Science.gov

Sample records for randomly dispersed adatoms

  1. Does Random Dispersion Help Survival?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinazi, Rinaldo B.

    2015-04-01

    Many species live in colonies that prosper for a while and then collapse. After the collapse the colony survivors disperse randomly and found new colonies that may or may not make it depending on the new environment they find. We use birth and death chains in random environments to model such a population and to argue that random dispersion is a superior strategy for survival.

  2. UNSTEADY DISPERSION IN RANDOM INTERMITTENT FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The longitudinal dispersion coefficient of a conservative tracer was calculated from flow tests in a dead-end pipe loop system. Flow conditions for these tests ranged from laminar to transitional flow, and from steady to intermittent and random. Two static mixers linked in series...

  3. Pulse confinement in optical fibers with random dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Chertkov, M.; Gabitov, I.; Moeser, J.

    2001-01-01

    Short-range correlated uniform noise in the dispersion coefficient, inherent in many types of optical fibers, broadens and eventually destroys all initially ultra-short pulses. However, under the constraint that the integral of the random component of the dispersion coefficient is set to zero (pinned), periodically or quasi-periodically along the fiber, the dynamics of the pulse propagation changes dramatically. For the case that randomness is present in addition to constant positive dispersion, the pinning restriction significantly reduces average pulse broadening. If the randomness is present in addition to piece-wise constant periodic dispersion with positive residual value, the pinning may even provide probability distributions of pulse parameters that are numerically indistinguishable from the statistically steady case. The pinning method can be used to both manufacture better fibers and upgrade existing fiber links. PMID:11717397

  4. Indirect exchange interaction between magnetic adatoms in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainov, I. V.; Rozhansky, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Lähderanta, E.

    2015-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of indirect exchange interaction between magnetic adatoms in graphene. The coupling between the adatoms to a graphene sheet is described in the framework of a tunneling Hamiltonian. We account for the possibility of this coupling being of resonant character if a bound state of the adatom effectively interacts with the continuum of 2D delocalized states in graphene. In this case the indirect exchange between the adatoms mediated by the 2D carriers appears to be substantially enhanced compared to the results known from Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) theory. Moreover, unlike the results of RKKY calculations in the case of resonant exchange, the magnetic coupling between the adatoms sitting over different graphene sublattices does not cancel each other. Thus, for a random distribution of the magnetic adatoms over a graphene surface, a nonzero magnetic interaction is expected. We also suggest the idea of controlling the magnetism by driving the tunnel coupling in and out of resonance by a gate voltage.

  5. Adaptive random renormalization group classification of multiscale dispersive processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushman, John; O'Malley, Dan

    2013-04-01

    Renormalization group operators provide a detailed classification tool for dispersive processes. We begin by reviewing a two-scale renormalization group classification scheme. Repeated application of one operator is associated with long time behavior of the process while repeated application of the other is associated with short time behavior. This approach is shown to be robust even in the presence of non-stationary increments and/or infinite second moments. Fixed points of the operators can be used for further sub classification of the processes when appropriate limits exist. As an example we look at advective dispersion in an ergodic velocity field. Let X(t) be a fixed point of the long-time renormalization group operator (RGO) RX(t)=X(rt)/r^p. Scaling laws for the probability density, mean first passage times, and finite-size Lyapunov exponents of such fixed points are reviewed in anticipation of more general results. A generalized RGO, Rp, where the exponent in R above is now a random variable is introduced. Scaling laws associated with these random RGOs (RRGOs) are demonstrated numerically and applied to a process modeling the transition from sub-dispersion to Fickian dispersion. The scaling laws for the RRGO are not simple power laws, but instead are a weighted average of power laws. The weighting in the scaling laws can be determined adaptively via Bayes' theorem.

  6. Dispersal of spores following a persistent random walk.

    PubMed

    Bicout, D J; Sache, I

    2003-03-01

    A model of a persistent random walk is used to describe the transport and deposition of the spore dispersal process. In this model, the spore particle flies along straight line trajectories, with constant speed v, which are interrupted by scattering, originating from interaction of spores with the field and wind variations, which randomly change its direction. To characterize the spore dispersal gradients, we have derived analytical expressions of the deposition probability epsilon (r|v) of airborne spores as a function of the distance r from the spore source in an infinite free space and in a disk of radius R with an absorbing edge that mimics an agricultural field surrounded with fields of nonhost plants and bare land. It is found in the free space that epsilon (r|v) approximately e(-alphar/l), with alpha a function of l(d)/l, where l and l(d) are the scattering and deposition mean free paths, respectively. In the disk, however, epsilon (r|v) is an infinite series of Bessel functions and, exhibits three regimes: absorbing (Rl(d)).

  7. Random walk approach for dispersive transport in pipe networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sämann, Robert; Graf, Thomas; Neuweiler, Insa

    2016-04-01

    Keywords: particle transport, random walk, pipe, network, HYSTEM-EXTAN, OpenGeoSys After heavy pluvial events in urban areas the available drainage system may be undersized at peak flows (Fuchs, 2013). Consequently, rainwater in the pipe network is likely to spill out through manholes. The presence of hazardous contaminants in the pipe drainage system represents a potential risk to humans especially when the contaminated drainage water reaches the land surface. Real-time forecasting of contaminants in the drainage system needs a quick calculation. Numerical models to predict the fate of contaminants are usually based on finite volume methods. Those are not applicable here because of their volume averaging elements. Thus, a more efficient method is preferable, which is independent from spatial discretization. In the present study, a particle-based method is chosen to calculate transport paths and spatial distribution of contaminants within a pipe network. A random walk method for particles in turbulent flow in partially filled pipes has been developed. Different approaches for in-pipe-mixing and node-mixing with respect to the geometry in a drainage network are shown. A comparison of dispersive behavior and calculation time is given to find the fastest model. The HYSTEM-EXTRAN (itwh, 2002) model is used to provide hydrodynamic conditions in the pipe network according to surface runoff scenarios in order to real-time predict contaminant transport in an urban pipe network system. The newly developed particle-based model will later be coupled to the subsurface flow model OpenGeoSys (Kolditz et al., 2012). References: Fuchs, L. (2013). Gefährdungsanalyse zur Überflutungsvorsorge kommunaler Entwässerungssysteme. Sanierung und Anpassung von Entwässerungssystemen-Alternde Infrastruktur und Klimawandel, Österreichischer Wasser-und Abfallwirtschaftsverband, Wien, ISBN, 978-3. itwh (2002). Modellbeschreibung, Institut für technisch-wissenschaftliche Hydrologie Gmb

  8. Adatom bond-induced geometric and electronic properties of passivated armchair graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Tsung; Chung, Hsien-Ching; Yang, Po-Hua; Lin, Shih-Yang; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2015-07-01

    The geometric and electronic properties of passivated armchair graphene nanoribbons, enriched by strong chemical bonding between edge-carbons and various adatoms, are investigated by first-principle calculations. Adatom arrangements, bond lengths, charge distributions, and energy dispersions are dramatically changed by edge passivation. Elements with an atomic number of less than 20 are classified into three types depending on the optimal geometric structures: planar and non-planar structures, the latter of which are associated with specific arrangements and stacked configurations of adatoms. Especially, the nitrogen passivated nanoribbon is the most stable one with a heptagon-pentagon structure at the edges. The low-lying band structures are drastically varied, exhibiting non-monotonous energy dispersions and adatom-dominated bands. A relationship between energy gaps and ribbon widths no longer exists, and some adatoms further induce a semiconductor-metal transition. All the main characteristics are directly reflected in the density of states, revealing dip structures, plateaus, symmetric peaks, and square-root divergent asymmetric peaks. PMID:26051862

  9. Flow Intermittency, Dispersion, and Correlated Continuous Time Random Walks in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    de Anna, Pietro; Le Borgne, Tanguy; Dentz, Marco; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Bolster, Diogo; Davy, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    We study the intermittency of fluid velocities in porous media and its relation to anomalous dispersion. Lagrangian velocities measured at equidistant points along streamlines are shown to form a spatial Markov process. As a consequence of this remarkable property, the dispersion of fluid particles can be described by a continuous time random walk with correlated temporal increments. This new dynamical picture of intermittency provides a direct link between the microscale flow, its intermittent properties, and non-Fickian dispersion.

  10. Heavy adatoms and Anderson localization in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Aguilar, Jose H.; Uchoa, Bruno; Covaci, Lucian; Rappoport, Tatiana G.

    2014-03-01

    We analyze electronic localization in a graphene layer doped with adatoms sitting in the center of the honeycomb hexagon, as happens with the heaviest adatoms. In this configuration, the hybridization between the adatom orbitals and its neighboring carbon atoms mediate hopping processes that connect all six vertices of the honeycomb hexagon around the impurity. The amplitudes of the hopping depend on the symmetry of the orbital that hybridizes with graphene, leading to an orbital-dependent ``plaquette disorder''. To capture the physics of localization, we propose an effective graphene-only Hamiltonian that preserves the associated orbital symmetries and conduct a scaling analysis of the local density of states (LDOS) for large system sizes. We show that adatoms that form a zero-energy resonant state lead to Anderson localization in the vicinity of the Dirac point. Among those, we show that there is a symmetry class of adatoms for which Anderson localization is suppressed, leading to an exotic quantum critical metallic state with large charge puddles, that localizes only at the Dirac point.

  11. Methods and optical fibers that decrease pulse degradation resulting from random chromatic dispersion

    DOEpatents

    Chertkov, Michael; Gabitov, Ildar

    2004-03-02

    The present invention provides methods and optical fibers for periodically pinning an actual (random) accumulated chromatic dispersion of an optical fiber to a predicted accumulated dispersion of the fiber through relatively simple modifications of fiber-optic manufacturing methods or retrofitting of existing fibers. If the pinning occurs with sufficient frequency (at a distance less than or are equal to a correlation scale), pulse degradation resulting from random chromatic dispersion is minimized. Alternatively, pinning may occur quasi-periodically, i.e., the pinning distance is distributed between approximately zero and approximately two to three times the correlation scale.

  12. Stabilizing Single Ni Adatoms on a Two-Dimensional Porous Titania Overlayer at the SrTiO3(110) Surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nickel vapor-deposited on the SrTiO3(110) surface was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy, photoemission spectroscopy (PES), and density functional theory calculations. This surface forms a (4 × 1) reconstruction, composed of a 2-D titania structure with periodic six- and ten-membered nanopores. Anchored at these nanopores, Ni single adatoms are stabilized at room temperature. PES measurements show that the Ni adatoms create an in-gap state located at 1.9 eV below the conduction band minimum and induce an upward band bending. Both experimental and theoretical results suggest that Ni adatoms are positively charged. Our study produces well-dispersed single-adatom arrays on a well-characterized oxide support, providing a model system to investigate single-adatom catalytic and magnetic properties. PMID:25177410

  13. Optimally conductive networks in randomly dispersed CNT:graphene hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Wonbo; Kwon, Youbin; Jeon, Seung-Yeol; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2015-01-01

    A predictive model is proposed that quantitatively describes the synergistic behavior of the electrical conductivities of CNTs and graphene in CNT:graphene hybrids. The number of CNT-to-CNT, graphene-to-graphene, and graphene-to-CNT contacts is calculated assuming a random distribution of CNTs and graphene particles in the hybrids and using an orientation density function. Calculations reveal that the total number of contacts reaches a maximum at a specific composition and depends on the particle sizes of the graphene and CNTs. The hybrids, prepared using inkjet printing, are distinguished by higher electrical conductivities than that of 100% CNT or graphene at certain composition ratios. These experimental results provide strong evidence that this approach involving constituent element contacts is suitable for investigating the properties of particulate hybrid materials. PMID:26564249

  14. The dispersive evolution of charged-particle bunches in random magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earl, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Shortly after a strongly anisotropic beam of charged particles is injected along a guiding magnetic field on which is superimposed a small random conponent, the particle density can be represented by a Gaussian profile whose center moves with the coherent velocity and whose width increases with time at a rate controlled by the coefficient of dispersion. Both parameters depend upon the mean free path, which characterizes scattering by the random fields, and the focusing length, which characterizes spatial variations of the guiding field. These dependencies are known explicitly for the coherent velocity. Formulae for coefficient of dispersion are available only in the limits of very weak and very strong focusing. A new expression for coefficient of dispersion, which spans this gap, is presented.

  15. Adsorption of metal adatoms on single-layer phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kulish, Vadym V; Malyi, Oleksandr I; Persson, Clas; Wu, Ping

    2015-01-14

    Single- or few-layer phosphorene is a novel two-dimensional direct-bandgap nanomaterial. Based on first-principles calculations, we present a systematic study on the binding energy, geometry, magnetic moment and electronic structure of 20 different adatoms adsorbed on phosphorene. The adatoms cover a wide range of valences, including s and p valence metals, 3d transition metals, noble metals, semiconductors, hydrogen and oxygen. We find that adsorbed adatoms produce a rich diversity of structural, electronic and magnetic properties. Our work demonstrates that phosphorene forms strong bonds with all studied adatoms while still preserving its structural integrity. The adsorption energies of adatoms on phosphorene are more than twice higher than on graphene, while the largest distortions of phosphorene are only ∼0.1-0.2 Å. The charge carrier type in phosphorene can be widely tuned by adatom adsorption. The unique combination of high reactivity with good structural stability is very promising for potential applications of phosphorene.

  16. Electronic transport in the quantum spin Hall state due to the presence of adatoms in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Leandro; Lewenkopf, Caio

    Heavy adatoms, even at low concentrations, are predicted to turn a graphene sheet into a topological insulator with substantial gap. The adatoms mediate the spin-orbit coupling that is fundamental to the quantum spin Hall effect. The adatoms act as local spin-orbit scatterer inducing hopping processes between distant carbon atoms giving origin to transverse spin currents. Although there are effective models that describe spectral properties of such systems with great detail, quantitative theoretical work for the transport counterpart is still lacking. We developed a multiprobe recursive Green's function technique with spin resolution to analyze the transport properties for large geometries. We use an effective tight-binding Hamiltonian to describe the problem of adatoms randomly placed at the center of the honeycomb hexagons, which is the case for most transition metals. Our choice of current and voltage probes is favorable to experiments since it filters the contribution of only one spin orientation, leading to a quantized spin Hall conductance of e2 / h . We also discuss the electronic propagation in the system by imaging the local density of states and the electronic current densities. The authors acknowledge the Brazilian agencies CNPq, CAPES, FAPERJ and INCT de Nanoestruturas de Carbono for financial support.

  17. Effects of Cl adatom on Na-Decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xinxiang; Sun, Yu; Dong, Meifeng; Li, Chun; Wang, Jiesheng; Mimura, Hidenori; Yuan, Guang

    2015-06-01

    The effects of the Cl adatom on Na-decorated graphene are studied using first principles density functional theory under the generalized gradient approximation to calculate the adsorption energy, geometric structure, charge density difference, and density of states. When Na and Cl adatoms are simultaneously absorbed on opposite sides of graphene, the adsorption energy of Na increases by about 1 eV and the adsorption system becomes more stable because graphene can effectively transfer the 3s valence of the Na adatom to the Cl adatom.

  18. Random lasing in dye-doped polymer dispersed liquid crystal film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Rina; Shi, Rui-xin; Wu, Xiaojiao; Wu, Jie; Dai, Qin

    2016-09-01

    A dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystal film was designed and fabricated, and random lasing action was studied. A mixture of laser dye, nematic liquid crystal, chiral dopant, and PVA was used to prepare the dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystal film by means of microcapsules. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that most liquid crystal droplets in the polymer matrix ranged from 30 μm to 40 μm, the size of the liquid crystal droplets was small. Under frequency doubled 532 nm Nd:YAG laser-pumped optical excitation, a plurality of discrete and sharp random laser radiation peaks could be measured in the range of 575-590 nm. The line-width of the lasing peak was 0.2 nm and the threshold of the random lasing was 9 mJ. Under heating, the emission peaks of random lasing disappeared. By detecting the emission light spot energy distribution, the mechanism of radiation was found to be random lasing. The random lasing radiation mechanism was then analyzed and discussed. Experimental results indicated that the size of the liquid crystal droplets is the decisive factor that influences the lasing mechanism. The surface anchor role can be ignored when the size of the liquid crystal droplets in the polymer matrix is small, which is beneficial to form multiple scattering. The transmission path of photons is similar to that in a ring cavity, providing feedback to obtain random lasing output. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61378042), the Colleges and Universities in Liaoning Province Outstanding Young Scholars Growth Plans, China (Grant No. LJQ2015093), and Shenyang Ligong University Laser and Optical Information of Liaoning Province Key Laboratory Open Funds, China.

  19. Random lasing in dye-doped polymer dispersed liquid crystal film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Rina; Shi, Rui-xin; Wu, Xiaojiao; Wu, Jie; Dai, Qin

    2016-09-01

    A dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystal film was designed and fabricated, and random lasing action was studied. A mixture of laser dye, nematic liquid crystal, chiral dopant, and PVA was used to prepare the dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystal film by means of microcapsules. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that most liquid crystal droplets in the polymer matrix ranged from 30 μm to 40 μm, the size of the liquid crystal droplets was small. Under frequency doubled 532 nm Nd:YAG laser-pumped optical excitation, a plurality of discrete and sharp random laser radiation peaks could be measured in the range of 575–590 nm. The line-width of the lasing peak was 0.2 nm and the threshold of the random lasing was 9 mJ. Under heating, the emission peaks of random lasing disappeared. By detecting the emission light spot energy distribution, the mechanism of radiation was found to be random lasing. The random lasing radiation mechanism was then analyzed and discussed. Experimental results indicated that the size of the liquid crystal droplets is the decisive factor that influences the lasing mechanism. The surface anchor role can be ignored when the size of the liquid crystal droplets in the polymer matrix is small, which is beneficial to form multiple scattering. The transmission path of photons is similar to that in a ring cavity, providing feedback to obtain random lasing output. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61378042), the Colleges and Universities in Liaoning Province Outstanding Young Scholars Growth Plans, China (Grant No. LJQ2015093), and Shenyang Ligong University Laser and Optical Information of Liaoning Province Key Laboratory Open Funds, China.

  20. Direct measurement of dispersion relation for directional random surface gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnus Arnesen Taklo, Tore; Trulsen, Karsten; Krogstad, Harald; Nieto Borge, José Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Linear wave theory is widely used to model for instance response of ocean structures and ships to water surface gravity waves and assumes that the water surface can be modeled as a linear superposition of regular waves satisfying the linear dispersion relation. The linear dispersion relation is often taken for granted for the interpretation of wave measurements. The interpretation of nautical radar images currently depends on the linear dispersion relation as a prerequisite, Nieto Borge et al. (J. Atmos. Ocean Tech., 2004, vol. 21, pp. 1291-1300). Krogstad & Trulsen (Ocean Dynamics, 2010, vol. 60, pp. 973-991) carried out numerical simulations in one horizontal dimension with the nonlinear Schrödinger equation NLS and the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation MNLS. From wavenumber-frequency spectra obtained from the simulated unidirectional surfaces they found that nonlinear evolution of unidirectional wave fields may cause deviation from the linear dispersion relation. Extending the work by Krogstad & Trulsen (2010) we carried out experiments with unidirectional waves with fixed wave steepness and various bandwidths in a narrow wave tank. These experiments verified the results obtained from the simulations with the (M)NLS models and showed that the directly measured dispersion relation deviated from the linear dispersion relation for sufficiently narrow bandwidths. For broad bandwidths, however, the linear dispersion relation was satisfied, suggesting validity of linear wave theory. By further analysis of the experimental data we suggest that the occurence of the deviation depends on steepness and spectral bandwidth. Recently we have extended the work by Krogstad & Trulsen (2010) to two horizontal dimensions using the MNLS equation and simulated directional random surface gravity waves with bandwidths ranging from narrow to relatively broad. The wavenumber-frequency spectra obtained from these simulated directional surfaces also show deviation from the linear

  1. From random sphere packings to regular pillar arrays: analysis of transverse dispersion.

    PubMed

    Daneyko, Anton; Hlushkou, Dzmitry; Khirevich, Siarhei; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2012-09-28

    We study the impact of microscopic order on transverse dispersion in the interstitial void space of bulk (unconfined) chromatographic beds by numerical simulations of incompressible fluid flow and mass transport of a passive tracer. Our study includes polydisperse random sphere packings (computer-generated with particle size distributions of modern core-shell and sub-2 μm particles), the macropore space morphology of a physically reconstructed silica monolith, and computer-generated regular pillar arrays. These bed morphologies are analyzed by their velocity probability density distributions, transient dispersion behavior, and the dependence of asymptotic transverse dispersion coefficients on the mobile phase velocity. In our work, the spherical particles, the monolith skeleton, and the cylindrical pillars are all treated as impermeable solid phase (nonporous) and the tracer is unretained, to focus on the impact of microscopic order on flow and (particularly transverse) hydrodynamic dispersion in the interstitial void space. The microscopic order of the pillar arrays causes their velocity probability density distributions to start and end abruptly, their transient dispersion coefficients to oscillate, and the asymptotic transverse dispersion coefficients to plateau out of initial power law behavior. The microscopically disordered beds, by contrast, follow power law behavior over the whole investigated velocity range, for which we present refined equations (i.e., Eq.(13) and the data in Table 2 for the polydisperse sphere packings; Eq.(17) for the silica monolith). The bulk bed morphologies and their intrinsic differences addressed in this work determine how efficient a bed can relax the transverse concentration gradients caused by wall effects, which exist in all confined separation media used in chromatographic practice. Whereas the effect of diffusion on transverse dispersion decreases and ultimately disappears at increasing velocity with the microscopically

  2. Controlling dispersion forces between small particles with artificially created random light fields

    PubMed Central

    Brügger, Georges; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S.; Scheffold, Frank; José Sáenz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with optical tweezers as well as to induce significant optical binding forces between particles. These interaction forces are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic, translationally invariant, van der Waals and, in general, Casimir–Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that dispersion forces between small colloidal particles can also be induced and controlled using artificially created fluctuating light fields. Using optical tweezers as a gauge, we present experimental evidence for the predicted isotropic attractive interactions between dielectric microspheres induced by laser-generated, random light fields. These light-induced interactions open a path towards the control of translationally invariant interactions with tuneable strength and range in colloidal systems. PMID:26096622

  3. Slow gold adatom diffusion on graphene: effect of silicon dioxide and hexagonal boron nitride substrates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Chen, Zheyuan; Wang, Lei; Polyakova Stolyarova, Elena; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Hone, James; Flynn, George W; Brus, Louis E

    2013-04-25

    We examine the nucleation kinetics of Au clusters on graphene and explore the relationship with layer number and underlying supporting substrate of graphene. Using the mean field theory of diffusion-limited aggregation, morphology patterns are semiquantitatively analyzed to obtain Au adatom effective diffusion constants and activation energies. Under specified assumptions, the Au adatom diffusion constant for single-layer graphene supported on SiO2 is ∼50 times smaller than that for hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN)-supported graphene and on the order of 800 times smaller than that for multilayer graphite. Bilayer graphene on SiO2 shows a Au adatom diffusion constant similar to single-layer graphene on h-BN. Scanning probe data show that single-layer graphene is far flatter on h-BN than on SiO2. Two factors are proposed as contributing to the observed lower diffusion constants on single-layer graphene: local surface roughness and homogeneous loss of dispersion/van der Waals electronic stability in multilayers. Graphene Raman spectroscopy shows little charge transfer between Au nanoparticles and graphene. PMID:23121443

  4. Effective pore-scale dispersion upscaling with a correlated continuous time random walk approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Borgne, T.; Bolster, D.; Dentz, M.; de Anna, P.; Tartakovsky, A.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the upscaling of dispersion from a pore-scale analysis of Lagrangian velocities. A key challenge in the upscaling procedure is to relate the temporal evolution of spreading to the pore-scale velocity field properties. We test the hypothesis that one can represent Lagrangian velocities at the pore scale as a Markov process in space. The resulting effective transport model is a continuous time random walk (CTRW) characterized by a correlated random time increment, here denoted as correlated CTRW. We consider a simplified sinusoidal wavy channel model as well as a more complex heterogeneous pore space. For both systems, the predictions of the correlated CTRW model, with parameters defined from the velocity field properties (both distribution and correlation), are found to be in good agreement with results from direct pore-scale simulations over preasymptotic and asymptotic times. In this framework, the nontrivial dependence of dispersion on the pore boundary fluctuations is shown to be related to the competition between distribution and correlation effects. In particular, explicit inclusion of spatial velocity correlation in the effective CTRW model is found to be important to represent incomplete mixing in the pore throats.

  5. Hindrance Velocity Model for Phase Segregation in Suspensions of Poly-dispersed Randomly Oriented Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faroughi, S. A.; Huber, C.

    2015-12-01

    Crystal settling and bubbles migration in magmas have significant effects on the physical and chemical evolution of magmas. The rate of phase segregation is controlled by the force balance that governs the migration of particles suspended in the melt. The relative velocity of a single particle or bubble in a quiescent infinite fluid (melt) is well characterized; however, the interplay between particles or bubbles in suspensions and emulsions and its effect on their settling/rising velocity remains poorly quantified. We propose a theoretical model for the hindered velocity of non-Brownian emulsions of nondeformable droplets, and suspensions of spherical solid particles in the creeping flow regime. The model is based on three sets of hydrodynamic corrections: two on the drag coefficient experienced by each particle to account for both return flow and Smoluchowski effects and a correction on the mixture rheology to account for nonlocal interactions between particles. The model is then extended for mono-disperse non-spherical solid particles that are randomly oriented. The non-spherical particles are idealized as spheroids and characterized by their aspect ratio. The poly-disperse nature of natural suspensions is then taken into consideration by introducing an effective volume fraction of particles for each class of mono-disperse particles sizes. Our model is tested against new and published experimental data over a wide range of particle volume fraction and viscosity ratios between the constituents of dispersions. We find an excellent agreement between our model and experiments. We also show two significant applications for our model: (1) We demonstrate that hindered settling can increase mineral residence time by up to an order of magnitude in convecting magma chambers. (2) We provide a model to correct for particle interactions in the conventional hydrometer test to estimate the particle size distribution in soils. Our model offers a greatly improved agreement with

  6. Dispersal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clobert, J.; Danchin, E.; Dhondt, A.A.; Nichols, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    The ability of species to migrate and disperse is a trait that has interested ecologists for many years. Now that so many species and ecosystems face major environmental threats from habitat fragmentation and global climate change, the ability of species to adapt to these changes by dispersing, migrating, or moving between patches of habitat can be crucial to ensuring their survival. This book provides a timely and wide-ranging overview of the study of dispersal and incorporates much of the latest research. The causes, mechanisms, and consequences of dispersal at the individual, population, species and community levels are considered. The potential of new techniques and models for studying dispersal, drawn from molecular biology and demography, is also explored. Perspectives and insights are offered from the fields of evolution, conservation biology and genetics. Throughout the book, theoretical approaches are combined with empirical data, and care has been taken to include examples from as wide a range of species as possible.

  7. Fano fingerprints of Majoranas in Kitaev dimers of superconducting adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessotti, F. A.; Ricco, L. S.; Marques, Y.; Machado, R. S.; Guessi, L. H.; Figueira, M. S.; de Souza, M.; Seridonio, A. C.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate theoretically a Fano interferometer composed by STM and AFM tips close to a Kitaev dimer of superconducting adatoms, in which the adatom placed under the AFM tip, encloses a pair of Majorana fermions (MFs). For the binding energy Δ of the Cooper pair delocalized into the adatoms under the tips coincident with the tunneling amplitude t between them, namely Δ=t, we find that only one MF beneath the AFM tip hybridizes with the adatom coupled to the STM tips. As a result, a gate invariance feature emerges: the Fano profile of the transmittance rises as an invariant quantity depending upon the STM tips Fermi energy, due to the symmetric swap in the gate potential of the AFM tip.

  8. Electron confinement induced by diluted hydrogen-like ad-atoms in graphene ribbons.

    PubMed

    González, J W; Rosales, L; Pacheco, M; Ayuela, A

    2015-10-14

    We report the electronic properties of two-dimensional systems made of graphene nanoribbons, which are patterned with ad-atoms in two separated regions. Due to the extra electronic confinement induced by the presence of impurities, we find resonant levels, quasi-bound and impurity-induced localized states, which determine the transport properties of the system. Regardless of the ad-atom distribution in the system, we apply band-folding procedures to simple models and predict the energies and the spatial distribution of those impurity-induced states. We take into account two different scenarios: gapped graphene and the presence of randomly distributed ad-atoms in a low dilution regime. In both cases the defect-induced resonances are still detected. Our findings would encourage experimentalists to synthesize these systems and characterize their quasi-localized states by employing, for instance, scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). Additionally, the resonant transport features could be used in electronic applications and molecular sensing devices.

  9. Scattering theory of spin-orbit active adatoms on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachoud, Alexandre; Ferreira, Aires; Ã-zyilmaz, B.; Castro Neto, A. H.

    2014-07-01

    The scattering of two-dimensional massless Dirac fermions from local spin-orbit interactions with an origin in dilute concentrations of physisorbed atomic species on graphene is theoretically investigated. The hybridization between graphene and the adatoms' orbitals lifts spin and valley degeneracies of the pristine host material, giving rise to rich spin-orbit coupling mechanisms with features determined by the exact adsorption position on the honeycomb lattice—bridge, hollow, or top position—and the adatoms' outer-shell orbital type. Effective graphene-only Hamiltonians are derived from symmetry considerations, while a microscopic tight-binding approach connects effective low-energy couplings and graphene-adatom hybridization parameters. Within the T-matrix formalism, a theory for (spin-dependent) scattering events involving graphene's charge carriers, and the spin-orbit active adatoms is developed. Spin currents associated with intravalley and intervalley scattering are found to tend to oppose each other. We establish that under certain conditions, hollow-position adatoms give rise to the spin Hall effect, through skew scattering, while top-position adatoms induce transverse charge currents via trigonal potential scattering. We also identify the critical Fermi energy range where the spin Hall effect is dramatically enhanced, and the associated transverse spin currents can be reversed.

  10. Dynamics of continuous-time random walk, fractal time dispersion, and fractional exponential time relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fu-Sui; Chao, Wen

    1989-10-01

    This paper attempts to establish the dynamics of a microscopic model for a continuous-time random walk. The waiting-time distribution Q(t) is derived from the time-dependent perturbation theory of quantum mechanics for the walker's motion coupled with the media. The walker's motion includes the hopping of a localized particle and a spin (or dipole) flip. The medium is modeled as a harmonic heat bath. The walker moves among a set of degenerate localized states. The scaling behavior of the effective spectrum at low frequency with index β is modeled by using stochastic theory. It is found that Q(t)=exp(-at(2-β)) for 0<=β<2 and Q(t)~t-α for β=2. The applications of our theory include dispersion diffusion, the transient drift of hopping control light excitation in a-Si:H, and thermoremanent magnetization relaxation in spin glasses.

  11. Distributed feedback and random lasing in DCNP aggregates dispersed in a polymeric layer.

    PubMed

    Parafiniuk, Kacper; Sznitko, Lech; Mysliwiec, Jaroslaw

    2015-04-01

    Here, we report on the realization of random lasing (RL) and distributed feedback (DFB) lasing in a layer of luminescent 3-(1,1-dicyanoethenyl)-1-phenyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole (DCNP) organic nonlinear optical dye that has been dispersed in a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix. The RL phenomenon appears due to the presence of spontaneously formed micro- and nano-crystals of DCNP in the bulk of the PMMA during the sample preparation. DFB can be realized in an optical system by using degenerated two-wave mixing in the pumping beams. The period of the interference pattern can be easily changed by changing the intersection angle of the pumping beams, resulting in a real time, fully reversible method of DFB lasing emission tuning. Because of the two neighboring stimulated emission bands of DCNP, it is possible to tune the lasing wavelength over a long range of about 65 nm.

  12. Binding of an adatom to a simple metal surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntington, H. B.; Turk, L. A.; White, W. W., III

    1975-01-01

    The density functional formalism of Hohenberg and Kohn is used to investigate the energies, charge densities and forces which hold an adatom on the surface of a simple metal. The valence wavefunction of the adatom is fitted to the Herman-Skillman solutions at large distance and is simplified somewhat in the core region. The field of the ion is represented by the Ashcroft pseudopotential. For the metal the jellium model is used. Detailed calculations are carried out for a sodium adatom on a sodium surface. Simply juxtaposing adatom and surface gives a binding energy of about 1/3 eV. This value is approximately twice the surface energy per atom in the close-packed plane. Charge redistributions as determined variationally increase the binding energy by about 10%. The equilibrium distance for the adatom turns out to be 1.66 A from the surface, as compared with 1.52 A, the observed value for one-half the distance between the close-packed planes.

  13. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lin, Hai -Qing; Ho, Kai -Ming; Thiel, Patricia A.; Tringides, Michael C.

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective massmore » transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.« less

  14. Mechanism of acoustically induced diffusional structuring of surface adatoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chengping; Zhigilei, Leonid V.; Zaitsev, Vladimir Yu.

    2013-11-25

    Physical mechanisms of time-averaged structuring of adatoms induced by a standing surface acoustic wave (SAW) on a solid substrate are studied. Despite some similarity with conventional mechanisms based on averaging of fast oscillation-type motion or radiation-pressure effects, we demonstrate that, for diffusional (i.e., strongly damped) adatom motion, the origin of time-averaged structuring is essentially different. The proposed analytical model and kinetic Monte–Carlo (kMC) simulations reveal several distinct structuring regimes and directly relate them to the transient modification of diffusion barriers and adiabatic temperature variations induced by SAW strains.

  15. Ab initio study of interaction between 3d adatoms on the vicinal Cu(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syromyatnikov, A. G.; Kabanov, N. S.; Saletsky, A. M.; Klavsyuk, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    Density functional theory is used to resolve the adatom-step and adatom-adatom interactions on vicinal Cu(111) surface. We demonstrated that the interactions between 3d adatoms appreciably depend on the distance from a surface step. Our calculations show that the magnitude of the repulsive barrier related to the surface step is larger for 3d adatoms located at the upper surface terrace than for adatoms located at the lower surface terrace.

  16. Migration characterization of Ga and In adatoms on dielectric surface in selective MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Jie; Han, Xiao-Biao; Lin, Jia-Li; Hu, Guo-Heng; Liu, Ming-Gang; Yang, Yi-Bin; Chen, Jie; Wu, Zhi-Sheng; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Bai-Jun

    2015-11-01

    Migration characterizations of Ga and In adatoms on the dielectric surface in selective metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) were investigated. In the typical MOVPE environment, the selectivity of growth is preserved for GaN, and the growth rate of GaN micro-pyramids is sensitive to the period of the patterned SiO2 mask. A surface migration induced model was adopted to figure out the effective migration length of Ga adatoms on the dielectric surface. Different from the growth of GaN, the selective area growth of InGaN on the patterned template would induce the deposition of InGaN polycrystalline particles on the patterned SiO2 mask with a long period. It was demonstrated with a scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy that the In adatoms exhibit a shorter migration length on the dielectric surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274039 and 51177175), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB301903), the Ph.D. Programs Foundation of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 20110171110021), the International Sci. & Tech. Collaboration Program of China (Grant No. 2012DFG52260), the International Sci. & Tech. Collaboration Program of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2013B051000041), the Science and Technology Plan of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2013B010401013), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2014AA032606), and the Opened Fund of the State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, China (Grant No. IOSKL2014KF17).

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanoscale surface diffusion of heterogeneous adatoms clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Imran; Fayyaz, Hussain; Muhammad, Rashid; Muhammad, Ismail; Hafeez, Ullah; Yongqing, Cai; M Arshad, Javid; Ejaz, Ahmad; S, A. Ahmad

    2016-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation employing the embedded atom method potential is utilized to investigate nanoscale surface diffusion mechanisms of binary heterogeneous adatoms clusters at 300 K, 500 K, and 700 K. Surface diffusion of heterogeneous adatoms clusters can be vital for the binary island growth on the surface and can be useful for the formation of alloy-based thin film surface through atomic exchange process. The results of the diffusion process show that at 300 K, the diffusion of small adatoms clusters shows hopping, sliding, and shear motion; whereas for large adatoms clusters (hexamer and above), the diffusion is negligible. At 500 K, small adatoms clusters, i.e., dimer, show almost all possible diffusion mechanisms including the atomic exchange process; however no such exchange is observed for adatoms clusters greater than dimer. At 700 K, the exchange mechanism dominates for all types of clusters, where Zr adatoms show maximum tendency and Ag adatoms show minimum or no tendency toward the exchange process. Separation and recombination of one or more adatoms are also observed at 500 K and 700 K. The Ag adatoms also occupy pop-up positions over the adatoms clusters for short intervals. At 700 K, the vacancies are also generated in the vicinity of the adatoms cluster, vacancy formation, filling, and shifting can be observed from the results.

  18. First-principles calculations of gated adatoms on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kevin T.; Lee, Hoonkyung; Cohen, Marvin L.

    2011-03-01

    The two-dimensional surface of graphene is well-suited for adsorption of adatoms or molecules. The application of a gate voltage can be used to precisely control the electron concentration of the adsorbate-graphene system. Such control over electronic properties of adsorbates on graphene might have useful applications in areas such as catalysis and hydrogen storage. In this work, the gating of a variety of adatoms adsorbed on graphene is studied using first-principles calculations. We compute the projected density of states, local electrostatic potential, and charge density of the adatom-graphene system as a function of gate voltage. We demonstrate that adatoms on graphene can be ionized by gating, and that the ionization causes a sharp change in the electrostatic potential. Additional interesting features of our results are also discussed. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR10-1006184 and DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources were provided by the IT Division at LBNL.

  19. Spin-spin correlations of magnetic adatoms on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güçlü, A. D.; Bulut, Nejat

    2015-03-01

    We study the interaction between two magnetic adatom impurities in graphene using the Anderson model. The two-impurity Anderson Hamiltonian is solved numerically by using the quantum Monte Carlo technique. We find that the interimpurity spin susceptibility is strongly enhanced at low temperatures, significantly diverging from the well-known Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yoshida result which decays as R-3.

  20. Anisotropic surface-state-mediated RKKY interaction between adatoms on a hexagonal lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrone, Paul N.; Einstein, T. L.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by recent numerical studies of Ag on Pt(111), we derive an expression for the RKKY interaction mediated by surface states, considering the effect of anisotropy in the Fermi edge. Our analysis is based on a stationary phase approximation. The main contribution to the interaction comes from electrons whose Fermi velocity vF is parallel to the vector R connecting the interacting adatoms; we show that, in general, the corresponding Fermi wave vector kF is not parallel to R. The interaction is oscillatory; the amplitude and wavelength of oscillations have angular dependence arising from the anisotropy of the surface-state band structure. The wavelength, in particular, is determined by the projection of this kF (corresponding to vF) onto the direction of R. Our analysis is easily generalized to other systems. For Ag on Pt(111), our results indicate that the RKKY interaction between pairs of adatoms should be nearly isotropic and so cannot account for the anisotropy found in the studies motivating our work. However, for metals with surface-state dispersions similar to Be(101¯0), we show that the RKKY interaction should have considerable anisotropy.

  1. Thermal tweezers for manipulation of adatoms and nanoparticles on surfaces heated by interfering laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Daniel R.; Gramotnev, Dmitri K.; Gramotnev, Galina

    2008-09-15

    We conduct the detailed numerical investigation of a nanomanipulation and nanofabrication technique--thermal tweezers with dynamic evolution of surface temperature, caused by absorption of interfering laser pulses in a thin metal film or any other absorbing surface. This technique uses random Brownian forces in the presence of strong temperature modulation (surface thermophoresis) for effective manipulation of particles/adatoms with nanoscale resolution. Substantial redistribution of particles on the surface is shown to occur with the typical size of the obtained pattern elements of {approx}100 nm, which is significantly smaller than the wavelength of the incident pulses used (532 nm). It is also demonstrated that thermal tweezers based on surface thermophoresis of particles/adatoms are much more effective in achieving permanent high maximum-to-minimum concentration ratios than bulk thermophoresis, which is explained by the interaction of diffusing particles with the periodic lattice potential on the surface. Typically required pulse regimes including pulse lengths and energies are also determined. The approach is applicable for reproducing any holographically achievable surface patterns, and can thus be used for engineering properties of surfaces including nanopatterning and design of surface metamaterials.

  2. Sputtering at grazing ion incidence: Influence of adatom islands

    SciTech Connect

    Rosandi, Yudi; Redinger, Alex; Michely, Thomas; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2010-09-15

    When energetic ions impinge at grazing incidence onto an atomically flat terrace, they will not sputter. However, when adatom islands (containing N atoms) are deposited on the surface, they induce sputtering. We investigate this effect for the specific case of 83 deg. -incident 5 keV Ar ions on a Pt (111) surface by means of molecular-dynamics simulation and experiment. We find that - for constant coverage {Theta} - the sputter yield has a maximum at island sizes of N congruent with 10-20. A detailed picture explaining the decline of the sputter yield toward larger and smaller island sizes is worked out. Our simulation results are compared with dedicated sputtering experiments, in which a coverage of {Theta}=0.09 of Pt adatoms are deposited onto the Pt (111) surface and form islands with a broad distribution around a most probable size of N congruent with 20.

  3. Giant topological insulator gap in graphene with 5d adatoms.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Alicea, Jason; Wu, Ruqian; Franz, Marcel

    2012-12-28

    Two-dimensional topological insulators (2D TIs) have been proposed as platforms for many intriguing applications, ranging from spintronics to topological quantum information processing. Realizing this potential will likely be facilitated by the discovery of new, easily manufactured materials in this class. With this goal in mind, we introduce a new framework for engineering a 2D TI by hybridizing graphene with impurity bands arising from heavy adatoms possessing partially filled d shells, in particular, osmium and iridium. First-principles calculations predict that the gaps generated by this means exceed 0.2 eV over a broad range of adatom coverage; moreover, tuning of the Fermi level is not required to enter the TI state. The mechanism at work is expected to be rather general and may open the door to designing new TI phases in many materials.

  4. Electron Doping of Ultrathin Black Phosphorus with Cu Adatoms.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Steven P; Doganov, Rostislav A; Seixas, Leandro; Carvalho, Alexandra; Tan, Jun You; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Yakovlev, Nikolai; Castro Neto, Antonio H; Özyilmaz, Barbaros

    2016-04-13

    Few-layer black phosphorus is a monatomic two-dimensional crystal with a direct band gap that has high carrier mobility for both holes and electrons. Similarly to other layered atomic crystals, like graphene or layered transition metal dichalcogenides, the transport behavior of few-layer black phosphorus is sensitive to surface impurities, adsorbates, and adatoms. Here we study the effect of Cu adatoms onto few-layer black phosphorus by characterizing few-layer black phosphorus field effect devices and by performing first-principles calculations. We find that the addition of Cu adatoms can be used to controllably n-dope few layer black phosphorus, thereby lowering the threshold voltage for n-type conduction without degrading the transport properties. We demonstrate a scalable 2D material-based complementary inverter which utilizes a boron nitride gate dielectric, a graphite gate, and a single bP crystal for both the p- and n-channels. The inverter operates at matched input and output voltages, exhibits a gain of 46, and does not require different contact metals or local electrostatic gating. PMID:26938106

  5. Electron Doping of Ultrathin Black Phosphorus with Cu Adatoms.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Steven P; Doganov, Rostislav A; Seixas, Leandro; Carvalho, Alexandra; Tan, Jun You; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Yakovlev, Nikolai; Castro Neto, Antonio H; Özyilmaz, Barbaros

    2016-04-13

    Few-layer black phosphorus is a monatomic two-dimensional crystal with a direct band gap that has high carrier mobility for both holes and electrons. Similarly to other layered atomic crystals, like graphene or layered transition metal dichalcogenides, the transport behavior of few-layer black phosphorus is sensitive to surface impurities, adsorbates, and adatoms. Here we study the effect of Cu adatoms onto few-layer black phosphorus by characterizing few-layer black phosphorus field effect devices and by performing first-principles calculations. We find that the addition of Cu adatoms can be used to controllably n-dope few layer black phosphorus, thereby lowering the threshold voltage for n-type conduction without degrading the transport properties. We demonstrate a scalable 2D material-based complementary inverter which utilizes a boron nitride gate dielectric, a graphite gate, and a single bP crystal for both the p- and n-channels. The inverter operates at matched input and output voltages, exhibits a gain of 46, and does not require different contact metals or local electrostatic gating.

  6. Floquet bound states around defects and adatoms in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovey, D. A.; Usaj, Gonzalo; Foa Torres, L. E. F.; Balseiro, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have focused on laser-induced gaps in graphene which have been shown to have a topological origin, thereby hosting robust states at the sample edges. While the focus has remained mainly on these topological chiral edge states, the Floquet bound states around defects lack a detailed study. In this paper we present such a study covering large defects of different shape and also vacancy-like defects and adatoms at the dynamical gap at ℏ Ω /2 (ℏ Ω being the photon energy). Our results, based on analytical calculations as well as numerics for full tight-binding models, show that the bound states are chiral and appear in a number which grows with the defect size. Furthermore, while the bound states exist regardless of the type of the defect's edge termination (zigzag, armchair, mixed), the spectrum is strongly dependent on it. In the case of top adatoms, the bound state quasienergies depend on the adatoms energy. The appearance of such bound states might open the door to the presence of topological effects on the bulk transport properties of dirty graphene.

  7. Approach for fast numerical propagation of uniformly polarized random electromagnetic fields in dispersive linearly birefringent systems.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Piotr L; Domanski, Andrzej W

    2013-09-01

    An efficient simulation technique is proposed for computing propagation of uniformly polarized statistically stationary fields in linear nonimage-forming systems that includes dispersion of linear birefringence to all orders. The method is based on the discrete-time Fourier transformation of modified frequency profiles of the spectral Stokes parameters. It works under the condition that all (linearly) birefringent sections present in the system are described by the same phase birefringence dispersion curve, being a monotonic function of the optical frequency within the bandwidth of the light. We demonstrate the technique as a supplement for the Mueller-Stokes matrix formalism extended to any uniformly polarized polychromatic illumination. Accuracy of its numerical implementation has been verified by using parameters of a Lyot depolarizer made of a highly birefringent and dispersive monomode photonic crystal fiber.

  8. Ab-initio calculations of interactions between Cu adatoms on Cu(1 1 0): Sensitivity of strong multi-site interactions to adatom relaxations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh; Einstein, T. L.

    2009-08-01

    We have parameterized the various interactions between Cu adatoms on Cu(1 1 0) using density-functional theory based ab-initio calculations. Our results indicate that in addition to pair interactions, 3-adatom and 4-adatom interactions of significant strengths are present in this system. This further stresses the importance of multi-site interactions in constructing a complete lattice-gas picture. Even though adding these multi-site interactions leads to good convergence in interaction energies, we find that some multi-site interactions are very sensitive to adatom relaxations. This makes the application of a simple lattice-gas picture inadequate for such surfaces. We also parameterize adatom interactions on this surface using the recently developed connector model. The connector model parameterization is as efficient as the parameterization using lattice-gas model. Further, we present diffusion barriers for nearest-neighbor (NN) and next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) hops on this surface.

  9. Electronic Nature of Step-edge Barriers Against Adatom Descent on Transition-metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Yina; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2008-01-01

    The activation barriers against adatom migration on terraces and across steps play an essential role in determining the growth morphology of surfaces, interfaces, and thin lms. By studying a series of adatoms on representative transition metal surfaces through extensive rst-principles calculations, we establish a clear correlation between the preferred mechanism and activation energy for adatom descent at a step and the relative degree of electronic shell lling between the adatom and the substrate. We also nd an approximate linear relation between the adatom hopping barriers at step edges and the adatom-surface bonding strength. These results may serve as simple guiding rules for predicting the precise atomic nature of surface morphologies in heteroepitaxial growth such as nanowires.

  10. Effective Pore-Scale Dispersion Upscaling with the Correlated Continuous Time Random Walk Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Le Borgne, Tanguy; Bolster, Diogo; Dentz, Marco; de Anna, Pietro; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2011-12-29

    We propose a general framework for upscaling dispersion in porous media. A key challenge of the upscaling procedure is to relate the temporal evolution of spreading to the small scale velocity field properties. The representation of the Lagrangian velocity transition process as a Markovian process in space provides a simple way to quantify complex correlation properties, i.e. non-Gaussian velocity distributions. The resulting effective transport model is a correlated CTRW. We use this framework to upscale pore scale dispersion for a periodic pore geometry. The correlated CTRW model is defined by the transit time distribution across one pore and the transition probability density quantifying the correlation between successive transit times. The latter is of central importance since it accounts for incomplete mixing at the pore throats. The predictions of the correlated CTRW model are in good agreement with the pore scale simulations over the pre-asymptotic and asymptotic regimes. We investigate the representation of this effective dispersion model in phase space (position, velocity) in a form similar to a Boltzmann transport equation.

  11. DISPERSION POLYMERIZATION OF STYRENE IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE UTILIZING RANDOM COPOLYMERS INCLUDING FLUORINATED ACRYLATE FOR PREPARING MICRON-SIZE POLYSTYRENE PARTICLES. (R826115)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The dispersion polymerization of styrene in supercritical CO2 utilizing CO2-philic random copolymers was investigated. The resulting high yield of polystyrene particles in the micron-size range was formed using various random copolymers as stabilizers. The p...

  12. Platinum-scatterer-based random lasers from dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystals in capillary tubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianlong; Zhang, Yating; Cao, Mingxuan; Song, Xiaoxian; Che, Yongli; Zhang, Haiting; Zhang, Heng; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-07-20

    The resonance characteristics of platinum-scatter-based random lasers from dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (DDPDLCs) in capillary tubes were researched for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. After adding platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) into the liquid crystal mixtures, the emission spectra of DDPDLCs revealed a lower lasing threshold in comparison with those of DDPDLCs without Pt NPs due to light scattering of liquid crystal droplets and the local field enhancement around Pt NPs. Furthermore, the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) and the lasing threshold were determined by the doping density of the Pt NPs. The threshold was decreased by about half from 17.5  μJ/pulse to 8.7  μJ/pulse on the condition that around 1.0 wt. % was the optimum concentration of Pt NPs doped into the DDPDLCs. The FWHM of the peaks sharply decreased to 0.1 nm. Our work provides an extremely simple method to enhance random lasers from DDPDLCs doped with Pt NPs, and it has potential applications in random fiber lasers or laser displays.

  13. Platinum-scatterer-based random lasers from dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystals in capillary tubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianlong; Zhang, Yating; Cao, Mingxuan; Song, Xiaoxian; Che, Yongli; Zhang, Haiting; Zhang, Heng; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-07-20

    The resonance characteristics of platinum-scatter-based random lasers from dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (DDPDLCs) in capillary tubes were researched for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. After adding platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) into the liquid crystal mixtures, the emission spectra of DDPDLCs revealed a lower lasing threshold in comparison with those of DDPDLCs without Pt NPs due to light scattering of liquid crystal droplets and the local field enhancement around Pt NPs. Furthermore, the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) and the lasing threshold were determined by the doping density of the Pt NPs. The threshold was decreased by about half from 17.5  μJ/pulse to 8.7  μJ/pulse on the condition that around 1.0 wt. % was the optimum concentration of Pt NPs doped into the DDPDLCs. The FWHM of the peaks sharply decreased to 0.1 nm. Our work provides an extremely simple method to enhance random lasers from DDPDLCs doped with Pt NPs, and it has potential applications in random fiber lasers or laser displays. PMID:27463926

  14. Compressive and Tensile Behaviours of PLLA Matrix Composites Reinforced with Randomly Dispersed Flax Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussière, Fabrice; Baley, Christophe; Godard, Grégory; Burr, Dominique

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays, the ecological footprint of a material is becoming tremendously important. The Poly l-Lactide Acid (PLLA) matrix composites reinforced by randomly scattered flax fibres have mechanical properties similar to polyester/glass composites [1], lower environmental impacts and can be compost at the end of their lives. In this study, the mechanical characterization of biocomposites has been pushed further with the determination of the compressive and tensile properties. Furthermore, the mechanical properties of single flax fibres have been measured and implemented in a micro-mechanical estimation of the composite elastic modulus. Tensile and compressive stiffness determined by the mechanical analyses show very good correlations with the mathematical estimation.

  15. Atomistic simulation of the electronic states of adatoms in monolayer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jiwon; Larentis, Stefano; Tutuc, Emanuel; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2014-04-01

    Using an ab initio density functional theory based electronic structure method, we study the effects of adatoms on the electronic properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide Molybdenum-disulfide (MoS2). We consider the 1st (Li, Na, K) and 7th (F, Cl, Br) column atoms and metals (Sc, Ti, Ta, Mo, Pd, Pt, Ag, Au). Three high symmetry sites for the adatom on the surface of monolayer MoS2 are examined as starting points to search for the most energetically stable configuration for each adatom-monolayer MoS2 system, as well as the type of associated bonding. For the most stable adatom positions, we characterize the emergence of adatom-induced electronic states including any dopant states.

  16. Light adatoms influences on electronic structures of the two-dimensional arsenene nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Xia, Congxin; Wang, Tianxing; Tan, Xiaoming; Zhao, Xu; Wei, Shuyi

    2016-03-01

    Gray arsenic monolayer named as arsenene is a new kind of two-dimensional (2D) semiconductor material. Herein, we focus on the electronic structures of the light atoms (such as B, C, N, O, F) adsorbed arsenene nanosheets by using first-principles calculations. The results show that most adatoms prefer to occupy the bridge site on the arsenene nanosheets except for the C adatom which prefer to valley site. The defect states can be found in the middle gap of the F adsorbed arsenene nanosheets, and N adatom can induce the n-type doping in the system. Moreover, O adatom has negligible effects on its electronic structures. In addition, B, C, N and F adatoms can induce the magnetism in the arsenene nanosheets.

  17. Theoretical study of optical conductivity of graphene with magnetic and nonmagnetic adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Muhammad Aziz; Siregar, Syahril; Rusydi, Andrivo

    2014-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of the optical conductivity of graphene with magnetic and nonmagnetic adatoms. First, by introducing an alternating potential in a pure graphene, we demonstrate a gap formation in the density of states and the corresponding optical conductivity. We highlight the distinction between such a gap formation and the so-called Pauli blocking effect. Next, we apply this idea to graphene with adatoms by introducing magnetic interactions between the carrier spins and the spins of the adatoms. Exploring various possible ground-state spin configurations of the adatoms, we find that the antiferromagnetic configuration yields the lowest total electronic energy and is the only configuration that forms a gap. Furthermore, we analyze four different circumstances leading to similar gaplike structures and propose a means to interpret the magneticity and the possible orderings of the adatoms on graphene solely from the optical conductivity data. We apply this analysis to the recently reported experimental data of oxygenated graphene.

  18. Dispersion and Attenuation of Surface Acoustic Waves of Various Polarizations on a Stress-Free Randomly Rough Surface of Solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosachev, V. V.; Shchegrov, A. V.

    1995-06-01

    An approach to obtaining the dispersion equation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on a stress-free, randomly rough surface of an anisotropic elastic medium is suggested. The problem is solved in the approximation of a weakly rough surface using Green's function technique. The dispersion and attenuation of sagittally and shear horizontally (SH) polarized SAWs are investigated both analytically and numerically for a three-dimensionally (3D) and a two-dimensionally (2D) rough surface of an isotropic medium. The results for 2D roughness are shown to be contained in the more general expressions for the 3D case, and the connection between the results for the 3D and the 2D cases is pointed out. Dispersion relations are derived for SAWs of both polarizations propagating in an arbitrary direction along a 2D rough surface. The SAW attenuation mechanisms are investigated at various incidence angles. It is concluded that all three mechanisms (viz. scattering into bulk transverse, longitudinal, and Rayleigh surface acoustic waves) are involved for the Rayleigh and SH polarized SAWs at certain incidence angles, whereas at the other angles only some of the mechanisms are. The criterion for the existence of SH polarized SAWs on a rough surface is considered. A possible increase of the SAW phase velocity on a rough surface compared with that for a flat boundary is discussed. In the limit λ ≫ a (where a is the roughness correlation length) simple explicit expressions for the phase velocities of Rayleigh and SH polarized SAWs are derived. A comparison of the results obtained herein with those of other workers is presented.

  19. Phenotypic evolution by distance in fluctuating environments: The contribution of dispersal, selection and random genetic drift.

    PubMed

    Engen, Steinar; Sæther, Bernt-Erik

    2016-06-01

    Here we analyze how dispersal, genetic drift, and adaptation to the local environment affect the geographical differentiation of a quantitative character through natural selection using a spatial dynamic model for the evolution of the distribution of mean breeding values in space and time. The variation in optimal phenotype is described by local Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes with a given spatial autocorrelation. Selection and drift are assumed to be governed by phenotypic variation within areas with a given mean breeding value and constant additive genetic variance. Between such neighboring areas there will be white noise variation in mean breeding values, while the variation at larger distances has a spatial structure and a spatial scale that we investigate. The model is analyzed by solving balance equations for the stationary distribution of mean breeding values. We also present scaling results for the spatial autocovariance function for mean breeding values as well as that for the covariance between mean breeding value and the optimal phenotype expressing local adaption. Our results show in particular how these spatial scales depend on population density. For large densities the spatial scale of fluctuations in mean breeding values have similarities with corresponding results in population dynamics, where the effect of migration on spatial scales may be large if the local strength of density regulation is small. In our evolutionary model strength of density regulation corresponds to strength of local selection so that weak local selection may produce large spatial scales of autocovariances. Genetic drift and stochastic migration are shown to act through the population size within a characteristic area with much smaller variation in optimal phenotypes than in the whole population.

  20. Theoretical study of the interparticle interaction of nanoparticles randomly dispersed on a substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Horikoshi, S.; Kato, T.

    2015-01-14

    Metal nanoparticles exhibit the phenomenon of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) due to the collective oscillation of their conduction electrons, which is induced by external electromagnetic radiation. The finite-differential time-domain (FDTD) method is widely used as an electromagnetic field analysis tool for nanoparticles. Although the influence of interparticle interactions is taken into consideration in the FDTD calculation for the plural particles configuration, the FDTD calculation of a random configuration is very difficult, particularly in the case of non-spherical particles. In this study, a theoretical calculation method incorporating interparticle interactions on a substrate with various particle shapes and sizes on a subwavelength scale is developed. The interparticle interaction is incorporated following FDTD calculation with an isolated single particle. This is explained systematically using a signal flow graph. Moreover, the mirror image effect of the substrate and the retardation effect are also taken into account in this method. The validity of this method is verified by calculations for simple arrangements of nanoparticles. In addition, it is confirmed that the method can improve the accuracy of predicted experimental results for Au nanoparticles prepared by the sputtering method, in terms of the plasmon peak wavelength. This method may enable the design of LSPR devices by controlling nanoparticle characteristics, such as the size, shape, and distribution density.

  1. Abundant topological states in silicene with transition metal adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhao, Bao; Yang, Zhongqin

    2013-10-01

    Electronic and topological properties of silicene adsorbed with 4d transition metal (TM) atoms are investigated by using ab initio methods together with tight-binding models. All six kinds of TM adatoms (Y to Ru) we studied prefer hollow sites of silicene. The interplay of TM-induced exchange interactions, spin-orbit coupling, and staggered AB-sublattice potential triggers abundant topological states, including quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) states, valley Hall states, and valley-polarized metallic states. Particularly, QAH states with different Chern numbers are obtained, which is -2 in the Nb/Ru doped system and 1 in the Y doped system. Our results indicate that great potential for information processing applications exists in these systems of silicene adsorbed with TM atoms.

  2. Chern mosaic: topology of chiral superconductivity in ferromagnetic adatom lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontynen, Joel; Ojanen, Teemu

    Recent experiments have demonstrated signatures of Majorana bound states in ferromagnetic atomic chains. We show that similar systems, extended to two dimensional geometry, may support chiral topological superconductivity with large Chern numbers. Our observation is based on the fact that magnetic adatoms on an s-wave superconductor bind subgap Shiba states, which can hybridize and form subgap energy bands with nontrivial topology. Such a Shiba lattice supports long-range hopping, leading to a complex, mosaic-like phase diagram with large Chern numbers. We analyze the incidence of different Chern numbers phases and the size of their energy gaps for various lattice geometries. Our findings reveal the studied system as one of the riches platforms of topological matter known to date. The authors acknowledge the Finnish Cultural Foundation and the Academy of Finland for support.

  3. Electronic transport experiments on osmium-adatom-decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Jamie; Henriksen, Erik

    Monolayer graphene is theoretically predicted to inherit a spin-orbit coupling from a dilute coating of certain transition metal adatoms. To explore these predictions we have constructed a cryogenic probe capable of in situ thermal annealing of graphene followed immediately by electronic transport measurements and controlled deposition of sub-monolayer coatings of most any metal. Previously a light coating of indium on graphene was investigated, and found to transfer electrons to graphene and reduce the mobility although no evidence of an induced spin-orbit coupling was seen. We are now depositing osmium and tungsten on graphene devices. Our initial results show an unexpected hole-doping and a sizable increase in resistance of the sample. We will report our progress on characterizing these samples by electronic transport measurements.

  4. Single adatom dynamics at monatomic steps of free-standing few-layer reduced graphene

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Haixin; Saito, Mitsuhiro; Nagai, Takuro; Liang, Yunye; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Wang, Zhongchang; Wu, Hongkai; Kimoto, Koji; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Steps and their associated adatoms extensively exist and play prominent roles in affecting surface properties of materials. Such impacts should be especially pronounced in two-dimensional, atomically-thin membranes like graphene. However, how single adatom behaves at monatomic steps of few-layer graphene is still illusive. Here, we report dynamics of individual adatom at monatomic steps of free-standing few-layer reduced graphene under the electron beam radiations, and demonstrate the prevalent existence of monatomic steps even down to unexpectedly ultrasmall lateral size of a circular diameter of ~5 Å. Single adatom prefers to stay at the edges of the atomic steps of few-layer reduced graphene and evolve with the steps. Moreover, we also find that how the single adatom behaves at atomic step edges can be remarkably influenced by the type of adatoms and step edges. Such single adatoms at monatomic steps and ultrasmall atomic steps open up a new window for surface physics and chemistry for graphene-based as well as other two-dimensional materials. PMID:25113125

  5. Self-organization of Ce adatoms on Ag(111) : A kinetic Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negulyaev, N. N.; Stepanyuk, V. S.; Niebergall, L.; Hergert, W.; Fangohr, H.; Bruno, P.

    2006-07-01

    One of the most fascinating experimental results in fabrication of artificial nanostructures is the creation of the macroscopically ordered superlattice of Ce adatoms on Ag(111) [F. Silly , Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 016101 (2004)]. Here, performing kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we study the formation of Ce superlattice at the atomic scale. It is demonstrated that the surface-state mediated long-range interaction between Ce adatoms can lead to their self-assembly into a well ordered structure. The temperature of the substrate and the concentration of Ce adatoms are shown to play a key role in this process.

  6. Metal Adatoms and Clusters on Ultrathin Zirconia Films

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nucleation and growth of transition metals on zirconia has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Since STM requires electrical conductivity, ultrathin ZrO2 films grown by oxidation of Pt3Zr(0001) and Pd3Zr(0001) were used as model systems. DFT studies were performed for single metal adatoms on supported ZrO2 films as well as the (1̅11) surface of monoclinic ZrO2. STM shows decreasing cluster size, indicative of increasing metal–oxide interaction, in the sequence Ag < Pd ≈ Au < Ni ≈ Fe. Ag and Pd nucleate mostly at steps and domain boundaries of ZrO2/Pt3Zr(0001) and form three-dimensional clusters. Deposition of low coverages of Ni and Fe at room temperature leads to a high density of few-atom clusters on the oxide terraces. Weak bonding of Ag to the oxide is demonstrated by removing Ag clusters with the STM tip. DFT calculations for single adatoms show that the metal–oxide interaction strength increases in the sequence Ag < Au < Pd < Ni on monoclinic ZrO2, and Ag ≈ Au < Pd < Ni on the supported ultrathin ZrO2 film. With the exception of Au, metal nucleation and growth on ultrathin zirconia films follow the usual rules: More reactive (more electropositive) metals result in a higher cluster density and wet the surface more strongly than more noble metals. These bind mainly to the oxygen anions of the oxide. Au is an exception because it can bind strongly to the Zr cations. Au diffusion may be impeded by changing its charge state between −1 and +1. We discuss differences between the supported ultrathin zirconia films and the surfaces of bulk ZrO2, such as the possibility of charge transfer to the substrate of the films. Due to their large in-plane lattice constant and the variety of adsorption sites, ZrO2{111} surfaces are more reactive than many other oxygen-terminated oxide surfaces. PMID:27213024

  7. Giant magnetic anisotropy of Co, Ru, and Os adatoms on MgO (001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongbo; Ou, Xuedong; Fan, Fengren; Li, Zhengwei; Wu, Hua

    Large magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) is desirable and critical for nanoscale magnetic devices. Here, using ligand-field level diagrams and density functional calculations, we well explain the very recent discovery [I.G. Rau et al., Science 344, 988 (2014)] that individual Co adatom on MgO (001) surface has a large MAE of more than 60 meV. More importantly, we predict that a giant MAE up to 110 meV could be realized for Ru adatoms on MgO (001), and even more for the Os adatoms (208 meV). This is a joint effect of the special ligand field, orbital multiplet, and significant spin-orbit interaction, in the intermediate-spin state of the Ru or Os adatoms on top of the surface oxygens. The giant MAE could provide a route to atomic scale memory.

  8. Giant Magnetic Anisotropy of Co, Ru, and Os Adatoms on MgO (001) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Xuedong; Wang, Hongbo; Fan, Fengren; Li, Zhengwei; Wu, Hua

    2015-12-01

    Large magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) is desirable and critical for nanoscale magnetic devices. Here, using ligand-field level diagrams and density functional calculations, we well explain the very recent discovery [I. G. Rau et al., Science 344, 988 (2014)] that an individual Co adatom on a MgO (001) surface has a large MAE of more than 60 meV. More importantly, we predict that a giant MAE up to 110 meV could be realized for Ru adatoms on MgO (001), and even more for the Os adatoms (208 meV). This is a joint effect of the special ligand field, orbital multiplet, and significant spin-orbit interaction, in the intermediate-spin state of the Ru or Os adatoms on top of the surface oxygens. The giant MAE could provide a route to atomic scale memory.

  9. Surface Coordination of Adatoms by Scanned Low Energy Photoelectron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asensio, M. C.

    In this article, a brief overview of the current activity in the field of low energy photoelectron diffraction is presented. Although alternatively angle and energy-scanned photoelectron diffraction can be used to obtain the surface-structural information, we limit our discussion to the low energy and energy-scanned modes and their use in connection with a new developed direct method. By the use of this most recent approach, adatom-substrate distances and adsorption sites are directly revealed from a discrete mapping of the Fourier transform of scanned energy photoelectron diffraction spectra, measured at a representative set of geometries, which depend on the symmetry of the particular studied system. In addition, a short discussion on the determination of the detailed structure of adsorbed overlayers by the traditional trial-and-error method is included, using model multiple scattering calculations. These latest developments are illustrated with a specific example of an atomic adsorbate, and comments about the capabilities and limitations of photoelectron diffraction as a structural technique in new fields.

  10. Noble-metal intercalation process leading to a protected adatom in a graphene hollow site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan Nair, M.; Cranney, M.; Jiang, T.; Hajjar-Garreau, S.; Aubel, D.; Vonau, F.; Florentin, A.; Denys, E.; Bocquet, M.-L.; Simon, L.

    2016-08-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that gold deposited on a monolayer (ML) of graphene on SiC(0001) is intercalated below the ML after an annealing procedure and affects the band structure of graphene. Here we prove experimentally and theoretically that some of the gold forms a dispersed phase composed of single adatoms, being intercalated between the ML and the buffer layer and in a hollow position with respect to C atoms of the ML on top. They are freestanding and negatively charged, due to the partial screening of the electron transfer between SiC and the ML, without changing the intrinsic n-type doping of the ML. As these single atoms decouple the ML from the buffer layer, the quasiparticles of graphene are less perturbed, thus increasing their Fermi velocity. Moreover, the hollow position of the intercalated single Au atoms might lead to spin-orbit coupling in the graphene layer covering IC domains. This effect of spin-orbit coupling has been recently observed experimentally in Au-intercalated graphene on SiC(0001) [D. Marchenko, A. Varykhalov, J. Sánchez-Barriga, Th. Seyller, and O. Rader, Appl. Phys. Lett. 108, 172405 (2016), 10.1063/1.4947286] and has been theoretically predicted for heavy atoms, like thallium, in a hollow position on graphene [C. Weeks, J. Hu, J. Alicea, M. Franz, and R. Wu, Phys. Rev. X 1, 021001 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevX.1.021001; A. Cresti, D. V. Tuan, D. Soriano, A. W. Cummings, and S. Roche, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 246603 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.246603].

  11. Effect of adatom surface diffusivity on microstructure and intrinsic stress evolutions during Ag film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flötotto, D.; Wang, Z. M.; Jeurgens, L. P. H.; Bischoff, E.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2012-08-01

    The effect of the adatom surface diffusivity on the evolution of the microstructure and the intrinsic stress of thin metal films was investigated for the case of growth of polycrystalline Ag films on amorphous SiO2 (a-SiO2) and amorphous Ge (a-Ge) substrates, with high and low Ag adatom surface diffusivity, respectively. The surface diffusivity of the deposited Ag adatoms on the a-Ge substrate is suppressed also after coalescence of Ag islands due to the continuous (re)segregation of Ge at the surface of the growing film as evidenced by in-situ XPS. An assessment could be made of the role of adatom surface diffusivity on the microstructural development and the intrinsic stress evolution during film growth. As demonstrated by ex-situ TEM and ex-situ XRD, the Ag films grown on the a-SiO2 and a-Ge substrates possess strikingly different microstructures in terms of grain shape, grain size, and crystallographic texture. Nevertheless, the real-time in-situ stress measurements revealed a compressive → tensile → compressive stress evolution for the developing Ag films on both types of substrates, however on different time scales and with stress-component values of largely different magnitudes. It was concluded that (i) the microstructural development of metallic thin films is predominated by the surface diffusivity of the adatoms and (ii) the intrinsic stress evolution is largely controlled by the developing microstructure and the grain-boundary diffusivity.

  12. Metals on graphene: correlation between adatom adsorption behavior and growth morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lu, Wencai; Tringides, Michael C.; Yao, Yongxin; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2012-05-19

    We present a systematic study of metal adatom adsorption on graphene by ab initio calculations. The calculations cover alkali metals, sp-simple metals, 3d and group 10 transition metals, noble metals, as well as rare earth metals. The correlation between the adatom adsorption properties and the growth morphology of the metals on graphene is also investigated. We show that the growth morphology is related to the ratio of the metal adsorption energy to its bulk cohesive energy (E(a)/E(c)) and the diffusion barrier (ΔE) of the metal adatom on graphene. Charge transfer, electric dipole and magnetic moments, and graphene lattice distortion induced by metal adsorption would also affect the growth morphologies of the metal islands. We also show that most of the metal nanostructures on graphene would be thermally stable against coarsening.

  13. Diffusion of Cu adatoms and dimers on Cu(111) and Ag(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mińkowski, Marcin; Załuska-Kotur, Magdalena A.

    2015-12-01

    Diffusion of Cu adatoms and dimers on Cu(111) and Ag(111) surfaces is analyzed based on ab initio surface potentials. Single adatom diffusion is compared with dimer diffusion on both surfaces. Surface geometry makes the adatoms jump alternately between two states in the same way in both systems, whereas dimers undergo more complex diffusion process that combines translational and rotational motion. Small difference in the surface lattice constant between Cu and Ag crystals results in a completely different energy landscape for dimer jumps. As an effect the character of diffusion process changes. Homogeneous Cu dimer diffusion is more difficult and dimers rather rotate within single surface cell, whereas diffusion over Ag surface is faster and happens more smoothly. The temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient and its parameters: energy barrier and prefactor is calculated and compared for both surfaces.

  14. A calculation of the diffusion energies for adatoms on surfaces of F.C.C. metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halicioglu, T.; Pound, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    The activation energies for diffusion were determined for gold, platinum and iridium adatoms on plane and plane PT surfaces and were found to be in good agreement with the measurements reported by Bassett and Webber. The Lennard-Jones pair potentials were used to model the interatomic forces, and relaxation of the substrate atoms in near proximity to the adatom was considered in detail. The present calculations clarify the mechanism of the observed two-dimensional diffusion of platinum and iridium atoms on a plane PT surface. The results are compared with those obtained using Morse potential functions and different relaxation techniques.

  15. Brownian Motion of 2D Vacancy Islands by Adatom Terrace Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Morgenstern, Karina; L {ae}gsgaard, Erik; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2001-06-18

    We have studied the Brownian motion of two-dimensional (2D) vacancy islands on Ag(110) at temperatures between 175 and 215K. While the detachment of adatoms from the island and their diffusion on the terrace are permitted in this temperature range, the periphery diffusion of single adatoms is prohibited. The present scanning tunneling microscopy results provide the first direct experimental proof that the Brownian motion of the islands follows a simple scaling law with terrace diffusion being the rate limiting process. The activation energy of the vacancy island motion is determined to 0.41eV.

  16. Effect of a quenched random field on a continuous symmetry breaking transition: Nematic to smectic-A transition in octyloxycyanobiphenyl-aerosil dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, P. S.; Stock, C.; Birgeneau, R. J.; Garland, C. W.; Roshi, A.; Iannacchione, G. S.

    2003-02-01

    High-resolution x-ray diffraction and ac-calorimetric experiments have been carried out on the liquid-crystal octyloxycyanobiphenyl in which aerosil particles are dispersed. The measurements were made over a temperature range around the bulk nematic to smectic-A transition temperature. At this transition the liquid crystal breaks translational symmetry in a single direction. The silica particles, which hydrogen bond together to form a very low density gel, provide the quenched disorder. The random gel leads to observable broadening of the x-ray reflection from the smectic layers. The structure factor is well described by modeling the effect of the aerosils as a quenched random field. Dispersed aerosils are thought to pin both the direction of the translational ordering and the position of the layers. The latter appears to have the greatest effect on the x-ray line shape. We show that the aerosil surface area, as verified by small-angle scattering, equates to the variance of the random field. Calorimetric results reveal substantial change in the specific heat peak associated with the nematic to smectic-A transition. As the concentration of aerosil increases, the specific heat peak remains sharp yet decreases in magnitude and shifts in temperature in a nonmonotonic fashion. In this regime, the critical exponent α becomes progressively smaller. For the samples with the largest concentrations of aerosil particles the Cp(N-A) peak becomes highly smeared and shifts smoothly to lower temperatures.

  17. Effects of extrinsic point defects in phosphorene: B, C, N, O, and F adatoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gaoxue E-mail: pandey@mtu.edu Pandey, Ravindra E-mail: pandey@mtu.edu; Karna, Shashi P. E-mail: pandey@mtu.edu

    2015-04-27

    Phosphorene is emerging as a promising 2D semiconducting material with a direct band gap and high carrier mobility. In this paper, we examine the role of the extrinsic point defects including surface adatoms in modifying the electronic properties of phosphorene using density functional theory. The surface adatoms considered are B, C, N, O, and F with a [He] core electronic configuration. Our calculations show that B and C, with electronegativity close to P, prefer to break the sp{sup 3} bonds of phosphorene and reside at the interstitial sites in the 2D lattice by forming sp{sup 2} like bonds with the native atoms. On the other hand, N, O, and F, which are more electronegative than P, prefer the surface sites by attracting the lone pairs of phosphorene. B, N, and F adsorption will also introduce local magnetic moment to the lattice. Moreover, B, C, N, and F adatoms will modify the band gap of phosphorene, yielding metallic transverse tunneling characters. Oxygen does not modify the band gap of phosphorene, and a diode like tunneling behavior is observed. Our results therefore offer a possible route to tailor the electronic and magnetic properties of phosphorene by the adatom functionalization and provide the physical insights of the environmental sensitivity of phosphorene, which will be helpful to experimentalists in evaluating the performance and aging effects of phosphorene-based electronic devices.

  18. RKKY-like contributions to the magnetic anisotropy energy: 3 d adatoms on Pt(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhassoune, Mohammmed; Dias, Manuel dos Santos; Zimmermann, Bernd; Dederichs, Peter H.; Lounis, Samir

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic anisotropy energy defines the energy barrier that stabilizes a magnetic moment. Utilizing density-functional-theory-based simulations and analytical formulations, we establish that this barrier is strongly modified by long-range contributions very similar to Friedel oscillations and Rudermann-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions. Thus, oscillations are expected and observed, with different decaying factors and highly anisotropic in realistic materials, which can switch nontrivially the sign of the magnetic anisotropy energy. This behavior is general, and for illustration we address the transition-metal adatoms, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co deposited on a Pt(111) surface. We explain, in particular, the mechanisms leading to the strong site dependence of the magnetic anisotropy energy observed for Fe adatoms on a Pt(111) surface as revealed previously via first-principles-based simulations and inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy [A. A. Khajetoorians et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 157204 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.157204]. The same mechanisms are probably active for the site dependence of the magnetic anisotropy energy obtained for Fe adatoms on Pd or Rh(111) surfaces and for Co adatoms on a Rh(111) surface [P. Blonski et al., Phys. Rev. B 81, 104426 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.81.104426].

  19. Hydrogen storage properties of light metal adatoms (Li, Na) decorated fluorographene monolayer.

    PubMed

    Hussain, T; Islam, M S; Rao, G S; Panigrahi, P; Gupta, D; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2015-07-10

    Owing to its high energy density, the potential of hydrogen (H2) as an energy carrier has been immense, however its storage remains a big obstacle and calls for an efficient storage medium. By means of density functional theory (DFT) in spin polarized generalized gradient approximation (GGA), we have investigated the structural, electronic and hydrogen storage properties of a light alkali metal (Li, Na) functionalized fluorographene monolayer (FG). Metal adatoms bind to the FG with significantly high binding energy, much higher than their cohesive energies, which helps to achieve a uniform distribution of metal adatoms on the monolayer and consequently ensure reversibility. Due to a difference of electronegativities, each metal adatom transfers a substantial amount of its charge to the FG monolayer and attains a partial positive state, which facilitates the adsorption of multiple H2 molecules around the adatoms by electrostatic as well as van der Waals interactions. To get a better description of H2 adsorption energies with metal-doped systems, we have also performed calculations using van der Waals corrections. For both the functionalized systems, the results indicate a reasonably high H2 storage capacity with H2 adsorption energies falling into the range for the practical applications.

  20. Dispersion for two classes of random variables: General theory and application to inference of an external ligand concentration by a cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2015-09-01

    We derive expressions for the dispersion for two classes of random variables in Markov processes. Random variables such as current and activity pertain to the first class, which is composed of random variables that change whenever a jump in the stochastic trajectory occurs. The second class corresponds to the time the trajectory spends in a state (or cluster of states). While the expression for the first class follows straightforwardly from known results in the literature, we show that a similar formalism can be used to derive an expression for the second class. As an application, we use this formalism to analyze a cellular two-component network estimating an external ligand concentration. The uncertainty related to this external concentration is calculated by monitoring different random variables related to an internal protein. We show that, inter alia, monitoring the time spent in the phosphorylated state of the protein leads to a finite uncertainty only if there is dissipation, whereas the uncertainty obtained from the activity of the transitions of the internal protein can reach the Berg-Purcell limit even in equilibrium.

  1. Dispersion for two classes of random variables: general theory and application to inference of an external ligand concentration by a cell.

    PubMed

    Barato, Andre C; Seifert, Udo

    2015-09-01

    We derive expressions for the dispersion for two classes of random variables in Markov processes. Random variables such as current and activity pertain to the first class, which is composed of random variables that change whenever a jump in the stochastic trajectory occurs. The second class corresponds to the time the trajectory spends in a state (or cluster of states). While the expression for the first class follows straightforwardly from known results in the literature, we show that a similar formalism can be used to derive an expression for the second class. As an application, we use this formalism to analyze a cellular two-component network estimating an external ligand concentration. The uncertainty related to this external concentration is calculated by monitoring different random variables related to an internal protein. We show that, inter alia, monitoring the time spent in the phosphorylated state of the protein leads to a finite uncertainty only if there is dissipation, whereas the uncertainty obtained from the activity of the transitions of the internal protein can reach the Berg-Purcell limit even in equilibrium.

  2. Diffusion of adatoms on face-centered cubic transition metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.

    1994-05-10

    Mechanisms and associated energetics for adatom diffusion on the (100) and (110) surfaces of Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, and Ag are investigated. Self-diffusion was studied on (100) and (I 10) surfaces of Ni, Cu, Pd and Ag using corrected effective medium method (CEM) and approximation to CEM used for molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo studies (MD/MC-CEM). Self-diffusion on Pd(100), Ag(100), Ni(110), Cu(110), Pd(110), and Ag(110) is accomplished by classical diffusion: the adatom hops from its equilibrium adsorption site over an intervening bridge site to an adjacent equilibrium site. Self-diffusion on Ni(100) and Cu(100) proceeds by atomic-exchange diffusion: the adatom on the surface displaces an atom in the first surface layer. Aside from explicit inclusion of the kinetic-exchange-correlation energy, it is critical to include enough movable atoms in the calculation to insure correct energetics. Distortions induced by these diffusion mechanisms, especially atomic exchange, are long ranged in surface plane, owing to small distortions of many atoms being energetically favored over large distortions of few atoms. Energetics and rates of heterogeneous adatom diffusion on the (100) surfaces of Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, and Ag show that the final state energies differ due to variation of metallic bonding with coordination for different types of metal atoms. The surface energies of the 2 metals can be used to correlate the amount of energy gained or released when the adatom displaces a surface atom. This difference in energetic stability of final configurations determines whether bridge hopping diffusion or atomic displacement is the dominant kinetic process in these heterogeneous systems.

  3. Relaxed random walk model coupled with ecological niche modeling unravel the dispersal dynamics of a Neotropical savanna tree species in the deeper Quaternary.

    PubMed

    Collevatti, Rosane G; Terribile, Levi C; Rabelo, Suelen G; Lima-Ribeiro, Matheus S

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dispersal routes of Neotropical savanna tree species is an essential step to unravel the effects of past climate change on genetic patterns, species distribution and population demography. Here we reconstruct the demographic history and dispersal dynamics of the Neotropical savanna tree species Tabebuia aurea to understand the effects of Quaternary climate change on its current spatial patterns of genetic diversity. We sampled 285 individuals from 21 populations throughout Brazilian savannas and sequenced all individuals for three chloroplast intergenic spacers and ITS nrDNA. We analyzed data using a multi-model inference framework by coupling the relaxed random walk model (RRW), ecological niche modeling (ENM) and statistical phylogeography. The most recent common ancestor of T. aurea lineages dated from ~4.0 ± 2.5 Ma. T. aurea lineages cyclically dispersed from the West toward the Central-West Brazil, and from the Southeast toward the East and Northeast Brazil, following the paleodistribution dynamics shown by the ENMs through the last glacial cycle. A historical refugium through time may have allowed dispersal of lineages among populations of Central Brazil, overlapping with population expansion during interglacial periods and the diversification of new lineages. Range and population expansion through the Quaternary were, respectively, the most frequent prediction from ENMs and the most likely demographic scenario from coalescent simulations. Consistent phylogeographic patterns among multiple modeling inferences indicate a promising approach, allowing us to understand how cyclical climate changes through the Quaternary drove complex population dynamics and the current patterns of species distribution and genetic diversity. PMID:26379681

  4. Formation of Sr adatom chains on SrTiO3 (1 1 0) surface determined by strain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan; Li, Fengmiao; Wang, Weihua; Yang, Hao; Guo, Jiandong

    2016-09-14

    The adsorption behavior of Sr adatoms on the SrTiO3 (1 1 0)-(4  ×  1) reconstructed surface with Ti2O3 vacancies distributed in a superstructure is studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations. With the adsorption amount increasing, all the Sr adatoms between adjacent Ti2O3 vacancies are closely packed along the quasi-1D stripes on the surface with a uniform separation from each other. The formation of such adatom chains is determined by the surface strain relief-the local lattice relaxations in response to Sr adatoms and Ti2O3 vacancies are incompatible, leading to the strong repulsive interaction between them. Consequently the distribution of Sr chains follows the long-range order of the growth template with their length tunable in a certain range by evaporation amount. PMID:27390937

  5. Formation of Sr adatom chains on SrTiO3 (1 1 0) surface determined by strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yan; Li, Fengmiao; Wang, Weihua; Yang, Hao; Guo, Jiandong

    2016-09-01

    The adsorption behavior of Sr adatoms on the SrTiO3 (1 1 0)-(4  ×  1) reconstructed surface with Ti2O3 vacancies distributed in a superstructure is studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations. With the adsorption amount increasing, all the Sr adatoms between adjacent Ti2O3 vacancies are closely packed along the quasi-1D stripes on the surface with a uniform separation from each other. The formation of such adatom chains is determined by the surface strain relief—the local lattice relaxations in response to Sr adatoms and Ti2O3 vacancies are incompatible, leading to the strong repulsive interaction between them. Consequently the distribution of Sr chains follows the long-range order of the growth template with their length tunable in a certain range by evaporation amount.

  6. Theoretical probing of inelastic spin-excitations in adatoms on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounis, Samir; Schweflinghaus, Benedikt; Dias, Manuel dos Santos; Bouhassoune, Mohammed; Muniz, Roberto B.; Costa, Antonio T.

    2014-12-01

    We review our recent work on the simulation, description and prediction of spin-excitations in adatoms and dimers deposited on metallic surfaces. This work done together with Douglas L. Mills, is an extension of his seminal contribution (with Pascal Lederer) published 50 years ago on the spin-dynamics of transition metal impurities embedded in transition metal hosts [Lederer et al. (1967)]. The main predictions of his model were verified experimentally with state of the art inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy on adatoms. Our formalism, presented in this review, is based on time-dependent density functional theory, combined with the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green function method. Comparison to experiments is shown and discussed in detail. Our scheme enables the description and prediction of the main characteristics of these excitations, i.e. their resonance frequency, their lifetime and their behavior upon application of external perturbations such as a magnetic field.

  7. Adatom Fe(III) on the hematite surface: Observation of a key reactive surface species

    PubMed Central

    Eggleston, Carrick M; Stack, Andrew G; Rosso, Kevin M; Bice, Angela M

    2004-01-01

    The reactivity of a mineral surface is determined by the variety and population of different types of surface sites (e.g., step, kink, adatom, and defect sites). The concept of "adsorbed nutrient" has been built into crystal growth theories, and many other studies of mineral surface reactivity appeal to ill-defined "active sites." Despite their theoretical importance, there has been little direct experimental or analytical investigation of the structure and properties of such species. Here, we use ex-situ and in-situ scanning tunneling microcopy (STM) combined with calculated images based on a resonant tunneling model to show that observed nonperiodic protrusions and depressions on the hematite (001) surface can be explained as Fe in an adsorbed or adatom state occupying sites different from those that result from simple termination of the bulk mineral. The number of such sites varies with sample preparation history, consistent with their removal from the surface in low pH solutions.

  8. Electronic structure and magnetism of samarium and neodymium adatoms on free-standing graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozub, Agnieszka L.; Shick, Alexander B.; Máca, František; Kolorenč, Jindřich; Lichtenstein, Alexander I.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic structure of selected rare-earth atoms adsorbed on a free-standing graphene was investigated using methods beyond the conventional density functional theory (DFT+U , DFT+HIA, and DFT+ED). The influence of the electron correlations and the spin-orbit coupling on the magnetic properties has been examined. The DFT+U method predicts both atoms to carry local magnetic moments (spin and orbital) contrary to a nonmagnetic f6 (J =0 ) ground-state configuration of Sm in the gas phase. Application of DFT +Hubbard-I (HIA) and DFT +exact diagonalization (ED) methods cures this problem, and yields a nonmagnetic ground state with six f electrons and J =0 for the Sm adatom. Our calculations show that Nd adatom remains magnetic, with four localized f electrons and J =4.0 . These conclusions could be verified by STM and XAS experiments.

  9. Adatom complexes and self-healing mechanisms on graphene and single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetseris, Leonidas; Pantelides, Sokrates T

    2009-01-01

    Point defects play a role in the functionalization, chemical activation, carrier transport, and nano-engineering of graphitic systems. Here, we use first-principles calculations to describe several processes that alter the properties of graphene and single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the presence of self-interstitials (SI's). We find that, while two or four SI's are stabilized in hillock-like structures that stay idle unless the system is heated to very high temperatures, clustering of three C adatoms leads to the formation of mobile protrusions on graphene and large enough SWCNTs. For different SI concentrations and SWCNT size, the interplay between mobile and immobile species may favor one of the two competing processes, self-healing or formation of adatom superstructures.

  10. Electronic and vibrational properties of graphene monolayers with iron adatoms: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Navarro, Nestor E.; Velazquez, Julian; Salgado, Andres

    2015-04-01

    Periodic density functional calculations on graphene monolayers with and without an iron adatom have been used to elucidate iron-graphene adsorption and its effects on graphene electronic and vibrational properties. Density-of-states calculations and charge density contour plots reveal charge transfer from the iron s orbitals to the d orbitals, in agreement with past reports. Adsorbed iron atoms covalently bind to the graphene substrate, verified by the strong hybridization of iron d-states with the graphene bands in the energy region just below the Fermi level. This adsorption is weak and compared to the well-analyzed CO adsorption on Pt: It is indicated by its small adsorption energy and the minimal change of the substrate geometry due to the presence of the iron adatoms. Graphene vibrational spectra are analyzed though a systematic variation of the graphene supercell size. The shifts of graphene most prominent infrared active vibrational modes due to iron adsorption are explored using normal mode eigenvectors.

  11. Theoretical investigation of structures and energetics of sodium adatom and its dimer on graphene: DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Rani, Pooja; Dharamvir, Keya

    2015-11-01

    Extensive ab initio calculations have been performed to study the energetics of a sodium (Na) atom and its dimer adsorbed on graphene using the SIESTA package Soler et al. (2002) [1] which works within a DFT(density functional theory)-GGA (generalized gradient approximation) pseudopotential framework. The adsorption energy, geometry, charge transfer, ionization potential and density of states (DOS), partial density states (PDOS) of adatom/dimer-graphene system have been calculated. After considering various sites for adsorption of Na on graphene, the center of a hexagonal ring of carbon atoms is found to be the preferred site of adsorption while the Na2 dimer prefers to rest parallel to the graphene sheet. We find insignificant energy differences among adsorption configurations involving different possible sites in parallel orientation, which implies high mobility of the dimer on the graphene sheet. We also notice only a slight distortion of the graphene sheet perpendicular to its plane upon adatom adsorption. However, some lateral displacements seen are more perceptible. Summary The adsorption energy, geometry, charge transfer, ionization potential and density of states (DOS) and PDOS of adatom/dimer-graphene system have been calculated using SIESTA package Soler et al. (2002) [1] which works within a DFT(density functional theory)-GGA (generalized gradient approximation) pseudopotential framework. Preferred site for adsorption of a sodium atom on graphene is the hollow site. For the Na dimer adsorption, we found that horizontal orientation is favored over the vertical one. From DOS plots, it is clear that graphene's states are nearly unaffected by the adsorption of Na adatom and Interaction between sodium and graphene is predominantly ionic

  12. Native gallium adatoms discovered on atomically-smooth gallium nitride surfaces at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Alam, Khan; Foley, Andrew; Smith, Arthur R

    2015-03-11

    In advanced compound semiconductor devices, such as in quantum dot and quantum well systems, detailed atomic configurations at the growth surfaces are vital in determining the structural and electronic properties. Therefore, it is important to investigate the surface reconstructions in order to make further technological advancements. Usually, conventional semiconductor surfaces (e.g., arsenides, phosphides, and antimonides) are highly reactive due to the existence of a high density of group V (anion) surface dangling bonds. However, in the case of nitrides, group III rich growth conditions in molecular beam epitaxy are usually preferred leading to group III (Ga)-rich surfaces. Here, we use low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to reveal a uniform distribution of native gallium adatoms with a density of 0.3%-0.5% of a monolayer on the clean, as-grown surface of nitrogen polar GaN(0001̅) having the centered 6 × 12 reconstruction. Unseen at room temperature, these Ga adatoms are strongly bound to the surface but move with an extremely low surface diffusion barrier and a high density saturation coverage in thermodynamic equilibrium with Ga droplets. Furthermore, the Ga adatoms reveal an intrinsic surface chirality and an asymmetric site occupation. These observations can have important impacts in the understanding of gallium nitride surfaces.

  13. Hot Adatom Diffusion Following Oxygen Dissociation on Pd(100) and Pd(111): A First-Principles Study of the Equilibration Dynamics of Exothermic Surface Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukas, Vanessa J.; Reuter, Karsten

    2016-09-01

    We augment ab initio molecular dynamics simulations with a quantitative account of phononic dissipation to study the hyperthermal adsorbate dynamics resulting from a noninstantaneous energy dissipation during exothermic surface chemical reactions. Comparing the hot adatom diffusion ensuing O2 dissociation over Pd(100) and Pd(111) we find experimentally accessible product end distances to form a rather misleading measure for the lifetime of this hyperthermal state. The lifetime is particularly long at Pd(111) where a random-walk-type diffusion leads only to small net displacements. A detailed phonon analysis rationalizes the slow equilibration through long-lived Rayleigh mode excitations that spatially confine the released energy within a nanoscopic "hot spot" around the impingement region.

  14. Hydrogen adsorption capacity of adatoms on double carbon vacancies of graphene: A trend study from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fair, K. M.; Cui, X. Y.; Li, L.; Shieh, C. C.; Zheng, R. K.; Liu, Z. W.; Delley, B.; Ford, M. J.; Ringer, S. P.; Stampfl, C.

    2013-01-01

    Structural stability and hydrogen adsorption capacity are two key quantities in evaluating the potential of metal-adatom decorated graphene for hydrogen storage and related devices. We have carried out extensive density functional theory calculations for the adsorption of hydrogen molecules on 12 different adatom (Ag, Au, Ca, Li, Mg, Pd, Pt, Sc, Sr, Ti, Y, and Zr) decorated graphene surfaces where the adatoms are found to be stabilized on double carbon vacancies, thus overcoming the “clustering problem” that occurs for adatoms on pristine graphene. Ca and Sr are predicted to bind the greatest number, namely six, of H2 molecules. We find an interesting correlation between the hydrogen capacity and the change of charge distribution with increasing H2 adsorption, where Ca, Li, Mg, Sc, Ti, Y, Sr, and Zr adatoms are partial electron donors and Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt are partial electron acceptors. The “18-electron rule” for predicting maximum hydrogen capacity is found not to be a reliable indicator for these systems.

  15. Kinetics of mesa overlayer growth: Climbing of adatoms onto the mesa top

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yong; Liu, Feng; Li, Shao-Chun; Jia, Jin-Feng; Xue, Qi-Kun; Lee, Byeong-Joo

    2008-01-17

    We have calculated the energy barriers for an adatom climbing up onto a Pb mesa top either over a facet-facet edge or through a facet-step joint, using a modified embedded atom method. We found that the second process is not only thermodynamically more favorable than the first one but also much faster with a diminishing barrier. Our results provide a plausible explanation for the experimentally observed intriguing growth behavior of a Pb mesa. The underlying mechanisms can be generally applicable to other systems.

  16. Density functional theory study of Fe, Co, and Ni adatoms and dimers adsorbed on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johll, Harman; Kang, Hway Chuan; Tok, Eng Soon

    2009-06-01

    Metal clusters have been investigated rather intensely for both fundamental and technological reasons. In this work we report the results of plane-wave density functional theory calculations of Fe, Co, and Ni adatoms and dimers adsorbed on graphene. We study both homonuclear and heteronuclear dimers, and the latter includes mixed dimers of Fe, Co, and Ni along with dimers of these elements with Pt. Our work is motivated by the fundamental interest in their configurational and magnetic properties. We calculated the adsorption site, the structure and relative stabilities of various adsorption configurations, the band structures, the atomic projected electronic density of states, and the magnetic moments of the adatoms and dimers. Contrary to previous work, our results show that adatoms bind weakly to graphene with binding energies ranging from 0.2 to 1.4 eV depending on the adsorption site and species. For both homonuclear and heteronuclear dimers the binding energies per atom are lower than the respective adatom cases, ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 eV per metal atom. The most strongly bound configurations for all the dimers studied are those with the dimer axis (nearly) perpendicular to the graphene plane and bound at the hole site. These configurations, which, to our knowledge, have not been considered in previous work, also turn out to have the largest enhancement of the magnetic moment at least for the atom farther from the graphene. The binding energies of these most strongly bound dimers are dependent on three factors, namely, the interconfigurational energy change in the dimer atom farther from graphene upon desorption, the charge transfer from the dimer to the graphene, and the adsorption site favored by the atom closer to the graphene sheet. The first factor is dominant for all the dimers studied here except for CoPt and NiPt. The relatively high electronegativity of Pt affects the character of the charge transfer from the dimer to graphene. In most of the dimers

  17. Influence of the adatom diffusion on selective growth of GaN nanowire regular arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotschke, T.; Schumann, T.; Limbach, F.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.

    2011-03-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on patterned Si/AlN/Si(111) substrates was used to obtain regular arrays of uniform-size GaN nanowires (NWs). The silicon top layer has been patterned with e-beam lithography, resulting in uniform arrays of holes with different diameters (dh) and periods (P). While the NW length is almost insensitive to the array parameters, the diameter increases significantly with dh and P till it saturates at P values higher than 800 nm. A diffusion induced model was used to explain the experimental results with an effective diffusion length of the adatoms on the Si, estimated to be about 400 nm.

  18. Oxidation mechanism of formic acid on the bismuth adatom-modified Pt(111) surface.

    PubMed

    Perales-Rondón, Juan Victor; Ferre-Vilaplana, Adolfo; Feliu, Juan M; Herrero, Enrique

    2014-09-24

    In order to improve catalytic processes, elucidation of reaction mechanisms is essential. Here, supported by a combination of experimental and computational results, the oxidation mechanism of formic acid on Pt(111) electrodes modified by the incorporation of bismuth adatoms is revealed. In the proposed model, formic acid is first physisorbed on bismuth and then deprotonated and chemisorbed in formate form, also on bismuth, from which configuration the C-H bond is cleaved, on a neighbor Pt site, yielding CO2. It was found computationally that the activation energy for the C-H bond cleavage step is negligible, which was also verified experimentally. PMID:25188779

  19. Electronic and spin transport properties of graphene nanoribbon mediated by metal adatoms: a study by the QUAMBO-NEGF approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, G. P.; Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, C. Z.; Yao, Y. X.; Zhang, Jian; Ho, K. M.

    2013-02-12

    Structural and electronic properties, including deformation, magnetic moment, Mulliken population, bond order, as well as electronic transport properties, of zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) with Co adatoms on hollow sites are investigated by quasi-atomic minimal basis orbits (QUAMBOs), a first-principles tight binding (TB) scheme based on density functional theory (DFT), combined with a non-equilibrium Green's function. For electronic transport, below the Fermi level the transmission is strongly suppressed and spin dependent as a result of magnetism by Co adatom adsorption, while above the Fermi level the transmission is slightly distorted and spin independent. Due to the local environment dependence of QUAMBOs–TB parameters, we construct QUAMBOs–TB parameters of ZGNR leads and ZGNR with Co adatoms on hollow center sites by a divide-and-conquer approach, and accurately reproduce the electronic transmission behavior. Our QUAMBO–NEGF method is a new and promising way of examining electronic transport in large-scale systems.

  20. Effect of adatom deposition on surface magnetism and exchange coupling parameter in (0001) SmCo{sub 5} slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Selva Chandrasekaran, S.; Murugan, P.; Saravanan, P.; Kamat, S. V.

    2015-04-07

    First principles calculations are performed on 3d-transition metal atom deposited (0001) surface of SmCo{sub 5} to understand the magnetic properties and the improvement of Curie temperature (T{sub c}). Various atomic sites are examined to identify the energetically feasible adsorption of adatom and it is found that the void site of Co-rich (0001) SmCo{sub 5} surface is the most favourable one to deposit. The surface magnetic moments of various adatom deposited SmCo{sub 5} surfaces are larger than the clean surface except for Cu and Zn. Eventually, the surface exchange coupling of clean and adatom deposited surface is found to increase for Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu deposited surfaces and this improvement results in the increase in T{sub c} of SmCo{sub 5} slab.

  1. Effects of Thermal Electronic Excitations on the Diffusion of Oxygen Adatoms on Graphene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Yao, Xinxin; Fabris, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    We conduct first-principles calculations to study oxygen diffusion on the graphene surface as a function of temperature up to 3000 K. The minimum energy migration path and the corresponding activation energy are determined by the nudged elastic band method with explicit inclusion of thermal electronic excitations. Below 1000 K the activation energy for epoxy oxygen to migrate remains close to its room temperature value (0.72 eV). Above 1000 K the activation energy decreases near linearly with temperature, from 0.70 eV at 1000 K to 0.47 eV at 3000 K. We show that this reduction originates from thermal electronic excitations. In particular, the effect is determined by the large contrasts in the electronic structures of the initial and transition states: the transition state exhibits much larger electronic density of states near the Fermi level and is more susceptible to thermal electronic excitations. The reduction in activation energy leads to appreciable enhancement in the diffusivity of oxygen adatoms. A moderate decrease in the vibrational prefactor, also caused by thermal electronic excitations, does not alter this trend. These findings may facilitate future works to accurately describe the dynamics of O adatoms on graphene at high T, which are critical for determining surface thermodynamic properties such as equilibrium coverage. PMID:27074529

  2. Symmetry-protected coherent transport for diluted vacancies and adatoms in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Tijerina, David A.; da Silva, Luis G. G. V. Dias

    2016-08-01

    We study the effects of a low concentration of adatoms or single vacancies in the linear-response transport properties of otherwise clean graphene. These impurities were treated as localized orbitals, and for each type two cases with distinct coupling symmetries were studied. For adatoms, we considered top- and hollow-site adsorbates (TOP and HS). For vacancies, we studied impurity formation by soft bond reconstruction (REC), as well as the more symmetric case of charge accumulation in unreconstructed vacancies (VAC). Our results indicate that the transport is determined by usual impurity scattering when the graphene-impurity coupling does not possess C3 v symmetry (TOP and REC). In contrast, VAC impurities decouple from the electronic states at the Dirac points, and yield no contribution to the resistivity for a sample in charge neutrality. Furthermore, the inversion-symmetry-conserving HS impurities also decouple from entire sets of momenta throughout the Brillouin zone, and do not contribute to the resistivity within a broad range of parameters. These behaviors are protected by C3 v and inversion symmetry, respectively, and persist for more general impurity models.

  3. Antiferromagnetic Spin Coupling between Rare Earth Adatoms and Iron Islands Probed by Spin-Polarized Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Coffey, David; Diez-Ferrer, José Luis; Serrate, David; Ciria, Miguel; de la Fuente, César; Arnaudas, José Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    High-density magnetic storage or quantum computing could be achieved using small magnets with large magnetic anisotropy, a requirement that rare-earth iron alloys fulfill in bulk. This compelling property demands a thorough investigation of the magnetism in low dimensional rare-earth iron structures. Here, we report on the magnetic coupling between 4f single atoms and a 3d magnetic nanoisland. Thulium and lutetium adatoms deposited on iron monolayer islands pseudomorphically grown on W(110) have been investigated at low temperature with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The spin-polarized current indicates that both kind of adatoms have in-plane magnetic moments, which couple antiferromagnetically with their underlying iron islands. Our first-principles calculations explain the observed behavior, predicting an antiparallel coupling of the induced 5d electrons magnetic moment of the lanthanides with the 3d magnetic moment of iron, as well as their in-plane orientation, and pointing to a non-contribution of 4f electrons to the spin-polarized tunneling processes in rare earths. PMID:26333417

  4. Anisotropic Surface State Mediated RKKY Interaction Between Adatoms on a Hexagonal Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einstein, Theodore; Patrone, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by recent numerical studies of Ag on Pt(111), we derive a far-field expression for the RKKY interaction mediated by surface states on a (111) FCC surface, considering the effect of anisotropy in the Fermi edge. The main contribution to the interaction comes from electrons whose Fermi velocity vF is parallel to the vector R connecting the interacting adatoms; we show that in general, the corresponding Fermi wave-vector kF is not parallel to R. The interaction is oscillatory; the amplitude and wavelength of oscillations have angular dependence arising from the anisotropy of the surface state band structure. The wavelength, in particular, is determined by the component of the aforementioned kF that is parallel to R. Our analysis is easily generalized to other systems. For Ag on Pt(111), our results indicate that the RKKY interaction between pairs of adatoms should be nearly isotropic and so cannot account for the anisotropy found in the studies motivating our work.

  5. Antiferromagnetic Spin Coupling between Rare Earth Adatoms and Iron Islands Probed by Spin-Polarized Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Coffey, David; Diez-Ferrer, José Luis; Serrate, David; Ciria, Miguel; de la Fuente, César; Arnaudas, José Ignacio

    2015-09-03

    High-density magnetic storage or quantum computing could be achieved using small magnets with large magnetic anisotropy, a requirement that rare-earth iron alloys fulfill in bulk. This compelling property demands a thorough investigation of the magnetism in low dimensional rare-earth iron structures. Here, we report on the magnetic coupling between 4f single atoms and a 3d magnetic nanoisland. Thulium and lutetium adatoms deposited on iron monolayer islands pseudomorphically grown on W(110) have been investigated at low temperature with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The spin-polarized current indicates that both kind of adatoms have in-plane magnetic moments, which couple antiferromagnetically with their underlying iron islands. Our first-principles calculations explain the observed behavior, predicting an antiparallel coupling of the induced 5d electrons magnetic moment of the lanthanides with the 3d magnetic moment of iron, as well as their in-plane orientation, and pointing to a non-contribution of 4f electrons to the spin-polarized tunneling processes in rare earths.

  6. Defects in Silicene: Vacancy Clusters, Extended Line Defects, and Di-adatoms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuang; Wu, Yifeng; Tu, Yi; Wang, Yonghui; Jiang, Tong; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Yonghao

    2015-01-01

    Defects are almost inevitable during the fabrication process, and their existence strongly affects thermodynamic and (opto)electronic properties of two-dimensional materials. Very recent experiments have provided clear evidence for the presence of larger multi-vacancies in silicene, but their structure, stability, and formation mechanism remain largely unexplored. Here, we present a detailed theoretical study of silicene monolayer containing three types of defects: vacancy clusters, extended line defects (ELDs), and di-adatoms. First-principles calculations, along with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, revealed the coalescence tendency of small defects and formation of highly stable vacancy clusters. The 5|8|5 ELD – the most favorable extended defect in both graphene and silicene sheets – is found to be easier to form in the latter case due to the mixed sp2/sp3 hybridization of silicon. In addition, hybrid functional calculations that contain part of the Hatree-Fock exchange energy demonstrated that the introduction of single and double silicon adatoms significantly enhances the stability of the system, and provides an effective approach on tuning the magnetic moment and band gap of silicene. PMID:25619941

  7. Antiferromagnetic Spin Coupling between Rare Earth Adatoms and Iron Islands Probed by Spin-Polarized Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, David; Diez-Ferrer, José Luis; Serrate, David; Ciria, Miguel; Fuente, César de la; Arnaudas, José Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    High-density magnetic storage or quantum computing could be achieved using small magnets with large magnetic anisotropy, a requirement that rare-earth iron alloys fulfill in bulk. This compelling property demands a thorough investigation of the magnetism in low dimensional rare-earth iron structures. Here, we report on the magnetic coupling between 4f single atoms and a 3d magnetic nanoisland. Thulium and lutetium adatoms deposited on iron monolayer islands pseudomorphically grown on W(110) have been investigated at low temperature with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The spin-polarized current indicates that both kind of adatoms have in-plane magnetic moments, which couple antiferromagnetically with their underlying iron islands. Our first-principles calculations explain the observed behavior, predicting an antiparallel coupling of the induced 5d electrons magnetic moment of the lanthanides with the 3d magnetic moment of iron, as well as their in-plane orientation, and pointing to a non-contribution of 4f electrons to the spin-polarized tunneling processes in rare earths. PMID:26333417

  8. N and Ti adatom dynamics on stoichiometric polar TiN(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangiovanni, D. G.; Tasnádi, F.; Hultman, L.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.; Chirita, V.

    2016-07-01

    We use molecular dynamics (MD) based on the modified embedded atom method (MEAM) to determine diffusion coefficients and migration pathways for Ti and N adatoms (Tiad and Nad) on TiN(111). The reliability of the classical model-potential is verified by comparison with density functional theory (DFT) results at 0 K. MD simulations carried out at temperatures between 600 and 1800 K show that both Tiad and Nad favor fcc surface sites and migrate among them by passing through metastable hcp positions. We find that Nad species are considerably more mobile than Tiad on TiN(111); contrary to our previous results on TiN(001). In addition, we show that lattice vibrations at finite temperatures strongly modify the potential energy landscape and result in smaller adatom migration energies, Ea = 1.03 for Tiad and 0.61 eV for Nad, compared to 0 K values Ea0K = 1.55 (Tiad) and 0.79 eV (Nad). We also demonstrate that the inclusion of dipole corrections, neglected in previous DFT calculations, is necessary in order to obtain the correct formation energies for polar surfaces such as TiN(111).

  9. Defects in silicene: vacancy clusters, extended line defects, and Di-adatoms.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Wu, Yifeng; Tu, Yi; Wang, Yonghui; Jiang, Tong; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Yonghao

    2015-01-26

    Defects are almost inevitable during the fabrication process, and their existence strongly affects thermodynamic and (opto)electronic properties of two-dimensional materials. Very recent experiments have provided clear evidence for the presence of larger multi-vacancies in silicene, but their structure, stability, and formation mechanism remain largely unexplored. Here, we present a detailed theoretical study of silicene monolayer containing three types of defects: vacancy clusters, extended line defects (ELDs), and di-adatoms. First-principles calculations, along with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, revealed the coalescence tendency of small defects and formation of highly stable vacancy clusters. The 5|8|5 ELD - the most favorable extended defect in both graphene and silicene sheets - is found to be easier to form in the latter case due to the mixed sp(2)/sp(3) hybridization of silicon. In addition, hybrid functional calculations that contain part of the Hatree-Fock exchange energy demonstrated that the introduction of single and double silicon adatoms significantly enhances the stability of the system, and provides an effective approach on tuning the magnetic moment and band gap of silicene.

  10. New adatom model for Si(11) 7X7 and Si(111)Ge 5X5 reconstructed surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chadi, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    A new adatom model differing from the conventional model by a reconstruction of the substrate is proposed. The new adatom structure provides an explanation for the 7x7 and 5x5 size of the unit cells seen on annealed Si(111) and Si(111)-Ge surfaces, respectively. The model is consistent with structural information from vacuum-tunneling microscopy. It also provides simple explanations for stacking-fault-type features expected from Rutherford backscattering experiments and for similarities in the LEED and photoemission spectra of 2x1 and 7x7 surfaces.

  11. Surface-enhanced raman scattering from silver-cyanide and silver-thiocyanate vibrations and the importance of adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, H.; Gerischer, H.; Pettinger, B.

    1981-05-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been studied for silver-cyanide and 3-thiocyanate vibrations at 221 and 2111 cm -1 and at 218 and 2132 cm -1, respectively. We report evidence that besides large-scale surface roughness the presence of adatoms is mandatory in order to obtain SERS.

  12. Diffusion and growth of aluminum adatoms on magnesium clusters with hexahedral structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiongying; Hu, Wangyu; Yang, Jianyu; Chen, Chuanpin

    2015-02-01

    The surface diffusion and growth of Al atoms on Mg clusters with hexahedral structure was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The diffusion pathways and the corresponding energy barriers were determined via the nudged elastic band method. Two diffusion paths from a (0001) facet to a neighboring (1 1 bar 01) facet and between two adjacent (1 1 bar 01) facets were considered. The energy barriers on the (1 1 bar 01) facets and between the two (1 1 bar 01) facets were remarkably increased. As such, the adatom's mobility became limited at low temperatures. The growth of small Al-Mg nanoclusters was modeled via the one-by-one atom deposition technique to form an anomalous core-shell structure. The Mg atoms with lower surface energy and larger atomic radius occupied the core and the Al atoms with higher surface energy and smaller atomic radius occupied the shell.

  13. Influence of the adatom diffusion on selective growth of GaN nanowire regular arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gotschke, T.; Schumann, T.; Limbach, F.; Calarco, R.; Stoica, T.

    2011-03-07

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on patterned Si/AlN/Si(111) substrates was used to obtain regular arrays of uniform-size GaN nanowires (NWs). The silicon top layer has been patterned with e-beam lithography, resulting in uniform arrays of holes with different diameters (d{sub h}) and periods (P). While the NW length is almost insensitive to the array parameters, the diameter increases significantly with d{sub h} and P till it saturates at P values higher than 800 nm. A diffusion induced model was used to explain the experimental results with an effective diffusion length of the adatoms on the Si, estimated to be about 400 nm.

  14. Ferromagnetism, adatom effect, and edge reconstruction induced by Klein boundary in graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Zhi-qiang; Shi, Jun-jie; Zhang, Min

    2013-05-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic characteristics of Klein graphene nanoribbons (KGNRs), as observed by Suenaga and Koshino [K. Suenaga and M. Koshino, Nature 468, 1088 (2010)], are investigated using first-principles calculations. We find three new characteristics induced by the Klein boundary. First, the localized edge states in the KGNRs have a ferromagnetic coupling rather than the antiferromagnetic coupling of the zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs). Lieb's theorem is no longer applicable in the KGNRs. Second, the marginal single carbon adatom of the ZGNRs can destroy the edge states nearby. The edge states can recover if the length of the zigzag chains is equal to or greater than five times that of the lattice constant. Finally, we show that the pentagon-heptagon edge can be induced from the Klein boundary.

  15. Two Pathways for Water Interaction with Oxygen Adatoms on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Deskins, N. Aaron; Zhang, Zhenrong; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Dupuis, Michel; Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2009-03-06

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory studies show that oxygen adatoms (Oa), produced during O2 exposure of reduced TiO2(110) surfaces, alter the water dissociation/recombination chemistry through two distinctive pathways. Depending on whether H2O and Oa are on the same or adjacent Ti4+ rows, Oa facilitates H2O dissociation and proton transfer to form a terminal hydroxyl pair, positioned along- or across-Ti row, respectively. The latter process has not been reported previously, and it starts from “pseudo-dissociated” state of water. In both pathways, the subsequent reverse proton transfer results in H2O recombination and statistical oxygen atom scrambling, as manifested by an apparent along- or across-row motion of Oa’s.

  16. Diffusion of Cd and Te adatoms on CdTe(111) surfaces: A computational study using density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Naderi, Ebadollah; Nanavati, Sachin; Majumder, Chiranjib; Ghaisas, S. V.

    2015-01-15

    CdTe is one of the most promising semiconductor for thin-film based solar cells. Here we report a computational study of Cd and Te adatom diffusion on the CdTe (111) A-type (Cd terminated) and B-type (Te terminated) surfaces and their migration paths. The atomic and electronic structure calculations are performed under the DFT formalism and climbing Nudge Elastic Band (cNEB) method has been applied to evaluate the potential barrier of the Te and Cd diffusion. In general the minimum energy site on the surface is labeled as A{sub a} site. In case of Te and Cd on B-type surface, the sub-surface site (a site just below the top surface) is very close in energy to the A site. This is responsible for the subsurface accumulation of adatoms and therefore, expected to influence the defect formation during growth. The diffusion process of adatoms is considered from A{sub a} (occupied) to A{sub a} (empty) site at the nearest distance. We have explored three possible migration paths for the adatom diffusion. The adatom surface interaction is highly dependent on the type of the surface. Typically, Te interaction with both type (5.2 eV for A-type and 3.8 eV for B-type) is stronger than Cd interactions(2.4 eV for B-type and 0.39 eV for A-type). Cd interaction with the A-type surface is very weak. The distinct behavior of the A-type and B-type surfaces perceived in our study explain the need of maintaining the A-type surface during growth for smooth and stoichiometric growth.

  17. Ab initio-based study for adatom kinetics on AlN(0001) surfaces during metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Toru; Nakamura, Kohji; Ito, Tomonori

    2012-06-01

    The kinetics of Al and N adatoms on reconstructed AlN(0001) surfaces under growth conditions is investigated by performing first-principles pseudopotential calculations. Our calculations reveal that the adsorption of Al adatom strongly depends on the surface reconstruction while its diffusion is not affected by the reconstruction: the adsorption of Al adatom on the surface under N-rich conditions is much easier than that under H-rich conditions. These results indicate that the growth of AlN during metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy is prominent under N-rich conditions rather than H-rich conditions, consistent with experimentally reported growth rate difference.

  18. Possibility of transforming the electronic structure of one species of graphene adatoms into that of another by application of gate voltage: First-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kevin T.; Lee, Hoonkyung; Cohen, Marvin L.

    2011-10-01

    Graphene provides many advantages for controlling the electronic structure of adatoms and other adsorbates via gating. Using the projected density of states and charge density obtained from first-principles density-functional periodic supercell calculations, we investigate the possibility of performing “alchemy” of adatoms on graphene, i.e., transforming the electronic structure of one species of adatom into that of another species by application of a gate voltage. Gating is modeled as a change in the number of electrons in the unit cell, with the inclusion of a compensating uniform background charge. Within this model and the generalized gradient approximation to the exchange-correlation functional, we find that such transformations are possible for K, Ca, and several transition-metal adatoms. Gate control of the occupation of the p states of In on graphene is also investigated. The validity of the supercell approximation with uniform compensating charge and the model for exchange and correlation is also discussed.

  19. Crystal orientation effects on helium ion depth distributions and adatom formation processes in plasma-facing tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-10-14

    We present atomistic simulations that show the effect of surface orientation on helium depth distributions and surface feature formation as a result of low-energy helium plasma exposure. We find a pronounced effect of surface orientation on the initial depth of implanted helium ions, as well as a difference in reflection and helium retention across different surface orientations. Our results indicate that single helium interstitials are sufficient to induce the formation of adatom/substitutional helium pairs under certain highly corrugated tungsten surfaces, such as (1 1 1)-orientations, leading to the formation of a relatively concentrated layer of immobile helium immediately below the surface. The energies involved for helium-induced adatom formation on (1 1 1) and (2 1 1) surfaces are exoergic for even a single adatom very close to the surface, while (0 0 1) and (0 1 1) surfaces require two or even three helium atoms in a cluster before a substitutional helium cluster and adatom will form with reasonable probability. This phenomenon results in much higher initial helium retention during helium plasma exposure to (1 1 1) and (2 1 1) tungsten surfaces than is observed for (0 0 1) or (0 1 1) surfaces and is much higher than can be attributed to differences in the initial depth distributions alone. The layer thus formed may serve as nucleation sites for further bubble formation and growth or as a source of material embrittlement or fatigue, which may have implications for the formation of tungsten “fuzz” in plasma-facing divertors for magnetic-confinement nuclear fusion reactors and/or the lifetime of such divertors.

  20. Diffusion and growth of nickel, iron and magnesium adatoms on the aluminum truncated octahedron: A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianyu; Hu, Wangyu; Wu, Yurong; Dai, Xiongying

    2012-06-01

    The structure of nickel (Ni), iron (Fe), and magnesium (Mg) adatoms on the aluminum (Al) truncated octahedron is studied using molecular dynamics and the analytic embedded atom method. First, the energy barriers of several typical diffusion processes of Ni, Fe, and Mg adatoms on the Al truncated octahedral cluster were calculated using the nudged elastic band method. The calculated energy barriers were found to be related to the surface energy and atomic radius of the adatom and substrate atom. The result shows that the incorporation of Ni and Fe atoms into Al core easily occurs, and the Mg atom should segregate at the surface of the Al cluster. Thus, the growth of Ni, Fe and Mg on the Al truncated octahedron with 1289 atoms was simulated at several temperatures. In the Ni-Al and Fe-Al cases, the core-shell structure was not obtained. For the Mg-Al system, a good Mg shell on the Al core was found at lower temperatures, and an almost perfect truncated octahedron with more Al shells emerged with an increase in temperature.

  1. Observing spin excitations in 3 d transition-metal adatoms on Pt(111) with inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy: A first-principles perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweflinghaus, Benedikt; dos Santos Dias, Manuel; Lounis, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Spin excitations in atomic-scale nanostructures have been investigated with inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy, sometimes with conflicting results. In this work, we present a theoretical viewpoint on a recent experimental controversy regarding the spin excitations of Co adatoms on Pt(111). While one group [Balashov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 257203 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.257203] claims to have detected them, another group reported their observation only after the hydrogenation of the Co adatom [Dubout et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 106807 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.106807]. Utilizing time-dependent density functional theory in combination with many-body perturbation theory, we demonstrate that, although inelastic spin excitations are possible for Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co adatoms, their efficiency differs. While the excitation signature is less pronounced for Mn and Co adatoms, it is larger for Cr and Fe adatoms. We find that the tunneling matrix elements or the tunneling cross-section related to the nature and symmetry of the relevant electronic states are more favorable for triggering the spin excitations in Fe than in Co. An enhancement of the tunneling and of the inelastic spectra is possible by attaching hydrogen to the adatom at the appropriate position.

  2. Two Pathways for Water Interaction with Oxygen Adatoms on TiO2(110) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubinetsky, Igor; Du, Yingge; Deskins, N. Aaron; Zhang, Zhenrong; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Dupuis, Michel

    2010-08-04

    Atomic-level investigation of the interaction of H2O with a partially re-oxidized TiO2(110) has been performed at 300 K by combining scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory. In particular, we demonstrate that oxygen adatoms (Oa), produced during O2 exposure of reduced TiO2(110) surfaces, alter water dissociation/ recombination chemistry through two different pathways. When H2O diffuses to Oa on the same Ti row, it becomes trapped near the Oa, exchanges a proton easily to dissociate and form a pair of terminal hydroxyls (OHt) along the row, which can then readily recombine and re-dissociate many times or overcome the barrier to move away. When H2O passes along the Oa on an adjacent row, an across-row proton transfer facilitated by the bridging O atom results in spontaneous dissociation of H2O on a Ti trough leading to the formation of a stable across-row OHt pair, which after awhile can recombine and H2O diffuses away. The across-row process has not been reported previously, and it starts from a ‘‘pseudo-dissociated’’ state of water. We also show how the H2O dissociation and OHt pair statistical reformation induce an apparent along- or across-row shift of Oa as a result of the oxygen scrambling process between H2O and Oa.

  3. Evolution of dispersal distance.

    PubMed

    Durrett, Rick; Remenik, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    The problem of how often to disperse in a randomly fluctuating environment has long been investigated, primarily using patch models with uniform dispersal. Here, we consider the problem of choice of seed size for plants in a stable environment when there is a trade off between survivability and dispersal range. Ezoe (J Theor Biol 190:287-293, 1998) and Levin and Muller-Landau (Evol Ecol Res 2:409-435, 2000) approached this problem using models that were essentially deterministic, and used calculus to find optimal dispersal parameters. Here we follow Hiebeler (Theor Pop Biol 66:205-218, 2004) and use a stochastic spatial model to study the competition of different dispersal strategies. Most work on such systems is done by simulation or nonrigorous methods such as pair approximation. Here, we use machinery developed by Cox et al. (Voter model perturbations and reaction diffusion equations 2011) to rigorously and explicitly compute evolutionarily stable strategies.

  4. Modelisation de la diffusion sur les surfaces metalliques: De l'adatome aux processus de croissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, Ghyslain

    Cette these est consacree a l'etude des processus de diffusion en surface dans le but ultime de comprendre, et de modeliser, la croissance d'une couche mince. L'importance de bien mai triser la croissance est primordiale compte tenu de son role dans la miniaturisation des circuits electroniques. Nous etudions ici les surface des metaux nobles et de ceux de la fin de la serie de transition. Dans un premier temps, nous nous interessons a la diffusion d'un simple adatome sur une surface metallique. Nous avons, entre autres, mis en evidence l'apparition d'une correlation entre evenements successifs lorsque la temperature est comparable a la barriere de diffusion, i.e., la diffusion ne peut pas etre associee a une marche aleatoire. Nous proposons un modele phenomenologique simple qui reproduit bien les resultats des simulations. Ces calculs nous ont aussi permis de montrer que la diffusion obeit a la loi de Meyer-Neldel. Cette loi stipule que, pour un processus active, le prefacteur augmente exponentiellement avec la barriere. En plus, ce travail permet de clarifier l'origine physique de cette loi. En comparant les resultats dynamiques aux resultats statiques, on se rend compte que la barriere extraite des calculs dynamiques est essentiellement la meme que celle obtenue par une approche statique, beaucoup plus simple. On peut donc obtenir cette barriere a l'aide de methodes plus precises, i.e., ab initio, comme la theorie de la fonctionnelle de la densite, qui sont aussi malheureusement beaucoup plus lourdes. C'est ce que nous avons fait pour plusieurs systemes metalliques. Nos resultats avec cette derniere approche se comparent tres bien aux resultats experimentaux. Nous nous sommes attardes plus longuement a la surface (111) du platine. Cette surface regorge de particularites interessantes, comme la forme d'equilibre non-hexagonale des i lots et deux sites d'adsorption differents pour l'adatome. De plus, des calculs ab initio precedents n'ont pas reussi a confirmer la

  5. Interaction of CO2 with Oxygen Adatoms on Rutile TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Xiao; Wang, Zhitao; Lyubinetsky, Igor; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2013-01-10

    The interactions of CO2 with oxygen adatoms (Oa’s) on rutile TiO2(110) surfaces have been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. At 50 K CO2 is found to adsorb preferentially on five-coordinated Ti sites (Ti5c’s) next to Oa’s rather than on oxygen vacancies (VO’s) (the most stable adsorption sites on reduced TiO2(110)). Temperature dependent studies show that after annealing to 100 - 150 K, VO’s become preferentially populated indicating the presence of a kinetic barrier for CO2 adsorption into the VO’s. The difference between the CO2 binding energy on VO’s and Ti5c sites next to the Oa’s are found to be only 0.009 - 0.025 eV. The barrier for CO2 diffusion away from Oa’s is estimated to be ~0.17 eV. Crescent-like feature of the images of CO2 adsorbed on Ti5c’s next to Oa’s are interpreted as a time average of terminally bound CO2 molecules switching between the configurations that are tilted towards Oa and/or towards one of the two neighboring bridging oxygen (Ob) rows. In the presence of VO defects, CO2 is found to tilt preferentially away from the VO containing Ob row. If another CO2 is present on the neighboring Ti5c row, both CO2 molecules tilt towards the common Ob row that separates them.

  6. Relating adatom emission to improved durability of Pt-Pd diesel oxidation catalysts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johns, Tyne Richele; Goeke, Ronald S.; Ashbacher, Valerie; Thune, Peter C.; Niemantsverdriet, J. W.; Kiefer, Boris; Kim, Chang H.; Balogh, Michael P.; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2015-06-05

    Sintering of nanoparticles is an important contributor to loss of activity in heterogeneous catalysts, such as those used for controlling harmful emissions from automobiles. But mechanistic details, such as the rates of atom emission or the nature of the mobile species, remain poorly understood. Herein we report a novel approach that allows direct measurement of atom emission from nanoparticles. We use model catalyst samples and a novel reactor that allows the same region of the sample to be observed after short-term heat treatments (seconds) under conditions relevant to diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs). Monometallic Pd is very stable and does notmore » sinter when heated in air (T ≤ 800 °C). Pt sinters readily in air, and at high temperatures (≥800 °C) mobile Pt species emitted to the vapor phase cause the formation of large, faceted particles. In Pt–Pd nanoparticles, Pd slows the rate of emission of atoms to the vapor phase due to the formation of an alloy. However, the role of Pd in Pt DOCs in air is quite complex: at low temperatures, Pt enhances the rate of Pd sintering (which otherwise would be stable as an oxide), while at higher temperature Pd helps to slow the rate of Pt sintering. DFT calculations show that the barrier for atom emission to the vapor phase is much greater than the barrier for emitting atoms to the support. Thus, vapor-phase transport becomes significant only at high temperatures while diffusion of adatoms on the support dominates at lower temperatures.« less

  7. Relating adatom emission to improved durability of Pt-Pd diesel oxidation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Tyne Richele; Goeke, Ronald S.; Ashbacher, Valerie; Thune, Peter C.; Niemantsverdriet, J. W.; Kiefer, Boris; Kim, Chang H.; Balogh, Michael P.; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2015-06-05

    Sintering of nanoparticles is an important contributor to loss of activity in heterogeneous catalysts, such as those used for controlling harmful emissions from automobiles. But mechanistic details, such as the rates of atom emission or the nature of the mobile species, remain poorly understood. Herein we report a novel approach that allows direct measurement of atom emission from nanoparticles. We use model catalyst samples and a novel reactor that allows the same region of the sample to be observed after short-term heat treatments (seconds) under conditions relevant to diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs). Monometallic Pd is very stable and does not sinter when heated in air (T ≤ 800 °C). Pt sinters readily in air, and at high temperatures (≥800 °C) mobile Pt species emitted to the vapor phase cause the formation of large, faceted particles. In Pt–Pd nanoparticles, Pd slows the rate of emission of atoms to the vapor phase due to the formation of an alloy. However, the role of Pd in Pt DOCs in air is quite complex: at low temperatures, Pt enhances the rate of Pd sintering (which otherwise would be stable as an oxide), while at higher temperature Pd helps to slow the rate of Pt sintering. DFT calculations show that the barrier for atom emission to the vapor phase is much greater than the barrier for emitting atoms to the support. Thus, vapor-phase transport becomes significant only at high temperatures while diffusion of adatoms on the support dominates at lower temperatures.

  8. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-28

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C{sub 6}-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom in the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ∼0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. This in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001)

  9. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-27

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C6-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom inmore » the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ~0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. Furthermore, this in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001).« less

  10. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-27

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C6-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom in the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ~0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. Furthermore, this in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001).

  11. Intrinsic life-time and external manipulation of Néel states in antiferromagnetic adatom spins on semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Liu, Bang-Gui

    2015-06-01

    It has been proposed that antiferromagnetic Fe adatom spins on semiconductor Cu-N surfaces can be used to store information (Loth et al 2012 Science 335 196). Here, we investigate spin dynamics of such antiferromagnetic systems through Monte Carlo simulations. We find out the temperature and size laws of switching rates of Néel states and show that the Néel states can become stable enough for the information storage when the number of spins reaches one or two dozens of the Fe spins. We also explore promising methods for manipulating the Néel states. These could help realize information storage with such antiferromagnetic spin systems.

  12. Computational investigation of longitudinal diffusion, eddy dispersion, and trans-particle mass transfer in bulk, random packings of core-shell particles with varied shell thickness and shell diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Daneyko, Anton; Hlushkou, Dzmitry; Baranau, Vasili; Khirevich, Siarhei; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2015-08-14

    In recent years, chromatographic columns packed with core-shell particles have been widely used for efficient and fast separations at comparatively low operating pressure. However, the influence of the porous shell properties on the mass transfer kinetics in core-shell packings is still not fully understood. We report on results obtained with a modeling approach to simulate three-dimensional advective-diffusive transport in bulk random packings of monosized core-shell particles, covering a range of reduced mobile phase flow velocities from 0.5 up to 1000. The impact of the effective diffusivity of analyte molecules in the porous shell and the shell thickness on the resulting plate height was investigated. An extension of Giddings' theory of coupled eddy dispersion to account for retention of analyte molecules due to stagnant regions in porous shells with zero mobile phase flow velocity is presented. The plate height equation involving a modified eddy dispersion term excellently describes simulated data obtained for particle-packings with varied shell thickness and shell diffusion coefficient. It is confirmed that the model of trans-particle mass transfer resistance of core-shell particles by Kaczmarski and Guiochon [42] is applicable up to a constant factor. We analyze individual contributions to the plate height from different mass transfer mechanisms in dependence of the shell parameters. The simulations demonstrate that a reduction of plate height in packings of core-shell relative to fully porous particles arises mainly due to reduced trans-particle mass transfer resistance and transchannel eddy dispersion.

  13. Computational investigation of longitudinal diffusion, eddy dispersion, and trans-particle mass transfer in bulk, random packings of core-shell particles with varied shell thickness and shell diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Daneyko, Anton; Hlushkou, Dzmitry; Baranau, Vasili; Khirevich, Siarhei; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2015-08-14

    In recent years, chromatographic columns packed with core-shell particles have been widely used for efficient and fast separations at comparatively low operating pressure. However, the influence of the porous shell properties on the mass transfer kinetics in core-shell packings is still not fully understood. We report on results obtained with a modeling approach to simulate three-dimensional advective-diffusive transport in bulk random packings of monosized core-shell particles, covering a range of reduced mobile phase flow velocities from 0.5 up to 1000. The impact of the effective diffusivity of analyte molecules in the porous shell and the shell thickness on the resulting plate height was investigated. An extension of Giddings' theory of coupled eddy dispersion to account for retention of analyte molecules due to stagnant regions in porous shells with zero mobile phase flow velocity is presented. The plate height equation involving a modified eddy dispersion term excellently describes simulated data obtained for particle-packings with varied shell thickness and shell diffusion coefficient. It is confirmed that the model of trans-particle mass transfer resistance of core-shell particles by Kaczmarski and Guiochon [42] is applicable up to a constant factor. We analyze individual contributions to the plate height from different mass transfer mechanisms in dependence of the shell parameters. The simulations demonstrate that a reduction of plate height in packings of core-shell relative to fully porous particles arises mainly due to reduced trans-particle mass transfer resistance and transchannel eddy dispersion. PMID:26162667

  14. A theoretical analysis of the spin dynamics of magnetic adatoms traced by time-resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüler, M.; Pavlyukh, Y.; Berakdar, J.

    2012-04-01

    Inelastic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has recently been shown (Loth et al 2010 Science 329 1628) to be extendable to access the nanosecond, spin-resolved dynamics of magnetic adatoms and molecules. Here we analyze this novel tool theoretically by considering the time-resolved spin dynamics of a single adsorbed Fe atom excited by a tunneling current pulse from a spin-polarized STM tip. The adatom spin configuration can be controlled and probed by applying voltage pulses between the substrate and the spin-polarized STM tip. We demonstrate how, in a pump-probe manner, the relaxation dynamics of the sample spin is manifested in the spin-dependent tunneling current. Our model calculations are based on the scattering theory in a wave-packet formulation. The scheme is non-perturbative and, hence, is valid for all voltages. The numerical results for the tunneling probability and the conductance are contrasted with the predictions of simple analytical models and compared with experiments.

  15. Interaction of cesium adatoms with free-standing graphene and graphene-veiled SiO2 surfaces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Biedermann, Grant W.

    2015-04-21

    In this study, the interaction of Cs adatoms with mono- or bi-layered graphene (MLG and BLG), either free-standing or on a SiO2 substrate, was investigated using density functional theory. The most stable adsorption sites for Cs are found to be hollow sites on both graphene sheets and graphene-veiled SiO2(0001). In addition, larger dipole moments are created when a MLG-veiled SiO2(0001) substrate is used for adsorption of Cs atoms compared to the adsorption on free-standing MLG, due to charge transfer occurring between the MLG and the SiO2 substrate. For the adsorption of Cs on BLG-veiled SiO2(0001) substrate, these differences are smoothedmore » out and the binding energies corresponding to different sites are nearly degenerate; smaller dipole moments created by the Cs adatoms on BLG compared to MLG are also predicted.« less

  16. Interaction of cesium adatoms with free-standing graphene and graphene-veiled SiO2 surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Biedermann, Grant W.

    2015-04-21

    In this study, the interaction of Cs adatoms with mono- or bi-layered graphene (MLG and BLG), either free-standing or on a SiO2 substrate, was investigated using density functional theory. The most stable adsorption sites for Cs are found to be hollow sites on both graphene sheets and graphene-veiled SiO2(0001). In addition, larger dipole moments are created when a MLG-veiled SiO2(0001) substrate is used for adsorption of Cs atoms compared to the adsorption on free-standing MLG, due to charge transfer occurring between the MLG and the SiO2 substrate. For the adsorption of Cs on BLG-veiled SiO2(0001) substrate, these differences are smoothed out and the binding energies corresponding to different sites are nearly degenerate; smaller dipole moments created by the Cs adatoms on BLG compared to MLG are also predicted.

  17. Ocular dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1999-06-01

    Spectrally resolved white-light interferometry (SRWLI) was used to measure the wavelength dependence of refractive index (i.e., dispersion) for various ocular components. The accuracy of the technique was assessed by measurement of fused silica and water, the refractive indices of which have been measured at several different wavelengths. The dispersion of bovine and rabbit aqueous and vitreous humor was measured from 400 to 1100 nm. Also, the dispersion was measured from 400 to 700 nm for aqueous and vitreous humor extracted from goat and rhesus monkey eyes. For the humors, the dispersion did not deviate significantly from water. In an additional experiment, the dispersion of aqueous and vitreous humor that had aged up to a month was compared to freshly harvested material. No difference was found between the fresh and aged media. An unsuccessful attempt was also made to use the technique for dispersion measurement of bovine cornea and lens. Future refinement may allow measurement of the dispersion of cornea and lens across the entire visible and near-infrared wavelength band. The principles of white- light interferometry including image analysis, measurement accuracy, and limitations of the technique, are discussed. In addition, alternate techniques and previous measurements of ocular dispersion are reviewed.

  18. Si-adatom kinetics in defect mediated growth of multilayer epitaxial graphene films on 6H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetu, Shamaita S.; Omar, S. U.; Daniels, K. M.; Daas, B.; Andrews, J.; Ma, S.; Sudarshan, T. S.; Chandrashekhar, M. V. S.

    2013-10-01

    We present a quantitative study on the growth of multilayer epitaxial graphene (EG) by solid-state decomposition of SiC on polar (c-plane Si and C-face) and non-polar (a and m planes) 6H-SiC faces, with distinctly different defect profiles. The growth rates are slower than expected from a mechanism that involves Si loss from an open and free surface, and much faster than expected for the nucleation of a defect-free EG layer, implying that defects in the EG play a critical role in determining the growth kinetics. We show that a Deal-Grove growth model, which assumes vertical diffusion of Si through these defects as the limiting factor for EG growth, is unsuitable for describing multilayer growth. Instead, we introduce a lateral "adatom" diffusion mechanism for Si out-diffusion, based on a modified Burton, Cabrera, and Frank model. In this model, defects in epitaxial graphene serve as sinks for Si desorption loss, taking the place of reactive sites, such as step edges for nucleation and growth of crystals produced with external precursors. This analysis shows that the surface diffusion of Si atoms to the grain boundaries of EG limits the growth on c-plane C-face and non-polar faces, rather than the purely vertical diffusion of Si through the grain boundaries described in the Deal-Grove model. However, for Si-face c-plane growth, diffusion of Si to the defects, as well as desorption of Si at the grain boundaries are both relevant, leading to a different temperature trend compared with the other faces. This distinct qualitative difference is ascribed to point-defects in Si-face growth, as contrasted with line defects/grain boundaries on the other faces. The size of the EG grains correlates with the surface diffusion length extracted from this model. The longer a Si adatom diffuses, the higher the quality of the grown EG film, an insight that provides valuable information on Si adatom kinetics for optimizing EG growth. We discuss the applicability of this model to

  19. Phonons in Potassium-doped Graphene: The Effects of Electron-phonon Interactions, Dimensionality, and Adatom Ordering

    SciTech Connect

    Dean M. P.; Howard, C.A.; Withers, F.

    2011-12-19

    Graphene phonons are measured as a function of electron doping via the addition of potassium adatoms. In the low doping regime, the in-plane carbon G peak hardens and narrows with increasing doping, analogous to the trend seen in graphene doped via the field effect. At high dopings, beyond those accessible by the field effect, the G peak strongly softens and broadens. This is interpreted as a dynamic, nonadiabatic renormalization of the phonon self-energy. At dopings between the light and heavily doped regimes, we find a robust inhomogeneous phase where the potassium coverage is segregated into regions of high and low density. The phonon energies, linewidths, and tunability are notably very similar for one- to four-layer potassium-doped graphene, but significantly different to bulk potassium-doped graphite.

  20. Intermixed adatom and surface-bound adsorbates in regular self-assembled monolayers of racemic 2-butanethiol on Au(111).

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Runhai; Yan, Jiawei; Jensen, Palle S; Ascic, Erhad; Gan, Shiyu; Tanner, David; Mao, Bingwei; Niu, Li; Zhang, Jingdong; Tang, Chunguang; Hush, Noel S; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Ulstrup, Jens

    2015-04-01

    In situ scanning tunneling microscopy combined with density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations reveal a complex structure for the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of racemic 2-butanethiol on Au(111) in aqueous solution. Six adsorbate molecules occupy a (10×√3)R30° cell organized as two RSAuSR adatom-bound motifs plus two RS species bound directly to face-centered-cubic and hexagonally close-packed sites. This is the first time that these competing head-group arrangements have been observed in the same ordered SAM. Such unusual packing is favored as it facilitates SAMs with anomalously high coverage (30%), much larger than that for enantiomerically resolved 2-butanethiol or secondary-branched butanethiol (25%) and near that for linear-chain 1-butanethiol (33%).

  1. Oscillatory interaction between O impurities and Al adatoms on Al(111) and its effect on nucleation and growth.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Henri; Linke, Udo; Feibelman, Peter Julian; Polop, Celia; Zhong, Z.; Michely, Thomas; Busse, Carsten; Langenkamp, Winfried; Kotrla, M.

    2003-07-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of submonolayer growth in the presence of predeposited immobile impurities. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements of Al/Al(1 1 1) epitaxy in the presence of oxygen adsorbates show that immobile O impurities influence all aspects of the early stages of homoepitaxial growth on Al(1 1 1). Possible scenarios for modified growth are investigated using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Dependences of island density on temperature, impurity concentration and strength and type of adatom-impurity interaction are compared. The comparison shows that the morphology of the growing Al film cannot result from only one interaction type: attractive or repulsive. An oscillatory interaction, suggested by ab initio calculations, is proposed to explain the behavior of the system.

  2. A density functional theory study of uranium-doped thoria and uranium adatoms on the major surfaces of thorium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Ashley E.; Santos-Carballal, David; de Leeuw, Nora H.

    2016-05-01

    Thorium dioxide is of significant research interest for its use as a nuclear fuel, particularly as part of mixed oxide fuels. We present the results of a density functional theory (DFT) study of uranium-substituted thorium dioxide, where we found that increasing levels of uranium substitution increases the covalent nature of the bonding in the bulk ThO2 crystal. Three low Miller index surfaces have been simulated and we propose the Wulff morphology for a ThO2 particle and STM images for the (100), (110), and (111) surfaces studied in this work. We have also calculated the adsorption of a uranium atom and the U adatom is found to absorb strongly on all three surfaces, with particular preference for the less stable (100) and (110) surfaces, thus providing a route to the incorporation of uranium into a growing thoria particle.

  3. Enhanced magnetic anisotropies of single transition-metal adatoms on a defective MoS2 monolayer.

    PubMed

    Cong, W T; Tang, Z; Zhao, X G; Chu, J H

    2015-03-23

    Single magnetic atoms absorbed on an atomically thin layer represent the ultimate limit of bit miniaturization for data storage. To approach the limit, a critical step is to find an appropriate material system with high chemical stability and large magnetic anisotropic energy. Here, on the basis of first-principles calculations and the spin-orbit coupling theory, it is elucidated that the transition-metal Mn and Fe atoms absorbed on disulfur vacancies of MoS2 monolayers are very promising candidates. It is analysed that these absorption systems are of not only high chemical stabilities but also much enhanced magnetic anisotropies and particularly the easy magnetization axis is changed from the in-plane one for Mn to the out-of-plane one for Fe by a symmetry-lowering Jahn-Teller distortion. The results point out a promising direction to achieve the ultimate goal of single adatomic magnets with utilizing the defective atomically thin layers.

  4. Enhanced Magnetic Anisotropies of Single Transition-Metal Adatoms on a Defective MoS2 Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Cong, W. T.; Tang, Z.; Zhao, X. G.; Chu, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Single magnetic atoms absorbed on an atomically thin layer represent the ultimate limit of bit miniaturization for data storage. To approach the limit, a critical step is to find an appropriate material system with high chemical stability and large magnetic anisotropic energy. Here, on the basis of first-principles calculations and the spin-orbit coupling theory, it is elucidated that the transition-metal Mn and Fe atoms absorbed on disulfur vacancies of MoS2 monolayers are very promising candidates. It is analysed that these absorption systems are of not only high chemical stabilities but also much enhanced magnetic anisotropies and particularly the easy magnetization axis is changed from the in-plane one for Mn to the out-of-plane one for Fe by a symmetry-lowering Jahn-Teller distortion. The results point out a promising direction to achieve the ultimate goal of single adatomic magnets with utilizing the defective atomically thin layers. PMID:25797135

  5. CO-Induced Embedding of Pt Adatoms in a Partially Reduced FeOx Film on Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Merte, L. R.; Knudsen, Jan; Eichhorn, Falk M.; Porsgaard, Soeren; Zeuthen, Helene; Grabow, Lars C.; Laegsgaard, E.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Salmeron, Miquel B.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Fleming

    2011-07-20

    The reduction of a single-layer FeOfilmgrown on Pt(111) by CO at elevated pressures and temperatures has been studied through an interplay of scanning tunneling microscopy, ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Exposure of the FeO thin film to CO at pressures between 1 and 30 Torr and temperatures between 500 and 530 K leads to formation of a honeycomb-structured Fe3O2 film with hollow sites occupied by single Pt atoms extracted from the substrate surface. The formation of these adatoms is driven by an increase in CO adsorption energy. In addition, the structure incorporates undercoordinated Fe centers, which are proposed to have substantial effects on the catalytic properties of the surface.

  6. Formation of O Adatom Pairs and Charge Transfer upon O-2 Dissociation on Reduced TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Deskins, N. Aaron; Zhang, Zhenrong; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Dupuis, Michel; Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2010-06-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory have been used to investigate the details of O2 dissociation leading to the formation of oxygen adatom (Oa) pairs at terminal Ti sites. An intermediate, metastable Oa-Oa configuration with two nearest-neighbor O atoms is observed after O2 dissociation at 300 K. The nearest-neighbor Oa pairs are destabilized by Coulomb repulsion of charged Oa’s that separate further along the Ti row into energetically more favorable second-nearest neighbor configuration. The potential energy profile calculated for O2 dissociation on Ti rows and following Oa’s separation strongly supports the experimental observations. Furthermore, our results suggest that the itinerant electrons associated with the O vacancies are being utilized in the O2 dissociation process at the Ti row, whereas at least two oxygen vacancies per O2 molecule are required in order for this process to become viable.

  7. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Surface diffusion of Si, Ge and C adatoms on Si (001) substrate studied by the molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Hui; Yu, Zhong-Yuan; Lu, Peng-Fei; Liu, Yu-Min

    2009-10-01

    Depositions of Si, Ge and C atoms onto a preliminary Si (001) substrate at different temperatures are investigated by using the molecular dynamics method. The mechanism of atomic self-assembling occurring locally on the flat terraces between steps is suggested. Diffusion and arrangement patterns of adatoms at different temperatures are observed. At 900 K, the deposited atoms are more likely to form dimers in the perpendicular [110] direction due to the more favourable movement along the perpendicular [110] direction. C adatoms are more likely to break or reconstruct the dimers on the substrate surface and have larger diffusion distances than Ge and Si adatoms. Exchange between C adatoms and substrate atoms are obvious and the epitaxial thickness is small. Total potential energies of adatoms and substrate atoms involved in the simulation cell are computed. When a newly arrived adatom reaches the stable position, the potential energy of the system will decrease and the curves turns into a ladder-like shape. It is found that C adatoms can lead to more reduction of the system energy and the potential energy of the system will increase as temperature increases.

  8. The Effects of Wenxin Keli on P-Wave Dispersion and Maintenance of Sinus Rhythm in Patients with Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Nie, Shaoping; Gao, Hai; Sun, Tao; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Xing, Yanhui; Chen, Wen; Zhang, Zhenpeng; Gao, Yonghong; Wang, Jie; Xing, Yanwei; Shang, Hongcai

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the beneficial and adverse effects of Wenxin Keli (WXKL), alone or combined with Western medicine, on P-wave dispersion (Pd) and maintenance of sinus rhythm for the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). Methods. Seven major electronic databases were searched to retrieve randomized controlled trials (RCTs) designed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of WXKL, alone or combined with Western medicine, for PAF, with Pd or maintenance rate of sinus rhythm as the main outcome measure. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using criteria from the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Review of Interventions, version 5.1.0, and analysed using RevMan 5.1.0 software. Results. Fourteen RCTs of WXKL were included. The methodological quality of the trials was generally evaluated as low. The results of meta-analysis showed that WXKL, alone or combined with Western medicine, was more effective in Pd and the maintenance of sinus rhythm, compared with no medicine or Western medicine alone, in patients with PAF or PAF complicated by other diseases. Seven of the trials reported adverse events, indicating that the safety of WXKL is still uncertain. Conclusions. WXKL, alone or combined with Western medicine, appears to be more effective in improving Pd as well as maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with PAF and its complications. PMID:24368925

  9. Dispersion Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budiansky, Stephen

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses the need for more accurate and complete input data and field verification of the various models of air pollutant dispension. Consideration should be given to changing the form of air quality standards based on enhanced dispersion modeling techniques. (Author/RE)

  10. Adsorption of metal adatoms on FeO(111) and MgO(111) monolayers: Effects of charge state of adsorbate on rumpling of supported oxide film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goniakowski, Jacek; Noguera, Claudine; Giordano, Livia; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2009-09-01

    We present a theoretical density-functional theory study on the deposition of metal atoms (Ir, Pd, Pt, Ag, and Au) on FeO(111) and MgO(111) monolayers supported on Pt(111). We show the existence of a strong coupling between the charge state of the adsorbed adatom and the local polaroniclike distortion of the oxide film, and we identify two qualitatively different adsorption modes in which the distortion either reinforces the rumpling of the supported oxide film (positively charged adsorbates) or reduces or even reverses the cation-anion stacking (negatively charged adsorbates). Thus, the adsorption mode is a response to the charge state of the adsorbate and is driven mainly by the capacity of adatoms to exchange electrons with the support.

  11. Fog dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Christensen, L. S.; Collins, F. G.; Camp, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    A study of economically viable techniques for dispersing warm fog at commercial airports is presented. Five fog dispersion techniques are examined: evaporation suppression, downwash, mixing, seeding with hygroscopic material, thermal techniques, and charged particle techniques. Thermal techniques, although effective, were found to be too expensive for routine airport operations, and detrimental to the environment. Seeding or helicopter downwash are practical for small-scale or temporary fog clearing, but are probably not useful for airport operations on a routine basis. Considerable disagreement exists on the capability of charged particle techniques, which stems from the fact that different assumptions and parameter values are used in the analytical models. Recommendations resulting from the review of this technique are listed, and include: experimental measurements of the parameters in question; a study to ascertain possible safety hazards, such as increased electrical activity or fuel ignition during refueling operations which could render charged particle techniques impractical; and a study of a single charged particle generator.

  12. Fivefold i-Al-Pd-Mn surface as template for growing monatomic quasiperiodic layers: First-principles simulations for adatoms from groups one to three

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajčí, Marian; Hafner, J.

    2008-04-01

    By using ab initio density-functional calculations, we have explored the conditions for the formation of quasiperiodic overlayers on top of a fivefold surface of an icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystal. We calculate binding energies of single adatoms at special sites of the surface, with the aim to construct the potential-energy landscape of the quasiperiodic surface. We show that the energetically favorable adsorption sites are located at the vertices of a DHBS tiling [consisting of decagons (D), hexagons (H), boats (B), and stars (S)] describing the quasiperiodic ordering of the surface. An idealized structural model for the adlayer is constructed by decorating the interior of these tiles such that atoms are placed again in energetically favorable locations and that the local arrangement does not break the fivefold symmetry of the underlying substrate. The stability of this idealized structure is probed for elements from groups one to three of the Periodic Table by performing a conjugate-gradient relaxation under the action of the ab initio calculated forces. We demonstrate that in addition to a strong binding of the adatoms to the substrate, the size of the adatoms and the achievement of a dense surface coverage are the most important factors influencing the stability of quasiperiodic ordering in the adsorbed monolayer. From the analysis of the geometrical distribution of the adsorption sites, we conclude that a dense quasiperiodic overlayer with a density of 0.066atoms/Å2 (corresponding to a coverage Θ≈0.50 monolayers) can be formed by adatoms with an atomic size of 3.7ű0.4Å . Atoms with this size are Na, Ca, Y, and La. We suggest that these elements and presumably also most rare-earth elements are good candidates for the formation of highly regular quasiperiodic adlayers with a structure described by a decagonal DHBS tiling consisting of decagons, hexagons, boats, and pentagonal stars.

  13. Surface enhanced raman scattering from silver-halide and silver-pyridine vibrations and the role of silver ad-atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, H.; Gerischer, H.; Pettinger, B.

    1981-03-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering has been observed for silver-halide vibrations at 246 (Ag-Cl), 166 (Ag-Br) and 117 cm -1 (Aa-I). At potentials cathodic to -0.6 V, addition of pyridine leads to the appearance of two enhanced bands around 173 and 252 cm -1. Two requirements are needed simultaneously for large enhancement factors, large-scale surface roughness and ad-atoms.

  14. The crossover from collective motion to periphery diffusion for two-dimensional adatom-islands on Cu(111).

    PubMed

    Karim, Altaf; Kara, Abdelkader; Trushin, Oleg; Rahman, Talat S

    2011-11-23

    The diffusion of two-dimensional adatom-islands (up to 100 atoms) on Cu(111) has been studied, using the self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo method (Trushin et al 2005 Phys. Rev. B 72 115401). A variety of multiple- and single-atom processes are revealed in the simulations, and the size dependences of the diffusion coefficients and effective diffusion barriers are calculated for each. From the tabulated frequencies of events found in the simulation, we show a crossover from diffusion due to the collective motion of the island to a regime in which the island diffuses through periphery-dominated mass transport. This crossover occurs for island sizes between 13 and 19 atoms. For islands containing 19-100 atoms the scaling exponent is 1.5, which is in good agreement with previous work. The diffusion of islands containing 2-13 atoms can be explained primarily on the basis of a linear increase of the barrier for the collective motion with the size of the island.

  15. Atomistic simulations of the adsorption and migration barriers of Cu adatoms on ZnO surfaces using COMB potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Shan, Tzu-Ray; Devine, Bryce; Lee, Donghwa; Liang, Tao; Hinojosa, Beverly B.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Asthagiri, Aravind; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2012-08-01

    Cu/ZnO heterogeneous systems are used to catalyze the CO2 hydrogenation to methanol, but questions remain about the nature of the active site and the role of Cu-ZnO interactions in the catalyst performance. The way in which ZnO surfaces support Cu clusters and stabilize their active sites is a key factor for maintaining catalyst activity. Processes such as sintering, alloying and encapsulation may play an important role in the activity of the catalyst but are difficult to model directly with density functional theory (DFT). In this work, we report the development of charge-optimized many-body (COMB) potentials to model the Cu/ZnO system. This potential is then used in conjugation with the dimer method, which uses the first derivative of the potential energy and the initial state of the transition to find saddle points, to examine the migration barriers of Cu adatoms on Cu and ZnO surfaces. These findings are validated against the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations and published experimental data.

  16. Électrooxydation du mésoérythritol sur platine, modifié ou non par des adatomes, en milieu acide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherqaoui, A.; Chbihi, M. El M.; Takky, D.; Kokoh, K. B.; Leger, J.-M.; Lamy, C.

    1999-03-01

    The electrocatalytic oxidation of meso-erythritol has been studied in 0.1 M HClO4 on platinum and on adatoms modified platinum. Preliminary investigations by cyclic voltammetry showed that erythritol was not reactive on a Pt electrode. Underpotential deposition of lead or thallium adatoms at platinum allowed to increase significantly the current densities. Long-time electrolyses were carried out using a three potential plateau program with different values of the oxidation potentials. Chromatographic analyses showed that the oxidation of erythritol led mainly to erythrose, erythrulose and to erythronic acid. Otherwise, electrolysis of erythritol on a Pt-Tl modified electrode orientated selectively the distribution of the reaction products towards the formation of erythrulose. L'oxydation électrocatalytique du mésoérythrytol a été étudiée en milieu acide HClO4 0,1 M sur le platine modifié ou non par des adatomes métalliques. Les études préliminaires réalisées par voltammétrie cyclique montrent que l'érythritol est très peu réactif sur le platine seul. La modification de la surface de l'électrode par dépôt en sous-tension d'adatomes de plomb et de thallium permet d'augmenter les densités de courant. Les électrolyses prolongées sont réalisées à l'aide d'un programme à trois paliers de potentiel et pour différentes valeurs de potentiel d'oxydation. Les analyses chromatographiques montrent que les produits d'oxydation sont l'érythrose, l'érythrulose et l'acide érythronique. D'autre part l'oxydation de l'érythritol sur le platine modifié par des adatomes de thallium conduit à une production sélective d'érythrulose.

  17. Model Comparison for Abiotic versus Biotic Pollen Dispersal.

    PubMed

    Foster, Erich L; Chan, David M; Dyer, Rodney J

    2016-10-01

    An agent-based model with a correlated random walk is used to explore pollination within a forest. For abiotic dispersal, say via the wind, we use a purely random walk where there is no correlation between consecutive steps and for biotic dispersal, say via insect, we use a moderate or highly correlated random walk. In particular, we examine the differences in a number of biological measurement between a purely random walk and a correlated random walk in terms of gene dispersal in low and high plant densities. PMID:27550704

  18. Model Comparison for Abiotic versus Biotic Pollen Dispersal.

    PubMed

    Foster, Erich L; Chan, David M; Dyer, Rodney J

    2016-10-01

    An agent-based model with a correlated random walk is used to explore pollination within a forest. For abiotic dispersal, say via the wind, we use a purely random walk where there is no correlation between consecutive steps and for biotic dispersal, say via insect, we use a moderate or highly correlated random walk. In particular, we examine the differences in a number of biological measurement between a purely random walk and a correlated random walk in terms of gene dispersal in low and high plant densities.

  19. Colloidal Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russel, W. B.; Saville, D. A.; Schowalter, W. R.

    1992-03-01

    The book covers the physical side of colloid science from the individual forces acting between submicron particles suspended in a liquid through the resulting equilibrium and dynamic properties. The relevant forces include Brownian motion, electrostatic repulsion, dispersion attraction, both attraction and repulsion due to soluble polymer, and viscous forces due to relative motion between the particles and the liquid. The balance among Brownian motion and the interparticle forces decides the questions of stability and phase behavior. Imposition of external fields produces complex effects, i.e. electrokinetic phenomena (electric field), sedimentation (gravitational field), diffusion (concentration/chemical potential gradient), and non-Newtonian rheology (shear field). The treatment aims to impart a sound, quantitative understanding based on fundamental theory and experiments with well-characterized model systems. This broad grasp of the fundamentals lends insight and helps to develop the intuitive sense needed to isolate essential features of technological problems and design critical experiments. Some exposure to fluid mechanics, statistical mechanics, and electricity and magnetism is assumed, but each subject is reintroduced in a self-contained manner.

  20. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Variation of adatom to substrate charge transfer value along the first-row transition metal series on Mo(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, T. T.; Christmann, K.; Lecante, P.; Moutinho, A. M. C.

    2002-04-01

    Adsorption of the first-row transition 3d metals (Ti-Cu) on the atomically clean Mo(110) surface in ultra-high-vacuum conditions has been studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and work function measurements (Anderson method). In this letter it is shown that adsorption behaviour of the metals under consideration systematically changes along the 3d series. The observed correlation between the systematic change of the dipole moments and the values of the charge transfer from adatom to substrate along the period leads us to the conclusion that the metal 3d orbitals play an important role in the formation of the chemisorption bond.

  1. The electrooxidation mechanism of formic acid on platinum and on lead ad-atoms modified platinum studied with the kinetic isotope effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bełtowska-Brzezinska, M.; Łuczak, T.; Stelmach, J.; Holze, R.

    2014-04-01

    Kinetics and mechanism of formic acid (FA) oxidation on platinum and upd-lead ad-atoms modified platinum electrodes have been studied using unlabelled and deuterated compounds. Poisoning of the electrode surface by CO-like species was prevented by suppression of dissociative chemisorption of FA due to a fast competitive underpotential deposition of lead ad-atoms on the Pt surface from an acidic solution containing Pb2+ cations. Modification of the Pt electrode with upd lead induced a catalytic effect in the direct electrooxidation of physisorbed FA to CO2. With increasing degree of H/D substitution, the rate of this reaction decreased in the order: HCOOH > DCOOH ≥ HCOOD > DCOOD. HCOOH was oxidized 8.5-times faster on a Pt/Pb electrode than DCOOD. This primary kinetic isotope effect proves that the C-H- and O-H-bonds are simultaneously cleaved in the rate determining step. A secondary kinetic isotope effect was found in the dissociative chemisorption of FA in the hydrogen adsorption-desorption range on a bare Pt electrode after H/D exchange in the C-H bond, wherein the influence of deuterium substitution in the O-H group was negligibly small. Thus the C-H bond cleavage is accompanied by the C-OH and not the O-H bond split in the FA decomposition, producing CO-like species on the Pt surface sites.

  2. Pest insect movement and dispersal as an example of applied movement ecology. Comment on “Multiscale approach to pest insect monitoring: Random walks, pattern formation, synchronization, and networks” by Petrovskii, Petrovskaya and Bearup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codling, Edward A.

    2014-09-01

    Over the past decade there has been a revolution in the development of new affordable sensing and tracking technology, and this has led to the deployment of a vast array of location sensors and data loggers for monitoring and recording animal movement [1,2]. This revolution has led to an enormous amount of animal movement data being collected and much of this is now freely available [3]. Alongside the technological revolution, by necessity there has also been a rapid development of new mathematical and statistical tools and techniques for analysing the enormous data sets collected [4-6]. Movement ecology has subsequently been recognised as an important research field in its own right [7,8]. Nevertheless, there are still many open problems remaining. In particular, Petrovskii et al. [9] highlight an important question about how the movement and dispersal of pest insects relates to their population abundance, dynamics and spatial spread. Such a question can be considered an example of "applied movement ecology". As well as serving as an important case study to develop and test movement analysis and spatial modelling techniques, there are obvious direct economic, societal, and conservation benefits to be had from better understanding of pest insect dispersal and subsequent population dynamics at different spatial and temporal scales. Outbreaks of pest insect species (such as Tipula paludosa, as discussed in [9]) are known to cause serious damage to crops. Outbreaks can occur at a range of spatial scales: from a small localised outbreak affecting part of a field, through to a regional outbreak or invasion of a pest species [10,11]. Many millions of dollars are lost globally every year because of lost or reduced crop yields caused directly by pest insect damage [10]. Hence it is important that we can develop better knowledge of pest insect movement and dispersal in order to properly implement integrated pest management (IPM) [11].

  3. Assessing the impacts of nonrandom seed dispersal by multiple frugivore partners on plant recruitment.

    PubMed

    Razafindratsima, Onja H; Dunham, Amy E

    2015-01-01

    Directed dispersal is defined as enhanced dispersal of seeds into suitable microhabitats, resulting in higher recruitment than if seeds were dispersed randomly. While this constitutes one of the main explanations for the adaptive value of frugivore-mediated seed dispersal, the generality of this advantage has received little study, particularly when multiple dispersers are involved. We used probability recruitment models of a long-lived rainforest tree in Madagascar to compare recruitment success under dispersal by multiple frugivores, no dispersal, and random dispersal. Models were parameterized using a three-year recruitment experiment and observational data of dispersal events by three frugivorous lemur species that commonly disperse its seeds. Frugivore-mediated seed dispersal was nonrandom with respect to canopy cover and increased modeled per-seed sapling recruitment fourfold compared to no dispersal. Seeds dispersed by one frugivore, Eulemur rubriventer, had higher modeled recruitment probability than seeds dispersed randomly. However, as a group, our models suggest that seeds dispersed by lemurs would have lower recruitment than if dispersal were random. Results demonstrate the importance of evaluating the contribution of multiple frugivores to plant recruitment for understanding plant population dynamics and the ecological and evolutionary significance of seed dispersal. PMID:26236886

  4. Physical models of polarization mode dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Menyuk, C.R.; Wai, P.K.A.

    1995-12-31

    The effect of randomly varying birefringence on light propagation in optical fibers is studied theoretically in the parameter regime that will be used for long-distance communications. In this regime, the birefringence is large and varies very rapidly in comparison to the nonlinear and dispersive scale lengths. We determine the polarization mode dispersion, and we show that physically realistic models yield the same result for polarization mode dispersion as earlier heuristic models that were introduced by Poole. We also prove an ergodic theorem.

  5. Theoretical and experimental studies of surface physics: Theory of surface electromigration wind force felt by a sodium adatom on stepped sodium(110) surfaces; and magnetic order-disorder phase transition of antiferromagnetic nickel oxide thin films on silver(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jason Yu-Lin

    This dissertation is composed of theoretical and experimental work in surface physics. I have performed calculations of electromigration wind forces felt by a Na adatom on Na (110) stepped metal surfaces. Electromigration is a process which impurities are induced to drift in a particular direction when an electric field is applied across the sample. I find that the electromigration wind force felt by an adatom is changed due to the presence of step edge on the surface. My experimental work explores the magnetic order-disorder phase transition of antiferromagnetic nickel oxide thin films. I find that the Neel temperature is different for nickel oxide thin films and bulk samples. In my theoretical calculations I have applied multiple scattering theory to explore the variation of the electromigration wind force experienced by a Na adatom on Na (110) stepped metal surfaces. I find that the electromigration wind force felt by a migrating adatom is strongly perturbed as the adatom approaches a step edge. This is a result of multiple scattering of the carriers between the adatom and step which alters the local current density. In addition, the electromigration wind force felt by a Na adatom in the lower and the upper step regions is asymmetric. The implications of this inhomogeneity in the electromigration driving force for current-induced changes in surface morphology are discussed. In my experimental work, antiferromagnetic nickel oxide (NiO) thin films were grown on single crystal Ag (100) by means of electron beam deposition. My low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) results indicate that the magnetic order in NiO may be dependent upon the oxygen stoichiometry in the thin film. I show that in thin films approximately 13 monolayers thick, the Neel temperature, TN, of NiO is 631 K which is higher than the bulk value of TN = 523 K. Furthermore, I find that as the film thickness is increased, the Neel temperature decreases towards the

  6. Design of Advanced Photocatalysis System by Adatom Decoration in 2D Nanosheets of Group-IV and III–V Binary Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hao; Dai, Ying; Huang, Bai-Biao

    2016-01-01

    Searching for novel photocatalysts is one of the most important topic in photocatalytic fields. In the present work, we propose a feasible approach to improve the photocatalytic activities of 2D bilayers through surface decoration, i.e. hydrogenation, halogenation, and hydroxylation. Our investigations demonstrate that after surface modification, the optical adsorption expands into the visible region, while a built-in electric field is induced due to the interlayer coupling, which can promote the charge separation for photogenerated electron-hole pairs. Our results show that the indirect-direct band gap transition of SiC, SnC, BN and GaN can be realised through adatom decoration. Furthermore, the surface-modified 2D bilayers have suitable VBM and CBM alignments with the oxidation and reduction potentials for water splitting, suggesting powerful potentials in energy and environmental applications. PMID:26983908

  7. Wave propagation on a random lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Sahlmann, Hanno

    2010-09-15

    Motivated by phenomenological questions in quantum gravity, we consider the propagation of a scalar field on a random lattice. We describe a procedure to calculate the dispersion relation for the field by taking a limit of a periodic lattice. We use this to calculate the lowest order coefficients of the dispersion relation for a specific one-dimensional model.

  8. Lectures on Dispersion Theory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Salam, A.

    1956-04-01

    Lectures with mathematical analysis are given on Dispersion Theory and Causality and Dispersion Relations for Pion-nucleon Scattering. The appendix includes the S-matrix in terms of Heisenberg Operators. (F. S.)

  9. Dispersion y dinamica poblacional

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dispersal behavior of fruit flies is appetitive. Measures of dispersion involve two different parameter: the maximum distance and the standard distance. Standard distance is a parameter that describes the probalility of dispersion and is mathematically equivalent to the standard deviation around ...

  10. Dispersants displace hot oiling

    SciTech Connect

    Wash, R.

    1984-02-01

    Laboratory experiments and field testing of dispersants in producing wells have resulted in development of 2 inexpensive paraffin dispersant packages with a broad application range, potential for significant savings over hot oiling, and that can be applied effectively by both continuous and batch treating techniques. The 2 dispersants are soluble in the carrier solvent (one soluble in oil, one in water); are able to readily disperse the wax during a hot flask test conducted in a laboratory; and leave the producing interval water wet. Field data on the 2 dispersants are tabulated, demonstrating their efficacy.

  11. Theory of dispersive microlenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, B.; Gal, George

    1993-01-01

    A dispersive microlens is a miniature optical element which simultaneously focuses and disperses light. Arrays of dispersive mircolenses have potential applications in multicolor focal planes. They have a 100 percent optical fill factor and can focus light down to detectors of diffraction spot size, freeing up areas on the focal plane for on-chip analog signal processing. Use of dispersive microlenses allows inband color separation within a pixel and perfect scene registration. A dual-color separation has the potential for temperature discrimination. We discuss the design of dispersive microlenses and present sample results for efficient designs.

  12. Dispersal kernel estimation: A comparison of empirical and modelled particle dispersion in a coastal marine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrycik, Janelle M.; Chassé, Joël; Ruddick, Barry R.; Taggart, Christopher T.

    2013-11-01

    Early life-stage dispersal influences recruitment and is of significance in explaining the distribution and connectivity of marine species. Motivations for quantifying dispersal range from biodiversity conservation to the design of marine reserves and the mitigation of species invasions. Here we compare estimates of real particle dispersion in a coastal marine environment with similar estimates provided by hydrodynamic modelling. We do so by using a system of magnetically attractive particles (MAPs) and a magnetic-collector array that provides measures of Lagrangian dispersion based on the time-integration of MAPs dispersing through the array. MAPs released as a point source in a coastal marine location dispersed through the collector array over a 5-7 d period. A virtual release and observed (real-time) environmental conditions were used in a high-resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamic model to estimate the dispersal of virtual particles (VPs). The number of MAPs captured throughout the collector array and the number of VPs that passed through each corresponding model location were enumerated and compared. Although VP dispersal reflected several aspects of the observed MAP dispersal, the comparisons demonstrated model sensitivity to the small-scale (random-walk) particle diffusivity parameter (Kp). The one-dimensional dispersal kernel for the MAPs had an e-folding scale estimate in the range of 5.19-11.44 km, while those from the model simulations were comparable at 1.89-6.52 km, and also demonstrated sensitivity to Kp. Variations among comparisons are related to the value of Kp used in modelling and are postulated to be related to MAP losses from the water column and (or) shear dispersion acting on the MAPs; a process that is constrained in the model. Our demonstration indicates a promising new way of 1) quantitatively and empirically estimating the dispersal kernel in aquatic systems, and 2) quantitatively assessing and (or) improving regional hydrodynamic

  13. Dispersible carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Soulié-Ziakovic, Corinne; Nicolaÿ, Renaud; Prevoteau, Alexandre; Leibler, Ludwik

    2014-01-27

    A method is proposed to produce nanoparticles dispersible and recyclable in any class of solvents, and the concept is illustrated with the carbon nanotubes. Classically, dispersions of CNTs can be achieved through steric stabilization induced by adsorbed or grafted polymer chains. Yet, the surface modification of CNTs surfaces is irreversible, and the chemical nature of the polymer chains imposes the range of solvents in which CNTs can be dispersed. To address this limitation, supramolecular bonds can be used to attach and to detach polymer chains from the surface of CNTs. The reversibility of supramolecular bonds offers an easy way to recycle CNTs as well as the possibility to disperse the same functional CNTs in any type of solvent, by simply adapting the chemical nature of the stabilizing chains to the dispersing medium. The concept of supramolecular functionalization can be applied to other particles, for example, silica or metal oxides, as well as to dispersing in polymer melts, films or coatings.

  14. Costs of dispersal.

    PubMed

    Bonte, Dries; Van Dyck, Hans; Bullock, James M; Coulon, Aurélie; Delgado, Maria; Gibbs, Melanie; Lehouck, Valerie; Matthysen, Erik; Mustin, Karin; Saastamoinen, Marjo; Schtickzelle, Nicolas; Stevens, Virginie M; Vandewoestijne, Sofie; Baguette, Michel; Barton, Kamil; Benton, Tim G; Chaput-Bardy, Audrey; Clobert, Jean; Dytham, Calvin; Hovestadt, Thomas; Meier, Christoph M; Palmer, Steve C F; Turlure, Camille; Travis, Justin M J

    2012-05-01

    Dispersal costs can be classified into energetic, time, risk and opportunity costs and may be levied directly or deferred during departure, transfer and settlement. They may equally be incurred during life stages before the actual dispersal event through investments in special morphologies. Because costs will eventually determine the performance of dispersing individuals and the evolution of dispersal, we here provide an extensive review on the different cost types that occur during dispersal in a wide array of organisms, ranging from micro-organisms to plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. In general, costs of transfer have been more widely documented in actively dispersing organisms, in contrast to a greater focus on costs during departure and settlement in plants and animals with a passive transfer phase. Costs related to the development of specific dispersal attributes appear to be much more prominent than previously accepted. Because costs induce trade-offs, they give rise to covariation between dispersal and other life-history traits at different scales of organismal organisation. The consequences of (i) the presence and magnitude of different costs during different phases of the dispersal process, and (ii) their internal organisation through covariation with other life-history traits, are synthesised with respect to potential consequences for species conservation and the need for development of a new generation of spatial simulation models. PMID:21929715

  15. Intragenomic Conflict over Dispersal.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Elizabeth J; Úbeda, Francisco; Gardner, Andy

    2015-09-01

    Intragenomic conflict may arise when social partners are more related through one parent than the other-for example, owing to individuals or gametes of one sex dispersing further prior to fertilization. In particular, genes originating from the former parent are favored to promote selflessness, and those originating from the latter parent are favored to promote selfishness. While the impact of patterns of dispersal on the evolution of intragenomic conflict has received recent attention, the consequences of intragenomic conflict for the evolution of dispersal remain to be explored. We suggest that if the evolution of dispersal is driven at least in part by kin selection, differential relatedness of social partners via their mothers versus their fathers may lead to an intragenomic conflict, with maternal-origin genes and paternal-origin genes favoring different rates of dispersal. As an illustration, we extend a classic model of the evolution of dispersal to explore how intragenomic conflict may arise between an individual's maternal-origin and paternal-origin genes over whether that individual should disperse in order to ease kin competition. Our analysis reveals extensive potential for intragenomic conflict over dispersal and predicts that genes underpinning dispersal phenotypes may exhibit parent-of-origin-specific expression, which may facilitate their discovery. PMID:26655360

  16. Probing many body effects using Fourier Transform Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy: Can spin-orbit splitting in dispersion be observed in q-space?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahi, Gelareh; UBC Labortory for Atomic Imaging Research (LAIR)) Team

    Well studied surface systems such as Ag and Cu provide a safe platform to test novel spectroscopy methods that can have extended applications in near future. Our current focus is given to Fourier Transform Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (FT-STS) that allows us to study scattering effects (quasiparticle interactions - namely QPI) of CO and Co on Cu(111) surface. Magnetic Co adatoms are expected to generate a spin-orbit split in dispersion in QPI(q) space, the existence of which is confirmed by the k-space angle-resolved photo-emission spectroscopy (ARPES) of Cu(111) surface in the recent years. Hence the previously observed electron-phonon kink and spin-orbit splitting of the dispersion, as well as the scattering properties of CO molecules and Co adatoms, should also be observable in QPI space via FT-STS of Cu(111), and compatible with previous studies on similar systems. We are using a low temperature (4.2 K) commercial Scanning Tunneling Microscope (CREATEC STM) that operates using Nanonis electronic controllers and software which allows us to perform FT-STS as well as topological imaging.

  17. Site-specific bonding of copper adatoms to pyridine end groups mediating the formation of two-dimensional coordination networks on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umbach, T. R.; Bernien, M.; Hermanns, C. F.; Sun, L. L.; Mohrmann, H.; Hermann, K. E.; Krüger, A.; Krane, N.; Yang, Z.; Nickel, F.; Chang, Y.-M.; Franke, K. J.; Pascual, J. I.; Kuch, W.

    2014-06-01

    We study the formation of a coordination network consisting of the organic pyridine-based 2,4,6-tris(4-pyridine)-1,3,5-triazine (T4PT) species and Cu atoms on Cu(111) and Ag(111) metal surfaces. Using scanning tunneling microscopy, we find that the organic molecule T4PT forms stable two-dimensional porous networks on the surface of Cu(111) and, by codeposition of Cu atoms, also on the Ag(111) crystal, in which Cu atoms are twofold coordinated by T4PT molecules. X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of the metal-organic network Cu-T4PT on Ag(111) accompanied by density-functional theory calculations show that the nitrogen atoms of the pyridine end groups of the T4PT molecules are the active sites in coordinating the Cu adatoms. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism experiments reveal that the Cu atom in such a metal-organic motif is in a low-valent d10 state and has no magnetic moment.

  18. Seed dispersal in fens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, B.; Van Diggelen, R.; Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and reducing genetic exchange. Species in fragmented wetlands may have lower reproductive success, which can lead to biodiversity loss. While fens may have always been relatively isolated from each other, they have become increasingly fragmented in modern times within agricultural and urban landscapes in both Europe and North America. Dispersal by water, animals and wind has been hampered by changes related to development in landscapes surrounding fens. Because the seeds of certain species are long-lived in the seed bank, frequent episodes of dispersal are not always necessary to maintain the biodiversity of fens. However, of particular concern to restoration is that some dominant species, such as the tussock sedge Carex stricta, may not disperse readily between fens. Conclusions: Knowledge of seed dispersal can be used to maintain and restore the biodiversity of fens in fragmented landscapes. Given that development has fragmented landscapes and that this situation is not likely to change, the dispersal of seeds might be enhanced by moving hay or cattle from fens to damaged sites, or by reestablishing lost hydrological connections. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  19. Dispersal of forest insects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Dispersal flights of selected species of forest insects which are associated with periodic outbreaks of pests that occur over large contiguous forested areas are discussed. Gypsy moths, spruce budworms, and forest tent caterpillars were studied for their massive migrations in forested areas. Results indicate that large dispersals into forested areas are due to the females, except in the case of the gypsy moth.

  20. Visualizing Dispersion Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottschalk, Elinor; Venkataraman, Bhawani

    2014-01-01

    An animation and accompanying activity has been developed to help students visualize how dispersion interactions arise. The animation uses the gecko's ability to walk on vertical surfaces to illustrate how dispersion interactions play a role in macroscale outcomes. Assessment of student learning reveals that students were able to develop…

  1. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  2. Spores Disperse, Too!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumann, Donna N.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests the use of spores and spore-producing structures to show adaptations facilitating spore dispersal and dispersal to favorable environments. Describes several activities using horsetails, ferns, and mosses. Lists five safety factors related to use of mold spores in the classroom. (DS)

  3. Dispersal from Microbial Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Barraud, Nicolas; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rice, Scott A

    2015-12-01

    One common feature of biofilm development is the active dispersal of cells from the mature biofilm, which completes the biofilm life cycle and allows for the subsequent colonization of new habitats. Dispersal is likely to be critical for species survival and appears to be a precisely regulated process that involves a complex network of genes and signal transduction systems. Sophisticated molecular mechanisms control the transition of sessile biofilm cells into dispersal cells and their coordinated detachment and release in the bulk liquid. Dispersal cells appear to be specialized and exhibit a unique phenotype different from biofilm or planktonic bacteria. Further, the dispersal population is characterized by a high level of heterogeneity, reminiscent of, but distinct from, that in the biofilm, which could potentially allow for improved colonization under various environmental conditions. Here we review recent advances in characterizing the molecular mechanisms that regulate biofilm dispersal events and the impact of dispersal in a broader ecological context. Several strategies that exploit the mechanisms controlling biofilm dispersal to develop as applications for biofilm control are also presented. PMID:27337281

  4. A Column Dispersion Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corapcioglu, M. Y.; Koroglu, F.

    1982-01-01

    Crushed glass and a Rhodamine B solution are used in a one-dimensional optically scanned column experiment to study the dispersion phenomenon in porous media. Results indicate that the described model gave satisfactory results and that the dispersion process in this experiment is basically convective. (DC)

  5. Random Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messaro. Semma; Harrison, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Ares I Zonal Random vibration environments due to acoustic impingement and combustion processes are develop for liftoff, ascent and reentry. Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components are developed by enveloping the applicable zonal environments where each component is located. Random vibration tests will be conducted to assure that these components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments. Methodology: Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components were desired that would envelope all the applicable environments where each component was located. Applicable Ares I Vehicle drawings and design information needed to be assessed to determine the location(s) for each component on the Ares I Upper Stage. Design and test criteria needed to be developed by plotting and enveloping the applicable environments using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software and documenting them in a report Using Microsoft Word Processing Software. Conclusion: Random vibration liftoff, ascent, and green run design & test criteria for the Upper Stage Pyrotechnic Components were developed by using Microsoft Excel to envelope zonal environments applicable to each component. Results were transferred from Excel into a report using Microsoft Word. After the report is reviewed and edited by my mentor it will be submitted for publication as an attachment to a memorandum. Pyrotechnic component designers will extract criteria from my report for incorporation into the design and test specifications for components. Eventually the hardware will be tested to the environments I developed to assure that the components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments.

  6. Dispersal and metapopulation stability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaopeng; Haegeman, Bart; Loreau, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Metapopulation dynamics are jointly regulated by local and spatial factors. These factors may affect the dynamics of local populations and of the entire metapopulation differently. Previous studies have shown that dispersal can stabilize local populations; however, as dispersal also tends to increase spatial synchrony, its net effect on metapopulation stability has been controversial. Here we present a simple metapopulation model to study how dispersal, in interaction with other spatial and local processes, affects the temporal variability of metapopulations in a stochastic environment. Our results show that in homogeneous metapopulations, the local stabilizing and spatial synchronizing effects of dispersal cancel each other out, such that dispersal has no effect on metapopulation variability. This result is robust to moderate heterogeneities in local and spatial parameters. When local and spatial dynamics exhibit high heterogeneities, however, dispersal can either stabilize or destabilize metapopulation dynamics through various mechanisms. Our findings have important theoretical and practical implications. We show that dispersal functions as a form of spatial intraspecific mutualism in metapopulation dynamics and that its effect on metapopulation stability is opposite to that of interspecific competition on local community stability. Our results also suggest that conservation corridors should be designed with appreciation of spatial heterogeneities in population dynamics in order to maximize metapopulation stability. PMID:26557427

  7. Dispersion in isotachophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, Moran; Santiago, Juan G.

    2008-11-01

    Isotachophoresis (ITP) is a widely used separation and preconcentration technique, which has been utilized in numerous applications including drug discovery, toxin detection, and food analysis. In ITP, analytes are segregated and focused between relatively high mobility leading ions and relatively low mobility trailing ions. These electromigration dynamics couple with advective processes associated with non-uniform electroosmotic flow (EOF). The latter generates internal pressure gradients leading to strong dispersive fluxes. This dispersion is nearly ubiquitous and currently limits the sensitivity and resolution of typical ITP assays. Despite this, there has been little work studying these coupled mechanisms. We performed an analytical and experimental study of dispersion dynamics in ITP. To achieve controlled pressure gradients, we suppressed EOF and applied an external pressure head to balance electromigration. Under these conditions, we show that radial electromigration (as opposed to radial diffusion as in Taylor dispersion) balances axial electromigration. To validate the analysis, we monitored the shape of a focusing fluorescent zone as a function of applied electric field. These experiments show that ITP dispersion may result in analyte widths an order of magnitude larger than predicted by the typical non-dispersive theory. Our goal is to develop a simplified dispersion model to capture this phenomenon, and to implement it in a numerical solver for general ITP problems.

  8. Dispersive hydrodynamics: Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondini, G.; El, G. A.; Hoefer, M. A.; Miller, P. D.

    2016-10-01

    This Special Issue on Dispersive Hydrodynamics is dedicated to the memory and work of G.B. Whitham who was one of the pioneers in this field of physical applied mathematics. Some of the papers appearing here are related to work reported on at the workshop "Dispersive Hydrodynamics: The Mathematics of Dispersive Shock Waves and Applications" held in May 2015 at the Banff International Research Station. This Preface provides a broad overview of the field and summaries of the various contributions to the Special Issue, placing them in a unified context.

  9. Fractional randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  10. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  11. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  12. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  13. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushman, John H.; O'Malley, Dan

    2015-12-01

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  14. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  15. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion wemore » illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.« less

  16. Magnetic orientation of nontronite clay in aqueous dispersions and its effect on water diffusion.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Christoffer; Nordstierna, Lars; Nordin, Matias; Dvinskikh, Sergey V; Nydén, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    The diffusion rate of water in dilute clay dispersions depends on particle concentration, size, shape, aggregation and water-particle interactions. As nontronite clay particles magnetically align parallel to the magnetic field, directional self-diffusion anisotropy can be created within such dispersion. Here we study water diffusion in exfoliated nontronite clay dispersions by diffusion NMR and time-dependant 1H-NMR-imaging profiles. The dispersion clay concentration was varied between 0.3 and 0.7 vol%. After magnetic alignment of the clay particles in these dispersions a maximum difference of 20% was measured between the parallel and perpendicular self-diffusion coefficients in the dispersion with 0.7 vol% clay. A method was developed to measure water diffusion within the dispersion in the absence of a magnetic field (random clay orientation) as this is not possible with standard diffusion NMR. However, no significant difference in self-diffusion coefficient between random and aligned dispersions could be observed.

  17. When is dispersal for dispersal? Unifying marine and terrestrial perspectives.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Scott C; Baskett, Marissa L; Grosberg, Richard K; Morgan, Steven G; Strathmann, Richard R

    2016-08-01

    Recent syntheses on the evolutionary causes of dispersal have focused on dispersal as a direct adaptation, but many traits that influence dispersal have other functions, raising the question: when is dispersal 'for' dispersal? We review and critically evaluate the ecological causes of selection on traits that give rise to dispersal in marine and terrestrial organisms. In the sea, passive dispersal is relatively easy and specific morphological, behavioural, and physiological adaptations for dispersal are rare. Instead, there may often be selection to limit dispersal. On land, dispersal is relatively difficult without specific adaptations, which are relatively common. Although selection for dispersal is expected in both systems and traits leading to dispersal are often linked to fitness, systems may differ in the extent to which dispersal in nature arises from direct selection for dispersal or as a by-product of selection on traits with other functions. Our analysis highlights incompleteness of theories that assume a simple and direct relationship between dispersal and fitness, not just insofar as they ignore a vast array of taxa in the marine realm, but also because they may be missing critically important effects of traits influencing dispersal in all realms. PMID:26118564

  18. Tree dispersion, abundance, and diversity in a tropical dry forest.

    PubMed

    Hubbell, S P

    1979-03-30

    Patterns of tree abundance and dispersion in a tropical deciduous (dry) forest are summarized. The generalization that tropical trees have spaced adults did not hold. All species were either clumped or randomly dispersed, with rare species more clumped than common species. Breeding system was unrelated to species abundance or dispersion, but clumping was related to mode of seed dispersal. Juvenile densities decreased approximately exponentially away from adults. Rare species gave evidence of poor reproductive performance compared with their performance when common in nearby forests. Patterns of relative species abundance in the dry forest are compared with patterns in other forests, and are explained by a simple stochastic model based on random-walk immigration and extinction set in motion by periodic community disturbance.

  19. Cauchy's dispersion equation reconsidered : dispersion in silicate glasses.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. Y.; Inokuti, M.; Karstens, W.; Physics; Univ. of Vermont; St. Michael's College

    2002-01-01

    We formulate a novel method of characterizing optically transparent substances using dispersion theory. The refractive index is given by a generalized Cauchy dispersion equation with coefficients that are moments of the uv and ir absorptions. Mean dispersion, Abbe number, and partial dispersion are combinations of these moments. The empirical relation between index and dispersion for families of glasses appears as a consequence of Beer's law applied to the uv spectra.

  20. Is random access memory random?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Most software is contructed on the assumption that the programs and data are stored in random access memory (RAM). Physical limitations on the relative speeds of processor and memory elements lead to a variety of memory organizations that match processor addressing rate with memory service rate. These include interleaved and cached memory. A very high fraction of a processor's address requests can be satified from the cache without reference to the main memory. The cache requests information from main memory in blocks that can be transferred at the full memory speed. Programmers who organize algorithms for locality can realize the highest performance from these computers.

  1. Random-walk enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  2. Random-walk enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chi H; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A; Goodman, Myron F

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C→U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  3. Random-walk enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C → U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics. PMID:26465508

  4. Random-walk enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chi H; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A; Goodman, Myron F

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C→U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics. PMID:26465508

  5. Drilling mud dispersants

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, P. A.; Brase, I. E.

    1985-05-21

    Dispersants useful in aqueous drilling mud formulations employed in the drilling of subterranean wells where high temperature and high pressure environments are encountered are disclosed. The dispersants, when used in amounts of about 0.1 to 25 ppb provide muds containing colloidal material suspended in an aqueous medium with improved high temperature and high pressure stability. The dispersants are water soluble sulfonated vinyl toluene-maleic anhydride copolymers which have a molar ratio of vinyl toluene to maleic anhydride of about 1:1 to less than about 2:1, a molecular weight of 1,000 to 25,000 and at least about 0.7 sulfonic acid groups per vinyl toluene unit.

  6. Investigation of Sn surface segregation during GeSn epitaxial growth by Auger electron spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Takahiro; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Hirose, Nobumitsu; Kasamatsu, Akifumi; Mimura, Takashi; Matsui, Toshiaki

    2015-02-02

    The mechanism of Sn surface segregation during the epitaxial growth of GeSn on Si (001) substrates was investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Sn surface segregation depends on the growth temperature and Sn content of GeSn layers. During Sn surface segregation, Sn-rich nanoparticles form and move on the surface during the deposition, which results in a rough surface owing to facet formation. The Sn-rich nanoparticles moving on the surface during the deposition absorb Sn from the periphery and yield a lower Sn content, not on the surface but within the layer, because the Sn surface segregation and the GeSn deposition occur simultaneously. Sn surface segregation can occur at a lower temperature during the deposition compared with that during postannealing. This suggests that the Sn surface segregation during the deposition is strongly promoted by the migration of deposited Ge and Sn adatoms on the surface originating from the thermal effect of substrate temperature, which also suggests that limiting the migration of deposited Ge and Sn adatoms can reduce the Sn surface segregation and improve the crystallinity of GeSn layers.

  7. Uranium Dispersion & Dosimetry Model.

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL,; MOMENI, H.

    2002-03-22

    The Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry (UDAD) program provides estimates of potential radiation exposure to individuals and to the general population in the vicinity of a uranium processing facility such as a uranium mine or mill. Only transport through the air is considered. Exposure results from inhalation, external irradiation from airborne and ground-deposited activity, and ingestion of foodstuffs. Individual dose commitments, population dose commitments, and environmental dose commitments are computed. The program was developed for application to uranium mining and milling; however, it may be applied to dispersion of any other pollutant.

  8. Ensemble Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Addis, R.P.

    2002-06-24

    Prognostic atmospheric dispersion models are used to generate consequence assessments, which assist decision-makers in the event of a release from a nuclear facility. Differences in the forecast wind fields generated by various meteorological agencies, differences in the transport and diffusion models, as well as differences in the way these models treat the release source term, result in differences in the resulting plumes. Even dispersion models using the same wind fields may produce substantially different plumes. This talk will address how ensemble techniques may be used to enable atmospheric modelers to provide decision-makers with a more realistic understanding of how both the atmosphere and the models behave.

  9. Uranium Dispersion & Dosimetry Model.

    2002-03-22

    The Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry (UDAD) program provides estimates of potential radiation exposure to individuals and to the general population in the vicinity of a uranium processing facility such as a uranium mine or mill. Only transport through the air is considered. Exposure results from inhalation, external irradiation from airborne and ground-deposited activity, and ingestion of foodstuffs. Individual dose commitments, population dose commitments, and environmental dose commitments are computed. The program was developed for applicationmore » to uranium mining and milling; however, it may be applied to dispersion of any other pollutant.« less

  10. MAMA Dispersion Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    Wavelength dispersion solutions will be determined on a yearly basis as part of a long-term monitoring program. Deep engineering wavecals for each MAMA grating will be obtained at common cenwaves. Intermediate settings will also be taken to check the reliability of derived dispersion solutions. Final selection was determined on basis of past monitoring and C17 requirements. The internal wavelength calibrations will be taken using the LINE line lamp. Extra-deep wavecals are included for some echelle modes and first order modes to ensure detection of weak lines.

  11. Warm fog dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1983-01-01

    The charged particle generator was further tested after some design modification. The generator performance was measured with additional instrumentation and found to confirm previous measurements. Plans for a field testing were than developed. The overall status of the program and the field test plans were presented to a group of atmospheric scientists and electrostatic experts at the NASA/MSFC sponsored USRA Workshop on Electrostatic Fog Dispersal at NCAR, Boulder, Colorado discussed in previous sections. The recommendations from this workshop are being evaluated as to whether NASA should proceed with the field test or whether further theoretical research on the phenomenon of electrostatic fog dispersal and additional development of the charged particle generator should be carried out. Information obtained from the USRA Workshop clearly identified three physical mechanisms that could possibly influence the fog dispersal process, which heretofore have not been considered, and which may provide additional insight to the direction of further fog dispersal work. These mechanisms are: the effect of corona discharge on the electric field strength at the surface, the influx of fog into the cleared volume by turbulent diffusion, and the increase in supersaturation as liquid water is removed, activating haze particles, and thus generating more fog. Plans are being formulated to investigate these mechanisms.

  12. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  13. Preasymptotic hydrodynamic dispersion as a quantitative probe of permeability.

    PubMed

    Brosten, Tyler R; Vogt, Sarah J; Seymour, Joseph D; Codd, Sarah L; Maier, Robert S

    2012-04-01

    We interpret a generalized short-time expansion of stochastic hydrodynamic dispersion dynamics in the case of small Reynolds number flow through macroscopically homogenous permeable porous media to directly determine hydrodynamic permeability. The approach allows determination of hydrodynamic permeability from pulsed field gradient spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of the short-time effective hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient. The analytical expansion of asymptotic dynamics agrees with experimental NMR data and lattice Boltzmann simulation of hydrodynamic dispersion in consolidated random sphere pack media. PMID:22680531

  14. Octave spanning wedge dispersive mirrors with low dispersion oscillations.

    PubMed

    Habel, Florian; Shirvanyan, Vage; Trubetskov, Michael; Burger, Christian; Sommer, Annkatrin; Kling, Matthias F; Schultze, Martin; Pervak, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    A novel concept for octave spanning dispersive mirrors with low spectral dispersion oscillations is presented. The key element of the so-called wedge dispersive mirror is a slightly wedged layer which is coated on a specially optimized dispersive multilayer stack by a common sputter coating process. The group delay dispersion (GDD) of a pulse reflected on a wedge dispersive mirror is nearly free of oscillations. Fabricated mirrors with negative GDD demonstrate the compression of a pulse down to 3.8 fs as good as double angled mirrors optimized for the same bandwidth.

  15. Non-Fickian dispersion of groundwater age

    PubMed Central

    Engdahl, Nicholas B.; Ginn, Timothy R.; Fogg, Graham E.

    2014-01-01

    We expand the governing equation of groundwater age to account for non-Fickian dispersive fluxes using continuous random walks. Groundwater age is included as an additional (fifth) dimension on which the volumetric mass density of water is distributed and we follow the classical random walk derivation now in five dimensions. The general solution of the random walk recovers the previous conventional model of age when the low order moments of the transition density functions remain finite at their limits and describes non-Fickian age distributions when the transition densities diverge. Previously published transition densities are then used to show how the added dimension in age affects the governing differential equations. Depending on which transition densities diverge, the resulting models may be nonlocal in time, space, or age and can describe asymptotic or pre-asymptotic dispersion. A joint distribution function of time and age transitions is developed as a conditional probability and a natural result of this is that time and age must always have identical transition rate functions. This implies that a transition density defined for age can substitute for a density in time and this has implications for transport model parameter estimation. We present examples of simulated age distributions from a geologically based, heterogeneous domain that exhibit non-Fickian behavior and show that the non-Fickian model provides better descriptions of the distributions than the Fickian model. PMID:24976651

  16. Nikolaevskiy equation with dispersion.

    PubMed

    Simbawa, Eman; Matthews, Paul C; Cox, Stephen M

    2010-03-01

    The Nikolaevskiy equation was originally proposed as a model for seismic waves and is also a model for a wide variety of systems incorporating a neutral "Goldstone" mode, including electroconvection and reaction-diffusion systems. It is known to exhibit chaotic dynamics at the onset of pattern formation, at least when the dispersive terms in the equation are suppressed, as is commonly the practice in previous analyses. In this paper, the effects of reinstating the dispersive terms are examined. It is shown that such terms can stabilize some of the spatially periodic traveling waves; this allows us to study the loss of stability and transition to chaos of the waves. The secondary stability diagram ("Busse balloon") for the traveling waves can be remarkably complicated. PMID:20365845

  17. Dispersion suppressors with bending

    SciTech Connect

    Garren, A.

    1985-10-01

    Dispersion suppressors of two main types are usually used. In one the cell quadrupole focussing structure is the same as in normal cells but some of the dipoles are replaced by drifts. In the other, the quadrupole strengths and/or spacings are different from those of the normal cells, but the bending is about the same as it is in the cells. In SSC designs to date, dispersion suppressors of the former type have been used, consisting of two cells with bending equivalent to one. In this note a suppressor design with normal bending and altered focussing is presented. The advantage of this scheme is that circumference is reduced. The disadvantages are that additional special quadrupoles must be provided (however, they need not be adjustable), and the maximum beta values within them are about 30% higher than the cell maxima.

  18. Dispersion Analysis Research Tool

    1998-11-10

    The DART thermomechanical model, for the prediction of fission-product-induced swelling in aluminum dispersion fuels, calculates irradiation-induced fission gas bubbles as a function of fuel morphology. DART calculates the behavior of a rod, tube, or plate during closure of as-fabricated porosity, during which the fuel particle swelling is accommodated by the relatively soft aluminum matrix flowing into the existing porosity. The code also determines the subsequent macroscopic changes in rod diameter or plate/tube thickness caused bymore » additional fuel deformation processes. In addition, a calculation for the effect of irradiation on the thermal conductivity of the dispersion fuel, and for fuel restructuring and swelling due to the aluminum fuel reaction, amorphization, and recrystallization is included.« less

  19. Light dispersion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, L. C.

    2015-09-01

    Considering an idea of F. Arago in 1853 regarding light dispersion through the light ether in the interstellar space, this paper presents a new idea on an alternative interpretation of the cosmological red shift of the galaxies in the universe. The model is based on an analogy with the temporal material dispersion that occurs with light in the optical fiber core. Since intergalactic space is transparent, according to the model, this phenomenon is related to the gravitational potential existing in the whole space. Thus, it is possible to find a new interpretation to Hubble's constant. In space, light undergoes a dispersion process in its path, which is interpreted by a red shift equation of the type Δz = HL, since H = (d2n/dλ2 Δv Δλ), where H means the Hubble constant, n is the refractive index of the intergalactic space, Δλ is the spectral width of the extragalactic source, and Δv is the variation of the speed of light caused by the gravitational potential. We observe that this "constant" is governed by three new parameters. Light traveling the intergalactic space undergoes red shift due to this mechanism, while light amplitude decreases with time, and the wavelength always increases, thus producing the same type of behavior given by Hubble's Law. It can be demonstrated that the dark matter phenomenon is produced by the apparent speed of light of the stars on the periphery of the galaxies, without the existence of dark energy. Based on this new idea, the model of the universe is static, lacking expansion. Other phenomena may be interpreted based on this new model of the universe. We have what we call temporal gravitational dispersion of light in space produced by the variations of the speed of light, due to the presence of the gravitational potential in the whole space.

  20. Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M

    2002-11-08

    Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

  1. Succinimide lubricating oil dispersant

    SciTech Connect

    Wisotsky, M.J.; Bloch, R.; Brownwell, D.W.; Chen, F.J.; Gutierrez, A.

    1987-08-11

    A lubricating oil composition is described exhibiting improved dispersancy in both gasoline and diesel engines comprising a major amount of lubricating oil and 0.5 to 10 weight percent of a dispersant, the dispersant being prepared in a sequential process comprising the steps of: (a) in a first step reacting an oil-soluble polyolefin succinic anhydride, the olefin being a C/sub 3/ or C/sub 4/ olefin and an alkylene polyamine of the formula H/sub 2/N(CH/sub 2/)/sub n/(NH(CH/sub 2/)/sub n/)/sub m/sup -// NH/sub 2/ wherein n is 2 or 3 and m is 0 to 10, in a molar ratio of about 1.0 to 2.2 moles of polyolefin succinic anhydride per mole of polyamine, and (b) reacting the product of step (a) with dicarboxylic acid anhydride selected from the group consisting of maleic anhydride and succinic anhydride in sufficient molar proportions to provide a total mole ratio of about 2,3 to 3.0 moles of anhydride compounds per mole of polyamine.

  2. Fractional dispersion in a sand bed river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, D. Nathan; Tucker, Gregory E.; Benson, David A.

    2010-03-01

    Random walk models of fluvial bed load transport use probability distributions to describe the distance a grain travels during an episode of transport and the time it rests after deposition. These models typically employ probability distributions with finite first and second moments, reflecting an underlying assumption that all the factors that influence sediment transport tend to combine in such a way that the length of a step or the duration of a rest can be characterized by a mean value surrounded by a specific amount of variability. The observation that many transport systems exhibit apparent scale-dependent behavior and non-Fickian dispersion suggests that this assumption is not always valid. We revisit a nearly 50 year old tracer experiment in which the tracer plume exhibits the hallmarks of dispersive transport described by a step length distribution with a divergent second moment and no characteristic dispersive size. The governing equation of this type of random walk contains fractional-order derivatives. We use the data from the experiment to test two versions of a fractional-order model of dispersive fluvial bed load transport. The first version uses a heavy-tailed particle step length distribution with a divergent second moment to reproduce the anomalously high fraction of tracer mass observed in the downstream tail of the spatial distribution. The second version adds a feature that partitions mass into a detectable mobile phase and an undetectable, immobile phase. This two-phase transport model predicts other features observed in the data: a decrease in the amount of detected tracer mass over the course of the experiment and enhanced particle retention near the source. The fractional-order models match the observed plume shape and growth rates better than prior attempts with classical models.

  3. Wavelength dispersion of optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, G. A.; Chen, C.-L.

    1980-06-01

    Coefficients that characterize the contribution to the total waveguide dispersion from guide geometry and from material dispersion are introduced. These are cast in terms of the normalized parameters of normalized frequency, asymmetry measure, and effective guide index. This allows plotting of universal curves for the dispersion coefficients for step thin film and exponentially graded slab waveguides that are applicable to all such structures.

  4. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

    1996-04-02

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

  5. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

    1995-11-07

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

  6. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Basaran, Osman A.; Harris, Michael T.

    1995-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  7. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Harris, Michael T.; Scott, Timothy C.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1996-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  8. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Basaran, Osman A.; Harris, Michael T.

    1998-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  9. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Harris, Michael T.; Scott, Timothy C.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1998-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  10. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

    1998-04-14

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

  11. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

    1998-06-02

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

  12. Dispersal dynamics in food webs.

    PubMed

    Melián, Carlos J; Křivan, Vlastimil; Altermatt, Florian; Starý, Petr; Pellissier, Loïc; De Laender, Frederik

    2015-02-01

    Studies of food webs suggest that limited nonrandom dispersal can play an important role in structuring food webs. It is not clear, however, whether density-dependent dispersal fits empirical patterns of food webs better than density-independent dispersal. Here, we study a spatially distributed food web, using a series of population-dispersal models that contrast density-independent and density-dependent dispersal in landscapes where sampled sites are either homogeneously or heterogeneously distributed. These models are fitted to empirical data, allowing us to infer mechanisms that are consistent with the data. Our results show that models with density-dependent dispersal fit the α, β, and γ tritrophic richness observed in empirical data best. Our results also show that density-dependent dispersal leads to a critical distance threshold beyond which site similarity (i.e., β tritrophic richness) starts to decrease much faster. Such a threshold can also be detected in the empirical data. In contrast, models with density-independent dispersal do not predict such a threshold. Moreover, preferential dispersal from more centrally located sites to peripheral sites does not provide a better fit to empirical data when compared with symmetric dispersal between sites. Our results suggest that nonrandom dispersal in heterogeneous landscapes is an important driver that shapes local and regional richness (i.e., α and γ tritrophic richness, respectively) as well as the distance-decay relationship (i.e., β tritrophic richness) in food webs.

  13. How to Do Random Allocation (Randomization)

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Wonshik

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To explain the concept and procedure of random allocation as used in a randomized controlled study. Methods We explain the general concept of random allocation and demonstrate how to perform the procedure easily and how to report it in a paper. PMID:24605197

  14. Quantum optical rotatory dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Tischler, Nora; Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Vidal, Xavier; Zeilinger, Anton; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of molecular optical activity manifests itself as the rotation of the plane of linear polarization when light passes through chiral media. Measurements of optical activity and its wavelength dependence, that is, optical rotatory dispersion, can reveal information about intricate properties of molecules, such as the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms comprising a molecule. Given a limited probe power, quantum metrology offers the possibility of outperforming classical measurements. This has particular appeal when samples may be damaged by high power, which is a potential concern for chiroptical studies. We present the first experiment in which multiwavelength polarization-entangled photon pairs are used to measure the optical activity and optical rotatory dispersion exhibited by a solution of chiral molecules. Our work paves the way for quantum-enhanced measurements of chirality, with potential applications in chemistry, biology, materials science, and the pharmaceutical industry. The scheme that we use for probing wavelength dependence not only allows one to surpass the information extracted per photon in a classical measurement but also can be used for more general differential measurements. PMID:27713928

  15. Limited dispersal, deleterious mutations and the evolution of sex

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, J.R.

    1996-03-01

    This study presents a mathematical model that allows for some offspring to be dispersed at random, while others stay close to their mothers. A single genetic locus is assumed to control fertility, and this locus is subject to the occurrence of deletions mutations. It is shown that, at equilibrium, the frequency of deleterious mutations in the population is inversely related to the rate of dispersal. The results also show that sexual reproduction can lead to a decrease in the equilibrium frequency of deleterious mutations. The reason for this relationship is that sex involves the dispersal of genetic material, and thus, like the dispersal of offspring, sex enhances competition among adults. The model is described using the example of a hermaphroditic plant population. However, the results should apply to animal populations as well. 36 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Longitudinal dispersion in vegetated rivers with stochastic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tealdi, S.; Camporeale, C.; Perucca, E.; Ridolfi, L.

    2010-05-01

    Longitudinal dispersion is one of the most important transport processes in fluvial ecosystems. It affects the transport of chemicals, nutrients, seeds, and wood debris along a river. The focus of this work is on the impact of riparian vegetation on the dispersion coefficient. The investigation considers stochastic forcing due to the river discharge randomness and its interplay with vegetation dynamics. A stochastic bio-hydrodynamical model is proposed and the probability distribution of the dispersion coefficient is obtained. The model allows one to elucidate the influence of (i) the vegetation characteristics, (ii) the probabilistic structure of the discharge time series, and (iii) the hydraulic characteristics of the transect. The work demonstrates the high variability of dispersion coefficients and the remarkable impact of riparian vegetation when medium/high discharges flow.

  17. Local volume-time averaged equations of motion for dispersed, turbulent, multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, W.T.; Slattery, J.C.

    1980-11-01

    In most flows of liquids and their vapors, the phases are dispersed randomly in both space and time. These dispersed flows can be described only statistically or in terms of averages. Local volume-time averaging is used here to derive a self-consistent set of equations governing momentum and energy transfer in dispersed, turbulent, multiphase flows. The empiricisms required for use with these equations are the subject of current research.

  18. SMED - Sulphur MEditerranean Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Giuseppe G.; Sellitto, Pasquale; Corradini, Stefano; Di Sarra, Alcide Giorgio; Merucci, Luca; Caltabiano, Tommaso; La Spina, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Emissions of volcanic gases and particles can have profound impacts on terrestrial environment, atmospheric composition, climate forcing, and then on human health at various temporal and spatial scales. Volcanic emissions have been identified as one of the largest sources of uncertainty in our understanding of recent climate change trends. In particular, a primary role is acted by sulphur dioxide emission due to its conversion to volcanic sulphate aerosol via atmospheric oxidation. Aerosols may play a key role in the radiative budget and then in photochemistry and tropospheric composition. Mt. Etna is one of the most prodigious and persistent emitters of gasses and particles on Earth, accounting for about 10% of global average volcanic emission of CO2 and SO2. Its sulphur emissions stand for 0.7 × 106 t S/yr9 and then about 10 times bigger than anthropogenic sulphur emissions in the Mediterranean area. Centrepiece of the SMED project is to advance the understanding of volcanogenic sulphur dioxide and sulphate aerosol particles dispersion and radiative impact on the downwind Mediterranean region by an integrated approach between ground- and space-based observations and modelling. Research is addressed by exploring the potential relationship between proximal SO2 flux and aerosol measured remotely in the volcanic plume of Mt. Etna between 2000 and 2014 and distal aerosol ground-based measurements in Lampedusa, Greece, and Malta from AERONET network. Ground data are combined with satellite multispectral polar and geostationary imagers able to detect and retrieve volcanic ash and SO2. The high repetition time of SEVIRI (15 minutes) will ensure the potential opportunity to follow the entire evolution of the volcanic cloud, while, the higher spatial resolution of MODIS (1x1 km2), are exploited for investigating the probability to retrieve volcanic SO2 abundances from passive degassing. Ground and space observations are complemented with atmospheric Lagrangian model

  19. Natural dispersion revisited.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Øistein; Reed, Mark; Bodsberg, Nils Rune

    2015-04-15

    This paper presents a new semi-empirical model for oil droplet size distributions generated by single breaking wave events. Empirical data was obtained from laboratory experiments with different crude oils at different stages of weathering. The paper starts with a review of the most commonly used model for natural dispersion, which is followed by a presentation of the laboratory study on oil droplet size distributions formed by breaking waves conducted by SINTEF on behalf of the NOAA/UNH Coastal Response Research Center. The next section presents the theoretical and empirical foundation for the new model. The model is based on dimensional analysis and contains two non-dimensional groups; the Weber and Reynolds number. The model was validated with data from a full scale experimental oil spill conducted in the Haltenbanken area offshore Norway in July 1982, as described in the last section of the paper.

  20. Acoustic Rectification in Dispersive Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  1. ACOUSTIC RECTIFICATION IN DISPERSIVE MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, John H.

    2009-03-03

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  2. Understanding the dispersion of Ag on high surface area TiO2 supports using XPS intensity ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Zenda D.; Tatarchuk, Bruce J.

    2015-10-01

    Silver-titania (Ag/TiO2) adsorbents, in the range of 4 wt% Ag, display high selectivity toward sulfur heterocyclic compounds from complex fuel streams containing other aromatics. An experimental investigation of Ag on TiO2 has been undertaken to understand the state of dispersion and growth of Ag. XPS is one of the more promising characterization tools for the state of dispersion. Silver loading from 1 wt% to 20 wt% on 150 m2/g titania was investigated. Ag/Ti intensity ratios increased linearly with Ag content up to 4 wt% and increased less significantly thereafter from 8 wt% to 20 wt% indicating nucleation and growth of Ag crystallites. Inelastic mean free path (IMFP) calculations were used to estimate Ag crystallite size based on the attenuation of the Ag signal, realizing in this regime there is insufficient Ag to attenuate background titania. At 4, 8, 12, and 20 wt% the estimated average crystallite sizes were 0.35, 0.71, 0.84, and 1.11 nm respectively. Ag loadings up to 4 wt% were present in the form of Ag+1 adatoms presumably occupying TiO2 surface defects. Saturation of surface TiO2 defects is in good agreement with quantitative sulfur heterocycle adsorption.

  3. Random broadcast on random geometric graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Elsasser, Robert; Friedrich, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we consider the random broadcast time on random geometric graphs (RGGs). The classic random broadcast model, also known as push algorithm, is defined as: starting with one informed node, in each succeeding round every informed node chooses one of its neighbors uniformly at random and informs it. We consider the random broadcast time on RGGs, when with high probability: (i) RGG is connected, (ii) when there exists the giant component in RGG. We show that the random broadcast time is bounded by {Omicron}({radical} n + diam(component)), where diam(component) is a diameter of the entire graph, or the giant component, for the regimes (i), or (ii), respectively. In other words, for both regimes, we derive the broadcast time to be {Theta}(diam(G)), which is asymptotically optimal.

  4. Quantumness, Randomness and Computability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, Aldo; Hirsch, Jorge G.

    2015-06-01

    Randomness plays a central role in the quantum mechanical description of our interactions. We review the relationship between the violation of Bell inequalities, non signaling and randomness. We discuss the challenge in defining a random string, and show that algorithmic information theory provides a necessary condition for randomness using Borel normality. We close with a view on incomputablity and its implications in physics.

  5. Improved carbon nanotubes dispersion through polar dispersant agents in polyamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morici, Elisabetta; Arrigo, Rossella; Teresi, Rosalia; Dintcheva, Nadka Tzankova

    2016-05-01

    The potential enhancement of the nanocomposite properties, with respect to the neat matrix, is strictly related to uniform distribution and dispersion of the nanofillers in the host polymer. In this work, two dispersant agents, particularly a polar wax and a silanol polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes POSS, have been used in order to improve the dispersion of bare and functionalized carbon nanotubes in polyamide matrix. To ensure a good compatibility between matrix and nanofillers, the dispersing agents having specific polarity have been chosen, in order to match that of the matrix. Significant alterations of the mechanical and rheological behaviour due to dispersion action of used additives have been noticed and discussed, also considering the obtained morphology.

  6. Electro-optic phase modulation by polymer dispersed liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicari, L.

    1997-05-01

    We present a mathematical model to describe the optical phase shift induced by polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDLCs) on light impinging transversely on the sample. PDLCs are dispersions of liquid crystal microdroplets in a polymeric binder. Droplets appear as optically uniaxial spheres randomly oriented so that the material is optically isotropic. The application of an external electric field results in a reorientation of the liquid crystal and therefore in an electrically controllable optical uniaxicity of the material. The model is discussed by comparison with experimental data and with previous theory [F. Basile, F. Bloisi, L. Vicari, and F. Simoni, Phys. Rev. E 48, 432 (1993)].

  7. Surface roughness effects with solid lubricants dispersed in mineral oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cusano, C.; Goglia, P. R.; Sliney, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    The lubricating effectiveness of solid-lubricant dispersions are investigated in both point and line contacts using surfaces with both random and directional roughness characteristics. Friction and wear data obtained at relatively low speeds and at room temperature, indicate that the existence of solid lubricants such as graphite, MoS2, and PTFE in a plain mineral oil generally will not improve the effectiveness of the oil as a lubricant for such surfaces. Under boundary lubrication conditions, the friction force, as a function of time, initially depends upon the directional roughness properties of the contacting surfaces irrespective of whether the base oil or dispersions are used as lubricants.

  8. Hybrid Dispersion Laser Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Goda, K.; Mahjoubfar, A.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2012-01-01

    Laser scanning technology is one of the most integral parts of today's scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and biomedicine. In many applications, high-speed scanning capability is essential for scanning a large area in a short time and multi-dimensional sensing of moving objects and dynamical processes with fine temporal resolution. Unfortunately, conventional laser scanners are often too slow, resulting in limited precision and utility. Here we present a new type of laser scanner that offers ∼1,000 times higher scan rates than conventional state-of-the-art scanners. This method employs spatial dispersion of temporally stretched broadband optical pulses onto the target, enabling inertia-free laser scans at unprecedented scan rates of nearly 100 MHz at 800 nm. To show our scanner's broad utility, we use it to demonstrate unique and previously difficult-to-achieve capabilities in imaging, surface vibrometry, and flow cytometry at a record 2D raster scan rate of more than 100 kHz with 27,000 resolvable points. PMID:22685627

  9. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  10. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-22

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  11. Directed random walk with random restarts: The Sisyphus random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, Miquel; Villarroel, Javier

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we consider a particular version of the random walk with restarts: random reset events which suddenly bring the system to the starting value. We analyze its relevant statistical properties, like the transition probability, and show how an equilibrium state appears. Formulas for the first-passage time, high-water marks, and other extreme statistics are also derived; we consider counting problems naturally associated with the system. Finally we indicate feasible generalizations useful for interpreting different physical effects.

  12. QT dispersion in adult hypertensives.

    PubMed Central

    Sani, Isa Muhammad; Solomon, Danbauchi Sulei; Imhogene, Oyati Albert; Ahmad, Alhassan Muhammad; Bala, Garko Sani

    2006-01-01

    Increased QT dispersion is associated with sudden cardiac death in congestive cardiac failure, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and following myocardial infarction. Patients with hypertension--in particular, those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH)--are also at greater risk of sudden cardiac death. We examined whether QT dispersion, which is easily obtained from a routine ECG, correlates with LVH. One-hundred untreated patients with systemic hypertension and 78 normotensives had QT dispersion measured manually from a surface 12-lead electrocardiogram and two-dimensional echocardiography performed to measure interventricular septal thickness, posterior wall thickness and left ventricular internal diameter. Office blood pressure was also recorded. Multivariate analysis demonstrated significant relationships between QT dispersion and office systolic blood pressure, and left ventricular mass index. Manual measurement of QT dispersion might be a simple, noninvasive screening procedure to identify those hypertensives at greatest risk of sudden cardiac death in a third-world country. PMID:16623077

  13. QTc dispersion and P-wave dispersion during migraine attacks.

    PubMed

    Duru, M; Melek, I; Seyfeli, E; Duman, T; Kuvandik, G; Kaya, H; Yalçin, F

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate increase of QTc dispersion and P-wave dispersion during migraine attacks. Fifty-five patients (16-65 years of age, 49 women, six men) with migraine were included in our study. Heart rate, QTc interval, maximum and minimum QTc interval, QTc dispersion, maximum and minimum P-wave duration and P-wave dispersion were measured from 12-lead ECG recording during migraine attacks and pain-free periods. ECGs were transferred to a personal computer via a scanner and then used for magnification of x400 by Adobe Photoshop software. Maximum QTc interval (454 +/- 24 ms vs. 429 +/- 23 ms, P < 0.001), QTc interval (443 +/- 26 ms vs. 408 +/- 22 ms, P < 0.001) and QTc dispersion (63 +/- 18 ms vs. 43 +/- 14 ms, P < 0.001) were found significantly higher during migraine attacks compared with pain-free periods. Maximum P-wave duration (107 +/- 11 ms vs. 100 +/- 11 ms, P < 0.001) and P-wave dispersion (45 +/- 13 ms vs. 35 +/- 13 ms, P < 0.001) were found higher during migraine attacks than pain-free periods. We concluded that migraine attacks are associated with increased QTc and P-wave dispersion compared with pain-free periods.

  14. Understanding the relative role of dispersion mechanisms across basin scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lazzaro, M.; Zarlenga, A.; Volpi, E.

    2016-05-01

    Different mechanisms are understood to represent the primary sources of the variance of travel time distribution in natural catchments. To quantify the fraction of variance introduced by each component, dispersion coefficients have been earlier defined in the framework of geomorphology-based rainfall-runoff models. In this paper we compare over a wide range of basin sizes and for a variety of runoff conditions the relative role of geomorphological dispersion, related to the heterogeneity of path lengths, and hillslope kinematic dispersion, generated by flow processes within the hillslopes. Unlike previous works, our approach does not focus on a specific study case; instead, we try to generalize results already obtained in previous literature stemming from the definition of a few significant parameters related to the metrics of the catchment and flow dynamics. We further extend this conceptual framework considering the effects of two additional variance-producing processes: the first covers the random variability of hillslope velocities (i.e. of travel times over hillslopes); the second deals with non-uniform production of runoff over the basin (specifically related to drainage density). Results are useful to clarify the role of hillslope kinematic dispersion and define under which conditions it counteracts or reinforces geomorphological dispersion. We show how its sign is ruled by the specific spatial distribution of hillslope lengths within the basin, as well as by flow conditions. Interestingly, while negative in a wide range of cases, kinematic dispersion is expected to become invariantly positive when the variability of hillslope velocity is large.

  15. Random nanolasing in the Anderson localized regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Garcia, P. D.; Ek, S.; Gregersen, N.; Suhr, T.; Schubert, M.; Mørk, J.; Stobbe, S.; Lodahl, P.

    2014-04-01

    The development of nanoscale optical devices for classical and quantum photonics is affected by unavoidable fabrication imperfections that often impose performance limitations. However, disorder may also enable new functionalities, for example in random lasers, where lasing relies on random multiple scattering. The applicability of random lasers has been limited due to multidirectional emission, lack of tunability, and strong mode competition with chaotic fluctuations due to a weak mode confinement. The regime of Anderson localization of light has been proposed for obtaining stable multimode random lasing, and initial work concerned macroscopic one-dimensional layered media. Here, we demonstrate on-chip random nanolasers where the cavity feedback is provided by the intrinsic disorder. The strong confinement achieved by Anderson localization reduces the spatial overlap between lasing modes, thus preventing mode competition and improving stability. This enables highly efficient, stable and broadband wavelength-controlled lasers with very small mode volumes. Furthermore, the complex interplay between gain, dispersion-controlled slow light, and disorder is demonstrated experimentally for a non-conservative random medium. The statistical analysis shows a way towards optimizing random-lasing performance by reducing the localization length, a universal parameter.

  16. Dispersive suspended microextraction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Yu; Lu, Yue-Le; Wu, Tong; Zhou, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Dong-Hui

    2011-11-14

    A novel sample pre-treatment technique termed dispersive suspended microextraction (DSME) coupled with gas chromatography-flame photometric detection (GC-FPD) has been developed for the determination of eight organophosphorus pesticides (ethoprophos, malathion, chlorpyrifos, isocarbophos, methidathion, fenamiphos, profenofos, triazophos) in aqueous samples. In this method, both extraction and two phases' separation process were performed by the assistance of magnetic stirring. After separating the two phases, 1 μL of the suspended phase was injected into GC for further instrument analysis. Varieties of experiment factors which could affect the experiment results were optimized and the following were selected: 12.0 μL p-xylene was selected as extraction solvent, extraction speed was 1200 rpm, extraction time was 30 s, the restoration speed was 800 rpm, the restoration time was 8 min, and no salt was added. Under the optimum conditions, limits of detections (LODs) varied between 0.01 and 0.05 μg L(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSDs, n=6) ranged from 4.6% to 12.1%. The linearity was obtained by five points in the concentration range of 0.1-100.0 μg L(-1). Correlation coefficients (r) varied from 0.9964 to 0.9995. The enrichment factors (EFs) were between 206 and 243. In the final experiment, the developed method has been successfully applied to the determination of organophosphorus pesticides in wine and tap water samples and the obtained recoveries were between 83.8% and 101.3%. Compared with other pre-treatment methods, DSME has its own features and could achieve satisfied results for the analysis of trace components in complicated matrices. PMID:22023861

  17. Migration of dispersive GPR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, M.H.; Oden, C.P.; ,

    2004-01-01

    Electrical conductivity and dielectric and magnetic relaxation phenomena cause electromagnetic propagation to be dispersive in earth materials. Both velocity and attenuation may vary with frequency, depending on the frequency content of the propagating energy and the nature of the relaxation phenomena. A minor amount of velocity dispersion is associated with high attenuation. For this reason, measuring effects of velocity dispersion in ground penetrating radar (GPR) data is difficult. With a dispersive forward model, GPR responses to propagation through materials with known frequency-dependent properties have been created. These responses are used as test data for migration algorithms that have been modified to handle specific aspects of dispersive media. When either Stolt or Gazdag migration methods are modified to correct for just velocity dispersion, the results are little changed from standard migration. For nondispersive propagating wavefield data, like deep seismic, ensuring correct phase summation in a migration algorithm is more important than correctly handling amplitude. However, the results of migrating model responses to dispersive media with modified algorithms indicate that, in this case, correcting for frequency-dependent amplitude loss has a much greater effect on the result than correcting for proper phase summation. A modified migration is only effective when it includes attenuation recovery, performing deconvolution and migration simultaneously.

  18. Hydrodynamics of CNT dispersion in high shear dispersion mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young Min; Lee, Dong Hyun; Hwang, Wook Ryol; Lee, Sang Bok; Jung, Seung-Il

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the carbon nanotube (CNT) fragmentation mechanism and dispersion in high shear homogenizers as a plausible dispersion technique, correlating with device geometries and processing conditions, for mass production of CNT-aluminum composites for automobile industries. A CNT dispersion model has been established in a turbulent flow regime and an experimental method in characterizing the critical yield stress of CNT flocs are presented. Considering CNT dispersion in ethanol as a model system, we tested two different geometries of high shear mixers — blade-stirrer type and rotor-stator type homogenizers — and reported the particle size distributions in time and the comparison has been made with the modeling approach and partly with the computational results.

  19. Carbon nanotube suspensions, dispersions, & composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Trevor John

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are amazing structures that hold the potential to revolutionize many areas of scientific research. CNTs can be behave both as semiconductors and metals, can be grown in highly ordered arrays and patterns or in random orientation, and can be comprised of one graphene cylinder (single wall nanotube, SWNT) or several concentric graphene cylinders (multi-wall nanotube, MWNT). Although these structures are usually only a few nanometers wide, they can be grown up to centimeter lengths, and in massive quantities. CNTs can be produced in a variety of processes ranging from repeated combustion of organic material such as dried grass, arc-discharge with graphite electrodes, laser ablation of a graphitic target, to sophisticated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. CNTs are stronger than steel but lighter than aluminum, and can be more conductive than copper or semiconducting like silicon. This variety of properties has been matched by the wide variety of applications that have been developed for CNTs. Many of these applications have been limited by the inability of researchers to tame these structures, and incorporating CNTs into existing technologies can be exceedingly difficult and prohibitively expensive. It is therefore the aim of the current study to develop strategies for the solution processing and deposition of CNTs and CNT-composites, which will enable the use of CNTs in existing and emerging technologies. CNTs are not easily suspended in polar solvents and are extremely hydrophobic materials, which has limited much of the solution processing to organic solvents, which also cannot afford high quality dispersions of CNTs. The current study has developed a variety of aqueous CNT solutions that employ surfactants, water-soluble polymers, or both to create suspensions of CNTs. These CNT 'ink' solutions were deposited with a variety of techniques that have afforded many interesting structures, both randomly oriented as well as highly

  20. Dispersion in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzens, Jeremy

    2005-11-01

    Investigations on the dispersive properties of photonic crystals, modified scattering in ring-resonators, monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and advanced data processing techniques for the finite-difference time-domain method are presented. Photonic crystals are periodic mesoscopic arrays of scatterers that modify the propagation properties of electromagnetic waves in a similar way as "natural" crystals modify the properties of electrons in solid-state physics. In this thesis photonic crystals are implemented as planar photonic crystals, i.e., optically thin semiconductor films with periodic arrays of holes etched into them, with a hole-to-hole spacing of the order of the wavelength of light in the dielectric media. Photonic crystals can feature forbidden frequency ranges (the band-gaps) in which light cannot propagate. Even though most work on photonic crystals has focused on these band-gaps for application such as confinement and guiding of light, this thesis focuses on the allowed frequency regions (the photonic bands) and investigates how the propagation of light is modified by the crystal lattice. In particular the guiding of light in bulk photonic crystals in the absence of lattice defects (the self-collimation effect) and the angular steering of light in photonic crystals (the superprism effect) are investigated. The latter is used to design a planar lightwave circuit for frequency domain demultiplexion. Difficulties such as efficient insertion of light into the crystal are resolved and previously predicted limitations on the resolution are circumvented. The demultiplexer is also fabricated and characterized. Monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by means of resonantly enhanced grating couplers is investigated. The grating coupler is designed to bend light through a ninety-degree angle and is characterized with the finite-difference time-domain method. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers are

  1. Velocity Dispersions Across Bulge Types

    SciTech Connect

    Fabricius, Maximilian; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Saglia, Roberto; Drory, Niv; Fisher, David

    2010-06-08

    We present first results from a long-slit spectroscopic survey of bulge kinematics in local spiral galaxies. Our optical spectra were obtained at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with the LRS spectrograph and have a velocity resolution of 45 km/s (sigma*), which allows us to resolve the velocity dispersions in the bulge regions of most objects in our sample. We find that the velocity dispersion profiles in morphological classical bulge galaxies are always centrally peaked while the velocity dispersion of morphologically disk-like bulges stays relatively flat towards the center--once strongly barred galaxies are discarded.

  2. Hydrodynamic dispersion of microswimmers in suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Matthieu; Rafaï, Salima; Peyla, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    In our laboratory, we study hydrodynamics of suspensions of micro-swimmers. These micro-organisms are unicellular algae Chlamydomonas Rheinhardii which are able to swim by using their flagella. The swimming dynamics of these micro-swimmers can be seen as a random walk, in absence of any kind of interaction. In addition, these algae have the property of being phototactic, i.e. they swim towards the light. Combining this property with a hydrodynamic flow, we were able to reversibly separate algae from the rest of the fluid. But for sufficiently high volume fraction, these active particles interact with each other. We are now interested in how the coupling of hydrodynamic interactions between swimmers and phototaxis can modify the swimming dynamics at the scale of the suspension. To this aim, we conduct experiments in microfluidic devices to study the dispersion of the micro-organisms in a the liquid phase as a function of the volume fraction. We show that the dispersion of an assembly of puller type microswimmers is quantitatively affected by hydrodynamics interactions. Phd student.

  3. Randomization in robot tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdmann, Michael

    1992-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of randomization in the solution of robot manipulation tasks. One example of randomization is shown by the strategy of shaking a bin holding a part in order to orient the part in a desired stable state with some high probability. Randomization can be useful for mobile robot navigation and as a means of guiding the design process.

  4. Random Item IRT Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Boeck, Paul

    2008-01-01

    It is common practice in IRT to consider items as fixed and persons as random. Both, continuous and categorical person parameters are most often random variables, whereas for items only continuous parameters are used and they are commonly of the fixed type, although exceptions occur. It is shown in the present article that random item parameters…

  5. Granular controls on the dispersion of bed load tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerolmack, D. J.; Martin, R. L.; Phillips, C. B.

    2014-12-01

    Coarse particles are transported in a river as bed load, i.e., they move in frequent contact with and are supported by the granular bed. This movement is typically intermittent and may be described by a series of steps are rests, the distributions of which determine particle dispersion. Laboratory and field studies of bed load tracer dispersion have reported sub- and super-diffusive behavior, both of which have been successfully reproduced with stochastic transport models. Although researchers have invoked heavy-tailed step lengths as the cause of anomalous dispersion, most observations report thin-tailed distributions. Little attention has been paid to rest periods, and stochastic transport models have not been connected to the underlying mechanics of particle motion. Based on theoretical and experimental evidence, we argue that step lengths are thin-tailed and do not control the longterm dispersion of bed load tracers; they are determined by momentum balance between the fluid and solid. Using laboratory experiments with both marbles and natural sediments, we demonstrate that the rest time distribution is power law, and argue that this distribution controls asymptotic dispersion. Observed rest times far exceed any hydrodynamic timescale. Experiments reveal that rest times of deposited particles are governed by fluctuations in river bed elevation; in particular, the return time for the bed to scour to the base of a deposited particle. Stochastic fluctuations in bed elevation are describable by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (mean-reverting random walk) model that contains two parameters, which we show are directly related to the granular shear rate and range of bed elevation fluctuations, respectively. Combining these results with the theory of asymmetric random walks (particles only move downstream), we predict superdiffusive behavior that is in quantitative agreement with our observations of tracer dispersion in a natural river.

  6. Rheology and phase behavior of dense casein micelle dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchoux, A.; Debbou, B.; Gésan-Guiziou, G.; Famelart, M.-H.; Doublier, J.-L.; Cabane, B.

    2009-10-01

    Casein micelle dispersions have been concentrated through osmotic stress and examined through rheological experiments. In conditions where the casein micelles are separated from each other, i.e., below random-close packing, the dispersions have exactly the flow and dynamic properties of the polydisperse hard-sphere fluid, demonstrating that the micelles interact only through excluded volume effects in this regime. These interactions cause the viscosity and the elastic modulus to increase by three orders of magnitude approaching the concentration of random-close packing estimated at Cmax≈178 g/l. Above Cmax, the dispersions progressively turn into "gels" (i.e., soft solids) as C increases, with elastic moduli G' that are nearly frequency independent. In this second regime, the micelles deform and/or deswell as C increases, and the resistance to deformation results from the formation of bonds between micelles combined with the intrinsic mechanical resistance of the micelles. The variation in G' with C is then very similar to that observed with concentrated emulsions where the resistance to deformation originates from a set of membranes that separate the droplets. As in the case of emulsions, the G' values at high frequency are also nearly identical to the osmotic pressures required to compress the casein dispersions. The rheology of sodium caseinate dispersions in which the caseins are not structured into micelles is also reported. Such dispersions have the behavior of associative polymer solutions at all the concentrations investigated, further confirming the importance of structure in determining the rheological properties of casein micelle systems.

  7. Dispersion coefficients for coastal regions

    SciTech Connect

    MacRae, B.L.; Kaleel, R.J.; Shearer, D.L.

    1983-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has undertaken an extensive atmospheric dispersion research and measurement program from which it is intended will emerge improved predictive techniques for employment in licensing decisions and for emergency planning and response. Through this program the NRC has conducted field measurement programs over a wide range of geographic and topographic locations, and are using the acquired tracer and meteorological measurements to evaluate existing dispersion models and prediction techniques, and to develop new techniques when necessary.

  8. Dispersion in alluvial convergent estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhilin; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2016-04-01

    The Van der Burgh's equation for longitudinal effective dispersion is a purely empirical method with practical implications. Its application to the effective tidal average dispersion under equilibrium conditions appears to have excellent performance in a wide range of alluvial estuaries. In this research, we try to find out the physical meaning of Van der Burgh's coefficient. Researchers like MacCready, Fischer, Kuijper, Hansen and Rattray have tried to split up dispersion into its constituents which did not do much to explain overall behaviour. In addition, traditional literature on dispersion is mostly related to flumes with constant cross-section. This research is about understanding the Van der Burgh's coefficient facing the fact that natural estuaries have exponentially varying cross-section. The objective is to derive a simple 1-D model considering both longitudinal and lateral mixing processes based on field observations (theoretical derivation). To that effect, we connect dispersion with salinity using the salt balance equation. Then we calculate the salinity along the longitudinal direction and compare it to the observed salinity. Calibrated dispersion coefficients in a range of estuaries are then compared with new expressions for the Van der Burgh's coefficient K and it is analysed if K varies from estuary to estuary. The set of reliable data used will be from estuaries: Kurau, Perak, Bernam, Selangor, Muar, Endau, Maputo, Thames, Corantijn, Sinnamary, Mae Klong, Lalang, Limpopo, Tha Chin, Chao Phraya, Edisto and Elbe.

  9. Sunspot random walk and 22-year variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, E. Joshua

    2012-01-01

    We examine two stochastic models for consistency with observed long-term secular trends in sunspot number and a faint, but semi-persistent, 22-yr signal: (1) a null hypothesis, a simple one-parameter random-walk model of sunspot-number cycle-to-cycle change, and, (2) an alternative hypothesis, a two-parameter random-walk model with an imposed 22-yr alternating amplitude. The observed secular trend in sunspots, seen from solar cycle 5 to 23, would not be an unlikely result of the accumulation of multiple random-walk steps. Statistical tests show that a 22-yr signal can be resolved in historical sunspot data; that is, the probability is low that it would be realized from random data. On the other hand, the 22-yr signal has a small amplitude compared to random variation, and so it has a relatively small effect on sunspot predictions. Many published predictions for cycle 24 sunspots fall within the dispersion of previous cycle-to-cycle sunspot differences. The probability is low that the Sun will, with the accumulation of random steps over the next few cycles, walk down to a Dalton-like minimum. Our models support published interpretations of sunspot secular variation and 22-yr variation resulting from cycle-to-cycle accumulation of dynamo-generated magnetic energy.

  10. Sunspot random walk and 22-year variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, E. Joshua

    2012-05-01

    We examine two stochastic models for consistency with observed long-term secular trends in sunspot number and a faint, but semi-persistent, 22-yr signal: (1) a null hypothesis, a simple one-parameter log-normal random-walk model of sunspot-number cycle-to-cycle change, and, (2) an alternative hypothesis, a two-parameter random-walk model with an imposed 22-yr alternating amplitude. The observed secular trend in sunspots, seen from solar cycle 5 to 23, would not be an unlikely result of the accumulation of multiple random-walk steps. Statistical tests show that a 22-yr signal can be resolved in historical sunspot data; that is, the probability is low that it would be realized from random data. On the other hand, the 22-yr signal has a small amplitude compared to random variation, and so it has a relatively small effect on sunspot predictions. Many published predictions for cycle 24 sunspots fall within the dispersion of previous cycle-to-cycle sunspot differences. The probability is low that the Sun will, with the accumulation of random steps over the next few cycles, walk down to a Dalton-like minimum. Our models support published interpretations of sunspot secular variation and 22-yr variation resulting from cycle-to-cycle accumulation of dynamo-generated magnetic energy.

  11. Quantum random number generation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Zhang, Zhen; Qi, Bing

    2016-06-28

    Here, quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness -- coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at amore » high speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.« less

  12. Predation risk increases dispersal distance in prey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuki, Hatsune; Yano, Shuichi

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the ecological factors that affect dispersal distances allows us to predict the consequences of dispersal. Although predator avoidance is an important cause of prey dispersal, its effects on dispersal distance have not been investigated. We used simple experimental setups to test dispersal distances of the ambulatory dispersing spider mite ( Tetranychus kanzawai) in the presence or absence of a predator ( Neoseiulus womersleyi). In the absence of predators, most spider mites settled in adjacent patches, whereas the majority of those dispersing in the presence of predators passed through adjacent patches and settled in distant ones. This is the first study to experimentally demonstrate that predators induce greater dispersal distance in prey.

  13. Scale-Dependent Dispersivity Explained Without Scale-Dependent Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaliwal, P.; Engdahl, N. B.; Fogg, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    The observed scale-dependence of dispersivity has often been attributed to the scale-dependence of porous media heterogeneity. However, mass transfer between areas of high and low hydraulic conductivity and preferential solute migration may provide an alternative explanation for this phenomenon. To illustrate this point, we used geostatistical models representing the heterogeneity and interconnectedness of a typical aquifer system and plume modeling via a highly accurate random walk particle tracking method. The apparent dispersivity values were calculated using the statistical moments of the plumes. Apparent dispersivity was seen to grow from 0.01(m)to 100(m) over length scales of 0.06(m) to 500(m) even though heterogeneity scales and facies proportions were stationary and invariant with scale in the simulations. The results suggest that the increase in dispersivity was due solely to a stretching of the plume by two mechanisms. The first mechanism results from the diffusion of solute into areas of low conductivity and the second comes from the movement of solute through well-connected high K zone channels. Under such conditions, an "asymptotic dispersivity" may never be reached.

  14. Disk Dispersal Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Yorke, Harold W.; Johnstone, Doug; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We review the evidence pertaining to the lifetimes of planet-forming disks and discuss possible disk dispersal mechanisms: 1) viscous accretion of material onto the central source, 2) close stellar encounters, 3) stellar winds, and 4) by ultraviolet radiation. We focus on 3) and 4) and describe the quasi-steady state appearance and the overall evolution of disks under the influence of winds and radiation from the central star and of radiation from external OB stars. Viscous accretion likely dominates disk dispersal in the, inner disk (r approx. less than A 10 AU), while photoevaporation is the principal process of disk dispersal outside of r approximately greater than 10 AU. Disk dispersed timescales are compared and discussed in relation to theoretical estimates for planet formation timescales. Photoevaporation may explain the large differences in the hydrogen content of the giant planets in the solar system. The commonly held belief that our early sun's stellar wind dispersed the solar nebula is called into question.

  15. Forest rodents provide directed dispersal of Jeffrey pine seeds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, J.S.; Wall, S.B.V.; Jenkins, S.H.

    2009-01-01

    Some species of animals provide directed dispersal of plant seeds by transporting them nonrandomly to microsites where their chances of producing healthy seedlings are enhanced. We investigated whether this mutualistic interaction occurs between granivorous rodents and Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi) in the eastern Sierra Nevada by comparing the effectiveness of random abiotic seed dispersal with the dispersal performed by four species of rodents: deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), yellow-pine and long-eared chipmunks (Tamias amoenus and T. quadrimaculatus), and golden-mantled ground squirrels (Spermophilus lateralis). We conducted two caching studies using radio-labeled seeds, the first with individual animals in field enclosures and the second with a community of rodents in open forest. We used artificial caches to compare the fates of seeds placed at the range of microsites and depths used by animals with the fates of seeds dispersed abiotically. Finally, we examined the distribution and survival of naturally establishing seedlings over an eight-year period.Several lines of evidence suggested that this community of rodents provided directed dispersal. Animals preferred to cache seeds in microsites that were favorable for emergence or survival of seedlings and avoided caching in microsites in which seedlings fared worst. Seeds buried at depths typical of animal caches (5–25 mm) produced at least five times more seedlings than did seeds on the forest floor. The four species of rodents differed in the quality of dispersal they provided. Small, shallow caches made by deer mice most resembled seeds dispersed by abiotic processes, whereas many of the large caches made by ground squirrels were buried too deeply for successful emergence of seedlings. Chipmunks made the greatest number of caches within the range of depths and microsites favorable for establishment of pine seedlings. Directed dispersal is an important element of the population dynamics of Jeffrey pine, a

  16. Plasmonic waves of a semi-infinite random nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin

    2013-10-15

    The dispersion curves of the plasmonic waves of a semi-infinite random metal-dielectric nanocomposite, consisting of bulk metal embedded with dielectric inclusions, are presented. Two branches of p-polarized surface plasmon-polariton modes are found to exist. The possibility of experimentally observing the surface waves by attenuated total reflection is demonstrated.

  17. Printed circuit dispersive transmission line

    DOEpatents

    Ikezi, H.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; DeGrassie, J.S.

    1991-08-27

    A printed circuit dispersive transmission line structure is disclosed comprising an insulator, a ground plane formed on one surface of the insulator, a first transmission line formed on a second surface of the insulator, and a second transmission line also formed on the second surface of the insulator and of longer length than the first transmission line and periodically intersecting the first transmission line. In a preferred embodiment, the transmission line structure exhibits highly dispersive characteristics by designing the length of one of the transmission line between two adjacent periodic intersections to be longer than the other. 5 figures.

  18. DISPERSION HARDENING OF URANIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Arbiter, W.

    1963-01-15

    A method of hardening U metal involves the forming of a fine dispersion of UO/sub 2/. This method consists of first hydriding the U to form a finely divided powder and then exposing the powder to a very dilute O gas in an inert atmosphere under such pressure and temperature conditions as to cause a thin oxide film to coat each particle of the U hydride, The oxide skin prevents agglomeration of the particles as the remaining H is removed, thus preserving the small particle size. The oxide skin coatings remain as an oxide dispersion. The resulting product may be workhardened to improve its physical characteristics. (AEC)

  19. Phase tracking with differential dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubois, Xavier; Lacour, Sylvestre; Perrin, Guy S.; Dembet, Roderick; Fedou, Pierre; Eisenhauer, Frank; Rousselet-Perraut, Karine; Straubmeier, Christian; Amorim, Antonio; Brandner, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Differential chromatic dispersion in single-mode optical fibres leads to a loss of contrast of the white light fringe. For the GRAVITY instrument, this aspect is critical since it limits the fringe tracking performance. We present a real-time algorithm that compensates for differential dispersion due to varying fibre lengths using prior calibration of the optical fibres. This correction is limited by the accuracy to which the fibres stretch is known. We show how this affects the SNR on the white light fringe for different scenarios and we estimate how this phenomenon might eventually impact the astrometric accuracy of GRAVITY observations.

  20. Printed circuit dispersive transmission line

    DOEpatents

    Ikezi, Hiroyuki; Lin-Liu, Yuh-Ren; DeGrassie, John S.

    1991-01-01

    A printed circuit dispersive transmission line structure is disclosed comprising an insulator, a ground plane formed on one surface of the insulator, a first transmission line formed on a second surface of the insulator, and a second transmission line also formed on the second surface of the insulator and of longer length than the first transmission line and periodically intersecting the first transmission line. In a preferred embodiment, the transmission line structure exhibits highly dispersive characteristics by designing the length of one of the transmission line between two adjacent periodic intersections to be longer than the other.

  1. Heavy Gas Dispersion Incompressible Flow

    1992-01-27

    FEM3 is a numerical model developed primarily to simulate heavy gas dispersion in the atmosphere, such as the gravitational spread and vapor dispersion that result from an accidental spill of liquefied natural gas (LNG). FEM3 solves both two and three-dimensional problems and, in addition to the generalized anelastic formulation, includes options to use either the Boussinesq approximation or an isothermal assumption, when appropriate. The FEM3 model is composed of three parts: a preprocessor PREFEM3, themore » main code FEM3, and two postprocessors TESSERA and THPLOTX.« less

  2. Fog dispersion. [charged particle technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, L. S.; Frost, W.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of using the charged particle technique to disperse warm fog at airports is investigated and compared with other techniques. The charged particle technique shows potential for warm fog dispersal, but experimental verification of several significant parameters, such as particle mobility and charge density, is needed. Seeding and helicopter downwash techniques are also effective for warm fog disperals, but presently are not believed to be viable techniques for routine airport operations. Thermal systems are currently used at a few overseas airports; however, they are expensive and pose potential environmental problems.

  3. Dispersion-compensated Fresnel lens

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, K.C.

    1992-11-03

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4[times]10[sup [minus]5] inch and a profile width of at least 10[sup [minus]3] inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight. 10 figs.

  4. Dispersion-compensated fresnel lens

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Kenneth C.

    1992-01-01

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4.multidot.10.sup.-5 inch and a profile width of at least 10.sup.-3 inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight.

  5. Mechanical dispersion of clay from soil into water: readily-dispersed and spontaneously-dispersed clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czyż, Ewa A.; Dexter, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    A method for the experimental determination of the amount of clay dispersed from soil into water is described. The method was evaluated using soil samples from agricultural fields in 18 locations in Poland. Soil particle size distributions, contents of organic matter and exchangeable cations were measured by standard methods. Sub-samples were placed in distilled water and were subjected to four different energy inputs obtained by different numbers of inversions (end-over-end movements). The amounts of clay that dispersed into suspension were measured by light scattering (turbidimetry). An empirical equation was developed that provided an approximate fit to the experimental data for turbidity as a function of number of inversions. It is suggested that extrapolation of the fitted equation to zero inversions enables the amount of spontaneously-dispersed clay to be estimated. This method introduces the possibility of replacing the existing subjective, qualitative method of determining spontaneously-dispersed clay with a quantitative, objective method. Even though the dispersed clay is measured under saturated conditions, soil samples retain a `memory' of the water contents at which they have been stored.

  6. Dispersion-Enhanced Laser Gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok; Arissian, L.; Diels, J. C.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the effect of a highly dispersive element placed inside a modulated optical cavity on the frequency and amplitude of the output modulation to determine the conditions for enhanced gyroscopic sensitivities. The element is treated as both a phase and amplitude filter, and the time-dependence of the cavity field is considered. Both atomic gases (two-level and multi-level) and optical resonators (single and coupled) are considered and compared as dispersive elements. We find that it is possible to simultaneously enhance the gyro scale factor sensitivity and suppress the dead band by using an element with anomalous dispersion that has greater loss at the carrier frequency than at the side-band frequencies, i.e., an element that simultaneously pushes and intensifies the perturbed cavity modes, e.g. a two-level absorber or an under-coupled optical resonator. The sensitivity enhancement is inversely proportional to the effective group index, becoming infinite at a group index of zero. However, the number of round trips required to reach a steady-state also becomes infinite when the group index is zero (or two). For even larger dispersions a steady-state cannot be achieved, and nonlinear dynamic effects such as bistability and periodic oscillations are predicted in the gyro response.

  7. Molecular mobility in glassy dispersions.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Mehak; McKenna, Gregory B; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2016-05-28

    Dielectric spectroscopy was used to characterize the structural relaxation in pharmaceutical dispersions containing nifedipine (NIF) and either poly(vinyl) pyrrolidone (PVP) or hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS). The shape of the dielectric response (permittivity versus log time) curve was observed to be independent of temperature. Thus, for the pure NIF as well as the dispersions, the validity of the time-temperature superposition principle was established. Furthermore, though the shape of the full dielectric response varied with polymer concentration, the regime related to the α- or structural relaxation was found to superimpose for the dispersions, though not with the response of the NIF itself. Hence, there is a limited time-temperature-concentration superposition for these systems as well. Therefore, in this polymer concentration range, calculation of long relaxation times in these glass-forming systems becomes possible. We found that strong drug-polymer hydrogen bonding interactions improved the physical stability (i.e., delayed crystallization) by reducing the molecular mobility. The strength of hydrogen bonding, structural relaxation time, and crystallization followed the order: NIF-PV P>NIF-HPMCAS>NIF. With an increase in polymer concentration, the relaxation times were longer indicating a decrease in molecular mobility. The temperature dependence of relaxation time, in other words fragility, was independent of polymer concentration. This is the first application of the superposition principle to characterize structural relaxation in glassy pharmaceutical dispersions.

  8. Anomalous dispersions of `hedgehog' particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Joong Hwan; Yeom, Bongjun; Wang, Yichun; Tung, Siu On; Hoff, J. Damon; Kotov, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophobic particles in water and hydrophilic particles in oil aggregate, but can form colloidal dispersions if their surfaces are chemically camouflaged with surfactants, organic tethers, adsorbed polymers or other particles that impart affinity for the solvent and increase interparticle repulsion. A different strategy for modulating the interaction between a solid and a liquid uses surface corrugation, which gives rise to unique wetting behaviour. Here we show that this topographical effect can also be used to disperse particles in a wide range of solvents without recourse to chemicals to camouflage the particles' surfaces: we produce micrometre-sized particles that are coated with stiff, nanoscale spikes and exhibit long-term colloidal stability in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic media. We find that these `hedgehog' particles do not interpenetrate each other with their spikes, which markedly decreases the contact area between the particles and, therefore, the attractive forces between them. The trapping of air in aqueous dispersions, solvent autoionization at highly developed interfaces, and long-range electrostatic repulsion in organic media also contribute to the colloidal stability of our particles. The unusual dispersion behaviour of our hedgehog particles, overturning the notion that like dissolves like, might help to mitigate adverse environmental effects of the use of surfactants and volatile organic solvents, and deepens our understanding of interparticle interactions and nanoscale colloidal chemistry.

  9. Dispersion of Responses over Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingsporn, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    Proposes a procedure for testing hypotheses regarding the dispersion of responses distributed over taxa that uses the distribution of the number of cells that are empty or are singly occupied. Presents a table showing the number of cases needed to achieve 0.10, 0.05, and 0.01 significance for excessive numbers of empty cells. (SLD)

  10. FORMATION OF INTERMETALLIC COMPOUND DISPERSIONS

    DOEpatents

    Bryner, J.S.

    1959-12-01

    BS>A method is presented for preparing dispersions containing thorium bismuthide in equiaxed form and having an average particle size of about 30 microns. Thorium particles having one dimension not greater than 0.015 in. are immersed in liquid bismuth at a temperature between 500 and 600 deg C, the quantity of thorium being in excess of its solubility in the bismuth.

  11. Airflow dispersion in unsaturated soil.

    PubMed

    Gidda, T; Cann, D; Stiver, W H; Zytner, R G

    2006-01-01

    Dispersion data is abundant for water flow in the saturated zone but is lacking for airflow in unsaturated soil. However, for remediation processes such as soil vapour extraction, characterization of airflow dispersion is necessary for improved modelling and prediction capabilities. Accordingly, gas-phase tracer experiments were conducted in five soils ranging from uniform sand to clay at air-dried and wetted conditions. The disturbed soils were placed in one-dimensional stainless steel columns, with sulfur hexafluoride used as the inert tracer. The tested interstitial velocities were typical of those present in the vicinity of a soil vapour extraction well, while wetting varied according to the water-holding capacity of the soils. Results gave dispersivities that varied between 0.42 and 2.6 cm, which are typical of values in the literature. In air-dried soils, dispersion was found to increase with the pore size variability of the soil. For wetted soils, particle shape was an important factor at low water contents, while at high water contents, the proportion of macroporous space filled with water was important. The relative importance of diffusion decreased with increasing interstitial velocity and water content and was, in general, found to be minor compared to mechanical mixing across all conditions studied. PMID:16246460

  12. Molecular mobility in glassy dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Mehak; McKenna, Gregory B.; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2016-05-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy was used to characterize the structural relaxation in pharmaceutical dispersions containing nifedipine (NIF) and either poly(vinyl) pyrrolidone (PVP) or hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS). The shape of the dielectric response (permittivity versus log time) curve was observed to be independent of temperature. Thus, for the pure NIF as well as the dispersions, the validity of the time-temperature superposition principle was established. Furthermore, though the shape of the full dielectric response varied with polymer concentration, the regime related to the α- or structural relaxation was found to superimpose for the dispersions, though not with the response of the NIF itself. Hence, there is a limited time-temperature-concentration superposition for these systems as well. Therefore, in this polymer concentration range, calculation of long relaxation times in these glass-forming systems becomes possible. We found that strong drug-polymer hydrogen bonding interactions improved the physical stability (i.e., delayed crystallization) by reducing the molecular mobility. The strength of hydrogen bonding, structural relaxation time, and crystallization followed the order: NIF-PV P>NIF-HPMCAS>NIF. With an increase in polymer concentration, the relaxation times were longer indicating a decrease in molecular mobility. The temperature dependence of relaxation time, in other words fragility, was independent of polymer concentration. This is the first application of the superposition principle to characterize structural relaxation in glassy pharmaceutical dispersions.

  13. Multiple overseas dispersal in amphibians.

    PubMed Central

    Vences, Miguel; Vieites, David R; Glaw, Frank; Brinkmann, Henner; Kosuch, Joachim; Veith, Michael; Meyer, Axel

    2003-01-01

    Amphibians are thought to be unable to disperse over ocean barriers because they do not tolerate the osmotic stress of salt water. Their distribution patterns have therefore generally been explained by vicariance biogeography. Here, we present compelling evidence for overseas dispersal of frogs in the Indian Ocean region based on the discovery of two endemic species on Mayotte. This island belongs to the Comoro archipelago, which is entirely volcanic and surrounded by sea depths of more than 3500 m. This constitutes the first observation of endemic amphibians on oceanic islands that did not have any past physical contact to other land masses. The two species of frogs had previously been thought to be nonendemic and introduced from Madagascar, but clearly represent new species based on their morphological and genetic differentiation. They belong to the genera Mantidactylus and Boophis in the family Mantellidae that is otherwise restricted to Madagascar, and are distinguished by morphology and mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences from mantellid species occurring in Madagascar. This discovery permits us to update and test molecular clocks for frogs distributed in this region. The new calibrations are in agreement with previous rate estimates and indicate two further Cenozoic transmarine dispersal events that had previously been interpreted as vicariance: hyperoliid frogs from Africa to Madagascar (Heterixalus) and from Madagascar to the Seychelles islands (Tachycnemis). Our results provide the strongest evidence so far that overseas dispersal of amphibians exists and is no rare exception, although vicariance certainly retains much of its importance in explaining amphibian biogeography. PMID:14667332

  14. An Introduction to Dispersive Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taddei, M. M.; Mendes, T. N. C.; Farina, C.

    2010-01-01

    Dispersive forces are a kind of van der Waals intermolecular force which could only be fully understood with the establishment of quantum mechanics and, in particular, of quantum electrodynamics. In this pedagogical paper, we introduce the subject in a more elementary approach, aiming at students with basic knowledge of quantum mechanics. We…

  15. Random bistochastic matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellini, Valerio; Sommers, Hans-Jürgen; Bruzda, Wojciech; Życzkowski, Karol

    2009-09-01

    Ensembles of random stochastic and bistochastic matrices are investigated. While all columns of a random stochastic matrix can be chosen independently, the rows and columns of a bistochastic matrix have to be correlated. We evaluate the probability measure induced into the Birkhoff polytope of bistochastic matrices by applying the Sinkhorn algorithm to a given ensemble of random stochastic matrices. For matrices of order N = 2 we derive explicit formulae for the probability distributions induced by random stochastic matrices with columns distributed according to the Dirichlet distribution. For arbitrary N we construct an initial ensemble of stochastic matrices which allows one to generate random bistochastic matrices according to a distribution locally flat at the center of the Birkhoff polytope. The value of the probability density at this point enables us to obtain an estimation of the volume of the Birkhoff polytope, consistent with recent asymptotic results.

  16. Generating random density matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Życzkowski, Karol; Penson, Karol A.; Nechita, Ion; Collins, Benoît

    2011-06-01

    We study various methods to generate ensembles of random density matrices of a fixed size N, obtained by partial trace of pure states on composite systems. Structured ensembles of random pure states, invariant with respect to local unitary transformations are introduced. To analyze statistical properties of quantum entanglement in bi-partite systems we analyze the distribution of Schmidt coefficients of random pure states. Such a distribution is derived in the case of a superposition of k random maximally entangled states. For another ensemble, obtained by performing selective measurements in a maximally entangled basis on a multi-partite system, we show that this distribution is given by the Fuss-Catalan law and find the average entanglement entropy. A more general class of structured ensembles proposed, containing also the case of Bures, forms an extension of the standard ensemble of structureless random pure states, described asymptotically, as N → ∞, by the Marchenko-Pastur distribution.

  17. Randomness: Quantum versus classical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Recent tremendous development of quantum information theory has led to a number of quantum technological projects, e.g. quantum random generators. This development had stimulated a new wave of interest in quantum foundations. One of the most intriguing problems of quantum foundations is the elaboration of a consistent and commonly accepted interpretation of a quantum state. Closely related problem is the clarification of the notion of quantum randomness and its interrelation with classical randomness. In this short review, we shall discuss basics of classical theory of randomness (which by itself is very complex and characterized by diversity of approaches) and compare it with irreducible quantum randomness. We also discuss briefly “digital philosophy”, its role in physics (classical and quantum) and its coupling to the information interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM).

  18. Quantum random number generator

    DOEpatents

    Pooser, Raphael C.

    2016-05-10

    A quantum random number generator (QRNG) and a photon generator for a QRNG are provided. The photon generator may be operated in a spontaneous mode below a lasing threshold to emit photons. Photons emitted from the photon generator may have at least one random characteristic, which may be monitored by the QRNG to generate a random number. In one embodiment, the photon generator may include a photon emitter and an amplifier coupled to the photon emitter. The amplifier may enable the photon generator to be used in the QRNG without introducing significant bias in the random number and may enable multiplexing of multiple random numbers. The amplifier may also desensitize the photon generator to fluctuations in power supplied thereto while operating in the spontaneous mode. In one embodiment, the photon emitter and amplifier may be a tapered diode amplifier.

  19. Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloulian, George K.; Woo, Simon S.; Chow, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Net-centric networking environments are often faced with limited resources and must utilize bandwidth as efficiently as possible. In networking environments that span wide areas, the data transmission has to be efficient without any redundant or exuberant metadata. The Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer software provides an extra level of security on top of existing data encryption methods. Randomizing the data s byte stream adds an extra layer to existing data protection methods, thus making it harder for an attacker to decrypt protected data. Based on a generated crypto-graphically secure random seed, a random sequence of numbers is used to intelligently and efficiently swap the organization of bytes in data using the unbiased and memory-efficient in-place Fisher-Yates shuffle method. Swapping bytes and reorganizing the crucial structure of the byte data renders the data file unreadable and leaves the data in a deconstructed state. This deconstruction adds an extra level of security requiring the byte stream to be reconstructed with the random seed in order to be readable. Once the data byte stream has been randomized, the software enables the data to be distributed to N nodes in an environment. Each piece of the data in randomized and distributed form is a separate entity unreadable on its own right, but when combined with all N pieces, is able to be reconstructed back to one. Reconstruction requires possession of the key used for randomizing the bytes, leading to the generation of the same cryptographically secure random sequence of numbers used to randomize the data. This software is a cornerstone capability possessing the ability to generate the same cryptographically secure sequence on different machines and time intervals, thus allowing this software to be used more heavily in net-centric environments where data transfer bandwidth is limited.

  20. Relative Dispersion of Ice Crystals in Seeded Cumuli.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil, Jeffrey C.; Lawson, R. Paul; Rodi, Alfred R.

    1993-06-01

    Relative dispersion of ice crystals was measured in 30 seeded cumulus clouds. A quasi-instantaneous, vertical area source of ice was generated by releasing dry-ice pellets from an airplane. The ice concentration distribution and relative dispersion were measured normal to the source and were complemented by cloud turbulence measurements, namely, velocity variances and the energy dissipation rate . The clouds were selected based on an objective set of criteria and were treated as members of the same ensemble.The observed mean relative dispersion rx agreed well with predictions from a Lagrangian stochastic two-particle model, which reproduces Batchelor's theoretical results for rx. For short times t after the seeding time ts, the predictions and observations suggested a growth like rx t ts rather than Batchelor's `intermediate' time prediction, rx 1/2 (t ts)3/2. This difference was attributed to the rather large initial dispersion 0 of ice crystals, 27 53 m, inferred from the measurements; Batchelor's result is only valid for 0 va3/, where va2 is the average velocity variance. At long times, the predictions and observations approached the same asymptotic limit, rx (t ts)1/2.In addition to the mean dispersion, probability density functions (pdfs) of the individual dispersion observations were constructed and showed an evolution from a highly skewed pdf at small times to a more symmetrical one at large times. This is one of the first reports of the rx pdf, which is important for determining the variance and pdf of the randomly varying concentration in a small ice cloud or plume of material.

  1. Interdependence of waveguide and material dispersion.

    PubMed

    Marcuse, D

    1979-09-01

    Theoretical work on dispersion in single-mode fibers sometimes uses the assumption that waveguide dispersion D(w) and material dispersion D(m) are separate effects that contribute additively to the total amount of dispersion D(m+w). Using Gloge's LP-mode approximation we compute the dispersion of the LP(0l) (HE(11)) mode by solving the eigenvalue equation taking dispersion of core and cladding materials into account. The dispersion of the LP(01) mode is computed by numerical differentiation of the solution of the eigenvalue equation. The difference D(m+w) - D(w) is compared to waveguide dispersion D(w), which is computed by ignoring the dispersive properties of the core and cladding materials. We find large percentage deviations between D(m+w) - D(m) and D(w). The assumption of additivity of material and waveguide dispersion is thus not quite correct. However, because of the small contribution of waveguide dispersion to the total dispersion of the LP(01) mode, even a large percentage error in the waveguide dispersion has little influence on the over-all dispersion of the LP(01) mode.

  2. Realistic dispersion kernels applied to cohabitation reaction dispersion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isern, Neus; Fort, Joaquim; Pérez-Losada, Joaquim

    2008-10-01

    We develop front spreading models for several jump distance probability distributions (dispersion kernels). We derive expressions for a cohabitation model (cohabitation of parents and children) and a non-cohabitation model, and apply them to the Neolithic using data from real human populations. The speeds that we obtain are consistent with observations of the Neolithic transition. The correction due to the cohabitation effect is up to 38%.

  3. Nitrogenous dispersants, lubricants and concentrates containing said nitrogenous dispersants

    SciTech Connect

    Pindar, J.F.; Bryant, C.P.; Cohen, J.M.

    1984-06-12

    Compositions useful as lubricant and fuel dispersants are prepared by reacting an intermediate (A) of the formulae, wherein each R is hydrogen or a lower hydrocarbon-based group, Ar is an aromatic moiety having at least one aliphatic substituent of at least 6 carbon atoms and x is 1 to about 10, with an amino compound (B) which contains one or more amino groups having hydrogen bonded directly to an amino nitrogen.

  4. Randomness for Free

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Doyen, Laurent; Gimbert, Hugo; Henzinger, Thomas A.

    We consider two-player zero-sum games on graphs. These games can be classified on the basis of the information of the players and on the mode of interaction between them. On the basis of information the classification is as follows: (a) partial-observation (both players have partial view of the game); (b) one-sided complete-observation (one player has complete observation); and (c) complete-observation (both players have complete view of the game). On the basis of mode of interaction we have the following classification: (a) concurrent (players interact simultaneously); and (b) turn-based (players interact in turn). The two sources of randomness in these games are randomness in transition function and randomness in strategies. In general, randomized strategies are more powerful than deterministic strategies, and randomness in transitions gives more general classes of games. We present a complete characterization for the classes of games where randomness is not helpful in: (a) the transition function (probabilistic transition can be simulated by deterministic transition); and (b) strategies (pure strategies are as powerful as randomized strategies). As consequence of our characterization we obtain new undecidability results for these games.

  5. Natal and breeding dispersal of northern spotted owls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forsman, E.D.; Anthony, R.G.; Reid, J.A.; Loschl, P.J.; Sovern, S.G.; Taylor, M.; Biswell, B.L.; Ellingson, A.; Meslow, E.C.; Miller, G.S.; Swindle, K.A.; Thrailkill, J.A.; Wagner, F.F.; Seaman, D.E.

    2002-01-01

    banded females, and 22.9 km for radio-marked females. On average, banded males and females settled within 4.2 and 7.0 territory widths of their natal sites, respectively. Maximum and final dispersal distances were largely independent of the number of days that juveniles were tracked. Although statistical tests of dispersal direction based on all owls indicated that direction of natal dispersal was non-random, the mean angular deviations and 95% CI's associated with the samples were large, and r-values (vector length) were small. This lead us to conclude that significant test results were the result of large sample size and were not biologically meaningful. Our samples were not large enough to test whether dispersal direction from individual territories was random. In the sample of radio-marked owls, 22% of males and 44% of females were paired at 1 year of age, but only 1.5% of males and 1.6% of females were actually breeding at 1 year of age. At 2 years of age, 68% of males and 77% of females were paired, but only 5.4% of males and 2.6% of females were breeding. In contrast to the radio-marked owls, most juveniles that were banded and relocated at 1 or 2 years of age were paired, although few were breeding. Although recruitment into the territorial population typically occurred when owls were 1-5 years old, 9% of banded juveniles were not recaptured until they were > 5 years old. We suspect that our estimates of age at recruitment of banded owls are biased high because of the likelihood that some individuals were not recaptured in the first year that they entered the territorial population. A minimum of 6% of the banded, non-juvenile owls on our demographic study areas changed territories each year (breeding dispersal). The likelihood of breeding dispersal was higher for females, young owls, owls that did not have a mate in the previous year, and owls that lost their mate from the previous year through death or divorce. Mean and median distances dispersed by adults were

  6. Modeling neutron scattering in disperse, nonuniformly labeled commercial polyolefins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habersberger, Brian; Hart, Kyle; Gillespie, David; Huang, Tianzi

    In spite of their chemically simple monomer elements, understanding of many structural, thermodynamic, and other aspects of polyolefins has remained elusive. Scattering studies on polyolefins are challenged by their nearly identical density in the melt, requiring the use of deuterium-labeling to provide contrast for small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Until recently, labeling of commercial polyolefins has been prohibitively costly, leading SANS investigations on polyolefins to focus on non-disperse model systems. Commercial polyolefins often have broad molecular weight and composition distributions, and such dispersity plays an important role in their rheology, crystallization, and mechanical properties. Recent reports have described facile hydrogen-deuterium exchange reactions that preserve the chain architecture of polyolefins. However, such exchange is not uniformly distributed across the chain population. Here, we report a generalized application of the Random Phase Approximation prediction for SANS from homogeneous polymer blends to account for such dispersity. A Monte-Carlo method is used to calculate the deuterium distribution that corresponds to SANS measurements. These methods provide powerful tools for probing the structure of disperse polymer architectures.

  7. A New Aerodynamic Data Dispersion Method for Launch Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for implementing aerodynamic data dispersion analysis is herein introduced. A general mathematical approach combined with physical modeling tailored to the aerodynamic quantity of interest enables the generation of more realistically relevant dispersed data and, in turn, more reasonable flight simulation results. The method simultaneously allows for the aerodynamic quantities and their derivatives to be dispersed given a set of non-arbitrary constraints, which stresses the controls model in more ways than with the traditional bias up or down of the nominal data within the uncertainty bounds. The adoption and implementation of this new method within the NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Project has resulted in significant increases in predicted roll control authority, and lowered the induced risks for flight test operations. One direct impact on launch vehicles is a reduced size for auxiliary control systems, and the possibility of an increased payload. This technique has the potential of being applied to problems in multiple areas where nominal data together with uncertainties are used to produce simulations using Monte Carlo type random sampling methods. It is recommended that a tailored physics-based dispersion model be delivered with any aerodynamic product that includes nominal data and uncertainties, in order to make flight simulations more realistic and allow for leaner spacecraft designs.

  8. Selecting people randomly.

    PubMed

    Broome, John

    1984-10-01

    This article considers what justification can be found for selecting randomly and in what circumstances it applies, including that of selecting patients to be treated by a scarce medical procedure. The author demonstrates that balancing the merits of fairness, common good, equal rights, and equal chance as they apply in various situations frequently leads to the conclusion that random selection may not be the most appropriate mode of selection. Broome acknowledges that, in the end, we may be forced to conclude that the only merit of random selection is the political one of guarding against partiality and oppression.

  9. Lagrangian Particle Method for Local Scale Dispersion Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunarko; ZakiSu'ud

    2016-08-01

    A deterministic model is developed for radioactive dispersion analysis based on random-walk Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Method (LPDM). A diagnostic 3dimensional mass-consistent wind-field with a capability to handle complex topography can be used to provide input for particle advection. Turbulent diffusion process of particles is determined based on empirical lateral and linear vertical relationships. Surface-level concentration is calculated for constant unit release from elevated point source. A series of 60-second segmented groups of particles are released in 3600 seconds total duration. Averaged surface-level concentration within a 5 meter surface layer is obtained and compared with available analytical solution. Results from LPDM shows good agreement with the analytical result for vertically constant and varying wind field with the same atmospheric stability.

  10. Study of Dispersion Coefficient Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, K. R.; Bressan, C. K.; Pires, M. S. G.; Canno, L. M.; Ribeiro, L. C. L. J.

    2016-08-01

    The issue of water pollution has worsened in recent times due to releases, intentional or not, of pollutants in natural water bodies. This causes several studies about the distribution of pollutants are carried out. The water quality models have been developed and widely used today as a preventative tool, ie to try to predict what will be the concentration distribution of constituent along a body of water in spatial and temporal scale. To understand and use such models, it is necessary to know some concepts of hydraulic high on their application, including the longitudinal dispersion coefficient. This study aims to conduct a theoretical and experimental study of the channel dispersion coefficient, yielding more information about their direct determination in the literature.

  11. Heavy Gas Dispersion Incompressible Flow

    1992-02-03

    FEM3 is a numerical model developed primarily to simulate heavy gas dispersion in the atmosphere, such as the gravitational spread and vapor dispersion that result from an accidental spill of liquefied natural gas (LNG). FEM3 solves both two and three-dimensional problems and, in addition to the generalized anelastic formulation, includes options to use either the Boussinesq approximation or an isothermal assumption, when appropriate. The FEM3 model is composed of three parts: a preprocessor PREFEM3, themore » main code FEM3, and two postprocessors TESSERA and THPLOTX. The DEC VAX11 version contains an auxiliary program, POLYREAD, which reads the polyplot file created by FEM3.« less

  12. Statistical description of turbulent dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwers, J. J. H.

    2012-12-01

    We derive a comprehensive statistical model for dispersion of passive or almost passive admixture particles such as fine particulate matter, aerosols, smoke, and fumes in turbulent flow. The model rests on the Markov limit for particle velocity. It is in accordance with the asymptotic structure of turbulence at large Reynolds number as described by Kolmogorov. The model consists of Langevin and diffusion equations in which the damping and diffusivity are expressed by expansions in powers of the reciprocal Kolmogorov constant C0. We derive solutions of O(C00) and O(C0-1). We truncate at O(C0-2) which is shown to result in an error of a few percentages in predicted dispersion statistics for representative cases of turbulent flow. We reveal analogies and remarkable differences between the solutions of classical statistical mechanics and those of statistical turbulence.

  13. Equitable random graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, M. E. J.; Martin, Travis

    2014-11-01

    Random graph models have played a dominant role in the theoretical study of networked systems. The Poisson random graph of Erdős and Rényi, in particular, as well as the so-called configuration model, have served as the starting point for numerous calculations. In this paper we describe another large class of random graph models, which we call equitable random graphs and which are flexible enough to represent networks with diverse degree distributions and many nontrivial types of structure, including community structure, bipartite structure, degree correlations, stratification, and others, yet are exactly solvable for a wide range of properties in the limit of large graph size, including percolation properties, complete spectral density, and the behavior of homogeneous dynamical systems, such as coupled oscillators or epidemic models.

  14. Dispersed Fringe Sensing Analysis - DFSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigrist, Norbert; Shi, Fang; Redding, David C.; Basinger, Scott A.; Ohara, Catherine M.; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa A.; Spechler, Joshua A.

    2012-01-01

    Dispersed Fringe Sensing (DFS) is a technique for measuring and phasing segmented telescope mirrors using a dispersed broadband light image. DFS is capable of breaking the monochromatic light ambiguity, measuring absolute piston errors between segments of large segmented primary mirrors to tens of nanometers accuracy over a range of 100 micrometers or more. The DFSA software tool analyzes DFS images to extract DFS encoded segment piston errors, which can be used to measure piston distances between primary mirror segments of ground and space telescopes. This information is necessary to control mirror segments to establish a smooth, continuous primary figure needed to achieve high optical quality. The DFSA tool is versatile, allowing precise piston measurements from a variety of different optical configurations. DFSA technology may be used for measuring wavefront pistons from sub-apertures defined by adjacent segments (such as Keck Telescope), or from separated sub-apertures used for testing large optical systems (such as sub-aperture wavefront testing for large primary mirrors using auto-collimating flats). An experimental demonstration of the coarse-phasing technology with verification of DFSA was performed at the Keck Telescope. DFSA includes image processing, wavelength and source spectral calibration, fringe extraction line determination, dispersed fringe analysis, and wavefront piston sign determination. The code is robust against internal optical system aberrations and against spectral variations of the source. In addition to the DFSA tool, the software package contains a simple but sophisticated MATLAB model to generate dispersed fringe images of optical system configurations in order to quickly estimate the coarse phasing performance given the optical and operational design requirements. Combining MATLAB (a high-level language and interactive environment developed by MathWorks), MACOS (JPL s software package for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical

  15. Turbulent Dispersion of Traffic Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staebler, R. M.; Gordon, M.; Liggio, J.; Makar, P.; Mihele, C.; Brook, J.; Wentzell, J. J.; Gong, S.; Lu, G.; Lee, P.

    2010-12-01

    Emissions from the transportation sector are a significant source of air pollution. Ongoing efforts to reduce the impacts require tools to provide guidance on policies regarding fuels, vehicle types and traffic control. The air quality models currently used to predict the effectiveness of policies typically treat traffic emissions as a source uniformly distributed across the surface of a model grid. In reality, emissions occur along lines above the surface, in an initially highly concentrated form, and are immediately mixed by traffic-enhanced turbulence. Differences between model and reality in terms of both chemistry and dispersion are to be expected. The ALMITEE (Advancing Local-scale Modeling through Inclusion of Transportation Emission Experiments) subproject FEVER (Fast Evolution of Vehicle Emissions from Roadways), conducted on multi-lane highways in the Toronto area in the summer of 2010, included measurements to quantify the evolution and dispersion of traffic emissions. Continuous micro-meteorological data (heat and momentum fluxes, temperature, humidity and incoming solar radiation) were collected 10m from the road, next to a traffic camera used to determine traffic density, composition and speed. Sonic anemometers and an aircraft turbulence probe mounted on a mobile lab provided measurements of turbulent dispersion both directly in traffic on the highway as well as on perpendicular side roads, as a function of distance from the highway. The mobile lab was equipped with instruments to characterize the aerosol size and mass distributions, aerosol composition including black carbon content, NO, NO2, CO2, CO, SO2 and VOCs at high time resolution. Preliminary results on the consequences of turbulent dispersion of traffic emissions levels under a variety of conditions will be disseminated.

  16. Integrated Urban Dispersion Modeling Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Kosovic, B; Chan, S T

    2003-11-03

    Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for developing a detailed understanding of three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). The accurate and timely prediction of the atmospheric dispersion of hazardous materials in densely populated urban areas is a critical homeland and national security need for emergency preparedness, risk assessment, and vulnerability studies. The main challenges in high-fidelity numerical modeling of urban dispersion are the accurate prediction of peak concentrations, spatial extent and temporal evolution of harmful levels of hazardous materials, and the incorporation of detailed structural geometries. Current computational tools do not include all the necessary elements to accurately represent hazardous release events in complex urban settings embedded in high-resolution terrain. Nor do they possess the computational efficiency required for many emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We are developing a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability, able to efficiently predict dispersion in diverse urban environments for a wide range of atmospheric conditions, temporal and spatial scales, and release event scenarios. This new computational fluid dynamics capability includes adaptive mesh refinement and it can simultaneously resolve individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features), treat complex building and structural geometries (e.g., stadiums, arenas, subways, airplane interiors), and cope with the full range of atmospheric conditions (e.g. stability). We are developing approaches for seamless coupling with mesoscale numerical weather prediction models to provide realistic forcing of the urban-scale model, which is critical to its performance in real-world conditions.

  17. Dispersion as a Survival Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junior, Valdivino Vargas; Machado, Fábio Prates; Roldán-Correa, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    We consider stochastic growth models to represent population subject to catastrophes. We analyze the subject from different set ups considering or not spatial restrictions, whether dispersion is a good strategy to increase the population viability. We find out it strongly depends on the effect of a catastrophic event, the spatial constraints of the environment and the probability that each exposed individual survives when a disaster strikes.

  18. Steady State Dense Gas Dispersion

    1995-03-01

    SLAB-LLNL is a steady-state one-dimensional program which calculates the atmospheric dispersion of a heavier than air gas that is continuously released at ground level. The model is based on the steady-state crosswind-averaged conservation equations of species, mass, energy, and momentum. It uses the air entrainment concept to account for the turbulent mixing of the gas cloud with the surrounding atmosphere and similarity profiles to determine the crosswind dependence.

  19. Dispersant application by fire monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Major, R.A.; Chen, A.C.T.

    1995-06-01

    Several years ago, Exxon Company, International, found itself with a need for a rugged system for open ocean use in applying dispersant which could be quickly installed on supply boats and would use readily available parts at remote offshore drilling sites. Fire monitors appeared promising, since they had been used effectively to disperse some minor spills in the past, and visually they appeared to produce a relatively-uniform spray pattern. Calculations also showed that fire monitors could potentially cover three to four times the area covered by a conventional boom because of a wide swatch and the potential for greater boat speed due to a lesser effect of pitching and rolling on monitors than on booms. There were questions, however, about the uniformity of the dosage, the difference in the droplet size produced, and their effect on dispersant performance. Exxon conducted several test programs to more thoroughly evaluate fire monitors for dispersant application, and these programs are the subject of this paper. The first test program involved the testing of numerous nozzles with modifications and monitor elevation angles to determine what combination would give the most uniform dosage in the likely offshore wind conditions. Once a nozzle was selected, the droplet pattern from the monitoring nozzle and from a conventional dilute spray boom were analyzed using high speed video. These tests were followed by application tests of COREXIT 9527 by fire monitor, dilute boom, and neat boom to spilled oil at the Imperial Oil Limited Wave Basin in Calgary. The major content of this paper deals with the results of those tests. Finally, at-sea tests were successfully conducted in the North Sea.

  20. Inbreeding avoidance, patch isolation and matrix permeability influence dispersal and settlement choices by male agile antechinus in a fragmented landscape.

    PubMed

    Banks, Sam C; Lindenmayer, David B

    2014-03-01

    Animal dispersal is highly non-random and has important implications for the dynamics of populations in fragmented habitat. We identified interpatch dispersal events from genetic tagging, parentage analyses and assignment tests and modelled the factors associated with apparent emigration and post-dispersal settlement choices by individual male agile antechinus (Antechinus agilis, a marsupial carnivore of south-east Australian forests). Emigration decisions were best modelled with on data patch isolation and inbreeding risk. The choice of dispersal destination by males was influenced by inbreeding risk, female abundance, patch size, patch quality and matrix permeability (variation in land cover). Males were less likely to settle in patches without highly unrelated females. Our findings highlight the importance of individual-level dispersal data for understanding how multiple processes drive non-randomness in dispersal in modified landscapes. Fragmented landscapes present novel environmental, demographic and genetic contexts in which dispersal decisions are made, so the major factors affecting dispersal decisions in fragmented habitat may differ considerably from unfragmented landscapes. We show that the spatial scale of genetic neighbourhoods can be large in fragmented habitat, such that dispersing males can potentially settle in the presence of genetically similar females after moving considerable distances, thereby necessitating both a choice to emigrate and a choice of where to settle to avoid inbreeding.

  1. Dispersibility of crude oil in fresh water.

    PubMed

    Wrenn, B A; Virkus, A; Mukherjee, B; Venosa, A D

    2009-06-01

    The effects of surfactant composition on the ability of chemical dispersants to disperse crude oil in fresh water were investigated. The objective of this research was to determine whether effective fresh water dispersants can be designed in case this technology is ever considered for use in fresh water environments. Previous studies on the chemical dispersion of crude oil in fresh water neither identified the dispersants that were investigated nor described the chemistry of the surfactants used. This information is necessary for developing a more fundamental understanding of chemical dispersion of crude oil at low salinity. Therefore, we evaluated the relationship between surfactant chemistry and dispersion effectiveness. We found that dispersants can be designed to drive an oil slick into the freshwater column with the same efficiency as in salt water as long as the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance is optimum.

  2. Statistical Physics of Colloidal Dispersions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canessa, E.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis is concerned with the equilibrium statistical mechanics of colloidal dispersions which represent useful model systems for the study of condensed matter physics; namely, charge stabilized colloidal dispersions and polymer stabilized colloidal dispersions. A one-component macroparticle approach is adopted in order to treat the macroscopic and microscopic properties of these systems in a simple and comprehensive manner. The thesis opens with the description of the nature of the colloidal state before reviewing some basic definitions and theory in Chapter II. In Chapter III a variational theory of phase equilibria based on the Gibbs-Bogolyobov inequality is applied to sterically stabilized colloidal dispersions. Hard spheres are chosen as the reference system for the disordered phases while an Einstein model is used for the ordered phases. The new choice of pair potential, taken for mathematical convenience, is a superposition of two Yukawa functions. By matching a double Yukawa potential to the van der Waals attractive potential at different temperatures and introducing a purely temperature dependent coefficient to the repulsive part, a rich variety of observed phase separation phenomena is qualitatively described. The behaviour of the potential is found to be consistent with a small decrease of the polymer layer thickness with increasing temperature. Using the same concept of a collapse transition the non-monotonic second virial coefficient is also explained and quantified. It is shown that a reduction of the effective macroparticle diameter with increasing temperature can only be partially examined from the point of view of a (binary-) polymer solution theory. This chapter concludes with the description of the observed, reversible, depletion flocculation behaviour. This is accomplished by using the variational formalism and by invoking the double Yukawa potential to allow

  3. Interactive effects of disturbance and dispersal directionality on species richness and composition in metacommunities.

    PubMed

    Altermatt, Florian; Schreiber, Sebastian; Holyoak, Marcel

    2011-04-01

    Dispersal among ecological communities is usually assumed to be random in direction, or to vary in distance or frequency among species. However, a variety of natural systems and types of organisms may experience dispersal that is biased by directional currents or by gravity on hillslopes. We developed a general model for competing species in metacommunities to evaluate the role of directionally biased dispersal on species diversity, abundance, and traits. In parallel, we tested the role of directionally biased dispersal on communities in a microcosm experiment with protists and rotifers. Both the model and experiment independently demonstrated that diversity in local communities was reduced by directionally biased dispersal, especially dispersal that was biased away from disturbed patches. Abundance of species (and composition) in local communities was a product of disturbance intensity but not dispersal directionality. High disturbance selected for species with high intrinsic growth rates and low competitive abilities. Overall, our conclusions about the key role of dispersal directionality in (meta)communities seem robust and general, since they were supported both by the model, which was set in a general framework and not parameterized to fit to a specific system, and by a specific experimental test with microcosms.

  4. Stochastic differential equations and turbulent dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    Aspects of the theory of continuous stochastic processes that seem to contribute to an understanding of turbulent dispersion are introduced and the theory and philosophy of modelling turbulent transport is emphasized. Examples of eddy diffusion examined include shear dispersion, the surface layer, and channel flow. Modeling dispersion with finite-time scale is considered including the Langevin model for homogeneous turbulence, dispersion in nonhomogeneous turbulence, and the asymptotic behavior of the Langevin model for nonhomogeneous turbulence.

  5. On the generation of dispersive shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Peter D.

    2016-10-01

    We review various methods for the analysis of initial-value problems for integrable dispersive equations in the weak-dispersion or semiclassical regime. Some methods are sufficiently powerful to rigorously explain the generation of modulated wavetrains, so-called dispersive shock waves, as the result of shock formation in a limiting dispersionless system. They also provide a detailed description of the solution near caustic curves that delimit dispersive shock waves, revealing fascinating universal wave patterns.

  6. Shear dispersion in dense granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-04-18

    We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor–Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extension to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

  7. Passive advection-dispersion in networks of pipes: Effect of connectivity and relationship to permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabé, Y.; Wang, Y.; Qi, T.; Li, M.

    2016-02-01

    The main purpose of this work is to investigate the relationship between passive advection-dispersion and permeability in porous materials presumed to be statistically homogeneous at scales larger than the pore scale but smaller than the reservoir scale. We simulated fluid flow through pipe network realizations with different pipe radius distributions and different levels of connectivity. The flow simulations used periodic boundary conditions, allowing monitoring of the advective motion of solute particles in a large periodic array of identical network realizations. In order to simulate dispersion, we assumed that the solute particles obeyed Taylor dispersion in individual pipes. When a particle entered a pipe, a residence time consistent with local Taylor dispersion was randomly assigned to it. When exiting the pipe, the particle randomly proceeded into one of the pipes connected to the original one according to probabilities proportional to the outgoing volumetric flow in each pipe. For each simulation we tracked the motion of at least 6000 solute particles. The mean fluid velocity was 10-3 ms-1, and the distance traveled was on the order of 10 m. Macroscopic dispersion was quantified using the method of moments. Despite differences arising from using different types of lattices (simple cubic, body-centered cubic, and face-centered cubic), a number of general observations were made. Longitudinal dispersion was at least 1 order of magnitude greater than transverse dispersion, and both strongly increased with decreasing pore connectivity and/or pore size variability. In conditions of variable hydraulic radius and fixed pore connectivity and pore size variability, the simulated dispersivities increased as power laws of the hydraulic radius and, consequently, of permeability, in agreement with previously published experimental results. Based on these observations, we were able to resolve some of the complexity of the relationship between dispersivity and permeability.

  8. 40 CFR 110.4 - Dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dispersants. 110.4 Section 110.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS DISCHARGE OF OIL § 110.4 Dispersants. Addition of dispersants or emulsifiers to oil to be discharged that would circumvent...

  9. DISPERSIBILITY OF CRUDE OIL IN FRESH WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of surfactant composition on the ability of chemical dispersants to disperse crude oil in fresh water were investigated. The objective of this research was to determine whether effective fresh water dispersants can be designed in case this technology is ever consider...

  10. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H.; Tzou, Ming-Shin; Jiang, Hui-Jong

    1987-01-01

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  11. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

    1987-03-31

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  12. DISPERSION TOLERANCE CALCULATION FOR NSLS-II.

    SciTech Connect

    LIN,F.; GUO, W.

    2007-06-25

    In this paper we discuss the effect on the emittance of the residual dispersion in the insertion devices. The dispersion in the straights could be generated by the lattice error, trim dipole, and insertion device. The effect on the emittance is examined, and the dispersion tolerances are given for the NSLS-11.

  13. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725 Food... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  14. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  15. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  16. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  17. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in food-contact materials....

  18. 40 CFR 110.4 - Dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dispersants. 110.4 Section 110.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS DISCHARGE OF OIL § 110.4 Dispersants. Addition of dispersants or emulsifiers to oil to be discharged that would circumvent...

  19. 40 CFR 110.4 - Dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dispersants. 110.4 Section 110.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS DISCHARGE OF OIL § 110.4 Dispersants. Addition of dispersants or emulsifiers to oil to be discharged that would circumvent...

  20. 40 CFR 110.4 - Dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dispersants. 110.4 Section 110.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS DISCHARGE OF OIL § 110.4 Dispersants. Addition of dispersants or emulsifiers to oil to be discharged that would circumvent...

  1. 40 CFR 110.4 - Dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Dispersants. 110.4 Section 110.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS DISCHARGE OF OIL § 110.4 Dispersants. Addition of dispersants or emulsifiers to oil to be discharged that would circumvent...

  2. Mixed random walks with a trap in scale-free networks including nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor jumps.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongzhi; Dong, Yuze; Sheng, Yibin

    2015-10-01

    Random walks including non-nearest-neighbor jumps appear in many real situations such as the diffusion of adatoms and have found numerous applications including PageRank search algorithm; however, related theoretical results are much less for this dynamical process. In this paper, we present a study of mixed random walks in a family of fractal scale-free networks, where both nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor jumps are included. We focus on trapping problem in the network family, which is a particular case of random walks with a perfect trap fixed at the central high-degree node. We derive analytical expressions for the average trapping time (ATT), a quantitative indicator measuring the efficiency of the trapping process, by using two different methods, the results of which are consistent with each other. Furthermore, we analytically determine all the eigenvalues and their multiplicities for the fundamental matrix characterizing the dynamical process. Our results show that although next-nearest-neighbor jumps have no effect on the leading scaling of the trapping efficiency, they can strongly affect the prefactor of ATT, providing insight into better understanding of random-walk process in complex systems. PMID:26450286

  3. Pictures of blockscale transport: Effective versus ensemble dispersion and its uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, Felipe P. J.; Dentz, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Solute transport models tend to use coarse numerical grid blocks to alleviate computational costs. Aside from computational issues, the subsurface environment is usually characterized over a coarse measurement network where only large scale fluctuations of the flow field are captured. Neglecting the subscale velocity fluctuations in transport simulators can lead to erroneous predictions with consequences in risk analysis and remediation. For such reasons, upscaled dispersion coefficients in spatially heterogeneous flow fields must (1) account for the subscale variability that is filtered out by homogenization and (2) be modeled as a random function to incorporate the uncertainty associated with non-ergodic solute bodies. In this work, we examine the low order statistical properties of the blockscale dispersion tensor. The blockscale is defined as the scale upon which the spatially variable flow field is homogenized (e.g. the numerical grid block). Using a Lagrangian framework, we discuss different conceptualizations of the blockscale dispersion tensor. We distinguish effective and ensemble blockscale dispersion, which measure the impact of subscale velocity fluctuations on solute dispersion. Ensemble dispersion quantifies subscale velocity fluctuations between realizations, which overestimates the actual velocity variability. Effective dispersion on the other hand quantifies the actual blockscale velocity variability and thus reflects the impact of subscale velocity fluctuations on mixing and spreading. Based on these concepts, we quantify the impact of subscale velocity fluctuations on solute particle spreading and determine the governing equations for the coarse-grained concentration distributions. We develop analytical and semi-analytical expressions for the average and variance of the blockscale dispersion tensor in 3D flow fields as a function of the structural parameters characterizing the subsurface. Our results illustrate the relevance of the blockscale

  4. Dispersal and individual quality in a long lived species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cam, E.; Monnat, J.-Y.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The idea of differences in individual quality has been put forward in numerous long-term studies in long-lived species to explain differences in lifetime production among individuals. Despite the important role of individual heterogeneity in vital rates in demography, population dynamics and life history theory, the idea of 'individual quality' is elusive. It is sometimes assumed to be a static or dynamic individual characteristic. When considered as a dynamic trait, it is sometimes assumed to vary deterministically or stochastically, or to be confounded with the characteristics of the habitat. We addressed heterogeneity in reproductive performance among individuals established in higher-quality habitat in a long-lived seabird species. We used approaches to statistical inference based on individual random effects permitting quantification of heterogeneity in populations and assessment of individual variation from the population mean. We found evidence of heterogeneity in breeding probability, not success probability. We assessed the influence of dispersal on individual reproductive potential. Dispersal is likely to be destabilizing in species with high site and mate fidelity. We detected heterogeneity after dispersal, not before. Individuals may perform well regardless of quality before destabilization, including those that recruited in higher-quality habitat by chance, but only higher-quality individuals may be able to overcome the consequences of dispersal. Importantly, results differed when accounting for individual heterogeneity (an increase in mean breeding probability when individuals dispersed), or not (a decrease in mean breeding probability). In the latter case, the decrease in mean breeding probability may result from a substantial decrease in breeding probability in a few individuals and a slight increase in others. In other words, the pattern observed at the population mean level may not reflect what happens in the majority of individuals.

  5. Dispersive interactions in solution complexes.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Hans-Jörg

    2015-07-21

    Dispersive interactions are known to play a major role in molecular associations in the gas phase and in the solid state. In solution, however, their significance has been disputed in recent years on the basis of several arguments. A major problem until now has been the separation of dispersive and hydrophobic effects, which are both maximized in water due the low polarizability of this most important medium. Analyses of complexes between porphyrins and systematically varied substrates in water have allowed us to discriminate dispersive from hydrophobic effects, as the latter turned out to be negligible for complexations with flat surfaces such as porphyrins. Also, for the first time, it has become possible to obtain binding free energy increments ΔΔG for a multitude of organic residues including halogen, amide, amino, ether, carbonyl, ester, nitro, sulfur, unsatured, and cyclopropane groups, which turned out to be additive. Binding contributions for saturated residues are unmeasurably small, with ΔΔG > 1 kJ/mol, but they increase to, e.g., ΔΔG = 5 kJ/mol for a nitro group, a value not far from, e.g., that of a stacking pyridine ring. Stacking interactions of heteroarenes with porphyrins depend essentially on the size of the arenes, in line with polarizabilities, and seem to be rather independent of the position of nitrogen within the rings. Measurements of halogen derivatives indicate that complexes with porphyrins, cyclodextrins, and pillarenes as hosts in different media consistently show increasing stability from fluorine to iodine as the substituent. This, and the observed sequence with other substrates, is in line with the expected increase in dispersive forces with increasing polarizability. Induced dipoles, which also would increase with polarizability, can be ruled out as providing the driving source in view of the data with halides: the observed stability sequence is opposite the change of electronegativity from fluorine to iodine. The same holds

  6. Dispersion forces between solvated electrons.

    PubMed

    Chuev, Gennady N

    2010-04-14

    Using the path integral centroid approach, we investigate dispersion interactions between electrons solvated in metal-ammonia solutions. We have argued that at finite metal concentrations, the behavior of the solvated electrons is controlled by these interactions. The latter result in a peculiar nonmetal-metal transition, which appears as a sharp dielectric enhancement and a mechanical instability of the system. Our results indicate also that the solvated electrons are to be considered as a two-component mixture consisting of localized and delocalized electrons beyond the critical density corresponding to this mechanical instability.

  7. Dispersive nanoSQUID magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenson-Falk, E. M.; Antler, N.; Siddiqi, I.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the theory and implementation of a dispersive magnetometer based on an aluminum nanoSQUID. The nanoSQUID consists of a superconducting loop interrupted by two variable-thickness weak-link nanobridge Josephson junctions. When the nanoSQUID is placed in parallel with a lumped-element capacitor, it acts as the inductive element in a resonant tank circuit. By performing microwave reflectometry on the circuit, the SQUID inductance can be measured, providing a sensitive meter of the flux threading the SQUID loop. In this review we provide the theoretical basis for the device, describe design and operation considerations, and present characterization results on several devices.

  8. Ubiquitous dispersal of microbial species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, Bland J.; Clarke, Ken J.

    1999-08-01

    The biosphere supports astronomical numbers of free-living microorganisms that belong to an indeterminate number of species. One view is that the abundance of microorganisms drives their dispersal, making them ubiquitous and resulting in a moderate global richness of species. But ubiquity is hard to demonstrate, not only because active species have a rapid turnover, but also because most species in a habitat at any moment in time are relatively rare or in some cryptic state. Here we use microbes that leave traces of their recent population growth in the form of siliceous scale structures to show that all species in the chrysomonad flagellate genus Paraphysomonas are probably ubiquitous.

  9. Optical fiber dispersion characterization study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geeslin, A.; Arriad, A.; Riad, S. M.; Padgett, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    The theory, design, and results of optical fiber pulse dispersion measurements are considered. Both the hardware and software required to perform this type of measurement are described. Hardware includes a thermoelectrically cooled injection laser diode source, an 800 GHz gain bandwidth produce avalanche photodiode and an input mode scrambler. Software for a HP 9825 computer includes fast Fourier transform, inverse Fourier transform, and optimal compensation deconvolution. Test set construction details are also included. Test results include data collected on a 1 Km fiber, a 4 Km fiber, a fused spliced, eight 600 meter length fibers concatenated to form 4.8 Km, and up to nine optical connectors.

  10. Dispersion analysis for baseline reference mission 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, L. S.

    1975-01-01

    A dispersion analysis considering uncertainties (or perturbations) in platform, vehicle, and environmental parameters was performed for baseline reference mission (BRM) 2. The dispersion analysis is based on the nominal trajectory for BRM 2. The analysis was performed to determine state vector and performance dispersions (or variations) which result from the indicated uncertainties. The dispersions are determined at major mission events and fixed times from liftoff (time slices). The dispersion results will be used to evaluate the capability of the vehicle to perform the mission within a specified level of confidence and to determine flight performance reserves.

  11. Random quantum operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzda, Wojciech; Cappellini, Valerio; Sommers, Hans-Jürgen; Życzkowski, Karol

    2009-01-01

    We define a natural ensemble of trace preserving, completely positive quantum maps and present algorithms to generate them at random. Spectral properties of the superoperator Φ associated with a given quantum map are investigated and a quantum analogue of the Frobenius-Perron theorem is proved. We derive a general formula for the density of eigenvalues of Φ and show the connection with the Ginibre ensemble of real non-symmetric random matrices. Numerical investigations of the spectral gap imply that a generic state of the system iterated several times by a fixed generic map converges exponentially to an invariant state.

  12. Random walks on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Isaac

    Random walks on lattices are a well used model for diffusion on continuum. They have been to model subdiffusive systems, systems with forcing and reactions as well as a combination of the three. We extend the traditional random walk framework to the network to obtain novel results. As an example due to the small graph diameter, the early time behaviour of subdiffusive dynamics dominates the observed system which has implications for models of the brain or airline networks. I would like to thank the Australian American Fulbright Association.

  13. Enhanced stability of dispersion-managed mode-locked fiber lasers with near-zero net cavity dispersion by high-contrast saturable absorbers.

    PubMed

    Liu, H H; Chow, K K

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the stability of dispersion-managed mode-locked fiber lasers using carbon-nanotube-based saturable absorbers (SAs) with different modulation depths. An unstable operation region of the mode-locked fiber laser with near-zero net cavity dispersion is observed, where the laser produces random pulse burst rather than stable pulse train. Through the implementation of high-contrast SAs in the laser, the unstable region is found to be shrunk by ~31.3% when the modulation depth of the SAs increases from 6.4% to 12.5%. The numerical simulation is consistent with the experimental observation.

  14. QT dispersion in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Unubol, Mustafa; Eryilmaz, Ufuk; Guney, Engin; Ture, Mevlut; Akgullu, Cagdas

    2013-04-01

    Acromegaly is a rare condition caused by a pituitary adenoma that secretes growth hormone. The mortality rate is 72 % higher in patients with acromegaly than in the general population according to meta-analyses. Mortality analysis has shown as many as 60 % of acromegalic patients die due to cardiovascular disease. Sudden cardiac death may occur in patients with acromegaly and malignant ventricular arrhythmia may play an important role in this fatal complication; however, the precise mechanism is not fully known. QT dispersion (dQT) is an electrophysiological factor known to be associated with a tendency for ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. This study aimed to evaluate dQT as an early predictor of ventricular tachyarrhythmia, as sudden cardiac death commonly occurs in acromegalic patients. This cross-sectional case-control study enrolled 20 patients (10 female and 10 male) with acromegaly and 20 healthy controls (11 female and 9 male) after exclusion criteria were applied. Each participant underwent 12-lead electrocardiography, including ≥3 QRS complexes, at a speed of 25 mm/s after a 15-min rest. In each participant, the QT interval (beginning of the Q wave to the end of the T wave) was corrected (QTc) for heart rate using Bazett's formula [Formula: see text] QTc dispersion (dQTc) (QTc max - QTc min) was also calculated. There was no significant difference in median dQTc between the acromegalic patients (0.79 s) and the controls (0.45 s) (p > 0.05). Active acromegalic patients (n = 14) were estimated to have a median dQTc of 0.82 s, after excluding from the analysis six patients that were under full biochemical control, and that had randomly obtained growth hormone levels <0.4 ng/mL, GH <1 ng/mL based on oral glucose tolerance test, and normal IGF-I for age and gender. A significant difference was noted in median dQTc between the active acromegalic patients and the controls (p = 0.015). The dQT in active acromegalic patients was

  15. Random lasing in a colloidal quantum dot-doped disordered polymer.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mingxuan; Zhang, Yating; Song, Xiaoxian; Che, Yongli; Zhang, Haiting; Dai, Haitao; Zhang, Guizhong; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-05-01

    We report random lasing in colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) doped disordered polymer. The CdSe/ZnS core-shell CQDs are dispersed in hybrid polymer including two types of monomers with different rates of polymerization. After UV curing, spatially localized random resonators are formed owing to long range refractive-index fluctuations in inhomogeneous polymer with gain. Upon the optical excitation, random lasing action is triggered above the threshold of 7mJ/cm2. Through the investigation on the spectral characteristics of random laser, the wavelengths of random lasers strongly depend on pump position, which confirms that random laser modes originate from spatially localized resnonators. According to power Fourier transform of emission spectrum, the average size of equivalent micro resonators is attributed to be 50 μm. The proposed method provides a facile route to develop random lasers based on CQDs, showing potential applications on random fiber laser and laser displays. PMID:27137548

  16. Dispersivity in heterogeneous permeable media

    SciTech Connect

    Chesnut, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    When one fluid displaces another through a one-dimensional porous medium, the composition changes from pure displacing fluid at the inlet to pure displaced fluid some distance downstream. The distance over which an arbitrary percentage of this change occurs is defined as the mixing zone length, which increases with increasing average distance traveled by the displacement front. For continuous injection, the mixing zone size can be determined from a breakthrough curve as the time required for the effluent displacing fluid concentration to change from, say, 10% to 90%. In classical dispersion theory, the mixing zone grows in proportion to the square root of the mean distance traveled, or, equivalently, to the square root of the mean breakthrough time. In a multi-dimensional heterogeneous medium, especially at field scales, the size of the mixing zone grows almost linearly with mean distance or travel time. If an observed breakthrough curve is forced to fit the, clinical theory, the resulting effective dispersivity, instead of being constant, also increases almost linearly with the spatial or temporal scale of the problem. This occurs because the heterogeneity in flow properties creates a corresponding velocity distribution along the different flow pathways from the inlet to the outlet of the system. Mixing occurs mostly at the outlet, or wherever the fluid is sampled, rather than within the medium. In this paper, we consider the effects. of this behavior on radionuclide or other contaminant migration.

  17. Disk Dispersal Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David

    2004-01-01

    We first review the evidence pertaining to the lifetimes of planet-forming disks of gas and dust around young stars and discuss possible disk dispersal mechanisms: 1) viscous accretion of material onto the central source, 2) close stellar encounters, 3) stellar winds, and 4) photoevaporation caused by the heating of the disk surface by ultraviolet radiation. Photoevaporation is likely the most important dispersal mechanism for the outer regions of disks, and this talk focuses on the evaporation caused by the presence of a nearby, luminous star rather than the central star itself. We also focus on disks around low-mass stars like the Sun rather than high-mass stars, which we have treated previously. Stars often form in clusters and the ultraviolet flux from the most luminous star in the cluster can have a dramatic effect on the disk orbiting a nearby low-mass star. We apply our theoretical models to the evaporating protoplanetary disks (or "proplyds") in the Trapezium cluster in Orion, to the formation of gas giant planets like Jupiter around Sun-like stars in the Galaxy, and to the formation of Kuiper belts around low mass stars. We find a possible explanation for the differences between Neptune and Jupiter, and make a prediction concerning recent searches for giant planets in large clusters. We discuss recent models of the infrared spectra from gaseous disks around young stars.

  18. Natural patterns of energy dispersal.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Teemu; Annila, Arto

    2010-12-01

    Universal patterns such as power-law dependences, skewed distributions, tree-like structures, networks and spirals are associated with energy dispersal processes using the principle of least action. Also ubiquitous temporal courses such as sigmoid growth, bifurcations and chaos are ascribed to the decrease of free energy in the least time. Moreover, emergence of natural standards such as the common genetic code and chirality consensus of amino acids are understood to follow from the quest to maximize the dispersal of energy. Many mathematical functions that model natural patterns and processes are found as approximations of the evolutionary equation of motion that has been derived from statistical physics of open systems. The evolutionary processes can be described as flows of energy that run from high energy sources to low energy sinks in the least time. However, the equation of evolution cannot be solved in general because the flows of energy and their driving forces are inseparable. Since the energy of the system keeps changing, the paths of evolution cannot be integrated from a given initial state to a final state. Although evolutionary courses of these non-Hamiltonian systems with two or more alternative ways of dissipation cannot be predicted, the flows of energy will search and naturally select paths of least action, known as geodesics, to consume free energy in the least time. The scale-invariant natural patterns follow from this natural law that impinges on processes at all scales of space and time.

  19. Emission Properties from ZnO Quantum Dots Dispersed in SiO{sub 2} Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Panigrahi, Shrabani; Basak, Durga

    2011-07-15

    Dispersion of ZnO quantum dots in SiO{sub 2} matrix has been achieved in two techniques based on StOeber method to form ZnO QDs-SiO{sub 2} nanocomposites. Sample A is formed with random dispersion by adding tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) to an ethanolic solution of ZnO nanoparticles and sample B is formed with a chain-like ordered dispersion by adding ZnO nanoparticles to an already hydrolyzed ethanolic TEOS solution. The photoluminescence spectra of the as-grown nanocomposites show strong emission in the ultraviolet region. When annealed at higher temperature, depending on the sample type, these show strong red or white emission. Interestingly, when the excitation is removed, the orderly dispersed ZnO QDs-SiO{sub 2} composite shows a very bright blue fluorescence visible by naked eyes for few seconds indicating their promise for display applications.

  20. Randomness Of Amoeba Movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiguchi, S.; Khadijah, Siti; Kuwajima, T.; Ohki, M.; Tacano, M.; Sikula, J.

    2005-11-01

    Movements of amoebas were automatically traced using the difference between two successive frames of the microscopic movie. It was observed that the movements were almost random in that the directions and the magnitudes of the successive two steps are not correlated, and that the distance from the origin was proportional to the square root of the step number.

  1. Random lasers ensnared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonetti, Marco; López, Cefe

    2012-06-01

    A random laser is formed by a haphazard assembly of nondescript optical scatters with optical gain. Multiple light scattering replaces the optical cavity of traditional lasers and the interplay between gain, scattering and size determines its unique properties. Random lasers studied till recently, consisted of irregularly shaped or polydisperse scatters, with some average scattering strength constant across the gain frequency band. Photonic glasses can sustain scattering resonances that can be placed in the gain window, since they are formed by monodisperse spheres [1]. The unique resonant scattering of this novel material allows controlling the lasing color via the diameter of the particles and their refractive index. Thus a random laser with a priori set lasing peak can be designed [2]. A special pumping scheme that enables to select the number of activated modes in a random laser permits to prepare RLs in two distinct regimes by controlling directionality through the shape of the pump [3]. When pumping is essentially unidirectional, few (barely interacting) modes are turned on that show as sharp, uncorrelated peaks in the spectrum. By increasing angular span of the pump beams, many resonances intervene generating a smooth emission spectrum with a high degree of correlation, and shorter lifetime. These are signs of a phaselocking transition, in which phases are clamped together so that modes oscillate synchronously.

  2. Generating "Random" Integers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Martin

    2011-01-01

    One of the author's undergraduate students recently asked him whether it was possible to generate a random positive integer. After some thought, the author realised that there were plenty of interesting mathematical ideas inherent in her question. So much so in fact, that the author decided to organise a workshop, open both to undergraduates and…

  3. Contouring randomly spaced data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibler, J. F.; Morris, W. D.; Hamm, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Computer program using triangulation contouring technique contours data points too numerous to fit into rectangular grid. Using random access procedures, program can handle up to 56,000 data points and provides up to 20 contour intervals for multiple number of parameters.

  4. Uniform random number generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    Methods are presented for the generation of random numbers with uniform and normal distributions. Subprogram listings of Fortran generators for the Univac 1108, SDS 930, and CDC 3200 digital computers are also included. The generators are of the mixed multiplicative type, and the mathematical method employed is that of Marsaglia and Bray.

  5. Randomization and sampling issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    The need for randomly selected routes and other sampling issues have been debated by the Amphibian electronic discussion group. Many excellent comments have been made, pro and con, but we have not reached consensus yet. This paper brings those comments together and attempts a synthesis. I hope that the resulting discussion will bring us closer to a consensus.

  6. On Random Numbers and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Ari, Morechai

    2004-01-01

    The term "random" is frequently used in discussion of the theory of evolution, even though the mathematical concept of randomness is problematic and of little relevance in the theory. Therefore, since the core concept of the theory of evolution is the non-random process of natural selection, the term random should not be used in teaching the…

  7. Filtering effect of wind flow turbulence on atmospheric pollutant dispersion.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Mohamed F

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a model for coupling the statistics of wind velocity distribution and atmospheric pollutant dispersion. The effect of wind velocity distribution is modeled as a three-dimensional finite-impulse response (3D-FIR) filter. A phase space representation of the 3D-FIR filter window is discussed. The resulting pollutant dispersion is the multiplication in the phase space of the 3-D Fourier transform of the pollutant concentration and the volume described by the filter window coefficients. The shape of the filter window in the phase space enables representing such effects as vortex shedding thermal currents, etc. The impact of spatial distribution of the sensors on the resulting pollutant spatial distribution and the 3-D FIR filter model employed also discuss. The case of a neutrally buoyant plume emitted from an elevated point source in a turbulent boundary layer considers. The results show that wind turbulence is an important factor in the pollutant dispersion and introduces expected random fluctuations in pollutant distribution and leads to spreading the distribution due to wind mixing.

  8. Random geometric graph description of connectedness percolation in rod systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Avik P.; Grimaldi, Claudio

    2015-09-01

    The problem of continuum percolation in dispersions of rods is reformulated in terms of weighted random geometric graphs. Nodes (or sites or vertices) in the graph represent spatial locations occupied by the centers of the rods. The probability that an edge (or link) connects any randomly selected pair of nodes depends upon the rod volume fraction as well as the distribution over their sizes and shapes, and also upon quantities that characterize their state of dispersion (such as the orientational distribution function). We employ the observation that contributions from closed loops of connected rods are negligible in the limit of large aspect ratios to obtain percolation thresholds that are fully equivalent to those calculated within the second-virial approximation of the connectedness Ornstein-Zernike equation. Our formulation can account for effects due to interactions between the rods, and many-body features can be partially addressed by suitable choices for the edge probabilities.

  9. Modeling the dispersion in electromechanically coupled myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Thomas S. E.; Prassl, Anton J.; Plank, Gernot; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We present an approach to model the dispersion of fiber and sheet orientations in the myocardium. By utilizing structure parameters, an existing orthotropic and invariant-based constitutive model developed to describe the passive behavior of the myocardium is augmented. Two dispersion parameters are fitted to experimentally observed angular dispersion data of the myocardial tissue. Computations are performed on a unit myocardium tissue cube and on a slice of the left ventricle indicating that the dispersion parameter has an effect on the myocardial deformation and stress development. The use of fiber dispersions relating to a pathological myocardium had a rather big effect. The final example represents an ellipsoidal model of the left ventricle indicating the influence of fiber and sheet dispersions upon contraction over a cardiac cycle. Although only a minor shift in the pressure–volume (PV) loops between the cases with no dispersions and with fiber and sheet dispersions for a healthy myocardium was observed, a remarkably different behavior is obtained with a fiber dispersion relating to a diseased myocardium. In future simulations, this dispersion model for myocardial tissue may advantageously be used together with models of, for example, growth and remodeling of various cardiac diseases. PMID:23868817

  10. Renormalized dispersion relations of β-Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chains in equilibrium and nonequilibrium states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shi-xiao W.; Lu, Hai-hao; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David

    2014-09-01

    We study the nonlinear dispersive characteristics in β-Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) chains in both thermal equilibrium and nonequilibrium steady state. By applying a multiple scale analysis to the FPU chain, we analyze the contribution of the trivial and nontrivial resonance to the renormalization of the dispersion relation. Our results show that the contribution of the nontrivial resonance remains significant to the renormalization, in particular, in strongly nonlinear regimes. We contrast our results with the dispersion relations obtained from the Zwanzig-Mori formalism and random phase approximation to further illustrate the role of resonances. Surprisingly, these theoretical dispersion relations can be generalized to describe dispersive characteristics well at the nonequilibrium steady state of the FPU chain with driving-damping in real space. Through numerical simulation, we confirm that the theoretical renormalized dispersion relations are valid for a wide range of nonlinearities in thermal equilibrium as well as in nonequilibrium steady state. We further show that the dispersive characteristics persist in nonequilibrium steady state driven-damped in Fourier space.

  11. Topography-specific seed dispersal by Japanese macaques in a lowland forest on Yakushima Island, Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Riyou; Yumoto, Takakazu

    2009-01-01

    1. We investigated patterns of seed dispersal (i.e. dispersal distances and topography of seed-deposition sites) via the cheek pouches of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata yakui) during three seasons in a lowland forest on Yakushima Island, Japan. 2. The mean seed-dispersal distances were 16.7, 26.1, 41.8, and 32.4 m from the trunks of mother trees of Myrica rubra, Persea thunbergii, Neolitsea sericea, and Litsea acuminata, respectively. 3. We assessed the possible effect of macaque foraging patterns and the spatial distribution of fruiting trees on topography-specific seed dispersal. The topography of the locations of macaques differed across seasons, likely because the spatial distribution of fruiting trees determined the seasonal foraging patterns of macaques. 4. In early summer, macaques foraged on a ridge and fed on fruits of M. rubra and P. thunbergii, which were primarily distributed and dispersed within this area. In contrast, during the winter, macaques foraged within a valley and fed on fruits of L. acuminata, which were chiefly distributed and dispersed within the valley. 5. Seeds of M. rubra, P. thunbergii, and L. acuminata were directly dispersed to the specific topographic areas in which adult trees were distributed and in which juveniles have a predictably high probability of survival relative to random sites.

  12. A single expression for solute and heat dispersion in homogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Milligen, Boudewijn Ph.; Bons, Paul D.

    2014-05-01

    A variety of expressions have been proposed for dispersion in homogeneous porous media. These expressions are either for heat (thermal) or solute dispersion, and often only valid for a limited range of flow rates, typically expressed in terms of the Péclet number. We present a single, universal expression for both the heat and solute dispersion coefficient (both transverse and longitudinal) in homogeneous porous media, valid over a wide range of Péclet numbers as long as flow is laminar. The expression covers the complex intermediate regime between diffusion and advection controlled dispersion, where dispersion increases non-linearly with flow velocity. Using numerical simulations of pore channel networks, we show that that the intermediate regime can be regarded as a phase transition between random, diffusive transport at low flow velocity and ordered transport controlled by the geometry of the pore space at high flow velocities. This phase transition explains the first-order behavior in the intermediate regime. A new quantifier, the ratio of the amount of solute in dominantly advective versus dominantly diffusive pore channels, plays the role of "order parameter" of this phase transition. Bons, P.D., van Milligen, B.P., Blum, P. 2013. A general unified expression for solute and heat dispersion in homegeneous porous media. Water Resources Research 49, 1-13. van Milligen, B.Ph., Bons, P.D. 2012. Analytical model for tracer dispersion in porous media. Physical Review E 85.

  13. Personality traits and dispersal tendency in the invasive mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis)

    PubMed Central

    Cote, Julien; Fogarty, Sean; Weinersmith, Kelly; Brodin, Tomas; Sih, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Ecological invasions, where non-native species spread to new areas, grow to high densities and have large, negative impacts on ecological communities, are a major worldwide problem. Recent studies suggest that one of the key mechanisms influencing invasion dynamics is personality-dependent dispersal: the tendency for dispersers to have a different personality type than the average from a source population. We examined this possibility in the invasive mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis). We measured individual tendencies to disperse in experimental streams and several personality traits: sociability, boldness, activity and exploration tendency before and three weeks after dispersal. We found that mosquitofish display consistent behavioural tendencies over time, and significant positive correlations between all personality traits. Most notably, sociability was an important indicator of dispersal distance, with more asocial individuals dispersing further, suggesting personality-biased dispersal on an invasion front. These results could have important ecological implications, as invasion by a biased subset of individuals is likely to have different ecological impacts than invasion by a random group of colonists. PMID:20071380

  14. EDITORIAL: Colloidal dispersions in external fields Colloidal dispersions in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    Colloidal dispersions have long been proven as pivotal model systems for equilibrium phase transition such as crystallization, melting and liquid-gas phase transition. The last decades have revealed that this is also true for nonequilibrium phenomena. In fact, the fascinating possibility to track the individual trajectories of colloidal particles has greatly advanced our understanding of collective behaviour in classical many-body systems and has helped to reveal the underlying physical principles of glass transition, crystal nucleation, and interfacial dynamics (to name just a few typical nonequilibrium effects). External fields can be used to bring colloids out of equilibrium in a controlled way. Different kinds of external fields can be applied to colloidal dispersions, namely shear flow, electric, magnetic and laser-optical fields, and confinement. Typical research areas can be sketched with the by now traditional complexity diagram (figure 1). The complexity of the colloidal system itself as embodied in statistical degrees of freedom is shown on the x-axis while the complexity of the problem posed, namely bulk, an inhomogeneity in equilibrium, steady state nonequilibrium and full time-dependent nonequilibrium are shown on the y-axis. The different external fields which can be imposed are indicated by the different hatched areas. figure1 Figure 1. Diagram of complexity for colloidal dispersions in external fields: while the x-axis shows the complexity of the system, the y-axis shows the complexity of the problem. Regions which can be accessed by different kinds of external fields are indicated. The arrows indicate recent research directions. Active particles are also indicated with a special complexity of internal degrees of freedom [1]. This collection of papers reflects the scientific programme of the International Conference on Colloidal Dispersions in External Fields III (CODEF III) which took place in Bonn-Bad Godesberg from 20-23 March 2012. This was the

  15. Uncertainty in Dispersion Forecasting Using Meteorological Ensembles

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, M J; Chin, H-N

    2000-03-23

    A approach for quantifying meteorological uncertainty is via development of an ensemble of forecasts from slightly perturbed initial conditions (Sivillo et al., 1997) to predict the time evolution of the probability density function of atmospheric variables (Mullen and Baurnhefner, 1994). We create an ensemble of forecasts by varying the initial (and boundary) conditions for the COAMPS meteorological model. The variations in the initial conditions must be consistent with analysis error. Optimally, the range of initial conditions would encompass the ''true'' atmospheric state, but which is never actually known. Our method for creating varying initial conditions is to use different global data sets to derive the necessary data. We use two models from the National Weather Service (the AVN and ETA models) and one from the Navy (the NOGAPS model). In addition to those data sets we perturb the data from those models, using a normally distributed random number at each grid point in the COAMPS model. We perturb the (u,v) wind components, the temperature and the moisture. The size of the perturbation is determined by the variability within that variable field. The forecasts are run for 48 hours. We then use the output from the COAMPS model to drive a Lagrangian dispersion model (LODI) for simulated releases. The results from a simulated release from hour 33 are shown in Figure 1. The center of the domain is Oakland airport and the basic on-shore wind is from the southwest. In three of the simulations, the plume goes over the top of the hills to the northeast, and in the other three the plume hugs the coastline and goes around those hills The two solutions reflect a dependence on the Froude number, a ratio of the Kinetic energy to Potential energy. Higher Kinetic energy flow (Higher Froude number) flow goes over the top of the mountain, while lower Kinetic energy flow goes around the hills.

  16. The NET effect of dispersants - a critical review of testing and modelling of surface oil dispersion.

    PubMed

    Zeinstra-Helfrich, Marieke; Koops, Wierd; Murk, Albertinka J

    2015-11-15

    Application of chemical dispersants or mechanical dispersion on surface oil is a trade-off between surface effects (impact of floating oil) and sub-surface effects (impact of suspended oil). Making an informed decision regarding such response, requires insight in the induced change in fate and transport of the oil. We aim to identify how natural, chemical and mechanical dispersion could be quantified in oil spill models. For each step in the dispersion process, we review available experimental data in order to identify overall trends and propose an algorithm or calculation method. Additionally, the conditions for successful mechanical and chemical dispersion are defined. Two commonly identified key parameters in surface oil dispersion are: oil properties (viscosity and presence of dispersants) and mixing energy (often wind speed). Strikingly, these parameters play a different role in several of the dispersion sub-processes. This may explain difficulties in simply relating overall dispersion effectiveness to the individual parameters. PMID:26412415

  17. The NET effect of dispersants - a critical review of testing and modelling of surface oil dispersion.

    PubMed

    Zeinstra-Helfrich, Marieke; Koops, Wierd; Murk, Albertinka J

    2015-11-15

    Application of chemical dispersants or mechanical dispersion on surface oil is a trade-off between surface effects (impact of floating oil) and sub-surface effects (impact of suspended oil). Making an informed decision regarding such response, requires insight in the induced change in fate and transport of the oil. We aim to identify how natural, chemical and mechanical dispersion could be quantified in oil spill models. For each step in the dispersion process, we review available experimental data in order to identify overall trends and propose an algorithm or calculation method. Additionally, the conditions for successful mechanical and chemical dispersion are defined. Two commonly identified key parameters in surface oil dispersion are: oil properties (viscosity and presence of dispersants) and mixing energy (often wind speed). Strikingly, these parameters play a different role in several of the dispersion sub-processes. This may explain difficulties in simply relating overall dispersion effectiveness to the individual parameters.

  18. Post-crash fuel dispersal

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.

    1997-03-01

    This paper is a brief overview of work over the last several decades in understanding what occurs to jet fuel stored in aircraft fuel tanks on impact with the ground. Fuel dispersal is discussed in terms of the overall crash dynamics process and impact regimes are identified. In a generic sense, the types of flow regimes which can occur are identified and general descriptions of the processes are given. Examples of engineering level tools, both computational and experimental, which have applicability to analyzing the complex environments are presented. Finally, risk based decision is discussed as a quick means of identifying requirements for development of preventative or mitigation strategies, such as further work on the development of an anti-misting agent.

  19. Engineering biofilm formation and dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Thomas K.; Hong, Seok Hoon; Ma, Qun

    2011-01-01

    Anywhere water is in the liquid state, bacteria will exist as biofilms, which are complex communities of cells cemented together. Although frequently associated with disease and biofouling, biofilms are also important for engineering applications, such as bioremediation, biocatalysis and microbial fuel cells. Here we review approaches to alter genetic circuits and cell signaling toward controlling biofilm formation, and emphasize utilizing these tools for engineering applications. Based on a better understanding of the genetic basis of biofilm formation, we find that biofilms may be controlled by manipulating extracellular signals and that they may be dispersed using conserved intracellular signals and regulators. Biofilms could also be formed at specific locations where they might be engineered to make chemicals or treat human disease. PMID:21131080

  20. Dual-Materials Dispersion Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Experiments to seek solutions for a range of biomedical issues are at the heart of several investigations that will be hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates (ITA), Inc. Biomedical Experiments (CIBX-2) payload. CIBX-2 is unique, encompassing more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments, and student hands-on experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the Stars program. This drawing depicts a cross-section of a set of Dual-Materials Dispersion Apparatus (DMDA) specimen wells, one of which can include a reverse osmosis membrane to dewater a protein solution and thus cause crystallization. Depending on individual needs, two or three wells may be used, the membrane may be absent, or other proprietary enhancements may be present. The experiments are sponsored by NASA's Space Product Development Program (SPD).

  1. Pollen Forecast and Dispersion Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Monica; Di Giuseppe, Fabio; Medaglia, Carlo Maria; Travaglini, Alessandro; Tocci, Raffaella; Brighetti, M. Antonia; Petitta, Marcello

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is monitoring, mapping and forecast of pollen distribution for the city of Rome using in-situ measurements of 10 species of common allergenic pollens and measurements of PM10. The production of daily concentration maps, associated to a mobile phone app, are innovative compared to existing dedicated services to people who suffer from respiratory allergies. The dispersal pollen is one of the most well-known causes of allergic disease that is manifested by disorders of the respiratory functions. Allergies are the third leading cause of chronic disease and it is estimated that tens millions of people in Italy suffer from it. Recent works reveal that during the last few years there was a progressive increase of affected subjects, especially in urban areas. This situation may depend: on the ability to transport of pollutants, on the ability to react between pollutants and pollen and from a combination of other irritants, existing in densely populated and polluted urban areas. The methodology used to produce maps is based on in-situ measurements time series relative to 2012, obtained from networks of air quality and pollen stations in the metropolitan area of Rome. The monitoring station aerobiological of University of Rome "Tor Vergata" is located at the Department of Biology. The instrument used to pollen monitoring is a volumetric sampler type Hirst (Hirst 1952), Model 2000 VPPS Lanzoni; the data acquisition is carried out as reported in Standard UNI 11008:2004 - "Qualità dell'aria - Metodo di campionamento e conteggio dei granuli pollinici e delle spore fungine aerodisperse" - the protocol that describes the procedure for measuring of the concentration of pollen grains and fungal spores dispersed into the atmosphere, and reported in the "Manuale di gestione e qualità della R.I.M.A" (Travaglini et. al. 2009). All 10 allergenic pollen are monitored since 1996. At Tor Vergata university is also operating a meteorological station (SP2000, CAE

  2. Do Ag{sub n} (up to n = 8) clusters retain their identity on graphite? Insights from first-principles calculations including dispersion interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Akansha; Sen, Prasenjit; Majumder, Chiranjib

    2014-04-28

    Adsorption of pre-formed Ag{sub n} clusters for n = 1 − 8 on a graphite substrate is studied within the density functional theory employing the vdW-DF2 functional to treat dispersion interactions. Top sites above surface layer carbon atoms turn out to be most favorable for a Ag adatom, in agreement with experimental observations. The same feature is observed for clusters of almost all sizes which have the lowest energies when the Ag atoms are positioned over top sites. Most gas phase isomers retain their structures over the substrate, though a couple of them undergo significant distortions. Energetics of the adsorption can be understood in terms of a competition between energy cost of disturbing Ag–Ag bonds in the cluster and energy gain from Ag–C interactions at the surface. Ag{sub 3} turns out to be an exceptional candidate in this regard that undergoes significant structural distortion and has only two of the Ag atoms close to surface C atoms in its lowest energy structure.

  3. The remarkable activity and stability of a highly dispersive beta-brass Cu-Zn catalyst for the production of ethylene glycol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Molly Meng-Jung; Zheng, Jianwei; Qu, Jin; Liao, Fenglin; Raine, Elizabeth; Kuo, Winson C. H.; Su, Shei Sia; Po, Pang; Yuan, Youzhu; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2016-02-01

    Incorporation of Zn atoms into a nanosize Cu lattice is known to alter the electronic properties of Cu, improving catalytic performance in a number of industrially important reactions. However the structural influence of Zn on the Cu phase is not well studied. Here, we show that Cu nano-clusters modified with increasing concentration of Zn, derived from ZnO support doped with Ga3+, can dramatically enhance their stability against metal sintering. As a result, the hydrogenation of dimethyl oxalate (DMO) to ethylene glycol, an important reaction well known for deactivation from copper nanoparticle sintering, can show greatly enhanced activity and stability with the CuZn alloy catalysts due to no noticeable sintering. HRTEM, nano-diffraction and EXAFS characterization reveal the presence of a small beta-brass CuZn alloy phase (body-centred cubic, bcc) which appears to greatly stabilise Cu atoms from aggregation in accelerated deactivation tests. DFT calculations also indicate that the small bcc CuZn phase is more stable against Cu adatom migration than the fcc CuZn phase with the ability to maintain a higher Cu dispersion on its surface.

  4. The remarkable activity and stability of a highly dispersive beta-brass Cu-Zn catalyst for the production of ethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Li, Molly Meng-Jung; Zheng, Jianwei; Qu, Jin; Liao, Fenglin; Raine, Elizabeth; Kuo, Winson C H; Su, Shei Sia; Po, Pang; Yuan, Youzhu; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2016-02-09

    Incorporation of Zn atoms into a nanosize Cu lattice is known to alter the electronic properties of Cu, improving catalytic performance in a number of industrially important reactions. However the structural influence of Zn on the Cu phase is not well studied. Here, we show that Cu nano-clusters modified with increasing concentration of Zn, derived from ZnO support doped with Ga(3+), can dramatically enhance their stability against metal sintering. As a result, the hydrogenation of dimethyl oxalate (DMO) to ethylene glycol, an important reaction well known for deactivation from copper nanoparticle sintering, can show greatly enhanced activity and stability with the CuZn alloy catalysts due to no noticeable sintering. HRTEM, nano-diffraction and EXAFS characterization reveal the presence of a small beta-brass CuZn alloy phase (body-centred cubic, bcc) which appears to greatly stabilise Cu atoms from aggregation in accelerated deactivation tests. DFT calculations also indicate that the small bcc CuZn phase is more stable against Cu adatom migration than the fcc CuZn phase with the ability to maintain a higher Cu dispersion on its surface.

  5. The remarkable activity and stability of a highly dispersive beta-brass Cu-Zn catalyst for the production of ethylene glycol

    PubMed Central

    Li, Molly Meng-Jung; Zheng, Jianwei; Qu, Jin; Liao, Fenglin; Raine, Elizabeth; Kuo, Winson C. H.; Su, Shei Sia; Po, Pang; Yuan, Youzhu; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of Zn atoms into a nanosize Cu lattice is known to alter the electronic properties of Cu, improving catalytic performance in a number of industrially important reactions. However the structural influence of Zn on the Cu phase is not well studied. Here, we show that Cu nano-clusters modified with increasing concentration of Zn, derived from ZnO support doped with Ga3+, can dramatically enhance their stability against metal sintering. As a result, the hydrogenation of dimethyl oxalate (DMO) to ethylene glycol, an important reaction well known for deactivation from copper nanoparticle sintering, can show greatly enhanced activity and stability with the CuZn alloy catalysts due to no noticeable sintering. HRTEM, nano-diffraction and EXAFS characterization reveal the presence of a small beta-brass CuZn alloy phase (body-centred cubic, bcc) which appears to greatly stabilise Cu atoms from aggregation in accelerated deactivation tests. DFT calculations also indicate that the small bcc CuZn phase is more stable against Cu adatom migration than the fcc CuZn phase with the ability to maintain a higher Cu dispersion on its surface. PMID:26856760

  6. The remarkable activity and stability of a highly dispersive beta-brass Cu-Zn catalyst for the production of ethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Li, Molly Meng-Jung; Zheng, Jianwei; Qu, Jin; Liao, Fenglin; Raine, Elizabeth; Kuo, Winson C H; Su, Shei Sia; Po, Pang; Yuan, Youzhu; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of Zn atoms into a nanosize Cu lattice is known to alter the electronic properties of Cu, improving catalytic performance in a number of industrially important reactions. However the structural influence of Zn on the Cu phase is not well studied. Here, we show that Cu nano-clusters modified with increasing concentration of Zn, derived from ZnO support doped with Ga(3+), can dramatically enhance their stability against metal sintering. As a result, the hydrogenation of dimethyl oxalate (DMO) to ethylene glycol, an important reaction well known for deactivation from copper nanoparticle sintering, can show greatly enhanced activity and stability with the CuZn alloy catalysts due to no noticeable sintering. HRTEM, nano-diffraction and EXAFS characterization reveal the presence of a small beta-brass CuZn alloy phase (body-centred cubic, bcc) which appears to greatly stabilise Cu atoms from aggregation in accelerated deactivation tests. DFT calculations also indicate that the small bcc CuZn phase is more stable against Cu adatom migration than the fcc CuZn phase with the ability to maintain a higher Cu dispersion on its surface. PMID:26856760

  7. Aqueous nanosilica dispersants for carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Takafumi; Minami, Daiki; Khoerunnisa, Fitri; Sunaga, Motoo; Nakamura, Masahiro; Utsumi, Shigenori; Itoh, Tsutomu; Fujimori, Toshihiko; Hayashi, Takuya; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Endo, Morinobu; Isobe, Hiroshi; Onodera, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Katsumi

    2015-03-17

    Nanosilicas can disperse single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) in aqueous solution efficiently; SWCNTs are stably dispersed in aqueous media for more than 6 months. The SWCNT dispersing solution with nanosilica can produce highly conductive transparent films which satisfy the requirements for application to touch panels. Even multiwall carbon nanotube can be dispersed easily in aqueous solution. The highly stable dispersion of SWCNTs in the presence of nanosilica is associated with charge transfer interaction which generates effective charges on the SWCNT particles, giving rise to electrostatic repulsion between the SWCNTs in the aqueous solution. Adhesion of charged nanosilicas on SWCNTs in the aqueous solution and a marked depression of the S11 peak of optical absorption spectrum of the SWCNT with nanosilicas suggest charge transfer interaction of nanosilicas with SWCNT. Thus-formed isolated SWCNTs are fixed on the flexible three-dimensional silica jelly structure in the aqueous solution, leading to the uniform and stable dispersion of SWCNTs. PMID:25706991

  8. Polyfunctional dispersants for controlling viscosity of phyllosilicates

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2006-07-25

    This invention provides phyllosilicates and polyfunctional dispersants which can be manipulated to selectively control the viscosity of phyllosilicate slurries. The polyfunctional dispersants used in the present invention, which include at least three functional groups, increase the dispersion and exfoliation of phyllosilicates in polymers and, when used in conjunction with phyllosilicate slurries, significantly reduce the viscosity of slurries having high concentrations of phyllosilicates. The functional groups of the polyfunctional dispersants are capable of associating with multivalent metal cations and low molecular weight organic polymers, which can be manipulated to substantially increase or decrease the viscosity of the slurry in a concentration dependent manner. The polyfunctional dispersants of the present invention can also impart desirable properties on the phyllosilicate dispersions including corrosion inhibition and enhanced exfoliation of the phyllosilicate platelets.

  9. Methods for dispersing hydrocarbons using autoclaved bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-11-26

    A method of dispersing a hydrocarbon includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 85527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution; and contacting the dispersant solution with a hydrocarbon to disperse the hydrocarbon. Moreover, a method for preparing a dispersant solution includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; and autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution.

  10. Methods for dispersing hydrocarbons using autoclaved bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    A method of dispersing a hydrocarbon includes the steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 85527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures thereof; autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution therefrom; and contacting the dispersant solution with a hydrocarbon to disperse the hydrocarbon. Moreover, a method for preparing a dispersant solution includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures thereof; and autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution therefrom.

  11. Relativistic Weierstrass random walks.

    PubMed

    Saa, Alberto; Venegeroles, Roberto

    2010-08-01

    The Weierstrass random walk is a paradigmatic Markov chain giving rise to a Lévy-type superdiffusive behavior. It is well known that special relativity prevents the arbitrarily high velocities necessary to establish a superdiffusive behavior in any process occurring in Minkowski spacetime, implying, in particular, that any relativistic Markov chain describing spacetime phenomena must be essentially Gaussian. Here, we introduce a simple relativistic extension of the Weierstrass random walk and show that there must exist a transition time t{c} delimiting two qualitative distinct dynamical regimes: the (nonrelativistic) superdiffusive Lévy flights, for tt{c} . Implications of this crossover between different diffusion regimes are discussed for some explicit examples. The study of such an explicit and simple Markov chain can shed some light on several results obtained in much more involved contexts. PMID:20866862

  12. Relativistic Weierstrass random walks.

    PubMed

    Saa, Alberto; Venegeroles, Roberto

    2010-08-01

    The Weierstrass random walk is a paradigmatic Markov chain giving rise to a Lévy-type superdiffusive behavior. It is well known that special relativity prevents the arbitrarily high velocities necessary to establish a superdiffusive behavior in any process occurring in Minkowski spacetime, implying, in particular, that any relativistic Markov chain describing spacetime phenomena must be essentially Gaussian. Here, we introduce a simple relativistic extension of the Weierstrass random walk and show that there must exist a transition time t{c} delimiting two qualitative distinct dynamical regimes: the (nonrelativistic) superdiffusive Lévy flights, for tt{c} . Implications of this crossover between different diffusion regimes are discussed for some explicit examples. The study of such an explicit and simple Markov chain can shed some light on several results obtained in much more involved contexts.

  13. Surface wave dispersion from small vertical scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wijk, K.; Levshin, A. L.

    2004-10-01

    Heterogeneity in the subsurface creates conflicting types of dispersion of seismic waves. A laboratory and numerical experiment show that multiple scattering of elastic waves from isolated heterogeneities near the surface not only attenuates, but also delays coherent events. Because scattering off these impedance contrasts is frequency dependent, multiple scattering is a source of dispersion. If ignored, multiple scattering dispersion could be erroneously attributed to a model with horizontal homogeneous layers of different wave speeds.

  14. Dispersion of tsunamis: does it really matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glimsdal, S.; Pedersen, G. K.; Harbitz, C. B.; Løvholt, F.

    2013-06-01

    This article focuses on the effect of dispersion in the field of tsunami modeling. Frequency dispersion in the linear long-wave limit is first briefly discussed from a theoretical point of view. A single parameter, denoted as "dispersion time", for the integrated effect of frequency dispersion is identified. This parameter depends on the wavelength, the water depth during propagation, and the propagation distance or time. Also the role of long-time asymptotes is discussed in this context. The wave generation by the two main tsunami sources, namely earthquakes and landslides, are briefly discussed with formulas for the surface response to the bottom sources. Dispersive effects are then exemplified through a semi-idealized study of a moderate-strength inverse thrust fault. Emphasis is put on the directivity, the role of the "dispersion time", the significance of the Boussinesq model employed (dispersive effect), and the effects of the transfer from bottom sources to initial surface elevation. Finally, the experience from a series of case studies, including earthquake- and landslide-generated tsunamis, is presented. The examples are taken from both historical (e.g. the 2011 Japan tsunami and the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami) and potential tsunamis (e.g. the tsunami after the potential La Palma volcanic flank collapse). Attention is mainly given to the role of dispersion during propagation in the deep ocean and the way the accumulation of this effect relates to the "dispersion time". It turns out that this parameter is useful as a first indication as to when frequency dispersion is important, even though ambiguity with respect to the definition of the wavelength may be a problem for complex cases. Tsunamis from most landslides and moderate earthquakes tend to display dispersive behavior, at least in some directions. On the other hand, for the mega events of the last decade dispersion during deep water propagation is mostly noticeable for transoceanic propagation.

  15. General relationships between ultrasonic attenuation and dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odonnell, M.; Jaynes, E. T.; Miller, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    General relationships between the ultrasonic attenuation and dispersion are presented. The validity of these nonlocal relationships hinges only on the properties of causality and linearity, and does not depend upon details of the mechanism responsible for the attenuation and dispersion. Approximate, nearly local relationships are presented and are demonstrated to predict accurately the ultrasonic dispersion in solutions of hemoglobin from the results of attenuation measurements.

  16. Interactions in random copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Toma; Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta

    2002-04-01

    The description of thermodynamic properties of copolymers in terms of simple lattice models requires a value for the effective interaction strength between chain segments, in addition to parameters that can be derived from the properties of the corresponding homopolymers. If the monomers are chemically similar, Berthelot's geometric-mean combining rule provides a good first approximation for interactions between unlike segments. In earlier work on blends of polyolefins [1], we found that the small-scale architecture of the chains leads to corrections to the geometric-mean approximation that are important for the prediction of phase diagrams. In this work, we focus on the additional effects due to sequencing of the monomeric units. In order to estimate the effective interaction for random copolymers, the small-scale simulation approach developed in [1] is extended to allow for random sequencing of the monomeric units. The approach is applied here to random copolymers of ethylene and 1-butene. [1] J. Luettmer-Strathmann and J.E.G. Lipson. Phys. Rev. E 59, 2039 (1999) and Macromolecules 32, 1093 (1999).

  17. The conservation physiology of seed dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Ruxton, Graeme D.; Schaefer, H. Martin

    2012-01-01

    At a time when plant species are experiencing increasing challenges from climate change, land-use change, harvesting and invasive species, dispersal has become a very important aspect of plant conservation. Seed dispersal by animals is particularly important because some animals disperse seeds to suitable sites in a directed fashion. Our review has two aims: (i) to highlight the various ways plant dispersal by animals can be affected by current anthropogenic change and (ii) to show the important role of plant and (particularly) animal physiology in shaping seed–dispersal interactions. We argue that large-bodied seed dispersers may be particularly important for plant conservation because seed dispersal of large-seeded plants is often more specialized and because large-bodied animals are targeted by human exploitation and have smaller population sizes. We further argue that more specialized seed-dispersal systems on island ecosystems might be particularly at risk from climate change both owing to small population sizes involved but also owing to the likely thermal specialization, particularly on tropical islands. More generally, the inherent vulnerability of seed-dispersal mutualisms to disruption driven by environmental change (as well as their ubiquity) demands that we continue to improve our understanding of their conservation physiology. PMID:22566677

  18. Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic

    SciTech Connect

    Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

    1989-12-01

    The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

  19. Wavelet dispersion and bright-spot detection

    SciTech Connect

    Luh, P.C.

    1989-03-01

    Since Ostrander in 1984 showed that the variations in reflectivity as a function of offset can be used for bright-spot validation, it has been known that these variations are often sensitive to errors in acquisition and processing of prestack seismic data. This presentation shows that even with perfect measurements, the bright-spot signal will be altered because the wavelet disperses as it propagates through an attenuating overburden. This in turn affects the slope term of the amplitude vs. offset (AVO) variation. For any single reflector, the dispersion of its propagated signal as a function of offset can be decomposed into a product of the vertical and horizontal dispersions. The vertical dispersion is the dispersion that a zero-offset arrival suffers through its propagation, and the horizontal dispersion is the additional dispersion that a nonzero-offset arrival must suffer further because of the residual normal moveout time. Numerical examples using a frequency-independent attenuation law show that even for a relatively high-Q or low-loss overburden, the horizontal dispersion alone can distort the AVO signal. This distortion cannot be taken care of by velocity analysis. A preferred method to overcome the dispersion effect would be to apply Q compensation on prestack seismic data before movement.

  20. Dispersing away from bad genotypes: the evolution of Fitness-Associated Dispersal (FAD) in homogeneous environments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dispersal is a major factor in ecological and evolutionary dynamics. Although empirical evidence shows that the tendency to disperse varies among individuals in many organisms, the evolution of dispersal patterns is not fully understood. Previous theoretical studies have shown that condition-dependent dispersal may evolve as a means to move to a different environment when environments are heterogeneous in space or in time. However, dispersal is also a means to genetically diversify offspring, a genetic advantage that might be particularly important when the individual fitness is low. We suggest that plasticity in dispersal, in which fit individuals are less likely to disperse (Fitness-Associated Dispersal, or FAD), can evolve due to its evolutionary advantages even when the environment is homogeneous and stable, kin competition is weak, and the cost of dispersal is high. Results Using stochastic simulations we show that throughout the parameter range, selection favors FAD over uniform dispersal (in which all individuals disperse with equal probability). FAD also has significant long-term effects on the mean fitness and genotypic variance of the population. Conclusions We show that FAD evolves under a very wide parameter range, regardless of its effects on the population mean fitness. We predict that individuals of low quality will have an increased tendency for dispersal, even when the environment is homogeneous, there is no direct competition with neighbors, and dispersal carries significant costs. PMID:23777293

  1. Drivers and fitness consequences of dispersive migration in a pelagic seabird

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Robin; Shoji, Akiko; Boyle, Dave; Kirk, Holly L.; Dean, Ben J.; Perrins, Chris M.; Guilford, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Animals can be flexible in their migration strategies, using several wintering sites or a variety of routes. The mechanisms promoting the development of these migratory patterns and their potential fitness consequences are poorly understood. Here, we address these questions by tracking the dispersive migration of a pelagic seabird, the Atlantic puffin Fratercula arctica, using over 100 complete migration tracks collected over 7 years, including repeated tracks of individuals for up to 6 consecutive years. Because puffins have high flight costs, dispersion may generate important variation in costs of migration. We investigate differences in activity budgets and energy expenditure between different strategies. We find that puffins visit a range of overwintering destinations, resulting in a diversity of migratory routes differing in energy expenditures; however, they show interindividual similarity in the timings and location of major movements. We consider 3 hypothetical mechanisms that could generate this pattern: 1) random dispersion; 2) sex segregation; and 3) intraspecific competition or differences in individual quality. First, we dismiss random dispersion because individuals show strong route fidelity between years. Second, we find that sex differences contribute to, but do not account fully for, the migratory variation observed. Third, we find significant differences in breeding success between overwintering destinations, which, together with differences in foraging levels between routes, suggest that birds of different quality may visit different destinations. Taken together, our results show that dispersive migration is a complex phenomenon that can be driven by multiple factors simultaneously and can shape a population’s fitness landscape. PMID:27418752

  2. Quantum random number generator using a microresonator-based Kerr oscillator.

    PubMed

    Okawachi, Yoshitomo; Yu, Mengjie; Luke, Kevin; Carvalho, Daniel O; Lipson, Michal; Gaeta, Alexander L

    2016-09-15

    We demonstrate an all-optical quantum random number generator using a dual-pumped degenerate optical parametric oscillator in a silicon nitride microresonator. The frequency-degenerate bi-phase state output is realized using parametric four-wave mixing in the normal group-velocity dispersion regime with two nondegenerate pumps. We achieve a random number generation rate of 2 MHz and verify the randomness of our output using the National Institute of Standards and Technology Statistical Test Suite. The scheme offers potential for a chip-scale random number generator with gigahertz generation rates and no postprocessing. PMID:27628355

  3. Quantum random number generator using a microresonator-based Kerr oscillator.

    PubMed

    Okawachi, Yoshitomo; Yu, Mengjie; Luke, Kevin; Carvalho, Daniel O; Lipson, Michal; Gaeta, Alexander L

    2016-09-15

    We demonstrate an all-optical quantum random number generator using a dual-pumped degenerate optical parametric oscillator in a silicon nitride microresonator. The frequency-degenerate bi-phase state output is realized using parametric four-wave mixing in the normal group-velocity dispersion regime with two nondegenerate pumps. We achieve a random number generation rate of 2 MHz and verify the randomness of our output using the National Institute of Standards and Technology Statistical Test Suite. The scheme offers potential for a chip-scale random number generator with gigahertz generation rates and no postprocessing.

  4. A random number generator for continuous random variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, V. M.; Tapia, R. A.; Thompson, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    A FORTRAN 4 routine is given which may be used to generate random observations of a continuous real valued random variable. Normal distribution of F(x), X, E(akimas), and E(linear) is presented in tabular form.

  5. Genetic detection of sex-biased and age-biased dispersal in a population of wild carnivore, the red fox, Vulpes vulpes.

    PubMed

    Gachot-Neveu, Helene; Lefevre, Pavine; Roeder, Jean-Jacques; Henry, Caroline; Poulle, Marie-Lazarine

    2009-02-01

    Field studies conducted on rural red fox (Vulpes vulpes) populations suggest that the majority of males tend to disperse while the majority of females tend to be philopatric, that males disperse farther than females, and that most of the foxes disperse during their first year of life. However, the quantification of dispersal parameters is poorly documented in the red fox, because this carnivore is notoriously difficult to follow from birth to maturity. The aim of this study was to test hypotheses from field data with the help of a molecular analysis using six random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. The study was conducted on samples collected from 85 foxes in a French rural population. Genetic and geographical distances between pairs of individuals were calculated for the 3570 potential pairs originating from this population to determine whether the foxes had dispersed. High genetic diversity and an absence of genetic clusters among studied individuals support the occurrence of intense and constant gene flow in the study population, probably induced by dispersion. At least 16.2% of the potential pairs we studied were subject to dispersal. Sex-biased dispersion was not observed, apart from a sex bias in favor of females towards long-distance dispersal. A predominance of males that ultimately dispersed a long distance could not thus be confirmed. Furthermore, it seems that dispersal did not occur primarily in the subadult age class in our rural study area, but that some pairs of juveniles may also have been involved in dispersal. PMID:19341332

  6. Method of making maximally dispersed heterogeneous catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Jennison, Dwight R.

    2005-11-15

    A method of making a catalyst with monolayer or sub-monolayer metal by controlling the wetting characteristics on the support surface and increasing the adhesion between the catalytic metal and an oxide layer. There are two methods that have been demonstrated by experiment and supported by theory. In the first method, which is useful for noble metals as well as others, a negatively-charged species is introduced to the surface of a support in sub-ML coverage. The layer-by-layer growth of metal deposited onto the oxide surface is promoted because the adhesion strength of the metal-oxide interface is increased. This method can also be used to achieve nanoislands of metal upon sub-ML deposition. The negatively-charged species can either be deposited onto the oxide surface or a compound can be deposited that dissociates on, or reacts with, the surface to form the negatively-charged species. The deposited metal adatoms can thereby bond laterally to the negatively-charged species as well as vertically to the oxide surface. Thus the negatively-charged species serve as anchors for the metal. In the second method, a chemical reaction that occurs when most metals are deposited on a fully hydroxylated oxide surface is used to create cationic metal species that bind strongly both to the substrate and to metallic metal atoms. These are incorporated into the top layer of the substrate and bind strongly both to the substrate and to metallic metal atoms. In this case, these oxidized metal atoms serve as the anchors. Here, as in the previous method, nanoislands of catalytic metal can be achieved to increase catalytic activity, or monolayers or bilayers of reactive metal can also be made.

  7. Adaptive Urban Dispersion Integrated Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wissink, A; Chand, K; Kosovic, B; Chan, S; Berger, M; Chow, F K

    2005-11-03

    Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for understanding the three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from contaminant releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). Utilization of the most accurate urban models, based on fully three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) that solve the Navier-Stokes equations with incorporated turbulence models, presents many challenges. We address two in this work; first, a fast but accurate way to incorporate the complex urban terrain, buildings, and other structures to enforce proper boundary conditions in the flow solution; second, ways to achieve a level of computational efficiency that allows the models to be run in an automated fashion such that they may be used for emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We have developed a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability based on FEM3MP (Gresho and Chan 1998, Chan and Stevens 2000), a CFD model from Lawrence Livermore National Lab. The integrated capability incorporates fast embedded boundary mesh generation for geometrically complex problems and full three-dimensional Cartesian adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Parallel AMR and embedded boundary gridding support are provided through the SAMRAI library (Wissink et al. 2001, Hornung and Kohn 2002). Embedded boundary mesh generation has been demonstrated to be an automatic, fast, and efficient approach for problem setup. It has been used for a variety of geometrically complex applications, including urban applications (Pullen et al. 2005). The key technology we introduce in this work is the application of AMR, which allows the application of high-resolution modeling to certain important features, such as individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features). It also allows the urban scale model to be readily interfaced with coarser resolution meso or regional scale models. This talk

  8. An investigation into pellet dispersion ballistics.

    PubMed

    Nag, N K; Sinha, P

    1992-08-01

    Existing works on pellet dispersion ballistics are confined to some data-based models derived from statistical analysis of observed patterns on targets but the underlying process causing the dispersion lacks due attention. The present article delves into the relatively unexplored areas of dispersion phenomena, and attempts to develop a theoretical model for general application. The radial velocity distribution of pellets has been worked out by probing into the physical process of dispersion based on transfer of momentum from undispersed shot mass to dispersed pellets. The ratio 2u/v0 (u = root mean square (r.m.s.) radial velocity and v0 = muzzle velocity of the pellets) is found to be fairly constant for a fixed gun-ammunition combination and has been suitably designated as 'Dispersion Index' (DI) characterising its dispersion capability. The present model adequately accounts for pellet distribution on targets and it appears that 'Effective Shot Dispersion' (ESD) as introduced by Mattoo and Nabar [ESD = [(4/N0)sigma Ri2]1/2, where N(0) is the total number of pellets and Ri is the radial distance of the i-th pellet from centre of pattern], gives a faithful numerical measure of overall dispersion at a given distance. A relationship between ESD and firing distance, incorporating the effects of air resistance and gravity has been worked out, which reveals that DI controls the dispersion at a given distance. For small distances (less than 20 m) the relation reduces to a linear one, as already observed empirically and looks like ESD = E0+DI x firing distance, E0 being a parameter dependent on gun and ammunition. The present model, unlike earlier ones, is versatile enough to explain the natures of the dependence of dispersion on firing distance as well as on gun-ammunition parameters, which are essential for a faithful reconstruction of a crime scene. The model has been tested with such experimental data as are available and reasonable agreement is observed. PMID:1398370

  9. Laboratory testing of dispersants under Arctic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Brandvik, P.J.; Knudsen, O.O; Moldestad, M.O.; Daling, P.S.

    1995-06-01

    The effectiveness of relevant dispersants for use under Arctic conditions has been tested with the IFP dilution test. Arctic conditions in this context are defined as low temperature (0 C) and water salinities varying between 0.5% and 3.5%. The study was performed in three steps with a screening activity first, where 14 dispersants were tested on water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions from two weathered oil types. In the next step five dispersants were tested on both weathered water free oils and w/o emulsions from four different oil types. As a third step, dispersant effectiveness as a function of salinity (0.5 to 3.5%) was tested with the most effective dispersants at high and low salinity. The results from this study shows that many of the most used dispersants which previously have shown an excellent effectiveness at high sea water salinity (3.5%) may give a very low effectiveness at low salinity (0.5%). Recently developed products especially designed for low salinity use (e.g. Inipol IPF) are very effective at low salinities, but suffer from a rather poor effectiveness at higher salinities. This is of significant operational importance in Arctic oil spill combat operations since the salinity of the surface water may vary due to ice melting. This study of dispersant`s effectiveness under Arctic conditions shows the need for development of dispersants with high effectiveness both at low temperature (0 C) and over a wide range of salinities (3.5% to 0.5%). Dispersant development has been a limited but important activity at IKU for the last five years and one of the objectives for an ongoing Arctic program at IKU is to develop such new dispersants for use under Arctic conditions.

  10. Randomizing Roaches: Exploring the "Bugs" of Randomization in Experimental Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagler, Amy; Wagler, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the roles of random selection and random assignment in experimental design is a central learning objective in most introductory statistics courses. This article describes an activity, appropriate for a high school or introductory statistics course, designed to teach the concepts, values and pitfalls of random selection and assignment…

  11. Cocklebur-shaped colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Lestage, David J; Urban, Marek W

    2005-11-01

    Unique cocklebur-shaped colloidal dispersions were prepared using a combination of a nanoextruder applied to the aqueous solution containing methyl methacrylate (MMA) and n-butyl acrylate (n-BA) with azo-bis-isobutyronitrile (AIBN) or potassium persulfate (KPS) initiators and stabilized by a mixture of sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (SDOSS) and 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DCPC) phospholipid. Upon extrusion and heating to 75 degrees C, methyl methacrylate/n-butyl acrylate (MMA/nBA) colloidal particles containing tubules pointing outward were obtained as a result of DCPC phospholipids present at the particle surfaces. The same cocklebur-shaped particles were obtained when classical polymerization was used without a nanoextruder under similar compositional and thermal conditions, giving a particle size of 159 nm. However, when Ca(2+) ions are present during polymerization, cocklebur morphologies are disrupted. Because DCPC tubules undergo a transition at 38 degrees C, such cocklebur morphologies may offer numerous opportunities for devices with stimuli-responsive characteristics. PMID:16262269

  12. Faraday dispersion functions of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Ideguchi, Shinsuke; Tashiro, Yuichi; Takahashi, Keitaro; Akahori, Takuya; Ryu, Dongsu E-mail: 136d8008@st.kumamoto-u.ac.jp E-mail: akahori@physics.usyd.edu.au

    2014-09-01

    The Faraday dispersion function (FDF), which can be derived from an observed polarization spectrum by Faraday rotation measure synthesis, is a profile of polarized emissions as a function of Faraday depth. We study intrinsic FDFs along sight lines through face-on Milky Way like galaxies by means of a sophisticated galactic model incorporating three-dimensional MHD turbulence, and investigate how much information the FDF intrinsically contains. Since the FDF reflects distributions of thermal and cosmic-ray electrons as well as magnetic fields, it has been expected that the FDF could be a new probe to examine internal structures of galaxies. We, however, find that an intrinsic FDF along a sight line through a galaxy is very complicated, depending significantly on actual configurations of turbulence. We perform 800 realizations of turbulence and find no universal shape of the FDF even if we fix the global parameters of the model. We calculate the probability distribution functions of the standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis of FDFs and compare them for models with different global parameters. Our models predict that the presence of vertical magnetic fields and the large-scale height of cosmic-ray electrons tend to make the standard deviation relatively large. In contrast, the differences in skewness and kurtosis are relatively less significant.

  13. Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Young, John; Chapman, Katie; Nixon, Jane; Patel, Anita; Holloway, Ivana; Mellish, Kirste; Anwar, Shamaila; Breen, Rachel; Knapp, Martin; Murray, Jenni; Farrin, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— We developed a new postdischarge system of care comprising a structured assessment covering longer-term problems experienced by patients with stroke and their carers, linked to evidence-based treatment algorithms and reference guides (the longer-term stroke care system of care) to address the poor longer-term recovery experienced by many patients with stroke. Methods— A pragmatic, multicentre, cluster randomized controlled trial of this system of care. Eligible patients referred to community-based Stroke Care Coordinators were randomized to receive the new system of care or usual practice. The primary outcome was improved patient psychological well-being (General Health Questionnaire-12) at 6 months; secondary outcomes included functional outcomes for patients, carer outcomes, and cost-effectiveness. Follow-up was through self-completed postal questionnaires at 6 and 12 months. Results— Thirty-two stroke services were randomized (29 participated); 800 patients (399 control; 401 intervention) and 208 carers (100 control; 108 intervention) were recruited. In intention to treat analysis, the adjusted difference in patient General Health Questionnaire-12 mean scores at 6 months was −0.6 points (95% confidence interval, −1.8 to 0.7; P=0.394) indicating no evidence of statistically significant difference between the groups. Costs of Stroke Care Coordinator inputs, total health and social care costs, and quality-adjusted life year gains at 6 months, 12 months, and over the year were similar between the groups. Conclusions— This robust trial demonstrated no benefit in clinical or cost-effectiveness outcomes associated with the new system of care compared with usual Stroke Care Coordinator practice. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN 67932305. PMID:26152298

  14. Composite Random Fiber Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picu, Catalin; Shahsavari, Ali

    2013-03-01

    Systems made from fibers are common in the biological and engineering worlds. In many instances, as for example in skin, where elastin and collagen fibers are present, the fiber network is composite, in the sense that it contains fibers of very different properties. The relationship between microstructural parameters and the elastic moduli of random fiber networks containing a single type of fiber is understood. In this work we address a similar target for the composite networks. We show that linear superposition of the contributions to stiffness of individual sub-networks does not apply and interesting non-linear effects are observed. A physical basis of these effects is proposed.

  15. Can randomization be informative?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Carlos A. B.; Campos, Thiago F.; Silva, Gustavo M.; Wechsler, Sergio

    2012-10-01

    In this paper the Pair of Siblings Paradox introduced by Pereira [1] is extended by considering more than two children and more than one child observed for gender. We follow the same lines of Wechsler et al. [2] that generalizes the three prisoners' dilemma, introduced by Gardner [3]. This paper's conjecture is that the Pair of Siblings and the Three Prisoners dilemma are dual paradoxes. Looking at possible likelihoods, the sure (randomized) selection for the former is non informative (informative), the opposite that holds for the latter. This situation is maintained for generalizations. Non informative likelihood here means that prior and posterior are equal.

  16. Colloid dispersion on the pore scale.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Thomas; Toops, Laura; Niessner, Reinhard

    2010-02-01

    Dispersion describes the spreading of a tracer or contaminant in an aquifer. Detailed knowledge of dispersion is the key to successful risk assessment in case of groundwater pollution or groundwater protection. The dispersion of colloids on the pore scale is controlled by flow velocity, ionic strength, colloid size, colloid concentration, and colloid-matrix interactions. The objective of this study was to provide quantitative data and to assess the scale dependency of colloid dispersion on the pore scale. The positions of carboxylated polystyrene microspheres (1 microm, 0.5 microm) were recorded during transport experiments in silicon micromodels with three pore topologies. The positions were combined into particle trajectories revealing the flow path of individual colloids. More than thousand trajectories were evaluated for each experiment to obtain the dispersivity of the colloids for flow distances between 10 and 1000 microm. All experiments were run at high Peclet numbers. The pore scale dispersivity was on the order of 8-30% of the flow distance with pure water, dependent on the heterogeneity of the pore topology. The dispersivity was positively correlated with the ionic strength and inversely correlated with the colloid size and the flow velocity. A coating of the micromodel surface with humic acid also increased dispersivity. The quantitative data set presented here supports the theoretical framework for colloid transport and allows to parametrize colloid transport on the pore scale.

  17. Intermolecular forces: a solution to dispersion interactions.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Ken D

    2013-12-01

    London dispersion forces have been cited as an important factor in protein folding, drug–receptor interactions, and catalyst selectivities. However, careful analysis of a model system finds that the dispersion interactions are only minor contributors to the formation of complexes in solution.

  18. Colloid dispersion on the pore scale.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Thomas; Toops, Laura; Niessner, Reinhard

    2010-02-01

    Dispersion describes the spreading of a tracer or contaminant in an aquifer. Detailed knowledge of dispersion is the key to successful risk assessment in case of groundwater pollution or groundwater protection. The dispersion of colloids on the pore scale is controlled by flow velocity, ionic strength, colloid size, colloid concentration, and colloid-matrix interactions. The objective of this study was to provide quantitative data and to assess the scale dependency of colloid dispersion on the pore scale. The positions of carboxylated polystyrene microspheres (1 microm, 0.5 microm) were recorded during transport experiments in silicon micromodels with three pore topologies. The positions were combined into particle trajectories revealing the flow path of individual colloids. More than thousand trajectories were evaluated for each experiment to obtain the dispersivity of the colloids for flow distances between 10 and 1000 microm. All experiments were run at high Peclet numbers. The pore scale dispersivity was on the order of 8-30% of the flow distance with pure water, dependent on the heterogeneity of the pore topology. The dispersivity was positively correlated with the ionic strength and inversely correlated with the colloid size and the flow velocity. A coating of the micromodel surface with humic acid also increased dispersivity. The quantitative data set presented here supports the theoretical framework for colloid transport and allows to parametrize colloid transport on the pore scale. PMID:20042215

  19. Dispersers shape fruit diversity in Ficus (Moraceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed dispersal by vertebrates is one of the most common and important plant-animal mutualisms, involving an enormous diversity of fruiting plants and frugivorous vertebrates. Even though plant reproduction largely depends on seed dispersal, evolutionary ecologists have been unable to link co-occurr...

  20. DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS ON OIL SPILLS - EMPIRICAL CORRELATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When a dispersant is applied to an oil slick, its effectiveness in dispersing the spilled oil depends on various factors such as oil properties, wave mixing energy, temperature of both oil and water, and salinity of the water. Estuaries represent water with varying salinities. In...

  1. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  2. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-09-24

    A new protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. The isolated consortia and bacteria are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. The isolated consortia, bacteria, and dispersants are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  3. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  4. "Dispersion modeling approaches for near road

    EPA Science Inventory

    Roadway design and roadside barriers can have significant effects on the dispersion of traffic-generated pollutants, especially in the near-road environment. Dispersion models that can accurately simulate these effects are needed to fully assess these impacts for a variety of app...

  5. Interspecific nematode signals regulate dispersal behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dispersal is an important nematode behavior. Upon crowding or food depletion, the free living bacteriovorus nematode Caenorhabditis elegans produces stress resistant dispersal larvae, called dauer, which are analogous to second stage juveniles (J2) of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. and infective ...

  6. Dispersal in female white-tailed deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, M.E.; Mech, L.D.

    1992-01-01

    Seven of 35 yearling female white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in a migratory herd in northeastern Minnesota dispersed 18-168 km from natal ranges during late May through June. Dispersal as a proximate event appears voluntary and independent of deer density.

  7. Blends of ascarosides regulate dispersal in nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blends of ascarosides regulate dispersal in nematodes Presenter: Dr. Fatma Kaplan Dispersal is an important behavior for many organisms. It can easily be observed when infectious juveniles of entomopathogenic nematodes (Steinernema and Heterorhabditis) leave a consumed insect host. Dauer larvae of ...

  8. Personality-dependent dispersal cancelled under predation risk.

    PubMed

    Cote, Julien; Fogarty, Sean; Tymen, Blaise; Sih, Andrew; Brodin, Tomas

    2013-12-22

    Dispersal is a fundamental life-history trait for many ecological processes. Recent studies suggest that dispersers, in comparison to residents, display various phenotypic specializations increasing their dispersal inclination or success. Among them, dispersers are believed to be consistently more bold, exploratory, asocial or aggressive than residents. These links between behavioural types and dispersal should vary with the cause of dispersal. However, with the exception of one study, personality-dependent dispersal has not been studied in contrasting environments. Here, we used mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) to test whether personality-dependent dispersal varies with predation risk, a factor that should induce boldness or sociability-dependent dispersal. Corroborating previous studies, we found that dispersing mosquitofish are less social than non-dispersing fish when there was no predation risk. However, personality-dependent dispersal is negated under predation risk, dispersers having similar personality types to residents. Our results suggest that adaptive dispersal decisions could commonly depend on interactions between phenotypes and ecological contexts.

  9. Random numbers from vacuum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yicheng; Chng, Brenda; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2016-07-01

    We implement a quantum random number generator based on a balanced homodyne measurement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. The digitized signal is directly processed with a fast randomness extraction scheme based on a linear feedback shift register. The random bit stream is continuously read in a computer at a rate of about 480 Mbit/s and passes an extended test suite for random numbers.

  10. Random recursive trees and the elephant random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürsten, Rüdiger

    2016-03-01

    One class of random walks with infinite memory, so-called elephant random walks, are simple models describing anomalous diffusion. We present a surprising connection between these models and bond percolation on random recursive trees. We use a coupling between the two models to translate results from elephant random walks to the percolation process. We calculate, besides other quantities, exact expressions for the first and the second moment of the root cluster size and of the number of nodes in child clusters of the first generation. We further introduce another model, the skew elephant random walk, and calculate the first and second moment of this process.

  11. Random recursive trees and the elephant random walk.

    PubMed

    Kürsten, Rüdiger

    2016-03-01

    One class of random walks with infinite memory, so-called elephant random walks, are simple models describing anomalous diffusion. We present a surprising connection between these models and bond percolation on random recursive trees. We use a coupling between the two models to translate results from elephant random walks to the percolation process. We calculate, besides other quantities, exact expressions for the first and the second moment of the root cluster size and of the number of nodes in child clusters of the first generation. We further introduce another model, the skew elephant random walk, and calculate the first and second moment of this process. PMID:27078296

  12. Pay dispersion and performance in teams.

    PubMed

    Bucciol, Alessandro; Foss, Nicolai J; Piovesan, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Extant research offers conflicting predictions about the effect of pay dispersion on team performance. We collected a unique dataset from the Italian soccer league to study the effect of intra-firm pay dispersion on team performance, under different definitions of what constitutes a "team". This peculiarity of our dataset can explain the conflicting evidence. Indeed, we also find positive, null, and negative effects of pay dispersion on team performance, using the same data but different definitions of team. Our results show that when the team is considered to consist of only the members who directly contribute to the outcome, high pay dispersion has a detrimental impact on team performance. Enlarging the definition of the team causes this effect to disappear or even change direction. Finally, we find that the detrimental effect of pay dispersion is due to worse individual performance, rather than a reduction of team cooperation. PMID:25397615

  13. Aquatic toxicity of two Corexit dispersants.

    PubMed

    George-Ares, A; Clark, J R

    2000-04-01

    The oil spill dispersants, Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527 have low to moderate toxicity to most aquatic species in laboratory tests. Toxicity estimates are significantly affected by test variables such as species, lifestage, exposure duration, and temperature. Aquatic toxicity data generated from spiked, declining exposures (107 min half-life) are more reflective of actual dispersant use conditions. Decisions to use oil spill response chemicals should not be based solely on aquatic toxicity. Factors to consider include product effectiveness, toxicity of dispersed oil, species/habitats requiring priority protection, and recovery potential of sensitive habitats and populations. An environmental risk assessment approach is recommended where dispersant toxicity data generated under environmentally relevant exposures are compared to estimated environmental concentrations of dispersants. PMID:10718584

  14. Flow properties of acetylated chickpea protein dispersions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li H; Hung, Tran V

    2010-06-01

    Chickpea protein concentrate was acetylated with acetic anhydride at 5 levels. Acetylated chickpea protein (ACP) dispersions at 3 levels (6%, 45%, and 49%) were chosen for this flow property study. Effects of protein concentration, temperature, concentrations of salt addition and particularly, degree of acetylation on these properties were examined. Compared with native chickpea proteins, the ACP dispersions exhibited a strong shear thinning behavior. Within measured temperature range (15 to 55 degrees C), the apparent viscosities of native chickpea protein dispersions were temperature independent; those of ACP dispersions were thermally affected. The flow index (n), consistency coefficient (m), apparent yield stress, and apparent viscosities of ACP dispersions increased progressively up to 45% acetylation but decreased at 49% acetylation level. Conformational studies by gel filtration suggested that chickpea proteins were associated or polymerized at up to 45% acetylation but the associated subunits gradually dissociated to smaller units at higher levels (49%) of acetylation.

  15. A multifaceted approach to applying dispersants

    SciTech Connect

    Crain, O.L.

    1982-10-01

    A comprehensive oil spill response plan has been developed partially to deal with accidental discharges of oil into the Arabian Gulf. The spill response capabilities of contractor companies in the area are fairly limited. The response plan relies on chemical agents and recovery as cleanup tools. The key to effective response is a rapid response and deployment of cleanup equipment. Initially, marine vessels equipped with portable dispersant spray booms patterned after the Warren Springs equipment were used. To improve existing oil spill response, an extensive modernization of dispersant deployment equipment has been developed. The areas of modernization include upgrading the marine vessel equipment, dedicating boats and vessels of opportunity for dispersant application, using helicopters for spill response, using large fixed-wing aircraft for spill response, and establishing dispersant and refueling stockpiles. This paper discusses the use of dispersants in response to an oil spill. It is intended not as a scientific paper but as a paper on a local response capability.

  16. Pay Dispersion and Performance in Teams

    PubMed Central

    Bucciol, Alessandro; Foss, Nicolai J.; Piovesan, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Extant research offers conflicting predictions about the effect of pay dispersion on team performance. We collected a unique dataset from the Italian soccer league to study the effect of intra-firm pay dispersion on team performance, under different definitions of what constitutes a “team”. This peculiarity of our dataset can explain the conflicting evidence. Indeed, we also find positive, null, and negative effects of pay dispersion on team performance, using the same data but different definitions of team. Our results show that when the team is considered to consist of only the members who directly contribute to the outcome, high pay dispersion has a detrimental impact on team performance. Enlarging the definition of the team causes this effect to disappear or even change direction. Finally, we find that the detrimental effect of pay dispersion is due to worse individual performance, rather than a reduction of team cooperation. PMID:25397615

  17. Aquatic toxicity of two Corexit dispersants.

    PubMed

    George-Ares, A; Clark, J R

    2000-04-01

    The oil spill dispersants, Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527 have low to moderate toxicity to most aquatic species in laboratory tests. Toxicity estimates are significantly affected by test variables such as species, lifestage, exposure duration, and temperature. Aquatic toxicity data generated from spiked, declining exposures (107 min half-life) are more reflective of actual dispersant use conditions. Decisions to use oil spill response chemicals should not be based solely on aquatic toxicity. Factors to consider include product effectiveness, toxicity of dispersed oil, species/habitats requiring priority protection, and recovery potential of sensitive habitats and populations. An environmental risk assessment approach is recommended where dispersant toxicity data generated under environmentally relevant exposures are compared to estimated environmental concentrations of dispersants.

  18. Hybrid interlayer excitons with tunable dispersion relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Brian

    When two semiconducting materials are layered on top of each other, interlayer excitons can be formed by the Coulomb attraction of an electron in one layer to a hole in the opposite layer. The resulting exciton is a composite boson with a dispersion relation that is a hybrid between the dispersion relations of the electron and the hole separately. In this talk I show how such hybridization is particularly interesting when one layer has a ``Mexican hat''-shaped dispersion relation and the other has a conventional parabolic dispersion. In this case the interlayer exciton can have a range of qualitatively different dispersion relations, which can be continuously altered by an external field. This tunability in principle allows one to continuously tune a collection of interlayer excitons between different quantum many-body phases, including Bose-Einstein condensate, Wigner crystal, and fermion-like ``moat band'' phases.

  19. Landscape influences on dispersal behaviour: a theoretical model and empirical test using the fire salamander, Salamandra infraimmaculata.

    PubMed

    Kershenbaum, Arik; Blank, Lior; Sinai, Iftach; Merilä, Juha; Blaustein, Leon; Templeton, Alan R

    2014-06-01

    When populations reside within a heterogeneous landscape, isolation by distance may not be a good predictor of genetic divergence if dispersal behaviour and therefore gene flow depend on landscape features. Commonly used approaches linking landscape features to gene flow include the least cost path (LCP), random walk (RW), and isolation by resistance (IBR) models. However, none of these models is likely to be the most appropriate for all species and in all environments. We compared the performance of LCP, RW and IBR models of dispersal with the aid of simulations conducted on artificially generated landscapes. We also applied each model to empirical data on the landscape genetics of the endangered fire salamander, Salamandra infraimmaculata, in northern Israel, where conservation planning requires an understanding of the dispersal corridors. Our simulations demonstrate that wide dispersal corridors of the low-cost environment facilitate dispersal in the IBR model, but inhibit dispersal in the RW model. In our empirical study, IBR explained the genetic divergence better than the LCP and RW models (partial Mantel correlation 0.413 for IBR, compared to 0.212 for LCP, and 0.340 for RW). Overall dispersal cost in salamanders was also well predicted by landscape feature slope steepness (76%), and elevation (24%). We conclude that fire salamander dispersal is well characterised by IBR predictions. Together with our simulation findings, these results indicate that wide dispersal corridors facilitate, rather than hinder, salamander dispersal. Comparison of genetic data to dispersal model outputs can be a useful technique in inferring dispersal behaviour from population genetic data.

  20. Random rough surface photofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissonneau, Vincent; Escoubas, Ludovic; Flory, François; Berginc, Gérard

    2011-10-01

    Random rough surfaces are of primary interest for their optical properties: reducing reflection at the interface or obtaining specific scattering diagram for example. Thus controlling surface statistics during the fabrication process paves the way to original and specific behaviors of reflected optical waves. We detail an experimental method allowing the fabrication of random rough surfaces showing tuned statistical properties. A two-step photoresist exposure process was developed. In order to initiate photoresist polymerization, an energy threshold needs to be reached by light exposure. This energy is brought by a uniform exposure equipment comprising UV-LEDs. This pre-exposure is studied by varying parameters such as optical power and exposure time. The second step consists in an exposure based on the Gray method.1 The speckle pattern of an enlarged scattered laser beam is used to insolate the photoresist. A specific photofabrication bench using an argon ion laser was implemented. Parameters such as exposure time and distances between optical components are discussed. Then, we describe how we modify the speckle-based exposure bench to include a spatial light modulator (SLM). The SLM used is a micromirror matrix known as Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) which allows spatial modulation by displaying binary images. Thus, the spatial beam shape can be tuned and so the speckle pattern on the photoresist is modified. As the photoresist photofabricated surface is correlated to the speckle pattern used to insolate, the roughness parameters can be adjusted.

  1. Random Numbers and Quantum Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Mark; Glass, David

    2002-01-01

    The topic of random numbers is investigated in such a way as to illustrate links between mathematics, physics and computer science. First, the generation of random numbers by a classical computer using the linear congruential generator and logistic map is considered. It is noted that these procedures yield only pseudo-random numbers since…

  2. Work analysis by random sampling.

    PubMed Central

    Divilbiss, J L; Self, P C

    1978-01-01

    Random sampling of work activities using an electronic random alarm mechanism provided a simple and effective way to determine how time was divided between various activities. At each random alarm the subject simply recorded the time and the activity. Analysis of the data led to reassignment of staff functions and also resulted in additional support for certain critical activities. PMID:626793

  3. Random Selection for Drug Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    Simple random sampling is generally the starting point for a random sampling process. This sampling technique ensures that each individual within a group (population) has an equal chance of being selected. There are a variety of ways to implement random sampling in a practical situation.

  4. Investigating the Randomness of Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendleton, Kenn L.

    2009-01-01

    The use of random numbers is pervasive in today's world. Random numbers have practical applications in such far-flung arenas as computer simulations, cryptography, gambling, the legal system, statistical sampling, and even the war on terrorism. Evaluating the randomness of extremely large samples is a complex, intricate process. However, the…

  5. Randomized Response Analysis in Mplus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hox, Joop; Lensvelt-Mulders, Gerty

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a technique to analyze randomized response data using available structural equation modeling (SEM) software. The randomized response technique was developed to obtain estimates that are more valid when studying sensitive topics. The basic feature of all randomized response methods is that the data are deliberately…

  6. Do Dispersing Monkeys Follow Kin? Evidence from Gray-cheeked Mangabeys (Lophocebus albigena).

    PubMed

    Chancellor, Rebecca L; Satkoski, Jessica; George, Debbie; Olupot, William; Lichti, Nathanael; Smith, David G; Waser, Peter M

    2011-04-01

    Among social vertebrates, immigrants may incur a substantial fitness cost when they attempt to join a new group. Dispersers could reduce that cost, or increase their probability of mating via coalition formation, by immigrating into groups containing first- or second-degree relatives. We here examine whether dispersing males tend to move into groups containing fathers or brothers in gray-cheeked mangabeys (Lophocebus albigena) in Kibale National Park, Uganda. We sampled blood from 21 subadult and adult male mangabeys in 7 social groups and genotyped them at 17 microsatellite loci. Twelve genotyped males dispersed to groups containing other genotyped adult males during the study; in only 1 case did the group contain a probable male relative. Contrary to the prediction that dispersing males would follow kin, relatively few adult male dyads were likely first- or second-degree relatives; opportunities for kin-biased dispersal by mangabeys appear to be rare. During 4 yr of observation, adult brothers shared a group only once, and for only 6 wk. Mean relatedness among adult males sharing a group was lower than that among males in different groups. Randomization tests indicate that closely related males share groups no more often than expected by chance, although these tests had limited power. We suggest that the demographic conditions that allow kin-biased dispersal to evolve do not occur in mangabeys, may be unusual among primates, and are worth further attention.

  7. Temporally variable dispersal and demography can accelerate the spread of invading species.

    PubMed

    Ellner, Stephen P; Schreiber, Sebastian J

    2012-12-01

    We analyze how temporal variability in local demography and dispersal combine to affect the rate of spread of an invading species. Our model combines state-structured local demography (specified by an integral or matrix projection model) with general dispersal distributions that may depend on the state of the individual or its parent. It allows very general patterns of stationary temporal variation in both local demography and in the frequency and distribution of dispersal distances. We show that expressions for the asymptotic spread rate and its sensitivity to parameters, which have been derived previously for less general models, continue to hold. Using these results we show that random temporal variability in dispersal can accelerate population spread. Demographic variability can further accelerate spread if it is positively correlated with dispersal variability, for example if high-fecundity years are also years in which juveniles tend to settle further away from their parents. A simple model for the growth and spread of patches of an invasive plant (perennial pepperweed, Lepidium latifolium) illustrates these effects and shows that they can have substantial impacts on the predicted speed of an invasion wave. Temporal variability in dispersal has received very little attention in both the theoretical and empirical literature on invasive species spread. Our results suggest that this needs to change.

  8. Dispersal syndromes and the use of life-histories to predict dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Virginie M; Trochet, Audrey; Blanchet, Simon; Moulherat, Sylvain; Clobert, Jean; Baguette, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Due to its impact on local adaptation, population functioning or range shifts, dispersal is considered a central process for population persistence and species evolution. However, measuring dispersal is complicated, which justifies the use of dispersal proxies. Although appealing, and despite its general relationship with dispersal, body size has however proven unsatisfactory as a dispersal proxy. Our hypothesis here is that, given the existence of dispersal syndromes, suites of life-history traits may be alternative, more appropriate proxies for dispersal. We tested this idea by using butterflies as a model system. We demonstrate that different elements of the dispersal process (i.e., individual movement rates, distances, and gene flow) are correlated with different suites of life-history traits: these various elements of dispersal form separate syndromes and must be considered real axes of a species' niche. We then showed that these syndromes allowed accurate predictions of dispersal. The use of life-history traits improved the precision of the inferences made from wing size alone by up to five times. Such trait-based predictions thus provided reliable dispersal inferences that can feed simulation models aiming at investigating the dynamics and evolution of butterfly populations, and possibly of other organisms, under environmental changes, to help their conservation. PMID:23789030

  9. Absolute Bragg wavelength and dispersion determination in dispersive incoherent OFDR interrogators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, J.; Torregrosa, G.; Hervás, J.; Fernández-Pousa, C. R.

    2016-05-01

    We report on an incoherent OFDR interrogator of FBG arrays based on the concept of dispersive wavelength to time delay mapping. The system is specifically designed to show stability to environmental thermal variations by the incorporation of a composite dispersive delay and weak broadband reflectors for delay and dispersion monitoring. Dispersion is imparted by the combination of a fiber coil and an athermally-packaged chirped fiber Bragg grating for dispersion compensation. Using differential measurements over a single acquisition trace, the values of Bragg wavelengths and dispersion are determined from the delays experienced by the FBGs and by additional reference wavelengths reflected in the broadband reflectors. The results show maximum deviations of 20 pm and 0.2 ps/nm with respect to OSA measurements of Bragg wavelengths and nominal dispersion values, respectively.

  10. Evolution of dispersal under a fecundity-dispersal trade-off.

    PubMed

    Weigang, Helene C; Kisdi, Éva

    2015-04-21

    Resources invested in dispersal structures as well as time and energy spent during transfer may often decrease fecundity. Here we analyse an extended version of the Hamilton-May model of dispersal evolution, where we include a fecundity-dispersal trade-off and also mortality between competition and reproduction. With adaptive dynamics and critical function analysis we investigate the evolution of dispersal strategies and ask whether adaptive diversification is possible. We exclude evolutionary branching for concave trade-offs and show that for convex trade-offs diversification is promoted in a narrow parameter range. We provide theoretical evidence that dispersal strategies can monotonically decrease with increasing survival during dispersal. Moreover, we illustrate the existence of two alternative attracting dispersal strategies. The model exhibits fold bifurcation points where slight changes in survival can lead to evolutionary catastrophes.

  11. The role of dispersants' dynamic interfacial tension in effective crude oil spill dispersion.

    PubMed

    Riehm, David A; McCormick, Alon V

    2014-07-15

    The dispersion effectiveness of dispersants containing Tween 80, Span 80, and dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DOSS) was characterized using a modified Swirling Flask test, and was correlated with both initial and dynamic interfacial tension produced by those dispersants at an oil-water interface. Compositional trends in effectiveness were shown to be governed by: (1) initial oil-water interfacial tension observed upon dispersant-oil-saltwater contact; (2) rate of increase (or decrease) from the initial interfacial tension as DOSS was rapidly lost to the aqueous phase; and (3) gradually slowing kinetics of dispersant adsorption to the oil-water interface as Span 80 concentration was increased, which ultimately diminished dispersion effectiveness considerably even as dynamic interfacial tension remained <10(-3) mN/m. It is proposed that this third phenomenon results not only from the hydrophobicity of Span 80, but also from the dependence of mixed Tween-Span-DOSS reverse micelles' stability in crude oil on dispersant composition.

  12. Random cyclic matrices.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sudhir R; Srivastava, Shashi C L

    2008-09-01

    We present a Gaussian ensemble of random cyclic matrices on the real field and study their spectral fluctuations. These cyclic matrices are shown to be pseudosymmetric with respect to generalized parity. We calculate the joint probability distribution function of eigenvalues and the spacing distributions analytically and numerically. For small spacings, the level spacing distribution exhibits either a Gaussian or a linear form. Furthermore, for the general case of two arbitrary complex eigenvalues, leaving out the spacings among real eigenvalues, and, among complex conjugate pairs, we find that the spacing distribution agrees completely with the Wigner distribution for a Poisson process on a plane. The cyclic matrices occur in a wide variety of physical situations, including disordered linear atomic chains and the Ising model in two dimensions. These exact results are also relevant to two-dimensional statistical mechanics and nu -parametrized quantum chromodynamics. PMID:18851127

  13. Structure of random foam.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinelt, Douglas A.; van Swol, Frank B.; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2004-06-01

    The Surface Evolver was used to compute the equilibrium microstructure of dry soap foams with random structure and a wide range of cell-size distributions. Topological and geometric properties of foams and individual cells were evaluated. The theory for isotropic Plateau polyhedra describes the dependence of cell geometric properties on their volume and number of faces. The surface area of all cells is about 10% greater than a sphere of equal volume; this leads to a simple but accurate theory for the surface free energy density of foam. A novel parameter based on the surface-volume mean bubble radius R32 is used to characterize foam polydispersity. The foam energy, total cell edge length, and average number of faces per cell all decrease with increasing polydispersity. Pentagonal faces are the most common in monodisperse foam but quadrilaterals take over in highly polydisperse structures.

  14. Alpha-dispersion in human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimnes, Sverre; Martinsen, Ørjan G.

    2010-04-01

    Beta dispersion is found in living tissue in the kilohertz - megahertz range and is caused by the cellular structure of biological materials with low frequency properties caused by cell membranes. Alpha dispersion is found in the hertz range and the causes are not so well known. Alpha dispersions are the first to disappear when tissue dies. Tissue data have often been based upon excised specimen from animals and are therefore not necessarily representative for human tissue alpha dispersions. Here we present data obtained with non-invasive skin surface electrodes for different segments of the living human body. We found alpha dispersions in all cases; the ankle-wrist results had the smallest. Large alpha dispersions were found where the distance between the electrodes and muscle masses was small, e.g. on the calf. Further studies on electrode technique and reciprocity, electrode positioning, statistical variations, gender, age and bodily constitutions are necessary in order to reveal more about the alpha dispersion, its appearance and disappearance.

  15. CONTOURING RANDOMLY SPACED DATA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamm, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    This program prepares contour plots of three-dimensional randomly spaced data. The contouring techniques use a triangulation procedure developed by Dr. C. L. Lawson of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory which allows the contouring of randomly spaced input data without first fitting the data into a rectangular grid. The program also allows contour points to be fitted with a smooth curve using an interpolating spline under tension. The input data points to be contoured are read from a magnetic tape or disk file with one record for each data point. Each record contains the X and Y coordinates, value to be contoured, and an alternate contour value (if applicable). The contour data is then partitioned by the program to reduce core storage requirements. Output consists of the contour plots and user messages. Several output options are available to the user such as: controlling which value in the data record is to be contoured, whether contours are drawn by polygonal lines or by a spline under tension (smooth curves), and controlling the contour level labels which may be suppressed if desired. The program can handle up to 56,000 data points and provide for up to 20 contour intervals for a multiple number of parameters. This program was written in FORTRAN IV for implementation on a CDC 6600 computer using CALCOMP plotting capabilities. The field length required is dependent upon the number of data points to be contoured. The program requires 42K octal storage locations plus the larger of: 24 times the maximum number of points in each data partition (defaults to maximum of 1000 data points in each partition with 20 percent overlap) or 2K plus four times the total number of points to be plotted. This program was developed in 1975.

  16. Generalized dispersive wave emission in nonlinear fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Webb, K E; Xu, Y Q; Erkintalo, M; Murdoch, S G

    2013-01-15

    We show that the emission of dispersive waves in nonlinear fiber optics is not limited to soliton-like pulses propagating in the anomalous dispersion regime. We demonstrate, both numerically and experimentally, that pulses propagating in the normal dispersion regime can excite resonant dispersive radiation across the zero-dispersion wavelength into the anomalous regime.

  17. Dispersion Method Using Focused Ultrasonic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungsoon; Kim, Moojoon; Ha, Kanglyel; Chu, Minchul

    2010-07-01

    The dispersion of powders into liquids has become one of the most important techniques in high-tech industries and it is a common process in the formulation of various products, such as paint, ink, shampoo, beverages, and polishing media. In this study, an ultrasonic system with a cylindrical transducer is newly introduced for pure nanoparticle dispersion. The acoustics pressure field and the characteristics of the shock pulse caused by cavitation are investigated. The frequency spectrum of the pulse from the collapse of air bubbles in the cavitation is analyzed theoretically. It was confirmed that a TiO2 water suspension can be dispersed effectively using the suggested system.

  18. Plasma Dispersion Function for the Kappa Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podesta, John J.

    2004-01-01

    The plasma dispersion function is computed for a homogeneous isotropic plasma in which the particle velocities are distributed according to a Kappa distribution. An ordinary differential equation is derived for the plasma dispersion function and it is shown that the solution can be written in terms of Gauss' hypergeometric function. Using the extensive theory of the hypergeometric function, various mathematical properties of the plasma dispersion function are derived including symmetry relations, series expansions, integral representations, and closed form expressions for integer and half-integer values of K.

  19. Characterizing SWCNT Dispersion in Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillehei, Peter T.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Gibbons, Luke; Park, Cheol

    2007-01-01

    The new wave of single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) infused composites will yield structurally sound multifunctional nanomaterials. The SWCNT network requires thorough dispersion within the polymer matrix in order to maximize the benefits of the nanomaterial. However, before any nanomaterials can be used in aerospace applications a means of quality assurance and quality control must be certified. Quality control certification requires a means of quantification, however, the measurement protocol mandates a method of seeing the dispersion first. We describe here the new tools that we have developed and implemented to first be able to see carbon nanotubes in polymers and second to measure or quantify the dispersion of the nanotubes.

  20. Stationary one-dimensional dispersive shock waves.

    PubMed

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Kamchatnov, Anatoly M

    2012-02-01

    We address shock waves generated upon the interaction of tilted plane waves with negative refractive index defects in defocusing media with linear gain and two-photon absorption. We found that, in contrast to conservative media where one-dimensional dispersive shock waves usually exist only as nonstationary objects expanding away from a defect or generating beam, the competition between gain and two-photon absorption in a dissipative medium results in the formation of localized stationary dispersive shock waves, whose transverse extent may considerably exceed that of the refractive index defect. One-dimensional dispersive shock waves are stable if the defect strength does not exceed a certain critical value.

  1. Dispersion properties of three-layered orthotropic shells

    SciTech Connect

    Markus, S.

    1995-05-01

    This paper studies the harmonic wave propagation in thick, cylindrical, three-layered shells of infinite length. Both the outer layers and the core are composites made of short strand fiberglass and polyester resin. The randomly oriented fibers were approximately in parallel planes to constitute a transversely isotropic fibre composite. The planes of isotropy in the outer layers are orthogonal to the plane of isotropy at the core. A closed form solution of the exact linear equations of elasticity in sought in terms of a Frobenius series. The influence of the core thickness on the dynamics of the wave motion is estimated from numerically computed dispersion curves. Asymmetric wave motion is given prime consideration and the different types of waves which can occur are identified over a wide range of wave numbers.

  2. Numerical studies of three-dimensional stochastic Darcy's equation and stochastic advection-diffusion-dispersion equation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2010-04-01

    In this study, we solve the three-dimensional stochastic Darcy's equation and stochastic advection-diffusion-dispersion equation using a probabilistic collocation method (PCM) on sparse grids. Karhunen-Lo\\`{e}ve (KL) decomposition is employed to represent the three-dimensional log hydraulic conductivity $Y=\\ln K_s$. The numerical examples which demonstrate the convergence of PCM are presented. It appears that the faster convergence rate in the variance can be obtained by using the Jacobi-chaos representing the truncated Gaussian distributions than using the Hermite-chaos for the Gaussian distribution. The effect of dispersion coefficient on the mean and standard deviation of the hydraulic head and solute concentration is investigated. Additionally, we also study how the statistical properties of the hydraulic head and solute concentration vary while using different types of random distributions and different standard deviations of random hydraulic conductivity.

  3. How random are random numbers generated using photons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, Aldo; Angulo Martínez, Alí M.; Ramírez Alarcón, Roberto; Cruz Ramírez, Hector; U'Ren, Alfred B.; Hirsch, Jorge G.

    2015-06-01

    Randomness is fundamental in quantum theory, with many philosophical and practical implications. In this paper we discuss the concept of algorithmic randomness, which provides a quantitative method to assess the Borel normality of a given sequence of numbers, a necessary condition for it to be considered random. We use Borel normality as a tool to investigate the randomness of ten sequences of bits generated from the differences between detection times of photon pairs generated by spontaneous parametric downconversion. These sequences are shown to fulfil the randomness criteria without difficulties. As deviations from Borel normality for photon-generated random number sequences have been reported in previous work, a strategy to understand these diverging findings is outlined.

  4. Quantum random walk polynomial and quantum random walk measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yuanbao; Wang, Caishi

    2014-05-01

    In the paper, we introduce a quantum random walk polynomial (QRWP) that can be defined as a polynomial , which is orthogonal with respect to a quantum random walk measure (QRWM) on , such that the parameters are in the recurrence relations and satisfy . We firstly obtain some results of QRWP and QRWM, in which case the correspondence between measures and orthogonal polynomial sequences is one-to-one. It shows that any measure with respect to which a quantum random walk polynomial sequence is orthogonal is a quantum random walk measure. We next collect some properties of QRWM; moreover, we extend Karlin and McGregor's representation formula for the transition probabilities of a quantum random walk (QRW) in the interacting Fock space, which is a parallel result with the CGMV method. Using these findings, we finally obtain some applications for QRWM, which are of interest in the study of quantum random walk, highlighting the role played by QRWP and QRWM.

  5. STS-1 operational flight profile. Volume 5: Descent, cycle 3. Appendix C: Monte Carlo dispersion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The results of three nonlinear the Monte Carlo dispersion analyses for the Space Transportation System 1 Flight (STS-1) Orbiter Descent Operational Flight Profile, Cycle 3 are presented. Fifty randomly selected simulation for the end of mission (EOM) descent, the abort once around (AOA) descent targeted line are steep target line, and the AOA descent targeted to the shallow target line are analyzed. These analyses compare the flight environment with system and operational constraints on the flight environment and in some cases use simplified system models as an aid in assessing the STS-1 descent flight profile. In addition, descent flight envelops are provided as a data base for use by system specialists to determine the flight readiness for STS-1. The results of these dispersion analyses supersede results of the dispersion analysis previously documented.

  6. Directed seed dispersal towards areas with low conspecific tree density by a scatter-hoarding rodent.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Ben T; Kays, Roland; Pereira, Verónica E; Jansen, Patrick A; Rejmanek, Marcel

    2012-12-01

    Scatter-hoarding animals spread out cached seeds to reduce density-dependent theft of their food reserves. This behaviour could lead to directed dispersal into areas with lower densities of conspecific trees, where seed and seedling survival are higher, and could profoundly affect the spatial structure of plant communities. We tested this hypothesis with Central American agoutis and Astrocaryum standleyanum palm seeds on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. We radio-tracked seeds as they were cached and re-cached by agoutis, calculated the density of adult Astrocaryum trees surrounding each cache, and tested whether the observed number of trees around seed caches declined more than expected under random dispersal. Seedling establishment success was negatively dependent on seed density, and agoutis carried seeds towards locations with lower conspecific tree densities, thus facilitating the escape of seeds from natural enemies. This behaviour may be a widespread mechanism leading to highly effective seed dispersal by scatter-hoarding animals.

  7. Parallelisation of the Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model NAME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Eike H.; Ford, Rupert; Hort, Matthew C.; Huggett, Lois; Riley, Graham; Thomson, David J.

    2013-12-01

    The NAME Atmospheric Dispersion Model is a Lagrangian particle model used by the Met Office to predict the propagation and spread of pollutants in the atmosphere. The model is routinely used in emergency response applications, where it is important to obtain results as quickly as possible. This requirement for a short runtime and the increase in core number of commonly available CPUs, such as the Intel Xeon series, has motivated the parallelisation of NAME in the OPENMP shared memory framework. In this work we describe the implementation of this parallelisation strategy in NAME and discuss the performance of the model for different setups. Due to the independence of the model particles, the parallelisation of the main compute intensive loops is relatively straightforward. The random number generator for modelling sub-grid scale turbulent motion needs to be adapted to ensure that different particles use independent sets of random numbers. We find that on Intel Xeon X5680 CPUs the model shows very good strong scaling up to 12 cores in a realistic emergency response application for predicting the dispersion of volcanic ash in the North Atlantic airspace. We implemented a mechanism for asynchronous reading of meteorological data from disk and demonstrate how this can reduce the runtime if disk access plays a significant role in a model run. To explore the performance on different chip architectures we also ported the part of the code which is used for calculating the gamma dose from a cloud of radioactive particles to a graphics processing unit (GPU) using CUDA-C. We were able to demonstrate a significant speedup of around one order of magnitude relative to the serial CPU version.

  8. Dispersion modeling of thermal power plant emissions on stochastic space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorle, J. M. R.; Sambana, N. R.

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to couple a deterministic atmospheric dispersion solver based on Gaussian model with a nonintrusive stochastic model to quantify the propagation of multiple uncertainties. The nonintrusive model is based on probabilistic collocation framework. The advantage of nonintrusive nature is to retain the existing deterministic plume dispersion model without missing the accuracy in extracting the statistics of stochastic solution. The developed model is applied to analyze the SO2 emission released from coal firing unit in the second stage of the National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC) in Dadri, India using "urban" conditions. The entire application is split into two cases, depending on the source of uncertainty. In case 1, the uncertainties in stack gas exit conditions are used to construct the stochastic space while in case 2, meteorological conditions are considered as the sources of uncertainty. Both cases develop 2D uncertain random space in which the uncertainty propagation is quantified in terms of plume rise and pollutant concentration distribution under slightly unstable atmospheric stability conditions. Starting with deterministic Gaussian plume model demonstration and its application, development of stochastic collocation model, convergence study, error analysis, and uncertainty quantification are presented in this paper.

  9. Dispersion, sorption and photodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in dispersant-seawater-sediment systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao; Liu, Wen; Fu, Jie; Cai, Zhengqing; O'Reilly, S E; Zhao, Dongye

    2016-08-15

    This work examined effects of model oil dispersants on dispersion, sorption and photodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in simulated marine systems. Three dispersants (Corexit 9500A, Corexit 9527A and SPC 1000) were used to prepare dispersed water accommodated oil (DWAO). While higher doses of dispersants dispersed more n-alkanes and PAHs, Corexit 9500A preferentially dispersed C11-C20 n-alkanes, whereas Corexit 9527A was more favorable for smaller alkanes (C10-C16), and SPC 1000 for C12-C28 n-alkanes. Sorption of petroleum hydrocarbons on sediment was proportional to TPH types/fractions in the DWAOs. Addition of 18mg/L of Corexit 9500A increased sediment uptake of 2-3 ring PAHs, while higher dispersant doses reduced the uptake, due to micelle-enhanced solubilization effects. Both dispersed n-alkanes and PAHs were susceptible to photodegradation under simulated sunlight. For PAHs, both photodegradation and photo-facilitated alkylation were concurrently taking place. The information can facilitate sounder assessment of fate and distribution of dispersed oil hydrocarbons in marine systems. PMID:27318763

  10. Dispersion, sorption and photodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in dispersant-seawater-sediment systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao; Liu, Wen; Fu, Jie; Cai, Zhengqing; O'Reilly, S E; Zhao, Dongye

    2016-08-15

    This work examined effects of model oil dispersants on dispersion, sorption and photodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in simulated marine systems. Three dispersants (Corexit 9500A, Corexit 9527A and SPC 1000) were used to prepare dispersed water accommodated oil (DWAO). While higher doses of dispersants dispersed more n-alkanes and PAHs, Corexit 9500A preferentially dispersed C11-C20 n-alkanes, whereas Corexit 9527A was more favorable for smaller alkanes (C10-C16), and SPC 1000 for C12-C28 n-alkanes. Sorption of petroleum hydrocarbons on sediment was proportional to TPH types/fractions in the DWAOs. Addition of 18mg/L of Corexit 9500A increased sediment uptake of 2-3 ring PAHs, while higher dispersant doses reduced the uptake, due to micelle-enhanced solubilization effects. Both dispersed n-alkanes and PAHs were susceptible to photodegradation under simulated sunlight. For PAHs, both photodegradation and photo-facilitated alkylation were concurrently taking place. The information can facilitate sounder assessment of fate and distribution of dispersed oil hydrocarbons in marine systems.

  11. Finite difference time domain modeling of dispersion from heterogeneous ground properties in ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Jennifer Jane

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a common technique for locating buried objects in the near surface. The near surface is never perfectly homogeneous due to different moisture levels, grain packing, and types of material that influence the properties in the subsurface. This dissertation examines the influence of heterogeneity on GPR measurements, its influence on spatial dispersion, and defining the GPR response from a range of standard deviations of different numerical models. Most modeling in GPR concentrates on antenna patterns or dispersion caused by complex permittivity in homogeneous blocks of material. The forward model developed in this dissertation incorporates heterogeneity by replacing the traditional homogenous spatial regions with a distribution of physical properties. The models in this dissertation maintain the major spatial model boundaries, but the physical model values within each boundary are determined by a statistical distribution. Statistical approximations of heterogeneity of the physical property distributions can provide an approximation of the geologic noise that influences GPR measurements. This dissertation presents a numerical modeling analysis of random property variation, where the variations occur in one, two, and three directions. The models are developed for a half space and a two layered earth model where the input is a Ricker wavelet. Most of the visible spatial dispersion of the electrical field in both the half space and the layered earth models studied in this dissertation, occurred in the near region of the electromagnetic field. However, the largest average dispersion occurred in the far field at 1.0 m distance from a dipole source. The presence of horizontal layers increased the dispersive effects of the random distribution of electrical property values. There was also a measurable change in the dispersed field when the layers were vertical. There was more change with thin horizontal layers than with tubes or three

  12. Dispersal Timing: Emigration of Insects Living in Patchy Environments

    PubMed Central

    Lakovic, Milica; Poethke, Hans-Joachim; Hovestadt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Dispersal is a life-history trait affecting dynamics and persistence of populations; it evolves under various known selective pressures. Theoretical studies on dispersal typically assume 'natal dispersal', where individuals emigrate right after birth. But emigration may also occur during a later moment within a reproductive season ('breeding dispersal'). For example, some female butterflies first deposit eggs in their natal patch before migrating to other site(s) to continue egg-laying there. How breeding compared to natal dispersal influences the evolution of dispersal has not been explored. To close this gap we used an individual-based simulation approach to analyze (i) the evolution of timing of breeding dispersal in annual organisms, (ii) its influence on dispersal (compared to natal dispersal). Furthermore, we tested (iii) its performance in direct evolutionary contest with individuals following a natal dispersal strategy. Our results show that evolution should typically result in lower dispersal under breeding dispersal, especially when costs of dispersal are low and population size is small. By distributing offspring evenly across two patches, breeding dispersal allows reducing direct sibling competition in the next generation whereas natal dispersal can only reduce trans-generational kin competition by producing highly dispersive offspring in each generation. The added benefit of breeding dispersal is most prominent in patches with small population sizes. Finally, the evolutionary contests show that a breeding dispersal strategy would universally out-compete natal dispersal. PMID:26132493

  13. Dispersion properties of x-ray waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Pelliccia, D.; Bukreeva, I.; Cedola, A.; Lagomarsino, S

    2006-04-20

    We study the propagation of ultrashort pulses in x-ray waveguides (WGs) by addressing the problem of the temporal dispersion. Starting from basic equations, by means of numerical calculation we demonstrate that far from the absorption edges of the WGs the cladding's material dispersion is negligible. However, close to the absorption edge significant dispersion can take place. This behavior could in principle be exploited to manipulate incoming chirped beams. Moreover, using the two coherent beams produced by the WG in the second (and higher) order of resonance suggests the use of the WC as a dispersion-free beam splitter, which can facilitate x-ray pump-probe experiments in the femtosecond temporal range without the need for external sources.

  14. Dispersive shock waves with nonlocal nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Barsi, Christopher; Wan, Wenjie; Sun, Can; Fleischer, Jason W

    2007-10-15

    We consider dispersive optical shock waves in nonlocal nonlinear media. Experiments are performed using spatial beams in a thermal liquid cell, and results agree with a hydrodynamic theory of propagation.

  15. Tackifier Dispersions to Make Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Development of new processes for tackifier dispersion could improve the production of pressure sensitive adhesives. Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) have the ability to adhere to different surfaces with manual or finger pressure.

  16. Controlling Dispersion Characteristics of Terahertz Metasurface

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Shi-Wei; Wu, Wei-Wei; Chen, Bao-Jie; Yi, Huan; Bai, Xue; Ng, Kung Bo; Chan, Chi Hou

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) metasurfaces have been explored recently due to their properties such as low material loss and ease of fabrication compared to three-dimensional (3D) metamaterials. Although the dispersion properties of the reflection/transmission-type THz metasurface were observed in some published literature, the method to control them at will has been scarcely reported to the best of our knowledge. In this context, flexible dispersion control of the THz metasurface will lead to great opportunities toward unprecedented THz devices. As an example, a THz metasurface with controllable dispersion characteristics has been successfully demonstrated in this article, and the incident waves at different frequencies from a source in front of the metasurface can be projected into different desired anomalous angular positions. Furthermore, this work provides a potential approach to other kinds of novel THz devices that need controllable metasurface dispersion properties. PMID:25797336

  17. The Flying Sunflower: A Seed Dispersal Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buege, Douglas J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes an open-ended activity in which students build a "plant" that launches its seeds as far as possible to study the dispersal strategies of various plants. Recommends extension activities for elementary- and secondary-level students. (WRM)

  18. PROBABILISTIC CHARACTERIZATION OF ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DISPERSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dispersion models are used to assess the possible extent and severity of accidental or terrorist releases of toxic materials. Most operational models only provide a characterization of average concentrations and conditions following a release. Knowledge of the variability about...

  19. Metal/molecule interfaces: Dispersion forces unveiled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ruitenbeek, Jan

    2012-10-01

    The role of dispersion forces in molecule-metal bonding has often been underestimated or ignored. Two groups now report independent single-molecule experiments that illustrate and quantify the effect of such interactions on bonding strength.

  20. Chirped mirrors with low dispersion ripple.

    PubMed

    Pervak, V; Naumov, S; Krausz, F; Apolonski, A

    2007-10-17

    We demonstrate a chirped dielectric multilayer mirror (CM) with controlled reflectivity and dispersion in the wavelength range 760-840 nm. It exhibits a reflectivity of >99.9% and a mean group delay dispersion (GDD) of about -30 fs(2) with a theoretical GDD ripple of less than 0.5 fs(2) in the working spectral range. Deviations of the measured GDD from the calculated one are restricted to less than +/- 3 fs(2), limited by our measurement system. Simulations reveal that a dispersive delay line composed of 120 bounces off these mirrors introduces negligible distortion to a femtosecond pulse and largely preserves its contrast. The mirrors constitute an ideal tool for precision intracavity or extracavity dispersion control in the range of several thousand fs(2), particularly if pulses with high contrast are to be generated.

  1. Interlayer excitons with tunable dispersion relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Interlayer excitons, comprising an electron in one material bound by Coulomb attraction to a hole in an adjacent material, are composite bosons that can assume a variety of many-body phases. The phase diagram of the bosonic system is largely determined by the dispersion relation of the bosons, which itself arises as a combination of the dispersion relations of the electron and hole separately. Here I show that in situations where either the electron or the hole has a nonmonotonic, "Mexican hat-shaped" dispersion relation, the exciton dispersion relation can have a range of qualitatively different forms, each corresponding to a different many-body phase at low temperature. This diversity suggests a platform for continuously tuning between different quantum phases using an external field.

  2. Landscape connectivity and seed dispersal characteristics inform the best management strategy for exotic plants.

    PubMed

    Minor, Emily S; Gardner, Robert H

    2011-04-01

    Exotic plant invasions have triggered environmental and economic problems throughout the world. Our ability to manage these invasions is hindered by the difficulty of predicting spread in fragmented landscapes. Because the spatial pattern of invasions depends on the dispersal characteristics of the invasive species and the configuration of suitable habitat within the landscape, a universal management strategy is unlikely to succeed for any particular species. We suggest that the most effective management strategy may be an adaptive one that shifts from local control to landscape management depending on the specific invader and landscape. In particular, we addressed the question of where management activities should be focused to minimize spread of the invading species. By simulating an invasion across a real landscape (Antietam National Battlefield in Maryland, USA), we examined the importance of patch size and connectivity to management success. We found that the best management strategy depended on the dispersal characteristics of the exotic species. Species with a high probability of random long-distance dispersal were best managed by focusing on the largest patches, while species with a lower probability of random long-distance dispersal were best managed by considering landscape configuration and connectivity of the patches. Connectivity metrics from network analysis were useful for identifying the most effective places to focus management efforts. These results provide insight into invasion patterns of various species and suggest a general rule for managers in National Parks and other places where invasive species are a concern.

  3. Landscape connectivity and seed dispersal characteristics inform the best management strategy for exotic plants.

    PubMed

    Minor, Emily S; Gardner, Robert H

    2011-04-01

    Exotic plant invasions have triggered environmental and economic problems throughout the world. Our ability to manage these invasions is hindered by the difficulty of predicting spread in fragmented landscapes. Because the spatial pattern of invasions depends on the dispersal characteristics of the invasive species and the configuration of suitable habitat within the landscape, a universal management strategy is unlikely to succeed for any particular species. We suggest that the most effective management strategy may be an adaptive one that shifts from local control to landscape management depending on the specific invader and landscape. In particular, we addressed the question of where management activities should be focused to minimize spread of the invading species. By simulating an invasion across a real landscape (Antietam National Battlefield in Maryland, USA), we examined the importance of patch size and connectivity to management success. We found that the best management strategy depended on the dispersal characteristics of the exotic species. Species with a high probability of random long-distance dispersal were best managed by focusing on the largest patches, while species with a lower probability of random long-distance dispersal were best managed by considering landscape configuration and connectivity of the patches. Connectivity metrics from network analysis were useful for identifying the most effective places to focus management efforts. These results provide insight into invasion patterns of various species and suggest a general rule for managers in National Parks and other places where invasive species are a concern. PMID:21639041

  4. Distinguishing the importance between habitat specialization and dispersal limitation on species turnover

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixiong; Wang, Xiaoan; Guo, Hua; Fan, Weiyi; Lv, Haiying; Duan, Renyan

    2013-01-01

    Understanding what governs community assembly and the maintenance of biodiversity is a central issue in ecology, but has been a continuing debate. A key question is the relative importance of habitat specialization (niche assembly) and dispersal limitation (dispersal assembly). In the middle of the Loess Plateau, northwestern China, we examined how species turnover in Liaodong oak (Quercus wutaishanica) forests differed between observed and randomized assemblies, and how this difference was affected by habitat specialization and dispersal limitation using variation partitioning. Results showed that expected species turnover based on individual randomization was significantly lower than the observed value (P < 0.01). The turnover deviation significantly depended on the environmental and geographical distances (P < 0.05). Environmental and spatial variables significantly explained approximately 40% of the species composition variation at all the three layers (P < 0.05). However, their contributions varied among forest layers; the herb and shrub layers were dominated by environmental factors, whereas the canopy layer was dominated by spatial factors. Our results underscore the importance of synthetic models that integrate effects of both dispersal and niche assembly for understanding the community assembly. However, habitat specialization (niche assembly) may not always be the dominant process in community assembly, even under harsh environments. Community assembly may be in a trait-dependent manner (e.g., forest layers in this study). Thus, taking more species traits into account would strengthen our confidence in the inferred assembly mechanisms. PMID:24223289

  5. Testing the directed dispersal hypothesis: are native ant mounds (Formica sp.) favorable microhabitats for an invasive plant?

    PubMed

    Berg-Binder, Moni C; Suarez, Andrew V

    2012-07-01

    Ant-mediated seed dispersal may be a form of directed dispersal if collected seeds are placed in a favorable microhabitat (e.g., in or near an ant nest) that increases plant establishment, growth, and/or reproduction relative to random locations. We investigated whether the native ant community interacts with invasive leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula) in a manner consistent with predictions of the directed dispersal hypothesis. Resident ants quickly located and dispersed 60% of experimentally offered E. esula seeds. Additionally, 40% of seeds whose final deposition site was observed were either brought inside or placed on top of an ant nest. Seed removal was 100% when seeds were placed experimentally on foraging trails of mound-building Formica obscuripes, although the deposition site of these seeds is unknown. Natural density and above-ground biomass of E. esula were greater on Formica mound edges compared to random locations. However, seedling recruitment and establishment from experimentally planted E. esula seeds was not greater on mound edges than random locations 3 m from the mound. Soil from Formica mound edges was greater in available nitrogen and available phosphorus relative to random soil locations 3 m from the mound. These results suggest Formica ant mounds are favorable microhabitats for E. esula growth following seedling establishment, a likely consequence of nutrient limitation during plant growth. The results also indicate positive species interactions may play an important role in biological invasions.

  6. Dispersal and survival of a polygynandrous passerine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, Heather R.; Kendall, Steve J.; Wild, Teri C.; Powell, Abby N.

    2015-01-01

    Although sex biases in survival and dispersal are thought to be linked to avian mating systems, little is known about these demographic patterns in less common mating strategies such as polygynandry. We investigated breeding-site fidelity, natal philopatry, and apparent survival of the polygynandrous Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) over a 7-yr period at 2 areas in Alaska's Brooks Range. We used capture–recapture histories of 243 color-banded adults and 431 juveniles to estimate annual survival and determined dispersal patterns from 34 adults that were found breeding within the study areas over multiple years. Most adults (88%) returned to nest in the same breeding neighborhood as in previous years; mean dispersal distance was 300.9 ± 74.2 m and did not differ between sexes. Juveniles exhibited low natal philopatry; only 4% of banded hatch-year birds were resighted as adults during subsequent years. Those that did return dispersed, on average, 1,674.4 ± 465.8 m from their natal nests (n = 6). Model-averaged survival estimates indicated that annual survival of adult females (50–58%) was only slightly lower than that of males (60–63%); juvenile survival was 41% but was paired with a low (13%) encounter probability. We attribute the lack of sex bias in adult dispersal to this species' polygynandrous mating strategy. Within this system, there are multiple mates within a breeding neighborhood. We argue that natural selection may favor females that remain on the same, familiar breeding site, because they do not have to disperse to a new area to find a suitable mate. Dispersal among breeding populations most likely occurs by juveniles returning as adults. Our findings support hypotheses that suggest a relationship between dispersal and mating strategy and provide some of the first insight into the demographic patterns of a polygynandrous passerine.

  7. Calculations of precursor propagation in dispersive dielectrics.

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Larry Donald

    2003-08-01

    The present study is a numerical investigation of the propagation of electromagnetic transients in dispersive media. It considers propagation in water using Debye and composite Rocard-Powles-Lorentz models for the complex permittivity. The study addresses this question: For practical transmitted spectra, does precursor propagation provide any features that can be used to advantage over conventional signal propagation in models of dispersive media of interest? A companion experimental study is currently in progress that will attempt to measure the effects studied here.

  8. Dispersion of carbon nanotubes using organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Dumonteil, S; Demortier, A; Detriche, S; Raes, C; Fonseca, A; Rühle, M; Nagy, J B

    2006-05-01

    Phenyl ethyl alcohol was used for fast and stable dispersion of carbon nanotubes. This solvent, more effective than ethanol and toluene, allows easy dispersion of carbon nanotubes for TEM characterization. For TEM grids prepared at high dilution, it is possible to observe each tube separately. Applying that solvent, it was possible to measure the length, the diameter and the solubility of different carbon nanotubes samples.

  9. Analysis of dispersal effects in metapopulation models.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Herrera, Alfonso

    2016-02-01

    The interplay between local dynamics and dispersal rates in discrete metapopulation models for homogeneous landscapes is studied. We introduce an approach based on scalar dynamics to study global attraction of equilibria and periodic orbits. This approach applies for any number of patches, dispersal rates, or landscape structure. The existence of chaos in metapopulation models is also discussed. We analyze issues such as sensitive dependence on the initial conditions or short/intermediate/long term behaviours of chaotic orbits. PMID:26032652

  10. URANIUM BISMUTHIDE DISPERSION IN MOLTEN METAL

    DOEpatents

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-10-27

    The formation of intermetallic bismuth compounds of thorium or uranium dispersed in a liquid media containing bismuth and lead is described. A bismuthide of uranium dispersed in a liquid metal medium is formed by dissolving uranium in composition of lead and bismuth containing less than 80% lead and lowering the temperature of the composition to a temperature below the point at which the solubility of uranium is exceeded and above the melting point of the composition.

  11. Invasion speeds with active dispersers in highly variable landscapes: Multiple scales, homogenization, and the migration of trees.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Ram C; Powell, James A

    2015-12-21

    The distribution of many tree species is strongly determined by the behavior and range of vertebrate dispersers, particularly birds. Many models for seed dispersal exist, and are built around the assumption that seeds undergo a random walk while they are being carried by vertebrates, either in the digestive tract or during the process of seed storage (caching). We use a PDF of seed handling (caching and digesting) times to model non-constant seed settling during dispersal, and model the random component of seed movement using ecological diffusion, in which animals make movement choices based purely on local habitat type instead of population gradients. Spatial variability in habitat directly affects the movement of dispersers and leads to anisotropic dispersal kernels. For birds, which can easily move many kilometers, habitat changes on the scale of tens of meters can viewed as rapidly varying. We introduce multiple scales and apply the method of homogenization to determine leading order solutions for the seed digestion kernel (SDK). Using an integrodifference equation (IDE) model for adult trees, we investigate the rate of forest migration. The existing theory for predicting spread rates in IDE does not apply when dispersal kernels are anisotropic. However, the homogenized SDK is isotropic on large scales and depends only on harmonically averaged motilities and modal rates of digestion. We show that speeds calculated using the harmonic average motility accurately predict rates of invasion for the spatially variable system.

  12. Invasion speeds with active dispersers in highly variable landscapes: Multiple scales, homogenization, and the migration of trees.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Ram C; Powell, James A

    2015-12-21

    The distribution of many tree species is strongly determined by the behavior and range of vertebrate dispersers, particularly birds. Many models for seed dispersal exist, and are built around the assumption that seeds undergo a random walk while they are being carried by vertebrates, either in the digestive tract or during the process of seed storage (caching). We use a PDF of seed handling (caching and digesting) times to model non-constant seed settling during dispersal, and model the random component of seed movement using ecological diffusion, in which animals make movement choices based purely on local habitat type instead of population gradients. Spatial variability in habitat directly affects the movement of dispersers and leads to anisotropic dispersal kernels. For birds, which can easily move many kilometers, habitat changes on the scale of tens of meters can viewed as rapidly varying. We introduce multiple scales and apply the method of homogenization to determine leading order solutions for the seed digestion kernel (SDK). Using an integrodifference equation (IDE) model for adult trees, we investigate the rate of forest migration. The existing theory for predicting spread rates in IDE does not apply when dispersal kernels are anisotropic. However, the homogenized SDK is isotropic on large scales and depends only on harmonically averaged motilities and modal rates of digestion. We show that speeds calculated using the harmonic average motility accurately predict rates of invasion for the spatially variable system. PMID:26453975

  13. Nonvolatile random access memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Katti, Romney R. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A nonvolatile magnetic random access memory can be achieved by an array of magnet-Hall effect (M-H) elements. The storage function is realized with a rectangular thin-film ferromagnetic material having an in-plane, uniaxial anisotropy and inplane bipolar remanent magnetization states. The thin-film magnetic element is magnetized by a local applied field, whose direction is used to form either a 0 or 1 state. The element remains in the 0 or 1 state until a switching field is applied to change its state. The stored information is detcted by a Hall-effect sensor which senses the fringing field from the magnetic storage element. The circuit design for addressing each cell includes transistor switches for providing a current of selected polarity to store a binary digit through a separate conductor overlying the magnetic element of the cell. To read out a stored binary digit, transistor switches are employed to provide a current through a row of Hall-effect sensors connected in series and enabling a differential voltage amplifier connected to all Hall-effect sensors of a column in series. To avoid read-out voltage errors due to shunt currents through resistive loads of the Hall-effect sensors of other cells in the same column, at least one transistor switch is provided between every pair of adjacent cells in every row which are not turned on except in the row of the selected cell.

  14. Spatially embedded random networks.

    PubMed

    Barnett, L; Di Paolo, E; Bullock, S

    2007-11-01

    Many real-world networks analyzed in modern network theory have a natural spatial element; e.g., the Internet, social networks, neural networks, etc. Yet, aside from a comparatively small number of somewhat specialized and domain-specific studies, the spatial element is mostly ignored and, in particular, its relation to network structure disregarded. In this paper we introduce a model framework to analyze the mediation of network structure by spatial embedding; specifically, we model connectivity as dependent on the distance between network nodes. Our spatially embedded random networks construction is not primarily intended as an accurate model of any specific class of real-world networks, but rather to gain intuition for the effects of spatial embedding on network structure; nevertheless we are able to demonstrate, in a quite general setting, some constraints of spatial embedding on connectivity such as the effects of spatial symmetry, conditions for scale free degree distributions and the existence of small-world spatial networks. We also derive some standard structural statistics for spatially embedded networks and illustrate the application of our model framework with concrete examples. PMID:18233726

  15. Spatially embedded random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, L.; di Paolo, E.; Bullock, S.

    2007-11-01

    Many real-world networks analyzed in modern network theory have a natural spatial element; e.g., the Internet, social networks, neural networks, etc. Yet, aside from a comparatively small number of somewhat specialized and domain-specific studies, the spatial element is mostly ignored and, in particular, its relation to network structure disregarded. In this paper we introduce a model framework to analyze the mediation of network structure by spatial embedding; specifically, we model connectivity as dependent on the distance between network nodes. Our spatially embedded random networks construction is not primarily intended as an accurate model of any specific class of real-world networks, but rather to gain intuition for the effects of spatial embedding on network structure; nevertheless we are able to demonstrate, in a quite general setting, some constraints of spatial embedding on connectivity such as the effects of spatial symmetry, conditions for scale free degree distributions and the existence of small-world spatial networks. We also derive some standard structural statistics for spatially embedded networks and illustrate the application of our model framework with concrete examples.

  16. Spatially varying dispersion to model breakthrough curves.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangquan

    2011-01-01

    Often the water flowing in a karst conduit is a combination of contaminated water entering at a sinkhole and cleaner water released from the limestone matrix. Transport processes in the conduit are controlled by advection, mixing (dilution and dispersion), and retention-release. In this article, a karst transport model considering advection, spatially varying dispersion, and dilution (from matrix seepage) is developed. Two approximate Green's functions are obtained using transformation of variables, respectively, for the initial-value problem and for the boundary-value problem. A numerical example illustrates that mixing associated with strong spatially varying conduit dispersion can cause strong skewness and long tailing in spring breakthrough curves. Comparison of the predicted breakthrough curve against that measured from a dye-tracing experiment between Ames Sink and Indian Spring, Northwest Florida, shows that the conduit dispersivity can be as large as 400 m. Such a large number is believed to imply strong solute interaction between the conduit and the matrix and/or multiple flow paths in a conduit network. It is concluded that Taylor dispersion is not dominant in transport in a karst conduit, and the complicated retention-release process between mobile- and immobile waters may be described by strong spatially varying conduit dispersion. PMID:21143474

  17. Uncertainty in spatially explicit animal dispersal models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mooij, Wolf M.; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2003-01-01

    Uncertainty in estimates of survival of dispersing animals is a vexing difficulty in conservation biology. The current notion is that this uncertainty decreases the usefulness of spatially explicit population models in particular. We examined this problem by comparing dispersal models of three levels of complexity: (1) an event-based binomial model that considers only the occurrence of mortality or arrival, (2) a temporally explicit exponential model that employs mortality and arrival rates, and (3) a spatially explicit grid-walk model that simulates the movement of animals through an artificial landscape. Each model was fitted to the same set of field data. A first objective of the paper is to illustrate how the maximum-likelihood method can be used in all three cases to estimate the means and confidence limits for the relevant model parameters, given a particular set of data on dispersal survival. Using this framework we show that the structure of the uncertainty for all three models is strikingly similar. In fact, the results of our unified approach imply that spatially explicit dispersal models, which take advantage of information on landscape details, suffer less from uncertainly than do simpler models. Moreover, we show that the proposed strategy of model development safeguards one from error propagation in these more complex models. Finally, our approach shows that all models related to animal dispersal, ranging from simple to complex, can be related in a hierarchical fashion, so that the various approaches to modeling such dispersal can be viewed from a unified perspective.

  18. Shock Waves in Dispersive Eulerian Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefer, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Shock waves in dispersive media with negligible dissipation are studied in the context of the compressible Euler equations with weak dispersion. Example fluids of this type include superfluids, shallow water flows, and ion-acoustic plasma. A characterization of one-dimensional dispersive shock waves (DSWs) will be presented. DSWs are sharply distinct from classical, dissipatively regularized shock waves both in terms of physical significance and mathematical description. Drawing on terminology from classical gas dynamics, jump conditions (shock loci and speeds) and admissibility criteria for the long time evolution of step-like initial data will be presented utilizing a nonlinear wave averaging technique. While entropy conditions determine admissible, dissipatively regularized shock waves, conservative, dispersive systems are time reversible and can exhibit positive or negative dispersion. The universal structure of weak shocks will be shown to depend solely upon the dispersion sign and pressure law. Large amplitude DSWs can exhibit novel effects such as cavitation and ``implosion'' yielding internal, multi-phase dynamics. Support from NSF DMS-1008973.

  19. Quantification of statistical phenomena in turbulent dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Matthew; Hann, David; Hewakandamby, Buddhika

    2015-11-01

    Understanding of turbulent dispersions is of great importance for environmental and industrial applications. This includes developing a greater understanding of particle movement in atmospheric flows, and providing data that can be used to validate CFD models aimed at producing more accurate simulations of dispersed turbulent flows, aiding design of many industrial components. Statistical phenomena in turbulent dispersions were investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry. Experiments were carried out in a two dimensional channel over a Reynolds number range of 10000-30000, using water and 500 micron hydrogel particles. Particles were injected at the channel entrance, and dispersion properties were characterised at different distances downstream from the injection point. Probability density functions were compiled for the velocity components of the hydrogels for differing flow conditions. Higher order PDFs were constructed to investigate the behaviour of particle pairs. Dispersed phase data was also used to investigate the mechanics of collisions between hydrogel particles, allowing for calculation of the co-efficient of restitution. PIV algorithms were used to create velocity maps for the continuous phase for varying dispersed phase fractions. Thanks to support of Chevron grant as part of TMF consortium.

  20. Dispersing hemipteran vectors have reduced arbovirus prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Amy T.; Brown, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    A challenge in managing vector-borne zoonotic diseases in human and wildlife populations is predicting where epidemics or epizootics are likely to occur, and this requires knowing in part the likelihood of infected insect vectors dispersing pathogens from existing infection foci to novel areas. We measured prevalence of an arbovirus, Buggy Creek virus, in dispersing and resident individuals of its exclusive vector, the ectoparasitic swallow bug (Oeciacus vicarius), that occupies cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) colonies in western Nebraska. Bugs colonizing new colony sites and immigrating into established colonies by clinging to the swallows’ legs and feet had significantly lower virus prevalence than bugs in established colonies and those that were clustering in established colonies before dispersing. The reduced likelihood of infected bugs dispersing to new colony sites indicates that even heavily infected sites may not always export virus to nearby foci at a high rate. Infected arthropods should not be assumed to exhibit the same dispersal or movement behaviour as uninfected individuals, and these differences in dispersal should perhaps be considered in the epidemiology of vector-borne pathogens such as arboviruses. PMID:24694692