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Sample records for randomized controlled experiment

  1. ASSISTments Dataset from Multiple Randomized Controlled Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selent, Douglas; Patikorn, Thanaporn; Heffernan, Neil

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a dataset consisting of data generated from 22 previously and currently running randomized controlled experiments inside the ASSISTments online learning platform. This dataset provides data mining opportunities for researchers to analyze ASSISTments data in a convenient format across multiple experiments at the same time.…

  2. Antenatal hypnosis training and childbirth experience: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Werner, Anette; Uldbjerg, Niels; Zachariae, Robert; Wu, Chun Sen; Nohr, Ellen A

    2013-12-01

    Childbirth is a demanding event in a woman's life. The aim of this study was to explore whether a brief intervention in the form of an antenatal course in self-hypnosis to ease childbirth could improve the childbirth experience. In a randomized, controlled, single-blinded trial, 1,222 healthy nulliparous women were allocated to one of three groups during pregnancy: A hypnosis group participating in three 1-hour sessions teaching self-hypnosis to ease childbirth, a relaxation group receiving three 1-hour lessons in various relaxation methods and Mindfulness, and a usual care group receiving ordinary antenatal care only. Wijmas Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire (W-DEQ) was used to measure the childbirth experience 6 weeks postpartum. The intention-to-treat analysis indicated that women in the hypnosis group experienced their childbirth as better compared with the other two groups (mean W-DEQ score of 42.9 in the Hypnosis group, 47.2 in the Relaxation group, and 47.5 in the Care as usual group (p = 0.01)). The tendency toward a better childbirth experience in the hypnosis group was also seen in subgroup analyses for mode of delivery and for levels of fear. In this large randomized controlled trial, a brief course in self-hypnosis improved the women's childbirth experience. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Women's experiences as members of attention control and experimental intervention groups in a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Beal, Claudia C; Stuifbergen, Alexa; Volker, Deborah; Becker, Heather

    2009-12-01

    Attention control groups are often used in research testing the efficacy of psychosocial and behavioural interventions in order to control for placebo effects. The authors conducted a descriptive qualitative study to investigate how participants viewed their experiences in attention control and experimental intervention groups following a randomized controlled trial for women with fibromyalgia syndrome. Moderately structured interviews were conducted with 18 women (12 from the experimental intervention group and 6 from the attention control group). Members of the control group reported some benefits but few behavioural changes as a result of participating in the RCT, and some participants expressed disappointment at not receiving the intervention. Perceptions of changes in attitudes towards fibromyalgia syndrome and behaviours reported by the intervention group appear to be consistent with the theory underlying the intervention. Possible placebo effects identified in both groups include negative and positive social interactions with other participants.

  4. Randomized Controlled Trial of Teaching Methods: Do Classroom Experiments Improve Economic Education in High Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenkopf, Gerald; Sulser, Pascal A.

    2016-01-01

    The authors present results from a comprehensive field experiment at Swiss high schools in which they compare the effectiveness of teaching methods in economics. They randomly assigned classes into an experimental and a conventional teaching group, or a control group that received no specific instruction. Both teaching treatments improve economic…

  5. Effect of an Immersive Preoperative Virtual Reality Experience on Patient Reported Outcomes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Bekelis, Kimon; Calnan, Daniel; Simmons, Nathan; MacKenzie, Todd A; Kakoulides, George

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effect of exposure to a virtual reality (VR) environment preoperatively on patient-reported outcomes for surgical operations. There is a scarcity of well-developed quality improvement initiatives targeting patient satisfaction. We performed a randomized controlled trial of patients undergoing cranial and spinal operations in a tertiary referral center. Patients underwent a 1:1 randomization to an immersive preoperative VR experience or standard preoperative experience stratified on type of operation. The primary outcome measures were the Evaluation du Vecu de l'Anesthesie Generale (EVAN-G) score and the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information (APAIS) score, as markers of the patient's experience during the surgical encounter. During the study period, a total of 127 patients (mean age 55.3 years, 41.9% females) underwent randomization. The average EVAN-G score was 84.3 (standard deviation, SD, 6.4) after VR, and 64.3 (SD, 11.7) after standard preoperative experience (difference, 20.0; 95% confidence interval, CI, 16.6-23.3). Exposure to an immersive VR experience also led to higher APAIS score (difference, 29.9; 95% CI, 24.5-35.2). In addition, VR led to lower preoperative VAS stress score (difference, -41.7; 95% CI, -33.1 to -50.2), and higher preoperative VAS preparedness (difference, 32.4; 95% CI, 24.9-39.8), and VAS satisfaction (difference, 33.2; 95% CI, 25.4-41.0) scores. No association was identified with VAS stress score (difference, -1.6; 95% CI, -13.4 to 10.2). In a randomized controlled trial, we demonstrated that patients exposed to preoperative VR had increased satisfaction during the surgical encounter. Harnessing the power of this technology, hospitals can create an immersive environment that minimizes stress, and enhances the perioperative experience.

  6. Does Provider Self-Reporting of Etiquette Behaviors Improve Patient Experience? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Zishan; Qayyum, Rehan; Bertram, Amanda; Durkin, Nowella; Kebede, Sosena; Ponor, Lucia; Oduyebo, Ibironke; Allen, Lisa; Brotman, Daniel J

    2017-06-01

    There is a glaring lack of published evidence-based strategies to improve the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) patient experience scores on the physician domain. Strategies that have been used are resource intensive and difficult to sustain. We hypothesized that prompting providers to assess their own etiquette-based practices every 2 weeks over the course of 1 year would improve patient experience on the physician domain. Randomized controlled trial. 4 acute care hospitals. Hospitalists. Hospitalists were randomized to the study or the control arm. The study arm was prompted every 2 weeks for 12 months to report how frequently they engaged in 7 best-practice bedside etiquette behaviors. Control arm participants received similarly worded questions on quality improvement behaviors. Provider experience scores were calculated from the physician HCAHPS and Press Ganey survey provider items. Physicians reported high rates of etiquette-based behavior at baseline, and this changed modestly over the study period. Self-reported etiquette behaviors were not associated with experience scores. The difference in difference analysis of the baseline and postintervention physician experience scores between the intervention arm and the control arm was not statistically significant (P = 0.71). In this 12-month study, biweekly reflection and reporting of best-practice bedside etiquette behaviors did not result in significant improvement on physician domain experience scores. It is likely that hospitalists' self-assessment of their bedside etiquette may not reflect patient perception of these behaviors. Furthermore, hospitalists may be resistant to improvement in this area since they rate themselves highly at baseline. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2017;12:402-406. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine

  7. Recruitment experience for a pragmatic randomized controlled trial: Using EMR initiatives and minimizing research infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Christine Lm; Ownby, Dennis R; Zoratti, Edward; Johnson, Dayna; Considine, Shannon; Bourgeois, Renee; Melkonian, Christina; Miree, Cheryl; Johnson, Christine Cole; Lu, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Modernized approaches to multisite randomized controlled trials (RCT) include the use of electronic medical records (EMR) for recruitment, remote data capture (RDC) for multisite data collection, and strategies to reduce the need for research infrastructure. These features facilitate the conduct of pragmatic trials, or trials conducted in "real life" settings. We describe the recruitment experience of an RCT to evaluate a clinic-based intervention targeting urban youth with asthma. Using encounter and prescription databases, a list of potentially-eligible patients was linked to the Epic appointment scheduling system. Patients were enrolled during a scheduled visit and then electronically randomized to a tailored versus generic online intervention. 1146 appointments for 580 eligible patients visiting 5 clinics were identified, of which 45.9% (266/580) were randomized to reach targeted enrollment (n=250). RDC facilitated multisite enrollment. Intervention content was further personalized through real- time entry of asthma medications prescribed at the clinic visit. EMR monitoring helped with recruitment trouble-shooting. Systemic challenges included a system-wide EMR transition and a system-wide reorganization of clinic staffing. Modernized RCTs can accelerate translation of research findings. Electronic initiatives facilitated implementation of this RCT; however, adaptations to recruitment strategies resulted in a more "explanatory" framework. .

  8. Patterned feeding experience for preterm infants: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pickler, Rita H; Wetzel, Paul A; Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Tubbs-Cooley, Heather L; Moore, Margo

    2015-06-04

    Neurobehavioral disabilities occur in 5-15% of preterm infants with an estimated 50-70% of very low birth weight preterm infants experiencing later dysfunction, including cognitive, behavioral, and social delays that often persist into adulthood. Factors implicated in poor neurobehavioral and developmental outcomes are hospitalization in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and inconsistent caregiving patterns. Although much underlying brain damage occurs in utero or shortly after birth, neuroprotective strategies can stop lesions from progressing, particularly when these strategies are used during the most sensitive periods of neural plasticity occurring months before term age. The purpose of this randomized trial is to test the effect of a patterned feeding experience on preterm infants' neurobehavioral organization and development, cognitive function, and clinical outcomes. This trial uses an experimental, longitudinal, 2-group design with 120 preterm infants. Infants are enrolled within the first week of life and randomized to an experimental group receiving a patterned feeding experience from the first gavage feeding through discharge or to a control group receiving usual feeding care experience. The intervention involves a continuity of tactile experiences associated with feeding to train and build neuronal networks supportive of normal infant feeding experience. Primary outcomes are neurobehavioral organization as measured by Neurobehavioral Assessment of the Preterm Infant at 3 time points: the transition to oral feedings, NICU discharge, and 2 months corrected age. Secondary aims are cognitive function measured using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition at 6 months corrected age, neurobehavioral development (sucking organization, feeding performance, and heart rate variability), and clinical outcomes (length of NICU stay and time to full oral feeding). The potential effects of demographic and biobehavioral factors

  9. Ethical challenges in cluster randomized controlled trials: experiences from public health interventions in Africa and Asia

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Kishwar; Fernandez, Armida; Manandhar, Dharma S; Mwansambo, Charles W; Tripathy, Prasanta; Costello, Anthony M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Public health interventions usually operate at the level of groups rather than individuals, and cluster randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are one means of evaluating their effectiveness. Using examples from six such trials in Bangladesh, India, Malawi and Nepal, we discuss our experience of the ethical issues that arise in their conduct. We set cluster RCTs in the broader context of public health research, highlighting debates about the need to reconcile individual autonomy with the common good and about the ethics of public health research in low-income settings in general. After a brief introduction to cluster RCTs, we discuss particular challenges we have faced. These include the nature of – and responsibility for – group consent, and the need for consent by individuals within groups to intervention and data collection. We discuss the timing of consent in relation to the implementation of public health strategies, and the problem of securing ethical review and approval in a complex domain. Finally, we consider the debate about benefits to control groups and the standard of care that they should receive, and the issue of post-trial adoption of the intervention under test. PMID:19876544

  10. Do motion controllers make action video games less sedentary? A randomized experiment.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Elizabeth J; Tate, Deborah F; Ward, Dianne S; Ribisl, Kurt M; Bowling, J Michael; Kalyanaraman, Sriram

    2012-01-01

    Sports- and fitness-themed video games using motion controllers have been found to produce physical activity. It is possible that motion controllers may also enhance energy expenditure when applied to more sedentary games such as action games. Young adults (N = 100) were randomized to play three games using either motion-based or traditional controllers. No main effect was found for controller or game pair (P > .12). An interaction was found such that in one pair, motion control (mean [SD] 0.96 [0.20] kcal · kg(-1) · hr(-1)) produced 0.10 kcal · kg(-1) · hr(-1) (95% confidence interval 0.03 to 0.17) greater energy expenditure than traditional control (0.86 [0.17] kcal · kg(-1) · hr(-1), P = .048). All games were sedentary. As currently implemented, motion control is unlikely to produce moderate intensity physical activity in action games. However, some games produce small but significant increases in energy expenditure, which may benefit health by decreasing sedentary behavior.

  11. Do Motion Controllers Make Action Video Games Less Sedentary? A Randomized Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Elizabeth J.; Tate, Deborah F.; Ward, Dianne S.; Ribisl, Kurt M.; Bowling, J. Michael; Kalyanaraman, Sriram

    2012-01-01

    Sports- and fitness-themed video games using motion controllers have been found to produce physical activity. It is possible that motion controllers may also enhance energy expenditure when applied to more sedentary games such as action games. Young adults (N = 100) were randomized to play three games using either motion-based or traditional controllers. No main effect was found for controller or game pair (P > .12). An interaction was found such that in one pair, motion control (mean [SD] 0.96 [0.20] kcal · kg−1 · hr−1) produced 0.10 kcal · kg−1 · hr−1 (95% confidence interval 0.03 to 0.17) greater energy expenditure than traditional control (0.86 [0.17] kcal · kg−1 · hr−1, P = .048). All games were sedentary. As currently implemented, motion control is unlikely to produce moderate intensity physical activity in action games. However, some games produce small but significant increases in energy expenditure, which may benefit health by decreasing sedentary behavior. PMID:22028959

  12. Effects of 25 mg oxazepam on emotional mimicry and empathy for pain: a randomized controlled experiment

    PubMed Central

    Sörman, Karolina; Olsson, Andreas; Petrovic, Predrag

    2017-01-01

    Emotional mimicry and empathy are mechanisms underlying social interaction. Benzodiazepines have been proposed to inhibit empathy and promote antisocial behaviour. First, we aimed to investigate the effects of oxazepam on emotional mimicry and empathy for pain, and second, we aimed to investigate the association of personality traits to emotional mimicry and empathy. Participants (n=76) were randomized to 25 mg oxazepam or placebo. Emotional mimicry was examined using video clips with emotional expressions. Empathy was investigated by pain stimulating the participant and a confederate. We recorded self-rated experience, activity in major zygomatic and superciliary corrugator muscles, skin conductance, and heart rate. In the mimicry experiment, oxazepam inhibited corrugator activity. In the empathy experiment, oxazepam caused increased self-rated unpleasantness and skin conductance. However, oxazepam specifically inhibited neither emotional mimicry nor empathy for pain. Responses in both experiments were associated with self-rated empathic, psychopathic and alexithymic traits. The present results do not support a specific effect of 25 mg oxazepam on emotional mimicry or empathy. PMID:28405353

  13. Protocol for the Locomotor Experience Applied Post-stroke (LEAPS) trial: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Pamela W; Sullivan, Katherine J; Behrman, Andrea L; Azen, Stanley P; Wu, Samuel S; Nadeau, Stephen E; Dobkin, Bruce H; Rose, Dorian K; Tilson, Julie K

    2007-01-01

    Background Locomotor training using body weight support and a treadmill as a therapeutic modality for rehabilitation of walking post-stroke is being rapidly adopted into clinical practice. There is an urgent need for a well-designed trial to determine the effectiveness of this intervention. The objective of the Locomotor Experience Applied Post-Stroke (LEAPS) trial is to determine if there is a difference in the proportion of participants who recover walking ability at one year post-stroke when randomized to a specialized locomotor training program (LTP), conducted at 2- or 6-months post-stroke, or those randomized to a home based non-specific, low intensity exercise intervention (HEP) provided 2 months post-stroke. We will determine if the timing of LTP delivery affects gait speed at 1 year and whether initial impairment severity interacts with the timing of LTP. The effect of number of treatment sessions will be determined by changes in gait speed taken pre-treatment and post-12, -24, and -36 sessions. Methods/Design We will recruit 400 adults with moderate or severe walking limitations within 30 days of stroke onset. At two months post stroke, participants are stratified by locomotor impairment severity as determined by overground walking speed and randomly assigned to one of three groups: (a) LTP-Early; (b) LTP-Late or (c) Home Exercise Program -Early. The LTP program includes body weight support on a treadmill and overground training. The LTP and HEP interventions are delivered for 36 sessions over 12 weeks. Primary outcome measure include successful walking recovery defined as the achievement of a 0.4 m/s gait speed or greater by persons with initial severe gait impairment or the achievement of a 0.8 m/s gait speed or greater by persons with initial moderate gait impairment. LEAPS is powered to detect a 20% difference in the proportion of participants achieving successful locomotor recovery between the LTP groups and the HEP group, and a 0.1 m/s mean

  14. Improving recruitment and retention for an online randomized controlled trial: experience from the Youthnet study.

    PubMed

    Bull, S S; Vallejos, D; Levine, D; Ortiz, C

    2008-09-01

    The objective of the study was to present recruitment and retention findings for an Internet based HIV prevention trial evaluated using a randomized controlled design among 15-25-year-olds accessing a website on the Internet. We used a combination of automated electronic and personalized approaches to increase and diversify recruitment, verify participant eligibility and increase retention. We posted 3.5 million banner advertisements, 9354 individuals clicked on the advertisement, 8950 completed an eligibility screener and 3298 a baseline survey; we flagged 675 of these as suspicious and enrolled 2623 individuals. Of these, 2082 (79%) completed a follow-up at one-month and 1398 (53%) completed a two-month follow-up. This retention rate is the highest we have seen for an Internet-based HIV-prevention trial. Our procedures can be replicated in other trials. We stress the importance of using a combination of automated and personalized techniques to increase enrollment, verify eligibility and promote retention.

  15. Can virtual nature improve patient experiences and memories of dental treatment? A study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tanja-Dijkstra, Karin; Pahl, Sabine; White, Mathew P; Andrade, Jackie; May, Jon; Stone, Robert J; Bruce, Malcolm; Mills, Ian; Auvray, Melissa; Gabe, Rhys; Moles, David R

    2014-03-22

    Dental anxiety and anxiety-related avoidance of dental care create significant problems for patients and the dental profession. Distraction interventions are used in daily medical practice to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. There is evidence that exposure to natural scenery is beneficial for patients and that the use of virtual reality (VR) distraction is more effective than other distraction interventions, such as watching television. The main aim of this randomized controlled trial is to determine whether the use of VR during dental treatment can improve the overall dental experience and recollections of treatment for patients, breaking the negative cycle of memories of anxiety leading to further anxiety, and avoidance of future dental appointments. Additionally, the aim is to test whether VR benefits dental patients with all levels of dental anxiety or whether it could be especially beneficial for patients suffering from higher levels of dental anxiety. The third aim is to test whether the content of the VR distraction can make a difference for its effectiveness by comparing two types of virtual environments, a natural environment and an urban environment. The effectiveness of VR distraction will be examined in patients 18 years or older who are scheduled to undergo dental treatment for fillings and/or extractions, with a maximum length of 30 minutes. Patients will be randomly allocated into one of three groups. The first group will be exposed to a VR of a natural environment. The second group will be exposed to a VR of an urban environment. A third group consists of patients who receive standard care (control group). Primary outcomes relate to patients' memories of the dental treatment one week after treatment: (a) remembered pain, (b) intrusive thoughts and (c) vividness of memories. Other measures of interest are the dental experience, the treatment experience and the VR experience. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN41442806.

  16. A practical limit to trials needed in one-person randomized controlled experiments.

    PubMed

    Alemi, Roshan; Alemi, Farrokh

    2007-01-01

    Recently in this journal, J. Olsson and colleagues suggested the use of factorial experimental designs to guide a patient's efforts to choose among multiple interventions. These authors argue that factorial design, where every possible combination of the interventions is tried, is superior to sequential trial and errors. Factorial design is efficient in identifying the effectiveness of interventions (factor effect). Most patients care only about feeling better and not why their conditions are improving. If the goal of the patient is to get better and not to estimate the factor effect, then no control groups are needed. In this article, we show a modification in the factorial design of experiments proposed by Olsson and colleagues where a full-factorial design is planned, but experimentation is stopped when the patient's condition improves. With this modification, the number of trials is radically fewer than those needed by factorial design. For example, a patient trying out 4 different interventions with a median probability of success of .50 is expected to need 2 trials before stopping the experimentation in comparison with 32 in a full-factorial design.

  17. Reconciling research and implementation in micro health insurance experiments in India: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Microinsurance or Community-Based Health Insurance is a promising healthcare financing mechanism, which is increasingly applied to aid rural poor persons in low-income countries. Robust empirical evidence on the causal relations between Community-Based Health Insurance and healthcare utilisation, financial protection and other areas is scarce and necessary. This paper contains a discussion of the research design of three Cluster Randomised Controlled Trials in India to measure the impact of Community-Based Health Insurance on several outcomes. Methods/Design Each trial sets up a Community-Based Health Insurance scheme among a group of micro-finance affiliate families. Villages are grouped into clusters which are congruous with pre-existing social groupings. These clusters are randomly assigned to one of three waves of implementation, ensuring the entire population is offered Community-Based Health Insurance by the end of the experiment. Each wave of treatment is preceded by a round of mixed methods evaluation, with quantitative, qualitative and spatial evidence on impact collected. Improving upon practices in published Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial literature, we detail how research design decisions have ensured that both the households offered insurance and the implementers of the Community-Based Health Insurance scheme operate in an environment replicating a non-experimental implementation. Discussion When a Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial involves randomizing within a community, generating adequate and valid conclusions requires that the research design must be made congruous with social structures within the target population, to ensure that such trials are conducted in an implementing environment which is a suitable analogue to that of a non-experimental implementing environment. PMID:21988774

  18. Reconciling research and implementation in micro health insurance experiments in India: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Conor; Panda, Pradeep; Van de Poel, Ellen; Radermacher, Ralf; Dror, David M

    2011-10-11

    Microinsurance or Community-Based Health Insurance is a promising healthcare financing mechanism, which is increasingly applied to aid rural poor persons in low-income countries. Robust empirical evidence on the causal relations between Community-Based Health Insurance and healthcare utilisation, financial protection and other areas is scarce and necessary. This paper contains a discussion of the research design of three Cluster Randomised Controlled Trials in India to measure the impact of Community-Based Health Insurance on several outcomes. Each trial sets up a Community-Based Health Insurance scheme among a group of micro-finance affiliate families. Villages are grouped into clusters which are congruous with pre-existing social groupings. These clusters are randomly assigned to one of three waves of implementation, ensuring the entire population is offered Community-Based Health Insurance by the end of the experiment. Each wave of treatment is preceded by a round of mixed methods evaluation, with quantitative, qualitative and spatial evidence on impact collected. Improving upon practices in published Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial literature, we detail how research design decisions have ensured that both the households offered insurance and the implementers of the Community-Based Health Insurance scheme operate in an environment replicating a non-experimental implementation. When a Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial involves randomizing within a community, generating adequate and valid conclusions requires that the research design must be made congruous with social structures within the target population, to ensure that such trials are conducted in an implementing environment which is a suitable analogue to that of a non-experimental implementing environment. © 2011 Doyle et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  19. Cumulative recruitment experience in two large single-center randomized, controlled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Galbreath, Autumn Dawn; Smith, Brad; Wood, Pamela; Forkner, Emma; Peters, Jay I

    2008-05-01

    Trial recruitment is challenging for researchers, who frequently overestimate the pool of qualified, willing participants. Little has been written about recruitment and the comparative success of recruitment strategies. We describe one center's experience with recruitment in two regional single-center clinical trials with a combined total of 1971 participants. The heart failure trial was conducted between 1999 and 2003. The asthma trial was performed between 2003 and 2006. Trial databases were queried for referral source of each individual. Data were analyzed for effectiveness of referral source using three measures: percentage of enrollment due to that source, subject commitment to the trial (retention rate), and economics (cost per enrollee). 47.8% of CHF enrollees came from computer-generated lists or from healthcare provider referrals. Average marketing cost for enrollees and completers was $29.20 and $41.96 respectively. The most economical marketing strategy was self-referral in response to flyers. Most asthma participants (53.5%) were referred from healthcare providers, mailings to lists from local healthcare institutions, or self-referred in response to flyers. Average marketing cost for enrollees and completers was $20.44 and $38.10 respectively. The most economical marketing strategy was patient mailings. Retention rates were not markedly different among referral sources in either trial. In order to be considered effective, a recruitment strategy must demonstrate a balance between response to recruitment, retention rates, and economics. Despite the differences between these two clinical trials, the most effective recruitment strategies in both trials were mailings to locally-generated, targeted lists, and referrals from healthcare providers.

  20. "Open mesh" or "strictly selected population" recruitment? The experience of the randomized controlled MeMeMe trial.

    PubMed

    Cortellini, Mauro; Berrino, Franco; Pasanisi, Patrizia

    2017-01-01

    Among randomized controlled trials (RCTs), trials for primary prevention require large samples and long follow-up to obtain a high-quality outcome; therefore the recruitment process and the drop-out rates largely dictate the adequacy of the results. We are conducting a Phase III trial on persons with metabolic syndrome to test the hypothesis that comprehensive lifestyle changes and/or metformin treatment prevents age-related chronic diseases (the MeMeMe trial, EudraCT number: 2012-005427-32, also registered on ClinicalTrials.gov [NCT02960711]). Here, we briefly analyze and discuss the reasons which may lead to participants dropping out from trials. In our experience, participants may back out of a trial for different reasons. Drug-induced side effects are certainly the most compelling reason. But what are the other reasons, relating to the participants' perception of the progress of the trial which led them to withdraw after randomization? What about the time-dependent drop-out rate in primary prevention trials? The primary outcome of this analysis is the point of drop-out from trial, defined as the time from the randomization date to the withdrawal date. Survival functions were non-parametrically estimated using the product-limit estimator. The curves were statistically compared using the log-rank test ( P =0.64, not significant). Researchers involved in primary prevention RCTs seem to have to deal with the paradox of the proverbial "short blanket syndrome". Recruiting only highly motivated candidates might be useful for the smooth progress of the trial but it may lead to a very low enrollment rate. On the other hand, what about enrolling all the eligible subjects without considering their motivation? This might boost the enrollment rate, but it can lead to biased results on account of large proportions of drop-outs. Our experience suggests that participants do not change their mind depending on the allocation group (intervention or control). There is no single

  1. Clinical learning experiences of nursing students using an innovative clinical partnership model: A non-randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chan, Aileen W K; Tang, Fiona W K; Choi, Kai Chow; Liu, Ting; Taylor-Piliae, Ruth E

    2018-06-05

    Clinical practicum is a major learning component for pre-registration nursing students. Various clinical practicum models have been used to facilitate students' clinical learning experiences, employing both university-based and hospital-based clinical teachers. Considering the strengths and limitations of these clinical practicum models, along with nursing workforce shortages, we developed and tested an innovative clinical partnership model (CPM) in Hong Kong. To evaluate an innovative CPM among nursing students actual and preferred clinical learning environment, compared with a conventional facilitation model (CFM). A non-randomized controlled trial examining students' clinical experiences, comparing the CPM (supervised by hospital clinical teacher) with the CFM (supervised by university clinical teacher). One university in Hong Kong. Pre-registration nursing students (N = 331), including bachelor of nursing (n = 246 year three-BN) and masters-entry nursing (n = 85 year one-MNSP). Students were assigned to either the CPM (n = 48 BN plus n = 85 MNSP students) or the CFM (n = 198 BN students) for their clinical practice experiences in an acute medical-surgical ward. Clinical teachers supervised between 6 and 8 students at a time, during these clinical practicums (duration = 4-6 weeks). At the end of the clinical practicum, students were invited to complete the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory (CLEI). Analysis of covariance was used to compare groups; adjusted for age, gender and prior work experience. A total of 259 students (mean age = 22 years, 76% female, 81% prior work experience) completed the CLEI (78% response rate). Students had higher scores on preferred versus actual experiences, in all domains of the CLEI. CPM student experiences indicated a higher preferred task orientation (p = 0.004), while CFM student experiences indicated a higher actual (p < 0.001) and preferred individualization (p = 0

  2. Therapist Experience and Knowledge Acquisition in Internet-Delivered CBT for Social Anxiety Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per; Furmark, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    Background Guided internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) has been tested in several trials on social anxiety disorder (SAD) with moderate to large effects. The aims of this study were threefold. First, to compare the effects of ICBT including online discussion forum with a moderated online discussion forum only. Second, to investigate if knowledge about SAD increased following treatment and third to compare the effects of inexperienced versus experienced therapists on patient outcomes. Methods A total of 204 participants with a primary diagnosis of SAD were included and randomized to either guided ICBT or the control condition. ICBT consisted of a 9-week treatment program which was guided by either psychology students at MSc level (n = 6) or by licensed psychologists with previous experience of ICBT (n = 7). A knowledge test dealing with social anxiety was administered before and after treatment. Measures of social anxiety and secondary outcomes dealing with general anxiety, depression, and quality of life were administered before and after treatment. In addition, a 1-year follow-up was conducted on the treated individuals. Results Immediately following treatment, the ICBT group showed superior outcome on the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale self-report version with a between group posttreatment Hedges g effect size of g = 0.75. In addition, significant differences on all the secondary outcomes were observed. Gains were well maintained one year later. Knowledge, as assessed by the knowledge test, increased following treatment with little gain in the control group. Therapist experience did not result in different outcomes, but experienced therapists logged in less frequently compared to the inexperienced therapists, suggesting that they needed less time to support patients. Discussion We conclude that guided ICBT reduce symptoms of SAD, increase knowledge about SAD and that therapist experience does not make a difference apart from the

  3. Experiences Recruiting Indian Worksites for an Integrated Health Protection and Health Promotion Randomized Control Trial in Maharashtra, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulman Cordeira, L.; Pednekar, M. S.; Nagler, E. M.; Gautam, J.; Wallace, L.; Stoddard, A. M.; Gupta, P. C.; Sorensen, G. C.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the recruitment strategies utilized in the Mumbai Worksites Tobacco Control Study, a cluster randomized trial testing the effectiveness of an integrated tobacco control and occupational safety and health program in Indian manufacturing worksites. From June 2012 to June 2013, 20 companies were recruited.…

  4. Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Young, John; Chapman, Katie; Nixon, Jane; Patel, Anita; Holloway, Ivana; Mellish, Kirste; Anwar, Shamaila; Breen, Rachel; Knapp, Martin; Murray, Jenni; Farrin, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— We developed a new postdischarge system of care comprising a structured assessment covering longer-term problems experienced by patients with stroke and their carers, linked to evidence-based treatment algorithms and reference guides (the longer-term stroke care system of care) to address the poor longer-term recovery experienced by many patients with stroke. Methods— A pragmatic, multicentre, cluster randomized controlled trial of this system of care. Eligible patients referred to community-based Stroke Care Coordinators were randomized to receive the new system of care or usual practice. The primary outcome was improved patient psychological well-being (General Health Questionnaire-12) at 6 months; secondary outcomes included functional outcomes for patients, carer outcomes, and cost-effectiveness. Follow-up was through self-completed postal questionnaires at 6 and 12 months. Results— Thirty-two stroke services were randomized (29 participated); 800 patients (399 control; 401 intervention) and 208 carers (100 control; 108 intervention) were recruited. In intention to treat analysis, the adjusted difference in patient General Health Questionnaire-12 mean scores at 6 months was −0.6 points (95% confidence interval, −1.8 to 0.7; P=0.394) indicating no evidence of statistically significant difference between the groups. Costs of Stroke Care Coordinator inputs, total health and social care costs, and quality-adjusted life year gains at 6 months, 12 months, and over the year were similar between the groups. Conclusions— This robust trial demonstrated no benefit in clinical or cost-effectiveness outcomes associated with the new system of care compared with usual Stroke Care Coordinator practice. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN 67932305. PMID:26152298

  5. Understanding the Patient Experience with Carcinoid Syndrome: Exit Interviews from a Randomized, Placebo-controlled Study of Telotristat Ethyl.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Lowell; Ervin, Claire; Lapuerta, Pablo; Kulke, Matthew H; Kunz, Pamela; Bergsland, Emily; Hörsch, Dieter; Metz, David C; Pasieka, Janice; Pavlakis, Nick; Pavel, Marianne; Caplin, Martyn; Öberg, Kjell; Ramage, John; Evans, Emily; Yang, Qi Melissa; Jackson, Shanna; Arnold, Karie; Law, Linda; DiBenedetti, Dana B

    2017-11-01

    Telotristat ethyl, an oral tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, is intended to treat carcinoid syndrome by reducing serotonin production. Telotristat ethyl was evaluated in TELESTAR, a Phase III study for patients who had carcinoid syndrome with at least 4 bowel movements (BMs) per day and who were receiving somatostatin analogue therapy. This interview substudy was conducted to provide insight into the patient experience in TELESTAR and to help understand whether reductions in BM frequency (the primary end point) and other symptoms were clinically meaningful. Participating sites were asked to invite (before randomization) all eligible patients to telephone interviews scheduled at the end of the double-blind treatment period. Patients and interviewers were blinded to treatment. All 35 interviewed participants reported diarrhea and/or excessive BMs at baseline. Patients reported that these symptoms negatively affected emotional, social, physical, and occupational well-being. Prespecified criteria for treatment response (achieving ≥30% reduction in BM frequency for at least 50% of the days) were met by 8 of 26 patients taking telotristat ethyl and 1 of 9 patients taking placebo. All 8 patients taking telotristat ethyl described clinically meaningful reductions in BM frequency and were very satisfied with the ability of the study drug to control their carcinoid syndrome symptoms. Overall, reports of being very satisfied were observed in 12 patients taking telotristat ethyl and 0 taking placebo. Patient interviews revealed that TELESTAR patients, at baseline, were significantly affected by their high BM frequency. Patient reports of their clinical trial experience supported the significance of the primary end point and clinical responder analysis in TELESTAR, helping identify and understand clinically meaningful change produced by telotristat ethyl. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Can Facebook Be Used for Research? Experiences Using Facebook to Recruit Pregnant Women for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Laura M; Manca, Donna P

    2016-01-01

    Background Recruitment is often a difficult and costly part of any human research study. Social media and other emerging means of mass communication hold promise as means to complement traditional strategies used for recruiting participants because they can reach a large number of people in a short amount of time. With the ability to target a specified audience, paid Facebook advertisements have potential to reach future research participants of a specific demographic. This paper describes the experiences of a randomized controlled trial in Edmonton, Alberta, attempting to recruit healthy pregnant women between 8 and 20 weeks’ gestation for participation in a prenatal study. Various traditional recruitment approaches, in addition to paid Facebook advertisements were trialed. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of paid advertisements on Facebook as a platform for recruiting pregnant women to a randomized controlled trial in comparison with traditional recruitment approaches. Methods Recruitment using traditional approaches occurred for 7 months, whereas Facebook advertisements ran for a total of 26 days. Interested women were prompted to contact the study staff for a screening call to determine study eligibility. Costs associated with each recruitment approach were recorded and used to calculate the cost to recruit eligible participants. Performance of Facebook advertisements was monitored using Facebook Ads Manager. Results Of the 115 women included, 39.1% (n=45) of the women who contacted study staff heard about the study through Facebook, whereas 60.9% (n=70) of them heard about it through traditional recruitment approaches. During the 215 days (~7 months) that the traditional approaches were used, the average rate of interest was 0.3 (0.2) women/day, whereas the 26 days of Facebook advertisements resulted in an average rate of interest of 2.8 (1.7) women/day. Facebook advertisements cost Can $506.91 with a cost per eligible participant of Cad $20.28. In

  7. Can Facebook Be Used for Research? Experiences Using Facebook to Recruit Pregnant Women for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Adam, Laura M; Manca, Donna P; Bell, Rhonda C

    2016-09-21

    Recruitment is often a difficult and costly part of any human research study. Social media and other emerging means of mass communication hold promise as means to complement traditional strategies used for recruiting participants because they can reach a large number of people in a short amount of time. With the ability to target a specified audience, paid Facebook advertisements have potential to reach future research participants of a specific demographic. This paper describes the experiences of a randomized controlled trial in Edmonton, Alberta, attempting to recruit healthy pregnant women between 8 and 20 weeks' gestation for participation in a prenatal study. Various traditional recruitment approaches, in addition to paid Facebook advertisements were trialed. To evaluate the effectiveness of paid advertisements on Facebook as a platform for recruiting pregnant women to a randomized controlled trial in comparison with traditional recruitment approaches. Recruitment using traditional approaches occurred for 7 months, whereas Facebook advertisements ran for a total of 26 days. Interested women were prompted to contact the study staff for a screening call to determine study eligibility. Costs associated with each recruitment approach were recorded and used to calculate the cost to recruit eligible participants. Performance of Facebook advertisements was monitored using Facebook Ads Manager. Of the 115 women included, 39.1% (n=45) of the women who contacted study staff heard about the study through Facebook, whereas 60.9% (n=70) of them heard about it through traditional recruitment approaches. During the 215 days (~7 months) that the traditional approaches were used, the average rate of interest was 0.3 (0.2) women/day, whereas the 26 days of Facebook advertisements resulted in an average rate of interest of 2.8 (1.7) women/day. Facebook advertisements cost Can $506.91 with a cost per eligible participant of Cad $20.28. In comparison, the traditional approaches

  8. After the Gold Rush: Questioning the "Gold Standard" and Reappraising the Status of Experiment and Randomized Controlled Trials in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The past few years have seen a resurgence of faith in experimentation in education inquiry, and particularly in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Proponents of such research have succeeded in bringing into common parlance the term "gold standard," which suggests that research emerging from any other design frame fails to achieve the…

  9. Promoting positive condom use experiences among young black MSM: a randomized controlled trial of a brief, clinic-based intervention.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Richard A; Mena, Leandro; Smith, Rachel Vickers

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study is to determine, among young Black men who have sex with men (YBMSM), the 12-month efficacy of a single-session, clinic-based intervention promoting condom use to enhance sexual pleasure (purpose 1) and the use of condoms from the start-to-finish of anal sex (purpose 2). A pre-test, post-test randomized controlled trial was conducted, using a 12-month period of follow-up observation, in STI clinics. Data from 394 YBMSM completing baseline and 12-month follow-up assessments were analyzed. The experimental condition comprised a one-to-one, interactive program (Focus on the Future) designed for tailored delivery. Regarding study purpose 1, in an age-adjusted linear regression model for 277 HIV-uninfected men, there was a significant effect of the intervention (Beta=0.13, P =0.036) relative to more favorable sexual experiences when using condoms. Regarding study purpose 2, in an adjusted logistic regression model, for HIV-uninfected men, there was a significant effect of the intervention (AOR=0.54, P =0.048) relative to using condoms from start-to-finish of anal sex. Significant effects for HIV-infected men were not observed. A small, but non-significant, effect was observed relative to men's self-report of always using condoms. This single-session program may be a valuable counseling tool for use in conjunction with pre-exposure prophylaxis-related care for HIV-uninfected YBMSM.

  10. Personal experiences and emotionality in health-related knowledge exchange in Internet forums: a randomized controlled field experiment comparing responses to facts vs personal experiences.

    PubMed

    Kimmerle, Joachim; Bientzle, Martina; Cress, Ulrike

    2014-12-04

    On the Internet, people share personal experiences as well as facts and objective information. This also holds true for the exchange of health-related information in a variety of Internet forums. In online discussions about health topics, both fact-oriented and strongly personal contributions occur on a regular basis. In this field experiment, we examined in what way the particular type of contribution (ie, factual information vs personal experiences) has an impact on the subsequent communication in health-related Internet forums. For this purpose, we posted parallelized queries to 28 comparable Internet forums; queries were identical with regard to the information contained but included either fact-oriented descriptions or personal experiences related to measles vaccination. In the factual information condition, we posted queries to the forums that contained the neutral summary of a scientific article. In the personal experiences condition, we posted queries to the forums that contained the same information as in the first condition, but were framed as personal experiences We found no evidence that personal experiences evoked more responses (mean 3.79, SD 3.91) from other members of the Internet forums than fact-oriented contributions (mean 2.14, SD 2.93, t26=0.126, P=.219). But personal experiences elicited emotional replies (mean 3.17, SD 1.29) from other users to a greater extent than fact-oriented contributions (mean 2.13, SD 1.29, t81=3.659, P<.001). We suggest that personal experiences elicited more emotional replies due to the process of emotional anchoring of people's own style of communication. We recommend future studies should aim at testing the hypotheses with more general and with less emotionally charged topics, constructing different fact-oriented posts, and examining additional potential factors of influence such as personality factors or particular communication situations.

  11. Nonresponse bias in randomized controlled experiments in criminology: Putting the Queensland Community Engagement Trial (QCET) under a microscope.

    PubMed

    Antrobus, Emma; Elffers, Henk; White, Gentry; Mazerolle, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this article is to examine whether or not the results of the Queensland Community Engagement Trial (QCET)-a randomized controlled trial that tested the impact of procedural justice policing on citizen attitudes toward police-were affected by different types of nonresponse bias. We use two methods (Cochrane and Elffers methods) to explore nonresponse bias: First, we assess the impact of the low response rate by examining the effects of nonresponse group differences between the experimental and control conditions and pooled variance under different scenarios. Second, we assess the degree to which item response rates are influenced by the control and experimental conditions. Our analysis of the QCET data suggests that our substantive findings are not influenced by the low response rate in the trial. The results are robust even under extreme conditions, and statistical significance of the results would only be compromised in cases where the pooled variance was much larger for the nonresponse group and the difference between experimental and control conditions was greatly diminished. We also find that there were no biases in the item response rates across the experimental and control conditions. RCTs that involve field survey responses-like QCET-are potentially compromised by low response rates and how item response rates might be influenced by the control or experimental conditions. Our results show that the QCET results were not sensitive to the overall low response rate across the experimental and control conditions and the item response rates were not significantly different across the experimental and control groups. Overall, our analysis suggests that the results of QCET are robust and any biases in the survey responses do not significantly influence the main experimental findings.

  12. Fear of childbirth in expectant fathers, subsequent childbirth experience and impact of antenatal education: subanalysis of results from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Malin; Rudman, Ann; Waldenström, Ulla; Kieler, Helle

    2013-08-01

    To explore if antenatal fear of childbirth in men affects their experience of the birth event and if this experience is associated with type of childbirth preparation. Data from a randomized controlled multicenter trial on antenatal education. 15 antenatal clinics in Sweden between January 2006 and May 2007. 762 men, of whom 83 (10.9%) suffered from fear of childbirth. Of these 83 men, 39 were randomized to psychoprophylaxis childbirth preparation where men were trained to coach their partners during labor and 44 to standard care antenatal preparation for childbirth and parenthood without such training. Experience of childbirth was compared between men with and without fear of childbirth regardless of randomization, and between fearful men in the randomized groups. Analyses by logistic regression adjusted for sociodemographic variables. Self-reported data on experience of childbirth including an adapted version of the Wijma Delivery Experience Questionnaire (W-DEQ B). Men with antenatal fear of childbirth more often experienced childbirth as frightening than men without fear: adjusted odds ratio 4.68, 95% confidence interval 2.67-8.20. Men with antenatal fear in the psychoprophylaxis group rated childbirth as frightening less often than those in standard care: adjusted odds ratio 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.10-0.95. Men who suffer from antenatal fear of childbirth are at higher risk of experiencing childbirth as frightening. Childbirth preparation including training as a coach may help fearful men to a more positive childbirth experience. Additional studies are needed to support this conclusion. © 2013 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  13. Experiences of being a control group: lessons from a UK-based randomized controlled trial of group singing as a health promotion initiative for older people.

    PubMed

    Skingley, Ann; Bungay, Hilary; Clift, Stephen; Warden, June

    2014-12-01

    Existing randomized controlled trials within the health field suggest that the concept of randomization is not always well understood and that feelings of disappointment may occur when participants are not placed in their preferred arm. This may affect a study's rigour and ethical integrity if not addressed. We aimed to test whether these issues apply to a healthy volunteer sample within a health promotion trial of singing for older people. Written comments from control group participants at two points during the trial were analysed, together with individual semi-structured interviews with a small sample (n = 11) of this group. We found that motivation to participate in the trial was largely due to the appeal of singing and disappointment resulted from allocation to the control group. Understanding of randomization was generally good and feelings of disappointment lessened over time and with a post-research opportunity to sing. Findings suggest that measures should be put in place to minimize the potential negative impacts of randomized controlled trials in health promotion research. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Does attention bias modification improve attentional control? A double-blind randomized experiment with individuals with social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Heeren, Alexandre; Mogoaşe, Cristina; McNally, Richard J; Schmitz, Anne; Philippot, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    People with anxiety disorders often exhibit an attentional bias for threat. Attention bias modification (ABM) procedure may reduce this bias, thereby diminishing anxiety symptoms. In ABM, participants respond to probes that reliably follow non-threatening stimuli (e.g., neutral faces) such that their attention is directed away from concurrently presented threatening stimuli (e.g., disgust faces). Early studies showed that ABM reduced anxiety more than control procedures lacking any contingency between valenced stimuli and probes. However, recent work suggests that no-contingency training and training toward threat cues can be as effective as ABM in reducing anxiety, implying that any training may increase executive control over attention, thereby helping people inhibit their anxious thoughts. Extending this work, we randomly assigned participants with DSM-IV diagnosed social anxiety disorder to either training toward non-threat (ABM), training toward threat, or no-contingency condition, and we used the attention network task (ANT) to assess all three components of attention. After two training sessions, subjects in all three conditions exhibited indistinguishably significant declines from baseline to post-training in self-report and behavioral measures of anxiety on an impromptu speech task. Moreover, all groups exhibited similarly significant improvements on the alerting and executive (but not orienting) components of attention. Implications for ABM research are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Learning to experience side effects after antidepressant intake - Results from a randomized, controlled, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Rheker, Julia; Winkler, Alexander; Doering, Bettina K; Rief, Winfried

    2017-02-01

    Side effects play a key role in patients' failure to take antidepressants. There is evidence that verbal suggestions and informed consent elicit expectations that can in turn trigger the occurrence of side effects. Prior experience or learning mechanisms are also assumed to contribute to the development of side effects, although their role has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we examined whether an antidepressant's side effects can be learned via Pavlovian conditioning. Participants (n = 39) were randomly allocated to one of two groups and were exposed to a classical conditioning procedure. During acquisition, 19 participants received amitriptyline and 20 participants received a placebo pill. Pills were taken for four nights together with a novel-tasting drink. After a washout phase, both groups received a placebo pill together with the novel-tasting drink (evocation). Side effects were assessed via the Generic Assessment of Side Effects Scale prior to acquisition (baseline), after acquisition, and after evocation. A score of antidepressant-specific side effects was calculated. Participants taking amitriptyline reported significantly more antidepressant-specific side effects after acquisition compared to both baseline and the placebo group. After evocation, participants who underwent the conditioning procedure with amitriptyline reported significantly more antidepressant-specific side effects than those who never received amitriptyline, even though both groups received a placebo. Our results indicate that antidepressant side effects can be learned using a conditioning paradigm and evoked via a placebo pill when applied with the same contextual factors as the verum.

  16. Patients' and therapists' experiences of general change mechanisms during bug-in-the-eye and delayed video-based supervised cognitive-behavioral therapy. A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Probst, Thomas; Jakob, Marion; Kaufmann, Yvonne M; Müller-Neng, Julia M B; Bohus, Martin; Weck, Florian

    2018-04-01

    This secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial investigated whether bug-in-the-eye (BITE) supervision (live computer-based supervision during a psychotherapy session) affects the manner in which patients and therapists experience general change mechanisms (GCMs) during cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). A total of 23 therapists were randomized either to the BITE condition or the control condition (delayed video-based [DVB] supervision). After each session, both patients (BITE: n = 19; DVB: n = 23) and therapists (BITE: n = 11; DVB: n = 12) completed the Helping Alliance Questionnaire (HAQ) and the Bernese Post Session Report (BPSR). The HAQ total score and the 3 secondary factors of the BPSR (interpersonal experiences, intrapersonal experiences, problem actuation) functioned as GCMs. Multilevel models were performed. For patients, GCMs did not develop differently between BITE and DVB during CBT. Therapists rated the alliance as well as interpersonal and intrapersonal experiences not significantly different between BITE and DVB during CBT, but they perceived problem actuation to increase significantly more in BITE than in DVB (p < .05). BITE supervision might be helpful in encouraging CBT therapists to apply interventions, which focus on the activation of relevant problems and related emotions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Study protocol: an early intervention program to improve motor outcome in preterm infants: a randomized controlled trial and a qualitative study of physiotherapy performance and parental experiences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Knowledge about early physiotherapy to preterm infants is sparse, given the risk of delayed motor development and cerebral palsy. Methods/Design A pragmatic randomized controlled study has been designed to assess the effect of a preventative physiotherapy program carried out in the neonatal intensive care unit. Moreover, a qualitative study is carried out to assess the physiotherapy performance and parents' experiences with the intervention. The aim of the physiotherapy program is to improve motor development i.e. postural control and selective movements in these infants. 150 infants will be included and randomized to either intervention or standard follow-up. The infants in the intervention group will be given specific stimulation to facilitate movements based on the individual infant's development, behavior and needs. The physiotherapist teaches the parents how to do the intervention and the parents receive a booklet with photos and descriptions of the intervention. Intervention is carried out twice a day for three weeks (week 34, 35, 36 postmenstrual age). Standardized tests are carried out at baseline, term age and at three, six, 12 and 24 months corrected age. In addition eight triads (infant, parent and physiotherapist) are observed and videotaped in four clinical encounters each to assess the process of physiotherapy performance. The parents are also interviewed on their experiences with the intervention and how it influences on the parent-child relationship. Eight parents from the follow up group are interviewed about their experience. The interviews are performed according to the same schedule as the standardized measurements. Primary outcome is at two years corrected age. Discussion The paper presents the protocol for a randomized controlled trial designed to study the effect of physiotherapy to preterm infants at neonatal intensive care units. It also studies physiotherapy performance and the parent's experiences with the intervention

  18. Learning to dislike safe water products: results from a randomized controlled trial of the effects of direct and peer experience on willingness to pay.

    PubMed

    Luoto, Jill; Mahmud, Minhaj; Albert, Jeff; Luby, Stephen; Najnin, Nusrat; Unicomb, Leanne; Levine, David I

    2012-06-05

    Low-cost point-of-use (POU) safe water products have the potential to reduce waterborne illness, but adoption by the global poor remains low. We performed an eight-month randomized trial of four low-cost household water treatment products in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Intervention households (n = 600) received repeated educational messages about the importance of drinking safe water along with consecutive two-month free trials with each of four POU products in random order. Households randomly assigned to the control group (n = 200) did not receive free products or repeated educational messages. Households' willingness to pay for these products was quite low on average (as measured by bids in an incentive-compatible real-money auction), although a modest share was willing to pay the actual or expected retail price for low-cost chlorine-based products. Furthermore, contrary to our hypotheses that both one's own personal experience and the influence of one's peers would increase consumers' willingness to pay, direct experience significantly decreased mean bids by 18-55% for three of the four products and had no discernible effect on the fourth. Neighbor experience also did not increase bids. Widespread dissemination of safe water products is unlikely until we better understand the preferences and aspirations of these at-risk populations.

  19. Central coordination as an alternative for local coordination in a multicenter randomized controlled trial: the FAITH trial experience.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Stephanie M; Viveiros, Helena; Heetveld, Martin J; Swiontkowski, Marc F; Bhandari, Mohit; Patka, Peter; Van Lieshout, Esther M M

    2012-01-08

    Surgeons in the Netherlands, Canada and the US participate in the FAITH trial (Fixation using Alternative Implants for the Treatment of Hip fractures). Dutch sites are managed and visited by a financed central trial coordinator, whereas most Canadian and US sites have local study coordinators and receive per patient payment. This study was aimed to assess how these different trial management strategies affected trial performance. Details related to obtaining ethics approval, time to trial start-up, inclusion, and percentage completed follow-ups were collected for each trial site and compared. Pre-trial screening data were compared with actual inclusion rates. Median trial start-up ranged from 41 days (P25-P75 10-139) in the Netherlands to 232 days (P25-P75 98-423) in Canada (p = 0.027). The inclusion rate was highest in the Netherlands; median 1.03 patients (P25-P75 0.43-2.21) per site per month, representing 34.4% of the total eligible population. It was lowest in Canada; 0.14 inclusions (P25-P75 0.00-0.28), representing 3.9% of eligible patients (p < 0.001). The percentage completed follow-ups was 83% for Canadian and Dutch sites and 70% for US sites (p = 0.217). In this trial, a central financed trial coordinator to manage all trial related tasks in participating sites resulted in better trial progression and a similar follow-up. It is therefore a suitable alternative for appointing these tasks to local research assistants. The central coordinator approach can enable smaller regional hospitals to participate in multicenter randomized controlled trials. Circumstances such as available budget, sample size, and geographical area should however be taken into account when choosing a management strategy. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00761813.

  20. The impact of presentation style on the retention of online health information: a randomized-controlled experiment.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Anne-Linda; Camerini, Luca; Schulz, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    The Internet plays an increasingly important role in health education, providing laypeople with information about health-related topics that range from disease-specific contexts to general health promotion. Compared to traditional health education, the Internet allows the use of multimedia applications that offer promise to enhance individuals' health knowledge and literacy. This study aims at testing the effect of multimedia presentation of health information on learning. Relying on an experimental design, it investigates how retention of information differs for text-only presentation, image-only presentation, and multimedia (text and image) presentation of online health information. Two hundred and forty students were randomly assigned to four groups each exposed to a different website version. Three groups were exposed to the same information using text only, image only, or text and image presentation. A fourth group received unrelated information (control group). Retention was assessed by the means of a recognition test. To examine a possible interaction between website version and recognition test, half of the students received a recognition test in text form and half of them received a recognition test in imagery form. In line with assumptions from Dual Coding Theory, students exposed to the multimedia (text and image) presentation recognized significantly more information than students exposed to the text-only presentation. This did not hold for students exposed to the image-only presentation. The impact of presentation style on retention scores was moderated by the way retention was assessed for image-only presentation, but not for text-only or multimedia presentation. Possible explanations and implications for the design of online health education interventions are discussed.

  1. Mindfulness Training Increases Momentary Positive Emotions and Reward Experience in Adults Vulnerable to Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geschwind, Nicole; Peeters, Frenk; Drukker, Marjan; van Os, Jim; Wichers, Marieke

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) increases momentary positive emotions and the ability to make use of natural rewards in daily life. Method: Adults with a life-time history of depression and current residual depressive symptoms (mean age = 43.9 years, SD = 9.6; 75% female; all Caucasian) were randomized to…

  2. Individual Differences Methods for Randomized Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.

    2011-01-01

    Experiments allow researchers to randomly vary the key manipulation, the instruments of measurement, and the sequences of the measurements and manipulations across participants. To date, however, the advantages of randomized experiments to manipulate both the aspects of interest and the aspects that threaten internal validity have been primarily…

  3. Does implementing a development plan for user participation in a mental hospital change patients' experience? A non-randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Rise, Marit B; Steinsbekk, Aslak

    2015-10-01

    Governments in several countries attempt to strengthen user participation through instructing health-care organizations to implement user participation initiatives. There is, however, little knowledge on the effect on patients' experience from comprehensive plans for enhancing user participation in whole health service organizations. To investigate whether implementing a development plan intending to enhance user participation in a mental hospital had any effect on the patients' experience of user participation. A non-randomized controlled study including patients in three mental hospitals in Central Norway, one intervention hospital and two control hospitals. A development plan intended to enhance user participation was implemented in the intervention hospital as a part of a larger reorganizational process. The plan included establishment of a patient education centre and a user office, purchase of user expertise, appointment of contact professionals for next of kin and improvement of the centre's information and the professional culture. Perceptions of Care, Inpatient Treatment Alliance Scale and questions made for this study. A total of 1651 patients participated. Implementing a development plan in a mental hospital intending to enhance user participation had no significant effect on the patients' experience of user participation. The lack of effect can be due to inappropriate initiatives or challenges in implementation processes. Further research should ensure that initiatives and implementation processes are appropriate to impact the patients' experience. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Trial participants' experiences of early enhanced speech and language therapy after stroke compared with employed visitor support: a qualitative study nested within a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Young, Alys; Gomersall, Timothy; Bowen, Audrey

    2013-02-01

    To explore trial participants' experiences of the process and outcomes of early, enhanced speech and language therapy after stroke with support from an employed visitor. Qualitative study nested within a randomized controlled trial. Twney-two people who, after stroke, had a diagnosis of aphasia (12), dysarthria (5) or both (5) and who participated in the ACT NoW study. Eight English NHS usual care settings. Individual interviews. Thematic content analysis assisted by a bespoke data transformation protocol for incorporating non-verbal and semantically ambiguous data. Participants highly regarded regular and sustained contact with someone outside of immediate family/friends who engaged them in deliberate activities/communication in the early months after stroke. Participants identified differences in the process of intervention between speech and language therapists and employed visitors. But no major discriminations were made between the impact or value of this contact according to whether provided by a speech and language therapist or employed visitor. Participant-defined criteria for effectiveness of contact included: impact on mood and confidence, self-recognition of progress and the meeting of individual needs. As in the randomized controlled trial, participants reported no evidence of added benefit of early communication therapy beyond that from attention control. The findings do not imply that regular contact with any non-professional can have beneficial effects for someone with aphasia or dysarthria in the early weeks following a stroke. The study points to specific conditions that would have to be met for contact to have a positive effect.

  5. Effect of a Website That Presents Patients’ Experiences on Self-Efficacy and Patient Competence of Colorectal Cancer Patients: Web-Based Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Giesler, Jürgen M; Keller, Bettina; Repke, Tim; Leonhart, Rainer; Weis, Joachim; Muckelbauer, Rebecca; Rieckmann, Nina; Müller-Nordhorn, Jacqueline; Lucius-Hoene, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients often seek other patients’ experiences with the disease. The Internet provides a wide range of opportunities to share and learn about other people’s health and illness experiences via blogs or patient-initiated online discussion groups. There also exists a range of medical information devices that include experiential patient information. However, there are serious concerns about the use of such experiential information because narratives of others may be powerful and pervasive tools that may hinder informed decision making. The international research network DIPEx (Database of Individual Patients’ Experiences) aims to provide scientifically based online information on people’s experiences with health and illness to fulfill patients’ needs for experiential information, while ensuring that the presented information includes a wide variety of possible experiences. Objective The aim is to evaluate the colorectal cancer module of the German DIPEx website krankheitserfahrungen.de with regard to self-efficacy for coping with cancer and patient competence. Methods In 2015, a Web-based randomized controlled trial was conducted using a two-group between-subjects design and repeated measures. The study sample consisted of individuals who had been diagnosed with colorectal cancer within the past 3 years or who had metastasis or recurrent disease. Outcome measures included self-efficacy for coping with cancer and patient competence. Participants were randomly assigned to either an intervention group that had immediate access to the colorectal cancer module for 2 weeks or to a waiting list control group. Outcome criteria were measured at baseline before randomization and at 2 weeks and 6 weeks Results The study randomized 212 persons. On average, participants were 54 (SD 11.1) years old, 58.8% (124/211) were female, and 73.6% (156/212) had read or heard stories of other patients online before entering the study, thus excluding any influence of the

  6. Effect of a Website That Presents Patients' Experiences on Self-Efficacy and Patient Competence of Colorectal Cancer Patients: Web-Based Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Giesler, Jürgen M; Keller, Bettina; Repke, Tim; Leonhart, Rainer; Weis, Joachim; Muckelbauer, Rebecca; Rieckmann, Nina; Müller-Nordhorn, Jacqueline; Lucius-Hoene, Gabriele; Holmberg, Christine

    2017-10-13

    Patients often seek other patients' experiences with the disease. The Internet provides a wide range of opportunities to share and learn about other people's health and illness experiences via blogs or patient-initiated online discussion groups. There also exists a range of medical information devices that include experiential patient information. However, there are serious concerns about the use of such experiential information because narratives of others may be powerful and pervasive tools that may hinder informed decision making. The international research network DIPEx (Database of Individual Patients' Experiences) aims to provide scientifically based online information on people's experiences with health and illness to fulfill patients' needs for experiential information, while ensuring that the presented information includes a wide variety of possible experiences. The aim is to evaluate the colorectal cancer module of the German DIPEx website krankheitserfahrungen.de with regard to self-efficacy for coping with cancer and patient competence. In 2015, a Web-based randomized controlled trial was conducted using a two-group between-subjects design and repeated measures. The study sample consisted of individuals who had been diagnosed with colorectal cancer within the past 3 years or who had metastasis or recurrent disease. Outcome measures included self-efficacy for coping with cancer and patient competence. Participants were randomly assigned to either an intervention group that had immediate access to the colorectal cancer module for 2 weeks or to a waiting list control group. Outcome criteria were measured at baseline before randomization and at 2 weeks and 6 weeks. The study randomized 212 persons. On average, participants were 54 (SD 11.1) years old, 58.8% (124/211) were female, and 73.6% (156/212) had read or heard stories of other patients online before entering the study, thus excluding any influence of the colorectal cancer module on

  7. Random Assignment: Practical Considerations from Field Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunford, Franklyn W.

    1990-01-01

    Seven qualitative issues associated with randomization that have the potential to weaken or destroy otherwise sound experimental designs are reviewed and illustrated via actual field experiments. Issue areas include ethics and legality, liability risks, manipulation of randomized outcomes, hidden bias, design intrusiveness, case flow, and…

  8. Economic evaluation of an experience sampling method intervention in depression compared with treatment as usual using data from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Simons, Claudia J P; Drukker, Marjan; Evers, Silvia; van Mastrigt, Ghislaine A P G; Höhn, Petra; Kramer, Ingrid; Peeters, Frenk; Delespaul, Philippe; Menne-Lothmann, Claudia; Hartmann, Jessica A; van Os, Jim; Wichers, Marieke

    2017-12-29

    Experience sampling, a method for real-time self-monitoring of affective experiences, holds opportunities for person-tailored treatment. By focussing on dynamic patterns of positive affect, experience sampling method interventions (ESM-I) accommodate strategies to enhance personalized treatment of depression-at potentially low-costs. This study aimed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of an experience sampling method intervention in patients with depression, from a societal perspective. Participants were recruited between January 2010 and February 2012 from out-patient mental health care facilities in or near the Dutch cities of Eindhoven and Maastricht, and through local advertisements. Out-patients diagnosed with major depression (n = 101) receiving pharmacotherapy were randomized into: (i) ESM-I consisting of six weeks of ESM combined with weekly feedback regarding the individual's positive affective experiences, (ii) six weeks of ESM without feedback, or (iii) treatment as usual only. Alongside this randomised controlled trial, an economic evaluation was conducted consisting of a cost-effectiveness and a cost-utility analysis, using Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) as outcome, with willingness-to-pay threshold for a QALY set at €50,000 (based on Dutch guidelines for moderate severe to severe illnesses). The economic evaluation showed that ESM-I is an optimal strategy only when willingness to pay is around €3000 per unit HDRS and around €40,500 per QALY. ESM-I was the least favourable treatment when willingness to pay was lower than €30,000 per QALY. However, at the €50,000 willingness-to-pay threshold, ESM-I was, with a 46% probability, the most favourable treatment (base-case analysis). Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of these results. We may tentatively conclude that ESM-I is a cost-effective add-on intervention to pharmacotherapy in outpatients with major depression. Netherlands

  9. Effects of a Cognitive Rehearsal Program on Interpersonal Relationships, Workplace Bullying, Symptom Experience, and Turnover Intention among Nurses: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jiyeon; Kim, Jeung Im; Yun, Seonyoung

    2017-10-01

    This research aimed to investigate the effects of a cognitive rehearsal program (CRP) on workplace bullying among nurses. A randomized controlled trial was performed. Participants were 40 nurses working in different university hospitals in B city, South Korea. The experimental group was provided with a 20-hour CRP comprising scenarios on bullying situations, standard communication, and role-playing. To evaluate effects of the CRP, we measured interpersonal relationships, workplace bullying, symptom experience, and turnover intention at preand post-intervention. Follow-up effect was measured in the experimental group only at 4 weeks after the intervention. After the intervention, there were significant differences in interpersonal relationships (F=6.21, p=.022) and turnover intention (F=5.55, p=.024) between experimental and wait-list groups. However, there was no significant difference in workplace bullying or symptom experience between the 2 groups. The beneficial effects on interpersonal relationships and turnover intention lasted at least up to 4 weeks after CRP. The CRP for workplace bullying improves interpersonal relationships and decreases turnover intention. So it can be utilized as one of the personal coping strategies to reduce the the turnover among nurses. Further studies on the effects of unit- or hospital-based CRP and on the long-term effects of CRP are necessary. © 2017 Korean Society of Nursing Science

  10. Impact of one-to-one tutoring on fundamentals of laparoscopic surgery (FLS) passing rate in a single center experience outside the United States: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gheza, Federico; Raimondi, Paolo; Solaini, Leonardo; Coccolini, Federico; Baiocchi, Gian Luca; Portolani, Nazario; Tiberio, Guido Alberto Massimo

    2018-04-11

    Outside the US, FLS certification is not required and its teaching methods are not well standardized. Even if the FLS was designed as "stand alone" training system, most of Academic Institution offer support to residents during training. We present the first systematic application of FLS in Italy. Our aim was to evaluate the role of mentoring/coaching on FLS training in terms of the passing rate and global performance in the search for resource optimization. Sixty residents in general surgery, obstetrics & gynecology, and urology were selected to be enrolled in a randomized controlled trial, practicing FLS with the goal of passing a simulated final exam. The control group practiced exclusively with video material from SAGES, whereas the interventional group was supported by a mentor. Forty-six subjects met the requirements and completed the trial. For the other 14 subjects no results are available for comparison. One subject for each group failed the exam, resulting in a passing rate of 95.7%, with no obvious differences between groups. Subgroup analysis did not reveal any difference between the groups for FLS tasks. We confirm that methods other than video instruction and deliberate FLS practice are not essential to pass the final exam. Based on these results, we suggest the introduction of the FLS system even where a trained tutor is not available. This trial is the first single institution application of the FLS in Italy and one of the few experiences outside the US. Trial Number: NCT02486575 ( https://www.clinicaltrials.gov ).

  11. Evaluating the capabilities model of dementia care: a non-randomized controlled trial exploring resident quality of life and care staff attitudes and experiences.

    PubMed

    Moyle, Wendy; Venturato, Lorraine; Cooke, Marie; Murfield, Jenny; Griffiths, Susan; Hughes, Julian; Wolf, Nathan

    2016-07-01

    This 12 month, Australian study sought to compare the Capabilities Model of Dementia Care (CMDC) with usual long-term care (LTC), in terms of (1) the effectiveness of the CMDC in assisting care staff to improve Quality Of Life (QOL) for older people with dementia; and (2) whether implementation of the CMDC improved staff attitudes towards, and experiences of working and caring for the person with dementia. A single blind, non-randomized controlled trial design, involving CMDC intervention group (three facilities) and a comparison usual LTC practice control group (one facility), was conducted from August 2010 to September 2011. Eighty-one staff members and 48 family members of a person with dementia were recruited from these four LTC facilities. At baseline, 6 and 12 months, staff completed a modified Staff Experiences of Working with Demented Residents questionnaire (SEWDR), and families completed the Quality of Life - Alzheimer's Disease questionnaire (QOL-AD). LTC staff in the usual care group reported significantly lower SEWDR scores (i.e. less work satisfaction) than those in the CMDC intervention group at 12 months (p = 0.005). Similarly, family members in the comparison group reported significantly lower levels of perceived QOL for their relative with dementia (QOL-AD scores) than their counterparts in the CMDC intervention group at 12 months (p = 0.012). Although the study has a number of limitations the CMDC appears to be an effective model of dementia care - more so than usual LTC practice. The CMDC requires further evaluation with participants from a diverse range of LTC facilities and stages of cognitive impairment.

  12. An Online Health Prevention Intervention for Youth with Addicted or Mentally Ill Parents: Experiences and Perspectives of Participants and Providers from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Woolderink, Marla; Bindels, Jill A P M; Evers, Silvia M A A; Paulus, Aggie T G; van Asselt, Antoinette D I; van Schayck, Onno C P

    2015-12-02

    Mental illnesses affect many people around the world, either directly or indirectly. Families of persons suffering from mental illness or addiction suffer too, especially their children. In the Netherlands, 864,000 parents meet the diagnostic criteria for a mental illness or addiction. Evidence shows that offspring of mentally ill or addicted parents are at risk for developing mental disorders or illnesses themselves. The Kopstoring course is an online 8-week group course with supervision by 2 trained psychologists or social workers, aimed to prevent behavioral and psychological problems for children (aged 16 to 25 years) of parents with mental health problems or addictions. The course addresses themes such as roles in the family and mastery skills. An online randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted to assess the effectiveness of the Kopstoring course. The aim was to gain knowledge about expectations, experiences, and perspectives of participants and providers of the online Kopstoring course. A process evaluation was performed to evaluate the online delivery of Kopstoring and the experiences and perspectives of participants and providers of Kopstoring. Interviews were performed with members from both groups. Participants were drawn from a sample from the Kopstoring RCT. Thirteen participants and 4 providers were interviewed. Five main themes emerged from these interviews: background, the requirements for the intervention, experience with the intervention, technical aspects, and research aspects. Overall, participants and providers found the intervention to be valuable because it was online; therefore, protecting their anonymity was considered a key component. Most barriers existed in the technical sphere. Additional barriers existed with conducting the RCT, namely gathering informed consent and gathering parental consent in the case of minors. This study provides valuable insight into participants' and providers' experiences and expectations with the online

  13. Microcomputer Controlled Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkman, John; Knaggs, David

    1982-01-01

    Describes a microcomputer-controlled system which determines the current/voltage characteristics of a resistor, lamp, and diode, detailing system elements, construction, and providing printout of the program developed to provide control and arithmetic functions necessary to complete the experiment. (SK)

  14. Medical Students' and Tutors' Experiences of Directed and Self-Directed Learning Programs in Evidence-Based Medicine: A Qualitative Evaluation Accompanying a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Peter; Oterholt, Christina; Nordheim, Lena; Bjorndal, Arild

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study aims to interpret the results of a randomized controlled trial comparing two educational programs (directed learning and self-directed learning) in evidence-based medicine (EBM) for medical students at the University of Oslo from 2002 to 2003. There is currently very little comparative educational research in this field. In…

  15. Comparison of post-obturation pain experience following one-visit and two-visit root canal treatment on teeth with vital pulps: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Xu, P; Ren, L; Dong, G; Ye, L

    2010-08-01

    To compare the incidence and intensity of post-obturation pain after one- or two-visit root canal treatment (RCT) on anterior teeth with vital pulps and a single root and canal in a randomized controlled trial. One hundred patients requiring RCT on permanent anterior teeth with vital pulps preoperatively were included. The patients were assigned randomly into two groups of 50 patients each. After local anaesthesia, isolation, access and pulp extirpation, the canals of all teeth were prepared using engine-driven rotary ProTaper nickel-titanium instruments in a crown-down technique and irrigated with 2.5% NaOCl. The teeth in group 1 (n = 50) were filled with AH Plus sealer and gutta-percha using a lateral compaction technique at the first visit, whilst those in group 2 (n = 50) were medicated with a calcium hydroxide paste, a sterile dry cotton pellet and Caviton and scheduled for a second visit 7 days later. A modified verbal descriptor scale was used to measure preoperative pain and post-obturation pain at 6, 24, 48 h and 1 week after operation. Chi-square tests and independent-sample T-tests were used to compare the incidence and intensity of post-obturation pain of two groups at each interval. Eleven patients were excluded from the study as they failed to follow the scheduled revisit or their selected teeth had more than one root canal. Data were obtained from the remaining 89 patients. Forty-three patients were undergoing one-visit treatment (group 1) and 46 undergoing two-visit treatment (group 2). Most patients in both groups reported no pain or only slight pain within each post-obturation interval, only one in group 1 and one in group 2 had flare-ups and slight swelling. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence and intensity of post-obturation pain experienced by two groups. The incidence and intensity of post-obturation pain experience following one- or two-visit RCT on teeth with vital pulps and a single canal were not

  16. The Impact of Personality Factors and Preceding User Comments on the Processing of Research Findings on Deep Brain Stimulation: A Randomized Controlled Experiment in a Simulated Online Forum

    PubMed Central

    Feinkohl, Insa; Flemming, Danny; Cress, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Background Laypeople frequently discuss medical research findings on Web-based platforms, but little is known about whether they grasp the tentativeness that is inherent in these findings. Potential influential factors involved in understanding medical tentativeness have hardly been assessed to date. Objective The research presented here aimed to examine the effects of personality factors and of other users’ previous contributions in a Web-based forum on laypeople’s understanding of the tentativeness of medical research findings, using the example of research on deep brain stimulation. Methods We presented 70 university students with an online news article that reported findings on applying deep brain stimulation as a novel therapeutic method for depression, which participants were unfamiliar with. In a randomized controlled experiment, we manipulated the forum such that the article was either accompanied by user comments that addressed the issue of tentativeness, by comments that did not address this issue, or the article was accompanied by no comments at all. Participants were instructed to write their own individual user comments. Their scientific literacy, epistemological beliefs, and academic self-efficacy were measured. The outcomes measured were perceived tentativeness and tentativeness addressed in the participants’ own comments. Results More sophisticated epistemological beliefs enhanced the perception of tentativeness (standardized β=.26, P=.034). Greater scientific literacy (stand. β=.25, P=.025) and greater academic self-efficacy (stand. β=.31, P=.007) were both predictors of a more extensive discussion of tentativeness in participants’ comments. When forum posts presented in the experiment addressed the issue of tentativeness, participants’ subsequent behavior tended to be consistent with what they had read in the forum, F 2,63=3.66; P=.049, ηp 2=.092. Conclusions Students’ understanding of the tentativeness of research findings on deep

  17. The Impact of Personality Factors and Preceding User Comments on the Processing of Research Findings on Deep Brain Stimulation: A Randomized Controlled Experiment in a Simulated Online Forum.

    PubMed

    Feinkohl, Insa; Flemming, Danny; Cress, Ulrike; Kimmerle, Joachim

    2016-03-03

    Laypeople frequently discuss medical research findings on Web-based platforms, but little is known about whether they grasp the tentativeness that is inherent in these findings. Potential influential factors involved in understanding medical tentativeness have hardly been assessed to date. The research presented here aimed to examine the effects of personality factors and of other users' previous contributions in a Web-based forum on laypeople's understanding of the tentativeness of medical research findings, using the example of research on deep brain stimulation. We presented 70 university students with an online news article that reported findings on applying deep brain stimulation as a novel therapeutic method for depression, which participants were unfamiliar with. In a randomized controlled experiment, we manipulated the forum such that the article was either accompanied by user comments that addressed the issue of tentativeness, by comments that did not address this issue, or the article was accompanied by no comments at all. Participants were instructed to write their own individual user comments. Their scientific literacy, epistemological beliefs, and academic self-efficacy were measured. The outcomes measured were perceived tentativeness and tentativeness addressed in the participants' own comments. More sophisticated epistemological beliefs enhanced the perception of tentativeness (standardized β=.26, P=.034). Greater scientific literacy (stand. β=.25, P=.025) and greater academic self-efficacy (stand. β=.31, P=.007) were both predictors of a more extensive discussion of tentativeness in participants' comments. When forum posts presented in the experiment addressed the issue of tentativeness, participants' subsequent behavior tended to be consistent with what they had read in the forum, F2,63=3.66; P=.049, ηp(2)=.092. Students' understanding of the tentativeness of research findings on deep brain stimulation in an online forum is influenced by a

  18. Impact of the condolence letter on the experience of bereaved families after a death in intensive care: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kentish-Barnes, Nancy; Chevret, Sylvie; Azoulay, Elie

    2016-02-20

    As intensive care mortality is high, end of life is a subject of major concern for intensivists. In this context, relatives are particularly vulnerable and prone to post-ICU syndrome, in the form of high levels of anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress, and complicated grief. Grieving families suffer from a feeling of abandonment and evoke the need to get back in touch with the team to ask questions and remove doubts, but very few actually do. Aiding families during the grieving process is an important aspect of palliative care. A condolence letter represents an opportunity to recognize the pain of the family member and the strong tie that linked the family member to the ICU team, and to offer additional information if necessary. The goal of the study is to measure the impact of the condolence letter on the experience of bereaved families after a death in the ICU. Our hypothesis is that a post-death follow-up in the form of a condolence letter sent by the ICU physician who was in charge of the patient may help to reduce the risks of presenting symptoms of anxiety/depression, post-traumatic stress, and complicated grief. This is a randomized, controlled, multicenter study. Research will compare two groups of bereaved family members: one group that does not receive a condolence letter (control) and one group that receives a condolence letter 15 days after the death (intervention). Each of the 22 participating centers will include 12 relatives. Participating relatives will be followed up by phone with a call at 1 month and one at 6 months to complete questionnaires, permitting evaluation of post-ICU burden. The main outcome is anxiety and depression measured at 1 month. Other outcomes include evaluation of quality of dying and death, post-traumatic stress, and complicated grief. This study will allow us to assess if sending a condolence letter can reduce the risks of presenting symptoms of anxiety and depression, complicated grief, and symptoms of post

  19. How breast cancer patients want to search for and retrieve information from stories of other patients on the internet: an online randomized controlled experiment.

    PubMed

    Overberg, Regina; Otten, Wilma; de Man, Andries; Toussaint, Pieter; Westenbrink, Judith; Zwetsloot-Schonk, Bertie

    2010-03-09

    Other patients' stories on the Internet can give patients information, support, reassurance, and practical advice. We examined which search facility for online stories resulted in patients' satisfaction and search success. This study was a randomized controlled experiment with a 2x2 factorial design conducted online. We facilitated access to 170 stories of breast cancer patients in four ways based on two factors: (1) no versus yes search by story topic, and (2) no versus yes search by writer profile. Dutch speaking women with breast cancer were recruited. Women who gave informed consent were randomly assigned to one of four groups. After searching for stories, women were offered a questionnaire relating to satisfaction with the search facility, the stories retrieved, and impact of the stories on coping with breast cancer. Of 353 enrolled women, 182 (51.6%) completed the questionnaire: control group (n = 37), story topics group (n = 49), writer profile group (n = 51), and combination group (n = 45). Questionnaire completers were evenly distributed over the four groups (chi(2) (3) = 3.7, P = .30). Women who had access to the story topics search facility (yes vs no): were more positive about (mean scores 4.0 vs 3.6, P = .001) and more satisfied with the search facility (mean scores 7.3 vs 6.3, P < .001); were more positive about the number of search options (mean scores 2.3 vs 2.1, P = .04); were better enabled to find desired information (mean scores 3.3 vs 2.8, P = .001); were more likely to recommend the search facility to others or intend to use it themselves (mean scores 4.1 vs 3.5, P < .001); were more positive about how retrieved stories were displayed (mean scores 3.6 vs 3.2, P = .001); retrieved stories that better covered their information needs (mean scores 3.0 vs 2.6, P = .02); were more satisfied with the stories retrieved (mean scores 7.1 vs 6.4, P = .002); and were more likely to report an impact of the stories on coping with breast cancer (mean scores

  20. Packet Randomized Experiments for Eliminating Classes of Confounders

    PubMed Central

    Pavela, Greg; Wiener, Howard; Fontaine, Kevin R.; Fields, David A.; Voss, Jameson D.; Allison, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although randomization is considered essential for causal inference, it is often not possible to randomize in nutrition and obesity research. To address this, we develop a framework for an experimental design—packet randomized experiments (PREs), which improves causal inferences when randomization on a single treatment variable is not possible. This situation arises when subjects are randomly assigned to a condition (such as a new roommate) which varies in one characteristic of interest (such as weight), but also varies across many others. There has been no general discussion of this experimental design, including its strengths, limitations, and statistical properties. As such, researchers are left to develop and apply PREs on an ad hoc basis, limiting its potential to improve causal inferences among nutrition and obesity researchers. Methods We introduce PREs as an intermediary design between randomized controlled trials and observational studies. We review previous research that used the PRE design and describe its application in obesity-related research, including random roommate assignments, heterochronic parabiosis, and the quasi-random assignment of subjects to geographic areas. We then provide a statistical framework to control for potential packet-level confounders not accounted for by randomization. Results PREs have successfully been used to improve causal estimates of the effect of roommates, altitude, and breastfeeding on weight outcomes. When certain assumptions are met, PREs can asymptotically control for packet-level characteristics. This has the potential to statistically estimate the effect of a single treatment even when randomization to a single treatment did not occur. Conclusions Applying PREs to obesity-related research will improve decisions about clinical, public health, and policy actions insofar as it offers researchers new insight into cause and effect relationships among variables. PMID:25444088

  1. Bell experiments with random destination sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sciarrino, Fabio; Mataloni, Paolo; Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche

    2011-03-15

    It is generally assumed that sources randomly sending two particles to one or two different observers, random destination sources (RDSs), cannot be used for genuine quantum nonlocality tests because of the postselection loophole. We demonstrate that Bell experiments not affected by the postselection loophole may be performed with (i) an RDS and local postselection using perfect detectors, (ii) an RDS, local postselection, and fair sampling assumption with any detection efficiency, and (iii) an RDS and a threshold detection efficiency required to avoid the detection loophole. These results allow the adoption of RDS setups which are simpler and more efficient formore » long-distance free-space Bell tests, and extend the range of physical systems which can be used for loophole-free Bell tests.« less

  2. Autoshaping, random control, and omission training in the rat1

    PubMed Central

    Locurto, Charles; Terrace, H. S.; Gibbon, John

    1976-01-01

    The role of the stimulus-reinforcer contingency in the development and maintenance of lever contact responding was studied in hooded rats. In Experiment I, three groups of experimentally naive rats were trained either on autoshaping, omission training, or a random-control procedure. Subjects trained by the autoshaping procedure responded more consistently than did either random-control or omission-trained subjects. The probability of at least one lever contact per trial was slightly higher in subjects trained by the omission procedure than by the random-control procedure. However, these differences were not maintained during extended training, nor were they evident in total lever-contact frequencies. When omission and random-control subjects were switched to the autoshaping condition, lever contacts increased in all animals, but a pronounced retardation was observed in omission subjects relative to the random-control subjects. In addition, subjects originally exposed to the random-control procedure, and later switched to autoshaping, acquired more rapidly than naive subjects that were exposed only on the autoshaping procedure. In Experiment II, subjects originally trained by an autoshaping procedure were exposed either to an omission, a random-control, or an extinction procedure. No differences were observed among the groups either in the rate at which lever contacts decreased or in the frequency of lever contacts at the end of training. These data implicate prior experience in the interpretation of omission-training effects and suggest limitations in the influence of stimulus-reinforcer relations in autoshaping. PMID:16811960

  3. Autoshaping, random control, and omission training in the rat.

    PubMed

    Locurto, C; Terrace, H S; Gibbon, J

    1976-11-01

    The role of the stimulus-reinforcer contingency in the development and maintenance of lever contact responding was studied in hooded rats. In Experiment I, three groups of experimentally naive rats were trained either on autoshaping, omission training, or a random-control procedure. Subjects trained by the autoshaping procedure responded more consistently than did either random-control or omission-trained subjects. The probability of at least one lever contact per trial was slightly higher in subjects trained by the omission procedure than by the random-control procedure. However, these differences were not maintained during extended training, nor were they evident in total lever-contact frequencies. When omission and random-control subjects were switched to the autoshaping condition, lever contacts increased in all animals, but a pronounced retardation was observed in omission subjects relative to the random-control subjects. In addition, subjects originally exposed to the random-control procedure, and later switched to autoshaping, acquired more rapidly than naive subjects that were exposed only on the autoshaping procedure. In Experiment II, subjects originally trained by an autoshaping procedure were exposed either to an omission, a random-control, or an extinction procedure. No differences were observed among the groups either in the rate at which lever contacts decreased or in the frequency of lever contacts at the end of training. These data implicate prior experience in the interpretation of omission-training effects and suggest limitations in the influence of stimulus-reinforcer relations in autoshaping.

  4. Astronomical random numbers for quantum foundations experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Calvin; Brown, Amy; Nguyen, Hien; Friedman, Andrew S.; Kaiser, David I.; Gallicchio, Jason

    2018-04-01

    Photons from distant astronomical sources can be used as a classical source of randomness to improve fundamental tests of quantum nonlocality, wave-particle duality, and local realism through Bell's inequality and delayed-choice quantum eraser tests inspired by Wheeler's cosmic-scale Mach-Zehnder interferometer gedanken experiment. Such sources of random numbers may also be useful for information-theoretic applications such as key distribution for quantum cryptography. Building on the design of an astronomical random number generator developed for the recent cosmic Bell experiment [Handsteiner et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 118, 060401 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.060401], in this paper we report on the design and characterization of a device that, with 20-nanosecond latency, outputs a bit based on whether the wavelength of an incoming photon is greater than or less than ≈700 nm. Using the one-meter telescope at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Table Mountain Observatory, we generated random bits from astronomical photons in both color channels from 50 stars of varying color and magnitude, and from 12 quasars with redshifts up to z =3.9 . With stars, we achieved bit rates of ˜1 ×106Hz/m 2 , limited by saturation of our single-photon detectors, and with quasars of magnitudes between 12.9 and 16, we achieved rates between ˜102 and 2 ×103Hz /m2 . For bright quasars, the resulting bitstreams exhibit sufficiently low amounts of statistical predictability as quantified by the mutual information. In addition, a sufficiently high fraction of bits generated are of true astronomical origin in order to address both the locality and freedom-of-choice loopholes when used to set the measurement settings in a test of the Bell-CHSH inequality.

  5. Efficacy of Web-Based Collection of Strength-Based Testimonials for Text Message Extension of Youth Suicide Prevention Program: Randomized Controlled Experiment.

    PubMed

    Thiha, Phyo; Pisani, Anthony R; Gurditta, Kunali; Cherry, Erin; Peterson, Derick R; Kautz, Henry; Wyman, Peter A

    2016-11-09

    Equipping members of a target population to deliver effective public health messaging to peers is an established approach in health promotion. The Sources of Strength program has demonstrated the promise of this approach for "upstream" youth suicide prevention. Text messaging is a well-established medium for promoting behavior change and is the dominant communication medium for youth. In order for peer 'opinion leader' programs like Sources of Strength to use scalable, wide-reaching media such as text messaging to spread peer-to-peer messages, they need techniques for assisting peer opinion leaders in creating effective testimonials to engage peers and match program goals. We developed a Web interface, called Stories of Personal Resilience in Managing Emotions (StoryPRIME), which helps peer opinion leaders write effective, short-form messages that can be delivered to the target population in youth suicide prevention program like Sources of Strength. To determine the efficacy of StoryPRIME, a Web-based interface for remotely eliciting high school peer leaders, and helping them produce high-quality, personal testimonials for use in a text messaging extension of an evidence-based, peer-led suicide prevention program. In a double-blind randomized controlled experiment, 36 high school students wrote testimonials with or without eliciting from the StoryPRIME interface. The interface was created in the context of Sources of Strength-an evidence-based youth suicide prevention program-and 24 ninth graders rated these testimonials on relatability, usefulness/relevance, intrigue, and likability. Testimonials written with the StoryPRIME interface were rated as more relatable, useful/relevant, intriguing, and likable than testimonials written without StoryPRIME, P=.054. StoryPRIME is a promising way to elicit high-quality, personal testimonials from youth for prevention programs that draw on members of a target population to spread public health messages. ©Phyo Thiha, Anthony

  6. Evaluation of an Online Campaign for Promoting Help-Seeking Attitudes for Depression Using a Facebook Advertisement: An Online Randomized Controlled Experiment.

    PubMed

    Hui, Alison; Wong, Paul Wai-Ching; Fu, King-Wa

    2015-01-01

    A depression-awareness campaign delivered through the Internet has been recommended as a public health approach that would enhance mental health literacy and encourage help-seeking attitudes. However, the outcomes of such a campaign remain understudied. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an online depression awareness campaign, which was informed by the theory of planned behavior, to encourage help-seeking attitudes for depression and to enhance mental health literacy in Hong Kong. The second aim was to examine click-through behaviors by varying the affective facial expressions of people in the Facebook advertisements. Potential participants were recruited through Facebook advertisements, using either a happy or sad face illustration. Volunteer participants registered for the study by clicking on the advertisement and were invited to leave their personal email addresses to receive educational content about depression. The participants were randomly assigned into two groups (campaign or control), and over a four consecutive week period, received either the campaign material or official information developed by the Hospital Authority in Hong Kong. Pretests and posttests were conducted before and after the campaign to measure the differences in help-seeking attitudes and mental health literacy among the campaign and control groups. Of the 199 participants that registered and completed the pretest, 116 (55 campaign and 62 control) completed the campaign and the posttest. At the posttest, we found no significant changes in help-seeking attitudes between the campaign and control groups, but the campaign group participants demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in mental health literacy (P=.031) and a higher willingness to access additional information (P<.001) than the control group. Moreover, the happy face Facebook advertisement attracted more click-throughs by users into the website than did the sad face advertisement (P=.03

  7. Evaluation of an Online Campaign for Promoting Help-Seeking Attitudes for Depression Using a Facebook Advertisement: An Online Randomized Controlled Experiment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background A depression-awareness campaign delivered through the Internet has been recommended as a public health approach that would enhance mental health literacy and encourage help-seeking attitudes. However, the outcomes of such a campaign remain understudied. Objective The main aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an online depression awareness campaign, which was informed by the theory of planned behavior, to encourage help-seeking attitudes for depression and to enhance mental health literacy in Hong Kong. The second aim was to examine click-through behaviors by varying the affective facial expressions of people in the Facebook advertisements. Methods Potential participants were recruited through Facebook advertisements, using either a happy or sad face illustration. Volunteer participants registered for the study by clicking on the advertisement and were invited to leave their personal email addresses to receive educational content about depression. The participants were randomly assigned into two groups (campaign or control), and over a four consecutive week period, received either the campaign material or official information developed by the Hospital Authority in Hong Kong. Pretests and posttests were conducted before and after the campaign to measure the differences in help-seeking attitudes and mental health literacy among the campaign and control groups. Results Of the 199 participants that registered and completed the pretest, 116 (55 campaign and 62 control) completed the campaign and the posttest. At the posttest, we found no significant changes in help-seeking attitudes between the campaign and control groups, but the campaign group participants demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in mental health literacy (P=.031) and a higher willingness to access additional information (P<.001) than the control group. Moreover, the happy face Facebook advertisement attracted more click-throughs by users into the website than

  8. Mortality and operator experience with vascular access for percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with acute coronary syndromes: A pairwise and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rahman; Askari, Reza; Haji, Showkat A; Rashid, Abdul

    2017-12-01

    Recently, several meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have shown that transradial access (TRA) reduces mortality compared to transfemoral access (TFA). However, a critical appraisal of these RCTs suggests that the findings could have resulted from a greater incidence of adverse events in the TFA groups rather than a beneficial effect of TRA. Scientific databases and websites were searched for RCTs. Patients were divided into groups based on access type and whether the operator was a radial expert (RE) or non-radial expert (NRE). The groups were TFA-RE, TFA-NRE, TRA-RE, and TRA-NRE. Both a traditional meta-analysis and a network meta-analysis using mixed-treatment comparison models were performed. Data from 13 trials including 15,615 patients were analyzed. The mortality rate for TFA-RE (3.54%) was more than double compared to TFA-NRE (1.61%). In pairwise meta-analysis, TFA-RE was associated with increased risk of mortality (RR: 1.72, 95% CI: 1.13-2.62; p=0.011) compared to TFA-NRE. In subgroup analysis, TFA-RE was associated with increased mortality (RR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.24-2.34; p=0.001) compared to TRA, but TRA-NRE was not. Similarly, in mixed comparison models, TFA-RE was associated with increased mortality compared to TRA-NRE, TRA-RE, and TFA-NRE, but TFA-NRE was not, compared to TRA-RE and TRA-NRE. Recently-reported survival differences between TRA and TFA may have been driven by adverse events in the TFA groups of the RCTs rather than a beneficial effect of TRA. This issue needs further investigation before labeling radial access a lifesaving procedure in invasively-managed patients with ACS. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Ultra-Brief Mindfulness Training Reduces Alcohol Consumption in At-Risk Drinkers: A Randomized Double-Blind Active-Controlled Experiment.

    PubMed

    Kamboj, Sunjeev K; Irez, Damla; Serfaty, Shirley; Thomas, Emily; Das, Ravi K; Freeman, Tom P

    2017-11-01

    Like other complex psychosocial interventions, mindfulness-based treatments comprise various modality-specific components as well as nonspecific therapeutic ingredients that collectively contribute to efficacy. Consequently, the isolated effects of mindfulness strategies per se remain unclear. Using a randomized double-blind design, we compared the isolated effects of 11-minutes of "supervised" mindfulness instruction against a closely matched active control (relaxation) on subjective, physiological, and behavioral indices of maladaptive alcohol responding in drinkers at risk of harm from alcohol use (n = 68). Simple follow-up instructions on strategy use were provided, but practice was unsupervised and not formally monitored. Both groups showed acute reductions in craving after training, although a trend group x time interaction (P = .056) suggested that this reduction was greater in the relaxation group (d = 0.722 P < .001) compared with the mindfulness group (d = 0.317, P = .004). Furthermore, upregulation of parasympathetic activity was found after relaxation (d = 0.562; P < .001) but not mindfulness instructions (d = 0.08; P > .1; group x time interaction: P = .009). By contrast, only the mindfulness group showed a reduction in past-week alcohol consumption at 7-day follow-up (-9.31 units, d = 0.593, P < .001), whereas no significant reduction was seen in the relaxation group (-3.00 units, d = 0.268, P > .1; group x time interaction: P = .026). Very brief mindfulness practice can significantly reduce alcohol consumption among at-risk drinkers, even with minimal encouragement to use this strategy outside of the experimental context. The effects on consumption may therefore represent a lower bound of efficacy of "ultra-brief" mindfulness instructions in hazardous drinkers, at least at short follow-up intervals. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  10. Ultra-Brief Mindfulness Training Reduces Alcohol Consumption in At-Risk Drinkers: A Randomized Double-Blind Active-Controlled Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Irez, Damla; Serfaty, Shirley; Thomas, Emily; Das, Ravi K; Freeman, Tom P

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Like other complex psychosocial interventions, mindfulness-based treatments comprise various modality-specific components as well as nonspecific therapeutic ingredients that collectively contribute to efficacy. Consequently, the isolated effects of mindfulness strategies per se remain unclear. Methods Using a randomized double-blind design, we compared the isolated effects of 11-minutes of “supervised” mindfulness instruction against a closely matched active control (relaxation) on subjective, physiological, and behavioral indices of maladaptive alcohol responding in drinkers at risk of harm from alcohol use (n = 68). Simple follow-up instructions on strategy use were provided, but practice was unsupervised and not formally monitored. Results Both groups showed acute reductions in craving after training, although a trend group x time interaction (P = .056) suggested that this reduction was greater in the relaxation group (d = 0.722 P < .001) compared with the mindfulness group (d = 0.317, P = .004). Furthermore, upregulation of parasympathetic activity was found after relaxation (d = 0.562; P < .001) but not mindfulness instructions (d = 0.08; P > .1; group x time interaction: P = .009). By contrast, only the mindfulness group showed a reduction in past-week alcohol consumption at 7-day follow-up (-9.31 units, d = 0.593, P < .001), whereas no significant reduction was seen in the relaxation group (-3.00 units, d = 0.268, P > .1; group x time interaction: P = .026). Conclusion Very brief mindfulness practice can significantly reduce alcohol consumption among at-risk drinkers, even with minimal encouragement to use this strategy outside of the experimental context. The effects on consumption may therefore represent a lower bound of efficacy of “ultra-brief” mindfulness instructions in hazardous drinkers, at least at short follow-up intervals. PMID:29016995

  11. From randomized controlled trials to observational studies.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Stuart L

    2009-02-01

    Randomized controlled trials are considered the gold standard in the hierarchy of research designs for evaluating the efficacy and safety of a treatment intervention. However, their results can have limited applicability to patients in clinical settings. Observational studies using large health care databases can complement findings from randomized controlled trials by assessing treatment effectiveness in patients encountered in day-to-day clinical practice. Results from these designs can expand upon outcomes of randomized controlled trials because of the use of larger and more diverse patient populations with common comorbidities and longer follow-up periods. Furthermore, well-designed observational studies can identify clinically important differences among therapeutic options and provide data on long-term drug effectiveness and safety.

  12. Thermal Control Surfaces Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, D. R.

    1999-01-01

    This report is the final experiment report for the TCSE and summarizes many years of hardware development and analyses. Also included are analyses presented in a number of TCSE papers that were prepared and given at scientific conferences including three LDEF Post-Retrieval Symposiums.

  13. Effect of a pragmatic, cluster-randomized controlled trial on patient experience with care: The Transforming Outcomes for Patients through Medical home Evaluation and reDesign (TOPMED) study

    PubMed Central

    Dorr, David A.; Anastas, Tracy; Ramsey, Katrina; Wagner, Jesse; Sachdeva, Bhavaya; Michaels, LeAnn; Fagnan, Lyle

    2016-01-01

    Background Health reform programs like the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) are intended to improve the Triple Aim. Previous studies on PCMHs have shown mixed effects, but High Value Elements (HVEs) are expected to improve the Triple Aim. Objective To understand whether focusing on high value elements (HVEs) would improve patient experience with care. Methods Eight clinics were cluster-randomized in a year-long trial. Both arms received practice facilitation, IT-based reporting, and financial incentives. Intervention practices were encouraged to choose HVEs for QI goals. To assess patient experience, 1,597 Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) surveys were sent pre- and post-trial to a stratified random sample of patients. Difference in difference multivariate analysis was used to compare patient responses from intervention and control practices, adjusting for confounders. Results The response rate was 43% (n=686). Non-respondent analysis showed no difference between arms, although differences were seen by risk status and age. The overall difference in difference was 2.8%, favoring the intervention. The intervention performed better in 9 of 11 composites. The intervention performed significantly better in Follow-up on test results (p=.091) and Patients’ rating of the provider (p=.091), while the control performed better in Access to care (p=.093). Both arms also had decreases, including 4 of 11 composites for the intervention, and 8 of 11 for the control. Discussion Practices that targeted HVEs showed significantly more improvement in patient experience of care. However, contemporaneous trends may have affected results, leading to declines in patient experience in both arms. PMID:27116107

  14. Outcomes and costs of left atrial appendage closure from randomized controlled trial and real-world experience relative to oral anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Panikker, Sandeep; Lord, Joanne; Jarman, Julian W E; Armstrong, Shannon; Jones, David G; Haldar, Shouvik; Butcher, Charles; Khan, Habib; Mantziari, Lilian; Nicol, Edward; Hussain, Wajid; Clague, Jonathan R; Foran, John P; Markides, Vias; Wong, Tom

    2016-12-07

    The aim of this study was to analyse randomized controlled study and real-world outcomes of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) undergoing left atrial appendage closure (LAAC) with the Watchman device and to compare costs with available antithrombotic therapies. Registry data of LAAC from two centres were prospectively collected from 110 patients with NVAF at risk of stroke, suitable and unsuitable for long-term anticoagulation (age 71.3 ± 9.2 years, CHADS 2 2.8 ± 1.2, CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc 4.5 ± 1.6, and HAS-BLED 3.8 ± 1.1). Outcomes from PROTECT AF and registry study LAAC were compared with warfarin, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, aspirin, and no treatment using a network meta-analysis. Costs were estimated over a 10-year horizon. Uncertainty was assessed using sensitivity analyses. The procedural success rate was 92% (103/112). Follow-up was 24.1 ± 4.6 months, during which annual rates of stroke, major bleeding, and all-cause mortality were 0.9% (2/223 patient-years), 0.9% (2/223 patient-years), and 1.8% (4/223 patient-years), respectively. Anticoagulant therapy was successfully stopped in 91.2% (93/102) of implanted patients by 12 months. Registry study LAAC stroke and major bleeding rates were significantly lower than PROTECT AF results: mean absolute difference of stroke, 0.89% (P = 0.02) and major bleeding, 5.48% (P < 0.001). Left atrial appendage closure achieved cost parity between 4.9 years vs. dabigatran 110 mg and 8.4 years vs. warfarin. At 10 years, LAAC was cost-saving against all therapies (range £1162-£7194). Left atrial appendage closure in NVAF in a real-world setting may result in lower stroke and major bleeding rates than reported in LAAC clinical trials. Left atrial appendage closure in both settings achieves cost parity in a relatively short period of time and may offer substantial savings compared with current therapies. Savings are most pronounced among higher risk patients and those unsuitable for anticoagulation

  15. Outcomes and costs of left atrial appendage closure from randomized controlled trial and real-world experience relative to oral anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Panikker, Sandeep; Lord, Joanne; Jarman, Julian W.E.; Armstrong, Shannon; Jones, David G.; Haldar, Shouvik; Butcher, Charles; Khan, Habib; Mantziari, Lilian; Nicol, Edward; Hussain, Wajid; Clague, Jonathan R.; Foran, John P.; Markides, Vias; Wong, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to analyse randomized controlled study and real-world outcomes of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) undergoing left atrial appendage closure (LAAC) with the Watchman device and to compare costs with available antithrombotic therapies. Methods and results Registry data of LAAC from two centres were prospectively collected from 110 patients with NVAF at risk of stroke, suitable and unsuitable for long-term anticoagulation (age 71.3 ± 9.2 years, CHADS2 2.8 ± 1.2, CHA2DS2-VASc 4.5 ± 1.6, and HAS-BLED 3.8 ± 1.1). Outcomes from PROTECT AF and registry study LAAC were compared with warfarin, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, aspirin, and no treatment using a network meta-analysis. Costs were estimated over a 10-year horizon. Uncertainty was assessed using sensitivity analyses. The procedural success rate was 92% (103/112). Follow-up was 24.1 ± 4.6 months, during which annual rates of stroke, major bleeding, and all-cause mortality were 0.9% (2/223 patient-years), 0.9% (2/223 patient-years), and 1.8% (4/223 patient-years), respectively. Anticoagulant therapy was successfully stopped in 91.2% (93/102) of implanted patients by 12 months. Registry study LAAC stroke and major bleeding rates were significantly lower than PROTECT AF results: mean absolute difference of stroke, 0.89% (P = 0.02) and major bleeding, 5.48% (P < 0.001). Left atrial appendage closure achieved cost parity between 4.9 years vs. dabigatran 110 mg and 8.4 years vs. warfarin. At 10 years, LAAC was cost-saving against all therapies (range £1162–£7194). Conclusion Left atrial appendage closure in NVAF in a real-world setting may result in lower stroke and major bleeding rates than reported in LAAC clinical trials. Left atrial appendage closure in both settings achieves cost parity in a relatively short period of time and may offer substantial savings compared with current therapies. Savings are most pronounced among higher risk patients and those

  16. Tank Pressure Control Experiment (TPCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentz, Mike

    1992-01-01

    The Tank Pressure Control Experiment (TPCE) is a small self-contained STS payload designed to test a jet mixer for cryogenic fluid pressure control. Viewgraphs are presented that describe project organization, experiment objectives and approach, risk management, payload concept and mission plan, and initial test data.

  17. Reporting Randomized Controlled Trials in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo-Wilson, Evan; Grant, Sean; Montgomery, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are increasingly used to evaluate programs and interventions in order to inform education policy and practice. High quality reports of these RCTs are needed for interested readers to understand the rigor of the study, the interventions tested, and the context in which the evaluation took place (Mayo-Wilson et…

  18. Recruiting Participants for Randomized Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, H. Alix; Roschelle, Jeremy; Feng, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to look across strategies used in a wide range of studies to build a framework for researchers to use in conceptualizing the recruitment process. This paper harvests lessons learned across 19 randomized controlled trials in K-12 school settings conducted by a leading research organization to identify strategies that…

  19. Automating quantum experiment control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Kelly E.; Amini, Jason M.; Doret, S. Charles; Mohler, Greg; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.

    2017-03-01

    The field of quantum information processing is rapidly advancing. As the control of quantum systems approaches the level needed for useful computation, the physical hardware underlying the quantum systems is becoming increasingly complex. It is already becoming impractical to manually code control for the larger hardware implementations. In this chapter, we will employ an approach to the problem of system control that parallels compiler design for a classical computer. We will start with a candidate quantum computing technology, the surface electrode ion trap, and build a system instruction language which can be generated from a simple machine-independent programming language via compilation. We incorporate compile time generation of ion routing that separates the algorithm description from the physical geometry of the hardware. Extending this approach to automatic routing at run time allows for automated initialization of qubit number and placement and additionally allows for automated recovery after catastrophic events such as qubit loss. To show that these systems can handle real hardware, we present a simple demonstration system that routes two ions around a multi-zone ion trap and handles ion loss and ion placement. While we will mainly use examples from transport-based ion trap quantum computing, many of the issues and solutions are applicable to other architectures.

  20. Alternatives to the Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    West, Stephen G.; Duan, Naihua; Pequegnat, Willo; Gaist, Paul; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Holtgrave, David; Szapocznik, José; Fishbein, Martin; Rapkin, Bruce; Clatts, Michael; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2008-01-01

    Public health researchers are addressing new research questions (e.g., effects of environmental tobacco smoke, Hurricane Katrina) for which the randomized controlled trial (RCT) may not be a feasible option. Drawing on the potential outcomes framework (Rubin Causal Model) and Campbellian perspectives, we consider alternative research designs that permit relatively strong causal inferences. In randomized encouragement designs, participants are randomly invited to participate in one of the treatment conditions, but are allowed to decide whether to receive treatment. In quantitative assignment designs, treatment is assigned on the basis of a quantitative measure (e.g., need, merit, risk). In observational studies, treatment assignment is unknown and presumed to be nonrandom. Major threats to the validity of each design and statistical strategies for mitigating those threats are presented. PMID:18556609

  1. A pilot randomized controlled trial of deprescribing.

    PubMed

    Beer, Christopher; Loh, Poh-Kooi; Peng, Yan Gee; Potter, Kathleen; Millar, Alasdair

    2011-04-01

    Polypharmacy and adverse drug reactions are frequent and important among older people. Few clinical trials have evaluated systematic withdrawal of medications among older people. This small, open, study was conducted to determine the feasibility of a randomized controlled deprescribing trial. Ten volunteers living in the community (recruited by media advertising) and 25 volunteers living in residential aged-care facilities (RCFs) were randomized to intervention or control groups. The intervention was gradual withdrawal of one target medication. The primary outcome was the number of intervention participants in whom medication withdrawal could be achieved. Other outcomes measures were quality of life, medication adherence, sleep quality, and cognitive impairment. Participants were aged 80 ± 11 years and were taking 9 ± 2 medications. Fifteen participants commenced medication withdrawal and all ceased or reduced the dose of their target medication. Two subjects withdrew; one was referred for clinical review, and one participant declined further dose reductions. A randomized controlled trial of deprescribing was acceptable to participants. Recruitment in RCFs is feasible. Definitive trials of deprescribing are required.

  2. From the Experience of Interactivity and Entertainment to Lower Intention to Smoke: A Randomized Controlled Trial and Path Analysis of a Web-Based Smoking Prevention Program for Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Calabro, Karen Sue; Mitra, Natasha; Shegog, Ross

    2017-01-01

    Background Web-based programs for smoking prevention are being increasingly used with some success among adolescents. However, little is known about the mechanisms that link the experience of such programs to intended nicotine or tobacco control outcomes. Objective Based on the experiential learning theory and extended elaboration likelihood model, this study aimed to evaluate the impact of a Web-based intervention, A Smoking Prevention Interactive Experience (ASPIRE), on adolescents’ intention to smoke, while considering the experience of interactivity and entertainment as predictors of reduced intention to smoke, under a transitional user experience model. Methods A total of 101 adolescents were recruited from after-school programs, provided consent, screened, and randomized in a single-blinded format to 1 of 2 conditions: the full ASPIRE program as the experimental condition (n=50) or an online , text-based version of ASPIRE as the control condition (n=51). Data were collected at baseline and immediate follow-up. Repeated-measures mixed-effects models and path analyses were conducted. Results A total of 82 participants completed the study and were included in the analysis. Participants in the experimental condition were more likely to show a decrease in their intention to smoke than those in the control condition (beta=−0.18, P=.008). Perceived interactivity (beta=−0.27, P=.004) and entertainment (beta=−0.20, P=.04) were each associated with a decrease in intention to smoke independently. Results of path analyses indicated that perceived interactivity and perceived entertainment mediated the relationship between ASPIRE use and emotional involvement. Furthermore, perceived presence mediated the relationship between perceived interactivity and emotional involvement. There was a direct relationship between perceived entertainment and emotional involvement. Emotional involvement predicted a decrease in intention to smoke (beta=−0.16, P=.04). Conclusions

  3. Perceptions of Massage Therapists Participating in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Adam; Dreusicke, Mark; Keever, Teresa; Ali, Ather

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical practice and randomized trials often have disparate aims, despite involving similar interventions. Attitudes and expectancies of practitioners influence patient outcomes, and there is growing emphasis on optimizing provider–patient relationships. In this study, we evaluated the experiences of licensed massage therapists involved in a randomized controlled clinical trial using qualitative methodology. Methods Seven massage therapists who were interventionists in a randomized controlled trial participated in structured interviews approximately 30 minutes in length. Interviews focused on their experiences and perceptions regarding aspects of the clinical trial, as well as recommendations for future trials. Transcribed interviews were analyzed for emergent topics and themes using standard qualitative methods. Results Six themes emerged. Therapists discussed 1) promoting the profession of massage therapy through research, 2) mixed views on using standardized protocols, 3) challenges of sham interventions, 4) participant response to the sham intervention, 5) views on scheduling and compensation, and 6) unanticipated benefits of participating in research. Conclusions Therapists largely appreciated the opportunity to promote massage through research. They demonstrated insight and understanding of the rationale for a clinical trial adhering to a standardized protocol. Evaluating the experiences and ideas of complementary and alternative medicine practitioners provides valuable insight that is relevant for the implementation and design of randomized trials. PMID:26388961

  4. General Framework for Effect Sizes in Cluster Randomized Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanHoudnos, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Cluster randomized experiments are ubiquitous in modern education research. Although a variety of modeling approaches are used to analyze these data, perhaps the most common methodology is a normal mixed effects model where some effects, such as the treatment effect, are regarded as fixed, and others, such as the effect of group random assignment…

  5. Social aggregation in pea aphids: experiment and random walk modeling.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Christa; Paige, John; Warner, Olivia; Mayhew, Benjamin; Sutley, Ryan; Lam, Matthew; Bernoff, Andrew J; Topaz, Chad M

    2013-01-01

    From bird flocks to fish schools and ungulate herds to insect swarms, social biological aggregations are found across the natural world. An ongoing challenge in the mathematical modeling of aggregations is to strengthen the connection between models and biological data by quantifying the rules that individuals follow. We model aggregation of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. Specifically, we conduct experiments to track the motion of aphids walking in a featureless circular arena in order to deduce individual-level rules. We observe that each aphid transitions stochastically between a moving and a stationary state. Moving aphids follow a correlated random walk. The probabilities of motion state transitions, as well as the random walk parameters, depend strongly on distance to an aphid's nearest neighbor. For large nearest neighbor distances, when an aphid is essentially isolated, its motion is ballistic with aphids moving faster, turning less, and being less likely to stop. In contrast, for short nearest neighbor distances, aphids move more slowly, turn more, and are more likely to become stationary; this behavior constitutes an aggregation mechanism. From the experimental data, we estimate the state transition probabilities and correlated random walk parameters as a function of nearest neighbor distance. With the individual-level model established, we assess whether it reproduces the macroscopic patterns of movement at the group level. To do so, we consider three distributions, namely distance to nearest neighbor, angle to nearest neighbor, and percentage of population moving at any given time. For each of these three distributions, we compare our experimental data to the output of numerical simulations of our nearest neighbor model, and of a control model in which aphids do not interact socially. Our stochastic, social nearest neighbor model reproduces salient features of the experimental data that are not captured by the control.

  6. Dealing with daily challenges in dementia (deal-id study): effectiveness of the experience sampling method intervention 'Partner in Sight' for spousal caregivers of people with dementia: design of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van Knippenberg, Rosalia J M; de Vugt, Marjolein E; Ponds, Rudolf W; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Verhey, Frans R J

    2016-05-11

    There is an urgent need for psychosocial interventions that effectively support dementia caregivers in daily life. The Experience Sampling Methodology (ESM) offers the possibility to provide a more dynamic view of caregiver functioning. ESM-derived feedback may help to redirect caregivers' behavior towards situations that elicit positive emotions and to increase their feelings of competence in the caretaking process. This paper presents the design of a study that evaluates the process characteristics and effects of the ESM-based intervention 'Partner in Sight'. A randomized controlled trial with 90 spousal caregivers of people with dementia will be conducted. Participants will be randomly assigned to the experimental (6-week ESM intervention including feedback), pseudo-experimental (6-week ESM intervention without feedback), or control group (care as usual). Assessments will be performed pre- and post-intervention and at 2-, and 6-month follow-up. Main outcomes will be sense of competence, perceived control, momentary positive affect, and psychological complaints (depressive symptoms, perceived stress, anxiety, momentary negative affect). In addition to the effect evaluation, a process and economic evaluation will be conducted to investigate the credibility and generalizability of the intervention, and its cost-effectiveness. The potential effects of the ESM intervention may help caregivers to endure their care responsibilities and prevent them from becoming overburdened. This is the first ESM intervention for caregivers of people with dementia. The results of this study, therefore, provide a valuable contribution to the growing knowledge on m-health interventions for dementia caregivers. Dutch Trial Register NTR4847 ; date registered Oct 9, 2014.

  7. The Analysis of Completely Randomized Factorial Experiments When Observations Are Lost at Random.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Thomas J.

    An investigation was conducted of the characteristics of two estimation procedures and corresponding test statistics used in the analysis of completely randomized factorial experiments when observations are lost at random. For one estimator, contrast coefficients for cell means did not involve the cell frequencies. For the other, contrast…

  8. ADULTS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Krupa N.; Majeed, Zahraa; Yoruk, Yilmaz B.; Yang, Hongmei; Hilton, Tiffany N.; McMahon, James M.; Hall, William J.; Walck, Donna; Luque, Amneris E.; Ryan, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective HIV-infected older adults (HOA) are at risk of functional decline. Interventions promoting physical activity that can attenuate functional decline and are easily translated into the HOA community are of high priority. We conducted a randomized, controlled clinical trial to evaluate whether a physical activity counseling intervention based on self-determination theory (SDT) improves physical function, autonomous motivation, depression and the quality of life (QOL) in HOA. Methods A total of 67 community-dwelling HOA with mild-to-moderate functional limitations were randomized to one of two groups: a physical activity counseling group or the usual care control group. We used SDT to guide the development of the experimental intervention. Outcome measures that were collected at baseline and final study visits included a battery of physical function tests, levels of physical activity, autonomous motivation, depression, and QOL. Results The study participants were similar in their demographic and clinical characteristics in both the treatment and control groups. Overall physical performance, gait speed, measures of endurance and strength, and levels of physical activity improved in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.05). Measures of autonomous regulation such as identified regulation, and measures of depression and QOL improved significantly in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.05). Across the groups, improvement in intrinsic regulation and QOL correlated with an improvement in physical function (p<0.05). Conclusion Our findings suggest that a physical activity counseling program grounded in SDT can improve physical function, autonomous motivation, depression, and QOL in HOA with functional limitations. PMID:26867045

  9. Randomized controlled trials in mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ronald G.; Aisen, Paul S.; Mohs, Richard C.; Carrillo, Maria C.; Albert, Marilyn S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To examine the variability in performance among placebo groups in randomized controlled trials for mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: Placebo group data were obtained from 2 National Institute on Aging (NIA) MCI randomized controlled trials, the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study (ADCS) MCI trial and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), which is a simulated clinical trial, in addition to industry-sponsored clinical trials involving rivastigmine, galantamine, rofecoxib, and donepezil. The data were collated for common measurement instruments. The performance of the placebo participants from these studies was tracked on the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale–cognitive subscale, Mini-Mental State Examination, and Clinical Dementia Rating–sum of boxes, and for progression on these measures to prespecified clinical study endpoints. APOE status, where available, was also analyzed for its effects. Results: The progression to clinical endpoints varied a great deal among the trials. The expected performances were seen for the participants in the 2 NIA trials, ADCS and ADNI, with generally worsening of performance over time; however, the industry-sponsored trials largely showed stable or improved performance in their placebo participants. APOE4 carrier status influenced results in an expected fashion on the study outcomes, including rates of progression and cognitive subscales. Conclusions: In spite of apparently similar criteria for MCI being adopted by the 7 studies, the implementation of the criteria varied a great deal. Several explanations including instruments used to characterize participants and variability among study populations contributed to the findings. PMID:28381516

  10. Low degree of formal education and musical experience predict degree of music-induced stress reduction in relatives and friends of patients: a single-center, randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tilt, Alexandra C; Werner, Paul D; Brown, David F; Alam, Hassan B; Warshaw, Andrew L; Parry, Blair A; Jazbar, Brigita; Booker, Abigail; Stangenberg, Lars; Fricchione, Gregory L; Benson, Herbert; Lillemoe, Keith D; Conrad, Claudius

    2013-05-01

    To determine the factors that may predict music-induced relaxation in friends and family of patients in the emergency department. It remains unclear to date which demographic and experiential factors predict the effectiveness of music-induced relaxation. Furthermore, in-hospital stressors for friends and family of patients rather than patients themselves are underresearched and deserve in-depth investigation to improve this group's experience in health care environments. A total of 169 relatives and friends of patients in the emergency department-waiting area completed a series of questionnaires, including the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Music Experience Questionnaire (MEQ), and a demographic survey. They were then randomly assigned to either Case Group (1 hour in the waiting area with classical music in the background) or Control Group (1 hour with no music) before completing a second, identical copy of the STAI to measure change from baseline. Data were analyzed for associations between music intervention, change in STAI scores, MEQ scores, and demographic characteristics. Participants who underwent the music intervention experienced a 9.8% decrease in overall mean State Anxiety, whereas those in the Control Group experienced no change over time (P = 0.001). Higher education significantly inversely correlated with the effectiveness of music intervention: participants with no formal education beyond high school showed a greater overall mean decrease in State Anxiety than those with a college education or beyond in response to classical music (P = 0.006). Furthermore, MEQ scores indicated that the Social Uplift scale (a measure of one's tendency to be uplifted in a group-oriented manner by music) was highly predictive of the effectiveness of music intervention. Music is an effective and inexpensive means of reducing anxiety in friends and family of patients, who are underresearched in medicine. Moreover, low educational attainment and

  11. From the Experience of Interactivity and Entertainment to Lower Intention to Smoke: A Randomized Controlled Trial and Path Analysis of a Web-Based Smoking Prevention Program for Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Georges Elias; Wang, Hua; Calabro, Karen Sue; Mitra, Natasha; Shegog, Ross; Prokhorov, Alexander V

    2017-02-16

    Web-based programs for smoking prevention are being increasingly used with some success among adolescents. However, little is known about the mechanisms that link the experience of such programs to intended nicotine or tobacco control outcomes. Based on the experiential learning theory and extended elaboration likelihood model, this study aimed to evaluate the impact of a Web-based intervention, A Smoking Prevention Interactive Experience (ASPIRE), on adolescents' intention to smoke, while considering the experience of interactivity and entertainment as predictors of reduced intention to smoke, under a transitional user experience model. A total of 101 adolescents were recruited from after-school programs, provided consent, screened, and randomized in a single-blinded format to 1 of 2 conditions: the full ASPIRE program as the experimental condition (n=50) or an online , text-based version of ASPIRE as the control condition (n=51). Data were collected at baseline and immediate follow-up. Repeated-measures mixed-effects models and path analyses were conducted. A total of 82 participants completed the study and were included in the analysis. Participants in the experimental condition were more likely to show a decrease in their intention to smoke than those in the control condition (beta=-0.18, P=.008). Perceived interactivity (beta=-0.27, P=.004) and entertainment (beta=-0.20, P=.04) were each associated with a decrease in intention to smoke independently. Results of path analyses indicated that perceived interactivity and perceived entertainment mediated the relationship between ASPIRE use and emotional involvement. Furthermore, perceived presence mediated the relationship between perceived interactivity and emotional involvement. There was a direct relationship between perceived entertainment and emotional involvement. Emotional involvement predicted a decrease in intention to smoke (beta=-0.16, P=.04). Adolescents' experience of interactivity and entertainment

  12. Individuals with tension and migraine headaches exhibit increased heart rate variability during post-stress mindfulness meditation practice but a decrease during a post-stress control condition - A randomized, controlled experiment.

    PubMed

    Azam, Muhammad Abid; Katz, Joel; Mohabir, Vina; Ritvo, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Current research suggests that associations between headache conditions (migraine, tension) and imbalances in the autonomic nervous system (ANS) are due to stress-related dysregulation in the activity of the parasympathetic-sympathetic branches. Mindfulness meditation has demonstrated effectiveness in reducing pain-related distress, and in enhancing heart rate variability-a vagal-mediated marker of ANS balance. This study examined HRV during cognitive stress and mindfulness meditation in individuals with migraine and tension headaches. Undergraduate students with tension and migraine headaches (n=36) and headache-free students (n=39) were recruited for an experiment involving HRV measurement during baseline, cognitive stress-induction, and after randomization to post-stress conditions of audio-guided mindfulness meditation practice (MMP) or mindfulness meditation description (MMD). HRV was derived using electrocardiograms as the absolute power in the high frequency bandwidth (ms 2 ). A three-way ANOVA tested the effects of Group (headache vs. headache-free), Phase (baseline, stress, & post-stress), and Condition (MMP vs. MMD) on HRV. ANOVA revealed a significant three-way interaction. Simple effects tests indicated: 1) HRV increased significantly from stress to MMP for headache and headache-free groups (p<0.001), 2) significantly greater HRV for headache (p<0.001) and headache-free (p<0.05) groups during MMP compared to MMD, and 3) significantly lower HRV in the headache vs. headache-free group during the post-stress MMD condition (p<0.05). Results suggest mindfulness practice can promote effective heart rate regulation, and thereby promote effective recovery after a stressful event for individuals with headache conditions. Moreover, headache conditions may be associated with dysregulated stress recovery, thus more research is needed on the cardiovascular health and stress resilience of headache sufferers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Reusable experiment controllers, case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Brian A.; Gaasbeck, Jim Van

    1996-03-01

    Congress has given NASA and the science community a reality check. The tight and ever shrinking budgets are trimming the fat from many space science programs. No longer can a Principal Investigator (PI) afford to waste development dollars on re-inventing spacecraft controllers, experiment/payload controllers, ground control systems, or test sets. Inheritance of the Ground Support Equipment (GSE) from one program to another is not a significant re-use of technology to develop a science mission in these times. Reduction of operational staff and highly autonomous experiments are needed to reduce the sustaining cost of a mission. The re-use of an infrastructure from one program to another is needed to truly attain the cost and time savings required. Interface and Control Systems, Inc. (ICS) has a long history of re-usable software. Navy, Air Force, and NASA programs have benefited from the re-use of a common control system from program to program. Several standardization efforts in the AIAA have adopted the Spacecraft Command Language (SCL) architecture as a point solution to satisfy requirements for re-use and autonomy. The Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (ERIM) has been a long-standing customer of ICS and are working on their 4th generation system using SCL. Much of the hardware and software infrastructure has been re-used from mission to mission with little cost for re-hosting a new experiment. The same software infrastructure has successfully been used on Clementine, and an end-to-end system is being deployed for the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) for Johns Hopkins University. A case study of the ERIM programs, Clementine and FUSE will be detailed in this paper.

  14. Do randomized controlled trials discuss healthcare costs?

    PubMed

    Allan, G Michael; Korownyk, Christina; LaSalle, Kate; Vandermeer, Ben; Ma, Victoria; Klein, Douglas; Manca, Donna

    2010-08-23

    Healthcare costs, particularly pharmaceutical costs, are a dominant issue for most healthcare organizations, but it is unclear if randomized controlled trials (RCTs) routinely discuss costs. Our objective was to assess the frequency and factors associated with the inclusion of costs in RCTs. We randomly sampled 188 RCTs spanning three years (2003-2005) from six high impact journals. The sample size for RCTs was based on a calculation to estimate the inclusion of actual drug costs with a precision of +/-3%. Two reviewers independently extracted cost data and study characteristics. Frequencies were calculated and potential characteristics associated with the inclusion of costs were explored. Actual drug costs were included in 4.7% (9/188) of RCTs; any actual costs were included in 7.4% (14/188) of RCTs; and any mention of costs was included in 27.7% (52/188) of RCTs. As the amount of industry funding increased across RCTs, from non-profit to mixed to fully industry funded RCTs, there was a statistically significant reduction in the number of RCTs with any actual costs (Cochran-Armitage test, p = 0.005) and any mention of costs (Cochran-Armitage test, p = 0.02). Logistic regression analysis also indicated funding was associated with the inclusion of any actual cost (OR = 0.34, p = 0.009) or any mention of costs (OR = 0.63, p = 0.02). Journal, study conclusions, study location, primary author's country and product age were not associated with inclusion of cost information. While physicians are encouraged to consider costs when prescribing drugs for their patients, actual drug costs were provided in only 5% of RCTs and were not mentioned at all in 72% of RCTs. Industry funded trials were less likely to include cost information. No other factors were associated with the inclusion of cost information.

  15. Frequency of Examinations and Student Achievement in a Randomized Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Paola, Maria; Scoppa, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    We carry out a randomized experiment involving undergraduate students enrolled at an Italian University attending two introductory economics classes to evaluate the impact on achievement of examination frequency and interim feedback provision. Students in the treated group were allowed to undertake an intermediate exam and were informed about the…

  16. RANDOMIZATION PROCEDURES FOR THE ANALYSIS OF EDUCATIONAL EXPERIMENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COLLIER, RAYMOND O.

    CERTAIN SPECIFIC ASPECTS OF HYPOTHESIS TESTS USED FOR ANALYSIS OF RESULTS IN RANDOMIZED EXPERIMENTS WERE STUDIED--(1) THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE THEORETICAL FACTOR, THAT OF PROVIDING INFORMATION ON STATISTICAL TESTS FOR CERTAIN EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS AND (2) THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE APPLIED ELEMENT, THAT OF SUPPLYING THE EXPERIMENTER WITH MACHINERY FOR…

  17. A protocol for a pragmatic randomized controlled trial using the Health Teams Advancing Patient Experience: Strengthening Quality (Health TAPESTRY) platform approach to promote person-focused primary healthcare for older adults.

    PubMed

    Dolovich, Lisa; Oliver, Doug; Lamarche, Larkin; Agarwal, Gina; Carr, Tracey; Chan, David; Cleghorn, Laura; Griffith, Lauren; Javadi, Dena; Kastner, Monika; Longaphy, Jennifer; Mangin, Dee; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Ploeg, Jenny; Raina, Parminder; Richardson, Julie; Risdon, Cathy; Santaguida, P Lina; Straus, Sharon; Thabane, Lehana; Valaitis, Ruta; Price, David

    2016-04-05

    Healthcare systems are not well designed to help people maintain or improve their health. They are generally not person-focused or well-coordinated. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Health Teams Advancing Patient Experience: Strengthening Quality (Health TAPESTRY) approach in older adults. The overarching hypothesis is that using the Health TAPESTRY approach to achieve better integration of the health and social care systems into a person's life that centers on meeting a person's health goals and needs will result in optimal aging. This is a 12-month delayed intervention pragmatic randomized controlled trial. The study will be performed in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada in the two-site McMaster Family Health Team. Participants will include 316 patients who are 70 years of age or older. Participants will be randomized to the Health TAPESTRY approach or control group. The Health TAPESTRY approach includes intentional, proactive conversations about a person's life and health goals and health risks and then initiation of congruent tailored interventions that support achievement of those goals and addressing of risks through (1) trained volunteers visiting clients in their homes to serve as a link between the primary care team and the client; (2) the use of novel technology including a personal health record from the home to link directly with the primary healthcare team; and (3) improved processes for connections, system navigation, and care delivery among interprofessional primary care teams, community service providers, and informal caregivers. The primary outcome will be the goal attainment scaling score. Secondary outcomes include self-efficacy for managing chronic disease, quality of life, the participant perspective on their own aging, social support, access to health services, comprehensiveness of care, patient empowerment, patient-centeredness, caregiver strain, satisfaction with care, healthcare resource utilization, and cost

  18. A randomized controlled trial of brief interventions for body dissatisfaction.

    PubMed

    Wade, Tracey; George, Wing Man; Atkinson, Melissa

    2009-10-01

    The authors examined the relative effectiveness of 3 different approaches to the experience of body dissatisfaction compared to a control and ruminative attention control condition, with respect to increasing weight and appearance satisfaction. One hundred female undergraduates (mean age = 24.38, SD = 9.39) underwent a body dissatisfaction induction procedure, which significantly decreased levels of weight and appearance satisfaction. Participants were then randomized, 20 to each of 5 groups: control, ruminative attention control, acceptance, distraction, and cognitive dissonance. With the exception of the control group, participants were briefly trained in their assigned technique and were asked to practice this over the next 5 min while repeated measures of weight and appearance satisfaction were recorded. Acceptance, cognitive dissonance, and distraction were superior to both control conditions in increasing weight satisfaction and were superior to a control condition in improving appearance satisfaction. Only acceptance was superior in improving appearance satisfaction compared to a ruminative attention control. The evidence suggests that acceptance is a promising approach to investigate further with respect to its efficacy for reducing body dissatisfaction. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Randomized Sequential Individual Assignment in Social Experiments: Evaluating the Design Options Prospectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Sharon L.; Zhu, Xiaoshu

    2017-01-01

    Many randomized experiments in the social sciences allocate subjects to treatment arms at the time the subjects enroll. Desirable features of the mechanism used to assign subjects to treatment arms are often (1) equal numbers of subjects in intervention and control arms, (2) balanced allocation for population subgroups and across covariates, (3)…

  20. To vape or not to vape? Effects of exposure to conflicting news headlines on beliefs about harms and benefits of electronic cigarette use: Results from a randomized controlled experiment.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andy S L; Lee, Chul-Joo; Nagler, Rebekah H; Bigman, Cabral A

    2017-12-01

    News coverage of novel tobacco products including e-cigarettes has framed the use of these products with both positive and negative slants. Conflicting information may shape public knowledge, perceptions of e-cigarettes, and their harms. The objective of this study is to assess effects of exposure to conflicting news coverage on US adults' beliefs about harms and benefits of e-cigarette use. We conducted a one-way between-subjects randomized controlled experiment in 2016 to compare the effects of viewing either 1) positive, 2) negative, 3) both positive and negative (conflicting) news headlines about the safety of using e-cigarettes, or 4) no-message. Participants were 2056 adults aged 18 and older from an online survey panel. Outcomes were beliefs about harms (3-item scale, α=0.76) and benefits (3-item scale, α=0.82) of using e-cigarettes. Participants who viewed negative headlines reported increased beliefs about harms (B=0.164, p=0.039) and lower beliefs about benefits of e-cigarette use (B=-0.216, p=0.009), compared with those in the positive headlines condition. These differences were replicated in subgroup analyses among never e-cigarette users. In addition, never e-cigarette users who viewed conflicting headlines reported lower beliefs about benefits of e-cigarette use (B=-0.221, p=0.030) than the positive headlines condition. Valence of news coverage about e-cigarettes (positive, negative, or conflicting) could influence people's beliefs about harms and benefits of e-cigarette use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. How Affiliation Disclosure and Control Over User-Generated Comments Affects Consumer Health Knowledge and Behavior: A Randomized Controlled Experiment of Pharmaceutical Direct-to-Consumer Advertising on Social Media.

    PubMed

    DeAndrea, David Christopher; Vendemia, Megan Ashley

    2016-07-19

    More people are seeking health information online than ever before and pharmaceutical companies are increasingly marketing their drugs through social media. The aim was to examine two major concerns related to online direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertising: (1) how disclosing an affiliation with a pharmaceutical company affects how people respond to drug information produced by both health organizations and online commenters, and (2) how knowledge that health organizations control the display of user-generated comments affects consumer health knowledge and behavior. We conducted a 2×2×2 between-subjects experiment (N=674). All participants viewed an infographic posted to Facebook by a health organization about a prescription allergy drug. Across conditions, the infographic varied in the degree to which the health organization and commenters appeared to be affiliated with a drug manufacturer, and the display of user-generated comments appeared to be controlled. Affiliation disclosure statements on a health organization's Facebook post increased perceptions of an organization-drug manufacturer connection, which reduced trust in the organization (point estimate -0.45, 95% CI -0.69 to -0.24) and other users who posted comments about the drug (point estimate -0.44, 95% CI -0.68 to -0.22). Furthermore, increased perceptions of an organization-manufacturer connection reduced the likelihood that people would recommend the drug to important others (point estimate -0.35, 95% CI -0.59 to -0.15), and share the drug post with others on Facebook (point estimate -0.37, 95% CI -0.64 to -0.16). An affiliation cue next to the commenters' names increased perceptions that the commenters were affiliated with the drug manufacturer, which reduced trust in the comments (point estimate -0.81, 95% CI -1.04 to -0.59), the organization that made the post (point estimate -0.68, 95% CI -0.90 to -0.49), the likelihood of participants recommending the drug (point estimate -0.61, 95% CI -0

  2. How Affiliation Disclosure and Control Over User-Generated Comments Affects Consumer Health Knowledge and Behavior: A Randomized Controlled Experiment of Pharmaceutical Direct-to-Consumer Advertising on Social Media

    PubMed Central

    Vendemia, Megan Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Background More people are seeking health information online than ever before and pharmaceutical companies are increasingly marketing their drugs through social media. Objective The aim was to examine two major concerns related to online direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertising: (1) how disclosing an affiliation with a pharmaceutical company affects how people respond to drug information produced by both health organizations and online commenters, and (2) how knowledge that health organizations control the display of user-generated comments affects consumer health knowledge and behavior. Methods We conducted a 2×2×2 between-subjects experiment (N=674). All participants viewed an infographic posted to Facebook by a health organization about a prescription allergy drug. Across conditions, the infographic varied in the degree to which the health organization and commenters appeared to be affiliated with a drug manufacturer, and the display of user-generated comments appeared to be controlled. Results Affiliation disclosure statements on a health organization’s Facebook post increased perceptions of an organization-drug manufacturer connection, which reduced trust in the organization (point estimate –0.45, 95% CI –0.69 to –0.24) and other users who posted comments about the drug (point estimate –0.44, 95% CI –0.68 to –0.22). Furthermore, increased perceptions of an organization-manufacturer connection reduced the likelihood that people would recommend the drug to important others (point estimate –0.35, 95% CI –0.59 to –0.15), and share the drug post with others on Facebook (point estimate –0.37, 95% CI –0.64 to –0.16). An affiliation cue next to the commenters' names increased perceptions that the commenters were affiliated with the drug manufacturer, which reduced trust in the comments (point estimate –0.81, 95% CI –1.04 to –0.59), the organization that made the post (point estimate –0.68, 95% CI –0.90 to –0.49), the

  3. EAGLE The controlled source experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, P. K. H.; Eagle Controlled Source Group

    2003-04-01

    In January 2003, a wide-angle reflection / refraction seismic project was carried out over the north-eastern section of the Main Ethiopian Rift as part of the international EAGLE (Ethiopia Afar Geoscientific Lithospheric Experiment) programme. EAGLE comprises a combination of passive and controlled source seismic experiments to determine the geometry and kinematics of a continental rift immediately prior to break-up, enabling the development of magmatic margin break-up models. A total of ˜900 seismic instruments were deployed along two 450km profiles, one along the axis of the Ethiopian Rift into the south-west corner of Afar; and a second across the rift, extending north and south across the uplifted, flood basalt covered, Ethiopian plateau. The two profiles intersect over the Nazret volcanic segment in the rift. This may be indicative of the transition from continental style rifting in which strain is accommodated on the rift bounding border faults, to a state where strain and magmatism have migrated to a narrow zone within the rift, a necessary pre-cursor to break-up. A further ˜300 instruments were deployed in a 100x100km^2 array around the intersection of the two profiles. A total of 16 borehole and 2 lake shots were fired into the network over a period of four days. The principal objectives of the controlled source project were to examine crustal strain, the distribution of crustal magmatic intrusions, the influence of pre-rift crustal property variations on rift development and also to provide a crustal seismic velocity distribution to improve images of the deep mantle, as well as earthquake locations derived from the EAGLE passive arrays.

  4. Automatic generation of randomized trial sequences for priming experiments.

    PubMed

    Ihrke, Matthias; Behrendt, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    In most psychological experiments, a randomized presentation of successive displays is crucial for the validity of the results. For some paradigms, this is not a trivial issue because trials are interdependent, e.g., priming paradigms. We present a software that automatically generates optimized trial sequences for (negative-) priming experiments. Our implementation is based on an optimization heuristic known as genetic algorithms that allows for an intuitive interpretation due to its similarity to natural evolution. The program features a graphical user interface that allows the user to generate trial sequences and to interactively improve them. The software is based on freely available software and is released under the GNU General Public License.

  5. ORCHIDS: an observational randomized controlled trial on childhood differential susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Chhangur, Rabia R; Weeland, Joyce; Overbeek, Geertjan; Matthys, Walterchj; Orobio de Castro, Bram

    2012-10-29

    A central tenet in developmental psychopathology is that childhood rearing experiences have a major impact on children's development. Recently, candidate genes have been identified that may cause children to be differentially susceptible to these experiences (i.e., susceptibility genes). However, our understanding of the differential impact of parenting is limited at best. Specifically, more experimental research is needed. The ORCHIDS study will investigate gene-(gene-)environment interactions to obtain more insight into a) moderating effects of polymorphisms on the link between parenting and child behavior, and b) behavioral mechanisms that underlie these gene-(gene-)environment interactions in an experimental design. The ORCHIDS study is a randomized controlled trial, in which the environment will be manipulated with an intervention (i.e., Incredible Years parent training). In a screening, families with children aged 4-8 who show mild to (sub)clinical behavior problems will be targeted through community records via two Dutch regional healthcare organizations. Assessments in both the intervention and control condition will be conducted at baseline (i.e., pretest), after 6 months (i.e., posttest), and after 10 months (i.e., follow-up). This study protocol describes the design of a randomized controlled trial that investigates gene-(gene-)environment interactions in the development of child behavior. Two hypotheses will be tested. First, we expect that children in the intervention condition who carry one or more susceptibility genes will show significantly lower levels of problem behavior and higher levels of prosocial behavior after their parent(s) received the Incredible Years training, compared to children without these genes, or children in the control group. Second, we expect that children carrying one or more susceptibility genes will show a heightened sensitivity to changes in parenting behaviors, and will manifest higher emotional synchronization in dyadic

  6. Digital servo control of random sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakich, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    It is necessary to place number of sensors at different positions in sound field to determine actual sound intensities to which test object is subjected. It is possible to determine whether specification is being met adequately or exceeded. Since excitation is of random nature, signals are essentially coherent and it is impossible to obtain true average.

  7. Receipt of Preventive Services After Oregon's Randomized Medicaid Experiment.

    PubMed

    Marino, Miguel; Bailey, Steffani R; Gold, Rachel; Hoopes, Megan J; O'Malley, Jean P; Huguet, Nathalie; Heintzman, John; Gallia, Charles; McConnell, K John; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2016-02-01

    It is predicted that gaining health insurance via the Affordable Care Act will result in increased rates of preventive health services receipt in the U.S., primarily based on self-reported findings from previous health insurance expansion studies. This study examined the long-term (36-month) impact of Oregon's 2008 randomized Medicaid expansion ("Oregon Experiment") on receipt of 12 preventive care services in community health centers using electronic health record data. Demographic data from adult (aged 19-64 years) Oregon Experiment participants were probabilistically matched to electronic health record data from 49 Oregon community health centers within the OCHIN community health information network (N=10,643). Intent-to-treat analyses compared receipt of preventive services over a 36-month (2008-2011) period among those randomly assigned to apply for Medicaid versus not assigned, and instrumental variable analyses estimated the effect of actually gaining Medicaid coverage on preventive services receipt (data collected in 2012-2014; analysis performed in 2014-2015). Intent-to-treat analyses revealed statistically significant differences between patients randomly assigned to apply for Medicaid (versus not assigned) for 8 of 12 assessed preventive services. In intent-to-treat analyses, Medicaid coverage significantly increased the odds of receipt of most preventive services (ORs ranging from 1.04 [95% CI=1.02, 1.06] for smoking assessment to 1.27 [95% CI=1.02, 1.57] for mammography). Rates of preventive services receipt will likely increase as community health center patients gain insurance through Affordable Care Act expansions. Continued effort is needed to increase health insurance coverage in an effort to decrease health disparities in vulnerable populations. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluating the Flipped Classroom: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wozny, Nathan; Balser, Cary; Ives, Drew

    2018-01-01

    Despite recent interest in flipped classrooms, rigorous research evaluating their effectiveness is sparse. In this study, the authors implement a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of a flipped classroom technique relative to a traditional lecture in an introductory undergraduate econometrics course. Random assignment enables the…

  9. Analyzing Randomized Controlled Interventions: Three Notes for Applied Linguists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanhove, Jan

    2015-01-01

    I discuss three common practices that obfuscate or invalidate the statistical analysis of randomized controlled interventions in applied linguistics. These are (a) checking whether randomization produced groups that are balanced on a number of possibly relevant covariates, (b) using repeated measures ANOVA to analyze pretest-posttest designs, and…

  10. Cognitive rehabilitation in patients with gliomas: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Karin; Sitskoorn, Margriet M; Gundy, Chad M; Sikkes, Sietske A M; Klein, Martin; Postma, Tjeerd J; van den Bent, Martin J; Beute, Guus N; Enting, Roelien H; Kappelle, Arnoud C; Boogerd, Willem; Veninga, Theo; Twijnstra, Albert; Boerman, Dolf H; Taphoorn, Martin J B; Aaronson, Neil K

    2009-08-01

    Patients with gliomas often experience cognitive deficits, including problems with attention and memory. This randomized, controlled trial evaluated the effects of a multifaceted cognitive rehabilitation program (CRP) on cognitive functioning and selected quality-of-life domains in patients with gliomas. One hundred forty adult patients with low-grade and anaplastic gliomas, favorable prognostic factors, and both subjective cognitive symptoms and objective cognitive deficits were recruited from 11 hospitals in the Netherlands. Patients were randomly assigned to an intervention group or to a waiting-list control group. The intervention incorporated both computer-based attention retraining and compensatory skills training of attention, memory, and executive functioning. Participants completed a battery of neuropsychological (NP) tests and self-report questionnaires on cognitive functioning, fatigue, mental health-related quality of life, and community integration at baseline, after completion of the CRP, and at 6-month follow-up. At the immediate post-treatment evaluation, statistically significant intervention effects were observed for measures of subjective cognitive functioning and its perceived burden but not for the objective NP outcomes or for any of the other self-report measures. At the 6-month follow-up, the CRP group performed significantly better than the control group on NP tests of attention and verbal memory and reported less mental fatigue. Group differences in other subjective outcomes were not significant at 6 months. The CRP has a salutary effect on short-term cognitive complaints and on longer-term cognitive performance and mental fatigue. Additional research is needed to identify which elements of the intervention are most effective.

  11. Epilepsy and Neuromodulation—Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Churl-Su; Ripa, Valeria; Al-Awar, Omar; Panov, Fedor; Ghatan, Saadi; Jetté, Nathalie

    2018-01-01

    Neuromodulation is a treatment strategy that is increasingly being utilized in those suffering from drug-resistant epilepsy who are not appropriate for resective surgery. The number of double-blinded RCTs demonstrating the efficacy of neurostimulation in persons with epilepsy is increasing. Although reductions in seizure frequency is common in these trials, obtaining seizure freedom is rare. Invasive neuromodulation procedures (DBS, VNS, and RNS) have been approved as therapeutic measures. However, further investigations are necessary to delineate effective targeting, minimize side effects that are related to chronic implantation and to improve the cost effectiveness of these devices. The RCTs of non-invasive modes of neuromodulation whilst showing much promise (tDCS, eTNS, rTMS), require larger powered studies as well as studies that focus at better targeting techniques. We provide a review of double-blinded randomized clinical trials that have been conducted for neuromodulation in epilepsy. PMID:29670050

  12. Fluid dynamics during Random Positioning Machine micro-gravity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leguy, Carole A. D.; Delfos, René; Pourquie, Mathieu J. B. M.; Poelma, Christian; Westerweel, Jerry; van Loon, Jack J. W. A.

    2017-06-01

    A Random Positioning Machine (RPM) is a device used to study the role of gravity on biological systems. This is accomplished through continuous reorientation of the sample such that the net influence of gravity is randomized over time. The aim of this study is to predict fluid flow behavior during such RPM simulated microgravity studies, which may explain differences found between RPM and space flight experiments. An analytical solution is given for a cylinder as a model for an experimental container. Then, a dual-axis rotating frame is used to mimic the motion characteristics of an RPM with sinusoidal rotation frequencies of 0.2 Hz and 0.1 Hz while Particle Image Velocimetry is used to measure the velocity field inside a flask. To reproduce the same experiment numerically, a Direct Numerical Simulation model is used. The analytical model predicts that an increase in the Womersley number leads to higher shear stresses at the cylinder wall and decrease in fluid angular velocity inside the cylinder. The experimental results show that periodic single-axis rotation induces a fluid motion parallel to the wall and that a complex flow is observed for two-axis rotation with a maximum wall shear stress of 8.0 mPa (80 mdyne /cm2). The experimental and numerical results show that oscillatory motion inside an RPM induces flow motion that can, depending on the experimental samples, reduce the quality of the simulated microgravity. Thus, it is crucial to determine the appropriate oscillatory frequency of the axes to design biological experiments.

  13. A Short History of Randomized Experiments in Criminology: A Meager Feast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrington, David P.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses advantages of randomized experiments and key issues raised in this special issue. Focuses on growth and decrease in the use of randomized experiments by the California Youth Authority, the U.S. National Institute of Justice, and the British Home Office. Calls for increased recognition of the importance of randomized experiments. (SLD)

  14. Caring Letters for Military Suicide Prevention: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-2-0123 TITLE: Caring Letters for Military Suicide Prevention: A Randomized Controlled Trial PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr...Caring Letters for Military Suicide Prevention: A Randomized 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Controlled Trial 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0123 5c. PROGRAM...determine if the intervention is effective in preventing suicide and suicidal behaviors among Service Members and Veterans. The “caring letters

  15. Caring Letters for Military Suicide Prevention: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-2-0123 TITLE: Caring Letters for Military Suicide Prevention: A Randomized Controlled Trial PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr...Caring Letters for Military Suicide Prevention: A Randomized 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Controlled Trial 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0123 5c. PROGRAM...determine if the intervention is effective in preventing suicide and suicidal behaviors among Service Members and Veterans. The “caring letters” concept

  16. Application of one-way ANOVA in completely randomized experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Zaharah; Izwan Latiff, Ahmad; Ahmad, Kartini

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes an application of a statistical technique one-way ANOVA in completely randomized experiments with three replicates. This technique was employed to a single factor with four levels and multiple observations at each level. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between chemical oxygen demand index and location on-sites. Two different approaches are employed for the analyses; critical value and p-value. It also presents key assumptions of the technique to be satisfied by the data in order to obtain valid results. Pairwise comparisons by Turkey method are also considered and discussed to determine where the significant differences among the means is after the ANOVA has been performed. The results revealed that there are statistically significant relationship exist between the chemical oxygen demand index and the location on-sites.

  17. Randomized controlled trial of probiotics after colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Basil; Slack, Timothy; Wong, Shing W; Lam, Francis; Muhlmann, Mark; Koestenbauer, Jakob; Dark, Jonathan; Newstead, Graham

    2017-09-01

    Up to 20% of patients have ongoing abdominal symptoms at day 2 and beyond following colonoscopy. It was hypothesized that some of these symptoms are related to alterations in gut microbiota secondary to bowel preparation and would improve with probiotics compared with placebo. Patients were given either a probiotic or placebo capsule in the days following colonoscopy. Colonoscopy was performed with air insufflation. The probiotic capsule contained the strains Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07. Patients recorded their symptoms at 1 h, 1, 2, 4, 7 and 14 days post colonoscopy and returned results once their symptoms had resolved. The primary outcomes used were the length of days to resolution of bloating, abdominal pain and altered bowel function post colonoscopy. A total of 320 patients were randomized. After loss to follow-up and withdrawal, 133 patients were analysed in the probiotic group and 126 in the placebo group. Patients having probiotic had a lower number of pain days following colonoscopy, 1.99 versus 2.78 days (P < 0.033). There was no significant difference in bloating or return to normal bowel habit days (P = 0.139 and 0.265 respectively). Subgroup analysis revealed that patients with pre-existing abdominal pain benefited from probiotics in number of pain days, 2.16 versus 4.08 (P = 0.0498). Our study has shown a significant reduction in the duration of pain days post colonoscopy in patients taking probiotic compared with placebo. No significant effect was seen in terms of return to normal bowel function or bloating post colonoscopy. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  18. Viscosity Control Experiment Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Heidi E.; Bradley, Paul Andrew

    Turbulent mix has been invoked to explain many results in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density (HED) physics, such as reduced yield in capsule implosions. Many ICF capsule implosions exhibit interfacial instabilities seeded by the drive shock, but it is not clear that fully developed turbulence results from this. Many simulations use turbulent mix models to help match simulation results to data, but this is not appropriate if turbulence is not present. It would be useful to have an experiment where turbulent mixing could be turned on or off by design. The use of high-Z dopants to modifymore » viscosity and the resulting influence on turbulence is considered here. A complicating factor is that the plasma in some implosions can become strongly coupled, which makes the Spitzer expression for viscosity invalid. We first consider equations that cover a broad parameter space in temperature and density to address regimes for various experimental applications. Next, a previous shock-tube and other ICF experiments that investigate viscosity or use doping to examine the effects on yield are reviewed. How viscosity and dopants play a role in capsule yield depends on the region and process under consideration. Experiments and simulations have been performed to study the effects of viscosity on both the hot spot and the fuel/ablator mix. Increases in yield have been seen for some designs, but not all. We then discuss the effect of adding krypton dopant to the gas region of a typical OMEGA and a 2-shock NIF implosion to determine approximately the effect of adding dopant on the computed Reynolds number. Recommendations for a path forward for possible experiments using high-Z dopants to affect viscosity and turbulence are made.« less

  19. The Effects of School Gardens on Children's Science Knowledge: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Low-Income Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Nancy M.; Myers, Beth M.; Todd, Lauren E.; Barale, Karen; Gaolach, Brad; Ferenz, Gretchen; Aitken, Martha; Henderson, Charles R.; Tse, Caroline; Pattison, Karen Ostlie; Taylor, Cayla; Connerly, Laura; Carson, Janet B.; Gensemer, Alexandra Z.; Franz, Nancy K.; Falk, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial or "true experiment" examines the effects of a school garden intervention on the science knowledge of elementary school children. Schools were randomly assigned to a group that received the garden intervention (n?=?25) or to a waitlist control group that received the garden intervention at the end of the…

  20. Affectionate Writing Reduces Total Cholesterol: Two Randomized, Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Kory; Mikkelson, Alan C.; Hesse, Colin; Pauley, Perry M.

    2007-01-01

    In two 5-week trials, healthy college students were randomly assigned either to experimental or control groups. Participants in the experimental groups wrote about their affection for significant friends, relatives, and/or romantic partners for 20 minutes on three separate occasions; on the same schedule, those in the control groups wrote about…

  1. Baseline experiments in teleoperator control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, W. W., III; Mixon, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Studies have been conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to establish baseline human teleoperator interface data and to assess the influence of some of the interface parameters on human performance in teleoperation. As baseline data, the results will be used to assess future interface improvements resulting from this research in basic teleoperator human factors. In addition, the data have been used to validate LaRC's basic teleoperator hardware setup and to compare initial teleoperator study results. Four subjects controlled a modified industrial manipulator to perform a simple task involving both high and low precision. Two different schemes for controlling the manipulator were studied along with both direct and indirect viewing of the task. Performance of the task was measured as the length of time required to complete the task along with the number of errors made in the process. Analyses of variance were computed to determine the significance of the influences of each of the independent variables. Comparisons were also made between the LaRC data and data taken earlier by Grumman Aerospace Corp. at their facilities.

  2. FPGA and USB based control board for quantum random number generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Wan, Xu; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Gao, Yuan; Chen, Teng-Yun; Liang, Hao

    2009-09-01

    The design and implementation of FPGA-and-USB-based control board for quantum experiments are discussed. The usage of quantum true random number generator, control- logic in FPGA and communication with computer through USB protocol are proposed in this paper. Programmable controlled signal input and output ports are implemented. The error-detections of data frame header and frame length are designed. This board has been used in our decoy-state based quantum key distribution (QKD) system successfully.

  3. Kinesio Taping for pain control during labor: Protocol of a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Miquelutti, Maria Amelia; Cecatti, José Guilherme

    2017-03-01

    This study protocol will evaluate the effectiveness and safety during labor and delivery of the Kinesio Taping bandage for pain sensation, satisfaction of patients, and obstetric and neonatal outcomes. A randomized controlled trial with 60 participants divided into two groups will be conducted. The intervention group will receive bandage application on the vertebral regions corresponding to uterine dermatomes - from T10 to L1 and from S2 to S4. The control group will receive bandage application away from uterine dermatomes, from T1 to T4. The primary endpoint is pain during labor. Secondary endpoints are perinatal outcomes and patient satisfaction with the bandage and with her labor. Pain levels will be evaluated on an hourly basis during labor, and intention-to-treat analysis will be performed. Risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals will be calculated. Findings on effectiveness of pain control with no adverse effects to both the mother and neonate are the first step in evaluating the systematic use of Kinesio Taping during labor. Since self-control may affect birthing experience satisfaction, discovering new alternatives for pain control may allow for a better experience. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Thinking outside the Randomized Controlled Trials Experimental Box: Strategies for Enhancing Credibility and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesse-Biber, Sharlene

    2013-01-01

    Some evaluators employ randomized controlled trials (RCTs) as the gold standard of evidence-based practice (EBP). Critics of RCT designs argue that RCTs do not include the complexity of program participants' experiences or clinical expertise, and couple this with criticisms that it is difficult to transfer RCT findings from the laboratory to…

  5. Challenges and Innovations in a Community-Based Participatory Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodkind, Jessica R.; Amer, Suha; Christian, Charlisa; Hess, Julia Meredith; Bybee, Deborah; Isakson, Brian L.; Baca, Brandon; Ndayisenga, Martin; Greene, R. Neil; Shantzek, Cece

    2017-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are a long-standing and important design for conducting rigorous tests of the effectiveness of health interventions. However, many questions have been raised about the external validity of RCTs, their utility in explicating mechanisms of intervention and participants' intervention experiences, and their…

  6. Effectiveness of a Parent Training Program in (Pre)Adolescence: Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leijten, Patty; Overbeek, Geertjan; Janssens, Jan M. A. M.

    2012-01-01

    The present randomized controlled trial examined the effectiveness of the parent training program Parents and Children Talking Together (PCTT) for parents with children in the preadolescent period who experience parenting difficulties. The program is focused on reducing child problem behavior by improving parents' communication and problem solving…

  7. Impacts of Child Development Accounts on maternal depressive symptoms: evidence from a randomized statewide policy experiment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Sherraden, Michael; Purnell, Jason Q

    2014-07-01

    This study examines the impact of Child Development Accounts (CDAs)-asset-building accounts created for children at birth-on the depressive symptoms of mothers in a statewide randomized experiment conducted in the United States. The experiment identified the primary caregivers of children born in Oklahoma during 2007, and 2704 of the caregivers completed a baseline interview before random assignment to the treatment (n = 1358) or the control group (n = 1346). To treatment participants, the experiment offered CDAs built on the existing Oklahoma 529 College Savings Plan. The baseline and follow-up surveys measured the participants' depressive symptoms with a shortened version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). In models that control for baseline CES-D scores, the mean follow-up score of treatment mothers is .17 lower than that of control mothers (p < .05). Findings suggest that CDAs have a greater impact among subsamples that reported lower income or lower education. Although designed as an economic intervention for children, CDAs may improve parents' psychological well-being. Findings also suggest that CDAs' impacts on maternal depressive symptoms may be partially mediated through children's social-emotional development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Thermal control surfaces experiment flight system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Donald R.; Hummer, Leigh L.; Zwiener, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The Thermal Control Surfaces Experiment (TCSE) is the most complex system, other than the LDEF, retrieved after long term space exposure. The TCSE is a microcosm of complex electro-optical payloads being developed and flow by NASA and the DoD including SDI. The objective of TCSE was to determine the effects of the near-Earth orbital environment and the LDEF induced environment on spacecraft thermal control surfaces. The TCSE was a comprehensive experiment that combined in-space measurements with extensive post flight analyses of thermal control surfaces to determine the effects of exposure to the low earth orbit space environment. The TCSE was the first space experiment to measure the optical properties of thermal control surfaces the way they are routinely measured in a lab. The performance of the TCSE confirms that low cost, complex experiment packages can be developed that perform well in space.

  9. Sample Selection in Randomized Experiments: A New Method Using Propensity Score Stratified Sampling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Elizabeth; Hedges, Larry; Vaden-Kiernan, Michael; Borman, Geoffrey; Sullivan, Kate; Caverly, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Randomized experiments are often seen as the "gold standard" for causal research. Despite the fact that experiments use random assignment to treatment conditions, units are seldom selected into the experiment using probability sampling. Very little research on experimental design has focused on how to make generalizations to well-defined…

  10. Pre- and post-treatment experiences of fear, anxiety, and pain among chronic periodontitis patients treated by scaling and root planing per quadrant versus one-stage full-mouth disinfection: a 6-month randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Santuchi, Camila Carvalho; Cortelli, Sheila Cavalca; Cortelli, José Roberto; Cota, Luís Otávio Miranda; Alencar, Camila Oliveira; Costa, Fernando Oliveira

    2015-11-01

    To relate the clinical effects of two different forms of non-surgical periodontal therapy - scaling and root planing per quadrant (SRP-Q) and one-stage full-mouth disinfection (FMD) - to patient-based outcomes such as fear, anxiety, and pain of moderate chronic periodontitis patients. Dental Fear Survey (DFS) and Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) questionnaires and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) were applied to 78 patients randomized into two groups: SRP-Q (n = 37) and FMD (n = 41). Periodontal clinical parameters: probing pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), plaque index (PI), and gingival index (GI) were monitored at baseline and 6 months after treatment. Data were statistically analysed by chi-square, Fisher's exact, Mann-Whitney, Wilcoxon tests, Pearson's correlation, and Cluster analysis. All periodontal clinical parameters improved from baseline to 6 months. Patients with higher fear and anxiety showed a worse clinical periodontal status before and after treatment (mean CAL, PI, and GI). After both types of treatment, fear and anxiety decreased (FMD: p = 0.019; SRP-Q: p = 0.043) with no differences between the groups. Pain did not differ between groups (FMD: 20.6 ± 19.0 and SRP: 20.7 ± 20.0; p = 0.930). In moderate chronic periodontitis patients, SRP-Q and FMD provided periodontal clinical improvements and similar experiences of fear, anxiety, and pain. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A randomized controlled trial of an electronic informed consent process.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, Erin; Wong, Bob; Rose, Nancy C; Anderson, Rebecca; Fedor, Beth; Stark, Louisa A; Botkin, Jeffrey R

    2014-12-01

    A pilot study assessed an electronic informed consent model within a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Participants who were recruited for the parent RCT project were randomly selected and randomized to either an electronic consent group (n = 32) or a simplified paper-based consent group (n = 30). Results from the electronic consent group reported significantly higher understanding of the purpose of the study, alternatives to participation, and who to contact if they had questions or concerns about the study. However, participants in the paper-based control group reported higher mean scores on some survey items. This research suggests that an electronic informed consent presentation may improve participant understanding for some aspects of a research study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. A Randomized Controlled Trial of an Electronic Informed Consent Process

    PubMed Central

    Rothwell, Erin; Wong, Bob; Rose, Nancy C.; Anderson, Rebecca; Fedor, Beth; Stark, Louisa A.; Botkin, Jeffrey R.

    2018-01-01

    A pilot study assessed an electronic informed consent model within a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Participants who were recruited for the parent RCT project were randomly selected and randomized to either an electronic consent group (n = 32) or a simplified paper-based consent group (n = 30). Results from the electronic consent group reported significantly higher understanding of the purpose of the study, alternatives to participation, and who to contact if they had questions or concerns about the study. However, participants in the paper-based control group reported higher mean scores on some survey items. This research suggests that an electronic informed consent presentation may improve participant understanding for some aspects of a research study. PMID:25747685

  13. A randomized controlled trial of storytelling as a communication tool.

    PubMed

    Hartling, Lisa; Scott, Shannon D; Johnson, David W; Bishop, Ted; Klassen, Terry P

    2013-01-01

    Stories may be an effective tool to communicate with patients because of their ability to engage the reader. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of story booklets compared to standard information sheets for parents of children attending the emergency department (ED) with a child with croup. Parents were randomized to receive story booklets (n=208) or standard information sheets (n=205) during their ED visit. The primary outcome was change in anxiety between triage to ED discharge as measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Follow-up telephone interviews were conducted at 1 and 3 days after discharge, then every other day until 9 days (or until resolution of symptoms), and at 1 year. Secondary outcomes included: expected future anxiety, event impact, parental knowledge, satisfaction, decision regret, healthcare utilization, time to symptom resolution. There was no significant difference in the primary outcome of change in parental anxiety between recruitment and ED discharge (change of 5 points for the story group vs. 6 points for the comparison group, p=0.78). The story group showed significantly greater decision regret regarding their decision to go to the ED (p<0.001): 6.7% of the story group vs. 1.5% of the comparison group strongly disagreed with the statement "I would go for the same choice if I had to do it over again". The story group reported shorter time to resolution of symptoms (mean 3.7 days story group vs. 4.0 days comparison group, median 3 days both groups; log rank test, p=0.04). No other outcomes were different between study groups. Stories about parent experiences managing a child with croup did not reduce parental anxiety. The story group showed significantly greater decision regret and quicker time to resolution of symptoms. Further research is needed to better understand whether stories can be effective in improving patient-important outcomes. Current Controlled Trials, ISRCTN39642997 (http://www.controlled

  14. Adaptive adjustment of the randomization ratio using historical control data

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Brian P.; Carlin, Bradley P.; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prospective trial design often occurs in the presence of “acceptable” [1] historical control data. Typically this data is only utilized for treatment comparison in a posteriori retrospective analysis to estimate population-averaged effects in a random-effects meta-analysis. Purpose We propose and investigate an adaptive trial design in the context of an actual randomized controlled colorectal cancer trial. This trial, originally reported by Goldberg et al. [2], succeeded a similar trial reported by Saltz et al. [3], and used a control therapy identical to that tested (and found beneficial) in the Saltz trial. Methods The proposed trial implements an adaptive randomization procedure for allocating patients aimed at balancing total information (concurrent and historical) among the study arms. This is accomplished by assigning more patients to receive the novel therapy in the absence of strong evidence for heterogeneity among the concurrent and historical controls. Allocation probabilities adapt as a function of the effective historical sample size (EHSS) characterizing relative informativeness defined in the context of a piecewise exponential model for evaluating time to disease progression. Commensurate priors [4] are utilized to assess historical and concurrent heterogeneity at interim analyses and to borrow strength from the historical data in the final analysis. The adaptive trial’s frequentist properties are simulated using the actual patient-level historical control data from the Saltz trial and the actual enrollment dates for patients enrolled into the Goldberg trial. Results Assessing concurrent and historical heterogeneity at interim analyses and balancing total information with the adaptive randomization procedure leads to trials that on average assign more new patients to the novel treatment when the historical controls are unbiased or slightly biased compared to the concurrent controls. Large magnitudes of bias lead to approximately equal

  15. Adaptive adjustment of the randomization ratio using historical control data.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Brian P; Carlin, Bradley P; Sargent, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Prospective trial design often occurs in the presence of 'acceptable' historical control data. Typically, these data are only utilized for treatment comparison in a posteriori retrospective analysis to estimate population-averaged effects in a random-effects meta-analysis. We propose and investigate an adaptive trial design in the context of an actual randomized controlled colorectal cancer trial. This trial, originally reported by Goldberg et al., succeeded a similar trial reported by Saltz et al., and used a control therapy identical to that tested (and found beneficial) in the Saltz trial. The proposed trial implements an adaptive randomization procedure for allocating patients aimed at balancing total information (concurrent and historical) among the study arms. This is accomplished by assigning more patients to receive the novel therapy in the absence of strong evidence for heterogeneity among the concurrent and historical controls. Allocation probabilities adapt as a function of the effective historical sample size (EHSS), characterizing relative informativeness defined in the context of a piecewise exponential model for evaluating time to disease progression. Commensurate priors are utilized to assess historical and concurrent heterogeneity at interim analyses and to borrow strength from the historical data in the final analysis. The adaptive trial's frequentist properties are simulated using the actual patient-level historical control data from the Saltz trial and the actual enrollment dates for patients enrolled into the Goldberg trial. Assessing concurrent and historical heterogeneity at interim analyses and balancing total information with the adaptive randomization procedure lead to trials that on average assign more new patients to the novel treatment when the historical controls are unbiased or slightly biased compared to the concurrent controls. Large magnitudes of bias lead to approximately equal allocation of patients among the treatment arms

  16. Pedometer Use in University Freshmen: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeCheminant, James D.; Smith, John D.; Covington, N. Kay; Hardin-Renschen, Tracie; Heden, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To describe activity patterns associated with a pedometer intervention in university freshmen and compare the intervention participants to controls for several health outcomes. Methods: Forty-six university freshmen were randomized to a group that wore a pedometer across the academic year with a goal of 10,000 steps/day or to a control…

  17. Asthma Self-Management Model: Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivera, Carolina M. X.; Vianna, Elcio Oliveira; Bonizio, Roni C.; de Menezes, Marcelo B.; Ferraz, Erica; Cetlin, Andrea A.; Valdevite, Laura M.; Almeida, Gustavo A.; Araujo, Ana S.; Simoneti, Christian S.; de Freitas, Amanda; Lizzi, Elisangela A.; Borges, Marcos C.; de Freitas, Osvaldo

    2016-01-01

    Information for patients provided by the pharmacist is reflected in adhesion to treatment, clinical results and patient quality of life. The objective of this study was to assess an asthma self-management model for rational medicine use. This was a randomized controlled trial with 60 asthmatic patients assigned to attend five modules presented by…

  18. Using Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate Interventions for Releasing Prisoners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettus-Davis, Carrie; Howard, Matthew Owen; Dunnigan, Allison; Scheyett, Anna M.; Roberts-Lewis, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are rarely used to evaluate social and behavioral interventions designed for releasing prisoners. Objective: We use a pilot RCT of a social support intervention (Support Matters) as a case example to discuss obstacles and strategies for conducting RCT intervention evaluations that span prison and community…

  19. Randomized Control Trials on the Dynamic Geometry Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Zhonghong; White, Alexander; Rosenwasser, Alana

    2011-01-01

    The project reported here is conducting repeated randomized control trials of an approach to high school geometry that utilizes Dynamic Geometry (DG) software to supplement ordinary instructional practices. It compares effects of that intervention with standard instruction that does not make use of computer drawing/exploration tools. The basic…

  20. Improving Balance in Subacute Stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goljar, Nika; Burger, Helena; Rudolf, Marko; Stanonik, Irena

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of balance training in a balance trainer, a newly developed mechanical device for training balance, with conventional balance training in subacute stroke patients. This was a randomized controlled study. Fifty participants met the inclusion criteria and 39 finished the study. The participants were…

  1. Lessons Learned from Large-Scale Randomized Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E.; Cheung, Alan C. K.

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale randomized studies provide the best means of evaluating practical, replicable approaches to improving educational outcomes. This article discusses the advantages, problems, and pitfalls of these evaluations, focusing on alternative methods of randomization, recruitment, ensuring high-quality implementation, dealing with attrition, and…

  2. Ear Acupuncture for Acute Sore Throat: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    SEP 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ear acupuncture for acute sore throat. A randomized controlled trial...Auncular Acupuncture is a low risk option for acute pain control •Battlefield acupuncture (BFA) IS a specific auncular acupuncture technique •BFA IS...Strengths: Prospect1ve RCT •Weaknesses Small sample stze. no sham acupuncture performed, patients not blinded to treatment •Th1s study represents an

  3. Attitude control fault protection - The Voyager experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litty, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    The length of the Voyager mission and the communication delay caused by the distances involved made fault protection a necessary part of the Voyager Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem (AACS) design. An overview of the Voyager attitude control fault protection is given and flight experiences relating to fault protection are provided.

  4. Patient satisfaction with different interpreting methods: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gany, Francesca; Leng, Jennifer; Shapiro, Ephraim; Abramson, David; Motola, Ivette; Shield, David C; Changrani, Jyotsna

    2007-11-01

    Growth of the foreign-born population in the U.S. has led to increasing numbers of limited-English-proficient (LEP) patients. Innovative medical interpreting strategies, including remote simultaneous medical interpreting (RSMI), have arisen to address the language barrier. This study evaluates the impact of interpreting method on patient satisfaction. 1,276 English-, Spanish-, Mandarin-, and Cantonese-speaking patients attending the primary care clinic and emergency department of a large New York City municipal hospital were screened for enrollment in a randomized controlled trial. Language-discordant patients were randomized to RSMI or usual and customary (U&C) interpreting. Patients with language-concordant providers received usual care. Demographic and patient satisfaction questionnaires were administered to all participants. 541 patients were language-concordant with their providers and not randomized; 371 were randomized to RSMI, 167 of whom were exposed to RSMI; and 364 were randomized to U&C, 198 of whom were exposed to U&C. Patients randomized to RSMI were more likely than those with U&C to think doctors treated them with respect (RSMI 71%, U&C 64%, p < 0.05), but they did not differ in other measures of physician communication/care. In a linear regression analysis, exposure to RSMI was significantly associated with an increase in overall satisfaction with physician communication/care (beta 0.10, 95% CI 0.02-0.18, scale 0-1.0). Patients randomized to RSMI were more likely to think the interpreting method protected their privacy (RSMI 51%, U&C 38%, p < 0.05). Patients randomized to either arm of interpretation reported less comprehension and satisfaction than patients in language-concordant encounters. While not a substitute for language-concordant providers, RSMI can improve patient satisfaction and privacy among LEP patients. Implementing RSMI should be considered an important component of a multipronged approach to addressing language barriers in health

  5. Acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Zheng, Hui; Witt, Claudia M.; Roll, Stephanie; Yu, Shu-guang; Yan, Jie; Sun, Guo-jie; Zhao, Ling; Huang, Wen-jing; Chang, Xiao-rong; Zhang, Hong-xing; Wang, De-jun; Lan, Lei; Zou, Ran; Liang, Fan-rong

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acupuncture is commonly used to treat migraine. We assessed the efficacy of acupuncture at migraine-specific acupuncture points compared with other acupuncture points and sham acupuncture. Methods: We performed a multicentre, single-blind randomized controlled trial. In total, 480 patients with migraine were randomly assigned to one of four groups (Shaoyang-specific acupuncture, Shaoyang-nonspecific acupuncture, Yangming-specific acupuncture or sham acupuncture [control]). All groups received 20 treatments, which included electrical stimulation, over a period of four weeks. The primary outcome was the number of days with a migraine experienced during weeks 5–8 after randomization. Our secondary outcomes included the frequency of migraine attack, migraine intensity and migraine-specific quality of life. Results: Compared with patients in the control group, patients in the acupuncture groups reported fewer days with a migraine during weeks 5–8, however the differences between treatments were not significant (p > 0.05). There was a significant reduction in the number of days with a migraine during weeks 13–16 in all acupuncture groups compared with control (Shaoyang-specific acupuncture v. control: difference –1.06 [95% confidence interval (CI) –1.77 to –0.5], p = 0.003; Shaoyang-nonspecific acupuncture v. control: difference –1.22 [95% CI –1.92 to –0.52], p < 0.001; Yangming-specific acupuncture v. control: difference –0.91 [95% CI –1.61 to –0.21], p = 0.011). We found that there was a significant, but not clinically relevant, benefit for almost all secondary outcomes in the three acupuncture groups compared with the control group. We found no relevant differences between the three acupuncture groups. Interpretation: Acupuncture tested appeared to have a clinically minor effect on migraine prophylaxis compared with sham acupuncture. Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00599586 PMID:22231691

  6. A slewing control experiment for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, J.-N.; Horta, L. G.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1985-01-01

    A hardware set-up has been developed to study slewing control for flexible structures including a steel beam and a solar panel. The linear optimal terminal control law is used to design active controllers which are implemented in an analog computer. The objective of this experiment is to demonstrate and verify the dynamics and optimal terminal control laws as applied to flexible structures for large angle maneuver. Actuation is provided by an electric motor while sensing is given by strain gages and angle potentiometer. Experimental measurements are compared with analytical predictions in terms of modal parameters of the system stability matrix and sufficient agreement is achieved to validate the theory.

  7. To Wait in Tier 1 or Intervene Immediately: A Randomized Experiment Examining First-Grade Response to Intervention in Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Connor, Carol M.; Folsom, Jessica S.; Wanzek, Jeanne; Greulich, Luana; Schatschneider, Christopher; Wagner, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    This randomized controlled experiment compared the efficacy of two response-to-intervention (RTI) models--typical RTI and dynamic RTI--and included 34 first-grade classrooms (n = 522 students) across 10 socioeconomically and culturally diverse schools. Typical RTI was designed to follow the two-stage RTI decision rules that wait to assess response…

  8. Random Assignment within Schools: Lessons Learned from the Teach for America Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazerman, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Randomized trials are a common way to provide rigorous evidence on the impacts of education programs. This article discusses the trade-offs associated with study designs that involve random assignment of students within schools and describes the experience from one such study of Teach for America (TFA). The TFA experiment faced challenges with…

  9. Wavefront Control Testbed (WCT) Experiment Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Laura A.; Basinger, Scott A.; Campion, Scott D.; Faust, Jessica A.; Feinberg, Lee D.; Hayden, William L.; Lowman, Andrew E.; Ohara, Catherine M.; Petrone, Peter P., III

    2004-01-01

    The Wavefront Control Testbed (WCT) was created to develop and test wavefront sensing and control algorithms and software for the segmented James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Last year, we changed the system configuration from three sparse aperture segments to a filled aperture with three pie shaped segments. With this upgrade we have performed experiments on fine phasing with line-of-sight and segment-to-segment jitter, dispersed fringe visibility and grism angle;. high dynamic range tilt sensing; coarse phasing with large aberrations, and sampled sub-aperture testing. This paper reviews the results of these experiments.

  10. GEECS (Generalized Equipment and Experiment Control System)

    SciTech Connect

    GONSALVES, ANTHONY; DESHMUKH, AALHAD

    2017-01-12

    GEECS (Generalized Equipment and Experiment Control System) monitors and controls equipment distributed across a network, performs experiments by scanning input variables, and collects and stores various types of data synchronously from devices. Examples of devices include cameras, motors and pressure gauges. GEEKS is based upon LabView graphical object oriented programming (GOOP), allowing for a modular and scalable framework. Data is published for subscription of an arbitrary number of variables over TCP. A secondary framework allows easy development of graphical user interfaces for a combined control of any available devices on the control system without the need of programming knowledge. Thismore » allows for rapid integration of GEECS into a wide variety of systems. A database interface provides for devise and process configuration while allowing the user to save large quantities of data to local or network drives.« less

  11. Observational studies are complementary to randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Grootendorst, Diana C; Jager, Kitty J; Zoccali, Carmine; Dekker, Friedo W

    2010-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are considered the gold standard study design to investigate the effect of health interventions, including treatment. However, in some situations, it may be unnecessary, inappropriate, impossible, or inadequate to perform an RCT. In these special situations, well-designed observational studies, including cohort and case-control studies, may provide an alternative to doing nothing in order to obtain estimates of treatment effect. It should be noted that such studies should be performed with caution and correctly. The aims of this review are (1) to explain why RCTs are considered the optimal study design to evaluate treatment effects, (2) to describe the situations in which an RCT is not possible and observational studies are an adequate alternative, and (3) to explain when randomization is not needed and can be approximated in observational studies. Examples from the nephrology literature are used for illustration. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Random Forest Application for NEXRAD Radar Data Quality Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keem, M.; Seo, B. C.; Krajewski, W. F.

    2017-12-01

    Identification and elimination of non-meteorological radar echoes (e.g., returns from ground, wind turbines, and biological targets) are the basic data quality control steps before radar data use in quantitative applications (e.g., precipitation estimation). Although WSR-88Ds' recent upgrade to dual-polarization has enhanced this quality control and echo classification, there are still challenges to detect some non-meteorological echoes that show precipitation-like characteristics (e.g., wind turbine or anomalous propagation clutter embedded in rain). With this in mind, a new quality control method using Random Forest is proposed in this study. This classification algorithm is known to produce reliable results with less uncertainty. The method introduces randomness into sampling and feature selections and integrates consequent multiple decision trees. The multidimensional structure of the trees can characterize the statistical interactions of involved multiple features in complex situations. The authors explore the performance of Random Forest method for NEXRAD radar data quality control. Training datasets are selected using several clear cases of precipitation and non-precipitation (but with some non-meteorological echoes). The model is structured using available candidate features (from the NEXRAD data) such as horizontal reflectivity, differential reflectivity, differential phase shift, copolar correlation coefficient, and their horizontal textures (e.g., local standard deviation). The influence of each feature on classification results are quantified by variable importance measures that are automatically estimated by the Random Forest algorithm. Therefore, the number and types of features in the final forest can be examined based on the classification accuracy. The authors demonstrate the capability of the proposed approach using several cases ranging from distinct to complex rain/no-rain events and compare the performance with the existing algorithms (e

  13. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Brief Interventions for Body Dissatisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Tracey; George, Wing Man; Atkinson, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the relative effectiveness of 3 different approaches to the experience of body dissatisfaction compared to a control and ruminative attention control condition, with respect to increasing weight and appearance satisfaction. One hundred female undergraduates (mean age = 24.38, SD = 9.39) underwent a body dissatisfaction…

  14. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Storytelling as a Communication Tool

    PubMed Central

    Hartling, Lisa; Scott, Shannon D.; Johnson, David W.; Bishop, Ted; Klassen, Terry P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Stories may be an effective tool to communicate with patients because of their ability to engage the reader. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of story booklets compared to standard information sheets for parents of children attending the emergency department (ED) with a child with croup. Methods Parents were randomized to receive story booklets (n=208) or standard information sheets (n=205) during their ED visit. The primary outcome was change in anxiety between triage to ED discharge as measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Follow-up telephone interviews were conducted at 1 and 3 days after discharge, then every other day until 9 days (or until resolution of symptoms), and at 1 year. Secondary outcomes included: expected future anxiety, event impact, parental knowledge, satisfaction, decision regret, healthcare utilization, time to symptom resolution. Results There was no significant difference in the primary outcome of change in parental anxiety between recruitment and ED discharge (change of 5 points for the story group vs. 6 points for the comparison group, p=0.78). The story group showed significantly greater decision regret regarding their decision to go to the ED (p<0.001): 6.7% of the story group vs. 1.5% of the comparison group strongly disagreed with the statement “I would go for the same choice if I had to do it over again”. The story group reported shorter time to resolution of symptoms (mean 3.7 days story group vs. 4.0 days comparison group, median 3 days both groups; log rank test, p=0.04). No other outcomes were different between study groups. Conclusions Stories about parent experiences managing a child with croup did not reduce parental anxiety. The story group showed significantly greater decision regret and quicker time to resolution of symptoms. Further research is needed to better understand whether stories can be effective in improving patient-important outcomes. Trial Registration Current Controlled

  15. A short history of randomized experiments in criminology. A meager feast.

    PubMed

    Farrington, David P

    2003-06-01

    This article discusses advantages of randomized experiments and key issues raised in the following articles. The main concern is the growth and decrease in the use of randomized experiments by the California Youth Authority, the U.S. National Institute of Justice, and the British Home Office, although other experiments are also discussed. It is concluded that feast and famine periods are influenced by key individuals. It is recommended that policy makers, practitioners, funders, the mass media, and the general public need better education in research quality so that they can tell the difference between good and poor evaluation studies. They might then demand better evaluations using randomized experiments.

  16. Describing Typical Capstone Course Experiences from a National Random Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grahe, Jon E.; Hauhart, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    The pedagogical value of capstones has been regularly discussed within psychology. This study presents results from an examination of a national random sample of department webpages and an online survey that characterized the typical capstone course in terms of classroom activities and course administration. The department webpages provide an…

  17. Nimbus 6 Random Access Measurement System applications experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cote, C. E. (Editor); Taylor, R. (Editor); Gilbert, E. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The advantages of a technique in which data collection platforms randomly transmit signal to a polar orbiting satellite, thus eliminating satellite interrogation are demonstrated in investigations of the atmosphere; oceanographic parameters; Arctic regions and ice conditions; navigation and position location; and data buoy development.

  18. Effect Sizes in Three-Level Cluster-Randomized Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.

    2011-01-01

    Research designs involving cluster randomization are becoming increasingly important in educational and behavioral research. Many of these designs involve two levels of clustering or nesting (students within classes and classes within schools). Researchers would like to compute effect size indexes based on the standardized mean difference to…

  19. Diffraction experiments with infrared remote controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik

    2012-02-01

    In this paper we describe an experiment in which radiation emitted by an infrared remote control is passed through a diffraction grating. An image of the diffraction pattern is captured using a cell phone camera and then used to determine the wavelength of the radiation.

  20. Distributed control network for optogenetic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprowicz, G.; Juszczyk, B.; Mankiewicz, L.

    2014-11-01

    Nowadays optogenetic experiments are constructed to examine social behavioural relations in groups of animals. A novel concept of implantable device with distributed control network and advanced positioning capabilities is proposed. It is based on wireless energy transfer technology, micro-power radio interface and advanced signal processing.

  1. Control and instanton trajectories for random transitions in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, Freddy; Laurie, Jason; Zaboronski, Oleg

    2011-12-01

    Many turbulent systems exhibit random switches between qualitatively different attractors. The transition between these bistable states is often an extremely rare event, that can not be computed through DNS, due to complexity limitations. We present results for the calculation of instanton trajectories (a control problem) between non-equilibrium stationary states (attractors) in the 2D stochastic Navier-Stokes equations. By representing the transition probability between two states using a path integral formulation, we can compute the most probable trajectory (instanton) joining two non-equilibrium stationary states. Technically, this is equivalent to the minimization of an action, which can be related to a fluid mechanics control problem.

  2. Analysis of random drop for gateway congestion control. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashem, Emam Salaheddin

    1989-01-01

    Lately, the growing demand on the Internet has prompted the need for more effective congestion control policies. Currently No Gateway Policy is used to relieve and signal congestion, which leads to unfair service to the individual users and a degradation of overall network performance. Network simulation was used to illustrate the character of Internet congestion and its causes. A newly proposed gateway congestion control policy, called Random Drop, was considered as a promising solution to the pressing problem. Random Drop relieves resource congestion upon buffer overflow by choosing a random packet from the service queue to be dropped. The random choice should result in a drop distribution proportional to the bandwidth distribution among all contending TCP connections, thus applying the necessary fairness. Nonetheless, the simulation experiments demonstrate several shortcomings with this policy. Because Random Drop is a congestion control policy, which is not applied until congestion has already occurred, it usually results in a high drop rate that hurts too many connections including well-behaved ones. Even though the number of packets dropped is different from one connection to another depending on the buffer utilization upon overflow, the TCP recovery overhead is high enough to neutralize these differences, causing unfair congestion penalties. Besides, the drop distribution itself is an inaccurate representation of the average bandwidth distribution, missing much important information about the bandwidth utilization between buffer overflow events. A modification of Random Drop to do congestion avoidance by applying the policy early was also proposed. Early Random Drop has the advantage of avoiding the high drop rate of buffer overflow. The early application of the policy removes the pressure of congestion relief and allows more accurate signaling of congestion. To be used effectively, algorithms for the dynamic adjustment of the parameters of Early Random Drop

  3. Electroacupuncture treatment for pancreatic cancer pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Liu, Tang-Yi; Kuai, Le; Zhu, Ji; Wu, Cai-Jun; Liu, Lu-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is often accompanied by severe abdominal or back pain. It's the first study to evaluate the analgesic effect of electroacupuncture on pancreatic cancer pain. A randomized controlled trial compared electroacupuncture with control acupuncture using the placebo needle. Sixty patients with pancreatic cancer pain were randomly assigned to the electroacupuncture group (n = 30) and the placebo control group (n = 30). Patients were treated on Jiaji (Ex-B2) points T8-T12 bilaterally for 30 min once a day for 3 days. Pain intensity was assessed with numerical rated scales (NRS) before the treatment (Baseline), after 3 treatments, and 2 days follow-up. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. After 3 treatment, pain intensity on NRS decreased compared with Baseline (-1.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.46 to -1.87) in the electroacupuncture group; there was little change (-0.13, 95% CI 0.08 to -0.35) in control group; the difference between two groups was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Follow-up also found a significant reduction in pain intensity in the electroacupuncture group compared with the control group (P < 0.001). Electroacupuncture was an effective treatment for relieving pancreatic cancer pain. Copyright © 2013 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Patient Satisfaction with Different Interpreting Methods: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Jennifer; Shapiro, Ephraim; Abramson, David; Motola, Ivette; Shield, David C.; Changrani, Jyotsna

    2007-01-01

    Background Growth of the foreign-born population in the U.S. has led to increasing numbers of limited-English-proficient (LEP) patients. Innovative medical interpreting strategies, including remote simultaneous medical interpreting (RSMI), have arisen to address the language barrier. This study evaluates the impact of interpreting method on patient satisfaction. Methods 1,276 English-, Spanish-, Mandarin-, and Cantonese-speaking patients attending the primary care clinic and emergency department of a large New York City municipal hospital were screened for enrollment in a randomized controlled trial. Language-discordant patients were randomized to RSMI or usual and customary (U&C) interpreting. Patients with language-concordant providers received usual care. Demographic and patient satisfaction questionnaires were administered to all participants. Results 541 patients were language-concordant with their providers and not randomized; 371 were randomized to RSMI, 167 of whom were exposed to RSMI; and 364 were randomized to U&C, 198 of whom were exposed to U&C. Patients randomized to RSMI were more likely than those with U&C to think doctors treated them with respect (RSMI 71%, U&C 64%, p < 0.05), but they did not differ in other measures of physician communication/care. In a linear regression analysis, exposure to RSMI was significantly associated with an increase in overall satisfaction with physician communication/care (β 0.10, 95% CI 0.02–0.18, scale 0–1.0). Patients randomized to RSMI were more likely to think the interpreting method protected their privacy (RSMI 51%, U&C 38%, p < 0.05). Patients randomized to either arm of interpretation reported less comprehension and satisfaction than patients in language-concordant encounters. Conclusions While not a substitute for language-concordant providers, RSMI can improve patient satisfaction and privacy among LEP patients. Implementing RSMI should be considered an important component of a multipronged

  5. Decentralized control experiments on NASA's flexible grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozguner, U.; Yurkowich, S.; Martin, J., III; Al-Abbass, F.

    1986-01-01

    Methods arising from the area of decentralized control are emerging for analysis and control synthesis for large flexible structures. In this paper the control strategy involves a decentralized model reference adaptive approach using a variable structure control. Local models are formulated based on desired damping and response time in a model-following scheme for various modal configurations. Variable structure controllers are then designed employing co-located angular rate and position feedback. In this scheme local control forces the system to move on a local sliding mode in some local error space. An important feature of this approach is that the local subsystem is made insensitive to dynamical interactions with other subsystems once the sliding surface is reached. Experiments based on the above have been performed for NASA's flexible grid experimental apparatus. The grid is designed to admit appreciable low-frequency structural dynamics, and allows for implementation of distributed computing components, inertial sensors, and actuation devices. A finite-element analysis of the grid provides the model for control system design and simulation; results of several simulations are reported on here, and a discussion of application experiments on the apparatus is presented.

  6. Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), phase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Deluis, Javier; Miller, David W.

    1989-01-01

    A rationale to determine which structural experiments are sufficient to verify the design of structures employing Controlled Structures Technology was derived. A survey of proposed NASA missions was undertaken to identify candidate test articles for use in the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE). The survey revealed that potential test articles could be classified into one of three roles: development, demonstration, and qualification, depending on the maturity of the technology and the mission the structure must fulfill. A set of criteria was derived that allowed determination of which role a potential test article must fulfill. A review of the capabilities and limitations of the STS middeck was conducted. A reference design for the MACE test article was presented. Computing requirements for running typical closed-loop controllers was determined, and various computer configurations were studied. The various components required to manufacture the structure were identified. A management plan was established for the remainder of the program experiment development, flight and ground systems development, and integration to the carrier. Procedures for configuration control, fiscal control, and safety, reliabilty, and quality assurance were developed.

  7. Progress on control experiments of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    1990-01-01

    Progress at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of control experiments for flexible structures is described. First the author presents the experimental results for a linear model which represents slewing maneuvers of a generic space station solar panel carried out to evaluate experimentally some control technologies. Then the status of the rotational/translational maneuvering experiment of a flexible steel panel carried by a translation cart is presented. Finally, experimental results of the NASA minimast testbed using velocity command stepper motors as reaction mass reactors are shown. All the test configurations are briefly described, including actuator and sensor, test setup, and test software. The status of some research activities oriented primarily to the experimental methods for control of flexible structures is presented.

  8. Randomly Sampled-Data Control Systems. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kuoruey

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to solve the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) problem with random time sampling. Such a sampling scheme may arise from imperfect instrumentation as in the case of sampling jitter. It can also model the stochastic information exchange among decentralized controllers to name just a few. A practical suboptimal controller is proposed with the nice property of mean square stability. The proposed controller is suboptimal in the sense that the control structure is limited to be linear. Because of i. i. d. assumption, this does not seem unreasonable. Once the control structure is fixed, the stochastic discrete optimal control problem is transformed into an equivalent deterministic optimal control problem with dynamics described by the matrix difference equation. The N-horizon control problem is solved using the Lagrange's multiplier method. The infinite horizon control problem is formulated as a classical minimization problem. Assuming existence of solution to the minimization problem, the total system is shown to be mean square stable under certain observability conditions. Computer simulations are performed to illustrate these conditions.

  9. Validation of Placebo in a Manual Therapy Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chaibi, Aleksander; Šaltytė Benth, Jūratė; Bjørn Russell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    At present, no consensus exists among clinical and academic experts regarding an appropriate placebo for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT). Therefore, we investigated whether it was possible to conduct a chiropractic manual-therapy RCT with placebo. Seventy migraineurs were randomized to a single-blinded placebo-controlled clinical trial that consisted of 12 treatment sessions over 3 months. The participants were randomized to chiropractic SMT or placebo (sham manipulation). After each session, the participants were surveyed on whether they thought they had undergone active treatment (“yes” or “no”) and how strongly they believed that active treatment was received (numeric rating scale 0–10). The outcome measures included the rate of successful blinding and the certitude of the participants’ beliefs in both treatment groups. At each treatment session, more than 80% of the participants believed that they had undergone active treatment, regardless of group allocation. The odds ratio for believing that active treatment was received was >10 for all treatment sessions in both groups (all p < 0.001). The blinding was maintained throughout the RCT. Our results strongly demonstrate that it is possible to conduct a single-blinded manual-therapy RCT with placebo and to maintain the blinding throughout 12 treatment sessions given over 3 months. PMID:26145718

  10. Treating neurocysticercosis medically: a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Salinas, R; Counsell, C; Prasad, K; Gelband, H; Garner, P

    1999-11-01

    To summarize the evidence from randomized controlled trials on the effects of cysticidal therapy used for treating human cysticercosis. Published and unpublished studies in any language identified through MEDLINE (1966 - June 1999) specialized databases, abstracts, proceedings and contact with experts were analysed. Those which compared, using randomized or quasi-randomized methods, any cysticidal drug with placebo or symptomatic therapy were entered in the study. Data were extracted independently by two reviewers and trial quality assessed. Meta-analysis using fixed effects models calculated provided there was no significant heterogeneity, expressed as relative risk. Four trials met the inclusion criteria, treating intraparenchymatous neurocysticercosis with either albendazole or praziquantel compared to placebo or no treatment. In the two trials reporting clinical outcomes, treatment was not associated with a reduction in the risk of seizures, although numbers were small (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.59-1.51). Four trials reported radiological outcomes, and cysticidal treatment was associated with a lower risk of cyst persistence of scans taken within six months of start of treatment (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.70-0.99). Subsidiary analysis assuming different outcomes in patients lost to follow-up did not alter the findings of the main analysis. There is insufficient evidence to determine whether cysticidal therapy is of any clinical benefit to patients with neurocysticercosis. The review does not exclude the possibility that more patients remain seizure-free when treated with cysticidal drugs. Further testing through placebo-controlled trials is required.

  11. The Effectiveness of Propolis on Gingivitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Paulino, Niraldo; Nör, Jacques E.; Moreira, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: A randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a propolis rinse on induced gingivitis by using the co-twin study design. Methods: Twenty-one twin pairs (n=42) were enrolled in a gingivitis study with oral hygiene promotion (14 days) and gingivitis induction (21 days). During the gingivitis induction phase, one member of the twin pair was randomly assigned to a 2% typified propolis rinse, and the other was assigned a color-matched 0.05% sodium fluoride plus 0.05% cetylpyridinium chloride rinse (positive control). Patients rinsed twice daily with 20 mL for 30 seconds for 21 days. Gingivitis was measured on days −14 (baseline), 0 (after hygiene phase), and 21 (after no-hygiene phase) by using the Papillary Bleeding Score (PBS) and by standard digital imaging of the gum tissues (G-parameter). Results: The 38 persons who completed the study (age 13–22 years) were well balanced according to PBS at baseline and G-parameter after the initial hygiene phase. After 21 days without oral hygiene, the propolis rinse and positive control rinse groups did not differ significantly for average PBS measurements or G-parameter. Conclusions: Use of a 2% typified propolis rinse was equivalent to a positive control rinse during a 21-day no-hygiene period. PMID:25380344

  12. The effectiveness of propolis on gingivitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bretz, Walter A; Paulino, Niraldo; Nör, Jacques E; Moreira, Alexandre

    2014-12-01

    A randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a propolis rinse on induced gingivitis by using the co-twin study design. Twenty-one twin pairs (n=42) were enrolled in a gingivitis study with oral hygiene promotion (14 days) and gingivitis induction (21 days). During the gingivitis induction phase, one member of the twin pair was randomly assigned to a 2% typified propolis rinse, and the other was assigned a color-matched 0.05% sodium fluoride plus 0.05% cetylpyridinium chloride rinse (positive control). Patients rinsed twice daily with 20 mL for 30 seconds for 21 days. Gingivitis was measured on days -14 (baseline), 0 (after hygiene phase), and 21 (after no-hygiene phase) by using the Papillary Bleeding Score (PBS) and by standard digital imaging of the gum tissues (G-parameter). The 38 persons who completed the study (age 13-22 years) were well balanced according to PBS at baseline and G-parameter after the initial hygiene phase. After 21 days without oral hygiene, the propolis rinse and positive control rinse groups did not differ significantly for average PBS measurements or G-parameter. Use of a 2% typified propolis rinse was equivalent to a positive control rinse during a 21-day no-hygiene period.

  13. Does Written Emotional Disclosure about Stress Improve College Students' Academic Performance? Results from Three Randomized, Controlled Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radcliffe, Alison M.; Stevenson, Jennifer K.; Lumley, Mark A.; D'Souza, Pamela J.; Kraft, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    Several early studies and subsequent reviews suggested that written emotional disclosure (WED)--writing repeatedly about personal stressful experiences--leads to improved academic performance of college students. A critical review of available studies casts some doubt on this conclusion, so we conducted three randomized, controlled experiments of…

  14. Aromatherapy and behaviour disturbances in dementia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, J; Brown, R; Coulter, F; Irvine, E; Copland, C

    2001-10-01

    A random controlled trial of the relaxing effects of an aromatherapy massage on disordered behaviour in dementia was conducted. Twenty-one patients were randomly allocated into one of three conditions, aromatherapy and massage (AM), conversation and aromatherapy (CA) and massage only (M). AM showed the greatest reduction in the frequency of excessive motor behaviour of all three conditions. This reached statistical significance between the hours of three and four pm (p < 0.05). Post hoc analysis suggested that at this time of day the AM consistently reduced motor behaviour when compared with CA (p = 0.05). This provides preliminary evidence of a measurable sedative effect of aromatherapy massage on dementia within a robust scientific paradigm. Further research is recommended with an expanded sample size. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Flight experience with flight control redundancy management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szalai, K. J.; Larson, R. R.; Glover, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Flight experience with both current and advanced redundancy management schemes was gained in recent flight research programs using the F-8 digital fly by wire aircraft. The flight performance of fault detection, isolation, and reconfiguration (FDIR) methods for sensors, computers, and actuators is reviewed. Results of induced failures as well as of actual random failures are discussed. Deficiencies in modeling and implementation techniques are also discussed. The paper also presents comparison off multisensor tracking in smooth air, in turbulence, during large maneuvers, and during maneuvers typical of those of large commercial transport aircraft. The results of flight tests of an advanced analytic redundancy management algorithm are compared with the performance of a contemporary algorithm in terms of time to detection, false alarms, and missed alarms. The performance of computer redundancy management in both iron bird and flight tests is also presented.

  16. Biomimetic propulsion under random heaving conditions, using active pitch control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politis, Gerasimos; Politis, Konstantinos

    2014-05-01

    Marine mammals travel long distances by utilizing and transforming wave energy to thrust through proper control of their caudal fin. On the other hand, manmade ships traveling in a wavy sea store large amounts of wave energy in the form of kinetic energy for heaving, pitching, rolling and other ship motions. A natural way to extract this energy and transform it to useful propulsive thrust is by using a biomimetic wing. The aim of this paper is to show how an actively pitched biomimetic wing could achieve this goal when it performs a random heaving motion. More specifically, we consider a biomimetic wing traveling with a given translational velocity in an infinitely extended fluid and performing a random heaving motion with a given energy spectrum which corresponds to a given sea state. A formula is invented by which the instantaneous pitch angle of the wing is determined using the heaving data of the current and past time steps. Simulations are then performed for a biomimetic wing at different heave energy spectra, using an indirect Source-Doublet 3-D-BEM, together with a time stepping algorithm capable to track the random motion of the wing. A nonlinear pressure type Kutta condition is applied at the trailing edge of the wing. With a mollifier-based filtering technique, the 3-D unsteady rollup pattern created by the random motion of the wing is calculated without any simplifying assumptions regarding its geometry. Calculated unsteady forces, moments and useful power, show that the proposed active pitch control always results in thrust producing motions, with significant propulsive power production and considerable beneficial stabilizing action to ship motions. Calculation of the power required to set the pitch angle prove it to be a very small percentage of the useful power and thus making the practical application of the device very tractable.

  17. [Working memory and executive control: inhibitory processes in updating and random generation tasks].

    PubMed

    Macizo, Pedro; Bajo, Teresa; Soriano, Maria Felipa

    2006-02-01

    Working Memory (WM) span predicts subjects' performance in control executive tasks and, in addition, it has been related to the capacity to inhibit irrelevant information. In this paper we investigate the role of WM span in two executive tasks focusing our attention on inhibitory components of both tasks. High and low span participants recalled targets words rejecting irrelevant items at the same time (Experiment 1) and they generated random numbers (Experiment 2). Results showed a clear relation between WM span and performance in both tasks. In addition, analyses of intrusion errors (Experiment 1) and stereotyped responses (Experiment 2) indicated that high span individuals were able to efficiently use the inhibitory component implied in both tasks. The pattern of data provides support to the relation between WM span and control executive tasks through an inhibitory mechanism.

  18. Building Kindergartners’ Number Sense: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Nancy C.; Glutting, Joseph; Dyson, Nancy; Hassinger-Das, Brenna; Irwin, Casey

    2015-01-01

    Math achievement in elementary school is mediated by performance and growth in number sense during kindergarten. The aim of the present study was to test the effectiveness of a targeted small group number sense intervention for high-risk kindergartners from low-income communities. Children were randomly assigned to one of three groups (n = 44 in each group): a number sense intervention group, a language intervention group, or a business as usual control group. Accounting for initial skill level in mathematical knowledge, children who received the number sense intervention performed better than controls at immediate post test, with meaningful effects on measures of number competencies and general math achievement. Many of the effects held eight weeks after the intervention was completed, suggesting that children internalized what they had learned. There were no differences between the language and control groups on any math-related measures. PMID:25866417

  19. Building Kindergartners' Number Sense: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Nancy C; Glutting, Joseph; Dyson, Nancy; Hassinger-Das, Brenna; Irwin, Casey

    2012-08-01

    Math achievement in elementary school is mediated by performance and growth in number sense during kindergarten. The aim of the present study was to test the effectiveness of a targeted small group number sense intervention for high-risk kindergartners from low-income communities. Children were randomly assigned to one of three groups ( n = 44 in each group): a number sense intervention group, a language intervention group, or a business as usual control group. Accounting for initial skill level in mathematical knowledge, children who received the number sense intervention performed better than controls at immediate post test, with meaningful effects on measures of number competencies and general math achievement. Many of the effects held eight weeks after the intervention was completed, suggesting that children internalized what they had learned. There were no differences between the language and control groups on any math-related measures.

  20. NSAID Use after Bariatric Surgery: a Randomized Controlled Intervention Study.

    PubMed

    Yska, Jan Peter; Gertsen, Sanneke; Flapper, Gerbrich; Emous, Marloes; Wilffert, Bob; van Roon, Eric N

    2016-12-01

    Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should be avoided in bariatric surgery patients. If use of an NSAID is inevitable, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) should also be used. To determine the effect of an, compared to care-as-usual, additional intervention to reduce NSAID use in patients who underwent bariatric surgery, and to determine the use of PPIs in patients who use NSAIDs after bariatric surgery. A randomized controlled intervention study in patients after bariatric surgery. Patients were randomized to an intervention or a control group. The intervention consisted of sending a letter to patients and their general practitioners on the risks of use of NSAIDs after bariatric surgery and the importance of avoiding NSAID use. The control group received care-as-usual. Dispensing data of NSAIDs and PPIs were collected from patients' pharmacies: from a period of 6 months before and from 3 until 9 months after the intervention. Two hundred forty-eight patients were included (intervention group: 124; control group: 124). The number of users of NSAIDs decreased from 22 to 18 % in the intervention group and increased from 20 to 21 % in the control group (NS). The use of a PPI with an NSAID rose from 52 to 55 % in the intervention group, and from 52 to 69 % in the control group (NS). Informing patients and their general practitioners by letter, in addition to care-as-usual, is not an effective intervention to reduce the use of NSAIDs after bariatric surgery (trial number NTR3665).

  1. Balneotherapy in fibromyalgia: a single blind randomized controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Ozkurt, Seçil; Dönmez, Arif; Zeki Karagülle, M; Uzunoğlu, Emel; Turan, Mustafa; Erdoğan, Nergis

    2012-07-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of balneotherapy in fibromyalgia management. Fifty women with fibromyalgia under pharmacological treatment were randomly assigned to either the balneotherapy (25) or the control (25) group. Four patients from the balneotherapy group and one patient from the control group left the study after randomization. The patients in the balneotherapy group (21) had 2 thermomineral water baths daily for 2 weeks in Tuzla Spa Center. The patients in the control group (24) continued to have their medical treatment and routine daily life. An investigator who was blinded to the study arms assessed the patients. All patients were assessed four times; at the beginning of the study, at the end of the 2nd week, the 1st month, and the 3rd month after balneotherapy. Outcome measures of the study were pain intensity, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), patient's global assessment, investigator's global assessment, SF-36 scores, and tender point count. Balneotherapy was found to be superior at the end of the cure period in terms of pain intensity, FIQ, Beck Depression Inventory, patient's global assessment, investigator's global assessment scores, and tender point count as compared to the control group. The superiority of balneotherapy lasted up to the end of the 3rd month, except for the Beck Depression Inventory score and the investigator's global assessment score. Significant improvements were observed in PF, GH, and MH subscales of SF-36 during the study period in the balneotherapy group; however, no such improvement was observed in the control group. Balneotherapy was superior only in VT subscale at the end of therapy and at the end of the third month after the therapy as compared to the controls. It was concluded that balneotherapy provides beneficial effects in patients with fibromyalgia.

  2. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Mentoring Interventions for Underrepresented Minorities.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Vivian; Martina, Camille A; McDermott, Michael P; Trief, Paula M; Goodman, Steven R; Morse, Gene D; LaGuardia, Jennifer G; Sharp, Daryl; Ryan, Richard M

    2016-07-01

    To conduct a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of different mentoring interventions on the basic psychological need satisfaction of underrepresented minorities and women in academia. Participants were 150 mentor/protégé dyads from three academic medical centers and eight other colleges and universities in western and central New York, randomized from 2010 to 2013 into mentor training (using principles of self-determination theory); peer mentoring for protégés; mentor training and peer mentoring for protégés combined; or control/usual practice. Protégé participants were graduate students, fellows, and junior faculty who were from underrepresented groups based on race, ethnicity, gender, or disability.The primary analysis was a comparison of intervention effects on changes in protégés' satisfaction of their basic psychological needs (competence, autonomy, and relatedness) with their mentor. They completed a well-validated, online questionnaire every two months for one year. There was no significant effect at the end of one year of either mentor training or peer mentoring on protégés' psychological basic need satisfaction with mentor specifically or at work in general. Exploratory analyses showed a significant effect of the mentor-based intervention on the protégés' overall psychological need satisfaction with their mentor at two months, the time point closest to completing mentor training. This randomized controlled trial showed a potential short-term effect of mentor training on changing basic psychological need satisfaction of underrepresented scholars with their mentors. Despite the lack of sustained effect of either mentor training or peer mentoring, these short-term changes suggest feasibility and potential for future study.

  3. Time-delayed feedback control of diffusion in random walkers.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hiroyasu; Takehara, Kohta; Kobayashi, Miki U

    2017-07-01

    Time delay in general leads to instability in some systems, while specific feedback with delay can control fluctuated motion in nonlinear deterministic systems to a stable state. In this paper, we consider a stochastic process, i.e., a random walk, and observe its diffusion phenomenon with time-delayed feedback. As a result, the diffusion coefficient decreases with increasing delay time. We analytically illustrate this suppression of diffusion by using stochastic delay differential equations and justify the feasibility of this suppression by applying time-delayed feedback to a molecular dynamics model.

  4. Neighborhood Effects in a Behavioral Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Sandi L.; Leonard, Tammy; Murdoch, James; Hughes, Amy; McQueen, Amy; Gupta, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions intended to modify health behaviors may be influenced by neighborhood effects which can impede unbiased estimation of intervention effects. Examining a RCT designed to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening (N=5,628), we found statistically significant neighborhood effects: average CRC test use among neighboring study participants was significantly and positively associated with individual patient’s CRC test use. This potentially important spatially-varying covariate has not previously been considered in a RCT. Our results suggest that future RCTs of health behavior interventions should assess potential social interactions between participants, which may cause intervention arm contamination and may bias effect size estimation. PMID:25456014

  5. Best (but oft-forgotten) practices: designing, analyzing, and reporting cluster randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Brown, Andrew W; Li, Peng; Bohan Brown, Michelle M; Kaiser, Kathryn A; Keith, Scott W; Oakes, J Michael; Allison, David B

    2015-08-01

    Cluster randomized controlled trials (cRCTs; also known as group randomized trials and community-randomized trials) are multilevel experiments in which units that are randomly assigned to experimental conditions are sets of grouped individuals, whereas outcomes are recorded at the individual level. In human cRCTs, clusters that are randomly assigned are typically families, classrooms, schools, worksites, or counties. With growing interest in community-based, public health, and policy interventions to reduce obesity or improve nutrition, the use of cRCTs has increased. Errors in the design, analysis, and interpretation of cRCTs are unfortunately all too common. This situation seems to stem in part from investigator confusion about how the unit of randomization affects causal inferences and the statistical procedures required for the valid estimation and testing of effects. In this article, we provide a brief introduction and overview of the importance of cRCTs and highlight and explain important considerations for the design, analysis, and reporting of cRCTs by using published examples. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. A randomized controlled trial of qigong for fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Fibromyalgia is difficult to treat and requires the use of multiple approaches. This study is a randomized controlled trial of qigong compared with a wait-list control group in fibromyalgia. Methods One hundred participants were randomly assigned to immediate or delayed practice groups, with the delayed group receiving training at the end of the control period. Qigong training (level 1 Chaoyi Fanhuan Qigong, CFQ), given over three half-days, was followed by weekly review/practice sessions for eight weeks; participants were also asked to practice at home for 45 to 60 minutes per day for this interval. Outcomes were pain, impact, sleep, physical function and mental function, and these were recorded at baseline, eight weeks, four months and six months. Immediate and delayed practice groups were analyzed individually compared to the control group, and as a combination group. Results In both the immediate and delayed treatment groups, CFQ demonstrated significant improvements in pain, impact, sleep, physical function and mental function when compared to the wait-list/usual care control group at eight weeks, with benefits extending beyond this time. Analysis of combined data indicated significant changes for all measures at all times for six months, with only one exception. Post-hoc analysis based on self-reported practice times indicated greater benefit with the per protocol group compared to minimal practice. Conclusions This study demonstrates that CFQ, a particular form of qigong, provides long-term benefits in several core domains in fibromyalgia. CFQ may be a useful adjuvant self-care treatment for fibromyalgia. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT00938834. PMID:22863206

  7. Mental practice enhances surgical technical skills: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sonal; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Sirimanna, Pramudith; Moran, Aidan; Grantcharov, Teodor; Kneebone, Roger; Sevdalis, Nick; Darzi, Ara

    2011-02-01

    To assess the effects of mental practice on surgical performance. Increasing concerns for patient safety have highlighted a need for alternative training strategies outside the operating room. Mental practice (MP), "the cognitive rehearsal of a task before performance," has been successful in sport and music to enhance skill. This study investigates whether MP enhances performance in laparoscopic surgery. After baseline skills testing, 20 novice surgeons underwent training on an evidence-based virtual reality curriculum. After randomization using the closed envelope technique, all participants performed 5 Virtual Reality (VR) laparoscopic cholecystectomies (LC). Mental practice participants performed 30 minutes of MP before each LC; control participants viewed an online lecture. Technical performance was assessed using video Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills-based global ratings scale (scored from 7 to 35). Mental imagery was assessed using a previously validated Mental Imagery Questionnaire. Eighteen participants completed the study. There were no intergroup differences in baseline technical ability. Learning curves were demonstrated for both MP and control groups. Mental practice was superior to control (global ratings) for the first LC (median 20 vs 15, P = 0.005), second LC (20.5 vs 13.5, P = 0.001), third LC (24 vs 15.5, P < 0.001), fourth LC (25.5 vs 15.5, P < 0.001) and the fifth LC (27.5 vs 19.5, P = 0.00). The imagery for the MP group was also significantly superior to the control group across all sessions (P < 0.05). Improved imagery significantly correlated with better quality of performance (ρ 0.51–0.62, Ps < 0.05). This is the first randomized controlled study to show that MP enhances the quality of performance based on VR laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This may be a time- and cost-effective strategy to augment traditional training in the OR thus potentially improving patient care.

  8. Child Health and Neighborhood Conditions: Results from a Randomized Housing Voucher Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortson, Jane G.; Sanbonmatsu, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Using data from the Moving to Opportunity randomized housing voucher experiment, we estimate the direct effects of housing and neighborhood quality on child health. We show that, five years after random assignment, housing mobility has little impact on overall health status, asthma, injuries, and body mass index. The few effects that we observe…

  9. A randomized, controlled trial of oral propranolol in infantile hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Léauté-Labrèze, Christine; Hoeger, Peter; Mazereeuw-Hautier, Juliette; Guibaud, Laurent; Baselga, Eulalia; Posiunas, Gintas; Phillips, Roderic J; Caceres, Hector; Lopez Gutierrez, Juan Carlos; Ballona, Rosalia; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon; Powell, Julie; Perek, Danuta; Metz, Brandie; Barbarot, Sebastien; Maruani, Annabel; Szalai, Zsuzsanna Zsofia; Krol, Alfons; Boccara, Olivia; Foelster-Holst, Regina; Febrer Bosch, Maria Isabel; Su, John; Buckova, Hana; Torrelo, Antonio; Cambazard, Frederic; Grantzow, Rainer; Wargon, Orli; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Roessler, Jochen; Bernabeu-Wittel, Jose; Valencia, Adriana M; Przewratil, Przemyslaw; Glick, Sharon; Pope, Elena; Birchall, Nicholas; Benjamin, Latanya; Mancini, Anthony J; Vabres, Pierre; Souteyrand, Pierre; Frieden, Ilona J; Berul, Charles I; Mehta, Cyrus R; Prey, Sorilla; Boralevi, Franck; Morgan, Caroline C; Heritier, Stephane; Delarue, Alain; Voisard, Jean-Jacques

    2015-02-19

    Oral propranolol has been used to treat complicated infantile hemangiomas, although data from randomized, controlled trials to inform its use are limited. We performed a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, adaptive, phase 2-3 trial assessing the efficacy and safety of a pediatric-specific oral propranolol solution in infants 1 to 5 months of age with proliferating infantile hemangioma requiring systemic therapy. Infants were randomly assigned to receive placebo or one of four propranolol regimens (1 or 3 mg of propranolol base per kilogram of body weight per day for 3 or 6 months). A preplanned interim analysis was conducted to identify the regimen to study for the final efficacy analysis. The primary end point was success (complete or nearly complete resolution of the target hemangioma) or failure of trial treatment at week 24, as assessed by independent, centralized, blinded evaluations of standardized photographs. Of 460 infants who underwent randomization, 456 received treatment. On the basis of an interim analysis of the first 188 patients who completed 24 weeks of trial treatment, the regimen of 3 mg of propranolol per kilogram per day for 6 months was selected for the final efficacy analysis. The frequency of successful treatment was higher with this regimen than with placebo (60% vs. 4%, P<0.001). A total of 88% of patients who received the selected propranolol regimen showed improvement by week 5, versus 5% of patients who received placebo. A total of 10% of patients in whom treatment with propranolol was successful required systemic retreatment during follow-up. Known adverse events associated with propranolol (hypoglycemia, hypotension, bradycardia, and bronchospasm) occurred infrequently, with no significant difference in frequency between the placebo group and the groups receiving propranolol. This trial showed that propranolol was effective at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram per day for 6 months in the treatment of infantile hemangioma. (Funded by

  10. Experiences of randomization: interviews with patients and clinicians in the SPCG-IV trial.

    PubMed

    Bill-Axelson, Anna; Christensson, Anna; Carlsson, Marianne; Norlén, Bo Johan; Holmberg, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Recruitment of both patients and clinicians to randomized trials is difficult. Low participation carries the risk of terminating studies early and making them invalid owing to insufficient statistical power. This study investigated patients' and clinicians' experiences of randomization with the aim of facilitating trial participation in the future. This was a qualitative study using content analysis. Patients offered to participate in a randomized trial and randomizing clinicians were interviewed. Five participants, four non-participants and five randomizing clinicians were interviewed, 2-8 years from randomization. Clinicians used strategies in interaction with the patients to facilitate decision making. Patients' attitudes differed and experiences of relatives or friends were often stated as reasons for treatment preferences. Patients described that letting chance decide treatment was a difficult barrier to overcome for randomization. The clinicians used a number of different strategies perceived to make randomization more acceptable to their patients. The clinicians' own motivation for randomizing patients for trials depended on the medical relevance of the study question and the clinicians' major obstacle was to maintain equipoise over time. Regular meetings with the study group helped to maintain equipoise and motivation. To establish a good platform for randomization the clinician needs to know about the patient's treatment preferences and the patient's attitude concerning the role of the clinician to facilitate decision making. The strategies used by the clinicians were perceived as helpful and could be tested in an intervention study.

  11. Random Access: The Latino Student Experience with Prior Learning Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein-Collins, Rebecca; Olson, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Many Latinos come to higher education as adults. One degree completion strategy that is particularly suited to adult students in higher education is prior learning assessment (PLA). PLA provides opportunities to evaluate a student's learning from work or life experience for the purpose of awarding college credit. For students whose…

  12. MiDAS ENCORE: Randomized Controlled Study Design and Protocol.

    PubMed

    Benyamin, Ramsin M; Staats, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESIs) are commonly used for treatment of symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). ESIs are generally administered after failure of conservative therapy. For LSS patients suffering from neurogenic claudication, the mild® procedure provides an alternative to ESIs via minimally invasive lumbar decompression. Both ESIs and mild offer interventional pain treatment options for LSS patients experiencing neurogenic claudication refractory to more conservative therapies. Prospective, multi-center, randomized controlled, clinical study. Twenty-six interventional pain management centers throughout the United States. To compare patient outcomes following treatment with either mild or ESIs in LSS patients with neurogenic claudication and having verified ligamentum flavum hypertrophy. Study participants include Medicare beneficiaries who meet study inclusion/exclusion criteria. Eligible patients will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to one of 2 treatment arms, mild (treatment group) or ESI (control group). Each study group will include approximately 150 patients who have experienced neurogenic claudication symptoms for ≥ 3 months duration who have failed to respond to physical therapy, home exercise programs, and oral analgesics. Those randomized to mild are prohibited from receiving lumbar ESIs during the study period, while those randomized to ESI may receive ESIs up to 4 times per year. Patient assessments will occur at baseline, 6 months, and one year. An additional assessment will be conducted for the mild patient group at 2 years. The primary efficacy outcome measure is the proportion of Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) responders from baseline to one year follow-up in the treatment group (mild) versus the control group (ESI). ODI responders are defined as those patients achieving the validated Minimal Important Change (MIC) of ≥ 10 point improvement in ODI from baseline to follow-up as a clinically significant efficacy threshold. Secondary

  13. Random fiber lasers based on artificially controlled backscattering fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daru; Wang, Xiaoliang; She, Lijuan; Qiang, Zexuan; Yu, Zhangwei

    2017-10-01

    The random fiber laser (RFL) which is a milestone in laser physics and nonlinear optics, has attracted considerable attention recently. Most previous RFLs are based on distributed feedback of Rayleigh scattering amplified through stimulated Raman/Brillouin scattering effect in single mode fibers, which required long-distance (tens of kilometers) single mode fibers and high threshold up to watt-level due to the extremely small Rayleigh scattering coefficient of the fiber. We proposed and demonstrated a half-open cavity RFL based on a segment of a artificially controlled backscattering SMF(ACB-SMF) with a length of 210m, 310m or 390m. A fiber Bragg grating with the central wavelength of 1530nm and a segment of ACB-SMF forms the half-open cavity. The proposed RFL achieves the threshold of 25mW, 30mW and 30mW, respectively. Random lasing at the wavelength of 1530nm and the extinction ratio of 50dB is achieved when a segment of 5m EDF is pumped by a 980nm LD in the RFL. Another half-open cavity RFL based on a segment of a artificially controlled backscattering EDF(ACBS-EDF) is also demonstrated without an ACB-SMF. The 3m ACB-EDF is fabricated by using the femtosecond laser with pulse energy of 0.34mJ which introduces about 50 reflectors in the EDF. Random lasing at the wavelength of 1530nm is achieved with the output power of 7.5mW and the efficiency of 1.88%. Two novel RFLs with much short cavities have been achieved with low threshold and high efficiency.

  14. Resistant hypertension optimal treatment trial: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Eduardo M; Drager, Luciano F; Giorgi, Dante Marcelo Artigas; Krieger, Jose Eduardo; Pereira, Alexandre Costa; Barreto-Filho, José Augusto Soares; da Rocha Nogueira, Armando; Mill, José Geraldo

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of resistant hypertension (ReHy) is not well established. Furthermore, diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers, and calcium channel blockers are largely used as the first 3-drug combinations for treating ReHy. However, the fourth drug to be added to the triple regimen is still controversial and guided by empirical choices. We sought (1) to determine the prevalence of ReHy in patients with stage II hypertension; (2) to compare the effects of spironolactone vs clonidine, when added to the triple regimen; and (3) to evaluate the role of measuring sympathetic and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone activities in predicting blood pressure response to spironolactone or clonidine. The Resistant Hypertension Optimal Treatment (ReHOT) study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01643434) is a prospective, multicenter, randomized trial comprising 26 sites in Brazil. In step 1, 2000 patients will be treated according to hypertension guidelines for 12 weeks, to detect the prevalence of ReHy. Medical therapy adherence will be checked by pill count monitoring. In step 2, patients with confirmed ReHy will be randomized to an open label 3-month treatment with spironolactone (titrating dose, 12.5-50 mg once daily) or clonidine (titrating dose, 0.1-0.3 mg twice daily). The primary endpoint is the effective control of blood pressure after a 12-week randomized period of treatment. The ReHOT study will disseminate results about the prevalence of ReHy in stage II hypertension and the comparison of spironolactone vs clonidine for blood pressure control in patients with ReHy under 3-drug standard regimen. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Empathy training in medical students - a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wündrich, M; Schwartz, C; Feige, B; Lemper, D; Nissen, C; Voderholzer, U

    2017-10-01

    Empathy is a core element in the doctor-patient relationship. This study examined whether empathy in medical students can be improved by specific training. 158 medical students were randomized into two groups. The intervention group participated in an empathy skills training with simulated patients (SPs). The control group participated in a history course. After the intervention, empathy was assessed by blinded SPs and experts in an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Students also filled out a self-assessment concerning their attitude on empathy (Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy Student Version, JSPE-S-S). Participants of the intervention group showed significantly higher levels of empathy when rated by SPs and experts than the control group. In contrast to that, no significant group differences were observed in self-rated empathy. The results underpin the value of empathy skills trainings in medical school study programs.

  16. Online psychoeducational support for infertile women: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cousineau, Tara M; Green, Traci C; Corsini, Evelyn; Seibring, A; Showstack, Marianne T; Applegarth, Linda; Davidson, Marie; Perloe, Mark

    2008-03-01

    The study goal was to develop and test the effectiveness of a brief online education and support program for female infertility patients. A randomized-controlled trial was conducted. Using a Solomon-four group design, 190 female patients were recruited from three US fertility centers and were randomized into two experimental and two no-treatment control groups. The psychological outcomes assessed included infertility distress, infertility self-efficacy, decisional conflict, marital cohesion and coping style. Program dosage and satisfaction were also assessed at four weeks follow-up. Women exposed to the online program significantly improved in the area of social concerns (P = 0.038) related to infertility distress, and felt more informed about a medical decision with which they were contending (P = 0.037). Trends were observed for decreased global stress(P = 0.10), sexual concerns (P = 0.059), distress related to child-free living (P = 0.063), increased infertility self-efficacy (P = 0.067) and decision making clarity (P = 0.079). A dosage response was observed in the experimental groups for women who spent >60 min online for decreased global stress (P = 0.028) and increased self efficacy (P = 0.024). This evidence-based eHealth program for women experiencing infertility suggests that a web-based patient education intervention can have beneficial effects in several psychological domains and may be a cost effective resource for fertility practices.

  17. Mindfulness vs psychoeducation in adult ADHD: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hoxhaj, E; Sadohara, C; Borel, P; D'Amelio, R; Sobanski, E; Müller, H; Feige, B; Matthies, S; Philipsen, Alexandra

    2018-06-01

    Mindfulness training is a promising treatment approach in adult ADHD. However, there has not yet been a randomized controlled trial comparing mindfulness to an active control condition. In this study, we assessed the efficacy of a mindfulness training program (MAP) compared to structured psychoeducation (PE). After randomization 81 medication-free adult ADHD patients participated either in an 8-week MAP or PE group program. At baseline (T1), after 8 weeks (T2) and after 8 months (T3), severity of ADHD and associated symptoms (depression, general psychopathology, quality of life) were measured with the Conner's ADHD Rating Scales (CAARS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) and the SF-36 by self and blind observer ratings. Both groups showed significant pre-post improvements in observer-rated Inattention scale (p < .001, partial η 2  = 0.18) and in associated symptomatology, which persisted through 6 months of follow-up. There were no significant differences regarding symptom reduction between the treatment groups. Women benefited more compared to men irrespective of treatment group. Men showed the most pronounced changes under MAP. In the current study, MAP was not superior to PE regarding symptom reduction in adult ADHD. Both interventions, mindfulness meditation and PE, were efficacious in reducing symptom load in adult ADHD. Furthermore in exploratory post hoc tests the study provides evidence for a potential gender-specific treatment response in adult ADHD.

  18. Random fiber laser based on artificially controlled backscattering fibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Chen, Daru; Li, Haitao; She, Lijuan; Wu, Qiong

    2018-01-10

    The random fiber laser (RFL), which is a milestone in laser physics and nonlinear optics, has attracted considerable attention recently. Most previously reported RFLs are based on distributed feedback of Rayleigh scattering amplified through the stimulated Raman-Brillouin scattering effect in single-mode fibers, which require long-distance (tens of kilometers) single-mode fibers and high threshold, up to watt level, due to the extremely small Rayleigh scattering coefficient of the fiber. We proposed and demonstrated a half-open-cavity RFL based on a segment of an artificially controlled backscattering single-mode fiber with a length of 210 m, 310 m, or 390 m. A fiber Bragg grating with a central wavelength of 1530 nm and a segment of artificially controlled backscattering single-mode fiber fabricated by using a femtosecond laser form the half-open cavity. The proposed RFL achieves thresholds of 25 mW, 30 mW, and 30 mW, respectively. Random lasing at a wavelength of 1530 nm and extinction ratio of 50 dB is achieved when a segment of 5 m erbium-doped fiber is pumped by a 980 nm laser diode in the RFL. A novel RFL with many short cavities has been achieved with low threshold.

  19. Review of Randomized Controlled Trials of Massage in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Niemi, Anna-Kaisa

    2017-01-01

    Preterm birth affects about 10% of infants born in the United States. Massage therapy is being used in some neonatal intensive care units for its potential beneficial effects on preterm infants. This article reviews published randomized controlled trials on the effects of massage in preterm infants. Most studies evaluating the effect of massage in weight gain in premature infants suggest a positive effect on weight gain. Increase in vagal tone has been reported in infants who receive massage and has been suggested as a possible mechanism for improved weight gain. More studies are needed on the underlying mechanisms of the effects of massage therapy on weight gain in preterm infants. While some trials suggest improvements in developmental scores, decreased stress behavior, positive effects on immune system, improved pain tolerance and earlier discharge from the hospital, the number of such studies is small and further evidence is needed. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, are needed on the effects of massage in preterm infants. PMID:28368368

  20. Moxibustion for breech version: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Guittier, Marie-Julia; Pichon, Michelle; Dong, Hongguang; Irion, Olivier; Boulvain, Michel

    2009-11-01

    To estimate the efficacy of moxibustion between 34 and 38 weeks of gestation to facilitate the cephalic version of fetuses in breech presentation and the acceptability of this method by women. We conducted a randomized controlled trial in a Swiss university hospital maternity unit. We proposed to stimulate the acupoint BL 67 by moxibustion daily for 2 weeks for 212 consenting women between 34 and 36 weeks of gestation with a single fetus in breech presentation. We did the intervention three times weekly in the hospital and a teaching session and information leaflet on the technique for additional daily therapy at home. The control group received expectant management care. The availability of external cephalic version was maintained for both groups. The main outcome measure was the comparison of the proportion of women with cephalic presentation at delivery. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups, except more nulliparous women were randomized to moxibustion. The percentage of versions was similar between groups: 18% in the moxibustion group compared with 16% in the control group (relative risk 1.12, 95% confidence interval 0.62 to 2.03). Adjustment for the imbalance in parity did not change these results. The frequency of cesarean delivery was similar (64% compared with 58% in the moxibustion group and the control group, respectively). Acceptability of the intervention and women's perceptions of moxibustion were favorable. We observed no beneficial effect of moxibustion to facilitate the cephalic version of fetuses in breech presentation. Despite this lack of proven effectiveness, women had positive opinions on the intervention. ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov,NCT00890474. I.

  1. Endurance exercise training in orthostatic intolerance: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Winker, Robert; Barth, Alfred; Bidmon, Daniela; Ponocny, Ivo; Weber, Michael; Mayr, Otmar; Robertson, David; Diedrich, André; Maier, Richard; Pilger, Alex; Haber, Paul; Rüdiger, Hugo W

    2005-03-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is a syndrome characterized by chronic orthostatic symptoms of light-headedness, fatigue, nausea, orthostatic tachycardia, and aggravated norepinephrine levels while standing. The aim of this study was to assess the protective effect of exercise endurance training on orthostatic symptoms and to examine its usefulness in the treatment of orthostatic intolerance. 2768 military recruits were screened for orthostatic intolerance by questionnaire. Tilt-table testing identified 36 cases of orthostatic intolerance out of the 2768 soldiers. Subsequently, 31 of these subjects with orthostatic intolerance entered a randomized, controlled trial. The patients were allocated randomly to either a "training" (3 months jogging) or a "control" group. The influence of exercise training on orthostatic intolerance was assessed by determination of questionnaire scores and tilt-table testing before and after intervention. After training, only 6 individuals of 16 still had orthostatic intolerance compared with 10 of 11 in the control group. The Fisher exact test showed a highly significant difference in diagnosis between the 2 groups (P=0.008) at the end of the study. Analysis of the questionnaire-score showed significant interaction between time and group (P=0.001). The trained subjects showed an improvement in the average symptom score from 1.79+/-0.4 to 1.04+/-0.4, whereas the control subjects showed no significant change in average symptom score (2.09+/-0.6 and 2.14+/-0.5, respectively). Our data demonstrate that endurance exercise training leads to an improvement of symptoms in the majority of patients with orthostatic intolerance. Therefore, we suggest that endurance training should be considered in the treatment of orthostatic intolerance patients.

  2. Randomized Controlled Trial of Primary Care Pediatric Parenting Programs

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, Alan L.; Dreyer, Benard P.; Brockmeyer, Carolyn A.; Berkule-Silberman, Samantha B.; Huberman, Harris S.; Tomopoulos, Suzy

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether pediatric primary care–based programs to enhance parenting and early child development reduce media exposure and whether enhanced parenting mediates the effects. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Urban public hospital pediatric primary care clinic. Participants A total of 410 mother-newborn dyads enrolled after childbirth. Interventions Patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 interventions, the Video Interaction Project (VIP) and Building Blocks (BB) interventions, or to a control group. The VIP intervention comprised 1-on-1 sessions with a child development specialist who facilitated interactions in play and shared reading through review of videotapes made of the parent and child on primary care visit days; learning materials and parenting pamphlets were also provided. The BB intervention mailed parenting materials, including age-specific newsletters suggesting activities to facilitate interactions, learning materials, and parent-completed developmental questionnaires (Ages and Stages questionnaires). Outcome Measures Electronic media exposure in the home using a 24-hour recall diary. Results The mean (SD) exposure at 6 months was 146.5 (125.0) min/d. Exposure to VIP was associated with reduced total duration of media exposure compared with the BB and control groups (mean [SD] min/d for VIP, 131.6 [118.7]; BB, 151.2 [116.7]; control, 155.4 [138.7]; P=.009). Enhanced parent-child interactions were found to partially mediate relations between VIP and media exposure for families with a ninth grade or higher literacy level (Sobel statistic=2.49; P=.01). Conclusion Pediatric primary care may represent an important venue for addressing the public health problem of media exposure in young children at a population level. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00212576 PMID:21199979

  3. The Anxiolytic Effect of Aromatherapy on Patients Awaiting Ambulatory Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Cheng-Hua; Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Kao, Ching-Chiu; Chang, Ming-Li; Yu, Lee-Fen; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Chiehfeng

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if aromatherapy could reduce preoperative anxiety in ambulatory surgery patients. A total of 109 preoperative patients were randomly assigned to experimental (bergamot essential oil) and control (water vapor) conditions and their responses to the State Trait Anxiety Inventory and vital signs were monitored. Patients were stratified by previous surgical experience, but that did not influence the results. All those exposed to bergamot essential oil aromatherapy showed a greater reduction in preoperative anxiety than those in the control groups. Aromatherapy may be a useful part of a holistic approach to reducing preoperative anxiety before ambulatory surgery. PMID:24454517

  4. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Emotional Disclosure in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can Clinician Assistance Enhance the Effects?

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Francis J.; Anderson, Timothy; Lumley, Mark; Caldwell, David; Stainbrook, David; Mckee, Daphne; Waters, Sandra J.; Connelly, Mark; Affleck, Glenn; Pope, Mary Susan; Weiss, Marianne; Riordan, Paul A.; Uhlin, Brian D.

    2008-01-01

    Emotional disclosure by writing or talking about stressful life experiences improves health status in non-clinical populations, but its success in clinical populations, particularly rheumatoid arthritis (RA), has been mixed. In this randomized, controlled trial, we attempted to increase the efficacy of emotional disclosure by having a trained clinician help patients emotionally disclose and process stressful experiences. We randomized 98 adults with RA to one of four conditions: a) private verbal emotional disclosure; b) clinician-assisted verbal emotional disclosure; c) arthritis information control (all of which engaged in four, 30-minute laboratory sessions); or d) no-treatment, standard care only control group. Outcome measures (pain, disability, affect, stress) were assessed at baseline, 2 months following treatment (2-month follow-up), and at 5-month, and 15-month follow-ups. A manipulation check demonstrated that, as expected, both types of emotional disclosure led to immediate (post-session) increases in negative affect compared with arthritis information. Outcome analyses at all three follow-ups revealed no clear pattern of effects for either clinician-assisted or private emotional disclosure compared with the two control groups. There were some benefits in terms of a reduction in pain behavior with private disclosure versus clinician-assisted disclosure at the 2 month follow-up, but no other significant between group differences. We conclude that verbal emotional disclosure about stressful experiences, whether conducted privately or assisted by a clinician, has little or no benefit for people with RA. PMID:17923329

  5. Deception and Shopping Behavior Among Current Cigarette Smokers: A Web-Based, Randomized Virtual Shopping Experiment.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Lauren McCarl; Nonnemaker, James; Taylor, Nathaniel; Kim, Annice E

    2018-06-29

    Virtual stores can be used to identify influences on consumer shopping behavior. Deception is one technique that may be used to attempt to increase the realism of virtual stores. The objective of the experiment was to test whether the purchasing behavior of participants in a virtual shopping task varied based on whether they were told that they would receive the products they selected in a virtual convenience store (a form of deception) or not. We recruited a US national sample of 402 adult current smokers by email from an online panel of survey participants. They completed a fully automated randomized virtual shopping experiment with a US $15 or US $20 budget in a Web-based virtual convenience store. We told a random half of participants that they would receive the products they chose in the virtual store or the cash equivalent (intervention condition), and the other random half simply to conduct a shopping task (control condition). We tested for differences in demographics, tobacco use behaviors, and in-store purchases (outcome variable, assessed by questionnaire) by experimental condition. The characteristics of the participants (398/402, 99.0% with complete data) were comparable across conditions except that the intervention group contained slightly more female participants (103/197, 52.3%) than the control group (84/201, 41.8%; P=.04). We did not find any other significant differences in any other demographic variables or tobacco use, or in virtual store shopping behaviors, including purchasing any tobacco (P=.44); purchasing cigarettes (P=.16), e-cigarettes (P=.54), cigars (P=.98), or smokeless tobacco (P=.72); amount spent overall (P=.63) or on tobacco (P=.66); percentage of budget spent overall (P=.84) or on tobacco (P=.74); number of total items (P=.64) and tobacco items purchased (P=.54); or total time spent in the store (P=.07). We found that telling participants that they will receive the products they select in a virtual store did not influence their

  6. Evidence-based narratives to improve recall of opioid prescribing guidelines: a randomized experiment.

    PubMed

    Kilaru, Austin S; Perrone, Jeanmarie; Auriemma, Catherine L; Shofer, Frances S; Barg, Frances K; Meisel, Zachary F

    2014-03-01

    Physicians adopt evidence-based guidelines with variable consistency. Narratives, or stories, offer a novel dissemination strategy for clinical recommendations. The study objective was to compare whether evidence-based narrative versus traditional summary improved recall of opioid prescribing guidelines from the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). This was a prospective, randomized controlled experiment to compare whether narrative versus summary promoted short-term recall of six themes contained in the ACEP opioid guideline. The experiment was modeled after the free-recall test, an established technique in studies of memory. At a regional conference, emergency physicians (EPs) were randomized to read either a summary of the guideline (control) or a narrative (intervention). The fictional narrative was constructed to match the summary in content and length. One hour after reading the text, participants listed all content that they could recall. Two reviewers independently scored the responses to assess recall of the six themes. The primary outcome was the total number of themes recalled per participant. Secondary outcomes included the proportion of responses in each study arm that recalled individual themes and the proportion of responses in each arm that contained falsely recalled or extraneous information. Ninety-five physicians were randomized. Eighty-two physicians completed the experiment, for a response rate of 86%. The mean of the total number of themes recalled per participant was 3.1 in the narrative arm versus 2.0 in the summary arm (difference = 1.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.6 to 1.7). For three themes, the proportion of responses that recalled the theme was significantly greater in the narrative arm compared to the summary arm, with the differences ranging from 20% to 51%. For one theme, recall was significantly greater in the summary arm. For two themes, there was no statistically significant difference in recall between the arms

  7. Evidence-based Narratives to Improve Recall of Opioid Prescribing Guidelines: A Randomized Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Kilaru, Austin S.; Perrone, Jeanmarie; Auriemma, Catherine L.; Shofer, Frances S.; Barg, Frances K.; Meisel, Zachary F.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Physicians adopt evidence-based guidelines with variable consistency. Narratives, or stories, offer a novel dissemination strategy for clinical recommendations. The study objective was to compare whether evidence-based narrative versus traditional summary improved recall of opioid prescribing guidelines from the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). Methods This was a prospective, randomized controlled experiment to compare whether narrative versus summary promoted short-term recall of six themes contained in the ACEP opioid guideline. The experiment was modeled after the free-recall test, an established technique in studies of memory. At a regional conference, emergency physicians were randomized to read either a summary of the guideline (control) or a narrative (intervention). The fictional narrative was constructed to match the summary in content and length. One hour after reading the text, participants listed all content that they could recall. Two reviewers independently scored the responses to assess recall of the six themes. The primary outcome was the total number of themes recalled per participant. Secondary outcomes included the proportion of responses in each study arm that recalled individual themes and the proportion of responses in each arm that contained falsely recalled or extraneous information. Results Ninety-five physicians were randomized. Eighty-two physicians completed the experiment, for a response rate of 86%. The mean of the total number of themes recalled per participant was 3.1 in the narrative arm versus 2.0 in the summary arm (difference = 1.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.6 to 1.7). For three themes, the proportion of responses that recalled the theme was significantly greater in the narrative arm compared to the summary arm, with the differences ranging from 20% to 51%. For one theme, recall was significantly greater in the summary arm. For two themes, there was no statistically significant difference in

  8. Incentive Spirometry after Lung Resection: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Malik, Peter Ra; Fahim, Christine; Vernon, Jordyn; Thomas, Priya; Schieman, Colin; Finley, Christian J; Agzarian, John; Shargall, Yaron; Farrokhyar, Forough; Hanna, Wael C

    2018-04-24

    Incentive spirometry (IS) is thought to reduce the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPC) after lung resection. We sought to determine whether the addition of IS to routine physiotherapy following lung resection results in a lower rate of PPC, as compared to physiotherapy alone. A single-blind prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted in adults undergoing lung resection. Individuals with previous lung surgery or home oxygen were excluded. Participants randomized to the control arm (PHY) received routine physiotherapy alone (deep breathing, ambulation and shoulder exercises). Those randomized to the intervention arm (PHY/IS) received IS in addition to routine physiotherapy. The trial was powered to detect a 10% difference in the rate of PPC (beta=80%). Student's t-test and chi-square were utilized for continuous and categorical variables respectively, with a significance level of p=0.05. A total of 387 participants (n=195 PHY/IS; n=192 PHY) were randomized between 2014-2017. Baseline characteristics were comparable for both arms. The majority of patients underwent a pulmonary lobectomy (PHY/IS=59.5%, PHY=61.0%, p=0.84), with no difference in the rates of minimally invasive and open procedures. There were no differences in the incidence of PPC at 30 days postoperatively (PHY/IS=12.3%, PHY=13.0%, p=0.88). There were no differences in rates of pneumonia (PHY/IS=4.6%, PHY=7.8%, p=0.21), mechanical ventilation (PHY/IS=2.1%, PHY=1.0%, p=0.41), home-oxygen (PHY/IS=13.8%, PHY=14.6%, p=0.89), hospital length of stay (PHY/IS=4 days, PHY=4 days, p=0.34), or rate of readmission to hospital (PHY/IS=10.3%, PH=9.9%, p=1.00). The addition of IS to routine postoperative physiotherapy does not reduce the incidence of PPC after lung resection. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Improving preschoolers' mathematics achievement with tablets: a randomized controlled trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schacter, John; Jo, Booil

    2017-09-01

    With a randomized field experiment of 433 preschoolers, we tested a tablet mathematics program designed to increase young children's mathematics learning. Intervention students played Math Shelf, a comprehensive iPad preschool and year 1 mathematics app, while comparison children received research-based hands-on mathematics instruction delivered by their classroom teachers. After 22 weeks, there was a large and statistically significant effect on mathematics achievement for Math Shelf students (Cohen's d = .94). Moderator analyses demonstrated an even larger effect for low achieving children (Cohen's d = 1.27). These results suggest that early education teachers can improve their students' mathematics outcomes by integrating experimentally proven tablet software into their daily routines.

  10. Ghana randomized air pollution and health study (GRAPHS): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jack, Darby W; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Wylie, Blair J; Chillrud, Steve N; Whyatt, Robin M; Ae-Ngibise, Kenneth A; Quinn, Ashlinn K; Yawson, Abena Konadu; Boamah, Ellen Abrafi; Agyei, Oscar; Mujtaba, Mohammed; Kaali, Seyram; Kinney, Patrick; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2015-09-22

    Household air pollution exposure is a major health risk, but validated interventions remain elusive. The Ghana Randomized Air Pollution and Health Study (GRAPHS) is a cluster-randomized trial that evaluates the efficacy of clean fuels (liquefied petroleum gas, or LPG) and efficient biomass cookstoves in the Brong-Ahafo region of central Ghana. We recruit pregnant women into LPG, efficient cookstove, and control arms and track birth weight and physician-assessed severe pneumonia incidence in the first year of life. A woman is eligible to participate if she is in the first or second trimester of pregnancy and carrying a live singleton fetus, if she is the primary cook, and if she does not smoke. We hypothesize that babies born to intervention mothers will weigh more and will have fewer cases of physician-assessed severe pneumonia in the first year of life. Additionally, an extensive personal air pollution exposure monitoring effort opens the way for exposure-response analyses, which we will present alongside intention-to-treat analyses. Major funding was provided by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, The Thrasher Research Fund, and the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves. Household air pollution exposure is a major health risk that requires well-tested interventions. GRAPHS will provide important new evidence on the efficacy of both efficient biomass cookstoves and LPG, and will thus help inform health and energy policies in developing countries. The trial was registered with clinicaltrials.gov on 13 April 2011 with the identifier NCT01335490 .

  11. Cultural participation and health: a randomized controlled trial among medical care staff.

    PubMed

    Bygren, Lars Olov; Weissglas, Gösta; Wikström, Britt-Maj; Konlaan, Boinkum Benson; Grjibovski, Andrej; Karlsson, Ann-Brith; Andersson, Sven-Olof; Sjöström, Michael

    2009-05-01

    Population studies demonstrate that attending cultural events is conducive to improved health when baseline health, income, education, and health habits are taken into account. Animal experiments suggest possible mechanisms. We studied the link in humans between attending cultural events and health in a randomized controlled trial. Members of the local government officers' union in the health services in Umeå, Sweden, were invited to the experiment and 101 people registered for fine arts visits once a week for 8 weeks. They chose films, concerts, or art exhibitions visits, or singing in a choir and were then randomized into 51 cases, starting at once, and 50 controls starting after the trial. Health was assessed before randomization and after the experimental period using the instrument for perceived health, short form (SF)-36, and tests of episodic memory, saliva-cortisol and immunoglobulin. The results were analyzed using a mixed design analysis of variance. The SF-36 Composite Score called physical health improved in the intervention group and decreased among controls during the experiment (F(1,87) = 7.06, p = .009). The individual factor of the SF-36 called social functioning, improved more in the intervention group than among controls (F(1,98) = 8.11, p = .005) as well as the factor vitality (F(1,98) = 5.26, p = .024). The six other factors and the Mental Health Composite Score, episodic memory, cortisol and immunoglobulin levels did not change otherwise than among controls. Mechanisms are left to be identified. Fine arts stimulations improved perceived physical health, social functioning, and vitality.

  12. Are Randomized Controlled Trials the (G)old Standard? From Clinical Intelligence to Prescriptive Analytics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the accelerating pace of scientific discovery, the current clinical research enterprise does not sufficiently address pressing clinical questions. Given the constraints on clinical trials, for a majority of clinical questions, the only relevant data available to aid in decision making are based on observation and experience. Our purpose here is 3-fold. First, we describe the classic context of medical research guided by Poppers’ scientific epistemology of “falsificationism.” Second, we discuss challenges and shortcomings of randomized controlled trials and present the potential of observational studies based on big data. Third, we cover several obstacles related to the use of observational (retrospective) data in clinical studies. We conclude that randomized controlled trials are not at risk for extinction, but innovations in statistics, machine learning, and big data analytics may generate a completely new ecosystem for exploration and validation. PMID:27383622

  13. Are Randomized Controlled Trials the (G)old Standard? From Clinical Intelligence to Prescriptive Analytics.

    PubMed

    Van Poucke, Sven; Thomeer, Michiel; Heath, John; Vukicevic, Milan

    2016-07-06

    Despite the accelerating pace of scientific discovery, the current clinical research enterprise does not sufficiently address pressing clinical questions. Given the constraints on clinical trials, for a majority of clinical questions, the only relevant data available to aid in decision making are based on observation and experience. Our purpose here is 3-fold. First, we describe the classic context of medical research guided by Poppers' scientific epistemology of "falsificationism." Second, we discuss challenges and shortcomings of randomized controlled trials and present the potential of observational studies based on big data. Third, we cover several obstacles related to the use of observational (retrospective) data in clinical studies. We conclude that randomized controlled trials are not at risk for extinction, but innovations in statistics, machine learning, and big data analytics may generate a completely new ecosystem for exploration and validation.

  14. Controlling memory impairment in elderly adults using virtual reality memory training: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Optale, Gabriele; Urgesi, Cosimo; Busato, Valentina; Marin, Silvia; Piron, Lamberto; Priftis, Konstantinos; Gamberini, Luciano; Capodieci, Salvatore; Bordin, Adalberto

    2010-05-01

    Memory decline is a prevalent aspect of aging but may also be the first sign of cognitive pathology. Virtual reality (VR) using immersion and interaction may provide new approaches to the treatment of memory deficits in elderly individuals. The authors implemented a VR training intervention to try to lessen cognitive decline and improve memory functions. The authors randomly assigned 36 elderly residents of a rest care facility (median age 80 years) who were impaired on the Verbal Story Recall Test either to the experimental group (EG) or the control group (CG). The EG underwent 6 months of VR memory training (VRMT) that involved auditory stimulation and VR experiences in path finding. The initial training phase lasted 3 months (3 auditory and 3 VR sessions every 2 weeks), and there was a booster training phase during the following 3 months (1 auditory and 1 VR session per week). The CG underwent equivalent face-to-face training sessions using music therapy. Both groups participated in social and creative and assisted-mobility activities. Neuropsychological and functional evaluations were performed at baseline, after the initial training phase, and after the booster training phase. The EG showed significant improvements in memory tests, especially in long-term recall with an effect size of 0.7 and in several other aspects of cognition. In contrast, the CG showed progressive decline. The authors suggest that VRMT may improve memory function in elderly adults by enhancing focused attention.

  15. A randomized controlled trial to promote volunteering in older adults.

    PubMed

    Warner, Lisa M; Wolff, Julia K; Ziegelmann, Jochen P; Wurm, Susanne

    2014-12-01

    Volunteering is presumed to confer health benefits, but interventions to encourage older adults to volunteer are sparse. Therefore, a randomized controlled trial with 280 community-dwelling older German adults was conducted to test the effects of a theory-based social-cognitive intervention against a passive waiting-list control group and an active control intervention designed to motivate physical activity. Self-reports of weekly volunteering minutes were assessed at baseline (5 weeks before the intervention) as well as 2 and 6 weeks after the intervention. Participants in the treatment group increased their weekly volunteering minutes to a greater extent than participants in the control groups 6 weeks after the intervention. We conclude that a single, face-to-face group session can increase volunteering among older community-dwelling adults. However, the effects need some time to unfold because changes in volunteering were not apparent 2 weeks after the intervention. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. FACE computer simulation. [Flexible Arm Controls Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadeh, Willy Z.; Szmyd, Jeffrey A.

    1990-01-01

    A computer simulation of the FACE (Flexible Arm Controls Experiment) was conducted to assess its design for use in the Space Shuttle. The FACE is supposed to be a 14-ft long articulate structure with 4 degrees of freedom, consisting of shoulder pitch and yaw, elbow pitch, and wrist pitch. Kinematics of the FACE was simulated to obtain data on arm operation, function, workspace and interaction. Payload capture ability was modeled. The simulation indicates the capability for detailed kinematic simulation and payload capture ability analysis, and the feasibility of real-time simulation was determined. In addition, the potential for interactive real-time training through integration of the simulation with various interface controllers was revealed. At this stage, the flexibility of the arm was not yet considered.

  17. Empowerment Program for People With Prediabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Fang; Hung, Shu-Ling; Chen, Shu-Lin

    2017-04-01

    Practicing a health-promoting lifestyle is believed to be effective for delaying or preventing the onset of diabetes. However, although empowerment interventions have proven effective for encouraging the adoption of a health-promoting lifestyle in people with diabetes, these interventions are rarely promoted to people with prediabetes. The aims of this study were to develop an empowerment program for people with prediabetes and to examine its efficacy in terms of the adoption of a health-promoting lifestyle and improvements in blood sugar, body mass index, and self-efficacy. A randomized controlled trial was conducted between May and December 2013. A convenience sample of people with a fasting blood sugar level of 100-125 mg/dl during the previous 3 months was recruited from the health examination center of a hospital in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Participants were assigned to either the experimental group or the control group using block randomization with a block size of 8. The experimental group (n = 38) participated in a 4-month empowerment program (the ABC empowerment program), which encouraged participants to practice a health-promoting lifestyle in three phases: awareness raising, behavior building, and results checking. The control group (n = 40) received routine clinical care. Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics, independent t test, paired t test, and generalized estimated equations. After controlling for the differences at baseline and considering the interaction between group and time from baseline to 1 week and 3 months after completing the intervention, the generalized estimating equation showed significantly larger improvements in a health-promoting lifestyle, blood sugar, and self-efficacy in the experimental group than in the control group (p < .01). Furthermore, the experimental group achieved a larger reduction in body mass index than the control group at 3 months after completing the intervention (p = .001). The empowerment program was

  18. Preconception maternal nutrition: a multi-site randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Research directed to optimizing maternal nutrition commencing prior to conception remains very limited, despite suggestive evidence of its importance in addition to ensuring an optimal nutrition environment in the periconceptional period and throughout the first trimester of pregnancy. Methods/Study design This is an individually randomized controlled trial of the impact on birth length (primary outcome) of the time at which a maternal nutrition intervention is commenced: Arm 1: ≥ 3 mo preconception vs. Arm 2: 12-14 wk gestation vs. Arm 3: none. 192 (derived from 480) randomized mothers and living offspring in each arm in each of four research sites (Guatemala, India, Pakistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo). The intervention is a daily 20 g lipid-based (118 kcal) multi-micronutient (MMN) supplement. Women randomized to receive this intervention with body mass index (BMI) <20 or whose gestational weight gain is low will receive an additional 300 kcal/d as a balanced energy-protein supplement. Researchers will visit homes biweekly to deliver intervention and monitor compliance, pregnancy status and morbidity; ensure prenatal and delivery care; and promote breast feeding. The primary outcome is birth length. Secondary outcomes include: fetal length at 12 and 34 wk; incidence of low birth weight (LBW); neonatal/infant anthropometry 0-6 mo of age; infectious disease morbidity; maternal, fetal, newborn, and infant epigenetics; maternal and infant nutritional status; maternal and infant microbiome; gut inflammatory biomarkers and bioactive and nutritive compounds in breast milk. The primary analysis will compare birth Length-for-Age Z-score (LAZ) among trial arms (independently for each site, estimated effect size: 0.35). Additional statistical analyses will examine the secondary outcomes and a pooled analysis of data from all sites. Discussion Positive results of this trial will support a paradigm shift in attention to nutrition of all females of

  19. Extended treatment for cigarette smoking cessation: a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Laude, Jennifer R; Bailey, Steffani R; Crew, Erin; Varady, Ann; Lembke, Anna; McFall, Danielle; Jeon, Anna; Killen, Diana; Killen, Joel D; David, Sean P

    2017-08-01

    To test the potential benefit of extending cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) relative to not extending CBT on long-term abstinence from smoking. Two-group parallel randomized controlled trial. Patients were randomized to receive non-extended CBT (n = 111) or extended CBT (n = 112) following a 26-week open-label treatment. Community clinic in the United States. A total of 219 smokers (mean age: 43 years; mean cigarettes/day: 18). All participants received 10 weeks of combined CBT + bupropion sustained release (bupropion SR) + nicotine patch and were continued on CBT and either no medications if abstinent, continued bupropion + nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) if increased craving or depression scores, or varenicline if still smoking at 10 weeks. Half the participants were randomized at 26 weeks to extended CBT (E-CBT) to week 48 and half to non-extended CBT (no additional CBT sessions). The primary outcome was expired CO-confirmed, 7-day point-prevalence (PP) at 52- and 104-week follow-up. Analyses were based on intention-to-treat. PP abstinence rates at the 52-week follow-up were comparable across non-extended CBT (40%) and E-CBT (39%) groups [odds ratio (OR) = 0.99; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.55, 1.78]. A similar pattern was observed across non-extended CBT (39%) and E-CBT (33%) groups at the 104-week follow-up (OR = 0.79; 95% CI= 0.44, 1.40). Prolonging cognitive-behavioral therapy from 26 to 48 weeks does not appear to improve long-term abstinence from smoking. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  20. Random and externally controlled occurrences of Dansgaard-Oeschger events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, Johannes; Ditlevsen, Peter D.

    2018-05-01

    Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events constitute the most pronounced mode of centennial to millennial climate variability of the last glacial period. Since their discovery, many decades of research have been devoted to understand the origin and nature of these rapid climate shifts. In recent years, a number of studies have appeared that report emergence of DO-type variability in fully coupled general circulation models via different mechanisms. These mechanisms result in the occurrence of DO events at varying degrees of regularity, ranging from periodic to random. When examining the full sequence of DO events as captured in the North Greenland Ice Core Project (NGRIP) ice core record, one can observe high irregularity in the timing of individual events at any stage within the last glacial period. In addition to the prevailing irregularity, certain properties of the DO event sequence, such as the average event frequency or the relative distribution of cold versus warm periods, appear to be changing throughout the glacial. By using statistical hypothesis tests on simple event models, we investigate whether the observed event sequence may have been generated by stationary random processes or rather was strongly modulated by external factors. We find that the sequence of DO warming events is consistent with a stationary random process, whereas dividing the event sequence into warming and cooling events leads to inconsistency with two independent event processes. As we include external forcing, we find a particularly good fit to the observed DO sequence in a model where the average residence time in warm periods are controlled by global ice volume and cold periods by boreal summer insolation.

  1. Implant and prosthesis movement after enucleation: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Shome, Debraj; Honavar, Santosh G; Raizada, Kuldeep; Raizada, Deepa

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate implant and prosthesis movement after myoconjunctival enucleation and subsequent polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) implantation, compared with the traditional enucleation with muscle imbrication using a PMMA implant and with enucleation accompanied by porous polyethylene implantation. Randomized, controlled, observer-masked, interventional study. One hundred fifty patients, equally and randomly allocated to the 3 groups. Group 1 consisted of patients in whom a PMMA implant was used after enucleation with muscle imbrication (traditional PMMA group). Group 2 consisted of patients in whom a PMMA implant was used after enucleation with a myoconjunctival technique (myoconjunctival PMMA group). Group 3 consisted of patients in whom a porous polyethylene implant was used after enucleation by the scleral cap technique (porous polyethylene group). Fifty patients were included in each group. Patients were allocated to 1 of the 3 groups using stratified randomization. Informed consent was obtained. Acrylic prostheses custom made by a trained ocularist were fitted 6 weeks after surgery in all patients. A masked observer measured implant and prosthesis movement 6 weeks after surgery using a slit-lamp device with real-time video and still photographic documentation. Analysis of implant and prosthesis movement was carried out using the Mann-Whitney U test, and a P value of < or =0.03 was considered significant. Complications including implant displacement and exposure also were noted. Implant and prosthesis movement. Myoconjunctival PMMA implant movement was better than the traditional PMMA implant (P = 0.001), but was similar to that of the porous polyethylene implant. Prosthesis movement with the myoconjunctival PMMA implant was better than that of either the traditional PMMA (P = 0.001) or porous polyethylene (P = 0.002) implants. Myoconjunctival enucleation technique with a PMMA implant provides statistically and clinically significantly better implant and prosthesis

  2. Game-Based Learning as a Vehicle to Teach First Aid Content: A Randomized Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlier, Nathalie; De Fraine, Bieke

    2013-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of first aid (FA), which constitutes lifesaving treatments for injuries or illnesses, is important for every individual. In this study, we have set up a group-randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a board game for learning FA. Methods: Four class groups (120 students) were randomly assigned to 2…

  3. Reiki for the treatment of fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Assefi, Nassim; Bogart, Andy; Goldberg, Jack; Buchwald, Dedra

    2008-11-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common, chronic pain condition for which patients frequently use complementary and alternative medicine, including Reiki. Our objective was to determine whether Reiki is beneficial as an adjunctive fibromyalgia treatment. This was a factorial designed, randomized, sham-controlled trial in which participants, data collection staff, and data analysts were blinded to treatment group. The study setting was private medical offices in the Seattle, Washington metropolitan area. The subjects were comprised 100 adults with fibromyalgia. Four (4) groups received twice-weekly treatment for 8 weeks by either a Reiki master or actor randomized to use direct touch or no touch (distant therapy). The primary outcome was subjective pain as measured by visual analog scale at weeks 4, 8, and 20 (3 months following end of treatment). Secondary outcomes were physical and mental functioning, medication use, and health provider visits. Participant blinding and adverse effects were ascertained by self-report. Improvement between groups was examined in an intention-to-treat analysis. Neither Reiki nor touch had any effect on pain or any of the secondary outcomes. All outcome measures were nearly identical among the 4 treatment groups during the course of the trial. Neither Reiki nor touch improved the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Energy medicine modalities such as Reiki should be rigorously studied before being recommended to patients with chronic pain symptoms.

  4. Reiki for the Treatment of Fibromyalgia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Assefi, Nassim; Bogart, Andy; Goldberg, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective Fibromyalgia is a common, chronic pain condition for which patients frequently use complementary and alternative medicine, including Reiki. Our objective was to determine whether Reiki is beneficial as an adjunctive fibromyalgia treatment. Design This was a factorial designed, randomized, sham-controlled trial in which participants, data collection staff, and data analysts were blinded to treatment group. Setting/location The study setting was private medical offices in the Seattle, Washington metropolitan area. Subjects The subjects were comprised 100 adults with fibromyalgia. Intervention Four (4) groups received twice-weekly treatment for 8 weeks by either a Reiki master or actor randomized to use direct touch or no touch (distant therapy). Outcome measures The primary outcome was subjective pain as measured by visual analog scale at weeks 4, 8, and 20 (3 months following end of treatment). Secondary outcomes were physical and mental functioning, medication use, and health provider visits. Participant blinding and adverse effects were ascertained by selfreport. Improvement between groups was examined in an intention-to-treat analysis. Results Neither Reiki nor touch had any effect on pain or any of the secondary outcomes. All outcome measures were nearly identical among the 4 treatment groups during the course of the trial. Conclusion Neither Reiki nor touch improved the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Energy medicine modalities such as Reiki should be rigorously studied before being recommended to patients with chronic pain symptoms. PMID:18991519

  5. Dry cupping for plantar fasciitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ge, Weiqing; Leson, Chelsea; Vukovic, Corey

    2017-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of dry cupping on pain and function of patients with plantar fasciitis. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine subjects (age 15 to 59 years old, 20 females and 9 males), randomly assigned into the two groups (dry cupping therapy and electrical stimulation therapy groups), participated in this study. The research design was a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Treatments were provided to the subjects twice a week for 4 weeks. Outcome measurements included the Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAS) (at rest, first in the morning, and with activities), the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM), the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS), as well as the pressure pain threshold. [Results]The data indicated that both dry cupping therapy and electrical stimulation therapy could reduce pain and increase function significantly in the population tested, as all the 95% Confidence Intervals (CIs) did not include 0 except for the pressure pain threshold. There was no significant difference between the dry cupping therapy and electrical stimulation groups in all the outcome measurements. [Conclusion] These results support that both dry cupping therapy and electrical stimulation therapy could reduce pain and increase function in the population tested.

  6. Dry cupping for plantar fasciitis: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Weiqing; Leson, Chelsea; Vukovic, Corey

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of dry cupping on pain and function of patients with plantar fasciitis. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine subjects (age 15 to 59 years old, 20 females and 9 males), randomly assigned into the two groups (dry cupping therapy and electrical stimulation therapy groups), participated in this study. The research design was a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Treatments were provided to the subjects twice a week for 4 weeks. Outcome measurements included the Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAS) (at rest, first in the morning, and with activities), the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM), the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS), as well as the pressure pain threshold. [Results]The data indicated that both dry cupping therapy and electrical stimulation therapy could reduce pain and increase function significantly in the population tested, as all the 95% Confidence Intervals (CIs) did not include 0 except for the pressure pain threshold. There was no significant difference between the dry cupping therapy and electrical stimulation groups in all the outcome measurements. [Conclusion] These results support that both dry cupping therapy and electrical stimulation therapy could reduce pain and increase function in the population tested. PMID:28603360

  7. Nasal saline for chronic sinonasal symptoms: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pynnonen, Melissa A; Mukerji, Shraddha S; Kim, H Myra; Adams, Meredith E; Terrell, Jeffrey E

    2007-11-01

    To determine if isotonic sodium chloride (hereinafter "saline") nasal irrigations performed with large volume and delivered with low positive pressure are more effective than saline sprays at improving quality of life and decreasing medication use. A prospective, randomized controlled trial. Community. A total of 127 adults with chronic nasal and sinus symptoms. Patients were randomly assigned to irrigation performed with large volume and delivered with low positive pressure (n = 64) or spray (n = 63) for 8 weeks. Change in symptom severity measured by mean 20-Item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-20) score; change in symptom frequency measured with a global question; and change in medication use. A total of 121 patients were evaluable. The irrigation group achieved lower SNOT-20 scores than the spray group at all 3 time points: 4.4 points lower at 2 weeks (P = .02); 8.2 points lower at 4 weeks (P < .001); and 6.4 points lower at 8 weeks (P = .002). When symptom frequency was analyzed, 40% of subjects in the irrigation group reported symptoms "often or always" at 8 weeks compared with 61% in the spray group (absolute risk reduction, 0.2; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.38 (P = .01). No significant differences in sinus medication use were seen between groups. Nasal irrigations performed with large volume and delivered with low positive pressure are more effective than saline sprays for treatment of chronic nasal and sinus symptoms in a community-based population.

  8. Cognitive training in Alzheimer's disease: a controlled randomized study.

    PubMed

    Giovagnoli, A R; Manfredi, V; Parente, A; Schifano, L; Oliveri, S; Avanzini, G

    2017-08-01

    This controlled randomized single-blind study evaluated the effects of cognitive training (CT), compared to active music therapy (AMT) and neuroeducation (NE), on initiative in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD). Secondarily, we explored the effects of CT on episodic memory, mood, and social relationships. Thirty-nine AD patients were randomly assigned to CT, AMT, or NE. Each treatment lasted 3 months. Before, at the end, and 3 months after treatment, neuropsychological tests and self-rated scales assessed initiative, episodic memory, depression, anxiety, and social relationships. At the end of the CT, initiative significantly improved, whereas, at the end of AMT and NE, it was unchanged. Episodic memory showed no changes at the end of CT or AMT and a worsening after NE. The rates of the patients with clinically significant improvement of initiative were greater after CT (about 62%) than after AMT (about 8%) or NE (none). At the 3-month follow-up, initiative and episodic memory declined in all patients. Mood and social relationships improved in the three groups, with greater changes after AMT or NE. In patients with mild to moderate AD, CT can improve initiative and stabilize memory, while the non-cognitive treatments can ameliorate the psychosocial aspects. The combining of CT and non-cognitive treatments may have useful clinical implications.

  9. 19. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Neurosteroid Intervention in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Chris; Naylor, Jennifer; Kilts, Jason; Allan, Trina; Smith, Karen; Szabo, Steven; Wagner, Ryan; Buchanan, Robert; Keefe, Richard; Shampine, Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Neurosteroids are endogenous molecules synthesized de novo in brain, adrenals, and other tissues. They demonstrate pleiotropic actions that are highly relevant to the neurobiology of schizophrenia. Clozapine markedly elevates neurosteroids in rodent hippocampus, potentially contributing to its superior therapeutic efficacy. Clinical evidence from a randomized controlled trial (RCT) conducted in Singapore suggests that pregnenolone significantly enhances functional capacity (as demonstrated by improvements in the UPSA Total Score and UPSA Communication Subscale Score) and that neurosteroid changes posttreatment predict therapeutic response (Marx et al 2014; Psychopharmacology). We thus conducted an RCT investigating adjunctive pregnenolone in schizophrenia. Methods: After a 2-week placebo lead-in, 88 participants with schizophrenia were randomized to pregnenolone (n = 42) or placebo (n = 46) for 8 weeks. Neurosteroids were quantified at baseline and posttreatment by mass spectrometry. Functional end points included the UPSA Total Score and UPSA Communication Subscale. Cognitive end points included the MCCB Composite Score and MCCB Subscales. Modified intent-to-treat analyses were conducted. Results: Participants randomized to the pregnenolone group did not outperform placebo on the UPSA Total Score or MCCB Composite Score. However, the pregnenolone group demonstrated significantly greater improvement in the UPSA Communication Subscale compared to participants randomized to placebo (P = .034), replicating prior RCT findings from Singapore. Elevations in pregnenolone post-treatment also predicted improvements in UPSA Total Score (r = .373; P = .039), again replicating prior efforts. In addition, the pregnenolone group demonstrated significantly greater improvement in the MCCB Verbal Learning Subscale compared to placebo (P = .023). Pregnenolone did not outperform placebo in the BACS Composite Score, SANS Total Score, or PANSS Total

  10. The feasibility of a randomized controlled trial of esophagectomy for esophageal cancer - the ROMIO (Randomized Oesophagectomy: Minimally Invasive or Open) study: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a need for evidence of the clinical effectiveness of minimally invasive surgery for the treatment of esophageal cancer, but randomized controlled trials in surgery are often difficult to conduct. The ROMIO (Randomized Open or Minimally Invasive Oesophagectomy) study will establish the feasibility of a main trial which will examine the clinical and cost-effectiveness of minimally invasive and open surgical procedures for the treatment of esophageal cancer. Methods/Design A pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT), in two centers (University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust and Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust) will examine numbers of incident and eligible patients who consent to participate in the ROMIO study. Interventions will include esophagectomy by: (1) open gastric mobilization and right thoracotomy, (2) laparoscopic gastric mobilization and right thoracotomy, and (3) totally minimally invasive surgery (in the Bristol center only). The primary outcomes of the feasibility study will be measures of recruitment, successful development of methods to monitor quality of surgery and fidelity to a surgical protocol, and development of a core outcome set to evaluate esophageal cancer surgery. The study will test patient-reported outcomes measures to assess recovery, methods to blind participants, assessments of surgical morbidity, and methods to capture cost and resource use. ROMIO will integrate methods to monitor and improve recruitment using audio recordings of consultations between recruiting surgeons, nurses, and patients to provide feedback for recruiting staff. Discussion The ROMIO study aims to establish efficient methods to undertake a main trial of minimally invasive surgery versus open surgery for esophageal cancer. Trial registration The pilot trial has Current Controlled Trials registration number ISRCTN59036820(25/02/2013) at http://www.controlled-trials.com; the ROMIO trial record at that site gives a link to the original version of

  11. The Effects of Attrition on Baseline Comparability in Randomized Experiments in Education: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Jeffrey C.; McHugh, Cathleen M.

    2007-01-01

    Using meta-analysis, randomized experiments in education that either clearly did or clearly did not experience student attrition were examined for the baseline comparability of groups. Results from 35 studies suggested that after attrition, the observed measures of baseline comparability of groups did not differ more than would be expected given…

  12. Neighborhood effects in a behavioral randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Sandi L; Leonard, Tammy; Murdoch, James; Hughes, Amy; McQueen, Amy; Gupta, Samir

    2014-11-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions intended to modify health behaviors may be influenced by neighborhood effects which can impede unbiased estimation of intervention effects. Examining a RCT designed to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening (N=5628), we found statistically significant neighborhood effects: average CRC test use among neighboring study participants was significantly and positively associated with individual patient's CRC test use. This potentially important spatially-varying covariate has not previously been considered in a RCT. Our results suggest that future RCTs of health behavior interventions should assess potential social interactions between participants, which may cause intervention arm contamination and may bias effect size estimation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Are results of randomized controlled trials useful to psychotherapists?

    PubMed

    Persons, J B; Silberschatz, G

    1998-02-01

    Two clinicians provided opposite answers to the title question: Persons argued that information from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) is vital to clinicians, and Silberschatz argued that information from RCTs is irrelevant to clinicians. Persons argued that clinicians cannot provide top quality care to their patients without attending to findings of RCTs and that clinicians have an ethical responsibility to inform patients about, recommend, and provide treatments supported by RCTs before informing patients about, recommending, and providing treatments shown to be inferior in RCTs or not evaluated in RCTs. Silberschatz argued that RCTs do not and cannot answer questions that concern practicing clinicians. He advocates alternative research approaches (effectiveness studies, quasi-experimental methods, case-specific research) for studying psychotherapy.

  14. [Critical of the additive model of the randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Boussageon, Rémy; Gueyffier, François; Bejan-Angoulvant, Theodora; Felden-Dominiak, Géraldine

    2008-01-01

    Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials are currently the best way to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of drugs. Its methodology relies on the method of difference (John Stuart Mill), through which the observed difference between two groups (drug vs placebo) can be attributed to the pharmacological effect of the drug being tested. However, this additive model can be questioned in the event of statistical interactions between the pharmacological and the placebo effects. Evidence in different domains has shown that the placebo effect can influence the effect of the active principle. This article evaluates the methodological, clinical and epistemological consequences of this phenomenon. Topics treated include extrapolating results, accounting for heterogeneous results, demonstrating the existence of several factors in the placebo effect, the necessity to take these factors into account for given symptoms or pathologies, as well as the problem of the "specific" effect.

  15. Family Caregiver Training Program (FCTP): A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    DiZazzo-Miller, Rosanne; Winston, Kristin; Winkler, Sandra L; Donovan, Mary L

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the Family Caregiver Training Program (FCTP) for caregivers of people with dementia. A random assignment control group research design with a 3-mo follow-up was implemented. Thirty-six family caregivers of people with dementia demonstrated an increase in activity of daily living (ADL) knowledge (p < .001) and maintenance of that knowledge 3 mo posttest. Caregiver confidence, regardless of group assignment, improved; however, it was not maintained. Burden, depression, and occupational performance and satisfaction remained unchanged for the intervention group; however, physical health as it pertained to quality of life improved 3 mo posttest (p < .001). Findings demonstrate that the FCTP can effectively provide knowledge to family caregivers on how to assist people with dementia with ADLs. Even when standard care was provided, there was limited information on ADLs that family caregivers faced daily. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  16. Hypnosis versus diazepam for embryo transfer: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Catoire, Patrick; Delaunay, Laurent; Dannappel, Thomas; Baracchini, Dominique; Marcadet-Fredet, Sabine; Moreau, Olivier; Pacaud, Luc; Przyrowski, Daniel; Marret, Emmanuel

    2013-04-01

    Levitas et al. (2006) showed in a cohort study that hypnosis during embryo transfer (ET) increased pregnancy ratio by 76%. In order to evaluate hypnosis during ET in a general population, the authors performed a randomized prospective controlled study comparing diazepam (usual premedication) administered before ET plus muscle relaxation versus hypnosis plus placebo in 94 patients. Additionally, the authors studied anxiety pre and post ET. Anxiety scores were not different in the two groups before and after ET. No difference in pregnancy and birth ratio was found in the two groups. Hypnosis during ET is as effective as diazepam in terms of pregnancy ratio and anxiolytic effects, but with fewer side effects and should be routinely available.

  17. A randomized, controlled trial of massage therapy as a treatment for migraine.

    PubMed

    Lawler, Sheleigh P; Cameron, Linda D

    2006-08-01

    Migraine is a distressing disorder that is often triggered by stress and poor sleep. Only one randomized controlled trial (RCT) has assessed the effects of massage therapy on migraine experiences, which yielded some promising findings. An RCT was designed to replicate and extend the earlier findings using a larger sample, additional stress-related indicators, and assessments past the final session to identify longer-term effects of massage therapy on stress and migraine experiences. Migraine sufferers (N = 47) who were randomly assigned to massage or control conditions completed daily assessments of migraine experiences and sleep patterns for 13 weeks. Massage participants attended weekly massage sessions during Weeks 5 to 10. State anxiety, heart rates, and salivary cortisol were assessed before and after the sessions. Perceived stress and coping efficacy were assessed at Weeks 4, 10, and 13. Compared to control participants, massage participants exhibited greater improvements in migraine frequency and sleep quality during the intervention weeks and the 3 follow-up weeks. Trends for beneficial effects of massage therapy on perceived stress and coping efficacy were observed. During sessions, massage induced decreases in state anxiety, heart rate, and cortisol. The findings provide preliminary support for the utility of massage therapy as a nonpharmacologic treatment for individuals suffering from migraines.

  18. Effects of nattokinase on blood pressure: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Gum, Si Nae; Paik, Jean Kyung; Lim, Hyo Hee; Kim, Kyong-Chol; Ogasawara, Kazuya; Inoue, Kenichi; Park, Sungha; Jang, Yangsoo; Lee, Jong Ho

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of nattokinase supplementation on blood pressure in subjects with pre-hypertension or stage 1 hypertension. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 86 participants ranging from 20 to 80 years of age with an initial untreated systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 130 to 159 mmHg received nattokinase (2,000 FU/capsule) or a placebo capsule for 8 weeks. Seventy-three subjects completed the protocol. Compared with the control group, the net changes in SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were -5.55 mmHg (95% confidence interval [CI], -10.5 to -0.57 mmHg; p<0.05) and -2.84 mmHg (CI, -5.33 to -0.33 mmHg; p<0.05), respectively, after the 8-week intervention. The corresponding net change in renin activity was -1.17 ng/mL/h for the nattokinase group compared with the control group (p<0.05). In conclusion, nattokinase supplementation resulted in a reduction in SBP and DBP. These findings suggest that increased intake of nattokinase may play an important role in preventing and treating hypertension.

  19. Integrated health programme: a workplace randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tveito, Torill H; Eriksen, Hege R

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the report of a pilot study to assess if an Integrated Health Programme would reduce sick leave and subjective health complaints, and increase coping in a population of nursing personnel. BACKGROUND. The work group in Norway with most sick leave is healthcare workers. More than 50% of the sick leave is because of subjective health complaints. Work place physical exercise interventions have a documented positive effect on sick leave. After baseline screening, employees who had agreed to participate (n=40) were randomized to an intervention or control group. The intervention group participated in an Integrated Health Programme twice weekly during working hours. The programme consisted of physical exercise, stress management training, health information and an examination of the participants' workplace. The control group was offered the same intervention after the project was finished. This study was carried out from 2001 to 2002. There were no statistically significant effects on sick leave or health-related quality of life. The intervention group reported fewer neck complaints compared to the control group, but otherwise there were no effects on subjective health complaints. However, the subjective effects were large and highly statistically significant, the intervention group reporting improvement in health, physical fitness, muscle pain, stress management, maintenance of health and work situation. The Integrated Health Programme was not effective in reducing sick leave and subjective health complaints, but may be of use to employers wanting to increase employee job satisfaction and well-being.

  20. Wellness program for anesthesiology residents: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Saadat, H; Snow, D L; Ottenheimer, S; Dai, F; Kain, Z N

    2012-10-01

    Multiple reports illustrate the deleterious effects of stress on physicians' mental and physical health, as well as on patient care. This study evaluates the effects of a wellness program on anesthesiology residents' well-being. Sixty residents were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) wellness intervention group, (2) no-treatment control with release time, and (3) no-treatment control with routine duties. Coping, stressors, social support, psychological symptoms, and alcohol and tobacco use were measured using a pre-test-post-test design. Residents in the wellness program reported significantly fewer stressors in their role as parent, increased social support at work, greater problem-solving coping, and less anxiety as compared with one or both of the control groups. Findings related to reducing avoidance coping and alcohol consumption also were suggestive of positive intervention effects. An intervention to increase the use of active coping and social support, to reduce reliance on avoidance coping, and to decrease work and family stressors had an overall pattern of beneficial effects on residents' well-being. The importance of offering such programs during residency training, ways to strengthen intervention effectiveness, and areas for future research are discussed. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2012 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  1. Infant Sleep After Immunization: Randomized Controlled Trial of Prophylactic Acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Caryl L.; Lynch, Mary; Lee, Kathryn A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of acetaminophen and axillary temperature responses on infant sleep duration after immunization. METHODS: We conducted a prospective, randomized controlled trial to compare the sleep of 70 infants monitored by using ankle actigraphy for 24 hours before and after their first immunization series at ∼2 months of age. Mothers of infants in the control group received standard care instructions from their infants' health care provider, and mothers of infants in the intervention group were provided with predosed acetaminophen and instructed to administer a dose 30 minutes before the scheduled immunization and every 4 hours thereafter, for a total of 5 doses. Infant age and birth weight and immunization factors, such as acetaminophen use and timing of administration, were evaluated for changes in infant sleep times after immunization. RESULTS: Sleep duration in the first 24 hours after immunization was increased, particularly for infants who received their immunizations after 1:30 pm and for those who experienced elevated temperatures in response to the vaccines. Infants who received acetaminophen at or after immunization had smaller increases in sleep duration than did infants who did not. However, acetaminophen use was not a significant predictor of sleep duration when other factors were controlled. CONCLUSIONS: If further research confirms the relationship between time of day of vaccine administration, increased sleep duration after immunization, and antibody responses, then our findings suggest that afternoon immunizations should be recommended to facilitate increased sleep in the 24 hours after immunization, regardless of acetaminophen administration. PMID:22123869

  2. Biofeedback Training in Crisis Managers: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Janka, A; Adler, C; Brunner, B; Oppenrieder, S; Duschek, S

    2017-06-01

    Working in crisis environments represents a major challenge, especially for executive personnel engaged in directing disaster operations, i.e. crisis managers. Crisis management involves operating under conditions of extreme stress resulting, for instance, from high-level decision-making, principal responsibility for personnel, multitasking or working under conditions of risk and time pressure. The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy of a newly developed biofeedback training procedure based on electrodermal activity, especially designed for the target group of crisis managers. The training comprised exercises promoting acquisition of control over sympathetic arousal under resting conditions and during exposure to visual, acoustic and cognitive stressors resembling situations related to crisis management. In a randomized controlled design, 36 crisis managers were assigned to either a biofeedback training group or waiting list control group. Subjective stress was assessed using the Perceived Stress Scale. In the training group, stress level markedly decreased; the decrease remained stable at follow-up 2 months after the training. The results indicate that biofeedback training in crisis management is an effective method for stress management that may help to reduce vulnerability to stress-related performance decline and stress-related disease.

  3. A randomized controlled trial of Moderation-Oriented Cue Exposure.

    PubMed

    Heather, N; Brodie, J; Wale, S; Wilkinson, G; Luce, A; Webb, E; McCarthy, S

    2000-07-01

    A randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine the effectiveness of Moderation-Oriented Cue Exposure (MOCE) in comparison to Behavioral Self-Control Training (BSCT). The main hypothesis was that MOCE would be more effective than BSCT among a sample of problem drinkers aiming at moderate drinking. A subsidiary hypothesis was that MOCE would be relatively more effective than BSCT among problem drinkers with higher levels of alcohol dependence. Clients (N = 91; 75% men) were randomly allocated to either MOCE or BSCT. Treatment was delivered in weekly sessions by two trained therapists, in a nested design in which therapists switched to the alternative treatment modality approximately halfway through the trial. Follow-up was carried out 6 months following posttreatment assessment, with 85% successful contact. There was no evidence for the general superiority of MOCE over BSCT. The subsidiary hypothesis was not confirmed. A subsample of clients (n = 14) showing levels of dependence at baseline above the commonly accepted cut-point for a moderation goal (Severity of Alcohol Dependence Questionnaire [SADQ] > 29) showed outcomes at least as favorable as those below the cut-point. The validity of self-reports of alcohol consumption and problems was supported by significant relationships with liver function tests (gamma-glutamyl transferase and alanine transferase). These results provide no grounds for the replacement of BSCT by MOCE in routine, moderation-oriented treatment practice. Assuming they prefer it to abstinence and that it is not contra-indicated on other grounds, there seems no reason why clients showing a higher level of dependence (SADQ = 30-45) should not be offered a moderation goal.

  4. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Mentoring Interventions for Underrepresented Minorities

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Vivian; Martina, Camille A.; McDermott, Michael P.; Trief, Paula; Goodman, Steven R.; Morse, Gene D.; LaGuardia, Jennifer G.; Sharp, Daryl; Ryan, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To conduct a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the effects of different mentoring interventions on the basic psychological need satisfaction of underrepresented minorities and women in academia. Method Participants were 150 mentor/protégé dyads from three academic medical centers and eight other colleges and universities in western and central New York, randomized from 2010–2013 into: mentor training (using principles of self-determination theory); peer mentoring for protégés; mentor training and peer mentoring for protégés combined; or control/usual practice. Protégé participants were graduate students, fellows and junior faculty who were from underrepresented groups based on race, ethnicity, gender, or disability. The primary analysis was a comparison of intervention effects on changes in protégés’ satisfaction of their basic psychological needs (competence, autonomy and relatedness) with their mentor. They completed a well-validated, online questionnaire every 2 months for 1 year. Results There was no significant effect at the end of 1 year of either mentor training or peer mentoring on protégés’ psychological basic need satisfaction with mentor specifically or at work in general. Exploratory analyses showed a significant effect of the mentor-based intervention on the protégés’ overall psychological need satisfaction with their mentor at 2 months, the time point closest to completing mentor training. Conclusions This RCT showed a potential short-term effect of mentor training on changing basic psychological need satisfaction of underrepresented scholars with their mentors. Despite the lack of sustained effect of either mentor training or peer mentoring, these short-term changes suggest feasibility and potential for future study. PMID:26717501

  5. Randomized controlled trial of Anticipatory and Preventive multidisciplinary Team Care

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, William; Lemelin, Jacques; Dahrouge, Simone; Liddy, Clare; Armstrong, Catherine Deri; Legault, Frances; Dalziel, Bill; Zhang, Wei

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE T o examine whether quality of care (QOC) improves when nurse practitioners and pharmacists work with family physicians in community practice and focus their work on patients who are 50 years of age and older and considered to be at risk of experiencing adverse health outcomes. DESIGN Randomized controlled trial. SETTING A family health network with 8 family physicians, 5 nurses, and 11 administrative personnel serving 10 000 patients in a rural area near Ottawa, Ont. PARTICIPANTS Patients 50 years of age and older at risk of experiencing adverse health outcomes (N = 241). INTERVENTIONS At-risk patients were randomly assigned to receive usual care from their family physicians or Anticipatory and Preventive Team Care (APTCare) from a collaborative team composed of their physicians, 1 of 3 nurse practitioners, and a pharmacist. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Quality of care for chronic disease management (CDM) for diabetes, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. RESULTS Controlling for baseline demographic characteristics, the APTCare approach improved CDM QOC by 9.2% (P < .001) compared with traditional care. The APTCare intervention also improved preventive care by 16.5% (P < .001). We did not observe significant differences in other secondary outcome measures (intermediate clinical outcomes, quality of life [Short-Form 36 and health-related quality of life scales], functional status [instrumental activities of daily living scale] and service usage). CONCLUSION Additional resources in the form of collaborative multidisciplinary care teams with intensive interventions in primary care can improve QOC for CDM in a population of older at-risk patients. The appropriateness of this intervention will depend on its cost-effectiveness. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER NCT00238836 (CONSORT) PMID:20008582

  6. Hockey Fans in Training: A Pilot Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Robert J; Gill, Dawn P; Zou, Guangyong; DE Cruz, Ashleigh; Riggin, Brendan; Bartol, Cassandra; Danylchuk, Karen; Hunt, Kate; Wyke, Sally; Gray, Cindy M; Bunn, Christopher; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2017-12-01

    Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT) is a gender-sensitized weight loss and healthy lifestyle program. We investigated 1) feasibility of recruiting and retaining overweight and obese men into a pilot pragmatic randomized controlled trial and 2) potential for Hockey FIT to lead to weight loss and improvements in other outcomes at 12 wk and 12 months. Male fans of two ice hockey teams (35-65 yr; body mass index ≥28 kg·m) located in Ontario (Canada) were randomized to intervention (Hockey FIT) or comparator (wait-list control). Hockey FIT includes a 12-wk active phase (weekly, coach-led group meetings including provision of dietary information, practice of behavior change techniques, and safe exercise sessions plus incremental pedometer walking) and a 40-wk minimally supported phase (smartphone app for sustaining physical activity, private online social network, standardized e-mails, booster session/reunion). Measurement at baseline and 12 wk (both groups) and 12 months (intervention group only) included clinical outcomes (e.g., weight) and self-reported physical activity, diet, and self-rated health. Eighty men were recruited in 4 wk; trial retention was >80% at 12 wk and >75% at 12 months. At 12 wk, the intervention group lost 3.6 kg (95% confidence interval, -5.26 to -1.90 kg) more than the comparator group (P < 0.001) and maintained this weight loss to 12 months. The intervention group also demonstrated greater improvements in other clinical measures, physical activity, diet, and self-rated health at 12 wk; most sustained to 12 months. Results suggest feasible recruitment/retention of overweight and obese men in the Hockey FIT program. Results provide evidence for the potential effectiveness of Hockey FIT for weight loss and improved health in at-risk men and, thus, evidence to proceed with a definitive trial.

  7. Hockey Fans in Training: A Pilot Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    PETRELLA, ROBERT J.; GILL, DAWN P.; ZOU, GUANGYONG; DE CRUZ, ASHLEIGH; RIGGIN, BRENDAN; BARTOL, CASSANDRA; DANYLCHUK, KAREN; HUNT, KATE; WYKE, SALLY; GRAY, CINDY M.; BUNN, CHRISTOPHER; ZWARENSTEIN, MERRICK

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT) is a gender-sensitized weight loss and healthy lifestyle program. We investigated 1) feasibility of recruiting and retaining overweight and obese men into a pilot pragmatic randomized controlled trial and 2) potential for Hockey FIT to lead to weight loss and improvements in other outcomes at 12 wk and 12 months. Methods Male fans of two ice hockey teams (35–65 yr; body mass index ≥28 kg·m−2) located in Ontario (Canada) were randomized to intervention (Hockey FIT) or comparator (wait-list control). Hockey FIT includes a 12-wk active phase (weekly, coach-led group meetings including provision of dietary information, practice of behavior change techniques, and safe exercise sessions plus incremental pedometer walking) and a 40-wk minimally supported phase (smartphone app for sustaining physical activity, private online social network, standardized e-mails, booster session/reunion). Measurement at baseline and 12 wk (both groups) and 12 months (intervention group only) included clinical outcomes (e.g., weight) and self-reported physical activity, diet, and self-rated health. Results Eighty men were recruited in 4 wk; trial retention was >80% at 12 wk and >75% at 12 months. At 12 wk, the intervention group lost 3.6 kg (95% confidence interval, −5.26 to −1.90 kg) more than the comparator group (P < 0.001) and maintained this weight loss to 12 months. The intervention group also demonstrated greater improvements in other clinical measures, physical activity, diet, and self-rated health at 12 wk; most sustained to 12 months. Conclusions Results suggest feasible recruitment/retention of overweight and obese men in the Hockey FIT program. Results provide evidence for the potential effectiveness of Hockey FIT for weight loss and improved health in at-risk men and, thus, evidence to proceed with a definitive trial. PMID:28719494

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Mindfulness Meditation for Chronic Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Jason C.; Manber, Rachel; Segal, Zindel; Xia, Yinglin; Shapiro, Shauna; Wyatt, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of mindfulness meditation for the treatment of chronic insomnia. Design: Three-arm, single-site, randomized controlled trial. Setting: Academic medical center. Participants: Fifty-four adults with chronic insomnia. Interventions: Participants were randomized to either mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), mindfulness-based therapy for insomnia (MBTI), or an eight-week self-monitoring (SM) condition. Measurements and Results: Patient-reported outcome measures were total wake time (TWT) from sleep diaries, the pre-sleep arousal scale (PSAS), measuring a prominent waking correlate of insomnia, and the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) to determine remission and response as clinical endpoints. Objective sleep measures were derived from laboratory polysomnography and wrist actigraphy. Linear mixed models showed that those receiving a meditation-based intervention (MBSR or MBTI) had significantly greater reductions on TWT minutes (43.75 vs 1.09), PSAS (7.13 vs 0.16), and ISI (4.56 vs 0.06) from baseline-to-post compared to SM. Post hoc analyses revealed that each intervention was superior to SM on each of the patient-reported measures, but no significant differences were found when comparing MBSR to MBTI from baseline-to-post. From baseline to 6-month follow-up, MBTI had greater reductions in ISI scores than MBSR (P < 0.05), with the largest difference occurring at the 3-month follow-up. Remission and response rates in MBTI and MBSR were sustained from post-treatment through follow-up, with MBTI showing the highest rates of treatment remission (50%) and response (78.6%) at the 6-month follow-up. Conclusions: Mindfulness meditation appears to be a viable treatment option for adults with chronic insomnia and could provide an alternative to traditional treatments for insomnia. Trial Registration: Mindfulness-Based Approaches to Insomnia: clinicaltrials.gov, identifier: NCT00768781 Citation: Ong JC, Manber R, Segal Z, Xia Y

  9. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of ZMapp for Ebola Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Data from studies in nonhuman primates suggest that the triple monoclonal antibody cocktail ZMapp is a promising immune-based treatment for Ebola virus disease (EVD). METHODS Beginning in March 2015, we conducted a randomized, controlled trial of ZMapp plus the current standard of care as compared with the current standard of care alone in patients with EVD that was diagnosed in West Africa by polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assay. Eligible patients of any age were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either the current standard of care or the current standard of care plus three intravenous infusions of ZMapp (50 mg per kilogram of body weight, administered every third day). Patients were stratified according to baseline PCR cycle-threshold value for the virus (≤22 vs. >22) and country of enrollment. Oral favipiravir was part of the current standard of care in Guinea. The primary end point was mortality at 28 days. RESULTS A total of 72 patients were enrolled at sites in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, and the United States. Of the 71 patients who could be evaluated, 21 died, representing an overall case fatality rate of 30%. Death occurred in 13 of 35 patients (37%) who received the current standard of care alone and in 8 of 36 patients (22%) who received the current standard of care plus ZMapp. The observed posterior probability that ZMapp plus the current standard of care was superior to the current standard of care alone was 91.2%, falling short of the prespecified threshold of 97.5%. Frequentist analyses yielded similar results (absolute difference in mortality with ZMapp, −15 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, −36 to 7). Baseline viral load was strongly predictive of both mortality and duration of hospitalization in all age groups. CONCLUSIONS In this randomized, controlled trial of a putative therapeutic agent for EVD, although the estimated effect of ZMapp appeared to be beneficial, the result did not meet the prespecified

  10. Mixing Methods in Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs): Validation, Contextualization, Triangulation, and Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spillane, James P.; Pareja, Amber Stitziel; Dorner, Lisa; Barnes, Carol; May, Henry; Huff, Jason; Camburn, Eric

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we described how we mixed research approaches in a Randomized Control Trial (RCT) of a school principal professional development program. Using examples from our study we illustrate how combining qualitative and quantitative data can address some key challenges from validating instruments and measures of mediator variables to…

  11. Myopia Control with Bifocal Contact Lenses: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Aller, Thomas A; Liu, Maria; Wildsoet, Christine F

    2016-04-01

    Most studies have reported only minimal reductions in myopia progression with bifocal or progressive multifocal spectacles, although somewhat larger, although mostly still clinically insignificant, effects have been reported in children with nearpoint esophoria and/or accommodative dysfunctions. The CONTROL study was a 1-year, prospective, randomized, clinical trial of bifocal contact lenses for control of myopia in children with eso fixation disparities at near. Eighty-six myopic subjects, aged 8 to 18 years, were enrolled in the study after passing the screening examination. Of these, 79 completed lens assignment and 78 completed the study. The mean refractive error of these 79 subjects was -2.69 ± 1.40D (SD), and all had progressed by -0.50D or more since their last examination. All subjects also had eso fixation disparity at near. Subjects were randomly assigned to wear either Vistakon Acuvue 2 (single-vision soft contact lenses [SVSCLs]) or Vistakon Acuvue Bifocal (bifocal soft contact lenses [BFSCLs]). Bifocal adds were selected to neutralize the associated phoria. Treatment outcomes included cycloplegic autorefraction and axial length, assessed in terms of changes after 6 and 12 months of treatment from pretreatment baseline values. The BFSCLs significantly slowed myopia progression, with statistically significant differences between the treatment groups after 6 months. After 12 months of treatment, the SVSCL group had progressed by -0.79 ± 0.43D compared with -0.22 ± 0.34D for the BFSCL group (cycloplegic objective spherical equivalent, average of two eyes). Corresponding axial length changes were 0.24 ± 0.17 mm and 0.05 ± 0.14 mm, respectively. All of these differences were found to be statistically significant (unpaired t-tests, p < 0.001). The distance center bifocal contact lenses tested in this study achieved greater control over myopia progression and axial elongation (>70%) compared with most published results with multifocal spectacles. Further

  12. Usual and Unusual Care: Existing Practice Control Groups In Randomized Controlled Trials of Behavioral Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Freedland, Kenneth E.; Mohr, David C.; Davidson, Karina W.; Schwartz, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the use of existing practice control groups in randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions, and the role of extrinsic healthcare services in the design and conduct of behavioral trials. Method Selective qualitative review. Results Extrinsic healthcare services, also known as nonstudy care, have important but under-recognized effects on the design and conduct of behavioral trials. Usual care, treatment as usual, standard of care, and other existing practice control groups pose a variety of methodological and ethical challenges, but they play a vital role in behavioral intervention research. Conclusion This review highlights the need for a scientific consensus statement on control groups in behavioral trials. PMID:21536837

  13. Usual and unusual care: existing practice control groups in randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions.

    PubMed

    Freedland, Kenneth E; Mohr, David C; Davidson, Karina W; Schwartz, Joseph E

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the use of existing practice control groups in randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions and the role of extrinsic health care services in the design and conduct of behavioral trials. Selective qualitative review. Extrinsic health care services, also known as nonstudy care, have important but under-recognized effects on the design and conduct of behavioral trials. Usual care, treatment-as-usual, standard of care, and other existing practice control groups pose a variety of methodological and ethical challenges, but they play a vital role in behavioral intervention research. This review highlights the need for a scientific consensus statement on control groups in behavioral trials.

  14. Experiment-Based Teaching in Advanced Control Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Precup, R.-E.; Preitl, S.; Radac, M.-B.; Petriu, E. M.; Dragos, C.-A.; Tar, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses an experiment-based approach to teaching an advanced control engineering syllabus involving controlled plant analysis and modeling, control structures and algorithms, real-time laboratory experiments, and their assessment. These experiments are structured around the representative case of the longitudinal slip control of an…

  15. Randomized controlled trial of patient navigation for newly diagnosed cancer patients: effects on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Hendren, Samantha; Griggs, Jennifer J; Epstein, Ronald; Humiston, Sharon; Jean-Pierre, Pascal; Winters, Paul; Sanders, Mechelle; Loader, Starlene; Fiscella, Kevin

    2012-10-01

    Patient navigation is a promising intervention to ameliorate cancer health disparities. This study objective was to measure patient navigation effects on cancer-specific quality of life (QOL) among patients with newly diagnosed cancer. A randomized controlled trial of patient navigation was conducted in Rochester, NY. Patients with breast cancer and colorectal cancer were randomly assigned to receive a patient navigation intervention or usual care. QOL was measured at baseline and four subsequent time points, using the validated Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT-B, FACT-C) instruments. Among 319 randomized patients (165 patient navigation, 154 control), median age was 57 years and 32.5% were from minority race/ethnicity groups. Patient navigation and control groups were comparable on baseline factors, except home ownership versus renting (more home ownership among controls, P = 0.05) and race (more whites among controls, P = 0.05). Total and subscale FACT scores did not differ between groups when analyzed as a change from baseline to 3 months, or at various time points. The emotional well-being subscale change from baseline approached significance (better change among patient navigation group, P = 0.05). Time trends of QOL measures did not differ significantly between groups. Adjustment for baseline patient factors did not reveal a benefit of patient navigation on QOL. In this randomized trial of patient navigation, there was no statistically significant effect on disease-specific QOL. These results suggest that patient navigation may not affect QOL during cancer treatment, that social/medical support are adequate in this study's setting, or that the trial failed to target patients likely to experience QOL benefit from patient navigation. 2012 AACR

  16. Pupil dilation using a pledget sponge: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Austin; Srinivasan, Sathish; Harun, Shabbir; Watts, Mark

    2006-08-01

    To show that a pledget soaked in mydriatics and placed in the lower conjunctival fornix is as effective as drops in providing mydriasis for cataract surgery. A randomized, masked, controlled trial of 56 patients assigned to either a pledget group (n=25) or a control eye drops group (n=31) was carried out. Controls had the routine practice of repeated topical mydriatic drops: tropicamide, phenylepherine and atropine. The trial group had a 3-mm pledget trimmed, soaked in mydriatics and placed in the inferior fornix for 20 min. Pupil diameter was measured using a photographic technique with a standard scale shown in each picture. Two masked observers measured the pupils using the scale of the ruler in the developed photograph. All patients completed a 0-10 stinging score prior to surgery. There were no complications. The mean pupil diameter in the control group was 7.23 (6.91-7.94 95% confidence intervals [CI]) and 7.44 (6.96-7.92 95% CI) in the pledget group. There was no statistically significant difference in pupil diameter between the two groups: difference between means 0.21 (-0.32 to 0.75 95% CI) and Student's t-test of the difference between means (t=0.8 and two-tailed) probability P=0.43. There was no significant difference in the stinging scores: Mann-Whitney test P=0.69. The use of a pledget cellulose sponge to deliver mydriatics prior to cataract surgery is as effective as the conventional method of repeated drop administration and was not associated with any adverse effects.

  17. Behavioral neurocardiac training in hypertension: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Robert P; Floras, John S; Harvey, Paula J; Kamath, Markad V; Picton, Peter E; Chessex, Caroline; Hiscock, Natalie; Powell, Jonathan; Catt, Michael; Hendrickx, Hilde; Talbot, Duncan; Chen, Maggie H

    2010-04-01

    It is not established whether behavioral interventions add benefit to pharmacological therapy for hypertension. We hypothesized that behavioral neurocardiac training (BNT) with heart rate variability biofeedback would reduce blood pressure further by modifying vagal heart rate modulation during reactivity and recovery from standardized cognitive tasks ("mental stress"). This randomized, controlled trial enrolled 65 patients with uncomplicated hypertension to BNT or active control (autogenic relaxation), with six 1-hour sessions over 2 months with home practice. Outcomes were analyzed with linear mixed models that adjusted for antihypertensive drugs. BNT reduced daytime and 24-hour systolic blood pressures (-2.4+/-0.9 mm Hg, P=0.009, and -2.1+/-0.9 mm Hg, P=0.03, respectively) and pulse pressures (-1.7+/-0.6 mm Hg, P=0.004, and -1.4+/-0.6 mm Hg, P=0.02, respectively). No effect was observed for controls (P>0.10 for all indices). BNT also increased RR-high-frequency power (0.15 to 0.40 Hz; P=0.01) and RR interval (P<0.001) during cognitive tasks. Among controls, high-frequency power was unchanged (P=0.29), and RR interval decreased (P=0.03). Neither intervention altered spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (P>0.10). In contrast to relaxation therapy, BNT with heart rate variability biofeedback modestly lowers ambulatory blood pressure during wakefulness, and it augments tonic vagal heart rate modulation. It is unknown whether efficacy of this treatment can be improved with biofeedback of baroreflex gain. BNT, alone or as an adjunct to drug therapy, may represent a promising new intervention for hypertension.

  18. A randomized controlled trial of interim methadone maintenance.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Robert P; Highfield, David A; Jaffe, Jerome H; Brady, Joseph V; Butler, Carol B; Rouse, Charles O; Callaman, Jason M; O'Grady, Kevin E; Battjes, Robert J

    2006-01-01

    Effective alternatives to long waiting lists for entry into methadone hydrochloride maintenance treatment are needed to reduce the complications of continuing heroin dependence and to increase methadone treatment entry. To compare the effectiveness of interim methadone maintenance with that of the usual waiting list condition in facilitating methadone treatment entry and reducing heroin and cocaine use and criminal behavior. Randomized, controlled, clinical trial using 2 conditions, with treatment assignment on a 3:2 basis to interim maintenance-waiting list control. A methadone treatment program in Baltimore. A total of 319 individuals meeting the criteria for current heroin dependence and methadone maintenance treatment. Participants were randomly assigned to either interim methadone maintenance, consisting of an individually determined methadone dose and emergency counseling only for up to 120 days, or referral to community-based methadone treatment programs. Entry into comprehensive methadone maintenance therapy at 4 months from baseline; self-reported days of heroin use, cocaine use, and criminal behavior; and number of urine drug test results positive for heroin and cocaine at the follow-up interview conducted at time of entry into comprehensive methadone treatment (or at 4 months from baseline for participants who did not enter regular treatment). Significantly more participants assigned to the interim methadone maintenance condition entered comprehensive methadone maintenance treatment by the 120th day from baseline (75.9%) than those assigned to the waiting list control condition (20.8%) (P<.001). Overall, in the past 30 days at follow-up, interim participants reported significantly fewer days of heroin use (P<.001), had a significant reduction in heroin-positive drug test results (P<.001), reported spending less money on drugs (P<.001), and received less illegal income (P<.02) than the waiting list participants. Interim methadone maintenance results in a

  19. Randomized controlled trial of a dose consolidation program.

    PubMed

    Delate, Thomas; Fairman, Kathleen A; Carey, Shelly M; Motheral, Brenda R

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and financial impact of a drug dose consolidation (optimization) program using letter intervention. This pilot program in a large, mid-Atlantic health plan utilized a randomized controlled trial research design. A review of adjudicated pharmacy claims records was performed monthly for 3 consecutive months from November 2002 through February 2003 to identify inefficient (i.e., >once-daily) regimens for any one of 68 dosage strengths of 37 single-source maintenance drugs with once-daily dosing recommendations. Prescribers who had prescribed one or more inefficient regimens were identified and randomized to one of the 2 intervention arms or a control arm. Prescribers in both intervention arms were sent personalized letters with information on their patients. inefficient regimens and suggested dose consolidation options. Patients of prescribers in one intervention arm received a complementary, patient-oriented letter. Pharmacy claims for patients in all arms were examined at 180 days after the date of the letter mailing for conversion to an efficient (once-daily) regimen. Financial modeling analysis calculated net savings as changes in pharmacy expenditures minus administrative costs. A total of 2,614 inefficient regimens, representing 6.7% of claims for the targeted medications, were identified. The rate of consolidation to a suggested dosing option was lower for the Physician Letter arm (7.3%) than for the Physician/Member Letter arm (10.2%) (P = 0.046). Both intervention arms had higher consolidation rates than the Control arm (3.9%) (P = 0.018 and P = 0.000, respectively.). Approximately 30% of the regimens in each study arm were never refilled after being targeted. Financial modeling indicated that a dose consolidation intervention could save 0.03 dollars to 0.07 dollars per member per month (PMPM) in 2003 dollars with full medication compliance but only 0.02 dollars to 0.03 dollars PMPM when savings were calculated with realistic

  20. Reducing medical service utilization by encouraging vaccines: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Berg, Gregory D; Thomas, Eileen; Silverstein, Steven; Neel, Cheryl L; Mireles, Matthew

    2004-11-01

    Vaccination against influenza is associated with reductions in hospitalizations for heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, pneumonia, or influenza, and the risk of death from all causes during the influenza season. Randomized controlled trial. All members enrolled in the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association's Government Wide Service Benefit Program in the states of Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Kentucky, California, Arizona, Utah, and Colorado in October 2002. The sample size was 339,220 members. Two identical influenza/pneumonia direct mail marketing pieces that encouraged members to receive influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations. The study period was October 15, 2002 through March 15, 2003 when most influenza cases occur. Data were collected in July 2003 and analyzed during August 2003. Administrative claims based on influenza/pneumonia inpatient admissions and emergency department (ED) visits. The intervention group experienced a 2.62% (p=0.010) higher rate of influenza vaccinations; 4.61% (p=0.080) higher rate of pneumonia vaccinations; 9.67% (p=0.136) lower rate of influenza/pneumonia inpatient admissions; and 22.64% (p=0.002) lower rate of influenza/pneumonia ED visits compared to the control group. The benefit-cost ratio (return on investment) from this intervention was estimated to be US dollar 2.21 per dollar spent. Administrative claims data suggest that members respond to health plan mailings with an increase in influenza vaccination rates. Health plans can cost-effectively impact medical service utilization and vaccination rates by mailing information to their members.

  1. Rural providers' access to online resources: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Laura J.; McElfresh, Karen R.; Warner, Teddy D.; Stromberg, Tiffany L.; Trost, Jaren; Jelinek, Devin A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The research determined the usage and satisfaction levels with one of two point-of-care (PoC) resources among health care providers in a rural state. Methods In this randomized controlled trial, twenty-eight health care providers in rural areas were stratified by occupation and region, then randomized into either the DynaMed or the AccessMedicine study arm. Study participants were physicians, physician assistants, and nurses. A pre- and post-study survey measured participants' attitudes toward different information resources and their information-seeking activities. Medical student investigators provided training and technical support for participants. Data analyses consisted of analysis of variance (ANOVA), paired t tests, and Cohen's d statistic to compare pre- and post-study effects sizes. Results Participants in both the DynaMed and the AccessMedicine arms of the study reported increased satisfaction with their respective PoC resource, as expected. Participants in both arms also reported that they saved time in finding needed information. At baseline, both arms reported too little information available, which increased to “about right amounts of information” at the completion of the study. DynaMed users reported a Cohen's d increase of +1.50 compared to AccessMedicine users' reported use of 0.82. DynaMed users reported d2 satisfaction increases of 9.48 versus AccessMedicine satisfaction increases of 0.59 using a Cohen's d. Conclusion Participants in the DynaMed arm of the study used this clinically oriented PoC more heavily than the users of the textbook-based AccessMedicine. In terms of user satisfaction, DynaMed users reported higher levels of satisfaction than the users of AccessMedicine. PMID:26807050

  2. A randomized controlled trial of mindfulness meditation for chronic insomnia.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jason C; Manber, Rachel; Segal, Zindel; Xia, Yinglin; Shapiro, Shauna; Wyatt, James K

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of mindfulness meditation for the treatment of chronic insomnia. Three-arm, single-site, randomized controlled trial. Academic medical center. Fifty-four adults with chronic insomnia. Participants were randomized to either mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), mindfulness-based therapy for insomnia (MBTI), or an eight-week self-monitoring (SM) condition. Patient-reported outcome measures were total wake time (TWT) from sleep diaries, the pre-sleep arousal scale (PSAS), measuring a prominent waking correlate of insomnia, and the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) to determine remission and response as clinical endpoints. Objective sleep measures were derived from laboratory polysomnography and wrist actigraphy. Linear mixed models showed that those receiving a meditation-based intervention (MBSR or MBTI) had significantly greater reductions on TWT minutes (43.75 vs 1.09), PSAS (7.13 vs 0.16), and ISI (4.56 vs 0.06) from baseline-to-post compared to SM. Post hoc analyses revealed that each intervention was superior to SM on each of the patient-reported measures, but no significant differences were found when comparing MBSR to MBTI from baseline-to-post. From baseline to 6-month follow-up, MBTI had greater reductions in ISI scores than MBSR (P < 0.05), with the largest difference occurring at the 3-month follow-up. Remission and response rates in MBTI and MBSR were sustained from post-treatment through follow-up, with MBTI showing the highest rates of treatment remission (50%) and response (78.6%) at the 6-month follow-up. Mindfulness meditation appears to be a viable treatment option for adults with chronic insomnia and could provide an alternative to traditional treatments for insomnia. Mindfulness-Based Approaches to Insomnia: clinicaltrials.gov, identifier: NCT00768781. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  3. Methodological review: quality of randomized controlled trials in health literacy.

    PubMed

    Brainard, Julii; Wilsher, Stephanie Howard; Salter, Charlotte; Loke, Yoon Kong

    2016-07-11

    The growing move towards patient-centred care has led to substantial research into improving the health literacy skills of patients and members of the public. Hence, there is a pressing need to assess the methodology used in contemporary randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions directed at health literacy, in particular the quality (risk of bias), and the types of outcomes reported. We conducted a systematic database search for RCTs involving interventions directed at health literacy in adults, published from 2009 to 2014. The Cochrane Risk of Bias tool was used to assess quality of RCT implementation. We also checked the sample size calculation for primary outcomes. Reported evidence of efficacy (statistical significance) was extracted for intervention outcomes in any of three domains of effect: knowledge, behaviour, health status. Demographics of intervention participants were also extracted, including socioeconomic status. We found areas of methodological strength (good randomization and allocation concealment), but areas of weakness regarding blinding of participants, people delivering the intervention and outcomes assessors. Substantial attrition (losses by monitoring time point) was seen in a third of RCTs, potentially leading to insufficient power to obtain precise estimates of intervention effect on primary outcomes. Most RCTs showed that the health literacy interventions had some beneficial effect on knowledge outcomes, but this was typically for less than 3 months after intervention end. There were far fewer reports of significant improvements in substantive patient-oriented outcomes, such as beneficial effects on behavioural change or health (clinical) status. Most RCTs featured participants from vulnerable populations. Our evaluation shows that health literacy trial design, conduct and reporting could be considerably improved, particularly by reducing attrition and obtaining longer follow-up. More meaningful RCTs would also result if health

  4. Dextrose prolotherapy for knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rabago, David; Patterson, Jeffrey J; Mundt, Marlon; Kijowski, Richard; Grettie, Jessica; Segal, Neil A; Zgierska, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a common, debilitating chronic disease. Prolotherapy is an injection therapy for chronic musculoskeletal pain. We conducted a 3-arm, blinded (injector, assessor, injection group participants), randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of prolotherapy for knee osteoarthritis. Ninety adults with at least 3 months of painful knee osteoarthritis were randomized to blinded injection (dextrose prolotherapy or saline) or at-home exercise. Extra- and intra-articular injections were done at 1, 5, and 9 weeks with as-needed additional treatments at weeks 13 and 17. Exercise participants received an exercise manual and in-person instruction. Outcome measures included a composite score on the Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC; 100 points); knee pain scale (KPS; individual knee), post-procedure opioid medication use, and participant satisfaction. Intention-to-treat analysis using analysis of variance was used. No baseline differences existed between groups. All groups reported improved composite WOMAC scores compared with baseline status (P <.01) at 52 weeks. Adjusted for sex, age, and body mass index, WOMAC scores for patients receiving dextrose prolotherapy improved more (P <.05) at 52 weeks than did scores for patients receiving saline and exercise (score change: 15.3 ± 3.5 vs 7.6 ± 3.4, and 8.2 ± 3.3 points, respectively) and exceeded the WOMAC-based minimal clinically important difference. Individual knee pain scores also improved more in the prolotherapy group (P = .05). Use of prescribed postprocedure opioid medication resulted in rapid diminution of injection-related pain. Satisfaction with prolotherapy was high. There were no adverse events. Prolotherapy resulted in clinically meaningful sustained improvement of pain, function, and stiffness scores for knee osteoarthritis compared with blinded saline injections and at-home exercises.

  5. A randomized controlled trial to assess the pain associated with the debond of orthodontic fixed appliances

    PubMed Central

    Mangnall, Louise A R; Dietrich, Thomas; Scholey, John M

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine patient experience of pain during treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances, expectations of pain during debond and whether biting on a soft acrylic wafer during debond decreases pain experience. Design: Multicentre randomized controlled trial. Setting: Three UK hospital based orthodontic departments: Mid-Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham Dental Hospital and University Hospital of North Staffordshire. Materials and methods: Ninety patients were randomly allocated to either the control (n = 45) or wafer group (n = 45). A visual analogue scale-based questionnaire was completed pre-debond to determine pain experience during treatment and expectations of pain during debond. The appliances were debonded and those in the wafer group bit on a soft acrylic wafer. A second questionnaire was completed post-debond to assess the pain experienced. Results: Biting on an acrylic wafer significantly reduced the pain experienced when debonding the posterior teeth (P≤0·05). Thirty-nine per cent found the lower anterior teeth the most painful. The expected pain was significantly greater than that actually experienced (P≤0·0001). Greater pain during treatment correlated with increased expectations and increased actually experienced pain (P≤0·0001). Conclusions: Biting on a soft acrylic wafer during debond of the posterior teeth reduces the pain experienced. The lower anterior teeth are the most painful. The pain expected is significantly greater than actually experienced. Patients who had greater pain during treatment expected and experienced greater pain at debond. PMID:24009318

  6. Content-specificity in verbal recall: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Zirk-Sadowski, Jan; Szucs, Denes; Holmes, Joni

    2013-01-01

    In this controlled experiment we examined whether there are content effects in verbal short-term memory and working memory for verbal stimuli. Thirty-seven participants completed forward and backward digit and letter recall tasks, which were constructed to control for distance effects between stimuli. A maximum-likelihood mixed-effects logistic regression revealed main effects of direction of recall (forward vs backward) and content (digits vs letters). There was an interaction between type of recall and content, in which the recall of digits was superior to the recall of letters in verbal short-term memory but not in verbal working memory. These results demonstrate that the recall of information from verbal short-term memory is content-specific, whilst the recall of information from verbal working memory is content-general.

  7. Treatment of periodontal disease during pregnancy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Newnham, John P; Newnham, Ian A; Ball, Colleen M; Wright, Michelle; Pennell, Craig E; Swain, Jonathan; Doherty, Dorota A

    2009-12-01

    To investigate whether treating periodontal disease prevents preterm birth and other major complications of pregnancy. This single-center trial was conducted across six obstetric sites in metropolitan Perth, Western Australia. Pregnant women identified by history to be at risk (n=3,737) were examined for periodontal disease. Approximately 1,000 women with periodontal disease were allocated at random to receive periodontal treatment commencing around 20 weeks of gestation (n=542) or 6 weeks after the pregnancy was completed (controls; n=540). The treatment included mechanical removal of oral biofilms together with oral hygiene instruction and motivation at a minimum of three weekly visits, with further visits if required. There were no differences between the control and treatment groups in preterm birth (9.3% compared with 9.7%, odds ratio [OR] 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI 0.7-1.58], P=.81), birth weight (3,450 compared with 3,410 g, P=.12), preeclampsia (4.1% compared with 3.4%, OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.44-1.56, P=.55), or other obstetric endpoints. There were four unexplained stillbirths in the control group and no pregnancy losses in the treated group (P=.12). Measures of fetal and neonatal well-being were similar in the two groups, including abnormalities in fetal heart rate recordings (P=.26), umbilical artery flow studies (P=.96), and umbilical artery blood gas values (P=.37). The periodontal treatment was highly successful in improving health of the gums (P<.01). The evidence provided by the present study does not support the hypothesis that treatment of periodontal disease during pregnancy in this population prevents preterm birth, fetal growth restriction, or preeclampsia. Periodontal treatment was not hazardous to the women or their pregnancies. ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00133926. I.

  8. Acupuncture in Menopause (AIM) study: a pragmatic, randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Avis, Nancy E; Coeytaux, Remy R; Isom, Scott; Prevette, Kristen; Morgan, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the short and long-term effects of acupuncture on vasomotor symptoms (VMS) and quality of life-related measures. A total of 209 perimenopausal and postmenopausal women aged 45 to 60 years, experiencing four or more VMS per day, were recruited from the community and randomized to receive up to 20 acupuncture treatments within the first 6 months (acupuncture group) or the second 6 months (waitlist control group) of the 12-month study period. The primary outcome was mean daily frequency of VMS. Secondary outcomes were VMS interference with daily life, sleep quality, depressive symptoms, somatic and other symptoms, anxiety, and quality of life. The VMS frequency declined by 36.7% at 6 months in the acupuncture group and increased by 6.0% in the control group (P < 0.001 for between-group comparison). At 12 months, the reduction from baseline in the acupuncture group was 29.4% (P < 0.001 for within-group comparison from baseline to 12 months), suggesting that the reduction was largely maintained after treatment. Statistically significant clinical improvement was observed after three acupuncture treatments, and maximal clinical effects occurred after a median of eight treatments. Persistent improvements were seen in many quality of life-related outcomes in the acupuncture group relative to the control group. We found that a course of acupuncture treatments was associated with significant reduction in VMS, and several quality-of-life measures, compared with no acupuncture, and that clinical benefit persisted for at least 6 months beyond the end of treatment.

  9. Challenges in randomized controlled trials and emerging multiple sclerosis therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Huang, DeRen

    2015-12-01

    The remarkable global development of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) specific for multiple sclerosis (MS) has significantly reduced the frequency of relapse, slowed the progression of disability, and improved the quality of life in patients with MS. With increasing numbers of approved DMTs, neurologists in North America and Europe are able to present multiple treatment options to their patients to achieve a better therapeutic outcome, and in many cases, no evidence of disease activity. MS patients have improved accessibility to various DMTs at no or minimal out-of-pocket cost. The ethical guidelines defined by the Edinburgh revision of the Declaration of Helsinki strongly discourage the use of placebo control groups in modern MS clinical trials. The use of an active comparator control group increases the number of participants in each group that is essential to achieve statistical significance, thus further increasing the difficulty of completing randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for the development of new MS therapies. There is evidence of a high prevalence of MS and a large number of patients in Asia. The belief of the existence of Asian types of MS that are distinct from Western types, and regulatory policies are among the reasons why DMTs are limited in most Asian countries. Lack of access to approved DMTs provides a good opportunity for clinical trials that are designed for the development of new MS therapies. Recently, data from RCTs have demonstrated excellent recruitment of participants and the completion of multi-nation and single-nation MS trials within this region. Recent studies using the McDonald MS diagnostic criteria carefully excluded patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and NMO spectrum disorder, and demonstrated that patients with MS in Asia have clinical characteristics and treatment responses similar to those in Western countries.

  10. Trace element supplementation in hemodialysis patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, Marcello; Wiebe, Natasha; Thompson, Stephanie; Kinniburgh, David; Klarenbach, Scott W; Walsh, Michael; Bello, Aminu K; Faruque, Labib; Field, Catherine; Manns, Braden J; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2015-04-11

    People with kidney failure are often deficient in zinc and selenium, but little is known about the optimal way to correct such deficiency. We did a double-blind randomized trial evaluating the effects of zinc (Zn), selenium (Se) and vitamin E added to the standard oral renal vitamin supplement (B and C vitamins) among hemodialysis patients in Alberta, Canada. We evaluated the effect of two daily doses of the new supplement (medium dose: 50 mg Zn, 75 mcg Se, 250 IU vitamin E; low dose: 25 mg Zn, 50 mcg Se, 250 IU vitamin E) compared to the standard supplement on blood concentrations of Se and Zn at 90 days (primary outcome) and 180 days (secondary outcome) as well as safety outcomes. We enrolled 150 participants. The proportion of participants with low zinc status (blood level <815 ug/L) did not differ between the control group and the two intervention groups at 90 days (control 23.9% vs combined intervention groups 23.9%, P > 0.99) or 180 days (18.6% vs 28.2%, P = 0.24). The proportion with low selenium status (blood level <121 ug/L) was similar for controls and the combined intervention groups at 90 days (32.6 vs 19.6%, P = 0.09) and 180 days (34.9% vs 23.5%, P = 0.17). There were no significant differences in the risk of adverse events between the groups. Supplementation with low or medium doses of zinc and selenium did not correct low zinc or selenium status in hemodialysis patients. Future studies should consider higher doses of zinc (≥75 mg/d) and selenium (≥100 mcg/d) with the standard supplement. Registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01473914).

  11. A Randomized Controlled Study of Neurofeedback for Chronic PTSD

    PubMed Central

    van der Kolk, Bessel A.; Hodgdon, Hilary; Gapen, Mark; Musicaro, Regina; Suvak, Michael K.; Hamlin, Ed; Spinazzola, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Brain/Computer Interaction (BCI) devices are designed to alter neural signals and, thereby, mental activity. This study was a randomized, waitlist (TAU) controlled trial of a BCI, EEG neurofeedback training (NF), in patients with chronic PTSD to explore the capacity of NF to reduce PTSD symptoms and increase affect regulation capacities. Study Design 52 individuals with chronic PTSD were randomized to either NF (n = 28) or waitlist (WL) (n = 24). They completed four evaluations, at baseline (T1), after week 6 (T2), at post-treatment (T3), and at one month follow up (T4). Assessment measures were:1. Traumatic Events Screening Inventory (T1); 2. the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS; T1, T3, T4); 3. the Davidson Trauma Scale (DTS; T1-T4) and 4. the Inventory of Altered Self-Capacities (IASC; T1-T4). NF training occurred two times per week for 12 weeks and involved a sequential placement with T4 as the active site, P4 as the reference site. Results Participants had experienced an average of 9.29 (SD = 2.90) different traumatic events. Post-treatment a significantly smaller proportion of NF (6/22, 27.3%) met criteria for PTSD than the WL condition (15/22, 68.2%), χ2 (n = 44, df = 1) = 7.38, p = .007. There was a significant treatment condition x time interaction (b = -10.45, t = -5.10, p< .001). Measures of tension reduction activities, affect dysregulation, and affect instability exhibited a significant Time x Condition interaction. The effect sizes of NF (d = -2.33 within, d = - 1.71 between groups) are comparable to those reported for the most effective evidence based treatments for PTSD. Discussion Compared with the control group NF produced significant PTSD symptom improvement in individuals with chronic PTSD, as well as in affect regulation capacities. NF deserves further investigation for its potential to ameliorate PTSD and to improve affect regulation, and to clarify its mechanisms of action. PMID:27992435

  12. The effects of learning about one's own genetic susceptibility to alcoholism: a randomized experiment.

    PubMed

    Dar-Nimrod, Ilan; Zuckerman, Miron; Duberstein, Paul R

    2013-02-01

    Increased accessibility of direct-to-consumer personalized genetic reports raises the question: how are people affected by information about their own genetic predispositions? Participants were led to believe that they had entered a study on the genetics of alcoholism and sleep disorders. Participants provided a saliva sample purportedly to be tested for the presence of relevant genes. While awaiting the results, they completed a questionnaire assessing their emotional state. They subsequently received a bogus report about their genetic susceptibility and completed a questionnaire about their emotional state and items assessing perceived control over drinking, relevant future drinking-related intentions, and intervention-related motivation and behavior. Participants who were led to believe that they had a gene associated with alcoholism showed an increase in negative affect, decrease in positive affect, and reduced perceived personal control over drinking. Reported intentions for alcohol consumption in the near future were not affected; however, individuals were more likely to enroll in a "responsible drinking" workshop after learning of their alleged genetic susceptibility. The first complete randomized experiment to examine the psychological and behavioral effects of receiving personalized genetic susceptibility information indicates some potential perils and benefits of direct-to-consumer genetic tests.

  13. Plain packaging of cigarettes and smoking behavior: study protocol for a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Olivia M; Leonards, Ute; Attwood, Angela S; Bauld, Linda; Hogarth, Lee; Munafò, Marcus R

    2014-06-25

    Previous research on the effects of plain packaging has largely relied on self-report measures. Here we describe the protocol of a randomized controlled trial investigating the effect of the plain packaging of cigarettes on smoking behavior in a real-world setting. In a parallel group randomization design, 128 daily cigarette smokers (50% male, 50% female) will attend an initial screening session and be assigned plain or branded packs of cigarettes to smoke for a full day. Plain packs will be those currently used in Australia where plain packaging has been introduced, while branded packs will be those currently used in the United Kingdom. Our primary study outcomes will be smoking behavior (self-reported number of cigarettes smoked and volume of smoke inhaled per cigarette as measured using a smoking topography device). Secondary outcomes measured pre- and post-intervention will be smoking urges, motivation to quit smoking, and perceived taste of the cigarettes. Secondary outcomes measured post-intervention only will be experience of smoking from the cigarette pack, overall experience of smoking, attributes of the cigarette pack, perceptions of the on-packet health warnings, behavior changes, views on plain packaging, and the rewarding value of smoking. Sex differences will be explored for all analyses. This study is novel in its approach to assessing the impact of plain packaging on actual smoking behavior. This research will help inform policymakers about the effectiveness of plain packaging as a tobacco control measure. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN52982308 (registered 27 June 2013).

  14. Meditation for migraines: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wells, Rebecca Erwin; Burch, Rebecca; Paulsen, Randall H; Wayne, Peter M; Houle, Timothy T; Loder, Elizabeth

    2014-10-01

    Our objective was to assess the safety, feasibility, and effects of the standardized 8-week mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) course in adults with migraines. Stress is a well-known trigger for headaches. Research supports the general benefits of mind/body interventions for migraines, but there are few rigorous studies supporting the use of specific standardized interventions. MBSR is a standardized 8-week mind/body intervention that teaches mindfulness meditation/yoga. Preliminary research has shown MBSR to be effective for chronic pain syndromes, but it has not been evaluated for migraines. We conducted a randomized controlled trial with 19 episodic migraineurs randomized to either MBSR (n = 10) or usual care (n = 9). Our primary outcome was change in migraine frequency from baseline to initial follow-up. Secondary outcomes included change in headache severity, duration, self-efficacy, perceived stress, migraine-related disability/impact, anxiety, depression, mindfulness, and quality of life from baseline to initial follow-up. MBSR was safe (no adverse events), with 0% dropout and excellent adherence (daily meditation average: 34 ± 11 minutes, range 16-50 minutes/day). Median class attendance from 9 classes (including retreat day) was 8 (range [3, 9]); average class attendance was 6.7 ± 2.5. MBSR participants had 1.4 fewer migraines/month (MBSR: 3.5 to 1.0 vs control: 1.2 to 0 migraines/month, 95% confidence interval CI [-4.6, 1.8], P = .38), an effect that did not reach statistical significance in this pilot sample. Headaches were less severe, although not significantly so (-1.3 points/headache on 0-10 scale, [-2.3, 0.09], P = .053) and shorter (-2.9 hours/headache, [-4.6, -0.02], P = .043) vs control. Migraine Disability Assessment and Headache Impact Test-6 dropped in MBSR vs control (-12.6, [-22.0, -1.0], P = .017 and -4.8, [-11.0, -1.0], P = .043, respectively). Self-efficacy and mindfulness improved in MBSR vs control (13.2 [1.0, 30.0], P

  15. Rigorous control conditions diminish treatment effects in weight loss randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, John A.; Kaiser, Kathryn A.; Affuso, Olivia; Cutter, Gary R.; Allison, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Background It has not been established whether control conditions with large weight losses (WLs) diminish expected treatment effects in WL or prevention of weight gain (PWG) randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Subjects/Methods We performed a meta-analysis of 239 WL/PWG RCTs that include a control group and at least one treatment group. A maximum likelihood meta-analysis framework is used in order to model and understand the relationship between treatment effects and control group outcomes. Results Under the informed model, an increase in control group WL of one kilogram corresponds with an expected shrinkage of the treatment effect by 0.309 kg [95% CI (−0.480, −0.138), p = 0.00081]; this result is robust against violations of the model assumptions. Conclusions We find that control conditions with large weight losses diminish expected treatment effects. Our investigation may be helpful to clinicians as they design future WL/PWG studies. PMID:26449419

  16. Placebo Effects and the Common Cold: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Bruce; Brown, Roger; Rakel, Dave; Rabago, David; Marchand, Lucille; Scheder, Jo; Mundt, Marlon; Thomas, Gay; Barlow, Shari

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE We wanted to determine whether the severity and duration of illness caused by the common cold are influenced by randomized assignment to open-label pills, compared with conventional double-blind allocation to active and placebo pills, compared with no pills at all. METHODS We undertook a randomized controlled trial among a population with new-onset common cold. Study participants were allocated to 4 parallel groups: (1) those receiving no pills, (2) those blinded to placebo, (3) those blinded to echinacea, and (4) those given open-label echinacea. Primary outcomes were illness duration and area-under-the-curve global severity. Secondary outcomes included neutrophil count and interleukin 8 levels from nasal wash at intake and 2 days later. RESULTS Of 719 randomized study participants, 2 were lost and 4 exited early. Participants were 64% female, 88% white, and aged 12 to 80 years. Mean illness duration for each group was 7.03 days for those in the no-pill group, 6.87 days for those blinded to placebo, 6.34 days for those blinded to echinacea, and 6.76 days for those in the open-label echinacea group. Mean global severity scores for the 4 groups were no pills, 286; blinded to placebo, 264; blinded to echinacea, 236; and open-label echinacea, 258. Between-group differences were not statistically significant. Comparing the no-pill with blinded to placebo groups, differences (95% confidence interval [CI]) were −0.16 days (95% CI, −0.90 to 0.58 days) for illness duration and −22 severity points (95% CI, −70 to 26 points) for global severity. Comparing the group blinded to echinacea with the open-label echinacea group, differences were 0.42 days (95% CI, −0.28 to 1.12 days) and 22 severity points (95% CI, −19 to 63 points). Median change in interleukin 8 concentration and neutrophil cell count, respectively by group, were 30 pg/mL and 1 cell for the no-pill group, 39 pg/mL and 1 cell for the group binded to placebo, 58 pg/mL and 2 cells for the group

  17. Multicenter, randomized, controlled trial of virtual-reality simulator training in acquisition of competency in colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jonathan; Cohen, Seth A; Vora, Kinjal C; Xue, Xiaonan; Burdick, J Steven; Bank, Simmy; Bini, Edmund J; Bodenheimer, Henry; Cerulli, Maurice; Gerdes, Hans; Greenwald, David; Gress, Frank; Grosman, Irwin; Hawes, Robert; Mullin, Gerard; Mullen, Gerard; Schnoll-Sussman, Felice; Starpoli, Anthony; Stevens, Peter; Tenner, Scott; Villanueva, Gerald

    2006-09-01

    The GI Mentor is a virtual reality simulator that uses force feedback technology to create a realistic training experience. To define the benefit of training on the GI Mentor on competency acquisition in colonoscopy. Randomized, controlled, blinded, multicenter trial. Academic medical centers with accredited gastroenterology training programs. First-year GI fellows. Subjects were randomized to receive 10 hours of unsupervised training on the GI Mentor or no simulator experience during the first 8 weeks of fellowship. After this period, both groups began performing real colonoscopies. The first 200 colonoscopies performed by each fellow were graded by proctors to measure technical and cognitive success, and patient comfort level during the procedure. A mixed-effects model comparison between the 2 groups of objective and subjective competency scores and patient discomfort in the performance of real colonoscopies over time. Forty-five fellows were randomized from 16 hospitals over 2 years. Fellows in the simulator group had significantly higher objective competency rates during the first 100 cases. A mixed-effects model demonstrated a higher objective competence overall in the simulator group (P < .0001), with the difference between groups being significantly greater during the first 80 cases performed. The median number of cases needed to reach 90% competency was 160 in both groups. The patient comfort level was similar. Fellows who underwent GI Mentor training performed significantly better during the early phase of real colonoscopy training.

  18. Enhanced Attitude Control Experiment for SSTI Lewis Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peoman G.

    1997-01-01

    The enhanced attitude control system experiment is a technology demonstration experiment on the NASA's small spacecraft technology initiative program's Lewis spacecraft to evaluate advanced attitude control strategies. The purpose of the enhanced attitude control system experiment is to evaluate the feasibility of designing and implementing robust multi-input/multi-output attitude control strategies for enhanced pointing performance of spacecraft to improve the quality of the measurements of the science instruments. Different control design strategies based on modern and robust control theories are being considered for the enhanced attitude control system experiment. This paper describes the experiment as well as the design and synthesis of a mixed H(sub 2)/H(sub infinity) controller for attitude control. The control synthesis uses a nonlinear programming technique to tune the controller parameters and impose robustness and performance constraints. Simulations are carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed attitude control design strategy. Introduction

  19. Cognitive rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hanssen, K T; Beiske, A G; Landrø, N I; Hofoss, D; Hessen, E

    2016-01-01

    The evidence base in cognitive rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis (MS) is still sparse. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of cognitive rehabilitation on cognitive and executive coping, psychological well-being and psychological aspects of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with MS. One hundred and twenty patients with cognitive complaints, taking part in a 4-week multidisciplinary rehabilitation, were randomized to an intervention group (n = 60) and a control group (n = 60). Both groups underwent neuropsychological assessment with subsequent feedback and took part in general multidisciplinary MS rehabilitation. Additionally, the intervention group participated in cognitive group sessions as well as individual sessions. The main focus was to formulate Goal Attainment Scaling goals for coping with cognitive challenges. For 3 months past rehabilitation, the intervention group received biweekly telephone follow-up, focusing on goal attainment. Executive functioning improved significantly from baseline to four and 7 months in both groups. Improvements in psychological well-being and psychological aspects of HRQoL occurred only in the intervention group. Multicomponent cognitive rehabilitation administered within the context of multidisciplinary rehabilitation can improve psychological well-being and psychological aspects of HRQoL. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Randomized controlled trial of ionization and photoelectric smoke alarm functionality.

    PubMed

    Mueller, B A; Sidman, E A; Alter, H; Perkins, R; Grossman, D C

    2008-04-01

    To compare functionality, reasons for non-function, and nuisance alarm levels of two common types of smoke alarms after installation in low- to mid-level income households in King County, Washington. Randomized controlled trial of 761 households. An ionization or photoelectric smoke alarm was installed between June 1, 2000 and July 31, 2002. Main outcome measures were: percentage of study alarms that were working, observed reasons for non-functional status, and self-reported frequency of nuisance alarms at 9 and 15 months of follow-up. At 9 months after installation, 20% of ionization, vs 5% of photoelectric alarms were non-functional, a difference that persisted at 15 months, with the most common reasons for both types being a disconnected or absent battery. The risk ratio for ionization, relative to photoelectric alarms, being non-functional or removed was 2.7 (95% CI 1.8 to 4.1) at 15 months of follow-up. These findings were not altered by educational level, or the presence of smokers, children <5 years, or adults > or =65 years. Burn prevention efforts are geared towards increasing smoke alarm ownership and improving maintenance of functional status. Results suggest that the selective use of photoelectric alarms by fire injury prevention programs or consumers may provide longer-term protection in similar populations. Designing smoke alarms that minimize nuisance alarming may also result in longer term functionality.

  1. Prenatal emotion management improves obstetric outcomes: a randomized control study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Li, He-Jiang; Wang, Jue; Mao, Hong-Jing; Jiang, Wen-Ying; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Shu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Negative emotions can cause a number of prenatal problems and disturb obstetric outcomes. We determined the effectiveness of prenatal emotional management on obstetric outcomes in nulliparas. Methods: All participants completed the PHQ-9 at the baseline assessment. Then, the participants were randomly assigned to the emotional management (EM) and usual care (UC) groups. The baseline evaluation began at 31 weeks gestation and the participants were followed up to 42 days postpartum. Each subject in the EM group received an extra EM program while the participants in the UC groups received routine prenatal care and education only. The PHQ-9 and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scale (EPDS) were used for assessment. Results: The EM group had a lower PHQ-9 score at 36 weeks gestation, and 7 and 42 days after delivery (P < 0.01), and a lower EPDS score 42 days postpartum (P < 0.05). The rate of cesarean section in the EM group was lower than the UC group (P < 0.01), and the cesarean section rate without a medical indication was lower (P < 0.01). The duration of the second stage of labor in the EM group was shorter than the UC group (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Prenatal EM intervention could control anxiety and depressive feelings in nulliparas, and improve obstetric outcomes. It may serve as an innovative approach to reduce the cesarean section rate in China. PMID:26309641

  2. Prenatal docosahexaenoic acid supplementation and infant morbidity: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Imhoff-Kunsch, Beth; Stein, Aryeh D; Martorell, Reynaldo; Parra-Cabrera, Socorro; Romieu, Isabelle; Ramakrishnan, Usha

    2011-09-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) influence immune function and inflammation; however, the influence of maternal DHA supplementation on infant morbidity is unknown. We investigated the effects of prenatal DHA supplementation on infant morbidity. In a double-blind randomized controlled trial conducted in Mexico, pregnant women received daily supplementation with 400 mg of DHA or placebo from 18 to 22 weeks' gestation through parturition. In infants aged 1, 3, and 6 months, caregivers reported the occurrence of common illness symptoms in the preceding 15 days. Data were available at 1, 3, and 6 months for 849, 834, and 834 infants, respectively. The occurrence of specific illness symptoms did not differ between groups; however, the occurrence of a combined measure of cold symptoms was lower in the DHA group at 1 month (OR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.58-1.00). At 1 month, the DHA group experienced 26%, 15%, and 30% shorter duration of cough, phlegm, and wheezing, respectively, but 22% longer duration of rash (all P ≤ .01). At 3 months, infants in the DHA group spent 14% less time ill (P < .0001). At 6 months, infants in the DHA group experienced 20%, 13%, 54%, 23%, and 25% shorter duration of fever, nasal secretion, difficulty breathing, rash, and "other illness," respectively, but 74% longer duration of vomiting (all P < .05). DHA supplementation during pregnancy decreased the occurrence of colds in children at 1 month and influenced illness symptom duration at 1, 3, and 6 months.

  3. Psychosocial benefits of workplace physical exercise: cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Markus D; Sundstrup, Emil; Brandt, Mikkel; Andersen, Lars L

    2017-10-10

    While benefits of workplace physical exercise on physical health is well known, little is known about the psychosocial effects of such initiatives. This study evaluates the effect of workplace versus home-based physical exercise on psychosocial factors among healthcare workers. A total of 200 female healthcare workers (Age: 42.0, BMI: 24.1) from 18 departments at three hospitals were cluster-randomized to 10 weeks of: 1) home-based physical exercise (HOME) performed alone during leisure time for 10 min 5 days per week or 2) workplace physical exercise (WORK) performed in groups during working hours for 10 min 5 days per week and up to 5 group-based coaching sessions on motivation for regular physical exercise. Vitality and mental health (SF-36, scale 0-100), psychosocial work environment (COPSOQ, scale 0-100), work- and leisure disability (DASH, 0-100), control- (Bournemouth, scale 0-10) and concern about pain (Pain Catastrophizing Scale, scale 0-10) were assessed at baseline and at 10-week follow-up. Vitality as well as control and concern about pain improved more following WORK than HOME (all p < 0.05) in spite of increased work pace (p < 0.05). Work- and leisure disability, emotional demands, influence at work, sense of community, social support and mental health remained unchanged. Between-group differences at follow-up (WORK vs. HOME) were 7 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 3 to 10] for vitality, -0.8 [95% CI -1.3 to -0.3] for control of pain and -0.9 [95% CI -1.4 to -0.5] for concern about pain, respectively. Performing physical exercise together with colleagues during working hours was more effective than home-based exercise in improving vitality and concern and control of pain among healthcare workers. These benefits occurred in spite of increased work pace. NCT01921764 at ClinicalTrials.gov . Registered 10 August 2013.

  4. Aerobic exercise for Alzheimer's disease: A randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Van Sciver, Angela; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Honea, Robyn A.; Brooks, William M.; Billinger, Sandra A.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Burns, Jeffrey M.

    2017-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in the role of physical exercise as a therapeutic strategy for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We assessed the effect of 26 weeks (6 months) of a supervised aerobic exercise program on memory, executive function, functional ability and depression in early AD. Methods and findings This study was a 26-week randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of 150 minutes per week of aerobic exercise vs. non-aerobic stretching and toning control intervention in individuals with early AD. A total of 76 well-characterized older adults with probable AD (mean age 72.9 [7.7]) were enrolled and 68 participants completed the study. Exercise was conducted with supervision and monitoring by trained exercise specialists. Neuropsychological tests and surveys were conducted at baseline,13, and 26 weeks to assess memory and executive function composite scores, functional ability (Disability Assessment for Dementia), and depressive symptoms (Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia). Cardiorespiratory fitness testing and brain MRI was performed at baseline and 26 weeks. Aerobic exercise was associated with a modest gain in functional ability (Disability Assessment for Dementia) compared to individuals in the ST group (X2 = 8.2, p = 0.02). There was no clear effect of intervention on other primary outcome measures of Memory, Executive Function, or depressive symptoms. However, secondary analyses revealed that change in cardiorespiratory fitness was positively correlated with change in memory performance and bilateral hippocampal volume. Conclusions Aerobic exercise in early AD is associated with benefits in functional ability. Exercise-related gains in cardiorespiratory fitness were associated with improved memory performance and reduced hippocampal atrophy, suggesting cardiorespiratory fitness gains may be important in driving brain benefits. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01128361 PMID:28187125

  5. Aerobic exercise for Alzheimer's disease: A randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jill K; Vidoni, Eric D; Johnson, David K; Van Sciver, Angela; Mahnken, Jonathan D; Honea, Robyn A; Wilkins, Heather M; Brooks, William M; Billinger, Sandra A; Swerdlow, Russell H; Burns, Jeffrey M

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the role of physical exercise as a therapeutic strategy for individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We assessed the effect of 26 weeks (6 months) of a supervised aerobic exercise program on memory, executive function, functional ability and depression in early AD. This study was a 26-week randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of 150 minutes per week of aerobic exercise vs. non-aerobic stretching and toning control intervention in individuals with early AD. A total of 76 well-characterized older adults with probable AD (mean age 72.9 [7.7]) were enrolled and 68 participants completed the study. Exercise was conducted with supervision and monitoring by trained exercise specialists. Neuropsychological tests and surveys were conducted at baseline,13, and 26 weeks to assess memory and executive function composite scores, functional ability (Disability Assessment for Dementia), and depressive symptoms (Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia). Cardiorespiratory fitness testing and brain MRI was performed at baseline and 26 weeks. Aerobic exercise was associated with a modest gain in functional ability (Disability Assessment for Dementia) compared to individuals in the ST group (X2 = 8.2, p = 0.02). There was no clear effect of intervention on other primary outcome measures of Memory, Executive Function, or depressive symptoms. However, secondary analyses revealed that change in cardiorespiratory fitness was positively correlated with change in memory performance and bilateral hippocampal volume. Aerobic exercise in early AD is associated with benefits in functional ability. Exercise-related gains in cardiorespiratory fitness were associated with improved memory performance and reduced hippocampal atrophy, suggesting cardiorespiratory fitness gains may be important in driving brain benefits. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01128361.

  6. Parent Mentors and Insuring Uninsured Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hua; Walker, Candy; Lee, Michael; Currie, Janet M.; Allgeyer, Rick; Fierro, Marco; Henry, Monica; Portillo, Alberto; Massey, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Six million US children are uninsured, despite two-thirds being eligible for Medicaid/Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and minority children are at especially high risk. The most effective way to insure uninsured children, however, is unclear. METHODS: We conducted a randomized trial of the effects of parent mentors (PMs) on insuring uninsured minority children. PMs were experienced parents with ≥1 Medicaid/CHIP-covered child who received 2 days of training, then assisted families for 1 year with insurance applications, retaining coverage, medical homes, and social needs; controls received traditional Medicaid/CHIP outreach. The primary outcome was obtaining insurance 1 year post-enrollment. RESULTS: We enrolled 237 participants (114 controls; 123 in PM group). PMs were more effective (P< .05 for all comparisons) than traditional methods in insuring children (95% vs 68%), and achieving faster coverage (median = 62 vs 140 days), high parental satisfaction (84% vs 62%), and coverage renewal (85% vs 60%). PM children were less likely to have no primary care provider (15% vs 39%), problems getting specialty care (11% vs 46%), unmet preventive (4% vs 22%) or dental (18% vs 31%) care needs, dissatisfaction with doctors (6% vs 16%), and needed additional income for medical expenses (6% vs 13%). Two years post-PM cessation, more PM children were insured (100% vs 76%). PMs cost $53.05 per child per month, but saved $6045.22 per child insured per year. CONCLUSIONS: PMs are more effective than traditional Medicaid/CHIP methods in insuring uninsured minority children, improving health care access, and achieving parental satisfaction, but are inexpensive and highly cost-effective. PMID:27244706

  7. Modifying media content for preschool children: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Christakis, Dimitri A; Garrison, Michelle M; Herrenkohl, Todd; Haggerty, Kevin; Rivara, Frederick P; Zhou, Chuan; Liekweg, Kimberly

    2013-03-01

    Although previous studies have revealed that preschool-aged children imitate both aggression and prosocial behaviors on screen, there have been few population-based studies designed to reduce aggression in preschool-aged children by modifying what they watch. We devised a media diet intervention wherein parents were assisted in substituting high quality prosocial and educational programming for aggression-laden programming without trying to reduce total screen time. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of 565 parents of preschool-aged children ages 3 to 5 years recruited from community pediatric practices. Outcomes were derived from the Social Competence and Behavior Evaluation at 6 and 12 months. At 6 months, the overall mean Social Competence and Behavior Evaluation score was 2.11 points better (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.78-3.44) in the intervention group as compared with the controls, and similar effects were observed for the externalizing subscale (0.68 [95% CI: 0.06-1.30]) and the social competence subscale (1.04 [95% CI: 0.34-1.74]). The effect for the internalizing subscale was in a positive direction but was not statistically significant (0.42 [95% CI: -0.14 to 0.99]). Although the effect sizes did not noticeably decay at 12 months, the effect on the externalizing subscale was no longer statistically significant (P = .05). In a stratified analysis of the effect on the overall scores, low-income boys appeared to derive the greatest benefit (6.48 [95% CI: 1.60-11.37]). An intervention to reduce exposure to screen violence and increase exposure to prosocial programming can positively impact child behavior.

  8. Hospital-Level Care at Home for Acutely Ill Adults: a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Levine, David M; Ouchi, Kei; Blanchfield, Bonnie; Diamond, Keren; Licurse, Adam; Pu, Charles T; Schnipper, Jeffrey L

    2018-05-01

    Hospitals are standard of care for acute illness, but hospitals can be unsafe, uncomfortable, and expensive. Providing substitutive hospital-level care in a patient's home potentially reduces cost while maintaining or improving quality, safety, and patient experience, although evidence from randomized controlled trials in the US is lacking. Determine if home hospital care reduces cost while maintaining quality, safety, and patient experience. Randomized controlled trial. Adults admitted via the emergency department with any infection or exacerbation of heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or asthma. Home hospital care, including nurse and physician home visits, intravenous medications, continuous monitoring, video communication, and point-of-care testing. Primary outcome was direct cost of the acute care episode. Secondary outcomes included utilization, 30-day cost, physical activity, and patient experience. Nine patients were randomized to home, 11 to usual care. Median direct cost of the acute care episode for home patients was 52% (IQR, 28%; p = 0.05) lower than for control patients. During the care episode, home patients had fewer laboratory orders (median per admission: 6 vs. 19; p < 0.01) and less often received consultations (0% vs. 27%; p = 0.04). Home patients were more physically active (median minutes, 209 vs. 78; p < 0.01), with a trend toward more sleep. No adverse events occurred in home patients, one occurred in control patients. Median direct cost for the acute care plus 30-day post-discharge period for home patients was 67% (IQR, 77%; p < 0.01) lower, with trends toward less use of home-care services (22% vs. 55%; p = 0.08) and fewer readmissions (11% vs. 36%; p = 0.32). Patient experience was similar in both groups. The use of substitutive home-hospitalization compared to in-hospital usual care reduced cost and utilization and improved physical activity. No significant differences in quality, safety

  9. A Comprehensive Lifestyle Randomized Clinical Trial: Design and Initial Patient Experience.

    PubMed

    Arun, Banu; Austin, Taylor; Babiera, Gildy V; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Carmack, Cindy L; Chaoul, Alejandro; Cohen, Lorenzo; Connelly, Lisa; Haddad, Robin; Harrison, Carol; Li, Yisheng; Mallaiah, Smitha; Nagarathna, Raghuram; Parker, Patricia A; Perkins, George H; Reuben, James M; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Spelman, Amy; Sood, Anil; Yang, Peiying; Yeung, Sai-Ching J

    2017-03-01

    Although epidemiological research demonstrates that there is an association between lifestyle factors and risk of breast cancer recurrence, progression of disease, and mortality, no comprehensive lifestyle change clinical trials have been conducted to determine if changing multiple risk factors leads to changes in biobehavioral processes and clinical outcomes in women with breast cancer. This article describes the design, feasibility, adherence to the intervention and data collection, and patient experience of a comprehensive lifestyle change clinical trial (CompLife). CompLife is a randomized, controlled trial of a multiple-behavior intervention focusing on diet, exercise, and mind-body practice along with behavioral counseling to support change. The initial exposure to the intervention takes place during the 4 to 6 weeks of radiotherapy (XRT) for women with stage III breast cancer and then across the subsequent 12 months. The intervention group will have 42 hours of in-person lifestyle counseling during XRT (7-10 hours a week) followed by up to 30 hours of counseling via video connection for the subsequent 12 months (weekly sessions for 6 months and then monthly for 6 months). The primary outcome is disease-free survival. Multiple secondary outcomes are being evaluated, including: (1) biological pathways; (2) overall survival; (3) patient-reported outcomes; (4) dietary patterns/fitness levels, anthropometrics, and body composition; and (5) economic outcomes. Qualitative data of the patient experience in the trial is collected from exit interviews, concluding remarks, direct email correspondences, and web postings from patients. Fifty-five patients have been recruited and randomized to the trial to date. Accrual of eligible patients is high (72%) and dropout rates extremely low (5%). Attendance to the in-person sessions is high (95% attending greater than 80% of sessions) as well as to the 30 hours of video counseling (88% attending more than 70% of sessions

  10. A brief randomized controlled intervention targeting parents improves grades during middle school.

    PubMed

    Destin, Mesmin; Svoboda, Ryan C

    2017-04-01

    Despite a growing number of brief, psychosocial interventions that improve academic achievement, little research investigates how to leverage parents during such efforts. We designed and tested a randomized controlled intervention targeting parents to influence important discussions about the future and responses to academic difficulty experienced by their adolescent during eighth grade in the United States. We recruited experienced parents to convey the main messages of the intervention in a parent panel format. As expected, current parents who were randomly assigned to observe the parent panel subsequently planned to talk with their adolescents sooner about future opportunities and to respond more positively to experiences of academic difficulty than parents who were randomly assigned to a control group. The intervention also led to a significant increase in student grades, which was mediated by parents' responses to academic difficulty. We suggest an increase in experimental research that utilizes parents to influence student achievement. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Randomized controlled trial of atorvastatin in clinically isolated syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Waubant, E.; Pelletier, D.; Mass, M.; Cohen, J.A.; Kita, M.; Cross, A.; Bar-Or, A.; Vollmer, T.; Racke, M.; Stüve, O.; Schwid, S.; Goodman, A.; Kachuck, N.; Preiningerova, J.; Weinstock-Guttman, B.; Calabresi, P.A.; Miller, A.; Mokhtarani, M.; Iklé, D.; Murphy, S.; Kopetskie, H.; Ding, L.; Rosenberg, E.; Spencer, C.; Zamvil, S.S.; Waubant, E.; Pelletier, D.; Mass, M.; Bourdette, D.; Egan, R.; Cohen, J.; Stone, L.; Kita, M.; Elliott, M.; Cross, A.; Parks, B.J.; Bar-Or, A.; Vollmer, T.; Campagnolo, D.; Racke, M.; Stüve, O.; Frohman, E.; Schwid, S.; Goodman, A.; Segal, B.; Kachuck, N.; Weiner, L.; Preiningerova, J.; Carrithers, M.; Weinstock-Guttman, B.; Calabresi, P.; Kerr, D.; Miller, A.; Lublin, F.; Sayre, Peter; Hayes, Deborah; Rosenberg, Ellen; Gao, Wendy; Ding, Linna; Adah, Steven; Mokhtarani, Masoud; Neuenburg, Jutta; Bromstead, Carolyn; Olinger, Lynn; Mullen, Blair; Jamison, Ross; Speth, Kelly; Saljooqi, Kerensa; Phan, Peter; Phippard, Deborah; Seyfert-Margolis, Vicki; Bourcier, Katarzyna; Debnam, Tracia; Romaine, Jennifer; Wolin, Stephanie; O'Dale, Brittany; Iklé, David; Murphy, Stacey; Kopetskie, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To test efficacy and safety of atorvastatin in subjects with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS). Methods: Subjects with CIS were enrolled in a phase II, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 14-center randomized trial testing 80 mg atorvastatin on clinical and brain MRI activity. Brain MRIs were performed quarterly. The primary endpoint (PEP) was development of ≥3 new T2 lesions, or one clinical relapse within 12 months. Subjects meeting the PEP were offered additional weekly interferon β-1a (IFNβ-1a). Results: Due to slow recruitment, enrollment was discontinued after 81 of 152 planned subjects with CIS were randomized and initiated study drug. Median (interquartile range) numbers of T2 and gadolinium-enhancing (Gd) lesions were 15.0 (22.0) and 0.0 (0.0) at baseline. A total of 53.1% of atorvastatin recipients (n = 26/49) met PEP compared to 56.3% of placebo recipients (n = 18/32) (p = 0.82). Eleven atorvastatin subjects (22.4%) and 7 placebo subjects (21.9%) met the PEP by clinical criteria. Proportion of subjects who did not develop new T2 lesions up to month 12 or to starting IFNβ-1a was 55.3% in the atorvastatin and 27.6% in the placebo group (p = 0.03). Likelihood of remaining free of new T2 lesions was significantly greater in the atorvastatin group compared with placebo (odds ratio [OR] = 4.34, p = 0.01). Likelihood of remaining free of Gd lesions tended to be higher in the atorvastatin group (OR = 2.72, p = 0.11). Overall, atorvastatin was well tolerated. No clear antagonistic effect of atorvastatin plus IFNβ-1a was observed on MRI measures. Conclusion: Atorvastatin treatment significantly decreased development of new brain MRI T2 lesion activity, although it did not achieve the composite clinical and imaging PEP. Classification of Evidence: This study provided Class II evidence that atorvastatin did not reduce the proportion of patients with CIS meeting imaging and clinical criteria for starting immunomodulating therapy after 12 months

  12. The effect of financial incentives on chlamydia testing rates: evidence from a randomized experiment.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Paul; Rudisill, Caroline

    2014-03-01

    Financial incentives have been used in a variety of settings to motivate behaviors that might not otherwise be undertaken. They have been highlighted as particularly useful in settings that require a single behavior, such as appointment attendance or vaccination. They also have differential effects based on socioeconomic status in some applications (e.g. smoking). To further investigate these claims, we tested the effect of providing different types of non-cash financial incentives on the return rates of chlamydia specimen samples amongst 16-24 year-olds in England. In 2011 and 2012, we ran a two-stage randomized experiment involving 2988 young people (1489 in Round 1 and 1499 in Round 2) who requested a chlamydia screening kit from Freetest.me, an online and text screening service run by Preventx Limited. Participants were randomized to control, or one of five types of financial incentives in Round 1 or one of four financial incentives in Round 2. We tested the effect of five types of incentives on specimen sample return; reward vouchers of differing values, charity donation, participation in a lottery, choices between a lottery and a voucher and including vouchers of differing values in the test kit prior to specimen return. Financial incentives of any type, did not make a significant difference in the likelihood of specimen return. The more deprived individuals were, as calculated using Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD), the less likely they were to return a sample. The extent to which incentive structures influenced sample return was not moderated by IMD score. Non-cash financial incentives for chlamydia testing do not seem to affect the specimen return rate in a chlamydia screening program where test kits are requested online, mailed to requestors and returned by mail. They also do not appear more or less effective in influencing test return depending on deprivation level. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. The Impact of Classroom Physical Activity Breaks on Middle School Students' Health-Related Fitness: An Xbox One Kinetic Delivered 4-Week Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yli-Piipari, S.; Layne, T.; McCollins, T.; Knox, T.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effect of a 4-week classroom physical activity break intervention on middle school students' health-related physical fitness. The study was a randomized controlled trial with students assigned to the experiment and control conditions. A convenience sample comprised 94 adolescents (experiment group n = 52;…

  14. A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Group-Based Modified Story Memory Technique in TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0726 TITLE: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Group -Based Modified Story Memory Technique in TBI PRINCIPAL...2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Group -Based Modified Story Memory Technique in TBI 5b. GRANT...forthcoming, The current study addresses this need through a double blind, placebo- controlled , randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a group

  15. Feedback on oral presentations during pediatric clerkships: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sox, Colin M; Dell, Michael; Phillipi, Carrie A; Cabral, Howard J; Vargas, Gabriela; Lewin, Linda O

    2014-11-01

    To measure the effects of participating in structured oral presentation evaluation sessions early in pediatric clerkships on students' subsequent presentations. We conducted a single-blind, 3-arm, cluster randomized controlled trial during pediatric clerkships at Boston University School of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Blocks of students at each school were randomly assigned to experience either (1) no formal presentation feedback (control) or a small-group presentation feedback session early in pediatric clerkships in which students gave live presentations and received feedback from faculty who rated their presentations by using a (2) single-item (simple) or (3) 18-item (detailed) evaluation form. At the clerkship end, overall quality of subjects' presentations was rated by faculty blinded to randomization status, and subjects reported whether their presentations had improved. Analyses included multivariable linear and logistic regressions clustered on clerkship block that controlled for medical school. A total of 476 participants were evenly divided into the 3 arms, which had similar characteristics. Compared with controls, presentation quality was significantly associated with participating in detailed (coefficient: 0.38; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.07-0.69) but not simple (coefficient: 0.16; 95% CI: -0.12-0.43) feedback sessions. Similarly, student self-report of presentation improvement was significantly associated with participating in detailed (odds ratio: 2.16; 95% CI: 1.11-4.18] but not simple (odds ratio: 1.89; 95% CI: 0.91-3.93) feedback sessions. Small-group presentation feedback sessions led by faculty using a detailed evaluation form resulted in clerkship students delivering oral presentations of higher quality compared with controls. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Fundamental movement skills in preschoolers: a randomized controlled trial targeting object control proficiency.

    PubMed

    Donath, L; Faude, O; Hagmann, S; Roth, R; Zahner, L

    2015-11-01

    Adequately developed fundamental movement skills, particularly object control dimensions, are considered essential to learn more complex movement patterns and to increase the likelihood to successfully participate in organized and non-organized sports during later years. Thus, the present randomized controlled trial aimed at improving object control dimensions at an early state in a kindergarten setting. Catching, throwing, kicking, rolling and stationary dribbling were assessed via gross motor development 2 (TGMD-2) testing in 41 normally developed preschoolers. On a cluster-randomized basis [strata: age, sex and body mass index (BMI)], three kindergartens were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n = 22, INT, age: 4.6 ± 1.0 years; BMI: 16.2 ± 1.1 kg/m(2) ) and three to a control group (n = 19, CON: age: 4.5 ± 1.2 years; BMI: 16.8 ± 1.2 kg/m(2) ). Twelve structured training sessions were given within 6 weeks (12 sessions). The total training volume was 330 min. Moderate time × group interaction were observed for the total sum score (Δ+22%, P = 0.05) and dribbling (Δ+41%, P = 0.002). Adjusting for baseline differences analyses of covariance did not affect these results. Interestingly, likely to most likely practically worthwhile effects were detected for the total sum score, catching and dribbling. Object control dimensions such as dribbling and catching that apparently rely on rhythmical movement patterns and anticipatory eye-hand coordination seem to benefit from short-term object control training. These skills are considered important for successful team-sport participation and appropriate sportive motor development. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Efficacy of popliteal block in postoperative pain control after ankle fracture fixation: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Rachel Y; Montero, Nicole; Jain, Sudheer K; Egol, Kenneth A; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2012-10-01

    To compare postoperative pain control in patients treated surgically for ankle fractures who receive popliteal blocks with those who received general anesthesia alone. Institutional Review Board approved prospective randomized study. Metropolitan tertiary-care referral center. All patients being treated with open reduction internal fixation for ankle fractures who met inclusion criteria and consented to participate were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive either general anesthesia (GETA) or intravenous sedation and popliteal block. Patients were assessed for duration of procedure, total time in the operating room, and postoperative pain at 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 hours after surgery using a visual analog scale. Fifty-one patients agreed to participate in the study. Twenty-five patients received popliteal block, while 26 patients received GETA. There were no anesthesia-related complications. At 2, 4, and 8 hours postoperatively, patients who underwent GETA demonstrated significantly higher pain. At 12 hours, there was no significant difference between the 2 groups with regard to pain control. However, by 24 hours, those who had received popliteal blocks had significantly higher pain with no difference by 48 hours. Popliteal block provides equivalent postoperative pain control to general anesthesia alone in patients undergoing operative fixation of ankle fractures. However, patients who receive popliteal blocks do experience a significant increase in pain between 12 and 24 hours. Recognition of this "rebound pain" with early narcotic administration may allow patients to have more effective postoperative pain control.

  18. Does gratitude writing improve the mental health of psychotherapy clients? Evidence from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wong, Y Joel; Owen, Jesse; Gabana, Nicole T; Brown, Joshua W; McInnis, Sydney; Toth, Paul; Gilman, Lynn

    2018-03-01

    Although the past decade has witnessed growing research interest in positive psychological interventions (PPIs), their potential as adjunctive interventions for psychotherapy remains relatively unexplored. Therefore, this article expands the frontiers of PPI research by reporting the first randomized controlled trial to test a gratitude writing adjunctive intervention for psychotherapy clients. Participants were 293 adults seeking university-based psychotherapy services. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: (a) control (psychotherapy only), (b) a psychotherapy plus expressive writing, and (c) a psychotherapy plus gratitude writing. Participants in the gratitude condition wrote letters expressing gratitude to others, whereas those in the expressive writing condition wrote about their deepest thoughts and feelings about stressful experiences. About 4 weeks as well as 12 weeks after the conclusion of the writing intervention, participants in the gratitude condition reported significantly better mental health than those in the expressive and control conditions, whereas those in the expressive and control conditions did not differ significantly. Moreover, lower proportions of negative emotion words in participants' writing mediated the positive effect of condition (gratitude versus expressive writing) on mental health. These findings are discussed in light of the use of gratitude interventions as adjunctive interventions for psychotherapy clients.

  19. Can Propensity Score Analysis Approximate Randomized Experiments Using Pretest and Demographic Information in Pre-K Intervention Research?

    PubMed

    Dong, Nianbo; Lipsey, Mark W

    2017-01-01

    It is unclear whether propensity score analysis (PSA) based on pretest and demographic covariates will meet the ignorability assumption for replicating the results of randomized experiments. This study applies within-study comparisons to assess whether pre-Kindergarten (pre-K) treatment effects on achievement outcomes estimated using PSA based on a pretest and demographic covariates can approximate those found in a randomized experiment. Data-Four studies with samples of pre-K children each provided data on two math achievement outcome measures with baseline pretests and child demographic variables that included race, gender, age, language spoken at home, and mother's highest education. Research Design and Data Analysis-A randomized study of a pre-K math curriculum provided benchmark estimates of effects on achievement measures. Comparison samples from other pre-K studies were then substituted for the original randomized control and the effects were reestimated using PSA. The correspondence was evaluated using multiple criteria. The effect estimates using PSA were in the same direction as the benchmark estimates, had similar but not identical statistical significance, and did not differ from the benchmarks at statistically significant levels. However, the magnitude of the effect sizes differed and displayed both absolute and relative bias larger than required to show statistical equivalence with formal tests, but those results were not definitive because of the limited statistical power. We conclude that treatment effect estimates based on a single pretest and demographic covariates in PSA correspond to those from a randomized experiment on the most general criteria for equivalence.

  20. Motivational Interviewing May Improve Exercise Experience for People with Multiple Sclerosis: A Small Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Douglas C.; Lanesskog, Deirdre; Cleeland, Leah; Motl, Robert; Weikert, Madeline; Dlugonski, Deirdre

    2012-01-01

    People with multiple sclerosis (MS) are likely to benefit from regular exercise, but physical inactivity is more common among people with MS than among the general population. This small randomized study evaluated whether motivational interviewing (MI) affects adherence to and personal experience in an exercise program. Inactive people with MS…

  1. The Effect of Teacher-Family Communication on Student Engagement: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Matthew A.; Dougherty, Shaun M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate the efficacy of teacher communication with parents and students as a means of increasing student engagement. We estimate the causal effect of teacher communication by conducting a randomized field experiment in which sixth- and ninth-grade students were assigned to receive a daily phone call home and a text/written…

  2. An Examination of the Benefits, Limitations, and Challenges of Conducting Randomized Experiments with Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camburn, Eric M.; Goldring, Ellen; Sebastian, James; May, Henry; Huff, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The past decade has seen considerable debate about how to best evaluate the efficacy of educational improvement initiatives, and members of the educational leadership research community have entered the debate with great energy. Throughout this debate, the use of randomized experiments has been a particularly contentious subject. This…

  3. Economic Intervention and Parenting: A Randomized Experiment of Statewide Child Development Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nam, Yunju; Wikoff, Nora; Sherraden, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We examine the effects of Child Development Accounts (CDAs) on parenting stress and practices. Methods: We use data from the SEED for Oklahoma Kids (SEED OK) experiment. SEED OK selected caregivers of infants from Oklahoma birth certificates using a probability sampling method, randomly assigned caregivers to the treatment (n = 1,132)…

  4. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Developmental Mathematics by Embedding a Randomized Experiment within a Regression Discontinuity Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Brian G.; Yeaton, William H.; Lloyd, Jane E.

    2014-01-01

    Using a novel design approach, a randomized experiment (RE) was embedded within a regression discontinuity (RD) design (R-RE-D) to evaluate the impact of developmental mathematics at a large midwestern college ("n" = 2,122). Within a region of uncertainty near the cut-score, estimates of benefit from a prospective RE were closely…

  5. Improving Learning in Primary Schools of Developing Countries: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    I gathered 77 randomized experiments (with 111 treatment arms) that evaluated the effects of school-based interventions on learning in developing-country primary schools. On average, monetary grants and deworming treatments had mean effect sizes that were close to zero and not statistically significant. Nutritional treatments, treatments that…

  6. The Effects of Student Coaching: An Evaluation of a Randomized Experiment in Student Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bettinger, Eric P.; Baker, Rachel B.

    2014-01-01

    College graduation rates often lag behind college attendance rates. One theory as to why students do not complete college is that they lack key information about how to be successful or fail to act on the information that they have. We present evidence from a randomized experiment which tests the effectiveness of individualized student coaching.…

  7. Effects of a Summer Mathematics Intervention for Low-Income Children: A Randomized Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Kathleen; Kim, James S.

    2017-01-01

    Prior research suggests that summer learning loss among low-income children contributes to income-based gaps in achievement and educational attainment. We present results from a randomized experiment of a summer mathematics program conducted in a large, high-poverty urban public school district. Children in the third to ninth grade (N = 263) were…

  8. Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Evelim L F D; Carvalho, Celso R F; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Teixeira-Carvalho, Etiene Farah; Mendonça, Juliana Fernandes Barreto; Stirbulov, Roberto; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma. A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20) or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16). Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO), maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol) and lung function. No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p < 0.05). Although the mean energy expenditure at rest and during exercise training was similar for both groups, the maximum energy expenditure was higher in the VGG. The present findings strongly suggest that aerobic training promoted by an active video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvement in their exercise capacity and a reduction in pulmonary inflammation. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294.

  9. Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Evelim L. F. D.; Carvalho, Celso R. F.; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Teixeira-Carvalho, Etiene Farah; Mendonça, Juliana Fernandes Barreto; Stirbulov, Roberto; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma. Design A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20) or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16). Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO), maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol) and lung function. Results No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p < 0.05). Although the mean energy expenditure at rest and during exercise training was similar for both groups, the maximum energy expenditure was higher in the VGG. Conclusion The present findings strongly suggest that aerobic training promoted by an active video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvementin their exercise capacity and a reductionin pulmonary inflammation. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294 PMID:26301706

  10. Attendance at cultural events and physical exercise and health: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Konlaan, B B; Björby, N; Bygren, L O; Weissglas, G; Karlsson, L G; Widmark, M

    2000-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the specific biomedico-social effects of participating in cultural events and gentle physical exercise effects apart from the general effect of participating in group activities. This was a randomized controlled investigation using a factorial design, where attending cultural events and taking easy physical exercise were tested simultaneously. The 21 participants, aged between 18 and 74 y were from a simple random sample of people registered as residents in Umeå, a town in northern Sweden. Among the 1000 in the sample, 21 individuals (11 men, 10 women) were recruited into the experiment. Two out of the 21 subjects dropped out and were discounted from our analysis. Nine people were encouraged to engage in cultural activity for a two-month period. Diastolic blood pressure in eight of these nine was significantly reduced following the experiment. There were no marked changes observed in either systolic or diastolic blood pressure in those not required to engage in any form of extra-cultural activity. A decrease in the levels of both adrenocorticotropical hormone (ACTH) and s-prolactin was observed in culturally stimulated subjects, whereas the average baseline s-prolactin level of 7 ng/l for the non-culturally stimulated group was unchanged after the experiment. Physical exercise produced an increase in the high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level and in the ratio of HDL to LDL (low density lipoprotein). It was concluded that cultural stimulation may have specific effects on health related determinants.

  11. An Experiment in Linguistic Synthesis with a Fuzzy Logic Controller

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamdani, E. H.; Assilian, S.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment on the "linguistic" synthesis of a controller for a model industrial plant (a steam engine). Fuzzy logic is used to convert heuristic control rules stated by a human operator into an automatic control strategy. (Author)

  12. Ophthalmic randomized controlled trials reports: the statement of the hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun Fan; Cheng, Andy Chi On; Fong, Daniel Yee Tak

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate whether the ophthalmic randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were designed properly, their hypotheses stated clearly, and their conclusions drawn correctly. A systematic review of 206 ophthalmic RCTs. The objective statement, methods, and results sections and the conclusions of RCTs published in 4 major general clinical ophthalmology journals from 2009 through 2011 were assessed. The clinical objective and specific hypothesis were the main outcome measures. The clinical objective of the trial was presented in 199 (96.6%) studies and the hypothesis was specified explicitly in 56 (27.2%) studies. One hundred ninety (92.2%) studies tested superiority. Among them, 17 (8.3%) studies comparing 2 or more active treatments concluded equal or similar effectiveness between the 2 arms after obtaining insignificant results. There were 5 noninferiority studies and 4 equivalence studies. How the treatments were compared was not mentioned in 1 of the noninferiority studies. Two of the equivalence studies did not specify the equivalence margin and used tests for detecting difference rather than confirming equivalence. The clinical objective commonly was stated, but the prospectively defined hypothesis tended to be understated in ophthalmic RCTs. Superiority was the most common type of comparison. Conclusions made in some of them with negative results were not consistent with the hypothesis, indicating that noninferiority or equivalence may be a more appropriate design. Flaws were common in the noninferiority and equivalence studies. Future ophthalmic researchers should choose the type of comparison carefully, specify the hypothesis clearly, and draw conclusions that are consistent with the hypothesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Oxytocin and autism: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Preti, Antonio; Melis, Mariangela; Siddi, Sara; Vellante, Marcello; Doneddu, Giuseppe; Fadda, Roberta

    2014-03-01

    Little is known about the effectiveness of pharmacological interventions on autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This is a systematic review of the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of oxytocin interventions in autism, made from January 1990 to September 2013. A search of computerized databases was supplemented by manual search in the bibliographies of key publications. The methodological quality of the studies included in the review was evaluated independently by two researchers, according to a set of formal criteria. Discrepancies in scoring were resolved through discussion. The review yielded seven RCTs, including 101 subjects with ASD (males=95) and 8 males with Fragile X syndrome. The main categories of target symptoms tested in the studies were repetitive behaviors, eye gaze, and emotion recognition. The studies had a medium to high risk of bias. Most studies had small samples (median=15). All the studies but one reported statistically significant between-group differences on at least one outcome variable. Most findings were characterized by medium effect size. Only one study had evidence that the improvement in emotion recognition was maintained after 6 weeks of treatment with intranasal oxytocin. Overall, oxytocin was well tolerated and side effects, when present, were generally rated as mild; however, restlessness, increased irritability, and increased energy occurred more often under oxytocin. RCTs of oxytocin interventions in autism yielded potentially promising findings in measures of emotion recognition and eye gaze, which are impaired early in the course of the ASD condition and might disrupt social skills learning in developing children. There is a need for larger, more methodologically rigorous RCTs in this area. Future studies should be better powered to estimate outcomes with medium to low effect size, and should try to enroll female participants, who were rarely considered in previous studies. Risk of bias should be minimized. Human long

  14. Generating and controlling homogeneous air turbulence using random jet arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Douglas; Petersen, Alec; Amili, Omid; Coletti, Filippo

    2016-12-01

    The use of random jet arrays, already employed in water tank facilities to generate zero-mean-flow homogeneous turbulence, is extended to air as a working fluid. A novel facility is introduced that uses two facing arrays of individually controlled jets (256 in total) to force steady homogeneous turbulence with negligible mean flow, shear, and strain. Quasi-synthetic jet pumps are created by expanding pressurized air through small straight nozzles and are actuated by fast-response low-voltage solenoid valves. Velocity fields, two-point correlations, energy spectra, and second-order structure functions are obtained from 2D PIV and are used to characterize the turbulence from the integral-to-the Kolmogorov scales. Several metrics are defined to quantify how well zero-mean-flow homogeneous turbulence is approximated for a wide range of forcing and geometric parameters. With increasing jet firing time duration, both the velocity fluctuations and the integral length scales are augmented and therefore the Reynolds number is increased. We reach a Taylor-microscale Reynolds number of 470, a large-scale Reynolds number of 74,000, and an integral-to-Kolmogorov length scale ratio of 680. The volume of the present homogeneous turbulence, the largest reported to date in a zero-mean-flow facility, is much larger than the integral length scale, allowing for the natural development of the energy cascade. The turbulence is found to be anisotropic irrespective of the distance between the jet arrays. Fine grids placed in front of the jets are effective at modulating the turbulence, reducing both velocity fluctuations and integral scales. Varying the jet-to-jet spacing within each array has no effect on the integral length scale, suggesting that this is dictated by the length scale of the jets.

  15. Prenatal Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation and Infant Morbidity: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Imhoff-Kunsch, Beth; Stein, Aryeh D.; Martorell, Reynaldo; Parra-Cabrera, Socorro; Romieu, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) influence immune function and inflammation; however, the influence of maternal DHA supplementation on infant morbidity is unknown. We investigated the effects of prenatal DHA supplementation on infant morbidity. METHODS: In a double-blind randomized controlled trial conducted in Mexico, pregnant women received daily supplementation with 400 mg of DHA or placebo from 18 to 22 weeks' gestation through parturition. In infants aged 1, 3, and 6 months, caregivers reported the occurrence of common illness symptoms in the preceding 15 days. RESULTS: Data were available at 1, 3, and 6 months for 849, 834, and 834 infants, respectively. The occurrence of specific illness symptoms did not differ between groups; however, the occurrence of a combined measure of cold symptoms was lower in the DHA group at 1 month (OR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.58–1.00). At 1 month, the DHA group experienced 26%, 15%, and 30% shorter duration of cough, phlegm, and wheezing, respectively, but 22% longer duration of rash (all P ≤ .01). At 3 months, infants in the DHA group spent 14% less time ill (P < .0001). At 6 months, infants in the DHA group experienced 20%, 13%, 54%, 23%, and 25% shorter duration of fever, nasal secretion, difficulty breathing, rash, and “other illness,” respectively, but 74% longer duration of vomiting (all P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: DHA supplementation during pregnancy decreased the occurrence of colds in children at 1 month and influenced illness symptom duration at 1, 3, and 6 months. PMID:21807696

  16. Sensorimotor Exercises and Enhanced Trunk Function: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Steffen; Engel, Tilman; Mueller, Juliane; Stoll, Josefine; Baur, Heiner; Mayer, Frank

    2018-05-18

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a 6-week sensorimotor or resistance training on maximum trunk strength and response to sudden, high-intensity loading in athletes.Forty-three healthy, well-trained participants were randomized into sensorimotor (SMT; n=11), resistance training (RT; n=16) and control groups (CG; n=16). Treatment groups received either sensorimotor training (SMT) or resistance training (RT) for 6 weeks, 3 times a week. At baseline and after 6 weeks of intervention, participants' maximum isokinetic strength in trunk rotation and extension was tested (concentric/eccentric 30°/s). In addition, sudden, high-intensity trunk loading was assessed for eccentric extension and rotation, with additional perturbation. Peak torque [Nm] was calculated as the outcome.Interventions showed no significant difference for maximum strength in concentric and eccentric testing (p>0.05). For perturbation compensation, higher peak torque response following SMT (Extension: +24 Nm 95%CI±19 Nm; Rotation: +19 Nm 95%CI±13 Nm) and RT (Extension: +35 Nm 95%CI±16 Nm; Rotation: +5 Nm 95%CI±4 Nm) compared to CG (Extension: -4 Nm 95%CI±16 Nm; Rotation: -2 Nm 95%CI±4 Nm) was present (p<0.05).This study showed that isokinetic strength gains were small, but that significant improvements in high-intensity trunk loading response could be shown for both interventions. Therefore, depending on the individual's preference, therapists have two treatment options to enhance trunk function for back pain prevention. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Effects of Voice Rehabilitation After Radiation Therapy for Laryngeal Cancer: A Randomized Controlled Study

    SciTech Connect

    Tuomi, Lisa, E-mail: lisa.tuomi@vgregion.se; Andréll, Paulin; Finizia, Caterina

    Background: Patients treated with radiation therapy for laryngeal cancer often experience voice problems. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to assess the efficacy of voice rehabilitation for laryngeal cancer patients after having undergone radiation therapy and to investigate whether differences between different tumor localizations with regard to rehabilitation outcomes exist. Methods and Materials: Sixty-nine male patients irradiated for laryngeal cancer participated. Voice recordings and self-assessments of communicative dysfunction were performed 1 and 6 months after radiation therapy. Thirty-three patients were randomized to structured voice rehabilitation with a speech-language pathologist and 36 to a control group. Furthermore, comparisons withmore » 23 healthy control individuals were made. Acoustic analyses were performed for all patients, including the healthy control individuals. The Swedish version of the Self Evaluation of Communication Experiences after Laryngeal Cancer and self-ratings of voice function were used to assess vocal and communicative function. Results: The patients who received vocal rehabilitation experienced improved self-rated vocal function after rehabilitation. Patients with supraglottic tumors who received voice rehabilitation had statistically significant improvements in voice quality and self-rated vocal function, whereas the control group did not. Conclusion: Voice rehabilitation for male patients with laryngeal cancer is efficacious regarding patient-reported outcome measurements. The patients experienced better voice function after rehabilitation. Patients with supraglottic tumors also showed an improvement in terms of acoustic voice outcomes. Rehabilitation with a speech-language pathologist is recommended for laryngeal cancer patients after radiation therapy, particularly for patients with supraglottic tumors.« less

  18. Randomized Controlled Trial for Behavioral Smoking and Weight Control Treatment: Effect of Concurrent versus Sequential Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bonnie; Doran, Neal; Pagoto, Sherry; Schneider, Kristin; Pingitore, Regina; Hedeker, Don

    2014-01-01

    Prospects for changing multiple health behaviors conjointly remain controversial. We compared effects on tobacco abstinence and weight gain of adding diet and exercise concurrently or after smoking treatment. Female regular smokers (n=315) randomized to 3 conditions received 16 weeks of behavioral smoking treatment, quit at week 5, and were followed for 9 months after the quit date. Weight management was added to the first 8 weeks for Early Diet (ED), the final 8 weeks for Late Diet (LD), and omitted for Control. Both Diet groups tended to show greater bio-verified abstinence than Control although differences were nonsignificant. Compared to Control, ED initially suppressed weight gain but lost that effect over time, whereas LD initially lacked but gradually acquired a weight suppression effect that stabilized [p = .004]. Behavioral weight control did not undermine smoking cessation and slowed the rate of weight gain when initiated after the smoking quit date, supporting a sequential approach to multiple behavior change. PMID:15482037

  19. Project Connect Online: Randomized Trial of an Internet-Based Program to Chronicle the Cancer Experience and Facilitate Communication

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Annette L.; Thompson, Elizabeth H.; Crespi, Catherine M.; Link, John S.; Waisman, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Evidence suggests that expressing emotions related to cancer and receiving interpersonal support can promote psychological and physical health in women diagnosed with breast cancer. However, adaptive expression of feelings and communication with one's social network can pose challenges for patients with cancer. We report on a randomized controlled trial of an intervention, Project Connect Online, for patients with breast cancer to create personal Web sites to chronicle their experience and communicate with their social network. Patients and Methods Women (N = 88) diagnosed with breast cancer (any stage, any interval since diagnosis) were randomly assigned to participate in a 3-hour workshop for hands-on creation of personal Web sites with a follow-up call to facilitate Web site use, or to a waiting-list control. Assessed before randomization and 6 months after the intervention, dependent variables included depressive symptoms, positive and negative mood, cancer-related intrusive thoughts, and perceived cancer-related benefits in life appreciation and strengthened relationships. Results Relative to control participants, women randomly assigned to Project Connect Online evidenced significant benefit 6 months later on depressive symptoms, positive mood, and life appreciation, but not negative mood, perceived strengthened relationships, or intrusive thoughts. Treatment status moderated the intervention effects, such that women currently undergoing medical treatment for cancer benefitted significantly more from the intervention on depressive symptoms and positive mood than did women not receiving treatment. Conclusion Findings suggest the promise of an intervention to facilitate the ability of women diagnosed with breast cancer to chronicle their experience and communicate with their social network via the Internet. PMID:23940228

  20. Project connect online: randomized trial of an internet-based program to chronicle the cancer experience and facilitate communication.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Annette L; Thompson, Elizabeth H; Crespi, Catherine M; Link, John S; Waisman, James R

    2013-09-20

    Evidence suggests that expressing emotions related to cancer and receiving interpersonal support can promote psychological and physical health in women diagnosed with breast cancer. However, adaptive expression of feelings and communication with one's social network can pose challenges for patients with cancer. We report on a randomized controlled trial of an intervention, Project Connect Online, for patients with breast cancer to create personal Web sites to chronicle their experience and communicate with their social network. Women (N = 88) diagnosed with breast cancer (any stage, any interval since diagnosis) were randomly assigned to participate in a 3-hour workshop for hands-on creation of personal Web sites with a follow-up call to facilitate Web site use, or to a waiting-list control. Assessed before randomization and 6 months after the intervention, dependent variables included depressive symptoms, positive and negative mood, cancer-related intrusive thoughts, and perceived cancer-related benefits in life appreciation and strengthened relationships. Relative to control participants, women randomly assigned to Project Connect Online evidenced significant benefit 6 months later on depressive symptoms, positive mood, and life appreciation, but not negative mood, perceived strengthened relationships, or intrusive thoughts. Treatment status moderated the intervention effects, such that women currently undergoing medical treatment for cancer benefitted significantly more from the intervention on depressive symptoms and positive mood than did women not receiving treatment. Findings suggest the promise of an intervention to facilitate the ability of women diagnosed with breast cancer to chronicle their experience and communicate with their social network via the Internet.

  1. Using frames to influence consumer willingness to pay for the patient health record: a randomized experiment.

    PubMed

    Vishwanath, Arun

    2009-07-01

    The American College of Medical Informatics rated the lack of willingness to pay for the patient health record (PHR) as the biggest obstacles to its rapid diffusion. Extending research propositions from the decision sciences and political communication, this study tests the influence of different types of emphasis frames on increasing consumer willingness to pay for the PHR. Using a randomized experiment embedded within a probability survey, the effects of 3 different types of emphasis frames (individual-focused, collective-focused, and joint), along with a no-frames control, are tested on a sample of early and later technology adopters. The results indicate a significant relationship between the type of frame and the type of adopter. Early adopters were more susceptible to individual-focused frames that made causal attributions at the individual level, whereas later adopters were significantly influenced by collective-focused frames that made causal attributions at the societal level. Interestingly, the framing effect continued and significantly influenced both early and later adopters' willingness to pay for the PHR. The findings demonstrate the need to carefully communicate the value of a technology to adopters and suggest the possibility of using frames to spur the diffusion of PHRs.

  2. Procedural and Physical Interventions for Vaccine Injections: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials and Quasi-Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Taddio, Anna; Shah, Vibhuti; McMurtry, C Meghan; MacDonald, Noni E; Ipp, Moshe; Riddell, Rebecca Pillai; Noel, Melanie; Chambers, Christine T

    2015-10-01

    This systematic review evaluated the effectiveness of physical and procedural interventions for reducing pain and related outcomes during vaccination. Databases were searched using a broad search strategy to identify relevant randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials. Data were extracted according to procedure phase (preprocedure, acute, recovery, and combinations of these) and pooled using established methods. A total of 31 studies were included. Acute infant distress was diminished during intramuscular injection without aspiration (n=313): standardized mean difference (SMD) -0.82 (95% confidence interval [CI]: -1.18, -0.46). Injecting the most painful vaccine last during vaccinations reduced acute infant distress (n=196): SMD -0.69 (95% CI: -0.98, -0.4). Simultaneous injections reduced acute infant distress compared with sequential injections (n=172): SMD -0.56 (95% CI: -0.87, -0.25). There was no benefit of simultaneous injections in children. Less infant distress during the acute and recovery phases combined occurred with vastus lateralis (vs. deltoid) injections (n=185): SMD -0.70 (95% CI: -1.00, -0.41). Skin-to-skin contact in neonates (n=736) reduced acute distress: SMD -0.65 (95% CI: -1.05, -0.25). Holding infants reduced acute distress after removal of the data from 1 methodologically diverse study (n=107): SMD -1.25 (95% CI: -2.05, -0.46). Holding after vaccination (n=417) reduced infant distress during the acute and recovery phases combined: SMD -0.65 (95% CI: -1.08, -0.22). Self-reported fear was reduced for children positioned upright (n=107): SMD -0.39 (95% CI: -0.77, -0.01). Non-nutritive sucking (n=186) reduced acute distress in infants: SMD -1.88 (95% CI: -2.57, -1.18). Manual tactile stimulation did not reduce pain across the lifespan. An external vibrating device and cold reduced pain in children (n=145): SMD -1.23 (95% CI: -1.58, -0.87). There was no benefit of warming the vaccine in adults. Muscle tension was beneficial in selected

  3. Massage Therapy and Labor Outcomes: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Patricia; Shroff, Farah; Jaspar, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Massage is a time-honored method by which women have received comfort throughout the millennia, yet it has not been rigorously evaluated in the modern day delivery suite. No study to date that we are aware of has evaluated the effect of massage therapy by a regulated massage therapist on labor pain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of massage therapy provided by registered massage therapists in managing pain among women in active labor. Methods BC Women’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC. Research Design: a randomized controlled trial. Participants: 77 healthy nulliparous women presenting in spontaneous labor. Intervention: Swedish massage administered for up to five hours by a registered massage therapist during labor vs. standard care. Main outcome measures include: cervical dilation at the time of administration of epidural, compared using estimated marginal means in an analysis of covariance. We also compared perception of pain at three time periods during labor according to cervical dilation at 3–4 cm, 5–7 cm, and 8–10 cm using the McGill Present Pain Intensity Scale. Results The mean cervical dilation at the time of epidural insertion after adjustment for station of the presenting part, cervical dilation, and status of membranes on admission to hospital was 5.9 cm (95% CI 5.2–6.7) compared to 4.9 in the control group (95% CI 4.2–5.8). Scores on the McGill Pain Scale were consistently lower in the massage therapy group (13.3 vs. 16.9 at 3–4 cm, 13.3 vs. 15.8 at 5–6 cm, and 19.4 vs. 28.3 at 7–8 cm), although these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions Our findings from this pilot study suggest that massage therapy by a registered massage therapist has the potential to be an effective means of pain management that may be associated with delayed use of epidural analgesia. It may therefore have the potential to reduce exposure to epidural analgesia during labor and decrease rates of associated

  4. Universal screening and decolonization for control of MRSA in nursing homes: a cluster randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Cristina; Petignat, Christiane; Masserey, Eric; Büla, Christophe; Burnand, Bernard; Rousson, Valentin; Blanc, Dominique S; Zanetti, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    The risk of carrying methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is higher among nursing home (NH) residents than in the general population. However, control strategies are not clearly defined in this setting. In this study, we compared the impact of standard precautions either alone (control) or combined with screening of residents and decolonization of carriers (intervention) to control MRSA in NHs. Cluster randomized controlled trial. NHs of the state of Vaud, Switzerland. Of 157 total NHs in Vaud, 104 (67%) participated in the study. Standard precautions were enforced in all participating NHs, and residents underwent MRSA screening at baseline and 12 months thereafter. All carriers identified in intervention NHs, either at study entry or among newly admitted residents, underwent topical decolonization combined with environmental disinfection, except in cases of MRSA infection, MRSA bacteriuria, or deep skin ulcers. NHs were randomly allocated to a control group (51 NHs, 2,412 residents) or an intervention group (53 NHs, 2,338 residents). Characteristics of NHs and residents were similar in both groups. The mean screening rates were 86% (range, 27%-100%) in control NHs and 87% (20%-100%) in intervention NHs. Prevalence of MRSA carriage averaged 8.9% in both control NHs (range, 0%-43%) and intervention NHs (range, 0%-38%) at baseline, and this rate significantly declined to 6.6% in control NHs and to 5.8% in intervention NHs after 12 months. However, the decline did not differ between groups (P=.66). Universal screening followed by decolonization of carriers did not significantly reduce the prevalence of the MRSA carriage rate at 1 year compared with standard precautions.

  5. Weight Control Intervention for Truck Drivers: The SHIFT Randomized Controlled Trial, United States

    PubMed Central

    Wipfli, Brad; Thompson, Sharon V.; Elliot, Diane L.; Anger, W. Kent; Bodner, Todd; Hammer, Leslie B.; Perrin, Nancy A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effectiveness of the Safety and Health Involvement For Truckers (SHIFT) intervention with a randomized controlled design. Methods. The multicomponent intervention was a weight-loss competition supported with body weight and behavioral self-monitoring, computer-based training, and motivational interviewing. We evaluated intervention effectiveness with a cluster-randomized design involving 22 terminals from 5 companies in the United States in 2012 to 2014. Companies were required to provide interstate transportation services and operate at least 2 larger terminals. We randomly assigned terminals to intervention or usual practice control conditions. We assessed participating drivers (n = 452) at baseline and 6 months. Results. In an intent-to-treat analysis, the postintervention difference between groups in mean body mass index change was 1.00 kilograms per meters squared (P < .001; intervention = −0.73; control = +0.27). Behavioral changes included statistically significant improvements in fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity. Conclusions. Results establish the effectiveness of a multicomponent and remotely administered intervention for producing significant weight loss among commercial truck drivers. PMID:27463067

  6. Weight Control Intervention for Truck Drivers: The SHIFT Randomized Controlled Trial, United States.

    PubMed

    Olson, Ryan; Wipfli, Brad; Thompson, Sharon V; Elliot, Diane L; Anger, W Kent; Bodner, Todd; Hammer, Leslie B; Perrin, Nancy A

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the Safety and Health Involvement For Truckers (SHIFT) intervention with a randomized controlled design. The multicomponent intervention was a weight-loss competition supported with body weight and behavioral self-monitoring, computer-based training, and motivational interviewing. We evaluated intervention effectiveness with a cluster-randomized design involving 22 terminals from 5 companies in the United States in 2012 to 2014. Companies were required to provide interstate transportation services and operate at least 2 larger terminals. We randomly assigned terminals to intervention or usual practice control conditions. We assessed participating drivers (n = 452) at baseline and 6 months. In an intent-to-treat analysis, the postintervention difference between groups in mean body mass index change was 1.00 kilograms per meters squared (P < .001; intervention = -0.73; control = +0.27). Behavioral changes included statistically significant improvements in fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity. Results establish the effectiveness of a multicomponent and remotely administered intervention for producing significant weight loss among commercial truck drivers.

  7. Involving fathers in teaching youth about farm tractor seatbelt safety--a randomized control study.

    PubMed

    Jinnah, Hamida Amirali; Stoneman, Zolinda; Rains, Glen

    2014-03-01

    Farm youth continue to experience high rates of injury and deaths as a result of agricultural activities. Farm machinery, especially tractors, is the most common cause of casualties to youth. A Roll-Over Protection Structure (ROPS) along with a fastened seatbelt can prevent almost all injuries and fatalities from tractor overturns. Despite this knowledge, the use of seatbelts by farmers on ROPS tractors remains low. This study treats farm safety as a family issue and builds on the central role of parents as teachers and role models of farm safety for youth. This research study used a longitudinal, repeated-measures, randomized-control design in which youth 10-19 years of age were randomly assigned to either of two intervention groups (parent-led group and staff-led group) or the control group. Fathers in the parent-led group were less likely to operate ROPS tractors without a seatbelt compared with other groups. They were more likely to have communicated with youth about the importance of wearing seatbelts on ROPS tractors. Consequently, youth in the parent-led group were less likely to operate a ROPS tractor without a seatbelt than the control group at post-test. This randomized control trial supports the effectiveness of a home-based, father-led farm safety intervention as a promising strategy for reducing youth as well as father-unsafe behaviors (related to tractor seatbelts) on the farm. This intervention appealed to fathers' strong motivation to practice tractor safety for the sake of their youth. Involving fathers helped change both father as well as youth unsafe tractor-seatbelt behaviors. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Mock Randomized Controlled Trial With Audience Response Technology for Teaching and Learning Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Baker, Philip R A; Francis, Daniel P; Cathcart, Abby

    2017-04-01

    The study's objective was to apply and assess an active learning approach to epidemiology and critical appraisal. Active learning comprised a mock, randomized controlled trial (RCT) conducted with learners in 3 countries. The mock trial consisted of blindly eating red Smarties candy (intervention) compared to yellow Smarties (control) to determine whether red Smarties increase happiness. Audience response devices were employed with the 3-fold purposes to produce outcome data for analysis of the effects of red Smarties, identify baseline and subsequent changes in participant's knowledge and confidence in understanding of RCTs, and assess the teaching approach. Of those attending, 82% (117 of 143 learners) participated in the trial component. Participating in the mock trial was a positive experience, and the use of the technology aided learning. The trial produced data that learners analyzed in "real time" during the class. The mock RCT is a fun and engaging approach to teaching RCTs and helping students to develop skills in critical appraisal.

  9. Impact of Attention Training on Academic Achievement, Executive Functioning, and Behavior: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Hannah; Gray, Kylie; Ellis, Kirsten; Taffe, John; Cornish, Kim

    2017-03-01

    Children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) experience significant difficulties in attention, learning, executive functions, and behavioral regulation. Emerging evidence suggests that computerized cognitive training may remediate these impairments. In a double blind controlled trial, 76 children with IDD (4-11 years) were randomized to either an attention training (n = 38) or control program (n = 38). Both programs were completed at home over a 5-week period. Outcome measures assessed literacy, numeracy, executive functioning, and behavioral/emotional problems, and were conducted at baseline, post-training, and 3-month follow-up. No training effects were observed at post-training; however, children in the training group showed greater improvements in numeracy skills at the 3-month follow-up. These results suggest that attention training may be beneficial for children with IDD; however, the modest nature of the intervention effects indicate that caution should be taken when interpreting clinical significance.

  10. Internet Delivered Support for Tobacco Control in Dental Practice: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Richman, Joshua S; Ray, Midge N; Allison, Jeroan J; Gilbert, Gregg H; Shewchuk, Richard M; Kohler, Connie L; Kiefe, Catarina I

    2008-01-01

    Background The dental visit is a unique opportunity for tobacco control. Despite evidence of effectiveness in dental settings, brief provider-delivered cessation advice is underutilized. Objective To evaluate an Internet-delivered intervention designed to increase implementation of brief provider advice for tobacco cessation in dental practice settings. Methods Dental practices (N = 190) were randomized to the intervention website or wait-list control. Pre-intervention and after 8 months of follow-up, each practice distributed exit cards (brief patient surveys assessing provider performance, completed immediately after the dental visit) to 100 patients. Based on these exit cards, we assessed: whether patients were asked about tobacco use (ASK) and, among tobacco users, whether they were advised to quit tobacco (ADVISE). All intervention practices with follow-up exit card data were analyzed as randomized regardless of whether they participated in the Internet-delivered intervention. Results Of the 190 practices randomized, 143 (75%) dental practices provided follow-up data. Intervention practices’ mean performance improved post-intervention by 4% on ASK (29% baseline, adjusted odds ratio = 1.29 [95% CI 1.17-1.42]), and by 11% on ADVISE (44% baseline, OR = 1.55 [95% CI 1.28-1.87]). Control practices improved by 3% on ASK (Adj. OR 1.18 [95% CI 1.07-1.29]) and did not significantly improve in ADVISE. A significant group-by-time interaction effect indicated that intervention practices improved more over the study period than control practices for ADVISE (P = 0.042) but not for ASK. Conclusion This low-intensity, easily disseminated intervention was successful in improving provider performance on advice to quit. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT00627185; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00627185 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/5c5Kugvzj) PMID:18984559

  11. Experience with ethylene plant computer control

    SciTech Connect

    Nasi, M.; Darby, M.L.; Sourander, M.

    This article discusses the control strategies, results and opinions of management and operations of a computer based ethylene plant control system. The ethylene unit contains 9 cracking heaters, and its nameplate capacity is 200,000 tpa ethylene. Reports on control performance during different unit loading and using different feedstock types. By converting the yield and utility consumption benefits due to computer control into monetary units, the payback time of the system is less than 2 yrs.

  12. Physics experiments with Nintendo Wii controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Martyn D.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a detailed description of the use of Nintendo Wii game controllers in physics demonstrations. The main features of the controller relevant to physics are outlined and the procedure for communicating with a PC is described. A piece of software written by the author is applied to gathering data from a controller suspended from a spring undergoing simple harmonic motion, a pair of controllers mounted on colliding gliders on a linear air track, and a person jumping from a balance board.

  13. Impact of Computerized Decision Support on Blood Pressure Management and Control: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sequist, Thomas D.; Ayanian, John Z.; Shaykevich, Shimon; Fairchild, David G.; Orav, E. John; Bates, David W.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND We conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial to examine the effectiveness of computerized decision support (CDS) designed to improve hypertension care and outcomes in a racially diverse sample of primary care patients. METHODS We randomized 2,027 adult patients receiving hypertension care in 14 primary care practices to either 18 months of their physicians receiving CDS for each hypertensive patient or to usual care without computerized support for the control group. We assessed prescribing of guideline-recommended drug therapy and levels of blood pressure control for patients in each group and examined if the effects of the intervention differed by patients’ race/ethnicity using interaction terms. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Rates of blood pressure control were 42% at baseline and 46% at the outcome visit with no significant differences between groups. After adjustment for patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics, number of prior visits, and levels of baseline blood pressure control, there were no differences between intervention groups in the odds of outcome blood pressure control. The use of CDS to providers significantly improved Joint National Committee (JNC) guideline adherent medication prescribing compared to usual care (7% versus 5%, P < 0.001); the effects of the intervention remained after multivariable adjustment (odds ratio [OR] 1.39 [CI, 1.13–1.72]) and the effects of the intervention did not differ by patients’ race and ethnicity. CONCLUSIONS CDS improved appropriate medication prescribing with no improvement in disparities in care and overall blood pressure control. Future work focusing on improvement of these interventions and the study of other practical interventions to reduce disparities in hypertension-related outcomes is needed. PMID:18373141

  14. Physics Experiments with Nintendo Wii Controllers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Martyn D.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a detailed description of the use of Nintendo Wii game controllers in physics demonstrations. The main features of the controller relevant to physics are outlined and the procedure for communicating with a PC is described. A piece of software written by the author is applied to gathering data from a controller suspended from…

  15. All optical mode controllable Er-doped random fiber laser with distributed Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W L; Ma, R; Tang, C H; Rao, Y J; Zeng, X P; Yang, Z J; Wang, Z N; Gong, Y; Wang, Y S

    2015-07-01

    An all-optical method to control the lasing modes of Er-doped random fiber lasers (RFLs) is proposed and demonstrated. In the RFL, an Er-doped fiber (EDF) recoded with randomly separated fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) is used as the gain medium and randomly distributed reflectors, as well as the controllable element. By combining random feedback of the FBG array and Fresnel feedback of a cleaved fiber end, multi-mode coherent random lasing is obtained with a threshold of 14 mW and power efficiency of 14.4%. Moreover, a laterally-injected control light is used to induce local gain perturbation, providing additional gain for certain random resonance modes. As a result, active mode selection of the RFL is realized by changing locations of the laser cavity that is exposed to the control light.

  16. Lansoprazole for children with poorly controlled asthma: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, Janet T; Wise, Robert A; Gold, Benjamin D; Blake, Kathryn; Brown, Ellen D; Castro, Mario; Dozor, Allen J; Lima, John J; Mastronarde, John G; Sockrider, Marianna M; Teague, W Gerald

    2012-01-25

    Asymptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is prevalent in children with asthma. Untreated GER has been postulated to be a cause of inadequate asthma control in children despite inhaled corticosteroid treatment, but it is not known whether treatment with proton pump inhibitors improves asthma control. To determine whether lansoprazole is effective in reducing asthma symptoms in children without overt GER. The Study of Acid Reflux in Children With Asthma, a randomized, masked, placebo-controlled, parallel clinical trial that compared lansoprazole with placebo in children with poor asthma control who were receiving inhaled corticosteroid treatment. Three hundred six participants enrolled from April 2007 to September 2010 at 19 US academic clinical centers were followed up for 24 weeks. A subgroup had an esophageal pH study before randomization. Participating children were randomly assigned to receive either lansoprazole, 15 mg/d if weighing less than 30 kg or 30 mg/d if weighing 30 kg or more (n = 149), or placebo (n = 157). The primary outcome measure was change in Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) score (range, 0-6; a 0.5-unit change is considered clinically meaningful). Secondary outcome measures included lung function measures, asthma-related quality of life, and episodes of poor asthma control. The mean age was 11 years (SD, 3 years). The mean difference in change (lansoprazole minus placebo) in the ACQ score was 0.2 units (95% CI, 0.0-0.3 units). There were no statistically significant differences in the mean difference in change for the secondary outcomes of forced expiratory volume in the first second (0.0 L; 95% CI, -0.1 to 0.1 L), asthma-related quality of life (-0.1; 95% CI, -0.3 to 0.1), or rate of episodes of poor asthma control (relative risk, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.9-1.5). Among the 115 children with esophageal pH studies, the prevalence of GER was 43%. In the subgroup with a positive pH study, no treatment effect for lansoprazole vs placebo was observed for

  17. The efficacy of imagery rescripting (IR) for social phobia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Won; Kwon, Jung-Hye

    2013-12-01

    There is a need for brief effective treatment of social phobia and Imagery Rescripting (IR) is a potential candidate. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of IR preceded by cognitive restructuring as a stand-alone brief treatment using a randomized controlled design. Twenty-three individuals with social phobia were randomly assigned to an IR group or to a control group. Participants in the IR group were provided with one session of imagery interviewing and two sessions of cognitive restructuring and Imagery Rescripting. Those in the control group had one session of clinical interviewing and two sessions of supportive therapy. Outcome measures including the Korean version of the social avoidance and distress scale (K-SADS) were administered before and after treatment, and at three-month follow-up. The short version of the Questionnaire upon Mental Imagery and the Traumatic Experience Scale were also administered before treatment. Participants in the IR group improved significantly on K-SADS and other outcome measures, compared to the control group. The beneficial effects of IR were maintained at three-month follow-up. It was also found that mental imagery ability and the severity of the traumatic experience did not moderate the outcome of IR. Further studies are needed to replicate the findings of our study using a large sample. The efficacy of IR as a stand-alone brief treatment was demonstrated for social phobia. The findings indicate that IR could be utilized as a cost-effective intervention for social phobia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. "Congratulations, you have been randomized into the control group!(?)": issues to consider when recruiting schools for matched-pair randomized control trials of prevention programs.

    PubMed

    Ji, Peter; DuBois, David L; Flay, Brian R; Brechling, Vanessa

    2008-03-01

    Recruiting schools into a matched-pair randomized control trial (MP-RCT) to evaluate the efficacy of a school-level prevention program presents challenges for researchers. We considered which of 2 procedures would be most effective for recruiting schools into the study and assigning them to conditions. In 1 procedure (recruit and match/randomize), we would recruit schools and match them prior to randomization, and in the other (match/randomize and recruitment), we would match schools and randomize them prior to recruitment. We considered how each procedure impacted the randomization process and our ability to recruit schools into the study. After implementing the selected procedure, the equivalence of both treatment and control group schools and the participating and nonparticipating schools on school demographic variables was evaluated. We decided on the recruit and match/randomize procedure because we thought it would provide the opportunity to build rapport with the schools and prepare them for the randomization process, thereby increasing the likelihood that they would accept their randomly assigned conditions. Neither the treatment and control group schools nor the participating and nonparticipating schools exhibited statistically significant differences from each other on any of the school demographic variables. Recruitment of schools prior to matching and randomization in an MP-RCT may facilitate the recruitment of schools and thus enhance both the statistical power and the representativeness of study findings. Future research would benefit from the consideration of a broader range of variables (eg, readiness to implement a comprehensive prevention program) both in matching schools and in evaluating their representativeness to nonparticipating schools.

  19. Empowerment of personal injury victims through the internet: design of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Elbers, Nieke A; Akkermans, Arno J; Cuijpers, Pim; Bruinvels, David J

    2011-02-02

    Research has shown that current claims settlement process can have a negative impact on psychological and physical recovery of personal injury (PI) victims. One of the explanations for the negative impact on health is that the claims settlement process is a stressful experience and victims suffer from renewed victimization caused by the claims settlement process. PI victims can experience a lack of information, lack of involvement, lack of 'voice', and poor communication. We present the first study that aims to empower PI victims with respect to the negative impact of the claims settlement process by means of an internet intervention. The study is a two armed, randomized controlled trial (RCT), in which 170 PI victims are randomized to either the intervention or control group. The intervention group will get access to a website providing 1) an information module, so participants learn what is happening and what to expect during the claims settlement process, and 2) an e-coach module, so participants learn to cope with problems they experience during the claims settlement process. The control group will get access to a website with hyperlinks to commonly available information only. Participants will be recruited via a PI claims settlement office. Participants are included if they have been involved in a traffic accident which happened less than two years ago, and are at least 18 years old.The main study parameter is the increase of empowerment within the intervention group compared to the control group. Empowerment will be measured by the mastery scale and a self-efficacy scale. The secondary outcomes are perceived justice, burden, well being, work ability, knowledge, amount of damages, and lawyer-client communication. Data are collected at baseline (T0 measurement before randomization), at three months, six months, and twelve months after baseline. Analyses will be conducted according to the intention-to-treat principle. This study evaluates the effectiveness of an

  20. Empowerment of personal injury victims through the internet: design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Research has shown that current claims settlement process can have a negative impact on psychological and physical recovery of personal injury (PI) victims. One of the explanations for the negative impact on health is that the claims settlement process is a stressful experience and victims suffer from renewed victimization caused by the claims settlement process. PI victims can experience a lack of information, lack of involvement, lack of 'voice', and poor communication. We present the first study that aims to empower PI victims with respect to the negative impact of the claims settlement process by means of an internet intervention. Methods/design The study is a two armed, randomized controlled trial (RCT), in which 170 PI victims are randomized to either the intervention or control group. The intervention group will get access to a website providing 1) an information module, so participants learn what is happening and what to expect during the claims settlement process, and 2) an e-coach module, so participants learn to cope with problems they experience during the claims settlement process. The control group will get access to a website with hyperlinks to commonly available information only. Participants will be recruited via a PI claims settlement office. Participants are included if they have been involved in a traffic accident which happened less than two years ago, and are at least 18 years old. The main study parameter is the increase of empowerment within the intervention group compared to the control group. Empowerment will be measured by the mastery scale and a self-efficacy scale. The secondary outcomes are perceived justice, burden, well being, work ability, knowledge, amount of damages, and lawyer-client communication. Data are collected at baseline (T0 measurement before randomization), at three months, six months, and twelve months after baseline. Analyses will be conducted according to the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion This

  1. The reporting quality of randomized controlled trials in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Lempesi, Evangelia; Koletsi, Despina; Fleming, Padhraig S; Pandis, Nikolaos

    2014-06-01

    Accurate trial reporting facilitates evaluation and better use of study results. The objective of this article is to investigate the quality of reporting of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in leading orthodontic journals, and to explore potential predictors of improved reporting. The 50 most recent issues of 4 leading orthodontic journals until November 2013 were electronically searched. Reporting quality assessment was conducted using the modified CONSORT statement checklist. The relationship between potential predictors and the modified CONSORT score was assessed using linear regression modeling. 128 RCTs were identified with a mean modified CONSORT score of 68.97% (SD = 11.09). The Journal of Orthodontics (JO) ranked first in terms of completeness of reporting (modified CONSORT score 76.21%, SD = 10.1), followed by American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (AJODO) (73.05%, SD = 10.1). Journal of publication (AJODO: β = 10.08, 95% CI: 5.78, 14.38; JO: β = 16.82, 95% CI: 11.70, 21.94; EJO: β = 7.21, 95% CI: 2.69, 11.72 compared to Angle), year of publication (β = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.28, 1.67 for each additional year), region of authorship (Europe: β = 5.19, 95% CI: 1.30, 9.09 compared to Asia/other), statistical significance (significant: β = 3.10, 95% CI: 0.11, 6.10 compared to non-significant) and methodologist involvement (involvement: β = 5.60, 95% CI: 1.66, 9.54 compared to non-involvement) were all significant predictors of improved modified CONSORT scores in the multivariable model. Additionally, median overall Jadad score was 2 (IQR = 2) across journals, with JO (median = 3, IQR = 1) and AJODO (median = 3, IQR = 2) presenting the highest score values. The reporting quality of RCTs published in leading orthodontic journals is considered suboptimal in various CONSORT areas. This may have a bearing in trial result interpretation and use in clinical decision making and evidence- based orthodontic treatment interventions. Copyright

  2. FIT for FUNCTION: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Julie; Tang, Ada; Guyatt, Gordon; Thabane, Lehana; Xie, Feng; Sahlas, Demetrios; Hart, Robert; Fleck, Rebecca; Hladysh, Genevieve; Macrae, Louise

    2018-01-15

    The current state of evidence suggests that community-based exercise programs are beneficial in improving impairment, function, and health status, and are greatly needed for persons with stroke. However, limitations of these studies include risk of bias, feasibility, and cost issues. This single-blinded, randomized controlled trial (RCT) of 216 participants with stroke will compare the effectiveness of a 12-week YMCA community-based wellness program (FIT for FUNCTION) specifically designed for community-dwelling persons with stroke to persons who receive a standard YMCA membership. The primary outcome will be community reintegration using the Reintegration to Normal Living Index at 12 and 24 weeks. Secondary outcomes include measurement of physical activity level using the Rapid Assessment of Physical Activity and accelerometry; balance using the Berg Balance Scale; lower extremity function using the Short Physical Performance Battery; exercise capacity using the 6-min walk test; grip strength and isometric knee extension strength using hand held dynamometry; and health-related quality of life using the European Quality of Life 5-Dimension Questionnaire. We are also assessing cardiovascular health and lipids; glucose and inflammatory markers will be collected following 12-h fast for total cholesterol, insulin, glucose, and glycated hemoglobin. Self-efficacy for physical activity will be assessed with a single question and self-efficacy for managing chronic disease will be assessed using the Stanford 6-item Scale. The Patient Activation Measure will be used to assess the patient's level of knowledge, skill, and confidence for self-management. Healthcare utilization and costs will be evaluated. Group, time, and group × time interaction effects will be estimated using generalized linear models for continuous variables, including relevant baseline variables as covariates in the analysis that differ appreciably between groups at baseline. Cost data will be treated

  3. Novel electronic refreshers for cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently the American Red Cross requires that individuals renew their cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification annually; this often requires a 4- to 8-hour refresher course. Those trained in CPR often show a decrease in essential knowledge and skills within just a few months after training. New electronic means of communication have expanded the possibilities for delivering CPR refreshers to members of the general public who receive CPR training. The study’s purpose was to determine the efficacy of three novel CPR refreshers - online website, e-mail and text messaging – for improving three outcomes of CPR training - skill retention, confidence for using CPR and intention to use CPR. These three refreshers may be considered “novel” in that they are not typically used to refresh CPR knowledge and skills. Methods The study conducted two randomized clinical trials of the novel CPR refreshers. A mailed brochure was a traditional, passive refresher format and served as the control condition. In Trial 1, the refreshers were delivered in a single episode at 6 months after initial CPR training. In Trial 2, the refreshers were delivered twice, at 6 and 9 months after initial CPR training, to test the effect of a repeated delivery. Outcomes for the three novel refreshers vs. the mailed brochure were determined at 12 months after initial CPR training. Results Assignment to any of three novel refreshers did not improve outcomes of CPR training one year later in comparison with receiving a mailed brochure. Comparing outcomes for subjects who actually reviewed some of the novel refreshers vs. those who did not indicated a significant positive effect for one outcome, confidence for performing CPR. The website refresher was associated with increased behavioral intent to perform CPR. Stated satisfaction with the refreshers was relatively high. The number of episodes of refreshers (one vs. two) did not have a significant effect on any outcomes

  4. Pediatric selective mutism therapy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Maria; Gimigliano, Francesca; Barillari, Maria R; Precenzano, Francesco; Ruberto, Maria; Sepe, Joseph; Barillari, Umberto; Gimigliano, Raffaele; Militerni, Roberto; Messina, Giovanni; Carotenuto, Marco

    2017-10-01

    Selective mutism (SM) is a rare disease in children coded by DSM-5 as an anxiety disorder. Despite the disabling nature of the disease, there is still no specific treatment. The aims of this study were to verify the efficacy of six-month standard psychomotor treatment and the positive changes in lifestyle, in a population of children affected by SM. Randomized controlled trial registered in the European Clinical Trials Registry (EuDract 2015-001161-36). University third level Centre (Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry Clinic). Study population was composed by 67 children in group A (psychomotricity treatment) (35 M, mean age 7.84±1.15) and 71 children in group B (behavioral and educational counseling) (37 M, mean age 7.75±1.36). Psychomotor treatment was administered by trained child therapists in residential settings three times per week. Each child was treated for the whole period by the same therapist and all the therapists shared the same protocol. The standard psychomotor session length is of 45 minutes. At T0 and after 6 months (T1) of treatments, patients underwent a behavioral and SM severity assessment. To verify the effects of the psychomotor management, the Child Behavior Checklist questionnaire (CBCL) and Selective Mutism Questionnaire (SMQ) were administered to the parents. After 6 months of psychomotor treatment SM children showed a significant reduction among CBCL scores such as in social relations, anxious/depressed, social problems and total problems (P<0.001), Withdrawn (P=0.007) and Internalizing problems (P=0.020). Regarding SM severity according to SMQ assessment, children of group A showed a reduction of SM symptoms in all situations (school, P=0.003; family, P=0.018; and social, P=0.030 situations) and in SMQ total score (P<0.001). Our preliminary results suggest the positive effect of the psychomotor treatment in rehabilitative program for children affected by selective mutism, even if further studies are needed. The present study

  5. Smoked cannabis for chronic neuropathic pain: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Mark A.; Wang, Tongtong; Shapiro, Stan; Robinson, Ann; Ducruet, Thierry; Huynh, Thao; Gamsa, Ann; Bennett, Gary J.; Collet, Jean-Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic neuropathic pain affects 1%–2% of the adult population and is often refractory to standard pharmacologic treatment. Patients with chronic pain have reported using smoked cannabis to relieve pain, improve sleep and improve mood. Methods Adults with post-traumatic or postsurgical neuropathic pain were randomly assigned to receive cannabis at four potencies (0%, 2.5%, 6% and 9.4% tetrahydrocannabinol) over four 14-day periods in a crossover trial. Participants inhaled a single 25-mg dose through a pipe three times daily for the first five days in each cycle, followed by a nine-day washout period. Daily average pain intensity was measured using an 11-point numeric rating scale. We recorded effects on mood, sleep and quality of life, as well as adverse events. Results We recruited 23 participants (mean age 45.4 [standard deviation 12.3] years, 12 women [52%]), of whom 21 completed the trial. The average daily pain intensity, measured on the 11-point numeric rating scale, was lower on the prespecified primary contrast of 9.4% v. 0% tetrahydrocannabinol (5.4 v. 6.1, respectively; difference = 0.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02–1.4). Preparations with intermediate potency yielded intermediate but nonsignificant degrees of relief. Participants receiving 9.4% tetrahydrocannabinol reported improved ability to fall asleep (easier, p = 0.001; faster, p < 0.001; more drowsy, p = 0.003) and improved quality of sleep (less wakefulness, p = 0.01) relative to 0% tetrahydrocannabinol. We found no differences in mood or quality of life. The most common drug-related adverse events during the period when participants received 9.4% tetrahydrocannabinol were headache, dry eyes, burning sensation in areas of neuropathic pain, dizziness, numbness and cough. Conclusion A single inhalation of 25 mg of 9.4% tetrahydrocannabinol herbal cannabis three times daily for five days reduced the intensity of pain, improved sleep and was well tolerated. Further long

  6. Clinical performance of a new blood control peripheral intravenous catheter: A prospective, randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Seiberlich, Laura E; Keay, Vanessa; Kallos, Stephane; Junghans, Tiffany; Lang, Eddy; McRae, Andrew D

    2016-03-01

    The performance of a new safety peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) that contains a blood control feature in the hub (blood control) was compared against the current hospital standard without blood control (standard). In this prospective, non-blinded trial, patients were randomized 1:1 to receive either device. Insertions were performed and rated by emergency room nurses. Primary endpoints included clinical acceptability, incidence of blood leakage, and risk of blood exposure. Secondary endpoints were digital compression, insertion success, and usability. 15 clinicians performed 152 PIVC insertions (73 blood control, 79 standard). Clinical acceptability of the blood control device (100%) was non-inferior to the standard (98.7%) (p < 0.0001). The blood control device had a lower incidence of blood leakage (14.1% vs 68.4%), was superior in eliminating the risk of blood exposure (93.9% vs 19.1%) and the need for digital compression (95.3% vs 19.1%), while maintaining non-inferior insertion success rates (95.9% vs 93.7%) and usability ratings (p < 0.0001). In comparison with the hospital-standard, the new safety PIVC with integrated blood control valve had similar clinical acceptability ratings yet demonstrated superior advantages to both clinicians and patients to decrease blood leakage and the clinician's risk of blood exposure, during the insertion process. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Heterogenic control groups in randomized, controlled, analgesic trials of total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Anders P; Mathiesen, Ole; Dahl, Jørgen B

    2018-03-01

    Postoperative analgesic interventions are often tested adjunct to basic non-opioid analgesics in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Consequently, treatment in control groups, and possible assay sensitivity, differs between trials. We hypothesized that postoperative opioid requirements and pain intensities vary between different control groups in analgesic trials. Control groups from RCTs investigating analgesic interventions after total hip and knee arthroplasty were categorized based on standardized basic analgesic treatment. Morphine consumption 0 to 24 hours postoperatively, and resting pain scores at 6 and 24 hours for subgroups of basic treatments, were compared with ANOVA. In an additional analysis, we compared pain and opioid requirements in trials where a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) was administered as an intervention with trial where NSAID was administered in a control group. We included 171 RCTs employing 28 different control groups with large variability in pain scores and opioid requirements. Four types of control groups (comprising 78 trials) were eligible for subgroup comparisons. These subgroups received "opioid" alone, "NSAID + opioid", "acetaminophen + opioid", or "NSAID + acetaminophen + opioid", respectively. Morphine consumption and pain scores varied substantially between these groups, with no consistent superior efficacy in any subgroup. Additionally, trials administering NSAID as an intervention demonstrated lower pain scores and opioid requirements than trials where NSAID was administered in a control group. Analgesic treatment in RCT control groups varies considerably. Control groups receiving various combinations of opioid, NSAID and acetaminophen did not differ consistently in pain and opioid requirements. Pain and opioid requirements were lower in trials administering NSAID as an intervention compared with trials administering NSAID in a control group.

  8. No Randomization? No Problem: Experimental Control and Random Assignment in Single Case Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Jennifer R.

    2018-01-01

    Randomization of large number of participants to different treatment groups is often not a feasible or preferable way to answer questions of immediate interest to professional practice. Single case designs (SCDs) are a class of research designs that are experimental in nature but require only a few participants, all of whom receive the…

  9. Early control treatment with montelukast in preschool children with asthma: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Mizuho; Ikeda, Masanori; Fukuda, Norimasa; Habukawa, Chizu; Kitamura, Tetsuro; Katsunuma, Toshio; Fujisawa, Takao

    2018-01-01

    While Japanese guideline recommends initial control treatment for preschool children with asthma symptoms more than once a month, Western guidelines do not. To determine whether control treatment with montelukast was more effective than as-needed β 2 -agonists in this population, we conducted a randomized controlled trial. Eligible patients were children aged 1-5 years who had asthma symptoms more than once a month but less than once a week. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive montelukast 4 mg daily for 48 weeks or as-needed β 2 -agonists. The primary endpoint was the number of acute asthma exacerbations before starting step-up treatment with inhaled corticosteroids. This study is registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network clinical trials registry, number UMIN000002219. From September 2009 to November 2012, 93 patients (47 in the montelukast group and 46 in the no-controller group) were enrolled into the study. All patients were included in the analysis. During the study, 13 patients (28%) in the montelukast group and 23 patients (50%) in the no-controller group had acute exacerbations with the mean numbers of 0.9 and 1.9/year, respectively (P = 0.027). In addition, 10 (21%) and 19 (41%) patients received step-up treatment, respectively. Cumulative incidence of step-up treatment was significantly lower in the montelukast group (hazard ratio 0.45, 95% confidence interval 0.21 to 0.92; P = 0.033). Montelukast is an effective control treatment for preschool children who had asthma symptoms more than once a month but less than once a week. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of a College Access Program for Youth Underrepresented in Higher Education: A Randomized Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergin, David A.; Cooks, Helen C.; Bergin, Christi C.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes EXCEL, a program that encourages youth underrepresented in higher education to enroll in higher education, specifically at the sponsoring university. Eighty-three eighth grade students with GPA of B and above and standardized test scores at grade level or above were randomly assigned to the program or to a control group. The…

  11. Preventing Youth Violence and Dropout: A Randomized Field Experiment. NBER Working Paper No. 19014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Sara; Pollack, Harold A.; Ander, Roseanna; Ludwig, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Improving the long-term life outcomes of disadvantaged youth remains a top policy priority in the United States, although identifying successful interventions for adolescents--particularly males--has proven challenging. This paper reports results from a large randomized controlled trial of an intervention for disadvantaged male youth grades 7-10…

  12. Intention-to-Treat Analysis in Partially Nested Randomized Controlled Trials with Real-World Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweig, Jonathan David; Pane, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Demands for scientific knowledge of what works in educational policy and practice has driven interest in quantitative investigations of educational outcomes, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have proliferated under these conditions. In educational settings, even when individuals are randomized, both experimental and control students are…

  13. Key Items to Get Right When Conducting a Randomized Controlled Trial in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This is a checklist of key items to get right when conducting a randomized controlled trial to evaluate an educational program or practice ("intervention"). It is intended as a practical resource for researchers and sponsors of research, describing items that are often critical to the success of a randomized controlled trial. A significant…

  14. The Efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Chinese Families: Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Sin, Tammy C. S.; Choi, Siu-yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine the efficacy of the Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in Hong Kong Chinese families, using randomized controlled trial design. Methods: The participants included 111 Hong Kong Chinese parents with children aged 2--7 years old, who were randomized into the intervention group (n = 54) and control group (n…

  15. A Randomized Controlled Study of the Virginia Student Threat Assessment Guidelines in Kindergarten through Grade 12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Dewey G.; Allen, Korrie; Fan, Xitao

    2012-01-01

    This randomized controlled study examined disciplinary outcomes for 201 students who made threats of violence at school. The students attended 40 schools randomly assigned to use the Virginia Student Threat Assessment Guidelines or follow a business-as-usual disciplinary approach in a control group. Logistic regression analyses found, after…

  16. The Walking School Bus and children's physical activity: A pilot cluster randomized controlled trial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To evaluate the impact of a "walking school bus" program on children's rates of active commuting to school and physical activity. We conducted a pilot cluster randomized controlled trial among 4th-graders from 8 schools in Houston, Texas (N = 149). Random allocation to treatment or control condition...

  17. Outcomes from a School-Randomized Controlled Trial of Steps to Respect: A Bullying Prevention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Eric C.; Low, Sabina; Smith, Brian H.; Haggerty, Kevin P.

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the outcomes of a randomized controlled trial of Steps to Respect: A Bullying Prevention Program conducted in 33 California elementary schools. Schools were matched on school demographic characteristics and assigned randomly to intervention or waitlisted control conditions. Outcome measures were obtained from (a) all school…

  18. Pharmaceutical care of elderly patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jyun-Hong; Ou, Huang-Tz; Lin, Tzu-Chieh; Lai, Edward Chia-Cheng; Kao, Yea-Huei Yang

    2016-02-01

    Care of the elderly with diabetes is more complicated than that for other age groups. The elderly and/or those with multiple comorbidities are often excluded from randomized controlled trials of treatments for diabetes. The heterogeneity of health status of the elderly also increases the difficulty in diabetes care; therefore, diabetes care for the elderly should be individualized. Motivated patients educated about diabetes benefit the most from collaborating with a multidisciplinary patient-care team. A pharmacist is an important team member by serving as an educator, coach, healthcare manager, and pharmaceutical care provider. To evaluate the effects of pharmaceutical care on glycemic control of ambulatory elderly patients with type 2 diabetes. A 421-bed district hospital in Nantou City, Taiwan. We conducted a randomized controlled clinical trial involving 100 patients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control (HbA1c levels of ≥9.0 %) aged ≥65 years over 6 months. Participants were randomly assigned to a standard-care (control, n = 50) or pharmaceutical-care (intervention, n = 50) group. Pharmaceutical care was provided by a certified diabetes-educator pharmacist who identified and resolved drug-related problems and established a procedure for consultations pertaining to medication. The Mann–Whitney test was used to evaluate nonparametric quantitative data. Statistical significance was defined as P < 0.05. The change in the mean HbA1c level from the baseline to the next level within 6 months after recruiting. Nonparametric data (Mann–Whitney test) showed that the mean HbA1c level significantly decreased (0.83 %) after 6 months for the intervention group compared with an increase of 0.43 % for the control group (P ≤ 0.001). Medical expenses between groups did not significantly differ (−624.06 vs. −418.7, P = 0.767). There was no significant difference in hospitalization rates between groups. The pharmacist intervention program provided

  19. Do terrorist attacks affect ethnic discrimination in the labour market? Evidence from two randomized field experiments.

    PubMed

    Birkelund, Gunn Elisabeth; Chan, Tak Wing; Ugreninov, Elisabeth; Midtbøen, Arnfinn H; Rogstad, Jon

    2018-01-24

    Terrorist attacks are known to influence public opinion. But do they also change behaviour? We address this question by comparing the results of two identical randomized field experiments on ethnic discrimination in hiring that we conducted in Oslo. The first experiment was conducted before the 2011 terrorist attacks in Norway; the second experiment was conducted after the attacks. In both experiments, applicants with a typical Pakistani name were significantly less likely to get a job interview compared to those with a typical Norwegian name. But the ethnic gap in call-back rates were very similar in the two experiments. Thus, Pakistanis in Norway still experienced the same level of discrimination, despite claims that Norwegians have become more positive about migrants after the far-right, anti-migrant terrorist attacks of 2011. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2018.

  20. Laser acupuncture reduces pain in pediatric kidney biopsies: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Oates, Aris; Benedict, Kelly A; Sun, Karen; Brakeman, Paul R; Lim, Jessica; Kim, Cynthia

    2017-01-01

    Evaluate laser acupuncture (LA) as an adjuvant therapy in pain management during percutaneous kidney biopsy procedure in children and adolescents. This prospective, double-blinded, randomized controlled trial enrolled patients aged 7 to 26 years admitted to a children's hospital for percutaneous kidney biopsy. Patients received LA to treatment points (acupuncture group) or sham points (control group) before the procedure. The laser delivered a dose of 42 J/cm over 10 acupoints. Patients and parents rated the pain during and after the biopsy, and change in pain scores were calculated for each patient. Anxiety, vital signs, sedation medication, and patient's biopsy experience were secondary outcomes. Sixty-nine treatments (33 in the acupuncture group and 36 in the control group) were eligible for analysis. Patients in the acupuncture group reported a significantly improved change in the pain score after the biopsy compared with the controls (0.8 vs -0.5, P = 0.044). Patients in the acupuncture group had a statistically significant decrease in procedure vital signs including heart rate (-1.8 vs 5.6, P = 0.043) and respiratory rate (-2.4 vs 0.4, P = 0.045) when compared with controls. Parents also perceived a correspondingly greater improvement in their child's pain for those in the acupuncture group compared with the controls (2.3 vs 0.3, P = 0.04). Adjunctive LA significantly improved pain after pediatric percutaneous kidney biopsies.

  1. Effect of Vitamin E on Oxaliplatin-induced Peripheral Neuropathy Prevention: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Zeinab; Roayaei, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most important limitations of oxaliplatin base regimen, which is the standard for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Evidence has shown that Vitamin E may be protective in chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Vitamin E administration on prevention of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy in patients with colorectal cancer. Methods: This was a prospective randomized, controlled clinical trial. Patients with colorectal cancer and scheduled to receive oxaliplatin-based regimens were enrolled in this study. Enrolled patients were randomized into two groups. The first group received Vitamin E at a dose of 400 mg daily and the second group observed, until after the sixth course of the oxaliplatin regimen. For oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy assessment, we used the symptom experience diary questionnaire that completed at baseline and after the sixth course of chemotherapy. Only patients with a score of zero at baseline were eligible for this study. Results: Thirty-two patients were randomized to the Vitamin E group and 33 to the control group. There was no difference in the mean peripheral neuropathy score changes (after − before) between two groups, after sixth course of the oxaliplatin base regimen (mean difference [after − before] of Vitamin E group = 6.37 ± 2.85, control group = 6.57 ± 2.94; P = 0.78). Peripheral neuropathy scores were significantly increased after intervention compared with a base line in each group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The results from this current trial demonstrate a lack of benefit for Vitamin E in preventing oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26682028

  2. Controllability of social networks and the strategic use of random information.

    PubMed

    Cremonini, Marco; Casamassima, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    This work is aimed at studying realistic social control strategies for social networks based on the introduction of random information into the state of selected driver agents. Deliberately exposing selected agents to random information is a technique already experimented in recommender systems or search engines, and represents one of the few options for influencing the behavior of a social context that could be accepted as ethical, could be fully disclosed to members, and does not involve the use of force or of deception. Our research is based on a model of knowledge diffusion applied to a time-varying adaptive network and considers two well-known strategies for influencing social contexts: One is the selection of few influencers for manipulating their actions in order to drive the whole network to a certain behavior; the other, instead, drives the network behavior acting on the state of a large subset of ordinary, scarcely influencing users. The two approaches have been studied in terms of network and diffusion effects. The network effect is analyzed through the changes induced on network average degree and clustering coefficient, while the diffusion effect is based on two ad hoc metrics which are defined to measure the degree of knowledge diffusion and skill level, as well as the polarization of agent interests. The results, obtained through simulations on synthetic networks, show a rich dynamics and strong effects on the communication structure and on the distribution of knowledge and skills. These findings support our hypothesis that the strategic use of random information could represent a realistic approach to social network controllability, and that with both strategies, in principle, the control effect could be remarkable.

  3. Effect of Vitamin E on Oxaliplatin-induced Peripheral Neuropathy Prevention: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Zeinab; Roayaei, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most important limitations of oxaliplatin base regimen, which is the standard for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Evidence has shown that Vitamin E may be protective in chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Vitamin E administration on prevention of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy in patients with colorectal cancer. This was a prospective randomized, controlled clinical trial. Patients with colorectal cancer and scheduled to receive oxaliplatin-based regimens were enrolled in this study. Enrolled patients were randomized into two groups. The first group received Vitamin E at a dose of 400 mg daily and the second group observed, until after the sixth course of the oxaliplatin regimen. For oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy assessment, we used the symptom experience diary questionnaire that completed at baseline and after the sixth course of chemotherapy. Only patients with a score of zero at baseline were eligible for this study. Thirty-two patients were randomized to the Vitamin E group and 33 to the control group. There was no difference in the mean peripheral neuropathy score changes (after - before) between two groups, after sixth course of the oxaliplatin base regimen (mean difference [after - before] of Vitamin E group = 6.37 ± 2.85, control group = 6.57 ± 2.94; P = 0.78). Peripheral neuropathy scores were significantly increased after intervention compared with a base line in each group (P < 0.001). The results from this current trial demonstrate a lack of benefit for Vitamin E in preventing oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy.

  4. Efficacy of Sleep Tool Education During Hospitalization: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Farrehi, Peter M; Clore, Kristen R; Scott, J Ryan; Vanini, Giancarlo; Clauw, Daniel J

    2016-12-01

    Patients are commonly provided tools in the hospital to overcome poor sleep. Whether education on use of sleep tools can impact health outcomes from a patient perspective is not known. We recruited 120 adults admitted to a nonintensive care unit cardiac-monitored floor. All patients received a set of sleep-enhancing tools (eye mask, ear plugs, and a white noise machine) and were randomized to receive direct education on use of and benefit of these sleep-enhancing tools (intervention), or an equal amount of time was spent discussing general benefits of sleep (control). Measurement of several symptom domains was assessed daily by health outcome survey responses, and change from baseline was assessed for differences between groups. Inpatient opioid use and length of stay were also measured. Participants randomized to receive the education intervention had a significantly greater decrease in fatigue scores over the 3 days, compared with controls (5.30 ± 6.93 vs 1.81 ± 6.96, t = 2.32, P = .028). There was a trend toward improvements in multiple other sleep-related domains, including sleep disturbance, sleep-related impairment, physical functioning, pain severity, or pain interference (all P >.140). There was no difference in length of stay between intervention and control groups (7.40 ± 7.29 vs 7.71 ± 6.06 days, P = .996). The change in number of opioid equivalents taken did not differ use between the groups (P = .688). In a randomized trial of education in the use of sleep-enhancing tools while hospitalized, patient fatigue was significantly improved, whereas several other patient-reported outcomes showed a trend toward improvements. Implementation of this very low-cost approach to improving sleep and well-being could substantially improve the patient care experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Bibliotherapy for Carers of Young People With First-Episode Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Terence V.

    2013-01-01

    Caring for young people with first-episode psychosis (FEP) is challenging and can adversely affect carer well-being, with limited evidence-based support materials available. We aimed to examine whether completion of a self-directed problem-solving bibliotherapy among carers of young people with FEP led to a better experience of caring, less distress and expressed emotion, and better general health than carers who only received treatment as usual (TAU). A randomized controlled trial was conducted across two early-intervention psychosis services in Melbourne, Australia. A total of 124 carers were randomized to problem-solving bibliotherapy intervention (PSBI) or TAU and assessed at baseline, 6-week and 16-week follow-up. Intent-to-treat analyses were carried out and indicated that recipients of PSBI had a more favorable experience of caring than those receiving TAU, and these effects were sustained at both follow-up time points. Across the other measures, both groups demonstrated improvements by week 16, although the PBSI group tended to improve earlier. The PSBI group experienced a greater reduction in negative emotional evaluations of the need to provide additional support to young people with FEP than the TAU group by week 6, while the level of psychological distress decreased at a greater rate from baseline to 6 weeks in the PSBI compared with the TAU group. These findings support the use of problem-solving bibliotherapy for first-time carers, particularly as a cost-effective adjunct to TAU. PMID:23172001

  6. Pain following foraminal enlargement in mandibular molars with necrosis and apical periodontitis: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Saini, H R; Sangwan, P; Sangwan, A

    2016-12-01

    This randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of foraminal enlargement during chemomechanical root canal preparation on postoperative pain. Seventy mandibular first molars with asymptomatic pulp necrosis and chronic apical periodontitis were randomized into two groups - foraminal enlargement (FE) and conventional nonforaminal enlargement (NFE). Canals were prepared according to the respective protocols, and the teeth were restored temporarily. Postoperatively, the patients were prescribed ibuprofen 400 mg, to be taken if required. Pain experience and analgesic intake were recorded for 7 days following chemomechanical preparation. The data were analysed using Mann-Whitney U-test and chi-square tests. Pain experience was higher with foraminal enlargement than when using a conventional technique. A significant difference was observed in postoperative pain during the first 4 days and the sixth day (P < 0.05), with greater pain in the FE as compared to the NFE group. There was no significant difference in prevalence of analgesic intake and number of doses between the experimental groups (P > 0.05). Enlargement of the apical foramen during root canal treatment increased the incidence and intensity of postoperative pain. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Internet peer support for individuals with psychiatric disabilities: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Katy; Salzer, Mark S; Solomon, Phyllis; Brusilovskiy, Eugene; Cousounis, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of Internet support groups for individuals with mental illnesses little is known about the potential benefits, or harm, of participating in such groups. Therefore, this randomized controlled trial sought to determine the impact of unmoderated, unstructured Internet peer support, similar to what is naturally occurring on the Internet, on the well-being of individuals with psychiatric disabilities. Three hundred individuals resident in the USA diagnosed with a Schizophrenia Spectrum or an Affective Disorder were randomized into one of three conditions: experimental Internet peer support via a listserv, experimental Internet peer support via a bulletin board, or a control condition. Three measurement time points, baseline, 4- and 12 months post-baseline, assessed well-being by examining measures of recovery, quality of life, empowerment, social support, and distress. Time × group interactions in the repeated measures ANOVA showed no differences between conditions on the main outcomes. Post-hoc repeated measures ANOVAs found that those individuals who participated more in Internet peer support reported higher levels of distress than those with less or no participation (p = 0.03). Those who reported more positive experiences with the Internet peer support group also reported higher levels of psychological distress than those reporting less positive experiences (p = 0.01). Study results therefore do not support the hypothesis that participation in an unmoderated, unstructured Internet listserv or bulletin board peer support group for individuals with psychiatric disabilities enhances well-being. Counterintuitive findings demonstrating those who report more positive experiences also experienced higher levels of distress are discussed but we also point to the need for additional research. Future research should explore the various structures, formats, and interventions of Internet support, as well as the content and quality of interactions

  8. Building Kindergartners' Number Sense: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Nancy C.; Glutting, Joseph; Dyson, Nancy; Hassinger-Das, Brenna; Irwin, Casey

    2012-01-01

    Math achievement in elementary school is mediated by performance and growth in number sense during kindergarten. The aim of the present study was to test the effectiveness of a targeted small-group number sense intervention for high-risk kindergartners from low-income communities. Children were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups (n = 44 in each…

  9. Randomized, Controlled Trial of CBT Training for PTSD Providers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    and Therapy, 47, 902-909. Shapiro, F. (2001). Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing ( EMDR ): Basic principles...Hopper, E. K., Korn, D. L., & Simpson, W. B. (2007). A randomized clinical trial of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing ( EMDR ), fluoxetine...Josef Ruzek, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Palo Alto Institute for Research and Education Palo Alto, CA 94304 REPORT

  10. Flexible manipulator control experiments and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yurkovich, S.; Ozguner, U.; Tzes, A.; Kotnik, P. T.

    1987-01-01

    Modeling and control design for flexible manipulators, both from an experimental and analytical viewpoint, are described. From the application perspective, an ongoing effort within the laboratory environment at the Ohio State University, where experimentation on a single link flexible arm is underway is described. Several unique features of this study are described here. First, the manipulator arm is slewed by a direct drive dc motor and has a rigid counterbalance appendage. Current experimentation is from two viewpoints: (1) rigid body slewing and vibration control via actuation with the hub motor, and (2) vibration suppression through the use of structure-mounted proof-mass actuation at the tip. Such an application to manipulator control is of interest particularly in design of space-based telerobotic control systems, but has received little attention to date. From an analytical viewpoint, parameter estimation techniques within the closed-loop for self-tuning adaptive control approaches are discussed. Also introduced is a control approach based on output feedback and frequency weighting to counteract effects of spillover in reduced-order model design. A model of the flexible manipulator based on experimental measurements is evaluated for such estimation and control approaches.

  11. Improving the quality of randomized controlled trials in Chinese herbal medicine, part II: control group design.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Moher, David; Dagenais, Simon; Li, You-Ping; Liu, Liang; Wu, Tai-Xiang; Miao, Jiang-Xia

    2006-03-01

    To discuss the types of control groups in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM), and to provide suggestions for improving the design of control group in future clinical studies in this therapeutic area. A search of the Cochrane Library was conducted in July 2005 to identify RCTs of CHM, and 66 RCTs with CHM for type 2 diabetes mellitus were obtained as the basis for further analysis. Of 66 RCTs with CHM for type 2 diabetes mellitus, 61 (92.4%) trials had both a treatment group and a control group. Twenty-seven (40.9%) RCTs compared CHM plus conventional drug vs conventional drug, 24 (36.4%) compared CHM vs conventional drug, 5 (7.6%) compared CHM vs placebo, 3 (4.5%) compared CHM plus conventional drug vs conventional drug plus placebo, 3 (4.5%) compared CHM plus conventional drug vs other CHM, 1 (1.5%) compared CHM vs no treatment, 1 (1.5%) compared CHM plus placebo vs conventional drug plus placebo, 1 (1.5%) compared CHM vs CHM plus conventional drug vs conventional drug vs placebo, and 1 (1.5%) compared CHM vs conventional drug vs CHM plus conventional drug. A variety of control groups were used in RCTs of CHM for type 2 diabetes mellitus, including placebo, active, and no treatment control groups. Justification for selecting particular types of control groups were not provided in the trials reviewed in this study. Different control groups may be appropriate according to the study objectives, and several factors should be considered prior to selecting control groups in future RCTs of CHM. (1) Investigators of CHM who design clinical trials should understand the rationale for selecting different types of control groups; (2) Control groups for RCTs should be selected according to study objectives; (3) Active control groups should select interventions for comparisons that have the strongest evidence of efficacy and prescribe them as recommended; (4) Placebo control groups should select a placebo that mimics the physical

  12. Interreality for the management and training of psychological stress: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychological stress occurs when an individual perceives that environmental demands tax or exceed his or her adaptive capacity. Its association with severe health and emotional diseases, points out the necessity to find new efficient strategies to treat it. Moreover, psychological stress is a very personal problem and requires training focused on the specific needs of individuals. To overcome the above limitations, the INTERSTRESS project suggests the adoption of a new paradigm for e-health - Interreality - that integrates contextualized assessment and treatment within a hybrid environment, bridging the physical and the virtual worlds. According to this premise, the aim of this study is to investigate the advantages of using advanced technologies, in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), based on a protocol for reducing psychological stress. Methods/Design The study is designed as a randomized controlled trial. It includes three groups of approximately 50 subjects each who suffer from psychological stress: (1) the experimental group, (2) the control group, (3) the waiting list group. Participants included in the experimental group will receive a treatment based on cognitive behavioral techniques combined with virtual reality, biofeedback and mobile phone, while the control group will receive traditional stress management CBT-based training, without the use of new technologies. The wait-list group will be reassessed and compared with the two other groups five weeks after the initial evaluation. After the reassessment, the wait-list patients will randomly receive one of the two other treatments. Psychometric and physiological outcomes will serve as quantitative dependent variables, while subjective reports of participants will be used as the qualitative dependent variable. Discussion What we would like to show with the present trial is that bridging virtual experiences, used to learn coping skills and emotional regulation, with real

  13. Experiments in randomly agitated granular assemblies close to the jamming transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, Gabriel; Lindner, Anke; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Reydellet, Guillaume; Lanuza, José; Clément, Eric

    2004-11-01

    We present the results obtained for two experiments on randomly agitated granular assemblies using a novel way of shaking. First we discuss the transport properties of a 2D model system undergoing classical shaking that show the importance of large scale dynamics for this type of agitation and offer a local view of the microscopic motions of a grain. We then develop a new way of vibrating the system allowing for random accelerations smaller than gravity. Using this method we study the evolution of the free surface as well as results from a light scattering method for a 3D model system. The final aim of these experiments is to investigate the ideas of effective temperature on the one hand as a function of inherent states and on the other hand using fluctuation dissipation relations.

  14. Experiments in randomly agitated granular assemblies close to the jamming transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, Gabriel; Lindner, Anke; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Reydellet, Guillaume; Lanuza, José; Clément, Eric

    2004-03-01

    We present the results obtained for two experiments on randomly agitated granular assemblies using a novel way of shaking. First we discuss the transport properties of a 2D model system undergoing classical shaking that show the importance of large scale dynamics for this type of agitation and offer a local view of the microscopic motions of a grain. We then develop a new way of vibrating the system allowing for random accelerations smaller than gravity. Using this method we study the evolution of the free surface as well as results from a light scattering method for a 3D model system. The final aim of these experiments is to investigate the ideas of effective temperature on the one hand as a function of inherent states and on the other hand using fluctuation dissipation relations.

  15. Slewing control experiment for a flexible panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    1987-01-01

    Technology areas are identified in which better analytical and/or experimental methods are needed to adequately and accurately control the dynamic responses of multibody space platforms such as the space station. A generic space station solar panel is used to experimentally evaluate current control technologies. Active suppression of solar panel vibrations induced by large angle maneuvers is studied with a torque actuator at the root of the solar panel. These active suppression tests will identify the hardware requirements and adequacy of various controller designs.

  16. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Immersive Virtual Reality Analgesia during Physical Therapy for Pediatric Burn Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Yuko S.; Hoffman, Hunter G.; Blough, David K.; Patterson, David R.; Jensen, Mark P.; Soltani, Maryam; Carrougher, Gretchen J.; Nakamura, Dana; Sharar, Sam R.

    2010-01-01

    This randomized, controlled, within-subjects (crossover design) study examined the effects of immersive virtual reality as an adjunctive analgesic technique for hospitalized pediatric burn inpatients undergoing painful physical therapy. Fifty-four subjects (6–19 years old) performed range-of-motion exercises under a therapist’s direction for one to five days. During each session, subjects spent equivalent time in both the virtual reality and the control conditions (treatment order randomized and counterbalanced). Graphic rating scale scores assessing the sensory, affective, and cognitive components of pain were obtained for each treatment condition. Secondary outcomes assessed subjects’ perception of the virtual reality experience and maximum range-of-motion. Results showed that on study day one, subjects reported significant decreases (27–44%) in pain ratings during virtual reality. They also reported improved affect (“fun”) during virtual reality. The analgesia and affect improvements were maintained with repeated virtual reality use over multiple therapy sessions. Maximum range-of-motion was not different between treatment conditions, but was significantly greater after the second treatment condition (regardless of treatment order). These results suggest that immersive virtual reality is an effective nonpharmacologic, adjunctive pain reduction technique in the pediatric burn population undergoing painful rehabilitation therapy. The magnitude of the analgesic effect is clinically meaningful and is maintained with repeated use. PMID:20692769

  17. A randomized, controlled trial of immersive virtual reality analgesia, during physical therapy for pediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Yuko S; Hoffman, Hunter G; Blough, David K; Patterson, David R; Jensen, Mark P; Soltani, Maryam; Carrougher, Gretchen J; Nakamura, Dana; Sharar, Sam R

    2011-02-01

    This randomized, controlled, within-subjects (crossover design) study examined the effects of immersive virtual reality as an adjunctive analgesic technique for hospitalized pediatric burn inpatients undergoing painful physical therapy. Fifty-four subjects (6-19 years old) performed range-of-motion exercises under a therapist's direction for 1-5 days. During each session, subjects spent equivalent time in both the virtual reality and the control conditions (treatment order randomized and counterbalanced). Graphic rating scale scores assessing the sensory, affective, and cognitive components of pain were obtained for each treatment condition. Secondary outcomes assessed subjects' perception of the virtual reality experience and maximum range-of-motion. Results showed that on study day one, subjects reported significant decreases (27-44%) in pain ratings during virtual reality. They also reported improved affect ("fun") during virtual reality. The analgesia and affect improvements were maintained with repeated virtual reality use over multiple therapy sessions. Maximum range-of-motion was not different between treatment conditions, but was significantly greater after the second treatment condition (regardless of treatment order). These results suggest that immersive virtual reality is an effective nonpharmacologic, adjunctive pain reduction technique in the pediatric burn population undergoing painful rehabilitation therapy. The magnitude of the analgesic effect is clinically meaningful and is maintained with repeated use. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcendental Meditation and Reduced Trauma Symptoms in Female Inmates: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Nidich, Sanford; Seng, Angela; Compton, Blaze; O'connor, Tom; Salerno, John W; Nidich, Randi

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the general population, trauma experiences are higher among incarcerated women. To evaluate the effects of Transcendental Meditation (TM) on trauma symptoms in female offenders. Twenty-two inmates at the Coffee Creek Correctional Facility in Wilsonville, OR, with at least 4 months left of incarceration were enrolled in this randomized controlled pilot study. Subjects were randomly assigned to either the TM group (n = 11) or a wait-list control group (n = 11). Subjects were measured at baseline and 4-month posttest using the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian version (PCL-C; primary outcome) with intrusive thoughts, avoidance, and hyperarousal subscales (secondary outcomes). Twenty of the subjects (10 in each group) took part in their treatment assignment and completed posttesting. Significant reductions were found on total trauma (p < 0.036), intrusive thoughts (p < 0.026), and hyperarousal (p < 0.043) on the PCL-C. Effect sizes ranged from 0.65 to 0.99 for all variables. Eighty-one percent of the TM subjects were compliant with their program. The results of this study indicate feasibility of the TM program in a female prison population and suggest that TM may be an effective tool for decreasing trauma symptoms. Future large-scale research is warranted.

  19. Depression treatment for impoverished mothers by point-of-care providers: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Segre, Lisa S; Brock, Rebecca L; O'Hara, Michael W

    2015-04-01

    Depression in low-income, ethnic-minority women of childbearing age is prevalent and compromises infant and child development. Yet numerous barriers prevent treatment delivery. Listening Visits (LV), an empirically supported intervention developed for delivery by British home-visiting nurses, could address this unmet mental health need. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluated the effectiveness of LV delivered at a woman's usual point-of-care, including home visits or an ob-gyn office. Listening Visits were delivered to depressed pregnant women or mothers of young children by their point-of-care provider (e.g., home visitor or physician's assistant), all of whom had low levels of prior counseling experience. Three quarters of the study's participants were low-income. Of those who reported ethnicity, all identified themselves as minorities. Participants from 4 study sites (N = 66) were randomized in a 2:1 ratio, to LV or a wait-list control group (WLC). Assessments, conducted at baseline and 8 weeks, evaluated depression, quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Depressive severity, depressive symptoms, and quality of life significantly improved among LV recipients as compared with women receiving standard social/health services. Women valued LV as evidenced by their high attendance rates and treatment satisfaction ratings. In a stepped model of depression care, LV can provide an accessible, acceptable, and effective first-line treatment option for at-risk women who otherwise are unlikely to receive treatment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Transcendental Meditation and Reduced Trauma Symptoms in Female Inmates: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Nidich, Sanford; Seng, Angela; Compton, Blaze; O’Connor, Tom; Salerno, John W; Nidich, Randi

    2017-01-01

    Context: Compared with the general population, trauma experiences are higher among incarcerated women. Objective: To evaluate the effects of Transcendental Meditation (TM) on trauma symptoms in female offenders. Design: Twenty-two inmates at the Coffee Creek Correctional Facility in Wilsonville, OR, with at least 4 months left of incarceration were enrolled in this randomized controlled pilot study. Subjects were randomly assigned to either the TM group (n = 11) or a wait-list control group (n = 11). Main Outcome Measures: Subjects were measured at baseline and 4-month posttest using the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian version (PCL-C; primary outcome) with intrusive thoughts, avoidance, and hyperarousal subscales (secondary outcomes). Twenty of the subjects (10 in each group) took part in their treatment assignment and completed posttesting. Results: Significant reductions were found on total trauma (p < 0.036), intrusive thoughts (p < 0.026), and hyperarousal (p < 0.043) on the PCL-C. Effect sizes ranged from 0.65 to 0.99 for all variables. Eighty-one percent of the TM subjects were compliant with their program. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate feasibility of the TM program in a female prison population and suggest that TM may be an effective tool for decreasing trauma symptoms. Future large-scale research is warranted. PMID:28333611

  1. Music therapy improves the mood of patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cells transplantation (controlled randomized study).

    PubMed

    Dóro, Carlos Antonio; Neto, José Zanis; Cunha, Rosemyriam; Dóro, Maribel Pelaez

    2017-03-01

    The allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is a therapeutic medical treatment for various neoplastic hematologic, congenital, genetic, or acquired disorders. In this procedure which combines high-dose chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy and has a high degree of cytotoxicity, the patient experiences solitary confinement, which causes psychological distress, pain, anxiety, mood disorders and can lead him/her to depression. Music therapy was applied with the purpose of decreasing this social confinement. This is a randomized controlled trial. Patients (n = 100) were selected randomly. Patients (n = 50) were selected for the Experimental Music Therapy Group (EMG) and n = 50 for the control group (CG) who received the standard treatment. The intervention of live music was applied using music therapy techniques. Assessment and quantification were made using the visual analog scale (VAS). The dependent variables were pain, anxiety, and mood of patients. The Mann-Whitney test (p < 0.05) applied was considered statistically significant when comparing the groups, improving mood significantly (EMG). Music therapy proved to be a strong ally in the treatment of patients undergoing allo-HSCT, providing bio-psychosocial welfare.

  2. Sternotomy or drainage for a hemopericardium after penetrating trauma: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Andrew J; Navsaria, Pradeep H; Hommes, Martijn; Ball, Chad G; Edu, Sorin; Kahn, Delawir

    2014-03-01

    To determine if stable patients with a hemopericardium detected after penetrating chest trauma can be safely managed with pericardial drainage alone. The current international practice is to perform a sternotomy and cardiac repair if a hemopericardium is detected after penetrating chest trauma. The experience in Cape Town, South Africa, on performing a mandatory sternotomy in hemodynamically stable patients was that a sternotomy was unnecessary and the cardiac injury, if present, had sealed. A single-center parallel-group randomized controlled study was completed. All hemodynamically stable patients with a hemopericardium confirmed at subxiphoid pericardial window (SPW), and no active bleeding, were randomized. The primary outcome measure was survival to discharge from hospital. Secondary outcomes were complications and postoperative hospital stay. Fifty-five patients were randomized to sternotomy and 56 to pericardial drainage and wash-out only. Fifty-one of the 55 patients (93%) randomized to sternotomy had either no cardiac injury or a tangential injury. There were only 4 patients with penetrating wounds to the endocardium and all had sealed. There was 1 death postoperatively among the 111 patients (0.9%) and this was in the sternotomy group. The mean intensive care unit (ICU) stay for a sternotomy was 2.04 days (range, 0-25 days) compared with 0.25 days (range, 0-2) for the drainage (P < 0.001). The estimated mean difference highlighted a stay of 1.8 days shorter in the ICU for the drainage group (95% CI: 0.8-2.7). Total hospital stay was significantly shorter in the SPW group (P < 0.001; 95% CI: 1.4-3.3). SPW and drainage is effective and safe in the stable patient with a hemopericardium after penetrating chest trauma, with no increase in mortality and a shorter ICU and hospital stay. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00823160).

  3. Executive Control and the Experience of Regret

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Patrick; Riggs, Kevin J.; Beck, Sarah R.

    2012-01-01

    The experience of regret rests on a counterfactual analysis of events. Previous research indicates that regret emerges at around 6 years of age, marginally later than the age at which children begin to answer counterfactual questions correctly. We hypothesized that the late emergence of regret relative to early counterfactual thinking is a result…

  4. CO2 driven endotracheal tube cuff control in critically ill patients: A randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    De Pascale, Gennaro; Pennisi, Mariano Alberto; Vallecoccia, Maria Sole; Bello, Giuseppe; Maviglia, Riccardo; Montini, Luca; Di Gravio, Valentina; Cutuli, Salvatore Lucio; Conti, Giorgio; Antonelli, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    To determine the safety and clinical efficacy of an innovative integrated airway system (AnapnoGuard™ 100 system) that continuously monitors and controls the cuff pressure (Pcuff), while facilitating the aspiration of subglottic secretions (SS). This was a prospective, single centre, open-label, randomized, controlled feasibility and safety trial. The primary endpoint of the study was the rate of device related adverse events (AE) and serious AE (SAE) as a result of using AnapnoGuard (AG) 100 during mechanical ventilation. Secondary endpoints were: (1) mechanical complications rate (2) ICU staff satisfaction; (3) VAP occurrence; (4) length of mechanical ventilation; (5) length of Intensive Care Unit stay and mortality; (6) volume of evacuated subglottic secretions. Sixty patients were randomized to be intubated with the AG endotracheal-tube (ETT) and connected to the AG 100 system allowing Pcuff adjustment and SS aspiration; or with an ETT combined with SS drainage and Pcuff controlled manually. No difference in adverse events rate was identified between the groups. The use of AG system was associated with a significantly higher incidence of Pcuff determinations in the safety range (97.3% vs. 71%; p<0.01) and a trend to a greater volume of aspirated SS secretions: (192.0[64-413] ml vs. 150[50-200], p = 0.19 (total)); (57.8[20-88.7] ml vs. 50[18.7-62] ml, p = 0.11 (daily)). No inter-group difference was detected using AG system vs. controls in terms of post-extubation throat pain level (0 [0-2] vs. 0 [0-3]; p = 0.7), hoarseness (42.9% vs. 75%; p = 0.55) and tracheal mucosa oedema (16.7% vs. 10%; p = 0.65). Patients enrolled in the AG group had a trend to reduced VAP risk of ventilator-associated pneumonia(VAP) (14.8% vs. 40%; p = 0.06), which were more frequently monomicrobial (25% vs. 70%; p = 0.03). No statistically significant difference was observed in duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU stay, and mortality. The use AG 100 system and AG tube in critically

  5. Description of the Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jeffrey P.; Rallo, Rosemary A.

    1987-01-01

    A laboratory facility for the study of control laws for large flexible spacecraft is described. The facility fulfills the requirements of the Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) design challenge for a laboratory experiment, which will allow slew maneuvers and pointing operations. The structural apparatus is described in detail sufficient for modelling purposes. The sensor and actuator types and characteristics are described so that identification and control algorithms may be designed. The control implementation computer and real-time subroutines are also described.

  6. Description of the Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jeffrey P.; Rallo, Rosemary A.

    1987-01-01

    A laboratory facility for the study of control laws for large flexible spacecraft is described. The facility fulfills the requirements of the Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) design challenge for laboratory experiments, which will allow slew maneuvers and pointing operations. The structural apparatus is described in detail sufficient for modelling purposes. The sensor and actuator types and characteristics are described so that identification and control algorithms may be designed. The control implementation computer and real-time subroutines are also described.

  7. Randomized controlled trial of benzocaine versus placebo spray for pain relief at hysterosalpingogram.

    PubMed

    Bachman, E A; Senapati, S; Sammel, M D; Kalra, S K

    2014-06-01

    Many women experience pain during hysterosalpingogram (HSG). This prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study assessed whether the use of benzocaine spray during HSG is associated with reduced pain as compared with placebo. Thirty women presenting for HSG were enrolled and randomized to either benzocaine or saline spray. Treatment groups were similar in age, race, parity, pre-procedure oral analgesic use and history of dysmenorrhoea and/or chronic pelvic pain. Median change in pain score from baseline to procedure was 50.6mm (-7.4 to 98.8mm) in the benzocaine group and 70.4mm (19.8 to 100mm) in the placebo group. There was no difference between groups after adjusting for history of dysmenorrhoea. There was no difference in resolution of pain in benzocaine versus placebo groups at 5 min post procedure--median pain score difference -11.1 (-90.1 to 18.5) versus -37.0 (-100 to 1.2)--or at 30 min post procedure. Satisfaction scores did not differ by treatment and did not correlate with pain score during the procedure (rho=0.005). The use of benzocaine spray does not significantly improve pain relief during HSG nor does it hasten resolution of pain post HSG. Of interest, patient satisfaction was not correlated with pain. Many women experience pain during hysterosalpingogram (HSG), which is a test used to evaluate the uterine cavity and fallopian tube. We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study to assess whether the use of benzocaine spray during HSG is associated with reduced pain as compared with placebo. Thirty women presenting for HSG were enrolled and randomized to either benzocaine or saline spray. Treatment groups were similar in age, race, previous pregnancies, pre-procedure oral analgesic use and history of dysmenorrhoea (painful periods) and/or chronic pelvic pain. There was no difference in pain scores or resolution of pain between the two groups. Satisfaction scores did not differ by treatment group

  8. Enhancing Foster Parent Training with Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Mersky, Joshua P.; Topitzes, James; Janczewski, Colleen E.; McNeil, Cheryl B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Research indicates that foster parents often do not receive sufficient training and support to help them meet the demands of caring for foster children with emotional and behavioral disturbances. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is a clinically efficacious intervention for child externalizing problems, and it also has been shown to mitigate parenting stress and enhance parenting attitudes and behaviors. However, PCIT is seldom available to foster families, and it rarely has been tested under intervention conditions that are generalizable to community-based child welfare service contexts. To address this gap, PCIT was adapted and implemented in a field experiment using 2 novel approaches—group-based training and telephone consultation—both of which have the potential to be integrated into usual care. Method This study analyzes 129 foster-parent-child dyads who were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 conditions: (a) waitlist control, (b) brief PCIT, and (c) extended PCIT. Self-report and observational data were gathered at multiple time points up to 14 weeks post baseline. Results Findings from mixed-model, repeated measures analyses indicated that the brief and extended PCIT interventions were associated with a significant decrease in self-reported parenting stress. Results from mixed-effects generalized linear models showed that the interventions also led to significant improvements in observed indicators of positive and negative parenting. The brief course of PCIT was as efficacious as the extended PCIT intervention. Conclusions The findings suggest that usual training and support services can be improved upon by introducing foster parents to experiential, interactive PCIT training. PMID:26977251

  9. Activity groups for people with schizophrenia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dean, Madeleine; Weston, Adam R W; Osborn, David P; Willis, Suzie; Patterson, Sue; Killaspy, Helen; Leurent, Baptiste; Crawford, Mike J

    2014-08-01

    UK guidelines recommend that patients with schizophrenia are offered access to social activities, however, the impact of such interventions have not been examined in a large randomized trial. To investigate the effect of an activity group intervention on mental health and global functioning 12 months after randomization compared to standard care alone. Secondary analysis of data from the MATISSE study. Primary outcomes were global functioning, assessed using the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF), and mental health symptoms measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). About 140 participants were randomized to activity groups and 137 to standard care alone. Follow-up data were collected from 242 (87%) participants. Mental health improved significantly among those offered activity groups (change in PANSS score = -6.0, 95% CI -2.3 to -9.8) but global functioning did not (change in GAF score = 0.8, 95% CI -1.7 to 3.3). No significant differences were found between treatment arms. Offering activity groups to patients with schizophrenia was not associated with any additional clinical benefits. There was poor uptake and attendance at activity groups. Interventions that aim to improve negative symptoms may be useful in enabling engagement in psychosocial interventions.

  10. Acupuncture for alcohol withdrawal: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Trümpler, François; Oez, Suzan; Stähli, Peter; Brenner, Hans Dieter; Jüni, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Previous trials on acupuncture in alcohol addiction were in outpatients and focused on relapse prevention. Rates of dropout were high and interpretation of results difficult. We compared auricular laser and needle acupuncture with sham laser stimulation in reducing the duration of alcohol withdrawal. Inpatients undergoing alcohol withdrawal were randomly allocated to laser acupuncture (n = 17), needle acupuncture (n = 15) or sham laser stimulation (n = 16). Attempts were made to blind patients, therapists and outcome assessors, but this was not feasible for needle acupuncture. The duration of withdrawal symptoms (as assessed using a nurse-rated scale) was the primary outcome; the duration of sedative prescription was the secondary outcome. Patients randomized to laser and sham laser had identical withdrawal symptom durations (median 4 days). Patients randomized to needle stimulation had a shorter duration of withdrawal symptoms (median 3 days; P = 0.019 versus sham intervention), and tended to have a shorter duration of sedative use, but these differences diminished after adjustment for baseline differences. The data from this pilot trial do not suggest a relevant benefit of auricular laser acupuncture for alcohol withdrawal. A larger trial including adequate sham interventions is needed, however, to reliably determine the effectiveness of any type of auricular acupuncture in this condition.

  11. Randomized, controlled trial of an intervention for toddlers with autism: the Early Start Denver Model.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Geraldine; Rogers, Sally; Munson, Jeffrey; Smith, Milani; Winter, Jamie; Greenson, Jessica; Donaldson, Amy; Varley, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    To conduct a randomized, controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM), a comprehensive developmental behavioral intervention, for improving outcomes of toddlers diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Forty-eight children diagnosed with ASD between 18 and 30 months of age were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups: (1) ESDM intervention, which is based on developmental and applied behavioral analytic principles and delivered by trained therapists and parents for 2 years; or (2) referral to community providers for intervention commonly available in the community. Compared with children who received community-intervention, children who received ESDM showed significant improvements in IQ, adaptive behavior, and autism diagnosis. Two years after entering intervention, the ESDM group on average improved 17.6 standard score points (1 SD: 15 points) compared with 7.0 points in the comparison group relative to baseline scores. The ESDM group maintained its rate of growth in adaptive behavior compared with a normative sample of typically developing children. In contrast, over the 2-year span, the comparison group showed greater delays in adaptive behavior. Children who received ESDM also were more likely to experience a change in diagnosis from autism to pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified, than the comparison group. This is the first randomized, controlled trial to demonstrate the efficacy of a comprehensive developmental behavioral intervention for toddlers with ASD for improving cognitive and adaptive behavior and reducing severity of ASD diagnosis. Results of this study underscore the importance of early detection of and intervention in autism.

  12. Explanation of random experiment sheduling and its application to space station analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. E.

    1970-01-01

    The capability of the McDonnell-Douglas Phase B space station concept to complete the Blue Book Experiment program is analyzed and the Random experiment program with Resource Impact (REPRI) which was used to generate the data is described. The results indicate that station manpower and electrical power are the two resources which will constrain the amount of the Blue Book program that the station can complete. The station experiment program and its resource requirements are sensitive to levels of manpower and electrical power 13.5 men and 11 kilowatts. Continuous artificial gravity experiments have much less impact on the experiment program than experiments using separate artificial gravity periods. Station storage volume presently allocated for the FPE's and their supplies (1600 cu ft) is more than adequate. The REPRI program uses the Monte Carlo technique to generate a set of feasible experiment schedules for a space station. The schedules are statistically analyzed to determine the impact of the station experiment program resource requirements on the station concept. Also, the sensitivity of the station concept to one or more resources is assessed.

  13. Radar backscatter from the sea: Controlled experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. K.

    1992-04-01

    The subwindowing method of modelling synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) imaging of ocean waves was extended to allow wave propagation in arbitrary directions. Simulated images show that the SAR image response to swells that are imaged by velocity bunching is reduced by random smearing due to wind-generated waves. The magnitude of this response is not accurately predicted by introducing a finite coherence time in the radar backscatter. The smearing does not affect the imaging of waves by surface radar cross-section modulation, and is independent of the wind direction. Adjusting the focus of the SAR processor introduces an offset in the image response of the surface scatters. When adjusted by one-half the azimuthal phase velocity of the wave, this compensates the incoherent advance of the wave being imaged, leading to a higher image contrast. The azimuthal cut-off and range rotation of the spectral peak are predicted when the imaging of wind-generated wave trains is simulated. The simulated images suggest that velocity bunching and azimuthal smearing are strongly interdependent, and cannot be included in a model separately.

  14. MiDAS ENCORE: Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Report of 6-Month Results.

    PubMed

    Staats, Peter S; Benyamin, Ramsin M

    2016-02-01

    Patients suffering from neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) often experience moderate to severe pain and significant functional disability. Neurogenic claudication results from progressive degenerative changes in the spine, and most often affects the elderly. Both the MILD® procedure and epidural steroid injections (ESIs) offer interventional pain treatment options for LSS patients experiencing neurogenic claudication refractory to more conservative therapies. MILD provides an alternative to ESIs via minimally invasive lumbar decompression. Prospective, multi-center, randomized controlled clinical trial. Twenty-six US interventional pain management centers. To compare patient outcomes following treatment with either MILD (treatment group) or ESIs (active control group) in LSS patients with neurogenic claudication and verified ligamentum flavum hypertrophy. This prospective, multi-center, randomized controlled clinical trial includes 2 study arms with a 1-to-1 randomization ratio. A total of 302 patients were enrolled, with 149 randomized to MILD and 153 to the active control. Six-month follow-up has been completed and is presented in this report. In addition, one year follow-up will be conducted for patients in both study arms, and supplementary 2 year outcome data will be collected for patients in the MILD group only. Outcomes are assessed using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), numeric pain rating scale (NPRS) and Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ). Primary efficacy is the proportion of ODI responders, tested for statistical superiority of the MILD group versus the active control group. ODI responders are defined as patients achieving the validated Minimal Important Change (MIC) of =10 point improvement in ODI from baseline to follow-up. Similarly, secondary efficacy includes proportion of NPRS and ZCQ responders using validated MIC thresholds. Primary safety is the incidence of device or procedure-related adverse events in each

  15. Experiments with a Magnetically Controlled Pendulum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    A magnetically controlled pendulum is used for observing free and forced oscillations, including nonlinear oscillations and chaotic motion. A data-acquisition system stores the data and displays time series of the oscillations and related phase plane plots, Poincare maps, Fourier spectra and histograms. The decay constant of the pendulum can be…

  16. Reproducibility, Controllability, and Optimization of Lenr Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, David J.

    2006-02-01

    Low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) measurements are significantly and increasingly reproducible. Practical control of the production of energy or materials by LENR has yet to be demonstrated. Minimization of costly inputs and maximization of desired outputs of LENR remain for future developments.

  17. Minimum intervention dentistry approach to managing early childhood caries: a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Arrow, Peter; Klobas, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    A pragmatic randomized control trial was undertaken to compare the minimum intervention dentistry (MID) approach, based on the atraumatic restorative treatment procedures (MID-ART: Test), against the standard care approach (Control) to treat early childhood caries in a primary care setting. Consenting parent/child dyads were allocated to the Test or Control group using stratified block randomization. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. Participants were examined at baseline and at follow-up by two calibrated examiners blind to group allocation status (κ = 0.77), and parents completed a questionnaire at baseline and follow-up. Dental therapists trained in MID-ART provided treatment to the Test group and dentists treated the Control group using standard approaches. The primary outcome of interest was the number of children who were referred for specialist pediatric care. Secondary outcomes were the number of teeth treated, changes in child oral health-related quality of life and dental anxiety and parental perceptions of care received. Data were analyzed on an intention to treat basis; risk ratio for referral for specialist care, test of proportions, Wilcoxon rank test and logistic regression were used. Three hundred and seventy parents/carers were initially screened; 273 children were examined at baseline and 254 were randomized (Test = 127; Control = 127): mean age = 3.8 years, SD 0.90; 59% male, mean dmft = 4.9, SD 4.0. There was no statistically significant difference in age, sex, baseline caries experience or child oral health-related quality of life between the Test and Control group. At follow-up (mean interval 11.4 months, SD 3.1 months), 220 children were examined: Test = 115, Control = 105. Case-notes review of 231 children showed Test = 6 (5%) and Control = 53 (49%) were referred for specialist care, P < 0.0001. More teeth were filled in the Test group (mean = 2.93, SD 2.48) than in the Control group (mean = 1.54, SD

  18. Mindfulness Meditation Training and Executive Control Network Resting State Functional Connectivity: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Taren, Adrienne A; Gianaros, Peter J; Greco, Carol M; Lindsay, Emily K; Fairgrieve, April; Brown, Kirk Warren; Rosen, Rhonda K; Ferris, Jennifer L; Julson, Erica; Marsland, Anna L; Creswell, J David

    Mindfulness meditation training has been previously shown to enhance behavioral measures of executive control (e.g., attention, working memory, cognitive control), but the neural mechanisms underlying these improvements are largely unknown. Here, we test whether mindfulness training interventions foster executive control by strengthening functional connections between dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC)-a hub of the executive control network-and frontoparietal regions that coordinate executive function. Thirty-five adults with elevated levels of psychological distress participated in a 3-day randomized controlled trial of intensive mindfulness meditation or relaxation training. Participants completed a resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan before and after the intervention. We tested whether mindfulness meditation training increased resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) between dlPFC and frontoparietal control network regions. Left dlPFC showed increased connectivity to the right inferior frontal gyrus (T = 3.74), right middle frontal gyrus (MFG) (T = 3.98), right supplementary eye field (T = 4.29), right parietal cortex (T = 4.44), and left middle temporal gyrus (T = 3.97, all p < .05) after mindfulness training relative to the relaxation control. Right dlPFC showed increased connectivity to right MFG (T = 4.97, p < .05). We report that mindfulness training increases rsFC between dlPFC and dorsal network (superior parietal lobule, supplementary eye field, MFG) and ventral network (right IFG, middle temporal/angular gyrus) regions. These findings extend previous work showing increased functional connectivity among brain regions associated with executive function during active meditation by identifying specific neural circuits in which rsFC is enhanced by a mindfulness intervention in individuals with high levels of psychological distress. Clinicaltrials.gov,NCT01628809.

  19. Telehealth to improve asthma control in pregnancy: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zairina, Elida; Abramson, Michael J; McDonald, Christine F; Li, Jonathan; Dharmasiri, Thanuja; Stewart, Kay; Walker, Susan P; Paul, Eldho; George, Johnson

    2016-07-01

    Poorly controlled asthma during pregnancy is hazardous for both mother and foetus. Better asthma control may be achieved if patients are involved in regular self-monitoring of symptoms and self-management according to a written asthma action plan. Telehealth applications to optimize asthma management and outcomes in pregnant women have not yet been evaluated. This study evaluated the efficacy of a telehealth programme supported by a handheld respiratory device in improving asthma control during pregnancy. Pregnant women with asthma (n = 72) from two antenatal clinics in Melbourne, Australia, were randomized to one of two groups: (i) intervention-involving a telehealth programme (management of asthma with supportive telehealth of respiratory function in pregnancy (MASTERY(©) )) supported by a handheld respiratory device and an Android smart phone application (Breathe-easy(©) ) and written asthma action plan or (ii) control-usual care. The primary outcome was change in asthma control at 3 and 6 months (prenatal). Secondary outcomes included changes in quality of life and lung function, and perinatal/neonatal outcomes. At baseline, participants' mean (± standard deviation) age was 31.4 ± 4.5 years and gestational age 16.7 ± 3.1 weeks. At 6 months, the MASTERY group had better asthma control (P = 0.02) and asthma-related quality of life (P = 0.002) compared with usual care. There were no significant differences between groups in lung function, unscheduled health-care visits, days off work/study, oral corticosteroid use, or perinatal outcomes. Differences between groups were not significant at 3 months. Telehealth interventions supporting self-management are feasible and could potentially improve asthma control and asthma-related quality of life during pregnancy. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  20. Effects of the FITKids randomized controlled trial on executive control and brain function.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Charles H; Pontifex, Matthew B; Castelli, Darla M; Khan, Naiman A; Raine, Lauren B; Scudder, Mark R; Drollette, Eric S; Moore, Robert D; Wu, Chien-Ting; Kamijo, Keita

    2014-10-01

    To assess the effect of a physical activity (PA) intervention on brain and behavioral indices of executive control in preadolescent children. Two hundred twenty-one children (7-9 years) were randomly assigned to a 9-month afterschool PA program or a wait-list control. In addition to changes in fitness (maximal oxygen consumption), electrical activity in the brain (P3-ERP) and behavioral measures (accuracy, reaction time) of executive control were collected by using tasks that modulated attentional inhibition and cognitive flexibility. Fitness improved more among intervention participants from pretest to posttest compared with the wait-list control (1.3 mL/kg per minute, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.3 to 2.4; d = 0.34 for group difference in pre-to-post change score). Intervention participants exhibited greater improvements from pretest to posttest in inhibition (3.2%, 95% CI: 0.0 to 6.5; d = 0.27) and cognitive flexibility (4.8%, 95% CI: 1.1 to 8.4; d = 0.35 for group difference in pre-to-post change score) compared with control. Only the intervention group increased attentional resources from pretest to posttest during tasks requiring increased inhibition (1.4 µV, 95% CI: 0.3 to 2.6; d = 0.34) and cognitive flexibility (1.5 µV, 95% CI: 0.6 to 2.5; d = 0.43). Finally, improvements in brain function on the inhibition task (r = 0.22) and performance on the flexibility task correlated with intervention attendance (r = 0.24). The intervention enhanced cognitive performance and brain function during tasks requiring greater executive control. These findings demonstrate a causal effect of a PA program on executive control, and provide support for PA for improving childhood cognition and brain health. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. Randomized controlled trial of peer mentoring for individuals with traumatic brain injury and their significant others.

    PubMed

    Hanks, Robin A; Rapport, Lisa J; Wertheimer, Jeffrey; Koviak, Carole

    2012-08-01

    To examine the efficacy of a peer-mentoring program for persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and their significant others, and to determine the relationship of this mentoring program to 3 main outcomes: (1) emotional well-being; (2) post-TBI quality of life; and (3) community integration. Randomized controlled trial. Midwestern rehabilitation hospital. Persons with TBI (n=96) and significant others/caregivers (n=62). Persons with TBI and friends/caregivers who knew the person prior to their injury were randomly assigned to a treatment (mentored) or no-treatment (no mentoring) control group immediately prior to discharge from the rehabilitation unit and were mentored for up to 2 years. Peer Mentoring Questionnaire; Brief Symptom Inventory-18; Family Assessment Device; Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations; Short Michigan Alcohol Screening Test; Medical Outcomes Study 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey; and Community Integration Measure. Eighty-eight percent of individuals who were involved in the mentoring program reported positive experiences. t tests revealed that among persons with TBI, individuals who received mentoring had significantly better behavioral control and less chaos in the living environment (P=.04), lower alcohol use (P=.01), less emotion-focused (P=.04) and avoidance coping (P=.03), and good physical quality of life (P=.04) compared with those who did not receive mentoring. Among significant others, mentored individuals demonstrated greater community integration (P=.03) than the nonmentored control group. Mentoring can be an effective way to benefit mood and healthy coping after TBI, and it can help to prevent maladaptive behaviors, such as substance abuse and behavioral dyscontrol, in the living situation. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A randomized controlled trial of simulation-based training for ear, nose, and throat emergencies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew Edward; Navaratnam, Annakan; Jablenska, Lily; Dimitriadis, Panagiotis A; Sharma, Rishi

    2015-08-01

    Life-threatening ear, nose, and throat (ENT) emergencies are uncommon but require immediate skilled management. We investigated if traditional lecture-based teaching can be improved by a simulation and lecture hybrid approach. A single-blinded, prospective, randomized controlled trial. Two groups of interns with no previous ENT experience were randomized to one of two training groups: a simulation/lecture hybrid group or a lecture-only control group. Both groups received 90 minutes of training covering the assessment of critically ill patients and four ENT emergency topics. Both groups received the same initial lecture slides. The control group received additional slides, and the simulation group received simulated emergency scenario training using basic mannequins. Following the training, candidates were asked to provide feedback on their perception of training, and they were formally assessed with a standardized one-to-one viva. Thirty-eight interns were recruited: 18 in the control group and 20 in the simulation group. The candidates in the simulation group performed significantly better in all viva situations (P < .05) and had better perception of learning (P < .05). Additionally, the simulation group was more likely to recommend the training to a colleague (P < .05). We have demonstrated that replacing traditional lecture-based training with a mixture of lectures and emergency scenario simulation is more effective at preparing junior doctors for ENT emergencies, and better met their learning needs. Implementing this kind of teaching is feasible with a minimum of additional resources or time. 1b © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Running injuries in novice runners enrolled in different training interventions: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Baltich, J; Emery, C A; Whittaker, J L; Nigg, B M

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this trial was to evaluate injury risk in novice runners participating in different strength training interventions. This was a pilot randomized controlled trial. Novice runners (n = 129, 18-60 years old, <2 years recent running experience) were block randomized to one of three groups: a "resistance" strength training group, a "functional" strength training group, or a stretching "control" group. The primary outcome was running related injury. The number of participants with complaints and the injury rate (IR = no. injuries/1000 running hours) were quantified for each intervention group. For the first 8 weeks, participants were instructed to complete their training intervention three to five times a week. The remaining 4 months was a maintenance period. NCT01900262. A total of 52 of the 129 (40%) novice runners experienced at least one running related injury: 21 in the functional strength training program, 16 in the resistance strength training program and 15 in the control stretching program. Injury rates did not differ between study groups [IR = 32.9 (95% CI 20.8, 49.3) in the functional group, IR = 31.6 (95% CI 18.4, 50.5) in the resistance group, and IR = 26.7 (95% CI 15.2, 43.2)] in the control group. Although this was a pilot assessment, home-based strength training did not appear to alter injury rates compared to stretching. Future studies should consider methods to minimize participant drop out to allow for the assessment of injury risk. Injury risk in novice runners based on this pilot study will inform the development of future larger studies investigating the impact of injury prevention interventions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Does peer use influence adoption of efficient cookstoves? Evidence from a randomized controlled trial in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Beltramo, Theresa; Blalock, Garrick; Levine, David I; Simons, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the effect of peer usage on consumer demand for efficient cookstoves with a randomized controlled trial in rural Uganda. The authors tested whether the neighbors of buyers who ordered and received a stove are more likely to purchase an efficient cookstove than the neighbors of buyers who ordered but have not yet received a stove. The authors found that neighbors of buyers who have experience with the stove are not detectably more likely to purchase a stove than neighbors of buyers who have not yet received their stove. The authors found evidence of peer effects in opinions about efficient cookstoves. Knowing that a prominent member of the community has the efficient stove predicts 17-22 percentage points higher odds of strongly favoring the stove. However, this more favorable opinion seemingly has no effect on purchase decisions.

  5. 2. VIEW OF THE EXPERIMENT CONTROL PANEL IN 1970. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF THE EXPERIMENT CONTROL PANEL IN 1970. THE NUCLEAR SAFETY GROUP CONDUCTED ABOUT 1,700 CRITICAL MASS EXPERIMENTS USING URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM IN SOLUTIONS (900 TESTS), COMPACTED POWDER (300), AND METALLIC FORMS (500). ALL 1,700 CRITICALITY ASSEMBLIES WERE CONTROLLED FROM THIS PANEL. - Rocky Flats Plant, Critical Mass Laboratory, Intersection of Central Avenue & 86 Drive, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  6. Balance versus resistance training on postural control in patients with Parkinson's disease: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Santos, Suhaila M; da Silva, Rubens A; Terra, Marcelle B; Almeida, Isabela A; de Melo, Lúcio B; Ferraz, Henrique B

    2017-04-01

    Evidences have shown that physiotherapy programs may improve the balance of individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD), although it is not clear which specific exercise program is better. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of balance versus resistance training on postural control measures in PD patients. Randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in a physiotherapy outpatient clinic of a university hospital. A total of 40 PD participants were randomly divided into two groups: balance training (BT) and resistance training (RT). The BT group focused on balance training, functional independence and gait while the RT group performed resistance exercises emphasizing the lower limbs and trunk, both supervised by trained physiotherapists. Therapy sessions were held twice a week (at 60 minutes), totaling 24 sessions. The primary outcome was evaluated by force platform with center of pressure sway measures in different balance conditions and the secondary outcome was evaluated by Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest) scale to determine the effects of the intervention on postural control. Significant improvement of postural control (pre vs. post 15.1 vs. 9.6 cm2) was only reported in favor of BT group (d=1.17) for one-legged stand condition on force platform. The standardized mean difference between groups was significantly (P<0.02), with 36% of improvement for BT vs. 0.07% for RT on this condition. Significant improvement (P<0.05) was also observed in favor of BT (in mean 3.2%) for balance gains in some BESTest scores, when compared to RT group (-0.98%). Postural control in Parkinson's disease is improved when training by a directional and specific balance program than a resistance training program. Balance training is superior to resistance training in regard to improving postural control of individuals with PD. Gold standard instruments (high in cost and difficult to access) were used to assess balance, as well as scales with clinical

  7. A randomized controlled trial of smartphone-based mindfulness training for smoking cessation: a study protocol.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Kathleen A; Pal, Prasanta; Rojiani, Rahil; Dallery, Jesse; O'Malley, Stephanie S; Brewer, Judson A

    2015-04-14

    Tobacco use is responsible for the death of about 1 in 10 individuals worldwide. Mindfulness training has shown preliminary efficacy as a behavioral treatment for smoking cessation. Recent advances in mobile health suggest advantages to smartphone-based smoking cessation treatment including smartphone-based mindfulness training. This study evaluates the efficacy of a smartphone app-based mindfulness training program for improving smoking cessation rates at 6-months follow-up. A two-group parallel-randomized clinical trial with allocation concealment will be conducted. Group assignment will be concealed from study researchers through to follow-up. The study will be conducted by smartphone and online. Daily smokers who are interested in quitting smoking and own a smartphone (n = 140) will be recruited through study advertisements posted online. After completion of a baseline survey, participants will be allocated randomly to the control or intervention group. Participants in both groups will receive a 22-day smartphone-based treatment program for smoking. Participants in the intervention group will receive mobile mindfulness training plus experience sampling. Participants in the control group will receive experience sampling-only. The primary outcome measure will be one-week point prevalence abstinence from smoking (at 6-months follow-up) assessed using carbon monoxide breath monitoring, which will be validated through smartphone-based video chat. This is the first intervention study to evaluate smartphone-based delivery of mindfulness training for smoking cessation. Such an intervention may provide treatment in-hand, in real-world contexts, to help individuals quit smoking. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02134509 . Registered 7 May 2014.

  8. Does Assessing Suicidality Frequently and Repeatedly Cause Harm? A Randomized Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Law, Mary Kate; Furr, R. Michael; Arnold, Elizabeth Mayfield; Mneimne, Malek; Jaquett, Caroline; Fleeson, William

    2015-01-01

    Assessing suicidality is common in mental health practice and is fundamental to suicide research. Although necessary, there is significant concern that such assessments have unintended harmful consequences. Using a longitudinal randomized control design, we evaluated whether repeated and frequent assessments of suicide-related thoughts and behaviors negatively affected individuals, including those at-risk for suicide-related outcomes. Adults (N = 282), including many diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), were recruited through psychiatric outpatient clinics and from the community at large, and were randomly assigned to assessment groups. A Control Assessment group responded to questions regarding negative psychological experiences several times each day during a 2-week Main Observation phase. During the same observation period, an Intensive Suicide Assessment group responded to the same questions, along with questions regarding suicidal behavior and ideation. Negative psychological outcomes were measured during the Main Observation phase (for BPD symptoms unrelated to suicide and for BPD-relevant emotions) and/or at the end of each week during the Main Observation phase and monthly for 6 months thereafter (for all outcomes, including suicidal ideation and behavior). Results revealed little evidence that intensive suicide assessment triggered negative outcomes, including suicidal ideation or behavior, even among people with BPD. A handful of effects did reach or approach significance, though these were temporary and non-robust. However, given the seriousness of some outcomes, we recommend that researchers or clinicians who implement experience sampling methods including suicide-related items carefully consider the benefits of asking about suicide and to inform participants about possible risks. PMID:25894705

  9. Does assessing suicidality frequently and repeatedly cause harm? A randomized control study.

    PubMed

    Law, Mary Kate; Furr, R Michael; Arnold, Elizabeth Mayfield; Mneimne, Malek; Jaquett, Caroline; Fleeson, William

    2015-12-01

    Assessing suicidality is common in mental health practice and is fundamental to suicide research. Although necessary, there is significant concern that such assessments have unintended harmful consequences. Using a longitudinal randomized control design, the authors evaluated whether repeated and frequent assessments of suicide-related thoughts and behaviors negatively affected individuals, including those at-risk for suicide-related outcomes. Adults (N = 282), including many diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD), were recruited through psychiatric outpatient clinics and from the community at large, and were randomly assigned to assessment groups. A control assessment group responded to questions regarding negative psychological experiences several times each day during a 2-week main observation phase. During the same observation period, an intensive suicide assessment group responded to the same questions, along with questions regarding suicidal behavior and ideation. Negative psychological outcomes were measured during the main observation phase (for BPD symptoms unrelated to suicide and for BPD-relevant emotions) and/or at the end of each week during the main observation phase and monthly for 6 months thereafter (for all outcomes, including suicidal ideation and behavior). Results revealed little evidence that intensive suicide assessment triggered negative outcomes, including suicidal ideation or behavior, even among people with BPD. A handful of effects did reach or approach significance, though these were temporary and nonrobust. However, given the seriousness of some outcomes, the authors recommend that researchers or clinicians who implement experience sampling methods including suicide-related items carefully consider the benefits of asking about suicide and to inform participants about possible risks. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Millikan's Oil-Drop Experiment as a Remotely Controlled Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Bodo; Grober, Sebastian; Vetter, Martin; Jodl, Hans-Jorg

    2012-01-01

    The Millikan oil-drop experiment, to determine the elementary electrical charge e and the quantization of charge Q = n [middle dot] e, is an essential experiment in physics teaching but it is hardly performed in class for several reasons. Therefore, we offer this experiment as a remotely controlled laboratory (RCL). We describe the interactivity…

  11. Experiments on individual strategy updating in iterated snowdrift game under random rematching.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hang; Ma, Shoufeng; Jia, Ning; Wang, Guangchao

    2015-03-07

    How do people actually play the iterated snowdrift games, particularly under random rematching protocol is far from well explored. Two sets of laboratory experiments on snowdrift game were conducted to investigate human strategy updating rules. Four groups of subjects were modeled by experience-weighted attraction learning theory at individual-level. Three out of the four groups (75%) passed model validation. Substantial heterogeneity is observed among the players who update their strategies in four typical types, whereas rare people behave like belief-based learners even under fixed pairing. Most subjects (63.9%) adopt the reinforcement learning (or alike) rules; but, interestingly, the performance of averaged reinforcement learners suffered. It is observed that two factors seem to benefit players in competition, i.e., the sensitivity to their recent experiences and the overall consideration of forgone payoffs. Moreover, subjects with changing opponents tend to learn faster based on their own recent experience, and display more diverse strategy updating rules than they do with fixed opponent. These findings suggest that most of subjects do apply reinforcement learning alike updating rules even under random rematching, although these rules may not improve their performance. The findings help evolutionary biology researchers to understand sophisticated human behavioral strategies in social dilemmas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effectiveness of Immersive Virtual Reality in Surgical Training-A Randomized Control Trial.

    PubMed

    Pulijala, Yeshwanth; Ma, Minhua; Pears, Matthew; Peebles, David; Ayoub, Ashraf

    2018-05-01

    Surgical training methods are evolving with the technological advancements, including the application of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality. However, 28 to 40% of novice residents are not confident in performing a major surgical procedure. VR surgery, an immersive VR (iVR) experience, was developed using Oculus Rift and Leap Motion devices (Leap Motion, Inc, San Francisco, CA) to address this challenge. Our iVR is a multisensory, holistic surgical training application that demonstrates a maxillofacial surgical technique, the Le Fort I osteotomy. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of using VR surgery on the self-confidence and knowledge of surgical residents. A multisite, single-blind, parallel, randomized controlled trial (RCT) was performed. The participants were novice surgical residents with limited experience in performing the Le Fort I osteotomy. The primary outcome measures were the self-assessment scores of trainee confidence using a Likert scale and an objective assessment of the cognitive skills. Ninety-five residents from 7 dental schools were included in the RCT. The participants were randomly divided into a study group of 51 residents and a control group of 44. Participants in the study group used the VR surgery application on an Oculus Rift with Leap Motion device. The control group participants used similar content in a standard PowerPoint presentation on a laptop. Repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance was applied to the data to assess the overall effect of the intervention on the confidence of the residents. The study group participants showed significantly greater perceived self-confidence levels compared with those in the control group (P = .034; α = 0.05). Novices in the first year of their training showed the greatest improvement in their confidence compared with those in their second and third year. iVR experiences improve the knowledge and self-confidence of the surgical residents

  13. Biofeedback Intervention for Stress and Anxiety among Nursing Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ratanasiripong, Paul; Ratanasiripong, Nop; Kathalae, Duangrat

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. It has been well documented that nursing students across the world experience stress and anxiety throughout their education and training. The purpose of this randomized controlled study is to investigate the impact of biofeedback intervention program on nursing students' levels of stress and anxiety during their first clinical training. Methods. Participants consisted of 60 second-year baccalaureate nursing students. The 30 participants in the biofeedback group received training on how to use the biofeedback device to assist in stress and anxiety management for 5 weeks while the 30 in the control group did not receive any training. Findings. Results indicated that the biofeedback group was able to maintain the stress level while the control group had a significant increase in the stress level over the 5-week period of clinical training. Additionally, the biofeedback group had a significant reduction in anxiety, while the control group had a moderate increase in anxiety. Conclusions. The better the nursing students can manage their stress and anxiety, the more successful they can be in their clinical training. Ultimately, the more psychologically healthy the nursing students are, the more likely they will flourish and graduate to become productive and contributing members of the nursing profession. PMID:22811932

  14. Combined universal and selective prevention for adolescent alcohol use: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Teesson, M; Newton, N C; Slade, T; Carragher, N; Barrett, E L; Champion, K E; Kelly, E V; Nair, N K; Stapinski, L A; Conrod, P J

    2017-07-01

    No existing models of alcohol prevention concurrently adopt universal and selective approaches. This study aims to evaluate the first combined universal and selective approach to alcohol prevention. A total of 26 Australian schools with 2190 students (mean age: 13.3 years) were randomized to receive: universal prevention (Climate Schools); selective prevention (Preventure); combined prevention (Climate Schools and Preventure; CAP); or health education as usual (control). Primary outcomes were alcohol use, binge drinking and alcohol-related harms at 6, 12 and 24 months. Climate, Preventure and CAP students demonstrated significantly lower growth in their likelihood to drink and binge drink, relative to controls over 24 months. Preventure students displayed significantly lower growth in their likelihood to experience alcohol harms, relative to controls. While adolescents in both the CAP and Climate groups demonstrated slower growth in drinking compared with adolescents in the control group over the 2-year study period, CAP adolescents demonstrated faster growth in drinking compared with Climate adolescents. Findings support universal, selective and combined approaches to alcohol prevention. Particularly novel are the findings of no advantage of the combined approach over universal or selective prevention alone.

  15. A randomized controlled trial of mindfulness to reduce stress and burnout among intern medical practitioners.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Michael J; Clough, Bonnie; Gill, Kim; Langan, Fleur; O'Connor, Angela; Spencer, Lyndall

    2017-04-01

    Stress and burnout are highly prevalent among medical doctors, and are associated with negative consequences for doctors, patients, and organizations. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effectiveness of a mindfulness training intervention in reducing stress and burnout among medical practitioners, by means of a Randomised Controlled Trial design. Participants were 44 intern doctors completing an emergency department rotation in a major Australian hospital. Participants were randomly assigned to either an active control (one hour extra break per week) or the 10-week mindfulness training intervention. Measures of stress and burnout were taken pre-, mid- and post intervention. Participants undergoing the 10-week mindfulness training program reported greater improvements in stress and burnout relative to participants in the control condition. Significant reduction in stress and burnout was observed for participants in the mindfulness condition. No such reductions were observed for participants in the control condition. Mindfulness interventions may provide medical practitioners with skills to effectively manage stress and burnout, thereby reducing their experience of these symptoms. It is likely that doctors would benefit from the inclusion of such a training program as a part of their general medical education.

  16. A single blind randomized control trial on support groups for Chinese persons with mild dementia.

    PubMed

    Young, Daniel K W; Kwok, Timothy C Y; Ng, Petrus Y N

    2014-01-01

    Persons with mild dementia experience multiple losses and manifest depressive symptoms. This research study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a support group led by a social worker for Chinese persons with mild dementia. Participants were randomly assigned to either a ten-session support group or a control group. Standardized assessment tools were used for data collection at pretreatment and post-treatment periods by a research assistant who was kept blind to the group assignment of the participants. Upon completion of the study, 20 treatment group participants and 16 control group participants completed all assessments. At baseline, the treatment and control groups did not show any significant difference on all demographic variables, as well as on all baseline measures; over one-half (59%) of all the participants reported having depression, as assessed by a Chinese Geriatric Depression Scale score ≥8. After completing the support group, the depressive mood of the treatment group participants reduced from 8.83 (standard deviation =2.48) to 7.35 (standard deviation =2.18), which was significant (Wilcoxon signed-rank test; P=0.017, P<0.05), while the control group's participants did not show any significant change. This present study supports the efficacy and effectiveness of the support group for persons with mild dementia in Chinese society. In particular, this present study shows that a support group can reduce depressive symptoms for participants.

  17. Effects of an anger management and stress control program on smoking cessation: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Bektas Murat; Unal, Mustafa; Pirdal, Hasan; Karahan, Tevfik Fikret

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a cognitive behavioral therapy-oriented anger management and stress control program on smokers' quit rates. Of 2348 smokers, 350 were randomly allocated into study and control groups (n = 175 each). An individualized therapy cessation technique was selected for each participant (combination of behavioral counseling, nicotine replacement therapy, and/or pharmacotherapy). The participants in the control group attended a standard quit program, whereas the study group also received an additional 5-session (90 minutes each) cognitive behavioral therapy-oriented program aimed at improving their anger and stress coping skills. At the beginning of the study, both groups were asked to complete the Trait Anger Scale (TAS) of the State and Trait Anger Scale and the Self-Confident (SCS) and Hopeless (HS) subscales of the Stress Coping Styles Inventory; pretest smoking status of both groups and their coping skills were compared with each other as soon as the program ended (post-test results) and after 3 and 6 months (first and second follow-up tests). Although there was no difference between pretest scores on the TAS (P = .234), SCS (P = .130), and HS (P = .148) subscales, post-test results indicate that the study groups' TAS and HS scores decreased and SCS scores increased (P < .001), whereas there was no change in the control group (P > .05). The study group had a better quit level after 6 months compared with the control group (44% vs 27.4%; P < .001). The anger management and stress control program was found to have a significant effect on cessation (odds ratio, 2.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.14-3.85). The anger and stress coping skills program may increase the success of quitting smoking. © Copyright 2014 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  18. Evaluation of random plasma glucose for assessment of glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ain, Qurratul; Latif, Atif; Jaffar, Syed Raza; Ijaz, Aamir

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of random plasma glucose in outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus for assessing glycaemic control. This comparative, cross-sectional study was conducted at the chemical pathology department of PNS Shifa Hospital, Karachi, from August 2015 to March 2016, and comprised data of subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus who reported for evaluation of glycaemic control in non-fasting state. All blood samples were analysed for random plasma glucose and glycated haemoglobin. Random plasma glucose was compared as an index test with glycated haemoglobin considering it as reference standard at a value of less than 7% for good glycaemic control. SPSS 20 was used for data analysis. Of the 222 subjects, 93(42%) had good glycaemic control. Random plasma glucose showed strong positive correlation with glycated haemoglobin (p=0.000).Area under curve for random plasma glucose as determined by plotting receiver operating characteristic curve against glycated haemoglobin value of 7% was 0.89 (95% confidence interval: 0.849-0.930). Random plasma glucose at cut-off value of 150 mg/dl was most efficient for ruling out poor glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with 90.7% sensitivity and69.9% specificity and Youden's index of 0.606. Random plasma glucose may be used to reflect glycaemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus in areas where glycated haemoglobin is not feasible.

  19. Highlighting consensus among medical scientists increases public support for vaccines: evidence from a randomized experiment.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Sander L; Clarke, Chris E; Maibach, Edward W

    2015-12-03

    A substantial minority of American adults continue to hold influential misperceptions about childhood vaccine safety. Growing public concern and refusal to vaccinate poses a serious public health risk. Evaluations of recent pro-vaccine health communication interventions have revealed mixed results (at best). This study investigated whether highlighting consensus among medical scientists about childhood vaccine safety can lower public concern, reduce key misperceptions about the discredited autism-vaccine link and promote overall support for vaccines. American adults (N = 206) were invited participate in an online survey experiment. Participants were randomly assigned to either a control group or to one of three treatment interventions. The treatment messages were based on expert-consensus estimates and either normatively described or prescribed the extant medical consensus: "90 % of medical scientists agree that vaccines are safe and that all parents should be required to vaccinate their children". Compared to the control group, the consensus-messages significantly reduced vaccine concern (M = 3.51 vs. M = 2.93, p < 0.01) and belief in the vaccine-autism-link (M = 3.07 vs M = 2.15, p < 0.01) while increasing perceived consensus about vaccine safety (M = 83.93 vs M = 89.80, p < 0.01) and public support for vaccines (M = 5.66 vs M = 6.22, p < 0.01). Mediation analysis further revealed that the public's understanding of the level of scientific agreement acts as an important "gateway" belief by promoting public attitudes and policy support for vaccines directly as well as indirectly by reducing endorsement of the discredited autism-vaccine link. These findings suggest that emphasizing the medical consensus about (childhood) vaccine safety is likely to be an effective pro-vaccine message that could help prevent current immunization rates from declining. We recommend that clinicians and public health officials

  20. Randomized controlled trial of Gastrografin in adhesive small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Burge, Jonathan; Abbas, Saleh M; Roadley, Graeme; Donald, Jennifer; Connolly, Andrew; Bissett, Ian P; Hill, Andrew G

    2005-08-01

    Several previous studies have shown that Gastrografin can be utilized to triage patients with adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO) to an operative or a non-operative course. Previous studies assessing the therapeutic effect of Gastrografin have been confounded by post-administration radiology alerting the physician to the treatment group of the patient. Therefore the aim of the present paper was to test the hypothesis that Gastrografin hastens the non-operative resolution of (ASBO). Patients, diagnosed with ASBO on clinical and radiological grounds, were randomized to receive Gastrografin or placebo in a double-blinded fashion. Patients did not undergo further radiological investigation. If the patient required subsequent radiological intervention or surgical intervention they were excluded from the study. End-points were passage of time to resolution of ASBO (flatus and bowel motion), length of hospital stay and complications. Forty-five patients with ASBO were randomized to receive either Gastrografin or placebo. Two patients were excluded due to protocol violations. Four patients in each group required surgery. Eighteen of the remaining patients received Gastrografin and 17 received placebo. Patients who received Gastrografin had complete resolution of their ASBO significantly earlier than placebo patients (12 vs 21 h, P = 0.009) and this translated into a median of a 1-day saving in time in hospital (3 vs 4 days, P = 0.03). Gastrografin accelerates resolution of ASBO by a specific therapeutic effect.

  1. Using internet and mobile phone technology to deliver an automated physical activity program: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hurling, Robert; Catt, Michael; Boni, Marco De; Fairley, Bruce William; Hurst, Tina; Murray, Peter; Richardson, Alannah; Sodhi, Jaspreet Singh

    2007-04-27

    The Internet has potential as a medium for health behavior change programs, but no controlled studies have yet evaluated the impact of a fully automated physical activity intervention over several months with real-time objective feedback from a monitor. The aim was to evaluate the impact of a physical activity program based on the Internet and mobile phone technology provided to individuals for 9 weeks. A single-center, randomized, stratified controlled trial was conducted from September to December 2005 in Bedfordshire, United Kingdom, with 77 healthy adults whose mean age was 40.4 years (SD = 7.6) and mean body mass index was 26.3 (SD = 3.4). Participants were randomized to a test group that had access to an Internet and mobile phone-based physical activity program (n = 47) or to a control group (n = 30) that received no support. The test group received tailored solutions for perceived barriers, a schedule to plan weekly exercise sessions with mobile phone and email reminders, a message board to share their experiences with others, and feedback on their level of physical activity. Both groups were issued a wrist-worn accelerometer to monitor their level of physical activity; only the test group received real-time feedback via the Internet. The main outcome measures were accelerometer data and self-report of physical activity. At the end of the study period, the test group reported a significantly greater increase over baseline than did the control group for perceived control (P < .001) and intention/expectation to exercise (P < .001). Intent-to-treat analyses of both the accelerometer data (P = .02) and leisure time self-report data (P = .03) found a higher level of moderate physical activity in the test group. The average increase (over the control group) in accelerometer-measured moderate physical activity was 2 h 18 min per week. The test group also lost more percent body fat than the control group (test group: -2.18, SD = 0.59; control group: -0.17, SD = 0

  2. NASA experiments onboard the controlled impact demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayduk, R. J.; Alfaro-Bou, E.; Fasanella, E. L.

    1985-01-01

    The structural crashworthiness tests conducted by NASA on the December 1, 1984 controlled impact demonstration are discussed. The components and locations of the data acquisition and photographic systems developed by NASA to evaluate impact loads throughout the aircraft structure and the transmission of loads into the dummies are described. The effectiveness of the NASA designed absorbing seats and the vertical, longitudinal, and transverse impact loads are measured. Data that is extremely applicable to crash dynamics structural research was obtained by the data acquisition system and very low load levels were measured for the NASA energy absorbing seats.

  3. NASA supercritical laminar flow control airfoil experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    The design and goals of experimental investigations of supercritical LFC airfoils conducted in the NASA Langley 8-ft Transonic Pressure Tunnel beginning in March 1982 are reviewed. Topics addressed include laminarization aspects; flow-quality requirements; simulation of flight parameters; the setup of screens, honeycomb, and sonic throat; the design cycle; theoretical pressure distributions and shock-free limits; drag divergence and stability analysis; and the LFC suction system. Consideration is given to the LFC airfoil model, the air-flow control system, airfoil-surface instrumentation, liner design and hardware, and test options. Extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, photographs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  4. Testing a Violence-Prevention Intervention for Incarcerated Women Using a Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubiak, Sheryl Pimlott; Kim, Woo Jong; Fedock, Gina; Bybee, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Beyond Violence (BV), a new prevention program for women with assaultive offenses, demonstrated feasibility in previous studies. This study's purpose is to assess the efficacy of BV using a randomized control trial. Method: Eligible women were randomly assigned to treatment as usual (TAU) and the experimental condition (BV). Measures of…

  5. Effect of Art Production on Negative Mood: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Chloe E.; Robbins, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    Art therapists have long held that art production causes reductions in stress and elevations in mood (Rubin, 1999). The authors examined this claim in a randomized, controlled trial. Fifty adults between the ages of 18 and 30 were randomly assigned to either create an art work or to view and sort a series of art prints. Three measures of overall…

  6. After-School Multifamily Groups: A Randomized Controlled Trial Involving Low-Income, Urban, Latino Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Lynn; Moberg, D. Paul; Brown, Roger; Rodriguez-Espiricueta, Ismael; Flores, Nydia I.; Burke, Melissa P.; Coover, Gail

    2006-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial evaluated a culturally representative parent engagement strategy with Latino parents of elementary school children. Ten urban schools serving low-income children from mixed cultural backgrounds participated in a large study. Classrooms were randomly assigned either either to an after-school, multifamily support…

  7. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Preventive Intervention for Perinatal Depression in High-Risk Latinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Huynh-Nhu; Perry, Deborah F.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral (CBT) intervention to prevent perinatal depression in high-risk Latinas. Method: A sample of 217 participants, predominantly low-income Central American immigrants who met demographic and depression risk criteria, were randomized into usual…

  8. What to Do when Data Are Missing in Group Randomized Controlled Trials. NCEE 2009-0049

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael J.; Olsen, Robert B.; Bell, Stephen H.; Price, Cristofer

    2009-01-01

    This NCEE Technical Methods report examines how to address the problem of missing data in the analysis of data in Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) of educational interventions, with a particular focus on the common educational situation in which groups of students such as entire classrooms or schools are randomized. Missing outcome data are a…

  9. Art Therapy and Cognitive Processing Therapy for Combat-Related PTSD: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Melissa; Decker, Kathleen P.; Kruk, Kerry; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2016-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial was designed to determine if art therapy in conjunction with Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) was more effective for reducing symptoms of combat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than CPT alone. Veterans (N = 11) were randomized to receive either individual CPT, or individual CPT in conjunction with individual…

  10. Maternal Dietary Counseling Reduces Consumption of Energy-Dense Foods among Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitolo, Marcia Regina; Bortolini, Gisele Ane; Campagnolo, Paula Dal Bo; Hoffman, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of a dietary counseling in reducing the intake of energy-dense foods by infants. Design: A randomized controlled trial. Setting and Participants: Sao Leopoldo, Brazil. Mothers and infants of a low-income-group population were randomized into intervention (n = 163) and received dietary counseling during 10 home…

  11. Evaluating the Collaborative Strategic Reading Intervention: An Overview of Randomized Controlled Trial Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchcock, John H.; Kurki, Anja; Wilkins, Chuck; Dimino, Joseph; Gersten, Russell

    2009-01-01

    When attempting to determine if an intervention has a causal impact, the "gold standard" of program evaluation is the randomized controlled trial (RCT). In education studies random assignment is rarely feasible at the student level, making RCTs harder to conduct. School-level assignment is more common but this often requires considerable resources…

  12. Randomized Controlled Trial of the Resilience and Coping Intervention (RCI) with Undergraduate University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, J. Brian; First, Jennifer; Spialek, Matthew L.; Sorenson, Mary E.; Mills-Sandoval, Toby; Lockett, McKenzie; First, Nathan L.; Nitiéma, Pascal; Allen, Sandra F.; Pfefferbaum, Betty

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the Resilience and Coping Intervention (RCI) with college students. Participants: College students (aged 18-23) from a large Midwest US university who volunteered for a randomized controlled trial during the 2015 spring semester. Methods: College students were randomly assigned to an…

  13. Efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Chinese ADHD Children: Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Ng, Gene S. H.; Choi, S. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in Chinese children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or ADHD features. Methods: This study adopted a randomized controlled trial design without blinding. Participants were randomized into either the intervention group (n = 32) and…

  14. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Standardized Behavior Management Intervention for Students with Externalizing Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Martin; Sundell, Knut; Morris, Richard J.; Karlberg, Martin; Melin, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the results from a Swedish randomized controlled trial of a standardized behavior management intervention. The intervention targeted students with externalizing behavior in a regular education setting. First- and second-grade students (N = 100) from 38 schools were randomly assigned to either the intervention or an active…

  15. Meals Enhancing Nutrition after Discharge (MEND): Findings from a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Anthony D.; Godfryd, Alice; Flood, Kellie; Kitchin, Elizabeth; Kilgore, Meredith L.; Allocca, Sally; Locher, Julie L.

    2016-01-01

    Background After older adults experience episodes of poor health or are hospitalized, they may not return to pre-morbid eating behaviors. Furthermore, poor nutrition increases hospital readmission risk, but evidence-based interventions addressing these risks are limited. Objective The pilot study’s objective was to evaluate the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial assessing a post-discharge home-delivered meals program’s impact on older adults’ nutritional intake and hospital readmissions and to assess patient acceptability and satisfaction with the program. The aims of the study were to 1) to evaluate successful recruitment, randomization, and retention of at least 80% of the 24 participants sought; 2) to compare the outcomes of hospital readmission and total daily caloric intake between participants in the intervention and control groups; and 3) to assess patient acceptability and satisfaction with the program. Design This study used a two-arm randomized controlled trial design, and baseline data were collected at enrollment; three 24-hour food recalls were collected during the intervention period; and health services utilization and intervention satisfaction was evaluated 45 days post-discharge. Participants/setting Twenty-four patients from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Hospital’s Acute Care for Elders Unit were enrolled from May 2014 to June 2015. They were 65 or older, at risk of malnutrition, cognitively intact, able to communicate, discharged to a place where the patient or family was responsible for preparing meals, and diagnosed with congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute myocardial infarction, or pneumonia. Final analysis included 21 participants. Intervention The intervention group received 10 days of home-delivered meals and nutrition education; the control group received usual care and nutrition education. Main outcome measures The main outcome was intervention feasibility

  16. A practical approach to automate randomized design of experiments for ligand-binding assays.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Jennifer; Patel, Vimal; Shih, Judy

    2014-03-01

    Design of experiments (DOE) is utilized in optimizing ligand-binding assay by modeling factor effects. To reduce the analyst's workload and error inherent with DOE, we propose the integration of automated liquid handlers to perform the randomized designs. A randomized design created from statistical software was imported into custom macro converting the design into a liquid-handler worklist to automate reagent delivery. An optimized assay was transferred to a contract research organization resulting in a successful validation. We developed a practical solution for assay optimization by integrating DOE and automation to increase assay robustness and enable successful method transfer. The flexibility of this process allows it to be applied to a variety of assay designs.

  17. Randomized controlled trial of benzocaine versus placebo spray for pain relief at hysterosalpingogram

    PubMed Central

    Bachman, Emelia Argyropoulos; Senapati, Suneeta; Sammel, Mary D.; Kalra, Suleena Kansal

    2016-01-01

    Many women experience pain during hysterosalpingogram (HSG). This prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study assessed whether the use of benzocaine spray during HSG is associated with reduced pain as compared with placebo. Thirty women presenting for HSG were enrolled and randomized to either benzocaine or saline spray. Treatment groups were similar in age, race, parity, pre-procedure oral analgesic use and history of dysmenorrhoea and/or chronic pelvic pain. Median change in pain score from baseline to procedure was 50.6 mm (−7.4 to 98.8 mm) in the benzocaine group and 70.4 mm (19.8 to 100 mm) in the placebo group. There was no difference between groups after adjusting for history of dysmenorrhoea. There was no difference in resolution of pain in benzocaine versus placebo groups at 5 min post procedure – median pain score difference – 11.1 (−90.1 to 18.5) versus −37.0 (−100 to 1.2) – or at 30 min post procedure. Satisfaction scores did not differ by treatment and did not correlate with pain score during the procedure (rho = 0.005). The use of benzocaine spray does not significantly improve pain relief during HSG nor does it hasten resolution of pain post HSG. Of interest, patient satisfaction was not correlated with pain. PMID:24745839

  18. Tribulus terrestris for treatment of sexual dysfunction in women: randomized double-blind placebo - controlled study.

    PubMed

    Akhtari, Elham; Raisi, Firoozeh; Keshavarz, Mansoor; Hosseini, Hamed; Sohrabvand, Farnaz; Bioos, Soodabeh; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Ghobadi, Ali

    2014-04-28

    Tribulus terrestris as a herbal remedy has shown beneficial aphrodisiac effects in a number of animal and human experiments. This study was designed as a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial to assess the safety and efficacy of Tribulus terrestris in women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder during their fertile years. Sixty seven women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder were randomly assigned to Tribulus terrestris extract (7.5 mg/day) or placebo for 4 weeks. Desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain were measured at baseline and after 4 weeks after the end of the treatment by using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Two groups were compared by repeated measurement ANOVA test. Thirty women in placebo group and thirty women in drug group completed the study. At the end of the fourth week, patients in the Tribulus terrestris group had experienced significant improvement in their total FSFI (p < 0.001), desire (p < 0.001), arousal (p = 0.037), lubrication (p < 0.001), satisfaction (p < 0.001) and pain (p = 0.041) domains of FSFI. Frequency of side effects was similar between the two groups. Tribulus terrestris may safely and effectively improve desire in women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder. Further investigation of Tribulus terrestris in women is warranted.

  19. Tribulus terrestris for treatment of sexual dysfunction in women: randomized double-blind placebo - controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tribulus terrestris as a herbal remedy has shown beneficial aphrodisiac effects in a number of animal and human experiments. This study was designed as a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial to assess the safety and efficacy of Tribulus terrestris in women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder during their fertile years. Sixty seven women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder were randomly assigned to Tribulus terrestris extract (7.5 mg/day) or placebo for 4 weeks. Desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain were measured at baseline and after 4 weeks after the end of the treatment by using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Two groups were compared by repeated measurement ANOVA test. Results Thirty women in placebo group and thirty women in drug group completed the study. At the end of the fourth week, patients in the Tribulus terrestris group had experienced significant improvement in their total FSFI (p < 0.001), desire (p < 0.001), arousal (p = 0.037), lubrication (p < 0.001), satisfaction (p < 0.001) and pain (p = 0.041) domains of FSFI. Frequency of side effects was similar between the two groups. Conclusions Tribulus terrestris may safely and effectively improve desire in women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder. Further investigation of Tribulus terrestris in women is warranted. PMID:24773615

  20. A preliminary double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized study of baclofen effects in alcoholic smokers

    PubMed Central

    Zywiak, William H.; Edwards, Steven M.; Tidey, Jennifer W.; Swift, Robert M.; Kenna, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale There is presently no approved single treatment for dual alcohol and nicotine dependencies. Objective This pilot study investigated baclofen effects in alcoholic smokers. Methods This was a preliminary double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical study with 30 alcoholic smokers randomized to baclofen at 80 mg/day or placebo. A subgroup (n=18) participated in an alcohol cue-reactivity experiment. Results Baclofen, compared with placebo, significantly decreased the percent days of abstinence from alcohol-tobacco co-use (p=0.004). Alcohol dependence severity moderated baclofen effects, with the higher severity group having the greater baclofen response (p<0.001). Although the percent days of alcohol-tobacco co-use declined in both groups, this decline was greater after placebo than baclofen (p<0.001). Secondary analyses on alcohol or tobacco use alone suggested that the increase in percent days of co-abstinence was driven by the medication differences on heavy drinking days and on percent days smoking. In the cue-reactivity substudy, baclofen slightly decreased alcohol urge (p=0.058) and significantly reduced salivation (p=0.001), but these effects were not related to cue type. Conclusions This study provides preliminary evidence suggesting a possible role of baclofen in the treatment of alcoholic smokers. However, the mixed results and the small sample require larger confirmatory studies. PMID:24973894

  1. Peer support for postpartum depression: volunteers' perceptions, recruitment strategies and training from a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Cindy-Lee

    2013-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial evaluated the effect of telephone-based peer support (mother-to-mother) on preventing postpartum depression among high-risk mothers. This paper reports volunteers' perceptions, which showed that peer support is an effective preventative intervention. Two-hundred and five (205) volunteers were recruited and trained to provide peer support to 349 mothers randomized to the intervention group. Volunteers' perceptions were measured at 12 weeks using the Peer Volunteer Experience Questionnaire, completed by 69% (121) of the 175 volunteers who provided support to at least one mother. Large majorities felt that the training session had prepared them for their role (94.2%), that volunteering did not interfere with their lives (81.8%) and that providing support helped them grow as individuals (87.8%). Over 90% stated that they would become a peer volunteer again, given the opportunity. Recruitment and retention of effective volunteers is essential to the success of any peer-support intervention. Results from this study can assist clinicians and program planners to provide effective training, sufficient on-going support and evaluation and appropriate matching of volunteers to mothers who desire peer support and are at high risk of postpartum depression. PMID:22388589

  2. Music-supported therapy in the rehabilitation of subacute stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Grau-Sánchez, Jennifer; Duarte, Esther; Ramos-Escobar, Neus; Sierpowska, Joanna; Rueda, Nohora; Redón, Susana; Veciana de Las Heras, Misericordia; Pedro, Jordi; Särkämö, Teppo; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2018-04-01

    The effect of music-supported therapy (MST) as a tool to restore hemiparesis of the upper extremity after a stroke has not been appropriately contrasted with conventional therapy. The aim of this trial was to test the effectiveness of adding MST to a standard rehabilitation program in subacute stroke patients. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in which patients were randomized to MST or conventional therapy in addition to the rehabilitation program. The intensity and duration of the interventions were equated in both groups. Before and after 4 weeks of treatment, motor and cognitive functions, mood, and quality of life (QoL) of participants were evaluated. A follow-up at 3 months was conducted to examine the retention of motor gains. Both groups significantly improved their motor function, and no differences between groups were found. The only difference between groups was observed in the language domain for QoL. Importantly, an association was encountered between the capacity to experience pleasure from music activities and the motor improvement in the MST group. MST as an add-on treatment showed no superiority to conventional therapies for motor recovery. Importantly, patient's intrinsic motivation to engage in musical activities was associated with better motor improvement. © 2018 New York Academy of Sciences.

  3. Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass for Morbid Obesity–a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Two Gastrojejunal Anastomosis Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Llopis, Salvador Navarrete; Isaac, Jose; Aulestia, Salvador Navarrete; Bravo, Carlos; Obregon, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: We present a randomized controlled trial of laparoscopic gastric bypass comparing 2 techniques of gastrojejunostomy in patients with morbid obesity. Methods: Eighty consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass between September 2005 and August 2006. Patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups by the use of sealed envelopes. In group A, the gastrojejunal anastomosis was performed with a 21-mm circular-stapler, and in group B, this anastomosis was performed with a 45-mm linear-stapler. The rest of the procedure was identical in both groups. Variables evaluated were complications involving the gastrojejunostomy, operative time, length of stay, and percentage of excess weight loss. Results: Both groups were similar in age and body mass index. No patients experienced leakage or gastrojejunal anastomosis fistula, but group A patients had a more frequent stricture rate (P<0.05). Operative time and hospital stay were comparable in both groups (P>0.05). Percentage excess weight loss at one year following surgery was satisfactory in both groups, without a statistically significant difference (P>0.05). Conclusion: Gastrojejunal anastomosis does not seem to be a critical factor in excess weight loss for morbidly obese patients who underwent laparoscopic gastric bypass. The 2 techniques used in this experience are safe and effective; however, the 45-mm liner-stapler is preferable because it has a lower stricture rate. PMID:19275854

  4. Dental Students' Perceptions of Digital and Conventional Impression Techniques: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Zitzmann, Nicola U; Kovaltschuk, Irina; Lenherr, Patrik; Dedem, Philipp; Joda, Tim

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to analyze inexperienced dental students' perceptions of the difficulty and applicability of digital and conventional implant impressions and their preferences including performance. Fifty undergraduate dental students at a dental school in Switzerland were randomly divided into two groups (2×25). Group A first took digital impressions in a standardized phantom model and then conventional impressions, while the procedures were reversed for Group B. Participants were asked to complete a VAS questionnaire (0-100) on the level of difficulty and applicability (user/patient-friendliness) of both techniques. They were asked which technique they preferred and perceived to be more efficient. A quotient of "effective scan time per software-recorded time" (TRIOS) was calculated as an objective quality indicator for intraoral optical scanning (IOS). The majority of students perceived IOS as easier than the conventional technique. Most (72%) preferred the digital approach using IOS to take the implant impression to the conventional method (12%) or had no preference (12%). Although total work was similar for males and females, the TRIOS quotient indicated that male students tended to use their time more efficiently. In this study, dental students with no clinical experience were very capable of acquiring digital tools, indicating that digital impression techniques can be included early in the dental curriculum to help them catch up with ongoing development in computer-assisted technologies used in oral rehabilitation.

  5. Comparing Adrenaline with Tranexamic Acid to Control Acute Endobronchial Bleeding: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fekri, Mitra Samareh; Hashemi-Bajgani, Seyed Mehdy; Shafahi, Ahmad; Zarshenas, Rozita

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hemoptysis occurs due to either pulmonary diseases or bronchoscopy interventions. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of the endobronchial instillation of adrenaline with that of tranexamic acid. Methods: Fifty patients were randomly selected as 2 double-blinded sample groups (n=25). In these patients, bleeding could not be controlled with cold saline lavage during bronchoscopy and they, therefore, required prescription of another medicine. Adrenaline (1 mg) in one group and tranexamic acid (500 mg) in the other group were diluted in 20 mL of normal saline and instilled through the bronchoscope. This technique was repeated 3 times at 90-second intervals, if necessary. In the case of persistent bleeding, 90 seconds after the last dose, a second medicine was given for bleeding control. Observation of clot through the bronchoscope meant that the bleeding had stopped. The efficacy of tranexamic acid and adrenaline was evaluated and then compared using the Mann–Whitney test. Results: The time of bleeding control had no significant difference between tranexamic acid and adrenaline (P=0.908). Another analysis was done to evaluate bleeding control with a second medicine; the results showed that 1 (4%) patient in the tranexamic acid and 8 (32%) in the adrenaline group needed the second medicine and there was no significant difference between the 2 groups (P=0.609). Conclusion: Our results suggested that tranexamic acid by endobronchial instillation was as efficient as adrenaline in controlling hemoptysis and required less frequent use of a second medicine. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2014120220188 PMID:28360438

  6. Comparing Adrenaline with Tranexamic Acid to Control Acute Endobronchial Bleeding: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Fekri, Mitra Samareh; Hashemi-Bajgani, Seyed Mehdy; Shafahi, Ahmad; Zarshenas, Rozita

    2017-03-01

    Hemoptysis occurs due to either pulmonary diseases or bronchoscopy interventions. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of the endobronchial instillation of adrenaline with that of tranexamic acid. Fifty patients were randomly selected as 2 double-blinded sample groups (n=25). In these patients, bleeding could not be controlled with cold saline lavage during bronchoscopy and they, therefore, required prescription of another medicine. Adrenaline (1 mg) in one group and tranexamic acid (500 mg) in the other group were diluted in 20 mL of normal saline and instilled through the bronchoscope. This technique was repeated 3 times at 90-second intervals, if necessary. In the case of persistent bleeding, 90 seconds after the last dose, a second medicine was given for bleeding control. Observation of clot through the bronchoscope meant that the bleeding had stopped. The efficacy of tranexamic acid and adrenaline was evaluated and then compared using the Mann-Whitney test. The time of bleeding control had no significant difference between tranexamic acid and adrenaline (P=0.908). Another analysis was done to evaluate bleeding control with a second medicine; the results showed that 1 (4%) patient in the tranexamic acid and 8 (32%) in the adrenaline group needed the second medicine and there was no significant difference between the 2 groups (P=0.609). Our results suggested that tranexamic acid by endobronchial instillation was as efficient as adrenaline in controlling hemoptysis and required less frequent use of a second medicine. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2014120220188.

  7. Web-based consultation between general practitioners and nephrologists: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van Gelder, Vincent A; Scherpbier-de Haan, Nynke D; van Berkel, Saskia; Akkermans, Reinier P; de Grauw, Inge S; Adang, Eddy M; Assendelft, Pim J; de Grauw, Wim J C; Biermans, Marion C J; Wetzels, Jack F M

    2017-08-01

    Consultation of a nephrologist is important in aligning care for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) at the primary-secondary care interface. However, current consultation methods come with practical difficulties that can lead to postponed consultation or patient referral instead. This study aimed to investigate whether a web-based consultation platform, telenephrology, led to a lower referral rate of indicated patients. Furthermore, we assessed consultation rate, quality of care, costs and general practitioner (GPs') experiences with telenephrology. Cluster randomized controlled trial with 47 general practices in the Netherlands was randomized to access to telenephrology or to enhanced usual care. A total of 3004 CKD patients aged 18 years or older who were under primary care were included (intervention group n = 1277, control group n = 1727) and 2693 completed the trial. All practices participated in a CKD management course and were given an overview of their CKD patients. The referral rates amounted to 2.3% (n = 29) in the intervention group and 3.0% (n = 52) in the control group, which was a non-significant difference, OR 0.61; 95% CI 0.31 to 1.23. The intervention group's consultation rate was 6.3% (n = 81) against 5.0% (n = 87) (OR 2.00; 95% CI 0.75-5.33). We found no difference in quality of care or costs. The majority of GPs had a positive opinion about telenephrology. The data in our study do not allow for conclusions on the effect of telenephrology on the rate of patient referrals and provider-to-provider consultations, compared to conventional methods. It was positively evaluated by GPs and was non-inferior in terms of quality of care and costs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Challenges and Innovations in a Community-Based Participatory Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Goodkind, Jessica R; Amer, Suha; Christian, Charlisa; Hess, Julia Meredith; Bybee, Deborah; Isakson, Brian L; Baca, Brandon; Ndayisenga, Martin; Greene, R Neil; Shantzek, Cece

    2017-02-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are a long-standing and important design for conducting rigorous tests of the effectiveness of health interventions. However, many questions have been raised about the external validity of RCTs, their utility in explicating mechanisms of intervention and participants' intervention experiences, and their feasibility and acceptability. In the current mixed-methods study, academic and community partners developed and implemented an RCT to test the effectiveness of a collaboratively developed community-based advocacy, learning, and social support intervention. The goals of the intervention were to address social determinants of health and build trust and connections with other mental health services in order to reduce mental health disparities among Afghan, Great Lakes Region African, and Iraqi refugee adults and to engage and retain refugees in trauma-focused treatment, if needed. Two cohorts completed the intervention between 2013 and 2015. Ninety-three adult refugees were randomly assigned to intervention or control group and completed four research interviews (pre-, mid-, and postintervention, and follow-up). Several challenges to conducting a community-based RCT emerged, including issues related to interviewer intervention to assist participants in the control group, diffusion of intervention resources throughout the small refugee communities, and staff and community concerns about the RCT design and what evidence is meaningful to demonstrate intervention effectiveness. These findings highlight important epistemological, methodological, and ethical challenges that should be considered when conducting community-based RCTs and interpreting results from them. In addition, several innovations were developed to address these challenges, which may be useful for other community-academic partnerships engaged in RCTs.

  9. CHALLENGES AND INNOVATIONS IN A COMMUNITY-BASED PARTICIPATORY RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Goodkind, Jessica R.; Amer, Suha; Christian, Charlisa; Hess, Julia Meredith; Bybee, Deborah; Isakson, Brian; Baca, Brandon; Ndaysenga, Martin; Greene, R. Neil; Shantzek, Cece

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are a long-standing and important design for conducting rigorous tests of the effectiveness of health interventions. However, many questions have been raised about the external validity of RCTs, their utility in explicating mechanisms of intervention and participants’ intervention experiences, and their feasibility and acceptability. In the current mixed methods study, academic and community partners developed and implemented an RCT to test the effectiveness of a collaboratively developed community-based advocacy, learning, and social support intervention. The goals of the intervention were to address social determinants of health and build trust and connections with other mental health services in order to reduce mental health disparities among Afghan, Great Lakes Region African and Iraqi refugee adults and engage and retain refugees in trauma-focused treatment, if needed. Two cohorts completed the intervention between 2013-2015. Ninety-three adult refugees were randomly assigned to intervention or control group and completed four research interviews (pre-, mid-, post-intervention, and follow-up). Several challenges to conducting a community-based RCT emerged, including issues related to interviewer intervention to assist participants in the control group, diffusion of intervention resources throughout the small refugee communities, and staff and community concerns about the RCT design and what evidence is meaningful to demonstrate intervention effectiveness. These findings highlight important epistemological, methodological, and ethical challenges that should be considered when conducting community-based RCTs and interpreting results from them. In addition, several innovations were developed to address these challenges, which may be useful for other community-academic partnerships engaged in RCTs. PMID:27179291

  10. Reducing intrusive traumatic memories after emergency caesarean section: A proof-of-principle randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Horsch, Antje; Vial, Yvan; Favrod, Céline; Harari, Mathilde Morisod; Blackwell, Simon E; Watson, Peter; Iyadurai, Lalitha; Bonsall, Michael B; Holmes, Emily A

    2017-07-01

    Preventative psychological interventions to aid women after traumatic childbirth are needed. This proof-of-principle randomized controlled study evaluated whether the number of intrusive traumatic memories mothers experience after emergency caesarean section (ECS) could be reduced by a brief cognitive intervention. 56 women after ECS were randomized to one of two parallel groups in a 1:1 ratio: intervention (usual care plus cognitive task procedure) or control (usual care). The intervention group engaged in a visuospatial task (computer-game 'Tetris' via a handheld gaming device) for 15 min within six hours following their ECS. The primary outcome was the number of intrusive traumatic memories related to the ECS recorded in a diary for the week post-ECS. As predicted, compared with controls, the intervention group reported fewer intrusive traumatic memories (M = 4.77, SD = 10.71 vs. M = 9.22, SD = 10.69, d = 0.647 [95% CI: 0.106, 1.182]) over 1 week (intention-to-treat analyses, primary outcome). There was a trend towards reduced acute stress re-experiencing symptoms (d = 0.503 [95% CI: -0.032, 1.033]) after 1 week (intention-to-treat analyses). Times series analysis on daily intrusions data confirmed the predicted difference between groups. 72% of women rated the intervention "rather" to "extremely" acceptable. This represents a first step in the development of an early (and potentially universal) intervention to prevent postnatal posttraumatic stress symptoms that may benefit both mother and child. ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT02502513. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Design of a factorial experiment with randomization restrictions to assess medical device performance on vascular tissue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Energy-based surgical scalpels are designed to efficiently transect and seal blood vessels using thermal energy to promote protein denaturation and coagulation. Assessment and design improvement of ultrasonic scalpel performance relies on both in vivo and ex vivo testing. The objective of this work was to design and implement a robust, experimental test matrix with randomization restrictions and predictive statistical power, which allowed for identification of those experimental variables that may affect the quality of the seal obtained ex vivo. Methods The design of the experiment included three factors: temperature (two levels); the type of solution used to perfuse the artery during transection (three types); and artery type (two types) resulting in a total of twelve possible treatment combinations. Burst pressures of porcine carotid and renal arteries sealed ex vivo were assigned as the response variable. Results The experimental test matrix was designed and carried out as a split-plot experiment in order to assess the contributions of several variables and their interactions while accounting for randomization restrictions present in the experimental setup. The statistical software package SAS was utilized and PROC MIXED was used to account for the randomization restrictions in the split-plot design. The combination of temperature, solution, and vessel type had a statistically significant impact on seal quality. Conclusions The design and implementation of a split-plot experimental test-matrix provided a mechanism for addressing the existing technical randomization restrictions of ex vivo ultrasonic scalpel performance testing, while preserving the ability to examine the potential effects of independent factors or variables. This method for generating the experimental design and the statistical analyses of the resulting data are adaptable to a wide variety of experimental problems involving large-scale tissue-based studies of medical or experimental

  12. Design of a factorial experiment with randomization restrictions to assess medical device performance on vascular tissue.

    PubMed

    Diestelkamp, Wiebke S; Krane, Carissa M; Pinnell, Margaret F

    2011-05-20

    Energy-based surgical scalpels are designed to efficiently transect and seal blood vessels using thermal energy to promote protein denaturation and coagulation. Assessment and design improvement of ultrasonic scalpel performance relies on both in vivo and ex vivo testing. The objective of this work was to design and implement a robust, experimental test matrix with randomization restrictions and predictive statistical power, which allowed for identification of those experimental variables that may affect the quality of the seal obtained ex vivo. The design of the experiment included three factors: temperature (two levels); the type of solution used to perfuse the artery during transection (three types); and artery type (two types) resulting in a total of twelve possible treatment combinations. Burst pressures of porcine carotid and renal arteries sealed ex vivo were assigned as the response variable. The experimental test matrix was designed and carried out as a split-plot experiment in order to assess the contributions of several variables and their interactions while accounting for randomization restrictions present in the experimental setup. The statistical software package SAS was utilized and PROC MIXED was used to account for the randomization restrictions in the split-plot design. The combination of temperature, solution, and vessel type had a statistically significant impact on seal quality. The design and implementation of a split-plot experimental test-matrix provided a mechanism for addressing the existing technical randomization restrictions of ex vivo ultrasonic scalpel performance testing, while preserving the ability to examine the potential effects of independent factors or variables. This method for generating the experimental design and the statistical analyses of the resulting data are adaptable to a wide variety of experimental problems involving large-scale tissue-based studies of medical or experimental device efficacy and performance.

  13. Randomized controlled trials for Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Lauretani, Fulvio; Ticinesi, Andrea; Meschi, Tiziana; Teresi, Giulio; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Maggio, Marcello

    2016-06-01

    The continuous increase in elderly and oldest-old population, and subsequent rise in prevalence of chronic neurological diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), are a major challenge for healthcare systems. These two conditions are the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases in older persons and physicians should engage treatment for these patients. In this field, Randomized Clinical Trials (RCTs) specifically focused on elderly populations are still lacking. The aim of this study was to identify RCTs conducted among AD and PD and to examine the difference between mean age of enrollment and incidence of these two neurodegenerative diseases. We found that the scenario is different between PD and AD. In particular, the enrollment for PD trials seems to include younger persons than AD, although the incidence of both diseases is similar and highest after 80 years old. The consequence of these results could influence conclusive guidelines of treatment in older parkinsonian patients.

  14. A quality assessment of randomized controlled trial reports in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Lucena, C; Souza, E M; Voinea, G C; Pulgar, R; Valderrama, M J; De-Deus, G

    2017-03-01

    To assess the quality of the randomized clinical trial (RCT) reports published in Endodontics between 1997 and 2012. Retrieval of RCTs in Endodontics was based on a search of the Thomson Reuters Web of Science (WoS) database (March 2013). Quality evaluation was performed using a checklist based on the Jadad criteria, CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) statement and SPIRIT (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials). Descriptive statistics were used for frequency distribution of data. Student's t-test and Welch test were used to identify the influence of certain trial characteristics upon report quality (α = 0.05). A total of 89 RCTs were evaluated, and several methodological flaws were found: only 45% had random sequence generation at low risk of bias, 75% did not provide information on allocation concealment, and 19% were nonblinded designs. Regarding statistics, only 55% of the RCTs performed adequate sample size estimations, only 16% presented confidence intervals, and 25% did not provide the exact P-value. Also, 2% of the articles used no statistical tests, and in 87% of the RCTs, the information provided was insufficient to determine whether the statistical methodology applied was appropriate or not. Significantly higher scores were observed for multicentre trials (P = 0.023), RCTs signed by more than 5 authors (P = 0.03), articles belonging to journals ranked above the JCR median (P = 0.03), and articles complying with the CONSORT guidelines (P = 0.000). The quality of RCT reports in key areas for internal validity of the study was poor. Several measures, such as compliance with the CONSORT guidelines, are important in order to raise the quality of RCTs in Endodontics. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Preparation before colonoscopy: a randomized controlled trial comparing different regimes.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Sita V; Goedhard, Jelle G; Winkens, Bjorn; van Deursen, Cees Th B M

    2011-10-01

    A good bowel preparation is essential for optimal visualization of the large intestine. Several preparations with a difference in composition and volume are available. We compared five methods for bowel cleansing quality and patients' acceptability. Adult ambulatory outpatients scheduled for elective colonoscopy were randomized to receive 4-l polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution (Klean-prep), 2-l PEG solution+ascorbic acid (Moviprep), or a sodium phosphate (NaP) solution, Phosphoral. Patients with the PEG solutions were also randomized to receive simethicone (Aeropax), to investigate whether this improves the bowel cleansing efficacy. Before colonoscopy patients completed a questionnaire about the acceptability and tolerability of the preparation. Endoscopists blinded to the type of preparation gave a bowel cleansing score. Data were available for 461 patients. 2-l PEG+ascorbic acid was noninferior to 4-l PEG in bowel cleansing quality of rectosigmoid and colon. NaP was noninferior to 4-l PEG in bowel cleansing quality of rectosigmoid but inferior for the whole colon. Compliance was significantly less in the group with 4-l PEG compared with the 2-l PEG and NaP group. No difference was found for abdominal cramps. Taste was significantly better in the 2-l PEG group. Simethicone did not improve the bowel cleansing quality. 2-l PEG+ascorbic acid was noninferior to the 4-l PEG solution in bowel cleansing quality and was better in taste and compliance. NaP was inferior to 4-l PEG in bowel cleansing quality. Addition of simethicone gave no improvement.

  16. Positive Psychotherapy for Smoking Cessation: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kahler, Christopher W; Spillane, Nichea S; Day, Anne M; Cioe, Patricia A; Parks, Acacia; Leventhal, Adam M; Brown, Richard A

    2015-11-01

    Greater depressive symptoms and low positive affect (PA) are associated with poor smoking cessation outcomes. Smoking cessation approaches that incorporate a focus on PA may benefit smokers trying to quit. The purpose of this study was to conduct a pilot randomized clinical trial to compare standard smoking cessation treatment (ST) with smoking cessation treatment that targets positive affect, termed positive psychotherapy for smoking cessation (PPT-S). Smokers who were seeking smoking cessation treatment were assigned by urn randomization to receive, along with 8 weeks of nicotine replacement therapy, either ST (n = 31) or PPT-S (n = 35). Seven-day point prevalence smoking abstinence was biochemically confirmed at 8, 16, and 26 weeks. Compared to ST, a greater percentage of participants in PPT-S were abstinent at 8 weeks, 16 weeks, and 26 weeks, but these differences were nonsignificant. In a more statistically powerful longitudinal model, participants in PPT-S had a significantly higher odds of abstinence (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.75; 95% CI = 1.02, 7.42; p = .046) across follow-ups compared to those in ST. The positive effect of PPT-S was stronger for those higher in PA (OR = 6.69, 95% CI = 1.16, 38.47, p = .03). Greater use of PPT-S strategies during the initial 8 weeks of quitting was associated with a less steep decline in smoking abstinence rates over time (OR = 2.64, 95% CI = 1.06, 6.56, p =.04). This trial suggests substantial promise for incorporating PPT into smoking cessation treatment. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Sildenafil Citrate Therapy for Oligohydramnios: A Randomized Controlled Trial.