynamics and stochastic chemical kinetics.

  3. Modulation of potassium channels in human T lymphocytes: effects of temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Pahapill, P A; Schlichter, L C

    1990-01-01

    1. The predominant channels found in lymphocytes with patch-clamp whole-cell recordings are voltage-gated K+ channels. Several lines of evidence suggest that these channels are involved in lymphocyte function. Most lymphocyte functions are temperature sensitive and have not been correlated with electrophysiology at different temperatures. We have examined the effect of temperature on the voltage-dependent K+ channel in normal human T lymphocytes. Both macroscopic current and single-channel events were studied with whole-cell recordings at temperatures from 5 to 42 degrees C. 2. Peak conductance, activation rate, inactivation rate and rate of recovery from inactivation all increased progressively as the temperature increased. The effect of temperature on channel opening processes was greater at low temperatures. In contrast, the inactivation process was most sensitive to temperature changes above room temperature. Arrhenius plots of conductance and kinetic parameters were curvilinear with no obvious break-points. 3. The increase in whole-cell conductance at 37 degrees C was due to both an increase in the single-channel conductance and in the probability that each channel is open at any time. 4. K+ currents were fitted by Hodgkin-Huxley equations with n4j kinetics providing the best description of the currents at all temperatures tested. 5. Steady-state activation- and inactivation-voltage curves shifted in opposite directions with warming, resulting in a greater area of overlap of the curves ('window' current). The increase in resting K+ channel activity predicted by a greater window current was confirmed with single-channel measurements. 6. The present study has shown that the behaviour of K+ channels in human T lymphocytes is temperature dependent. PMID:2352174

  4. Microsecond Microfluidic Mixing for Investigation of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzog, D E; Santiago, J G; Bakajin, O

    2005-02-10

    We have developed and characterized a mixer to study the reaction kinetics of protein folding on a microsecond timescale. The mixer uses hydrodynamic focusing of pressure-driven flow in a microfluidic channel to reduce diffusion times as first demonstrated by Knight et al.[1]. Features of the mixer include 1 {micro}s mixing times, sample consumptions of order 1 nl/s, loading sample volumes on the order of microliters, and the ability to manufacture in fused silica for compatibility with most spectroscopic methods.

  5. Modeling of single noninactivating Na+ channels: evidence for two open and several fast inactivated states.

    PubMed

    The, Yu-Kai; Fernandes, Jacqueline; Popa, M Oana; Alekov, Alexi K; Timmer, Jens; Lerche, Holger

    2006-05-15

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels play a fundamental role in the excitability of nerve and muscle cells. Defects in fast Na(+) channel inactivation can cause hereditary muscle diseases with hyper- or hypoexcitability of the sarcolemma. To explore the kinetics and gating mechanisms of noninactivating muscle Na(+) channels on a molecular level, we analyzed single channel currents from wild-type and five mutant Na(+) channels. The mutations were localized in different protein regions which have been previously shown to be important for fast inactivation (D3-D4-linker, D3/S4-S5, D4/S4-S5, D4/S6) and exhibited distinct grades of defective fast inactivation with varying levels of persistent Na(+) currents caused by late channel reopenings. Different gating schemes were fitted to the data using hidden Markov models with a correction for time interval omission and compared statistically. For all investigated channels including the wild-type, two open states were necessary to describe our data. Whereas one inactivated state was sufficient to fit the single channel behavior of wild-type channels, modeling the mutants with impaired fast inactivation revealed evidence for several inactivated states. We propose a single gating scheme with two open and three inactivated states to describe the behavior of all five examined mutants. This scheme provides a biological interpretation of the collected data, based on previous investigations in voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channels.

  6. Activation of olfactory-type cyclic nucleotide-gated channels is highly cooperative

    PubMed Central

    Nache, Vasilica; Schulz, Eckhard; Zimmer, Thomas; Kusch, Jana; Biskup, Christoph; Koopmann, Rolf; Hagen, Volker; Benndorf, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels play a key role in the sensory transduction of vision and olfaction. The channels are opened by the binding of cyclic nucleotides. Native olfactory CNG channels are heterotetramers of CNGA2, CNGA4, and CNGB1b subunits. Upon heterologous expression, only CNGA2 subunits can form functional homotetrameric channels. It is presently not known how the binding of the ligands to the four subunits is translated to channel opening. We studied activation of olfactory CNG channels by photolysis-induced jumps of cGMP or cAMP, two cyclic nucleotides with markedly different apparent affinity. It is shown that at equal degree of activation, the activation time course of homotetrameric channels is similar with cGMP and cAMP and it is also similar in homo- and heterotetrameric channels with the same cyclic nucleotide. Kinetic models were globally fitted to activation time courses of homotetrameric channels. While all models containing equivalent binding sites failed, a model containing three binding sites with a ligand affinity high–low–high described the data adequately. Only the second binding step switches from a very low to a very high open probability. We propose a unique gating mechanism for homotetrameric and heterotetrameric channels that involves only three highly cooperative binding steps. PMID:16081488

  7. Channeling your inner ear potassium: K(+) channels in vestibular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Frances L; Rennie, Katherine J

    2016-08-01

    During development of vestibular hair cells, K(+) conductances are acquired in a specific pattern. Functionally mature vestibular hair cells express different complements of K(+) channels which uniquely shape the hair cell receptor potential and filtering properties. In amniote species, type I hair cells (HCI) have a large input conductance due to a ubiquitous low-voltage-activated K(+) current that activates with slow sigmoidal kinetics at voltages negative to the membrane resting potential. In contrast type II hair cells (HCII) from mammalian and non-mammalian species have voltage-dependent outward K(+) currents that activate rapidly at or above the resting membrane potential and show significant inactivation. A-type, delayed rectifier and calcium-activated K(+) channels contribute to the outward K(+) conductance and are present in varying proportions in HCII. In many species, K(+) currents in HCII in peripheral locations of vestibular epithelia inactivate more than HCII in more central locations. Two types of inward rectifier currents have been described in both HCI and HCII. A rapidly activating K(+)-selective inward rectifier current (IK1, mediated by Kir2.1 channels) predominates in HCII in peripheral zones, whereas a slower mixed cation inward rectifier current (Ih), shows greater expression in HCII in central zones of vestibular epithelia. The implications for sensory coding of vestibular signals by different types of hair cells are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled .

  8. Precisely synchronous and cascadable multi-channel arbitrary waveform generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ke; Tian, Shulin; Guo, Guangkun; Xiao, Yindong

    2017-03-01

    The output bandwidth and the capability to generate multiple analog outputs with accurately adjustable relative phase are important specifications of arbitrary waveform generator (AWG). To increase the output bandwidth, AWG with a multi-memory paralleled direct digital synthesizer structure (DDS) was proposed to break through operating speed limitations of memory and field programmable gate array. But this structure does complicate synchronization of the analog outputs. This paper proposes a structure for synchronization of the outputs of multi-channel high speed AWG that generates arbitrary waveforms using a multi-memory paralleled DDS. Careful distribution of the clock and trigger signals enables elimination of the random initial phase caused by the frequency divider. Based on this structure, a four-channel 600 mega samples per second AWG is designed. An embedded clock synchronization calibration module is designed to eliminate the random phase difference caused by a frequency divider inside a digital-to-analog converter. The AWG provides a 240 MHz bandwidth, 16 mega-samples storage depth, inter-channel initial skew accuracy less than 150 ps, and 0.0001° phase resolution, which can be used to generate two pairs of I/Q signals or a pair of differential I/Q signals for the quadrature modulator. Additionally, more AWGs can be cascaded to obtain more output channels with an output timing skew between adjacent channels of less than 1.6 ns.

  9. Precisely synchronous and cascadable multi-channel arbitrary waveform generator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Tian, Shulin; Guo, Guangkun; Xiao, Yindong

    2017-03-01

    The output bandwidth and the capability to generate multiple analog outputs with accurately adjustable relative phase are important specifications of arbitrary waveform generator (AWG). To increase the output bandwidth, AWG with a multi-memory paralleled direct digital synthesizer structure (DDS) was proposed to break through operating speed limitations of memory and field programmable gate array. But this structure does complicate synchronization of the analog outputs. This paper proposes a structure for synchronization of the outputs of multi-channel high speed AWG that generates arbitrary waveforms using a multi-memory paralleled DDS. Careful distribution of the clock and trigger signals enables elimination of the random initial phase caused by the frequency divider. Based on this structure, a four-channel 600 mega samples per second AWG is designed. An embedded clock synchronization calibration module is designed to eliminate the random phase difference caused by a frequency divider inside a digital-to-analog converter. The AWG provides a 240 MHz bandwidth, 16 mega-samples storage depth, inter-channel initial skew accuracy less than 150 ps, and 0.0001° phase resolution, which can be used to generate two pairs of I/Q signals or a pair of differential I/Q signals for the quadrature modulator. Additionally, more AWGs can be cascaded to obtain more output channels with an output timing skew between adjacent channels of less than 1.6 ns.

  10. Linear-optics realization of channels for single-photon multimode qudits

    SciTech Connect

    Piani, Marco; Pitkanen, David; Luetkenhaus, Norbert; Kaltenbaek, Rainer

    2011-09-15

    We propose and theoretically study a method for the stochastic realization of arbitrary quantum channels on multimode single-photon qudits. In order for our method to be undemanding in its implementation, we restrict our analysis to linear-optical techniques, vacuum ancillary states, and nonadaptive schemes, but we allow for random switching between different optical networks. With our method it is possible to deterministically implement random-unitary channels and to stochastically implement general channels. We provide an expression for the optimal probability of success of our scheme and calculate this quantity for specific examples such as the qubit amplitude-damping channel. The success probability is shown to be related to the entanglement properties of the Choi-Jamiolkowski state isomorphic to the channel.

  11. Tunable random fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Babin, S. A.; Podivilov, E. V.; El-Taher, A. E.; Harper, P.; Turitsyn, S. K.

    2011-08-15

    An optical fiber is treated as a natural one-dimensional random system where lasing is possible due to a combination of Rayleigh scattering by refractive index inhomogeneities and distributed amplification through the Raman effect. We present such a random fiber laser that is tunable over a broad wavelength range with uniquely flat output power and high efficiency, which outperforms traditional lasers of the same category. Outstanding characteristics defined by deep underlying physics and the simplicity of the scheme make the demonstrated laser a very attractive light source both for fundamental science and practical applications.

  12. Viscosity stratified fluids in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldati, Alfredo; Ahmadi, Somayeh; Roccon, Alessio; Zonta, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) is used to study the turbulent Poiseuille flow of two immiscible liquid layers inside a rectangular channel. A thin liquid layer (fluid 1) flows on top of a thick liquid layer (fluid 2), such that their thickness ratio is h1 /h2 = 1 / 9 . The two liquid layers have the same density but different viscosities (viscosity-stratified fluids). In particular, we consider three different values of the viscosity ratio λ =ν1 /ν2 : λ = 1 , λ = 0 . 875 and λ = 0 . 75 . Numerical Simulations are based on a Phase Field method to describe the interaction between the two liquid layers. Compared with the case of a single phase flow, the presence of a liquid-liquid interface produces a remarkable turbulence modulation inside the channel, since a significant proportion of the kinetic energy is subtracted from the mean flow and converted into work to deform the interface. This induces a strong turbulence reduction in the proximity of the interface and causes a substantial increase of the volume-flowrate. These effects become more pronounced with decreasing λ.

  13. Voltage-dependent metabolic regulation of Kv2.1 channels in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masashi; Nakata, Masanori; Yamato, Shiho; Dezaki, Katsuya; Sugawara, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, San-e; Kawakami, Masanobu; Yada, Toshihiko; Kakei, Masafumi

    2010-05-28

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv channels) play a crucial role in formation of action potentials in response to glucose stimulation in pancreatic beta-ells. We previously reported that the Kv channel is regulated by glucose metabolism, particularly by MgATP. We examined whether the regulation of Kv channels is voltage-dependent and mechanistically related with phosphorylation of the channels. In rat pancreatic beta-cells, suppression of glucose metabolism with low glucose concentrations of 2.8mM or less or by metabolic inhibitors decreased the Kv2.1-channel activity at positive membrane potentials, while increased it at potentials negative to -10 mV, suggesting that modulation of Kv channels by glucose metabolism is voltage-dependent. Similarly, in HEK293 cells expressing the recombinant Kv2.1 channels, 0mM but not 10mM MgATP modulated the channel activity in a manner similar to that in beta-cells. Both steady-state activation and inactivation kinetics of the channel were shifted toward the negative potential in association with the voltage-dependent modulation of the channels by cytosolic dialysis of alkaline phosphatase in beta-cells. The modulation of Kv-channel current-voltage relations were also observed during and after glucose-stimulated electrical excitation. These results suggest that the cellular metabolism including MgATP production and/or channel phosphorylation/dephosphorylation underlie the physiological modulation of Kv2.1 channels during glucose-induced insulin secretion.

  14. Ion Channels in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pravir; Kumar, Dhiraj; Jha, Saurabh Kumar; Jha, Niraj Kumar; Ambasta, Rashmi K

    2016-01-01

    The convergent endeavors of the neuroscientist to establish a link between clinical neurology, genetics, loss of function of an important protein, and channelopathies behind neurological disorders are quite intriguing. Growing evidence reveals the impact of ion channels dysfunctioning in neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs). Many neurological/neuromuscular disorders, viz, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and age-related disorders are caused due to altered function or mutation in ion channels. To maintain cell homeostasis, ion channels are playing a crucial role which is a large transmembrane protein. Further, these channels are important as it determines the membrane potential and playing critically in the secretion of neurotransmitter. Behind NDDs, losses of pathological proteins and defective ion channels have been reported and are found to aggravate the disease symptoms. Moreover, ion channel dysfunctions are eliciting a range of symptoms, including memory loss, movement disabilities, neuromuscular sprains, and strokes. Since the possible mechanistic role played by aberrant ion channels, their receptor and associated factors in neurodegeneration remained elusive; therefore, it is a challenging task for the neuroscientist to implement the therapeutics for targeting NDDs. This chapter reviews the potential role of the ion channels in membrane physiology and brain homeostasis, where ion channels and their associated factors have been characterized with their functional consequences in neurological diseases. Moreover, mechanistic role of perturbed ion channels has been identified in various NDDs, and finally, ion channel modulators have been investigated for their therapeutic intervention in treating common NDDs.

  15. Kinetic analysis of barium currents in chick cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zidanic, M; Fuchs, P A

    1995-01-01

    Inward barium current (IBa) through voltage-gated calcium channels was recorded from chick cochlear hair cells using the whole-cell clamp technique. IBa was sensitive to dihydropyridines and insensitive to the peptide toxins omega-agatoxin IVa, omega-conotoxin GVIa, and omega-conotoxin MVIIC. Changing the holding potential over a -40 to -80 mV range had no effect on the time course or magnitude of IBa nor did it reveal any inactivating inward currents. The activation of IBa was modeled with Hodgkin-Huxley m2 kinetics. The time constant of activation, tau m, was 550 microseconds at -30 mV and gradually decreased to 100 microseconds at +50 mV. A Boltzmann fit to the activation curve, m infinity, yielded a half activation voltage of -15 mV and a steepness factor of 7.8 mV. Opening and closing rate constants, alpha m and beta m, were calculated from tau m and m infinity, then fit with modified exponential functions. The H-H model derived by evaluating the exponential functions for alpha m and beta m not only provided an excellent fit to the time course of IBa activation, but was predictive of the time course and magnitude of the IBa tail current. No differences in kinetics or voltage dependence of activation of IBa were found between tall and short hair cells. We conclude that both tall and short hair cells of the chick cochlea predominantly, if not exclusively, express noninactivating L-type calcium channels. These channels are therefore responsible for processes requiring voltage-dependent calcium entry through the basolateral cell membrane, such as transmitter release and activation of Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels. PMID:7787021

  16. Roughness characteristics of natural channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Harry Hawthorne

    1967-01-01

    Color photographs and descriptive data are presented for 50 stream channels for which roughness coefficients have been determined. All hydraulic computations involving flow in open channels require an evaluation of the roughness characteristics of the channel. In the absence of a satisfactory quantitative procedure this evaluation remains chiefly an art. The ability to evaluate roughness coefficients must be developed through experience. One means of gaining this experience is by examining and becoming acquainted with the appearance of some typical channels whose roughness coefficients are known. The photographs and data contained in this report represent a wide range of channel conditions. Familiarity with the appearance, geometry, and roughness characteristics of these channels will improve the engineer's ability to select roughness coefficients for other channels .

  17. Chloride channels as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a relatively under-explored target class for drug discovery as elucidation of their identity and physiological roles has lagged behind that of many other drug targets. Chloride channels are involved in a wide range of biological functions, including epithelial fluid secretion, cell-volume regulation, neuroexcitation, smooth-muscle contraction and acidification of intracellular organelles. Mutations in several chloride channels cause human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, macular degeneration, myotonia, kidney stones, renal salt wasting and hyperekplexia. Chloride-channel modulators have potential applications in the treatment of some of these disorders, as well as in secretory diarrhoeas, polycystic kidney disease, osteoporosis and hypertension. Modulators of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptor chloride channels are in clinical use and several small-molecule chloride-channel modulators are in preclinical development and clinical trials. Here, we discuss the broad opportunities that remain in chloride-channel-based drug discovery. PMID:19153558

  18. Comparison of aconitine-modified human heart (hH1) and rat skeletal (μ1) muscle Na+ channels: an important role for external Na+ ions

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Sterling N

    2002-01-01

    Neurotoxins such as aconitine (AC) bind to receptor site 2 on voltage-gated sodium channels and modify channel kinetics. Although AC modification typically induces hyperpolarizing shifts in sodium channel activation, the effects on channel inactivation seem to vary depending on the tissue origin of the channel. In the present study, the α subunits of human heart (hH1) and rat skeletal muscle (μ1) sodium channels were transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293t) cells. Whole-cell currents were examined before and after AC modification of the channels to determine whether the toxin had isoform-specific effects on channel kinetics. The magnitudes of the hyperpolarizing shifts in steady-state current activation and inactivation were similar for AC-modified hH1 and μ1 channels, and AC modification did not alter the voltage dependence of macroscopic current decay of either channel subtype. There were two notable differences between hH1 and μ1 channels after AC modification. First, the steady-state availability of AC-modified μ1 channels decreased by 5–10 % after very negative conditioning pulses. Second, AC-modified μ1 channels inactivated completely at all voltages, whereas AC-modified hH1 channels exhibited sustained inward currents at voltages near the threshold of current activation. Interestingly, AC-modified hH1 channels inactivated completely if the external solution did not contain sodium ions. The data demonstrate that AC modification affects the activation of hH1 and μ1 channels similarly but affects inactivation of the two channels distinctly. The results also imply that the reduced inactivation of AC-modified hH1 channels at least partially depends on the presence of extracellular sodium. PMID:11826163

  19. Asymmetrically doped stacked channel strained SOI FinFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Shashank; Kondekar, Pravin N.

    2017-02-01

    Strained SOI (SSOI) n-channel trigate FinFET is designed with asymmetrically doped stacked channels along the fin height. The OFF current is reduced with respect to lightly doped uniform SSOI FinFET because of band gap modification, originated between highly doped uniaxial strained and lightly doped Si fin. Through TCAD simulation it is observed that for the stacked devices the OFF current is reduced by more than 47%. The performances are also compared with highly doped uniform SSOI FinFETs and the results indicated that these devices have lesser random dopant variation at a moderate cost of ON and OFF current.

  20. Turning a Poor Ion Channel into a Good Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astumian, Dean

    2003-05-01

    We consider a membrane protein that can exist in two configurations, either one of which acts as a poor ion channel, allowing ions to slowly leak across the membrane from high to low elctrochemical potential. We show that random external fluctuations can provide the energy to turn this poor channel into a good pump that drives ion transport from low to high electrochemical potential. We discuss this result in terms of a gambling analogy, and point to possible implications for fields as far ranging as population biology, economics, and actuarial science.

  1. Controlling enzymatic activity and kinetics in swollen mesophases by physical nano-confinement.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjie; Vallooran, Jijo J; Zabara, Alexandru; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2014-06-21

    Bicontinuous lipid cubic mesophases are widely investigated as hosting matrices for functional enzymes to build biosensors and bio-devices due to their unique structural characteristics. However, the enzymatic activity within standard mesophases (in-meso) is severely hindered by the relatively small diameter of the mesophase aqueous channels, which provide only limited space for enzymes, and restrict them into a highly confined environment. We show that the enzymatic activity of a model enzyme, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), can be accurately controlled by relaxing its confinement within the cubic phases' water channels, when the aqueous channel diameters are systematically swollen with varying amount of hydration-enhancing sugar ester. The in-meso activity and kinetics of HRP are then systematically investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy, as a function of the size of the aqueous mesophase channels. The enzymatic activity of HRP increases with the swelling of the water channels. In swollen mesophases with water channel diameter larger than the HRP size, the enzymatic activity is more than double that measured in standard mesophases, approaching again the enzymatic activity of free HRP in bulk water. We also show that the physically-entrapped enzymes in the mesophases exhibit a restricted-diffusion-induced initial lag period and report the first observation of in-meso enzymatic kinetics significantly deviating from the normal Michaelis-Menten behaviour observed in free solutions, with deviations vanishing when enzyme confinement is released by swelling the mesophase.

  2. Voltage-dependent block by saxitoxin of sodium channels incorporated into planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    French, R J; Worley, J F; Krueger, B K

    1984-01-01

    We have previously studied single, voltage-dependent, saxitoxin-(STX) blockable sodium channels from rat brain in planar lipid bilayers, and found that channel block by STX was voltage-dependent. Here we describe the effect of voltage on the degree of block and on the kinetics of the blocking reaction. From their voltage dependence and kinetics, it was possible to distinguish single-channel current fluctuations due to blocking and unblocking of the channels by STX from those caused by intrinsic channel gating. The use of batrachotoxin (BTX) to inhibit sodium-channel inactivation allowed recordings of stationary fluctuations over extended periods of time. In a range of membrane potentials where the channels were open greater than 98% of the time, STX block was voltage-dependent, provided sufficient time was allowed to reach a steady state. Hyperpolarizing potentials favored block. Both association (blocking) and dissociation (unblocking) rate constants were voltage-dependent. The equilibrium dissociation constants computed from the association and dissociation rate constants for STX block were about the same as those determined from the steady-state fractional reduction in current. The steepness of the voltage dependence was consistent with the divalent toxin sensing 30-40% of the transmembrane potential. PMID:6324910

  3. Definition of two agonist types at the mammalian cold-activated channel TRPM8

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Annelies; Gees, Maarten; Toth, Balazs Istvan; Ghosh, Debapriya; Mulier, Marie; Vennekens, Rudi; Vriens, Joris; Talavera, Karel; Voets, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Various TRP channels act as polymodal sensors of thermal and chemical stimuli, but the mechanisms whereby chemical ligands impact on TRP channel gating are poorly understood. Here we show that AITC (allyl isothiocyanate; mustard oil) and menthol represent two distinct types of ligands at the mammalian cold sensor TRPM8. Kinetic analysis of channel gating revealed that AITC acts by destabilizing the closed channel, whereas menthol stabilizes the open channel, relative to the transition state. Based on these differences, we classify agonists as either type I (menthol-like) or type II (AITC-like), and provide a kinetic model that faithfully reproduces their differential effects. We further demonstrate that type I and type II agonists have a distinct impact on TRPM8 currents and TRPM8-mediated calcium signals in excitable cells. These findings provide a theoretical framework for understanding the differential actions of TRP channel ligands, with important ramifications for TRP channel structure-function analysis and pharmacology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17240.001 PMID:27449282

  4. Conformational Flip of Nonactivated HCN2 Channel Subunits Evoked by Cyclic Nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Thon, Susanne; Schulz, Eckhard; Kusch, Jana; Benndorf, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN) channels are tetrameric proteins that evoke electrical rhythmicity in specialized neurons and cardiomyocytes. The channels are activated by hyperpolarizing voltage but are also receptors for the intracellular ligand adenosine-3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) that enhances activation but is unable to activate the channels alone. Using fcAMP, a fluorescent derivative of cAMP, we analyzed the effect of ligand binding on HCN2 channels not preactivated by voltage. We identified a conformational flip of the channel as an intermediate state following the ligand binding and quantified it kinetically. Globally fitting the time courses of ligand binding and unbinding revealed modest cooperativity among the subunits in the conformational flip. The intensity of this cooperativity, however, was only moderate compared to channels preactivated by hyperpolarizing voltage. These data provide kinetic information about conformational changes proceeding in nonactivated HCN2 channels when cAMP binds. Moreover, our approach bears potential for analyzing the function of any other membrane receptor if a potent fluorescent ligand is available. PMID:26636938

  5. Bead-rod-spring models in random flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plan, Emmanuel Lance Christopher Medillo, VI; Ali, Aamir; Vincenzi, Dario

    2016-08-01

    Bead-rod-spring models are the foundation of the kinetic theory of polymer solutions. We derive the diffusion equation for the probability density function of the configuration of a general bead-rod-spring model in short-correlated Gaussian random flows. Under isotropic conditions, we solve this equation analytically for the elastic rhombus model introduced by Curtiss, Bird, and Hassager [Adv. Chem. Phys. 35, 31 (1976)].

  6. Randomness Of Amoeba Movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiguchi, S.; Khadijah, Siti; Kuwajima, T.; Ohki, M.; Tacano, M.; Sikula, J.

    2005-11-01

    Movements of amoebas were automatically traced using the difference between two successive frames of the microscopic movie. It was observed that the movements were almost random in that the directions and the magnitudes of the successive two steps are not correlated, and that the distance from the origin was proportional to the square root of the step number.

  7. Random lattice superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Haidong; Siegel, Warren

    2006-08-15

    We propose some new simplifying ingredients for Feynman diagrams that seem necessary for random lattice formulations of superstrings. In particular, half the fermionic variables appear only in particle loops (similarly to loop momenta), reducing the supersymmetry of the constituents of the type IIB superstring to N=1, as expected from their interpretation in the 1/N expansion as super Yang-Mills.

  8. Generating "Random" Integers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Martin

    2011-01-01

    One of the author's undergraduate students recently asked him whether it was possible to generate a random positive integer. After some thought, the author realised that there were plenty of interesting mathematical ideas inherent in her question. So much so in fact, that the author decided to organise a workshop, open both to undergraduates and…

  9. Randomization and sampling issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    The need for randomly selected routes and other sampling issues have been debated by the Amphibian electronic discussion group. Many excellent comments have been made, pro and con, but we have not reached consensus yet. This paper brings those comments together and attempts a synthesis. I hope that the resulting discussion will bring us closer to a consensus.

  10. Channels and Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 20 June 2003

    The dissected and eroded channel observed in this THEMIS image taken of plains materials southwest of the volcano Elysium Mons shows typical erosional islands and depositional features. The interesting thing about this channel is that it appears to start out of nowhere. The MOLA context image shows that the channel originates from a fissure within the ground, whose origin is likely volcanic, but may also be related to volatile processes.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 19.5, Longitude 126.8 East (233.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. Channel to Nowhere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 22 May 2003

    A channel-like feature roughly halfway between the Isidis Basin and Elysium Mons shows no connection to either a source region or terminal basin. It may be that this feature is not a channel at all and has instead arisen from the erosion of a once continuous layer of material into remnants that mimic a channel.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 20.9, Longitude 105 East (255) meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Information transmission and recovery in neural communications channels

    SciTech Connect

    Eguia, M. C.; Rabinovich, M. I.; Abarbanel, H. D. I.

    2000-11-01

    Biological neural communications channels transport environmental information from sensors through chains of active dynamical neurons to neural centers for decisions and actions to achieve required functions. These kinds of communications channels are able to create information and to transfer information from one time scale to the other because of the intrinsic nonlinear dynamics of the component neurons. We discuss a very simple neural information channel composed of sensory input in the form of a spike train that arrives at a model neuron, then moves through a realistic synapse to a second neuron where the information in the initial sensory signal is read. Our model neurons are four-dimensional generalizations of the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron, and we use a model of chemical synapse derived from first-order kinetics. The four-dimensional model neuron has a rich variety of dynamical behaviors, including periodic bursting, chaotic bursting, continuous spiking, and multistability. We show that, for many of these regimes, the parameters of the chemical synapse can be tuned so that information about the stimulus that is unreadable at the first neuron in the channel can be recovered by the dynamical activity of the synapse and the second neuron. Information creation by nonlinear dynamical systems that allow chaotic oscillations is familiar in their autonomous oscillations. It is associated with the instabilities that lead to positive Lyapunov exponents in their dynamical behavior. Our results indicate how nonlinear neurons acting as input/output systems along a communications channel can recover information apparently ''lost'' in earlier junctions on the channel. Our measure of information transmission is the average mutual information between elements, and because the channel is active and nonlinear, the average mutual information between the sensory source and the final neuron may be greater than the average mutual information at an earlier neuron in the channel. This

  13. On Random Numbers and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Ari, Morechai

    2004-01-01

    The term "random" is frequently used in discussion of the theory of evolution, even though the mathematical concept of randomness is problematic and of little relevance in the theory. Therefore, since the core concept of the theory of evolution is the non-random process of natural selection, the term random should not be used in teaching the…

  14. A Kinetic-fluid Model

    SciTech Connect

    First Author = C.Z. Cheng; Jay R. Johnson

    1998-07-10

    A nonlinear kinetic-fluid model for high-beta plasmas with multiple ion species which can be applied to multiscale phenomena is presented. The model embeds important kinetic effects due to finite ion Larmor radius (FLR), wave-particle resonances, magnetic particle trapping, etc. in the framework of simple fluid descriptions. When further restricting to low frequency phenomena with frequencies less than the ion cyclotron frequency the kinetic-fluid model takes a simpler form in which the fluid equations of multiple ion species collapse into single-fluid density and momentum equations and a low frequency generalized Ohm's law. The kinetic effects are introduced via plasma pressure tensors for ions and electrons which are computed from particle distribution functions that are governed by the Vlasov equation or simplified plasma dynamics equations such as the gyrokinetic equation. The ion FLR effects provide a finite parallel electric field, a perpendicular velocity that modifies the ExB drift, and a gyroviscosity tensor, all of which are neglected in the usual one-fluid MHD description. Eigenmode equations are derived which include magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling effects for low frequency waves (e.g., kinetic/inertial Alfven waves and ballooning-mirror instabilities).

  15. Bacterial sodium channels: models for eukaryotic sodium and calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Scheuer, Todd

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic sodium and calcium channels are made up of four linked homologous but different transmembrane domains. Bacteria express sodium channels comprised of four identical subunits, each being analogous to a single homologous domain of their eukaryotic counterparts. Key elements of primary structure are conserved between bacterial and eukaryotic sodium and calcium channels. The simple protein structure of the bacterial channels has allowed extensive structure-function probes of key regions as well as allowing determination of several X-ray crystallographic structures of these channels. The structures have revealed novel features of sodium and calcium channel pores and elucidated the structural importance of many of the conserved features of primary sequence. The structural information has also formed the basis for computational studies probing the basis for sodium and calcium selectivity and gating.

  16. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  17. GlialCAM, a CLC-2 Cl(-) channel subunit, activates the slow gate of CLC chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Jeworutzki, Elena; Lagostena, Laura; Elorza-Vidal, Xabier; López-Hernández, Tania; Estévez, Raúl; Pusch, Michael

    2014-09-02

    GlialCAM, a glial cell adhesion molecule mutated in megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts, targets the CLC-2 Cl(-) channel to cell contacts in glia and activates CLC-2 currents in vitro and in vivo. We found that GlialCAM clusters all CLC channels at cell contacts in vitro and thus studied GlialCAM interaction with CLC channels to investigate the mechanism of functional activation. GlialCAM slowed deactivation kinetics of CLC-Ka/barttin channels and increased CLC-0 currents opening the common gate and slowing its deactivation. No functional effect was seen for common gate deficient CLC-0 mutants. Similarly, GlialCAM targets the common gate deficient CLC-2 mutant E211V/H816A to cell contacts, without altering its function. Thus, GlialCAM is able to interact with all CLC channels tested, targeting them to cell junctions and activating them by stabilizing the open configuration of the common gate. These results are important to better understand the physiological role of GlialCAM/CLC-2 interaction.

  18. Effect of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent potassium channel (Kv1.1)

    PubMed Central

    Tytgat, J; Maertens, Ch; Daenens, P

    1997-01-01

    Fluoxetine (Prozac) is widely used as an antidepressant drug and is assumed to be a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Claims that its beneficial psychotropic effects extend beyond those in treatment of depression have drawn clinical and popular attention to this compound, raising the question of whether there is anything exceptional about the supposed selective actions.We have used the voltage clamp technique to study the effect of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent potassium (K+) channel (RCK1; Kv1.1), expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. This channel subunit is abundantly expressed in the central nervous system and K+ channels containing this subunit are involved in the repolarization process of many types of neurones.Blockade of the K+ currents by fluoxetine was found to be use- and dose-dependent. Wash-out of this compound could not be achieved. Fluoxetine did not affect the ion selectivity of this K+ channel, as the reversal potential was unaltered.Slowing of both activation and deactivation kinetics of the channel by fluoxetine was observed, including tail current crossover upon repolarization.Hodgkin-Huxley type of models and more generalized Markov chain models were used to fit the kinetics of the data. Based upon a Markov kinetic scheme, our data can be interpreted to mean that blockade of fluoxetine consists of two components: a voltage-independent occurring in the last closed, but available state of the channel, and a voltage-dependent occurring in the open state.This study describes the first biophysical working model for the mechanism of action of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent K+ channel, RCK1. Although this channel is not very potently blocked by fluoxetine when expressed in oocytes, this study may help us to understand some of the clinical symptoms seen with elevated serum concentrations of this SSRI. PMID:9421290

  19. Voltage- and cold-dependent gating of single TRPM8 ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Skryma, Roman; Bidaux, Gabriel; Magleby, Karl L.; Scholfield, C. Norman; McGeown, J. Graham; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels play critical roles in cell signaling by coupling various environmental factors to changes in membrane potential that modulate calcium influx. TRP channels are typically activated in a polymodal manner, thus integrating multiple stimuli. Although much progress has been made, the underlying mechanisms of TRP channel activation are largely unknown. The TRPM8 cation channel has been extensively investigated as a major neuronal cold sensor but is also activated by voltage, calcium store depletion, and some lipids as well as by compounds that produce cooling sensations, such as menthol or icilin. Several models of TRPM8 activation have been proposed to explain the interaction between these diverse stimuli. However, a kinetic scheme is not yet available that can describe the detailed single-channel kinetics to gain further insight into the underlying gating mechanism. To work toward this goal, we investigated voltage-dependent single-channel gating in cell-attached patches at two different temperatures (20 and 30°C) using HEK293 cells stably expressing TRPM8. Both membrane depolarization and cooling increased channel open probability (Po) mainly by decreasing the duration of closed intervals, with a smaller increase in the duration of open intervals. Maximum likelihood analysis of dwell times at both temperatures indicated gating in a minimum of five closed and two open states, and global fitting over a wide range of voltages identified a seven-state model that described the voltage dependence of Po, the single-channel kinetics, and the response of whole-cell currents to voltage ramps and steps. The major action of depolarization and cooling was to accelerate forward transitions between the same two sets of adjacent closed states. The seven-state model provides a general mechanism to account for TRPM8 activation by membrane depolarization at two temperatures and can serve as a starting point for further investigations of

  20. Computational Kinetic Study for the Unimolecular Decomposition Pathways of Cyclohexanone.

    PubMed

    Zaras, Aristotelis M; Dagaut, Philippe; Serinyel, Zeynep

    2015-07-16

    There has been evidence lately that several endophytic fungi can convert lignocellulosic biomass into ketones among other oxygenated compounds. Such compounds could prove useful as biofuels for internal combustion engines. Therefore, their combustion properties are of high interest. Cyclohexanone was identified as an interesting second-generation biofuel ( Boot , M. ; et al. Cyclic Oxygenates: A New Class of Second-Generation Biofuels for Diesel Engines? Energy Fuels 2009 , 23 , 1808 - 1817 ; Klein-Douwel , R. J. H. ; et al. Soot and Chemiluminescence in Diesel Combustion of Bio-Derived, Oxygenated and Reference Fuels . Proc. Combust. Inst. 2009 , 32 , 2817 - 2825 ). However, until recently ( Serinyel , Z. ; et al. Kinetics of Oxidation of Cyclohexanone in a Jet- Stirred Reactor: Experimental and Modeling . Proc. Combust. Inst. 2014 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.proci.2014.06.150 ), no previous studies on the kinetics of oxidation of that fuel could be found in the literature. In this work, we present the first theoretical kinetic study of the unimolecular decomposition pathways of cyclohexanone, a cyclic ketone that could demonstrate important fuel potential. Using the quantum composite G3B3 method, we identified six different decomposition pathways for cyclohexanone and computed the corresponding rate constants. The rate constants were calculated using the G3B3 method coupled with Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory in the temperature range of 800-2000 K. Our calculations show that the kinetically more favorable channel for thermal decomposition is pathway 2 that produces 1,3-butadien-2-ol, which in turn can isomerize easily to methyl vinyl ketone through a small barrier. The results presented here can be used in a future kinetic combustion mechanism.

  1. Stream Channel Stability. Appendix E. Geomorphic Controls of Channel Stability,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    Erosion and Channels Research Unit, USDA Sedimentation Laboratory, Oxford, MS. 1,"<Xi i .. i,,< .;,i,<..7 PREFACE This process -oriented study was...organized to investigate three complementary aspects of channel stability including (a) the nature of channel failure processes ; (b) the influences of...valley-fill depositional units on these processes and (c) the properties and distributions of the valley-fill units. The study was process oriented to

  2. Minio Vallis Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This VIS image is of the southern reach of Minio Vallis, a small fluvial channel located near the larger Mangala Vallis. Both channels are in the Tharsis region, in the area west of Arsia Mons and southeast of Medusae Fossae.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -8.2, Longitude 208.1 East (151.9 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Channel Wall Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The multiple landslides in this VIS image occur along a steep channel wall. Note the large impact crater in the context image. The formation of the crater may have initially weakened that area of the surface prior to channel formation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.7, Longitude 324.8 East (35.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. MscS-Like10 is a stretch-activated ion channel from Arabidopsis thaliana with a preference for anions

    PubMed Central

    Maksaev, Grigory; Haswell, Elizabeth S.

    2012-01-01

    Like many other organisms, plants are capable of sensing and responding to mechanical stimuli such as touch, osmotic pressure, and gravity. One mechanism for the perception of force is the activation of mechanosensitive (or stretch-activated) ion channels, and a number of mechanosensitive channel activities have been described in plant membranes. Based on their homology to the bacterial mechanosensitive channel MscS, the 10 MscS-Like (MSL) proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana have been hypothesized to form mechanosensitive channels in plant cell and organelle membranes. However, definitive proof that MSLs form mechanosensitive channels has been lacking. Here we used single-channel patch clamp electrophysiology to show that MSL10 is capable of providing a MS channel activity when heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. This channel had a conductance of ∼100 pS, consistent with the hypothesis that it underlies an activity previously observed in the plasma membrane of plant root cells. We found that MSL10 formed a channel with a moderate preference for anions, which was modulated by strongly positive and negative membrane potentials, and was reversibly inhibited by gadolinium, a known inhibitor of mechanosensitive channels. MSL10 demonstrated asymmetric activation/inactivation kinetics, with the channel closing at substantially lower tensions than channel opening. The electrophysiological characterization of MSL10 reported here provides insight into the evolution of structure and function of this important family of proteins. PMID:23112188

  5. Fatty acid analogue N-arachidonoyl taurine restores function of IKs channels with diverse long QT mutations

    PubMed Central

    Liin, Sara I; Larsson, Johan E; Barro-Soria, Rene; Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Larsson, H Peter

    2016-01-01

    About 300 loss-of-function mutations in the IKs channel have been identified in patients with Long QT syndrome and cardiac arrhythmia. How specific mutations cause arrhythmia is largely unknown and there are no approved IKs channel activators for treatment of these arrhythmias. We find that several Long QT syndrome-associated IKs channel mutations shift channel voltage dependence and accelerate channel closing. Voltage-clamp fluorometry experiments and kinetic modeling suggest that similar mutation-induced alterations in IKs channel currents may be caused by different molecular mechanisms. Finally, we find that the fatty acid analogue N-arachidonoyl taurine restores channel gating of many different mutant channels, even though the mutations are in different domains of the IKs channel and affect the channel by different molecular mechanisms. N-arachidonoyl taurine is therefore an interesting prototype compound that may inspire development of future IKs channel activators to treat Long QT syndrome caused by diverse IKs channel mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20272.001 PMID:27690226

  6. Time-dependent molecular memory in single voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Tapan K; Sikdar, S K

    2007-10-01

    Excitability in neurons is associated with firing of action potentials and requires the opening of voltage-gated sodium channels with membrane depolarization. Sustained membrane depolarization, as seen in pathophysiological conditions like epilepsy, can have profound implications on the biophysical properties of voltage-gated ion channels. Therefore, we sought to characterize the effect of sustained membrane depolarization on single voltage-gated Na+ channels. Single-channel activity was recorded in the cell-attached patch-clamp mode from the rNa(v)1.2 alpha channels expressed in CHO cells. Classical statistical analysis revealed complex nonlinear changes in channel dwell times and unitary conductance of single Na+ channels as a function of conditioning membrane depolarization. Signal processing tools like weighted wavelet Z (WWZ) and discrete Fourier transform analyses attributed a "pseudo-oscillatory" nature to the observed nonlinear variation in the kinetic parameters. Modeling studies using the hidden Markov model (HMM) illustrated significant changes in kinetic states and underlying state transition rate constants upon conditioning depolarization. Our results suggest that sustained membrane depolarization induces novel nonlinear properties in voltage-gated Na+ channels. Prolonged membrane depolarization also induced a "molecular memory" phenomenon, characterized by clusters of dwell time events and strong autocorrelation in the dwell time series similar to that reported recently for single enzyme molecules. The persistence of such molecular memory was found to be dependent on the duration of depolarization. Voltage-gated Na+ channel with the observed time-dependent nonlinear properties and the molecular memory phenomenon may determine the functional state of the channel and, in turn, the excitability of a neuron.

  7. G protein modulation of recombinant P/Q-type calcium channels by regulators of G protein signalling proteins.

    PubMed

    Mark, M D; Wittemann, S; Herlitze, S

    2000-10-01

    1. Fast synaptic transmission is triggered by the activation of presynaptic Ca2+ channels which can be inhibited by Gbetagamma subunits via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Regulators of G protein signalling (RGS) proteins are GTPase-accelerating proteins (GAPs), which are responsible for >100-fold increases in the GTPase activity of G proteins and might be involved in the regulation of presynaptic Ca2+ channels. In this study we investigated the effects of RGS2 on G protein modulation of recombinant P/Q-type channels expressed in a human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cell line using whole-cell recordings. 2. RGS2 markedly accelerates transmitter-mediated inhibition and recovery from inhibition of Ba2+ currents (IBa) through P/Q-type channels heterologously expressed with the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (mAChR M2). 3. Both RGS2 and RGS4 modulate the prepulse facilitation properties of P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. G protein reinhibition is accelerated, while release from inhibition is slowed. These kinetics depend on the availability of G protein alpha and betagamma subunits which is altered by RGS proteins. 4. RGS proteins unmask the Ca2+ channel beta subunit modulation of Ca2+ channel G protein inhibition. In the presence of RGS2, P/Q-type channels containing the beta2a and beta3 subunits reveal significantly altered kinetics of G protein modulation and increased facilitation compared to Ca2+ channels coexpressed with the beta1b or beta4 subunit.

  8. Kinetic study on biomass gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Bingyan, X.; Chuangzhi, W.; Zhengfen, L.; Guang, Z.X. )

    1992-09-01

    An experimental apparatus, with the features of fast heating rate and continuous record of reaction parameters, was developed to study kinetics of fast pyrolysis. The temperature effects, at a range of 400 C to 900 C, on pyrolysis rate, products profile, gas quality and quantity, and so on, were studied and the results are listed and analyzed. The effect of secondary reaction of gas phase at 700 C was tested and the regression result is expressed in an experimental formula. Based on the experimental results, the three-stage-reaction mechanism module is suggested. The kinetic expression to calculate gas formation rate is concluded as: d{alpha}/dt = A exp({minus}E/RT)(1 {minus} {alpha}){sup n}. The kinetic parameters of A, E, and n at different temperatures are given in the paper.

  9. Kinetic model of network traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniou, I.; Ivanov, V. V.; Kalinovsky, Yu. L.

    2002-05-01

    We present the first results on the application of the Prigogine-Herman kinetic approach (Kinetic Theory of Vehicular Traffic, American Elsevier Publishing Company, Inc., New York, 1971) to the network traffic. We discuss the solution of the kinetic equation for homogeneous time-independent situations and for the desired speed distribution function, obtained from traffic measurements analysis. For the log-normal desired speed distribution function the solution clearly shows two modes corresponding to individual flow patterns (low-concentration mode) and to collective flow patterns (traffic jam mode). For low-concentration situations we found almost linear dependence of the information flow versus the concentration and that the higher the average speed the lower the concentration at which the optimum flow takes place. When approaching the critical concentration there are no essential differences in the flow for different desired average speeds, whereas for the individual flow regions there are dramatic differences.

  10. Ultraviolet photoalteration of ion channels in voltage-clamped lobster giant axons.

    PubMed

    Oxford, G S; Pooler, J P

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of the ultraviolet light-induced changes in ionic conductances of lobster giant axon membranes has been carried out using the double sucrose gap voltage-clamp technique. The predominant effect of monochromatic light from a xenon arc source in the 255 to 305 nm region is an irreversible reduction in the magnitude of sodium conductance, without change in sodium channel activation or inactivation kinetics. A considerably smaller reduction in the magnitude of potassium conductance occurs, with some slowing of potassium channel activation kinetics. Leakage conductance is essentially not altered. The fall in sodium conductance follows an exponential time course toward a zero asymptote. The rate constant for conductance decrease was used as an assay for the wavelength dependence. The sodium conductance was maximally sensitive at 290 nm. It is suggested that individual sodium channels are closed upon absorption of single photons by aromatic amino acid residues in membrane proteins.

  11. Hydroxyapatite formation from cuttlefish bones: kinetics.

    PubMed

    Ivankovic, H; Tkalcec, E; Orlic, S; Ferrer, G Gallego; Schauperl, Z

    2010-10-01

    Highly porous hydroxyapatite (Ca(10)(PO(4))(6)·(OH)(2), HA) was prepared through hydrothermal transformation of aragonitic cuttlefish bones (Sepia officinalis L. Adriatic Sea) in the temperature range from 140 to 220°C for 20 min to 48 h. The phase composition of converted hydroxyapatite was examined by quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) using Rietveld structure refinement and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach was used to follow the kinetics and mechanism of transformation. Diffusion controlled one dimensional growth of HA, predominantly along the a-axis, could be defined. FTIR spectroscopy determined B-type substitutions of CO(3) (2-) groups. The morphology and microstructure of converted HA was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The general architecture of cuttlefish bones was preserved after hydrothermal treatment and the cuttlefish bones retained its form with the same channel size (~80 × 300 μm). The formation of dandelion-like HA spheres with diameter from 3 to 8 μm were observed on the surface of lamellae, which further transformed into various radially oriented nanoplates and nanorods with an average diameter of about 200-300 nm and an average length of about 8-10 μm.

  12. Shear-Driven Reconnection in Kinetic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, C.; Antiochos, S. K.; Germaschewski, K.; Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.; Bessho, N.

    2015-12-01

    The explosive energy release in solar eruptive phenomena is believed to be due to magnetic reconnection. In the standard model for coronal mass ejections (CME) and/or solar flares, the free energy for the event resides in the strongly sheared magnetic field of a filament channel. The pre-eruption force balance consists of an upward force due to the magnetic pressure of the sheared field countered by a downward tension due to overlying unsheared field. Magnetic reconnection disrupts this force balance; therefore, it is critical for understanding CME/flare initiation, to model the onset of reconnection driven by the build-up of magnetic shear. In MHD simulations, the application of a magnetic-field shear is a trivial matter. However, kinetic effects are dominant in the diffusion region and thus, it is important to examine this process with PIC simulations as well. The implementation of such a driver in PIC methods is challenging, however, and indicates the necessity of a true multiscale model for such processes in the solar environment. The field must be sheared self-consistently and indirectly to prevent the generation of waves that destroy the desired system. Plasma instabilities can arise nonetheless. In the work presented here, we show that we can control this instability and generate a predicted out-of-plane magnetic flux. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Award No. AGS-1331356.

  13. Fuzzy Field Theory as a Random Matrix Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekel, Juraj

    This dissertation considers the theory of scalar fields on fuzzy spaces from the point of view of random matrices. First we define random matrix ensembles, which are natural description of such theory. These ensembles are new and the novel feature is a presence of kinetic term in the probability measure, which couples the random matrix to a set of external matrices and thus breaks the original symmetry. Considering the case of a free field ensemble, which is generalization of a Gaussian matrix ensemble, we develop a technique to compute expectation values of the observables of the theory based on explicit Wick contractions and we write down recursion rules for these. We show that the eigenvalue distribution of the random matrix follows the Wigner semicircle distribution with a rescaled radius. We also compute distributions of the matrix Laplacian of the random matrix given by the new term and demonstrate that the eigenvalues of these two matrices are correlated. We demonstrate the robustness of the method by computing expectation values and distributions for more complicated observables. We then consider the ensemble corresponding to an interacting field theory, with a quartic interaction. We use the same method to compute the distribution of the eigenvalues and show that the presence of the kinetic terms rescales the distribution given by the original theory, which is a polynomially deformed Wigner semicircle. We compute the eigenvalue distribution of the matrix Laplacian and the joint distribution up to second order in the correlation and we show that the correlation between the two changes from the free field case. Finally, as an application of these results, we compute the phase diagram of the fuzzy scalar field theory, we find multiscaling which stabilizes this diagram in the limit of large matrices and compare it with the results obtained numerically and by considering the kinetic part as a perturbation.

  14. Side Channel Passive Quantum Key Distribution with One Uninformative State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Guo-Dong; Zhou, Qing-Ping; Fang, Mao-Fa

    2016-12-01

    In most of quantum key distribution schemes, real random number generators are required on both sides for preparation and measurement bases choice. In this paper, via entangled photon pairs, we present a side channel passive quantum key distribution scheme, in which random number generator is unneeded on the receiver side. On the sender Alice side, along with massive of signal photons, small amount of uninformative photons are randomly sent to her partner Bob for eavesdropper-presence testing and error estimation. While on the other side channel, without using random number generator Bob do not actively measure the income signals randomly in two non-orthogonal bases. Instead, he just passively register photon click events, in two settled symmetric (i.e.X) bases, and the raw key(click events) is the probable outcomes of a special quantum measurement module constructed by Alice and Bob. Further, security analysis and formulas of security bounds for this scheme is also investigated under reasonable assumptions. Our work shows that the uninformative state employed in this paper is powerful to fight against eavesdropper Eve.

  15. Side Channel Passive Quantum Key Distribution with One Uninformative State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Guo-Dong; Zhou, Qing-Ping; Fang, Mao-Fa

    2017-03-01

    In most of quantum key distribution schemes, real random number generators are required on both sides for preparation and measurement bases choice. In this paper, via entangled photon pairs, we present a side channel passive quantum key distribution scheme, in which random number generator is unneeded on the receiver side. On the sender Alice side, along with massive of signal photons, small amount of uninformative photons are randomly sent to her partner Bob for eavesdropper-presence testing and error estimation. While on the other side channel, without using random number generator Bob do not actively measure the income signals randomly in two non-orthogonal bases. Instead, he just passively register photon click events, in two settled symmetric (i.e. X) bases, and the raw key(click events) is the probable outcomes of a special quantum measurement module constructed by Alice and Bob. Further, security analysis and formulas of security bounds for this scheme is also investigated under reasonable assumptions. Our work shows that the uninformative state employed in this paper is powerful to fight against eavesdropper Eve.

  16. Kinetic Measurements for Enzyme Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Enzyme kinetics is the study of the chemical reactions that are catalyzed by enzymes, with a focus on their reaction rates. The study of an enzyme's kinetics considers the various stages of activity, reveals the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme, correlates its value to assay conditions, and describes how a drug or a poison might inhibit the enzyme. Victor Henri initially reported that enzyme reactions were initiated by a bond between the enzyme and the substrate. By 1910, Michaelis and Menten were advancing their work by studying the kinetics of an enzyme saccharase which catalyzes the hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose. They published their analysis and ever since the Michaelis-Menten equation has been used as the standard to describe the kinetics of many enzymes. Unfortunately, soluble enzymes must generally be immobilized to be reused for long times in industrial reactors. In addition, other critical enzyme properties have to be improved like stability, activity, inhibition by reaction products, and selectivity towards nonnatural substrates. Immobilization is by far the chosen process to achieve these goals.Although the Michaelis-Menten approach has been regularly adapted to the analysis of immobilized enzyme activity, its applicability to the immobilized state is limited by the barriers the immobilization matrix places upon the measurement of compounds that are used to model enzyme kinetics. That being said, the estimated value of the Michaelis-Menten coefficients (e.g., V max, K M) can be used to evaluate effects of immobilization on enzyme activity in the immobilized state when applied in a controlled manner. In this review enzyme activity and kinetics are discussed in the context of the immobilized state, and a few novel protocols are presented that address some of the unique constraints imposed by the immobilization barrier.

  17. Kinetic measurements for enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme kinetics is the study of the chemical reactions that are catalyzed by enzymes, with a focus on their reaction rates. The study of an enzyme's kinetics considers the various stages of activity, reveals the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme, correlates its value to assay conditions, and describes how a drug or a poison might inhibit the enzyme. Victor Henri initially reported that enzyme reactions were initiated by a bond between the enzyme and the substrate. By 1910, Michaelis and Menten had advanced this work by studying the kinetics of the enzyme saccharase, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose. They published their analysis, and ever since, the Michaelis-Menten equation has been used as the standard to describe the kinetics of many enzymes. Unfortunately, soluble enzymes must generally be immobilized to be reused for long times in industrial reactors. In addition, other critical enzyme properties have to be improved like stability, activity, inhibition by reaction products, selectivity toward nonnatural substrates. Immobilization is by far the chosen process to achieve these goals.Although the Michaelis-Menten approach has been regularly adopted for the analysis of immobilized enzyme activity, its applicability to the immobilized state is limited by the barriers the immobilization matrix places upon the measurement of compounds that are used to model enzyme kinetics. That being said, the estimated value of the Michaelis-Menten coefficients (e.g., V(max), K(M)) can be used to evaluate effects of immobilization on enzyme activity in the immobilized state when applied in a controlled manner. In this review, enzyme activity and kinetics are discussed in the context of the immobilized state, and a few novel protocols are presented that address some of the unique constraints imposed by the immobilization barrier.

  18. Endogenous chloride channels of insect sf9 cells. Evidence for coordinated activity of small elementary channel units

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, EH; Gabriei, SE; Stutts, MJ; Fullton, J; Price, EM; Boucher, RC

    1996-01-01

    The endogenous Cl- conductance of Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells was studied 20-35 h after plating out of either uninfected cells or cells infected by a baculovirus vector carrying the cloned beta-galactosidase gene (beta-Gal cells). With the cation Tris+ in the pipette and Na+ in the bath, the reversal potential of whole-cell currents was governed by the prevailing Cl- equilibrium potential and could be fitted by the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation with similar permeabilities for uninfected and beta-Gal cells. In the frequency range 0.12 < f < 300 Hz, the power density spectrum of whole-cell Cl- currents could be fitted by three Lorentzians. Independent of membrane potential, >50% of the total variance of whole-cell current fluctuations was accounted for by the low frequency Lorentzian (fc = 0.40 +/- 0.03 Hz, n = 6). Single-Cl- channels showed complex gating kinetics with long lasting (seconds) openings interrupted by similar long closures. In the open state, channels exhibited fast burst-like closures. Since the patches normally contained more than a single channel, it was not possible to measure open and closed dwell-time distributions for comparing single-Cl- channel activity with the kinetic features of whole-cell currents. However, the power density spectrum of Cl- currents of cell-attached and excised outside-out patches contained both high and low frequency Lorentzian components, with the corner frequency of the slow component (fc = 0.40 +/- 0.02 Hz, n = 4) similar to that of whole-cell current fluctuations. Chloride channels exhibited multiple conductance states with similar Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz-type rectification. Single-channel permeabilities covered the range from approximately 0.6.10(-14) cm5/s to approximately 6.10(-14) cm3/s, corresponding to a limiting conductance (gamma 150/150) of approximately 3.5 pS and approximately 35 pS, respectively. All states reversed near the same membrane potential, and they exhibited similar halide ion selectivity, P1

  19. Activation of single cardiac and skeletal ryanodine receptor channels by flash photolysis of caged Ca2+.

    PubMed Central

    Györke, S; Vélez, P; Suárez-Isla, B; Fill, M

    1994-01-01

    Single ryanodine-sensitive sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channels isolated from rabbit skeletal and canine cardiac muscle were reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers. Single channel activity was measured in simple solutions (no ATP or Mg2+) with 250 mM symmetrical Cs+ as charge carrier. A laser flash was used to photolyze caged-Ca2+ (DM-nitrophen) in a small volume directly in front of the bilayer. The free [Ca2+] in this small volume and in the bulk solution was monitored with Ca2+ electrodes. This setup allowed fast, calibrated free [Ca2+] stimuli to be applied repetitively to single SR Ca2+ release channels. A standard photolytically induced free [Ca2+] step (pCa 7-->6) was applied to both the cardiac and skeletal release channels. The rate of channel activation was determined by fitting a single exponential to ensemble currents generated from at least 50 single channel sweeps. The time constants of activation were 1.43 +/- 0.65 ms (mean +/- SD; n = 5) and 1.28 +/- 0.61 ms (n = 5) for cardiac and skeletal channels, respectively. This study presents a method for defining the fast Ca2+ regulation kinetics of single SR Ca2+ release channels and shows that the activation rate of skeletal SR Ca2+ release channels is consistent with a role for CICR in skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling. PMID:8075325

  20. The purified mechanosensitive channel TREK-1 is directly sensitive to membrane tension.

    PubMed

    Berrier, Catherine; Pozza, Alexandre; de Lacroix de Lavalette, Agnes; Chardonnet, Solenne; Mesneau, Agnes; Jaxel, Christine; le Maire, Marc; Ghazi, Alexandre

    2013-09-20

    Mechanosensitive channels are detected in all cells and are speculated to play a key role in many functions including osmoregulation, growth, hearing, balance, and touch. In prokaryotic cells, a direct gating of mechanosensitive channels by membrane tension was clearly demonstrated because the purified channels could be functionally reconstituted in a lipid bilayer. No such evidence has been presented yet in the case of mechanosensitive channels from animal cells. TREK-1, a two-pore domain K(+) channel, was the first animal mechanosensitive channel identified at the molecular level. It is the target of a large variety of agents such as volatile anesthetics, neuroprotective agents, and antidepressants. We have produced the mouse TREK-1 in yeast, purified it, and reconstituted the protein in giant liposomes amenable to patch clamp recording. The protein exhibited the expected electrophysiological properties in terms of kinetics, selectivity, and pharmacology. Negative pressure (suction) applied through the pipette had no effect on the channel, but positive pressure could completely and reversibly close the channel. Our interpretation of these data is that the intrinsic tension in the lipid bilayer is sufficient to maximally activate the channel, which can be closed upon modification of the tension. These results indicate that TREK-1 is directly sensitive to membrane tension.