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Sample records for random number generator

  1. Quantum random number generator

    DOEpatents

    Pooser, Raphael C.

    2016-05-10

    A quantum random number generator (QRNG) and a photon generator for a QRNG are provided. The photon generator may be operated in a spontaneous mode below a lasing threshold to emit photons. Photons emitted from the photon generator may have at least one random characteristic, which may be monitored by the QRNG to generate a random number. In one embodiment, the photon generator may include a photon emitter and an amplifier coupled to the photon emitter. The amplifier may enable the photon generator to be used in the QRNG without introducing significant bias in the random number and may enable multiplexing of multiple random numbers. The amplifier may also desensitize the photon generator to fluctuations in power supplied thereto while operating in the spontaneous mode. In one embodiment, the photon emitter and amplifier may be a tapered diode amplifier.

  2. Quantum random number generation

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; ...

    2016-06-28

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness -- coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a highmore » speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.« less

  3. Self-correcting random number generator

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S.; Pooser, Raphael C.

    2016-09-06

    A system and method for generating random numbers. The system may include a random number generator (RNG), such as a quantum random number generator (QRNG) configured to self-correct or adapt in order to substantially achieve randomness from the output of the RNG. By adapting, the RNG may generate a random number that may be considered random regardless of whether the random number itself is tested as such. As an example, the RNG may include components to monitor one or more characteristics of the RNG during operation, and may use the monitored characteristics as a basis for adapting, or self-correcting, tomore » provide a random number according to one or more performance criteria.« less

  4. Generation of pseudo-random numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L. W.; Rheinfurth, M. H.

    1982-01-01

    Practical methods for generating acceptable random numbers from a variety of probability distributions which are frequently encountered in engineering applications are described. The speed, accuracy, and guarantee of statistical randomness of the various methods are discussed.

  5. Random Number Generation in Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Mark A.; Moss, Simon A.; Bradshaw, John L.; Rinehart, Nicole J.

    2002-01-01

    This study explored the ability of 14 individuals with autism to generate a unique series of digits. Individuals with autism were more likely to repeat previous digits than comparison individuals, suggesting they may exhibit a shortfall in response inhibition. Results support the executive dysfunction theory of autism. (Contains references.)…

  6. Source-Independent Quantum Random Number Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhu; Zhou, Hongyi; Yuan, Xiao; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Quantum random number generators can provide genuine randomness by appealing to the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics. In general, a physical generator contains two parts—a randomness source and its readout. The source is essential to the quality of the resulting random numbers; hence, it needs to be carefully calibrated and modeled to achieve information-theoretical provable randomness. However, in practice, the source is a complicated physical system, such as a light source or an atomic ensemble, and any deviations in the real-life implementation from the theoretical model may affect the randomness of the output. To close this gap, we propose a source-independent scheme for quantum random number generation in which output randomness can be certified, even when the source is uncharacterized and untrusted. In our randomness analysis, we make no assumptions about the dimension of the source. For instance, multiphoton emissions are allowed in optical implementations. Our analysis takes into account the finite-key effect with the composable security definition. In the limit of large data size, the length of the input random seed is exponentially small compared to that of the output random bit. In addition, by modifying a quantum key distribution system, we experimentally demonstrate our scheme and achieve a randomness generation rate of over 5 ×103 bit /s .

  7. Truly random number generation: an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauchiger, Daniela; Renner, Renato

    2013-10-01

    Randomness is crucial for a variety of applications, ranging from gambling to computer simulations, and from cryptography to statistics. However, many of the currently used methods for generating randomness do not meet the criteria that are necessary for these applications to work properly and safely. A common problem is that a sequence of numbers may look random but nevertheless not be truly random. In fact, the sequence may pass all standard statistical tests and yet be perfectly predictable. This renders it useless for many applications. For example, in cryptography, the predictability of a "andomly" chosen password is obviously undesirable. Here, we review a recently developed approach to generating true | and hence unpredictable | randomness.

  8. Programmable quantum random number generator without postprocessing.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Lac; Rehain, Patrick; Sua, Yong Meng; Huang, Yu-Ping

    2018-02-15

    We demonstrate a viable source of unbiased quantum random numbers whose statistical properties can be arbitrarily programmed without the need for any postprocessing such as randomness distillation or distribution transformation. It is based on measuring the arrival time of single photons in shaped temporal modes that are tailored with an electro-optical modulator. We show that quantum random numbers can be created directly in customized probability distributions and pass all randomness tests of the NIST and Dieharder test suites without any randomness extraction. The min-entropies of such generated random numbers are measured close to the theoretical limits, indicating their near-ideal statistics and ultrahigh purity. Easy to implement and arbitrarily programmable, this technique can find versatile uses in a multitude of data analysis areas.

  9. The RANDOM computer program: A linear congruential random number generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, R. F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The RANDOM Computer Program is a FORTRAN program for generating random number sequences and testing linear congruential random number generators (LCGs). The linear congruential form of random number generator is discussed, and the selection of parameters of an LCG for a microcomputer described. This document describes the following: (1) The RANDOM Computer Program; (2) RANDOM.MOD, the computer code needed to implement an LCG in a FORTRAN program; and (3) The RANCYCLE and the ARITH Computer Programs that provide computational assistance in the selection of parameters for an LCG. The RANDOM, RANCYCLE, and ARITH Computer Programs are written in Microsoft FORTRAN for the IBM PC microcomputer and its compatibles. With only minor modifications, the RANDOM Computer Program and its LCG can be run on most micromputers or mainframe computers.

  10. Standard random number generation for MBASIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    A machine-independent algorithm is presented and analyzed for generating pseudorandom numbers suitable for the standard MBASIC system. The algorithm used is the polynomial congruential or linear recurrence modulo 2 method. Numbers, formed as nonoverlapping adjacent 28-bit words taken from the bit stream produced by the formula a sub m + 532 = a sub m + 37 + a sub m (modulo 2), do not repeat within the projected age of the solar system, show no ensemble correlation, exhibit uniform distribution of adjacent numbers up to 19 dimensions, and do not deviate from random runs-up and runs-down behavior.

  11. Long period pseudo random number sequence generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Charles C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A circuit for generating a sequence of pseudo random numbers, (A sub K). There is an exponentiator in GF(2 sup m) for the normal basis representation of elements in a finite field GF(2 sup m) each represented by m binary digits and having two inputs and an output from which the sequence (A sub K). Of pseudo random numbers is taken. One of the two inputs is connected to receive the outputs (E sub K) of maximal length shift register of n stages. There is a switch having a pair of inputs and an output. The switch outputs is connected to the other of the two inputs of the exponentiator. One of the switch inputs is connected for initially receiving a primitive element (A sub O) in GF(2 sup m). Finally, there is a delay circuit having an input and an output. The delay circuit output is connected to the other of the switch inputs and the delay circuit input is connected to the output of the exponentiator. Whereby after the exponentiator initially receives the primitive element (A sub O) in GF(2 sup m) through the switch, the switch can be switched to cause the exponentiator to receive as its input a delayed output A(K-1) from the exponentiator thereby generating (A sub K) continuously at the output of the exponentiator. The exponentiator in GF(2 sup m) is novel and comprises a cyclic-shift circuit; a Massey-Omura multiplier; and, a control logic circuit all operably connected together to perform the function U(sub i) = 92(sup i) (for n(sub i) = 1 or 1 (for n(subi) = 0).

  12. Random Number Generation for High Performance Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    number streams, a quality metric for the parallel random number streams. * * * * * Atty. Dkt . No.: 5660-14400 Customer No. 35690 Eric B. Meyertons...responsibility to ensure timely payment of maintenance fees when due. Pagel of3 PTOL-85 (Rev. 02/11) Atty. Dkt . No.: 5660-14400 Page 1 Meyertons...with each subtask executed by a separate thread or process (henceforth, process). Each process has Atty. Dkt . No.: 5660-14400 Page 2 Meyertons

  13. Towards a high-speed quantum random number generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucki, Damien; Burri, Samuel; Charbon, Edoardo; Chunnilall, Christopher; Meneghetti, Alessio; Regazzoni, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    Randomness is of fundamental importance in various fields, such as cryptography, numerical simulations, or the gaming industry. Quantum physics, which is fundamentally probabilistic, is the best option for a physical random number generator. In this article, we will present the work carried out in various projects in the context of the development of a commercial and certified high speed random number generator.

  14. Generation of physical random numbers by using homodyne detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirakawa, Kodai; Oya, Shota; Oguri, Yusuke; Ichikawa, Tsubasa; Eto, Yujiro; Hirano, Takuya; Tsurumaru, Toyohiro

    2016-10-01

    Physical random numbers generated by quantum measurements are, in principle, impossible to predict. We have demonstrated the generation of physical random numbers by using a high-speed balanced photodetector to measure the quadrature amplitudes of vacuum states. Using this method, random numbers were generated at 500 Mbps, which is more than one order of magnitude faster than previously [Gabriel et al:, Nature Photonics 4, 711-715 (2010)]. The Crush test battery of the TestU01 suite consists of 31 tests in 144 variations, and we used them to statistically analyze these numbers. The generated random numbers passed 14 of the 31 tests. To improve the randomness, we performed a hash operation, in which each random number was multiplied by a random Toeplitz matrix; the resulting numbers passed all of the tests in the TestU01 Crush battery.

  15. Pseudo-Random Number Generator Based on Coupled Map Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Huaping; Wang, Shihong; Hu, Gang

    A one-way coupled chaotic map lattice is used for generating pseudo-random numbers. It is shown that with suitable cooperative applications of both chaotic and conventional approaches, the output of the spatiotemporally chaotic system can easily meet the practical requirements of random numbers, i.e., excellent random statistical properties, long periodicity of computer realizations, and fast speed of random number generations. This pseudo-random number generator system can be used as ideal synchronous and self-synchronizing stream cipher systems for secure communications.

  16. Quantum random number generation for loophole-free Bell tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Morgan; Abellan, Carlos; Amaya, Waldimar

    2015-05-01

    We describe the generation of quantum random numbers at multi-Gbps rates, combined with real-time randomness extraction, to give very high purity random numbers based on quantum events at most tens of ns in the past. The system satisfies the stringent requirements of quantum non-locality tests that aim to close the timing loophole. We describe the generation mechanism using spontaneous-emission-driven phase diffusion in a semiconductor laser, digitization, and extraction by parity calculation using multi-GHz logic chips. We pay special attention to experimental proof of the quality of the random numbers and analysis of the randomness extraction. In contrast to widely-used models of randomness generators in the computer science literature, we argue that randomness generation by spontaneous emission can be extracted from a single source.

  17. Generating random numbers by means of nonlinear dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Jiaqi; Hu, Haojie; Zhong, Juhua; Luo, Duanbin; Fang, Yi

    2018-07-01

    To introduce the randomness of a physical process to students, a chaotic pendulum experiment was opened in East China University of Science and Technology (ECUST) on the undergraduate level in the physics department. It was shown chaotic motion could be initiated through adjusting the operation of a chaotic pendulum. By using the data of the angular displacements of chaotic motion, random binary numerical arrays can be generated. To check the randomness of generated numerical arrays, the NIST Special Publication 800-20 method was adopted. As a result, it was found that all the random arrays which were generated by the chaotic motion could pass the validity criteria and some of them were even better than the quality of pseudo-random numbers generated by a computer. Through the experiments, it is demonstrated that chaotic pendulum can be used as an efficient mechanical facility in generating random numbers, and can be applied in teaching random motion to the students.

  18. Pseudo-random number generator for the Sigma 5 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, S. N.

    1983-01-01

    A technique is presented for developing a pseudo-random number generator based on the linear congruential form. The two numbers used for the generator are a prime number and a corresponding primitive root, where the prime is the largest prime number that can be accurately represented on a particular computer. The primitive root is selected by applying Marsaglia's lattice test. The technique presented was applied to write a random number program for the Sigma 5 computer. The new program, named S:RANDOM1, is judged to be superior to the older program named S:RANDOM. For applications requiring several independent random number generators, a table is included showing several acceptable primitive roots. The technique and programs described can be applied to any computer having word length different from that of the Sigma 5.

  19. Quantum Random Number Generation Using a Quanta Image Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Amri, Emna; Felk, Yacine; Stucki, Damien; Ma, Jiaju; Fossum, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    A new quantum random number generation method is proposed. The method is based on the randomness of the photon emission process and the single photon counting capability of the Quanta Image Sensor (QIS). It has the potential to generate high-quality random numbers with remarkable data output rate. In this paper, the principle of photon statistics and theory of entropy are discussed. Sample data were collected with QIS jot device, and its randomness quality was analyzed. The randomness assessment method and results are discussed. PMID:27367698

  20. A hybrid-type quantum random number generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai-Qiang, Ma; Wu, Zhu; Ke-Jin, Wei; Rui-Xue, Li; Hong-Wei, Liu

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a well-performing hybrid-type truly quantum random number generator based on the time interval between two independent single-photon detection signals, which is practical and intuitive, and generates the initial random number sources from a combination of multiple existing random number sources. A time-to-amplitude converter and multichannel analyzer are used for qualitative analysis to demonstrate that each and every step is random. Furthermore, a carefully designed data acquisition system is used to obtain a high-quality random sequence. Our scheme is simple and proves that the random number bit rate can be dramatically increased to satisfy practical requirements. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61178010 and 11374042), the Fund of State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications (Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications), China, and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. bupt2014TS01).

  1. Superparamagnetic perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions for true random number generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Bradley; Bapna, Mukund; Igbokwe, Julianne; Almasi, Hamid; Wang, Weigang; Majetich, Sara A.

    2018-05-01

    Superparamagnetic perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions are fabricated and analyzed for use in random number generators. Time-resolved resistance measurements are used as streams of bits in statistical tests for randomness. Voltage control of the thermal stability enables tuning the average speed of random bit generation up to 70 kHz in a 60 nm diameter device. In its most efficient operating mode, the device generates random bits at an energy cost of 600 fJ/bit. A narrow range of magnetic field tunes the probability of a given state from 0 to 1, offering a means of probabilistic computing.

  2. Employing online quantum random number generators for generating truly random quantum states in Mathematica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miszczak, Jarosław Adam

    2013-01-01

    The presented package for the Mathematica computing system allows the harnessing of quantum random number generators (QRNG) for investigating the statistical properties of quantum states. The described package implements a number of functions for generating random states. The new version of the package adds the ability to use the on-line quantum random number generator service and implements new functions for retrieving lists of random numbers. Thanks to the introduced improvements, the new version provides faster access to high-quality sources of random numbers and can be used in simulations requiring large amount of random data. New version program summaryProgram title: TRQS Catalogue identifier: AEKA_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKA_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 18 134 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 520 49 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica, C. Computer: Any supporting Mathematica in version 7 or higher. Operating system: Any platform supporting Mathematica; tested with GNU/Linux (32 and 64 bit). RAM: Case-dependent Supplementary material: Fig. 1 mentioned below can be downloaded. Classification: 4.15. External routines: Quantis software library (http://www.idquantique.com/support/quantis-trng.html) Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEKA_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 183(2012)118 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Generation of random density matrices and utilization of high-quality random numbers for the purpose of computer simulation. Solution method: Use of a physical quantum random number generator and an on-line service providing access to the source of true random

  3. Unbiased All-Optical Random-Number Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinle, Tobias; Greiner, Johannes N.; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Giessen, Harald; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2017-10-01

    The generation of random bits is of enormous importance in modern information science. Cryptographic security is based on random numbers which require a physical process for their generation. This is commonly performed by hardware random-number generators. These often exhibit a number of problems, namely experimental bias, memory in the system, and other technical subtleties, which reduce the reliability in the entropy estimation. Further, the generated outcome has to be postprocessed to "iron out" such spurious effects. Here, we present a purely optical randomness generator, based on the bistable output of an optical parametric oscillator. Detector noise plays no role and postprocessing is reduced to a minimum. Upon entering the bistable regime, initially the resulting output phase depends on vacuum fluctuations. Later, the phase is rigidly locked and can be well determined versus a pulse train, which is derived from the pump laser. This delivers an ambiguity-free output, which is reliably detected and associated with a binary outcome. The resulting random bit stream resembles a perfect coin toss and passes all relevant randomness measures. The random nature of the generated binary outcome is furthermore confirmed by an analysis of resulting conditional entropies.

  4. Social Noise: Generating Random Numbers from Twitter Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Norberto; Quintas, Fernando; Sánchez, Luis; Arias, Jesús

    2015-12-01

    Due to the multiple applications of random numbers in computer systems (cryptography, online gambling, computer simulation, etc.) it is important to have mechanisms to generate these numbers. True Random Number Generators (TRNGs) are commonly used for this purpose. TRNGs rely on non-deterministic sources to generate randomness. Physical processes (like noise in semiconductors, quantum phenomenon, etc.) play this role in state of the art TRNGs. In this paper, we depart from previous work and explore the possibility of defining social TRNGs using the stream of public messages of the microblogging service Twitter as randomness source. Thus, we define two TRNGs based on Twitter stream information and evaluate them using the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) statistical test suite. The results of the evaluation confirm the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  5. An investigation of the uniform random number generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temple, E. C.

    1982-01-01

    Most random number generators that are in use today are of the congruential form X(i+1) + AX(i) + C mod M where A, C, and M are nonnegative integers. If C=O, the generator is called the multiplicative type and those for which C/O are called mixed congruential generators. It is easy to see that congruential generators will repeat a sequence of numbers after a maximum of M values have been generated. The number of numbers that a procedure generates before restarting the sequence is called the length or the period of the generator. Generally, it is desirable to make the period as long as possible. A detailed discussion of congruential generators is given. Also, several promising procedures that differ from the multiplicative and mixed procedure are discussed.

  6. Accelerating Pseudo-Random Number Generator for MCNP on GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chunye; Liu, Jie; Chi, Lihua; Hu, Qingfeng; Deng, Li; Gong, Zhenghu

    2010-09-01

    Pseudo-random number generators (PRNG) are intensively used in many stochastic algorithms in particle simulations, artificial neural networks and other scientific computation. The PRNG in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) requires long period, high quality, flexible jump and fast enough. In this paper, we implement such a PRNG for MCNP on NVIDIA's GTX200 Graphics Processor Units (GPU) using CUDA programming model. Results shows that 3.80 to 8.10 times speedup are achieved compared with 4 to 6 cores CPUs and more than 679.18 million double precision random numbers can be generated per second on GPU.

  7. Source-Device-Independent Ultrafast Quantum Random Number Generation.

    PubMed

    Marangon, Davide G; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2017-02-10

    Secure random numbers are a fundamental element of many applications in science, statistics, cryptography and more in general in security protocols. We present a method that enables the generation of high-speed unpredictable random numbers from the quadratures of an electromagnetic field without any assumption on the input state. The method allows us to eliminate the numbers that can be predicted due to the presence of classical and quantum side information. In particular, we introduce a procedure to estimate a bound on the conditional min-entropy based on the entropic uncertainty principle for position and momentum observables of infinite dimensional quantum systems. By the above method, we experimentally demonstrated the generation of secure true random bits at a rate greater than 1.7 Gbit/s.

  8. GASPRNG: GPU accelerated scalable parallel random number generator library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shuang; Peterson, Gregory D.

    2013-04-01

    Graphics processors represent a promising technology for accelerating computational science applications. Many computational science applications require fast and scalable random number generation with good statistical properties, so they use the Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators library (SPRNG). We present the GPU Accelerated SPRNG library (GASPRNG) to accelerate SPRNG in GPU-based high performance computing systems. GASPRNG includes code for a host CPU and CUDA code for execution on NVIDIA graphics processing units (GPUs) along with a programming interface to support various usage models for pseudorandom numbers and computational science applications executing on the CPU, GPU, or both. This paper describes the implementation approach used to produce high performance and also describes how to use the programming interface. The programming interface allows a user to be able to use GASPRNG the same way as SPRNG on traditional serial or parallel computers as well as to develop tightly coupled programs executing primarily on the GPU. We also describe how to install GASPRNG and use it. To help illustrate linking with GASPRNG, various demonstration codes are included for the different usage models. GASPRNG on a single GPU shows up to 280x speedup over SPRNG on a single CPU core and is able to scale for larger systems in the same manner as SPRNG. Because GASPRNG generates identical streams of pseudorandom numbers as SPRNG, users can be confident about the quality of GASPRNG for scalable computational science applications. Catalogue identifier: AEOI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: UTK license. No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 167900 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1422058 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C and CUDA. Computer: Any PC or

  9. DNA-based random number generation in security circuitry.

    PubMed

    Gearheart, Christy M; Arazi, Benjamin; Rouchka, Eric C

    2010-06-01

    DNA-based circuit design is an area of research in which traditional silicon-based technologies are replaced by naturally occurring phenomena taken from biochemistry and molecular biology. This research focuses on further developing DNA-based methodologies to mimic digital data manipulation. While exhibiting fundamental principles, this work was done in conjunction with the vision that DNA-based circuitry, when the technology matures, will form the basis for a tamper-proof security module, revolutionizing the meaning and concept of tamper-proofing and possibly preventing it altogether based on accurate scientific observations. A paramount part of such a solution would be self-generation of random numbers. A novel prototype schema employs solid phase synthesis of oligonucleotides for random construction of DNA sequences; temporary storage and retrieval is achieved through plasmid vectors. A discussion of how to evaluate sequence randomness is included, as well as how these techniques are applied to a simulation of the random number generation circuitry. Simulation results show generated sequences successfully pass three selected NIST random number generation tests specified for security applications.

  10. Analysis of entropy extraction efficiencies in random number generation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Shuang; Chen, Wei; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2016-05-01

    Random numbers (RNs) have applications in many areas: lottery games, gambling, computer simulation, and, most importantly, cryptography [N. Gisin et al., Rev. Mod. Phys. 74 (2002) 145]. In cryptography theory, the theoretical security of the system calls for high quality RNs. Therefore, developing methods for producing unpredictable RNs with adequate speed is an attractive topic. Early on, despite the lack of theoretical support, pseudo RNs generated by algorithmic methods performed well and satisfied reasonable statistical requirements. However, as implemented, those pseudorandom sequences were completely determined by mathematical formulas and initial seeds, which cannot introduce extra entropy or information. In these cases, “random” bits are generated that are not at all random. Physical random number generators (RNGs), which, in contrast to algorithmic methods, are based on unpredictable physical random phenomena, have attracted considerable research interest. However, the way that we extract random bits from those physical entropy sources has a large influence on the efficiency and performance of the system. In this manuscript, we will review and discuss several randomness extraction schemes that are based on radiation or photon arrival times. We analyze the robustness, post-processing requirements and, in particular, the extraction efficiency of those methods to aid in the construction of efficient, compact and robust physical RNG systems.

  11. Solution-Processed Carbon Nanotube True Random Number Generator.

    PubMed

    Gaviria Rojas, William A; McMorrow, Julian J; Geier, Michael L; Tang, Qianying; Kim, Chris H; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2017-08-09

    With the growing adoption of interconnected electronic devices in consumer and industrial applications, there is an increasing demand for robust security protocols when transmitting and receiving sensitive data. Toward this end, hardware true random number generators (TRNGs), commonly used to create encryption keys, offer significant advantages over software pseudorandom number generators. However, the vast network of devices and sensors envisioned for the "Internet of Things" will require small, low-cost, and mechanically flexible TRNGs with low computational complexity. These rigorous constraints position solution-processed semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as leading candidates for next-generation security devices. Here, we demonstrate the first TRNG using static random access memory (SRAM) cells based on solution-processed SWCNTs that digitize thermal noise to generate random bits. This bit generation strategy can be readily implemented in hardware with minimal transistor and computational overhead, resulting in an output stream that passes standardized statistical tests for randomness. By using solution-processed semiconducting SWCNTs in a low-power, complementary architecture to achieve TRNG, we demonstrate a promising approach for improving the security of printable and flexible electronics.

  12. Random number generators tested on quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Hongo, Kenta; Maezono, Ryo; Miura, Kenichi

    2010-08-01

    We have tested and compared several (pseudo) random number generators (RNGs) applied to a practical application, ground state energy calculations of molecules using variational and diffusion Monte Carlo metheds. A new multiple recursive generator with 8th-order recursion (MRG8) and the Mersenne twister generator (MT19937) are tested and compared with the RANLUX generator with five luxury levels (RANLUX-[0-4]). Both MRG8 and MT19937 are proven to give the same total energy as that evaluated with RANLUX-4 (highest luxury level) within the statistical error bars with less computational cost to generate the sequence. We also tested the notorious implementation of linear congruential generator (LCG), RANDU, for comparison. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. FPGA Implementation of Metastability-Based True Random Number Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Hisashi; Ichikawa, Shuichi

    True random number generators (TRNGs) are important as a basis for computer security. Though there are some TRNGs composed of analog circuit, the use of digital circuits is desired for the application of TRNGs to logic LSIs. Some of the digital TRNGs utilize jitter in free-running ring oscillators as a source of entropy, which consume large power. Another type of TRNG exploits the metastability of a latch to generate entropy. Although this kind of TRNG has been mostly implemented with full-custom LSI technology, this study presents an implementation based on common FPGA technology. Our TRNG is comprised of logic gates only, and can be integrated in any kind of logic LSI. The RS latch in our TRNG is implemented as a hard-macro to guarantee the quality of randomness by minimizing the signal skew and load imbalance of internal nodes. To improve the quality and throughput, the output of 64-256 latches are XOR'ed. The derived design was verified on a Xilinx Virtex-4 FPGA (XC4VFX20), and passed NIST statistical test suite without post-processing. Our TRNG with 256 latches occupies 580 slices, while achieving 12.5Mbps throughput.

  14. Statistical evaluation of PACSTAT random number generation capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, G.F.; Toland, M.R.; Harty, H.

    1988-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed in verifying the general purpose Monte Carlo driver-program PACSTAT. The main objective of the work was to verify the performance of PACSTAT's random number generation capabilities. Secondary objectives were to document (using controlled configuration management procedures) changes made in PACSTAT at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and to assure that PACSTAT input and output files satisfy quality assurance traceability constraints. Upon receipt of the PRIME version of the PACSTAT code from the Basalt Waste Isolation Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff converted the code to run on Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAXs. The modifications to PACSTAT weremore » implemented using the WITNESS configuration management system, with the modifications themselves intended to make the code as portable as possible. Certain modifications were made to make the PACSTAT input and output files conform to quality assurance traceability constraints. 10 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.« less

  15. Analysis of Uniform Random Numbers Generated by Randu and Urn Ten Different Seeds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The statistical properties of the numbers generated by two uniform random number generators, RANDU and URN, each using ten different seeds are...The testing is performed on a sequence of 50,000 numbers generated by each uniform random number generator using each of the ten seeds . (Author)

  16. The Evolution of Random Number Generation in MUVES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    mathematical basis and statistical justification for algorithms used in the code. The working code provided produces results identical to the current...MUVES, includ- ing the mathematical basis and statistical justification for algorithms used in the code. The working code provided produces results...questionable numerical and statistical properties. The development of the modern system is traced through software change requests, resulting in a random number

  17. Efficient and robust quantum random number generation by photon number detection

    SciTech Connect

    Applegate, M. J.; Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE; Thomas, O.

    2015-08-17

    We present an efficient and robust quantum random number generator based upon high-rate room temperature photon number detection. We employ an electric field-modulated silicon avalanche photodiode, a type of device particularly suited to high-rate photon number detection with excellent photon number resolution to detect, without an applied dead-time, up to 4 photons from the optical pulses emitted by a laser. By both measuring and modeling the response of the detector to the incident photons, we are able to determine the illumination conditions that achieve an optimal bit rate that we show is robust against variation in the photon flux. Wemore » extract random bits from the detected photon numbers with an efficiency of 99% corresponding to 1.97 bits per detected photon number yielding a bit rate of 143 Mbit/s, and verify that the extracted bits pass stringent statistical tests for randomness. Our scheme is highly scalable and has the potential of multi-Gbit/s bit rates.« less

  18. Using Computer-Generated Random Numbers to Calculate the Lifetime of a Comet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danesh, Iraj

    1991-01-01

    An educational technique to calculate the lifetime of a comet using software-generated random numbers is introduced to undergraduate physiques and astronomy students. Discussed are the generation and eligibility of the required random numbers, background literature related to the problem, and the solution to the problem using random numbers.…

  19. Anosov C-systems and random number generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savvidy, G. K.

    2016-08-01

    We further develop our previous proposal to use hyperbolic Anosov C-systems to generate pseudorandom numbers and to use them for efficient Monte Carlo calculations in high energy particle physics. All trajectories of hyperbolic dynamical systems are exponentially unstable, and C-systems therefore have mixing of all orders, a countable Lebesgue spectrum, and a positive Kolmogorov entropy. These exceptional ergodic properties follow from the C-condition introduced by Anosov. This condition defines a rich class of dynamical systems forming an open set in the space of all dynamical systems. An important property of C-systems is that they have a countable set of everywhere dense periodic trajectories and their density increases exponentially with entropy. Of special interest are the C-systems defined on higher-dimensional tori. Such C-systems are excellent candidates for generating pseudorandom numbers that can be used in Monte Carlo calculations. An efficient algorithm was recently constructed that allows generating long C-system trajectories very rapidly. These trajectories have good statistical properties and can be used for calculations in quantum chromodynamics and in high energy particle physics.

  20. Real-time fast physical random number generator with a photonic integrated circuit.

    PubMed

    Ugajin, Kazusa; Terashima, Yuta; Iwakawa, Kento; Uchida, Atsushi; Harayama, Takahisa; Yoshimura, Kazuyuki; Inubushi, Masanobu

    2017-03-20

    Random number generators are essential for applications in information security and numerical simulations. Most optical-chaos-based random number generators produce random bit sequences by offline post-processing with large optical components. We demonstrate a real-time hardware implementation of a fast physical random number generator with a photonic integrated circuit and a field programmable gate array (FPGA) electronic board. We generate 1-Tbit random bit sequences and evaluate their statistical randomness using NIST Special Publication 800-22 and TestU01. All of the BigCrush tests in TestU01 are passed using 410-Gbit random bit sequences. A maximum real-time generation rate of 21.1 Gb/s is achieved for random bit sequences in binary format stored in a computer, which can be directly used for applications involving secret keys in cryptography and random seeds in large-scale numerical simulations.

  1. A generator for unique quantum random numbers based on vacuum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Christian; Wittmann, Christoffer; Sych, Denis; Dong, Ruifang; Mauerer, Wolfgang; Andersen, Ulrik L.; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2010-10-01

    Random numbers are a valuable component in diverse applications that range from simulations over gambling to cryptography. The quest for true randomness in these applications has engendered a large variety of different proposals for producing random numbers based on the foundational unpredictability of quantum mechanics. However, most approaches do not consider that a potential adversary could have knowledge about the generated numbers, so the numbers are not verifiably random and unique. Here we present a simple experimental setup based on homodyne measurements that uses the purity of a continuous-variable quantum vacuum state to generate unique random numbers. We use the intrinsic randomness in measuring the quadratures of a mode in the lowest energy vacuum state, which cannot be correlated to any other state. The simplicity of our source, combined with its verifiably unique randomness, are important attributes for achieving high-reliability, high-speed and low-cost quantum random number generators.

  2. Low-Energy Truly Random Number Generation with Superparamagnetic Tunnel Junctions for Unconventional Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodenicarevic, D.; Locatelli, N.; Mizrahi, A.; Friedman, J. S.; Vincent, A. F.; Romera, M.; Fukushima, A.; Yakushiji, K.; Kubota, H.; Yuasa, S.; Tiwari, S.; Grollier, J.; Querlioz, D.

    2017-11-01

    Low-energy random number generation is critical for many emerging computing schemes proposed to complement or replace von Neumann architectures. However, current random number generators are always associated with an energy cost that is prohibitive for these computing schemes. We introduce random number bit generation based on specific nanodevices: superparamagnetic tunnel junctions. We experimentally demonstrate high-quality random bit generation that represents an orders-of-magnitude improvement in energy efficiency over current solutions. We show that the random generation speed improves with nanodevice scaling, and we investigate the impact of temperature, magnetic field, and cross talk. Finally, we show how alternative computing schemes can be implemented using superparamagentic tunnel junctions as random number generators. These results open the way for fabricating efficient hardware computing devices leveraging stochasticity, and they highlight an alternative use for emerging nanodevices.

  3. Generating Random Numbers by Means of Nonlinear Dynamic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zang, Jiaqi; Hu, Haojie; Zhong, Juhua; Luo, Duanbin; Fang, Yi

    2018-01-01

    To introduce the randomness of a physical process to students, a chaotic pendulum experiment was opened in East China University of Science and Technology (ECUST) on the undergraduate level in the physics department. It was shown chaotic motion could be initiated through adjusting the operation of a chaotic pendulum. By using the data of the…

  4. Novel pseudo-random number generator based on quantum random walks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Zhao, Qian-Qian

    2016-02-04

    In this paper, we investigate the potential application of quantum computation for constructing pseudo-random number generators (PRNGs) and further construct a novel PRNG based on quantum random walks (QRWs), a famous quantum computation model. The PRNG merely relies on the equations used in the QRWs, and thus the generation algorithm is simple and the computation speed is fast. The proposed PRNG is subjected to statistical tests such as NIST and successfully passed the test. Compared with the representative PRNG based on quantum chaotic maps (QCM), the present QRWs-based PRNG has some advantages such as better statistical complexity and recurrence. For example, the normalized Shannon entropy and the statistical complexity of the QRWs-based PRNG are 0.999699456771172 and 1.799961178212329e-04 respectively given the number of 8 bits-words, say, 16Mbits. By contrast, the corresponding values of the QCM-based PRNG are 0.999448131481064 and 3.701210794388818e-04 respectively. Thus the statistical complexity and the normalized entropy of the QRWs-based PRNG are closer to 0 and 1 respectively than those of the QCM-based PRNG when the number of words of the analyzed sequence increases. It provides a new clue to construct PRNGs and also extends the applications of quantum computation.

  5. Novel pseudo-random number generator based on quantum random walks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Zhao, Qian-Qian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the potential application of quantum computation for constructing pseudo-random number generators (PRNGs) and further construct a novel PRNG based on quantum random walks (QRWs), a famous quantum computation model. The PRNG merely relies on the equations used in the QRWs, and thus the generation algorithm is simple and the computation speed is fast. The proposed PRNG is subjected to statistical tests such as NIST and successfully passed the test. Compared with the representative PRNG based on quantum chaotic maps (QCM), the present QRWs-based PRNG has some advantages such as better statistical complexity and recurrence. For example, the normalized Shannon entropy and the statistical complexity of the QRWs-based PRNG are 0.999699456771172 and 1.799961178212329e-04 respectively given the number of 8 bits-words, say, 16Mbits. By contrast, the corresponding values of the QCM-based PRNG are 0.999448131481064 and 3.701210794388818e-04 respectively. Thus the statistical complexity and the normalized entropy of the QRWs-based PRNG are closer to 0 and 1 respectively than those of the QCM-based PRNG when the number of words of the analyzed sequence increases. It provides a new clue to construct PRNGs and also extends the applications of quantum computation. PMID:26842402

  6. Problems with the random number generator RANF implemented on the CDC cyber 205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalle, Claus; Wansleben, Stephan

    1984-10-01

    We show that using RANF may lead to wrong results when lattice models are simulated by Monte Carlo methods. We present a shift-register sequence random number generator which generates two random numbers per cycle on a two pipe CDC Cyber 205.

  7. Doing better by getting worse: posthypnotic amnesia improves random number generation.

    PubMed

    Terhune, Devin Blair; Brugger, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Although forgetting is often regarded as a deficit that we need to control to optimize cognitive functioning, it can have beneficial effects in a number of contexts. We examined whether disrupting memory for previous numerical responses would attenuate repetition avoidance (the tendency to avoid repeating the same number) during random number generation and thereby improve the randomness of responses. Low suggestible and low dissociative and high dissociative highly suggestible individuals completed a random number generation task in a control condition, following a posthypnotic amnesia suggestion to forget previous numerical responses, and in a second control condition following the cancellation of the suggestion. High dissociative highly suggestible participants displayed a selective increase in repetitions during posthypnotic amnesia, with equivalent repetition frequency to a random system, whereas the other two groups exhibited repetition avoidance across conditions. Our results demonstrate that temporarily disrupting memory for previous numerical responses improves random number generation.

  8. Doing Better by Getting Worse: Posthypnotic Amnesia Improves Random Number Generation

    PubMed Central

    Terhune, Devin Blair; Brugger, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Although forgetting is often regarded as a deficit that we need to control to optimize cognitive functioning, it can have beneficial effects in a number of contexts. We examined whether disrupting memory for previous numerical responses would attenuate repetition avoidance (the tendency to avoid repeating the same number) during random number generation and thereby improve the randomness of responses. Low suggestible and low dissociative and high dissociative highly suggestible individuals completed a random number generation task in a control condition, following a posthypnotic amnesia suggestion to forget previous numerical responses, and in a second control condition following the cancellation of the suggestion. High dissociative highly suggestible participants displayed a selective increase in repetitions during posthypnotic amnesia, with equivalent repetition frequency to a random system, whereas the other two groups exhibited repetition avoidance across conditions. Our results demonstrate that temporarily disrupting memory for previous numerical responses improves random number generation. PMID:22195022

  9. On the limiting characteristics of quantum random number generators at various clusterings of photocounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2017-03-01

    Various methods for the clustering of photocounts constituting a sequence of random numbers are considered. It is shown that the clustering of photocounts resulting in the Fermi-Dirac distribution makes it possible to achieve the theoretical limit of the random number generation rate.

  10. Self-balanced real-time photonic scheme for ultrafast random number generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pu; Guo, Ya; Guo, Yanqiang; Fan, Yuanlong; Guo, Xiaomin; Liu, Xianglian; Shore, K. Alan; Dubrova, Elena; Xu, Bingjie; Wang, Yuncai; Wang, Anbang

    2018-06-01

    We propose a real-time self-balanced photonic method for extracting ultrafast random numbers from broadband randomness sources. In place of electronic analog-to-digital converters (ADCs), the balanced photo-detection technology is used to directly quantize optically sampled chaotic pulses into a continuous random number stream. Benefitting from ultrafast photo-detection, our method can efficiently eliminate the generation rate bottleneck from electronic ADCs which are required in nearly all the available fast physical random number generators. A proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates that using our approach 10 Gb/s real-time and statistically unbiased random numbers are successfully extracted from a bandwidth-enhanced chaotic source. The generation rate achieved experimentally here is being limited by the bandwidth of the chaotic source. The method described has the potential to attain a real-time rate of 100 Gb/s.

  11. High-speed true random number generation based on paired memristors for security electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Teng; Yin, Minghui; Xu, Changmin; Lu, Xiayan; Sun, Xinhao; Yang, Yuchao; Huang, Ru

    2017-11-01

    True random number generator (TRNG) is a critical component in hardware security that is increasingly important in the era of mobile computing and internet of things. Here we demonstrate a TRNG using intrinsic variation of memristors as a natural source of entropy that is otherwise undesirable in most applications. The random bits were produced by cyclically switching a pair of tantalum oxide based memristors and comparing their resistance values in the off state, taking advantage of the more pronounced resistance variation compared with that in the on state. Using an alternating read scheme in the designed TRNG circuit, the unbiasedness of the random numbers was significantly improved, and the bitstream passed standard randomness tests. The Pt/TaO x /Ta memristors fabricated in this work have fast programming/erasing speeds of ˜30 ns, suggesting a high random number throughput. The approach proposed here thus holds great promise for physically-implemented random number generation.

  12. High-speed true random number generation based on paired memristors for security electronics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Teng; Yin, Minghui; Xu, Changmin; Lu, Xiayan; Sun, Xinhao; Yang, Yuchao; Huang, Ru

    2017-11-10

    True random number generator (TRNG) is a critical component in hardware security that is increasingly important in the era of mobile computing and internet of things. Here we demonstrate a TRNG using intrinsic variation of memristors as a natural source of entropy that is otherwise undesirable in most applications. The random bits were produced by cyclically switching a pair of tantalum oxide based memristors and comparing their resistance values in the off state, taking advantage of the more pronounced resistance variation compared with that in the on state. Using an alternating read scheme in the designed TRNG circuit, the unbiasedness of the random numbers was significantly improved, and the bitstream passed standard randomness tests. The Pt/TaO x /Ta memristors fabricated in this work have fast programming/erasing speeds of ∼30 ns, suggesting a high random number throughput. The approach proposed here thus holds great promise for physically-implemented random number generation.

  13. Recommendations and illustrations for the evaluation of photonic random number generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Joseph D.; Terashima, Yuta; Uchida, Atsushi; Baumgartner, Gerald B.; Murphy, Thomas E.; Roy, Rajarshi

    2017-09-01

    The never-ending quest to improve the security of digital information combined with recent improvements in hardware technology has caused the field of random number generation to undergo a fundamental shift from relying solely on pseudo-random algorithms to employing optical entropy sources. Despite these significant advances on the hardware side, commonly used statistical measures and evaluation practices remain ill-suited to understand or quantify the optical entropy that underlies physical random number generation. We review the state of the art in the evaluation of optical random number generation and recommend a new paradigm: quantifying entropy generation and understanding the physical limits of the optical sources of randomness. In order to do this, we advocate for the separation of the physical entropy source from deterministic post-processing in the evaluation of random number generators and for the explicit consideration of the impact of the measurement and digitization process on the rate of entropy production. We present the Cohen-Procaccia estimate of the entropy rate h (𝜖 ,τ ) as one way to do this. In order to provide an illustration of our recommendations, we apply the Cohen-Procaccia estimate as well as the entropy estimates from the new NIST draft standards for physical random number generators to evaluate and compare three common optical entropy sources: single photon time-of-arrival detection, chaotic lasers, and amplified spontaneous emission.

  14. A Comparison of Three Random Number Generators for Aircraft Dynamic Modeling Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.

    2017-01-01

    Three random number generators, which produce Gaussian white noise sequences, were compared to assess their suitability in aircraft dynamic modeling applications. The first generator considered was the MATLAB (registered) implementation of the Mersenne-Twister algorithm. The second generator was a website called Random.org, which processes atmospheric noise measured using radios to create the random numbers. The third generator was based on synthesis of the Fourier series, where the random number sequences are constructed from prescribed amplitude and phase spectra. A total of 200 sequences, each having 601 random numbers, for each generator were collected and analyzed in terms of the mean, variance, normality, autocorrelation, and power spectral density. These sequences were then applied to two problems in aircraft dynamic modeling, namely estimating stability and control derivatives from simulated onboard sensor data, and simulating flight in atmospheric turbulence. In general, each random number generator had good performance and is well-suited for aircraft dynamic modeling applications. Specific strengths and weaknesses of each generator are discussed. For Monte Carlo simulation, the Fourier synthesis method is recommended because it most accurately and consistently approximated Gaussian white noise and can be implemented with reasonable computational effort.

  15. Implementation of a quantum random number generator based on the optimal clustering of photocounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balygin, K. A.; Zaitsev, V. I.; Klimov, A. N.; Kulik, S. P.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2017-10-01

    To implement quantum random number generators, it is fundamentally important to have a mathematically provable and experimentally testable process of measurements of a system from which an initial random sequence is generated. This makes sure that randomness indeed has a quantum nature. A quantum random number generator has been implemented with the use of the detection of quasi-single-photon radiation by a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) matrix, which makes it possible to reliably reach the Poisson statistics of photocounts. The choice and use of the optimal clustering of photocounts for the initial sequence of photodetection events and a method of extraction of a random sequence of 0's and 1's, which is polynomial in the length of the sequence, have made it possible to reach a yield rate of 64 Mbit/s of the output certainly random sequence.

  16. Not all numbers are equal: preferences and biases among children and adults when generating random sequences.

    PubMed

    Towse, John N; Loetscher, Tobias; Brugger, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the number preferences of children and adults when generating random digit sequences. Previous research has shown convincingly that adults prefer smaller numbers when randomly choosing between responses 1-6. We analyze randomization choices made by both children and adults, considering a range of experimental studies and task configurations. Children - most of whom are between 8 and 11~years - show a preference for relatively large numbers when choosing numbers 1-10. Adults show a preference for small numbers with the same response set. We report a modest association between children's age and numerical bias. However, children also exhibit a small number bias with a smaller response set available, and they show a preference specifically for the numbers 1-3 across many datasets. We argue that number space demonstrates both continuities (numbers 1-3 have a distinct status) and change (a developmentally emerging bias toward the left side of representational space or lower numbers).

  17. Compact Quantum Random Number Generator with Silicon Nanocrystals Light Emitting Device Coupled to a Silicon Photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisadi, Zahra; Acerbi, Fabio; Fontana, Giorgio; Zorzi, Nicola; Piemonte, Claudio; Pucker, Georg; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2018-02-01

    A small-sized photonic quantum random number generator, easy to be implemented in small electronic devices for secure data encryption and other applications, is highly demanding nowadays. Here, we propose a compact configuration with Silicon nanocrystals large area light emitting device (LED) coupled to a Silicon photomultiplier to generate random numbers. The random number generation methodology is based on the photon arrival time and is robust against the non-idealities of the detector and the source of quantum entropy. The raw data show high quality of randomness and pass all the statistical tests in national institute of standards and technology tests (NIST) suite without a post-processing algorithm. The highest bit rate is 0.5 Mbps with the efficiency of 4 bits per detected photon.

  18. Note: Fully integrated 3.2 Gbps quantum random number generator with real-time extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao-Guang; Nie, You-Qi; Liang, Hao

    2016-07-15

    We present a real-time and fully integrated quantum random number generator (QRNG) by measuring laser phase fluctuations. The QRNG scheme based on laser phase fluctuations is featured for its capability of generating ultra-high-speed random numbers. However, the speed bottleneck of a practical QRNG lies on the limited speed of randomness extraction. To close the gap between the fast randomness generation and the slow post-processing, we propose a pipeline extraction algorithm based on Toeplitz matrix hashing and implement it in a high-speed field-programmable gate array. Further, all the QRNG components are integrated into a module, including a compact and actively stabilizedmore » interferometer, high-speed data acquisition, and real-time data post-processing and transmission. The final generation rate of the QRNG module with real-time extraction can reach 3.2 Gbps.« less

  19. Scope of Various Random Number Generators in Ant System Approach for TSP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S. K.; Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    Experimented on heuristic, based on an ant system approach for traveling Salesman problem, are several quasi and pseudo-random number generators. This experiment is to explore if any particular generator is most desirable. Such an experiment on large samples has the potential to rank the performance of the generators for the foregoing heuristic. This is just to seek an answer to the controversial performance ranking of the generators in probabilistic/statically sense.

  20. Random Number Generation and Executive Functions in Parkinson's Disease: An Event-Related Brain Potential Study.

    PubMed

    Münte, Thomas F; Joppich, Gregor; Däuper, Jan; Schrader, Christoph; Dengler, Reinhard; Heldmann, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    The generation of random sequences is considered to tax executive functions and has been reported to be impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD) previously. To assess the neurophysiological markers of random number generation in PD. Event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded in 12 PD patients and 12 age-matched normal controls (NC) while either engaging in random number generation (RNG) by pressing the number keys on a computer keyboard in a random sequence or in ordered number generation (ONG) necessitating key presses in the canonical order. Key presses were paced by an external auditory stimulus at a rate of 1 tone every 1800 ms. As a secondary task subjects had to monitor the tone-sequence for a particular target tone to which the number "0" key had to be pressed. This target tone occurred randomly and infrequently, thus creating a secondary oddball task. Behaviorally, PD patients showed an increased tendency to count in steps of one as well as a tendency towards repetition avoidance. Electrophysiologically, the amplitude of the P3 component of the ERP to the target tone of the secondary task was reduced during RNG in PD but not in NC. The behavioral findings indicate less random behavior in PD while the ERP findings suggest that this impairment comes about, because attentional resources are depleted in PD.

  1. Fast physical-random number generation using laser diode's frequency noise: influence of frequency discriminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kouhei; Kasuya, Yuki; Yumoto, Mitsuki; Arai, Hideaki; Sato, Takashi; Sakamoto, Shuichi; Ohkawa, Masashi; Ohdaira, Yasuo

    2018-02-01

    Not so long ago, pseudo random numbers generated by numerical formulae were considered to be adequate for encrypting important data-files, because of the time needed to decode them. With today's ultra high-speed processors, however, this is no longer true. So, in order to thwart ever-more advanced attempts to breach our system's protections, cryptologists have devised a method that is considered to be virtually impossible to decode, and uses what is a limitless number of physical random numbers. This research describes a method, whereby laser diode's frequency noise generate a large quantities of physical random numbers. Using two types of photo detectors (APD and PIN-PD), we tested the abilities of two types of lasers (FP-LD and VCSEL) to generate random numbers. In all instances, an etalon served as frequency discriminator, the examination pass rates were determined using NIST FIPS140-2 test at each bit, and the Random Number Generation (RNG) speed was noted.

  2. 25 CFR 547.14 - What are the minimum technical standards for electronic random number generation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... CLASS II GAMES § 547.14 What are the minimum technical standards for electronic random number generation... rules of the game. For example, if a bingo game with 75 objects with numbers or other designations has a... serial correlation (outcomes shall be independent from the previous game); and (x) Test on subsequences...

  3. 25 CFR 547.14 - What are the minimum technical standards for electronic random number generation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... CLASS II GAMES § 547.14 What are the minimum technical standards for electronic random number generation... rules of the game. For example, if a bingo game with 75 objects with numbers or other designations has a... serial correlation (outcomes shall be independent from the previous game); and (x) Test on subsequences...

  4. 25 CFR 547.14 - What are the minimum technical standards for electronic random number generation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CLASS II GAMES § 547.14 What are the minimum technical standards for electronic random number generation... rules of the game. For example, if a bingo game with 75 objects with numbers or other designations has a... serial correlation (outcomes shall be independent from the previous game); and (x) Test on subsequences...

  5. Practical quantum random number generator based on measuring the shot noise of vacuum states

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yong; Zou Hongxin; Tian Liang

    2010-06-15

    The shot noise of vacuum states is a kind of quantum noise and is totally random. In this paper a nondeterministic random number generation scheme based on measuring the shot noise of vacuum states is presented and experimentally demonstrated. We use a homodyne detector to measure the shot noise of vacuum states. Considering that the frequency bandwidth of our detector is limited, we derive the optimal sampling rate so that sampling points have the least correlation with each other. We also choose a method to extract random numbers from sampling values, and prove that the influence of classical noise canmore » be avoided with this method so that the detector does not have to be shot-noise limited. The random numbers generated with this scheme have passed ent and diehard tests.« less

  6. Quantum random number generator based on quantum nature of vacuum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, A. E.; Chivilikhin, S. A.; Gleim, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    Quantum random number generator (QRNG) allows obtaining true random bit sequences. In QRNG based on quantum nature of vacuum, optical beam splitter with two inputs and two outputs is normally used. We compare mathematical descriptions of spatial beam splitter and fiber Y-splitter in the quantum model for QRNG, based on homodyne detection. These descriptions were identical, that allows to use fiber Y-splitters in practical QRNG schemes, simplifying the setup. Also we receive relations between the input radiation and the resulting differential current in homodyne detector. We experimentally demonstrate possibility of true random bits generation by using QRNG based on homodyne detection with Y-splitter.

  7. Direct generation of all-optical random numbers from optical pulse amplitude chaos.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Wang, Yun-Cai; Wang, An-Bang; Yang, Ling-Zhen; Zhang, Ming-Jiang; Zhang, Jian-Zhong

    2012-02-13

    We propose and theoretically demonstrate an all-optical method for directly generating all-optical random numbers from pulse amplitude chaos produced by a mode-locked fiber ring laser. Under an appropriate pump intensity, the mode-locked laser can experience a quasi-periodic route to chaos. Such a chaos consists of a stream of pulses with a fixed repetition frequency but random intensities. In this method, we do not require sampling procedure and external triggered clocks but directly quantize the chaotic pulses stream into random number sequence via an all-optical flip-flop. Moreover, our simulation results show that the pulse amplitude chaos has no periodicity and possesses a highly symmetric distribution of amplitude. Thus, in theory, the obtained random number sequence without post-processing has a high-quality randomness verified by industry-standard statistical tests.

  8. An efficient algorithm for generating random number pairs drawn from a bivariate normal distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. W.

    1983-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for generating random number pairs from a bivariate normal distribution was developed. Any desired value of the two means, two standard deviations, and correlation coefficient can be selected. Theoretically the technique is exact and in practice its accuracy is limited only by the quality of the uniform distribution random number generator, inaccuracies in computer function evaluation, and arithmetic. A FORTRAN routine was written to check the algorithm and good accuracy was obtained. Some small errors in the correlation coefficient were observed to vary in a surprisingly regular manner. A simple model was developed which explained the qualities aspects of the errors.

  9. A revision of the subtract-with-borrow random number generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibidanov, Alexei

    2017-12-01

    The most popular and widely used subtract-with-borrow generator, also known as RANLUX, is reimplemented as a linear congruential generator using large integer arithmetic with the modulus size of 576 bits. Modern computers, as well as the specific structure of the modulus inferred from RANLUX, allow for the development of a fast modular multiplication - the core of the procedure. This was previously believed to be slow and have too high cost in terms of computing resources. Our tests show a significant gain in generation speed which is comparable with other fast, high quality random number generators. An additional feature is the fast skipping of generator states leading to a seeding scheme which guarantees the uniqueness of random number sequences. Licensing provisions: GPLv3 Programming language: C++, C, Assembler

  10. Megahertz-Rate Semi-Device-Independent Quantum Random Number Generators Based on Unambiguous State Discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brask, Jonatan Bohr; Martin, Anthony; Esposito, William; Houlmann, Raphael; Bowles, Joseph; Zbinden, Hugo; Brunner, Nicolas

    2017-05-01

    An approach to quantum random number generation based on unambiguous quantum state discrimination is developed. We consider a prepare-and-measure protocol, where two nonorthogonal quantum states can be prepared, and a measurement device aims at unambiguously discriminating between them. Because the states are nonorthogonal, this necessarily leads to a minimal rate of inconclusive events whose occurrence must be genuinely random and which provide the randomness source that we exploit. Our protocol is semi-device-independent in the sense that the output entropy can be lower bounded based on experimental data and a few general assumptions about the setup alone. It is also practically relevant, which we demonstrate by realizing a simple optical implementation, achieving rates of 16.5 Mbits /s . Combining ease of implementation, a high rate, and a real-time entropy estimation, our protocol represents a promising approach intermediate between fully device-independent protocols and commercial quantum random number generators.

  11. High-Speed Device-Independent Quantum Random Number Generation without a Detection Loophole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Yuan, Xiao; Li, Ming-Han; Zhang, Weijun; Zhao, Qi; Zhong, Jiaqiang; Cao, Yuan; Li, Yu-Huai; Chen, Luo-Kan; Li, Hao; Peng, Tianyi; Chen, Yu-Ao; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Shi, Sheng-Cai; Wang, Zhen; You, Lixing; Ma, Xiongfeng; Fan, Jingyun; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2018-01-01

    Quantum mechanics provides the means of generating genuine randomness that is impossible with deterministic classical processes. Remarkably, the unpredictability of randomness can be certified in a manner that is independent of implementation devices. Here, we present an experimental study of device-independent quantum random number generation based on a detection-loophole-free Bell test with entangled photons. In the randomness analysis, without the independent identical distribution assumption, we consider the worst case scenario that the adversary launches the most powerful attacks against the quantum adversary. After considering statistical fluctuations and applying an 80 Gb ×45.6 Mb Toeplitz matrix hashing, we achieve a final random bit rate of 114 bits /s , with a failure probability less than 10-5. This marks a critical step towards realistic applications in cryptography and fundamental physics tests.

  12. High-Speed Device-Independent Quantum Random Number Generation without a Detection Loophole.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Yuan, Xiao; Li, Ming-Han; Zhang, Weijun; Zhao, Qi; Zhong, Jiaqiang; Cao, Yuan; Li, Yu-Huai; Chen, Luo-Kan; Li, Hao; Peng, Tianyi; Chen, Yu-Ao; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Shi, Sheng-Cai; Wang, Zhen; You, Lixing; Ma, Xiongfeng; Fan, Jingyun; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2018-01-05

    Quantum mechanics provides the means of generating genuine randomness that is impossible with deterministic classical processes. Remarkably, the unpredictability of randomness can be certified in a manner that is independent of implementation devices. Here, we present an experimental study of device-independent quantum random number generation based on a detection-loophole-free Bell test with entangled photons. In the randomness analysis, without the independent identical distribution assumption, we consider the worst case scenario that the adversary launches the most powerful attacks against the quantum adversary. After considering statistical fluctuations and applying an 80  Gb×45.6  Mb Toeplitz matrix hashing, we achieve a final random bit rate of 114  bits/s, with a failure probability less than 10^{-5}. This marks a critical step towards realistic applications in cryptography and fundamental physics tests.

  13. On the design of henon and logistic map-based random number generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magfirawaty; Suryadi, M. T.; Ramli, Kalamullah

    2017-10-01

    The key sequence is one of the main elements in the cryptosystem. True Random Number Generators (TRNG) method is one of the approaches to generating the key sequence. The randomness source of the TRNG divided into three main groups, i.e. electrical noise based, jitter based and chaos based. The chaos based utilizes a non-linear dynamic system (continuous time or discrete time) as an entropy source. In this study, a new design of TRNG based on discrete time chaotic system is proposed, which is then simulated in LabVIEW. The principle of the design consists of combining 2D and 1D chaotic systems. A mathematical model is implemented for numerical simulations. We used comparator process as a harvester method to obtain the series of random bits. Without any post processing, the proposed design generated random bit sequence with high entropy value and passed all NIST 800.22 statistical tests.

  14. 640-Gbit/s fast physical random number generation using a broadband chaotic semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Limeng; Pan, Biwei; Chen, Guangcan; Guo, Lu; Lu, Dan; Zhao, Lingjuan; Wang, Wei

    2017-04-01

    An ultra-fast physical random number generator is demonstrated utilizing a photonic integrated device based broadband chaotic source with a simple post data processing method. The compact chaotic source is implemented by using a monolithic integrated dual-mode amplified feedback laser (AFL) with self-injection, where a robust chaotic signal with RF frequency coverage of above 50 GHz and flatness of ±3.6 dB is generated. By using 4-least significant bits (LSBs) retaining from the 8-bit digitization of the chaotic waveform, random sequences with a bit-rate up to 640 Gbit/s (160 GS/s × 4 bits) are realized. The generated random bits have passed each of the fifteen NIST statistics tests (NIST SP800-22), indicating its randomness for practical applications.

  15. Toward DNA-based Security Circuitry: First Step - Random Number Generation.

    PubMed

    Bogard, Christy M; Arazi, Benjamin; Rouchka, Eric C

    2008-08-10

    DNA-based circuit design is an area of research in which traditional silicon-based technologies are replaced by naturally occurring phenomena taken from biochemistry and molecular biology. Our team investigates the implications of DNA-based circuit design in serving security applications. As an initial step we develop a random number generation circuitry. A novel prototype schema employs solid-phase synthesis of oligonucleotides for random construction of DNA sequences. Temporary storage and retrieval is achieved through plasmid vectors.

  16. Experimentally Generated Random Numbers Certified by the Impossibility of Superluminal Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierhorst, Peter; Shalm, Lynden K.; Mink, Alan; Jordan, Stephen; Liu, Yi-Kai; Rommal, Andrea; Glancy, Scott; Christensen, Bradley; Nam, Sae Woo; Knill, Emanuel

    Random numbers are an important resource for applications such as numerical simulation and secure communication. However, it is difficult to certify whether a physical random number generator is truly unpredictable. Here, we exploit the phenomenon of quantum nonlocality in a loophole-free photonic Bell test experiment to obtain data containing randomness that cannot be predicted by any theory that does not also allow the sending of signals faster than the speed of light. To certify and quantify the randomness, we develop a new protocol that performs well in an experimental regime characterized by low violation of Bell inequalities. Applying an extractor function to our data, we obtain 256 new random bits, uniform to within 10- 3 .

  17. Scope of Various Random Number Generators in ant System Approach for TSP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S. K.; Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    Experimented on heuristic, based on an ant system approach for traveling salesman problem, are several quasi- and pseudo-random number generators. This experiment is to explore if any particular generator is most desirable. Such an experiment on large samples has the potential to rank the performance of the generators for the foregoing heuristic. This is mainly to seek an answer to the controversial issue "which generator is the best in terms of quality of the result (accuracy) as well as cost of producing the result (time/computational complexity) in a probabilistic/statistical sense."

  18. Compact quantum random number generator based on superluminescent light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shihai; Yang, Jie; Fan, Fan; Huang, Wei; Li, Dashuang; Xu, Bingjie

    2017-12-01

    By measuring the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise of the superluminescent light emitting diodes, we propose and realize a quantum random number generator (QRNG) featured with practicability. In the QRNG, after the detection and amplification of the ASE noise, the data acquisition and randomness extraction which is integrated in a field programmable gate array (FPGA) are both implemented in real-time, and the final random bit sequences are delivered to a host computer with a real-time generation rate of 1.2 Gbps. Further, to achieve compactness, all the components of the QRNG are integrated on three independent printed circuit boards with a compact design, and the QRNG is packed in a small enclosure sized 140 mm × 120 mm × 25 mm. The final random bit sequences can pass all the NIST-STS and DIEHARD tests.

  19. Minimalist design of a robust real-time quantum random number generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, K. S.; Radchenko, I. V.; Kulik, S. P.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2015-08-01

    We present a simple and robust construction of a real-time quantum random number generator (QRNG). Our minimalist approach ensures stable operation of the device as well as its simple and straightforward hardware implementation as a stand-alone module. As a source of randomness the device uses measurements of time intervals between clicks of a single-photon detector. The obtained raw sequence is then filtered and processed by a deterministic randomness extractor, which is realized as a look-up table. This enables high speed on-the-fly processing without the need of extensive computations. The overall performance of the device is around 1 random bit per detector click, resulting in 1.2 Mbit/s generation rate in our implementation.

  20. Experimental study of a quantum random-number generator based on two independent lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shi-Hai; Xu, Feihu

    2017-12-01

    A quantum random-number generator (QRNG) can produce true randomness by utilizing the inherent probabilistic nature of quantum mechanics. Recently, the spontaneous-emission quantum phase noise of the laser has been widely deployed for quantum random-number generation, due to its high rate, its low cost, and the feasibility of chip-scale integration. Here, we perform a comprehensive experimental study of a phase-noise-based QRNG with two independent lasers, each of which operates in either continuous-wave (CW) or pulsed mode. We implement the QRNG by operating the two lasers in three configurations, namely, CW + CW, CW + pulsed, and pulsed + pulsed, and demonstrate their trade-offs, strengths, and weaknesses.

  1. Digital-Analog Hybrid Scheme and Its Application to Chaotic Random Number Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zeshi; Li, Hongtao; Miao, Yunchi; Hu, Wen; Zhu, Xiaohua

    2017-12-01

    Practical random number generation (RNG) circuits are typically achieved with analog devices or digital approaches. Digital-based techniques, which use field programmable gate array (FPGA) and graphics processing units (GPU) etc. usually have better performances than analog methods as they are programmable, efficient and robust. However, digital realizations suffer from the effect of finite precision. Accordingly, the generated random numbers (RNs) are actually periodic instead of being real random. To tackle this limitation, in this paper we propose a novel digital-analog hybrid scheme that employs the digital unit as the main body, and minimum analog devices to generate physical RNs. Moreover, the possibility of realizing the proposed scheme with only one memory element is discussed. Without loss of generality, we use the capacitor and the memristor along with FPGA to construct the proposed hybrid system, and a chaotic true random number generator (TRNG) circuit is realized, producing physical RNs at a throughput of Gbit/s scale. These RNs successfully pass all the tests in the NIST SP800-22 package, confirming the significance of the scheme in practical applications. In addition, the use of this new scheme is not restricted to RNGs, and it also provides a strategy to solve the effect of finite precision in other digital systems.

  2. FPGA and USB based control board for quantum random number generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Wan, Xu; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Gao, Yuan; Chen, Teng-Yun; Liang, Hao

    2009-09-01

    The design and implementation of FPGA-and-USB-based control board for quantum experiments are discussed. The usage of quantum true random number generator, control- logic in FPGA and communication with computer through USB protocol are proposed in this paper. Programmable controlled signal input and output ports are implemented. The error-detections of data frame header and frame length are designed. This board has been used in our decoy-state based quantum key distribution (QKD) system successfully.

  3. Leveraging Random Number Generation for Mastery of Learning in Teaching Quantitative Research Courses via an E-Learning Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boonsathorn, Wasita; Charoen, Danuvasin; Dryver, Arthur L.

    2014-01-01

    E-Learning brings access to a powerful but often overlooked teaching tool: random number generation. Using random number generation, a practically infinite number of quantitative problem-solution sets can be created. In addition, within the e-learning context, in the spirit of the mastery of learning, it is possible to assign online quantitative…

  4. An On-Demand Optical Quantum Random Number Generator with In-Future Action and Ultra-Fast Response

    PubMed Central

    Stipčević, Mario; Ursin, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Random numbers are essential for our modern information based society e.g. in cryptography. Unlike frequently used pseudo-random generators, physical random number generators do not depend on complex algorithms but rather on a physicsal process to provide true randomness. Quantum random number generators (QRNG) do rely on a process, wich can be described by a probabilistic theory only, even in principle. Here we present a conceptualy simple implementation, which offers a 100% efficiency of producing a random bit upon a request and simultaneously exhibits an ultra low latency. A careful technical and statistical analysis demonstrates its robustness against imperfections of the actual implemented technology and enables to quickly estimate randomness of very long sequences. Generated random numbers pass standard statistical tests without any post-processing. The setup described, as well as the theory presented here, demonstrate the maturity and overall understanding of the technology. PMID:26057576

  5. Chaotic oscillation and random-number generation based on nanoscale optical-energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Naruse, Makoto; Kim, Song-Ju; Aono, Masashi; Hori, Hirokazu; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2014-08-12

    By using nanoscale energy-transfer dynamics and density matrix formalism, we demonstrate theoretically and numerically that chaotic oscillation and random-number generation occur in a nanoscale system. The physical system consists of a pair of quantum dots (QDs), with one QD smaller than the other, between which energy transfers via optical near-field interactions. When the system is pumped by continuous-wave radiation and incorporates a timing delay between two energy transfers within the system, it emits optical pulses. We refer to such QD pairs as nano-optical pulsers (NOPs). Irradiating an NOP with external periodic optical pulses causes the oscillating frequency of the NOP to synchronize with the external stimulus. We find that chaotic oscillation occurs in the NOP population when they are connected by an external time delay. Moreover, by evaluating the time-domain signals by statistical-test suites, we confirm that the signals are sufficiently random to qualify the system as a random-number generator (RNG). This study reveals that even relatively simple nanodevices that interact locally with each other through optical energy transfer at scales far below the wavelength of irradiating light can exhibit complex oscillatory dynamics. These findings are significant for applications such as ultrasmall RNGs.

  6. Single-electron random-number generator (RNG) for highly secure ubiquitous computing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Ken; Tanamoto, Tetsufumi; Fujita, Shinobu

    2007-11-01

    Since the security of all modern cryptographic techniques relies on unpredictable and irreproducible digital keys generated by random-number generators (RNGs), the realization of high-quality RNG is essential for secure communications. In this report, a new RNG, which utilizes single-electron phenomena, is proposed. A room-temperature operating silicon single-electron transistor (SET) having nearby an electron pocket is used as a high-quality, ultra-small RNG. In the proposed RNG, stochastic single-electron capture/emission processes to/from the electron pocket are detected with high sensitivity by the SET, and result in giant random telegraphic signals (GRTS) on the SET current. It is experimentally demonstrated that the single-electron RNG generates extremely high-quality random digital sequences at room temperature, in spite of its simple configuration. Because of its small-size and low-power properties, the single-electron RNG is promising as a key nanoelectronic device for future ubiquitous computing systems with highly secure mobile communication capabilities.

  7. Random number generators for large-scale parallel Monte Carlo simulations on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Wang, F.; Liu, B.

    2018-05-01

    Through parallelization, field programmable gate array (FPGA) can achieve unprecedented speeds in large-scale parallel Monte Carlo (LPMC) simulations. FPGA presents both new constraints and new opportunities for the implementations of random number generators (RNGs), which are key elements of any Monte Carlo (MC) simulation system. Using empirical and application based tests, this study evaluates all of the four RNGs used in previous FPGA based MC studies and newly proposed FPGA implementations for two well-known high-quality RNGs that are suitable for LPMC studies on FPGA. One of the newly proposed FPGA implementations: a parallel version of additive lagged Fibonacci generator (Parallel ALFG) is found to be the best among the evaluated RNGs in fulfilling the needs of LPMC simulations on FPGA.

  8. Developmental Changes in the Effect of Active Left and Right Head Rotation on Random Number Generation

    PubMed Central

    Sosson, Charlotte; Georges, Carrie; Guillaume, Mathieu; Schuller, Anne-Marie; Schiltz, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Numbers are thought to be spatially organized along a left-to-right horizontal axis with small/large numbers on its left/right respectively. Behavioral evidence for this mental number line (MNL) comes from studies showing that the reallocation of spatial attention by active left/right head rotation facilitated the generation of small/large numbers respectively. While spatial biases in random number generation (RNG) during active movement are well established in adults, comparable evidence in children is lacking and it remains unclear whether and how children’s access to the MNL is affected by active head rotation. To get a better understanding of the development of embodied number processing, we investigated the effect of active head rotation on the mean of generated numbers as well as the mean difference between each number and its immediately preceding response (the first order difference; FOD) not only in adults (n = 24), but also in 7- to 11-year-old elementary school children (n = 70). Since the sign and absolute value of FODs carry distinct information regarding spatial attention shifts along the MNL, namely their direction (left/right) and size (narrow/wide) respectively, we additionally assessed the influence of rotation on the total of negative and positive FODs regardless of their numerical values as well as on their absolute values. In line with previous studies, adults produced on average smaller numbers and generated smaller mean FODs during left than right rotation. More concretely, they produced more negative/positive FODs during left/right rotation respectively and the size of negative FODs was larger (in terms of absolute value) during left than right rotation. Importantly, as opposed to adults, no significant differences in RNG between left and right head rotations were observed in children. Potential explanations for such age-related changes in the effect of active head rotation on RNG are discussed. Altogether, the present study confirms that

  9. Developmental Changes in the Effect of Active Left and Right Head Rotation on Random Number Generation.

    PubMed

    Sosson, Charlotte; Georges, Carrie; Guillaume, Mathieu; Schuller, Anne-Marie; Schiltz, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Numbers are thought to be spatially organized along a left-to-right horizontal axis with small/large numbers on its left/right respectively. Behavioral evidence for this mental number line (MNL) comes from studies showing that the reallocation of spatial attention by active left/right head rotation facilitated the generation of small/large numbers respectively. While spatial biases in random number generation (RNG) during active movement are well established in adults, comparable evidence in children is lacking and it remains unclear whether and how children's access to the MNL is affected by active head rotation. To get a better understanding of the development of embodied number processing, we investigated the effect of active head rotation on the mean of generated numbers as well as the mean difference between each number and its immediately preceding response (the first order difference; FOD) not only in adults ( n = 24), but also in 7- to 11-year-old elementary school children ( n = 70). Since the sign and absolute value of FODs carry distinct information regarding spatial attention shifts along the MNL, namely their direction (left/right) and size (narrow/wide) respectively, we additionally assessed the influence of rotation on the total of negative and positive FODs regardless of their numerical values as well as on their absolute values. In line with previous studies, adults produced on average smaller numbers and generated smaller mean FODs during left than right rotation. More concretely, they produced more negative/positive FODs during left/right rotation respectively and the size of negative FODs was larger (in terms of absolute value) during left than right rotation. Importantly, as opposed to adults, no significant differences in RNG between left and right head rotations were observed in children. Potential explanations for such age-related changes in the effect of active head rotation on RNG are discussed. Altogether, the present study confirms that

  10. PUFKEY: A High-Security and High-Throughput Hardware True Random Number Generator for Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongfang; Lu, Zhaojun; Zou, Xuecheng; Liu, Zhenglin

    2015-01-01

    Random number generators (RNG) play an important role in many sensor network systems and applications, such as those requiring secure and robust communications. In this paper, we develop a high-security and high-throughput hardware true random number generator, called PUFKEY, which consists of two kinds of physical unclonable function (PUF) elements. Combined with a conditioning algorithm, true random seeds are extracted from the noise on the start-up pattern of SRAM memories. These true random seeds contain full entropy. Then, the true random seeds are used as the input for a non-deterministic hardware RNG to generate a stream of true random bits with a throughput as high as 803 Mbps. The experimental results show that the bitstream generated by the proposed PUFKEY can pass all standard national institute of standards and technology (NIST) randomness tests and is resilient to a wide range of security attacks. PMID:26501283

  11. PUFKEY: a high-security and high-throughput hardware true random number generator for sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongfang; Lu, Zhaojun; Zou, Xuecheng; Liu, Zhenglin

    2015-10-16

    Random number generators (RNG) play an important role in many sensor network systems and applications, such as those requiring secure and robust communications. In this paper, we develop a high-security and high-throughput hardware true random number generator, called PUFKEY, which consists of two kinds of physical unclonable function (PUF) elements. Combined with a conditioning algorithm, true random seeds are extracted from the noise on the start-up pattern of SRAM memories. These true random seeds contain full entropy. Then, the true random seeds are used as the input for a non-deterministic hardware RNG to generate a stream of true random bits with a throughput as high as 803 Mbps. The experimental results show that the bitstream generated by the proposed PUFKEY can pass all standard national institute of standards and technology (NIST) randomness tests and is resilient to a wide range of security attacks.

  12. Association between severe dorsolateral prefrontal dysfunction during random number generation and earlier onset in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Koike, Shinsuke; Takizawa, Ryu; Nishimura, Yukika; Marumo, Kohei; Kinou, Masaru; Kawakubo, Yuki; Rogers, Mark A; Kasai, Kiyoto

    2011-08-01

    Schizophrenia involves impairment in attention, working memory and executive processes associated with prefrontal cortical function, an essential contributor of social functioning. Age at onset is a major factor for predicting social outcome in schizophrenia. In clinical settings, we need an objective assessment tool for evaluating prefrontal function and social outcome. Participants included 22 right-handed patients with schizophrenia and 40 gender- and age-matched healthy controls. We used a 52-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) instrument to measure oxygenated haemoglobin ([oxy-Hb]) changes over the prefrontal cortex during a random number generation (RNG) task. In healthy controls, we found significant [oxy-Hb] increase in the bilateral dorsolateral (DLPFC; BA9 and BA46) and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC; BA44, 45 and 47). The patients with schizophrenia showed significantly smaller activation than the healthy controls in the same approximate regions. In the patient group, a smaller [oxy-Hb] increase in the right DLPFC region (BA9) was significantly correlated with earlier age at onset. NIRS can detect prefrontal cortical dysfunction associated with an executive task, which was coupled with earlier age at onset in schizophrenia. Multichannel NIRS, a non-invasive and user-friendly instrument, may be useful in evaluating cognitive function and social outcome in clinical settings in psychiatry. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Harvesting Entropy for Random Number Generation for Internet of Things Constrained Devices Using On-Board Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Pawlowski, Marcin Piotr; Jara, Antonio; Ogorzalek, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Entropy in computer security is associated with the unpredictability of a source of randomness. The random source with high entropy tends to achieve a uniform distribution of random values. Random number generators are one of the most important building blocks of cryptosystems. In constrained devices of the Internet of Things ecosystem, high entropy random number generators are hard to achieve due to hardware limitations. For the purpose of the random number generation in constrained devices, this work proposes a solution based on the least-significant bits concatenation entropy harvesting method. As a potential source of entropy, on-board integrated sensors (i.e., temperature, humidity and two different light sensors) have been analyzed. Additionally, the costs (i.e., time and memory consumption) of the presented approach have been measured. The results obtained from the proposed method with statistical fine tuning achieved a Shannon entropy of around 7.9 bits per byte of data for temperature and humidity sensors. The results showed that sensor-based random number generators are a valuable source of entropy with very small RAM and Flash memory requirements for constrained devices of the Internet of Things. PMID:26506357

  14. Harvesting entropy for random number generation for internet of things constrained devices using on-board sensors.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Marcin Piotr; Jara, Antonio; Ogorzalek, Maciej

    2015-10-22

    Entropy in computer security is associated with the unpredictability of a source of randomness. The random source with high entropy tends to achieve a uniform distribution of random values. Random number generators are one of the most important building blocks of cryptosystems. In constrained devices of the Internet of Things ecosystem, high entropy random number generators are hard to achieve due to hardware limitations. For the purpose of the random number generation in constrained devices, this work proposes a solution based on the least-significant bits concatenation entropy harvesting method. As a potential source of entropy, on-board integrated sensors (i.e., temperature, humidity and two different light sensors) have been analyzed. Additionally, the costs (i.e., time and memory consumption) of the presented approach have been measured. The results obtained from the proposed method with statistical fine tuning achieved a Shannon entropy of around 7.9 bits per byte of data for temperature and humidity sensors. The results showed that sensor-based random number generators are a valuable source of entropy with very small RAM and Flash memory requirements for constrained devices of the Internet of Things.

  15. 40 CFR 761.308 - Sample selection by random number generation on any two-dimensional square grid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... generation on any two-dimensional square grid. 761.308 Section 761.308 Protection of Environment... § 761.79(b)(3) § 761.308 Sample selection by random number generation on any two-dimensional square grid. (a) Divide the surface area of the non-porous surface into rectangular or square areas having a...

  16. 40 CFR 761.308 - Sample selection by random number generation on any two-dimensional square grid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... generation on any two-dimensional square grid. 761.308 Section 761.308 Protection of Environment... § 761.79(b)(3) § 761.308 Sample selection by random number generation on any two-dimensional square grid. (a) Divide the surface area of the non-porous surface into rectangular or square areas having a...

  17. 40 CFR 761.308 - Sample selection by random number generation on any two-dimensional square grid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... generation on any two-dimensional square grid. 761.308 Section 761.308 Protection of Environment... § 761.79(b)(3) § 761.308 Sample selection by random number generation on any two-dimensional square grid. (a) Divide the surface area of the non-porous surface into rectangular or square areas having a...

  18. 40 CFR 761.308 - Sample selection by random number generation on any two-dimensional square grid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... generation on any two-dimensional square grid. 761.308 Section 761.308 Protection of Environment... § 761.79(b)(3) § 761.308 Sample selection by random number generation on any two-dimensional square grid. (a) Divide the surface area of the non-porous surface into rectangular or square areas having a...

  19. 40 CFR 761.308 - Sample selection by random number generation on any two-dimensional square grid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... generation on any two-dimensional square grid. 761.308 Section 761.308 Protection of Environment... § 761.79(b)(3) § 761.308 Sample selection by random number generation on any two-dimensional square grid. (a) Divide the surface area of the non-porous surface into rectangular or square areas having a...

  20. Generating Random Samples of a Given Size Using Social Security Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Richard C.; Brauchle, Paul E.

    1984-01-01

    The purposes of this article are (1) to present a method by which social security numbers may be used to draw cluster samples of a predetermined size and (2) to describe procedures used to validate this method of drawing random samples. (JOW)

  1. Random numbers from vacuum fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yicheng; Kurtsiefer, Christian, E-mail: christian.kurtsiefer@gmail.com; Center for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543

    2016-07-25

    We implement a quantum random number generator based on a balanced homodyne measurement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. The digitized signal is directly processed with a fast randomness extraction scheme based on a linear feedback shift register. The random bit stream is continuously read in a computer at a rate of about 480 Mbit/s and passes an extended test suite for random numbers.

  2. A homodyne detector integrated onto a photonic chip for measuring quantum states and generating random numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffaelli, Francesco; Ferranti, Giacomo; Mahler, Dylan H.; Sibson, Philip; Kennard, Jake E.; Santamato, Alberto; Sinclair, Gary; Bonneau, Damien; Thompson, Mark G.; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2018-04-01

    Optical homodyne detection has found use as a characterisation tool in a range of quantum technologies. So far implementations have been limited to bulk optics. Here we present the optical integration of a homodyne detector onto a silicon photonics chip. The resulting device operates at high speed, up 150 MHz, it is compact and it operates with low noise, quantified with 11 dB clearance between shot noise and electronic noise. We perform on-chip quantum tomography of coherent states with the detector and show that it meets the requirements for characterising more general quantum states of light. We also show that the detector is able to produce quantum random numbers at a rate of 1.2 Gbps, by measuring the vacuum state of the electromagnetic field and applying off-line post processing. The produced random numbers pass all the statistical tests provided by the NIST test suite.

  3. Do bacterial cell numbers follow a theoretical Poisson distribution? Comparison of experimentally obtained numbers of single cells with random number generation via computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kento; Hokunan, Hidekazu; Hasegawa, Mayumi; Kawamura, Shuso; Koseki, Shigenobu

    2016-12-01

    We investigated a bacterial sample preparation procedure for single-cell studies. In the present study, we examined whether single bacterial cells obtained via 10-fold dilution followed a theoretical Poisson distribution. Four serotypes of Salmonella enterica, three serotypes of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli and one serotype of Listeria monocytogenes were used as sample bacteria. An inoculum of each serotype was prepared via a 10-fold dilution series to obtain bacterial cell counts with mean values of one or two. To determine whether the experimentally obtained bacterial cell counts follow a theoretical Poisson distribution, a likelihood ratio test between the experimentally obtained cell counts and Poisson distribution which parameter estimated by maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) was conducted. The bacterial cell counts of each serotype sufficiently followed a Poisson distribution. Furthermore, to examine the validity of the parameters of Poisson distribution from experimentally obtained bacterial cell counts, we compared these with the parameters of a Poisson distribution that were estimated using random number generation via computer simulation. The Poisson distribution parameters experimentally obtained from bacterial cell counts were within the range of the parameters estimated using a computer simulation. These results demonstrate that the bacterial cell counts of each serotype obtained via 10-fold dilution followed a Poisson distribution. The fact that the frequency of bacterial cell counts follows a Poisson distribution at low number would be applied to some single-cell studies with a few bacterial cells. In particular, the procedure presented in this study enables us to develop an inactivation model at the single-cell level that can estimate the variability of survival bacterial numbers during the bacterial death process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of finger and mouth action observation on random number generation: an instance of embodied cognition for abstract concepts.

    PubMed

    Grade, Stéphane; Badets, Arnaud; Pesenti, Mauro

    2017-05-01

    Numerical magnitude and specific grasping action processing have been shown to interfere with each other because some aspects of numerical meaning may be grounded in sensorimotor transformation mechanisms linked to finger grip control. However, how specific these interactions are to grasping actions is still unknown. The present study tested the specificity of the number-grip relationship by investigating how the observation of different closing-opening stimuli that might or not refer to prehension-releasing actions was able to influence a random number generation task. Participants had to randomly produce numbers after they observed action stimuli representing either closure or aperture of the fingers, the hand or the mouth, or a colour change used as a control condition. Random number generation was influenced by the prior presentation of finger grip actions, whereby observing a closing finger grip led participants to produce small rather than large numbers, whereas observing an opening finger grip led them to produce large rather than small numbers. Hand actions had reduced or no influence on number production; mouth action influence was restricted to opening, with an overproduction of large numbers. Finally, colour changes did not influence number generation. These results show that some characteristics of observed finger, hand and mouth grip actions automatically prime number magnitude, with the strongest effect for finger grasping. The findings are discussed in terms of the functional and neural mechanisms shared between hand actions and number processing, but also between hand and mouth actions. The present study provides converging evidence that part of number semantics is grounded in sensory-motor mechanisms.

  5. Random number generation in bilingual Balinese and German students: preliminary findings from an exploratory cross-cultural study.

    PubMed

    Strenge, Hans; Lesmana, Cokorda Bagus Jaya; Suryani, Luh Ketut

    2009-08-01

    Verbal random number generation is a procedurally simple task to assess executive function and appears ideally suited for the use under diverse settings in cross-cultural research. The objective of this study was to examine ethnic group differences between young adults in Bali (Indonesia) and Kiel (Germany): 50 bilingual healthy students, 30 Balinese and 20 Germans, attempted to generate a random sequence of the digits 1 to 9. In Balinese participants, randomization was done in Balinese (native language L1) and Indonesian (first foreign language L2), in German subjects in the German (L1) and English (L2) languages. 10 of 30 Balinese (33%), but no Germans, were unable to inhibit habitual counting in more than half of the responses. The Balinese produced significantly more nonrandom responses than the Germans with higher rates of counting and significantly less occurrence of the digits 2 and 3 in L1 compared with L2. Repetition and cycling behavior did not differ between the four languages. The findings highlight the importance of taking into account culture-bound psychosocial factors for Balinese individuals when administering and interpreting a random number generation test.

  6. Theory and implementation of a very high throughput true random number generator in field programmable gate array

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yonggang, E-mail: wangyg@ustc.edu.cn; Hui, Cong; Liu, Chong

    The contribution of this paper is proposing a new entropy extraction mechanism based on sampling phase jitter in ring oscillators to make a high throughput true random number generator in a field programmable gate array (FPGA) practical. Starting from experimental observation and analysis of the entropy source in FPGA, a multi-phase sampling method is exploited to harvest the clock jitter with a maximum entropy and fast sampling speed. This parametrized design is implemented in a Xilinx Artix-7 FPGA, where the carry chains in the FPGA are explored to realize the precise phase shifting. The generator circuit is simple and resource-saving,more » so that multiple generation channels can run in parallel to scale the output throughput for specific applications. The prototype integrates 64 circuit units in the FPGA to provide a total output throughput of 7.68 Gbps, which meets the requirement of current high-speed quantum key distribution systems. The randomness evaluation, as well as its robustness to ambient temperature, confirms that the new method in a purely digital fashion can provide high-speed high-quality random bit sequences for a variety of embedded applications.« less

  7. Theory and implementation of a very high throughput true random number generator in field programmable gate array.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonggang; Hui, Cong; Liu, Chong; Xu, Chao

    2016-04-01

    The contribution of this paper is proposing a new entropy extraction mechanism based on sampling phase jitter in ring oscillators to make a high throughput true random number generator in a field programmable gate array (FPGA) practical. Starting from experimental observation and analysis of the entropy source in FPGA, a multi-phase sampling method is exploited to harvest the clock jitter with a maximum entropy and fast sampling speed. This parametrized design is implemented in a Xilinx Artix-7 FPGA, where the carry chains in the FPGA are explored to realize the precise phase shifting. The generator circuit is simple and resource-saving, so that multiple generation channels can run in parallel to scale the output throughput for specific applications. The prototype integrates 64 circuit units in the FPGA to provide a total output throughput of 7.68 Gbps, which meets the requirement of current high-speed quantum key distribution systems. The randomness evaluation, as well as its robustness to ambient temperature, confirms that the new method in a purely digital fashion can provide high-speed high-quality random bit sequences for a variety of embedded applications.

  8. Pseudorandom Number Generators for Mobile Devices: An Examination and Attempt to Improve Randomness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Notes in Computer Science (LNCS), Vol. 4341), (Hanoi, Vietnam: Springer, 2006), 260–270. 36 Simon R. Blackburn , “The Linear Complexity of the Self... Blackburn , Simon R. ‘The Linear Complexity of the Self-Shrinking Generator.” IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory, 45 (September 1999). Blum, Leonore, Manuel...afloat when the waters have been rough! xv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK xvi I. INTRODUCTION When the average man thinks about war and

  9. 25 CFR 547.14 - What are the minimum technical standards for electronic random number generation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the application under the rules of the game. For example, if a bingo game with 75 objects with numbers... test potency and degree of serial correlation (outcomes must be independent from the previous game...) General requirements. (1) Software that calls an RNG to derive game outcome events must immediately use...

  10. 25 CFR 547.14 - What are the minimum technical standards for electronic random number generation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the application under the rules of the game. For example, if a bingo game with 75 objects with numbers... test potency and degree of serial correlation (outcomes must be independent from the previous game...) General requirements. (1) Software that calls an RNG to derive game outcome events must immediately use...

  11. Hyperquarks and generation number

    SciTech Connect

    Buchmann, Alfons J.; Schmid, Michael L.

    2005-03-01

    In a model in which quarks and leptons are built up from two spin-(1/2) preons as fundamental entities, a new class of fermionic bound states (hyperquarks) arises. It turns out that these hyperquarks are necessary to fulfill the 't Hooft anomaly constraint, which then links the number of fermionic generations to the number of colors and hypercolors.

  12. Benefits of Reiki therapy for a severely neutropenic patient with associated influences on a true random number generator.

    PubMed

    Morse, Melvin L; Beem, Lance W

    2011-12-01

    Reiki therapy is documented for relief of pain and stress. Energetic healing has been documented to alter biologic markers of illness such as hematocrit. True random number generators are reported to be affected by energy healers and spiritually oriented conscious awareness. The patient was a then 54-year-old severely ill man who had hepatitis C types 1 and 2 and who did not improve with conventional therapy. He also suffered from obesity, the metabolic syndrome, asthma, and hypertension. He was treated with experimental high-dose interferon/riboviron therapy with resultant profound anemia and neutropenia. Energetic healing and Reiki therapy was administered initially to enhance the patient's sense of well-being and to relieve anxiety. Possible effects on the patient's absolute neutrophil count and hematocrit were incidentally noted. Reiki therapy was then initiated at times of profound neutropenia to assess its possible effect on the patient's absolute neutrophil count (ANC). Reiki and other energetic healing sessions were monitored with a true random number generator (RNG). Statistically significant relationships were documented between Reiki therapy, a quieting of the electronically created white noise of the RNG during healing sessions, and improvement in the patient's ANC. The immediate clinical result was that the patient could tolerate the high-dose interferon regimen without missing doses because of absolute neutropenia. The patient was initially a late responder to interferon and had been given a 5% chance of clearing the virus. He remains clear of the virus 1 year after treatment. The association between changes in the RNG, Reiki therapy, and a patient's ANC is the first to the authors' knowledge in the medical literature. Future studies assessing the effects of energetic healing on specific biologic markers of disease are anticipated. Concurrent use of a true RNG may prove to correlate with the effectiveness of energetic therapy.

  13. Benefits of Reiki Therapy for a Severely Neutropenic Patient with Associated Influences on a True Random Number Generator

    PubMed Central

    Beem, Lance W.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Reiki therapy is documented for relief of pain and stress. Energetic healing has been documented to alter biologic markers of illness such as hematocrit. True random number generators are reported to be affected by energy healers and spiritually oriented conscious awareness. Methods The patient was a then 54-year-old severely ill man who had hepatitis C types 1 and 2 and who did not improve with conventional therapy. He also suffered from obesity, the metabolic syndrome, asthma, and hypertension. He was treated with experimental high-dose interferon/riboviron therapy with resultant profound anemia and neutropenia. Energetic healing and Reiki therapy was administered initially to enhance the patient's sense of well-being and to relieve anxiety. Possible effects on the patient's absolute neutrophil count and hematocrit were incidentally noted. Reiki therapy was then initiated at times of profound neutropenia to assess its possible effect on the patient's absolute neutrophil count (ANC). Reiki and other energetic healing sessions were monitored with a true random number generator (RNG). Results Statistically significant relationships were documented between Reiki therapy, a quieting of the electronically created white noise of the RNG during healing sessions, and improvement in the patient's ANC. The immediate clinical result was that the patient could tolerate the high-dose interferon regimen without missing doses because of absolute neutropenia. The patient was initially a late responder to interferon and had been given a 5% chance of clearing the virus. He remains clear of the virus 1 year after treatment. Conclusions The association between changes in the RNG, Reiki therapy, and a patient's ANC is the first to the authors' knowledge in the medical literature. Future studies assessing the effects of energetic healing on specific biologic markers of disease are anticipated. Concurrent use of a true RNG may prove to correlate with the

  14. CNV-RF Is a Random Forest-Based Copy Number Variation Detection Method Using Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Onsongo, Getiria; Baughn, Linda B; Bower, Matthew; Henzler, Christine; Schomaker, Matthew; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Thyagarajan, Bharat

    2016-11-01

    Simultaneous detection of small copy number variations (CNVs) (<0.5 kb) and single-nucleotide variants in clinically significant genes is of great interest for clinical laboratories. The analytical variability in next-generation sequencing (NGS) and artifacts in coverage data because of issues with mappability along with lack of robust bioinformatics tools for CNV detection have limited the utility of targeted NGS data to identify CNVs. We describe the development and implementation of a bioinformatics algorithm, copy number variation-random forest (CNV-RF), that incorporates a machine learning component to identify CNVs from targeted NGS data. Using CNV-RF, we identified 12 of 13 deletions in samples with known CNVs, two cases with duplications, and identified novel deletions in 22 additional cases. Furthermore, no CNVs were identified among 60 genes in 14 cases with normal copy number and no CNVs were identified in another 104 patients with clinical suspicion of CNVs. All positive deletions and duplications were confirmed using a quantitative PCR method. CNV-RF also detected heterozygous deletions and duplications with a specificity of 50% across 4813 genes. The ability of CNV-RF to detect clinically relevant CNVs with a high degree of sensitivity along with confirmation using a low-cost quantitative PCR method provides a framework for providing comprehensive NGS-based CNV/single-nucleotide variant detection in a clinical molecular diagnostics laboratory. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. High speed true random number generator with a new structure of coarse-tuning PDL in FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hongzhen; Wang, Pengjun; Cheng, Xu; Zhou, Keji

    2018-03-01

    A metastability-based TRNG (true random number generator) is presented in this paper, and implemented in FPGA. The metastable state of a D flip-flop is tunable through a two-stage PDL (programmable delay line). With the proposed coarse-tuning PDL structure, the TRNG core does not require extra placement and routing to ensure its entropy. Furthermore, the core needs fewer stages of coarse-tuning PDL at higher operating frequency, and thus saves more resources in FPGA. The designed TRNG achieves 25 Mbps @ 100 MHz throughput after proper post-processing, which is several times higher than other previous TRNGs based on FPGA. Moreover, the robustness of the system is enhanced with the adoption of a feedback system. The quality of the designed TRNG is verified by NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) and also accepted by class P1 of the AIS-20/31 test suite. Project supported by the S&T Plan of Zhejiang Provincial Science and Technology Department (No. 2016C31078), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61574041, 61474068, 61234002), and the K.C. Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University, China.

  16. Investigating the Randomness of Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendleton, Kenn L.

    2009-01-01

    The use of random numbers is pervasive in today's world. Random numbers have practical applications in such far-flung arenas as computer simulations, cryptography, gambling, the legal system, statistical sampling, and even the war on terrorism. Evaluating the randomness of extremely large samples is a complex, intricate process. However, the…

  17. Programmable random interval generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, R. S., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Random pulse generator can supply constant-amplitude randomly distributed pulses with average rate ranging from a few counts per second to more than one million counts per second. Generator requires no high-voltage power supply or any special thermal cooling apparatus. Device is uniquely versatile and provides wide dynamic range of operation.

  18. Pseudo-Random Number Generation in Children with High-Functioning Autism and Asperger's Disorder: Further Evidence for a Dissociation in Executive Functioning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, Nicole J.; Bradshaw, John L.; Moss, Simon A.; Brereton, Avril V.; Tonge, Bruce J.

    2006-01-01

    The repetitive, stereotyped and obsessive behaviours, which are core diagnostic features of autism, are thought to be underpinned by executive dysfunction. This study examined executive impairment in individuals with autism and Asperger's disorder using a verbal equivalent of an established pseudo-random number generating task. Different patterns…

  19. Random numbers certified by Bell's theorem.

    PubMed

    Pironio, S; Acín, A; Massar, S; de la Giroday, A Boyer; Matsukevich, D N; Maunz, P; Olmschenk, S; Hayes, D; Luo, L; Manning, T A; Monroe, C

    2010-04-15

    Randomness is a fundamental feature of nature and a valuable resource for applications ranging from cryptography and gambling to numerical simulation of physical and biological systems. Random numbers, however, are difficult to characterize mathematically, and their generation must rely on an unpredictable physical process. Inaccuracies in the theoretical modelling of such processes or failures of the devices, possibly due to adversarial attacks, limit the reliability of random number generators in ways that are difficult to control and detect. Here, inspired by earlier work on non-locality-based and device-independent quantum information processing, we show that the non-local correlations of entangled quantum particles can be used to certify the presence of genuine randomness. It is thereby possible to design a cryptographically secure random number generator that does not require any assumption about the internal working of the device. Such a strong form of randomness generation is impossible classically and possible in quantum systems only if certified by a Bell inequality violation. We carry out a proof-of-concept demonstration of this proposal in a system of two entangled atoms separated by approximately one metre. The observed Bell inequality violation, featuring near perfect detection efficiency, guarantees that 42 new random numbers are generated with 99 per cent confidence. Our results lay the groundwork for future device-independent quantum information experiments and for addressing fundamental issues raised by the intrinsic randomness of quantum theory.

  20. Quantum Hash function and its application to privacy amplification in quantum key distribution, pseudo-random number generation and image encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Xu, Peng; Yang, Rui; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Shi, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information and quantum computation have achieved a huge success during the last years. In this paper, we investigate the capability of quantum Hash function, which can be constructed by subtly modifying quantum walks, a famous quantum computation model. It is found that quantum Hash function can act as a hash function for the privacy amplification process of quantum key distribution systems with higher security. As a byproduct, quantum Hash function can also be used for pseudo-random number generation due to its inherent chaotic dynamics. Further we discuss the application of quantum Hash function to image encryption and propose a novel image encryption algorithm. Numerical simulations and performance comparisons show that quantum Hash function is eligible for privacy amplification in quantum key distribution, pseudo-random number generation and image encryption in terms of various hash tests and randomness tests. It extends the scope of application of quantum computation and quantum information.

  1. Quantum Hash function and its application to privacy amplification in quantum key distribution, pseudo-random number generation and image encryption

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Xu, Peng; Yang, Rui; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Shi, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information and quantum computation have achieved a huge success during the last years. In this paper, we investigate the capability of quantum Hash function, which can be constructed by subtly modifying quantum walks, a famous quantum computation model. It is found that quantum Hash function can act as a hash function for the privacy amplification process of quantum key distribution systems with higher security. As a byproduct, quantum Hash function can also be used for pseudo-random number generation due to its inherent chaotic dynamics. Further we discuss the application of quantum Hash function to image encryption and propose a novel image encryption algorithm. Numerical simulations and performance comparisons show that quantum Hash function is eligible for privacy amplification in quantum key distribution, pseudo-random number generation and image encryption in terms of various hash tests and randomness tests. It extends the scope of application of quantum computation and quantum information. PMID:26823196

  2. Quantum Hash function and its application to privacy amplification in quantum key distribution, pseudo-random number generation and image encryption.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Xu, Peng; Yang, Rui; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Shi, Wei-Min

    2016-01-29

    Quantum information and quantum computation have achieved a huge success during the last years. In this paper, we investigate the capability of quantum Hash function, which can be constructed by subtly modifying quantum walks, a famous quantum computation model. It is found that quantum Hash function can act as a hash function for the privacy amplification process of quantum key distribution systems with higher security. As a byproduct, quantum Hash function can also be used for pseudo-random number generation due to its inherent chaotic dynamics. Further we discuss the application of quantum Hash function to image encryption and propose a novel image encryption algorithm. Numerical simulations and performance comparisons show that quantum Hash function is eligible for privacy amplification in quantum key distribution, pseudo-random number generation and image encryption in terms of various hash tests and randomness tests. It extends the scope of application of quantum computation and quantum information.

  3. Autocorrelation peaks in congruential pseudorandom number generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, F.; Merrick, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    The complete correlation structure of several congruential pseudorandom number generators (PRNG) of the same type and small cycle length was studied to deal with the problem of congruential PRNG almost repeating themselves at intervals smaller than their cycle lengths, during simulation of bandpass filtered normal random noise. Maximum period multiplicative and mixed congruential generators were studied, with inferences drawn from examination of several tractable members of a class of random number generators, and moduli from 2 to the 5th power to 2 to the 9th power. High correlation is shown to exist in mixed and multiplicative congruential random number generators and prime moduli Lehmer generators for shifts a fraction of their cycle length. The random noise sequences in question are required when simulating electrical noise, air turbulence, or time variation of wind parameters.

  4. Random pulse generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, R. S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a source of random width and random spaced rectangular voltage pulses whose mean or average frequency of operation is controllable within prescribed limits of about 10 hertz to 1 megahertz. A pair of thin-film metal resistors are used to provide a differential white noise voltage pulse source. Pulse shaping and amplification circuitry provide relatively short duration pulses of constant amplitude which are applied to anti-bounce logic circuitry to prevent ringing effects. The pulse outputs from the anti-bounce circuits are then used to control two one-shot multivibrators whose output comprises the random length and random spaced rectangular pulses. Means are provided for monitoring, calibrating and evaluating the relative randomness of the generator.

  5. True random numbers from amplified quantum vacuum.

    PubMed

    Jofre, M; Curty, M; Steinlechner, F; Anzolin, G; Torres, J P; Mitchell, M W; Pruneri, V

    2011-10-10

    Random numbers are essential for applications ranging from secure communications to numerical simulation and quantitative finance. Algorithms can rapidly produce pseudo-random outcomes, series of numbers that mimic most properties of true random numbers while quantum random number generators (QRNGs) exploit intrinsic quantum randomness to produce true random numbers. Single-photon QRNGs are conceptually simple but produce few random bits per detection. In contrast, vacuum fluctuations are a vast resource for QRNGs: they are broad-band and thus can encode many random bits per second. Direct recording of vacuum fluctuations is possible, but requires shot-noise-limited detectors, at the cost of bandwidth. We demonstrate efficient conversion of vacuum fluctuations to true random bits using optical amplification of vacuum and interferometry. Using commercially-available optical components we demonstrate a QRNG at a bit rate of 1.11 Gbps. The proposed scheme has the potential to be extended to 10 Gbps and even up to 100 Gbps by taking advantage of high speed modulation sources and detectors for optical fiber telecommunication devices.

  6. Priming psychic and conjuring abilities of a magic demonstration influences event interpretation and random number generation biases

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Christine; Koutrakis, Nikolaos; Kuhn, Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Magical ideation and belief in the paranormal is considered to represent a trait-like character; people either believe in it or not. Yet, anecdotes indicate that exposure to an anomalous event can turn skeptics into believers. This transformation is likely to be accompanied by altered cognitive functioning such as impaired judgments of event likelihood. Here, we investigated whether the exposure to an anomalous event changes individuals’ explicit traditional (religious) and non-traditional (e.g., paranormal) beliefs as well as cognitive biases that have previously been associated with non-traditional beliefs, e.g., repetition avoidance when producing random numbers in a mental dice task. In a classroom, 91 students saw a magic demonstration after their psychology lecture. Before the demonstration, half of the students were told that the performance was done respectively by a conjuror (magician group) or a psychic (psychic group). The instruction influenced participants’ explanations of the anomalous event. Participants in the magician, as compared to the psychic group, were more likely to explain the event through conjuring abilities while the reverse was true for psychic abilities. Moreover, these explanations correlated positively with their prior traditional and non-traditional beliefs. Finally, we observed that the psychic group showed more repetition avoidance than the magician group, and this effect remained the same regardless of whether assessed before or after the magic demonstration. We conclude that pre-existing beliefs and contextual suggestions both influence people’s interpretations of anomalous events and associated cognitive biases. Beliefs and associated cognitive biases are likely flexible well into adulthood and change with actual life events. PMID:25653626

  7. Generating "Random" Integers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Martin

    2011-01-01

    One of the author's undergraduate students recently asked him whether it was possible to generate a random positive integer. After some thought, the author realised that there were plenty of interesting mathematical ideas inherent in her question. So much so in fact, that the author decided to organise a workshop, open both to undergraduates and…

  8. Design of high-throughput and low-power true random number generator utilizing perpendicularly magnetized voltage-controlled magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hochul; Ebrahimi, Farbod; Amiri, Pedram Khalili; Wang, Kang L.

    2017-05-01

    A true random number generator based on perpendicularly magnetized voltage-controlled magnetic tunnel junction devices (MRNG) is presented. Unlike MTJs used in memory applications where a stable bit is needed to store information, in this work, the MTJ is intentionally designed with small perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). This allows one to take advantage of the thermally activated fluctuations of its free layer as a stochastic noise source. Furthermore, we take advantage of the voltage dependence of anisotropy to temporarily change the MTJ state into an unstable state when a voltage is applied. Since the MTJ has two energetically stable states, the final state is randomly chosen by thermal fluctuation. The voltage controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) effect is used to generate the metastable state of the MTJ by lowering its energy barrier. The proposed MRNG achieves a high throughput (32 Gbps) by implementing a 64 ×64 MTJ array into CMOS circuits and executing operations in a parallel manner. Furthermore, the circuit consumes very low energy to generate a random bit (31.5 fJ/bit) due to the high energy efficiency of the voltage-controlled MTJ switching.

  9. Extracting random numbers from quantum tunnelling through a single diode.

    PubMed

    Bernardo-Gavito, Ramón; Bagci, Ibrahim Ethem; Roberts, Jonathan; Sexton, James; Astbury, Benjamin; Shokeir, Hamzah; McGrath, Thomas; Noori, Yasir J; Woodhead, Christopher S; Missous, Mohamed; Roedig, Utz; Young, Robert J

    2017-12-19

    Random number generation is crucial in many aspects of everyday life, as online security and privacy depend ultimately on the quality of random numbers. Many current implementations are based on pseudo-random number generators, but information security requires true random numbers for sensitive applications like key generation in banking, defence or even social media. True random number generators are systems whose outputs cannot be determined, even if their internal structure and response history are known. Sources of quantum noise are thus ideal for this application due to their intrinsic uncertainty. In this work, we propose using resonant tunnelling diodes as practical true random number generators based on a quantum mechanical effect. The output of the proposed devices can be directly used as a random stream of bits or can be further distilled using randomness extraction algorithms, depending on the application.

  10. Astronomical random numbers for quantum foundations experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Calvin; Brown, Amy; Nguyen, Hien; Friedman, Andrew S.; Kaiser, David I.; Gallicchio, Jason

    2018-04-01

    Photons from distant astronomical sources can be used as a classical source of randomness to improve fundamental tests of quantum nonlocality, wave-particle duality, and local realism through Bell's inequality and delayed-choice quantum eraser tests inspired by Wheeler's cosmic-scale Mach-Zehnder interferometer gedanken experiment. Such sources of random numbers may also be useful for information-theoretic applications such as key distribution for quantum cryptography. Building on the design of an astronomical random number generator developed for the recent cosmic Bell experiment [Handsteiner et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 118, 060401 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.060401], in this paper we report on the design and characterization of a device that, with 20-nanosecond latency, outputs a bit based on whether the wavelength of an incoming photon is greater than or less than ≈700 nm. Using the one-meter telescope at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Table Mountain Observatory, we generated random bits from astronomical photons in both color channels from 50 stars of varying color and magnitude, and from 12 quasars with redshifts up to z =3.9 . With stars, we achieved bit rates of ˜1 ×106Hz/m 2 , limited by saturation of our single-photon detectors, and with quasars of magnitudes between 12.9 and 16, we achieved rates between ˜102 and 2 ×103Hz /m2 . For bright quasars, the resulting bitstreams exhibit sufficiently low amounts of statistical predictability as quantified by the mutual information. In addition, a sufficiently high fraction of bits generated are of true astronomical origin in order to address both the locality and freedom-of-choice loopholes when used to set the measurement settings in a test of the Bell-CHSH inequality.

  11. Security of practical private randomness generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pironio, Stefano; Massar, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Measurements on entangled quantum systems necessarily yield outcomes that are intrinsically unpredictable if they violate a Bell inequality. This property can be used to generate certified randomness in a device-independent way, i.e., without making detailed assumptions about the internal working of the quantum devices used to generate the random numbers. Furthermore these numbers are also private; i.e., they appear random not only to the user but also to any adversary that might possess a perfect description of the devices. Since this process requires a small initial random seed to sample the behavior of the quantum devices and to extract uniform randomness from the raw outputs of the devices, one usually speaks of device-independent randomness expansion. The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, we point out that in most real, practical situations, where the concept of device independence is used as a protection against unintentional flaws or failures of the quantum apparatuses, it is sufficient to show that the generated string is random with respect to an adversary that holds only classical side information; i.e., proving randomness against quantum side information is not necessary. Furthermore, the initial random seed does not need to be private with respect to the adversary, provided that it is generated in a way that is independent from the measured systems. The devices, however, will generate cryptographically secure randomness that cannot be predicted by the adversary, and thus one can, given access to free public randomness, talk about private randomness generation. The theoretical tools to quantify the generated randomness according to these criteria were already introduced in S. Pironio [Nature (London)NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature09008 464, 1021 (2010)], but the final results were improperly formulated. The second aim of this paper is to correct this inaccurate formulation and therefore lay out a precise theoretical framework for practical device

  12. Load-Dependent Interference of Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus with Switching from Automatic to Controlled Processing During Random Number Generation in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Isobel Anne; Wilkinson, Leonora; Limousin, Patricia; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) ameliorates the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, some aspects of executive control are impaired with STN DBS. We tested the prediction that (i) STN DBS interferes with switching from automatic to controlled processing during fast-paced random number generation (RNG) (ii) STN DBS-induced cognitive control changes are load-dependent. Fifteen PD patients with bilateral STN DBS performed paced-RNG, under three levels of cognitive load synchronised with a pacing stimulus presented at 1, 0.5 and 0.33 Hz (faster rates require greater cognitive control), with DBS on or off. Measures of output randomness were calculated. Countscore 1 (CS1) indicates habitual counting in steps of one (CS1). Countscore 2 (CS2) indicates a more controlled strategy of counting in twos. The fastest rate was associated with an increased CS1 score with STN DBS on compared to off. At the slowest rate, patients had higher CS2 scores with DBS off than on, such that the differences between CS1 and CS2 scores disappeared. We provide evidence for a load-dependent effect of STN DBS on paced RNG in PD. Patients could switch to more controlled RNG strategies during conditions of low cognitive load at slower rates only when the STN stimulators were off, but when STN stimulation was on, they engaged in more automatic habitual counting under increased cognitive load. These findings are consistent with the proposal that the STN implements a switch signal from the medial frontal cortex which enables a shift from automatic to controlled processing.

  13. Load-Dependent Interference of Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus with Switching from Automatic to Controlled Processing During Random Number Generation in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Isobel Anne; Wilkinson, Leonora; Limousin, Patricia; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) ameliorates the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, some aspects of executive control are impaired with STN DBS. Objective: We tested the prediction that (i) STN DBS interferes with switching from automatic to controlled processing during fast-paced random number generation (RNG) (ii) STN DBS-induced cognitive control changes are load-dependent. Methods: Fifteen PD patients with bilateral STN DBS performed paced-RNG, under three levels of cognitive load synchronised with a pacing stimulus presented at 1, 0.5 and 0.33 Hz (faster rates require greater cognitive control), with DBS on or off. Measures of output randomness were calculated. Countscore 1 (CS1) indicates habitual counting in steps of one (CS1). Countscore 2 (CS2) indicates a more controlled strategy of counting in twos. Results: The fastest rate was associated with an increased CS1 score with STN DBS on compared to off. At the slowest rate, patients had higher CS2 scores with DBS off than on, such that the differences between CS1 and CS2 scores disappeared. Conclusions: We provide evidence for a load-dependent effect of STN DBS on paced RNG in PD. Patients could switch to more controlled RNG strategies during conditions of low cognitive load at slower rates only when the STN stimulators were off, but when STN stimulation was on, they engaged in more automatic habitual counting under increased cognitive load. These findings are consistent with the proposal that the STN implements a switch signal from the medial frontal cortex which enables a shift from automatic to controlled processing. PMID:25720447

  14. Random Numbers and Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Philipp O. J.

    Many-body problems often involve the calculation of integrals of very high dimension which cannot be treated by standard methods. For the calculation of thermodynamic averages Monte Carlo methods are very useful which sample the integration volume at randomly chosen points. After summarizing some basic statistics, we discuss algorithms for the generation of pseudo-random numbers with given probability distribution which are essential for all Monte Carlo methods. We show how the efficiency of Monte Carlo integration can be improved by sampling preferentially the important configurations. Finally the famous Metropolis algorithm is applied to classical many-particle systems. Computer experiments visualize the central limit theorem and apply the Metropolis method to the traveling salesman problem.

  15. Hurwitz numbers and products of random matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. Yu.

    2017-09-01

    We study multimatrix models, which may be viewed as integrals of products of tau functions depending on the eigenvalues of products of random matrices. We consider tau functions of the two-component Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy (semi-infinite relativistic Toda lattice) and of the B-type KP (BKP) hierarchy introduced by Kac and van de Leur. Such integrals are sometimes tau functions themselves. We consider models that generate Hurwitz numbers HE,F, where E is the Euler characteristic of the base surface and F is the number of branch points. We show that in the case where the integrands contain the product of n > 2 matrices, the integral generates Hurwitz numbers with E ≤ 2 and F ≤ n+2. Both the numbers E and F depend both on n and on the order of the factors in the matrix product. The Euler characteristic E can be either an even or an odd number, i.e., it can match both orientable and nonorientable (Klein) base surfaces depending on the presence of the tau function of the BKP hierarchy in the integrand. We study two cases, the products of complex and the products of unitary matrices.

  16. Secure uniform random-number extraction via incoherent strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masahito; Zhu, Huangjun

    2018-01-01

    To guarantee the security of uniform random numbers generated by a quantum random-number generator, we study secure extraction of uniform random numbers when the environment of a given quantum state is controlled by the third party, the eavesdropper. Here we restrict our operations to incoherent strategies that are composed of the measurement on the computational basis and incoherent operations (or incoherence-preserving operations). We show that the maximum secure extraction rate is equal to the relative entropy of coherence. By contrast, the coherence of formation gives the extraction rate when a certain constraint is imposed on the eavesdropper's operations. The condition under which the two extraction rates coincide is then determined. Furthermore, we find that the exponential decreasing rate of the leaked information is characterized by Rényi relative entropies of coherence. These results clarify the power of incoherent strategies in random-number generation, and can be applied to guarantee the quality of random numbers generated by a quantum random-number generator.

  17. Integrated-Circuit Pseudorandom-Number Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steelman, James E.; Beasley, Jeff; Aragon, Michael; Ramirez, Francisco; Summers, Kenneth L.; Knoebel, Arthur

    1992-01-01

    Integrated circuit produces 8-bit pseudorandom numbers from specified probability distribution, at rate of 10 MHz. Use of Boolean logic, circuit implements pseudorandom-number-generating algorithm. Circuit includes eight 12-bit pseudorandom-number generators, outputs are uniformly distributed. 8-bit pseudorandom numbers satisfying specified nonuniform probability distribution are generated by processing uniformly distributed outputs of eight 12-bit pseudorandom-number generators through "pipeline" of D flip-flops, comparators, and memories implementing conditional probabilities on zeros and ones.

  18. Fast generation of sparse random kernel graphs

    DOE PAGES

    Hagberg, Aric; Lemons, Nathan; Du, Wen -Bo

    2015-09-10

    The development of kernel-based inhomogeneous random graphs has provided models that are flexible enough to capture many observed characteristics of real networks, and that are also mathematically tractable. We specify a class of inhomogeneous random graph models, called random kernel graphs, that produces sparse graphs with tunable graph properties, and we develop an efficient generation algorithm to sample random instances from this model. As real-world networks are usually large, it is essential that the run-time of generation algorithms scales better than quadratically in the number of vertices n. We show that for many practical kernels our algorithm runs in timemore » at most ο(n(logn)²). As an example, we show how to generate samples of power-law degree distribution graphs with tunable assortativity.« less

  19. The correlation structure of several popular pseudorandom number generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, F.; Merrick, R.; Martin, C. F.

    1973-01-01

    One of the desirable properties of a pseudorandom number generator is that the sequence of numbers it generates should have very low autocorrelation for all shifts except for zero shift and those that are multiples of its cycle length. Due to the simple methods of constructing random numbers, the ideal is often not quite fulfilled. A simple method of examining any random generator for previously unsuspected regularities is discussed. Once they are discovered it is often easy to derive the mathematical relationships, which describe the mathematical relationships, which describe the regular behavior. As examples, it is shown that high correlation exists in mixed and multiplicative congruential random number generators and prime moduli Lehmer generators for shifts a fraction of their cycle lengths.

  20. Configurable Cellular Automata for Pseudorandom Number Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quieta, Marie Therese; Guan, Sheng-Uei

    This paper proposes a generalized structure of cellular automata (CA) — the configurable cellular automata (CoCA). With selected properties from programmable CA (PCA) and controllable CA (CCA), a new approach to cellular automata is developed. In CoCA, the cells are dynamically reconfigured at run-time via a control CA. Reconfiguration of a cell simply means varying the properties of that cell with time. Some examples of properties to be reconfigured are rule selection, boundary condition, and radius. While the objective of this paper is to propose CoCA as a new CA method, the main focus is to design a CoCA that can function as a good pseudorandom number generator (PRNG). As a PRNG, CoCA can be a suitable candidate as it can pass 17 out of 18 Diehard tests with 31 cells. CoCA PRNG's performance based on Diehard test is considered superior over other CA PRNG works. Moreover, CoCA opens new rooms for research not only in the field of random number generation, but in modeling complex systems as well.

  1. Generating constrained randomized sequences: item frequency matters.

    PubMed

    French, Robert M; Perruchet, Pierre

    2009-11-01

    All experimental psychologists understand the importance of randomizing lists of items. However, randomization is generally constrained, and these constraints-in particular, not allowing immediately repeated items-which are designed to eliminate particular biases, frequently engender others. We describe a simple Monte Carlo randomization technique that solves a number of these problems. However, in many experimental settings, we are concerned not only with the number and distribution of items but also with the number and distribution of transitions between items. The algorithm mentioned above provides no control over this. We therefore introduce a simple technique that uses transition tables for generating correctly randomized sequences. We present an analytic method of producing item-pair frequency tables and item-pair transitional probability tables when immediate repetitions are not allowed. We illustrate these difficulties and how to overcome them, with reference to a classic article on word segmentation in infants. Finally, we provide free access to an Excel file that allows users to generate transition tables with up to 10 different item types, as well as to generate appropriately distributed randomized sequences of any length without immediately repeated elements. This file is freely available from http://leadserv.u-bourgogne.fr/IMG/xls/TransitionMatrix.xls.

  2. Generating functions for weighted Hurwitz numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guay-Paquet, Mathieu; Harnad, J.

    2017-08-01

    Double Hurwitz numbers enumerating weighted n-sheeted branched coverings of the Riemann sphere or, equivalently, weighted paths in the Cayley graph of Sn generated by transpositions are determined by an associated weight generating function. A uniquely determined 1-parameter family of 2D Toda τ -functions of hypergeometric type is shown to consist of generating functions for such weighted Hurwitz numbers. Four classical cases are detailed, in which the weighting is uniform: Okounkov's double Hurwitz numbers for which the ramification is simple at all but two specified branch points; the case of Belyi curves, with three branch points, two with specified profiles; the general case, with a specified number of branch points, two with fixed profiles, the rest constrained only by the genus; and the signed enumeration case, with sign determined by the parity of the number of branch points. Using the exponentiated quantum dilogarithm function as a weight generator, three new types of weighted enumerations are introduced. These determine quantum Hurwitz numbers depending on a deformation parameter q. By suitable interpretation of q, the statistical mechanics of quantum weighted branched covers may be related to that of Bosonic gases. The standard double Hurwitz numbers are recovered in the classical limit.

  3. Physical Principle for Generation of Randomness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2009-01-01

    A physical principle (more precisely, a principle that incorporates mathematical models used in physics) has been conceived as the basis of a method of generating randomness in Monte Carlo simulations. The principle eliminates the need for conventional random-number generators. The Monte Carlo simulation method is among the most powerful computational methods for solving high-dimensional problems in physics, chemistry, economics, and information processing. The Monte Carlo simulation method is especially effective for solving problems in which computational complexity increases exponentially with dimensionality. The main advantage of the Monte Carlo simulation method over other methods is that the demand on computational resources becomes independent of dimensionality. As augmented by the present principle, the Monte Carlo simulation method becomes an even more powerful computational method that is especially useful for solving problems associated with dynamics of fluids, planning, scheduling, and combinatorial optimization. The present principle is based on coupling of dynamical equations with the corresponding Liouville equation. The randomness is generated by non-Lipschitz instability of dynamics triggered and controlled by feedback from the Liouville equation. (In non-Lipschitz dynamics, the derivatives of solutions of the dynamical equations are not required to be bounded.)

  4. Intergenerational resource transfers with random offspring numbers

    PubMed Central

    Arrow, Kenneth J.; Levin, Simon A.

    2009-01-01

    A problem common to biology and economics is the transfer of resources from parents to children. We consider the issue under the assumption that the number of offspring is unknown and can be represented as a random variable. There are 3 basic assumptions. The first assumption is that a given body of resources can be divided into consumption (yielding satisfaction) and transfer to children. The second assumption is that the parents' welfare includes a concern for the welfare of their children; this is recursive in the sense that the children's welfares include concern for their children and so forth. However, the welfare of a child from a given consumption is counted somewhat differently (generally less) than that of the parent (the welfare of a child is “discounted”). The third assumption is that resources transferred may grow (or decline). In economic language, investment, including that in education or nutrition, is productive. Under suitable restrictions, precise formulas for the resulting allocation of resources are found, demonstrating that, depending on the shape of the utility curve, uncertainty regarding the number of offspring may or may not favor increased consumption. The results imply that wealth (stock of resources) will ultimately have a log-normal distribution. PMID:19617553

  5. Generating and using truly random quantum states in Mathematica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miszczak, Jarosław Adam

    2012-01-01

    The problem of generating random quantum states is of a great interest from the quantum information theory point of view. In this paper we present a package for Mathematica computing system harnessing a specific piece of hardware, namely Quantis quantum random number generator (QRNG), for investigating statistical properties of quantum states. The described package implements a number of functions for generating random states, which use Quantis QRNG as a source of randomness. It also provides procedures which can be used in simulations not related directly to quantum information processing. Program summaryProgram title: TRQS Catalogue identifier: AEKA_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKA_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7924 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 88 651 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica, C Computer: Requires a Quantis quantum random number generator (QRNG, http://www.idquantique.com/true-random-number-generator/products-overview.html) and supporting a recent version of Mathematica Operating system: Any platform supporting Mathematica; tested with GNU/Linux (32 and 64 bit) RAM: Case dependent Classification: 4.15 Nature of problem: Generation of random density matrices. Solution method: Use of a physical quantum random number generator. Running time: Generating 100 random numbers takes about 1 second, generating 1000 random density matrices takes more than a minute.

  6. Computer routines for probability distributions, random numbers, and related functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, W.

    1983-01-01

    Use of previously coded and tested subroutines simplifies and speeds up program development and testing. This report presents routines that can be used to calculate various probability distributions and other functions of importance in statistical hydrology. The routines are designed as general-purpose Fortran subroutines and functions to be called from user-written main progress. The probability distributions provided include the beta, chi-square, gamma, Gaussian (normal), Pearson Type III (tables and approximation), and Weibull. Also provided are the distributions of the Grubbs-Beck outlier test, Kolmogorov 's and Smirnov 's D, Student 's t, noncentral t (approximate), and Snedecor F. Other mathematical functions include the Bessel function, I sub o, gamma and log-gamma functions, error functions, and exponential integral. Auxiliary services include sorting and printer-plotting. Random number generators for uniform and normal numbers are provided and may be used with some of the above routines to generate numbers from other distributions. (USGS)

  7. Computer routines for probability distributions, random numbers, and related functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    Use of previously codes and tested subroutines simplifies and speeds up program development and testing. This report presents routines that can be used to calculate various probability distributions and other functions of importance in statistical hydrology. The routines are designed as general-purpose Fortran subroutines and functions to be called from user-written main programs. The probability distributions provided include the beta, chisquare, gamma, Gaussian (normal), Pearson Type III (tables and approximation), and Weibull. Also provided are the distributions of the Grubbs-Beck outlier test, Kolmogorov 's and Smirnov 's D, Student 's t, noncentral t (approximate), and Snedecor F tests. Other mathematical functions include the Bessel function I (subzero), gamma and log-gamma functions, error functions and exponential integral. Auxiliary services include sorting and printer plotting. Random number generators for uniform and normal numbers are provided and may be used with some of the above routines to generate numbers from other distributions. (USGS)

  8. Generating high Reynolds-number flows.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Present test facilities are seriously limited regarding investigations involving high Reynolds numbers due to financial considerations. Quasi-steady testing facilities offer a practical immediate solution to the problem of high-Re testing. A familiar example is the blowdown wind tunnel, but even more flexibility and economy may be provided by using shock-tube devices. The Ludwieg tube is the shock-tube device most often proposed as a means of generating high-Re flows. Two-stage nozzles may be used with a Ludwieg tube. Quasi-steady facilities will be useful only if the available test time exceeds that required to establish steady flow.

  9. Experimentally generated randomness certified by the impossibility of superluminal signals.

    PubMed

    Bierhorst, Peter; Knill, Emanuel; Glancy, Scott; Zhang, Yanbao; Mink, Alan; Jordan, Stephen; Rommal, Andrea; Liu, Yi-Kai; Christensen, Bradley; Nam, Sae Woo; Stevens, Martin J; Shalm, Lynden K

    2018-04-01

    From dice to modern electronic circuits, there have been many attempts to build better devices to generate random numbers. Randomness is fundamental to security and cryptographic systems and to safeguarding privacy. A key challenge with random-number generators is that it is hard to ensure that their outputs are unpredictable 1-3 . For a random-number generator based on a physical process, such as a noisy classical system or an elementary quantum measurement, a detailed model that describes the underlying physics is necessary to assert unpredictability. Imperfections in the model compromise the integrity of the device. However, it is possible to exploit the phenomenon of quantum non-locality with a loophole-free Bell test to build a random-number generator that can produce output that is unpredictable to any adversary that is limited only by general physical principles, such as special relativity 1-11 . With recent technological developments, it is now possible to carry out such a loophole-free Bell test 12-14,22 . Here we present certified randomness obtained from a photonic Bell experiment and extract 1,024 random bits that are uniformly distributed to within 10 -12 . These random bits could not have been predicted according to any physical theory that prohibits faster-than-light (superluminal) signalling and that allows independent measurement choices. To certify and quantify the randomness, we describe a protocol that is optimized for devices that are characterized by a low per-trial violation of Bell inequalities. Future random-number generators based on loophole-free Bell tests may have a role in increasing the security and trust of our cryptographic systems and infrastructure.

  10. Random Item Generation Is Affected by Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Multani, Namita; Rudzicz, Frank; Wong, Wing Yiu Stephanie; Namasivayam, Aravind Kumar; van Lieshout, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Random item generation (RIG) involves central executive functioning. Measuring aspects of random sequences can therefore provide a simple method to complement other tools for cognitive assessment. We examine the extent to which RIG relates to specific measures of cognitive function, and whether those measures can be estimated using RIG…

  11. On grey levels in random CAPTCHA generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Fraser; Kouritzin, Michael A.

    2011-06-01

    A CAPTCHA is an automatically generated test designed to distinguish between humans and computer programs; specifically, they are designed to be easy for humans but difficult for computer programs to pass in order to prevent the abuse of resources by automated bots. They are commonly seen guarding webmail registration forms, online auction sites, and preventing brute force attacks on passwords. In the following, we address the question: How does adding a grey level to random CAPTCHA generation affect the utility of the CAPTCHA? We treat the problem of generating the random CAPTCHA as one of random field simulation: An initial state of background noise is evolved over time using Gibbs sampling and an efficient algorithm for generating correlated random variables. This approach has already been found to yield highly-readable yet difficult-to-crack CAPTCHAs. We detail how the requisite parameters for introducing grey levels are estimated and how we generate the random CAPTCHA. The resulting CAPTCHA will be evaluated in terms of human readability as well as its resistance to automated attacks in the forms of character segmentation and optical character recognition.

  12. A Comparison of One Time Pad Random Key Generation using Linear Congruential Generator and Quadratic Congruential Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apdilah, D.; Harahap, M. K.; Khairina, N.; Husein, A. M.; Harahap, M.

    2018-04-01

    One Time Pad algorithm always requires a pairing of the key for plaintext. If the length of keys less than a length of the plaintext, the key will be repeated until the length of the plaintext same with the length of the key. In this research, we use Linear Congruential Generator and Quadratic Congruential Generator for generating a random number. One Time Pad use a random number as a key for encryption and decryption process. Key will generate the first letter from the plaintext, we compare these two algorithms in terms of time speed encryption, and the result is a combination of OTP with LCG faster than the combination of OTP with QCG.

  13. 49 CFR 229.105 - Steam generator number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steam generator number. 229.105 Section 229.105..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.105 Steam generator number. An identification number shall be marked on the steam generator's...

  14. 49 CFR 229.105 - Steam generator number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Steam generator number. 229.105 Section 229.105....105 Steam generator number. An identification number shall be marked on the steam generator's separator and that number entered on FRA Form F 6180-49A. ...

  15. 49 CFR 229.105 - Steam generator number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Steam generator number. 229.105 Section 229.105....105 Steam generator number. An identification number shall be marked on the steam generator's separator and that number entered on FRA Form F 6180-49A. ...

  16. The generative basis of natural number concepts.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Alan M; Gelman, Rochel; Gallistel, C R

    2008-06-01

    Number concepts must support arithmetic inference. Using this principle, it can be argued that the integer concept of exactly ONE is a necessary part of the psychological foundations of number, as is the notion of the exact equality - that is, perfect substitutability. The inability to support reasoning involving exact equality is a shortcoming in current theories about the development of numerical reasoning. A simple innate basis for the natural number concepts can be proposed that embodies the arithmetic principle, supports exact equality and also enables computational compatibility with real- or rational-valued mental magnitudes.

  17. Simulations Using Random-Generated DNA and RNA Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryce, C. F. A.

    1977-01-01

    Using a very simple computer program written in BASIC, a very large number of random-generated DNA or RNA sequences are obtained. Students use these sequences to predict complementary sequences and translational products, evaluate base compositions, determine frequencies of particular triplet codons, and suggest possible secondary structures.…

  18. Generating equilateral random polygons in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Y.; Ernst, C.; Montemayor, A.; Ziegler, U.

    2011-10-01

    One challenging problem in biology is to understand the mechanism of DNA packing in a confined volume such as a cell. It is known that confined circular DNA is often knotted and hence the topology of the extracted (and relaxed) circular DNA can be used as a probe of the DNA packing mechanism. However, in order to properly estimate the topological properties of the confined circular DNA structures using mathematical models, it is necessary to generate large ensembles of simulated closed chains (i.e. polygons) of equal edge lengths that are confined in a volume such as a sphere of certain fixed radius. Finding efficient algorithms that properly sample the space of such confined equilateral random polygons is a difficult problem. In this paper, we propose a method that generates confined equilateral random polygons based on their probability distribution. This method requires the creation of a large database initially. However, once the database has been created, a confined equilateral random polygon of length n can be generated in linear time in terms of n. The errors introduced by the method can be controlled and reduced by the refinement of the database. Furthermore, our numerical simulations indicate that these errors are unbiased and tend to cancel each other in a long polygon.

  19. Building Kindergartners' Number Sense: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Nancy C.; Glutting, Joseph; Dyson, Nancy; Hassinger-Das, Brenna; Irwin, Casey

    2012-01-01

    Math achievement in elementary school is mediated by performance and growth in number sense during kindergarten. The aim of the present study was to test the effectiveness of a targeted small-group number sense intervention for high-risk kindergartners from low-income communities. Children were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups (n = 44 in each…

  20. Device-independent randomness generation from several Bell estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto-Silleras, Olmo; Bamps, Cédric; Silman, Jonathan; Pironio, Stefano

    2018-02-01

    Device-independent randomness generation and quantum key distribution protocols rely on a fundamental relation between the non-locality of quantum theory and its random character. This relation is usually expressed in terms of a trade-off between the probability of guessing correctly the outcomes of measurements performed on quantum systems and the amount of violation of a given Bell inequality. However, a more accurate assessment of the randomness produced in Bell experiments can be obtained if the value of several Bell expressions is simultaneously taken into account, or if the full set of probabilities characterizing the behavior of the device is considered. We introduce protocols for device-independent randomness generation secure against classical side information, that rely on the estimation of an arbitrary number of Bell expressions or even directly on the experimental frequencies of measurement outcomes. Asymptotically, this results in an optimal generation of randomness from experimental data (as measured by the min-entropy), without having to assume beforehand that the devices violate a specific Bell inequality.

  1. At least some errors are randomly generated (Freud was wrong)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, A. J.; Senders, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    An experiment was carried out to expose something about human error generating mechanisms. In the context of the experiment, an error was made when a subject pressed the wrong key on a computer keyboard or pressed no key at all in the time allotted. These might be considered, respectively, errors of substitution and errors of omission. Each of seven subjects saw a sequence of three digital numbers, made an easily learned binary judgement about each, and was to press the appropriate one of two keys. Each session consisted of 1,000 presentations of randomly permuted, fixed numbers broken into 10 blocks of 100. One of two keys should have been pressed within one second of the onset of each stimulus. These data were subjected to statistical analyses in order to probe the nature of the error generating mechanisms. Goodness of fit tests for a Poisson distribution for the number of errors per 50 trial interval and for an exponential distribution of the length of the intervals between errors were carried out. There is evidence for an endogenous mechanism that may best be described as a random error generator. Furthermore, an item analysis of the number of errors produced per stimulus suggests the existence of a second mechanism operating on task driven factors producing exogenous errors. Some errors, at least, are the result of constant probability generating mechanisms with error rate idiosyncratically determined for each subject.

  2. Realization of a Quantum Random Generator Certified with the Kochen-Specker Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, Anatoly; Jerger, Markus; Potočnik, Anton; Wallraff, Andreas; Fedorov, Arkady

    2017-12-01

    Random numbers are required for a variety of applications from secure communications to Monte Carlo simulation. Yet randomness is an asymptotic property, and no output string generated by a physical device can be strictly proven to be random. We report an experimental realization of a quantum random number generator (QRNG) with randomness certified by quantum contextuality and the Kochen-Specker theorem. The certification is not performed in a device-independent way but through a rigorous theoretical proof of each outcome being value indefinite even in the presence of experimental imperfections. The analysis of the generated data confirms the incomputable nature of our QRNG.

  3. Realization of a Quantum Random Generator Certified with the Kochen-Specker Theorem.

    PubMed

    Kulikov, Anatoly; Jerger, Markus; Potočnik, Anton; Wallraff, Andreas; Fedorov, Arkady

    2017-12-15

    Random numbers are required for a variety of applications from secure communications to Monte Carlo simulation. Yet randomness is an asymptotic property, and no output string generated by a physical device can be strictly proven to be random. We report an experimental realization of a quantum random number generator (QRNG) with randomness certified by quantum contextuality and the Kochen-Specker theorem. The certification is not performed in a device-independent way but through a rigorous theoretical proof of each outcome being value indefinite even in the presence of experimental imperfections. The analysis of the generated data confirms the incomputable nature of our QRNG.

  4. Pseudorandom number generation using chaotic true orbits of the Bernoulli map

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Asaki, E-mail: saito@fun.ac.jp; Yamaguchi, Akihiro

    We devise a pseudorandom number generator that exactly computes chaotic true orbits of the Bernoulli map on quadratic algebraic integers. Moreover, we describe a way to select the initial points (seeds) for generating multiple pseudorandom binary sequences. This selection method distributes the initial points almost uniformly (equidistantly) in the unit interval, and latter parts of the generated sequences are guaranteed not to coincide. We also demonstrate through statistical testing that the generated sequences possess good randomness properties.

  5. DNA based random key generation and management for OTP encryption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunpeng; Liu, Xin; Sun, Manhui

    2017-09-01

    One-time pad (OTP) is a principle of key generation applied to the stream ciphering method which offers total privacy. The OTP encryption scheme has proved to be unbreakable in theory, but difficult to realize in practical applications. Because OTP encryption specially requires the absolute randomness of the key, its development has suffered from dense constraints. DNA cryptography is a new and promising technology in the field of information security. DNA chromosomes storing capabilities can be used as one-time pad structures with pseudo-random number generation and indexing in order to encrypt the plaintext messages. In this paper, we present a feasible solution to the OTP symmetric key generation and transmission problem with DNA at the molecular level. Through recombinant DNA technology, by using only sender-receiver known restriction enzymes to combine the secure key represented by DNA sequence and the T vector, we generate the DNA bio-hiding secure key and then place the recombinant plasmid in implanted bacteria for secure key transmission. The designed bio experiments and simulation results show that the security of the transmission of the key is further improved and the environmental requirements of key transmission are reduced. Analysis has demonstrated that the proposed DNA-based random key generation and management solutions are marked by high security and usability. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Building Kindergartners’ Number Sense: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Nancy C.; Glutting, Joseph; Dyson, Nancy; Hassinger-Das, Brenna; Irwin, Casey

    2015-01-01

    Math achievement in elementary school is mediated by performance and growth in number sense during kindergarten. The aim of the present study was to test the effectiveness of a targeted small group number sense intervention for high-risk kindergartners from low-income communities. Children were randomly assigned to one of three groups (n = 44 in each group): a number sense intervention group, a language intervention group, or a business as usual control group. Accounting for initial skill level in mathematical knowledge, children who received the number sense intervention performed better than controls at immediate post test, with meaningful effects on measures of number competencies and general math achievement. Many of the effects held eight weeks after the intervention was completed, suggesting that children internalized what they had learned. There were no differences between the language and control groups on any math-related measures. PMID:25866417

  7. Building Kindergartners' Number Sense: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Nancy C; Glutting, Joseph; Dyson, Nancy; Hassinger-Das, Brenna; Irwin, Casey

    2012-08-01

    Math achievement in elementary school is mediated by performance and growth in number sense during kindergarten. The aim of the present study was to test the effectiveness of a targeted small group number sense intervention for high-risk kindergartners from low-income communities. Children were randomly assigned to one of three groups ( n = 44 in each group): a number sense intervention group, a language intervention group, or a business as usual control group. Accounting for initial skill level in mathematical knowledge, children who received the number sense intervention performed better than controls at immediate post test, with meaningful effects on measures of number competencies and general math achievement. Many of the effects held eight weeks after the intervention was completed, suggesting that children internalized what they had learned. There were no differences between the language and control groups on any math-related measures.

  8. On Models for Binomial Data with Random Numbers of Trials

    PubMed Central

    Comulada, W. Scott; Weiss, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A binomial outcome is a count s of the number of successes out of the total number of independent trials n = s + f, where f is a count of the failures. The n are random variables not fixed by design in many studies. Joint modeling of (s, f) can provide additional insight into the science and into the probability π of success that cannot be directly incorporated by the logistic regression model. Observations where n = 0 are excluded from the binomial analysis yet may be important to understanding how π is influenced by covariates. Correlation between s and f may exist and be of direct interest. We propose Bayesian multivariate Poisson models for the bivariate response (s, f), correlated through random effects. We extend our models to the analysis of longitudinal and multivariate longitudinal binomial outcomes. Our methodology was motivated by two disparate examples, one from teratology and one from an HIV tertiary intervention study. PMID:17688514

  9. The Numbers Game: Phasing in Generated ID Numbers at the University of Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eveland, Sue

    2005-01-01

    With all the recent headlines about security breaches and information loss at financial and educational institutions, the higher education community needs to address the issue of using social security numbers as ID numbers. The University of Oregon undertook a change process to assign generated ID numbers to all records in their information…

  10. Generating Variable and Random Schedules of Reinforcement Using Microsoft Excel Macros

    PubMed Central

    Bancroft, Stacie L; Bourret, Jason C

    2008-01-01

    Variable reinforcement schedules are used to arrange the availability of reinforcement following varying response ratios or intervals of time. Random reinforcement schedules are subtypes of variable reinforcement schedules that can be used to arrange the availability of reinforcement at a constant probability across number of responses or time. Generating schedule values for variable and random reinforcement schedules can be difficult. The present article describes the steps necessary to write macros in Microsoft Excel that will generate variable-ratio, variable-interval, variable-time, random-ratio, random-interval, and random-time reinforcement schedule values. PMID:18595286

  11. Generating variable and random schedules of reinforcement using Microsoft Excel macros.

    PubMed

    Bancroft, Stacie L; Bourret, Jason C

    2008-01-01

    Variable reinforcement schedules are used to arrange the availability of reinforcement following varying response ratios or intervals of time. Random reinforcement schedules are subtypes of variable reinforcement schedules that can be used to arrange the availability of reinforcement at a constant probability across number of responses or time. Generating schedule values for variable and random reinforcement schedules can be difficult. The present article describes the steps necessary to write macros in Microsoft Excel that will generate variable-ratio, variable-interval, variable-time, random-ratio, random-interval, and random-time reinforcement schedule values.

  12. Random Sequence for Optimal Low-Power Laser Generated Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vangi, D.; Virga, A.; Gulino, M. S.

    2017-08-01

    Low-power laser generated ultrasounds are lately gaining importance in the research world, thanks to the possibility of investigating a mechanical component structural integrity through a non-contact and Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) procedure. The ultrasounds are, however, very low in amplitude, making it necessary to use pre-processing and post-processing operations on the signals to detect them. The cross-correlation technique is used in this work, meaning that a random signal must be used as laser input. For this purpose, a highly random and simple-to-create code called T sequence, capable of enhancing the ultrasound detectability, is introduced (not previously available at the state of the art). Several important parameters which characterize the T sequence can influence the process: the number of pulses Npulses , the pulse duration δ and the distance between pulses dpulses . A Finite Element FE model of a 3 mm steel disk has been initially developed to analytically study the longitudinal ultrasound generation mechanism and the obtainable outputs. Later, experimental tests have shown that the T sequence is highly flexible for ultrasound detection purposes, making it optimal to use high Npulses and δ but low dpulses . In the end, apart from describing all phenomena that arise in the low-power laser generation process, the results of this study are also important for setting up an effective NDT procedure using this technology.

  13. RANDOM PULSE GENERATOR PRODUCING FIDUCIAL MARKS

    DOEpatents

    Nielsen, W.F.

    1960-02-01

    The apparatus for automatically applying a fiducial marking, having a nonrepetitive pattern, to a plurality of simultaneously made records comprises, in series, a bypass filter, a trigger circuit, and a pulse generator, with printing means connected to and controlled by the pulse generator for simultaneously making the visible fiducial marks on a plurality of simultaneously produced records.

  14. Generation of kth-order random toposequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odgers, Nathan P.; McBratney, Alex. B.; Minasny, Budiman

    2008-05-01

    The model presented in this paper derives toposequences from a digital elevation model (DEM). It is written in ArcInfo Macro Language (AML). The toposequences are called kth-order random toposequences, because they take a random path uphill to the top of a hill and downhill to a stream or valley bottom from a randomly selected seed point, and they are located in a streamshed of order k according to a particular stream-ordering system. We define a kth-order streamshed as the area of land that drains directly to a stream segment of stream order k. The model attempts to optimise the spatial configuration of a set of derived toposequences iteratively by using simulated annealing to maximise the total sum of distances between each toposequence hilltop in the set. The user is able to select the order, k, of the derived toposequences. Toposequences are useful for determining soil sampling locations for use in collecting soil data for digital soil mapping applications. Sampling locations can be allocated according to equal elevation or equal-distance intervals along the length of the toposequence, for example. We demonstrate the use of this model for a study area in the Hunter Valley of New South Wales, Australia. Of the 64 toposequences derived, 32 were first-order random toposequences according to Strahler's stream-ordering system, and 32 were second-order random toposequences. The model that we present in this paper is an efficient method for sampling soil along soil toposequences. The soils along a toposequence are related to each other by the topography they are found in, so soil data collected by this method is useful for establishing soil-landscape rules for the preparation of digital soil maps.

  15. Image encryption using random sequence generated from generalized information domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia-Yan, Zhang; Guo-Ji, Zhang; Xuan, Li; Ya-Zhou, Ren; Jie-Hua, Wu

    2016-05-01

    A novel image encryption method based on the random sequence generated from the generalized information domain and permutation-diffusion architecture is proposed. The random sequence is generated by reconstruction from the generalized information file and discrete trajectory extraction from the data stream. The trajectory address sequence is used to generate a P-box to shuffle the plain image while random sequences are treated as keystreams. A new factor called drift factor is employed to accelerate and enhance the performance of the random sequence generator. An initial value is introduced to make the encryption method an approximately one-time pad. Experimental results show that the random sequences pass the NIST statistical test with a high ratio and extensive analysis demonstrates that the new encryption scheme has superior security.

  16. Pseudo-random properties of a linear congruential generator investigated by b-adic diaphony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoev, Peter; Stoilova, Stanislava

    2017-12-01

    In the proposed paper we continue the study of the diaphony, defined in b-adic number system, and we extend it in different directions. We investigate this diaphony as a tool for estimation of the pseudorandom properties of some of the most used random number generators. This is done by evaluating the distribution of specially constructed two-dimensional nets on the base of the obtained random numbers. The aim is to see how the generated numbers are suitable for calculations in some numerical methods (Monte Carlo etc.).

  17. Power generation in random diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvydka, Diana; Karpov, V. G.

    2005-03-01

    We discuss nonlinear disordered systems, random diode arrays (RDAs), which can represent such objects as large-area photovoltaics and ion channels of biological membranes. Our numerical modeling has revealed several interesting properties of RDAs. In particular, the geometrical distribution of nonuniformities across a RDA has only a minor effect on its integral characteristics determined by RDA parameter statistics. In the meantime, the dispersion of integral characteristics vs system size exhibits a nontrivial scaling dependence. Our theoretical interpretation here remains limited and is based on the picture of eddy currents flowing through weak diodes in the RDA.

  18. Probabilistic Generation of Random Networks Taking into Account Information on Motifs Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Bois, Frederic Y.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Because of the huge number of graphs possible even with a small number of nodes, inference on network structure is known to be a challenging problem. Generating large random directed graphs with prescribed probabilities of occurrences of some meaningful patterns (motifs) is also difficult. We show how to generate such random graphs according to a formal probabilistic representation, using fast Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to sample them. As an illustration, we generate realistic graphs with several hundred nodes mimicking a gene transcription interaction network in Escherichia coli. PMID:25493547

  19. Probabilistic generation of random networks taking into account information on motifs occurrence.

    PubMed

    Bois, Frederic Y; Gayraud, Ghislaine

    2015-01-01

    Because of the huge number of graphs possible even with a small number of nodes, inference on network structure is known to be a challenging problem. Generating large random directed graphs with prescribed probabilities of occurrences of some meaningful patterns (motifs) is also difficult. We show how to generate such random graphs according to a formal probabilistic representation, using fast Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to sample them. As an illustration, we generate realistic graphs with several hundred nodes mimicking a gene transcription interaction network in Escherichia coli.

  20. Testing, Selection, and Implementation of Random Number Generators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    Complexity and Lempel - Ziv Compression tests. This causes concern for cryptographic use but is not relevant for our applications. In fact, the features of...Linear Complexity, Lempel - Ziv Compression , and Matrix Rank test failures excluded. The Mersenne Twister is widely accepted by the community; in fact...searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection information. Send comments

  1. A Random Word Generator for Pronounceable Passwords

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-01

    Box 208 Bedford, MA 01730 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT, TASK AREA ft WORK UNIT NUMBERS Project No. 522N 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME...the unit-pair " rt " will have bits specifying that the pair may not begin a syllable and that a vowel must precede this pair if it is entirely...uk 00 011 vz 01 011 pd 01 010- rs 00 000 swh- i-OO 000 ul 00 011 vch 01 000 pe 00 010- rt 00 000 squ- -01 000 um 00 011 vgh 01 011 pf 01 000 ru 00

  2. Pseudo-random bit generator based on lag time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Martínez, M.; Campos-Cantón, E.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we present a pseudo-random bit generator (PRBG) based on two lag time series of the logistic map using positive and negative values in the bifurcation parameter. In order to hidden the map used to build the pseudo-random series we have used a delay in the generation of time series. These new series when they are mapped xn against xn+1 present a cloud of points unrelated to the logistic map. Finally, the pseudo-random sequences have been tested with the suite of NIST giving satisfactory results for use in stream ciphers.

  3. Experimental nonlocality-based randomness generation with nonprojective measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, S.; Mattar, A.; Gómez, E. S.; Cavalcanti, D.; Farías, O. Jiménez; Acín, A.; Lima, G.

    2018-04-01

    We report on an optical setup generating more than one bit of randomness from one entangled bit (i.e., a maximally entangled state of two qubits). The amount of randomness is certified through the observation of Bell nonlocal correlations. To attain this result we implemented a high-purity entanglement source and a nonprojective three-outcome measurement. Our implementation achieves a gain of 27% of randomness as compared with the standard methods using projective measurements. Additionally, we estimate the amount of randomness certified in a one-sided device-independent scenario, through the observation of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering. Our results prove that nonprojective quantum measurements allow extending the limits for nonlocality-based certified randomness generation using current technology.

  4. The Reliability of Randomly Generated Math Curriculum-Based Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strait, Gerald G.; Smith, Bradley H.; Pender, Carolyn; Malone, Patrick S.; Roberts, Jarod; Hall, John D.

    2015-01-01

    "Curriculum-Based Measurement" (CBM) is a direct method of academic assessment used to screen and evaluate students' skills and monitor their responses to academic instruction and intervention. Interventioncentral.org offers a math worksheet generator at no cost that creates randomly generated "math curriculum-based measures"…

  5. Spline methods for approximating quantile functions and generating random samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiess, J. R.; Matthews, C. G.

    1985-01-01

    Two cubic spline formulations are presented for representing the quantile function (inverse cumulative distribution function) of a random sample of data. Both B-spline and rational spline approximations are compared with analytic representations of the quantile function. It is also shown how these representations can be used to generate random samples for use in simulation studies. Comparisons are made on samples generated from known distributions and a sample of experimental data. The spline representations are more accurate for multimodal and skewed samples and to require much less time to generate samples than the analytic representation.

  6. Ultra-fast quantum randomness generation by accelerated phase diffusion in a pulsed laser diode.

    PubMed

    Abellán, C; Amaya, W; Jofre, M; Curty, M; Acín, A; Capmany, J; Pruneri, V; Mitchell, M W

    2014-01-27

    We demonstrate a high bit-rate quantum random number generator by interferometric detection of phase diffusion in a gain-switched DFB laser diode. Gain switching at few-GHz frequencies produces a train of bright pulses with nearly equal amplitudes and random phases. An unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer is used to interfere subsequent pulses and thereby generate strong random-amplitude pulses, which are detected and digitized to produce a high-rate random bit string. Using established models of semiconductor laser field dynamics, we predict a regime of high visibility interference and nearly complete vacuum-fluctuation-induced phase diffusion between pulses. These are confirmed by measurement of pulse power statistics at the output of the interferometer. Using a 5.825 GHz excitation rate and 14-bit digitization, we observe 43 Gbps quantum randomness generation.

  7. The Effects of Two Generative Activities on Learner Comprehension of Part-Whole Meaning of Rational Numbers Using Virtual Manipulatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trespalacios, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of two generative learning activities on students' academic achievement of the part-whole meaning of rational numbers while using virtual manipulatives. Third-grade students were divided randomly in two groups to evaluate the effects of two generative learning activities: answering-questions and…

  8. Narrow-band generation in random distributed feedback fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Sugavanam, Srikanth; Tarasov, Nikita; Shu, Xuewen; Churkin, Dmitry V

    2013-07-15

    Narrow-band emission of spectral width down to ~0.05 nm line-width is achieved in the random distributed feedback fiber laser employing narrow-band fiber Bragg grating or fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer filters. The observed line-width is ~10 times less than line-width of other demonstrated up to date random distributed feedback fiber lasers. The random DFB laser with Fabry-Perot interferometer filter provides simultaneously multi-wavelength and narrow-band (within each line) generation with possibility of further wavelength tuning.

  9. Generating and controlling homogeneous air turbulence using random jet arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Douglas; Petersen, Alec; Amili, Omid; Coletti, Filippo

    2016-12-01

    The use of random jet arrays, already employed in water tank facilities to generate zero-mean-flow homogeneous turbulence, is extended to air as a working fluid. A novel facility is introduced that uses two facing arrays of individually controlled jets (256 in total) to force steady homogeneous turbulence with negligible mean flow, shear, and strain. Quasi-synthetic jet pumps are created by expanding pressurized air through small straight nozzles and are actuated by fast-response low-voltage solenoid valves. Velocity fields, two-point correlations, energy spectra, and second-order structure functions are obtained from 2D PIV and are used to characterize the turbulence from the integral-to-the Kolmogorov scales. Several metrics are defined to quantify how well zero-mean-flow homogeneous turbulence is approximated for a wide range of forcing and geometric parameters. With increasing jet firing time duration, both the velocity fluctuations and the integral length scales are augmented and therefore the Reynolds number is increased. We reach a Taylor-microscale Reynolds number of 470, a large-scale Reynolds number of 74,000, and an integral-to-Kolmogorov length scale ratio of 680. The volume of the present homogeneous turbulence, the largest reported to date in a zero-mean-flow facility, is much larger than the integral length scale, allowing for the natural development of the energy cascade. The turbulence is found to be anisotropic irrespective of the distance between the jet arrays. Fine grids placed in front of the jets are effective at modulating the turbulence, reducing both velocity fluctuations and integral scales. Varying the jet-to-jet spacing within each array has no effect on the integral length scale, suggesting that this is dictated by the length scale of the jets.

  10. Simulation and study of small numbers of random events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    Random events were simulated by computer and subjected to various statistical methods to extract important parameters. Various forms of curve fitting were explored, such as least squares, least distance from a line, maximum likelihood. Problems considered were dead time, exponential decay, and spectrum extraction from cosmic ray data using binned data and data from individual events. Computer programs, mostly of an iterative nature, were developed to do these simulations and extractions and are partially listed as appendices. The mathematical basis for the compuer programs is given.

  11. Multi-peak structure of generation spectrum of random distributed feedback fiber Raman lasers.

    PubMed

    Vatnik, I D; Zlobina, E A; Kablukov, S I; Babin, S A

    2017-02-06

    We study spectral features of the generation of random distributed feedback fiber Raman laser arising from two-peak shape of the Raman gain spectral profile realized in the germanosilicate fibers. We demonstrate that number of peaks can be calculated using power balance model considering different subcomponents within each Stokes component.

  12. Imagining Complex Numbers by Generating, Interpreting and Representing Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vozzo, Enzo

    2017-01-01

    Ever since their serendipitous discovery by Italian mathematicians trying to solve cubic equations in the 16th century, imaginary and complex numbers have been difficult topics to understand. Here the word complex is used to describe something consisting of a number of interconnecting parts. The different parts of a complex number are the…

  13. Quantum random bit generation using energy fluctuations in stimulated Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Philip J; England, Duncan G; Nunn, Josh; Moffatt, Doug; Spanner, Michael; Lausten, Rune; Sussman, Benjamin J

    2013-12-02

    Random number sequences are a critical resource in modern information processing systems, with applications in cryptography, numerical simulation, and data sampling. We introduce a quantum random number generator based on the measurement of pulse energy quantum fluctuations in Stokes light generated by spontaneously-initiated stimulated Raman scattering. Bright Stokes pulse energy fluctuations up to five times the mean energy are measured with fast photodiodes and converted to unbiased random binary strings. Since the pulse energy is a continuous variable, multiple bits can be extracted from a single measurement. Our approach can be generalized to a wide range of Raman active materials; here we demonstrate a prototype using the optical phonon line in bulk diamond.

  14. Automatic generation of randomized trial sequences for priming experiments.

    PubMed

    Ihrke, Matthias; Behrendt, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    In most psychological experiments, a randomized presentation of successive displays is crucial for the validity of the results. For some paradigms, this is not a trivial issue because trials are interdependent, e.g., priming paradigms. We present a software that automatically generates optimized trial sequences for (negative-) priming experiments. Our implementation is based on an optimization heuristic known as genetic algorithms that allows for an intuitive interpretation due to its similarity to natural evolution. The program features a graphical user interface that allows the user to generate trial sequences and to interactively improve them. The software is based on freely available software and is released under the GNU General Public License.

  15. Secure self-calibrating quantum random-bit generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorentino, M.; Santori, C.; Spillane, S. M.

    2007-03-15

    Random-bit generators (RBGs) are key components of a variety of information processing applications ranging from simulations to cryptography. In particular, cryptographic systems require 'strong' RBGs that produce high-entropy bit sequences, but traditional software pseudo-RBGs have very low entropy content and therefore are relatively weak for cryptography. Hardware RBGs yield entropy from chaotic or quantum physical systems and therefore are expected to exhibit high entropy, but in current implementations their exact entropy content is unknown. Here we report a quantum random-bit generator (QRBG) that harvests entropy by measuring single-photon and entangled two-photon polarization states. We introduce and implement a quantum tomographicmore » method to measure a lower bound on the 'min-entropy' of the system, and we employ this value to distill a truly random-bit sequence. This approach is secure: even if an attacker takes control of the source of optical states, a secure random sequence can be distilled.« less

  16. Nonquadratic Variation of the Blum Blum Shub Pseudorandom Number Generator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    maximum 200 words) Cryptography is essential for secure online communications. Many different types of ciphers are implemented in modern-day... cryptography , but they all have one common factor. All ciphers require a source of randomness, which makes them unpre- dictable. One such source of this...Martinsen Second Reader Craig Rasmussen Chair, Department of Applied Mathematics iii THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK iv ABSTRACT Cryptography is

  17. Realistic noise-tolerant randomness amplification using finite number of devices.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fernando G S L; Ramanathan, Ravishankar; Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Karol; Horodecki, Michał; Horodecki, Paweł; Szarek, Tomasz; Wojewódka, Hanna

    2016-04-21

    Randomness is a fundamental concept, with implications from security of modern data systems, to fundamental laws of nature and even the philosophy of science. Randomness is called certified if it describes events that cannot be pre-determined by an external adversary. It is known that weak certified randomness can be amplified to nearly ideal randomness using quantum-mechanical systems. However, so far, it was unclear whether randomness amplification is a realistic task, as the existing proposals either do not tolerate noise or require an unbounded number of different devices. Here we provide an error-tolerant protocol using a finite number of devices for amplifying arbitrary weak randomness into nearly perfect random bits, which are secure against a no-signalling adversary. The correctness of the protocol is assessed by violating a Bell inequality, with the degree of violation determining the noise tolerance threshold. An experimental realization of the protocol is within reach of current technology.

  18. Realistic noise-tolerant randomness amplification using finite number of devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Ramanathan, Ravishankar; Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Karol; Horodecki, Michał; Horodecki, Paweł; Szarek, Tomasz; Wojewódka, Hanna

    2016-04-01

    Randomness is a fundamental concept, with implications from security of modern data systems, to fundamental laws of nature and even the philosophy of science. Randomness is called certified if it describes events that cannot be pre-determined by an external adversary. It is known that weak certified randomness can be amplified to nearly ideal randomness using quantum-mechanical systems. However, so far, it was unclear whether randomness amplification is a realistic task, as the existing proposals either do not tolerate noise or require an unbounded number of different devices. Here we provide an error-tolerant protocol using a finite number of devices for amplifying arbitrary weak randomness into nearly perfect random bits, which are secure against a no-signalling adversary. The correctness of the protocol is assessed by violating a Bell inequality, with the degree of violation determining the noise tolerance threshold. An experimental realization of the protocol is within reach of current technology.

  19. Realistic noise-tolerant randomness amplification using finite number of devices

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Ramanathan, Ravishankar; Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Karol; Horodecki, Michał; Horodecki, Paweł; Szarek, Tomasz; Wojewódka, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Randomness is a fundamental concept, with implications from security of modern data systems, to fundamental laws of nature and even the philosophy of science. Randomness is called certified if it describes events that cannot be pre-determined by an external adversary. It is known that weak certified randomness can be amplified to nearly ideal randomness using quantum-mechanical systems. However, so far, it was unclear whether randomness amplification is a realistic task, as the existing proposals either do not tolerate noise or require an unbounded number of different devices. Here we provide an error-tolerant protocol using a finite number of devices for amplifying arbitrary weak randomness into nearly perfect random bits, which are secure against a no-signalling adversary. The correctness of the protocol is assessed by violating a Bell inequality, with the degree of violation determining the noise tolerance threshold. An experimental realization of the protocol is within reach of current technology. PMID:27098302

  20. Heterogeneous Suppression of Sequential Effects in Random Sequence Generation, but Not in Operant Learning.

    PubMed

    Shteingart, Hanan; Loewenstein, Yonatan

    2016-01-01

    There is a long history of experiments in which participants are instructed to generate a long sequence of binary random numbers. The scope of this line of research has shifted over the years from identifying the basic psychological principles and/or the heuristics that lead to deviations from randomness, to one of predicting future choices. In this paper, we used generalized linear regression and the framework of Reinforcement Learning in order to address both points. In particular, we used logistic regression analysis in order to characterize the temporal sequence of participants' choices. Surprisingly, a population analysis indicated that the contribution of the most recent trial has only a weak effect on behavior, compared to more preceding trials, a result that seems irreconcilable with standard sequential effects that decay monotonously with the delay. However, when considering each participant separately, we found that the magnitudes of the sequential effect are a monotonous decreasing function of the delay, yet these individual sequential effects are largely averaged out in a population analysis because of heterogeneity. The substantial behavioral heterogeneity in this task is further demonstrated quantitatively by considering the predictive power of the model. We show that a heterogeneous model of sequential dependencies captures the structure available in random sequence generation. Finally, we show that the results of the logistic regression analysis can be interpreted in the framework of reinforcement learning, allowing us to compare the sequential effects in the random sequence generation task to those in an operant learning task. We show that in contrast to the random sequence generation task, sequential effects in operant learning are far more homogenous across the population. These results suggest that in the random sequence generation task, different participants adopt different cognitive strategies to suppress sequential dependencies when

  1. On-chip generation of heralded photon-number states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergyris, Panagiotis; Meany, Thomas; Lunghi, Tommaso; Sauder, Gregory; Downes, James; Steel, M. J.; Withford, Michael J.; Alibart, Olivier; Tanzilli, Sébastien

    2016-10-01

    Beyond the use of genuine monolithic integrated optical platforms, we report here a hybrid strategy enabling on-chip generation of configurable heralded two-photon states. More specifically, we combine two different fabrication techniques, i.e., non-linear waveguides on lithium niobate for efficient photon-pair generation and femtosecond-laser-direct-written waveguides on glass for photon manipulation. Through real-time device manipulation capabilities, a variety of path-coded heralded two-photon states can be produced, ranging from product to entangled states. Those states are engineered with high levels of purity, assessed by fidelities of 99.5 ± 8% and 95.0 ± 8%, respectively, obtained via quantum interferometric measurements. Our strategy therefore stands as a milestone for further exploiting entanglement-based protocols, relying on engineered quantum states, and enabled by scalable and compatible photonic circuits.

  2. On-chip generation of heralded photon-number states

    PubMed Central

    Vergyris, Panagiotis; Meany, Thomas; Lunghi, Tommaso; Sauder, Gregory; Downes, James; Steel, M. J.; Withford, Michael J.; Alibart, Olivier; Tanzilli, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Beyond the use of genuine monolithic integrated optical platforms, we report here a hybrid strategy enabling on-chip generation of configurable heralded two-photon states. More specifically, we combine two different fabrication techniques, i.e., non-linear waveguides on lithium niobate for efficient photon-pair generation and femtosecond-laser-direct-written waveguides on glass for photon manipulation. Through real-time device manipulation capabilities, a variety of path-coded heralded two-photon states can be produced, ranging from product to entangled states. Those states are engineered with high levels of purity, assessed by fidelities of 99.5 ± 8% and 95.0 ± 8%, respectively, obtained via quantum interferometric measurements. Our strategy therefore stands as a milestone for further exploiting entanglement-based protocols, relying on engineered quantum states, and enabled by scalable and compatible photonic circuits. PMID:27775062

  3. Multiprime Blum-Blum-Shub Pseudorandom Number Generator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    Cryptography , National Institute of Standards and Technology Tests 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 83 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18...1: Introduction Cryptography is a part of our daily lives. Many digital communications require secrecy and authentication over open channels such as...security, of which cryptography is an intrinsic part. Encryption is the process of transforming data, in the form of plaintext, into ciphertext using a

  4. Effect of pole number and slot number on performance of dual rotor permanent magnet wind power generator using ferrite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peifeng; Shi, Kai; Sun, Yuxin; Zhua, Huangqiu

    2017-05-01

    Dual rotor permanent magnet (DRPM) wind power generator using ferrite magnets has the advantages of low cost, high efficiency, and high torque density. How to further improve the performance and reduce the cost of the machine by proper choice of pole number and slot number is an important problem to be solved when performing preliminarily design a DRPM wind generator. This paper presents a comprehensive performance comparison of a DRPM wind generator using ferrite magnets with different slot and pole number combinations. The main winding factors are calculated by means of the star of slots. Under the same machine volume and ferrite consumption, the flux linkage, back-electromotive force (EMF), cogging torque, output torque, torque pulsation, and losses are investigated and compared using finite element analysis (FEA). The results show that the slot and pole number combinations have an important impact on the generator properties.

  5. Raw and Central Moments of Binomial Random Variables via Stirling Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We consider here the problem of calculating the moments of binomial random variables. It is shown how formulae for both the raw and the central moments of such random variables may be obtained in a recursive manner utilizing Stirling numbers of the first kind. Suggestions are also provided as to how students might be encouraged to explore this…

  6. Synchronization of random bit generators based on coupled chaotic lasers and application to cryptography.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Ido; Butkovski, Maria; Peleg, Yitzhak; Zigzag, Meital; Aviad, Yaara; Reidler, Igor; Rosenbluh, Michael; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2010-08-16

    Random bit generators (RBGs) constitute an important tool in cryptography, stochastic simulations and secure communications. The later in particular has some difficult requirements: high generation rate of unpredictable bit strings and secure key-exchange protocols over public channels. Deterministic algorithms generate pseudo-random number sequences at high rates, however, their unpredictability is limited by the very nature of their deterministic origin. Recently, physical RBGs based on chaotic semiconductor lasers were shown to exceed Gbit/s rates. Whether secure synchronization of two high rate physical RBGs is possible remains an open question. Here we propose a method, whereby two fast RBGs based on mutually coupled chaotic lasers, are synchronized. Using information theoretic analysis we demonstrate security against a powerful computational eavesdropper, capable of noiseless amplification, where all parameters are publicly known. The method is also extended to secure synchronization of a small network of three RBGs.

  7. KMCLib 1.1: Extended random number support and technical updates to the KMCLib general framework for kinetic Monte-Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leetmaa, Mikael; Skorodumova, Natalia V.

    2015-11-01

    We here present a revised version, v1.1, of the KMCLib general framework for kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) simulations. The generation of random numbers in KMCLib now relies on the C++11 standard library implementation, and support has been added for the user to choose from a set of C++11 implemented random number generators. The Mersenne-twister, the 24 and 48 bit RANLUX and a 'minimal-standard' PRNG are supported. We have also included the possibility to use true random numbers via the C++11 std::random_device generator. This release also includes technical updates to support the use of an extended range of operating systems and compilers.

  8. Pseudo-random generator based on Chinese Remainder Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajard, Jean Claude; Hördegen, Heinrich

    2009-08-01

    Pseudo-Random Generators (PRG) are fundamental in cryptography. Their use occurs at different level in cipher protocols. They need to verify some properties for being qualified as robust. The NIST proposes some criteria and a tests suite which gives informations on the behavior of the PRG. In this work, we present a PRG constructed from the conversion between further residue systems of representation of the elements of GF(2)[X]. In this approach, we use some pairs of co-prime polynomials of degree k and a state vector of 2k bits. The algebraic properties are broken by using different independent pairs during the process. Since this method is reversible, we also can use it as a symmetric crypto-system. We evaluate the cost of a such system, taking into account that some operations are commonly implemented on crypto-processors. We give the results of the different NIST Tests and we explain this choice compare to others found in the literature. We describe the behavior of this PRG and explain how the different rounds are chained for ensuring a fine secure randomness.

  9. Pólya number and first return of bursty random walk: Rigorous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, J.; Xu, X. P.

    2012-03-01

    The recurrence properties of random walks can be characterized by Pólya number, i.e., the probability that the walker has returned to the origin at least once. In this paper, we investigate Pólya number and first return for bursty random walk on a line, in which the walk has different step size and moving probabilities. Using the concept of the Catalan number, we obtain exact results for first return probability, the average first return time and Pólya number for the first time. We show that Pólya number displays two different functional behavior when the walk deviates from the recurrent point. By utilizing the Lagrange inversion formula, we interpret our findings by transferring Pólya number to the closed-form solutions of an inverse function. We also calculate Pólya number using another approach, which corroborates our results and conclusions. Finally, we consider the recurrence properties and Pólya number of two variations of the bursty random walk model.

  10. Generated effect modifiers (GEM’s) in randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Petkova, Eva; Tarpey, Thaddeus; Su, Zhe; Ogden, R. Todd

    2017-01-01

    In a randomized clinical trial (RCT), it is often of interest not only to estimate the effect of various treatments on the outcome, but also to determine whether any patient characteristic has a different relationship with the outcome, depending on treatment. In regression models for the outcome, if there is a non-zero interaction between treatment and a predictor, that predictor is called an “effect modifier”. Identification of such effect modifiers is crucial as we move towards precision medicine, that is, optimizing individual treatment assignment based on patient measurements assessed when presenting for treatment. In most settings, there will be several baseline predictor variables that could potentially modify the treatment effects. This article proposes optimal methods of constructing a composite variable (defined as a linear combination of pre-treatment patient characteristics) in order to generate an effect modifier in an RCT setting. Several criteria are considered for generating effect modifiers and their performance is studied via simulations. An example from a RCT is provided for illustration. PMID:27465235

  11. Generated effect modifiers (GEM's) in randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Petkova, Eva; Tarpey, Thaddeus; Su, Zhe; Ogden, R Todd

    2017-01-01

    In a randomized clinical trial (RCT), it is often of interest not only to estimate the effect of various treatments on the outcome, but also to determine whether any patient characteristic has a different relationship with the outcome, depending on treatment. In regression models for the outcome, if there is a non-zero interaction between treatment and a predictor, that predictor is called an "effect modifier". Identification of such effect modifiers is crucial as we move towards precision medicine, that is, optimizing individual treatment assignment based on patient measurements assessed when presenting for treatment. In most settings, there will be several baseline predictor variables that could potentially modify the treatment effects. This article proposes optimal methods of constructing a composite variable (defined as a linear combination of pre-treatment patient characteristics) in order to generate an effect modifier in an RCT setting. Several criteria are considered for generating effect modifiers and their performance is studied via simulations. An example from a RCT is provided for illustration. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Pre-Service Mathematics Teachers' Pattern Conversion Ability: Generating Figural Patterns Based on Number Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiliç, Çigdem

    2017-01-01

    In that current study, pattern conversion ability of 25 pre-service mathematics teachers (producing figural patterns following number patterns) was investigated. During the study participants were asked to generate figural patterns based on those number patterns. The results of the study indicate that many participants could generate different…

  13. Analysis of random point images with the use of symbolic computation codes and generalized Catalan numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, A. L.; Tuzikov, A. V.; Solov'ev, A. A.; Torgov, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    Original codes and combinatorial-geometrical computational schemes are presented, which are developed and applied for finding exact analytical formulas that describe the probability of errorless readout of random point images recorded by a scanning aperture with a limited number of threshold levels. Combinatorial problems encountered in the course of the study and associated with the new generalization of Catalan numbers are formulated and solved. An attempt is made to find the explicit analytical form of these numbers, which is, on the one hand, a necessary stage of solving the basic research problem and, on the other hand, an independent self-consistent problem.

  14. Random-effects meta-analysis: the number of studies matters.

    PubMed

    Guolo, Annamaria; Varin, Cristiano

    2017-06-01

    This paper investigates the impact of the number of studies on meta-analysis and meta-regression within the random-effects model framework. It is frequently neglected that inference in random-effects models requires a substantial number of studies included in meta-analysis to guarantee reliable conclusions. Several authors warn about the risk of inaccurate results of the traditional DerSimonian and Laird approach especially in the common case of meta-analysis involving a limited number of studies. This paper presents a selection of likelihood and non-likelihood methods for inference in meta-analysis proposed to overcome the limitations of the DerSimonian and Laird procedure, with a focus on the effect of the number of studies. The applicability and the performance of the methods are investigated in terms of Type I error rates and empirical power to detect effects, according to scenarios of practical interest. Simulation studies and applications to real meta-analyses highlight that it is not possible to identify an approach uniformly superior to alternatives. The overall recommendation is to avoid the DerSimonian and Laird method when the number of meta-analysis studies is modest and prefer a more comprehensive procedure that compares alternative inferential approaches. R code for meta-analysis according to all of the inferential methods examined in the paper is provided.

  15. Random bit generation at tunable rates using a chaotic semiconductor laser under distributed feedback.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Zhou; Li, Song-Sui; Zhuang, Jun-Ping; Chan, Sze-Chun

    2015-09-01

    A semiconductor laser with distributed feedback from a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is investigated for random bit generation (RBG). The feedback perturbs the laser to emit chaotically with the intensity being sampled periodically. The samples are then converted into random bits by a simple postprocessing of self-differencing and selecting bits. Unlike a conventional mirror that provides localized feedback, the FBG provides distributed feedback which effectively suppresses the information of the round-trip feedback delay time. Randomness is ensured even when the sampling period is commensurate with the feedback delay between the laser and the grating. Consequently, in RBG, the FBG feedback enables continuous tuning of the output bit rate, reduces the minimum sampling period, and increases the number of bits selected per sample. RBG is experimentally investigated at a sampling period continuously tunable from over 16 ns down to 50 ps, while the feedback delay is fixed at 7.7 ns. By selecting 5 least-significant bits per sample, output bit rates from 0.3 to 100 Gbps are achieved with randomness examined by the National Institute of Standards and Technology test suite.

  16. Quantum cryptography using coherent states: Randomized encryption and key generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corndorf, Eric

    With the advent of the global optical-telecommunications infrastructure, an increasing number of individuals, companies, and agencies communicate information with one another over public networks or physically-insecure private networks. While the majority of the traffic flowing through these networks requires little or no assurance of secrecy, the same cannot be said for certain communications between banks, between government agencies, within the military, and between corporations. In these arenas, the need to specify some level of secrecy in communications is a high priority. While the current approaches to securing sensitive information (namely the public-key-cryptography infrastructure and deterministic private-key ciphers like AES and 3DES) seem to be cryptographically strong based on empirical evidence, there exist no mathematical proofs of secrecy for any widely deployed cryptosystem. As an example, the ubiquitous public-key cryptosystems infer all of their secrecy from the assumption that factoring of the product of two large primes is necessarily time consuming---something which has not, and perhaps cannot, be proven. Since the 1980s, the possibility of using quantum-mechanical features of light as a physical mechanism for satisfying particular cryptographic objectives has been explored. This research has been fueled by the hopes that cryptosystems based on quantum systems may provide provable levels of secrecy which are at least as valid as quantum mechanics itself. Unfortunately, the most widely considered quantum-cryptographic protocols (BB84 and the Ekert protocol) have serious implementation problems. Specifically, they require quantum-mechanical states which are not readily available, and they rely on unproven relations between intrusion-level detection and the information available to an attacker. As a result, the secrecy level provided by these experimental implementations is entirely unspecified. In an effort to provably satisfy the cryptographic

  17. Copy number variation of individual cattle genomes using next-generation sequencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Copy number variations (CNVs) affect a wide range of phenotypic traits; however, CNVs in or near segmental duplication regions are often intractable. Using a read depth approach based on next-generation sequencing, we examined genome-wide copy number differences among five taurine (three Angus, one ...

  18. Individualized cattle copy number and segmental duplication maps using next generation sequencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Copy Number Variations (CNVs) affect a wide range of phenotypic traits; however, CNVs in or near segmental duplication regions are often intractable. Using a read depth approach based on next generation sequencing, we examined genome-wide copy number differences among five taurine (three Angus, one ...

  19. Copy number variation of individual cattle genomes using next-generation sequencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Copy Number Variations (CNVs) affect a wide range of phenotypic traits; however, CNVs in or near segmental duplication regions are often difficult to track. Using a read depth approach based on next generation sequencing, we examined genome-wide copy number differences among five taurine (three Angu...

  20. The randomized benchmarking number is not what you think it is

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Timothy; Rudinger, Kenneth; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Sarovar, Mohan; Young, Kevin

    Randomized benchmarking (RB) is a widely used technique for characterizing a gate set, whereby random sequences of gates are used to probe the average behavior of the gate set. The gates are chosen to ideally compose to the identity, and the rate of decay in the survival probability of an initial state with increasing length sequences is extracted from a set of experiments - this is the `RB number'. For reasonably well-behaved noise and particular gate sets, it has been claimed that the RB number is a reliable estimate of the average gate fidelity (AGF) of each noisy gate to the ideal target unitary, averaged over all gates in the set. Contrary to this widely held view, we show that this is not the case. We show that there are physically relevant situations, in which RB was thought to be provably reliable, where the RB number is many orders of magnitude away from the AGF. These results have important implications for interpreting the RB protocol, and immediate consequences for many advanced RB techniques. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Estimating the number of motor units using random sums with independently thinned terms.

    PubMed

    Müller, Samuel; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Z'graggen, Werner J; Kaelin-Lang, Alain

    2006-07-01

    The problem of estimating the numbers of motor units N in a muscle is embedded in a general stochastic model using the notion of thinning from point process theory. In the paper a new moment type estimator for the numbers of motor units in a muscle is denned, which is derived using random sums with independently thinned terms. Asymptotic normality of the estimator is shown and its practical value is demonstrated with bootstrap and approximative confidence intervals for a data set from a 31-year-old healthy right-handed, female volunteer. Moreover simulation results are presented and Monte-Carlo based quantiles, means, and variances are calculated for N in{300,600,1000}.

  2. Two-dimensional Ising model on random lattices with constant coordination number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrauth, Manuel; Richter, Julian A. J.; Portela, Jefferson S. E.

    2018-02-01

    We study the two-dimensional Ising model on networks with quenched topological (connectivity) disorder. In particular, we construct random lattices of constant coordination number and perform large-scale Monte Carlo simulations in order to obtain critical exponents using finite-size scaling relations. We find disorder-dependent effective critical exponents, similar to diluted models, showing thus no clear universal behavior. Considering the very recent results for the two-dimensional Ising model on proximity graphs and the coordination number correlation analysis suggested by Barghathi and Vojta [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 120602 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.120602], our results indicate that the planarity and connectedness of the lattice play an important role on deciding whether the phase transition is stable against quenched topological disorder.

  3. Autocatalytic polymerization generates persistent random walk of crawling cells.

    PubMed

    Sambeth, R; Baumgaertner, A

    2001-05-28

    The autocatalytic polymerization kinetics of the cytoskeletal actin network provides the basic mechanism for a persistent random walk of a crawling cell. It is shown that network remodeling by branching processes near the cell membrane is essential for the bimodal spatial stability of the network which induces a spontaneous breaking of isotropic cell motion. Details of the phenomena are analyzed using a simple polymerization model studied by analytical and simulation methods.

  4. Design and Test of Pseudorandom Number Generator Using a Star Network of Lorenz Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kenichiro; Miyano, Takaya

    We have recently developed a chaos-based stream cipher based on augmented Lorenz equations as a star network of Lorenz subsystems. In our method, the augmented Lorenz equations are used as a pseudorandom number generator. In this study, we propose a new method based on the augmented Lorenz equations for generating binary pseudorandom numbers and evaluate its security using the statistical tests of SP800-22 published by the National Institute for Standards and Technology in comparison with the performances of other chaotic dynamical models used as binary pseudorandom number generators. We further propose a faster version of the proposed method and evaluate its security using the statistical tests of TestU01 published by L’Ecuyer and Simard.

  5. On an acoustic field generated by subsonic jet at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Arndt, R. E. A.

    1978-01-01

    An acoustic field generated by subsonic jets at low Reynolds numbers was investigated. This work is motivated by the need to increase the fundamental understanding of the jet noise generation mechanism which is essential to the development of further advanced techniques of noise suppression. The scope of this study consists of two major investigation. One is a study of large scale coherent structure in the jet turbulence, and the other is a study of the Reynolds number dependence of jet noise. With this in mind, extensive flow and acoustic measurements in low Reynolds number turbulent jets (8,930 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 220,000) were undertaken using miniature nozzles of the same configuration but different diameters at various exist Mach numbers (0.2 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 0.9).

  6. Random motor generation in a finger tapping task: influence of spatial contingency and of cortical and subcortical hemispheric brain lesions

    PubMed Central

    Annoni, J.; Pegna, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To test the hypothesis that, during random motor generation, the spatial contingencies inherent to the task would induce additional preferences in normal subjects, shifting their performances farther from randomness. By contrast, perceptual or executive dysfunction could alter these task related biases in patients with brain damage.
METHODS—Two groups of patients, with right and left focal brain lesions, as well as 25 right handed subjects matched for age and handedness were asked to execute a random choice motor task—namely, to generate a random series of 180 button presses from a set of 10 keys placed vertically in front of them.
RESULTS—In the control group, as in the left brain lesion group, motor generation was subject to deviations from theoretical expected randomness, similar to those when numbers are generated mentally, as immediate repetitions (successive presses on the same key) are avoided. However, the distribution of button presses was also contingent on the topographic disposition of the keys: the central keys were chosen more often than those placed at extreme positions. Small distances were favoured, particularly with the left hand. These patterns were influenced by implicit strategies and task related contingencies.
 By contrast, right brain lesion patients with frontal involvement tended to show a more square distribution of key presses—that is, the number of key presses tended to be more equally distributed. The strategies were also altered by brain lesions: the number of immediate repetitions was more frequent when the lesion involved the right frontal areas yielding a random generation nearer to expected theoretical randomness. The frequency of adjacent key presses was increased by right anterior and left posterior cortical as well as by right subcortical lesions, but decreased by left subcortical lesions.
CONCLUSIONS—Depending on the side of the lesion and the degree of cortical-subcortical involvement, the

  7. On the Generation of Intermediate Number Squeezed State of the Quantized Radiation Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baseia, B.; de Lima, A. F.; Bagnato, V. S.

    Recently, a new state of the quantized radiation field — the intermediate number squeezed state (INSS) — has been introduced in the literature: it interpolates between the number state |n> and the squeezed state |z, α>=Ŝ(z)|α>, and exhibits interesting nonclassical properties as antibunching, sub-Poissonian statistics and squeezing. Here we introduce a slight modification in the previous definition allowing us a proposal to generate the INSS. Nonclassical properties using a new set of parameters are also studied.

  8. Test-enhanced web-based learning: optimizing the number of questions (a randomized crossover trial).

    PubMed

    Cook, David A; Thompson, Warren G; Thomas, Kris G

    2014-01-01

    Questions enhance learning in Web-based courses, but preliminary evidence suggests that too many questions may interfere with learning. The authors sought to determine how varying the number of self-assessment questions affects knowledge outcomes in a Web-based course. The authors conducted a randomized crossover trial in one internal medicine and one family medicine residency program between January 2009 and July 2010. Eight Web-based modules on ambulatory medicine topics were developed, with varying numbers of self-assessment questions (0, 1, 5, 10, or 15). Participants completed modules in four different formats each year, with sequence randomly assigned. Participants completed a pretest for half their modules. Outcomes included knowledge, completion time, and module ratings. One hundred eighty residents provided data. The mean (standard error) percent correct knowledge score was 53.2 (0.8) for pretests and 73.7 (0.5) for posttests. In repeated-measures analysis pooling all data, mean posttest knowledge scores were highest for the 10- and 15-question formats (75.7 [1.1] and 74.4 [1.0], respectively) and lower for 0-, 1-, and 5-question formats (73.1 [1.3], 72.9 [1.0], and 72.8 [1.5], respectively); P = .04 for differences across all modules. Modules with more questions generally took longer to complete and were rated higher, although differences were small. Residents most often identified 10 questions as ideal. Posttest knowledge scores were higher for modules that included a pretest (75.4 [0.9] versus 72.2 [0.9]; P = .0002). Increasing the number of self-assessment questions improves learning until a plateau beyond which additional questions do not add value.

  9. Grouping by proximity and the visual impression of approximate number in random dot arrays.

    PubMed

    Im, Hee Yeon; Zhong, Sheng-Hua; Halberda, Justin

    2016-09-01

    We address the challenges of how to model human perceptual grouping in random dot arrays and how perceptual grouping affects human number estimation in these arrays. We introduce a modeling approach relying on a modified k-means clustering algorithm to formally describe human observers' grouping behavior. We found that a default grouping window size of approximately 4° of visual angle describes human grouping judgments across a range of random dot arrays (i.e., items within 4° are grouped together). This window size was highly consistent across observers and images, and was also stable across stimulus durations, suggesting that the k-means model captured a robust signature of perceptual grouping. Further, the k-means model outperformed other models (e.g., CODE) at describing human grouping behavior. Next, we found that the more the dots in a display are clustered together, the more human observers tend to underestimate the numerosity of the dots. We demonstrate that this effect is independent of density, and the modified k-means model can predict human observers' numerosity judgments and underestimation. Finally, we explored the robustness of the relationship between clustering and dot number underestimation and found that the effects of clustering remain, but are greatly reduced, when participants receive feedback on every trial. Together, this work suggests some promising avenues for formal models of human grouping behavior, and it highlights the importance of a 4° window of perceptual grouping. Lastly, it reveals a robust, somewhat plastic, relationship between perceptual grouping and number estimation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. On random field Completely Automated Public Turing Test to Tell Computers and Humans Apart generation.

    PubMed

    Kouritzin, Michael A; Newton, Fraser; Wu, Biao

    2013-04-01

    Herein, we propose generating CAPTCHAs through random field simulation and give a novel, effective and efficient algorithm to do so. Indeed, we demonstrate that sufficient information about word tests for easy human recognition is contained in the site marginal probabilities and the site-to-nearby-site covariances and that these quantities can be embedded directly into certain conditional probabilities, designed for effective simulation. The CAPTCHAs are then partial random realizations of the random CAPTCHA word. We start with an initial random field (e.g., randomly scattered letter pieces) and use Gibbs resampling to re-simulate portions of the field repeatedly using these conditional probabilities until the word becomes human-readable. The residual randomness from the initial random field together with the random implementation of the CAPTCHA word provide significant resistance to attack. This results in a CAPTCHA, which is unrecognizable to modern optical character recognition but is recognized about 95% of the time in a human readability study.

  11. [Working memory and executive control: inhibitory processes in updating and random generation tasks].

    PubMed

    Macizo, Pedro; Bajo, Teresa; Soriano, Maria Felipa

    2006-02-01

    Working Memory (WM) span predicts subjects' performance in control executive tasks and, in addition, it has been related to the capacity to inhibit irrelevant information. In this paper we investigate the role of WM span in two executive tasks focusing our attention on inhibitory components of both tasks. High and low span participants recalled targets words rejecting irrelevant items at the same time (Experiment 1) and they generated random numbers (Experiment 2). Results showed a clear relation between WM span and performance in both tasks. In addition, analyses of intrusion errors (Experiment 1) and stereotyped responses (Experiment 2) indicated that high span individuals were able to efficiently use the inhibitory component implied in both tasks. The pattern of data provides support to the relation between WM span and control executive tasks through an inhibitory mechanism.

  12. Feasibility of including cellular telephone numbers in random digit dialing for epidemiologic case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Lynda F; Schwartz, Stephen M; Doody, David R; Lee, Spencer C; Li, Christopher I

    2011-01-01

    The usefulness of landline random digit dialing (RDD) in epidemiologic studies is threatened by the rapid increase in households with only cellular telephone service. This study assessed the feasibility of including cellular telephone numbers in RDD and differences between young adults with landline telephones and those with only cellular telephones. Between 2008 and 2009, a total of 9,023 cellular telephone numbers were called and 43.8% were successfully screened; 248 men and 249 women who resided in 3 Washington State counties, were 20-44 years of age, and used only cellular telephones were interviewed. They were compared with 332 men and 526 women with landline telephones interviewed as controls for 2 case-control studies conducted in parallel with cellular telephone interviewing. Cellular-only users were more likely to be college educated and less likely to have fathered/birthed a child than were their landline counterparts. Male cellular-only users were less likely to be obese and more likely to exercise, to be Hispanic, and to have lower incomes, while female cellular-only users were more likely to be single than landline respondents. Including cellular telephone numbers in RDD is feasible and should be incorporated into epidemiologic studies that rely on this method to ascertain subjects, although low screening rates could hamper the representativeness of such a sample.

  13. Optimal Number of Thermoelectric Couples in a Heat Pipe Assisted Thermoelectric Generator for Waste Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tongjun; Wang, Tongcai; Luan, Weiling; Cao, Qimin

    2017-05-01

    Waste heat recovery through thermoelectric generators is a promising way to improve energy conversion efficiency. This paper proposes a type of heat pipe assisted thermoelectric generator (HP-TEG) system. The expandable evaporator and condenser surface of the heat pipe facilitates the intensive assembly of thermoelectric (TE) modules to compose a compact device. Compared with a conventional layer structure thermoelectric generator, this system is feasible for the installment of more TE couples, thus increasing power output. To investigate the performance of the HP-TEG and the optimal number of TE couples, a theoretical model was presented and verified by experiment results. Further theoretical analysis results showed the performance of the HP-TEG could be further improved by optimizing the parameters, including the inlet air temperature, the thermal resistance of the heating section, and thermal resistance of the cooling structure. Moreover, applying a proper number of TE couples is important to acquire the best power output performance.

  14. Brownian motion properties of optoelectronic random bit generators based on laser chaos.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Wang, Yuncai; Wang, Yongge

    2016-07-11

    The nondeterministic property of the optoelectronic random bit generator (RBG) based on laser chaos are experimentally analyzed from two aspects of the central limit theorem and law of iterated logarithm. The random bits are extracted from an optical feedback chaotic laser diode using a multi-bit extraction technique in the electrical domain. Our experimental results demonstrate that the generated random bits have no statistical distance from the Brownian motion, besides that they can pass the state-of-the-art industry-benchmark statistical test suite (NIST SP800-22). All of them give a mathematically provable evidence that the ultrafast random bit generator based on laser chaos can be used as a nondeterministic random bit source.

  15. Number statistics for β-ensembles of random matrices: Applications to trapped fermions at zero temperature.

    PubMed

    Marino, Ricardo; Majumdar, Satya N; Schehr, Grégory; Vivo, Pierpaolo

    2016-09-01

    Let P_{β}^{(V)}(N_{I}) be the probability that a N×Nβ-ensemble of random matrices with confining potential V(x) has N_{I} eigenvalues inside an interval I=[a,b] on the real line. We introduce a general formalism, based on the Coulomb gas technique and the resolvent method, to compute analytically P_{β}^{(V)}(N_{I}) for large N. We show that this probability scales for large N as P_{β}^{(V)}(N_{I})≈exp[-βN^{2}ψ^{(V)}(N_{I}/N)], where β is the Dyson index of the ensemble. The rate function ψ^{(V)}(k_{I}), independent of β, is computed in terms of single integrals that can be easily evaluated numerically. The general formalism is then applied to the classical β-Gaussian (I=[-L,L]), β-Wishart (I=[1,L]), and β-Cauchy (I=[-L,L]) ensembles. Expanding the rate function around its minimum, we find that generically the number variance var(N_{I}) exhibits a nonmonotonic behavior as a function of the size of the interval, with a maximum that can be precisely characterized. These analytical results, corroborated by numerical simulations, provide the full counting statistics of many systems where random matrix models apply. In particular, we present results for the full counting statistics of zero-temperature one-dimensional spinless fermions in a harmonic trap.

  16. Field Line Random Walk in Isotropic Magnetic Turbulence up to Infinite Kubo Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonsrettee, W.; Wongpan, P.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Chuychai, P.; Rowlands, G.

    2013-12-01

    In astrophysical plasmas, the magnetic field line random walk (FLRW) plays a key role in the transport of energetic particles. In the present, we consider isotropic magnetic turbulence, which is a reasonable model for interstellar space. Theoretical conceptions of the FLRW have been strongly influenced by studies of the limit of weak fluctuations (or a strong mean field) (e.g, Isichenko 1991a, b). In this case, the behavior of FLRW can be characterized by the Kubo number R = (b/B0)(l_∥ /l_ \\bot ) , where l∥ and l_ \\bot are turbulence coherence scales parallel and perpendicular to the mean field, respectively, and b is the root mean squared fluctuation field. In the 2D limit (R ≫ 1), there has been an apparent conflict between concepts of Bohm diffusion, which is based on the Corrsin's independence hypothesis, and percolative diffusion. Here we have used three non-perturbative analytic techniques based on Corrsin's independence hypothesis for B0 = 0 (R = ∞ ): diffusive decorrelation (DD), random ballistic decorrelation (RBD) and a general ordinary differential equation (ODE), and compared them with direct computer simulations. All the analytical models and computer simulations agree that isotropic turbulence for R = ∞ has a field line diffusion coefficient that is consistent with Bohm diffusion. Partially supported by the Thailand Research Fund, NASA, and NSF.

  17. Next-generation narrow band imaging system for colonic polyp detection: a prospective multicenter randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Horimatsu, Takahiro; Sano, Yasushi; Tanaka, Shinji; Kawamura, Takuji; Saito, Shoichi; Iwatate, Mineo; Oka, Shiro; Uno, Koji; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Ishikawa, Hideki; Muto, Manabu; Tajiri, Hisao

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have yielded conflicting results on the colonic polyp detection rate with narrow-band imaging (NBI) compared with white-light imaging (WLI). We compared the mean number of colonic polyps detected per patient for NBI versus WLI using a next-generation NBI system (EVIS LUCERA ELITE; Olympus Medical Systems) used with standard-definition (SD) colonoscopy and wide-angle (WA) colonoscopy. this study is a 2 × 2 factorial, prospective, multicenter randomized controlled trial. this study was conducted at five academic centers in Japan. patients were allocated to one of four groups: (1) WLI with SD colonoscopy (H260AZI), (2) NBI with SD colonoscopy (H260AZI), (3) WLI with WA colonoscopy (CF-HQ290), and (4) NBI with WA colonoscopy (CF-HQ290). the mean numbers of polyps detected per patient were compared between the four groups: WLI with/without WA colonoscopy and NBI with/without WA colonoscopy. Of the 454 patients recruited, 431 patients were enrolled. The total numbers of polyps detected by WLI with SD, NBI with SD, WLI with WA, and NBI with WA were 164, 176, 188, and 241, respectively. The mean number of polyps detected per patient was significantly higher in the NBI group than in the WLI group (2.01 vs 1.56; P = 0.032). The rate was not higher in the WA group than in the SD group (1.97 vs 1.61; P = 0.089). Although WA colonoscopy did not improve the polyp detection, next-generation NBI colonoscopy represents a significant improvement in the detection of colonic polyps.

  18. A fast ergodic algorithm for generating ensembles of equilateral random polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, R.; Hinson, K.; Arsuaga, J.; Diao, Y.

    2009-03-01

    Knotted structures are commonly found in circular DNA and along the backbone of certain proteins. In order to properly estimate properties of these three-dimensional structures it is often necessary to generate large ensembles of simulated closed chains (i.e. polygons) of equal edge lengths (such polygons are called equilateral random polygons). However finding efficient algorithms that properly sample the space of equilateral random polygons is a difficult problem. Currently there are no proven algorithms that generate equilateral random polygons with its theoretical distribution. In this paper we propose a method that generates equilateral random polygons in a 'step-wise uniform' way. We prove that this method is ergodic in the sense that any given equilateral random polygon can be generated by this method and we show that the time needed to generate an equilateral random polygon of length n is linear in terms of n. These two properties make this algorithm a big improvement over the existing generating methods. Detailed numerical comparisons of our algorithm with other widely used algorithms are provided.

  19. Minimal two-sphere model of the generation of fluid flow at low Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Leoni, M; Bassetti, B; Kotar, J; Cicuta, P; Cosentino Lagomarsino, M

    2010-03-01

    Locomotion and generation of flow at low Reynolds number are subject to severe limitations due to the irrelevance of inertia: the "scallop theorem" requires that the system have at least two degrees of freedom, which move in non-reciprocal fashion, i.e. breaking time-reversal symmetry. We show here that a minimal model consisting of just two spheres driven by harmonic potentials is capable of generating flow. In this pump system the two degrees of freedom are the mean and relative positions of the two spheres. We have performed and compared analytical predictions, numerical simulation and experiments, showing that a time-reversible drive is sufficient to induce flow.

  20. Creating, generating and comparing random network models with NetworkRandomizer.

    PubMed

    Tosadori, Gabriele; Bestvina, Ivan; Spoto, Fausto; Laudanna, Carlo; Scardoni, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Biological networks are becoming a fundamental tool for the investigation of high-throughput data in several fields of biology and biotechnology. With the increasing amount of information, network-based models are gaining more and more interest and new techniques are required in order to mine the information and to validate the results. To fill the validation gap we present an app, for the Cytoscape platform, which aims at creating randomised networks and randomising existing, real networks. Since there is a lack of tools that allow performing such operations, our app aims at enabling researchers to exploit different, well known random network models that could be used as a benchmark for validating real, biological datasets. We also propose a novel methodology for creating random weighted networks, i.e. the multiplication algorithm, starting from real, quantitative data. Finally, the app provides a statistical tool that compares real versus randomly computed attributes, in order to validate the numerical findings. In summary, our app aims at creating a standardised methodology for the validation of the results in the context of the Cytoscape platform.

  1. DNA copy number, including telomeres and mitochondria, assayed using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Castle, John C; Biery, Matthew; Bouzek, Heather; Xie, Tao; Chen, Ronghua; Misura, Kira; Jackson, Stuart; Armour, Christopher D; Johnson, Jason M; Rohl, Carol A; Raymond, Christopher K

    2010-04-16

    DNA copy number variations occur within populations and aberrations can cause disease. We sought to develop an improved lab-automatable, cost-efficient, accurate platform to profile DNA copy number. We developed a sequencing-based assay of nuclear, mitochondrial, and telomeric DNA copy number that draws on the unbiased nature of next-generation sequencing and incorporates techniques developed for RNA expression profiling. To demonstrate this platform, we assayed UMC-11 cells using 5 million 33 nt reads and found tremendous copy number variation, including regions of single and homogeneous deletions and amplifications to 29 copies; 5 times more mitochondria and 4 times less telomeric sequence than a pool of non-diseased, blood-derived DNA; and that UMC-11 was derived from a male individual. The described assay outputs absolute copy number, outputs an error estimate (p-value), and is more accurate than array-based platforms at high copy number. The platform enables profiling of mitochondrial levels and telomeric length. The assay is lab-automatable and has a genomic resolution and cost that are tunable based on the number of sequence reads.

  2. DNA copy number, including telomeres and mitochondria, assayed using next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background DNA copy number variations occur within populations and aberrations can cause disease. We sought to develop an improved lab-automatable, cost-efficient, accurate platform to profile DNA copy number. Results We developed a sequencing-based assay of nuclear, mitochondrial, and telomeric DNA copy number that draws on the unbiased nature of next-generation sequencing and incorporates techniques developed for RNA expression profiling. To demonstrate this platform, we assayed UMC-11 cells using 5 million 33 nt reads and found tremendous copy number variation, including regions of single and homogeneous deletions and amplifications to 29 copies; 5 times more mitochondria and 4 times less telomeric sequence than a pool of non-diseased, blood-derived DNA; and that UMC-11 was derived from a male individual. Conclusion The described assay outputs absolute copy number, outputs an error estimate (p-value), and is more accurate than array-based platforms at high copy number. The platform enables profiling of mitochondrial levels and telomeric length. The assay is lab-automatable and has a genomic resolution and cost that are tunable based on the number of sequence reads. PMID:20398377

  3. Law of large numbers for the SIR model with random vertex weights on Erdős-Rényi graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xiaofeng

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we are concerned with the SIR model with random vertex weights on Erdős-Rényi graph G(n , p) . The Erdős-Rényi graph G(n , p) is generated from the complete graph Cn with n vertices through independently deleting each edge with probability (1 - p) . We assign i. i. d. copies of a positive r. v. ρ on each vertex as the vertex weights. For the SIR model, each vertex is in one of the three states 'susceptible', 'infective' and 'removed'. An infective vertex infects a given susceptible neighbor at rate proportional to the production of the weights of these two vertices. An infective vertex becomes removed at a constant rate. A removed vertex will never be infected again. We assume that at t = 0 there is no removed vertex and the number of infective vertices follows a Bernoulli distribution B(n , θ) . Our main result is a law of large numbers of the model. We give two deterministic functions HS(ψt) ,HV(ψt) for t ≥ 0 and show that for any t ≥ 0, HS(ψt) is the limit proportion of susceptible vertices and HV(ψt) is the limit of the mean capability of an infective vertex to infect a given susceptible neighbor at moment t as n grows to infinity.

  4. The role of ferroelectric domain structure in second harmonic generation in random quadratic media.

    PubMed

    Roppo, Vito; Wang, W; Kalinowski, K; Kong, Y; Cojocaru, C; Trull, J; Vilaseca, R; Scalora, M; Krolikowski, W; Kivshar, Yu

    2010-03-01

    We study theoretically and numerically the second harmonic generation in a nonlinear crystal with random distribution of ferroelectric domains. We show that the specific features of disordered domain structure greatly affect the emission pattern of the generated harmonics. This phenomena can be used to characterize the degree of disorder in nonlinear photonic structures.

  5. Application of remote sensing and geographical information system for generation of runoff curve number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshram, S. Gajbhiye; Sharma, S. K.; Tignath, S.

    2017-07-01

    Watershed is an ideal unit for planning and management of land and water resources (Gajbhiye et al., IEEE international conference on advances in technology and engineering (ICATE), Bombay, vol 1, issue 9, pp 23-25, 2013a; Gajbhiye et al., Appl Water Sci 4(1):51-61, 2014a; Gajbhiye et al., J Geol Soc India (SCI-IF 0.596) 84(2):192-196, 2014b). This study aims to generate the curve number, using remote sensing and geographical information system (GIS) and the effect of slope on curve number values. The study was carried out in Kanhaiya Nala watershed located in Satna district of Madhya Pradesh. Soil map, Land Use/Land cover and slope map were generated in GIS Environment. The CN parameter values corresponding to various soil, land cover, and land management conditions were selected from Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) standard table. Curve number (CN) is an index developed by the NRCS, to represent the potential for storm water runoff within a drainage area. The CN for a drainage basin is estimated using a combination of land use, soil, and antecedent soil moisture condition (AMC). In present study effect of slope on CN values were determined. The result showed that the CN unadjusted value are higher in comparison to CN adjusted with slope. Remote sensing and GIS is very reliable technique for the preparation of most of the input data required by the SCS curve number model.

  6. Remediating Number Combination and Word Problem Deficits Among Students With Mathematics Difficulties: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Powell, Sarah R.; Seethaler, Pamela M.; Cirino, Paul T.; Fletcher, Jack M.; Fuchs, Douglas; Hamlett, Carol L.; Zumeta, Rebecca O.

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess the efficacy of remedial tutoring for 3rd graders with mathematics difficulty, to investigate whether tutoring is differentially efficacious depending on students’ math difficulty status (mathematics difficulty alone vs. mathematics plus reading difficulty), to explore transfer from number combination (NC) remediation, and to examine the transportability of the tutoring protocols. At 2 sites, 133 students were stratified on mathematics difficulty status and site and then randomly assigned to 3 conditions: control (no tutoring), tutoring on automatic retrieval of NCs (i.e., Math Flash), or tutoring on word problems with attention to the foundational skills of NCs, procedural calculations, and algebra (i.e., Pirate Math). Tutoring occurred for 16 weeks, 3 sessions per week and 20–30 min per session. Math Flash enhanced fluency with NCs with transfer to procedural computation but without transfer to algebra or word problems. Pirate Math enhanced word problem skill as well as fluency with NCs, procedural computation, and algebra. Tutoring was not differentially efficacious as a function of students’ mathematics difficulty status. The tutoring protocols proved transportable across sites. PMID:19865600

  7. A cubic map chaos criterion theorem with applications in generalized synchronization based pseudorandom number generator and image encryption.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuping; Min, Lequan; Wang, Xue

    2015-05-01

    This paper sets up a chaos criterion theorem on a kind of cubic polynomial discrete maps. Using this theorem, Zhou-Song's chaos criterion theorem on quadratic polynomial discrete maps and generalized synchronization (GS) theorem construct an eight-dimensional chaotic GS system. Numerical simulations have been carried out to verify the effectiveness of theoretical results. The chaotic GS system is used to design a chaos-based pseudorandom number generator (CPRNG). Using FIPS 140-2 test suit/Generalized FIPS 140-2, test suit tests the randomness of two 1000 key streams consisting of 20 000 bits generated by the CPRNG, respectively. The results show that there are 99.9%/98.5% key streams to have passed the FIPS 140-2 test suit/Generalized FIPS 140-2 test. Numerical simulations show that the different keystreams have an average 50.001% same codes. The key space of the CPRNG is larger than 2(1345). As an application of the CPRNG, this study gives an image encryption example. Experimental results show that the linear coefficients between the plaintext and the ciphertext and the decrypted ciphertexts via the 100 key streams with perturbed keys are less than 0.00428. The result suggests that the decrypted texts via the keystreams generated via perturbed keys of the CPRNG are almost completely independent on the original image text, and brute attacks are needed to break the cryptographic system.

  8. A cubic map chaos criterion theorem with applications in generalized synchronization based pseudorandom number generator and image encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiuping; Min, Lequan; Wang, Xue

    2015-05-01

    This paper sets up a chaos criterion theorem on a kind of cubic polynomial discrete maps. Using this theorem, Zhou-Song's chaos criterion theorem on quadratic polynomial discrete maps and generalized synchronization (GS) theorem construct an eight-dimensional chaotic GS system. Numerical simulations have been carried out to verify the effectiveness of theoretical results. The chaotic GS system is used to design a chaos-based pseudorandom number generator (CPRNG). Using FIPS 140-2 test suit/Generalized FIPS 140-2, test suit tests the randomness of two 1000 key streams consisting of 20 000 bits generated by the CPRNG, respectively. The results show that there are 99.9%/98.5% key streams to have passed the FIPS 140-2 test suit/Generalized FIPS 140-2 test. Numerical simulations show that the different keystreams have an average 50.001% same codes. The key space of the CPRNG is larger than 21345. As an application of the CPRNG, this study gives an image encryption example. Experimental results show that the linear coefficients between the plaintext and the ciphertext and the decrypted ciphertexts via the 100 key streams with perturbed keys are less than 0.00428. The result suggests that the decrypted texts via the keystreams generated via perturbed keys of the CPRNG are almost completely independent on the original image text, and brute attacks are needed to break the cryptographic system.

  9. Intervention for First Graders with Limited Number Knowledge: Large-Scale Replication of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gersten, Russell; Rolfhus, Eric; Clarke, Ben; Decker, Lauren E.; Wilkins, Chuck; Dimino, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Replication studies are extremely rare in education. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) is a scale-up replication of Fuchs et al., which in a sample of 139 found a statistically significant positive impact for Number Rockets, a small-group intervention for at-risk first graders that focused on building understanding of number operations. The…

  10. Early stage hot spot analysis through standard cell base random pattern generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Joong-Won; Song, Jaewan; Kim, Jeong-Lim; Park, Seongyul; Yang, Seung-Hune; Lee, Sooryong; Kang, Hokyu; Madkour, Kareem; ElManhawy, Wael; Lee, SeungJo; Kwan, Joe

    2017-04-01

    Due to limited availability of DRC clean patterns during the process and RET recipe development, OPC recipes are not tested with high pattern coverage. Various kinds of pattern can help OPC engineer to detect sensitive patterns to lithographic effects. Random pattern generation is needed to secure robust OPC recipe. However, simple random patterns without considering real product layout style can't cover patterning hotspot in production levels. It is not effective to use them for OPC optimization thus it is important to generate random patterns similar to real product patterns. This paper presents a strategy for generating random patterns based on design architecture information and preventing hotspot in early process development stage through a tool called Layout Schema Generator (LSG). Using LSG, we generate standard cell based on random patterns reflecting real design cell structure - fin pitch, gate pitch and cell height. The output standard cells from LSG are applied to an analysis methodology to assess their hotspot severity by assigning a score according to their optical image parameters - NILS, MEEF, %PV band and thus potential hotspots can be defined by determining their ranking. This flow is demonstrated on Samsung 7nm technology optimizing OPC recipe and early enough in the process avoiding using problematic patterns.

  11. Temperature modulates dengue virus epidemic growth rates through its effects on reproduction numbers and generation intervals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siraj, A. S.; Oidtman, R. J.; Huber, J. H.; Kraemer, M. U.; Brady, O. J.; Johansson, M. A.; Perkins, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    Epidemic growth rate, r, provides a more complete description of the potential for epidemics than the more commonly studied basic reproduction number, R0, yet the former has never been described as a function of temperature for dengue virus or other pathogens with temperature-sensitive transmission. The need to understand the drivers of epidemics of these pathogens is acute, with arthropod-borne virus epidemics becoming increasingly problematic. We addressed this need by developing temperature-dependent descriptions of the two components of r—R0 and the generation interval—to obtain a temperature-dependent description of r. Our results show that the generation interval is highly sensitive to temperature, decreasing twofold between 25 and 35 °C and suggesting that dengue virus epidemics may accelerate as temperatures increase, not only because of more infections per generation but also because of faster generations. Under the empirical temperature relationships that we considered, we found that r peaked at a temperature threshold that was robust to uncertainty in model parameters that do not depend on temperature. Although the precise value of this temperature threshold could be refined following future studies of empirical temperature relationships, the framework we present for identifying such temperature thresholds offers a new way to classify regions in which dengue virus epidemic intensity could either increase or decrease under future climate change.

  12. Temperature modulates dengue virus epidemic growth rates through its effects on reproduction numbers and generation intervals

    PubMed Central

    Oidtman, Rachel J.; Huber, John H.; Kraemer, Moritz U. G.; Brady, Oliver J.; Johansson, Michael A.; Perkins, T. Alex

    2017-01-01

    Epidemic growth rate, r, provides a more complete description of the potential for epidemics than the more commonly studied basic reproduction number, R0, yet the former has never been described as a function of temperature for dengue virus or other pathogens with temperature-sensitive transmission. The need to understand the drivers of epidemics of these pathogens is acute, with arthropod-borne virus epidemics becoming increasingly problematic. We addressed this need by developing temperature-dependent descriptions of the two components of r—R0 and the generation interval—to obtain a temperature-dependent description of r. Our results show that the generation interval is highly sensitive to temperature, decreasing twofold between 25 and 35°C and suggesting that dengue virus epidemics may accelerate as temperatures increase, not only because of more infections per generation but also because of faster generations. Under the empirical temperature relationships that we considered, we found that r peaked at a temperature threshold that was robust to uncertainty in model parameters that do not depend on temperature. Although the precise value of this temperature threshold could be refined following future studies of empirical temperature relationships, the framework we present for identifying such temperature thresholds offers a new way to classify regions in which dengue virus epidemic intensity could either increase or decrease under future climate change. PMID:28723920

  13. Multiple ECG Fiducial Points-Based Random Binary Sequence Generation for Securing Wireless Body Area Networks.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guanglou; Fang, Gengfa; Shankaran, Rajan; Orgun, Mehmet A; Zhou, Jie; Qiao, Li; Saleem, Kashif

    2017-05-01

    Generating random binary sequences (BSes) is a fundamental requirement in cryptography. A BS is a sequence of N bits, and each bit has a value of 0 or 1. For securing sensors within wireless body area networks (WBANs), electrocardiogram (ECG)-based BS generation methods have been widely investigated in which interpulse intervals (IPIs) from each heartbeat cycle are processed to produce BSes. Using these IPI-based methods to generate a 128-bit BS in real time normally takes around half a minute. In order to improve the time efficiency of such methods, this paper presents an ECG multiple fiducial-points based binary sequence generation (MFBSG) algorithm. The technique of discrete wavelet transforms is employed to detect arrival time of these fiducial points, such as P, Q, R, S, and T peaks. Time intervals between them, including RR, RQ, RS, RP, and RT intervals, are then calculated based on this arrival time, and are used as ECG features to generate random BSes with low latency. According to our analysis on real ECG data, these ECG feature values exhibit the property of randomness and, thus, can be utilized to generate random BSes. Compared with the schemes that solely rely on IPIs to generate BSes, this MFBSG algorithm uses five feature values from one heart beat cycle, and can be up to five times faster than the solely IPI-based methods. So, it achieves a design goal of low latency. According to our analysis, the complexity of the algorithm is comparable to that of fast Fourier transforms. These randomly generated ECG BSes can be used as security keys for encryption or authentication in a WBAN system.

  14. Graphene based widely-tunable and singly-polarized pulse generation with random fiber lasers

    PubMed Central

    Yao, B. C.; Rao, Y. J.; Wang, Z. N.; Wu, Y.; Zhou, J. H.; Wu, H.; Fan, M. Q.; Cao, X. L.; Zhang, W. L.; Chen, Y. F.; Li, Y. R.; Churkin, D.; Turitsyn, S.; Wong, C. W.

    2015-01-01

    Pulse generation often requires a stabilized cavity and its corresponding mode structure for initial phase-locking. Contrastingly, modeless cavity-free random lasers provide new possibilities for high quantum efficiency lasing that could potentially be widely tunable spectrally and temporally. Pulse generation in random lasers, however, has remained elusive since the discovery of modeless gain lasing. Here we report coherent pulse generation with modeless random lasers based on the unique polarization selectivity and broadband saturable absorption of monolayer graphene. Simultaneous temporal compression of cavity-free pulses are observed with such a polarization modulation, along with a broadly-tunable pulsewidth across two orders of magnitude down to 900 ps, a broadly-tunable repetition rate across three orders of magnitude up to 3 MHz, and a singly-polarized pulse train at 41 dB extinction ratio, about an order of magnitude larger than conventional pulsed fiber lasers. Moreover, our graphene-based pulse formation also demonstrates robust pulse-to-pulse stability and wide-wavelength operation due to the cavity-less feature. Such a graphene-based architecture not only provides a tunable pulsed random laser for fiber-optic sensing, speckle-free imaging, and laser-material processing, but also a new way for the non-random CW fiber lasers to generate widely tunable and singly-polarized pulses. PMID:26687730

  15. Graphene based widely-tunable and singly-polarized pulse generation with random fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Yao, B C; Rao, Y J; Wang, Z N; Wu, Y; Zhou, J H; Wu, H; Fan, M Q; Cao, X L; Zhang, W L; Chen, Y F; Li, Y R; Churkin, D; Turitsyn, S; Wong, C W

    2015-12-21

    Pulse generation often requires a stabilized cavity and its corresponding mode structure for initial phase-locking. Contrastingly, modeless cavity-free random lasers provide new possibilities for high quantum efficiency lasing that could potentially be widely tunable spectrally and temporally. Pulse generation in random lasers, however, has remained elusive since the discovery of modeless gain lasing. Here we report coherent pulse generation with modeless random lasers based on the unique polarization selectivity and broadband saturable absorption of monolayer graphene. Simultaneous temporal compression of cavity-free pulses are observed with such a polarization modulation, along with a broadly-tunable pulsewidth across two orders of magnitude down to 900 ps, a broadly-tunable repetition rate across three orders of magnitude up to 3 MHz, and a singly-polarized pulse train at 41 dB extinction ratio, about an order of magnitude larger than conventional pulsed fiber lasers. Moreover, our graphene-based pulse formation also demonstrates robust pulse-to-pulse stability and wide-wavelength operation due to the cavity-less feature. Such a graphene-based architecture not only provides a tunable pulsed random laser for fiber-optic sensing, speckle-free imaging, and laser-material processing, but also a new way for the non-random CW fiber lasers to generate widely tunable and singly-polarized pulses.

  16. A plane wave generation method by wave number domain point focusing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ji-Ho; Choi, Jung-Woo; Kim, Yang-Hann

    2010-11-01

    A method for generation of a wave-field that is a plane wave is described. This method uses an array of loudspeakers phased so that the field in the wave-number domain is nearly concentrated at a point, this point being at the wave-number vector of the desired plane wave. The method described here for such a wave-number concentration makes use of an expansion in spherical harmonics, and requires a relatively small number of measurement points for a good approximate achievement of a plane wave. The measurement points are on a spherical surface surrounding the array of loudspeakers. The input signals for the individual loudspeakers can be derived without a matrix inversion or without explicit assumptions about the loudspeakers. The mathematical development involves spherical harmonics and three-dimensional Fourier transforms. Some numerical examples are given, with various assumptions concerning the nature of the loudspeakers, that support the premise that the method described in the present paper may be useful in applications.

  17. Multiwavelength generation in a random distributed feedback fiber laser using an all fiber Lyot filter.

    PubMed

    Sugavanam, S; Yan, Z; Kamynin, V; Kurkov, A S; Zhang, L; Churkin, D V

    2014-02-10

    Multiwavelength lasing in the random distributed feedback fiber laser is demonstrated by employing an all fiber Lyot filter. Stable multiwavelength generation is obtained, with each line exhibiting sub-nanometer line-widths. A flat power distribution over multiple lines is obtained, which indicates that the power between lines is redistributed in nonlinear mixing processes. The multiwavelength generation is observed both in first and second Stokes waves.

  18. Comparison of designed and randomly generated catalysts for simple chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Kipnis, Yakov; Baker, David

    2012-09-01

    There has been recent success in designing enzymes for simple chemical reactions using a two-step protocol. In the first step, a geometric matching algorithm is used to identify naturally occurring protein scaffolds at which predefined idealized active sites can be realized. In the second step, the residues surrounding the transition state model are optimized to increase transition state binding affinity and to bolster the primary catalytic side chains. To improve the design methodology, we investigated how the set of solutions identified by the design calculations relate to the overall set of solutions for two different chemical reactions. Using a TIM barrel scaffold in which catalytically active Kemp eliminase and retroaldolase designs were obtained previously, we carried out activity screens of random libraries made to be compositionally similar to active designs. A small number of active catalysts were found in screens of 10³ variants for each of the two reactions, which differ from the computational designs in that they reuse charged residues already present in the native scaffold. The results suggest that computational design considerably increases the frequency of catalyst generation for active sites involving newly introduced catalytic residues, highlighting the importance of interaction cooperativity in enzyme active sites. Copyright © 2012 The Protein Society.

  19. Minimal-post-processing 320-Gbps true random bit generation using physical white chaos.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anbang; Wang, Longsheng; Li, Pu; Wang, Yuncai

    2017-02-20

    Chaotic external-cavity semiconductor laser (ECL) is a promising entropy source for generation of high-speed physical random bits or digital keys. The rate and randomness is unfortunately limited by laser relaxation oscillation and external-cavity resonance, and is usually improved by complicated post processing. Here, we propose using a physical broadband white chaos generated by optical heterodyning of two ECLs as entropy source to construct high-speed random bit generation (RBG) with minimal post processing. The optical heterodyne chaos not only has a white spectrum without signature of relaxation oscillation and external-cavity resonance but also has a symmetric amplitude distribution. Thus, after quantization with a multi-bit analog-digital-convertor (ADC), random bits can be obtained by extracting several least significant bits (LSBs) without any other processing. In experiments, a white chaos with a 3-dB bandwidth of 16.7 GHz is generated. Its entropy rate is estimated as 16 Gbps by single-bit quantization which means a spectrum efficiency of 96%. With quantization using an 8-bit ADC, 320-Gbps physical RBG is achieved by directly extracting 4 LSBs at 80-GHz sampling rate.

  20. True random bit generators based on current time series of contact glow discharge electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Andrea Espinel; Allagui, Anis; Elwakil, Ahmed S.; Alawadhi, Hussain

    2018-05-01

    Random bit generators (RBGs) in today's digital information and communication systems employ a high rate physical entropy sources such as electronic, photonic, or thermal time series signals. However, the proper functioning of such physical systems is bound by specific constrains that make them in some cases weak and susceptible to external attacks. In this study, we show that the electrical current time series of contact glow discharge electrolysis, which is a dc voltage-powered micro-plasma in liquids, can be used for generating random bit sequences in a wide range of high dc voltages. The current signal is quantized into a binary stream by first using a simple moving average function which makes the distribution centered around zero, and then applying logical operations which enables the binarized data to pass all tests in industry-standard randomness test suite by the National Institute of Standard Technology. Furthermore, the robustness of this RBG against power supply attacks has been examined and verified.

  1. Physiological numbers of CD4+ T cells generate weak recall responses following influenza virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Paul G; Brown, Scott A; Morris, Melissa Y; Yue, Wen; So, Jenny; Reynolds, Cory; Webby, Richard J; Doherty, Peter C

    2010-02-15

    Naive and recall CD4(+) T cell responses were probed with recombinant influenza A viruses incorporating the OVA OT-II peptide. The extent of OT-II-specific CD4(+) T cell expansion was greater following primary exposure, with secondary challenge achieving no significant increase in numbers, despite higher precursor frequencies. Adoptive transfer experiments with OT-II TCR-transgenic T cells established that the predominant memory set is CD62L(hi), whereas the CD62L(lo) precursors make little contribution to the recall response. Unlike the situation described by other investigators, in which the transfer of very large numbers of in vitro-activated CD4 effectors can modify the disease process, providing CD62L(hi) or CD62L(lo) OT-II-specific T cells at physiological levels neither enhanced virus clearance nor altered clinical progression. Some confounding effects of the transgenic model were observed, with decreasing primary expansion efficiency correlating with greater numbers of transferred cells. This was associated with increased levels of mRNA for the proapoptotic molecule Bim in cells recovered following high-dose transfer. However, even with very low numbers of transferred cells, memory T cells did not expand significantly following secondary challenge. A similar result was recorded in mice primed and boosted to respond to an endogenous IA(b)-restricted epitope derived from the influenza virus hemagglutinin glycoprotein. Depletion of CD8(+) T cells during secondary challenge generated an increased accumulation of OT-II-specific T cells but only at the site of infection. Taken together, significant expansion was not a feature of these secondary influenza-specific CD4 T cell responses and the recall of memory did not enhance recovery.

  2. One Model Fits All: Explaining Many Aspects of Number Comparison within a Single Coherent Model-A Random Walk Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reike, Dennis; Schwarz, Wolf

    2016-01-01

    The time required to determine the larger of 2 digits decreases with their numerical distance, and, for a given distance, increases with their magnitude (Moyer & Landauer, 1967). One detailed quantitative framework to account for these effects is provided by random walk models. These chronometric models describe how number-related noisy…

  3. Unstructured and adaptive mesh generation for high Reynolds number viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for generating and adaptively refining a highly stretched unstructured mesh suitable for the computation of high-Reynolds-number viscous flows about arbitrary two-dimensional geometries was developed. The method is based on the Delaunay triangulation of a predetermined set of points and employs a local mapping in order to achieve the high stretching rates required in the boundary-layer and wake regions. The initial mesh-point distribution is determined in a geometry-adaptive manner which clusters points in regions of high curvature and sharp corners. Adaptive mesh refinement is achieved by adding new points in regions of large flow gradients, and locally retriangulating; thus, obviating the need for global mesh regeneration. Initial and adapted meshes about complex multi-element airfoil geometries are shown and compressible flow solutions are computed on these meshes.

  4. A Statistical Test Suite for Random and Pseudorandom Number Generators for Cryptographic Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-15

    is based on a calculated test statistic value, which is a function of the data. If the test statistic value is S and the critical value is t, then...5 Defined in The Handbook of Applied Cryptography ; A. Menezes, P. Van Oorschot and S . Vanstone; CRC Press, 1997. The first 4...3rd ed. Reading: Addison-Wesley, Inc., pp. 61-80. [4] A. J. Menezes, P. C. van Oorschot, and S . A. Vanstone (1997), Handbook of Applied Cryptography

  5. Spectral turning bands for efficient Gaussian random fields generation on GPUs and accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunger, L.; Cosenza, B.; Kimeswenger, S.; Fahringer, T.

    2015-11-01

    A random field (RF) is a set of correlated random variables associated with different spatial locations. RF generation algorithms are of crucial importance for many scientific areas, such as astrophysics, geostatistics, computer graphics, and many others. Current approaches commonly make use of 3D fast Fourier transform (FFT), which does not scale well for RF bigger than the available memory; they are also limited to regular rectilinear meshes. We introduce random field generation with the turning band method (RAFT), an RF generation algorithm based on the turning band method that is optimized for massively parallel hardware such as GPUs and accelerators. Our algorithm replaces the 3D FFT with a lower-order, one-dimensional FFT followed by a projection step and is further optimized with loop unrolling and blocking. RAFT can easily generate RF on non-regular (non-uniform) meshes and efficiently produce fields with mesh sizes bigger than the available device memory by using a streaming, out-of-core approach. Our algorithm generates RF with the correct statistical behavior and is tested on a variety of modern hardware, such as NVIDIA Tesla, AMD FirePro and Intel Phi. RAFT is faster than the traditional methods on regular meshes and has been successfully applied to two real case scenarios: planetary nebulae and cosmological simulations.

  6. Comparative studies of copy number variation detection methods for next-generation sequencing technologies.

    PubMed

    Duan, Junbo; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Deng, Hong-Wen; Wang, Yu-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) has played an important role in studies of susceptibility or resistance to complex diseases. Traditional methods such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) suffer from low resolution of genomic regions. Following the emergence of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, CNV detection methods based on the short read data have recently been developed. However, due to the relatively young age of the procedures, their performance is not fully understood. To help investigators choose suitable methods to detect CNVs, comparative studies are needed. We compared six publicly available CNV detection methods: CNV-seq, FREEC, readDepth, CNVnator, SegSeq and event-wise testing (EWT). They are evaluated both on simulated and real data with different experiment settings. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve is employed to demonstrate the detection performance in terms of sensitivity and specificity, box plot is employed to compare their performances in terms of breakpoint and copy number estimation, Venn diagram is employed to show the consistency among these methods, and F-score is employed to show the overlapping quality of detected CNVs. The computational demands are also studied. The results of our work provide a comprehensive evaluation on the performances of the selected CNV detection methods, which will help biological investigators choose the best possible method.

  7. An adaptive random search for short term generation scheduling with network constraints.

    PubMed

    Marmolejo, J A; Velasco, Jonás; Selley, Héctor J

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive random search approach to address a short term generation scheduling with network constraints, which determines the startup and shutdown schedules of thermal units over a given planning horizon. In this model, we consider the transmission network through capacity limits and line losses. The mathematical model is stated in the form of a Mixed Integer Non Linear Problem with binary variables. The proposed heuristic is a population-based method that generates a set of new potential solutions via a random search strategy. The random search is based on the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. The main key of the proposed method is that the noise level of the random search is adaptively controlled in order to exploring and exploiting the entire search space. In order to improve the solutions, we consider coupling a local search into random search process. Several test systems are presented to evaluate the performance of the proposed heuristic. We use a commercial optimizer to compare the quality of the solutions provided by the proposed method. The solution of the proposed algorithm showed a significant reduction in computational effort with respect to the full-scale outer approximation commercial solver. Numerical results show the potential and robustness of our approach.

  8. Generating Variable and Random Schedules of Reinforcement Using Microsoft Excel Macros

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bancroft, Stacie L.; Bourret, Jason C.

    2008-01-01

    Variable reinforcement schedules are used to arrange the availability of reinforcement following varying response ratios or intervals of time. Random reinforcement schedules are subtypes of variable reinforcement schedules that can be used to arrange the availability of reinforcement at a constant probability across number of responses or time.…

  9. Detection of genome-wide copy number variants in myeloid malignancies using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Paxton, Christian N; Szankasi, Philippe; Longhurst, Maria; Schumacher, Jonathan A; Frizzell, Kimberly A; Sorrells, Shelly M; Clayton, Adam L; Jattani, Rakhi P; Patel, Jay L; Toydemir, Reha; Kelley, Todd W; Xu, Xinjie

    2018-04-01

    Genetic abnormalities, including copy number variants (CNV), copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) and gene mutations, underlie the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies and serve as important diagnostic, prognostic and/or therapeutic markers. Currently, multiple testing strategies are required for comprehensive genetic testing in myeloid malignancies. The aim of this proof-of-principle study was to investigate the feasibility of combining detection of genome-wide large CNVs, CN-LOH and targeted gene mutations into a single assay using next-generation sequencing (NGS). For genome-wide CNV detection, we designed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sequencing backbone with 22 762 SNP regions evenly distributed across the entire genome. For targeted mutation detection, 62 frequently mutated genes in myeloid malignancies were targeted. We combined this SNP sequencing backbone with a targeted mutation panel, and sequenced 9 healthy individuals and 16 patients with myeloid malignancies using NGS. We detected 52 somatic CNVs, 11 instances of CN-LOH and 39 oncogenic mutations in the 16 patients with myeloid malignancies, and none in the 9 healthy individuals. All CNVs and CN-LOH were confirmed by SNP microarray analysis. We describe a genome-wide SNP sequencing backbone which allows for sensitive detection of genome-wide CNVs and CN-LOH using NGS. This proof-of-principle study has demonstrated that this strategy can provide more comprehensive genetic profiling for patients with myeloid malignancies using a single assay. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Generalized Knudsen Number for Oscillatory Flows Generated by MEMS and NEMS Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekinci, Kamil; Kara, Vural; Yakhot, Victor

    2017-11-01

    We have explored the scaling behavior of oscillatory flows that are generated by the oscillations of MEMS and NEMS resonators in a gas. If the gas is gradually rarefied, the Navier-Stokes equations begin to fail and a kinetic description of the flow becomes more appropriate. The failure of the Navier-Stokes equations can be thought to take place via two different physical mechanisms: either the continuum hypothesis breaks down as a result of a finite size effect; or local equilibrium is violated due to the high rate of strain. By independently tuning the relevant linear dimensions and the frequencies of the MEMS and NEMS resonators, we experimentally observe these two different physical mechanisms. All the experimental data, however, can be collapsed using a single dimensionless scaling parameter that combines the linear dimension and the frequency of each resonator. This proposed Knudsen number for oscillatory flows is rooted in a fundamental symmetry principle, namely Galilean invariance. We acknowledge support from US NSF through Grant No. CBET-1604075.

  11. Clinical Validation of Copy Number Variant Detection from Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Panels.

    PubMed

    Kerkhof, Jennifer; Schenkel, Laila C; Reilly, Jack; McRobbie, Sheri; Aref-Eshghi, Erfan; Stuart, Alan; Rupar, C Anthony; Adams, Paul; Hegele, Robert A; Lin, Hanxin; Rodenhiser, David; Knoll, Joan; Ainsworth, Peter J; Sadikovic, Bekim

    2017-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has rapidly replaced Sanger sequencing in the assessment of sequence variations in clinical genetics laboratories. One major limitation of current NGS approaches is the ability to detect copy number variations (CNVs) approximately >50 bp. Because these represent a major mutational burden in many genetic disorders, parallel CNV assessment using alternate supplemental methods, along with the NGS analysis, is normally required, resulting in increased labor, costs, and turnaround times. The objective of this study was to clinically validate a novel CNV detection algorithm using targeted clinical NGS gene panel data. We have applied this approach in a retrospective cohort of 391 samples and a prospective cohort of 2375 samples and found a 100% sensitivity (95% CI, 89%-100%) for 37 unique events and a high degree of specificity to detect CNVs across nine distinct targeted NGS gene panels. This NGS CNV pipeline enables stand-alone first-tier assessment for CNV and sequence variants in a clinical laboratory setting, dispensing with the need for parallel CNV analysis using classic techniques, such as microarray, long-range PCR, or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. This NGS CNV pipeline can also be applied to the assessment of complex genomic regions, including pseudogenic DNA sequences, such as the PMS2CL gene, and to mitochondrial genome heteroplasmy detection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of next-generation sequencing to detect LDLR gene copy number variation in familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Iacocca, Michael A; Wang, Jian; Dron, Jacqueline S; Robinson, John F; McIntyre, Adam D; Cao, Henian; Hegele, Robert A

    2017-11-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a heritable condition of severely elevated LDL cholesterol, caused predominantly by autosomal codominant mutations in the LDL receptor gene ( LDLR ). In providing a molecular diagnosis for FH, the current procedure often includes targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) panels for the detection of small-scale DNA variants, followed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) in LDLR for the detection of whole-exon copy number variants (CNVs). The latter is essential because ∼10% of FH cases are attributed to CNVs in LDLR ; accounting for them decreases false negative findings. Here, we determined the potential of replacing MLPA with bioinformatic analysis applied to NGS data, which uses depth-of-coverage analysis as its principal method to identify whole-exon CNV events. In analysis of 388 FH patient samples, there was 100% concordance in LDLR CNV detection between these two methods: 38 reported CNVs identified by MLPA were also successfully detected by our NGS method, while 350 samples negative for CNVs by MLPA were also negative by NGS. This result suggests that MLPA can be removed from the routine diagnostic screening for FH, significantly reducing associated costs, resources, and analysis time, while promoting more widespread assessment of this important class of mutations across diagnostic laboratories. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Similar numbers of neurons are generated in the male and female rat preoptic area in utero.

    PubMed

    Orikasa, Chitose; Kondo, Yasuhiko; Usui, Sumiko; Sakuma, Yasuo

    2010-09-01

    The birth date of neurons comprising the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the rat preoptic area (SDN-POA) was determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) injections at a prescribed time during the embryonic period. Calbindin immunostaining was used as a marker to identity the SDN-POA. The animals were bred from dams injected with BrdU on days 14, 16 or 18 of pregnancy (fertilization defined as day 1). On day 15 after birth (PD), all offspring were euthanized and brain sections were prepared for histology. Neurogenesis in the SDN-POA began around embryonic day (ED) 14 and culminated on ED 18, whereas the preoptic neurons surrounding the SDN-POA generated earlier than did those of the SDN-POA. Although the SDN-POA was significantly larger in males than in females at PD15, the total numbers of neurons comprising the SDN-POA were not significantly different between sexes. Similar aggregates of somatostatin mRNA-positive cells in the central portion of the SDN-POA were observed in both sexes at PD8. On PD15, the aggregates became scattered in males, whereas the aggregates in females remained congested. These data suggest that sexual dimorphism in the SDN-POA results from male-specific postnatal radial spreading of cells rather than cell proliferation during embryonic neurogenesis. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Population clustering based on copy number variations detected from next generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Duan, Junbo; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Wan, Mingxi; Deng, Hong-Wen; Wang, Yu-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) can be used as significant bio-markers and next generation sequencing (NGS) provides a high resolution detection of these CNVs. But how to extract features from CNVs and further apply them to genomic studies such as population clustering have become a big challenge. In this paper, we propose a novel method for population clustering based on CNVs from NGS. First, CNVs are extracted from each sample to form a feature matrix. Then, this feature matrix is decomposed into the source matrix and weight matrix with non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). The source matrix consists of common CNVs that are shared by all the samples from the same group, and the weight matrix indicates the corresponding level of CNVs from each sample. Therefore, using NMF of CNVs one can differentiate samples from different ethnic groups, i.e. population clustering. To validate the approach, we applied it to the analysis of both simulation data and two real data set from the 1000 Genomes Project. The results on simulation data demonstrate that the proposed method can recover the true common CNVs with high quality. The results on the first real data analysis show that the proposed method can cluster two family trio with different ancestries into two ethnic groups and the results on the second real data analysis show that the proposed method can be applied to the whole-genome with large sample size consisting of multiple groups. Both results demonstrate the potential of the proposed method for population clustering.

  15. Human Y chromosome copy number variation in the next generation sequencing era and beyond.

    PubMed

    Massaia, Andrea; Xue, Yali

    2017-05-01

    The human Y chromosome provides a fertile ground for structural rearrangements owing to its haploidy and high content of repeated sequences. The methodologies used for copy number variation (CNV) studies have developed over the years. Low-throughput techniques based on direct observation of rearrangements were developed early on, and are still used, often to complement array-based or sequencing approaches which have limited power in regions with high repeat content and specifically in the presence of long, identical repeats, such as those found in human sex chromosomes. Some specific rearrangements have been investigated for decades; because of their effects on fertility, or their outstanding evolutionary features, the interest in these has not diminished. However, following the flourishing of large-scale genomics, several studies have investigated CNVs across the whole chromosome. These studies sometimes employ data generated within large genomic projects such as the DDD study or the 1000 Genomes Project, and often survey large samples of healthy individuals without any prior selection. Novel technologies based on sequencing long molecules and combinations of technologies, promise to stimulate the study of Y-CNVs in the immediate future.

  16. Catalytic micromotor generating self-propelled regular motion through random fluctuation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daigo; Mukai, Atsushi; Okita, Naoaki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Shioi, Akihisa

    2013-07-21

    Most of the current studies on nano∕microscale motors to generate regular motion have adapted the strategy to fabricate a composite with different materials. In this paper, we report that a simple object solely made of platinum generates regular motion driven by a catalytic chemical reaction with hydrogen peroxide. Depending on the morphological symmetry of the catalytic particles, a rich variety of random and regular motions are observed. The experimental trend is well reproduced by a simple theoretical model by taking into account of the anisotropic viscous effect on the self-propelled active Brownian fluctuation.

  17. Catalytic micromotor generating self-propelled regular motion through random fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Daigo; Mukai, Atsushi; Okita, Naoaki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Shioi, Akihisa

    2013-07-01

    Most of the current studies on nano/microscale motors to generate regular motion have adapted the strategy to fabricate a composite with different materials. In this paper, we report that a simple object solely made of platinum generates regular motion driven by a catalytic chemical reaction with hydrogen peroxide. Depending on the morphological symmetry of the catalytic particles, a rich variety of random and regular motions are observed. The experimental trend is well reproduced by a simple theoretical model by taking into account of the anisotropic viscous effect on the self-propelled active Brownian fluctuation.

  18. Comparative Emissions of Random Orbital Sanding between Conventional and Self-Generated Vacuum Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liverseed, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional abrasive sanding generates high concentrations of particles. Depending on the substrate being abraded and exposure duration, overexposure to the particles can cause negative health effects ranging from respiratory irritation to cancer. The goal of this study was to understand the differences in particle emissions between a conventional random orbital sanding system and a self-generated vacuum random orbital sanding system with attached particle filtration bag. Particle concentrations were sampled for each system in a controlled test chamber for oak wood, chromate painted (hexavalent chromium) steel panels, and gel-coated (titanium dioxide) fiberglass panels using a Gesamtstaub-Probenahmesystem (GSP) sampler at three different locations adjacent to the sanding. Elevated concentrations were reported for all particles in the samples collected during conventional sanding. The geometric mean concentration ratios for the three substrates ranged from 320 to 4640 times greater for the conventional sanding system than the self-generated vacuum sanding system. The differences in the particle concentration generated by the two sanding systems were statistically significant with the two sample t-test (P < 0.0001) for all three substances. The data suggest that workers using conventional sanding systems could utilize the self-generated vacuum sanding system technology to potentially reduce exposure to particles and mitigate negative health effects. PMID:23065674

  19. Comparative emissions of random orbital sanding between conventional and self-generated vacuum systems.

    PubMed

    Liverseed, David R; Logan, Perry W; Johnson, Carl E; Morey, Sandy Z; Raynor, Peter C

    2013-03-01

    Conventional abrasive sanding generates high concentrations of particles. Depending on the substrate being abraded and exposure duration, overexposure to the particles can cause negative health effects ranging from respiratory irritation to cancer. The goal of this study was to understand the differences in particle emissions between a conventional random orbital sanding system and a self-generated vacuum random orbital sanding system with attached particle filtration bag. Particle concentrations were sampled for each system in a controlled test chamber for oak wood, chromate painted (hexavalent chromium) steel panels, and gel-coated (titanium dioxide) fiberglass panels using a Gesamtstaub-Probenahmesystem (GSP) sampler at three different locations adjacent to the sanding. Elevated concentrations were reported for all particles in the samples collected during conventional sanding. The geometric mean concentration ratios for the three substrates ranged from 320 to 4640 times greater for the conventional sanding system than the self-generated vacuum sanding system. The differences in the particle concentration generated by the two sanding systems were statistically significant with the two sample t-test (P < 0.0001) for all three substances. The data suggest that workers using conventional sanding systems could utilize the self-generated vacuum sanding system technology to potentially reduce exposure to particles and mitigate negative health effects.

  20. Effects of number of training generations on genomic prediction for various traits in a layer chicken population.

    PubMed

    Weng, Ziqing; Wolc, Anna; Shen, Xia; Fernando, Rohan L; Dekkers, Jack C M; Arango, Jesus; Settar, Petek; Fulton, Janet E; O'Sullivan, Neil P; Garrick, Dorian J

    2016-03-19

    Genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) based on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes are widely used in animal improvement programs. It is typically assumed that the larger the number of animals is in the training set, the higher is the prediction accuracy of GEBV. The aim of this study was to quantify genomic prediction accuracy depending on the number of ancestral generations included in the training set, and to determine the optimal number of training generations for different traits in an elite layer breeding line. Phenotypic records for 16 traits on 17,793 birds were used. All parents and some selection candidates from nine non-overlapping generations were genotyped for 23,098 segregating SNPs. An animal model with pedigree relationships (PBLUP) and the BayesB genomic prediction model were applied to predict EBV or GEBV at each validation generation (progeny of the most recent training generation) based on varying numbers of immediately preceding ancestral generations. Prediction accuracy of EBV or GEBV was assessed as the correlation between EBV and phenotypes adjusted for fixed effects, divided by the square root of trait heritability. The optimal number of training generations that resulted in the greatest prediction accuracy of GEBV was determined for each trait. The relationship between optimal number of training generations and heritability was investigated. On average, accuracies were higher with the BayesB model than with PBLUP. Prediction accuracies of GEBV increased as the number of closely-related ancestral generations included in the training set increased, but reached an asymptote or slightly decreased when distant ancestral generations were used in the training set. The optimal number of training generations was 4 or more for high heritability traits but less than that for low heritability traits. For less heritable traits, limiting the training datasets to individuals closely related to the validation population resulted in the best

  1. The cosmic microwave background radiation power spectrum as a random bit generator for symmetric- and asymmetric-key cryptography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeffrey S; Cleaver, Gerald B

    2017-10-01

    In this note, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Radiation is shown to be capable of functioning as a Random Bit Generator, and constitutes an effectively infinite supply of truly random one-time pad values of arbitrary length. It is further argued that the CMB power spectrum potentially conforms to the FIPS 140-2 standard. Additionally, its applicability to the generation of a (n × n) random key matrix for a Vernam cipher is established.

  2. Random walks with long-range steps generated by functions of Laplacian matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riascos, A. P.; Michelitsch, T. M.; Collet, B. A.; Nowakowski, A. F.; Nicolleau, F. C. G. A.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we explore different Markovian random walk strategies on networks with transition probabilities between nodes defined in terms of functions of the Laplacian matrix. We generalize random walk strategies with local information in the Laplacian matrix, that describes the connections of a network, to a dynamic determined by functions of this matrix. The resulting processes are non-local allowing transitions of the random walker from one node to nodes beyond its nearest neighbors. We find that only two types of Laplacian functions are admissible with distinct behaviors for long-range steps in the infinite network limit: type (i) functions generate Brownian motions, type (ii) functions Lévy flights. For this asymptotic long-range step behavior only the lowest non-vanishing order of the Laplacian function is relevant, namely first order for type (i), and fractional order for type (ii) functions. In the first part, we discuss spectral properties of the Laplacian matrix and a series of relations that are maintained by a particular type of functions that allow to define random walks on any type of undirected connected networks. Once described general properties, we explore characteristics of random walk strategies that emerge from particular cases with functions defined in terms of exponentials, logarithms and powers of the Laplacian as well as relations of these dynamics with non-local strategies like Lévy flights and fractional transport. Finally, we analyze the global capacity of these random walk strategies to explore networks like lattices and trees and different types of random and complex networks.

  3. GAMETES: a fast, direct algorithm for generating pure, strict, epistatic models with random architectures.

    PubMed

    Urbanowicz, Ryan J; Kiralis, Jeff; Sinnott-Armstrong, Nicholas A; Heberling, Tamra; Fisher, Jonathan M; Moore, Jason H

    2012-10-01

    Geneticists who look beyond single locus disease associations require additional strategies for the detection of complex multi-locus effects. Epistasis, a multi-locus masking effect, presents a particular challenge, and has been the target of bioinformatic development. Thorough evaluation of new algorithms calls for simulation studies in which known disease models are sought. To date, the best methods for generating simulated multi-locus epistatic models rely on genetic algorithms. However, such methods are computationally expensive, difficult to adapt to multiple objectives, and unlikely to yield models with a precise form of epistasis which we refer to as pure and strict. Purely and strictly epistatic models constitute the worst-case in terms of detecting disease associations, since such associations may only be observed if all n-loci are included in the disease model. This makes them an attractive gold standard for simulation studies considering complex multi-locus effects. We introduce GAMETES, a user-friendly software package and algorithm which generates complex biallelic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) disease models for simulation studies. GAMETES rapidly and precisely generates random, pure, strict n-locus models with specified genetic constraints. These constraints include heritability, minor allele frequencies of the SNPs, and population prevalence. GAMETES also includes a simple dataset simulation strategy which may be utilized to rapidly generate an archive of simulated datasets for given genetic models. We highlight the utility and limitations of GAMETES with an example simulation study using MDR, an algorithm designed to detect epistasis. GAMETES is a fast, flexible, and precise tool for generating complex n-locus models with random architectures. While GAMETES has a limited ability to generate models with higher heritabilities, it is proficient at generating the lower heritability models typically used in simulation studies evaluating new

  4. A stochastical event-based continuous time step rainfall generator based on Poisson rectangular pulse and microcanonical random cascade models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohle, Ina; Niebisch, Michael; Zha, Tingting; Schümberg, Sabine; Müller, Hannes; Maurer, Thomas; Hinz, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Rainfall variability within a storm is of major importance for fast hydrological processes, e.g. surface runoff, erosion and solute dissipation from surface soils. To investigate and simulate the impacts of within-storm variabilities on these processes, long time series of rainfall with high resolution are required. Yet, observed precipitation records of hourly or higher resolution are in most cases available only for a small number of stations and only for a few years. To obtain long time series of alternating rainfall events and interstorm periods while conserving the statistics of observed rainfall events, the Poisson model can be used. Multiplicative microcanonical random cascades have been widely applied to disaggregate rainfall time series from coarse to fine temporal resolution. We present a new coupling approach of the Poisson rectangular pulse model and the multiplicative microcanonical random cascade model that preserves the characteristics of rainfall events as well as inter-storm periods. In the first step, a Poisson rectangular pulse model is applied to generate discrete rainfall events (duration and mean intensity) and inter-storm periods (duration). The rainfall events are subsequently disaggregated to high-resolution time series (user-specified, e.g. 10 min resolution) by a multiplicative microcanonical random cascade model. One of the challenges of coupling these models is to parameterize the cascade model for the event durations generated by the Poisson model. In fact, the cascade model is best suited to downscale rainfall data with constant time step such as daily precipitation data. Without starting from a fixed time step duration (e.g. daily), the disaggregation of events requires some modifications of the multiplicative microcanonical random cascade model proposed by Olsson (1998): Firstly, the parameterization of the cascade model for events of different durations requires continuous functions for the probabilities of the multiplicative

  5. Number of social roles, health, and well-being in three generations of Australian women.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christina; Powers, Jennifer R

    2002-01-01

    The relation between multiple social roles and health is a particular issue for women, who continue to take major responsibility for childcare and domestic labor despite increasing levels of involvement in the paid workforce. This article analyzes Survey 1 data from the Australian Longitudinal Survey on Women's Health to explore relations between role occupancy and health, well-being, and health service use in three generations of Australian women. A total of 41,818 women in three age groups (young, 18-23; mid-age, 40-45; older, 70-75) responded to mailed surveys. Young and mid-age women were classified according to their occupancy of five roles--paid worker, partner, mother, student, and family caregiver--whereas older women were classified according to occupancy of partner and caregiver roles only. Common symptoms (headaches, tiredness, back pain, difficulty sleeping), diagnosis of chronic illness, and use of health services were compared across groups characterized by number of roles. Comparisons were also conducted on the physical and mental component scores of the SF-36 and perceived stress, with and without adjustment for confounders. Among young women, the best health was associated with occupancy of one role; among mid-age women, those with three or more roles were in the best health; and for older women, those with one role were in the best health. Young women with none or with four or more roles, and mid-age and older women with none of the defined social roles tended to be in the poorest health. Different patterns of results may be explained by differences in the extent to which women at different life stages feel committed to various social roles, and to the extent to which they are able to draw on social, material, and economic supports.

  6. Random parameter models of interstate crash frequencies by severity, number of vehicles involved, collision and location type.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Narayan; Ulfarsson, Gudmundur F; Shankar, Venky N

    2013-10-01

    A nine-year (1999-2007) continuous panel of crash histories on interstates in Washington State, USA, was used to estimate random parameter negative binomial (RPNB) models for various aggregations of crashes. A total of 21 different models were assessed in terms of four ways to aggregate crashes, by: (a) severity, (b) number of vehicles involved, (c) crash type, and by (d) location characteristics. The models within these aggregations include specifications for all severities (property damage only, possible injury, evident injury, disabling injury, and fatality), number of vehicles involved (one-vehicle to five-or-more-vehicle), crash type (sideswipe, same direction, overturn, head-on, fixed object, rear-end, and other), and location types (urban interchange, rural interchange, urban non-interchange, rural non-interchange). A total of 1153 directional road segments comprising of the seven Washington State interstates were analyzed, yielding statistical models of crash frequency based on 10,377 observations. These results suggest that in general there was a significant improvement in log-likelihood when using RPNB compared to a fixed parameter negative binomial baseline model. Heterogeneity effects are most noticeable for lighting type, road curvature, and traffic volume (ADT). Median lighting or right-side lighting are linked to increased crash frequencies in many models for more than half of the road segments compared to both-sides lighting. Both-sides lighting thereby appears to generally lead to a safety improvement. Traffic volume has a random parameter but the effect is always toward increasing crash frequencies as expected. However that the effect is random shows that the effect of traffic volume on crash frequency is complex and varies by road segment. The number of lanes has a random parameter effect only in the interchange type models. The results show that road segment-specific insights into crash frequency occurrence can lead to improved design policy and

  7. Point processes in arbitrary dimension from fermionic gases, random matrix theory, and number theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torquato, Salvatore; Scardicchio, A.; Zachary, Chase E.

    2008-11-01

    It is well known that one can map certain properties of random matrices, fermionic gases, and zeros of the Riemann zeta function to a unique point process on the real line \\mathbb {R} . Here we analytically provide exact generalizations of such a point process in d-dimensional Euclidean space \\mathbb {R}^d for any d, which are special cases of determinantal processes. In particular, we obtain the n-particle correlation functions for any n, which completely specify the point processes in \\mathbb {R}^d . We also demonstrate that spin-polarized fermionic systems in \\mathbb {R}^d have these same n-particle correlation functions in each dimension. The point processes for any d are shown to be hyperuniform, i.e., infinite wavelength density fluctuations vanish, and the structure factor (or power spectrum) S(k) has a non-analytic behavior at the origin given by S(k)~|k| (k \\rightarrow 0 ). The latter result implies that the pair correlation function g2(r) tends to unity for large pair distances with a decay rate that is controlled by the power law 1/rd+1, which is a well-known property of bosonic ground states and more recently has been shown to characterize maximally random jammed sphere packings. We graphically display one-and two-dimensional realizations of the point processes in order to vividly reveal their 'repulsive' nature. Indeed, we show that the point processes can be characterized by an effective 'hard core' diameter that grows like the square root of d. The nearest-neighbor distribution functions for these point processes are also evaluated and rigorously bounded. Among other results, this analysis reveals that the probability of finding a large spherical cavity of radius r in dimension d behaves like a Poisson point process but in dimension d+1, i.e., this probability is given by exp[-κ(d)rd+1] for large r and finite d, where κ(d) is a positive d-dependent constant. We also show that as d increases, the point process behaves effectively like a sphere

  8. Theory and generation of conditional, scalable sub-Gaussian random fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzeri, M.; Riva, M.; Guadagnini, A.; Neuman, S. P.

    2016-03-01

    Many earth and environmental (as well as a host of other) variables, Y, and their spatial (or temporal) increments, ΔY, exhibit non-Gaussian statistical scaling. Previously we were able to capture key aspects of such non-Gaussian scaling by treating Y and/or ΔY as sub-Gaussian random fields (or processes). This however left unaddressed the empirical finding that whereas sample frequency distributions of Y tend to display relatively mild non-Gaussian peaks and tails, those of ΔY often reveal peaks that grow sharper and tails that become heavier with decreasing separation distance or lag. Recently we proposed a generalized sub-Gaussian model (GSG) which resolves this apparent inconsistency between the statistical scaling behaviors of observed variables and their increments. We presented an algorithm to generate unconditional random realizations of statistically isotropic or anisotropic GSG functions and illustrated it in two dimensions. Most importantly, we demonstrated the feasibility of estimating all parameters of a GSG model underlying a single realization of Y by analyzing jointly spatial moments of Y data and corresponding increments, ΔY. Here, we extend our GSG model to account for noisy measurements of Y at a discrete set of points in space (or time), present an algorithm to generate conditional realizations of corresponding isotropic or anisotropic random fields, introduce two approximate versions of this algorithm to reduce CPU time, and explore them on one and two-dimensional synthetic test cases.

  9. Thermodynamic method for generating random stress distributions on an earthquake fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barall, Michael; Harris, Ruth A.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a new method for generating random stress distributions on an earthquake fault, suitable for use as initial conditions in a dynamic rupture simulation. The method employs concepts from thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. A pattern of fault slip is considered to be analogous to a micro-state of a thermodynamic system. The energy of the micro-state is taken to be the elastic energy stored in the surrounding medium. Then, the Boltzmann distribution gives the probability of a given pattern of fault slip and stress. We show how to decompose the system into independent degrees of freedom, which makes it computationally feasible to select a random state. However, due to the equipartition theorem, straightforward application of the Boltzmann distribution leads to a divergence which predicts infinite stress. To avoid equipartition, we show that the finite strength of the fault acts to restrict the possible states of the system. By analyzing a set of earthquake scaling relations, we derive a new formula for the expected power spectral density of the stress distribution, which allows us to construct a computer algorithm free of infinities. We then present a new technique for controlling the extent of the rupture by generating a random stress distribution thousands of times larger than the fault surface, and selecting a portion which, by chance, has a positive stress perturbation of the desired size. Finally, we present a new two-stage nucleation method that combines a small zone of forced rupture with a larger zone of reduced fracture energy.

  10. Statistical analysis of mesoscale rainfall: Dependence of a random cascade generator on large-scale forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Over, Thomas, M.; Gupta, Vijay K.

    1994-01-01

    Under the theory of independent and identically distributed random cascades, the probability distribution of the cascade generator determines the spatial and the ensemble properties of spatial rainfall. Three sets of radar-derived rainfall data in space and time are analyzed to estimate the probability distribution of the generator. A detailed comparison between instantaneous scans of spatial rainfall and simulated cascades using the scaling properties of the marginal moments is carried out. This comparison highlights important similarities and differences between the data and the random cascade theory. Differences are quantified and measured for the three datasets. Evidence is presented to show that the scaling properties of the rainfall can be captured to the first order by a random cascade with a single parameter. The dependence of this parameter on forcing by the large-scale meteorological conditions, as measured by the large-scale spatial average rain rate, is investigated for these three datasets. The data show that this dependence can be captured by a one-to-one function. Since the large-scale average rain rate can be diagnosed from the large-scale dynamics, this relationship demonstrates an important linkage between the large-scale atmospheric dynamics and the statistical cascade theory of mesoscale rainfall. Potential application of this research to parameterization of runoff from the land surface and regional flood frequency analysis is briefly discussed, and open problems for further research are presented.

  11. Multi-Objective Random Search Algorithm for Simultaneously Optimizing Wind Farm Layout and Number of Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ju; Shen, Wen Zhong; Xu, Chang

    2016-09-01

    A new algorithm for multi-objective wind farm layout optimization is presented. It formulates the wind turbine locations as continuous variables and is capable of optimizing the number of turbines and their locations in the wind farm simultaneously. Two objectives are considered. One is to maximize the total power production, which is calculated by considering the wake effects using the Jensen wake model combined with the local wind distribution. The other is to minimize the total electrical cable length. This length is assumed to be the total length of the minimal spanning tree that connects all turbines and is calculated by using Prim's algorithm. Constraints on wind farm boundary and wind turbine proximity are also considered. An ideal test case shows the proposed algorithm largely outperforms a famous multi-objective genetic algorithm (NSGA-II). In the real test case based on the Horn Rev 1 wind farm, the algorithm also obtains useful Pareto frontiers and provides a wide range of Pareto optimal layouts with different numbers of turbines for a real-life wind farm developer.

  12. Mendelian randomization with fine-mapped genetic data: Choosing from large numbers of correlated instrumental variables.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Stephen; Zuber, Verena; Valdes-Marquez, Elsa; Sun, Benjamin B; Hopewell, Jemma C

    2017-12-01

    Mendelian randomization uses genetic variants to make causal inferences about the effect of a risk factor on an outcome. With fine-mapped genetic data, there may be hundreds of genetic variants in a single gene region any of which could be used to assess this causal relationship. However, using too many genetic variants in the analysis can lead to spurious estimates and inflated Type 1 error rates. But if only a few genetic variants are used, then the majority of the data is ignored and estimates are highly sensitive to the particular choice of variants. We propose an approach based on summarized data only (genetic association and correlation estimates) that uses principal components analysis to form instruments. This approach has desirable theoretical properties: it takes the totality of data into account and does not suffer from numerical instabilities. It also has good properties in simulation studies: it is not particularly sensitive to varying the genetic variants included in the analysis or the genetic correlation matrix, and it does not have greatly inflated Type 1 error rates. Overall, the method gives estimates that are less precise than those from variable selection approaches (such as using a conditional analysis or pruning approach to select variants), but are more robust to seemingly arbitrary choices in the variable selection step. Methods are illustrated by an example using genetic associations with testosterone for 320 genetic variants to assess the effect of sex hormone related pathways on coronary artery disease risk, in which variable selection approaches give inconsistent inferences. © 2017 The Authors Genetic Epidemiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Precise algorithm to generate random sequential adsorption of hard polygons at saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, G.

    Random sequential adsorption (RSA) is a time-dependent packing process, in which particles of certain shapes are randomly and sequentially placed into an empty space without overlap. In the infinite-time limit, the density approaches a "saturation'' limit. Although this limit has attracted particular research interest, the majority of past studies could only probe this limit by extrapolation. We have previously found an algorithm to reach this limit using finite computational time for spherical particles, and could thus determine the saturation density of spheres with high accuracy. Here in this paper, we generalize this algorithm to generate saturated RSA packings of two-dimensionalmore » polygons. We also calculate the saturation density for regular polygons of three to ten sides, and obtain results that are consistent with previous, extrapolation-based studies.« less

  14. Precise algorithm to generate random sequential adsorption of hard polygons at saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.

    2018-04-01

    Random sequential adsorption (RSA) is a time-dependent packing process, in which particles of certain shapes are randomly and sequentially placed into an empty space without overlap. In the infinite-time limit, the density approaches a "saturation" limit. Although this limit has attracted particular research interest, the majority of past studies could only probe this limit by extrapolation. We have previously found an algorithm to reach this limit using finite computational time for spherical particles and could thus determine the saturation density of spheres with high accuracy. In this paper, we generalize this algorithm to generate saturated RSA packings of two-dimensional polygons. We also calculate the saturation density for regular polygons of three to ten sides and obtain results that are consistent with previous, extrapolation-based studies.

  15. Precise algorithm to generate random sequential adsorption of hard polygons at saturation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G

    2018-04-01

    Random sequential adsorption (RSA) is a time-dependent packing process, in which particles of certain shapes are randomly and sequentially placed into an empty space without overlap. In the infinite-time limit, the density approaches a "saturation" limit. Although this limit has attracted particular research interest, the majority of past studies could only probe this limit by extrapolation. We have previously found an algorithm to reach this limit using finite computational time for spherical particles and could thus determine the saturation density of spheres with high accuracy. In this paper, we generalize this algorithm to generate saturated RSA packings of two-dimensional polygons. We also calculate the saturation density for regular polygons of three to ten sides and obtain results that are consistent with previous, extrapolation-based studies.

  16. Precise algorithm to generate random sequential adsorption of hard polygons at saturation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, G.

    2018-04-30

    Random sequential adsorption (RSA) is a time-dependent packing process, in which particles of certain shapes are randomly and sequentially placed into an empty space without overlap. In the infinite-time limit, the density approaches a "saturation'' limit. Although this limit has attracted particular research interest, the majority of past studies could only probe this limit by extrapolation. We have previously found an algorithm to reach this limit using finite computational time for spherical particles, and could thus determine the saturation density of spheres with high accuracy. Here in this paper, we generalize this algorithm to generate saturated RSA packings of two-dimensionalmore » polygons. We also calculate the saturation density for regular polygons of three to ten sides, and obtain results that are consistent with previous, extrapolation-based studies.« less

  17. On the generation of log-Lévy distributions and extreme randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2011-10-01

    The log-normal distribution is prevalent across the sciences, as it emerges from the combination of multiplicative processes and the central limit theorem (CLT). The CLT, beyond yielding the normal distribution, also yields the class of Lévy distributions. The log-Lévy distributions are the Lévy counterparts of the log-normal distribution, they appear in the context of ultraslow diffusion processes, and they are categorized by Mandelbrot as belonging to the class of extreme randomness. In this paper, we present a natural stochastic growth model from which both the log-normal distribution and the log-Lévy distributions emerge universally—the former in the case of deterministic underlying setting, and the latter in the case of stochastic underlying setting. In particular, we establish a stochastic growth model which universally generates Mandelbrot’s extreme randomness.

  18. A study of the influence of conductive paths and their directions in randomly generated conductor network.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandolesi, E.; Moorkamp, M.; Jones, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    Most electromagnetic (EM) geophysical methods focus on the electrical conductivity of rocks and sediments to determine the geological structure of the subsurface. Electric conductivity itself is measured in the laboratory with a wide range of instruments and techniques. These measurements seldom return a compatible result. The presence of partially-interconnected random pathways of electrically conductive materials in resistive hosts has been studied for decades, and recently with increasing interest. To comprehend which conductive mechanism scales from the microstructures up to field electrical conductivity measurements, two main branch of studies have been undertaken: statistical probability of having a conductive pathways and mixing laws. Several numerical approaches have been tested to understand the effects of interconnected pathways of conductors at field scale. Usually these studies were restricted in two ways: the sources are considered constant in time (i.e., DC) and the domain is, with few exception, two-dimensional. We simulated the effects of time-varying EM sources on the conductivity measured on the surface of a three-dimensional randomly generated body embedded in an uniform host by using electromagnetic induction equations. We modelled a two-phase mixture of resistive and conductive elements with the goal of comparing the conductivity measured on field scale with the one proper of the elements constituting the random rock, and to test how the internal structures influence the directionality of the responses. Moreover, we modelled data from randomly generated bodies characterized by coherent internal structures, to check the effect of the named structures on the anisotropy of the effective conductivity. We compared these values with the electrical conductivity limits predicted by Hashin-Shtrikman bounds and the effective conductivity predicted by the Archie's law, both cast in its classic form and in an updated that allow to take in account two

  19. A random approach of test macro generation for early detection of hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-hyun; Kim, Chin; Kang, Minsoo; Hwang, Sungwook; Yang, Jae-seok; Harb, Mohammed; Al-Imam, Mohamed; Madkour, Kareem; ElManhawy, Wael; Kwan, Joe

    2016-03-01

    Multiple-Patterning Technology (MPT) is still the preferred choice over EUV for the advanced technology nodes, starting the 20nm node. Down the way to 7nm and 5nm nodes, Self-Aligned Multiple Patterning (SAMP) appears to be one of the effective multiple patterning techniques in terms of achieving small pitch of printed lines on wafer, yet its yield is in question. Predicting and enhancing the yield in the early stages of technology development are some of the main objectives for creating test macros on test masks. While conventional yield ramp techniques for a new technology node have relied on using designs from previous technology nodes as a starting point to identify patterns for Design of Experiment (DoE) creation, these techniques are challenging to apply in the case of introducing an MPT technique like SAMP that did not exist in previous nodes. This paper presents a new strategy for generating test structures based on random placement of unit patterns that can construct more meaningful bigger patterns. Specifications governing the relationships between those unit patterns can be adjusted to generate layout clips that look like realistic SAMP designs. A via chain can be constructed to connect the random DoE of SAMP structures through a routing layer to external pads for electrical measurement. These clips are decomposed according to the decomposition rules of the technology into the appropriate mandrel and cut masks. The decomposed clips can be tested through simulations, or electrically on silicon to discover hotspots. The hotspots can be used in optimizing the fabrication process and models to fix them. They can also be used as learning patterns for DFM deck development. By expanding the size of the randomly generated test structures, more hotspots can be detected. This should provide a faster way to enhance the yield of a new technology node.

  20. Model and Scenario Variations in Predicted Number of Generations of Spodoptera litura Fab. on Peanut during Future Climate Change Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasa Rao, Mathukumalli; Swathi, Pettem; Rama Rao, Chitiprolu Anantha; Rao, K. V.; Raju, B. M. K.; Srinivas, Karlapudi; Manimanjari, Dammu; Maheswari, Mandapaka

    2015-01-01

    The present study features the estimation of number of generations of tobacco caterpillar, Spodoptera litura. Fab. on peanut crop at six locations in India using MarkSim, which provides General Circulation Model (GCM) of future data on daily maximum (T.max), minimum (T.min) air temperatures from six models viz., BCCR-BCM2.0, CNRM-CM3, CSIRO-Mk3.5, ECHams5, INCM-CM3.0 and MIROC3.2 along with an ensemble of the six from three emission scenarios (A2, A1B and B1). This data was used to predict the future pest scenarios following the growing degree days approach in four different climate periods viz., Baseline-1975, Near future (NF) -2020, Distant future (DF)-2050 and Very Distant future (VDF)—2080. It is predicted that more generations would occur during the three future climate periods with significant variation among scenarios and models. Among the seven models, 1–2 additional generations were predicted during DF and VDF due to higher future temperatures in CNRM-CM3, ECHams5 & CSIRO-Mk3.5 models. The temperature projections of these models indicated that the generation time would decrease by 18–22% over baseline. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to partition the variation in the predicted number of generations and generation time of S. litura on peanut during crop season. Geographical location explained 34% of the total variation in number of generations, followed by time period (26%), model (1.74%) and scenario (0.74%). The remaining 14% of the variation was explained by interactions. Increased number of generations and reduction of generation time across the six peanut growing locations of India suggest that the incidence of S. litura may increase due to projected increase in temperatures in future climate change periods. PMID:25671564

  1. Numbers matter to informed patient choices: A randomized design across age and numeracy levels

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Ellen; Hart, P. Sol; Tusler, Martin; Fraenkel, Liana

    2013-01-01

    Background How drug adverse events (AEs) are communicated in the United States may mislead consumers and result in low adherence. Requiring written information to include numeric AE-likelihood information might lessen these effects, but providing numbers may disadvantage less skilled populations. Objective To determine risk comprehension and willingness to use a medication when presented with numeric or non-numeric AE-likelihood information across age, numeracy, and cholesterol-lowering-drug-usage groups. Design In a cross-sectional internet survey (N=905; American Life Panel, 5/15/08–6/18/08), respondents were presented with a hypothetical prescription medication for high cholesterol. AE likelihoods were described using one of six formats (non-numeric: Consumer-Medication-Information (CMI)-like list, risk labels; numeric: percentage, frequency, risk-labels-plus-percentage, risk-labels-plus-frequency). Main outcome measures were risk comprehension (recoded to indicate presence/absence of risk overestimation and underestimation), willingness to use the medication (7-point scale; not likely=0, very likely=6), and main reason for willingness (chosen from eight predefined reasons). Results Individuals given non-numeric information were more likely to overestimate risk, less willing to take the medication, and gave different reasons than those provided numeric information across numeracy and age groups (e.g., among less numerate: 69% and 18% overestimated risks in non-numeric and numeric formats, respectively; among more numerate: these same proportions were 66% and 6%). Less numerate middle-aged and older adults, however, showed less influence of numeric format on willingness to take the medication. Limitations It is unclear whether differences are clinically meaningful although some differences are large. Conclusions Providing numeric AE-likelihood information (compared to non-numeric) is likely to increase risk comprehension across numeracy and age levels. Its

  2. Numbers matter to informed patient choices: a randomized design across age and numeracy levels.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ellen; Hart, P Sol; Tusler, Martin; Fraenkel, Liana

    2014-05-01

    How drug adverse events (AEs) are communicated in the United States may mislead consumers and result in low adherence. Requiring written information to include numeric AE-likelihood information might lessen these effects, but providing numbers may disadvantage less skilled populations. The objective was to determine risk comprehension and willingness to use a medication when presented with numeric or nonnumeric AE-likelihood information across age, numeracy, and cholesterol-lowering drug-use groups. In a cross-sectional Internet survey (N = 905; American Life Panel, 15 May 2008 to 18 June 2008), respondents were presented with a hypothetical prescription medication for high cholesterol. AE likelihoods were described using 1 of 6 formats (nonnumeric: consumer medication information (CMI)-like list, risk labels; numeric: percentage, frequency, risk labels + percentage, risk labels + frequency). Main outcome measures were risk comprehension (recoded to indicate presence/absence of risk overestimation and underestimation), willingness to use the medication (7-point scale; not likely = 0, very likely = 6), and main reason for willingness (chosen from 8 predefined reasons). Individuals given nonnumeric information were more likely to overestimate risk, were less willing to take the medication, and gave different reasons than those provided numeric information across numeracy and age groups (e.g., among the less numerate, 69% and 18% overestimated risks in nonnumeric and numeric formats, respectively; among the more numerate, these same proportions were 66% and 6%). Less numerate middle-aged and older adults, however, showed less influence of numeric format on willingness to take the medication. It is unclear whether differences are clinically meaningful, although some differences are large. Providing numeric AE-likelihood information (compared with nonnumeric) is likely to increase risk comprehension across numeracy and age levels. Its effects on uptake and adherence of

  3. ArcCN-Runoff: An ArcGIS tool for generating curve number and runoff maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhan, X.; Huang, M.-L.

    2004-01-01

    The development and the application of ArcCN-Runoff tool, an extension of ESRI@ ArcGIS software, are reported. This tool can be applied to determine curve numbers and to calculate runoff or infiltration for a rainfall event in a watershed. Implementation of GIS techniques such as dissolving, intersecting, and a curve-number reference table improve efficiency. Technical processing time may be reduced from days, if not weeks, to hours for producing spatially varied curve number and runoff maps. An application example for a watershed in Lyon County and Osage County, Kansas, USA, is presented. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Parity generator and parity checker in the modified trinary number system using savart plate and spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Amal K.

    2010-09-01

    The parity generators and the checkers are the most important circuits in communication systems. With the development of multi-valued logic (MVL), the proposed system with parity generators and checkers is the most required using the recently developed optoelectronic technology in the modified trinary number (MTN) system. This system also meets up the tremendous needs of speeds by exploiting the savart plates and spatial light modulators (SLM) in the optical tree architecture (OTA).

  5. Generation of random microstructures and prediction of sound velocity and absorption for open foams with spherical pores.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Tomasz G

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes and discusses an approach for the design and quality inspection of the morphology dedicated for sound absorbing foams, using a relatively simple technique for a random generation of periodic microstructures representative for open-cell foams with spherical pores. The design is controlled by a few parameters, namely, the total open porosity and the average pore size, as well as the standard deviation of pore size. These design parameters are set up exactly and independently, however, the setting of the standard deviation of pore sizes requires some number of pores in the representative volume element (RVE); this number is a procedure parameter. Another pore structure parameter which may be indirectly affected is the average size of windows linking the pores, however, it is in fact weakly controlled by the maximal pore-penetration factor, and moreover, it depends on the porosity and pore size. The proposed methodology for testing microstructure-designs of sound absorbing porous media applies the multi-scale modeling where some important transport parameters-responsible for sound propagation in a porous medium-are calculated from microstructure using the generated RVE, in order to estimate the sound velocity and absorption of such a designed material.

  6. Allelic recombination between distinct genomic locations generates copy number diversity in human β-defensins

    PubMed Central

    Bakar, Suhaili Abu; Hollox, Edward J.; Armour, John A. L.

    2009-01-01

    β-Defensins are small secreted antimicrobial and signaling peptides involved in the innate immune response of vertebrates. In humans, a cluster of at least 7 of these genes shows extensive copy number variation, with a diploid copy number commonly ranging between 2 and 7. Using a genetic mapping approach, we show that this cluster is at not 1 but 2 distinct genomic loci ≈5 Mb apart on chromosome band 8p23.1, contradicting the most recent genome assembly. We also demonstrate that the predominant mechanism of change in β-defensin copy number is simple allelic recombination occurring in the interval between the 2 distinct genomic loci for these genes. In 416 meiotic transmissions, we observe 3 events creating a haplotype copy number not found in the parent, equivalent to a germ-line rate of copy number change of ≈0.7% per gamete. This places it among the fastest-changing copy number variants currently known. PMID:19131514

  7. Randomized Trial of the Effect of Four Second-Generation Antipsychotics and One First-Generation Antipsychotic on Cigarette Smoking, Alcohol, and Drug Use in Chronic Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Somaia; Rosenheck, Robert A; Lin, Haiqun; Swartz, Marvin; McEvoy, Joseph; Stroup, Scott

    2015-07-01

    No large-scale randomized trial has compared the effect of different second-generation antipsychotic drugs and any first-generation drug on alcohol, drug and nicotine use in patients with schizophrenia. The Clinical Antipsychotic Trial of Intervention Effectiveness study randomly assigned 1432 patients formally diagnosed with schizophrenia to four second-generation antipsychotic drugs (olanzapine, risperidone quetiapine, and ziprasidone) and one first-generation antipsychotic (perphenazine) and followed them for up to 18 months. Secondary outcome data documented cigarettes smoked in the past week and alcohol and drug use severity ratings. At baseline, 61% of patients smoked, 35% used alcohol, and 23% used illicit drugs. Although there were significant effects of time showing reduction in substance use over the 18 months (all p < 0.0001), this study found no evidence that any antipsychotic was robustly superior to any other in a secondary analysis of data on substance use outcomes from a large 18-month randomized schizophrenia trial.

  8. Generation mechanism of nonlinear ultrasonic Lamb waves in thin plates with randomly distributed micro-cracks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Youxuan; Li, Feilong; Cao, Peng; Liu, Yaolu; Zhang, Jianyu; Fu, Shaoyun; Zhang, Jun; Hu, Ning

    2017-08-01

    Since the identification of micro-cracks in engineering materials is very valuable in understanding the initial and slight changes in mechanical properties of materials under complex working environments, numerical simulations on the propagation of the low frequency S 0 Lamb wave in thin plates with randomly distributed micro-cracks were performed to study the behavior of nonlinear Lamb waves. The results showed that while the influence of the randomly distributed micro-cracks on the phase velocity of the low frequency S 0 fundamental waves could be neglected, significant ultrasonic nonlinear effects caused by the randomly distributed micro-cracks was discovered, which mainly presented as a second harmonic generation. By using a Monte Carlo simulation method, we found that the acoustic nonlinear parameter increased linearly with the micro-crack density and the size of micro-crack zone, and it was also related to the excitation frequency and friction coefficient of the micro-crack surfaces. In addition, it was found that the nonlinear effect of waves reflected by the micro-cracks was more noticeable than that of the transmitted waves. This study theoretically reveals that the low frequency S 0 mode of Lamb waves can be used as the fundamental waves to quantitatively identify micro-cracks in thin plates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Study of Randomness in AES Ciphertexts Produced by Randomly Generated S-Boxes and S-Boxes with Various Modulus and Additive Constant Polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Suman; Sadique Uz Zaman, J. K. M.; Ghosh, Ranjan

    2016-06-01

    In Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), the standard S-Box is conventionally generated by using a particular irreducible polynomial {11B} in GF(28) as the modulus and a particular additive constant polynomial {63} in GF(2), though it can be generated by many other polynomials. In this paper, it has been shown that it is possible to generate secured AES S-Boxes by using some other selected modulus and additive polynomials and also can be generated randomly, using a PRNG like BBS. A comparative study has been made on the randomness of corresponding AES ciphertexts generated, using these S-Boxes, by the NIST Test Suite coded for this paper. It has been found that besides using the standard one, other moduli and additive constants are also able to generate equally or better random ciphertexts; the same is true for random S-Boxes also. As these new types of S-Boxes are user-defined, hence unknown, they are able to prevent linear and differential cryptanalysis. Moreover, they act as additional key-inputs to AES, thus increasing the key-space.

  10. Genarris: Random generation of molecular crystal structures and fast screening with a Harris approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiayue; Curtis, Farren S.; Rose, Timothy; Schober, Christoph; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Reuter, Karsten; Oberhofer, Harald; Marom, Noa

    2018-06-01

    We present Genarris, a Python package that performs configuration space screening for molecular crystals of rigid molecules by random sampling with physical constraints. For fast energy evaluations, Genarris employs a Harris approximation, whereby the total density of a molecular crystal is constructed via superposition of single molecule densities. Dispersion-inclusive density functional theory is then used for the Harris density without performing a self-consistency cycle. Genarris uses machine learning for clustering, based on a relative coordinate descriptor developed specifically for molecular crystals, which is shown to be robust in identifying packing motif similarity. In addition to random structure generation, Genarris offers three workflows based on different sequences of successive clustering and selection steps: the "Rigorous" workflow is an exhaustive exploration of the potential energy landscape, the "Energy" workflow produces a set of low energy structures, and the "Diverse" workflow produces a maximally diverse set of structures. The latter is recommended for generating initial populations for genetic algorithms. Here, the implementation of Genarris is reported and its application is demonstrated for three test cases.

  11. A Geostatistical Scaling Approach for the Generation of Non Gaussian Random Variables and Increments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadagnini, Alberto; Neuman, Shlomo P.; Riva, Monica; Panzeri, Marco

    2016-04-01

    We address manifestations of non-Gaussian statistical scaling displayed by many variables, Y, and their (spatial or temporal) increments. Evidence of such behavior includes symmetry of increment distributions at all separation distances (or lags) with sharp peaks and heavy tails which tend to decay asymptotically as lag increases. Variables reported to exhibit such distributions include quantities of direct relevance to hydrogeological sciences, e.g. porosity, log permeability, electrical resistivity, soil and sediment texture, sediment transport rate, rainfall, measured and simulated turbulent fluid velocity, and other. No model known to us captures all of the documented statistical scaling behaviors in a unique and consistent manner. We recently proposed a generalized sub-Gaussian model (GSG) which reconciles within a unique theoretical framework the probability distributions of a target variable and its increments. We presented an algorithm to generate unconditional random realizations of statistically isotropic or anisotropic GSG functions and illustrated it in two dimensions. In this context, we demonstrated the feasibility of estimating all key parameters of a GSG model underlying a single realization of Y by analyzing jointly spatial moments of Y data and corresponding increments. Here, we extend our GSG model to account for noisy measurements of Y at a discrete set of points in space (or time), present an algorithm to generate conditional realizations of corresponding isotropic or anisotropic random field, and explore them on one- and two-dimensional synthetic test cases.

  12. Preparing the Next Generation: The Kentucky Leadership Academy Model. Occasional Paper, Volume 10, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Allen G.

    In July 1990, the Leadership Academy was established within the Kentucky Community College System (KCCS) for the purpose of preparing the next generation of leaders within the system's 14 colleges. An eight-member advisory board, appointed by the chancellor of the KCCS, set about developing the activities of the Academy. The three goals adopted by…

  13. NHash: Randomized N-Gram Hashing for Distributed Generation of Validatable Unique Study Identifiers in Multicenter Research

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Tao, Shiqiang; Xing, Guangming; Mozes, Jeno; Zonjy, Bilal; Lhatoo, Samden D

    2015-01-01

    Background A unique study identifier serves as a key for linking research data about a study subject without revealing protected health information in the identifier. While sufficient for single-site and limited-scale studies, the use of common unique study identifiers has several drawbacks for large multicenter studies, where thousands of research participants may be recruited from multiple sites. An important property of study identifiers is error tolerance (or validatable), in that inadvertent editing mistakes during their transmission and use will most likely result in invalid study identifiers. Objective This paper introduces a novel method called "Randomized N-gram Hashing (NHash)," for generating unique study identifiers in a distributed and validatable fashion, in multicenter research. NHash has a unique set of properties: (1) it is a pseudonym serving the purpose of linking research data about a study participant for research purposes; (2) it can be generated automatically in a completely distributed fashion with virtually no risk for identifier collision; (3) it incorporates a set of cryptographic hash functions based on N-grams, with a combination of additional encryption techniques such as a shift cipher; (d) it is validatable (error tolerant) in the sense that inadvertent edit errors will mostly result in invalid identifiers. Methods NHash consists of 2 phases. First, an intermediate string using randomized N-gram hashing is generated. This string consists of a collection of N-gram hashes f 1, f 2, ..., f k. The input for each function f i has 3 components: a random number r, an integer n, and input data m. The result, f i(r, n, m), is an n-gram of m with a starting position s, which is computed as (r mod |m|), where |m| represents the length of m. The output for Step 1 is the concatenation of the sequence f 1(r 1, n 1, m 1), f 2(r 2, n 2, m 2), ..., f k(r k, n k, m k). In the second phase, the intermediate string generated in Phase 1 is encrypted

  14. NHash: Randomized N-Gram Hashing for Distributed Generation of Validatable Unique Study Identifiers in Multicenter Research.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Tao, Shiqiang; Xing, Guangming; Mozes, Jeno; Zonjy, Bilal; Lhatoo, Samden D; Cui, Licong

    2015-11-10

    A unique study identifier serves as a key for linking research data about a study subject without revealing protected health information in the identifier. While sufficient for single-site and limited-scale studies, the use of common unique study identifiers has several drawbacks for large multicenter studies, where thousands of research participants may be recruited from multiple sites. An important property of study identifiers is error tolerance (or validatable), in that inadvertent editing mistakes during their transmission and use will most likely result in invalid study identifiers. This paper introduces a novel method called "Randomized N-gram Hashing (NHash)," for generating unique study identifiers in a distributed and validatable fashion, in multicenter research. NHash has a unique set of properties: (1) it is a pseudonym serving the purpose of linking research data about a study participant for research purposes; (2) it can be generated automatically in a completely distributed fashion with virtually no risk for identifier collision; (3) it incorporates a set of cryptographic hash functions based on N-grams, with a combination of additional encryption techniques such as a shift cipher; (d) it is validatable (error tolerant) in the sense that inadvertent edit errors will mostly result in invalid identifiers. NHash consists of 2 phases. First, an intermediate string using randomized N-gram hashing is generated. This string consists of a collection of N-gram hashes f1, f2, ..., fk. The input for each function fi has 3 components: a random number r, an integer n, and input data m. The result, fi(r, n, m), is an n-gram of m with a starting position s, which is computed as (r mod |m|), where |m| represents the length of m. The output for Step 1 is the concatenation of the sequence f1(r1, n1, m1), f2(r2, n2, m2), ..., fk(rk, nk, mk). In the second phase, the intermediate string generated in Phase 1 is encrypted using techniques such as shift cipher. The result

  15. [Influence of PCR cycle number on microbial diversity analysis through next generation sequencing].

    PubMed

    An, Yunhe; Gao, Lijuan; Li, Junbo; Tian, Yanjie; Wang, Jinlong; Zheng, Xuejuan; Wu, Huijuan

    2016-08-25

    Using of high throughput sequencing technology to study the microbial diversity in complex samples has become one of the hottest issues in the field of microbial diversity research. In this study, the soil and sheep rumen chyme samples were used to extract DNA, respectively. Then the 25 ng total DNA was used to amplify the 16S rRNA V3 region with 20, 25, 30 PCR cycles, and the final sequencing library was constructed by mixing equal amounts of purified PCR products. Finally, the operational taxonomic unit (OUT) amount, rarefaction curve, microbial number and species were compared through data analysis. It was found that at the same amount of DNA template, the proportion of the community composition was not the best with more numbers of PCR cycle, although the species number was much more. In all, when the PCR cycle number is 25, the number of species and proportion of the community composition were the most optimal both in soil or chyme samples.

  16. Reliable, responsive pacemaking and pattern generation with minimal cell numbers: the crustacean cardiac ganglion.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Ian M

    2002-04-01

    Investigations of the electrophysiology of crustacean cardiac ganglia over the last half-century are reviewed for their contributions to elucidating the cellular mechanisms and interactions by which a small (as few as nine cells) neuronal network accomplishes extremely reliable, rhythmical, patterned activation of muscular activity-in this case, beating of the neurogenic heart. This ganglion is thus a model for pacemaking and central pattern generation. Favorable anatomy has permitted voltage- and space-clamp analyses of voltage-dependent ionic currents that endow each neuron with the intrinsic ability to respond with rhythmical, patterned impulse activity to nonpatterned stimulation. The crustacean soma and initial axon segment do not support impulse generation but integrate input from stretch-sensitive dendrites and electrotonic and chemically mediated synapses on axonal processes in neuropils. The soma and initial axon produce a depolarization-activated, calcium-mediated, sustained potential, the "driver potential," so-called because it drives a train of impulses at the "trigger zone" of the axon. Extreme reliability results from redundancy and the electrotonic coupling and synaptic interaction among all the neurons. Complex modulation by central nervous system inputs and by neurohormones to adjust heart pumping to physiological demands has long been demonstrated, but much remains to be learned about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of action. The continuing relevance of the crustacean cardiac ganglion as a relatively simple model for pacemaking and central pattern generation is confirmed by the rapidly widening documentation of intrinsic potentials such as plateau potentials in neurons of all major animal groups. The suite of ionic currents (a slowly inactivating calcium current and various potassium currents, with variations) observed for the crustacean cardiac ganglion have been implicated in or proven to underlie a majority of the intrinsic potentials

  17. Supporting Generative Thinking about Number Lines, the Cartesian Plane, and Graphs of Linear Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earnest, Darrell Steven

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation explores fifth and eighth grade students' interpretations of three kinds of mathematical representations: number lines, the Cartesian plane, and graphs of linear functions. Two studies were conducted. In Study 1, I administered the paper-and-pencil Linear Representations Assessment (LRA) to examine students'…

  18. Performance of a cascade in an annular vortex-generating tunnel over range of Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurston, Sidney; Brunk, Ralph E

    1951-01-01

    Total-pressure deficiency for an annular cascade of 65-(12)10 blades was measured at three radial stations over a range of Reynolds numbers from 50,000 to 250,000 and at angles of attack of 15 degrees and 25 degrees. The variation of turning angle and shape of static pressure distribution at these stations is also shown.

  19. Enhanced enstrophy generation for turbulent convection in low-Prandtl-number fluids

    DOE PAGES

    Schumacher, Jörg; Götzfried, Paul; Scheel, Janet D.

    2015-07-20

    Turbulent convection is often present in liquids with a kinematic viscosity much smaller than the diffusivity of the temperature. Here we reveal why these convection flows obey a much stronger level of fluid turbulence than those in which kinematic viscosity and thermal diffusivity are the same; i.e., the Prandtl number Pr is unity. We compare turbulent convection in air at Pr = 0.7 and in liquid mercury at Pr = 0.021. In this comparison the Prandtl number at constant Grashof number Gr is varied, rather than at constant Rayleigh number Ra as usually done. Our simulations demonstrate that the turbulentmore » Kolmogorov-like cascade is extended both at the large- and small-scale ends with decreasing Pr. The kinetic energy injection into the flow takes place over the whole cascade range. In contrast to convection in air, the kinetic energy injection rate is particularly enhanced for liquid mercury for all scales larger than the characteristic width of thermal plumes. As a consequence, mean values and fluctuations of the local strain rates are increased, which in turn results in significantly enhanced enstrophy production by vortex stretching. The normalized distributions of enstrophy production in the bulk and the ratio of the principal strain rates are found to agree for both Prs. Finally, despite the different energy injection mechanisms, the principal strain rates also agree with those in homogeneous isotropic turbulence conducted at the same Reynolds numbers as for the convection flows. Thus, our results have interesting implications for small-scale turbulence modeling of liquid metal convection in astrophysical and technological applications.« less

  20. Random behaviour, amplification processes and number of participants: How they contribute to the foraging properties of ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneubourg, J. L.; Aron, S.; Goss, S.; Pasteels, J. M.; Duerinck, G.

    1986-10-01

    Two major types of foraging organisation in ants are described and compared, being illustrated with experimental data and mathematical models. The first concerns large colonies of identical, unspecialised foragers. The communication and interaction between foragers and their randomness generates collective and efficient structures. The second concerns small societies of deterministic and specialised foragers, rarely communicating together. The first organisation is discussed in relation to the different recruitment mechanisms, trail-following error, quality and degree of aggregation of food-sources, and territorial marking, and is the key to many types of collective behaviour in social insects. The second is discussed in relation to spatial specialisation, foraging density, individual learning and genetic programming. The two organisations may be associated in the same colony. The choice of organisation is discussed in relation to colony size and size and predictability of food sources.

  1. Entropy generation, particle creation, and quantum field theory in a cosmological spacetime: When do number and entropy increase\\?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandrup, Henry E.

    1988-06-01

    This paper reexamines the statistical quantum field theory of a free, minimally coupled, real scalar field Φ in a statically bounded, classical Friedmann cosmology, where the time-dependent scale factor Ω(t) tends to constant values Ω1 and Ω2 for tt2. The principal objective is to investigate the intuition that ``entropy'' S correlates with average particle number , so that increases in induced by parametric amplification manifest a one-to-one connection with increases in S. The definition of particle number Nk becomes unambiguous for t>t2 and tnumber representation. A key observation then is that - is guaranteed generically to be positive only for special initial data which, in a number representation, are characterized by ``random phases'' in the sense that any relative phase for the projection of ρ(t1) into two different number eigenstates is ``random'' or ``unobservable physically,'' and averaged over in a density matrix. More importantly for the notion of entropy, random-phase initial data also guarantee an increase in the spread of P(\\{k,Nk\\}), so that, e.g., the sum of the variances Δ2N+/-k(t2) exceeds the initial Δ2N+/-k(t1). It is this increasing spread in P, rather than the growth in average numbers per se, which suggests that, for initial data manifesting random phases, SN(t2)>SN(t1), a result established rigorously in the limits of strong and weak particle creation.

  2. A method for generating new datasets based on copy number for cancer analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shinuk; Kon, Mark; Kang, Hyunsik

    2015-01-01

    New data sources for the analysis of cancer data are rapidly supplementing the large number of gene-expression markers used for current methods of analysis. Significant among these new sources are copy number variation (CNV) datasets, which typically enumerate several hundred thousand CNVs distributed throughout the genome. Several useful algorithms allow systems-level analyses of such datasets. However, these rich data sources have not yet been analyzed as deeply as gene-expression data. To address this issue, the extensive toolsets used for analyzing expression data in cancerous and noncancerous tissue (e.g., gene set enrichment analysis and phenotype prediction) could be redirected to extract a great deal of predictive information from CNV data, in particular those derived from cancers. Here we present a software package capable of preprocessing standard Agilent copy number datasets into a form to which essentially all expression analysis tools can be applied. We illustrate the use of this toolset in predicting the survival time of patients with ovarian cancer or glioblastoma multiforme and also provide an analysis of gene- and pathway-level deletions in these two types of cancer.

  3. Generation and Evolution of High-Mach-Number Laser-Driven Magnetized Collisionless Shocks in the Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, D B; Fox, W; Haberberger, D; Fiksel, G; Bhattacharjee, A; Barnak, D H; Hu, S X; Germaschewski, K

    2017-07-14

    We present the first laboratory generation of high-Mach-number magnetized collisionless shocks created through the interaction of an expanding laser-driven plasma with a magnetized ambient plasma. Time-resolved, two-dimensional imaging of plasma density and magnetic fields shows the formation and evolution of a supercritical shock propagating at magnetosonic Mach number M_{ms}≈12. Particle-in-cell simulations constrained by experimental data further detail the shock formation and separate dynamics of the multi-ion-species ambient plasma. The results show that the shocks form on time scales as fast as one gyroperiod, aided by the efficient coupling of energy, and the generation of a magnetic barrier between the piston and ambient ions. The development of this experimental platform complements present remote sensing and spacecraft observations, and opens the way for controlled laboratory investigations of high-Mach number collisionless shocks, including the mechanisms and efficiency of particle acceleration.

  4. Randomized clinical trials in implant therapy: relationships among methodological, statistical, clinical, paratextual features and number of citations.

    PubMed

    Nieri, Michele; Clauser, Carlo; Franceschi, Debora; Pagliaro, Umberto; Saletta, Daniele; Pini-Prato, Giovanpaolo

    2007-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships among reported methodological, statistical, clinical and paratextual variables of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in implant therapy, and their influence on subsequent research. The material consisted of the RCTs in implant therapy published through the end of the year 2000. Methodological, statistical, clinical and paratextual features of the articles were assessed and recorded. The perceived clinical relevance was subjectively evaluated by an experienced clinician on anonymous abstracts. The impact on research was measured by the number of citations found in the Science Citation Index. A new statistical technique (Structural learning of Bayesian Networks) was used to assess the relationships among the considered variables. Descriptive statistics revealed that the reported methodology and statistics of RCTs in implant therapy were defective. Follow-up of the studies was generally short. The perceived clinical relevance appeared to be associated with the objectives of the studies and with the number of published images in the original articles. The impact on research was related to the nationality of the involved institutions and to the number of published images. RCTs in implant therapy (until 2000) show important methodological and statistical flaws and may not be appropriate for guiding clinicians in their practice. The methodological and statistical quality of the studies did not appear to affect their impact on practice and research. Bayesian Networks suggest new and unexpected relationships among the methodological, statistical, clinical and paratextual features of RCTs.

  5. A novel image encryption algorithm based on synchronized random bit generated in cascade-coupled chaotic semiconductor ring lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiafu; Xiang, Shuiying; Wang, Haoning; Gong, Junkai; Wen, Aijun

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a novel image encryption algorithm based on synchronization of physical random bit generated in a cascade-coupled semiconductor ring lasers (CCSRL) system is proposed, and the security analysis is performed. In both transmitter and receiver parts, the CCSRL system is a master-slave configuration consisting of a master semiconductor ring laser (M-SRL) with cross-feedback and a solitary SRL (S-SRL). The proposed image encryption algorithm includes image preprocessing based on conventional chaotic maps, pixel confusion based on control matrix extracted from physical random bit, and pixel diffusion based on random bit stream extracted from physical random bit. Firstly, the preprocessing method is used to eliminate the correlation between adjacent pixels. Secondly, physical random bit with verified randomness is generated based on chaos in the CCSRL system, and is used to simultaneously generate the control matrix and random bit stream. Finally, the control matrix and random bit stream are used for the encryption algorithm in order to change the position and the values of pixels, respectively. Simulation results and security analysis demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is effective and able to resist various typical attacks, and thus is an excellent candidate for secure image communication application.

  6. Unified Strouhal-Reynolds number relationship for laminar vortex streets generated by different-shaped obstacles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ildoo; Wu, X L

    2015-10-01

    A structure-based Strouhal-Reynolds number relationship, St=1/(A+B/Re), has been recently proposed based on observations of laminar vortex shedding from circular cylinders in a flowing soap film. Since the new St-Re relation was derived from a general physical consideration, it raises the possibility that it may be applicable to vortex shedding from bodies other than circular ones. The work presented herein provides experimental evidence that this is the case. Our measurements also show that, in the asymptotic limit (Re→∞), St(∞)=1/A≃0.21 is constant independent of rod shapes, leaving B the only parameter that is shape dependent.

  7. From Narratives to Numbers: Data Work and Patient-Generated Health Data in Consultations.

    PubMed

    Lindroth, Tomas; Islind, Anna Sigridur; Steineck, Gunnar; Lundin, Johan

    2018-01-01

    This article presents preliminary findings on how the introduction of patient-generated health data (PGHD) triggers changes during patient-nurse consultations. This article builds on a two-year case study, examining the work practice at a cancer rehabilitation clinic at a Swedish Hospital using PGHD. The study focuses on how nurses' use data, gathered by patients with a mobile phone app, during consultations. The use of PGHD introduce a change in the translation work, the work of turning rich patient descriptions and transform them into data, during the consultation for documentation and clinical decision-making. This change affects precision, questions asked and the use of visualizations as well as the patient-nurse decision making.

  8. Ballistic range experiments on the superboom generated at increasing flight Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanai, M.; Toong, T.-Y.; Pierce, A. D.

    1976-01-01

    Ballistic range experiments for the study of the propagation of converging shocks are described and the similarity between the observed phenomenon and that expected for superbooms created by accelerating supersonic aircraft is discussed. For weak shocks (shock Mach numbers of about 1.03), a structure resembling that of a folded shock predicted by geometrical acoustics theory is observed while for stronger shocks, a concave front with enhanced overpressure is recorded. Other results are in general accord with the basic concepts of shock propagation and in conjunction with some theoretical scaling laws indicate that the peak magnification of sonic booms due to aircraft flight acceleration in the real atmosphere should be in the range of 6 to 13.

  9. [Formula: see text]-convergence, complete convergence, and weak laws of large numbers for asymptotically negatively associated random vectors with values in [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    Ko, Mi-Hwa

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, based on the Rosenthal-type inequality for asymptotically negatively associated random vectors with values in [Formula: see text], we establish results on [Formula: see text]-convergence and complete convergence of the maximums of partial sums are established. We also obtain weak laws of large numbers for coordinatewise asymptotically negatively associated random vectors with values in [Formula: see text].

  10. Characterizing the next-generation matrix and basic reproduction number in ecological epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Roberts, M G; Heesterbeek, J A P

    2013-03-01

    We address the interaction of ecological processes, such as consumer-resource relationships and competition, and the epidemiology of infectious diseases spreading in ecosystems. Modelling such interactions seems essential to understand the dynamics of infectious agents in communities consisting of interacting host and non-host species. We show how the usual epidemiological next-generation matrix approach to characterize invasion into multi-host communities can be extended to calculate R₀, and how this relates to the ecological community matrix. We then present two simple examples to illustrate this approach. The first of these is a model of the rinderpest, wildebeest, grass interaction, where our inferred dynamics qualitatively matches the observed phenomena that occurred after the eradication of rinderpest from the Serengeti ecosystem in the 1980s. The second example is a prey-predator system, where both species are hosts of the same pathogen. It is shown that regions for the parameter values exist where the two host species are only able to coexist when the pathogen is present to mediate the ecological interaction.

  11. Gametophytic vs. sporophytic control of pollen aperture number: a generational conflict.

    PubMed

    Till-Bottraud, Irène; Gouyon, Pierre-Henri; Ressayre, Adrienne; Godelle, Bernard

    2012-11-01

    In flowering plants, the haploid phase is reduced to the pollen grain and embryo sac. These reproductive tissues (gametophytes) are actually distinct individuals that have a different genome from the plant (sporophyte), and are more or less independent. The morphology of pollen grains, particularly the openings permitting pollen tube germination (apertures), is crucial for determining the outcome of pollen competition. Many species of flowering plants simultaneously produce pollen grains with different aperture numbers in a single individual (heteromorphism). In this paper, we show that the heteromorphic pollen aperture pattern depends on the genetic control of pollen morphogenesis. This points out a conflict of interest between genes expressed in the sporophyte and genes expressed in the gametophyte. More generally, such a conflict should exist whenever heteromorphism is an ESS resulting from a bet-hedging strategy. For pollen aperture, heteromorphism has been observed in about 40% of angiosperm species, suggesting that conflicting situations are the rule. In this context, the sporo-gametophytic conflict could be one of the factors that led to the reduction of the haploid phase in plants. 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

  12. Identification of copy number variation in French dairy and beef breeds using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Letaief, Rabia; Rebours, Emmanuelle; Grohs, Cécile; Meersseman, Cédric; Fritz, Sébastien; Trouilh, Lidwine; Esquerré, Diane; Barbieri, Johanna; Klopp, Christophe; Philippe, Romain; Blanquet, Véronique; Boichard, Didier; Rocha, Dominique; Boussaha, Mekki

    2017-10-24

    Copy number variations (CNV) are known to play a major role in genetic variability and disease pathogenesis in several species including cattle. In this study, we report the identification and characterization of CNV in eight French beef and dairy breeds using whole-genome sequence data from 200 animals. Bioinformatics analyses to search for CNV were carried out using four different but complementary tools and we validated a subset of the CNV by both in silico and experimental approaches. We report the identification and localization of 4178 putative deletion-only, duplication-only and CNV regions, which cover 6% of the bovine autosomal genome; they were validated by two in silico approaches and/or experimentally validated using array-based comparative genomic hybridization and single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping arrays. The size of these variants ranged from 334 bp to 7.7 Mb, with an average size of ~ 54 kb. Of these 4178 variants, 3940 were deletions, 67 were duplications and 171 corresponded to both deletions and duplications, which were defined as potential CNV regions. Gene content analysis revealed that, among these variants, 1100 deletions and duplications encompassed 1803 known genes, which affect a wide spectrum of molecular functions, and 1095 overlapped with known QTL regions. Our study is a large-scale survey of CNV in eight French dairy and beef breeds. These CNV will be useful to study the link between genetic variability and economically important traits, and to improve our knowledge on the genomic architecture of cattle.

  13. A random generation approach to pattern library creation for full chip lithographic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Elain; Hong, Sid; Liu, Limei; Huang, Lucas; Yang, Legender; Kabeel, Aliaa; Madkour, Kareem; ElManhawy, Wael; Kwan, Joe; Du, Chunshan; Hu, Xinyi; Wan, Qijian; Zhang, Recoo

    2017-04-01

    As technology advances, the need for running lithographic (litho) checking for early detection of hotspots before tapeout has become essential. This process is important at all levels—from designing standard cells and small blocks to large intellectual property (IP) and full chip layouts. Litho simulation provides high accuracy for detecting printability issues due to problematic geometries, but it has the disadvantage of slow performance on large designs and blocks [1]. Foundries have found a good compromise solution for running litho simulation on full chips by filtering out potential candidate hotspot patterns using pattern matching (PM), and then performing simulation on the matched locations. The challenge has always been how to easily create a PM library of candidate patterns that provides both comprehensive coverage for litho problems and fast runtime performance. This paper presents a new strategy for generating candidate real design patterns through a random generation approach using a layout schema generator (LSG) utility. The output patterns from the LSG are simulated, and then classified by a scoring mechanism that categorizes patterns according to the severity of the hotspots, probability of their presence in the design, and the likelihood of the pattern causing a hotspot. The scoring output helps to filter out the yield problematic patterns that should be removed from any standard cell design, and also to define potential problematic patterns that must be simulated within a bigger context to decide whether or not they represent an actual hotspot. This flow is demonstrated on SMIC 14nm technology, creating a candidate hotspot pattern library that can be used in full chip simulation with very high coverage and robust performance.

  14. A randomized comparison of patients' understanding of number needed to treat and other common risk reduction formats.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Stacey L; Pignone, Michael P; Lewis, Carmen L

    2003-11-01

    Commentators have suggested that patients may understand quantitative information about treatment benefits better when they are presented as numbers needed to treat (NNT) rather than as absolute or relative risk reductions. To determine whether NNT helps patients interpret treatment benefits better than absolute risk reduction (ARR), relative risk reduction (RRR), or a combination of all three of these risk reduction presentations (COMBO). Randomized cross-sectional survey. University internal medicine clinic. Three hundred fifty-seven men and women, ages 50 to 80, who presented for health care. Subjects were given written information about the baseline risk of a hypothetical "disease Y" and were asked (1) to compare the benefits of two drug treatments for disease Y, stating which provided more benefit; and (2) to calculate the effect of one of those drug treatments on a given baseline risk of disease. Risk information was presented to each subject in one of four randomly allocated risk formats: NNT, ARR, RRR, or COMBO. When asked to state which of two treatments provided more benefit, subjects who received the RRR format responded correctly most often (60% correct vs 43% for COMBO, 42% for ARR, and 30% for NNT, P =.001). Most subjects were unable to calculate the effect of drug treatment on the given baseline risk of disease, although subjects receiving the RRR and ARR formats responded correctly more often (21% and 17% compared to 7% for COMBO and 6% for NNT, P =.004). Patients are best able to interpret the benefits of treatment when they are presented in an RRR format with a given baseline risk of disease. ARR also is easily interpreted. NNT is often misinterpreted by patients and should not be used alone to communicate risk to patients.

  15. Computational tools for copy number variation (CNV) detection using next-generation sequencing data: features and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Wang, Qingguo; Wang, Quan; Jia, Peilin; Zhao, Zhongming

    2013-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) is a prevalent form of critical genetic variation that leads to an abnormal number of copies of large genomic regions in a cell. Microarray-based comparative genome hybridization (arrayCGH) or genotyping arrays have been standard technologies to detect large regions subject to copy number changes in genomes until most recently high-resolution sequence data can be analyzed by next-generation sequencing (NGS). During the last several years, NGS-based analysis has been widely applied to identify CNVs in both healthy and diseased individuals. Correspondingly, the strong demand for NGS-based CNV analyses has fuelled development of numerous computational methods and tools for CNV detection. In this article, we review the recent advances in computational methods pertaining to CNV detection using whole genome and whole exome sequencing data. Additionally, we discuss their strengths and weaknesses and suggest directions for future development.

  16. Computational tools for copy number variation (CNV) detection using next-generation sequencing data: features and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) is a prevalent form of critical genetic variation that leads to an abnormal number of copies of large genomic regions in a cell. Microarray-based comparative genome hybridization (arrayCGH) or genotyping arrays have been standard technologies to detect large regions subject to copy number changes in genomes until most recently high-resolution sequence data can be analyzed by next-generation sequencing (NGS). During the last several years, NGS-based analysis has been widely applied to identify CNVs in both healthy and diseased individuals. Correspondingly, the strong demand for NGS-based CNV analyses has fuelled development of numerous computational methods and tools for CNV detection. In this article, we review the recent advances in computational methods pertaining to CNV detection using whole genome and whole exome sequencing data. Additionally, we discuss their strengths and weaknesses and suggest directions for future development. PMID:24564169

  17. NullSeq: A Tool for Generating Random Coding Sequences with Desired Amino Acid and GC Contents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sophia S; Hockenberry, Adam J; Lancichinetti, Andrea; Jewett, Michael C; Amaral, Luís A N

    2016-11-01

    The existence of over- and under-represented sequence motifs in genomes provides evidence of selective evolutionary pressures on biological mechanisms such as transcription, translation, ligand-substrate binding, and host immunity. In order to accurately identify motifs and other genome-scale patterns of interest, it is essential to be able to generate accurate null models that are appropriate for the sequences under study. While many tools have been developed to create random nucleotide sequences, protein coding sequences are subject to a unique set of constraints that complicates the process of generating appropriate null models. There are currently no tools available that allow users to create random coding sequences with specified amino acid composition and GC content for the purpose of hypothesis testing. Using the principle of maximum entropy, we developed a method that generates unbiased random sequences with pre-specified amino acid and GC content, which we have developed into a python package. Our method is the simplest way to obtain maximally unbiased random sequences that are subject to GC usage and primary amino acid sequence constraints. Furthermore, this approach can easily be expanded to create unbiased random sequences that incorporate more complicated constraints such as individual nucleotide usage or even di-nucleotide frequencies. The ability to generate correctly specified null models will allow researchers to accurately identify sequence motifs which will lead to a better understanding of biological processes as well as more effective engineering of biological systems.

  18. The optimal number of personnel for good quality of chest compressions: A prospective randomized parallel manikin trial

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Ji Young; Nishiyama, Kei; Hayashi, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Background Long durational chest compression (CC) deteriorates cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality. The appropriate number of CC personnel for minimizing rescuer’s fatigue is mostly unknown. Objective We determined the optimal number of personnel needed for 30-min CPR in a rescue-team. Methods We conducted a randomized, manikin trial on healthcare providers. We divided them into Groups A to D according to the assigned different rest period to each group between the 2 min CCs. Groups A, B, C, and D performed CCs at 2, 4, 6, and 8 min rest period. All participants performed CCs for 30 min with a different rest period; participants allocated to Groups A, B, C, and D performed, eight, five, four, and three cycles, respectively. We compared a quality change of CCs among these groups to investigate how the assigned rest period affects the maintenance of CC quality during the 30-min CPR. Results This study involved 143 participants (male 58 [41%]; mean age, 24 years,) for the evaluation. As participants had less rest periods, the quality of their CCs such as sufficient depth ratio declined over 30-min CPR. A significant decrease in the sufficient CC depth ratio was observed in the second to the last cycle as compared to the first cycle. (median changes; A: −4%, B: −3%, C: 0%, and D: 0% p < 0.01). Conclusions A 6 min rest period after 2 min CC is vital in order to sustain the quality of CC during a 30-min CPR cycle. At least four personnel may be needed to reduce rescuer's fatigue for a 30-min CPR cycle when the team consists of men and women. PMID:29267300

  19. A high-speed on-chip pseudo-random binary sequence generator for multi-tone phase calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gommé, Liesbeth; Vandersteen, Gerd; Rolain, Yves

    2011-07-01

    An on-chip reference generator is conceived by adopting the technique of decimating a pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS) signal in parallel sequences. This is of great benefit when high-speed generation of PRBS and PRBS-derived signals is the objective. The design implemented standard CMOS logic is available in commercial libraries to provide the logic functions for the generator. The design allows the user to select the periodicity of the PRBS and the PRBS-derived signals. The characterization of the on-chip generator marks its performance and reveals promising specifications.

  20. Method of and apparatus for generating an interstitial point in a data stream having an even number of data points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, T. R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus for doubling the data density rate of an analog to digital converter or doubling the data density storage capacity of a memory deviced is discussed. An interstitial data point midway between adjacent data points in a data stream having an even number of equal interval data points is generated by applying a set of predetermined one-dimensional convolute integer coefficients which can include a set of multiplier coefficients and a normalizer coefficient. Interpolator means apply the coefficients to the data points by weighting equally on each side of the center of the even number of equal interval data points to obtain an interstital point value at the center of the data points. A one-dimensional output data set, which is twice as dense as a one-dimensional equal interval input data set, can be generated where the output data set includes interstitial points interdigitated between adjacent data points in the input data set. The method for generating the set of interstital points is a weighted, nearest-neighbor, non-recursive, moving, smoothing averaging technique, equivalent to applying a polynomial regression calculation to the data set.

  1. Numerical Study of Mixed Convective Peristaltic Flow through Vertical Tube with Heat Generation for Moderate Reynolds and Wave Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, Tariq; Ahmed, B.; Sajid, M.

    2018-04-01

    The current study focuses on the numerical investigation of the mixed convective peristaltic mechanism through a vertical tube for non-zero Reynolds and wave number. In the set of constitutional equations, energy equation contains the term representing heat generation parameter. The problem is formulated by dropping the assumption of lubrication theory that turns the model mathematically into a system of the nonlinear partial differential equations. The results of the long wavelength in a creeping flow are deduced from the present analysis. Thus, the current study explores the neglected features of peristaltic heat flow in the mixed convective model by considering moderate values of Reynolds and wave numbers. The finite element based on Galerkin’s weighted residual scheme is applied to solve the governing equations. The computed solution is presented in the form of contours of streamlines and isothermal lines, velocity and temperature profiles for variation of different involved parameters. The investigation shows that the strength of circulation for stream function increases by increasing the wave number and Reynolds number. Symmetric isotherms are reported for small values of time-mean flow. Linear behavior of pressure is noticed by vanishing inertial forces while the increase in pressure is observed by amplifying the Reynolds number.

  2. Using GIS to generate spatially balanced random survey designs for natural resource applications.

    PubMed

    Theobald, David M; Stevens, Don L; White, Denis; Urquhart, N Scott; Olsen, Anthony R; Norman, John B

    2007-07-01

    Sampling of a population is frequently required to understand trends and patterns in natural resource management because financial and time constraints preclude a complete census. A rigorous probability-based survey design specifies where to sample so that inferences from the sample apply to the entire population. Probability survey designs should be used in natural resource and environmental management situations because they provide the mathematical foundation for statistical inference. Development of long-term monitoring designs demand survey designs that achieve statistical rigor and are efficient but remain flexible to inevitable logistical or practical constraints during field data collection. Here we describe an approach to probability-based survey design, called the Reversed Randomized Quadrant-Recursive Raster, based on the concept of spatially balanced sampling and implemented in a geographic information system. This provides environmental managers a practical tool to generate flexible and efficient survey designs for natural resource applications. Factors commonly used to modify sampling intensity, such as categories, gradients, or accessibility, can be readily incorporated into the spatially balanced sample design.

  3. Shocking Behavior: Random Wealth in Antebellum Georgia and Human Capital Across Generations

    PubMed Central

    Bleakley, Hoyt; Ferrie, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Does the lack of wealth constrain parents’ investments in the human capital of their descendants? We conduct a nearly fifty-year followup of an episode in which such constraints would have been plausibly relaxed by a random allocation of substantial wealth to families. We track descendants of participants in Georgia’s Cherokee Land Lottery of 1832, in which nearly every adult white male in Georgia took part. Winners received close to the median level of wealth – a large financial windfall orthogonal to participants’ underlying characteristics that might have also affected their children’s human capital. Although winners had slightly more children than non-winners, they did not send them to school more. Sons of winners have no better adult outcomes (wealth, income, literacy) than the sons of non-winners, and winners’ grandchildren do not have higher literacy or school attendance than non-winners’ grandchildren. This suggests only a limited role for family financial resources in the formation of human capital in the next generations in this environment and a potentially more important role for other factors that persist through family lines. PMID:28529385

  4. Can social capital be intentionally generated? a randomized trial from rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Pronyk, Paul M; Harpham, Trudy; Busza, Joanna; Phetla, Godfrey; Morison, Linda A; Hargreaves, James R; Kim, Julia C; Watts, Charlotte H; Porter, John D

    2008-11-01

    While much descriptive research has documented positive associations between social capital and a range of economic, social and health outcomes, there have been few intervention studies to assess whether social capital can be intentionally generated. We conducted an intervention in rural South Africa that combined group-based microfinance with participatory gender and HIV training in an attempt to catalyze changes in solidarity, reciprocity and social group membership as a means to reduce women's vulnerability to intimate partner violence and HIV. A cluster randomized trial was used to assess intervention effects among eight study villages. In this paper, we examined effects on structural and cognitive social capital among 845 participants and age and wealth matched women from households in comparison villages. This was supported by a diverse portfolio of qualitative research. After two years, adjusted effect estimates indicated higher levels of structural and cognitive social capital in the intervention group than the comparison group, although confidence intervals were wide. Qualitative research illustrated the ways in which economic and social gains enhanced participation in social groups, and the positive and negative dynamics that emerged within the program. There were numerous instances where individuals and village loan centres worked to address community concerns, both working through existing social networks, and through the establishment of new partnerships with local leadership structures, police, the health sector and NGOs. This is among the first experimental trials suggesting that social capital can be exogenously strengthened. The implications for community interventions in public health are further explored.

  5. Generation and Evolution of High-Mach-Number Laser-Driven Magnetized Collisionless Shocks in the Laboratory

    DOE PAGES

    Schaeffer, D. B.; Fox, W.; Haberberger, D.; ...

    2017-07-13

    Here, we present the first laboratory generation of high-Mach-number magnetized collisionless shocks created through the interaction of an expanding laser-driven plasma with a magnetized ambient plasma. Time-resolved, two-dimensional imaging of plasma density and magnetic fields shows the formation and evolution of a supercritical shock propagating at magnetosonic Mach number M ms ≈ 12. Particle-in-cell simulations constrained by experimental data further detail the shock formation and separate dynamics of the multi-ion-species ambient plasma. The results show that the shocks form on time scales as fast as one gyroperiod, aided by the efficient coupling of energy, and the generation of a magneticmore » barrier between the piston and ambient ions. The development of this experimental platform complements present remote sensing and spacecraft observations, and opens the way for controlled laboratory investigations of high-Mach number collisionless shocks, including the mechanisms and efficiency of particle acceleration.« less

  6. Generation and Evolution of High-Mach-Number Laser-Driven Magnetized Collisionless Shocks in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeffer, D. B.; Fox, W.; Haberberger, D.

    Here, we present the first laboratory generation of high-Mach-number magnetized collisionless shocks created through the interaction of an expanding laser-driven plasma with a magnetized ambient plasma. Time-resolved, two-dimensional imaging of plasma density and magnetic fields shows the formation and evolution of a supercritical shock propagating at magnetosonic Mach number M ms ≈ 12. Particle-in-cell simulations constrained by experimental data further detail the shock formation and separate dynamics of the multi-ion-species ambient plasma. The results show that the shocks form on time scales as fast as one gyroperiod, aided by the efficient coupling of energy, and the generation of a magneticmore » barrier between the piston and ambient ions. The development of this experimental platform complements present remote sensing and spacecraft observations, and opens the way for controlled laboratory investigations of high-Mach number collisionless shocks, including the mechanisms and efficiency of particle acceleration.« less

  7. Adaptive unstructured triangular mesh generation and flow solvers for the Navier-Stokes equations at high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashford, Gregory A.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    A method for generating high quality unstructured triangular grids for high Reynolds number Navier-Stokes calculations about complex geometries is described. Careful attention is paid in the mesh generation process to resolving efficiently the disparate length scales which arise in these flows. First the surface mesh is constructed in a way which ensures that the geometry is faithfully represented. The volume mesh generation then proceeds in two phases thus allowing the viscous and inviscid regions of the flow to be meshed optimally. A solution-adaptive remeshing procedure which allows the mesh to adapt itself to flow features is also described. The procedure for tracking wakes and refinement criteria appropriate for shock detection are described. Although at present it has only been implemented in two dimensions, the grid generation process has been designed with the extension to three dimensions in mind. An implicit, higher-order, upwind method is also presented for computing compressible turbulent flows on these meshes. Two recently developed one-equation turbulence models have been implemented to simulate the effects of the fluid turbulence. Results for flow about a RAE 2822 airfoil and a Douglas three-element airfoil are presented which clearly show the improved resolution obtainable.

  8. Generating maximally-path-entangled number states in two spin ensembles coupled to a superconducting flux qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Yusef; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.

    2018-01-01

    An ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers coupled to a circuit QED device is shown to enable an efficient, high-fidelity generation of high-N00N states. Instead of first creating entanglement and then increasing the number of entangled particles N , our source of high-N00N states first prepares a high-N Fock state in one of the NV ensembles and then entangles it to the rest of the system. With such a strategy, high-N N00N states can be generated in just a few operational steps with an extraordinary fidelity. Once prepared, such a state can be stored over a longer period of time due to the remarkably long coherence time of NV centers.

  9. Generation of Aptamers from A Primer-Free Randomized ssDNA Library Using Magnetic-Assisted Rapid Aptamer Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Shih-Ming; Lai, Ji-Ching; Horng, Horng-Er; Liu, Tu-Chen; Hong, Chin-Yih

    2017-04-01

    Aptamers are oligonucleotides that can bind to specific target molecules. Most aptamers are generated using random libraries in the standard systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). Each random library contains oligonucleotides with a randomized central region and two fixed primer regions at both ends. The fixed primer regions are necessary for amplifying target-bound sequences by PCR. However, these extra-sequences may cause non-specific bindings, which potentially interfere with good binding for random sequences. The Magnetic-Assisted Rapid Aptamer Selection (MARAS) is a newly developed protocol for generating single-strand DNA aptamers. No repeat selection cycle is required in the protocol. This study proposes and demonstrates a method to isolate aptamers for C-reactive proteins (CRP) from a randomized ssDNA library containing no fixed sequences at 5‧ and 3‧ termini using the MARAS platform. Furthermore, the isolated primer-free aptamer was sequenced and binding affinity for CRP was analyzed. The specificity of the obtained aptamer was validated using blind serum samples. The result was consistent with monoclonal antibody-based nephelometry analysis, which indicated that a primer-free aptamer has high specificity toward targets. MARAS is a feasible platform for efficiently generating primer-free aptamers for clinical diagnoses.

  10. Effect of number and position of intraocular lens haptics on anterior capsule contraction: a randomized, prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mihyun; Lazo, Marjorie Z; Kang, Minji; Lee, Jeehye; Joo, Choun-Ki

    2018-03-20

    The present study aimed to evaluate the degree of anterior capsule contraction (capsulorhexis contraction) with three different single-piece, hydrophilic acrylic intraocular lenses (IOLs). Patients were prospectively randomized to be implanted with one of three types of IOLs during cataract surgery: the Ophtec Precizon (IOL A), the Lucid Korea Microflex (IOL B), and the Carl Zeiss Asphina (IOL C). One week, 2 weeks, and 6 months after surgery, the area of the anterior capsule opening was measured using digital retro-illumination images after dilation of the pupil. The data were then evaluated using POCOman software. The study included 236 eyes of 202 patients. The area of the anterior capsule opening reduced by 3.53 ± 3.31 mm (17.06% ± 15.99%) between 1 week and 2 months post-operatively in the IOL A group, by 0.62 ± 1.32 mm (2.87% ± 6.03%) in the IOL B group, and by 1.09 ± 1.53 mm (4.72% ± 6.10%) in the IOL C group. The IOL B group showed minimal anterior capsule contraction 2 months after surgery (p < 0.001). IOLs with a four-plate haptic design (IOL B) showed more anterior capsular stability than those with a two-loop plate haptic (IOL A) or two-plate haptic (IOL C) design. The number and position of haptics in a capsular bag may affect anterior capsule contraction. We assume that supporting the zonules evenly may play a role in anterior capsular stability. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN76566080 , Retrospectively registered (Date of registration: 14 Feb 2018).

  11. Targeted next-generation sequencing at copy-number breakpoints for personalized analysis of rearranged ends in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Kyoung; Park, Won Cheol; Lee, Kwang Man; Hwang, Hai-Li; Park, Seong-Yeol; Sorn, Sungbin; Chandra, Vishal; Kim, Kwang Gi; Yoon, Woong-Bae; Bae, Joon Seol; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Seoh, Ju-Young; Kim, Jong-Il; Hong, Kyeong-Man

    2014-01-01

    The concept of the utilization of rearranged ends for development of personalized biomarkers has attracted much attention owing to its clinical applicability. Although targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) for recurrent rearrangements has been successful in hematologic malignancies, its application to solid tumors is problematic due to the paucity of recurrent translocations. However, copy-number breakpoints (CNBs), which are abundant in solid tumors, can be utilized for identification of rearranged ends. As a proof of concept, we performed targeted next-generation sequencing at copy-number breakpoints (TNGS-CNB) in nine colon cancer cases including seven primary cancers and two cell lines, COLO205 and SW620. For deduction of CNBs, we developed a novel competitive single-nucleotide polymorphism (cSNP) microarray method entailing CNB-region refinement by competitor DNA. Using TNGS-CNB, 19 specific rearrangements out of 91 CNBs (20.9%) were identified, and two polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplifiable rearrangements were obtained in six cases (66.7%). And significantly, TNGS-CNB, with its high positive identification rate (82.6%) of PCR-amplifiable rearrangements at candidate sites (19/23), just from filtering of aligned sequences, requires little effort for validation. Our results indicate that TNGS-CNB, with its utility for identification of rearrangements in solid tumors, can be successfully applied in the clinical laboratory for cancer-relapse and therapy-response monitoring.

  12. Hesr1 and Hesr3 are essential to generate undifferentiated quiescent satellite cells and to maintain satellite cell numbers

    PubMed Central

    Fukada, So-ichiro; Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Kokubo, Hiroki; Ogawa, Ryo; Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Yoneda, Tomohiro; Matev, Miroslav M.; Motohashi, Norio; Ito, Takahito; Zolkiewska, Anna; Johnson, Randy L.; Saga, Yumiko; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Tsujikawa, Kazutake; Takeda, Shin’ichi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Satellite cells, which are skeletal muscle stem cells, divide to provide new myonuclei to growing muscle fibers during postnatal development, and then are maintained in an undifferentiated quiescent state in adult skeletal muscle. This state is considered to be essential for the maintenance of satellite cells, but their molecular regulation is unknown. We show that Hesr1 (Hey1) and Hesr3 (Heyl) (which are known Notch target genes) are expressed simultaneously in skeletal muscle only in satellite cells. In Hesr1 and Hesr3 single-knockout mice, no obvious abnormalities of satellite cells or muscle regenerative potentials are observed. However, the generation of undifferentiated quiescent satellite cells is impaired during postnatal development in Hesr1/3 double-knockout mice. As a result, myogenic (MyoD and myogenin) and proliferative (Ki67) proteins are expressed in adult satellite cells. Consistent with the in vivo results, Hesr1/3-null myoblasts generate very few Pax7+ MyoD– undifferentiated cells in vitro. Furthermore, the satellite cell number gradually decreases in Hesr1/3 double-knockout mice even after it has stabilized in control mice, and an age-dependent regeneration defect is observed. In vivo results suggest that premature differentiation, but not cell death, is the reason for the reduced number of satellite cells in Hesr1/3 double-knockout mice. These results indicate that Hesr1 and Hesr3 are essential for the generation of adult satellite cells and for the maintenance of skeletal muscle homeostasis. PMID:21989910

  13. Scalable hierarchical PDE sampler for generating spatially correlated random fields using nonmatching meshes: Scalable hierarchical PDE sampler using nonmatching meshes

    DOE PAGES

    Osborn, Sarah; Zulian, Patrick; Benson, Thomas; ...

    2018-01-30

    This work describes a domain embedding technique between two nonmatching meshes used for generating realizations of spatially correlated random fields with applications to large-scale sampling-based uncertainty quantification. The goal is to apply the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method for the quantification of output uncertainties of PDEs with random input coefficients on general and unstructured computational domains. We propose a highly scalable, hierarchical sampling method to generate realizations of a Gaussian random field on a given unstructured mesh by solving a reaction–diffusion PDE with a stochastic right-hand side. The stochastic PDE is discretized using the mixed finite element method on anmore » embedded domain with a structured mesh, and then, the solution is projected onto the unstructured mesh. This work describes implementation details on how to efficiently transfer data from the structured and unstructured meshes at coarse levels, assuming that this can be done efficiently on the finest level. We investigate the efficiency and parallel scalability of the technique for the scalable generation of Gaussian random fields in three dimensions. An application of the MLMC method is presented for quantifying uncertainties of subsurface flow problems. Here, we demonstrate the scalability of the sampling method with nonmatching mesh embedding, coupled with a parallel forward model problem solver, for large-scale 3D MLMC simulations with up to 1.9·109 unknowns.« less

  14. Scalable hierarchical PDE sampler for generating spatially correlated random fields using nonmatching meshes: Scalable hierarchical PDE sampler using nonmatching meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, Sarah; Zulian, Patrick; Benson, Thomas

    This work describes a domain embedding technique between two nonmatching meshes used for generating realizations of spatially correlated random fields with applications to large-scale sampling-based uncertainty quantification. The goal is to apply the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method for the quantification of output uncertainties of PDEs with random input coefficients on general and unstructured computational domains. We propose a highly scalable, hierarchical sampling method to generate realizations of a Gaussian random field on a given unstructured mesh by solving a reaction–diffusion PDE with a stochastic right-hand side. The stochastic PDE is discretized using the mixed finite element method on anmore » embedded domain with a structured mesh, and then, the solution is projected onto the unstructured mesh. This work describes implementation details on how to efficiently transfer data from the structured and unstructured meshes at coarse levels, assuming that this can be done efficiently on the finest level. We investigate the efficiency and parallel scalability of the technique for the scalable generation of Gaussian random fields in three dimensions. An application of the MLMC method is presented for quantifying uncertainties of subsurface flow problems. Here, we demonstrate the scalability of the sampling method with nonmatching mesh embedding, coupled with a parallel forward model problem solver, for large-scale 3D MLMC simulations with up to 1.9·109 unknowns.« less

  15. Random sequences generation through optical measurements by phase-shifting interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, M.; Grosges, T.; Barchiesi, D.; Erra, R.; Cornet, A.

    2012-04-01

    The development of new techniques for producing random sequences with a high level of security is a challenging topic of research in modern cryptographics. The proposed method is based on the measurement by phase-shifting interferometry of the speckle signals of the interaction between light and structures. We show how the combination of amplitude and phase distributions (maps) under a numerical process can produce random sequences. The produced sequences satisfy all the statistical requirements of randomness and can be used in cryptographic schemes.

  16. [Thermal requirements and estimate of the annual number of generations of Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on strawberry crop].

    PubMed

    Nondillo, Aline; Redaelli, Luiza R; Botton, Marcos; Pinent, Silvia M J; Gitz, Rogério

    2008-01-01

    Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) is one of the major strawberry pests in southern Brazil. The insect causes russeting and wither in flowers and fruits reducing commercial value. In this work, the thermal requirements of the eggs, larvae and pupae of F. occidentalis were estimated. Thrips development was studied in folioles of strawberry plants at six constant temperatures (16, 19, 22, 25, 28 and 31 degrees C) in controlled conditions (70 +/- 10% R.H. and 12:12 L:D). The number of annual generations of F. occidentalis was estimated for six strawberry production regions of Rio Grande do Sul State based on its thermal requirements. Developmental time of each F. occidentalis stages was proportional to the temperature increase. The best development rate was obtained when insects were reared at 25 masculineC and 28 masculineC. The lower threshold and the thermal requirements for the egg to adult stage were 9.9 masculineC and 211.9 degree-days, respectively. Considering the thermal requirements of F. occidentalis, 10.7, 12.6, 13.1, 13.6, 16.5 and 17.9 generations/year were estimated, respectively, for Vacaria, Caxias do Sul, Farroupilha, Pelotas, Porto Alegre and Taquari producing regions located in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil.

  17. Identification of copy number variations associated with congenital heart disease by chromosomal microarray analysis and next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiangyu; Li, Jie; Ru, Tong; Wang, Yaping; Xu, Yan; Yang, Ying; Wu, Xing; Cram, David S; Hu, Yali

    2016-04-01

    To determine the type and frequency of pathogenic chromosomal abnormalities in fetuses diagnosed with congenital heart disease (CHD) using chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) and validate next-generation sequencing as an alternative diagnostic method. Chromosomal aneuploidies and submicroscopic copy number variations (CNVs) were identified in amniocytes DNA samples from CHD fetuses using high-resolution CMA and copy number variation sequencing (CNV-Seq). Overall, 21 of 115 CHD fetuses (18.3%) referred for CMA had a pathogenic chromosomal anomaly. In six of 73 fetuses (8.2%) with an isolated CHD, CMA identified two cases of DiGeorge syndrome, and one case each of 1q21.1 microdeletion, 16p11.2 microdeletion and Angelman/Prader Willi syndromes, and 22q11.21 microduplication syndrome. In 12 of 42 fetuses (28.6%) with CHD and additional structural abnormalities, CMA identified eight whole or partial trisomies (19.0%), five CNVs (11.9%) associated with DiGeorge, Wolf-Hirschhorn, Miller-Dieker, Cri du Chat and Blepharophimosis, Ptosis, and Epicanthus Inversus syndromes and four other rare pathogenic CNVs (9.5%). Overall, there was a 100% diagnostic concordance between CMA and CNV-Seq for detecting all 21 pathogenic chromosomal abnormalities associated with CHD. CMA and CNV-Seq are reliable and accurate prenatal techniques for identifying pathogenic fetal chromosomal abnormalities associated with cardiac defects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Simultaneous Detection of Both Single Nucleotide Variations and Copy Number Alterations by Next-Generation Sequencing in Gorlin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Kei-ichi; Naruto, Takuya; Tanimoto, Kousuke; Yasukawa, Chisato; Oikawa, Yu; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei; Inazawa, Johji; Omura, Ken; Harada, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin syndrome (GS) is an autosomal dominant disorder that predisposes affected individuals to developmental defects and tumorigenesis, and caused mainly by heterozygous germline PTCH1 mutations. Despite exhaustive analysis, PTCH1 mutations are often unidentifiable in some patients; the failure to detect mutations is presumably because of mutations occurred in other causative genes or outside of analyzed regions of PTCH1, or copy number alterations (CNAs). In this study, we subjected a cohort of GS-affected individuals from six unrelated families to next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis for the combined screening of causative alterations in Hedgehog signaling pathway-related genes. Specific single nucleotide variations (SNVs) of PTCH1 causing inferred amino acid changes were identified in four families (seven affected individuals), whereas CNAs within or around PTCH1 were found in two families in whom possible causative SNVs were not detected. Through a targeted resequencing of all coding exons, as well as simultaneous evaluation of copy number status using the alignment map files obtained via NGS, we found that GS phenotypes could be explained by PTCH1 mutations or deletions in all affected patients. Because it is advisable to evaluate CNAs of candidate causative genes in point mutation-negative cases, NGS methodology appears to be useful for improving molecular diagnosis through the simultaneous detection of both SNVs and CNAs in the targeted genes/regions. PMID:26544948

  19. Simultaneous Detection of Both Single Nucleotide Variations and Copy Number Alterations by Next-Generation Sequencing in Gorlin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morita, Kei-ichi; Naruto, Takuya; Tanimoto, Kousuke; Yasukawa, Chisato; Oikawa, Yu; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei; Inazawa, Johji; Omura, Ken; Harada, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin syndrome (GS) is an autosomal dominant disorder that predisposes affected individuals to developmental defects and tumorigenesis, and caused mainly by heterozygous germline PTCH1 mutations. Despite exhaustive analysis, PTCH1 mutations are often unidentifiable in some patients; the failure to detect mutations is presumably because of mutations occurred in other causative genes or outside of analyzed regions of PTCH1, or copy number alterations (CNAs). In this study, we subjected a cohort of GS-affected individuals from six unrelated families to next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis for the combined screening of causative alterations in Hedgehog signaling pathway-related genes. Specific single nucleotide variations (SNVs) of PTCH1 causing inferred amino acid changes were identified in four families (seven affected individuals), whereas CNAs within or around PTCH1 were found in two families in whom possible causative SNVs were not detected. Through a targeted resequencing of all coding exons, as well as simultaneous evaluation of copy number status using the alignment map files obtained via NGS, we found that GS phenotypes could be explained by PTCH1 mutations or deletions in all affected patients. Because it is advisable to evaluate CNAs of candidate causative genes in point mutation-negative cases, NGS methodology appears to be useful for improving molecular diagnosis through the simultaneous detection of both SNVs and CNAs in the targeted genes/regions.

  20. Generation and performance of special quasirandom structures for studying the elastic properties of random alloys: Application to Al-Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Pezold, Johann; Dick, Alexey; Friák, Martin; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2010-03-01

    The performance of special-quasirandom structures (SQSs) for the description of elastic properties of random alloys was evaluated. A set of system-independent 32-atom-fcc SQS spanning the entire concentration range was generated and used to determine C11 , C12 , and C44 of binary random substitutional AlTi alloys. The elastic properties of these alloys could be described using the set of SQS with an accuracy comparable to the accuracy achievable by statistical sampling of the configurational space of 3×3×3 (108 atom, C44 ) and 4×4×4 (256 atom, C11 and C12 ) fcc supercells, irrespective of the impurity concentration. The smaller system size makes the proposed SQS ideal candidates for the ab initio determination of the elastic constants of random substitutional alloys. The set of optimized SQS is provided.

  1. Mean convergence theorems and weak laws of large numbers for weighted sums of random variables under a condition of weighted integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordóñez Cabrera, Manuel; Volodin, Andrei I.

    2005-05-01

    From the classical notion of uniform integrability of a sequence of random variables, a new concept of integrability (called h-integrability) is introduced for an array of random variables, concerning an array of constantsE We prove that this concept is weaker than other previous related notions of integrability, such as Cesàro uniform integrability [Chandra, Sankhya Ser. A 51 (1989) 309-317], uniform integrability concerning the weights [Ordóñez Cabrera, Collect. Math. 45 (1994) 121-132] and Cesàro [alpha]-integrability [Chandra and Goswami, J. Theoret. ProbabE 16 (2003) 655-669]. Under this condition of integrability and appropriate conditions on the array of weights, mean convergence theorems and weak laws of large numbers for weighted sums of an array of random variables are obtained when the random variables are subject to some special kinds of dependence: (a) rowwise pairwise negative dependence, (b) rowwise pairwise non-positive correlation, (c) when the sequence of random variables in every row is [phi]-mixing. Finally, we consider the general weak law of large numbers in the sense of Gut [Statist. Probab. Lett. 14 (1992) 49-52] under this new condition of integrability for a Banach space setting.

  2. Using histograms to introduce randomization in the generation of ensembles of decision trees

    DOEpatents

    Kamath, Chandrika; Cantu-Paz, Erick; Littau, David

    2005-02-22

    A system for decision tree ensembles that includes a module to read the data, a module to create a histogram, a module to evaluate a potential split according to some criterion using the histogram, a module to select a split point randomly in an interval around the best split, a module to split the data, and a module to combine multiple decision trees in ensembles. The decision tree method includes the steps of reading the data; creating a histogram; evaluating a potential split according to some criterion using the histogram, selecting a split point randomly in an interval around the best split, splitting the data, and combining multiple decision trees in ensembles.

  3. A Proposed Solution to the Problem with Using Completely Random Data to Assess the Number of Factors with Parallel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samuel B.; Levy, Roy; Thompson, Marilyn S.; Lu, Min; Lo, Wen-Juo

    2012-01-01

    A number of psychometricians have argued for the use of parallel analysis to determine the number of factors. However, parallel analysis must be viewed at best as a heuristic approach rather than a mathematically rigorous one. The authors suggest a revision to parallel analysis that could improve its accuracy. A Monte Carlo study is conducted to…

  4. Random generation of the turbulence slopes of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Conan, Rodolphe

    2014-03-15

    A method to generate the turbulence measurements of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is presented. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the spatial and temporal statistic properties of the slopes are respected, allowing us to generate the turbulence wavefront gradient corresponding to both natural and laser guide stars, as well as time series in accordance with the frozen flow model.

  5. Use of next-generation sequencing to detect LDLR gene copy number variation in familial hypercholesterolemia[S

    PubMed Central

    Iacocca, Michael A.; Wang, Jian; Dron, Jacqueline S.; Robinson, John F.; McIntyre, Adam D.; Cao, Henian

    2017-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a heritable condition of severely elevated LDL cholesterol, caused predominantly by autosomal codominant mutations in the LDL receptor gene (LDLR). In providing a molecular diagnosis for FH, the current procedure often includes targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) panels for the detection of small-scale DNA variants, followed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) in LDLR for the detection of whole-exon copy number variants (CNVs). The latter is essential because ∼10% of FH cases are attributed to CNVs in LDLR; accounting for them decreases false negative findings. Here, we determined the potential of replacing MLPA with bioinformatic analysis applied to NGS data, which uses depth-of-coverage analysis as its principal method to identify whole-exon CNV events. In analysis of 388 FH patient samples, there was 100% concordance in LDLR CNV detection between these two methods: 38 reported CNVs identified by MLPA were also successfully detected by our NGS method, while 350 samples negative for CNVs by MLPA were also negative by NGS. This result suggests that MLPA can be removed from the routine diagnostic screening for FH, significantly reducing associated costs, resources, and analysis time, while promoting more widespread assessment of this important class of mutations across diagnostic laboratories. PMID:28874442

  6. Stable and efficient retrospective 4D-MRI using non-uniformly distributed quasi-random numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, Kathrin; Meyer, Cord B.; Breuer, Felix A.; Richter, Anne; Exner, Florian; Weng, Andreas M.; Ströhle, Serge; Polat, Bülent; Jakob, Peter M.; Sauer, Otto A.; Flentje, Michael; Weick, Stefan

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this work is the development of a robust and reliable three-dimensional (3D) Cartesian imaging technique for fast and flexible retrospective 4D abdominal MRI during free breathing. To this end, a non-uniform quasi random (NU-QR) reordering of the phase encoding (k y –k z ) lines was incorporated into 3D Cartesian acquisition. The proposed sampling scheme allocates more phase encoding points near the k-space origin while reducing the sampling density in the outer part of the k-space. Respiratory self-gating in combination with SPIRiT-reconstruction is used for the reconstruction of abdominal data sets in different respiratory phases (4D-MRI). Six volunteers and three patients were examined at 1.5 T during free breathing. Additionally, data sets with conventional two-dimensional (2D) linear and 2D quasi random phase encoding order were acquired for the volunteers for comparison. A quantitative evaluation of image quality versus scan times (from 70 s to 626 s) for the given sampling schemes was obtained by calculating the normalized mutual information (NMI) for all volunteers. Motion estimation was accomplished by calculating the maximum derivative of a signal intensity profile of a transition (e.g. tumor or diaphragm). The 2D non-uniform quasi-random distribution of phase encoding lines in Cartesian 3D MRI yields more efficient undersampling patterns for parallel imaging compared to conventional uniform quasi-random and linear sampling. Median NMI values of NU-QR sampling are the highest for all scan times. Therefore, within the same scan time 4D imaging could be performed with improved image quality. The proposed method allows for the reconstruction of motion artifact reduced 4D data sets with isotropic spatial resolution of 2.1  ×  2.1  ×  2.1 mm3 in a short scan time, e.g. 10 respiratory phases in only 3 min. Cranio-caudal tumor displacements between 23 and 46 mm could be observed. NU-QR sampling enables for stable 4D

  7. Colloids exposed to random potential energy landscapes: From particle number density to particle-potential and particle-particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bewerunge, Jörg; Capellmann, Ronja F.; Platten, Florian

    2016-07-28

    Colloidal particles were exposed to a random potential energy landscape that has been created optically via a speckle pattern. The mean particle density as well as the potential roughness, i.e., the disorder strength, were varied. The local probability density of the particles as well as its main characteristics were determined. For the first time, the disorder-averaged pair density correlation function g{sup (1)}(r) and an analogue of the Edwards-Anderson order parameter g{sup (2)}(r), which quantifies the correlation of the mean local density among disorder realisations, were measured experimentally and shown to be consistent with replica liquid state theory results.

  8. Generation Mechanism of Nonlinear Rayleigh Surface Waves for Randomly Distributed Surface Micro-Cracks.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiangyan; Li, Feilong; Zhao, Youxuan; Xu, Yongmei; Hu, Ning; Cao, Peng; Deng, Mingxi

    2018-04-23

    This paper investigates the propagation of Rayleigh surface waves in structures with randomly distributed surface micro-cracks using numerical simulations. The results revealed a significant ultrasonic nonlinear effect caused by the surface micro-cracks, which is mainly represented by a second harmonic with even more distinct third/quadruple harmonics. Based on statistical analysis from the numerous results of random micro-crack models, it is clearly found that the acoustic nonlinear parameter increases linearly with micro-crack density, the proportion of surface cracks, the size of micro-crack zone, and the excitation frequency. This study theoretically reveals that nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves are feasible for use in quantitatively identifying the physical characteristics of surface micro-cracks in structures.

  9. Generation Mechanism of Nonlinear Rayleigh Surface Waves for Randomly Distributed Surface Micro-Cracks

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiangyan; Li, Feilong; Xu, Yongmei; Cao, Peng; Deng, Mingxi

    2018-01-01

    This paper investigates the propagation of Rayleigh surface waves in structures with randomly distributed surface micro-cracks using numerical simulations. The results revealed a significant ultrasonic nonlinear effect caused by the surface micro-cracks, which is mainly represented by a second harmonic with even more distinct third/quadruple harmonics. Based on statistical analysis from the numerous results of random micro-crack models, it is clearly found that the acoustic nonlinear parameter increases linearly with micro-crack density, the proportion of surface cracks, the size of micro-crack zone, and the excitation frequency. This study theoretically reveals that nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves are feasible for use in quantitatively identifying the physical characteristics of surface micro-cracks in structures. PMID:29690580

  10. Random waves in the brain: Symmetries and defect generation in the visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, M.; Kaschube, M.; Löwel, S.; Wolf, F.

    2007-06-01

    How orientation maps in the visual cortex of the brain develop is a matter of long standing debate. Experimental and theoretical evidence suggests that their development represents an activity-dependent self-organization process. Theoretical analysis [1] exploring this hypothesis predicted that maps at an early developmental stage are realizations of Gaussian random fields exhibiting a rigorous lower bound for their densities of topological defects, called pinwheels. As a consequence, lower pinwheel densities, if observed in adult animals, are predicted to develop through the motion and annihilation of pinwheel pairs. Despite of being valid for a large class of developmental models this result depends on the symmetries of the models and thus of the predicted random field ensembles. In [1] invariance of the orientation map's statistical properties under independent space rotations and orientation shifts was assumed. However, full rotation symmetry appears to be broken by interactions of cortical neurons, e.g. selective couplings between groups of neurons with collinear orientation preferences [2]. A recently proposed new symmetry, called shift-twist symmetry [3], stating that spatial rotations have to occur together with orientation shifts in order to be an appropriate symmetry transformation, is more consistent with this organization. Here we generalize our random field approach to this important symmetry class. We propose a new class of shift-twist symmetric Gaussian random fields and derive the general correlation functions of this ensemble. It turns out that despite strong effects of the shift-twist symmetry on the structure of the correlation functions and on the map layout the lower bound on the pinwheel densities remains unaffected, predicting pinwheel annihilation in systems with low pinwheel densities.

  11. Predicting the velocity and azimuth of fragments generated by the range destruction or random failure of rocket casings and tankage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, M.; Mukunda, M.

    The proliferation of space vehicle launch sites and the projected utilization of these facilities portends an increase in the number of on-pad, ascent, and on-orbit solid-rocket motor (SRM) casings and liquid-rocket tanks which will randomly fail or will fail from range destruct actions. Beyond the obvious safety implications, these failures may have serious resource implications for mission system and facility planners. SRM-casing failures and liquid-rocket tankage failures result in the generation of large, high velocity fragments which may be serious threats to the safety of launch support personnel if proper bunkers and exclusion areas are not provided. In addition, these fragments may be indirect threats to the general public's safety if they encounter hazardous spacecraft payloads which have not been designed to withstand shrapnel of this caliber. They may also become threats to other spacecraft if, by failing on-orbit, they add to the ever increasing space-junk collision cross-section. Most prior attempts to assess the velocity of fragments from failed SRM casings have simply assigned the available chamber impulse to available casing and fuel mass and solved the resulting momentum balance for velocity. This method may predict a fragment velocity which is high or low by a factor of two depending on the ratio of fuel to casing mass extant at the time of failure. Recognizing the limitations of existing methods, the authors devised an analytical approach which properly partitions the available impulse to each major system-mass component. This approach uses the Physics International developed PISCES code to couple the forces generated by an Eulerian modeled gas flow field to a Lagrangian modeled fuel and casing system. The details of a predictive analytical modeling process as well as the development of normalized relations for momentum partition as a function of SRM burn time and initial geometry are discussed in this paper. Methods for applying similar modeling

  12. Pseudo-Random Modulation of a Laser Diode for Generating Ultrasonic Longitudinal Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Anatasi, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    Laser generated ultrasound systems have historically been more complicated and expensive than conventional piezoelectric based systems, and this fact has relegated the acceptance of laser based systems to niche applications for which piezoelectric based systems are less suitable. Lowering system costs, while improving throughput, increasing ultrasound signal levels, and improving signal-to-noise are goals which will help increase the general acceptance of laser based ultrasound. One current limitation with conventional laser generated ultrasound is a material s damage threshold limit. Increasing the optical power to generate more signal eventually damages the material being tested due to rapid, high heating. Generation limitations for laser based ultrasound suggests the use of pulse modulation techniques as an alternate generation method. Pulse modulation techniques can spread the laser energy over time or space, thus reducing laser power densities and minimizing damage. Previous experiments by various organizations using spatial or temporal pulse modulation have been shown to generate detectable surface, plate, and bulk ultrasonic waves with narrow frequency bandwidths . Using narrow frequency bandwidths improved signal detectability, but required the use of expensive and powerful lasers and opto-electronic systems. The use of a laser diode to generate ultrasound is attractive because of its low cost, small size, light weight, simple optics and modulation capability. The use of pulse compression techniques should allow certain types of laser diodes to produce usable ultrasonic signals. The method also does not need to be limited to narrow frequency bandwidths. The method demonstrated here uses a low power laser diode (approximately 150 mW) that is modulated by controlling the diode s drive current and the resulting signal is recovered by cross correlation. A potential application for this system which is briefly demonstrated is in detecting signals in thick

  13. Measurement of the Number of Light Neutrino Generations, Z Resonance Parameters, and Absolute Luminosity at the Aleph Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wear, James A.

    Measurements of the production cross section sigma (e^+e^-to Z to hadrons) have been made with the ALEPH detector in a seven-point energy scan across the Z resonance at the LEP e^+e^ - collider. The selection of hadronic Z decays is performed with a systematic uncertainty of 0.3%, resulting in 147,836 events. The absolute luminosity has been determined with a systematic uncertainty of 0.9%. These hadronic cross sections and ALEPH's measurement of Z decay into charged leptons, sigma(e^+e^ -to Z to l^+l^ -), are used in fits to extract parameters of the Z resonance in a model-independent way. The Z mass and total width are measured to be M_{Z } = 91.177 +/- 0.010 _{exp} +/- 0.020_{LEP} GeV and Gamma_{Z} = 2.482 +/- 0.018_{exp} +/- 0.006_{LEP } GeV where the second errors are due to LEP beam energy uncertainties. The Z decay partial widths are measured to be Gamma_{h} = 1.738 +/- 0.016 GeV, Gamma_{l} = 83.45 +/- 0.76 MeV, and Gamma_ {inv} = 0.493 +/- 0.015 GeV. The Born-level peak hadronic cross section is sigma_sp{had}{0 } = 41.58 +/- 0.44 nb, R = Gamma_{h }/Gamma_{l} = 20.83 +/- 0.21, and Gamma_{inv}/Gamma _{l} = 5.91 +/- 0.18. The number of light neutrino generations is determined to be N_{nu} = 2.96 +/- 0.09 and the Standard Model electroweak mixing angle to be sin^2 theta_{W} = 0.2325 +/- 0.0027.

  14. The effects of the number of rubber bands placed at each endoscopic session upon variceal outcomes: a prospective, randomized study.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Francisco C; Colon, Victor J; Landan, Derek; Grade, Andrew J; Evanich, Elizabeth

    2007-07-01

    To determine the role of the number of bands placed per session upon patient-related and procedural-related outcomes. Patients were assigned to receive as many bands as could be possibly placed (group 1) or up to a maximum of six bands (group 2) per session. The primary outcome measured was the number of sessions to achieve obliteration. Other outcomes measured included: rebleeding, variceal recurrence, mortality (within 6 wk and within 1 yr), complications, banding and total procedure times, and number of bands misfired. A total of 86 patients were enrolled: 45 in group 1 and 41 in group 2. The two groups had similar age, Child-Pugh scores, grade of varices at entry. The overall proportion of patients achieving obliteration was 56% (53% and 59% for groups 1 and 2, respectively). Despite receiving significantly more mean bands per session, patients in group 1 required similar (mean +/- SEM) number of sessions to obliteration (2.9 +/- 0.3 vs 3.3 +/- 0.3) and total number of bands (20.0 +/- 2.4 vs 16.6 +/- 1.8) to achieve this goal compared with group 2. The overall proportion of patients with variceal rebleeding was 25%, the 1-yr variceal recurrence 31.3%, and the overall early- and 1-yr mortality were 18.6% and 33.7%, respectively. These proportions were similar in the two groups. Banding and total procedure times were significantly longer and associated with significantly more misfired bands per session in group 1. Compared with a maximum of six bands per session, the placement of >6 bands per session was not associated with better patient outcomes but with significantly more prolonged banding and total procedure times and significantly more misfired bands.

  15. Use of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) for generating specific DNA probes for oxyuroid species (Nematoda).

    PubMed

    Jobet, E; Bougnoux, M E; Morand, S; Rivault, C; Cloarec, A; Hugot, J P

    1998-03-01

    Random amplified DNA markers (RAPD; Williams et al., 1990) were used to obtained specific RAPD fragments characterising different species of oxyuroids. We tested six species of worms parasitizing vertebrates or invertebrates: Passalurus ambiguus Rudolphi, 1819, parasite of Leporids; Syphacia obvelata (Rudolphi, 1802) Seurat, 1916, a parasite of rodents; Blatticola blattae (Graeffe, 1860) Chitwood, 1932 parasite of the cockroach Blattella germanica; Hammerschmidtiella diesingi (Hammerschmidt, 1838) Chitwood, 1932 and Thelastoma bulhoesi (Magalhaes, 1990) Travassos, 1929, parasites of the cockroach Periplaneta americana, and an undescribed parasite species of a passalid insect from New Caledonia. Among 15 oligonucleotides tested, nine produced several specific bands allowing the interspecific discrimination.

  16. RANDOMNESS of Numbers DEFINITION(QUERY:WHAT? V HOW?) ONLY Via MAXWELL-BOLTZMANN CLASSICAL-Statistics(MBCS) Hot-Plasma VS. Digits-Clumping Log-Law NON-Randomness Inversion ONLY BOSE-EINSTEIN QUANTUM-Statistics(BEQS) .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Z.; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig

    2011-03-01

    RANDOMNESS of Numbers cognitive-semantics DEFINITION VIA Cognition QUERY: WHAT???, NOT HOW?) VS. computer-``science" mindLESS number-crunching (Harrel-Sipser-...) algorithmics Goldreich "PSEUDO-randomness"[Not.AMS(02)] mea-culpa is ONLY via MAXWELL-BOLTZMANN CLASSICAL-STATISTICS(NOT FDQS!!!) "hot-plasma" REPULSION VERSUS Newcomb(1881)-Weyl(1914;1916)-Benford(1938) "NeWBe" logarithmic-law digit-CLUMPING/ CLUSTERING NON-Randomness simple Siegel[AMS Joint.Mtg.(02)-Abs. # 973-60-124] algebraic-inversion to THE QUANTUM and ONLY BEQS preferentially SEQUENTIALLY lower-DIGITS CLUMPING/CLUSTERING with d = 0 BEC, is ONLY VIA Siegel-Baez FUZZYICS=CATEGORYICS (SON OF TRIZ)/"Category-Semantics"(C-S), latter intersection/union of Lawvere(1964)-Siegel(1964)] category-theory (matrix: MORPHISMS V FUNCTORS) "+" cognitive-semantics'' (matrix: ANTONYMS V SYNONYMS) yields Siegel-Baez FUZZYICS=CATEGORYICS/C-S tabular list-format matrix truth-table analytics: MBCS RANDOMNESS TRUTH/EMET!!!

  17. Can Targeted Intervention Mitigate Early Emotional and Behavioral Problems?: Generating Robust Evidence within Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Orla; McGlanaghy, Edel; O’Farrelly, Christine; Tremblay, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a targeted Irish early intervention program on children’s emotional and behavioral development using multiple methods to test the robustness of the results. Data on 164 Preparing for Life participants who were randomly assigned into an intervention group, involving home visits from pregnancy onwards, or a control group, was used to test the impact of the intervention on Child Behavior Checklist scores at 24-months. Using inverse probability weighting to account for differential attrition, permutation testing to address small sample size, and quantile regression to characterize the distributional impact of the intervention, we found that the few treatment effects were largely concentrated among boys most at risk of developing emotional and behavioral problems. The average treatment effect identified a 13% reduction in the likelihood of falling into the borderline clinical threshold for Total Problems. The interaction and subgroup analysis found that this main effect was driven by boys. The distributional analysis identified a 10-point reduction in the Externalizing Problems score for boys at the 90th percentile. No effects were observed for girls or for the continuous measures of Total, Internalizing, and Externalizing problems. These findings suggest that the impact of this prenatally commencing home visiting program may be limited to boys experiencing the most difficulties. Further adoption of the statistical methods applied here may help to improve the internal validity of randomized controlled trials and contribute to the field of evaluation science more generally. Trial Registration: ISRCTN Registry ISRCTN04631728 PMID:27253184

  18. Highly efficient hybrid energy generator: coupled organic photovoltaic device and randomly oriented electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride) nanofiber.

    PubMed

    Park, Boongik; Lee, Kihwan; Park, Jongjin; Kim, Jongmin; Kim, Ohyun

    2013-03-01

    A hybrid architecture consisting of an inverted organic photovoltaic device and a randomly-oriented electrospun PVDF piezoelectric device was fabricated as a highly-efficient energy generator. It uses the inverted photovoltaic device with coupled electrospun PVDF nanofibers as tandem structure to convert solar and mechanical vibrations energy to electricity simultaneously or individually. The power conversion efficiency of the photovoltaic device was also significantly improved up to 4.72% by optimized processes such as intrinsic ZnO, MoO3 and active layer. A simple electrospinning method with the two electrode technique was adopted to achieve a high voltage of - 300 mV in PVDF piezoelectric fibers. Highly-efficient HEG using voltage adder circuit provides the conceptual possibility of realizing multi-functional energy generator whenever and wherever various energy sources are available.

  19. Numbering questionnaires had no impact on the response rate and only a slight influence on the response content of a patient safety culture survey: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Kundig, François; Staines, Anthony; Kinge, Thompson; Perneger, Thomas V

    2011-11-01

    In self-completed surveys, anonymous questionnaires are sometimes numbered so as to avoid sending reminders to initial nonrespondents. This number may be perceived as a threat to confidentiality by some respondents, which may reduce the response rate, or cause social desirability bias. In this study, we evaluated whether using nonnumbered vs. numbered questionnaires influenced the response rate and the response content. During a patient safety culture survey, we randomized participants into two groups: one received an anonymous nonnumbered questionnaire and the other a numbered questionnaire. We compared the survey response rates and distributions of the responses for the 42-questionnaire items across the two groups. Response rates were similar in the two groups (nonnumbered, 75.2%; numbered, 72.8%; difference, 2.4%; P=0.28). Five of the 42 questions had statistically significant differences in distributions, but these differences were small. Unexpectedly, in all five instances, the patient safety culture ratings were more favorable in the nonnumbered group. Numbering of mailed questionnaires had no impact on the response rate. Numbering influenced significantly the response content of several items, but these differences were small and ran against the hypothesis of social desirability bias. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Polarization chaos and random bit generation in nonlinear fiber optics induced by a time-delayed counter-propagating feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Morosi, J; Berti, N; Akrout, A; Picozzi, A; Guasoni, M; Fatome, J

    2018-01-22

    In this manuscript, we experimentally and numerically investigate the chaotic dynamics of the state-of-polarization in a nonlinear optical fiber due to the cross-interaction between an incident signal and its intense backward replica generated at the fiber-end through an amplified reflective delayed loop. Thanks to the cross-polarization interaction between the two-delayed counter-propagating waves, the output polarization exhibits fast temporal chaotic dynamics, which enable a powerful scrambling process with moving speeds up to 600-krad/s. The performance of this all-optical scrambler was then evaluated on a 10-Gbit/s On/Off Keying telecom signal achieving an error-free transmission. We also describe how these temporal and chaotic polarization fluctuations can be exploited as an all-optical random number generator. To this aim, a billion-bit sequence was experimentally generated and successfully confronted to the dieharder benchmarking statistic tools. Our experimental analysis are supported by numerical simulations based on the resolution of counter-propagating coupled nonlinear propagation equations that confirm the observed behaviors.

  1. Analysis of using interpulse intervals to generate 128-bit biometric random binary sequences for securing wireless body sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-He; Poon, Carmen C Y; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2012-01-01

    Wireless body sensor network (WBSN), a key building block for m-Health, demands extremely stringent resource constraints and thus lightweight security methods are preferred. To minimize resource consumption, utilizing information already available to a WBSN, particularly common to different sensor nodes of a WBSN, for security purposes becomes an attractive solution. In this paper, we tested the randomness and distinctiveness of the 128-bit biometric binary sequences (BSs) generated from interpulse intervals (IPIs) of 20 healthy subjects as well as 30 patients suffered from myocardial infarction and 34 subjects with other cardiovascular diseases. The encoding time of a biometric BS on a WBSN node is on average 23 ms and memory occupation is 204 bytes for any given IPI sequence. The results from five U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology statistical tests suggest that random biometric BSs can be generated from both healthy subjects and cardiovascular patients and can potentially be used as authentication identifiers for securing WBSNs. Ultimately, it is preferred that these biometric BSs can be used as encryption keys such that key distribution over the WBSN can be avoided.

  2. Closed loop ventilation mode in Intensive Care Unit: a randomized controlled clinical trial comparing the numbers of manual ventilator setting changes.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Jean-Michel; Garnero, Aude; Novotni, Dominik; Corno, Gaëlle; Donati, Stéphane-Yannis; Demory, Didier; Quintana, Gabrielle; Ducros, Laurent; Laubscher, Thomas; Durand-Gasselin, Jacques

    2018-01-01

    There is an equipoise regarding closed-loop ventilation modes and the ability to reduce workload for providers. On one hand some settings are managed by the ventilator but on another hand the automatic mode introduces new settings for the user. This randomized controlled trial compared the number of manual ventilator setting changes between a full closed loop ventilation and oxygenation mode (INTELLiVENT-ASV®) and conventional ventilation modes (volume assist control and pressure support) in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. The secondary endpoints were to compare the number of arterial blood gas analysis, the sedation dose and the user acceptance. Sixty subjects with an expected duration of mechanical ventilation of at least 48 hours were randomized to be ventilated using INTELLiVENT-ASV® or conventional modes with a protocolized weaning. All manual ventilator setting changes were recorded continuously from inclusion to successful extubation or death. Arterial blood gases were performed upon decision of the clinician in charge. User acceptance score was assessed for nurses and physicians once daily using a Likert Scale. The number of manual ventilator setting changes per 24 h-period per subject was lower in INTELLiVENT-ASV® as compared to conventional ventilation group (5 [4-7] versus 10 [7-17]) manuals settings per subject per day [P<0.001]). The number of arterial blood gas analysis and the sedation doses were not significantly different between the groups. Nurses and physicians reported that INTELLiVENT-ASV® was significantly easier to use as compared to conventional ventilation (P<0.001 for nurses and P<0.01 for physicians). For mechanically ventilated ICU patients, INTELLiVENT-ASV® significantly reduces the number of manual ventilator setting changes with the same number of arterial blood gas analysis and sedation dose, and is easier to use for the caregivers as compared to conventional ventilation modes.

  3. Use of predefined biochemical admission profiles does not reduce the number of tests or total cost: a randomized-controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pareek, Manan; Haidl, Felix; Folkestad, Lars; Brabrand, Mikkel

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate whether the use of predefined biochemical profiles as an alternative to individually ordered blood tests by the treating physicians resulted in fewer tests or a lower total cost. This was a randomized-controlled trial of 191 adult patients admitted to a medical admission unit. Upon admission, the patients were randomized to have their blood tests determined by either using a predefined profile (used routinely and designed by the department head) or ordered individually by the treating physician. All patients were initially assessed by junior physicians. We compared the number of tests, estimated total cost, and length of stay. Data are presented as median (interquartile range). Differences were compared using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Fishers' exact test. Ninety-two patients were men, median age 65 years. Patients randomized to the use of the predefined profile had median 17 (14-22) blood tests drawn and patients randomized to physician discretion had median 17 (12-21) tests drawn (P=0.3). The median total cost of tests in the profile group was 618 DKK (493-803) and the cost in the physician group was 564 DKK (434-812) (P=0.19). Length of stay in the profile group was a median of 4 days (2-6 days) and 2 days (2-6 days) in the physician group (P=0.08). The use of a predefined blood test panel did not significantly affect the number of tests, total cost, or length of stay for acutely admitted medical patients compared with tests ordered at the discretion of the treating physician.

  4. Control logic to track the outputs of a command generator or randomly forced target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trankle, T. L.; Bryson, A. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure is presented for synthesizing time-invariant control logic to cause the outputs of a linear plant to track the outputs of an unforced (or randomly forced) linear dynamic system. The control logic uses feed-forward of the reference system state variables and feedback of the plant state variables. The feed-forward gains are obtained from the solution of a linear algebraic matrix equation of the Liapunov type. The feedback gains are the usual regulator gains, determined to stabilize (or augment the stability of) the plant, possibly including integral control. The method is applied here to the design of control logic for a second-order servomechanism to follow a linearly increasing (ramp) signal, an unstable third-order system with two controls to track two separate ramp signals, and a sixth-order system with two controls to track a constant signal and an exponentially decreasing signal (aircraft landing-flare or glide-slope-capture with constant velocity).

  5. Random Forests Are Able to Identify Differences in Clotting Dynamics from Kinetic Models of Thrombin Generation.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Jayavel; Bukkapatnam, Satish T S; Narayanan, Krishna R; Srinivasa, Arun R

    2016-01-01

    Current methods for distinguishing acute coronary syndromes such as heart attack from stable coronary artery disease, based on the kinetics of thrombin formation, have been limited to evaluating sensitivity of well-established chemical species (e.g., thrombin) using simple quantifiers of their concentration profiles (e.g., maximum level of thrombin concentration, area under the thrombin concentration versus time curve). In order to get an improved classifier, we use a 34-protein factor clotting cascade model and convert the simulation data into a high-dimensional representation (about 19000 features) using a piecewise cubic polynomial fit. Then, we systematically find plausible assays to effectively gauge changes in acute coronary syndrome/coronary artery disease populations by introducing a statistical learning technique called Random Forests. We find that differences associated with acute coronary syndromes emerge in combinations of a handful of features. For instance, concentrations of 3 chemical species, namely, active alpha-thrombin, tissue factor-factor VIIa-factor Xa ternary complex, and intrinsic tenase complex with factor X, at specific time windows, could be used to classify acute coronary syndromes to an accuracy of about 87.2%. Such a combination could be used to efficiently assay the coagulation system.

  6. New techniques for experimental generation of two-dimensional blade-vortex interaction at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, E., Jr.; Yu, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental investigation of two dimensional blade vortex interaction was held at NASA Langley Research Center. The first phase was a flow visualization study to document the approach process of a two dimensional vortex as it encountered a loaded blade model. To accomplish the flow visualization study, a method for generating two dimensional vortex filaments was required. The numerical study used to define a new vortex generation process and the use of this process in the flow visualization study were documented. Additionally, photographic techniques and data analysis methods used in the flow visualization study are examined.

  7. Replacement of dietary saturated fat with unsaturated fats increases numbers of circulating endothelial progenitor cells and decreases numbers of microparticles: findings from the randomized, controlled Dietary Intervention and VAScular function (DIVAS) study.

    PubMed

    Weech, Michelle; Altowaijri, Hana; Mayneris-Perxachs, Jordi; Vafeiadou, Katerina; Madden, Jacqueline; Todd, Susan; Jackson, Kim G; Lovegrove, Julie A; Yaqoob, Parveen

    2018-06-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and microparticles are emerging as novel markers of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, which could potentially be modified by dietary fat. We have previously shown that replacing dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs) with monounsaturated or n-6 (ω-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs or PUFAs, respectively) improved lipid biomarkers, blood pressure, and markers of endothelial activation, but their effects on circulating EPCs and microparticles are unclear. The Dietary Intervention and VAScular function (DIVAS) Study investigated the replacement of 9.5-9.6% of total energy (%TE) contributed by SFAs with MUFAs or n-6 PUFAs for 16 wk on EPC and microparticle numbers in United Kingdom adults with moderate CVD risk. In this randomized, controlled, single-blind, parallel-group dietary intervention, men and women aged 21-60 y (n = 190) with moderate CVD risk (≥50% above the population mean) consumed 1 of three 16-wk isoenergetic diets. Target compositions for total fat, SFAs, MUFAs, and n-6 PUFAs (%TE) were as follows: SFA-rich diet (36:17:11:4; n = 64), MUFA-rich diet (36:9:19:4; n = 62), and n-6 PUFA-rich diet (36:9:13:10; n = 66). Circulating EPC, endothelial microparticle (EMP), and platelet microparticle (PMP) numbers were analyzed by flow cytometry. Dietary intake, vascular function, and other cardiometabolic risk factors were determined at baseline. Relative to the SFA-rich diet, MUFA- and n-6 PUFA-rich diets decreased EMP (-47.3%, -44.9%) respectively and PMP (-36.8%, -39.1%) numbers (overall diet effects, P < 0.01). The MUFA-rich diet increased EPC numbers (+28.4%; P = 0.023). Additional analyses that used stepwise regression models identified the augmentation index (measuring arterial stiffness determined by pulse-wave analysis) as an independent predictor of baseline EPC and microparticle numbers. Replacement of 9.5-9.6%TE dietary SFAs with MUFAs increased EPC numbers, and replacement with either MUFAs or n-6

  8. Mendelian randomization analysis in three Japanese populations supports a causal role of alcohol consumption in lowering low-density lipid cholesterol levels and particle numbers.

    PubMed

    Tabara, Yasuharu; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Takashima, Naoyuki; Hisamatsu, Takashi; Fujiyoshi, Akira; Zaid, Maryam; Sumi, Masaki; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Miki, Tetsuro; Miura, Katsuyuki

    2016-11-01

    While alcohol consumption is known to increase plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels, its relationship with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels is unclear. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a rate-controlling enzyme in alcohol metabolism, but a large number of Japanese people have the inactive allele. Here, we conducted a Mendelian randomization analysis using the ALDH2 genotype to clarify a causal role of alcohol on circulating cholesterol levels and lipoprotein particle numbers. This study was conducted in three independent general Japanese populations (men, n = 2289; women, n = 1940; mean age 63.3 ± 11.2 years). Alcohol consumption was assessed using a questionnaire. Lipoprotein particle numbers were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Alcohol consumption increased linearly in proportion to the number of subjects carrying the enzymatically active *1 allele in men (p < 0.001). The *1 allele was also positively associated with HDL cholesterol level (adjusted mean ± standard error, *1*1: 60 ± 0.5, *1*2: 56 ± 0.6, *2*2: 55 ± 1.3 mg/dl, p < 0.001) and inversely associated with LDL cholesterol level (116 ± 0.9, 124 ± 1.1, 130 ± 2.6 mg/dl, p < 0.001). The *1 allele was also positively associated with HDL particle numbers (per-allele: 2.60 ± 0.32 μmol/l, p < 0.001) and inversely associated with LDL particle numbers (-67.8 ± 19.6 nmol/l, p = 0.001). Additional Mendelian randomization analysis failed to clarify the involvement of cholesteryl ester transfer protein in alcohol-related changes in lipoprotein cholesterol levels. No significant association was observed in women, presumably due to their small amount of alcohol intake. Alcohol consumption has a causal role in not only increasing HDL cholesterol levels but also decreasing LDL cholesterol levels and particle numbers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Revelation: Quantum-Statistics and Classical-Statistics are Analytic-Geometry Conic-Sections and Numbers/Functions: Euler, Riemann, Bernoulli Generating-Functions: Conics to Numbers/Functions Deep Subtle Connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descartes, R.; Rota, G.-C.; Euler, L.; Bernoulli, J. D.; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig

    2011-03-01

    Quantum-statistics Dichotomy: Fermi-Dirac(FDQS) Versus Bose-Einstein(BEQS), respectively with contact-repulsion/non-condensation(FDCR) versus attraction/ condensationBEC are manifestly-demonstrated by Taylor-expansion ONLY of their denominator exponential, identified BOTH as Descartes analytic-geometry conic-sections, FDQS as Elllipse (homotopy to rectangle FDQS distribution-function), VIA Maxwell-Boltzmann classical-statistics(MBCS) to Parabola MORPHISM, VS. BEQS to Hyperbola, Archimedes' HYPERBOLICITY INEVITABILITY, and as well generating-functions[Abramowitz-Stegun, Handbook Math.-Functions--p. 804!!!], respectively of Euler-numbers/functions, (via Riemann zeta-function(domination of quantum-statistics: [Pathria, Statistical-Mechanics; Huang, Statistical-Mechanics]) VS. Bernoulli-numbers/ functions. Much can be learned about statistical-physics from Euler-numbers/functions via Riemann zeta-function(s) VS. Bernoulli-numbers/functions [Conway-Guy, Book of Numbers] and about Euler-numbers/functions, via Riemann zeta-function(s) MORPHISM, VS. Bernoulli-numbers/ functions, visa versa!!! Ex.: Riemann-hypothesis PHYSICS proof PARTLY as BEQS BEC/BEA!!!

  10. Reliability Evaluation of Next Generation Inverter: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-478

    SciTech Connect

    Paret, Paul

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will conduct thermal and reliability modeling on three sets of power modules for the development of a next generation inverter for electric traction drive vehicles. These modules will be chosen by General Motors (GM) to represent three distinct technological approaches to inverter power module packaging. Likely failure mechanisms will be identified in each package and a physics-of-failure-based reliability assessment will be conducted.

  11. Next generation sequencing analysis reveals a relationship between rDNA unit diversity and locus number in Nicotiana diploids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tandemly arranged nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), exhibit concerted evolution, a pattern thought to result from the homogenisation of rDNA arrays. However rDNA homogeneity at the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) level has not been detailed in organisms with more than a few hundred copies of the rDNA unit. Here we study rDNA complexity in species with arrays consisting of thousands of units. Methods We examined homogeneity of genic (18S) and non-coding internally transcribed spacer (ITS1) regions of rDNA using Roche 454 and/or Illumina platforms in four angiosperm species, Nicotiana sylvestris, N. tomentosiformis, N. otophora and N. kawakamii. We compared the data with Southern blot hybridisation revealing the structure of intergenic spacer (IGS) sequences and with the number and distribution of rDNA loci. Results and Conclusions In all four species the intragenomic homogeneity of the 18S gene was high; a single ribotype makes up over 90% of the genes. However greater variation was observed in the ITS1 region, particularly in species with two or more rDNA loci, where >55% of rDNA units were a single ribotype, with the second most abundant variant accounted for >18% of units. IGS heterogeneity was high in all species. The increased number of ribotypes in ITS1 compared with 18S sequences may reflect rounds of incomplete homogenisation with strong selection for functional genic regions and relaxed selection on ITS1 variants. The relationship between the number of ITS1 ribotypes and the number of rDNA loci leads us to propose that rDNA evolution and complexity is influenced by locus number and/or amplification of orphaned rDNA units at new chromosomal locations. PMID:23259460

  12. Do we really need a large number of particles to simulate bimolecular reactive transport with random walk methods? A kernel density estimation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbaralam, Maryam; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Random walk particle tracking methods are a computationally efficient family of methods to solve reactive transport problems. While the number of particles in most realistic applications is in the order of 106-109, the number of reactive molecules even in diluted systems might be in the order of fractions of the Avogadro number. Thus, each particle actually represents a group of potentially reactive molecules. The use of a low number of particles may result not only in loss of accuracy, but also may lead to an improper reproduction of the mixing process, limited by diffusion. Recent works have used this effect as a proxy to model incomplete mixing in porous media. In this work, we propose using a Kernel Density Estimation (KDE) of the concentrations that allows getting the expected results for a well-mixed solution with a limited number of particles. The idea consists of treating each particle as a sample drawn from the pool of molecules that it represents; this way, the actual location of a tracked particle is seen as a sample drawn from the density function of the location of molecules represented by that given particle, rigorously represented by a kernel density function. The probability of reaction can be obtained by combining the kernels associated to two potentially reactive particles. We demonstrate that the observed deviation in the reaction vs time curves in numerical experiments reported in the literature could be attributed to the statistical method used to reconstruct concentrations (fixed particle support) from discrete particle distributions, and not to the occurrence of true incomplete mixing. We further explore the evolution of the kernel size with time, linking it to the diffusion process. Our results show that KDEs are powerful tools to improve computational efficiency and robustness in reactive transport simulations, and indicates that incomplete mixing in diluted systems should be modeled based on alternative mechanistic models and not on a

  13. Radioactive emission data from Canadian nuclear generating stations, 1988 to 1997. Report number INFO-0210/Rev.8

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This edition incorporates histograms for each nuclear generating station (NGS) displaying the annual gaseous emissions containing tritium, in the form of tritium oxide, noble gases, iodine-131, and radioactive particulates, as well as the annual liquid emissions containing tritium, in the form of tritiated water, and gross beta-gamma activity. For Pickering NGS A and Gentilly 2, annual emissions of carbon-14 are depicted; and for Darlington NGS A, airborne emissions of elemental tritium since 1988 are shown. In each case, the emission data are compared to the derived emission limits.

  14. Generation of Multiple Vortex Beams with Specified Vortex Number from Lasers with Controlled Ince-Gaussian Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Shu-Chun

    2008-07-01

    This study proposes a systematic method of selecting excitations of part of Ince-Gaussian modes (IGMs) and a three-lens configuration for generating multiple vortex beams with forced IGMs in the model of laser-diode (LD)-pumped solid-state lasers. Simply changing the lateral off-axis position of the tight pump beam focus on the laser crystal can produce the desired multiple optical vortex beam from the laser in a well-controlled manner using a proposed astigmatic mode converter assembled into one body with the laser cavity.

  15. Tunable ultraviolet and blue light generation from Nd:YAB random laser bolstered by second-order nonlinear processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, André L.; Carreño, Sandra J. M.; Pincheira, Pablo I. R.; Fabris, Zanine V.; Maia, Lauro J. Q.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; de Araújo, Cid B.

    2016-06-01

    Ultraviolet and blue light were obtained by nonlinear frequency conversion in a random laser (RL) based on Nd0.10Y0.90Al3(BO3)4 nanocrystalline powder. RL operation at 1062 nm, due to the 4F3/2 → 4I11/2 transition of neodymium ions (Nd3+), was achieved by exciting the Nd3+ with a tunable beam from 680 to 920 nm covering the ground state absorption transitions to the 4F9/2, (4F7/2,4S3/2), (4F5/2,2H9/2), and 4F3/2 states. Light from 340 to 460 nm was obtained via the second-harmonic generation of the excitation beam while tunable blue light, from 417 to 486 nm, was generated by self-sum-frequency mixing between the excitation beam and the RL emission.

  16. Genome-wide patterns of copy number variation in the diversified chicken genomes using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guoqiang; Qu, Lujiang; Liu, Jianfeng; Yan, Yiyuan; Xu, Guiyun; Yang, Ning

    2014-11-07

    Copy number variation (CNV) is important and widespread in the genome, and is a major cause of disease and phenotypic diversity. Herein, we performed a genome-wide CNV analysis in 12 diversified chicken genomes based on whole genome sequencing. A total of 8,840 CNV regions (CNVRs) covering 98.2 Mb and representing 9.4% of the chicken genome were identified, ranging in size from 1.1 to 268.8 kb with an average of 11.1 kb. Sequencing-based predictions were confirmed at a high validation rate by two independent approaches, including array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and quantitative PCR (qPCR). The Pearson's correlation coefficients between sequencing and aCGH results ranged from 0.435 to 0.755, and qPCR experiments revealed a positive validation rate of 91.71% and a false negative rate of 22.43%. In total, 2,214 (25.0%) predicted CNVRs span 2,216 (36.4%) RefSeq genes associated with specific biological functions. Besides two previously reported copy number variable genes EDN3 and PRLR, we also found some promising genes with potential in phenotypic variation. Two genes, FZD6 and LIMS1, related to disease susceptibility/resistance are covered by CNVRs. The highly duplicated SOCS2 may lead to higher bone mineral density. Entire or partial duplication of some genes like POPDC3 may have great economic importance in poultry breeding. Our results based on extensive genetic diversity provide a more refined chicken CNV map and genome-wide gene copy number estimates, and warrant future CNV association studies for important traits in chickens.

  17. Impact of Different e-Cigarette Generation and Models on Cognitive Performances, Craving and Gesture: A Randomized Cross-Over Trial (CogEcig).

    PubMed

    Caponnetto, Pasquale; Maglia, Marilena; Cannella, Maria Concetta; Inguscio, Lucio; Buonocore, Mariachiara; Scoglio, Claudio; Polosa, Riccardo; Vinci, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Most electronic-cigarettes (e-cigarette) are designed to look like traditional cigarettes and simulate the visual, sensory, and behavioral aspects of smoking traditional cigarettes. This research aimed to explore whether different e-cigarette models and smokers' usual classic cigarettes can impact on cognitive performances, craving and gesture. Methods: The study is randomized cross-over trial designed to compare cognitive performances, craving, and gesture in subjects who used first generation electronic cigarettes, second generation electronic cigarettes with their usual cigarettes. (Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT01735487). Results: Cognitive performance was not affected by "group condition." Within-group repeated measures analyses showed a significant time effect, indicating an increase of participants' current craving measure in group "usual classic cigarettes (group C)," "disposable cigalike electronic cigarette loaded with cartridges with 24 mg nicotine (group H), second generation electronic cigarette, personal vaporizer model Ego C, loaded with liquid nicotine 24 mg (group E). Measures of gesture not differ over the course of the experiment for all the products under investigation Conclusion: All cognitive measures attention, executive function and working memory are not influenced by the different e-cigarette and gender showing that in general electronics cigarettes could become a strong support also from a cognitive point of view for those who decide to quit smoking. It seems that not only craving and other smoke withdrawal symptoms but also cognitive performance is not only linked to the presence of nicotine; this suggests that the reasons behind the dependence and the related difficulty to quit smoking needs to be looked into also other factors like the gesture. www.ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT01735487.

  18. Impact of Different e-Cigarette Generation and Models on Cognitive Performances, Craving and Gesture: A Randomized Cross-Over Trial (CogEcig)

    PubMed Central

    Caponnetto, Pasquale; Maglia, Marilena; Cannella, Maria Concetta; Inguscio, Lucio; Buonocore, Mariachiara; Scoglio, Claudio; Polosa, Riccardo; Vinci, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Most electronic-cigarettes (e-cigarette) are designed to look like traditional cigarettes and simulate the visual, sensory, and behavioral aspects of smoking traditional cigarettes. This research aimed to explore whether different e-cigarette models and smokers' usual classic cigarettes can impact on cognitive performances, craving and gesture. Methods: The study is randomized cross-over trial designed to compare cognitive performances, craving, and gesture in subjects who used first generation electronic cigarettes, second generation electronic cigarettes with their usual cigarettes. (Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT01735487). Results: Cognitive performance was not affected by “group condition.” Within-group repeated measures analyses showed a significant time effect, indicating an increase of participants' current craving measure in group “usual classic cigarettes (group C),” “disposable cigalike electronic cigarette loaded with cartridges with 24 mg nicotine (group H), second generation electronic cigarette, personal vaporizer model Ego C, loaded with liquid nicotine 24 mg (group E). Measures of gesture not differ over the course of the experiment for all the products under investigation Conclusion: All cognitive measures attention, executive function and working memory are not influenced by the different e-cigarette and gender showing that in general electronics cigarettes could become a strong support also from a cognitive point of view for those who decide to quit smoking. It seems that not only craving and other smoke withdrawal symptoms but also cognitive performance is not only linked to the presence of nicotine; this suggests that the reasons behind the dependence and the related difficulty to quit smoking needs to be looked into also other factors like the gesture. Clinical Trial Registration: www.ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT01735487. PMID:28337155

  19. Comparison of Sleep Latency and Number of SOREMPs in the Home and Hospital With a Modified Multiple Sleep Latency Test: A Randomized Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Beiske, Kornelia K; Sand, Trond; Rugland, Eyvind; Stavem, Knut

    2017-05-01

    Comparison of mean sleep latencies and number of sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods (SOREMPs) between modified multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) performed in the unattended home and in-hospital laboratory setting. A randomized crossover single-blinded design. Thirty-four subjects referred to MSLT for suspected hypersomnia or narcolepsy were included. Participants were randomized to perform modified MSLT in the unattended home or in the hospital first. Scores in the two settings were compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank test or exact McNemar test. Agreement between home and hospital categorized mean sleep latency and number of SOREMPs was assessed using simple kappa (κ) and proportion agreement. Agreement between home and hospital mean sleep latency was assessed using a Bland-Altman plot and an intraclass correlation coefficient. There was no difference between home and hospital assessment of mean sleep latency (P = 0.86). Two or more SOREMPs were found more frequently on modified MSLTs performed at home compared with those at the hospital (7 and 2, respectively; P = 0.025). Agreement was moderate for categorized sleep latency (κ = 0.53) and fair for categorized SOREMPs (κ = 0.39) in the 2 settings. Analysis of mean sleep latency using intraclass correlation coefficient showed a very good agreement between the two settings. Group mean sleep latency for home modified MSLTs seems to be reliable compared with that for the attended sleep-laboratory setting. Higher rate of SOREMP in the unattended home suggests that napping in a familiar environment facilitates the transition into REM sleep. Further studies are needed to assess the normal limit, sensitivity, and specificity for SOREMP at home before the clinical utility of home-based napping can be determined.

  20. Efficacy and tolerability of saxagliptin compared with glimepiride in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized, controlled study (GENERATION).

    PubMed

    Schernthaner, G; Durán-Garcia, S; Hanefeld, M; Langslet, G; Niskanen, L; Östgren, C J; Malvolti, E; Hardy, E

    2015-07-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of adjunctive saxagliptin vs glimepiride in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and inadequate glycaemic control. In this multinational, randomized, double-blind, phase IIIb/IV study (GENERATION; NCT01006603), patients aged ≥65 years were randomized (1 : 1) to receive saxagliptin 5 mg/day or glimepiride ≤6 mg/day, added to metformin, during a 52-week treatment period. The primary endpoint was achievement of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) <7.0% at week 52 without confirmed/severe hypoglycaemia. The key secondary endpoint was incidence of confirmed/severe hypoglycaemia. Safety and tolerability were also assessed. Of 720 patients randomized (360 in each treatment group; mean age 72.6 years; mean T2D duration 7.6 years), 574 (79.8%) completed the study (saxagliptin 80.3%; glimepiride 79.2%). Similar proportions of patients achieved the primary endpoint with saxagliptin and glimepiride (37.9 vs 38.2%; odds ratio 0.99, 95% confidence interval 0.73, 1.34; p = 0.9415); however, a significant treatment-by-age interaction effect was detected (p = 0.0389): saxagliptin was numerically (but not significantly) superior to glimepiride for patients aged <75 years (39.2 vs 33.3%) and numerically inferior for patients aged ≥75 years (35.9 vs 45.5%). The incidence of confirmed/severe hypoglycaemia was lower with saxagliptin vs glimepiride (1.1 vs 15.3%; nominal p < 0.0001). Saxagliptin was generally well tolerated, with similar incidences of adverse events compared with glimepiride. As avoiding hypoglycaemia is a key clinical objective in elderly patients, saxagliptin is a suitable alternative to glimepiride in patients with T2D aged ≥65 years. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Hundred-watt-level high power random distributed feedback Raman fiber laser at 1150 nm and its application in mid-infrared laser generation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanwei; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiong; Du, Xueyuan; Xiao, Hu; Xu, Xiaojun

    2015-06-29

    Two kinds of hundred-watt-level random distributed feedback Raman fiber have been demonstrated. The optical efficiency can reach to as high as 84.8%. The reported power and efficiency of the random laser is the highest one as we know. We have also demonstrated that the developed random laser can be further used to pump a Ho-doped fiber laser for mid-infrared laser generation. Finally, 23 W 2050 nm laser is achieved. The presented laser can obtain high power output efficiently and conveniently and opens a new direction for high power laser sources at designed wavelength.

  2. Combined mutation and copy-number variation detection by targeted next-generation sequencing in uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Smit, Kyra N; van Poppelen, Natasha M; Vaarwater, Jolanda; Verdijk, Robert; van Marion, Ronald; Kalirai, Helen; Coupland, Sarah E; Thornton, Sophie; Farquhar, Neil; Dubbink, Hendrikus-Jan; Paridaens, Dion; de Klein, Annelies; Kiliç, Emine

    2018-05-01

    Uveal melanoma is a highly aggressive cancer of the eye, in which nearly 50% of the patients die from metastasis. It is the most common type of primary eye cancer in adults. Chromosome and mutation status have been shown to correlate with the disease-free survival. Loss of chromosome 3 and inactivating mutations in BAP1, which is located on chromosome 3, are strongly associated with 'high-risk' tumors that metastasize early. Other genes often involved in uveal melanoma are SF3B1 and EIF1AX, which are found to be mutated in intermediate- and low-risk tumors, respectively. To obtain genetic information of all genes in one test, we developed a targeted sequencing method that can detect mutations in uveal melanoma genes and chromosomal anomalies in chromosome 1, 3, and 8. With as little as 10 ng DNA, we obtained enough coverage on all genes to detect mutations, such as substitutions, deletions, and insertions. These results were validated with Sanger sequencing in 28 samples. In >90% of the cases, the BAP1 mutation status corresponded to the BAP1 immunohistochemistry. The results obtained in the Ion Torrent single-nucleotide polymorphism assay were confirmed with several other techniques, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and Illumina SNP array. By validating our assay in 27 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded and 43 fresh uveal melanomas, we show that mutations and chromosome status can reliably be obtained using targeted next-generation sequencing. Implementing this technique as a diagnostic pathology application for uveal melanoma will allow prediction of the patients' metastatic risk and potentially assess eligibility for new therapies.

  3. Critical side channel effects in random bit generation with multiple semiconductor lasers in a polarization-based quantum key distribution system.

    PubMed

    Ko, Heasin; Choi, Byung-Seok; Choe, Joong-Seon; Kim, Kap-Joong; Kim, Jong-Hoi; Youn, Chun Ju

    2017-08-21

    Most polarization-based BB84 quantum key distribution (QKD) systems utilize multiple lasers to generate one of four polarization quantum states randomly. However, random bit generation with multiple lasers can potentially open critical side channels that significantly endangers the security of QKD systems. In this paper, we show unnoticed side channels of temporal disparity and intensity fluctuation, which possibly exist in the operation of multiple semiconductor laser diodes. Experimental results show that the side channels can enormously degrade security performance of QKD systems. An important system issue for the improvement of quantum bit error rate (QBER) related with laser driving condition is further addressed with experimental results.

  4. Limiting (zero-load) speed of the rotary motor of Escherichia coli is independent of the number of torque-generating units

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Zhang, Rongjing; Yuan, Junhua

    2017-01-01

    Rotation of the bacterial flagellar motor is driven by multiple torque-generating units (stator elements). The torque-generating dynamics can be understood in terms of the “duty ratio” of the stator elements, that is, the fraction of time a stator element engages with the rotor during its mechanochemical cycle. The dependence of the limiting speed (zero-load speed) of the motor on the number of stator elements is the determining test of the duty ratio, which has been controversial experimentally and theoretically over the past decade. Here, we developed a method combining laser dark-field microscopy and optical trapping to resolve this controversy. We found that the zero-load speed is independent of the number of stator elements for the bacterial flagellar motor in Escherichia coli, demonstrating that these elements have a duty ratio close to 1. PMID:29109285

  5. Limiting (zero-load) speed of the rotary motor of Escherichia coli is independent of the number of torque-generating units.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Zhang, Rongjing; Yuan, Junhua

    2017-11-21

    Rotation of the bacterial flagellar motor is driven by multiple torque-generating units (stator elements). The torque-generating dynamics can be understood in terms of the "duty ratio" of the stator elements, that is, the fraction of time a stator element engages with the rotor during its mechanochemical cycle. The dependence of the limiting speed (zero-load speed) of the motor on the number of stator elements is the determining test of the duty ratio, which has been controversial experimentally and theoretically over the past decade. Here, we developed a method combining laser dark-field microscopy and optical trapping to resolve this controversy. We found that the zero-load speed is independent of the number of stator elements for the bacterial flagellar motor in Escherichia coli , demonstrating that these elements have a duty ratio close to 1.

  6. An Application of the Finite Element Method to the Solution of Low Reynolds Number, Incompressible Flow Around a Joukowski Aerofoil, with Emphasis on Automatic Generation of Grids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    Library Universities and Colleges Sydney Dr G.P. Steven, Dept. of Aeronautical Engineering SPARES (10 copies) TOTAL (50 copies) * 1’ Department of...ORGANISATION AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH LABORATORIES MELBOURNE, VICTORIA AsZodynaiLcs Tecbhical ismiro a 349 AN APPLICATION OF THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD TO THE...SOLUTION OF LOW REYNOLDS NUMBER, INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOW AROUND A JOUIKOWSKI AEROFOIL , WITH EMPHASIS ON ALJTOMATIC GENERATION OF 6RIDS T. TDTIC SELECTED SEP29

  7. The Number of Point Mutations in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer Embryonic Stem Cells Depends on the Method and Somatic Cell Type Used for Their Generation.

    PubMed

    Araki, Ryoko; Mizutani, Eiji; Hoki, Yuko; Sunayama, Misato; Wakayama, Sayaka; Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Kasama, Yasuji; Nakamura, Miki; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Abe, Masumi

    2017-05-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells hold great promise for regenerative medicine but point mutations have been identified in these cells and have raised serious concerns about their safe use. We generated nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells (ntESCs) from both mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and tail-tip fibroblasts (TTFs) and by whole genome sequencing found fewer mutations compared with iPSCs generated by retroviral gene transduction. Furthermore, TTF-derived ntESCs showed only a very small number of point mutations, approximately 80% less than the number observed in iPSCs generated using retrovirus. Base substitution profile analysis confirmed this greatly reduced number of point mutations. The point mutations in iPSCs are therefore not a Yamanaka factor-specific phenomenon but are intrinsic to genome reprogramming. Moreover, the dramatic reduction in point mutations in ntESCs suggests that most are not essential for genome reprogramming. Our results suggest that it is feasible to reduce the point mutation frequency in iPSCs by optimizing various genome reprogramming conditions. We conducted whole genome sequencing of ntES cells derived from MEFs or TTFs. We thereby succeeded in establishing TTF-derived ntES cell lines with far fewer point mutations. Base substitution profile analysis of these clones also indicated a reduced point mutation frequency, moving from a transversion-predominance to a transition-predominance. Stem Cells 2017;35:1189-1196. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  8. Use of Hot Rolling for Generating Low Deviation Twins and a Disconnected Random Boundary Network in Inconel 600 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Sandeep; Yadav, Prabhat Chand; Shekhar, Shashank

    2018-02-01

    In this investigation, Inconel 600 alloy was thermomechanically processed to different strains via hot rolling followed by a short-time annealing treatment to determine an appropriate thermomechanical process to achieve a high fraction of low-Σ CSL boundaries. Experimental results demonstrate that a certain level of deformation is necessary to obtain effective "grain boundary engineering"; i.e., the deformation must be sufficiently high to provide the required driving force for postdeformation static recrystallization, yet it should be low enough to retain a large fraction of original twin boundaries. Samples processed in such a fashion exhibited 77 pct length fraction of low-Σ CSL boundaries, a dominant fraction of which was from Σ3 ( 64 pct), the latter with very low deviation from its theoretical misorientation. The application of hot rolling also resulted in a very low fraction of Σ1 ( 1 pct) boundaries, as desired. The process also leads to so-called "triple junction engineering" with the generation of special triple junctions, which are very effective in disrupting the connectivity of the random grain boundary network.

  9. Response Rates in Random-Digit-Dialed Telephone Surveys: Estimation vs. Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, Jennifer D.

    The efficacy of the random digit dialing method in telephone surveys was examined. Random digit dialing (RDD) generates a pure random sample and provides the advantage of including unlisted phone numbers, as well as numbers which are too new to be listed. Its disadvantage is that it generates a major proportion of nonworking and business…

  10. Coupling Poisson rectangular pulse and multiplicative microcanonical random cascade models to generate sub-daily precipitation timeseries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohle, Ina; Niebisch, Michael; Müller, Hannes; Schümberg, Sabine; Zha, Tingting; Maurer, Thomas; Hinz, Christoph

    2018-07-01

    To simulate the impacts of within-storm rainfall variabilities on fast hydrological processes, long precipitation time series with high temporal resolution are required. Due to limited availability of observed data such time series are typically obtained from stochastic models. However, most existing rainfall models are limited in their ability to conserve rainfall event statistics which are relevant for hydrological processes. Poisson rectangular pulse models are widely applied to generate long time series of alternating precipitation events durations and mean intensities as well as interstorm period durations. Multiplicative microcanonical random cascade (MRC) models are used to disaggregate precipitation time series from coarse to fine temporal resolution. To overcome the inconsistencies between the temporal structure of the Poisson rectangular pulse model and the MRC model, we developed a new coupling approach by introducing two modifications to the MRC model. These modifications comprise (a) a modified cascade model ("constrained cascade") which preserves the event durations generated by the Poisson rectangular model by constraining the first and last interval of a precipitation event to contain precipitation and (b) continuous sigmoid functions of the multiplicative weights to consider the scale-dependency in the disaggregation of precipitation events of different durations. The constrained cascade model was evaluated in its ability to disaggregate observed precipitation events in comparison to existing MRC models. For that, we used a 20-year record of hourly precipitation at six stations across Germany. The constrained cascade model showed a pronounced better agreement with the observed data in terms of both the temporal pattern of the precipitation time series (e.g. the dry and wet spell durations and autocorrelations) and event characteristics (e.g. intra-event intermittency and intensity fluctuation within events). The constrained cascade model also

  11. Using next-generation sequencing for high resolution multiplex analysis of copy number variation from nanogram quantities of DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens.

    PubMed

    Wood, Henry M; Belvedere, Ornella; Conway, Caroline; Daly, Catherine; Chalkley, Rebecca; Bickerdike, Melissa; McKinley, Claire; Egan, Phil; Ross, Lisa; Hayward, Bruce; Morgan, Joanne; Davidson, Leslie; MacLennan, Ken; Ong, Thian K; Papagiannopoulos, Kostas; Cook, Ian; Adams, David J; Taylor, Graham R; Rabbitts, Pamela

    2010-08-01

    The use of next-generation sequencing technologies to produce genomic copy number data has recently been described. Most approaches, however, reply on optimal starting DNA, and are therefore unsuitable for the analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, which largely precludes the analysis of many tumour series. We have sought to challenge the limits of this technique with regards to quality and quantity of starting material and the depth of sequencing required. We confirm that the technique can be used to interrogate DNA from cell lines, fresh frozen material and FFPE samples to assess copy number variation. We show that as little as 5 ng of DNA is needed to generate a copy number karyogram, and follow this up with data from a series of FFPE biopsies and surgical samples. We have used various levels of sample multiplexing to demonstrate the adjustable resolution of the methodology, depending on the number of samples and available resources. We also demonstrate reproducibility by use of replicate samples and comparison with microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and digital PCR. This technique can be valuable in both the analysis of routine diagnostic samples and in examining large repositories of fixed archival material.

  12. Error free physically unclonable function with programmed resistive random access memory using reliable resistance states by specific identification-generation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Po-Hao; Hsu, Kai-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Yu; Lee, Feng-Min; Lee, Ming-Hsiu; Lung, Hsiang-Lan; Hsieh, Kuang-Yeu; Chung Wang, Keh; Lu, Chih-Yuan

    2018-04-01

    A high performance physically unclonable function (PUF) implemented with WO3 resistive random access memory (ReRAM) is presented in this paper. This robust ReRAM-PUF can eliminated bit flipping problem at very high temperature (up to 250 °C) due to plentiful read margin by using initial resistance state and set resistance state. It is also promised 10 years retention at the temperature range of 210 °C. These two stable resistance states enable stable operation at automotive environments from -40 to 125 °C without need of temperature compensation circuit. The high uniqueness of PUF can be achieved by implementing a proposed identification (ID)-generation method. Optimized forming condition can move 50% of the cells to low resistance state and the remaining 50% remain at initial high resistance state. The inter- and intra-PUF evaluations with unlimited separation of hamming distance (HD) are successfully demonstrated even under the corner condition. The number of reproduction was measured to exceed 107 times with 0% bit error rate (BER) at read voltage from 0.4 to 0.7 V.

  13. Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloulian, George K.; Woo, Simon S.; Chow, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Net-centric networking environments are often faced with limited resources and must utilize bandwidth as efficiently as possible. In networking environments that span wide areas, the data transmission has to be efficient without any redundant or exuberant metadata. The Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer software provides an extra level of security on top of existing data encryption methods. Randomizing the data s byte stream adds an extra layer to existing data protection methods, thus making it harder for an attacker to decrypt protected data. Based on a generated crypto-graphically secure random seed, a random sequence of numbers is used to intelligently and efficiently swap the organization of bytes in data using the unbiased and memory-efficient in-place Fisher-Yates shuffle method. Swapping bytes and reorganizing the crucial structure of the byte data renders the data file unreadable and leaves the data in a deconstructed state. This deconstruction adds an extra level of security requiring the byte stream to be reconstructed with the random seed in order to be readable. Once the data byte stream has been randomized, the software enables the data to be distributed to N nodes in an environment. Each piece of the data in randomized and distributed form is a separate entity unreadable on its own right, but when combined with all N pieces, is able to be reconstructed back to one. Reconstruction requires possession of the key used for randomizing the bytes, leading to the generation of the same cryptographically secure random sequence of numbers used to randomize the data. This software is a cornerstone capability possessing the ability to generate the same cryptographically secure sequence on different machines and time intervals, thus allowing this software to be used more heavily in net-centric environments where data transfer bandwidth is limited.

  14. Randomized comparison of next-generation sequencing and array comparative genomic hybridization for preimplantation genetic screening: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhihong; Lin, James; Zhang, John; Fong, Wai Ieng; Li, Pei; Zhao, Rong; Liu, Xiaohong; Podevin, William; Kuang, Yanping; Liu, Jiaen

    2015-06-23

    Recent advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) have provided new methods for preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) of human embryos from in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles. However, there is still limited information about clinical applications of NGS in IVF and PGS (IVF-PGS) treatments. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of NGS screening on clinical pregnancy and implantation outcomes for PGS patients in comparison to array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) screening. This study was performed in two phases. Phase I study evaluated the accuracy of NGS for aneuploidy screening in comparison to aCGH. Whole-genome amplification (WGA) products (n = 164) derived from previous IVF-PGS cycles (n = 38) were retrospectively analyzed with NGS. The NGS results were then compared with those of aCGH. Phase II study further compared clinical pregnancy and implantation outcomes between NGS and aCGH for IVF-PGS patients. A total of 172 patients at mean age 35.2 ± 3.5 years were randomized into two groups: 1) NGS (Group A): patients (n = 86) had embryos screened with NGS and 2) aCGH (Group B): patients (n = 86) had embryos screened with aCGH. For both groups, blastocysts were vitrified after trophectoderm biopsy. One to two euploid blastocysts were thawed and transferred to individual patients primarily based on the PGS results. Ongoing pregnancy and implantation rates were compared between the two study groups. NGS detected all types of aneuploidies of human blastocysts accurately and provided a 100 % 24-chromosome diagnosis consistency with the highly validated aCGH method. Moreover, NGS screening identified euploid blastocysts for transfer and resulted in similarly high ongoing pregnancy rates for PGS patients compared to aCGH screening (74.7 % vs. 69.2 %, respectively, p >0.05). The observed implantation rates were also comparable between the NGS and aCGH groups (70.5 % vs. 66.2 %, respectively, p >0.05). While NGS screening

  15. A retrospective analysis of RET translocation, gene copy number gain and expression in NSCLC patients treated with vandetanib in four randomized Phase III studies.

    PubMed

    Platt, Adam; Morten, John; Ji, Qunsheng; Elvin, Paul; Womack, Chris; Su, Xinying; Donald, Emma; Gray, Neil; Read, Jessica; Bigley, Graham; Blockley, Laura; Cresswell, Carl; Dale, Angela; Davies, Amanda; Zhang, Tianwei; Fan, Shuqiong; Fu, Haihua; Gladwin, Amanda; Harrod, Grace; Stevens, James; Williams, Victoria; Ye, Qingqing; Zheng, Li; de Boer, Richard; Herbst, Roy S; Lee, Jin-Soo; Vasselli, James

    2015-03-23

    To determine the prevalence of RET rearrangement genes, RET copy number gains and expression in tumor samples from four Phase III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) trials of vandetanib, a selective inhibitor of VEGFR, RET and EGFR signaling, and to determine any association with outcome to vandetanib treatment. Archival tumor samples from the ZODIAC ( NCT00312377 , vandetanib ± docetaxel), ZEAL ( NCT00418886 , vandetanib ± pemetrexed), ZEPHYR ( NCT00404924 , vandetanib vs placebo) and ZEST ( NCT00364351 , vandetanib vs erlotinib) studies were evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 944 and 1102 patients. The prevalence of RET rearrangements by FISH was 0.7% (95% CI 0.3-1.5%) among patients with a known result. Seven tumor samples were positive for RET rearrangements (vandetanib, n = 3; comparator, n = 4). 2.8% (n = 26) of samples had RET amplification (innumerable RET clusters, or ≥7 copies in > 10% of tumor cells), 8.1% (n = 76) had low RET gene copy number gain (4-6 copies in ≥40% of tumor cells) and 8.3% (n = 92) were RET expression positive (signal intensity ++ or +++ in >10% of tumor cells). Of RET-rearrangement-positive patients, none had an objective response in the vandetanib arm and one patient responded in the comparator arm. Radiologic evidence of tumor shrinkage was observed in two patients treated with vandetanib and one treated with comparator drug. The objective response rate was similar in the vandetanib and comparator arms for patients positive for RET copy number gains or RET protein expression. We have identified prevalence for three RET biomarkers in a population predominated by non-Asians and smokers. RET rearrangement prevalence was lower than previously reported. We found no evidence of a differential benefit for efficacy by IHC and RET gene copy number gains. The low prevalence of RET rearrangements (0.7%) prevents firm conclusions regarding association of vandetanib treatment with

  16. The effects of in utero bisphenol A exposure on ovarian follicle numbers and steroidogenesis in the F1 and F2 generations of mice.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, Sharada; Ther, Laura; Gao, Liying; Wang, Wei; Ziv-Gal, Ayelet; Flaws, Jodi A

    2017-12-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a commonly used plasticizer. Previous studies show that in utero exposure to BPA affects reproductive outcomes in the F1-F3 generations of mice. However, its multigenerational effects on ovarian histology and steroidogenesis over the reproductive lifespan are unknown. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that BPA has multigenerational effects on follicle numbers and steroidogenesis. Mice were exposed in utero to vehicle control or BPA (0.5, 20, and 50μg/kg/day). Ovaries were collected for histological and gene expression analyses and sera were collected for hormone assays. In utero BPA exposure decreased preantral follicle numbers, cytochrome P450 aromatase mRNA levels, and estradiol levels in the F1 generation, whereas it decreased testosterone levels and altered steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, and cytochrome P450 aromatase mRNA levels in the F2 generation. These data suggest that BPA has multigenerational effects on the ovary in mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A scaling theory for number-flux distributions generated during steady-state coagulation and settling and application to particles in Lake Zurich, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Alexandria B

    2002-10-15

    In this study, we extend the established scaling theory for cluster size distributions generated during unsteady coagulation to number-flux distributions that arise during steady-state coagulation and settling in an unmixed water mass. The scaling theory predicts self-similar number-flux distributions and power-law decay of total number flux with depth. The shape of the number-flux distributions and the power-law exponent describing the decay of the total number flux are shown to depend on the homogeneity and small i/j limit of the coagulation kernel and the exponent kappa, which describes the variation in settling velocity with cluster volume. Particle field measurements from Lake Zurich, collected by U. Weilenmann and co-workers (Limnol. Oceanogr.34, 1 (1989)), are used to illustrate how the scaling predictions can be applied to a natural system. This effort indicates that within the mid-depth region of Lake Zurich, clusters of the same size preferentially interact and large clusters react with one another more quickly than small ones, indicative of clusters coagulating in a reaction-limited regime.

  18. Involvement of postnatal apoptosis on sex difference in number of cells generated during late fetal period in the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area in rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yukinori; Nakashima, Shizuka; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Tsukahara, Shinji

    2012-05-16

    Postnatal apoptosis is involved in formation of the sex difference in neuron number of the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) in rats. In this study, we examined the origin of neurons that die with apoptosis on the postnatal period to exhibit the sex difference in neuron number of the SDN-POA. First, we measured the number of cells that were labeled with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) on embryonic day (ED) 17, ED18, and ED19 in the SDN-POA of rats on postnatal day (PD) 4 and PD8. The SDN-POA had many more cells labeled with BrdU on ED17 and ED18 than those on ED19. Significantly fewer cells labeled with BrdU on ED18 in the female SDN-POA from PD4 to PD8 resulted in a significant sex difference in the number at PD8. Next, combination analyses of BrdU-labeling and immunohistochemistry for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), an apoptotic marker, were succeeded to investigate whether SDN-POA neurons generated during ED17-18 were removed by apoptosis. Many more ssDNA-immunoreactive cells that had been labeled with BrdU during ED17-18 were found in the SDN-POA of PD8 females, but few in the SDN-POA of PD8 males and PD4 females and males. These results suggest that the sex difference in the number of SDN-POA neurons generated during the late fetal period was caused by postnatal apoptosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Exact distribution of a pattern in a set of random sequences generated by a Markov source: applications to biological data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In bioinformatics it is common to search for a pattern of interest in a potentially large set of rather short sequences (upstream gene regions, proteins, exons, etc.). Although many methodological approaches allow practitioners to compute the distribution of a pattern count in a random sequence generated by a Markov source, no specific developments have taken into account the counting of occurrences in a set of independent sequences. We aim to address this problem by deriving efficient approaches and algorithms to perform these computations both for low and high complexity patterns in the framework of homogeneous or heterogeneous Markov models. Results The latest advances in the field allowed us to use a technique of optimal Markov chain embedding based on deterministic finite automata to introduce three innovative algorithms. Algorithm 1 is the only one able to deal with heterogeneous models. It also permits to avoid any product of convolution of the pattern distribution in individual sequences. When working with homogeneous models, Algorithm 2 yields a dramatic reduction in the complexity by taking advantage of previous computations to obtain moment generating functions efficiently. In the particular case of low or moderate complexity patterns, Algorithm 3 exploits power computation and binary decomposition to further reduce the time complexity to a logarithmic scale. All these algorithms and their relative interest in comparison with existing ones were then tested and discussed on a toy-example and three biological data sets: structural patterns in protein loop structures, PROSITE signatures in a bacterial proteome, and transcription factors in upstream gene regions. On these data sets, we also compared our exact approaches to the tempting approximation that consists in concatenating the sequences in the data set into a single sequence. Conclusions Our algorithms prove to be effective and able to handle real data sets with multiple sequences, as well

  20. Exact distribution of a pattern in a set of random sequences generated by a Markov source: applications to biological data.

    PubMed

    Nuel, Gregory; Regad, Leslie; Martin, Juliette; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2010-01-26

    In bioinformatics it is common to search for a pattern of interest in a potentially large set of rather short sequences (upstream gene regions, proteins, exons, etc.). Although many methodological approaches allow practitioners to compute the distribution of a pattern count in a random sequence generated by a Markov source, no specific developments have taken into account the counting of occurrences in a set of independent sequences. We aim to address this problem by deriving efficient approaches and algorithms to perform these computations both for low and high complexity patterns in the framework of homogeneous or heterogeneous Markov models. The latest advances in the field allowed us to use a technique of optimal Markov chain embedding based on deterministic finite automata to introduce three innovative algorithms. Algorithm 1 is the only one able to deal with heterogeneous models. It also permits to avoid any product of convolution of the pattern distribution in individual sequences. When working with homogeneous models, Algorithm 2 yields a dramatic reduction in the complexity by taking advantage of previous computations to obtain moment generating functions efficiently. In the particular case of low or moderate complexity patterns, Algorithm 3 exploits power computation and binary decomposition to further reduce the time complexity to a logarithmic scale. All these algorithms and their relative interest in comparison with existing ones were then tested and discussed on a toy-example and three biological data sets: structural patterns in protein loop structures, PROSITE signatures in a bacterial proteome, and transcription factors in upstream gene regions. On these data sets, we also compared our exact approaches to the tempting approximation that consists in concatenating the sequences in the data set into a single sequence. Our algorithms prove to be effective and able to handle real data sets with multiple sequences, as well as biological patterns of

  1. K-Ras(G12D)-selective inhibitory peptides generated by random peptide T7 phage display technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Kotaro; Kamada, Yusuke; Sameshima, Tomoya

    Amino-acid mutations of Gly{sup 12} (e.g. G12D, G12V, G12C) of V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (K-Ras), the most promising drug target in cancer therapy, are major growth drivers in various cancers. Although over 30 years have passed since the discovery of these mutations in most cancer patients, effective mutated K-Ras inhibitors have not been marketed. Here, we report novel and selective inhibitory peptides to K-Ras(G12D). We screened random peptide libraries displayed on T7 phage against purified recombinant K-Ras(G12D), with thorough subtraction of phages bound to wild-type K-Ras, and obtained KRpep-2 (Ac-RRCPLYISYDPVCRR-NH{sub 2}) as a consensus sequence. KRpep-2 showedmore » more than 10-fold binding- and inhibition-selectivity to K-Ras(G12D), both in SPR analysis and GDP/GTP exchange enzyme assay. K{sub D} and IC{sub 50} values were 51 and 8.9 nM, respectively. After subsequent sequence optimization, we successfully generated KRpep-2d (Ac-RRRRCPLYISYDPVCRRRR-NH{sub 2}) that inhibited enzyme activity of K-Ras(G12D) with IC{sub 50} = 1.6 nM and significantly suppressed ERK-phosphorylation, downstream of K-Ras(G12D), along with A427 cancer cell proliferation at 30 μM peptide concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a K-Ras(G12D)-selective inhibitor, contributing to the development and study of K-Ras(G12D)-targeting drugs. - Highlights: • The first K-Ras(G12D)-selective inhibitory peptides were generated. • These peptides showed more than 10-fold binding- and inhibition-selectivity to K-Ras(G12D) in compared to wild type K-Ras. • The peptide KRpep-2d suppressed downstream signal of K-Ras(G12D) and cell proliferations of cancer cell line A427.« less

  2. The impact of second generation antipsychotics on insight in schizophrenia: Results from 14 randomized, placebo controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Taina; Koeter, Maarten; Wohlfarth, Tamar; Storosum, Jitschak; van den Brink, Wim; Derks, Eske; Leufkens, Hubertus; Denys, Damiaan

    2017-01-01

    Despite the negative impact of lack of insight on the prognosis, general functioning and treatment adherence, the effect of antipsychotic medication on insight has been investigated only in small samples and uncontrolled studies. In this study we examine whether previously reported effects of antipsychotics on insight from uncontrolled studies can be confirmed in a database including 14 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. The database contained placebo-controlled RCTs of five second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs: olanzapine, paliperidone, quetiapine, risperidone and sertindole) and included a total of 4243 patients with schizophrenia. Insight was assessed with item G12 of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) at baseline and at six weeks. Overall, SGA treatment resulted in a significantly larger improvement in insight than placebo (0.43 points versus 0.15 points; Hedge׳s g 0.23; p<0.001). However this difference in improvement in insight was largely explained by improvement in other symptoms. In the initial analysis, one of the compounds was significantly less effective in improving insight than the other SGAs, but this difference no longer persisted when improvement in other symptoms was taken into account. The effect of SGAs on improvement in insight was not moderated by geographic region, illness duration or drop-out. The present study showed that SGA treatment of patients with schizophrenia is associated with improved insight, but that this improvement is associated with SGA induced improvements in other symptoms, though the causal relationship may not be established. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  3. K-Ras(G12D)-selective inhibitory peptides generated by random peptide T7 phage display technology.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kotaro; Kamada, Yusuke; Sameshima, Tomoya; Yaguchi, Masahiro; Niida, Ayumu; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Miwa, Masanori; Ohkubo, Shoichi; Sakamoto, Jun-Ichi; Kamaura, Masahiro; Cho, Nobuo; Tani, Akiyoshi

    2017-03-11

    Amino-acid mutations of Gly 12 (e.g. G12D, G12V, G12C) of V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (K-Ras), the most promising drug target in cancer therapy, are major growth drivers in various cancers. Although over 30 years have passed since the discovery of these mutations in most cancer patients, effective mutated K-Ras inhibitors have not been marketed. Here, we report novel and selective inhibitory peptides to K-Ras(G12D). We screened random peptide libraries displayed on T7 phage against purified recombinant K-Ras(G12D), with thorough subtraction of phages bound to wild-type K-Ras, and obtained KRpep-2 (Ac-RRCPLYISYDPVCRR-NH 2 ) as a consensus sequence. KRpep-2 showed more than 10-fold binding- and inhibition-selectivity to K-Ras(G12D), both in SPR analysis and GDP/GTP exchange enzyme assay. K D and IC 50 values were 51 and 8.9 nM, respectively. After subsequent sequence optimization, we successfully generated KRpep-2d (Ac-RRRRCPLYISYDPVCRRRR-NH 2 ) that inhibited enzyme activity of K-Ras(G12D) with IC 50  = 1.6 nM and significantly suppressed ERK-phosphorylation, downstream of K-Ras(G12D), along with A427 cancer cell proliferation at 30 μM peptide concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a K-Ras(G12D)-selective inhibitor, contributing to the development and study of K-Ras(G12D)-targeting drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effect of Mobile App Home Monitoring on Number of In-Person Visits Following Ambulatory Surgery: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Coyte, Peter C; Bhatia, R Sacha; Semple, John L

    2015-01-01

    Background Women’s College Hospital, Toronto, Canada, offers specialized ambulatory surgical procedures. Patients often travel great distances to undergo surgery. Most patients receiving ambulatory surgery have a low rate of postoperative events necessitating clinic visits. However, regular follow-up is still considered important in the early postoperative phase. Increasingly, telemedicine is used to overcome the distance patients must travel to receive specialized care. Telemedicine data suggest that mobile monitoring and follow-up care is valued by patients and can reduce costs to society. Women’s College Hospital has used a mobile app (QoC Health Inc) to complement in-person postoperative follow-up care for breast reconstruction patients. Preliminary studies suggest that mobile app follow-up care is feasible, can avert in-person follow-up care, and is cost-effective from a societal and health care system perspective. Objective We hope to expand the use of mobile app follow-up care through its formal assessment in a randomized controlled trial. In postoperative ambulatory surgery patients at Women’s College Hospital (WCH), can we avert in-person follow-up care through the use of mobile app follow-up care compared to conventional, in-person follow-up care in the first 30 days after surgery. Methods This will be a pragmatic, single-center, open, controlled, 2-arm parallel-group superiority randomized trial comparing mobile app and in-person follow-up care over the first month following surgery. The patient population will comprise all postoperative ambulatory surgery patients at WCH undergoing breast reconstruction. The intervention consists of a postoperative mobile app follow-up care using the quality of recovery-9 (QoR9) and a pain visual analog scale (VAS), surgery-specific questions, and surgical site photos submitted daily for the first 2 weeks and weekly for the following 2 weeks. The primary outcome is the total number of physician visits related to

  5. An analysis of the effect of funding source in randomized clinical trials of second generation antipsychotics for the treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, John H; Byerly, Matthew; Carmody, Thomas; Li, Baitao; Miller, Daniel R; Varghese, Femina; Holland, Rhiannon

    2004-12-01

    The effect of funding source on the outcome of randomized controlled trials has been investigated in several medical disciplines; however, psychiatry has been largely excluded from such analyses. In this article, randomized controlled trials of second generation antipsychotics in schizophrenia are reviewed and analyzed with respect to funding source (industry vs. non-industry funding). A literature search was conducted for randomized, double-blind trials in which at least one of the tested treatments was a second generation antipsychotic. In each study, design quality and study outcome were assessed quantitatively according to rating scales. Mean quality and outcome scores were compared in the industry-funded studies and non-industry-funded studies. An analysis of the primary author's affiliation with industry was similarly performed. Results of industry-funded studies significantly favored second generation over first generation antipsychotics when compared to non-industry-funded studies. Non-industry-funded studies showed a trend toward higher quality than industry-funded studies; however, the difference between the two was not significant. Also, within the industry-funded studies, outcomes of trials involving first authors employed by industry sponsors demonstrated a trend toward second generation over first generation antipsychotics to a greater degree than did trials involving first authors employed outside the industry (p=0.05). While the retrospective design of the study limits the strength of the findings, the data suggest that industry bias may occur in randomized controlled trials in schizophrenia. There appears to be several sources by which bias may enter clinical research, including trial design, control of data analysis and multiplicity/redundancy of trials.

  6. Prime Numbers Comparison using Sieve of Eratosthenes and Sieve of Sundaram Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, D.; Rahim, R.; Apdilah, D.; Efendi, S.; Tulus, T.; Suwilo, S.

    2018-03-01

    Prime numbers are numbers that have their appeal to researchers due to the complexity of these numbers, many algorithms that can be used to generate prime numbers ranging from simple to complex computations, Sieve of Eratosthenes and Sieve of Sundaram are two algorithm that can be used to generate Prime numbers of randomly generated or sequential numbered random numbers, testing in this study to find out which algorithm is better used for large primes in terms of time complexity, the test also assisted with applications designed using Java language with code optimization and Maximum memory usage so that the testing process can be simultaneously and the results obtained can be objective

  7. Very late stent thrombosis with second generation drug eluting stents compared to bare metal stents: Network meta-analysis of randomized primary percutaneous coronary intervention trials.

    PubMed

    Philip, Femi; Stewart, Susan; Southard, Jeffrey A

    2016-07-01

    The relative safety of drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare-metal stents (BMS) in primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) in ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) continues to be debated. The long-term clinical outcomes between second generation DES and BMS for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using network meta-analysis were compared. Randomized controlled trials comparing stent types (first generation DES, second generation DES, or BMS) were considered for inclusion. A search strategy used Medline, Embase, Cochrane databases, and proceedings of international meetings. Information about study design, inclusion criteria, and sample characteristics were extracted. Network meta-analysis was used to pool direct (comparison of second generation DES to BMS) and indirect evidence (first generation DES with BMS and second generation DES) from the randomized trials. Twelve trials comparing all stents types including 9,673 patients randomly assigned to treatment groups were analyzed. Second generation DES was associated with significantly lower incidence of definite or probable ST (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.39-0.89), MI (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.39-0.89), and TVR at 3 years (OR 0.50: 95% CI 0.31-0.81) compared with BMS. In addition, there was a significantly lower incidence of MACE with second generation DES versus BMS (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.34-0.74) at 3 years. These were driven by a higher rate of TVR, MI and stent thrombosis in the BMS group at 3 years. There was a non-significant reduction in the overall and cardiac mortality [OR 0.83, 95% CI (0.60-1.14), OR 0.88, 95% CI (0.6-1.28)] with the use of second generation DES versus BMS at 3 years. Network meta-analysis of randomized trials of primary PCI demonstrated lower incidence of MACE, MI, TVR, and stent thrombosis with second generation DES compared with BMS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. CNV-CH: A Convex Hull Based Segmentation Approach to Detect Copy Number Variations (CNV) Using Next-Generation Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    De, Rajat K.

    2015-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) is a form of structural alteration in the mammalian DNA sequence, which are associated with many complex neurological diseases as well as cancer. The development of next generation sequencing (NGS) technology provides us a new dimension towards detection of genomic locations with copy number variations. Here we develop an algorithm for detecting CNVs, which is based on depth of coverage data generated by NGS technology. In this work, we have used a novel way to represent the read count data as a two dimensional geometrical point. A key aspect of detecting the regions with CNVs, is to devise a proper segmentation algorithm that will distinguish the genomic locations having a significant difference in read count data. We have designed a new segmentation approach in this context, using convex hull algorithm on the geometrical representation of read count data. To our knowledge, most algorithms have used a single distribution model of read count data, but here in our approach, we have considered the read count data to follow two different distribution models independently, which adds to the robustness of detection of CNVs. In addition, our algorithm calls CNVs based on the multiple sample analysis approach resulting in a low false discovery rate with high precision. PMID:26291322

  9. CNV-CH: A Convex Hull Based Segmentation Approach to Detect Copy Number Variations (CNV) Using Next-Generation Sequencing Data.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rituparna; Samaddar, Sandip; De, Rajat K

    2015-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) is a form of structural alteration in the mammalian DNA sequence, which are associated with many complex neurological diseases as well as cancer. The development of next generation sequencing (NGS) technology provides us a new dimension towards detection of genomic locations with copy number variations. Here we develop an algorithm for detecting CNVs, which is based on depth of coverage data generated by NGS technology. In this work, we have used a novel way to represent the read count data as a two dimensional geometrical point. A key aspect of detecting the regions with CNVs, is to devise a proper segmentation algorithm that will distinguish the genomic locations having a significant difference in read count data. We have designed a new segmentation approach in this context, using convex hull algorithm on the geometrical representation of read count data. To our knowledge, most algorithms have used a single distribution model of read count data, but here in our approach, we have considered the read count data to follow two different distribution models independently, which adds to the robustness of detection of CNVs. In addition, our algorithm calls CNVs based on the multiple sample analysis approach resulting in a low false discovery rate with high precision.

  10. Application of CPL with Interference Mapping Lithography to generate random contact reticle designs for the 65-nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Den Broeke, Douglas J.; Laidig, Thomas L.; Chen, J. Fung; Wampler, Kurt E.; Hsu, Stephen D.; Shi, Xuelong; Socha, Robert J.; Dusa, Mircea V.; Corcoran, Noel P.

    2004-08-01

    Imaging contact and via layers continues to be one of the major challenges to be overcome for 65nm node lithography. Initial results of using ASML MaskTools' CPL Technology to print contact arrays through pitch have demonstrated the potential to further extend contact imaging to a k1 near 0.30. While there are advantages and disadvantages for any potential RET, the benefits of not having to solve the phase assignment problem (which can lead to unresolvable phase conflicts), of it being a single reticle - single exposure technique, and its application to multiple layers within a device (clear field and dark field) make CPL an attractive, cost effective solution to low k1 imaging. However, real semiconductor circuit designs consist of much more than regular arrays of contact holes and a method to define the CPL reticle design for a full chip circuit pattern is required in order for this technique to be feasible in volume manufacturing. Interference Mapping Lithography (IML) is a novel approach for defining optimum reticle patterns based on the imaging conditions that will be used when the wafer is exposed. Figure 1 shows an interference map for an isolated contact simulated using ASML /1150 settings of 0.75NA and 0.92/0.72/30deg Quasar illumination. This technique provides a model-based approach for placing all types features (scattering bars, anti-scattering bars, non-printing assist features, phase shifted and non-phase shifted) for the purpose of enhancing the resolution of the target pattern and it can be applied to any reticle type including binary (COG), attenuated phase shifting mask (attPSM), alternating aperture phase shifting mask (altPSM), and CPL. In this work, we investigate the application of IML to generate CPL reticle designs for random contact patterns that are typical for 65nm node logic devices. We examine the critical issues related to using CPL with Interference Mapping Lithography including controlling side lobe printing, contact patterns with

  11. Recurrence of random walks with long-range steps generated by fractional Laplacian matrices on regular networks and simple cubic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelitsch, T. M.; Collet, B. A.; Riascos, A. P.; Nowakowski, A. F.; Nicolleau, F. C. G. A.

    2017-12-01

    We analyze a Markovian random walk strategy on undirected regular networks involving power matrix functions of the type L\\frac{α{2}} where L indicates a ‘simple’ Laplacian matrix. We refer to such walks as ‘fractional random walks’ with admissible interval 0<α ≤slant 2 . We deduce probability-generating functions (network Green’s functions) for the fractional random walk. From these analytical results we establish a generalization of Polya’s recurrence theorem for fractional random walks on d-dimensional infinite lattices: The fractional random walk is transient for dimensions d > α (recurrent for d≤slantα ) of the lattice. As a consequence, for 0<α< 1 the fractional random walk is transient for all lattice dimensions d=1, 2, .. and in the range 1≤slantα < 2 for dimensions d≥slant 2 . Finally, for α=2 , Polya’s classical recurrence theorem is recovered, namely the walk is transient only for lattice dimensions d≥slant 3 . The generalization of Polya’s recurrence theorem remains valid for the class of random walks with Lévy flight asymptotics for long-range steps. We also analyze the mean first passage probabilities, mean residence times, mean first passage times and global mean first passage times (Kemeny constant) for the fractional random walk. For an infinite 1D lattice (infinite ring) we obtain for the transient regime 0<α<1 closed form expressions for the fractional lattice Green’s function matrix containing the escape and ever passage probabilities. The ever passage probabilities (fractional lattice Green’s functions) in the transient regime fulfil Riesz potential power law decay asymptotic behavior for nodes far from the departure node. The non-locality of the fractional random walk is generated by the non-diagonality of the fractional Laplacian matrix with Lévy-type heavy tailed inverse power law decay for the probability of long-range moves. This non-local and asymptotic behavior of the fractional random walk

  12. Effect of a moderate fat diet with and without avocados on lipoprotein particle number, size and subclasses in overweight and obese adults: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Bordi, Peter L; Fleming, Jennifer A; Hill, Alison M; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2015-01-07

    Avocados are a nutrient-dense source of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) that can be used to replace saturated fatty acids (SFA) in a diet to lower low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Well-controlled studies are lacking on the effect of avocado consumption on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. A randomized, crossover, controlled feeding trial was conducted with 45 overweight or obese participants with baseline LDL-C in the 25th to 90th percentile. Three cholesterol-lowering diets (6% to 7% SFA) were fed (5 weeks each): a lower-fat diet (LF: 24% fat); 2 moderate-fat diets (34% fat) provided similar foods and were matched for macronutrients and fatty acids: the avocado diet (AV) included one fresh Hass avocado (136 g) per day, and the moderate-fat diet (MF) mainly used high oleic acid oils to match the fatty acid content of one avocado. Compared with baseline, the reduction in LDL-C and non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol on the AV diet (-13.5 mg/dL, -14.6 mg/dL) was greater (P<0.05) than the MF (-8.3 mg/dL, -8.7 mg/dL) and LF (-7.4 mg/dL, -4.8 mg/dL) diets. Furthermore, only the AV diet significantly decreased LDL particle number (LDL-P, -80.1 nmol/L, P=0.0001), small dense LDL cholesterol (LDL(3+4), -4.1 mg/dL, P=0.04), and the ratio of LDL/HDL (-6.6%, P<0.0001) from baseline. Inclusion of one avocado per day as part of a moderate-fat, cholesterol-lowering diet has additional LDL-C, LDL-P, and non-HDL-C lowering effects, especially for small, dense LDL. Our results demonstrate that avocados have beneficial effects on cardio-metabolic risk factors that extend beyond their heart-healthy fatty acid profile. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01235832. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  13. SNPitty: An Intuitive Web Application for Interactive B-Allele Frequency and Copy Number Visualization of Next-Generation Sequencing Data.

    PubMed

    van Riet, Job; Krol, Niels M G; Atmodimedjo, Peggy N; Brosens, Erwin; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Jansen, Maurice P H M; Martens, John W M; Looijenga, Leendert H; Jenster, Guido; Dubbink, Hendrikus J; Dinjens, Winand N M; van de Werken, Harmen J G

    2018-03-01

    Exploration and visualization of next-generation sequencing data are crucial for clinical diagnostics. Software allowing simultaneous visualization of multiple regions of interest coupled with dynamic heuristic filtering of genetic aberrations is, however, lacking. Therefore, the authors developed the web application SNPitty that allows interactive visualization and interrogation of variant call format files by using B-allele frequencies of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and single-nucleotide variants, coverage metrics, and copy numbers analysis results. SNPitty displays variant alleles and allelic imbalances with a focus on loss of heterozygosity and copy number variation using genome-wide heterozygous markers and somatic mutations. In addition, SNPitty is capable of generating predefined reports that summarize and highlight disease-specific targets of interest. SNPitty was validated for diagnostic interpretation of somatic events by showcasing a serial dilution series of glioma tissue. Additionally, SNPitty is demonstrated in four cancer-related scenarios encountered in daily clinical practice and on whole-exome sequencing data of peripheral blood from a Down syndrome patient. SNPitty allows detection of loss of heterozygosity, chromosomal and gene amplifications, homozygous or heterozygous deletions, somatic mutations, or any combination thereof in regions or genes of interest. Furthermore, SNPitty can be used to distinguish molecular relationships between multiple tumors from a single patient. On the basis of these data, the authors demonstrate that SNPitty is robust and user friendly in a wide range of diagnostic scenarios. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Generation of large numbers of dendritic cells from mouse bone marrow cultures supplemented with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Antigen-presenting, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II- rich dendritic cells are known to arise from bone marrow. However, marrow lacks mature dendritic cells, and substantial numbers of proliferating less-mature cells have yet to be identified. The methodology for inducing dendritic cell growth that was recently described for mouse blood now has been modified to MHC class II- negative precursors in marrow. A key step is to remove the majority of nonadherent, newly formed granulocytes by gentle washes during the first 2-4 d of culture. This leaves behind proliferating clusters that are loosely attached to a more firmly adherent "stroma." At days 4-6 the clusters can be dislodged, isolated by 1-g sedimentation, and upon reculture, large numbers of dendritic cells are released. The latter are readily identified on the basis of their distinct cell shape, ultrastructure, and repertoire of antigens, as detected with a panel of monoclonal antibodies. The dendritic cells express high levels of MHC class II products and act as powerful accessory cells for initiating the mixed leukocyte reaction. Neither the clusters nor mature dendritic cells are generated if macrophage colony-stimulating factor rather than granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is applied. Therefore, GM-CSF generates all three lineages of myeloid cells (granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells). Since > 5 x 10(6) dendritic cells develop in 1 wk from precursors within the large hind limb bones of a single animal, marrow progenitors can act as a major source of dendritic cells. This feature should prove useful for future molecular and clinical studies of this otherwise trace cell type. PMID:1460426

  15. A novel generation of 3D SAR-based passive micromixer: efficient mixing and low pressure drop at a low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, Vladimir; Nimafar, Mohammad

    2013-05-01

    This study introduces a novel generation of 3D splitting and recombination (SAR) passive micromixer with microstructures placed on the top and bottom floors of microchannels called a ‘chain mixer’. Both experimental verification and numerical analysis of the flow structure of this type of passive micromixer have been performed to evaluate the mixing performance and pressure drop of the microchannel, respectively. We propose here two types of chain mixer—chain 1 and chain 2—and compare their mixing performance and pressure drop with other micromixers, T-, o- and tear-drop micromixers. Experimental tests carried out in the laminar flow regime with a low Reynolds number range, 0.083 ≤ Re ≤ 4.166, and image-based techniques are used to evaluate the mixing efficiency. Also, the computational fluid dynamics code, ANSYS FLUENT-13.0 has been used to analyze the flow and pressure drop in the microchannel. Experimental results show that the chain and tear-drop mixer's efficiency is very high because of the SAR process: specifically, an efficiency of up to 98% can be achieved at the tested Reynolds number. The results also show that chain mixers have a lower required pressure drop in comparison with a tear-drop micromixer.

  16. cn.MOPS: mixture of Poissons for discovering copy number variations in next-generation sequencing data with a low false discovery rate.

    PubMed

    Klambauer, Günter; Schwarzbauer, Karin; Mayr, Andreas; Clevert, Djork-Arné; Mitterecker, Andreas; Bodenhofer, Ulrich; Hochreiter, Sepp

    2012-05-01

    Quantitative analyses of next-generation sequencing (NGS) data, such as the detection of copy number variations (CNVs), remain challenging. Current methods detect CNVs as changes in the depth of coverage along chromosomes. Technological or genomic variations in the depth of coverage thus lead to a high false discovery rate (FDR), even upon correction for GC content. In the context of association studies between CNVs and disease, a high FDR means many false CNVs, thereby decreasing the discovery power of the study after correction for multiple testing. We propose 'Copy Number estimation by a Mixture Of PoissonS' (cn.MOPS), a data processing pipeline for CNV detection in NGS data. In contrast to previous approaches, cn.MOPS incorporates modeling of depths of coverage across samples at each genomic position. Therefore, cn.MOPS is not affected by read count variations along chromosomes. Using a Bayesian approach, cn.MOPS decomposes variations in the depth of coverage across samples into integer copy numbers and noise by means of its mixture components and Poisson distributions, respectively. The noise estimate allows for reducing the FDR by filtering out detections having high noise that are likely to be false detections. We compared cn.MOPS with the five most popular methods for CNV detection in NGS data using four benchmark datasets: (i) simulated data, (ii) NGS data from a male HapMap individual with implanted CNVs from the X chromosome, (iii) data from HapMap individuals with known CNVs, (iv) high coverage data from the 1000 Genomes Project. cn.MOPS outperformed its five competitors in terms of precision (1-FDR) and recall for both gains and losses in all benchmark data sets. The software cn.MOPS is publicly available as an R package at http://www.bioinf.jku.at/software/cnmops/ and at Bioconductor.

  17. cn.MOPS: mixture of Poissons for discovering copy number variations in next-generation sequencing data with a low false discovery rate

    PubMed Central

    Klambauer, Günter; Schwarzbauer, Karin; Mayr, Andreas; Clevert, Djork-Arné; Mitterecker, Andreas; Bodenhofer, Ulrich; Hochreiter, Sepp

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative analyses of next-generation sequencing (NGS) data, such as the detection of copy number variations (CNVs), remain challenging. Current methods detect CNVs as changes in the depth of coverage along chromosomes. Technological or genomic variations in the depth of coverage thus lead to a high false discovery rate (FDR), even upon correction for GC content. In the context of association studies between CNVs and disease, a high FDR means many false CNVs, thereby decreasing the discovery power of the study after correction for multiple testing. We propose ‘Copy Number estimation by a Mixture Of PoissonS’ (cn.MOPS), a data processing pipeline for CNV detection in NGS data. In contrast to previous approaches, cn.MOPS incorporates modeling of depths of coverage across samples at each genomic position. Therefore, cn.MOPS is not affected by read count variations along chromosomes. Using a Bayesian approach, cn.MOPS decomposes variations in the depth of coverage across samples into integer copy numbers and noise by means of its mixture components and Poisson distributions, respectively. The noise estimate allows for reducing the FDR by filtering out detections having high noise that are likely to be false detections. We compared cn.MOPS with the five most popular methods for CNV detection in NGS data using four benchmark datasets: (i) simulated data, (ii) NGS data from a male HapMap individual with implanted CNVs from the X chromosome, (iii) data from HapMap individuals with known CNVs, (iv) high coverage data from the 1000 Genomes Project. cn.MOPS outperformed its five competitors in terms of precision (1–FDR) and recall for both gains and losses in all benchmark data sets. The software cn.MOPS is publicly available as an R package at http://www.bioinf.jku.at/software/cnmops/ and at Bioconductor. PMID:22302147

  18. An Analytical Framework for Studying Small-Number Effects in Catalytic Reaction Networks: A Probability Generating Function Approach to Chemical Master Equations

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Masaki; Togashi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Cell activities primarily depend on chemical reactions, especially those mediated by enzymes, and this has led to these activities being modeled as catalytic reaction networks. Although deterministic ordinary differential equations of concentrations (rate equations) have been widely used for modeling purposes in the field of systems biology, it has been pointed out that these catalytic reaction networks may behave in a way that is qualitatively different from such deterministic representation when the number of molecules for certain chemical species in the system is small. Apart from this, representing these phenomena by simple binary (on/off) systems that omit the quantities would also not be feasible. As recent experiments have revealed the existence of rare chemical species in cells, the importance of being able to model potential small-number phenomena is being recognized. However, most preceding studies were based on numerical simulations, and theoretical frameworks to analyze these phenomena have not been sufficiently developed. Motivated by the small-number issue, this work aimed to develop an analytical framework for the chemical master equation describing the distributional behavior of catalytic reaction networks. For simplicity, we considered networks consisting of two-body catalytic reactions. We used the probability generating function method to obtain the steady-state solutions of the chemical master equation without specifying the parameters. We obtained the time evolution equations of the first- and second-order moments of concentrations, and the steady-state analytical solution of the chemical master equation under certain conditions. These results led to the rank conservation law, the connecting state to the winner-takes-all state, and analysis of 2-molecules M-species systems. A possible interpretation of the theoretical conclusion for actual biochemical pathways is also discussed. PMID:27047384

  19. Enzymatic synthesis of random sequences of RNA and RNA analogues by DNA polymerase theta mutants for the generation of aptamer libraries.

    PubMed

    Randrianjatovo-Gbalou, Irina; Rosario, Sandrine; Sismeiro, Odile; Varet, Hugo; Legendre, Rachel; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Huteau, Valérie; Pochet, Sylvie; Delarue, Marc

    2018-05-21

    Nucleic acid aptamers, especially RNA, exhibit valuable advantages compared to protein therapeutics in terms of size, affinity and specificity. However, the synthesis of libraries of large random RNAs is still difficult and expensive. The engineering of polymerases able to directly generate these libraries has the potential to replace the chemical synthesis approach. Here, we start with a DNA polymerase that already displays a significant template-free nucleotidyltransferase activity, human DNA polymerase theta, and we mutate it based on the knowledge of its three-dimensional structure as well as previous mutational studies on members of the same polA family. One mutant exhibited a high tolerance towards ribonucleotides (NTPs) and displayed an efficient ribonucleotidyltransferase activity that resulted in the assembly of long RNA polymers. HPLC analysis and RNA sequencing of the products were used to quantify the incorporation of the four NTPs as a function of initial NTP concentrations and established the randomness of each generated nucleic acid sequence. The same mutant revealed a propensity to accept other modified nucleotides and to extend them in long fragments. Hence, this mutant can deliver random natural and modified RNA polymers libraries ready to use for SELEX, with custom lengths and balanced or unbalanced ratios.

  20. Review of Three Recent Randomized Trials of School-Based Mentoring: Making Sense of Mixed Findings. Social Policy Report. Volume 24, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Marc E.; Keller, Thomas E.; DuBois, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Between 2007 and 2009, reports were released on the results of three separate large-scale random assignment studies of the effectiveness of school-based mentoring programs for youth. The studies evaluated programs implemented by Big Brothers Big Sisters of America (BBBSA) affiliates (Herrera et al., 2007), Communities In Schools of San Antonio,…

  1. Generational Analysis Reveals that TGF-Beta1 Inhibits the Rate of Angiogenesis in Vivo by Selective Decrease in the Number of New Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Elliott, Katherine E.; Farr, Andrew G.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Clark, John I.; Sage, E. Helene

    2000-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of vascular generational branching demonstrated that transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), a multifunctional cytokine and angiogenic regulator, strongly inhibited angiogenesis in the arterial tree of the developing quail chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) by inhibition of the normal increase in the number of new, small vessels. The cytokine was applied uniformly in solution at embryonic day 7 (E7) to the CAMs of quail embryos cultured in petri dishes. After 24 h the rate of arterial growth was inhibited by as much as 105% as a function of increasing TGF-beta1 concentration. Inhibition of the rate of angiogenesis in the arterial tree by TGF-beta1 relative to controls was measured in digital images by three well-correlated, computerized methods. The first computerized method, direct measurement by the computer code VESGEN of vascular morphological parameters according to branching generations G(sub 1) through G(sub greater than or equal to 5), revealed that TGF-beta1 selectively inhibited the increase in the number density of small vessels, N(sub v greater than or equal to 5), (382 plus or minus 85 per square centimeter) for specimens treated with 1 microgram TGF-beta1/CAM for 24 h, compared to 583 plus or minus 99 per square centimeter for controls), but did not significantly affect other parameters such as average vessel length or vessel diameter. The second and third methods, the fractal dimension (D(sub f)) and grid intersection (rho (sub v)), are statistical descriptors of spatial pattern and density. According to D(sub f) and rho(sub v), arterial density increased in control specimens from 1.382 plus or minus 0.007 and 662 plus or minus 52 per square centimeters at E7 (0 h) to 1.439 plus or minus 0.013 and 884 plus or minus 55 per square centimeters at E8 (24 h), compared to 1.379 plus or minus 0.039 and 650 plus or minus 111 per square centimeter for specimens treated with 1 microgram TGF-beta1/CAM for 24 h. TGF-beta1 therefore

  2. Next-Generation Sequencing-based genomic profiling of brain metastases of primary ovarian cancer identifies high number of BRCA-mutations.

    PubMed

    Balendran, S; Liebmann-Reindl, S; Berghoff, A S; Reischer, T; Popitsch, N; Geier, C B; Kenner, L; Birner, P; Streubel, B; Preusser, M

    2017-07-01

    Ovarian cancer represents the most common gynaecological malignancy and has the highest mortality of all female reproductive cancers. It has a rare predilection to develop brain metastases (BM). In this study, we evaluated the mutational profile of ovarian cancer metastases through Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) with the aim of identifying potential clinically actionable genetic alterations with options for small molecule targeted therapy. Library preparation was conducted using Illumina TruSight Rapid Capture Kit in combination with a cancer specific enrichment kit covering 94 genes. BRCA-mutations were confirmed by using TruSeq Custom Amplicon Low Input Kit in combination with a custom-designed BRCA gene panel. In our cohort all eight sequenced BM samples exhibited a multitude of variant alterations, each with unique molecular profiles. The 37 identified variants were distributed over 22 cancer-related genes (23.4%). The number of mutated genes per sample ranged from 3 to 7 with a median of 4.5. The most commonly altered genes were BRCA1/2, TP53, and ATM. In total, 7 out of 8 samples revealed either a BRCA1 or a BRCA2 pathogenic mutation. Furthermore, all eight BM samples showed mutations in at least one DNA repair gene. Our NGS study of BM of ovarian carcinoma revealed a significant number of BRCA-mutations beside TP53, ATM and CHEK2 mutations. These findings strongly suggest the implication of BRCA and DNA repair malfunction in ovarian cancer metastasizing to the brain. Based on these findings, pharmacological PARP inhibition could be one potential targeted therapeutic for brain metastatic ovarian cancer patients.

  3. A method for generating reliable atomistic models of amorphous polymers based on a random search of energy minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcó, David; Casanovas, Jordi; Roca, Marc; Alemán, Carlos

    2005-07-01

    A method for generating atomistic models of dense amorphous polymers is presented. The method is organized in a two-steps procedure. First, structures are generated using an algorithm that minimizes the torsional strain. After this, a relaxation algorithm is applied to minimize the non-bonding interactions. Two alternative relaxation methods, which are based simple minimization and Concerted Rotation techniques, have been implemented. The performance of the method has been checked by simulating polyethylene, polypropylene, nylon 6, poly(L,D-lactic acid) and polyglycolic acid.

  4. Effects of Passage Number and Differentiation Protocol on the Generation of Dopaminergic Neurons from Rat Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Shall, Gabrielle; Menosky, Megan; Decker, Sarah; Nethala, Priya; Welchko, Ryan; Leveque, Xavier; Lu, Ming; Sandstrom, Michael; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Rossignol, Julien; Dunbar, Gary

    2018-03-02

    Multiple studies have demonstrated the ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to differentiate into dopamine-producing cells, in vitro and in vivo, indicating their potential to be used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, there are discrepancies among studies regarding the optimal time (i.e., passage number) and method for dopaminergic induction, in vitro. In the current study, we compared the ability of early (P4) and later (P40) passaged bone marrow-derived MSCs to differentiate into dopaminergic neurons using two growth-factor-based approaches. A direct dopaminergic induction (DDI) was used to directly convert MSCs into dopaminergic neurons, and an indirect dopaminergic induction (IDI) was used to direct MSCs toward a neuronal lineage prior to terminal dopaminergic differentiation. Results indicate that both early and later passaged MSCs exhibited positive expression of neuronal and dopaminergic markers following either the DDI or IDI protocols. Additionally, both early and later passaged MSCs released dopamine and exhibited spontaneous neuronal activity following either the DDI or IDI. Still, P4 MSCs exhibited significantly higher spiking and bursting frequencies as compared to P40 MSCs. Findings from this study provide evidence that early passaged MSCs, which have undergone the DDI, are more efficient at generating dopaminergic-like cells in vitro, as compared to later passaged MSCs or MSCs that have undergone the IDI.

  5. Random ambience using high fidelity images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu, Nur Azman; Sahib, Shahrin

    2011-06-01

    Most of the secure communication nowadays mandates true random keys as an input. These operations are mostly designed and taken care of by the developers of the cryptosystem. Due to the nature of confidential crypto development today, pseudorandom keys are typically designed and still preferred by the developers of the cryptosystem. However, these pseudorandom keys are predictable, periodic and repeatable, hence they carry minimal entropy. True random keys are believed to be generated only via hardware random number generators. Careful statistical analysis is still required to have any confidence the process and apparatus generates numbers that are sufficiently random to suit the cryptographic use. In this underlying research, each moment in life is considered unique in itself. The random key is unique for the given moment generated by the user whenever he or she needs the random keys in practical secure communication. An ambience of high fidelity digital image shall be tested for its randomness according to the NIST Statistical Test Suite. Recommendation on generating a simple 4 megabits per second random cryptographic keys live shall be reported.

  6. Assessing Adolescents' Communicative Self-Efficacy to Discuss Controversial Issues: Findings from a Randomized Study of the Word Generation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Alex R.; Lawrence, Joshua F.; Snow, Catherine E.; Taylor, Karen S.

    2016-01-01

    Communicative self-efficacy serves as an important link between discussing controversial issues and civic engagement because confidence in one's discourse skills is important to managing conflicting perspectives and developing solutions to community-based problems. Freely available to schools, "Word Generation" is a cross-content…

  7. Clap and Fling Interaction of Bristled Wings: Effects of Varying Reynolds Number and Bristle Spacing on Force Generation and Flow Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasoju, Vishwa Teja

    The smallest flying insects with body lengths under 1 mm, such as thrips and fairyflies, typically show the presence of long bristles on their wings. Thrips have been observed to use wing-wing interaction via 'clap and fling' for flapping flight at low Reynolds number (Re) on the order of 10, where a wing pair comes into close contact at the end of upstroke and fling apart at the beginning of downstroke. We examined the effects of varying the following parameters on force generation and flow structures formed during clap and fling: (1) Re ranging from 5 to 15 for a bristled wing pair (G/D = 17) and a geometrically equivalent solid wing pair; and (2) ratio of spacing between bristles to bristle diameter (G/D) for Re = 10. The G/D ratio in 70 thrips species were quantified from published forewing images. Scaled-up physical models of three bristled wing pairs of varying G/D (5, 11, 17) and a solid wing pair (G/D = 0) were fabricated. A robotic model was used for this study, in which a wing pair was immersed in an aquarium tank filled with glycerin and driven by stepper motors to execute clap and fling kinematics. Dimensionless lift and drag coefficients were determined from strain gauge measurements. Phase-locked particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were used to examine flow through the bristles. Chordwise PIV was used to visualize the leading edge vortex (LEV) and trailing edge vortex (TEV) formed over the wings during clap and fling. With increasing G/D, larger reduction was observed in peak drag coefficients as compared to reduction in peak lift coefficients. Net circulation, defined as the difference in circulation (strength) of LEV and TEV, diminished with increasing G/D. Reduction in net circulation resulted in reducing lift generated by bristled wings as compared to solid wings. Leaky, recirculating flow through the bristles provided large drag reduction during fling of a bristled wing pair. If flight efficiency is defined as the ratio of lift to drag

  8. Random bits, true and unbiased, from atmospheric turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Marangon, Davide G.; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Random numbers represent a fundamental ingredient for secure communications and numerical simulation as well as to games and in general to Information Science. Physical processes with intrinsic unpredictability may be exploited to generate genuine random numbers. The optical propagation in strong atmospheric turbulence is here taken to this purpose, by observing a laser beam after a 143 km free-space path. In addition, we developed an algorithm to extract the randomness of the beam images at the receiver without post-processing. The numbers passed very selective randomness tests for qualification as genuine random numbers. The extracting algorithm can be easily generalized to random images generated by different physical processes. PMID:24976499

  9. Trauma-informed Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF): A Randomized Controlled Trial with a Two-Generation Impact.

    PubMed

    Booshehri, Layla G; Dugan, Jerome; Patel, Falguni; Bloom, Sandra; Chilton, Mariana

    2018-01-01

    Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) has limited success in building self-sufficiency, and rarely addresses exposure to trauma as a barrier to employment. The objective of the Building Wealth and Health Network randomized controlled trial was to test effectiveness of financial empowerment combined with trauma-informed peer support against standard TANF programming. Through the method of single-blind randomization we assigned 103 caregivers of children under age six into three groups: control (standard TANF programming), partial (28-weeks financial education), and full (same as partial with simultaneous 28-weeks of trauma-informed peer support). Participants completed baseline and follow-up surveys every 3 months over 15 months. Group response rates were equivalent throughout. With mixed effects analysis we compared post-program outcomes at months 9, 12, and 15 to baseline. We modeled the impact of amount of participation in group classes on participant outcomes. Despite high exposure to trauma and adversity results demonstrate that, compared to the other groups, caregivers in the full intervention reported improved self-efficacy and depressive symptoms, and reduced economic hardship. Unlike the intervention groups, the control group reported increased developmental risk among their children. Although the control group showed higher levels of employment, the full intervention group reported greater earnings. The partial intervention group showed little to no differences compared with the control group. We conclude that financial empowerment education with trauma-informed peer support is more effective than standard TANF programming at improving behavioral health, reducing hardship, and increasing income. Policymakers may consider adapting TANF to include trauma-informed programming.

  10. Comparative effectiveness of next generation genomic sequencing for disease diagnosis: design of a randomized controlled trial in patients with colorectal cancer/polyposis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Carlos J; Bennette, Caroline S; Heagerty, Patrick; Comstock, Bryan; Horike-Pyne, Martha; Hisama, Fuki; Amendola, Laura M; Bennett, Robin L; Dorschner, Michael O; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Grady, William M; Fullerton, S Malia; Trinidad, Susan B; Regier, Dean A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Burke, Wylie; Patrick, Donald L; Jarvik, Gail P; Veenstra, David L

    2014-09-01

    Whole exome and whole genome sequencing are applications of next generation sequencing transforming clinical care, but there is little evidence whether these tests improve patient outcomes or if they are cost effective compared to current standard of care. These gaps in knowledge can be addressed by comparative effectiveness and patient-centered outcomes research. We designed a randomized controlled trial that incorporates these research methods to evaluate whole exome sequencing compared to usual care in patients being evaluated for hereditary colorectal cancer and polyposis syndromes. Approximately 220 patients will be randomized and followed for 12 months after return of genomic findings. Patients will receive findings associated with colorectal cancer in a first return of results visit, and findings not associated with colorectal cancer (incidental findings) during a second return of results visit. The primary outcome is efficacy to detect mutations associated with these syndromes; secondary outcomes include psychosocial impact, cost-effectiveness and comparative costs. The secondary outcomes will be obtained via surveys before and after each return visit. The expected challenges in conducting this randomized controlled trial include the relatively low prevalence of genetic disease, difficult interpretation of some genetic variants, and uncertainty about which incidental findings should be returned to patients. The approaches utilized in this study may help guide other investigators in clinical genomics to identify useful outcome measures and strategies to address comparative effectiveness questions about the clinical implementation of genomic sequencing in clinical care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Generation of random mutants to improve light-use efficiency of Nannochloropsis gaditana cultures for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Perin, Giorgio; Bellan, Alessandra; Segalla, Anna; Meneghesso, Andrea; Alboresi, Alessandro; Morosinotto, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    The productivity of an algal culture depends on how efficiently it converts sunlight into biomass and lipids. Wild-type algae in their natural environment evolved to compete for light energy and maximize individual cell growth; however, in a photobioreactor, global productivity should be maximized. Improving light use efficiency is one of the primary aims of algae biotechnological research, and genetic engineering can play a major role in attaining this goal. In this work, we generated a collection of Nannochloropsis gaditana mutant strains and screened them for alterations in the photosynthetic apparatus. The selected mutant strains exhibited diverse phenotypes, some of which are potentially beneficial under the specific artificial conditions of a photobioreactor. Particular attention was given to strains showing reduced cellular pigment contents, and further characterization revealed that some of the selected strains exhibited improved photosynthetic activity; in at least one case, this trait corresponded to improved biomass productivity in lab-scale cultures. This work demonstrates that genetic modification of N. gaditana has the potential to generate strains with improved biomass productivity when cultivated under the artificial conditions of a photobioreactor.

  12. True randomness from an incoherent source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Bing

    2017-11-01

    Quantum random number generators (QRNGs) harness the intrinsic randomness in measurement processes: the measurement outputs are truly random, given the input state is a superposition of the eigenstates of the measurement operators. In the case of trusted devices, true randomness could be generated from a mixed state ρ so long as the system entangled with ρ is well protected. We propose a random number generation scheme based on measuring the quadrature fluctuations of a single mode thermal state using an optical homodyne detector. By mixing the output of a broadband amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source with a single mode local oscillator (LO) at a beam splitter and performing differential photo-detection, we can selectively detect the quadrature fluctuation of a single mode output of the ASE source, thanks to the filtering function of the LO. Experimentally, a quadrature variance about three orders of magnitude larger than the vacuum noise has been observed, suggesting this scheme can tolerate much higher detector noise in comparison with QRNGs based on measuring the vacuum noise. The high quality of this entropy source is evidenced by the small correlation coefficients of the acquired data. A Toeplitz-hashing extractor is applied to generate unbiased random bits from the Gaussian distributed raw data, achieving an efficiency of 5.12 bits per sample. The output of the Toeplitz extractor successfully passes all the NIST statistical tests for random numbers.

  13. Predicting the velocity and azimuth of fragments generated by the range destruction or random failure of rocket casings and tankage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, Marshall; Mukunda, Meera

    1988-01-01

    A calculational method is described which provides a powerful tool for predicting solid rocket motor (SRM) casing and liquid rocket tankage fragmentation response. The approach properly partitions the available impulse to each major system-mass component. It uses the Pisces code developed by Physics International to couple the forces generated by an Eulerian-modeled gas flow field to a Lagrangian-modeled fuel and casing system. The details of the predictive analytical modeling process and the development of normalized relations for momentum partition as a function of SRM burn time and initial geometry are discussed. Methods for applying similar modeling techniques to liquid-tankage-overpressure failures are also discussed. Good agreement between predictions and observations are obtained for five specific events.

  14. Improvements in Negative Symptoms and Functional Outcome After a New Generation Cognitive Remediation Program: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive remediation improves cognition in patients with schizophrenia, but its effect on other relevant factors such as negative symptoms and functional outcome has not been extensively studied. In this hospital-based study, 84 inpatients with chronic schizophrenia were recruited from Alava Hospital (Spain). All of the subjects underwent a baseline and a 3-month assessment that examined neurocognition, clinical symptoms, insight, and functional outcome according to the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scale and Disability Assessment Schedule from World Health Organization (DAS-WHO). In addition to receiving standard treatment, patients were randomly assigned either to receive neuropsychological rehabilitation (REHACOP) or to a control group. REHACOP is an integrative program that taps all basic cognitive functions. The program included experts’ latest suggestions about positive feedback and activities of daily living in the patients’ environment. The REHACOP group showed significantly greater improvements at 3 months in the areas of neurocognition, negative symptoms, disorganization, and emotional distress compared with the control group (Cohen’s effect size for these changes ranged from d = 0.47 for emotional distress to d = 0.58 for disorganization symptoms). The REHACOP group also improved significantly in both the GAF (d = 0.61) and DAS-WHO total scores (d = 0.57). Specifically, the patients showed significant improvement in vocational outcomes (d = 0.47), family contact (d = 0.50), and social competence (d = 0.56). In conclusion, neuropsychological rehabilitation may be useful for the reduction of negative symptoms and functional disability in schizophrenia. These findings support the integration of neuropsychological rehabilitation into standard treatment programs for patients with schizophrenia. PMID:23686130

  15. Random phase encoding for optical security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, RuiKang K.; Watson, Ian A.; Chatwin, Christopher R.

    1996-09-01

    A new optical encoding method for security applications is proposed. The encoded image (encrypted into the security products) is merely a random phase image statistically and randomly generated by a random number generator using a computer, which contains no information from the reference pattern (stored for verification) or the frequency plane filter (a phase-only function for decoding). The phase function in the frequency plane is obtained using a modified phase retrieval algorithm. The proposed method uses two phase-only functions (images) at both the input and frequency planes of the optical processor leading to maximum optical efficiency. Computer simulation shows that the proposed method is robust for optical security applications.

  16. A randomized, double-blind, dose-finding Phase II study to evaluate immunogenicity and safety of the third generation smallpox vaccine candidate IMVAMUNE®

    PubMed Central

    von Krempelhuber, Alfred; Vollmar, Jens; Pokorny, Rolf; Rapp, Petra; Wulff, Niels; Petzold, Barbara; Handley, Amanda; Mateo, Lyn; Siersbol, Henriette; Kollaritsch, Herwig; Chaplin, Paul

    2009-01-01

    IMVAMUNE® is a Modified Vaccinia Ankara-based virus that is being developed as a safer 3rd generation smallpox vaccine. In order to determine the optimal dose for further development, a double-blind, randomized Phase II trial was performed testing three different doses of IMVAMUNE® in 164 healthy volunteers. All three IMVAMUNE® doses displayed a favourable safety profile, with local reactions as the most frequent observation. The 1×108 TCID50 IMVAMUNE® dose induced a total antibody response in 94% of the subjects following the first vaccination and the highest peak seroconversion rates by ELISA (100%) and PRNT (71%). This IMVAMUNE® dose was considered to be optimal for the further clinical development of this highly attenuated poxvirus as a safer smallpox vaccine. PMID:19944151

  17. Embedded Gaussian unitary ensembles with U(Ω)⊗SU(r) embedding generated by random two-body interactions with SU(r) symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Manan; Kota, V. K. B.

    2012-12-01

    Following the earlier studies on embedded unitary ensembles generated by random two-body interactions [EGUE(2)] with spin SU(2) and spin-isospin SU(4) symmetries, developed is a general formulation, for deriving lower order moments of the one- and two-point correlation functions in eigenvalues, that is valid for any EGUE(2) and BEGUE(2) ("B" stands for bosons) with U(Ω)⊗SU(r) embedding and with two-body interactions preserving SU(r) symmetry. Using this formulation with r = 1, we recover the results derived by Asaga et al. [Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 297, 344 (2002)], 10.1006/aphy.2002.6248 for spinless boson systems. Going further, new results are obtained for r = 2 (this corresponds to two species boson systems) and r = 3 (this corresponds to spin 1 boson systems).

  18. Neutron monitor generated data distributions in quantum variational Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussainov, A. S.; Pya, N.

    2016-08-01

    We have assessed the potential applications of the neutron monitor hardware as random number generator for normal and uniform distributions. The data tables from the acquisition channels with no extreme changes in the signal level were chosen as the retrospective model. The stochastic component was extracted by fitting the raw data with splines and then subtracting the fit. Scaling the extracted data to zero mean and variance of one is sufficient to obtain a stable standard normal random variate. Distributions under consideration pass all available normality tests. Inverse transform sampling is suggested to use as a source of the uniform random numbers. Variational Monte Carlo method for quantum harmonic oscillator was used to test the quality of our random numbers. If the data delivery rate is of importance and the conventional one minute resolution neutron count is insufficient, we could always settle for an efficient seed generator to feed into the faster algorithmic random number generator or create a buffer.

  19. Simulation of flight maneuver-load distributions by utilizing stationary, non-Gaussian random load histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leybold, H. A.

    1971-01-01

    Random numbers were generated with the aid of a digital computer and transformed such that the probability density function of a discrete random load history composed of these random numbers had one of the following non-Gaussian distributions: Poisson, binomial, log-normal, Weibull, and exponential. The resulting random load histories were analyzed to determine their peak statistics and were compared with cumulative peak maneuver-load distributions for fighter and transport aircraft in flight.

  20. An empirical determination of the minimum number of measurements needed to estimate the mean random vitrinite reflectance of disseminated organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, C.E.; Pawlewicz, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    In coal samples, published recommendations based on statistical methods suggest 100 measurements are needed to estimate the mean random vitrinite reflectance (Rv-r) to within ??2%. Our survey of published thermal maturation studies indicates that those using dispersed organic matter (DOM) mostly have an objective of acquiring 50 reflectance measurements. This smaller objective size in DOM versus that for coal samples poses a statistical contradiction because the standard deviations of DOM reflectance distributions are typically larger indicating a greater sample size is needed to accurately estimate Rv-r in DOM. However, in studies of thermal maturation using DOM, even 50 measurements can be an unrealistic requirement given the small amount of vitrinite often found in such samples. Furthermore, there is generally a reduced need for assuring precision like that needed for coal applications. Therefore, a key question in thermal maturation studies using DOM is how many measurements of Rv-r are needed to adequately estimate the mean. Our empirical approach to this problem is to compute the reflectance distribution statistics: mean, standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis in increments of 10 measurements. This study compares these intermediate computations of Rv-r statistics with a final one computed using all measurements for that sample. Vitrinite reflectance was measured on mudstone and sandstone samples taken from borehole M-25 in the Cerro Prieto, Mexico geothermal system which was selected because the rocks have a wide range of thermal maturation and a comparable humic DOM with depth. The results of this study suggest that after only 20-30 measurements the mean Rv-r is generally known to within 5% and always to within 12% of the mean Rv-r calculated using all of the measured particles. Thus, even in the worst case, the precision after measuring only 20-30 particles is in good agreement with the general precision of one decimal place recommended for mean Rv

  1. Comparison the effects of shallow and deep endotracheal tube suctioning on respiratory rate, arterial blood oxygen saturation and number of suctioning in patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Abbasinia, Mohammad; Irajpour, Alireza; Babaii, Atye; Shamali, Mehdi; Vahdatnezhad, Jahanbakhsh

    2014-09-01

    Endotracheal tube suctioning is essential for improve oxygenation in the patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. There are two types of shallow and deep endotracheal tube suctioning. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of shallow and deep suctioning methods on respiratory rate (RR), arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and number of suctioning in patients hospitalized in the intensive care units of Al-Zahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. In this randomized controlled trial, 74 patients who hospitalized in the intensive care units of Isfahan Al-Zahra Hospital were randomly allocated to the shallow and deep suctioning groups. RR and SpO2 were measured immediately before, immediately after, 1 and 3 minute after each suctioning. Number of suctioning was also noted in each groups. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance (RMANOVA), chi-square and independent t-tests. RR was significantly increased and SpO2 was significantly decreased after each suctioning in the both groups. However, these changes were not significant between the two groups. The numbers of suctioning was significantly higher in the shallow suctioning group than in the deep suctioning group. Conclusion : Shallow and deep suctioning had a similar effect on RR and SpO2. However, shallow suctioning caused further manipulation of patient's trachea than deep suctioning method. Therefore, it seems that deep endotracheal tube suctioning method can be used to clean the airway with lesser manipulation of the trachea.

  2. Comparison the Effects of Shallow and Deep Endotracheal Tube Suctioning on Respiratory Rate, Arterial Blood Oxygen Saturation and Number of Suctioning in Patients Hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Abbasinia, Mohammad; Irajpour, Alireza; Babaii, Atye; Shamali, Mehdi; Vahdatnezhad, Jahanbakhsh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Endotracheal tube suctioning is essential for improve oxygenation in the patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. There are two types of shallow and deep endotracheal tube suctioning. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of shallow and deep suctioning methods on respiratory rate (RR), arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and number of suctioning in patients hospitalized in the intensive care units of Al-Zahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 74 patients who hospitalized in the intensive care units of Isfahan Al-Zahra Hospital were randomly allocated to the shallow and deep suctioning groups. RR and SpO2 were measured immediately before, immediately after, 1 and 3 minute after each suctioning. Number of suctioning was also noted in each groups. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance (RMANOVA), chi-square and independent t-tests. Results: RR was significantly increased and SpO2 was significantly decreased after each suctioning in the both groups. However, these changes were not significant between the two groups. The numbers of suctioning was significantly higher in the shallow suctioning group than in the deep suctioning group. Conclusion: Shallow and deep suctioning had a similar effect on RR and SpO2. However, shallow suctioning caused further manipulation of patient's trachea than deep suctioning method. Therefore, it seems that deep endotracheal tube suctioning method can be used to clean the airway with lesser manipulation of the trachea. PMID:25276759

  3. Generation of a novel artificial TrkB agonist, BM17d99, using T7 phage-displayed random peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Asami-Odaka, Asano; Nakamura, Kimie; Shimizu, Ayako; Ito, Takashi; Asami, Taiji; Ohtaki, Tetsuya; Inooka, Hiroshi

    2017-01-29

    Tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) is a known receptor of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Because it plays a critical role in the regulation of neuronal development, maturation, survival, etc., TrkB is a good target for drugs against central nervous system diseases. In this study, we aimed to generate peptidic TrkB agonists by applying random peptide phage display technology. After the phage panning against recombinant Fc-fused TrkB (TrkB-Fc), agonistic phages were directly screened against TrkB-expressing HEK293 cells. Through subsequent screening of the first-hit BM17 peptide-derived focus library, we successfully obtained the BM17d99 peptide, which had no sequence similarity with BDNF but had TrkB-binding capacity. We then synthesized a dimeric BM17d99 analog peptide that could phosphorylate or activate TrkB by facilitating receptor homodimerization. Treatment of TrkB-expressing HEK293 cells with the dimeric BM17d99 analog peptide significantly induced the phosphorylation of TrkB, suggesting that homodimerization of TrkB was enhanced by the dimeric peptide. This report demonstrates that our approach is useful for the generation of artificial peptidic agonists of cell surface receptors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Black carbon, particle number concentration and nitrogen oxide emission factors of random in-use vehicles measured with the on-road chasing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ježek, I.; Katrašnik, T.; Westerdahl, D.; Močnik, G.

    2015-06-01

    The chasing method was used in an on-road measurement campaign, and emission factors (EF) of black carbon (BC), particle number (PN) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) were determined for 139 individual vehicles of different types encountered on the roads. The aggregated results provide EFs for BC, NOx and PN for three vehicle categories: goods vehicles, gasoline and diesel passenger cars. This is the first on-road measurement study where BC EFs of numerous individual diesel cars were determined in real-world driving conditions. We found good agreement between EFs of goods vehicles determined in this campaign and the results of previous studies that used either chasing or remote sensing measurement techniques. The composition of the sampled car fleet determined from the national vehicle registry information is reflective of Eurostat statistical data on the Slovenian and European vehicle fleet. The median BC EF of diesel and gasoline cars that were in use for less than 5 years, decreased by 60 and 47% from those in use for 5-10 years, respectively, the median NOx and PN EFs, of goods vehicles that were in use for less than five years, decreased from those in use for 5-10 years by 52 and 67%, respectively. The influence of engine maximum power of the measured EFs showed an increase in NOx EF from least to more powerful vehicles with diesel engines. Finally a disproportionate contribution of high emitters to the total emissions of the measured fleet was found; the top 25% of emitting diesel cars contributed 63, 47 and 61% of BC, NOx and PN emissions respectively. With the combination of relatively simple on-road measurements with sophisticated post processing individual vehicles EF can be determined and useful information about the fleet emissions can be obtained by exactly representing vehicles which contribute disproportionally to vehicle fleet emissions; and monitor how the numerous emission reduction approaches are reflected in on-road driving conditions.

  5. Comparison of the Effects of Two Auditory Methods by Mother and Fetus on the Results of Non-Stress Test (Baseline Fetal Heart Rate and Number of Accelerations) in Pregnant Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Khoshkholgh, Roghaie; Keshavarz, Tahereh; Moshfeghy, Zeinab; Akbarzadeh, Marzieh; Asadi, Nasrin; Zare, Najaf

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of two auditory methods by mother and fetus on the results of NST in 2011-2012. Materials and methods: In this single-blind clinical trial, 213 pregnant women with gestational age of 37-41 weeks who had no pregnancy complications were randomly divided into 3 groups (auditory intervention for mother, auditory intervention for fetus, and control) each containing 71 subjects. In the intervention groups, music was played through the second 10 minutes of NST. The three groups were compared regarding baseline fetal heart rate and number of accelerations in the first and second 10 minutes of NST. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, and paired T-test. Results: The results showed no significant difference among the three groups regarding baseline fetal heart rate in the first (p = 0.945) and second (p = 0.763) 10 minutes. However, a significant difference was found among the three groups concerning the number of accelerations in the second 10 minutes. Also, a significant difference was observed in the number of accelerations in the auditory intervention for mother (p = 0.013) and auditory intervention for fetus groups (p < 0.001). The difference between the number of accelerations in the first and second 10 minutes was also statistically significant (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Music intervention was effective in the number of accelerations which is the indicator of fetal health. Yet, further studies are required to be conducted on the issue. PMID:27385971

  6. Comparison of the Effects of Two Auditory Methods by Mother and Fetus on the Results of Non-Stress Test (Baseline Fetal Heart Rate and Number of Accelerations) in Pregnant Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Khoshkholgh, Roghaie; Keshavarz, Tahereh; Moshfeghy, Zeinab; Akbarzadeh, Marzieh; Asadi, Nasrin; Zare, Najaf

    2016-03-01

    To compare the effects of two auditory methods by mother and fetus on the results of NST in 2011-2012. In this single-blind clinical trial, 213 pregnant women with gestational age of 37-41 weeks who had no pregnancy complications were randomly divided into 3 groups (auditory intervention for mother, auditory intervention for fetus, and control) each containing 71 subjects. In the intervention groups, music was played through the second 10 minutes of NST. The three groups were compared regarding baseline fetal heart rate and number of accelerations in the first and second 10 minutes of NST. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, and paired T-test. The results showed no significant difference among the three groups regarding baseline fetal heart rate in the first (p = 0.945) and second (p = 0.763) 10 minutes. However, a significant difference was found among the three groups concerning the number of accelerations in the second 10 minutes. Also, a significant difference was observed in the number of accelerations in the auditory intervention for mother (p = 0.013) and auditory intervention for fetus groups (p < 0.001). The difference between the number of accelerations in the first and second 10 minutes was also statistically significant (p = 0.002). Music intervention was effective in the number of accelerations which is the indicator of fetal health. Yet, further studies are required to be conducted on the issue.

  7. Random Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanmarcke, Erik

    1983-03-01

    Random variation over space and time is one of the few attributes that might safely be predicted as characterizing almost any given complex system. Random fields or "distributed disorder systems" confront astronomers, physicists, geologists, meteorologists, biologists, and other natural scientists. They appear in the artifacts developed by electrical, mechanical, civil, and other engineers. They even underlie the processes of social and economic change. The purpose of this book is to bring together existing and new methodologies of random field theory and indicate how they can be applied to these diverse areas where a "deterministic treatment is inefficient and conventional statistics insufficient." Many new results and methods are included. After outlining the extent and characteristics of the random field approach, the book reviews the classical theory of multidimensional random processes and introduces basic probability concepts and methods in the random field context. It next gives a concise amount of the second-order analysis of homogeneous random fields, in both the space-time domain and the wave number-frequency domain. This is followed by a chapter on spectral moments and related measures of disorder and on level excursions and extremes of Gaussian and related random fields. After developing a new framework of analysis based on local averages of one-, two-, and n-dimensional processes, the book concludes with a chapter discussing ramifications in the important areas of estimation, prediction, and control. The mathematical prerequisite has been held to basic college-level calculus.

  8. Black carbon, particle number concentration and nitrogen oxide emission factors of random in-use vehicles measured with the on-road chasing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ježek, I.; Katrašnik, T.; Westerdahl, D.; Močnik, G.

    2015-10-01

    The chasing method was used in an on-road measurement campaign, and emission factors (EF) of black carbon (BC), particle number (PN) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) were determined for 139 individual vehicles of different types encountered on the roads. The aggregated results provide EFs for BC, NOx and PN for three vehicle categories: goods vehicles, gasoline and diesel passenger cars. This is the first on-road measurement study where BC EFs of numerous individual diesel cars were determined in real-world driving conditions. We found good agreement between EFs of goods vehicles determined in this campaign and the results of previous studies that used either chasing or remote-sensing measurement techniques. The composition of the sampled car fleet determined from the national vehicle registry information is reflective of Eurostat statistical data on the Slovenian and European vehicle fleet. The median BC EF of diesel and gasoline cars that were in use for less than 5 years decreased by 60 and 47 % from those in use for 5-10 years, respectively; the median NOx and PN EFs of goods vehicles that were in use for less than 5 years decreased from those in use for 5-10 years by 52 and 67 %, respectively. Surprisingly, we found an increase of BC EFs in the newer goods vehicle fleet compared to the 5-10-year old one. The influence of engine maximum power of the measured EFs showed an increase in NOx EF from least to more powerful vehicles with diesel engines. Finally, a disproportionate contribution of high emitters to the total emissions of the measured fleet was found; the top 25 % of emitting diesel cars contributed 63, 47 and 61 % of BC, NOx and PN emissions respectively. With the combination of relatively simple on-road measurements and sophisticated post processing, individual vehicle EF can be determined and useful information about the fleet emissions can be obtained by exactly representing vehicles which contribute disproportionally to vehicle fleet emissions; and

  9. Cost-benefit analysis of second-generation antipsychotics and placebo in a randomized trial of the treatment of psychosis and aggression in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenheck, Robert A; Leslie, Douglas L; Sindelar, Jody L; Miller, Edward A; Tariot, Peter N; Dagerman, Karen S; Davis, Sonia M; Lebowitz, Barry D; Rabins, Peter; Hsiao, John K; Lieberman, Jeffery A; Schneider, Lon S

    2007-11-01

    Second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) are prescribed for psychosis, aggression, and agitation in Alzheimer disease (AD). To conduct a cost-benefit analysis of SGAs and placebo (taken to represent a "watchful waiting" treatment strategy) for psychosis and aggression in outpatients with AD. Randomized placebo-controlled trial of alternative SGA initiation strategies. Forty-two outpatient clinics. Outpatients with AD and psychosis, aggression, or agitation (N = 421). Intervention Participants were randomly assigned to treatment with olanzapine, quetiapine fumarate, risperidone, or placebo with the option of double-blind rerandomization to another antipsychotic or citalopram hydrobromide or open treatment over 9 months. Monthly interviews documented health service use and costs. The economic perspective addressed total health care and medication costs. Costs of study drugs were estimated from wholesale prices with adjustment for discounts and rebates. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were assessed with the Health Utilities Index Mark 3 and were supplemented with measures of functioning, activities of daily living, and quality of life. Primary analyses were conducted using all available data. Secondary analyses excluded observations after the first medication change (ie, phase 1 only). Cost-benefit analysis was conducted using the net health benefits approach in a sensitivity analysis in which QALYs were valued at $50,000 per year and $100,000 per year. Average total health costs, including medications, were significantly lower for placebo than for SGAs, by $50 to $100 per month. There were no differences between treatments in QALYs or other measures of function. Phase 1-only analyses were broadly similar. Net-benefit analysis showed greater net health benefits for placebo as compared with other treatments, with probabilities ranging from 50% to 90%. There were no differences in measures of effectiveness between initiation of active treatments or placebo (which

  10. An assessment of the new generation three-dimensional high definition laparoscopic vision system on surgical skills: a randomized prospective study.

    PubMed

    Usta, Taner A; Ozkaynak, Aysel; Kovalak, Ebru; Ergul, Erdinc; Naki, M Murat; Kaya, Erdal

    2015-08-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) view is known to cause practical difficulties for surgeons in conventional laparoscopy. Our goal was to evaluate whether the new-generation, Three-Dimensional Laparoscopic Vision System (3D LVS) provides greater benefit in terms of execution time and error number during the performance of surgical tasks. This study tests the hypothesis that the use of the new generation 3D LVS can significantly improve technical ability on complex laparoscopic tasks in an experimental model. Twenty-four participants (8 experienced, 8 minimally experienced, and 8 inexperienced) were evaluated for 10 different tasks in terms of total execution time and error number. The 4-point lickert scale was used for subjective assessment of the two imaging modalities. All tasks were completed by all participants. Statistically significant difference was determined between 3D and 2D systems in the tasks of bead transfer and drop, suturing, and pick-and-place in the inexperienced group; in the task of passing through two circles with the needle in the minimally experienced group; and in the tasks of bead transfer and drop, suturing and passing through two circles with the needle in the experienced group. Three-dimensional imaging was preferred over 2D in 6 of the 10 subjective criteria questions on 4-point lickert scale. The majority of the tasks were completed in a shorter time using 3D LVS compared to 2D LVS. The subjective Likert-scale ratings from each group also demonstrated a clear preference for 3D LVS. New 3D LVS has the potential to improve the learning curve, and reduce the operating time and error rate during the performances of laparoscopic surgeons. Our results suggest that the new-generation 3D HD LVS will be helpful for surgeons in laparoscopy (Clinical Trial ID: NCT01799577, Protocol ID: BEHGynobs-4).

  11. Impact of an Automatically Generated Cancer Survivorship Care Plan on Patient-Reported Outcomes in Routine Clinical Practice: Longitudinal Outcomes of a Pragmatic, Cluster Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Nicolaije, Kim A H; Ezendam, Nicole P M; Vos, M Caroline; Pijnenborg, Johanna M A; Boll, Dorry; Boss, Erik A; Hermans, Ralph H M; Engelhart, Karin C M; Haartsen, Joke E; Pijlman, Brenda M; van Loon-Baelemans, Ingrid E A M; Mertens, Helena J M M; Nolting, Willem E; van Beek, Johannes J; Roukema, Jan A; Zijlstra, Wobbe P; Kruitwagen, Roy F P M; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V

    2015-11-01

    This study was conducted to longitudinally assess the impact of an automatically generated survivorship care plan (SCP) on patient-reported outcomes in routine clinical practice. Primary outcomes were patient satisfaction with information and care. Secondary outcomes included illness perceptions and health care use. Twelve hospitals were randomly assigned to SCP care or usual care in a pragmatic, cluster randomized trial. Newly diagnosed patients with endometrial cancer completed questionnaires after diagnosis (n = 221; 75% response), 6 months (n = 158), and 12 months (n = 147). An SCP application was built in the Web-based ROGY (Registration System Oncological Gynecology). By clicking the SCP button, a patient-tailored SCP was generated. In the SCP care arm, 74% of patients received an SCP. They reported receiving more information about their treatment (mean [M] = 57, standard deviation [SD] = 20 v M = 47, SD = 24; P = .03), other services (M = 35, SD = 22 v M = 25, SD = 22; P = .03), and different places of care (M = 27, SD = 25 v M = 23, SD = 26; P = .04) than the usual care arm (scales, 0 to 100). However, there were no differences regarding satisfaction with information or care. Patients in the SCP care arm experienced more symptoms (M = 3.3, SD = 2.0 v M = 2.6, SD = 1.6; P = .03), were more concerned about their illness (M = 4.4, SD = 2.3 v M = 3.9, SD = 2.1; P = .03), were more affected emotionally (M = 4.0, SD = 2.2 v M = 3.7, SD = 2.2; P = .046), and reported more cancer-related contact with their primary care physician (M = 1.8, SD = 2.0 v M = 1.1, SD = 0.9; P = .003) than those in the usual care arm (scale, 1 to 10). These effects did not differ over time. The present trial showed no evidence of a benefit of SCPs on satisfaction with information and care. Furthermore, SCPs increased patients' concerns, emotional impact, experienced symptoms, and the amount of cancer-related contact with the primary care physician. Whether this may ultimately lead to more

  12. A randomized controlled trial undertaken to test a nurse-led weight management and exercise intervention designed for people with serious mental illness who take second generation antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Usher, Kim; Park, Tanya; Foster, Kim; Buettner, Petra

    2013-07-01

    To test the effect of a nurse-led intervention on weight gain in people with serious mental illness prescribed and taking second generation antipsychotic medication. Weight gain and obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the general population with the prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome reaching 20-25% of the global population. People with serious mental illness are at even higher risk, particularly those taking second generation antipsychotic medication. An experimental randomized controlled trial was undertaken. The control group received a 12-week healthy lifestyle booklet. In addition to the booklet, the intervention group received weekly nutrition and exercise education, exercise sessions, and nurse support. Participants (n = 101) were assessed at baseline and 12 weeks. Data were collected between March 2008-December 2010. Seven outcome measures were used: body measurements included girth (cm), weight (kg), height (cm), and body mass index (kg/m(2) ); questionnaires included the medication compliance questionnaire, the Drug Attitude Inventory, the Liverpool University Neuroleptic Side Effect Rating Scale, and the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36. Differences in primary outcome measures between baseline and 12 weeks follow-up were compared between intervention and control groups using standard bi-variate statistical tests. The study was conducted between 2008-2010. The analysis of outcome measures for the control group (n = 50) and intervention group (n = 51) was not statistically significant. There was a mean weight change of -0·74 kg at 12 weeks for the intervention group (n = 51), while the control group (n = 50) had a mean weight change of -0·17 kg at 12 weeks. The results were not statistically significant. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Localization of human coagulation factor VIII (hFVIII) in transgenic rabbit by FISH-TSA: identification of transgene copy number and transmission to the next generation.

    PubMed

    Krylov, V; Tlapáková, T; Mácha, J; Curlej, J; Ryban, L; Chrenek, P

    2008-01-01

    For chromosomal localization of the hFVIII human transgene in F2 and F3 generation of transgenic rabbits, FISH-TSA was applied. A short cDNA probe (1250 bp) targeted chromosomes 3, 7, 8, 9 and 18 of an F2 male (animal 1-3-8). Two transgenic offspring (F3) revealed signal positions in chromosome 3 and chromosomes 3 and 7, respectively. Sequencing and structure analysis of the rabbit orthologous gene revealed high similarity to its human counterpart. Part of the sequenced cDNA (1310 bp) served as a probe for FISH-TSA analysis. The rabbit gene was localized in the q arm terminus of the X chromosome. This result is in agreement with reciprocal chromosome painting between the rabbit and the human. The presented FISH-TSA method provides strong signals without any interspecies reactivity.

  14. Hupa Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Ruth, Ed.; And Others

    An introduction to the Hupa number system is provided in this workbook, one in a series of numerous materials developed to promote the use of the Hupa language. The book is written in English with Hupa terms used only for the names of numbers. The opening pages present the numbers from 1-10, giving the numeral, the Hupa word, the English word, and…

  15. The non-alcoholic fraction of beer increases stromal cell derived factor 1 and the number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in high cardiovascular risk subjects: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Chiva-Blanch, Gemma; Condines, Ximena; Magraner, Emma; Roth, Irene; Valderas-Martínez, Palmira; Arranz, Sara; Casas, Rosa; Martínez-Huélamo, Miriam; Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna; Quifer-Rada, Paola; Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa M; Estruch, Ramon

    2014-04-01

    Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a decrease in cardiovascular risk, but fermented beverages seem to confer greater cardiovascular protection due to their polyphenolic content. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are bone-marrow-derived stem cells with the ability to repair and maintain endothelial integrity and function and are considered as a surrogate marker of vascular function and cumulative cardiovascular risk. Nevertheless, no study has been carried out on the effects of moderate beer consumption on the number of circulating EPC in high cardiovascular risk patients. To compare the effects of moderate consumption of beer, non-alcoholic beer and gin on the number of circulating EPC and EPC-mobilizing factors. In this crossover trial, 33 men at high cardiovascular risk were randomized to receive beer (30 g alcohol/d), the equivalent amount of polyphenols in the form of non-alcoholic beer, or gin (30 g alcohol/d) for 4 weeks. Diet and physical exercise were carefully monitored. The number of circulating EPC and EPC-mobilizing factors were determined at baseline and after each intervention. After the beer and non-alcoholic beer interventions, the number of circulating EPC significantly increased by 8 and 5 units, respectively, while no significant differences were observed after the gin period. In correlation, stromal cell derived factor 1 increased significantly after the non-alcoholic and the beer interventions. The non-alcoholic fraction of beer increases the number of circulating EPC in peripheral blood from high cardiovascular risk subjects. http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN95345245 ISRCTN95345245. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. SAAS-CNV: A Joint Segmentation Approach on Aggregated and Allele Specific Signals for the Identification of Somatic Copy Number Alterations with Next-Generation Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongyang; Hao, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Cancer genomes exhibit profound somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs). Studying tumor SCNAs using massively parallel sequencing provides unprecedented resolution and meanwhile gives rise to new challenges in data analysis, complicated by tumor aneuploidy and heterogeneity as well as normal cell contamination. While the majority of read depth based methods utilize total sequencing depth alone for SCNA inference, the allele specific signals are undervalued. We proposed a joint segmentation and inference approach using both signals to meet some of the challenges. Our method consists of four major steps: 1) extracting read depth supporting reference and alternative alleles at each SNP/Indel locus and comparing the total read depth and alternative allele proportion between tumor and matched normal sample; 2) performing joint segmentation on the two signal dimensions; 3) correcting the copy number baseline from which the SCNA state is determined; 4) calling SCNA state for each segment based on both signal dimensions. The method is applicable to whole exome/genome sequencing (WES/WGS) as well as SNP array data in a tumor-control study. We applied the method to a dataset containing no SCNAs to test the specificity, created by pairing sequencing replicates of a single HapMap sample as normal/tumor pairs, as well as a large-scale WGS dataset consisting of 88 liver tumors along with adjacent normal tissues. Compared with representative methods, our method demonstrated improved accuracy, scalability to large cancer studies, capability in handling both sequencing and SNP array data, and the potential to improve the estimation of tumor ploidy and purity. PMID:26583378

  17. SAAS-CNV: A Joint Segmentation Approach on Aggregated and Allele Specific Signals for the Identification of Somatic Copy Number Alterations with Next-Generation Sequencing Data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongyang; Hao, Ke

    2015-11-01

    Cancer genomes exhibit profound somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs). Studying tumor SCNAs using massively parallel sequencing provides unprecedented resolution and meanwhile gives rise to new challenges in data analysis, complicated by tumor aneuploidy and heterogeneity as well as normal cell contamination. While the majority of read depth based methods utilize total sequencing depth alone for SCNA inference, the allele specific signals are undervalued. We proposed a joint segmentation and inference approach using both signals to meet some of the challenges. Our method consists of four major steps: 1) extracting read depth supporting reference and alternative alleles at each SNP/Indel locus and comparing the total read depth and alternative allele proportion between tumor and matched normal sample; 2) performing joint segmentation on the two signal dimensions; 3) correcting the copy number baseline from which the SCNA state is determined; 4) calling SCNA state for each segment based on both signal dimensions. The method is applicable to whole exome/genome sequencing (WES/WGS) as well as SNP array data in a tumor-control study. We applied the method to a dataset containing no SCNAs to test the specificity, created by pairing sequencing replicates of a single HapMap sample as normal/tumor pairs, as well as a large-scale WGS dataset consisting of 88 liver tumors along with adjacent normal tissues. Compared with representative methods, our method demonstrated improved accuracy, scalability to large cancer studies, capability in handling both sequencing and SNP array data, and the potential to improve the estimation of tumor ploidy and purity.

  18. Identification of the first multi-exonic WDR72 deletion in isolated amelogenesis imperfecta, and generation of a WDR72-specific copy number screening tool.

    PubMed

    Hentschel, Julia; Tatun, Dana; Parkhomchuk, Dmitri; Kurth, Ingo; Schimmel, Bettina; Heinrich-Weltzien, Roswitha; Bertzbach, Sabine; Peters, Hartmut; Beetz, Christian

    2016-09-15

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder of tooth development which is due to aberrant deposition or composition of enamel. Both syndromic and isolated forms exist; they may be inherited in an X-linked, autosomal recessive, or autosomal dominant manner. WDR72 is one of ten currently known genes for recessive isolated AI; nine WDR72 mutations affecting single nucleotides have been described to date. Based on whole exome sequencing in a large consanguineous AI pedigree, we obtained evidence for presence of a multi-exonic WDR72 deletion. A home-made multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay was used to confirm the aberration, to narrow its extent, and to identify heterozygous carriers. Our study extends the mutational spectrum for WDR72 to include large deletions, and supports a relevance of the previously proposed loss-of-function mechanism. It also introduces an easy-to-use and highly sensitive tool for detecting WDR72 copy number alterations. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Effects of clopidogrel with or without aspirin on the generation of extracellular vesicles in the microcirculation and in venous blood: A randomized placebo controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Traby, L; Kaider, A; Kollars, M; Eichinger, S; Wolzt, M; Kyrle, P A

    2018-05-17

    Dual-antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is a standard strategy in acute coronary heart disease; however, it confers a considerable bleeding risk. Single-antiplatelet therapy (SAPT) inhibits haemostatic system activation ex vivo to a similar extent as DAPT. Extracellular vesicles (EV) are procoagulant and contribute to haemostatic system activation. We aimed to investigate the effect of DAPT compared with SAPT on EV. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 44 healthy volunteers received DAPT (clopidogrel + aspirin) or SAPT (clopidogrel + placebo) for 7 days. Blood was obtained from a standardized microvascular injury and through venipuncture at baseline (BL) and at 2 h, 24 h, and 8 days after treatment initiation. The number, origin, and surface expression of EV were assessed using flow cytometry. Data are given as median (quartiles). Non-parametric tests were used to evaluate the short-term (BL vs 2 h) and long-term differences (2 h to 8 days), as well as the differences between treatment groups. There was no difference either in the short-term effects on the number (×10 3  mL -1 ) of EV in microvascular blood between DAPT [BL: 1433 (653; 3184) vs 2 h: 862 (545; 2026), p = 0.39] and SAPT [(BL: 614 (552; 1402) vs 2 h: 1079 (781; 1538), p = 0.75)] or in the long-term effects. DAPT and SAPT did not exhibit differential short-term effects on the number and proportion (36% and 27% vs 55% and 36%) of platelet-derived EV. DAPT and SAPT resulted in a significant short-term increase in phosphatidylserine expression in microvascular blood. The effects of DAPT and SAPT on EV in venous blood were similar to those in microvascular blood. DAPT and SAPT have comparable effects on the amount, origin, and surface characteristics of EV. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Neurological adverse events of new generation sodium blocker antiepileptic drugs. Meta-analysis of randomized, double-blinded studies with eslicarbazepine acetate, lacosamide and oxcarbazepine.

    PubMed

    Zaccara, Gaetano; Giovannelli, Fabio; Maratea, Dario; Fadda, Valeria; Verrotti, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    Analysis of overall tolerability and neurological adverse effects (AEs) of eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), lacosamide (LCM) and oxcarbazepine (OXC) from double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. Indirect comparisons of patients withdrawing because of AEs, and the incidence of some vestibulocerebellar AEs between these three antiepileptic dugs (AEDs). We searched MEDLINE for all randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials investigating therapeutic effects of fixed oral doses of ESL, LCM and OXC in patients with drug resistant epilepsy. Withdrawal rate due to AEs, percentages of patients with serious AEs, and the proportion of patients experiencing any neurological AE, nausea and vomiting were assessed for their association with the experimental drug. Analyses were performed between recommended daily doses of each AED according to the approved summary of product characteristics (SPC). Risk differences were used to evaluate the association of any AE [99% confidence intervals (CIs)] or study withdrawals because of AEs (95% CIs) with the experimental drug. Indirect comparisons between withdrawal rate and AEs dizziness, coordination abnormal/ataxia and diplopia were estimated according to network meta-analysis (Net-MA). Eight randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials (4 with ESL, 3 with LCM, and 1 with OXC) were included in our analysis. At high doses (OXC 1200mg, ESL 1200mg and LCM 400mg) there was an increased risk of AE-related study withdrawals compared to placebo for all drugs. Several AEs were associated with the experimental drug. Both number and frequency of AEs were dose-related. At high recommended doses, patients treated with OXC withdrew from the experimental treatment significantly more frequently than patients treated with ESL and LCM. Furthermore, the AEs coordination abnormal/ataxia and diplopia were significantly more frequently observed in patients treated with OXC compared to patients treated with LCM and ESL. The overall tolerability

  1. Are numbers gendered?

    PubMed

    Wilkie, James E B; Bodenhausen, Galen V

    2012-05-01

    We examined the possibility that nonsocial, highly generic concepts are gendered. Specifically, we investigated the gender connotations of Arabic numerals. Across several experiments, we show that the number 1 and other odd numbers are associated with masculinity, whereas the number 2 and other even numbers are associated with femininity, in ways that influence judgments of stimuli arbitrarily paired with numerical cues; specifically, babies' faces and foreign names were more likely to be judged as "male" when paired with odd versus even numbers. The power of logically irrelevant numerical stimuli to connote masculinity or femininity reflects the pervasiveness of gender as a social scaffolding for generating understandings of abstract concepts.

  2. A Comparison of the Number of Men Who Have Sex with Men among Rural-To-Urban Migrants with Non-Migrant Rural and Urban Residents in Wuhan, China: A GIS/GPS-Assisted Random Sample Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinguang; Yu, Bin; Zhou, Dunjin; Zhou, Wang; Gong, Jie; Li, Shiyue; Stanton, Bonita

    2015-01-01

    Background Mobile populations and men who have sex with men (MSM) play an increasing role in the current HIV epidemic in China and across the globe. While considerable research has addressed both of these at-risk populations, more effective HIV control requires accurate data on the number of MSM at the population level, particularly MSM among migrant populations. Methods Survey data from a random sample of male rural-to-urban migrants (aged 18-45, n=572) in Wuhan, China were analyzed and compared with those of randomly selected non-migrant urban (n=566) and rural counterparts (580). The GIS/GPS technologies were used for sampling and the survey estimation method was used for data analysis. Results HIV-related risk behaviors among rural-to-urban migrants were similar to those among the two comparison groups. The estimated proportion of MSM among migrants [95% CI] was 5.8% [4.7, 6.8], higher than 2.8% [1.2, 4.5] for rural residents and 1.0% [0.0, 2.4] for urban residents, respectively. Among these migrants, the MSM were more likely than non-MSM to be older in age, married, and migrated to more cities. They were also more likely to co-habit with others in rental properties located in new town and neighborhoods with fewer old acquaintances and more entertainment establishments. In addition, they were more likely to engage in commercial sex and less likely to consistently use condoms. Conclusion Findings of this study indicate that compared to rural and urban populations, the migrant population in Wuhan consists of a higher proportion of MSM who also exhibit higher levels of HIV-related risk behaviors. More effective interventions should target this population with a focus on neighborhood factors, social capital and collective efficacy for risk reduction. PMID:26241900

  3. The early effects of stavudine compared with tenofovir on adipocyte gene expression, mitochondrial DNA copy number and metabolic parameters in South African HIV-infected patients: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Menezes, C N; Duarte, R; Dickens, C; Dix-Peek, T; Van Amsterdam, D; John, M-A; Ive, P; Maskew, M; Macphail, P; Fox, M P; Raal, F; Sanne, I; Crowther, N J

    2013-04-01

    Stavudine is being phased out because of its mitochondrial toxicity and tenofovir (TDF) is recommended as part of first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in South Africa. A prospective, open-label, randomized controlled trial comparing standard- and low-dose stavudine with TDF was performed to assess early differences in adipocyte mtDNA copy number, gene expression and metabolic parameters in Black South African HIV-infected patients. Sixty patients were randomized 1:1:1 to either standard-dose (30-40 mg) or low-dose (20-30 mg) stavudine or TDF (300 mg) each combined with lamivudine and efavirenz. Subcutaneous fat biopsies were obtained at weeks 0 and 4. Adipocyte mtDNA copies/cell and gene expression were measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Markers of inflammation and lipid and glucose metabolism were also assessed. A 29% and 32% decrease in the mean mtDNA copies/cell was noted in the standard-dose (P < 0.05) and low-dose stavudine (P < 0.005) arms, respectively, when compared with TDF at 4 weeks. Nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF1) and mitochondrial cytochrome B (MTCYB) gene expression levels were affected by stavudine, with a significantly (P < 0.05) greater fall in expression observed with the standard, but not the low dose compared with TDF. No significant differences were observed in markers of inflammation and lipid and glucose metabolism. These results demonstrate early mitochondrial depletion among Black South African patients receiving low and standard doses of stavudine, with preservation of gene expression levels, except for NRF1 and MTCYB, when compared with patients on TDF. © 2012 British HIV Association.

  4. Moving along the Mental Number Line: Interactions between Whole-Body Motion and Numerical Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, Matthias; Grabherr, Luzia; Mast, Fred W.

    2012-01-01

    Active head turns to the left and right have recently been shown to influence numerical cognition by shifting attention along the mental number line. In the present study, we found that passive whole-body motion influences numerical cognition. In a random-number generation task (Experiment 1), leftward and downward displacement of participants…

  5. Number Guessing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sezin, Fatin

    2009-01-01

    It is instructive and interesting to find hidden numbers by using different positional numeration systems. Most of the present guessing techniques use the binary system expressed as less-than, greater-than or present-absent type information. This article describes how, by employing four cards having integers 1-64 written in different colours, one…

  6. Numbers Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kathotia, Vinay

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on work undertaken by schools as part of Qualifications and Curriculum Authority's (QCA's) "Engaging mathematics for all learners" project. The goal was to use in the classroom, materials and approaches from a Royal Institution (Ri) Year 10 master-class, "Number Sense", which was inspired by examples from…

  7. A New Model that Generates Lotka's Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, John C.

    2002-01-01

    Develops a new model for a process that generates Lotka's Law. Topics include measuring scientific productivity through the number of publications; rate of production; career duration; randomness; Poisson distribution; computer simulations; goodness-of-fit; theoretical support for the model; and future research. (Author/LRW)

  8. Consumption of cranberry polyphenols enhances human γδ-T cell proliferation and reduces the number of symptoms associated with colds and influenza: a randomized, placebo-controlled intervention study.

    PubMed

    Nantz, Meri P; Rowe, Cheryl A; Muller, Catherine; Creasy, Rebecca; Colee, James; Khoo, Christina; Percival, Susan S

    2013-12-13

    Our main objective was to evaluate the ability of cranberry phytochemicals to modify immunity, specifically γδ-T cell proliferation, after daily consumption of a cranberry beverage, and its effect on health outcomes related to cold and influenza symptoms. The study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel intervention. Subjects drank a low calorie cranberry beverage (450 ml) made with a juice-derived, powdered cranberry fraction (n = 22) or a placebo beverage (n = 23), daily, for 10 wk. PBMC were cultured for six days with autologous serum and PHA-L stimulation. Cold and influenza symptoms were self-reported. The proliferation index of γδ-T cells in culture was almost five times higher after 10 wk of cranberry beverage consumption (p <0.001). In the cranberry beverage group, the incidence of illness was not reduced, however significantly fewer symptoms of illness were reported (p = 0.031). Consumption of the cranberry beverage modified the ex vivo proliferation of γδ-T cells. As these cells are located in the epithelium and serve as a first line of defense, improving their function may be related to reducing the number of symptoms associated with a cold and flu.

  9. Enhancing Lifestyle Change in Cardiac Patients Through the Do CHANGE System ("Do Cardiac Health: Advanced New Generation Ecosystem"): Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol.

    PubMed

    Habibović, Mirela; Broers, Eva; Piera-Jimenez, Jordi; Wetzels, Mart; Ayoola, Idowu; Denollet, Johan; Widdershoven, Jos

    2018-02-08

    Promoting a healthy lifestyle (eg, physical activity, healthy diet) is crucial for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiac disease in order to decrease disease burden and mortality. The current trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the Do Cardiac Health: Advanced New Generation Ecosystem (Do CHANGE) service, which is developed to assist cardiac patients in adopting a healthy lifestyle and improving their quality of life. Cardiac patients (ie, people who have been diagnosed with heart failure, coronary artery disease, and/or hypertension) will be recruited at three pilot sites (Badalona Serveis Assistencials, Badalona, Spain [N=75]; Buddhist Tzu Chi Dalin General Hospital, Dalin, Taiwan [N=100] and Elisabeth-TweeSteden Hospital, Tilburg, The Netherlands [N=75]). Patients will be assisted by the Do Something Different (DSD) program to change their unhealthy habits and/or lifestyle. DSD has been developed to increase behavioral flexibility and subsequently adopt new (healthier) habits. In addition, patients' progress will be monitored with a number of (newly developed) devices (eg, Fitbit, Beddit, COOKiT, FLUiT), which will be integrated in one application. The Do CHANGE trial will provide us with new insights regarding the effectiveness of the proposed intervention in different cultural settings. In addition, it will give insight into what works for whom and why. The Do CHANGE service integrates new technologies into a behavior change intervention in order to change the unhealthy lifestyles of cardiac patients. The program is expected to facilitate long-term, sustainable behavioral change. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT03178305; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03178305 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6wfWHvuyU). ©Mirela Habibović, Eva Broers, Jordi Piera-Jimenez, Mart Wetzels, Idowu Ayoola, Johan Denollet, Jos Widdershoven. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 08.02.2018.

  10. Enhancing Lifestyle Change in Cardiac Patients Through the Do CHANGE System (“Do Cardiac Health: Advanced New Generation Ecosystem”): Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Broers, Eva; Piera-Jimenez, Jordi; Wetzels, Mart; Ayoola, Idowu; Denollet, Johan; Widdershoven, Jos

    2018-01-01

    Background Promoting a healthy lifestyle (eg, physical activity, healthy diet) is crucial for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiac disease in order to decrease disease burden and mortality. Objective The current trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the Do Cardiac Health: Advanced New Generation Ecosystem (Do CHANGE) service, which is developed to assist cardiac patients in adopting a healthy lifestyle and improving their quality of life. Methods Cardiac patients (ie, people who have been diagnosed with heart failure, coronary artery disease, and/or hypertension) will be recruited at three pilot sites (Badalona Serveis Assistencials, Badalona, Spain [N=75]; Buddhist Tzu Chi Dalin General Hospital, Dalin, Taiwan [N=100] and Elisabeth-TweeSteden Hospital, Tilburg, The Netherlands [N=75]). Patients will be assisted by the Do Something Different (DSD) program to change their unhealthy habits and/or lifestyle. DSD has been developed to increase behavioral flexibility and subsequently adopt new (healthier) habits. In addition, patients’ progress will be monitored with a number of (newly developed) devices (eg, Fitbit, Beddit, COOKiT, FLUiT), which will be integrated in one application. Results The Do CHANGE trial will provide us with new insights regarding the effectiveness of the proposed intervention in different cultural settings. In addition, it will give insight into what works for whom and why. Conclusions The Do CHANGE service integrates new technologies into a behavior change intervention in order to change the unhealthy lifestyles of cardiac patients. The program is expected to facilitate long-term, sustainable behavioral change. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT03178305; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03178305 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6wfWHvuyU). PMID:29422454

  11. Certified randomness in quantum physics.

    PubMed

    Acín, Antonio; Masanes, Lluis

    2016-12-07

    The concept of randomness plays an important part in many disciplines. On the one hand, the question of whether random processes exist is fundamental for our understanding of nature. On the other, randomness is a resource for cryptography, algorithms and simulations. Standard methods for generating randomness rely on assumptions about the devices that are often not valid in practice. However, quantum technologies enable new methods for generating certified randomness, based on the violation of Bell inequalities. These methods are referred to as device-independent because they do not rely on any modelling of the devices. Here we review efforts to design device-independent randomness generators and the associated challenges.

  12. Influence of insulin and glargine on outgrowth and number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in type 2 diabetes patients: a partially double-blind, randomized, three-arm unicenter study.

    PubMed

    Oikonomou, Dimitrios; Kopf, Stefan; von Bauer, Rüdiger; Djuric, Zdenka; Cebola, Rita; Sander, Anja; Englert, Stefan; Vittas, Spiros; Hidmark, Asa; Morcos, Michael; Korosoglou, Grigorios; Nawroth, Peter P; Humpert, Per M

    2014-10-11

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are bone marrow-derived cells which can undergo differentiation into endothelial cells and participate in endothelial repair and angiogenesis. Insulin facilitates this in vitro mediated by the IGF-1 receptor. Clinical trials showed that the number of circulating EPCs is influenced by glucose control and EPC are a predictor of cardiovascular death. To study direct effects of insulin treatment on EPCs in type 2 diabetes patients, add-on basal insulin treatment was compared to an escalation of oral medication aiming at similar glucose control between the groups. 55 patients with type 2 diabetes (61.6±5.9 years) on oral diabetes medication were randomized in a 2:2:1 ratio in 3 groups. Patients were treated additionally with insulin glargine (n=20), NPH insulin (n=22) or escalated with oral medication (n=13). Number of circulating EPC, EPC-outgrowth, intima media thickness, skin microvascular function and HbA1c were documented at baseline and/or after 4 weeks and 4 months. HbA1c at baseline was, 7.3+/-0.7% in the oral group, 7.3+/-0.9% and 7.5+/-0.7% in the glargine and NPH insulin respectively (p=0.713). HbA1c after 4 months decreased to 6.8+/-0.8%, 6.6+/-0.7% and 6.7+/-0.6%, in the oral, glargine and NPH insulin group respectively (p=0.61). FACS analysis showed no difference in number of circulating EPC between the groups after 4 weeks and 4 months. However, the outgrowth of EPCs as detected by colony forming assay was increased in the NPH insulin and glargine groups (29.2+/-6.4 and 29.4+/- 6.7 units respectively) compared to the group on oral medication (23.2+/-6.3, p=0.013) after 4 months of treatment. A significant decrease of IMT from 0.80mm (+/-0.14) at baseline to 0.76mm (+/-0.12) after 4 months could be observed in all patients only (p=0.03) with a trend towards a reduction of IMT after 4 months when all patients on insulin treatment were compared to the oral treatment group (p=0.06). Skin microvascular function revealed no

  13. Sampling large random knots in a confined space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsuaga, J.; Blackstone, T.; Diao, Y.; Hinson, K.; Karadayi, E.; Saito, M.

    2007-09-01

    DNA knots formed under extreme conditions of condensation, as in bacteriophage P4, are difficult to analyze experimentally and theoretically. In this paper, we propose to use the uniform random polygon model as a supplementary method to the existing methods for generating random knots in confinement. The uniform random polygon model allows us to sample knots with large crossing numbers and also to generate large diagrammatically prime knot diagrams. We show numerically that uniform random polygons sample knots with large minimum crossing numbers and certain complicated knot invariants (as those observed experimentally). We do this in terms of the knot determinants or colorings. Our numerical results suggest that the average determinant of a uniform random polygon of n vertices grows faster than O(e^{n^2}) . We also investigate the complexity of prime knot diagrams. We show rigorously that the probability that a randomly selected 2D uniform random polygon of n vertices is almost diagrammatically prime goes to 1 as n goes to infinity. Furthermore, the average number of crossings in such a diagram is at the order of O(n2). Therefore, the two-dimensional uniform random polygons offer an effective way in sampling large (prime) knots, which can be useful in various applications.

  14. Creative Test Generators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vickers, F. D.

    1973-01-01

    A brief description of a test generating program which generates questions concerning the Fortran programming language in a random but guided fashion and without resorting to an item bank.'' (Author/AK)

  15. ComOn Coaching: Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial to assess the effect of a varied number of coaching sessions on transfer into clinical practice following communication skills training.

    PubMed

    Niglio de Figueiredo, Marcelo; Rudolph, Bärbel; Rodolph, Bärbel; Bylund, Carma L; Goelz, Tanja; Heußner, Pia; Sattel, Heribert; Fritzsche, Kurt; Wuensch, Alexander

    2015-07-07

    Communication skills training has proven to be an effective means to enhance communication of health care professionals in oncology. These effects are well studied in standardized settings. The question of transferring these skills into clinical consultations remains open. We build up on a previous developed training concept consisting of a workshop and coaching. This training achieved a medium effect size in two studies with standardized patients. In the current study, we expanded and manualized the coaching concept, and we will evaluate effects of a varied number of coaching sessions on real clinical consultations. Our aim is to determine how much coaching oncologists need to transfer communication skills into clinical practice. Physicians of two German medical centers will participate in a workshop for communication skills and will be randomized to either a group with one coaching session or a group with four coaching sessions following the workshop. The participation is voluntary and the physicians will receive medical education points. Consultations held by the participating physicians with actual patients who gave their informed consent will be filmed at three time points. These consultations will be evaluated by blinded raters using a checklist based on the training content (primary outcome). Secondary outcomes will be the self-evaluated communication competence by physicians and an evaluation of the consultations by both physicians and patients. We will evaluate our communication training concept on three levels - rater, physician and patient - and concentrate on the transfer of communication skills into real life situations. As we emphasize the external validity in this study design, limitations will be expected due to heterogeneity of data. With this study we aim to gain data on how to improve communication skills training that will result in better patient outcomes. German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00004385 .

  16. Comparative study between Federer and Gomez method for number of replication in complete randomized design using simulation: study of Areca Palm (Areca catechu) as organic waste for producing handicraft paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihwah, A.; Deoranto, P.; Wijana, S.; Dewi, I. A.

    2018-03-01

    The part of Areca Palm (Areca catechu) that economical is the seed. It is commercially available in dried, cured and fresh forms, while the fibre is usually thrown away. Cellulose fibers from agricultural waste can be utilized as raw material for handicraft paper. Laboratory research showed that Areca palm fibre contained 70.2% of cellulose, 10.92% of water, and 6.02% of ash. This indicated that Areca palm fibre is very potential to be processed as handicraft paper. Handicraft paper is made of wastepaper or plants which cointain celluloce to produce rough-textured paper. In order to obtain preferred sensory quality of handicraft paper such as color, fiber appearance and texture as well as good physical quantity such as tensile strength, tear resistance and grammage, the addition of wastepaper to provide secondary fibre and sometimes adhesive are needed in making handicraft paper. Handicraft paper making was one alternative to treat the solid waste and to reduce the use of wood fiber as paper raw material. The aim of this study is to compare the two most famous method, i.e. Federer and Gomez Method, for calculate the number of replications. This study is preliminary research before do the research in order to get the best treatment to produce handicraft paper. The Gomez method calculates fewer replications than the Federer method. Based on data simulation the error generated using 3 replicates of 0.0876 while using 2 replicates of 0.1032.

  17. N-state random switching based on quantum tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardo Gavito, Ramón; Jiménez Urbanos, Fernando; Roberts, Jonathan; Sexton, James; Astbury, Benjamin; Shokeir, Hamzah; McGrath, Thomas; Noori, Yasir J.; Woodhead, Christopher S.; Missous, Mohamed; Roedig, Utz; Young, Robert J.

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we show how the hysteretic behaviour of resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs) can be exploited for new functionalities. In particular, the RTDs exhibit a stochastic 2-state switching mechanism that could be useful for random number generation and cryptographic applications. This behaviour can be scaled to N-bit switching, by connecting various RTDs in series. The InGaAs/AlAs RTDs used in our experiments display very sharp negative differential resistance (NDR) peaks at room temperature which show hysteresis cycles that, rather than having a fixed switching threshold, show a probability distribution about a central value. We propose to use this intrinsic uncertainty emerging from the quantum nature of the RTDs as a source of randomness. We show that a combination of two RTDs in series results in devices with three-state outputs and discuss the possibility of scaling to N-state devices by subsequent series connections of RTDs, which we demonstrate for the up to the 4-state case. In this work, we suggest using that the intrinsic uncertainty in the conduction paths of resonant tunnelling diodes can behave as a source of randomness that can be integrated into current electronics to produce on-chip true random number generators. The N-shaped I-V characteristic of RTDs results in a two-level random voltage output when driven with current pulse trains. Electrical characterisation and randomness testing of the devices was conducted in order to determine the validity of the true randomness assumption. Based on the results obtained for the single RTD case, we suggest the possibility of using multi-well devices to generate N-state random switching devices for their use in random number generation or multi-valued logic devices.

  18. Age-Related Corresponding Relationships of Controlled Force Exertion Measured by a Computer-Generated Sinusoidal and Quasi-Random Display

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagasawa, Yoshinori; Demura, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    This study examined age-group corresponding relationships of the controlled force exertion based on sinusoidal and quasi-random waveforms in 175 right-handed male adults aged 20 to 86 years. The subjects were divided into 3 groups based on age-level: 53 young (mean age 24.6, SD = 3.3 years), 71 middle aged (mean age 44.3, SD = 8.7 years), and 51…

  19. Complex architecture of primes and natural numbers.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Guillermo; Serrano, M Ángeles; Boguñá, Marián

    2014-08-01

    Natural numbers can be divided in two nonoverlapping infinite sets, primes and composites, with composites factorizing into primes. Despite their apparent simplicity, the elucidation of the architecture of natural numbers with primes as building blocks remains elusive. Here, we propose a new approach to decoding the architecture of natural numbers based on complex networks and stochastic processes theory. We introduce a parameter-free non-Markovian dynamical model that naturally generates random primes and their relation with composite numbers with remarkable accuracy. Our model satisfies the prime number theorem as an emerging property and a refined version of Cramér's conjecture about the statistics of gaps between consecutive primes that seems closer to reality than the original Cramér's version. Regarding composites, the model helps us to derive the prime factors counting function, giving the probability of distinct prime factors for any integer. Probabilistic models like ours can help to get deeper insights about primes and the complex architecture of natural numbers.

  20. A Random Variable Transformation Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheuermann, Larry

    1989-01-01

    Provides a short BASIC program, RANVAR, which generates random variates for various theoretical probability distributions. The seven variates include: uniform, exponential, normal, binomial, Poisson, Pascal, and triangular. (MVL)