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Sample records for random network coding

  1. The optimation of random network coding in wireless MESH networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Chunjiang; Pan, Xikun

    2013-03-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of wireless mesh network transmission, this paper focused on the network coding technology. Using network coding can significantly increase the wireless mesh network's throughput, but it will inevitably increase the computational complexity to the network, and the traditional linear network coding algorithm requires the aware of the whole network topology, which is impossible in the ever-changing topology of wireless mesh networks. In this paper, we use a distributed network coding strategy: random network coding, which don't need to know the whole topology of the network. In order to decrease the computation complexity, this paper suggests an improved strategy for random network coding: Do not code the packets which bring no good to the whole transmission. In this paper, we list several situations which coding is not necessary. Simulation results show that applying these strategies can improve the efficiency of wireless mesh network transmission.

  2. Efficient broadcasting for scalable video coding streaming using random linear network coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ji; Xiao, Song; Wu, Chengke

    2010-08-01

    In order to improve the reconstructed quality of video sequence, a Random Linear Network Coding (RLNC) based video transmission scheme for Scalable Video Coding (SVC) is proposed in wireless broadcast scenario. A packetization model for SVC streaming is introduced to transmit the scalable bit streams conveniently, on the basis of which the RLNC based Unequal Error Protection (RUEP) method is proposed to improve the efficiency of video transmission. The RUEP's advantage lies in the fact that the redundancy protection of UEP can be efficiently determine by the capacity of broadcast channel. Simulation results show that RUEP can improve the reconstructed quality of video sequence compared with the traditional Store and Forward (SF) based transmission schemes.

  3. Topology-selective jamming of fully-connected, code-division random-access networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polydoros, Andreas; Cheng, Unjeng

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to introduce certain models of topology selective stochastic jamming and examine its impact on a class of fully-connected, spread-spectrum, slotted ALOHA-type random access networks. The theory covers dedicated as well as half-duplex units. The dominant role of the spatial duty factor is established, and connections with the dual concept of time selective jamming are discussed. The optimal choices of coding rate and link access parameters (from the users' side) and the jamming spatial fraction are numerically established for DS and FH spreading.

  4. MATIN: A Random Network Coding Based Framework for High Quality Peer-to-Peer Live Video Streaming

    PubMed Central

    Barekatain, Behrang; Khezrimotlagh, Dariush; Aizaini Maarof, Mohd; Ghaeini, Hamid Reza; Salleh, Shaharuddin; Quintana, Alfonso Ariza; Akbari, Behzad; Cabrera, Alicia Triviño

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, Random Network Coding (RNC) has emerged as a promising solution for efficient Peer-to-Peer (P2P) video multicasting over the Internet. This probably refers to this fact that RNC noticeably increases the error resiliency and throughput of the network. However, high transmission overhead arising from sending large coefficients vector as header has been the most important challenge of the RNC. Moreover, due to employing the Gauss-Jordan elimination method, considerable computational complexity can be imposed on peers in decoding the encoded blocks and checking linear dependency among the coefficients vectors. In order to address these challenges, this study introduces MATIN which is a random network coding based framework for efficient P2P video streaming. The MATIN includes a novel coefficients matrix generation method so that there is no linear dependency in the generated coefficients matrix. Using the proposed framework, each peer encapsulates one instead of n coefficients entries into the generated encoded packet which results in very low transmission overhead. It is also possible to obtain the inverted coefficients matrix using a bit number of simple arithmetic operations. In this regard, peers sustain very low computational complexities. As a result, the MATIN permits random network coding to be more efficient in P2P video streaming systems. The results obtained from simulation using OMNET++ show that it substantially outperforms the RNC which uses the Gauss-Jordan elimination method by providing better video quality on peers in terms of the four important performance metrics including video distortion, dependency distortion, End-to-End delay and Initial Startup delay. PMID:23940530

  5. MATIN: a random network coding based framework for high quality peer-to-peer live video streaming.

    PubMed

    Barekatain, Behrang; Khezrimotlagh, Dariush; Aizaini Maarof, Mohd; Ghaeini, Hamid Reza; Salleh, Shaharuddin; Quintana, Alfonso Ariza; Akbari, Behzad; Cabrera, Alicia Triviño

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, Random Network Coding (RNC) has emerged as a promising solution for efficient Peer-to-Peer (P2P) video multicasting over the Internet. This probably refers to this fact that RNC noticeably increases the error resiliency and throughput of the network. However, high transmission overhead arising from sending large coefficients vector as header has been the most important challenge of the RNC. Moreover, due to employing the Gauss-Jordan elimination method, considerable computational complexity can be imposed on peers in decoding the encoded blocks and checking linear dependency among the coefficients vectors. In order to address these challenges, this study introduces MATIN which is a random network coding based framework for efficient P2P video streaming. The MATIN includes a novel coefficients matrix generation method so that there is no linear dependency in the generated coefficients matrix. Using the proposed framework, each peer encapsulates one instead of n coefficients entries into the generated encoded packet which results in very low transmission overhead. It is also possible to obtain the inverted coefficients matrix using a bit number of simple arithmetic operations. In this regard, peers sustain very low computational complexities. As a result, the MATIN permits random network coding to be more efficient in P2P video streaming systems. The results obtained from simulation using OMNET++ show that it substantially outperforms the RNC which uses the Gauss-Jordan elimination method by providing better video quality on peers in terms of the four important performance metrics including video distortion, dependency distortion, End-to-End delay and Initial Startup delay.

  6. Minimal Increase Network Coding for Dynamic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Because of the mobility, computing power and changeable topology of dynamic networks, it is difficult for random linear network coding (RLNC) in static networks to satisfy the requirements of dynamic networks. To alleviate this problem, a minimal increase network coding (MINC) algorithm is proposed. By identifying the nonzero elements of an encoding vector, it selects blocks to be encoded on the basis of relationship between the nonzero elements that the controls changes in the degrees of the blocks; then, the encoding time is shortened in a dynamic network. The results of simulations show that, compared with existing encoding algorithms, the MINC algorithm provides reduced computational complexity of encoding and an increased probability of delivery. PMID:26867211

  7. Minimal Increase Network Coding for Dynamic Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoyin; Fan, Xu; Wu, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Because of the mobility, computing power and changeable topology of dynamic networks, it is difficult for random linear network coding (RLNC) in static networks to satisfy the requirements of dynamic networks. To alleviate this problem, a minimal increase network coding (MINC) algorithm is proposed. By identifying the nonzero elements of an encoding vector, it selects blocks to be encoded on the basis of relationship between the nonzero elements that the controls changes in the degrees of the blocks; then, the encoding time is shortened in a dynamic network. The results of simulations show that, compared with existing encoding algorithms, the MINC algorithm provides reduced computational complexity of encoding and an increased probability of delivery.

  8. The random coding bound is tight for the average code.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallager, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    The random coding bound of information theory provides a well-known upper bound to the probability of decoding error for the best code of a given rate and block length. The bound is constructed by upperbounding the average error probability over an ensemble of codes. The bound is known to give the correct exponential dependence of error probability on block length for transmission rates above the critical rate, but it gives an incorrect exponential dependence at rates below a second lower critical rate. Here we derive an asymptotic expression for the average error probability over the ensemble of codes used in the random coding bound. The result shows that the weakness of the random coding bound at rates below the second critical rate is due not to upperbounding the ensemble average, but rather to the fact that the best codes are much better than the average at low rates.

  9. Diffusion in random networks

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Duan Z.; Padrino, Juan C.

    2017-06-01

    The ensemble averaging technique is applied to model mass transport by diffusion in random networks. The system consists of an ensemble of random networks, where each network is made of pockets connected by tortuous channels. Inside a channel, fluid transport is assumed to be governed by the one-dimensional diffusion equation. Mass balance leads to an integro-differential equation for the pocket mass density. The so-called dual-porosity model is found to be equivalent to the leading order approximation of the integration kernel when the diffusion time scale inside the channels is small compared to the macroscopic time scale. As a test problem,more » we consider the one-dimensional mass diffusion in a semi-infinite domain. Because of the required time to establish the linear concentration profile inside a channel, for early times the similarity variable is xt$-$1/4 rather than xt$-$1/2 as in the traditional theory. We found this early time similarity can be explained by random walk theory through the network.« less

  10. Sparse coding with memristor networks.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Patrick M; Cai, Fuxi; Du, Chao; Ma, Wen; Zhang, Zhengya; Lu, Wei D

    2017-08-01

    Sparse representation of information provides a powerful means to perform feature extraction on high-dimensional data and is of broad interest for applications in signal processing, computer vision, object recognition and neurobiology. Sparse coding is also believed to be a key mechanism by which biological neural systems can efficiently process a large amount of complex sensory data while consuming very little power. Here, we report the experimental implementation of sparse coding algorithms in a bio-inspired approach using a 32 × 32 crossbar array of analog memristors. This network enables efficient implementation of pattern matching and lateral neuron inhibition and allows input data to be sparsely encoded using neuron activities and stored dictionary elements. Different dictionary sets can be trained and stored in the same system, depending on the nature of the input signals. Using the sparse coding algorithm, we also perform natural image processing based on a learned dictionary.

  11. Wireless Network Security Using Randomness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-19

    REPORT WIRELESS NETWORK SECURITY USING RANDOMNESS 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The present invention provides systems and methods for... securing communications in a wireless network by utilizing the inherent randomness of propagation errors to enable legitimate users to dynamically...Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Patent, security , wireless networks, randomness Sheng Xiao, Weibo Gong

  12. Quantifying randomness in real networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsini, Chiara; Dankulov, Marija M.; Colomer-de-Simón, Pol; Jamakovic, Almerima; Mahadevan, Priya; Vahdat, Amin; Bassler, Kevin E.; Toroczkai, Zoltán; Boguñá, Marián; Caldarelli, Guido; Fortunato, Santo; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-10-01

    Represented as graphs, real networks are intricate combinations of order and disorder. Fixing some of the structural properties of network models to their values observed in real networks, many other properties appear as statistical consequences of these fixed observables, plus randomness in other respects. Here we employ the dk-series, a complete set of basic characteristics of the network structure, to study the statistical dependencies between different network properties. We consider six real networks--the Internet, US airport network, human protein interactions, technosocial web of trust, English word network, and an fMRI map of the human brain--and find that many important local and global structural properties of these networks are closely reproduced by dk-random graphs whose degree distributions, degree correlations and clustering are as in the corresponding real network. We discuss important conceptual, methodological, and practical implications of this evaluation of network randomness, and release software to generate dk-random graphs.

  13. Quantifying randomness in real networks.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Chiara; Dankulov, Marija M; Colomer-de-Simón, Pol; Jamakovic, Almerima; Mahadevan, Priya; Vahdat, Amin; Bassler, Kevin E; Toroczkai, Zoltán; Boguñá, Marián; Caldarelli, Guido; Fortunato, Santo; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-10-20

    Represented as graphs, real networks are intricate combinations of order and disorder. Fixing some of the structural properties of network models to their values observed in real networks, many other properties appear as statistical consequences of these fixed observables, plus randomness in other respects. Here we employ the dk-series, a complete set of basic characteristics of the network structure, to study the statistical dependencies between different network properties. We consider six real networks--the Internet, US airport network, human protein interactions, technosocial web of trust, English word network, and an fMRI map of the human brain--and find that many important local and global structural properties of these networks are closely reproduced by dk-random graphs whose degree distributions, degree correlations and clustering are as in the corresponding real network. We discuss important conceptual, methodological, and practical implications of this evaluation of network randomness, and release software to generate dk-random graphs.

  14. Quantifying randomness in real networks

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Chiara; Dankulov, Marija M.; Colomer-de-Simón, Pol; Jamakovic, Almerima; Mahadevan, Priya; Vahdat, Amin; Bassler, Kevin E.; Toroczkai, Zoltán; Boguñá, Marián; Caldarelli, Guido; Fortunato, Santo; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Represented as graphs, real networks are intricate combinations of order and disorder. Fixing some of the structural properties of network models to their values observed in real networks, many other properties appear as statistical consequences of these fixed observables, plus randomness in other respects. Here we employ the dk-series, a complete set of basic characteristics of the network structure, to study the statistical dependencies between different network properties. We consider six real networks—the Internet, US airport network, human protein interactions, technosocial web of trust, English word network, and an fMRI map of the human brain—and find that many important local and global structural properties of these networks are closely reproduced by dk-random graphs whose degree distributions, degree correlations and clustering are as in the corresponding real network. We discuss important conceptual, methodological, and practical implications of this evaluation of network randomness, and release software to generate dk-random graphs. PMID:26482121

  15. Applications of Coding in Network Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Christopher SungWook

    2012-01-01

    This thesis uses the tool of network coding to investigate fast peer-to-peer file distribution, anonymous communication, robust network construction under uncertainty, and prioritized transmission. In a peer-to-peer file distribution system, we use a linear optimization approach to show that the network coding framework significantly simplifies…

  16. Applications of Coding in Network Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Christopher SungWook

    2012-01-01

    This thesis uses the tool of network coding to investigate fast peer-to-peer file distribution, anonymous communication, robust network construction under uncertainty, and prioritized transmission. In a peer-to-peer file distribution system, we use a linear optimization approach to show that the network coding framework significantly simplifies…

  17. Binary continuous random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Normand; Barkema, G. T.

    2004-11-01

    Many properties of disordered materials can be understood by looking at idealized structural models, in which the strain is as small as is possible in the absence of long-range order. For covalent amorphous semiconductors and glasses, such an idealized structural model, the continuous random network, was introduced 70 years ago by Zachariasen. In this model, each atom is placed in a crystal-like local environment, with perfect coordination and chemical ordering, yet longer-range order is nonexistent. Defects, such as missing or added bonds, or chemical mismatches, however, are not accounted for. In this paper we explore under what conditions the idealized CRN model without defects captures the properties of the material, and under what conditions defects are an inherent part of the idealized model. We find that the density of defects in tetrahedral networks does not vary smoothly with variations in the interaction strengths, but jumps from close to zero to a finite density. Consequently, in certain materials, defects do not play a role except for being thermodynamical excitations, whereas in others they are a fundamental ingredient of the ideal structure.

  18. Secure Computation from Random Error Correcting Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Cramer, Ronald; Goldwasser, Shafi; de Haan, Robbert; Vaikuntanathan, Vinod

    Secure computation consists of protocols for secure arithmetic: secret values are added and multiplied securely by networked processors. The striking feature of secure computation is that security is maintained even in the presence of an adversary who corrupts a quorum of the processors and who exercises full, malicious control over them. One of the fundamental primitives at the heart of secure computation is secret-sharing. Typically, the required secret-sharing techniques build on Shamir's scheme, which can be viewed as a cryptographic twist on the Reed-Solomon error correcting code. In this work we further the connections between secure computation and error correcting codes. We demonstrate that threshold secure computation in the secure channels model can be based on arbitrary codes. For a network of size n, we then show a reduction in communication for secure computation amounting to a multiplicative logarithmic factor (in n) compared to classical methods for small, e.g., constant size fields, while tolerating t < ({1 over 2} - {ɛ}) {n} players to be corrupted, where ɛ> 0 can be arbitrarily small. For large networks this implies considerable savings in communication. Our results hold in the broadcast/negligible error model of Rabin and Ben-Or, and complement results from CRYPTO 2006 for the zero-error model of Ben-Or, Goldwasser and Wigderson (BGW). Our general theory can be extended so as to encompass those results from CRYPTO 2006 as well. We also present a new method for constructing high information rate ramp schemes based on arbitrary codes, and in particular we give a new construction based on algebraic geometry codes.

  19. On Delay and Security in Network Coding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dikaliotis, Theodoros K.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, delay and security issues in network coding are considered. First, we study the delay incurred in the transmission of a fixed number of packets through acyclic networks comprised of erasure links. The two transmission schemes studied are routing with hop-by-hop retransmissions, where every node in the network simply stores and…

  20. On Delay and Security in Network Coding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dikaliotis, Theodoros K.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, delay and security issues in network coding are considered. First, we study the delay incurred in the transmission of a fixed number of packets through acyclic networks comprised of erasure links. The two transmission schemes studied are routing with hop-by-hop retransmissions, where every node in the network simply stores and…

  1. Network Coding for Function Computation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appuswamy, Rathinakumar

    2011-01-01

    In this dissertation, the following "network computing problem" is considered. Source nodes in a directed acyclic network generate independent messages and a single receiver node computes a target function f of the messages. The objective is to maximize the average number of times f can be computed per network usage, i.e., the "computing…

  2. Robust Self-Authenticating Network Coding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-30

    a subspace U of W u = nk{v) E This formulation is very similar to non-coherent detection in the MIMO case: Zheng and Tse Network coding and...network error correction Just as in the MIMO case: Constructing codes is equivalent to packing subspaces of dimension An in ambient space of dimension n...surveillance and reconnaissance and command and control massive amounts of informa- tion sharing by providing ’bandwidth-available" environment Through

  3. Robust entanglement distribution via quantum network coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epping, Michael; Kampermann, Hermann; Bruß, Dagmar

    2016-10-01

    Many protocols of quantum information processing, like quantum key distribution or measurement-based quantum computation, ‘consume’ entangled quantum states during their execution. When participants are located at distant sites, these resource states need to be distributed. Due to transmission losses quantum repeater become necessary for large distances (e.g. ≳ 300 {{km}}). Here we generalize the concept of the graph state repeater to D-dimensional graph states and to repeaters that can perform basic measurement-based quantum computations, which we call quantum routers. This processing of data at intermediate network nodes is called quantum network coding. We describe how a scheme to distribute general two-colourable graph states via quantum routers with network coding can be constructed from classical linear network codes. The robustness of the distribution of graph states against outages of network nodes is analysed by establishing a link to stabilizer error correction codes. Furthermore we show, that for any stabilizer error correction code there exists a corresponding quantum network code with similar error correcting capabilities.

  4. Apply network coding for H.264/SVC multicasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Kuo, C.-C. Jay

    2008-08-01

    In a packet erasure network environment, video streaming benefits from error control in two ways to achieve graceful degradation. The first approach is application-level (or the link-level) forward error-correction (FEC) to provide erasure protection. The second error control approach is error concealment at the decoder end to compensate lost packets. A large amount of research work has been done in the above two areas. More recently, network coding (NC) techniques have been proposed for efficient data multicast over networks. It was shown in our previous work that multicast video streaming benefits from NC for its throughput improvement. An algebraic model is given to analyze the performance in this work. By exploiting the linear combination of video packets along nodes in a network and the SVC video format, the system achieves path diversity automatically and enables efficient video delivery to heterogeneous receivers in packet erasure channels. The application of network coding can protect video packets against the erasure network environment. However, the rank defficiency problem of random linear network coding makes the error concealment inefficiently. It is shown by computer simulation that the proposed NC video multicast scheme enables heterogenous receiving according to their capacity constraints. But it needs special designing to improve the video transmission performance when applying network coding.

  5. Systematic network coding for two-hop lossy transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ye; Blostein, Steven; Chan, Wai-Yip

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we consider network transmissions over a single or multiple parallel two-hop lossy paths. These scenarios occur in applications such as sensor networks or WiFi offloading. Random linear network coding (RLNC), where previously received packets are re-encoded at intermediate nodes and forwarded, is known to be a capacity-achieving approach for these networks. However, a major drawback of RLNC is its high encoding and decoding complexity. In this work, a systematic network coding method is proposed. We show through both analysis and simulation that the proposed method achieves higher end-to-end rate as well as lower computational cost than RLNC for finite field sizes and finite-sized packet transmissions.

  6. Coherent diffractive imaging using randomly coded masks

    DOE PAGES

    Seaberg, Matthew H.; d'Aspremont, Alexandre; Turner, Joshua J.

    2015-12-07

    We experimentally demonstrate an extension to coherent diffractive imaging that encodes additional information through the use of a series of randomly coded masks, removing the need for typical object-domain constraints while guaranteeing a unique solution to the phase retrieval problem. Phase retrieval is performed using a numerical convex relaxation routine known as “PhaseCut,” an iterative algorithm known for its stability and for its ability to find the global solution, which can be found efficiently and which is robust to noise. As a result, the experiment is performed using a laser diode at 532.2 nm, enabling rapid prototyping for future X-raymore » synchrotron and even free electron laser experiments.« less

  7. Coherent diffractive imaging using randomly coded masks

    SciTech Connect

    Seaberg, Matthew H.; D'Aspremont, Alexandre; Turner, Joshua J.

    2015-12-07

    We experimentally demonstrate an extension to coherent diffractive imaging that encodes additional information through the use of a series of randomly coded masks, removing the need for typical object-domain constraints while guaranteeing a unique solution to the phase retrieval problem. Phase retrieval is performed using a numerical convex relaxation routine known as “PhaseCut,” an iterative algorithm known for its stability and for its ability to find the global solution, which can be found efficiently and which is robust to noise. The experiment is performed using a laser diode at 532.2 nm, enabling rapid prototyping for future X-ray synchrotron and even free electron laser experiments.

  8. Spike Code Flow in Cultured Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shinichi; Nishitani, Yoshi; Hosokawa, Chie; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Sawai, Hajime; Kamimura, Takuya; Yagi, Yasushi; Mizuno-Matsumoto, Yuko; Chen, Yen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We observed spike trains produced by one-shot electrical stimulation with 8 × 8 multielectrodes in cultured neuronal networks. Each electrode accepted spikes from several neurons. We extracted the short codes from spike trains and obtained a code spectrum with a nominal time accuracy of 1%. We then constructed code flow maps as movies of the electrode array to observe the code flow of "1101" and "1011," which are typical pseudorandom sequence such as that we often encountered in a literature and our experiments. They seemed to flow from one electrode to the neighboring one and maintained their shape to some extent. To quantify the flow, we calculated the "maximum cross-correlations" among neighboring electrodes, to find the direction of maximum flow of the codes with lengths less than 8. Normalized maximum cross-correlations were almost constant irrespective of code. Furthermore, if the spike trains were shuffled in interval orders or in electrodes, they became significantly small. Thus, the analysis suggested that local codes of approximately constant shape propagated and conveyed information across the network. Hence, the codes can serve as visible and trackable marks of propagating spike waves as well as evaluating information flow in the neuronal network.

  9. MINET (momentum integral network) code documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Van Tuyle, G J; Nepsee, T C; Guppy, J G

    1989-12-01

    The MINET computer code, developed for the transient analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer, is documented in this four-part reference. In Part 1, the MINET models, which are based on a momentum integral network method, are described. The various aspects of utilizing the MINET code are discussed in Part 2, The User's Manual. The third part is a code description, detailing the basic code structure and the various subroutines and functions that make up MINET. In Part 4, example input decks, as well as recent validation studies and applications of MINET are summarized. 32 refs., 36 figs., 47 tabs.

  10. Energy coding in biological neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhikang

    2007-01-01

    According to the experimental result of signal transmission and neuronal energetic demands being tightly coupled to information coding in the cerebral cortex, we present a brand new scientific theory that offers an unique mechanism for brain information processing. We demonstrate that the neural coding produced by the activity of the brain is well described by our theory of energy coding. Due to the energy coding model’s ability to reveal mechanisms of brain information processing based upon known biophysical properties, we can not only reproduce various experimental results of neuro-electrophysiology, but also quantitatively explain the recent experimental results from neuroscientists at Yale University by means of the principle of energy coding. Due to the theory of energy coding to bridge the gap between functional connections within a biological neural network and energetic consumption, we estimate that the theory has very important consequences for quantitative research of cognitive function. PMID:19003513

  11. Energy coding in biological neural networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rubin; Zhang, Zhikang

    2007-09-01

    According to the experimental result of signal transmission and neuronal energetic demands being tightly coupled to information coding in the cerebral cortex, we present a brand new scientific theory that offers an unique mechanism for brain information processing. We demonstrate that the neural coding produced by the activity of the brain is well described by our theory of energy coding. Due to the energy coding model's ability to reveal mechanisms of brain information processing based upon known biophysical properties, we can not only reproduce various experimental results of neuro-electrophysiology, but also quantitatively explain the recent experimental results from neuroscientists at Yale University by means of the principle of energy coding. Due to the theory of energy coding to bridge the gap between functional connections within a biological neural network and energetic consumption, we estimate that the theory has very important consequences for quantitative research of cognitive function.

  12. Percolation on correlated random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliari, E.; Cioli, C.; Guadagnini, E.

    2011-09-01

    We consider a class of random, weighted networks, obtained through a redefinition of patterns in an Hopfield-like model, and, by performing percolation processes, we get information about topology and resilience properties of the networks themselves. Given the weighted nature of the graphs, different kinds of bond percolation can be studied: stochastic (deleting links randomly) and deterministic (deleting links based on rank weights), each mimicking a different physical process. The evolution of the network is accordingly different, as evidenced by the behavior of the largest component size and of the distribution of cluster sizes. In particular, we can derive that weak ties are crucial in order to maintain the graph connected and that, when they are the most prone to failure, the giant component typically shrinks without abruptly breaking apart; these results have been recently evidenced in several kinds of social networks.

  13. Patterns in randomly evolving networks: Idiotypic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brede, Markus; Behn, Ulrich

    2003-03-01

    We present a model for the evolution of networks of occupied sites on undirected regular graphs. At every iteration step in a parallel update, I randomly chosen empty sites are occupied and occupied sites having occupied neighbor degree outside of a given interval (tl,tu) are set empty. Depending on the influx I and the values of both lower threshold and upper threshold of the occupied neighbor degree, different kinds of behavior can be observed. In certain regimes stable long-living patterns appear. We distinguish two types of patterns: static patterns arising on graphs with low connectivity and dynamic patterns found on high connectivity graphs. Increasing I patterns become unstable and transitions between almost stable patterns, interrupted by disordered phases, occur. For still larger I the lifetime of occupied sites becomes very small and network structures are dominated by randomness. We develop methods to analyze the nature and dynamics of these network patterns, give a statistical description of defects and fluctuations around them, and elucidate the transitions between different patterns. Results and methods presented can be applied to a variety of problems in different fields and a broad class of graphs. Aiming chiefly at the modeling of functional networks of interacting antibodies and B cells of the immune system (idiotypic networks), we focus on a class of graphs constructed by bit chains. The biological relevance of the patterns and possible operational modes of idiotypic networks are discussed.

  14. Improved classical and quantum random access codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liabøtrø, O.

    2017-05-01

    A (quantum) random access code ((Q)RAC) is a scheme that encodes n bits into m (qu)bits such that any of the n bits can be recovered with a worst case probability p >1/2 . We generalize (Q)RACs to a scheme encoding n d -levels into m (quantum) d -levels such that any d -level can be recovered with the probability for every wrong outcome value being less than 1/d . We construct explicit solutions for all n ≤d/2m-1 d -1 . For d =2 , the constructions coincide with those previously known. We show that the (Q)RACs are d -parity oblivious, generalizing ordinary parity obliviousness. We further investigate optimization of the success probabilities. For d =2 , we use the measure operators of the previously best-known solutions, but improve the encoding states to give a higher success probability. We conjecture that for maximal (n =4m-1 ,m ,p ) QRACs, p =1/2 {1 +[(√{3}+1)m-1 ] -1} is possible, and show that it is an upper bound for the measure operators that we use. We then compare (n ,m ,pq) QRACs with classical (n ,2 m ,pc) RACs. We can always find pq≥pc , but the classical code gives information about every input bit simultaneously, while the QRAC only gives information about a subset. For several different (n ,2 ,p ) QRACs, we see the same trade-off, as the best p values are obtained when the number of bits that can be obtained simultaneously is as small as possible. The trade-off is connected to parity obliviousness, since high certainty information about several bits can be used to calculate probabilities for parities of subsets.

  15. Multihop optical network with convolutional coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Sufong; Takahashi, Kenzo; Prasad Majumder, Satya

    2002-01-01

    We evaluate the bit-error-rate (BER) performance of a multihop optical ShuffleNet with and without convolutional coding. Computed results show that there is considerable improvement in network performance resulting from coding in terms of an increased number of traversable hops from a given transmitter power at a given BER. For a rate-1/2 convolutional code with constraint length K = 9 at BER = 10-9, the hop gains are found to be 20 hops for hot-potato routing and 7 hops for single-buffer routing at the transmitter power of 0 dBm. We can further increase the hop gain by increasing transmitter power.

  16. Random Coding Bounds for DNA Codes Based on Fibonacci Ensembles of DNA Sequences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    COVERED (From - To) 6 Jul 08 – 11 Jul 08 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RANDOM CODING BOUNDS FOR DNA CODES BASED ON FIBONACCI ENSEMBLES OF DNA SEQUENCES ... sequences which are generalizations of the Fibonacci sequences . 15. SUBJECT TERMS DNA Codes, Fibonacci Ensembles, DNA Computing, Code Optimization 16...coding bound on the rate of DNA codes is proved. To obtain the bound, we use some ensembles of DNA sequences which are generalizations of the Fibonacci

  17. Evolution of random catalytic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, S.M.; Reidys, C.M. |

    1997-06-01

    In this paper the authors investigate the evolution of populations of sequences on a random catalytic network. Sequences are mapped into structures, between which are catalytic interactions that determine their instantaneous fitness. The catalytic network is constructed as a random directed graph. They prove that at certain parameter values, the probability of some relevant subgraphs of this graph, for example cycles without outgoing edges, is maximized. Populations evolving under point mutations realize a comparatively small induced subgraph of the complete catalytic network. They present results which show that populations reliably discover and persist on directed cycles in the catalytic graph, though these may be lost because of stochastic effects, and study the effect of population size on this behavior.

  18. Random access codes and nonlocal resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Anubhav; Pawlowski, Marcin; Horodecki, Karol

    2017-08-01

    This work explores the notion of inter-convertibility between a cryptographic primitive: the random access code (RAC) and bipartite no-signaling nonlocal resources. To this end we introduce two generalizations of the Popescu-Rohrlich box (PR) and investigate their relation with the corresponding RACs. The first generalization is based on the number of Alice's input bits; we refer to it as the Bn-box. We show that the no-signaling condition imposes an equivalence between the Bn-box and the (n →1 ) RAC (encoding of n input bits to 1 bit of message). As an application we show that (n -1 ) PRs supplemented with one bit communication are necessary and sufficient to win a (n →1 ) RAC with certainty. Furthermore, we present a signaling instant of a perfectly working (n →1 ) RAC which cannot simulate the Bn-box, thus showing that it is weaker than its no-signaling counterpart. For the second generalization we replace Alice's input bits with d its (d -leveled classical systems); we call this the Bnd-box. In this case the no-signaling condition is not enough to enforce an equivalence between the Bnd-box and (n →1 ,d ) RAC (encoding of n input d its to 1 d it of message); i.e., while the Bnd-box can win a (n →1 ,d ) RAC with certainty, not all no-signaling instances of a (n →1 ,d ) RAC can simulate the Bnd-box. We use resource inequalities to quantitatively capture these results.

  19. Packet switched networks with photonic code processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas-Fernandez, J. B.; Chen, L. R.; LaRochelle, S.; Leon-Garcia, A.; Plant, D.; Rusch, L. A.

    2006-09-01

    In this paper we present our study of all optical label encoding and ultrafast processing to route packets through optical networks. Our investigations include new network topologies, novel photonic components and performance analysis. We propose a label stacked packet switching system using spectral amplitude codes (SAC) as labels. We have developed enabling technologies to realize key photonic components for generation, correlation (identification) and conversion (swapping) of SAC-labels. We generate and identify the labels with fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) encoders used in transmission. Furthermore, we demonstrate a static, all-photonic code-label converter based on a semiconductor fiber ring laser that can be used for label swapping of SAC-labels. We also address the design of dedicated receivers for optical burst detection. For this, we propose a novel architecture for a burst mode receiver module. In the system studies, we have shown by simulations that the throughput of standard Ethernet passive optical networks (E-PONs) can be substantially increased by the use of data encoded with SACs to achieve optical code division multiple access over passive optical networks (OCDMA-PONs). In the paper, we present recent results for all of these photonic technologies and we discuss how they can enable flexible packet switched networks.

  20. Medical reliable network using concatenated channel codes through GSM network.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Emtithal; Kohno, Ryuji

    2013-01-01

    Although the 4(th) generation (4G) of global mobile communication network, i.e. Long Term Evolution (LTE) coexisting with the 3(rd) generation (3G) has successfully started; the 2(nd) generation (2G), i.e. Global System for Mobile communication (GSM) still playing an important role in many developing countries. Without any other reliable network infrastructure, GSM can be applied for tele-monitoring applications, where high mobility and low cost are necessary. A core objective of this paper is to introduce the design of a more reliable and dependable Medical Network Channel Code system (MNCC) through GSM Network. MNCC design based on simple concatenated channel code, which is cascade of an inner code (GSM) and an extra outer code (Convolution Code) in order to protect medical data more robust against channel errors than other data using the existing GSM network. In this paper, the MNCC system will provide Bit Error Rate (BER) equivalent to the BER for medical tele monitoring of physiological signals, which is 10(-5) or less. The performance of the MNCC has been proven and investigated using computer simulations under different channels condition such as, Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN), Rayleigh noise and burst noise. Generally the MNCC system has been providing better performance as compared to GSM.

  1. Molecular codes in biological and chemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Görlich, Dennis; Dittrich, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Shannon's theory of communication has been very successfully applied for the analysis of biological information. However, the theory neglects semantic and pragmatic aspects and thus cannot directly be applied to distinguish between (bio-) chemical systems able to process "meaningful" information from those that do not. Here, we present a formal method to assess a system's semantic capacity by analyzing a reaction network's capability to implement molecular codes. We analyzed models of chemical systems (martian atmosphere chemistry and various combustion chemistries), biochemical systems (gene expression, gene translation, and phosphorylation signaling cascades), an artificial chemistry, and random reaction networks. Our study suggests that different chemical systems possess different semantic capacities. No semantic capacity was found in the model of the martian atmosphere chemistry, the studied combustion chemistries, and highly connected random networks, i.e. with these chemistries molecular codes cannot be implemented. High semantic capacity was found in the studied biochemical systems and in random reaction networks where the number of second order reactions is twice the number of species. We conclude that our approach can be applied to evaluate the information processing capabilities of a chemical system and may thus be a useful tool to understand the origin and evolution of meaningful information, e.g. in the context of the origin of life.

  2. Connectivity Restoration in Wireless Sensor Networks via Space Network Coding

    PubMed Central

    Uwitonze, Alfred; Huang, Jiaqing; Ye, Yuanqing; Cheng, Wenqing

    2017-01-01

    The problem of finding the number and optimal positions of relay nodes for restoring the network connectivity in partitioned Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) is Non-deterministic Polynomial-time hard (NP-hard) and thus heuristic methods are preferred to solve it. This paper proposes a novel polynomial time heuristic algorithm, namely, Relay Placement using Space Network Coding (RPSNC), to solve this problem, where Space Network Coding, also called Space Information Flow (SIF), is a new research paradigm that studies network coding in Euclidean space, in which extra relay nodes can be introduced to reduce the cost of communication. Unlike contemporary schemes that are often based on Minimum Spanning Tree (MST), Euclidean Steiner Minimal Tree (ESMT) or a combination of MST with ESMT, RPSNC is a new min-cost multicast space network coding approach that combines Delaunay triangulation and non-uniform partitioning techniques for generating a number of candidate relay nodes, and then linear programming is applied for choosing the optimal relay nodes and computing their connection links with terminals. Subsequently, an equilibrium method is used to refine the locations of the optimal relay nodes, by moving them to balanced positions. RPSNC can adapt to any density distribution of relay nodes and terminals, as well as any density distribution of terminals. The performance and complexity of RPSNC are analyzed and its performance is validated through simulation experiments. PMID:28425923

  3. Network Coded TCP (CTCP) Performance over Satellite Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-22

    control mechanism based off of H- TCP that opens the congestion window quickly to overcome the challenges of large latency networks. Preliminary results are...Solomon (RS) coding with TCP to overcome this issue, but it requires the use of explicit congestion control (ECN) and the RS code can result in... TCP and Hybla TCP ) for high packet loss rates (e.g., > 2.5%). We then explore the possibility of a modified congestion control mechanism based off of

  4. Temporal Coding in Realistic Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasyuta, S. M.; Ivanov, D. V.

    1995-10-01

    The modification of realistic neural network model have been proposed. The model differs from the Hopfield model because of the two characteristic contributions to synaptic efficacious: the short-time contribution which is determined by the chemical reactions in the synapses and the long-time contribution corresponding to the structural changes of synaptic contacts. The approximation solution of the realistic neural network model equations is obtained. This solution allows us to calculate the postsynaptic potential as function of input. Using the approximate solution of realistic neural network model equations the behaviour of postsynaptic potential of realistic neural network as function of time for the different temporal sequences of stimuli is described. The various outputs are obtained for the different temporal sequences of the given stimuli. These properties of the temporal coding can be exploited as a recognition element capable of being selectively tuned to different inputs.

  5. The weight distribution and randomness of linear codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, K.-M.

    1989-01-01

    Finding the weight distributions of block codes is a problem of theoretical and practical interest. Yet the weight distributions of most block codes are still unknown except for a few classes of block codes. Here, by using the inclusion and exclusion principle, an explicit formula is derived which enumerates the complete weight distribution of an (n,k,d) linear code using a partially known weight distribution. This expression is analogous to the Pless power-moment identities - a system of equations relating the weight distribution of a linear code to the weight distribution of its dual code. Also, an approximate formula for the weight distribution of most linear (n,k,d) codes is derived. It is shown that for a given linear (n,k,d) code over GF(q), the ratio of the number of codewords of weight u to the number of words of weight u approaches the constant Q = q(-)(n-k) as u becomes large. A relationship between the randomness of a linear block code and the minimum distance of its dual code is given, and it is shown that most linear block codes with rigid algebraic and combinatorial structure also display certain random properties which make them similar to random codes with no structure at all.

  6. A Network Coding Based Routing Protocol for Underwater Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huayang; Chen, Min; Guan, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Due to the particularities of the underwater environment, some negative factors will seriously interfere with data transmission rates, reliability of data communication, communication range, and network throughput and energy consumption of underwater sensor networks (UWSNs). Thus, full consideration of node energy savings, while maintaining a quick, correct and effective data transmission, extending the network life cycle are essential when routing protocols for underwater sensor networks are studied. In this paper, we have proposed a novel routing algorithm for UWSNs. To increase energy consumption efficiency and extend network lifetime, we propose a time-slot based routing algorithm (TSR).We designed a probability balanced mechanism and applied it to TSR. The theory of network coding is introduced to TSBR to meet the requirement of further reducing node energy consumption and extending network lifetime. Hence, time-slot based balanced network coding (TSBNC) comes into being. We evaluated the proposed time-slot based balancing routing algorithm and compared it with other classical underwater routing protocols. The simulation results show that the proposed protocol can reduce the probability of node conflicts, shorten the process of routing construction, balance energy consumption of each node and effectively prolong the network lifetime. PMID:22666045

  7. Network predicting drug's anatomical therapeutic chemical code.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Cui; Chen, Shi-Long; Deng, Nai-Yang; Wang, Yong

    2013-05-15

    Discovering drug's Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification rules at molecular level is of vital importance to understand a vast majority of drugs action. However, few studies attempt to annotate drug's potential ATC-codes by computational approaches. Here, we introduce drug-target network to computationally predict drug's ATC-codes and propose a novel method named NetPredATC. Starting from the assumption that drugs with similar chemical structures or target proteins share common ATC-codes, our method, NetPredATC, aims to assign drug's potential ATC-codes by integrating chemical structures and target proteins. Specifically, we first construct a gold-standard positive dataset from drugs' ATC-code annotation databases. Then we characterize ATC-code and drug by their similarity profiles and define kernel function to correlate them. Finally, we use a kernel method, support vector machine, to automatically predict drug's ATC-codes. Our method was validated on four drug datasets with various target proteins, including enzymes, ion channels, G-protein couple receptors and nuclear receptors. We found that both drug's chemical structure and target protein are predictive, and target protein information has better accuracy. Further integrating these two data sources revealed more experimentally validated ATC-codes for drugs. We extensively compared our NetPredATC with SuperPred, which is a chemical similarity-only based method. Experimental results showed that our NetPredATC outperforms SuperPred not only in predictive coverage but also in accuracy. In addition, database search and functional annotation analysis support that our novel predictions are worthy of future experimental validation. In conclusion, our new method, NetPredATC, can predict drug's ATC-codes more accurately by incorporating drug-target network and integrating data, which will promote drug mechanism understanding and drug repositioning and discovery. NetPredATC is available at http

  8. Learning and coding in biological neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiete, Ila Rani

    How can large groups of neurons that locally modify their activities learn to collectively perform a desired task? Do studies of learning in small networks tell us anything about learning in the fantastically large collection of neurons that make up a vertebrate brain? What factors do neurons optimize by encoding sensory inputs or motor commands in the way they do? In this thesis I present a collection of four theoretical works: each of the projects was motivated by specific constraints and complexities of biological neural networks, as revealed by experimental studies; together, they aim to partially address some of the central questions of neuroscience posed above. We first study the role of sparse neural activity, as seen in the coding of sequential commands in a premotor area responsible for birdsong. We show that the sparse coding of temporal sequences in the songbird brain can, in a network where the feedforward plastic weights must translate the sparse sequential code into a time-varying muscle code, facilitate learning by minimizing synaptic interference. Next, we propose a biologically plausible synaptic plasticity rule that can perform goal-directed learning in recurrent networks of voltage-based spiking neurons that interact through conductances. Learning is based on the correlation of noisy local activity with a global reward signal; we prove that this rule performs stochastic gradient ascent on the reward. Thus, if the reward signal quantifies network performance on some desired task, the plasticity rule provably drives goal-directed learning in the network. To assess the convergence properties of the learning rule, we compare it with a known example of learning in the brain. Song-learning in finches is a clear example of a learned behavior, with detailed available neurophysiological data. With our learning rule, we train an anatomically accurate model birdsong network that drives a sound source to mimic an actual zebrafinch song. Simulation and

  9. Holographic coherent states from random tensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; Yang, Zhao; You, Yi-Zhuang

    2017-08-01

    Random tensor networks provide useful models that incorporate various important features of holographic duality. A tensor network is usually defined for a fixed graph geometry specified by the connection of tensors. In this paper, we generalize the random tensor network approach to allow quantum superposition of different spatial geometries. We setup a framework in which all possible bulk spatial geometries, characterized by weighted adjacient matrices of all possible graphs, are mapped to the boundary Hilbert space and form an overcomplete basis of the boundary. We name such an overcomplete basis as holographic coherent states. A generic boundary state can be expanded in this basis, which describes the state as a superposition of different spatial geometries in the bulk. We discuss how to define distinct classical geometries and small fluctuations around them. We show that small fluctuations around classical geometries define "code subspaces" which are mapped to the boundary Hilbert space isometrically with quantum error correction properties. In addition, we also show that the overlap between different geometries is suppressed exponentially as a function of the geometrical difference between the two geometries. The geometrical difference is measured in an area law fashion, which is a manifestation of the holographic nature of the states considered.

  10. Organization of growing random networks

    SciTech Connect

    Krapivsky, P. L.; Redner, S.

    2001-06-01

    The organizational development of growing random networks is investigated. These growing networks are built by adding nodes successively, and linking each to an earlier node of degree k with an attachment probability A{sub k}. When A{sub k} grows more slowly than linearly with k, the number of nodes with k links, N{sub k}(t), decays faster than a power law in k, while for A{sub k} growing faster than linearly in k, a single node emerges which connects to nearly all other nodes. When A{sub k} is asymptotically linear, N{sub k}(t){similar_to}tk{sup {minus}{nu}}, with {nu} dependent on details of the attachment probability, but in the range 2{lt}{nu}{lt}{infinity}. The combined age and degree distribution of nodes shows that old nodes typically have a large degree. There is also a significant correlation in the degrees of neighboring nodes, so that nodes of similar degree are more likely to be connected. The size distributions of the in and out components of the network with respect to a given node{emdash}namely, its {open_quotes}descendants{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ancestors{close_quotes}{emdash}are also determined. The in component exhibits a robust s{sup {minus}2} power-law tail, where s is the component size. The out component has a typical size of order lnt, and it provides basic insights into the genealogy of the network.

  11. Ring correlations in random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, Mahdi; Thorpe, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    We examine the correlations between rings in random network glasses in two dimensions as a function of their separation. Initially, we use the topological separation (measured by the number of intervening rings), but this leads to pseudo-long-range correlations due to a lack of topological charge neutrality in the shells surrounding a central ring. This effect is associated with the noncircular nature of the shells. It is, therefore, necessary to use the geometrical distance between ring centers. Hence we find a generalization of the Aboav-Weaire law out to larger distances, with the correlations between rings decaying away when two rings are more than about three rings apart.

  12. Random Sequential Coding by Hamming Distance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    cae of the amino, acid code, 64 words are thArtAY * possible in the triplet codling system by fou species of nucleotides ILe. 4P . The actual number of...and ini-mm disanc k, if kfd < I, thus where p = k/241S = (1/2p(1 - Vr’t4),(p) -p% =- 4p ~ (Wynw (186), Ask (186)). Consider a regular pacing for k as2

  13. Dynamic switching of neural codes in networks with gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Katori, Yuichi; Masuda, Naoki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2006-12-01

    Population rate coding and temporal coding are common neural codes. Recent studies suggest that these two codes may be alternatively used in one neural system. Based on the fact that there are massive gap junctions in the brain, we explore how this switching behavior may be related to neural codes in networks of neurons connected by gap junctions. First, we show that under time-varying inputs, such neural networks show switching between synchronous and asynchronous states. Then, we quantify network dynamics by three mutual information measures to show that population rate coding carries more information in asynchronous states and temporal coding does so in synchronous states.

  14. Binary random systematic erasure code for RAID system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Pengguo; Wang, Xiaojing; Chen, Liang; Yuan, Dezhai

    2017-03-01

    As the increasing expansion of data scale, storage systems grow in size and complexity, the requirements for systems scalability and methodologies to recover simultaneous disk and sector failures are inevitable. To ensure high reliability and flexible scalability, erasure codes with high fault tolerance and flexibility are required. In this pa per, we present a class of erasure codes satisfied the previous requirements, which referred as Binary Random Systematic erasure code, called BRS code for short. BRS code constructs its generator matrix based on random matrix, whose elements are in Galois Field GF (2), and takes the advantage of exclusive-or (XOR) operations to make it work much fast. It is designed as a systematic code to facilitate the store and recovery. Moreover, δ random redundancies make the probability of successfully decoding controllable. Our evaluations and experiments show that BRS code is flexible on parameters and fault tolerance setting, and has high computing efficiency on encoding and decoding speeds, what is more, when the code length is long enough, BRS code is approximately MDS, thus make it have nearly optimal storage efficiency.

  15. Random graph models of social networks

    PubMed Central

    Newman, M. E. J.; Watts, D. J.; Strogatz, S. H.

    2002-01-01

    We describe some new exactly solvable models of the structure of social networks, based on random graphs with arbitrary degree distributions. We give models both for simple unipartite networks, such as acquaintance networks, and bipartite networks, such as affiliation networks. We compare the predictions of our models to data for a number of real-world social networks and find that in some cases, the models are in remarkable agreement with the data, whereas in others the agreement is poorer, perhaps indicating the presence of additional social structure in the network that is not captured by the random graph. PMID:11875211

  16. Clique percolation in random networks.

    PubMed

    Derényi, Imre; Palla, Gergely; Vicsek, Tamás

    2005-04-29

    The notion of k-clique percolation in random graphs is introduced, where k is the size of the complete subgraphs whose large scale organizations are analytically and numerically investigated. For the Erdos-Rényi graph of N vertices we obtain that the percolation transition of k-cliques takes place when the probability of two vertices being connected by an edge reaches the threshold p(c) (k) = [(k - 1)N](-1/(k - 1)). At the transition point the scaling of the giant component with N is highly nontrivial and depends on k. We discuss why clique percolation is a novel and efficient approach to the identification of overlapping communities in large real networks.

  17. Secure quantum network coding for controlled repeater networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Tao; Li, Jiao; Liu, Jian-wei

    2016-07-01

    To realize efficient quantum communication based on quantum repeater, we propose a secure quantum network coding scheme for controlled repeater networks, which adds a controller as a trusted party and is able to control the process of EPR-pair distribution. As the key operations of quantum repeater, local operations and quantum communication are designed to adopt quantum one-time pad to enhance the function of identity authentication instead of local operations and classical communication. Scheme analysis shows that the proposed scheme can defend against active attacks for quantum communication and realize long-distance quantum communication with minimal resource consumption.

  18. Randomizing Genome-Scale Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Areejit; Martin, Olivier C.

    2011-01-01

    Networks coming from protein-protein interactions, transcriptional regulation, signaling, or metabolism may appear to have “unusual” properties. To quantify this, it is appropriate to randomize the network and test the hypothesis that the network is not statistically different from expected in a motivated ensemble. However, when dealing with metabolic networks, the randomization of the network using edge exchange generates fictitious reactions that are biochemically meaningless. Here we provide several natural ensembles of randomized metabolic networks. A first constraint is to use valid biochemical reactions. Further constraints correspond to imposing appropriate functional constraints. We explain how to perform these randomizations with the help of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and show that they allow one to approach the properties of biological metabolic networks. The implication of the present work is that the observed global structural properties of real metabolic networks are likely to be the consequence of simple biochemical and functional constraints. PMID:21779409

  19. Securing optical code-division multiple-access networks with a postswitching coding scheme of signature reconfiguration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jen-Fa; Meng, Sheng-Hui; Lin, Ying-Chen

    2014-11-01

    The optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) technique is considered a good candidate for providing optical layer security. An enhanced OCDMA network security mechanism with a pseudonoise (PN) random digital signals type of maximal-length sequence (M-sequence) code switching to protect against eavesdropping is presented. Signature codes unique to individual OCDMA-network users are reconfigured according to the register state of the controlling electrical shift registers. Examples of signature reconfiguration following state switching of the controlling shift register for both the network user and the eavesdropper are numerically illustrated. Dynamically changing the PN state of the shift register to reconfigure the user signature sequence is shown; this hinders eavesdroppers' efforts to decode correct data sequences. The proposed scheme increases the probability of eavesdroppers committing errors in decoding and thereby substantially enhances the degree of an OCDMA network's confidentiality.

  20. Stability of biological networks as represented in Random Boolean Nets.

    SciTech Connect

    Slepoy, Alexander; Thompson, Marshall

    2004-09-01

    We explore stability of Random Boolean Networks as a model of biological interaction networks. We introduce surface-to-volume ratio as a measure of stability of the network. Surface is defined as the set of states within a basin of attraction that maps outside the basin by a bit-flip operation. Volume is defined as the total number of states in the basin. We report development of an object-oriented Boolean network analysis code (Attract) to investigate the structure of stable vs. unstable networks. We find two distinct types of stable networks. The first type is the nearly trivial stable network with a few basins of attraction. The second type contains many basins. We conclude that second type stable networks are extremely rare.

  1. Universality in complex networks: random matrix analysis.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Jayendra N; Jalan, Sarika

    2007-08-01

    We apply random matrix theory to complex networks. We show that nearest neighbor spacing distribution of the eigenvalues of the adjacency matrices of various model networks, namely scale-free, small-world, and random networks follow universal Gaussian orthogonal ensemble statistics of random matrix theory. Second, we show an analogy between the onset of small-world behavior, quantified by the structural properties of networks, and the transition from Poisson to Gaussian orthogonal ensemble statistics, quantified by Brody parameter characterizing a spectral property. We also present our analysis for a protein-protein interaction network in budding yeast.

  2. Gradient networks on uncorrelated random scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Gui-Jun; Yan, Xiao-Qing; Huang, Zhong-Bing; Ma, Wei-Chuan

    2011-03-01

    Uncorrelated random scale-free (URSF) networks are useful null models for checking the effects of scale-free topology on network-based dynamical processes. Here, we present a comparative study of the jamming level of gradient networks based on URSF networks and Erdős-Rényi (ER) random networks. We find that the URSF networks are less congested than ER random networks for the average degree langkrang>kc (kc ≈ 2 denotes a critical connectivity). In addition, by investigating the topological properties of the two kinds of gradient networks, we discuss the relations between the topological structure and the transport efficiency of the gradient networks. These findings show that the uncorrelated scale-free structure might allow more efficient transport than the random structure.

  3. Statistical properties of random clique networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yi-Min; Meng, Jun; Fan, Jing-Fang; Ye, Fang-Fu; Chen, Xiao-Song

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a random clique network model to mimic the large clustering coefficient and the modular structure that exist in many real complex networks, such as social networks, artificial networks, and protein interaction networks, is introduced by combining the random selection rule of the Erdös and Rényi (ER) model and the concept of cliques. We find that random clique networks having a small average degree differ from the ER network in that they have a large clustering coefficient and a power law clustering spectrum, while networks having a high average degree have similar properties as the ER model. In addition, we find that the relation between the clustering coefficient and the average degree shows a non-monotonic behavior and that the degree distributions can be fit by multiple Poisson curves; we explain the origin of such novel behaviors and degree distributions.

  4. Community structure of non-coding RNA interaction network.

    PubMed

    Nacher, Jose C

    2013-04-02

    Rapid technological advances have shown that the ratio of non-protein coding genes rises to 98.5% in humans, suggesting that current knowledge on genetic information processing might be largely incomplete. It implies that protein-coding sequences only represent a small fraction of cellular transcriptional information. Here, we examine the community structure of the network defined by functional interactions between non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and proteins related bio-macromolecules (PRMs) using a two-fold approach: modularity in bipartite network and k-clique community detection. First, the high modularity scores as well as the distribution of community sizes showing a scaling-law revealed manifestly non-random features. Second, the k-clique sub-graphs and overlaps show that the identified communities of the ncRNA molecules of H. sapiens can potentially be associated with certain functions. These findings highlight the complex modular structure of ncRNA interactions and its possible regulatory roles in the cell.

  5. Random matrix analysis of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Jalan, Sarika; Bandyopadhyay, Jayendra N

    2007-10-01

    We study complex networks under random matrix theory (RMT) framework. Using nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor spacing distributions we analyze the eigenvalues of the adjacency matrix of various model networks, namely, random, scale-free, and small-world networks. These distributions follow the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble statistic of RMT. To probe long-range correlations in the eigenvalues we study spectral rigidity via the Delta_{3} statistic of RMT as well. It follows RMT prediction of linear behavior in semilogarithmic scale with the slope being approximately 1pi;{2} . Random and scale-free networks follow RMT prediction for very large scale. A small-world network follows it for sufficiently large scale, but much less than the random and scale-free networks.

  6. Spiking network simulation code for petascale computers

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Susanne; Schmidt, Maximilian; Eppler, Jochen M.; Plesser, Hans E.; Masumoto, Gen; Igarashi, Jun; Ishii, Shin; Fukai, Tomoki; Morrison, Abigail; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    Brain-scale networks exhibit a breathtaking heterogeneity in the dynamical properties and parameters of their constituents. At cellular resolution, the entities of theory are neurons and synapses and over the past decade researchers have learned to manage the heterogeneity of neurons and synapses with efficient data structures. Already early parallel simulation codes stored synapses in a distributed fashion such that a synapse solely consumes memory on the compute node harboring the target neuron. As petaflop computers with some 100,000 nodes become increasingly available for neuroscience, new challenges arise for neuronal network simulation software: Each neuron contacts on the order of 10,000 other neurons and thus has targets only on a fraction of all compute nodes; furthermore, for any given source neuron, at most a single synapse is typically created on any compute node. From the viewpoint of an individual compute node, the heterogeneity in the synaptic target lists thus collapses along two dimensions: the dimension of the types of synapses and the dimension of the number of synapses of a given type. Here we present a data structure taking advantage of this double collapse using metaprogramming techniques. After introducing the relevant scaling scenario for brain-scale simulations, we quantitatively discuss the performance on two supercomputers. We show that the novel architecture scales to the largest petascale supercomputers available today. PMID:25346682

  7. Spiking network simulation code for petascale computers.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Susanne; Schmidt, Maximilian; Eppler, Jochen M; Plesser, Hans E; Masumoto, Gen; Igarashi, Jun; Ishii, Shin; Fukai, Tomoki; Morrison, Abigail; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    Brain-scale networks exhibit a breathtaking heterogeneity in the dynamical properties and parameters of their constituents. At cellular resolution, the entities of theory are neurons and synapses and over the past decade researchers have learned to manage the heterogeneity of neurons and synapses with efficient data structures. Already early parallel simulation codes stored synapses in a distributed fashion such that a synapse solely consumes memory on the compute node harboring the target neuron. As petaflop computers with some 100,000 nodes become increasingly available for neuroscience, new challenges arise for neuronal network simulation software: Each neuron contacts on the order of 10,000 other neurons and thus has targets only on a fraction of all compute nodes; furthermore, for any given source neuron, at most a single synapse is typically created on any compute node. From the viewpoint of an individual compute node, the heterogeneity in the synaptic target lists thus collapses along two dimensions: the dimension of the types of synapses and the dimension of the number of synapses of a given type. Here we present a data structure taking advantage of this double collapse using metaprogramming techniques. After introducing the relevant scaling scenario for brain-scale simulations, we quantitatively discuss the performance on two supercomputers. We show that the novel architecture scales to the largest petascale supercomputers available today.

  8. Networked Dynamic Systems: Identification, Controllability, and Randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi-Abdolyousefi, Marzieh

    The presented dissertation aims to develop a graph-centric framework for the analysis and synthesis of networked dynamic systems (NDS) consisting of multiple dynamic units that interact via an interconnection topology. We examined three categories of network problems, namely, identification, controllability, and randomness. In network identification, as a subclass of inverse problems, we made an explicit relation between the input-output behavior of an NDS and the underlying interacting network. In network controllability, we provided structural and algebraic insights into features of the network that enable external signal(s) to control the state of the nodes in the network for certain classes of interconnections, namely, path, circulant, and Cartesian networks. We also examined the relation between network controllability and the symmetry structure of the graph. Motivated by the analysis results for the controllability and observability of deterministic networks, a natural question is whether randomness in the network layer or in the layer of inputs and outputs generically leads to favorable system theoretic properties. In this direction, we examined system theoretic properties of random networks including controllability, observability, and performance of optimal feedback controllers and estimators. We explored some of the ramifications of such an analysis framework in opinion dynamics over social networks and sensor networks in estimating the real-time position of a Seaglider from experimental data.

  9. Variable weight spectral amplitude coding for multiservice OCDMA networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyedzadeh, Saleh; Rahimian, Farzad Pour; Glesk, Ivan; Kakaee, Majid H.

    2017-09-01

    The emergence of heterogeneous data traffic such as voice over IP, video streaming and online gaming have demanded networks with capability of supporting quality of service (QoS) at the physical layer with traffic prioritisation. This paper proposes a new variable-weight code based on spectral amplitude coding for optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) networks to support QoS differentiation. The proposed variable-weight multi-service (VW-MS) code relies on basic matrix construction. A mathematical model is developed for performance evaluation of VW-MS OCDMA networks. It is shown that the proposed code provides an optimal code length with minimum cross-correlation value when compared to other codes. Numerical results for a VW-MS OCDMA network designed for triple-play services operating at 0.622 Gb/s, 1.25 Gb/s and 2.5 Gb/s are considered.

  10. Random walk centrality for temporal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Luis E. C.; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-06-01

    Nodes can be ranked according to their relative importance within a network. Ranking algorithms based on random walks are particularly useful because they connect topological and diffusive properties of the network. Previous methods based on random walks, for example the PageRank, have focused on static structures. However, several realistic networks are indeed dynamic, meaning that their structure changes in time. In this paper, we propose a centrality measure for temporal networks based on random walks under periodic boundary conditions that we call TempoRank. It is known that, in static networks, the stationary density of the random walk is proportional to the degree or the strength of a node. In contrast, we find that, in temporal networks, the stationary density is proportional to the in-strength of the so-called effective network, a weighted and directed network explicitly constructed from the original sequence of transition matrices. The stationary density also depends on the sojourn probability q, which regulates the tendency of the walker to stay in the node, and on the temporal resolution of the data. We apply our method to human interaction networks and show that although it is important for a node to be connected to another node with many random walkers (one of the principles of the PageRank) at the right moment, this effect is negligible in practice when the time order of link activation is included.

  11. Random vibrational networks and the renormalization group.

    PubMed

    Hastings, M B

    2003-04-11

    We consider the properties of vibrational dynamics on random networks, with random masses and spring constants. The localization properties of the eigenstates contrast greatly with the Laplacian case on these networks. We introduce several real-space renormalization techniques which can be used to describe this dynamics on general networks, drawing on strong disorder techniques developed for regular lattices. The renormalization group is capable of elucidating the localization properties, and provides, even for specific network instances, a fast approximation technique for determining the spectra which compares well with exact results.

  12. Fast frequency hopping codes applied to SAC optical CDMA network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Shin-Pin

    2015-06-01

    This study designed a fast frequency hopping (FFH) code family suitable for application in spectral-amplitude-coding (SAC) optical code-division multiple-access (CDMA) networks. The FFH code family can effectively suppress the effects of multiuser interference and had its origin in the frequency hopping code family. Additional codes were developed as secure codewords for enhancing the security of the network. In considering the system cost and flexibility, simple optical encoders/decoders using fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) and a set of optical securers using two arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) demultiplexers (DeMUXs) were also constructed. Based on a Gaussian approximation, expressions for evaluating the bit error rate (BER) and spectral efficiency (SE) of SAC optical CDMA networks are presented. The results indicated that the proposed SAC optical CDMA network exhibited favorable performance.

  13. Autoregressive cascades on random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Srikanth K.; Vaze, Rahul; Narasimha, Dheeraj

    2016-04-01

    A network cascade model that captures many real-life correlated node failures in large networks via load redistribution is studied. The considered model is well suited for networks where physical quantities are transmitted, e.g., studying large scale outages in electrical power grids, gridlocks in road networks, and connectivity breakdown in communication networks, etc. For this model, a phase transition is established, i.e., existence of critical thresholds above or below which a small number of node failures lead to a global cascade of network failures or not. Theoretical bounds are obtained for the phase transition on the critical capacity parameter that determines the threshold above and below which cascade appears or disappears, respectively, that are shown to closely follow numerical simulation results.

  14. Navigability of interconnected networks under random failures

    PubMed Central

    De Domenico, Manlio; Solé-Ribalta, Albert; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the navigability of interconnected networks (transporting information, people, or goods) under eventual random failures is of utmost importance to design and protect critical infrastructures. Random walks are a good proxy to determine this navigability, specifically the coverage time of random walks, which is a measure of the dynamical functionality of the network. Here, we introduce the theoretical tools required to describe random walks in interconnected networks accounting for structure and dynamics inherent to real systems. We develop an analytical approach for the covering time of random walks in interconnected networks and compare it with extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Generally speaking, interconnected networks are more resilient to random failures than their individual layers per se, and we are able to quantify this effect. As an application––which we illustrate by considering the public transport of London––we show how the efficiency in exploring the multiplex critically depends on layers’ topology, interconnection strengths, and walk strategy. Our findings are corroborated by data-driven simulations, where the empirical distribution of check-ins and checks-out is considered and passengers travel along fastest paths in a network affected by real disruptions. These findings are fundamental for further development of searching and navigability strategies in real interconnected systems. PMID:24912174

  15. Navigability of interconnected networks under random failures.

    PubMed

    De Domenico, Manlio; Solé-Ribalta, Albert; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2014-06-10

    Assessing the navigability of interconnected networks (transporting information, people, or goods) under eventual random failures is of utmost importance to design and protect critical infrastructures. Random walks are a good proxy to determine this navigability, specifically the coverage time of random walks, which is a measure of the dynamical functionality of the network. Here, we introduce the theoretical tools required to describe random walks in interconnected networks accounting for structure and dynamics inherent to real systems. We develop an analytical approach for the covering time of random walks in interconnected networks and compare it with extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Generally speaking, interconnected networks are more resilient to random failures than their individual layers per se, and we are able to quantify this effect. As an application--which we illustrate by considering the public transport of London--we show how the efficiency in exploring the multiplex critically depends on layers' topology, interconnection strengths, and walk strategy. Our findings are corroborated by data-driven simulations, where the empirical distribution of check-ins and checks-out is considered and passengers travel along fastest paths in a network affected by real disruptions. These findings are fundamental for further development of searching and navigability strategies in real interconnected systems.

  16. Routing in Networks with Random Topologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bambos, Nicholas

    1997-01-01

    We examine the problems of routing and server assignment in networks with random connectivities. In such a network the basic topology is fixed, but during each time slot and for each of tis input queues, each server (node) is either connected to or disconnected from each of its queues with some probability.

  17. Routing in Networks with Random Topologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bambos, Nicholas

    1997-01-01

    We examine the problems of routing and server assignment in networks with random connectivities. In such a network the basic topology is fixed, but during each time slot and for each of tis input queues, each server (node) is either connected to or disconnected from each of its queues with some probability.

  18. Spatial versus sequential correlations for random access coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Armin; Marques, Breno; Pawłowski, Marcin; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Random access codes are important for a wide range of applications in quantum information. However, their implementation with quantum theory can be made in two very different ways: (i) by distributing data with strong spatial correlations violating a Bell inequality or (ii) using quantum communication channels to create stronger-than-classical sequential correlations between state preparation and measurement outcome. Here we study this duality of the quantum realization. We present a family of Bell inequalities tailored to the task at hand and study their quantum violations. Remarkably, we show that the use of spatial and sequential quantum correlations imposes different limitations on the performance of quantum random access codes: Sequential correlations can outperform spatial correlations. We discuss the physics behind the observed discrepancy between spatial and sequential quantum correlations.

  19. Weight distributions for turbo codes using random and nonrandom permutations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolinar, S.; Divsalar, D.

    1995-01-01

    This article takes a preliminary look at the weight distributions achievable for turbo codes using random, nonrandom, and semirandom permutations. Due to the recursiveness of the encoders, it is important to distinguish between self-terminating and non-self-terminating input sequences. The non-self-terminating sequences have little effect on decoder performance, because they accumulate high encoded weight until they are artificially terminated at the end of the block. From probabilistic arguments based on selecting the permutations randomly, it is concluded that the self-terminating weight-2 data sequences are the most important consideration in the design of constituent codes; higher-weight self-terminating sequences have successively decreasing importance. Also, increasing the number of codes and, correspondingly, the number of permutations makes it more and more likely that the bad input sequences will be broken up by one or more of the permuters. It is possible to design nonrandom permutations that ensure that the minimum distance due to weight-2 input sequences grows roughly as the square root of (2N), where N is the block length. However, these nonrandom permutations amplify the bad effects of higher-weight inputs, and as a result they are inferior in performance to randomly selected permutations. But there are 'semirandom' permutations that perform nearly as well as the designed nonrandom permutations with respect to weight-2 input sequences and are not as susceptible to being foiled by higher-weight inputs.

  20. Synchronization in random balanced networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García del Molino, Luis Carlos; Pakdaman, Khashayar; Touboul, Jonathan; Wainrib, Gilles

    2013-10-01

    Characterizing the influence of network properties on the global emerging behavior of interacting elements constitutes a central question in many areas, from physical to social sciences. In this article we study a primary model of disordered neuronal networks with excitatory-inhibitory structure and balance constraints. We show how the interplay between structure and disorder in the connectivity leads to a universal transition from trivial to synchronized stationary or periodic states. This transition cannot be explained only through the analysis of the spectral density of the connectivity matrix. We provide a low-dimensional approximation that shows the role of both the structure and disorder in the dynamics.

  1. Code 672 observational science branch computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, D. W.; Shirk, H. G.

    1988-01-01

    In general, networking increases productivity due to the speed of transmission, easy access to remote computers, ability to share files, and increased availability of peripherals. Two different networks within the Observational Science Branch are described in detail.

  2. Spectral analysis of deformed random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalan, Sarika

    2009-10-01

    We study spectral behavior of sparsely connected random networks under the random matrix framework. Subnetworks without any connection among them form a network having perfect community structure. As connections among the subnetworks are introduced, the spacing distribution shows a transition from the Poisson statistics to the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble statistics of random matrix theory. The eigenvalue density distribution shows a transition to the Wigner’s semicircular behavior for a completely deformed network. The range for which spectral rigidity, measured by the Dyson-Mehta Δ3 statistics, follows the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble statistics depends upon the deformation of the network from the perfect community structure. The spacing distribution is particularly useful to track very slight deformations of the network from a perfect community structure, whereas the density distribution and the Δ3 statistics remain identical to the undeformed network. On the other hand the Δ3 statistics is useful for the larger deformation strengths. Finally, we analyze the spectrum of a protein-protein interaction network for Helicobacter, and compare the spectral behavior with those of the model networks.

  3. Random walks on generalized Koch networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weigang

    2013-10-01

    For deterministically growing networks, it is a theoretical challenge to determine the topological properties and dynamical processes. In this paper, we study random walks on generalized Koch networks with features that include an initial state that is a globally connected network to r nodes. In each step, every existing node produces m complete graphs. We then obtain the analytical expressions for first passage time (FPT), average return time (ART), i.e. the average of FPTs for random walks from node i to return to the starting point i for the first time, and average sending time (AST), defined as the average of FPTs from a hub node to all other nodes, excluding the hub itself with regard to network parameters m and r. For this family of Koch networks, the ART of the new emerging nodes is identical and increases with the parameters m or r. In addition, the AST of our networks grows with network size N as N ln N and also increases with parameter m. The results obtained in this paper are the generalizations of random walks for the original Koch network.

  4. Random Boolean network models and the yeast transcriptional network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, Stuart; Peterson, Carsten; Samuelsson, Björn; Troein, Carl

    2003-12-01

    The recently measured yeast transcriptional network is analyzed in terms of simplified Boolean network models, with the aim of determining feasible rule structures, given the requirement of stable solutions of the generated Boolean networks. We find that for ensembles of generated models, those with canalyzing Boolean rules are remarkably stable, whereas those with random Boolean rules are only marginally stable. Furthermore, substantial parts of the generated networks are frozen, in the sense that they reach the same state regardless of initial state. Thus, our ensemble approach suggests that the yeast network shows highly ordered dynamics.

  5. Handheld laser scanner automatic registration based on random coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lei; Yu, Chun-ping; Wang, Li

    2011-06-01

    Current research on Laser Scanner often focuses mainly on the static measurement. Little use has been made of dynamic measurement, that are appropriate for more problems and situations. In particular, traditional Laser Scanner must Keep stable to scan and measure coordinate transformation parameters between different station. In order to make the scanning measurement intelligently and rapidly, in this paper ,we developed a new registration algorithm for handleheld laser scanner based on the positon of target, which realize the dynamic measurement of handheld laser scanner without any more complex work. the double camera on laser scanner can take photograph of the artificial target points to get the three-dimensional coordinates, this points is designed by random coding. And then, a set of matched points is found from control points to realize the orientation of scanner by the least-square common points transformation. After that the double camera can directly measure the laser point cloud in the surface of object and get the point cloud data in an unified coordinate system. There are three major contributions in the paper. Firstly, a laser scanner based on binocular vision is designed with double camera and one laser head. By those, the real-time orientation of laser scanner is realized and the efficiency is improved. Secondly, the coding marker is introduced to solve the data matching, a random coding method is proposed. Compared with other coding methods,the marker with this method is simple to match and can avoid the shading for the object. Finally, a recognition method of coding maker is proposed, with the use of the distance recognition, it is more efficient. The method present here can be used widely in any measurement from small to huge obiect, such as vehicle, airplane which strengthen its intelligence and efficiency. The results of experiments and theory analzing demonstrate that proposed method could realize the dynamic measurement of handheld laser

  6. Optimal Grouping and Matching for Network-Coded Cooperative Communications

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S; Shi, Y; Hou, Y T; Kompella, S; Midkiff, S F

    2011-11-01

    Network-coded cooperative communications (NC-CC) is a new advance in wireless networking that exploits network coding (NC) to improve the performance of cooperative communications (CC). However, there remains very limited understanding of this new hybrid technology, particularly at the link layer and above. This paper fills in this gap by studying a network optimization problem that requires joint optimization of session grouping, relay node grouping, and matching of session/relay groups. After showing that this problem is NP-hard, we present a polynomial time heuristic algorithm to this problem. Using simulation results, we show that our algorithm is highly competitive and can produce near-optimal results.

  7. Scaling properties of multilayer random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-Bermúdez, J. A.; de Arruda, Guilherme Ferraz; Rodrigues, Francisco A.; Moreno, Yamir

    2017-07-01

    Multilayer networks are widespread in natural and manmade systems. Key properties of these networks are their spectral and eigenfunction characteristics, as they determine the critical properties of many dynamics occurring on top of them. Here, we numerically demonstrate that the normalized localization length β of the eigenfunctions of multilayer random networks follows a simple scaling law given by β =x*/(1 +x*) , with x*=γ (beff2/L ) δ , δ ˜1 , and beff being the effective bandwidth of the adjacency matrix of the network, whose size is L . The scaling law for β , that we validate on real-world networks, might help to better understand criticality in multilayer networks and to predict the eigenfunction localization properties of them.

  8. Optimal Near-Hitless Network Failure Recovery Using Diversity Coding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avci, Serhat Nazim

    2013-01-01

    Link failures in wide area networks are common and cause significant data losses. Mesh-based protection schemes offer high capacity efficiency but they are slow, require complex signaling, and instable. Diversity coding is a proactive coding-based recovery technique which offers near-hitless (sub-ms) restoration with a competitive spare capacity…

  9. Optimal Near-Hitless Network Failure Recovery Using Diversity Coding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avci, Serhat Nazim

    2013-01-01

    Link failures in wide area networks are common and cause significant data losses. Mesh-based protection schemes offer high capacity efficiency but they are slow, require complex signaling, and instable. Diversity coding is a proactive coding-based recovery technique which offers near-hitless (sub-ms) restoration with a competitive spare capacity…

  10. Recurrent networks with soft-thresholding nonlinearities for lightweight coding.

    PubMed

    Kafashan, MohammadMehdi; Ching, ShiNung

    2017-10-01

    A long-standing and influential hypothesis in neural information processing is that early sensory networks adapt themselves to produce efficient codes of afferent inputs. Here, we show how a nonlinear recurrent network provides an optimal solution for the efficient coding of an afferent input and its history. We specifically consider the problem of producing lightweight codes, ones that minimize both ℓ1 and ℓ2 constraints on sparsity and energy, respectively. When embedded in a linear coding paradigm, this problem results in a non-smooth convex optimization problem. We employ a proximal gradient descent technique to develop the solution, showing that the optimal code is realized through a recurrent network endowed with a nonlinear soft thresholding operator. The training of the network connection weights is readily achieved through gradient-based local learning. If such learning is assumed to occur on a slower time-scale than the (faster) recurrent dynamics, then the network as a whole converges to an optimal set of codes and weights via what is, in effect, an alternative minimization procedure. Our results show how the addition of thresholding nonlinearities to a recurrent network may enable the production of lightweight, history-sensitive encoding schemes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Range sidelobe reduction for the random binary phase codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hong; Liu, Guosui; Sun, Guangmin; Li, Xi; Su, Weimin

    1997-06-01

    Based on the statistics theory and the pulse compression technique, a statistical method of reducing the range sidelobe (RSL) of the random binary phase codes (RBPC) is presented, which is different from those of decreasing the RSL of the pseudorandom binary phase codes. The theoretical analysis and computer simulation show that it is possible to suppress the peak RSL to lower than -30 dB, which can effectively guarantee the RBPC radar with good electronic counter-countermeasures feature applicable. Additionally, owing to the Doppler of the target, the maximum loss of the ratio of the mainlobe and sidelobe (MSR) is also discussed. In the meantime, the approach to realization of the RSL reduction with digital signal processors is given.

  12. Random walk centrality in interconnected multilayer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solé-Ribalta, Albert; De Domenico, Manlio; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2016-06-01

    Real-world complex systems exhibit multiple levels of relationships. In many cases they require to be modeled as interconnected multilayer networks, characterizing interactions of several types simultaneously. It is of crucial importance in many fields, from economics to biology and from urban planning to social sciences, to identify the most (or the less) influent nodes in a network using centrality measures. However, defining the centrality of actors in interconnected complex networks is not trivial. In this paper, we rely on the tensorial formalism recently proposed to characterize and investigate this kind of complex topologies, and extend two well known random walk centrality measures, the random walk betweenness and closeness centrality, to interconnected multilayer networks. For each of the measures we provide analytical expressions that completely agree with numerically results.

  13. Random interactions in higher order neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldi, Pierre; Venkatesh, Santosh S.

    1993-01-01

    Recurrent networks of polynomial threshold elements with random symmetric interactions are studied. Precise asymptotic estimates are derived for the expected number of fixed points as a function of the margin of stability. In particular, it is shown that there is a critical range of margins of stability (depending on the degree of polynomial interaction) such that the expected number of fixed points with margins below the critical range grows exponentially with the number of nodes in the network, while the expected number of fixed points with margins above the critical range decreases exponentially with the number of nodes in the network. The random energy model is also briefly examined and links with higher order neural networks and higher order spin glass models made explicit.

  14. Exploring the randomness of directed acyclic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goñi, Joaquín; Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Solé, Ricard V.; Rodríguez-Caso, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    The feed-forward relationship naturally observed in time-dependent processes and in a diverse number of real systems—such as some food webs and electronic and neural wiring—can be described in terms of the so-called directed acyclic graphs (DAGs). An important ingredient of the analysis of such networks is a proper comparison of their observed architecture against an ensemble of randomized graphs, thereby quantifying the randomness of the real systems with respect to suitable null models. This approximation is particularly relevant when the finite size and/or large connectivity of real systems make inadequate a comparison with the predictions obtained from the so-called configuration model. In this paper we analyze two methods of DAG randomization as defined by the desired combination of two topological invariants (directed degree sequence and component distributions) aimed to be preserved. A highly ordered DAG, called snake graph, and an Erdös-Rényi DAG were used to validate the performance of the algorithms. Finally, three real case studies, namely, the C. elegans cell lineage network, a Ph.D. student-supervisor network, and the Milgram’s citation network, were analyzed using each randomization method. Results show how the interpretation of degree-degree relations in DAGs with respect to their randomized ensembles depends on the topological invariants imposed.

  15. Quantum Random Access Codes Using Single d -Level Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Armin; Hameedi, Alley; Marques, Breno; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2015-05-01

    Random access codes (RACs) are used by a party to, with limited communication, access an arbitrary subset of information held by another party. Quantum resources are known to enable RACs that break classical limitations. Here, we study quantum and classical RACs with high-level communication. We derive average performances of classical RACs and present families of high-level quantum RACs. Our results show that high-level quantum systems can significantly increase the advantage of quantum RACs over their classical counterparts. We demonstrate our findings in an experimental realization of a quantum RAC with four-level communication.

  16. Executable Code Recognition in Network Flows Using Instruction Transition Probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ikkyun; Kang, Koohong; Choi, Yangseo; Kim, Daewon; Oh, Jintae; Jang, Jongsoo; Han, Kijun

    The ability to recognize quickly inside network flows to be executable is prerequisite for malware detection. For this purpose, we introduce an instruction transition probability matrix (ITPX) which is comprised of the IA-32 instruction sets and reveals the characteristics of executable code's instruction transition patterns. And then, we propose a simple algorithm to detect executable code inside network flows using a reference ITPX which is learned from the known Windows Portable Executable files. We have tested the algorithm with more than thousands of executable and non-executable codes. The results show that it is very promising enough to use in real world.

  17. Distributed Estimation, Coding, and Scheduling in Wireless Visual Sensor Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Chao

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, we consider estimation, coding, and sensor scheduling for energy efficient operation of wireless visual sensor networks (VSN), which consist of battery-powered wireless sensors with sensing (imaging), computation, and communication capabilities. The competing requirements for applications of these wireless sensor networks (WSN)…

  18. Distributed Estimation, Coding, and Scheduling in Wireless Visual Sensor Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Chao

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, we consider estimation, coding, and sensor scheduling for energy efficient operation of wireless visual sensor networks (VSN), which consist of battery-powered wireless sensors with sensing (imaging), computation, and communication capabilities. The competing requirements for applications of these wireless sensor networks (WSN)…

  19. Weighted networks as randomly reinforced urn processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldarelli, Guido; Chessa, Alessandro; Crimaldi, Irene; Pammolli, Fabio

    2013-02-01

    We analyze weighted networks as randomly reinforced urn processes, in which the edge-total weights are determined by a reinforcement mechanism. We develop a statistical test and a procedure based on it to study the evolution of networks over time, detecting the “dominance” of some edges with respect to the others and then assessing if a given instance of the network is taken at its steady state or not. Distance from the steady state can be considered as a measure of the relevance of the observed properties of the network. Our results are quite general, in the sense that they are not based on a particular probability distribution or functional form of the random weights. Moreover, the proposed tool can be applied also to dense networks, which have received little attention by the network community so far, since they are often problematic. We apply our procedure in the context of the International Trade Network, determining a core of “dominant edges.”

  20. On the Dynamics of Random Neuronal Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Philippe; Touboul, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    We study the mean-field limit and stationary distributions of a pulse-coupled network modeling the dynamics of a large neuronal assemblies. Our model takes into account explicitly the intrinsic randomness of firing times, contrasting with the classical integrate-and-fire model. The ergodicity properties of the Markov process associated to finite networks are investigated. We derive the large network size limit of the distribution of the state of a neuron, and characterize their invariant distributions as well as their stability properties. We show that the system undergoes transitions as a function of the averaged connectivity parameter, and can support trivial states (where the network activity dies out, which is also the unique stationary state of finite networks in some cases) and self-sustained activity when connectivity level is sufficiently large, both being possibly stable.

  1. Energy-Efficient Channel Coding Strategy for Underwater Acoustic Networks.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Grasielli; Simão, Daniel H; Pellenz, Marcelo E; Souza, Richard D; Jamhour, Edgard; Penna, Manoel C; Brante, Glauber; Chang, Bruno S

    2017-03-31

    Underwater acoustic networks (UAN) allow for efficiently exploiting and monitoring the sub-aquatic environment. These networks are characterized by long propagation delays, error-prone channels and half-duplex communication. In this paper, we address the problem of energy-efficient communication through the use of optimized channel coding parameters. We consider a two-layer encoding scheme employing forward error correction (FEC) codes and fountain codes (FC) for UAN scenarios without feedback channels. We model and evaluate the energy consumption of different channel coding schemes for a K-distributed multipath channel. The parameters of the FEC encoding layer are optimized by selecting the optimal error correction capability and the code block size. The results show the best parameter choice as a function of the link distance and received signal-to-noise ratio.

  2. Ground-state coding in partially connected neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baram, Yoram

    1989-01-01

    Patterns over (-1,0,1) define, by their outer products, partially connected neural networks, consisting of internally strongly connected, externally weakly connected subnetworks. The connectivity patterns may have highly organized structures, such as lattices and fractal trees or nests. Subpatterns over (-1,1) define the subcodes stored in the subnetwork, that agree in their common bits. It is first shown that the code words are locally stable stares of the network, provided that each of the subcodes consists of mutually orthogonal words or of, at most, two words. Then it is shown that if each of the subcodes consists of two orthogonal words, the code words are the unique ground states (absolute minima) of the Hamiltonian associated with the network. The regions of attraction associated with the code words are shown to grow with the number of subnetworks sharing each of the neurons. Depending on the particular network architecture, the code sizes of partially connected networks can be vastly greater than those of fully connected ones and their error correction capabilities can be significantly greater than those of the disconnected subnetworks. The codes associated with lattice-structured and hierarchical networks are discussed in some detail.

  3. A random interacting network model for complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Bedartha; Shekatkar, Snehal M.; Rheinwalt, Aljoscha; Ambika, G.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    We propose a RAndom Interacting Network (RAIN) model to study the interactions between a pair of complex networks. The model involves two major steps: (i) the selection of a pair of nodes, one from each network, based on intra-network node-based characteristics, and (ii) the placement of a link between selected nodes based on the similarity of their relative importance in their respective networks. Node selection is based on a selection fitness function and node linkage is based on a linkage probability defined on the linkage scores of nodes. The model allows us to relate within-network characteristics to between-network structure. We apply the model to the interaction between the USA and Schengen airline transportation networks (ATNs). Our results indicate that two mechanisms: degree-based preferential node selection and degree-assortative link placement are necessary to replicate the observed inter-network degree distributions as well as the observed inter-network assortativity. The RAIN model offers the possibility to test multiple hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying network interactions. It can also incorporate complex interaction topologies. Furthermore, the framework of the RAIN model is general and can be potentially adapted to various real-world complex systems. PMID:26657032

  4. Optimal bounds for parity-oblivious random access codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chailloux, André; Kerenidis, Iordanis; Kundu, Srijita; Sikora, Jamie

    2016-04-01

    Random access coding is an information task that has been extensively studied and found many applications in quantum information. In this scenario, Alice receives an n-bit string x, and wishes to encode x into a quantum state {ρ }x, such that Bob, when receiving the state {ρ }x, can choose any bit i\\in [n] and recover the input bit x i with high probability. Here we study two variants: parity-oblivious random access codes (RACs), where we impose the cryptographic property that Bob cannot infer any information about the parity of any subset of bits of the input apart from the single bits x i ; and even-parity-oblivious RACs, where Bob cannot infer any information about the parity of any even-size subset of bits of the input. In this paper, we provide the optimal bounds for parity-oblivious quantum RACs and show that they are asymptotically better than the optimal classical ones. Our results provide a large non-contextuality inequality violation and resolve the main open problem in a work of Spekkens et al (2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 010401). Second, we provide the optimal bounds for even-parity-oblivious RACs by proving their equivalence to a non-local game and by providing tight bounds for the success probability of the non-local game via semidefinite programming. In the case of even-parity-oblivious RACs, the cryptographic property holds also in the device independent model.

  5. Semi-device-independent randomness expansion with partially free random sources using 3 →1 quantum random access code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu-Qian; Gao, Fei; Li, Dan-Dan; Li, Xin-Hui; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2016-09-01

    We have proved that new randomness can be certified by partially free sources using 2 →1 quantum random access code (QRAC) in the framework of semi-device-independent (SDI) protocols [Y.-Q. Zhou, H.-W. Li, Y.-K. Wang, D.-D. Li, F. Gao, and Q.-Y. Wen, Phys. Rev. A 92, 022331 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.92.022331]. To improve the effectiveness of the randomness generation, here we propose the SDI randomness expansion using 3 →1 QRAC and obtain the corresponding classical and quantum bounds of the two-dimensional quantum witness. Moreover, we get the condition which should be satisfied by the partially free sources to successfully certify new randomness, and the analytic relationship between the certified randomness and the two-dimensional quantum witness violation.

  6. Simulation of Code Spectrum and Code Flow of Cultured Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shinichi; Nishitani, Yoshi; Hosokawa, Chie; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Sawai, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that, in cultured neuronal networks on a multielectrode, pseudorandom-like sequences (codes) are detected, and they flow with some spatial decay constant. Each cultured neuronal network is characterized by a specific spectrum curve. That is, we may consider the spectrum curve as a "signature" of its associated neuronal network that is dependent on the characteristics of neurons and network configuration, including the weight distribution. In the present study, we used an integrate-and-fire model of neurons with intrinsic and instantaneous fluctuations of characteristics for performing a simulation of a code spectrum from multielectrodes on a 2D mesh neural network. We showed that it is possible to estimate the characteristics of neurons such as the distribution of number of neurons around each electrode and their refractory periods. Although this process is a reverse problem and theoretically the solutions are not sufficiently guaranteed, the parameters seem to be consistent with those of neurons. That is, the proposed neural network model may adequately reflect the behavior of a cultured neuronal network. Furthermore, such prospect is discussed that code analysis will provide a base of communication within a neural network that will also create a base of natural intelligence.

  7. Coded Cooperation for Multiway Relaying in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Si, Zhongwei; Ma, Junyang; Thobaben, Ragnar

    2015-06-29

    Wireless sensor networks have been considered as an enabling technology for constructing smart cities. One important feature of wireless sensor networks is that the sensor nodes collaborate in some manner for communications. In this manuscript, we focus on the model of multiway relaying with full data exchange where each user wants to transmit and receive data to and from all other users in the network. We derive the capacity region for this specific model and propose a coding strategy through coset encoding. To obtain good performance with practical codes, we choose spatially-coupled LDPC (SC-LDPC) codes for the coded cooperation. In particular, for the message broadcasting from the relay, we construct multi-edge-type (MET) SC-LDPC codes by repeatedly applying coset encoding. Due to the capacity-achieving property of the SC-LDPC codes, we prove that the capacity region can theoretically be achieved by the proposed MET SC-LDPC codes. Numerical results with finite node degrees are provided, which show that the achievable rates approach the boundary of the capacity region in both binary erasure channels and additive white Gaussian channels.

  8. Network meta-analysis of disconnected networks: How dangerous are random baseline treatment effects?

    PubMed

    Béliveau, Audrey; Goring, Sarah; Platt, Robert W; Gustafson, Paul

    2017-07-24

    In network meta-analysis, the use of fixed baseline treatment effects (a priori independent) in a contrast-based approach is regularly preferred to the use of random baseline treatment effects (a priori dependent). That is because, often, there is not a need to model baseline treatment effects, which carry the risk of model misspecification. However, in disconnected networks, fixed baseline treatment effects do not work (unless extra assumptions are made), as there is not enough information in the data to update the prior distribution on the contrasts between disconnected treatments. In this paper, we investigate to what extent the use of random baseline treatment effects is dangerous in disconnected networks. We take 2 publicly available datasets of connected networks and disconnect them in multiple ways. We then compare the results of treatment comparisons obtained from a Bayesian contrast-based analysis of each disconnected network using random normally distributed and exchangeable baseline treatment effects to those obtained from a Bayesian contrast-based analysis of their initial connected network using fixed baseline treatment effects. For the 2 datasets considered, we found that the use of random baseline treatment effects in disconnected networks was appropriate. Because those datasets were not cherry-picked, there should be other disconnected networks that would benefit from being analyzed using random baseline treatment effects. However, there is also a risk for the normality and exchangeability assumption to be inappropriate in other datasets even though we have not observed this situation in our case study. We provide code, so other datasets can be investigated. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Unraveling spurious properties of interaction networks with tailored random networks.

    PubMed

    Bialonski, Stephan; Wendler, Martin; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We investigate interaction networks that we derive from multivariate time series with methods frequently employed in diverse scientific fields such as biology, quantitative finance, physics, earth and climate sciences, and the neurosciences. Mimicking experimental situations, we generate time series with finite length and varying frequency content but from independent stochastic processes. Using the correlation coefficient and the maximum cross-correlation, we estimate interdependencies between these time series. With clustering coefficient and average shortest path length, we observe unweighted interaction networks, derived via thresholding the values of interdependence, to possess non-trivial topologies as compared to Erdös-Rényi networks, which would indicate small-world characteristics. These topologies reflect the mostly unavoidable finiteness of the data, which limits the reliability of typically used estimators of signal interdependence. We propose random networks that are tailored to the way interaction networks are derived from empirical data. Through an exemplary investigation of multichannel electroencephalographic recordings of epileptic seizures--known for their complex spatial and temporal dynamics--we show that such random networks help to distinguish network properties of interdependence structures related to seizure dynamics from those spuriously induced by the applied methods of analysis.

  10. Unraveling Spurious Properties of Interaction Networks with Tailored Random Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bialonski, Stephan; Wendler, Martin; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We investigate interaction networks that we derive from multivariate time series with methods frequently employed in diverse scientific fields such as biology, quantitative finance, physics, earth and climate sciences, and the neurosciences. Mimicking experimental situations, we generate time series with finite length and varying frequency content but from independent stochastic processes. Using the correlation coefficient and the maximum cross-correlation, we estimate interdependencies between these time series. With clustering coefficient and average shortest path length, we observe unweighted interaction networks, derived via thresholding the values of interdependence, to possess non-trivial topologies as compared to Erdös-Rényi networks, which would indicate small-world characteristics. These topologies reflect the mostly unavoidable finiteness of the data, which limits the reliability of typically used estimators of signal interdependence. We propose random networks that are tailored to the way interaction networks are derived from empirical data. Through an exemplary investigation of multichannel electroencephalographic recordings of epileptic seizures – known for their complex spatial and temporal dynamics – we show that such random networks help to distinguish network properties of interdependence structures related to seizure dynamics from those spuriously induced by the applied methods of analysis. PMID:21850239

  11. Compositional properties of random Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrova, Elena; Teslenko, Maxim

    2005-05-01

    Random Boolean networks (RBNs) are used in a number of applications, including cell differentiation, immune response, evolution, gene regulatory networks, and neural networks. This paper addresses the problem of computing attractors in RBNs. An RBN with n vertices has up to 2n states. Therefore, for large n , computing attractors by full enumeration of states is not feasible. The state space can be reduced by removing irrelevant vertices, which have no influence on the network’s dynamics. In this paper, we show that attractors of an RBN can be computed compositionally from the attractors of the independent components of the subgraph induced by the relevant vertices of the network. The presented approach reduces the complexity of the problem from O(2n) to O(2l) , where l is the number of relevant vertices in the largest component.

  12. Continuous-variable quantum network coding for coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Tao; Li, Ke; Liu, Jian-wei

    2017-04-01

    As far as the spectral characteristic of quantum information is concerned, the existing quantum network coding schemes can be looked on as the discrete-variable quantum network coding schemes. Considering the practical advantage of continuous variables, in this paper, we explore two feasible continuous-variable quantum network coding (CVQNC) schemes. Basic operations and CVQNC schemes are both provided. The first scheme is based on Gaussian cloning and ADD/SUB operators and can transmit two coherent states across with a fidelity of 1/2, while the second scheme utilizes continuous-variable quantum teleportation and can transmit two coherent states perfectly. By encoding classical information on quantum states, quantum network coding schemes can be utilized to transmit classical information. Scheme analysis shows that compared with the discrete-variable paradigms, the proposed CVQNC schemes provide better network throughput from the viewpoint of classical information transmission. By modulating the amplitude and phase quadratures of coherent states with classical characters, the first scheme and the second scheme can transmit 4{log _2}N and 2{log _2}N bits of information by a single network use, respectively.

  13. Incorporation of Condensation Heat Transfer in a Flow Network Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, Miranda; Majumdar, Alok; McConnaughey, Paul K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the condensation of water vapor in a short tube. A numerical model of condensation heat transfer was incorporated in a flow network code. The flow network code that we have used in this paper is Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). GFSSP is a finite volume based flow network code. Four different condensation models were presented in the paper. Soliman's correlation has been found to be the most stable in low flow rates which is of particular interest in this application. Another highlight of this investigation is conjugate or coupled heat transfer between solid or fluid. This work was done in support of NASA's International Space Station program.

  14. Accessibility and delay in random temporal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajbakhsh, Shahriar Etemadi; Coon, Justin P.; Simmons, David E.

    2017-09-01

    In a wide range of complex networks, the links between the nodes are temporal and may sporadically appear and disappear. This temporality is fundamental to analyzing the formation of paths within such networks. Moreover, the presence of the links between the nodes is a random process induced by nature in many real-world networks. In this paper, we study random temporal networks at a microscopic level and formulate the probability of accessibility from a node i to a node j after a certain number of discrete time units T . While solving the original problem is computationally intractable, we provide an upper and two lower bounds on this probability for a very general case with arbitrary time-varying probabilities of the links' existence. Moreover, for a special case where the links have identical probabilities across the network at each time slot, we obtain the exact probability of accessibility between any two nodes. Finally, we discuss scenarios where the information regarding the presence and absence of links is initially available in the form of time duration (of presence or absence intervals) continuous probability distributions rather than discrete probabilities over time slots. We provide a method for transforming such distributions to discrete probabilities, which enables us to apply the given bounds in this paper to a broader range of problem settings.

  15. Scalable networks for discrete quantum random walks

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, S.; Osaki, H.; Buluta, I.M.; Hasegawa, S.

    2005-09-15

    Recently, quantum random walks (QRWs) have been thoroughly studied in order to develop new quantum algorithms. In this paper we propose scalable quantum networks for discrete QRWs on circles, lines, and also in higher dimensions. In our method the information about the position of the walker is stored in a quantum register and the network consists of only one-qubit rotation and (controlled){sup n}-NOT gates, therefore it is purely computational and independent of the physical implementation. As an example, we describe the experimental realization in an ion-trap system.

  16. Randomness and preserved patterns in cancer network

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Aparna; Menon, A. Vipin; Jalan, Sarika

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer has been reported to account for the maximum cases among all female cancers till date. In order to gain a deeper insight into the complexities of the disease, we analyze the breast cancer network and its normal counterpart at the proteomic level. While the short range correlations in the eigenvalues exhibiting universality provide an evidence towards the importance of random connections in the underlying networks, the long range correlations along with the localization properties reveal insightful structural patterns involving functionally important proteins. The analysis provides a benchmark for designing drugs which can target a subgraph instead of individual proteins. PMID:25220184

  17. Applying a rateless code in content delivery networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suherman; Zarlis, Muhammad; Parulian Sitorus, Sahat; Al-Akaidi, Marwan

    2017-09-01

    Content delivery network (CDN) allows internet providers to locate their services, to map their coverage into networks without necessarily to own them. CDN is part of the current internet infrastructures, supporting multi server applications especially social media. Various works have been proposed to improve CDN performances. Since accesses on social media servers tend to be short but frequent, providing redundant to the transmitted packets to ensure lost packets not degrade the information integrity may improve service performances. This paper examines the implementation of rateless code in the CDN infrastructure. The NS-2 evaluations show that rateless code is able to reduce packet loss up to 50%.

  18. Resolving social dilemmas on evolving random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2009-05-01

    We show that strategy-independent adaptations of random interaction networks can induce powerful mechanisms, ranging from the Red Queen to group selection, which promote cooperation in evolutionary social dilemmas. These two mechanisms emerge spontaneously as dynamical processes due to deletions and additions of links, which are performed whenever players adopt new strategies and after a certain number of game iterations, respectively. The potency of cooperation promotion, as well as the mechanism responsible for it, can thereby be tuned via a single parameter determining the frequency of link additions. We thus demonstrate that coevolving random networks may evoke an appropriate mechanism for each social dilemma, such that cooperation prevails even in highly unfavorable conditions.

  19. Distributed joint source-channel coding in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuqi; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Lin

    2009-01-01

    Considering the fact that sensors are energy-limited and the wireless channel conditions in wireless sensor networks, there is an urgent need for a low-complexity coding method with high compression ratio and noise-resisted features. This paper reviews the progress made in distributed joint source-channel coding which can address this issue. The main existing deployments, from the theory to practice, of distributed joint source-channel coding over the independent channels, the multiple access channels and the broadcast channels are introduced, respectively. To this end, we also present a practical scheme for compressing multiple correlated sources over the independent channels. The simulation results demonstrate the desired efficiency.

  20. Code generation: a strategy for neural network simulators.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Dan F M

    2010-10-01

    We demonstrate a technique for the design of neural network simulation software, runtime code generation. This technique can be used to give the user complete flexibility in specifying the mathematical model for their simulation in a high level way, along with the speed of code written in a low level language such as C+ +. It can also be used to write code only once but target different hardware platforms, including inexpensive high performance graphics processing units (GPUs). Code generation can be naturally combined with computer algebra systems to provide further simplification and optimisation of the generated code. The technique is quite general and could be applied to any simulation package. We demonstrate it with the 'Brian' simulator ( http://www.briansimulator.org ).

  1. Quantum games on evolving random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawela, Łukasz

    2016-09-01

    We study the advantages of quantum strategies in evolutionary social dilemmas on evolving random networks. We focus our study on the two-player games: prisoner's dilemma, snowdrift and stag-hunt games. The obtained result show the benefits of quantum strategies for the prisoner's dilemma game. For the other two games, we obtain regions of parameters where the quantum strategies dominate, as well as regions where the classical strategies coexist.

  2. Superdense coding facilitated by hyper-entanglement and quantum networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James F.

    2017-05-01

    A method of generating superdense coding based on quantum hyper-entanglement and facilitated by quantum networks is discussed. Superdense coding refers to the coding of more than one classical bit into each qubit. Quantum hyperentanglement refers to quantum entanglement in more than one degree of freedom, e.g. polarization, energy-time, and orbital angular momentum (OAM). The new superdense coding scheme permits 2L bits to be encoded into each qubit where L is the number of degrees of freedom used for quantum hyper-entanglement. The superdense coding procedure is based on a generalization of the Bell state for L degrees of freedom. Theory describing the structure, generation/transmission, and detection of the generalized Bell state is developed. Circuit models are provided describing the generation/transmission process and detection process. Detection processes are represented mathematically as projection operators. A mathematical proof that that the detection scheme permits the generalized Bell states to be distinguished with 100% probability is provided. Measures of effectiveness (MOEs) are derived for the superdense coding scheme based on open systems theory represented in terms of density operators. Noise and loss related to generation/transmission, detection and propagation are included. The MOEs include various probabilities, quantum Chernoff bound, a measure of the number of message photons that must be transmitted to successfully send and receive a message, SNR and the quantum Cramer Rao' lower bound. Quantum networks with quantum memory are used to increase the efficiency of the superdense coding scheme.

  3. Topics in networks: Community detection, random graphs, and network epidemiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karrer, Brian C.

    In this dissertation, we present research on several topics in networks including community detection, random graphs, and network epidemiology. Traditional stochastic blockmodels may produce inaccurate fits to complex networks with heterogeneous degree distributions and we devise a degree-corrected block-model that alleviates this problematic behavior. The resulting objective function for community detection using the degree-corrected version outperforms the traditional model at finding communities on a variety of real-world and synthetic tests. Then we study a different generative model that associates communities to the edges of the network and naturally includes overlapping vertex communities. We create a fast and accurate algorithm to fit this model to empirical networks and show that it can be used to quickly find non-overlapping communities as well. We also develop random graph models for directed acyclic graphs, a class of networks including family trees and citation networks. We argue that the lack of cycles comes from an ordering constraint and then generalize the configuration model to incorporate this constraint. We calculate many properties of these models and demonstrate that sonic of the model predictions agree quite well with real-world networks, emphasizing the importance of vertex ordering to generating directed acyclic networks with realistic properties. Finally, we examine the spread of disease over networks, starting with a simple model of two diseases spreading with cross-immunity, where infection by one disease makes an individual immune to the other disease and vice versa. Utilizing a timescale separation argument, we map the system to consecutive bond percolation, one disease spreading after the other. The resulting phase diagram includes discontinuous and continuous phase transitions and a coexistence region where both diseases can spread to a substantial fraction of the population. Then we analyze a flexible susceptible

  4. Symmetry in critical random Boolean network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hossein, Shabnam; Reichl, Matthew D; Bassler, Kevin E

    2014-04-01

    Using Boolean networks as prototypical examples, the role of symmetry in the dynamics of heterogeneous complex systems is explored. We show that symmetry of the dynamics, especially in critical states, is a controlling feature that can be used both to greatly simplify analysis and to characterize different types of dynamics. Symmetry in Boolean networks is found by determining the frequency at which the various Boolean output functions occur. There are classes of functions that consist of Boolean functions that behave similarly. These classes are orbits of the controlling symmetry group. We find that the symmetry that controls the critical random Boolean networks is expressed through the frequency by which output functions are utilized by nodes that remain active on dynamical attractors. This symmetry preserves canalization, a form of network robustness. We compare it to a different symmetry known to control the dynamics of an evolutionary process that allows Boolean networks to organize into a critical state. Our results demonstrate the usefulness and power of using the symmetry of the behavior of the nodes to characterize complex network dynamics, and introduce an alternative approach to the analysis of heterogeneous complex systems.

  5. Symmetry in Critical Random Boolean Networks Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassler, Kevin E.; Hossein, Shabnam

    2014-03-01

    Using Boolean networks as prototypical examples, the role of symmetry in the dynamics of heterogeneous complex systems is explored. We show that symmetry of the dynamics, especially in critical states, is a controlling feature that can be used to both greatly simplify analysis and to characterize different types of dynamics. Symmetry in Boolean networks is found by determining the frequency at which the various Boolean output functions occur. Classes of functions occur at the same frequency. These classes are orbits of the controlling symmetry group. We find the nature of the symmetry that controls the dynamics of critical random Boolean networks by determining the frequency of output functions utilized by nodes that remain active on dynamical attractors. This symmetry preserves canalization, a form of network robustness. We compare it to a different symmetry known to control the dynamics of an evolutionary process that allows Boolean networks to organize into a critical state. Our results demonstrate the usefulness and power of using symmetry to characterize complex network dynamics, and introduce a novel approach to the analysis of heterogeneous complex systems. This work was supported by the NSF through grants DMR-0908286 and DMR-1206839, and by the AFSOR and DARPA through grant FA9550-12-1-0405.

  6. Symmetry in critical random Boolean network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossein, Shabnam; Reichl, Matthew D.; Bassler, Kevin E.

    2014-04-01

    Using Boolean networks as prototypical examples, the role of symmetry in the dynamics of heterogeneous complex systems is explored. We show that symmetry of the dynamics, especially in critical states, is a controlling feature that can be used both to greatly simplify analysis and to characterize different types of dynamics. Symmetry in Boolean networks is found by determining the frequency at which the various Boolean output functions occur. There are classes of functions that consist of Boolean functions that behave similarly. These classes are orbits of the controlling symmetry group. We find that the symmetry that controls the critical random Boolean networks is expressed through the frequency by which output functions are utilized by nodes that remain active on dynamical attractors. This symmetry preserves canalization, a form of network robustness. We compare it to a different symmetry known to control the dynamics of an evolutionary process that allows Boolean networks to organize into a critical state. Our results demonstrate the usefulness and power of using the symmetry of the behavior of the nodes to characterize complex network dynamics, and introduce an alternative approach to the analysis of heterogeneous complex systems.

  7. Driven synchronization in random networks of oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindes, Jason; Myers, Christopher R.

    2015-07-01

    Synchronization is a universal phenomenon found in many non-equilibrium systems. Much recent interest in this area has overlapped with the study of complex networks, where a major focus is determining how a system's connectivity patterns affect the types of behavior that it can produce. Thus far, modeling efforts have focused on the tendency of networks of oscillators to mutually synchronize themselves, with less emphasis on the effects of external driving. In this work, we discuss the interplay between mutual and driven synchronization in networks of phase oscillators of the Kuramoto type, and explore how the structure and emergence of such states depend on the underlying network topology for simple random networks with a given degree distribution. We find a variety of interesting dynamical behaviors, including bifurcations and bistability patterns that are qualitatively different for heterogeneous and homogeneous networks, and which are separated by a Takens-Bogdanov-Cusp singularity in the parameter region where the coupling strength between oscillators is weak. Our analysis is connected to the underlying dynamics of oscillator clusters for important states and transitions.

  8. Epidemic spreading in random rectangular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Meloni, Sandro; Sheerin, Matthew; Moreno, Yamir

    2016-11-01

    The use of network theory to model disease propagation on populations introduces important elements of reality to the classical epidemiological models. The use of random geometric graphs (RGGs) is one of such network models that allows for the consideration of spatial properties on disease propagation. In certain real-world scenarios—like in the analysis of a disease propagating through plants—the shape of the plots and fields where the host of the disease is located may play a fundamental role in the propagation dynamics. Here we consider a generalization of the RGG to account for the variation of the shape of the plots or fields where the hosts of a disease are allocated. We consider a disease propagation taking place on the nodes of a random rectangular graph and we consider a lower bound for the epidemic threshold of a susceptible-infected-susceptible model or a susceptible-infected-recovered model on these networks. Using extensive numerical simulations and based on our analytical results we conclude that (ceteris paribus) the elongation of the plot or field in which the nodes are distributed makes the network more resilient to the propagation of a disease due to the fact that the epidemic threshold increases with the elongation of the rectangle. These results agree with accumulated empirical evidence and simulation results about the propagation of diseases on plants in plots or fields of the same area and different shapes.

  9. Physical-layer network coding in coherent optical OFDM systems.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xun; Chan, Chun-Kit

    2015-04-20

    We present the first experimental demonstration and characterization of the application of optical physical-layer network coding in coherent optical OFDM systems. It combines two optical OFDM frames to share the same link so as to enhance system throughput, while individual OFDM frames can be recovered with digital signal processing at the destined node.

  10. A Remote Code Update Mechanism for Wireless Sensor Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-11-01

    A Remote Code Update Mechanism for Wireless Sensor Networks Thanos Stathopoulos † John Heidemann ‡ Deborah Estrin † CENS Technical Report # 30 Center...Ganesan, L. Girod, B. Greenstein, T. Schoellhammer, T. Stathopoulos , and D. Es- trin. EmStar: An Environment for Developing Wire- less Embedded

  11. Random walks in directed modular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comin, Cesar H.; Viana, Mateus P.; Antiqueira, Lucas; Costa, Luciano da F.

    2014-12-01

    Because diffusion typically involves symmetric interactions, scant attention has been focused on studying asymmetric cases. However, important networked systems underlain by diffusion (e.g. cortical networks and WWW) are inherently directed. In the case of undirected diffusion, it can be shown that the steady-state probability of the random walk dynamics is fully correlated with the degree, which no longer holds for directed networks. We investigate the relationship between such probability and the inward node degree, which we call efficiency, in modular networks. Our findings show that the efficiency of a given community depends mostly on the balance between its ingoing and outgoing connections. In addition, we derive analytical expressions to show that the internal degree of the nodes does not play a crucial role in their efficiency, when considering the Erdős-Rényi and Barabási-Albert models. The results are illustrated with respect to the macaque cortical network, providing subsidies for improving transportation and communication systems.

  12. Anomalous Anticipatory Responses in Networked Random Data

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Roger D.; Bancel, Peter A.

    2006-10-16

    We examine an 8-year archive of synchronized, parallel time series of random data from a world spanning network of physical random event generators (REGs). The archive is a publicly accessible matrix of normally distributed 200-bit sums recorded at 1 Hz which extends from August 1998 to the present. The primary question is whether these data show non-random structure associated with major events such as natural or man-made disasters, terrible accidents, or grand celebrations. Secondarily, we examine the time course of apparently correlated responses. Statistical analyses of the data reveal consistent evidence that events which strongly affect people engender small but significant effects. These include suggestions of anticipatory responses in some cases, leading to a series of specialized analyses to assess possible non-random structure preceding precisely timed events. A focused examination of data collected around the time of earthquakes with Richter magnitude 6 and greater reveals non-random structure with a number of intriguing, potentially important features. Anomalous effects in the REG data are seen only when the corresponding earthquakes occur in populated areas. No structure is found if they occur in the oceans. We infer that an important contributor to the effect is the relevance of the earthquake to humans. Epoch averaging reveals evidence for changes in the data some hours prior to the main temblor, suggestive of reverse causation.

  13. Improving residents' code status discussion skills: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Szmuilowicz, Eytan; Neely, Kathy J; Sharma, Rashmi K; Cohen, Elaine R; McGaghie, William C; Wayne, Diane B

    2012-07-01

    Inpatient Code Status Discussions (CSDs) are commonly facilitated by resident physicians, despite inadequate training. We studied the efficacy of a CSD communication skills training intervention for internal medicine residents. This was a prospective, randomized controlled trial of a multimodality communication skills educational intervention for postgraduate year (PGY) 1 residents. Intervention group residents completed a 2 hour teaching session with deliberate practice of communication skills, online modules, self-reflection, and a booster training session in addition to assigned clinical rotations. Control group residents completed clinical rotations alone. CSD skills of residents in both groups were assessed 2 months after the intervention using an 18 item behavioral checklist during a standardized patient encounter. Average scores for intervention and control group residents were calculated and between-group differences on the CSD skills assessment were evaluated using two-tailed independent sample t tests. Intervention group residents displayed higher overall scores on the simulated CSD (75.1% versus 53.2%, p<0.0001) than control group residents. The intervention group also displayed a greater number of key CSD communication behaviors and facilitated significantly longer conversations. The training, evaluation, and feedback sessions were rated highly. A focused, multimodality curriculum can improve resident performance of simulated CSDs. Skill improvement lasted for at least 2 months after the intervention. Further studies are needed to assess skill retention and to set minimum performance standards.

  14. Coding and non-coding gene regulatory networks underlie the immune response in liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueming; Huang, Yongming; Yang, Zhengpeng; Zhang, Yuguo; Zhang, Weihui; Gao, Zu-hua; Xue, Dongbo

    2017-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is recognized as being the consequence of immune-mediated hepatocyte damage and repair processes. However, the regulation of these immune responses underlying liver cirrhosis has not been elucidated. In this study, we used GEO datasets and bioinformatics methods to established coding and non-coding gene regulatory networks including transcription factor-/lncRNA-microRNA-mRNA, and competing endogenous RNA interaction networks. Our results identified 2224 mRNAs, 70 lncRNAs and 46 microRNAs were differentially expressed in liver cirrhosis. The transcription factor -/lncRNA- microRNA-mRNA network we uncovered that results in immune-mediated liver cirrhosis is comprised of 5 core microRNAs (e.g., miR-203; miR-219-5p), 3 transcription factors (i.e., FOXP3, ETS1 and FOS) and 7 lncRNAs (e.g., ENTS00000671336, ENST00000575137). The competing endogenous RNA interaction network we identified includes a complex immune response regulatory subnetwork that controls the entire liver cirrhosis network. Additionally, we found 10 overlapping GO terms shared by both liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma including “immune response” as well. Interestingly, the overlapping differentially expressed genes in liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma were enriched in immune response-related functional terms. In summary, a complex gene regulatory network underlying immune response processes may play an important role in the development and progression of liver cirrhosis, and its development into hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:28355233

  15. Network coding on heterogeneous multi-core processors for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deokho; Park, Karam; Ro, Won W

    2011-01-01

    While network coding is well known for its efficiency and usefulness in wireless sensor networks, the excessive costs associated with decoding computation and complexity still hinder its adoption into practical use. On the other hand, high-performance microprocessors with heterogeneous multi-cores would be used as processing nodes of the wireless sensor networks in the near future. To this end, this paper introduces an efficient network coding algorithm developed for the heterogenous multi-core processors. The proposed idea is fully tested on one of the currently available heterogeneous multi-core processors referred to as the Cell Broadband Engine.

  16. Network Coding on Heterogeneous Multi-Core Processors for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deokho; Park, Karam; Ro, Won W.

    2011-01-01

    While network coding is well known for its efficiency and usefulness in wireless sensor networks, the excessive costs associated with decoding computation and complexity still hinder its adoption into practical use. On the other hand, high-performance microprocessors with heterogeneous multi-cores would be used as processing nodes of the wireless sensor networks in the near future. To this end, this paper introduces an efficient network coding algorithm developed for the heterogenous multi-core processors. The proposed idea is fully tested on one of the currently available heterogeneous multi-core processors referred to as the Cell Broadband Engine. PMID:22164053

  17. Marginalization in Random Nonlinear Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudeva Raju, Rajkumar; Pitkow, Xaq

    2015-03-01

    Computations involved in tasks like causal reasoning in the brain require a type of probabilistic inference known as marginalization. Marginalization corresponds to averaging over irrelevant variables to obtain the probability of the variables of interest. This is a fundamental operation that arises whenever input stimuli depend on several variables, but only some are task-relevant. Animals often exhibit behavior consistent with marginalizing over some variables, but the neural substrate of this computation is unknown. It has been previously shown (Beck et al. 2011) that marginalization can be performed optimally by a deterministic nonlinear network that implements a quadratic interaction of neural activity with divisive normalization. We show that a simpler network can perform essentially the same computation. These Random Nonlinear Networks (RNN) are feedforward networks with one hidden layer, sigmoidal activation functions, and normally-distributed weights connecting the input and hidden layers. We train the output weights connecting the hidden units to an output population, such that the output model accurately represents a desired marginal probability distribution without significant information loss compared to optimal marginalization. Simulations for the case of linear coordinate transformations show that the RNN model has good marginalization performance, except for highly uncertain inputs that have low amplitude population responses. Behavioral experiments, based on these results, could then be used to identify if this model does indeed explain how the brain performs marginalization.

  18. Optical code division multiplexed fiber Bragg grating sensing networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triana, Cristian; Varón, Margarita; Pastor, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    We present the application of Optical Code Division Multiplexing (OCDM) techniques in order to enhance the spectral operation and detection capability of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors networks even under overlapping conditions. In this paper, Optical Orthogonal Codes (OOC) are used to design FBG sensors composed of more than one reflection band. Simulation of the interaction between the encoded Gaussian-shaped sensors is presented. Signal decoding is performed in the electrical domain without requiring additional optical components by means of the autocorrelation product between the reflected spectrum and each sensor-codeword. Results illustrate the accuracy and distinction capability of the method.

  19. Opportunistic quantum network coding based on quantum teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Tao; Du, Gang; Liu, Jian-wei

    2016-04-01

    It seems impossible to endow opportunistic characteristic to quantum network on the basis that quantum channel cannot be overheard without disturbance. In this paper, we propose an opportunistic quantum network coding scheme by taking full advantage of channel characteristic of quantum teleportation. Concretely, it utilizes quantum channel for secure transmission of quantum states and can detect eavesdroppers by means of quantum channel verification. What is more, it utilizes classical channel for both opportunistic listening to neighbor states and opportunistic coding by broadcasting measurement outcome. Analysis results show that our scheme can reduce the times of transmissions over classical channels for relay nodes and can effectively defend against classical passive attack and quantum active attack.

  20. Distributed Joint Source-Channel Coding in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuqi; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Lin

    2009-01-01

    Considering the fact that sensors are energy-limited and the wireless channel conditions in wireless sensor networks, there is an urgent need for a low-complexity coding method with high compression ratio and noise-resisted features. This paper reviews the progress made in distributed joint source-channel coding which can address this issue. The main existing deployments, from the theory to practice, of distributed joint source-channel coding over the independent channels, the multiple access channels and the broadcast channels are introduced, respectively. To this end, we also present a practical scheme for compressing multiple correlated sources over the independent channels. The simulation results demonstrate the desired efficiency. PMID:22408560

  1. Random walk with priorities in communicationlike networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastas, Nikolaos; Maragakis, Michalis; Argyrakis, Panos; ben-Avraham, Daniel; Havlin, Shlomo; Carmi, Shai

    2013-08-01

    We study a model for a random walk of two classes of particles (A and B). Where both species are present in the same site, the motion of A's takes precedence over that of B's. The model was originally proposed and analyzed in Maragakis [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.77.020103 77, 020103(R) (2008)]; here we provide additional results. We solve analytically the diffusion coefficients of the two species in lattices for a number of protocols. In networks, we find that the probability of a B particle to be free decreases exponentially with the node degree. In scale-free networks, this leads to localization of the B's at the hubs and arrest of their motion. To remedy this, we investigate several strategies to avoid trapping of the B's, including moving an A instead of the hindered B, allowing a trapped B to hop with a small probability, biased walk toward non-hub nodes, and limiting the capacity of nodes. We obtain analytic results for lattices and networks, and we discuss the advantages and shortcomings of the possible strategies.

  2. A chemical reaction network solver for the astrophysics code NIRVANA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, U.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Chemistry often plays an important role in astrophysical gases. It regulates thermal properties by changing species abundances and via ionization processes. This way, time-dependent cooling mechanisms and other chemistry-related energy sources can have a profound influence on the dynamical evolution of an astrophysical system. Modeling those effects with the underlying chemical kinetics in realistic magneto-gasdynamical simulations provide the basis for a better link to observations. Aims: The present work describes the implementation of a chemical reaction network solver into the magneto-gasdynamical code NIRVANA. For this purpose a multispecies structure is installed, and a new module for evolving the rate equations of chemical kinetics is developed and coupled to the dynamical part of the code. A small chemical network for a hydrogen-helium plasma was constructed including associated thermal processes which is used in test problems. Methods: Evolving a chemical network within time-dependent simulations requires the additional solution of a set of coupled advection-reaction equations for species and gas temperature. Second-order Strang-splitting is used to separate the advection part from the reaction part. The ordinary differential equation (ODE) system representing the reaction part is solved with a fourth-order generalized Runge-Kutta method applicable for stiff systems inherent to astrochemistry. Results: A series of tests was performed in order to check the correctness of numerical and technical implementation. Tests include well-known stiff ODE problems from the mathematical literature in order to confirm accuracy properties of the solver used as well as problems combining gasdynamics and chemistry. Overall, very satisfactory results are achieved. Conclusions: The NIRVANA code is now ready to handle astrochemical processes in time-dependent simulations. An easy-to-use interface allows implementation of complex networks including thermal processes

  3. QOS-aware error recovery in wireless body sensor networks using adaptive network coding.

    PubMed

    Razzaque, Mohammad Abdur; Javadi, Saeideh S; Coulibaly, Yahaya; Hira, Muta Tah

    2014-12-29

    Wireless body sensor networks (WBSNs) for healthcare and medical applications are real-time and life-critical infrastructures, which require a strict guarantee of quality of service (QoS), in terms of latency, error rate and reliability. Considering the criticality of healthcare and medical applications, WBSNs need to fulfill users/applications and the corresponding network's QoS requirements. For instance, for a real-time application to support on-time data delivery, a WBSN needs to guarantee a constrained delay at the network level. A network coding-based error recovery mechanism is an emerging mechanism that can be used in these systems to support QoS at very low energy, memory and hardware cost. However, in dynamic network environments and user requirements, the original non-adaptive version of network coding fails to support some of the network and user QoS requirements. This work explores the QoS requirements of WBSNs in both perspectives of QoS. Based on these requirements, this paper proposes an adaptive network coding-based, QoS-aware error recovery mechanism for WBSNs. It utilizes network-level and user-/application-level information to make it adaptive in both contexts. Thus, it provides improved QoS support adaptively in terms of reliability, energy efficiency and delay. Simulation results show the potential of the proposed mechanism in terms of adaptability, reliability, real-time data delivery and network lifetime compared to its counterparts.

  4. QoS-Aware Error Recovery in Wireless Body Sensor Networks Using Adaptive Network Coding

    PubMed Central

    Razzaque, Mohammad Abdur; Javadi, Saeideh S.; Coulibaly, Yahaya; Hira, Muta Tah

    2015-01-01

    Wireless body sensor networks (WBSNs) for healthcare and medical applications are real-time and life-critical infrastructures, which require a strict guarantee of quality of service (QoS), in terms of latency, error rate and reliability. Considering the criticality of healthcare and medical applications, WBSNs need to fulfill users/applications and the corresponding network's QoS requirements. For instance, for a real-time application to support on-time data delivery, a WBSN needs to guarantee a constrained delay at the network level. A network coding-based error recovery mechanism is an emerging mechanism that can be used in these systems to support QoS at very low energy, memory and hardware cost. However, in dynamic network environments and user requirements, the original non-adaptive version of network coding fails to support some of the network and user QoS requirements. This work explores the QoS requirements of WBSNs in both perspectives of QoS. Based on these requirements, this paper proposes an adaptive network coding-based, QoS-aware error recovery mechanism for WBSNs. It utilizes network-level and user-/application-level information to make it adaptive in both contexts. Thus, it provides improved QoS support adaptively in terms of reliability, energy efficiency and delay. Simulation results show the potential of the proposed mechanism in terms of adaptability, reliability, real-time data delivery and network lifetime compared to its counterparts. PMID:25551485

  5. Biased random walks on Kleinberg's spatial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Gui-Jun; Niu, Rui-Wu

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the problem of the particle or message that travels as a biased random walk toward a target node in Kleinberg's spatial network which is built from a d-dimensional (d = 2) regular lattice improved by adding long-range shortcuts with probability P(rij) ∼rij-α, where rij is the lattice distance between sites i and j, and α is a variable exponent. Bias is represented as a probability p of the packet to travel at every hop toward the node which has the smallest Manhattan distance to the target node. We study the mean first passage time (MFPT) for different exponent α and the scaling of the MFPT with the size of the network L. We find that there exists a threshold probability pth ≈ 0.5, for p ≥pth the optimal transportation condition is obtained with an optimal transport exponent αop = d, while for 0 < p pth, and increases with L less than a power law and get close to logarithmical law for 0 < p network with a highly efficient structure for navigation although nodes hold null local information with a relatively large probability, which gives a powerful evidence for the reason why many real networks' navigability have small world property.

  6. A Network-Coding Based Event Diffusion Protocol for Wireless Mesh Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraldi, Roberto; Alnuweiri, Hussein

    Publish/subscribe is a well know and powerful distributed programming paradigm with many potential applications. In this paper we consider the central problem of any pub/sub implementation, namely the problem of event dissemination, in the case of a Wireless Mesh Network. We propose a protocol based on non-trivial forwarding mechanisms that employ network coding as a central tool for supporting adaptive event dissemination while exploiting the broadcast nature of wireless transmissions. Our results show that network coding provides significant improvements to event diffusion compared to standard blind dissemination solutions, namely flooding and gossiping.

  7. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Retrieval dynamics of neural networks for sparsely coded sequential patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitano, Katsunori; Aoyagi, Toshio

    1998-09-01

    It is well known that a sparsely coded network in which the activity level is extremely low has intriguing equilibrium properties. In this work, we study the dynamical properties of a neural network designed to store sparsely coded sequential patterns rather than static ones. Applying the theory of statistical neurodynamics, we derive the dynamical equations governing the retrieval process which are described by some macroscopic order parameters such as the overlap. It is found that our theory provides good predictions for the storage capacity and the basin of attraction obtained through numerical simulations. The results indicate that the nature of the basin of attraction depends on the methods of activity control employed. Furthermore, it is found that robustness against random synaptic dilution slightly deteriorates with the degree of sparseness.

  8. Optimal control of coupled PDE networks with automated code generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, D.

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a framework for the optimal control of coupled PDE networks. A coupled PDE network is a system of partial differential equations coupled together. Such systems can be represented as a directed graph. A domain specific language (DSL)—an extension of the DOT language—is used for the description of such a coupled PDE network. The adjoint equations and the gradient, required for its optimal control, are computed with the help of a computer algebra system (CAS). Automated code generation techniques have been used for the generation of the PDE systems of both the direct and the adjoint equations. Both the direct and adjoint equations are solved with the standard finite element method. Finally, for the numerical optimization of the system standard optimization techniques are used such as BFGS and Newton conjugate gradient.

  9. Content-Based Multi-Channel Network Coding Algorithm in the Millimeter-Wave Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kai; Wang, Di; Hu, Long

    2016-01-01

    With the development of wireless technology, the widespread use of 5G is already an irreversible trend, and millimeter-wave sensor networks are becoming more and more common. However, due to the high degree of complexity and bandwidth bottlenecks, the millimeter-wave sensor network still faces numerous problems. In this paper, we propose a novel content-based multi-channel network coding algorithm, which uses the functions of data fusion, multi-channel and network coding to improve the data transmission; the algorithm is referred to as content-based multi-channel network coding (CMNC). The CMNC algorithm provides a fusion-driven model based on the Dempster-Shafer (D-S) evidence theory to classify the sensor nodes into different classes according to the data content. By using the result of the classification, the CMNC algorithm also provides the channel assignment strategy and uses network coding to further improve the quality of data transmission in the millimeter-wave sensor network. Extensive simulations are carried out and compared to other methods. Our simulation results show that the proposed CMNC algorithm can effectively improve the quality of data transmission and has better performance than the compared methods. PMID:27376302

  10. Content-Based Multi-Channel Network Coding Algorithm in the Millimeter-Wave Sensor Network.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai; Wang, Di; Hu, Long

    2016-07-01

    With the development of wireless technology, the widespread use of 5G is already an irreversible trend, and millimeter-wave sensor networks are becoming more and more common. However, due to the high degree of complexity and bandwidth bottlenecks, the millimeter-wave sensor network still faces numerous problems. In this paper, we propose a novel content-based multi-channel network coding algorithm, which uses the functions of data fusion, multi-channel and network coding to improve the data transmission; the algorithm is referred to as content-based multi-channel network coding (CMNC). The CMNC algorithm provides a fusion-driven model based on the Dempster-Shafer (D-S) evidence theory to classify the sensor nodes into different classes according to the data content. By using the result of the classification, the CMNC algorithm also provides the channel assignment strategy and uses network coding to further improve the quality of data transmission in the millimeter-wave sensor network. Extensive simulations are carried out and compared to other methods. Our simulation results show that the proposed CMNC algorithm can effectively improve the quality of data transmission and has better performance than the compared methods.

  11. Energy and criticality in random Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrecut, M.; Kauffman, S. A.

    2008-06-01

    The central issue of the research on the Random Boolean Networks (RBNs) model is the characterization of the critical transition between ordered and chaotic phases. Here, we discuss an approach based on the ‘energy’ associated with the unsatisfiability of the Boolean functions in the RBNs model, which provides an upper bound estimation for the energy used in computation. We show that in the ordered phase the RBNs are in a ‘dissipative’ regime, performing mostly ‘downhill’ moves on the ‘energy’ landscape. Also, we show that in the disordered phase the RBNs have to ‘hillclimb’ on the ‘energy’ landscape in order to perform computation. The analytical results, obtained using Derrida's approximation method, are in complete agreement with numerical simulations.

  12. High-quality continuous random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkema, G. T.; Mousseau, Normand

    2000-08-01

    The continuous random network (CRN) model is an idealized model for perfectly coordinated amorphous semiconductors. The quality of a CRN can be assessed in terms of topological and configurational properties, including coordination, bond-angle distributions, and deformation energy. Using a variation on the sillium approach proposed 14 years ago by Wooten, Winer, and Weaire, we present 1000-atom and 4096-atom configurations with a degree of strain significantly less than the best CRN available at the moment and comparable to experimental results. The low strain is also reflected in the electronic properties. The electronic density of state obtained from ab initio calculation shows a perfect band gap, without any defect, in agreement with experimental data.

  13. Random symmetry breaking and freezing in chaotic networks.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Y; Kinzel, W; Kanter, I

    2012-09-01

    Parameter space of a driven damped oscillator in a double well potential presents either a chaotic trajectory with sign oscillating amplitude or a nonchaotic trajectory with a fixed sign amplitude. A network of such delay coupled damped oscillators is shown to present chaotic dynamics while the sign amplitude of each damped oscillator is randomly frozen. This phenomenon of random broken global symmetry of the network simultaneous with random freezing of each degree of freedom is accompanied by the existence of exponentially many randomly frozen chaotic attractors with the size of the network. Results are exemplified by a network of modified Duffing oscillators with infinite range pseudoinverse delayed interactions.

  14. Network Coded Cooperative Communication in a Real-Time Wireless Hospital Sensor Network.

    PubMed

    Prakash, R; Balaji Ganesh, A; Sivabalan, Somu

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents a network coded cooperative communication (NC-CC) enabled wireless hospital sensor network architecture for monitoring health as well as postural activities of a patient. A wearable device, referred as a smartband is interfaced with pulse rate, body temperature sensors and an accelerometer along with wireless protocol services, such as Bluetooth and Radio-Frequency transceiver and Wi-Fi. The energy efficiency of wearable device is improved by embedding a linear acceleration based transmission duty cycling algorithm (NC-DRDC). The real-time demonstration is carried-out in a hospital environment to evaluate the performance characteristics, such as power spectral density, energy consumption, signal to noise ratio, packet delivery ratio and transmission offset. The resource sharing and energy efficiency features of network coding technique are improved by proposing an algorithm referred as network coding based dynamic retransmit/rebroadcast decision control (LA-TDC). From the experimental results, it is observed that the proposed LA-TDC algorithm reduces network traffic and end-to-end delay by an average of 27.8% and 21.6%, respectively than traditional network coded wireless transmission. The wireless architecture is deployed in a hospital environment and results are then successfully validated.

  15. Dynamic quality of service differentiation using fixed code weight in optical CDMA networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakaee, Majid H.; Essa, Shawnim I.; Abd, Thanaa H.; Seyedzadeh, Saleh

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of network-driven applications, such as internet, video conferencing, and online gaming, brings in the need for a network the environments with capability of providing diverse Quality of Services (QoS). In this paper, a new code family of novel spreading sequences, called a Multi-Service (MS) code, has been constructed to support multiple services in Optical- Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) system. The proposed method uses fixed weight for all services, however reducing the interfering codewords for the users requiring higher QoS. The performance of the proposed code is demonstrated using mathematical analysis. It shown that the total number of served users with satisfactory BER of 10-9 using NB=2 is 82, while they are only 36 and 10 when NB=3 and 4 respectively. The developed MS code is compared with variable-weight codes such as Variable Weight-Khazani Syed (VW-KS) and Multi-Weight-Random Diagonal (MW-RD). Different numbers of basic users (NB) are used to support triple-play services (audio, data and video) with different QoS requirements. Furthermore, reference to the BER of 10-12, 10-9, and 10-3 for video, data and audio, respectively, the system can support up to 45 total users. Hence, results show that the technique can clearly provide a relative QoS differentiation with lower value of basic users can support larger number of subscribers as well as better performance in terms of acceptable BER of 10-9 at fixed code weight.

  16. Mean first return time for random walks on weighted networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xing-Li; Ling, Xiang; Long, Jiancheng; Shi, Qing; Hu, Mao-Bin

    2015-11-01

    Random walks on complex networks are of great importance to understand various types of phenomena in real world. In this paper, two types of biased random walks on nonassortative weighted networks are studied: edge-weight-based random walks and node-strength-based random walks, both of which are extended from the normal random walk model. Exact expressions for stationary distribution and mean first return time (MFRT) are derived and examined by simulation. The results will be helpful for understanding the influences of weights on the behavior of random walks.

  17. Perturbation propagation in random and evolved Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fretter, Christoph; Szejka, Agnes; Drossel, Barbara

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the propagation of perturbations in Boolean networks by evaluating the Derrida plot and its modifications. We show that even small random Boolean networks agree well with the predictions of the annealed approximation, but nonrandom networks show a very different behaviour. We focus on networks that were evolved for high dynamical robustness. The most important conclusion is that the simple distinction between frozen, critical and chaotic networks is no longer useful, since such evolved networks can display the properties of all three types of networks. Furthermore, we evaluate a simplified empirical network and show how its specific state space properties are reflected in the modified Derrida plots.

  18. Transition to Chaos in Random Neuronal Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadmon, Jonathan; Sompolinsky, Haim

    2015-10-01

    Firing patterns in the central nervous system often exhibit strong temporal irregularity and considerable heterogeneity in time-averaged response properties. Previous studies suggested that these properties are the outcome of the intrinsic chaotic dynamics of the neural circuits. Indeed, simplified rate-based neuronal networks with synaptic connections drawn from Gaussian distribution and sigmoidal nonlinearity are known to exhibit chaotic dynamics when the synaptic gain (i.e., connection variance) is sufficiently large. In the limit of an infinitely large network, there is a sharp transition from a fixed point to chaos, as the synaptic gain reaches a critical value. Near the onset, chaotic fluctuations are slow, analogous to the ubiquitous, slow irregular fluctuations observed in the firing rates of many cortical circuits. However, the existence of a transition from a fixed point to chaos in neuronal circuit models with more realistic architectures and firing dynamics has not been established. In this work, we investigate rate-based dynamics of neuronal circuits composed of several subpopulations with randomly diluted connections. Nonzero connections are either positive for excitatory neurons or negative for inhibitory ones, while single neuron output is strictly positive with output rates rising as a power law above threshold, in line with known constraints in many biological systems. Using dynamic mean field theory, we find the phase diagram depicting the regimes of stable fixed-point, unstable-dynamic, and chaotic-rate fluctuations. We focus on the latter and characterize the properties of systems near this transition. We show that dilute excitatory-inhibitory architectures exhibit the same onset to chaos as the single population with Gaussian connectivity. In these architectures, the large mean excitatory and inhibitory inputs dynamically balance each other, amplifying the effect of the residual fluctuations. Importantly, the existence of a transition to chaos

  19. Holographic duality from random tensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Patrick; Nezami, Sepehr; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Thomas, Nathaniel; Walter, Michael; Yang, Zhao

    2016-11-01

    Tensor networks provide a natural framework for exploring holographic duality because they obey entanglement area laws. They have been used to construct explicit toy models realizing many of the interesting structural features of the AdS/CFT correspondence, including the non-uniqueness of bulk operator reconstruction in the boundary theory. In this article, we explore the holographic properties of networks of random tensors. We find that our models naturally incorporate many features that are analogous to those of the AdS/CFT correspondence. When the bond dimension of the tensors is large, we show that the entanglement entropy of all boundary regions, whether connected or not, obey the Ryu-Takayanagi entropy formula, a fact closely related to known properties of the multipartite entanglement of assistance. We also discuss the behavior of Rényi entropies in our models and contrast it with AdS/CFT. Moreover, we find that each boundary region faithfully encodes the physics of the entire bulk entanglement wedge, i.e., the bulk region enclosed by the boundary region and the minimal surface. Our method is to interpret the average over random tensors as the partition function of a classical ferromagnetic Ising model, so that the minimal surfaces of Ryu-Takayanagi appear as domain walls. Upon including the analog of a bulk field, we find that our model reproduces the expected corrections to the Ryu-Takayanagi formula: the bulk minimal surface is displaced and the entropy is augmented by the entanglement of the bulk field. Increasing the entanglement of the bulk field ultimately changes the minimal surface behavior topologically, in a way similar to the effect of creating a black hole. Extrapolating bulk correlation functions to the boundary permits the calculation of the scaling dimensions of boundary operators, which exhibit a large gap between a small number of low-dimension operators and the rest. While we are primarily motivated by the AdS/CFT duality, the main

  20. DYNAVAC: a transient-vacuum-network analysis code

    SciTech Connect

    Deis, G.A.

    1980-07-08

    This report discusses the structure and use of the program DYNAVAC, a new transient-vacuum-network analysis code implemented on the NMFECC CDC-7600 computer. DYNAVAC solves for the transient pressures in a network of up to twenty lumped volumes, interconnected in any configuration by specified conductances. Each volume can have an internal gas source, a pumping speed, and any initial pressure. The gas-source rates can vary with time in any piecewise-linear manner, and up to twenty different time variations can be included in a single problem. In addition, the pumping speed in each volume can vary with the total gas pumped in the volume, thus simulating the saturation of surface pumping. This report is intended to be both a general description and a user's manual for DYNAVAC.

  1. Cross over of recurrence networks to random graphs and random geometric graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Rinku; Harikrishnan, K. P.; Misra, R.; Ambika, G.

    2017-02-01

    Recurrence networks are complex networks constructed from the time series of chaotic dynamical systems where the connection between two nodes is limited by the recurrence threshold. This condition makes the topology of every recurrence network unique with the degree distribution determined by the probability density variations of the representative attractor from which it is constructed. Here we numerically investigate the properties of recurrence networks from standard low-dimensional chaotic attractors using some basic network measures and show how the recurrence networks are different from random and scale-free networks. In particular, we show that all recurrence networks can cross over to random geometric graphs by adding sufficient amount of noise to the time series and into the classical random graphs by increasing the range of interaction to the system size. We also highlight the effectiveness of a combined plot of characteristic path length and clustering coefficient in capturing the small changes in the network characteristics.

  2. A More Efficient COPE Architecture for Network Coding in Multihop Wireless Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Kaikai; Jiang, Xiaohong; Horiguchi, Susumu

    Recently, a promising packet forwarding architecture COPE was proposed to essentially improve the throughput of multihop wireless networks, where each network node can intelligently encode multiple packets together and forward them in a single transmission. However, COPE is still in its infancy and has the following limitations: (1) COPE adopts the FIFO packet scheduling and thus does not provide different priorities for different types of packets. (2) COPE simply classifies all packets destined to the same nexthop into small-size or large-size virtual queues and examines only the head packet of each virtual queue to find coding solutions. Such a queueing structure will lose some potential coding opportunities, because among packets destined to the same nexthop at most two packets (the head packets of small-size and large-size queues) will be examined in the coding process, regardless of the number of flows. (3) The coding algorithm adopted in COPE is fast but cannot always find good solutions. In order to address the above limitations, in this paper we first present a new queueing structure for COPE, which can provide more potential coding opportunities, and then propose a new packet scheduling algorithm for this queueing structure to assign different priorities to different types of packets. Finally, we propose an efficient coding algorithm to find appropriate packets for coding. Simulation results demonstrate that this new COPE architecture can further greatly improve the node transmission efficiency.

  3. Scaling solutions for connectivity and conductivity of continuous random networks.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Torres, S A; Molebatsi, T; Kong, X-Z; Scheuermann, A; Bringemeier, D; Li, L

    2015-10-01

    Connectivity and conductivity of two-dimensional fracture networks (FNs), as an important type of continuous random networks, are examined systematically through Monte Carlo simulations under a variety of conditions, including different power law distributions of the fracture lengths and domain sizes. The simulation results are analyzed using analogies of the percolation theory for discrete random networks. With a characteristic length scale and conductivity scale introduced, we show that the connectivity and conductivity of FNs can be well described by universal scaling solutions. These solutions shed light on previous observations of scale-dependent FN behavior and provide a powerful method for quantifying effective bulk properties of continuous random networks.

  4. Experimental percolation studies of random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinerman, A.; Weddell, J.

    2017-06-01

    This report establishes an experimental method of studying electrically percolating networks at a higher resolution than previously implemented. This method measures the current across a conductive sheet as a function of time as elliptical pores are cut into the sheet. This is done utilizing a Universal Laser System X2-600 100 W CO2 laser system with a 76 × 46 cm2 field and 394 dpc (dots/cm) resolution. This laser can cut a random system of elliptical pores into a conductive sheet with a potential voltage applied across it and measures the current versus time. This allows for experimental verification of a percolation threshold as a function of the ellipse's aspect ratio (minor/major diameter). We show that as an ellipse's aspect ratio approaches zero, the percolation threshold approaches one. The benefit of this method is that it can experimentally measure the effect of removing small pores, as well as pores with complex geometries, such as an asterisk from a conductive sheet.

  5. Gain Control Network Conditions in Early Sensory Coding

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Eduardo; Nowotny, Thomas; Levi, Rafael; Smith, Brian H.; Huerta, Ramón

    2013-01-01

    Gain control is essential for the proper function of any sensory system. However, the precise mechanisms for achieving effective gain control in the brain are unknown. Based on our understanding of the existence and strength of connections in the insect olfactory system, we analyze the conditions that lead to controlled gain in a randomly connected network of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. We consider two scenarios for the variation of input into the system. In the first case, the intensity of the sensory input controls the input currents to a fixed proportion of neurons of the excitatory and inhibitory populations. In the second case, increasing intensity of the sensory stimulus will both, recruit an increasing number of neurons that receive input and change the input current that they receive. Using a mean field approximation for the network activity we derive relationships between the parameters of the network that ensure that the overall level of activity of the excitatory population remains unchanged for increasing intensity of the external stimulation. We find that, first, the main parameters that regulate network gain are the probabilities of connections from the inhibitory population to the excitatory population and of the connections within the inhibitory population. Second, we show that strict gain control is not achievable in a random network in the second case, when the input recruits an increasing number of neurons. Finally, we confirm that the gain control conditions derived from the mean field approximation are valid in simulations of firing rate models and Hodgkin-Huxley conductance based models. PMID:23874176

  6. Accurate multiple network alignment through context-sensitive random walk

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Comparative network analysis can provide an effective means of analyzing large-scale biological networks and gaining novel insights into their structure and organization. Global network alignment aims to predict the best overall mapping between a given set of biological networks, thereby identifying important similarities as well as differences among the networks. It has been shown that network alignment methods can be used to detect pathways or network modules that are conserved across different networks. Until now, a number of network alignment algorithms have been proposed based on different formulations and approaches, many of them focusing on pairwise alignment. Results In this work, we propose a novel multiple network alignment algorithm based on a context-sensitive random walk model. The random walker employed in the proposed algorithm switches between two different modes, namely, an individual walk on a single network and a simultaneous walk on two networks. The switching decision is made in a context-sensitive manner by examining the current neighborhood, which is effective for quantitatively estimating the degree of correspondence between nodes that belong to different networks, in a manner that sensibly integrates node similarity and topological similarity. The resulting node correspondence scores are then used to predict the maximum expected accuracy (MEA) alignment of the given networks. Conclusions Performance evaluation based on synthetic networks as well as real protein-protein interaction networks shows that the proposed algorithm can construct more accurate multiple network alignments compared to other leading methods. PMID:25707987

  7. Universality in the spectral and eigenfunction properties of random networks.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Bermúdez, J A; Alcazar-López, A; Martínez-Mendoza, A J; Rodrigues, Francisco A; Peron, Thomas K Dm

    2015-03-01

    By the use of extensive numerical simulations, we show that the nearest-neighbor energy-level spacing distribution P(s) and the entropic eigenfunction localization length of the adjacency matrices of Erdős-Rényi (ER) fully random networks are universal for fixed average degree ξ≡αN (α and N being the average network connectivity and the network size, respectively). We also demonstrate that the Brody distribution characterizes well P(s) in the transition from α=0, when the vertices in the network are isolated, to α=1, when the network is fully connected. Moreover, we explore the validity of our findings when relaxing the randomness of our network model and show that, in contrast to standard ER networks, ER networks with diagonal disorder also show universality. Finally, we also discuss the spectral and eigenfunction properties of small-world networks.

  8. Improved Iterative Decoding of Network-Channel Codes for Multiple-Access Relay Channel

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Saikat; Verma, Shrish

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative communication using relay nodes is one of the most effective means of exploiting space diversity for low cost nodes in wireless network. In cooperative communication, users, besides communicating their own information, also relay the information of other users. In this paper we investigate a scheme where cooperation is achieved using a common relay node which performs network coding to provide space diversity for two information nodes transmitting to a base station. We propose a scheme which uses Reed-Solomon error correcting code for encoding the information bit at the user nodes and convolutional code as network code, instead of XOR based network coding. Based on this encoder, we propose iterative soft decoding of joint network-channel code by treating it as a concatenated Reed-Solomon convolutional code. Simulation results show significant improvement in performance compared to existing scheme based on compound codes. PMID:27347526

  9. Improved Iterative Decoding of Network-Channel Codes for Multiple-Access Relay Channel.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Saikat; Verma, Shrish

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative communication using relay nodes is one of the most effective means of exploiting space diversity for low cost nodes in wireless network. In cooperative communication, users, besides communicating their own information, also relay the information of other users. In this paper we investigate a scheme where cooperation is achieved using a common relay node which performs network coding to provide space diversity for two information nodes transmitting to a base station. We propose a scheme which uses Reed-Solomon error correcting code for encoding the information bit at the user nodes and convolutional code as network code, instead of XOR based network coding. Based on this encoder, we propose iterative soft decoding of joint network-channel code by treating it as a concatenated Reed-Solomon convolutional code. Simulation results show significant improvement in performance compared to existing scheme based on compound codes.

  10. Distributed coding/decoding complexity in video sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Paulo J; Assunção, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Video Sensor Networks (VSNs) are recent communication infrastructures used to capture and transmit dense visual information from an application context. In such large scale environments which include video coding, transmission and display/storage, there are several open problems to overcome in practical implementations. This paper addresses the most relevant challenges posed by VSNs, namely stringent bandwidth usage and processing time/power constraints. In particular, the paper proposes a novel VSN architecture where large sets of visual sensors with embedded processors are used for compression and transmission of coded streams to gateways, which in turn transrate the incoming streams and adapt them to the variable complexity requirements of both the sensor encoders and end-user decoder terminals. Such gateways provide real-time transcoding functionalities for bandwidth adaptation and coding/decoding complexity distribution by transferring the most complex video encoding/decoding tasks to the transcoding gateway at the expense of a limited increase in bit rate. Then, a method to reduce the decoding complexity, suitable for system-on-chip implementation, is proposed to operate at the transcoding gateway whenever decoders with constrained resources are targeted. The results show that the proposed method achieves good performance and its inclusion into the VSN infrastructure provides an additional level of complexity control functionality.

  11. Distributed Coding/Decoding Complexity in Video Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Paulo J.; Assunção, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Video Sensor Networks (VSNs) are recent communication infrastructures used to capture and transmit dense visual information from an application context. In such large scale environments which include video coding, transmission and display/storage, there are several open problems to overcome in practical implementations. This paper addresses the most relevant challenges posed by VSNs, namely stringent bandwidth usage and processing time/power constraints. In particular, the paper proposes a novel VSN architecture where large sets of visual sensors with embedded processors are used for compression and transmission of coded streams to gateways, which in turn transrate the incoming streams and adapt them to the variable complexity requirements of both the sensor encoders and end-user decoder terminals. Such gateways provide real-time transcoding functionalities for bandwidth adaptation and coding/decoding complexity distribution by transferring the most complex video encoding/decoding tasks to the transcoding gateway at the expense of a limited increase in bit rate. Then, a method to reduce the decoding complexity, suitable for system-on-chip implementation, is proposed to operate at the transcoding gateway whenever decoders with constrained resources are targeted. The results show that the proposed method achieves good performance and its inclusion into the VSN infrastructure provides an additional level of complexity control functionality. PMID:22736972

  12. A Novel Cross-Layer Routing Protocol Based on Network Coding for Underwater Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Shilian; Bu, Renfei; Zhang, Eryang

    2017-01-01

    Underwater wireless sensor networks (UWSNs) have attracted increasing attention in recent years because of their numerous applications in ocean monitoring, resource discovery and tactical surveillance. However, the design of reliable and efficient transmission and routing protocols is a challenge due to the low acoustic propagation speed and complex channel environment in UWSNs. In this paper, we propose a novel cross-layer routing protocol based on network coding (NCRP) for UWSNs, which utilizes network coding and cross-layer design to greedily forward data packets to sink nodes efficiently. The proposed NCRP takes full advantages of multicast transmission and decode packets jointly with encoded packets received from multiple potential nodes in the entire network. The transmission power is optimized in our design to extend the life cycle of the network. Moreover, we design a real-time routing maintenance protocol to update the route when detecting inefficient relay nodes. Substantial simulations in underwater environment by Network Simulator 3 (NS-3) show that NCRP significantly improves the network performance in terms of energy consumption, end-to-end delay and packet delivery ratio compared with other routing protocols for UWSNs. PMID:28786915

  13. Non-coding RNAs and complex distributed genetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2011-08-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the mRNA-protein interplay can be dramatically influenced by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Although this new paradigm is now widely accepted, an understanding of the effect of ncRNAs on complex genetic networks is lacking. To clarify what may happen in this case, we propose a mean-field kinetic model describing the influence of ncRNA on a complex genetic network with a distributed architecture including mutual protein-mediated regulation of many genes transcribed into mRNAs. ncRNA is considered to associate with mRNAs and inhibit their translation and/or facilitate degradation. Our results are indicative of the richness of the kinetics under consideration. The main complex features are found to be bistability and oscillations. One could expect to find kinetic chaos as well. The latter feature has however not been observed in our calculations. In addition, we illustrate the difference in the regulation of distributed networks by mRNA and ncRNA.

  14. Advancing Underwater Acoustic Communication for Autonomous Distributed Networks via Sparse Channel Sensing, Coding, and Navigation Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    channel interference mitigation for underwater acoustic MIMO-OFDM. 3) Turbo equalization for OFDM modulated physical layer network coding. 4) Blind CFO...Localization and tracking of underwater physical systems. 7) NAMS: A networked acoustic modem system for underwater applications . 8) OFDM receiver design in...3) Turbo Equalization for OFDM Modulated Physical Layer Network Coding. We have investigated a practical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing

  15. Joint clustering of protein interaction networks through Markov random walk

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Biological networks obtained by high-throughput profiling or human curation are typically noisy. For functional module identification, single network clustering algorithms may not yield accurate and robust results. In order to borrow information across multiple sources to alleviate such problems due to data quality, we propose a new joint network clustering algorithm ASModel in this paper. We construct an integrated network to combine network topological information based on protein-protein interaction (PPI) datasets and homological information introduced by constituent similarity between proteins across networks. A novel random walk strategy on the integrated network is developed for joint network clustering and an optimization problem is formulated by searching for low conductance sets defined on the derived transition matrix of the random walk, which fuses both topology and homology information. The optimization problem of joint clustering is solved by a derived spectral clustering algorithm. Network clustering using several state-of-the-art algorithms has been implemented to both PPI networks within the same species (two yeast PPI networks and two human PPI networks) and those from different species (a yeast PPI network and a human PPI network). Experimental results demonstrate that ASModel outperforms the existing single network clustering algorithms as well as another recent joint clustering algorithm in terms of complex prediction and Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis. PMID:24565376

  16. Random matrix analysis of localization properties of gene coexpression network.

    PubMed

    Jalan, Sarika; Solymosi, Norbert; Vattay, Gábor; Li, Baowen

    2010-04-01

    We analyze gene coexpression network under the random matrix theory framework. The nearest-neighbor spacing distribution of the adjacency matrix of this network follows Gaussian orthogonal statistics of random matrix theory (RMT). Spectral rigidity test follows random matrix prediction for a certain range and deviates afterwards. Eigenvector analysis of the network using inverse participation ratio suggests that the statistics of bulk of the eigenvalues of network is consistent with those of the real symmetric random matrix, whereas few eigenvalues are localized. Based on these IPR calculations, we can divide eigenvalues in three sets: (a) The nondegenerate part that follows RMT. (b) The nondegenerate part, at both ends and at intermediate eigenvalues, which deviates from RMT and expected to contain information about important nodes in the network. (c) The degenerate part with zero eigenvalue, which fluctuates around RMT-predicted value. We identify nodes corresponding to the dominant modes of the corresponding eigenvectors and analyze their structural properties.

  17. Phase transitions for information diffusion in random clustered networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sungsu; Shin, Joongbo; Kwak, Namju; Jung, Kyomin

    2016-09-01

    We study the conditions for the phase transitions of information diffusion in complex networks. Using the random clustered network model, a generalisation of the Chung-Lu random network model incorporating clustering, we examine the effect of clustering under the Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) epidemic diffusion model with heterogeneous contact rates. For this purpose, we exploit the branching process to analyse information diffusion in random unclustered networks with arbitrary contact rates, and provide novel iterative algorithms for estimating the conditions and sizes of global cascades, respectively. Showing that a random clustered network can be mapped into a factor graph, which is a locally tree-like structure, we successfully extend our analysis to random clustered networks with heterogeneous contact rates. We then identify the conditions for phase transitions of information diffusion using our method. Interestingly, for various contact rates, we prove that random clustered networks with higher clustering coefficients have strictly lower phase transition points for any given degree sequence. Finally, we confirm our analytical results with numerical simulations of both synthetically-generated and real-world networks.

  18. Evolution of the genetic code: partial optimization of a random code for robustness to translation error in a rugged fitness landscape

    PubMed Central

    Novozhilov, Artem S; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2007-01-01

    Background The standard genetic code table has a distinctly non-random structure, with similar amino acids often encoded by codons series that differ by a single nucleotide substitution, typically, in the third or the first position of the codon. It has been repeatedly argued that this structure of the code results from selective optimization for robustness to translation errors such that translational misreading has the minimal adverse effect. Indeed, it has been shown in several studies that the standard code is more robust than a substantial majority of random codes. However, it remains unclear how much evolution the standard code underwent, what is the level of optimization, and what is the likely starting point. Results We explored possible evolutionary trajectories of the genetic code within a limited domain of the vast space of possible codes. Only those codes were analyzed for robustness to translation error that possess the same block structure and the same degree of degeneracy as the standard code. This choice of a small part of the vast space of possible codes is based on the notion that the block structure of the standard code is a consequence of the structure of the complex between the cognate tRNA and the codon in mRNA where the third base of the codon plays a minimum role as a specificity determinant. Within this part of the fitness landscape, a simple evolutionary algorithm, with elementary evolutionary steps comprising swaps of four-codon or two-codon series, was employed to investigate the optimization of codes for the maximum attainable robustness. The properties of the standard code were compared to the properties of four sets of codes, namely, purely random codes, random codes that are more robust than the standard code, and two sets of codes that resulted from optimization of the first two sets. The comparison of these sets of codes with the standard code and its locally optimized version showed that, on average, optimization of random codes

  19. A random spatial network model based on elementary postulates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlinger, M.R.; Troutman, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    In contrast to the random topology model, this model ascribes a unique spatial specification to generated drainage networks, a distinguishing property of some network growth models. The simplicity of the postulates creates an opportunity for potential analytic investigations of the probabilistic structure of the drainage networks, while the spatial specification enables analyses of spatially dependent network properties. In the random topology model all drainage networks, conditioned on magnitude (number of first-order streams), are equally likely, whereas in this model all spanning trees of a grid, conditioned on area and drainage density, are equally likely. As a result, link lengths in the generated networks are not independent, as usually assumed in the random topology model. -from Authors

  20. Listening to the noise: random fluctuations reveal gene network parameters.

    PubMed

    Munsky, Brian; Trinh, Brooke; Khammash, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    The cellular environment is abuzz with noise originating from the inherent random motion of reacting molecules in the living cell. In this noisy environment, clonal cell populations show cell-to-cell variability that can manifest significant phenotypic differences. Noise-induced stochastic fluctuations in cellular constituents can be measured and their statistics quantified. We show that these random fluctuations carry within them valuable information about the underlying genetic network. Far from being a nuisance, the ever-present cellular noise acts as a rich source of excitation that, when processed through a gene network, carries its distinctive fingerprint that encodes a wealth of information about that network. We show that in some cases the analysis of these random fluctuations enables the full identification of network parameters, including those that may otherwise be difficult to measure. This establishes a potentially powerful approach for the identification of gene networks and offers a new window into the workings of these networks.

  1. The random energy model in a magnetic field and joint source channel coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merhav, Neri

    2008-09-01

    We demonstrate that there is an intimate relationship between the magnetic properties of Derrida’s random energy model (REM) of spin glasses and the problem of joint source-channel coding in Information Theory. In particular, typical patterns of erroneously decoded messages in the coding problem have “magnetization” properties that are analogous to those of the REM in certain phases, where the non-uniformity of the distribution of the source in the coding problem plays the role of an external magnetic field applied to the REM. We also relate the ensemble performance (random coding exponents) of joint source-channel codes to the free energy of the REM in its different phases.

  2. Application of random matrix theory to biological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Feng; Zhong, Jianxin; Yang, Yunfeng; Scheuermann, Richard H.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2006-09-01

    We show that spectral fluctuation of interaction matrices of a yeast protein protein interaction network and a yeast metabolic network follows the description of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE) of random matrix theory (RMT). Furthermore, we demonstrate that while the global biological networks evaluated belong to GOE, removal of interactions between constituents transitions the networks to systems of isolated modules described by the Poisson distribution. Our results indicate that although biological networks are very different from other complex systems at the molecular level, they display the same statistical properties at network scale. The transition point provides a new objective approach for the identification of functional modules.

  3. A hippocampal network for spatial coding during immobility and sleep

    PubMed Central

    Kay, K.; Sosa, M.; Chung, J.E.; Karlsson, M.P.; Larkin, M.C.; Frank, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    How does an animal know where it is when it stops moving? Hippocampal place cells fire at discrete locations as subjects traverse space, thereby providing an explicit neural code for current location during locomotion. In contrast, during awake immobility, the hippocampus is thought to be dominated by neural firing representing past and possible future experience. The question of whether and how the hippocampus constructs a representation of current location in the absence of locomotion has stood unresolved. Here we report that a distinct population of hippocampal neurons, located in the CA2 subregion, signals current location during immobility, and furthermore does so in association with a previously unidentified hippocampus-wide network pattern. In addition, signaling of location persists into brief periods of desynchronization prevalent in slow-wave sleep. The hippocampus thus generates a distinct representation of current location during immobility, pointing to mnemonic processing specific to experience occurring in the absence of locomotion. PMID:26934224

  4. Synchronization in networks with random interactions: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jianfeng; Jirsa, Viktor K.; Ding, Mingzhou

    2006-03-01

    Synchronization is an emergent property in networks of interacting dynamical elements. Here we review some recent results on synchronization in randomly coupled networks. Asymptotical behavior of random matrices is summarized and its impact on the synchronization of network dynamics is presented. Robert May's results on the stability of equilibrium points in linear dynamics are first extended to systems with time delayed coupling and then nonlinear systems where the synchronized dynamics can be periodic or chaotic. Finally, applications of our results to neuroscience, in particular, networks of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons, are included.

  5. Evaluation of attractors and basins of asynchronous random Boolean networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Chu, Tianguang

    2012-05-01

    We present an algebraic approach for determining the attractors and their basins of random Boolean networks under an asynchronous stochastic update based on the recently developed matrix semitensor product theory, which allows for converting the logical dynamics of a Boolean network into a standard iterative dynamics. In this setting, all attractors and basins are specified by the network transition matrices. We then devise procedures that can find all attractors and their basins exactly. We also discuss the issue of overlapping basins in asynchronous random Boolean networks, and we propose methods to compute the weight of each attractor and the basin entropy of the systems.

  6. Non-Coding RNAs in Neural Networks, REST-Assured

    PubMed Central

    Rossbach, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In the nervous system, several key steps in cellular complexity and development are regulated by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and the repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor (REST/NRSF). REST recruits gene regulatory complexes to regulatory sequences, among them the repressor element-1/neuron-restrictive silencer element, and mediates developmental stage-specific gene expression or repression, chromatin (re-)organization or silencing for protein-coding genes as well as for several ncRNAs like microRNAs, short interfering RNAs or long ncRNAs. NcRNAs are far from being just transcriptional noise and are involved in chromatin accessibility, transcription and post-transcriptional processing, trafficking, or RNA editing. REST and its cofactor CoREST are both highly regulated through various ncRNAs. The importance of the correct regulation within the ncRNA network, the ncRNAome, is demonstrated when it comes to a deregulation of REST and/or ncRNAs associated with molecular pathophysiology underlying diverse disorders including neurodegenerative diseases or brain tumors. PMID:22303307

  7. Replicating disease spread in empirical cattle networks by adjusting the probability of infection in random networks.

    PubMed

    Duncan, A J; Gunn, G J; Umstatter, C; Humphry, R W

    2014-12-01

    Comparisons between mass-action or "random" network models and empirical networks have produced mixed results. Here we seek to discover whether a simulated disease spread through randomly constructed networks can be coerced to model the spread in empirical networks by altering a single disease parameter - the probability of infection. A stochastic model for disease spread through herds of cattle is utilised to model the passage of an SEIR (susceptible-latent-infected-resistant) through five networks. The first network is an empirical network of recorded contacts, from four datasets available, and the other four networks are constructed from randomly distributed contacts based on increasing amounts of information from the recorded network. A numerical study on adjusting the value of the probability of infection was conducted for the four random network models. We found that relative percentage reductions in the probability of infection, between 5.6% and 39.4% in the random network models, produced results that most closely mirrored the results from the empirical contact networks. In all cases tested, to reduce the differences between the two models, required a reduction in the probability of infection in the random network. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Lévy random walks on multiplex networks

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Quantong; Cozzo, Emanuele; Zheng, Zhiming; Moreno, Yamir

    2016-01-01

    Random walks constitute a fundamental mechanism for many dynamics taking place on complex networks. Besides, as a more realistic description of our society, multiplex networks have been receiving a growing interest, as well as the dynamical processes that occur on top of them. Here, inspired by one specific model of random walks that seems to be ubiquitous across many scientific fields, the Lévy flight, we study a new navigation strategy on top of multiplex networks. Capitalizing on spectral graph and stochastic matrix theories, we derive analytical expressions for the mean first passage time and the average time to reach a node on these networks. Moreover, we also explore the efficiency of Lévy random walks, which we found to be very different as compared to the single layer scenario, accounting for the structure and dynamics inherent to the multiplex network. Finally, by comparing with some other important random walk processes defined on multiplex networks, we find that in some region of the parameters, a Lévy random walk is the most efficient strategy. Our results give us a deeper understanding of Lévy random walks and show the importance of considering the topological structure of multiplex networks when trying to find efficient navigation strategies. PMID:27892508

  9. Lévy random walks on multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Quantong; Cozzo, Emanuele; Zheng, Zhiming; Moreno, Yamir

    2016-11-01

    Random walks constitute a fundamental mechanism for many dynamics taking place on complex networks. Besides, as a more realistic description of our society, multiplex networks have been receiving a growing interest, as well as the dynamical processes that occur on top of them. Here, inspired by one specific model of random walks that seems to be ubiquitous across many scientific fields, the Lévy flight, we study a new navigation strategy on top of multiplex networks. Capitalizing on spectral graph and stochastic matrix theories, we derive analytical expressions for the mean first passage time and the average time to reach a node on these networks. Moreover, we also explore the efficiency of Lévy random walks, which we found to be very different as compared to the single layer scenario, accounting for the structure and dynamics inherent to the multiplex network. Finally, by comparing with some other important random walk processes defined on multiplex networks, we find that in some region of the parameters, a Lévy random walk is the most efficient strategy. Our results give us a deeper understanding of Lévy random walks and show the importance of considering the topological structure of multiplex networks when trying to find efficient navigation strategies.

  10. Analysis of oscillator neural networks for sparsely coded phase patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Masaki; Aoyagi, Toshio

    2000-12-01

    We study a simple extended model of oscillator neural networks capable of storing sparsely coded phase patterns, in which information is encoded both in the mean activity level and in the timing of spikes. Applying the methods of statistical neurodynamics to our model, we investigate theoretically the model's associative memory capability by evaluating its maximum storage capacities and deriving its basins of attraction. It is shown that, as in the Hopfield model, the storage capacity diverges as the activity level decreases. We consider various practically and theoretically important cases. For example, it is revealed that a dynamically adjusted threshold mechanism enhances the retrieval ability of the associative memory. It is also found that, under suitable conditions, the network can recall patterns even in the case that patterns with different activity levels are stored at the same time. In addition, we examine the robustness with respect to damage of the synaptic connections. The validity of these theoretical results is confirmed by reasonable agreement with numerical simulations.

  11. Performance of wireless sensor networks under random node failures

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Hagberg, Aric; Feng, Pan

    2011-01-28

    Networks are essential to the function of a modern society and the consequence of damages to a network can be large. Assessing network performance of a damaged network is an important step in network recovery and network design. Connectivity, distance between nodes, and alternative routes are some of the key indicators to network performance. In this paper, random geometric graph (RGG) is used with two types of node failure, uniform failure and localized failure. Since the network performance are multi-facet and assessment can be time constrained, we introduce four measures, which can be computed in polynomial time, to estimate performance of damaged RGG. Simulation experiments are conducted to investigate the deterioration of networks through a period of time. With the empirical results, the performance measures are analyzed and compared to provide understanding of different failure scenarios in a RGG.

  12. Spectral coarse graining for random walks in bipartite networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zeng, An; Di, Zengru; Fan, Ying

    2013-03-01

    Many real-world networks display a natural bipartite structure, yet analyzing and visualizing large bipartite networks is one of the open challenges in complex network research. A practical approach to this problem would be to reduce the complexity of the bipartite system while at the same time preserve its functionality. However, we find that existing coarse graining methods for monopartite networks usually fail for bipartite networks. In this paper, we use spectral analysis to design a coarse graining scheme specific for bipartite networks, which keeps their random walk properties unchanged. Numerical analysis on both artificial and real-world networks indicates that our coarse graining can better preserve most of the relevant spectral properties of the network. We validate our coarse graining method by directly comparing the mean first passage time of the walker in the original network and the reduced one.

  13. Softening in Random Networks of Non-Identical Beams

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Ehsan; Barocas, Victor H.; Shephard, Mark S.; Picu, Catalin R.

    2015-01-01

    Random fiber networks are assemblies of elastic elements connected in random configurations. They are used as models for a broad range of fibrous materials including biopolymer gels and synthetic nonwovens. Although the mechanics of networks made from the same type of fibers has been studied extensively, the behavior of composite systems of fibers with different properties has received less attention. In this work we numerically and theoretically study random networks of beams and springs of different mechanical properties. We observe that the overall network stiffness decreases on average as the variability of fiber stiffness increases, at constant mean fiber stiffness. Numerical results and analytical arguments show that for small variabilities in fiber stiffness the amount of network softening scales linearly with the variance of the fiber stiffness distribution. This result holds for any beam structure and is expected to apply to a broad range of materials including cellular solids. PMID:26644629

  14. Cross-Layer Design for Downlink Multihop Cloud Radio Access Networks With Network Coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liang; Yu, Wei

    2017-04-01

    There are two fundamentally different fronthaul techniques in the downlink communication of cloud radio access network (C-RAN): the data-sharing strategy and the compression-based strategy. Under the former strategy, each user's message is multicast from the central processor (CP) to all the serving remote radio heads (RRHs) over the fronthaul network, which then cooperatively serve the users through joint beamforming; while under the latter strategy, the user messages are first beamformed then quantized at the CP, and the compressed signal is unicast to the corresponding RRH, which then decompresses its received signal for wireless transmission. Previous works show that in general the compression-based strategy outperforms the data-sharing strategy. This paper, on the other hand, point s out that in a C-RAN model where the RRHs are connected to the CP via multi-hop routers, data-sharing can be superior to compression if the network coding technique is adopted for multicasting user messages to the cooperating RRHs, and the RRH's beamforming vectors, the user-RRH association, and the network coding design over the fronthaul network are jointly optimized based on the techniques of sparse optimization an d successive convex approximation. This is in comparison to the compression-based strategy, where information is unicast over the fronthaul network by simple routing, and the RRH's compression noise covariance and beamforming vectors, as well as the routing strategy over the fronthaul network are jointly optimized based on the successive convex approximation technique. The observed gain in overall network throughput is due to that information multicast is more efficient than information unicast over the multi-hop fronthaul of a C-RAN.

  15. Technology Infusion of CodeSonar into the Space Network Ground Segment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Markland J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the applicability of CodeSonar to the Space Network software. CodeSonar is a commercial off the shelf system that analyzes programs written in C, C++ or Ada for defects in the code. Software engineers use CodeSonar results as an input to the existing source code inspection process. The study is focused on large scale software developed using formal processes. The systems studied are mission critical in nature but some use commodity computer systems.

  16. Network coding based joint signaling and dynamic bandwidth allocation scheme for inter optical network unit communication in passive optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Pei; Gu, Rentao; Ji, Yuefeng

    2014-06-01

    As an innovative and promising technology, network coding has been introduced to passive optical networks (PON) in recent years to support inter optical network unit (ONU) communication, yet the signaling process and dynamic bandwidth allocation (DBA) in PON with network coding (NC-PON) still need further study. Thus, we propose a joint signaling and DBA scheme for efficiently supporting differentiated services of inter ONU communication in NC-PON. In the proposed joint scheme, the signaling process lays the foundation to fulfill network coding in PON, and it can not only avoid the potential threat to downstream security in previous schemes but also be suitable for the proposed hybrid dynamic bandwidth allocation (HDBA) scheme. In HDBA, a DBA cycle is divided into two sub-cycles for applying different coding, scheduling and bandwidth allocation strategies to differentiated classes of services. Besides, as network traffic load varies, the entire upstream transmission window for all REPORT messages slides accordingly, leaving the transmission time of one or two sub-cycles to overlap with the bandwidth allocation calculation time at the optical line terminal (the OLT), so that the upstream idle time can be efficiently eliminated. Performance evaluation results validate that compared with the existing two DBA algorithms deployed in NC-PON, HDBA demonstrates the best quality of service (QoS) support in terms of delay for all classes of services, especially guarantees the end-to-end delay bound of high class services. Specifically, HDBA can eliminate queuing delay and scheduling delay of high class services, reduce those of lower class services by at least 20%, and reduce the average end-to-end delay of all services over 50%. Moreover, HDBA also achieves the maximum delay fairness between coded and uncoded lower class services, and medium delay fairness for high class services.

  17. A Network Coding Based Hybrid ARQ Protocol for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Shilian; Zhang, Eryang; Zou, Jianbin

    2016-01-01

    Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks (UASNs) have attracted increasing interest in recent years due to their extensive commercial and military applications. However, the harsh underwater channel causes many challenges for the design of reliable underwater data transport protocol. In this paper, we propose an energy efficient data transport protocol based on network coding and hybrid automatic repeat request (NCHARQ) to ensure reliability, efficiency and availability in UASNs. Moreover, an adaptive window length estimation algorithm is designed to optimize the throughput and energy consumption tradeoff. The algorithm can adaptively change the code rate and can be insensitive to the environment change. Extensive simulations and analysis show that NCHARQ significantly reduces energy consumption with short end-to-end delay. PMID:27618044

  18. A Network Coding Based Hybrid ARQ Protocol for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Shilian; Zhang, Eryang; Zou, Jianbin

    2016-09-07

    Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks (UASNs) have attracted increasing interest in recent years due to their extensive commercial and military applications. However, the harsh underwater channel causes many challenges for the design of reliable underwater data transport protocol. In this paper, we propose an energy efficient data transport protocol based on network coding and hybrid automatic repeat request (NCHARQ) to ensure reliability, efficiency and availability in UASNs. Moreover, an adaptive window length estimation algorithm is designed to optimize the throughput and energy consumption tradeoff. The algorithm can adaptively change the code rate and can be insensitive to the environment change. Extensive simulations and analysis show that NCHARQ significantly reduces energy consumption with short end-to-end delay.

  19. Cascading failures in spatially-embedded random networks.

    PubMed

    Asztalos, Andrea; Sreenivasan, Sameet; Szymanski, Boleslaw K; Korniss, Gyorgy

    2014-01-01

    Cascading failures constitute an important vulnerability of interconnected systems. Here we focus on the study of such failures on networks in which the connectivity of nodes is constrained by geographical distance. Specifically, we use random geometric graphs as representative examples of such spatial networks, and study the properties of cascading failures on them in the presence of distributed flow. The key finding of this study is that the process of cascading failures is non-self-averaging on spatial networks, and thus, aggregate inferences made from analyzing an ensemble of such networks lead to incorrect conclusions when applied to a single network, no matter how large the network is. We demonstrate that this lack of self-averaging disappears with the introduction of a small fraction of long-range links into the network. We simulate the well studied preemptive node removal strategy for cascade mitigation and show that it is largely ineffective in the case of spatial networks. We introduce an altruistic strategy designed to limit the loss of network nodes in the event of a cascade triggering failure and show that it performs better than the preemptive strategy. Finally, we consider a real-world spatial network viz. a European power transmission network and validate that our findings from the study of random geometric graphs are also borne out by simulations of cascading failures on the empirical network.

  20. Cascading Failures in Spatially-Embedded Random Networks

    PubMed Central

    Asztalos, Andrea; Sreenivasan, Sameet; Szymanski, Boleslaw K.; Korniss, Gyorgy

    2014-01-01

    Cascading failures constitute an important vulnerability of interconnected systems. Here we focus on the study of such failures on networks in which the connectivity of nodes is constrained by geographical distance. Specifically, we use random geometric graphs as representative examples of such spatial networks, and study the properties of cascading failures on them in the presence of distributed flow. The key finding of this study is that the process of cascading failures is non-self-averaging on spatial networks, and thus, aggregate inferences made from analyzing an ensemble of such networks lead to incorrect conclusions when applied to a single network, no matter how large the network is. We demonstrate that this lack of self-averaging disappears with the introduction of a small fraction of long-range links into the network. We simulate the well studied preemptive node removal strategy for cascade mitigation and show that it is largely ineffective in the case of spatial networks. We introduce an altruistic strategy designed to limit the loss of network nodes in the event of a cascade triggering failure and show that it performs better than the preemptive strategy. Finally, we consider a real-world spatial network viz. a European power transmission network and validate that our findings from the study of random geometric graphs are also borne out by simulations of cascading failures on the empirical network. PMID:24400101

  1. Sequential defense against random and intentional attacks in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin-Yu; Cheng, Shin-Ming

    2015-02-01

    Network robustness against attacks is one of the most fundamental researches in network science as it is closely associated with the reliability and functionality of various networking paradigms. However, despite the study on intrinsic topological vulnerabilities to node removals, little is known on the network robustness when network defense mechanisms are implemented, especially for networked engineering systems equipped with detection capabilities. In this paper, a sequential defense mechanism is first proposed in complex networks for attack inference and vulnerability assessment, where the data fusion center sequentially infers the presence of an attack based on the binary attack status reported from the nodes in the network. The network robustness is evaluated in terms of the ability to identify the attack prior to network disruption under two major attack schemes, i.e., random and intentional attacks. We provide a parametric plug-in model for performance evaluation on the proposed mechanism and validate its effectiveness and reliability via canonical complex network models and real-world large-scale network topology. The results show that the sequential defense mechanism greatly improves the network robustness and mitigates the possibility of network disruption by acquiring limited attack status information from a small subset of nodes in the network.

  2. Current-reinforced random walks for constructing transport networks

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qi; Johansson, Anders; Tero, Atsushi; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Sumpter, David J. T.

    2013-01-01

    Biological systems that build transport networks, such as trail-laying ants and the slime mould Physarum, can be described in terms of reinforced random walks. In a reinforced random walk, the route taken by ‘walking’ particles depends on the previous routes of other particles. Here, we present a novel form of random walk in which the flow of particles provides this reinforcement. Starting from an analogy between electrical networks and random walks, we show how to include current reinforcement. We demonstrate that current-reinforcement results in particles converging on the optimal solution of shortest path transport problems, and avoids the self-reinforcing loops seen in standard density-based reinforcement models. We further develop a variant of the model that is biologically realistic, in the sense that the particles can be identified as ants and their measured density corresponds to those observed in maze-solving experiments on Argentine ants. For network formation, we identify the importance of nonlinear current reinforcement in producing networks that optimize both network maintenance and travel times. Other than ant trail formation, these random walks are also closely related to other biological systems, such as blood vessels and neuronal networks, which involve the transport of materials or information. We argue that current reinforcement is likely to be a common mechanism in a range of systems where network construction is observed. PMID:23269849

  3. Muller's ratchet in random graphs and scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Paulo R. A.; Combadão, Jaime; Dionisio, Francisco; Gordo, Isabel

    2006-10-01

    Muller’s ratchet is an evolutionary process that has been implicated in the extinction of asexual species, the evolution of mitochondria, the degeneration of the Y chromosome, the evolution of sex and recombination and the evolution of microbes. Here we study the speed of Muller’s ratchet in a population subdivided into many small subpopulations connected by migration, and distributed on a network. We compare the speed of the ratchet in two distinct types of topologies: scale free networks and random graphs. The difference between the topologies is noticeable when the average connectivity of the network and the migration rate is large. In this situation we observe that the ratchet clicks faster in scale free networks than in random graphs. So contrary to intuition, scale free networks are more prone to loss of genetic information than random graphs. On the other hand, we show that scale free networks are more robust to the random extinction than random graphs. Since these complex networks have been shown to describe well real-life systems, our results open a framework for studying the evolution of microbes and disease epidemics.

  4. Wireless Network Cocast: Cooperative Communications with Space-Time Network Coding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-21

    the transformed-based STNC for different numbers of user nodes (N = 2 and N = 3), QPSK and 16- QAM modulation , and (a) (M = 1) and (b) (M = 2...and (b) 16- QAM modulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 4.6 Performance comparison between the proposed STNC scheme and a scheme employing...distributed Alamouti code for N = 2 and M = 2, (a) QPSK and (b) 16- QAM modulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 5.1 A multi-source wireless network

  5. General clique percolation in random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jingfang; Chen, Xiaosong

    2014-07-01

    A general (k,l) clique community of a network, which consists of adjacent k-cliques sharing at least l vertices with k-1\\ge l\\ge1 , is introduced. With the emergence of a giant (k,l) clique community in the network, there is a (k,l) clique percolation. Using the largest size jump Δ of the largest clique community during network evolution and the corresponding evolution step Tc, we study the general (k,l) clique percolation of the Erdős-Rényi network. We investigate the averages of Δ and Tc and their fluctuations for different network size N. The clique percolation can be identified by the power-law finite-size effects of the averages and root mean squares of fluctuation. The finite-size scaling distribution functions of fluctuations are calculated. The universality class of the (k,l) clique percolation is characterized by the critical exponents of power-law finite-size effects. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we find that the Erdős-Rényi network experiences a series of (k,l) clique percolation with (k,l)=(2,1),(3,1),(3,2),(4,1),(4,2),(4,3),(5,1) . We find that the critical exponents and therefore the universality class of the (k,l) clique percolation depend on clique connection index l, but are independent of clique size k.

  6. Application of statistical physics to random graph models of networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivasan, Sameet

    This thesis deals with the application of concepts from statistical physics to the understanding of static and dynamical properties of random networks. The classical paradigm for random networks is the Erdos-Renyi (ER) random graph model denoted as G(N, p), in which a network of N nodes is created by placing a link between each of the N(N--1)/2 pairs of nodes with a probability p. The probability distribution of the number of links per node, or the degree distribution, is a Poissonian distribution in the limit of asymptotic network sizes. Recent investigations of the structure of networks such as the internet have revealed a power law in the degree distribution of the network. The question then arises as how the presence of this power law affects the behavior of static and dynamic properties of a network and how this behavior is different from that seen in ER random graphs. In general, irrespective of other details of their structure, networks having a power law degree distribution are known as "scale-free" (SF) networks. In this thesis, we focus on the simplest model of SF networks, known as the configuration model. In the first chapter, we introduce ER and SF networks, and define central concepts that will be used throughout this thesis. In the second chapter we address the problem of optimal paths on weighted networks, formulated as follows. On a network with weighted links where link weights represent transit times along the link, we define the optimal path as the path between two nodes with the least total transit time. We study the scaling of optimal path length ℓopt as a function of the network size N, and as a function of the parameters in the weight distribution. We show that when link weights are highly disordered, only paths on the "minimal spanning tree"---the tree with the lowest total link weight---are used, and this leads to a crossover between two regimes of scaling behavior for ℓopt. For a simple distribution of link weights, we derive for ER

  7. Construction and performance research on variable-length codes for multirate OCDMA multimedia networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan-qi; Yang, Meng-jie; Luo, De-jun; Lu, Ye; Kong, Yi-pu; Zhang, Dong-chuang

    2014-09-01

    A new kind of variable-length codes with good correlation properties for the multirate asynchronous optical code division multiple access (OCDMA) multimedia networks is proposed, called non-repetition interval (NRI) codes. The NRI codes can be constructed by structuring the interval-sets with no repetition, and the code length depends on the number of users and the code weight. According to the structural characteristics of NRI codes, the formula of bit error rate (BER) is derived. Compared with other variable-length codes, the NRI codes have lower BER. A multirate OCDMA multimedia simulation system is designed and built, the longer codes are assigned to the users who need slow speed, while the shorter codes are assigned to the users who need high speed. It can be obtained by analyzing the eye diagram that the user with slower speed has lower BER, and the conclusion is the same as the actual demand in multimedia data transport.

  8. Epidemic transmission on random mobile network with diverse infection periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kezan; Yu, Hong; Zeng, Zhaorong; Ding, Yong; Ma, Zhongjun

    2015-05-01

    The heterogeneity of individual susceptibility and infectivity and time-varying topological structure are two realistic factors when we study epidemics on complex networks. Current research results have shown that the heterogeneity of individual susceptibility and infectivity can increase the epidemic threshold in a random mobile dynamical network with the same infection period. In this paper, we will focus on random mobile dynamical networks with diverse infection periods due to people's different constitutions and external circumstances. Theoretical results indicate that the epidemic threshold of the random mobile network with diverse infection periods is larger than the counterpart with the same infection period. Moreover, the heterogeneity of individual susceptibility and infectivity can play a significant impact on disease transmission. In particular, the homogeneity of individuals will avail to the spreading of epidemics. Numerical examples verify further our theoretical results very well.

  9. A scaling law for random walks on networks

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Theodore J.; Foxall, Eric; Glass, Leon; Edwards, Roderick

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of many natural and artificial systems are well described as random walks on a network: the stochastic behaviour of molecules, traffic patterns on the internet, fluctuations in stock prices and so on. The vast literature on random walks provides many tools for computing properties such as steady-state probabilities or expected hitting times. Previously, however, there has been no general theory describing the distribution of possible paths followed by a random walk. Here, we show that for any random walk on a finite network, there are precisely three mutually exclusive possibilities for the form of the path distribution: finite, stretched exponential and power law. The form of the distribution depends only on the structure of the network, while the stepping probabilities control the parameters of the distribution. We use our theory to explain path distributions in domains such as sports, music, nonlinear dynamics and stochastic chemical kinetics. PMID:25311870

  10. A scaling law for random walks on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Theodore J.; Foxall, Eric; Glass, Leon; Edwards, Roderick

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of many natural and artificial systems are well described as random walks on a network: the stochastic behaviour of molecules, traffic patterns on the internet, fluctuations in stock prices and so on. The vast literature on random walks provides many tools for computing properties such as steady-state probabilities or expected hitting times. Previously, however, there has been no general theory describing the distribution of possible paths followed by a random walk. Here, we show that for any random walk on a finite network, there are precisely three mutually exclusive possibilities for the form of the path distribution: finite, stretched exponential and power law. The form of the distribution depends only on the structure of the network, while the stepping probabilities control the parameters of the distribution. We use our theory to explain path distributions in domains such as sports, music, nonlinear dynamics and stochastic chemical kinetics.

  11. Layered Video Transmission with Network Coding in a Cooperative Virtual MIMO Cellular Relay Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yo-Han; Yoon, Jisun; Shin, Jitae; Yang, Janghoon

    In this letter, we propose a layered video streaming technique that combines network coding (NC), multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO), and hierarchical modulation (HM) over cellular relay networks. We provide a performance analysis of different transmission modes of NC and MIMO in terms of the error rate in video layers, which is reflected in the total layered-video quality. The HM is used to differentiate the error rates among video layers. The simulation results show that the NC, the MIMO spatial multiplexing (SM), and the combination of both the NC and MIMO-SM gives video-quality gains of about 1.9dB, 6dB, and 12dB maximally, respectively, compared to the conventional single-input and single-output (SISO) single relay network (SRN) system.

  12. Random fracture networks: percolation, geometry and flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. M.; Thovert, J. F.; Mourzenko, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reviews some of the basic properties of fracture networks. Most of the data can only be derived numerically, and to be useful they need to be rationalized, i.e., a large set of numbers should be replaced by a simple formula which is easy to apply for estimating orders of magnitude. Three major tools are found useful in this rationalization effort. First, analytical results can usually be derived for infinite fractures, a limit which corresponds to large densities. Second, the excluded volume and the dimensionless density prove crucial to gather data obtained at intermediate densities. Finally, shape factors can be used to further reduce the influence of fracture shapes. Percolation of fracture networks is of primary importance since this characteristic controls transport properties such as permeability. Recent numerical studies for various types of fracture networks (isotropic, anisotropic, heterogeneous in space, polydisperse, mixture of shapes) are summarized; the percolation threshold rho is made dimensionless by means of the excluded volume. A general correlation for rho is proposed as a function of the gyration radius. The statistical characteristics of the blocks which are cut in the solid matrix by the network are presented, since they control transfers between the porous matrix and the fractures. Results on quantities such as the volume, surface and number of faces are given and semi empirical relations are proposed. The possible intersection of a percolating network and of a cubic cavity is also summarized. This might be of importance for the underground storage of wastes. An approximate reasoning based on the excluded volume of the percolating cluster and of the cubic cavity is proposed. Finally, consequences on the permeability of fracture networks are briefly addressed. An empirical formula which verifies some theoretical properties is proposed.

  13. Network robustness and fragility: percolation on random graphs.

    PubMed

    Callaway, D S; Newman, M E; Strogatz, S H; Watts, D J

    2000-12-18

    Recent work on the Internet, social networks, and the power grid has addressed the resilience of these networks to either random or targeted deletion of network nodes or links. Such deletions include, for example, the failure of Internet routers or power transmission lines. Percolation models on random graphs provide a simple representation of this process but have typically been limited to graphs with Poisson degree distribution at their vertices. Such graphs are quite unlike real-world networks, which often possess power-law or other highly skewed degree distributions. In this paper we study percolation on graphs with completely general degree distribution, giving exact solutions for a variety of cases, including site percolation, bond percolation, and models in which occupation probabilities depend on vertex degree. We discuss the application of our theory to the understanding of network resilience.

  14. Random walks on activity-driven networks with attractiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessandretti, Laura; Sun, Kaiyuan; Baronchelli, Andrea; Perra, Nicola

    2017-05-01

    Virtually all real-world networks are dynamical entities. In social networks, the propensity of nodes to engage in social interactions (activity) and their chances to be selected by active nodes (attractiveness) are heterogeneously distributed. Here, we present a time-varying network model where each node and the dynamical formation of ties are characterized by these two features. We study how these properties affect random-walk processes unfolding on the network when the time scales describing the process and the network evolution are comparable. We derive analytical solutions for the stationary state and the mean first-passage time of the process, and we study cases informed by empirical observations of social networks. Our work shows that previously disregarded properties of real social systems, such as heterogeneous distributions of activity and attractiveness as well as the correlations between them, substantially affect the dynamical process unfolding on the network.

  15. Randomizing bipartite networks: the case of the World Trade Web

    PubMed Central

    Saracco, Fabio; Di Clemente, Riccardo; Gabrielli, Andrea; Squartini, Tiziano

    2015-01-01

    Within the last fifteen years, network theory has been successfully applied both to natural sciences and to socioeconomic disciplines. In particular, bipartite networks have been recognized to provide a particularly insightful representation of many systems, ranging from mutualistic networks in ecology to trade networks in economy, whence the need of a pattern detection-oriented analysis in order to identify statistically-significant structural properties. Such an analysis rests upon the definition of suitable null models, i.e. upon the choice of the portion of network structure to be preserved while randomizing everything else. However, quite surprisingly, little work has been done so far to define null models for real bipartite networks. The aim of the present work is to fill this gap, extending a recently-proposed method to randomize monopartite networks to bipartite networks. While the proposed formalism is perfectly general, we apply our method to the binary, undirected, bipartite representation of the World Trade Web, comparing the observed values of a number of structural quantities of interest with the expected ones, calculated via our randomization procedure. Interestingly, the behavior of the World Trade Web in this new representation is strongly different from the monopartite analogue, showing highly non-trivial patterns of self-organization. PMID:26029820

  16. Randomizing bipartite networks: the case of the World Trade Web.

    PubMed

    Saracco, Fabio; Di Clemente, Riccardo; Gabrielli, Andrea; Squartini, Tiziano

    2015-06-01

    Within the last fifteen years, network theory has been successfully applied both to natural sciences and to socioeconomic disciplines. In particular, bipartite networks have been recognized to provide a particularly insightful representation of many systems, ranging from mutualistic networks in ecology to trade networks in economy, whence the need of a pattern detection-oriented analysis in order to identify statistically-significant structural properties. Such an analysis rests upon the definition of suitable null models, i.e. upon the choice of the portion of network structure to be preserved while randomizing everything else. However, quite surprisingly, little work has been done so far to define null models for real bipartite networks. The aim of the present work is to fill this gap, extending a recently-proposed method to randomize monopartite networks to bipartite networks. While the proposed formalism is perfectly general, we apply our method to the binary, undirected, bipartite representation of the World Trade Web, comparing the observed values of a number of structural quantities of interest with the expected ones, calculated via our randomization procedure. Interestingly, the behavior of the World Trade Web in this new representation is strongly different from the monopartite analogue, showing highly non-trivial patterns of self-organization.

  17. Dual random circuit breaker network model with equivalent thermal circuit network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwanyong; Yoon, Seong Jun; Choi, Woo Young

    2014-02-01

    A SPICE-based dual random circuit breaker (RCB) network model with an equivalent thermal circuit network has been proposed in order to emulate resistance switching (RS) of unipolar resistive random access memory (RRAM). The dual RCB network model consists of the electrical RCB network model for the forming and set operations and the equivalent thermal circuit network model for the reset operation. In addition, the proposed model can explain the effects of heat dissipation on the memory and threshold RS with the variation in electrode thickness.

  18. Universality in the synchronization of weighted random networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changsong; Motter, Adilson E; Kurths, Jürgen

    2006-01-27

    Realistic networks display not only a complex topological structure, but also a heterogeneous distribution of weights in the connection strengths. Here we study synchronization in weighted complex networks and show that the synchronizability of random networks with a large minimum degree is determined by two leading parameters: the mean degree and the heterogeneity of the distribution of node's intensity, where the intensity of a node, defined as the total strength of input connections, is a natural combination of topology and weights. Our results provide a possibility for the control of synchronization in complex networks by the manipulation of a few parameters.

  19. Optical information authentication using compressed double-random-phase-encoded images and quick-response codes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaogang; Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2015-03-09

    In this paper, we develop a new optical information authentication system based on compressed double-random-phase-encoded images and quick-response (QR) codes, where the parameters of optical lightwave are used as keys for optical decryption and the QR code is a key for verification. An input image attached with QR code is first optically encoded in a simplified double random phase encoding (DRPE) scheme without using interferometric setup. From the single encoded intensity pattern recorded by a CCD camera, a compressed double-random-phase-encoded image, i.e., the sparse phase distribution used for optical decryption, is generated by using an iterative phase retrieval technique with QR code. We compare this technique to the other two methods proposed in literature, i.e., Fresnel domain information authentication based on the classical DRPE with holographic technique and information authentication based on DRPE and phase retrieval algorithm. Simulation results show that QR codes are effective on improving the security and data sparsity of optical information encryption and authentication system.

  20. A large scale code resolution service network in the Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haining; Zhang, Hongli; Fang, Binxing; Yu, Xiangzhan

    2012-11-07

    In the Internet of Things a code resolution service provides a discovery mechanism for a requester to obtain the information resources associated with a particular product code immediately. In large scale application scenarios a code resolution service faces some serious issues involving heterogeneity, big data and data ownership. A code resolution service network is required to address these issues. Firstly, a list of requirements for the network architecture and code resolution services is proposed. Secondly, in order to eliminate code resolution conflicts and code resolution overloads, a code structure is presented to create a uniform namespace for code resolution records. Thirdly, we propose a loosely coupled distributed network consisting of heterogeneous, independent; collaborating code resolution services and a SkipNet based code resolution service named SkipNet-OCRS, which not only inherits DHT’s advantages, but also supports administrative control and autonomy. For the external behaviors of SkipNet-OCRS, a novel external behavior mode named QRRA mode is proposed to enhance security and reduce requester complexity. For the internal behaviors of SkipNet-OCRS, an improved query algorithm is proposed to increase query efficiency. It is analyzed that integrating SkipNet-OCRS into our resolution service network can meet our proposed requirements. Finally, simulation experiments verify the excellent performance of SkipNet-OCRS.

  1. A Large Scale Code Resolution Service Network in the Internet of Things

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haining; Zhang, Hongli; Fang, Binxing; Yu, Xiangzhan

    2012-01-01

    In the Internet of Things a code resolution service provides a discovery mechanism for a requester to obtain the information resources associated with a particular product code immediately. In large scale application scenarios a code resolution service faces some serious issues involving heterogeneity, big data and data ownership. A code resolution service network is required to address these issues. Firstly, a list of requirements for the network architecture and code resolution services is proposed. Secondly, in order to eliminate code resolution conflicts and code resolution overloads, a code structure is presented to create a uniform namespace for code resolution records. Thirdly, we propose a loosely coupled distributed network consisting of heterogeneous, independent; collaborating code resolution services and a SkipNet based code resolution service named SkipNet-OCRS, which not only inherits DHT's advantages, but also supports administrative control and autonomy. For the external behaviors of SkipNet-OCRS, a novel external behavior mode named QRRA mode is proposed to enhance security and reduce requester complexity. For the internal behaviors of SkipNet-OCRS, an improved query algorithm is proposed to increase query efficiency. It is analyzed that integrating SkipNet-OCRS into our resolution service network can meet our proposed requirements. Finally, simulation experiments verify the excellent performance of SkipNet-OCRS. PMID:23202207

  2. Finite size corrections to random Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Michele; Pagnani, Andrea; Parisi, Giorgio; Zagordi, Osvaldo

    2006-12-01

    Since their introduction, Boolean networks have been traditionally studied in view of their rich dynamical behaviour under different update protocols and for their qualitative analogy with cell regulatory networks. More recently, tools borrowed from the statistical physics of disordered systems and from computer science have provided a more complete characterization of their equilibrium behaviour. However, the largest number of results have been obtained in the thermodynamic limit, which is often far from being reached when dealing with realistic instances of the problem. The numerical analysis presented here aims at comparing—for a specific family of models—the outcomes given by the heuristic belief propagation algorithm with those given by exhaustive enumeration. In the second part of the paper some analytical considerations on the validity of the annealed approximation are discussed.

  3. Brainwashing random asymmetric “neural” networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, P. C.; Littlewort, G. C.; Rafelski, J.

    1991-11-01

    An algorithm for synaptic modification (plasticity) is described by which a recurrently connected network of neuron-like units can organize itself to produce a sequence of activation states that does not repeat itself for a very long time. During the self-organization stage, the connections between the units undergo non-Hebbian modifications, which tend to decorrelate the activity of the units, thereby lengthening the period of the cyclic modes inherent in the network. It is shown that the peridiodicity of the activity rises exponentially with the amount of exposure to this plasticity algorithm. Threshold is also a critical parameter in determining cycle lengths, as is the rate of decay of the fields that accumulate at silent units.

  4. Connectivity in Random Grain Boundary Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M; Schuh, C A; King, W E

    2002-10-22

    Mechanical properties of FCC metals and alloys can be improved by exercising control over the population of grain boundary types in the microstructure. The existing studies also suggest that such properties tend to have percolative mechanisms that depend on the topology of the grain boundary network. With the emergence of SEM-based automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), statistically significant datasets of interface crystallography can be analyzed in a routine manner, giving new insight into the topology and percolative properties of grain boundary networks. In this work, we review advanced analysis techniques for EBSD datasets to quantify microstructures in terms of grain boundary character and triple junction distributions, as well as detailed percolation-theory based cluster analysis.

  5. Randomization of Symbol Repetition of Punch Cards with Superimposed Coding in Information-Search Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirovich, L. Ya

    The article shows the effect of the irregularity of using separate symbols on search noise on punch cards with superimposed symbol coding in information-search system (IPS). A binomial law of random value distribution of repetition of each symbol is established and analyzed. A method of determining the maximum value of symbol repetition is…

  6. Cognitive aspects of chaos in random networks.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Gaetano L

    2012-01-01

    A special case of deterministic chaos that is independent of the architecture of the connections has been observed in a computer model of a purely excitatory neuronal network. Chaos onsets when the level of connectivity is critically low. The results indicate a typical period-doubling route to chaos as the connectivity decreases. A cognitive interpretation of such type of chaos, based on information theory and phase-transitions, is proposed.

  7. Prioritized Degree Distribution in Wireless Sensor Networks with a Network Coded Data Collection Method

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jan; Xiong, Naixue; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Qinchao; Wan, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    The reliability of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) can be greatly affected by failures of sensor nodes due to energy exhaustion or the influence of brutal external environment conditions. Such failures seriously affect the data persistence and collection efficiency. Strategies based on network coding technology for WSNs such as LTCDS can improve the data persistence without mass redundancy. However, due to the bad intermediate performance of LTCDS, a serious ‘cliff effect’ may appear during the decoding period, and source data are hard to recover from sink nodes before sufficient encoded packets are collected. In this paper, the influence of coding degree distribution strategy on the ‘cliff effect’ is observed and the prioritized data storage and dissemination algorithm PLTD-ALPHA is presented to achieve better data persistence and recovering performance. With PLTD-ALPHA, the data in sensor network nodes present a trend that their degree distribution increases along with the degree level predefined, and the persistent data packets can be submitted to the sink node according to its degree in order. Finally, the performance of PLTD-ALPHA is evaluated and experiment results show that PLTD-ALPHA can greatly improve the data collection performance and decoding efficiency, while data persistence is not notably affected. PMID:23235451

  8. Security authentication with a three-dimensional optical phase code using random forest classifier: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markman, Adam; Carnicer, Artur; Javidi, Bahram

    2017-05-01

    We overview our recent work [1] on utilizing three-dimensional (3D) optical phase codes for object authentication using the random forest classifier. A simple 3D optical phase code (OPC) is generated by combining multiple diffusers and glass slides. This tag is then placed on a quick-response (QR) code, which is a barcode capable of storing information and can be scanned under non-uniform illumination conditions, rotation, and slight degradation. A coherent light source illuminates the OPC and the transmitted light is captured by a CCD to record the unique signature. Feature extraction on the signature is performed and inputted into a pre-trained random-forest classifier for authentication.

  9. Encrypted optical storage with wavelength-key and random phase codes.

    PubMed

    Matoba, O; Javidi, B

    1999-11-10

    An encrypted optical memory system that uses a wavelength code as well as input and Fourier-plane random phase codes is proposed. Original data are illuminated by a coherent light source with a specified wavelength and are then encrypted with two random phase codes before being stored holographically in a photorefractive material. Successful decryption requires the use of a readout beam with the same wavelength as that used in the recording, in addition to the correct phase key in the Fourier plane. The wavelength selectivity of the proposed system is evaluated numerically. We show that the number of available wavelength keys depends on the correlation length of the phase key in the Fourier plane. Preliminary experiments of encryption and decryption of optical memory in a LiNbO(3):Fe photorefractive crystal are demonstrated.

  10. Selective randomized load balancing and mesh networks with changing demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, F. B.; Winzer, P. J.

    2006-05-01

    We consider the problem of building cost-effective networks that are robust to dynamic changes in demand patterns. We compare several architectures using demand-oblivious routing strategies. Traditional approaches include single-hop architectures based on a (static or dynamic) circuit-switched core infrastructure and multihop (packet-switched) architectures based on point-to-point circuits in the core. To address demand uncertainty, we seek minimum cost networks that can carry the class of hose demand matrices. Apart from shortest-path routing, Valiant's randomized load balancing (RLB), and virtual private network (VPN) tree routing, we propose a third, highly attractive approach: selective randomized load balancing (SRLB). This is a blend of dual-hop hub routing and randomized load balancing that combines the advantages of both architectures in terms of network cost, delay, and delay jitter. In particular, we give empirical analyses for the cost (in terms of transport and switching equipment) for the discussed architectures, based on three representative carrier networks. Of these three networks, SRLB maintains the resilience properties of RLB while achieving significant cost reduction over all other architectures, including RLB and multihop Internet protocol/multiprotocol label switching (IP/MPLS) networks using VPN-tree routing.

  11. Exponential-family random graph models for valued networks

    PubMed Central

    Krivitsky, Pavel N.

    2013-01-01

    Exponential-family random graph models (ERGMs) provide a principled and flexible way to model and simulate features common in social networks, such as propensities for homophily, mutuality, and friend-of-a-friend triad closure, through choice of model terms (sufficient statistics). However, those ERGMs modeling the more complex features have, to date, been limited to binary data: presence or absence of ties. Thus, analysis of valued networks, such as those where counts, measurements, or ranks are observed, has necessitated dichotomizing them, losing information and introducing biases. In this work, we generalize ERGMs to valued networks. Focusing on modeling counts, we formulate an ERGM for networks whose ties are counts and discuss issues that arise when moving beyond the binary case. We introduce model terms that generalize and model common social network features for such data and apply these methods to a network dataset whose values are counts of interactions. PMID:24678374

  12. Enhanced networked server management with random remote backups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Kyoo

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, the model is focused on available server management in network environments. The (remote) backup servers are hooked up by VPN (Virtual Private Network) and replace broken main severs immediately. A virtual private network (VPN) is a way to use a public network infrastructure and hooks up long-distance servers within a single network infrastructure. The servers can be represent as "machines" and then the system deals with main unreliable and random auxiliary spare (remote backup) machines. When the system performs a mandatory routine maintenance, auxiliary machines are being used for backups during idle periods. Unlike other existing models, the availability of auxiliary machines is changed for each activation in this enhanced model. Analytically tractable results are obtained by using several mathematical techniques and the results are demonstrated in the framework of optimized networked server allocation problems.

  13. Complex networks: when random walk dynamics equals synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriener, Birgit; Anand, Lishma; Timme, Marc

    2012-09-01

    Synchrony prevalently emerges from the interactions of coupled dynamical units. For simple systems such as networks of phase oscillators, the asymptotic synchronization process is assumed to be equivalent to a Markov process that models standard diffusion or random walks on the same network topology. In this paper, we analytically derive the conditions for such equivalence for networks of pulse-coupled oscillators, which serve as models for neurons and pacemaker cells interacting by exchanging electric pulses or fireflies interacting via light flashes. We find that the pulse synchronization process is less simple, but there are classes of, e.g., network topologies that ensure equivalence. In particular, local dynamical operators are required to be doubly stochastic. These results provide a natural link between stochastic processes and deterministic synchronization on networks. Tools for analyzing diffusion (or, more generally, Markov processes) may now be transferred to pin down features of synchronization in networks of pulse-coupled units such as neural circuits.

  14. Performance analysis of hybrid ARQ protocols in a slotted code division multiple-access network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanratty, Joseph M.

    1989-08-01

    A link throughput-delay analysis is presented for a slotted direct-sequence spread-spectrum multiple-access packet radio network (PRN) operating in the presence of background noise, multiple-access interference, and pulsed jammer noise. The PRN is comprised of an arbitrary number of full-duplex radio units arranged in a paired-off topology. Slotted ALOHA random access is used in conjunction with CDMA for channel access and a type 1 hybrid ARQ is used for error control. Expression are derived for the link throughput-delay in terms of the channel cutoff rate and capacity. With the friendly objective of maximizing the link throughput, and the enemy objective of minimizing the link throughput, the dependency of the optimal retransmission probability, processing gain, code rate, and jamming fraction on the population size, traffic intensity, bit energy-to-background-noise ratio, is examined in detail. It is shown that properly designed (optimized) PRN using random-access CDMA offers a significantly larger heavy load throughput than a random-access PRN.

  15. Tunable Allosteric Behavior in Random Spring Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocks, Jason W.; Pashine, Nidhi; Bischofberger, Irmgard; Goodrich, Carl P.; Nagel, Sidney R.; Liu, Andrea J.

    Many proteins and other macromolecules exhibit allosteric behavior in which the binding of a ligand to one site affects the activity at a second distant site. Inspired by this biological process, we present an algorithm to tune disordered spring networks to exhibit allostery-like behavior. When the positions of a pair of nodes at one site in a network are perturbed, we can precisely tune the response of nodes located at another distant site in the system by removing only a small fraction of the bonds. This algorithm can be used to create a wide variety of different response types: response nodes can be located far away from each other, a large number of response sites can be simultaneously controlled, and even multiple independent responses can be tuned into the system. In addition, this algorithm can be generalized to account for bond bending, geometric nonlinearities and nonlinear bond potentials. However, even linear calculations match surprisingly well with macroscopic experimental realizations made by laser cutting or 3D printing.

  16. Channel coding in the space station data system network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Healy, T.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed discussion of the use of channel coding for error correction, privacy/secrecy, channel separation, and synchronization is presented. Channel coding, in one form or another, is an established and common element in data systems. No analysis and design of a major new system would fail to consider ways in which channel coding could make the system more effective. The presence of channel coding on TDRS, Shuttle, the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite Program system, the JSC-proposed Space Operations Center, and the proposed 30/20 GHz Satellite Communication System strongly support the requirement for the utilization of coding for the communications channel. The designers of the space station data system have to consider the use of channel coding.

  17. How Fast Can Networks Synchronize? A Random Matrix Theory Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timme, Marc; Wolf, Fred; Geisel, Theo

    2004-03-01

    Pulse-coupled oscillators constitute a paradigmatic class of dynamical systems interacting on networks because they model a variety of biological systems including flashing fireflies and chirping crickets as well as pacemaker cells of the heart and neural networks. Synchronization is one of the most simple and most prevailing kinds of collective dynamics on such networks. Here we study collective synchronization [1] of pulse-coupled oscillators interacting on asymmetric random networks. Using random matrix theory we analytically determine the speed of synchronization in such networks in dependence on the dynamical and network parameters [2]. The speed of synchronization increases with increasing coupling strengths. Surprisingly, however, it stays finite even for infinitely strong interactions. The results indicate that the speed of synchronization is limited by the connectivity of the network. We discuss the relevance of our findings to general equilibration processes on complex networks. [5mm] [1] M. Timme, F. Wolf, T. Geisel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89:258701 (2002). [2] M. Timme, F. Wolf, T. Geisel, cond-mat/0306512 (2003).

  18. Exploring community structure in biological networks with random graphs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Community structure is ubiquitous in biological networks. There has been an increased interest in unraveling the community structure of biological systems as it may provide important insights into a system’s functional components and the impact of local structures on dynamics at a global scale. Choosing an appropriate community detection algorithm to identify the community structure in an empirical network can be difficult, however, as the many algorithms available are based on a variety of cost functions and are difficult to validate. Even when community structure is identified in an empirical system, disentangling the effect of community structure from other network properties such as clustering coefficient and assortativity can be a challenge. Results Here, we develop a generative model to produce undirected, simple, connected graphs with a specified degrees and pattern of communities, while maintaining a graph structure that is as random as possible. Additionally, we demonstrate two important applications of our model: (a) to generate networks that can be used to benchmark existing and new algorithms for detecting communities in biological networks; and (b) to generate null models to serve as random controls when investigating the impact of complex network features beyond the byproduct of degree and modularity in empirical biological networks. Conclusion Our model allows for the systematic study of the presence of community structure and its impact on network function and dynamics. This process is a crucial step in unraveling the functional consequences of the structural properties of biological systems and uncovering the mechanisms that drive these systems. PMID:24965130

  19. Simulation of nonlinear random vibrations using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, T.L.; Tucker, S.; O`Gorman, C.

    1997-02-01

    The simulation of mechanical system random vibrations is important in structural dynamics, but it is particularly difficult when the system under consideration is nonlinear. Artificial neural networks provide a useful tool for the modeling of nonlinear systems, however, such modeling may be inefficient or insufficiently accurate when the system under consideration is complex. This paper shows that there are several transformations that can be used to uncouple and simplify the components of motion of a complex nonlinear system, thereby making its modeling and random vibration simulation, via component modeling with artificial neural networks, a much simpler problem. A numerical example is presented.

  20. Construction and Analysis of Random Networks with Explosive Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Eric J.; Landsberg, Adam S.

    2009-12-01

    The existence of explosive phase transitions in random (Erdös Rényi-type) networks has been recently documented by Achlioptas, D’Souza, and Spencer [Science 323, 1453 (2009)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1167782] via simulations. In this Letter we describe the underlying mechanism behind these first-order phase transitions and develop tools that allow us to identify (and predict) when a random network will exhibit an explosive transition. Several interesting new models displaying explosive transitions are also presented.

  1. Random resistor network model of minimal conductivity in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheianov, V. V.; Falko, V. I.; Altshuler, B. L.; Aleiner, I. L.

    2007-06-01

    Transport in undoped graphene is related to percolating current patterns in the networks of {\\em N-} and {\\em P}-type regions reflecting the strong bipolar charge density fluctuations. Transmissions of the {\\em P-N} junctions, though small, are vital in establishing the macroscopic conductivity. We propose a random resistor network model to analyze scaling dependencies of the conductance on the doping and disorder, the quantum magnetoresistance and the corresponding dephasing rate.

  2. Random Resistor Network Model of Minimal Conductivity in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheianov, Vadim V.; Fal'Ko, Vladimir I.; Altshuler, Boris L.; Aleiner, Igor L.

    2007-10-01

    Transport in undoped graphene is related to percolating current patterns in the networks of n- and p-type regions reflecting the strong bipolar charge density fluctuations. Finite transparency of the p-n junctions is vital in establishing the macroscopic conductivity. We propose a random resistor network model to analyze scaling dependencies of the conductance on the doping and disorder, the quantum magnetoresistance and the corresponding dephasing rate.

  3. Characteristic times of biased random walks on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaventura, Moreno; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2014-01-01

    We consider degree-biased random walkers whose probability to move from a node to one of its neighbors of degree k is proportional to kα, where α is a tuning parameter. We study both numerically and analytically three types of characteristic times, namely (i) the time the walker needs to come back to the starting node, (ii) the time it takes to visit a given node for the first time, and (iii) the time it takes to visit all the nodes of the network. We consider a large data set of real-world networks and we show that the value of α which minimizes the three characteristic times differs from the value αmin=-1 analytically found for uncorrelated networks in the mean-field approximation. In addition to this, we found that assortative networks have preferentially a value of αmin in the range [-1,-0.5], while disassortative networks have αmin in the range [-0.5,0]. We derive an analytical relation between the degree correlation exponent ν and the optimal bias value αmin, which works well for real-world assortative networks. When only local information is available, degree-biased random walks can guarantee smaller characteristic times than the classical unbiased random walks by means of an appropriate tuning of the motion bias.

  4. Listening to the noise: random fluctuations reveal gene network parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Munsky, Brian; Khammash, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    The cellular environment is abuzz with noise. The origin of this noise is attributed to the inherent random motion of reacting molecules that take part in gene expression and post expression interactions. In this noisy environment, clonal populations of cells exhibit cell-to-cell variability that frequently manifests as significant phenotypic differences within the cellular population. The stochastic fluctuations in cellular constituents induced by noise can be measured and their statistics quantified. We show that these random fluctuations carry within them valuable information about the underlying genetic network. Far from being a nuisance, the ever-present cellular noise acts as a rich source of excitation that, when processed through a gene network, carries its distinctive fingerprint that encodes a wealth of information about that network. We demonstrate that in some cases the analysis of these random fluctuations enables the full identification of network parameters, including those that may otherwise be difficult to measure. This establishes a potentially powerful approach for the identification of gene networks and offers a new window into the workings of these networks.

  5. Characteristic times of biased random walks on complex networks.

    PubMed

    Bonaventura, Moreno; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2014-01-01

    We consider degree-biased random walkers whose probability to move from a node to one of its neighbors of degree k is proportional to k(α), where α is a tuning parameter. We study both numerically and analytically three types of characteristic times, namely (i) the time the walker needs to come back to the starting node, (ii) the time it takes to visit a given node for the first time, and (iii) the time it takes to visit all the nodes of the network. We consider a large data set of real-world networks and we show that the value of α which minimizes the three characteristic times differs from the value α(min)=-1 analytically found for uncorrelated networks in the mean-field approximation. In addition to this, we found that assortative networks have preferentially a value of α(min) in the range [-1,-0.5], while disassortative networks have α(min) in the range [-0.5,0]. We derive an analytical relation between the degree correlation exponent ν and the optimal bias value α(min), which works well for real-world assortative networks. When only local information is available, degree-biased random walks can guarantee smaller characteristic times than the classical unbiased random walks by means of an appropriate tuning of the motion bias.

  6. Chirp- and random-based coded ultrasonic excitation for localized blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, H A S; Wang, S; Wu, S-Y; Karakatsani, M E; Acosta, C; Carneiro, A A O; Konofagou, E E

    2015-10-07

    Chirp- and random-based coded excitation methods have been proposed to reduce standing wave formation and improve focusing of transcranial ultrasound. However, no clear evidence has been shown to support the benefits of these ultrasonic excitation sequences in vivo. This study evaluates the chirp and periodic selection of random frequency (PSRF) coded-excitation methods for opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in mice. Three groups of mice (n  =  15) were injected with polydisperse microbubbles and sonicated in the caudate putamen using the chirp/PSRF coded (bandwidth: 1.5–1.9 MHz, peak negative pressure: 0.52 MPa, duration: 30 s) or standard ultrasound (frequency: 1.5 MHz, pressure: 0.52 MPa, burst duration: 20 ms, duration: 5 min) sequences. T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI scans were performed to quantitatively analyze focused ultrasound induced BBB opening. The mean opening volumes evaluated from the MRI were mm3, mm3and mm3 for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The mean cavitation levels were V.s, V.s and V.s for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The chirp and PSRF coded pulsing sequences improved the BBB opening localization by inducing lower cavitation levels and smaller opening volumes compared to results of the regular sonication technique. Larger bandwidths were associated with more focused targeting but were limited by the frequency response of the transducer, the skull attenuation and the microbubbles optimal frequency range. The coded methods could therefore facilitate highly localized drug delivery as well as benefit other transcranial ultrasound techniques that use higher pressure levels and higher precision to induce the necessary bioeffects in a brain region while avoiding damage to the surrounding healthy tissue.

  7. File Transfer with Erasure Coding over Wireless Sensor Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    27 1. Onion Networks JAVA FEC Library ..............................................27 2. SNAIL Server Modifications...internet router , or some other device, the average person today is using wireless devices on an increasingly regular basis. A small subset of wireless...from Onion Networks were extremely helpful during this research [5]. 2. Medium Access Control for Wireless Sensor Networks One of the realizations

  8. Spread of information and infection on finite random networks.

    PubMed

    Isham, Valerie; Kaczmarska, Joanna; Nekovee, Maziar

    2011-04-01

    The modeling of epidemic-like processes on random networks has received considerable attention in recent years. While these processes are inherently stochastic, most previous work has been focused on deterministic models that ignore important fluctuations that may persist even in the infinite network size limit. In a previous paper, for a class of epidemic and rumor processes, we derived approximate models for the full probability distribution of the final size of the epidemic, as opposed to only mean values. In this paper we examine via direct simulations the adequacy of the approximate model to describe stochastic epidemics and rumors on several random network topologies: homogeneous networks, Erdös-Rényi (ER) random graphs, Barabasi-Albert scale-free networks, and random geometric graphs. We find that the approximate model is reasonably accurate in predicting the probability of spread. However, the position of the threshold and the conditional mean of the final size for processes near the threshold are not well described by the approximate model even in the case of homogeneous networks. We attribute this failure to the presence of other structural properties beyond degree-degree correlations, and in particular clustering, which are present in any finite network but are not incorporated in the approximate model. In order to test this "hypothesis"  we perform additional simulations on a set of ER random graphs where degree-degree correlations and clustering are separately and independently introduced using recently proposed algorithms from the literature. Our results show that even strong degree-degree correlations have only weak effects on the position of the threshold and the conditional mean of the final size. On the other hand, the introduction of clustering greatly affects both the position of the threshold and the conditional mean. Similar analysis for the Barabasi-Albert scale-free network confirms the significance of clustering on the dynamics of rumor

  9. Network motifs come in sets: correlations in the randomization process.

    PubMed

    Ginoza, Reid; Mugler, Andrew

    2010-07-01

    The identification of motifs--subgraphs that appear significantly more often in a particular network than in an ensemble of randomized networks--has become a ubiquitous method for uncovering potentially important subunits within networks drawn from a wide variety of fields. We find that the most common algorithms used to generate the ensemble from the real network change subgraph counts in a highly correlated manner, such that one subgraph's status as a motif may not be independent from the statuses of the other subgraphs. We demonstrate this effect for the problem of three- and four-node motif identification in the transcriptional regulatory networks of E. coli and S. cerevisiae in which randomized networks are generated via an edge-swapping algorithm. We find strong correlations among subgraph counts; for three-node subgraphs these correlations are easily interpreted, and we present an information-theoretic tool that may be used to identify correlations among subgraphs of any size. Our results suggest that single-feature statistics such as Z scores that implicitly assume independence among subgraph counts constitute an insufficient summary of the network.

  10. Maps of random walks on complex networks reveal community structure.

    PubMed

    Rosvall, Martin; Bergstrom, Carl T

    2008-01-29

    To comprehend the multipartite organization of large-scale biological and social systems, we introduce an information theoretic approach that reveals community structure in weighted and directed networks. We use the probability flow of random walks on a network as a proxy for information flows in the real system and decompose the network into modules by compressing a description of the probability flow. The result is a map that both simplifies and highlights the regularities in the structure and their relationships. We illustrate the method by making a map of scientific communication as captured in the citation patterns of >6,000 journals. We discover a multicentric organization with fields that vary dramatically in size and degree of integration into the network of science. Along the backbone of the network-including physics, chemistry, molecular biology, and medicine-information flows bidirectionally, but the map reveals a directional pattern of citation from the applied fields to the basic sciences.

  11. Dense graphlet statistics of protein interaction and random networks.

    PubMed

    Colak, R; Hormozdiari, F; Moser, F; Schönhuth, A; Holman, J; Ester, M; Sahinalp, S C

    2009-01-01

    Understanding evolutionary dynamics from a systemic point of view crucially depends on knowledge about how evolution affects size and structure of the organisms' functional building blocks (modules). It has been recently reported that statistics over sparse PPI graphlets can robustly monitor such evolutionary changes. However, there is abundant evidence that in PPI networks modules can be identified with highly interconnected (dense) and/or bipartite subgraphs. We count such dense graphlets in PPI networks by employing recently developed search strategies that render related inference problems tractable. We demonstrate that corresponding counting statistics differ significantly between prokaryotes and eukaryotes as well as between "real" PPI networks and scale free network emulators. We also prove that another class of emulators, the low-dimensional geometric random graphs (GRGs) cannot contain a specific type of motifs, complete bipartite graphs, which are abundant in PPI networks.

  12. Impact of dynamic rate coding aspects of mobile phone networks on forensic voice comparison.

    PubMed

    Alzqhoul, Esam A S; Nair, Balamurali B T; Guillemin, Bernard J

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that landline and mobile phone networks are different in their ways of handling the speech signal, and therefore in their impact on it. But the same is also true of the different networks within the mobile phone arena. There are two major mobile phone technologies currently in use today, namely the global system for mobile communications (GSM) and code division multiple access (CDMA) and these are fundamentally different in their design. For example, the quality of the coded speech in the GSM network is a function of channel quality, whereas in the CDMA network it is determined by channel capacity (i.e., the number of users sharing a cell site). This paper examines the impact on the speech signal of a key feature of these networks, namely dynamic rate coding, and its subsequent impact on the task of likelihood-ratio-based forensic voice comparison (FVC). Surprisingly, both FVC accuracy and precision are found to be better for both GSM- and CDMA-coded speech than for uncoded. Intuitively one expects FVC accuracy to increase with increasing coded speech quality. This trend is shown to occur for the CDMA network, but, surprisingly, not for the GSM network. Further, in respect to comparisons between these two networks, FVC accuracy for CDMA-coded speech is shown to be slightly better than for GSM-coded speech, particularly when the coded-speech quality is high, but in terms of FVC precision the two networks are shown to be very similar. Copyright © 2015 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Random vs. nonrandom mixing in network epidemic models.

    PubMed

    Zaric, Gregory S

    2002-04-01

    In this paper we compare random and nonrandom mixing patterns for network epidemic models. Several of studies have examined the impact of different mixing patterns using compartmental epidemic models. We extend the work on compartmental models to the case of network epidemic models. We define two nonrandom mixing patterns for a network epidemic model and investigate the impact that these mixing patterns have on a number of epidemic outcomes when compared to random mixing. We find that different mixing assumptions lead to small but statistically significant differences in disease prevalence, cumulative number of new infections, final population size, and network structure. Significant differences in outcomes were more likely to be observed for larger populations and longer time horizons. Sensitivity analysis revealed that greater differences in outcomes between random and nonrandom mixing were associated with a larger incremental mortality rate among infected individuals, a larger average number of partners, and a greater probability of forming new partnerships. When adjusted for the initial population size, differences between random and nonrandom mixing models were approximately constant across all population sizes considered. We also considered the impact that differences between mixing models might have on the cost effectiveness ratio for epidemic control interventions.

  14. Navigation by anomalous random walks on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Tongfeng; Zhang, Jie; Khajehnejad, Moein; Small, Michael; Zheng, Rui; Hui, Pan

    2016-11-01

    Anomalous random walks having long-range jumps are a critical branch of dynamical processes on networks, which can model a number of search and transport processes. However, traditional measurements based on mean first passage time are not useful as they fail to characterize the cost associated with each jump. Here we introduce a new concept of mean first traverse distance (MFTD) to characterize anomalous random walks that represents the expected traverse distance taken by walkers searching from source node to target node, and we provide a procedure for calculating the MFTD between two nodes. We use Lévy walks on networks as an example, and demonstrate that the proposed approach can unravel the interplay between diffusion dynamics of Lévy walks and the underlying network structure. Moreover, applying our framework to the famous PageRank search, we show how to inform the optimality of the PageRank search. The framework for analyzing anomalous random walks on complex networks offers a useful new paradigm to understand the dynamics of anomalous diffusion processes, and provides a unified scheme to characterize search and transport processes on networks.

  15. Navigation by anomalous random walks on complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Tongfeng; Zhang, Jie; Khajehnejad, Moein; Small, Michael; Zheng, Rui; Hui, Pan

    2016-01-01

    Anomalous random walks having long-range jumps are a critical branch of dynamical processes on networks, which can model a number of search and transport processes. However, traditional measurements based on mean first passage time are not useful as they fail to characterize the cost associated with each jump. Here we introduce a new concept of mean first traverse distance (MFTD) to characterize anomalous random walks that represents the expected traverse distance taken by walkers searching from source node to target node, and we provide a procedure for calculating the MFTD between two nodes. We use Lévy walks on networks as an example, and demonstrate that the proposed approach can unravel the interplay between diffusion dynamics of Lévy walks and the underlying network structure. Moreover, applying our framework to the famous PageRank search, we show how to inform the optimality of the PageRank search. The framework for analyzing anomalous random walks on complex networks offers a useful new paradigm to understand the dynamics of anomalous diffusion processes, and provides a unified scheme to characterize search and transport processes on networks. PMID:27876855

  16. Listening to the Noise: Random Fluctuations Reveal Gene Network Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munsky, Brian; Trinh, Brooke; Khammash, Mustafa

    2010-03-01

    The cellular environment is abuzz with noise originating from the inherent random motion of reacting molecules in the living cell. In this noisy environment, clonal cell populations exhibit cell-to-cell variability that can manifest significant prototypical differences. Noise induced stochastic fluctuations in cellular constituents can be measured and their statistics quantified using flow cytometry, single molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization, time lapse fluorescence microscopy and other single cell and single molecule measurement techniques. We show that these random fluctuations carry within them valuable information about the underlying genetic network. Far from being a nuisance, the ever-present cellular noise acts as a rich source of excitation that, when processed through a gene network, carries its distinctive fingerprint that encodes a wealth of information about that network. We demonstrate that in some cases the analysis of these random fluctuations enables the full identification of network parameters, including those that may otherwise be difficult to measure. We use theoretical investigations to establish experimental guidelines for the identification of gene regulatory networks, and we apply these guideline to experimentally identify predictive models for different regulatory mechanisms in bacteria and yeast.

  17. Bistable synchronization of coupled random network of cubic maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Mayurakshi

    2017-06-01

    The spatiotemporal behavior of coupled cubic maps over a dynamic network having randomness in coupling connections is investigated here. Due to the bistable nature of cubic map the synchronization behavior is dependent on the initial conditions. The network can stabilize to any one of the nonzero unstable fixed point of the map depending on the initial conditions. Linear stability analysis of synchronized fixed point gives the value of coupling at which onset of synchronization occurs. The critical coupling strength depends on the randomness in rewiring, properties of the local map, but it is independent of lattice size. Numerical simulation results match very well with predictions from theoretical analysis. Behaviors of the network for synchronized initial conditions are pointed out. Looking at the case of stability in a network with static rewiring, it is found that, the range of synchronization of fixed point becomes shorter than the dynamical random one. Contribution of delay in the synchronization phenomenon is studied both analytically and numerically and the range of synchronized period-2 orbit is found to be quite similar in both the cases. Multistable nature of the delay coupled network is shown numerically.

  18. Random Time Identity Based Firewall In Mobile Ad hoc Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suman, Patel, R. B.; Singh, Parvinder

    2010-11-01

    A mobile ad hoc network (MANET) is a self-organizing network of mobile routers and associated hosts connected by wireless links. MANETs are highly flexible and adaptable but at the same time are highly prone to security risks due to the open medium, dynamically changing network topology, cooperative algorithms, and lack of centralized control. Firewall is an effective means of protecting a local network from network-based security threats and forms a key component in MANET security architecture. This paper presents a review of firewall implementation techniques in MANETs and their relative merits and demerits. A new approach is proposed to select MANET nodes at random for firewall implementation. This approach randomly select a new node as firewall after fixed time and based on critical value of certain parameters like power backup. This approach effectively balances power and resource utilization of entire MANET because responsibility of implementing firewall is equally shared among all the nodes. At the same time it ensures improved security for MANETs from outside attacks as intruder will not be able to find out the entry point in MANET due to the random selection of nodes for firewall implementation.

  19. Energy distribution property and energy coding of a structural neural network

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ziyin; Wang, Rubin

    2014-01-01

    Studying neural coding through neural energy is a novel view. In this paper, based on previously proposed single neuron model, the correlation between the energy consumption and the parameters of the cortex networks (amount of neurons, coupling strength, and transform delay) under an oscillational condition were researched. We found that energy distribution varies orderly as these parameters change, and it is closely related to the synchronous oscillation of the neural network. Besides, we compared this method with traditional method of relative coefficient, which shows energy method works equal to or better than the traditional one. It is novel that the synchronous activity and neural network parameters could be researched by assessing energy distribution and consumption. Therefore, the conclusion of this paper will refine the framework of neural coding theory and contribute to our understanding of the coding mechanism of the cerebral cortex. It provides a strong theoretical foundation of a novel neural coding theory—energy coding. PMID:24600382

  20. Energy distribution property and energy coding of a structural neural network.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziyin; Wang, Rubin

    2014-01-01

    Studying neural coding through neural energy is a novel view. In this paper, based on previously proposed single neuron model, the correlation between the energy consumption and the parameters of the cortex networks (amount of neurons, coupling strength, and transform delay) under an oscillational condition were researched. We found that energy distribution varies orderly as these parameters change, and it is closely related to the synchronous oscillation of the neural network. Besides, we compared this method with traditional method of relative coefficient, which shows energy method works equal to or better than the traditional one. It is novel that the synchronous activity and neural network parameters could be researched by assessing energy distribution and consumption. Therefore, the conclusion of this paper will refine the framework of neural coding theory and contribute to our understanding of the coding mechanism of the cerebral cortex. It provides a strong theoretical foundation of a novel neural coding theory-energy coding.

  1. H.264 Layered Coded Video over Wireless Networks: Channel Coding and Modulation Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghandi, M. M.; Barmada, B.; Jones, E. V.; Ghanbari, M.

    2006-12-01

    This paper considers the prioritised transmission of H.264 layered coded video over wireless channels. For appropriate protection of video data, methods such as prioritised forward error correction coding (FEC) or hierarchical quadrature amplitude modulation (HQAM) can be employed, but each imposes system constraints. FEC provides good protection but at the price of a high overhead and complexity. HQAM is less complex and does not introduce any overhead, but permits only fixed data ratios between the priority layers. Such constraints are analysed and practical solutions are proposed for layered transmission of data-partitioned and SNR-scalable coded video where combinations of HQAM and FEC are used to exploit the advantages of both coding methods. Simulation results show that the flexibility of SNR scalability and absence of picture drift imply that SNR scalability as modelled is superior to data partitioning in such applications.

  2. Classical-quantum arbitrarily varying wiretap channel: common randomness assisted code and continuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boche, Holger; Cai, Minglai; Deppe, Christian; Nötzel, Janis

    2017-01-01

    We determine the secrecy capacities under common randomness assisted coding of arbitrarily varying classical-quantum wiretap channels. Furthermore, we determine the secrecy capacity of a mixed channel model which is compound from the sender to the legitimate receiver and varies arbitrarily from the sender to the eavesdropper. We examine when the secrecy capacity is a continuous function of the system parameters as an application and show that resources, e.g., having access to a perfect copy of the outcome of a random experiment, can guarantee continuity of the capacity function of arbitrarily varying classical-quantum wiretap channels.

  3. Critical dynamics of randomly assembled and diluted threshold networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürten, Karl E.; Clark, John W.

    2008-04-01

    The dynamical behavior of a class of randomly assembled networks of binary threshold units subject to random deletion of connections is studied based on the annealed approximation suitable in the thermodynamic limit. The dynamical phase diagram is constructed for several forms of the probability density distribution of nonvanishing connection strengths. The family of power-law distribution functions ρ0(x)=(1-α)/(2|x|α) is found to play a special role in expanding the domain of stable, ordered dynamics at the expense of the disordered, “chaotic” phase. Relationships with other recent studies of the dynamics of complex networks allowing for variable in-degree of the units are explored. The relevance of the pruning of network connections to neural modeling and developmental neurobiology is discussed.

  4. Random Deep Belief Networks for Recognizing Emotions from Speech Signals.

    PubMed

    Wen, Guihua; Li, Huihui; Huang, Jubing; Li, Danyang; Xun, Eryang

    2017-01-01

    Now the human emotions can be recognized from speech signals using machine learning methods; however, they are challenged by the lower recognition accuracies in real applications due to lack of the rich representation ability. Deep belief networks (DBN) can automatically discover the multiple levels of representations in speech signals. To make full of its advantages, this paper presents an ensemble of random deep belief networks (RDBN) method for speech emotion recognition. It firstly extracts the low level features of the input speech signal and then applies them to construct lots of random subspaces. Each random subspace is then provided for DBN to yield the higher level features as the input of the classifier to output an emotion label. All outputted emotion labels are then fused through the majority voting to decide the final emotion label for the input speech signal. The conducted experimental results on benchmark speech emotion databases show that RDBN has better accuracy than the compared methods for speech emotion recognition.

  5. Equivalent Linearization Analysis of Geometrically Nonlinear Random Vibrations Using Commercial Finite Element Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Muravyov, Alexander A.

    2002-01-01

    Two new equivalent linearization implementations for geometrically nonlinear random vibrations are presented. Both implementations are based upon a novel approach for evaluating the nonlinear stiffness within commercial finite element codes and are suitable for use with any finite element code having geometrically nonlinear static analysis capabilities. The formulation includes a traditional force-error minimization approach and a relatively new version of a potential energy-error minimization approach, which has been generalized for multiple degree-of-freedom systems. Results for a simply supported plate under random acoustic excitation are presented and comparisons of the displacement root-mean-square values and power spectral densities are made with results from a nonlinear time domain numerical simulation.

  6. Hybrid scheduling mechanisms for Next-generation Passive Optical Networks based on network coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jijun; Bai, Wei; Liu, Xin; Feng, Nan; Maier, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Network coding (NC) integrated into Passive Optical Networks (PONs) is regarded as a promising solution to achieve higher throughput and energy efficiency. To efficiently support multimedia traffic under this new transmission mode, novel NC-based hybrid scheduling mechanisms for Next-generation PONs (NG-PONs) including energy management, time slot management, resource allocation, and Quality-of-Service (QoS) scheduling are proposed in this paper. First, we design an energy-saving scheme that is based on Bidirectional Centric Scheduling (BCS) to reduce the energy consumption of both the Optical Line Terminal (OLT) and Optical Network Units (ONUs). Next, we propose an intra-ONU scheduling and an inter-ONU scheduling scheme, which takes NC into account to support service differentiation and QoS assurance. The presented simulation results show that BCS achieves higher energy efficiency under low traffic loads, clearly outperforming the alternative NC-based Upstream Centric Scheduling (UCS) scheme. Furthermore, BCS is shown to provide better QoS assurance.

  7. Hide and Seek: Exploiting and Hardening Leakage-Resilient Code Randomization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-30

    execute-only permissions on memory accesses, (ii) code pointer hid- ing (e.g., indirection or encryption), and (iii) decoys (e.g., booby traps). Among...the author and are not nec- essarily endorsed by the United States Government. Direct leakage of memory content (a.k.a., memory dis- closure) [55, 57...execute-only memory (X-only) to build leakage-resilient, randomization-based defenses [5, 19, 27]. These schemes deploy some or all of the fol

  8. Network motifs come in sets: Correlations in the randomization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginoza, Reid; Mugler, Andrew

    2010-07-01

    The identification of motifs—subgraphs that appear significantly more often in a particular network than in an ensemble of randomized networks—has become a ubiquitous method for uncovering potentially important subunits within networks drawn from a wide variety of fields. We find that the most common algorithms used to generate the ensemble from the real network change subgraph counts in a highly correlated manner, such that one subgraph’s status as a motif may not be independent from the statuses of the other subgraphs. We demonstrate this effect for the problem of three- and four-node motif identification in the transcriptional regulatory networks of E. coli and S. cerevisiae in which randomized networks are generated via an edge-swapping algorithm. We find strong correlations among subgraph counts; for three-node subgraphs these correlations are easily interpreted, and we present an information-theoretic tool that may be used to identify correlations among subgraphs of any size. Our results suggest that single-feature statistics such as Z scores that implicitly assume independence among subgraph counts constitute an insufficient summary of the network.

  9. On the Existence of t-Identifying Codes in Undirected De Bruijn Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-04

    Identifying Code; De Bruijn Network; Graph Theory 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...of Codes for Identifying Vertices Graphs , IEEE Transactions on Information Theory , 355 (1998) no. 2, 599-611. 17 ...proves the existence of t-identifying codes on the class of undirected de Bruijn graphs with string length n and alphabet size d, referred to as B(d

  10. Complementarity between entanglement-assisted and quantum distributed random access code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameedi, Alley; Saha, Debashis; Mironowicz, Piotr; Pawłowski, Marcin; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2017-05-01

    Collaborative communication tasks such as random access codes (RACs) employing quantum resources have manifested great potential in enhancing information processing capabilities beyond the classical limitations. The two quantum variants of RACs, namely, quantum random access code (QRAC) and the entanglement-assisted random access code (EARAC), have demonstrated equal prowess for a number of tasks. However, there do exist specific cases where one outperforms the other. In this article, we study a family of 3 →1 distributed RACs [J. Bowles, N. Brunner, and M. Pawłowski, Phys. Rev. A 92, 022351 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.92.022351] and present its general construction of both the QRAC and the EARAC. We demonstrate that, depending on the function of inputs that is sought, if QRAC achieves the maximal success probability then EARAC fails to do so and vice versa. Moreover, a tripartite Bell-type inequality associated with the EARAC variants reveals the genuine multipartite nonlocality exhibited by our protocol. We conclude with an experimental realization of the 3 →1 distributed QRAC that achieves higher success probabilities than the maximum possible with EARACs for a number of tasks.

  11. Optical receiver sensitivity analysis for electronic code division multiple access over passive optical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yamei; Liang, Siyuan; Wang, Liqian; Chen, Xue

    2010-12-01

    Optical receiver sensitivity for electronic code division multiple access over a passive optical network (ECDMA-PON) is analyzed theoretically. Compared with TDM system, ECDMA-PON offers better receiver sensitivity due to coding gain. Fundamental simulation results are provided to show its validity.

  12. Knowledge extraction from evolving spiking neural networks with rank order population coding.

    PubMed

    Soltic, Snjezana; Kasabov, Nikola

    2010-12-01

    This paper demonstrates how knowledge can be extracted from evolving spiking neural networks with rank order population coding. Knowledge discovery is a very important feature of intelligent systems. Yet, a disproportionally small amount of research is centered on the issue of knowledge extraction from spiking neural networks which are considered to be the third generation of artificial neural networks. The lack of knowledge representation compatibility is becoming a major detriment to end users of these networks. We show that a high-level knowledge can be obtained from evolving spiking neural networks. More specifically, we propose a method for fuzzy rule extraction from an evolving spiking network with rank order population coding. The proposed method was used for knowledge discovery on two benchmark taste recognition problems where the knowledge learnt by an evolving spiking neural network was extracted in the form of zero-order Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy IF-THEN rules.

  13. Random Evolution of Idiotypic Networks: Dynamics and Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brede, Markus; Behn, Ulrich

    The paper deals with modelling a subsystem of the immune system, the so-called idiotypic network (INW). INWs, conceived by N.K. Jerne in 1974, are functional networks of interacting antibodies and B cells. In principle, Jernes' framework provides solutions to many issues in immunology, such as immunological memory, mechanisms for antigen recognition and self/non-self discrimination. Explaining the interconnection between the elementary components, local dynamics, network formation and architecture, and possible modes of global system function appears to be an ideal playground of statistical mechanics. We present a simple cellular automaton model, based on a graph representation of the system. From a simplified description of idiotypic interactions, rules for the random evolution of networks of occupied and empty sites on these graphs are derived. In certain biologically relevant parameter ranges the resultant dynamics leads to stationary states. A stationary state is found to correspond to a specific pattern of network organization. It turns out that even these very simple rules give rise to a multitude of different kinds of patterns. We characterize these networks by classifying `static' and `dynamic' network-patterns. A type of `dynamic' network is found to display many features of real INWs.

  14. MFPT calculation for random walks in inhomogeneous networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesundera, Isuri; Halgamuge, Malka N.; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Nanayakkara, Thrishantha

    2016-11-01

    Knowing the expected arrival time at a particular state, also known as the mean first passage time (MFPT), often plays an important role for a large class of random walkers in their respective state-spaces. Contrasting to ideal conditions required by recent advancements on MFPT estimations, many naturally occurring random walkers encounter inhomogeneity of transport characteristics in the networks they walk on. This paper presents a heuristic method to divide an inhomogeneous network into homogeneous network primitives (NPs) optimized using particle swarm optimizer, and to use a 'hop-wise' MFPT calculation method. This methodology's potential is demonstrated through simulated random walks and with a case study using the dataset of past cyclone tracks over the North Atlantic Ocean. Parallel processing was used to increase calculation efficiency. The predictions using the proposed method are compared to real data averages and predictions assuming homogeneous transport properties. The results show that breaking the problem into NPs reduces the average error from 18.8% to 5.4% with respect to the homogeneous network assumption.

  15. Scaling properties of random walks on small-world networks.

    PubMed

    Almaas, E; Kulkarni, R V; Stroud, D

    2003-11-01

    Using both numerical simulations and scaling arguments, we study the behavior of a random walker on a one-dimensional small-world network. For the properties we study, we find that the random walk obeys a characteristic scaling form. These properties include the average number of distinct sites visited by the random walker, the mean-square displacement of the walker, and the distribution of first-return times. The scaling form has three characteristic time regimes. At short times, the walker does not see the small-world shortcuts and effectively probes an ordinary Euclidean network in d dimensions. At intermediate times, the properties of the walker shows scaling behavior characteristic of an infinite small-world network. Finally, at long times, the finite size of the network becomes important, and many of the properties of the walker saturate. We propose general analytical forms for the scaling properties in all three regimes, and show that these analytical forms are consistent with our numerical simulations.

  16. The Effect of Random Edge Removal on Network Degree Sequence

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, Thomas; Eubank, Stephen; Srinivasan, Aravind

    2012-01-01

    Many networks arise in a random and distributed fashion, and yet result in having a specific type of degree structure: e.g., the WWW, many social networks, biological networks, etc., exhibit power-law, stretched exponential, or similar degree structures. Much work has examined how a graph’s degree-structure influences other graph properties such as connectivity, diameter, etc. Probabilistic edge removal models link failures, information spreading, and processes that consider (random) subgraphs. They also model spreading influence of information as in the independent cascade model [20]. We examine what happens to a graph’s degree structure under edge failures where the edges are removed independently with identical probabilities. We start by analyzing the effect of edge failure on the degree sequence for power-law and exponential networks, and improve upon results of Martin, Carr & Faulon and Cooper & Lu; then, using intuition from the power-law case, we derive asymptotic results for almost any degree sequence of interest. Our major result shows a classification of degree sequences which leads to simple rules that give much of the new expected degree sequence after random edge-removal; we also provide associated concentration bounds. PMID:23024579

  17. Coded-subcarrier-aided chromatic dispersion monitoring scheme for flexible optical OFDM networks.

    PubMed

    Tse, Kam-Hon; Chan, Chun-Kit

    2014-08-11

    A simple coded-subcarrier aided scheme is proposed to perform chromatic dispersion monitoring in flexible optical OFDM networks. A pair of coded label subcarriers is added to both edges of the optical OFDM signal spectrum at the edge transmitter node. Upon reception at any intermediate or the receiver node, chromatic dispersion estimation is performed, via simple direct detection, followed by electronic correlation procedures with the designated code sequences. The feasibility and the performance of the proposed scheme have been experimentally characterized. It provides a cost-effective monitoring solution for the optical OFDM signals across intermediate nodes in flexible OFDM networks.

  18. Low-dimensional dynamics of structured random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljadeff, Johnatan; Renfrew, David; Vegué, Marina; Sharpee, Tatyana O.

    2016-02-01

    Using a generalized random recurrent neural network model, and by extending our recently developed mean-field approach [J. Aljadeff, M. Stern, and T. Sharpee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 088101 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.088101], we study the relationship between the network connectivity structure and its low-dimensional dynamics. Each connection in the network is a random number with mean 0 and variance that depends on pre- and postsynaptic neurons through a sufficiently smooth function g of their identities. We find that these networks undergo a phase transition from a silent to a chaotic state at a critical point we derive as a function of g . Above the critical point, although unit activation levels are chaotic, their autocorrelation functions are restricted to a low-dimensional subspace. This provides a direct link between the network's structure and some of its functional characteristics. We discuss example applications of the general results to neuroscience where we derive the support of the spectrum of connectivity matrices with heterogeneous and possibly correlated degree distributions, and to ecology where we study the stability of the cascade model for food web structure.

  19. Low-dimensional dynamics of structured random networks

    PubMed Central

    Aljade, Johnatan; Renfrew, David; Vegué, Marina; Sharpee, Tatyana O.

    2016-01-01

    Using a generalized random recurrent neural network model, and by extending our recently developed mean-field approach, we study the relationship between the network connectivity structure and its low dimensional dynamics. Each connection in the network is a random number with mean 0 and variance that depends on pre- and post-synaptic neurons through a sufficiently smooth function g of their identities. We find that these networks undergo a phase transition from a silent to a chaotic state at a critical point we derive as a function of g. Above the critical point, although unit activation levels are chaotic, their autocorrelation functions are restricted to a low-dimensional subspace. This provides a direct link between the network's structure and some of its functional characteristics. We discuss example applications of the general results to neuroscience where we derive the support of the spectrum of connectivity matrices with heterogeneous and possibly correlated degree distributions, and to ecology where we study the stability of the cascade model for food web structure. PMID:26986347

  20. QRAP: A numerical code for projected (Q)uasiparticle (RA)ndom (P)hase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samana, A. R.; Krmpotić, F.; Bertulani, C. A.

    2010-06-01

    A computer code for quasiparticle random phase approximation - QRPA and projected quasiparticle random phase approximation - PQRPA models of nuclear structure is explained in details. The residual interaction is approximated by a simple δ-force. An important application of the code consists in evaluating nuclear matrix elements involved in neutrino-nucleus reactions. As an example, cross sections for 56Fe and 12C are calculated and the code output is explained. The application to other nuclei and the description of other nuclear and weak decay processes are also discussed. Program summaryTitle of program: QRAP ( Quasiparticle RAndom Phase approximation) Computers: The code has been created on a PC, but also runs on UNIX or LINUX machines Operating systems: WINDOWS or UNIX Program language used: Fortran-77 Memory required to execute with typical data: 16 Mbytes of RAM memory and 2 MB of hard disk space No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: ˜ 8000 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: ˜ 256 kB Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of physical problem: The program calculates neutrino- and antineutrino-nucleus cross sections as a function of the incident neutrino energy, and muon capture rates, using the QRPA or PQRPA as nuclear structure models. Method of solution: The QRPA, or PQRPA, equations are solved in a self-consistent way for even-even nuclei. The nuclear matrix elements for the neutrino-nucleus interaction are treated as the beta inverse reaction of odd-odd nuclei as function of the transfer momentum. Typical running time: ≈ 5 min on a 3 GHz processor for Data set 1.

  1. An Optimal Pull-Push Scheduling Algorithm Based on Network Coding for Mesh Peer-to-Peer Live Streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Laizhong; Jiang, Yong; Wu, Jianping; Xia, Shutao

    Most large-scale Peer-to-Peer (P2P) live streaming systems are constructed as a mesh structure, which can provide robustness in the dynamic P2P environment. The pull scheduling algorithm is widely used in this mesh structure, which degrades the performance of the entire system. Recently, network coding was introduced in mesh P2P streaming systems to improve the performance, which makes the push strategy feasible. One of the most famous scheduling algorithms based on network coding is R2, with a random push strategy. Although R2 has achieved some success, the push scheduling strategy still lacks a theoretical model and optimal solution. In this paper, we propose a novel optimal pull-push scheduling algorithm based on network coding, which consists of two stages: the initial pull stage and the push stage. The main contributions of this paper are: 1) we put forward a theoretical analysis model that considers the scarcity and timeliness of segments; 2) we formulate the push scheduling problem to be a global optimization problem and decompose it into local optimization problems on individual peers; 3) we introduce some rules to transform the local optimization problem into a classical min-cost optimization problem for solving it; 4) We combine the pull strategy with the push strategy and systematically realize our scheduling algorithm. Simulation results demonstrate that decode delay, decode ratio and redundant fraction of the P2P streaming system with our algorithm can be significantly improved, without losing throughput and increasing overhead.

  2. Optimal resource allocation in random networks with transportation bandwidths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, C. H.; Wong, K. Y. Michael

    2009-03-01

    We apply statistical physics to study the task of resource allocation in random sparse networks with limited bandwidths for the transportation of resources along the links. Recursive relations from the Bethe approximation are converted into useful algorithms. Bottlenecks emerge when the bandwidths are small, causing an increase in the fraction of idle links. For a given total bandwidth per node, the efficiency of allocation increases with the network connectivity. In the high connectivity limit, we find a phase transition at a critical bandwidth, above which clusters of balanced nodes appear, characterized by a profile of homogenized resource allocation similar to the Maxwell construction.

  3. Reliable Wireless Broadcast with Linear Network Coding for Multipoint-to-Multipoint Real-Time Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yoshihisa; Yomo, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Shinji; Davis, Peter; Miura, Ryu; Obana, Sadao; Sampei, Seiichi

    This paper proposes multipoint-to-multipoint (MPtoMP) real-time broadcast transmission using network coding for ad-hoc networks like video game networks. We aim to achieve highly reliable MPtoMP broadcasting using IEEE 802.11 media access control (MAC) that does not include a retransmission mechanism. When each node detects packets from the other nodes in a sequence, the correctly detected packets are network-encoded, and the encoded packet is broadcasted in the next sequence as a piggy-back for its native packet. To prevent increase of overhead in each packet due to piggy-back packet transmission, network coding vector for each node is exchanged between all nodes in the negotiation phase. Each user keeps using the same coding vector generated in the negotiation phase, and only coding information that represents which user signal is included in the network coding process is transmitted along with the piggy-back packet. Our simulation results show that the proposed method can provide higher reliability than other schemes using multi point relay (MPR) or redundant transmissions such as forward error correction (FEC). We also implement the proposed method in a wireless testbed, and show that the proposed method achieves high reliability in a real-world environment with a practical degree of complexity when installed on current wireless devices.

  4. Chirp- and random-based coded ultrasonic excitation for localized blood-brain barrier opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, H. A. S.; Wang, S.; Wu, S.-Y.; Karakatsani, M. E.; Acosta, C.; Carneiro, A. A. O.; Konofagou, E. E.

    2015-10-01

    Chirp- and random-based coded excitation methods have been proposed to reduce standing wave formation and improve focusing of transcranial ultrasound. However, no clear evidence has been shown to support the benefits of these ultrasonic excitation sequences in vivo. This study evaluates the chirp and periodic selection of random frequency (PSRF) coded-excitation methods for opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in mice. Three groups of mice (n  =  15) were injected with polydisperse microbubbles and sonicated in the caudate putamen using the chirp/PSRF coded (bandwidth: 1.5-1.9 MHz, peak negative pressure: 0.52 MPa, duration: 30 s) or standard ultrasound (frequency: 1.5 MHz, pressure: 0.52 MPa, burst duration: 20 ms, duration: 5 min) sequences. T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI scans were performed to quantitatively analyze focused ultrasound induced BBB opening. The mean opening volumes evaluated from the MRI were 9.38+/- 5.71 mm3, 8.91+/- 3.91 mm3and 35.47+/- 5.10 mm3 for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The mean cavitation levels were 55.40+/- 28.43 V.s, 63.87+/- 29.97 V.s and 356.52+/- 257.15 V.s for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The chirp and PSRF coded pulsing sequences improved the BBB opening localization by inducing lower cavitation levels and smaller opening volumes compared to results of the regular sonication technique. Larger bandwidths were associated with more focused targeting but were limited by the frequency response of the transducer, the skull attenuation and the microbubbles optimal frequency range. The coded methods could therefore facilitate highly localized drug delivery as well as benefit other transcranial ultrasound techniques that use higher pressure levels and higher precision to induce the necessary bioeffects in a brain region while avoiding damage to the surrounding healthy tissue.

  5. Chirp- and random-based coded ultrasonic excitation for localized blood-brain barrier opening

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, HAS; Wang, S; Wu, S-Y; Karakatsani, ME; Acosta, C; Carneiro, AAO; Konofagou, EE

    2015-01-01

    Chirp- and random-based coded excitation methods have been proposed to reduce standing wave formation and improve focusing of transcranial ultrasound. However, no clear evidence has been shown to support the benefits of these ultrasonic excitation sequences in vivo. This study evaluates the chirp and periodic selection of random frequency (PSRF) coded-excitation methods for opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in mice. Three groups of mice (n=15) were injected with polydisperse microbubbles and sonicated in the caudate putamen using the chirp/PSRF coded (bandwidth: 1.5-1.9 MHz, peak negative pressure: 0.52 MPa, duration: 30 s) or standard ultrasound (frequency: 1.5 MHz, pressure: 0.52 MPa, burst duration: 20 ms, duration: 5 min) sequences. T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI scans were performed to quantitatively analyze focused ultrasound induced BBB opening. The mean opening volumes evaluated from the MRI were 9.38±5.71 mm3, 8.91±3.91 mm3 and 35.47 ± 5.10 mm3 for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The mean cavitation levels were 55.40±28.43 V.s, 63.87±29.97 V.s and 356.52±257.15 V.s for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The chirp and PSRF coded pulsing sequences improved the BBB opening localization by inducing lower cavitation levels and smaller opening volumes compared to results of the regular sonication technique. Larger bandwidths were associated with more focused targeting but were limited by the frequency response of the transducer, the skull attenuation and the microbubbles optimal frequency range. The coded methods could therefore facilitate highly localized drug delivery as well as benefit other transcranial ultrasound techniques that use higher pressure levels and higher precision to induce the necessary bioeffects in a brain region while avoiding damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. PMID:26394091

  6. Limited Imitation Contagion on Random Networks: Chaos, Universality, and Unpredictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Harris, Kameron Decker; Danforth, Christopher M.

    2013-04-01

    We study a family of binary state, socially inspired contagion models which incorporate imitation limited by an aversion to complete conformity. We uncover rich behavior in our models whether operating with either probabilistic or deterministic individual response functions on both dynamic and fixed random networks. In particular, we find significant variation in the limiting behavior of a population’s infected fraction, ranging from steady state to chaotic. We show that period doubling arises as we increase the average node degree, and that the universality class of this well-known route to chaos depends on the interaction structure of random networks rather than the microscopic behavior of individual nodes. We find that increasing the fixedness of the system tends to stabilize the infected fraction, yet disjoint, multiple equilibria are possible depending solely on the choice of the initially infected node.

  7. Random lasing in organo-lead halide perovskite microcrystal networks

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanker, R.; Brigeman, A. N.; Giebink, N. C.; Larsen, A. V.; Stewart, R. J.; Asbury, J. B.

    2014-10-13

    We report optically pumped random lasing in planar methylammonium lead iodide perovskite microcrystal networks that form spontaneously from spin coating. Low thresholds (<200 μJ/cm{sup 2}) and narrow linewidths (Δλ < 0.5 nm) reflect lasing from closed quasi-modes that result from ballistic waveguiding in linear network segments linked by scattering at the junctions. Spatio-spectral imaging indicates that these quasi-modes extend over lateral length scales >100 μm and spatially overlap with one another, resulting in chaotic pulse-to-pulse intensity fluctuations due to gain competition. These results demonstrate this class of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite as a platform to study random lasing with well-defined, low-level disorder, and support the potential of these materials for use in semiconductor laser applications.

  8. Initial state randomness improves sequence learning in a model hippocampal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shon, A. P.; Wu X.; Sullivan, D. W.; Levy, W. B.

    2002-03-01

    Randomness can be a useful component of computation. Using a computationally minimal, but still biologically based model of the hippocampus, we evaluate the effects of initial state randomization on learning a cognitive problem that requires this brain structure. Greater randomness of initial states leads to more robust performance in simulations of the cognitive task called transverse patterning, a context-dependent discrimination task that we code as a sequence prediction problem. At the conclusion of training, greater initial randomness during training trials also correlates with increased, repetitive firing of select individual neurons, previously named local context neurons. In essence, such repetitively firing neurons recognize subsequences, and previously their presence has been correlated with solving the transverse patterning problem. A more detailed analysis of the simulations across training trials reveals more about initial state randomization. The beneficial effects of initial state randomization derive from enhanced variation, across training trials, of the sequential states of a network. This greater variation is not uniformly present during training; it is largely restricted to the beginning of training and when novel sequences are introduced. Little such variation occurs after extensive or even moderate amounts of training. We explain why variation is high early in training, but not later. This automatic modulation of the initial-state-driven random variation through state space is reminiscent of simulated annealing where modulated randomization encourages a selectively broad search through state space. In contrast to an annealing schedule, the selective occurrence of such a random search here is an emergent property, and the critical randomization occurs during training rather than testing.

  9. All-optical code routing in interconnected optical CDMA and WDM ring networks.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yanhua; Fok, Mable P; Prucnal, Paul R; Wang, Ting

    2010-11-01

    We propose an all-optical hybrid network composed of optical code division multiple access (CDMA) rings interconnecting through a reconfigurable wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) metro area ring. This network retains the advantages of both the optical CDMA and WDM techniques, including asynchronous access and differentiated quality of service, while removing the hard limit on the number of subscribers and increasing network flexibility. The all-optical network is enabled by using nonlinear optical loop mirrors in an add/drop router (ADR) that performs code conversion, dropping, and switching asynchronously. We experimentally demonstrate the functionalities of the ADR in the proposed scheme asynchronously and obtain error-free performance. The bit-error rate measurements show acceptable power penalties for different code routes.

  10. Efficient network-aware macroblock mode decision for error resilient H.264/AVC video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Luis Ducla; Nunes, Paulo; Pereira, Fernando

    2008-08-01

    This paper proposes a network-aware macroblock (MB) coding mode decision method, which is both error resilient and coding efficient. This method differs from traditional mode decision methods since MB mode decisions are made by simultaneously taking into account: i) their rate-distortion (RD) cost and also ii) their impact on error resilience by considering feedback information from the underlying network regarding current error characteristics. By doing so, the amount of Intra coded MBs can be varied to better suit, in a cost efficient way, the current state of the network and, therefore, further improve the decoded video quality for a given packet loss rate. The proposed approach outperforms a network-aware version of the H.264/AVC reference software with cyclic MB Intra refresh, for typical test sequences encoded at various bit rates and for several error conditions in terms of packet loss rate.

  11. A neutron spectrum unfolding computer code based on artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Rodríguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.

    2014-02-01

    The Bonner Spheres Spectrometer consists of a thermal neutron sensor placed at the center of a number of moderating polyethylene spheres of different diameters. From the measured readings, information can be derived about the spectrum of the neutron field where measurements were made. Disadvantages of the Bonner system are the weight associated with each sphere and the need to sequentially irradiate the spheres, requiring long exposure periods. Provided a well-established response matrix and adequate irradiation conditions, the most delicate part of neutron spectrometry, is the unfolding process. The derivation of the spectral information is not simple because the unknown is not given directly as a result of the measurements. The drawbacks associated with traditional unfolding procedures have motivated the need of complementary approaches. Novel methods based on Artificial Intelligence, mainly Artificial Neural Networks, have been widely investigated. In this work, a neutron spectrum unfolding code based on neural nets technology is presented. This code is called Neutron Spectrometry and Dosimetry with Artificial Neural networks unfolding code that was designed in a graphical interface. The core of the code is an embedded neural network architecture previously optimized using the robust design of artificial neural networks methodology. The main features of the code are: easy to use, friendly and intuitive to the user. This code was designed for a Bonner Sphere System based on a 6LiI(Eu) neutron detector and a response matrix expressed in 60 energy bins taken from an International Atomic Energy Agency compilation. The main feature of the code is that as entrance data, for unfolding the neutron spectrum, only seven rate counts measured with seven Bonner spheres are required; simultaneously the code calculates 15 dosimetric quantities as well as the total flux for radiation protection purposes. This code generates a full report with all information of the unfolding in

  12. Intergranular degradation assessment via random grain boundary network analysis

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Mukul; Schwartz, Adam J.; King, Wayne E.

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for determining the resistance of polycrystalline materials to intergranular degradation or failure (IGDF), by analyzing the random grain boundary network connectivity (RGBNC) microstructure. Analysis of the disruption of the RGBNC microstructure may be assess the effectiveness of materials processing in increasing IGDF resistance. Comparison of the RGBNC microstructures of materials exposed to extreme operating conditions to unexposed materials may be used to diagnose and predict possible onset of material failure due to

  13. Random neural networks with multiple classes of signals.

    PubMed

    Gelenbe, E; Fourneau, J M

    1999-05-15

    By extending the pulsed recurrent random neural network (RNN) discussed in Gelenbe (1989, 1990, 1991), we propose a recurrent random neural network model in which each neuron processes several distinctly characterized streams of "signals" or data. The idea that neurons may be able to distinguish between the pulses they receive and use them in a distinct manner is biologically plausible. In engineering applications, the need to process different streams of information simultaneously is commonplace (e.g., in image processing, sensor fusion, or parallel processing systems). In the model we propose, each distinct stream is a class of signals in the form of spikes. Signals may arrive to a neuron from either the outside world (exogenous signals) or other neurons (endogenous signals). As a function of the signals it has received, a neuron can fire and then send signals of some class to another neuron or to the outside world. We show that the multiple signal class random model with exponential interfiring times, Poisson external signal arrivals, and Markovian signal movements between neurons has product form; this implies that the distribution of its state (i.e., the probability that each neuron of the network is excited) can be computed simply from the solution of a system of 2Cn simultaneous nonlinear equations where C is the number of signal classes and n is the number of neurons. Here we derive the stationary solution for the multiple class model and establish necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of the stationary solution. The recurrent random neural network model with multiple classes has already been successfully applied to image texture generation (Atalay & Gelenbe, 1992), where multiple signal classes are used to model different colors in the image.

  14. Laplacian normalization and random walk on heterogeneous networks for disease-gene prioritization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Qin; Han, Guo-Sheng; Yu, Zu-Guo; Li, Jinyan

    2015-08-01

    Random walk on heterogeneous networks is a recently emerging approach to effective disease gene prioritization. Laplacian normalization is a technique capable of normalizing the weight of edges in a network. We use this technique to normalize the gene matrix and the phenotype matrix before the construction of the heterogeneous network, and also use this idea to define the transition matrices of the heterogeneous network. Our method has remarkably better performance than the existing methods for recovering known gene-phenotype relationships. The Shannon information entropy of the distribution of the transition probabilities in our networks is found to be smaller than the networks constructed by the existing methods, implying that a higher number of top-ranked genes can be verified as disease genes. In fact, the most probable gene-phenotype relationships ranked within top 3 or top 5 in our gene lists can be confirmed by the OMIM database for many cases. Our algorithms have shown remarkably superior performance over the state-of-the-art algorithms for recovering gene-phenotype relationships. All Matlab codes can be available upon email request.

  15. Encoding binary neural codes in networks of threshold-linear neurons.

    PubMed

    Curto, Carina; Degeratu, Anda; Itskov, Vladimir

    2013-11-01

    Networks of neurons in the brain encode preferred patterns of neural activity via their synaptic connections. Despite receiving considerable attention, the precise relationship between network connectivity and encoded patterns is still poorly understood. Here we consider this problem for networks of threshold-linear neurons whose computational function is to learn and store a set of binary patterns (e.g., a neural code) as "permitted sets" of the network. We introduce a simple encoding rule that selectively turns "on" synapses between neurons that coappear in one or more patterns. The rule uses synapses that are binary, in the sense of having only two states ("on" or "off"), but also heterogeneous, with weights drawn from an underlying synaptic strength matrix S. Our main results precisely describe the stored patterns that result from the encoding rule, including unintended "spurious" states, and give an explicit characterization of the dependence on S. In particular, we find that binary patterns are successfully stored in these networks when the excitatory connections between neurons are geometrically balanced--i.e., they satisfy a set of geometric constraints. Furthermore, we find that certain types of neural codes are natural in the context of these networks, meaning that the full code can be accurately learned from a highly undersampled set of patterns. Interestingly, many commonly observed neural codes in cortical and hippocampal areas are natural in this sense. As an application, we construct networks that encode hippocampal place field codes nearly exactly, following presentation of only a small fraction of patterns. To obtain our results, we prove new theorems using classical ideas from convex and distance geometry, such as Cayley-Menger determinants, revealing a novel connection between these areas of mathematics and coding properties of neural networks.

  16. Mean field theory for scale-free random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabási, Albert-László; Albert, Réka; Jeong, Hawoong

    1999-10-01

    Random networks with complex topology are common in Nature, describing systems as diverse as the world wide web or social and business networks. Recently, it has been demonstrated that most large networks for which topological information is available display scale-free features. Here we study the scaling properties of the recently introduced scale-free model, that can account for the observed power-law distribution of the connectivities. We develop a mean-field method to predict the growth dynamics of the individual vertices, and use this to calculate analytically the connectivity distribution and the scaling exponents. The mean-field method can be used to address the properties of two variants of the scale-free model, that do not display power-law scaling.

  17. Effects of reciprocity on random walks in weighted networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongzhi; Li, Huan; Sheng, Yibin

    2014-12-12

    It has been recently reported that the reciprocity of real-life weighted networks is very pronounced, however its impact on dynamical processes is poorly understood. In this paper, we study random walks in a scale-free directed weighted network with a trap at the central hub node, where the weight of each directed edge is dominated by a parameter controlling the extent of network reciprocity. We derive two expressions for the mean first passage time (MFPT) to the trap, by using two different techniques, the results of which agree well with each other. We also analytically determine all the eigenvalues as well as their multiplicities for the fundamental matrix of the dynamical process, and show that the largest eigenvalue has an identical dominant scaling as that of the MFPT.We find that the weight parameter has a substantial effect on the MFPT, which behaves as a power-law function of the system size with the power exponent dependent on the parameter, signaling the crucial role of reciprocity in random walks occurring in weighted networks.

  18. Effects of reciprocity on random walks in weighted networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongzhi; Li, Huan; Sheng, Yibin

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the reciprocity of real-life weighted networks is very pronounced, however its impact on dynamical processes is poorly understood. In this paper, we study random walks in a scale-free directed weighted network with a trap at the central hub node, where the weight of each directed edge is dominated by a parameter controlling the extent of network reciprocity. We derive two expressions for the mean first passage time (MFPT) to the trap, by using two different techniques, the results of which agree well with each other. We also analytically determine all the eigenvalues as well as their multiplicities for the fundamental matrix of the dynamical process, and show that the largest eigenvalue has an identical dominant scaling as that of the MFPT.We find that the weight parameter has a substantial effect on the MFPT, which behaves as a power-law function of the system size with the power exponent dependent on the parameter, signaling the crucial role of reciprocity in random walks occurring in weighted networks. PMID:25500907

  19. Coevolution of Quantum and Classical Strategies on Evolving Random Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Iqbal, Azhar; Perc, Matjaž; Chen, Minyou; Abbott, Derek

    2013-01-01

    We study the coevolution of quantum and classical strategies on weighted and directed random networks in the realm of the prisoner’s dilemma game. During the evolution, agents can break and rewire their links with the aim of maximizing payoffs, and they can also adjust the weights to indicate preferences, either positive or negative, towards their neighbors. The network structure itself is thus also subject to evolution. Importantly, the directionality of links does not affect the accumulation of payoffs nor the strategy transfers, but serves only to designate the owner of each particular link and with it the right to adjust the link as needed. We show that quantum strategies outperform classical strategies, and that the critical temptation to defect at which cooperative behavior can be maintained rises, if the network structure is updated frequently. Punishing neighbors by reducing the weights of their links also plays an important role in maintaining cooperation under adverse conditions. We find that the self-organization of the initially random network structure, driven by the evolutionary competition between quantum and classical strategies, leads to the spontaneous emergence of small average path length and a large clustering coefficient. PMID:23874622

  20. Order-Based Representation in Random Networks of Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kermany, Einat; Lyakhov, Vladimir; Zrenner, Christoph; Marom, Shimon

    2008-01-01

    The wide range of time scales involved in neural excitability and synaptic transmission might lead to ongoing change in the temporal structure of responses to recurring stimulus presentations on a trial-to-trial basis. This is probably the most severe biophysical constraint on putative time-based primitives of stimulus representation in neuronal networks. Here we show that in spontaneously developing large-scale random networks of cortical neurons in vitro the order in which neurons are recruited following each stimulus is a naturally emerging representation primitive that is invariant to significant temporal changes in spike times. With a relatively small number of randomly sampled neurons, the information about stimulus position is fully retrievable from the recruitment order. The effective connectivity that makes order-based representation invariant to time warping is characterized by the existence of stations through which activity is required to pass in order to propagate further into the network. This study uncovers a simple invariant in a noisy biological network in vitro; its applicability under in vivo constraints remains to be seen. PMID:19023409

  1. Adaptive Local Information Transfer in Random Boolean Networks.

    PubMed

    Haruna, Taichi

    2017-01-01

    Living systems such as gene regulatory networks and neuronal networks have been supposed to work close to dynamical criticality, where their information-processing ability is optimal at the whole-system level. We investigate how this global information-processing optimality is related to the local information transfer at each individual-unit level. In particular, we introduce an internal adjustment process of the local information transfer and examine whether the former can emerge from the latter. We propose an adaptive random Boolean network model in which each unit rewires its incoming arcs from other units to balance stability of its information processing based on the measurement of the local information transfer pattern. First, we show numerically that random Boolean networks can self-organize toward near dynamical criticality in our model. Second, the proposed model is analyzed by a mean-field theory. We recognize that the rewiring rule has a bootstrapping feature. The stationary indegree distribution is calculated semi-analytically and is shown to be close to dynamical criticality in a broad range of model parameter values.

  2. Nonlinear system modeling with random matrices: echo state networks revisited.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bai; Miller, David J; Wang, Yue

    2012-01-01

    Echo state networks (ESNs) are a novel form of recurrent neural networks (RNNs) that provide an efficient and powerful computational model approximating nonlinear dynamical systems. A unique feature of an ESN is that a large number of neurons (the "reservoir") are used, whose synaptic connections are generated randomly, with only the connections from the reservoir to the output modified by learning. Why a large randomly generated fixed RNN gives such excellent performance in approximating nonlinear systems is still not well understood. In this brief, we apply random matrix theory to examine the properties of random reservoirs in ESNs under different topologies (sparse or fully connected) and connection weights (Bernoulli or Gaussian). We quantify the asymptotic gap between the scaling factor bounds for the necessary and sufficient conditions previously proposed for the echo state property. We then show that the state transition mapping is contractive with high probability when only the necessary condition is satisfied, which corroborates and thus analytically explains the observation that in practice one obtains echo states when the spectral radius of the reservoir weight matrix is smaller than 1.

  3. Analysis of a Coded, M-ary Orthogonal Input Optical Channel with Random-gain Photomultiplier Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    Performance of two coding systems is analyzed for a noisy optical channel with M(=2(L)-ary orthogonal signaling and random gain photomultiplier detection. The considered coding systems are the Reed Solomon (RS) coding with error only correction decoding and the interleaved binary convolutional system with soft decision Viterbi decoding. The required average number of received signal photons per information bit, N sub b, for a desired bit error of 0.000001 is found for a set of commonly used parameters and with a high background noise level. We find that the interleaved binary convolutional coding system is preferable to the RS coding system in performance complexity tradeoffs.

  4. Fat fractal scaling of drainage networks from a random spatial network model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlinger, Michael R.; Troutman, Brent M.

    1992-01-01

    An alternative quantification of the scaling properties of river channel networks is explored using a spatial network model. Whereas scaling descriptions of drainage networks previously have been presented using a fractal analysis primarily of the channel lengths, we illustrate the scaling of the surface area of the channels defining the network pattern with an exponent which is independent of the fractal dimension but not of the fractal nature of the network. The methodology presented is a fat fractal analysis in which the drainage basin minus the channel area is considered the fat fractal. Random channel networks within a fixed basin area are generated on grids of different scales. The sample channel networks generated by the model have a common outlet of fixed width and a rule of upstream channel narrowing specified by a diameter branching exponent using hydraulic and geomorphologic principles. Scaling exponents are computed for each sample network on a given grid size and are regressed against network magnitude. Results indicate that the size of the exponents are related to magnitude of the networks and generally decrease as network magnitude increases. Cases showing differences in scaling exponents with like magnitudes suggest a direction of future work regarding other topologic basin characteristics as potential explanatory variables.

  5. Neural Network Approach to Locating Cryptography in Object Code

    SciTech Connect

    Jason L. Wright; Milos Manic

    2009-09-01

    Finding and identifying cryptography is a growing concern in the malware analysis community. In this paper, artificial neural networks are used to classify functional blocks from a disassembled program as being either cryptography related or not. The resulting system, referred to as NNLC (Neural Net for Locating Cryptography) is presented and results of applying this system to various libraries are described.

  6. Rapid quantification of mutant fitness in diverse bacteria by sequencing randomly bar-coded transposons

    DOE PAGES

    Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Waters, Robert J.; ...

    2015-05-12

    Transposon mutagenesis with next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to annotate gene function in bacteria, but existing protocols for TnSeq require laborious preparation of every sample before sequencing. Thus, the existing protocols are not amenable to the throughput necessary to identify phenotypes and functions for the majority of genes in diverse bacteria. Here, we present a method, random bar code transposon-site sequencing (RB-TnSeq), which increases the throughput of mutant fitness profiling by incorporating random DNA bar codes into Tn5 and mariner transposons and by using bar code sequencing (BarSeq) to assay mutant fitness. RB-TnSeq can be used with anymore » transposon, and TnSeq is performed once per organism instead of once per sample. Each BarSeq assay requires only a simple PCR, and 48 to 96 samples can be sequenced on one lane of an Illumina HiSeq system. We demonstrate the reproducibility and biological significance of RB-TnSeq with Escherichia coli, Phaeobacter inhibens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Shewanella amazonensis, and Shewanella oneidensis. To demonstrate the increased throughput of RB-TnSeq, we performed 387 successful genome-wide mutant fitness assays representing 130 different bacterium-carbon source combinations and identified 5,196 genes with significant phenotypes across the five bacteria. In P. inhibens, we used our mutant fitness data to identify genes important for the utilization of diverse carbon substrates, including a putative D-mannose isomerase that is required for mannitol catabolism. RB-TnSeq will enable the cost-effective functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness profiling. A large challenge in microbiology is the functional assessment of the millions of uncharacterized genes identified by genome sequencing. Transposon mutagenesis coupled to next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to assign phenotypes and functions to genes. However, the current strategies for TnSeq are

  7. Rapid quantification of mutant fitness in diverse bacteria by sequencing randomly bar-coded transposons

    SciTech Connect

    Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Waters, Robert J.; Lamson, Jacob S.; He, Jennifer; Hoover, Cindi A.; Blow, Matthew J.; Bristow, James; Butland, Gareth; Arkin, Adam P.; Deutschbauer, Adam

    2015-05-12

    Transposon mutagenesis with next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to annotate gene function in bacteria, but existing protocols for TnSeq require laborious preparation of every sample before sequencing. Thus, the existing protocols are not amenable to the throughput necessary to identify phenotypes and functions for the majority of genes in diverse bacteria. Here, we present a method, random bar code transposon-site sequencing (RB-TnSeq), which increases the throughput of mutant fitness profiling by incorporating random DNA bar codes into Tn5 and mariner transposons and by using bar code sequencing (BarSeq) to assay mutant fitness. RB-TnSeq can be used with any transposon, and TnSeq is performed once per organism instead of once per sample. Each BarSeq assay requires only a simple PCR, and 48 to 96 samples can be sequenced on one lane of an Illumina HiSeq system. We demonstrate the reproducibility and biological significance of RB-TnSeq with Escherichia coli, Phaeobacter inhibens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Shewanella amazonensis, and Shewanella oneidensis. To demonstrate the increased throughput of RB-TnSeq, we performed 387 successful genome-wide mutant fitness assays representing 130 different bacterium-carbon source combinations and identified 5,196 genes with significant phenotypes across the five bacteria. In P. inhibens, we used our mutant fitness data to identify genes important for the utilization of diverse carbon substrates, including a putative D-mannose isomerase that is required for mannitol catabolism. RB-TnSeq will enable the cost-effective functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness profiling. A large challenge in microbiology is the functional assessment of the millions of uncharacterized genes identified by genome sequencing. Transposon mutagenesis coupled to next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to assign phenotypes and functions to genes

  8. Analysis of random point images with the use of symbolic computation codes and generalized Catalan numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, A. L.; Tuzikov, A. V.; Solov'ev, A. A.; Torgov, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    Original codes and combinatorial-geometrical computational schemes are presented, which are developed and applied for finding exact analytical formulas that describe the probability of errorless readout of random point images recorded by a scanning aperture with a limited number of threshold levels. Combinatorial problems encountered in the course of the study and associated with the new generalization of Catalan numbers are formulated and solved. An attempt is made to find the explicit analytical form of these numbers, which is, on the one hand, a necessary stage of solving the basic research problem and, on the other hand, an independent self-consistent problem.

  9. Random access to mobile networks with advanced error correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dippold, Michael

    A random access scheme for unreliable data channels is investigated in conjunction with an adaptive Hybrid-II Automatic Repeat Request (ARQ) scheme using Rate Compatible Punctured Codes (RCPC) Forward Error Correction (FEC). A simple scheme with fixed frame length and equal slot sizes is chosen and reservation is implicit by the first packet transmitted randomly in a free slot, similar to Reservation Aloha. This allows the further transmission of redundancy if the last decoding attempt failed. Results show that a high channel utilization and superior throughput can be achieved with this scheme that shows a quite low implementation complexity. For the example of an interleaved Rayleigh channel and soft decision utilization and mean delay are calculated. A utilization of 40 percent may be achieved for a frame with the number of slots being equal to half the station number under high traffic load. The effects of feedback channel errors and some countermeasures are discussed.

  10. Random access to mobile networks with advanced error correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dippold, Michael

    1990-01-01

    A random access scheme for unreliable data channels is investigated in conjunction with an adaptive Hybrid-II Automatic Repeat Request (ARQ) scheme using Rate Compatible Punctured Codes (RCPC) Forward Error Correction (FEC). A simple scheme with fixed frame length and equal slot sizes is chosen and reservation is implicit by the first packet transmitted randomly in a free slot, similar to Reservation Aloha. This allows the further transmission of redundancy if the last decoding attempt failed. Results show that a high channel utilization and superior throughput can be achieved with this scheme that shows a quite low implementation complexity. For the example of an interleaved Rayleigh channel and soft decision utilization and mean delay are calculated. A utilization of 40 percent may be achieved for a frame with the number of slots being equal to half the station number under high traffic load. The effects of feedback channel errors and some countermeasures are discussed.

  11. Network sampling coverage II: The effect of non-random missing data on network measurement.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeffrey A; Moody, James; Morgan, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Missing data is an important, but often ignored, aspect of a network study. Measurement validity is affected by missing data, but the level of bias can be difficult to gauge. Here, we describe the effect of missing data on network measurement across widely different circumstances. In Part I of this study (Smith and Moody, 2013), we explored the effect of measurement bias due to randomly missing nodes. Here, we drop the assumption that data are missing at random: what happens to estimates of key network statistics when central nodes are more/less likely to be missing? We answer this question using a wide range of empirical networks and network measures. We find that bias is worse when more central nodes are missing. With respect to network measures, Bonacich centrality is highly sensitive to the loss of central nodes, while closeness centrality is not; distance and bicomponent size are more affected than triad summary measures and behavioral homophily is more robust than degree-homophily. With respect to types of networks, larger, directed networks tend to be more robust, but the relation is weak. We end the paper with a practical application, showing how researchers can use our results (translated into a publically available java application) to gauge the bias in their own data.

  12. Mechanical Behavior of Homogeneous and Composite Random Fiber Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahsavari, Ali

    Random fiber networks are present in many biological and non-biological materials such as paper, cytoskeleton, and tissue scaffolds. Mechanical behavior of networks is controlled by the mechanical properties of the constituent fibers and the architecture of the network. To characterize these two main factors, different parameters such as fiber density, fiber length, average segment length, nature of the cross-links at the fiber intersections, ratio of bending to axial behavior of fibers have been considered. Random fiber networks are usually modeled by representing each fiber as a Timoshenko or an Euler-Bernoulli beam and each cross-link as either a welded or rotating joint. In this dissertation, the effect of these modeling options on the dependence of the overall linear network modulus on microstructural parameters is studied. It is concluded that Timoshenko beams can be used for the whole range of density and fiber stiffness parameters, while the Euler-Bernoulli model can be used only at relatively low densities. In the low density-low bending stiffness range, elastic strain energy is stored in the bending mode of the deformation, while in the other extreme range of parameters, the energy is stored predominantly in the axial and shear deformation modes. It is shown that both rotating and welded joint models give the same rules for scaling of the network modulus with different micromechanical parameters. The elastic modulus of sparsely cross-linked random fiber networks, i.e. networks in which the degree of cross-linking varies, is studied. The relationship between the micromechanical parameters - fiber density, fiber axial and bending stiffness, and degree of cross-linking - and the overall elastic modulus is presented in terms of a master curve. It is shown that the master plot with various degrees of cross-linking can be collapsed to a curve which is also valid for fully cross-linked networks. Random fiber networks in which fibers are bonded to each other are

  13. Flow Localization in Non-Linear Random Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donev, Aleksandar; Phillip, Duxbury

    2001-03-01

    Local instabilities occur in the flow-potential characterstics of many complex materials, such as superconductors, dielectrics and porous materials. We describe a study of large networks in which each bond has a flow-potential characteristic having a threshold behavior. The thresholds vary randomly with values drawn from a variety of probability distributions. These large networks also exhibit a threshold-type response. The macroscopic onset occurs through a geometrical localization of the flow in the networks. For superconducting materials the critical current occurs when a surface of saturated arcs occurs transverse to the direction of flow. For porous materials on the other hand, at the macroscopic critical pressure a linear flow path begins across the network. We find these geometrical structures at the critical threshold using combinatorial graph algoritmhs (such as Dijkstra or push-relabel algorithms). The overall macroscopic problem is a convex, separable, minimal-cost network optimization problem. We have developed an efficient parallel algorithm for this problem and describe some preliminary results.

  14. Robustness and information propagation in attractors of Random Boolean Networks.

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Price, Jason; Gupta, Abhishekh; Ribeiro, Andre S

    2012-01-01

    Attractors represent the long-term behaviors of Random Boolean Networks. We study how the amount of information propagated between the nodes when on an attractor, as quantified by the average pairwise mutual information (I(A)), relates to the robustness of the attractor to perturbations (R(A)). We find that the dynamical regime of the network affects the relationship between I(A) and R(A). In the ordered and chaotic regimes, I(A) is anti-correlated with R(A), implying that attractors that are highly robust to perturbations have necessarily limited information propagation. Between order and chaos (for so-called "critical" networks) these quantities are uncorrelated. Finite size effects cause this behavior to be visible for a range of networks, from having a sensitivity of 1 to the point where I(A) is maximized. In this region, the two quantities are weakly correlated and attractors can be almost arbitrarily robust to perturbations without restricting the propagation of information in the network.

  15. Information transmission using UEP turbo codes in wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zude; Xu, Chao

    2005-11-01

    Wireless sensing is prevalent quickly in these years, and it has many advantages, such as fewer catastrophic failures, conservation of natural resources, improved emergency response, etc. Wireless sensors can be deployed in extremely hostile environment. Since the wireless sensors are energy constrained, many researches have been in progress to solve these problems. In this paper, we proposed a joint source-channel coding scheme to solve energy efficiency of wireless sensors. Firstly, we decomposition information in wavelet domain, then compress it by using multi-scale embedded zerotree wavelet algorithm, and generate a bit stream that can be decompressed in a scalable bit rate. Then, we transmit the bit stream after encoding them with unequal error protection turbo codes to achieve error robust transmission. We transmit multiple bit streams according to some energy strategy, and redundancies to base stations are reduced by only transmitting coarse scale information. Due to the scalability of multi-scale EZW, we can adopt diversified bit rate strategy to save energy of battery powered sensors.

  16. Accurate imaging of moving targets via random sensor arrays and Kerdock codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmer, Thomas; Wang, Haichao

    2013-08-01

    The detection and parameter estimation of moving targets is one of the most important tasks in radar. Arrays of randomly distributed antennas have been popular for this purpose for about half a century. Yet, surprisingly little rigorous mathematical theory exists for random arrays that addresses fundamental questions such as how many targets can be recovered, at what resolution, at which noise level, and with which algorithm. In a different line of research in radar, mathematicians and engineers have invested significant effort into the design of radar transmission waveforms which satisfy various desirable properties. In this paper we bring these two seemingly unrelated areas together. Using tools from compressive sensing we derive a theoretical framework for the imaging of targets in the azimuth-range-Doppler domain via random antenna arrays. In one manifestation of our theory we use Kerdock codes as transmission waveforms and exploit some of their peculiar properties in our analysis. Our paper provides two main contributions. (i) We derive the first rigorous mathematical theory for the detection of moving targets using random sensor arrays. (ii) The transmitted waveforms satisfy a variety of properties that are very desirable and important from a practical viewpoint. Thus our approach does not just lead to useful theoretical insights, but is also of practical importance. Various extensions of our results are derived and numerical simulations confirming our theory are presented.

  17. Characteristics of phase transitions via intervention in random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xiao; Hong, Jin-Song; Yang, Hong-Chun; Yang, Chun; Shi, Xiao-Hong; Hu, Jian-Quan

    2014-07-01

    We present a percolation process in which the classical Erdös—Rényi (ER) random evolutionary network is intervened by the product rule (PR) from some moment t0. The parameter t0 is continuously tunable over the real interval [0, 1]. This model becomes the random network under the Achlioptas process at t0 = 0 and the ER network at t0 = 1. For the percolation process at t0 <= 1, we introduce a relatively slow-growing point, after which the largest cluster begins growing faster than that in the ER model. A weakly discontinuous transition is generated in the percolation process at t0 <= 0.5. We take the relatively slow-growing point as the lower pseudotransition point and the maximum gap point of the order parameter as the upper pseudotransition point. The critical point can be approximately predicted by each fitting function of the two points about t0. This contributes to understanding the rapid mergence of the large clusters at the critical point. The numerical simulations indicate that the lower pseudotransition point and the upper pseudotransition point are equal in the thermodynamic limit. When t0 > 0.5, the percolation processes generate a continuous transition. The scaling analyses of several quantities are presented, including the relatively slow-growing point, the duration of the relatively slow-growing process, as well as the relatively maximum strength between the percolation percolation at t0 < 1 and the ER network about different t0. The presented mechanism can be viewed as a two-stage percolation process that has many potential applications in the growth processes of real networks.

  18. Physical-Layer Network Coding for VPN in TDM-PON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qike; Tse, Kam-Hon; Chen, Lian-Kuan; Liew, Soung-Chang

    2012-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel optical physical-layer network coding (PNC) scheme over time-division multiplexing (TDM) passive optical network (PON). Full-duplex error-free communications between optical network units (ONUs) at 2.5 Gb/s are shown for all-optical virtual private network (VPN) applications. Compared to the conventional half-duplex communications set-up, our scheme can increase the capacity by 100% with power penalty smaller than 3 dB. Synchronization of two ONUs is not required for the proposed VPN scheme

  19. A Novel Joint Spatial-Code Clustered Interference Alignment Scheme for Large-Scale Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhilu; Jiang, Lihui; Ren, Guanghui; Zhao, Nan; Zhao, Yaqin

    2015-01-01

    Interference alignment (IA) has been put forward as a promising technique which can mitigate interference and effectively increase the throughput of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). However, the number of users is strictly restricted by the IA feasibility condition, and the interference leakage will become so strong that the quality of service will degrade significantly when there are more users than that IA can support. In this paper, a novel joint spatial-code clustered (JSCC)-IA scheme is proposed to solve this problem. In the proposed scheme, the users are clustered into several groups so that feasible IA can be achieved within each group. In addition, each group is assigned a pseudo noise (PN) code in order to suppress the inter-group interference via the code dimension. The analytical bit error rate (BER) expressions of the proposed JSCC-IA scheme are formulated for the systems with identical and different propagation delays, respectively. To further improve the performance of the JSCC-IA scheme in asymmetric networks, a random grouping selection (RGS) algorithm is developed to search for better grouping combinations. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed JSCC-IA scheme is capable of accommodating many more users to communicate simultaneously in the same frequency band with better performance. PMID:25602270

  20. A novel joint spatial-code clustered interference alignment scheme for large-scale wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhilu; Jiang, Lihui; Ren, Guanghui; Zhao, Nan; Zhao, Yaqin

    2015-01-16

    Interference alignment (IA) has been put forward as a promising technique which can mitigate interference and effectively increase the throughput of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). However, the number of users is strictly restricted by the IA feasibility condition, and the interference leakage will become so strong that the quality of service will degrade significantly when there are more users than that IA can support. In this paper, a novel joint spatial-code clustered (JSCC)-IA scheme is proposed to solve this problem. In the proposed scheme, the users are clustered into several groups so that feasible IA can be achieved within each group. In addition, each group is assigned a pseudo noise (PN) code in order to suppress the inter-group interference via the code dimension. The analytical bit error rate (BER) expressions of the proposed JSCC-IA scheme are formulated for the systems with identical and different propagation delays, respectively. To further improve the performance of the JSCC-IA scheme in asymmetric networks, a random grouping selection (RGS) algorithm is developed to search for better grouping combinations. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed JSCC-IA scheme is capable of accommodating many more users to communicate simultaneously in the same frequency band with better performance.

  1. Analysis of complex contagions in random multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaǧan, Osman; Gligor, Virgil

    2012-09-01

    We study the diffusion of influence in random multiplex networks where links can be of r different types, and, for a given content (e.g., rumor, product, or political view), each link type is associated with a content-dependent parameter ci in [0,∞] that measures the relative bias type i links have in spreading this content. In this setting, we propose a linear threshold model of contagion where nodes switch state if their “perceived” proportion of active neighbors exceeds a threshold τ. Namely a node connected to mi active neighbors and ki-mi inactive neighbors via type i links will turn active if ∑cimi/∑ciki exceeds its threshold τ. Under this model, we obtain the condition, probability and expected size of global spreading events. Our results extend the existing work on complex contagions in several directions by (i) providing solutions for coupled random networks whose vertices are neither identical nor disjoint, (ii) highlighting the effect of content on the dynamics of complex contagions, and (iii) showing that content-dependent propagation over a multiplex network leads to a subtle relation between the giant vulnerable component of the graph and the global cascade condition that is not seen in the existing models in the literature.

  2. Computational capabilities of random automata networks for reservoir computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, David; Goudarzi, Alireza; Teuscher, Christof

    2013-04-01

    This paper underscores the conjecture that intrinsic computation is maximal in systems at the “edge of chaos”. We study the relationship between dynamics and computational capability in random Boolean networks (RBN) for reservoir computing (RC). RC is a computational paradigm in which a trained readout layer interprets the dynamics of an excitable component (called the reservoir) that is perturbed by external input. The reservoir is often implemented as a homogeneous recurrent neural network, but there has been little investigation into the properties of reservoirs that are discrete and heterogeneous. Random Boolean networks are generic and heterogeneous dynamical systems and here we use them as the reservoir. A RBN is typically a closed system; to use it as a reservoir we extend it with an input layer. As a consequence of perturbation, the RBN does not necessarily fall into an attractor. Computational capability in RC arises from a tradeoff between separability and fading memory of inputs. We find the balance of these properties predictive of classification power and optimal at critical connectivity. These results are relevant to the construction of devices which exploit the intrinsic dynamics of complex heterogeneous systems, such as biomolecular substrates.

  3. Functional brain networks: random, "small world" or deterministic?

    PubMed

    Blinowska, Katarzyna J; Kaminski, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Lately the problem of connectivity in brain networks is being approached frequently by graph theoretical analysis. In several publications based on bivariate estimators of relations between EEG channels authors reported random or "small world" structure of networks. The results of these works often have no relation to other evidence based on imaging, inverse solutions methods, physiological and anatomical data. Herein we try to find reasons for this discrepancy. We point out that EEG signals are very much interdependent, thus bivariate measures applied to them may produce many spurious connections. In fact, they may outnumber the true connections. Giving all connections equal weights, as it is usual in the framework of graph theoretical analysis, further enhances these spurious links. In effect, close to random and disorganized patterns of connections emerge. On the other hand, multivariate connectivity estimators, which are free of the artificial links, show specific, well determined patterns, which are in a very good agreement with other evidence. The modular structure of brain networks may be identified by multivariate estimators based on Granger causality and formalism of assortative mixing. In this way, the strength of coupling may be evaluated quantitatively. During working memory task, by means of multivariate Directed Transfer Function, it was demonstrated that the modules characterized by strong internal bonds exchange the information by weaker connections.

  4. Applications of random walks: From network exploration to cellulose hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asztalos, Andrea

    In the first part of the thesis we investigate network exploration by random walks defined via stationary and adaptive transition probabilities on large, but finite graphs. An exact formula for the number of visited nodes and edges as function of time is presented, that is valid for arbitrary graphs and arbitrary walks defined by stationary transition probabilities (STP). We show that for STP walks site and edge exploration obey the same scaling ˜ nnu as function of time n, and therefore edge exploration on graphs with many loops is always lagging compared to site exploration. We then introduce the Edge Explorer Model, presenting a novel class of adaptive walks, that performs faithful network discovery even on dense networks. In the second part of the thesis we present a random walk-based computational model of enzymatic degradation of cellulose. The coarse-grained dynamical model accounts for the mobility and action of a single enzyme as well as for the synergy of multiple enzymes on a homogeneous cellulose surface. The quantitative description of cellulose degradation is calculated on a spatial model by including free and bound states of all enzymes with explicit reactive surface terms (e.g., hydrogen bond reformation) and corresponding reaction rates. The dynamical evolution of the system is based on physical interactions between enzymes and cellulose. We show how the model provides insight into enzyme loading and coverage for the degradation process.

  5. Random Deep Belief Networks for Recognizing Emotions from Speech Signals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huihui; Huang, Jubing; Li, Danyang; Xun, Eryang

    2017-01-01

    Now the human emotions can be recognized from speech signals using machine learning methods; however, they are challenged by the lower recognition accuracies in real applications due to lack of the rich representation ability. Deep belief networks (DBN) can automatically discover the multiple levels of representations in speech signals. To make full of its advantages, this paper presents an ensemble of random deep belief networks (RDBN) method for speech emotion recognition. It firstly extracts the low level features of the input speech signal and then applies them to construct lots of random subspaces. Each random subspace is then provided for DBN to yield the higher level features as the input of the classifier to output an emotion label. All outputted emotion labels are then fused through the majority voting to decide the final emotion label for the input speech signal. The conducted experimental results on benchmark speech emotion databases show that RDBN has better accuracy than the compared methods for speech emotion recognition. PMID:28356908

  6. First Passage Time for Random Walks in Heterogeneous Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, S.; Lee, D.-S.; Kahng, B.

    2012-08-01

    The first passage time (FPT) for random walks is a key indicator of how fast information diffuses in a given system. Despite the role of FPT as a fundamental feature in transport phenomena, its behavior, particularly in heterogeneous networks, is not yet fully understood. Here, we study, both analytically and numerically, the scaling behavior of the FPT distribution to a given target node, averaged over all starting nodes. We find that random walks arrive quickly at a local hub, and therefore, the FPT distribution shows a crossover with respect to time from fast decay behavior (induced from the attractive effect to the hub) to slow decay behavior (caused by the exploring of the entire system). Moreover, the mean FPT is independent of the degree of the target node in the case of compact exploration. These theoretical results justify the necessity of using a random jump protocol (empirically used in search engines) and provide guidelines for designing an effective network to make information quickly accessible.

  7. Distributed Space-Time Coding for Cooperative Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-05

    log2 M . (10) We assume that the channels are Rayleigh fading, so that |h|2 is an exponential random variable with expected value σ2h = 1/r α, where r is...analysis to Nakagami - m -fading channels and we showed that the advantage decreases as the index m increases, i.e. as the channel tends to be less and less...symbols over two successive time periods, so that TSR2D = 2Ts and TS2R = 2 log2( M )Ts/ log2( Q ). The sequence transmitted by the source-relay pair is

  8. HyDEn: a hybrid steganocryptographic approach for data encryption using randomized error-correcting DNA codes.

    PubMed

    Tulpan, Dan; Regoui, Chaouki; Durand, Guillaume; Belliveau, Luc; Léger, Serge

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel hybrid DNA encryption (HyDEn) approach that uses randomized assignments of unique error-correcting DNA Hamming code words for single characters in the extended ASCII set. HyDEn relies on custom-built quaternary codes and a private key used in the randomized assignment of code words and the cyclic permutations applied on the encoded message. Along with its ability to detect and correct errors, HyDEn equals or outperforms existing cryptographic methods and represents a promising in silico DNA steganographic approach.

  9. HyDEn: A Hybrid Steganocryptographic Approach for Data Encryption Using Randomized Error-Correcting DNA Codes

    PubMed Central

    Regoui, Chaouki; Durand, Guillaume; Belliveau, Luc; Léger, Serge

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel hybrid DNA encryption (HyDEn) approach that uses randomized assignments of unique error-correcting DNA Hamming code words for single characters in the extended ASCII set. HyDEn relies on custom-built quaternary codes and a private key used in the randomized assignment of code words and the cyclic permutations applied on the encoded message. Along with its ability to detect and correct errors, HyDEn equals or outperforms existing cryptographic methods and represents a promising in silico DNA steganographic approach. PMID:23984392

  10. Rapid Quantification of Mutant Fitness in Diverse Bacteria by Sequencing Randomly Bar-Coded Transposons

    PubMed Central

    Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Waters, Robert J.; Lamson, Jacob S.; He, Jennifer; Hoover, Cindi A.; Blow, Matthew J.; Bristow, James; Butland, Gareth

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transposon mutagenesis with next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to annotate gene function in bacteria, but existing protocols for TnSeq require laborious preparation of every sample before sequencing. Thus, the existing protocols are not amenable to the throughput necessary to identify phenotypes and functions for the majority of genes in diverse bacteria. Here, we present a method, random bar code transposon-site sequencing (RB-TnSeq), which increases the throughput of mutant fitness profiling by incorporating random DNA bar codes into Tn5 and mariner transposons and by using bar code sequencing (BarSeq) to assay mutant fitness. RB-TnSeq can be used with any transposon, and TnSeq is performed once per organism instead of once per sample. Each BarSeq assay requires only a simple PCR, and 48 to 96 samples can be sequenced on one lane of an Illumina HiSeq system. We demonstrate the reproducibility and biological significance of RB-TnSeq with Escherichia coli, Phaeobacter inhibens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Shewanella amazonensis, and Shewanella oneidensis. To demonstrate the increased throughput of RB-TnSeq, we performed 387 successful genome-wide mutant fitness assays representing 130 different bacterium-carbon source combinations and identified 5,196 genes with significant phenotypes across the five bacteria. In P. inhibens, we used our mutant fitness data to identify genes important for the utilization of diverse carbon substrates, including a putative d-mannose isomerase that is required for mannitol catabolism. RB-TnSeq will enable the cost-effective functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness profiling. PMID:25968644

  11. Source Authentication for Code Dissemination Supporting Dynamic Packet Size in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daehee; Kim, Dongwan; An, Sunshin

    2016-01-01

    Code dissemination in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is a procedure for distributing a new code image over the air in order to update programs. Due to the fact that WSNs are mostly deployed in unattended and hostile environments, secure code dissemination ensuring authenticity and integrity is essential. Recent works on dynamic packet size control in WSNs allow enhancing the energy efficiency of code dissemination by dynamically changing the packet size on the basis of link quality. However, the authentication tokens attached by the base station become useless in the next hop where the packet size can vary according to the link quality of the next hop. In this paper, we propose three source authentication schemes for code dissemination supporting dynamic packet size. Compared to traditional source authentication schemes such as μTESLA and digital signatures, our schemes provide secure source authentication under the environment, where the packet size changes in each hop, with smaller energy consumption. PMID:27409616

  12. A Bayesian network coding scheme for annotating biomedical information presented to genetic counseling clients.

    PubMed

    Green, Nancy

    2005-04-01

    We developed a Bayesian network coding scheme for annotating biomedical content in layperson-oriented clinical genetics documents. The coding scheme supports the representation of probabilistic and causal relationships among concepts in this domain, at a high enough level of abstraction to capture commonalities among genetic processes and their relationship to health. We are using the coding scheme to annotate a corpus of genetic counseling patient letters as part of the requirements analysis and knowledge acquisition phase of a natural language generation project. This paper describes the coding scheme and presents an evaluation of intercoder reliability for its tag set. In addition to giving examples of use of the coding scheme for analysis of discourse and linguistic features in this genre, we suggest other uses for it in analysis of layperson-oriented text and dialogue in medical communication.

  13. Source Authentication for Code Dissemination Supporting Dynamic Packet Size in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehee; Kim, Dongwan; An, Sunshin

    2016-07-09

    Code dissemination in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is a procedure for distributing a new code image over the air in order to update programs. Due to the fact that WSNs are mostly deployed in unattended and hostile environments, secure code dissemination ensuring authenticity and integrity is essential. Recent works on dynamic packet size control in WSNs allow enhancing the energy efficiency of code dissemination by dynamically changing the packet size on the basis of link quality. However, the authentication tokens attached by the base station become useless in the next hop where the packet size can vary according to the link quality of the next hop. In this paper, we propose three source authentication schemes for code dissemination supporting dynamic packet size. Compared to traditional source authentication schemes such as μTESLA and digital signatures, our schemes provide secure source authentication under the environment, where the packet size changes in each hop, with smaller energy consumption.

  14. NetCoDer: A Retransmission Mechanism for WSNs Based on Cooperative Relays and Network Coding.

    PubMed

    Valle, Odilson T; Montez, Carlos; Medeiros de Araujo, Gustavo; Vasques, Francisco; Moraes, Ricardo

    2016-05-31

    Some of the most difficult problems to deal with when using Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are related to the unreliable nature of communication channels. In this context, the use of cooperative diversity techniques and the application of network coding concepts may be promising solutions to improve the communication reliability. In this paper, we propose the NetCoDer scheme to address this problem. Its design is based on merging cooperative diversity techniques and network coding concepts. We evaluate the effectiveness of the NetCoDer scheme through both an experimental setup with real WSN nodes and a simulation assessment, comparing NetCoDer performance against state-of-the-art TDMA-based (Time Division Multiple Access) retransmission techniques: BlockACK, Master/Slave and Redundant TDMA. The obtained results highlight that the proposed NetCoDer scheme clearly improves the network performance when compared with other retransmission techniques.

  15. Energy-efficient population coding constrains network size of a neuronal array system

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lianchun; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Liwei; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    We consider the open issue of how the energy efficiency of the neural information transmission process, in a general neuronal array, constrains the network size, and how well this network size ensures the reliable transmission of neural information in a noisy environment. By direct mathematical analysis, we have obtained general solutions proving that there exists an optimal number of neurons in the network, where the average coding energy cost (defined as energy consumption divided by mutual information) per neuron passes through a global minimum for both subthreshold and superthreshold signals. With increases in background noise intensity, the optimal neuronal number decreases for subthreshold signals and increases for suprathreshold signals. The existence of an optimal number of neurons in an array network reveals a general rule for population coding that states that the neuronal number should be large enough to ensure reliable information transmission that is robust to the noisy environment but small enough to minimize energy cost. PMID:26781354

  16. Energy-efficient population coding constrains network size of a neuronal array system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lianchun; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Liwei; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-19

    We consider the open issue of how the energy efficiency of the neural information transmission process, in a general neuronal array, constrains the network size, and how well this network size ensures the reliable transmission of neural information in a noisy environment. By direct mathematical analysis, we have obtained general solutions proving that there exists an optimal number of neurons in the network, where the average coding energy cost (defined as energy consumption divided by mutual information) per neuron passes through a global minimum for both subthreshold and superthreshold signals. With increases in background noise intensity, the optimal neuronal number decreases for subthreshold signals and increases for suprathreshold signals. The existence of an optimal number of neurons in an array network reveals a general rule for population coding that states that the neuronal number should be large enough to ensure reliable information transmission that is robust to the noisy environment but small enough to minimize energy cost.

  17. NetCoDer: A Retransmission Mechanism for WSNs Based on Cooperative Relays and Network Coding

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Odilson T.; Montez, Carlos; Medeiros de Araujo, Gustavo; Vasques, Francisco; Moraes, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Some of the most difficult problems to deal with when using Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are related to the unreliable nature of communication channels. In this context, the use of cooperative diversity techniques and the application of network coding concepts may be promising solutions to improve the communication reliability. In this paper, we propose the NetCoDer scheme to address this problem. Its design is based on merging cooperative diversity techniques and network coding concepts. We evaluate the effectiveness of the NetCoDer scheme through both an experimental setup with real WSN nodes and a simulation assessment, comparing NetCoDer performance against state-of-the-art TDMA-based (Time Division Multiple Access) retransmission techniques: BlockACK, Master/Slave and Redundant TDMA. The obtained results highlight that the proposed NetCoDer scheme clearly improves the network performance when compared with other retransmission techniques. PMID:27258280

  18. Energy-efficient population coding constrains network size of a neuronal array system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lianchun; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Liwei; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    We consider the open issue of how the energy efficiency of the neural information transmission process, in a general neuronal array, constrains the network size, and how well this network size ensures the reliable transmission of neural information in a noisy environment. By direct mathematical analysis, we have obtained general solutions proving that there exists an optimal number of neurons in the network, where the average coding energy cost (defined as energy consumption divided by mutual information) per neuron passes through a global minimum for both subthreshold and superthreshold signals. With increases in background noise intensity, the optimal neuronal number decreases for subthreshold signals and increases for suprathreshold signals. The existence of an optimal number of neurons in an array network reveals a general rule for population coding that states that the neuronal number should be large enough to ensure reliable information transmission that is robust to the noisy environment but small enough to minimize energy cost.

  19. A Random Network Model of Electrical Conduction in Hydrous Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, K.; Seki, M.; Katsura, T.; Ichiki, M.

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the variation in conductivity of hydrous rock during the dehydration, it is essential to comprehend the mechanism of electrical conduction network in rock. In the recent past, several attempts have been made to demonstrate the mechanism of electrical conduction network in hydrous rock. However, realistic conduction mechanism within the crustal rock and mineral is unknown and relevant theories have not been successful. The aim of our study is to quantify the electrical conduction network in the rock and/or mineral. We developed a cell-type lattice network model to evaluate the electrical conduction mechanism of fluid-mineral interaction. Using cell-type lattice model, we simulated the various electrical paths and connectivity in the rock and/or mineral sample. First, we assumed a network model consists of 100 by 100 elementary cells as matrix configuration. We also settled the current input and output layers at the edge of the lattice model. Second, we randomly generated and put the conductive and resistive cells using the scheme of Mersenne Twister. Third, we applied the current for this model and performed a great number of realization on each mineral distribution patterns explaining realistic conduction network model. Considering fractal dimensions, our model has been compared with images from Electron Probe Micro Analysis. To evaluate the distribution pattern of conductive and resistive cells quantitatively, we have determined fractal dimensions by box-counting method. Assessing the bulk conductivity change as a function of conductor ratio in the hydrous rock, the model has been examined successfully both against simulated data and experimental data.

  20. Cascading dynamics on random networks: crossover in phase transition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Run-Ran; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2012-02-01

    In a complex network, random initial attacks or failures can trigger subsequent failures in a cascading manner, which is effectively a phase transition. Recent works have demonstrated that in networks with interdependent links so that the failure of one node causes the immediate failures of all nodes connected to it by such links, both first- and second-order phase transitions can arise. Moreover, there is a crossover between the two types of transitions at a critical system-parameter value. We demonstrate that these phenomena can occur in the more general setting where no interdependent links are present. A heuristic theory is derived to estimate the crossover and phase-transition points, and a remarkable agreement with numerics is obtained.

  1. Random Regular Networks with Distance-limited Interdependent Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowinger, Steven; Kornbluth, Yosef; Cwilich, Gabriel; Buldyrev, Sergey

    2014-03-01

    We study the mutual percolation of a system composed of two interdependent random regular networks. We introduce a notion of distance, d, to explore the effects of the proximity of interdependent nodes on the cascade of failures after an initial attack. The nature of the transition through which the networks disintegrate depends on the parameters of the system, which are the degree of the nodes and the maximum distance between interdependent nodes. As the distance and degree increase, the collapse at the critical threshold changes from a second-order transition to a first-order one. The critical threshold monotonically increases with distance. We find a transitional case, in which a novel type of phase transition appears. The case d = 1 can be completely solved analytically and it maps into a discrete version of the Rényi parking problem.

  2. Cascading dynamics on random networks: Crossover in phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Run-Ran; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2012-02-01

    In a complex network, random initial attacks or failures can trigger subsequent failures in a cascading manner, which is effectively a phase transition. Recent works have demonstrated that in networks with interdependent links so that the failure of one node causes the immediate failures of all nodes connected to it by such links, both first- and second-order phase transitions can arise. Moreover, there is a crossover between the two types of transitions at a critical system-parameter value. We demonstrate that these phenomena can occur in the more general setting where no interdependent links are present. A heuristic theory is derived to estimate the crossover and phase-transition points, and a remarkable agreement with numerics is obtained.

  3. Uncertainty of cooperation in random scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arapaki, Eleni

    2009-07-01

    We study the spatial prisoner’s dilemma game where the players are located on the nodes of a random scale-free network. The prisoner’s dilemma game is a powerful tool and has been used for the study of mutual trust and cooperation among individuals in structured populations. We vary the structure of the network and the payoff values for the game, and show that the specific conditions can greatly influence the outcome of the game. A variety of behaviors are reproduced and the percentage of cooperating agents fluctuates significantly, even in the absence of irrational behavior. For example, the steady state of the game may be a configuration where either cooperators or defectors dominate, while in many cases the solution fluctuates between these two limiting behaviors.

  4. Exploring MEDLINE Space with Random Indexing and Pathfinder Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Trevor

    2008-01-01

    The integration of disparate research domains is a prerequisite for the success of the translational science initiative. MEDLINE abstracts contain content from a broad range of disciplines, presenting an opportunity for the development of methods able to integrate the knowledge they contain. Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) and related methods learn human-like associations between terms from unannotated text. However, their computational and memory demands limits their ability to address a corpus of this size. Furthermore, visualization methods previously used in conjunction with LSA have limited ability to define the local structure of the associative networks LSA learns. This paper explores these issues by (1) processing the entire MEDLINE corpus using Random Indexing, a variant of LSA, and (2) exploring learned associations using Pathfinder Networks. Meaningful associations are inferred from MEDLINE, including a drug-disease association undetected by PUBMED search. PMID:18999236

  5. Exploring MEDLINE space with random indexing and pathfinder networks.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Trevor

    2008-11-06

    The integration of disparate research domains is a prerequisite for the success of the translational science initiative. MEDLINE abstracts contain content from a broad range of disciplines, presenting an opportunity for the development of methods able to integrate the knowledge they contain. Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) and related methods learn human-like associations between terms from unannotated text. However, their computational and memory demands limits their ability to address a corpus of this size. Furthermore, visualization methods previously used in conjunction with LSA have limited ability to define the local structure of the associative networks LSA learns. This paper explores these issues by (1) processing the entire MEDLINE corpus using Random Indexing, a variant of LSA, and (2) exploring learned associations using Pathfinder Networks. Meaningful associations are inferred from MEDLINE, including a drug-disease association undetected by PUBMED search.

  6. Power-law relations in random networks with communities.

    PubMed

    Stegehuis, Clara; van der Hofstad, Remco; van Leeuwaarden, Johan S H

    2016-07-01

    Most random graph models are locally tree-like-do not contain short cycles-rendering them unfit for modeling networks with a community structure. We introduce the hierarchical configuration model (HCM), a generalization of the configuration model that includes community structures, while properties such as the size of the giant component, and the size of the giant percolating cluster under bond percolation can still be derived analytically. Viewing real-world networks as realizations of HCM, we observe two previously undiscovered power-law relations: between the number of edges inside a community and the community sizes, and between the number of edges going out of a community and the community sizes. We also relate the power-law exponent τ of the degree distribution with the power-law exponent of the community-size distribution γ. In the case of extremely dense communities (e.g., complete graphs), this relation takes the simple form τ=γ-1.

  7. Epidemic spreading on random surfer networks with infected avoidance strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yun; Ding, Li; Huang, Yun-Han; Guan, Zhi-Hong

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we study epidemic spreading on random surfer networks with infected avoidance (IA) strategy. In particular, we consider that susceptible individuals’ moving direction angles are affected by the current location information received from infected individuals through a directed information network. The model is mainly analyzed by discrete-time numerical simulations. The results indicate that the IA strategy can restrain epidemic spreading effectively. However, when long-distance jumps of individuals exist, the IA strategy’s effectiveness on restraining epidemic spreading is heavily reduced. Finally, it is found that the influence of the noises from information transferring process on epidemic spreading is indistinctive. Project supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61403284, 61272114, 61673303, and 61672112) and the Marine Renewable Energy Special Fund Project of the State Oceanic Administration of China (Grant No. GHME2013JS01).

  8. Distributed clone detection in static wireless sensor networks: random walk with network division.

    PubMed

    Khan, Wazir Zada; Aalsalem, Mohammed Y; Saad, N M

    2015-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are vulnerable to clone attacks or node replication attacks as they are deployed in hostile and unattended environments where they are deprived of physical protection, lacking physical tamper-resistance of sensor nodes. As a result, an adversary can easily capture and compromise sensor nodes and after replicating them, he inserts arbitrary number of clones/replicas into the network. If these clones are not efficiently detected, an adversary can be further capable to mount a wide variety of internal attacks which can emasculate the various protocols and sensor applications. Several solutions have been proposed in the literature to address the crucial problem of clone detection, which are not satisfactory as they suffer from some serious drawbacks. In this paper we propose a novel distributed solution called Random Walk with Network Division (RWND) for the detection of node replication attack in static WSNs which is based on claimer-reporter-witness framework and combines a simple random walk with network division. RWND detects clone(s) by following a claimer-reporter-witness framework and a random walk is employed within each area for the selection of witness nodes. Splitting the network into levels and areas makes clone detection more efficient and the high security of witness nodes is ensured with moderate communication and memory overheads. Our simulation results show that RWND outperforms the existing witness node based strategies with moderate communication and memory overheads.

  9. Distributed Clone Detection in Static Wireless Sensor Networks: Random Walk with Network Division

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Wazir Zada; Aalsalem, Mohammed Y.; Saad, N. M.

    2015-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are vulnerable to clone attacks or node replication attacks as they are deployed in hostile and unattended environments where they are deprived of physical protection, lacking physical tamper-resistance of sensor nodes. As a result, an adversary can easily capture and compromise sensor nodes and after replicating them, he inserts arbitrary number of clones/replicas into the network. If these clones are not efficiently detected, an adversary can be further capable to mount a wide variety of internal attacks which can emasculate the various protocols and sensor applications. Several solutions have been proposed in the literature to address the crucial problem of clone detection, which are not satisfactory as they suffer from some serious drawbacks. In this paper we propose a novel distributed solution called Random Walk with Network Division (RWND) for the detection of node replication attack in static WSNs which is based on claimer-reporter-witness framework and combines a simple random walk with network division. RWND detects clone(s) by following a claimer-reporter-witness framework and a random walk is employed within each area for the selection of witness nodes. Splitting the network into levels and areas makes clone detection more efficient and the high security of witness nodes is ensured with moderate communication and memory overheads. Our simulation results show that RWND outperforms the existing witness node based strategies with moderate communication and memory overheads. PMID:25992913

  10. Network Randomization and Dynamic Defense for Critical Infrastructure Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Adrian R.; Martin, Mitchell Tyler; Hamlet, Jason; Stout, William M.S.; Lee, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Critical Infrastructure control systems continue to foster predictable communication paths, static configurations, and unpatched systems that allow easy access to our nation's most critical assets. This makes them attractive targets for cyber intrusion. We seek to address these attack vectors by automatically randomizing network settings, randomizing applications on the end devices themselves, and dynamically defending these systems against active attacks. Applying these protective measures will convert control systems into moving targets that proactively defend themselves against attack. Sandia National Laboratories has led this effort by gathering operational and technical requirements from Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and performing research and development to create a proof-of-concept solution. Our proof-of-concept has been tested in a laboratory environment with over 300 nodes. The vision of this project is to enhance control system security by converting existing control systems into moving targets and building these security measures into future systems while meeting the unique constraints that control systems face.

  11. Regular graphs maximize the variability of random neural networks.

    PubMed

    Wainrib, Gilles; Galtier, Mathieu

    2015-09-01

    In this work we study the dynamics of systems composed of numerous interacting elements interconnected through a random weighted directed graph, such as models of random neural networks. We develop an original theoretical approach based on a combination of a classical mean-field theory originally developed in the context of dynamical spin-glass models, and the heterogeneous mean-field theory developed to study epidemic propagation on graphs. Our main result is that, surprisingly, increasing the variance of the in-degree distribution does not result in a more variable dynamical behavior, but on the contrary that the most variable behaviors are obtained in the regular graph setting. We further study how the dynamical complexity of the attractors is influenced by the statistical properties of the in-degree distribution.

  12. Universality classes of the generalized epidemic process on random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kihong; Baek, Yongjoo; Ha, Meesoon; Jeong, Hawoong

    2016-05-01

    We present a self-contained discussion of the universality classes of the generalized epidemic process (GEP) on Poisson random networks, which is a simple model of social contagions with cooperative effects. These effects lead to rich phase transitional behaviors that include continuous and discontinuous transitions with tricriticality in between. With the help of a comprehensive finite-size scaling theory, we numerically confirm static and dynamic scaling behaviors of the GEP near continuous phase transitions and at tricriticality, which verifies the field-theoretical results of previous studies. We also propose a proper criterion for the discontinuous transition line, which is shown to coincide with the bond percolation threshold.

  13. Bouchaud-Mézard model on a random network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinomiya, Takashi

    2012-09-01

    We studied the Bouchaud-Mézard (BM) model, which was introduced to explain Pareto's law in a real economy, on a random network. Using “adiabatic and independent” assumptions, we analytically obtained the stationary probability distribution function of wealth. The results show that wealth condensation, indicated by the divergence of the variance of wealth, occurs at a larger J than that obtained by the mean-field theory, where J represents the strength of interaction between agents. We compared our results with numerical simulation results and found that they were in good agreement.

  14. Metal-insulator transition in random superconducting networks

    SciTech Connect

    Soukoulis, C.M.; Grest, G.S.; Li, Q.

    1988-12-01

    The nature of the eigenstates and the effects on the superconducting-to-normal phase boundary in a two-dimensional random superconducting network are examined by finite-size scaling transfer-matrix calculations within the mean-field Ginzburg-Landau theory of second-order phase transitions. Results for a site-diluted square lattice are presented and a rich structure in the mobility-edge trajectory is obtained. The critical exponent for the slope of the critical field on (p-p/sub c/) is calculated and compared with previous estimates.

  15. Speech coding and compression using wavelets and lateral inhibitory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricart, Richard

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to introduce the concept of lateral inhibition as a generalized technique for compressing time/frequency representations of electromagnetic and acoustical signals, particularly speech. This requires at least a rudimentary treatment of the theory of frames- which generalizes most commonly known time/frequency distributions -the biology of hearing, and digital signal processing. As such, this material, along with the interrelationships of the disparate subjects, is presented in a tutorial style. This may leave the mathematician longing for more rigor, the neurophysiological psychologist longing for more substantive support of the hypotheses presented, and the engineer longing for a reprieve from the theoretical barrage. Despite the problems that arise when trying to appeal to too wide an audience, this thesis should be a cogent analysis of the compression of time/frequency distributions via lateral inhibitory networks.

  16. Learning and coding of concepts in neural networks.

    PubMed

    Salu, Y

    1985-01-01

    Our environment consists of virtually an infinite number of scenarios in which we have to function. In order to respond properly to an incoming stimulus, the brain has first to analyze it, and to find out the basic familiar elements that are part of it. In other words, by using a library which contains a relatively small number of basic concepts, the brain analyzes the multitude of incoming events. Some of those basic concepts are innate, but many of them must be learned, in order to accommodate for the arbitrary environment around us. A classifying box is defined as the neural network that finds out the familiar concepts that are present in an incoming stimulus. Models for classifying boxes are introduced, and possible mechanisms by which they may establish their libraries of concepts are suggested, and then compared and evaluated by computer simulations.

  17. Differential Cooperative Communications with Space-Time Network Coding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    The received signal at Un in the mth time slot of Phase I is ykmn = √ Ptg k mnv k m + w k mn, (1) where Pt is the power constraint of the user nodes, w...rate (SER) at Un for the symbols from Um is pmn , βmn’s are independent Bernoulli random variables with a distribution P (βmn) = { 1− pmn , for βmn = 1... pmn , for βmn = 0 . (17) The SER for M-QAM modulation can be expressed as [12] pmn = F2 ( 1 + bqγmn sin2 θ ) , (18) where bq = bQAM 2 = 3 2(M+1) and γmn

  18. Alternative knowledge acquisition: Developing a pulse coded neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.

    1987-01-01

    After a Rip-van-Winkle nap of more than 20 years, the ideas of biologically motivated computing are re-emerging. Instrumental to this awakening have been the highly publicized contributions of John Hopfield and major advances in the neurosciences. In 1982, Hopfield showed how a system of maximally coupled neutron-like elements described by a Hamiltonian formalism (a linear, conservative system) could behave in a manner startlingly suggestive of the way humans might go about solving problems and retrieving memories. Continuing advances in the neurosciences are providing a coherent basis in suggesting how nature's neurons might function. A particular model is described for an artificial neural system designed to interact with (learn from and manipulate) a simulated (or real) environment. The model is based on early work by Iben Browning. The Browning model, designed to investigate computer-based intelligence, contains a particular simplification based on observations of frequency coding of information in the brain and information flow from receptors to the brain and back to effectors. The ability to act on and react to the environment was seen as an important principle, leading to self-organization of the system.

  19. Random walk approach for dispersive transport in pipe networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sämann, Robert; Graf, Thomas; Neuweiler, Insa

    2016-04-01

    Keywords: particle transport, random walk, pipe, network, HYSTEM-EXTAN, OpenGeoSys After heavy pluvial events in urban areas the available drainage system may be undersized at peak flows (Fuchs, 2013). Consequently, rainwater in the pipe network is likely to spill out through manholes. The presence of hazardous contaminants in the pipe drainage system represents a potential risk to humans especially when the contaminated drainage water reaches the land surface. Real-time forecasting of contaminants in the drainage system needs a quick calculation. Numerical models to predict the fate of contaminants are usually based on finite volume methods. Those are not applicable here because of their volume averaging elements. Thus, a more efficient method is preferable, which is independent from spatial discretization. In the present study, a particle-based method is chosen to calculate transport paths and spatial distribution of contaminants within a pipe network. A random walk method for particles in turbulent flow in partially filled pipes has been developed. Different approaches for in-pipe-mixing and node-mixing with respect to the geometry in a drainage network are shown. A comparison of dispersive behavior and calculation time is given to find the fastest model. The HYSTEM-EXTRAN (itwh, 2002) model is used to provide hydrodynamic conditions in the pipe network according to surface runoff scenarios in order to real-time predict contaminant transport in an urban pipe network system. The newly developed particle-based model will later be coupled to the subsurface flow model OpenGeoSys (Kolditz et al., 2012). References: Fuchs, L. (2013). Gefährdungsanalyse zur Überflutungsvorsorge kommunaler Entwässerungssysteme. Sanierung und Anpassung von Entwässerungssystemen-Alternde Infrastruktur und Klimawandel, Österreichischer Wasser-und Abfallwirtschaftsverband, Wien, ISBN, 978-3. itwh (2002). Modellbeschreibung, Institut für technisch-wissenschaftliche Hydrologie Gmb

  20. Upscaling of spectral induced polarization response using random tube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maineult, Alexis; Revil, André; Camerlynck, Christian; Florsch, Nicolas; Titov, Konstantin

    2017-02-01

    In order to upscale the induced polarization (IP) response of porous media, from the pore scale to the sample scale, we implement a procedure to compute the macroscopic complex resistivity response of random tube networks. A network is made of a 2D square-meshed grid of connected tubes, which obey to a given tube radius distribution. In a simplified approach, the electrical impedance of each tube follows a local Pelton resistivity model, with identical resistivity, chargeability and Cole-Cole exponent values for all the tubes - only the time constant varies, as it depends on the radius of each tube and on a diffusion coefficient also identical for all the tubes. By solving the conservation law for the electrical charge, the macroscopic IP response of the network is obtained. We fit successfully the macroscopic complex resistivity also by a Pelton resistivity model. Simulations on uncorrelated and correlated networks, for which the tube radius distribution is so that the decimal logarithm of the radius is normally distributed, evidence that the local and macroscopic model parameters are the same, except the Cole-Cole exponent: its macroscopic value diminishes with increasing heterogeneity (i.e., with increasing standard deviation of the radius distribution), compared to its local value. The methodology is also applied to six siliciclastic rock samples, for which the pore radius distributions from mercury porosimetry are available. These samples exhibit the same behaviour as synthetic media, i.e., the macroscopic Cole-Cole exponent is always lower than the local one. As a conclusion, the pore network method seems to be a promising tool for studying the upscaling of the IP response of porous media.

  1. Eigenvalue tunneling and decay of quenched random network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avetisov, V.; Hovhannisyan, M.; Gorsky, A.; Nechaev, S.; Tamm, M.; Valba, O.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the canonical ensemble of N -vertex Erdős-Rényi (ER) random topological graphs with quenched vertex degree, and with fugacity μ for each closed triple of bonds. We claim complete defragmentation of large-N graphs into the collection of [p-1] almost full subgraphs (cliques) above critical fugacity, μc, where p is the ER bond formation probability. Evolution of the spectral density, ρ (λ ) , of the adjacency matrix with increasing μ leads to the formation of a multizonal support for μ >μc . Eigenvalue tunneling from the central zone to the side one means formation of a new clique in the defragmentation process. The adjacency matrix of the network ground state has a block-diagonal form, where the number of vertices in blocks fluctuates around the mean value N p . The spectral density of the whole network in this regime has triangular shape. We interpret the phenomena from the viewpoint of the conventional random matrix model and speculate about possible physical applications.

  2. H.264/AVC intra-only coding (iAVC) techniques for video over wireless networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming; Trifas, Monica; Xiong, Guolun; Rogers, Joshua

    2009-02-01

    The requirement to transmit video data over unreliable wireless networks (with the possibility of packet loss) is anticipated in the foreseeable future. Significant compression ratio and error resilience are both needed for complex applications including tele-operated robotics, vehicle-mounted cameras, sensor network, etc. Block-matching based inter-frame coding techniques, including MPEG-4 and H.264/AVC, do not perform well in these scenarios due to error propagation between frames. Many wireless applications often use intra-only coding technologies such as Motion-JPEG, which exhibit better recovery from network data loss at the price of higher data rates. In order to address these research issues, an intra-only coding scheme of H.264/AVC (iAVC) is proposed. In this approach, each frame is coded independently as an I-frame. Frame copy is applied to compensate for packet loss. This approach is a good balance between compression performance and error resilience. It achieves compression performance comparable to Motion- JPEG2000 (MJ2), with lower complexity. Error resilience similar to Motion-JPEG (MJ) will also be accomplished. Since the intra-frame prediction with iAVC is strictly confined within the range of a slice, memory usage is also extremely low. Low computational complexity and memory usage are very crucial to mobile stations and devices in wireless network.

  3. Combining Topological Hardware and Topological Software: Color-Code Quantum Computing with Topological Superconductor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litinski, Daniel; Kesselring, Markus S.; Eisert, Jens; von Oppen, Felix

    2017-07-01

    We present a scalable architecture for fault-tolerant topological quantum computation using networks of voltage-controlled Majorana Cooper pair boxes and topological color codes for error correction. Color codes have a set of transversal gates which coincides with the set of topologically protected gates in Majorana-based systems, namely, the Clifford gates. In this way, we establish color codes as providing a natural setting in which advantages offered by topological hardware can be combined with those arising from topological error-correcting software for full-fledged fault-tolerant quantum computing. We provide a complete description of our architecture, including the underlying physical ingredients. We start by showing that in topological superconductor networks, hexagonal cells can be employed to serve as physical qubits for universal quantum computation, and we present protocols for realizing topologically protected Clifford gates. These hexagonal-cell qubits allow for a direct implementation of open-boundary color codes with ancilla-free syndrome read-out and logical T gates via magic-state distillation. For concreteness, we describe how the necessary operations can be implemented using networks of Majorana Cooper pair boxes, and we give a feasibility estimate for error correction in this architecture. Our approach is motivated by nanowire-based networks of topological superconductors, but it could also be realized in alternative settings such as quantum-Hall-superconductor hybrids.

  4. Dynamic bandwidth allocation algorithm for next-generation time division multiplexing passive optical networks with network coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Pei; Gu, Rentao; Ji, Yuefeng

    2013-08-01

    An efficient dynamic bandwidth allocation (DBA) algorithm for multiclass services called MSDBA is proposed for next-generation time division multiplexing (TDM) passive optical networks with network coding (NC-PON). In MSDBA, a DBA cycle is divided into two subcycles with different coding strategies for differentiated classes of services, and the transmission time of the first subcycle overlaps with the bandwidth allocation calculation time at the optical line terminal. Moreover, according to the quality-of-service (QoS) requirements of services, different scheduling and bandwidth allocation schemes are applied to coded or uncoded services in the corresponding subcycle. Numerical analyses and simulations for performance evaluation are performed in 10 Gbps ethernet passive optical networks (10G EPON), which is a standardized solution for next-generation EPON. Evaluation results show that compared with the existing two DBA algorithms deployed in TDM NC-PON, MSDBA not only demonstrates better performance in delay and QoS support for all classes of services but also achieves the maximum end-to-end delay fairness between coded and uncoded lower-class services and guarantees the end-to-end delay bound and fixed polling order of high-class services by sacrificing their end-to-end delay fairness for compromise.

  5. Effect of random synaptic dilution on recalling dynamics in an oscillator neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitano, Katsunori; Aoyagi, Toshio

    1998-05-01

    In the present paper, we study the effect of random synaptic dilution in an oscillator neural network in which information is encoded by the relative timing of neuronal firing. In order to analyze the recalling process in this oscillator network, we apply the method of statistical neurodynamics. The results show that the dynamical equations are described by some macroscopic order parameters, such as that representing the overlap with the retrieved pattern. We also present the phase diagram showing both the basin of attraction and the equilibrium overlap in the retrieval state. Our results are supported by numerical simulation. Consequently, it is found that both the attractor and the basin are preserved even though dilution is promoted. Moreover, as compared with the basin of attraction in the traditional binary model, it is suggested that the oscillator model is more robust against the synaptic dilution. Taking into account the fact that oscillator networks contain more detailed information than binary networks, the obtained results constitute significant support for the plausibility of temporal coding.

  6. Effects of random rewiring on the degree correlation of scale-free networks

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jing; Wang, Sheng-Jun; Jusup, Marko; Wang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Random rewiring is used to generate null networks for the purpose of analyzing the topological properties of scale-free networks, yet the effects of random rewiring on the degree correlation are subject to contradicting interpretations in the literature. We comprehensively analyze the degree correlation of randomly rewired scale-free networks and show that random rewiring increases disassortativity by reducing the average degree of the nearest neighbors of high-degree nodes. The effect can be captured by the measures of the degree correlation that consider all links in the network, but not by analogous measures that consider only links between degree peers, hence the potential for contradicting interpretations. We furthermore find that random and directional rewiring affect the topology of a scale-free network differently, even if the degree correlation of the rewired networks is the same. Consequently, the network dynamics is changed, which is proven here by means of the biased random walk. PMID:26482005

  7. Effects of random rewiring on the degree correlation of scale-free networks.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jing; Wang, Sheng-Jun; Jusup, Marko; Wang, Zhen

    2015-10-20

    Random rewiring is used to generate null networks for the purpose of analyzing the topological properties of scale-free networks, yet the effects of random rewiring on the degree correlation are subject to contradicting interpretations in the literature. We comprehensively analyze the degree correlation of randomly rewired scale-free networks and show that random rewiring increases disassortativity by reducing the average degree of the nearest neighbors of high-degree nodes. The effect can be captured by the measures of the degree correlation that consider all links in the network, but not by analogous measures that consider only links between degree peers, hence the potential for contradicting interpretations. We furthermore find that random and directional rewiring affect the topology of a scale-free network differently, even if the degree correlation of the rewired networks is the same. Consequently, the network dynamics is changed, which is proven here by means of the biased random walk.

  8. Synchronous neural activity in scale-free network models versus random network models

    PubMed Central

    Grinstein, Geoffrey; Linsker, Ralph

    2005-01-01

    Synchronous firing peaks at levels greatly exceeding background activity have recently been reported in neocortical tissue. A small subset of neurons is dominant in a large fraction of the peaks. To investigate whether this striking behavior can emerge from a simple model, we constructed and studied a model neural network that uses a modified Hopfield-type dynamical rule. We find that networks having a power-law (“scale-free”) node degree distribution readily generate extremely large synchronous firing peaks dominated by a small subset of nodes, whereas random (Erdös–Rényi) networks do not. This finding suggests that network topology may play an important role in determining the nature and magnitude of synchronous neural activity. PMID:15998732

  9. CoCo trial: Color-coded blood pressure Control, a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Chmiel, Corinne; Senn, Oliver; Rosemann, Thomas; Del Prete, Valerio; Steurer-Stey, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Background Inadequate blood pressure (BP) control is a frequent challenge in general practice. The objective of this study was to determine whether a color-coded BP booklet using a traffic light scheme (red, >180 mmHg systolic BP and/or >110 mmHg diastolic BP; yellow, >140–180 mmHg systolic BP or >90–110 mmHg diastolic BP; green, ≤140 mmHg systolic BP and ≤90 mmHg diastolic BP) improves BP control and adherence with home BP measurement. Methods In this two-group, randomized controlled trial, general practitioners recruited adult patients with a BP >140 mmHg systolic and/or >90 mmHg diastolic. Patients in the control group received a standard BP booklet and the intervention group used a color-coded booklet for daily home BP measurement. The main outcomes were changes in BP, BP control (treatment goal <140/90 mmHg), and adherence with home BP measurement after 6 months. Results One hundred and twenty-one of 137 included patients qualified for analysis. After 6 months, a significant decrease in systolic and diastolic BP was achieved in both groups, with no significant difference between the groups (16.1/7.9 mmHg in the intervention group versus 13.1/8.6 mmHg in the control group, P=0.3/0.7). BP control (treatment target <140/90 mmHg) was achieved significantly more often in the intervention group (43% versus 25%; P=0.037; number needed to treat of 5). Adherence with home BP measurement overall was high, with a trend in favor of the intervention group (98.6% versus 96.2%; P=0.1) Conclusion Color-coded BP self-monitoring significantly improved BP control (number needed to treat of 5, meaning that every fifth patient utilizing color-coded self-monitoring achieved better BP control after 6 months), but no significant between-group difference was observed in BP change. A markedly higher percentage of patients achieved BP values in the normal range. This simple, inexpensive approach of color-coded BP self-monitoring is user-friendly and applicable in primary care

  10. Frequency-coded artificial neural networks: An approach to self-organizing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.

    1987-01-01

    A frequency-based model of an artificial neural network is being explored for active learning in a simulated environment and for its response to multiple modalities of input data. Physical sensors couple naturally to such a network, providing an easy migration path from simulation to application. The combination of an artificial neural network processing frequency-coded sensor information and implemented on advanced computer architectures is seen as an answer to the problems arising in robotics and the fusion of large quantities of multisensory data.

  11. Hybrid decode-amplify-forward (HDAF) scheme in distributed Alamouti-coded cooperative network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrala, Kiran Kumar; Das, Susmita

    2015-05-01

    In this article, a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)-based hybrid decode-amplify-forward scheme in a distributed Alamouti-coded cooperative network is proposed. Considering a flat Rayleigh fading channel environment, the MATLAB simulation and analysis are carried out. In the cooperative scheme, two relays are employed, where each relay is transmitting each row Alamouti code. The selection of SNR threshold depends on the target rate information. The closed form expressions of symbol error rate (SER), the outage probability and average channel capacity with tight upper bounds are derived and compared with the simulation done in MATLAB environment. Furthermore, the impact of relay location on the SER performance is analysed. It is observed that the proposed hybrid relaying technique outperforms the individual amplify and forward and decode and forward ones in the distributed Alamouti-coded cooperative network.

  12. Potts-model formulation of the random resistor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. B.; Lubensky, T. C.

    1987-05-01

    The randomly diluted resistor network is formulated in terms of an n-replicated s-state Potts model with a spin-spin coupling constant J in the limit when first n, then s, and finally 1/J go to zero. This limit is discussed and to leading order in 1/J the generalized susceptibility is shown to reproduce the results of the accompanying paper where the resistor network is treated using the xy model. This Potts Hamiltonian is converted into a field theory by the usual Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation and thereby a renormalization-group treatment is developed to obtain the corrections to the critical exponents to first order in ɛ=6-d, where d is the spatial dimensionality. The recursion relations are shown to be the same as for the xy model. Their detailed analysis (given in the accompanying paper) gives the resistance crossover exponent as φ1=1+ɛ/42, and determines the critical exponent, t for the conductivity of the randomly diluted resistor network at concentrations, p, just above the percolation threshold: t=(d-2)ν+φ1, where ν is the critical exponent for the correlation length at the percolation threshold. These results correct previously accepted results giving φ=1 to all orders in ɛ. The new result for φ1 removes the paradox associated with the numerical result that t>1 for d=2, and also shows that the Alexander-Orbach conjecture, while numerically quite accurate, is not exact, since it disagrees with the ɛ expansion.

  13. Do Vascular Networks Branch Optimally or Randomly across Spatial Scales?

    PubMed

    Tekin, Elif; Hunt, David; Newberry, Mitchell G; Savage, Van M

    2016-11-01

    Modern models that derive allometric relationships between metabolic rate and body mass are based on the architectural design of the cardiovascular system and presume sibling vessels are symmetric in terms of radius, length, flow rate, and pressure. Here, we study the cardiovascular structure of the human head and torso and of a mouse lung based on three-dimensional images processed via our software Angicart. In contrast to modern allometric theories, we find systematic patterns of asymmetry in vascular branching, potentially explaining previously documented mismatches between predictions (power-law or concave curvature) and observed empirical data (convex curvature) for the allometric scaling of metabolic rate. To examine why these systematic asymmetries in vascular branching might arise, we construct a mathematical framework to derive predictions based on local, junction-level optimality principles that have been proposed to be favored in the course of natural selection and development. The two most commonly used principles are material-cost optimizations (construction materials or blood volume) and optimization of efficient flow via minimization of power loss. We show that material-cost optimization solutions match with distributions for asymmetric branching across the whole network but do not match well for individual junctions. Consequently, we also explore random branching that is constrained at scales that range from local (junction-level) to global (whole network). We find that material-cost optimizations are the strongest predictor of vascular branching in the human head and torso, whereas locally or intermediately constrained random branching is comparable to material-cost optimizations for the mouse lung. These differences could be attributable to developmentally-programmed local branching for larger vessels and constrained random branching for smaller vessels.

  14. Do Vascular Networks Branch Optimally or Randomly across Spatial Scales?

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Mitchell G.; Savage, Van M.

    2016-01-01

    Modern models that derive allometric relationships between metabolic rate and body mass are based on the architectural design of the cardiovascular system and presume sibling vessels are symmetric in terms of radius, length, flow rate, and pressure. Here, we study the cardiovascular structure of the human head and torso and of a mouse lung based on three-dimensional images processed via our software Angicart. In contrast to modern allometric theories, we find systematic patterns of asymmetry in vascular branching, potentially explaining previously documented mismatches between predictions (power-law or concave curvature) and observed empirical data (convex curvature) for the allometric scaling of metabolic rate. To examine why these systematic asymmetries in vascular branching might arise, we construct a mathematical framework to derive predictions based on local, junction-level optimality principles that have been proposed to be favored in the course of natural selection and development. The two most commonly used principles are material-cost optimizations (construction materials or blood volume) and optimization of efficient flow via minimization of power loss. We show that material-cost optimization solutions match with distributions for asymmetric branching across the whole network but do not match well for individual junctions. Consequently, we also explore random branching that is constrained at scales that range from local (junction-level) to global (whole network). We find that material-cost optimizations are the strongest predictor of vascular branching in the human head and torso, whereas locally or intermediately constrained random branching is comparable to material-cost optimizations for the mouse lung. These differences could be attributable to developmentally-programmed local branching for larger vessels and constrained random branching for smaller vessels. PMID:27902691

  15. Random Walks in Social Networks and their Applications: A Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Purnamrita; Moore, Andrew W.

    A wide variety of interesting real world applications, e.g. friend suggestion in social networks, keyword search in databases, web-spam detection etc. can be framed as ranking entities in a graph. In order to obtain ranking we need a graph-theoretic measure of similarity. Ideally this should capture the information hidden in the graph structure. For example, two entities are similar, if there are lots of short paths between them. Random walks have proven to be a simple, yet powerful mathematical tool for extracting information from the ensemble of paths between entities in a graph. Since real world graphs are enormous and complex, ranking using random walks is still an active area of research. The research in this area spans from new applications to novel algorithms and mathematical analysis, bringing together ideas from different branches of statistics, mathematics and computer science. In this book chapter, we describe different random walk based proximity measures, their applications, and existing algorithms for computing them.

  16. All-optical OFDM network coding scheme for all-optical virtual private communication in PON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lijun; Gu, Rentao; Ji, Yuefeng; Bai, Lin; Huang, Zhitong

    2014-03-01

    A novel optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) network coding scheme is proposed over passive optical network (PON) system. The proposed scheme for all-optical virtual private network (VPN) does not only improve transmission efficiency, but also realize full-duplex communication mode in a single fiber. Compared with the traditional all-optical VPN architectures, the all-optical OFDM network coding scheme can support higher speed, more flexible bandwidth allocation, and higher spectrum efficiency. In order to reduce the difficulty of alignment for encoding operation between inter-communication traffic, the width of OFDM subcarrier pulse is stretched in our proposed scheme. The feasibility of all-optical OFDM network coding scheme for VPN is verified, and the relevant simulation results show that the full-duplex inter-communication traffic stream can be transmitted successfully. Furthermore, the tolerance of misalignment existing in inter-ONUs traffic is investigated and analyzed for all-optical encoding operation, and the difficulty of pulse alignment is proved to be lower.

  17. Frequency decoding of periodically timed action potentials through distinct activity patterns in a random neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Tobias; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2012-11-01

    Frequency discrimination is a fundamental task of the auditory system. The mammalian inner ear, or cochlea, provides a place code in which different frequencies are detected at different spatial locations. However, a temporal code based on spike timing is also available: action potentials evoked in an auditory-nerve fiber by a low-frequency tone occur at a preferred phase of the stimulus—they exhibit phase locking—and thus provide temporal information about the tone's frequency. Humans employ this temporal information for discrimination of low frequencies. How might such temporal information be read out in the brain? Here we employ statistical and numerical methods to demonstrate that recurrent random neural networks in which connections between neurons introduce characteristic time delays, and in which neurons require temporally coinciding inputs for spike initiation, can perform sharp frequency discrimination when stimulated with phase-locked inputs. Although the frequency resolution achieved by such networks is limited by the noise in phase locking, the resolution for realistic values reaches the tiny frequency difference of 0.2% that has been measured in humans.

  18. Cooperative MIMO communication at wireless sensor network: an error correcting code approach.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Rakibul; Han, Young Shin

    2011-01-01

    Cooperative communication in wireless sensor network (WSN) explores the energy efficient wireless communication schemes between multiple sensors and data gathering node (DGN) by exploiting multiple input multiple output (MIMO) and multiple input single output (MISO) configurations. In this paper, an energy efficient cooperative MIMO (C-MIMO) technique is proposed where low density parity check (LDPC) code is used as an error correcting code. The rate of LDPC code is varied by varying the length of message and parity bits. Simulation results show that the cooperative communication scheme outperforms SISO scheme in the presence of LDPC code. LDPC codes with different code rates are compared using bit error rate (BER) analysis. BER is also analyzed under different Nakagami fading scenario. Energy efficiencies are compared for different targeted probability of bit error p(b). It is observed that C-MIMO performs more efficiently when the targeted p(b) is smaller. Also the lower encoding rate for LDPC code offers better error characteristics.

  19. Control packet signaling mechanism using electronic code division multiple access for packet-based networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadarajah, Nishaanthan

    2008-10-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of a control packet signaling technique using electronic code division multiple access for a wavelength division multiplexing packet-based network, whereby each wavelength channel is assigned a unique electronic code based label on a radio frequency subcarrier. Such a technique allows each wavelength channel to be electronically identified without requiring the use of a WDM demultiplexer. We experimentally demonstrate this technique with two wavelength channels each with 1.25 Gb/s baseband payload data and 10 Mb/s header coded onto an electronic code at 160 Mb/s. A performance study of the electronic code division multiple access based control signaling scheme in a wavelength division multiplexed packet-based access network is also performed in terms of the required power budget to monitor the electronic code division multiple access control signals in the presence of several sources of noise for error-free transmission of both payload data and electronic code division multiple access based control signals. It is shown that the modulation depth of each signal impacts the amount of required optical tap power. As the modulation depth of the electronic code division multiple access based control signal is increased, the required optical tap power is reduced. However, this increases the bit-error-rate for the payload data. Therefore, there lies a maximum and a minimum of the required tap optical power for the successful recovery of both signals. The lower bound of this range is usually determined by the successful recovery of electronic code division multiple access based control signal while the upper bound is determined by the successful recovery of payload data. The required optical tap power is analyzed for different transmission bit rates of the payload data for various receiver architecture scenarios without an optical amplifier at the receiver. The scalability analyses were repeated with an optical

  20. Development of flow network analysis code for block type VHTR core by linear theory method

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Yoon, S. J.; Park, J. W.; Park, G. C.

    2012-07-01

    VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) is high-efficiency nuclear reactor which is capable of generating hydrogen with high temperature of coolant. PMR (Prismatic Modular Reactor) type reactor consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks. The flow paths in the prismatic VHTR core consist of coolant holes, bypass gaps and cross gaps. Complicated flow paths are formed in the core since the coolant holes and bypass gap are connected by the cross gap. Distributed coolant was mixed in the core through the cross gap so that the flow characteristics could not be modeled as a simple parallel pipe system. It requires lot of effort and takes very long time to analyze the core flow with CFD analysis. Hence, it is important to develop the code for VHTR core flow which can predict the core flow distribution fast and accurate. In this study, steady state flow network analysis code is developed using flow network algorithm. Developed flow network analysis code was named as FLASH code and it was validated with the experimental data and CFD simulation results. (authors)

  1. Coded unicast downstream traffic in a wireless network: analysis and WiFi implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Asaf; Biton, Erez; Kampeas, Joseph; Gurewitz, Omer

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we design, analyze and implement a network coding based scheme for the problem of transmitting multiple unicast streams from a single access point to multiple receivers. In particular, we consider the scenario in which an access point has access to infinite streams of data to be distributed to their intended receivers. After each time slot, the access point receives acknowledgments on previous transmissions. Based on the acknowledgements, it decides on the structure of a coded or uncoded packet to be broadcast to all receivers in the next slot. The goal of the access point is to maximize the cumulative throughput or discounted cumulative throughput in the system. We first rigorously model the relevant coding problem and the information available to the access point and the receivers. We then formulate the problem using a Markov decision process with an infinite horizon, analyze the value function under the uncoded and coded policies and, despite the exponential number of states, devise greedy and semi-greedy policies with a running time which is polynomial with high probability. We then analyze the two users case in more detail and show the optimality of the semi-greedy policy in that case. Finally, we describe a simple implementation of the suggested concepts within a WiFi open-source driver. The implementation performs the network coding such that the enhanced WiFi architecture is transparent above the MAC layer.

  2. Scattering and transport properties of tight-binding random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Mendoza, A. J.; Alcazar-López, A.; Méndez-Bermúdez, J. A.

    2013-07-01

    We study numerically scattering and transport statistical properties of tight-binding random networks characterized by the number of nodes N and the average connectivity α. We use a scattering approach to electronic transport and concentrate on the case of a small number of single-channel attached leads. We observe a smooth crossover from insulating to metallic behavior in the average scattering matrix elements <|Smn|2>, the conductance probability distribution w(T), the average conductance , the shot noise power P, and the elastic enhancement factor F by varying α from small (α→0) to large (α→1) values. We also show that all these quantities are invariant for fixed ξ=αN. Moreover, we proposes a heuristic and universal relation between <|Smn|2>, , and P and the disorder parameter ξ.

  3. Information filtering via biased random walk on coupled social network.

    PubMed

    Nie, Da-Cheng; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Dong, Qiang; Sun, Chongjing; Fu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The recommender systems have advanced a great deal in the past two decades. However, most researchers focus their attentions on mining the similarities among users or objects in recommender systems and overlook the social influence which plays an important role in users' purchase process. In this paper, we design a biased random walk algorithm on coupled social networks which gives recommendation results based on both social interests and users' preference. Numerical analyses on two real data sets, Epinions and Friendfeed, demonstrate the improvement of recommendation performance by taking social interests into account, and experimental results show that our algorithm can alleviate the user cold-start problem more effectively compared with the mass diffusion and user-based collaborative filtering methods.

  4. Information Filtering via Biased Random Walk on Coupled Social Network

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qiang; Fu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The recommender systems have advanced a great deal in the past two decades. However, most researchers focus their attentions on mining the similarities among users or objects in recommender systems and overlook the social influence which plays an important role in users' purchase process. In this paper, we design a biased random walk algorithm on coupled social networks which gives recommendation results based on both social interests and users' preference. Numerical analyses on two real data sets, Epinions and Friendfeed, demonstrate the improvement of recommendation performance by taking social interests into account, and experimental results show that our algorithm can alleviate the user cold-start problem more effectively compared with the mass diffusion and user-based collaborative filtering methods. PMID:25147867

  5. Damage spreading in spatial and small-world random boolean networks

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Qiming; Teuscher, Christof

    2008-01-01

    Random Boolean Networks (RBNs) are often used as generic models for certain dynamics of complex systems, ranging from social networks, neural networks, to gene or protein interaction networks. Traditionally, RBNs are interconnected randomly and without considering any spatial arrangement of the links and nodes. However, most real-world networks are spatially extended and arranged with regular, small-world, or other non-random connections. Here we explore the RBN network topology between extreme local connections, random small-world, and random networks, and study the damage spreading with small perturbations. We find that spatially local connections change the scaling of the relevant component at very low connectivities ({bar K} << 1) and that the critical connectivity of stability K{sub s} changes compared to random networks. At higher {bar K}, this scaling remains unchanged. We also show that the relevant component of spatially local networks scales with a power-law as the system size N increases, but with a different exponent for local and small-world networks. The scaling behaviors are obtained by finite-size scaling. We further investigate the wiring cost of the networks. From an engineering perspective, our new findings provide the key trade-offs between damage spreading (robustness), the network wiring cost, and the network's communication characteristics.

  6. A New Family of 2-D Optical Orthogonal Codes and Analysis of Its Performance in Optical CDMA Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurong, Sun; Yin, Hongxi; Wang, Ziyu; Xu, Anshi

    2006-04-01

    A new family of two-dimensional optical orthogonal code (2-D OOC), one-coincidence frequency hop code (OCFHC)/OOC, which employs OCFHC and OOC as wavelengthhopping and time-spreading patterns, respectively, is proposed in this paper. In contrary to previously constructed 2-D OOCs, OCFHC/OOC provides more choices on the number of available wavelengths and its cardinality achieves the upper bound in theory without sacrificing good auto-and-cross correlation properties, i.e., the correlation properties of the code is still ideal. Meanwhile, we utilize a new method, called effective normalized throughput, to compare the performance of diverse codes applicable to optical code division multiple access (OCDMA) systems besides conventional measure bit error rate, and the results indicate that our code performs better than obtained OCDMA codes and is truly applicable to OCDMA networks as multiaccess codes and will greatly facilitate the implementation of OCDMA access networks.

  7. Degree distribution of random birth-and-death network with network size decline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Jun, Zhang; Hui-Lan, Yang

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we provide a general method to obtain the exact solutions of the degree distributions for random birth-and-death network (RBDN) with network size decline. First, by stochastic process rules, the steady state transformation equations and steady state degree distribution equations are given in the case of m ≥ 3 and 0 < p < 1/2, then the average degree of network with n nodes is introduced to calculate the degree distributions. Specifically, taking m = 3 for example, we explain the detailed solving process, in which computer simulation is used to verify our degree distribution solutions. In addition, the tail characteristics of the degree distribution are discussed. Our findings suggest that the degree distributions will exhibit Poisson tail property for the declining RBDN. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61273015) and the Chinese Scholarship Council.

  8. Development of a new code family based on SAC-OCDMA system with large cardinality for OCDMA network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd, Thanaa Hussein; Aljunid, S. A.; Fadhil, Hilal Adnan; Ahmad, R. A.; Saad, N. M.

    2011-07-01

    We have proposed a new Multi-Diagonal (MD) code for Spectral Amplitude - Coding Optical Code Division Multiple Access (SAC-OCDMA). Although this new MD code has many properties, one of the important properties of this code is that the cross correlation is always zero. Simplicity in code construction and flexibility in cross correlation control has made this code a compelling candidate for future OCDMA applications. The Multiple access interference (MAI) effects have been successfully and completely eliminated. Based on the theoretical analysis MD code is shown here to provide a much better performance compared to Modified Quadratic Congruence (MQC) code and Random Diagonal (RD) code. Proof-of-principle simulations of encoding with 5 and 10 users with 622 Mb/s data transmission at a BER of 10 -12 have been successfully demonstrated together with the DIRECT detection scheme.

  9. Adaptive coded spreading OFDM signal for dynamic-λ optical access network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Zhang, Lijia; Xin, Xiangjun

    2015-12-01

    This paper proposes and experimentally demonstrates a novel adaptive coded spreading (ACS) orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal for dynamic distributed optical ring-based access network. The wavelength can be assigned to different remote nodes (RNs) according to the traffic demand of optical network unit (ONU). The ACS can provide dynamic spreading gain to different signals according to the split ratio or transmission length, which offers flexible power budget for the network. A 10×13.12 Gb/s OFDM access with ACS is successfully demonstrated over two RNs and 120 km transmission in the experiment. The demonstrated method may be viewed as one promising for future optical metro access network.

  10. Adaptive coded spreading OFDM signal for dynamic-λ optical access network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Zhang, Lijia; Xin, Xiangjun

    2015-12-01

    This paper proposes and experimentally demonstrates a novel adaptive coded spreading (ACS) orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal for dynamic distributed optical ring-based access network. The wavelength can be assigned to different remote nodes (RNs) according to the traffic demand of optical network unit (ONU). The ACS can provide dynamic spreading gain to different signals according to the split ratio or transmission length, which offers flexible power budget for the network. A 10×13.12 Gb/s OFDM access with ACS is successfully demonstrated over two RNs and 120 km transmission in the experiment. The demonstrated method may be viewed as one promising for future optical metro access network.

  11. Protection of HEVC Video Delivery in Vehicular Networks with RaptorQ Codes

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Rach, Miguel; López, Otoniel; Malumbres, Manuel Pérez

    2014-01-01

    With future vehicles equipped with processing capability, storage, and communications, vehicular networks will become a reality. A vast number of applications will arise that will make use of this connectivity. Some of them will be based on video streaming. In this paper we focus on HEVC video coding standard streaming in vehicular networks and how it deals with packet losses with the aid of RaptorQ, a Forward Error Correction scheme. As vehicular networks are packet loss prone networks, protection mechanisms are necessary if we want to guarantee a minimum level of quality of experience to the final user. We have run simulations to evaluate which configurations fit better in this type of scenarios. PMID:25136675

  12. Classification of melanoma lesions using sparse coded features and random forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastgoo, Mojdeh; Lemaître, Guillaume; Morel, Olivier; Massich, Joan; Garcia, Rafael; Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Marzani, Franck; Sidibé, Désiré

    2016-03-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer, yet it is the most treatable kind of cancer, conditioned by its early diagnosis which is a challenging task for clinicians and dermatologists. In this regard, CAD systems based on machine learning and image processing techniques are developed to differentiate melanoma lesions from benign and dysplastic nevi using dermoscopic images. Generally, these frameworks are composed of sequential processes: pre-processing, segmentation, and classification. This architecture faces mainly two challenges: (i) each process is complex with the need to tune a set of parameters, and is specific to a given dataset; (ii) the performance of each process depends on the previous one, and the errors are accumulated throughout the framework. In this paper, we propose a framework for melanoma classification based on sparse coding which does not rely on any pre-processing or lesion segmentation. Our framework uses Random Forests classifier and sparse representation of three features: SIFT, Hue and Opponent angle histograms, and RGB intensities. The experiments are carried out on the public PH2 dataset using a 10-fold cross-validation. The results show that SIFT sparse-coded feature achieves the highest performance with sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 90.3% respectively, with a dictionary size of 800 atoms and a sparsity level of 2. Furthermore, the descriptor based on RGB intensities achieves similar results with sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 71.3%, respectively for a smaller dictionary size of 100 atoms. In conclusion, dictionary learning techniques encode strong structures of dermoscopic images and provide discriminant descriptors.

  13. Properties of networks with partially structured and partially random connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadian, Yashar; Fumarola, Francesco; Miller, Kenneth D.

    2016-01-01

    Networks studied in many disciplines, including neuroscience and mathematical biology, have connectivity that may be stochastic about some underlying mean connectivity represented by a nonnormal matrix. Furthermore the stochasticity may not be i.i.d. across elements of the connectivity matrix. More generally, the problem of understanding the behavior of stochastic matrices with nontrivial mean structure and correlations arises in many settings. We address this by characterizing large random N × N matrices of the form A = M + LJR, where M, L and R are arbitrary deterministic matrices and J is a random matrix of zero-mean independent and identically distributed elements. M can be nonnormal, and L and R allow correlations that have separable dependence on row and column indices. We first provide a general formula for the eigenvalue density of A. For A nonnormal, the eigenvalues do not suffice to specify the dynamics induced by A, so we also provide general formulae for the transient evolution of the magnitude of activity and frequency power spectrum in an N -dimensional linear dynamical system with a coupling matrix given by A. These quantities can also be thought of as characterizing the stability and the magnitude of the linear response of a nonlinear network to small perturbations about a fixed point. We derive these formulae and work them out analytically for some examples of M, L and R motivated by neurobiological models. We also argue that the persistence as N → ∞ of a finite number of randomly distributed outlying eigenvalues outside the support of the eigenvalue density of A, as previously observed, arises in regions of the complex plane Ω where there are nonzero singular values of L−1(z1 − M)R−1 (for z ∈ Ω) that vanish as N → ∞. When such singular values do not exist and L and R are equal to the identity, there is a correspondence in the normalized Frobenius norm (but not in the operator norm) between the support of the spectrum of A for

  14. All-optical swapping of spectral amplitude code labels for packet-switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lawrence R.

    2008-08-01

    Packet-switched networks have attracted considerable attention as a basis for next-generation optical networks due to their advantages in terms of flexibility and network efficiency over traditional circuit-switched networks. Optical code multi-protocol label switching (OC-MPLS) promises fast, flexible, power-efficient switching by keeping signals in the optical domain and avoiding costly conversions to the electrical domain. In this paper, we review the use of spectral amplitude codes (SACs) for implementing OC-MPLS labels. We discuss the principles and features, as well as key enabling technologies required for their processing. In particular, we compare three different approaches for low cost all-optical swapping of SAC labels. All approaches are based on semiconductor fiber lasers and exploit nonlinearity in a semiconductor device: the first uses cross-absorption modulation in an electroabsorption modulator, the second uses cross-gain modulation (XGM) in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), and the third makes use of XGM in an SOA as well as injection locking in a Fabry-Pérot laser. We present the static and dynamic responses of each for swapping a multi-wavelength input label to a multi-wavelength output label. The benefits and limitations of each approach as well as future improvements are discussed. We also present the results of systems experiments which demonstrate error-free all-optical label swapping, recognition, and switching of multi-rate packets in packet-switched networks using multi-wavelength labels.

  15. Optimizing Network-Coded Cooperative Communications via Joint Session Grouping and Relay Node Selection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Optimizing Network-Coded Cooperative Communications via Joint Session Grouping and Relay Node Selection Sushant Sharma Yi Shi Y. Thomas Hou Hanif...that for a single relay node, we can group as many sessions as we want. But, in a recent study [20], Sharma et al. showed that there exists a so-called...destination wireless network. In [20], Sharma et al. considered NC-CC with only one relay node. Their analysis showed that NC is not always good for CC, and

  16. Delay Analysis of Car-to-Car Reliable Data Delivery Strategies Based on Data Mulling with Network Coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Sang; Lee, Uichin; Oh, Soon Young; Gerla, Mario; Lun, Desmond Siumen; Ro, Won Woo; Park, Joonseok

    Vehicular ad hoc networks (VANET) aims to enhance vehicle navigation safety by providing an early warning system: any chance of accidents is informed through the wireless communication between vehicles. For the warning system to work, it is crucial that safety messages be reliably delivered to the target vehicles in a timely manner and thus reliable and timely data dissemination service is the key building block of VANET. Data mulling technique combined with three strategies, network codeing, erasure coding and repetition coding, is proposed for the reliable and timely data dissemination service. Particularly, vehicles in the opposite direction on a highway are exploited as data mules, mobile nodes physically delivering data to destinations, to overcome intermittent network connectivity cause by sparse vehicle traffic. Using analytic models, we show that in such a highway data mulling scenario the network coding based strategy outperforms erasure coding and repetition based strategies.

  17. Use of an Integrated Discrete Fracture Network Code for Stochastic Stability Analyses of Fractured Rock Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrien-Soukatchoff, V.; Korini, T.; Thoraval, A.

    2012-03-01

    The paper presents the Discrete Fracture Network code RESOBLOK, which couples geometrical block system construction and a quick iterative stability analysis in the same package. The deterministic or stochastic geometry of a fractured rock mass can be represented and interactively displayed in 3D using two different fracture generators: one mainly used for hydraulic purposes and another designed to allow block stability evaluation. RESOBLOK has downstream modules that can quickly compute stability (based on limit equilibrium or energy-based analysis), display geometric information and create links to other discrete software. The advantage of the code is that it couples stochastic geometrical representation and a quick iterative stability analysis to allow risk-analysis with or without reinforcement and, for the worst cases, more accurate analysis using stress-strain analysis computer codes. These different aspects are detailed for embankment and underground works.

  18. Isolated user security enhancement in optical code division multiple access network against eavesdropping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyoti, Vishav; Kaler, Rajinder Singh

    2012-09-01

    A novel virtual user system is modeled for enhancing the security of an optical code division multiple access (OCDMA) network. Although the OCDMA system implementing code shift keying (CSK) is secure against a conventional power detector, it is susceptible to differential eavesdropping. An analytical framework is developed for the CSK-OCDMA system to show eavesdropper's code interception performance for a single transmitting user in the presence of a virtual user. It is shown that the eavesdropper's probability of correct bit interception decreases from 7.1×10-1 to 1.85×10-5 with the inclusion of the virtual user. Furthermore, the results confirm that the proposed virtual user scheme increases the confidentiality of the CSK-OCDMA system and outperforms the conventional OCDMA scheme in terms of security.

  19. Principles of odor coding and a neural network for odor discrimination.

    PubMed Central

    Schild, D

    1988-01-01

    A concept of olfactory coding is proposed. It describes the stimulus responses of all receptor cells by the use of vector spaces. The morphological convergence pattern between receptor cells and glomeruli is given in the same vector space as the receptor cell activities. The overall input of a glomerulus follows as the scalar product of the receptor cell activity vector and the vector of the glomerulus' convergence pattern. The proposed coding concept shows how the network of the olfactory bulb succeeds in discriminating odors with high selectivity. It is concluded that sets of mitral cells coding similar odors work very much in the way of mutually inhibited matched filters. This solves one main problem both in olfaction as well as real-time odor detection by an artificial nose, i.e., how the fairly low degree of selectivity of receptor cells or sensors is overcome by the neural network following the receptor stage. The formal description of olfactory coding suggests that quality perception which is invariant under concentration shifts is accomplished by an associative memory in the olfactory bulb. PMID:3233263

  20. SAS Code for Calculating Intraclass Correlation Coefficients and Effect Size Benchmarks for Site-Randomized Education Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Paul R.; Harrison, George M.; Lawton, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    When evaluators plan site-randomized experiments, they must conduct the appropriate statistical power analyses. These analyses are most likely to be valid when they are based on data from the jurisdictions in which the studies are to be conducted. In this method note, we provide software code, in the form of a SAS macro, for producing statistical…

  1. SAS Code for Calculating Intraclass Correlation Coefficients and Effect Size Benchmarks for Site-Randomized Education Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Paul R.; Harrison, George M.; Lawton, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    When evaluators plan site-randomized experiments, they must conduct the appropriate statistical power analyses. These analyses are most likely to be valid when they are based on data from the jurisdictions in which the studies are to be conducted. In this method note, we provide software code, in the form of a SAS macro, for producing statistical…

  2. Analysis of bHLH coding genes using gene co-expression network approach.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Swati; Sanchita; Singh, Garima; Singh, Noopur; Srivastava, Gaurava; Sharma, Ashok

    2016-07-01

    Network analysis provides a powerful framework for the interpretation of data. It uses novel reference network-based metrices for module evolution. These could be used to identify module of highly connected genes showing variation in co-expression network. In this study, a co-expression network-based approach was used for analyzing the genes from microarray data. Our approach consists of a simple but robust rank-based network construction. The publicly available gene expression data of Solanum tuberosum under cold and heat stresses were considered to create and analyze a gene co-expression network. The analysis provide highly co-expressed module of bHLH coding genes based on correlation values. Our approach was to analyze the variation of genes expression, according to the time period of stress through co-expression network approach. As the result, the seed genes were identified showing multiple connections with other genes in the same cluster. Seed genes were found to be vary in different time periods of stress. These analyzed seed genes may be utilized further as marker genes for developing the stress tolerant plant species.

  3. The NEST Dry-Run Mode: Efficient Dynamic Analysis of Neuronal Network Simulation Code.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Susanne; Schenck, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    NEST is a simulator for spiking neuronal networks that commits to a general purpose approach: It allows for high flexibility in the design of network models, and its applications range from small-scale simulations on laptops to brain-scale simulations on supercomputers. Hence, developers need to test their code for various use cases and ensure that changes to code do not impair scalability. However, running a full set of benchmarks on a supercomputer takes up precious compute-time resources and can entail long queuing times. Here, we present the NEST dry-run mode, which enables comprehensive dynamic code analysis without requiring access to high-performance computing facilities. A dry-run simulation is carried out by a single process, which performs all simulation steps except communication as if it was part of a parallel environment with many processes. We show that measurements of memory usage and runtime of neuronal network simulations closely match the corresponding dry-run data. Furthermore, we demonstrate the successful application of the dry-run mode in the areas of profiling and performance modeling.

  4. PRODIAG: Combined expert system/neural network for process fault diagnosis. Volume 2, Code manual

    SciTech Connect

    Reifman, J.; Wei, T.Y.C.

    1995-09-01

    We recommend the reader first review Volume 1 of this document, Code Theory, before reading Volume 2. In this volume we make extensive use of terms and concepts described and defined in Volume 1 which are not redefined here to the same extent. To try to reduce the amount of redundant information, we have restricted this volume to the presentation of the expert system code and refer back to the theory described in Volume 1 when necessary. Verification and validation of the results are presented in Volume 3, Application, of this document. Volume 3 also presents the implementation of the component characteristics diagnostic approach through artificial neural networks discussed in Volume 1. We decided to present the component characteristics approach in Volume 3, as opposed to write a separate code manual for it, because the approach, although general, requires a case-by-case analysis. The purpose of this volume is to present the details of the expert system (ES) portion o the PRODIAG process diagnostic program. In addition, we present here the graphical diagnostics interface (GDI) and illustrate the combined use of the ES and GDI with a sample problem. For completeness, we provide the file names of all files, programs and major subroutines of these two systems, ES and GDI, and their corresponding location in the Reactor Analysis Division (RA) computer network and Reactor Engineering Division (RE) computer network as of 30 September 1995.

  5. Hierarchical surface code for network quantum computing with modules of arbitrary size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Benjamin, Simon C.

    2016-10-01

    The network paradigm for quantum computing involves interconnecting many modules to form a scalable machine. Typically it is assumed that the links between modules are prone to noise while operations within modules have a significantly higher fidelity. To optimize fault tolerance in such architectures we introduce a hierarchical generalization of the surface code: a small "patch" of the code exists within each module and constitutes a single effective qubit of the logic-level surface code. Errors primarily occur in a two-dimensional subspace, i.e., patch perimeters extruded over time, and the resulting noise threshold for intermodule links can exceed ˜10 % even in the absence of purification. Increasing the number of qubits within each module decreases the number of qubits necessary for encoding a logical qubit. But this advantage is relatively modest, and broadly speaking, a "fine-grained" network of small modules containing only about eight qubits is competitive in total qubit count versus a "course" network with modules containing many hundreds of qubits.

  6. The NEST Dry-Run Mode: Efficient Dynamic Analysis of Neuronal Network Simulation Code

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Susanne; Schenck, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    NEST is a simulator for spiking neuronal networks that commits to a general purpose approach: It allows for high flexibility in the design of network models, and its applications range from small-scale simulations on laptops to brain-scale simulations on supercomputers. Hence, developers need to test their code for various use cases and ensure that changes to code do not impair scalability. However, running a full set of benchmarks on a supercomputer takes up precious compute-time resources and can entail long queuing times. Here, we present the NEST dry-run mode, which enables comprehensive dynamic code analysis without requiring access to high-performance computing facilities. A dry-run simulation is carried out by a single process, which performs all simulation steps except communication as if it was part of a parallel environment with many processes. We show that measurements of memory usage and runtime of neuronal network simulations closely match the corresponding dry-run data. Furthermore, we demonstrate the successful application of the dry-run mode in the areas of profiling and performance modeling. PMID:28701946

  7. Damage Spreading in Spatial and Small-world Random Boolean Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Qiming; Teuscher, Christof

    2014-02-18

    The study of the response of complex dynamical social, biological, or technological networks to external perturbations has numerous applications. Random Boolean Networks (RBNs) are commonly used a simple generic model for certain dynamics of complex systems. Traditionally, RBNs are interconnected randomly and without considering any spatial extension and arrangement of the links and nodes. However, most real-world networks are spatially extended and arranged with regular, power-law, small-world, or other non-random connections. Here we explore the RBN network topology between extreme local connections, random small-world, and pure random networks, and study the damage spreading with small perturbations. We find that spatially local connections change the scaling of the relevant component at very low connectivities ($\\bar{K} \\ll 1$) and that the critical connectivity of stability $K_s$ changes compared to random networks. At higher $\\bar{K}$, this scaling remains unchanged. We also show that the relevant component of spatially local networks scales with a power-law as the system size N increases, but with a different exponent for local and small-world networks. The scaling behaviors are obtained by finite-size scaling. We further investigate the wiring cost of the networks. From an engineering perspective, our new findings provide the key design trade-offs between damage spreading (robustness), the network's wiring cost, and the network's communication characteristics.

  8. Biometrics based key management of double random phase encoding scheme using error control codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Nirmala; Sinha, Aloka

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, an optical security system has been proposed in which key of the double random phase encoding technique is linked to the biometrics of the user to make it user specific. The error in recognition due to the biometric variation is corrected by encoding the key using the BCH code. A user specific shuffling key is used to increase the separation between genuine and impostor Hamming distance distribution. This shuffling key is then further secured using the RSA public key encryption to enhance the security of the system. XOR operation is performed between the encoded key and the feature vector obtained from the biometrics. The RSA encoded shuffling key and the data obtained from the XOR operation are stored into a token. The main advantage of the present technique is that the key retrieval is possible only in the simultaneous presence of the token and the biometrics of the user which not only authenticates the presence of the original input but also secures the key of the system. Computational experiments showed the effectiveness of the proposed technique for key retrieval in the decryption process by using the live biometrics of the user.

  9. Selection of DNA binding sites for zinc fingers using rationally randomized DNA reveals coded interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Y; Klug, A

    1994-01-01

    In the preceding paper [Choo, Y. & Klug, A. (1994) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91, 11163-11167], we showed how selections from a library of zinc fingers displayed on phage yielded fingers able to bind to a number of DNA triplets. Here, we describe a technique to deal efficiently with the converse problem--namely, the selection of a DNA binding site for a given zinc finger. This is done by screening against libraries of DNA triplet binding sites randomized in two positions but having one base fixed in the third position. The technique is applied here to determine the specificity of fingers previously selected by phage display. We find that some of these fingers are able to specify a unique base in each position of the cognate triplet. This is further illustrated by examples of fingers which can discriminate between closely related triplets as measured by their respective equilibrium dissociation constants. Comparing the amino acid sequences of fingers which specify a particular base in a triplet, we infer that in most instances, sequence-specific binding of zinc fingers to DNA can be achieved by using a small set of amino acid-nucleotide base contacts amenable to a code. Images PMID:7972028

  10. When Are Popescu-Rohrlich Boxes and Random Access Codes Equivalent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Karol; Horodecki, Michał; Kłobus, Waldemar; Pawłowski, Marcin

    2014-09-01

    We study a problem of interconvertibility of two supraquantum resources: one is the so-called Popescu-Rohrlich (PR) box, which violates Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality up to the maximal algebraic bound, and the second is the so-called random access code (RAC). The latter is a functionality that enables Bob (receiver) to choose one of two bits of Alice. It is known that a PR box supplemented with one bit of communication can be used to simulate a RAC. We ask the converse question: to what extent can a RAC can simulate a PR box? To this end, we introduce a "racbox": a box such that when it is supplemented with one bit of communication it offers a RAC. As said, a PR box can simulate a racbox. The question we raise is whether any racbox can simulate a PR box. We show that a nonsignaling racbox, indeed, can simulate a PR box; hence, these two resources are equivalent. We also provide an example of a signaling racbox that cannot simulate a PR box. We give a resource inequality between racboxes and PR boxes and show that it is saturated.

  11. A Energy-Saving Path-Shared Protection Based on Diversity Network Coding for Multi-rate Multicast in WDM Mesh Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Danling; Lv, Lei; Liu, Huanlin

    2017-08-01

    For improving the survivability and energy saving of multi-rate multicast, a novel energy-saving path-shared protection based on diversity network coding (EPP-DNC) for multi-rate multicast in wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) mesh networks is proposed in the paper. In the EPP-DNC algorithm, diversity network coding on the source node for multi-rate multicast is adopted to reduce the coding energy consumption by avoiding network coding on the network's intermediate nodes. To decrease the transmission energy, shortest path shared based on heuristic is proposed to transmit the protection information for the request. To provision request's working paths efficiency, the working paths are routed on the preselected P-cycles with minimum required links and minimum energy consumption. Simulation results show that the proposed EPP-DNC can save energy consumption and improve bandwidth utilization.

  12. Damage spreading in spatial and small-world random Boolean networks.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiming; Teuscher, Christof

    2014-02-01

    The study of the response of complex dynamical social, biological, or technological networks to external perturbations has numerous applications. Random Boolean networks (RBNs) are commonly used as a simple generic model for certain dynamics of complex systems. Traditionally, RBNs are interconnected randomly and without considering any spatial extension and arrangement of the links and nodes. However, most real-world networks are spatially extended and arranged with regular, power-law, small-world, or other nonrandom connections. Here we explore the RBN network topology between extreme local connections, random small-world, and pure random networks, and study the damage spreading with small perturbations. We find that spatially local connections change the scaling of the Hamming distance at very low connectivities (K ≪ 1) and that the critical connectivity of stability K(s) changes compared to random networks. At higher K, this scaling remains unchanged. We also show that the Hamming distance of spatially local networks scales with a power law as the system size N increases, but with a different exponent for local and small-world networks. The scaling arguments for small-world networks are obtained with respect to the system sizes and strength of spatially local connections. We further investigate the wiring cost of the networks. From an engineering perspective, our new findings provide the key design trade-offs between damage spreading (robustness), the network's wiring cost, and the network's communication characteristics.

  13. Damage spreading in spatial and small-world random Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qiming; Teuscher, Christof

    2014-02-01

    The study of the response of complex dynamical social, biological, or technological networks to external perturbations has numerous applications. Random Boolean networks (RBNs) are commonly used as a simple generic model for certain dynamics of complex systems. Traditionally, RBNs are interconnected randomly and without considering any spatial extension and arrangement of the links and nodes. However, most real-world networks are spatially extended and arranged with regular, power-law, small-world, or other nonrandom connections. Here we explore the RBN network topology between extreme local connections, random small-world, and pure random networks, and study the damage spreading with small perturbations. We find that spatially local connections change the scaling of the Hamming distance at very low connectivities (K¯≪1) and that the critical connectivity of stability Ks changes compared to random networks. At higher K¯, this scaling remains unchanged. We also show that the Hamming distance of spatially local networks scales with a power law as the system size N increases, but with a different exponent for local and small-world networks. The scaling arguments for small-world networks are obtained with respect to the system sizes and strength of spatially local connections. We further investigate the wiring cost of the networks. From an engineering perspective, our new findings provide the key design trade-offs between damage spreading (robustness), the network's wiring cost, and the network's communication characteristics.

  14. Random sequential renormalization of networks: application to critical trees.

    PubMed

    Bizhani, Golnoosh; Sood, Vishal; Paczuski, Maya; Grassberger, Peter

    2011-03-01

    We introduce the concept of random sequential renormalization (RSR) for arbitrary networks. RSR is a graph renormalization procedure that locally aggregates nodes to produce a coarse grained network. It is analogous to the (quasi)parallel renormalization schemes introduced by C. Song et al. [C. Song et al., Nature (London) 433, 392 (2005)] and studied by F. Radicchi et al. [F. Radicchi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 148701 (2008)], but much simpler and easier to implement. Here we apply RSR to critical trees and derive analytical results consistent with numerical simulations. Critical trees exhibit three regimes in their evolution under RSR. (i) For N₀{ν}≲Nrandom walk and other arguments. The degree distribution becomes broader under successive steps, reaching a power law p{k}~1/k{γ} with γ=2 and a variance that diverges as N₀¹/² at the end of this regime. Both of these latter results are obtained from a scaling theory. (ii) For N₀{ν{star}}≲N ≲ N₀¹/², with ν_{star}≈1/4 hubs develop, and fluctuations between different realizations of the RSR are large. Trees are short and fat with an average radius that is O(1). Crossover functions exhibiting finite-size scaling in the critical region N~N₀¹/²→∞ connect the behaviors in the first two regimes. (iii) For N ≲ N₀{ν{star}}, star configurations appear with a central hub surrounded by many leaves. The distribution of stars is broadly distributed over this range. The scaling behaviors found under RSR are identified with a continuous transition in a process called "agglomerative percolation" (AP), with the coarse-grained nodes in RSR corresponding to clusters in AP that grow by simultaneously attaching to all their neighboring clusters.

  15. Resonant spatiotemporal learning in large random recurrent networks.

    PubMed

    Daucé, Emmanuel; Quoy, Mathias; Doyon, Bernard

    2002-09-01

    Taking a global analogy with the structure of perceptual biological systems, we present a system composed of two layers of real-valued sigmoidal neurons. The primary layer receives stimulating spatiotemporal signals, and the secondary layer is a fully connected random recurrent network. This secondary layer spontaneously displays complex chaotic dynamics. All connections have a constant time delay. We use for our experiments a Hebbian (covariance) learning rule. This rule slowly modifies the weights under the influence of a periodic stimulus. The effect of learning is twofold: (i) it simplifies the secondary-layer dynamics, which eventually stabilizes to a periodic orbit; and (ii) it connects the secondary layer to the primary layer, and realizes a feedback from the secondary to the primary layer. This feedback signal is added to the incoming signal, and matches it (i.e., the secondary layer performs a one-step prediction of the forthcoming stimulus). After learning, a resonant behavior can be observed: the system resonates with familiar stimuli, which activates a feedback signal. In particular, this resonance allows the recognition and retrieval of partial signals, and dynamic maintenance of the memory of past stimuli. This resonance is highly sensitive to the temporal relationships and to the periodicity of the presented stimuli. When we present stimuli which do not match in time or space, the feedback remains silent. The number of different stimuli for which resonant behavior can be learned is analyzed. As with Hopfield networks, the capacity is proportional to the size of the second, recurrent layer. Moreover, the high capacity displayed allows the implementation of our model on real-time systems interacting with their environment. Such an implementation is reported in the case of a simple behavior-based recognition task on a mobile robot. Finally, we present some functional analogies with biological systems in terms of autonomy and dynamic binding, and present

  16. Non-cooperative code design in radar networks: a game-theoretic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piezzo, Marco; Aubry, Augusto; Buzzi, Stefano; Maio, Antonio De; Farina, Alfonso

    2013-12-01

    A network of radars sharing the same frequency band, and using properly coded waveforms to improve features attractive from the radar point of view is considered in this article. Non-cooperative games aimed at code design for maximization of the signal-to-interference plus noise ratio (SINR) of each active radar are presented. Code update strategies are proposed, and, resorting to the theory of potential games, the existence of Nash equilibria is analytically proven. In particular, we propose non-cooperative code update procedures for the cases in which a matched filter, a minimum integrated sidelobe level filter, and a minimum peak to sidelobe level filter are used at the receiver. The case in which the received data contain a non-negligible Doppler shift is also analyzed. Experimental results confirm that the proposed procedures reach an equilibrium in few iterations, as well as that the SINR values at the equilibrium are largely superior to those in the case in which classical waveforms are used and no optimization of the radar code is performed.

  17. A direct sequence spread spectrum code acquisition circuit for wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaisari, Jafar; Ferdosi, Arash

    2011-06-01

    Narrow band (NB), spread spectrum (SS), and ultra wide band (UWB) are three physical layer bandwidth types used in wireless sensor networks (WSN). SS and UWB technologies have many advantages over NB, which make them preferable for WSN. Synchronisation of different nodes in a WSN is an important task that is necessary to improve cooperation and lifetime of nodes. Code acquisition is the main step of a node's time synchronisation. In this article, a pseudo noise code generator and a code acquisition circuit are proposed, designed and tested using direct sequence SS technique. To investigate the properties of the designed circuits, simulations are carried out via Xilinx Foundation Series software in the real mode. The results demonstrate excellent performance of the proposed algorithms and circuits in all realistic conditions. The code acquisition circuit proposed an adaptive testing window for single dwell serial search method. The code acquisition circuit is a clock phase free approach, thus the clock coherency step is cancelled. Moreover, clock phase difference between transmitter and receiver nodes does not mostly affect the acquisition and thus synchronisation time.

  18. [Learning of reproduction of random sequences by the right and the left hand movements: coding of positions or movements].

    PubMed

    Bobrova, E V; Liakhovetskiĭ, V A; Skopin, G N

    2012-01-01

    Positional and movement errors during reproduction of memorized sequences of six random hand movements were analyzed. The task was performed by two groups of subjects: during six days by one hand (right/left) and during next six days by another hand (left/right). Mean values of accuracy errors decreases during learning only in a group which begins to work by the right hand. The quantity of transposition errors depends on type of error: positional or movement one. Subjects transpose the positions of the right hand more often when it begins to perform the task. Subjects transpose the movements of the left hand more often when it begins to perform the task. The results are evident in favor of the hypothesis about two type of movement coding: positional and vector coding (coding of positions or of changing of positions) specific in the right and the left hemispheres and suggest that learning of reproduction of movement sequences is provided by vector coding.

  19. Determining Associations between Human Diseases and non-coding RNAs with Critical Roles in Network Control.

    PubMed

    Kagami, Haruna; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Maegawa, Shingo; Hosokawa, Hiroshi; Nacher, Jose C

    2015-10-13

    Deciphering the association between life molecules and human diseases is currently an important task in systems biology. Research over the past decade has unveiled that the human genome is almost entirely transcribed, producing a vast number of non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) with potential regulatory functions. More recent findings suggest that many diseases may not be exclusively linked to mutations in protein-coding genes. The combination of these arguments poses the question of whether ncRNAs that play a critical role in network control are also enriched with disease-associated ncRNAs. To address this question, we mapped the available annotated information of more than 350 human disorders to the largest collection of human ncRNA-protein interactions, which define a bipartite network of almost 93,000 interactions. Using a novel algorithmic-based controllability framework applied to the constructed bipartite network, we found that ncRNAs engaged in critical network control are also statistically linked to human disorders (P-value of P = 9.8 × 10(-109)). Taken together, these findings suggest that the addition of those genes that encode optimized subsets of ncRNAs engaged in critical control within the pool of candidate genes could aid disease gene prioritization studies.

  20. Determining Associations between Human Diseases and non-coding RNAs with Critical Roles in Network Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagami, Haruna; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Maegawa, Shingo; Hosokawa, Hiroshi; Nacher, Jose C.

    2015-10-01

    Deciphering the association between life molecules and human diseases is currently an important task in systems biology. Research over the past decade has unveiled that the human genome is almost entirely transcribed, producing a vast number of non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) with potential regulatory functions. More recent findings suggest that many diseases may not be exclusively linked to mutations in protein-coding genes. The combination of these arguments poses the question of whether ncRNAs that play a critical role in network control are also enriched with disease-associated ncRNAs. To address this question, we mapped the available annotated information of more than 350 human disorders to the largest collection of human ncRNA-protein interactions, which define a bipartite network of almost 93,000 interactions. Using a novel algorithmic-based controllability framework applied to the constructed bipartite network, we found that ncRNAs engaged in critical network control are also statistically linked to human disorders (P-value of P = 9.8 × 10-109). Taken together, these findings suggest that the addition of those genes that encode optimized subsets of ncRNAs engaged in critical control within the pool of candidate genes could aid disease gene prioritization studies.

  1. An Adaptive Data Gathering Scheme for Multi-Hop Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Compressed Sensing and Network Coding.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Yang, Yuwang; Wang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Joint design of compressed sensing (CS) and network coding (NC) has been demonstrated to provide a new data gathering paradigm for multi-hop wireless sensor networks (WSNs). By exploiting the correlation of the network sensed data, a variety of data gathering schemes based on NC and CS (Compressed Data Gathering--CDG) have been proposed. However, these schemes assume that the sparsity of the network sensed data is constant and the value of the sparsity is known before starting each data gathering epoch, thus they ignore the variation of the data observed by the WSNs which are deployed in practical circumstances. In this paper, we present a complete design of the feedback CDG scheme where the sink node adaptively queries those interested nodes to acquire an appropriate number of measurements. The adaptive measurement-formation procedure and its termination rules are proposed and analyzed in detail. Moreover, in order to minimize the number of overall transmissions in the formation procedure of each measurement, we have developed a NP-complete model (Maximum Leaf Nodes Minimum Steiner Nodes--MLMS) and realized a scalable greedy algorithm to solve the problem. Experimental results show that the proposed measurement-formation method outperforms previous schemes, and experiments on both datasets from ocean temperature and practical network deployment also prove the effectiveness of our proposed feedback CDG scheme.

  2. An Adaptive Data Gathering Scheme for Multi-Hop Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Compressed Sensing and Network Coding

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jun; Yang, Yuwang; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Joint design of compressed sensing (CS) and network coding (NC) has been demonstrated to provide a new data gathering paradigm for multi-hop wireless sensor networks (WSNs). By exploiting the correlation of the network sensed data, a variety of data gathering schemes based on NC and CS (Compressed Data Gathering—CDG) have been proposed. However, these schemes assume that the sparsity of the network sensed data is constant and the value of the sparsity is known before starting each data gathering epoch, thus they ignore the variation of the data observed by the WSNs which are deployed in practical circumstances. In this paper, we present a complete design of the feedback CDG scheme where the sink node adaptively queries those interested nodes to acquire an appropriate number of measurements. The adaptive measurement-formation procedure and its termination rules are proposed and analyzed in detail. Moreover, in order to minimize the number of overall transmissions in the formation procedure of each measurement, we have developed a NP-complete model (Maximum Leaf Nodes Minimum Steiner Nodes—MLMS) and realized a scalable greedy algorithm to solve the problem. Experimental results show that the proposed measurement-formation method outperforms previous schemes, and experiments on both datasets from ocean temperature and practical network deployment also prove the effectiveness of our proposed feedback CDG scheme. PMID:27043574

  3. Data compression in wireless sensors network using MDCT and embedded harmonic coding.

    PubMed

    Alsalaet, Jaafar K; Ali, Abduladhem A

    2015-05-01

    One of the major applications of wireless sensors networks (WSNs) is vibration measurement for the purpose of structural health monitoring and machinery fault diagnosis. WSNs have many advantages over the wired networks such as low cost and reduced setup time. However, the useful bandwidth is limited, as compared to wired networks, resulting in relatively low sampling. One solution to this problem is data compression which, in addition to enhancing sampling rate, saves valuable power of the wireless nodes. In this work, a data compression scheme, based on Modified Discrete Cosine Transform (MDCT) followed by Embedded Harmonic Components Coding (EHCC) is proposed to compress vibration signals. The EHCC is applied to exploit harmonic redundancy present is most vibration signals resulting in improved compression ratio. This scheme is made suitable for the tiny hardware of wireless nodes and it is proved to be fast and effective. The efficiency of the proposed scheme is investigated by conducting several experimental tests.

  4. Method and system for pattern analysis using a coarse-coded neural network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirkovska, Liljana (Inventor); Reid, Max B. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method and system for performing pattern analysis with a neural network coarse-coding a pattern to be analyzed so as to form a plurality of sub-patterns collectively defined by data. Each of the sub-patterns comprises sets of pattern data. The neural network includes a plurality fields, each field being associated with one of the sub-patterns so as to receive the sub-pattern data therefrom. Training and testing by the neural network then proceeds in the usual way, with one modification: the transfer function thresholds the value obtained from summing the weighted products of each field over all sub-patterns associated with each pattern being analyzed by the system.

  5. Minimum spanning trees and random resistor networks in d dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, N.

    2005-09-01

    We consider minimum-cost spanning trees, both in lattice and Euclidean models, in d dimensions. For the cost of the optimum tree in a box of size L , we show that there is a correction of order Lθ , where θ⩽0 is a universal d -dependent exponent. There is a similar form for the change in optimum cost under a change in boundary condition. At nonzero temperature T , there is a crossover length ξ˜T-ν , such that on length scales larger than ξ , the behavior becomes that of uniform spanning trees. There is a scaling relation θ=-1/ν , and we provide several arguments that show that ν and -1/θ both equal νperc , the correlation length exponent for ordinary percolation in the same dimension d , in all dimensions d⩾1 . The arguments all rely on the close relation of Kruskal’s greedy algorithm for the minimum spanning tree, percolation, and (for some arguments) random resistor networks. The scaling of the entropy and free energy at small nonzero T , and hence of the number of near-optimal solutions, is also discussed. We suggest that the Steiner tree problem is in the same universality class as the minimum spanning tree in all dimensions, as is the traveling salesman problem in two dimensions. Hence all will have the same value of θ=-3/4 in two dimensions.

  6. Stability and dynamical properties of material flow systems on random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, K.; Galla, T.

    2009-04-01

    The theory of complex networks and of disordered systems is used to study the stability and dynamical properties of a simple model of material flow networks defined on random graphs. In particular we address instabilities that are characteristic of flow networks in economic, ecological and biological systems. Based on results from random matrix theory, we work out the phase diagram of such systems defined on extensively connected random graphs, and study in detail how the choice of control policies and the network structure affects stability. We also present results for more complex topologies of the underlying graph, focussing on finitely connected Erdös-Réyni graphs, Small-World Networks and Barabási-Albert scale-free networks. Results indicate that variability of input-output matrix elements, and random structures of the underlying graph tend to make the system less stable, while fast price dynamics or strong responsiveness to stock accumulation promote stability.

  7. Efficient File Sharing by Multicast - P2P Protocol Using Network Coding and Rank Based Peer Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoenescu, Tudor M.; Woo, Simon S.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we consider information dissemination and sharing in a distributed peer-to-peer (P2P highly dynamic communication network. In particular, we explore a network coding technique for transmission and a rank based peer selection method for network formation. The combined approach has been shown to improve information sharing and delivery to all users when considering the challenges imposed by the space network environments.

  8. Efficient File Sharing by Multicast - P2P Protocol Using Network Coding and Rank Based Peer Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoenescu, Tudor M.; Woo, Simon S.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we consider information dissemination and sharing in a distributed peer-to-peer (P2P highly dynamic communication network. In particular, we explore a network coding technique for transmission and a rank based peer selection method for network formation. The combined approach has been shown to improve information sharing and delivery to all users when considering the challenges imposed by the space network environments.

  9. Design of packet erasure mitigation technique using a digital fountain code for wearable wireless body area networks.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Kenichi; Hamaguchi, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a digital fountain code as a design criterion in order to mitigate packet erasure in wireless wearable body area networks (WBANs). First, we measure its radio propagation around the human body between two antennas attached to participants, and then analyze the measurement results from the standpoint of occurrence ratio of packet erasure. Then, we evaluate the application of digital fountain code into such WBANs where a rateless code is introduced as such code in order to provide a design criterion for the code.

  10. Modeling Training Site Vegetation Coverage Probability with a Random Optimizing Procedure: An Artificial Neural Network Approach.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-01

    Coverage Probability with a Random Optimization Procedure: An Artificial Neural Network Approach by Biing T. Guan, George Z. Gertner, and Alan B...Modeling Training Site Vegetation Coverage Probability with a Random Optimizing Procedure: An Artificial Neural Network Approach 6. AUTHOR(S) Biing...coverage based on past coverage. Approach A literature survey was conducted to identify artificial neural network analysis techniques applicable for

  11. Secure Communications in High Speed Fiber Optical Networks Using Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) Transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Han, I; Bond, S; Welty, R; Du, Y; Yoo, S; Reinhardt, C; Behymer, E; Sperry, V; Kobayashi, N

    2004-02-12

    This project is focused on the development of advanced components and system technologies for secure data transmission on high-speed fiber optic data systems. This work capitalizes on (1) a strong relationship with outstanding faculty at the University of California-Davis who are experts in high speed fiber-optic networks, (2) the realization that code division multiple access (CDMA) is emerging as a bandwidth enhancing technique for fiber optic networks, (3) the realization that CDMA of sufficient complexity forms the basis for almost unbreakable one-time key transmissions, (4) our concepts for superior components for implementing CDMA, (5) our expertise in semiconductor device processing and (6) our Center for Nano and Microtechnology, which is where the majority of the experimental work was done. Here we present a novel device concept, which will push the limits of current technology, and will simultaneously solve system implementation issues by investigating new state-of-the-art fiber technologies. This will enable the development of secure communication systems for the transmission and reception of messages on deployed commercial fiber optic networks, through the CDMA phase encoding of broad bandwidth pulses. CDMA technology has been developed as a multiplexing technology, much like wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) or time division multiplexing (TDM), to increase the potential number of users on a given communication link. A novel application of the techniques created for CDMA is to generate secure communication through physical layer encoding. Physical layer encoding devices are developed which utilize semiconductor waveguides with fast carrier response times to phase encode spectral components of a secure signal. Current commercial technology, most commonly a spatial light modulator, allows phase codes to be changed at rates of only 10's of Hertz ({approx}25ms response). The use of fast (picosecond to nanosecond) carrier dynamics of semiconductors, as

  12. Lung Cancer Classification Employing Proposed Real Coded Genetic Algorithm Based Radial Basis Function Neural Network Classifier.

    PubMed

    Selvakumari Jeya, I Jasmine; Deepa, S N

    2016-01-01

    A proposed real coded genetic algorithm based radial basis function neural network classifier is employed to perform effective classification of healthy and cancer affected lung images. Real Coded Genetic Algorithm (RCGA) is proposed to overcome the Hamming Cliff problem encountered with the Binary Coded Genetic Algorithm (BCGA). Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN) classifier is chosen as a classifier model because of its Gaussian Kernel function and its effective learning process to avoid local and global minima problem and enable faster convergence. This paper specifically focused on tuning the weights and bias of RBFNN classifier employing the proposed RCGA. The operators used in RCGA enable the algorithm flow to compute weights and bias value so that minimum Mean Square Error (MSE) is obtained. With both the lung healthy and cancer images from Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) database and Real time database, it is noted that the proposed RCGA based RBFNN classifier has performed effective classification of the healthy lung tissues and that of the cancer affected lung nodules. The classification accuracy computed using the proposed approach is noted to be higher in comparison with that of the classifiers proposed earlier in the literatures.

  13. Lung Cancer Classification Employing Proposed Real Coded Genetic Algorithm Based Radial Basis Function Neural Network Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    A proposed real coded genetic algorithm based radial basis function neural network classifier is employed to perform effective classification of healthy and cancer affected lung images. Real Coded Genetic Algorithm (RCGA) is proposed to overcome the Hamming Cliff problem encountered with the Binary Coded Genetic Algorithm (BCGA). Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN) classifier is chosen as a classifier model because of its Gaussian Kernel function and its effective learning process to avoid local and global minima problem and enable faster convergence. This paper specifically focused on tuning the weights and bias of RBFNN classifier employing the proposed RCGA. The operators used in RCGA enable the algorithm flow to compute weights and bias value so that minimum Mean Square Error (MSE) is obtained. With both the lung healthy and cancer images from Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) database and Real time database, it is noted that the proposed RCGA based RBFNN classifier has performed effective classification of the healthy lung tissues and that of the cancer affected lung nodules. The classification accuracy computed using the proposed approach is noted to be higher in comparison with that of the classifiers proposed earlier in the literatures. PMID:28050198

  14. A neutron spectrum unfolding code based on generalized regression artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Del Rosario Martinez-Blanco, Ma; Ornelas-Vargas, Gerardo; Castañeda-Miranda, Celina Lizeth; Solís-Sánchez, Luis Octavio; Castañeda-Miranada, Rodrigo; Vega-Carrillo, Héctor René; Celaya-Padilla, Jose M; Garza-Veloz, Idalia; Martínez-Fierro, Margarita; Ortiz-Rodríguez, José Manuel

    2016-11-01

    The most delicate part of neutron spectrometry, is the unfolding process. The derivation of the spectral information is not simple because the unknown is not given directly as a result of the measurements. Novel methods based on Artificial Neural Networks have been widely investigated. In prior works, back propagation neural networks (BPNN) have been used to solve the neutron spectrometry problem, however, some drawbacks still exist using this kind of neural nets, i.e. the optimum selection of the network topology and the long training time. Compared to BPNN, it's usually much faster to train a generalized regression neural network (GRNN). That's mainly because spread constant is the only parameter used in GRNN. Another feature is that the network will converge to a global minimum, provided that the optimal values of spread has been determined and that the dataset adequately represents the problem space. In addition, GRNN are often more accurate than BPNN in the prediction. These characteristics make GRNNs to be of great interest in the neutron spectrometry domain. This work presents a computational tool based on GRNN capable to solve the neutron spectrometry problem. This computational code, automates the pre-processing, training and testing stages using a k-fold cross validation of 3 folds, the statistical analysis and the post-processing of the information, using 7 Bonner spheres rate counts as only entrance data. The code was designed for a Bonner Spheres System based on a (6)LiI(Eu) neutron detector and a response matrix expressed in 60 energy bins taken from an International Atomic Energy Agency compilation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hybrid information privacy system: integration of chaotic neural network and RSA coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ming-Kai; Willey, Jeff; Lee, Ting N.; Szu, Harold H.

    2005-03-01

    Electronic mails are adopted worldwide; most are easily hacked by hackers. In this paper, we purposed a free, fast and convenient hybrid privacy system to protect email communication. The privacy system is implemented by combining private security RSA algorithm with specific chaos neural network encryption process. The receiver can decrypt received email as long as it can reproduce the specified chaos neural network series, so called spatial-temporal keys. The chaotic typing and initial seed value of chaos neural network series, encrypted by the RSA algorithm, can reproduce spatial-temporal keys. The encrypted chaotic typing and initial seed value are hidden in watermark mixed nonlinearly with message media, wrapped with convolution error correction codes for wireless 3rd generation cellular phones. The message media can be an arbitrary image. The pattern noise has to be considered during transmission and it could affect/change the spatial-temporal keys. Since any change/modification on chaotic typing or initial seed value of chaos neural network series is not acceptable, the RSA codec system must be robust and fault-tolerant via wireless channel. The robust and fault-tolerant properties of chaos neural networks (CNN) were proved by a field theory of Associative Memory by Szu in 1997. The 1-D chaos generating nodes from the logistic map having arbitrarily negative slope a = p/q generating the N-shaped sigmoid was given first by Szu in 1992. In this paper, we simulated the robust and fault-tolerance properties of CNN under additive noise and pattern noise. We also implement a private version of RSA coding and chaos encryption process on messages.

  16. Large Discriminative Structured Set Prediction Modeling With Max-Margin Markov Network for Lossless Image Coding.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wenrui; Xiong, Hongkai; Wang, Jia; Zheng, Yuan F

    2014-02-01

    Inherent statistical correlation for context-based prediction and structural interdependencies for local coherence is not fully exploited in existing lossless image coding schemes. This paper proposes a novel prediction model where the optimal correlated prediction for a set of pixels is obtained in the sense of the least code length. It not only exploits the spatial statistical correlations for the optimal prediction directly based on 2D contexts, but also formulates the data-driven structural interdependencies to make the prediction error coherent with the underlying probability distribution for coding. Under the joint constraints for local coherence, max-margin Markov networks are incorporated to combine support vector machines structurally to make max-margin estimation for a correlated region. Specifically, it aims to produce multiple predictions in the blocks with the model parameters learned in such a way that the distinction between the actual pixel and all possible estimations is maximized. It is proved that, with the growth of sample size, the prediction error is asymptotically upper bounded by the training error under the decomposable loss function. Incorporated into the lossless image coding framework, the proposed model outperforms most prediction schemes reported.

  17. Surveying Multidisciplinary Aspects in Real-Time Distributed Coding for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Braccini, Carlo; Davoli, Franco; Marchese, Mario; Mongelli, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), where a multiplicity of sensors observe a physical phenomenon and transmit their measurements to one or more sinks, pertain to the class of multi-terminal source and channel coding problems of Information Theory. In this category, “real-time” coding is often encountered for WSNs, referring to the problem of finding the minimum distortion (according to a given measure), under transmission power constraints, attainable by encoding and decoding functions, with stringent limits on delay and complexity. On the other hand, the Decision Theory approach seeks to determine the optimal coding/decoding strategies or some of their structural properties. Since encoder(s) and decoder(s) possess different information, though sharing a common goal, the setting here is that of Team Decision Theory. A more pragmatic vision rooted in Signal Processing consists of fixing the form of the coding strategies (e.g., to linear functions) and, consequently, finding the corresponding optimal decoding strategies and the achievable distortion, generally by applying parametric optimization techniques. All approaches have a long history of past investigations and recent results. The goal of the present paper is to provide the taxonomy of the various formulations, a survey of the vast related literature, examples from the authors' own research, and some highlights on the inter-play of the different theories. PMID:25633597

  18. Surveying multidisciplinary aspects in real-time distributed coding for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Braccini, Carlo; Davoli, Franco; Marchese, Mario; Mongelli, Maurizio

    2015-01-27

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), where a multiplicity of sensors observe a physical phenomenon and transmit their measurements to one or more sinks, pertain to the class of multi-terminal source and channel coding problems of Information Theory. In this category, "real-time" coding is often encountered for WSNs, referring to the problem of finding the minimum distortion (according to a given measure), under transmission power constraints, attainable by encoding and decoding functions, with stringent limits on delay and complexity. On the other hand, the Decision Theory approach seeks to determine the optimal coding/decoding strategies or some of their structural properties. Since encoder(s) and decoder(s) possess different information, though sharing a common goal, the setting here is that of Team Decision Theory. A more pragmatic vision rooted in Signal Processing consists of fixing the form of the coding strategies (e.g., to linear functions) and, consequently, finding the corresponding optimal decoding strategies and the achievable distortion, generally by applying parametric optimization techniques. All approaches have a long history of past investigations and recent results. The goal of the present paper is to provide the taxonomy of the various formulations, a survey of the vast related literature, examples from the authors' own research, and some highlights on the inter-play of the different theories.

  19. NullSeq: A Tool for Generating Random Coding Sequences with Desired Amino Acid and GC Contents

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sophia S.; Hockenberry, Adam J.; Lancichinetti, Andrea; Jewett, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    The existence of over- and under-represented sequence motifs in genomes provides evidence of selective evolutionary pressures on biological mechanisms such as transcription, translation, ligand-substrate binding, and host immunity. In order to accurately identify motifs and other genome-scale patterns of interest, it is essential to be able to generate accurate null models that are appropriate for the sequences under study. While many tools have been developed to create random nucleotide sequences, protein coding sequences are subject to a unique set of constraints that complicates the process of generating appropriate null models. There are currently no tools available that allow users to create random coding sequences with specified amino acid composition and GC content for the purpose of hypothesis testing. Using the principle of maximum entropy, we developed a method that generates unbiased random sequences with pre-specified amino acid and GC content, which we have developed into a python package. Our method is the simplest way to obtain maximally unbiased random sequences that are subject to GC usage and primary amino acid sequence constraints. Furthermore, this approach can easily be expanded to create unbiased random sequences that incorporate more complicated constraints such as individual nucleotide usage or even di-nucleotide frequencies. The ability to generate correctly specified null models will allow researchers to accurately identify sequence motifs which will lead to a better understanding of biological processes as well as more effective engineering of biological systems. PMID:27835644

  20. Large-scale prediction of long non-coding RNA functions in a coding–non-coding gene co-expression network

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Qi; Liu, Changning; Yuan, Xiongying; Kang, Shuli; Miao, Ruoyu; Xiao, Hui; Zhao, Guoguang; Luo, Haitao; Bu, Dechao; Zhao, Haitao; Skogerbø, Geir; Wu, Zhongdao; Zhao, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Although accumulating evidence has provided insight into the various functions of long-non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), the exact functions of the majority of such transcripts are still unknown. Here, we report the first computational annotation of lncRNA functions based on public microarray expression profiles. A coding–non-coding gene co-expression (CNC) network was constructed from re-annotated Affymetrix Mouse Genome Array data. Probable functions for altogether 340 lncRNAs were predicted based on topological or other network characteristics, such as module sharing, association with network hubs and combinations of co-expression and genomic adjacency. The functions annotated to the lncRNAs mainly involve organ or tissue development (e.g. neuron, eye and muscle development), cellular transport (e.g. neuronal transport and sodium ion, acid or lipid transport) or metabolic processes (e.g. involving macromolecules, phosphocreatine and tyrosine). PMID:21247874

  1. iRegNet3D: three-dimensional integrated regulatory network for the genomic analysis of coding and non-coding disease mutations.

    PubMed

    Liang, Siqi; Tippens, Nathaniel D; Zhou, Yaoda; Mort, Matthew; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Yu, Haiyuan

    2017-01-18

    The mechanistic details of most disease-causing mutations remain poorly explored within the context of regulatory networks. We present a high-resolution three-dimensional integrated regulatory network (iRegNet3D) in the form of a web tool, where we resolve the interfaces of all known transcription factor (TF)-TF, TF-DNA and chromatin-chromatin interactions for the analysis of both coding and non-coding disease-associated mutations to obtain mechanistic insights into their functional impact. Using iRegNet3D, we find that disease-associated mutations may perturb the regulatory network through diverse mechanisms including chromatin looping. iRegNet3D promises to be an indispensable tool in large-scale sequencing and disease association studies.

  2. Grid cells: the position code, neural network models of activity, and the problem of learning.

    PubMed

    Welinder, Peter E; Burak, Yoram; Fiete, Ila R

    2008-01-01

    We review progress on the modeling and theoretical fronts in the quest to unravel the computational properties of the grid cell code and to explain the mechanisms underlying grid cell dynamics. The goals of the review are to outline a coherent framework for understanding the dynamics of grid cells and their representation of space; to critically present and draw contrasts between recurrent network models of grid cells based on continuous attractor dynamics and independent-neuron models based on temporal interference; and to suggest open questions for experiment and theory.

  3. Noncoherent Physical-Layer Network Coding with FSK Modulation: Relay Receiver Design Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    digital network coding ( DNC ) to distinguish it from ANC. Under 0090-6778/11$25.00 c⃝ 2011 IEEE Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188...223 2596 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 59, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2011 many channel conditions, DNC offers enhanced performance over ANC. This...is because the decoding operation at the relay helps DNC to remove noise from the MAC phase, while the noise is amplied by the relay when ANC is used

  4. Differential network coding for two-way relay networks with massive arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhaoxi; Shao, Pengfei; Zheng, Wen; Pang, Zeping

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a low-complexity differential transmission scheme for a two-way relay network (TWRN) with two sources and one relay node, where each source is equipped with a single antenna, while the relay node is equipped with a large number of antennas. In the proposed scheme, no channel state information (CSI) is required at each source node for signal detection. It is shown that as the number of relay antennas becomes large, the received signal at each source node includes the desired signal only. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the bit-to-error rate (BER) performance of the proposed scheme.

  5. Predicting the Lifetime of Dynamic Networks Experiencing Persistent Random Attacks.

    PubMed

    Podobnik, Boris; Lipic, Tomislav; Horvatic, Davor; Majdandzic, Antonio; Bishop, Steven R; Eugene Stanley, H

    2015-09-21

    Estimating the critical points at which complex systems abruptly flip from one state to another is one of the remaining challenges in network science. Due to lack of knowledge about the underlying stochastic processes controlling critical transitions, it is widely considered difficult to determine the location of critical points for real-world networks, and it is even more difficult to predict the time at which these potentially catastrophic failures occur. We analyse a class of decaying dynamic networks experiencing persistent failures in which the magnitude of the overall failure is quantified by the probability that a potentially permanent internal failure will occur. When the fraction of active neighbours is reduced to a critical threshold, cascading failures can trigger a total network failure. For this class of network we find that the time to network failure, which is equivalent to network lifetime, is inversely dependent upon the magnitude of the failure and logarithmically dependent on the threshold. We analyse how permanent failures affect network robustness using network lifetime as a measure. These findings provide new methodological insight into system dynamics and, in particular, of the dynamic processes of networks. We illustrate the network model by selected examples from biology, and social science.

  6. Predicting the Lifetime of Dynamic Networks Experiencing Persistent Random Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Podobnik, Boris; Lipic, Tomislav; Horvatic, Davor; Majdandzic, Antonio; Bishop, Steven R.; Eugene Stanley, H.

    2015-01-01

    Estimating the critical points at which complex systems abruptly flip from one state to another is one of the remaining challenges in network science. Due to lack of knowledge about the underlying stochastic processes controlling critical transitions, it is widely considered difficult to determine the location of critical points for real-world networks, and it is even more difficult to predict the time at which these potentially catastrophic failures occur. We analyse a class of decaying dynamic networks experiencing persistent failures in which the magnitude of the overall failure is quantified by the probability that a potentially permanent internal failure will occur. When the fraction of active neighbours is reduced to a critical threshold, cascading failures can trigger a total network failure. For this class of network we find that the time to network failure, which is equivalent to network lifetime, is inversely dependent upon the magnitude of the failure and logarithmically dependent on the threshold. We analyse how permanent failures affect network robustness using network lifetime as a measure. These findings provide new methodological insight into system dynamics and, in particular, of the dynamic processes of networks. We illustrate the network model by selected examples from biology, and social science. PMID:26387609

  7. Identification of long non-coding RNAs biomarkers for early diagnosis of myocardial infarction from the dysregulated coding-non-coding co-expression network

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chaoyu; Jiang, Hao; Sun, Zhiguo; Gui, Yifang; Xia, Hongyuan

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently been shown as novel promising diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers for various cancers. However, lncRNA expression patterns and their predictive value in early diagnosis of myocardial infarction (MI) have not been systematically investigated. In our study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of lncRNA expression profiles in MI and found altered lncRNA expression pattern in MI compared to healthy samples. We then constructed a lncRNA-mRNA dysregulation network (DLMCEN) by integrating aberrant lncRNAs, mRNAs and their co-dysregulation relationships, and found that some of mRNAs were previously reported to be involved in cardiovascular disease, suggesting the functional roles of dysregulated lncRNAs in the pathogenesis of MI. Therefore, using support vector machine (SVM) and leave one out cross-validation (LOOCV), we developed a 9-lncRNA signature (termed 9LncSigAMI) from the discovery cohort which could distinguish MI patients from healthy samples with accuracy of 95.96%, sensitivity of 93.88% and specificity of 98%, and validated its predictive power in early diagnosis of MI in another completely independent cohort. Functional analysis demonstrated that these nine lncRNA biomarkers in the 9LncSigAMI may be involved in myocardial innate immune and inflammatory response, and their deregulation may lead to the dysfunction of the inflammatory and immune system contributing to MI recurrence. With prospective validation, the 9LncSigAMI identified by our work will provide additional diagnostic information beyond other known clinical parameters, and increase the understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of MI. PMID:27634901

  8. Associative fear learning enhances sparse network coding in primary sensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gdalyahu, Amos; Tring, Elaine; Polack, Pierre-Olivier; Gruver, Robin; Golshani, Peyman; Fanselow, Michael S.; Silva, Alcino J.; Trachtenberg, Joshua T.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Several models of associative learning predict that stimulus processing changes during association formation. How associative learning reconfigures neural circuits in primary sensory cortex to "learn" associative attributes of a stimulus remains unknown. Using 2-photon in-vivo calcium imaging to measure responses of networks of neurons in primary somatosensory cortex, we discovered that associative fear learning, in which whisker stimulation is paired with foot shock, enhances sparse population coding and robustness of the conditional stimulus, yet decreases total network activity. Fewer cortical neurons responded to stimulation of the trained whisker than in controls, yet their response strength was enhanced. These responses were not observed in mice exposed to a non-associative learning procedure. Our results define how the cortical representation of a sensory stimulus is shaped by associative fear learning. These changes are proposed to enhance efficient sensory processing after associative learning. PMID:22794266

  9. Implementation of Finite Volume based Navier Stokes Algorithm Within General Purpose Flow Network Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schallhorn, Paul; Majumdar, Alok

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a finite volume based numerical algorithm that allows multi-dimensional computation of fluid flow within a system level network flow analysis. There are several thermo-fluid engineering problems where higher fidelity solutions are needed that are not within the capacity of system level codes. The proposed algorithm will allow NASA's Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) to perform multi-dimensional flow calculation within the framework of GFSSP s typical system level flow network consisting of fluid nodes and branches. The paper presents several classical two-dimensional fluid dynamics problems that have been solved by GFSSP's multi-dimensional flow solver. The numerical solutions are compared with the analytical and benchmark solution of Poiseulle, Couette and flow in a driven cavity.

  10. Modelling and Simulation of National Electronic Product Code Network Demonstrator Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, John P. T.

    The National Electronic Product Code (EPC) Network Demonstrator Project (NDP) was the first large scale consumer goods track and trace investigation in the world using full EPC protocol system for applying RFID technology in supply chains. The NDP demonstrated the methods of sharing information securely using EPC Network, providing authentication to interacting parties, and enhancing the ability to track and trace movement of goods within the entire supply chain involving transactions among multiple enterprise. Due to project constraints, the actual run of the NDP was 3 months only and was unable to consolidate with quantitative results. This paper discusses the modelling and simulation of activities in the NDP in a discrete event simulation environment and provides an estimation of the potential benefits that can be derived from the NDP if it was continued for one whole year.

  11. Optimal performance of networked control systems with bandwidth and coding constraints.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xi-Sheng; Sun, Xin-xiang; Li, Tao; Wu, Jie; Jiang, Xiao-Wei

    2015-11-01

    The optimal tracking performance of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) discrete-time networked control systems with bandwidth and coding constraints is studied in this paper. The optimal tracking performance of networked control system is obtained by using spectral factorization technique and partial fraction. The obtained results demonstrate that the optimal performance is influenced by the directions and locations of the nonminimum phase zeros and unstable poles of the given plant. In addition to that, the characters of the reference signal, encoding, the bandwidth and additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) of the communication channel are also closely influenced by the optimal tracking performance. Some typical examples are given to illustrate the theoretical results.

  12. THATCH: A computer code for modelling thermal networks of high- temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeger, P.G.; Kennett, R.J.; Colman, J.; Ginsberg, T. )

    1991-10-01

    This report documents the THATCH code, which can be used to model general thermal and flow networks of solids and coolant channels in two-dimensional r-z geometries. The main application of THATCH is to model reactor thermo-hydraulic transients in High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs). The available modules simulate pressurized or depressurized core heatup transients, heat transfer to general exterior sinks or to specific passive Reactor Cavity Cooling Systems, which can be air or water-cooled. Graphite oxidation during air or water ingress can be modelled, including the effects of added combustion products to the gas flow and the additional chemical energy release. A point kinetics model is available for analyzing reactivity excursions; for instance due to water ingress, and also for hypothetical no-scram scenarios. For most HTGR transients, which generally range over hours, a user-selected nodalization of the core in r-z geometry is used. However, a separate model of heat transfer in the symmetry element of each fuel element is also available for very rapid transients. This model can be applied coupled to the traditional coarser r-z nodalization. This report described the mathematical models used in the code and the method of solution. It describes the code and its various sub-elements. Details of the input data and file usage, with file formats, is given for the code, as well as for several preprocessing and postprocessing options. The THATCH model of the currently applicable 350 MW{sub th} reactor is described. Input data for four sample cases are given with output available in fiche form. Installation requirements and code limitations, as well as the most common error indications are listed. 31 refs., 23 figs., 32 tabs.

  13. Evaluation of in-network adaptation of scalable high efficiency video coding (SHVC) in mobile environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nightingale, James; Wang, Qi; Grecos, Christos; Goma, Sergio

    2014-02-01

    High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC), the latest video compression standard (also known as H.265), can deliver video streams of comparable quality to the current H.264 Advanced Video Coding (H.264/AVC) standard with a 50% reduction in bandwidth. Research into SHVC, the scalable extension to the HEVC standard, is still in its infancy. One important area for investigation is whether, given the greater compression ratio of HEVC (and SHVC), the loss of packets containing video content will have a greater impact on the quality of delivered video than is the case with H.264/AVC or its scalable extension H.264/SVC. In this work we empirically evaluate the layer-based, in-network adaptation of video streams encoded using SHVC in situations where dynamically changing bandwidths and datagram loss ratios require the real-time adaptation of video streams. Through the use of extensive experimentation, we establish a comprehensive set of benchmarks for SHVC-based highdefinition video streaming in loss prone network environments such as those commonly found in mobile networks. Among other results, we highlight that packet losses of only 1% can lead to a substantial reduction in PSNR of over 3dB and error propagation in over 130 pictures following the one in which the loss occurred. This work would be one of the earliest studies in this cutting-edge area that reports benchmark evaluation results for the effects of datagram loss on SHVC picture quality and offers empirical and analytical insights into SHVC adaptation to lossy, mobile networking conditions.

  14. Steady state and mean recurrence time for random walks on stochastic temporal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speidel, Leo; Lambiotte, Renaud; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Masuda, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Random walks are basic diffusion processes on networks and have applications in, for example, searching, navigation, ranking, and community detection. Recent recognition of the importance of temporal aspects on networks spurred studies of random walks on temporal networks. Here we theoretically study two types of event-driven random walks on a stochastic temporal network model that produces arbitrary distributions of interevent times. In the so-called active random walk, the interevent time is reinitialized on all links upon each movement of the walker. In the so-called passive random walk, the interevent time is reinitialized only on the link that has been used the last time, and it is a type of correlated random walk. We find that the steady state is always the uniform density for the passive random walk. In contrast, for the active random walk, it increases or decreases with the node's degree depending on the distribution of interevent times. The mean recurrence time of a node is inversely proportional to the degree for both active and passive random walks. Furthermore, the mean recurrence time does or does not depend on the distribution of interevent times for the active and passive random walks, respectively.

  15. A novel all-optical label processing based on multiple optical orthogonal codes sequences for optical packet switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chongfu; Qiu, Kun; Xu, Bo; Ling, Yun

    2008-05-01

    This paper proposes an all-optical label processing scheme that uses the multiple optical orthogonal codes sequences (MOOCS)-based optical label for optical packet switching (OPS) (MOOCS-OPS) networks. In this scheme, each MOOCS is a permutation or combination of the multiple optical orthogonal codes (MOOC) selected from the multiple-groups optical orthogonal codes (MGOOC). Following a comparison of different optical label processing (OLP) schemes, the principles of MOOCS-OPS network are given and analyzed. Firstly, theoretical analyses are used to prove that MOOCS is able to greatly enlarge the number of available optical labels when compared to the previous single optical orthogonal code (SOOC) for OPS (SOOC-OPS) network. Then, the key units of the MOOCS-based optical label packets, including optical packet generation, optical label erasing, optical label extraction and optical label rewriting etc., are given and studied. These results are used to verify that the proposed MOOCS-OPS scheme is feasible.

  16. NSDann2BS, a neutron spectrum unfolding code based on neural networks technology and two bonner spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz-Rodriguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Solis Sanches, L. O.; Miranda, R. Castaneda; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.

    2013-07-03

    In this work a neutron spectrum unfolding code, based on artificial intelligence technology is presented. The code called ''Neutron Spectrometry and Dosimetry with Artificial Neural Networks and two Bonner spheres'', (NSDann2BS), was designed in a graphical user interface under the LabVIEW programming environment. The main features of this code are to use an embedded artificial neural network architecture optimized with the ''Robust design of artificial neural networks methodology'' and to use two Bonner spheres as the only piece of information. In order to build the code here presented, once the net topology was optimized and properly trained, knowledge stored at synaptic weights was extracted and using a graphical framework build on the LabVIEW programming environment, the NSDann2BS code was designed. This code is friendly, intuitive and easy to use for the end user. The code is freely available upon request to authors. To demonstrate the use of the neural net embedded in the NSDann2BS code, the rate counts of {sup 252}Cf, {sup 241}AmBe and {sup 239}PuBe neutron sources measured with a Bonner spheres system.

  17. Financial Time Series Prediction Using Elman Recurrent Random Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Jun; Fang, Wen; Niu, Hongli

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, financial market dynamics forecasting has been a focus of economic research. To predict the price indices of stock markets, we developed an architecture which combined Elman recurrent neural networks with stochastic time effective function. By analyzing the proposed model with the linear regression, complexity invariant distance (CID), and multiscale CID (MCID) analysis methods and taking the model compared with different models such as the backpropagation neural network (BPNN), the stochastic time effective neural network (STNN), and the Elman recurrent neural network (ERNN), the empirical results show that the proposed neural network displays the best performance among these neural networks in financial time series forecasting. Further, the empirical research is performed in testing the predictive effects of SSE, TWSE, KOSPI, and Nikkei225 with the established model, and the corresponding statistical comparisons of the above market indices are also exhibited. The experimental results show that this approach gives good performance in predicting the values from the stock market indices. PMID:27293423

  18. Enhancing network robustness against targeted and random attacks using a memetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xianglong; Liu, Jing; Zhou, Mingxing

    2015-08-01

    In the past decades, there has been much interest in the elasticity of infrastructures to targeted and random attacks. In the recent work by Schneider C. M. et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 108 (2011) 3838, the authors proposed an effective measure (namely R, here we label it as R t to represent the measure for targeted attacks) to evaluate network robustness against targeted node attacks. Using a greedy algorithm, they found that the optimal structure is an onion-like one. However, real systems are often under threats of both targeted attacks and random failures. So, enhancing networks robustness against both targeted and random attacks is of great importance. In this paper, we first design a random-robustness index (Rr) . We find that the onion-like networks destroyed the original strong ability of BA networks in resisting random attacks. Moreover, the structure of an R r -optimized network is found to be different from that of an onion-like network. To design robust scale-free networks (RSF) which are resistant to both targeted and random attacks (TRA) without changing the degree distribution, a memetic algorithm (MA) is proposed, labeled as \\textit{MA-RSF}\\textit{TRA} . In the experiments, both synthetic scale-free networks and real-world networks are used to validate the performance of \\textit{MA-RSF}\\textit{TRA} . The results show that \\textit{MA-RSF} \\textit{TRA} has a great ability in searching for the most robust network structure that is resistant to both targeted and random attacks.

  19. Research on invulnerability of the random scale-free network against cascading failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Rong-Rong; Liu, Bin; Liu, Hao-Ran; Li, Ya-Qian

    2016-02-01

    The effect of structure parameters of random scale-free network on the network invulnerability for cascading failure is investigated by establishing a cascading failure model of random scale-free network based on node degree and analyzing the effect of node capacity on the cascading failure. The node capacity threshold is thus obtained. Furthermore, the relationship between the threshold of node capacity and the structure parameters of the network (the number of added edges per time slot and the power exponent) is established. The experimental results show that the structure parameters of the network are positively correlated with the network invulnerability for cascading failure. The more the number of added edges at a time and higher the power exponent, the stronger the network invulnerability for cascading failure.

  20. Universality of the emergent scaling in finite random binary percolation networks

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we apply lattice models of finite binary percolation networks to examine the effects of network configuration on macroscopic network responses. We consider both square and rectangular lattice structures in which bonds between nodes are randomly assigned to be either resistors or capacitors. Results show that for given network geometries, the overall normalised frequency-dependent electrical conductivities for different capacitor proportions are found to converge at a characteristic frequency. Networks with sufficiently large size tend to share the same convergence point uninfluenced by the boundary and electrode conditions, can be then regarded as homogeneous media. For these networks, the span of the emergent scaling region is found to be primarily determined by the smaller network dimension (width or length). This study identifies the applicability of power-law scaling in random two phase systems of different topological configurations. This understanding has implications in the design and testing of disordered systems in diverse applications. PMID:28207872

  1. Universality of the emergent scaling in finite random binary percolation networks.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Chongpu; Hanaor, Dorian; Gan, Yixiang

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we apply lattice models of finite binary percolation networks to examine the effects of network configuration on macroscopic network responses. We consider both square and rectangular lattice structures in which bonds between nodes are randomly assigned to be either resistors or capacitors. Results show that for given network geometries, the overall normalised frequency-dependent electrical conductivities for different capacitor proportions are found to converge at a characteristic frequency. Networks with sufficiently large size tend to share the same convergence point uninfluenced by the boundary and electrode conditions, can be then regarded as homogeneous media. For these networks, the span of the emergent scaling region is found to be primarily determined by the smaller network dimension (width or length). This study identifies the applicability of power-law scaling in random two phase systems of different topological configurations. This understanding has implications in the design and testing of disordered systems in diverse applications.

  2. Code to generate random identifiers and select QA/QC samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehnert, Edward

    1992-01-01

    SAMPLID is a PC-based, FORTRAN-77 code which generates unique numbers for identification of samples, selection of QA/QC samples, and generation of labels. These procedures are tedious, but using a computer code such as SAMPLID can increase efficiency and reduce or eliminate errors and bias. The algorithm, used in SAMPLID, for generation of pseudorandom numbers is free of statistical flaws present in commonly available algorithms.

  3. Comprehensive reconstruction and visualization of non-coding regulatory networks in human.

    PubMed

    Bonnici, Vincenzo; Russo, Francesco; Bombieri, Nicola; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba

    2014-01-01

    Research attention has been powered to understand the functional roles of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Many studies have demonstrated their deregulation in cancer and other human disorders. ncRNAs are also present in extracellular human body fluids such as serum and plasma, giving them a great potential as non-invasive biomarkers. However, non-coding RNAs have been relatively recently discovered and a comprehensive database including all of them is still missing. Reconstructing and visualizing the network of ncRNAs interactions are important steps to understand their regulatory mechanism in complex systems. This work presents ncRNA-DB, a NoSQL database that integrates ncRNAs data interactions from a large number of well established on-line repositories. The interactions involve RNA, DNA, proteins, and diseases. ncRNA-DB is available at http://ncrnadb.scienze.univr.it/ncrnadb/. It is equipped with three interfaces: web based, command-line, and a Cytoscape app called ncINetView. By accessing only one resource, users can search for ncRNAs and their interactions, build a network annotated with all known ncRNAs and associated diseases, and use all visual and mining features available in Cytoscape.

  4. SOMM: A new service oriented middleware for generic wireless multimedia sensor networks based on code mobility.

    PubMed

    Faghih, Mohammad Mehdi; Moghaddam, Mohsen Ebrahimi

    2011-01-01

    Although much research in the area of Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks (WMSNs) has been done in recent years, the programming of sensor nodes is still time-consuming and tedious. It requires expertise in low-level programming, mainly because of the use of resource constrained hardware and also the low level API provided by current operating systems. The code of the resulting systems has typically no clear separation between application and system logic. This minimizes the possibility of reusing code and often leads to the necessity of major changes when the underlying platform is changed. In this paper, we present a service oriented middleware named SOMM to support application development for WMSNs. The main goal of SOMM is to enable the development of modifiable and scalable WMSN applications. A network which uses the SOMM is capable of providing multiple services to multiple clients at the same time with the specified Quality of Service (QoS). SOMM uses a virtual machine with the ability to support mobile agents. Services in SOMM are provided by mobile agents and SOMM also provides a t space on each node which agents can use to communicate with each other.

  5. Parameters affecting the resilience of scale-free networks to random failures.

    SciTech Connect

    Link, Hamilton E.; LaViolette, Randall A.; Lane, Terran; Saia, Jared

    2005-09-01

    It is commonly believed that scale-free networks are robust to massive numbers of random node deletions. For example, Cohen et al. in (1) study scale-free networks including some which approximate the measured degree distribution of the Internet. Their results suggest that if each node in this network failed independently with probability 0.99, most of the remaining nodes would still be connected in a giant component. In this paper, we show that a large and important subclass of scale-free networks are not robust to massive numbers of random node deletions. In particular, we study scale-free networks which have minimum node degree of 1 and a power-law degree distribution beginning with nodes of degree 1 (power-law networks). We show that, in a power-law network approximating the Internet's reported distribution, when the probability of deletion of each node is 0.5 only about 25% of the surviving nodes in the network remain connected in a giant component, and the giant component does not persist beyond a critical failure rate of 0.9. The new result is partially due to improved analytical accommodation of the large number of degree-0 nodes that result after node deletions. Our results apply to power-law networks with a wide range of power-law exponents, including Internet-like networks. We give both analytical and empirical evidence that such networks are not generally robust to massive random node deletions.

  6. Coding the presence of visual objects in a recurrent neural network of visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Zwickel, Timm; Wachtler, Thomas; Eckhorn, Reinhard

    2007-01-01

    Before we can recognize a visual object, our visual system has to segregate it from its background. This requires a fast mechanism for establishing the presence and location of objects independently of their identity. Recently, border-ownership neurons were recorded in monkey visual cortex which might be involved in this task [Zhou, H., Friedmann, H., von der Heydt, R., 2000. Coding of border ownership in monkey visual cortex. J. Neurosci. 20 (17), 6594-6611]. In order to explain the basic mechanisms required for fast coding of object presence, we have developed a neural network model of visual cortex consisting of three stages. Feed-forward and lateral connections support coding of Gestalt properties, including similarity, good continuation, and convexity. Neurons of the highest area respond to the presence of an object and encode its position, invariant of its form. Feedback connections to the lowest area facilitate orientation detectors activated by contours belonging to potential objects, and thus generate the experimentally observed border-ownership property. This feedback control acts fast and significantly improves the figure-ground segregation required for the consecutive task of object recognition.

  7. A New Wavelength Optimization and Energy-Saving Scheme Based on Network Coding in Software-Defined WDM-PON Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Danping; Wu, Shanshan; Zhang, Lijing

    2016-09-01

    In view of the characteristics of the global control and flexible monitor of software-defined networks (SDN), we proposes a new optical access network architecture dedicated to Wavelength Division Multiplexing-Passive Optical Network (WDM-PON) systems based on SDN. The network coding (NC) technology is also applied into this architecture to enhance the utilization of wavelength resource and reduce the costs of light source. Simulation results show that this scheme can optimize the throughput of the WDM-PON network, greatly reduce the system time delay and energy consumption.

  8. Bearing performance degradation assessment based on time-frequency code features and SOM network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Tang, Baoping; Han, Yan; Deng, Lei

    2017-04-01

    Bearing performance degradation assessment and prognostics are extremely important in supporting maintenance decision and guaranteeing the system’s reliability. To achieve this goal, this paper proposes a novel feature extraction method for the degradation assessment and prognostics of bearings. Features of time-frequency codes (TFCs) are extracted from the time-frequency distribution using a hybrid procedure based on short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) theory. An alternative way to design the health indicator is investigated by quantifying the similarity between feature vectors using a self-organizing map (SOM) network. On the basis of this idea, a new health indicator called time-frequency code quantification error (TFCQE) is proposed to assess the performance degradation of the bearing. This indicator is constructed based on the bearing real-time behavior and the SOM model that is previously trained with only the TFC vectors under the normal condition. Vibration signals collected from the bearing run-to-failure tests are used to validate the developed method. The comparison results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed TFCQE indicator over many other traditional features in terms of feature quality metrics, incipient degradation identification and achieving accurate prediction. Highlights • Time-frequency codes are extracted to reflect the signals’ characteristics. • SOM network served as a tool to quantify the similarity between feature vectors. • A new health indicator is proposed to demonstrate the whole stage of degradation development. • The method is useful for extracting the degradation features and detecting the incipient degradation. • The superiority of the proposed method is verified using experimental data.

  9. Programmed optoelectronic time-pulse coded relational processor as base element for sorting neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilenko, Vladimir G.; Bardachenko, Vitaliy F.; Nikolsky, Alexander I.; Lazarev, Alexander A.

    2007-04-01

    In the paper we show that the biologically motivated conception of the use of time-pulse encoding gives the row of advantages (single methodological basis, universality, simplicity of tuning, training and programming et al) at creation and designing of sensor systems with parallel input-output and processing, 2D-structures of hybrid and neuro-fuzzy neurocomputers of next generations. We show principles of construction of programmable relational optoelectronic time-pulse coded processors, continuous logic, order logic and temporal waves processes, that lie in basis of the creation. We consider structure that executes extraction of analog signal of the set grade (order), sorting of analog and time-pulse coded variables. We offer optoelectronic realization of such base relational elements of order logic, which consists of time-pulse coded phototransformers (pulse-width and pulse-phase modulators) with direct and complementary outputs, sorting network on logical elements and programmable commutations blocks. We make estimations of basic technical parameters of such base devices and processors on their basis by simulation and experimental research: power of optical input signals - 0.200-20 μW, processing time - microseconds, supply voltage - 1.5-10 V, consumption power - hundreds of microwatts per element, extended functional possibilities, training possibilities. We discuss some aspects of possible rules and principles of training and programmable tuning on the required function, relational operation and realization of hardware blocks for modifications of such processors. We show as on the basis of such quasiuniversal hardware simple block and flexible programmable tuning it is possible to create sorting machines, neural networks and hybrid data-processing systems with the untraditional numerical systems and pictures operands.

  10. Pragmatic Cluster Randomized Trials Using Covariate Constrained Randomization: A Method for Practice-based Research Networks (PBRNs).

    PubMed

    Dickinson, L Miriam; Beaty, Brenda; Fox, Chet; Pace, Wilson; Dickinson, W Perry; Emsermann, Caroline; Kempe, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Cluster randomized trials (CRTs) are useful in practice-based research network translational research. However, simple or stratified randomization often yields study groups that differ on key baseline variables when the number of clusters is small. Unbalanced study arms constitute a potentially serious methodological problem for CRTs. Covariate constrained randomization with data on relevant variables before randomization was used to achieve balanced study arms in 2 pragmatic CRTs. In study 1, 16 counties in Colorado were randomized to practice-based or population-based reminder recall for vaccinating children ages 19 to 35 months. In study 2, 18 primary care practices were randomized to computer decision support plus practice facilitation versus computer decision support alone to improve care for patients with stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease. For each study, a set of optimal randomizations, which minimized differences of key variables between study arms, was identified from the set of all possible randomizations. Differences between study arms were smaller in the optimal versus remaining randomizations. Even for the randomization in the optimal set with the largest difference between groups, study arms did not differ significantly on any variable for either study (P > .05). Covariate constrained randomization, which restricts the full randomization set to a subset in which differences between study arms are minimized, is a useful tool for achieving balanced study arms in CRTs. Because of the increasing recognition of the risk of imbalance in CRTs and implications for interpreting study findings, procedures of this type should be considered in designing practice-based or community-based trials. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  11. Random Matrices, Combinatorics, Numerical Linear Algebra and Complex Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-16

    Rudelson and R. Vershynin, The Littlewood -Offord Problem and invertibility of random matrices, Advances in Mathematics 218 (2008), 600–633. [25] L... Littlewood -Offord theorems and the condition number of random discrete matrices, Annals of Mathematics, to appear. [29] T. Tao and V. Vu, The condition

  12. Effective trapping of random walkers in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, S.; Lee, D.-S.; Kahng, B.

    2012-04-01

    Exploring the World Wide Web has become one of the key issues in information science, specifically in view of its application to the PageRank-like algorithms used in search engines. The random walk approach has been employed to study such a problem. The probability of return to the origin (RTO) of random walks is inversely related to how information can be accessed during random surfing. We find analytically that the RTO probability for a given starting node shows a crossover from a slow to a fast decay behavior with time and the crossover time increases with the degree of the starting node. We remark that the RTO probability becomes almost constant in the early-time regime as the degree exponent approaches two. This result indicates that a random surfer can be effectively trapped at the hub and supports the necessity of the random jump strategy empirically used in the Google's search engine.

  13. Single exposure optically compressed imaging and visualization using random aperture coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, A.; Rivenson, Yair; Javidi, Bahrain

    2008-11-01

    The common approach in digital imaging follows the sample-then-compress framework. According to this approach, in the first step as many pixels as possible are captured and in the second step the captured image is compressed by digital means. The recently introduced theory of compressed sensing provides the mathematical foundation necessary to combine these two steps in a single one, that is, to compress the information optically before it is recorded. In this paper we overview and extend an optical implementation of compressed sensing theory that we have recently proposed. With this new imaging approach the compression is accomplished inherently in the optical acquisition step. The primary feature of this imaging approach is a randomly encoded aperture realized by means of a random phase screen. The randomly encoded aperture implements random projection of the object field in the image plane. Using a single exposure, a randomly encoded image is captured which can be decoded by proper decoding algorithm.

  14. Dense percolation in large-scale mean-field random networks is provably "explosive".

    PubMed

    Veremyev, Alexander; Boginski, Vladimir; Krokhmal, Pavlo A; Jeffcoat, David E

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that evolving large-scale networks exhibit "explosive percolation": a large fraction of nodes suddenly becomes connected when sufficiently many links have formed in a network. This phase transition has been shown to be continuous (second-order) for most random network formation processes, including classical mean-field random networks and their modifications. We study a related yet different phenomenon referred to as dense percolation, which occurs when a network is already connected, but a large group of nodes must be dense enough, i.e., have at least a certain minimum required percentage of possible links, to form a "highly connected" cluster. Such clusters have been considered in various contexts, including the recently introduced network modularity principle in biological networks. We prove that, contrary to the traditionally defined percolation transition, dense percolation transition is discontinuous (first-order) under the classical mean-field network formation process (with no modifications); therefore, there is not only quantitative, but also qualitative difference between regular and dense percolation transitions. Moreover, the size of the largest dense (highly connected) cluster in a mean-field random network is explicitly characterized by rigorously proven tight asymptotic bounds, which turn out to naturally extend the previously derived formula for the size of the largest clique (a cluster with all possible links) in such a network. We also briefly discuss possible implications of the obtained mathematical results on studying first-order phase transitions in real-world linked systems.

  15. Entropy distribution and condensation in random networks with a given degree distribution.

    PubMed

    Anand, Kartik; Krioukov, Dmitri; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2014-06-01

    The entropy of network ensembles characterizes the amount of information encoded in the network structure and can be used to quantify network complexity and the relevance of given structural properties observed in real network datasets with respect to a random hypothesis. In many real networks the degrees of individual nodes are not fixed but change in time, while their statistical properties, such as the degree distribution, are preserved. Here we characterize the distribution of entropy of random networks with given degree sequences, where each degree sequence is drawn randomly from a given degree distribution. We show that the leading term of the entropy of scale-free network ensembles depends only on the network size and average degree and that entropy is self-averaging, meaning that its relative variance vanishes in the thermodynamic limit. We also characterize large fluctuations of entropy that are fully determined by the average degree in the network. Finally, above a certain threshold, large fluctuations of the average degree in the ensemble can lead to condensation, meaning that a single node in a network of size N can attract O(N) links.

  16. Fast Prediction of HCCI Combustion with an Artificial Neural Network Linked to a Fluid Mechanics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L; Chen, J; Babaimopoulos, A

    2006-08-29

    We have developed an artificial neural network (ANN) based combustion model and have integrated it into a fluid mechanics code (KIVA3V) to produce a new analysis tool (titled KIVA3V-ANN) that can yield accurate HCCI predictions at very low computational cost. The neural network predicts ignition delay as a function of operating parameters (temperature, pressure, equivalence ratio and residual gas fraction). KIVA3V-ANN keeps track of the time history of the ignition delay during the engine cycle to evaluate the ignition integral and predict ignition for each computational cell. After a cell ignites, chemistry becomes active, and a two-step chemical kinetic mechanism predicts composition and heat generation in the ignited cells. KIVA3V-ANN has been validated by comparison with isooctane HCCI experiments in two different engines. The neural network provides reasonable predictions for HCCI combustion and emissions that, although typically not as good as obtained with the more physically representative multi-zone model, are obtained at a much reduced computational cost. KIVA3V-ANN can perform reasonably accurate HCCI calculations while requiring only 10% more computational effort than a motored KIVA3V run. It is therefore considered a valuable tool for evaluation of engine maps or other performance analysis tasks requiring multiple individual runs.

  17. A Reexamination of Connectivity Trends via Exponential Random Graph Modeling in Two IDU Risk Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dombrowski, Kirk; Khan, Bilal; McLean, Katherine; Curtis, Ric; Wendel, Travis; Misshula, Evan; Friedman, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Patterns of risk in injecting drug user (IDU) networks have been a key focus of network approaches to HIV transmission histories. New network modeling techniques allow for a reexamination of these patterns with greater statistical accuracy and the comparative weighting of model elements. This paper describes the results of a reexamination of network data from the SFHR and P90 data sets using Exponential Random Graph Modeling. The results show that “transitive closure” is an important feature of IDU network topologies, and provides relative importance measures for race/ethnicity, age, gender, and number of risk partners in predicting risk relationships. PMID:23819740

  18. Neural network based adaptive control of nonlinear plants using random search optimization algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, Dhemetrios; Wang, Shyh J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a method for utilizing artificial neural networks for direct adaptive control of dynamic systems with poorly known dynamics. The neural network weights (controller gains) are adapted in real time using state measurements and a random search optimization algorithm. The results are demonstrated via simulation using two highly nonlinear systems.

  19. Neural network based adaptive control of nonlinear plants using random search optimization algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, Dhemetrios; Wang, Shyh J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a method for utilizing artificial neural networks for direct adaptive control of dynamic systems with poorly known dynamics. The neural network weights (controller gains) are adapted in real time using state measurements and a random search optimization algorithm. The results are demonstrated via simulation using two highly nonlinear systems.

  20. Probing the Extent of Randomness in Protein Interaction Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-11

    elegans [16], Plasmodium falciparum [17], Campylobacter jejuni [18], and Homo sapiens [7]. A number of efforts to compile and, in some cases, curate the...Weighted Connectivity in Two PPI Networks. (A) Helicobacter pylori and (B) Campylobacter jejuni . For k1k2.10, probabilities of interaction P(k1,k2) were...Four PPI Networks and their DCDW Equivalents. (A) Drosophila melanogaster, (B) Campylobacter jejuni , (C) Escherichia coli (HT2), and (D) Escherichia

  1. Will electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks undergo first-order transition under random attacks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xingpei; Wang, Bo; Liu, Dichen; Dong, Zhaoyang; Chen, Guo; Zhu, Zhenshan; Zhu, Xuedong; Wang, Xunting

    2016-10-01

    Whether the realistic electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks will undergo first-order transition under random failures still remains a question. To reflect the reality of Chinese electrical cyber-physical system, the "partial one-to-one correspondence" interdependent networks model is proposed and the connectivity vulnerabilities of three realistic electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks are analyzed. The simulation results show that due to the service demands of power system the topologies of power grid and its cyber network are highly inter-similar which can effectively avoid the first-order transition. By comparing the vulnerability curves between electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks and its single-layer network, we find that complex network theory is still useful in the vulnerability analysis of electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks.

  2. Random walks in weighted networks with a perfect trap: an application of Laplacian spectra.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan; Zhang, Zhongzhi

    2013-06-01

    Trapping processes constitute a primary problem of random walks, which characterize various other dynamical processes taking place on networks. Most previous works focused on the case of binary networks, while there is much less related research about weighted networks. In this paper, we propose a general framework for the trapping problem on a weighted network with a perfect trap fixed at an arbitrary node. By utilizing the spectral graph theory, we provide an exact formula for mean first-passage time (MFPT) from one node to another, based on which we deduce an explicit expression for average trapping time (ATT) in terms of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Laplacian matrix associated with the weighted graph, where ATT is the average of MFPTs to the trap over all source nodes. We then further derive a sharp lower bound for the ATT in terms of only the local information of the trap node, which can be obtained in some graphs. Moreover, we deduce the ATT when the trap is distributed uniformly in the whole network. Our results show that network weights play a significant role in the trapping process. To apply our framework, we use the obtained formulas to study random walks on two specific networks: trapping in weighted uncorrelated networks with a deep trap, the weights of which are characterized by a parameter, and Lévy random walks in a connected binary network with a trap distributed uniformly, which can be looked on as random walks on a weighted network. For weighted uncorrelated networks we show that the ATT to any target node depends on the weight parameter, that is, the ATT to any node can change drastically by modifying the parameter, a phenomenon that is in contrast to that for trapping in binary networks. For Lévy random walks in any connected network, by using their equivalence to random walks on a weighted complete network, we obtain the optimal exponent characterizing Lévy random walks, which have the minimal average of ATTs taken over all

  3. High resolution general purpose D-layer experiment for EISCAT incoherent scatter radars using selected set of random codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turunen, T.; Westman, A.; Häggström, I.; Wannberg, G.

    2002-09-01

    The ionospheric D-layer is a narrow bandwidth radar target often with a very small scattering cross section. The target autocorrelation function can be obtained by transmitting a series of relatively short coded pulses and computing the correlation between data obtained from different pulses. The spatial resolution should be as high as possible and the spatial side lobes of the codes used should be as small as possible. However, due to the short pulse repetition period (in the order of milliseconds) at any instant, the radar receives detectable scattered signals not only from the pulse illuminating the D-region but also from 3 5 ambiguous-range pulses, which makes it difficult to produce a reliable estimate near zero lag of the autocorrelation function. A new experimental solution to this measurement problem, using a selected set of 40-bit random codes with 4 µs elements giving 600 m spatial resolution is presented. The zero lag is approximated by dividing the pulse into two 20-bit codes and computing the correlation between those two pulses. The lowest altitudes of the E-layer are measured by dividing the pulse into 5 pieces of 8 bits, which allows for computation of 4 lags. In addition, coherent integration of data from four pulses is used for obtaining separately the autocorrelation function estimate for the lowest altitudes and in cases when the target contains structures with a long coherence time. Design details and responses of the experiment are given, and analysed test data are shown.

  4. General mapping between random walks and thermal vibrations in elastic networks: fractal networks as a case study.

    PubMed

    Reuveni, Shlomi; Granek, Rony; Klafter, Joseph

    2010-10-01

    We present an approach to mapping between random walks and vibrational dynamics on general networks. Random walk occupation probabilities, first passage time distributions and passage probabilities between nodes are expressed in terms of thermal vibrational correlation functions. Recurrence is demonstrated equivalent to the Landau-Peierls instability. Fractal networks are analyzed as a case study. In particular, we show that the spectral dimension governs whether or not the first passage time distribution is well represented by its mean. We discuss relevance to universal features arising in protein vibrational dynamics.

  5. Representation of nonlinear random transformations by non-gaussian stochastic neural networks.

    PubMed

    Turchetti, Claudio; Crippa, Paolo; Pirani, Massimiliano; Biagetti, Giorgio

    2008-06-01

    The learning capability of neural networks is equivalent to modeling physical events that occur in the real environment. Several early works have demonstrated that neural networks belonging to some classes are universal approximators of input-output deterministic functions. Recent works extend the ability of neural networks in approximating random functions using a class of networks named stochastic neural networks (SNN). In the language of system theory, the approximation of both deterministic and stochastic functions falls within the identification of nonlinear no-memory systems. However, all the results presented so far are restricted to the case of Gaussian stochastic processes (SPs) only, or to linear transformations that guarantee this property. This paper aims at investigating the ability of stochastic neural networks to approximate nonlinear input-output random transformations, thus widening the range of applicability of these networks to nonlinear systems with memory. In particular, this study shows that networks belonging to a class named non-Gaussian stochastic approximate identity neural networks (SAINNs) are capable of approximating the solutions of large classes of nonlinear random ordinary differential transformations. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated and discussed by some application examples.

  6. Evaluating the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz-Rodriguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Solis Sanches, L. O.; Miranda, R. Castaneda; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.

    2013-07-03

    In this work the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks is evaluated. The first one code based on traditional iterative procedures and called Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry from the Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas (NSDUAZ) use the SPUNIT iterative algorithm and was designed to unfold neutron spectrum and calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and 7 IAEA survey meters. The main feature of this code is the automated selection of the initial guess spectrum trough a compendium of neutron spectrum compiled by the IAEA. The second one code known as Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry with artificial neural networks (NDSann) is a code designed using neural nets technology. The artificial intelligence approach of neural net does not solve mathematical equations. By using the knowledge stored at synaptic weights on a neural net properly trained, the code is capable to unfold neutron spectrum and to simultaneously calculate 15 dosimetric quantities, needing as entrance data, only the rate counts measured with a Bonner spheres system. Similarities of both NSDUAZ and NSDann codes are: they follow the same easy and intuitive user's philosophy and were designed in a graphical interface under the LabVIEW programming environment. Both codes unfold the neutron spectrum expressed in 60 energy bins, calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and generate a full report in HTML format. Differences of these codes are: NSDUAZ code was designed using classical iterative approaches and needs an initial guess spectrum in order to initiate the iterative procedure. In NSDUAZ, a programming routine was designed to calculate 7 IAEA instrument survey meters using the fluence-dose conversion coefficients. NSDann code use artificial neural networks for solving the ill-conditioned equation system of neutron spectrometry problem through synaptic weights of a properly trained neural network. Contrary to iterative procedures, in neural

  7. Evaluating the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Rodríguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Solís Sánches, L. O.; Miranda, R. Castañeda; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.

    2013-07-01

    In this work the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks is evaluated. The first one code based on traditional iterative procedures and called Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry from the Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas (NSDUAZ) use the SPUNIT iterative algorithm and was designed to unfold neutron spectrum and calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and 7 IAEA survey meters. The main feature of this code is the automated selection of the initial guess spectrum trough a compendium of neutron spectrum compiled by the IAEA. The second one code known as Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry with artificial neural networks (NDSann) is a code designed using neural nets technology. The artificial intelligence approach of neural net does not solve mathematical equations. By using the knowledge stored at synaptic weights on a neural net properly trained, the code is capable to unfold neutron spectrum and to simultaneously calculate 15 dosimetric quantities, needing as entrance data, only the rate counts measured with a Bonner spheres system. Similarities of both NSDUAZ and NSDann codes are: they follow the same easy and intuitive user's philosophy and were designed in a graphical interface under the LabVIEW programming environment. Both codes unfold the neutron spectrum expressed in 60 energy bins, calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and generate a full report in HTML format. Differences of these codes are: NSDUAZ code was designed using classical iterative approaches and needs an initial guess spectrum in order to initiate the iterative procedure. In NSDUAZ, a programming routine was designed to calculate 7 IAEA instrument survey meters using the fluence-dose conversion coefficients. NSDann code use artificial neural networks for solving the ill-conditioned equation system of neutron spectrometry problem through synaptic weights of a properly trained neural network. Contrary to iterative procedures, in neural

  8. Phenotype accessibility and noise in random threshold gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Ricardo; Garcia, Victor; Feldman, Marcus W

    2014-01-01

    Evolution requires phenotypic variation in a population of organisms for selection to function. Gene regulatory processes involved in organismal development affect the phenotypic diversity of organisms. Since only a fraction of all possible phenotypes are predicted to be accessed by the end of development, organisms may evolve strategies to use environmental cues and noise-like fluctuations to produce additional phenotypic diversity, and hence to enhance the speed of adaptation. We used a generic model of organismal development --gene regulatory networks-- to investigate how different levels of noise on gene expression states (i.e. phenotypes) may affect access to new, unique phenotypes, thereby affecting phenotypic diversity. We studied additional strategies that organisms might adopt to attain larger phenotypic diversity: either by augmenting their genome or the number of gene expression states. This was done for different types of gene regulatory networks that allow for distinct levels of regulatory influence on gene expression or are more likely to give rise to stable phenotypes. We found that if gene expression is binary, increasing noise levels generally decreases phenotype accessibility for all network types studied. If more gene expression states are considered, noise can moderately enhance the speed of discovery if three or four gene expression states are allowed, and if there are enough distinct regulatory networks in the population. These results were independent of the network types analyzed, and were robust to different implementations of noise. Hence, for noise to increase the number of accessible phenotypes in gene regulatory networks, very specific conditions need to be satisfied. If the number of distinct regulatory networks involved in organismal development is large enough, and the acquisition of more genes or fine tuning of their expression states proves costly to the organism, noise can be useful in allowing access to more unique phenotypes.

  9. A new neural network model for solving random interval linear programming problems.

    PubMed

    Arjmandzadeh, Ziba; Safi, Mohammadreza; Nazemi, Alireza

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a neural network model for solving random interval linear programming problems. The original problem involving random interval variable coefficients is first transformed into an equivalent convex second order cone programming problem. A neural network model is then constructed for solving the obtained convex second order cone problem. Employing Lyapunov function approach, it is also shown that the proposed neural network model is stable in the sense of Lyapunov and it is globally convergent to an exact satisfactory solution of the original problem. Several illustrative examples are solved in support of this technique.

  10. Transition to chaos in random networks with cell-type-specific connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Aljadeff, Johnatan; Stern, Merav; Sharpee, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    In neural circuits, statistical connectivity rules strongly depend on cell-type identity. We study dynamics of neural networks with cell-type specific connectivity by extending the dynamic mean field method, and find that these networks exhibit a phase transition between silent and chaotic activity. By analyzing the locus of this transition, we derive a new result in random matrix theory: the spectral radius of a random connectivity matrix with block-structured variances. We apply our results to show how a small group of hyper-excitable neurons within the network can significantly increase the network’s computational capacity by bringing it into the chaotic regime. PMID:25768781

  11. NRZ versus RZ over Absolute Added Correlative coding in optical metro-access networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong-Nhat, Nguyen; Elsherif, Mohamed A.; Le Minh, Hoa; Malekmohammadi, Amin

    2017-03-01

    This paper comparatively investigates the transmission performance of absolute added correlative coding (AACC) using non-return-to-zero (NRZ) and return-to-zero (RZ) pulse shapes with a binary intensity modulation direct detection receiver in 40 Gb/s optical metro-access networks operating at 1550 nm. It is shown that, for AACC transmission, the NRZ impulse shaping is superior in comparison to RZ in spectral efficiency, dispersion tolerance, residual dispersion and self-phase modulation (SPM) tolerance. However, RZ-AACC experiences a 1-2 dB advantage in receiver sensitivity over NRZ-AACC for back-to-back configuration as well as after 300-km single-mode fiber delivery.

  12. Coding/decoding and reversibility of droplet trains in microfluidic networks.

    PubMed

    Fuerstman, Michael J; Garstecki, Piotr; Whitesides, George M

    2007-02-09

    Droplets of one liquid suspended in a second, immiscible liquid move through a microfluidic device in which a channel splits into two branches that reconnect downstream. The droplets choose a path based on the number of droplets that occupy each branch. The interaction among droplets in the channels results in complex sequences of path selection. The linearity of the flow through the microchannels, however, ensures that the behavior of the system can be reversed. This reversibility makes it possible to encrypt and decrypt signals coded in the intervals between droplets. The encoding/decoding device is a functional microfluidic system that requires droplets to navigate a network in a precise manner without the use of valves, switches, or other means of external control.

  13. Application of Poisson random effect models for highway network screening.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ximiao; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Alamili, Samer

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, Bayesian random effect models that account for the temporal and spatial correlations of crash data became popular in traffic safety research. This study employs random effect Poisson Log-Normal models for crash risk hotspot identification. Both the temporal and spatial correlations of crash data were considered. Potential for Safety Improvement (PSI) were adopted as a measure of the crash risk. Using the fatal and injury crashes that occurred on urban 4-lane divided arterials from 2006 to 2009 in the Central Florida area, the random effect approaches were compared to the traditional Empirical Bayesian (EB) method and the conventional Bayesian Poisson Log-Normal model. A series of method examination tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of different approaches. These tests include the previously developed site consistence test, method consistence test, total rank difference test, and the modified total score test, as well as the newly proposed total safety performance measure difference test. Results show that the Bayesian Poisson model accounting for both temporal and spatial random effects (PTSRE) outperforms the model that with only temporal random effect, and both are superior to the conventional Poisson Log-Normal model (PLN) and the EB model in the fitting of crash data. Additionally, the method evaluation tests indicate that the PTSRE model is significantly superior to the PLN model and the EB model in consistently identifying hotspots during successive time periods. The results suggest that the PTSRE model is a superior alternative for road site crash risk hotspot identification.

  14. Hybrid Ag nanowire transparent conductive electrodes with randomly oriented and grid-patterned Ag nanowire networks.

    PubMed

    Ha, Bonhee; Jo, Sungjin

    2017-09-14

    To improve the electrical properties of silver nanowire (Ag NW) transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs), the density of Ag NW networks should be increased, to increase the number of percolation paths. However, because of the inverse relationship between optical transmittance and electrical resistivity, the optical properties of Ag NW TCEs deteriorate with increasing density of the Ag NW network. In this study, a hybrid Ag NW electrode composed of randomly oriented and grid-patterned Ag NW networks is demonstrated. The hybrid Ag NW electrodes exhibit significantly improved sheet resistances and slightly decreased transmittances compared to randomly oriented Ag NW networks. Hybrid Ag NW TCEs show excellent mechanical flexibilities and durabilities in bending tests with a 5 mm radius of curvature. Moreover, flexible transparent film heaters (TFHs) based on the hybrid Ag NW electrodes show elevated maximum temperatures relative to TFHs based on randomly oriented Ag NW electrodes, when operated at the same input voltages.

  15. Combating QR-Code-Based Compromised Accounts in Mobile Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Cao, Jian; Wang, Xiaoqi; Fu, Qiang; Li, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cyber Physical Social Sensing makes mobile social networks (MSNs) popular with users. However, such attacks are rampant as malicious URLs are spread covertly through quick response (QR) codes to control compromised accounts in MSNs to propagate malicious messages. Currently, there are generally two types of methods to identify compromised accounts in MSNs: one type is to analyze the potential threats on wireless access points and the potential threats on handheld devices’ operation systems so as to stop compromised accounts from spreading malicious messages; the other type is to apply the method of detecting compromised accounts in online social networks to MSNs. The above types of methods above focus neither on the problems of MSNs themselves nor on the interaction of sensors’ messages, which leads to the restrictiveness of platforms and the simplification of methods. In order to stop the spreading of compromised accounts in MSNs effectively, the attacks have to be traced to their sources first. Through sensors, users exchange information in MSNs and acquire information by scanning QR codes. Therefore, analyzing the traces of sensor-related information helps to identify the compromised accounts in MSNs. This paper analyzes the diversity of information sending modes of compromised accounts and normal accounts, analyzes the regularity of GPS (Global Positioning System)-based location information, and introduces the concepts of entropy and conditional entropy so as to construct an entropy-based model based on machine learning strategies. To achieve the goal, about 500,000 accounts of Sina Weibo and about 100 million corresponding messages are collected. Through the validation, the accuracy rate of the model is proved to be as high as 87.6%, and the false positive rate is only 3.7%. Meanwhile, the comparative experiments of the feature sets prove that sensor-based location information can be applied to detect the compromised accounts in MSNs. PMID:27657071

  16. Combating QR-Code-Based Compromised Accounts in Mobile Social Networks.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Cao, Jian; Wang, Xiaoqi; Fu, Qiang; Li, Qiang

    2016-09-20

    Cyber Physical Social Sensing makes mobile social networks (MSNs) popular with users. However, such attacks are rampant as malicious URLs are spread covertly through quick response (QR) codes to control compromised accounts in MSNs to propagate malicious messages. Currently, there are generally two types of methods to identify compromised accounts in MSNs: one type is to analyze the potential threats on wireless access points and the potential threats on handheld devices' operation systems so as to stop compromised accounts from spreading malicious messages; the other type is to apply the method of detecting compromised accounts in online social networks to MSNs. The above types of methods above focus neither on the problems of MSNs themselves nor on the interaction of sensors' messages, which leads to the restrictiveness of platforms and the simplification of methods. In order to stop the spreading of compromised accounts in MSNs effectively, the attacks have to be traced to their sources first. Through sensors, users exchange information in MSNs and acquire information by scanning QR codes. Therefore, analyzing the traces of sensor-related information helps to identify the compromised accounts in MSNs. This paper analyzes the diversity of information sending modes of compromised accounts and normal accounts, analyzes the regularity of GPS (Global Positioning System)-based location information, and introduces the concepts of entropy and conditional entropy so as to construct an entropy-based model based on machine learning strategies. To achieve the goal, about 500,000 accounts of Sina Weibo and about 100 million corresponding messages are collected. Through the validation, the accuracy rate of the model is proved to be as high as 87.6%, and the false positive rate is only 3.7%. Meanwhile, the comparative experiments of the feature sets prove that sensor-based location information can be applied to detect the compromised accounts in MSNs.

  17. Vulnerability of networks: Fractional percolation on random graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yilun

    2014-01-01

    We present a theoretical framework for understanding nonbinary, nonindependent percolation on networks with general degree distributions. The model incorporates a partially functional (PF) state of nodes so that both intensity and extensity of error are characterized. Two connected nodes in a PF state cannot sustain the load and therefore break their link. We give exact solutions for the percolation threshold, the fraction of giant cluster, and the mean size of small clusters. The robustness-fragility transition point for scale-free networks with a degree distribution pk∝k-α is identified to be α =3. The analysis reveals that scale-free networks are vulnerable to targeted attack at hubs: a more complete picture of their Achilles' heel turns out to be not only the hubs themselves but also the edges linking them together.

  18. Interaction of cellular and network mechanisms for efficient pheromone coding in moths

    PubMed Central

    Belmabrouk, Hana; Nowotny, Thomas; Rospars, Jean-Pierre; Martinez, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Sensory systems, both in the living and in machines, have to be optimized with respect to their environmental conditions. The pheromone subsystem of the olfactory system of moths is a particularly well-defined example in which rapid variations of odor content in turbulent plumes require fast, concentration-invariant neural representations. It is not clear how cellular and network mechanisms in the moth antennal lobe contribute to coding efficiency. Using computational modeling, we show that intrinsic potassium currents (IA and ISK) in projection neurons may combine with extrinsic inhibition from local interneurons to implement a dual latency code for both pheromone identity and intensity. The mean latency reflects stimulus intensity, whereas latency differences carry concentration-invariant information about stimulus identity. In accordance with physiological results, the projection neurons exhibit a multiphasic response of inhibition–excitation–inhibition. Together with synaptic inhibition, intrinsic currents IA and ISK account for the first and second inhibitory phases and contribute to a rapid encoding of pheromone information. The first inhibition plays the role of a reset to limit variability in the time to first spike. The second inhibition prevents responses of excessive duration to allow tracking of intermittent stimuli. PMID:22109556

  19. Assessment of BeiDou differential code bias variations from multi-GNSS network observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, S. G.; Jin, R.; Li, D.

    2016-02-01

    The differential code bias (DCB) of global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs) affects precise ionospheric modeling and applications. In this paper, daily DCBs of the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) are estimated and investigated from 2-year multi-GNSS network observations (2013-2014) based on global ionospheric maps (GIMs) from the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE), which are compared with Global Positioning System (GPS) results. The DCB of BDS satellites is a little less stable than GPS solutions, especially for geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) satellites. The BDS GEO observations decrease the precision of inclined geosynchronous satellite orbit (IGSO) and medium Earth orbit (MEO) DCB estimations. The RMS of BDS satellites DCB decreases to about 0.2 ns when we remove BDS GEO observations. Zero-mean condition effects are not the dominant factor for the higher RMS of BDS satellites DCB. Although there are no obvious secular variations in the DCB time series, sub-nanosecond variations are visible for both BDS and GPS satellites DCBs during 2013-2014. For satellites in the same orbital plane, their DCB variations have similar characteristics. In addition, variations in receivers DCB in the same region are found with a similar pattern between BDS and GPS. These variations in both GPS and BDS DCBs are mainly related to the estimated error from ionospheric variability, while the BDS DCB intrinsic variation is in sub-nanoseconds.

  20. Hide and Seek: Exploiting and Hardening Leakage-Resilient Code Randomization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-30

    execute-only permissions on memory accesses, (ii) code pointer hid- ing (e.g., indirection or encryption), and (iii) decoys (e.g., booby traps). Among...inserting decoy trampolines also known as booby traps [18]. Goals and Contributions. In this paper, we system- atically investigate the effectiveness of...Security Symposium (2003), USENIX Sec. [18] CRANE, S., LARSEN, P., BRUNTHALER, S., AND FRANZ, M. Booby trapping software. In New Security Paradigms Workshop