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Sample records for random peptide libraries

  1. A cell-penetrating peptide from a novel pVII-pIX phage-displayed random peptide library.

    PubMed

    Gao, Changshou; Mao, Shenlan; Ditzel, Henrik J; Farnaes, Lauge; Wirsching, Peter; Lerner, Richard A; Janda, Kim D

    2002-12-01

    A novel random peptide library was constructed using a phage-display format on the coat proteins pVII and pIX of filamentous bacteriophage. Panning against B-lymphocyte WI-L2 cells yielded one unique peptide-phage, denoted CHL8, that specifically bound to and penetrated the cells. Studies of each peptide derived from CHL8, denoted pep7 and pep9, established that only pep7 mediated the observed activity and only as a homodimer. Peptide libraries displayed on pVII-pIX should serve as a novel source of bioactive ligands for a variety of applications.

  2. Screening specific polypeptides of breast cancer stem cells from a phage display random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Qi, Chun-Ling; Kong, Mian; Liu, Ting-Ting; Li, Lei; Li, Bao-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify polypeptides that specifically bond to breast cancer stem cells from a phage display random 12 peptide library, in addition to the affinity and specificity of polypeptides. A phage display random 12 peptide library was screened using breast cancer stem cells as targets isolated from the MDA-MB-231 cell line using the serum-free culture technique with hs578bst and MDA-MB-231 cells as subtract-screening cells. Positive and specific binding clones were amplified and sent for sequencing. The affinity and specificity of the positive clones were subsequently identified by ELISA and 3,3′-diaminobenzidine staining. The results demonstrated that phages were gathered ~500 times following three rounds of biopanning. ELISA identified that the affinity to breast cancer stem cells of the no. 6 phage was 6.14 times higher than that in the control group. In addition, immunohistochemistry observed that the no. 6 phage exhibited high-specificity bonding to breast cancer stem cells, and the peptide sequence of the positive phage was GYSASRSTIPGK following DNA sequencing and translation. Thus, the present study isolated a specific peptide that bonds to breast cancer stem cells from a phage display random peptide library, which may facilitate further studies regarding the stem cell-targeted therapy of breast cancer. PMID:28105180

  3. Chemokine CCR3 ligands-binding peptides derived from a random phage-epitope library.

    PubMed

    Houimel, Mehdi; Mazzucchelli, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophils are major effectors cells implicated in a number of chronic inflammatory diseases in humans, particularly bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis. The human chemokine receptor C-C receptor 3 (hCCR3) provides a mechanism for the recruitment of eosinophils into tissue and thus has recently become an attractive biological target for therapeutic intervention. In order to develop peptides antagonists of hCCR3-hCCL11 (human eotaxin) interactions, a random bacteriophage hexapeptide library was used to map structural features of hCCR3 by determining the epitopes of neutralizing anti-hCCR3 mAb 7B11. This mAb t is selective for hCCR3 and exhibit potent antagonist activity in receptor binding and functional assays. After three rounds of biopanning, four mAb7B11-binding peptides were identified from a 6-mer linear peptide library. The phage bearing the peptides showed specific binding to immobilized mAb 7B11 with over 94% of phages bound being competitively inhibited by free synthetic peptides. In FACScan analysis all selected phage peptides were able to strongly inhibit the binding of mAb 7B11 to hCCR3-transfected preB-300-19 murine cells. Furthermore, synthetic peptides of the corresponding phage epitopes were effective in blocking the antibody-hCCR3 interactions and to inhibit the binding of hCCL11 to hCCR3 transfectants. Chemically synthesized peptides CKGERF, FERKGK, SSMKVK and RHVSSQ, effectively competed for (125)I-hCCL11 binding to hCCR3 with IC(50) ranging from 3.5 to 9.7μM. Calcium release and chemotaxis of hCCR3 transfectants or human eosinophils were inhibited by all peptides in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, they showed inhibitory effects on chemotaxis of human eosinophils induced by hCCL11, hCCL5, hCCL7, hCCL8, and hCCL24. Specificities of all selected peptides were assessed with hCXCR1, hCXCR2, hCXCR3, and hCCR5 receptors. Peptides CKGERF and FERKGK showed inhibitory effects on eosinophil chemotaxis in a murine model of mCCL11-induced

  4. Identification of high-affinity VEGFR3-binding peptides through a phage-displayed random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Li, Cai-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) interaction with its receptor, VEGFR-3/Flt-4, regulates lymphangiogenesis. VEGFR-3/Flt-4 expression in cancer cells has been correlated with clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, and lymphatic invasion. The objective of this study is to identify a VEGFR-3/Flt-4-interacting peptide that could be used to inhibit VEGFR-3 for ovarian cancer therapy. Methods The extracellular fragment of recombinant human VEGFR-3/Flt-4 (rhVEGFR-3/Flt-4) fused with coat protein pIII was screened against a phage-displayed random peptide library. Using affinity enrichment and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening, positive clones of phages were amplified. Three phage clones were selected after four rounds of biopanning, and the specific binding of the peptides to rhVEGFR-3 was detected by ELISA and compared with that of VEGF-D. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses of ovarian cancer tissue sections was undertaken to demonstrate the specificity of the peptides. Results After four rounds of biopanning, ELISA confirmed the specificity of the enriched bound phage clones for rhVEGFR-3. Sequencing and translation identified three different peptides. Non-competitive ELISA revealed that peptides I, II, and III had binding affinities for VEGFR-3 with Kaff (affinity constant) of 16.4±8.6 µg/mL (n=3), 9.2±2.1 µg/mL (n=3), and 174.8±31.1 µg/mL (n=3), respectively. In ovarian carcinoma tissue sections, peptide III (WHWLPNLRHYAS), which had the greatest binding affinity, also co-localized with VEGFR-3 in endothelial cells lining lymphatic vessels; its labeling of ovarian tumors in vivo was also confirmed. Conclusion These finding showed that peptide III has high specificity and activity and, therefore, may represent a potential therapeutic approach to target VEGF-VEGFR-3 signaling for the treatment or diagnosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:26197772

  5. Epitope prediction based on random peptide library screening: benchmark dataset and prediction tools evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pingping; Chen, Wenhan; Huang, Yanxin; Wang, Hongyan; Ma, Zhiqiang; Lv, Yinghua

    2011-06-16

    Epitope prediction based on random peptide library screening has become a focus as a promising method in immunoinformatics research. Some novel software and web-based servers have been proposed in recent years and have succeeded in given test cases. However, since the number of available mimotopes with the relevant structure of template-target complex is limited, a systematic evaluation of these methods is still absent. In this study, a new benchmark dataset was defined. Using this benchmark dataset and a representative dataset, five examples of the most popular epitope prediction software products which are based on random peptide library screening have been evaluated. Using the benchmark dataset, in no method did performance exceed a 0.42 precision and 0.37 sensitivity, and the MCC scores suggest that the epitope prediction results of these software programs are greater than random prediction about 0.09-0.13; while using the representative dataset, most of the values of these performance measures are slightly improved, but the overall performance is still not satisfactory. Many test cases in the benchmark dataset cannot be applied to these pieces of software due to software limitations. Moreover chances are that these software products are overfitted to the small dataset and will fail in other cases. Therefore finding the correlation between mimotopes and genuine epitope residues is still far from resolved and much larger dataset for mimotope-based epitope prediction is desirable.

  6. Internally quenched fluorescent peptide libraries with randomized sequences designed to detect endopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Lilian C G; Silva, Vinícius O; Okamoto, Debora N; Kondo, Marcia Y; Santos, Saara M B; Hirata, Isaura Y; Vallim, Marcelo A; Pascon, Renata C; Gouvea, Iuri E; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz

    2012-02-01

    Identification of synthetic peptide substrates for novel peptidases is an essential step for their study. With this purpose we synthesized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptide libraries Abz (or MCA)-GXXXXXQ-EDDnp and Abz (or MCA)-GXXZXXQ-EDDnp, where X consists of an equimolar mixture of all amino acids, the Z position is fixed with one of the proteinogenic amino acids (cysteine was excluded), Abz (ortho-aminobenzoic acid) or MCA ([7-amino-4-methyl]coumarin) is the fluorescence donor and Q-EDDnp (glutamine-[N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-ethylenediamine]) is the fluorescence acceptor. The peptide libraries MCA-GXXX↓XXQ-EDDnp and MCA-GXXZ↓XXQ-EDDnp were cleaved as indicated (↓) by trypsin, chymotrypsin, cathepsin L, pepsin A, and Eqolisin as confirmed by Edman degradation of the products derived from the digestion of these libraries. The best hydrolyzed Abz-GXXZXXQ-EDDnp sublibraries by these proteases, including Dengue 2 virus NS2B-NS3 protease, contained amino acids at the Z position that are reported to be well accepted by their S(1) subsite. The pH profiles of the hydrolytic activities of these canonical proteases on the libraries were similar to those reported for typical substrates. The FRET peptide libraries provide an efficient and simple approach for detecting nanomolar concentrations of endopeptidases and are useful for initial specificity characterization as performed for two proteases secreted by a Bacillus subtilis.

  7. Screening of randomly mutagenized glucagon-like peptide-1 library by using an integrated yeast-mammalian assay system.

    PubMed

    Shigemori, Tomohiro; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-09-10

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) is a 30-amino acid peptide hormone activating the GLP1 receptor (GLP1R), a class B G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), and is considered to be effective for treating diabetes and other metabolic diseases. Phage display is the first innovative technology in order to prepare and screen a large polypeptide library including GLP1R agonists, but this methodology is not as effective in discovering functional peptides such as activators for GPCRs. Here, we report a novel functional screening system for GPCR-acting peptides, which integrates a yeast peptide secretion system into a biological detection system with GPCR-producing mammalian cells. Using this screening system, we found attractive GLP1R agonists with several substitutions from a random mutant GLP1 library which was secreted by yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This system established here not only enables peptides to be analyzed in the soluble form but also needs no chemical synthesis, purification, and condensation of peptides of interests, and therefore, can be widely applied to the discovery of novel bioactive peptides acting on GPCRs.

  8. Development of a novel efficient method to construct an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Goto, Naoko; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Ohnami, Shumpei; Uchida, Hiroaki; Miura, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masato; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    Redirection of adenovirus vectors by engineering the capsid-coding region has shown limited success because proper targeting ligands are generally unknown. To overcome this limitation, we constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob, and its screening led to successful selections of several particular targeted vectors. In the previous library construction method, the full length of an adenoviral genome was generated by a Cre-lox mediated in vitro recombination between a fiber-modified plasmid library and the enzyme-digested adenoviral DNA/terminal protein complex (DNA-TPC) before transfection to the producer cells. In this system, the procedures were complicated and time-consuming, and approximately 30% of the vectors in the library were defective with no displaying peptide. These may hinder further extensive exploration of cancer-targeting vectors. To resolve these problems, in this study, we developed a novel method with the transfection of a fiber-modified plasmid library and a fiberless adenoviral DNA-TPC in Cre-expressing 293 cells. The use of in-cell Cre recombination and fiberless adenovirus greatly simplified the library-making steps. The fiberless adenovirus was useful in suppressing the expansion of unnecessary adenovirus vectors. In addition, the complexity of the library was more than a 104 level in one well in a 6-well dish, which was 10-fold higher than that of the original method. The results demonstrated that this novel method is useful in producing a high quality live adenovirus library, which could facilitate the development of targeted adenovirus vectors for a variety of applications in medicine. PMID:24380399

  9. Specific and selective probes for Staphylococcus aureus from phage-displayed random peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    De Plano, Laura M; Carnazza, Santina; Messina, Grazia M L; Rizzo, Maria Giovanna; Marletta, Giovanni; Guglielmino, Salvatore P P

    2017-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen causing health care-associated and community-associated infections. Early diagnosis is essential to prevent disease progression and to reduce complications that can be serious. In this study, we selected, from a 9-mer phage peptide library, a phage clone displaying peptide capable of specific binding to S. aureus cell surface, namely St.au9IVS5 (sequence peptide RVRSAPSSS).The ability of the isolated phage clone to interact specifically with S. aureus and the efficacy of its bacteria-binding properties were established by using enzyme linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA). We also demonstrated by Western blot analysis that the most reactive and selective phage peptide binds a 78KDa protein on the bacterial cell surface. Furthermore, we observed selectivity of phage-bacteria-binding allowing to identify clinical isolates of S. aureus in comparison with a panel of other bacterial species. In order to explore the possibility of realizing a selective bacteria biosensor device, based on immobilization of affinity-selected phage, we have studied the physisorbed phage deposition onto a mica surface. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the organization of phage on mica surface and then the binding performance of mica-physisorbed phage to bacterial target was evaluated during the time by fluorescent microscopy. The system is able to bind specifically about 50% of S. aureus cells after 15' and 90% after one hour. Due to specificity and rapidness, this biosensing strategy paves the way to the further development of new cheap biosensors to be used in developing countries, as lab-on-chip (LOC) to detect bacterial agents in clinical diagnostics applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Purification of polyclonal anti-conformational antibodies for use in affinity selection from random peptide phage display libraries: A study using the hydatid vaccine EG95

    PubMed Central

    Read, A.J.; Gauci, C.G.; Lightowlers, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    The use of polyclonal antibodies to screen random peptide phage display libraries often results in the recognition of a large number of peptides that mimic linear epitopes on various proteins. There appears to be a bias in the use of this technology toward the selection of peptides that mimic linear epitopes. In many circumstances the correct folding of a protein immunogen is required for conferring protection. The use of random peptide phage display libraries to identify peptide mimics of conformational epitopes in these cases requires a strategy for overcoming this bias. Conformational epitopes on the hydatid vaccine EG95 have been shown to result in protective immunity in sheep, whereas linear epitopes are not protective. In this paper we describe a strategy that results in the purification of polyclonal antibodies directed against conformational epitopes while eliminating antibodies directed against linear epitopes. These affinity purified antibodies were then used to select a peptide from a random peptide phage display library that has the capacity to mimic conformational epitopes on EG95. This peptide was subsequently used to affinity purify monospecific antibodies against EG95. PMID:19349218

  11. Affinity selection of Nipah and Hendra virus-related vaccine candidates from a complex random peptide library displayed on bacteriophage virus-like particles

    DOEpatents

    Peabody, David S.; Chackerian, Bryce; Ashley, Carlee; Carnes, Eric; Negrete, Oscar

    2017-01-24

    The invention relates to virus-like particles of bacteriophage MS2 (MS2 VLPs) displaying peptide epitopes or peptide mimics of epitopes of Nipah Virus envelope glycoprotein that elicit an immune response against Nipah Virus upon vaccination of humans or animals. Affinity selection on Nipah Virus-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies using random sequence peptide libraries on MS2 VLPs selected peptides with sequence similarity to peptide sequences found within the envelope glycoprotein of Nipah itself, thus identifying the epitopes the antibodies recognize. The selected peptide sequences themselves are not necessarily identical in all respects to a sequence within Nipah Virus glycoprotein, and therefore may be referred to as epitope mimics VLPs displaying these epitope mimics can serve as vaccine. On the other hand, display of the corresponding wild-type sequence derived from Nipah Virus and corresponding to the epitope mapped by affinity selection, may also be used as a vaccine.

  12. Epitope Mapping with Random Phage Display Library

    PubMed Central

    Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi; Goldblum, Randall M.

    2017-01-01

    Random phage display library is used to map conformational as well as linear epitopes. These libraries are available in varying lengths and with circularization. We provide here a protocol conveying our experience using a commercially available peptide phage display library, which in our hands provides good results. PMID:24515483

  13. Generation of bioactive peptides by biological libraries.

    PubMed

    Mersich, Christa; Jungbauer, Alois

    2008-01-15

    Biological libraries are powerful tools for discovery of new ligands as well as for identification of cellular interaction partners. Since the first development of the first biological libraries in form of phage displays, numerous biological libraries have been developed. For the development of new ligands, the usage of synthetic oligonucleotides is the method of choice. Generation of random oligonucleotides has been refined and various strategies for random oligonucleotide design were developed. We trace the progress and design of new strategies for the generation of random oligonucleotides, and include a look at arising diversity biases. On the other hand, genomic libraries are widely employed for investigation of cellular protein-protein interactions and targeted search of proteomic binding partners. Expression of random peptides and proteins in a linear form or integrated in a scaffold can be facilitated both in vitro and in vivo. A typical in vitro system, ribosome display, provides the largest available library size. In vivo methods comprise smaller libraries, the size of which depends on their transformation efficiency. Libraries in different hosts such as phage, bacteria, yeast, insect cells, mammalian cells exhibit higher biosynthetic capabilities. The latest library systems are compared and their strengths and limitations are reviewed.

  14. Identification of polypeptides with selective affinity to intact mouse cerebellar granule neurons from a random peptide-presenting phage library.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sheng T; Dove, Mike; Anderson, Erica; Zhang, Jiangbing; MacKenzie, C Roger

    2004-09-30

    Targeting of postmitotic neurons selectively for gene delivery poses a challenge. One way to achieve such a selective targeting is to link the gene delivery vector with small ligand-binding polypeptides which have selective affinity to intact neurons. In order to identify such novel neuron selective polypeptides, we screened a phage-display library displaying random 12-mer polypeptides and subtractively bio-panned for clones having selectivity towards cultured mouse cerebellar granule neurons. The selected phage clones were amplified and sequenced. Affinities of these clones to neurons were determined by the visible presence or absence of fluorescence of phage particles as detected by immunocytochemistry using an antibody to M-13 phage. This affinity was further qualified by how much phage was bound, and where in or on the cell it tended to accumulate. The selectivity of binding to neurons was determined by the negative binding of these clones to several cultured non-neuronal cells, including, primary glial cells, NT2 cells, human embryonic kidney 293 cells, neuroblastoma cells, and mouse 3T3 cells. Among the 46 clones that we have sequenced and characterized, four clones appeared to have excellent selectivity in binding to neurons. Homology comparison of these polypeptides revealed that three of them contained a consensus D(E)-W(F)-I(N)-D-W motif. This motif was also present in the Bdm1 gene product which was predominantly expressed in postnatal brains. Further characterizations of these polypeptides are required to reveal the utilities of these peptides to function as an effective linker to facilitate gene transfer selectively to neurons.

  15. A NEW RECOMBINANT ADENO-ASSOCIATED VIRUS (AAV)-BASED RANDOM PEPTIDE DISPLAY LIBRARY SYSTEM: INFECTION-DEFECTIVE AAV1.9-3 AS A NOVEL DETARGETED PLATFORM FOR VECTOR EVOLUTION*

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Kei; Nakai, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Directed evolution through genetic engineering of viral capsids followed by selection has emerged as a powerful means to create novel recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors with desired tropism and enhanced properties. One of the most effective approaches uses rAAV-based random peptide display libraries. Here we report a novel system based on an infection-defective rAAV1.9-3 as a platform for random peptide display, and show that biopanning of the libraries in vitro effectively identifies the peptides that restore and enhance rAAV transduction. rAAV1.9-3 has a genetically engineered AAV1 capsid with amino acids 445–568 being replaced with those of AAV9, and has been identified as a variant exhibiting significantly impaired infectivity and delayed blood clearance when infused into mice. In this study, we generated rAAV1.9-3 variant libraries in which 7- or 12-mer random peptides were expressed at the capsid amino acid position 590. Three rounds of positive selection for primary human dermal fibroblasts successfully identified new rAAV-peptide variants that transduce them more efficiently than the prototype rAAV2. Thus our study demonstrates that an infection-defective rAAV variant serves as a novel detargeted platform for random peptide display libraries. We also describe a brief review of recent progress in rAAV-based random peptide display library approaches. PMID:21603583

  16. Enriching Peptide Libraries for Binding Affinity and Specificity Through Computationally Directed Library Design.

    PubMed

    Foight, Glenna Wink; Chen, T Scott; Richman, Daniel; Keating, Amy E

    2017-01-01

    Peptide reagents with high affinity or specificity for their target protein interaction partner are of utility for many important applications. Optimization of peptide binding by screening large libraries is a proven and powerful approach. Libraries designed to be enriched in peptide sequences that are predicted to have desired affinity or specificity characteristics are more likely to yield success than random mutagenesis. We present a library optimization method in which the choice of amino acids to encode at each peptide position can be guided by available experimental data or structure-based predictions. We discuss how to use analysis of predicted library performance to inform rounds of library design. Finally, we include protocols for more complex library design procedures that consider the chemical diversity of the amino acids at each peptide position and optimize a library score based on a user-specified input model.

  17. Screening of Random Peptide Library of Hemagglutinin from Pandemic 2009 A(H1N1) Influenza Virus Reveals Unexpected Antigenically Important Regions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wanghui; Han, Lu; Lin, Zhanglin

    2011-01-01

    The antigenic structure of the membrane protein hemagglutinin (HA) from the 2009 A(H1N1) influenza virus was dissected with a high-throughput screening method using complex antisera. The approach involves generating yeast cell libraries displaying a pool of random peptides of controllable lengths on the cell surface, followed by one round of fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) against antisera from mouse, goat and human, respectively. The amino acid residue frequency appearing in the antigenic peptides at both the primary sequence and structural level was determined and used to identify “hot spots” or antigenically important regions. Unexpectedly, different antigenic structures were seen for different antisera. Moreover, five antigenic regions were identified, of which all but one are located in the conserved HA stem region that is responsible for membrane fusion. Our findings are corroborated by several recent studies on cross-neutralizing H1 subtype antibodies that recognize the HA stem region. The antigenic peptides identified may provide clues for creating peptide vaccines with better accessibility to memory B cells and better induction of cross-neutralizing antibodies than the whole HA protein. The scheme used in this study enables a direct mapping of the antigenic regions of viral proteins recognized by antisera, and may be useful for dissecting the antigenic structures of other viral proteins. PMID:21437206

  18. Intracellular Production of Cyclic Peptide Libraries with SICLOPPS.

    PubMed

    Osher, Eliot L; Tavassoli, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Cyclic peptides are an important class of molecules that are increasingly viewed as an ideal scaffold for inhibition of protein-protein interactions (PPI). Here we detail an approach that enables the intracellular synthesis of cyclic peptide libraries of around 10(8) members. The method utilizes split intein mediated circular ligation of peptides and proteins (SICLOPPS), taking advantage of split intein splicing to cyclize a library of peptide sequences. SICLOPPS allows the ring size, set residues and number of random residues within a library to be predetermined by the user. SICLOPPS libraries have been combined with a variety of cell-based screens to identify cyclic peptide inhibitors of a variety of enzymes and protein-protein interactions.

  19. SICLOPPS cyclic peptide libraries in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Tavassoli, Ali

    2017-02-28

    Cyclic peptide libraries have demonstrated significant potential when employed against challenging targets such as protein-protein interactions. While a variety of methods for library generation exist, genetically encoded libraries hold several advantages over their chemically synthesized counterparts; they are more readily accessible and allow straightforward hit deconvolution. One method for the intracellular generation of such libraries is split-intein circular ligation of peptides and proteins (SICLOPPS). Here we detail and discuss the deployment of SICLOPPS libraries for the identification of cyclic peptide inhibitors of a variety of targets.

  20. Screening of paclitaxel-binding molecules from a library of random peptides displayed on T7 phage particles using paclitaxel-photoimmobilized resin.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Sota; Morohashi, Kengo; Sunoki, Takashi; Kuramochi, Kouji; Kobayashi, Susumu; Sugawara, Fumio

    2007-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol), an effective anticancer agent, is known to bind to tubulin and induce tubulin polymerization. Several other binding proteins of paclitaxel, such as Bcl-2, heat shock proteins, and NSC-1, have also been reported. Here, we describe a T7 phage-based display to screen for paclitaxel-binding molecules from a random peptide library using paclitaxel-photoimmobilized TentaGel resin. Specific phage particles that bind the paclitaxel-immobilized resin were obtained. Among them, two phage clones included the same consensus amino acid sequence (KACGRTRVTS). Analysis of the protein database using BLAST revealed that a portion of this sequence is conserved in the zinc finger domain of human NFX1. Binding affinity of paclitaxel against the partial recombinant protein of NFX1 (424aa-876aa) was confirmed by pull-down assays and surface plasmon resonance analyses.

  1. Identification of a Conserved B-cell Epitope on Reticuloendotheliosis Virus Envelope Protein by Screening a Phage-displayed Random Peptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mei; Shi, Xingming; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Yan; Cui, Hongyu; Hu, Shunlei; Gao, Hongbo; Cui, Xianlan; Wang, Yun-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Background The gp90 protein of avian reticuloendotheliosis-associated virus (REV-A) is an important envelope glycoprotein, which is responsible for inducing protective antibody immune responses in animals. B-cell epitopes on the gp90 protein of REV have not been well studied and reported. Methods and Results This study describes the identification of a linear B-cell epitope on the gp90 protein by screening a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library with the neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) A9E8 directed against the gp90. The mAb A9E8 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif SVQYHPL. Amino acid sequence of the motif exactly matched 213SVQYHPL219 of the gp90. Further identification of the displayed B cell epitope was conducted using a set of truncated peptides expressed as GST fusion proteins and the Western blot results indicated that 213SVQYHPL219 was the minimal determinant of the linear B cell epitope recognized by the mAb A9E8. Moreover, an eight amino acid peptide SVQYHPLA was proven to be the minimal unit of the epitope with the maximal binding activity to mAb A9E8. The REV-A-positive chicken serum reacted with the minimal linear epitopes in Western blot, revealing the importance of the eight amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding activity. Furthermore, we found that the epitope is a common motif shared among REV-A and other members of REV group. Conclusions and Significance We identified 213SVQYHPL219 as a gp90-specific linear B-cell epitope recognized by the neutralizing mAb A9E8. The results in this study may have potential applications in development of diagnostic techniques and epitope-based marker vaccines against REV-A and other viruses of the REV group. PMID:23185456

  2. Biomathematical Description of Synthetic Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Trepel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Libraries of randomised peptides displayed on phages or viral particles are essential tools in a wide spectrum of applications. However, there is only limited understanding of a library's fundamental dynamics and the influences of encoding schemes and sizes on their quality. Numeric properties of libraries, such as the expected number of different peptides and the library's coverage, have long been in use as measures of a library's quality. Here, we present a graphical framework of these measures together with a library's relative efficiency to help to describe libraries in enough detail for researchers to plan new experiments in a more informed manner. In particular, these values allow us to answer-in a probabilistic fashion-the question of whether a specific library does indeed contain one of the "best" possible peptides. The framework is implemented in a web-interface based on two packages, discreteRV and peptider, to the statistical software environment R. We further provide a user-friendly web-interface called PeLiCa (Peptide Library Calculator, http://www.pelica.org), allowing scientists to plan and analyse their peptide libraries. PMID:26042419

  3. Identification of a Conserved Linear B-Cell Epitope of Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC Protein by Screening Phage-Displayed Random Peptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Wang, Xintong; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    The GapC of Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) is a highly conserved surface protein that can induce protective humoral immune response in animals. However, B-cell epitopes on the S. dysgalactiae GapC have not been well identified. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb5B7) against the GapC1-150 protein was prepared. After passive transfer, mAb5B7 could partially protect mice against S. dysgalactiae infection. Eleven positive phage clones recognized by mAb5B7 were identified by screening phage-displayed random 12-peptide library, most of which matched the consensus motif DTTQGRFD. The motif sequence exactly matches amino acids 48-55 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC protein. In addition, the motif 48DTTQGRFD55 shows high homology among various streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues D48, T50, Q51, G52 and F54 formed the core motif of 48DTTQGRFD55. This motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb5B7. As expected, epitope-peptide evoked protective immune response against S. dysgalactiae infection in immunized mice. Taken together, this identified conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC could provide very valuable insights for vaccine design against S. dysgalactiae infection. PMID:26121648

  4. Genetically Encoded Libraries of Nonstandard Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Takashi; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The presence of a nonproteinogenic moiety in a nonstandard peptide often improves the biological properties of the peptide. Non-standard peptide libraries are therefore used to obtain valuable molecules for biological, therapeutic, and diagnostic applications. Highly diverse non-standard peptide libraries can be generated by chemically or enzymatically modifying standard peptide libraries synthesized by the ribosomal machinery, using posttranslational modifications. Alternatively, strategies for encoding non-proteinogenic amino acids into the genetic code have been developed for the direct ribosomal synthesis of non-standard peptide libraries. In the strategies for genetic code expansion, non-proteinogenic amino acids are assigned to the nonsense codons or 4-base codons in order to add these amino acids to the universal genetic code. In contrast, in the strategies for genetic code reprogramming, some proteinogenic amino acids are erased from the genetic code and non-proteinogenic amino acids are reassigned to the blank codons. Here, we discuss the generation of genetically encoded non-standard peptide libraries using these strategies and also review recent applications of these libraries to the selection of functional non-standard peptides. PMID:23097693

  5. Identification of two linear B-cell epitopes from West Nile virus NS1 by screening a phage-displayed random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The West Nile virus (WNV) nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is an important antigenic protein that elicits protective antibody responses in animals and can be used for the serological diagnosis of WNV infection. Although previous work has demonstrated the vital role of WNV NS1-specific antibody responses, the specific epitopes in the NS1 have not been identified. Results The present study describes the identification of two linear B-cell epitopes in WNV NS1 through screening a phage-displayed random 12-mer peptide library with two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 3C7 and 4D1 that directed against the NS1. The mAbs 3C7 and 4D1 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motifs LTATTEK and VVDGPETKEC, respectively. Exact sequences of both motifs were found in the NS1 (895LTATTEK901 and 925VVDGPETKEC934). Further identification of the displayed B cell epitopes were conducted using a set of truncated peptides expressed as MBP fusion proteins. The data indicated that 896TATTEK901 and925VVDGPETKEC934 are minimal determinants of the linear B cell epitopes recognized by the mAbs 3C7 and 4D1, respectively. Antibodies present in the serum of WNV-positive horses recognized the minimal linear epitopes in Western blot analysis, indicating that the two peptides are antigenic in horses during infection. Furthermore, we found that the epitope recognized by 3C7 is conserved only among WNV strains, whereas the epitope recognized by 4D1 is a common motif shared among WNV and other members of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) serocomplex. Conclusions We identified TATTEK and VVDGPETKEC as NS1-specific linear B-cell epitopes recognized by the mAbs 3C7 and 4D1, respectively. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study may have potential applications in differential diagnosis and the development of epitope-based marker vaccines against WNV and other viruses of JEV serocomplex. PMID:21729328

  6. Encoded libraries of chemically modified peptides.

    PubMed

    Heinis, Christian; Winter, Greg

    2015-06-01

    The use of powerful technologies for generating and screening DNA-encoded protein libraries has helped drive the development of proteins as pharmaceutical ligands. However the development of peptides as pharmaceutical ligands has been more limited. Although encoded peptide libraries are typically several orders of magnitude larger than classical chemical libraries, can be more readily screened, and can give rise to higher affinity ligands, their use as pharmaceutical ligands is limited by their intrinsic properties. Two of the intrinsic limitations include the rotational flexibility of the peptide backbone and the limited number (20) of natural amino acids. However these limitations can be overcome by use of chemical modification. For example, the libraries can be modified to introduce topological constraints such as cyclization linkers, or to introduce new chemical entities such as small molecule ligands, fluorophores and photo-switchable compounds. This article reviews the chemistry involved, the properties of the peptide ligands, and the new opportunities offered by chemical modification of DNA-encoded peptide libraries.

  7. Phage-displayed peptide library screening for preferred human substrate peptide sequences for transglutaminase 7.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Katsuma; Yamasaki, Risa; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Hitomi, Kiyotaka

    2013-09-01

    Transglutaminases are a family of enzymes that catalyze cross-linking reactions between proteins. Among the members, there is currently no information regarding the substrate preferences of transglutaminase 7 (TG7), that would clarify its physiological significance. We previously obtained several highly reactive substrate peptide sequences of transglutaminases from a random peptide library. In this study, we screened for preferred substrate sequences for TG7 from a phage-displayed 12-mer peptide library. The most preferred sequence was selected based on reactivity and isozyme specificity. We firstly exhibited the tendency for the preference of substrate sequence for TG7. Then, using the most efficient peptide, Z3S, we established an in vitro assay system to assess enzymatic activity of TG7.

  8. Selection of novel nickel-binding peptides from flagella displayed secondary peptide library.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jie; Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Jie; Xin, Zhong-Tao; Yang, Guang; Gao, Bo; Mao, Can-Quan; Liu, Nong-Le; Wang, Fang; Shao, Ning-Sheng; Fan, Ming; Xue, Yan-Ning

    2006-08-01

    Nickel (Ni) performs its biological or toxic functions in nickel-protein coordination form. Novel Ni-binding peptides were isolated from a random dodecapeptide library displayed on the flagella of Escherichia coli against immobilized ions. On the basis of isolated sequences rich in histidine residues, two secondary libraries were constructed respectively. By consequent selection, more Ni-chelating peptides were identified and the consensus motif RHXHR (where X was always H) was deduced. The result suggested that not only histidine, but also arginine, play an important role in Ni-binding. Furthermore, two selected clones (1035 and 2022) were chosen for further identification. They exhibited similar relative binding affinity, which was about nine times that of the original library derived clones and statistically much more significant than the positive control with polyhistidine insert. Free nickel ions could almost completely inhibit the binding of the clones 1035 and 2022 to immobilized nickel, implicating that the peptides were able to chelate nickel ions. These studies reveal that bacterial surface displayed peptide libraries may have promising future potential for the development of metal bioadsorbents. Furthermore, novel Ni-binding peptides may provide lead molecules for Ni-chelation and applications thereof.

  9. Analysis of the CD2 and spliceosomal Sm B/B' polyproline-arginine motifs defined by a monoclonal antibody using a phage-displayed random peptide library.

    PubMed

    Monos, Dimitri; Heliopoulos, John; Argyris, Elias; Cordopatis, Paul; Zompra, Aikaterini; Kamoun, Malek

    2006-01-01

    The cytoplasmic region of the CD2 receptor of lymphocytes contains proline-rich motifs, which are involved in T cell activation and interleukin-2 production. An intracellular CD2 binding protein, CD2BP2, interacts with two tandem PPPPGHR segments of the CD2 tail. CD2BP2 contains a GYF (glycine-tyrosine-phenylalanine) domain that confers binding to these proline-rich sequences. Monoclonal antibody 3E10 that was previously raised against a peptide containing the CD2 PPPPGHR segment reacts with the native CD2 molecule and spliceosomal Sm B/B' proteins. To identify the exact epitope on the CD2 peptide recognized by 3E10, a phage-displayed combinatorial peptide library was used. Analysis of the selected clones revealed that the mAb 3E10 binds preferentially to the motif PxxPPGxR. Experiments using amino acid substitutions with synthetic peptides confirmed the reactivity of mAb 3E10 with this motif. In addition, we show that several similarities exist between this motif and the CD2BP2-GFY recognition motif PPGxR/K. Binding of antibody 3E10 indicates some degree of degeneracy, which is consistent with its ability to recognize structurally related polyproline-arginine motifs found in intracellular proteins including Sm B/B' proteins and other RNA binding proteins. Thus, mAb 3E10 can be used to specifically identify a sub-class of proline-rich motifs, and as such can be used to study the potential role of these proline-rich sequences in mediating protein-protein interactions.

  10. Mixture-based peptide libraries for identifying protease cleavage motifs.

    PubMed

    Turk, Benjamin E

    2009-01-01

    All proteases and peptidases are to some extent sequence-specific, in that one or more residues are preferred at particular positions surrounding the cleavage site in substrates. I describe here a general protocol for determining protease cleavage site preferences using mixture-based peptide libraries. Initially a completely random, amino-terminally capped peptide mixture is digested with the protease of interest, and the cleavage products are analyzed by automated Edman sequencing. The distribution of amino acids found in each sequencing cycle indicates which residues are preferred by the protease at positions downstream of the cleavage site. On the basis of these results, a second peptide library is designed that is partially degenerate and partially fixed sequence. Edman sequencing analysis of the cleavage products of this peptide mixture provides preferences amino-terminal to the scissile bond. As necessary, the process is reiterated until the full cleavage motif of the protease is known. Cleavage specificity data obtained with this method have been used to generate specific and efficient peptide substrates, to design potent and specific inhibitors, and to identify novel protease substrates.

  11. PASSEL: the PeptideAtlas SRMexperiment library.

    PubMed

    Farrah, Terry; Deutsch, Eric W; Kreisberg, Richard; Sun, Zhi; Campbell, David S; Mendoza, Luis; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Brusniak, Mi-Youn; Hüttenhain, Ruth; Schiess, Ralph; Selevsek, Nathalie; Aebersold, Ruedi; Moritz, Robert L

    2012-04-01

    Public repositories for proteomics data have accelerated proteomics research by enabling more efficient cross-analyses of datasets, supporting the creation of protein and peptide compendia of experimental results, supporting the development and testing of new software tools, and facilitating the manuscript review process. The repositories available to date have been designed to accommodate either shotgun experiments or generic proteomic data files. Here, we describe a new kind of proteomic data repository for the collection and representation of data from selected reaction monitoring (SRM) measurements. The PeptideAtlas SRM Experiment Library (PASSEL) allows researchers to easily submit proteomic data sets generated by SRM. The raw data are automatically processed in a uniform manner and the results are stored in a database, where they may be downloaded or browsed via a web interface that includes a chromatogram viewer. PASSELenables cross-analysis of SRMdata, supports optimization of SRMdata collection, and facilitates the review process of SRMdata. Further, PASSELwill help in the assessment of proteotypic peptide performance in a wide array of samples containing the same peptide, as well as across multiple experimental protocols.

  12. Screening of a specific peptide binding to esophageal squamous carcinoma cells from phage displayed peptide library.

    PubMed

    Ma, Caixia; Li, Chunyan; Jiang, Dongliang; Gao, Xiaojie; Han, Juanjuan; Xu, Nan; Wu, Qiong; Nie, Guochao; Chen, Wei; Lin, Fenghuei; Hou, Yingchun

    2015-06-01

    To select a specifically binding peptide for imaging detection of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), a phage-displayed 12-mer peptide library was used to screen the peptide that bind to ESCC cells specifically. After four rounds of bio-panning, the phage recovery rate gradually increased, and specific phage clones were effectively enriched. The 60 randomly selected phage clones were tested using cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and 41 phage clones were identified as positive clones with the over 2.10 ratio of absorbance higher than other clones, IRP and PBS controls. From the sequencing results of the positive clones, 14 peptide sequences were obtained and ESCP9 consensus sequence was identified as the peptide with best affinity to ESCC cells via competitive inhibition, fluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. The results indicate that the peptide ESCP9 can bind to ESCC cells specifically and sensitively, and it is a potential candidate to be developed as an useful molecule to the imaging detection and targeting therapy for ESCC.

  13. Use of Peptide Libraries for Identification and Optimization of Novel Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Martin; Petkova, Asya; Gani, Jurnorain; Mikut, Ralf; Hilpert, Kai

    2017-01-01

    The increasing rates of resistance among bacteria and to a lesser extent fungi have resulted in an urgent need to find new molecules that hold therapeutic promise against multidrug-resistant strains. Antimicrobial peptides have proven very effective against a variety of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Additionally, the low levels of resistance reported towards these molecules are an attractive feature for antimicrobial drug development. Here we summarise information on diverse peptide libraries used to discover or to optimize antimicrobial peptides. Chemical synthesized peptide libraries, for example split and mix method, tea bag method, multi-pin method and cellulose spot method are discussed. In addition biological peptide library screening methods are summarized, like phage display, bacterial display, mRNA-display and ribosomal display. A few examples are given for small peptide libraries, which almost exclusively follow a rational design of peptides of interest rather than a combinatorial approach.

  14. Inhibition of multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes by peptides isolated from combinatorial phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Flachbartova, Z; Pulzova, L; Bencurova, E; Potocnakova, L; Comor, L; Bednarikova, Z; Bhide, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to isolate and characterize novel antimicrobial peptides from peptide phage library with antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes. Combinatorial phage-display library was used to affinity select peptides binding to the cell surface of multidrug resistant L. monocytogenes. After several rounds of affinity selection followed by sequencing, three peptides were revealed as the most promising candidates. Peptide L2 exhibited features common to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), and was rich in Asp, His and Lys residues. Peptide L3 (NSWIQAPDTKSI), like peptide L2, inhibited bacterial growth in vitro, without any hemolytic or cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells. L1 peptide showed no inhibitory effect on Listeria. Structurally, peptides L2 and L3 formed random coils composed of α-helix and β-sheet units. Peptides L2 and L3 exhibited antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant isolates of L. monocytogenes with no haemolytic or toxic effects. Both peptides identified in this study have the potential to be beneficial in human and veterinary medicine.

  15. Were arachnids the first to use combinatorial peptide libraries?

    PubMed

    Sollod, Brianna L; Wilson, David; Zhaxybayeva, Olga; Gogarten, J Peter; Drinkwater, Roger; King, Glenn F

    2005-01-01

    Spiders, scorpions, and cone snails are remarkable for the extent and diversity of gene-encoded peptide neurotoxins that are expressed in their venom glands. These toxins are produced in the form of structurally constrained combinatorial peptide libraries in which there is hypermutation of essentially all residues in the mature-toxin sequence with the exception of a handful of strictly conserved cysteines that direct the three-dimensional fold of the toxin. This gene-based combinatorial peptide library strategy appears to have been first implemented by arachnids almost 400 million years ago, long before cone snails evolved a similar mechanism for generating peptide diversity.

  16. Assessing high affinity binding to HLA-DQ2.5 by a novel peptide library based approach.

    PubMed

    Jüse, Ulrike; Arntzen, Magnus; Højrup, Peter; Fleckenstein, Burkhard; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2011-04-01

    Here we report on a novel peptide library based method for HLA class II binding motif identification. The approach is based on water soluble HLA class II molecules and soluble dedicated peptide libraries. A high number of different synthetic peptides are competing to interact with a limited amount of HLA molecules, giving a selective force in the binding. The peptide libraries can be designed so that the sequence length, the alignment of binding registers, the numbers and composition of random positions are controlled, and also modified amino acids can be included. Selected library peptides bound to HLA are then isolated by size exclusion chromatography and sequenced by tandem mass spectrometry online coupled to liquid chromatography. The MS/MS data are subsequently searched against a library defined database using a search engine such as Mascot, followed by manual inspection of the results. We used two dodecamer and two decamer peptide libraries and HLA-DQ2.5 to test possibilities and limits of this method. The selected sequences which we identified in the fraction eluted from HLA-DQ2.5 showed a higher average of their predicted binding affinity values compared to the original peptide library. The eluted sequences fit very well with the previously described HLA-DQ2.5 peptide binding motif. This novel method, limited by library complexity and sensitivity of mass spectrometry, allows the analysis of several thousand synthetic sequences concomitantly in a simple water soluble format.

  17. Library design-facilitated high-throughput sequencing of synthetic peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander Alexandrovich; Gates, Zachary P; Zhang, Chi; Quartararo, Anthony J; Halloran, Kathryn H; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2017-09-11

    A methodology to achieve high-throughput de novo sequencing of synthetic peptide mixtures is reported. The approach leverages shotgun nano-liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry-based de novo sequencing of library mixtures (up to 2000 peptides), as well as automated data analysis protocols to filter away incorrect assignments, noise and synthetic side-products. To increase the confidence in sequencing results, mass spectrometry-friendly library designs were developed, which enabled unambiguous decoding of up to 600 peptide sequences per hour while maintaining greater than 85% sequence identification rate in most cases. The reliability of the reported decoding strategy was additionally confirmed by matching fragmentation spectra for select authentic peptides identified from library sequencing samples. The methods reported here are directly applicable to screening techniques that yield mixtures of active compounds, including particle sorting of one-bead one-compound libraries, and affinity enrichment of synthetic library mixtures performed in solution.

  18. Preparation of peptides which mimic glycosphingolipids by using phage peptide library and their modulation on beta-galactosidase activity.

    PubMed

    Taki, T; Ishikawa, D; Hamasaki, H; Handa, S

    1997-11-24

    We describe the use of a phage-displayed random pentadecamer peptide library for searching glycosphingolipid mimicking peptides. Two phage clones (AD-1 and AD-2) were selected by biopanning using monoclonal antibody AD117m, directed to lactotetraosylceramide (Lc4Cer). The amino acid sequences of the selected clones showed high homology (VPPXFXXXY) in 9-mer. Three phage clones were selected by using monoclonal antibody H11, directed to neolactotetraosylceramide (nLc4Cer), the linkage isomer of Lc4Cer, and the displayed amino acid sequences were compared. One of these peptides showed the same amino acid sequence as that of AD-2 except for one amino acid substitution. Pentadecamer, 9-mer and point mutated 9-mer peptides were synthesized on the basis of the displayed amino acid sequences. Binding activity of the peptides to the monoclonal antibodies or Ricinus communis lectin showed that 9-mer peptides are enough to mimic the epitope carbohydrate structure. Furthermore, six of the synthesized peptides inhibited Jack bean beta-galactosidase activity towards nLc4Cer at a high concentration of the enzyme, whereas at lower enzyme concentrations some peptides showed potent activation of the enzyme activity. This is the first report of carbohydrate mimicking peptides which modulate glycosidase activity.

  19. Inhibitors of human heart chymase based on a peptide library.

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, M; Maeji, N J; Abeles, R H

    1995-01-01

    We have synthesized two sets of noncleavable peptide-inhibitor libraries to map the S and S' subsites of human heart chymase. Human heart chymase is a chymotrypsin-like enzyme that converts angiotensin I to angiotensin II. The first library consists of peptides with 3-fluorobenzylpyruvamides in the P1 position. (Amino acid residues of substrates numbered P1, P2, etc., are toward the N-terminal direction, and P'1, P'2, etc., are toward the C-terminal direction from the scissile bond.) The P'1 and P'2 positions were varied to contain each one of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids and P'3 was kept constant as an arginine. The second library consists of peptides with phenylalanine keto-amides at P1, glycine in P'1, and benzyloxycarbonyl (Z)-isoleucine in P4. The P2 and P3 positions were varied to contain each of the naturally occurring amino acids, except for cysteine and methionine. The peptides of both libraries are attached to a solid support (pins). The peptides are evaluated by immersing the pins in a solution of the target enzyme and evaluating the amount of enzyme absorbed. The pins with the best inhibitors will absorb most enzyme. The libraries select the best and worst inhibitors within each group of peptides and provide an approximate ranking of the remaining peptides according to Ki. Through this library, we determined that Z-Ile-Glu-Pro-Phe-CO2Me and (F)-Phe-CO-Glu-Asp-ArgOMe should be the best inhibitors of chymase in this collection of peptide inhibitors. We synthesized the peptides and found Ki values were 1 nM and 1 microM, respectively. The corresponding Ki values for chymotrypsin were 10 nM and 100 microM. The use of libraries of inhibitors has advantages over the classical method of synthesis of potential inhibitors in solution: the libraries are reusable, the same libraries can be used with a variety of different serine proteases, and the method allows the screening of hundreds of compounds in short periods of time. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7624313

  20. Inhibitors of human heart chymase based on a peptide library.

    PubMed

    Bastos, M; Maeji, N J; Abeles, R H

    1995-07-18

    We have synthesized two sets of noncleavable peptide-inhibitor libraries to map the S and S' subsites of human heart chymase. Human heart chymase is a chymotrypsin-like enzyme that converts angiotensin I to angiotensin II. The first library consists of peptides with 3-fluorobenzylpyruvamides in the P1 position. (Amino acid residues of substrates numbered P1, P2, etc., are toward the N-terminal direction, and P'1, P'2, etc., are toward the C-terminal direction from the scissile bond.) The P'1 and P'2 positions were varied to contain each one of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids and P'3 was kept constant as an arginine. The second library consists of peptides with phenylalanine keto-amides at P1, glycine in P'1, and benzyloxycarbonyl (Z)-isoleucine in P4. The P2 and P3 positions were varied to contain each of the naturally occurring amino acids, except for cysteine and methionine. The peptides of both libraries are attached to a solid support (pins). The peptides are evaluated by immersing the pins in a solution of the target enzyme and evaluating the amount of enzyme absorbed. The pins with the best inhibitors will absorb most enzyme. The libraries select the best and worst inhibitors within each group of peptides and provide an approximate ranking of the remaining peptides according to Ki. Through this library, we determined that Z-Ile-Glu-Pro-Phe-CO2Me and (F)-Phe-CO-Glu-Asp-ArgOMe should be the best inhibitors of chymase in this collection of peptide inhibitors. We synthesized the peptides and found Ki values were 1 nM and 1 microM, respectively. The corresponding Ki values for chymotrypsin were 10 nM and 100 microM. The use of libraries of inhibitors has advantages over the classical method of synthesis of potential inhibitors in solution: the libraries are reusable, the same libraries can be used with a variety of different serine proteases, and the method allows the screening of hundreds of compounds in short periods of time.

  1. Optimization of design and production strategies for novel adeno-associated viral display peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Körbelin, J; Hunger, A; Alawi, M; Sieber, T; Binder, M; Trepel, M

    2017-08-01

    Libraries displaying random peptides on the surface of adeno-associated virus (AAV) are powerful tools for the generation of target-specific gene therapy vectors. However, for unknown reasons the success rate of AAV library screenings is variable and the influence of the production procedure has not been thoroughly evaluated. During library screenings, the capsid variants with the most favorable tropism are enriched over several selection rounds on a target of choice and identified by subsequent sequencing of the encapsidated viral genomes encoding the library capsids with targeting peptide insertions. Thus, a high capsid-genome correlation is crucial to obtain the correct information about the selected capsid variants. Producing AAV libraries by a two-step protocol with pseudotyped library transfer shuttles has been proposed as one way to ensure such a correlation. Here we show that AAV2 libraries produced by such a protocol via transfer shuttles display an unexpected additional bias in the amino-acid composition which confers increased heparin affinity and thus similarity to wildtype AAV2 tropism. This bias may fundamentally impair the intended use of AAV libraries, discouraging the use of transfer shuttles for the production of AAV libraries in the future.

  2. An in vitro polysome display system for identifying ligands from very large peptide libraries.

    PubMed Central

    Mattheakis, L C; Bhatt, R R; Dower, W J

    1994-01-01

    We have used an in vitro protein synthesis system to construct a very large library of peptides displayed on polysomes. A pool of DNA sequences encoding 10(12) random decapeptides was incubated in an Escherichia coli S30 coupled transcription/translation system. Polysomes were isolated and screened by affinity selection of the nascent peptides on an immobilized monoclonal antibody specific for the peptide dynorphin B. The mRNA from the enriched pool of polysomes was recovered, copied into cDNA, and amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to produce template for the next round of in vitro synthesis and selection. A portion of the amplified template from each round was cloned into a filamentous phagemid vector to determine the specificity of peptide binding by phage ELISA and to sequence the DNA. After four rounds of affinity selection, the majority of clones encoded peptides that bound specifically to the antibody and contained a consensus sequence that is similar to the known epitope for the antibody. Synthetic peptides corresponding to several of these sequences have binding affinities ranging from 7 to 140 nM. The in vitro system described here has the potential to screen peptide libraries that are three to six orders of magnitude larger than current biological peptide display systems. Images PMID:7522328

  3. Building and Searching Tandem Mass Spectral Libraries for Peptide Identification*

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Spectral library searching is an emerging approach in peptide identifications from tandem mass spectra, a critical step in proteomic data analysis. Conceptually, the premise of this approach is that the tandem MS fragmentation pattern of a peptide under some fixed conditions is a reproducible fingerprint of that peptide, such that unknown spectra acquired under the same conditions can be identified by spectral matching. In actual practice, a spectral library is first meticulously compiled from a large collection of previously observed and identified tandem MS spectra, usually obtained from shotgun proteomics experiments of complex mixtures. Then, a query spectrum is then identified by spectral matching using recently developed spectral search engines. This review discusses the basic principles of the two pillars of this approach: spectral library construction, and spectral library searching. An overview of the software tools available for these two tasks, as well as a high-level description of the underlying algorithms, will be given. Finally, several new methods that utilize spectral libraries for peptide identification in ways other than straightforward spectral matching will also be described. PMID:21900153

  4. Reversible cyclic peptide libraries for the discovery of affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Menegatti, Stefano; Ward, Kevin Lawrence; Naik, Amith Dattatray; Kish, William Stanley; Blackburn, Robert Kevin; Carbonell, Ruben Guillermo

    2013-10-01

    A novel strategy is presented for the identification of cyclic peptide ligands from combinatorial libraries of reversible cyclic depsipeptides. A method for the solid-phase synthesis of individual cyclic depsipeptides and combinatorial libraries of these compounds is proposed, which employs lactic acid (Lact) and the dipeptide ester (Nα-Ac)-Ser(Ala)- as linkers for dilactonization. Upon alkaline treatment of the beads selected by screening a model library, the cyclic depsipeptides are linearized and released from the solid support to the liquid phase, to be sequenced via single-step tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The protocol presented for library synthesis provides for wide structural diversity. Two model sequences, VVWVVK and AAWAAR, were chosen to present different structural examples for depsipeptide libraries and demonstrate the process of sequence determination by mass spectrometry. Further, a case study using the IgG binding cyclic depsipeptide cyclo[(Nα-Ac)-S(A)-RWHYFK-Lact-E] is presented to demonstrate the process of library screening and sequence determination on the selected beads. Finally, a method is shown for synthesis of the irreversible cyclic peptide corresponding to the proposed depsipeptide structure, to make the ligand stable to the aqueous acid and alkaline conditions encountered in affinity chromatographic applications. The cyclic peptide ligand was synthesized on a poly(methacrylate) resin and used for chromatographic binding of the target IgG.

  5. Improvement of binding of Puumala virus neutralization site resembling peptide with a second-generation phage library.

    PubMed

    Heiskanen, Tuomas; Li, Xiao-Dong; Hepojoki, Jussi; Gustafsson, Elisabeth; Lundkvist, Ake; Vaheri, Antti; Lankinen, Hilkka

    2003-06-01

    We have previously selected a peptide insert FPCDRLSGYWERGIPSPCVR recognizing the Puumala virus (PUUV) G2-glycoprotein-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb) 1C9 with Kd of 2.85 x 10(-8) from a random peptide library X2CX14CX2 expressed on the pIII protein of the filamentous phage fd-tet. We have now created a second-generation phage-displayed peptide library in which each amino acid of the peptide was mutated randomly to another with a certain probability. Peptides were selected for higher affinity for MAb 1C9 and for a common binding motif for MAb 4G2 having an overlapping epitope with MAb 1C9 in G2 glycoprotein. The resulting peptides were synthesized as spots on cellulose membrane. Amino acid changes which improved the reactivity of the peptides to MAb 1C9 were combined in the peptide ATCDKLFGYYERGIPLPCAL with Kd of 1.49 x 10(-9) in biosensor measurements. Our results show that the binding properties of peptides, the affinity and the specificity can be improved and the binding specificity determining amino acids and structural factors can be analyzed by combining binding assays with synthetic peptides on membrane with the use of second-generation phage display libraries.

  6. Peptide library synthesis on spectrally encoded beads for multiplexed protein/peptide bioassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Huy Q.; Brower, Kara; Harink, Björn; Baxter, Brian; Thorn, Kurt S.; Fordyce, Polly M.

    2017-02-01

    Protein-peptide interactions are essential for cellular responses. Despite their importance, these interactions remain largely uncharacterized due to experimental challenges associated with their measurement. Current techniques (e.g. surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence polarization, and isothermal calorimetry) either require large amounts of purified material or direct fluorescent labeling, making high-throughput measurements laborious and expensive. In this report, we present a new technology for measuring antibody-peptide interactions in vitro that leverages spectrally encoded beads for biological multiplexing. Specific peptide sequences are synthesized directly on encoded beads with a 1:1 relationship between peptide sequence and embedded code, thereby making it possible to track many peptide sequences throughout the course of an experiment within a single small volume. We demonstrate the potential of these bead-bound peptide libraries by: (1) creating a set of 46 peptides composed of 3 commonly used epitope tags (myc, FLAG, and HA) and single amino-acid scanning mutants; (2) incubating with a mixture of fluorescently-labeled antimyc, anti-FLAG, and anti-HA antibodies; and (3) imaging these bead-bound libraries to simultaneously identify the embedded spectral code (and thus the sequence of the associated peptide) and quantify the amount of each antibody bound. To our knowledge, these data demonstrate the first customized peptide library synthesized directly on spectrally encoded beads. While the implementation of the technology provided here is a high-affinity antibody/protein interaction with a small code space, we believe this platform can be broadly applicable to any range of peptide screening applications, with the capability to multiplex into libraries of hundreds to thousands of peptides in a single assay.

  7. Multipin technology in the preparation and screening of peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Rodda, S J; Mason, T J; Maeji, N J

    1993-01-01

    Peptide libraries are relatively new sources of enormous numbers of unique compounds, fodder for the mill of drug discovery programs. Their enormous diversity derives from vast numbers of combinations of a small number of monomers (Geysen et al., 1986). For example, a complete hexapeptide library synthesized from just 10 monomers (amino acids) has one million unique compounds in it. In principle, other types of combinatorial libraries can have equally vast numbers of members; for example, the monomers can be N-acyl glycines, giving rise to the so-called "peptoids" (Simon et al., 1992); or the monomers could be monosaccharides or nucleotides.

  8. Identification and immunogenicity of an immunodominant mimotope of Avibacterium paragallinarum from a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjun; Gao, Yaping; Gong, Yumei; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Chuan; Zhou, Xuemei; Blackall, P J; Zhang, Peijun; Yang, Hanchun

    2007-01-31

    Avibacterium paragallinarum is the causative agent of infectious coryza. The protective antigens of this important pathogen have not yet been clearly identified. In this paper, we applied phage display technique to screen the immunodominant mimotopes of a serovar A strain of A. paragallinarum by using a random 12-peptide library, and evaluated the immunogenicity in chickens of the selected mimotope. Polyclonal antibody directed against A. paragallinarum strain 0083 (serovar A) was used as the target antibody and phage clones binding to this target were screened from the 12-mer random peptide library. More than 50% of the phage clones selected in the third round carried the consensus peptide motif sequence A-DP(M)L. The phage clones containing the peptide motif reacted with the target antibody and this interaction could be blocked, in a dose-dependent manner, by A. paragallinarum. One of the peptide sequences, YGLLAVDPLFKP, was selected and the corresponding oligonucleotide sequence was synthesized and then inserted into the expression vector pFliTrx. The recombinant plasmid was transferred into an expression host Escherichia coli GI826 by electroporation, resulting in a recombinant E. coli expressing the peptide on the bacterial surface. Intramuscular injection of the epitope-expressing recombinant bacteria into chickens induced a specific serological response to serovar A. A. paragallinarum. The chickens given the recombinant E. coli showed significant protection against challenge with A. paragallinarum 0083. These results indicated a potential for the use of the mimotope in the development of molecular vaccines for infectious coryza.

  9. Synthesis and screening of peptide libraries with free C-termini.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yen-Chih; Distefano, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Peptide libraries are useful tools to investigate the relationship between structure and function of proteins. The creation of peptide libraries with free C-termini presents unique synthetic challenges. In this review, methods for creating peptide libraries using either solid-phase peptide synthesis or phage display are described. Methods for screening such libraries and their application in studying several important biological problems are also reported.

  10. Random glycopeptide bead libraries for seromic biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Kracun, Stjepan K; Cló, Emiliano; Clausen, Henrik; Levery, Steven B; Jensen, Knud J; Blixt, Ola

    2010-12-03

    Identification of disease-specific biomarkers is important to address early diagnosis and management of disease. Aberrant post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins such as O-glycosylations (O-PTMs) are emerging as triggers of autoantibodies that can serve as sensitive biomarkers. Here we have developed a random glycopeptide bead library screening platform for detection of autoantibodies and other binding proteins. Libraries were build on biocompatible PEGA beads including a safety-catch C-terminal amide linker (SCAL) that allowed mild cleavage conditions (I(2)/NaBH(4) and TFA) for release of glycopeptides and sequence determination by ESI-Orbitrap-MS(n). As proof-of-principle, tumor -specific glycopeptide reporter epitopes were built-in into the libraries and were detected by tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies and autoantibodies from cancer patients. Sequenced and identified glycopeptides were resynthesized at the preparative scale by automated parallel peptide synthesis and printed on microarrays for validation and broader analysis with larger sets of sera. We further showed that chemical synthesis of the monosaccharide O-glycopeptide library (Tn-glycoform) could be diversified to other tumor glycoforms by on-bead enzymatic glycosylation reactions with recombinant glycosyltransferases. Hence, we have developed a high-throughput flexible platform for rapid discovery of O-glycopeptide biomarkers and the method has applicability in other types of assays such as lectin/antibody/enzyme specificity studies as well as investigation of other PTMs.

  11. Purification of anti-MUC1 antibodies by peptide mimotope affinity chromatography using peptides derived from a polyvalent phage display library.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard G; Missailidis, Sotiris; Price, Michael R

    2002-01-05

    A polyvalent, lytic phage display system (T7Select415-1b) displaying a random peptide library has been investigated for its ability to discover novel mimotopes reactive with the therapeutic monoclonal antibody C595. Sequence analysis of enriched phage lead to the identification of a predominant sequence RNREAPRGKICS, and two other consensus sequences RXXP and RXP. The novel synthetic peptide RNREAPRGKICS was linked to beaded agarose and the performance as a mimotope affinity chromatography matrix evaluated. Antibody purified using the novel matrix was found to be of higher specific reactivity than antibody purified using the conventional epitope matrix (peptide APDTRPAPG). The RNREAPRGKICS peptide binding to C595 demonstrated a higher equilibrium association constant (K(A)=0.75 x 10(6)) than the epitope peptide (K(A)=0.16 x 10(6)). Circular dichroism showed that the novel peptide had a more highly ordered structure at 4 degrees C and room temperature, than the epitope peptide.

  12. Spectrum-based method to generate good decoy libraries for spectral library searching in peptide identifications.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chia-Ying; Tsai, Chia-Feng; Chen, Yu-Ju; Sung, Ting-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2013-05-03

    As spectral library searching has received increasing attention for peptide identification, constructing good decoy spectra from the target spectra is the key to correctly estimating the false discovery rate in searching against the concatenated target-decoy spectral library. Several methods have been proposed to construct decoy spectral libraries. Most of them construct decoy peptide sequences and then generate theoretical spectra accordingly. In this paper, we propose a method, called precursor-swap, which directly constructs decoy spectral libraries directly at the "spectrum level" without generating decoy peptide sequences by swapping the precursors of two spectra selected according to a very simple rule. Our spectrum-based method does not require additional efforts to deal with ion types (e.g., a, b or c ions), fragment mechanism (e.g., CID, or ETD), or unannotated peaks, but preserves many spectral properties. The precursor-swap method is evaluated on different spectral libraries and the results of obtained decoy ratios show that it is comparable to other methods. Notably, it is efficient in time and memory usage for constructing decoy libraries. A software tool called Precursor-Swap-Decoy-Generation (PSDG) is publicly available for download at http://ms.iis.sinica.edu.tw/PSDG/.

  13. Identification of a novel skin penetration enhancement peptide by phage display peptide library screening.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunny; Sahdev, Preety; Perumal, Omathanu; Tummala, Hemachand

    2012-05-07

    Skin is an important site for local or systemic application of drugs. However, a majority of drugs have poor permeability through the skin's topmost layer, stratum corneum (SC). The aim of this study was to identify safe and smaller peptides that could enhance the skin penetration of drug molecules. By screening phage display peptide library, we have identified a T2 peptide (LVGVFH), which enhanced the penetration of bacteriophages (~800 nm long bacterial viruses) across porcine and mouse skin. Pretreating the skin with synthetic T2 peptide at pH 4.5 resulted in significant penetration enhancement of hydrophilic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) across skin. FTIR spectroscopy showed that the T2 peptide interacted with skin lipids to enhance the skin penetration. Pretreating the skin with T2 peptide enhanced the partitioning of small molecules with different lipophilicities (5-FU, fluorescein isothiocyanate, and rhodamine 123 hydrochloride) into skin. Fluorescence studies showed that T2 peptide enhanced the diffusion of these molecules into intercellular lipids of SC and thus enhanced the penetration into the skin. Histidine at the c-terminus of T2 peptide was identified to be critical for the skin penetration enhancement. T2 peptide interacted with skin lipids to cause skin penetration enhancement. The study identified a novel, safe, and noninvasive peptide to improve the skin penetration of drugs without chemical conjugation.

  14. Design, synthesis, and application of OB2C combinatorial peptide and peptidomimetic libraries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruiwu; Shih, Tsung-Chieh; Deng, Xiaojun; Anwar, Lara; Ahadi, Sara; Kumaresan, Pappanaicken; Lam, Kit S

    2015-01-01

    The "one-bead two-compound" (OB2C) combinatorial library is constructed on topologically segregated trifunctional bilayer beads such that each bead has a fixed cell-capturing ligand and a random library compound co-displayed on its surface and a chemical coding tag (bar code) inside the bead. An OB2C library containing thousands to millions of compounds can be synthesized and screened concurrently within a short period of time. When live cells are incubated with such OB2C libraries, every bead will be coated with a monolayer of cells. The cell membranes of the captured cells facing the bead surface are exposed to the library compounds tethered to each bead. A specific biochemical or cellular response can be detected with an appropriate reporter system. The OB2C method enables investigators to rapidly discover synthetic molecules that not only interact with cell-surface receptors but can also stimulate or inhibit downstream cell signaling. To demonstrate this powerful method, one OB2C peptide library and two OB2C peptidomimetic libraries were synthesized and screened against Molt-4 lymphoma cells to discover "death ligands." Apoptosis of the bead-bound cells was detected with immunocytochemistry using horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated anti-cleaved caspase-3 antibody and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine as a substrate. Two novel synthetic "death ligands" against Molt-4 cells were discovered using this OB2C library approach.

  15. Mixture-based combinatorial libraries from small individual peptide libraries: a case study on α1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Pin; Chu, Yen-Ho

    2014-05-16

    The design, synthesis and screening of diversity-oriented peptide libraries using a "libraries from libraries" strategy for the development of inhibitors of α1-antitrypsin deficiency are described. The major buttress of the biochemical approach presented here is the use of well-established solid-phase split-and-mix method for the generation of mixture-based libraries. The combinatorial technique iterative deconvolution was employed for library screening. While molecular diversity is the general consideration of combinatorial libraries, exquisite design through systematic screening of small individual libraries is a prerequisite for effective library screening and can avoid potential problems in some cases. This review will also illustrate how large peptide libraries were designed, as well as how a conformation-sensitive assay was developed based on the mechanism of the conformational disease. Finally, the combinatorially selected peptide inhibitor capable of blocking abnormal protein aggregation will be characterized by biophysical, cellular and computational methods.

  16. Entomopathogenic bacteria use multiple mechanisms for bioactive peptide library design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiaofeng; Nowak, Sarah; Wesche, Frank; Bischoff, Iris; Kaiser, Marcel; Fürst, Robert; Bode, Helge. B.

    2016-12-01

    The production of natural product compound libraries has been observed in nature for different organisms such as bacteria, fungi and plants; however, little is known about the mechanisms generating such chemically diverse libraries. Here we report mechanisms leading to the biosynthesis of the chemically diverse rhabdopeptide/xenortide peptides (RXPs). They are exclusively present in entomopathogenic bacteria of the genera Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus that live in symbiosis with nematodes delivering them to insect prey, which is killed and utilized for nutrition by both nematodes and bacteria. Chemical diversity of the biologically active RXPs results from a combination of iterative and flexible use of monomodular nonribosomal peptide synthetases including substrate promiscuity, enzyme cross-talk and enzyme stoichiometry as shown by in vivo and in vitro experiments. Together, this highlights several of nature's methods for diversification, or evolution, of natural products and sheds light on the biosynthesis of the bioactive RXPs.

  17. Entomopathogenic bacteria use multiple mechanisms for bioactive peptide library design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiaofeng; Nowak, Sarah; Wesche, Frank; Bischoff, Iris; Kaiser, Marcel; Fürst, Robert; Bode, Helge. B.

    2017-04-01

    The production of natural product compound libraries has been observed in nature for different organisms such as bacteria, fungi and plants; however, little is known about the mechanisms generating such chemically diverse libraries. Here we report mechanisms leading to the biosynthesis of the chemically diverse rhabdopeptide/xenortide peptides (RXPs). They are exclusively present in entomopathogenic bacteria of the genera Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus that live in symbiosis with nematodes delivering them to insect prey, which is killed and utilized for nutrition by both nematodes and bacteria. Chemical diversity of the biologically active RXPs results from a combination of iterative and flexible use of monomodular nonribosomal peptide synthetases including substrate promiscuity, enzyme cross-talk and enzyme stoichiometry as shown by in vivo and in vitro experiments. Together, this highlights several of nature's methods for diversification, or evolution, of natural products and sheds light on the biosynthesis of the bioactive RXPs.

  18. Determination of the sequence specificity of XIAP BIR domains by screening a combinatorial peptide library.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Michael C; Wang, Xianxi; Park, Junguk; Liu, Yusen; Pei, Dehua

    2006-12-12

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins regulate programmed cell death by inhibiting members of the caspase family of proteases. The X-chromosome-linked IAP (XIAP) contains three baculovirus IAP repeat (BIR) domains, which bind directly to the N-termini of target proteins including those of caspases-3, -7, and -9. In the present study, we defined the consensus sequences of the motifs that interact with the three BIR domains in an unbiased manner. A combinatorial peptide library containing four random residues at the N-terminus was constructed and screened using BIR domains as probes. We found that the BIR3 domain binds a highly specific motif containing an alanine or valine at the N-terminus (P1 position), an arginine or proline at the P3 position, and a hydrophobic residue (Phe, Ile, and Tyr) at the P4 position. The BIR2-binding motif is less stringent. Although it still requires an N-terminal alanine, it tolerates a wide variety of amino acids at P2-P4 positions. The BIR1 failed to bind to any peptides in the library. SPR analysis of individually synthesized peptides confirmed the library screening results. Database searches with the BIR2- and BIR3-binding consensus sequences revealed a large number of potential target proteins. The combinatorial library method should be readily applicable to other BIR domains or other types of protein modular domains.

  19. Dynamic peptide libraries for the discovery of supramolecular nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Charalampos G; Shafi, Ramim; Sasselli, Ivan R; Siccardi, Henry; Wang, Tong; Narang, Vishal; Abzalimov, Rinat; Wijerathne, Nadeesha; Ulijn, Rein V

    2016-11-01

    Sequence-specific polymers, such as oligonucleotides and peptides, can be used as building blocks for functional supramolecular nanomaterials. The design and selection of suitable self-assembling sequences is, however, challenging because of the vast combinatorial space available. Here we report a methodology that allows the peptide sequence space to be searched for self-assembling structures. In this approach, unprotected homo- and heterodipeptides (including aromatic, aliphatic, polar and charged amino acids) are subjected to continuous enzymatic condensation, hydrolysis and sequence exchange to create a dynamic combinatorial peptide library. The free-energy change associated with the assembly process itself gives rise to selective amplification of self-assembling candidates. By changing the environmental conditions during the selection process, different sequences and consequent nanoscale morphologies are selected.

  20. Dynamic peptide libraries for the discovery of supramolecular nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, Charalampos G.; Shafi, Ramim; Sasselli, Ivan R.; Siccardi, Henry; Wang, Tong; Narang, Vishal; Abzalimov, Rinat; Wijerathne, Nadeesha; Ulijn, Rein V.

    2016-11-01

    Sequence-specific polymers, such as oligonucleotides and peptides, can be used as building blocks for functional supramolecular nanomaterials. The design and selection of suitable self-assembling sequences is, however, challenging because of the vast combinatorial space available. Here we report a methodology that allows the peptide sequence space to be searched for self-assembling structures. In this approach, unprotected homo- and heterodipeptides (including aromatic, aliphatic, polar and charged amino acids) are subjected to continuous enzymatic condensation, hydrolysis and sequence exchange to create a dynamic combinatorial peptide library. The free-energy change associated with the assembly process itself gives rise to selective amplification of self-assembling candidates. By changing the environmental conditions during the selection process, different sequences and consequent nanoscale morphologies are selected.

  1. Dynamic Peptide Library for the Discovery of Charge Transfer Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Berdugo, Cristina; Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Javid, Nadeem; Escuder, Beatriu; Miravet, Juan F; Ulijn, Rein V

    2015-11-25

    Coupling of peptide self-assembly to dynamic sequence exchange provides a useful approach for the discovery of self-assembling materials. In here, we demonstrate the discovery and optimization of aqueous, gel-phase nanostructures based on dynamically exchanging peptide sequences that self-select to maximize charge transfer of n-type semiconducting naphthalenediimide (NDI)-dipeptide bioconjugates with various π-electron-rich donors (dialkoxy/hydroxy/amino-naphthalene or pyrene derivatives). These gel-phase peptide libraries are characterized by spectroscopy (UV-vis and fluorescence), microscopy (TEM), HPLC, and oscillatory rheology and it is found that, of the various peptide sequences explored (tyrosine Y-NDI with tyrosine Y, phenylalanine F, leucine L, valine V, alanine A or glycine G-NH2), the optimum sequence is tyrosine-phenylalanine in each case; however, both its absolute and relative yield amplification is dictated by the properties of the donor component, indicating cooperativity of peptide sequence and donor/acceptor pairs in assembly. The methodology provides an in situ discovery tool for nanostructures that enable dynamic interfacing of supramolecular electronics with aqueous (biological) systems.

  2. Selection of ganglioside GM1-binding peptides by using a phage library.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, T; Ishikawa, D; Taki, T; Okahata, Y; Sato, T

    1999-08-06

    Ganglioside Gal beta1 --> 3GalNAc beta1 --> 4(NeuAc alpha2 --> 3) Gal beta1 --> 4Glc beta1 -->1'Cer (GM1)-binding peptides were obtained from a phage-displayed pentadecapeptide library by an affinity selection. The selection processes were in situ-monitored by a quartz-crystal microbalance method, on which a ganglioside GM1 monolayer was transferred. After five rounds of biopanning, the DNA sequencing of 18 selected phages showed that only three individual clones were selected. The peptide sequences of the random region were found to be DFRRLPGAFWQLRQP, GWWYKGRARPVSAVA and VWRLLAPPFSNRLLP. Binding constants of these phage clones to the GM1 monolayer were 10(10) M(-1). Three synthetic pentadecapeptides inhibited the binding of cholera toxin B subunit to the GM1 monolayer with an IC50 of 24, 13 and 1.0 microM, respectively. These peptides will be useful for searching functional roles of ganglioside GMI.

  3. Virtual screening using combinatorial cyclic peptide libraries reveals protein interfaces readily targetable by cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Fergal J; O'Donovan, Darragh; Devocelle, Marc; Moran, Niamh; O'Connell, David J; Shields, Denis C

    2015-03-23

    Protein-protein and protein-peptide interactions are responsible for the vast majority of biological functions in vivo, but targeting these interactions with small molecules has historically been difficult. What is required are efficient combined computational and experimental screening methods to choose among a number of potential protein interfaces worthy of targeting lead macrocyclic compounds for further investigation. To achieve this, we have generated combinatorial 3D virtual libraries of short disulfide-bonded peptides and compared them to pharmacophore models of important protein-protein and protein-peptide structures, including short linear motifs (SLiMs), protein-binding peptides, and turn structures at protein-protein interfaces, built from 3D models available in the Protein Data Bank. We prepared a total of 372 reference pharmacophores, which were matched against 108,659 multiconformer cyclic peptides. After normalization to exclude nonspecific cyclic peptides, the top hits notably are enriched for mimetics of turn structures, including a turn at the interaction surface of human α thrombin, and also feature several protein-binding peptides. The top cyclic peptide hits also cover the critical "hot spot" interaction sites predicted from the interaction crystal structure. We have validated our method by testing cyclic peptides predicted to inhibit thrombin, a key protein in the blood coagulation pathway of important therapeutic interest, identifying a cyclic peptide inhibitor with lead-like activity. We conclude that protein interfaces most readily targetable by cyclic peptides and related macrocyclic drugs may be identified computationally among a set of candidate interfaces, accelerating the choice of interfaces against which lead compounds may be screened.

  4. N-Terminal Peptide Detection with Optimized Peptide-Spectrum Matching and Streamlined Sequence Libraries.

    PubMed

    Lycette, Brynne E; Glickman, Jacob W; Roth, Samuel J; Cram, Abigail E; Kim, Tae Hee; Krizanc, Danny; Weir, Michael P

    2016-09-02

    We identified tryptic peptides in yeast cell lysates that map to translation initiation sites downstream of the annotated start sites using the peptide-spectrum matching algorithms OMSSA and Mascot. To increase the accuracy of peptide-spectrum matching, both algorithms were run using several standardized parameter sets, and Mascot was run utilizing a, b, and y ions from collision-induced dissociation. A large fraction (22%) of the detected N-terminal peptides mapped to translation initiation downstream of the annotated initiation sites. Expression of several truncated proteins from downstream initiation in the same reading frame as the full-length protein (frame 1) was verified by western analysis. To facilitate analysis of the larger proteome of Drosophila, we created a streamlined sequence library from which all duplicated trypsin fragments had been removed. OMSSA assessment using this "stripped" library revealed 171 peptides that map to downstream translation initiation sites, 76% of which are in the same reading frame as the full-length annotated proteins, although some are in different reading frames creating new protein sequences not in the annotated proteome. Sequences surrounding implicated downstream AUG start codons are associated with nucleotide preferences with a pronounced three-base periodicity N1^G2^A3.

  5. Fabrication of nanofibrous electrospun scaffolds from a heterogeneous library of co- and self-assembling peptides.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Mahboubeh; Natalello, Antonino; Pugliese, Raffaele; Gelain, Fabrizio

    2017-03-15

    Self-assembling (SAPs) and co-assembling peptides (CAPs) are driving increasing enthusiasm as synthetic but biologically inspired biomaterials amenable of easy functionalization for regenerative medicine. On the other hand, electrospinning (ES) is a versatile technique useful for tailoring the nanostructures of various biomaterials into scaffolds resembling the extracellular matrices found in organs and tissues. The synergistic merging of these two approaches is a long-awaited advance in nanomedicine that has not been deeply documented so far. In the present work, we describe the successful ES of a library of diverse SAPs and CAPs into biomimetic nanofibrous mats. Our results suggest that suitable ES solutions are characterized by high concentrations of peptides, providing backbone physical chain entanglements, and by random coil/α-helical conformations while β-sheet aggregation may be detrimental to spinnability. The resulting peptide fibers feature interconnected seamless mats with nanofibers average diameters ranging from ∼100nm to ∼400nm. Also, peptide chemical nature and ES set up parameters play pivotal roles in determining the conformational transitions and morphological properties of the produced nanofibers. Far from being an exhaustive description of the just-opened novel field of ES-assembled peptides, this seminal work aims at shining a light on a still missing general theory for the production of electrospun peptidic biomaterials bringing together the spatial, biochemical and biomimetic of these two techniques into unique scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  6. SWATH Mass Spectrometry Performance Using Extended Peptide MS/MS Assay Libraries*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jemma X.; Song, Xiaomin; Pascovici, Dana; Zaw, Thiri; Care, Natasha; Krisp, Christoph; Molloy, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    The use of data-independent acquisition methods such as SWATH for mass spectrometry based proteomics is usually performed with peptide MS/MS assay libraries which enable identification and quantitation of peptide peak areas. Reference assay libraries can be generated locally through information dependent acquisition, or obtained from community data repositories for commonly studied organisms. However, there have been no studies performed to systematically evaluate how locally generated or repository-based assay libraries affect SWATH performance for proteomic studies. To undertake this analysis, we developed a software workflow, SwathXtend, which generates extended peptide assay libraries by integration with a local seed library and delivers statistical analysis of SWATH-quantitative comparisons. We designed test samples using peptides from a yeast extract spiked into peptides from human K562 cell lysates at three different ratios to simulate protein abundance change comparisons. SWATH-MS performance was assessed using local and external assay libraries of varying complexities and proteome compositions. These experiments demonstrated that local seed libraries integrated with external assay libraries achieve better performance than local assay libraries alone, in terms of the number of identified peptides and proteins and the specificity to detect differentially abundant proteins. Our findings show that the performance of extended assay libraries is influenced by the MS/MS feature similarity of the seed and external libraries, while statistical analysis using multiple testing corrections increases the statistical rigor needed when searching against large extended assay libraries. PMID:27161445

  7. SWATH Mass Spectrometry Performance Using Extended Peptide MS/MS Assay Libraries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jemma X; Song, Xiaomin; Pascovici, Dana; Zaw, Thiri; Care, Natasha; Krisp, Christoph; Molloy, Mark P

    2016-07-01

    The use of data-independent acquisition methods such as SWATH for mass spectrometry based proteomics is usually performed with peptide MS/MS assay libraries which enable identification and quantitation of peptide peak areas. Reference assay libraries can be generated locally through information dependent acquisition, or obtained from community data repositories for commonly studied organisms. However, there have been no studies performed to systematically evaluate how locally generated or repository-based assay libraries affect SWATH performance for proteomic studies. To undertake this analysis, we developed a software workflow, SwathXtend, which generates extended peptide assay libraries by integration with a local seed library and delivers statistical analysis of SWATH-quantitative comparisons. We designed test samples using peptides from a yeast extract spiked into peptides from human K562 cell lysates at three different ratios to simulate protein abundance change comparisons. SWATH-MS performance was assessed using local and external assay libraries of varying complexities and proteome compositions. These experiments demonstrated that local seed libraries integrated with external assay libraries achieve better performance than local assay libraries alone, in terms of the number of identified peptides and proteins and the specificity to detect differentially abundant proteins. Our findings show that the performance of extended assay libraries is influenced by the MS/MS feature similarity of the seed and external libraries, while statistical analysis using multiple testing corrections increases the statistical rigor needed when searching against large extended assay libraries.

  8. Combinatorial Library Screening Coupled to Mass Spectrometry to Identify Valuable Cyclic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Camperi, Silvia A; Giudicessi, Silvana L; Martínez-Ceron, María C; Gurevich-Messina, Juan M; Saavedra, Soledad L; Acosta, Gerardo; Cascone, Osvaldo; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Albericio, Fernando

    2016-06-02

    Combinatorial library screening coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) analysis is a practical approach to identify useful peptides. Cyclic peptides can have high biological activity, selectivity, and affinity for target proteins, and high stability against proteolytic degradation. Here we describe two strategies to prepare combinatorial libraries suitable for MS analysis to accelerate the discovery of cyclic peptide structures. Both approaches use ChemMatrix resin and the linker 4-hydroxymethylbenzoic acid. One strategy involves the synthesis of a one-bead-two-peptides library in which each bead contains both the cyclic peptide and its linear counterpart to facilitate MS analysis. The other protocol is based on the synthesis of a cyclic depsipeptide library in which a glycolamidic ester group is incorporated by adding glycolic acid. After library screening, the ring is opened and the peptide is released simultaneously for subsequent MS analysis. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. Ligand-Based Peptide Design and Combinatorial Peptide Libraries to Target G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Christian W.; Muttenthaler, Markus; Freissmuth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are considered to represent the most promising drug targets; it has been repeatedly said that a large fraction of the currently marketed drugs elicit their actions by binding to GPCRs (with cited numbers varying from 30–50%). Closer scrutiny, however, shows that only a modest fraction of (~60) GPCRs are, in fact, exploited as drug targets, only ~20 of which are peptide-binding receptors. The vast majority of receptors in the humane genome have not yet been explored as sites of action for drugs. Given the drugability of this receptor class, it appears that opportunities for drug discovery abound. In addition, GPCRs provide for binding sites other than the ligand binding sites (referred to as the “orthosteric site”). These additional sites include (i) binding sites for ligands (referred to as “allosteric ligands”) that modulate the affinity and efficacy of orthosteric ligands, (ii) the interaction surface that recruits G proteins and arrestins, (iii) the interaction sites of additional proteins (GIPs, GPCR interacting proteins that regulate G protein signaling or give rise to G protein-independent signals). These sites can also be targeted by peptides. Combinatorial and natural peptide libraries are therefore likely to play a major role in identifying new GPCR ligands at each of these sites. In particular the diverse natural peptide libraries such as the venom peptides from marine cone-snails and plant cyclotides have been established as a rich source of drug leads. High-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry approaches allow for progressing from these starting points to potential drug candidates. This will be illustrated by focusing on the ligand-based drug design of oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) receptor ligands using natural peptide leads as starting points. PMID:20687879

  10. Error analysis of deep sequencing of phage libraries: peptides censored in sequencing.

    PubMed

    Matochko, Wadim L; Derda, Ratmir

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing techniques empower selection of ligands from phage-display libraries because they can detect low abundant clones and quantify changes in the copy numbers of clones without excessive selection rounds. Identification of errors in deep sequencing data is the most critical step in this process because these techniques have error rates >1%. Mechanisms that yield errors in Illumina and other techniques have been proposed, but no reports to date describe error analysis in phage libraries. Our paper focuses on error analysis of 7-mer peptide libraries sequenced by Illumina method. Low theoretical complexity of this phage library, as compared to complexity of long genetic reads and genomes, allowed us to describe this library using convenient linear vector and operator framework. We describe a phage library as N × 1 frequency vector n = ||ni||, where ni is the copy number of the ith sequence and N is the theoretical diversity, that is, the total number of all possible sequences. Any manipulation to the library is an operator acting on n. Selection, amplification, or sequencing could be described as a product of a N × N matrix and a stochastic sampling operator (Sa). The latter is a random diagonal matrix that describes sampling of a library. In this paper, we focus on the properties of Sa and use them to define the sequencing operator (Seq). Sequencing without any bias and errors is Seq = Sa IN, where IN is a N × N unity matrix. Any bias in sequencing changes IN to a nonunity matrix. We identified a diagonal censorship matrix (CEN), which describes elimination or statistically significant downsampling, of specific reads during the sequencing process.

  11. Error Analysis of Deep Sequencing of Phage Libraries: Peptides Censored in Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Matochko, Wadim L.; Derda, Ratmir

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing techniques empower selection of ligands from phage-display libraries because they can detect low abundant clones and quantify changes in the copy numbers of clones without excessive selection rounds. Identification of errors in deep sequencing data is the most critical step in this process because these techniques have error rates >1%. Mechanisms that yield errors in Illumina and other techniques have been proposed, but no reports to date describe error analysis in phage libraries. Our paper focuses on error analysis of 7-mer peptide libraries sequenced by Illumina method. Low theoretical complexity of this phage library, as compared to complexity of long genetic reads and genomes, allowed us to describe this library using convenient linear vector and operator framework. We describe a phage library as N × 1 frequency vector n = ||ni||, where ni is the copy number of the ith sequence and N is the theoretical diversity, that is, the total number of all possible sequences. Any manipulation to the library is an operator acting on n. Selection, amplification, or sequencing could be described as a product of a N × N matrix and a stochastic sampling operator (Sa). The latter is a random diagonal matrix that describes sampling of a library. In this paper, we focus on the properties of Sa and use them to define the sequencing operator (Seq). Sequencing without any bias and errors is Seq = Sa IN, where IN is a N × N unity matrix. Any bias in sequencing changes IN to a nonunity matrix. We identified a diagonal censorship matrix (CEN), which describes elimination or statistically significant downsampling, of specific reads during the sequencing process. PMID:24416071

  12. Multidrug-resistance drug-binding peptides generated by using a phage display library.

    PubMed

    Popkov, M; Lussier, I; Medvedkine, V; Estève, P O; Alakhov, V; Mandeville, R

    1998-01-15

    A phage display library of random decapeptides was used to generate peptide ligands that can bind multidrug-resistance (MDR) drugs mimicking, in this respect, the drug-binding activity of P-glycoprotein. Seven peptide sequences were identified that specifically bound doxorubicin. Five of these sequences expressed the core consensus motif WXXW. The displacement assay showed that the phages expressing these peptides bound MDR type drugs (vinblastine, doxorubicin, verapamil, and genistein) with the same selectivity as P-glycoprotein and did not interact with non-MDR type drugs, such as arabinosylcytosine (Ara-C) and melphalan. One of the selected peptides that showed a highest capacity for the binding (VCDWWGWGIC) was synthesized and displayed competition with the phage for doxorubicin binding. The structure modeling suggested that all the selected sequences contained a hydrophobic envelope in which MDR drugs could be docked with substantial energy minimization. Western blot analysis showed that monospecific antibody obtained against the phage expressing VCDWWGWGIC peptide could specifically recognize P-glycoprotein in the membrane fraction of MDR phenotype MCF-7ADR cells. The MDR drug-binding sequences generated during this work could provide an important tool for design and screening of new chemotherapeutic agents.

  13. Random Thoughts about Medical Library Planning *

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Alderson

    1965-01-01

    There seems to be enough material about library planning, but since mistakes, obvious ones, are made, maybe it is information without meaning. Sources of planning material are discussed, and some new libraries are considered. The necessity of discarding is urged, and methods of bringing it about are suggested. PMID:14306023

  14. Determination of the peptide binding motif and high-affinity ligands for HLA-DQ4 using synthetic peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Volz, Thomas; Schwarz, Gerold; Fleckenstein, Burkhard; Schepp, Carsten P; Haug, Markus; Roth, Johannes; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Dannecker, Günther E

    2004-06-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is considered to be an autoimmune disease. Various human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations for different subgroups of this heterogeneous disease have been found. For early-onset pauciarticular arthritis (now oligoarthritic JIA), a strong association with the HLA class II haplotype DQA1*0401/DQB1*0402 (DQ4) has been described. We determined the peptide-binding specificities of this HLA-DQ molecule by screening a synthetic acetylated nonapeptide amide library with one defined and eight random sequence positions. A characteristic binding motif could be deduced. By use of these data, we designed defined specific nonapeptides and identified high-affinity ligands binding to HLA-DQ4. The peptide binding motif of HLA-DQ4 is very similar to the motif of HLA-DQ7, also associated with oligoarthritic JIA. It is, however, different from binding motifs of neutral or protective HLA-DQ molecules. Our results further support the idea of differential peptide presentation in the pathogenesis of oligoarthritic JIA.

  15. Isolation and characterization of anti-SEB peptides using magnetic sorting and bacterial peptide display library technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, Joseph M.; Kogot, Joshua M.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2012-06-01

    Peptide display libraries offer an alternative method to existing antibody development methods enabling rapid isolation of highly stable reagents for detection of new and emerging biological threats. Bacterial display libraries are used to isolate new peptide reagents within 1 week, which is simpler and timelier than using competing display library technology based on phage or yeast. Using magnetic sorting methods, we have isolated peptide reagents with high affinity and specificity to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), a suspected food pathogen. Flow cytometry methods were used for on-cell characterization and the binding affinity (Kd) of this new peptide reagent was determined to be 56 nm with minimal cross-reactivity to other proteins. These results demonstrated that magnetic sorting for new reagents using bacterial display libraries is a rapid and effective method and has the potential for current and new and emerging food pathogen targets.

  16. A peptide library expressed in yeast reveals new major epitopes from human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Madaule, P; Gairin, J E; Bénichou, S; Rossier, J

    1991-04-01

    In order to characterize novel human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) continuous epitopes, we designed a simple method, based on recombinant DNA, providing a complete set of peptides derived from HIV-1. A library (4 x 10(4) clones) was first constructed in a new expression/secretion vector, using as inserts small fragments of HIV-1 DNA (50-150 bp) generated by random DNAse I cleavage. This peptide library, expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was screened with sera of HIV-1 infected individuals and human and murine anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies. Plasmids from immunoreactive colonies were recovered and the sequences of the HIV-1 derived inserts were determined. By using human sera, we have detected classical HIV-1 epitopes and identified two novel major epitopes, which may be used to improve diagnostic tests, localized in the p24 core protein and in the endonuclease. In addition, four minor epitopes were also defined by screening the library with monoclonal antibodies: in the protease, in the p17 core protein, in gp120 and near the C-terminal of gp41. This method is general and can be used for any protein from which a cloned cDNA is available.

  17. CycloPs: generating virtual libraries of cyclized and constrained peptides including nonnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Fergal J; Verniere, Mélanie; Devocelle, Marc; Bernard, Elise; Shields, Denis C; Chubb, Anthony J

    2011-04-25

    We introduce CycloPs, software for the generation of virtual libraries of constrained peptides including natural and nonnatural commercially available amino acids. The software is written in the cross-platform Python programming language, and features include generating virtual libraries in one-dimensional SMILES and three-dimensional SDF formats, suitable for virtual screening. The stand-alone software is capable of filtering the virtual libraries using empirical measurements, including peptide synthesizability by standard peptide synthesis techniques, stability, and the druglike properties of the peptide. The software and accompanying Web interface is designed to enable the rapid generation of large, structurally diverse, synthesizable virtual libraries of constrained peptides quickly and conveniently, for use in virtual screening experiments. The stand-alone software, and the Web interface for evaluating these empirical properties of a single peptide, are available at http://bioware.ucd.ie .

  18. Direct selection of targeted adenovirus vectors by random peptide display on the fiber knob.

    PubMed

    Miura, Y; Yoshida, K; Nishimoto, T; Hatanaka, K; Ohnami, S; Asaka, M; Douglas, J T; Curiel, D T; Yoshida, T; Aoki, K

    2007-10-01

    Targeting of gene transfer at the level of cell entry is one of the most attractive challenges in vector development. However, attempts to redirect adenovirus vectors to alternative receptors by engineering the capsid-coding region have shown limited success because proper targeting ligand-receptor systems on the cells of interest are generally unknown. Systematic approaches to generate adenovirus vectors targeting any given cell type need to be developed to achieve this goal. Here, we constructed an adenovirus library that was generated by a Cre-lox-mediated in vitro recombination between an adenoviral fiber-modified plasmid library and genomic DNA to display random peptides on a fiber knob. As proof of concept, we screened the adenovirus display library on a glioma cell line and observed selection of several particular peptide sequences. The targeted vector carrying the most frequently isolated peptide significantly enhanced gene transduction in the glioma cell line but not in many other cell lines. Because the insertion of a pre-selected peptide into a fiber knob often fails to generate an adenovirus vector, the selection of targeting peptides is highly useful in the context of the adenoviral capsid. This vector-screening system can facilitate the development of a targeted adenovirus vector for a variety of applications in medicine.

  19. Investigation of VUV Photodissociation Propensities Using Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohui; Li, Yong Fuji; Bohrer, Brian C.; Arnold, Randy J.; Radivojac, Predrag; Tang, Haixu; Reilly, James P.

    2011-01-01

    PSD does not usually generate a complete series of y-type ions, particularly at high mass, and this is a limitation for de novo sequencing algorithms. It is demonstrated that b2 and b3 ions can be used to help assign high mass xN-2 and xN-3 fragments that are found in vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photofragmentation experiments. In addition, vN-type ion fragments with side chain loss from the N-terminal residue often enable confirmation of N-terminal amino acids. Libraries containing several thousand peptides were examined using photodissociation in a MALDI-TOF/TOF instrument. 1345 photodissociation spectra with a high S/N ratio were interpreted. PMID:22125417

  20. A mimotope from a solid-phase peptide library induces a measles virus-neutralizing and protective antibody response.

    PubMed

    Steward, M W; Stanley, C M; Obeid, O E

    1995-12-01

    A solid-phase 8-mer random combinatorial peptide library was used to generate a panel of mimotopes of an epitope recognized by a monoclonal antibody to the F protein of measles virus (MV). An inhibition immunoassay was used to show that these peptides were bound by the monoclonal antibody with different affinities. BALB/c mice were coimmunized with the individual mimotopes and a T-helper epitope peptide (from MV fusion protein), and the reactivity of the induced anti-mimotope antibodies with the corresponding peptides and with MV was determined. The affinities of the antibodies with the homologous peptides ranged from 8.9 x 10(5) to 4.4 x 10(7) liters/mol. However, only one of the anti-mimotope antibodies cross-reacted with MV in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and inhibited MV plaque formation. Coimmunization of mice with this mimotope and the T-helper epitope peptide induced an antibody response which conferred protection against fatal encephalitis induced following challenge with MV and with the structurally related canine distemper virus. These results indicate that peptide libraries can be used to identify mimotopes of conformational epitopes and that appropriate immunization with these mimotopes can induce protective antibody responses.

  1. Tumor-Specific Peptide, Selected from a Phage Peptide Library, Enhances Antitumor Activity of Lactaptin

    PubMed Central

    Makartsova, Anna A.; Fomin, Alexandr S.; Nushtaeva, Anna A.; Koval, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    A recombinant analogue of lactaptin (RL2), a new potential anticancer molecule, induces apoptosis in cultured tumor cells. The tumor suppression efficacy of RL2 was shown against mouse hepatoma-1 cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast adenocarcinoma cells. The RL2-based therapeutic drug lactaptin is distributed evenly throughout the organism, which reduces its antitumor efficacy. In the current study, we obtained a genetic construct that allows production of the recombinant fusion protein T3-RL2, consisting of RL2 and T3 peptide (YTYDPWLIFPAN), in E. coli cells. T3 peptide was selected from a phage peptide library as a result of two screenings: in vitro using MDA-MB-231 cell culture and in vivo using a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer MDA-MB-231. It was shown that the displayed peptide T3 provides binding and internalization of phage particles by MDA-MB-231 cells and their specific accumulation in MDA-MB-231 tumor tissue. In addition, based on the nucleotide sequences coding RL2 and the known tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, we obtained genetic constructs that provide synthesis of fusion proteins RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His. We studied the cytotoxic activity of fusion proteins T3-RL2, RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His in vitro using MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human adenocarcinoma cells. The in vitro results showed that the fusion proteins inhibit proliferation of both cell cultures, and their cytotoxic activity is higher than that of RL2. In vivo experiments on the study of the antitumor efficacy of the obtained fusion proteins demonstrated that T3-RL2 protein significantly inhibits MDA-MB-231 tumor growth in a xenograft model compared with RL2, while the antitumor effect of RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His proteins is comparable to the effect of RL2. PMID:27513518

  2. RNGAVXLIB: Program library for random number generation, AVX realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guskova, M. S.; Barash, L. Yu.; Shchur, L. N.

    2016-03-01

    We present the random number generator (RNG) library RNGAVXLIB, which contains fast AVX realizations of a number of modern random number generators, and also the abilities to jump ahead inside a RNG sequence and to initialize up to 1019 independent random number streams with block splitting method. Fast AVX implementations produce exactly the same output sequences as the original algorithms. Usage of AVX vectorization allows to substantially improve performance of the generators. The new realizations are up to 2 times faster than the SSE realizations implemented in the previous version of the library (Barash and Shchur, 2013), and up to 40 times faster compared to the original algorithms written in ANSI C.

  3. Selection of peptides binding to metallic borides by screening M13 phage display libraries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metal borides are a class of inorganic solids that is much less known and investigated than for example metal oxides or intermetallics. At the same time it is a highly versatile and interesting class of compounds in terms of physical and chemical properties, like semiconductivity, ferromagnetism, or catalytic activity. This makes these substances attractive for the generation of new materials. Very little is known about the interaction between organic materials and borides. To generate nanostructured and composite materials which consist of metal borides and organic modifiers it is necessary to develop new synthetic strategies. Phage peptide display libraries are commonly used to select peptides that bind specifically to metals, metal oxides, and semiconductors. Further, these binding peptides can serve as templates to control the nucleation and growth of inorganic nanoparticles. Additionally, the combination of two different binding motifs into a single bifunctional phage could be useful for the generation of new composite materials. Results In this study, we have identified a unique set of sequences that bind to amorphous and crystalline nickel boride (Ni3B) nanoparticles, from a random peptide library using the phage display technique. Using this technique, strong binders were identified that are selective for nickel boride. Sequence analysis of the peptides revealed that the sequences exhibit similar, yet subtle different patterns of amino acid usage. Although a predominant binding motif was not observed, certain charged amino acids emerged as essential in specific binding to both substrates. The 7-mer peptide sequence LGFREKE, isolated on amorphous Ni3B emerged as the best binder for both substrates. Fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy confirmed the specific binding affinity of LGFREKE expressing phage to amorphous and crystalline Ni3B nanoparticles. Conclusions This study is, to our knowledge, the first to identify peptides that

  4. Determination of CK2 specificity and substrates by proteome-derived peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunli; Ye, Mingliang; Bian, Yangyang; Liu, Fangjie; Cheng, Kai; Dong, Mingming; Dong, Jing; Zou, Hanfa

    2013-08-02

    Understanding the specificity of kinases enables prediction of their substrates and uncovering kinase functions in signaling pathways. Traditionally synthesized peptide libraries are used to determine the kinase specificity. In this study, a proteomics-based method was developed to determine the specificity of kinase by taking the advantages of proteome-derived peptide libraries and quantitative proteomics. Proteome-derived peptide libraries were constructed by digesting proteins in total cell lysate followed with dephosphorylation of the resulting peptides. After incubating the peptide libraries with/without CK2 for in vitro kinase assay, stable isotopic labeling based quantitative phosphoproteomics was applied to distinguish the in vitro phosphosites generated by CK2. By using the above approach, 404 CK2 in vitro phosphosites were identified by 1D LC-MS/MS. Those sites allowed the statistic determination of the CK2 specificity. In addition to the easy construction of the proteome-derived peptide library, another significant advantage of this method over the method with synthesized peptide libraries is that the identified phosphosites could be directly mapped to proteins for the screening of putative kinase substrates. It was found that the confidence for substrate identification could be significantly improved by comparing the in vitro CK2 sites with the in vivo sites identified by phosphoproteomics analysis of the same cell lines. By applying this integrated strategy, 138 phosphosites from 105 putative CK2 substrates of high confidence were determined.

  5. Expanding tandem mass spectral libraries of phosphorylated peptides: advances and applications.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yingwei; Lam, Henry

    2013-12-06

    The identification of phosphorylated proteins remains a challenge in proteomics, partially due to the difficulty in assigning tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra to their originating peptide sequences with correct phosphosite localization. Because of its advantages in efficiency and sensitivity, spectral library searching is a promising alternative to conventional sequence database searching. Our work aims to construct the largest collision-induced dissociation (CID) MS/MS spectral libraries of phosphorylated peptides in human (Homo sapiens) and four model organisms (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Mus musculus) to date, to facilitate phosphorylated peptide identification by spectral library searching. We employed state-of-the-art search methods to published data and applied two recently published phosphorylation site localization tools (PhosphoRS and PTMProphet) to ascertain the phosphorylation sites. To further increase the coverage of this library, we predicted "semi-empirical" spectra for peptides containing known phosphorylation sites from the corresponding template unphosphorylated peptide spectra. The performance of the spectral libraries built were evaluated and found to be superior to conventional database searching in terms of sensitivity. Updated spectral libraries of phosphorylated peptides are made freely available for use with the spectral search engine SpectraST. The work flow being developed will be used to continuously update the libraries when new data become available.

  6. Rapid Optimization of Mcl-1 Inhibitors using Stapled Peptide Libraries Including Non-Natural Side Chains.

    PubMed

    Rezaei Araghi, Raheleh; Ryan, Jeremy A; Letai, Anthony; Keating, Amy E

    2016-05-20

    Alpha helices form a critical part of the binding interface for many protein-protein interactions, and chemically stabilized synthetic helical peptides can be effective inhibitors of such helix-mediated complexes. In particular, hydrocarbon stapling of peptides to generate constrained helices can improve binding affinity and other peptide properties, but determining the best stapled peptide variant often requires laborious trial and error. Here, we describe the rapid discovery and optimization of a stapled-helix peptide that binds to Mcl-1, an antiapoptotic protein that is overexpressed in many chemoresistant cancers. To accelerate discovery, we developed a peptide library synthesis and screening scheme capable of identifying subtle affinity differences among Mcl-1-binding stapled peptides. We used our method to sample combinations of non-natural amino-acid substitutions that we introduced into Mcl-1 inhibitors in the context of a fixed helix-stabilizing hydrocarbon staple that increased peptide helical content and reduced proteolysis. Peptides discovered in our screen contained surprising substitutions at sites that are conserved in natural binding partners. Library-identified peptide M3d is the most potent molecule yet tested for selectively triggering mitochondrial permeabilization in Mcl-1 dependent cell lines. Our library approach for optimizing helical peptide inhibitors can be readily applied to the study of other biomedically important targets.

  7. FragBuilder: an efficient Python library to setup quantum chemistry calculations on peptides models.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Anders S; Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H

    2014-01-01

    We present a powerful Python library to quickly and efficiently generate realistic peptide model structures. The library makes it possible to quickly set up quantum mechanical calculations on model peptide structures. It is possible to manually specify a specific conformation of the peptide. Additionally the library also offers sampling of backbone conformations and side chain rotamer conformations from continuous distributions. The generated peptides can then be geometry optimized by the MMFF94 molecular mechanics force field via convenient functions inside the library. Finally, it is possible to output the resulting structures directly to files in a variety of useful formats, such as XYZ or PDB formats, or directly as input files for a quantum chemistry program. FragBuilder is freely available at https://github.com/jensengroup/fragbuilder/ under the terms of the BSD open source license.

  8. FragBuilder: an efficient Python library to setup quantum chemistry calculations on peptides models

    PubMed Central

    Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H.

    2014-01-01

    We present a powerful Python library to quickly and efficiently generate realistic peptide model structures. The library makes it possible to quickly set up quantum mechanical calculations on model peptide structures. It is possible to manually specify a specific conformation of the peptide. Additionally the library also offers sampling of backbone conformations and side chain rotamer conformations from continuous distributions. The generated peptides can then be geometry optimized by the MMFF94 molecular mechanics force field via convenient functions inside the library. Finally, it is possible to output the resulting structures directly to files in a variety of useful formats, such as XYZ or PDB formats, or directly as input files for a quantum chemistry program. FragBuilder is freely available at https://github.com/jensengroup/fragbuilder/ under the terms of the BSD open source license. PMID:24688855

  9. Synthesis, screening, and sequencing of cysteine-rich one-bead one-compound peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Juskowiak, Gary L; McGee, Christopher J; Greaves, John; Van Vranken, David L

    2008-01-01

    Cysteine-rich peptides are valued as tags for biarsenical fluorophores and as environmentally important reagents for binding toxic heavy metals. Due to the inherent difficulties created by cysteine, the power of one-bead one-compound (OBOC) libraries has never been applied to the discovery of short cysteine-rich peptides. We have developed the first method for the synthesis, screening, and sequencing of cysteine-rich OBOC peptide libraries. First, we synthesized a heavily biased cysteine-rich OBOC library, incorporating 50% cysteine at each position (Ac-X8-KM-TentaGel). Then, we developed conditions for cysteine alkylation, cyanogen bromide cleavage, and direct MS/MS sequencing of that library at the single bead level. The sequencing efficiency of this library was comparable to a traditional cysteine-free library. To validate screening of cysteine-rich OBOC libraries, we reacted a library with the biarsenical FlAsH and identified beads bearing the known biarsenical-binding motif (CCXXCC). These results enable OBOC libraries to be used in high-throughput discovery of cysteine-rich peptides for protein tagging, environmental remediation of metal contaminants, or cysteine-rich pharmaceuticals.

  10. Scaffolded multiple cyclic peptide libraries for protein mimics by native chemical ligation.

    PubMed

    van de Langemheen, H; van Hoeke, M; Quarles van Ufford, H C; Kruijtzer, J A W; Liskamp, R M J

    2014-07-07

    The accessibility to collections, libraries and arrays of cyclic peptides is increasingly important since cyclic peptides may provide better mimics of the loop-like structures ubiquitously present in and - especially - on the surface of proteins. The next important step is the preparation of libraries of ensembles of scaffolded cyclic peptides, which upon screening may lead to promising protein mimics. Here we describe the synthesis of a tri-cysteine containing scaffold as well as the simultaneous native chemical ligation of three cyclic peptides thereby affording a clean library of multiple cyclic peptides on this scaffold, representing potential mimics of gp120. Members of this collection of protein mimics showed a decent inhibition of the gp120-CD4 interaction.

  11. 99mTc-HYNIC-TNF analogs (WH701) derived from phage display peptide libraries for imaging TNF-receptor-positive ovarian carcinoma: preclinical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yan; Xia, Jinsong; Wu, H.; Li, H. F.

    2002-04-01

    Radiolabeled bioactive peptides which bind specifically to surface receptors over expressed in tumor cells are considered as alternatives for tumor detection with ECT. In this investigation, 99mTc-hydrazinonicotinyl - TNF analogs (WH701) was labeled using ethylenediaminediacetic acid (EDDA) as coligand (a number of TNF analogs had been selected and synthesized using random phage-display peptides library in our lab) and Pharmacokinetics and feasibility studies were performed.

  12. Combinatorial peptide library-based identification of peptide ligands for tumor-reactive cytolytic T lymphocytes of unknown specificity.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Godoy, Verena; Ayyoub, Maha; Dutoit, Valerie; Servis, Catherine; Schink, Amy; Rimoldi, Donata; Romero, Pedro; Cerottini, Jean-Charles; Simon, Richard; Zhao, Yindong; Houghten, Richard A; Pinilla, Clemencia; Valmori, Danila

    2002-08-01

    A novel approach for the identification of tumor antigen-derived sequences recognized by CD8(+) cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) consists in using synthetic combinatorial peptide libraries. Here we have screened a library composed of 3.1 x 10(11) nonapeptides arranged in a positional scanning format, in a cytotoxicity assay, to search the antigen recognized by melanoma-reactive CTL of unknown specificity. The results of this analysis enabled the identification of several optimal peptide ligands, as most of the individual nonapeptides deduced from the primary screening were efficiently recognized by the CTL. The results of the library screening were also analyzed with a mathematical approach based on a model of independent and additive contribution of individual amino acids to antigen recognition. This biometrical data analysis enabled the retrieval, in public databases, of the native antigenic peptide SSX-2(41-49), whose sequence is highly homologous to the ones deduced from the library screening, among the ones with the highest stimulatory score. These results underline the high predictive value of positional scanning synthetic combinatorial peptide library analysis and encourage its use for the identification of CTL ligands.

  13. Peptides come round: using SICLOPPS libraries for early stage drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Lennard, Katherine R; Tavassoli, Ali

    2014-08-18

    Cyclic peptides are an emerging class of molecular therapeutics that are increasingly viewed as ideal backbones for modulation of protein-protein interactions. A split-intein based method, termed SICLOPPS, enables the rapid generation of genetically encoded cyclic peptide libraries of around a hundred million members. Here we review recent approaches using SICLOPPS for the discovery of bioactive compounds.

  14. Conformational stability studies of a stapled hexa-β3-peptide library.

    PubMed

    Gopalan, Romila D; Del Borgo, Mark P; Bergman, Ylva E; Unabia, Sharon; Mulder, Roger J; Wilce, Matthew C J; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Perlmutter, Patrick

    2012-03-07

    A library of 14-helical hexa β(3)-peptides was synthesized in order to determine the influence of sequence variation as well as staple size and location on conformational stability. From this study we show that appropriately stapled hexa-β(3)-peptides can allow for a number of variations without significant perturbation of the 14-helix.

  15. Building and searching tandem mass (MS/MS) spectral libraries for peptide identification in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lam, Henry; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2011-08-01

    Spectral library searching is an emerging approach in peptide identifications from tandem mass spectra, a critical step in proteomic data analysis. In spectral library searching, a spectral library is first meticulously compiled from a large collection of previously observed peptide MS/MS spectra that are conclusively assigned to their corresponding amino acid sequence. An unknown spectrum is then identified by comparing it to all the candidates in the spectral library for the most similar match. This review discusses the basic principles of spectral library building and searching, describes its advantages and limitations, and provides a primer for researchers interested in adopting this new approach in their data analysis. It will also discuss the future outlook on the evolution and utility of spectral libraries in the field of proteomics.

  16. Combinatorial peptide libraries in drug design: lessons from venomous cone snails.

    PubMed

    Olivera, B M; Hillyard, D R; Marsh, M; Yoshikami, D

    1995-10-01

    Many present-day drugs are derived from compounds that are natural products, a traditional source of which is fermentation broths of microorganisms. The venoms of cone snails are a new natural resource of peptides that may have a pharmaceutical potential equivalent to those from traditional sources, particularly for developing drugs that target cell-surface receptors or ion channels. In effect, cone snails have used a combinatorial library strategy to evolve their small, highly bioactive venom peptides. The methods by which the snails have generated thousands of peptides with remarkable specificity and high affinity for their targets may provide important lessons in designing combinatorial libraries for drug development.

  17. Identification of distinct antibody epitopes and mimotopes from a peptide array of 5520 randomly generated sequences.

    PubMed

    Reineke, Ulrich; Ivascu, Claudia; Schlief, Marén; Landgraf, Christiane; Gericke, Seike; Zahn, Grit; Herzel, Hanspeter; Volkmer-Engert, Rudolf; Schneider-Mergener, Jens

    2002-09-01

    We used a relatively small library of 5520 randomly generated single 15-mer peptides prepared by SPOT synthesis as an array of 28.5x19.0 cm to identify epitopes for three distinct monoclonal antibodies, namely anti-p24 (human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1) monoclonal anibody (mab) CB4-1, anti-interleukin-10 (IL-10) mab CB/RS/13, and anti-transforming growth factor alpha (TGFalpha) mab Tab2. Initially identified peptide ligands mostly had very low affinities for the antibodies with dissociation constants around 10(-4) M. Subsequent identification of residues critical for the antibody interactions involved complete L-amino acid substitutional analyses. Several substitutions resulted in analogs with dissociation constants in the low micromolar and high nanomolar range. Specifically binding peptides with key residue patterns matching the wild-type epitopes were identified for all three antibodies. In addition, for antibody CB4-1 mimotopes that showed no homology to the known epitope were selected. Our results suggest that a very limited library diversity, although far from covering the entire sequence repertoire, can suffice to rapidly and economically select peptidic antibody epitopes and mimotopes.

  18. PECAN: library-free peptide detection for data-independent acquisition tandem mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Ting, Ying S; Egertson, Jarrett D; Bollinger, James G; Searle, Brian C; Payne, Samuel H; Noble, William Stafford; MacCoss, Michael J

    2017-09-01

    Data-independent acquisition (DIA) is an emerging mass spectrometry (MS)-based technique for unbiased and reproducible measurement of protein mixtures. DIA tandem mass spectrometry spectra are often highly multiplexed, containing product ions from multiple cofragmenting precursors. Detecting peptides directly from DIA data is therefore challenging; most DIA data analyses require spectral libraries. Here we present PECAN (http://pecan.maccosslab.org), a library-free, peptide-centric tool that robustly and accurately detects peptides directly from DIA data. PECAN reports evidence of detection based on product ion scoring, which enables detection of low-abundance analytes with poor precursor ion signal. We demonstrate the chromatographic peak picking accuracy and peptide detection capability of PECAN, and we further validate its detection with data-dependent acquisition and targeted analyses. Lastly, we used PECAN to build a plasma proteome library from DIA data and to query known sequence variants.

  19. Specificity Profiling of Protein-Binding Domains Using One-Bead-One-Compound Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Kunys, Andrew R.; Lian, Wenlong; Pei, Dehua

    2013-01-01

    One-bead-one-compound (OBOC) libraries consist of structurally related compounds (e.g., peptides) covalently attached to a solid support, with each resin bead carrying a unique compound. OBOC libraries of high structural diversity can be rapidly synthesized and screened without the need of any special equipment and therefore can be employed in any chemical or biochemical laboratory. OBOC peptide libraries have been widely used to map the ligand specificity of proteins, to determine the substrate specificity of enzymes, and to develop inhibitors against macromolecular targets. They have proven particularly useful in profiling the binding specificity of protein modular domains (e.g., SH2 domains, BIR domains, and PDZ domains) and subsequently using the specificity information to predict the protein targets of these domains. The protocols outlined in this article describe the methodologies for synthesizing and screening OBOC peptide libraries against SH2 and PDZ domains and the related data analysis. PMID:23788558

  20. Denoising peptide tandem mass spectra for spectral libraries: a Bayesian approach.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wenguang; Lam, Henry

    2013-07-05

    With the rapid accumulation of data from shotgun proteomics experiments, it has become feasible to build comprehensive and high-quality spectral libraries of tandem mass spectra of peptides. A spectral library condenses experimental data into a retrievable format and can be used to aid peptide identification by spectral library searching. A key step in spectral library building is spectrum denoising, which is best accomplished by merging multiple replicates of the same peptide ion into a consensus spectrum. However, this approach cannot be applied to "singleton spectra," for which only one observed spectrum is available for the peptide ion. We developed a method, based on a Bayesian classifier, for denoising peptide tandem mass spectra. The classifier accounts for relationships between peaks, and can be trained on the fly from consensus spectra and immediately applied to denoise singleton spectra, without hard-coded knowledge about peptide fragmentation. A linear regression model was also trained to predict the number of useful "signal" peaks in a spectrum, thereby obviating the need for arbitrary thresholds for peak filtering. This Bayesian approach accumulates weak evidence systematically to boost the discrimination power between signal and noise peaks, and produces readily interpretable conditional probabilities that offer valuable insights into peptide fragmentation behaviors. By cross validation, spectra denoised by this method were shown to retain more signal peaks, and have higher spectral similarities to replicates, than those filtered by intensity only.

  1. Chemically synthesized peptide libraries as a new source of BBB shuttles. Use of mass spectrometry for peptide identification.

    PubMed

    Guixer, B; Arroyo, X; Belda, I; Sabidó, E; Teixidó, M; Giralt, E

    2016-09-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a biological barrier that protects the brain from neurotoxic agents and regulates the influx and efflux of molecules required for its correct function. This stringent regulation hampers the passage of brain parenchyma-targeting drugs across the BBB. BBB shuttles have been proposed as a way to overcome this hurdle because these peptides can not only cross the BBB but also carry molecules which would otherwise be unable to cross the barrier unaided. Here we developed a new high-throughput screening methodology to identify new peptide BBB shuttles in a broadly unexplored chemical space. By introducing d-amino acids, this approach screens only protease-resistant peptides. This methodology combines combinatorial chemistry for peptide library synthesis, in vitro models mimicking the BBB for library evaluation and state-of-the-art mass spectrometry techniques to identify those peptides able to cross the in vitro assays. BBB shuttle synthesis was performed by the mix-and-split technique to generate a library based on the following: Ac-d-Arg-XXXXX-NH2 , where X were: d-Ala (a), d-Arg (r), d-Ile (i), d-Glu (e), d-Ser (s), d-Trp (w) or d-Pro (p). The assays used comprised the in vitro cell-based BBB assay (mimicking both active and passive transport) and the PAMPA (mimicking only passive diffusion). The identification of candidates was determined using a two-step mass spectrometry approach combining LTQ-Orbitrap and Q-trap mass spectrometers. Identified sequences were postulated to cross the BBB models. We hypothesized that some sequences cross the BBB through passive diffusion mechanisms and others through other mechanisms, including paracellular flux and active transport. These results provide a new set of BBB shuttle peptide families. Furthermore, the methodology described is proposed as a consistent approach to search for protease-resistant therapeutic peptides. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Methods for the creation of cyclic Peptide libraries for use in lead discovery.

    PubMed

    Foster, Andrew D; Ingram, James D; Leitch, Eilidh K; Lennard, Katherine R; Osher, Eliot L; Tavassoli, Ali

    2015-06-01

    The identification of initial hits is a crucial stage in the drug discovery process. Although many projects adopt high-throughput screening of small-molecule libraries at this stage, there is significant potential for screening libraries of macromolecules created using chemical biology approaches. Not only can the production of the library be directly interfaced with a cell-based assay, but these libraries also require significantly fewer resources to generate and maintain. In this context, cyclic peptides are increasingly viewed as ideal scaffolds and have proven capability against challenging targets such as protein-protein interactions. Here we discuss a range of methods used for the creation of cyclic peptide libraries and detail examples of their successful implementation.

  3. Development of a Backbone Cyclic Peptide Library as Potential Antiparasitic Therapeutics Using Microwave Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Qvit, Nir; Kornfeld, Opher S

    2016-01-26

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are intimately involved in almost all biological processes and are linked to many human diseases. Therefore, there is a major effort to target PPIs in basic research and in the pharmaceutical industry. Protein-protein interfaces are usually large, flat, and often lack pockets, complicating the discovery of small molecules that target such sites. Alternative targeting approaches using antibodies have limitations due to poor oral bioavailability, low cell-permeability, and production inefficiency. Using peptides to target PPI interfaces has several advantages. Peptides have higher conformational flexibility, increased selectivity, and are generally inexpensive. However, peptides have their own limitations including poor stability and inefficiency crossing cell membranes. To overcome such limitations, peptide cyclization can be performed. Cyclization has been demonstrated to improve peptide selectivity, metabolic stability, and bioavailability. However, predicting the bioactive conformation of a cyclic peptide is not trivial. To overcome this challenge, one attractive approach it to screen a focused library to screen in which all backbone cyclic peptides have the same primary sequence, but differ in parameters that influence their conformation, such as ring size and position. We describe a detailed protocol for synthesizing a library of backbone cyclic peptides targeting specific parasite PPIs. Using a rational design approach, we developed peptides derived from the scaffold protein Leishmania receptor for activated C-kinase (LACK). We hypothesized that sequences in LACK that are conserved in parasites, but not in the mammalian host homolog, may represent interaction sites for proteins that are critical for the parasites' viability. The cyclic peptides were synthesized using microwave irradiation to reduce reaction times and increase efficiency. Developing a library of backbone cyclic peptides with different ring sizes facilitates a

  4. Prevention of passively transferred experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis by a phage library-derived cyclic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Natarajan; Im, Sin-Heyog; Balass, Moshe; Fuchs, Sara; Katchalski-Katzir, Ephraim

    2000-01-01

    Many pathogenic antibodies in myasthenia gravis (MG) and its animal model, experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG), are directed against the main immunogenic region (MIR) of the acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR). These antibodies are highly conformation dependent; hence, linear peptides derived from native receptor sequences are poor candidates for their immunoneutralization. We employed a phage-epitope library to identify peptide-mimotopes capable of preventing the pathogenicity of the anti-MIR mAb 198. We identified a 15-mer peptide (PMTLPENYFSERPYH) that binds specifically to mAb 198 and inhibits its binding to AcChoR. A 10-fold increase in the affinity of this peptide was achieved by incorporating flanking amino acid residues from the coat protein as present in the original phage library. This extended peptide (AEPMTLPENYFSERPYHPPPP) was constrained by the addition of cysteine residues on both ends of the peptide, thus generating a cyclic peptide that inhibited the binding of mAb 198 to AcChoR with a potency that is three orders of magnitude higher when compared with the parent library peptide. This cyclic peptide inhibited the in vitro binding of mAb 198 to AcChoR and prevented the antigenic modulation of AcChoR caused by mAb 198 in human muscle cell cultures. The cyclic peptide also reacted with several other anti-MIR mAbs and the sera of EAMG rats. In addition, this peptide blocked the ability of mAb 198 to passively transfer EAMG in rats. Further derivatization of the cyclic peptide may aid in the design of suitable synthetic mimotopes for modulation of MG. PMID:10639153

  5. Synthetic molecular evolution of pore-forming peptides by iterative combinatorial library screening.

    PubMed

    Krauson, Aram J; He, Jing; Wimley, Andrew W; Hoffmann, Andrew R; Wimley, William C

    2013-04-19

    We previously reported the de novo design of a combinatorial peptide library that was subjected to high-throughput screening to identify membrane-permeabilizing antimicrobial peptides that have β-sheet-like secondary structure. Those peptides do not form discrete pores in membranes but instead partition into membrane interfaces and cause transient permeabilization by membrane disruption, but only when present at high concentration. In this work, we used a consensus sequence from that initial screen as a template to design an iterative, second generation library. In the 24-26-residue, 16,200-member second generation library we varied six residues. Two diad repeat motifs of alternating polar and nonpolar amino acids were preserved to maintain a propensity for non-helical secondary structure. We used a new high-throughput assay to identify members that self-assemble into equilibrium pores in synthetic lipid bilayers. This screen was done at a very stringent peptide to lipid ratio of 1:1000 where most known membrane-permeabilizing peptides, including the template peptide, are not active. In a screen of 10,000 library members we identified 16 (~0.2%) that are equilibrium pore-formers at this high stringency. These rare and highly active peptides, which share a common sequence motif, are as potent as the most active pore-forming peptides known. Furthermore, they are not α-helical, which makes them unusual, as most of the highly potent pore-forming peptides are amphipathic α-helices. Here we demonstrate that this synthetic molecular evolution-based approach, taken together with the new high-throughput tools we have developed, enables the identification, refinement, and optimization of unique membrane active peptides.

  6. Evolving nanomaterials using enzyme-driven dynamic peptide libraries (eDPL).

    PubMed

    Das, Apurba K; Hirsth, Andrew R; Ulijn, Rein V

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the application of dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCL) towards the discovery of self-assembling nanostructures based on aromatic peptide derivatives and the continuous enzymatic exchange of amino acid sequences. Ultimately, the most thermodynamically stable self-assembling structures will dominate the system. In this respect, a library of precursor components, based on N-fluorenyl-9-methoxycarbonyl (Fmoc)-amino acids (serine, S and threonine, T) and nucleophiles (leucine, L-; phenylalanine, F-; tyrosine, Y-; valine, V-; glycine, G-; alanine, A-OMe amino-acid esters) were investigated to produce Fmoc-dipeptide esters, denoted Fmoc-XY-OMe. Upon exposure to a protease (thermolysin), which catalyses peptide bond formation and hydrolysis under aqueous conditions at pH 8, dynamic libraries of self-assembling gelator species were generated. Depending on the molecular composition of the precursors present in the library different behaviours were observed. Single components, Fmoc-SF-OMe and Fmoc-TF-OMe, dominated over time in Fmoc-S/(L+F+Y+V+G+A)-OMe and Fmoc-T/ (L+F+Y+V+G+A)-OMe libraries. This represented > 80% of all peptide formed suggesting that a single component molecular structure dominates in these systems. In a competition experiment between Fmoc-(S+T)/F-OMe, conversions to each peptide corresponded directly with ratios of starting materials, implying that a bi-component nanostructure, where Fmoc-TF-OMe and Fmoc-SF-OMe are incorporated equally favourably, was formed. Several techniques including HPLC, LCMS and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to characterize library composition and molecular interactions within the self-selecting libraries. Fluorescence spectroscopy analysis suggests that the most stable peptide nanostructures show significant pi-pi intermolecular electronic communication. Overall, the paper demonstrates a novel evolution-based approach with self-selection and amplification of supramolecular peptide nanostructures from a

  7. Rational design of a biomimetic cell penetrating peptide library.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Emmanouil D; Urbanska, Aleksandra M; Sahay, Gaurav; Pelet, Jeisa M; Jhunjhunwala, Siddharth; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2013-10-22

    Cell penetrating peptides have demonstrated potential to facilitate the cellular delivery of therapeutic molecules. Here we develop a set of 50 cell penetrating peptide based formulations with potential to deliver small interfering RNAs intercellularly. The transfection efficacy of siRNA containing lipid-like nanoparticles decorated with different peptides was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo and correlated with the peptide physical and chemical properties. In vitro, these particles were internalized primarily through macropinocytosis. When the peptides were presented to bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, they induce low immunoactivation relative to control cell penetrating peptides including the antennapedia homeodomain and TAT, as quantified by the expression of activation specific surface proteins like CD80, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex class II. In vivo, peptide decorated nanoparticles primarily accumulated in the lungs and the liver. Three human peptides derived from surfactant protein B (a lung surfactant protein), orexin (a neuropeptide hormone, and lactoferricin (a globular glycoprotein) that exist in many physiological fluids facilitated the in vivo delivery of siRNA and induce significant knock down (90%) of a hepatocyte expressed protein, coagulation Factor VII.

  8. Antiviral Drug Discovery Strategy Using Combinatorial Libraries of Structurally Constrained Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Real, Eléonore; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Battaglia, Véronique; Jallet, Corinne; Perrin, Pierre; Tordo, Noël; Chrisment, Peggy; D'Alayer, Jacques; Legrain, Pierre; Jacob, Yves

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new strategy for antiviral peptide discovery by using lyssaviruses (rabies virus and rabies-related viruses) as models. Based on the mimicry of natural bioactive peptides, two genetically encoded combinatorial peptide libraries composed of intrinsically constrained peptides (coactamers) were designed. Proteomic knowledge concerning the functional network of interactions in the lyssavirus transcription-replication complex highlights the phosphoprotein (P) as a prime target for inhibitors of viral replication. We present an integrated, sequential drug discovery process for selection of peptides with antiviral activity directed against the P. Our approach combines (i) an exhaustive two-hybrid selection of peptides binding two phylogenetically divergent lyssavirus P's, (ii) a functional analysis of protein interaction inhibition in a viral reverse genetic assay, coupled with a physical analysis of viral nucleoprotein-P complex by protein chip mass spectrometry, and (iii) an assay for inhibition of lyssavirus infection in mammalian cells. The validity of this strategy was demonstrated by the identification of four peptides exhibiting an efficient antiviral activity. Our work highlights the importance of P as a target in anti-rabies virus drug discovery. Furthermore, the screening strategy and the coactamer libraries presented in this report could be considered, respectively, a general target validation strategy and a potential source of biologically active peptides which could also help to design pharmacologically active peptide-mimicking molecules. The strategy described here is easily applicable to other pathogens. PMID:15220414

  9. GASPRNG: GPU accelerated scalable parallel random number generator library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shuang; Peterson, Gregory D.

    2013-04-01

    Graphics processors represent a promising technology for accelerating computational science applications. Many computational science applications require fast and scalable random number generation with good statistical properties, so they use the Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators library (SPRNG). We present the GPU Accelerated SPRNG library (GASPRNG) to accelerate SPRNG in GPU-based high performance computing systems. GASPRNG includes code for a host CPU and CUDA code for execution on NVIDIA graphics processing units (GPUs) along with a programming interface to support various usage models for pseudorandom numbers and computational science applications executing on the CPU, GPU, or both. This paper describes the implementation approach used to produce high performance and also describes how to use the programming interface. The programming interface allows a user to be able to use GASPRNG the same way as SPRNG on traditional serial or parallel computers as well as to develop tightly coupled programs executing primarily on the GPU. We also describe how to install GASPRNG and use it. To help illustrate linking with GASPRNG, various demonstration codes are included for the different usage models. GASPRNG on a single GPU shows up to 280x speedup over SPRNG on a single CPU core and is able to scale for larger systems in the same manner as SPRNG. Because GASPRNG generates identical streams of pseudorandom numbers as SPRNG, users can be confident about the quality of GASPRNG for scalable computational science applications. Catalogue identifier: AEOI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: UTK license. No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 167900 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1422058 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C and CUDA. Computer: Any PC or

  10. Quantitative peptide binding motifs for 19 human and mouse MHC class I molecules derived using positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries

    PubMed Central

    Sidney, John; Assarsson, Erika; Moore, Carrie; Ngo, Sandy; Pinilla, Clemencia; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2008-01-01

    Background It has been previously shown that combinatorial peptide libraries are a useful tool to characterize the binding specificity of class I MHC molecules. Compared to other methodologies, such as pool sequencing or measuring the affinities of individual peptides, utilizing positional scanning combinatorial libraries provides a baseline characterization of MHC molecular specificity that is cost effective, quantitative and unbiased. Results Here, we present a large-scale application of this technology to 19 different human and mouse class I alleles. These include very well characterized alleles (e.g. HLA A*0201), alleles with little previous data available (e.g. HLA A*3201), and alleles with conflicting previous reports on specificity (e.g. HLA A*3001). For all alleles, the positional scanning combinatorial libraries were able to elucidate distinct binding patterns defined with a uniform approach, which we make available here. We introduce a heuristic method to translate this data into classical definitions of main and secondary anchor positions and their preferred residues. Finally, we validate that these matrices can be used to identify candidate MHC binding peptides and T cell epitopes in the vaccinia virus and influenza virus systems, respectively. Conclusion These data confirm, on a large scale, including 15 human and 4 mouse class I alleles, the efficacy of the positional scanning combinatorial library approach for describing MHC class I binding specificity and identifying high affinity binding peptides. These libraries were shown to be useful for identifying specific primary and secondary anchor positions, and thereby simpler motifs, analogous to those described by other approaches. The present study also provides matrices useful for predicting high affinity binders for several alleles for which detailed quantitative descriptions of binding specificity were previously unavailable, including A*3001, A*3201, B*0801, B*1501 and B*1503. PMID:18221540

  11. Histidine-containing peptide catalysts developed by a facile library screening method.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Kengo; Sakai, Nobutaka; Kudo, Kazuaki

    2015-02-02

    Although peptide catalysts have a high potential for the use as organocatalysts, the optimization of peptide sequences is laborious and time-consuming. To address this issue, a facile screening method for finding efficient aminocatalysts from a peptide library has been developed. In the screening for the Michael addition of a malonate to an enal, a dye-labeled product is immobilized on resin-bound peptides through reductive amination to visualize active catalysts. This procedure allows for the monitoring of the reactivity of entire peptides without modifying the resin beads beforehand. Peptides containing histidine at an appropriate position were identified by this method. A novel function of the histidyl residue, which enhances the binding of a substrate to the catalyst by capturing an iminium intermediate, was indicated.

  12. Protease specificity profiling by tandem mass spectrometry using proteome-derived peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Oliver; auf dem Keller, Ulrich; Overall, Christopher M

    2011-01-01

    Protease specificity profiling using proteome-derived, database-searchable peptide libraries is a novel approach to define the active site specificity of proteolytic enzymes we call PICS (Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites). Proteome-derived peptide libraries are generated by trypsin, GluC, or chymotrypsin digestion of biologically relevant proteomes, such as cytosolic lysates, to generate three separate libraries that each differ from the others in their C-terminal amino acid residues according to the protease specificity. Primary amines of all peptides are then chemically protected so that after incubation with a test protease, the neo-N-termini of the prime-side cleavage products with exposed α-amines can be specifically biotinylated, enriched, and identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The corresponding nonprime-side sequences are derived bioinformatically. Suited for all protease classes except carboxyproteases and those aminoproteases and dipeptidases requiring a free α-amine for cleavage, PICS simultaneously profiles the specificity of prime and nonprime positions and directly determines scissile peptide bonds of up to hundreds of cleavage site sequences in a single experiment. This wealth of sequence specificity information also allows for the investigation of subsite cooperativity. Herein we describe a simplified procedure to produce PICS peptide libraries, the methods to perform a PICS assay, and a new method of data analysis.

  13. Bacteria-based in vivo peptide library screening using biopanning approach.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji-Hyeon; Park, Sang-Hyun

    2011-10-01

    Traditionally, library screening has been performed to identify biologically active agents including small molecules or peptides that inhibit target proteins or molecules with therapeutic interests. Due to its chemical nature, library screening is usually performed under in vitro environments using purified proteins and molecules. However, active agents identified from in vitro screenings often fail to exhibit biological activities in cells. To overcome this inherent limitation, we have developed an in vivo peptide library screening system that allows for the identification of dissociative inhibitors of protein interactions of interest. The screening is based on the reconstitution of the cI repressor from bacteriophage lambda with high-density expression peptide library and is entirely performed in bacteria cells. Furthermore, to enhance the efficacy and sensitivity of the screening, a multiple-round biopanning approach was employed for amplification and enrichment of positive peptides. Overall, this in vivo screening should provide a fast and efficient tool for identification of biologically active peptide molecules against target protein assembly.

  14. Rapid analysis of protein farnesyltransferase substrate specificity using peptide libraries and isoprenoid diphosphate analogues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yen-Chih; Dozier, Jonathan K; Beese, Lorena S; Distefano, Mark D

    2014-08-15

    Protein farnesytransferase (PFTase) catalyzes the farnesylation of proteins with a carboxy-terminal tetrapeptide sequence denoted as a Ca1a2X box. To explore the specificity of this enzyme, an important therapeutic target, solid-phase peptide synthesis in concert with a peptide inversion strategy was used to prepare two libraries, each containing 380 peptides. The libraries were screened using an alkyne-containing isoprenoid analogue followed by click chemistry with biotin azide and subsequent visualization with streptavidin-AP. Screening of the CVa2X and CCa2X libraries with Rattus norvegicus PFTase revealed reaction by many known recognition sequences as well as numerous unknown ones. Some of the latter occur in the genomes of bacteria and viruses and may be important for pathogenesis, suggesting new targets for therapeutic intervention. Screening of the CVa2X library with alkyne-functionalized isoprenoid substrates showed that those prepared from C10 or C15 precursors gave similar results, whereas the analogue synthesized from a C5 unit gave a different pattern of reactivity. Lastly, the substrate specificities of PFTases from three organisms (R. norvegicus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans) were compared using CVa2X libraries. R. norvegicus PFTase was found to share more peptide substrates with S. cerevisiae PFTase than with C. albicans PFTase. In general, this method is a highly efficient strategy for rapidly probing the specificity of this important enzyme.

  15. Protected aminooxyprolines for expedited library synthesis: application to Tsg101-directed proline-oxime containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fa; Stephen, Andrew G; Fisher, Robert J; Burke, Terrence R

    2008-02-01

    The stereoselective synthesis of aminooxy-containing proline analogues bearing Fmoc/Boc or Fmoc/Mtt protection that renders them suitable for incorporation into peptides using Fmoc protocols is reported. Acid-catalyzed unmasking at the completion of peptide synthesis yields free aminooxy-functionalities for oxime formation through reaction with libraries of aldehydes. This allows post solid-phase diversification strategies that may facilitate structure-activity relationship studies.

  16. Strategies for the construction and use of peptide and antibody libraries displayed on phages.

    PubMed

    Pini, Alessandro; Giuliani, Andrea; Ricci, Claudia; Runci, Ylenia; Bracci, Luisa

    2004-12-01

    Combinatorial chemistry and biology have become popular methods for the identification of bio-active molecules in drug discovery. A widely used technique in combinatorial biology is "phage display", by which peptides, antibody fragments and enzymes are displayed on the surface of bacteriophages, and can be selected by simple procedures of biopanning. The construction of phage libraries of peptides or antibody fragments provides a huge source of ligands and bio-active molecules that can be isolated from the library without laborious studies on antigen characteristics and prediction of ligand structure. This "irrational" approach for the construction of new drugs is extremely rapid and is now used by thousands of laboratories world-wide. The bottleneck in this procedure is the availability of large reliable libraries that can be used repeatedly over the years without loss of ligand expression and diversity. Construction of personalized libraries is therefore important for public and private laboratories engaged in the isolation of specific molecules for therapeutic or diagnostic use. Here we report the general strategies for constructing large phage peptide and antibody libraries, based on the experience of researchers who built the world's most widely used libraries. Particular attention is paid to advanced strategies for the construction, preservation and panning.

  17. Identification of Bacterial Surface Antigens by Screening Peptide Phage Libraries Using Whole Bacteria Cell-Purified Antisera.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun-Fei; Zhao, Dun; Yu, Xing-Long; Hu, Yu-Li; Li, Run-Cheng; Ge, Meng; Xu, Tian-Qi; Liu, Xiao-Bo; Liao, Hua-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial surface proteins can be good vaccine candidates. In the present study, we used polyclonal antibodies purified with intact Erysipelothrix rhusiopthiae to screen phage-displayed random dodecapeptide and loop-constrained heptapeptide libraries, which led to the identification of mimotopes. Homology search of the mimotope sequences against E. rhusiopthiae-encoded ORF sequences revealed 14 new antigens that may localize on the surface of E. rhusiopthiae. When these putative surface proteins were used to immunize mice, 9/11 antigens induced protective immunity. Thus, we have demonstrated that a combination of using the whole bacterial cells to purify antibodies and using the phage-displayed peptide libraries to determine the antigen specificities of the antibodies can lead to the discovery of novel bacterial surface antigens. This can be a general approach for identifying surface antigens for other bacterial species.

  18. Identification of Bacterial Surface Antigens by Screening Peptide Phage Libraries Using Whole Bacteria Cell-Purified Antisera

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yun-Fei; Zhao, Dun; Yu, Xing-Long; Hu, Yu-Li; Li, Run-Cheng; Ge, Meng; Xu, Tian-Qi; Liu, Xiao-Bo; Liao, Hua-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial surface proteins can be good vaccine candidates. In the present study, we used polyclonal antibodies purified with intact Erysipelothrix rhusiopthiae to screen phage-displayed random dodecapeptide and loop-constrained heptapeptide libraries, which led to the identification of mimotopes. Homology search of the mimotope sequences against E. rhusiopthiae-encoded ORF sequences revealed 14 new antigens that may localize on the surface of E. rhusiopthiae. When these putative surface proteins were used to immunize mice, 9/11 antigens induced protective immunity. Thus, we have demonstrated that a combination of using the whole bacterial cells to purify antibodies and using the phage-displayed peptide libraries to determine the antigen specificities of the antibodies can lead to the discovery of novel bacterial surface antigens. This can be a general approach for identifying surface antigens for other bacterial species. PMID:28184219

  19. Cell surface profiling with peptide libraries yields ligand arrays that classify breast tumor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Dane, Karen Y; Gottstein, Claudia; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2009-05-01

    Cancer heterogeneity renders risk stratification and therapy decisions challenging. Thus, genomic and proteomic methodologies have been used in an effort to identify biomarkers that can differentiate tumor subtypes to improve therapeutic outcome. Here, we report a generally applicable strategy to generate tumor type-specific peptide ligand arrays. Peptides that specifically recognize breast tumor-derived cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and T47-D) were identified using cell-displayed peptide libraries carrying an intrinsic fluorescent marker allowing for sorting and characterization with quantitative flow cytometry. Tumor cell specificity was achieved by depleting libraries of ligands binding to normal mammary epithelial cells (HMEC and MCF-10A). Although integrin binding RGD motifs were favored by some cell lines, screening with RGD competitors yielded several novel consensus motifs exhibiting improved tumor specificity. The resultant peptide array contained multiple consensus motifs exhibiting strong similarity to breast tumor-associated proteins. Profiling a panel of breast cancer cell lines with the peptide array revealed receptor expression patterns distinctive for luminal or basal tumor subtypes. In addition, peptide displaying bacteria and peptide functionalized microparticles enabled fluorescent labeling of tumor cells and frozen tumor tissue sections. Our results indicate that cell surface profiling using highly specific breast tumor cell binding ligands may provide an efficient route for tumor subtype classification, biomarker identification, and for the development of targeted diagnostics and therapeutics.

  20. Autocrine-Based Selection of Drugs That Target Ion Channels from Combinatorial Venom Peptide Libraries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkai; Du, Mingjuan; Xie, Jia; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Jingying; Wang, Wei; Xin, Xiu; Possani, Lourival D; Yea, Kyungmoo; Lerner, Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Animal venoms represent a rich source of pharmacologically active peptides that interact with ion channels. However, a challenge to discovering drugs remains because of the slow pace at which venom peptides are discovered and refined. An efficient autocrine-based high-throughput selection system was developed to discover and refine venom peptides that target ion channels. The utility of this system was demonstrated by the discovery of novel Kv1.3 channel blockers from a natural venom peptide library that was formatted for autocrine-based selection. We also engineered a Kv1.3 blocker peptide (ShK) derived from sea anemone to generate a subtype-selective Kv1.3 blocker with a long half-life in vivo.

  1. Rapid Identification of Protein Kinase Phosphorylation Site Motifs Using Combinatorial Peptide Libraries.

    PubMed

    Miller, Chad J; Turk, Benjamin E

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases phosphorylate substrates at serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues that fall within the context of short sequence motifs. Knowing the phosphorylation site motif for a protein kinase facilitates designing substrates for kinase assays and mapping phosphorylation sites in protein substrates. Here, we describe an arrayed peptide library protocol for rapidly determining kinase phosphorylation consensus sequences. This method uses a set of peptide mixtures in which each of the 20 amino acid residues is systematically substituted at nine positions surrounding a central site of phosphorylation. Peptide mixtures are arrayed in multiwell plates and analyzed by radiolabel assay with the kinase of interest. The preferred sequence is determined from the relative rate of phosphorylation of each peptide in the array. Consensus peptides based on these sequences typically serve as efficient and specific kinase substrates for high-throughput screening or incorporation into biosensors.

  2. Technologies for the synthesis of mRNA-encoding libraries and discovery of bioactive natural product-inspired non-traditional macrocyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kenichiro; Passioura, Toby; Suga, Hiroaki

    2013-03-18

    In this review, we discuss emerging technologies for drug discovery, which yields novel molecular scaffolds based on natural product-inspired non-traditional peptides expressed using the translation machinery. Unlike natural products, these technologies allow for constructing mRNA-encoding libraries of macrocyclic peptides containing non-canonical sidechains and N-methyl-modified backbones. The complexity of sequence space in such libraries reaches as high as a trillion (>1012), affording initial hits of high affinity ligands against protein targets. Although this article comprehensively covers several related technologies, we discuss in greater detail the technical development and advantages of the Random non-standard Peptide Integration Discovery (RaPID) system, including the recent identification of inhibitors against various therapeutic targets.

  3. Rapid Generation of a Nanocrystal-Labeled Peptide Library for Specific Identification of the Bacterium Clostrium Botulinum

    SciTech Connect

    Tok, J B

    2004-11-11

    Several peptide libraries containing up to 2 million unique peptide ligands have been synthesized. The peptides are attached onto a 80 micron resin and the length of these peptide ligands ranges from 5 to 9 amino acid residues. Using a novel calorimetric assay, the libraries were screened for binding to the ganglioside-binding domain of Clostridium Tetanus Toxin, a structural similar analog of the Clostridium Botulinum toxin. Several binding peptide sequences were identified, in which the detailed binding kinetics are currently underway using the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique.

  4. Friendly strategy to prepare encoded one bead-one compound cyclic peptide library.

    PubMed

    Giudicessi, Silvana L; Gurevich-Messina, Juan M; Martínez-Ceron, María C; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Albericio, Fernando; Cascone, Osvaldo; Camperi, Silvia A

    2013-10-14

    One bead-one peptide libraries allow the screening of suitable ligands for any target protein. Short cyclic peptides are ideal ligands for affinity chromatography because of their high affinity and selectivity for the target protein and stability against proteases. We designed a library synthesis strategy to facilitate the identification of cyclic peptides by MS consisting of (a) sequential incorporation of a mixture of Fmoc-Ala-OH and Fmoc-Asp[2-phenylisopropyl (OPp)]-OH (15:85) to Gly-oxymethylbenzamide-ChemMatrix (Gly-HMBA-CM) resin, (b) synthesis of the combinatorial library on the resin by the divide-couple-recombine method, (c) removal of OPp with 4% TFA, (d) peptide cyclization on solid phase through side-chain Asp and amino terminus, and (e) removal of side chain protecting groups with a 95% TFA cocktail. Peptides were cleaved from the beads with ammonia and the linear code was sequenced by MALDI-TOF MS/MS. The high capacity of ChemMatrix resin together with the sensitivity of MS allows code sequencing from a single bead.

  5. Immunogenic peptides from phage display libraries with potential of protecting mice against the Pseudorabies virus.

    PubMed

    Gazarian, Karlen; Gazarian, Tatiana; Betancourt, José Iván Sánchez; Alonso Morales, Rogelio A

    2011-12-29

    Phage display selection of combinatorial peptide libraries has demonstrated its almost unlimited potential in identifying binding ligands for many targets. The method shows promise for selection of immunogenic peptides against pathogens by antibodies. We have undertaken a study designed to select such mimics for one of the representatives of Herpesviridae, the Pseudorabies virus (PrV), infecting pigs and causing severe neurological complications known as Aujeszky's disease. By screening a 12mer linear and a 7mer cysteine-constrained libraries with immunoglobulins of a rabbit immunized with the virus, a family of 10 antigenic and immunogenic peptides was derived sharing a sequence motif K(L/P/V)GDP(R/K/L). Groups of six C57BL/6 mice were immunized with bacteriophages expressing peptides with this motif sequences. Some of the mice were found to be positive in seroneutralization assay; in a challenge setting, all but two immunized mice survived, albeit presenting some disease symptoms. We discuss the perspectives and limits of generating peptide leads by library screening with immune polyclonal antiserum for designing pure epitope-based vaccines to PrV in the future.

  6. Combinatorial chemistry: polymer supported synthesis of peptide and non-peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Kundu, B; Khare, S K; Rastogi, S K

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, combinatorial chemistry has emerged as a powerful tool for accelerating drug discovery. While industry is rapidly embracing the technology, researchers continue to develop novel library methods including resins, linkers, tagging and deconvolution techniques. Newer strategies involving computer-customized combinatorial libraries offer enormous potential for the design of more "focused" and "smart" chemical libraries with maximal diversity. In addition, miniaturized systems for synthesizing chemical libraries are also being developed, which has made it possible to carry out reactions at submicroliter volumes.

  7. Extending the coverage of spectral libraries: a neighbor-based approach to predicting intensities of peptide fragmentation spectra.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chao; Arnold, Randy J; Sokoloski, Kevin J; Hardy, Richard W; Tang, Haixu; Radivojac, Predrag

    2013-03-01

    Searching spectral libraries in MS/MS is an important new approach to improving the quality of peptide and protein identification. The idea relies on the observation that ion intensities in an MS/MS spectrum of a given peptide are generally reproducible across experiments, and thus, matching between spectra from an experiment and the spectra of previously identified peptides stored in a spectral library can lead to better peptide identification compared to the traditional database search. However, the use of libraries is greatly limited by their coverage of peptide sequences: even for well-studied organisms a large fraction of peptides have not been previously identified. To address this issue, we propose to expand spectral libraries by predicting the MS/MS spectra of peptides based on the spectra of peptides with similar sequences. We first demonstrate that the intensity patterns of dominant fragment ions between similar peptides tend to be similar. In accordance with this observation, we develop a neighbor-based approach that first selects peptides that are likely to have spectra similar to the target peptide and then combines their spectra using a weighted K-nearest neighbor method to accurately predict fragment ion intensities corresponding to the target peptide. This approach has the potential to predict spectra for every peptide in the proteome. When rigorous quality criteria are applied, we estimate that the method increases the coverage of spectral libraries available from the National Institute of Standards and Technology by 20-60%, although the values vary with peptide length and charge state. We find that the overall best search performance is achieved when spectral libraries are supplemented by the high quality predicted spectra.

  8. Tandem Mass Spectral Libraries of Peptides in Digests of Individual Proteins: Human Serum Albumin (HSA) *

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qian; Yan, Xinjian; Kilpatrick, Lisa E.; Liang, Yuxue; Mirokhin, Yuri A.; Roth, Jeri S.; Rudnick, Paul A.; Stein, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a method for creating a mass spectral library containing tandem spectra of identifiable peptide ions in the tryptic digestion of a single protein. Human serum albumin (HSA1) was selected for this purpose owing to its ubiquity, high level of characterization and availability of digest data. The underlying experimental data consisted of ∼3000 one-dimensional LC-ESI-MS/MS runs with ion-trap fragmentation. In order to generate a wide range of peptides, studies covered a broad set of instrument and digestion conditions using multiple sources of HSA and trypsin. Computer methods were developed to enable the reliable identification and reference spectrum extraction of all peptide ions identifiable by current sequence search methods. This process made use of both MS2 (tandem) spectra and MS1 (electrospray) data. Identified spectra were generated for 2918 different peptide ions, using a variety of manually-validated filters to ensure spectrum quality and identification reliability. The resulting library was composed of 10% conventional tryptic and 29% semitryptic peptide ions, along with 42% tryptic peptide ions with known or unknown modifications, which included both analytical artifacts and post-translational modifications (PTMs) present in the original HSA. The remaining 19% contained unexpected missed-cleavages or were under/over alkylated. The methods described can be extended to create equivalent spectral libraries for any target protein. Such libraries have a number of applications in addition to their known advantages of speed and sensitivity, including the ready re-identification of known PTMs, rejection of artifact spectra and a means of assessing sample and digestion quality. PMID:24889059

  9. Screening and identification of a peptide specifically targeted to NCI-H1299 from a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Zang, Linquan; Shi, Lei; Guo, Jiao; Pan, Qin; Wu, Wei; Pan, Xuediao; Wang, Junye

    2009-08-18

    In this study, a NCI-H1299 (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, NSCLC) and a normal lung cell line (Small Airway Epithelial Cells, SAEC) were used for the subtractive screening in vitro with a phage display-12 peptide library. After three rounds of panning, there was an obvious enrichment for the phages specifically binding to the NCI-H1299 cells, and the output/input ratio of phages increased about 875-fold (from 0.4x10(4) to 3.5x10(6)). A group of peptides being capable of binding specifically to the NCI-H1299 cells were obtained, and the affinity of these peptides to bind to the targeted cells and tissues was studied. Through a cell-based ELISA, immunocytochemical staining, immunohistochemical staining, and immunofluorescence, a M13 phage isolated and identified from the above screenings, and a synthetic peptide ZS-1 (sequence EHMALTYPFRPP) corresponded to the sequence of the surface protein of the M13 phage were demonstrated to be capable of binding to the tumor cell surfaces of NCI-H1299 and A549 cell lines and biopsy specimens, but not to normal lungs tissue samples, other different cancer cells, or nontumor surrounding lung tissues. In conclusion, the peptide ZS-1 may be a potential candidate of biomarker ligands used for targeted drug delivery in therapy of lung cancer.

  10. K-Ras(G12D)-selective inhibitory peptides generated by random peptide T7 phage display technology.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kotaro; Kamada, Yusuke; Sameshima, Tomoya; Yaguchi, Masahiro; Niida, Ayumu; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Miwa, Masanori; Ohkubo, Shoichi; Sakamoto, Jun-Ichi; Kamaura, Masahiro; Cho, Nobuo; Tani, Akiyoshi

    2017-03-11

    Amino-acid mutations of Gly(12) (e.g. G12D, G12V, G12C) of V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (K-Ras), the most promising drug target in cancer therapy, are major growth drivers in various cancers. Although over 30 years have passed since the discovery of these mutations in most cancer patients, effective mutated K-Ras inhibitors have not been marketed. Here, we report novel and selective inhibitory peptides to K-Ras(G12D). We screened random peptide libraries displayed on T7 phage against purified recombinant K-Ras(G12D), with thorough subtraction of phages bound to wild-type K-Ras, and obtained KRpep-2 (Ac-RRCPLYISYDPVCRR-NH2) as a consensus sequence. KRpep-2 showed more than 10-fold binding- and inhibition-selectivity to K-Ras(G12D), both in SPR analysis and GDP/GTP exchange enzyme assay. KD and IC50 values were 51 and 8.9 nM, respectively. After subsequent sequence optimization, we successfully generated KRpep-2d (Ac-RRRRCPLYISYDPVCRRRR-NH2) that inhibited enzyme activity of K-Ras(G12D) with IC50 = 1.6 nM and significantly suppressed ERK-phosphorylation, downstream of K-Ras(G12D), along with A427 cancer cell proliferation at 30 μM peptide concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a K-Ras(G12D)-selective inhibitor, contributing to the development and study of K-Ras(G12D)-targeting drugs.

  11. Identification of antigenic epitopes of the SapA protein of Campylobacter fetus using a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hailing; Yu, Shenye; Liu, Huifang; Si, Wei; Wang, Chunlai; Liu, Siguo

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we immunized mice with prokaryotically expressed recombinant surface layer protein, SapA, of Campylobacter fetus, generated hybridomas secreting mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAb) targeting SapA, and purified the mAb A2D5 from mouse ascites using saturated ammonium sulfate solution. The mAb A2D5, coated onto ELISA plates, was used to screen the phage random 12-peptide library through three rounds of panning. Following panning, 15 phage clones were randomly chosen and tested for reactivity with mAb A2D5 by indirect ELISA. Single-stranded DNA from positive clones was sequenced and compared with the sequence of SapA to predict the key epitope. ELISA and/or Western blot analyses further validated that synthetic peptides and recombinant peptide mimotopes all interact with mAb A2D5. Nine of ten positive phage clones identified by screening were sequenced successfully. Seven clones shared the same sequence HYDRHNYHWWHT; one had the sequence LSKNLPLTALGN; and the final one had the sequence SGMKEPELRSYS. These three sequences shared high homology with SapA J05577 in the region GNEKDFVTKIYSIALGNTSDVDGINYW, in which the underlined amino acids may serve as key residues in the epitope. ELISA and/or Western blot analyses showed that mAb A2D5 not only interacted with the four synthetic peptide mimotopes, but also with 14 prokaryotically expressed recombinant peptide mimotopes. The mimotopes identified in this study will aid future studies into the pathological processes and immune mechanisms of the SapA protein of C. fetus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of protein kinase specificity using arrayed positional scanning peptide libraries

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Catherine; Turk, Benjamin E.

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases vary substantially in their consensus phosphorylation motifs, the residues that are either preferred or deselected by the kinase at specific positions surrounding the phosphorylation site. The protocol described here is used to rapidly determine phosphorylation motifs for serine-threonine kinases. The procedure involves screening an arrayed combinatorial peptide library consisting of 198 biotinylated substrates. Peptides are phosphorylated by the kinase of interest in the presence of radiolabeled ATP and then captured on streptavidin membrane. The membrane is subsequently washed, dried and exposed to a phosphor screen to visualize and quantify incorporation of radiolabel into the peptides. The phosphorylation motif is thereby derived from the relative extent of phosphorylation of each peptide in the array. PMID:20583094

  13. Imaging combinatorial libraries by mass spectrometry: from peptide to organic-supported syntheses.

    PubMed

    Enjalbal, Christine; Maux, Delphine; Combarieu, Robert; Martinez, Jean; Aubagnac, Jean-Louis

    2003-01-01

    Supported peptide and drug-like organic molecule libraries were profiled in single nondestructive imaging static secondary ion mass spectrometric experiments. The selective rupture of the bond linking the compound and the insoluble polymeric support (resin) produced ions that were characteristic of the anchored molecules, thus allowing unambiguous resin bead assignment. Very high sensitivity and specificity were obtained with such a direct analytical method, which avoids the chemical release of the molecules from the support. Libraries issued from either mix-and-split or parallel solid-phase organic syntheses were profiled, demonstrating the usefulness of such a technique for characterization and optimization during combinatorial library development. Moreover, the fact that the control was effected at the bead level whatever the structure and quantity of the anchored molecules allows the sole identification of active beads selected from on-bead screening. Under such circumstances, the time-consuming whole-library characterization could thus be suppressed, enhancing the throughput of the analytical process.

  14. Development of a dedicated peptide tandem mass spectral library for conservation science.

    PubMed

    Fremout, Wim; Dhaenens, Maarten; Saverwyns, Steven; Sanyova, Jana; Vandenabeele, Peter; Deforce, Dieter; Moens, Luc

    2012-05-30

    In recent years, the use of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) on tryptic digests of cultural heritage objects has attracted much attention. It allows for unambiguous identification of peptides and proteins, and even in complex mixtures species-specific identification becomes feasible with minimal sample consumption. Determination of the peptides is commonly based on theoretical cleavage of known protein sequences and on comparison of the expected peptide fragments with those found in the MS/MS spectra. In this approach, complex computer programs, such as Mascot, perform well identifying known proteins, but fail when protein sequences are unknown or incomplete. Often, when trying to distinguish evolutionarily well preserved collagens of different species, Mascot lacks the required specificity. Complementary and often more accurate information on the proteins can be obtained using a reference library of MS/MS spectra of species-specific peptides. Therefore, a library dedicated to various sources of proteins in works of art was set up, with an initial focus on collagen rich materials. This paper discusses the construction and the advantages of this spectral library for conservation science, and its application on a number of samples from historical works of art.

  15. Split-and-pool Synthesis and Characterization of Peptide Tertiary Amide Library

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu; Kodadek, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Peptidomimetics are great sources of protein ligands. The oligomeric nature of these compounds enables us to access large synthetic libraries on solid phase by using combinatorial chemistry. One of the most well studied classes of peptidomimetics is peptoids. Peptoids are easy to synthesize and have been shown to be proteolysis-resistant and cell-permeable. Over the past decade, many useful protein ligands have been identified through screening of peptoid libraries. However, most of the ligands identified from peptoid libraries do not display high affinity, with rare exceptions. This may be due, in part, to the lack of chiral centers and conformational constraints in peptoid molecules. Recently, we described a new synthetic route to access peptide tertiary amides (PTAs). PTAs are a superfamily of peptidomimetics that include but are not limited to peptides, peptoids and N-methylated peptides. With side chains on both α-carbon and main chain nitrogen atoms, the conformation of these molecules are greatly constrained by sterical hindrance and allylic 1,3 strain. (Figure 1) Our study suggests that these PTA molecules are highly structured in solution and can be used to identify protein ligands. We believe that these molecules can be a future source of high-affinity protein ligands. Here we describe the synthetic method combining the power of both split-and-pool and sub-monomer strategies to synthesize a sample one-bead one-compound (OBOC) library of PTAs. PMID:24998250

  16. Combinatorial Library Screening with Liposomes for Discovery of Membrane Active Peptides.

    PubMed

    Carney, Randy P; Thillier, Yann; Kiss, Zsofia; Sahabi, Amir; Heleno Campos, Jean Carlos; Knudson, Alisha; Liu, Ruiwu; Olivos, David; Saunders, Mary; Tian, Lin; Lam, Kit S

    2017-04-05

    Membrane active peptides (MAPs) represent a class of short biomolecules that have shown great promise in facilitating intracellular delivery without disrupting cellular plasma membranes. Yet their clinical application has been stalled by numerous factors: off-target delivery, a requirement for high local concentration near cells of interest, degradation en route to the target site, and, in the case of cell-penetrating peptides, eventual entrapment in endolysosomal compartments. The current method of deriving MAPs from naturally occurring proteins has restricted the discovery of new peptides that may overcome these limitations. Here we describe a new branch of assays featuring high-throughput functional screening capable of discovering new peptides with tailored cell uptake and endosomal escape capabilities. The one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial method is used to screen libraries containing millions of potential MAPs for binding to synthetic liposomes, which can be adapted to mimic various aspects of limiting membranes. By incorporating unnatural and D-amino acids in the library, in addition to varying buffer conditions and liposome compositions, we have identified several new highly potent MAPs that improve on current standards and introduce motifs that were previously unknown or considered unsuitable. Since small variations in pH and lipid composition can be controlled during screening, peptides discovered using this methodology could aid researchers building drug delivery platforms with unique requirements, such as targeted intracellular localization.

  17. Novel antimicrobial peptides identified from an endoparasitic wasp cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaojing; Ye, Gongyin; Cheng, Xiongying; Yu, Chunyan; Yao, Hongwei; Hu, Cui

    2010-01-01

    We screened an endoparasitic wasp (Pteromalus puparum) cDNA library for DNA sequences having antimicrobial activity using a vital dye exclusion assay. Two dozens of clones were isolated that inhibited the growth of host Escherichia coli cells due to expression of the cloned genes. Three peptides (PP13, PP102 and PP113) were synthesized chemically based on the amino acid sequences deduced from these clones and assayed for their antimicrobial activity. These peptides have net positive charges and are active against both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria, but are not active against fungi tested. Their hemolytic activity on human red blood cells was measured, and no hemolytic activity was observed after 1-h incubation at a concentration of 62.5 microM or below. A Blast search indicated that the three peptides have not been previously characterized as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Salt-dependency studies revealed that the biocidal activity of these peptides against E. coli decreased with increasing concentration of NaCl. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) examination of PP13-treated E. coli cells showed extensive damage of cell membranes. The CD spectroscopy studies noted that the enhanced alpha-helical characteristics of PP13 strongly contribute to its higher antimicrobial properties. These results demonstrate the feasibility to identify novel AMPs by screening the expressional cDNA library.

  18. Statistical methods for building random transposon mutagenesis libraries.

    PubMed

    Will, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    During the construction of random transposon mutagenesis libraries, four essential statistical issues arise: (1) Computing basic probability results for number of open reading frame knockouts. (2) Estimating the number of new open reading frames that will be knockouts in the next set of clones. (3) Estimating the number of essential open reading frames. (4) Computing the probability that an open reading frame is essential given the distribution of insertions. This chapter examines these issues and evaluates potential solutions using three different approaches: Efron and Thisted's estimator, Will and Jacobs's parametric bootstrap, and Blades and Broman's Gibbs sampler. In doing so, this chapter provides guidance for using the R statistical project to solve these problems.

  19. Effect of peptide assay library size and composition in targeted data-independent acquisition-MS analyses.

    PubMed

    Parker, Sarah J; Venkatraman, Vidya; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2016-08-01

    The quantification of peptides using targeted analysis of data-independent acquisition MS (DIA-MS) is dependent on the size and characteristics of the assay library. We addressed several important questions on how library composition influences: (1) the number of peptides extracted from DIA-MS datasets, (2) the quality of these peptides and proteins, and (3) the biological conclusions inferred. To answer these questions we constructed five libraries from mouse vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) lysate, each unique in depth, input sample complexity, data acquisition mode (DDA-MS or DIA-MS), and precursor fragmentation mode (TOF-CID or Orbitrap HCD) and extracted them against the same eight DIA-MS files of VSMCs treated with vehicle or transforming growth factor β-1 (TGF-β1). We found that along with differences in peptide and protein composition, the fragments representing a given peptide differed between the libraries. Collectively these differences impacted both peak group score profile and protein abundance estimates. Surprisingly, there was little overlap in the TGF-β1 response proteome between libraries. We conclude that additional work is needed to optimize peptide assay library building for DIA-MS applications, particularly in terms of selecting optimal peptides and their respective fragments for protein quantification.

  20. High affinity mimotope of the polysaccharide capsule of Cryptococcus neoformans identified from an evolutionary phage peptide library.

    PubMed

    Beenhouwer, David O; May, Rena J; Valadon, Philippe; Scharff, Matthew D

    2002-12-15

    Cryptococcus neoformans causes a life-threatening meningoencephalitis in a significant percentage of AIDS patients. Mice immunized with a glycoconjugate vaccine composed of the glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) component of the cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT) produce Abs that, based on the epitope recognized, can be either protective or nonprotective. Since nonprotective Abs block the efficacy of protective Abs, we are interested in developing a vaccine that would focus the immune response specifically to protective epitopes. Previously, we screened a phage display library with 2H1, a protective anti-GXM mAb, and isolated PA1, a representative peptide that had a K(d) of 295 nM for 2H1. Mice immunized with PA1 conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin developed high anti-peptide (1/13,000), but low anti-GXM (maximum, 1/200) titers. We now report our efforts to improve this vaccine by screening a sublibrary with six random amino acids added to either end of the PA1 motif to identify higher affinity peptides. P206.1, a peptide isolated from this sublibrary, had 80-fold higher affinity for 2H1 (K(d) = 3.7 nM) than PA1. P206.1 bound protective, but not nonprotective, anti-GXM Abs. Mice immunized with P206.1 conjugated to various carriers did not mount an Ab response to GXM despite developing high anti-peptide titers. However, mice primed with GXM-TT and boosted with P206.1-TT developed significant anti-GXM titers (maximum, 1/180,000). This latter immunization scheme focused the immune response on protective epitopes, since only 2-5% of these titers were directed against nonprotective de-O-acetylated GXM epitopes compared with 20-60% in animals primed and boosted with GXM-TT.

  1. Screening of Peptide Libraries Against Protective Antigen of Bacillus Anthracis in a Disposable Microfluidic Cartridge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-28

    3227 Cheadle Hall Santa Barbara, CA 93106 -2050 U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 55012-LS-ICB.503...construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision, unless so designated by other documentation. Screening of Peptide Libraries...United States Army Research Laboratory, Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, Adelphi, Maryland, United States of America, 2 Cynvenio Biosystems

  2. Screening and identification of a peptide specifically targeted to NCI-H1299 cells from a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Tu, Xiangan; Zang, Linquan; Lan, Daiyan; Liang, Weican

    2009-01-01

    Ligands that are capable of binding to tumor cell surface biomarkers specifically used in the early diagnosis of cancer and targeted drug delivery in cancer chemotherapy have been extensively investigated. Phage display technology has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool in this field. In this study, the non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H1299 and the normal lung small airway epithelial cell lines were used for subtractive screening in vitro with a phage display 12-peptide library. After three rounds of panning, there was an obvious enrichment in the phages specifically binding to the NCI-H1299 cells, and the output/input ratio of phages increased approximately 875-fold (from 0.4x104 to 3.5x106). A group of peptides capable of binding specifically to the NCI-H1299 cells was obtained, and the affinity of these peptides to bind to the targeted cells and tissues was studied. Through cell-based ELISA, immunocytochemical staining, immunohistochemical staining and immunofluorescence, an M13 phage was isolated and identified from the above screenings, and a synthetic peptide, ZT-1 (sequence QQMHLMSYAPGP), corresponding to the sequence of the surface protein of the M13 phage, was demonstrated to be capable of binding to the tumor cell surfaces of NCI-H1299 and A549 cells and biopsy specimens, but not to normal lung tissue samples, other cancer cells, or non-tumor adjacent lung tissues. In conclusion, the peptide ZT-1 may be a potential candidate biomarker ligand that can be used for targeted drug delivery in lung cancer therapy.

  3. Molecular diversification in spider venoms: a web of combinatorial peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Escoubas, Pierre

    2006-11-01

    Spider venoms are a rich source of novel pharmacologically and agrochemically interesting compounds that have received increased attention from pharmacologists and biochemists in recent years. The application of technologies derived from genomics and proteomics have led to the discovery of the enormous molecular diversity of those venoms, which consist mainly of peptides and proteins. The molecular diversity of spider peptides has been revealed by mass spectrometry and appears to be based on a limited set of structural scaffolds. Genetic analysis has led to a further understanding of the molecular evolution mechanisms presiding over the generation of these combinatorial peptide libraries. Gene duplication and focal hypermutation, which has been described in cone snails, appear to be common mechanisms to venomous mollusks and spiders. Post-translational modifications, fine structural variations and new molecular scaffolds are other potential mechanisms of toxin diversification, leading to the pharmacologically complex cocktails used for predation and defense.

  4. [Proteomic peptide library for determination of substrate motif of casein kinase 2].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Manyu; Wang, Chunli; Bian, Yangyang; Cheng, Kai; Wei, Xiaoluan; Ye, Mingliang; Zou, Hanfa

    2011-08-01

    Substrate motif is of great importance in kinase-substrate recognition and contributes a lot to the understanding of signal transduction. In this study, a proteomic peptide library was generated to determine substrate motif of casein kinase 2. Firstly, whole cell lysate was digested by trypsin to generate a large number of candidate peptides, which were then incubated with alkaline phosphotase to dephosphorylate intrinsic phosphopeptides. Then, the unphosphorylated peptide mixture was incubated with casein kinase 2 (CK2) and adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) for 30 min, and the resulting phosphopeptides were enriched by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) followed by reversed-phase liquid chromatographic separation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry detection. Finally, the 472 unique phosphopeptides and 451 unique phosphorylation sites were identified, resulting in the determination of a motif of S/T-D/E-x-D/E for CK2. This method enables accurate determination of substrate motif in a short time and can be readily applied to other kinases.

  5. A novel phage-library-selected peptide inhibits human TNF-α binding to its receptors.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Jlenia; Lelli, Barbara; Scali, Silvia; Falciani, Chiara; Bracci, Luisa; Pini, Alessandro

    2014-06-03

    We report the identification of a new human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) specific peptide selected by competitive panning of a phage library. Competitive elution of phages was obtained using the monoclonal antibody adalimumab, which neutralizes pro-inflammatory processes caused by over-production of TNF-α in vivo, and is used to treat severe symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. The selected peptide was synthesized in monomeric and branched form and analyzed for binding to TNF-α and competition with adalimumab and TNF-α receptors. Results of competition with TNF-α receptors in surface plasmon resonance and melanoma cells expressing both TNF receptors make the peptide a candidate compound for the development of a novel anti-TNF-α drug.

  6. Induction of humoral immune response against Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites by immunization with a synthetic peptide mimotope whose sequence was derived from screening a filamentous phage epitope library.

    PubMed

    Stoute, J A; Ballou, W R; Kolodny, N; Deal, C D; Wirtz, R A; Lindler, L E

    1995-03-01

    The mouse monoclonal antibody 2A10 (immunoglobulin G), which recognizes the (NANP)n repeat of Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite surface protein, was used to screen a filamentous phage epitope library expressing random amino acid hexamers. The sequences obtained were TNRNPQ, SNRNPQ, NND-NPQ, SNYNPQ, and QNDNPQ (single-letter amino acid designation). These peptides showed 50% homology with the native epitope (PNANPN) and therefore were considered to mimic its structure (mimotopes). Two of these mimotopes (TNRNPQ and NNDNPQ) inhibited the binding of monoclonal antibody 2A10 to the recombinant protein R32LR, which contains the amino acid sequence [(NANP)15NVDP]2. Immunization of mice and rabbits using the peptide (TNRNPQ)4 induced a humoral response that recognized R32LR by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and P. falciparum sporozoites by an immunofluorescence assay. These results suggest that phage epitope libraries can be exploited to screen for mimotopes in the design of subunit vaccines against infectious agents.

  7. Solid-Phase Synthesis of C-Terminal Peptide Libraries for Studying the Specificity of Enzymatic Protein Prenylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yen-Chih; Distefano, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Prenylation is an essential post-translational modification in all eukaryotes. Here we describe the synthesis of a 340-member library of peptides containing free C-termini on cellulose membranes. The resulting library was then used to probe the specificity of protein farnesyltransferase from S. cerevisiae. PMID:22783549

  8. Solid-phase synthesis of C-terminal peptide libraries for studying the specificity of enzymatic protein prenylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yen-Chih; Distefano, Mark D

    2012-08-25

    Prenylation is an essential post-translational modification in all eukaryotes. Here we describe the synthesis of a 340-member library of peptides containing free C-termini on cellulose membranes. The resulting library was then used to probe the specificity of protein farnesyltransferase from S. cerevisiae.

  9. Blocking peptides against HBV: PreS1 protein selected from a phage display library

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zu, Xiangyang; Jin, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Successfully selected specific PreS1-interacting peptides by using phage displayed library. {yields} Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a consensus PreS1 binding motif. {yields} A highly enriched peptide named P7 had a strong binding ability for PreS1. {yields} P7 could block PreS1 attachment. -- Abstract: The PreS1 protein is present on the outermost part of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface and has been shown to have a pivotal function in viral infectivity and assembly. The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity for PreS1 is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of HBV infection. A phage display library of dodecapeptide was screened for interactions with purified PreS1 protein. Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a putative consensus PreS1 binding motif of HX{sub n}HX{sub m}HP/R. Moreover, a peptide named P7 (KHMHWHPPALNT) was highly enriched and occurred with a surprisingly high frequency of 72%. A thermodynamic study revealed that P7 has a higher binding affinity to PreS1 than the other peptides. Furthermore, P7 was able to abrogate the binding of HBV virions to the PreS1 antibody, suggesting that P7 covers key functional sites on the native PreS1 protein. This newly isolated peptide may, therefore, be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV. The consensus motif could be modified to deliver imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents to tissues affected by HBV.

  10. Identification of Novel Hexapeptides Bioactive against Phytopathogenic Fungi through Screening of a Synthetic Peptide Combinatorial Library

    PubMed Central

    López-García, Belén; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Marcos, Jose F.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to improve the antifungal activity against selected phytopathogenic fungi of the previously identified hexapeptide PAF19. We describe some properties of a set of novel synthetic hexapeptides whose d-amino acid sequences were obtained through screening of a synthetic peptide combinatorial library in a positional scanning format. As a result of the screening, 12 putative bioactive peptides were identified, synthesized, and assayed. The peptides PAF26 (Ac-rkkwfw-NH2), PAF32 (Ac-rkwhfw-NH2), and PAF34 (Ac-rkwlfw-NH2) showed stronger activity than PAF19 against isolates of Penicillium digitatum, Penicillium italicum, and Botrytis cinerea. PAF26 and PAF32, but not PAF34, were also active against Fusarium oxysporum. Penicillium expansum was less susceptible to all four PAF peptides, and only PAF34 showed weak activity against it. Assays were also conducted on nontarget organisms, and PAF26 and PAF32 showed much-reduced toxicity to Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, demonstrating selectivity towards certain filamentous fungi. Thus, the data showed distinct activity profiles for peptides differentiated by just one or two residue substitutions. Our conclusion from this observation is that a specificity factor is involved in the activity of these short peptides. Furthermore, PAF26 and PAF32 displayed activities against P. digitatum, P. italicum, and B. cinerea similar to that of the hemolytic 26-amino acid melittin, but they did not show the high toxicity of melittin towards bacteria and yeasts. The four peptides acted additively, with no synergistic interactions among them, and PAF26 was shown to have improved activity over PAF19 in in vivo orange fruit decay experiments. PMID:11976121

  11. Correlated matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and fluorescent imaging of photocleavable peptide-coded random bead-arrays

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mark J; Liu, Ziying; Braunschweiger, Karen I; Awad, Amany; Rothschild, Kenneth J

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE Rapidly performing global proteomic screens is an important goal in the post-genomic era. Correlated matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and fluorescent imaging of photocleavable peptide-coded random bead-arrays was evaluated as a critical step in a new method for proteomic screening that combines many of the advantages of MS with fluorescence-based microarrays. METHODS Small peptide-coded model bead libraries containing up to 20 different bead species were constructed by attaching peptides to 30–34 µm diameter glass, agarose or TentaGel® beads using photocleavable biotin or a custom-designed photocleavable linker. The peptide-coded bead libraries were randomly arrayed into custom gold-coated micro-well plates with 45 µm diameter wells and subjected to fluorescence and MALDI mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI). RESULTS Photocleavable mass-tags from individual beads in these libraries were spatially localized as ∼65 µm spots using MALDI-MSI with high sensitivity and mass resolution. Fluorescently tagged beads were identified and correlated with their matching photocleavable mass-tags by comparing the fluorescence and MALDI-MS images of the same bead-array. Post-translational modification of the peptide Kemptide was also detected on individual beads in a photocleavable peptide-coded bead-array by MALDI-MSI alone, after exposure of the beads to protein kinase A (PKA). CONCLUSIONS Correlated MALDI-MS and fluorescent imaging of photocleavable peptide-coded random bead-arrays can provide a basis for performing global proteomic screening. © 2013 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24285390

  12. Process automation toward ultra-high-throughput screening of combinatorial one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Cha, Junhoe; Lim, Jaehong; Zheng, Yiran; Tan, Sylvia; Ang, Yi Li; Oon, Jessica; Ang, Mei Wei; Ling, Jingjing; Bode, Marcus; Lee, Su Seong

    2012-06-01

    With an aim to develop peptide-based protein capture agents that can replace antibodies for in vitro diagnosis, an ultra-high-throughput screening strategy has been investigated by automating labor-intensive, time-consuming processes that are the construction of peptide libraries, sorting of positive beads, and peptide sequencing through analysis of tandem mass spectrometry data. Although instruments for automation, such as peptide synthesizers and automatic bead sorters, have been used in some groups, the overall process has not been well optimized to minimize time, cost, and efforts, as well as to maximize product quality and performance. Herein we suggest and explore several solutions to the existing problems with the automation of the key processes. The overall process optimization has been done successfully in orchestration with the technologies such as rapid cleavage of peptides from beads and semiautomatic peptide sequencing that we have developed previously. This optimization allowed one-round screening, from peptide library construction to peptide sequencing, to be completed within 4 to 5 days. We also successfully identified a 6-mer ligand for carcinoembryonic antigen-cell adhesion molecule 5 (CEACAM 5) through three-round screenings, including one-round screening of a focused library.

  13. Identification of the immunogenic epitopes of the whole venom component of the Hemiscorpius lepturus scorpion using the phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Jahdasani, Roghaye; Jamnani, Fatemeh Rahimi; Behdani, Mahdi; Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi; Yardehnavi, Najmeh; Shahbazzadeh, Delavar; Kazemi-Lomedasht, Fatemeh

    2016-12-15

    The venom of the Hemiscorpius lepturus scorpion contains mixtures of bioactive compounds that disturb biochemical and physiological functions of the victims. Hemiscorpius lepturus envenomation is recognized as a serious health concern in tropical regions. So far, there is no preventive procedure, and the main focus is on treatment of victims with an antiserum purified from hyper-immunized horses. Although antisera can neutralize the venom, they, in some cases, lead to anaphylactic shock and even death. Selection of peptides mimicking antigenic and immunogenic epitopes of toxins from random peptide libraries is a novel approach for the development of recombinant toxins and poly-epitopic vaccine. To achieve this aim, a phage display peptide library and three rounds of biopanning were performed on immobilized antibodies (IgGs) purified from the sera of hyper-immunized horses. The results show that the highest binding of the phage to immobilized horse antibodies occurred in the third round of biopanning. Over 125 individual clones carrying mimotopes of Hemiscorpius lepturus toxins were selected and subjected for sequencing. The sequencing results identified unique peptides mimicking the antigenic and immunogenic epitopes of Hemiscorpius lepturus toxins. The results of this study provide a basis for further studies and the development of a putative epitopic vaccine and a recombinant toxin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of peptide mimotopes of gp96 using single-chain antibody library.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Arulkumaran; Suriano, Robert; Goswami, Neha; Chaudhuri, Devyani; Ashok, Badithe T; Rajoria, Shilpi; George, Andrea L; Mittelman, Abraham; Tiwari, Raj K

    2011-03-01

    Heat shock proteins such as gp96 are immunogenic and are widely used as vaccines in immunotherapy of cancers. The present study focuses on the use of peptide mimotopes as immunotherapeutic vaccines for prostate cancer. To this end, we developed a 15-mer gp96 peptide mimotope specifically reactive to MAT-LyLu gp96-peptide complex using combinatorial single-chain antibody and peptide phage display library. The immunogenicity of the synthesized gp96 mimotope was analyzed initially in normal BALB/c mice in combination with various adjuvants such as complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), aluminum salts (ALUM), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and liposome, of which CFA served as a positive control. The antibody response was determined and found that the gp96 mimotope with ALUM showed a significant increase in antibody titer, followed by GM-CSF and liposomes. Further, the T cell (CD4(+) and CD8(+)) populations from splenocytes, as well as IgG isotypes, interleukin-4, and interleukin-5 of gp96 mimotope with ALUM-immunized animals, were analyzed. The results suggest that the gp96 mimotope may elicit a potent and effective antitumor antibody response. Further, the study identifies ALUM and GM-CSF as adjuvant options to drive an appropriate protective immune response as these adjuvants have prior use in humans.

  15. SAR by oxime-containing peptide libraries: application to Tsg101 ligand optimization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fa; Stephen, Andrew G; Waheed, Abdul A; Aman, M Javad; Freed, Eric O; Fisher, Robert J; Burke, Terrence R

    2008-08-11

    HIV-1 viral assembly requires a direct interaction between a Pro-Thr-Ala-Pro ("PTAP") motif in the viral protein Gag-p6 and the cellular endosomal sorting factor Tsg101. In an effort to develop competitive inhibitors of this interaction, an SAR study was conducted based on the application of post solid-phase oxime formation involving the sequential insertion of aminooxy-containing residues within a nonamer parent peptide followed by reaction with libraries of aldehydes. Approximately 15-20-fold enhancement in binding affinity was achieved by this approach.

  16. Introduction of Mismatches in a Random shRNA-Encoding Library Improves Potency for Phenotypic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongping; Speier, Jacqueline S.; Engram-Pearl, Jessica; Wilson, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism for interfering with gene expression through the action of small, non-coding RNAs. We previously constructed a short-hairpin-loop RNA (shRNA) encoding library that is random at the nucleotide level [1]. In this library, the stems of the hairpin are completely complementary. To improve the potency of initial hits, and therefore signal-to-noise ratios in library screening, as well as to simplify hit-sequence retrieval by PCR, we constructed a second-generation library in which we introduced random mismatches between the two halves of the stem of each hairpin, on a random template background. In a screen for shRNAs that protect an interleukin-3 (IL3) dependent cell line from IL3 withdrawal, our second-generation library yielded hit sequences with significantly higher potencies than those from the first-generation library in the same screen. Our method of random mutagenesis was effective for a random template and is likely suitable, therefore, for any DNA template of interest. The improved potency of our second-generation library expands the range of possible unbiased screens for small-RNA therapeutics and biologic tools. PMID:24498319

  17. Peptide ligands for pro-survival protein Bfl-1 from computationally guided library screening

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sanjib; Chen, T. Scott; Keating, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    Pro-survival members of the Bcl-2 protein family inhibit cell death by binding short helical BH3 motifs in pro-apoptotic proteins. Mammalian pro-survival proteins Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, Bcl-w, Mcl-1 and Bfl-1 bind with varying affinities and specificities to native BH3 motifs, engineered peptides and small molecules. Biophysical studies have determined interaction patterns for these proteins, particularly for the most-studied family members Bcl-xL and Mcl-1. Bfl-1 is a pro-survival protein implicated in preventing apoptosis in leukemia, lymphoma and melanoma. Although Bfl-1 is a promising therapeutic target, relatively little is known about its binding preferences. We explored the binding of Bfl-1 to BH3-like peptides by screening a peptide library that was designed to sample a high degree of relevant sequence diversity. Screening using yeast-surface display led to several novel high-affinity Bfl-1 binders and to thousands of putative binders identified through deep sequencing. Further screening for specificity led to identification of a peptide that bound to Bfl-1 with Kd < 1 nM and very slow dissociation from Bfl-1 compared to other pro-survival Bcl-2 family members. A point mutation in this sequence gave a peptide with ~50 nM affinity for Bfl-1 that was selective for Bfl-1 in equilibrium binding assays. Analysis of engineered Bfl-1 binders deepens our understanding of how the binding profiles of pro-survival proteins differ, and may guide the development of targeted Bfl-1 inhibitors. PMID:23363053

  18. Peptide ligands for pro-survival protein Bfl-1 from computationally guided library screening.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sanjib; Chen, T Scott; Keating, Amy E

    2013-04-19

    Pro-survival members of the Bcl-2 protein family inhibit cell death by binding short helical BH3 motifs in pro-apoptotic proteins. Mammalian pro-survival proteins Bcl-x(L), Bcl-2, Bcl-w, Mcl-1, and Bfl-1 bind with varying affinities and specificities to native BH3 motifs, engineered peptides, and small molecules. Biophysical studies have determined interaction patterns for these proteins, particularly for the most-studied family members Bcl-x(L) and Mcl-1. Bfl-1 is a pro-survival protein implicated in preventing apoptosis in leukemia, lymphoma, and melanoma. Although Bfl-1 is a promising therapeutic target, relatively little is known about its binding preferences. We explored the binding of Bfl-1 to BH3-like peptides by screening a peptide library that was designed to sample a high degree of relevant sequence diversity. Screening using yeast-surface display led to several novel high-affinity Bfl-1 binders and to thousands of putative binders identified through deep sequencing. Further screening for specificity led to identification of a peptide that bound to Bfl-1 with K(d) < 1 nM and very slow dissociation from Bfl-1 compared to other pro-survival Bcl-2 family members. A point mutation in this sequence gave a peptide with ~50 nM affinity for Bfl-1 that was selective for Bfl-1 in equilibrium binding assays. Analysis of engineered Bfl-1 binders deepens our understanding of how the binding profiles of pro-survival proteins differ and may guide the development of targeted Bfl-1 inhibitors.

  19. In-depth exploration of cow's whey proteome via combinatorial peptide ligand libraries.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, Alfonsina; Bachi, Angela; Fasoli, Elisa; Boschetti, Egisto; Peltre, Gabriel; Sénéchal, Helène; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2009-08-01

    The use of combinatorial peptide ligand libraries, containing hexapeptides terminating with a primary amine, or modified with a terminal carboxyl group, allowed discovering and identifying a large number of previously unreported proteins in cow's whey. Whereas comprehensive whey protein lists progressively increased in the last 6 years from 17 unique gene products to more than 100, our findings have considerably expanded this list to a total of 149 unique protein species, of which 100 were not described in previous proteomics studies. As an additional interesting result, a polymorphic alkaline protein was observed with a strong positive signal when blotted from an isoelectric focusing separation in gel and tested with sera of allergic patients. This polymorphic protein, found only after treatment with the peptide library, was identified as an immunoglobulin (Ig), a minor allergen that had been largely amplified. The list of cow's whey components here reported is by far the most comprehensive at present and could serve as a starting point for the functional characterization of low-abundance proteins possibly having novel pharmaceutical, diagnostic, and biomedical applications.

  20. Functional Selection of Vaccine Candidate Peptides from Staphylococcus aureus Whole-Genome Expression Libraries In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Weichhart, Thomas; Horky, Markus; Söllner, Johannes; Gangl, Susanne; Henics, Tamàs; Nagy, Eszter; Meinke, Andreas; von Gabain, Alexander; Fraser, Claire M.; Gill, Steve R.; Hafner, Martin; von Ahsen, Uwe

    2003-01-01

    An in vitro protein selection method, ribosome display, has been applied to comprehensively identify and map the immunologically relevant proteins of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. A library built up from genomic fragments of the virulent S. aureus COL strain (methicillin-resistant S. aureus) allowed us to screen all possible encoded peptides for immunoreactivity. As selective agents, human sera exhibiting a high antibody titer and opsonic activity against S. aureus were used, since these antibodies indicate the in vivo expression and immunoreactivity of the corresponding proteins. Identified clones cluster in distinct regions of 75 genes, most of them classifiable as secreted or surface-localized proteins, including previously identified virulence factors. In addition, 14 putative novel short open reading frames were identified and their immunoreactivity and in vivo mRNA expression were confirmed, underscoring the annotation-independent, true genomic nature of our approach. Evidence is provided that a large fraction of the identified peptides cannot be expressed in an in vivo-based surface display system. Thus, in vitro protein selection, not biased by the context of living entities, allows screening of genomic expression libraries with a large number of different ligands simultaneously. It is a powerful approach for fingerprinting the repertoire of immune reactive proteins serving as target candidates for active and passive vaccination against pathogens. PMID:12874343

  1. Screening of integrin-binding peptides in a laminin peptide library derived from the mouse laminin β chain short arm regions.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Fumihiko; Takagi, Masaharu; Nakamura, Minako; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Hozumi, Kentaro; Kikkawa, Yamato; Nomizu, Motoyoshi

    2014-05-15

    Laminins, major components of basement membrane, consist of three different subunits, α, β, and γ chains, and so far, five α, three β, and three γ chains have been identified. We have constructed synthetic peptide libraries derived from the laminin sequences and identified various cell-adhesive peptides. Ten active peptides from the laminin α chain sequences (α1-α5) were found to promote integrin-mediated cell adhesion. Previously, we found fourteen cell-adhesive peptides from the β1 chain sequence but their receptors have not been analyzed. Here, we expanded the synthetic peptide library to add peptides from the short arm regions of the laminin β2 and β3 chains and screened for integrin-binding peptides. Twenty-seven peptides promoted human dermal fibroblast (HDF) attachment in a peptide-coated plate assay. The morphological appearance of HDFs on the peptide-coated plates differed depending on the peptides. B34 (REKYYYAVYDMV, mouse laminin β1 chain, 255-266), B67 (IPYSMEYEILIRY, mouse laminin β1 chain, 604-616), B2-105 (APNFWNFTSGRG, mouse laminin β2 chain, 1081-1092), and B3-19 (GHLTGGKVQLNL, mouse laminin β3 chain, 182-193) promoted HDF spreading and HDF attachment was inhibited by EDTA, suggesting that the peptides interact with integrins. Immunostaining analyses revealed that B67 induced well-organized actin stress fibers and focal contacts containing vinculin, however, B34, B2-105, and B3-19 did not exhibit stress fiber formation or focal contacts. The inhibition assay using anti-integrin antibodies indicated that B67 interacts with α3, α6, and β1 integrins, and B34 and B3-19 interact with β1 integrin. Based on adhesion analysis of peptides modified with an alanine scan and on switching analysis with the homologous inactive sequence B2-64 (LPRAMDYDLLLRW, mouse laminin β2 chain, 618-630), the Glu(8) residue in the B67 peptide was critical for HDF adhesion. These findings are useful for identifying an integrin binding motif. The B67 peptide

  2. Screening bicyclic peptide libraries for protein-protein interaction inhibitors: discovery of a tumor necrosis factor-α antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lian, Wenlong; Upadhyaya, Punit; Rhodes, Curran A; Liu, Yusen; Pei, Dehua

    2013-08-14

    Protein-protein interactions represent a new class of exciting but challenging drug targets, because their large, flat binding sites lack well-defined pockets for small molecules to bind. We report here a methodology for chemical synthesis and screening of large combinatorial libraries of bicyclic peptides displayed on rigid small-molecule scaffolds. With planar trimesic acid as the scaffold, the resulting bicyclic peptides are effective for binding to protein surfaces such as the interfaces of protein-protein interactions. Screening of a bicyclic peptide library against tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) identified a potent antagonist that inhibits the TNFα-TNFα receptor interaction and protects cells from TNFα-induced cell death. Bicyclic peptides of this type may provide a general solution for inhibition of protein-protein interactions.

  3. Discovery of a Direct Ras Inhibitor by Screening a Combinatorial Library of Cell-Permeable Bicyclic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic peptides have great potential as therapeutic agents and research tools. However, their applications against intracellular targets have been limited, because cyclic peptides are generally impermeable to the cell membrane. It was previously shown that fusion of cyclic peptides with a cyclic cell-penetrating peptide resulted in cell-permeable bicyclic peptides that are proteolytically stable and biologically active in cellular assays. In this work, we tested the generality of the bicyclic approach by synthesizing a combinatorial library of 5.7 × 106 bicyclic peptides featuring a degenerate sequence in the first ring and an invariant cell-penetrating peptide in the second ring. Screening of the library against oncoprotein K-Ras G12V followed by hit optimization produced a moderately potent and cell-permeable K-Ras inhibitor, which physically blocks the Ras-effector interactions in vitro, inhibits the signaling events downstream of Ras in cancer cells, and induces apoptosis of the cancer cells. Our approach should be generally applicable to developing cell-permeable bicyclic peptide inhibitors against other intracellular proteins. PMID:26645887

  4. Identification of Small Ligands Targeting Breast Cancer by In Vivo Screening of Peptide Libraries in Breast Cancer Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    DATES COVERED Annual ( 5 Aug 99-4 Aug 00) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Identification of Small Ligands Targeting Breast Cancer by In Vivo Screening of...Peptide Libraries in Breast Cancer Patients 6. AUTHOR(S) David N. Krag, M.D. 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS DAMD17-99-1-9425 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...constructed in a fuse 5 system (Scott and Smith 1990). The original library displays nine amino acid peptides flanked by cysteine residues (CX9C). The

  5. Random small interfering RNA library screen identifies siRNAs that induce human erythroleukemia cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Cuiqing; Xiong, Yuan; Zhu, Ning; Lu, Yabin; Zhang, Jiewen; Wang, Song; Liang, Zicai; Shen, Yan; Chen, Meihong

    2011-03-01

    Cancers are characterized by poor differentiation. Differentiation therapy is a strategy to alleviate malignant phenotypes by inducing cancer cell differentiation. Here we carried out a combinatorial high-throughput screen with a random siRNA library on human erythroleukemia K-562 cell differentiation. Two siRNAs screened from the library were validated to be able to induce erythroid differentiation to varying degrees, determined by CD235 and globin up-regulation, GATA-2 down-regulation, and cell growth inhibition. The screen we performed here is the first trial of screening cancer differentiation-inducing agents from a random siRNA library, demonstrating that a random siRNA library can be considered as a new resource in efforts to seek new therapeutic agents for cancers. As a random siRNA library has a broad coverage for the entire genome, including known/unknown genes and protein coding/non-coding sequences, screening using a random siRNA library can be expected to greatly augment the repertoire of therapeutic siRNAs for cancers.

  6. High-throughput expression of animal venom toxins in Escherichia coli to generate a large library of oxidized disulphide-reticulated peptides for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Turchetto, Jeremy; Sequeira, Ana Filipa; Ramond, Laurie; Peysson, Fanny; Brás, Joana L A; Saez, Natalie J; Duhoo, Yoan; Blémont, Marilyne; Guerreiro, Catarina I P D; Quinton, Loic; De Pauw, Edwin; Gilles, Nicolas; Darbon, Hervé; Fontes, Carlos M G A; Vincentelli, Renaud

    2017-01-17

    Animal venoms are complex molecular cocktails containing a wide range of biologically active disulphide-reticulated peptides that target, with high selectivity and efficacy, a variety of membrane receptors. Disulphide-reticulated peptides have evolved to display improved specificity, low immunogenicity and to show much higher resistance to degradation than linear peptides. These properties make venom peptides attractive candidates for drug development. However, recombinant expression of reticulated peptides containing disulphide bonds is challenging, especially when associated with the production of large libraries of bioactive molecules for drug screening. To date, as an alternative to artificial synthetic chemical libraries, no comprehensive recombinant libraries of natural venom peptides are accessible for high-throughput screening to identify novel therapeutics. In the accompanying paper an efficient system for the expression and purification of oxidized disulphide-reticulated venom peptides in Escherichia coli is described. Here we report the development of a high-throughput automated platform, that could be adapted to the production of other families, to generate the largest ever library of recombinant venom peptides. The peptides were produced in the periplasm of E. coli using redox-active DsbC as a fusion tag, thus allowing the efficient formation of correctly folded disulphide bridges. TEV protease was used to remove fusion tags and recover the animal venom peptides in the native state. Globally, within nine months, out of a total of 4992 synthetic genes encoding a representative diversity of venom peptides, a library containing 2736 recombinant disulphide-reticulated peptides was generated. The data revealed that the animal venom peptides produced in the bacterial host were natively folded and, thus, are putatively biologically active. Overall this study reveals that high-throughput expression of animal venom peptides in E. coli can generate large

  7. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Theaker, Sarah M; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J; Cole, David K; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K; Dolton, Garry

    2016-03-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8(+) or CD4(+) polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein-Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer.

  8. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones

    PubMed Central

    Theaker, Sarah M.; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J.; Cole, David K.; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K.; Dolton, Garry

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8+ or CD4+ polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein–Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. PMID:26826277

  9. Substrate specificity of mitochondrial intermediate peptidase analysed by a support-bound peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Marcondes, M.F.M.; Alves, F.M.; Assis, D.M.; Hirata, I.Y.; Juliano, L.; Oliveira, V.; Juliano, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The substrate specificity of recombinant human mitochondrial intermediate peptidase (hMIP) using a synthetic support-bound FRET peptide library is presented. The collected fluorescent beads, which contained the hydrolysed peptides generated by hMIP, were sequenced by Edman degradation. The results showed that this peptidase presents a remarkable preference for polar uncharged residues at P1 and P1′ substrate positions: Ser = Gln > Thr at P1 and Ser > Thr at P1′. Non-polar residues were frequent at the substrate P3, P2, P2′ and P3′ positions. Analysis of the predicted MIP processing sites in imported mitochondrial matrix proteins shows these cleavages indeed occur between polar uncharged residues. Previous analysis of these processing sites indicated the importance of positions far from the MIP cleavage site, namely the presence of a hydrophobic residue (Phe or Leu) at P8 and a polar uncharged residue (Ser or Thr) at P5. To evaluate this, additional kinetic analyses were carried out, using fluorogenic substrates synthesized based on the processing sites attributed to MIP. The results described here underscore the importance of the P1 and P1′ substrate positions for the hydrolytic activity of hMIP. The information presented in this work will help in the design of new substrate-based inhibitors for this peptidase. PMID:26082885

  10. In-depth proteomic analysis of banana (Musa spp.) fruit with combinatorial peptide ligand libraries.

    PubMed

    Esteve, Clara; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Marina, María Luisa; García, María Concepción; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Musa ssp. is among the world's leading fruit crops. Although a strong interest on banana biochemistry exists in the scientific community, focused on metabolite composition, proteins have been scarcely investigated even if they play an important role in food allergy and stability, are a source of biologically active peptides, and can provide information about nutritional aspects of this fruit. In this work we have employed the combinatorial peptide ligand libraries after different types of protein extractions, for searching the very low-abundance proteins in banana. The use of advanced MS techniques and Musa ssp. mRNAs database in combination with the Uniprot_viridiplantae database allowed us to identify 1131 proteins. Among this huge amount of proteins we found several already known allergens such as Mus a 1, pectinesterase, superoxide dismutase, and potentially new allergens. Additionally several enzymes involved in degradation of starch granules and strictly correlated to ripening stage were identified. This is the first in-depth exploration of the banana fruit proteome and one of the largest descriptions of the proteome of any vegetable system.

  11. Protease specificity determination by using cellular libraries of peptide substrates (CLiPS).

    PubMed

    Boulware, Kevin T; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2006-05-16

    We report a general combinatorial approach to identify optimal substrates of a given protease by using quantitative kinetic screening of cellular libraries of peptide substrates (CLiPS). A whole-cell protease activity assay was developed by displaying fluorescent reporter substrates on the surface of Escherichia coli as N-terminal fusions. This approach enabled generation of substrate libraries of arbitrary amino acid composition and length that are self-renewing. Substrate hydrolysis by a target protease was measured quantitatively via changes in whole-cell fluorescence by using FACS. FACS enabled efficient screening to identify optimal substrates for a given protease and characterize their cleavage kinetics. The utility of CLiPS was demonstrated by determining the substrate specificity of two unrelated proteases, caspase-3 and enteropeptidase (or enterokinase). CLiPS unambiguously identified the caspase-3 consensus cleavage sequence DXVDG. Enteropeptidase was unexpectedly promiscuous, but exhibited a preference for substrates with the motif (D/E)RM, which were cleaved substantially faster than the canonical DDDDK recognition sequence, widely used for protein purification. CLiPS provides a straightforward and versatile approach to determine protease specificity and discover optimal substrates on the basis of cleavage kinetics.

  12. Restriction enzyme-free construction of random gene mutagenesis libraries in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pai, Jen C; Entzminger, Kevin C; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2012-02-15

    Directed evolution relies on both random and site-directed mutagenesis of individual genes and regulatory elements to create variants with altered activity profiles for engineering applications. Central to these experiments is the construction of large libraries of related variants. However, a number of technical hurdles continue to limit routine construction of random mutagenesis libraries in Escherichia coli, in particular, inefficiencies during digestion and ligation steps. Here, we report a restriction enzyme-free approach to library generation using megaprimers termed MegAnneal. Target DNA is first exponentially amplified using error-prone polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and then linearly amplified with a single 3' primer to generate long, randomly mutated, single-stranded megaprimers. These are annealed to single-stranded dUTP-containing template plasmid and extended with T7 polymerase to create a complementary strand, and the resulting termini are ligated with T4 DNA ligase. Using this approach, we are able to reliably generate libraries of approximately 10⁷ colony-forming units (cfu)/μg DNA/transformation in a single day. We have created MegAnneal libraries based on three different single-chain antibodies and identified variants with enhanced expression and ligand-binding affinity. The key advantages of this approach include facile amplification, restriction enzyme-free library generation, and a significantly reduced risk of mutations outside the targeted region and wild-type contamination as compared with current methods.

  13. Construction of a random circular permutation library using an engineered transposon.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Brennal; Shah, Vandan; Xiao, Jenny; Kim, Jin Ryoun

    2015-04-01

    Circular permutation is an important protein engineering tool used to create sequence diversity of a protein by changing its linear order of amino acid sequence. Circular permutation has proven to be effective in the evolution of proteins for desired properties while maintaining similar three-dimensional structures. Due to the lack of a robust design principle guiding the selection of new termini, construction of a combinatorial library is much preferred for comprehensive evaluation of circular permutation. Unfortunately, the conventional methods used to create random circular permutation libraries cause significant sequence modification at new termini of circular permutants. In addition, these methods impose additional limitations by requiring either relatively inefficient blunt-end ligation during library construction or redesign of transposons for tailored expression of circular permutants. In this study, we present the development of an engineered transposon for facile construction of random circular permutation libraries. We provide evidence that minimal modification at the new termini of the random circular permutants is possible with our engineered transposon. In addition, our method enables the use of sticky-end ligation during library construction and provides external tunability for expression of random circular permutants.

  14. Screening and identification of mimotopes of the major shrimp allergen tropomyosin using one-bead-one-compound peptide libraries

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Nicki YH; Wai, Christine YY; Ho, Marco HK; Liu, Ruiwu; Lam, Kit S; Wang, Jin Jun; Shu, Shang An; Chu, Ka Hou; Leung, Patrick SC

    2017-01-01

    The one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial peptide library is a powerful tool to identify ligand and receptor interactions. Here, we applied the OBOC library technology to identify mimotopes specific to the immunoglobulin E (IgE) epitopes of the major shellfish allergen tropomyosin. OBOC peptide libraries with 8–12 amino acid residues were screened with serum samples from patients with shellfish allergy for IgE mimotopes of tropomyosin. Twenty-five mimotopes were identified from the screening and their binding reactivity to tropomyosin-specific IgE was confirmed by peptide ELISA. These mimotopes could be divided into seven clusters based on sequence homology, and epitope mapping by EpiSearch of the clustered mimotopes was performed to characterize and confirm the validity of mimotopes. Five out of six of the predicted epitopes were found to overlap with previously identified epitopes of tropomyosin. To further confirm the mimicry potential of mimotopes, BALB/c mice were immunized with mimotopes conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin and assayed for their capacity to induce tropomyosin-specific antibodies. BALB/c mice that received mimotope immunization were found to have an elevated level of tropomyosin-specific immunoglobulin G, but not mice that received an irrelevant mimotope. This study pioneers the successful application of the OBOC libraries using whole sera to screen and identify multiple shrimp allergen mimotopes and validates their mimicry potential using in vitro, in vivo, and in silico methods. PMID:26364917

  15. Combinatorial peptide libraries as an alternative approach to the identification of ligands for tumor-reactive cytolytic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Pinilla, C; Rubio-Godoy, V; Dutoit, V; Guillaume, P; Simon, R; Zhao, Y; Houghten, R A; Cerottini, J C; Romero, P; Valmori, D

    2001-07-01

    The recent identification of molecularly defined human tumor antigens recognized by autologous CTLs has opened new opportunities for the development of antigen-specific cancer vaccines. Despite extensive work, however, the number of CTL-defined tumor antigens that are suitable targets for generic vaccination of cancer patients is still limited, mostly because of the painstaking and lengthy nature of the procedures currently used for their identification. A novel approach is based on the combined use of combinatorial peptide libraries in positional scanning format (positional scanning synthetic combinatorial peptide libraries, PS-SCLs) and tumor-reactive CTL clones. To validate this approach, we herein analyzed in detail the recognition of PS-SCLs by Melan-A-specific CTL clones. Our results indicate that, at least for some clones, most of the amino acids composing the native antigenic peptide can be identified through the use of PS-SCLs. Interestingly, this analysis also allowed the identification of peptide analogues with increased antigenic activity as well as agonist peptides containing multiple amino-acid substitutions. In addition, biometrical analysis of the data generated by PS-SCL screening allowed the identification of the native ligand in a public database. Overall, these data demonstrate the successful use of PS-SCLs for the identification and optimization of tumor-associated CTL epitopes.

  16. Induction of anti-EGFR immune response with mimotopes identified from a phage display peptide library by panitumumab

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Hong; Di, Jiabo; Wang, Zaozao; Xing, Jiadi; Wu, Fan; Wu, Wei; Wang, Xicheng; Shen, Lin; Jiang, Beihai; Su, Xiangqian

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in several epithelial tumors. Anti-EGFR humanized monoclonal antibodies, cetuximab and panitumumab, in combination with chemotherapy have improved the prognosis for patients with wild-type RAS tumors. To identify mimotopes of EGFR and develop mimotope-based EGFR vaccines, we screened a phage display peptide library with panitumumab. Two EGFR mimotopes P19 and P26, which could be recognized by panitumumab specifically, were isolated. To enhance the immune responses, we generated recombinant proteins of P19 or P26 fused to a heat-shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70), and evaluated the efficacy of Hsc70-P19 and Hsc70-P26 as vaccines in vivo. Immunization with Hsc70-P19 or Hsc70-P26 fusion protein stimulated the immune system to produce specific antibodies against peptides as well as EGFR. Moreover, antibodies elicited against mimotopes could induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), and inhibit the proliferation of EGFR-overexpressing A431 cells. Treatment with Hsc70-P19 and Hsc70-P26 significantly reduced tumor growth in BALB/c transplantable lung cancer models. Although there was no sequence homology between the phage-derived peptides and EGFR by alignments, both peptides mimic the conformational structure of EGFR binding to panitumumab. In conclusion, the mimotopes we identified from phage display peptide library could be promising candidate vaccines for active anti-EGFR immunotherapy against cancers. PMID:27659529

  17. Induction of anti-EGFR immune response with mimotopes identified from a phage display peptide library by panitumumab.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aidong; Cui, Ming; Qu, Hong; Di, Jiabo; Wang, Zaozao; Xing, Jiadi; Wu, Fan; Wu, Wei; Wang, Xicheng; Shen, Lin; Jiang, Beihai; Su, Xiangqian

    2016-11-15

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in several epithelial tumors. Anti-EGFR humanized monoclonal antibodies, cetuximab and panitumumab, in combination with chemotherapy have improved the prognosis for patients with wild-type RAS tumors. To identify mimotopes of EGFR and develop mimotope-based EGFR vaccines, we screened a phage display peptide library with panitumumab. Two EGFR mimotopes P19 and P26, which could be recognized by panitumumab specifically, were isolated. To enhance the immune responses, we generated recombinant proteins of P19 or P26 fused to a heat-shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70), and evaluated the efficacy of Hsc70-P19 and Hsc70-P26 as vaccines in vivo. Immunization with Hsc70-P19 or Hsc70-P26 fusion protein stimulated the immune system to produce specific antibodies against peptides as well as EGFR. Moreover, antibodies elicited against mimotopes could induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), and inhibit the proliferation of EGFR-overexpressing A431 cells. Treatment with Hsc70-P19 and Hsc70-P26 significantly reduced tumor growth in BALB/c transplantable lung cancer models. Although there was no sequence homology between the phage-derived peptides and EGFR by alignments, both peptides mimic the conformational structure of EGFR binding to panitumumab. In conclusion, the mimotopes we identified from phage display peptide library could be promising candidate vaccines for active anti-EGFR immunotherapy against cancers.

  18. De novo designed library of linear helical peptides: an exploratory tool in the discovery of protein-protein interaction modulators.

    PubMed

    Bonache, M Ángeles; Balsera, Beatriz; López-Méndez, Blanca; Millet, Oscar; Brancaccio, Diego; Gómez-Monterrey, Isabel; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Pavone, Luigi M; Reille-Seroussi, Marie; Gagey-Eilstein, Nathalie; Vidal, Michel; de la Torre-Martinez, Roberto; Fernández-Carvajal, Asia; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; García-López, M Teresa; Martín-Martínez, Mercedes; de Vega, M Jesús Pérez; González-Muñiz, Rosario

    2014-05-12

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) have emerged as important targets for pharmaceutical intervention because of their essential role in numerous physiological and pathological processes, but screening efforts using small-molecules have led to very low hit rates. Linear peptides could represent a quick and effective approach to discover initial PPI hits, particularly if they have inherent ability to adopt specific peptide secondary structures. Here, we address this hypothesis through a linear helical peptide library, composed of four sublibraries, which was designed by theoretical predictions of helicity (Agadir software). The 13-mer peptides of this collection fixes either a combination of three aromatic or two aromatic and one aliphatic residues on one face of the helix (Ac-SSEEX(5)ARNX(9)AAX(12)N-NH2), since these are structural features quite common at PPIs interfaces. The 81 designed peptides were conveniently synthesized by parallel solid-phase methodologies, and the tendency of some representative library components to adopt the intended secondary structure was corroborated through CD and NMR experiments. As proof of concept in the search for PPI modulators, the usefulness of this library was verified on the widely studied p53-MDM2 interaction and on the communication between VEGF and its receptor Flt-1, two PPIs for which a hydrophobic α-helix is essential for the interaction. We have demonstrated here that, in both cases, selected peptides from the library, containing the right hydrophobic sequence of the hot-spot in one of the protein partners, are able to interact with the complementary protein. Moreover, we have discover some new, quite potent inhibitors of the VEGF-Flt-1 interaction, just by replacing one of the aromatic residues of the initial F(5)Y(9)Y(12) peptide by W, in agreement with previous results on related antiangiogenic peptides. Finally, the HTS evaluation of the full collection on thermoTRPs has led to a few antagonists of TRPV1 and TRPA

  19. Successful identification of novel agents to control infectious diseases from screening mixture-based peptide combinatorial libraries in complex cell-based bioassays.

    PubMed

    Boggiano, César; Reixach, Natàlia; Pinilla, Clemencia; Blondelle, Sylvie E

    2003-01-01

    Mixture-based peptide synthetic combinatorial libraries (SCLs) represent a valuable source for the development of novel agents to control infectious diseases. Indeed, a number of studies have now proven the ability of identifying active peptides from libraries composed of thousands to millions of peptides in cell-based biosystems of varying complexity. Furthermore, progressing knowledge on the importance of endogenous peptides in various immune responses lead to a regain in importance for peptides as potential therapeutic agents. This article is aimed at providing recent studies in our laboratory for the development of antimicrobial or antiviral peptides derived from mixture-based SCLs using cell-based assays, as well as a short review of the importance of such peptides in the control of infectious diseases. Furthermore, the use of positional scanning (PS) SCL-based biometrical analyses for the identification of native optimal epitopes specific to HIV-1 proteins is also presented.

  20. Identification of the human melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan antigen epitope recognized by the antitumor monoclonal antibody 763.74 from a peptide phage library.

    PubMed

    Geiser, M; Schultz, D; Le Cardinal, A; Voshol, H; García-Echeverría, C

    1999-02-15

    To identify the epitope of the melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP) recognized by the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 763.74, we first expressed random DNA fragments obtained from the complete coding sequence of the MCSP core glycoproteins in phages and selected without success for binders to the murine mAb 763.74. We then used a library of random heptapeptides displayed at the surface of the filamentous M13 phage as fusion protein to the NH2-terminal portion of the minor coat protein III. After three rounds of selection on the bound mAb, several phages displaying related binding peptides were identified, yielding the consensus sequence Val-His-Leu-Asn-Tyr-Glu-His. Competitive ELISA experiments showed that this peptide can be specifically prevented from binding to mAb 763.74 by an anti-idiotypic MK2-23 mouse:human chimeric mAb and by A375 melanoma cells expressing the antigen MCSP. We screened the amino acid sequence of the MCSP molecule for a region of homology to the consensus sequence and found that the amino acid sequence Val-His-Ile-Asn-Ala-His spanning positions 289 and 294 has high homology. Synthetic linear peptides corresponding to the consensus sequence as well as to the MCSP-derived epitope inhibit the binding of mAb 763.74 to the phages displaying the consensus amino acid sequence. Finally, the biotinylated consensus peptide absorbed to streptavidin-microtiter plates can be used for the detection of mAb 763.74 in human serum. These results show clearly that the MCSP epitope defined by mAb 763.74 has been identified.

  1. Identification of avocado (Persea americana) pulp proteins by nano-LC-MS/MS via combinatorial peptide ligand libraries.

    PubMed

    Esteve, Clara; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Marina, María Luisa; García, María Concepción; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2012-09-01

    Avocado (Persea americana) proteins have been scarcely studied despite their importance, especially in food related allergies. The proteome of avocado pulp was explored in depth by extracting proteins with capture by combinatorial peptide ligand libraries at pH 7.4 and under conditions mimicking reverse-phase capture at pH 2.2. The total number of unique gene products identified amounts to 1012 proteins, of which 174 are in common with the control, untreated sample, 190 are present only in the control and 648 represent the new species detected via combinatorial peptide ligand libraries of all combined eluates and likely represent low-abundance proteins. Among the 1012 proteins, it was possible to identify the already known avocado allergen Pers a 1 and different proteins susceptible to be allergens such as a profilin, a polygalacturonase, a thaumatin-like protein, a glucanase, and an isoflavone reductase like protein.

  2. Using oriented peptide array libraries to evaluate methylarginine-specific antibodies and arginine methyltransferase substrate motifs

    PubMed Central

    Gayatri, Sitaram; Cowles, Martis W.; Vemulapalli, Vidyasiri; Cheng, Donghang; Sun, Zu-Wen; Bedford, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    Signal transduction in response to stimuli relies on the generation of cascades of posttranslational modifications that promote protein-protein interactions and facilitate the assembly of distinct signaling complexes. Arginine methylation is one such modification, which is catalyzed by a family of nine protein arginine methyltransferases, or PRMTs. Elucidating the substrate specificity of each PRMT will promote a better understanding of which signaling networks these enzymes contribute to. Although many PRMT substrates have been identified, and their methylation sites mapped, the optimal target motif for each of the nine PRMTs has not been systematically addressed. Here we describe the use of Oriented Peptide Array Libraries (OPALs) to methodically dissect the preferred methylation motifs for three of these enzymes – PRMT1, CARM1 and PRMT9. In parallel, we show that an OPAL platform with a fixed methylarginine residue can be used to validate the methyl-specific and sequence-specific properties of antibodies that have been generated against different PRMT substrates, and can also be used to confirm the pan nature of some methylarginine-specific antibodies. PMID:27338245

  3. Epitope Identification from Fixed-complexity Random-sequence Peptide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Josh; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Stafford, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies play an important role in modern science and medicine. They are essential in many biological assays and have emerged as an important class of therapeutics. Unfortunately, current methods for mapping antibody epitopes require costly synthesis or enrichment steps, and no low-cost universal platform exists. In order to address this, we tested a random-sequence peptide microarray consisting of over 330,000 unique peptide sequences sampling 83% of all possible tetramers and 27% of pentamers. It is a single, unbiased platform that can be used in many different types of tests, it does not rely on informatic selection of peptides for a particular proteome, and it does not require iterative rounds of selection. In order to optimize the platform, we developed an algorithm that considers the significance of k-length peptide subsequences (k-mers) within selected peptides that come from the microarray. We tested eight monoclonal antibodies and seven infectious disease cohorts. The method correctly identified five of the eight monoclonal epitopes and identified both reported and unreported epitope candidates in the infectious disease cohorts. This algorithm could greatly enhance the utility of random-sequence peptide microarrays by enabling rapid epitope mapping and antigen identification. PMID:25368412

  4. Phage display biopanning and isolation of target-unrelated peptides: in search of nonspecific binders hidden in a combinatorial library.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Zade, Hesam Motaleb; Shekarabi, Hosna Sadat Zahed; Neman, Sara

    2016-12-01

    Phage display is known as a powerful methodology for the identification of targeting ligands that specifically bind to a variety of targets. The high-throughput screening of phage display combinatorial peptide libraries is performed through the affinity selection method of biopanning. Although phage display selection has proven very successful in the discovery of numerous high-affinity target-binding peptides with potential application in drug discovery and delivery, the enrichment of false-positive target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) without any actual affinity towards the target remains a major problem of library screening. Selection-related TUPs may emerge because of binding to the components of the screening system rather than the target. Propagation-related TUPs may arise as a result of faster growth rate of some phage clones enabling them to outcompete slow-propagating clones. Amplification of the library between rounds of biopanning makes a significant contribution to the selection of phage clones with propagation advantage. Distinguishing nonspecific TUPs from true target binders is of particular importance for the translation of biopanning findings from basic research to clinical applications. Different experimental and in silico approaches are applied to assess the specificity of phage display-derived peptides towards the target. Bioinformatic tools are playing a rapidly growing role in the analysis of biopanning data and identification of target-irrelevant TUPs. Recent progress in the introduction of efficient strategies for TUP detection holds enormous promise for the discovery of clinically relevant cell- and tissue-homing peptides and paves the way for the development of novel targeted diagnostic and therapeutic platforms in pharmaceutical areas.

  5. Library+

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses possible future directions for academic libraries in the post Web/Library 2.0 world. These possible directions include areas such as data literacy, linked data sets, and opportunities for libraries in support of digital humanities. The author provides a brief sketch of the background information regarding the topics and…

  6. Advancement and applications of peptide phage display technology in biomedical science.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Hsun; Liu, I-Ju; Lu, Ruei-Min; Wu, Han-Chung

    2016-01-19

    Combinatorial phage library is a powerful research tool for high-throughput screening of protein interactions. Of all available molecular display techniques, phage display has proven to be the most popular approach. Screening phage-displayed random peptide libraries is an effective means of identifying peptides that can bind target molecules and regulate their function. Phage-displayed peptide libraries can be used for (i) B-cell and T-cell epitope mapping, (ii) selection of bioactive peptides bound to receptors or proteins, disease-specific antigen mimics, peptides bound to non-protein targets, cell-specific peptides, or organ-specific peptides, and (iii) development of peptide-mediated drug delivery systems and other applications. Targeting peptides identified using phage display technology may be useful for basic research and translational medicine. In this review article, we summarize the latest technological advancements in the application of phage-displayed peptide libraries to applied biomedical sciences.

  7. High-Speed Optical Library System Using Digital Versatile Disk Random Access Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Takaya; Ura, Tetsu; Yamamoto, Manabu

    2000-02-01

    A high-data-transfer-rate optical storage system using a redundant array of inexpensive libraries (RAIL) has been developed and tested. It incorporates multiple libraries, where each library consists of dual digital versatile disk (DVD) random access memory (RAM) drives and a single robotic hand and holds 2.6 GB DVD disks. To increase the reliability of data storage and at the same time to eliminate the need for read-after-write verification, which doubles the recording time, a redundant array of inexpensive drives (RAID) 4 algorithm is implemented in the control unit of the storage system. Data sent by the host is transferred to a control unit, which stripes the data into five data groups plus one parity unit. The striped and parity data is sent to individual libraries and written to the DVD disks. This system writes and retrieves data with a transfer rate of approximately 6 MB/s, using write and read control methods that minimize the data striping overhead. This reliable library system can be used for networked multimedia applications.

  8. RNGSSELIB: Program library for random number generation. More generators, parallel streams of random numbers and Fortran compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barash, L. Yu.; Shchur, L. N.

    2013-10-01

    In this update, we present the new version of the random number generator (RNG) library RNGSSELIB, which, in particular, contains fast SSE realizations of a number of modern and most reliable generators [1]. The new features are: (i) Fortran compatibility and examples of using the library in Fortran; (ii) new modern and reliable generators; (iii) the abilities to jump ahead inside a RNG sequence and to initialize up to 1019 independent random number streams with block splitting method. Summary of revisions: We added Fortran compatibility and examples of using the library in Fortran for each of the generators. New modern and reliable generators GM29, GM55.4, GQ58.1, GQ58.3, and GQ58.4, which were introduced in [5] were added to the library. The ability to jump ahead inside a RNG sequence and to initialize independent random number streams with block splitting method are added for each of the RNGs. Restrictions: For SSE realizations of the generators, the Intel or AMD CPU supporting SSE2 command set is required. In order to use the SSE realization for the lfsr113 generator, the CPU must support the SSE4.1 command set. Additional comments: The function call interface has been slightly modified compared to the previous version in order to support Fortran compatibility. For each of the generators, RNGSSELIB supports the following functions, where rng should be replaced by the particular name of the RNG: void rng_skipahead_(rng_state* state, unsigned long long offset); void rng_init_(rng_state* state); void rng_init_sequence_(rng_state* state,unsigned long long SequenceNumber); unsigned int rng_generate_(rng_state* state); float rng_generate_uniform_float_(rng_state* state); unsigned int rng_sse_generate_(rng_sse_state* state); void rng_get_sse_state_(rng_state* state,rng_sse_state* sse_state); void rng_print_state_(rng_state* state); void rng_print_sse_state_(rng_sse_state* state); There are a few peculiarities for some of the RNGs. For example, the function void mt

  9. Combinatorial peptide libraries reveal the ligand-binding mechanism of the oligopeptide receptor OppA of Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Detmers, Frank J. M.; Lanfermeijer, Frank C.; Abele, Rupert; Jack, Ralph W.; Tampé, Robert; Konings, Wil N.; Poolman, Bert

    2000-01-01

    The oligopeptide transport system (Opp) of Lactococcus lactis has the unique capacity to mediate the transport of peptides from 4 up to at least 18 residues. The substrate specificity of this binding protein-dependent ATP-binding cassette transporter is determined mainly by the receptor protein OppA. To study the specificity and ligand-binding mechanism of OppA, the following strategy was used: (i) OppA was purified and anchored via the lipid moiety to the surface of liposomes; (ii) the proteoliposomes were used in a rapid filtration-based binding assay with radiolabeled nonameric bradykinin as a reporter peptide; and (iii) combinatorial peptide libraries were used to determine the specificity and selectivity of OppA. The studies show that (i) OppA is able to bind peptides up to at least 35 residues, but there is a clear optimum in affinity for nonameric peptides; (ii) the specificity for nonameric peptides is not equally distributed over the whole peptide, because positions 4, 5, and 6 in the binding site are more selective; and (iii) the differences in affinity for given side chains is relatively small, but overall hydrophobic residues are favored—whereas glycine, proline, and negatively charged residues lower the binding affinity. The data indicate that not only the first six residues (enclosed by the protein) but also the C-terminal three residues interact in a nonopportunistic manner with (the surface of) OppA. This binding mechanism is different from the one generally accepted for receptors of ATP-binding cassette-transporter systems. PMID:11050157

  10. Design, synthesis, and validation of a β-turn mimetic library targeting protein-protein and peptide-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Whitby, Landon R; Ando, Yoshio; Setola, Vincent; Vogt, Peter K; Roth, Bryan L; Boger, Dale L

    2011-07-06

    The design and synthesis of a β-turn mimetic library as a key component of a small-molecule library targeting the major recognition motifs involved in protein-protein interactions is described. Analysis of a geometric characterization of 10,245 β-turns in the protein data bank (PDB) suggested that trans-pyrrolidine-3,4-dicarboxamide could serve as an effective and synthetically accessible library template. This was confirmed by initially screening select compounds against a series of peptide-activated GPCRs that recognize a β-turn structure in their endogenous ligands. This validation study was highlighted by identification of both nonbasic and basic small molecules with high affinities (K(i) = 390 and 23 nM, respectively) for the κ-opioid receptor (KOR). Consistent with the screening capabilities of collaborators and following the design validation, the complete library was assembled as 210 mixtures of 20 compounds, providing a total of 4200 compounds designed to mimic all possible permutations of 3 of the 4 residues in a naturally occurring β-turn. Unique to the design and because of the C(2) symmetry of the template, a typical 20 × 20 × 20-mix (8000 compounds prepared as 400 mixtures of 20 compounds) needed to represent 20 variations in the side chains of three amino acid residues reduces to a 210 × 20-mix, thereby simplifying the library synthesis and subsequent screening. The library was prepared using a solution-phase synthetic protocol with liquid-liquid or liquid-solid extractions for purification and conducted on a scale that insures its long-term availability for screening campaigns. Screening the library against the human opioid receptors (KOR, MOR, and DOR) identified not only the activity of library members expected to mimic the opioid receptor peptide ligands but also additional side-chain combinations that provided enhanced receptor binding selectivities (>100-fold) and affinities (as low as K(i) = 80 nM for KOR). A key insight to emerge from

  11. Novel cell-surface peptides specific to human oral squamous cell carcinoma using an E. coli peptide display library.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Noriko; Asaumi, Junichi; Murakami, Jun; Wakasa, Toru; Kuroda, Masahiro; Hisatomi, Miki; Unetsubo, Teruhisa; Maki, Yuu; Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Yanagi, Yoshinonu; Konouchi, Hironobu

    2007-04-01

    We attempted to find a specific antigen of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells that could be safely applied to gene therapy in the conservative clinical treatment of oral cancer. We performed subtraction using normal human keratinocyte cells, followed by selection using four oral SCC cell lines. We isolated three clones from poorly differentiated SCC cells and four from well-differentiated SCC cells. These seven clones adsorbed to the oral SCC cells at rates 10-100 times those of normal human keratinocyte cells. The three clones from the poorly differentiated SCC cells showed the same peptide sequence (LAPRTHP). Of the four clones from the well-differentiated SCC cells, three showed the same peptide sequence (FGTLPGT) and the fourth showed a different one (VTPNSTP). Each peptide sequence may recognize the material that exists specifically on the oral SCC cell cortex. We can expect applications not only for tumor-targeting treatment using a gene therapy virus vector but also for diagnosis using, as a tumor marker, the peculiar SCC surface material that these peptides recognize.

  12. Evaluation of a D-amino-acid-containing fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptide library for profiling prokaryotic proteases.

    PubMed

    Kaman, Wendy E; Voskamp-Visser, Ingrid; de Jongh, Denise M C; Endtz, Hubert P; van Belkum, Alex; Hays, John P; Bikker, Floris J

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial proteases play an important role in a broad spectrum of processes, including colonization, proliferation, and virulence. In this respect, bacterial proteases are potential biomarkers for bacterial diagnosis and targets for novel therapeutic protease inhibitors. To investigate these potential functions, the authors designed and used a protease substrate fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) library comprising 115 short d- and l-amino-acid-containing fluorogenic substrates as a tool to generate proteolytic profiles for a wide range of bacteria. Bacterial specificity of the d-amino acid substrates was confirmed using enzymes isolated from both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Interestingly, bacterial proteases that are known to be involved in housekeeping and nutrition, but not in virulence, were able to degrade substrates in which a d-amino acid was present. Using our FRET peptide library and culture supernatants from a total of 60 different bacterial species revealed novel, bacteria-specific, proteolytic profiles, although in-species variation was observed for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Overall, the specific characteristic of our substrate peptide library makes it a rapid tool to high-throughput screen for novel substrates to detect bacterial proteolytic activity.

  13. Identification of plum and peach seed proteins by nLC-MS/MS via combinatorial peptide ligand libraries.

    PubMed

    González-García, Estefanía; Marina, María Luisa; García, María Concepción; Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Fasoli, Elisa

    2016-10-04

    Plum (Prunus domestica L.) and peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) seed proteins are a source of bioactive peptides. These seeds, though, are usual residues produced during canning and beverage preparation that, in most cases, are irreversibly lost. The recovery and identification of these proteins might be of importance in human nutrition. This work employs the combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLLs) technology as a tool to reduce the proteins dynamic concentration range. The most suitable extraction and CPLL capture conditions have been obtained and applied for the comprehensive identification of seed proteins. The analysis of recovered species by nLC-MS/MS has allowed the identification of 141 and 97 unique gene products from plum and peach seeds, respectively. It was possible to identify 16 proteins belonging to the Prunus genus. Moreover, a high number of histones and seed storage proteins were identified. Additionally, 21 and 14 bioactive peptides previously identified were found within protein sequences in plum and peach seeds, respectively. Plums and peaches seeds are cheap sources of proteins that are irretrievably lost after canning and beverage production. Although this kind of residues has been used in animal feed or production of biofuel, they are usually incinerated or sent to landfills, wasting their huge potential. In order to exploit this, it is important to comprehensively study proteins present in plum and peach seeds. Nevertheless, since proteomics analysis is in most cases handicapped by the presence of high-abundance proteins masking the detection of the low-abundance ones, it is important to overcome this challenge. In this sense, combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLLs) have been used in this work to reduce the dynamic protein concentration range to enable the identification of a higher amount of proteins than employing conventional methods. In this work, the better extracting conditions have been optimized and up to 141 and 97

  14. A Cell-Based Approach for the Biosynthesis/Screening of Cyclic Peptide Libraries against Bacterial Toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Camarero, J A; Kimura, R; Woo, Y; Cantor, J; Steenblock, E

    2007-10-24

    Available methods for developing and screening small drug-like molecules able to knockout toxins or pathogenic microorganisms have some limitations. In order to be useful, these new methods must provide high-throughput analysis and identify specific binders in a short period of time. To meet this need, we are developing an approach that uses living cells to generate libraries of small biomolecules, which are then screened inside the cell for activity. Our group is using this new, combined approach to find highly specific ligands capable of disabling anthrax Lethal Factor (LF) as proof of principle. Key to our approach is the development of a method for the biosynthesis of libraries of cyclic peptides, and an efficient screening process that can be carried out inside the cell.

  15. A Robust and Versatile Method of Combinatorial Chemical Synthesis of Gene Libraries via Hierarchical Assembly of Partially Randomized Modules

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Blagovesta; Schubert, Steffen; Bulla, Ingo; Buchwald, Daniela; Kramer, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in gene library generation is to guarantee a large functional size and diversity that significantly increases the chances of selecting different functional protein variants. The use of trinucleotides mixtures for controlled randomization results in superior library diversity and offers the ability to specify the type and distribution of the amino acids at each position. Here we describe the generation of a high diversity gene library using tHisF of the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima as a scaffold. Combining various rational criteria with contingency, we targeted 26 selected codons of the thisF gene sequence for randomization at a controlled level. We have developed a novel method of creating full-length gene libraries by combinatorial assembly of smaller sub-libraries. Full-length libraries of high diversity can easily be assembled on demand from smaller and much less diverse sub-libraries, which circumvent the notoriously troublesome long-term archivation and repeated proliferation of high diversity ensembles of phages or plasmids. We developed a generally applicable software tool for sequence analysis of mutated gene sequences that provides efficient assistance for analysis of library diversity. Finally, practical utility of the library was demonstrated in principle by assessment of the conformational stability of library members and isolating protein variants with HisF activity from it. Our approach integrates a number of features of nucleic acids synthetic chemistry, biochemistry and molecular genetics to a coherent, flexible and robust method of combinatorial gene synthesis. PMID:26355961

  16. A Robust and Versatile Method of Combinatorial Chemical Synthesis of Gene Libraries via Hierarchical Assembly of Partially Randomized Modules.

    PubMed

    Popova, Blagovesta; Schubert, Steffen; Bulla, Ingo; Buchwald, Daniela; Kramer, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in gene library generation is to guarantee a large functional size and diversity that significantly increases the chances of selecting different functional protein variants. The use of trinucleotides mixtures for controlled randomization results in superior library diversity and offers the ability to specify the type and distribution of the amino acids at each position. Here we describe the generation of a high diversity gene library using tHisF of the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima as a scaffold. Combining various rational criteria with contingency, we targeted 26 selected codons of the thisF gene sequence for randomization at a controlled level. We have developed a novel method of creating full-length gene libraries by combinatorial assembly of smaller sub-libraries. Full-length libraries of high diversity can easily be assembled on demand from smaller and much less diverse sub-libraries, which circumvent the notoriously troublesome long-term archivation and repeated proliferation of high diversity ensembles of phages or plasmids. We developed a generally applicable software tool for sequence analysis of mutated gene sequences that provides efficient assistance for analysis of library diversity. Finally, practical utility of the library was demonstrated in principle by assessment of the conformational stability of library members and isolating protein variants with HisF activity from it. Our approach integrates a number of features of nucleic acids synthetic chemistry, biochemistry and molecular genetics to a coherent, flexible and robust method of combinatorial gene synthesis.

  17. MapReduce Implementation of a Hybrid Spectral Library-Database Search Method for Large-Scale Peptide Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyanaraman, Anantharaman; Cannon, William R.; Latt, Benjamin K.; Baxter, Douglas J.

    2011-11-01

    A MapReduce-based implementation called MR- MSPolygraph for parallelizing peptide identification from mass spectrometry data is presented. The underlying serial method, MSPolygraph, uses a novel hybrid approach to match an experimental spectrum against a combination of a protein sequence database and a spectral library. Our MapReduce implementation can run on any Hadoop cluster environment. Experimental results demonstrate that, relative to the serial version, MR-MSPolygraph reduces the time to solution from weeks to hours, for processing tens of thousands of experimental spectra. Speedup and other related performance studies are also reported on a 400-core Hadoop cluster using spectral datasets from environmental microbial communities as inputs.

  18. Isolation of a peptide from Ph.D.-C7C phage display library for detection of Cry1Ab.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Wang, Qian; Wu, Ai-Hua; Hao, Zhen-Ping; Liu, Xian-Jin

    2017-03-06

    Traditional ELISA methods of using animal immunity yield antibodies for detection Cry toxin. Not only is this incredibly harmful to the animals, but is also time-intensive. Here we developed a simple method to yield the recognition element. Using a critical selection strategy and immunoassay we confirmed a clone from the Ph.D-C7C phage library, which has displayed the most interesting Cry1Ab-binding characteristics examined in this study (Fig. 1). The current study indicates that isolating peptide is an alternative method for the preparation of a recognition element, and that the developed assay is a potentially useful tool for detecting Cry1Ab.

  19. Method for high-volume sequencing of nucleic acids: random and directed priming with libraries of oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William

    1995-04-18

    Random and directed priming methods for determining nucleotide sequences by enzymatic sequencing techniques, using libraries of primers of lengths 8, 9 or 10 bases, are disclosed. These methods permit direct sequencing of nucleic acids as large as 45,000 base pairs or larger without the necessity for subcloning. Individual primers are used repeatedly to prime sequence reactions in many different nucleic acid molecules. Libraries containing as few as 10,000 octamers, 14,200 nonamers, or 44,000 decamers would have the capacity to determine the sequence of almost any cosmid DNA. Random priming with a fixed set of primers from a smaller library can also be used to initiate the sequencing of individual nucleic acid molecules, with the sequence being completed by directed priming with primers from the library. In contrast to random cloning techniques, a combined random and directed priming strategy is far more efficient.

  20. Method for high-volume sequencing of nucleic acids: random and directed priming with libraries of oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.

    1995-04-18

    Random and directed priming methods for determining nucleotide sequences by enzymatic sequencing techniques, using libraries of primers of lengths 8, 9 or 10 bases, are disclosed. These methods permit direct sequencing of nucleic acids as large as 45,000 base pairs or larger without the necessity for subcloning. Individual primers are used repeatedly to prime sequence reactions in many different nucleic acid molecules. Libraries containing as few as 10,000 octamers, 14,200 nonamers, or 44,000 decamers would have the capacity to determine the sequence of almost any cosmid DNA. Random priming with a fixed set of primers from a smaller library can also be used to initiate the sequencing of individual nucleic acid molecules, with the sequence being completed by directed priming with primers from the library. In contrast to random cloning techniques, a combined random and directed priming strategy is far more efficient. 2 figs.

  1. Exploring the venom proteome of the western diamondback rattlesnake, Crotalus atrox, via snake venomics and combinatorial peptide ligand library approaches.

    PubMed

    Calvete, Juan J; Fasoli, Elisa; Sanz, Libia; Boschetti, Egisto; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2009-06-01

    We report the proteomic characterization of the venom of the medically important North American western diamondback rattlesnake, Crotalus atrox, using two complementary approaches: snake venomics (to gain an insight of the overall venom proteome), and two solid-phase combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLL), followed by 2D electrophoresis and mass spectrometric characterization of in-gel digested protein bands (to capture and "amplify" low-abundance proteins). The venomics approach revealed approximately 24 distinct proteins belonging to 2 major protein families (snake venom metalloproteinases, SVMP, and serine proteinases), which represent 69.5% of the total venom proteins, 4 medium abundance families (medium-size disintegrin, PLA(2), cysteine-rich secretory protein, and l-amino acid oxidase) amounting to 25.8% of the venom proteins, and 3 minor protein families (vasoactive peptides, endogenous inhibitor of SVMP, and C-type lectin-like). This toxin profile potentially explains the cytotoxic, myotoxic, hemotoxic, and hemorrhagic effects evoked by C. atrox envenomation. Further, our results showing that C. atrox exhibits a similar level of venom variation as Sistrurus miliarius points to a "diversity gain" scenario in the lineage leading to the Sistrurus catenatus taxa. On the other hand, the two combinatorial hexapeptide libraries captured distinct sets of proteins. Although the CPLL-treated samples did not retain a representative venom proteome, protein spots barely, or not at all, detectable in the whole venom were enriched in the two CPLL-treated samples. The amplified low copy number C. atrox venom proteins comprised a C-type lectin-like protein, several PLA(2) molecules, PIII-SVMP isoforms, glutaminyl cyclase isoforms, and a 2-cys peroxiredoxin highly conserved across the animal kingdom. Peroxiredoxin and glutaminyl cyclase may participate, respectively, in redox processes leading to the structural/functional diversification of toxins, and in the N

  2. Immunodiagnosis of Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis Using Mimotope Peptides Selected from Phage Displayed Combinatorial Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Toledo-Machado, Christina Monerat; Machado de Avila, Ricardo Andrez; NGuyen, Christophe; Granier, Claude; Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Carneiro, Claudia Martins; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Carneiro, Rubens Antonio; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2015-01-01

    ELISA and RIFI are currently used for serodiagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL). The accuracy of these tests is controversial in endemic areas where canine infections by Trypanosoma cruzi may occur. We evaluated the usefulness of synthetic peptides that were selected through phage display technique in the serodiagnosis of CVL. Peptides were chosen based on their ability to bind to IgGs purified from infected dogs pooled sera. We selected three phage clones that reacted only with those IgGs. Peptides were synthesized, polymerized with glutaraldehyde, and used as antigens in ELISA assays. Each individual peptide or a mix of them was reactive with infected dogs serum. The assay was highly sensitive and specific when compared to soluble Leishmania antigen that showed cross-reactivity with anti-T. cruzi IgGs. Our results demonstrate that phage display technique is useful for selection of peptides that may represent valuable synthetic antigens for an improved serodiagnosis of CVL. PMID:25710003

  3. A specific library of randomly integrated reporter genes for the isolation of inducible functions by cell sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Lapeyre, J.N.; Marini, F.; Gratzner, H.G. AMC ImmunoDiagnostics, Houston, TX )

    1993-01-01

    A library of cells containing randomly integrated reporter genes has been constructed. The purpose of this library is to enable the isolation of genes of interest which are inducible by radiation, biological response modifiers, cytokines, or other agents. These genes are located near reporter genes which can be induced by the upstream promoter of the gene of interest. The reporter gene, Lac Z, was randomly inserted into the genome by retroviral transduction and subsequent selection of the neo[sup r] gene with gentamycin. Studies of radiation inducible genes were undertaken, whereby cells with the radiation sensitive function were isolated by sorting the cells fluorescent after staining with the beta gal substrate, fluorescein digalactoside (FDG). This gene-tagging approach is an improvement over the cDNA library subtraction protocol in that a single library of cells with random marker gene integration can be repeatedly and sequentially probed by sorting under different, selective conditions, dependent upon the genes to be characterized.

  4. Selection of SARS-Coronavirus-specific B cell epitopes by phage peptide library screening and evaluation of the immunological effect of epitope-based peptides on mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Hua; Jiang Lifang . E-mail: jianglf909@yahoo.com.cn; Fang Danyun; Yan Huijun; Zhou Jingjiao; Zhou Junmei; Liang Yu; Gao Yang; Zhao, Wei; Long Beiguo

    2007-03-15

    Antibodies to SARS-Coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-specific B cell epitopes might recognize the pathogen and interrupt its adherence to and penetration of host cells. Hence, these epitopes could be useful for diagnosis and as vaccine constituents. Using the phage-displayed peptide library screening method and purified Fab fragments of immunoglobulin G (IgG Fab) from normal human sera and convalescent sera from SARS-CoV-infected patients as targets, 11 B cell epitopes of SARS-CoV spike glycoprotein (S protein) and membrane protein (M protein) were screened. After a bioinformatics tool was used to analyze these epitopes, four epitope-based S protein dodecapeptides corresponding to the predominant epitopes were chosen for synthesis. Their antigenic specificities and immunogenicities were studied in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry and ELISPOT analysis of lymphocytes as well as a serologic analysis of antibody showed that these peptides could trigger a rapid, highly effective, and relatively safe immune response in BALB/c mice. These findings might aid development of SARS diagnostics and vaccines. Moreover, the role of S and M proteins as important surface antigens is confirmed.

  5. Screening a Phage Display Library for Two Novel OmpU-Binding Peptides with Adhesion Antagonistic Activity against Vibrio mimicus

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Huizhu; Xiao, Ning; Li, Jinnian; Kong, Lingyan; Hou, Liting

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio mimicus is a pathogen that causes ascites disease in fish. We have previously demonstrated that the outer membrane protein U (OmpU) is an important adhesin in V. mimicus. Here eight specific OmpU-binding phage clones, which presented three different OmpU-binding peptides (designated P1, P2, P3), were screened from a commercially available phage displayed 12-mer peptide library using rOmpU protein as target. Then, synthetic OmpU-binding peptides were measured for their adhesion antagonistic activity and binding affinity via adhesion inhibition test and non-competitive ELISA, respectively. The results showed that after co-incubated with the mixture of rOmpU and P3, visible green fluorescence could be observed on the epithelioma papulosum cyprinidi (EPC) cells surface; while the EPC cells co-incubated with the mixture of rOmpU and P1/P2 exhibited little green fluorescence. The average adhesion number of V. mimicus 04–14 isolate before and after treatment with peptide was 21.4 ± 1.5, 20.8 ± 0.8 (irrelevant peptide), 20.2 ± 0.5 (P3), 5.1 ± 0.7 (P1) and 3.4 ± 0.8 (P2), respectively. There was a significant decrease in the adhesive level of 04–14 isolate treated with P1/ P2 compared to the untreated isolate (p<0.01). The affinity constants of P1 and P2 were (6.17 ± 0.19) × 108 L/mol and (1.24 ± 0.56) × 109 L/mol, respectively. Furthermore, protective effects of P1 and P2 on grass carps challenged with V. mimicus were preliminary detected. It was found there was delayed death of fish in the groups treated with P1/P2, and the survival rate of challenged fish improved with the increase of the dose of adhesion antagonistic peptide. Taken together, two novel OmpU-binding peptides, which possessed adhesion antagonistic activity, high affinity and a certain degree of antibacterial activity against V. mimicus, were screened and identified. PMID:27832083

  6. School Libraries and Language Skills in Indian Primary Schools: A Randomized Evaluation of the Akshara Library Program. NBER Working Paper No. 18183

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borkum, Evan; He, Fang; Linden, Leigh L.

    2012-01-01

    We conduct a randomized evaluation of a school library program on children's language skills. We find that the program had little impact on students' scores on a language test administered 16 months after implementation. The estimates are sufficiently precise to rule out effects larger than 0.13 and 0.11 standard deviations based on the 95 and 90…

  7. School Libraries and Language Skills in Indian Primary Schools: A Randomized Evaluation of the Akshara Library Program. NBER Working Paper No. 18183

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borkum, Evan; He, Fang; Linden, Leigh L.

    2012-01-01

    We conduct a randomized evaluation of a school library program on children's language skills. We find that the program had little impact on students' scores on a language test administered 16 months after implementation. The estimates are sufficiently precise to rule out effects larger than 0.13 and 0.11 standard deviations based on the 95 and 90…

  8. Epitope mapping of rat neutralizing monoclonal antibody against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 by a phage peptide library: comparison with ELISA using synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Ichiyama, K; Ishikawa, D; Tanaka, Y; Kashiwa, T; Koyanagi, Y; Handa, S; Yamashita, A; Fukushi, M; Yamamoto, N; Taki, T

    1999-01-01

    We generated a rat monoclonal antibody (mAb W#10) with the ability to neutralize human immunodeficiency virus type 1IIIB (HIV-1IIIB) infection. The epitope recognized by mAb W#10 was defined as R-I-Q-R-G-P-G by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the use of synthetic peptides. The filamentous phage clones displaying random 15-amino-acid peptides on the amino terminus of the pIII coat protein reacting with mAb W#10 were identified with affinity and immunological selection procedures. Thirteen out of 16 selected phage clones contained the G-X-G-R-X-F sequence in the coat protein region representing significant homology to a part of conserved G-P-G-R-A-F sequence in the V3 loop of various HIV-1 strains. In addition, the phage clones included the G-X-G sequence in the sequence detected by synthetic peptides as the recognition site. The selected phage clones were stained by mAb W#10 specifically and were able to compete with mAb binding to cells expressing viral antigens.

  9. A peptide isolated from phage display libraries is a structural and functional mimic of an RGD-binding site on integrins

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Many integrins recognize short RGD-containing amino acid sequences and such peptide sequences can be identified from phage libraries by panning with an integrin. Here, in a reverse strategy, we have used such libraries to isolate minimal receptor sequences that bind to fibronectin and RGD-containing fibronectin fragments in affinity panning. A predominant cyclic motif, *CWDDG/LWLC*, was obtained (the asterisks denote a potential disulfide bond). Studies using the purified phage and the corresponding synthetic cyclic peptides showed that *CWDDGWLC*-expressing phage binds specifically to fibronectin and to fibronectin fragments containing the RGD sequence. The binding did not require divalent cations and was inhibited by both RGD and *CWDDGWLC*-containing synthetic peptides. Conversely, RGD-expressing phage attached specifically to immobilized *CWDDGWLC*-peptide and the binding could be blocked by the respective synthetic peptides in solution. Moreover, fibronectin bound to a *CWDDGWLC*-peptide affinity column, and could be eluted with an RGD-containing peptide. The *CWDDGWLC*-peptide inhibited RGD-dependent cell attachment to fibronectin and vitronectin, but not to collagen. A region of the beta subunit of RGD-binding integrins that has been previously demonstrated to be involved in ligand binding includes a polypeptide stretch, KDDLW (in beta 3) similar to WDDG/LWL. Synthetic peptides corresponding to this region in beta 3 were found to bind RGD-displaying phage and conversion of its two aspartic residues into alanines greatly reduced the RGD binding. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the *CWDDGWLC*- peptide recognized beta 1 and beta 3 in immunoblots. These data indicate that the *CWDDGWLC*-peptide is a functional mimic of ligand binding sites of RGD-directed integrins, and that the structurally similar site in the integrin beta subunit is a binding site for RGD. PMID:7657703

  10. Cleavage Specificity Analysis of Six Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases (TTSPs) Using PICS with Proteome-Derived Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Béliveau, François; Leduc, Richard; Overall, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) are a family of cell membrane tethered serine proteases with unclear roles as their cleavage site specificities and substrate degradomes have not been fully elucidated. Indeed just 52 cleavage sites are annotated in MEROPS, the database of proteases, their substrates and inhibitors. Methodology/Principal Finding To profile the active site specificities of the TTSPs, we applied Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites (PICS). Human proteome-derived database searchable peptide libraries were assayed with six human TTSPs (matriptase, matriptase-2, matriptase-3, HAT, DESC and hepsin) to simultaneously determine sequence preferences on the N-terminal non-prime (P) and C-terminal prime (P’) sides of the scissile bond. Prime-side cleavage products were isolated following biotinylation and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. The corresponding non-prime side sequences were derived from human proteome databases using bioinformatics. Sequencing of 2,405 individual cleaved peptides allowed for the development of the family consensus protease cleavage site specificity revealing a strong specificity for arginine in the P1 position and surprisingly a lysine in P1′ position. TTSP cleavage between R↓K was confirmed using synthetic peptides. By parsing through known substrates and known structures of TTSP catalytic domains, and by modeling the remainder, structural explanations for this strong specificity were derived. Conclusions Degradomics analysis of 2,405 cleavage sites revealed a similar and characteristic TTSP family specificity at the P1 and P1′ positions for arginine and lysine in unfolded peptides. The prime side is important for cleavage specificity, thus making these proteases unusual within the tryptic-enzyme class that generally has overriding non-prime side specificity. PMID:25211023

  11. Randomizing the unfolded state of peptides (and proteins) by nearest neighbor interactions between unlike residues.

    PubMed

    Toal, Siobhan E; Kubatova, Nina; Richter, Christian; Linhard, Verena; Schwalbe, Harald; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard

    2015-03-23

    To explore the influence of nearest neighbors on conformational biases in unfolded peptides, we combined vibrational and 2D NMR spectroscopy to obtain the conformational distributions of selected "GxyG" host-guest peptides in aqueous solution: GDyG, GSyG, GxLG, GxVG, where x/y=A, K, L, V. Large changes of conformational propensities were observed due to nearest-neighbor interactions, at variance with the isolated pair hypothesis. We found that protonated aspartic acid and serine lose their above-the-average preference for turn-like structures in favor of polyproline II (pPII) populations in the presence of neighbors with bulky side chains. Such residues also decrease the above-the-average pPII preference of alanine. These observations suggest that the underlying mechanism involves a disruption of the hydration shell. Thermodynamic analysis of (3) J(H(N) ,H(α) ) (T) data for each x,y residue reveals that modest changes in the conformational ensemble masks larger changes of enthalpy and entropy governing the pPII↔β equilibrium indicating a significant residue dependent temperature dependence of the peptides' conformational ensembles. These results suggest that nearest-neighbor interactions between unlike residues act as conformational randomizers close to the enthalpy-entropy compensation temperature, eliminating intrinsic biases in favor of largely balanced pPII/β dominated ensembles at physiological temperatures. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. MapReduce implementation of a hybrid spectral library-database search method for large-scale peptide identification.

    PubMed

    Kalyanaraman, Ananth; Cannon, William R; Latt, Benjamin; Baxter, Douglas J

    2011-11-01

    A MapReduce-based implementation called MR-MSPolygraph for parallelizing peptide identification from mass spectrometry data is presented. The underlying serial method, MSPolygraph, uses a novel hybrid approach to match an experimental spectrum against a combination of a protein sequence database and a spectral library. Our MapReduce implementation can run on any Hadoop cluster environment. Experimental results demonstrate that, relative to the serial version, MR-MSPolygraph reduces the time to solution from weeks to hours, for processing tens of thousands of experimental spectra. Speedup and other related performance studies are also reported on a 400-core Hadoop cluster using spectral datasets from environmental microbial communities as inputs. The source code along with user documentation are available on http://compbio.eecs.wsu.edu/MR-MSPolygraph. ananth@eecs.wsu.edu; william.cannon@pnnl.gov. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  13. Screening of substrate peptide sequences for tissue-type transglutaminase (TGase 2) using T7 phage cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Sugimura, Yoshiaki; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Hitomi, Kiyotaka

    2011-03-01

    Transglutaminase (TGase) is a family of enzymes that catalyzes cross-linking reaction between glutamine- and lysine residue of substrate proteins in several mammalian biological events. Substrate proteins for TGase and their physiological relevance have been still in research, continuously expanding. In this study, we have established a novel screening system that enables identification of cDNA sequence encoding favorable primary structure as a substrate for tissue-type transglutaminase (TGase 2), a multifunctional and ubiquitously expressing isozyme. By the screening, we identified several T7 phage clones that displayed substrate peptides for TGase 2 as a translated product from human brain cDNA library. Among the selected clones, the C-terminal region of IKAP, IkappaB kinase complex associated protein, appeared as a highly reactive substrate sequence for TGase 2. This system will open possibility of rapid identification of substrate sequences for transglutaminases at a genetic level.

  14. Going nuts for nuts? The trace proteome of a Cola drink, as detected via combinatorial peptide ligand libraries.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, Alfonsina; Fasoli, Elisa; Kravchuk, Alexander V; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2011-05-06

    The "invisible" proteome of a Cola drink, stated to be produced with a kola nut extract, has been investigated via capture with combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLL). Indeed, a few proteins in the M(r) 15-20 kDa range could be identified by treating large beverage volumes (1 L) and performing the capture with CPLLs at very acidic pH values (pH 2.2) under conditions mimicking reverse-phase adsorption. Ascertaining the presence of proteins deriving from plant extracts has confirmed the genuineness of such beverage and suggests the possibility of certifying whether soft drinks present on the market are indeed made with vegetable extracts or only with artificial chemical flavoring.

  15. In-depth exploration of cerebrospinal fluid by combining peptide ligand library treatment and label-free protein quantification.

    PubMed

    Mouton-Barbosa, Emmanuelle; Roux-Dalvai, Florence; Bouyssié, David; Berger, François; Schmidt, Eric; Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Guerrier, Luc; Boschetti, Egisto; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Monsarrat, Bernard; Gonzalez de Peredo, Anne

    2010-05-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is the biological fluid in closest contact with the brain and thus contains proteins of neural cell origin. Hence, CSF is a biochemical window into the brain and is particularly attractive for the search for biomarkers of neurological diseases. However, as in the case of other biological fluids, one of the main analytical challenges in proteomic characterization of the CSF is the very wide concentration range of proteins, largely exceeding the dynamic range of current analytical approaches. Here, we used the combinatorial peptide ligand library technology (ProteoMiner) to reduce the dynamic range of protein concentration in CSF and unmask previously undetected proteins by nano-LC-MS/MS analysis on an LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. This method was first applied on a large pool of CSF from different sources with the aim to better characterize the protein content of this fluid, especially for the low abundance components. We were able to identify 1212 proteins in CSF, and among these, 745 were only detected after peptide library treatment. However, additional difficulties for clinical studies of CSF are the low protein concentration of this fluid and the low volumes typically obtained after lumbar puncture, precluding the conventional use of ProteoMiner with large volume columns for treatment of patient samples. The method has thus been optimized to be compatible with low volume samples. We could show that the treatment is still efficient with this miniaturized protocol and that the dynamic range of protein concentration is actually reduced even with small amounts of beads, leading to an increase of more than 100% of the number of identified proteins in one LC-MS/MS run. Moreover, using a dedicated bioinformatics analytical work flow, we found that the method is reproducible and applicable for label-free quantification of series of samples processed in parallel.

  16. Combinatorial Peptide Ligand Library and two dimensional electrophoresis: new frontiers in the study of peritoneal dialysis effluent in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Candiano, Giovanni; Santucci, Laura; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Scaloni, Andrea; Bonsano, Marco; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Verrina, Enrico

    2015-02-26

    Peritoneal dialysis effluent (PDE) is a fluid resulting from the close contact of peritoneal dialysis (PD) solutions with the peritoneal membrane (PM) and represents a readily available material for the search of biomarkers of PM function or damage. Our laboratory has developed a method for the in-depth proteomic characterization of PDE, which involves Combinatorial Peptides Ligand Library (CPLL) to reduce the dynamic range of protein concentration in PDE, followed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). In this study we applied this method to the analysis of PDE proteome obtained from 19 pediatric patients on automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) with glucose-based PD solutions. The combined use of this proteomic approach highlighted a mean of 700 new proteins. Differences in PDE proteome profile were observed in relation with the duration of APD treatment. In particular, in patients on long-term APD, we observed an increase of intelectin-1, and a decrease of gelsolin. These changes were also observed by in vitro treatment of mesothelial cells with oxidative or pro-fibrotic stimulus which supported the biological role of these proteins' changes. In order to clarify the biological meaning of the observed differences, further step of our study will consist of the longitudinal evaluation of PDE proteome. The in-depth proteomic characterization of peritoneal dialysis effluent (PDE) in pediatric patients by the combined use of Combinatorial Peptide Ligand Library (CPLL) and two dimensional electrophoresis allowed to detect 1788 spots, a relevant part (724) of which were previously undetected in sample untreated with CPLL. In patients on long-term automated peritoneal dialysis, this proteomic approach allowed to identify 29 potential biomarkers that could be of help to identify patients with subclinical inflammation and/or developing peritoneal membrane fibrosis, thus adapting dialysis treatment accordingly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Definition of peptide inhibitors from a synthetic peptide library by targeting gelatinase B/matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM-17).

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zheng; Yan, Ming; Li, Qian; Liu, Datao; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Wang, Min; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Hu, Jialiang

    2012-08-01

    Gelatinase B/matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is a regulatory and effector metalloproteinase in inflammation. TNF-α is an important proinflammatory cytokine and is released by the action of a Zn(2+)-containing converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM-17). Both metallo-enzymes play important roles during the development of shock syndromes. Combinatorial chemical synthesis and subsequent library deconvolution were previously used to define a peptide inhibitor (Regasepin1) acting, almost to the same degree, on neutrophil collagenase/MMP-8 and MMP-9 in vitro, and protecting mice against lethal endotoxinemia in vivo. We have now extended this approach by incorporating D-form amino acids and residues preferred by TACE. A new peptide library was designed and synthesized, and by deconvolution new peptide inhibitors were defined. These included a TACE-specific inhibitor, an MMP-9- specific inhibitor, and inhibitors for both enzymes.

  18. Proteomic analysis of sweet algerian apricot kernels (Prunus armeniaca L.) by combinatorial peptide ligand libraries and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Ghorab, Hamida; Lammi, Carmen; Arnoldi, Anna; Kabouche, Zahia; Aiello, Gilda

    2018-01-15

    An investigation on the proteome of the sweet kernel of apricot, based on equalisation with combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLLs), SDS-PAGE, nLC-ESI-MS/MS, and database search, permitted identifying 175 proteins. Gene ontology analysis indicated that their main molecular functions are in nucleotide binding (20.9%), hydrolase activities (10.6%), kinase activities (7%), and catalytic activity (5.6%). A protein-protein association network analysis using STRING software permitted to build an interactomic map of all detected proteins, characterised by 34 interactions. In order to forecast the potential health benefits deriving from the consumption of these proteins, the two most abundant, i.e. Prunin 1 and 2, were enzymatically digested in silico predicting 10 and 14 peptides, respectively. Searching their sequences in the database BIOPEP, it was possible to suggest a variety of bioactivities, including dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) and angiotensin converting enzyme I (ACE) inhibition, glucose uptake stimulation and antioxidant properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Targeting essential Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae sporozoite ligands for caprine host endothelial cell invasion with a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, A; Pérez, D; Muñoz, M C; Molina, J M; Taubert, A; Jacobs-Lorena, M; Vega-Rodríguez, J; López, A M; Hermosilla, C

    2015-11-01

    Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae is an important coccidian parasite of goats which causes severe diarrhoea in young animals. Specific molecules that mediate E. ninakohlyakimovae host interactions and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis are still unknown. Although strong circumstantial evidence indicates that E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoite interactions with caprine endothelial host cells (ECs) are specific, hardly any information is available about the interacting molecules that confer host cell specificity. In this study, we describe a novel method to identify surface proteins of caprine umbilical vein endothelial cells (CUVEC) using a phage display library. After several panning rounds, we identified a number of peptides that specifically bind to the surface of CUVEC. Importantly, caprine endothelial cell peptide 2 (PCEC2) and PCEC5 selectively reduced the infection rate by E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoites. These preliminary data give new insight for the molecular identification of ligands involved in the interaction between E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoites and host ECs. Further studies using this phage approach might be useful to identify new potential target molecules for the development of anti-coccidial drugs or even new vaccine strategies.

  20. The effects of vasonatrin peptide on random pattern skin flap survival.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Ping; Lan, Zhi-Yong; Xia, Wei; Zhao, Xi; Ma, Ge-Jia; Liu, Bei; Pan, Bao-Hua; Guo, Shu-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    A lot of methods have been intensively investigated to improve random skin flap survival. Decreasing inflammation and alleviating tissue injury have been reported to be effective in improving survival ratio. Vasonatrin peptide (VNP) is a chimera of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP). The current study demonstrates that VNP possesses the venodilating actions of CNP, the natriuretic actions of ANP, and the unique arterial vasodilating actions not associated with either ANP or CNP. However, its effects on skin flap survival have not been previously reported. Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 220 to 260 g, were randomly divided into 2 groups, namely, the VNP-treated group and the control group. Rectangular random dorsal skin flaps measuring 3 × 9 cm including the panniculus carnosus were elevated, then the flaps were sutured into their original places. In the VNP group, 0.1 mg/kg of VNP was administered intravenously (IV) after surgery and then daily for 3 days. In the control group, 1 mL/kg of saline was administered IV after surgery and then daily for 3 days. To observe the effects of VNP, blood perfusion, histopathological examination, the inflammatory mediators (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, and interferon γ), and biochemical analysis (malondialdehyde, glutathione, and myeloperoxidase) were detected and the flap viability was evaluated 7 days after surgery by measuring necrotic flap area and total flap area. The viability measurements showed the percentage of flap survival was increased in the VNP-treated group (76.53% ± 6.36%) as compared with the control group (61.12% ± 4.92%) (P < 0.05), and the histological and biochemical assays corroborated the data. The blood perfusion of flaps in the VNP-treated group was higher than the control group (P < 0.05). The inflammatory mediators (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, and interferon γ) were significantly lower in the VNP-treated group than the control group (P

  1. Development of Diagnostic Fragment Ion Library for Glycated Peptides of Human Serum Albumin: Targeted Quantification in Prediabetic, Diabetic, and Microalbuminuria Plasma by Parallel Reaction Monitoring, SWATH, and MSE*

    PubMed Central

    Korwar, Arvind M.; Vannuruswamy, Garikapati; Jagadeeshaprasad, Mashanipalya G.; Jayaramaiah, Ramesha H.; Bhat, Shweta; Regin, Bhaskaran S.; Ramaswamy, Sureshkumar; Giri, Ashok P.; Mohan, Viswanathan; Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy; Kulkarni, Mahesh J.

    2015-01-01

    Human serum albumin is one of the most abundant plasma proteins that readily undergoes glycation, thus glycated albumin has been suggested as an additional marker for monitoring glycemic status. Hitherto, only Amadori-modified peptides of albumin were quantified. In this study, we report the construction of fragment ion library for Amadori-modified lysine (AML), N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML)-, and N(ε)-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL)-modified peptides of the corresponding synthetically modified albumin using high resolution accurate mass spectrometry (HR/AM). The glycated peptides were manually inspected and validated for their modification. Further, the fragment ion library was used for quantification of glycated peptides of albumin in the context of diabetes. Targeted Sequential Window Acquisition of all THeoretical Mass Spectra (SWATH) analysis in pooled plasma samples of control, prediabetes, diabetes, and microalbuminuria, has led to identification and quantification of 13 glycated peptides comprised of four AML, seven CML, and two CEL modifications, representing nine lysine sites of albumin. Five lysine sites namely K549, K438, K490, K88, and K375, were observed to be highly sensitive for glycation modification as their respective m/z showed maximum fold change and had both AML and CML modifications. Thus, peptides involving these lysine sites could be potential novel markers to assess the degree of glycation in diabetes. PMID:26023067

  2. Development of Diagnostic Fragment Ion Library for Glycated Peptides of Human Serum Albumin: Targeted Quantification in Prediabetic, Diabetic, and Microalbuminuria Plasma by Parallel Reaction Monitoring, SWATH, and MSE.

    PubMed

    Korwar, Arvind M; Vannuruswamy, Garikapati; Jagadeeshaprasad, Mashanipalya G; Jayaramaiah, Ramesha H; Bhat, Shweta; Regin, Bhaskaran S; Ramaswamy, Sureshkumar; Giri, Ashok P; Mohan, Viswanathan; Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy; Kulkarni, Mahesh J

    2015-08-01

    Human serum albumin is one of the most abundant plasma proteins that readily undergoes glycation, thus glycated albumin has been suggested as an additional marker for monitoring glycemic status. Hitherto, only Amadori-modified peptides of albumin were quantified. In this study, we report the construction of fragment ion library for Amadori-modified lysine (AML), N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML)-, and N(ε)-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL)-modified peptides of the corresponding synthetically modified albumin using high resolution accurate mass spectrometry (HR/AM). The glycated peptides were manually inspected and validated for their modification. Further, the fragment ion library was used for quantification of glycated peptides of albumin in the context of diabetes. Targeted Sequential Window Acquisition of all THeoretical Mass Spectra (SWATH) analysis in pooled plasma samples of control, prediabetes, diabetes, and microalbuminuria, has led to identification and quantification of 13 glycated peptides comprised of four AML, seven CML, and two CEL modifications, representing nine lysine sites of albumin. Five lysine sites namely K549, K438, K490, K88, and K375, were observed to be highly sensitive for glycation modification as their respective m/z showed maximum fold change and had both AML and CML modifications. Thus, peptides involving these lysine sites could be potential novel markers to assess the degree of glycation in diabetes. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Combinatorial chemistry: libraries from libraries, the art of the diversity-oriented transformation of resin-bound peptides and chiral polyamides to low molecular weight acyclic and heterocyclic compounds.

    PubMed

    Nefzi, Adel; Ostresh, John M; Yu, Yongping; Yu, Jongping; Houghten, Richard A

    2004-05-28

    Combinatorial chemistry has deeply impacted the drug discovery process by accelerating the synthesis and screening of large numbers of compounds having therapeutic and/or diagnostic potential. These techniques offer unique enhancement in the potential identification of new and/or therapeutic candidates. Our efforts over the past 10 years in the design and diversity-oriented synthesis of low molecular weight acyclic and heterocyclic combinatorial libraries derived from amino acids, peptides, and/or peptidomimetics are described. Employing a "toolbox" of various chemical transformations, including alkylation, oxidation, reduction, acylation, and the use of a variety of multifunctional reagents, the "libraries from libraries" concept has enabled the continued development of an ever-expanding, structurally varied series of organic chemical libraries.

  4. Ligand Discovery for a Peptide-Binding GPCR by Structure-Based Screening of Fragment- and Lead-Like Chemical Libraries.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Anirudh; Heine, Philipp; Rudling, Axel; Plückthun, Andreas; Kummer, Lutz; Carlsson, Jens

    2017-03-17

    Peptide-recognizing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are promising therapeutic targets but often resist drug discovery efforts. Determination of crystal structures for peptide-binding GPCRs has provided opportunities to explore structure-based methods in lead development. Molecular docking screens of two chemical libraries, containing either fragment- or lead-like compounds, against a neurotensin receptor 1 crystal structure allowed for a comparison between different drug development strategies for peptide-binding GPCRs. A total of 2.3 million molecules were screened computationally, and 25 fragments and 27 leads that were top-ranked in each library were selected for experimental evaluation. Of these, eight fragments and five leads were confirmed as ligands by surface plasmon resonance. The hit rate for the fragment screen (32%) was thus higher than for the lead-like library (19%), but the affinities of the fragments were ∼100-fold lower. Both screens returned unique scaffolds and demonstrated that a crystal structure of a stabilized peptide-binding GPCR can guide the discovery of small-molecule agonists. The complementary advantages of exploring fragment- and lead-like chemical space suggest that these strategies should be applied synergistically in structure-based screens against challenging GPCR targets.

  5. A random generation approach to pattern library creation for full chip lithographic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Elain; Hong, Sid; Liu, Limei; Huang, Lucas; Yang, Legender; Kabeel, Aliaa; Madkour, Kareem; ElManhawy, Wael; Kwan, Joe; Du, Chunshan; Hu, Xinyi; Wan, Qijian; Zhang, Recoo

    2017-04-01

    As technology advances, the need for running lithographic (litho) checking for early detection of hotspots before tapeout has become essential. This process is important at all levels—from designing standard cells and small blocks to large intellectual property (IP) and full chip layouts. Litho simulation provides high accuracy for detecting printability issues due to problematic geometries, but it has the disadvantage of slow performance on large designs and blocks [1]. Foundries have found a good compromise solution for running litho simulation on full chips by filtering out potential candidate hotspot patterns using pattern matching (PM), and then performing simulation on the matched locations. The challenge has always been how to easily create a PM library of candidate patterns that provides both comprehensive coverage for litho problems and fast runtime performance. This paper presents a new strategy for generating candidate real design patterns through a random generation approach using a layout schema generator (LSG) utility. The output patterns from the LSG are simulated, and then classified by a scoring mechanism that categorizes patterns according to the severity of the hotspots, probability of their presence in the design, and the likelihood of the pattern causing a hotspot. The scoring output helps to filter out the yield problematic patterns that should be removed from any standard cell design, and also to define potential problematic patterns that must be simulated within a bigger context to decide whether or not they represent an actual hotspot. This flow is demonstrated on SMIC 14nm technology, creating a candidate hotspot pattern library that can be used in full chip simulation with very high coverage and robust performance.

  6. Exploring the hidden honeybee (Apis mellifera) venom proteome by integrating a combinatorial peptide ligand library approach with FTMS.

    PubMed

    Van Vaerenbergh, Matthias; Debyser, Griet; Devreese, Bart; de Graaf, Dirk C

    2014-03-17

    At present, 30 compounds have been described in the venom of the honeybee, and 16 of them were confirmed by mass spectrometry. Previous studies typically combined 2-D PAGE with MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, a technology which now appears to lack sensitivity to detect additional venom compounds. Here, we report an in-depth study of the honeybee venom proteome using a combinatorial peptide ligand library sample pretreatment to enrich for minor components followed by shotgun LC-FT-ICR MS analysis. This strategy revealed an unexpectedly rich venom composition: in total 102 proteins and peptides were found, with 83 of them never described in bee venom samples before. Based on their predicted function and subcellular location, the proteins could be divided into two groups. A group of 33 putative toxins is proposed to contribute to venom activity by exerting toxic functions or by playing a role in social immunity. The other group, considered as venom trace molecules, appears to be secreted for their functions in the extracellular space, or is unintentionally secreted by the venom gland cells due to insufficient protein recycling or co-secretion with other compounds. In conclusion, our approach allowed to explore the hidden honeybee venom proteome and extended the list of potential venom allergens. This study dug deeper into the complex honeybee venom proteome than ever before by applying a highly performing sample pretreatment and mass spectrometric technology. We present putative biological functions for all identified compounds, largely extending our knowledge of the venom toxicity. In addition, this study offers a long list of potential new venom allergens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Generation of Aptamers from A Primer-Free Randomized ssDNA Library Using Magnetic-Assisted Rapid Aptamer Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Shih-Ming; Lai, Ji-Ching; Horng, Horng-Er; Liu, Tu-Chen; Hong, Chin-Yih

    2017-04-01

    Aptamers are oligonucleotides that can bind to specific target molecules. Most aptamers are generated using random libraries in the standard systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). Each random library contains oligonucleotides with a randomized central region and two fixed primer regions at both ends. The fixed primer regions are necessary for amplifying target-bound sequences by PCR. However, these extra-sequences may cause non-specific bindings, which potentially interfere with good binding for random sequences. The Magnetic-Assisted Rapid Aptamer Selection (MARAS) is a newly developed protocol for generating single-strand DNA aptamers. No repeat selection cycle is required in the protocol. This study proposes and demonstrates a method to isolate aptamers for C-reactive proteins (CRP) from a randomized ssDNA library containing no fixed sequences at 5‧ and 3‧ termini using the MARAS platform. Furthermore, the isolated primer-free aptamer was sequenced and binding affinity for CRP was analyzed. The specificity of the obtained aptamer was validated using blind serum samples. The result was consistent with monoclonal antibody-based nephelometry analysis, which indicated that a primer-free aptamer has high specificity toward targets. MARAS is a feasible platform for efficiently generating primer-free aptamers for clinical diagnoses.

  8. Generation of Aptamers from A Primer-Free Randomized ssDNA Library Using Magnetic-Assisted Rapid Aptamer Selection.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Shih-Ming; Lai, Ji-Ching; Horng, Horng-Er; Liu, Tu-Chen; Hong, Chin-Yih

    2017-04-03

    Aptamers are oligonucleotides that can bind to specific target molecules. Most aptamers are generated using random libraries in the standard systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). Each random library contains oligonucleotides with a randomized central region and two fixed primer regions at both ends. The fixed primer regions are necessary for amplifying target-bound sequences by PCR. However, these extra-sequences may cause non-specific bindings, which potentially interfere with good binding for random sequences. The Magnetic-Assisted Rapid Aptamer Selection (MARAS) is a newly developed protocol for generating single-strand DNA aptamers. No repeat selection cycle is required in the protocol. This study proposes and demonstrates a method to isolate aptamers for C-reactive proteins (CRP) from a randomized ssDNA library containing no fixed sequences at 5' and 3' termini using the MARAS platform. Furthermore, the isolated primer-free aptamer was sequenced and binding affinity for CRP was analyzed. The specificity of the obtained aptamer was validated using blind serum samples. The result was consistent with monoclonal antibody-based nephelometry analysis, which indicated that a primer-free aptamer has high specificity toward targets. MARAS is a feasible platform for efficiently generating primer-free aptamers for clinical diagnoses.

  9. Generation of Aptamers from A Primer-Free Randomized ssDNA Library Using Magnetic-Assisted Rapid Aptamer Selection

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Shih-Ming; Lai, Ji-Ching; Horng, Horng-Er; Liu, Tu-Chen; Hong, Chin-Yih

    2017-01-01

    Aptamers are oligonucleotides that can bind to specific target molecules. Most aptamers are generated using random libraries in the standard systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). Each random library contains oligonucleotides with a randomized central region and two fixed primer regions at both ends. The fixed primer regions are necessary for amplifying target-bound sequences by PCR. However, these extra-sequences may cause non-specific bindings, which potentially interfere with good binding for random sequences. The Magnetic-Assisted Rapid Aptamer Selection (MARAS) is a newly developed protocol for generating single-strand DNA aptamers. No repeat selection cycle is required in the protocol. This study proposes and demonstrates a method to isolate aptamers for C-reactive proteins (CRP) from a randomized ssDNA library containing no fixed sequences at 5′ and 3′ termini using the MARAS platform. Furthermore, the isolated primer-free aptamer was sequenced and binding affinity for CRP was analyzed. The specificity of the obtained aptamer was validated using blind serum samples. The result was consistent with monoclonal antibody-based nephelometry analysis, which indicated that a primer-free aptamer has high specificity toward targets. MARAS is a feasible platform for efficiently generating primer-free aptamers for clinical diagnoses. PMID:28367958

  10. Types of pediatric diabetes mellitus defined by anti-islet autoimmunity and random C-peptide at diagnosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that anti-islet autoantibody expression and random serum C-peptide obtained at diagnosis define phenotypes of pediatric diabetes with distinct clinical features. We analyzed 607 children aged <19 yr consecutively diagnosed with diabetes after ex...

  11. Single-primer-limited amplification: a method to generate random single-stranded DNA sub-library for aptamer selection.

    PubMed

    He, Chao-Zhu; Zhang, Kun-He; Wang, Ting; Wan, Qin-Si; Hu, Piao-Ping; Hu, Mei-Di; Huang, De-Qiang; Lv, Nong-Hua

    2013-09-01

    The amplification of a random single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) library by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a key step in each round of aptamer selection by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), but it can be impeded by the amplification of by-products due to the severely nonspecific hybridizations among various sequences in the PCR system. To amplify a random ssDNA library free from by-products, we developed a novel method termed single-primer-limited amplification (SPLA), which was initiated from the amplification of minus-stranded DNA (msDNA) of an ssDNA library with reverse primer limited to 5-fold molar quantity of the template, followed by the amplification of plus-stranded DNA (psDNA) of the msDNA with forward primer limited to 10-fold molar quantity of the template and recovery of psDNA by gel excision. We found that the amount of by-products increased with the increase of template amount and thermal cycle number. With the optimized template amount and thermal cycle, SPLA could amplify target ssDNA without detectable by-products and nonspecific products and could produce psDNA 16.1 times as much as that by asymmetric PCR. In conclusion, SPLA is a simple and feasible method to efficiently generate a random ssDNA sub-library for aptamer selection.

  12. Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Scheinberg DA. Vaccination with Synthetic Analog Peptides Derived from WT1 Oncoprotein Induces T Cell Responses in Patients with Complete Remission ...TITLE:Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of...TITLE:Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality

  13. Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    10-1-0699 TITLE: Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 W81XWH-10-1-0699 Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant... peptides that are given together with Montanide and GM-CSF as immunologic adjuvants. This WT1 vaccine was previously tested in a small pilot trial

  14. In-depth proteomic analysis of non-alcoholic beverages with peptide ligand libraries. I: Almond milk and orgeat syrup.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, Elisa; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Kravchuk, Alexander V; Citterio, Attilio; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2011-06-10

    Combinatorial peptide ligand libraries, both commercial and home-made, have been adopted to investigate the proteome of non-alcoholic beverages, in order to assess their genuineness and detect also trace proteins, in search of potential allergens. Two such beverages have been studied: almond milk and orgeat syrup. In the first product we have been able to identify 132 unique protein species, the deepest investigation so far of the almond proteome. In the second beverage, a handful of proteins (just 14) have been detected, belonging to a bitter almond extract. In both cases, the genuineness of such products has been verified, as well as the fact that almond milk, judging on the total protein and fat content, must have been produced with 100g ground almonds per litre of beverage, as required by authorities. On the contrary, cheap orgeat syrups produced by local supermarkets and sold as their own brands, where found not to contain any residual proteins, suggesting that they contained only synthetic aromas and no natural plant extracts. This could be the starting point for investigating the myriad of beverages that in the last decades have invaded the shelves of supermarkets the world over, whose genuineness and natural origin have never been properly assessed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Lonicera japonica Thunb. Immature Flower Buds Using Combinatorial Peptide Ligand Libraries and Polyethylene Glycol Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Xu, Xiaobao; Tian, Jingkui; Zhang, Lin; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-01-04

    Lonicera japonica Thunb. flower is a well-known medicinal plant that has been widely used for the treatment of human disease. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the biological activities of L. japonica immature flower buds, a gel-free/label-free proteomic technique was used in combination with combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLL) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) fractionation for the enrichment of low-abundance proteins and removal of high-abundance proteins, respectively. A total of 177, 614, and 529 proteins were identified in crude protein extraction, CPLL fractions, and PEG fractions, respectively. Among the identified proteins, 283 and 239 proteins were specifically identified by the CPLL and PEG methods, respectively. In particular, proteins related to the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, signaling, hormone metabolism, and transport were highly enriched by CPLL and PEG fractionation compared to crude protein extraction. A total of 28 secondary metabolism-related proteins and 25 metabolites were identified in L. japonica immature flower buds. To determine the specificity of the identified proteins and metabolites for L. japonica immature flower buds, Cerasus flower buds were used, which resulted in the abundance of hydroxymethylbutenyl 4-diphosphate synthase in L. japonica immature flower buds being 10-fold higher than that in Cerasus flower buds. These results suggest that proteins related to secondary metabolism might be responsible for the biological activities of L. japonica immature flower buds.

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis of egg white proteins during the rapid embryonic growth period by combinatorial peptide ligand libraries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yijun; Qiu, Ning; Ma, Meihu

    2015-10-01

    Egg white proteins provide essential nutrients and antimicrobial protection during embryonic development. Although various biological functions of major egg white proteins have been investigated via embryogenesis, understanding of global changes in low-abundance proteins has been limited. In the current study, a proteomic analysis of low-abundance egg white proteins was conducted using combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLL), two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight with two mass analyzers for tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS/MS) during the rapid embryonic growth period. Significant increases in the relative abundance of 88 protein spots (P ≤ 0.05), of which 47 spots were found to correspond to 10 proteins from 8 protein families were identified over 16 d incubation. During this developmental process, the protein concentration increased and the amount of albumin solid material decreased in the residual egg white. Clusterin precursors were observed over a wide range of pH values and the tenp protein increased continuously during embryonic development. Low-abundance proteins were identified in a comparison of optimal incubation conditions to the altered conditions of 2 control groups to better understand the function of these proteins in egg whites. Collectively, these findings provide insight into the supportive role of the egg white during embryonic development, enabling a broader understanding of chick embryogenesis. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  17. Construction of random tumor transcriptome expression library for creating and selecting novel tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huizhun; Zhao, Xiuyun; Du, Peng; Qi, Gaofu

    2016-09-01

    Novel tumor antigens are necessary for the development of efficient tumor vaccines for overcoming the immunotolerance and immunosuppression induced by tumors. Here, we developed a novel strategy to create tumor antigens by construction of random tumor transcriptome expression library (RTTEL). The complementary DNA (cDNA) from S180 sarcoma was used as template for arbitrarily amplifying gene fragments with random primers by PCR, then ligated to the C-terminal of HSP65 in a plasmid pET28a-HSP for constructing RTTEL in Escherichia coli. A novel antigen of A5 was selected from RTTEL with the strongest immunotherapeutic effects on S180 sarcoma. Adoptive immunotherapy with anti-A5 sera also inhibited tumor growth, further confirming the key antitumor roles of A5-specific antibodies in mice. A5 contains a sequence similar to protein-L-isoaspartate (D-aspartate) O-methyltransferase (PCMT1). The antisera of A5 were verified to cross-react with PCMT1 by Western blotting assay and vice versa. Both anti-A5 sera and anti-PCMT1 sera could induce antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity toward S180 cells by in vitro assay. Further assay with fluorescent staining showed that PCMT1 is detectable on the surface of S180 cells. Summary, the strategy to construct RTTEL is potential for creating and screening novel tumor antigens to develop efficient tumor vaccines. By RTTEL, we successfully created a protein antigen of A5 with significant immunotherapeutic effects on S180 sarcoma by induction of antibodies targeting for PCMT1.

  18. The isolation of strand-specific nicking endonucleases from a randomized SapI expression library.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, James C; Zhu, Zhenyu; Xu, Shuang-yong

    2004-01-01

    The Type IIS restriction endonuclease SapI recognizes the DNA sequence 5'-GCTCTTC-3' (top strand by convention) and cleaves downstream (N1/N4) indicating top- and bottom-strand spacing, respectively. The asymmetric nature of DNA recognition presented the possibility that one, if not two, nicking variants might be created from SapI. To explore this possibility, two parallel selection procedures were designed to isolate either top-strand nicking or bottom-strand nicking variants from a randomly mutated SapI expression library. These procedures take advantage of a SapI substrate site designed into the expression plasmid, which allows for in vitro selection of plasmid clones possessing a site-specific and strand-specific nick. A procedure designed to isolate bottom-strand nicking enzymes yielded Nb.SapI-1 containing a critical R420I substitution near the end of the protein. The top-strand procedure yielded several SapI variants with a distinct preference for top-strand cleavage. Mutations present within the selected clones were segregated to confirm a top-strand nicking phenotype for single variants Q240R, E250K, G271R or K273R. The nature of the amino acid substitutions found in the selected variants provides evidence that SapI may possess two active sites per monomer. This work presents a framework for establishing the mechanism of SapI DNA cleavage.

  19. Anti‐microbial peptide gene expression during oral vaccination: analysis of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Simuyandi, M.; Kapulu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary We have observed previously that micronutrient supplementation ameliorated suppression of α‐defensin expression during diarrhoea. However, how interactions between anti‐microbial peptide (AMP) expression and diarrhoeal disease are altered by micronutrient supplementation remain unclear. Using oral vaccination as a model of intestinal infection, we measured changes in AMP expression during multiple micronutrient supplementation. In the first part, volunteers underwent duodenal jejunal biopsy before and at 1, 2, 4 or 7 days after administration of one of three live, attenuated oral vaccines against rotavirus, typhoid and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. In the second part, participants were randomized to receive a multiple micronutrient supplement or placebo for 6 weeks before undergoing intestinal biopsy, vaccination against typhoid and rebiopsy after 14 days. Expression of human alpha‐defensin (HD)5, HD6, hBD1, hBD2 and LL‐37 was measured by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Taken together, the bacterial vaccines, but not rotavirus vaccine, reduced HD5 expression (P = 0·02, signed‐rank test) and reduced LL‐37 expression in seven of the eight individuals whose biopsies had expression prevaccination (P = 0·03). hBD2 was not detected. In the controlled trial, HD5 and HD6 expression after vaccination was lower [median ratio 0·5, interquartile range (IQR) = 0·07–2·2 and 0·58, IQR = 0·13–2·3, respectively] than before vaccination. There was no significant effect detected of micronutrient supplementation on expression of HD5, HD6, hBD1 or LL‐37. We conclude that live attenuated bacterial vaccines, but not rotavirus vaccine, can reduce intestinal α‐defensins, and typhoid vaccine reduced LL‐37 expression. We found no evidence that micronutrient supplementation in the short term had any impact on anti‐microbial peptide expression. PMID:27465597

  20. Small and Random Peptides: An Unexplored Reservoir of Potentially Functional Primitive Organocatalysts. The Case of Seryl-Histidine

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, Rafal; Adamala, Katarzyna; Gasperi, Tecla; Polticelli, Fabio; Stano, Pasquale

    2017-01-01

    Catalysis is an essential feature of living systems biochemistry, and probably, it played a key role in primordial times, helping to produce more complex molecules from simple ones. However, enzymes, the biocatalysts par excellence, were not available in such an ancient context, and so, instead, small molecule catalysis (organocatalysis) may have occurred. The best candidates for the role of primitive organocatalysts are amino acids and short random peptides, which are believed to have been available in an early period on Earth. In this review, we discuss the occurrence of primordial organocatalysts in the form of peptides, in particular commenting on reports about seryl-histidine dipeptide, which have recently been investigated. Starting from this specific case, we also mention a peptide fragment condensation scenario, as well as other potential roles of peptides in primordial times. The review actually aims to stimulate further investigation on an unexplored field of research, namely one that specifically looks at the catalytic activity of small random peptides with respect to reactions relevant to prebiotic chemistry and early chemical evolution. PMID:28397774

  1. Characterization of UPF peptides, members of the glutathione analogues library, on the basis of their effects on oxidative stress-related enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Kersti; Ida, Katrin; Mahlapuu, Riina; Kairane, Ceslava; Oit, Ingrid; Zilmer, Mihkel; Soomets, Ursel

    2009-06-01

    Previously the authors have designed and synthesized a library of antioxidative glutathione analogues called UPF peptides which are superior to glutathione in hydroxyl radical elimination. This paper is a follow-up study which investigated the effects of the most promising members of the library (UPF1 and UPF17) on oxidative stress-related enzymes. At concentrations used in vivo experiments neither UPF peptide influenced the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) when purified enzyme or erythrocyte lysate was used. At higher concentrations they inhibited GPx activity. UPF peptides had no effect on glutathione reductase (GR) activity. Also they, as well as glutathione itself, slightly increased MnSOD activity in human brain mitochondria and inhibited oxidative burst caused by neutrophil NAD(P)H oxidase. RT-PCR measurements showed that UPF1 and UPF17 have no effect on GPx and MnSOD expression level in human blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study confirm that investigated UPF peptides do not interfere with the enzymatic mechanisms of antioxidative defence and can be used as themselves or as a lead for the protector molecule design against excessive oxidative stress.

  2. Combining positional scanning peptide libraries, HLA-DR transfectants and bioinformatics to dissect the epitope spectrum of HLA class II cross-restricted CD4+ T cell clones.

    PubMed

    Sospedra, Mireia; Zhao, Yingdong; Giulianotti, Marc; Simon, Richard; Pinilla, Clemencia; Martin, Roland

    2010-02-28

    The use of positional scanning peptide libraries in combination with biometrical analysis is one of the few approaches, which allows the identification of stimulatory peptides for T cells of unknown specificity. Despite the successful application of this strategy in different studies, not every T cell is suited for analysis. For as yet unknown reasons some T cells do not recognize these highly complex libraries, and even more importantly the predictive capacity of the current approach shows high variability among individual T cell clones and their TCRs. A number of factors probably contribute to differences in T cell recognition and have to be taken into account in order to overcome these difficulties. Our results suggest that the ability of some T cells to recognize peptides in the context of more than one HLA class II molecule expressed by autologous APCs could diminish the predictive capacity of the approach. In contrast, the use of B cell lines expressing single HLA class II molecules as APCs instead of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells markedly improves the capacity to identify target peptides for this type of T cells.

  3. Peptide array-based characterization and design of ZnO-high affinity peptides.

    PubMed

    Okochi, Mina; Sugita, Tomoya; Furusawa, Seiji; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2010-08-15

    Peptides with both an affinity for ZnO and the ability to generate ZnO nanoparticles have attracted attention for the self-assembly and templating of nanoscale building blocks under ambient conditions with compositional uniformity. In this study, we have analyzed the specific binding sites of the ZnO-binding peptide, EAHVMHKVAPRP, which was identified using a phage display peptide library. The peptide binding assay against ZnO nanoparticles was performed using peptides synthesized on a cellulose membrane using the spot method. Using randomized rotation of amino acids in the ZnO-binding peptide, 125 spot-synthesized peptides were assayed. The peptide binding activity against ZnO nanoparticles varied greatly. This indicates that ZnO binding does not depend on total hydrophobicity or other physical parameters of these peptides, but rather that ZnO recognizes the specific amino acid alignment of these peptides. In addition, several peptides were found to show higher binding ability compared with that of the original peptides. Identification of important binding sites in the EAHVMHKVAPRP peptide was investigated by shortened, stepwise sequence from both termini. Interestingly, two ZnO-binding sites were found as 6-mer peptides: HVMHKV and HKVAPR. The peptides identified by amino acid substitution of HKVAPR were found to show high affinity and specificity for ZnO nanoparticles.

  4. The comparison of BLyS-binding peptides from phage display library and computer-aided design on BLyS-TACI interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yacong; Hao, Xiafei; Feng, Jiannan; Shen, Beifen; Wei, Jing; Sun, Jian

    2015-02-01

    BLyS antagonists have become the therapeutic reagents in the treatment of autoimmune disorders. BLyS binding peptides and their Fc fusion proteins may be alternative BLyS antagonists in such application. In this study, the activity of BLyS binding peptide 814 obtained from phage display library and peptide TA designed by computer-aided modeling on the interaction of BLyS-TACI was compared. In addition, to maintain the spatial conformation and stability of the peptides, human IgG1 Fc fragment was fused to peptides 814 and TA to form peptide-Fc fusion proteins, steady and innovative peptibodies. The prokaryotic expression plasmids pET30a-814-Fc and pET30a-TA-Fc for these peptibodies were acquired by genetic engineering, and confirmed by DNA sequencing. After the right plasmids were transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), the fusion proteins were expressed and purified by protein A affinity column. As a result of competitive ELISA, peptides 814 and TA at 100μg/ml displayed 52.2% and 28.6% inhibition on the interaction of TACI-Fc with BLyS respectively. Moreover, 814-Fc and TA-Fc fusion proteins could bind to BLyS in a dosage-dependent manner as TACI-Fc did, and displayed 54.7% and 26.1% inhibition on the interaction of TACI-Fc-Myc with BLyS at 100μg/ml respectively. So 814-Fc and TA-Fc proteins had the similar bioactivity as the peptides did. Furthermore, compared with TA-Fc, 814-Fc showed two-fold inhibition effect on BLyS binding to TACI, suggesting that 814-Fc could inhibit BLyS bioactivity significantly and might serve as a potential antagonist to treat autoimmune diseases associated with BLyS overexpression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Combinatorial discovery of tumor targeting peptides using phage display.

    PubMed

    Landon, Linda A; Deutscher, Susan L

    2003-10-15

    Peptides possess appropriate pharmacokinetic properties to serve as cancer imaging or therapeutic targeting agents. Currently, only a small number of rationally-derived, labeled peptide analogues that target only a limited subset of antigens are available. Thus, finding new cancer targeting peptides is a central goal in the field of molecular targeting. Novel tumor-avid peptides can be efficiently identified via affinity selections using complex random peptide libraries containing millions of peptides that are displayed on bacteriophage. In vitro and in situ affinity selections may be used to identify peptides with high affinity for the target antigen in vitro. Unfortunately, it has been found that peptides selected in vitro or in situ may not effectively target tumors in vivo due to poor peptide stability and other problems. To improve in vivo targeting, methodological combinatorial chemistry innovations allow selections to be conducted in the environment of the whole animal. Thus, new targeting peptides with optimal in vivo properties can be selected in vivo in tumor-bearing animals. In vivo selections have been proven successful in identifying peptides that target the vasculature of specific organs. In addition, in vivo selections have identified peptides that bind specifically to the surface of or are internalized into tumor cells. In the future, direct selection of peptides for cancer imaging may be expedited using genetically engineered bacteriophage libraries that encode peptides with intrinsic radiometal-chelation or fluorescent sequences.

  6. Synthetic Random Copolymers as a Molecular Platform To Mimic Host-Defense Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Haruko; Caputo, Gregory A; Vemparala, Satyavani; Kuroda, Kenichi

    2017-05-17

    Synthetic polymers have been used as a molecular platform to develop host-defense antimicrobial peptide (AMP) mimetics which are effective in killing drug-resistant bacteria. In this topical review, we will discuss the AMP-mimetic design and chemical optimization strategies as well as the biological and biophysical implications of AMP mimicry by synthetic polymers. Traditionally, synthetic polymers have been used as a chemical means to replicate the chemical functionalities and physicochemical properties of AMPs (e.g., cationic charge, hydrophobicity) to recapitulate their mode of action. However, we propose a new perception that AMP-mimetic polymers are an inherently bioactive platform as whole molecules, which mimic more than the side chain functionalities of AMPs. The tunable nature and chemical simplicity of synthetic random polymers facilitate the development of potent, cost-effective, broad-spectrum antimicrobials. The polymer-based approach offers the potential for many antimicrobial applications to be used directly in solution or attached to surfaces to fight against drug-resistant bacteria.

  7. A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating a Cx43-Mimetic Peptide in Cutaneous Scarring.

    PubMed

    Grek, Christina L; Montgomery, Jade; Sharma, Meenakshi; Ravi, A; Rajkumar, J S; Moyer, Kurtis E; Gourdie, Robert G; Ghatnekar, Gautam S

    2017-03-01

    The transmembrane protein Cx43 has key roles in fibrogenic processes including inflammatory signaling and extracellular matrix composition. aCT1 is a Cx43 mimetic peptide that in preclinical studies accelerated wound closure, decreased inflammation and granulation tissue area, and normalized mechanical properties after cutaneous injury. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of aCT1 in the reduction of scar formation in human incisional wounds. In a prospective, multicenter, within-participant controlled trial, patients with bilateral incisional wounds (≥10 mm) after laparoscopic surgery were randomized to receive acute treatment (immediately after wounding and 24 hours later) with an aCT1 gel formulation plus conventional standard of care protocols, involving moisture-retentive occlusive dressing, or standard of care alone. The primary efficacy endpoint was average scarring score using visual analog scales evaluating incision appearance and healing progress over 9 months. There was no significant difference in scar appearance between aCT1- or control-treated incisions after 1 month. At month 9, aCT1-treated incisions showed a 47% improvement in scar scores over controls (Vancouver Scar Scale; P = 0.0045), a significantly higher Global Assessment Scale score (P = 0.0009), and improvements in scar pigmentation, thickness, surface roughness, and mechanical suppleness. Adverse events were similar in both groups. aCT1 has potential to improve scarring outcome after surgery. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Peptides Derived from a Phage Display Library Inhibit Adhesion and Protect the Host against Infection by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Haroldo C; Michaloski, Jussara S; da Silva, Julhiany F; Scorzoni, Liliana; de Paula E Silva, Ana C A; Marcos, Caroline M; Assato, Patrícia A; Yamazaki, Daniella S; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M; Giordano, Ricardo J; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J S

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii are dimorphic fungi and are the etiological agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). Adhesion is one of the most important steps in infections with Paracoccidioides and is responsible for the differences in the virulence of isolates of these fungi. Because of the importance of adhesion to the establishment of an infection, this study focused on the preliminary development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit adhesion by Paracoccidioides, thus inhibiting infection and preventing the disease. We used two phage display libraries to select peptides that strongly bind to the Paracoccidioides cell wall to inhibit adhesion to host cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) components (laminin, fibronectin, and type I and type IV collagen). This approach allowed us to identify four peptides that inhibited up to 64% of the adhesion of Paracoccidioides to pneumocytes in vitro and inhibited the adhesion to the ECM components by up to 57%. Encouraged by these results, we evaluated the ability of these peptides to protect Galleria mellonella from Paracoccidioides infection by treating G. mellonella larvae with the different peptides prior to infection with Paracoccidioides and observing larval survival. The results show that all of the peptides tested increased the survival of the larvae infected with P. brasiliensis by up to 64% and by up to 60% in those infected with P. lutzii. These data may open new horizons for therapeutic strategies to prevent PCM, and anti-adhesion therapy could be an important strategy.

  9. Peptides Derived from a Phage Display Library Inhibit Adhesion and Protect the Host against Infection by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Haroldo C.; Michaloski, Jussara S.; da Silva, Julhiany F.; Scorzoni, Liliana; de Paula e Silva, Ana C. A.; Marcos, Caroline M.; Assato, Patrícia A.; Yamazaki, Daniella S.; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M.; Giordano, Ricardo J.; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii are dimorphic fungi and are the etiological agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). Adhesion is one of the most important steps in infections with Paracoccidioides and is responsible for the differences in the virulence of isolates of these fungi. Because of the importance of adhesion to the establishment of an infection, this study focused on the preliminary development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit adhesion by Paracoccidioides, thus inhibiting infection and preventing the disease. We used two phage display libraries to select peptides that strongly bind to the Paracoccidioides cell wall to inhibit adhesion to host cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) components (laminin, fibronectin, and type I and type IV collagen). This approach allowed us to identify four peptides that inhibited up to 64% of the adhesion of Paracoccidioides to pneumocytes in vitro and inhibited the adhesion to the ECM components by up to 57%. Encouraged by these results, we evaluated the ability of these peptides to protect Galleria mellonella from Paracoccidioides infection by treating G. mellonella larvae with the different peptides prior to infection with Paracoccidioides and observing larval survival. The results show that all of the peptides tested increased the survival of the larvae infected with P. brasiliensis by up to 64% and by up to 60% in those infected with P. lutzii. These data may open new horizons for therapeutic strategies to prevent PCM, and anti-adhesion therapy could be an important strategy. PMID:28066254

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of spontaneous fibril formation by random-coil peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Hall, Carol K.

    2004-11-01

    Assembly of normally soluble proteins into amyloid fibrils is a cause or associated symptom of numerous human disorders, including Alzheimer's and the prion diseases. We report molecular-level simulation of spontaneous fibril formation. Systems containing 12-96 model polyalanine peptides form fibrils at temperatures greater than a critical temperature that decreases with peptide concentration and exceeds the peptide's folding temperature, consistent with experimental findings. Formation of small amorphous aggregates precedes ordered nucleus formation and subsequent rapid fibril growth through addition of -sheets laterally and monomeric peptides at fibril ends. The fibril's structure is similar to that observed experimentally. amyloid | protein aggregation

  11. Identification of a novel aFGF-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on breast cancer from phage display library

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiaoyong; Cai, Cuizan; Xiao, Fei; Xiong, Yaoling; Huang, Yadong; Zhang, Qihao; Xiang, Qi; Lou, Guofeng; Lian, Mengyang; Su, Zhijian; Zheng, Qing

    2014-03-21

    Highlights: • A specific aFGF-binding peptide AP8 was identified from a phage display library. • AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. • AP8 arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by suppressing Cyclin D1. • AP8 could block the activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase. • AP8 counteracted proliferation and cell cycle via influencing PA2G4 and PCNA. - Abstract: It has been reported that acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) is expressed in breast cancer and via interactions with fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) to promote the stage and grade of the disease. Thus, aFGF/FGFRs have been considered essential targets in breast cancer therapy. We identified a specific aFGF-binding peptide (AGNWTPI, named AP8) from a phage display heptapeptide library with aFGF after four rounds of biopanning. The peptide AP8 contained two (TP) amino acids identical and showed high homology to the peptides of the 182–188 (GTPNPTL) site of high-affinity aFGF receptor FGFR1. Functional analyses indicated that AP8 specifically competed with the corresponding phage clone A8 for binding to aFGF. In addition, AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by increasing PA2G4 and suppressing Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blocked the aFGF-induced activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase in both breast cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, these results indicate that peptide AP8, acting as an aFGF antagonist, is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of breast cancer.

  12. Diversity and censoring of landscape phage libraries

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmicheva, G.A.; Jayanna, P.K.; Sorokulova, I.B.; Petrenko, V.A.

    2009-01-01

    Libraries of random peptides displayed on the surface of filamentous phages are a valuable source for biospecific ligands. However, their successful use can be hindered by a disproportionate representation of different phage clones and fluctuation of their composition that arises during phage reproduction, which have potential to affect efficiency of selection of clones with an optimal binding. Therefore, there is a need to develop phage display libraries with extended and varied repertoires of displayed peptides. In this work, we compared the complexity, evolution and representation of two phage display libraries displaying foreign octamers and nonamers in 4000 copies as the N-terminal part of the major coat protein pVIII of phage fd–tet (landscape libraries). They were obtained by replacement of amino acids 2–4 and 2–5 of pVIII with random octa- and nonamers, respectively. Statistical analysis of the libraries revealed their dramatic censoring and evolution during amplification. Further, a survey of both libraries for clones that bind common selectors revealed the presence of different non-overlapping families of target-specific clones in each library justifying the concept that different landscape libraries cover different areas of a sequence space. PMID:18988692

  13. Antibody binding site mapping of SARS-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain by a combination of yeast surface display and phage peptide library screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Wang, Jingxue; Wen, Kun; Mou, Zhirong; Zou, Liyun; Che, Xiaoyan; Ni, Bing; Wu, Yuzhang

    2009-12-01

    The receptor-binding domain (RBD) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) spike (S) protein plays an important role in viral infection, and is a potential major neutralizing determinant. In this study, three hybridoma cell lines secreting specific monoclonal antibodies against the RBD of the S protein were generated and their exact binding sites were identified. Using yeast surface display, the binding sites of these antibodies were defined to two linear regions on the RBD: S(337-360) and S(380-399). Using these monoclonal antibodies in phage peptide library screening identified 10 distinct mimotopes 12 amino acids in length. Sequence comparison between native epitopes and these mimotopes further confirmed the binding sites, and revealed key amino acid residues involved in antibody binding. None of these antibodies could neutralize the murine leukemia virus pseudotyped expressing the SARS-CoV spike protein (MLV/SARS-CoV). However, these mAbs could be useful in the diagnosis of SARS-CoV due to their exclusive reactivity with SARS-CoV. Furthermore, this study established a feasible platform for epitope mapping. Yeast surface display combined with phage peptide library screening provides a convenient strategy for the identification of epitope peptides from certain antigenic proteins.

  14. Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Analog Peptides Derived from WT1 Oncoprotein Induces T Cell Responses in Patients with Complete Remission from Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), Blood 2010...10-1-0699 TITLE: Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after...vaccine comprised of four WT1 heteroclitic peptides that are given together with Montanide and GM- CSF as immunologic adjuvants. This WT1 vaccine was

  15. Analysis and prediction of the critical regions of antimicrobial peptides based on conditional random fields.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kuan Y; Lin, Tung-pei; Shih, Ling-Yi; Wang, Chien-Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are potent drug candidates against microbes such as bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses. The size of AMPs ranges from less than ten to hundreds of amino acids. Often only a few amino acids or the critical regions of antimicrobial proteins matter the functionality. Accurately predicting the AMP critical regions could benefit the experimental designs. However, no extensive analyses have been done specifically on the AMP critical regions and computational modeling on them is either non-existent or settled to other problems. With a focus on the AMP critical regions, we thus develop a computational model AMPcore by introducing a state-of-the-art machine learning method, conditional random fields. We generate a comprehensive dataset of 798 AMPs cores and a low similarity dataset of 510 representative AMP cores. AMPcore could reach a maximal accuracy of 90% and 0.79 Matthew's correlation coefficient on the comprehensive dataset and a maximal accuracy of 83% and 0.66 MCC on the low similarity dataset. Our analyses of AMP cores follow what we know about AMPs: High in glycine and lysine, but low in aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and methionine; the abundance of α-helical structures; the dominance of positive net charges; the peculiarity of amphipathicity. Two amphipathic sequence motifs within the AMP cores, an amphipathic α-helix and an amphipathic π-helix, are revealed. In addition, a short sequence motif at the N-terminal boundary of AMP cores is reported for the first time: arginine at the P(-1) coupling with glycine at the P1 of AMP cores occurs the most, which might link to microbial cell adhesion.

  16. Directional, seamless, and restriction enzyme-free construction of random-primed complementary DNA libraries using phosphorothioate-modified primers.

    PubMed

    Howland, Shanshan W; Poh, Chek-Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2011-09-01

    Directional cloning of complementary DNA (cDNA) primed by oligo(dT) is commonly achieved by appending a restriction site to the primer, whereas the second strand is synthesized through the combined action of RNase H and Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I (PolI). Although random primers provide more uniform and complete coverage, directional cloning with the same strategy is highly inefficient. We report that phosphorothioate linkages protect the tail sequence appended to random primers from the 5'→3' exonuclease activity of PolI. We present a simple strategy for constructing a random-primed cDNA library using the efficient, size-independent, and seamless In-Fusion cloning method instead of restriction enzymes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Selective enrichment of environmental DNA libraries for genes encoding nonribosomal peptides and polyketides by phosphopantetheine transferase-dependent complementation of siderophore biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Banik, Jacob J.; Owen, Jeremy G.; Craig, Jeffrey W.; Brady, Sean F.

    2012-01-01

    The cloning of DNA directly from environmental samples provides a means to functionally access biosynthetic gene clusters present in the genomes of the large fraction of bacteria that remains recalcitrant to growth in the laboratory. Herein we demonstrate a method by which complementation of phosphopantetheine transferase deletion mutants can be used to restore siderophore biosynthesis and to therefore selectively enrich eDNA libraries for nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and polyketide synthase (PKS) gene sequences to unprecedented levels. The common use of NRPS/PKS-derived siderophores across bacterial taxa makes this method generalizable and should allow for the facile selective enrichment of NRPS/PKS-containing biosynthetic gene clusters from large environmental DNA libraries using a wide variety of phylogenetically diverse bacterial hosts. PMID:23072412

  18. Selective enrichment of environmental DNA libraries for genes encoding nonribosomal peptides and polyketides by phosphopantetheine transferase-dependent complementation of siderophore biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Banik, Jacob J; Owen, Jeremy G; Craig, Jeffrey W; Brady, Sean F

    2013-01-18

    The cloning of DNA directly from environmental samples provides a means to functionally access biosynthetic gene clusters present in the genomes of the large fraction of bacteria that remains recalcitrant to growth in the laboratory. Herein, we demonstrate a method by which complementation of phosphopantetheine transferase deletion mutants can be used to restore siderophore biosynthesis and to therefore selectively enrich eDNA libraries for nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and polyketide synthase (PKS) gene sequences to unprecedented levels. The common use of NRPS/PKS-derived siderophores across bacterial taxa makes this method generalizable and should allow for the facile selective enrichment of NRPS/PKS-containing biosynthetic gene clusters from large environmental DNA libraries using a wide variety of phylogenetically diverse bacterial hosts.

  19. Probing the specificity of binding to the major nuclear localization sequence-binding site of importin-alpha using oriented peptide library screening.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sundy N Y; Takeda, Agnes A S; Fontes, Marcos R M; Harris, Jonathan M; Jans, David A; Kobe, Bostjan

    2010-06-25

    Importin-alpha is the nuclear import receptor that recognizes the classic monopartite and bipartite nuclear localization sequences (cNLSs), which contain one or two clusters of basic amino acids, respectively. Different importin-alpha paralogs in a single organism are specific for distinct repertoires of cargos. Structural studies revealed that monopartite cNLSs and the C-terminal basic clusters of the bipartite cNLSs bind to the same site on importin-alpha, termed the major cNLS-binding site. We used an oriented peptide library approach with five degenerate positions to probe the specificity of the major cNLS-binding site in importin-alpha. We identified the sequences KKKRR, KKKRK, and KKRKK as the optimal sequences for binding to this site for mouse importin-alpha2, human importin-alpha1, and human importin-alpha5, respectively. The crystal structure of mouse importin-alpha2 with its optimal peptide confirmed the expected binding mode resembling the binding of simian virus 40 large tumor-antigen cNLS. Binding assays confirmed that the peptides containing these sequences bound to the corresponding proteins with low nanomolar affinities. Nuclear import assays showed that the sequences acted as functional cNLSs, with specificity for particular importin-alphas. This is the first time that structural information has been linked to an oriented peptide library screening approach for importin-alpha; the results will contribute to understanding of the sequence determinants of cNLSs, and may help identify as yet unidentified cNLSs in novel proteins.

  20. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus; identification of M protein-binding peptide ligands with antiviral and diagnostic potential

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The membrane (M) protein is one of the major structural proteins of coronavirus particles. In this study, the M protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was used to biopan a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. Three phages expressing TGEV-M-binding peptides were identified and ...

  1. A randomized phase II trial of personalized peptide vaccine with low dose cyclophosphamide in biliary tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Shirahama, Takahisa; Muroya, Daisuke; Matsueda, Satoko; Yamada, Akira; Shichijo, Shigeki; Naito, Masayasu; Yamashita, Takuto; Sakamoto, Shinjiro; Okuda, Koji; Itoh, Kyogo; Sasada, Tetsuro; Yutani, Shigeru

    2017-02-11

    Since the prognosis of advanced biliary tract cancer (aBTC) still remains very poor, new therapeutic approaches, including immunotherapies, need to be developed. In the current study, we conducted an open-label randomized phase II study to test whether low dose cyclophosphamide (CPA) could improve antigen-specific immune responses and clinical efficacy of personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) in 49 previously treated aBTC patients. Patients with aBTC refractory to at least one regimen of chemotherapies were randomly assigned to receive PPV with low dose CPA (100 mg/ day for 7 days before vaccination) (PPV/CPA, n=24) or PPV alone (n=25). A maximum of four HLA-matched peptides were selected based on the pre-existing peptide-specific IgG responses, followed by subcutaneous administration. T cell responses to the vaccinated peptides in the PPV/CPA arm tended to be greater than those in the PPV alone arm. The PPV/CPA arm showed significantly better progression-free survival (median time: 6.1 vs 2.9 months; hazard ratio (HR): 0.427; P = 0.008) and overall survival (median time: 12.1 vs 5.9 months; HR: 0.376; P = 0.004), compared to the PPV alone arm. The PPV alone arm, but not the PPV/CPA arm, showed significant increase in plasma IL-6 after vaccinations, which might be associated with inhibition of antigen-specific T cell responses. These results suggested that combined treatment with low dose CPA could provide clinical benefits in aBTC patients under PPV, possibly through prevention of IL-6-mediated immune suppression. Further clinical studies would be recommended to clarify the clinical efficacy of PPV/CPA in aBTC patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhibition of lethal endotoxin shock with an L-pyridylalanine containing metalloproteinase inhibitor selected by high-throughput screening of a new peptide library.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jialiang; Dubois, Véronique; Chaltin, Patrick; Fiten, Pierre; Dillen, Christiane; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2006-09-01

    Gelatinase B/MMP-9 fulfills crucial regulator or effector functions in disease states and may be pharmacologically targeted by specific inhibitors. The characteristics of cleavages of a natural gelatinase B substrate were simulated and amino acids with zinc-ion chelating side-groups were employed to design a library of peptide-based inhibitors. Here, we extend previous findings of combinatorial chemical synthesis and subsequent library deconvolution with a recently established high-throughput technology. This enabled us to study MMP inhibitors with two zinc-binding groups and to identify a new L-pyridylalanine-containing gelatinase B inhibitor. The peptide analog was found to inhibit, almost to the same degree, the neutrophil enzymes collagenase 2/ MMP-8 and MMP-9 and the monocytic tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM-17) in vitro and to protect mice against lethal endotoxinemia in vivo. These data illustrate the usefulness of the screening platform for protective inhibitor discovery and complement recent insights in the pathogenesis and treatment of shock syndromes.

  3. Mimotope peptides selected from phage display combinatorial library by serum antibodies of pigs experimentally infected with Taenia solium as leads to developing diagnostic antigens for human neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Gazarian, Karlen; Rowlay, Merril; Gazarian, Tatiana; Vazquez Buchelli, Jorge Enrique; Hernández Gonzáles, Marisela

    2012-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis is caused by penetration of the tapeworm Taenia solium larvae into the central nervous system resulting in a diverse range of neurologic complications including epilepsy in endemic areas that globalization spreads worldwide. Sensitive and specific immunodiagnosis is needed for the early detection and elimination of the parasite, but the lack of standardized, readily obtainable antigens is a challenge. Here, we used the phage display for resolving the problem. The rationale of the strategy rests on the concept that the screening of combinatorial libraries with polyclonal serum to pathogens reveals families of peptides mimicking the pathogen most immunodominant epitopes indispensable for the successful diagnosis. The screening of a 7mer library with serum IgG of four pigs experimentally infected with parasite followed by computer aided segregation of the selected sequences resulted in the discovery of four clusters of homologous sequences of which one presented a family of ten mimotopes selected by three infected pig serum IgGs; the common motif sequence LSPF carried by the family was considered to be the core of an immunodominant epitope of the parasite critical for the binding with the antibody that selected the mimotopes. The immunoassay testing permitted to select a mimotope whose synthetic peptide free of the phage with the amino acid sequence Leu-Ser-Fen-Pro-Ser-Val-Val that distinguished well a panel of 21 cerebrospinal fluids of neurocysticercosis patients from the fluids of individuals with neurological complications of other etiology. This peptide is proposed as a lead for developing a novel molecularly defined diagnostic antigen(s) for the neurocysticercosis.

  4. Screening a phage display library for a novel FGF8b-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenhui; Chen, Xilei; Li, Tao; Li, Yanmei; Wang, Ruixue; He, Dan; Luo, Wu; Li, Xiaokun; Wu, Xiaoping

    2013-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) is the major isoform of FGF8 expressed in prostate cancer and it correlates with the stage and grade of the disease. FGF8b has been considered as a potential target for prostate cancer therapy. Here we isolated 12 specific FGF8b-binding phage clones by screening a phage display heptapeptide library with FGF8b. The peptide (HSQAAVP, named as P12) corresponding to one of these clones showed high homology to the immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain II(D2) of high-affinity FGF8b receptor (FGFR3c), contained 3 identical amino acids (AVP) to the authentic FGFR3 D2 sequence aa 163–169 (LLAVPAA) directly participating in ligand binding, carried the same charges as its corresponding motif (aa163–169) in FGFR3c, suggesting that P12 may have a greater potential to interrupt FGF8b binding to its receptors than other identified heptapeptides do. Functional analysis indicated that synthetic P12 peptides mediate significant inhibition of FGF8b-induced cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blockade of the activations of Erk1/2 and Akt cascades in both prostate cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. The results demonstrated that the P12 peptide acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer. - Highlights: ► A novel FGF8b-binding peptide P12 was isolated from a phage display library. ► The mechanisms for P12 peptide inhibiting cell proliferation were proposed. ► P12 caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA. ► P12 suppressed FGF8b-induced activations of Akt and MAP kinases. ► P12 acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer.

  5. Xendorphin B1, a novel opioid-like peptide determined from a Xenopus laevis brain cDNA library, produces opioid antinociception after spinal administration in amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Craig W.; Tóth, Géza; Borsodi, Anna; Benyhe, Sándor

    2007-01-01

    Prodynorphins (PDYNs) from the African clawed frog (Xenopus leavis), originally described as ‘proxendorphins’, are novel members of the family of opioid-like precursor polypeptides and were recently discovered based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) isolates from a Xenopus brain cDNA library. This amphibian prodynorphin was found in two isoforms, XenPDYN-A and XenPDYN-B, consisting of 247 and 279 amino acids, respectively. Each prepropeptide contains five potential opioid-like peptides, collectively named xendorphins. One of these, xendorphin B1 (XenPDYN-B sequence 96–111: YGGFIRKPDKYKFLNA), is a hexadecapeptide that displaced [3H]naloxone and the radiolabelled kappa opioid, [3H]dynorphin A (1–17), with nanomolar affinity from rat brain membranes. Using the acetic acid pain test, the present study examined the antinociceptive effects of spinally administered xendorphin B1 in amphibians. Xendorphin B1 produced a long-lasting and dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in the Northern grass frog (Rana pipiens) with an ED50 value of 44.5 nmol/frog. The antinociceptive effects of xendorphin B1 were significantly blocked by pretreatment with the non-selective opioid antagonist, naltrexone. This is the first report of the in vivo characterization of a non-mammalian prodynorphin-derived peptide and suggests that xendorphin peptides may play a role in the modulation of noxious information in vertebrates. PMID:17292806

  6. Tools (Viewer, Library and Validator) that Facilitate Use of the Peptide and Protein Identification Standard Format, Termed mzIdentML*

    PubMed Central

    Ghali, Fawaz; Krishna, Ritesh; Lukasse, Pieter; Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Reisinger, Florian; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Jones, Andrew R.

    2013-01-01

    The Proteomics Standards Initiative has recently released the mzIdentML data standard for representing peptide and protein identification results, for example, created by a search engine. When a new standard format is produced, it is important that software tools are available that make it straightforward for laboratory scientists to use it routinely and for bioinformaticians to embed support in their own tools. Here we report the release of several open-source Java-based software packages based on mzIdentML: ProteoIDViewer, mzidLibrary, and mzidValidator. The ProteoIDViewer is a desktop application allowing users to visualize mzIdentML-formatted results originating from any appropriate identification software; it supports visualization of all the features of the mzIdentML format. The mzidLibrary is a software library containing routines for importing data from external search engines, post-processing identification data (such as false discovery rate calculations), combining results from multiple search engines, performing protein inference, setting identification thresholds, and exporting results from mzIdentML to plain text files. The mzidValidator is able to process files and report warnings or errors if files are not correctly formatted or contain some semantic error. We anticipate that these developments will simplify adoption of the new standard in proteomics laboratories and the integration of mzIdentML into other software tools. All three tools are freely available in the public domain. PMID:23813117

  7. Dissection of the LXXLL Nuclear Receptor-Coactivator Interaction Motif Using Combinatorial Peptide Libraries: Discovery of Peptide Antagonists of Estrogen Receptors α and β

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-yi; Norris, John D.; Grøn, Hanne; Paige, Lisa A.; Hamilton, Paul T.; Kenan, Daniel J.; Fowlkes, Dana; McDonnell, Donald P.

    1999-01-01

    Recruitment of transcriptional coactivators following ligand activation is a critical step in nuclear receptor-mediated target gene expression. Upon binding an agonist, the receptor undergoes a conformational change which facilitates the formation of a specific coactivator binding pocket within the carboxyl terminus of the receptor. This permits the α-helical LXXLL motif within some coactivators to interact with the nuclear receptors. Until recently, the LXXLL motif was thought to function solely as a docking module; however, it now appears that sequences flanking the core motif may play a role in determining receptor selectivity. To address this issue, we used a combinatorial phage display approach to evaluate the role of flanking sequences in influencing these interactions. We sampled more than 108 variations of the core LXXLL motif with estradiol-activated estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) as a target and found three different classes of peptides. All of these peptides interacted with ERα in an agonist-dependent manner and disrupted ERα-mediated transcriptional activity when introduced into target cells. Using a series of ERα-mutants, we found that these three classes of peptides showed different interaction patterns from each other, suggesting that not all LXXLL motifs are the same and that receptor binding selectivity can be achieved by altering sequences flanking the LXXLL core motif. Most notable in this regard was the discovery of a peptide which, when overexpressed in cells, selectively disrupted ERβ- but not ERα-mediated reporter gene expression. This novel ERβ-specific antagonist may be useful in identifying and characterizing the ERβ-regulated process in estradiol-responsive cells. In conclusion, using a combinatorial approach to define cofactor-receptor interactions, we have clearly been able to demonstrate that not all LXXLL motifs are functionally equivalent, a finding which suggests that it may be possible to target receptor-LXXLL interactions

  8. Discovery of active proteins directly from combinatorial randomized protein libraries without display, purification or sequencing: identification of novel zinc finger proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Marcus D.; Zhang, Zhan-Ren; Sutherland, Andrew J.; Santos, Albert F.; Hine, Anna V.

    2005-01-01

    We have successfully linked protein library screening directly with the identification of active proteins, without the need for individual purification, display technologies or physical linkage between the protein and its encoding sequence. By using ‘MAX’ randomization we have rapidly constructed 60 overlapping gene libraries that encode zinc finger proteins, randomized variously at the three principal DNA-contacting residues. Expression and screening of the libraries against five possible target DNA sequences generated data points covering a potential 40 000 individual interactions. Comparative analysis of the resulting data enabled direct identification of active proteins. Accuracy of this library analysis methodology was confirmed by both in vitro and in vivo analyses of identified proteins to yield novel zinc finger proteins that bind to their target sequences with high affinity, as indicated by low nanomolar apparent dissociation constants. PMID:15722478

  9. Proven in vitro evolution of protease cathepsin E-inhibitors and -activators at pH 4.5 using a paired peptide method.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Koichiro; Komatsu, Masayuki; Biyani, Madhu; Futakami, Masae; Kawakubo, Tomoyo; Yamamoto, Kenji; Nishigaki, Koichi

    2012-12-01

    Improving a particular function of molecules is often more difficult than identifying such molecules ab initio. Here, a method to acquire higher affinity and/or more functional peptides was developed as a progressive library selection method. The primary library selection products were utilized to build a secondary library composed of blocks of 4 amino acids, of which selection led to peptides with increased activity. These peptides were further converted to randomly generate paired peptides. Cathepsin E-inhibitors thus obtained exhibited the highest activities and affinities (pM order). This was also the case with cathepsin E-activating peptides, proving the methodological effectiveness. The primary, secondary, and tertiary library selections can be regarded as module-finding, module-shuffling, and module-pairing, respectively, which resembles the progression of the natural evolution of proteins. The mode of peptide binding to their target proteins is discussed in analogy to antibodies and epitopes of an antigen.

  10. Discovery of macrocyclic peptides armed with a mechanism-based warhead: isoform-selective inhibition of human deacetylase SIRT2.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Jumpei; Hayashi, Yuuki; Suga, Hiroaki

    2012-04-02

    Designed to inhibit: by using the random nonstandard peptide integrated discovery (RaPID) system, highly potent isoform-selective inhibitors can be identified from a library of nonstandard macrocyclic peptides. These inhibitors, which contain a mechanism-based warhead residue, are active against the human deacetylase SIRT2, with IC(50) values in the low nanomolar region.

  11. Development of a Small Peptide Tag for Covalent Labeling of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Fujie; Fuller, Roberta; Asawapornmongkol, Lily; Warsinke, Axel; Gobuty, Sarah; Barbas, Carlos F.

    2008-01-01

    A 21-mer peptide that can be used to covalently introduce synthetic molecules into proteins has been developed. Phage displayed peptide libraries were subjected to reaction-based selection with 1,3-diketones. The peptide was further evolved by addition of a randomized region and reselection for improved binding. The resulting 21-mer peptide had a reactive amino group that formed an enaminone with 1,3-diketone and was used as a tag for labeling of maltose binding protein. Using this peptide tag and 1,3-diketone derivatives, a variety of molecules such as reporter probes and functionalities may be covalently introduced into proteins of interest. PMID:17602682

  12. Screening of peptides with a high affinity to bile acids using peptide arrays and a computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Toshikazu; Okochi, Mina; Kato, Ryuji; Kaga, Chiaki; Tomita, Yasuyuki; Nagaoka, Satoshi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2011-07-01

    Bile acid binding peptides have attracted attention for the improvement and prevention of hypercholesterolemia. In this study, screening of bile acid high affinity peptides was investigated using computationally-assisted peptide array analysis. Starting with the screening data obtained from a limited, random 6-mer library (2212 sequences), the peptides with a high affinity to bile acid were characterized by comparison of high- and low-affinity peptides using fuzzy neural network (FNN) analysis. The physical properties of amino acids at specific positions that contribute to bile acid binding activity were extracted as the structural rule; optimization was carried out using three repeated screening cycles of the rule extraction. The extracted structural rule indicates that Trp, Tyr, Phe, Leu, Ile and Val are enriched in bile acid binding peptides. The yields of bile acid binding peptides with an affinity of above the VAWWMY peptide (soystatin, control sequence) were significantly higher in the optimized structural rule (32.5%) compared to that of the random library (3.1%), and 6 peptides were obtained with above 2.0-fold increased binding activity. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Self-condensation of a thiazole-peptide bearing a 21-membered loop into a library of giant macrocycles with multiple orthogonal loops.

    PubMed

    Singh, Yogendra; Hoang, Huy N; Flanagan, Bernadine; Fairlie, David P

    2006-03-16

    [reaction: see text] Tetrapeptide analogue H-[Glu-Ser-Lys(Thz)]-OH, containing a turn-inducing thiazole constraint, was used as a template to produce a 21-membered structurally characterized loop by linking Glu and Lys side chains with a Val-Ile dipeptide. This template was oligomerized in one pot to a library (cyclo-[1](n)(), n = 2-10) of giant symmetrical macrocycles (up to 120-membered rings), fused to 2-10 appended loops that were carried intact through multiple oligomerization (chain extension) and cyclization (chain terminating) reactions of the template. A three-dimensional solution structure for cyclo-[1](3) shows all three appended loops projecting from the same face of the macrocycle. This is a promising approach to separating peptide motifs over large distances.

  14. Effect of apolipoprotein E genotype and diet on apolipoprotein E lipidation and amyloid peptides: randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Angela J; Bayer-Carter, Jennifer L; Green, Pattie S; Montine, Thomas J; Wilkinson, Charles W; Baker, Laura D; Watson, G Stennis; Bonner, Laura M; Callaghan, Maureen; Leverenz, James B; Tsai, Elaine; Postupna, Nadia; Zhang, Jing; Lampe, Johanna; Craft, Suzanne

    2013-08-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) is caused in part by decreased clearance of the β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide breakdown products. Lipid-depleted (LD) apolipoproteins are less effective at binding and clearing Aβ, and LD Aβ peptides are more toxic to neurons. However, not much is known about the lipid states of these proteins in human cerebrospinal fluid. To characterize the lipidation states of Aβ peptides and apolipoprotein E in the cerebrospinal fluid in adults with respect to cognitive diagnosis and APOE ε4 allele carrier status and after a dietary intervention. Randomized clinical trial. Veterans Affairs Medical Center clinical research unit. Twenty older adults with normal cognition (mean [SD] age, 69 [7] years) and 27 with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (67 [6] years). Randomization to a diet high in saturated fat content and with a high glycemic index (High diet; 45% of energy from fat [>25% saturated fat], 35%-40% from carbohydrates with a mean glycemic index >70, and 15%-20% from protein) or a diet low in saturated fat content and with a low glycemic index (Low diet; 25% of energy from fat [<7% saturated fat], 55%-60% from carbohydrates with a mean glycemic index <55, and 15%-20% from protein). Lipid-depleted Aβ42 and Aβ40 and apolipoprotein E in cerebrospinal fluid. Baseline levels of LD Aβ were greater for adults with mild cognitive impairment compared with adults with normal cognition (LD Aβ42, P = .05; LD Aβ40, P = .01). These findings were magnified in adults with mild cognitive impairment and the ε4 allele, who had higher LD apolipoprotein E levels irrespective of cognitive diagnosis (P < .001). The Low diet tended to decrease LD Aβ levels, whereas the High diet increased these fractions (LD Aβ42, P = .01; LD Aβ40, P = .15). Changes in LD Aβ levels with the Low diet negatively correlated with changes in cerebrospinal fluid levels of insulin (LD Aβ42 and insulin, r = -0.68 [P = .01]; LD Aβ40 and insulin, r = -0.78 [P = .002]). The

  15. Development of a fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptide library technology for detection of protease contaminants in protein-based raw materials used in diagnostic assays.

    PubMed

    Kapprell, Hans-Peter; Maurer, Andreas; Kramer, Florian; Heinrich, Boris; Buenning, Carsten; Narvaez, Alfredo; Kalbacher, Hubert; Flad, Thomas

    2011-10-01

    Protease impurities in raw materials used in enzyme immunoassays can impair assay performance. This risk may be greatly decreased if incoming protein-based raw materials are controlled for protease impurities or if protease inhibitors are used in the assay formulations. As many different proteases might occur in protein raw materials, it is desirable to have a general test for protease contamination. With the help of a fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptide library containing about 2.5 million peptides, we have succeeded in establishing such a system, with sensitivity in the nanogram range for known proteases. Protease contamination was found to differ between different raw materials and was correlated with assay performance. Protease activity in contaminated raw materials could be suppressed to various degrees with different chemical inhibitors or by thermal treatment. This technology is suited for the control of incoming protein-based raw materials used for enzyme immunoassays, as well as for the optimization of the use of protein inhibitors or thermal treatment of protein-based raw materials for the inactivation of proteases.

  16. A pH Sensitive High-Throughput Assay for miRNA Binding of a Peptide-Aminoglycoside (PA) Library.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Derrick; Jiang, Liuwei; Nahar, Smita; Maiti, Souvik; Arya, Dev P

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small RNAs that have a regulatory role in gene expression. Because of this regulatory role, miRNAs have become a new target for therapeutic compounds. Here, we outline an approach to target specific miRNAs using a high throughput capable assay and a 215 compound peptidic-aminosugar (PA) library. Aminosugars have been shown in a number of recent reports as important lead compounds that bind miRNA. In order to screen for compounds that bind miRNA, we have developed a high throughput displacement assay using a fluorescein-neomycin conjugated molecule (F-neo) as a probe for competitive miRNA binding compounds. We have applied the F-neo assay to four different miRNA constructs and the assay is applicable to most miRNAs, at various stages of processing. The results of the screen were validated by the determination of the IC50 for a select group of compounds from the library. For example, we identified eight compounds that bind to hsa-miR 504 with higher affinity than the parent neomycin. From the F-neo displacement assay we found that the number of binding sites differs for each miRNA, and the binding sites appear to differ both physically and chemically, with different affinity of the compounds resulting from the size of the molecule as well as the chemical structure. Additionally, the affinity of the compounds was dependent on the identity and position of the amino acid position of conjugation and the affinity of the compounds relative to other compounds in the library was miRNA dependent with the introduction of a second amino acid.

  17. Fast Screening Procedures for Random Transposon Libraries of Cloned Herpesvirus Genomes: Mutational Analysis of Human Cytomegalovirus Envelope Glycoprotein Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hobom, Urs; Brune, Wolfram; Messerle, Martin; Hahn, Gabriele; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.

    2000-01-01

    We have cloned the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome as an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) in Escherichia coli. Here, we have subjected the HCMV BAC to random transposon (Tn) mutagenesis using a Tn1721-derived insertion sequence and have provided the conditions for excision of the BAC cassette. We report on a fast and efficient screening procedure for a Tn insertion library. Bacterial clones containing randomly mutated full-length HCMV genomes were transferred into 96-well microtiter plates. A PCR screening method based on two Tn primers and one primer specific for the desired genomic position of the Tn insertion was established. Within three consecutive rounds of PCR a Tn insertion of interest can be assigned to a specific bacterial clone. We applied this method to retrieve mutants of HCMV envelope glycoprotein genes. To determine the infectivities of the mutant HCMV genomes, the DNA of the identified BACs was transfected into permissive fibroblasts. In contrast to BACs with mutations in the genes coding for gB, gH, gL, and gM, which did not yield infectious virus, BACs with disruptions of open reading frame UL4 (gp48) or UL74 (gO) were viable, although gO-deficient viruses showed a severe growth deficit. Thus, gO (UL74), a component of the glycoprotein complex III, is dispensable for viral growth. We conclude that our approach of PCR screening for Tn insertions will greatly facilitate the functional analysis of herpesvirus genomes. PMID:10933677

  18. Chi-square comparison of tryptic peptide-to-protein distributions of tandem mass spectrometry from blood with those of random expectation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peihong; Bowden, Peter; Tucholska, Monika; Marshall, John G

    2011-02-15

    Proteomics uses tandem mass spectrometers and correlation algorithms to match peptides and their fragment spectra to amino acid sequences. The replication of multiple liquid chromatography experiments with electrospray ionization of peptides and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) produces large sets of MS/MS spectra. There is a need to assess the quality of large sets of experimental results by statistical comparison with that of random expectation. Classical frequency-based statistics such as goodness-of-fit tests for peptide-to-protein distributions could be used to calculate the probability that an entire set of experimental results has arisen by random chance. The frequency distributions of authentic MS/MS spectra from human blood were compared with those of false positive MS/MS spectra generated by a computer, or instrument noise, using the chi-square test. Here the mechanics of the chi-square test to compare the results in toto from a set of LC-ESI-MS/MS experiments with those of random expectation is detailed. The chi-square analysis of authentic spectra demonstrates unambiguously that the analysis of blood proteins separated by partition chromatography prior to tryptic digestions has a low probability that the cumulative peptide-to-protein distribution is the same as that of random or noise false positive spectra. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Randomized Multicenter Trial of the Effects of Melanoma-Associated Helper Peptides and Cyclophosphamide on the Immunogenicity of a Multipeptide Melanoma Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Slingluff, Craig L.; Petroni, Gina R.; Chianese-Bullock, Kimberly A.; Smolkin, Mark E.; Ross, Merrick I.; Haas, Naomi B.; von Mehren, Margaret; Grosh, William W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This multicenter randomized trial was designed to test whether melanoma-associated helper peptides augment CD8+ T-cell responses to a melanoma vaccine and whether cyclophosphamide (CY) pretreatment augments CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell responses to that vaccine. Patients and Methods In all, 167 eligible patients with resected stage IIB to IV melanoma were randomly assigned to four vaccination study arms. Patients were vaccinated with 12 class I major histocompatibility complex–restricted melanoma peptides (12MP) to stimulate CD8+ T cells and were randomly assigned to receive a tetanus helper peptide or a mixture of six melanoma-associated helper peptides (6MHP) to stimulate CD4+ T cells. Before vaccination, patients were also randomly assigned to receive CY pretreatment or not. T-cell responses were assessed by an ex vivo interferon gamma ELISpot assay. Clinical outcomes and toxicities were recorded. Results Vaccination with 12MP plus tetanus induced CD8+ T-cell responses in 78% of patients and CD4+ T-cell responses to tetanus peptide in 93% of patients. Vaccination with 12MP plus 6MHP induced CD8+ responses in 19% of patients and CD4+ responses to 6MHP in 48% of patients. CY had no significant effect on T-cell responses. Overall 3-year survival was 79% (95% CI, 71% to 86%), with no significant differences (at this point) by study arm. Conclusion Melanoma-associated helper peptides paradoxically decreased CD8+ T-cell responses to a melanoma vaccine (P < .001), and CY pretreatment had no immunologic or clinical effect. Prior work showed immunologic and clinical activity of 6MHP alone. Possible explanations for negative effects on CD8 responses include modulation of homing receptor expression or induction of antigen-specific regulatory T cells. PMID:21690475

  20. Construction of a cDNA library for sea cucumber Acaudina leucoprocta and differential expression of ferritin peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Hou, Fujing; Li, Ye; Su, Xiurong; Li, Taiwu; Jin, Chunhua

    2016-07-01

    Acaudina leucoprocta is an edible sea cucumber of economic interest that is widely distributed in China. Little information is available concerning the molecular genetics of this species although such knowledge would contribute to a better understanding of the optimal conditions for its aquaculture and its mechanisms of defense against disease. Therefore, we constructed a cDNA library and, based on bioinformatics analysis of the sequences, the functions of 75% of the cDNAs were identified, including those involved in cell structure, energy metabolism, mitochondrial function, and signal transduction pathways. Approximately 25% of genes in the library were unmatched. The gene for A. leucoprocta ferritin was also cloned. The predicted amino-acid sequence of ferritin displayed significant homology with other sea-cucumber counterparts but indicated that it was a new member of the ferritin family. Semiquantitative real-time RT-PCR indicated the highest levels of ferritin mRNA expression in the intestine. A polyclonal antibody of ferritin was also produced. These data provide a set of molecular tools essential for further studies of the functions of ferritin protein in A. leucoprocta.

  1. Topical administration of a connexin43-based peptide augments healing of chronic neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers: A multicenter, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Grek, Christina L; Prasad, G M; Viswanathan, Vijay; Armstrong, David G; Gourdie, Robert G; Ghatnekar, Gautam S

    2015-01-01

    Nonhealing neuropathic foot ulcers remain a significant problem in individuals with diabetes. The gap-junctional protein connexin43 (Cx43) has roles in dermal wound healing and targeting Cx43 signalling accelerates wound reepithelialization. In a prospective, randomized, multicenter clinical trial we evaluated the efficacy and safety of a peptide mimetic of the C-terminus of Cx43, alpha connexin carboxy-terminal (ACT1), in accelerating the healing of chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) when incorporated into standard of care (SOC) protocols. Adults with DFUs of at least four weeks duration were randomized to receive SOC with or without topical application of ACT1. Primary outcome was mean percent ulcer reepithelialization and safety variables included incidence of treatment related adverse events (AEs) and detection of ACT1 immunogenicity. ACT1 treatment was associated with a significantly greater reduction in mean percent ulcer area from baseline to 12 weeks (72.1% vs. 57.1%; p = 0.03). Analysis of incidence and median time-to-complete-ulcer closure revealed that ACT1 treatment was associated with a greater percentage of participants that reached 100% ulcer reepitheliazation and a reduced median time-to-complete-ulcer closure. No AEs reported were treatment related, and ACT1 was not immunogenic. Treatment protocols that incorporate ACT1 may present a therapeutic strategy that safely augments the reepithelialization of chronic DFUs. © 2015 Authors. Wound Repair and Regeneration published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Wound Healing Society.

  2. A comparison of random sequence reads versus 16S rDNA sequences for estimating the biodiversity of a metagenomic library.

    PubMed

    Manichanh, Chaysavanh; Chapple, Charles E; Frangeul, Lionel; Gloux, Karine; Guigo, Roderic; Dore, Joel

    2008-09-01

    The construction of metagenomic libraries has permitted the study of microorganisms resistant to isolation and the analysis of 16S rDNA sequences has been used for over two decades to examine bacterial biodiversity. Here, we show that the analysis of random sequence reads (RSRs) instead of 16S is a suitable shortcut to estimate the biodiversity of a bacterial community from metagenomic libraries. We generated 10,010 RSRs from a metagenomic library of microorganisms found in human faecal samples. Then searched them using the program BLASTN against a prokaryotic sequence database to assign a taxon to each RSR. The results were compared with those obtained by screening and analysing the clones containing 16S rDNA sequences in the whole library. We found that the biodiversity observed by RSR analysis is consistent with that obtained by 16S rDNA. We also show that RSRs are suitable to compare the biodiversity between different metagenomic libraries. RSRs can thus provide a good estimate of the biodiversity of a metagenomic library and, as an alternative to 16S, this approach is both faster and cheaper.

  3. PR01 Molecular Pathogenesis of Rickettsioses and Development of Anti-Rickettsial Treatment by Combinatorial Peptide-Based Libraries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 01-02-2006 2 . REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 Feb 2005 - 31...library and challenge with R. prowazekii, R. rickettsii, and O. tsutsugamushi; 2 ) To determine the role of NF-κB, cytokines, ROS and NO in intracellular...Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Table of Contents COVER………………………………………………………………………………… SF 298……………………………………………………………………………..…… 2

  4. Construction and optimization of an efficient amplification method of a random ssDNA library by asymmetric emulsion PCR.

    PubMed

    Shao, Keke; Shi, Xinhui; Zhu, Xiangjun; Cui, Leilei; Shao, Qixiang; Ma, Da

    2015-12-16

    Construction of a random ssDNA sublibrary is an important step of the aptamer screening process. The available construction methods include asymmetric PCR, biotin-streptavidin separation, and lambda exonuclease digestions, in which PCR amplification is a key step. The main drawback of PCR amplification is overamplification increasing nonspecific hybridization among different products and by-products, which may cause the loss of potential high-quality aptamers, inefficient screening, and even screening failure. Cycle number optimization in PCR amplification is the main way to avoid overamplification but does not fundamentally eliminate the nonspecific hybridization, and the decreased cycle number may lead to insufficient product amounts. Here, we developed a new method, "asymmetric emulsion PCR," which could overcome the shortcomings of conventional PCR. In asymmetric emulsion PCR, different templates were separated by emulsion particles, allowing single-molecule PCR, in which each template was separately amplified, and the nonspecific hybridization was avoided. Overamplification or formation of by-products was not observed. The method is so simple that direct amplification of 40 or more cycles can provide a high-quality ssDNA library. Therefore, the asymmetric emulsion PCR would improve the screening efficiency of systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment.

  5. Random isotopolog libraries for protein perturbation studies. 13C NMR studies on lumazine protein of Photobacterium leiognathi.

    PubMed

    Illarionov, Boris; Lee, Chan Yong; Bacher, Adelbert; Fischer, Markus; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2005-11-25

    [graph: see text] Lumazine proteins of luminescent bacteria are paralogs of riboflavin synthase which are devoid of catalytic activity but bind the riboflavin synthase substrate, 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine, with high affinity and are believed to serve as optical transponders for bioluminescence emission. Lumazine protein of Photobacterium leiognathi was expressed in a recombinant Escherichia coli host and was reconstituted with mixtures (random libraries) of 13C-labeled isotopologs of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine or riboflavin that had been prepared by biotransformation of [U-(13)C6]-, [1-(13)C1]-, [2-(13)C1]-, and [3-(13)C1]glucose. 13C NMR analysis of the protein/ligand complexes afforded the assignments of the 13C NMR chemical shifts for all carbon atoms of the protein-bound ligands by isotopolog abundance editing. The carbon atoms of the ribityl groups of both ligands studied were shifted up to 6 ppm upon binding to the protein. Chemical shift modulation of the side chain and chromophore carbon atoms due to protein/ligand interaction is discussed on the basis of the sequence similarity between lumazine protein and riboflavin synthase.

  6. Construction of an artificially randomized IgNAR phage display library: screening of variable regions that bind to hen egg white lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Maki; Hikima, Jun-ichi; Jung, Tae Sung; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Aoki, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    To develop a multi-antigen-specific immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (IgNAR) variable (V) region phage display library, CDR3 in the V region of IgNAR from banded houndshark (Triakis scyllium) was artificially randomized, and clones specific for hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) were obtained by the biopanning method. The nucleotide sequence of CDR3 in the V region was randomly rearranged by PCR. Randomized CDR3-containing segments of the V region were ligated into T7 phage vector to construct a phage display library and resulted in a phage titer of 3.7 × 10(7) PFU/ml. Forty clones that contained randomized CDR3 inserts were sequenced and shown to have different nucleotide sequences. The HEL-specific clones were screened by biopanning using HEL-coated ELISA plates. After six rounds of screening, nine clones were identified as HEL-specific, eight of which showed a strong affinity to HEL in ELISA compared to a negative control (i.e., empty phage clone). The deduced amino acid sequences of CDR3 from the HEL-specific phage clones fell into four types (I-IV): type I contains a single cysteine residue and type II-IV contain two cysteine residues. These results indicated that the artificially randomized IgNAR library is useful for the rapid isolation of antigen-specific IgNAR V region without immunization of target antigen and showed that it is possible to isolate an antigen-specific IgNAR V region from this library.

  7. Teplizumab preserves C-peptide in recent-onset type 1 diabetes: two-year results from the randomized, placebo-controlled Protégé trial.

    PubMed

    Hagopian, William; Ferry, Robert J; Sherry, Nicole; Carlin, David; Bonvini, Ezio; Johnson, Syd; Stein, Kathryn E; Koenig, Scott; Daifotis, Anastasia G; Herold, Kevan C; Ludvigsson, Johnny

    2013-11-01

    Protégé was a phase 3, randomized, double-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled 2-year study of three intravenous teplizumab dosing regimens, administered daily for 14 days at baseline and again after 26 weeks, in new-onset type 1 diabetes. We sought to determine efficacy and safety of teplizumab immunotherapy at 2 years and to identify characteristics associated with therapeutic response. Of 516 randomized patients, 513 were treated, and 462 completed 2 years of follow-up. Teplizumab (14-day full-dose) reduced the loss of C-peptide mean area under the curve (AUC), a prespecified secondary end point, at 2 years versus placebo. In analyses of prespecified and post hoc subsets at entry, U.S. residents, patients with C-peptide mean AUC >0.2 nmol/L, those randomized ≤6 weeks after diagnosis, HbA1c <7.5% (58 mmol/mol), insulin use <0.4 units/kg/day, and 8-17 years of age each had greater teplizumab-associated C-peptide preservation than their counterparts. Exogenous insulin needs tended to be reduced versus placebo. Antidrug antibodies developed in some patients, without apparent change in drug efficacy. No new safety or tolerability issues were observed during year 2. In summary, anti-CD3 therapy reduced C-peptide loss 2 years after diagnosis using a tolerable dose.

  8. Peptides specific for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection: diagnostic potential.

    PubMed

    Casey, J L; Sanalla, A M; Tamvakis, D; Thalmann, C; Carroll, E L; Parisi, K; Coley, A M; Stewart, D J; Vaughan, J A; Michalski, W P; Luke, R; Foley, M

    2011-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD). Current serological diagnostic tests for JD are limited by their sensitivity when used in sub-clinical stages of the disease. Our objective was to identify peptides that mimic diagnostically important Map epitopes that might be incorporated into a new-generation JD diagnostic. Four peptides were isolated from a phage-displayed random peptide library by screening on antibodies derived from Map-infected goats. The peptides were recognised by antibodies from Map-infected goats but not by antibodies from uninfected goats. The peptides elicited immune responses in rabbits, which reacted strongly with bona fide Map antigens proving the peptides were true epitope mimics. To assess the diagnostic value a panel of goat sera was screened for reactivity's with peptides. The peptides were recognised by antibodies from a proportion of goats infected with Map compared with control animals with a diagnostic specificity of 100% and the sensitivity ranged from 50 to 75%. Combinations of any two peptides improved sensitivity 62.5-87.5% and 100% sensitivity was achieved with three of the four peptides in combination. These data suggest peptides representing diagnostically important Map epitopes could be incorporated into a sensitive diagnostic test.

  9. Peptide phage display as a tool for drug discovery: targeting membrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Molek, Peter; Strukelj, Borut; Bratkovic, Tomaz

    2011-01-21

    Ligands selected from phage-displayed random peptide libraries tend to be directed to biologically relevant sites on the surface of the target protein. Consequently, peptides derived from library screenings often modulate the target protein's activity in vitro and in vivo and can be used as lead compounds in drug design and as alternatives to antibodies for target validation in both genomics and drug discovery. This review discusses the use of phage display to identify membrane receptor modulators with agonistic or antagonistic activities. Because isolating or producing recombinant membrane proteins for use as target molecules in library screening is often impossible, innovative selection strategies such as panning against whole cells or tissues, recombinant receptor ectodomains, or neutralizing antibodies to endogenous binding partners were devised. Prominent examples from a two-decade history of peptide phage display will be presented, focusing on the design of affinity selection experiments, methods for improving the initial hits, and applications of the identified peptides.

  10. An Open-Label, Randomized Phase II Trial of Personalized Peptide Vaccination in Patients with Bladder Cancer that Progressed after Platinum-Based Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Masanori; Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Arai, Gaku; Eto, Masatoshi; Naito, Seiji; Ohyama, Chikara; Nasu, Yasutomo; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Moriya, Fukuko; Suekane, Shigetaka; Matsueda, Satoko; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Sasada, Tetsuro; Yamada, Akira; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Itoh, Kyogo

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of platinum-based chemotherapy-resistant metastatic urothelial cancer of the bladder remains poor. Personalized selection of the right peptides for each patient could be a novel approach for a cancer vaccine to boost anticancer immunity. In this randomized, open-label, phase II study, patients ages ≥18 years with progressive bladder cancer after first-line platinum-based chemotherapy were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) plus best supportive care (BSC) or BSC. PPV treatment used a maximum of four peptides chosen from 31 candidate peptides according to human leukocyte antigen types and peptide-reactive IgG titers, for 12 s.c. injections (8 injections, weekly; 4 injections, bi-weekly). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), immune response, and toxicity. Eighty patients were randomly assigned to receive either PPV plus BSC (n = 39) or BSC (n = 41). No significant improvement in PFS was noted [HR, 0.7; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.4-1.2, P = 0.17]. For the secondary endpoints, PPV plus BSC significantly prolonged OS compared with BSC (HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.34-0.99, P = 0.049), with median OS of 7.9 months (95% CI, 3.5-12.0) in the PPV plus BSC and 4.1 months (95% CI, 2.8-6.9) in the BSC. PPV treatment was well tolerated, without serious adverse drug reactions. PPV could not prolong PFS, but OS appeared to be improved with low toxicity and immune responses. Further large-scale, randomized trials are needed to confirm these results. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Combinatorial peptide ligand libraries for the analysis of low-expression proteins: Validation for normal urine and definition of a first protein MAP.

    PubMed

    Santucci, Laura; Candiano, Giovanni; Bruschi, Maurizio; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Petretto, Andrea; Scaloni, Andrea; Urbani, Andrea; Righetti, Pier G; Ghiggeri, Gian M

    2012-02-01

    In this review, we report the evolution on experimental conditions for the analysis of normal urine based on combinatorial peptide ligand library (CPLL) treatment and successive 2-DE and 2-DE/MS analysis. The main topics are (i) definition of the urine sample requirements, (ii) optimization of the urine/ligand ratio, (iii) essay conditions, (iv) en bloc elution. Overall, normal urine protein composition as studied by 2-DE includes over 2600 spots. Relevant data on inter and intraessay reproducibility obtained by the analysis of different normal urines repeated several times are also here presented. We found a 73% reproducibility upon analysis of the same sample and 68% correspondence of protein composition among different normal urine samples. Based on the above results, we are completing the characterization with LC-MS of 249 spots. The composition of normal urine proteins after CPLLs is finally shown with the indication of those spots which are currently under identification. This map will be completed in a near future; in the meantime this would represent the basic reference sample for newly developed studies on human diseases.

  12. An Entirely Solid Phase Peptide Synthesis-Based Strategy for Synthesis of Gelatinase Biosynthesis-Activating Pheromone (GBAP) Analogue Libraries: Investigating the Structure-Activity Relationships of the Enterococcus faecalis Quorum Sensing Signal.

    PubMed

    McBrayer, Dominic N; Gantman, Brooke K; Cameron, Crissey D; Tal-Gan, Yftah

    2017-06-16

    The development of an entirely solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS)-based synthesis of the quorum sensing signal gelatinase biosynthesis-activating pheromone (GBAP) from Enterococcus faecalis is reported. The method was used to prepare three libraries of analogues to investigate the structure-activity relationships (SARs) of the GBAP signal. The SAR studies revealed new characteristics of the GBAP signal and uncovered the most potent quorum sensing activator in E. faecalis known to date.

  13. The Effect of a Connexin43-Based Peptide on the Healing of Chronic Venous Leg Ulcers: A Multicenter, Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ghatnekar, Gautam S; Grek, Christina L; Armstrong, David G; Desai, Sanjay C; Gourdie, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    The gap junction protein, connexin43 (Cx43), has critical roles in the inflammatory, edematous, and fibrotic processes following dermal injury and during wound healing, and is abnormally upregulated at the epidermal wound margins of venous leg ulcers (VLUs). Targeting Cx43 with ACT1, a peptide mimetic of the carboxyl-terminus of Cx43, accelerates fibroblast migration and proliferation, and wound reepithelialization. In a prospective, multicenter clinical trial conducted in India, adults with chronic VLUs were randomized to treatment with an ACT1 gel formulation plus conventional standard-of-care (SOC) protocols, involving maintaining wound moisture and four-layer compression bandage therapy, or SOC protocols alone. The primary end point was mean percent ulcer reepithelialization from baseline to 12 weeks. A significantly greater reduction in mean percent ulcer area from baseline to 12 weeks was associated with the incorporation of ACT1 therapy (79% (SD 50.4)) as compared with compression bandage therapy alone (36% (SD 179.8); P=0.02). Evaluation of secondary efficacy end points indicated a reduced median time to 50 and 100% ulcer reepithelialization for ACT1-treated ulcers. Incorporation of ACT1 in SOC protocols may represent a well-tolerated, highly effective therapeutic strategy that expedites chronic venous ulcer healing by treating the underlying ulcer pathophysiology through Cx43-mediated pathways. PMID:25072595

  14. The effect of a connexin43-based Peptide on the healing of chronic venous leg ulcers: a multicenter, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Ghatnekar, Gautam S; Grek, Christina L; Armstrong, David G; Desai, Sanjay C; Gourdie, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    The gap junction protein, connexin43 (Cx43), has critical roles in the inflammatory, edematous, and fibrotic processes following dermal injury and during wound healing, and is abnormally upregulated at the epidermal wound margins of venous leg ulcers (VLUs). Targeting Cx43 with ACT1, a peptide mimetic of the carboxyl-terminus of Cx43, accelerates fibroblast migration and proliferation, and wound reepithelialization. In a prospective, multicenter clinical trial conducted in India, adults with chronic VLUs were randomized to treatment with an ACT1 gel formulation plus conventional standard-of-care (SOC) protocols, involving maintaining wound moisture and four-layer compression bandage therapy, or SOC protocols alone. The primary end point was mean percent ulcer reepithelialization from baseline to 12 weeks. A significantly greater reduction in mean percent ulcer area from baseline to 12 weeks was associated with the incorporation of ACT1 therapy (79% (SD 50.4)) as compared with compression bandage therapy alone (36% (SD 179.8); P=0.02). Evaluation of secondary efficacy end points indicated a reduced median time to 50 and 100% ulcer reepithelialization for ACT1-treated ulcers. Incorporation of ACT1 in SOC protocols may represent a well-tolerated, highly effective therapeutic strategy that expedites chronic venous ulcer healing by treating the underlying ulcer pathophysiology through Cx43-mediated pathways.

  15. Identification of peptide motif that binds to the surface of zirconia.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kazuhiko; Yoshinari, Masao; Matsuzaka, Kenichi; Shiba, Kiyotaka; Inoue, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A zirconia-binding peptide motif was identified using a peptide phage display system. Yttria stabilized zirconia beads and discs were used as the target. Quartz crystal microbalance was used to monitor the binding of phages to zirconia. Starting from a library of phages displaying random sequences of 12-mer peptides, we repeated cycles of biopanning against zirconia beads. After four cycles of biopanning, we isolated a phage clone Φ#17. DNA sequencing of the corresponding portion of Φ#17 unexpectedly revealed that it displayed a 58-mer peptide (amino acid sequence: WMPSDVDINDPQGGGSRPNLHQPKPAAEAASKKKSENRKVPFYSHSWY-SSMSEDKRGW). We found that Φ#17 had a 300-fold, significantly higher binding affinity for zirconia discs than phages displaying no peptide. In quartz crystal microbalance assay, a rapid increase in energy dissipation was observed from Φ#17 but not from the control phages, indicating that Φ#17 binds to the surface of zirconia via its displayed peptide. We successfully identified a peptide motif that binds zirconia.

  16. Suppression of tumor growth by novel peptides homing to tumor-derived new blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Asai, Tomohiro; Nagatsuka, Mayumi; Kuromi, Koichi; Yamakawa, Satoru; Kurohane, Kohta; Ogino, Koichi; Tanaka, Michinori; Taki, Takao; Oku, Naoto

    2002-01-16

    Novel peptides homing to angiogenic vessels were recently isolated from a phage-displayed random pentadecapeptide library. One of the isolated peptides, ASSSYPLIHWRPWAR, significantly suppressed the migration of VEGF-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Dendoric ASSSYPLIHWRPWAR-peptide suppressed the formation of new blood vessels in dorsal air sac model mice. Furthermore, ASSSYPLIHWRPWAR-peptide and the fragment peptides containing WRP, which is revealed to be an epitope sequence, significantly suppressed the tumor growth, although 15-mer shuffled peptide derived from ASSSYPLIHWRPWAR and pentapeptides with alanine substitution of each residue of WRP did not. Taken together, ASSSYPLIHWRPWAR-peptide may cause tumor dormancy through inhibition of angiogenesis, and the WRP sequence may be the minimal and essential sequence for this activity.

  17. Dual mechanism of bacterial lethality for a cationic sequence-random copolymer that mimics host-defense antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Epand, Raquel F; Mowery, Brendan P; Lee, Sarah E; Stahl, Shannon S; Lehrer, Robert I; Gellman, Samuel H; Epand, Richard M

    2008-05-23

    Flexible sequence-random polymers containing cationic and lipophilic subunits that act as functional mimics of host-defense peptides have recently been reported. We used bacteria and lipid vesicles to study one such polymer, having an average length of 21 residues, that is active against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. At low concentrations, this polymer is able to permeabilize model anionic membranes that mimic the lipid composition of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, or Bacillus subtilis but is ineffective against model zwitterionic membranes, which explains its low hemolytic activity. The polymer is capable of binding to negatively charged vesicles, inducing segregation of anionic lipids. The appearance of anionic lipid-rich domains results in formation of phase-boundary defects through which leakage can occur. We had earlier proposed such a mechanism of membrane disruption for another antimicrobial agent. Experiments with the mutant E. coli ML-35p indicate that permeabilization is biphasic: at low concentrations, the polymer permeabilizes the outer and inner membranes; at higher polymer concentrations, permeabilization of the outer membrane is progressively diminished, while the inner membrane remains unaffected. Experiments with wild-type E. coli K12 show that the polymer blocks passage of solutes into the intermembrane space at high concentrations. Cell membrane integrity in E. coli K12 and S. aureus exhibits biphasic dependence on polymer concentration. Isothermal titration calorimetry indicates that the polymer associates with the negatively charged lipopolysaccharide of Gram-negative bacteria and with the lipoteichoic acid of Gram-positive bacteria. We propose that this polymer has two mechanisms of antibacterial action, one predominating at low concentrations of polymer and the other predominating at high concentrations.

  18. Use of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and bone fractures: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Mabilleau, Guillaume; Mieczkowska, Aleksandra; Chappard, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at a higher risk of bone fractures independent of the use of antidiabetic medications. Furthermore, antidiabetic medications could directly affect bone metabolism. Recently, the use of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors has been associated with a lower rate of bone fracture. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to assess whether patients with T2DM treated with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1Ra) present a lower incidence of bone fracture compared with patients using other antidiabetic drugs. A search on Medline, Embase, and http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, as well as a manual search for randomized clinical trials of T2DM treated with either a GLP-1Ra or another antidiabetic drug for a duration of ≥24 weeks was conducted by two authors (GM, AM) independently. Although 28 eligible studies were identified, only seven trials reported the occurrence of at least a bone fracture in one arm of the trial. The total number of fractures was 19 (13 and six with GLP-1Ra and comparator, respectively). The pooled Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio for GLP-1Ra was 0.75 (95% confidence interval 0.28-2.02, P = 0.569) in trials versus other antidiabetic agents. Although preliminary, our study highlighted that the use of GLP-1Ra does not modify the risk of bone fracture in T2DM compared with the use of other antidiabetic medications. © 2013 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Towards an animal model of ovarian cancer: cataloging chicken blood proteins using combinatorial peptide ligand libraries coupled with shotgun proteomic analysis for translational research.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingying; Sun, Zeyu; de Matos, Ricardo; Zhang, Jing; Odunsi, Kunle; Lin, Biaoyang

    2014-05-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecological cancer around the world, with high morbidity in industrialized countries. Early diagnosis is key in reducing its morbidity rate. Yet, robust biomarkers, diagnostics, and animal models are still limited for ovarian cancer. This calls for broader omics and systems science oriented diagnostics strategies. In this vein, the domestic chicken has been used as an ovarian cancer animal model, owing to its high rate of developing spontaneous epithelial ovarian tumors. Chicken blood has thus been considered a surrogate reservoir from which cancer biomarkers can be identified. However, the presence of highly abundant proteins in chicken blood has compromised the applicability of proteomics tools to study chicken blood owing to a lack of immunodepletion methods. Here, we demonstrate that a combinatorial peptide ligand library (CPLL) can efficiently remove highly abundant proteins from chicken blood samples, consequently doubling the number of identified proteins. Using an integrated CPLL-1DGE-LC-MSMS workflow, we identified a catalog of 264 unique proteins. Functional analyses further suggested that most proteins were coagulation and complement factors, blood transport and binding proteins, immune- and defense-related proteins, proteases, protease inhibitors, cellular enzymes, or cell structure and adhesion proteins. Semiquantitative spectral counting analysis identified 10 potential biomarkers from the present chicken ovarian cancer model. Additionally, many human homologs of chicken blood proteins we have identified have been independently suggested as diagnostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer, further triangulating our novel observations reported here. In conclusion, the CPLL-assisted proteomic workflow using the chicken ovarian cancer model provides a feasible platform for translational research to identify ovarian cancer biomarkers and understand ovarian cancer biology. To the best of our knowledge, we report here

  20. Synthesis of libraries of thiazole, oxazole and imidazole-based cyclic peptides from azole-based amino acids. A new synthetic approach to bistratamides and didmolamides.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Anna; Maulucci, Nakia; New, Olivia M; Mohd Nor, Siti Mariam; Pattenden, Gerald

    2007-05-21

    Treatment of a 1 : 1 mixture of the thiazole-based amino acids 8a and 8b with FDPP-i-Pr(2)NEt in CH(3)CN gave a mixture of the cyclic trimers 14, 15, 16 and 17 and the cyclic tetramers 19 and 23 in the ratio 2 : 7 : 5 : 8 : 1 : 1 and in a combined yield of 70%. Separate coupling reactions between the bisimidazole amino acid 45 and the thiazole/oxazole amino acids 43a and 42a in the presence of FDPP-i-Pr(2)NEt led to the bisimidazole based cyclic trimers 55 and 57 respectively (54-57%) and to the cyclic tetramer 56 (8-11%). Similar coupling reactions involving the bisthiazole and bisoxazole amino acids 49 and 47 with the imidazole/oxazole/thiazole amino acids 41a, 42a and 43a gave rise to the library of oxazole, thiazole and imidazole-based cyclic peptides 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64 and 65. A coupling reaction between the bisthiazole amino acid 49 and the oxazole amino acid 73 led to an efficient (36% overall) synthesis of bistratamide H (67) found in the ascidian Lissoclinum bistratum. Coupling reactions involving oxazolines with thiazole amino acids were less successful. Thus, a coupling reaction between the phenylalanine-based oxazoline amino acid 71a and either the thiazole amino acid 8a or the bisthiazole amino acid 74 gave only a 2% yield of the cyclic hexapeptide didmolamide A (4) found in the ascidian Didemnum molle. Didmolamide B (68) was obtained in 9% yield from a coupling reaction between 74 and the phenylalanine threonine amino acid 72, using either FDPP or DPPA.

  1. Towards an Animal Model of Ovarian Cancer: Cataloging Chicken Blood Proteins Using Combinatorial Peptide Ligand Libraries Coupled with Shotgun Proteomic Analysis for Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingying; Sun, Zeyu; de Matos, Ricardo; Zhang, Jing; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecological cancer around the world, with high morbidity in industrialized countries. Early diagnosis is key in reducing its morbidity rate. Yet, robust biomarkers, diagnostics, and animal models are still limited for ovarian cancer. This calls for broader omics and systems science oriented diagnostics strategies. In this vein, the domestic chicken has been used as an ovarian cancer animal model, owing to its high rate of developing spontaneous epithelial ovarian tumors. Chicken blood has thus been considered a surrogate reservoir from which cancer biomarkers can be identified. However, the presence of highly abundant proteins in chicken blood has compromised the applicability of proteomics tools to study chicken blood owing to a lack of immunodepletion methods. Here, we demonstrate that a combinatorial peptide ligand library (CPLL) can efficiently remove highly abundant proteins from chicken blood samples, consequently doubling the number of identified proteins. Using an integrated CPLL-1DGE-LC-MSMS workflow, we identified a catalog of 264 unique proteins. Functional analyses further suggested that most proteins were coagulation and complement factors, blood transport and binding proteins, immune- and defense-related proteins, proteases, protease inhibitors, cellular enzymes, or cell structure and adhesion proteins. Semiquantitative spectral counting analysis identified 10 potential biomarkers from the present chicken ovarian cancer model. Additionally, many human homologs of chicken blood proteins we have identified have been independently suggested as diagnostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer, further triangulating our novel observations reported here. In conclusion, the CPLL-assisted proteomic workflow using the chicken ovarian cancer model provides a feasible platform for translational research to identify ovarian cancer biomarkers and understand ovarian cancer biology. To the best of our knowledge, we

  2. Variable domain antibodies specific for viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) selected from a randomized IgNAR phage display library.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Maki; Hikima, Jun-ichi; Jung, Tae-Sung; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Takeyama, Haruko; Aoki, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    Phage display libraries are used to screen for nucleotide sequences that encode immunoglobulin variable (V) regions that are specific for a target antigen. We previously constructed an immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (IgNAR) phage display library. Here we used this library to obtain an IgNAR V region that is specific for viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). A phage clone (clone 653) was found to be specific for VHSV by the biopanning method. The V region of clone 653 was used to construct a 6 × His tagged recombinant IgNAR-653 V protein (rIgNAR-653) using the Escherichia coli pET system. The rIgNAR-653 protein bound specifically to VHSV, confirming its activity.

  3. Mendelian Randomization Study of B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and Type 2 Diabetes: Evidence of Causal Association from Population Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Roman; Sharp, Stephen; Luben, Robert; Welsh, Paul; Barroso, Inês; Salomaa, Veikko; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Sattar, Naveed; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic and epidemiological evidence suggests an inverse association between B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels in blood and risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but the prospective association of BNP with T2D is uncertain, and it is unclear whether the association is confounded. Methods and Findings We analysed the association between levels of the N-terminal fragment of pro-BNP (NT-pro-BNP) in blood and risk of incident T2D in a prospective case-cohort study and genotyped the variant rs198389 within the BNP locus in three T2D case-control studies. We combined our results with existing data in a meta-analysis of 11 case-control studies. Using a Mendelian randomization approach, we compared the observed association between rs198389 and T2D to that expected from the NT-pro-BNP level to T2D association and the NT-pro-BNP difference per C allele of rs198389. In participants of our case-cohort study who were free of T2D and cardiovascular disease at baseline, we observed a 21% (95% CI 3%–36%) decreased risk of incident T2D per one standard deviation (SD) higher log-transformed NT-pro-BNP levels in analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, smoking, family history of T2D, history of hypertension, and levels of triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The association between rs198389 and T2D observed in case-control studies (odds ratio = 0.94 per C allele, 95% CI 0.91–0.97) was similar to that expected (0.96, 0.93–0.98) based on the pooled estimate for the log-NT-pro-BNP level to T2D association derived from a meta-analysis of our study and published data (hazard ratio = 0.82 per SD, 0.74–0.90) and the difference in NT-pro-BNP levels (0.22 SD, 0.15–0.29) per C allele of rs198389. No significant associations were observed between the rs198389 genotype and potential confounders. Conclusions Our results provide evidence for a potential causal role of the BNP

  4. Silent Encoding of Chemical Post-Translational Modifications in Phage-Displayed Libraries.

    PubMed

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Kitov, Pavel I; Ng, Simon; Kitova, Elena N; Deng, Lu; Klassen, John S; Derda, Ratmir

    2016-01-13

    In vitro selection of chemically modified peptide libraries presented on phage, while a powerful technology, is limited to one chemical post-translational modification (cPTM) per library. We use unique combinations of redundant codons to encode cPTMs with "silent barcodes" to trace multiple modifications within a mixed modified library. As a proof of concept, we produced phage-displayed peptide libraries Ser-[X]4-Gly-Gly-Gly, with Gly and Ser encoded using unique combinations of codons (TCA-[X]4-GGAGGAGGA, AGT-[X]4-GGTGGTGGT, etc., where [X]4 denotes a random NNK library). After separate chemical modification and pooling, mixed-modified libraries can be panned and deep-sequenced to identify the enriched peptide sequence and the accompanying cPTM simultaneously. We panned libraries bearing combinations of modifications (sulfonamide, biotin, mannose) against matched targets (carbonic anhydrase, streptavidin, concanavalin A) to identify desired ligands. Synthesis and validation of sequences identified by deep sequencing revealed that specific cPTMs are significantly enriched in panning against the specific targets. Panning on carbonic anhydrase yielded a potent ligand, sulfonamide-WIVP, with Kd = 6.7 ± 2.1 nM, a 20-fold improvement compared with the control ligand sulfonamide-GGGG. Silent encoding of multiple cPTMs can be readily incorporated into other in vitro display technologies such as bacteriophage T7 or mRNA display.

  5. A randomized pilot phase I study of modified carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) peptide (CAP1-6D)/montanide/GM-CSF-vaccine in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CEA is expressed in >90% of pancreatic cancers (PC) and may be an appropriate immunotherapy target. CEA is poorly immunogenic due to immune tolerance; CAP1-6D, an altered peptide ligand can help bypass tolerance. We conducted a pilot randomized phase I trial in PC patients to determine the peptide dose required to induce an optimal CD8+ T cell response. Methods Patients with a PS 0-1, HLA-A2+ and CEA-expressing, previously-treated PC were randomized to receive 10 μg (arm A), 100 μg (arm B) or 1000 μg (arm C) of CEA peptide emulsified in Montanide and GM-CSF, given every 2 weeks until disease progression. Results Sixty-six patients were screened and 19 enrolled of whom 14 received at least 3 doses of the vaccine and thus evaluated for the primary immunologic endpoint. A median of 4 cycles (range 1-81) was delivered. Median and mean peak IFN-γ T cell response by ELISPOT (spots per 104 CD8+ cells, Arm A/B/C) was 11/52/271 (A vs. C, p = 0.028) for medians and 37/148/248 (A vs. C, p = 0.032) for means. T cell responses developed or increased in 20%/60%/100% of pts in Arms A/B/C. Seven of the 19 patients remain alive at a minimum 32 months from trial initiation, including three with unresectable disease. Conclusions The T cell response in this randomized phase I trial was dose-dependent with the 1 mg CEA peptide dose eliciting the most robust T cell responses. A signal of clinical benefit was observed and no significant toxicity was noted. Further evaluation of 1 mg CEA peptide with stronger adjuvants, and/or combined with agents to overcome immune inhibitory pathways, may be warranted in PC pts. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00203892 PMID:24829746

  6. Use of superparamagnetic beads for the isolation of a peptide with specificity to cymbidium mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Diana Jia Miin; Dzulkurnain, Adriya; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Lim, Saw Hoon; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2006-09-01

    A modified method for the rapid isolation of specific ligands to whole virus particles is described. Biopanning against cymbidium mosaic virus was carried out with a commercial 12-mer random peptide display library. A solution phase panning method was devised using streptavidin-coated superparamagnetic beads. The solution based panning method was more efficient than conventional immobilized target panning when using whole viral particles of cymbidium mosaic virus as a target. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of cymbidium mosaic virus-binding peptides isolated from the library identified seven peptides with affinity for cymbidium mosaic virus and one peptide which was specific to cymbidium mosaic virus and had no significant binding to odontoglossum ringspot virus. This method should have broad application for the screening of whole viral particles towards the rapid development of diagnostic reagents without the requirement for cloning and expression of single antigens.

  7. PNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Zambaldo, Claudio; Barluenga, Sofia; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-encoded chemical libraries along with DNA-encoded libraries have provided a powerful new paradigm for library synthesis and ligand discovery. PNA-encoding stands out for its compatibility with standard solid phase synthesis and the technology has been used to prepare libraries of peptides, heterocycles and glycoconjugates. Different screening formats have now been reported including selection-based and microarray-based methods that have yielded specific ligands against diverse target classes including membrane receptors, lectins and challenging targets such as Hsp70.

  8. Definition of Proteasomal Peptide Splicing Rules for High-Efficiency Spliced Peptide Presentation by MHC Class I Molecules.

    PubMed

    Berkers, Celia R; de Jong, Annemieke; Schuurman, Karianne G; Linnemann, Carsten; Meiring, Hugo D; Janssen, Lennert; Neefjes, Jacques J; Schumacher, Ton N M; Rodenko, Boris; Ovaa, Huib

    2015-11-01

    Peptide splicing, in which two distant parts of a protein are excised and then ligated to form a novel peptide, can generate unique MHC class I-restricted responses. Because these peptides are not genetically encoded and the rules behind proteasomal splicing are unknown, it is difficult to predict these spliced Ags. In the current study, small libraries of short peptides were used to identify amino acid sequences that affect the efficiency of this transpeptidation process. We observed that splicing does not occur at random, neither in terms of the amino acid sequences nor through random splicing of peptides from different sources. In contrast, splicing followed distinct rules that we deduced and validated both in vitro and in cells. Peptide ligation was quantified using a model peptide and demonstrated to occur with up to 30% ligation efficiency in vitro, provided that optimal structural requirements for ligation were met by both ligating partners. In addition, many splicing products could be formed from a single protein. Our splicing rules will facilitate prediction and detection of new spliced Ags to expand the peptidome presented by MHC class I Ags.

  9. Losing Libraries, Saving Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    This summer, as public libraries continued to get budget hit after budget hit across the country, several readers asked for a comprehensive picture of the ravages of the recession on library service. In partnership with 2010 Movers & Shakers Laura Solomon and Mandy Knapp, Ohio librarians who bought the Losing Libraries domain name,…

  10. Losing Libraries, Saving Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    This summer, as public libraries continued to get budget hit after budget hit across the country, several readers asked for a comprehensive picture of the ravages of the recession on library service. In partnership with 2010 Movers & Shakers Laura Solomon and Mandy Knapp, Ohio librarians who bought the Losing Libraries domain name,…

  11. A novel family of antimicrobial peptides from the skin of Amolops loloensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aili; Wang, Jiyuan; Hong, Jing; Feng, Hao; Yang, Hailong; Yu, Xiaodong; Ma, Yufang; Lai, Ren

    2008-06-01

    While conducting experiments to investigate antimicrobial peptides of amphibians living in the Yunnan-Sichuan region of southwest China, a new family of antimicrobial peptides was identified from skin secretions of the rufous-spotted torrent frog, Amolops loloensis. Members of the new peptide family named amolopins are composed of 18 amino acids with a unique sequence, for example, NILSSIVNGINRALSFFG. By BLAST search, amolopins did no show similarity to any known peptides. Among the tested microorganisms, native and synthetic peptides only showed antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC2592 and Bacillus pumilus, no effects on other microorganisms. The CD spectroscopy showed that it adopted a structure of random combined with beta-sheet in water, Tris-HCl or Tris-HCl-SDS. Several cDNAs encoding amolopins were cloned from the skin cDNA library of A. loloensis. The precursors of amolopin are composed of 62 amino acid residues including predicted signal peptides, acidic propieces, and mature antimicrobial peptides. The preproregion of amolopin precursor comprises a hydrophobic signal peptide of 22 residues followed by an 18 residue acidic propiece which terminates by a typical prohormone processing signal Lys-Arg. The preproregions of precursors are very similar to other amphibian antimicrobial peptide precursors but the mature amolopins are different from other antimicrobial peptide families. The remarkable similarity of preproregions of precursors that give rise to very different antimicrobial peptides in distantly related frog species suggests that the corresponding genes form a multigene family originating from a common ancestor.

  12. A novel method to identify and characterise peptide mimotopes of heat shock protein 70-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Arnaiz, Blanca; Madrigal-Estebas, Laura; Todryk, Stephen; James, Tharappel C; Doherty, Derek G; Bond, Ursula

    2006-04-08

    The heat shock protein, Hsp70, has been shown to play an important role in tumour immunity. Vaccination with Hsp70-peptide complexes (Hsp70-PCs), isolated from autologous tumour cells, can induce protective immune responses. We have developed a novel method to identify synthetic mimic peptides of Hsp70-PCs and to test their ability to activate T-cells. Peptides (referred to as "recognisers") that bind to Hsp70-PCs from the human breast carcinoma cell line, MDA-MB-231, were identified by bio-panning a random peptide M13 phage display library. Synthetic recogniser peptides were subsequently used as bait in a reverse bio-panning experiment to identify potential Hsp70-PC mimic peptides. The ability of the recogniser and mimic peptides to prime human lymphocyte responses against tumour cell antigens was tested by stimulating lymphocytes with autologous peptide-loaded monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Priming and subsequent stimulation with either the recogniser or mimic peptide resulted in interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) secretion by the lymphocytes. Furthermore, DCs loaded with Hsp70, Hsp70-PC or the recogniser or the mimic peptide primed the lymphocytes to respond to soluble extracts from breast cells. These results highlight the potential application of synthetic peptide-mimics of Hsp70-PCs, as modulators of the immune response against tumours.

  13. Complementary DNA libraries: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ying, Shao-Yao

    2004-07-01

    The generation of complete and full-length cDNA libraries for potential functional assays of specific gene sequences is essential for most molecules in biotechnology and biomedical research. The field of cDNA library generation has changed rapidly in the past 10 yr. This review presents an overview of the method available for the basic information of generating cDNA libraries, including the definition of the cDNA library, different kinds of cDNA libraries, difference between methods for cDNA library generation using conventional approaches and a novel strategy, and the quality of cDNA libraries. It is anticipated that the high-quality cDNA libraries so generated would facilitate studies involving genechips and the microarray, differential display, subtractive hybridization, gene cloning, and peptide library generation.

  14. A randomized phase II clinical trial of personalized peptide vaccination with metronomic low-dose cyclophosphamide in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Masanori; Moriya, Fukuko; Koga, Noriko; Matsueda, Satoko; Sasada, Tetsuro; Yamada, Akira; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Itoh, Kyogo

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of metronomic cyclophosphamide (CPA) in combination with personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) on regulatory T cells (Treg) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and whether it could improve the antitumor effect of PPV. Seventy patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive PPV plus oral low-dose CPA (50 mg/day), or PPV alone. PPV treatment used a maximum of four peptides chosen from 31 pooled peptides according to human leukocyte antigen types and antigen-specific humoral immune responses before PPV, for 8 subcutaneous weekly injections. Peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and immunoglobulin G responses were measured before and after PPV. The incidence of grade 3 or 4 hematologic adverse events was higher in the PPV plus CPA arm than in the PPV alone arm. Decrease in Treg and increase in MDSC were more pronounced in PPV plus CPA treatment than in PPV alone (p = 0.036 and p = 0.048, respectively). There was no correlation between the changes in Treg or MDSC and CTL response. There was no difference in positive immune responses between the two arms, although overall survival in patients with positive immune responses was longer than in those with negative immune responses (p = 0.001). Significant differences in neither progression-free survival nor overall survival were observed between the two arms. Low-dose CPA showed no change in the antitumor effect of PPV, possibly due to the simultaneous decrease in Treg and increase in MDSC, in patients under PPV.

  15. Attaching the phage display-selected GLA peptide to liposomes: factors influencing target binding.

    PubMed

    van Rooy, Inge; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2012-02-14

    In our previous study, phage display selections were performed by in situ perfusion of a random peptide library through a mouse brain. This yielded two peptides (GLA and GYR) that showed significant binding to human brain endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) when displayed on phage particles, but not to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In the present study, these peptides were produced synthetically and coupled to liposomes to investigate the capacity of the peptides to act as ligands for targeting to hCMEC/D3 cells. Flow cytometry studies showed that these peptides when coupled to liposomes showed weak binding to the target brain endothelial cells. We hypothesized that the weak endothelial cell binding of the selected peptides when coupled to liposomes as compared to the binding of the peptides displayed on phage particles may be ascribed to: change of vehicle shape, change of peptide density, or change of peptide conformation. Peptide density on the liposomes influenced binding of the liposomes to the cells, however, this effect was minor. To study the influence of the peptide conformation, the GLA peptide was recombinantly produced fused to the N1-N2 domains of the phage p3 minor coat protein (p3-GLA) to mimic its conformation when displayed on phage particles. Binding of liposomes modified with either the GLA peptide or the p3-GLA protein to hCMEC/D3 cells was studied, and the p3-GLA-liposomes showed a higher binding to the cells compared to the GLA-liposomes. The experiments demonstrate that bringing the GLA peptide into the original phage protein environment restores and improves the peptide binding capacity and suggest that the GLA peptide, with some modifications, may be used as a brain-targeting ligand in the future.

  16. Identification of Mimotope Peptides Which Bind to the Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol-Specific Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qiaoping; Pestka, James J.; Hespenheide, Brandon M.; Kuhn, Leslie A.; Linz, John E.; Hart, L. Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody 6F5 (mAb 6F5), which recognizes the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) (vomitoxin), was used to select for peptides that mimic the mycotoxin by employing a library of filamentous phages that have random 7-mer peptides on their surfaces. Two phage clones selected from the random peptide phage-displayed library coded for the amino acid sequences SWGPFPF and SWGPLPF. These clones were designated DONPEP.2 and DONPEP.12, respectively. The results of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) suggested that the two phage displayed peptides bound to mAb 6F5 specifically at the DON binding site. The amino acid sequence of DONPEP.2 plus a structurally flexible linker at the C terminus (SWGPFPFGGGSC) was synthesized and tested to determine its ability to bind to mAb 6F5. This synthetic peptide (designated peptide C430) and DON competed with each other for mAb 6F5 binding. When translationally fused with bacterial alkaline phosphatase, DONPEP.2 bound specifically to mAb 6F5, while the fusion protein retained alkaline phosphatase activity. The potential of using DONPEP.2 as an immunochemical reagent in a DON immunoassay was evaluated with a DON-spiked wheat extract. When peptide C430 was conjugated to bovine serum albumin, it elicited antibody specific to peptide C430 but not to DON in both mice and rabbits. In an in vitro translation system containing rabbit reticulocyte lysate, synthetic peptide C430 did not inhibit protein synthesis but did show antagonism toward DON-induced protein synthesis inhibition. These data suggest that the peptides selected in this study bind to mAb 6F5 and that peptide C430 binds to ribosomes at the same sites as DON. PMID:10427007

  17. Probability-based pattern recognition and statistical framework for randomization: modeling tandem mass spectrum/peptide sequence false match frequencies.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jian; Naiman, Daniel Q; Cooper, Bret

    2007-09-01

    In proteomics, reverse database searching is used to control the false match frequency for tandem mass spectrum/peptide sequence matches, but reversal creates sequences devoid of patterns that usually challenge database-search software. We designed an unsupervised pattern recognition algorithm for detecting patterns with various lengths from large sequence datasets. The patterns found in a protein sequence database were used to create decoy databases using a Monte Carlo sampling algorithm. Searching these decoy databases led to the prediction of false positive rates for spectrum/peptide sequence matches. We show examples where this method, independent of instrumentation, database-search software and samples, provides better estimation of false positive identification rates than a prevailing reverse database searching method. The pattern detection algorithm can also be used to analyze sequences for other purposes in biology or cryptology. On request from the authors. http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/.

  18. Facile Construction of Random Gene Mutagenesis Library for Directed Evolution Without the Use of Restriction Enzyme in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Eung; Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; You, Chun; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-09-01

    A foolproof protocol was developed for the construction of mutant DNA library for directed protein evolution. First, a library of linear mutant gene was generated by error-prone PCR or molecular shuffling, and a linear vector backbone was prepared by high-fidelity PCR. Second, the amplified insert and vector fragments were assembled by overlap-extension PCR with a pair of 5'-phosphorylated primers. Third, full-length linear plasmids with phosphorylated 5'-ends were self-ligated with T4 ligase, yielding circular plasmids encoding mutant variants suitable for high-efficiency transformation. Self-made competent Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) showed a transformation efficiency of 2.4 × 10(5) cfu/µg of the self-ligated circular plasmid. Using this method, three mutants of mCherry fluorescent protein were found to alter their colors and fluorescent intensities under visible and UV lights, respectively. Also, one mutant of 6-phosphorogluconate dehydrogenase from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica was found to show the 3.5-fold improved catalytic efficiency (kcat /Km ) on NAD(+) as compared to the wild-type. This protocol is DNA-sequence independent, and does not require restriction enzymes, special E. coli host, or labor-intensive optimization. In addition, this protocol can be used for subcloning the relatively long DNA sequences into any position of plasmids.

  19. Cluster randomized trial of an active, multifaceted information dissemination intervention based on The WHO Reproductive health library to change obstetric practices: methods and design issues [ISRCTN14055385

    PubMed Central

    Gülmezoglu, A Metin; Villar, José; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Piaggio, Gilda; Lumbiganon, Pisake; Langer, Ana

    2004-01-01

    Background Effective strategies for implementing best practices in low and middle income countries are needed. RHL is an annually updated electronic publication containing Cochrane systematic reviews, commentaries and practical recommendations on how to implement evidence-based practices. We are conducting a trial to evaluate the improvement in obstetric practices using an active dissemination strategy to promote uptake of recommendations in The WHO Reproductive Health Library (RHL). Methods A cluster randomized trial to improve obstetric practices in 40 hospitals in Mexico and Thailand is conducted. The trial uses a stratified random allocation based on country, size and type of hospitals. The core intervention consists of three interactive workshops delivered over a period of six months. The main outcome measures are changes in clinical practices that are recommended in RHL measured approximately a year after the first workshop. Results The design and implementation of a complex intervention using a cluster randomized trial design are presented. Conclusion Designing the intervention, choosing outcome variables and implementing the protocol in two diverse settings has been a time-consuming and challenging process. We hope that sharing this experience will help others planning similar projects and improve our ability to implement change. PMID:14723792

  20. A randomized phase II trial of personalized peptide vaccine plus low dose estramustine phosphate (EMP) versus standard dose EMP in patients with castration resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Masanori; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Hirao, Yasuhiko; Moriya, Fukuko; Suekane, Shigetaka; Matsuoka, Kei; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Shichijo, Shigeki; Yamada, Akira; Itoh, Kyogo

    2010-07-01

    Personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) combined with chemotherapy could be a novel approach for many cancer patients. In this randomized study, we evaluated the anti-tumor effect and safety of PPV plus low-dose estramustine phosphate (EMP) as compared to standard-dose EMP for HLA-A2- or -A24-positive patients with castration resistant prostate cancer. Patients were randomized into groups receiving either PPV plus low-dose EMP (280 mg/day) or standard-dose EMP (560 mg/day). After disease progression, patients were switched to the opposite regime. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). We randomly assigned 28 patients to receive PPV plus low-dose EMP and 29 patients to receive standard-dose EMP. Nineteen events in the PPV group and 20 events in the EMP group occurred during the first treatment. Median PFS for the first treatment was 8.5 months in the PPV group and 2.8 months in the EMP group with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.28 (95% CI, 0.14-0.61; log-rank P = 0.0012), while there was no difference for median PFS for the second treatment. The HR for overall survival was 0.3 (95% CI, 0.1-0.91) in favor of the PPV plus low-dose EMP group (log-rank, P = 0.0328). The PPV plus low-dose EMP was well tolerated without major adverse effects and with increased levels of IgG and cytotoxic-T cell responses to the vaccinated peptides. PPV plus low-dose EMP was associated with an improvement in PSA-based PFS as compared to the standard-dose EMP alone.

  1. A new approach to quantification of mAb aggregates using peptide affinity probes

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Crystal S. F.; Anderson, Kyle W.; Patel, Pooja M.; Cade, Keale L.; Phinney, Karen W.; Turko, Illarion V.

    2017-01-01

    Using mAbs as therapeutic molecules is complicated by the propensity of mAbs to aggregate at elevated concentrations, which can lead to a variety of adverse events in treatment. Here, we describe a proof-of-concept for new methodology to detect and quantify mAb aggregation. Assay development included using an aggregated mAb as bait for screening of phage display peptide library and identifying those peptides with random sequence which can recognize mAb aggregates. Once identified, the selected peptides can be used for developing quantitative methods to assess mAb aggregation. Results indicate that a peptide binding method coupled with mass spectrometric detection of bound peptide can quantify mAb aggregation and potentially be useful for monitoring aggregation propensity of therapeutic protein candidates. PMID:28186164

  2. A new approach to quantification of mAb aggregates using peptide affinity probes.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Crystal S F; Anderson, Kyle W; Patel, Pooja M; Cade, Keale L; Phinney, Karen W; Turko, Illarion V

    2017-02-10

    Using mAbs as therapeutic molecules is complicated by the propensity of mAbs to aggregate at elevated concentrations, which can lead to a variety of adverse events in treatment. Here, we describe a proof-of-concept for new methodology to detect and quantify mAb aggregation. Assay development included using an aggregated mAb as bait for screening of phage display peptide library and identifying those peptides with random sequence which can recognize mAb aggregates. Once identified, the selected peptides can be used for developing quantitative methods to assess mAb aggregation. Results indicate that a peptide binding method coupled with mass spectrometric detection of bound peptide can quantify mAb aggregation and potentially be useful for monitoring aggregation propensity of therapeutic protein candidates.

  3. Novel peptides functionally targeting in vivo human lung cancer discovered by in vivo peptide displayed phage screening.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Jin; Lee, Jae Hee; Chung, Hye Kyung; Choi, Jinhyang; Park, Jaesook; Park, Seok Soon; Ju, Eun Jin; Park, Jin; Shin, Seol Hwa; Park, Hye Ji; Ko, Eun Jung; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, InKi; Hwang, Jung Jin; Song, Si Yeol; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2015-02-01

    Discovery of the cancer-specific peptidic ligands have been emphasized for active targeting drug delivery system and non-invasive imaging. For the discovery of useful and applicable peptidic ligands, in vivo peptide-displayed phage screening has been performed in this study using a xenograft mouse model as a mimic microenvironment to tumor. To seek human lung cancer-specific peptides, M13 phage library displaying 2.9 × 10(9) random peptides was intravenously injected into mouse model bearing A549-derived xenograft tumor through the tail vein. Then the phages emerged from a course of four rounds of biopanning in the xenograft tumor tissue. Novel peptides were categorized into four groups according to a sequence-homology phylogenicity, and in vivo tumor-targeting capacity of these peptides was validated by whole body imaging with Cy5.5-labeled phages in various cancer types. The result revealed that novel peptides accumulated only in adenocarcinoma lung cancer cell-derived xenograft tissue. For further confirmation of the specific targeting ability, in vitro cell-binding assay and immunohistochemistry in vivo tumor tissue were performed with a selected peptide. The peptide was found to bind intensely to lung cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, which was efficiently compromised with unlabeled phages in an in vitro competition assay. In conclusion, the peptides specifically targeting human lung cancer were discovered in this study, which is warranted to provide substantive feasibilities for drug delivery and imaging in terms of a novel targeted therapeutics and diagnostics.

  4. Effect of a mouthrinse containing rice peptide CL(14-25) on early dental plaque regrowth: a randomized crossover pilot study.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Saori; Kato, Tetsuo; Imamura, Kentaro; Kita, Daichi; Ota, Koki; Suzuki, Eiichi; Sugito, Hiroki; Saitoh, Eiichi; Taniguchi, Masayuki; Saito, Atsushi

    2015-10-03

    We aimed to evaluate clinically the effect of mouthrinse containing a rice peptide on early dental plaque regrowth. The study was designed as a double-masked, two-group crossover randomized pilot trial, involving 10 periodontally healthy volunteers. After receiving a professional tooth cleaning at baseline, over the next 3 days each participant refrained from all oral hygiene measures and had two daily rinses with 20 ml of the test mouthrinse containing 0.4 % rice peptide CL(14-25) or placebo rinse. At the end of each experimental period, plaque score was assessed using the modified Volpe's method, and the participants filled out a questionnaire. Each participant underwent a 7-day washout period followed by a second allocation. The plaque score was the primary outcome of the study and participant perception was the secondary outcome. No adverse effects were observed in the participants during the study. Clinically, the mean plaque score of the examined teeth was significantly lower in the test group (2.44 ± 0.74, CI: 1.91-2.96) than the placebo group (2.65 ± 0.63, CI: 2.20-3.10) (P < 0.05). When analyzed according to the type of teeth, a significantly lower score of the premolars/molars was observed in the test group (2.39 ± 0.68, CI: 2.08-2.71) than that in the placebo group (2.66 ± 0.58, CI: 2.39-2.93) (P < 0.05). The mouthrinse containing 0.4 % rice peptide CL(14-25) was effective in reducing the early regrowth of dental plaque. However, clinical relevance of this efficacy needs to be validated in a future large-scale study. UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR) R000014000. Date of formal registration: November 1, 2013.

  5. Structure-based peptide mimicry of tumor-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Ohtaki, Akashi; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas; Murali, Ramachandran

    2013-02-01

    Two major obstacles in developing cancer vaccines are identifying unique tumor-associated antigens (TAA) and overcoming the lack of structural information about TAAs. Unlike progress with T cell-based vaccines, B cell vaccines are less well developed due to discontinuous or spatially disposed B cell epitopes. Synthetic peptides that emulate B cell epitopes are nevertheless proposed to induce immune responses to TAA. Currently, such antigen-mimicking peptides are identified using informatics approaches, by screening of random peptide libraries against an isolating antibody without any regard to structural principles and by rationale design methodologies. In our own studies we have developed various peptide mimics of TAAs based on combining the structural analysis of antibody-antigen complexes with the peptide library screening process. Understanding the structural context of antigen mimicry is key, as our studies show that mimicry depends on the structural and conformational features of the combining region of antibody-antigen surface amino acids. The ability of a mimic to contact the same set of amino acids found on a template antibody dictates whether or not it is a functional antigenic mimic capable of inducing TAA cross-reactive antibodies. Presented here is an overview of our current rationale and status of structure-based tumor antigenic mimics relevant for breast cancer TAAs.

  6. Synthetic Peptides as Potential Antigens for Cutaneous Leishmaniosis Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Link, Juliana Seger; Alban, Silvana Maria; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo; Pereira, Gilberto Vinicius Melo

    2017-01-01

    This work's goal was to research new candidate antigens for cutaneous leishmaniosis (CL). In order to reach the goal, we used random peptide phage display libraries screened using antibodies from Leishmania braziliensis patients. After selection, three peptides (P1, P2, and P3) were synthesized using Fmoc chemistry. The peptides individually or a mixture of them (MIX) was subsequently emulsified in complete and incomplete Freund's adjuvant and injected subcutaneously in golden hamsters. Sera from the hamsters administered with P1 presented antibodies that recognized proteins between 76 and 150 kDa from L. braziliensis. Sera from hamsters which had peptides P2 and P3, as well as the MIX, administered presented antibodies that recognized proteins between 52 and 76 kDa of L. braziliensis. The research on the similarity of the peptides' sequences in protein databases showed that they match a 63 kDa glycoprotein. The three peptides and the MIX were recognized by the sera from CL patients by immunoassay approach (ELISA). The peptides' MIX showed the best performance (79% sensitivity) followed by the P1 (72% sensitivity), and the AS presented 91% sensitivity. These results show a new route for discovering molecules for diagnosis or for immunoprotection against leishmaniosis. PMID:28367456

  7. Identifying Diagnostic Peptides for Lyme Disease through Epitope Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kouzmitcheva, Galina A.; Petrenko, Valery A.; Smith, George P.

    2001-01-01

    Serum antibodies from patients with Lyme disease (LD) were used to affinity select peptide epitopes from 12 large random peptide libraries in phage display format. The selected peptides were surveyed for reactivity with a panel of positive sera (from LD patients) and negative sera (from subjects without LD), thus identifying 17 peptides with a diagnostically useful binding pattern: reactivity with at least three positive sera and no reactivity with any of the negative sera. The peptides define eight sequence motifs, none of which can be matched convincingly with segments of proteins from Borrelia burgdorferi, the LD pathogen; evidently, then, they are “mimotopes,” mimicking natural pathogen epitopes without matching contiguous amino acids of pathogen proteins. Peptides like these could be the basis of a new diagnostic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for LD, with sufficient specificity and sensitivity to replace expensive immunoblotting tests that are currently required for definitive serological diagnosis. Moreover, the method used to discover these peptides did not require any knowledge of the pathogen and involved generic procedures that are applicable to almost any infectious disease, including emerging diseases for which no pathogen has yet been identified. PMID:11139210

  8. Creating Library Spaces: Libraries 2040.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruijnzeels, Rob

    This paper suggests that by 2004, the traditional public libraries will have ceased to exist and new, attractive future libraries will have taken their place. The Libraries 2040 project of the Netherlands is initiating seven different libraries of the future. The Brabant library is the "ultimate library of the future" for the Dutch…

  9. Phage display as a technology delivering on the promise of peptide drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hamzeh-Mivehroud, Maryam; Alizadeh, Ali Akbar; Morris, Michael B; Church, W Bret; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2013-12-01

    Phage display represents an important approach in the development pipeline for producing peptides and peptidomimetics therapeutics. Using randomly generated DNA sequences and molecular biology techniques, large diverse peptide libraries can be displayed on the phage surface. The phage library can be incubated with a target of interest and the phage which bind can be isolated and sequenced to reveal the displayed peptides' primary structure. In this review, we focus on the 'mechanics' of the phage display process, whilst highlighting many diverse and subtle ways it has been used to further the drug-development process, including the potential for the phage particle itself to be used as a drug carrier targeted to a particular pathogen or cell type in the body.

  10. A Combinatorial Peptide Ligand Libraries Treatment Followed by a Dual-Enzyme, Dual-Activation Approach on a nano-flow LC/Orbitrap/ETD for Comprehensive Analysis of Swine Plasma Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Chengjian; Li, Jun; Young, Rebeccah; Page, Brian J.; Engler, Frank; Halfon, Marc S.; Canty, John M.; Qu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    The plasma proteome holds enormous clinical potentials, yet an in-depth analysis of the plasma proteome remains a daunting challenge due to its high complexity and the extremely-wide dynamic range in protein concentrations. Furthermore, existing antibody-based approaches for depleting high-abundance proteins are not adaptable to the analysis of animal plasma proteome, which are often essential for experimental pathology/pharmacology. Here we describe a highly-comprehensive method for the investigation of animal plasma proteomes, which employs an optimized combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLL) treatment to reduce the protein concentration dynamic range and a dual-enzyme, dual-activation strategy to achieve high proteomic coverage. The CPLL-treatment enriched the lower-abundance proteins by >100-fold when loading the samples in moderately-denaturing condition with multiple loading-washing cycles. The native and the CPLL-treated plasma were digested in-parallel respectively by two enzymes (trypsin and GluC) carrying orthogonal specificities. By performing this differential proteolysis, the proteome coverage is improved where peptides produced by only one enzyme are poorly detectable. Digests were fractionated with high-resolution SCX chromatography and then resolved on a long, heated nano-LC column. MS analysis was performed on an LTQ/Orbitrap respectively with two complementary activation methods (CID and ETD). We applied this optimized strategy to investigate the plasma proteome from swine, a prominent animal model for cardiovascular diseases(CVD). This large-scale analysis results in an identification of a total 3421 unique proteins, spanning a concentration range of 9–10 orders of magnitude. The proteins were identified under a set of commonly-accepted criteria including precursor mass error<15 ppm, Xcorr cutoffs, ≥two unique peptides at the peptide probability≥95% and protein probability≥99%, and the peptide FDR of the dataset was 1.8% as

  11. Artificial decoy spectral libraries for false discovery rate estimation in spectral library searching in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lam, Henry; Deutsch, Eric W; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2010-01-01

    The challenge of estimating false discovery rates (FDR) in peptide identification from MS/MS spectra has received increased attention in proteomics. The simple approach of target-decoy searching has become popular with traditional sequence (database) searching methods, but has yet to be practiced in spectral (library) searching, an emerging alternative to sequence searching. We extended this target-decoy searching approach to spectral searching by developing and validating a robust method to generate realistic, but unnatural, decoy spectra. Our method involves randomly shuffling the peptide identification of each reference spectrum in the library, and repositioning each fragment ion peak along the m/z axis to match the fragment ions expected from the shuffled sequence. We show that this method produces decoy spectra that are sufficiently realistic, such that incorrect identifications are equally likely to match real and decoy spectra, a key assumption necessary for decoy counting. This approach has been implemented in the open-source library building software, SpectraST.

  12. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Viral morphogenesis is the dominant source of sequence censorship in M13 combinatorial peptide phage display.

    SciTech Connect

    Rodi, D. J.; Soares, A. S.; Makowski, L.; Biosciences Division; BNL

    2002-01-01

    Novel statistical methods have been developed and used to quantitate and annotate the sequence diversity within combinatorial peptide libraries on the basis of small numbers (1-200) of sequences selected at random from commercially available M13 p3-based phage display libraries. These libraries behave statistically as though they correspond to populations containing roughly 4.0{+-}1.6% of the random dodecapeptides and 7.9{+-}2.6% of the random constrained heptapeptides that are theoretically possible within the phage populations. Analysis of amino acid residue occurrence patterns shows no demonstrable influence on sequence censorship by Escherichia coli tRNA isoacceptor profiles or either overall codon or Class II codon usage patterns, suggesting no metabolic constraints on recombinant p3 synthesis. There is an overall depression in the occurrence of cysteine, arginine and glycine residues and an overabundance of proline, threonine and histidine residues. The majority of position-dependent amino acid sequence bias is clustered at three positions within the inserted peptides of the dodecapeptide library, +1, +3 and +12 downstream from the signal peptidase cleavage site. Conformational tendency measures of the peptides indicate a significant preference for inserts favoring a {beta}-turn conformation. The observed protein sequence limitations can primarily be attributed to genetic codon degeneracy and signal peptidase cleavage preferences. These data suggest that for applications in which maximal sequence diversity is essential, such as epitope mapping or novel receptor identification, combinatorial peptide libraries should be constructed using codon-corrected trinucleotide cassettes within vector-host systems designed to minimize morphogenesis-related censorship.

  14. Inhibitory Peptides of the Sulfotransferase Domain of the Heparan Sulfate Enzyme, N-Deacetylase-N-sulfotransferase-1

    PubMed Central

    Gesteira, Tarsis F.; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J.; Taunay-Rodrigues, Alessandro; Oliveira, Vitor; Thacker, Bryan E.; Juliano, Maria A.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Tersariol, Ivarne L. S.; Nader, Helena B.; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Pinhal, Maria A. S.

    2011-01-01

    N-Deacetylase-N-sulfotransferase 1 (Ndst1) catalyzes the initial modification of heparan sulfate and heparin during their biosynthesis by removal of acetyl groups from subsets of N-acetylglucosamine units and subsequent sulfation of the resulting free amino groups. In this study, we used a phage display library to select peptides that interact with Ndst1, with the aim of finding inhibitors of the enzyme. The phage library consisted of cyclic random 10-mer peptides expressed in the phage capsid protein pIII. Selection was based on the ability of engineered phage to bind to recombinant murine Ndst1 (mNdst1) and displacement with heparin. Peptides that were enriched through multiple cycles of binding and disassociation displayed two specific sequences, CRGWRGEKIGNC and CNMQALSMPVTC. Both peptides inhibited mNdst1 activity in vitro, however, by distinct mechanisms. The peptide CRGWRGEKIGNC presents a chemokine-like repeat motif (BXX, where B represents a basic amino acid and X is a noncharged amino acid) and binds to heparan sulfate, thus blocking the binding of substrate to the enzyme. The peptide NMQALSMPVT inhibits mNdst1 activity by direct interaction with the enzyme near the active site. The discovery of inhibitory peptides in this way suggests a method for developing peptide inhibitors of heparan sulfate biosynthesis. PMID:20129923

  15. Screening and evaluating the mimic peptides as a useful serum biomarker of ankylosing spondylitis using a phage display technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Li, Xianping; Chen, Jingwei; Zhou, Yong; Cao, Hong; Wu, Xiang; Jiang, Hongmin

    2011-08-01

    To screen specific serum biomarker for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) using a phage random peptide library. A phage random peptide library of random peptide 12-mers was immunoscreened with purified immunoglobulin (Ig) G from sera of AS patients. Positive clones obtained after three rounds of biopanning were detected with ELISA and sequenced. Reaction of the screened positive clones with sera from AS patients, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, osteoarthritis (OA) patients and healthy controls was detected using phage ELISA. Correlation among erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and the absorbance value of the positive clone in phage ELISA was examined in AS patients. Seventeen out of twenty randomly selected phage clones exhibited specific reaction with purified sera IgG from AS patients, among them seven coming from the same clone whose inserted peptide sequence was LALPPLAPNHHH (named "AS1"). Phage ELISA results showed that the positive reaction rate of the AS1 clone was 92.0% with AS patients, significantly different (P < 0.01) from those with SLE patients (56.7%), RA patients (50.0%), OA patients (13.3%), and healthy controls (14.0%). Absorbance value of the AS1 clone in phage ELISA was significantly higher than those in the other groups (P < 0.05). In addition, the absorbance value of the AS1 clone showed no statistically significant correlation with ESR and CRP in AS patients, suggesting that AS1 detects AS patients through a unique mechanism other than inflammation. The short peptide AS1 obtained through screening of a phage random peptide library with purified serum IgG from AS patients can specifically react with the sera of AS patients, and thereby may be a candidate of AS-specific serum biomarkers.

  16. Casting epPCR (cepPCR): A simple random mutagenesis method to generate high quality mutant libraries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianhua; Ruff, Anna J; Arlt, Marcus; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2017-09-01

    During the last decade, directed evolution has become a standard protein engineering strategy to reengineer proteins for industrial applications under high stress conditions (e.g., high temperature, extreme pH, ionic liquids, or organic solvents). The most commonly employed method for diversity generation to improve biocatalysts for these properties is random mutagenesis by error-prone polymerase chain reaction (epPCR). However, recent reports show that epPCR often fails to produce >70% of beneficial positions/amino acid exchanges which improve enzyme properties such as organic solvent or ionic liquid resistance. In this report, bsla (543 bp, small lipase gene from Bacillus subtilis) was divided into three fragments (147, 192, 204 bp). Each fragment was subjected to an epPCR with a high mutation load (22, 31, and 33 mutations per kb) in order to increase the number of identified beneficial positions while maintaining a fraction of active population which can efficiently be screened in agar plate or microtiter plate format. The use of this "casting epPCR" process termed as (cepPCR), doubles the number of identified beneficial positions (from 14% to 29%), when compared to standard epPCR for the BSLA enzyme model. A further increase to 39% of beneficial positions is obtainable through combination of cepPCR with the transversion biased sequence saturation mutagenesis (SeSaM) method. Furthermore, sequencing of up to 600 mutations per fragment provided valuable insights into the correlation of total throughput and number of identified beneficial positions as well as how an efficient balance of screening efforts to obtainable results can be achieved in directed evolution campaigns. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1921-1927. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Peptides actively transported across the tympanic membrane: Functional and structural properties

    PubMed Central

    Kurabi, Arwa; Beasley, Kerry A.; Chang, Lisa; McCann, James; Pak, Kwang; Ryan, Allen F.

    2017-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is the most common infectious disease of children under six, causing more antibiotic prescriptions and surgical procedures than any other pediatric condition. By screening a bacteriophage (phage) library genetically engineered to express random peptides on their surfaces, we discovered unique peptides that actively transport phage particles across the intact tympanic membrane (TM) and into the middle ear (ME). Herein our goals were to characterize the physiochemical peptide features that may underlie trans-TM phage transport; assess morphological and functional effects of phage peptides on the ME and inner ear (IE); and determine whether peptide-bearing phage transmigrate from the ME into the IE. Incubation of five peptide-bearing phage on the TM for over 4hrs resulted in demonstrably superior transport of one peptide, in level and in exponential increase over time. This suggests a preferred peptide motif for TM active transport. Functional and structural comparisons revealed unique features of this peptide: These include a central lysine residue, isoelectric point of 0.0 at physiological pH and a hydrophobic C-terminus. When the optimal peptide was applied to the TM independent of phage, similar transport was observed, indicating that integration into phage is not required. When 109 particles of the four different trans-TM phage were applied directly into the ME, no morphological effects were detected in the ME or IE when compared to saline or wild-type (WT) phage controls. Comparable, reversible hearing loss was observed for saline controls, WT phage and trans-TM peptide phage, suggesting a mild conductive hearing loss due to ME fluid. Perilymph titers after ME incubation established that few copies of trans-TM peptide phage crossed into the IE. The results suggest that, within the parameters tested, trans-TM peptides are safe and could be used as potential agents for noninvasive delivery of drugs, particles and gene therapy vectors to the ME

  18. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  19. Library Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This special supplement to "Library Journal" and "School Library Journal" includes articles on technological dependency, promise of computers for reluctant readers, copyright and database downloading, access to neighborhood of Mister Rogers, library acquisitions, circulating personal computers, "microcomputeritis,"…

  20. A peptide derived from phage display library exhibits anti-tumor activity by targeting GRP78 in gastric cancer multidrug resistance cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jianqin; Zhao, Guohong; Lin, Tao; Tang, Shanhong; Xu, Guanghui; Hu, Sijun; Bi, Qian; Guo, Changcun; Sun, Li; Han, Shuang; Xu, Qian; Nie, Yongzhan; Wang, Biaoluo; Liang, Shuhui; Ding, Jie; Wu, Kaichun

    2013-10-10

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a significant challenge to the clinical treatment of gastric cancer (GC). In the present study, using a phage display approach combined with MTT assays, we screened a specific peptide GMBP1 (Gastric cancer MDR cell-specific binding peptide), ETAPLSTMLSPY, which could bind to the surface of GC MDR cells specifically and reverse their MDR phenotypes. Immunocytochemical staining showed that the potential receptor of GMBP1 was located at the membrane and cytoplasm of MDR cells. In vitro and in vivo drug sensitivity assays, FACS analysis and Western blotting confirmed that GMBP1 was able to re-sensitize MDR cells to chemical drugs. Western blotting and proteomic approaches were used to screen the receptor of GMBP1, and GRP78, a MDR-related protein, was identified as a receptor of GMBP1. This result was further supported by immunofluoresence microscopy and Western blot. Additionally, Western blotting demonstrated that pre-incubation of GMBP1 in MDR cells greatly diminished MDR1, Bcl-2 and GRP78 expression but increased the expression of Bax, whereas downregulation of GRP78, function as a receptor and directly target for GMBP1, only inhibited MDR1 expression. Our findings suggest that GMBP1 could re-sensitize GC MDR cells to a variety of chemotherapeutic agents and this role might be mediated partly through down-regulating GRP78 expression and then inhibiting MDR1 expression. These findings indicate that peptide GMBP1 likely recognizes a novel GRP78 receptor and mediates cellular activities associated with the MDR phenotype, which provides new insight into research on the management of MDR in gastric cancer cells.

  1. Screening for voltage-gated sodium channel interacting peptides.

    PubMed

    Meng, Er; Cai, Tian-Fu; Zhang, Hui; Tang, Si; Li, Meng-Jie; Li, Wen-Ying; Huang, Peng-Fei; Liu, Kai; Wu, Lei; Zhu, Ling-Yun; Liu, Long; Peng, Kuan; Dai, Xian-Dong; Jiang, Hui; Zeng, Xiong-Zhi; Liang, Song-Ping; Zhang, Dong-Yi

    2014-04-02

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) interacting peptide is of special interest for both basic research and pharmaceutical purposes. In this study, we established a yeast-two-hybrid based strategy to detect the interaction(s) between neurotoxic peptide and the extracellular region of VGSC. Using a previously reported neurotoxin JZTX-III as a model molecule, we demonstrated that the interactions between JZTX-III and the extracellular regions of its target hNav1.5 are detectable and the detected interactions are directly related to its activity. We further applied this strategy to the screening of VGSC interacting peptides. Using the extracellular region of hNav1.5 as the bait, we identified a novel sodium channel inhibitor SSCM-1 from a random peptide library. This peptide selectively inhibits hNav1.5 currents in the whole-cell patch clamp assays. This strategy might be used for the large scale screening for target-specific interacting peptides of VGSCs or other ion channels.

  2. Deep Sequencing of Random Mutant Libraries Reveals the Active Site of the Narrow Specificity CphA Metallo-β-Lactamase is Fragile to Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhizeng; Mehta, Shrenik C.; Adamski, Carolyn J.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    CphA is a Zn2+-dependent metallo-β-lactamase that efficiently hydrolyzes only carbapenem antibiotics. To understand the sequence requirements for CphA function, single codon random mutant libraries were constructed for residues in and near the active site and mutants were selected for E. coli growth on increasing concentrations of imipenem, a carbapenem antibiotic. At high concentrations of imipenem that select for phenotypically wild-type mutants, the active-site residues exhibit stringent sequence requirements in that nearly all residues in positions that contact zinc, the substrate, or the catalytic water do not tolerate amino acid substitutions. In addition, at high imipenem concentrations a number of residues that do not directly contact zinc or substrate are also essential and do not tolerate substitutions. Biochemical analysis confirmed that amino acid substitutions at essential positions decreased the stability or catalytic activity of the CphA enzyme. Therefore, the CphA active - site is fragile to substitutions, suggesting active-site residues are optimized for imipenem hydrolysis. These results also suggest that resistance to inhibitors targeted to the CphA active site would be slow to develop because of the strong sequence constraints on function. PMID:27616327

  3. Isolation of peptide aptamers that inhibit intracellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Jonathan H.; Dove, Simon L.; Hochschild, Ann; Mekalanos, John J.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a method for isolation of random peptides that inhibit intracellular processes in bacteria. A library of random peptides expressed as fusions to Escherichia coli thioredoxin (aptamers) were expressed under the tight control of the arabinose-inducible PBAD promoter. A selection was applied to the library to isolate aptamers that interfered with the activity of thymidylate synthase (ThyA) in vivo. Expression of an aptamer isolated by this method resulted in a ThyA− phenotype that was suppressed by simultaneous overexpression of ThyA. Two-hybrid analysis showed that this aptamer is likely to interact with ThyA in vivo. The library also was screened for aptamers that inhibited growth of bacteria expressing them, and five such aptamers were characterized. Four aptamers were bacteriostatic when expressed, whereas one showed a bactericidal effect. Introduction of translational stop codons into various aptamers blocked their activity, suggesting that their biological effects were likely to be due to protein aptamer rather than RNA. Combinatorial aptamers provide a new genetic and biochemical tool for identifying targets for antibacterial drug development. PMID:10688899

  4. Protective effect of corn peptides against alcoholic liver injury in men with chronic alcohol consumption: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuhong; Pan, Xingchang; Zhang, Shixiu; Wang, Wenxian; Cai, Muyi; Li, Yanrong; Yang, Fan; Guo, Hongwei

    2014-12-13

    Corn peptides (CPs) are a novel food prepared from corn gluten meal, which is a main by-product of the corn starch industry. Recently, significant beneficial effects of CPs on early alcoholic liver injury in rats and on acute alcoholic injury in mice were observed. To our knowledge, the present study is the first report showing that CPs supplementation has beneficial effects on lipid profile, oxidative stress and alcoholic liver injury in men with chronic alcohol consumption. A 9-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted between September 2011 and August 2012 to assess the hepatoprotective effect of CPs. A total of 161 men were randomized to receive CPs (n=53), whey protein (n=54), or corn starch placebo (n=54) at the same dose of 2 g twice daily. 146 participants completed the study. Serum lipid profile, serum markers of liver injury, oxidative stress and inflammation, and fatty liver based on the results of abdominal ultrasonography were assessed at the beginning and end of the intervention. CPs supplementation (4 g/d) for 9 weeks significantly lowered serum levels or activities of total cholesterol, triglyceride, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, malondialdehyde and tumor necrosis factor-α, and significantly increased serum activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, but the same dose of whey protein and corn starch (placebo) did not demonstrate these effects. Our results indicate that CPs may have protective effects on alcohol-induced liver damage via modulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress. CPs may potentially be used as a functional food for the management of alcoholic liver disease in subjects with chronic alcohol consumption.

  5. Risk of bone fractures associated with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists' treatment: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Su, Bin; Sheng, Hui; Zhang, Manna; Bu, Le; Yang, Peng; Li, Liang; Li, Fei; Sheng, Chunjun; Han, Yuqi; Qu, Shen; Wang, Jiying

    2015-02-01

    Traditional anti-diabetic drugs may have negative or positive effects on risk of bone fractures. Yet the relationship between the new class glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RA) and risk of bone fractures has not been established. We performed a meta-analysis including randomized controlled trials (RCT) to study the risk of bone fractures associated with liraglutide or exenatide, compared to placebo or other active drugs. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and clinical trial registration websites for published or unpublished RCTs comparing the effects of liraglutide or exenatide with comparators. Only studies with disclosed bone fracture data were included. Separate pooled analysis was performed for liraglutide or exenatide, respectively, by calculating Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio (MH-OR). 16 RCTs were identified including a total of 11,206 patients. Liraglutide treatment was associated with a significant reduced risk of incident bone fractures (MH-OR=0.38, 95% CI 0.17-0.87); however, exenatide treatment was associated with an elevated risk of incident bone fractures (MH-OR=2.09, 95% CI 1.03-4.21). Publication bias and heterogeneity between studies were not observed. Our study demonstrated a divergent risk of bone fractures associated with different GLP-1 RA treatments. The current findings need to be confirmed by future well-designed prospective or RCT studies.

  6. The effects of wenxin keli on left ventricular ejection fraction and brain natriuretic Peptide in patients with heart failure: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Xiong, Xingjiang; Wang, Chunmei; Wang, Chenggang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xingyong; Gao, Yonghong; Xing, Yanhui; Li, Jun; Wang, Jie; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Xing, Yanwei

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the beneficial and adverse effects of Wenxin Keli (WXKL), either alone or in combination with Western medicine, on the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in the treatment of heart failure (HF). Methods. Seven major electronic databases were searched to retrieve potential randomized controlled trials (RCTs) designed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of WXKL, either alone or in combination with Western medicine, for HF, with the LVEF or BNP after eight weeks of treatment as main outcome measures. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using criteria from the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Review of Interventions, Version 5.1.0, and analyzed using RevMan 5.1.0 software. Results. Eleven RCTs of WXKL were included. The methodological quality of the trials was generally evaluated as low. The risk of bias was high. The results of the meta-analysis showed that WXKL, either alone or in combination with Western medicine, was more effective in LVEF and BNP, compared with no medicine or Western medicine alone, in patients with HF or HF complicated by other diseases. Five of the trials reported adverse events, while the others did not mention them, indicating that the safety of WXKL remains uncertain. Conclusions. WXKL, either alone or in combination with Western medicine, appears to be more effective in improving the LVEF and BNP in patients with HF and HF complications.

  7. The Effects of Wenxin Keli on Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction and Brain Natriuretic Peptide in Patients with Heart Failure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Xiong, Xingjiang; Wang, Chunmei; Wang, Chenggang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xingyong; Gao, Yonghong; Xing, Yanhui; Li, Jun; Wang, Jie; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Xing, Yanwei

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the beneficial and adverse effects of Wenxin Keli (WXKL), either alone or in combination with Western medicine, on the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in the treatment of heart failure (HF). Methods. Seven major electronic databases were searched to retrieve potential randomized controlled trials (RCTs) designed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of WXKL, either alone or in combination with Western medicine, for HF, with the LVEF or BNP after eight weeks of treatment as main outcome measures. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using criteria from the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Review of Interventions, Version 5.1.0, and analyzed using RevMan 5.1.0 software. Results. Eleven RCTs of WXKL were included. The methodological quality of the trials was generally evaluated as low. The risk of bias was high. The results of the meta-analysis showed that WXKL, either alone or in combination with Western medicine, was more effective in LVEF and BNP, compared with no medicine or Western medicine alone, in patients with HF or HF complicated by other diseases. Five of the trials reported adverse events, while the others did not mention them, indicating that the safety of WXKL remains uncertain. Conclusions. WXKL, either alone or in combination with Western medicine, appears to be more effective in improving the LVEF and BNP in patients with HF and HF complications. PMID:24868236

  8. Identification of a conserved JEV serocomplex B-cell epitope by screening a phage-display peptide library with a mAb generated against West Nile virus capsid protein

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The West Nile virus (WNV) capsid (C) protein is one of the three viral structural proteins, encapsidates the viral RNA to form the nucleocapsid, and is necessary for nuclear and nucleolar localization. The antigenic sites on C protein that are targeted by humoral immune responses have not been studied thoroughly, and well-defined B-cell epitopes on the WNV C protein have not been reported. Results In this study, we generated a WNV C protein-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) and defined the linear epitope recognized by the mAb by screening a 12-mer peptide library using phage-display technology. The mAb, designated as 6D3, recognized the phages displaying a consensus motif consisting of the amino acid sequence KKPGGPG, which is identical to an amino acid sequence present in WNV C protein. Further fine mapping was conducted using truncated peptides expressed as MBP-fusion proteins. We found that the KKPGGPG motif is the minimal determinant of the linear epitope recognized by the mAb 6D3. Western blot (WB) analysis demonstrated that the KKPGGPG epitope could be recognized by antibodies contained in WNV- and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV)-positive equine serum, but was not recognized by Dengue virus 1-4 (DENV1-4)-positive mice serum. Furthermore, we found that the epitope recognized by 6D3 is highly conserved among the JEV serocomplex of the Family Flaviviridae. Conclusion The KKPGGPG epitope is a JEV serocomplex-specific linear B-cell epitope recognized by the 6D3 mAb generated in this study. The 6D3 mAb may serve as a novel reagent in development of diagnostic tests for JEV serocomplex infection. Further, the identification of the B-cell epitope that is highly conserved among the JEV serocomplex may support the rationale design of vaccines against viruses of the JEV serocomplex. PMID:21375771

  9. Library 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Miriam A.

    In fall 1984, the Georgia Institute of Technology administration and library staff began planning for Library 2000, a project aimed at creating a showcase library to demonstrate the application of the latest information technology in an academic and research environment. The purposes of Library 2000 include: increasing awareness of students,…

  10. Library Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manley, Will; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The innovative designs of three libraries are described: the Tempe (Arizona) Public Library, which emphasizes services for children and students; an underground library at Park College, Missouri; and a public library located in the Vancouver (Washington) Mall. The fourth article describes the work going on to restore the Los Angeles (California)…

  11. Library Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayall, Susan A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Six articles on computers in libraries discuss training librarians and staff to use new software; appropriate technology; system upgrades of the Research Libraries Group's information system; pre-IBM PC microcomputers; multiuser systems for small to medium-sized libraries; and a library user's view of the traditional card catalog. (EM)

  12. Special Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foskett, D. J.

    The Special Library is distinguished from other libraries as being a library serving a particular group of readers, who have an existence as a group outside of their readership of the library, and whose members direct at least some of their activities towards a common purpose. Thus, the special librarian's first and major responsibility is to know…

  13. Secondary structure formation and LCST behavior of short elastin-like peptides.

    PubMed

    Nuhn, Harald; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2008-10-01

    This contribution investigates the effects of chain length and chemical composition on the secondary structure and LCST behavior of a library of short, elastin-like peptides based on the GVGVP motif. CD experiments revealed that most of the investigated peptides showed the typical elastin conformational behavior with a decrease in random coil and an increase in beta-turn character with increasing temperature. For several peptides, LCST behavior was observed in aqueous NaCl solutions containing 10 mg/mL peptide. By extrapolation of the LCSTs measured at different NaCl concentrations to zero-salt concentration, apparent LCSTs were determined. The apparent LCST was found to decrease with increasing peptide chain length, which correlated well with the trend in the predicted partition coefficients. The apparent LCST of the peptides could be manipulated by successive replacement of the valine residues by more hydrophobic isoleucine, leucine, or phenylalanine residues. Within a particular series of variants, the apparent LCST was found to decrease with an increasing number of valine replacements, which also correlated well with the predicted evolution of the partition coefficient. Although the relative importance of the overall peptide hydrophobicity and the conformational preferences of the constituent amino acids on the LCST behavior still remains an open question, the results described in this contribution clearly demonstrate that short, elastin-like peptides are potentially attractive building blocks for a range of materials applications in biomedicine and engineering.

  14. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  15. Lean Seafood Intake Reduces Postprandial C-peptide and Lactate Concentrations in Healthy Adults in a Randomized Controlled Trial with a Crossover Design.

    PubMed

    Aadland, Eli K; Graff, Ingvild E; Lavigne, Charles; Eng, Øyvin; Paquette, Martine; Holthe, Asle; Mellgren, Gunnar; Madsen, Lise; Jacques, Hélène; Liaset, Bjørn

    2016-05-01

    Recently we showed that lean seafood consumption reduced circulating triacylglycerol (TG) and VLDL concentrations and prevented an elevated total-to-HDL-cholesterol ratio relative to intake of a nonseafood diet. We aimed to elucidate whether diet-induced altered carbohydrate metabolism could be a contributing factor to the previously observed different lipoprotein patterns. This was a secondary outcome and explorative randomized controlled trial with a crossover design in 20 healthy adults (7 men and 13 women) that were 50.6 ± 3.4 (mean ± SEM) y old, weighed 75.7 ± 2.5 kg, and had a body mass index (BMI, in kg/m(2)) of 25.6 ± 0.7. After a 3-wk run-in period and separated by a 5-wk wash-out period, the participants consumed 2 balanced diets [in percentage of energy (energy%); 29% fat, 52% carbohydrates, 19% protein] for 4 wk. The diets varied in the main protein sources; 60 energy% of total protein was from either lean seafood or nonseafood sources. On the first and last day of each diet period, fasting and postprandial blood samples were collected before and after consumption of test meals (in energy%; 28% fat, 52% carbohydrates, 20% protein) with cod or lean beef. The diets did not alter serum insulin and glucose concentrations. However, relative to the nonseafood diet period, the lean seafood diet period reduced postprandial C-peptide (P = 0.04) and lactate (P = 0.012) concentrations and fasting and postprandial TG/HDL-cholesterol ratios (P = 0.002). Hence, different postprandial lactate levels occurred at equal glucose concentrations. Even though the diets did not alter serum insulin and glucose concentrations, intake of the lean seafood compared with the nonseafood diet reduced postprandial concentrations of C-peptide and lactate and the TG/HDL-cholesterol ratio in healthy adults in a manner that may affect the long-term development of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT

  16. Chemical posttranslational modification of phage-displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Ng, Simon; Tjhung, Katrina F; Paschal, Beth M; Noren, Christopher J; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-01-01

    Phage-displayed peptide library has fueled the discovery of novel ligands for diverse targets. A new type of phage libraries that displays not only linear and disulfide-constrained cyclic peptides but moieties that cannot be encoded genetically or incorporated easily by bacterial genetic machinery has emerged recently. Chemical posttranslational modification of phage library is one of the simplest approaches to encode nonnatural moieties. It confers the library with new functionality and makes it possible to select and evolve molecules with properties not found in the peptides, for instance, glycopeptides recognized by carbohydrate-binding protein and peptides with photoswitching capability. To this end, we describe the newly emerging techniques to chemically modify the phage library and quantify the efficiency of the reaction with a biotin-capture assay. Finally, we provide the methods to construct N-terminal Ser peptide library that allows site-selective modification of phage.

  17. Adoption of Library 2.0 Functionalities by Academic Libraries and Users: A Knowledge Management Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yong-Mi; Abbas, June

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the adoption of Library 2.0 functionalities by academic libraries and users through a knowledge management perspective. Based on randomly selected 230 academic library Web sites and 184 users, the authors found RSS and blogs are widely adopted by academic libraries while users widely utilized the bookmark function.…

  18. Adoption of Library 2.0 Functionalities by Academic Libraries and Users: A Knowledge Management Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yong-Mi; Abbas, June

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the adoption of Library 2.0 functionalities by academic libraries and users through a knowledge management perspective. Based on randomly selected 230 academic library Web sites and 184 users, the authors found RSS and blogs are widely adopted by academic libraries while users widely utilized the bookmark function.…

  19. Antagonistic effect of disulfide-rich peptide aptamers selected by cDNA display on interleukin-6-dependent cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, Naoto; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Yamaguchi, Junichi; Ueno, Shingo; Machida, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Toshikatsu; Sakai, Takafumi

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disulfide-rich peptide aptamer inhibits IL-6-dependent cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disulfide bond of peptide aptamer is essential for its affinity to IL-6R. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibitory effect of peptide depends on number and pattern of its disulfide bonds. -- Abstract: Several engineered protein scaffolds have been developed recently to circumvent particular disadvantages of antibodies such as their large size and complex composition, low stability, and high production costs. We previously identified peptide aptamers containing one or two disulfide-bonds as an alternative ligand to the interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). Peptide aptamers (32 amino acids in length) were screened from a random peptide library by in vitro peptide selection using the evolutionary molecular engineering method 'cDNA display'. In this report, the antagonistic activity of the peptide aptamers were examined by an in vitro competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and an IL-6-dependent cell proliferation assay. The results revealed that a disulfide-rich peptide aptamer inhibited IL-6-dependent cell proliferation with similar efficacy to an anti-IL-6R monoclonal antibody.

  20. Humoral immune response against proteophosphoglycan surface antigens of Entamoeba histolytica elicited by immunization with synthetic mimotope peptides.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Helen; Baier, Karin; Felici, Franco; von Specht, Bernd Ulrich; Wiedermann, Gerhard; Kollaritsch, Herwig; Wiedermann, Ursula; Duchêne, Michael

    2003-07-15

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, which is responsible for intestinal amebiasis and amebic liver abscess, is causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Proteophosphoglycans (PPGs, also known as lipophosphoglycans, LPGs, or lipopeptidophosphoglycans, LPPGs) are major surface components of E. histolytica. Passive immunization with a monoclonal antibody (EH5) directed against the PPGs protected severe combined immune-deficient mice from amebic liver abscess. The structure of the PPGs is very complex and only known in part. To find peptide mimics of E. histolytica PPG antigens, we had screened phage-displayed random peptide libraries with the antibody EH5. We identified various peptide mimics of E. histolytica PPGs, all sharing a consensus sequence Gly-Thr-His-Pro-X-Leu. Several of the phage clones induced a significant, specific IgG response against membrane antigens of E. histolytica after immunization of mice with whole phage particles. In the present work, in order to avoid the use of phage particles for immunization, we coupled two selected chemically synthesized peptides to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). The two KLH-conjugated peptides were immunogenic in mice and induced the production of high titers of anti-peptide antibodies, and one of the two peptides was also able to induce significant titers of antibodies against E. histolytica PPGs. Our results demonstrate that the KLH-conjugated peptides are able to mimic the EH5 epitope without the M13 phage sequences flanking the peptide inserts and independent of the structural framework of the phage.

  1. Conformational Fine-Tuning of Pore-Forming Peptide Potency and Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the sequence–structure–function relationships that control the activity and selectivity of membrane-permeabilizing peptides, we screened a peptide library, based on the archetypal pore-former melittin, for loss-of-function variants. This was accomplished by assaying library members for failure to cause leakage of entrapped contents from synthetic lipid vesicles at a peptide-to-lipid ratio of 1:20, 10-fold higher than the concentration at which melittin efficiently permeabilizes the same vesicles. Surprisingly, about one-third of the library members are inactive under these conditions. In the negative peptides, two changes of hydrophobic residues to glycine were especially abundant. We show that loss-of-function activity can be completely recapitulated by a single-residue change of the leucine at position 16 to glycine. Unlike the potently cytolytic melittin, the loss-of-function peptides, including the single-site variant, are essentially inactive against phosphatidylcholine vesicles and multiple types of eukaryotic cells. Loss of function is shown to result from a shift in the binding–folding equilibrium away from the active, bound, α-helical state toward the inactive, unbound, random-coil state. Accordingly, the addition of anionic lipids to synthetic lipid vesicles restored binding, α-helical secondary structure, and potent activity of the “negative” peptides. While nontoxic to mammalian cells, the single-site variant has potent bactericidal activity, consistent with the anionic nature of bacterial membranes. The results show that conformational fine-tuning of helical pore-forming peptides is a powerful way to modulate their activity and selectivity. PMID:26632653

  2. Specific ligands for classical swine fever virus screened from landscape phage display library.

    PubMed

    Yin, Long; Luo, Yuzi; Liang, Bo; Wang, Fei; Du, Min; Petrenko, Valery A; Qiu, Hua-Ji; Liu, Aihua

    2014-09-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a devastating infectious disease caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV). The screening of CSFV-specific ligands is of great significance for diagnosis and treatment of CSF. Affinity selection from random peptide libraries is an efficient approach to discover ligands with high stability and specificity. Here, we screened phage ligands for the CSFV E2 protein from f8/8 landscape phage display library by biopanning and obtained four phage clones specific for the E2 protein of CSFV. Viral blocking assays indicated that the phage clone displaying the octapeptide sequence DRATSSNA remarkably inhibited the CSFV replication in PK-15 cells at a titer of 10(10) transduction units, as evidenced by significantly decreased viral RNA copies and viral titers. The phage-displayed E2-binding peptides have the potential to be developed as antivirals for CSF.

  3. Self-assembling peptide matrix for the prevention of esophageal stricture after endoscopic resection: a randomized controlled trial in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Barret, M; Bordaçahar, B; Beuvon, F; Terris, B; Camus, M; Coriat, R; Chaussade, S; Batteux, F; Prat, F

    2017-05-01

    Esophageal stricture formation after extensive endoscopic resection remains a major limitation of endoscopic therapy for early esophageal neoplasia. This study assessed a recently developed self-assembling peptide (SAP) matrix as a wound dressing after endoscopic resection for the prevention of esophageal stricture. Ten pigs were randomly assigned to the SAP or the control group after undergoing a 5-cm-long circumferential endoscopic submucosal dissection of the lower esophagus. Esophageal diameter on endoscopy and esophagogram, weight variation, and histological measurements of fibrosis, granulation tissue, and neoepithelium were assessed in each animal. The rate of esophageal stricture at day 14 was 40% in the SAP-treated group versus 100% in the control group (P = 0.2). Median interquartile range (IQR) esophageal diameter at day 14 was 8 mm (2.5-9) in the SAP-treated group versus 4 mm (3-4) in the control group (P = 0.13). The median (IQR) stricture indexes on esophagograms at day 14 were 0.32 (0.14-0.48) and 0.26 (0.14-0.33) in the SAP-treated and control groups, respectively (P = 0.42). Median (IQR) weight variation during the study was +0.2 (-7.4; +1.8) and -3.8 (-5.4; +0.6) in the SAP-treated and control groups, respectively (P = 0.9). Fibrosis, granulation tissue, and neoepithelium were not significantly different between the groups. The application of SAP matrix on esophageal wounds after a circumferential endoscopic submucosal dissection delayed the onset of esophageal stricture in a porcine model. © International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Primary analysis of a prospective, randomized, single-blinded phase II trial evaluating the HER2 peptide GP2 vaccine in breast cancer patients to prevent recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Ardavanis, Alexandros; Litton, Jennifer K.; Shumway, Nathan M.; Hale, Diane F.; Murray, James L.; Perez, Sonia A.; Ponniah, Sathibalan; Baxevanis, Constantin N.; Papamichail, Michael

    2016-01-01

    GP2 is a HER2-derived, HLA-A2+ restricted peptide. Phase I studies showed GP2 administered with GM-CSF to be safe and immunogenic. Here we report the primary analysis of a prospective, randomized, multicenter phase II adjuvant trial conducted to determine the vaccine's efficacy. The trial enrolled HLA-A2+, clinically disease-free, node-positive and high-risk node-negative breast cancer patients with tumors expressing HER2 (immunohistochemistry[IHC] 1+-3+). Patients were randomized to GP2+GM-CSF versus GM-CSF alone. Disease-free survival (DFS) was analyzed in intention-to-treat (ITT) and per-treatment cohorts; pre-specified subgroup analyses were performed for patients with IHC 3+ or FISH+ disease. The trial enrolled 180 patients; 89 received GP2+GM-CSF and 91 received GM-CSF alone. The groups were well-matched for clinicopathologic characteristics. Toxicities have been minimal. The Kaplan-Meier estimated 5-year DFS rate in the ITT analyses was 88% (95% CI:78-94%) in vaccinated vs. 81% (95% CI:69-89%) (P = 0.43) in control patients after a 34 month median follow-up. In the per-treatment analysis, the estimated 5-year DFS rates were 94% (95% CI:83-98%) and 85% (73-92%) (P = 0.17). In IHC 3+/FISH+ patients, the estimated 5-year DFS rate was 94% (82-98%) in vaccinated patients (n = 51) vs. 89% (71-96%) in control patients (n = 50), (P = 0.86) in the ITT analyses and 100% vs. 89% (71-96%) in vaccinated vs. control patients in the per-treatment analyses (P = 0.08). While the overall ITT analysis did not demonstrate benefit to vaccination, this trial confirmed that the GP2 vaccine is safe and suggests that vaccination may have clinical activity, particularly in patients with HER2 overexpression who received the full vaccine series (ie per-treatment group). PMID:27589688

  5. Identification of gliadin-binding peptides by phage display

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coeliac disease (CD) is a common and complex disorder of the small intestine caused by intolerance to wheat gluten and related edible cereals like barley and rye. Peptides originating from incomplete gliadin digestion activate the lamina propria infiltrating T cells to release proinflammatory cytokines, which in turn cause profound tissue remodelling of the small intestinal wall. There is no cure for CD except refraining from consuming gluten-containing products. Results Phage from a random oligomer display library were enriched by repeated pannings against immobilised gliadin proteins. Phage from the final panning round were plated, individual plaques picked, incubated with host bacteria, amplified to a population size of 1011 to 1012 and purified. DNA was isolated from 1000 purified phage populations and the region covering the 36 bp oligonucleotide insert from which the displayed peptides were translated, was sequenced. Altogether more than 150 different peptide-encoding sequences were identified, many of which were repeatedly isolated under various experimental conditions. Amplified phage populations, each expressing a single peptide, were tested first in pools and then one by one for their ability to inhibit binding of human anti-gliadin antibodies in ELISA assays. These experiments showed that several of the different peptide-expressing phage tested inhibited the interaction between gliadin and anti-gliadin antibodies. Finally, four different peptide-encoding sequences were selected for further analysis, and the corresponding 12-mer peptides were synthesised in vitro. By ELISA assays it was demonstrated that several of the peptides inhibited the interaction between gliadin molecules and serum anti-gliadin antibodies. Moreover, ELISA competition experiments as well as dot-blot and western blot revealed that the different peptides interacted with different molecular sites of gliadin. Conclusions We believe that several of the isolated and

  6. Identification of peptide sequences that target to the brain using in vivo phage display.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingwei; Zhang, Qizhi; Pang, Zhiqing; Wang, Yuchen; Liu, Qingfeng; Guo, Liangran; Jiang, Xinguo

    2012-06-01

    Phage display technology could provide a rapid means for the discovery of novel peptides. To find peptide ligands specific for the brain vascular receptors, we performed a modified phage display method. Phages were recovered from mice brain parenchyma after administrated with a random 7-mer peptide library intravenously. A longer circulation time was arranged according to the biodistributive brain/blood ratios of phage particles. Following sequential rounds of isolation, a number of phages were sequenced and a peptide sequence (CTSTSAPYC, denoted as PepC7) was identified. Clone 7-1, which encodes PepC7, exhibited translocation efficiency about 41-fold higher than the random library phage. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that Clone 7-1 had a significant superiority on transport efficiency into the brain compared with native M13 phage. Clone 7-1 was inhibited from homing to the brain in a dose-dependent fashion when cyclic peptides of the same sequence were present in a competition assay. Interestingly, the linear peptide (ATSTSAPYA, Pep7) and a scrambled control peptide PepSC7 (CSPATSYTC) did not compete with the phage at the same tested concentration (0.2-200 pg). Labeled by Cy5.5, PepC7 exhibited significant brain-targeting capability in in vivo optical imaging analysis. The cyclic conformation of PepC7 formed by disulfide bond, and the correct structure itself play a critical role in maintaining the selectivity and affinity for the brain. In conclusion, PepC7 is a promising brain-target motif never been reported before and it could be applied to targeted drug delivery into the brain.

  7. Special Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavendel, Giuliana

    1977-01-01

    Discusses problems involved in maintaining special scientific or engineering libraries, including budget problems, remote storage locations, rental computer retrieval systems, protecting trade secrets, and establishing a magnetic tape library. (MLH)

  8. Library Buildings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Walter C.

    1976-01-01

    Examines a century of library architecture in relation to the changing perceptions of library functions, the development of building techniques and materials, fluctuating esthetic fashions and sometimes wildly erratic economic climates. (Author)

  9. Identification of a hexapeptide that mimics a conformation-dependent binding site of acetylcholine receptor by use of a phage-epitope library.

    PubMed Central

    Balass, M; Heldman, Y; Cabilly, S; Givol, D; Katchalski-Katzir, E; Fuchs, S

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) 5.5 is directed against the ligand-binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The epitope for this antibody is conformation-dependent, and the antibody does not react with synthetic peptides derived from the receptor sequence. We have identified a ligand peptide that mimics this conformation-dependent epitope from a phage-epitope library composed of filamentous phage displaying random hexapeptides. Among 38 positive phage clones, individually selected from the library, 34 positive clones carried the sequence Asp-Leu-Val-Trp-Leu-Leu (DLVWLL), 1 positive clone had the sequence Asp-Ile-Val-Trp-Leu-Leu (DIVWLL), and 3 positive clones expressed the sequence Leu-Ile-Glu-Trp-Leu-Leu (LIEWLL), none of which are significantly homologous with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit sequence. All of these phages bind specifically to mAb 5.5. The synthetic peptide DLVWLL inhibits binding of mAb 5.5 to the related peptide-presenting phage and to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in a concentration-dependent manner; the IC50 value is of the order of 10(-4) M. Bioactivity of the peptide "mimotope" DLVWLL was demonstrated in vivo in hatched chickens by inhibition of the mAb 5.5 effect by the peptide. The neuromuscular block and myasthenia gravis-like symptoms that are induced in chicken by passive transfer of mAb 5.5 were specifically abolished by DLVWLL. This study shows the potential of a random peptide phage-epitope library for selecting a mimotope for an antibody that recognizes a folded form of the protein, where peptides from the linear amino acid sequence of the protein are not applicable. Images Fig. 5 PMID:7504273

  10. A Randomized Phase II Trial of Multi-epitope Vaccination with Melanoma Peptides for Cytotoxic T-Cells and Helper T-Cells for Patients with Metastatic Melanoma (E1602)

    PubMed Central

    Slingluff, Craig L.; Lee, Sandra; Zhao, Fengmin; Chianese-Bullock, Kimberly A.; Olson, Walter; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Whiteside, Theresa; Leming, Philip D.; Kirkwood, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This multicenter randomized trial was designed to evaluate whether melanoma helper peptides augment cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses to a melanoma vaccine and improve clinical outcome in patients with advanced melanoma. Patients and Methods One hundred seventy-five patients with measurable stage IV melanoma were enrolled into 4 treatment groups, vaccinated with 12 MHC Class I-restricted melanoma peptides (12MP) to stimulate CTL (group A), plus a tetanus peptide (group B) or a mixture of 6 melanoma helper peptides (6MHP, group C) to stimulate helper T lymphocytes (HTL), or with 6MHP alone (group D), in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) plus GM-CSF. CTL responses were assessed using an in vitro stimulated IFN-gamma ELIspot assay, and HTL responses using proliferation assay. Results In groups A–D, respectively, CTL response rates to 12MP were 43%, 47%, 28%, and 5%, and HTL response rates to 6MHP were in 3%, 0%, 40% and 41%. Best clinical response was partial response (PR) in 7/148 evaluable patients (4.7%) without significant difference among study arms. Median overall survival (OS) was 11.8 months. Immune response to 6MHP was significantly associated with both clinical response (p=0.036) and OS (p=0.004). Conclusion Each vaccine regimen was immunogenic, but melanoma helper peptides did not augment CTL responses to 12MP. The association of survival and immune response to 6MHP supports further investigation of helper peptide vaccines. For patients with advanced melanoma, multipeptide vaccines should be studied in combination with other potentially synergistic active therapies. PMID:23653149

  11. Peptide mimics selected from immune sera using phage display technology can replace native antigens in the diagnosis of Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Casey, J L; Coley, A M; Parisi, K; Foley, M

    2009-02-01

    There is an expanding area of small molecule discovery, especially in the area of peptide mimetics. Peptide sequences can be used to substitute for the entire native antigen for use in diagnostic assays. Our approach is to select peptides that mimic epitopes of the natural immune response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) that may be recognised by antibodies typically produced after infection with EBV. We screened a random peptide library on sera from rabbits immunised with a crude preparation of EBV and serum antibodies from a patient with a high titer of EBV antibodies. We selected four peptides (Eb1-4) with the highest relative binding affinity with immune rabbit sera and a single peptide with high affinity to human serum antibodies. The peptides were coupled to the carrier molecule BSA and the recognition of the peptides by IgM antibodies in clinical samples after infection with EBV was measured. The sensitivities were Eb1 94%, Eb2, 3, 4 88%, H1 81% and all had 100% specificity. This study illustrates that the phage display approach to select epitope mimics can be applied to polyclonal antibodies and peptides that represent several diagnostically important epitopes can be selected simultaneously. This panel of EBV peptides representing a wide coverage of immunodominant epitopes could replace crude antigen preparations currently used for capture in commercial diagnostic tests for EBV.

  12. Peptide mimics selected from immune sera using phage display technology can replace native antigens in the diagnosis of Epstein–Barr virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Casey, J.L.; Coley, A.M.; Parisi, K.; Foley, M.

    2009-01-01

    There is an expanding area of small molecule discovery, especially in the area of peptide mimetics. Peptide sequences can be used to substitute for the entire native antigen for use in diagnostic assays. Our approach is to select peptides that mimic epitopes of the natural immune response to Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) that may be recognised by antibodies typically produced after infection with EBV. We screened a random peptide library on sera from rabbits immunised with a crude preparation of EBV and serum antibodies from a patient with a high titer of EBV antibodies. We selected four peptides (Eb1–4) with the highest relative binding affinity with immune rabbit sera and a single peptide with high affinity to human serum antibodies. The peptides were coupled to the carrier molecule BSA and the recognition of the peptides by IgM antibodies in clinical samples after infection with EBV was measured. The sensitivities were Eb1 94%, Eb2, 3, 4 88%, H1 81% and all had 100% specificity. This study illustrates that the phage display approach to select epitope mimics can be applied to polyclonal antibodies and peptides that represent several diagnostically important epitopes can be selected simultaneously. This panel of EBV peptides representing a wide coverage of immunodominant epitopes could replace crude antigen preparations currently used for capture in commercial diagnostic tests for EBV. PMID:19073711

  13. Library Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Karin; Kuhlthau, Carol C.; Branch, Jennifer L.; Solowan, Diane Galloway; Case, Roland; Abilock, Debbie; Eisenberg, Michael B.; Koechlin, Carol; Zwaan, Sandi; Hughes, Sandra; Low, Ann; Litch, Margaret; Lowry, Cindy; Irvine, Linda; Stimson, Margaret; Schlarb, Irene; Wilson, Janet; Warriner, Emily; Parsons, Les; Luongo-Orlando, Katherine; Hamilton, Donald

    2003-01-01

    Includes 19 articles that address issues related to library skills and Canadian school libraries. Topics include information literacy; inquiry learning; critical thinking and electronic research; collaborative inquiry; information skills and the Big 6 approach to problem solving; student use of online databases; library skills; Internet accuracy;…

  14. Library Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Karin; Kuhlthau, Carol C.; Branch, Jennifer L.; Solowan, Diane Galloway; Case, Roland; Abilock, Debbie; Eisenberg, Michael B.; Koechlin, Carol; Zwaan, Sandi; Hughes, Sandra; Low, Ann; Litch, Margaret; Lowry, Cindy; Irvine, Linda; Stimson, Margaret; Schlarb, Irene; Wilson, Janet; Warriner, Emily; Parsons, Les; Luongo-Orlando, Katherine; Hamilton, Donald

    2003-01-01

    Includes 19 articles that address issues related to library skills and Canadian school libraries. Topics include information literacy; inquiry learning; critical thinking and electronic research; collaborative inquiry; information skills and the Big 6 approach to problem solving; student use of online databases; library skills; Internet accuracy;…

  15. Library Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodgion, Laurel; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Eight articles in special supplement to "Library Journal" and "School Library Journal" cover a computer program called "Byte into Books"; microcomputers and the small library; creating databases with students; online searching with a microcomputer; quality automation software; Meckler Publishing Company's…

  16. Library Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Computing, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Special supplement to "Library Journal" and "School Library Journal" covers topics of interest to school, public, academic, and special libraries planning for automation: microcomputer use, readings in automation, online searching, databases of microcomputer software, public access to microcomputers, circulation, creating a…

  17. Identification of lanthanum-specific peptides for future recycling of rare earth elements from compact fluorescent lamps.

    PubMed

    Lederer, Franziska L; Curtis, Susan B; Bachmann, Stefanie; Dunbar, W Scott; MacGillivray, Ross T A

    2017-05-01

    As components of electronic scrap, rare earth minerals are an interesting but little used source of raw materials that are highly important for the recycling industry. Currently, there exists no cost-efficient technology to separate rare earth minerals from an electronic scrap mixture. In this study, phage surface display has been used as a key method to develop peptides with high specificity for particular inorganic targets in electronic scrap. Lanthanum phosphate doped with cerium and terbium as part of the fluorescent phosphors of spent compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) was used as a target material of economic interest to test the suitability of the phage display method to the separation of rare earth minerals. One random pVIII phage library was screened for peptide sequences that bind specifically to the fluorescent phosphor LaPO4 :Ce(3+) ,Tb(3+) (LAP). The library contained at least 100 binding pVIII peptides per phage particle with a diversity of 1 × 10(9) different phage per library. After three rounds of enrichment, a phage clone containing the surface peptide loop RCQYPLCS was found to bind specifically to LAP. Specificity and affinity of the identified phage bound peptide was confirmed by using binding and competition assays, immunofluorescence assays, and zeta potential measurements. Binding and immunofluorescence assays identified the peptide's affinity for the fluorescent phosphor components CAT (CeMgAl11 O19 :Tb(3+) ) and BAM (BaMgAl10 O17 :Eu(2+) ). No affinity was found for other fluorescent phosphor components such as YOX (Y2 O3 :Eu(3+) ). The binding specificity of the RCQYPLCS peptide loop was improved 3-51-fold by using alanine scanning mutagenesis. The identification of peptides with high specificity and affinity for special components in the fluorescent phosphor in CFLs provides a potentially new strategic approach to rare earth recycling. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1016-1024. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Inhibition of the angiogenesis by the MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mee Young; Byeon, Cheol Woo; Hong, Kyung Hee; Han, Ki Hoon; Jeong, Sunjoo

    2005-03-14

    The CC chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), plays a crucial role in the initiation of atherosclerosis and has direct effects that promote angiogenesis. To develop a specific inhibitor for MCP-1-induced angiogenesis, we performed in vitro selection employing phage display random peptide libraries. Most of the selected peptides were found to be homologous to the second extracellular loops of CCR2 and CCR3. We synthesized the peptide encoding the homologous sequences of the receptors and tested its effect on the MCP-1 induced angiogenesis. Surface plasmon resonance measurements demonstrated specific binding of the peptide to MCP-1 but not to the other homologous protein, MCP-3. Flow cytometry revealed that the peptide inhibited the MCP-1 binding to THP-1 monocytes. Moreover, CAM and rat aortic ring assays showed that the peptide inhibited MCP-1 induced angiogenesis. Our observations indicate that the MCP-1-binding peptide exerts its anti-angiogenic effect by interfering with the interaction between MCP-1 and its receptor.

  19. Evaluation of Phage Display Discovered Peptides as Ligands for Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA)

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, W. Barry

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify potential ligands of PSMA suitable for further development as novel PSMA-targeted peptides using phage display technology. The human PSMA protein was immobilized as a target followed by incubation with a 15-mer phage display random peptide library. After one round of prescreening and two rounds of screening, high-stringency screening at the third round of panning was performed to identify the highest affinity binders. Phages which had a specific binding activity to PSMA in human prostate cancer cells were isolated and the DNA corresponding to the 15-mers were sequenced to provide three consensus sequences: GDHSPFT, SHFSVGS and EVPRLSLLAVFL as well as other sequences that did not display consensus. Two of the peptide sequences deduced from DNA sequencing of binding phages, SHSFSVGSGDHSPFT and GRFLTGGTGRLLRIS were labeled with 5-carboxyfluorescein and shown to bind and co-internalize with PSMA on human prostate cancer cells by fluorescence microscopy. The high stringency requirements yielded peptides with affinities KD∼1 µM or greater which are suitable starting points for affinity maturation. While these values were less than anticipated, the high stringency did yield peptide sequences that apparently bound to different surfaces on PSMA. These peptide sequences could be the basis for further development of peptides for prostate cancer tumor imaging and therapy. PMID:23935860

  20. Selection of phage-displayed peptides that bind to a particular ligand-bound antibody.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Fujie; Hu, Yunfeng; Sutton, Jori; Asawapornmongkol, Lily; Fuller, Roberta; Olson, Arthur J; Barbas, Carlos F; Lerner, Richard A

    2008-06-01

    Phage-displayed peptides that selectively bind to aldolase catalytic antibody 93F3 when bound to a particular 1,3-diketone hapten derivative have been developed using designed selection strategies with libraries containing 7-12 randomized amino acid residues. These phage-displayed peptides discriminated the particular 93F3-diketone complex from ligand-free 93F3 and from 93F3 bound to other 1,3-diketone hapten derivatives. By altering the selection procedures, phage-displayed peptides that bind to antibody 93F3 in the absence of 1,3-diketone hapten derivatives have also been developed. With using these phage-displayed peptides, ligand-bound states of the antibody were distinguished from each other. A docking model of one of the peptides bound to the antibody 93F3-diketone complex was created using a sequential divide-and-conquer peptide docking strategy; the model suggests that the peptide interacts with both the antibody and the ligand through a delicate hydrogen bonding network.

  1. Identification of peptide targets in neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaoli; Green, Miyoko; Gilden, Don; Lam, Chiwah; Bautista, Katherine; Bennett, Jeffrey L

    2011-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease that predominantly affects the optic nerves and spinal cord. Recombinant antibodies (rAbs) generated from clonally expanded plasma cells in an NMO patient are specific to AQP4 and pathogenic. We screened phage-displayed peptide libraries with these rAbs, and identified 14 high affinity linear and conformational peptides. The linear peptides shared sequence homologies with NMO autoantigen AQP4 on the extracellular surface. Competitive inhibition ELISA and immunocytochemistry demonstrated that these peptides represent epitopes of NMO autoantigen AQP4. Peptide epitopes/mimotopes may have potential uses for disease prognosis, monitoring, and therapy. PMID:21621279

  2. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and heart failure in type 2 diabetes: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized and observational studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Li, Sheyu; Liu, Jiali; Deng, Ke; Busse, Jason W; Vandvik, Per Olav; Wong, Evelyn; Sohani, Zahra N; Bala, Malgorzata M; Rios, Lorena P; Malaga, German; Ebrahim, Shanil; Shen, Jiantong; Zhang, Longhao; Zhao, Pujing; Chen, Qunfei; Wang, Yingqiang; Guyatt, Gordon H; Sun, Xin

    2016-05-11

    The effect of glucagon-like peptide-1(GLP-1) receptor agonists on heart failure remains uncertain. We therefore conducted a systematic review to assess the possible impact of GLP-1 agonists on heart failure or hospitalization for heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and ClinicalTrials.gov to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies that addressed the effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists in adults with type 2 diabetes, and explicitly reported heart failure or hospitalization for heart failure. Two paired reviewers screened reports, collected data, and assessed the risk of bias. We pooled data from RCTs and observational studies separately, and used the GRADE approach to rate the quality of evidence. We identified 25 studies that were eligible for our review; 21 RCTs (n = 18,270) and 4 observational studies (n = 111,029). Low quality evidence from 20 RCTs suggested, if anything, a lower incidence of heart failure between GLP-1 agonists versus control (17/7,441 vs. 19/4,317; odds ratio (OR) 0.62, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.31 to 1.22; risk difference (RD) 19 fewer, 95 % CI 34 fewer to 11 more per 1000 over 5 years). Three cohort studies comparing GLP-1 agonists to alternative agents provided very low quality evidence that GLP-1 agonists do not increase the incidence of heart failure. One RCT provided moderate quality evidence that GLP-1 agonists were not associated with hospitalization for heart failure (lixisenatide vs placebo: 122/3,034 vs. 127/3,034; adjusted hazard ratio 0.96, 95 % CI 0.75 to 1.23; RD 4 fewer, 95 % CI 25 fewer to 23 more per 1000 over 5 years) and a case-control study provided very low quality evidence also suggesting no association (GLP-1 agonists vs. other anti-hyperglycemic drugs: 1118 cases and 17,626 controls, adjusted OR 0.67, 95 % CI 0.32 to 1.42). The current evidence suggests that GLP-1 agonists do not

  3. A mix-and-read drop-based in vitro two-hybrid method for screening high-affinity peptide binders.

    PubMed

    Cui, Naiwen; Zhang, Huidan; Schneider, Nils; Tao, Ye; Asahara, Haruichi; Sun, Zhiyi; Cai, Yamei; Koehler, Stephan A; de Greef, Tom F A; Abbaspourrad, Alireza; Weitz, David A; Chong, Shaorong

    2016-03-04

    Drop-based microfluidics have recently become a novel tool by providing a stable linkage between phenotype and genotype for high throughput screening. However, use of drop-based microfluidics for screening high-affinity peptide binders has not been demonstrated due to the lack of a sensitive functional assay that can detect single DNA molecules in drops. To address this sensitivity issue, we introduced in vitro two-hybrid system (IVT2H) into microfluidic drops and developed a streamlined mix-and-read drop-IVT2H method to screen a random DNA library. Drop-IVT2H was based on the correlation between the binding affinity of two interacting protein domains and transcriptional activation of a fluorescent reporter. A DNA library encoding potential peptide binders was encapsulated with IVT2H such that single DNA molecules were distributed in individual drops. We validated drop-IVT2H by screening a three-random-residue library derived from a high-affinity MDM2 inhibitor PMI. The current drop-IVT2H platform is ideally suited for affinity screening of small-to-medium-sized libraries (10(3)-10(6)). It can obtain hits within a single day while consuming minimal amounts of reagents. Drop-IVT2H simplifies and accelerates the drop-based microfluidics workflow for screening random DNA libraries, and represents a novel alternative method for protein engineering and in vitro directed protein evolution.

  4. A mix-and-read drop-based in vitro two-hybrid method for screening high-affinity peptide binders

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Naiwen; Zhang, Huidan; Schneider, Nils; Tao, Ye; Asahara, Haruichi; Sun, Zhiyi; Cai, Yamei; Koehler, Stephan A.; de Greef, Tom F. A.; Abbaspourrad, Alireza; Weitz, David A.; Chong, Shaorong

    2016-01-01

    Drop-based microfluidics have recently become a novel tool by providing a stable linkage between phenotype and genotype for high throughput screening. However, use of drop-based microfluidics for screening high-affinity peptide binders has not been demonstrated due to the lack of a sensitive functional assay that can detect single DNA molecules in drops. To address this sensitivity issue, we introduced in vitro two-hybrid system (IVT2H) into microfluidic drops and developed a streamlined mix-and-read drop-IVT2H method to screen a random DNA library. Drop-IVT2H was based on the correlation between the binding affinity of two interacting protein domains and transcriptional activation of a fluorescent reporter. A DNA library encoding potential peptide binders was encapsulated with IVT2H such that single DNA molecules were distributed in individual drops. We validated drop-IVT2H by screening a three-random-residue library derived from a high-affinity MDM2 inhibitor PMI. The current drop-IVT2H platform is ideally suited for affinity screening of small-to-medium-sized libraries (103–106). It can obtain hits within a single day while consuming minimal amounts of reagents. Drop-IVT2H simplifies and accelerates the drop-based microfluidics workflow for screening random DNA libraries, and represents a novel alternative method for protein engineering and in vitro directed protein evolution. PMID:26940078

  5. Use of artificial intelligence in the design of small peptide antibiotics effective against a broad spectrum of highly antibiotic-resistant superbugs.

    PubMed

    Cherkasov, Artem; Hilpert, Kai; Jenssen, Håvard; Fjell, Christopher D; Waldbrook, Matt; Mullaly, Sarah C; Volkmer, Rudolf; Hancock, Robert E W

    2009-01-16

    Increased multiple antibiotic resistance in the face of declining antibiotic discovery is one of society's most pressing health issues. Antimicrobial peptides represent a promising new class of antibiotics. Here we ask whether it is possible to make small broad spectrum peptides employing minimal assumptions, by capitalizing on accumulating chemical biology information. Using peptide array technology, two large random 9-amino-acid peptide libraries were iteratively created using the amino acid composition of the most active peptides. The resultant data was used together with Artificial Neural Networks, a powerful machine learning technique, to create quantitative in silico models of antibiotic activity. On the basis of random testing, these models proved remarkably effective in predicting the activity of 100,000 virtual peptides. The best peptides, representing the top quartile of predicted activities, were effective against a broad array of multidrug-resistant "Superbugs" with activities that were equal to or better than four highly used conventional antibiotics, more effective than the most advanced clinical candidate antimicrobial peptide, and protective against Staphylococcus aureus infections in animal models.

  6. QSAR modeling of the antimicrobial activity of peptides as a mathematical function of a sequence of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Toropova, Mariya A; Veselinović, Aleksandar M; Veselinović, Jovana B; Stojanović, Dušica B; Toropov, Andrey A

    2015-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have emerged as new therapeutic agents for fighting multi-drug-resistant bacteria. However, the process of optimizing peptide antimicrobial activity and specificity using large peptide libraries is both tedious and expensive. Therefore, computational techniques had to be applied for process optimization. In this work, the representation of the molecular structure of peptides (mastoparan analogs) by a sequence of amino acids has been used to establish quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for their antibacterial activity. The data for the studied peptides were split three times into the training, calibration and test sets. The Monte Carlo method was used as a computational technique for QSAR models calculation. The statistical quality of QSAR for the antibacterial activity of peptides for the external validation set was: n=7, r(2)=0.8067, s=0.248 (split 1); n=6, r(2)=0.8319, s=0.169 (split 2); and n=6, r(2)=0.6996, s=0.297 (split 3). The stated statistical parameters favor the presented QSAR models in comparison to 2D and 3D descriptor based ones. The Monte Carlo method gave a reasonably good prediction for the antibacterial activity of peptides. The statistical quality of the prediction is different for three random splits. However, the predictive potential is reasonably well for all cases. The presented QSAR modeling approach can be an attractive alternative of 3D QSAR at least for the described peptides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Exploring high-affinity binding properties of octamer peptides by principal component analysis of tetramer peptides.

    PubMed

    Kume, Akiko; Kawai, Shun; Kato, Ryuji; Iwata, Shinmei; Shimizu, Kazunori; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the binding properties of a peptide sequence, we conducted principal component analysis (PCA) of the physicochemical features of a tetramer peptide library comprised of 512 peptides, and the variables were reduced to two principal components. We selected IL-2 and IgG as model proteins and the binding affinity to these proteins was assayed using the 512 peptides mentioned above. PCA of binding affinity data showed that 16 and 18 variables were suitable for localizing IL-2 and IgG high-affinity binding peptides, respectively, into a restricted region of the PCA plot. We then investigated whether the binding affinity of octamer peptide libraries could be predicted using the identified region in the tetramer PCA. The results show that octamer high-affinity binding peptides were also concentrated in the tetramer high-affinity binding region of both IL-2 and IgG. The average fluorescence intensity of high-affinity binding peptides was 3.3- and 2.1-fold higher than that of low-affinity binding peptides for IL-2 and IgG, respectively. We conclude that PCA may be used to identify octamer peptides with high- or low-affinity binding properties from data from a tetramer peptide library. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Phages Bearing Affinity Peptides to Bovine Rotavirus Differentiate the Virus from Other Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guangxing; Ren, Yudong; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify potential ligands and develop a novel diagnostic test to pathogenic bovine rotavirus (BRV) using phage display technology. The viruses were used as an immobilized target followed by incubation with a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. After five rounds of biopanning, phages had a specific binding activity to BRV were isolated. DNA sequencing indicated that phage displayed peptides HVHPPLRPHSDK, HATNHLPTPHNR or YPTHHAHTTPVR were potential ligands to BRV. Using the specific peptide-expressing phages, we developed a phage-based ELISA to differentiate BRV from other viruses. Compared with quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), the phage-mediated ELISA was more suitable for the capture of BRV and the detection limitation of this approach was 0.1 µg/ml of samples. The high sensitivity, specificity and low cross-reactivity for the phage-based ELISA were confirmed in receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. PMID:22163050

  9. Acyclic peptide inhibitors of amylases.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Nicola

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Chemistry and Biology, a library screening approach reveals a linear octapeptide inhibitor of alpha-amylases reached by de novo design . The selected molecule shares characteristics with naturally occurring protein inhibitors -- a result that suggests general rules for the design of peptide-based amylase inhibitors may be achievable.

  10. High capsid-genome correlation facilitates creation of AAV libraries for directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Nonnenmacher, Mathieu; van Bakel, Harm; Hajjar, Roger J; Weber, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Directed evolution of adeno-associated virus (AAV) through successive rounds of phenotypic selection is a powerful method to isolate variants with improved properties from large libraries of capsid mutants. Importantly, AAV libraries used for directed evolution are based on the "natural" AAV genome organization where the capsid proteins are encoded in cis from replicating genomes. This is necessary to allow the recovery of the capsid DNA after each step of phenotypic selection. For directed evolution to be used successfully, it is essential to minimize the random mixing of capsomers and the encapsidation of nonmatching viral genomes during the production of the viral libraries. Here, we demonstrate that multiple AAV capsid variants expressed from Rep/Cap containing viral genomes result in near-homogeneous capsids that display an unexpectedly high capsid-DNA correlation. Next-generation sequencing of AAV progeny generated by bulk transfection of a semi-random peptide library showed a strong counter-selection of capsid variants encoding premature stop codons, which further supports a strong capsid-genome identity correlation. Overall, our observations demonstrate that production of "natural" AAVs results in low capsid mosaicism and high capsid-genome correlation. These unique properties allow the production of highly diverse AAV libraries in a one-step procedure with a minimal loss in phenotype-genotype correlation.

  11. High Capsid–Genome Correlation Facilitates Creation of AAV Libraries for Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nonnenmacher, Mathieu; van Bakel, Harm; Hajjar, Roger J; Weber, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Directed evolution of adeno-associated virus (AAV) through successive rounds of phenotypic selection is a powerful method to isolate variants with improved properties from large libraries of capsid mutants. Importantly, AAV libraries used for directed evolution are based on the “natural” AAV genome organization where the capsid proteins are encoded in cis from replicating genomes. This is necessary to allow the recovery of the capsid DNA after each step of phenotypic selection. For directed evolution to be used successfully, it is essential to minimize the random mixing of capsomers and the encapsidation of nonmatching viral genomes during the production of the viral libraries. Here, we demonstrate that multiple AAV capsid variants expressed from Rep/Cap containing viral genomes result in near-homogeneous capsids that display an unexpectedly high capsid–DNA correlation. Next-generation sequencing of AAV progeny generated by bulk transfection of a semi-random peptide library showed a strong counter-selection of capsid variants encoding premature stop codons, which further supports a strong capsid–genome identity correlation. Overall, our observations demonstrate that production of “natural” AAVs results in low capsid mosaicism and high capsid–genome correlation. These unique properties allow the production of highly diverse AAV libraries in a one-step procedure with a minimal loss in phenotype–genotype correlation. PMID:25586687

  12. In vitro selection using a dual RNA library that allows primerless selection.

    PubMed

    Jarosch, Florian; Buchner, Klaus; Klussmann, Sven

    2006-07-19

    High affinity target-binding aptamers are identified from random oligonucleotide libraries by an in vitro selection process called Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (SELEX). Since the SELEX process includes a PCR amplification step the randomized region of the oligonucleotide libraries need to be flanked by two fixed primer binding sequences. These primer binding sites are often difficult to truncate because they may be necessary to maintain the structure of the aptamer or may even be part of the target binding motif. We designed a novel type of RNA library that carries fixed sequences which constrain the oligonucleotides into a partly double-stranded structure, thereby minimizing the risk that the primer binding sequences become part of the target-binding motif. Moreover, the specific design of the library including the use of tandem RNA Polymerase promoters allows the selection of oligonucleotides without any primer binding sequences. The library was used to select aptamers to the mirror-image peptide of ghrelin. Ghrelin is a potent stimulator of growth-hormone release and food intake. After selection, the identified aptamer sequences were directly synthesized in their mirror-image configuration. The final 44 nt-Spiegelmer, named NOX-B11-3, blocks ghrelin action in a cell culture assay displaying an IC50 of 4.5 nM at 37 degrees C.

  13. Libraries program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Congress authorized a library for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1879. The library was formally established in 1882 with the naming of the first librarian and began with a staff of three and a collection of 1,400 books. Today, the USGS Libraries Program is one of the world's largest Earth and natural science repositories and a resource of national significance used by researchers and the public worldwide.

  14. America's Star Libraries: Top-Rated Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Keith Curry; Lyons, Ray

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service 2009, Round 2, identifies 258 "star" libraries. Created by Keith Curry Lance and Ray Lyons and based on 2007 data from the IMLS, it rates 7,268 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three stars. All included libraries,…

  15. America's Star Libraries: Top-Rated Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Keith Curry; Lyons, Ray

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service 2009, Round 2, identifies 258 "star" libraries. Created by Keith Curry Lance and Ray Lyons and based on 2007 data from the IMLS, it rates 7,268 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three stars. All included libraries,…

  16. Enzyme engineering by targeted libraries.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Moshe; Tawfik, Dan S

    2013-01-01

    This review outlines the strategies we apply for directed enzyme evolution using targeted libraries, namely, libraries that diversify specific residues with predefined mutational compositions. The theoretical grounds underlining the design of such libraries are described, including the mutational load, the ratio of beneficial versus deleterious mutations, and screening capacity. We point out the advantage of using mutational spiking strategies for "hedging the bets," exploring a large number of potentially beneficial mutations, and tuning the library's mutational load. Also highlighted are the merits of low-throughput screens that measure multiple parameters at high accuracy, and of using the desired substrate and reaction conditions rather than surrogates. We subsequently describe library construction strategies (rational and analytical) based on structure and sequence analyses, including ancestral libraries, which are particularly suitable for low-throughput screens. We also discuss the critical role of including compensatory, stabilizing mutations during library construction. Finally, the design efficiency and the optimal mutational loads of libraries are assessed by comparing targeted mutational libraries versus libraries of random mutations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Library Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Nancy Kirkpatrick

    This workbook, designed for a Library Research course at Yavapai College, provides 15 lessons in advanced library reference skills. Each lesson provides explanatory text and reinforcement exercises. After Lesson I introduces specialized dictionaries and encyclopedias (e.g., for foreign languages, medicine, music, economics, social sciences, and…

  18. Privatizing Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerrard, Jane; Bolt, Nancy; Strege, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This timely special report from ALA Editions provides a succinct but comprehensive overview of the "privatization" of public libraries. It provides a history of the trend of local and state governments privatizing public services and assets, and then examines the history of public library privatization right up to the California…

  19. Library Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Nancy Kirkpatrick

    This workbook, designed for a Library Research course at Yavapai College, provides 15 lessons in advanced library reference skills. Each lesson provides explanatory text and reinforcement exercises. After Lesson I introduces specialized dictionaries and encyclopedias (e.g., for foreign languages, medicine, music, economics, social sciences, and…

  20. Privatizing Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerrard, Jane; Bolt, Nancy; Strege, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This timely special report from ALA Editions provides a succinct but comprehensive overview of the "privatization" of public libraries. It provides a history of the trend of local and state governments privatizing public services and assets, and then examines the history of public library privatization right up to the California…

  1. SiteLight: binding-site prediction using phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Inbal; Wolfson, Haim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2003-07-01

    Phage display enables the presentation of a large number of peptides on the surface of phage particles. Such libraries can be tested for binding to target molecules of interest by means of affinity selection. Here we present SiteLight, a novel computational tool for binding site prediction using phage display libraries. SiteLight is an algorithm that maps the 1D peptide library onto a three-dimensional (3D) protein surface. It is applicable to complexes made up of a protein Template and any type of molecule termed Target. Given the three-dimensional structure of a Template and a collection of sequences derived from biopanning against the Target, the Template interaction site with the Target is predicted. We have created a large diverse data set for assessing the ability of SiteLight to correctly predict binding sites. SiteLight predictive mapping enables discrimination between the binding and nonbinding parts of the surface. This prediction can be used to effectively reduce the surface by 75% without excluding the binding site. In 63% of the cases we have tested, there is at least one binding site prediction that overlaps the interface by at least 50%. These results suggest the applicability of phage display libraries for automated binding site prediction on three-dimensional structures. For most effective binding site prediction we propose using a random phage display library twice, to scan both binding partners of a given complex. The derived peptides are mapped to the other binding partner (now used as a Template). Here, the surface of each partner is reduced by 75%, focusing their relative positions with respect to each other significantly. Such information can be utilized to improve docking algorithms and scoring functions.

  2. Binding of Hemagglutinin and Influenza Virus to a Peptide-Conjugated Lipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Teruhiko; Shibata, Rabi; Sato, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) plays an important role in the first step of influenza virus (IFV) infection because it initiates the binding of the virus to the sialylgalactose linkages of the receptors on the host cells. We herein demonstrate that a HA-binding peptide immobilized on a solid support is available to bind to HA and IFV. We previously obtained a HA-binding pentapeptide (Ala-Arg-Leu-Pro-Arg), which was identified by phage-display selection against HAs from random peptide libraries. This peptide binds to the receptor-binding site of HA by mimicking sialic acid. A peptide-conjugated lipid (pep-PE) was chemically synthesized from the peptide and a saturated phospholipid. A lipid bilayer composed of pep-PE and an unsaturated phospholipid (DOPC) was immobilized on a mica plate; and the interaction between HA and the pep-PE/DOPC membrane was investigated using atomic force microscopy. The binding of IFV to the pep-PE/DOPC membrane was detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time reverse transcription PCR. Our results indicate that peptide-conjugated lipids are a useful molecular device for the detection of HA and IFV. PMID:27092124

  3. Tandem mass spectrometry spectral libraries and library searching.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Eric W

    2011-01-01

    Spectral library searching in the field of proteomics has been gaining visibility and use in the last few years, primarily due to the expansion of public proteomics data repositories and the large spectral libraries that can be generated from them. Spectral library searching has several advantages over conventional sequence searching: it is generally much faster, and has higher specificity and sensitivity. The speed increase is primarily, due to having a smaller, fully indexable search space of real spectra that are known to be observable. The increase in specificity and sensitivity is primarily due to the ability of a search engine to utilize the known intensities of the fragment ions, rather than just comparing with theoretical spectra as is done with sequence searching. The main disadvantage of spectral library searching is that one can only identify peptide ions that have been seen before and are stored in the spectral library. In this chapter, an overview of spectral library searching and the libraries currently available are presented.

  4. The First Salamander Defensin Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ke; Rong, Mingqiang; Lai, Ren

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have been widely identified from amphibian skins except salamanders. A novel antimicrobial peptide (CFBD) was isolated and characterized from skin secretions of the salamander, Cynops fudingensis. The cDNA encoding CFBD precursor was cloned from the skin cDNA library of C. fudingensis. The precursor was composed of three domains: signal peptide of 17 residues, mature peptide of 41 residues and intervening propeptide of 3 residues. There are six cysteines in the sequence of mature CFBD peptide, which possibly form three disulfide-bridges. CFBD showed antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli. This peptide could be classified into family of β-defensin based on its seqeuence similarity with β-defensins from other vertebrates. Evolution analysis indicated that CFBD was close to fish β-defensin. As far as we know, CFBD is the first β-defensin antimicrobial peptide from salamanders. PMID:24386139

  5. The first salamander defensin antimicrobial peptide.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ping; Yang, Shilong; Shen, Chuanbin; Jiang, Ke; Rong, Mingqiang; Lai, Ren

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have been widely identified from amphibian skins except salamanders. A novel antimicrobial peptide (CFBD) was isolated and characterized from skin secretions of the salamander, Cynops fudingensis. The cDNA encoding CFBD precursor was cloned from the skin cDNA library of C. fudingensis. The precursor was composed of three domains: signal peptide of 17 residues, mature peptide of 41 residues and intervening propeptide of 3 residues. There are six cysteines in the sequence of mature CFBD peptide, which possibly form three disulfide-bridges. CFBD showed antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli. This peptide could be classified into family of β-defensin based on its sequence similarity with β-defensins from other vertebrates. Evolution analysis indicated that CFBD was close to fish β-defensin. As far as we know, CFBD is the first β-defensin antimicrobial peptide from salamanders.

  6. Web Technology in Public Libraries: Findings from Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prabha, Chandra; Irwin, Raymond

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the ways in which public libraries are using Web technology and describes a study that assessed public library accessibility via the Web based on a random sample. Highlights include public library structures; hosts of public library Web sites; size and design of Web sites; and size of the population served. (Author/LRW)

  7. Evolutionary optimization of peptide substrates for proteases that exhibit rapid hydrolysis kinetics.

    PubMed

    Boulware, Kevin T; Jabaiah, Abeer; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2010-06-15

    Protease cleavage site recognition motifs can be identified using protease substrate discovery methodologies, but typically exhibit non-optimal specificity and activity. To enable evolutionary optimization of substrate cleavage kinetics, a two-color cellular library of peptide substrates (CLiPS) methodology was developed. Two-color CLiPS was applied to identify peptide substrates for the tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease from a random pentapeptide library, which were then optimized by screening of a focused, extended substrate library. Quantitative library screening yielded seven amino acid substrates exhibiting rapid hydrolysis by TEV protease and high sequence similarity to the native seven-amino-acid substrate, with a strong consensus of EXLYPhiQG. Comparison of hydrolysis rates for a family of closely related substrates indicates that the native seven-residue TEV substrate co-evolved with TEV protease to facilitate highly efficient hydrolysis. Consensus motifs revealed by screening enabled database identification of a family of related, putative viral protease substrates. More generally, our results suggest that substrate evolution using CLiPS may be useful for optimizing substrate selectivity and activity to enable the design of more effective protease activity probes, molecular imaging agents, and prodrugs.

  8. Collection of phage-peptide probes for HIV-1 immunodominant loop-epitope.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Rodríguez, Yadira; Gazarian, Tatiana; Rowley, Merrill; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Gazarian, Karlen

    2007-02-01

    Early diagnosis and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection, which remains a serious public health threat, is inhibited by the lack of reagents that elicit antiviral responses in the immune system. To create mimotopes (peptide models of epitopes) of the most immunodominant epitope, CSGKLIC, that occurs as a loop on the envelope gp41 glycoprotein and is a key participant in infection, we used phage-display technology involving biopanning of large random libraries with IgG of HIV-1-infected patients. Under the conditions used, library screening with IgG from patient serum was directed to the CSGKLIC epitope. Three rounds of selection converted a 12 mer library of 10(9) sequences into a population in which up to 79% of phage bore a family of CxxKxxC sequences ("x" designates a non-epitope amino acid). Twenty-one phage clones displaying the most frequently selected peptides were obtained and were shown to display the principal structural (sequence and conformational), antigenic and immunogenic features of the HIV-1 immunodominant loop-epitope. Notably, when the mixture of the phage mimotopes was injected into mice, it induced 2- to 3-fold higher titers of antibody to the HIV-1 epitope than could be induced from individual mimotopes. The described approach could be applicable for accurately reproducing HIV-1 epitope structural and immunological patterns by generation of specialized viral epitope libraries for use in diagnosis and therapy.

  9. Expression, purification and characterization of a group of lectin-like peptides from the spider Ornithoctonus huwena.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liping; Peng, Li; Zhang, Yongqun; Chen, Jinjun; Zhang, Dongyi; Liang, Songping

    2009-04-01

    By sequencing random clones from the venom gland cDNA library of the spider Ornithoctonus huwena, a transcript, named SHL-Ib1, encoding a lectin-like peptide was cloned. The amino acid sequence of the putative mature peptide of SHL-Ib1 is identical, except for seven different residues, with that of SHL-I, a lectin found in the venom of O. huwena. The mature peptides of SHL-Ib1b and SHL-Ib1c are the mutants of SHL-Ib1 with two or three amino acid residues truncated at the C-terminal. The recombinant SHL-Ib1b and SHL-Ib1c were expressed successfully by the yeast expression system and purified by using a combination of ion-exchange and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The molecular masses of the two expressed peptides were identified by mass spectrometry, indicating that the C-terminals of the two peptides were not amidated. The two peptides can agglutinate human erythrocytes at minimal concentrations of 0.75 and 1.475mg/ml, respectively. Structure modeling of SHL-Ib1 has given a clue to the low agglutination bioactivities of these recombinant toxins. These lectin-like peptides, due to the small molecular sizes, may have the advantage to investigate the binding mechanism of the lectin and have the potential to be the carrier for drug delivery.

  10. Selection of short peptides with high affinity for various metal ions: Strategies and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ataai, M.M.; Whiteford, W.K.

    1995-12-01

    The authors have used a random combinatorial library to generate an immensely diverse population of candidate peptides and have screened the library, using novel strategies, for selection of peptides of displaying high affinity towards a target metal. As the pool of available binding candidates, we have employed a hexapeptide library, containing essentially all the possible combination of sequences for a hexapeptide, expressed on surface of phage. Our experiments with copper demonstrated that our amplification and selection procedure is very effective. Out of 20 clones sequenced, after four rounds of amplification and selection 18 shared the same sequence. The corresponding peptide which contain two histidines was then synthesized and its binding affinity for copper was assessed. The results revealed that the selected peptide has a very high affinity for copper; its affinity is significantly higher than any hexapeptide which we are aware of including six adjacent histidine, (his)6, frequently used as an affinity tag in bioseparation. Selection of short peptides with high affinity and selectivity for arsenic, mercury, and lead is also underway. We envision important application of this work including discovery of highly effective drugs for treating metal toxicity replacing the chelating agents currently in use, and development of inexpensive whole cell adsorbents for toxicity replacing the chelating agents currently in use, and development of inexpensive whole cell adsorbents for the removal of toxic metals from dilute aqueous streams because dead cells or isolated cell wall, covered by the desired metal-binding domain may serve as high affinity and high capacity metal adsorbents. Other potential application will also be discussed in this presentation.

  11. [The Presidential Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, John

    There are seven Presidential libraries in various states of existence, from quite active to proposed: (1) Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, (2) Harry S. Truman Library, (3) Herbert Hoover Library, (4) Dwight D. Eisenhower Library, (5) John F. Kennedy Memorial Library (6) Lyndon B. Johnson Library and (7) Rutherford B. Hayes Memorial Library. Each…

  12. Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT -1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    Chicago, IL - poster presented at Trials in Progress Session World Conference on Lung Cancer , Amsterdam, Jul 2011, slide presentation Meso Foundation...Scheinberg DA. WT1 peptide vaccinations induce CD4 and CD8 T cell immune responses in patients with mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer , Cancer ...Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality Therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Marjorie Zauderer CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sloan-Kettering Cancer

  13. Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 1970

    1970-01-01

    Building data is given for the following academic libraries: (1) Rosary College, River Forest, Illinois; (2) Abilene Christian College, Abilene, Texas; (3) University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California. (MF)

  14. Digital Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Edward A.; Urs, Shalini R.

    2002-01-01

    Provides an overview of digital libraries research, practice, and literature. Highlights include new technologies; redefining roles; historical background; trends; creating digital content, including conversion; metadata; organizing digital resources; services; access; information retrieval; searching; natural language processing; visualization;…

  15. Digital Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Edward A.; Urs, Shalini R.

    2002-01-01

    Provides an overview of digital libraries research, practice, and literature. Highlights include new technologies; redefining roles; historical background; trends; creating digital content, including conversion; metadata; organizing digital resources; services; access; information retrieval; searching; natural language processing; visualization;…

  16. Presidential Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Garold L.

    1972-01-01

    Presented are a description of the history of the presidential papers in the United States, the development and functions of the presidential library system, and a brief look at future developments. (39 references) (Author)

  17. Callpath Library

    SciTech Connect

    Gamblin, T.

    2013-11-09

    The "Callpath Library" is a software abstraction layer over a number of stack tracing utilities. It allows tool develoopers to conveniently represent and mNipulate call paths gathered fro U. Wisconsin's Stackwalker API and GNU Backtrace.

  18. Peptide imprinted receptors for the determination of the small cell lung cancer associated biomarker progastrin releasing peptide.

    PubMed

    Qader, Abed Abdel; Urraca, Javier; Torsetnes, Silje Bøen; Tønnesen, Finn; Reubsaet, Léon; Sellergren, Börje

    2014-11-28

    Peptide imprinted polymers were developed for detection of progastrin releasing peptide (ProGRP); a low abundant blood based biomarker for small cell lung cancer. The polymers targeted the proteotypic nona-peptide sequence NLLGLIEAK and were used for selective enrichment of the proteotypic peptide prior to LCMS based quantification. Peptide imprinted polymers with the best affinity characteristics were first identified from a 96-polymer combinatorial library. The effects of functional monomers, crosslinker, porogen, and template on adsorption capacity and selectivity for NLLGLIEAK were investigated and optimized. Ultimately, a solid phase extraction method was developed for highly selective enrichment of the target peptide from tryptic digests.

  19. Coordinated series of studies to evaluate characteristics and mechanisms of acute coronary syndromes in high-risk patients randomly assigned to enoxaparin or unfractionated heparin: design and rationale of the SYNERGY Library.

    PubMed

    Petersen, John L; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Becker, Richard C; Goodman, Shaun G; Kleiman, Neal S; Marian, A J; Stone, Gregg W; Lansky, Alexandra J; Lincoff, A Michael; Hazen, Stanley L; Nessel, Christopher C; Toro-Figueroa, Luis; Tate, Lynn; Reist, Craig J; Cohen, Marc; Califf, Robert M; Ferguson, James J

    2004-08-01

    Clinical trials and accompanying substudies in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) have over the last several years yielded a wealth of knowledge about the pathophysiology and management of this high-risk condition. The Superior Yield of the New strategy of Enoxaparin, Revascularization, and GlYcoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (SYNERGY) trial is a large-scale, randomized, controlled trial evaluating the effect of enoxaparin and unfractionated heparin on death and myocardial infarction in high-risk patients presenting with non-ST-segment elevation ACS. The SYNERGY Library has been designed as a coordinated series of investigations with simultaneous data acquisition on the same cohort of approximately 500 SYNERGY patients at 60 centers in North America. Specifically, electrocardiograms, coronary arteriograms, inflammatory markers, coagulation studies, and genetic samples will be collected and processed at core laboratory facilities, and the results will be stored in a central repository. This novel strategy for substudy investigation is unprecedented in cardiovascular clinical trials. The goal is to gain significant understanding about this patient population, discover new principles of pathophysiology, identify novel pharmacologic targets, and streamline further drug development. It is hoped that the SYNERGY Library will serve as a model for future substudy design to maximize academic insight within the framework of a large-scale, multicenter trial.

  20. Chemical library screening using a SPR-based inhibition in solution assay: simulations and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Choulier, Laurence; Nominé, Yves; Zeder-Lutz, Gabrielle; Charbonnier, Sebastian; Didier, Bruno; Jung, Marie-Louise; Altschuh, Danièle

    2013-09-17

    We have developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based inhibition in solution assay (ISA) to search for inhibitors of the medium affinity (KD = 0.8 μM) interaction between an E6-derived peptide (E6peptide) immobilized on the sensor and a PDZ domain (MAGI-1 PDZ1) in the mobile phase. DZ domains are widespread protein-protein interaction modules that recognize the C-terminus of various partners. Simulations indicated that relatively low compound concentrations (10 μM) and limited peptide densities (Rmax < 200 resonance units) should allow the detection of inhibitors with a target affinity close to 100 μM, which was then demonstrated experimentally. ISA screening, carried out on the Prestwick Chemical Library® (1120 compounds), identified 36 compounds that inhibited the interaction by more than 5%. Concentration-dependent ISA, carried out on a subset of 19 potential inhibitors, indicated that 13 of these indeed affected the interaction between MAGI-1 PDZ1 and the E6peptide. No effect was observed for 84 compounds randomly chosen among noninhibitors. One of the four best inhibitors was a peptide binder, and three were PDZ binders with KD in the 10-50 μM range. We propose that a medium (μM) affinity between the target and surface-bound partner is optimal for SPR-based ISA screening.

  1. Bioactive Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Daliri, Eric Banan-Mwine; Oh, Deog H.; Lee, Byong H.

    2017-01-01

    The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development. PMID:28445415

  2. Bioactive Peptides.

    PubMed

    Daliri, Eric Banan-Mwine; Oh, Deog H; Lee, Byong H

    2017-04-26

    The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  3. Isolation of a highly specific ligand for the alpha 5 beta 1 integrin from a phage display library

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that the alpha 5 beta 1 integrin selects cysteine pair-containing RGD peptides from a phage display library based on a random hexapeptide. We have therefore searched for more selective peptides for this integrin using a larger phage display library, where heptapeptides are flanked by cysteine residues, thus making the inserts potentially cyclic. Most of the phage sequences that bound to alpha 5 beta 1 (69 of 125) contained the RGD motif. Some of the heptapeptides contained an NGR motif. As the NGR sequence occurs in the cell-binding region of the fibronectin molecule, this sequence could contribute to the specific recognition of fibronectin by alpha 5 beta 1. Selection for high affinity peptides for alpha 5 beta 1 surprisingly yielded a sequence RRETAWA that does not bear obvious resemblance to known integrin ligand sequences. The synthetic cyclic peptide GACRRETAWACGA (*CRRETAWAC*) was a potent inhibitor of alpha 5 beta 1-mediated cell attachment to fibronectin. This peptide is nearly specific for the alpha 5 beta 1 integrin, because much higher concentrations were needed to inhibit the alpha v beta 1 integrin, and there was no effect on alpha v beta 3- and alpha v beta 5-mediated cell attachment to vitronectin. The peptide also did not bind to the alpha IIb beta 3 integrin. *CRRETAWAC* appears to interact with the same or an overlapping binding site in alpha 5 beta 1 as RGD, because cell attachment to *CRRETAWAC* coated on plastic was divalent cation dependent and could be blocked by an RGD-containing peptide. These results reveal a novel binding specificity in the alpha 5 beta 1 integrin. PMID:7507494

  4. Novel p16 binding peptide development for p16-overexpressing cancer cell detection using phage display.

    PubMed

    Khemthongcharoen, Numfon; Ruangpracha, Athisake; Sarapukdee, Pongsak; Rattanavarin, Santi; Jolivot, Romuald; Jarujareet, Ungkarn; Plaimas, Kitiporn; Bhattarakosol, Parvapan; Patumraj, Suthiluk; Piyawattanametha, Wibool

    2015-04-01

    Protein p(16INK4a) (p16) is a well-known biomarker for diagnosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) related cancers. In this work, we identify novel p16 binding peptides by using phage display selection method. A random heptamer phage display library was screened on purified recombinant p16 protein-coated plates to elute only the bound phages from p16 surfaces. Binding affinity of the bound phages was compared with each other by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), fluorescence imaging technique, and bioinformatic computations. Binding specificity and binding selectivity of the best candidate phage-displayed p16 binding peptide were evaluated by peptide blocking experiment in competition with p16 monoclonal antibody and fluorescence imaging technique, respectively. Five candidate phage-displayed peptides were isolated from the phage display selection method. All candidate p16 binding phages show better binding affinity than wild-type phage in ELISA test, but only three of them can discriminate p16-overexpressing cancer cell, CaSki, from normal uterine fibroblast cell, HUF, with relative fluorescence intensities from 2.6 to 4.2-fold greater than those of wild-type phage. Bioinformatic results indicate that peptide 'Ser-His-Ser-Leu-Leu-Ser-Ser' binds to p16 molecule with the best binding score and does not interfere with the common protein functions of p16. Peptide blocking experiment shows that the phage-displayed peptide 'Ser-His-Ser-Leu-Leu-Ser-Ser' can conceal p16 from monoclonal antibody interaction. This phage clone also selectively interacts with the p16 positive cell lines, and thus, it can be applied for p16-overexpressing cell detection. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Enhancing access to reports of randomized trials published world-wide – the contribution of EMBASE records to the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Carol; Eisinga, Anne; McDonald, Steve; Paul, Nina

    2008-01-01

    Background Randomized trials are essential in assessing the effects of healthcare interventions and are a key component in systematic reviews of effectiveness. Searching for reports of randomized trials in databases is problematic due to the absence of appropriate indexing terms until the 1990s and inconsistent application of these indexing terms thereafter. Objectives The objectives of this study are to devise a search strategy for identifying reports of randomized trials in EMBASE which are not already indexed as trials in MEDLINE and to make these reports easily accessible by including them in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, with the permission of Elsevier, the publishers of EMBASE. Methods A highly sensitive search strategy was designed for EMBASE based on free-text and thesaurus terms which occurred frequently in the titles, abstracts, EMTREE terms (or some combination of these) of reports of trials indexed in EMBASE. This search strategy was run against EMBASE from 1980 to 2005 (1974 to 2005 for four of the terms) and records retrieved by the search, which were not already indexed as randomized trials in MEDLINE, were downloaded from EMBASE, printed and read. An analysis of the language of publication was conducted for the reports of trials published in 2005 (the most recent year completed at the time of this study). Results Twenty-two search terms were used (including nine which were later rejected due to poor cumulative precision). More than a third of a million records were downloaded and scanned and approximately 80,000 reports of trials were identified which were not already indexed as randomized trials in MEDLINE. These are now easily identifiable in CENTRAL, in The Cochrane Library. Cumulative sensitivity ranged from 0.1% to 60% and cumulative precision ranged from 8% to 61%. The truncated term 'random$' identified 60% of the total number of reports of trials but only 35% of the more than 130

  6. A randomized, controlled comparative study of the wrinkle reduction benefits of a cosmetic niacinamide/peptide/retinyl propionate product regimen vs. a prescription 0.02% tretinoin product regimen.

    PubMed

    Fu, J J J; Hillebrand, G G; Raleigh, P; Li, J; Marmor, M J; Bertucci, V; Grimes, P E; Mandy, S H; Perez, M I; Weinkle, S H; Kaczvinsky, J R

    2010-03-01

    Tretinoin is considered the benchmark prescription topical therapy for improving fine facial wrinkles, but skin tolerance issues can affect patient compliance. In contrast, cosmetic antiwrinkle products are well tolerated but are generally presumed to be less efficacious than tretinoin. To compare the efficacy of a cosmetic moisturizer regimen vs. a prescription regimen with 0.02% tretinoin for improving the appearance of facial wrinkles. An 8-week, randomized, parallel-group study was conducted in 196 women with moderate to moderately severe periorbital wrinkles. Following 2 weeks washout, subjects on the cosmetic regimen (n = 99) used a sun protection factor (SPF) 30 moisturizing lotion containing 5% niacinamide, peptides and antioxidants, a moisturizing cream containing niacinamide and peptides, and a targeted wrinkle product containing niacinamide, peptides and 0.3% retinyl propionate. Subjects on the prescription regimen (n = 97) used 0.02% tretinoin plus moisturizing SPF 30 sunscreen. Subject cohorts (n = 25) continued treatment for an additional 16 weeks. Changes in facial wrinkling were assessed by both expert grading and image analysis of digital images of subjects' faces and by self-assessment questionnaire. Product tolerance was assessed via clinical erythema and dryness grading, subject self-assessment, and determinations of skin barrier integrity (transepidermal water loss) and stratum corneum protein changes. The cosmetic regimen significantly improved wrinkle appearance after 8 weeks relative to tretinoin, with comparable benefits after 24 weeks. The cosmetic regimen was significantly better tolerated than tretinoin through 8 weeks by all measures. An appropriately designed cosmetic regimen can improve facial wrinkle appearance comparably with the benchmark prescription treatment, with improved tolerability.

  7. A randomized, controlled comparative study of the wrinkle reduction benefits of a cosmetic niacinamide/peptide/retinyl propionate product regimen vs. a prescription 0·02% tretinoin product regimen

    PubMed Central

    Fu, JJJ; Hillebrand, GG; Raleigh, P; Li, J; Marmor, MJ; Bertucci, V; Grimes, PE; Mandy, SH; Perez, MI; Weinkle, SH; Kaczvinsky, JR

    2010-01-01

    Background Tretinoin is considered the benchmark prescription topical therapy for improving fine facial wrinkles, but skin tolerance issues can affect patient compliance. In contrast, cosmetic antiwrinkle products are well tolerated but are generally presumed to be less efficacious than tretinoin. Objectives To compare the efficacy of a cosmetic moisturizer regimen vs. a prescription regimen with 0·02% tretinoin for improving the appearance of facial wrinkles. Methods An 8-week, randomized, parallel-group study was conducted in 196 women with moderate to moderately severe periorbital wrinkles. Following 2 weeks washout, subjects on the cosmetic regimen (n=99) used a sun protection factor (SPF) 30 moisturizing lotion containing 5% niacinamide, peptides and antioxidants, a moisturizing cream containing niacinamide and peptides, and a targeted wrinkle product containing niacinamide, peptides and 0·3% retinyl propionate. Subjects on the prescription regimen (n=97) used 0·02% tretinoin plus moisturizing SPF 30 sunscreen. Subject cohorts (n=25) continued treatment for an additional 16 weeks. Changes in facial wrinkling were assessed by both expert grading and image analysis of digital images of subjects’ faces and by self-assessment questionnaire. Product tolerance was assessed via clinical erythema and dryness grading, subject self-assessment, and determinations of skin barrier integrity (transepidermal water loss) and stratum corneum protein changes. Results The cosmetic regimen significantly improved wrinkle appearance after 8 weeks relative to tretinoin, with comparable benefits after 24 weeks. The cosmetic regimen was significantly better tolerated than tretinoin through 8 weeks by all measures. Conclusions An appropriately designed cosmetic regimen can improve facial wrinkle appearance comparably with the benchmark prescription treatment, with improved tolerability. PMID:20374604

  8. America's Star Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  9. Personal Virtual Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2004-01-01

    Virtual libraries are becoming more and more common. Most states have a virtual library. A growing number of public libraries have a virtual presence on the Web. Virtual libraries are a growing addition to school library media collections. The next logical step would be personal virtual libraries. A personal virtual library (PVL) is a collection…

  10. America's Star Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  11. Personal Virtual Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2004-01-01

    Virtual libraries are becoming more and more common. Most states have a virtual library. A growing number of public libraries have a virtual presence on the Web. Virtual libraries are a growing addition to school library media collections. The next logical step would be personal virtual libraries. A personal virtual library (PVL) is a collection…

  12. Study on CCR5 analogs and affinity peptides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingping; Deng, Riqiang; Wu, Wenyan

    2012-03-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor of human chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a key target in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection process due to its major involvement in binding to the HIV type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 and facilitating virus entry into the cells. The identification of naturally occurring CCR5 mutations (especially CCR5 delta-32) has allowed us to address the CCR5 molecule as a promising target to prevent or resist HIV infection in vivo. To obtain high-affinity peptides that can be used to block CCR5, CCR5 analogs with high conformational similarity are required. In this study, two recombinant proteins named CCR5 N-Linker-E2 and CCR5 mN-E1-E2 containing the fragments of the CCR5 N-terminal, the first extracellular loop or the second extracellular loop are cloned from a full-length human CCR5 cDNA. The recombinant human CCR5 analogs with self-cleavage activity of the intein Mxe or Ssp in the vector pTwinI were then produced with a high-yield expression and purification system in Escherichia coli. Experiments of extracellular epitope-activity identification (such as immunoprecipitation and indirective/competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) confirmed the close similarity between the epitope activity of the CCR5 analogs and that of the natural CCR5, suggesting the applicability of the recombinant CCR5 analogs as antagonists of the chemokine ligands. Subsequent screening of high-affinity peptides from the phage random-peptides library acquired nine polypeptides, which could be used as CCR5 peptide antagonists. The CCR5 analogs and affinity peptides elucidated in this paper provide us with a basis for further study of the mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 infection.

  13. Identification and characterization of Strychnine binding peptide using phage display screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Wang, Min; Qiu, Zheng; Wang, Xiao-Meng; Xu, Chun-Lei; Zhang, Xia

    2017-04-04

    Phage display has been proved in drug development as a high-throughput method for identifying specific cellular target of different drugs. However, phage display remains an intricate process for insoluble small chemicals because of the difficulty of presenting the molecules to the phages without occupying or destroying the very limited functional groups. In the present study, with Strychnine (Stry) selected as a model compound, we have developed an alternative in vitro bio-panning method against insoluble suspension. In this study, a phage library displaying random sequences of fifteen peptides was employed to screen for interactions between Stry and its cellular selective binding peptides, which are of great value to have a complete understanding of the mechanism of Stry for its antitumor activity. After four rounds of biopanning, a selection of 100 binding clones were randomly selected and subjected to modified anti-proliferation assays and diffusion assays to evaluate their binding affinity to Stry, after which eleven clones were identified as positive binding clones. After DNA sequencing and characterization, the corresponding peptides were found to be associated with tumorigenesis, indicating that Stry may play its antitumor activity by mediating several related actions of tumor development. Our study provided a feasible scheme for the interaction of chemical compounds with cellular binding peptides. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. The structure of a thermophilic kinase shapes fitness upon random circular permutation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Alicia M.; Mehta, Manan M.; Thomas, Emily E.; Atkinson, Joshua T.; Segall-Shapiro, Thomas H.; Liu, Shirley; Silberg, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins can be engineered for synthetic biology through circular permutation, a sequence rearrangement where native protein termini become linked and new termini are created elsewhere through backbone fission. However, it remains challenging to anticipate a protein’s functional tolerance to circular permutation. Here, we describe new transposons for creating libraries of randomly circularly permuted proteins that minimize peptide additions at their termini, and we use transposase mutagenesis to study the tolerance of a thermophilic adenylate kinase (AK) to circular permutation. We find that libraries expressing permuted AK with either short or long peptides amended to their N-terminus yield distinct sets of active variants and present evidence that this trend arises because permuted protein expression varies across libraries. Mapping all sites that tolerate backbone cleavage onto AK structure reveals that the largest contiguous regions of sequence that lack cleavage sites are proximal to the phosphotransfer site. A comparison of our results with a range of structure-derived parameters further showed that retention of function correlates to the strongest extent with the distance to the phosphotransfer site, amino acid variability in an AK family sequence alignment, and residue-level deviations in superimposed AK structures. Our work illustrates how permuted protein libraries can be created with minimal peptide additions using transposase mutagenesis, and they reveal a challenge of maintaining consistent expression across permuted variants in a library that minimizes peptide additions. Furthermore, these findings provide a basis for interpreting responses of thermophilic phosphotransferases to circular permutation by calibrating how different structure-derived parameters relate to retention of function in a cellular selection. PMID:26976658

  15. In Silico Models for Designing and Discovering Novel Anticancer Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Atul; Kapoor, Pallavi; Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, G. P. S.

    2013-10-01

    Use of therapeutic peptides in cancer therapy has been receiving considerable attention in the recent years. Present study describes the development of computational models for predicting and discovering novel anticancer peptides. Preliminary analysis revealed that Cys, Gly, Ile, Lys, and Trp are dominated at various positions in anticancer peptides. Support vector machine models were developed using amino acid composition and binary profiles as input features on main dataset that contains experimentally validated anticancer peptides and random peptides derived from SwissProt database. In addition, models were developed on alternate dataset that contains antimicrobial peptides instead of random peptides. Binary profiles-based model achieved maximum accuracy 91.44% with MCC 0.83. We have developed a webserver, which would be helpful in: (i) predicting minimum mutations required for improving anticancer potency; (ii) virtual screening of peptides for discovering novel anticancer peptides, and (iii) scanning natural proteins for identification of anticancer peptides (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/anticp/).

  16. Peptide-guided targeting of GPR55 for anti-cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Giovanna Mosca, Maria; Mimmi, Selena; D’Angelo, Rosa; Quinto, Ileana; Scala, Giuseppe; Mariggiò, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    Expression of the lysophosphatidylinositol receptor GPR55 correlates with invasive potential of metastatic cells and bone metastasis formation of different types of tumors. These findings suggest a role for GPR55 signaling in cancer progression, including in lymphoproliferative diseases. Here, we screened a M13-phage-displayed random library using the bait of HEK293 cells that heterologously expressed full-length HA-GPR55. We selected a set of phagotopes that carried 7-mer insert peptides flanked by a pair of cysteine residues, which resulted in cyclized peptides. Sequencing of selected phagotopes dictated the primary structure for the synthetic FITC-labeled peptide P1, which was analyzed for binding specificity to immunoprecipitated HA-GPR55, and to endogenously expressed GPR55, using cells interfered or not for GPR55, as well as for co-localization imaging with HA-GPR55 at the membrane level. The peptide P1 stimulated GPR55 endocytosis and inhibited GPR55-dependent proliferation of EHEB and DeFew cells, two human B-lymphoblastoid cell lines. Our data support the potential therapeutic application of peptide ligands of GPR55 for targeting and inhibiting growth of neoplastic cells, which overexpress GPR55 and are dependent on GPR55 signaling for their proliferation. PMID:28029647

  17. Hishot Display—A New Combinatorial Display for Obtaining Target-Recognizing Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Shoutaro; Yamashita, Makiko; Kageyama, Taihei; Ohtsu, Takashi; Suzuki, Katsuo; Kato, Shintaro; Akitomi, Joe; Furuichi, Makio; Waga, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    Display technologies are procedures used for isolating target-recognizing peptides without using immunized animals. In this study, we describe a new display method, named Hishot display, that uses Escherichia coli and an expression plasmid to isolate target-recognizing peptides. This display method is based on the formation, in bacteria, of complexes between a polyhistidine (His)-tagged peptide including random sequences and the peptide-encoding mRNA including an RNA aptamer against the His-tag. When this system was tested using a sequence encoding His-tagged green fluorescent protein that included an RNA aptamer against the His-tag, the collection of mRNA encoding the protein was dependent on the RNA aptamer. Using this display method and a synthetic library of surrogate single-chain variable fragments consisting of VpreB and Ig heavy-chain variable domains, it was possible to isolate clones that could specifically recognize a particular target (intelectin-1 or tumor necrosis factor-α). These clones were obtained as soluble proteins produced by E. coli, and the purified peptide clones recognizing intelectin-1 could be used as detectors for sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The Hishot display will be a useful method to add to the repertoire of display technologies. PMID:24386149

  18. Hishot display--a new combinatorial display for obtaining target-recognizing peptides.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Shoutaro; Yamashita, Makiko; Kageyama, Taihei; Ohtsu, Takashi; Suzuki, Katsuo; Kato, Shintaro; Akitomi, Joe; Furuichi, Makio; Waga, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    Display technologies are procedures used for isolating target-recognizing peptides without using immunized animals. In this study, we describe a new display method, named Hishot display, that uses Escherichia coli and an expression plasmid to isolate target-recognizing peptides. This display method is based on the formation, in bacteria, of complexes between a polyhistidine (His)-tagged peptide including random sequences and the peptide-encoding mRNA including an RNA aptamer against the His-tag. When this system was tested using a sequence encoding His-tagged green fluorescent protein that included an RNA aptamer against the His-tag, the collection of mRNA encoding the protein was dependent on the RNA aptamer. Using this display method and a synthetic library of surrogate single-chain variable fragments consisting of VpreB and Ig heavy-chain variable domains, it was possible to isolate clones that could specifically recognize a particular target (intelectin-1 or tumor necrosis factor-α). These clones were obtained as soluble proteins produced by E. coli, and the purified peptide clones recognizing intelectin-1 could be used as detectors for sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The Hishot display will be a useful method to add to the repertoire of display technologies.

  19. Specific binding of GM1-binding peptides to high-density GM1 in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Teruhiko; Iijima, Kazutoshi; Nakamura, Miwa; Taki, Takao; Okahata, Yoshio; Sato, Toshinori

    2007-01-16

    The ganglioside Galbeta1-3GalNAcbeta1-4(Neu5Acalpha2-3)Galbeta1-4Glcbeta1-1'Cer (GM1) is an important receptor. We have previously identified GM1-binding peptides based on affinity selection from a random peptide library. In the present study, we determined the amino acids essential for binding GM1 and investigated the specific interaction with GM1 in the lipid membrane. Arginines and aromatic amino acids in the consensus sequence (W/F)RxL(xP/Px)xFxx(Rx/xR)xP contributed to the ability of the peptides to bind GM1. The peptide p3, VWRLLAPPFSNRLLP, having the consensus sequence, showed high affinity for GM1 with a dissociation constant of 1.2 microM. Furthermore, the density-dependent binding of p3 was investigated using mixed monolayers of GM1 and Glcbeta1-1'Cer (GlcCer). p3 binds preferentially to high-density GM1, and its interaction with GM1 was found to be cooperative based on a Hill plot. These results indicated that a lateral assembly of GM1 molecules was required for the recognition of carbohydrates by p3. The GM1-binding peptide played a role as a unique anti-GM1 probe differing from the cholera toxin B subunit or antibodies.

  20. Antibodies Directed against a Peptide Epitope of a Klebsiella pneumoniae-Derived Protein Are Present in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Tinazzi, Elisa; Moretta, Francesca; D’Angelo, Salvatore; Olivieri, Ignazio; Lunardi, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis of unknown origin. Its autoimmune origin has been suggested but never proven. Several reports have implicated Klebsiella pneumoniae as a triggering or perpetuating factor in AS; however, its role in the disease pathogenesis remains debated. Moreover, despite extensive investigations, a biomarker for AS has not yet been identified. To clarify these issues, we screened a random peptide library with pooled IgGs obtained from 40 patients with AS. A peptide (AS peptide) selected from the library was recognized by serum IgGs from 170 of 200 (85%) patients with AS but not by serum specimens from 100 healthy controls. Interestingly, the AS peptide shows a sequence similarity with several molecules expressed at the fibrocartilaginous sites that are primarily involved in the AS inflammatory process. Moreover, the peptide is highly homologous to a Klebsiella pneumoniae dipeptidase (DPP) protein. The antibody affinity purified against the AS peptide recognizes the autoantigens and the DPP protein. Furthermore, serum IgG antibodies against the Klebsiella DPP121-145 peptide epitope were detected in 190 of 200 patients with AS (95%), 3 of 200 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (1.5%) and only 1 of 100 (1%) patients with psoriatic arthritis. Such reactivity was not detected in healthy control donors. Our results show that antibodies directed against an epitope of a Klebsiella pneumoniae-derived protein are present in nearly all patients with AS. In the absence of serological biomarkers for AS, such antibodies may represent a useful tool in the diagnosis of the disease. PMID:28135336

  1. Antibodies Directed against a Peptide Epitope of a Klebsiella pneumoniae-Derived Protein Are Present in Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Puccetti, Antonio; Dolcino, Marzia; Tinazzi, Elisa; Moretta, Francesca; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Olivieri, Ignazio; Lunardi, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis of unknown origin. Its autoimmune origin has been suggested but never proven. Several reports have implicated Klebsiella pneumoniae as a triggering or perpetuating factor in AS; however, its role in the disease pathogenesis remains debated. Moreover, despite extensive investigations, a biomarker for AS has not yet been identified. To clarify these issues, we screened a random peptide library with pooled IgGs obtained from 40 patients with AS. A peptide (AS peptide) selected from the library was recognized by serum IgGs from 170 of 200 (85%) patients with AS but not by serum specimens from 100 healthy controls. Interestingly, the AS peptide shows a sequence similarity with several molecules expressed at the fibrocartilaginous sites that are primarily involved in the AS inflammatory process. Moreover, the peptide is highly homologous to a Klebsiella pneumoniae dipeptidase (DPP) protein. The antibody affinity purified against the AS peptide recognizes the autoantigens and the DPP protein. Furthermore, serum IgG antibodies against the Klebsiella DPP121-145 peptide epitope were detected in 190 of 200 patients with AS (95%), 3 of 200 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (1.5%) and only 1 of 100 (1%) patients with psoriatic arthritis. Such reactivity was not detected in healthy control donors. Our results show that antibodies directed against an epitope of a Klebsiella pneumoniae-derived protein are present in nearly all patients with AS. In the absence of serological biomarkers for AS, such antibodies may represent a useful tool in the diagnosis of the disease.

  2. Adsorption behavior of linear and cyclic genetically engineered platinum binding peptides.

    PubMed

    Seker, Urartu Ozgur Safak; Wilson, Brandon; Dincer, Sevil; Kim, Il Won; Oren, Ersin Emre; Evans, John Spencer; Tamerler, Candan; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2007-07-17

    Recently, phage and cell-surface display libraries have been adapted for genetically selecting short peptides for a variety of inorganic materials. Despite the enormous number of inorganic-binding peptides reported and their bionanotechnological utility as synthesizers and molecular linkers, there is still a limited understanding of molecular mechanisms of peptide recognition of and binding to solid materials. As part of our goal of genetically designing these peptides, understanding the binding kinetics and thermodynamics, and using the peptides as molecular erectors, in this report we discuss molecular structural constraints imposed upon the quantitative binding characteristics of peptides with an affinity for inorganics. Specifically, we use a high-affinity seven amino acid Pt-binding sequence, PTSTGQA, as we reported in earlier studies and build two constructs: one is a Cys-Cys constrained "loop" sequence (CPTSTGQAC) that mimics the domain used in the pIII tail sequence of the phage library construction, and the second is the linear form, a septapeptide, without the loop. Both sequences were analyzed for their adsorption behavior on Pt thin films by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy and for their conformational properties by circular dichroism (CD). We find that the cyclic peptide of the integral Pt-binding sequence possesses single or 1:1 Langmuir adsorption behavior and displays equilibrium and adsorption rate constants that are significantly larger than those obtained for the linear form. Conversely, the linear form exhibits biexponential Langmuir isotherm behavior with slower and weaker binding. Furthermore, the structure of the cyclic version was found to adopt a random coil molecular conformation, whereas the linear version adopts a polyproline type II conformation in equilibrium with the random coil. The 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol titration experiments indicate that TFE has a different effect on the secondary structures of the linear and cyclic

  3. Combinatorially Developed Peptide Receptors for Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Chikashi; Miyake, Jun

    Various combinatorial libraries were screened for short peptides of 4-10 mer, which were used as sensor molecules for capturing target chemicals or biomolecules. Immuno-antibodies can be synthesized in the living bodies of higher animals even for low-molecular-weight nonnatural chemical compounds, such as dioxins or PCBs. Recently, some peptide ligands that can even bind to inorganic crystals have been reported. This indicates that the 20 natural amino acids have the potential to recognize almost all types of molecules and substances. The question arises whether one should design a “rational” mini library of peptides consisting of a limited number of amino acids according to the motifs in epitopes or paratopes or the binding pocket sequences in receptors, or a completely “random” combinatorial library containing all sequences. If one wants to obtain a peptide binder to target a small chemical compound, the answer is a “random” library, since the molecular interaction between the target compound and an amino acid cannot be precisely predicted beforehand. In this section, we discuss the possibility of using short combinatorial peptides as binders for biosensors to detect chemical compounds.

  4. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  5. Rapid screening of peptide probes through in situ single-bead sequencing microarray.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weizhi; Wei, Zewen; Zhang, Di; Ma, Huailei; Wang, Zihua; Bu, Xiangli; Li, Menglin; Geng, Lingling; Lausted, Christopher; Hood, Leroy; Fang, Qiaojun; Wang, Hao; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2014-12-02

    Peptide ligands as targeting probes for in vivo imaging and drug delivery have attracted great interest in the biomedical community. However, high affinity and specificity screening of large peptide libraries remains a tedious process. Here, we report a continuous-flow microfluidic method for one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial peptide library screening. We screened a library with 2 × 10(5) peptide beads within 4 h and discovered 140 noncanonical peptide hits targeting the tumor marker, aminopeptidase N (APN). Using the Clustal algorithm, we identified the conserved sequence Tyr-XX-Tyr in the N terminal. We demonstrated that the novel sequence YVEYHLC peptides have both nanomolar affinity and high specificity for APN in ex vivo and in vivo models. We envision that the successful demonstration of this integrated novel nanotechnology for peptide screening and identification open a new avenue for rapid discovery of new peptide-based reagents for disease diagnostics and therapeutics.

  6. Underground Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuhlrott, Rolf

    1986-01-01

    Discussion of underground buildings constructed primarily during last two decades for various reasons (energy conservation, density of environment, preservation of landscape and historic buildings) notes advantages, disadvantages, and psychological and design considerations. Examples of underground libraries, built mainly in United States, are…

  7. Public Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Building data is given for the following public libraries: New York, New York; Blue Island, Illinois; Corte Madera, California; Muskogee, Oklahoma: Charlotte, North Carolina; Washington, D.C.; Houston, Texas; Albermarle, North Carolina; Spokane, Washington; and Hemet, California. (Author/NH)

  8. Comparison of fractionation proteomics for local SWATH library building

    PubMed Central

    Govaert, Elisabeth; Van Steendam, Katleen; Willems, Sander; Vossaert, Liesbeth; Dhaenens, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    For data‐independent acquisition by means of sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion spectra (SWATH), a reference library of data‐dependent acquisition (DDA) runs is typically used to correlate the quantitative data from the fragment ion spectra with peptide identifications. The quality and coverage of such a reference library is therefore essential when processing SWATH data. In general, library sizes can be increased by reducing the impact of DDA precursor selection with replicate runs or fractionation. However, these strategies can affect the match between the library and SWATH measurement, and thus larger library sizes do not necessarily correspond to improved SWATH quantification. Here, three fractionation strategies to increase local library size were compared to standard library building using replicate DDA injection: protein SDS‐PAGE fractionation, peptide high‐pH RP‐HPLC fractionation and MS‐acquisition gas phase fractionation. The impact of these libraries on SWATH performance was evaluated in terms of the number of extracted peptides and proteins, the match quality of the peptides and the extraction reproducibility of the transitions. These analyses were conducted using the hydrophilic proteome of differentiating human embryonic stem cells. Our results show that SWATH quantitative results and interpretations are affected by choice of fractionation technique. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD006190. PMID:28664598

  9. Facile synthesis of peptide nucleic acids and peptide nucleic acid-peptide conjugates on an automated peptide synthesizer.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rajendra; Jha, Deepti; Su, Wu; Engelmann, Joern

    2011-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are DNA mimics with a neutral peptide backbone instead of the negatively charged sugar phosphates. PNAs exhibit several attractive features such as high chemical and thermal stability, resistance to enzymatic degradation, and stable binding to their RNA or DNA targets in a sequence-specific manner. Therefore, they are widely used in molecular diagnosis of antisense-targeted therapeutic drugs or probes and in pharmaceutical applications. However, the main hindrance to the effective use of PNAs is their poor uptake by cells as well as the difficult and laborious chemical synthesis. In order to achieve an efficient delivery of PNAs into cells, there are already many published reports of peptides being used for transport across the cell membrane. In this protocol, we describe the automated as well as cost-effective semi-automated synthesis of PNAs and PNA-peptide constructs on an automated peptide synthesizer. The facile synthesis of PNAs will be helpful in generating PNA libraries usable, e.g. for high-throughput screening in biomolecular studies. Efficient synthetic schemes, the automated procedure, the reduced consumption of costly reagents, and the high purity of the products are attractive features of the reported procedure. Copyright © 2010 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. [Peptide phage display in biotechnology and biomedicine].

    PubMed

    Kuzmicheva, G A; Belyavskaya, V A

    2016-07-01

    To date peptide phage display is one of the most common combinatorial methods used for identifying specific peptide ligands. Phage display peptide libraries containing billions different clones successfully used for selection of ligands with high affinity and selectivity toward wide range of targets including individual proteins, bacteria, viruses, spores, different kind of cancer cells and variety of nonorganic targets (metals, alloys, semiconductors etc.) Success of using filamentous phage in phage display technologies relays on the robustness of phage particles and a possibility to genetically modify its DNA to construct new phage variants with novel properties. In this review we are discussing characteristics of the most known non-commercial peptide phage display libraries of different formats (landscape libraries in particular) and their successful applications in several fields of biotechnology and biomedicine: discovery of peptides with diagnostic values against different pathogens, discovery and using of peptides recognizing cancer cells, trends in using of phage display technologies in human interactome studies, application of phage display technologies in construction of novel nano materials.

  11. Bioprospecting open reading frames for peptide effectors.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ling; Scott, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Recent successes in the development of small-molecule antagonists of protein-protein interactions designed based on co-crystal structures of peptides bound to their biological targets confirm that short peptides derived from interacting proteins can be high-value ligands for pharmacologic validation of targets and for identification of druggable sites. Evolved sequence space is likely to be enriched for interacting peptides, but identifying minimal peptide effectors within genomic sequence can be labor intensive. Here we describe the use of incremental truncation to diversify genetic material on the scale of open reading frames into comprehensive libraries of constituent peptides. The approach is capable of generating peptides derived from both continuous and discontinuous sequence elements, and is compatible with the expression of free linear or backbone cyclic peptides, with peptides tethered to amino- or carboxyl-terminal fusion partners or with the expression of peptides displayed within protein scaffolds (peptide aptamers). Incremental truncation affords a valuable source of molecular diversity to interrogate the druggable genome or evaluate the therapeutic potential of candidate genes.

  12. Beyond Helper Phage: Using "Helper Cells" to Select Peptide Affinity Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N.; Paavola, Chad D.; Naranjo, Leslie; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I.; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Martinez, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The “helper cell” packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report on the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands. PMID:27626637

  13. Minnesota Zoological Garden Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norell, Angela

    1988-01-01

    Describes the history and functions of the Minnesota Zoological Garden library. Topics covered include the library collections; library services, including online search capabilities; and the various groups of users served by the library. (three references) (CLB)

  14. Similarity between the sequences of taxol-selected peptides and the disordered loop of the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Rodi, D J; Makowski, L

    1999-01-01

    The anti-cancer drug taxol is known to bind to and induce the polymerization of tubulin and has recently been shown to bind to the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, but not to its homolog, Bcl-XL. Libraries of random peptides displayed on the surface of a bacteriophage were screened to select those exhibiting affinity for taxol. The sequences of these peptides were compared to sequences of proteins involved in mitosis and apoptosis. No significant similarities were detected between the sequences of tubulins and the taxol-selected peptides. However, a high level of similarity exists between the selected peptides and the disordered loop of Bcl-2. Conversely, there was little similarity between the sequences of the selected peptides and Bcl-XL. These results indicate that peptides displayed on the surface of a bacteriophage can mimic the ligand-binding behavior of a disordered protein loop and that comparison of the sequences of affinity-selected peptides with protein sequences can be predictive for ligand binding.

  15. Phage-Displayed Peptides that Mimic Aflatoxins and its Application in Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanru; Wang, Hong; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Kim, Hee Joo; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    To search for an alternative to using protein conjugated aflatoxin as a coating antigen in aflatoxin detection by an ELISA method, a random-8-peptide library was constructed and used as a source of peptides that mimic aflatoxins (termed as mimotopes). Five mimotope peptides were obtained by panning-elution from the library and were successfully used in an indirect competitive ELISA for analyzing total aflatoxin concentration. The assay exhibited an IC50 value of 14 µg/kg in samples (with 1 in 7 dilution of sample extract) for aflatoxins. The linear range is 4–24 µg/kg. Further validation indicated relatively good recovery (60–120%) in peanut, rice and corn. Natural contaminated samples (peanut and feedstuff) were analyzed for aflatoxin concentration by both conventional ELISA and phage ELISA. The results showed good correlation. It can be concluded that the mimotope preparation is an effective substitute for the aflatoxin based coating antigen in ELISA and can be used in real sample analysis. PMID:23394544

  16. A novel glucagon-like peptide 1 peptide identified from Ophisaurus harti.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingjing; Huang, Xian; Gao, Hong; Bao, Qiuying; Zhao, Yun; Hu, Jin-Feng; Xia, Gang

    2013-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) is a promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Because of the short half-life of endogenous GLP1 peptide, other GLP1R agonists are considered to be appealing therapeutic candidates. A high-throughput assay has been established to screen for GLP1R agonists in a 60 000-well natural product compound library fractionated from 670 different herbs/materials widely used in traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs). The screening is based on primary screen of GLP1R⁺ reporter gene assay with the counter screen in GLP1R⁻ cell line. An active fraction, A089-147, was identified from the screening. Fraction A089-147 was isolated from dried Ophisaurus harti, and the fact that its GLP1R agonist activity was sensitive to trypsin treatment indicates its peptidic nature. The active ingredient of A089-147 was later identified as O. harti GLP1 through transcriptome analysis. Chemically synthesized O. harti GLP1 showed GLP1R agonist activity and sensitivity to dipeptidase IV digestion. This study illustrated a comprehensive screening strategy to identify novel GLP1R agonists from TCMs libraries and at the same time underlined the difficulty of identifying a non-peptidic GLP1R agonist. The novel O. harti GLP1 peptide yielded from this study confirmed broader application of TCMs libraries in active peptide identification. Copyright © 2013 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Symposium on Presidential Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Relyea, Harold C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Includes five articles that discuss presidential libraries. Highlights include an overview of the development of the federal presidential library system; the Ronald Reagan library; the Richard Nixon library archives; access at the Gerald Ford library; and computerizing the Jimmy Carter library. (LRW)

  18. Turkish Libraries: Historical Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cakin, Irfan

    1984-01-01

    Summary of the development of libraries in Turkey highlights the existence of libraries in the ninth century, the Shamssaddin Altunaba Medrese library in Konya, libraries established during the Ottoman era, reports to reform libraries (1869-70, 1909), and reports and library developments attributed to the Republican Era beginning in 1923. (EJS)

  19. The Sister Libraries Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sager, Don

    2000-01-01

    These articles describe the Sister Libraries program, part of the White House Millennium project, sponsored by the National Commission on Libraries and Information Science and the American Library Association to build relationships with libraries in other cultures. Discusses projects with public and school libraries and library development in…

  20. Turkish Libraries: Historical Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cakin, Irfan

    1984-01-01

    Summary of the development of libraries in Turkey highlights the existence of libraries in the ninth century, the Shamssaddin Altunaba Medrese library in Konya, libraries established during the Ottoman era, reports to reform libraries (1869-70, 1909), and reports and library developments attributed to the Republican Era beginning in 1923. (EJS)

  1. Library Research and Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mary Jo; St. Lifer, Evan; Halstead, Kent; Fox, Bette-Lee; Miller, Marilyn L.; Shontz, Marilyn L.

    2001-01-01

    These nine articles discuss research and statistics on libraries and librarianship, including libraries in the United States, Canada, and Mexico; acquisition expenditures in public, academic, special, and government libraries; price indexes; state rankings of public library data; library buildings; expenditures in school library media centers; and…

  2. Discovering and improving novel peptide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Duncan Patrick

    2008-10-01

    Peptides have a number of advantages over small molecules in terms of specificity and affinity for targets, and over antibodies in terms of size. However, sensitivity to serum and tissue proteases coupled with short serum half-life has resulted in few recombinant library derived peptides, making the transition from lead to drug on the market. Recently, a series of technologies have been developed to address both these issues: selection methodologies addressing protease resistance have been developed that when combined with methods such as pegylation antibody Fc attachment and binding to serum albumin look likely to finally turn therapeutic peptides into a widely accepted drug class.

  3. PEP-on-DEP: A competitive peptide-based disposable electrochemical aptasensor for renin diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Biyani, Manish; Kawai, Keiko; Kitamura, Koichiro; Chikae, Miyuki; Biyani, Madhu; Ushijima, Hiromi; Tamiya, Eiichi; Yoneda, Takashi; Takamura, Yuzuru

    2016-10-15

    Antibody-based immunosensors are relatively less accessible to a wide variety of unreachable targets, such as low-molecular-weight biomarkers that represent a rich untapped source of disease-specific diagnostic information. Here, we present a peptide aptamer-based electrochemical sensor technology called 'PEP-on-DEP' to detect less accessible target molecules, such as renin, and to improve the quality of life. Peptide-based aptamers represent a relatively smart class of affinity binders and show great promise in biosensor development. Renin is involved in the regulation of arterial blood pressure and is an emerging biomarker protein for predicting cardiovascular risk and prognosis. To our knowledge, no studies have described aptamer molecules that can be used as new potent probes for renin. Here, we describe a portable electrochemical biosensor platform based on the newly identified peptide aptamer molecules for renin. We constructed a randomized octapeptide library pool with diversified sequences and selected renin specific peptide aptamers using cDNA display technology. We identified a few peptide aptamer sequences with a KD in the µM binding affinity range for renin. Next, we grafted the selected peptide aptamers onto gold nanoparticles and detected renin in a one-step competitive assay using our originally developed DEP (Disposable Electrochemical Printed) chip and a USB powered portable potentiostat system. We successfully detected renin in as little as 300ngmL(-1) using the PEP-on-DEP method. Thus, the generation and characterization of novel probes for unreachable target molecules by merging a newly identified peptide aptamer with electrochemical transduction allowed for the development of a more practical biosensor that, in principle, can be adapted to develop a portable, low-cost and mass-producible biosensor for point-of-care applications.

  4. Engineering RNA phage MS2 virus-like particles for peptide display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Sheldon Keith

    Phage display is a powerful and versatile technology that enables the selection of novel binding functions from large populations of randomly generated peptide sequences. Random sequences are genetically fused to a viral structural protein to produce complex peptide libraries. From a sufficiently complex library, phage bearing peptides with practically any desired binding activity can be physically isolated by affinity selection, and, since each particle carries in its genome the genetic information for its own replication, the selectants can be amplified by infection of bacteria. For certain applications however, existing phage display platforms have limitations. One such area is in the field of vaccine development, where the goal is to identify relevant epitopes by affinity-selection against an antibody target, and then to utilize them as immunogens to elicit a desired antibody response. Today, affinity selection is usually conducted using display on filamentous phages like M13. This technology provides an efficient means for epitope identification, but, because filamentous phages do not display peptides in the high-density, multivalent arrays the immune system prefers to recognize, they generally make poor immunogens and are typically useless as vaccines. This makes it necessary to confer immunogenicity by conjugating synthetic versions of the peptides to more immunogenic carriers. Unfortunately, when introduced into these new structural environments, the epitopes often fail to elicit relevant antibody responses. Thus, it would be advantageous to combine the epitope selection and immunogen functions into a single platform where the structural constraints present during affinity selection can be preserved during immunization. This dissertation describes efforts to develop a peptide display system based on the virus-like particles (VLPs) of bacteriophage MS2. Phage display technologies rely on (1) the identification of a site in a viral structural protein that is

  5. Peptide-Like Molecules (PLMs): A Journey from Peptide Bond Isosteres to Gramicidin S Mimetics and Mitochondrial Targeting Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wipf, Peter; Xiao, Jingbo; Stephenson, Corey R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Peptides are natural ligands and substrates for receptors and enzymes and exhibit broad physiological effects. However, their use as therapeutic agents often suffers from poor bioavailability and insufficient membrane permeability. The success of peptide mimicry hinges on the ability of bioisosteres, in particular peptide bond replacements, to adopt suitable secondary structures relevant to peptide strands and position functional groups in equivalent space. This perspective highlights past and ongoing studies in our group that involve new methods development as well as specific synthetic library preparations and applications in chemical biology, with the goal to enhance the use of alkene and cyclopropane peptide bond isosteres. PMID:20725595

  6. Examination of the transcription factor NtcA-binding motif by in vitro selection of DNA sequences from a random library.

    PubMed

    Jiang, F; Wisén, S; Widersten, M; Bergman, B; Mannervik, B

    2000-08-25

    A recursive in vitro selection among random DNA sequences was used for analysis of the cyanobacterial transcription factor NtcA-binding motifs. An eight-base palindromic sequence, TGTA-(N(8))-TACA, was found to be the optimal NtcA-binding sequence. The more divergent the binding sequences, compared to this consensus sequence, the lower the NtcA affinity. The second and third bases in each four-nucleotide half of the consensus sequence were crucial for NtcA binding, and they were in general highly conserved. The most frequently occurring sequence in the middle weakly conserved region was similar to that of the NtcA-binding motif of the Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 glnA gene, previously known to have high affinity for NtcA. This indicates that the middle sequences were selected for high NtcA affinity. Analysis of natural NtcA-binding motifs showed that these could be classified into two groups based on differences in recognition consensus sequences. It is suggested that NtcA naturally recognizes different DNA-binding motifs, or has differential affinities to these sequences under different physiological conditions.

  7. Effect of Teduglutide, a Glucagon-like Peptide 2 Analog, on Citrulline Levels in Patients With Short Bowel Syndrome in Two Phase III Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Seidner, Douglas L; Joly, Francisca; Youssef, Nader N

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In clinical trials, treatment with the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide was associated with improved fluid and nutrient absorption and increased intestinal villus height and crypt depth in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Plasma citrulline, an amino acid produced by enterocytes, is considered a measure of enterocyte mass. This analysis assessed changes in plasma citrulline levels in patients with SBS in 2 phase III clinical studies of teduglutide. Methods: Both teduglutide studies (0.05 or 0.10 mg/kg/day in CL0600-004 and 0.05 mg/kg/day in CL0600-020) were phase III, 24-week, double-blind, and placebo controlled. Plasma citrulline levels were analyzed and validated by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Results: In both the CL0600-004 and CL0600-020 studies, change in mean plasma citrulline concentrations at Week 24 vs. baseline was significantly greater with teduglutide compared with placebo (10.9 (0.05-mg/kg/day dose) and 15.7 (0.10-mg/kg/day dose) vs. 2.0 μmol/L and 20.6 vs. 0.7 μmol/L, respectively, for each study (P≤0.0001 for each comparison with placebo)). Teduglutide treatment was associated with reductions from baseline in PS (parenteral support) volume requirements; however, a significant correlation between PS reduction and increase in plasma citrulline at Week 24 was observed in only one out of the three teduglutide treatment groups. Conclusions: In 2 phase III studies, patients receiving teduglutide had significant increases in plasma citrulline at Week 24 compared with patients receiving placebo. Increases in plasma citrulline concentrations likely reflect enterocyte mass expansion, but no clear correlation was detected between change in plasma citrulline and change in weekly PS volume. PMID:26111125

  8. Entropy reduction in unfolded peptides (and proteins) due to conformational preferences of amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Toal, Siobhan E

    2014-11-07

    As established by several groups over the last 20 years, amino acid residues in unfolded peptides and proteins do not exhibit the unspecific random distribution as assumed by the classical random coil model. Individual amino acid residues in small peptides were found to exhibit different conformational preferences. Here, we utilize recently obtained conformational distributions of guest amino acid residues in GxG peptides to estimate their conformational entropy, which we find to be significantly lower than the entropy of an assumed random coil like distribution. Only at high temperature do backbone entropies approach random coil like values. We utilized the obtained backbone entropies of the investigated amino acid residues to estimate the loss of conformational entropy caused by a coil → helix transition and identified two subsets of amino acid residues for which the thus calculated entropy losses correlate well with the respective Gibbs energy of helix formation obtained for alanine based host-guest systems. Calculated and experimentally derived entropic losses were found to be in good agreement. For most of the amino acid residues investigated entropic losses derived from our GxG distributions correlate very well with corresponding values recently obtained from MD simulations biased by conformational propensities derived from truncated coil libraries. Both, conformational entropy and the entropy of solvation exhibit a strong, residue specific temperature dependence, which can be expected to substantially affect the stability of unfolded states. Altogether, our results provide strong evidence for the notion that conformational preferences of amino acid residues matter with regard to the thermodynamics of peptide and protein folding.

  9. Strengthening State Library Administrative Agency (Territorial Library).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieves M. Flores Memorial Library, Agana, Guam.

    This document describes the Basic State Plan Amendments for the Library Services and Construction Act in Guam and the regulations promulgated thereunder. The major projects described under the plan are: Strengthening State Library Administrative Agency; Staff Development; Library Collections, Extention Services, Institutional Libraries; and…

  10. Art Libraries Section. Special Libraries Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on art libraries, librarianship, and documentation presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "The Tyranny of Distance: Art Libraries in Canada," a description by Mary F. Williamson of Canada's regional art libraries which serve both art students and the general public;…

  11. Dacarbazine (DTIC) versus vaccination with autologous peptide-pulsed dendritic cells (DC) in first-line treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma: a randomized phase III trial of the DC study group of the DeCOG.

    PubMed

    Schadendorf, D; Ugurel, S; Schuler-Thurner, B; Nestle, F O; Enk, A; Bröcker, E-B; Grabbe, S; Rittgen, W; Edler, L; Sucker, A; Zimpfer-Rechner, C; Berger, T; Kamarashev, J; Burg, G; Jonuleit, H; Tüttenberg, A; Becker, J C; Keikavoussi, P; Kämpgen, E; Schuler, G

    2006-04-01

    This randomized phase III trial was designed to demonstrate the superiority of autologous peptide-loaded dendritic cell (DC) vaccination over standard dacarbazine (DTIC) chemotherapy in stage IV melanoma patients. DTIC 850 mg/m2 intravenously was applied in 4-week intervals. DC vaccines loaded with MHC class I and II-restricted peptides were applied subcutaneously at 2-week intervals for the first five vaccinations and every 4 weeks thereafter. The primary study end point was objective response (OR); secondary end points were toxicity, overall (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). At the time of the first interim analysis 55 patients had been enrolled into the DTIC and 53 into the DC-arm (ITT). OR was low (DTIC: 5.5%, DC: 3.8%), but not significantly different in the two arms. The Data Safety & Monitoring Board recommended closure of the study. Unscheduled subset analyses revealed that patients with normal serum LDH and/or stage M1a/b survived longer in both arms than those with elevated serum LDH and/or stage M1c. Only in the DC-arm did those patients with (i) an initial unimpaired general health status (Karnofsky = 100) or (ii) an HLA-A2+/HLA-B44- haplotype survive significantly longer than patients with a Karnofsky index <100 (P = 0.007 versus P = 0.057