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Sample records for random telegraph signal

  1. Random Telegraph Signal in a Metallic Double-Dot System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardi, Yuval; Guttman, Avraham; Bar-Joseph, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Double quantum dot systems offer a unique opportunity for studying the world of quantum transport. This stems from the ability to localize an electron in a limited region in space on the dot, and monitor its presence and properties. Another system, in which electrons can be stored and measured, is an electronic trap in solid. The electrons in such a trap are better isolated from the environment. However, their measurement and control are more difficult. Here we demonstrate how these two systems, metallic double-dots and electronic traps, are combined to yield a hybrid structure in which an electron can be stored for long durations and can be easily detected and measured. We investigate the dynamics of a single electron surface trap, embedded in a self-assembly metallic double-dot system. The charging and discharging of the trap by a single electron is manifested as a random telegraph signal of the current through the double-dot device. We find that we can control the duration that an electron resides in the trap through the current, varying it between fractions of a second to more than an hour, at the Coulomb blockade region. We suggest that the observed switching is the electrical manifestation of the optical blinking phenomenon, commonly observed in semiconductor quantum dots. Y. Vardi, A. Guttman, and I. Bar-Joseph, Nano Lett. 14, 2794 (2014). [DOI: 10.1021/nl500803p

  2. Modeling random telegraph signal noise in CMOS image sensor under low light based on binomial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhang; Xinmiao, Lu; Guangyi, Wang; Yongcai, Hu; Jiangtao, Xu

    2016-07-01

    The random telegraph signal noise in the pixel source follower MOSFET is the principle component of the noise in the CMOS image sensor under low light. In this paper, the physical and statistical model of the random telegraph signal noise in the pixel source follower based on the binomial distribution is set up. The number of electrons captured or released by the oxide traps in the unit time is described as the random variables which obey the binomial distribution. As a result, the output states and the corresponding probabilities of the first and the second samples of the correlated double sampling circuit are acquired. The standard deviation of the output states after the correlated double sampling circuit can be obtained accordingly. In the simulation section, one hundred thousand samples of the source follower MOSFET have been simulated, and the simulation results show that the proposed model has the similar statistical characteristics with the existing models under the effect of the channel length and the density of the oxide trap. Moreover, the noise histogram of the proposed model has been evaluated at different environmental temperatures. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61372156 and 61405053) and the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province of China (Grant No. LZ13F04001).

  3. Exploratory observations of random telegraphic signals and noise in homogeneous hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, W. K.; Owen, A. E.; LeComber, P. G.; Rose, M. J.

    1990-07-01

    Noise measurements on unhydrogenated and hydrogenated rf sputtered intrinsic amorphous silicon reported by D'Amico, Fortunato, and Van Vliet [Solid-State Electron. 28, 837 (1985)] have 1/f and Lorentzian spectra, respectively. Similar noise measurements on glow-discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous intrinsic silicon reported by Bathaei and Anderson [Philos. Mag. B 55, 87 (1987)] gave a 1/f m spectrum with 0.7random telegraph signals in a-Si: H/a-Si1-xNx: H double barrier structures. The associated noise was a Lorentzian noise spectrum. In this paper the first observation of random telegraph signals in notionally homogeneous heavily doped (p+) glow-discharged-deposited amorphous silicon is reported. It was found that the current passing through the sample fluctuates between two easily identifiable levels with the periods of fluctuations separated by a quiescent period. The occurrence of these fluctuations is unpredictable but the current noise spectrum obtained during quiescent periods is Lorentzian, probably indicative of a generation-recombination process. Noise measurements are not possible at higher biases (>105 V/cm) as the current fluctuates chaotically and this is also the prebreakdown regime of the sample.

  4. Random telegraph signal and spin characteristics of the gate-all-around poly-silicon nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tsung-Han; Li, Yan-Ting; Hu, Shu-Fen E-mail: sfhu.hu@gmail.com

    2014-11-07

    An arsenic (As)-doped poly-silicon nanowire gate-all-around transistor fabricated using standard semiconductor methods was used to measure the Coulomb blockade effect by applying a tunable gate voltage. Two-level trapping states due to the random telegraph signal of fluctuating drain current were observed in the silicon transport channel. Under high magnetic fields, the superposition points of differential conductance revealed weak 2-electron singlet-triplet splitting states of the arsenic magnetic impurity. The weak spin-orbital coupling suggests that the electron-spin-polarization in the As-doped silicon nanowire and the two-level trapping state coexisted in the Coulomb blockade oscillations. These characteristics indicate that a few arsenic donors strongly affect the quantum behavior of the poly-silicon material.

  5. 1/f Noise decomposition in random telegraph signals using the wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Principato, Fabio; Ferrante, Gaetano

    2007-07-01

    By using the continuous wavelet transform with Haar basis the second-order properties of the wavelet coefficients are derived for the random telegraph signal (RTS) and for the 1/f noise which is obtained by summation of many RTSs. The correlation structure of the Haar wavelet coefficients for these processes is found. For the wavelet spectrum of the 1/f noise some characteristics related to the distribution of the relaxation times of the RTS are derived. A statistical test based on the characterization of the time evolution of the scalogram is developed, which allows to detect non-stationarity in the times τ's which compose the 1/f process and to identify the time scales of the relaxation times where the non-stationarity is localized. The proposed method allows to distinguish noise signals with 1/f power spectral density generated by RTSs, and thus gives informations on the origin of this type of 1/f noise which cannot be obtained using the Fourier transform or other methods based on second-order statistical analysis. The reported treatment is applied to both simulated and experimental signals. The present analysis is based on the McWhorter [ 1/f Noise and germanium surface properties, in: R.H. Kingstone (Ed.), Semiconductor Surface Physics, University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, PA, 1957, pp. 207-228] model of low frequency electric noise, and the obtained results are expected to prove especially useful for semiconductor devices.

  6. Characterization of nitride hole lateral transport in a charge trap flash memory by using a random telegraph signal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Heng; Jiang, Cheng-Min; Lin, Hsiao-Yi; Wang, Tahui; Tsai, Wen-Jer; Lu, Tao-Cheng; Chen, Kuang-Chao; Lu, Chih-Yuan

    2017-07-01

    We use a random telegraph signal method to investigate nitride trapped hole lateral transport in a charge trap flash memory. The concept of this method is to utilize an interface oxide trap and its associated random telegraph signal as an internal probe to detect a local channel potential change resulting from nitride charge lateral movement. We apply different voltages to the drain of a memory cell and vary a bake temperature in retention to study the electric field and temperature dependence of hole lateral movement in a nitride. Thermal energy absorption by trapped holes in lateral transport is characterized. Mechanisms of hole lateral transport in retention are investigated. From the measured and modeled results, we find that thermally assisted trap-to-band tunneling is a major trapped hole emission mechanism in nitride hole lateral transport.

  7. Hopping conduction and random telegraph signal in an exfoliated multilayer MoS2 field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lijun; Lee, Inyeal; Youn, Doo-Hyeb; Kim, Gil-Ho

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the hopping conduction and random telegraph signal caused by various species of interface charge scatterers in a MoS2 multilayer field-effect transistor. The temperature dependence of the channel resistivity shows that at low temperatures and low carrier densities the carrier transport is via Mott variable range hopping with a hopping length changing from 41 to 80 nm. The hopping conduction was due to electron tunneling through localized band tail states formed by the scatterers located in the vicinity of the MoS2 layer. In the temperature range of 40-70 K, we observed random telegraph signal (RTS) that is caused by the capture and emission of a carrier by the interface traps that are located away from the layer. These traps form strong potential that interact with the layer and change the potential profile of the electron system. The characteristics of RTS depend strongly on gate bias and temperature, as well as the application of a magnetic field.

  8. Hopping conduction and random telegraph signal in an exfoliated multilayer MoS2 field-effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Li, Lijun; Lee, Inyeal; Youn, Doo-Hyeb; Kim, Gil-Ho

    2017-02-17

    We investigate the hopping conduction and random telegraph signal caused by various species of interface charge scatterers in a MoS2 multilayer field-effect transistor. The temperature dependence of the channel resistivity shows that at low temperatures and low carrier densities the carrier transport is via Mott variable range hopping with a hopping length changing from 41 to 80 nm. The hopping conduction was due to electron tunneling through localized band tail states formed by the scatterers located in the vicinity of the MoS2 layer. In the temperature range of 40-70 K, we observed random telegraph signal (RTS) that is caused by the capture and emission of a carrier by the interface traps that are located away from the layer. These traps form strong potential that interact with the layer and change the potential profile of the electron system. The characteristics of RTS depend strongly on gate bias and temperature, as well as the application of a magnetic field.

  9. Probing the gate--voltage-dependent surface potential of individual InAs nanowires using random telegraph signals.

    PubMed

    Salfi, Joe; Paradiso, Nicola; Roddaro, Stefano; Heun, Stefan; Nair, Selvakumar V; Savelyev, Igor G; Blumin, Marina; Beltram, Fabio; Ruda, Harry E

    2011-03-22

    We report a novel method for probing the gate-voltage dependence of the surface potential of individual semiconductor nanowires. The statistics of electronic occupation of a single defect on the surface of the nanowire, determined from a random telegraph signal, is used as a measure for the local potential. The method is demonstrated for the case of one or two switching defects in indium arsenide (InAs) nanowire field effect transistors at temperatures T=25-77 K. Comparison with a self-consistent model shows that surface potential variation is retarded in the conducting regime due to screening by surface states with density Dss≈10(12) cm(-2) eV(-1). Temperature-dependent dynamics of electron capture and emission producing the random telegraph signals are also analyzed, and multiphonon emission is identified as the process responsible for capture and emission of electrons from the surface traps. Two defects studied in detail had capture activation energies of EB≈50 meV and EB≈110 meV and cross sections of σ∞≈3×10(-19) cm2 and σ∞≈2×10(-17) cm2, respectively. A lattice relaxation energy of Sℏω=187±15 meV was found for the first defect.

  10. Experimental detection of active defects in few layers MoS2 through random telegraphic signals analysis observed in its FET characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Nan; Nagashio, Kosuke; Toriumi, Akira

    2017-03-01

    Transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), are expected to be promising for next generation device applications. The existence of sulfur vacancies formed in MoS2, however, will potentially make devices unstable and problematic. Random telegraphic signals (RTSs) have often been studied in small area Si metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) to identify the carrier capture and emission processes at defects. In this paper, we have systemically analyzed RTSs observed in atomically thin layer MoS2 FETs. Several types of RTSs have been analyzed. One is the simple on/off type of telegraphic signals, the second is multilevel telegraphic signals with a superposition of the simple signals, and the third is multilevel telegraphic signals that are correlated with each other. The last one is discussed from the viewpoint of the defect-defect interaction in MoS2 FETs with a weak screening in atomically confined two-dimensional electron-gas systems. Furthermore, the position of defects causing RTSs has also been investigated by preparing MoS2 FETs with multi-probes. The electron beam was locally irradiated to intentionally generate defects in the MoS2 channel. It is clearly demonstrated that the MoS2 channel is one of the RTS origins. RTS analysis enables us to analyze the defect dynamics of TMD devices.

  11. Random telegraph signal (RTS) noise and other anomalies in the near-infrared detector systems for the Euclid mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohley, Ralf; Barbier, Rémi; Kubik, Bogna; Ferriol, Sylvain; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Ealet, Anne; Secroun, Aurélia; Conversi, Luca; Strada, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Euclid is an ESA mission to map the geometry of the dark Universe with a planned launch date in 2020. Euclid is optimised for two primary cosmological probes, weak gravitational lensing and galaxy clustering. They are implemented through two science instruments on-board Euclid, a visible imager (VIS) and a near-infrared spectro-photometer (NISP), which are being developed and built by the Euclid Consortium instrument development teams. The NISP instrument contains a large focal plane assembly of 16 Teledyne HgCdTe H2RG detectors with 2.3μm cut-off wavelength and SIDECAR readout electronics. The performance of the detector systems is critical to the science return of the mission and extended on-ground tests are being performed for characterisation and calibration purposes. Special attention is given also to effects even on the scale of individual pixels, which are difficult to model and calibrate, and to identify any possible impact on science performance. This paper discusses a variety of undesired pixel behaviour including the known effect of random telegraph signal (RTS) noise based on initial on-ground test results from demonstrator model detector systems. Some stability aspects of the RTS pixel populations are addressed as well.

  12. Temperature-independent switching rates for a random telegraph signal in a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Scofield, John H.; Borland, Nick; Fleetwood, D. M.

    2000-05-29

    We have observed discrete random telegraph signals (RTSs) in the drain voltages of three, nominally 1.25 {mu}mx1.25 {mu}m, enhancement-mode p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor transistors operated in strong inversion in their linear regimes with constant drain-current and gate-voltage bias, for temperatures ranging from 4.2 to 300 K. The switching rates for all RTSs observed above 30 K were thermally activated. The switching rate for the only RTS observed below 30 K was thermally activated above 30 K but temperature independent below 10 K. This response is consistent with a crossover from thermal activation to tunneling at low temperatures. Implications are discussed for models of change exchange between the Si and the near-interfacial SiO{sub 2}. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Origins of Highly Stable Al-evaporated Solution-processed ZnO Thin Film Transistors: Insights from Low Frequency and Random Telegraph Signal Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joo Hyung; Kang, Tae Sung; Yang, Jung Yup; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2015-11-01

    One long-standing goal in the emerging field of flexible and transparent electronic devices is to meet the demand of key markets, such as enhanced output performance for metal oxide semiconductor thin film transistors (TFTs) prepared by a solution process. While solution-based fabrication techniques are cost-effective and ensure large-area coverage at low temperature, their utilization has the disadvantage of introducing large trap states into TFTs. Such states, the formation of which is induced by intrinsic defects initially produced during preparation, have a significant impact on electrical performance. Therefore, the ability to enhance the electrical characteristics of solution-processed TFTs, along with attaining a firm understanding of their physical nature, remains a key step towards extending their use. In this study, measurements of low-frequency noise and random telegraph signal noise are employed as generic alternative tools to examine the origins of enhanced output performance for solution-processed ZnO TFTs through the control of defect sites by Al evaporation.

  14. Temperature-Independent Switching Rates for a Random Telegraph Signal in a Silicon Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Borland, Nick; Fleetwood, D.M.; Scofield, John H.

    1999-07-19

    We have observed discrete random telegraph signals (RTS'S) in the drain voltages of three, observed above 30 K were thermally activated. The switching rate for the only RTS observed below 30 K was thermally activated above 30 K but temperature-independent below 10 K. To our knowledge, this cross-over from thermal activation to tunneling behavior has not been previously observed for RTS's Metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MCEWETS) often exhibit relatively large levels of low-frequency (1/fl noise) [1,2]. Much evidence suggests that this noise is related to the capture all cases, switching rates have been thermally activated, often with different activation energies for capture and/or emission is accompanied by lattice relaxation. Though thermally activated behavior has sufficiently low temperatures [7,9]. While not observed in MOSFETS, cross-over from thermal activation to configurational tunneling has been observed for RTS's in junctions [13]. drain voltage was observed to randomly switch between two discrete levels, designated as Vup and Vdn, similar to RTS's reported by others [2,7'- 11 ]. We have characterized six RTS `S for temperatures above 30 K where thermally activated switching rates are observed. The properties of five of these have been the trap, i.e., the mean time a captured charge carrier spends in the trap before it is emitted. Similarly, we identify the mean time in the low resistance state ( trup in state Vup) as the capture time rc. F@ure 1 shows a typical time trace of the drain-voltage fluctuation &d(t)= Vd(t)+Vd>. This indicate that both the mean capture and emission times become independent of Tat low temperatures and where a= capture or emission, is temperature independent. The solid curve in Figure 3(a) (mean capture time) was obtained using a weighted nonlinear charge carriers are not in thermal equilibrium with the lattice, i.e., that while the lattice is being cooled Instead, we believe that the transition from thermally

  15. Emergent 1 /f Noise in Ensembles of Random Telegraph Noise Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzi, Barry N.; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2017-09-01

    The emergence of 1 /f noise from an aggregate of 1 /f2 noise signals in magnetic nanodots undergoing random telegraph oscillations in their magnetization is reported. This emergence is found to occur with as few as two random telegraph noise (RTN) oscillators producing 1 /f noise across two decades of frequency bandwidth, and with fewer than ten such oscillators producing 1 /f noise across over four decades. The RTN fluctuations observed are as small as one part in 10 000 compared to dc voltage signals but still generate easily observable 1 /f noise at up to 105 Hz . These observations may explain the historic difficulty in identifying RTN oscillator sources of 1 /f noise.

  16. Random telegraph noise in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hyun-Jong; Woo Uhm, Tae; Won Kim, Sung; Gyu You, Young; Wook Lee, Sang; Ho Jhang, Sung; Campbell, Eleanor E. B.; Woo Park, Yung

    2014-05-12

    We have investigated random telegraph noise (RTN) observed in individual metallic carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Mean lifetimes in high- and low-current states, τ{sub high} and τ{sub low}, have been studied as a function of bias-voltage and gate-voltage as well as temperature. By analyzing the statistics and features of the RTN, we suggest that this noise is due to the random transition of defects between two metastable states, activated by inelastic scattering with conduction electrons. Our results indicate an important role of defect motions in the 1/f noise in CNTs.

  17. Characterizing Random Telegraph Frequency Noise in a Micromechanical Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fengpei; Zou, Jie; Maizelis, Zakhar; Chan, Ho Bun

    2014-03-01

    We perform a comprehensive study of the effect of random telegraph frequency noise(RTFN) on a micromechanical torsional oscillator. A sinusoidal driving voltage is applied to one electrode of the oscillator to excite its torsional vibration. Telegraph noise is applied to the other electrode so that the eigenfrequency of the oscillator randomly jumps back and forth between two states. This arrangement resembles a mechanical oscillator dispersively coupled to a classical or quantum two-level system. As the jumping rate of the eigenfrequency is increased, the two peaks in the spectrum of the time-averaged vibration amplitude merge into a single peak, displaying spectral broadening followed by motional narrowing. Furthermore, we analyze the ratios of the moments of the complex vibration amplitude to the powers of the averaged complex amplitude as a function of the driving frequency. If RTFN is absent, the ratios are equal to one; otherwise they deviate from one near resonance and approach to one far off resonance. The shape of the spectra depends strongly on the characteristics of RTFN and this dependence remains valid even in the presence of strong thermal or detector noise. Our results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  18. Delayed uncoupled continuous-time random walks do not provide a model for the telegraph equation.

    PubMed

    Rukolaine, S A; Samsonov, A M

    2012-02-01

    It has been alleged in several papers that the so-called delayed continuous-time random walks (DCTRWs) provide a model for the one-dimensional telegraph equation at microscopic level. This conclusion, being widespread now, is strange, since the telegraph equation describes phenomena with finite propagation speed, while the velocity of the motion of particles in the DCTRWs is infinite. In this paper we investigate the accuracy of the approximations to the DCTRWs provided by the telegraph equation. We show that the diffusion equation, being the correct limit of the DCTRWs, gives better approximations in L(2) norm to the DCTRWs than the telegraph equation. We conclude, therefore, that first, the DCTRWs do not provide any correct microscopic interpretation of the one-dimensional telegraph equation, and second, the kinetic (exact) model of the telegraph equation is different from the model based on the DCTRWs.

  19. Anomalous random telegraph noise and temporary phenomena in resistive random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, Francesco Maria; Larcher, Luca; Padovani, Andrea; Pavan, Paolo

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we present a comprehensive examination of the characteristics of complex Random Telegraph Noise (RTN) signals in Resistive Random Access Memory (RRAM) devices with TiN/Ti/HfO2/TiN structure. Initially, the anomalous RTN (aRTN) is investigated through careful systematic experiment, dedicated characterization procedures, and physics-based simulations to gain insights into the physics of this phenomenon. The experimentally observed RTN parameters (amplitude of the current fluctuations, capture and emission times) are analyzed in different operating conditions. Anomalous behaviors are characterized and their statistical characteristics are evaluated. Physics-based simulations considering both the Coulomb interactions among different defects in the device and the possible existence of defects with metastable states are exploited to suggest a possible physical origin of aRTN. The same simulation framework is also shown to be able to predict other temporary phenomena related to RTN, such as the temporary change in RTN stochastic properties or the sudden and iterative random appearing and vanishing of RTN fluctuations always exhibiting the same statistical characteristics. Results highlight the central role of the electrostatic interactions among individual defects and the trapped charge in describing RTN and related phenomena.

  20. Systematic method for electrical characterization of random telegraph noise in MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquez, Carlos; Rodriguez, Noel; Gamiz, Francisco; Ohata, Akiko

    2017-02-01

    This work introduces a new protocol which aims to facilitate massive on-wafer characterization of Random Telegraph Noise (RTN) in MOS transistors. The methodology combines the noise spectral density scanning by gate bias assisted with a modified Weighted Time Lag Plot algorithm to identify unequivocally the single-trap RTN signals in optimum bias conditions for their electrical characterization. The strength of the method is demonstrated by its application for monitoring the distribution of traps over the transistors of a SOI wafer. The influence of the back-gate bias on the RTN characteristics of the SOI devices with coupled front- and back-interfaces has revealed unusual characteristics compatible with the carrier emission to the gate metal contact.

  1. Modeling of electron conduction in contact resistive random access memory devices as random telegraph noise

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yuan Heng; Shen, Wen Chao; Lin, Chrong Jung

    2012-01-01

    The intense development and study of resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices has opened a new era in semiconductor memory manufacturing. Resistive switching and carrier conduction inside RRAM films have become critical issues in recent years. Electron trapping/detrapping behavior is observed and investigated in the proposed contact resistive random access memory (CR-RAM) cell. Through the fitting of the space charge limiting current (SCLC) model, and analysis in terms of the random telegraph noise (RTN) model, the temperature-dependence of resistance levels and the high-temperature data retention behavior of the contact RRAM film are successfully and completely explained. Detail analyses of the electron capture and emission from the traps by forward and reverse read measurements provide further verifications for hopping conduction mechanism and current fluctuation discrepancies. PMID:22536005

  2. Decoherence and Disentanglement of Two Intereacting Qubits in the Presence of Random Telegraphic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Amrit; Lang, Alex; Joynt, Robert

    2010-03-01

    We have studied the dissipative dynamics of a pair of quits coupled via the exchange interaction in the presence of random telegraphic noise. We use a recently developed transfer-matrix formalism that is suitable for computing the temporal evolution of a quantum system affected by a classical stochastic process. For bipartite systems, the concurrence provides a measure of the entanglement between two qubits. We have calculated the concurrence as a function of the qubit working point, noise coupling strength, fluctuator rates and exchange interaction strengths. Sudden death of entanglement and its revival are seen to depend on various factors. We show that for certain cases, the exchange interaction between the qubits can be used to significantly slow down the decoherence process and maintain entanglement over much longer periods of time. This could be particularly promising for quantum computing applications.

  3. Goldstein-Kac telegraph processes with random speeds: Path probabilities, likelihoods, and reported Lévy flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Aaron; Liepe, Juliane; Stumpf, Michael P. H.

    2015-04-01

    The Goldstein-Kac telegraph process describes the one-dimensional motion of particles with constant speed undergoing random changes in direction. Despite its resemblance to numerous real-world phenomena, the singular nature of the resultant spatial distribution of each particle precludes the possibility of any a posteriori empirical validation of this random-walk model from data. Here we show that by simply allowing for random speeds, the ballistic terms are regularized and that the diffusion component can be well-approximated via the unscented transform. The result is a computationally efficient yet robust evaluation of the full particle path probabilities and, hence, the parameter likelihoods of this generalized telegraph process. We demonstrate how a population diffusing under such a model can lead to non-Gaussian asymptotic spatial distributions, thereby mimicking the behavior of an ensemble of Lévy walkers.

  4. Goldstein-Kac telegraph processes with random speeds: Path probabilities, likelihoods, and reported Lévy flights.

    PubMed

    Sim, Aaron; Liepe, Juliane; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2015-04-01

    The Goldstein-Kac telegraph process describes the one-dimensional motion of particles with constant speed undergoing random changes in direction. Despite its resemblance to numerous real-world phenomena, the singular nature of the resultant spatial distribution of each particle precludes the possibility of any a posteriori empirical validation of this random-walk model from data. Here we show that by simply allowing for random speeds, the ballistic terms are regularized and that the diffusion component can be well-approximated via the unscented transform. The result is a computationally efficient yet robust evaluation of the full particle path probabilities and, hence, the parameter likelihoods of this generalized telegraph process. We demonstrate how a population diffusing under such a model can lead to non-Gaussian asymptotic spatial distributions, thereby mimicking the behavior of an ensemble of Lévy walkers.

  5. Low frequency 1/f and random telegraph noise in (Ga,Mn)As

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Meng; Li, Xia; Xiang, Gang; Samarth, Nitin

    2007-03-01

    Resistance noise measurements can provide insights into the interplay between charge transport and magnetism in complex physical systems [B. Raquet et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4485 (2000)]. We report the temperature- and magnetic field-dependence of the low frequency electrical noise in (Ga,Mn)As epilayers with different Mn concentrations (and different conductivity). Surprisingly, we do not observe any anomalies in the noise spectra across the Curie temperature. However, we find an enhancement in the integrated noise (over the frequency span 125mHz-11Hz) at temperatures below ˜10 K where the resistivity shows a minimum. For more metallic samples, the normalized power spectrum density is 1/f-like over the entire temperature range studied, while more insulating samples show Lorentzian spectra accompanied by random telegraph noise (RTN) at low temperatures. The magnetic field dependence of the integrated noise shows distinct correlations with magnetization switching, suggesting changes in scattering during domain wall nucleation/propagation. From the magnetic field driven suppression of the RTN, we infer the existence of nanoscale magnetic clusters that fluctuate between two states separated by a field-tunable barrier.

  6. Quantum correlations and decoherence dynamics for a qutrit-qutrit system under random telegraph noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsokeng, Arthur Tsamouo; Tchoffo, Martin; Fai, Lukong Cornelius

    2017-08-01

    We analyze the effect of a classical random telegraph noise on the dynamics of quantum correlations and decoherence between two non-interacting spin-qutrit particles, initially entangled, and coupled either to independent sources or to a common source of noise. Both Markovian and non-Markovian environments are considered. For the Markov regime, as the noise switching rate decreases, a monotonic decay of the initial quantum correlations is found and the loss of coherence increases monotonically with time up to the saturation value. For the non-Markov regime, evident oscillations of correlations and decoherence are observed due to the noise regime, but correlations, however, avoid sudden death phenomena. The oscillatory behavior is more and more prominent as the noise switching rate decreases in this regime, thus enhancing robustness of correlations. Similarly to the qubits case, independent environments coupling is more effective than a common environment coupling in preserving quantum correlations and coherence of the system for a Markovian noise; meanwhile, the opposite is found for the non-Markovian one.

  7. Dynamics of tripartite quantum entanglement and discord under a classical dephasing random telegraph noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenfack, Lionel Tenemeza; Tchoffo, Martin; Fai, Lukong Cornelius

    2017-02-01

    We address the dynamics of quantum correlations, including entanglement and quantum discord of a three-qubit system interacting with a classical pure dephasing random telegraph noise (RTN) in three different physical environmental situations (independent, mixed and common environments). Two initial entangled states of the system are examined, namely the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ)- and Werner (W)-type states. The classical noise is introduced as a stochastic process affecting the energy splitting of the qubits. With the help of suitable measures of tripartite entanglement (entanglement witnesses and lower bound of concurrence) and quantum discord (global quantum discord and quantum dissension), we show that the evolution of quantum correlations is not only affected by the type of the system-environment interaction but also by the input configuration of the qubits and the memory properties of the environmental noise. Indeed, depending on the memory properties of the environmental noise and the initial state considered, we find that independent, common and mixed environments can play opposite roles in preserving quantum correlations, and that the sudden death and revival phenomena or the survival of quantum correlations may occur. On the other hand, we also show that the W-type state has strong dynamics under this noise than the GHZ-type ones.

  8. Robust random telegraph conductivity noise in single crystals of the ferromagnetic insulating manganite La0.86Ca0.14MnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybytek, J.; Fink-Finowicki, J.; Puźniak, R.; Shames, A.; Markovich, V.; Mogilyansky, D.; Jung, G.

    2017-03-01

    Robust random telegraph conductivity fluctuations have been observed in La0.86Ca0.14MnO3 manganite single crystals. At room temperatures, the spectra of conductivity fluctuations are featureless and follow a 1 /f shape in the entire experimental frequency and bias range. Upon lowering the temperature, clear Lorentzian bias-dependent excess noise appears on the 1 /f background and eventually dominates the spectral behavior. In the time domain, fully developed Lorentzian noise appears as pronounced two-level random telegraph noise with a thermally activated switching rate, which does not depend on bias current and applied magnetic field. The telegraph noise is very robust and persists in the exceptionally wide temperature range of more than 50 K. The amplitude of the telegraph noise decreases exponentially with increasing bias current in exactly the same manner as the sample resistance increases with the current, pointing out the dynamic current redistribution between percolation paths dominated by phase-separated clusters with different conductivity as a possible origin of two-level conductivity fluctuations.

  9. Probing Cu doped Ge0.3Se0.7 based resistance switching memory devices with random telegraph noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, R.; Meuffels, P.; Petraru, A.; Weides, M.; Kügeler, C.; Waser, R.; Kohlstedt, H.

    2010-01-01

    The ultimate sensitivity of any solid state device is limited by fluctuations. Fluctuations are manifestations of the thermal motion of matter and the discreteness of its structure which are also inherent ingredients during the resistive switching process of resistance random access memory (RRAM) devices. In quest for the role of fluctuations in different memory states and to develop resistive switching based nonvolatile memory devices, here we present our study on random telegraph noise (RTN) resistance fluctuations in Cu doped Ge0.3Se0.7 based RRAM cells. The influence of temperature and electric field on the RTN fluctuations is studied on different resistance states of the memory cells to reveal the dynamics of the underlying fluctuators. Our analysis indicates that the observed fluctuations could arise from thermally activated transpositions of Cu ions inside ionic or redox "double-site traps" triggering fluctuations in the current transport through a filamentary conducting path. Giant RTN fluctuations characterized by relative resistance variations of up to 50% in almost macroscopic samples clearly point to the existence of weak links with small effective cross-sectional areas along the conducting paths. Such large resistance fluctuations can be an important issue for the industrial applications of RRAM devices because they might lead to huge bit-error rates during reading cycles.

  10. Number of traps and trap depth position on statistical distribution of random telegraph noise in scaled NAND flash memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Toshihiro; Miyaji, Kousuke

    2016-04-01

    The dependence of random telegraph noise (RTN) amplitude distribution on the number of traps and trap depth position is investigated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo device simulation including random dopant fluctuation (RDF) in a 30 nm NAND multi level flash memory. The ΔV th tail distribution becomes broad at fixed double traps, indicating that the number of traps greatly affects the worst RTN characteristics. It is also found that for both fixed single and fixed double traps, the ΔV th distribution in the lowest cell threshold voltage (V th) state shows the broadest distribution among all cell V th states. This is because the drain current flows at the channel surface in the lowest cell V th state, while at a high cell V th, it flows at the deeper position owing to the fringing coupling between the control gate (CG) and the channel. In this work, the ΔV th distribution with the number of traps following the Poisson distribution is also considered to cope with the variations in trap number. As a result, it is found that the number of traps is an important factor for understanding RTN characteristics. In addition, considering trap position in the tunnel oxide thickness direction is also an important factor.

  11. Joseph Henry and the Telegraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochfelder, David

    1997-04-01

    Morse's telegraph rested upon three scientific advances which occured between 1800 and 1830: the development of battery technology, the formulation of laws governing the behavior of electrical components in circuits, and the discovery of electromagnetic phenomena. Joseph Henry was crucial to the development of the early telegraph. His work on electromagnetism made it possible for the electric current to manifest itself as useful mechanical work. Henry developed electromagnets of sufficient lifting power, but which drew relatively small currents; these magnets were the heart of Morse's telegraph receiver. Morse also used electromagnets as relays, which allowed him to transmit signals over great distances. Morse often acknowledged his debt to Henry, and the two enjoyed a cordial working relationship until the mid-1840s. But during the bitter and protracted litigation over Morse's patent, Henry testified (unwillingly, he claimed) against the inventor. This began a lifelong quarrel between the two men, the specifics of which were tedious and petty. In general terms, however, their conflict arose over different notions regarding scientific discovery and technological innovation.

  12. Localized characterization of charge transport and random telegraph noise at the nanoscale in HfO2 films combining scanning tunneling microscopy and multi-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamankar, R.; Puglisi, F. M.; Ranjan, A.; Raghavan, N.; Shubhakar, K.; Molina, J.; Larcher, L.; Padovani, A.; Pavan, P.; O'Shea, S. J.; Pey, K. L.

    2017-07-01

    Charge transport and Random Telegraph Noise (RTN) are measured successfully at the nanoscale on a thin polycrystalline HfO2 film using room temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). STM is used to scan the surface of the sample with the aim of identifying grains and grain boundaries, which show different charge transport characteristics. The defects responsible for charge transport in grains and grain boundaries are identified as positively charged oxygen vacancies by matching the localized I-V curves measured at the nanoscale with the predictions of physics-based multi-scale simulations. The estimated defect densities at grains and grain boundaries agree with earlier reports in the literature. Furthermore, the current-time traces acquired by STM at fixed bias voltages on grains show characteristic RTN fluctuations. The high spatial resolution of the STM-based RTN measurement allows us to detect fluctuations related to individual defects that typically cannot be resolved by the conventional device-level probe station measurement. The same physical framework employed to reproduce the I-V conduction characteristics at the grains also successfully simulates the RTN detected at the nanoscale. We confirm that charge trapping at defects not directly involved in charge transport can induce significant current fluctuations through Coulombic interactions with other defects in the proximity that support charge transport.

  13. 46 CFR 167.40-7 - Voice tubes, telephone, and telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Voice tubes, telephone, and telegraph systems. 167.40-7... NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Certain Equipment Requirements § 167.40-7 Voice tubes, telephone, and telegraph... the pilothouse and engine room. This may be by bell signals with voice tubes, telephone, or...

  14. 46 CFR 167.40-7 - Voice tubes, telephone, and telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Voice tubes, telephone, and telegraph systems. 167.40-7... NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Certain Equipment Requirements § 167.40-7 Voice tubes, telephone, and telegraph... the pilothouse and engine room. This may be by bell signals with voice tubes, telephone, or...

  15. 46 CFR 167.40-7 - Voice tubes, telephone, and telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Voice tubes, telephone, and telegraph systems. 167.40-7... NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Certain Equipment Requirements § 167.40-7 Voice tubes, telephone, and telegraph... the pilothouse and engine room. This may be by bell signals with voice tubes, telephone, or...

  16. 46 CFR 167.40-7 - Voice tubes, telephone, and telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Voice tubes, telephone, and telegraph systems. 167.40-7... NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Certain Equipment Requirements § 167.40-7 Voice tubes, telephone, and telegraph... the pilothouse and engine room. This may be by bell signals with voice tubes, telephone, or...

  17. 46 CFR 167.40-7 - Voice tubes, telephone, and telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Voice tubes, telephone, and telegraph systems. 167.40-7... NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Certain Equipment Requirements § 167.40-7 Voice tubes, telephone, and telegraph... the pilothouse and engine room. This may be by bell signals with voice tubes, telephone, or...

  18. Investigation of trap properties in high-k/metal gate p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors with aluminum ion implantation using random telegraph noise analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Tsung-Hsien; Chang, Shoou-Jinn Fang, Yean-Kuen; Huang, Po-Chin; Wu, Chung-Yi; Wu, San-Lein

    2014-08-11

    In this study, the impact of aluminum ion implantation (Al I/I) on random telegraph noise (RTN) in high-k/metal gate (HK/MG) p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (pMOSFETs) was investigated. The trap parameters of HK/MG pMOSFETs with Al I/I, such as trap energy level, capture time and emission time, activation energies for capture and emission, and trap location in the gate dielectric, were determined. The configuration coordinate diagram was also established. It was observed that the implanted Al could fill defects and form a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer and thus increase the tunneling barrier height for holes. It was also observed that the trap position in the Al I/I samples was lower due to the Al I/I-induced dipole at the HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} interface.

  19. Multiband signal reconstruction for random equivalent sampling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y J; Liu, C J

    2014-10-01

    The random equivalent sampling (RES) is a sampling approach that can be applied to capture high speed repetitive signals with a sampling rate that is much lower than the Nyquist rate. However, the uneven random distribution of the time interval between the excitation pulse and the signal degrades the signal reconstruction performance. For sparse multiband signal sampling, the compressed sensing (CS) based signal reconstruction algorithm can tease out the band supports with overwhelming probability and reduce the impact of uneven random distribution in RES. In this paper, the mathematical model of RES behavior is constructed in the frequency domain. Based on the constructed mathematical model, the band supports of signal can be determined. Experimental results demonstrate that, for a signal with unknown sparse multiband, the proposed CS-based signal reconstruction algorithm is feasible, and the CS reconstruction algorithm outperforms the traditional RES signal reconstruction method.

  20. INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH AT THE EASTERN TELEGRAPH COMPANY, 1872-1929.

    PubMed

    2014-03-01

    By the late nineteenth century the submarine telegraph cable industry, which had blossomed in the 1850s, had reached what historians regard as technological maturity. For a host of commercial, cultural and technical reasons, the industry seems to have become conservative in its attitude towards technological development, which is reflected in the small scale of its staff and facilities for research and development. This paper argues that the attitude of the cable industry towards research and development was less conservative and altogether more complex than historians have suggested. Focusing on the crucial case of the Eastern Telegraph Company, the largest single operator of submarine cables, it shows how the company encouraged inventive activity among outside and in-house electricians and, in 1903, established a small research laboratory where staff and outside scientific advisors pursued new methods of cable signalling and cable designs. The scale of research and development at the Eastern Telegraph Company, however, was small by comparison to that of its nearest competitor, Western Union, and dwarfed by that of large electrical manufacturers. This paper explores the reasons for this comparatively weak provision but also suggests that this was not inappropriate for a service-sector firm.

  1. INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH AT THE EASTERN TELEGRAPH COMPANY, 1872-1929

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    By the late nineteenth century the submarine telegraph cable industry, which had blossomed in the 1850s, had reached what historians regard as technological maturity. For a host of commercial, cultural and technical reasons, the industry seems to have become conservative in its attitude towards technological development, which is reflected in the small scale of its staff and facilities for research and development. This paper argues that the attitude of the cable industry towards research and development was less conservative and altogether more complex than historians have suggested. Focusing on the crucial case of the Eastern Telegraph Company, the largest single operator of submarine cables, it shows how the company encouraged inventive activity among outside and in-house electricians and, in 1903, established a small research laboratory where staff and outside scientific advisors pursued new methods of cable signalling and cable designs. The scale of research and development at the Eastern Telegraph Company, however, was small by comparison to that of its nearest competitor, Western Union, and dwarfed by that of large electrical manufacturers. This paper explores the reasons for this comparatively weak provision but also suggests that this was not inappropriate for a service-sector firm. PMID:25977587

  2. Reaction of Paramecium to Temperature Gradients and the Telegraph Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tadashi; Fujimura, Jun

    1992-01-01

    The telegraph equation with a drift term to determine an asymmetric random walk is applied to the behavior of paramecia to accumulate at their optimal temperature in the presence of temperature gradient. From this equation, the following two points are clarified; 1, the stationary solution of the equation explains that the observed stationary distribution of the cells decreases exponentially from their optimal position, and 2, on a kind of paramecium that begins to accumulate at the optimal temperature after the treatment with riboflavin, the calculated transition time from a random distribution to the stationary distribution agrees with the observed transition time, 3 minutes.

  3. Probabilistic Signal Recovery and Random Matrices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-08

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0369 Probabilistic Signal Recovery and Random Matrices Roman Vershynin UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Final Report 12/08/2016...SUBTITLE Probabilistic Signal Recovery and Random Matrices 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-14-1-0009 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6...computing the permanents of matrices with non-negative entries. In computational graph theory, we studied a randomized algorithm for estimating the number of

  4. Neural coding using telegraphic switching of magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Dong Ik; Bae, Gi Yoon; Oh, Heong Sik; Park, Wanjun

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we present a synaptic transmission representing neural coding with spike trains by using a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). Telegraphic switching generates an artificial neural signal with both the applied magnetic field and the spin-transfer torque that act as conflicting inputs for modulating the number of spikes in spike trains. The spiking probability is observed to be weighted with modulation between 27.6% and 99.8% by varying the amplitude of the voltage input or the external magnetic field. With a combination of the reverse coding scheme and the synaptic characteristic of MTJ, an artificial function for the synaptic transmission is achieved.

  5. Neural coding using telegraphic switching of magnetic tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Dong Ik; Bae, Gi Yoon; Oh, Heong Sik; Park, Wanjun

    2015-05-07

    In this work, we present a synaptic transmission representing neural coding with spike trains by using a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). Telegraphic switching generates an artificial neural signal with both the applied magnetic field and the spin-transfer torque that act as conflicting inputs for modulating the number of spikes in spike trains. The spiking probability is observed to be weighted with modulation between 27.6% and 99.8% by varying the amplitude of the voltage input or the external magnetic field. With a combination of the reverse coding scheme and the synaptic characteristic of MTJ, an artificial function for the synaptic transmission is achieved.

  6. Evolution of Lotka-Volterra predator-prey systems under telegraph noise.

    PubMed

    Auger, P; Du, N H; Hieu, N T

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we study a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey system with prey logistic growth under the telegraph noise. The telegraph noise switches at random two prey-predator models. The aim of this work is to determine the subset of omega-limit set of the system and show out the existence of a stationary distribution. We also focus on persistence of the predator and thus we look for conditions that allow persistence of the predator and prey community. We show that the asymptotic behaviour highly depends on the value of some constant lambda which is useful to make suitable predictions about the persistence of the system.

  7. 46 CFR 129.560 - Engine-order telegraphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... INSTALLATIONS Miscellaneous Electrical Systems § 129.560 Engine-order telegraphs. No OSV need carry an engine-order telegraph, provided the vessel meets the requirements of § 113.35-3(d) of this chapter. ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Engine-order telegraphs. 129.560 Section...

  8. 46 CFR 169.693 - Engine order telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Engine order telegraph systems. 169.693 Section 169.693... Machinery and Electrical Electrical Installations on Vessels of 100 Gross Tons and Over § 169.693 Engine order telegraph systems. An engine order telegraph system is not required. ...

  9. 46 CFR 169.693 - Engine order telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Engine order telegraph systems. 169.693 Section 169.693... Machinery and Electrical Electrical Installations on Vessels of 100 Gross Tons and Over § 169.693 Engine order telegraph systems. An engine order telegraph system is not required. ...

  10. 46 CFR 169.693 - Engine order telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Engine order telegraph systems. 169.693 Section 169.693... Machinery and Electrical Electrical Installations on Vessels of 100 Gross Tons and Over § 169.693 Engine order telegraph systems. An engine order telegraph system is not required. ...

  11. 46 CFR 169.693 - Engine order telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Engine order telegraph systems. 169.693 Section 169.693... Machinery and Electrical Electrical Installations on Vessels of 100 Gross Tons and Over § 169.693 Engine order telegraph systems. An engine order telegraph system is not required. ...

  12. 46 CFR 169.693 - Engine order telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Engine order telegraph systems. 169.693 Section 169.693... Machinery and Electrical Electrical Installations on Vessels of 100 Gross Tons and Over § 169.693 Engine order telegraph systems. An engine order telegraph system is not required. ...

  13. Story Problem Formats: Verbal Versus Telegraphic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, John C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Students in grades three to seven were given tests on which problems were presented in either verbal or telegraphic format. Only in grade six was a significant difference found, favoring the verbal format. Problems with conventional syntax appeared to be easier to interpret than those with bare bones syntax. (MNS)

  14. 46 CFR 129.560 - Engine-order telegraphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Engine-order telegraphs. 129.560 Section 129.560 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS Miscellaneous Electrical Systems § 129.560 Engine-order telegraphs. No OSV need carry an engine...

  15. 46 CFR 129.560 - Engine-order telegraphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Engine-order telegraphs. 129.560 Section 129.560 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS Miscellaneous Electrical Systems § 129.560 Engine-order telegraphs. No OSV need carry an engine...

  16. 46 CFR 129.560 - Engine-order telegraphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Engine-order telegraphs. 129.560 Section 129.560 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS Miscellaneous Electrical Systems § 129.560 Engine-order telegraphs. No OSV need carry an engine...

  17. 46 CFR 129.560 - Engine-order telegraphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Engine-order telegraphs. 129.560 Section 129.560 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS Miscellaneous Electrical Systems § 129.560 Engine-order telegraphs. No OSV need carry an engine...

  18. 26 CFR 49.4252-3 - Telegraph service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Telegraph service. 49.4252-3 Section 49.4252-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Communications § 49.4252-3 Telegraph service. (a) In general...

  19. 26 CFR 49.4252-3 - Telegraph service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Telegraph service. 49.4252-3 Section 49.4252-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Communications § 49.4252-3 Telegraph service. (a) In...

  20. 26 CFR 49.4252-3 - Telegraph service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Telegraph service. 49.4252-3 Section 49.4252-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Communications § 49.4252-3 Telegraph service. (a) In...

  1. 26 CFR 49.4252-3 - Telegraph service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Telegraph service. 49.4252-3 Section 49.4252-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Communications § 49.4252-3 Telegraph service. (a) In...

  2. Dots and dashes: art, virtual reality, and the telegraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzanka, Silvia; Chang, Ben

    2009-02-01

    Dots and Dashes is a virtual reality artwork that explores online romance over the telegraph, based on Ella Cheever Thayer's novel Wired Love - a Romance in Dots and Dashes (an Old Story Told in a New Way)1. The uncanny similarities between this story and the world of today's virtual environments provides the springboard for an exploration of a wealth of anxieties and dreams, including the construction of identities in an electronically mediated environment, the shifting boundaries between the natural and machine worlds, and the spiritual dimensions of science and technology. In this paper we examine the parallels between the telegraph networks and our current conceptions of cyberspace, as well as unique social and cultural impacts specific to the telegraph. These include the new opportunities and roles available to women in the telegraph industry and the connection between the telegraph and the Spiritualist movement. We discuss the development of the artwork, its structure and aesthetics, and the technical development of the work.

  3. Randomness in quantum mechanics - nature's ultimate cryptogram?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erber, T.; Putterman, S.

    1985-11-01

    The possibility that a single atom irradiated by coherent light will be equivalent to an infinite computer with regard to its ability to generate random numbers is addressed. A search for unexpected patterns of order by crypt analysis of the telegraph signal generated by the on/off time of the atom's fluorescence is described. The results will provide new experimental tests of the fundamental principles of quantum theory.

  4. 46 CFR 113.35-15 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application...) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-15 Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application. If a mechanical engine order telegraph...

  5. 46 CFR 113.35-15 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application...) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-15 Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application. If a mechanical engine order telegraph...

  6. 46 CFR 113.35-15 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application...) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-15 Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application. If a mechanical engine order telegraph...

  7. 46 CFR 113.35-15 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application...) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-15 Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application. If a mechanical engine order telegraph...

  8. 46 CFR 113.35-15 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application...) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-15 Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application. If a mechanical engine order telegraph...

  9. 46 CFR 113.35-5 - Electric engine order telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electric engine order telegraph systems. 113.35-5... COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-5 Electric engine order telegraph systems. (a) Each electric engine order telegraph system must have transmitters and...

  10. 46 CFR 32.30-5 - Engine order telegraph equipment-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Engine order telegraph equipment-T/ALL. 32.30-5 Section..., MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Sound Powered Telephone, Voice Tube, and Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 32.30-5 Engine order telegraph equipment—T/ALL. Each tankship must have an engine order telegraph...

  11. 46 CFR 32.30-5 - Engine order telegraph equipment-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Engine order telegraph equipment-T/ALL. 32.30-5 Section..., MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Sound Powered Telephone, Voice Tube, and Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 32.30-5 Engine order telegraph equipment—T/ALL. Each tankship must have an engine order telegraph...

  12. Curiosity Drill After Drilling at Telegraph Peak

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-06

    This view from the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows the rover's drill just after finishing a drilling operation at a target rock called "Telegraph Peak" on Feb. 24, 2015, the 908th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars. Three sols later, a fault-protection action by the rover halted a process of transferring sample powder that was collected during this drilling. The image is in raw color, as recorded directly by the camera, and has not been white-balanced. The fault-protection event, triggered by an irregularity in electrical current, led to engineering tests in subsequent days to diagnose the underlying cause. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19145

  13. 28. Interior view of telegrapher's bay, east wall, showing interior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Interior view of telegrapher's bay, east wall, showing interior finishes, framing, and furring over stonework - Bend Railroad Depot, 1160 Northeast Divion Street (At foot of Kearny Street), Bend, Deschutes County, OR

  14. Hybrid computer technique yields random signal probability distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, W. D.

    1965-01-01

    Hybrid computer determines the probability distributions of instantaneous and peak amplitudes of random signals. This combined digital and analog computer system reduces the errors and delays of manual data analysis.

  15. Random neural networks with multiple classes of signals.

    PubMed

    Gelenbe, E; Fourneau, J M

    1999-05-15

    By extending the pulsed recurrent random neural network (RNN) discussed in Gelenbe (1989, 1990, 1991), we propose a recurrent random neural network model in which each neuron processes several distinctly characterized streams of "signals" or data. The idea that neurons may be able to distinguish between the pulses they receive and use them in a distinct manner is biologically plausible. In engineering applications, the need to process different streams of information simultaneously is commonplace (e.g., in image processing, sensor fusion, or parallel processing systems). In the model we propose, each distinct stream is a class of signals in the form of spikes. Signals may arrive to a neuron from either the outside world (exogenous signals) or other neurons (endogenous signals). As a function of the signals it has received, a neuron can fire and then send signals of some class to another neuron or to the outside world. We show that the multiple signal class random model with exponential interfiring times, Poisson external signal arrivals, and Markovian signal movements between neurons has product form; this implies that the distribution of its state (i.e., the probability that each neuron of the network is excited) can be computed simply from the solution of a system of 2Cn simultaneous nonlinear equations where C is the number of signal classes and n is the number of neurons. Here we derive the stationary solution for the multiple class model and establish necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of the stationary solution. The recurrent random neural network model with multiple classes has already been successfully applied to image texture generation (Atalay & Gelenbe, 1992), where multiple signal classes are used to model different colors in the image.

  16. Random Deep Belief Networks for Recognizing Emotions from Speech Signals.

    PubMed

    Wen, Guihua; Li, Huihui; Huang, Jubing; Li, Danyang; Xun, Eryang

    2017-01-01

    Now the human emotions can be recognized from speech signals using machine learning methods; however, they are challenged by the lower recognition accuracies in real applications due to lack of the rich representation ability. Deep belief networks (DBN) can automatically discover the multiple levels of representations in speech signals. To make full of its advantages, this paper presents an ensemble of random deep belief networks (RDBN) method for speech emotion recognition. It firstly extracts the low level features of the input speech signal and then applies them to construct lots of random subspaces. Each random subspace is then provided for DBN to yield the higher level features as the input of the classifier to output an emotion label. All outputted emotion labels are then fused through the majority voting to decide the final emotion label for the input speech signal. The conducted experimental results on benchmark speech emotion databases show that RDBN has better accuracy than the compared methods for speech emotion recognition.

  17. 46 CFR 113.35-13 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; operation...) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-13 Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; operation. If more than one transmitter operates a...

  18. 46 CFR 113.35-13 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; operation...) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-13 Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; operation. If more than one transmitter operates a...

  19. 46 CFR 113.35-13 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; operation...) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-13 Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; operation. If more than one transmitter operates a...

  20. 46 CFR 113.35-13 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; operation...) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-13 Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; operation. If more than one transmitter operates a...

  1. 46 CFR 113.35-13 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; operation...) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-13 Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; operation. If more than one transmitter operates a...

  2. 46 CFR 32.30-5 - Engine order telegraph equipment-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Engine order telegraph equipment-T/ALL. 32.30-5 Section..., MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Sound Powered Telephone, Voice Tube, and Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 32.30-5 Engine order telegraph equipment—T/ALL. Each tankship must have an engine order...

  3. No-signaling, perfect bipartite dichotomic correlations and local randomness

    SciTech Connect

    Seevinck, M. P.

    2011-03-28

    The no-signaling constraint on bi-partite correlations is reviewed. It is shown that in order to obtain non-trivial Bell-type inequalities that discern no-signaling correlations from more general ones, one must go beyond considering expectation values of products of observables only. A new set of nontrivial no-signaling inequalities is derived which have a remarkably close resemblance to the CHSH inequality, yet are fundamentally different. A set of inequalities by Roy and Singh and Avis et al., which is claimed to be useful for discerning no-signaling correlations, is shown to be trivially satisfied by any correlation whatsoever. Finally, using the set of newly derived no-signaling inequalities a result with potential cryptographic consequences is proven: if different parties use identical devices, then, once they have perfect correlations at spacelike separation between dichotomic observables, they know that because of no-signaling the local marginals cannot but be completely random.

  4. Early Telegraphic News Dispatches: The Forerunner of the AP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarzlose, Richard A.

    The origin of the Associated Press (AP) lies in the early cooperative news gathering efforts of the editors of several New York newspapers. As early as May 1846, these editors were "pooling" their energies in response to newly developed modes of communication--the wire and wireless telegraph and the trans-oceanic steamship mail services.…

  5. Hole at Telegraph Peak Drilled by Mars Rover Curiosity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-25

    This hole, with a diameter slightly smaller than a U.S. dime, was drilled by NASA Curiosity Mars rover into a rock target called Telegraph Peak. The rock is located within the basal layer of Mount Sharp. The hole was drilled on Feb. 24, 2015.

  6. 48 CFR 14.202-2 - Telegraphic bids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Telegraphic bids. 14.202-2 Section 14.202-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS... and mailgrams shall be authorized only when— (1) The date for the opening of bids will not allow...

  7. Big Sky Telegraph: Telecommunications Guide to Community Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odasz, Frank B., Comp.

    This document contains a wide assortment of papers and promotional materials concerning the Big Sky Telegraph, a Montana-based telecommunications network serving rural economic development organizations. Funded by the US West Foundation and Western Montana College, Big Sky was created to stimulate grassroots innovation in rural education,…

  8. Nonlinearly driven Landau-Zener transition in a qubit with telegraph noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestgården, J. I.; Bergli, J.; Galperin, Y. M.

    2008-01-01

    We study Landau-Zener-like dynamics of a qubit influenced by transverse random telegraph noise. The telegraph noise is characterized by its coupling strength υ and switching rate γ . The qubit energy levels are driven nonlinearly in time, ∝sgn(t)∣t∣ν , and we derive the transition probability in the limit of sufficiently fast noise, for arbitrary exponent ν . The level occupation after the transition depends strongly on ν , and there exists a critical νc with qualitative difference between ν<νc and ν>νc . When ν<νc , the final state is always fully incoherent with equal population of both quantum levels, even for arbitrarily weak noise. For ν>νc , the system keeps some coherence depending on the strength of the noise, and in the limit of weak noise, no transition takes place. For fast noise νc=1/2 , while for slow noise νc<1/2 and it depends on γ . We also discuss phase coherence, which is relevant when the qubit has a nonzero minimum energy gap. The qualitative dependency on ν is the same for the phase coherence and level occupation. The state after the transition does, in general, depend on γ . For fixed υ , increasing γ decreases the final state coherence when ν<1 and increases the final state coherence when ν>1 . Only the conventional linear driving is independent of γ .

  9. Random Deep Belief Networks for Recognizing Emotions from Speech Signals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huihui; Huang, Jubing; Li, Danyang; Xun, Eryang

    2017-01-01

    Now the human emotions can be recognized from speech signals using machine learning methods; however, they are challenged by the lower recognition accuracies in real applications due to lack of the rich representation ability. Deep belief networks (DBN) can automatically discover the multiple levels of representations in speech signals. To make full of its advantages, this paper presents an ensemble of random deep belief networks (RDBN) method for speech emotion recognition. It firstly extracts the low level features of the input speech signal and then applies them to construct lots of random subspaces. Each random subspace is then provided for DBN to yield the higher level features as the input of the classifier to output an emotion label. All outputted emotion labels are then fused through the majority voting to decide the final emotion label for the input speech signal. The conducted experimental results on benchmark speech emotion databases show that RDBN has better accuracy than the compared methods for speech emotion recognition. PMID:28356908

  10. Sequential time interleaved random equivalent sampling for repetitive signal.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yijiu; Liu, Jingjing

    2016-12-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) based sampling techniques exhibit many advantages over other existing approaches for sparse signal spectrum sensing; they are also incorporated into non-uniform sampling signal reconstruction to improve the efficiency, such as random equivalent sampling (RES). However, in CS based RES, only one sample of each acquisition is considered in the signal reconstruction stage, and it will result in more acquisition runs and longer sampling time. In this paper, a sampling sequence is taken in each RES acquisition run, and the corresponding block measurement matrix is constructed using a Whittaker-Shannon interpolation formula. All the block matrices are combined into an equivalent measurement matrix with respect to all sampling sequences. We implemented the proposed approach with a multi-cores analog-to-digital converter (ADC), whose ADC cores are time interleaved. A prototype realization of this proposed CS based sequential random equivalent sampling method has been developed. It is able to capture an analog waveform at an equivalent sampling rate of 40 GHz while sampled at 1 GHz physically. Experiments indicate that, for a sparse signal, the proposed CS based sequential random equivalent sampling exhibits high efficiency.

  11. Sequential time interleaved random equivalent sampling for repetitive signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yijiu; Liu, Jingjing

    2016-12-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) based sampling techniques exhibit many advantages over other existing approaches for sparse signal spectrum sensing; they are also incorporated into non-uniform sampling signal reconstruction to improve the efficiency, such as random equivalent sampling (RES). However, in CS based RES, only one sample of each acquisition is considered in the signal reconstruction stage, and it will result in more acquisition runs and longer sampling time. In this paper, a sampling sequence is taken in each RES acquisition run, and the corresponding block measurement matrix is constructed using a Whittaker-Shannon interpolation formula. All the block matrices are combined into an equivalent measurement matrix with respect to all sampling sequences. We implemented the proposed approach with a multi-cores analog-to-digital converter (ADC), whose ADC cores are time interleaved. A prototype realization of this proposed CS based sequential random equivalent sampling method has been developed. It is able to capture an analog waveform at an equivalent sampling rate of 40 GHz while sampled at 1 GHz physically. Experiments indicate that, for a sparse signal, the proposed CS based sequential random equivalent sampling exhibits high efficiency.

  12. Multistability, chaos, and random signal generation in semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Lei; Huang, Danhong; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Historically, semiconductor superlattices, artificial periodic structures of different semiconductor materials, were invented with the purpose of engineering or manipulating the electronic properties of semiconductor devices. A key application lies in generating radiation sources, amplifiers, and detectors in the "unusual" spectral range of subterahertz and terahertz (0.1-10 THz), which cannot be readily realized using conventional radiation sources, the so-called THz gap. Efforts in the past three decades have demonstrated various nonlinear dynamical behaviors including chaos, suggesting the potential to exploit chaos in semiconductor superlattices as random signal sources (e.g., random number generators) in the THz frequency range. We consider a realistic model of hot electrons in semiconductor superlattice, taking into account the induced space charge field. Through a systematic exploration of the phase space we find that, when the system is subject to an external electrical driving of a single frequency, chaos is typically associated with the occurrence of multistability. That is, for a given parameter setting, while there are initial conditions that lead to chaotic trajectories, simultaneously there are other initial conditions that lead to regular motions. Transition to multistability, i.e., the emergence of multistability with chaos as a system parameter passes through a critical point, is found and argued to be abrupt. Multistability thus presents an obstacle to utilizing the superlattice system as a reliable and robust random signal source. However, we demonstrate that, when an additional driving field of incommensurate frequency is applied, multistability can be eliminated, with chaos representing the only possible asymptotic behavior of the system. In such a case, a random initial condition will lead to a trajectory landing in a chaotic attractor with probability 1, making quasiperiodically driven semiconductor superlattices potentially as a reliable

  13. Multistability, chaos, and random signal generation in semiconductor superlattices.

    PubMed

    Ying, Lei; Huang, Danhong; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Historically, semiconductor superlattices, artificial periodic structures of different semiconductor materials, were invented with the purpose of engineering or manipulating the electronic properties of semiconductor devices. A key application lies in generating radiation sources, amplifiers, and detectors in the "unusual" spectral range of subterahertz and terahertz (0.1-10 THz), which cannot be readily realized using conventional radiation sources, the so-called THz gap. Efforts in the past three decades have demonstrated various nonlinear dynamical behaviors including chaos, suggesting the potential to exploit chaos in semiconductor superlattices as random signal sources (e.g., random number generators) in the THz frequency range. We consider a realistic model of hot electrons in semiconductor superlattice, taking into account the induced space charge field. Through a systematic exploration of the phase space we find that, when the system is subject to an external electrical driving of a single frequency, chaos is typically associated with the occurrence of multistability. That is, for a given parameter setting, while there are initial conditions that lead to chaotic trajectories, simultaneously there are other initial conditions that lead to regular motions. Transition to multistability, i.e., the emergence of multistability with chaos as a system parameter passes through a critical point, is found and argued to be abrupt. Multistability thus presents an obstacle to utilizing the superlattice system as a reliable and robust random signal source. However, we demonstrate that, when an additional driving field of incommensurate frequency is applied, multistability can be eliminated, with chaos representing the only possible asymptotic behavior of the system. In such a case, a random initial condition will lead to a trajectory landing in a chaotic attractor with probability 1, making quasiperiodically driven semiconductor superlattices potentially as a reliable

  14. Quantum lattice gas algorithm for the telegraph equation.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Mark W; Colburn, Gabriel G

    2009-06-01

    The telegraph equation combines features of both the diffusion and wave equations and has many applications to heat propagation, transport in disordered media, and elsewhere. We describe a quantum lattice gas algorithm (QLGA) for this partial differential equation with one spatial dimension. This algorithm generalizes one previously known for the diffusion equation. We present an analysis of the algorithm and accompanying simulation results. The QLGA is suitable for simulation on combined classical-quantum computers.

  15. On the stability and convergence of the time-fractional variable order telegraph equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atangana, Abdon

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we have generalized the time-fractional telegraph equation using the concept of derivative of fractional variable order. The generalized equation is called time-fractional variable order telegraph equation. This new equation was solved numerically via the Crank-Nicholson scheme. Stability and convergence of the numerical solution were presented in details. Numerical simulations of the approximate solution of the time-fractional variable order telegraph equation were presented for different values of the grid point.

  16. Estimating random signal parameters from noisy images with nuisance parameters

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Meredith Kathryn; Clarkson, Eric; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2008-01-01

    In a pure estimation task, an object of interest is known to be present, and we wish to determine numerical values for parameters that describe the object. This paper compares the theoretical framework, implementation method, and performance of two estimation procedures. We examined the performance of these estimators for tasks such as estimating signal location, signal volume, signal amplitude, or any combination of these parameters. The signal is embedded in a random background to simulate the effect of nuisance parameters. First, we explore the classical Wiener estimator, which operates linearly on the data and minimizes the ensemble mean-squared error. The results of our performance tests indicate that the Wiener estimator can estimate amplitude and shape once a signal has been located, but is fundamentally unable to locate a signal regardless of the quality of the image. Given these new results on the fundamental limitations of Wiener estimation, we extend our methods to include more complex data processing. We introduce and evaluate a scanning-linear estimator that performs impressively for location estimation. The scanning action of the estimator refers to seeking a solution that maximizes a linear metric, thereby requiring a global-extremum search. The linear metric to be optimized can be derived as a special case of maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation when the likelihood is Gaussian and a slowly varying covariance approximation is made. PMID:18545527

  17. Epoch synchronization of random FH signals in broadband noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Char-Dir; Polydoros, Andreas

    A scheme for epoch synchronization of random frequency-hopped signals in broadband noise is presented. This scheme operates on the power samples of the real-time autocorrelation function of the received waveform. The scheme takes advantage of the fact that power sampling in the correlation domain suppresses frequency and phase dependence, but preserves timing information, in order to construct a maximum-likelihood epoch estimation algorithm for which the hopping pattern need not be known. The conditional mean and variance of this estimator are derived analytically and a simple parameter is found to be adequate for measuring the estimation performance. Simulation results that confirm the analytical results are reported.

  18. 46 CFR 113.35-9 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems. 113.35-9 Section 113.35-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-9 Mechanical engine order...

  19. 46 CFR 113.35-9 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems. 113.35-9 Section 113.35-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-9 Mechanical engine order...

  20. 46 CFR 113.35-9 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems. 113.35-9 Section 113.35-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-9 Mechanical engine order...

  1. 46 CFR 113.35-9 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems. 113.35-9 Section 113.35-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-9 Mechanical engine order...

  2. 46 CFR 113.35-9 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems. 113.35-9 Section 113.35-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-9 Mechanical engine order...

  3. Parent Telegraphic Speech Use and Spoken Language in Preschoolers with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venker, Courtney E.; Bolt, Daniel M.; Meyer, Allison; Sindberg, Heidi; Weismer, Susan Ellis; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: There is considerable controversy regarding whether to use telegraphic or grammatical input when speaking to young children with language delays, including children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study examined telegraphic speech use in parents of preschoolers with ASD and associations with children's spoken language 1 year…

  4. 46 CFR 32.30-5 - Engine order telegraph equipment-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Engine order telegraph equipment-T/ALL. 32.30-5 Section 32.30-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Sound Powered Telephone, Voice Tube, and Engine Order Telegraph...

  5. 46 CFR 32.30-5 - Engine order telegraph equipment-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Engine order telegraph equipment-T/ALL. 32.30-5 Section 32.30-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Sound Powered Telephone, Voice Tube, and Engine Order Telegraph...

  6. 46 CFR 113.35-5 - Electric engine order telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electric engine order telegraph systems. 113.35-5 Section 113.35-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-5 Electric engine order...

  7. 46 CFR 113.35-5 - Electric engine order telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electric engine order telegraph systems. 113.35-5 Section 113.35-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-5 Electric engine order...

  8. 46 CFR 113.35-5 - Electric engine order telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electric engine order telegraph systems. 113.35-5 Section 113.35-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-5 Electric engine order...

  9. 46 CFR 113.35-7 - Electric engine order telegraph systems; operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electric engine order telegraph systems; operations. 113.35-7 Section 113.35-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-7 Electric...

  10. 46 CFR 113.35-5 - Electric engine order telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electric engine order telegraph systems. 113.35-5 Section 113.35-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-5 Electric engine order...

  11. Parent Telegraphic Speech Use and Spoken Language in Preschoolers with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venker, Courtney E.; Bolt, Daniel M.; Meyer, Allison; Sindberg, Heidi; Weismer, Susan Ellis; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: There is considerable controversy regarding whether to use telegraphic or grammatical input when speaking to young children with language delays, including children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study examined telegraphic speech use in parents of preschoolers with ASD and associations with children's spoken language 1 year…

  12. Analytic solution for Telegraph equation by differential transform method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biazar, J.; Eslami, M.

    2010-06-01

    In this article differential transform method (DTM) is considered to solve Telegraph equation. This method is a powerful tool for solving large amount of problems (Zhou (1986) [1], Chen and Ho (1999) [2], Jang et al. (2001) [3], Kangalgil and Ayaz (2009) [4], Ravi Kanth and Aruna (2009) [5], Arikoglu and Ozkol (2007) [6]). Using differential transform method, it is possible to find the exact solution or a closed approximate solution of an equation. To illustrate the ability and reliability of the method some examples are provided. The results reveal that the method is very effective and simple.

  13. Comparison of the telegraph and hyperdiffusion approximations in cosmic-ray transport

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Noble, P. L.

    2016-06-15

    The telegraph equation and its generalizations have been repeatedly considered in the models of diffusive cosmic-ray transport. Yet the telegraph model has well-known limitations, and analytical arguments suggest that a hyperdiffusion model should serve as a more accurate alternative to the telegraph model, especially on the timescale of a few scattering times. We present a detailed side-by-side comparison of an evolving particle density profile, predicted by the telegraph and hyperdiffusion models in the context of a simple but physically meaningful initial-value problem, compare the predictions with the solution based on the Fokker–Planck equation, and discuss the applicability of the telegraph and hyperdiffusion approximations to the description of strongly anisotropic particle distributions.

  14. Calibration of Correlation Radiometers Using Pseudo-Random Noise Signals

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Isaac Ramos; Bosch-Lluis, Xavi; Camps, Adriano; Alvarez, Nereida Rodriguez; Hernandez, Juan Fernando Marchán; Domènech, Enric Valencia; Vernich, Carlos; de la Rosa, Sonia; Pantoja, Sebastián

    2009-01-01

    The calibration of correlation radiometers, and particularly aperture synthesis interferometric radiometers, is a critical issue to ensure their performance. Current calibration techniques are based on the measurement of the cross-correlation of receivers’ outputs when injecting noise from a common noise source requiring a very stable distribution network. For large interferometric radiometers this centralized noise injection approach is very complex from the point of view of mass, volume and phase/amplitude equalization. Distributed noise injection techniques have been proposed as a feasible alternative, but are unable to correct for the so-called “baseline errors” associated with the particular pair of receivers forming the baseline. In this work it is proposed the use of centralized Pseudo-Random Noise (PRN) signals to calibrate correlation radiometers. PRNs are sequences of symbols with a long repetition period that have a flat spectrum over a bandwidth which is determined by the symbol rate. Since their spectrum resembles that of thermal noise, they can be used to calibrate correlation radiometers. At the same time, since these sequences are deterministic, new calibration schemes can be envisaged, such as the correlation of each receiver’s output with a baseband local replica of the PRN sequence, as well as new distribution schemes of calibration signals. This work analyzes the general requirements and performance of using PRN sequences for the calibration of microwave correlation radiometers, and particularizes the study to a potential implementation in a large aperture synthesis radiometer using an optical distribution network. PMID:22454576

  15. Application of the three-dimensional telegraph equation to cosmic-ray transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautz, Robert C.; Lerche, Ian

    2016-10-01

    An analytical solution to the three-dimensional telegraph equation is presented. This equation has recently received some attention but so far the treatment has been one-dimensional. By using the structural similarity to the Klein-Gordon equation, the telegraph equation can be solved in closed form. Illustrative examples are used to discuss the qualitative differences from the diffusion solution. A comparison with a numerical test-particle simulation reveals that some features of an intensity profile can be better explained using the telegraph approach.

  16. Parent Telegraphic Speech Use and Spoken Language in Preschoolers With ASD

    PubMed Central

    Bolt, Daniel M.; Meyer, Allison; Sindberg, Heidi; Ellis Weismer, Susan; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose There is considerable controversy regarding whether to use telegraphic or grammatical input when speaking to young children with language delays, including children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study examined telegraphic speech use in parents of preschoolers with ASD and associations with children's spoken language 1 year later. Method Parent–child dyads (n = 55) participated when children were, on average, 3 (Time 1) and 4 years old (Time 2). The rate at which parents omitted obligatory determiners was derived from transcripts of parent–child play sessions; measures of children's spoken language were obtained from these same transcripts. Results Telegraphic speech use varied substantially across parents. Higher rates of parent determiner omissions at Time 1 were significantly associated with lower lexical diversity in children's spoken language at Time 2, even when controlling for children's baseline lexical diversity and nonverbal IQ. Findings from path analyses supported the directionality of effects assumed in our regression analyses, although these results should be interpreted with caution due to the limited sample size. Conclusions Telegraphic input may have a negative impact on language development in young children with ASD. Future experimental research is needed to directly investigate how telegraphic input affects children's language learning and processing. PMID:26381592

  17. Constrained Perturbation Regularization Approach for Signal Estimation Using Random Matrix Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suliman, Mohamed; Ballal, Tarig; Kammoun, Abla; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.

    2016-12-01

    In this supplementary appendix we provide proofs and additional extensive simulations that complement the analysis of the main paper (constrained perturbation regularization approach for signal estimation using random matrix theory).

  18. 46 CFR 31.35-5 - Communications; alarm systems, telephone and voice tube systems, engine telegraph systems, etc...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Communications; alarm systems, telephone and voice tube systems, engine telegraph systems, etc.-TB/ALL. 31.35-5 Section 31.35-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Communications; alarm systems, telephone and voice tube systems, engine telegraph systems, etc.—TB/ALL. All...

  19. 46 CFR 31.35-5 - Communications; alarm systems, telephone and voice tube systems, engine telegraph systems, etc...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Communications; alarm systems, telephone and voice tube systems, engine telegraph systems, etc.-TB/ALL. 31.35-5 Section 31.35-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Communications; alarm systems, telephone and voice tube systems, engine telegraph systems, etc.—TB/ALL. All...

  20. 46 CFR 31.35-5 - Communications; alarm systems, telephone and voice tube systems, engine telegraph systems, etc...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Communications; alarm systems, telephone and voice tube systems, engine telegraph systems, etc.-TB/ALL. 31.35-5 Section 31.35-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Communications; alarm systems, telephone and voice tube systems, engine telegraph systems, etc.—TB/ALL. All...

  1. 46 CFR 31.35-5 - Communications; alarm systems, telephone and voice tube systems, engine telegraph systems, etc...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Communications; alarm systems, telephone and voice tube systems, engine telegraph systems, etc.-TB/ALL. 31.35-5 Section 31.35-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Communications; alarm systems, telephone and voice tube systems, engine telegraph systems, etc.—TB/ALL. All...

  2. 46 CFR 31.35-5 - Communications; alarm systems, telephone and voice tube systems, engine telegraph systems, etc...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Communications; alarm systems, telephone and voice tube systems, engine telegraph systems, etc.-TB/ALL. 31.35-5 Section 31.35-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Communications; alarm systems, telephone and voice tube systems, engine telegraph systems, etc.—TB/ALL. All...

  3. 26 CFR 49.4254-2 - Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones. 49.4254-2 Section 49.4254-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Communications § 49.4254-2 Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones...

  4. 26 CFR 49.4254-2 - Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones. 49.4254-2 Section 49.4254-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Communications § 49.4254-2 Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated...

  5. 26 CFR 49.4254-2 - Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones. 49.4254-2 Section 49.4254-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Communications § 49.4254-2 Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated...

  6. 26 CFR 49.4254-2 - Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones. 49.4254-2 Section 49.4254-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Communications § 49.4254-2 Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated...

  7. Numerical simulation of second-order hyperbolic telegraph type equations with variable coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Sapna; Kumar, Manoj; Tiwari, Surabhi

    2015-02-01

    In this article, the authors proposed a numerical scheme based on Crank-Nicolson finite difference scheme and Haar wavelets to find numerical solutions of different types of second order hyperbolic telegraph equations (i.e. telegraph equation with constant coefficients, with variable coefficients, and singular telegraph equation). This work is an extension of the scheme by Jiwari (2012) for hyperbolic equations. The use of Haar basis function is made with multiresolution analysis to get the fast and accurate results on collocation points. The convergence of the proposed scheme is proved by doing its error analysis. Four test examples are considered to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the scheme. The scheme is easy and very suitable for computer implementation and provides numerical solutions close to the exact solutions and available in the literature.

  8. Covert communications using random noise signals: overall system simulation and modulation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Jack; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2005-06-01

    In military communications, there exist numerous potential threats to message security. Ultra-wideband (UWB) signals provide secure communications because they cannot, in general, be detected using conventional receivers and they can be made relatively immune from jamming. The security of an UWB signal can be further improved by mixing it with random noise. By using a random noise signal, the user can conceal the message signal within the noise waveform and thwart detection by hostile forces. This paper describes a novel spread spectrum technique that can be used for secure and covert communications. The technique is based on the use of heterodyne correlation techniques to inject coherence in a random noise signal. The modulated signal to be transmitted containing the coherent carrier is mixed with a sample of an ultrawideband random noise signal. The frequency range of the ultra-wideband noise signal is appropriately chosen so that the lower sideband of the mixing process falls over the same frequency range. Both the frequency-converted noise-like signal and the original random noise signal are simultaneously transmitted on orthogonally polarized channels through a dual-polarized transmitting antenna. The receiver consists of a similar dual-polarized antenna that simultaneously receives the two orthogonally polarized transmitted signals, amplifies each in a minimum phase limiting amplifier, and mixes these signals in a double sideband up-converter. The upper sideband of the mixing process recovers the modulated signal, which can then be demodulated. The advantage of this technique lies in the relative immunity of the random noise-like un-polarized transmit signal from detection and jamming. Since the transmit signal "appears" totally un-polarized and noise-like, linearly polarized receivers are unable to identify, decode, or otherwise extract useful information from the signal. The system is immune from interference caused by high power linearly polarized signal

  9. Covert communications using random noise signals: effects of atmospheric propagation nulls and rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Karen M.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2005-06-01

    In military communications, there exist numerous potential threats to message security. Ultra-wideband (UWB) signals provide secure communications because they cannot, in general, be detected using conventional receivers and they can be made relatively immune from jamming. The security of an UWB signal can be further improved by mixing it with random noise. By using a random noise signal, the user can conceal the message signal within the noise waveform and thwart detection by hostile forces. This paper describes a novel spread spectrum technique that can be used for secure and covert communications. The technique is based on the use of heterodyne correlation techniques to inject coherence in a random noise signal. The modulated signal to be transmitted containing the coherent carrier is mixed with a sample of an ultra-wideband (UWB) random noise signal. The frequency range of the UWB noise signal is appropriately chosen so that the lower sideband of the mixing process falls over the same frequency range. Both the frequency-converted noise-like signal and the original random noise signal are simultaneously transmitted on orthogonally polarized channels through a dual-polarized transmitting antenna. The receiver consists of a similar dual-polarized antenna that simultaneously receives the two orthogonally polarized transmitted signals, amplifies each in a minimum phase limiting amplifier, and mixes these signals in a double sideband upconverter. The upper sideband of the mixing process recovers the modulated signal, which can then be demodulated. The advantage of this technique lies in the relative immunity of the random noise-like unpolarized transmit signal from detection and jamming. Since the transmitted signal "appears" totally unpolarized and noise-like, linearly polarized receivers are unable to identify, decode, or otherwise extract useful information from the signal. The system is immune from interference caused by high power linearly polarized signal

  10. Beneficial randomness of signals in a neuronal circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, S.; Blesić, S.; Stratimirović, Dj.

    2002-11-01

    We have analyzed spontaneous discharge dynamics of fusimotor neurons, by applying the so-called detrended fluctuation analysis, which is a modification of the random walk model analysis. Besides, we applied the wavelet analysis method to the same problem. By using these methods we have found evidence for the white noise characteristics of the time series generated by the neuron discharges. We concluded that such a discharge dynamics represents the requisite noisy component for occurrence of the stochastic resonance mechanism in the neural coordination of muscle spindles. This finding appears to be very intriguing, since it provided for the first time statistical characterization of the neuronal noise.

  11. Information retrieval and cross-correlation function analysis of random noise radar signal through dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejos, Ana Vazques; Dawood, Muhammad

    2012-06-01

    In this contribution we examine the propagation of an ultrawideband (UWB) random noise signal through dispersive media such as soil, vegetation, and water, using Fourier-based analysis. For such media, the propagated signal undergoes medium-specific impairments which degrade the received signal in a different way than the non-dispersive propagation media. Theoretically, larger penetration depths into a dispersive medium can be achieved by identifying and detecting the precursors, thereby offering significantly better signal-to-noise ratio and enhanced imaging. For a random noise signal, well defined precursors in term of peak-amplitude don't occur. The phenomenon must therefore be studied in terms of energy evolution. Additionally, the distortion undergone by the UWB random noise signal through a dispersive medium can introduce frequency-dependent uncertainty or noise in the received signal. This leads to larger degradation of the cross-correlation function (CCF), mainly in terms of sidelobe levels and main peak deformation, and consequently making the information retrieval difficult. We would further analyze one method to restore the shape and carrier frequency of the input UWB random noise signal, thereby, improving the CCF estimation.

  12. A Random Walk into Optical Signal Processing and Integrated Optofluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylor, Martha-Elizabeth

    2013-04-01

    As a young child, I knew that I wanted to be a paleontologist. My parents, both artists, did their best to encourage me in my quest to dig for dinosaurs. However, decisions during my late high school and early college years serendipitously shifted my path so that I ended up pursuing a career in applied physics. In particular, my career path has been centered in optics with an emphasis on holography and signal processing. This talk will discuss my research in the areas of opto-electronic blind source separation and holographic photopolymers as well as the non-linear path that has gotten me to this point.

  13. Random pattern signal characteristics of super-RENS disk in blue laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jooho; Hwang, Inoh; Kim, Hyunki; Yoon, Duseop; Park, Hyun-Soo; Jung, Kiuhae; Park, Insic; Tominaga, Junji

    2004-09-01

    We report the random pattern signal characteristics of the super resolution near field structure (Super-RENS) disk in a blue laser optical system. (Laser wavelength 405 nm, numerical aperture 0.85) We introduced new structure for blue laser system, which results in 43 dB carrier to noise ratio (CNR) at the 75 nm mark length signal (which is equivalent to 50 GB capacity with 0.32 micrometer track pitch) and much better readout stability were obtained. The relatively clear eye pattern, phase locked loop (PLL) state and data to clock jitter of around 20% for a 50 GB (2T:75 nm) random pattern signal were realized.

  14. Signals in Communication Engineering History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consonni, Denise; Silva, Magno T. M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a study of various electric signals, which have been employed throughout the history of communication engineering in its two main landmarks: the telegraph and the telephone. The signals are presented in their time and frequency domain representations. The historical order has been followed in the presentation: wired systems, spark…

  15. Signals in Communication Engineering History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consonni, Denise; Silva, Magno T. M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a study of various electric signals, which have been employed throughout the history of communication engineering in its two main landmarks: the telegraph and the telephone. The signals are presented in their time and frequency domain representations. The historical order has been followed in the presentation: wired systems, spark…

  16. A robust random number generator based on differential comparison of chaotic laser signals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianzhong; Wang, Yuncai; Liu, Ming; Xue, Lugang; Li, Pu; Wang, Anbang; Zhang, Mingjiang

    2012-03-26

    We experimentally realize a robust real-time random number generator by differentially comparing the signal from a chaotic semiconductor laser and its delayed signal through a 1-bit analog-to-digital converter. The probability density distribution of the output chaotic signal based on the differential comparison method possesses an extremely small coefficient of Pearson's median skewness (1.5 × 10⁻⁶), which can yield a balanced random sequence much easily than the previously reported method that compares the signal from the chaotic laser with a certain threshold value. Moveover, we experimently demonstrate that our method can stably generate good random numbers at rates of 1.44 Gbit/s with excellent immunity from external perturbations while the previously reported method fails.

  17. Efficiency of the human observer detecting random signals in random backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Park, Subok; Clarkson, Eric; Kupinski, Matthew A; Barrett, Harrison H

    2005-01-01

    The efficiencies of the human observer and the channelized-Hotelling observer relative to the ideal observer for signal-detection tasks are discussed. Both signal-known-exactly (SKE) tasks and signal-known-statistically (SKS) tasks are considered. Signal location is uncertain for the SKS tasks, and lumpy backgrounds are used for background uncertainty in both cases. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are employed to determine ideal-observer performance on the detection tasks. Psychophysical studies are conducted to compute human-observer performance on the same tasks. Efficiency is computed as the squared ratio of the detectabilities of the observer of interest to the ideal observer. Human efficiencies are approximately 2.1% and 24%, respectively, for the SKE and SKS tasks. The results imply that human observers are not affected as much as the ideal observer by signal-location uncertainty even though the ideal observer outperforms the human observer for both tasks. Three different simplified pinhole imaging systems are simulated, and the humans and the model observers rank the systems in the same order for both the SKE and the SKS tasks.

  18. 46 CFR 113.35-7 - Electric engine order telegraph systems; operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-7 Electric..., or on the wings of, the navigating bridge operate a common indicator in the engineroom, the...) Except for a transmitter in an unattended navigating bridge on a double-ended vessel, each transmitter...

  19. 46 CFR 113.35-7 - Electric engine order telegraph systems; operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-7 Electric..., or on the wings of, the navigating bridge operate a common indicator in the engineroom, the...) Except for a transmitter in an unattended navigating bridge on a double-ended vessel, each transmitter...

  20. 46 CFR 113.35-7 - Electric engine order telegraph systems; operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-7 Electric..., or on the wings of, the navigating bridge operate a common indicator in the engineroom, the...) Except for a transmitter in an unattended navigating bridge on a double-ended vessel, each transmitter...

  1. 46 CFR 113.35-7 - Electric engine order telegraph systems; operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-7 Electric..., or on the wings of, the navigating bridge operate a common indicator in the engineroom, the...) Except for a transmitter in an unattended navigating bridge on a double-ended vessel, each transmitter...

  2. 25 CFR 169.26 - Telephone and telegraph lines; radio, television, and other communications facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Telephone and telegraph lines; radio, television, and...; radio, television, and other communications facilities. (a) The Act of February 15, 1901 (31 Stat. 790... communication purposes, and for radio, television, and other forms of communication transmitting, relay, and...

  3. 25 CFR 169.26 - Telephone and telegraph lines; radio, television, and other communications facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Telephone and telegraph lines; radio, television, and...; radio, television, and other communications facilities. (a) The Act of February 15, 1901 (31 Stat. 790... communication purposes, and for radio, television, and other forms of communication transmitting, relay, and...

  4. 25 CFR 169.26 - Telephone and telegraph lines; radio, television, and other communications facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Telephone and telegraph lines; radio, television, and...; radio, television, and other communications facilities. (a) The Act of February 15, 1901 (31 Stat. 790... communication purposes, and for radio, television, and other forms of communication transmitting, relay, and...

  5. 25 CFR 169.26 - Telephone and telegraph lines; radio, television, and other communications facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Telephone and telegraph lines; radio, television, and...; radio, television, and other communications facilities. (a) The Act of February 15, 1901 (31 Stat. 790... communication purposes, and for radio, television, and other forms of communication transmitting, relay, and...

  6. 25 CFR 169.26 - Telephone and telegraph lines; radio, television, and other communications facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Telephone and telegraph lines; radio, television, and...; radio, television, and other communications facilities. (a) The Act of February 15, 1901 (31 Stat. 790... communication purposes, and for radio, television, and other forms of communication transmitting, relay, and...

  7. 26 CFR 49.4252-4 - Provisions common to telephone and telegraph services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Provisions common to telephone and telegraph services. 49.4252-4 Section 49.4252-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Communications § 49.4252-4...

  8. 26 CFR 49.4252-4 - Provisions common to telephone and telegraph services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Provisions common to telephone and telegraph services. 49.4252-4 Section 49.4252-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Communications §...

  9. 26 CFR 49.4252-4 - Provisions common to telephone and telegraph services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Provisions common to telephone and telegraph services. 49.4252-4 Section 49.4252-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Communications §...

  10. 26 CFR 49.4252-4 - Provisions common to telephone and telegraph services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Provisions common to telephone and telegraph services. 49.4252-4 Section 49.4252-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Communications §...

  11. Synaptic signal streams generated by ex vivo neuronal networks contain non-random, complex patterns.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmook; Zemianek, Jill M; Shultz, Abraham; Vo, Anh; Maron, Ben Y; Therrien, Mikaela; Courtright, Christina; Guaraldi, Mary; Yanco, Holly A; Shea, Thomas B

    2014-11-01

    Cultured embryonic neurons develop functional networks that transmit synaptic signals over multiple sequentially connected neurons as revealed by multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) embedded within the culture dish. Signal streams of ex vivo networks contain spikes and bursts of varying amplitude and duration. Despite the random interactions inherent in dissociated cultures, neurons are capable of establishing functional ex vivo networks that transmit signals among synaptically connected neurons, undergo developmental maturation, and respond to exogenous stimulation by alterations in signal patterns. These characteristics indicate that a considerable degree of organization is an inherent property of neurons. We demonstrate herein that (1) certain signal types occur more frequently than others, (2) the predominant signal types change during and following maturation, (3) signal predominance is dependent upon inhibitory activity, and (4) certain signals preferentially follow others in a non-reciprocal manner. These findings indicate that the elaboration of complex signal streams comprised of a non-random distribution of signal patterns is an emergent property of ex vivo neuronal networks.

  12. Adaptive denoising for simplified signal-dependent random noise model in optoelectronic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Weiping; Wang, Guangyi; Xu, Jiangtao

    2017-05-01

    Existing denoising algorithms based on a simplified signal-dependent noise model are valid under the assumption of the predefined parameters. Consequently, these methods fail if the predefined conditions are not satisfied. An adaptive method for eliminating random noise from the simplified signal-dependent noise model is presented in this paper. A linear mapping function between multiplicative noise and noiseless image data is established using the Maclaurin formula. Through demonstrations of the cross-correlation between random variables and independent random variable functions, the mapping function between the variances of multiplicative noise and noiseless image data is acquired. Accordingly, the adaptive denoising model of simplified signal-dependent noise in the wavelet domain is built. The experimental results confirm that the proposed method outperforms conventional ones.

  13. Investigation of correlation characteristics for random array collaborative beamforming using noise signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, David B.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Himed, Braham

    2016-05-01

    The performance of different random array geometries is analyzed and compared. Three phased array geometries are considered: linear arrays with non-uniform randomized spacing between elements, circular arrays with non-uniform element radii, and ad hoc sensor networks with elements located randomly within a circular area. For each of these array geometries, computer simulations modeled the transmission, reflection from an arbitrary target, and reception of signals. The effectiveness of each array's beamforming techniques was measured by taking the peak cross-correlation between the received signal and a time-delayed replica of the original transmitted signal. For each array type, the correlation performance was obtained for transmission and reception of both chirp waveforms and ultra-wideband noise signals. It was found that the non-uniform linear array generally produced the highest correlation between transmitted and reflected signals. The non-uniform circular and ad hoc arrays demonstrated the most consistent performance with respect to noise signal bandwidth. The effect of scan angle was found to have a significant impact on the correlation performance of the linear arrays, where the correlation performance declines as the scan angle moves away from broadside to the array.

  14. Cramer-Rao Bound for Gaussian Random Processes and Applications to Radar Processing of Atmospheric Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, Rod

    1993-01-01

    Calculations of the exact Cramer-Rao Bound (CRB) for unbiased estimates of the mean frequency, signal power, and spectral width of Doppler radar/lidar signals (a Gaussian random process) are presented. Approximate CRB's are derived using the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT). These approximate results are equal to the exact CRB when the DFT coefficients are mutually uncorrelated. Previous high SNR limits for CRB's are shown to be inaccurate because the discrete summations cannot be approximated with integration. The performance of an approximate maximum likelihood estimator for mean frequency approaches the exact CRB for moderate signal to noise ratio and moderate spectral width.

  15. A Method of Reducing Random Drift in the Combined Signal of an Array of Inertial Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    METHOD OF REDUCING RANDOM DRIFT IN THE COMBINED SIGNAL OF AN ARRAY OF INERTIAL SENSORS STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described...royalties thereon or therefore. CROSS REFERENCE TO OTHER PATENT APPLICATIONS [0002] None. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION (1) Field of the... Invention [0003] The present invention relates to the components of inertial measurement units, sensors such as gyroscopes and accelerometers. More

  16. Classification of epileptic EEG signals based on simple random sampling and sequential feature selection.

    PubMed

    Ghayab, Hadi Ratham Al; Li, Yan; Abdulla, Shahab; Diykh, Mohammed; Wan, Xiangkui

    2016-06-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals are used broadly in the medical fields. The main applications of EEG signals are the diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as epilepsy, Alzheimer, sleep problems and so on. This paper presents a new method which extracts and selects features from multi-channel EEG signals. This research focuses on three main points. Firstly, simple random sampling (SRS) technique is used to extract features from the time domain of EEG signals. Secondly, the sequential feature selection (SFS) algorithm is applied to select the key features and to reduce the dimensionality of the data. Finally, the selected features are forwarded to a least square support vector machine (LS_SVM) classifier to classify the EEG signals. The LS_SVM classifier classified the features which are extracted and selected from the SRS and the SFS. The experimental results show that the method achieves 99.90, 99.80 and 100 % for classification accuracy, sensitivity and specificity, respectively.

  17. Nonlinear Estimation of Discrete-Time Signals Under Random Observation Delay

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero-Aguila, R.; Jimenez-Lopez, J. D.; Nakamori, S.

    2008-11-06

    This paper presents an approximation to the nonlinear least-squares estimation problem of discrete-time stochastic signals using nonlinear observations with additive white noise which can be randomly delayed by one sampling time. The observation delay is modelled by a sequence of independent Bernoulli random variables whose values, zero or one, indicate that the real observation arrives on time or it is delayed and, hence, the available measurement to estimate the signal is not up-to-date. Assuming that the state-space model generating the signal is unknown and only the covariance functions of the processes involved in the observation equation are ready for use, a filtering algorithm based on linear approximations of the real observations is proposed.

  18. Origin of multi-level switching and telegraphic noise in organic nanocomposite memory devices

    PubMed Central

    Song, Younggul; Jeong, Hyunhak; Chung, Seungjun; Ahn, Geun Ho; Kim, Tae-Young; Jang, Jingon; Yoo, Daekyoung; Jeong, Heejun; Javey, Ali; Lee, Takhee

    2016-01-01

    The origin of negative differential resistance (NDR) and its derivative intermediate resistive states (IRSs) of nanocomposite memory systems have not been clearly analyzed for the past decade. To address this issue, we investigate the current fluctuations of organic nanocomposite memory devices with NDR and the IRSs under various temperature conditions. The 1/f noise scaling behaviors at various temperature conditions in the IRSs and telegraphic noise in NDR indicate the localized current pathways in the organic nanocomposite layers for each IRS. The clearly observed telegraphic noise with a long characteristic time in NDR at low temperature indicates that the localized current pathways for the IRSs are attributed to trapping/de-trapping at the deep trap levels in NDR. This study will be useful for the development and tuning of multi-bit storable organic nanocomposite memory device systems. PMID:27659298

  19. 'A thorn in the side of European geodesy': measuring Paris-Greenwich longitude by electric telegraph.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The difference in longitude between the observatories of Paris and Greenwich was long of fundamental importance to geodesy, navigation and timekeeping. Measured many times and by many different means since the seventeenth century, the preferred method of the later nineteenth and early twentieth centuries made use of the electric telegraph. I describe here for the first time the four Paris-Greenwich telegraphic longitude determinations made between 1854 and 1902. Despite contemporary faith in the new technique, the first was soon found to be inaccurate; the second was a failure, ending in Anglo-French dispute over whose result was to be trusted; the third failed in exactly the same way; and when eventually the fourth was presented as a success, the evidence for that success was far from clear-cut. I use this as a case study in precision measurement, showing how mutual grounding between different measurement techniques, in the search for agreement between them, was an important force for change and improvement. I also show that better precision had more to do with the gradually improving methods of astronomical, time determination than with the singular innovation of the telegraph, thus emphasizing the importance of what have been described as 'observatory techniques' to nineteenth-century practices of precision measurement.

  20. Super-resolution techniques for velocity estimation using UWB random noise radar signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawood, Muhammad; Quraishi, Nafish; Alejos, Ana V.

    2011-06-01

    The Doppler spread pertaining to the ultrawideband (UWB) radar signals from moving target is directly proportional to the bandwidth of the transmitted signal and the target velocity. Using typical FFT-based methods, the estimation of true velocities pertaining to two targets moving with relatively close velocities within a radar range bin is problematic. In this paper, we extend the Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm to resolve targets moving velocities closer to each other within a given range bin for UWB random noise radar waveforms. Simulated and experimental results are compared for various target velocities using both narrowband (200MHz) and wideband (1GHz) noise radar signals, clearly establishing the unbiased and unambiguous velocity estimations using the MUSIC algorithm.

  1. Study of statistical properties of random signals in multirate filter banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Leu-Shing

    1995-04-01

    Previous works on subband-related signal processing were mainly dedicated to the applications of subband systems and to the formulation of multirate filter banks. Only very limited results can be found that treat statistical properties of random signals inside a multirate filter bank. In this paper, such a theoretical study is performed from the statistical viewpoint. Our main interest lies in how a multirate structure interacts with a random signal. The key statistical properties examined are stationarity, autocorrelation, cross-correlation, power spectral density, and spectral flatness measure. Exact explicit expressions are obtained. These results have their counterparts in a fullband system; however, inside a multirate structure or a subband system, the aliasing effect caused by decimation should be taken into account. In a multirate system, stationarity is not preserved when an upsampling (or expanding) operation is encountered. Furthermore the equivalent filtering operation is nonlinear. A test example of an AR-1 process is included for demonstration. From this example, an interesting phenomenon is observed. When the correlation coefficient of the AR-1 process is close to 1, the lowpassed signal is not, in any sense, a rough replica of the source. This example justifies the significance and necessity of a theoretical analysis of subband systems from a statistical viewpoint. We believe that stochastic signal processing applications of a subband structure such as estimation, detection, recognition, etc. will benefit from study of this nature.

  2. Precise ultrasonic ranging based on pseudo-random sequence modulated continuous signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Chunjie; Huang, Zhigang; Zhou, Chao

    2013-10-01

    The ultrasonic ranging equipment usually need to measure the "time of flight", that it takes for acoustic waves to travel the measured distance. Due to the influence of various noises, ultrasonic distance measurement using the pulse signal is difficult to obtain accurate measurement results. Continuous signal phase detected method can achieve the precision measurement of the transmission time, and has a strong noise resistance capability. When single-frequency signals are used, the measurement range is limited to a small extent. This problem can be solved by dual-tone or multi-frequency method. But in short distance ranging applications especial in the restricted space fields, there usually exists strong multiple echoes. Because of the echoes, the ranging accuracy will be significantly decreased. In this paper, a singlefrequency continuous signal modulated by a pseudo-random sequence is used, since the pseudo-random sequence has excellent autocorrelation properties. On the other hand, an improved signal phase estimation algorithm is used to realize the high-precision measurement of TOF. An experimental measurement system was built, and experiments showed that the method can get micron degree precision.

  3. Power of the echo signal at grazing angles of location of a randomly irregular surface

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, M.L.

    1995-03-01

    The power of an optical signal detected upon nonstationary irradiation of a randomly irregular surface in the case when mutual shading of surface elements is an essential factor is investigated. An expression for an average (over an ensemble of irregular surfaces) power detected in location of a surface with a Gaussian distribution of heights and inclinations by a {delta}-pulse under conditions of strong shadings is derived. Shading is shown to produce a substantial distortion of the shape of the echo signal. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Improved Statistical Signal Processing of Nonstationary Random Processes Using Time-Warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisdom, Scott Thomas

    A common assumption used in statistical signal processing of nonstationary random signals is that the signals are locally stationary. Using this assumption, data is segmented into short analysis frames, and processing is performed using these short frames. Short frames limit the amount of data available, which in turn limits the performance of statistical estimators. In this thesis, we propose a novel method that promises improved performance for a variety of statistical signal processing algorithms. This method proposes to estimate certain time-varying parameters of nonstationary signals and then use this estimated information to perform a time-warping of the data that compensates for the time-varying parameters. Since the time-warped data is more stationary, longer analysis frames may be used, which improves the performance of statistical estimators. We first examine the spectral statistics of two particular types of nonstationary random processes that are useful for modeling ship propeller noise and voiced speech. We examine the effect of time-varying frequency content on these spectral statistics, and in addition show that the cross-frequency spectral statistics of these signals contain significant additional information that is not usually exploited using a stationary assumption. This information, combined with our proposed method, promises improvements for a wide variety of applications in the future. We then describe and test an implementation of our time-warping method, the fan-chirp transform. We apply our method to two applications, detection of ship noise in a passive sonar application and joint denoising and dereverberation of speech. Our method yields improved results for both applications compared to conventional methods.

  5. Random migration and signal integration promote rapid and robust T cell recruitment.

    PubMed

    Textor, Johannes; Henrickson, Sarah E; Mandl, Judith N; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Westermann, Jürgen; de Boer, Rob J; Beltman, Joost B

    2014-08-01

    To fight infections, rare T cells must quickly home to appropriate lymph nodes (LNs), and reliably localize the antigen (Ag) within them. The first challenge calls for rapid trafficking between LNs, whereas the second may require extensive search within each LN. Here we combine simulations and experimental data to investigate which features of random T cell migration within and between LNs allow meeting these two conflicting demands. Our model indicates that integrating signals from multiple random encounters with Ag-presenting cells permits reliable detection of even low-dose Ag, and predicts a kinetic feature of cognate T cell arrest in LNs that we confirm using intravital two-photon data. Furthermore, we obtain the most reliable retention if T cells transit through LNs stochastically, which may explain the long and widely distributed LN dwell times observed in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that random migration, both between and within LNs, allows recruiting the majority of cognate precursors within a few days for various realistic infection scenarios. Thus, the combination of two-scale stochastic migration and signal integration is an efficient and robust strategy for T cell immune surveillance.

  6. Random Migration and Signal Integration Promote Rapid and Robust T Cell Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Textor, Johannes; Henrickson, Sarah E.; Mandl, Judith N.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Westermann, Jürgen; de Boer, Rob J.; Beltman, Joost B.

    2014-01-01

    To fight infections, rare T cells must quickly home to appropriate lymph nodes (LNs), and reliably localize the antigen (Ag) within them. The first challenge calls for rapid trafficking between LNs, whereas the second may require extensive search within each LN. Here we combine simulations and experimental data to investigate which features of random T cell migration within and between LNs allow meeting these two conflicting demands. Our model indicates that integrating signals from multiple random encounters with Ag-presenting cells permits reliable detection of even low-dose Ag, and predicts a kinetic feature of cognate T cell arrest in LNs that we confirm using intravital two-photon data. Furthermore, we obtain the most reliable retention if T cells transit through LNs stochastically, which may explain the long and widely distributed LN dwell times observed in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that random migration, both between and within LNs, allows recruiting the majority of cognate precursors within a few days for various realistic infection scenarios. Thus, the combination of two-scale stochastic migration and signal integration is an efficient and robust strategy for T cell immune surveillance. PMID:25102014

  7. Graph-Based Transform for 2D Piecewise Smooth Signals With Random Discontinuity Locations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong; Liang, Jie

    2017-04-01

    The graph-based block transform recently emerged as an effective tool for compressing some special signals such as depth images in 3D videos. However, in existing methods, overheads are required to describe the graph of the block, from which the decoder has to calculate the transform via time-consuming eigendecomposition. To address these problems, in this paper, we aim to develop a single graph-based transform for a class of 2D piecewise smooth signals with similar discontinuity patterns. We first consider the deterministic case with a known discontinuity location in each row. We propose a 2D first-order autoregression (2D AR1) model and a 2D graph for this type of signals. We show that the closed-form expression of the inverse of a biased Laplacian matrix of the proposed 2D graph is exactly the covariance matrix of the proposed 2D AR1 model. Therefore, the optimal transform for the signal are the eigenvectors of the proposed graph Laplacian. Next, we show that similar results hold in the random case, where the locations of the discontinuities in different rows are randomly distributed within a confined region, and we derive the closed-form expression of the corresponding optimal 2D graph Laplacian. The theory developed in this paper can be used to design both pre-computed transforms and signal-dependent transforms with low complexities. Finally, depth image coding experiments demonstrate that our methods can achieve similar performance to the state-of-the-art method, but our complexity is much lower.

  8. Gearbox fault diagnosis based on deep random forest fusion of acoustic and vibratory signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Sanchez, René-Vinicio; Zurita, Grover; Cerrada, Mariela; Cabrera, Diego; Vásquez, Rafael E.

    2016-08-01

    Fault diagnosis is an effective tool to guarantee safe operations in gearboxes. Acoustic and vibratory measurements in such mechanical devices are all sensitive to the existence of faults. This work addresses the use of a deep random forest fusion (DRFF) technique to improve fault diagnosis performance for gearboxes by using measurements of an acoustic emission (AE) sensor and an accelerometer that are used for monitoring the gearbox condition simultaneously. The statistical parameters of the wavelet packet transform (WPT) are first produced from the AE signal and the vibratory signal, respectively. Two deep Boltzmann machines (DBMs) are then developed for deep representations of the WPT statistical parameters. A random forest is finally suggested to fuse the outputs of the two DBMs as the integrated DRFF model. The proposed DRFF technique is evaluated using gearbox fault diagnosis experiments under different operational conditions, and achieves 97.68% of the classification rate for 11 different condition patterns. Compared to other peer algorithms, the addressed method exhibits the best performance. The results indicate that the deep learning fusion of acoustic and vibratory signals may improve fault diagnosis capabilities for gearboxes.

  9. New explicit group iterative methods in the solution of three dimensional hyperbolic telegraph equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kew, Lee Ming; Ali, Norhashidah Hj. Mohd

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, new group iterative numerical schemes based on the centred and rotated (skewed) seven-point finite difference discretisations are proposed for the solution of a three dimensional second order hyperbolic telegraph equation, subject to specific initial and Dirichlet boundary conditions. Both schemes are shown to be of second order accuracies and unconditionally stable. The scheme derived from the rotated grid stencil results in a reduced linear system with lower computational complexity compared to the scheme derived from the centred approximation formula. A comparative study with other common point iterative methods based on the seven-point centred difference approximation together with their computational complexity analyses is also presented.

  10. Modelling the effect of telegraph noise in the SIRS epidemic model using Markovian switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhalgh, D.; Liang, Y.; Mao, X.

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the effect of introducing telegraph noise, which is an example of an environmental noise, into the susceptible-infectious-recovered-susceptible (SIRS) model by examining the model using a finite-state Markov Chain (MC). First we start with a two-state MC and show that there exists a unique nonnegative solution and establish the conditions for extinction and persistence. We then explain how the results can be generalised to a finite-state MC. The results for the SIR (Susceptible-Infectious-Removed) model with Markovian Switching (MS) are a special case. Numerical simulations are produced to confirm our theoretical results.

  11. Two Stochastic Resonances Induced by Two Different Multiplicative Telegraphic Noises for an Electric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing-Hui

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, an electric system with two dichotomous resistors is investigated. It is shown that this system can display two stochastic resonances, which are the amplitude of the periodic response as the functions of the two dichotomous resistors strengthes respectively. In the limits of Gaussian white noise and shot white noise (i.e., the two noises are both Gaussian white noise or shot white noise), no phenomena of resonance appear. By further study, we find that when the system is with three or more multiplicative telegraphic noises, there are three or more stochastic resonances.

  12. Comprehensive studies on the accuracy of trap characterization by using advanced random telegraph noise simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, Yusuke; Matsuzawa, Kazuya; Ishihara, Takamitsu

    2015-04-01

    Our developed noise simulator can represent the dynamic behaviors of electron and hole trapping and de-trapping via interactions with both the Si substrate and the poly-Si gate. Simulations reveal that the conventional analytical model using the ratio between the capture and emission time constants yields large errors in the estimates of trap site positions due to interactions with the Si substrate and poly-Si gate especially in thin gate insulator MOSFETs.

  13. Stochastic resonance in a fractional harmonic oscillator subject to random mass and signal-modulated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Zhu, Cheng-Yin; Cheng, Xiao-Feng; Li, Heng

    2016-10-01

    Stochastic resonance in a fractional harmonic oscillator with random mass and signal-modulated noise is investigated. Applying linear system theory and the characteristics of the noises, the analysis expression of the mean output-amplitude-gain (OAG) is obtained. It is shown that the OAG varies non-monotonically with the increase of the intensity of the multiplicative dichotomous noise, with the increase of the frequency of the driving force, as well as with the increase of the system frequency. In addition, the OAG is a non-monotonic function of the system friction coefficient, as a function of the viscous damping coefficient, as a function of the fractional exponent.

  14. Application of the Radon-FCL approach to seismic random noise suppression and signal preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanlei; Li, Yue; Liu, Yanping; Tian, Yanan; Wu, Ning

    2016-08-01

    The fractal conservation law (FCL) is a linear partial differential equation that is modified by an anti-diffusive term of lower order. The analysis indicated that this algorithm could eliminate high frequencies and preserve or amplify low/medium-frequencies. Thus, this method is quite suitable for the simultaneous noise suppression and enhancement or preservation of seismic signals. However, the conventional FCL filters seismic data only along the time direction, thereby ignoring the spatial coherence between neighbouring traces, which leads to the loss of directional information. Therefore, we consider the development of the conventional FCL into the time-space domain and propose a Radon-FCL approach. We applied a Radon transform to implement the FCL method in this article; performing FCL filtering in the Radon domain achieves a higher level of noise attenuation. Using this method, seismic reflection events can be recovered with the sacrifice of fewer frequency components while effectively attenuating more random noise than conventional FCL filtering. Experiments using both synthetic and common shot point data demonstrate the advantages of the Radon-FCL approach versus the conventional FCL method with regard to both random noise attenuation and seismic signal preservation.

  15. Multi-label spacecraft electrical signal classification method based on DBN and random forest.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Yu, Nan; Li, Pengfei; Song, Shimin; Wu, Yalei; Li, Yang; Liu, Meng

    2017-01-01

    In spacecraft electrical signal characteristic data, there exists a large amount of data with high-dimensional features, a high computational complexity degree, and a low rate of identification problems, which causes great difficulty in fault diagnosis of spacecraft electronic load systems. This paper proposes a feature extraction method that is based on deep belief networks (DBN) and a classification method that is based on the random forest (RF) algorithm; The proposed algorithm mainly employs a multi-layer neural network to reduce the dimension of the original data, and then, classification is applied. Firstly, we use the method of wavelet denoising, which was used to pre-process the data. Secondly, the deep belief network is used to reduce the feature dimension and improve the rate of classification for the electrical characteristics data. Finally, we used the random forest algorithm to classify the data and comparing it with other algorithms. The experimental results show that compared with other algorithms, the proposed method shows excellent performance in terms of accuracy, computational efficiency, and stability in addressing spacecraft electrical signal data.

  16. Multi-label spacecraft electrical signal classification method based on DBN and random forest

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Yu, Nan; Li, Pengfei; Song, Shimin; Wu, Yalei; Li, Yang; Liu, Meng

    2017-01-01

    In spacecraft electrical signal characteristic data, there exists a large amount of data with high-dimensional features, a high computational complexity degree, and a low rate of identification problems, which causes great difficulty in fault diagnosis of spacecraft electronic load systems. This paper proposes a feature extraction method that is based on deep belief networks (DBN) and a classification method that is based on the random forest (RF) algorithm; The proposed algorithm mainly employs a multi-layer neural network to reduce the dimension of the original data, and then, classification is applied. Firstly, we use the method of wavelet denoising, which was used to pre-process the data. Secondly, the deep belief network is used to reduce the feature dimension and improve the rate of classification for the electrical characteristics data. Finally, we used the random forest algorithm to classify the data and comparing it with other algorithms. The experimental results show that compared with other algorithms, the proposed method shows excellent performance in terms of accuracy, computational efficiency, and stability in addressing spacecraft electrical signal data. PMID:28486479

  17. Neurons in Striate Cortex Signal Disparity in Half-Matched Random-Dot Stereograms.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Sid; Read, Jenny C A; Cumming, Bruce G

    2016-08-24

    Human stereopsis can operate in dense "cyclopean" images containing no monocular objects. This is believed to depend on the computation of binocular correlation by neurons in primary visual cortex (V1). The observation that humans perceive depth in half-matched random-dot stereograms, although these stimuli have no net correlation, has led to the proposition that human depth perception in these stimuli depends on a distinct "matching" computation possibly performed in extrastriate cortex. However, recording from disparity-selective neurons in V1 of fixating monkeys, we found that they are in fact able to signal disparity in half-matched stimuli. We present a simple model that explains these results. This reinstates the view that disparity-selective neurons in V1 provide the initial substrate for perception in dense cyclopean stimuli, and strongly suggests that separate correlation and matching computations are not necessary to explain existing data on mixed correlation stereograms. The initial step in stereoscopic 3D vision is generally thought to be a correlation-based computation that takes place in striate cortex. Recent research has argued that there must be an additional matching computation involved in extracting stereoscopic depth in random-dot stereograms. This is based on the observation that humans can perceive depth in stimuli with a mean binocular correlation of zero (where a correlation-based mechanism should not signal depth). We show that correlation-based cells in striate cortex do in fact signal depth here because they convert fluctuations in the correlation level into a mean change in the firing rate. Our results reinstate the view that these cells provide a sufficient substrate for the perception of stereoscopic depth. Copyright © 2016 Henriksen et al.

  18. Neurons in Striate Cortex Signal Disparity in Half-Matched Random-Dot Stereograms

    PubMed Central

    Read, Jenny C. A.; Cumming, Bruce G.

    2016-01-01

    Human stereopsis can operate in dense “cyclopean” images containing no monocular objects. This is believed to depend on the computation of binocular correlation by neurons in primary visual cortex (V1). The observation that humans perceive depth in half-matched random-dot stereograms, although these stimuli have no net correlation, has led to the proposition that human depth perception in these stimuli depends on a distinct “matching” computation possibly performed in extrastriate cortex. However, recording from disparity-selective neurons in V1 of fixating monkeys, we found that they are in fact able to signal disparity in half-matched stimuli. We present a simple model that explains these results. This reinstates the view that disparity-selective neurons in V1 provide the initial substrate for perception in dense cyclopean stimuli, and strongly suggests that separate correlation and matching computations are not necessary to explain existing data on mixed correlation stereograms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The initial step in stereoscopic 3D vision is generally thought to be a correlation-based computation that takes place in striate cortex. Recent research has argued that there must be an additional matching computation involved in extracting stereoscopic depth in random-dot stereograms. This is based on the observation that humans can perceive depth in stimuli with a mean binocular correlation of zero (where a correlation-based mechanism should not signal depth). We show that correlation-based cells in striate cortex do in fact signal depth here because they convert fluctuations in the correlation level into a mean change in the firing rate. Our results reinstate the view that these cells provide a sufficient substrate for the perception of stereoscopic depth. PMID:27559177

  19. Random noise de-noising and direct wave eliminating based on SVD method for ground penetrating radar signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cai; Song, Chao; Lu, Qi

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present a method using singular value decomposition (SVD) which aims at eliminating the random noise and direct wave from ground penetrating radar (GPR) signals. To demonstrate the validity and high efficiency of the SVD method in eliminating random noise, we compare the SVD de-noising method with wavelet threshold de-noising method and bandpass filtering method on both noisy synthetic data and field data. After that, we compare the SVD method with the mean trace deleting in eliminating direct wave on synthetic data and field data. We set general and quantitative criteria on choosing singular values to carry out the random noise de-noising and direct wave eliminating process. We find that by choosing appropriate singular values, SVD method can eliminate the random noise and direct wave in the GPR data validly and efficiently to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the GPR profiles and make effective reflection signals clearer.

  20. A stochastic mechanism for signal propagation in the brain: Force of rapid random fluctuations in membrane potentials of individual neurons.

    PubMed

    Hong, Dawei; Man, Shushuang; Martin, Joseph V

    2016-01-21

    There are two functionally important factors in signal propagation in a brain structural network: the very first synaptic delay-a time delay about 1ms-from the moment when signals originate to the moment when observation on the signal propagation can begin; and rapid random fluctuations in membrane potentials of every individual neuron in the network at a timescale of microseconds. We provide a stochastic analysis of signal propagation in a general setting. The analysis shows that the two factors together result in a stochastic mechanism for the signal propagation as described below. A brain structural network is not a rigid circuit rather a very flexible framework that guides signals to propagate but does not guarantee success of the signal propagation. In such a framework, with the very first synaptic delay, rapid random fluctuations in every individual neuron in the network cause an "alter-and-concentrate effect" that almost surely forces signals to successfully propagate. By the stochastic mechanism we provide analytic evidence for the existence of a force behind signal propagation in a brain structural network caused by rapid random fluctuations in every individual neuron in the network at a timescale of microseconds with a time delay of 1ms. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. 75 FR 49535 - Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company LLC, a Wholly Owned Subsidiary of Embarq Corporation, a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company LLC, a Wholly Owned Subsidiary of Embarq Corporation, a Subsidiary of Centurylink, Inc., New Bern Call Center, New Bern, NC...

  2. Communications Technology Transforms the Marketplace: The Impact of the Telegraph, Telephone, and Ticker on the Cincinnati Merchants' Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharlott, Bradford W.

    During the mid-nineteenth century, merchants in Cincinnati (Ohio) gained access to the latest telegraphic news through the Merchants' Exchange, which became a vital link in a communications network that served as the nervous system of the nation's economy. The Cincinnati Merchants' Exchange was founded in 1843 by the Young Men's Mercantile Library…

  3. Directed random walks and constraint programming reveal active pathways in hepatocyte growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Kittas, Aristotelis; Delobelle, Aurélien; Schmitt, Sabrina; Breuhahn, Kai; Guziolowski, Carito; Grabe, Niels

    2016-01-01

    An effective means to analyze mRNA expression data is to take advantage of established knowledge from pathway databases, using methods such as pathway-enrichment analyses. However, pathway databases are not case-specific and expression data could be used to infer gene-regulation patterns in the context of specific pathways. In addition, canonical pathways may not always describe the signaling mechanisms properly, because interactions can frequently occur between genes in different pathways. Relatively few methods have been proposed to date for generating and analyzing such networks, preserving the causality between gene interactions and reasoning over the qualitative logic of regulatory effects. We present an algorithm (MCWalk) integrated with a logic programming approach, to discover subgraphs in large-scale signaling networks by random walks in a fully automated pipeline. As an exemplary application, we uncover the signal transduction mechanisms in a gene interaction network describing hepatocyte growth factor-stimulated cell migration and proliferation from gene-expression measured with microarray and RT-qPCR using in-house perturbation experiments in a keratinocyte-fibroblast co-culture. The resulting subgraphs illustrate possible associations of hepatocyte growth factor receptor c-Met nodes, differentially expressed genes and cellular states. Using perturbation experiments and Answer Set programming, we are able to select those which are more consistent with the experimental data. We discover key regulator nodes by measuring the frequency with which they are traversed when connecting signaling between receptors and significantly regulated genes and predict their expression-shift consistently with the measured data. The Java implementation of MCWalk is publicly available under the MIT license at: https://bitbucket.org/akittas/biosubg. © 2015 FEBS.

  4. The use of steerable channels for detecting asymmetrical signals with random orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Bart; Platiša, Ljiljana; Vansteenkiste, Ewout; Philips, Wilfried

    2010-02-01

    In the optimization of medical imaging systems, there is a stringent need to shift from human observer studies to numerical observer studies, because of both cost and time limitations. Numerical models give an objective measure for the quality of displayed images for a given task and can be designed to predict the performance of medical specialists performing the same task. For the task of signal detection, the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) has been successfully used, although several studies indicate an overefficiency of the CHO compared to human observers. One of the main causes of this overefficiency is attributed to the intrinsic uncertainty about the signal (such as its orientation) that a human observer is dealing with. Deeper knowledge of the discrepancies of the CHO and the human observer may provide extra insight in the processing of the human visual system and this knowledge can be utilized to better fine-tune medical imaging systems. In this paper, we investigate the optimal detection of asymmetrical signals with statistically known random orientation, based on joint detection and estimation theory. We derive the optimal channelized observer for this task and we show that the optimal detection in channel space requires the use of steerable channels, which are used in steerable pyramid transforms in image processing. Even though the use of CHOs for SKS tasks has not been studied so far, our findings indicate that CHO models can be further extended to incorporate intrinsic uncertainty about the signal to behave closer to humans. Experimental results are provided to illustrate these findings.

  5. Classification of acoustic emission signals using wavelets and Random Forests : Application to localized corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morizet, N.; Godin, N.; Tang, J.; Maillet, E.; Fregonese, M.; Normand, B.

    2016-03-01

    This paper aims to propose a novel approach to classify acoustic emission (AE) signals deriving from corrosion experiments, even if embedded into a noisy environment. To validate this new methodology, synthetic data are first used throughout an in-depth analysis, comparing Random Forests (RF) to the k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN) algorithm. Moreover, a new evaluation tool called the alter-class matrix (ACM) is introduced to simulate different degrees of uncertainty on labeled data for supervised classification. Then, tests on real cases involving noise and crevice corrosion are conducted, by preprocessing the waveforms including wavelet denoising and extracting a rich set of features as input of the RF algorithm. To this end, a software called RF-CAM has been developed. Results show that this approach is very efficient on ground truth data and is also very promising on real data, especially for its reliability, performance and speed, which are serious criteria for the chemical industry.

  6. Seismic random noise attenuation and signal-preserving by multiple directional time-frequency peak filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Yue; Lin, Hong-bo; Yang, Bao-jun

    2015-01-01

    Time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF) is an effective method for seismic random noise attenuation. The linearity of the signal has a significant influence on the accuracy of the TFPF method. The higher the linearity of the signal to be filtered is, the better the denoising result is. With this in mind, and taking the lateral coherence of reflected events into account, we do TFPF along the reflected events to improve the degree of linearity and enhance the continuity of these events. The key factor to realize this idea is to find the traces of the reflected events. However, the traces of the events are too hard to obtain in the complicated field seismic data. In this paper, we propose a Multiple Directional TFPF (MD-TFPF), in which the filtering is performed in certain direction components of the seismic data. These components are obtained by a directional filter bank. In each direction component, we do TFPF along these decomposed reflected events (the local direction of the events) instead of the channel direction. The final result is achieved by adding up the filtering results of all decomposition directions of seismic data. In this way, filtering along the reflected events is implemented without accurately finding the directions. The effectiveness of the proposed method is tested on synthetic and field seismic data. The experimental results demonstrate that MD-TFPF can more effectively eliminate random noise and enhance the continuity of the reflected events with better preservation than the conventional TFPF, curvelet denoising method and F-X deconvolution method.

  7. Studies on spectral analysis of randomly sampled signals: Application to laser velocimetry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, David

    1992-01-01

    Spectral analysis is very useful in determining the frequency characteristics of many turbulent flows, for example, vortex flows, tail buffeting, and other pulsating flows. It is also used for obtaining turbulence spectra from which the time and length scales associated with the turbulence structure can be estimated. These estimates, in turn, can be helpful for validation of theoretical/numerical flow turbulence models. Laser velocimetry (LV) is being extensively used in the experimental investigation of different types of flows, because of its inherent advantages; nonintrusive probing, high frequency response, no calibration requirements, etc. Typically, the output of an individual realization laser velocimeter is a set of randomly sampled velocity data. Spectral analysis of such data requires special techniques to obtain reliable estimates of correlation and power spectral density functions that describe the flow characteristics. FORTRAN codes for obtaining the autocorrelation and power spectral density estimates using the correlation-based slotting technique were developed. Extensive studies have been conducted on simulated first-order spectrum and sine signals to improve the spectral estimates. A first-order spectrum was chosen because it represents the characteristics of a typical one-dimensional turbulence spectrum. Digital prefiltering techniques, to improve the spectral estimates from randomly sampled data were applied. Studies show that the spectral estimates can be increased up to about five times the mean sampling rate.

  8. Moving target detection method for bistatic radar using random stepped-frequency chirp signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Caiyong; Tian, Ruiqi; Wang, Dinghe; Bao, Qinglong; Chen, Zengping

    2016-10-01

    As random stepped-frequency chirp (RSFC) signal is used in wide-band radar applications such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and inverse SAR. RSFC has advantages over the linear stepped-frequency chirp, including suppressing the range ambiguity, decoupling the range-Doppler coupling, and reducing the signal interference. RSFC is usually descrambled and then fed to the inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT) to achieve a coherent integration as well as a high-resolution range. However, this method needs frequency descrambling and accurate velocity pre-estimation for moving target detection. We propose a coherent integration method based on time-dechirping for bistatic radar. This method can detect moving targets without frequency descrambling or accurate velocity pre-estimation. This paper first models the target echo mathematically and outlines the difficulties associated with the processing of IFFT for RSFC. Then the detailed principles of the proposed method are introduced and the flowchart is given. Finally, numerical simulations are conducted to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method and show its detecting ability in the presence of noise.

  9. A three-component model of the control error in manual tracking of continuous random signals.

    PubMed

    Gerisch, Hans; Staude, Gerhard; Wolf, Werner; Bauch, Gerhard

    2013-10-01

    The performance of human operators acting within closed-loop control systems is investigated in a classic tracking task. The dependence of the control error (tracking error) on the parameters display gain, k(display), and input signal frequency bandwidth, f(g), which alter task difficulty and presumably the control delay, is studied with the aim of functionally specifying it via a model. The human operator as an element of a cascaded human-machine control system (e.g., car driving or piloting an airplane) codetermines the overall system performance. Control performance of humans in continuous tracking has been described in earlier studies. Using a handheld joystick, 10 participants tracked continuous random input signals. The parameters f(g) and k(display) were altered between experiments. Increased task difficulty promoted lengthened control delay and, consequently, increased control error.Tracking performance degraded profoundly with target deflection components above 1 Hz, confirming earlier reports. The control error is composed of a delay-induced component, a demand-based component, and a novel component: a human tracking limit. Accordingly, a new model that allows concepts of the observed control error to be split into these three components is suggested. To achieve optimal performance in control systems that include a human operator (e.g., vehicles, remote controlled rovers, crane control), (a) tasks should be kept as simple as possible to achieve shortest control delays, and (b) task components requiring higher-frequency (> 1 Hz) tracking actions should be avoided or automated by technical systems.

  10. Novel Evidence That Attributing Affectively Salient Signal to Random Noise Is Associated with Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Catalan, Ana; Simons, Claudia J. P.; Bustamante, Sonia; Drukker, Marjan; Madrazo, Aranzazu; de Artaza, Maider Gonzalez; Gorostiza, Iñigo; van Os, Jim; Gonzalez-Torres, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    We wished to replicate evidence that an experimental paradigm of speech illusions is associated with psychotic experiences. Fifty-four patients with a first episode of psychosis (FEP) and 150 healthy subjects were examined in an experimental paradigm assessing the presence of speech illusion in neutral white noise. Socio-demographic, cognitive function and family history data were collected. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was administered in the patient group and the Structured Interview for Schizotypy-Revised (SIS-R), and the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE) in the control group. Patients had a much higher rate of speech illusions (33.3% versus 8.7%, ORadjusted: 5.1, 95% CI: 2.3–11.5), which was only partly explained by differences in IQ (ORadjusted: 3.4, 95% CI: 1.4–8.3). Differences were particularly marked for signals in random noise that were perceived as affectively salient (ORadjusted: 9.7, 95% CI: 1.8–53.9). Speech illusion tended to be associated with positive symptoms in patients (ORadjusted: 3.3, 95% CI: 0.9–11.6), particularly affectively salient illusions (ORadjusted: 8.3, 95% CI: 0.7–100.3). In controls, speech illusions were not associated with positive schizotypy (ORadjusted: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.3–3.4) or self-reported psychotic experiences (ORadjusted: 1.4, 95% CI: 0.4–4.6). Experimental paradigms indexing the tendency to detect affectively salient signals in noise may be used to identify liability to psychosis. PMID:25020079

  11. Novel evidence that attributing affectively salient signal to random noise is associated with psychosis.

    PubMed

    Catalan, Ana; Simons, Claudia J P; Bustamante, Sonia; Drukker, Marjan; Madrazo, Aranzazu; de Artaza, Maider Gonzalez; Gorostiza, Iñigo; van Os, Jim; Gonzalez-Torres, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    We wished to replicate evidence that an experimental paradigm of speech illusions is associated with psychotic experiences. Fifty-four patients with a first episode of psychosis (FEP) and 150 healthy subjects were examined in an experimental paradigm assessing the presence of speech illusion in neutral white noise. Socio-demographic, cognitive function and family history data were collected. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was administered in the patient group and the Structured Interview for Schizotypy-Revised (SIS-R), and the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE) in the control group. Patients had a much higher rate of speech illusions (33.3% versus 8.7%, ORadjusted: 5.1, 95% CI: 2.3-11.5), which was only partly explained by differences in IQ (ORadjusted: 3.4, 95% CI: 1.4-8.3). Differences were particularly marked for signals in random noise that were perceived as affectively salient (ORadjusted: 9.7, 95% CI: 1.8-53.9). Speech illusion tended to be associated with positive symptoms in patients (ORadjusted: 3.3, 95% CI: 0.9-11.6), particularly affectively salient illusions (ORadjusted: 8.3, 95% CI: 0.7-100.3). In controls, speech illusions were not associated with positive schizotypy (ORadjusted: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.3-3.4) or self-reported psychotic experiences (ORadjusted: 1.4, 95% CI: 0.4-4.6). Experimental paradigms indexing the tendency to detect affectively salient signals in noise may be used to identify liability to psychosis.

  12. Statistics of cellular signal transduction as a race to the nucleus by multiple random walkers in compartment/phosphorylation space.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ting; Shen, Tongye; Zong, Chenghang; Hasty, Jeff; Wolynes, Peter G

    2006-11-07

    Cellular signal transduction often involves a reaction network of phosphorylation and transport events arranged with a ladder topology. If we keep track of the location of the phosphate groups describing an abstract state space, a simple model of signal transduction involving enzymes can be mapped on to a problem of how multiple biased random walkers compete to reach their target in the nucleus yielding a signal. Here, the first passage time probability and the survival probability for multiple walkers can be used to characterize the response of the network. The statistics of the first passage through the network has an asymmetric distribution with a long tail arising from the hierarchical structure of the network. This distribution implies a significant difference between the mean and the most probable signal transduction time. The response patterns for various external inputs generated by our model agree with recent experiments. In addition, the model predicts that there is an optimal phosphorylation enzyme concentration for rapid signal transduction.

  13. Telegraph Canyon Creek, City of Chula Vista, San Diego County, California. Detailed Report for Flood Control. Volume 1. Main Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    social , and historical information concerning the Telegraph Canyon area is very limited. For that reason, and because the economy of the study area is...Diego Department of Sanitation and Flood Control by letter dated November 10, 1978 also reaffirmed its support of such solution. Such reaffirmation...marsh and tidal habitats predominate. This area, known as the J Street Marsh, is a valuable and productive habitat that supports many species of

  14. A Bayesian meta-analytic approach for safety signal detection in randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Odani, Motoi; Fukimbara, Satoru; Sato, Tosiya

    2017-04-01

    Meta-analyses are frequently performed on adverse event data and are primarily used for improving statistical power to detect safety signals. However, in the evaluation of drug safety for New Drug Applications, simple pooling of adverse event data from multiple clinical trials is still commonly used. We sought to propose a new Bayesian hierarchical meta-analytic approach based on consideration of a hierarchical structure of reported individual adverse event data from multiple randomized clinical trials. To develop our meta-analysis model, we extended an existing three-stage Bayesian hierarchical model by including an additional stage of the clinical trial level in the hierarchical model; this generated a four-stage Bayesian hierarchical model. We applied the proposed Bayesian meta-analysis models to published adverse event data from three premarketing randomized clinical trials of tadalafil and to a simulation study motivated by the case example to evaluate the characteristics of three alternative models. Comparison of the results from the Bayesian meta-analysis model with those from Fisher's exact test after simple pooling showed that 6 out of 10 adverse events were the same within a top 10 ranking of individual adverse events with regard to association with treatment. However, more individual adverse events were detected in the Bayesian meta-analysis model than in Fisher's exact test under the body system "Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders." Moreover, comparison of the overall trend of estimates between the Bayesian model and the standard approach (odds ratios after simple pooling methods) revealed that the posterior median odds ratios for the Bayesian model for most adverse events shrank toward values for no association. Based on the simulation results, the Bayesian meta-analysis model could balance the false detection rate and power to a better extent than Fisher's exact test. For example, when the threshold value of the posterior probability for

  15. Randomly organized lipids and marginally stable proteins: a coupling of weak interactions to optimize membrane signaling.

    PubMed

    Rice, Anne M; Mahling, Ryan; Fealey, Michael E; Rannikko, Anika; Dunleavy, Katie; Hendrickson, Troy; Lohese, K Jean; Kruggel, Spencer; Heiling, Hillary; Harren, Daniel; Sutton, R Bryan; Pastor, John; Hinderliter, Anne

    2014-09-01

    Eukaryotic lipids in a bilayer are dominated by weak cooperative interactions. These interactions impart highly dynamic and pliable properties to the membrane. C2 domain-containing proteins in the membrane also interact weakly and cooperatively giving rise to a high degree of conformational plasticity. We propose that this feature of weak energetics and plasticity shared by lipids and C2 domain-containing proteins enhance a cell's ability to transduce information across the membrane. We explored this hypothesis using information theory to assess the information storage capacity of model and mast cell membranes, as well as differential scanning calorimetry, carboxyfluorescein release assays, and tryptophan fluorescence to assess protein and membrane stability. The distribution of lipids in mast cell membranes encoded 5.6-5.8bits of information. More information resided in the acyl chains than the head groups and in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane than the outer leaflet. When the lipid composition and information content of model membranes were varied, the associated C2 domains underwent large changes in stability and denaturation profile. The C2 domain-containing proteins are therefore acutely sensitive to the composition and information content of their associated lipids. Together, these findings suggest that the maximum flow of signaling information through the membrane and into the cell is optimized by the cooperation of near-random distributions of membrane lipids and proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. Guest Editors: William C. Wimley and Kalina Hristova. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Charting the signal trajectory in a light-oxygen-voltage photoreceptor by random mutagenesis and covariance analysis.

    PubMed

    Gleichmann, Tobias; Diensthuber, Ralph P; Möglich, Andreas

    2013-10-11

    Modular signal receptors empower organisms to process environmental stimuli into adequate physiological responses. At the molecular level, a sensor module receives signals and processes the inherent information into changes of biological activity of an effector module. To better understand the molecular bases underpinning these processes, we analyzed signal reception and processing in the dimeric light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) blue light receptor YF1 that serves as a paradigm for the widespread Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) signal receptors. Random mutagenesis identifies numerous YF1 variants in which biological activity is retained but where light regulation is abolished or inverted. One group of variants carries mutations within the LOV photosensor that disrupt proper coupling of the flavin-nucleotide chromophore to the protein scaffold. Another larger group bears mutations that cluster at the dyad interface and disrupt signal transmission to two coaxial coiled-coils that connect to the effector. Sequence covariation implies wide conservation of structural and mechanistic motifs, as also borne out by comparison to several PAS domains in which mutations leading to disruption of signal transduction consistently map to confined regions broadly equivalent to those identified in YF1. Not only do these data provide insight into general mechanisms of signal transduction, but also they establish concrete means for customized reprogramming of signal receptors.

  17. Geologic map of the Telegraph Peak 7.5' quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, D.M.; Woodburne, M.O.; Foster, J.H.; Morton, Gregory; Cossette, P.M.

    2001-01-01

    a. This Readme; includes in Appendix I, data contained in fif_met.txt b. The same graphic as plotted in 2 above. Test plots have not produced 1:24,000-scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat pagesize setting influences map scale. The Correlation of Map Units and Description of Map Units is in the editorial format of USGS Miscellaneous Investigations Series (I-series) maps but has not been edited to comply with I-map standards. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formation-name, age, and lithology. Even though this is an author-prepared report, every attempt has been made to closely adhere to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U. S. Geological Survey. Descriptions of units can be obtained by viewing or plotting the .pdf file (3b above) or plotting the postscript file (2 above). If roads in some areas, especially forest roads that parallel topographic contours, do not show well on plots of the geologic map, we recommend use of the USGS Telegraph Peak 7.5’ topographic quadrangle in conjunction with the geologic map.

  18. Numerical analysis of an H1-Galerkin mixed finite element method for time fractional telegraph equation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinfeng; Zhao, Meng; Zhang, Min; Liu, Yang; Li, Hong

    2014-01-01

    We discuss and analyze an H(1)-Galerkin mixed finite element (H(1)-GMFE) method to look for the numerical solution of time fractional telegraph equation. We introduce an auxiliary variable to reduce the original equation into lower-order coupled equations and then formulate an H(1)-GMFE scheme with two important variables. We discretize the Caputo time fractional derivatives using the finite difference methods and approximate the spatial direction by applying the H(1)-GMFE method. Based on the discussion on the theoretical error analysis in L(2)-norm for the scalar unknown and its gradient in one dimensional case, we obtain the optimal order of convergence in space-time direction. Further, we also derive the optimal error results for the scalar unknown in H(1)-norm. Moreover, we derive and analyze the stability of H(1)-GMFE scheme and give the results of a priori error estimates in two- or three-dimensional cases. In order to verify our theoretical analysis, we give some results of numerical calculation by using the Matlab procedure.

  19. Numerical Analysis of an H 1-Galerkin Mixed Finite Element Method for Time Fractional Telegraph Equation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinfeng; Zhao, Meng; Zhang, Min; Liu, Yang; Li, Hong

    2014-01-01

    We discuss and analyze an H 1-Galerkin mixed finite element (H 1-GMFE) method to look for the numerical solution of time fractional telegraph equation. We introduce an auxiliary variable to reduce the original equation into lower-order coupled equations and then formulate an H 1-GMFE scheme with two important variables. We discretize the Caputo time fractional derivatives using the finite difference methods and approximate the spatial direction by applying the H 1-GMFE method. Based on the discussion on the theoretical error analysis in L 2-norm for the scalar unknown and its gradient in one dimensional case, we obtain the optimal order of convergence in space-time direction. Further, we also derive the optimal error results for the scalar unknown in H 1-norm. Moreover, we derive and analyze the stability of H 1-GMFE scheme and give the results of a priori error estimates in two- or three-dimensional cases. In order to verify our theoretical analysis, we give some results of numerical calculation by using the Matlab procedure. PMID:25184148

  20. FOG Random Drift Signal Denoising Based on the Improved AR Model and Modified Sage-Husa Adaptive Kalman Filter

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jin; Xu, Xiaosu; Liu, Yiting; Zhang, Tao; Li, Yao

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce the influence of fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) random drift error on inertial navigation systems, an improved auto regressive (AR) model is put forward in this paper. First, based on real-time observations at each restart of the gyroscope, the model of FOG random drift can be established online. In the improved AR model, the FOG measured signal is employed instead of the zero mean signals. Then, the modified Sage-Husa adaptive Kalman filter (SHAKF) is introduced, which can directly carry out real-time filtering on the FOG signals. Finally, static and dynamic experiments are done to verify the effectiveness. The filtering results are analyzed with Allan variance. The analysis results show that the improved AR model has high fitting accuracy and strong adaptability, and the minimum fitting accuracy of single noise is 93.2%. Based on the improved AR(3) model, the denoising method of SHAKF is more effective than traditional methods, and its effect is better than 30%. The random drift error of FOG is reduced effectively, and the precision of the FOG is improved. PMID:27420062

  1. FOG Random Drift Signal Denoising Based on the Improved AR Model and Modified Sage-Husa Adaptive Kalman Filter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Xu, Xiaosu; Liu, Yiting; Zhang, Tao; Li, Yao

    2016-07-12

    In order to reduce the influence of fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) random drift error on inertial navigation systems, an improved auto regressive (AR) model is put forward in this paper. First, based on real-time observations at each restart of the gyroscope, the model of FOG random drift can be established online. In the improved AR model, the FOG measured signal is employed instead of the zero mean signals. Then, the modified Sage-Husa adaptive Kalman filter (SHAKF) is introduced, which can directly carry out real-time filtering on the FOG signals. Finally, static and dynamic experiments are done to verify the effectiveness. The filtering results are analyzed with Allan variance. The analysis results show that the improved AR model has high fitting accuracy and strong adaptability, and the minimum fitting accuracy of single noise is 93.2%. Based on the improved AR(3) model, the denoising method of SHAKF is more effective than traditional methods, and its effect is better than 30%. The random drift error of FOG is reduced effectively, and the precision of the FOG is improved.

  2. Effects of Random Circuit Fabrication Errors on Small Signal Gain and on Output Phase In a Traveling Wave Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittersdorf, I. M.; Antonsen, T. M., Jr.; Chernin, D.; Lau, Y. Y.

    2011-10-01

    Random fabrication errors may have detrimental effects on the performance of traveling-wave tubes (TWTs) of all types. A new scaling law for the modification in the average small signal gain and in the output phase is derived from the third order ordinary differential equation that governs the forward wave interaction in a TWT in the presence of random error that is distributed along the axis of the tube. Analytical results compare favorably with numerical results, in both gain and phase modifications as a result of random error in the phase velocity of the slow wave circuit. Results on the effect of the reverse-propagating circuit mode will be reported. This work supported by AFOSR, ONR, L-3 Communications Electron Devices, and Northrop Grumman Corporation.

  3. Validation of the k-filtering technique for a signal composed of random phase plane waves and non-random coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, O. W.; Li, X.; Jeska, L.

    2014-08-01

    Recent observations of astrophysical magnetic fields have shown the presence of fluctuations being wave-like (propagating in the plasma frame) and those described as being structure-like (advected by the plasma bulk velocity). Typically with single spacecraft missions it is impossible to differentiate between these two fluctuations, due to the inherent spatio-temporal ambiguity associated with a single point measurement. However missions such as Cluster which contain multiple spacecraft have allowed temporal and spatial changes to be resolved, with techniques such as the k-filtering technique. While this technique does not assume Taylor's hypothesis as is necessary with single spacecraft missions, it does require weak stationarity of the time series, and that the fluctuations can be described by a superposition of plane waves with random phase. In this paper we test whether the method can cope with a synthetic signal which is composed of a combination of non-random phase coherent structures with a mean radius d and a mean separation λ, as well as plane waves with random phase.

  4. Validation of the k-filtering technique for a signal composed of random-phase plane waves and non-random coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, O. W.; Li, X.; Jeska, L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent observations of astrophysical magnetic fields have shown the presence of fluctuations being wave-like (propagating in the plasma frame) and those described as being structure-like (advected by the plasma bulk velocity). Typically with single-spacecraft missions it is impossible to differentiate between these two fluctuations, due to the inherent spatio-temporal ambiguity associated with a single point measurement. However missions such as Cluster which contain multiple spacecraft have allowed for temporal and spatial changes to be resolved, using techniques such as k filtering. While this technique does not assume Taylor's hypothesis it requires both weak stationarity of the time series and that the fluctuations can be described by a superposition of plane waves with random phases. In this paper we test whether the method can cope with a synthetic signal which is composed of a combination of non-random-phase coherent structures with a mean radius d and a mean separation λ, as well as plane waves with random phase.

  5. Power Spectrum of Uplink Array Signals with Random Phase and Delay Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor A.

    2011-01-01

    Link Array signals emanating from different antennas must be compensated for Doppler and delay in order to achieve the N(sup 2) array gain predicted by theory. However compensation is never perfect, leaving residual errors that cause losses in array gain and degradation in signal quality. Here we develop a mathematical model for Uplink Array signals in the presence of phase and delay errors, similar to well-known multipath analyses but with features unique to this problem. The resulting losses and distortions are described, and the power spectral density of the array signal derived first conditioned on a given error vector, then averaged over distributions deemed suitable for Uplink Array applications. The impact of phase and delay errors on array gain and signal distortion are addressed, and the maximum data throughput is quantified in terms of the assumed error statistics.

  6. Information-theoretic secure key distribution based on common random-signal induced synchronization in unidirectionally-coupled cascades of semiconductor lasers.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Hayato; Morikatsu, Shinichiro; Aida, Hiroki; Nozawa, Takahiro; Kakesu, Izumi; Uchida, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Kazuyuki; Muramatsu, Jun; Davis, Peter

    2013-07-29

    It has been proposed that a secure key distribution scheme using correlated random bit sequences can be implemented using common random-signal induced synchronization of semiconductor laser systems. In this scheme it is necessary to use laser systems consisting of multiple cascaded lasers to be secure against a powerful eavesdropper. In this paper, we report the results of an experimental study that demonstrate that the common random-signal induced synchronization is possible in cascaded semiconductor laser systems. We also show that the correlated random bit sequences generated in the synchronized cascaded laser systems can be used to create an information-theoretically secure key between two legitimate users.

  7. Superior signal-to-noise ratio of a new AA1 sequence for random-modulation continuous-wave lidar.

    PubMed

    Rybaltowski, Adam; Taflove, Allen

    2004-08-01

    In an earlier work [Proc. SPIE 4484, 216 (2001)] we proposed a new AA1 modulation sequence for random-modulation continuous-wave lidar. It possesses significantly better signal properties than other pseudorandom codes (the M, A1, and A2 sequences). We derive and compare the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the new AA1 sequence with those of previous modulation sequences. Using a figure of merit proposed for pseudorandom sequences in additive (and generally colored) noise, we show that the SNR of the AA1 sequence in 1/f noise can be as much as 50 times better than that of the commonly used M sequence. This improved SNR should permit as much as a 7:1 increase of the maximum lidar sensing range in baseband-modulation direct-detection infrared lidar with no significant changes to the transmitter and receiver.

  8. Time-based clustering and its application to determining a signal's motivation: Deterministic chaos or random disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolle, Charles Robert

    The theory and applications of deterministic chaos have received a great deal of attention during the last decade, with several new and valuable approaches introduced that can be used to obtain a clearer understanding of the origins of such signals and the nature of the systems responsible for their presence. Mutual information theory, for example, a concept introduced by A. Fraser (Physical Review A, 1986), can be used to address the choice of an optimal embedding time step in order to avoid oversampling experimental data. For the most part, however, current tools for the analysis of apparently chaotic signals lack in their ability to adequately address the significance of time evolution within their methodology. This dissertation introduces a new method for probing whether a signal has a deterministic or purely random origin. The approach employs a time-dependent clustering quantizer (TBC) to transform the original waveform data into a symbol train, which can then be analyzed for excluded symbol combinations. A hypothesis test is used to bound the likelihood of randomness of a complex time series, using Markoff chains to calculate the probability of missing and existing symbol combinations. Finally, J. Theiler's technique of surrogate data (Physica D, 1992) is employed to strengthen these quantitative results. It is shown that the new TBC quantizer unifies the concepts of mutual information theory with attractor reconstruction time-embedding, as a means of obtaining dynamically optimal signal coarsening. Future chaotic system research and directions for applications of the TBC method include possible new attractor reconstructions with a generalization of the underlying time-dependent clustering method quantizer, development of cluster-based models for complex dynamical systems such as weather and communication phenomena, as well as the fundamental problem of controlling the behavior of systems subject to chaotic behavior.

  9. Active targeting in a random porous medium by chemical swarm robots with secondary chemical signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grančič, Peter; Štěpánek, František

    2011-08-01

    The multibody dynamics of a system of chemical swarm robots in a porous environment is investigated. The chemical swarm robots are modeled as Brownian particles capable of delivering an encapsulated chemical payload toward a given target location and releasing it in response to an external stimulus. The presence of chemical signals (chemo-attractant) in the system plays a crucial role in coordinating the collective movement of the particles via chemotaxis. For a number of applications, such as distributed chemical processing and targeted drug delivery, the understanding of factors that govern the collective behavior of the particles, especially their ability to localize a given target, is of immense importance. A hybrid modeling methodology based on the combination of the Brownian dynamics method and diffusion problem coupled through the chemotaxis phenomena is used to analyze the impact of a varying signaling threshold and the strength of chemotaxis on the ability of the chemical robots to fulfill their target localization mission. The results demonstrate that the selected performance criteria (the localization half time and the success rate) can be improved when an appropriate signaling process is chosen. Furthermore, for an optimum target localization strategy, the topological complexity of the porous environment needs to be reflected.

  10. A Robust Random Forest-Based Approach for Heart Rate Monitoring Using Photoplethysmography Signal Contaminated by Intense Motion Artifacts.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yalan; He, Wenwen; Cheng, Yunfei; Huang, Wenxia; Zhang, Zhilin

    2017-02-16

    The estimation of heart rate (HR) based on wearable devices is of interest in fitness. Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a promising approach to estimate HR due to low cost; however, it is easily corrupted by motion artifacts (MA). In this work, a robust approach based on random forest is proposed for accurately estimating HR from the photoplethysmography signal contaminated by intense motion artifacts, consisting of two stages. Stage 1 proposes a hybrid method to effectively remove MA with a low computation complexity, where two MA removal algorithms are combined by an accurate binary decision algorithm whose aim is to decide whether or not to adopt the second MA removal algorithm. Stage 2 proposes a random forest-based spectral peak-tracking algorithm, whose aim is to locate the spectral peak corresponding to HR, formulating the problem of spectral peak tracking into a pattern classification problem. Experiments on the PPG datasets including 22 subjects used in the 2015 IEEE Signal Processing Cup showed that the proposed approach achieved the average absolute error of 1.65 beats per minute (BPM) on the 22 PPG datasets. Compared to state-of-the-art approaches, the proposed approach has better accuracy and robustness to intense motion artifacts, indicating its potential use in wearable sensors for health monitoring and fitness tracking.

  11. A Robust Random Forest-Based Approach for Heart Rate Monitoring Using Photoplethysmography Signal Contaminated by Intense Motion Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yalan; He, Wenwen; Cheng, Yunfei; Huang, Wenxia; Zhang, Zhilin

    2017-01-01

    The estimation of heart rate (HR) based on wearable devices is of interest in fitness. Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a promising approach to estimate HR due to low cost; however, it is easily corrupted by motion artifacts (MA). In this work, a robust approach based on random forest is proposed for accurately estimating HR from the photoplethysmography signal contaminated by intense motion artifacts, consisting of two stages. Stage 1 proposes a hybrid method to effectively remove MA with a low computation complexity, where two MA removal algorithms are combined by an accurate binary decision algorithm whose aim is to decide whether or not to adopt the second MA removal algorithm. Stage 2 proposes a random forest-based spectral peak-tracking algorithm, whose aim is to locate the spectral peak corresponding to HR, formulating the problem of spectral peak tracking into a pattern classification problem. Experiments on the PPG datasets including 22 subjects used in the 2015 IEEE Signal Processing Cup showed that the proposed approach achieved the average absolute error of 1.65 beats per minute (BPM) on the 22 PPG datasets. Compared to state-of-the-art approaches, the proposed approach has better accuracy and robustness to intense motion artifacts, indicating its potential use in wearable sensors for health monitoring and fitness tracking. PMID:28212327

  12. Effect of signal-temporal uncertainty in children and adults: Tone detection in noise or a random-frequency masker

    PubMed Central

    Bonino, Angela Yarnell; Leibold, Lori J.; Buss, Emily

    2013-01-01

    A cue indicating when in time to listen can improve adults' tone detection thresholds, particularly for conditions that produce substantial informational masking. The purpose of this study was to determine if 5- to 13-yr-old children likewise benefit from a light cue indicating when in time to listen for a masked pure-tone signal. Each listener was tested in one of two continuous maskers: Broadband noise (low informational masking) or a random-frequency, two-tone masker (high informational masking). Using a single-interval method of constant stimuli, detection thresholds were measured for two temporal conditions: (1) Temporally-defined, with the listening interval defined by a light cue, and (2) temporally-uncertain, with no light cue. Thresholds estimated from psychometric functions fitted to the data indicated that children and adults benefited to the same degree from the visual cue. Across listeners, the average benefit of a defined listening interval was 1.8 dB in the broadband noise and 8.6 dB in the random-frequency, two-tone masker. Thus, the benefit of knowing when in time to listen was more robust for conditions believed to be dominated by informational masking. An unexpected finding of this study was that children's thresholds were comparable to adults' in the random-frequency, two-tone masker. PMID:25669256

  13. Hierarchical random cellular neural networks for system-level brain-like signal processing.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Robert; Puljic, Marko

    2013-09-01

    Sensory information processing and cognition in brains are modeled using dynamic systems theory. The brain's dynamic state is described by a trajectory evolving in a high-dimensional state space. We introduce a hierarchy of random cellular automata as the mathematical tools to describe the spatio-temporal dynamics of the cortex. The corresponding brain model is called neuropercolation which has distinct advantages compared to traditional models using differential equations, especially in describing spatio-temporal discontinuities in the form of phase transitions. Phase transitions demarcate singularities in brain operations at critical conditions, which are viewed as hallmarks of higher cognition and awareness experience. The introduced Monte-Carlo simulations obtained by parallel computing point to the importance of computer implementations using very large-scale integration (VLSI) and analog platforms.

  14. Modeling of ΔIBL due to random telegraph noise with considering bit-line interference in NAND flash memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe, Sung-Min; Bae, Jong-Ho; Park, Chan Hyeong; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2014-12-01

    Bit-line (BL) current fluctuation (ΔIBL = high IBL - low IBL) of the trap position is modeled as a parameter of the state (program or erase) of adjacent BL cells which affects the current density distribution appreciably. To model ΔIBL, we extracted the integrated electron current density (J0 = f(z)) and the electric blockade length (Lt) by considering the effect of the interference of adjacent cells. A characteristic function (g(z)) which has a Gaussian functional form is defined based on Lt and the trap position within the tunneling oxide from the channel surface (xT). Finally, ΔIBL is extracted through the integration of f(z) and g(z). Our model predicts accurately the ΔIBL with the trap position as a parameter of the state of BL cells, showing good agreement with 3D simulation data.

  15. Relationship between flux and concentration gradient of diffusive particles with the usage of random walk model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, M. N.

    2017-09-01

    The fundamental solutions of the diffusion equation for the local-equilibrium and nonlocal models are considered as the limiting cases of the solution of a problem related to consideration of the Brownian particles random walks. The differences between fundamental solutions, flows and concentration gradients were studied. The new modified non-local diffusion equation of the telegrapher type with correction function is suggested. It contains only microparameters of the random walk problem.

  16. Two-dimensional ultrasound detection with unfocused frequency-randomized signals

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Gregory T.

    2006-01-01

    A method is described for detecting scattering in two-dimensions using an unfocused ultrasound field created from a continuously-driven source array. The frequency of each element on the array is unique, resulting in a field that is highly variant as a function of both time and position. The scattered signal is then received by a single receiving line. The method, as currently written, is valid under the first order Born approximation. To demonstrate the approach, a series of simulations within the frequency range of 0.10 MHz to 1.25 MHz are performed and compared with a simulated B-Scan in the same frequency range. The method is found to be superior in resolving closely spaced objects, discerning 1.4-mm separation in the radial and 0.5-mm separation in the axial direction. The method was also better able to determining object size, resolving scatters less than 10% of wavelength associated with the center frequency. PMID:17297817

  17. Yoga reduces inflammatory signaling in fatigued breast cancer survivors: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Julienne E.; Greendale, Gail; Crosswell, Alexandra D.; Garet, Deborah; Sternlieb, Beth; Ganz, Patricia A.; Irwin, Michael R.; Olmstead, Richard; Arevalo, Jesusa; Cole, Steve W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Yoga is a popular mind-body therapy that has demonstrated beneficial effects on psychological, behavioral, and functional outcomes. However, few studies have investigated effects on inflammatory processes. This study tested the hypothesis that an Iyengar yoga intervention specifically designed for fatigued breast cancer survivors would lead to decreases in inflammation-related gene expression and circulating markers of proinflammatory cytokine activity. Methods Breast cancer survivors with persistent cancer-related fatigue were randomized to a 12-week Iyengar yoga intervention (n = 16) or a 12-week health education control condition (n = 15). Blood samples were collected at baseline, post-intervention, and at a 3-month follow-up for genome-wide transcriptional profiling and bioinformatic analyses. Plasma inflammatory markers and salivary cortisol were also assessed. Results In promoter-based bioinformatics analyses, the yoga group showed reduced activity of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), increased activity of the anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid receptor, and reduced activity of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) family transcription factors relative to controls (all ps < .05). There was also a significant intervention effect on the soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor type II (sTNF-RII), a marker of TNF activity; plasma levels of sTNF-RII remained stable in the yoga group, whereas levels of this marker increased in the health education group (p = .028). A similar, non-significant trend was observed for the interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (p = .16). No significant changes in C reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), or diurnal cortisol measures were observed. Conclusions A 12-week restorative Iyengar yoga intervention reduced inflammation-related gene expression in breast cancer survivors with persistent fatigue. These findings suggest that a targeted yoga program may have beneficial effects

  18. Efficient Signal Processing in Random Networks that Generate Variability: A Comparison of Internally Generated and Externally Induced Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Nishikawa, Isao; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Toyoizumi, Taro

    Source of cortical variability and its influence on signal processing remain an open question. We address the latter, by studying two types of balanced randomly connected networks of quadratic I-F neurons, with irregular spontaneous activity: (a) a deterministic network with strong connections generating noise by chaotic dynamics (b) a stochastic network with weak connections receiving noisy input. They are analytically tractable in the limit of large network-size and channel time-constant. Despite different sources of noise, spontaneous activity of these networks are identical unless majority of neurons are simultaneously recorded. However, the two networks show remarkably different sensitivity to external stimuli. In the former, input reverberates internally and can be read out over long time, but in the latter, inputs rapidly decay. This is further enhanced with activity-dependent plasticity at input synapses producing marked difference in decoding inputs from neural activity. We show, this leads to distinct performance of the two networks to integrate temporally separate signals from multiple sources, with the deterministic chaotic network activity serving as reservoir for Monte Carlo sampling to perform near optimal Bayesian integration, unlike its stochastic counterpart.

  19. Approximate solution of two-term fractional-order diffusion, wave-diffusion, and telegraph models arising in mathematical physics using optimal homotopy asymptotic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, S.; Rashidi, M. M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper deals with the investigation of the analytical approximate solutions for two-term fractional-order diffusion, wave-diffusion, and telegraph equations. The fractional derivatives are defined in the Caputo sense, whose orders belong to the intervals [0,1], (1,2), and [1,2], respectively. In this paper, we extended optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM) for two-term fractional-order wave-diffusion equations. Highly approximate solution is obtained in series form using this extended method. Approximate solution obtained by OHAM is compared with the exact solution. It is observed that OHAM is a prevailing and convergent method for the solutions of nonlinear-fractional-order time-dependent partial differential problems. The numerical results rendering that the applied method is explicit, effective, and easy to use, for handling more general fractional-order wave diffusion, diffusion, and telegraph problems.

  20. Evaluation of the telegrapher's equation and multiple-flux theories for calculating the transmittance and reflectance of a diffuse absorbing slab.

    PubMed

    Kong, Steven H; Shore, Joel D

    2007-03-01

    We study the propagation of light through a medium containing isotropic scattering and absorption centers. With a Monte Carlo simulation serving as the benchmark solution to the radiative transfer problem of light propagating through a turbid slab, we compare the transmission and reflection density computed from the telegrapher's equation, the diffusion equation, and multiple-flux theories such as the Kubelka-Munk and four-flux theories. Results are presented for both normally incident light and diffusely incident light. We find that we can always obtain very good results from the telegrapher's equation provided that two parameters that appear in the solution are set appropriately. We also find an interesting connection between certain solutions of the telegrapher's equation and solutions of the Kubelka-Munk and four-flux theories with a small modification to how the phenomenological parameters in those theories are traditionally related to the optical scattering and absorption coefficients of the slab. Finally, we briefly explore how well the theories can be extended to the case of anisotropic scattering by multiplying the scattering coefficient by a simple correction factor.

  1. Asynchronous decoding of finger movements from ECoG signals using long-range dependencies conditional random fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Saa, Jaime F.; de Pesters, Adriana; Cetin, Mujdat

    2016-06-01

    Objective. In this work we propose the use of conditional random fields with long-range dependencies for the classification of finger movements from electrocorticographic recordings. Approach. The proposed method uses long-range dependencies taking into consideration time-lags between the brain activity and the execution of the motor task. In addition, the proposed method models the dynamics of the task executed by the subject and uses information about these dynamics as prior information during the classification stage. Main results. The results show that incorporating temporal information about the executed task as well as incorporating long-range dependencies between the brain signals and the labels effectively increases the system’s classification performance compared to methods in the state of art. Significance. The method proposed in this work makes use of probabilistic graphical models to incorporate temporal information in the classification of finger movements from electrocorticographic recordings. The proposed method highlights the importance of including prior information about the task that the subjects execute. As the results show, the combination of these two features effectively produce a significant improvement of the system’s classification performance.

  2. Regulation of Lipolysis and Adipose Tissue Signaling during Acute Endotoxin-Induced Inflammation: A Human Randomized Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rittig, Nikolaj; Bach, Ermina; Thomsen, Henrik Holm; Pedersen, Steen Bønlykke; Nielsen, Thomas Sava; Jørgensen, Jens O.; Jessen, Niels; Møller, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Background Lipolysis is accelerated during the acute phase of inflammation, a process being regulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. TNF-α), stress-hormones, and insulin. The intracellular mechanisms remain elusive and we therefore measured pro- and anti-lipolytic signaling pathways in adipocytes after in vivo endotoxin exposure. Methods Eight healthy, lean, male subjects were investigated using a randomized cross over trial with two interventions: i) bolus injection of saline (Placebo) and ii) bolus injection of lipopolysaccharide endotoxin (LPS). A 3H-palmitate tracer was used to measure palmitate rate of appearance (Rapalmitate) and indirect calorimetry was performed to measure energy expenditures and lipid oxidation rates. A subcutaneous abdominal fat biopsy was obtained during both interventions and subjected to western blotting and qPCR quantifications. Results LPS caused a mean increase in serum free fatty acids (FFA) concentrations of 90% (CI-95%: 37–142, p = 0.005), a median increase in Rapalmitate of 117% (CI-95%: 77–166, p<0.001), a mean increase in lipid oxidation of 49% (CI-95%: 1–96, p = 0.047), and a median increase in energy expenditure of 28% (CI-95%: 16–42, p = 0.001) compared with Placebo. These effects were associated with increased phosphorylation of hormone sensitive lipase (pHSL) at ser650 in adipose tissue (p = 0.03), a trend towards elevated pHSL at ser552 (p = 0.09) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation of perilipin 1 (PLIN1) (p = 0.09). Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) also tended to increase (p = 0.08) while phosphorylation of Akt at Thr308 tended to decrease (p = 0.09) during LPS compared with Placebo. There was no difference between protein or mRNA expression of ATGL, G0S2, and CGI-58. Conclusion LPS stimulated lipolysis in adipose tissue and is associated with increased pHSL and signs of increased PLIN1 phosphorylation combined with a trend toward decreased insulin signaling. The combination of

  3. Automated identification of sleep states from EEG signals by means of ensemble empirical mode decomposition and random under sampling boosting.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ahnaf Rashik; Bhuiyan, Mohammed Imamul Hassan

    2017-03-01

    Automatic sleep staging is essential for alleviating the burden of the physicians of analyzing a large volume of data by visual inspection. It is also a precondition for making an automated sleep monitoring system feasible. Further, computerized sleep scoring will expedite large-scale data analysis in sleep research. Nevertheless, most of the existing works on sleep staging are either multichannel or multiple physiological signal based which are uncomfortable for the user and hinder the feasibility of an in-home sleep monitoring device. So, a successful and reliable computer-assisted sleep staging scheme is yet to emerge. In this work, we propose a single channel EEG based algorithm for computerized sleep scoring. In the proposed algorithm, we decompose EEG signal segments using Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) and extract various statistical moment based features. The effectiveness of EEMD and statistical features are investigated. Statistical analysis is performed for feature selection. A newly proposed classification technique, namely - Random under sampling boosting (RUSBoost) is introduced for sleep stage classification. This is the first implementation of EEMD in conjunction with RUSBoost to the best of the authors' knowledge. The proposed feature extraction scheme's performance is investigated for various choices of classification models. The algorithmic performance of our scheme is evaluated against contemporary works in the literature. The performance of the proposed method is comparable or better than that of the state-of-the-art ones. The proposed algorithm gives 88.07%, 83.49%, 92.66%, 94.23%, and 98.15% for 6-state to 2-state classification of sleep stages on Sleep-EDF database. Our experimental outcomes reveal that RUSBoost outperforms other classification models for the feature extraction framework presented in this work. Besides, the algorithm proposed in this work demonstrates high detection accuracy for the sleep states S1 and REM

  4. Climate change, wellbeing and resilience in the Weenusk First Nation at Peawanuck: the Moccasin Telegraph goes global.

    PubMed

    Lemelin, Harvey; Matthews, Drew; Mattina, Charlie; McIntyre, Norman; Johnston, Margaret; Koster, Rhonda; Weenusk First Nation At Peawanuck

    2010-01-01

    The Cree of Northern Ontario, Canada, have proved resilient and adaptable to social and environmental changes. However, the rapidity of climate change impacts in the Hudson Bay Lowlands of the Canadian sub-Arctic is challenging this resiliency. A collaborative project conducted with the Weenusk First Nation at Peawanuck and researchers at Lakehead University used the concept of wellbeing to explore the impact of climate change on current subsistence activities, resource management, and conservation strategies, while considering the implications of globalization on climate change awareness. This article describes the analysis of 22 interviews conducted with members of the Weenusk First Nation at Peawanuck. Findings indicate that residents are concerned with a variety of changes in the environment and their ability to use the land. For example, they noted changes in travel routes on water and land, often attributing these to geomorphic changes in the coastal landscapes along Hudson Bay. They also noted the disappearance of particular insects and bird species, and variations in the distribution of particular fauna and flora. Possible impacts of these changes on the community's wellbeing and resiliency are examined. Another major theme that arose from the analysis was the impact of traditional modes of communication (eg traditional knowledge, radio, newspaper) and newer forms (eg satellite television and the internet) on Indigenous people's understanding of climate change. Given that few researchers have acknowledged or recognized the globalization of the moccasin telegraph (ie the traditional mode of communication between First Nations), a discussion of this phenomenon and its significance for understanding emerging knowledge systems in small, remote First Nation communities is central to this article.

  5. A Phase IIa Randomized, Double-Blind Trial of Erlotinib in Inhibiting Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling in Aberrant Crypt Foci of the Colorectum

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, Daniel L.; Meyskens, Frank L.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Zell, Jason; Carroll, Robert; Benya, Richard; Chen, Wen-Pin; Mo, Allen; Tucker, Chris; Bhattacharya, Asmita; Huang, Zhiliang; Arcilla, Myra; Wong, Vanessa; Chung, Jinah; Gonzalez, Rachel; Rodriguez, Luz Maria; Szabo, Eva; Rosenberg, Daniel W.; Lipkin, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) progresses through multiple distinct stages that are potentially amenable to chemopreventative intervention. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) inhibitors are efficacious in advanced tumors including CRC. There is significant evidence that EGFR also plays important roles in CRC initiation, and that EGFR inhibitors block tumorigenesis. We performed a double-blind randomized clinical trial to test whether the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib given for up to 30 days had an acceptable safety and efficacy profile to reduce EGFR signaling biomarkers in colorectal aberrant crypt foci (ACF), a subset of which progress to CRC, and normal rectal tissue. A total of N=45 patients were randomized to one of three erlotinib doses (25 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg) with randomization stratified by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use. There were no unanticipated adverse events with Erlotinib therapy. Erlotinib was detected in both normal rectal mucosa and ACFs. Colorectal ACF phosphoERK, phosphoEGFR and total EGFR signaling changes from baseline were modest and there was no dose response. Overall, this trial did not meet is primary efficacy endpoint. Colorectal EGFR signaling inhibition by erlotinib is therefore likely insufficient to merit further studies without additional pre-screening stratification or potentially longer duration of use. PMID:25604134

  6. Random Addition Concatenation Analysis: a novel approach to the exploration of phylogenomic signal reveals strong agreement between core and shell genomic partitions in the cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Narechania, Apurva; Baker, Richard H; Sit, Ryan; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; DeSalle, Rob; Planet, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Recent whole-genome approaches to microbial phylogeny have emphasized partitioning genes into functional classes, often focusing on differences between a stable core of genes and a variable shell. To rigorously address the effects of partitioning and combining genes in genome-level analyses, we developed a novel technique called Random Addition Concatenation Analysis (RADICAL). RADICAL operates by sequentially concatenating randomly chosen gene partitions starting with a single-gene partition and ending with the entire genomic data set. A phylogenetic tree is built for every successive addition, and the entire process is repeated creating multiple random concatenation paths. The result is a library of trees representing a large variety of differently sized random gene partitions. This library can then be mined to identify unique topologies, assess overall agreement, and measure support for different trees. To evaluate RADICAL, we used 682 orthologous genes across 13 cyanobacterial genomes. Despite previous assertions of substantial differences between a core and a shell set of genes for this data set, RADICAL reveals the two partitions contain congruent phylogenetic signal. Substantial disagreement within the data set is limited to a few nodes and genes involved in metabolism, a functional group that is distributed evenly between the core and the shell partitions. We highlight numerous examples where RADICAL reveals aspects of phylogenetic behavior not evident by examining individual gene trees or a "'total evidence" tree. Our method also demonstrates that most emergent phylogenetic signal appears early in the concatenation process. The software is freely available at http://desalle.amnh.org.

  7. Numerical approximation of higher-order time-fractional telegraph equation by using a combination of a geometric approach and method of line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, M. S.; Baleanu, D.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a simple and accurate numerical scheme for solving the time fractional telegraph (TFT) equation within Caputo type fractional derivative. A fictitious coordinate ϑ is imposed onto the problem in order to transform the dependent variable u (x , t) into a new variable with an extra dimension. In the new space with the added fictitious dimension, a combination of method of line and group preserving scheme (GPS) is proposed to find the approximate solutions. This method preserves the geometric structure of the problem. Power and accuracy of this method has been illustrated through some examples of TFT equation.

  8. Digital Semaphore: Tactical Implications of QR Code Optical Signaling for Fleet Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Flashing Light a. Flashing light description Morse code was developed primarily by the telegraph inventor Samuel F.B. Morse in 1843. Morse code is...of Operations (From the U.S. Seventh Fleet website, 15APR2013). ......21 Figure 6. Sailor sending a Morse code signal via the flashing light technique...Allied forces all knew and understood Morse code, the primary foundation for flashing light communications. Visual communications methods were not

  9. Tunnel conductance of Watson-Crick nucleoside-base pairs from telegraph noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shuai; He, Jin; Lin, Lisha; Zhang, Peiming; Liang, Feng; Young, Michael; Huang, Shuo; Lindsay, Stuart

    2009-05-01

    The use of tunneling signals to sequence DNA is presently hampered by the small tunnel conductance of a junction spanning an entire DNA molecule. The design of a readout system that uses a shorter tunneling path requires knowledge of the absolute conductance across base pairs. We have exploited the stochastic switching of hydrogen-bonded DNA base-nucleoside pairs trapped in a tunnel junction to determine the conductance of individual molecular pairs. This conductance is found to be sensitive to the geometry of the junction, but a subset of the data appears to come from unstrained molecular pairs. The conductances determined from these pairs are within a factor of two of the predictions of density functional calculations. The experimental data reproduces the counterintuitive theoretical prediction that guanine-deoxycytidine pairs (3 H-bonds) have a smaller conductance than adenine-thymine pairs (2 H-bonds). A bimodal distribution of switching lifetimes shows that both H-bonds and molecule-metal contacts break.

  10. Tunnel Conductance of Watson-Crick Nucleoside-Base Pairs from Telegraph Noise

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shuai; He, Jin; Lin, Lisha; Zhang, Peiming; Liang, Feng; Young, Michael; Huang, Shuo; Lindsay, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    The use of tunneling signals to sequence DNA is presently hampered by the small tunnel conductance of a junction spanning an entire DNA molecule. The design of a readout system that uses a shorter tunneling path requires knowledge of the absolute conductance across base-pairs. We have exploited the stochastic switching of hydrogen-bonded DNA base-nucleoside pairs trapped in a tunnel junction to determine the conductance of individual molecular pairs. This conductance is found to be sensitive to the geometry of the junction, but a subset of the data appears to come from unstrained molecular pairs. The conductances determined from these pairs are within a factor two of the predictions of density functional calculations. The experimental data reproduces the counterintuitive theoretical prediction that guanine-deoxycytidine pairs (3 H-bonds) have a smaller conductance than adenine-thymine pairs (2 H-bonds). A bimodal distribution of switching lifetimes shows that both H-bonds and molecule-metal contacts break. PMID:19420603

  11. Qubit Metrology of Ultralow Phase Noise Using Randomized Benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, P. J. J.; Kelly, J.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fowler, A. G.; Hoi, I.-C.; Jeffrey, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Neill, C.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Korotkov, A. N.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M.

    2015-04-01

    A precise measurement of dephasing over a range of time scales is critical for improving quantum gates beyond the error correction threshold. We present a metrological tool based on randomized benchmarking capable of greatly increasing the precision of Ramsey and spin-echo sequences by the repeated but incoherent addition of phase noise. We find our superconducting-quantum-interference-device-based qubit is not limited by 1 /f flux noise at short time scales but instead observe a telegraph noise mechanism that is not amenable to study with standard measurement techniques.

  12. Generation of multi-channel high-speed physical random numbers originated from two chaotic signals of mutually coupled semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X.; Wu, Z. M.; Wu, J. G.; Deng, T.; Fan, L.; Zhong, Z. Q.; Chen, J. J.; Xia, G. Q.

    2015-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel technique to generate multi-channel high-speed physical random numbers (PRNs) by taking two chaotic signal outputs from mutually coupled semiconductor lasers (MC-SLs) as entropy sources. First, through controlling the operation parameters of the MC-SL system, two time-delay signature (TDS) suppressed chaotic signals can be obtained. Next, each of these two chaotic signals is sampled by an 8 bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC) with a sampling rate of 10 GHz, and then a bitwise exclusive-OR (XOR) operation on the corresponding bits in samples of the chaotic signal and its time delayed signal is implemented to obtain 8 bit XOR data. Furthermore, through selecting the five least significant bits (LSBs) of 8 bit XOR data to form 5 bit Boolean sequences, two sets of PRN streams with a rate up to 50 Gbits s-1 are generated and successfully pass the NIST statistical tests. Finally, merging these two sets of 50 Gbits s-1 PRN streams by an interleaving operation, another set of the 100 Gbits s-1 PRN stream, which meets all the quality criteria of NIST statistical tests, is also acquired.

  13. Random Addition Concatenation Analysis: A Novel Approach to the Exploration of Phylogenomic Signal Reveals Strong Agreement between Core and Shell Genomic Partitions in the Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Narechania, Apurva; Baker, Richard H.; Sit, Ryan; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; DeSalle, Rob; Planet, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent whole-genome approaches to microbial phylogeny have emphasized partitioning genes into functional classes, often focusing on differences between a stable core of genes and a variable shell. To rigorously address the effects of partitioning and combining genes in genome-level analyses, we developed a novel technique called Random Addition Concatenation Analysis (RADICAL). RADICAL operates by sequentially concatenating randomly chosen gene partitions starting with a single-gene partition and ending with the entire genomic data set. A phylogenetic tree is built for every successive addition, and the entire process is repeated creating multiple random concatenation paths. The result is a library of trees representing a large variety of differently sized random gene partitions. This library can then be mined to identify unique topologies, assess overall agreement, and measure support for different trees. To evaluate RADICAL, we used 682 orthologous genes across 13 cyanobacterial genomes. Despite previous assertions of substantial differences between a core and a shell set of genes for this data set, RADICAL reveals the two partitions contain congruent phylogenetic signal. Substantial disagreement within the data set is limited to a few nodes and genes involved in metabolism, a functional group that is distributed evenly between the core and the shell partitions. We highlight numerous examples where RADICAL reveals aspects of phylogenetic behavior not evident by examining individual gene trees or a “‘total evidence” tree. Our method also demonstrates that most emergent phylogenetic signal appears early in the concatenation process. The software is freely available at http://desalle.amnh.org. PMID:22094860

  14. Fast measurement of proton exchange membrane fuel cell impedance based on pseudo-random binary sequence perturbation signals and continuous wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debenjak, Andrej; Boškoski, Pavle; Musizza, Bojan; Petrovčič, Janko; Juričić, Đani

    2014-05-01

    This paper proposes an approach to the estimation of PEM fuel cell impedance by utilizing pseudo-random binary sequence as a perturbation signal and continuous wavelet transform with Morlet mother wavelet. With the approach, the impedance characteristic in the frequency band from 0.1 Hz to 500 Hz is identified in 60 seconds, approximately five times faster compared to the conventional single-sine approach. The proposed approach was experimentally evaluated on a single PEM fuel cell of a larger fuel cell stack. The quality of the results remains at the same level compared to the single-sine approach.

  15. The Development and Application of Random Matrix Theory in Adaptive Signal Processing in the Sample Deficient Regime

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Approved for publication; distribution unlimited. Approved for Distribution: Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Edward A. Boyle ...Speech, and Signal Processing, 34(5):1097–1110, 1986. [18] R. Everson and S. Roberts . Inferring the eigenvalues of covariance matrices from limited, noisy

  16. Critical ratios in harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) for tonal signals between 0.315 and 150 kHz in random Gaussian white noise.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Wensveen, Paul J; Hoek, Lean; Au, Whitlow W L; Terhune, John M; de Jong, Christ A F

    2009-09-01

    A psychoacoustic behavioral technique was used to determine the critical ratios (CRs) of two harbor porpoises for tonal signals with frequencies between 0.315 and 150 kHz, in random Gaussian white noise. The masked 50% detection hearing thresholds were measured using a "go/no-go" response paradigm and an up-down staircase psychometric method. CRs were determined at one masking noise level for each test frequency and were similar in both animals. For signals between 0.315 and 4 kHz, the CRs were relatively constant at around 18 dB. Between 4 and 150 kHz the CR increased gradually from 18 to 39 dB ( approximately 3.3 dB/octave). Generally harbor porpoises can detect tonal signals in Gaussian white noise slightly better than most odontocetes tested so far. By combining the mean CRs found in the present study with the spectrum level of the background noise levels at sea, the basic audiogram, and the directivity index, the detection threshold levels of harbor porpoises for tonal signals in various sea states can be calculated.

  17. Signal propagation in long wire chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, P.; Engelfried, J.; Friedrich, T.; Heintze, J.; Lennert, P.; Russ, M.; Zimmer, M.

    2012-09-01

    The propagation of signals in long proportional counters or multi-wire tracking chambers is simulated, using numerical solutions of the multi-wire telegraph equations. The results are compared to experimental data, recorded with a proportional counter and a multi-wire test chamber. The signal shape, the charge division ratio and, in the case of the drift chamber, also the cross talk between the wires, are well reproduced. Similar shapes for signals and their cross talk can be obtained with a properly chosen electrical termination. It is shown how data from a multi-wire chamber can then be corrected for cross talk. The effects limiting the precision of position measurements along the wires with the charge division method are discussed. The simulation was applied to the reconstruction of tracks measured with the OPAL JET chamber.

  18. The Acetylcholine Signaling Network of Corneal Epithelium and Its Role in Regulation of Random and Directional Migration of Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chernyavsky, Alex I.; Galitovskiy, Valentin; Shchepotin, Igor B.; Jester, James V.; Grando, Sergei A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Because cholinergic drugs are used in ophthalmology and cholinergic stimulation has been shown to facilitate epithelialization of mucocutaneous wounds, we performed a systematic analysis of components of the cholinergic network of human and murine corneal epithelial cells (CECs) and determined the role of autocrine and paracrine acetylcholine (ACh) in regulation of CEC motility. Methods. We investigated the expression of ACh receptors at the mRNA and protein levels in human immortalized CECs, localization of cholinergic molecules in normal and wounded murine cornea, and the effects of cholinergic drugs on CEC directional and random migration in vitro, intercellular adhesion, and expression of integrin αV and E-cadherin. Results. We demonstrated that corneal epithelium expresses the ACh-synthesizing enzyme choline acetyltransferase, the ACh-degrading enzyme acetylcholinesterase, two muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs), M3 and M4, and several nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs), including both α7- and α9-made homomeric nAChRs and predominantly the α3β2 ± α5 subtype of heteromeric nAChRs. Wounding affected the expression patterns of cholinergic molecules in the murine corneal epithelium. Constant stimulation of CECs through both muscarinic and nicotinic signaling pathways was essential for CEC survival and both directional and random migration in vitro. Both α7 and non-α7 nAChRs elicited chemotaxis, with the α7 signaling exhibiting a stronger chemotactic effect. Cholinergic stimulation of CECs upregulated expression of the integrin and cadherin molecules involved in epithelialization. We found synergy between the proepithelialization signals elicited by different ACh receptors expressed in CECs. Conclusions. Simultaneous stimulation of mAChRs and nAChRs by ACh may be required to synchronize and balance ionic and metabolic events in a single cell. Localization of these cholinergic enzymes and receptors in murine cornea indicated that the concentration of

  19. On the design of optimal input signals in system identification. [of linear systems with unknown random parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez-Toledo, A. A.; Athans, M.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of designing optimal inputs in the identification of linear systems with unknown random parameters is considered using a Bayesian approach. The information matrix, which is positive definite for the class of systems analyzed, gives a measure of performance for the system inputs. The computation of the optimal closed-loop input mappings is shown to be a nontrivial exercise in adaptive control. Deterministic optimal inputs are shown to be easily computable. Numerical examples are given. A Kalman filter is used to estimate the parameters. A necessary condition for the Kalman filter not to diverge when applying linear feedback is also given.

  20. Randomized comparison of bleeding patterns in women using a combined contraceptive vaginal ring or a low-dose combined oral contraceptive on a menstrually signaled regimen.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Edith; Merki-Feld, Gabriele S; McGeechan, Kevin; Fraser, Ian S

    2015-02-01

    To compare bleeding patterns for 12 months continuous use of a contraceptive ring [contraceptive vaginal ring (CVR)] and pill [combined oral contraceptive (COC)] on a menstrually signaled regimen and the effectiveness of 4 days "treatment withdrawal" to stop bleeding. Women, 66 to each group, were randomized to continuous use of a CVR (15 mcg ethinyl estradiol/150 mcg etonogestrel) or a low-dose pill (20 mcg ethinyl estradiol/100 mcg levonorgestrel) for 360 days on a menstrually signaled regimen. Bleeding/spotting days, daily use of ring or pill, was recorded. Endpoint was the total number of bleeding/spotting days for each method over four 90-day reference periods (RP) plus the analysis of bleeding patterns using modified World Health Organization criteria. There was a reduction in the mean (±S.D.) number of bleeding/spotting days from RP1 (CVR 14.2±10; pill 16.6±10.9) to RP4 (CVR 8.8±9.6; pill 8.8±9.1). Fifteen percent of CVR and 4% COC users experienced amenorrhea or infrequent bleeding throughout the study. Amenorrhea increased over time (RP1 vs. RP4: CVR 10% vs. 21% and COC 2% vs. 30%). Compliance with the menstrually signaled regimen was poor. Ceasing hormones for 4 days stopped a bleeding episode within 5 days in the majority of episodes and many stopped spontaneously. Bleeding patterns with continuous use of the CVR and COC are similar and improve over 1 year of use. The unpredictability, but short duration, of bleeding episodes should be stressed during counseling. This information for clinicians and women about breakthrough bleeding patterns with use of a CVR or combined pill over 12 months using a menstrually signaled regimen will give women an indication of what to expect with continuous use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Single electron charge sensitivity of liquid-gated carbon nanotube transistors.

    PubMed

    Sharf, Tal; Wang, Neng-Ping; Kevek, Joshua W; Brown, Morgan A; Wilson, Heather; Heinze, Stefan; Minot, Ethan D

    2014-09-10

    Random telegraph signals corresponding to activated charge traps were observed with liquid-gated CNT FETs. The high signal-to-noise ratio that we observe demonstrates that single electron charge sensing is possible with CNT FETs in liquids at room temperature. We have characterized the gate-voltage dependence of the random telegraph signals and compared to theoretical predictions. The gate-voltage dependence clearly identifies the sign of the activated trapped charge.

  2. Signal transduction in T lymphocytes--a comparison of the data from space, the free fall machine and the random positioning machine.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberg, M; Pippia, P; Meloni, M A; Cossu, G; Cogoli-Greuter, M; Cogoli, A

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the effect of microgravity on T cells and we present the data of studies with two new machines for 0 g simulations. Several experiments in space show that mitogenic T cell activation is lost at 0 g. Immunocytochemistry indicates that such effect is associated with changes of the cytoskeleton. Biochemical studies suggest that the lack of expression of the interleukin-2 receptor is one of the major causes of the loss of activity. In fact, interleukin-2 is the third signal required for full activation. In order to deepen our investigations we are now working with the free-fall machine, FFM, invented by D. Mesland, and with the random positioning machine, RPM, or three-dimensional clinostat, developed by T. Hoson. The FFM produces periods of free-fall lasting approximately 800 ms followed by bounces of 15-30 g lasting 45-60 ms. The RPM eliminates the effect of gravity by rotating biological specimen randomly around two orthogonal axes. While the FFM failed to reproduce the results obtained with T lymphocytes in space, the data from the RPM are in good agreement with those in real microgravity. In fact, the inhibition of the mitotic index in the RPM is 89% compared to static controls. The RPM (as the FFM) can carry markedly larger specimen than the fast rotating clinostat and thus allows to conduct comprehensive studies to select suitable biological objects for further investigations in space.

  3. Signal transduction in T lymphocytes — A comparison of the data from space, the free fall machine and the random positioning machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzenberg, M.; Pippia, P.; Meloni, M. A.; Cossu, G.; Cogoli-Greuter, M.; Cogoli, A.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the effect of microgravity on T cells and we present the data of studies with two new machines for 0 g simulations. Several experiments in space show that mitogenic T cell activation is lost at 0 g. Immunocytochemistry indicates that such effect is associated with changes of the cytoskeleton. Biochemical studies suggest that the lack of expression of the interleukin-2 receptor is one of the major causes of the loss of activity. In fact, interleukin-2 is the third signal required for full activation. In order to deepen our investigations we are now working with the free-fall machine, FFM, invented by D. Mesland, and with the random positioning machine, RPM, or three-dimensional clinostat, developed by T. Hoson. The FFM produces periods of free-fall lasting approximately 800 ms followed by bounces of 15-30 g lasting 45-60 ms. The RPM eliminates the effect of gravity by rotating biological specimen randomly around two orthogonal axes. While the FFM failed to reproduce the results obtained with T lymphocytes in space, the data from the RPM are in good agreement with those in real microgravity. In fact, the inhibition of the mitotic index in the RPM is 89% compared to static controls. The RPM (as the FFM) can carry markedly larger specimen than the fast rotating clinostat and thus allows to conduct comprehensive studies to select suitable biological objects for further investigations in space.

  4. The effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on clinical outcomes, synovial fluid cytokine concentration and signal transduction pathways in knee osteoarthritis. A randomized open label trial.

    PubMed

    Gallelli, L; Galasso, O; Falcone, D; Southworth, S; Greco, M; Ventura, V; Romualdi, P; Corigliano, A; Terracciano, R; Savino, R; Gulletta, E; Gasparini, G; De Sarro, G

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effects of celecoxib, diclofenac, and ibuprofen on the disease-specific quality of life, synovial fluid cytokines and signal transduction pathways in symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). Ninety patients scheduled for a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were randomized to six groups that were treated with low and high dosages of celecoxib, diclofenac or ibuprofen. At the time of the first admission (T0) and at surgery (T1 = 14 days after beginning of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)), samples of knee synovial fluid were obtained from each patient for analysis. During the surgery the synovial tissue was harvested from the knee of patients. The Western Ontario and McMaster universities (WOMAC) score was used to evaluate the patient disease-specific quality of life at T0 and T1. Microarray tests performed at T0 and T1 were used to evaluate the effects of NSAIDs on Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, Interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL8 and Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentration in the synovial fluid. Western blot assays evaluated the effects of NSAIDs on MAP kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathway in the synovial membrane. NSAID treatment induced a statistically significant improvement in the WOMAC score and a statistically significant decrease in the IL-6, VEGF and TNF-alpha concentration in the synovial fluid. Higher dosages of NSAIDs provided a greater improvement in the disease-specific quality of life of patients and lower concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the synovial fluid. Inhibition of MAPKs was noted after NSAID treatment. Short-term NSAID treatment improves the patient disease-specific quality of life with a parallel decrease in pro-inflammatory synovial fluid cytokine levels in knee OA. Signal transduction pathways may be involved in regulating the anti-inflammatory effects of NSAIDs. ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT01860833. © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  5. Do TETRA (Airwave) Base Station Signals Have a Short-Term Impact on Health and Well-Being? A Randomized Double-Blind Provocation Study

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Denise; Eltiti, Stacy; Ridgewell, Anna; Garner, Kelly; Russo, Riccardo; Sepulveda, Francisco; Walker, Stuart; Quinlan, Terence; Dudley, Sandra; Maung, Sithu; Deeble, Roger; Fox, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    Background “Airwave” is the new communication system currently being rolled out across the United Kingdom for the police and emergency services, based on the Terrestrial Trunked Radio Telecommunications System (TETRA). Some police officers have complained about skin rashes, nausea, headaches, and depression as a consequence of using their Airwave handsets. In addition, a small subgroup in the population self-report being sensitive to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in general. Objectives We conducted a randomized double-blind provocation study to establish whether short-term exposure to a TETRA base station signal has an impact on the health and well-being of individuals with self-reported “electrosensitivity” and of participants who served as controls. Methods Fifty-one individuals with self-reported electrosensitivity and 132 age- and sex-matched controls participated in an open provocation test; 48 sensitive and 132 control participants went on to complete double-blind tests in a fully screened semianechoic chamber. Heart rate, skin conductance, and blood pressure readings provided objective indices of short-term physiological response. Visual analog scales and symptom scales provided subjective indices of well-being. Results We found no differences on any measure between TETRA and sham (no signal) under double-blind conditions for either controls or electrosensitive participants, and neither group could detect the presence of a TETRA signal at rates greater than chance (50%). When conditions were not double blind, however, the self-reported electrosensitive individuals did report feeling worse and experienced more severe symptoms during TETRA compared with sham. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the adverse symptoms experienced by electrosensitive individuals are due to the belief of harm from TETRA base stations rather than to the low-level EMF exposure itself. PMID:20075020

  6. Current-limiting and ultrafast system for the characterization of resistive random access memories

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Fortuny, J. Maestro, M.; Martin-Martinez, J.; Crespo-Yepes, A.; Rodriguez, R.; Nafria, M.; Aymerich, X.

    2016-06-15

    A new system for the ultrafast characterization of resistive switching phenomenon is developed to acquire the current during the Set and Reset process in a microsecond time scale. A new electronic circuit has been developed as a part of the main setup system, which is capable of (i) applying a hardware current limit ranging from nanoampers up to miliampers and (ii) converting the Set and Reset exponential gate current range into an equivalent linear voltage. The complete system setup allows measuring with a microsecond resolution. Some examples demonstrate that, with the developed setup, an in-depth analysis of resistive switching phenomenon and random telegraph noise can be made.

  7. Evaluation of electromyographic signals in children with bruxism before and after therapy with Melissa Officinalis L—a randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Bortoletto, Carolina Carvalho; Cordeiro da Silva, Fernanda; Salgueiro, Monica da Consolação Canuto; Motta, Lara Jansiski; Curiki, Lucia Maria; Mesquita-Ferarri, Raquel Agnelli; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Bruxism is a repetitive muscle activity involving the clenching or grinding of one’s teeth during sleep or waking hours. Melissa officinalis L. may be employed as a natural therapy due to the sedative, anxiolytic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-spasm properties of the chemical constituents of the essential oil obtained from its leaves. The aim of the present study was to evaluate electromyographic signals in the temporal muscle using the BiteStrip® test on children with sleep bruxism before and after therapy with Melissa officinalis L. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly allocated to two groups. Group 1 (n = 12) ingested a tincture containing Melissa officinalis L. for 30 days. Group 2 (n = 12) received a placebo solution with the same dose and frequency as Group 1. The Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests were employed for statistical analysis. [Results] The sample was made up of 24 children aged 6 to 10 years. No statistically significant differences were found between initial and final muscle activity in either group or in an intergroup comparison. [Conclusion] Use of the Melissa officinalis L. tincture at the dose employed did not lead to a reduction in muscle activity in children with bruxism. PMID:27134350

  8. Evaluation of electromyographic signals in children with bruxism before and after therapy with Melissa Officinalis L-a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bortoletto, Carolina Carvalho; Cordeiro da Silva, Fernanda; Salgueiro, Monica da Consolação Canuto; Motta, Lara Jansiski; Curiki, Lucia Maria; Mesquita-Ferarri, Raquel Agnelli; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] Bruxism is a repetitive muscle activity involving the clenching or grinding of one's teeth during sleep or waking hours. Melissa officinalis L. may be employed as a natural therapy due to the sedative, anxiolytic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-spasm properties of the chemical constituents of the essential oil obtained from its leaves. The aim of the present study was to evaluate electromyographic signals in the temporal muscle using the BiteStrip(®) test on children with sleep bruxism before and after therapy with Melissa officinalis L. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly allocated to two groups. Group 1 (n = 12) ingested a tincture containing Melissa officinalis L. for 30 days. Group 2 (n = 12) received a placebo solution with the same dose and frequency as Group 1. The Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests were employed for statistical analysis. [Results] The sample was made up of 24 children aged 6 to 10 years. No statistically significant differences were found between initial and final muscle activity in either group or in an intergroup comparison. [Conclusion] Use of the Melissa officinalis L. tincture at the dose employed did not lead to a reduction in muscle activity in children with bruxism.

  9. Application of a topical biomimetic electrical signaling technology to photo-aging: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a galvanic zinc-copper complex.

    PubMed

    Chantalat, Jeannette; Bruning, Elizabeth; Sun, Ying; Liu, Jue-Chen

    2012-01-01

    The first signs of facial skin photo-aging often occur in the skin of the periorbital area and include sagging, loss of firmness and definition, and sallowness. Epidermal wounds have been shown to alter the trans-epithelial electrical potential creating an electric signal that directs cell migration in epithelial wound healing; this electric field declines sharply with age. A topical galvanic zinc-copper complex, which couples elemental zinc and copper to create a biomimetic electric field, has demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity and extracellular matrix improvement in vitro, including collagen and elastin production. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a galvanic zinc-copper complex on photo-aging parameters in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. In this eight-week study, women (40-65 years) with mild to moderate photo-aging were randomized to use placebo or 1 of 3 galvanic zinc-copper complex compositions (gel and activating moisturizer). Efficacy evaluations included clinical grading, specialized clinical imaging, and subject self-assessments performed at baseline, 15-30 minutes after product application and after 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. Tolerability was based on adverse events and clinical grading of irritation. Significance was set at P?0.05 versus baseline and between treatment groups. The study was completed by 124 women. Compositions containing the galvanic zinc-copper complex showed statistically significant clinical improvements versus placebo and baseline rapidly (15-30 min) after application and through week 8. Clinical grading showed significant improvement versus placebo in skin radiance and under-eye dark circles 15-30 minutes after first application with continued improvement through week 8, and in overall photo-damage, fine lines, lifted appearance of the eyes, and under-eye wrinkles starting after two weeks and continuing through week 8. Test compositions were well tolerated. This galvanic zinc-copper complex

  10. News CERN Celebration: CERN marks 20 years of the Web Workshops: Physics Teachers' Day aired live on Web Teacher Programme: Physics Teachers at CERN 2009 leaves attendees thirsty for more GIREP: Registration open for GIREP '09 Science and Creationism: Telegraph headline leads readers down wrong path Recruitment: Is recession proving to be good news for science teaching? Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    CERN Celebration: CERN marks 20 years of the Web Workshops: Physics Teachers' Day aired live on Web Teacher Programme: Physics Teachers at CERN 2009 leaves attendees thirsty for more GIREP: Registration open for GIREP '09 Science and Creationism: Telegraph headline leads readers down wrong path Recruitment: Is recession proving to be good news for science teaching? Forthcoming Events

  11. The time light signals of New Zealand: yet another way of communicating time in the pre-wireless era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinns, Roger

    2017-08-01

    The signalling of exact time using an array of lights appears to have been unique to New Zealand. It was a simple and effective solution for calibration of marine chronometers when transmission of time signals by wireless was in its infancy. Three lights, coloured green, red and white, were arranged in a vertical array. They were switched on in a defined sequence during the evening and then extinguished together to signal exact time. Time lights were first operated at the Dominion Observatory in Wellington during February 1912 and on the Ferry Building in Auckland during October 1915. The Wellington lights were immediately adjacent to the observatory buildings, but those in Auckland were operated using telegraph signals from Wellington. The timings varied over the years, but the same physical arrangement was retained at each location. The time light service was withdrawn during 1937, when wireless signals had become almost universally available for civil and navigation purposes.

  12. SPECIAL ISSUE DEVOTED TO MULTIPLE RADIATION SCATTERING IN RANDOM MEDIA: Simulations of a spatially resolved reflectometry signal from a highly scattering three-layer medium applied to the problem of glucose sensing in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. V.; Kirillin, M. Yu; Priezzhev, A. V.; Myllylä, Risto

    2006-12-01

    The possibility of using spatially resolved reflectometry (SRR) at a wavelength of 820 nm to detect changes in the optical properties of a highly scattering layered random medium simulating a biological tissue caused by changes in the glucose level is analysed. Model signals from a three-layer biological tissue phantom consisting of two skin layers and a blood layer located between them are obtained by the Monte-Carlo method. It was assumed that variations in the glucose level induce variations in the optical parameters of the blood layer and the bottom skin layer. To analyse the trajectories of photons forming the SRR signal, their scattering maps are obtained. The ratio of the photon path in layers sensitive to the glucose level to the total path in the medium was used as a parameter characterising these trajectories. The relative change in the reflected signal caused by a change in the glucose concentration is analysed depending on the distance between a probe radiation source and a detector. It is shown that the maximum relative change in the signal (about 7%) takes place for the source — detector separation in the range from 0.3 to 0.5 mm depending on the model parameters.

  13. Ticks of a Random clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, P.; Talkner, P.

    2010-09-01

    A simple way to convert a purely random sequence of events into a signal with a strong periodic component is proposed. The signal consists of those instants of time at which the length of the random sequence exceeds an integer multiple of a given number. The larger this number the more pronounced the periodic behavior becomes.

  14. Does short-term exposure to mobile phone base station signals increase symptoms in individuals who report sensitivity to electromagnetic fields? A double-blind randomized provocation study.

    PubMed

    Eltiti, Stacy; Wallace, Denise; Ridgewell, Anna; Zougkou, Konstantina; Russo, Riccardo; Sepulveda, Francisco; Mirshekar-Syahkal, Dariush; Rasor, Paul; Deeble, Roger; Fox, Elaine

    2007-11-01

    Individuals with idiopathic environmental illness with attribution to electromagnetic fields (IEI-EMF) believe they suffer negative health effects when exposed to electromagnetic fields from everyday objects such as mobile phone base stations. This study used both open provocation and double-blind tests to determine if sensitive and control individuals experience more negative health effects when exposed to base station-like signals compared with sham. Fifty-six self-reported sensitive and 120 control participants were tested in an open provocation test. Of these, 12 sensitive and 6 controls withdrew after the first session. The remainder completed a series of double-blind tests. Subjective measures of well-being and symptoms as well as physiological measures of blood volume pulse, heart rate, and skin conductance were obtained. During the open provocation, sensitive individuals reported lower levels of well-being in both the global system for mobile communication (GSM) and universal mobile telecommunications system (UMTS) compared with sham exposure, whereas controls reported more symptoms during the UMTS exposure. During double-blind tests the GSM signal did not have any effect on either group. Sensitive participants did report elevated levels of arousal during the UMTS condition, whereas the number or severity of symptoms experienced did not increase. Physiological measures did not differ across the three exposure conditions for either group. Short-term exposure to a typical GSM base station-like signal did not affect well-being or physiological functions in sensitive or control individuals. Sensitive individuals reported elevated levels of arousal when exposed to a UMTS signal. Further analysis, however, indicated that this difference was likely to be due to the effect of order of exposure rather than the exposure itself.

  15. La place du clou Telegraph court dans le traitement des fractures de l'extrémité supérieure de l'humérus: à propos de 19 cas

    PubMed Central

    karabila, Mohamed Amine; Hmouri, Ismail; Mhamdi, Younes; Azouz, Mohamed; Madani, Tarik; Kharmaz, Mohamed; Ouadaghiri, Mohamed; Lamrani, Moulay Omar; Bardouni, Ahmed; Lahlou, Abdou; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; Montbarbon, Éric; Beaudouin, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    La fracture de l'extrémité supérieure de l'humérus est la troisième fracture en fréquence chez les sujets âgés et leur répartition est bimodale touchant préférentiellement le sujet âgé ostéoporotique après un traumatisme à faible énergie ou plus rarement le sujet jeune par mécanisme à forte cinétique. Le traitement des fractures complexes de l'humérus proximal est le sujet de nombreuses controverses Le clou Telegraph constitue une approche thérapeutique très efficace pour les fractures déplacées de l'extrémité supérieure de l'humérus, de technique chirurgicale facile mais avec une courbe d'apprentissage et permettant un protocole de rééducation dans l'immédiat de l'intervention. C'est un matériel d'enclouage antérograde de 15 cm de long, plein verrouillé en proximal et en distal, le verrouillage proximal est assuré par 4 vis spongieuses, de filetage long, stables dans le clou et cela confère une solidité tout-à-fait remarquable à ce montage alors que le verrouillage distal est assuré au niveau du V deltoïdien en zone avasculaire et là où il n'y a pas de passage nerveux. L’étude présentée concerne 19 patients traités par un clou Telegraph court dans le traitement des fractures de l'extrémité supérieure de l'humérus entre 2013 et 2015 et elle a pour but d'analyser les résultats radio-cliniques et d’évaluer la répercussion de cette technique sur la fonction de l’épaule. Le clou Telegraph proposé depuis plus de 12 ans à peu près, a rencontré et continue de rencontrer un réel succès. Il permet de traiter très efficacement les fractures simples type 2 et 3, mais aussi les fractures impactées en valgus à 4 fragments. L'ostéosynthèse par clou Telegraph est une solution efficace, rapide et reproductible dans le traitement chirurgical des fractures de l'extrémité supérieur de l'humérus même en cas des fractures complexes et permet une reprise rapide de la mobilité de l’épaule. PMID:27583100

  16. Random numbers from vacuum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yicheng; Chng, Brenda; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2016-07-01

    We implement a quantum random number generator based on a balanced homodyne measurement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. The digitized signal is directly processed with a fast randomness extraction scheme based on a linear feedback shift register. The random bit stream is continuously read in a computer at a rate of about 480 Mbit/s and passes an extended test suite for random numbers.

  17. Random numbers from vacuum fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yicheng; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Chng, Brenda

    2016-07-25

    We implement a quantum random number generator based on a balanced homodyne measurement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. The digitized signal is directly processed with a fast randomness extraction scheme based on a linear feedback shift register. The random bit stream is continuously read in a computer at a rate of about 480 Mbit/s and passes an extended test suite for random numbers.

  18. Effect of mandibular mobilization on electromyographic signals in muscles of mastication and static balance in individuals with temporomandibular disorder: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    El Hage, Yasmin; Politti, Fabiano; de Sousa, Dowglas F Magalhães; Herpich, Carolina Marciela; Gloria, Igor Phillip dos Santos; Gomes, Cid André Fidelis de Paula; Amaral, Ana Paula; de Melo, Nívea Cristina; da Silva, Thais Correa; Arruda, Eric Edmur Camargo; Amorim, Cesar Ferreira; Gadotti, Inaê Caroline; Gonzalez, Tabajara Oliveira; Berzin, Fausto; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Garcia, Marília Barbosa Santos; Barbosa, Bruno Roberto Borges; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida

    2013-10-01

    The stomatognathic system and dysfunction in this system may be related to postural control. The proposal of the present study is to assess the effect of mandibular mobilization in individuals with temporomandibular disorder using surface electromyography of the muscles of mastication and stabilometric variables. A randomized, controlled, blind, clinical trial will be carried out, with the participants divided into three groups: 1) facial massage therapy (control group), 2) nonspecific mandibular mobilization and 3) specific mandibular mobilization. All groups will be assessed before and after treatment using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, surface electromyography of the masseter and temporal muscles and stabilometry. This study is registered with the Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials (RBR9x8ssz). A large number of studies have employed surface electromyography to investigate the function/dysfunction of the muscles of mastication and associations with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. However, it has not yet been determined whether stabilometric variables offer adequate reliability in patients with this disorder. The results of the proposed study will help determine whether specific and/or nonspecific mandibular mobilization exerts an effect on the muscles of mastication and postural control. Moreover, if an effect is detected, the methodology defined in the proposed study will allow identifying whether the effect is local (found only in the muscles of mastication), global (found only in postural control) or generalized.

  19. Effect of mandibular mobilization on electromyographic signals in muscles of mastication and static balance in individuals with temporomandibular disorder: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The stomatognathic system and dysfunction in this system may be related to postural control. The proposal of the present study is to assess the effect of mandibular mobilization in individuals with temporomandibular disorder using surface electromyography of the muscles of mastication and stabilometric variables. Methods/Design A randomized, controlled, blind, clinical trial will be carried out, with the participants divided into three groups: 1) facial massage therapy (control group), 2) nonspecific mandibular mobilization and 3) specific mandibular mobilization. All groups will be assessed before and after treatment using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, surface electromyography of the masseter and temporal muscles and stabilometry. This study is registered with the Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials (RBR9x8ssz). Discussion A large number of studies have employed surface electromyography to investigate the function/dysfunction of the muscles of mastication and associations with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. However, it has not yet been determined whether stabilometric variables offer adequate reliability in patients with this disorder. The results of the proposed study will help determine whether specific and/or nonspecific mandibular mobilization exerts an effect on the muscles of mastication and postural control. Moreover, if an effect is detected, the methodology defined in the proposed study will allow identifying whether the effect is local (found only in the muscles of mastication), global (found only in postural control) or generalized. PMID:24083628

  20. Network-Physics (NP) BEC DIGITAL(#)-VULNERABILITY; ``Q-Computing"=Simple-Arithmetic;Modular-Congruences=SignalXNoise PRODUCTS=Clock-model;BEC-Factorization;RANDOM-# Definition;P=/=NP TRIVIAL Proof!!!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, E. I.; Siegel, E.

    2010-03-01

    Siegel[AMS Natl.Mtg.(2002)-Abs.973-60-124] digits logarithmic- law inversion to ONLY BEQS BEC:Quanta/Bosons=#: EMP-like SEVERE VULNERABILITY of ONLY #-networks(VS.ANALOG INvulnerability) via Barabasi NP(VS.dynamics[Not.AMS(5/2009)] critique);(so called)``quantum-computing''(QC) = simple-arithmetic (sansdivision);algorithmiccomplexities:INtractibility/UNdecidabi lity/INefficiency/NONcomputability/HARDNESS(so MIScalled) ``noise''-induced-phase-transition(NIT)ACCELERATION:Cook-Levin theorem Reducibility = RG fixed-points; #-Randomness DEFINITION via WHAT? Query(VS. Goldreich[Not.AMS(2002)] How? mea culpa)= ONLY MBCS hot-plasma v #-clumping NON-random BEC; Modular-Arithmetic Congruences = Signal x Noise PRODUCTS = clock-model; NON-Shor[Physica A,341,586(04)]BEC logarithmic-law inversion factorization: Watkins #-theory U statistical- physics); P=/=NP C-S TRIVIAL Proof: Euclid!!! [(So Miscalled) computational-complexity J-O obviation(3 millennia AGO geometry: NO:CC,``CS'';``Feet of Clay!!!'']; Query WHAT?:Definition: (so MIScalled)``complexity''=UTTER-SIMPLICITY!! v COMPLICATEDNESS MEASURE(S).

  1. Signal processor for processing ultrasonic receiver signals

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1980-01-01

    A signal processor is provided which uses an analog integrating circuit in conjunction with a set of digital counters controlled by a precision clock for sampling timing to provide an improved presentation of an ultrasonic transmitter/receiver signal. The signal is sampled relative to the transmitter trigger signal timing at precise times, the selected number of samples are integrated and the integrated samples are transferred and held for recording on a strip chart recorder or converted to digital form for storage. By integrating multiple samples taken at precisely the same time with respect to the trigger for the ultrasonic transmitter, random noise, which is contained in the ultrasonic receiver signal, is reduced relative to the desired useful signal.

  2. Effective strategies for management of hypertension after vascular endothelial growth factor signaling inhibition therapy: results from a phase II randomized, factorial, double-blind study of Cediranib in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Langenberg, Marlies H G; van Herpen, Carla M L; De Bono, Johann; Schellens, Jan H M; Unger, Clemens; Hoekman, Klaas; Blum, Hubert E; Fiedler, Walter; Drevs, Joachim; Le Maulf, Florence; Fielding, Anitra; Robertson, Jane; Voest, Emile E

    2009-12-20

    PURPOSE Hypertension is a commonly reported adverse effect after administration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors. Cediranib is a highly potent and selective VEGF signaling inhibitor of all three VEGFRs. This study prospectively investigated hypertension management to help minimize dose interruptions/reductions to maximize cediranib dose intensity. PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients (n = 126) with advanced solid tumors were randomly assigned to one of four groups: cediranib 30 or 45 mg/d with or without antihypertensive prophylaxis. All patients developing hypertension on cediranib treatment were treated with a standardized, predefined hypertension management protocol. Results Cediranib was generally well tolerated, and all groups achieved high-dose intensities in the first 12 weeks (> 74% in all groups). Antihypertensive prophylaxis did not result in fewer dose reductions or interruptions. Increases in blood pressure, including moderate and severe readings of hypertension, were seen early in treatment in all groups and successfully managed. Severe hypertension occurred in one patient receiving prophylaxis versus 18 in the nonprophylaxis groups. Overall, there were nine partial responses, and 38 patients experienced stable disease >/= 8 weeks. CONCLUSION To our knowledge, this is the first prospective investigation of hypertension management during administration of a VEGF signaling inhibitor. All four regimens were well tolerated with high-dose intensities and no strategy was clearly superior. The current cediranib hypertension management protocol appears to be effective in managing hypertension compared with previous cediranib studies where no plan was in place, and early recognition and treatment of hypertension is likely to reduce the number of severe hypertension events. This protocol is included in all ongoing cediranib clinical studies.

  3. Do signals of a hand-held TETRA transmitter affect cognitive performance, well-being, mood or somatic complaints in healthy young men? Results of a randomized double-blind cross-over provocation study.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Cornelia; Eggert, Torsten; Dorn, Hans; Schmid, Gernot; Bolz, Thomas; Marasanov, Alexander; Hansen, Marie-Luise; Peter, Anita; Danker-Hopfe, Heidi

    2015-07-01

    TETRA (terrestrial trunked radio) is a digital radio communication standard, which has been implemented in several European countries and is used by public executives, transportation services, and by private companies. Studies on possible impacts on the users' health considering different exposure conditions are missing. To investigate possible acute effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) of two different levels of TETRA hand-held transmitter signals on cognitive function and well-being in healthy young males. In the present double-blind cross-over study possible effects of short-term (2.5h) EMF exposure of handset-like signals of TETRA (385 MHz) were studied in 30 healthy male participants (mean±SD: 25.4±2.6 years). Individuals were tested on nine study days, on which they were exposed to three different exposure conditions (Sham, TETRA 1.5 W/kg and TETRA 6.0 W/kg) in a randomly assigned and balanced order. Participants were tested in the afternoon at a fixed timeframe. Attention remained unchanged in two out of three tasks. In the working memory significant changes were observed in two out of four subtasks. Significant results were found in 5 out of 35 tested parameters, four of them led to an improvement in performance. Mood, well-being and subjective somatic complaints were not affected by TETRA exposure. The results of the present study do not indicate a negative impact of a short-term EMF-effect of TETRA on cognitive function and well-being in healthy young men. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Lager, Darrell; Azevado, Stephen

    1986-06-01

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time- and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments,commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  5. Signal voter

    DOEpatents

    Goodwin, Roy L.

    1981-01-01

    A voter for providing a single accurate output signal that is derived from the closest two signal levels of three input signals, each of which signals represents a measurement of the same phenomena. By means of the voting circuit, the signals are first sorted by level of amplitude and then ranked as highest, middle or lowest. The highest or lowest signal that is furthest from the middle signal is rejected, while the other highest or lowest signal is selected for processing. The selected high or low signal is then averaged with the middle signal to provide the output signal.

  6. Signal voter

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, R.L.

    1981-04-28

    A voter for providing a single accurate output signal that is derived from the closest two signal levels of three input signals , each of which signals represents a measurement of the same phenomena. By means of the voting circuit, the signals are first sorted by level of amplitude and then ranked as highest, middle or lowest. The highest or lowest signal that is furthest from the middle signal is rejected, while the other highest or lowest signal is selected for processing. The selected high or low signal is then averaged with the middle signal to provide the output signal.

  7. Randomization Strategies.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K

    2017-04-01

    An understanding of randomization is important both for study design and to assist medical professionals in evaluating the medical literature. Simple randomization can be done through a variety of techniques, but carries a risk of unequal distribution of subjects into treatment groups. Block randomization can be used to overcome this limitation by ensuring that small subgroups are distributed evenly between treatment groups. Finally, techniques can be used to evenly distribute subjects between treatment groups while accounting for confounding variables, so as to not skew results when there is a high index of suspicion that a particular variable will influence outcome.

  8. Filtering Random Graph Processes Over Random Time-Varying Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isufi, Elvin; Loukas, Andreas; Simonetto, Andrea; Leus, Geert

    2017-08-01

    Graph filters play a key role in processing the graph spectra of signals supported on the vertices of a graph. However, despite their widespread use, graph filters have been analyzed only in the deterministic setting, ignoring the impact of stochastic- ity in both the graph topology as well as the signal itself. To bridge this gap, we examine the statistical behavior of the two key filter types, finite impulse response (FIR) and autoregressive moving average (ARMA) graph filters, when operating on random time- varying graph signals (or random graph processes) over random time-varying graphs. Our analysis shows that (i) in expectation, the filters behave as the same deterministic filters operating on a deterministic graph, being the expected graph, having as input signal a deterministic signal, being the expected signal, and (ii) there are meaningful upper bounds for the variance of the filter output. We conclude the paper by proposing two novel ways of exploiting randomness to improve (joint graph-time) noise cancellation, as well as to reduce the computational complexity of graph filtering. As demonstrated by numerical results, these methods outperform the disjoint average and denoise algorithm, and yield a (up to) four times complexity redution, with very little difference from the optimal solution.

  9. Random thoughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ajansen; kwhitefoot; panteltje1; edprochak; sudhakar, the

    2014-07-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com news story “How to make a quantum random-number generator from a mobile phone” (16 May, http://ow.ly/xFiYc, see also p5), which describes a way of delivering random numbers by counting the number of photons that impinge on each of the individual pixels in the camera of a Nokia N9 smartphone.

  10. Tailpulse signal generator

    DOEpatents

    Baker, John; Archer, Daniel E.; Luke, Stanley John; Decman, Daniel J.; White, Gregory K.

    2009-06-23

    A tailpulse signal generating/simulating apparatus, system, and method designed to produce electronic pulses which simulate tailpulses produced by a gamma radiation detector, including the pileup effect caused by the characteristic exponential decay of the detector pulses, and the random Poisson distribution pulse timing for radioactive materials. A digital signal process (DSP) is programmed and configured to produce digital values corresponding to pseudo-randomly selected pulse amplitudes and pseudo-randomly selected Poisson timing intervals of the tailpulses. Pulse amplitude values are exponentially decayed while outputting the digital value to a digital to analog converter (DAC). And pulse amplitudes of new pulses are added to decaying pulses to simulate the pileup effect for enhanced realism in the simulation.

  11. Random Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messaro. Semma; Harrison, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Ares I Zonal Random vibration environments due to acoustic impingement and combustion processes are develop for liftoff, ascent and reentry. Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components are developed by enveloping the applicable zonal environments where each component is located. Random vibration tests will be conducted to assure that these components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments. Methodology: Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components were desired that would envelope all the applicable environments where each component was located. Applicable Ares I Vehicle drawings and design information needed to be assessed to determine the location(s) for each component on the Ares I Upper Stage. Design and test criteria needed to be developed by plotting and enveloping the applicable environments using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software and documenting them in a report Using Microsoft Word Processing Software. Conclusion: Random vibration liftoff, ascent, and green run design & test criteria for the Upper Stage Pyrotechnic Components were developed by using Microsoft Excel to envelope zonal environments applicable to each component. Results were transferred from Excel into a report using Microsoft Word. After the report is reviewed and edited by my mentor it will be submitted for publication as an attachment to a memorandum. Pyrotechnic component designers will extract criteria from my report for incorporation into the design and test specifications for components. Eventually the hardware will be tested to the environments I developed to assure that the components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments.

  12. Randomly Accountable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Thomas J.; Staiger, Douglas O.; Geppert, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    The accountability debate tends to devolve into a battle between the pro-testing and anti-testing crowds. When it comes to the design of a school accountability system, the devil is truly in the details. A well-designed accountability plan may go a long way toward giving school personnel the kinds of signals they need to improve performance.…

  13. Fractional randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  14. Common Randomness Principles of Secrecy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyagi, Himanshu

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation concerns the secure processing of distributed data by multiple terminals, using interactive public communication among themselves, in order to accomplish a given computational task. In the setting of a probabilistic multiterminal source model in which several terminals observe correlated random signals, we analyze secure…

  15. Common Randomness Principles of Secrecy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyagi, Himanshu

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation concerns the secure processing of distributed data by multiple terminals, using interactive public communication among themselves, in order to accomplish a given computational task. In the setting of a probabilistic multiterminal source model in which several terminals observe correlated random signals, we analyze secure…

  16. Random grammars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshev, V. A.

    1998-04-01

    Contents § 1. Definitions1.1. Grammars1.2. Random grammars and L-systems1.3. Semigroup representations § 2. Infinite string dynamics2.1. Cluster expansion2.2. Cluster dynamics2.3. Local observer § 3. Large time behaviour: small perturbations3.1. Invariant measures3.2. Classification § 4. Large time behaviour: context free case4.1. Invariant measures for grammars4.2. L-systems4.3. Fractal correlation functions4.4. Measures on languages Bibliography

  17. EEG signal analysis: a survey.

    PubMed

    Subha, D Puthankattil; Joseph, Paul K; Acharya U, Rajendra; Lim, Choo Min

    2010-04-01

    The EEG (Electroencephalogram) signal indicates the electrical activity of the brain. They are highly random in nature and may contain useful information about the brain state. However, it is very difficult to get useful information from these signals directly in the time domain just by observing them. They are basically non-linear and nonstationary in nature. Hence, important features can be extracted for the diagnosis of different diseases using advanced signal processing techniques. In this paper the effect of different events on the EEG signal, and different signal processing methods used to extract the hidden information from the signal are discussed in detail. Linear, Frequency domain, time - frequency and non-linear techniques like correlation dimension (CD), largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE), Hurst exponent (H), different entropies, fractal dimension(FD), Higher Order Spectra (HOS), phase space plots and recurrence plots are discussed in detail using a typical normal EEG signal.

  18. Signaling aggression.

    PubMed

    van Staaden, Moira J; Searcy, William A; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-01-01

    From psychological and sociological standpoints, aggression is regarded as intentional behavior aimed at inflicting pain and manifested by hostility and attacking behaviors. In contrast, biologists define aggression as behavior associated with attack or escalation toward attack, omitting any stipulation about intentions and goals. Certain animal signals are strongly associated with escalation toward attack and have the same function as physical attack in intimidating opponents and winning contests, and ethologists therefore consider them an integral part of aggressive behavior. Aggressive signals have been molded by evolution to make them ever more effective in mediating interactions between the contestants. Early theoretical analyses of aggressive signaling suggested that signals could never be honest about fighting ability or aggressive intentions because weak individuals would exaggerate such signals whenever they were effective in influencing the behavior of opponents. More recent game theory models, however, demonstrate that given the right costs and constraints, aggressive signals are both reliable about strength and intentions and effective in influencing contest outcomes. Here, we review the role of signaling in lieu of physical violence, considering threat displays from an ethological perspective as an adaptive outcome of evolutionary selection pressures. Fighting prowess is conveyed by performance signals whose production is constrained by physical ability and thus limited to just some individuals, whereas aggressive intent is encoded in strategic signals that all signalers are able to produce. We illustrate recent advances in the study of aggressive signaling with case studies of charismatic taxa that employ a range of sensory modalities, viz. visual and chemical signaling in cephalopod behavior, and indicators of aggressive intent in the territorial calls of songbirds.

  19. How to do random allocation (randomization).

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeehyoung; Shin, Wonshik

    2014-03-01

    To explain the concept and procedure of random allocation as used in a randomized controlled study. We explain the general concept of random allocation and demonstrate how to perform the procedure easily and how to report it in a paper.

  20. Is random access memory random?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Most software is contructed on the assumption that the programs and data are stored in random access memory (RAM). Physical limitations on the relative speeds of processor and memory elements lead to a variety of memory organizations that match processor addressing rate with memory service rate. These include interleaved and cached memory. A very high fraction of a processor's address requests can be satified from the cache without reference to the main memory. The cache requests information from main memory in blocks that can be transferred at the full memory speed. Programmers who organize algorithms for locality can realize the highest performance from these computers.

  1. SIG. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, J.; Lager, D.; Azevedo, S.

    1992-01-22

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG; a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments, commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a `repeat` sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  2. SIG. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, J.; Lager, D.; Azevedo, S.

    1992-01-22

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time-and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments, commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  3. SIG. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, J.; Lager, D.; Azevedo, S.

    1992-01-22

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time- and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments,commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  4. Reversal of the neurological deficit in acute stroke with the signal of efficacy trial of auto-BPAP to limit damage from suspected sleep apnea (Reverse-STEAL): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the negative impact of sleep apnea on the clinical course of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is well known, data regarding non-invasive ventilation in acute patients are scarce. Several studies have shown its tolerability and safety, yet no controlled randomized sequential phase studies exist that aim to establish the efficacy of early non-invasive ventilation in AIS patients. Methods/design We decided to examine our hypothesis that early non-invasive ventilation with auto-titrating bilevel positive airway pressure (auto-BPAP) positively affects short-term clinical outcomes in AIS patients. We perform a multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled, third rater- blinded, parallel-group trial. Patients with AIS with proximal arterial obstruction and clinically suspected sleep apnea will be randomized to standard stroke care alone or standard stroke care plus auto-BPAP. Auto-BPAP will be initiated within 24 hours of stroke onset and performed for a maximum of 48 hours during diurnal and nocturnal sleep. Patients will undergo unattended cardiorespiratory polygraphy between days three and five to assess sleep apnea. Our primary endpoint will be any early neurological improvement on the NIHSS at 72 hours from randomization. Safety, tolerability, short-term and three-months functional outcomes will be assessed as secondary endpoints by un-blinded and blinded observers respectively. Discussion We expect that this study will advance our understanding of how early treatment with non-invasive ventilation can counterbalance, or possibly reverse, the deleterious effects of sleep apnea in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. The study will provide preliminary data to power a subsequent phase III study. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01812993 PMID:23941576

  5. Tailored Random Graph Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, E. S.; Annibale, A.; Coolen, A. C. C.

    2013-02-01

    Tailored graph ensembles are a developing bridge between biological networks and statistical mechanics. The aim is to use this concept to generate a suite of rigorous tools that can be used to quantify and compare the topology of cellular signalling networks, such as protein-protein interaction networks and gene regulation networks. We calculate exact and explicit formulae for the leading orders in the system size of the Shannon entropies of random graph ensembles constrained with degree distribution and degree-degree correlation. We also construct an ergodic detailed balance Markov chain with non-trivial acceptance probabilities which converges to a strictly uniform measure and is based on edge swaps that conserve all degrees. The acceptance probabilities can be generalized to define Markov chains that target any alternative desired measure on the space of directed or undirected graphs, in order to generate graphs with more sophisticated topological features.

  6. Signal focusing through active transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The accuracy of molecular signaling in biological cells and novel diagnostic devices is ultimately limited by the counting noise floor imposed by the thermal diffusion. Motivated by the fact that messenger RNA and vesicle-engulfed signaling molecules transiently bind to molecular motors and are actively transported in biological cells, we show here that the random active delivery of signaling particles to within a typical diffusion distance to the receptor generically reduces the correlation time of the counting noise. Considering a variety of signaling particle sizes from mRNA to vesicles and cell sizes from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells, we show that the conditions for active focusing—faster and more precise signaling—are indeed compatible with observations in living cells. Our results improve the understanding of molecular cellular signaling and novel diagnostic devices.

  7. [A biomedical signal processing toolkit programmed by Java].

    PubMed

    Xie, Haiyuan

    2012-09-01

    According to the biomedical signal characteristics, a new biomedical signal processing toolkit is developed. The toolkit is programmed by Java. It is used in basic digital signal processing, random signal processing and etc. All the methods in toolkit has been tested, the program is robust. The feature of the toolkit is detailed explained, easy use and good practicability.

  8. How to Do Random Allocation (Randomization)

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Wonshik

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To explain the concept and procedure of random allocation as used in a randomized controlled study. Methods We explain the general concept of random allocation and demonstrate how to perform the procedure easily and how to report it in a paper. PMID:24605197

  9. Theoretical aspects of calcium signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pencea, Corneliu Stefan

    2001-08-01

    Experiments investigating intracellular calcium dynamics have revealed that calcium signals differentially affect a variety of intracellular processes, from fertilization and cell development and differentiation to subsequent cellular activity, ending with cell death. As an intracellular messenger, calcium transmits information within and between cells, thus regulating their activity. To control such a variety of processes, calcium signals have to be very flexible and also precisely regulated. The cell uses a calcium signaling ``toolkit'', where calcium ions can act in different contexts of space, amplitude and time. For different tasks, the cell selects the particular signal, or combination of signals, that triggers the appropriate physiological response. The physical foundations of such a versatile cellular signaling toolkit involving calcium are not completely understood, despite important experimental and theoretical progress made recently. The declared goal of this work is to investigate physical mechanisms on which the propagation of differential signals can be based. The dynamics of calcium near a cluster of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) activated calcium channels has been investigated analytically and numerically. Our work has demonstrated that clusters of different IP3 receptors can show similar bistable behavior, but differ in both the transient and long term dynamics. We have also investigated the conditions under which a calcium signal propagates between a pair of localized stores. We have shown that the propagation of the signal across a random distribution of such stores shows a percolation transition manifested in the shape of the wave front. More importantly, our work indicates that specific distribution of stores can be interpreted as calcium circuits that can perform important signal analyzing task, from unidirectional propagation and coincidence detection to a complete set of logic gates. We believe that phenomena like the ones described are

  10. Dextran reduces embolic signals after carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Levi, C R; Stork, J L; Chambers, B R; Abbott, A L; Cameron, H M; Peeters, A; Royle, J P; Roberts, A K; Fell, G; Hoare, M C; Chan, A T; Donnan, G A

    2001-10-01

    One hundred fifty patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy were randomly assigned to receive intravenous 10% dextran 40 or placebo. Transcranial Doppler monitoring of the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery 0 to 1 hour postoperatively detected embolic signals in 57% of placebo and 42% of dextran patients, with overall embolic signal counts 46% less for dextran (p = 0.052). Two to 3 hours postoperatively, embolic signals were present in 45% of placebo and 27% of dextran patients, with embolic signal counts 64% less for dextran (p = 0.040). We conclude that dextran reduces embolic signals within 3 hours of CEA.

  11. Prognostic value of cetuximab-related skin toxicity in metastatic colorectal cancer patients and its correlation with parameters of the epidermal growth factor receptor signal transduction pathway: results from a randomized trial of the GERMAN AIO CRC Study Group.

    PubMed

    Stintzing, Sebastian; Kapaun, Christine; Laubender, Rüdiger Paul; Jung, Andreas; Neumann, Jens; Modest, Dominik Paul; Giessen, Clemens; Moosmann, Nicolas; Wollenberg, Andreas; Kirchner, Thomas; Heinemann, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Skin toxicity is a frequent adverse event of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeting agents. Occurrence of cetuximab-induced skin toxicity (Cet-ST) correlates with better treatment response and longer survival times. Molecular markers predicting Cet-ST are still missing. This investigation analyzed the value of Cet-ST for treatment efficacy in a randomized trial comparing cetuximab plus capecitabine/irinotecan to cetuximab plus capecitabine/oxaliplatin as first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Patient characteristics and molecular parameters (KRAS mutation, EGFR-FISH, EGFR-IHC and EGFR intron-1 polymorphism) of the tumour were correlated with response and Cet-ST. Cet-ST grade 0-1 was observed in 31%, grade 2-3 in 69% of patients. Outcome favoured patients with grade 2-3 Cet-ST with regard to overall response rate (62 vs. 41%), PFS (7.8 vs. 5.2 months) and overall survival (OS) (30.3 vs. 18.0 months). First-cycle rash was observed in 66% of patients and corresponded with longer survival (30.7 vs. 20.2 months, p = 0.007). Patients without Cet-ST had a poor outcome (PFS, 1.9 months; OS, 11 months). The correlation of Cet-ST with survival was specifically evident in patients with KRAS codon-12-mutated tumours assumed to be cetuximab resistant. In multivariate analysis of patient characteristics, male gender and younger age were significantly correlated with Cet-ST. Among molecular parameters, no significant correlation with Cet-ST was found. Cet-ST is an early predictor of treatment efficacy in cetuximab-treated patients. This effect of Cet-ST is independent of the KRAS mutation status, suggesting that Cet-ST rather relates to constitutional factors of the patient than alterations of the EGFR pathway in the tumour.

  12. A randomized crossover, pilot study examining the effects of a normal protein vs. high protein breakfast on food cravings and reward signals in overweight/obese "breakfast skipping", late-adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Hoertel, Heather A; Will, Matthew J; Leidy, Heather J

    2014-08-06

    This pilot study examined whether the addition of a normal protein (NP) vs. high protein (HP) breakfast leads to alterations in food cravings and plasma homovanillic acid (HVA), which is an index of central dopamine production, in overweight/obese 'breakfast skipping' late-adolescent young women. A randomized crossover design was incorporated in which 20 girls (age 19 ± 1 y; BMI 28.6 ± 0.7 kg/m2) consumed 350 kcal NP (13 g protein) breakfast meals, 350 kcal HP (35 g protein) breakfast meals, or continued breakfast skipping (BS) for 6 consecutive days/pattern. On day 7 of each pattern, a 4 h testing day was completed including the consumption of breakfast (or no breakfast) followed by food craving questionnaires and blood sampling for HVA concentrations throughout the morning. Both breakfast meals reduced post-meal cravings for sweet and savory foods and increased HVA concentrations vs. BS (all, p < 0.05). Between breakfast meals, the HP breakfast tended to elicit greater reductions in post-meal savory cravings vs. NP (p = 0.08) and tended to elicit sustained increases in HVA concentrations prior to lunch vs. NP (p = 0.09). Lastly, HVA concentrations were positively correlated with the protein content at breakfast (r: 0.340; p < 0.03). Collectively, these findings suggest that the addition of breakfast reduces post-meal food cravings and increases homovanillic acid concentrations in overweight/obese young people with higher protein versions eliciting greater responses.

  13. Sunspot random walk and 22-year variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, E. Joshua

    2012-01-01

    We examine two stochastic models for consistency with observed long-term secular trends in sunspot number and a faint, but semi-persistent, 22-yr signal: (1) a null hypothesis, a simple one-parameter random-walk model of sunspot-number cycle-to-cycle change, and, (2) an alternative hypothesis, a two-parameter random-walk model with an imposed 22-yr alternating amplitude. The observed secular trend in sunspots, seen from solar cycle 5 to 23, would not be an unlikely result of the accumulation of multiple random-walk steps. Statistical tests show that a 22-yr signal can be resolved in historical sunspot data; that is, the probability is low that it would be realized from random data. On the other hand, the 22-yr signal has a small amplitude compared to random variation, and so it has a relatively small effect on sunspot predictions. Many published predictions for cycle 24 sunspots fall within the dispersion of previous cycle-to-cycle sunspot differences. The probability is low that the Sun will, with the accumulation of random steps over the next few cycles, walk down to a Dalton-like minimum. Our models support published interpretations of sunspot secular variation and 22-yr variation resulting from cycle-to-cycle accumulation of dynamo-generated magnetic energy.

  14. Sunspot random walk and 22-year variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, E. Joshua

    2012-05-01

    We examine two stochastic models for consistency with observed long-term secular trends in sunspot number and a faint, but semi-persistent, 22-yr signal: (1) a null hypothesis, a simple one-parameter log-normal random-walk model of sunspot-number cycle-to-cycle change, and, (2) an alternative hypothesis, a two-parameter random-walk model with an imposed 22-yr alternating amplitude. The observed secular trend in sunspots, seen from solar cycle 5 to 23, would not be an unlikely result of the accumulation of multiple random-walk steps. Statistical tests show that a 22-yr signal can be resolved in historical sunspot data; that is, the probability is low that it would be realized from random data. On the other hand, the 22-yr signal has a small amplitude compared to random variation, and so it has a relatively small effect on sunspot predictions. Many published predictions for cycle 24 sunspots fall within the dispersion of previous cycle-to-cycle sunspot differences. The probability is low that the Sun will, with the accumulation of random steps over the next few cycles, walk down to a Dalton-like minimum. Our models support published interpretations of sunspot secular variation and 22-yr variation resulting from cycle-to-cycle accumulation of dynamo-generated magnetic energy.

  15. Random broadcast on random geometric graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Elsasser, Robert; Friedrich, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we consider the random broadcast time on random geometric graphs (RGGs). The classic random broadcast model, also known as push algorithm, is defined as: starting with one informed node, in each succeeding round every informed node chooses one of its neighbors uniformly at random and informs it. We consider the random broadcast time on RGGs, when with high probability: (i) RGG is connected, (ii) when there exists the giant component in RGG. We show that the random broadcast time is bounded by {Omicron}({radical} n + diam(component)), where diam(component) is a diameter of the entire graph, or the giant component, for the regimes (i), or (ii), respectively. In other words, for both regimes, we derive the broadcast time to be {Theta}(diam(G)), which is asymptotically optimal.

  16. How random is a random vector?

    SciTech Connect

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2015-12-15

    Over 80 years ago Samuel Wilks proposed that the “generalized variance” of a random vector is the determinant of its covariance matrix. To date, the notion and use of the generalized variance is confined only to very specific niches in statistics. In this paper we establish that the “Wilks standard deviation” –the square root of the generalized variance–is indeed the standard deviation of a random vector. We further establish that the “uncorrelation index” –a derivative of the Wilks standard deviation–is a measure of the overall correlation between the components of a random vector. Both the Wilks standard deviation and the uncorrelation index are, respectively, special cases of two general notions that we introduce: “randomness measures” and “independence indices” of random vectors. In turn, these general notions give rise to “randomness diagrams”—tangible planar visualizations that answer the question: How random is a random vector? The notion of “independence indices” yields a novel measure of correlation for Lévy laws. In general, the concepts and results presented in this paper are applicable to any field of science and engineering with random-vectors empirical data.

  17. Signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, David M.

    The application of signal processing technology to conventional weapons systems can lower operator workloads and enhance kill probabilities, while automating wide-area surveillance, target search and classification, target tracking, and aimpoint selection. Immediate opportunities exist for automatic target cueing in underwater and over-the-horizon targeting, as well as for airborne multiple-target fire control. By embedding the transit/receive electronics into conformal aircraft sensor arrays, a 'smart' skin can be created. Electronically scanned phased arrays can be used to yield accurate azimuthal and elevation positions while nullifying EW threats. Attention is given to major development thrusts in algorithm design.

  18. Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    ORGANIZATION Univ of Minnesota (f*fto U. S. Army Research Office 6c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (Wiy Stat, and ZIP Code...Minneapolis, MN 55455 P. 0. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Sa. NAME Of FUNDING ISPONSORING Sb. OFFICE SYMBOL 9. PROCUREMENT INSTRUMENT...PROJECT ITASK jWORK UNIT Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 EMNTO.I NO NO CESOIO 11. TITLE (Incudt Security Classifiratio") Signal Processing of, he auth

  19. Bright emission from a random Raman laser

    PubMed Central

    Hokr, Brett H.; Bixler, Joel N.; Cone, Michael T.; Mason, John D.; Beier, Hope T.; Noojin, Gary D.; Petrov, Georgi I.; Golovan, Leonid A.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2014-01-01

    Random lasers are a developing class of light sources that utilize a highly disordered gain medium as opposed to a conventional optical cavity. Although traditional random lasers often have a relatively broad emission spectrum, a random laser that utilizes vibration transitions via Raman scattering allows for an extremely narrow bandwidth, on the order of 10 cm−1. Here we demonstrate the first experimental evidence of lasing via a Raman interaction in a bulk three-dimensional random medium, with conversion efficiencies on the order of a few percent. Furthermore, Monte Carlo simulations are used to study the complex spatial and temporal dynamics of nonlinear processes in turbid media. In addition to providing a large signal, characteristic of the Raman medium, the random Raman laser offers us an entirely new tool for studying the dynamics of gain in a turbid medium. PMID:25014073

  20. Directed random walk with random restarts: The Sisyphus random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, Miquel; Villarroel, Javier

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we consider a particular version of the random walk with restarts: random reset events which suddenly bring the system to the starting value. We analyze its relevant statistical properties, like the transition probability, and show how an equilibrium state appears. Formulas for the first-passage time, high-water marks, and other extreme statistics are also derived; we consider counting problems naturally associated with the system. Finally we indicate feasible generalizations useful for interpreting different physical effects.

  1. Directed random walk with random restarts: The Sisyphus random walk.

    PubMed

    Montero, Miquel; Villarroel, Javier

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we consider a particular version of the random walk with restarts: random reset events which suddenly bring the system to the starting value. We analyze its relevant statistical properties, like the transition probability, and show how an equilibrium state appears. Formulas for the first-passage time, high-water marks, and other extreme statistics are also derived; we consider counting problems naturally associated with the system. Finally we indicate feasible generalizations useful for interpreting different physical effects.

  2. Pattern randomness aftereffect

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yuki; Kawabe, Takahiro; Miyazaki, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Humans can easily discriminate a randomly spaced from a regularly spaced visual pattern. Here, we demonstrate that observers can adapt to pattern randomness. Following their adaption to prolonged exposure to two-dimensional patterns with varying levels of physical randomness, observers judged the randomness of the pattern. Perceived randomness decreased (increased) following adaptation to high (low) physical randomness (Experiment 1). Adaptation to 22.5°-rotated adaptor stimuli did not cause a randomness aftereffect (Experiment 2), suggesting that positional variation is unlikely to be responsible for the pattern randomness perception. Moreover, the aftereffect was not selective to contrast polarity (Experiment 3) and was not affected by spatial jitter (Experiment 4). Last, the aftereffect was not affected by adaptor configuration (Experiment 5). Our data were consistent with a model assuming filter-rectify-filter processing for orientation inputs. Thus, we infer that neural processing for orientation grouping/segregation underlies the perception of pattern randomness. PMID:24113916

  3. Hearing random matrices and random waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. V.; Shukla, Pragya

    2013-01-01

    The eigenangles of random matrices in the three standard circular ensembles are rendered as sounds in several different ways. The different fluctuation properties of these ensembles can be heard, and distinguished from the two extreme cases, of angles that are distributed uniformly round the unit circle and those that are random and uncorrelated. Similarly, in Gaussian random superpositions of monochromatic plane waves in one, two and three dimensions, the dimensions can be distinguished in sounds created from one-dimensional sections. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Richard E Crandall.

  4. Spectroscopy with Random and Displaced Random Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez, V.; Zuker, A. P.

    2002-02-01

    Because of the time reversal invariance of the angular momentum operator J2, the average energies and variances at fixed J for random two-body Hamiltonians exhibit odd-even- J staggering that may be especially strong for J = 0. It is shown that upon ensemble averaging over random runs, this behavior is reflected in the yrast states. Displaced (attractive) random ensembles lead to rotational spectra with strongly enhanced B(E2) transitions for a certain class of model spaces. It is explained how to generalize these results to other forms of collectivity.

  5. Theory of a random fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kolokolov, I. V. Lebedev, V. V.; Podivilov, E. V.; Vergeles, S. S.

    2014-12-15

    We develop the theory explaining the role of nonlinearity in generation of radiation in a fiber laser that is pumped by external light. The pumping energy is converted into the generating signal due to the Raman scattering supplying an effective gain for the signal. The signal is generated with frequencies near the one corresponding to the maximum value of the gain. Generation conditions and spectral properties of the generated signal are examined. We focus mainly on the case of a random laser where reflection of the signal occurs on impurities of the fiber. From the theoretical standpoint, kinetics of a wave system close to an integrable one are investigated. We demonstrate that in this case, the perturbation expansion in the kinetic equation has to use the closeness to the integrable case.

  6. On Gaussian random supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Thomas C.

    2014-04-01

    We study the distribution of metastable vacua and the likelihood of slow roll inflation in high dimensional random landscapes. We consider two examples of landscapes: a Gaussian random potential and an effective supergravity potential defined via a Gaussian random superpotential and a trivial Kähler potential. To examine these landscapes we introduce a random matrix model that describes the correlations between various derivatives and we propose an efficient algorithm that allows for a numerical study of high dimensional random fields. Using these novel tools, we find that the vast majority of metastable critical points in N dimensional random supergravities are either approximately supersymmetric with | F| ≪ M susy or supersymmetric. Such approximately supersymmetric points are dynamical attractors in the landscape and the probability that a randomly chosen critical point is metastable scales as log( P ) ∝ - N. We argue that random supergravities lead to potentially interesting inflationary dynamics.

  7. Random Matrix Theory in molecular dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Palese, Luigi Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that, in some situations, principal component analysis (PCA) carried out on molecular dynamics data results in the appearance of cosine-shaped low index projections. Because this is reminiscent of the results obtained by performing PCA on a multidimensional Brownian dynamics, it has been suggested that short-time protein dynamics is essentially nothing more than a noisy signal. Here we use Random Matrix Theory to analyze a series of short-time molecular dynamics experiments which are specifically designed to be simulations with high cosine content. We use as a model system the protein apoCox17, a mitochondrial copper chaperone. Spectral analysis on correlation matrices allows to easily differentiate random correlations, simply deriving from the finite length of the process, from non-random signals reflecting the intrinsic system properties. Our results clearly show that protein dynamics is not really Brownian also in presence of the cosine-shaped low index projections on principal axes.

  8. Urothelial Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2013-01-01

    The urothelium, which lines the inner surface of the renal pelvis, the ureters, and the urinary bladder, not only forms a high-resistance barrier to ion, solute and water flux, and pathogens, but also functions as an integral part of a sensory web which receives, amplifies, and transmits information about its external milieu. Urothelial cells have the ability to sense changes in their extracellular environment, and respond to chemical, mechanical and thermal stimuli by releasing various factors such as ATP, nitric oxide, and acetylcholine. They express a variety of receptors and ion channels, including P2X3 purinergic receptors, nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and TRP channels, which all have been implicated in urothelial-neuronal interactions, and involved in signals that via components in the underlying lamina propria, such as interstitial cells, can be amplified and conveyed to nerves, detrusor muscle cells, and ultimately the central nervous system. The specialized anatomy of the urothelium and underlying structures, and the possible communication mechanisms from urothelial cells to various cell types within the bladder wall are described. Changes in the urothelium/lamina propria (“mucosa”) produced by different bladder disorders are discussed, as well as the mucosa as a target for therapeutic interventions. PMID:23589830

  9. Subnoise detection of a fast random event.

    PubMed

    Ataie, V; Esman, D; Kuo, B P-P; Alic, N; Radic, S

    2015-12-11

    Observation of random, nonrepetitive phenomena is of critical importance in astronomy, spectroscopy, biology, and remote sensing. Heralded by weak signals, hidden in noise, they pose basic detection challenges. In contrast to repetitive waveforms, a single-instance signal cannot be separated from noise through averaging. Here, we show that a fast, randomly occurring event can be detected and extracted from a noisy background without conventional averaging. An isolated 80-picosecond pulse was received with confidence level exceeding 99%, even when accompanied by noise. Our detector relies on instantaneous spectral cloning and a single-step, coherent field processor. The ability to extract fast, subnoise events is expected to increase detection sensitivity in multiple disciplines. Additionally, the new spectral-cloning receiver can potentially intercept communication signals that are presently considered secure. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Quantum random number generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Zhang, Zhen; Qi, Bing

    2016-06-28

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness -- coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a high speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.

  11. Quantum random number generation

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; ...

    2016-06-28

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness -- coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a highmore » speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.« less

  12. Quantum random number generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Qi, Bing; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which have important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness—coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. On the basis of the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a high speed by properly modelling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, in which verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category that provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.

  13. On the time arrows, and randomness in cosmological signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurzadyan, V. G.; Sargsyan, S.; Yegorian, G.

    2013-09-01

    Arrows of time - thermodynamical, cosmological, electromagnetic, quantum mechanical, psychological - are basic properties of Nature. For a quantum system-bath closed system the de-correlated initial conditions and no-memory (Markovian) dynamics are outlined as necessary conditions for the appearance of the thermodynamical arrow. The emergence of the arrow for the system evolving according to non-unitary dynamics due to the presence of the bath, then, is a result of limited observability, and we conjecture the arrow in the observable Universe as determined by the dark sector acting as a bath. The voids in the large scale matter distribution induce hyperbolicity of the null geodesics, with possible observational consequences.

  14. User's manual SIG: a general-purpose signal processing program

    SciTech Connect

    Lager, D.; Azevedo, S.

    1983-10-25

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Many of the basic operations one would perform on digitized data are contained in the core SIG package. Out of these core commands, more powerful signal processing algorithms may be built. Many different operations on time- and frequency-domain signals can be performed by SIG. They include operations on the samples of a signal, such as adding a scalar to each sample, operations on the entire signal such as digital filtering, and operations on two or more signals such as adding two signals. Signals may be simulated, such as a pulse train or a random waveform. Graphics operations display signals and spectra.

  15. Randomizing Genome-Scale Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Areejit; Martin, Olivier C.

    2011-01-01

    Networks coming from protein-protein interactions, transcriptional regulation, signaling, or metabolism may appear to have “unusual” properties. To quantify this, it is appropriate to randomize the network and test the hypothesis that the network is not statistically different from expected in a motivated ensemble. However, when dealing with metabolic networks, the randomization of the network using edge exchange generates fictitious reactions that are biochemically meaningless. Here we provide several natural ensembles of randomized metabolic networks. A first constraint is to use valid biochemical reactions. Further constraints correspond to imposing appropriate functional constraints. We explain how to perform these randomizations with the help of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and show that they allow one to approach the properties of biological metabolic networks. The implication of the present work is that the observed global structural properties of real metabolic networks are likely to be the consequence of simple biochemical and functional constraints. PMID:21779409

  16. Anomaly detection and reconstruction from random projections.

    PubMed

    Fowler, James E; Du, Qian

    2012-01-01

    Compressed-sensing methodology typically employs random projections simultaneously with signal acquisition to accomplish dimensionality reduction within a sensor device. The effect of such random projections on the preservation of anomalous data is investigated. The popular RX anomaly detector is derived for the case in which global anomalies are to be identified directly in the random-projection domain, and it is determined via both random simulation, as well as empirical observation that strongly anomalous vectors are likely to be identifiable by the projection-domain RX detector even in low-dimensional projections. Finally, a reconstruction procedure for hyperspectral imagery is developed wherein projection-domain anomaly detection is employed to partition the data set, permitting anomaly and normal pixel classes to be separately reconstructed in order to improve the representation of the anomaly pixels.

  17. Scram signal generator

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, E.W.; Simms, R.

    A scram signal generating circuit for nuclear reactor installations monitors a flow signal representing the flow rate of the liquid sodium coolant which is circulated through the reactor, and initiates reactor shutdown for a rapid variation in the flow signal, indicative of fuel motion. The scram signal generating circuit includes a long-term drift compensation circuit which processes the flow signal and generates an output signal representing the flow rate of the coolant. The output signal remains substantially unchanged for small variations in the flow signal, attributable to long term drift in the flow rate, but a rapid change in the flow signal, indicative of a fast flow variation, causes a corresponding change in the output signal. A comparator circuit compares the output signal with a reference signal, representing a given percentage of the steady state flow rate of the coolant, and generates a scram signal to initiate reactor shutdown when the output signal equals the reference signal.

  18. Scram signal generator

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, Edward W.; Simms, Richard

    1981-01-01

    A scram signal generating circuit for nuclear reactor installations monitors a flow signal representing the flow rate of the liquid sodium coolant which is circulated through the reactor, and initiates reactor shutdown for a rapid variation in the flow signal, indicative of fuel motion. The scram signal generating circuit includes a long-term drift compensation circuit which processes the flow signal and generates an output signal representing the flow rate of the coolant. The output signal remains substantially unchanged for small variations in the flow signal, attributable to long term drift in the flow rate, but a rapid change in the flow signal, indicative of a fast flow variation, causes a corresponding change in the output signal. A comparator circuit compares the output signal with a reference signal, representing a given percentage of the steady state flow rate of the coolant, and generates a scram signal to initiate reactor shutdown when the output signal equals the reference signal.

  19. Quantum Zeno Effect in the Strong Measurement Regime of Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-17

    New J. Phys. 18 (2016) 053031 doi:10.1088/1367-2630/18/5/053031 PAPER Quantum Zeno effect in the strongmeasurement regime of circuit quantum ...Keywords: quantumZeno effect, quantum jumps, superconducting qubit, circuit QED, random telegraph signals Abstract Weobserve the quantumZeno effect...where the act ofmeasurement slows the rate of quantum state transitions—in a superconducting qubit using linear circuit quantum electrodynamics readout

  20. Tutorials from the Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) applications and Planning Meeting (23rd), Held in Pasadena, California on December 3-5, 1991.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    noises. One such noise is " popcorn " noise, named after the noise generated by corn popping . It is also referred to as a random telegraph signal...oscillators). 20 When low noise is required in the microwave (or higher) frequency range, SAW oscillators and dielectric resonator oscillators (DROs) are...H., Microwave Time and Frequency Standards, In: Precision Frequency Control, Vol. 2 (E. A. Gerber and A. Ballato, eds.), Academic Press, New York

  1. CT detector evaluation with complex random backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Helen; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2012-02-01

    Modern computed tomography (CT) uses detector arrays consisting of large numbers of photodiodes with scintil- lator crystals. The number of pixels in the array can play an important role in system performance. Considerable research has been performed on signal detection in flat backgrounds under various conditions, but little has been done with complex, random backgrounds in CT; our work investigates in particular the effect of the number of detector elements on signal detection by a channelized Hotelling observer in a complex background. For this project, a simulated three-dimensional phantom is generated with its attenuation equal to that of water. The phantom contains a smaller central section with random variations to simulate random anatomical structures. Cone-beam projections of the phantom are acquired at different angles and used to calculate the covariance matrix of the raw projection data. Laguerre-Gauss channels are used to reduce the dimensionality of each 2D projection and hence the size of the covariance matrix, but the covariance is still a function of two projection angles. A strong cross-channel correlation is observed as a function of the difference between the angles. A signal with known location and size is used, and the performance of the observer is calculated from the channel outputs at multiple projection angles. A contrast-detail diagram is computed for different variables such as signal size, number of incident x-ray photons, pixel size, etc. At a fixed observer signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the contrast required to detect a signal increases dramatically as the signal size decreases.

  2. Blocked randomization with randomly selected block sizes.

    PubMed

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  3. Blocked Randomization with Randomly Selected Block Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes. PMID:21318011

  4. Quantum random number generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Collantes, Miguel; Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Random numbers are a fundamental resource in science and engineering with important applications in simulation and cryptography. The inherent randomness at the core of quantum mechanics makes quantum systems a perfect source of entropy. Quantum random number generation is one of the most mature quantum technologies with many alternative generation methods. This review discusses the different technologies in quantum random number generation from the early devices based on radioactive decay to the multiple ways to use the quantum states of light to gather entropy from a quantum origin. Randomness extraction and amplification and the notable possibility of generating trusted random numbers even with untrusted hardware using device-independent generation protocols are also discussed.

  5. Random-Dot Stereogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwayama, Tetsuro

    The technology and history of random-dot stereogram are described. The paper on two-picture type random-dot stereogram is delivered in 1960, and this technology came to be known widely in 1960s. On the other hand, the principle of the single image random-dot stereogram (Autostereogram) was invented in 1979, but came to be known since the announcement of SPIE conference in 1990. Wallpaper stereogram is also described.

  6. Invitation to Random Tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurau, Razvan

    2016-09-01

    This article is preface to the SIGMA special issue ''Tensor Models, Formalism and Applications'', http://www.emis.de/journals/SIGMA/Tensor_Models.html. The issue is a collection of eight excellent, up to date reviews on random tensor models. The reviews combine pedagogical introductions meant for a general audience with presentations of the most recent developments in the field. This preface aims to give a condensed panoramic overview of random tensors as the natural generalization of random matrices to higher dimensions.

  7. Randomized SUSAN edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Ping; Gao, Ying-Hui; Wang, Peng

    2011-11-01

    A speed up technique for the SUSAN edge detector based on random sampling is proposed. Instead of sliding the mask pixel by pixel on an image as the SUSAN edge detector does, the proposed scheme places the mask randomly on pixels to find edges in the image; we hereby name it randomized SUSAN edge detector (R-SUSAN). Specifically, the R-SUSAN edge detector adopts three approaches in the framework of random sampling to accelerate a SUSAN edge detector: procedure integration of response computation and nonmaxima suppression, reduction of unnecessary processing for obvious nonedge pixels, and early termination. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Random Packing and Random Covering Sequences.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-24

    obtained by appeain~g to a result due to Marsaglia [39, and de Finetti [8]. Their result states that if (XI. X2 .. X,) is a random point on the simplex {X E...to sequeil~ coverage problems. J. App). Prob. 11. 281-293. [81 de Finetti . B. (1964). Alcune ossevazioni in tema de "suddivisione casuale." Giornale I

  9. 30 CFR 56.12048 - Communication conductors on power poles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Electricity § 56.12048 Communication conductors on power poles. Telegraph, telephone, or signal wires shall... powerlines, they shall be installed as specified by the National Electrical Code....

  10. Random numbers spring from alpha decay

    SciTech Connect

    Frigerio, N.A.; Sanathanan, L.P.; Morley, M.; Clark, N.A.; Tyler, S.A.

    1980-05-01

    Congruential random number generators, which are widely used in Monte Carlo simulations, are deficient in that the number they generate are concentrated in a relatively small number of hyperplanes. While this deficiency may not be a limitation in small Monte Carlo studies involving a few variables, it introduces a significant bias in large simulations requiring high resolution. This bias was recognized and assessed during preparations for an accident analysis study of nuclear power plants. This report describes a random number device based on the radioactive decay of alpha particles from a /sup 235/U source in a high-resolution gas proportional counter. The signals were fed to a 4096-channel analyzer and for each channel the frequency of signals registered in a 20,000-microsecond interval was recorded. The parity bits of these frequency counts (0 for an even count and 1 for an odd count) were then assembled in sequence to form 31-bit binary random numbers and transcribed to a magnetic tape. This cycle was repeated as many times as were necessary to create 3 million random numbers. The frequency distribution of counts from the present device conforms to the Brockwell-Moyal distribution, which takes into account the dead time of the counter (both the dead time and decay constant of the underlying Poisson process were estimated). Analysis of the count data and tests of randomness on a sample set of the 31-bit binary numbers indicate that this random number device is a highly reliable source of truly random numbers. Its use is, therefore, recommended in Monte Carlo simulations for which the congruential pseudorandom number generators are found to be inadequate. 6 figures, 5 tables.

  11. Note: The design of thin gap chamber simulation signal source based on field programmable gate array

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Kun; Wang, Xu; Li, Feng; Jin, Ge; Lu, Houbing; Liang, Futian

    2015-01-15

    The Thin Gap Chamber (TGC) is an important part of ATLAS detector and LHC accelerator. Targeting the feature of the output signal of TGC detector, we have designed a simulation signal source. The core of the design is based on field programmable gate array, randomly outputting 256-channel simulation signals. The signal is generated by true random number generator. The source of randomness originates from the timing jitter in ring oscillators. The experimental results show that the random number is uniform in histogram, and the whole system has high reliability.

  12. Quantum random number generator

    SciTech Connect

    Pooser, Raphael C.

    2016-05-10

    A quantum random number generator (QRNG) and a photon generator for a QRNG are provided. The photon generator may be operated in a spontaneous mode below a lasing threshold to emit photons. Photons emitted from the photon generator may have at least one random characteristic, which may be monitored by the QRNG to generate a random number. In one embodiment, the photon generator may include a photon emitter and an amplifier coupled to the photon emitter. The amplifier may enable the photon generator to be used in the QRNG without introducing significant bias in the random number and may enable multiplexing of multiple random numbers. The amplifier may also desensitize the photon generator to fluctuations in power supplied thereto while operating in the spontaneous mode. In one embodiment, the photon emitter and amplifier may be a tapered diode amplifier.

  13. Randomness: Quantum versus classical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Recent tremendous development of quantum information theory has led to a number of quantum technological projects, e.g. quantum random generators. This development had stimulated a new wave of interest in quantum foundations. One of the most intriguing problems of quantum foundations is the elaboration of a consistent and commonly accepted interpretation of a quantum state. Closely related problem is the clarification of the notion of quantum randomness and its interrelation with classical randomness. In this short review, we shall discuss basics of classical theory of randomness (which by itself is very complex and characterized by diversity of approaches) and compare it with irreducible quantum randomness. We also discuss briefly “digital philosophy”, its role in physics (classical and quantum) and its coupling to the information interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM).

  14. Within-Subject Testing of the Signaled-Reinforcement Effect on Operant Responding as Measured by Response Rate and Resistance to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Phil; Doughty, Adam H.

    2005-01-01

    Response rates under random-interval schedules are lower when a brief (500 ms) signal accompanies reinforcement than when there is no signal. The present study examined this signaled-reinforcement effect and its relation to resistance to change. In Experiment 1, rats responded on a multiple random-interval 60-s random-interval 60-s schedule, with…

  15. Within-Subject Testing of the Signaled-Reinforcement Effect on Operant Responding as Measured by Response Rate and Resistance to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Phil; Doughty, Adam H.

    2005-01-01

    Response rates under random-interval schedules are lower when a brief (500 ms) signal accompanies reinforcement than when there is no signal. The present study examined this signaled-reinforcement effect and its relation to resistance to change. In Experiment 1, rats responded on a multiple random-interval 60-s random-interval 60-s schedule, with…

  16. Signal processing of heart signals for the quantification of non-deterministic events

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heart signals represent an important way to evaluate cardiovascular function and often what is desired is to quantify the level of some signal of interest against the louder backdrop of the beating of the heart itself. An example of this type of application is the quantification of cavitation in mechanical heart valve patients. Methods An algorithm is presented for the quantification of high-frequency, non-deterministic events such as cavitation from recorded signals. A closed-form mathematical analysis of the algorithm investigates its capabilities. The algorithm is implemented on real heart signals to investigate usability and implementation issues. Improvements are suggested to the base algorithm including aligning heart sounds, and the implementation of the Short-Time Fourier Transform to study the time evolution of the energy in the signal. Results The improvements result in better heart beat alignment and better detection and measurement of the random events in the heart signals, so that they may provide a method to quantify nondeterministic events in heart signals. The use of the Short-Time Fourier Transform allows the examination of the random events in both time and frequency allowing for further investigation and interpretation of the signal. Conclusions The presented algorithm does allow for the quantification of nondeterministic events but proper care in signal acquisition and processing must be taken to obtain meaningful results. PMID:21269508

  17. Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloulian, George K.; Woo, Simon S.; Chow, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Net-centric networking environments are often faced with limited resources and must utilize bandwidth as efficiently as possible. In networking environments that span wide areas, the data transmission has to be efficient without any redundant or exuberant metadata. The Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer software provides an extra level of security on top of existing data encryption methods. Randomizing the data s byte stream adds an extra layer to existing data protection methods, thus making it harder for an attacker to decrypt protected data. Based on a generated crypto-graphically secure random seed, a random sequence of numbers is used to intelligently and efficiently swap the organization of bytes in data using the unbiased and memory-efficient in-place Fisher-Yates shuffle method. Swapping bytes and reorganizing the crucial structure of the byte data renders the data file unreadable and leaves the data in a deconstructed state. This deconstruction adds an extra level of security requiring the byte stream to be reconstructed with the random seed in order to be readable. Once the data byte stream has been randomized, the software enables the data to be distributed to N nodes in an environment. Each piece of the data in randomized and distributed form is a separate entity unreadable on its own right, but when combined with all N pieces, is able to be reconstructed back to one. Reconstruction requires possession of the key used for randomizing the bytes, leading to the generation of the same cryptographically secure random sequence of numbers used to randomize the data. This software is a cornerstone capability possessing the ability to generate the same cryptographically secure sequence on different machines and time intervals, thus allowing this software to be used more heavily in net-centric environments where data transfer bandwidth is limited.

  18. Maximally nonlocal theories cannot be maximally random.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Gonzalo; Hoban, Matty J; Dhara, Chirag; Prettico, Giuseppe; Acín, Antonio

    2015-04-24

    Correlations that violate a Bell inequality are said to be nonlocal; i.e., they do not admit a local and deterministic explanation. Great effort has been devoted to study how the amount of nonlocality (as measured by a Bell inequality violation) serves to quantify the amount of randomness present in observed correlations. In this work we reverse this research program and ask what do the randomness certification capabilities of a theory tell us about the nonlocality of that theory. We find that, contrary to initial intuition, maximal randomness certification cannot occur in maximally nonlocal theories. We go on and show that quantum theory, in contrast, permits certification of maximal randomness in all dichotomic scenarios. We hence pose the question of whether quantum theory is optimal for randomness; i.e., is it the most nonlocal theory that allows maximal randomness certification? We answer this question in the negative by identifying a larger-than-quantum set of correlations capable of this feat. Not only are these results relevant to understanding quantum mechanics' fundamental features, but also put fundamental restrictions on device-independent protocols based on the no-signaling principle.

  19. Optofluidic random laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivakiran Bhaktha, B. N.; Bachelard, Nicolas; Noblin, Xavier; Sebbah, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    Random lasing is reported in a dye-circulated structured polymeric microfluidic channel. The role of disorder, which results from limited accuracy of photolithographic process, is demonstrated by the variation of the emission spectrum with local-pump position and by the extreme sensitivity to a local perturbation of the structure. Thresholds comparable to those of conventional microfluidic lasers are achieved, without the hurdle of state-of-the-art cavity fabrication. Potential applications of optofluidic random lasers for on-chip sensors are discussed. Introduction of random lasers in the field of optofluidics is a promising alternative to on-chip laser integration with light and fluidic functionalities.

  20. Derivation of Randomized Algorithms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    81] randomized algorithm, 2)AKS deterministic algorithm[AKS83], 3) Column Sorting algorithm [Leighton 83], 4)FLASH SORT algorithm[Reif and Valiant 83...34 ) (for any a). This result immediately implies that r,. _ i- logN with 8 -’ probability > 1 - O(N - *) thus proving our claim. Lemma 3.3 A random SCX of...will be sampleselect, (LN/2J, N). With this modification, quicksort becomes atlgrithm samplesort, (X); if I Al 1 then r rnX; Choose a random subset SCX

  1. Signal verification can promote reliable signalling

    PubMed Central

    Broom, Mark; Ruxton, Graeme D.; Schaefer, H. Martin

    2013-01-01

    The central question in communication theory is whether communication is reliable, and if so, which mechanisms select for reliability. The primary approach in the past has been to attribute reliability to strategic costs associated with signalling as predicted by the handicap principle. Yet, reliability can arise through other mechanisms, such as signal verification; but the theoretical understanding of such mechanisms has received relatively little attention. Here, we model whether verification can lead to reliability in repeated interactions that typically characterize mutualisms. Specifically, we model whether fruit consumers that discriminate among poor- and good-quality fruits within a population can select for reliable fruit signals. In our model, plants either signal or they do not; costs associated with signalling are fixed and independent of plant quality. We find parameter combinations where discriminating fruit consumers can select for signal reliability by abandoning unprofitable plants more quickly. This self-serving behaviour imposes costs upon plants as a by-product, rendering it unprofitable for unrewarding plants to signal. Thus, strategic costs to signalling are not a prerequisite for reliable communication. We expect verification to more generally explain signal reliability in repeated consumer–resource interactions that typify mutualisms but also in antagonistic interactions such as mimicry and aposematism. PMID:24068354

  2. Retroactive Signaling in Short Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sepulchre, Jacques-Alexandre; Merajver, Sofía D.; Ventura, Alejandra C.

    2012-01-01

    In biochemical signaling pathways without explicit feedback connections, the core signal transduction is usually described as a one-way communication, going from upstream to downstream in a feedforward chain or network of covalent modification cycles. In this paper we explore the possibility of a new type of signaling called retroactive signaling, offered by the recently demonstrated property of retroactivity in signaling cascades. The possibility of retroactive signaling is analysed in the simplest case of the stationary states of a bicyclic cascade of signaling cycles. In this case, we work out the conditions for which variables of the upstream cycle are affected by a change of the total amount of protein in the downstream cycle, or by a variation of the phosphatase deactivating the same protein. Particularly, we predict the characteristic ranges of the downstream protein, or of the downstream phosphatase, for which a retroactive effect can be observed on the upstream cycle variables. Next, we extend the possibility of retroactive signaling in short but nonlinear signaling pathways involving a few covalent modification cycles. PMID:22848403

  3. Random array grid collimator

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-08-22

    A hexagonally shaped quasi-random no-two-holes touching grid collimator. The quasi-random array grid collimator eliminates contamination from small angle off-axis rays by using a no-two-holes-touching pattern which simultaneously provides for a self-supporting array increasng throughput by elimination of a substrate. The presentation invention also provides maximum throughput using hexagonally shaped holes in a hexagonal lattice pattern for diffraction limited applications. Mosaicking is also disclosed for reducing fabrication effort.

  4. Random template placement and prior information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röver, Christian

    2010-05-01

    In signal detection problems, one is usually faced with the task of searching a parameter space for peaks in the likelihood function which indicate the presence of a signal. Random searches have proven to be very efficient as well as easy to implement, compared e.g. to searches along regular grids in parameter space. Knowledge of the parameterised shape of the signal searched for adds structure to the parameter space, i.e., there are usually regions requiring to be densely searched while in other regions a coarser search is sufficient. On the other hand, prior information identifies the regions in which a search will actually be promising or may likely be in vain. Defining specific figures of merit allows one to combine both template metric and prior distribution and devise optimal sampling schemes over the parameter space. We show an example related to the gravitational wave signal from a binary inspiral event. Here the template metric and prior information are particularly contradictory, since signals from low-mass systems tolerate the least mismatch in parameter space while high-mass systems are far more likely, as they imply a greater signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and hence are detectable to greater distances. The derived sampling strategy is implemented in a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm where it improves convergence.

  5. A hybrid-type quantum random number generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai-Qiang, Ma; Wu, Zhu; Ke-Jin, Wei; Rui-Xue, Li; Hong-Wei, Liu

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a well-performing hybrid-type truly quantum random number generator based on the time interval between two independent single-photon detection signals, which is practical and intuitive, and generates the initial random number sources from a combination of multiple existing random number sources. A time-to-amplitude converter and multichannel analyzer are used for qualitative analysis to demonstrate that each and every step is random. Furthermore, a carefully designed data acquisition system is used to obtain a high-quality random sequence. Our scheme is simple and proves that the random number bit rate can be dramatically increased to satisfy practical requirements. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61178010 and 11374042), the Fund of State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications (Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications), China, and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. bupt2014TS01).

  6. Sunglasses, traffic signals, and color vision deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Dain, Stephen J; Wood, Joanne M; Atchison, David A

    2009-04-01

    To determine (a) the effect of different sunglass tint colorations on traffic signal detection and recognition for color normal and color deficient observers, and (b) the adequacy of coloration requirements in current sunglass standards. Twenty color-normals and 49 color-deficient males performed a tracking task while wearing sunglasses of different colorations (clear, gray, green, yellow-green, yellow-brown, red-brown). At random intervals, simulated traffic light signals were presented against a white background at 5 degrees to the right or left and observers were instructed to identify signal color (red/yellow/green) by pressing a response button as quickly as possible; response times and response errors were recorded. Signal color and sunglass tint had significant effects on response times and error rates (p < 0.05), with significant between-color group differences and interaction effects. Response times for color deficient people were considerably slower than color normals for both red and yellow signals for all sunglass tints, but for green signals they were only noticeably slower with the green and yellow-green lenses. For most of the color deficient groups, there were recognition errors for yellow signals combined with the yellow-green and green tints. In addition, deuteranopes had problems for red signals combined with red-brown and yellow-brown tints, and protanopes had problems for green signals combined with the green tint and for red signals combined with the red-brown tint. Many sunglass tints currently permitted for drivers and riders cause a measurable decrement in the ability of color deficient observers to detect and recognize traffic signals. In general, combinations of signals and sunglasses of similar colors are of particular concern. This is prima facie evidence of a risk in the use of these tints for driving and cautions against the relaxation of coloration limits in sunglasses beyond those represented in the study.

  7. Research on adaptive filtering method for electrostatic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongke; Pang, Yue; Yi, Yingmin

    2017-05-01

    The signal will be inevitably mixed with various types of noise in the process of transmission, which causes the distortion of information in different degree, in order to obtain accurate information, it's an important work to suppress random noise in the digital signal processing system. This paper mainly studies the adaptive filtering method, using LMS algorithm in adaptive filter (Least mean square LMS algorithm), when the filter starts reading the electrostatic signal, it also can estimate the statistical characteristics of electrostatic signal, adaptive adjust its filter parameters, filtering the electrostatic signal on time, attain the maximum noise suppression, to avoid distortion of information, and to achieve optimal filtering.

  8. Multidimensional signal processing for ultrasonic signal classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Ramuhalli, P.; Udpa, L.; Udpa, S.

    2001-04-01

    Neural network based signal classification systems are being used increasingly in the analysis of large volumes of data obtained in NDE applications. One example is in the interpretation on ultrasonic signals obtained from inspection of welds where signals can be due to porosity, slag, lack of fusion and cracks in the weld region. Standard techniques rely on differences in individual A-scans to classify the signals. This paper proposes an ultrasonic signal classification technique based on the information in a group of signals and examining the statistical characteristics of the signals. The method was 2-dimensional signal processing algorithms to analyze the information in B- and B'-scan images. In this paper, 2-dimensional transform based coefficients of the images are used as features and a multilayer perceptron is used to classify them. These results are then combined to get the final classification for the inspected region. Results of applying the technique to data obtained from the inspection of welds are presented.

  9. Coherent Doppler lidar signal covariance including wind shear and wind turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of coherent Doppler lidar is determined by the statistics of the coherent Doppler signal. The derivation and calculation of the covariance of the Doppler lidar signal is presented for random atmospheric wind fields with wind shear. The random component is described by a Kolmogorov turbulence spectrum. The signal parameters are clarified for a general coherent Doppler lidar system. There are two distinct physical regimes: one where the transmitted pulse determines the signal statistics and the other where the wind field dominates the signal statistics. The Doppler shift of the signal is identified in terms of the wind field and system parameters.

  10. Acoustic signal propagation characterization of conduit networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Muhammad Safeer

    Analysis of acoustic signal propagation in conduit networks has been an important area of research in acoustics. One major aspect of analyzing conduit networks as acoustic channels is that a propagating signal suffers frequency dependent attenuation due to thermo-viscous boundary layer effects and the presence of impedance mismatches such as side branches. The signal attenuation due to side branches is strongly influenced by their numbers and dimensions such as diameter and length. Newly developed applications for condition based monitoring of underground conduit networks involve measurement of acoustic signal attenuation through tests in the field. In many cases the exact installation layout of the field measurement location may not be accessible or actual installation may differ from the documented layout. The lack of exact knowledge of numbers and lengths of side branches, therefore, introduces uncertainty in the measurements of attenuation and contributes to the random variable error between measured results and those predicted from theoretical models. There are other random processes in and around conduit networks in the field that also affect the propagation of an acoustic signal. These random processes include but are not limited to the presence of strong temperature and humidity gradients within the conduits, blockages of variable sizes and types, effects of aging such as cracks, bends, sags and holes, ambient noise variations and presence of variable layer of water. It is reasonable to consider that the random processes contributing to the error in the measured attenuation are independent and arbitrarily distributed. The error, contributed by a large number of independent sources of arbitrary probability distributions, is best described by an approximately normal probability distribution in accordance with the central limit theorem. Using an analytical approach to model the attenuating effect of each of the random variable sources can be very complex and

  11. City of Phildelphia: Light emitting diodes for traffic signal displays

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This project investigated the feasibility of using light emitting diodes (LEDs) for red traffic signals in a demonstration program at 27 signalized intersections in the City of Philadelphia. LED traffic signals have the potential to achieve significant savings over standard incandescent signals in terms of energy usage and costs, signal relamping costs, signal system maintenance costs, tort liability, and environmental impact. Based on successful experience with the demonstration program, the City of Philadelphia is currently developing funding for the conversion of all existing red incandescent traffic signals at approximately 2,700 intersections to LED signals. This program is expected to cost approximately $4.0 million and save about $850,000 annually in energy costs. During late 1993 and early 1994, 212 red LED traffic signals (134 8-inch signals and 78 12-inch signals) were installed at 27 intersections in Philadelphia. The first group of 93 signals were installed at 13 prototypical intersections throughout the City. The remaining group of signals were installed on a contiguous route in West Philadelphia consisting of standard incandescent signals and LED signals interspersed in a random pattern.

  12. Two algorithms for compressing noise like signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaian, Sos S.; Cherukuri, Ravindranath; Akopian, David

    2005-05-01

    Compression is a technique that is used to encode data so that the data needs less storage/memory space. Compression of random data is vital in case where data where we need preserve data that has low redundancy and whose power spectrum is close to noise. In case of noisy signals that are used in various data hiding schemes the data has low redundancy and low energy spectrum. Therefore, upon compressing with lossy compression algorithms the low energy spectrum might get lost. Since the LSB plane data has low redundancy, lossless compression algorithms like Run length, Huffman coding, Arithmetic coding are in effective in providing a good compression ratio. These problems motivated in developing a new class of compression algorithms for compressing noisy signals. In this paper, we introduce a two new compression technique that compresses the random data like noise with reference to know pseudo noise sequence generated using a key. In addition, we developed a representation model for digital media using the pseudo noise signals. For simulation, we have made comparison between our methods and existing compression techniques like Run length that shows the Run length cannot compress when data is random but the proposed algorithms can compress. Furthermore, the proposed algorithms can be extended to all kinds of random data used in various applications.

  13. How chaosity and randomness control human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulmetyev, Renat M.; Yulmetyeva, Dinara; Gafarov, Fail M.

    2005-08-01

    We discuss the fundamental role that chaosity and randomness play in the determination of quality and efficiency of medical treatment. The statistical parameter of non-Markovity from non-equilibrium statistical physics of condensed matters is offered as a quantitative information measure of chaosity and randomness. The role of chaosity and randomness is determined by the phenomenological property, which includes quantitative informational measures of chaosity and randomness and pathology (disease) in a covariant form. Manifestations of the statistical informational behavior of chaosity and randomness are examined while analyzing the chaotic dynamics of RR intervals from human ECG's, the electric signals of a human muscle's tremor of legs in a normal state and at Parkinson disease, the electric potentials of the human brain core from EEG's during epileptic seizure and a human hand finger tremor in Parkinson's disease. The existence of the above stated informational measure allows to introduce the quantitative factor of the quality of treatment. The above-stated examples confirm the existence of new phenomenological property, which is important not only for the decision of medical problems, but also for the analysis of the wide range of problems of physics of complex systems of life and lifeless nature.

  14. Acoustic Localization of Transient Signals with Wind Compensation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Microphone Calibration on Localization of Transient Signals, Dec. 2008. 8. Papoulis , A.; Pillai, S. Probability , Random Variables, and Stochastic...have a window of probable AOA that is large enough to include signals affected by the wind, but not take signals that are coming from implausible...is the likelihood function and is the joint probability density function (8). To simplify the calculations, the measurement

  15. ERK Signals: Scaffolding Scaffolds?

    PubMed Central

    Casar, Berta; Crespo, Piero

    2016-01-01

    ERK1/2 MAP Kinases become activated in response to multiple intra- and extra-cellular stimuli through a signaling module composed of sequential tiers of cytoplasmic kinases. Scaffold proteins regulate ERK signals by connecting the different components of the module into a multi-enzymatic complex by which signal amplitude and duration are fine-tuned, and also provide signal fidelity by isolating this complex from external interferences. In addition, scaffold proteins play a central role as spatial regulators of ERKs signals. In this respect, depending on the subcellular localization from which the activating signals emanate, defined scaffolds specify which substrates are amenable to be phosphorylated. Recent evidence has unveiled direct interactions among different scaffold protein species. These scaffold-scaffold macro-complexes could constitute an additional level of regulation for ERK signals and may serve as nodes for the integration of incoming signals and the subsequent diversification of the outgoing signals with respect to substrate engagement. PMID:27303664

  16. Statistical properties of filtered pseudo-random digital sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weathers, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    A tutorial presentation of pseudo-random digital sequences, their generation and properties is given. The results of a study of filtered pseudo-random sequences, and their statistical properties are reported. The generator, to be used in a telemetry communications system test unit, must generate its pseudo-random signals by filtering a long digital sequence. Desired signal properties include: (1) approximately Gaussian amplitude probability density function; and (2) signal spectral envelope approximately that of the filter being used in the generator. Filtered maximum-length sequences have been used for this, and similar applications in the past. The results were good for low-pass filtered sequences when the ratio of digital clock frequency to filter cutoff frequency was between fifteen and twenty. However, for higher values of this ratio, a definite skewing of the amplitude density function was observed.

  17. Deterministic-random separation in nonstationary regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, D.; Antoni, J.; Sieg-Zieba, S.; Eltabach, M.

    2016-02-01

    In rotating machinery vibration analysis, the synchronous average is perhaps the most widely used technique for extracting periodic components. Periodic components are typically related to gear vibrations, misalignments, unbalances, blade rotations, reciprocating forces, etc. Their separation from other random components is essential in vibration-based diagnosis in order to discriminate useful information from masking noise. However, synchronous averaging theoretically requires the machine to operate under stationary regime (i.e. the related vibration signals are cyclostationary) and is otherwise jeopardized by the presence of amplitude and phase modulations. A first object of this paper is to investigate the nature of the nonstationarity induced by the response of a linear time-invariant system subjected to speed varying excitation. For this purpose, the concept of a cyclo-non-stationary signal is introduced, which extends the class of cyclostationary signals to speed-varying regimes. Next, a "generalized synchronous average'' is designed to extract the deterministic part of a cyclo-non-stationary vibration signal-i.e. the analog of the periodic part of a cyclostationary signal. Two estimators of the GSA have been proposed. The first one returns the synchronous average of the signal at predefined discrete operating speeds. A brief statistical study of it is performed, aiming to provide the user with confidence intervals that reflect the "quality" of the estimator according to the SNR and the estimated speed. The second estimator returns a smoothed version of the former by enforcing continuity over the speed axis. It helps to reconstruct the deterministic component by tracking a specific trajectory dictated by the speed profile (assumed to be known a priori).The proposed method is validated first on synthetic signals and then on actual industrial signals. The usefulness of the approach is demonstrated on envelope-based diagnosis of bearings in variable

  18. Theory of random packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makse, Hernan; Song, Chaoming; Wang, Ping

    2009-03-01

    We present a theory of random packings to describe the statistical mechanics of jammed matter with the aim of shedding light to the long-standing problem of characterizing the random close packing (RCP) and random loose packing (RLP) of particles. We describe the jammed system with equations of state relating observables such as entropy, coordination number, volume fraction, and compactivity as well as the probability distributions of volume and contacts. We follow a systematic route to classify packings into a phase diagram of jamming, from frictionless to frictional particles, from hard to deformable particles, from monodisperse to polydisperse systems, from spherical particles to nonspherical convex particles, in an attempt to understand the packing problem from a unifying perspective. The studies of RCP and RLP includes 2d, nd, and the mean field limit of infinite dimension.

  19. Reconstructing random media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeong, C. L. Y.; Torquato, S.

    1998-01-01

    We formulate a procedure to reconstruct the structure of general random heterogeneous media from limited morphological information by extending the methodology of Rintoul and Torquato [J. Colloid Interface Sci. 186, 467 (1997)] developed for dispersions. The procedure has the advantages that it is simple to implement and generally applicable to multidimensional, multiphase, and anisotropic structures. Furthermore, an extremely useful feature is that it can incorporate any type and number of correlation functions in order to provide as much morphological information as is necessary for accurate reconstruction. We consider a variety of one- and two-dimensional reconstructions, including periodic and random arrays of rods, various distribution of disks, Debye random media, and a Fontainebleau sandstone sample. We also use our algorithm to construct heterogeneous media from specified hypothetical correlation functions, including an exponentially damped, oscillating function as well as physically unrealizable ones.

  20. Leaky Random Oracle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneyama, Kazuki; Miyagawa, Satoshi; Ohta, Kazuo

    This work focuses on a vulnerability of hash functions due to sloppy usages or implementations in the real world. If our cryptographic research community succeeded in the development of a perfectly secure random function as the random oracle, it might be broken in some sense by invalid uses. In this paper, we propose a new variant of the random oracle model in order to analyze the security of cryptographic protocols under the situation of an invalid use of hash functions. Our model allows adversaries to obtain contents of the hash list of input and output pairs arbitrarily. Also, we analyze the security of several prevailing protocols (FDH, OAEP, Cramer-Shoup cryptosystem, Kurosawa-Desmedt cryptosystem, NAXOS) in our model. As the result of analyses, we clarify that FDH and Cramer-Shoup cryptosystem are still secure but others are insecure in our model. This result shows the separation between our model and the standard model.

  1. Tunable random fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Babin, S. A.; Podivilov, E. V.; El-Taher, A. E.; Harper, P.; Turitsyn, S. K.

    2011-08-15

    An optical fiber is treated as a natural one-dimensional random system where lasing is possible due to a combination of Rayleigh scattering by refractive index inhomogeneities and distributed amplification through the Raman effect. We present such a random fiber laser that is tunable over a broad wavelength range with uniquely flat output power and high efficiency, which outperforms traditional lasers of the same category. Outstanding characteristics defined by deep underlying physics and the simplicity of the scheme make the demonstrated laser a very attractive light source both for fundamental science and practical applications.

  2. Conformations of Random Polyampholytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakov, Vesselin; Milchev, Andrey; Jörg Limbach, Hans; Dünweg, Burkhard; Everaers, Ralf

    2000-11-01

    We study the size Rg of random polyampholytes (i.e., polymers with randomly charged monomers) as a function of their length N. All results of our extensive Monte Carlo simulations can be rationalized in terms of the scaling theory we develop for the Kantor-Kardar necklace model, although this theory neglects the quenched disorder in the charge sequence along the chain. We find ~N1/2. The elongated globule model, the initial predictions of both Higgs and Joanny ( ~N1/3) and Kantor and Kardar ( ~N), and previous numerical estimates are ruled out.

  3. Signaling in myxobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Dale

    2004-01-01

    Myxobacteria use soluble and cell-contact signals during their starvation-induced formation of fruiting bodies. These signals coordinate developmental gene expression with the cell movements that build fruiting bodies. Early in development, the quorum-sensing A-signal in Myxococcus xanthus helps to assess starvation and induce the first stage of aggregation. Later, the morphogenetic C-signal helps to pattern cell movement and shape the fruiting body. C-signal is a 17-kDa cell surface protein that signals by contact between the ends of two cells. The number of C-signal molecules per cell rises 100-fold from the beginning of fruiting body development to the end, when spores are formed. Traveling waves, streams, and sporulation have increasing thresholds for C-signal activity, and this progression ensures that spores form inside fruiting bodies.

  4. Signal sciences workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.

    1997-05-01

    This meeting is aimed primarily at signal processing and controls. The technical program for the 1997 Workshop includes a variety of efforts in the Signal Sciences with applications in the Microtechnology Area a new program at LLNL and a future area of application for both Signal/Image Sciences. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Seismic and Optical Signal Processing as well as Micro-Impulse Radar Processing highlight the program, while the speakers at the Signal Processing Applications session discuss various applications of signal processing/control to real world problems. For the more theoretical, a session on Signal Processing Algorithms was organized as well as for the more pragmatic, featuring a session on Real-Time Signal Processing.

  5. Staggered Costas signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Avraham; Levanon, Nadav

    1986-11-01

    A radar signal, based on coherent processing of a train of staggered Costas (1984) bursts is based on a minimum number of collocation of their individual ambiguity function sidelobe peaks. The resulting ambiguity function combines qualities of both 'thumbtack' and 'bed of nails' signals. Comparison with linear-FM, V-FM, and complementary phase coded signals is given, as well as comparison with hybrid signals consisting of both phase and frequency coding.

  6. Networked Dynamic Systems: Identification, Controllability, and Randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi-Abdolyousefi, Marzieh

    The presented dissertation aims to develop a graph-centric framework for the analysis and synthesis of networked dynamic systems (NDS) consisting of multiple dynamic units that interact via an interconnection topology. We examined three categories of network problems, namely, identification, controllability, and randomness. In network identification, as a subclass of inverse problems, we made an explicit relation between the input-output behavior of an NDS and the underlying interacting network. In network controllability, we provided structural and algebraic insights into features of the network that enable external signal(s) to control the state of the nodes in the network for certain classes of interconnections, namely, path, circulant, and Cartesian networks. We also examined the relation between network controllability and the symmetry structure of the graph. Motivated by the analysis results for the controllability and observability of deterministic networks, a natural question is whether randomness in the network layer or in the layer of inputs and outputs generically leads to favorable system theoretic properties. In this direction, we examined system theoretic properties of random networks including controllability, observability, and performance of optimal feedback controllers and estimators. We explored some of the ramifications of such an analysis framework in opinion dynamics over social networks and sensor networks in estimating the real-time position of a Seaglider from experimental data.

  7. [Intel random number generator-based true random number generator].

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng; Shen, Hong

    2004-09-01

    To establish a true random number generator on the basis of certain Intel chips. The random numbers were acquired by programming using Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0 via register reading from the random number generator (RNG) unit of an Intel 815 chipset-based computer with Intel Security Driver (ISD). We tested the generator with 500 random numbers in NIST FIPS 140-1 and X(2) R-Squared test, and the result showed that the random number it generated satisfied the demand of independence and uniform distribution. We also compared the random numbers generated by Intel RNG-based true random number generator and those from the random number table statistically, by using the same amount of 7500 random numbers in the same value domain, which showed that the SD, SE and CV of Intel RNG-based random number generator were less than those of the random number table. The result of u test of two CVs revealed no significant difference between the two methods. Intel RNG-based random number generator can produce high-quality random numbers with good independence and uniform distribution, and solves some problems with random number table in acquisition of the random numbers.

  8. On Random Numbers and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Ari, Morechai

    2004-01-01

    The term "random" is frequently used in discussion of the theory of evolution, even though the mathematical concept of randomness is problematic and of little relevance in the theory. Therefore, since the core concept of the theory of evolution is the non-random process of natural selection, the term random should not be used in teaching the…

  9. On Random Numbers and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Ari, Morechai

    2004-01-01

    The term "random" is frequently used in discussion of the theory of evolution, even though the mathematical concept of randomness is problematic and of little relevance in the theory. Therefore, since the core concept of the theory of evolution is the non-random process of natural selection, the term random should not be used in teaching the…

  10. Tetrapyrrole Signaling in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles make critical contributions to a number of important processes in diverse organisms. In plants, tetrapyrroles are essential for light signaling, the detoxification of reactive oxygen species, the assimilation of nitrate and sulfate, respiration, photosynthesis, and programed cell death. The misregulation of tetrapyrrole metabolism can produce toxic reactive oxygen species. Thus, it is not surprising that tetrapyrrole metabolism is strictly regulated and that tetrapyrrole metabolism affects signaling mechanisms that regulate gene expression. In plants and algae, tetrapyrroles are synthesized in plastids and were some of the first plastid signals demonstrated to regulate nuclear gene expression. In plants, the mechanism of tetrapyrrole-dependent plastid-to-nucleus signaling remains poorly understood. Additionally, some of experiments that tested ideas for possible signaling mechanisms appeared to produce conflicting data. In some instances, these conflicts are potentially explained by different experimental conditions. Although the biological function of tetrapyrrole signaling is poorly understood, there is compelling evidence that this signaling is significant. Specifically, this signaling appears to affect the accumulation of starch and may promote abiotic stress tolerance. Tetrapyrrole-dependent plastid-to-nucleus signaling interacts with a distinct plastid-to-nucleus signaling mechanism that depends on GENOMES UNCUOPLED1 (GUN1). GUN1 contributes to a variety of processes, such as chloroplast biogenesis, the circadian rhythm, abiotic stress tolerance, and development. Thus, the contribution of tetrapyrrole signaling to plant function is potentially broader than we currently appreciate. In this review, I discuss these aspects of tetrapyrrole signaling. PMID:27807442

  11. Generating "Random" Integers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Martin

    2011-01-01

    One of the author's undergraduate students recently asked him whether it was possible to generate a random positive integer. After some thought, the author realised that there were plenty of interesting mathematical ideas inherent in her question. So much so in fact, that the author decided to organise a workshop, open both to undergraduates and…

  12. Randomization and sampling issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    The need for randomly selected routes and other sampling issues have been debated by the Amphibian electronic discussion group. Many excellent comments have been made, pro and con, but we have not reached consensus yet. This paper brings those comments together and attempts a synthesis. I hope that the resulting discussion will bring us closer to a consensus.

  13. Randomness Of Amoeba Movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiguchi, S.; Khadijah, Siti; Kuwajima, T.; Ohki, M.; Tacano, M.; Sikula, J.

    2005-11-01

    Movements of amoebas were automatically traced using the difference between two successive frames of the microscopic movie. It was observed that the movements were almost random in that the directions and the magnitudes of the successive two steps are not correlated, and that the distance from the origin was proportional to the square root of the step number.

  14. Randomized branch sampling

    Treesearch

    Harry T. Valentine

    2002-01-01

    Randomized branch sampling (RBS) is a special application of multistage probability sampling (see Sampling, environmental), which was developed originally by Jessen [3] to estimate fruit counts on individual orchard trees. In general, the method can be used to obtain estimates of many different attributes of trees or other branched plants. The usual objective of RBS is...

  15. Random lattice superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Haidong; Siegel, Warren

    2006-08-15

    We propose some new simplifying ingredients for Feynman diagrams that seem necessary for random lattice formulations of superstrings. In particular, half the fermionic variables appear only in particle loops (similarly to loop momenta), reducing the supersymmetry of the constituents of the type IIB superstring to N=1, as expected from their interpretation in the 1/N expansion as super Yang-Mills.

  16. Statistical physics approaches to understanding physiological signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi

    This thesis applies novel statistical physics approaches to investigate complex mechanisms underlying some physiological signals related to human motor activity and stroke. The scale-invariant properties of motor activity fluctuations and the phase coupling between blood flow (BF) in the brain and blood pressure (BP) at the finger are studied. Both BF and BP signals are controlled by cerebral autoregulation, the impairment of which is relevant to stroke. Part I of this thesis introduces experimental methods of assessing human activity fluctuations, BF and BP signals. These signals are often nonstationary, i.e., the mean and the standard deviation of signals are not invariant under time shifts. This fact imposes challenges in correctly analyzing properties of such signals. A review of conventional methods and the methods from statistical physics in quantifying long-range power-law correlations (an important scale-invariant property) and phase coupling in nonstationary signals is provided. Part II investigates the effects of trends, nonstationarities and applying certain nonlinear filters on the scale-invariant properties of signals. Nonlinear logarithmic filters are shown to change correlation properties of anti-correlated signals and strongly positively-correlated signals. It is also shown that different types of trends may change correlation properties and thus mask true correlations in the original signal. A "superposition rule" is established to quantitatively describe the relationship among correlation properties of any two signals and the sum of these two signals. Based on this rule, simulations are conducted to show how to distinguish the correlations due to trends and nonstationaries from the true correlations in the real world signals. Part III investigates dynamics of human activity fluctuations. Results suggest that apparently random forearm motion possesses previously unrecognized dynamic patterns characterized by common distribution forms, scale

  17. Satellite signaling at synapses

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor-Giles, Kate M.; Ganetzky, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Neural function requires effective communication between neurons and their targets at synapses. Thus, proper formation, growth and plasticity of synapses are critical to behavior. A retrograde (muscle to neuron) BMP signal is required to promote synaptic growth, homeostasis and stability at Drosophila neuromuscular junctions (NMJs).1-4 We recently demonstrated that this signal constitutes an instructive signal that sculpts synaptic growth in a graded manner and uncovered a presynaptic endocytic mechanism that modulates BMP signaling levels. In the absence of this regulation, excessive BMP signaling results in overgrown NMJs with a proliferation of ectopic boutons.5 PMID:20798607

  18. 77 FR 42694 - Helena National Forest, Montana, Telegraph Vegetation Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... trees followed by prescribed burning within the Jericho Mountain Inventoried Roadless Area. The Helena... mountain pine beetle outbreak in this area by recovering economic value of dead and dying trees, promoting... through Friday. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose and Need for Action Wide-scale tree mortality...

  19. Acoustic Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, William M.; Candy, James V.

    Signal processing refers to the acquisition, storage, display, and generation of signals - also to the extraction of information from signals and the re-encoding of information. As such, signal processing in some form is an essential element in the practice of all aspects of acoustics. Signal processing algorithms enable acousticians to separate signals from noise, to perform automatic speech recognition, or to compress information for more efficient storage or transmission. Signal processing concepts are the building blocks used to construct models of speech and hearing. Now, in the 21st century, all signal processing is effectively digital signal processing. Widespread access to high-speed processing, massive memory, and inexpensive software make signal processing procedures of enormous sophistication and power available to anyone who wants to use them. Because advanced signal processing is now accessible to everybody, there is a need for primers that introduce basic mathematical concepts that underlie the digital algorithms. The present handbook chapter is intended to serve such a purpose.

  20. Neuronal signaling through endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cosker, Katharina E; Segal, Rosalind A

    2014-02-01

    The distinctive morphology of neurons, with complex dendritic arbors and extensive axons, presents spatial challenges for intracellular signal transduction. The endosomal system provides mechanisms that enable signaling molecules initiated by extracellular cues to be trafficked throughout the expanse of the neuron, allowing intracellular signals to be sustained over long distances. Therefore endosomes are critical for many aspects of neuronal signaling that regulate cell survival, axonal growth and guidance, dendritic branching, and cell migration. An intriguing characteristic of neuronal signal transduction is that endosomal trafficking enables physiological responses that vary based on the subcellular location of signal initiation. In this review, we will discuss the specialized mechanisms and the functional significance of endosomal signaling in neurons, both during normal development and in disease.

  1. Neuronal Signaling through Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Cosker, Katharina E.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2014-01-01

    The distinctive morphology of neurons, with complex dendritic arbors and extensive axons, presents spatial challenges for intracellular signal transduction. The endosomal system provides mechanisms that enable signaling molecules initiated by extracellular cues to be trafficked throughout the expanse of the neuron, allowing intracellular signals to be sustained over long distances. Therefore endosomes are critical for many aspects of neuronal signaling that regulate cell survival, axonal growth and guidance, dendritic branching, and cell migration. An intriguing characteristic of neuronal signal transduction is that endosomal trafficking enables physiological responses that vary based on the subcellular location of signal initiation. In this review, we will discuss the specialized mechanisms and the functional significance of endosomal signaling in neurons, both during normal development and in disease. PMID:24492712

  2. Signal processing for smart cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quisquater, Jean-Jacques; Samyde, David

    2003-06-01

    In 1998, Paul Kocher showed that when a smart card computes cryptographic algorithms, for signatures or encryption, its consumption or its radiations leak information. The keys or the secrets hidden in the card can then be recovered using a differential measurement based on the intercorrelation function. A lot of silicon manufacturers use desynchronization countermeasures to defeat power analysis. In this article we detail a new resynchronization technic. This method can be used to facilitate the use of a neural network to do the code recognition. It becomes possible to reverse engineer a software code automatically. Using data and clock separation methods, we show how to optimize the synchronization using signal processing. Then we compare these methods with watermarking methods for 1D and 2D signal. The very last watermarking detection improvements can be applied to signal processing for smart cards with very few modifications. Bayesian processing is one of the best ways to do Differential Power Analysis, and it is possible to extract a PIN code from a smart card in very few samples. So this article shows the need to continue to set up effective countermeasures for cryptographic processors. Although the idea to use advanced signal processing operators has been commonly known for a long time, no publication explains that results can be obtained. The main idea of differential measurement is to use the cross-correlation of two random variables and to repeat consumption measurements on the processor to be analyzed. We use two processors clocked at the same external frequency and computing the same data. The applications of our design are numerous. Two measurements provide the inputs of a central operator. With the most accurate operator we can improve the signal noise ratio, re-synchronize the acquisition clock with the internal one, or remove jitter. The analysis based on consumption or electromagnetic measurements can be improved using our structure. At first sight

  3. Random template banks and relaxed lattice coverings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messenger, C.; Prix, R.; Papa, M. A.

    2009-05-01

    Template-based searches for gravitational waves are often limited by the computational cost associated with searching large parameter spaces. The study of efficient template banks, in the sense of using the smallest number of templates, is therefore of great practical interest. The traditional approach to template-bank construction requires every point in parameter space to be covered by at least one template, which rapidly becomes inefficient at higher dimensions. Here we study an alternative approach, where any point in parameter space is covered only with a given probability η<1. We find that by giving up complete coverage in this way, large reductions in the number of templates are possible, especially at higher dimensions. The prime examples studied here are random template banks in which templates are placed randomly with uniform probability over the parameter space. In addition to its obvious simplicity, this method turns out to be surprisingly efficient. We analyze the statistical properties of such random template banks, and compare their efficiency to traditional lattice coverings. We further study relaxed lattice coverings (using Zn and An* lattices), which similarly cover any signal location only with probability η. The relaxed An* lattice is found to yield the most efficient template banks at low dimensions (n≲10), while random template banks increasingly outperform any other method at higher dimensions.

  4. Random template banks and relaxed lattice coverings

    SciTech Connect

    Messenger, C.; Prix, R.; Papa, M. A.

    2009-05-15

    Template-based searches for gravitational waves are often limited by the computational cost associated with searching large parameter spaces. The study of efficient template banks, in the sense of using the smallest number of templates, is therefore of great practical interest. The traditional approach to template-bank construction requires every point in parameter space to be covered by at least one template, which rapidly becomes inefficient at higher dimensions. Here we study an alternative approach, where any point in parameter space is covered only with a given probability {eta}<1. We find that by giving up complete coverage in this way, large reductions in the number of templates are possible, especially at higher dimensions. The prime examples studied here are random template banks in which templates are placed randomly with uniform probability over the parameter space. In addition to its obvious simplicity, this method turns out to be surprisingly efficient. We analyze the statistical properties of such random template banks, and compare their efficiency to traditional lattice coverings. We further study relaxed lattice coverings (using Z{sub n} and A{sub n}* lattices), which similarly cover any signal location only with probability {eta}. The relaxed A{sub n}* lattice is found to yield the most efficient template banks at low dimensions (n < or approx. 10), while random template banks increasingly outperform any other method at higher dimensions.

  5. Universal microbial diagnostics using random DNA probes

    PubMed Central

    Aghazadeh, Amirali; Lin, Adam Y.; Sheikh, Mona A.; Chen, Allen L.; Atkins, Lisa M.; Johnson, Coreen L.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Drezek, Rebekah A.; Baraniuk, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Early identification of pathogens is essential for limiting development of therapy-resistant pathogens and mitigating infectious disease outbreaks. Most bacterial detection schemes use target-specific probes to differentiate pathogen species, creating time and cost inefficiencies in identifying newly discovered organisms. We present a novel universal microbial diagnostics (UMD) platform to screen for microbial organisms in an infectious sample, using a small number of random DNA probes that are agnostic to the target DNA sequences. Our platform leverages the theory of sparse signal recovery (compressive sensing) to identify the composition of a microbial sample that potentially contains novel or mutant species. We validated the UMD platform in vitro using five random probes to recover 11 pathogenic bacteria. We further demonstrated in silico that UMD can be generalized to screen for common human pathogens in different taxonomy levels. UMD’s unorthodox sensing approach opens the door to more efficient and universal molecular diagnostics. PMID:27704040

  6. Random matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelman, Alan; Rao, N. Raj

    Random matrix theory is now a big subject with applications in many disciplines of science, engineering and finance. This article is a survey specifically oriented towards the needs and interests of a numerical analyst. This survey includes some original material not found anywhere else. We include the important mathematics which is a very modern development, as well as the computational software that is transforming the theory into useful practice.

  7. Random equations in aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bharucha-Reid, A. T.

    1984-01-01

    Literature was reviewed to identify aerodynamic models which might be treated by probablistic methods. The numerical solution of some integral equations that arise in aerodynamical problems were investigated. On the basis of the numerical studies a qualitative theory of random integral equations was developed to provide information on the behavior of the solutions of these equations (in particular, boundary and asymptotic behavior, and stability) and their statistical properties without actually obtaining explicit solutions of the equations.

  8. Telephone multiline signaling using common signal pair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodloe, R. R.; Toole, P. C.; Belt, J. L.; Leininger, D. B. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An operator can rapidly and automatically produce coded electrical signals by manipulating mechanical thumb wheel switches so as to instruct a service center to connect any number of telephone lines to the console thus enabling the operator to listen and/or talk over several lines simultaneously. The system includes an on-site console having several mechanically operated thumb wheel switches to which the desired lines to be connected can be dialed in. Electrical coded signals are fed to a number of banks of line AND gates representing units, tens and hundreds, a group of channel gates, and a command gate. These signals are gated out in a controlled manner to an encoder which generates tones that are transmitted over a single line to a communication service center.

  9. Diffusion in random networks

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Duan Z.; Padrino, Juan C.

    2017-06-01

    The ensemble averaging technique is applied to model mass transport by diffusion in random networks. The system consists of an ensemble of random networks, where each network is made of pockets connected by tortuous channels. Inside a channel, fluid transport is assumed to be governed by the one-dimensional diffusion equation. Mass balance leads to an integro-differential equation for the pocket mass density. The so-called dual-porosity model is found to be equivalent to the leading order approximation of the integration kernel when the diffusion time scale inside the channels is small compared to the macroscopic time scale. As a test problem,more » we consider the one-dimensional mass diffusion in a semi-infinite domain. Because of the required time to establish the linear concentration profile inside a channel, for early times the similarity variable is xt$-$1/4 rather than xt$-$1/2 as in the traditional theory. We found this early time similarity can be explained by random walk theory through the network.« less

  10. Quantitation of signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Krauss, S; Brand, M D

    2000-12-01

    Conventional qualitative approaches to signal transduction provide powerful ways to explore the architecture and function of signaling pathways. However, at the level of the complete system, they do not fully depict the interactions between signaling and metabolic pathways and fail to give a manageable overview of the complexity that is often a feature of cellular signal transduction. Here, we introduce a quantitative experimental approach to signal transduction that helps to overcome these difficulties. We present a quantitative analysis of signal transduction during early mitogen stimulation of lymphocytes, with steady-state respiration rate as a convenient marker of metabolic stimulation. First, by inhibiting various key signaling pathways, we measure their relative importance in regulating respiration. About 80% of the input signal is conveyed via identifiable routes: 50% through pathways sensitive to inhibitors of protein kinase C and MAP kinase and 30% through pathways sensitive to an inhibitor of calcineurin. Second, we quantify how each of these pathways differentially stimulates functional units of reactions that produce and consume a key intermediate in respiration: the mitochondrial membrane potential. Both the PKC and calcineurin routes stimulate consumption more strongly than production, whereas the unidentified signaling routes stimulate production more than consumption, leading to no change in membrane potential despite increased respiration rate. The approach allows a quantitative description of the relative importance of signal transduction pathways and the routes by which they activate a specific cellular process. It should be widely applicable.

  11. Random Walks in Model Brain Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Farida; Farrher, Ezequiel; Oros-Peusquens, Ana-Maria; Shah, N. Jon

    2011-03-01

    The propagation of water molecules in the brain and the corresponding NMR response are affected by many factors such as compartmentalization, restrictions and anisotropy imposed by the cellular microstructure. Interfacial interactions with cell membranes and exchange additionally come into play. Due to the complexity of the underlying factors, a differentiation between the various contributions to the average NMR signal in in vivo studies represents a difficult task. In this work we perform random-walk Monte Carlo simulations in well-defined model systems aiming at establishing quantitative relations between dynamics and microstructure. The results are compared with experimental data obtained for artificial anisotropic model systems.

  12. Random versus directionally persistent cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Ryan J.; Doyle, Andrew D.; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2009-01-01

    Directional migration is an important component of cell motility. Although the basic mechanisms of random cell movement are well characterized, no single model explains the complex regulation of directional migration. Multiple factors operate at each step of cell migration to stabilize lamellipodia and maintain directional migration. Factors such as topography of the extracellular matrix, the cellular polarity machinery, receptor signalling, integrin trafficking and co-receptors, and actin–myosin contraction converge on regulation of the Rho family of GTPases and control of lamellipodial protrusions to promote directional migration. PMID:19603038

  13. Performance of random multiple access transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinainitisart, N.; Wu, W. W.

    1990-01-01

    The performance of the Random Multiple Access (RMA) technique, applied to a direct terminal-to-terminal link with a large number of potential users, is determined. The average signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is derived. Under Gaussian assumption, the approximation of the probability of error is given. The analysis shows that the system performance is affected by the sequence length, the number of simultaneous users, and the number of cochannel symbols, but is not sensitive to the thermal noise. The performance of using very small aperture antenna for both transmitting and receiving without a hub station is given.

  14. Theory of optimum radio reception methods in random noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutkin, L. S.

    1982-09-01

    The theory of optimum methods of reception of signals on the background of random noise, widely used in development of any radioelectronic systems and devices based on reception and transmission of information (radar and radio controlled, radio communications, radio telemetry, radio astronomy, television, and other systems), as well as electroacoustical and wire communications sytems, is presented. Optimum linear and nonlinear filtration, binary and comples signal detection and discrimination, estimation of signal parameters, receiver synthesis for incomplete a priori data, special features of synthesis with respect to certain quality indicators, and other problems are examined.

  15. Randomness Amplification under Minimal Fundamental Assumptions on the Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, Ravishankar; Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Horodecki, Karol; Horodecki, Michał; Horodecki, Paweł; Wojewódka, Hanna

    2016-12-01

    Recently, the physically realistic protocol amplifying the randomness of Santha-Vazirani sources producing cryptographically secure random bits was proposed; however, for reasons of practical relevance, the crucial question remained open regarding whether this can be accomplished under the minimal conditions necessary for the task. Namely, is it possible to achieve randomness amplification using only two no-signaling components and in a situation where the violation of a Bell inequality only guarantees that some outcomes of the device for specific inputs exhibit randomness? Here, we solve this question and present a device-independent protocol for randomness amplification of Santha-Vazirani sources using a device consisting of two nonsignaling components. We show that the protocol can amplify any such source that is not fully deterministic into a fully random source while tolerating a constant noise rate and prove the composable security of the protocol against general no-signaling adversaries. Our main innovation is the proof that even the partial randomness certified by the two-party Bell test [a single input-output pair (u* , x* ) for which the conditional probability P (x*|u*) is bounded away from 1 for all no-signaling strategies that optimally violate the Bell inequality] can be used for amplification. We introduce the methodology of a partial tomographic procedure on the empirical statistics obtained in the Bell test that ensures that the outputs constitute a linear min-entropy source of randomness. As a technical novelty that may be of independent interest, we prove that the Santha-Vazirani source satisfies an exponential concentration property given by a recently discovered generalized Chernoff bound.

  16. The RANDOM computer program: A linear congruential random number generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, R. F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The RANDOM Computer Program is a FORTRAN program for generating random number sequences and testing linear congruential random number generators (LCGs). The linear congruential form of random number generator is discussed, and the selection of parameters of an LCG for a microcomputer described. This document describes the following: (1) The RANDOM Computer Program; (2) RANDOM.MOD, the computer code needed to implement an LCG in a FORTRAN program; and (3) The RANCYCLE and the ARITH Computer Programs that provide computational assistance in the selection of parameters for an LCG. The RANDOM, RANCYCLE, and ARITH Computer Programs are written in Microsoft FORTRAN for the IBM PC microcomputer and its compatibles. With only minor modifications, the RANDOM Computer Program and its LCG can be run on most micromputers or mainframe computers.

  17. Certified randomness in quantum physics.

    PubMed

    Acín, Antonio; Masanes, Lluis

    2016-12-07

    The concept of randomness plays an important part in many disciplines. On the one hand, the question of whether random processes exist is fundamental for our understanding of nature. On the other, randomness is a resource for cryptography, algorithms and simulations. Standard methods for generating randomness rely on assumptions about the devices that are often not valid in practice. However, quantum technologies enable new methods for generating certified randomness, based on the violation of Bell inequalities. These methods are referred to as device-independent because they do not rely on any modelling of the devices. Here we review efforts to design device-independent randomness generators and the associated challenges.

  18. Certified randomness in quantum physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acín, Antonio; Masanes, Lluis

    2016-12-01

    The concept of randomness plays an important part in many disciplines. On the one hand, the question of whether random processes exist is fundamental for our understanding of nature. On the other, randomness is a resource for cryptography, algorithms and simulations. Standard methods for generating randomness rely on assumptions about the devices that are often not valid in practice. However, quantum technologies enable new methods for generating certified randomness, based on the violation of Bell inequalities. These methods are referred to as device-independent because they do not rely on any modelling of the devices. Here we review efforts to design device-independent randomness generators and the associated challenges.

  19. Wnt signaling in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, T; Rindtorff, N; Boutros, M

    2017-01-01

    Wnt signaling is one of the key cascades regulating development and stemness, and has also been tightly associated with cancer. The role of Wnt signaling in carcinogenesis has most prominently been described for colorectal cancer, but aberrant Wnt signaling is observed in many more cancer entities. Here, we review current insights into novel components of Wnt pathways and describe their impact on cancer development. Furthermore, we highlight expanding functions of Wnt signaling for both solid and liquid tumors. We also describe current findings how Wnt signaling affects maintenance of cancer stem cells, metastasis and immune control. Finally, we provide an overview of current strategies to antagonize Wnt signaling in cancer and challenges that are associated with such approaches. PMID:27617575

  20. [Growth hormone signaling pathways].

    PubMed

    Zych, Sławomir; Szatkowska, Iwona; Czerniawska-Piatkowska, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    The substantial improvement in the studies on a very complicated mechanism-- growth hormone signaling in a cell, has been noted in last decade. GH-induced signaling is characterized by activation of several pathways, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), the signal transducer and activator of transcription and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3) pathways. This review shows a current model of the growth hormone receptor dimerization, rotation of subunits and JAK2 kinase activation as the initial steps in the cascade of events. In the next stages of the signaling process, the GH-(GHR)2-(JAK2)2 complex may activate signaling molecules such as Stat, IRS-1 and IRS-2, and particularly all cascade proteins that activate MAP kinase. These pathways regulate basal cellular functions including target gene transcription, enzymatic activity and metabolite transport. Therefore growth hormone is considered as a major regulator of postnatal growth and metabolism, probably for mammary gland growth and development too.

  1. Optical signal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses several optical configurations used for signal processing. Electronic-to-optical transducers are outlined, noting fixed window transducers and moving window acousto-optic transducers. Folded spectrum techniques are considered, with reference to wideband RF signal analysis, fetal electroencephalogram analysis, engine vibration analysis, signal buried in noise, and spatial filtering. Various methods for radar signal processing are described, such as phased-array antennas, the optical processing of phased-array data, pulsed Doppler and FM radar systems, a multichannel one-dimensional optical correlator, correlations with long coded waveforms, and Doppler signal processing. Means for noncoherent optical signal processing are noted, including an optical correlator for speech recognition and a noncoherent optical correlator.

  2. Random access codes and nonlocal resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Anubhav; Pawlowski, Marcin; Horodecki, Karol

    2017-08-01

    This work explores the notion of inter-convertibility between a cryptographic primitive: the random access code (RAC) and bipartite no-signaling nonlocal resources. To this end we introduce two generalizations of the Popescu-Rohrlich box (PR) and investigate their relation with the corresponding RACs. The first generalization is based on the number of Alice's input bits; we refer to it as the Bn-box. We show that the no-signaling condition imposes an equivalence between the Bn-box and the (n →1 ) RAC (encoding of n input bits to 1 bit of message). As an application we show that (n -1 ) PRs supplemented with one bit communication are necessary and sufficient to win a (n →1 ) RAC with certainty. Furthermore, we present a signaling instant of a perfectly working (n →1 ) RAC which cannot simulate the Bn-box, thus showing that it is weaker than its no-signaling counterpart. For the second generalization we replace Alice's input bits with d its (d -leveled classical systems); we call this the Bnd-box. In this case the no-signaling condition is not enough to enforce an equivalence between the Bnd-box and (n →1 ,d ) RAC (encoding of n input d its to 1 d it of message); i.e., while the Bnd-box can win a (n →1 ,d ) RAC with certainty, not all no-signaling instances of a (n →1 ,d ) RAC can simulate the Bnd-box. We use resource inequalities to quantitatively capture these results.

  3. Nimbus 6 Random Access Measurement System applications experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cote, C. E. (Editor); Taylor, R. (Editor); Gilbert, E. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The advantages of a technique in which data collection platforms randomly transmit signal to a polar orbiting satellite, thus eliminating satellite interrogation are demonstrated in investigations of the atmosphere; oceanographic parameters; Arctic regions and ice conditions; navigation and position location; and data buoy development.

  4. Optical Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-28

    compatible with the laser cation in the on-line inspection of products such as source. Thus, if the laser wavelength is z850 nm, hypodermic needles ...content for cw signals, short pulse signals, and evolving pulse signals - - the most difficult ones to analyze. We performed an extensive analysis on a...agreer.nt with the theory , and support our claims concerning the high performance level of our acousto-optir. architecture. We recognized the opportunity to

  5. Signaling Mechanisms for Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Chun-Lin; Iijima, Miho

    2011-01-01

    Cells recognize external chemical gradients and translate these environmental cues into amplified intracellular signaling that results in elongated cell shape, actin polymerization toward the leading edge, and movement along the gradient. Mechanisms underlying chemotaxis are conserved evolutionarily from Dictyostelium amoeba to mammalian neutrophils. Recent studies have uncovered several parallel intracellular signaling pathways that crosstalk in chemotaxing cells. Here, we review these signaling mechanisms in Dictyostelium discoideum. PMID:21585354

  6. Randomizing Roaches: Exploring the "Bugs" of Randomization in Experimental Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagler, Amy; Wagler, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the roles of random selection and random assignment in experimental design is a central learning objective in most introductory statistics courses. This article describes an activity, appropriate for a high school or introductory statistics course, designed to teach the concepts, values and pitfalls of random selection and assignment…

  7. Randomizing Roaches: Exploring the "Bugs" of Randomization in Experimental Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagler, Amy; Wagler, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the roles of random selection and random assignment in experimental design is a central learning objective in most introductory statistics courses. This article describes an activity, appropriate for a high school or introductory statistics course, designed to teach the concepts, values and pitfalls of random selection and assignment…

  8. Danger signals in stroke.

    PubMed

    Gelderblom, Mathias; Sobey, Christopher G; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Magnus, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Danger molecules are the first signals released from dying tissue after stroke. These danger signals bind to receptors on immune cells that will result in their activation and the release of inflammatory and neurotoxic mediators, resulting in amplification of the immune response and subsequent enlargement of the damaged brain volume. The release of danger signals is a central event that leads to a multitude of signals and cascades in the affected and neighbouring tissue, therefore providing a potential target for therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Slit-Robo signaling.

    PubMed

    Blockus, Heike; Chédotal, Alain

    2016-09-01

    Slits are secreted proteins that bind to Roundabout (Robo) receptors. Slit-Robo signaling is best known for mediating axon repulsion in the developing nervous system. However, in recent years the functional repertoire of Slits and Robo has expanded tremendously and Slit-Robo signaling has been linked to roles in neurogenesis, angiogenesis and cancer progression among other processes. Likewise, our mechanistic understanding of Slit-Robo signaling has progressed enormously. Here, we summarize new insights into Slit-Robo evolutionary and system-dependent diversity, receptor-ligand interactions, signaling crosstalk and receptor activation.

  10. Cell signaling and cytotoxicity by peroxynitrite.

    PubMed Central

    Cantoni, Orazio; Palomba, Letizia; Guidarelli, Andrea; Tommasini, Ilaria; Cerioni, Liana; Sestili, Piero

    2002-01-01

    Reactive nitrogen species are now considered to play an important role in various pathologies. Although the pathological significance of these molecules, peroxynitrite in particular, has long been attributed to their abilities to react with any component of the cells, including lipids, proteins, and DNA, a paradigm shift has recently been occurring whereby reactive nitrogen species are appreciated as signaling molecules. The question therefore arises as to whether nitrosative stress is indeed the result of a random (stochastic) process of cell damage, as it has traditionally been viewed, or rather is a consequence of the specific activation of a cascade of signaling events. The above considerations have provided the bases for the research work performed in our laboratory, and the results obtained are illustrated in the present article. In particular, our results indicate that some effects of peroxynitrite are not directly mediated by the oxidant; rather, it appears that peroxynitrite triggers a signaling pathway that finally leads to cytotoxicity. PMID:12426139

  11. Fractal Signals & Space-Time Cartoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oetama, -Hc, Jakob, , Dr; Maksoed, Wh-

    2016-03-01

    In ``Theory of Scale Relativity'', 1991- L. Nottale states whereas ``scale relativity is a geometrical & fractal space-time theory''. It took in comparisons to ``a unified, wavelet based framework for efficiently synthetizing, analyzing ∖7 processing several broad classes of fractal signals''-Gregory W. Wornell:``Signal Processing with Fractals'', 1995. Furthers, in Fig 1.1. a simple waveform from statistically scale-invariant random process [ibid.,h 3 ]. Accompanying RLE Technical Report 566 ``Synthesis, Analysis & Processing of Fractal Signals'' as well as from Wornell, Oct 1991 herewith intended to deducts =a Δt + (1 - β Δ t) ...in Petersen, et.al: ``Scale invariant properties of public debt growth'',2010 h. 38006p2 to [1/{1- (2 α (λ) /3 π) ln (λ/r)}depicts in Laurent Nottale,1991, h 24. Acknowledgment devotes to theLates HE. Mr. BrigadierGeneral-TNI[rtd].Prof. Ir. HANDOJO.

  12. Identifying Potential Noise Sources within Acoustic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, Victoria; Lewalle, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    We test a new algorithm for its ability to detect sources of noise within random background. The goal of these tests is to better understand how to identify sources within acoustic signals while simultaneously determining the strengths and weaknesses of the algorithm in question. Unlike previously published algorithms, the antenna method does not pinpoint events by looking for the most energetic portions of a signal. The algorithm searches for the ideal lag combinations between three signals by taking excerpts of possible events. The excerpt with the lowest calculated minimum distance between possible events is how the algorithm identifies sources. At the minimum distance, the events are close in time and frequency. This method can be compared to the cross correlation and denoising methods to better understand its effectiveness. This work is supported in part by Spectral Energies LLC, under an SBIR grant from AFRL, as well as the Syracuse University MAE department.

  13. Challenges of cluster randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Cluster randomized trials are trials that randomize clusters of people, rather than individuals. They are becoming increasingly common. A number of innovations have been developed recently, particularly in the calculation of the required size of a cluster trial, the handling of missing data, designs to minimize recruitment bias, the ethics of cluster randomized trials and the stepped wedge design. This article will highlight and illustrate these developments. It will also discuss issues with regards to the reporting of cluster randomized trials.

  14. Random recursive trees and the elephant random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürsten, Rüdiger

    2016-03-01

    One class of random walks with infinite memory, so-called elephant random walks, are simple models describing anomalous diffusion. We present a surprising connection between these models and bond percolation on random recursive trees. We use a coupling between the two models to translate results from elephant random walks to the percolation process. We calculate, besides other quantities, exact expressions for the first and the second moment of the root cluster size and of the number of nodes in child clusters of the first generation. We further introduce another model, the skew elephant random walk, and calculate the first and second moment of this process.

  15. Randomly hyperbranched polymers.

    PubMed

    Konkolewicz, Dominik; Gilbert, Robert G; Gray-Weale, Angus

    2007-06-08

    We describe a model for the structures of randomly hyperbranched polymers in solution, and find a logarithmic growth of radius with polymer mass. We include segmental overcrowding, which puts an upper limit on the density. The model is tested against simulations, against data on amylopectin, a major component of starch, on glycogen, and on polyglycerols. For samples of synthetic polyglycerol and glycogen, our model holds well for all the available data. The model reveals higher-level scaling structure in glycogen, related to the beta particles seen in electron microscopy.

  16. Randomly Hyperbranched Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konkolewicz, Dominik; Gilbert, Robert G.; Gray-Weale, Angus

    2007-06-01

    We describe a model for the structures of randomly hyperbranched polymers in solution, and find a logarithmic growth of radius with polymer mass. We include segmental overcrowding, which puts an upper limit on the density. The model is tested against simulations, against data on amylopectin, a major component of starch, on glycogen, and on polyglycerols. For samples of synthetic polyglycerol and glycogen, our model holds well for all the available data. The model reveals higher-level scaling structure in glycogen, related to the β particles seen in electron microscopy.

  17. Random Numbers and Quantum Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Mark; Glass, David

    2002-01-01

    The topic of random numbers is investigated in such a way as to illustrate links between mathematics, physics and computer science. First, the generation of random numbers by a classical computer using the linear congruential generator and logistic map is considered. It is noted that these procedures yield only pseudo-random numbers since…

  18. Investigating the Randomness of Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendleton, Kenn L.

    2009-01-01

    The use of random numbers is pervasive in today's world. Random numbers have practical applications in such far-flung arenas as computer simulations, cryptography, gambling, the legal system, statistical sampling, and even the war on terrorism. Evaluating the randomness of extremely large samples is a complex, intricate process. However, the…

  19. Wireless Network Security Using Randomness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-19

    REPORT WIRELESS NETWORK SECURITY USING RANDOMNESS 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The present invention provides systems and methods for... securing communications in a wireless network by utilizing the inherent randomness of propagation errors to enable legitimate users to dynamically...Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Patent, security , wireless networks, randomness Sheng Xiao, Weibo Gong

  20. Randomness and Non-Locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senno, Gabriel; Bendersky, Ariel; Figueira, Santiago

    2016-07-01

    The concepts of randomness and non-locality are intimately intertwined outcomes of randomly chosen measurements over entangled systems exhibiting non-local correlations are, if we preclude instantaneous influence between distant measurement choices and outcomes, random. In this paper, we survey some recent advances in the knowledge of the interplay between these two important notions from a quantum information science perspective.

  1. Investigating the Randomness of Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendleton, Kenn L.

    2009-01-01

    The use of random numbers is pervasive in today's world. Random numbers have practical applications in such far-flung arenas as computer simulations, cryptography, gambling, the legal system, statistical sampling, and even the war on terrorism. Evaluating the randomness of extremely large samples is a complex, intricate process. However, the…

  2. Random Numbers and Quantum Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Mark; Glass, David

    2002-01-01

    The topic of random numbers is investigated in such a way as to illustrate links between mathematics, physics and computer science. First, the generation of random numbers by a classical computer using the linear congruential generator and logistic map is considered. It is noted that these procedures yield only pseudo-random numbers since…

  3. Random Selection for Drug Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    Simple random sampling is generally the starting point for a random sampling process. This sampling technique ensures that each individual within a group (population) has an equal chance of being selected. There are a variety of ways to implement random sampling in a practical situation.

  4. Signaling by Gasotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Asif K.; Gadalla, Moataz M.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide is well established as a major signaling molecule. Evidence is accumulating that carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide also are physiologic mediators in the cardiovascular, immune, and nervous systems. This Review focuses on mechanisms whereby they signal by binding to metal centers in metalloproteins, such as in guanylyl cyclase, or modifying sulfhydryl groups in protein targets. PMID:19401594

  5. MBA Quality Signals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Randall S.

    1998-01-01

    A study identified quality signals for master's programs in business administration (MBAs). Traditional scholarly oriented academic signals are apparently not valued as such by external customer groups. MBA academic quality appears to be a multidimensional construct, with subdimensions of real-worldness; placement; student satisfaction; and…

  6. Geophysical Signal Recognition,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    quite helpful in the magnetosphere. Detecting a particular in earthquake prediction . However pattern recog- micropulsation event can provide a diagnosis...bio- In su..a.iry, application of pattern recognition to medical signals, progress in geophysical signal earthquake prediction is in its infancy

  7. MBA Quality Signals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Randall S.

    1998-01-01

    A study identified quality signals for master's programs in business administration (MBAs). Traditional scholarly oriented academic signals are apparently not valued as such by external customer groups. MBA academic quality appears to be a multidimensional construct, with subdimensions of real-worldness; placement; student satisfaction; and…

  8. Instant Random Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Nils H.

    2010-12-01

    Information is carried by matter or by energy and thus Einstein stated that "no information can travel faster than light." He also was very critical to the "Spooky action at distance" as described in Quantum Physics. However, many verified experiments have proven that the "Spooky actions" not only work at distance but also that they travel at a velocity faster than light, probably at infinite velocity. Examples are Young's fringes at low light levels or entanglements. My explanation is that this information is without energy. In the following I will refer to this spooky information as exformation, where "ex-" refers to existence, the information is not transported in any way, it simply exists. Thus Einstein might have been wrong when he stated that no information can travel faster than light. But he was right in that no detectable information can travel faster than light. Phenomena connected to entanglement appear at first to be exceptions, but in those cases the information can not be reconstructed until energy is later sent in the form of correlation using ordinary information at the velocity of light. In entanglement we see that even if the exformation can not be detected directly because its luck of energy it still can influence what happens at random, because in Quantum Physics there is by definition no energy difference between two states that happen randomly.

  9. Fragmentation of random trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalay, Z.; Ben-Naim, E.

    2015-01-01

    We study fragmentation of a random recursive tree into a forest by repeated removal of nodes. The initial tree consists of N nodes and it is generated by sequential addition of nodes with each new node attaching to a randomly-selected existing node. As nodes are removed from the tree, one at a time, the tree dissolves into an ensemble of separate trees, namely, a forest. We study statistical properties of trees and nodes in this heterogeneous forest, and find that the fraction of remaining nodes m characterizes the system in the limit N\\to ∞ . We obtain analytically the size density {{φ }s} of trees of size s. The size density has power-law tail {{φ }s}˜ {{s}-α } with exponent α =1+\\frac{1}{m}. Therefore, the tail becomes steeper as further nodes are removed, and the fragmentation process is unusual in that exponent α increases continuously with time. We also extend our analysis to the case where nodes are added as well as removed, and obtain the asymptotic size density for growing trees.

  10. Fragmentation of random trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalay, Ziya; Ben-Naim, Eli

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the fragmentation of a random recursive tree by repeated removal of nodes, resulting in a forest of disjoint trees. The initial tree is generated by sequentially attaching new nodes to randomly chosen existing nodes until the tree contains N nodes. As nodes are removed, one at a time, the tree dissolves into an ensemble of separate trees, namely a forest. We study the statistical properties of trees and nodes in this heterogeneous forest. In the limit N --> ∞ , we find that the system is characterized by a single parameter: the fraction of remaining nodes m. We obtain analytically the size density ϕs of trees of size s, which has a power-law tail ϕs ~s-α , with exponent α = 1 + 1 / m . Therefore, the tail becomes steeper as further nodes are removed, producing an unusual scaling exponent that increases continuously with time. Furthermore, we investigate the fragment size distribution in a growing tree, where nodes are added as well as removed, and find that the distribution for this case is much narrower.

  11. Random-walk enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C → U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics. PMID:26465508

  12. Random-walk enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chi H; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A; Goodman, Myron F

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C→U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  13. Random walk with barriers

    PubMed Central

    Novikov, Dmitry S.; Fieremans, Els; Jensen, Jens H.; Helpern, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Restrictions to molecular motion by barriers (membranes) are ubiquitous in porous media, composite materials and biological tissues. A major challenge is to characterize the microstructure of a material or an organism nondestructively using a bulk transport measurement. Here we demonstrate how the long-range structural correlations introduced by permeable membranes give rise to distinct features of transport. We consider Brownian motion restricted by randomly placed and oriented membranes (d − 1 dimensional planes in d dimensions) and focus on the disorder-averaged diffusion propagator using a scattering approach. The renormalization group solution reveals a scaling behavior of the diffusion coefficient for large times, with a characteristically slow inverse square root time dependence for any d. Its origin lies in the strong structural fluctuations introduced by the spatially extended random restrictions, representing a novel universality class of the structural disorder. Our results agree well with Monte Carlo simulations in two dimensions. They can be used to identify permeable barriers as restrictions to transport, and to quantify their permeability and surface area. PMID:21686083

  14. Random-walk enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  15. Adaptive signal processor

    SciTech Connect

    Walz, H.V.

    1980-07-01

    An experimental, general purpose adaptive signal processor system has been developed, utilizing a quantized (clipped) version of the Widrow-Hoff least-mean-square adaptive algorithm developed by Moschner. The system accommodates 64 adaptive weight channels with 8-bit resolution for each weight. Internal weight update arithmetic is performed with 16-bit resolution, and the system error signal is measured with 12-bit resolution. An adapt cycle of adjusting all 64 weight channels is accomplished in 8 ..mu..sec. Hardware of the signal processor utilizes primarily Schottky-TTL type integrated circuits. A prototype system with 24 weight channels has been constructed and tested. This report presents details of the system design and describes basic experiments performed with the prototype signal processor. Finally some system configurations and applications for this adaptive signal processor are discussed.

  16. Jasmonate signalling: a copycat of auxin signalling?

    PubMed

    Pérez, A Cuéllar; Goossens, A

    2013-12-01

    Plant hormones regulate almost all aspects of plant growth and development. The past decade has provided breakthrough discoveries in phytohormone sensing and signal transduction, and highlighted the striking mechanistic similarities between the auxin and jasmonate (JA) signalling pathways. Perception of auxin and JA involves the formation of co-receptor complexes in which hormone-specific E3-ubiquitin ligases of the SKP1-Cullin-F-box protein (SCF) type interact with specific repressor proteins. Across the plant kingdom, the Aux/IAA and the JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins correspond to the auxin- and JA-specific repressors, respectively. In the absence of the hormones, these repressors form a complex with transcription factors (TFs) specific for both pathways. They also recruit several proteins, among which the general co-repressor TOPLESS, and thereby prevent the TFs from activating gene expression. The hormone-mediated interaction between the SCF and the repressors targets the latter for 26S proteasome-mediated degradation, which, in turn, releases the TFs to allow modulating hormone-dependent gene expression. In this review, we describe the similarities and differences in the auxin and JA signalling cascades with respect to the protein families and the protein domains involved in the formation of the pathway-specific complexes.

  17. Coherent Doppler lidar signal spectrum with wind turbulence.

    PubMed

    Frehlich, R; Cornman, L

    1999-12-20

    The average signal spectrum (periodogram) for coherent Doppler lidar is calculated for a turbulent wind field. Simple approximations are compared with the exact calculation. The effects of random errors in the zero velocity reference, the effects of averaging spectral estimates by use of multiple lidar pulses, and the effects of the range dependence of the lidar signal power over the range gate are included. For high spatial resolution measurements the lidar signal power is concentrated around one spectral estimate (spectral bin), and correct interpretation of the contribution from turbulence is difficult because of the effects of spectral leakage. For range gates that are larger than the lidar pulse volume, the signal power is contained in many spectral bins and the effects of turbulence can be determined accurately for constant signal power over the range gate and for the far-field range dependence of the signal power.

  18. Mapping in random-structures

    SciTech Connect

    Reidys, C.M.

    1996-06-01

    A mapping in random-structures is defined on the vertices of a generalized hypercube Q{sub {alpha}}{sup n}. A random-structure will consist of (1) a random contact graph and (2) a family of relations imposed on adjacent vertices. The vertex set of a random contact graph will be the set of all coordinates of a vertex P {element_of} Q{sub {alpha}}{sup n}. Its edge will be the union of the edge sets of two random graphs. The first is a random 1-regular graph on 2m vertices (coordinates) and the second is a random graph G{sub p} with p = c{sub 2}/n on all n vertices (coordinates). The structure of the random contact graphs will be investigated and it will be shown that for certain values of m, c{sub 2} the mapping in random-structures allows to search by the set of random-structures. This is applied to mappings in RNA-secondary structures. Also, the results on random-structures might be helpful for designing 3D-folding algorithms for RNA.

  19. Signal-exon trap: a novel method for the identification of signal sequences from genomic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Péterfy, Miklós; Gyuris, Tibor; Takács, László

    2000-01-01

    We describe a genomic DNA-based signal sequence trap method, signal-exon trap (SET), for the identification of genes encoding secreted and membrane-bound proteins. SET is based on the coupling of an exon trap to the translation of captured exons, which allows screening of the exon-encoded polypeptides for signal peptide function. Since most signal sequences are expected to be located in the 5′-terminal exons of genes, we first demonstrate that trapping of these exons is feasible. To test the applicability of SET for the screening of complex genomic DNA, we evaluated two critical features of the method. Specificity was assessed by the analysis of random genomic DNA and efficiency was demonstrated by screening a 425 kb YAC known to contain the genes of four secretory or membrane-bound proteins. All trapped clones contained a translation initiation signal followed by a hydrophobic stretch of amino acids representing either a known signal peptide, transmembrane domain or novel sequence. Our results suggest that SET is a potentially useful method for the isolation of signal sequence-containing genes and may find application in the discovery of novel members of known secretory gene clusters, as well as in other positional cloning approaches. PMID:10710443

  20. Metadisorder for designer light in random systems

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sunkyu; Piao, Xianji; Hong, Jiho; Park, Namkyoo

    2016-01-01

    Disorder plays a critical role in signal transport by controlling the correlation of a system, as demonstrated in various complex networks. In wave physics, disordered potentials suppress wave transport, because of their localized eigenstates, from the interference between multiple scattering paths. Although the variation of localization with tunable disorder has been intensively studied as a bridge between ordered and disordered media, the general trend of disorder-enhanced localization has remained unchanged, and the existence of complete delocalization in highly disordered potentials has not been explored. We propose the concept of “metadisorder”: randomly coupled optical systems in which eigenstates can be engineered to achieve unusual localization. We demonstrate that one of the eigenstates in a randomly coupled system can always be arbitrarily molded, regardless of the degree of disorder, by adjusting the self-energy of each element. Ordered waves with the desired form are then achieved in randomly coupled systems, including plane waves and globally collective resonances. We also devise counterintuitive functionalities in disordered systems, such as “small-world–like” transport from non–Anderson-type localization, phase-conserving disorder, and phase-controlled beam steering. PMID:27757414

  1. Metadisorder for designer light in random systems.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sunkyu; Piao, Xianji; Hong, Jiho; Park, Namkyoo

    2016-10-01

    Disorder plays a critical role in signal transport by controlling the correlation of a system, as demonstrated in various complex networks. In wave physics, disordered potentials suppress wave transport, because of their localized eigenstates, from the interference between multiple scattering paths. Although the variation of localization with tunable disorder has been intensively studied as a bridge between ordered and disordered media, the general trend of disorder-enhanced localization has remained unchanged, and the existence of complete delocalization in highly disordered potentials has not been explored. We propose the concept of "metadisorder": randomly coupled optical systems in which eigenstates can be engineered to achieve unusual localization. We demonstrate that one of the eigenstates in a randomly coupled system can always be arbitrarily molded, regardless of the degree of disorder, by adjusting the self-energy of each element. Ordered waves with the desired form are then achieved in randomly coupled systems, including plane waves and globally collective resonances. We also devise counterintuitive functionalities in disordered systems, such as "small-world-like" transport from non-Anderson-type localization, phase-conserving disorder, and phase-controlled beam steering.

  2. Phase Retrieval with Signal Bias. Section 7.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurman, Samuel T.; Fienup, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of a uniform measurement bias, due to background light, stray light, detector dark current, or detector offset, on phase retrieval wavefront sensing algorithms is analyzed. Simulation results indicate that the root-mean-square error of the retrieved phase can be more sensitive to an unaccounted-for signal bias than to random noise in practical scenarios. Three methods for reducing the impact of signal bias are presented

  3. Assessment of Human Random Number Generation for Biometric Verification

    PubMed Central

    Jokar, Elham; Mikaili, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Random number generation is one of the human abilities. It is proven that the sequence of random numbers generated by people do not follow full randomness criteria. These numbers produced by brain activity seem to be completely nonstationary. In this paper, we show that there is a distinction between the random numbers generated by different people who provide the discrimination capability, and can be used as a biometric signature. We considered these numbers as a signal, and their complexity for various time-frequency sections was calculated. Then with a proper structure of a support vector machine, we classify the features. The error rate, obtained in this study, shows high discrimination capabilities for this biometric characteristic. PMID:23626943

  4. Distinguishing chaotic time series from noise: A random matrix approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Bin; Chen, Jianxing; Ju, Chen; Li, Huijun; Wang, Xuesong

    2017-03-01

    Deterministically chaotic systems can often give rise to random and unpredictable behaviors which make the time series obtained from them to be almost indistinguishable from noise. Motivated by the fact that data points in a chaotic time series will have intrinsic correlations between them, we propose a random matrix theory (RMT) approach to identify the deterministic or stochastic dynamics of the system. We show that the spectral distributions of the correlation matrices, constructed from the chaotic time series, deviate significantly from the predictions of random matrix ensembles. On the contrary, the eigenvalue statistics for a noisy signal follow closely those of random matrix ensembles. Numerical results also indicate that the approach is to some extent robust to additive observational noise which pollutes the data in many practical situations. Our approach is efficient in recognizing the continuous chaotic dynamics underlying the evolution of the time series.

  5. Rotary components, random ellipses and polarization: a statistical perspective.

    PubMed

    Walden, A T

    2013-02-13

    Rotary analysis decomposes vector motions on the plane into counter-rotating components, which have proved particularly useful in the study of geophysical flows influenced by the rotation of the Earth. For stationary random signals, the motion at any frequency takes the form of a random ellipse. Although there are numerous applications of rotary analysis, relatively little attention has been paid to the statistical properties of the random ellipses or to the estimated rotary coefficient, which measures the tendency to rotate counterclockwise or clockwise. The precise statistical structure of the ellipses is reviewed, including the random behaviour of the ellipse orientation, aspect ratio and intensity. Special attention is then paid to spectral matrix estimation from physical data and to hypothesis testing and confidence intervals computed using the estimated matrices.

  6. Deblurring Signal Network Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kamps, Dominic; Dehmelt, Leif

    2017-09-15

    To orchestrate the function and development of multicellular organisms, cells integrate intra- and extracellular information. This information is processed via signal networks in space and time, steering dynamic changes in cellular structure and function. Defects in those signal networks can lead to developmental disorders or cancer. However, experimental analysis of signal networks is challenging as their state changes dynamically and differs between individual cells. Thus, causal relationships between network components are blurred if lysates from large cell populations are analyzed. To directly study causal relationships, perturbations that target specific components have to be combined with measurements of cellular responses within individual cells. However, using standard single-cell techniques, the number of signal activities that can be monitored simultaneously is limited. Furthermore, diffusion of signal network components limits the spatial precision of perturbations, which blurs the analysis of spatiotemporal processing in signal networks. Hybrid strategies based on optogenetics, surface patterning, chemical tools, and protein design can overcome those limitations and thereby sharpen our view into the dynamic spatiotemporal state of signal networks and enable unique insights into the mechanisms that control cellular function in space and time.

  7. Application of variational mode decomposition to seismic random noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Cao, Siyuan; Wang, Zhiming

    2017-08-01

    We have proposed a new denoising method for the simultaneous noise reduction and preservation of seismic signals based on variational mode decomposition (VMD). VMD is a recently developed adaptive signal decomposition method and an advance in non-stationary signal analysis. It solves the mode-mixing and non-optimal reconstruction performance problems of empirical mode decomposition that have existed for a long time. By using VMD, a multi-component signal can be non-recursively decomposed into a series of quasi-orthogonal intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), each of which has a relatively local frequency range. Meanwhile, the signal will focus on a smaller number of obtained IMFs after decomposition, and thus the denoised result is able to be obtained by reconstructing these signal-dominant IMFs. Synthetic examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach and comparison is made with the complete ensemble empirical mode decomposition, which demonstrates that the VMD algorithm has lower computational cost and better random noise elimination performance. The application of on field seismic data further illustrates the superior performance of our method in both random noise attenuation and the recovery of seismic events.

  8. Generalized random sequential adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarjus, G.; Schaaf, P.; Talbot, J.

    1990-12-01

    Adsorption of hard spherical particles onto a flat uniform surface is analyzed by using generalized random sequential adsorption (RSA) models. These models are defined by releasing the condition of immobility present in the usual RSA rules to allow for desorption or surface diffusion. Contrary to the simple RSA case, generalized RSA processes are no longer irreversible and the system formed by the adsorbed particles on the surface may reach an equilibrium state. We show by using a distribution function approach that the kinetics of such processes can be described by means of an exact infinite hierarchy of equations reminiscent of the Kirkwood-Salsburg hierarchy for systems at equilibrium. We illustrate the way in which the systems produced by adsorption/desorption and by adsorption/diffusion evolve between the two limits represented by ``simple RSA'' and ``equilibrium'' by considering approximate solutions in terms of truncated density expansions.

  9. Investments in random environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Barrientos, Jesús Emeterio; Cantero-Álvarez, Rubén; Matias Rodrigues, João F.; Schweitzer, Frank

    2008-03-01

    We present analytical investigations of a multiplicative stochastic process that models a simple investor dynamics in a random environment. The dynamics of the investor's budget, x(t) , depends on the stochasticity of the return on investment, r(t) , for which different model assumptions are discussed. The fat-tail distribution of the budget is investigated and compared with theoretical predictions. We are mainly interested in the most probable value xmp of the budget that reaches a constant value over time. Based on an analytical investigation of the dynamics, we are able to predict xmpstat . We find a scaling law that relates the most probable value to the characteristic parameters describing the stochastic process. Our analytical results are confirmed by stochastic computer simulations that show a very good agreement with the predictions.

  10. Structure of random foam.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinelt, Douglas A.; van Swol, Frank B.; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2004-06-01

    The Surface Evolver was used to compute the equilibrium microstructure of dry soap foams with random structure and a wide range of cell-size distributions. Topological and geometric properties of foams and individual cells were evaluated. The theory for isotropic Plateau polyhedra describes the dependence of cell geometric properties on their volume and number of faces. The surface area of all cells is about 10% greater than a sphere of equal volume; this leads to a simple but accurate theory for the surface free energy density of foam. A novel parameter based on the surface-volume mean bubble radius R32 is used to characterize foam polydispersity. The foam energy, total cell edge length, and average number of faces per cell all decrease with increasing polydispersity. Pentagonal faces are the most common in monodisperse foam but quadrilaterals take over in highly polydisperse structures.

  11. Structure of Random Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraynik, Andrew M.; Reinelt, Douglas A.; van Swol, Frank

    2004-11-01

    The Surface Evolver was used to compute the equilibrium microstructure of dry soap foams with random structure and a wide range of cell-size distributions. Topological and geometric properties of foams and individual cells were evaluated. The theory for isotropic Plateau polyhedra describes the dependence of cell geometric properties on their volume and number of faces. The surface area of all cells is about 10% greater than a sphere of equal volume; this leads to a simple but accurate theory for the surface free energy density of foam. A novel parameter based on the surface-volume mean bubble radius R32 is used to characterize foam polydispersity. The foam energy, total cell edge length, and average number of faces per cell all decrease with increasing polydispersity. Pentagonal faces are the most common in monodisperse foam but quadrilaterals take over in highly polydisperse structures.

  12. Random RNA under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, F.; Hagendorf, C.; Wiese, K.-J.

    2007-06-01

    The Lässig-Wiese (LW) field theory for the freezing transition of random RNA secondary structures is generalized to the situation of an external force. We find a second-order phase transition at a critical applied force f=fc. For ffc, the extension \\cal L as a function of pulling force f scales as {\\cal L}(f) \\sim (f-f_{c})^{1/\\gamma-1} . The exponent γ is calculated in an epsi-expansion: At 1-loop order γ=epsi/2=1/2, equivalent to the disorder-free case. 2-loop results yielding γ=0.6 are briefly mentioned. Using a locking argument, we speculate that this result extends to the strong-disorder phase.

  13. Associative Hierarchical Random Fields.

    PubMed

    Ladický, L'ubor; Russell, Chris; Kohli, Pushmeet; Torr, Philip H S

    2014-06-01

    This paper makes two contributions: the first is the proposal of a new model-The associative hierarchical random field (AHRF), and a novel algorithm for its optimization; the second is the application of this model to the problem of semantic segmentation. Most methods for semantic segmentation are formulated as a labeling problem for variables that might correspond to either pixels or segments such as super-pixels. It is well known that the generation of super pixel segmentations is not unique. This has motivated many researchers to use multiple super pixel segmentations for problems such as semantic segmentation or single view reconstruction. These super-pixels have not yet been combined in a principled manner, this is a difficult problem, as they may overlap, or be nested in such a way that the segmentations form a segmentation tree. Our new hierarchical random field model allows information from all of the multiple segmentations to contribute to a global energy. MAP inference in this model can be performed efficiently using powerful graph cut based move making algorithms. Our framework generalizes much of the previous work based on pixels or segments, and the resulting labelings can be viewed both as a detailed segmentation at the pixel level, or at the other extreme, as a segment selector that pieces together a solution like a jigsaw, selecting the best segments from different segmentations as pieces. We evaluate its performance on some of the most challenging data sets for object class segmentation, and show that this ability to perform inference using multiple overlapping segmentations leads to state-of-the-art results.

  14. Plant Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Atienza, Juliana; Van Ingelgem, Carl; Roef, Luc

    2007-01-01

    The presence of the cyclic nucleotides 3′,5′-cyclic adenyl monophosphate (cAMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic guanyl monophosphate (cGMP) in plants is now generally accepted. In addition, cAMP and cGMP have been implicated in the regulation of important plant processes such as stomatal functioning, monovalent and divalent cation fluxes, chloroplast development, gibberellic acid signalling, pathogen response and gene transcription. However, very little is known regarding the components of cyclic nucleotide signalling in plants. In this addendum, the evidence for specific mechanisms of plant cyclic nucleotide signalling is evaluated and discussed. PMID:19704553

  15. Electrical signaling and photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical irritation of trigger hairs and subsequent generation of action potentials have significant impact on photosynthesis and respiration in carnivorous Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula). Action potential-mediated inhibition of photosynthesis and stimulation of respiration is confined only to the trap and was not recorded in adjacent photosynthetic lamina. We showed that the main primary target of electrical signals on assimilation is in the dark enzymatic reaction of photosynthesis. Without doubt, the electrical signaling is costly, and the possible co-existence of such type of signals and photosynthesis in plant cell is discussed. PMID:21558815

  16. Aestivation: signaling and hypometabolism.

    PubMed

    Storey, Kenneth B; Storey, Janet M

    2012-05-01

    Aestivation is a survival strategy used by many vertebrates and invertebrates to endure arid environmental conditions. Key features of aestivation include strong metabolic rate suppression, strategies to retain body water, conservation of energy and body fuel reserves, altered nitrogen metabolism, and mechanisms to preserve and stabilize organs, cells and macromolecules over many weeks or months of dormancy. Cell signaling is crucial to achieving both a hypometabolic state and reorganizing multiple metabolic pathways to optimize long-term viability during aestivation. This commentary examines the current knowledge about cell signaling pathways that participate in regulating aestivation, including signaling cascades mediated by the AMP-activated kinase, Akt, ERK, and FoxO1.

  17. Quantum random walk polynomial and quantum random walk measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yuanbao; Wang, Caishi

    2014-05-01

    In the paper, we introduce a quantum random walk polynomial (QRWP) that can be defined as a polynomial , which is orthogonal with respect to a quantum random walk measure (QRWM) on , such that the parameters are in the recurrence relations and satisfy . We firstly obtain some results of QRWP and QRWM, in which case the correspondence between measures and orthogonal polynomial sequences is one-to-one. It shows that any measure with respect to which a quantum random walk polynomial sequence is orthogonal is a quantum random walk measure. We next collect some properties of QRWM; moreover, we extend Karlin and McGregor's representation formula for the transition probabilities of a quantum random walk (QRW) in the interacting Fock space, which is a parallel result with the CGMV method. Using these findings, we finally obtain some applications for QRWM, which are of interest in the study of quantum random walk, highlighting the role played by QRWP and QRWM.

  18. Pedestrian crash estimation models for signalized intersections.

    PubMed

    Pulugurtha, Srinivas S; Sambhara, Venkata R

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this paper is twofold: (1) to examine the non-linear relationship between pedestrian crashes and predictor variables such as demographic characteristics (population and household units), socio-economic characteristics (mean income and total employment), land use characteristics, road network characteristics (the number of lanes, speed limit, presence of median, and pedestrian and vehicular volume) and accessibility to public transit systems, and (2) to develop generalized linear pedestrian crash estimation models (based on negative binomial distribution to accommodate for over-dispersion of data) by the level of pedestrian activity and spatial proximity to extract site specific data at signalized intersections. Data for 176 randomly selected signalized intersections in the City of Charlotte, North Carolina were used to examine the non-linear relationships and develop pedestrian crash estimation models. The average number of pedestrian crashes per year within 200 feet of each intersection was considered as the dependent variable whereas the demographic characteristics, socio-economic characteristics, land use characteristics, road network characteristics and the number of transit stops were considered as the predictor variables. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to eliminate predictor variables that were correlated to each other. Models were then developed separately for all signalized intersections, high pedestrian activity signalized intersections and low pedestrian activity signalized intersections. The use of 0.25mile, 0.5mile and 1mile buffer widths to extract data and develop models was also evaluated.

  19. An ultrasonic pseudorandom signal-correlation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    A working ultrasonic pseudorandom signal-correlation system is described which, unlike ultrasonic random signal-correlation systems, does not require an acoustic delay line. Elimination of the delay line allows faster data acquisition and better range resolution. The system uses two identical shift-register type generators to produce pseudonoise bursts which are subsequences of a 65 535-bit complementary m-sequence. One generator produces the transmitted bursts while the other generates identical reference bursts which start at a variable correlation delay time after the transmitted bursts. The reference bursts are cross-correlated with the received echoes to obtain the approximate impulse response of the transducer/specimen system under test. Range sidelobes are reduced by transmitting and correlating many bursts at a given correlation delay before incrementing the delay. Signal-to-sidelobe ratios of greater than 47 dB have been obtained using this method. Limitations of the system due to sampling constraints and the pseudonoise power spectrum are discussed, and the system design and implementation are outlined. Results of experimental characterization of the system show that the pseudorandom signal-correlation system has approximately the same range resolution as a conventional pulse-echo system but can yield a significant increase in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).

  20. Probing signal design for seismic landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James S.; Scott, Waymond R., Jr.; Larson, Gregg D.; Rogers, Peter H.; McCall, George S., II

    2004-09-01

    This paper addresses the design of time-domain signals for use as seismic excitations in a system that images buried landmines. The goal of the design is the selection of a signal that provides sufficient contrast for the post-processed landmine image in the shortest possible measurement time. Although the goal is relatively straightforward and the problem appears similar to one of system identification for a linear time invariant (LTI) system, practical implementation of many commonly accepted approaches to the system-identification problem has proven difficult. The reason for this is that the system under consideration exhibits observable nonlinearity over the entire range of drive levels that are of interest. The problem is therefore constrained by the requirement that nonlinear effects be tolerable rather than imperceptible (i.e. that the nonlinearity be sufficiently weak that the system can be reasonably characterized as linear). Several candidate signal types that have been shown to offer good noise immunity for the LTI system identification problem were considered. These included circular chirps, binary-sequence-based (BSB) signals, and numerically optimized randomly seeded multisines. Based on purely experimental figures of merit, circular chirps with flat amplitude and linearly swept frequency offered the best performance among the signals that were tested.

  1. GNSS Ocean Reflected Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeg, P.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean reflected signals from the GNSS satellites (received at low-Earth orbiting satellites, airplanes and fixed mountain locations) describe the ocean surface mean height, waves, roughness, spectral reflectivity and emissivity. The estimated accuracy of the average surface height is of the order of 10 cm for smooth conditions. Thus global observations could be an important new contribution to long-term variations of the ocean mean height as well as the monitoring of ocean mesoscale eddies, which result in sea-height changes much larger than the accuracy of the GNSS technique for reflected signals. The ocean reflected signals can be divided into two set of measurements, 1) high elevation measurements (equal to low incidence angles) and 2) low elevation grazing angle measurements. For the first type the ocean reflection cross-section has a limited extent. The reflected signal is coherent with smaller errors due to ocean waves, sampling rate and the internal processing method of the receiver. For low elevations, the signal reveals the incoherent scatter process at the reflection zone. To quantify the potential of the GNSS signals for determining spectral reflectivity at low elevations, we present ocean reflection GPS measurements from the Haleakala Summit on Maui, Hawaii, revealing the spectral characteristics of both the direct satellite signal and the ocean reflected signal for low elevation angles. The characteristics of the reflected signal depend on the scattering properties of the sea surface and the footprint of the reflection zone. While the footprint size and shape in turn depends on the signal incidence angle, the ocean mean tilt, and the relative velocities of transmitter and receiver to the reflection point. Thus the scattering properties of the sea surface are related to the sea surface roughness. We present the spectral properties of the signals as received by a high precision GPS instrument, simultaneously in both phase-locked mode and open-loop raw

  2. Peptide signaling in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Toshitaka; Hayakawa, Eisuke

    2012-01-01

    Peptides play a number of crucial roles as signaling molecules in metazoans. In order to elaborate a more complete picture of the roles played by peptides in a single organism, we launched the "Hydra Peptide Project". For this project, we used Hydra magnipapillata, a species belonging to Cnidaria, one of the most basal metazoan phyla, and using a peptidomic approach, we systematically identified a number of peptide signaling molecules, their encoding genes and their functions. In this article, we report the peptides isolated from Hydra and other cnidarians, as well as their synthesis, processing and release from the cells to the target. Possible peptide signaling pathways are overviewed and finally we discuss the evolution of the peptide signaling system.

  3. Signal processing in SETI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullers, D. K.; Linscott, I. R.; Oliver, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    It is believed that the Galaxy might contain ten billion potential life sites. In view of the physical inaccessibility of extraterrestrial life on account of the vast distances involved, a logical first step in a search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) appears to be an attempt to detect signals already being radiated. The characteristics of the signals to be expected are discussed together with the search strategy of a NASA program. It is pointed out that all presently planned searches will use existing radio-astronomy antennas. If no extraterrestrial intelligence signals are discovered, society will have to decide whether SETI justifies a dedicated facility of much greater collecting area. Attention is given to a multichannel spectrum analyzer, CW signal detection, pulse detection, the pattern detector, and details of SETI system operation.

  4. Nucleotide signalling during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Idzko, Marco; Ferrari, Davide; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions are associated with the extracellular release of nucleotides, particularly ATP. In the extracellular compartment, ATP predominantly functions as a signalling molecule through the activation of purinergic P2 receptors. Metabotropic P2Y receptors are G-protein-coupled, whereas ionotropic P2X receptors are ATP-gated ion channels. Here we discuss how signalling events through P2 receptors alter the outcomes of inflammatory or infectious diseases. Recent studies implicate a role for P2X/P2Ysignalling in mounting appropriate inflammatory responses critical for host defence against invading pathogens or tumours. Conversely, P2X/P2Y signalling can promote chronic inflammation during ischaemia and reperfusion injury, inflammatory bowel disease or acute and chronic diseases of the lungs. Although nucleotide signalling has been used clinically in patients before, research indicates an expanding field of opportunities for specifically targeting individual P2 receptors for the treatment of inflammatory or infectious diseases. PMID:24828189

  5. Audio signal processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, R. L.

    1970-01-01

    System provides automatic volume control for an audio amplifier or a voice communication system without introducing noise surges during pauses in the input, and without losing the initial signal when the input resumes.

  6. Signals from the Cosmos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Jeffrey M.

    1991-01-01

    Introduces the basics of radio astronomy and describes how to assemble several simple systems for receiving radio signals from the cosmos. Includes schematics, parts lists, working drawings, and contact information for radio astronomy suppliers. (11 references) (Author/JJK)

  7. Transmembrane Signalling: Membrane messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockroft, Scott L.

    2017-05-01

    Life has evolved elaborate means of communicating essential chemical information across cell membranes. Inspired by biology, two new artificial mechanisms have now been developed that use synthetic messenger molecules to relay chemical signals into or across lipid membranes.

  8. Quantifying Ubiquitin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ordureau, Alban; Münch, Christian; Harper, J. Wade

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin (UB)-driven signaling systems permeate biology, and are often integrated with other types of post-translational modifications (PTMs), most notably phosphorylation. Flux through such pathways is typically dictated by the fractional stoichiometry of distinct regulatory modifications and protein assemblies as well as the spatial organization of pathway components. Yet, we rarely understand the dynamics and stoichiometry of rate-limiting intermediates along a reaction trajectory. Here, we review how quantitative proteomic tools and enrichment strategies are being used to quantify UB-dependent signaling systems, and to integrate UB signaling with regulatory phosphorylation events. A key regulatory feature of ubiquitylation is that the identity of UB chain linkage types can control downstream processes. We also describe how proteomic and enzymological tools can be used to identify and quantify UB chain synthesis and linkage preferences. The emergence of sophisticated quantitative proteomic approaches will set a new standard for elucidating biochemical mechanisms of UB-driven signaling systems. PMID:26000850

  9. Signals from the Cosmos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Jeffrey M.

    1991-01-01

    Introduces the basics of radio astronomy and describes how to assemble several simple systems for receiving radio signals from the cosmos. Includes schematics, parts lists, working drawings, and contact information for radio astronomy suppliers. (11 references) (Author/JJK)

  10. Signal processing in SETI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullers, D. K.; Linscott, I. R.; Oliver, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    It is believed that the Galaxy might contain ten billion potential life sites. In view of the physical inaccessibility of extraterrestrial life on account of the vast distances involved, a logical first step in a search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) appears to be an attempt to detect signals already being radiated. The characteristics of the signals to be expected are discussed together with the search strategy of a NASA program. It is pointed out that all presently planned searches will use existing radio-astronomy antennas. If no extraterrestrial intelligence signals are discovered, society will have to decide whether SETI justifies a dedicated facility of much greater collecting area. Attention is given to a multichannel spectrum analyzer, CW signal detection, pulse detection, the pattern detector, and details of SETI system operation.

  11. Randomness fault detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, B. Don (Inventor); Aucoin, B. Michael (Inventor); Benner, Carl L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for detecting a fault on a power line carrying a line parameter such as a load current. The apparatus monitors and analyzes the load current to obtain an energy value. The energy value is compared to a threshold value stored in a buffer. If the energy value is greater than the threshold value a counter is incremented. If the energy value is greater than a high value threshold or less than a low value threshold then a second counter is incremented. If the difference between two subsequent energy values is greater than a constant then a third counter is incremented. A fault signal is issued if the counter is greater than a counter limit value and either the second counter is greater than a second limit value or the third counter is greater than a third limit value.

  12. Optical Signal Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-31

    8217 \\..\\ We let k be the ratio of the time base of the reference\\ \\ . signal to that of the received signal. PAU~ ~; II .~** We could analyze this case for an...decreases. The central to the approximation usually stated in optics texts. lobe of the pattern just covers the region II :s I when k We claimed...Reference Waveforms for Heterodyne Spectrum Analyzers K We previously developed the use of a distributed local oscillator, generated by a reference wavefront

  13. Dissecting DR3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Pobezinskaya, Yelena L; Liu, Zhenggang; Choksi, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Receptor signaling can be evaluated in multiple ways, including analysis of phosphorylation of downstream molecules and analysis of proteins that are recruited to the receptor upon ligand binding. Majority of studies on the mechanism of DR3 signaling were performed using overexpression systems that can often lead to artifacts. In this chapter we describe how to analyze DR3 downstream events with most attention being paid to endogenous immunoprecipitation.

  14. Wnt signaling and osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Manolagas, Stavros C.

    2014-01-01

    Major advances in understanding basic bone biology and the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of osteoporosis, over the last 20 years, have dramatically altered the management of this disease. The purpose of this mini-review is to highlight the seminal role of Wnt signaling in bone homeostasis and disease and the emergence of novel osteoporosis therapies by targeting Wnt signaling with drugs. PMID:24815296

  15. Signal-light nomogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, J. I.; Edgerton, C. F.; Duntley, S. Q.

    1975-01-01

    A nomogram is presented for predicting the sighting range for white, steady-burning signal lights. The theoretical and experimental bases are explained and instructions are provided for its use for a variety of practical problems concerning the visibility of signal lights. The nomogram is appropriate for slant path as well as horizontal sightings, and the gain of range achieved by utilizing binoculars can be predicted by use of it.

  16. Digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, A. V.; Baggeroer, A. B.; Lim, J. S.; Musicus, B. R.; Mook, D. R.; Duckworth, G. L.; Bordley, T. E.; Curtis, S. R.; Deadrick, D. S.; Dove, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    Signal and image processing research projects are described. Topics include: (1) modeling underwater acoustic propagation; (2) image restoration; (3) signal reconstruction; (4) speech enhancement; (5) pitch detection; (6) spectral analysis; (7) speech synthesis; (8) speech enhancement; (9) autoregressive spectral estimation; (10) knowledge based array processing; (11) speech analysis; (12) estimating the degree of coronary stenosis with image processing; (13) automatic target detection; and (14) video conferencing.

  17. Design and implementation of the NaI(Tl)/CsI(Na) detectors output signal generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xu; Liu, Cong-Zhan; Zhao, Jian-Ling; Zhang, Fei; Zhang, Yi-Fei; Li, Zheng-Wei; Zhang, Shuo; Li, Xu-Fang; Lu, Xue-Feng; Xu, Zhen-Ling; Lu, Fang-Jun

    2014-02-01

    We designed and implemented a signal generator that can simulate the output of the NaI(Tl)/CsI(Na) detectors' pre-amplifier onboard the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT). Using the development of the FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) with VHDL language and adding a random constituent, we have finally produced the double exponential random pulse signal generator. The statistical distribution of the signal amplitude is programmable. The occurrence time intervals of the adjacent signals contain negative exponential distribution statistically.

  18. Redox signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Foyer, Christine H; Noctor, Graham

    2013-06-01

    Our aim is to deliver an authoritative and challenging perspective of current concepts in plant redox signaling, focusing particularly on the complex interface between the redox and hormone-signaling pathways that allow precise control of plant growth and defense in response to metabolic triggers and environmental constraints and cues. Plants produce significant amounts of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of photosynthetic electron transport and metabolism. Such pathways contribute to the compartment-specific redox-regulated signaling systems in plant cells that convey information to the nucleus to regulate gene expression. Like the chloroplasts and mitochondria, the apoplast-cell wall compartment makes a significant contribution to the redox signaling network, but unlike these organelles, the apoplast has a low antioxidant-buffering capacity. The respective roles of ROS, low-molecular antioxidants, redox-active proteins, and antioxidant enzymes are considered in relation to the functions of plant hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and auxin, in the composite control of plant growth and defense. Regulation of redox gradients between key compartments in plant cells such as those across the plasma membrane facilitates flexible and multiple faceted opportunities for redox signaling that spans the intracellular and extracellular environments. In conclusion, plants are recognized as masters of the art of redox regulation that use oxidants and antioxidants as flexible integrators of signals from metabolism and the environment.

  19. Cytokinin signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ildoo; Sheen, Jen; Müller, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Despite long-standing observations on diverse cytokinin actions, the discovery path to cytokinin signaling mechanisms was tortuous. Unyielding to conventional genetic screens, experimental innovations were paramount in unraveling the core cytokinin signaling circuitry, which employs a large repertoire of genes with overlapping and specific functions. The canonical two-component transcription circuitry involves His kinases that perceive cytokinin and initiate signaling, as well as His-to-Asp phosphorelay proteins that transfer phosphoryl groups to response regulators, transcriptional activators, or repressors. Recent advances have revealed the complex physiological functions of cytokinins, including interactions with auxin and other signal transduction pathways. This review begins by outlining the historical path to cytokinin discovery and then elucidates the diverse cytokinin functions and key signaling components. Highlights focus on the integration of cytokinin signaling components into regulatory networks in specific contexts, ranging from molecular, cellular, and developmental regulations in the embryo, root apical meristem, shoot apical meristem, stem and root vasculature, and nodule organogenesis to organismal responses underlying immunity, stress tolerance, and senescence.

  20. Sucrose signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tognetti, Jorge A.; Pontis, Horacio G.; Martínez-Noël, Giselle M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The role of sucrose as a signaling molecule in plants was originally proposed several decades ago. However, recognition of sucrose as a true signal has been largely debated and only recently this role has been fully accepted. The best-studied cases of sucrose signaling involve metabolic processes, such as the induction of fructan or anthocyanin synthesis, but a large volume of scattered information suggests that sucrose signals may control a vast array of developmental processes along the whole life cycle of the plant. Also, wide gaps exist in our current understanding of the intracellular steps that mediate sucrose action. Sucrose concentration in plant tissues tends to be directly related to light intensity, and inversely related to temperature, and accordingly, exogenous sucrose supply often mimics the effect of high light and cold. However, many exceptions to this rule seem to occur due to interactions with other signaling pathways. In conclusion, the sucrose role as a signal molecule in plants is starting to be unveiled and much research is still needed to have a complete map of its significance in plant function. PMID:23333971

  1. Interferometric SAR imaging by transmitting stepped frequency chaotic noise signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunhua; Gu, Xiang; Zhai, Wenshuai; Dong, Xiao; Shi, Xiaojin; Kang, Xueyan

    2015-10-01

    Noise radar has been applied in many fields since it was proposed more than 50 years ago. However, it has not been applied to interferometric SAR imaging yet as far as we know. This paper introduces our recent work on interferometric noise radar. An interferometric SAR system was developed which can transmit both chirp signal and chaotic noise signal (CNS) at multiple carrier frequencies. An airborne experiment with this system by transmitting both signals was carried out, and the data were processed to show the capability of interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The results shows that although the interferometric phase quality of CNS is degraded due to the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is lower compared with that of chirp signal, we still can get satisfied DEM after multi-looking processing. Another work of this paper is to apply compressed sensing (CS) theory to the interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The CS theory states that if a signal is sparse, then it can be accurately reconstructed with much less sampled data than that regularly required according to Nyquist Sampling Theory. To form a structured random matrix, if the transmitted signal is of fixed waveform, then random subsampling is needed. However, if the transmitted signal is of random waveform, then only uniform subsampling is needed. This is another advantage of noise signal. Both the interferometric phase images and the DEMs by regular method and by CS method are processed with results compared. It is shown that the degradation of interferometric phases due to subsampling is larger than that of amplitude image.

  2. Diffusion on regular random fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarão Reis, Fábio D. A.

    1996-12-01

    We study random walks on structures intermediate to statistical and deterministic fractals called regular random fractals, constructed introducing randomness in the distribution of lacunas of Sierpinski carpets. Random walks are simulated on finite stages of these fractals and the scaling properties of the mean square displacement 0305-4470/29/24/007/img1 of N-step walks are analysed. The anomalous diffusion exponents 0305-4470/29/24/007/img2 obtained are very near the estimates for the carpets with the same dimension. This result motivates a discussion on the influence of some types of lattice irregularity (random structure, dead ends, lacunas) on 0305-4470/29/24/007/img2, based on results on several fractals. We also propose to use these and other regular random fractals as models for real self-similar structures and to generalize results for statistical systems on fractals.

  3. DS/LPI autocorrelation detection in noise plus random-tone interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinedi, Sami; Polydoros, Andreas

    1990-01-01

    An analysis is presented of a frequency-noncoherent, two-lag autocorrelation statistic for the wideband detection of random binary phase-shift keying (BPSK) signals in noise plus random multitone interference. It is shown that this detector is quite robust to the presence or absence of interference and its specific parameter values contrary to an energy detector. The rule assumes knowledge of the data rate and the active scenario under H0. The purpose of the paper is to promote the real-time autocorrelation domain and its samples (lags) as a viable approach for detecting random signals in dense environments.

  4. Random Noise Monopulse Radar System for Covert Tracking of Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Ram M.

    2002-07-01

    The University of Nebraska is currently developing a unique monopulse radar concept based on the use of random noise signal for covert tracking applications. This project is funded by the Missile Defense Agency (MDA). The advantage of this system over conventional frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW) or short pulse systems is its covertness resulting from the random waveform's immunity from interception and jamming. The system integrates a novel heterodyne correlation receiver with conventional monopulse architecture. Based on the previous work such as random noise interferometry, a series of theoretical analysis and simulations were conducted to examine the potential performance of this monopulse system. Furthermore, a prototype system is under development to exploit practical design aspects of phase comparison angle measurement. It is revealed that random noise monopulse radar can provide the same function as traditional monopulse radar, i.e., implement range and angular estimation and tracking in real time. The bandwidth of random noise signal can be optimized to achieve the best range resolution as well as the angular accuracy.

  5. Does Random Dispersion Help Survival?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinazi, Rinaldo B.

    2015-04-01

    Many species live in colonies that prosper for a while and then collapse. After the collapse the colony survivors disperse randomly and found new colonies that may or may not make it depending on the new environment they find. We use birth and death chains in random environments to model such a population and to argue that random dispersion is a superior strategy for survival.

  6. Fractional random walk lattice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelitsch, T. M.; Collet, B. A.; Riascos, A. P.; Nowakowski, A. F.; Nicolleau, F. C. G. A.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze time-discrete and time-continuous ‘fractional’ random walks on undirected regular networks with special focus on cubic periodic lattices in n  =  1, 2, 3,.. dimensions. The fractional random walk dynamics is governed by a master equation involving fractional powers of Laplacian matrices {{L}\\fracα{2}}} where α =2 recovers the normal walk. First we demonstrate that the interval 0<α ≤slant 2 is admissible for the fractional random walk. We derive analytical expressions for the transition matrix of the fractional random walk and closely related the average return probabilities. We further obtain the fundamental matrix {{Z}(α )} , and the mean relaxation time (Kemeny constant) for the fractional random walk. The representation for the fundamental matrix {{Z}(α )} relates fractional random walks with normal random walks. We show that the matrix elements of the transition matrix of the fractional random walk exihibit for large cubic n-dimensional lattices a power law decay of an n-dimensional infinite space Riesz fractional derivative type indicating emergence of Lévy flights. As a further footprint of Lévy flights in the n-dimensional space, the transition matrix and return probabilities of the fractional random walk are dominated for large times t by slowly relaxing long-wave modes leading to a characteristic {{t}-\\frac{n{α}} -decay. It can be concluded that, due to long range moves of fractional random walk, a small world property is emerging increasing the efficiency to explore the lattice when instead of a normal random walk a fractional random walk is chosen.

  7. Random number generation and creativity.

    PubMed

    Bains, William

    2008-01-01

    A previous paper suggested that humans can generate genuinely random numbers. I tested this hypothesis by repeating the experiment with a larger number of highly numerate subjects, asking them to call out a sequence of digits selected from 0 through 9. The resulting sequences were substantially non-random, with an excess of sequential pairs of numbers and a deficit of repeats of the same number, in line with previous literature. However, the previous literature suggests that humans generate random numbers with substantial conscious effort, and distractions which reduce that effort reduce the randomness of the numbers. I reduced my subjects' concentration by asking them to call out in another language, and with alcohol - neither affected the randomness of their responses. This suggests that the ability to generate random numbers is a 'basic' function of the human mind, even if those numbers are not mathematically 'random'. I hypothesise that there is a 'creativity' mechanism, while not truly random, provides novelty as part of the mind's defence against closed programming loops, and that testing for the effects seen here in people more or less familiar with numbers or with spontaneous creativity could identify more features of this process. It is possible that training to perform better at simple random generation tasks could help to increase creativity, through training people to reduce the conscious mind's suppression of the 'spontaneous', creative response to new questions.

  8. A Random Variable Transformation Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheuermann, Larry

    1989-01-01

    Provides a short BASIC program, RANVAR, which generates random variates for various theoretical probability distributions. The seven variates include: uniform, exponential, normal, binomial, Poisson, Pascal, and triangular. (MVL)

  9. A relativistically covariant random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaguer, J.; Larralde, H.

    2007-08-01

    In this work we present and analyze an extremely simple relativistically covariant random walk model. In our approach, the probability density and the flow of probability arise naturally as the components of a four-vector and they are related to one another via a tensorial constitutive equation. We show that the system can be described in terms of an underlying invariant space time random walk parameterized by the number of sojourns. Finally, we obtain explicit expressions for the moments of the covariant random walk as well as for the underlying invariant random walk.

  10. Binary continuous random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Normand; Barkema, G. T.

    2004-11-01

    Many properties of disordered materials can be understood by looking at idealized structural models, in which the strain is as small as is possible in the absence of long-range order. For covalent amorphous semiconductors and glasses, such an idealized structural model, the continuous random network, was introduced 70 years ago by Zachariasen. In this model, each atom is placed in a crystal-like local environment, with perfect coordination and chemical ordering, yet longer-range order is nonexistent. Defects, such as missing or added bonds, or chemical mismatches, however, are not accounted for. In this paper we explore under what conditions the idealized CRN model without defects captures the properties of the material, and under what conditions defects are an inherent part of the idealized model. We find that the density of defects in tetrahedral networks does not vary smoothly with variations in the interaction strengths, but jumps from close to zero to a finite density. Consequently, in certain materials, defects do not play a role except for being thermodynamical excitations, whereas in others they are a fundamental ingredient of the ideal structure.

  11. Nonvolatile random access memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Katti, Romney R. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A nonvolatile magnetic random access memory can be achieved by an array of magnet-Hall effect (M-H) elements. The storage function is realized with a rectangular thin-film ferromagnetic material having an in-plane, uniaxial anisotropy and inplane bipolar remanent magnetization states. The thin-film magnetic element is magnetized by a local applied field, whose direction is used to form either a 0 or 1 state. The element remains in the 0 or 1 state until a switching field is applied to change its state. The stored information is detcted by a Hall-effect sensor which senses the fringing field from the magnetic storage element. The circuit design for addressing each cell includes transistor switches for providing a current of selected polarity to store a binary digit through a separate conductor overlying the magnetic element of the cell. To read out a stored binary digit, transistor switches are employed to provide a current through a row of Hall-effect sensors connected in series and enabling a differential voltage amplifier connected to all Hall-effect sensors of a column in series. To avoid read-out voltage errors due to shunt currents through resistive loads of the Hall-effect sensors of other cells in the same column, at least one transistor switch is provided between every pair of adjacent cells in every row which are not turned on except in the row of the selected cell.

  12. Scale invariance of human electroencephalogram signals in sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shi-Min; Jiang, Zhao-Hui; Zhou, Tao; Zhou, Pei-Ling; Yang, Hui-Jie; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamical properties of electroencephalogram (EEG) signals of humans in sleep. By using a modified random walk method, we demonstrate that scale-invariance is embedded in EEG signals after a detrending procedure is applied. Furthermore, we study the dynamical evolution of the probability density function (PDF) of the detrended EEG signals by nonextensive statistical modeling. It displays a scale-independent property, which is markedly different from the usual scale-dependent PDF evolution and cannot be described by the Fokker-Planck equation.

  13. Detectability of auditory signals presented without defined observation intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, C. S.; Nichols, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    Ability to detect tones in noise was measured without defined observation intervals. Latency density functions were estimated for the first response following a signal and, separately, for the first response following randomly distributed instances of background noise. Detection performance was measured by the maximum separation between the cumulative latency density functions for signal-plus-noise and for noise alone. Values of the index of detectability, estimated by this procedure, were approximately those obtained with a 2-dB weaker signal and defined observation intervals. Simulation of defined- and non-defined-interval tasks with an energy detector showed that this device performs very similarly to the human listener in both cases.

  14. Detectability of auditory signals presented without defined observation intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, C. S.; Nichols, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    Ability to detect tones in noise was measured without defined observation intervals. Latency density functions were estimated for the first response following a signal and, separately, for the first response following randomly distributed instances of background noise. Detection performance was measured by the maximum separation between the cumulative latency density functions for signal-plus-noise and for noise alone. Values of the index of detectability, estimated by this procedure, were approximately those obtained with a 2-dB weaker signal and defined observation intervals. Simulation of defined- and non-defined-interval tasks with an energy detector showed that this device performs very similarly to the human listener in both cases.

  15. Methods and analysis of realizing randomized grouping.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liang-Ping; Bao, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Qi

    2011-07-01

    Randomization is one of the four basic principles of research design. The meaning of randomization includes two aspects: one is to randomly select samples from the population, which is known as random sampling; the other is to randomly group all the samples, which is called randomized grouping. Randomized grouping can be subdivided into three categories: completely, stratified and dynamically randomized grouping. This article mainly introduces the steps of complete randomization, the definition of dynamic randomization and the realization of random sampling and grouping by SAS software.

  16. Random allocation software for parallel group randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Saghaei, Mahmood

    2004-11-09

    Typically, randomization software should allow users to exert control over the different aspects of randomization including block design, provision of unique identifiers and control over the format and type of program output. While some of these characteristics have been addressed by available software, none of them have all of these capabilities integrated into one package. The main objective of the Random Allocation Software project was to enhance the user's control over different aspects of randomization in parallel group trials, including output type and format, structure and ordering of generated unique identifiers and enabling users to specify group names for more than two groups. The program has different settings for: simple and blocked randomizations; length, format and ordering of generated unique identifiers; type and format of program output; and saving sessions for future use. A formatted random list generated by this program can be used directly (without further formatting) by the coordinator of the research team to prepare and encode different drugs or instruments necessary for the parallel group trial. Random Allocation Software enables users to control different attributes of the random allocation sequence and produce qualified lists for parallel group trials.

  17. Random allocation software for parallel group randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Saghaei, Mahmood

    2004-01-01

    Background Typically, randomization software should allow users to exert control over the different aspects of randomization including block design, provision of unique identifiers and control over the format and type of program output. While some of these characteristics have been addressed by available software, none of them have all of these capabilities integrated into one package. The main objective of the Random Allocation Software project was to enhance the user's control over different aspects of randomization in parallel group trials, including output type and format, structure and ordering of generated unique identifiers and enabling users to specify group names for more than two groups. Results The program has different settings for: simple and blocked randomizations; length, format and ordering of generated unique identifiers; type and format of program output; and saving sessions for future use. A formatted random list generated by this program can be used directly (without further formatting) by the coordinator of the research team to prepare and encode different drugs or instruments necessary for the parallel group trial. Conclusions Random Allocation Software enables users to control different attributes of the random allocation sequence and produce qualified lists for parallel group trials. PMID:15535880

  18. Calcium signaling and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Kass, G E; Orrenius, S

    1999-01-01

    The divalent calcium cation Ca(2+) is used as a major signaling molecule during cell signal transduction to regulate energy output, cellular metabolism, and phenotype. The basis to the signaling role of Ca(2+) is an intricate network of cellular channels and transporters that allow a low resting concentration of Ca(2+) in the cytosol of the cell ([Ca(2+)]i) but that are also coupled to major dynamic and rapidly exchanging stores. This enables extracellular signals from hormones and growth factors to be transduced as [Ca(2+)]i spikes that are amplitude and frequency encoded. There is considerable evidence that a number of toxic environmental chemicals target these Ca(2+) signaling processes, alter them, and induce cell death by apoptosis. Two major pathways for apoptosis will be considered. The first one involves Ca(2+)-mediated expression of ligands that bind to and activate death receptors such as CD95 (Fas, APO-1). In the second pathway, Ca(2+) has a direct toxic effect and its primary targets include the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Mitochondria may respond to an apoptotic Ca(2+) signal by the selective release of cytochrome c or through enhanced production of reactive oxygen species and opening of an inner mitochondrial membrane pore. Toxic agents such as the environmental pollutant tributyltin or the natural plant product thapsigargin, which deplete the ER Ca(2+) stores, will induce as a direct result of this effect the opening of plasma membrane Ca(2+) channels and an ER stress response. In contrast, under some conditions, Ca(2+) signals may be cytoprotective and antagonize the apoptotic machinery. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10229704

  19. An experimental comparison of triggered and random pulse train uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Henzlova, Daniela; Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, Martyn T

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present an experimental comparison of signal-triggered and randomly triggered based analysis algorithms of neutron multiplicity data. Traditional shift register type signal-triggered multiplicity analysis of singles, doubles and triples rates is compared with analysis using randomly triggered gates. Two methods of random gate generation are explored - non-overlapping gates (Feyrunan approach) and periodic overlapping gates (fast accidentals). Using californium sources with low, medium and high rate in combination with AmLi sources (as a surrogate for plutonium) we investigate relative standard deviation (RSD) of data in order to determine if there are parameter spaces in which one of the measurement methods should be preferred. Neutron correlation analysis is a commonly used NDA technique to assay plutonium mass. The data can be collected in two distinct ways: using signal-triggered or randomly triggered counting gates. Analysis algorithms were developed for both approaches to determine singles (S), doubles (D) and triples (7) rates from the measured sample. Currently the most commonly implemented technique to collect neutron coincidence data utilizes shift register based electronics. Shift register uses signal-triggered counting gates to generate foreground multiplicity distribution of correlated+accidental events and a random gate (opened after a predefined long delay following the signal trigger) to generate background multiplicity distribution of accidental events. Modern shift registers include fast accidental option to sample data with a fixed clock frequency. This way a set of overlapping gates is used to generate background multiplicity distributions in order to improve the measurement precision. In parallel to shift register approach the Feynman variance technique is frequently used, which utilizes set of consecutive non-overlapping gates. In general, different user communities (e.g. safeguards, nuclear material accountancy, emergency

  20. Digital servo control of random sound test excitation. [in reverberant acoustic chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakich, R. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A digital servocontrol system for random noise excitation of a test object in a reverberant acoustic chamber employs a plurality of sensors spaced in the sound field to produce signals in separate channels which are decorrelated and averaged. The average signal is divided into a plurality of adjacent frequency bands cyclically sampled by a time division multiplex system, converted into digital form, and compared to a predetermined spectrum value stored in digital form. The results of the comparisons are used to control a time-shared up-down counter to develop gain control signals for the respective frequency bands in the spectrum of random sound energy picked up by the microphones.