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Sample records for range component directional

  1. Spherical mesh adaptive direct search for separating quasi-uncorrelated sources by range-based independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Selvan, S Easter; Borckmans, Pierre B; Chattopadhyay, A; Absil, P-A

    2013-09-01

    It is seemingly paradoxical to the classical definition of the independent component analysis (ICA), that in reality, the true sources are often not strictly uncorrelated. With this in mind, this letter concerns a framework to extract quasi-uncorrelated sources with finite supports by optimizing a range-based contrast function under unit-norm constraints (to handle the inherent scaling indeterminacy of ICA) but without orthogonality constraints. Albeit the appealing contrast properties of the range-based function (e.g., the absence of mixing local optima), the function is not differentiable everywhere. Unfortunately, there is a dearth of literature on derivative-free optimizers that effectively handle such a nonsmooth yet promising contrast function. This is the compelling reason for the design of a nonsmooth optimization algorithm on a manifold of matrices having unit-norm columns with the following objectives: to ascertain convergence to a Clarke stationary point of the contrast function and adhere to the necessary unit-norm constraints more naturally. The proposed nonsmooth optimization algorithm crucially relies on the design and analysis of an extension of the mesh adaptive direct search (MADS) method to handle locally Lipschitz objective functions defined on the sphere. The applicability of the algorithm in the ICA domain is demonstrated with simulations involving natural, face, aerial, and texture images.

  2. Pantaloon Hernia: Obstructed Indirect Component and Direct Component with Cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Kariappa, Mohan Kumar; Harihar, Vivek; Kothudum, Ashwini Rajareddy; Hiremath, Vivekanand Kedarlingayya

    2016-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition in which one or both testes have not passed down into the scrotal sac. It is categorized as true undescended testis in which testes are present in the normal path of descent, and as ectopic testis, in which testes are present at abnormal site. Common complications of cryptorchidism are testicular torsion, subfertility, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer. Here we present a rare case of pantaloon hernia of obstructed indirect component and direct component with cryptorchidism.

  3. Pantaloon Hernia: Obstructed Indirect Component and Direct Component with Cryptorchidism

    PubMed Central

    Kariappa, Mohan Kumar; Hiremath, Vivekanand Kedarlingayya

    2016-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition in which one or both testes have not passed down into the scrotal sac. It is categorized as true undescended testis in which testes are present in the normal path of descent, and as ectopic testis, in which testes are present at abnormal site. Common complications of cryptorchidism are testicular torsion, subfertility, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer. Here we present a rare case of pantaloon hernia of obstructed indirect component and direct component with cryptorchidism. PMID:27579208

  4. Directed light fabrication of rhenium components

    SciTech Connect

    Milewski, J.O.; Thoma, D.J.; Lewis, G.K.

    1997-02-01

    Directed Light Fabrication (DLF) is a direct metal deposition process that fuses powder, delivered by gas into the focal zone of a high powered laser beam to form fully dense near-net shaped components. This is accomplished in one step without the use of molds, dies, forming, pressing, sintering or forging equipment. DLF is performed in a high purity inert environment free from the contaminants associated with conventional processing such as oxide and carbon pickup, lubricants, binding agents, cooling or cleaning agents. Applications using rhenium have historically been limited in part by its workability and cost. This study demonstrates the ability to fuse rhenium metal powder, using a DLF machine, into free standing rods and describes the associated parameter study. Microstructural comparisons between DLF deposited rhenium and commercial rhenium sheet product is performed. This research combined with existing DLF technology demonstrates the feasibility of forming complex rhenium, metal shapes directly from powder.

  5. Additional sampling directions improve detection range of wireless radiofrequency probes

    PubMed Central

    Mada, Marius; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Williams, Guy B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose While MRI is enhancing our knowledge about the structure and function of the human brain, subject motion remains a problem in many clinical applications. Recently, the use of wireless radiofrequency markers with three one‐dimensional (1D) navigators for prospective correction was demonstrated. This method is restricted in the range of motion that can be corrected, however, because of limited information in the 1D readouts. Methods Here, the limitation of techniques for disambiguating marker locations was investigated. It was shown that including more sampling directions extends the tracking range for head rotations. The efficiency of trading readout resolution for speed was explored. Results Tracking of head rotations was demonstrated from −19.2 to 34.4°, −2.7 to 10.0°, and −60.9 to 70.9° in the x‐, y‐, and z‐directions, respectively. In the presence of excessive head motion, the deviation of marker estimates from SPM8 was reduced by 17.1% over existing three‐projection methods. This was achieved by using an additional seven directions, extending the time needed for readouts by a factor of 3.3. Much of this increase may be circumvented by reducing resolution, without compromising accuracy. Conclusion Including additional sampling directions extends the range in which markers can be used, for patients who move a lot. Magn Reson Med 76:913–918, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26418189

  6. Goal-Directed Aiming: Two Components but Multiple Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Digby; Hansen, Steve; Grierson, Lawrence E. M.; Lyons, James; Bennett, Simon J.; Hayes, Spencer J.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the behavioral literature on the control of goal-directed aiming and presents a multiple-process model of limb control. The model builds on recent variants of Woodworth's (1899) two-component model of speed-accuracy relations in voluntary movement and incorporates ideas about dynamic online limb control based on prior…

  7. Ionoacoustics: A new direct method for range verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parodi, Katia; Assmann, Walter

    2015-05-01

    The superior ballistic properties of ion beams may offer improved tumor-dose conformality and unprecedented sparing of organs at risk in comparison to other radiation modalities in external radiotherapy. However, these advantages come at the expense of increased sensitivity to uncertainties in the actual treatment delivery, resulting from inaccuracies of patient positioning, physiological motion and uncertainties in the knowledge of the ion range in living tissue. In particular, the dosimetric selectivity of ion beams depends on the longitudinal location of the Bragg peak, making in vivo knowledge of the actual beam range the greatest challenge to full clinical exploitation of ion therapy. Nowadays, in vivo range verification techniques, which are already, or close to, being investigated in the clinical practice, rely on the detection of the secondary annihilation photons or prompt gammas, resulting from nuclear interaction of the primary ion beam with the irradiated tissue. Despite the initial promising results, these methods utilize a not straightforward correlation between nuclear and electromagnetic processes, and typically require massive and costly instrumentation. On the contrary, the long-term known, yet only recently revisited process of "ionoacoustics", which is generated by local tissue heating especially at the Bragg peak, may offer a more direct approach to in vivo range verification, as reviewed here.

  8. Canopy Components Temperature Retrieval through Bayesian inversion of Directional measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, J.; Verhoef, W.; van der Tol, C.; Jia, L.; Su, Z.

    2008-12-01

    In the calculation of Evapotranspiration the kinematic temperature of the individual canopy components plays a crucial role. Most remote sensing algorithms, like SEBAL and SEBS, use a single surface temperature to calculate the evapotranspiration. These algorithms break down when used for canopies with a heterogeneous kinematic temperature profile. A two-source or four-source approach would result in much more realistic values of the evapotranspiration. Single view Nadir looking sensors are not able to extract the multiple kinetic temperatures with high precision. The use of multi-directional sensors is therefore essential. A bi-angular setup is sufficient to separate soil and canopy temperatures (e.g. Jia et al. 2003). For separation of sunlit and shaded soil or vegetation temperatures measurements at additional angles are needed. Calculation of the component temperatures from measured thermal radiances requires the use of more sophisticated radiative transfer models, because the use of fractional vegetation cover alone is no longer sufficient for an inversion scheme for four components. The radiative transfer model used for the calculation of the component temperatures was the four stream SAIL radiative transfer model (Verhoef et al. 2007). We present the algorithm used and the results obtained for the Bayesian inversion. The results were obtained using several directional measurement configurations. The configurations were chosen such to represent various present and future satellite-borne sensors. In this way the configurations give a clear indication of the possibilities of multi-directional thermal remote sensing. References Jia. L. Li, Z. -I., Menenti, M., Su, Z., Verhoef, W. and Wan, Z. (2003), "A practical algorithm to infer soil and foliage component temperatures from bi-angular ATSR-2 data", International Journal of Remote Sensing, 24:23, 4739-4760. Verhoef, W. Jia, L. Xiao, Q. Su, Z., (2007), "Unified optical-thermal four-stream radiative transfer

  9. Automatic and Direct Identification of Blink Components from Scalp EEG

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wanzeng; Zhou, Zhanpeng; Hu, Sanqing; Zhang, Jianhai; Babiloni, Fabio; Dai, Guojun

    2013-01-01

    Eye blink is an important and inevitable artifact during scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) recording. The main problem in EEG signal processing is how to identify eye blink components automatically with independent component analysis (ICA). Taking into account the fact that the eye blink as an external source has a higher sum of correlation with frontal EEG channels than all other sources due to both its location and significant amplitude, in this paper, we proposed a method based on correlation index and the feature of power distribution to automatically detect eye blink components. Furthermore, we prove mathematically that the correlation between independent components and scalp EEG channels can be translating directly from the mixing matrix of ICA. This helps to simplify calculations and understand the implications of the correlation. The proposed method doesn't need to select a template or thresholds in advance, and it works without simultaneously recording an electrooculography (EOG) reference. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can automatically recognize eye blink components with a high accuracy on entire datasets from 15 subjects. PMID:23959240

  10. Directed long-range molecular migration energized by surface reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harikumar, K. R.; Polanyi, John C.; Zabet-Khosousi, Amir; Czekala, Piotr; Lin, Haiping; Hofer, Werner A.

    2011-05-01

    The recoil of adsorbates away (desorption) and towards (reaction) surfaces is well known. Here, we describe the long-range recoil of adsorbates in the plane of a surface, and accordingly the novel phenomenon of reactions occurring at a substantial distance from the originating event. Three thermal and three electron-induced surface reactions are shown by scanning tunnelling microscopy to propel their physisorbed ethylenic products across the rough surface of Si(100) over a distance of up to 200 Å before an attachment reaction. The recoil energy in the ethylenic products comes from thermal exoergicity or from electronic excitation of chemisorbed alkenes. We propose that the mechanism of migration is a rolling motion, because the recoiling molecule overcomes raised surface obstacles. Electronic excitation of propene causes directional recoil and often end-to-end inversion, suggesting cartwheeling. Ab initio calculations of the halogenation and electron-induced reactions support a model in which asymmetric forces between the molecule and the surface induce rotation and therefore migration.

  11. Principal component analysis under population genetic models of range expansion and admixture.

    PubMed

    François, Olivier; Currat, Mathias; Ray, Nicolas; Han, Eunjung; Excoffier, Laurent; Novembre, John

    2010-06-01

    In a series of highly influential publications, Cavalli-Sforza and colleagues used principal component (PC) analysis to produce maps depicting how human genetic diversity varies across geographic space. Within Europe, the first axis of variation (PC1) was interpreted as evidence for the demic diffusion model of agriculture, in which farmers expanded from the Near East approximately 10,000 years ago and replaced the resident hunter-gatherer populations with little or no interbreeding. These interpretations of the PC maps have been recently questioned as the original results can be reproduced under models of spatially covarying allele frequencies without any expansion. Here, we study PC maps for data simulated under models of range expansion and admixture. Our simulations include a spatially realistic model of Neolithic farmer expansion and assume various levels of interbreeding between farmer and resident hunter-gatherer populations. An important result is that under a broad range of conditions, the gradients in PC1 maps are oriented along a direction perpendicular to the axis of the expansion, rather than along the same axis as the expansion. We propose that this surprising pattern is an outcome of the "allele surfing" phenomenon, which creates sectors of high allele-frequency differentiation that align perpendicular to the direction of the expansion.

  12. Bilayer metasurface for directional launching of cross-polarization component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joonsoo; Lee, Yohan; Yun, Hansik; Park, Hyeonsoo; Lee, Byoungho

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a bilayer metasurface which is capable of launching helicity-inverted wave only in the forward direction. In order to obtain directional scattering characteristics of individual cells, we employed two layers of thin metasurfaces that are separated by a dielectric spacer. Multiple scattering analysis is used to derive design conditions for single metasurface reflectances for each polarization and it was shown that such target reflectances are realizable with split-ring aperture. The unit cell structure optimized for forward-only scattering of cross-polarization component is shown to have power extinction ratio as high as 32. The proposed structure can potentially form a supercell with reflective cells so that geometric phases of transmitted light and reflected light can be independently controlled. The proposed scheme is expected to pave a way to new types of metasurfaces with multiplexed optical functions.

  13. Ranging system which compares an object reflected component of a light beam to a reference component of the light beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclauchlan, J. M.; Auyeung, J.; Tubbs, E. F.; Goss, W. C.; Psaltis, D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A system is described for measuring the distance to an object by comparing a first component of a light pulse that is reflected off the object with a second component of the light pulse that passes along a reference path of known length, which provides great accuracy with a relatively simple and rugged design. The reference path can be changed in precise steps so that it has an equivalent length approximately equal to the path length of the light pulse component that is reflected from the object. The resulting small difference in path lengths can be precisely determined by directing the light pulse components into opposite ends of a detector formed of a material that emits a second harmonic light output at the locations where the opposite going pulses past simultaneously across one another.

  14. Direct and Collisional Excitation of Automotive Fuel Components)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Allen R.; Wilson, Kyle; Sakai, Stephen; Devasher, Rebecca B.

    2010-06-01

    Adding energy directly into the vibrational modes of automotive fuel may reduce the threshold energy required for combustion, without raising the combustion charge temperature. This energy can be supplied either directly via incident laser radiation or indirectly through collision with directly excited molecules. The most common chemical in commercial gasoline, isooctane, does not absorb infrared radiation sufficiently at any wavelength for which an infrared laser is readily available. However, CO2 lasers are relatively cheap, and are available at wavelengths which are absorbed by isopropanol as well as ethanol, which is also a component of commercial gasoline. In this study, the infrared absorption of isopropanol and ethanol in balance isooctane were measured at three wavelengths (10.6 m, 10.2 m, and 9.3 m) of incident CO2 laser radiation. Additional time-resolved emission measurements were performed for these mixtures. The data support the existence of the proposed collisional pathway for energy transfer from ethanol and isopropanol to isooctane.

  15. Bi-Directional Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analyzer System for Long Range Distributed Sensing.

    PubMed

    Guo, Nan; Wang, Liang; Wang, Jie; Jin, Chao; Tam, Hwa-Yaw; Zhang, A Ping; Lu, Chao

    2016-12-16

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel scheme of bi-directional Brillouin time domain analyzer (BD-BOTDA) to extend the sensing range. By deploying two pump-probe pairs at two different wavelengths, the Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) distribution over each half of the whole fiber can be obtained with the simultaneous detection of Brillouin signals in both channels. Compared to the conventional unidirectional BOTDA system of the same sensing range, the proposed BD-BOTDA scheme enables distributed sensing with a performance level comparable to the conventional one with half of the sensing range and a spatial resolution of 2 m, while maintaining the Brillouin signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the BFS uncertainty. Based on this technique, we have achieved distributed temperature sensing with a measurement range of 81.9 km fiber at a spatial resolution of 2 m and BFS uncertainty of ~0.44 MHz without introducing any complicated components or schemes.

  16. Bi-Directional Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analyzer System for Long Range Distributed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Nan; Wang, Liang; Wang, Jie; Jin, Chao; Tam, Hwa-Yaw; Zhang, A. Ping; Lu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel scheme of bi-directional Brillouin time domain analyzer (BD-BOTDA) to extend the sensing range. By deploying two pump-probe pairs at two different wavelengths, the Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) distribution over each half of the whole fiber can be obtained with the simultaneous detection of Brillouin signals in both channels. Compared to the conventional unidirectional BOTDA system of the same sensing range, the proposed BD-BOTDA scheme enables distributed sensing with a performance level comparable to the conventional one with half of the sensing range and a spatial resolution of 2 m, while maintaining the Brillouin signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the BFS uncertainty. Based on this technique, we have achieved distributed temperature sensing with a measurement range of 81.9 km fiber at a spatial resolution of 2 m and BFS uncertainty of ~0.44 MHz without introducing any complicated components or schemes. PMID:27999250

  17. Direct Numerical Simulation of Combustion Using Principal Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owoyele, Opeoluwa; Echekki, Tarek

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the potential of accelerating chemistry integration during the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of complex fuels based on the transport equations of representative scalars that span the desired composition space using principal component analysis (PCA). The transported principal components (PCs) offer significant potential to reduce the computational cost of DNS through a reduction in the number of transported scalars, as well as the spatial and temporal resolution requirements. The strategy is demonstrated using DNS of a premixed methane-air flame in a 2D vortical flow and is extended to the 3D geometry to further demonstrate the computational efficiency of PC transport. The PCs are derived from a priori PCA of a subset of the full thermo-chemical scalars' vector. The PCs' chemical source terms and transport properties are constructed and tabulated in terms of the PCs using artificial neural networks (ANN). Comparison of DNS based on a full thermo-chemical state and DNS based on PC transport based on 6 PCs shows excellent agreement even for species that are not included in the PCA reduction. The transported PCs reproduce some of the salient features of strongly curved and strongly strained flames. The 2D DNS results also show a significant reduction of two orders of magnitude in the computational cost of the simulations, which enables an extension of the PCA approach to 3D DNS under similar computational requirements. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation Grant DMS-1217200.

  18. Goal-directed aiming: two components but multiple processes.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Digby; Hansen, Steve; Grierson, Lawrence E M; Lyons, James; Bennett, Simon J; Hayes, Spencer J

    2010-11-01

    This article reviews the behavioral literature on the control of goal-directed aiming and presents a multiple-process model of limb control. The model builds on recent variants of Woodworth's (1899) two-component model of speed-accuracy relations in voluntary movement and incorporates ideas about dynamic online limb control based on prior expectations about the efferent and afferent consequences of a planned movement. The model considers the relationship between movement speed and accuracy, and how performers adjust their trial-to-trial aiming behavior to find a safe, but fast, zone for movement execution. The model also outlines how the energy and safety costs associated with different movement outcomes contribute to movement planning processes and the control of aiming trajectories. Our theoretical position highlights the importance of advance knowledge about the sensory information that will be available for online control and the need to develop a robust internal representation of expected sensory consequences. We outline how early practice contributes to optimizing strategic planning to avoid worst-case outcomes associated with inherent neural-motor variability. Our model considers the role of both motor development and motor learning in refining feed-forward and online control. The model reconciles procedural and representational accounts of the specificity-of-learning phenomenon. Finally, we examine the breakdown of perceptual-motor precision in several special populations (i.e., Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, autism spectrum disorder, normal aging) within the framework of a multiple-process approach to goal-directed aiming.

  19. Weighted Model Components for Gradient Direction Matching in Overhead Images

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, C W; Nikolaev, S; Paglieroni, D W

    2006-03-17

    Gradient direction matching (GDM) is the main target identification algorithm used in the Image Content Engine project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. GDM is a 3D solid model-based edge-matching algorithm which does not require explicit edge extraction from the source image. The GDM algorithm is presented, identifying areas where performance enhancement seems possible. Improving the process of producing model gradient directions from the solid model by assigning different weights to different parts of the model is an extension tested in the current study. Given a simple geometric model, we attempt to determine, without obvious semantic clues, if different weight values produce significantly better matching accuracy, and how those weights should be assigned to produce the best matching accuracy. Two simple candidate strategies for assigning weights are proposed--pixel-weighted and edge-weighted. We adjust the weights of the components in a simple model of a tractor/semi-trailer using relevance feedback to produce an optimal set of weights for this model and a particular test image. The optimal weights are then compared with pixel and edge-weighting strategies to determine which is most suitable and under what circumstances.

  20. Hot isostatic pressing of direct selective laser sintered metal components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlert, Martin Steven

    2000-10-01

    A new manufacturing process combining the benefits of Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) and Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) has been developed to permit Rapid Prototyping of high performance metal components. The new process uses Direct Metal SLS to produce a gas impermeable HIP container from the same powdered material that will eventually compose the bulk of the part. The SLS generated capsule performs the functions of the sheet metal container in traditional HIP, but unlike a sheet metal container, the SLSed capsule becomes an integral part of the final component. Additionally, SLS can produce a capsule of far greater geometric complexity than can be achieved by sheet metal forming. Two high performance alloys, Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 625, were selected for use in the development of the new process. HIP maps were constructed to predict the densification rate of the two materials during HIP processing. Comparison to experimentally determined densification behavior indicated that the maps provide a useful qualitative description of densification rates; however, the accuracy of quantitative predictions was greatly enhanced by tuning key material parameters based on a limited number of experimental HIP cycles. Microstructural characterization of SLS + HIP samples revealed two distinct regions within the components. The outer SLS processed capsule material exhibited a relatively coarse microstructure comparable to a cast, or multi-layer welded structure. No layer boundaries were discernible in the SLS material, with grains observed to grow epitaxially from previously deposited material. The microstructure of the HIP consolidated core material was similar to conventionally HIP processed powder materials, featuring a fine grain structure and preserved prior particle boundaries. The large variation in grain size between the capsule and core materials was reflected in hardness measurements conducted on the Alloy 625 material; however, the variation in hardness was less

  1. Direct Measurement of Intermediate-Range Casimir-Polder Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, H.; Courteille, Ph. W.; Marzok, C.; Zimmermann, C.; Slama, S.

    2010-02-26

    We present the first direct measurements of Casimir-Polder forces between solid surfaces and atomic gases in the transition regime between the electrostatic short-distance and the retarded long-distance limit. The experimental method is based on ultracold ground-state Rb atoms that are reflected from evanescent wave barriers at the surface of a dielectric glass prism. Our novel approach does not require assumptions about the potential shape. The experimental data are compared to the theoretical predictions valid in the different regimes. They agree best with a full QED calculation.

  2. Directed self-assembly of mesoscopic components for led applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, Anton

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) constitute a rapidly evolving and fast growing technology that promises to replace incandescent bulbs and compact fluorescent lights in many illumination applications. Large-area LED luminaires have a capability to transform lighting by providing a venue for development of smart lighting systems with additional benefits, such as visible light communications, sensing, health and productivity improvement through color temperature control, capability of creating "virtual sky" ceiling, and many others. The objective of this work is to explore directed self-assembly (DSA) approaches suitable for cost-effective assembly of large amount of LEDs and other mesoscopic (i.e. millimeter and sub-millimeter) electronic components and thus to enable manufacturing of smart lighting luminaires. Existing alternative approaches for assembly of semiconductor dies are examined including transfer printing, laser-assisted die transfer, and various directed self-assembly approaches using shape-recognition, magnetic and capillary forces, etc. After comparing their advantages and limitations, we developed two approaches to magnetic force-assisted DSA of LEDs on a large-area substrate in liquid and air medium. The first approach involves pick-up of buoyant and magnetic dies from the liquid surface onto the flexible substrate in a roll-to-roll process. The possibility of high-speed assembly of LED dies is demonstrated, but with a low yield due to the influence of the capillary force of the carrier liquid and the difficulty in ensuring reliable supply of dies to the assembly interface. To overcome the aforementioned challenges this process was modified to assemble the dies by sinking them onto the receiving substrate with a stencil mask on top, demonstrating LED assembly with a very low error rate but at a lower speed. A solder-assisted self-alignment is used to further improve placement precision and to ensure the proper orientation of the dies. The second

  3. Component validation of direct diode 488nm lasers in BD Accuri C6 flow cytometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei P.; Luo, Ningyi D.

    2016-03-01

    The 488nm laser is the most important excitation light source of flow cytometry. The indirect diode (frequency-doubled diode) 488nm lasers are used in the excitation of Becton Dickinson (BD) AccuriTM C6. For using cost effective lasers, we have validated direct diode 488nm lasers as the replacement component of frequency-doubled diode laser. BD Bioscience issued the protocols to cover wavelength, power, noise, and polarization at the operation temperature range of cytometer. Pavilion Integration Corporation (PIC) tested 6 samples as the component validation of direct diode 488nm lasers based on the protocols from BD Biosciences. BD Bioscience also tested one of laser samples to further validate the test results of power, noise, and polarization from PIC.

  4. Bi-Directional Communication: A Critical Component of HAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Known problems with automation include lack of mode awareness, automation brittleness, and risk of miscalibrated trust. Human-Autonomy Teaming (HAT) is essential for improving these problems. This presentation outlines critical components for Human-Autonomy Teaming.

  5. Enhancement of concentration range of chromatographically detectable components with array detector mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Enke, Christie

    2013-02-19

    Methods and instruments for high dynamic range analysis of sample components are described. A sample is subjected to time-dependent separation, ionized, and the ions dispersed with a constant integration time across an array of detectors according to the ions m/z values. Each of the detectors in the array has a dynamically adjustable gain or a logarithmic response function, producing an instrument capable of detecting a ratio of responses or 4 or more orders of magnitude.

  6. Efficient treatment of offsets of internal components in adaptive sub-ranging A/D converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Małkiewicz, Ł.; Jedrzejewski, K.

    2016-09-01

    One of the constraints in manufacturing of sub-ranging ADCs with high ENOB, is a necessity to provide that the internal components have very small offsets. Application of readily available solutions consisting in designing "large" components or using dynamic offset cancelation techniques, increases die size and power consumption. The paper proposes an alternative approach free of these unwanted consequences. There are developed and analyzed three methods of reduction of the influence of offsets on the performance of adaptive sub-ranging ADCs that do not require any changes in the structure of their analog part, varying in whether and where the offsets are compensated. On the basis of the results of simulation analysis, we recommend the latter of the examined methods as most preferable in all conditions, enabling elimination of the influence of offsets to the extent depending on the accuracy of their postproduction measurement and representation in the digital part of the converter. Its application allows improvement of achievable ENOB and significant weakening of the requirements to offsets of the internal components and, in effect, reduction of power consumption and manufacturing costs of the adaptive sub-ranging ADCs.

  7. The Metadiscourse Component: Understanding Writing about Reading Directives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crismore, Avon

    One of the most important functions for metadiscourse (reading directives) is to serve as textual relevance cues. Readers must use metadiscourse to determine the specific task or communicative context for understanding the total meaning of a text. Some of the more common types of metadiscourse include (1) hedges--words used to convey a note of…

  8. Achievement Directed Leadership: Final Report of the Basic Skills Component.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, David C.; And Others

    This report summarizes the development, testing, and dissemination of an instructional improvement program called Achievement Directed Leadership (ADL) during the period of National Institute of Education (NIE) funding for ADL, from late 1977 to late 1985. A brief introductory chapter discusses the context and rationale for the work on ADL, whose…

  9. Sizing Power Components of an Electrically Driven Tail Cone Thruster and a Range Extender

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Ralph H.; Bowman, Cheryl; Jankovsky, Amy

    2016-01-01

    The aeronautics industry has been challenged on many fronts to increase efficiency, reduce emissions, and decrease dependency on carbon-based fuels. This paper provides an overview of the turboelectric and hybrid electric technologies being developed under NASA's Advanced Air Transportation Technology (AATT) Project and discusses how these technologies can impact vehicle design. The discussion includes an overview of key hybrid electric studies and technology investments, the approach to making informed investment decisions based on key performance parameters and mission studies, and the power system architectures for two candidate aircraft. Finally, the power components for a single-aisle turboelectric aircraft with an electrically driven tail cone thruster and for a hybrid-electric nine-passenger aircraft with a range extender are parametrically sized, and the sensitivity of these components to key parameters is presented.

  10. Uncertainty in direction estimation: a comparison of small arrays and three-component stations

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.B.

    1982-10-08

    This report presents a comparison of the relative capabilities of isolated three-component seismometers and small arrays for ascertaining the back-azimuth of regional events. The Cramer-Rao bound, a method well-known in estimation theory, is used to obtain quantitative predictions of the errors to be expected in estimating direction in the presence of noise. These quantitative error estimates form the basis for comparison. The theoretical approach taken assumes spatially coherent signals and incoherent noise. There are ranges of inter-station separation for which these models are reasonable approximations. Within the limitations on array aperture and element density imposed by the spatial correlation lengths of real signals and noise, the theory demonstrates that arrays have a definite advantage over isolated triaxial seismometers in estimating the direction of P waves. The gain in performance is proportional to the product of the aperture and the square root of the number of array elements. The performance of arrays of three-component elements in estimating P wave direction is examined also. Although such arrays have an advantage over arrays of vertical sensors for this purpose, the advantage is slight compared to the increased data bandwidth required. Consequently, the usefulness of horizontal sensors appears to depend on the importance of horizontally polarized phases for monitoring purposes or on the degree of noise polarization. Conditions of highly polarized noise favor the use of triaxial elements, since such noise can be reduced by polarization filtering.

  11. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Haagsman, Henk P.; Roelen, Bernard A.J.

    2010-02-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  12. Interpreting the Geochemistry of the Northern Peninsula Ranges Batholith Using Principle Component Analysis and Spatial Interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompe, L.; Clausen, B. L.; Morton, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Cretaceous northern Peninsular Ranges batholith (PRB) exemplifies emplacement in a combination oceanic arc / continental margin arc setting. Two approaches that can aid in understanding its statistical and spatial geochemistry variation are principle component analysis (PCA) and GIS interpolation mapping. The data analysis primarily used 287 samples from the large granitoid geochemical data set systematically collected by Baird and Welday. Of these, 80 points fell in the western Santa Ana block, 108 in the transitional Perris block, and 99 in the eastern San Jacinto block. In the statistical analysis, multivariate outliers were identified using Mahalanobis distance and excluded. A centered log ratio transformation was used to facilitate working with geochemical concentration values that range over many orders of magnitude. The data was then analyzed using PCA with IBM SPSS 21 reducing 40 geochemical variables to 4 components which are approximately related to the compatible, HFS, HRE, and LIL elements. The 4 components were interpreted as follows: (1) compatible [and negatively correlated incompatible] elements indicate extent of differentiation as typified by SiO2, (2) HFS elements indicate crustal contamination as typified by Sri and Nb/Yb ratios, (3) HRE elements indicate source depth as typified by Sr/Y and Gd/Yb ratios, and (4) LIL elements indicate alkalinity as typified by the K2O/SiO2ratio. Spatial interpolation maps of the 4 components were created with Esri ArcGIS for Desktop 10.2 by interpolating between the sample points using kriging and inverse distance weighting. Across-arc trends on the interpolation maps indicate a general increase from west to east for each of the 4 components, but with local exceptions as follows. The 15km offset on the San Jacinto Fault may be affecting the contours. South of San Jacinto is a west-east band of low Nb/Yb, Gd/Yb, and Sr/Y ratios. The highest Sr/Y ratios in the north central area that decrease further east may

  13. Single-shot acquisition of optical direct and global components using single coded pattern projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Takamasa; Horisaki, Ryoichi; Nakamura, Tomoya; Tanida, Jun

    2015-04-01

    We present a single-shot approach for separating optical direct and global components from an object. The former component is caused by direct illumination that travels from a light source to a point on the object and goes back to a camera directly. The latter one is caused by indirect illumination that travels from the light source to a point on the object through other points and goes back to the camera, such as multi-path reflection, diffusion, and scattering, or from another unintended light source, such as ambient illumination. In this method, the direct component is modulated by a single coded pattern from a projector. The modulated direct and un-modulated global components are integrated on an image sensor, which captures a single image. These two components are separated from the single captured image with a numerical algorithm employing a sparsity constraint. Ambient light separation and descattering based on the proposed scheme are experimentally demonstrated.

  14. Bi-directional flow sensor with a wide dynamic range for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Al-Salaymeh, A; Jovanović, J; Durst, F

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes a novel three-wire thermal flow sensor for medical applications. The present innovation for low-frequency measurements involves the use of a pulsed-wire anemometer with a comparatively large wire diameter (12.5 microm and larger) together with a novel signal processing approach. A small wire is heated using a sinusoidal alternating current, and two sensing wires, acting as resistance thermometers, are set parallel to, and at a small distance on either side of, the pulsed wire. The thermal wake of the pulsed wire is convected downstream to one of the two receiving wires which detect its delayed arrival. This arrangement allows the sensing of both the direction and the flow velocity component normal to the three probes. By appropriate signal processing, the present sensor can be operated such that the phase shift between the periodic current that drives the central wire and the detected signal by either the upstream or downstream wire takes into account a combination of convection, diffusion and the finite thermal response time of both the pulsed wire and the receiving wire. Because the time constants increase as the flow velocity decreases, the time lag due to thermal inertia supplements the time lag due to the true time of flight, thus yielding an effective operating range of 0.05 m/s range of 500:1. This wide velocity range is an order of magnitude larger than that for the traditional time-of-flight pulsed-wire anemometers. An important application of the bi-directional thermal flowmeter is the measurement of human respiration, e.g. for early diagnostics of asthmatic attacks. The main advantage of the present sensor is its low sensitivity to variations in temperature and also to the composition of the flowing gas. Also, a calibration will be not needed for each density and gas used in addition to that for velocity. The resultant design work aimed at developing a sensor that can be mass

  15. Generation of a highly directional supercontinuum in the visible spectrum range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, N. G.; Losev, V. F.; Prokop'ev, V. E.; Sitnik, K. A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental studies on the formation conditions of a highly directional supercontinuum (SC) produced via filamentation of a femtosecond laser pulse in air. The laser beam had an energy of 8-15 mJ, radiation wavelength of 940 nm and pulse duration of 70 fs. A spherical mirror, with or without aberrations, was used to focus the laser beam. It is shown that a SC forms behind a visible filament through a step-by-step conversion of the spectral composition from long wavelength to short wavelength (to 350 nm). The radiation is most stable when it is generated in the presence of aberrations in the wave front of the laser beam. On the track section 35-135 cm from the filament, radiation propagates in the form of a spatially stable structure similar to a soliton with a transverse dimension ≤300 μm. In this case, the SC significantly differs from the conical off-axis emission that occurs in the aberration-free filament, in that it displays a divergence close to the diffraction limit, linear polarisation and a shorter-range wing of the spectrum. The infrared component of the SC has a duration 2.8-times shorter than the pulse duration of the initial laser beam.

  16. Control range: a controllability-based index for node significance in directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbo; Gao, Lin; Gao, Yong

    2012-04-01

    While a large number of methods for module detection have been developed for undirected networks, it is difficult to adapt them to handle directed networks due to the lack of consensus criteria for measuring the node significance in a directed network. In this paper, we propose a novel structural index, the control range, motivated by recent studies on the structural controllability of large-scale directed networks. The control range of a node quantifies the size of the subnetwork that the node can effectively control. A related index, called the control range similarity, is also introduced to measure the structural similarity between two nodes. When applying the index of control range to several real-world and synthetic directed networks, it is observed that the control range of the nodes is mainly influenced by the network's degree distribution and that nodes with a low degree may have a high control range. We use the index of control range similarity to detect and analyze functional modules in glossary networks and the enzyme-centric network of homo sapiens. Our results, as compared with other approaches to module detection such as modularity optimization algorithm, dynamic algorithm and clique percolation method, indicate that the proposed indices are effective and practical in depicting structural and modular characteristics of sparse directed networks.

  17. A direct method for measuring acoustic ground impedance in long-range propagation experiments.

    PubMed

    Soh, Jin H; Gilbert, Kenneth E; Frazier, W M Garth; Talmadge, Carrick L; Waxler, Roger

    2010-11-01

    A method is reported for determining ground impedance in long-range propagation experiments by using the definition of impedance directly. The method is envisioned as way of measuring the impedence at multiple locations along the propagation path, using the signals broadcast during the experiment itself. In a short-range (10 m) test, the direct method was in good agreement with a more conventional model-based least-squares method. The utility of the direct method was demonstrated in a 400 m propagation experiment in a agricultural field. The resulting impedance was consistent with the impedance measured previously in the same field.

  18. Field Comparisons of Direct and Component Measurements of Net Radiation under Clear Skies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchon, Claude E.; Wilk, Gregory E.

    1994-02-01

    Accurate measurements of net radiation are basic to all studies of the surface energy budget. In preparation for an energy budget experiment significant differences were found between direct and component measurement of net radiation, which prompted this investigation of their cause. The instruments involved were an all-black single-dome Fritschen-type net pyrradiometer, two Eppley model 8 48 pyranometers, and an Eppley model PIR pyrgeometer. Each had recently been calibrated. The accuracy of the component instruments was considered first. Comparisons of about one hour on each of three nights between the pyrgeometer and five empirical formulas showed that the average departure over all formulas from the pyrgeometer average was 1%. Other comparisons between the pyrgeometer and an infrared thermometer viewing the surface yielded similar results. Alternate shading and unshading of the pyrgeometer looking upward during daytime resulted in a formula that was used to correct the downward longwave radiation under clear skies. The correction is dependent on wind speed, in contrast to a recent paper showing negligible dependence, but is in accord with earlier findings. Based on the manufacturer's specifications, the pyranometer calibrations were considered to be within 2% of the World Radiation Reference.Thus a series of experiments was carried out using what were believed to be reasonably accurate component measurements of net radiation and measurements from the net pyrradiometer. The results showed that the sensitivity of the latter was less in the longwave band than in the shortwave band in agreement with findings of others. Speculating on possible further dependence of sensitivity to the upward and downward streams of radiation, a method was developed to determine the magnitude of the individual net pyrmdiometer components. A reflective double-shell hemispherical cup was affixed to the upward or downward face of the net pyrradiometer such that linear regression could be

  19. Emergence of the giant weak component in directed random graphs with arbitrary degree distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryven, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    The weak component generalizes the idea of connected components to directed graphs. In this paper, an exact criterion for the existence of the giant weak component is derived for directed graphs with arbitrary bivariate degree distributions. In addition, we consider a random process for evolving directed graphs with bounded degrees. The bounds are not the same for different vertices but satisfy a predefined distribution. The analytic expression obtained for the evolving degree distribution is then combined with the weak-component criterion to obtain the exact time of the phase transition. The phase-transition time is obtained as a function of the distribution that bounds the degrees. Remarkably, when viewed from the step-polymerization formalism, the new results yield Flory-Stockmayer gelation theory and generalize it to a broader scope.

  20. Wide-range Vacuum Measurements from MWNT Field Emitters Grown Directly on Stainless Steel Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Detian; Zhao, Yangyang; Cheng, Yongjun; Dong, Changkun

    2016-01-01

    The field emission properties and the vacuum measurement application are investigated from the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) grown directly on catalytic stainless steel substrates. The MWNT emitters present excellent emission properties after the acid treatment of the substrate. The MWNT gauge is able to work down to the extreme-high vacuum (XHV) range with linear measurement performance in wide range from 10-11 to 10-6 Torr. A modulating grid is attempted with improved gauge sensitivity. The extension of the lower pressure limit is attributed largely to low outgassing effect due to direct growth of MWNTs and justified design of the electron source.

  1. Wide-range Vacuum Measurements from MWNT Field Emitters Grown Directly on Stainless Steel Substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Detian; Zhao, Yangyang; Cheng, Yongjun; Dong, Changkun

    2016-12-01

    The field emission properties and the vacuum measurement application are investigated from the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) grown directly on catalytic stainless steel substrates. The MWNT emitters present excellent emission properties after the acid treatment of the substrate. The MWNT gauge is able to work down to the extreme-high vacuum (XHV) range with linear measurement performance in wide range from 10(-11) to 10(-6) Torr. A modulating grid is attempted with improved gauge sensitivity. The extension of the lower pressure limit is attributed largely to low outgassing effect due to direct growth of MWNTs and justified design of the electron source.

  2. Future directions for probing two and three nucleon short-range correlations at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Frankfurt, Leonid; Sargsian, Misak; Strikman, Mark

    2008-10-13

    We summarize recent progress in the studies of the short-rang correlations (SRC) in nuclei in high energy electron and hadron nucleus scattering and suggest directions for the future high energy studies aimed at establishing detailed structure of two-nucleon SRCs, revealing structure of three nucleon SRC correlations and discovering non-nucleonic degrees of freedom in nuclei.

  3. HOTCFGM-2D: A Coupled Higher-Order Theory for Cylindrical Structural Components with Bi-Directionally Components with Bi-Directionally Graded Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Aboudi, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this two-year project was to develop and deliver to the NASA-Glenn Research Center a two-dimensional higher-order theory, and related computer codes, for the analysis and design of cylindrical functionally graded materials/structural components for use in advanced aircraft engines (e.g., combustor linings, rotor disks, heat shields, brisk blades). To satisfy this objective, two-dimensional version of the higher-order theory, HOTCFGM-2D, and four computer codes based on this theory, for the analysis and design of structural components functionally graded in the radial and circumferential directions were developed in the cylindrical coordinate system r-Theta-z. This version of the higher-order theory is a significant generalization of the one-dimensional theory, HOTCFGM-1D, developed during the FY97 for the analysis and design of cylindrical structural components with radially graded microstructures. The generalized theory is applicable to thin multi-phased composite shells/cylinders subjected to steady-state thermomechanical, transient thermal and inertial loading applied uniformly along the axial direction such that the overall deformation is characterized by a constant average axial strain. The reinforcement phases are uniformly distributed in the axial direction, and arbitrarily distributed in the radial and circumferential direction, thereby allowing functional grading of the internal reinforcement in the r-Theta plane. The four computer codes fgmc3dq.cylindrical.f, fgmp3dq.cylindrical.f, fgmgvips3dq.cylindrical.f, and fgmc3dq.cylindrical.transient.f are research-oriented codes for investigating the effect of functionally graded architectures, as well as the properties of the multi-phase reinforcement, in thin shells subjected to thermomechanical and inertial loading, on the internal temperature, stress and (inelastic) strain fields. The reinforcement distribution in the radial and circumferential directions is specified by the user. The thermal

  4. Light-Directed Ranging System Implementing Single Camera System for Telerobotics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Dennis L. (Inventor); Li, Larry C. (Inventor); Cox, Brian J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A laser-directed ranging system has utility for use in various fields, such as telerobotics applications and other applications involving physically handicapped individuals. The ranging system includes a single video camera and a directional light source such as a laser mounted on a camera platform, and a remotely positioned operator. In one embodiment, the position of the camera platform is controlled by three servo motors to orient the roll axis, pitch axis and yaw axis of the video cameras, based upon an operator input such as head motion. The laser is offset vertically and horizontally from the camera, and the laser/camera platform is directed by the user to point the laser and the camera toward a target device. The image produced by the video camera is processed to eliminate all background images except for the spot created by the laser. This processing is performed by creating a digital image of the target prior to illumination by the laser, and then eliminating common pixels from the subsequent digital image which includes the laser spot. A reference point is defined at a point in the video frame, which may be located outside of the image area of the camera. The disparity between the digital image of the laser spot and the reference point is calculated for use in a ranging analysis to determine range to the target.

  5. Towards the bi-directional cellular automaton model with perception ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liang; Zhong, Shiquan; Ma, Shoufeng

    2013-07-01

    The traditional cellular automaton (CA) model assumes that drivers only receive information from the preceding vehicles, e.g. the brake light information. However, in reality, drivers not only perceive information from downstream but can also get upstream information, e.g. the honk stimulation. The CA model involving traffic information from downstream and upstream is called the bi-directional CA model here. Meanwhile, with the introduction of Connected Vehicle Technologies, the perception range of drivers is expected to significantly increase which can lead to more informed driving behavior. Such an impact cannot be easily modeled by traditional one-directional CA models. In this study, the perception ranges of both the brake light effect and honk stimulation are introduced into the bi-directional CA model. Fundamental diagrams and spatial-temporal diagrams are then analyzed and two methods, i.e. the traffic flow interruption effect and microscopic analysis of time series data, are utilized to distinguish the synchronized traffic flow. Further numerical results illustrate that the perception range and slow-to-start sensitivity threshold are two important factors to reproduce the synchronized flow, and consideration of the honk information and the larger perception range both benefit the stability of traffic flow, which implies the potential significance of the application of Connected Vehicle Technologies.

  6. From lignin to cycloparaffins and aromatics: directional synthesis of jet and diesel fuel range biofuels using biomass.

    PubMed

    Bi, Peiyan; Wang, Jicong; Zhang, Yajing; Jiang, Peiwen; Wu, Xiaoping; Liu, Junxu; Xue, He; Wang, Tiejun; Li, Quanxin

    2015-05-01

    The continual growth in commercial aviation fuels and more strict environmental legislations have led to immense interest in developing green aviation fuels from biomass. This paper demonstrated a controllable transformation of lignin into jet and diesel fuel range hydrocarbons, involving directional production of C8-C15 aromatics by the catalytic depolymerization of lignin into C6-C8 low carbon aromatic monomers coupled with the alkylation of aromatics, and the directional production of C8-C15 cycloparaffins by the hydrogenation of aromatics. The key step, the production of the desired C8-C15 aromatics with the selectivity up to 94.3%, was achieved by the low temperature alkylation reactions of the lignin-derived monomers using ionic liquid. The synthetic biofuels basically met the main technical requirements of conventional jet fuels. The transformation potentially provides a useful way for the development of cycloparaffinic and aromatic components in jet fuels using renewable lignocellulose biomass.

  7. In orbit degradation of UV optical components for the wavelength range 10-140 microns. AO 138.3 (FRECOPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delabouinere, J. P.; Carabetian, C.; Hochedez, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    Optical components (thin film filters and multilayered mirrors) for use in the wavelength range 10-140 micro-m were included in the vacuum tight container FRECOPA in preparation for the SOHO mission. They were exposed during 9 months at the beginning of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) flight. One batch of components was exposed to the sun, while another one was shielded from solar radiation. The results of the optical transmission measurements of the flight components and of a groundbase reference set, made at the ORSAY Synchotron radiation light source are presented.

  8. Direct detection of the Yarkovsky effect by radar ranging to ateroid 6489 Golevka

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesley, S. R.; Ostro, S. J.; Vokrouhlicky, D.; Capek, D.; Giorgini, J. D.; Nolan, M. C.; Margot, J. L.; Hine, A. A.; Benner, L. A. M.; Chamberlin, A. B.

    2003-01-01

    Radar ranging from Arecibo, Puerto Rico, to the 0.5-kilometer near-Earth asteroid 6489 Golevka unambiguously reveals a small nongravitational acceleration caused by the anisotropic thermal emission of absorbed sunlight. The magnitude of this perturbation, known as the Yarkovsky effect, is a function of the asteroid's mass and surface thermal characteristics. Direct detection of the Yarkovsky effect on asteroids will help constrain their physical properties, such as bulk density, and refine their orbital paths.

  9. Bearing splitting and near-surface source ranging in the direct zone of deep water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun-Nan; Zhou, Shi-Hong; Peng, Zhao-Hui; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Ren-He

    2016-12-01

    Sound multipath propagation is very important for target localization and identification in different acoustical zones of deep water. In order to distinguish the multipath characteristics in deep water, the Northwest Pacific Acoustic Experiment was conducted in 2015. A low-frequency horizontal line array towed at the depth of around 150 m on a receiving ship was used to receive the noise radiated by the source ship. During this experiment, a bearing-splitting phenomenon in the direct zone was observed through conventional beamforming of the horizontal line array within the frequency band 160 Hz-360 Hz. In this paper, this phenomenon is explained based on ray theory. In principle, the received signal in the direct zone of deep water arrives from two general paths including a direct one and bottom bounced one, which vary considerably in arrival angles. The split bearings correspond to the contributions of these two paths. The bearing-splitting phenomenon is demonstrated by numerical simulations of the bearing-time records and experimental results, and they are well consistent with each other. Then a near-surface source ranging approach based on the arrival angles of direct path and bottom bounced path in the direct zone is presented as an application of bearing splitting and is verified by experimental results. Finally, the applicability of the proposed ranging approach for an underwater source within several hundred meters in depth in the direct zone is also analyzed and demonstrated by simulations. Project supported by the Program of One Hundred Talented People of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11434012 and 41561144006).

  10. Patch-clamp analysis in canine cardiac Purkinje cells of a novel sodium component in the pacemaker range.

    PubMed

    Rota, Marcello; Vassalle, Mario

    2003-04-01

    A putative Na+ component playing a role in the initiation and maintenance of spontaneous discharge in Purkinje fibres was studied by means of the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in canine cardiac single Purkinje cells. In 4 mM [K+]o, during depolarising clamp steps, a slowly inactivating current appeared at approximately -58 mV, negative to the threshold for the fast Na+ current (INa; approximately -50 mV). During depolarising ramps, the current underwent inward rectification with a negative slope region that began at approximately -60 mV. The current underlying the negative slope increased during faster ramps, decreased as a function of time when the initial depolarising ramp was over, decreased during depolarisations positive to approximately -35 mV and was much larger than the current during the symmetrical repolarising ramp. Increasing biphasic ('oscillatory') voltage ramps required much smaller currents at a holding potential (Vh) of -60 mV than at -80 mV and were associated with a marked decrease in slope conductance. At Vh -50/-40 mV, the oscillatory ramp currents and superimposed pulse currents reversed direction. The negative slope in the I-V relation as well as the change in current direction at -50/-40 mV were markedly reduced by tetrodotoxin (15 microM) and lidocaine (lignocaine, 100 microM) and therefore are due to a slowly inactivating Na+ current, labelled here INa3. Lower [K+]o (2.7 mM) reduced the steady state slope conductance as well as the current in the diastolic range, and increased as well as shifted INa3 in a negative direction. High [K+]o had the opposite effects. Cs+ (2 mM) and Ba2+ (2 mM) reduced the initial current during depolarising ramps but not INa3. In current-clamp mode, current-induced voltage oscillations elicited action potentials through a gradual transition between diastolic depolarisation and upstroke, consistent with the activation of INa3. Thus, the initiation and maintenance of spontaneous discharge in Purkinje strands

  11. Laser-Directed Ranging System Implementing Single Camera System for Telerobotics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Dennis L. (Inventor); Li, Larry C. (Inventor); Cox, Brian J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The invention relates generally to systems for determining the range of an object from a reference point and, in one embodiment, to laser-directed ranging systems useful in telerobotics applications. Digital processing techniques are employed which minimize the complexity and cost of the hardware and software for processing range calculations, thereby enhancing the commercial attractiveness of the system for use in relatively low-cost robotic systems. The system includes a video camera for generating images of the target, image digitizing circuitry, and an associated frame grabber circuit. The circuit first captures one of the pairs of stereo video images of the target, and then captures a second video image of the target as it is partly illuminated by the light beam, suitably generated by a laser. The two video images, taken sufficiently close together in time to minimize camera and scene motion, are converted to digital images and then compared. Common pixels are eliminated, leaving only a digital image of the laser-illuminated spot on the target. Mw centroid of the laser illuminated spot is dm obtained and compared with a predetermined reference point, predetermined by design or calibration, which represents the coordinate at the focal plane of the laser illumination at infinite range. Preferably, the laser and camera are mounted on a servo-driven platform which can be oriented to direct the camera and the laser toward the target. In one embodiment the platform is positioned in response to movement of the operator's head. Position and orientation sensors are used to monitor head movement. The disparity between the digital image of the laser spot and the reference point is calculated for determining range to the target. Commercial applications for the system relate to active range-determination systems, such as those used with robotic systems in which it is necessary to determine the, range to a workpiece or object to be grasped or acted upon by a robot arm end

  12. Short and medium range order in two-component silica glasses by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, K.; Kataoka, H.; Nagai, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2014-05-01

    The dependence of chemical composition on the average sizes of subnanometer-scale intrinsic structural open spaces surrounded by glass random networks in two-component silica-based glasses was investigated systematically using positronium (Ps) confined in the open spaces. The average sizes of the open spaces for SiO2-B2O3 and SiO2-GeO2 glasses are only slightly dependent on the chemical compositions because the B2O3 and GeO2 are glass network formers that are incorporated into the glass network of the base SiO2. However, the open space sizes for all SiO2-R2O (R = Li, Na, K) glasses, where R2O is a glass network modifier that occupies the open spaces, decrease rapidly with an increase in the R2O concentration. Despite the large difference in the ionic radii of the alkali metal (R) atoms, the open space sizes decrease similarly for all the alkali metal atoms studied. This dependence of the chemical composition on the open space sizes in SiO2-R2O observed by Ps shows that the alkali metal atoms do not randomly occupy the structural open spaces, but filling of the open spaces by R2O proceeds selectively from the larger to the smaller open spaces as the R2O concentrations are increased.

  13. Analysis on vertical directional couplers with long range surface plasmons for multilayer optical routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, B.; Veroli, A.; Benedetti, A.

    2016-08-01

    A structure featuring vertical directional coupling of long-range surface plasmon polaritons between strip waveguides at λ = 1.55 μm is investigated with the aim of producing efficient elements that enable optical multilayer routing for 3D photonics. We have introduced a practical computational method to calculate the interaction on the bent part. This method allows us both to assess the importance of the interaction in the bent part and to control it by a suitable choice of the fabrication parameters that helps also to restrain effects due to fabrication issues. The scheme adopted here allows to reduce the insertion losses compared with other planar and multilayer devices.

  14. A comparative study of optimum and suboptimum direct-detection laser ranging receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    A summary of previously proposed receiver strategies for direct-detection laser ranging receivers is presented. Computer simulations are used to compare performance of candidate implementation strategies in the 1- to 100-photoelectron region. Under the condition of no background radiation, the maximum-likelihood and minimum mean-square error estimators were found to give the same performance for both bell-shaped and rectangular optical-pulse shapes. For signal energies greater than 100 photoelectrons, the root-mean-square range error is shown to decrease as Q to the -1/2 power for bell-shaped pulses and Q to the -1 power for rectangular pulses, where Q represents the average pulse energy. Of several receiver implementations presented, the matched-filter peak detector was found to be preferable. A similar configuration, using a constant-fraction discriminator, exhibited a signal-level dependent time bias.

  15. Development of a Piezoelectric Vacuum Sensing Component for a Wide Pressure Range

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing-Yu; Hsieh, Fan-Chun; Lin, Che-Yu; Chen, Shao-En; Chen, Fong-Zhi; Wu, Chia-Che

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we develop a clamped–clamped beam-type piezoelectric vacuum pressure sensing element. The clamped–clamped piezoelectric beam is composed of a PZT layer and a copper substrate. A pair of electrodes is set near each end. An input voltage is applied to a pair of electrodes to vibrate the piezoelectric beam, and the output voltage is measured at the other pair. Because the viscous forces on the piezoelectric beam vary at different air pressures, the vibration of the beam depends on the vacuum pressure. The developed pressure sensor can sense a wide range of pressure, from 6.5 × 10−6 to 760 Torr. The experimental results showed that the output voltage is inversely proportional to the gas damping ratio, and thus, the vacuum pressure was estimated from the output voltage. PMID:25421736

  16. Short and medium range order in two-component silica glasses by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, K.; Kataoka, H.; Nagai, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2014-05-28

    The dependence of chemical composition on the average sizes of subnanometer-scale intrinsic structural open spaces surrounded by glass random networks in two-component silica-based glasses was investigated systematically using positronium (Ps) confined in the open spaces. The average sizes of the open spaces for SiO{sub 2}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2}-GeO{sub 2} glasses are only slightly dependent on the chemical compositions because the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and GeO{sub 2} are glass network formers that are incorporated into the glass network of the base SiO{sub 2}. However, the open space sizes for all SiO{sub 2}-R{sub 2}O (R = Li, Na, K) glasses, where R{sub 2}O is a glass network modifier that occupies the open spaces, decrease rapidly with an increase in the R{sub 2}O concentration. Despite the large difference in the ionic radii of the alkali metal (R) atoms, the open space sizes decrease similarly for all the alkali metal atoms studied. This dependence of the chemical composition on the open space sizes in SiO{sub 2}-R{sub 2}O observed by Ps shows that the alkali metal atoms do not randomly occupy the structural open spaces, but filling of the open spaces by R{sub 2}O proceeds selectively from the larger to the smaller open spaces as the R{sub 2}O concentrations are increased.

  17. Fabrication of 3D components by laser-aided direct metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, Jyotirmoy; Qi, Huan

    2005-03-01

    Breinan and Kear first reported fabrication of three-dimensional metallic components via layer by layer laser cladding in 1978 and subsequently a patent was issued to Brown et al. in 1982. Recently, various groups are working world wide on different types of layered manufacturing techniques for fabrication of near net shape metallic components. Integration of lasers with multi-axis presently available CNC machines, CAD/CAM, sensors and powder metal delivery through co-axial nozzles along with the laser beam are the main innovations for fabrication of 3-Dimensional components. Continuous corrective measures during the manufacturing process are necessary to fabricate net shape functional parts with close tolerances and acceptable residual stress. The closed loop Direct Metal Deposition(DMD) System, using an optical feedback loop along with a CNC working under the instructions from a CAD/CAM software, indicate that it can produce three dimensional components directly from the CAD data eliminating intermediate machining and reduces final machining considerably. This technology is now being commercialized.

  18. Discriminating low frequency components from long range persistent fluctuations in daily atmospheric temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanfredi, M.; Simoniello, T.; Cuomo, V.; Macchiato, M.

    2009-07-01

    This study originated from recent results reported in literature, which support the existence of long-range (power-law) persistence in atmospheric temperature fluctuations on monthly and inter-annual scales. We investigated the results of Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) carried out on twenty-two historical daily time series recorded in Europe in order to evaluate the reliability of such findings in depth. More detailed inspections emphasized systematic deviations from power-law and high statistical confidence for functional form misspecification. Rigorous analyses did not support scale-free correlation as an operative concept for Climate modelling, as instead suggested in literature. In order to understand the physical implications of our results better, we designed a bivariate Markov process, parameterised on the basis of the atmospheric observational data by introducing a slow dummy variable. The time series generated by this model, analysed both in time and frequency domains, tallied with the real ones very well. They accounted for both the deceptive scaling found in literature and the correlation details enhanced by our analysis. Our results seem to evidence the presence of slow fluctuations from another climatic sub-system such as ocean, which inflates temperature variance up to several months. They advise more precise re-analyses of temperature time series before suggesting dynamical paradigms useful for Climate modelling and for the assessment of Climate Change.

  19. Discriminating low frequency components from long range persistent fluctuations in daily atmospheric temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanfredi, M.; Simoniello, T.; Cuomo, V.; Macchiato, M.

    2009-02-01

    This study originated from recent results reported in literature, which support the existence of long-range (power-law) persistence in atmospheric temperature fluctuations on monthly and inter-annual scales. We investigated the results of Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) carried out on twenty-two historical daily time series recorded in Europe in order to evaluate the reliability of such findings in depth. More detailed inspections emphasized systematic deviations from power-law and high statistical confidence for functional form misspecification. Rigorous analyses did not support scale-free correlation as an operative concept for Climate modelling, as instead suggested in literature. In order to understand the physical implications of our results better, we designed a bivariate Markov process, parameterised on the basis of the atmospheric observational data by introducing a slow dummy variable. The time series generated by this model, analysed both in time and frequency domains, tallied with the real ones very well. They accounted for both the deceptive scaling found in literature and the correlation details enhanced by our analysis. Our results seem to evidence the presence of slow fluctuations from another climatic sub-system such as ocean, which inflates temperature variance up to several months. They advise more precise re-analyses of temperature time series before suggesting dynamical paradigms useful for Climate modelling and for the assessment of Climate Change.

  20. NEET-AMM Final Technical Report on Laser Direct Manufacturing (LDM) for Nuclear Power Components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Scott; Baca, Georgina; O'Connor, Michael

    2015-12-31

    Final technical report summarizes the program progress and technical accomplishments of the Laser Direct Manufacturing (LDM) for Nuclear Power Components project. A series of experiments varying build process parameters (scan speed and laser power) were conducted at the outset to establish the optimal build conditions for each of the alloys. Fabrication was completed in collaboration with Quad City Manufacturing Laboratory (QCML). The density of all sample specimens was measured and compared to literature values. Optimal build process conditions giving fabricated part densities close to literature values were chosen for making mechanical test coupons. Test coupons whose principal axis is on the x-y plane (perpendicular to build direction) and on the z plane (parallel to build direction) were built and tested as part of the experimental build matrix to understand the impact of the anisotropic nature of the process.. Investigations are described 316L SS, Inconel 600, 718 and 800 and oxide dispersion strengthed 316L SS (Yttria) alloys.

  1. EON: a component-based approach to automation of protocol-directed therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Musen, M A; Tu, S W; Das, A K; Shahar, Y

    1996-01-01

    Provision of automated support for planning protocol-directed therapy requires a computer program to take as input clinical data stored in an electronic patient-record system and to generate as output recommendations for therapeutic interventions and laboratory testing that are defined by applicable protocols. This paper presents a synthesis of research carried out at Stanford University to model the therapy-planning task and to demonstrate a component-based architecture for building protocol-based decision-support systems. We have constructed general-purpose software components that (1) interpret abstract protocol specifications to construct appropriate patient-specific treatment plans; (2) infer from time-stamped patient data higher-level, interval-based, abstract concepts; (3) perform time-oriented queries on a time-oriented patient database; and (4) allow acquisition and maintenance of protocol knowledge in a manner that facilitates efficient processing both by humans and by computers. We have implemented these components in a computer system known as EON. Each of the components has been developed, evaluated, and reported independently. We have evaluated the integration of the components as a composite architecture by implementing T-HELPER, a computer-based patient-record system that uses EON to offer advice regarding the management of patients who are following clinical trial protocols for AIDS or HIV infection. A test of the reuse of the software components in a different clinical domain demonstrated rapid development of a prototype application to support protocol-based care of patients who have breast cancer. PMID:8930854

  2. Thioarsenides: A case for long-range Lewis acid-base-directed van der Waals interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Wallace, Adam F.; Downs, R. T.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2011-04-01

    Electron density distributions, bond paths, Laplacian and local energy density properties have been calculated for a number of As4Sn (n = 3,4,5) thioarsenide molecular crystals. On the basis of the distributions, the intramolecular As-S and As-As interactions classify as shared bonded interactions and the intermolecular As-S, As-As and S-S interactions classify as closed-shell van der Waals bonded interactions. The bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths link regions of locally concentrated electron density (Lewis base regions) with aligned regions of locally depleted electron density (Lewis acid regions) on adjacent molecules. The paths are comparable with intermolecular paths reported for several other molecular crystals that link aligned Lewis base and acid regions in a key-lock fashion, interactions that classified as long range Lewis acid-base directed van der Waals interactions. As the bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths (~70%) link Lewis acid-base regions on adjacent molecules, it appears that molecules adopt an arrangement that maximizes the number of As-S Lewis acid-base intermolecular bonded interactions. The maximization of the number of Lewis acid-base interactions appears to be connected with the close-packed array adopted by molecules: distorted cubic close-packed arrays are adopted for alacránite, pararealgar, uzonite, realgar and β-AsS and the distorted hexagonal close-packed arrays adopted by α- and β-dimorphite. A growth mechanism is proposed for thioarsenide molecular crystals from aqueous species that maximizes the number of long range Lewis acid-base vdW As-S bonded interactions with the resulting directed bond paths structuralizing the molecules as a molecular crystal.

  3. Spatiotemporal analysis of GPS time series in vertical direction using independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Dai, Wujiao; Peng, Wei; Meng, Xiaolin

    2015-11-01

    GPS has been widely used in the field of geodesy and geodynamics thanks to its technology development and the improvement of positioning accuracy. A time series observed by GPS in vertical direction usually contains tectonic signals, non-tectonic signals, residual atmospheric delay, measurement noise, etc. Analyzing these information is the basis of crustal deformation research. Furthermore, analyzing the GPS time series and extracting the non-tectonic information are helpful to study the effect of various geophysical events. Principal component analysis (PCA) is an effective tool for spatiotemporal filtering and GPS time series analysis. But as it is unable to extract statistically independent components, PCA is unfavorable for achieving the implicit information in time series. Independent component analysis (ICA) is a statistical method of blind source separation (BSS) and can separate original signals from mixed observations. In this paper, ICA is used as a spatiotemporal filtering method to analyze the spatial and temporal features of vertical GPS coordinate time series in the UK and Sichuan-Yunnan region in China. Meanwhile, the contributions from atmospheric and soil moisture mass loading are evaluated. The analysis of the relevance between the independent components and mass loading with their spatial distribution shows that the signals extracted by ICA have a strong correlation with the non-tectonic deformation, indicating that ICA has a better performance in spatiotemporal analysis.

  4. The impact of space-time speckle to the resolution in range and azimuth direction on synthetic aperture imaging ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qian; Zhou, Yu; Sun, Jianfeng; Zhi, Ya'nan; Ma, Xiaoping; Sun, Zhiwei; Lu, Dong; Liu, Liren

    2013-09-01

    As synthetic aperture imaging ladar employs the linear chirp laser signal, it is inevitably impacted by the space-time varying speckle effect. In many SAIL two-dimensional reconstructed images, the laser speckle effect severely reduces the image quality. In this paper, we analyze and simulate the influence of space-time speckle effect to the resolution element imaging both in range direction and in azimuth direction. Expressions for two-dimensional data collection contained space-time speckle effect are obtained, and computer simulation results of resolution degradation both in range direction and in cross-range direction are presented.

  5. Direct Machining of Low-Loss THz Waveguide Components With an RF Choke

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Samantha M.; Nanni, Emilio A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    We present results for the successful fabrication of low-loss THz metallic waveguide components using direct machining with a CNC end mill. The approach uses a split-block machining process with the addition of an RF choke running parallel to the waveguide. The choke greatly reduces coupling to the parasitic mode of the parallel-plate waveguide produced by the split-block. This method has demonstrated loss as low as 0.2 dB/cm at 280 GHz for a copper WR-3 waveguide. It has also been used in the fabrication of 3 and 10 dB directional couplers in brass, demonstrating excellent agreement with design simulations from 240–260 GHz. The method may be adapted to structures with features on the order of 200 μm. PMID:25821412

  6. Laser alchemy: direct writing of multifunctional components in a glass chip with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yang; Lin, Jintian; Cheng, Ya

    2013-12-01

    Recently, hybrid integration of multifunctional micro-components for creating complex, intelligent micro/nano systems has attracted significant attention. These micro-/nano-systems have important applications in a variety of areas, such as healthcare, environment, communication, national security, and so on. However, fabrication of micro/nano systems incorporated with different functions is still a challenging task, which generally requires fabrication of discrete microcomponents beforehand followed by assembly and packaging procedures. Furthermore, current micro-/nano-fabrication techniques are mainly based on the well-established planar lithographic approach, which suffer from severe issues in producing three dimensional (3D) structures with complex geometries and arbitrary configurations. In recent years, the rapid development of femtosecond laser machining technology has enabled 3D direct fabrication and integration of multifunctional components, such as microfluidics, microoptics, micromechanics, microelectronics, etc., into single substrates. In this invited talk, we present our recent progress in this active area. Particularly, we focus on fabrication of 3D micro- and nanofluidic devices and 3D high-Q microcavities in glass substrates by femtosecond laser direct writing.

  7. Directing folding pathways for multi-component DNA origami nanostructures with complex topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marras, A. E.; Zhou, L.; Kolliopoulos, V.; Su, H.-J.; Castro, C. E.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular self-assembly has become a well-established technique to design complex nanostructures and hierarchical mesoscale assemblies. The typical approach is to design binding complementarity into nucleotide or amino acid sequences to achieve the desired final geometry. However, with an increasing interest in dynamic nanodevices, the need to design structures with motion has necessitated the development of multi-component structures. While this has been achieved through hierarchical assembly of similar structural units, here we focus on the assembly of topologically complex structures, specifically with concentric components, where post-folding assembly is not feasible. We exploit the ability to direct folding pathways to program the sequence of assembly and present a novel approach of designing the strand topology of intermediate folding states to program the topology of the final structure, in this case a DNA origami slider structure that functions much like a piston-cylinder assembly in an engine. The ability to program the sequence and control orientation and topology of multi-component DNA origami nanostructures provides a foundation for a new class of structures with internal and external moving parts and complex scaffold topology. Furthermore, this work provides critical insight to guide the design of intermediate states along a DNA origami folding pathway and to further understand the details of DNA origami self-assembly to more broadly control folding states and landscapes.

  8. Direct glucose sensing in the physiological range through plasmonic nanoparticle formation.

    PubMed

    Unser, Sarah; Campbell, Ian; Jana, Debrina; Sagle, Laura

    2015-01-21

    Development of improved glucose detection has vast significance in both clinical and point of care settings. Herein, we present a novel, label-free, enzyme-free, colorimetric method of glucose detection that relies on the reduction of a gold salt precursor facilitated by physiological concentrations of glucose (1.25-50 mM). The concentration of glucose present during the reduction process results in nanoparticles of different size, which in turn change the color of solution. Through transmission electron microscopy (TEM), it was found that the nanoparticle size decreases as the glucose concentration increases. Kinetic characterization of nanoparticle formation shows rate constants change 5-8 orders of magnitude when comparing normal versus diabetic glucose concentrations. Assay versatility was also investigated through incorporation onto solid substrates as well as the addition of a filtering step, which produced relatively clear samples below the diabetic cut-off (10 mM glucose) and colored samples above. The colorimetric sensor was then found to also show similar color changes with glucose solutions containing biological interfering agents as well as samples with 20% serum. Last, the sensor was tested in solution containing 100% mouse serum and 100% bovine urine spiked with varying glucose concentrations, which resulted in smaller nanoparticle formation whose intensities were dependent on glucose concentration. The resulting color changes observed for this sensor in urine samples are directly compared with Benedict's reagent and are shown to be significantly more sensitive to lower concentrations of glucose in the diabetic relevant range.

  9. Direct detection of the tertiary component in the massive multiple HD 150136 with VLTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Bermudez, J.; Schödel, R.; Alberdi, A.; Barbá, R. H.; Hummel, C. A.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Pott, J.-U.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Massive stars are of fundamental importance for almost all aspects of astrophysics, but there still exist large gaps in our understanding of their properties and formation because they are rare and therefore distant. It has been found that most O-stars are multiples. It may well be that almost all massive stars are born as triples or higher multiples, but their large distances require milliarcsecond angular resolution for a direct detection of the companions. Aims: HD 150136 is the nearest system to Earth with >100 M⊙ and provides a unique opportunity to study an extremely massive system. Recently, evidence for the existence of a third component in HD 150136, in addition to the tight spectroscopic binary that forms the main component, was found in spectroscopic observations. Our aim was to image and obtain astrometric and photometric measurements of this component using long-baseline optical interferometry to further constrain the nature of this component. Methods: We observed HD 150136 with the near-infrared instrument AMBER attached to the ESO VLT Interferometer, which provides an angular resolution of 2 mas. The recovered closure phases are robust to systematic errors and provide unique information on the source asymmetry. Therefore, they are of crucial relevance for both image reconstruction and model fitting of the source structure. Results: The third component in HD 150136 is clearly detected in the high-quality data from AMBER. It is located at a projected angular distance of 7.3 mas, or about 13 AU at the line-of-sight distance of HD 150136, at a position angle of 209 degrees east of north, and has a flux ratio of 0.25 with respect to the inner binary. Our findings agree with previous results and have permitted us to improve the orbital solutions of the tertiary around the inner system. Conclusions: We resolved the third component of HD 150136 in J, H and K filters. The luminosity and color of the tertiary agrees with the predictions and shows

  10. Identification of PM sources by principal component analysis (PCA) coupled with wind direction data.

    PubMed

    Viana, M; Querol, X; Alastuey, A; Gil, J I; Menéndez, M

    2006-12-01

    The effectiveness of combining principal component analysis (PCA) with multi-linear regression (MLRA) and wind direction data was demonstrated in this study. PM data from three grain-size fractions from a highly industrialised area in Northern Spain were analysed. Seven independent PM sources were identified by PCA: steel (Pb, Zn, Cd, Mn) and pigment (Cr, Mo, Ni) manufacture, road dust (Fe, Ba, Cd), traffic exhaust (P, OC + EC), regional-scale transport (, , V), crustal contributions (Al2O3, Sr, K) and sea spray (Na, Cl). The spatial distribution of the sources was obtained by coupling PCA with wind direction data, which helped identify regional drainage flows as the main source of crustal material. The same analysis showed that the contribution of motorway traffic to PM10 levels is 4-5 microg m-3 higher than that of local traffic. The coupling of PCA-MLRA with wind direction data proved thus to be useful in extracting further information on source contributions and locations. Correct identification and characterisation of PM sources is essential for the design and application of effective abatement strategies.

  11. 30 CFR 75.703 - Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and the enclosures of related detached components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 75.703 Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and the enclosures of related detached components. The frames of all offtrack direct-current machines and the enclosures...

  12. 30 CFR 75.703 - Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and the enclosures of related detached components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 75.703 Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and the enclosures of related detached components. The frames of all offtrack direct-current machines and the enclosures...

  13. 30 CFR 75.703 - Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and the enclosures of related detached components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 75.703 Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and the enclosures of related detached components. The frames of all offtrack direct-current machines and the enclosures...

  14. 30 CFR 75.703 - Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and the enclosures of related detached components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 75.703 Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and the enclosures of related detached components. The frames of all offtrack direct-current machines and the enclosures...

  15. 30 CFR 75.703 - Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and the enclosures of related detached components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 75.703 Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and the enclosures of related detached components. The frames of all offtrack direct-current machines and the enclosures...

  16. Resolving the lateral component of blood flow velocity based on ultrasound speckle size change with scan direction and speed.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tiantian; Bashford, Gregory R

    2009-01-01

    Conventional blood flow velocity measurement using ultrasound is capable of resolving the axial component (i.e., that aligned with the ultrasound propagation direction) of the blood flow velocity vector. However, these Doppler-based methods are incapable of detecting blood flow in the direction normal to the ultrasound beam. In addition, these methods require repeated pulse-echo interrogation at the same spatial location. In this paper, we introduce a method which estimates the lateral component of blood flow within a single image frame using the observation that the speckle pattern corresponding to the blood reflectors (typically red blood cells) stretches (i.e., is "smeared") if the blood is moving in the same direction as the electronically-controlled transducer line selection in a 2D image. The situation is analogous to the observed elongation of a subject photographed with a moving camera. Here, we develop a relationship between speckle size, scan speed, and blood flow velocity. Experiments were performed with a blood flow phantom and high-frequency transducer of a commercially available ultrasound machine. Data was captured through an interface allowing access to the raw beam formed data. Blood flow with velocities ranging from 15 to 40 cm/s were investigated in this paper. Results show that there is a linear relationship between the reciprocal of the stretch factor and blood flow velocity. Two scan speeds were used in our experiments. When the scan velocity is 64.8 cm/s, compared with the theoretical model, fitting results based on experimental data gave us a linear relationship with average flow estimation error of 1.74+/-1.48 cm/s. When the scan velocity is 37.4 cm/s, the average estimation error is 0.65+/-0.45 cm/s.

  17. Is criminal behavior a central component of psychopathy? Conceptual directions for resolving the debate.

    PubMed

    Skeem, Jennifer L; Cooke, David J

    2010-06-01

    The development of the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R; R. D. Hare, 2003) has fueled intense clinical interest in the construct of psychopathy. Unfortunately, a side effect of this interest has been conceptual confusion and, in particular, the conflating of measures with constructs. Indeed, the field is in danger of equating the PCL-R with the theoretical construct of psychopathy. A key point in the debate is whether criminal behavior is a central component, or mere downstream correlate, of psychopathy. In this article, the authors present conceptual directions for resolving this debate. First, factor analysis of PCL-R items in a theoretical vacuum cannot reveal the essence of psychopathy. Second, a myth about the PCL-R and its relation to violence must be examined to avoid the view that psychopathy is merely a violent variant of antisocial personality disorder. Third, a formal, iterative process between theory development and empirical validation must be adopted. Fundamentally, constructs and measures must be recognized as separate entities, and neither reified. Applying such principles to the current state of the field, the authors believe the evidence favors viewing criminal behavior as a correlate, not a component, of psychopathy.

  18. A modelling methodology to predict the range of organic components expected to condense to atmospheric aerosol: Sensitivities to fundamental properties and routes for reduced complexity parameterisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G. B.; Barley, M.; Jenkin, M.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles are an important yet uncertain component of climate change and air quality. Influencing climate directly by the scattering and absorption of solar radiation and indirectly through their role as cloud condensation nuclei, their radiatively important properties are determined by the chemical composition, mass loading, mixing state and size distribution, as are their impacts on human health. Mechanistic understanding and knowledge of individual compounds involved in the chemical evolution of aerosol particles is far from complete. A full chemical analysis of the organic component of atmospheric aerosols is not available. Whilst explicit hydrocarbon oxidation mechanisms that track many thousands of degradation products of volatile organic compounds (VOC) have been developed, aerosol schemes in large-scale models neglect the majority of chemical components predicted to occur in the organic mixture and will continue to do so in the future. This is a result of prohibitive computational expense of explicit mechanisms which must be avoided via a reduction in complexity (numerical, chemical or both). Reduction mechanisms that neglect compositional information are widely used to derive those parameters deemed important for climatic and health impacts. However, it is possible to make detailed predictions of the range of organic components expected to condense to atmospheric aerosol by combining a gas/particle partitioning model with a detailed gas phase chemical mechanism. Provided they are of sufficient skill, these predictions can be used as the basis for process and composition complexity reduction whilst retaining mechanistic understanding. Here we present development of compound selection methodologies that combine detailed gas phase mechanisms, pure component vapour pressure calculations, thermodynamic properties and a gas/aerosol partition model. As an example, we combine the methodology with the master chemical mechanism (MCM) to simulate

  19. Selection of astrophysical/astronomical/solar sites at the Argentina East Andes range taking into account atmospheric components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piacentini, R. D.; García, B.; Micheletti, M. I.; Salum, G.; Freire, M.; Maya, J.; Mancilla, A.; Crinó, E.; Mandat, D.; Pech, M.; Bulik, T.

    2016-06-01

    In the present work we analyze sites in the Argentinian high Andes mountains as possible places for astrophysical/astronomical/solar observatories. They are located at: San Antonio de los Cobres (SAC) and El Leoncito/CASLEO region: sites 1 and 2. We consider the following atmospheric components that affect, in different and specific wavelength ranges, the detection of photons of astronomical/astrophysical/solar origin: ozone, microscopic particles, precipitable water and clouds. We also determined the atmospheric radiative transmittance in a day near the summer solstice at noon, in order to confirm the clearness of the sky in the proposed sites at SAC and El Leoncito. Consequently, all the collected and analyzed data in the present work, indicate that the proposed sites are very promising to host astrophysical/astronomical/solar observatories. Some atmospheric components, like aerosols, play a significant role in the attenuation of light (Cherencov and/or fluorescence) detected in cosmic rays (particles or gamma photons) astrophysical observatories, while others, like ozone have to be considered in astronomical/solar light detection.

  20. Low loss photonic components in high index bismuth borate glass by femtosecond laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weijia; Corbari, Costantino; Kazansky, Peter G; Sakaguchi, Koichi; Carvalho, Isabel C S

    2008-09-29

    Single mode, low loss waveguides were fabricated in high index bismuth borate glass by femtosecond laser direct writing. A specific set of writing parameters leading to waveguides perfectly mode matched to standard single-mode fibers at 1.55 microm with an overall insertion loss of approximately 1 dB and with propagation loss below 0.2 dB/cm was identified. Photonic components such as Y-splitters and directional couplers were also demonstrated. A close agreement between their performances and theoretical predictions based upon the characterization of the waveguide properties is shown. Finally, the nonlinear refractive index of the waveguides has been measured to be 6.6 x 10(-15) cm(2)/W by analyzing self-phase modulation of the propagating femtosecond laser pulse at the wavelength of 1.46 microm. Broadening of the transmitted light source as large as 500 nm was demonstrated through a waveguide with the length of 1.8 cm.

  1. Effect of Directional Array Size on the Measurement of Airframe Noise Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the effects of overall size of directional (or phased) arrays on the measurement of aeroacoustic components. An airframe model was mounted in the potential core of an open-jet windtunnel, with the directional arrays located outside the flow in an anechoic environment. Two array systems were used; one with a solid measurement angle that encompasses 31.6 deg.of source directivity and a smaller one that encompasses 7.2 deg. The arrays, and sub-arrays of various sizes, measured noise from a calibrator source and flap edge model setups. In these cases, noise was emitted from relatively small, but finite size source regions, with intense levels compared to other sources. Although the larger arrays revealed much more source region detail, the measured source levels were substantially reduced due to finer resolution compared to that of the smaller arrays. To better understand the measurements quantitatively, an analytical model was used to define the basic relationships between array to source region sizes and measured output level. Also, the effect of noise scattering by shear layer turbulence was examined using the present data and those of previous studies. Taken together, the two effects were sufficient to explain spectral level differences between arrays of different sizes. An important result of this study is that total (integrated) noise source levels are retrievable and the levels are independent of the array size as long as certain experimental and processing criteria are met. The criteria for both open and closed tunnels are discussed. The success of special purpose diagonal-removal processing in obtaining integrated results is apparently dependent in part on source distribution. Also discussed is the fact that extended sources are subject to substantial measurement error, especially for large arrays.

  2. The passive, human calf muscles in relation to standing: the short range stiffness lies in the contractile component.

    PubMed

    Loram, Ian D; Maganaris, Constantinos N; Lakie, Martin

    2007-10-15

    Using short duration perturbations, previous attempts to measure the intrinsic ankle stiffness during human standing have revealed a substantial stabilizing contribution (65-90% normalized to load stiffness 'mgh'). Others regard this method as unsuitable for the low-frequency conditions of quiet standing and believe the passive contribution to be small (10-15%). This latter view, consistent with a linear Hill-type model, argues that during standing, the contractile portion of the muscle is much less stiff than the tendon. Here, for upright subjects, we settle this issue by measuring the stiffness of the contractile portion of the passive calf muscles using low-frequency ankle rotations. Using ultrasound we tracked the changes in muscle contractile length and partitioned the ankle rotation into contractile and extra-contractile (series elastic) portions. Small ankle rotations of 0.15 and 0.4 deg show a contractile to series elastic stiffness ratio (K(ce)/K(se)) of 12 +/- 9 and 6.3 +/- 10, respectively, with both elements displaying predominantly elastic behaviour. Larger, 7 deg rotations reveal the range of this ratio. It declines in a non-linear way from a high value (K(ce)/K(se) = 18 +/- 11) to a low value (K(ce)/K(se) = 1 +/- 0.4) as rotation increases from 0.1 to 7 deg. There is a marked transition at around 0.5 deg. The series elastic stiffness (K(se)/mgh) remains largely constant (77 +/- 13%) demonstrating the contractile component origin of passive, short range stiffness. The linear Hill-type model does not describe the range-related stiffness relevant to the progression from quiet standing to perturbed balance and movement and can lead to inaccurate predictions regarding human balance.

  3. Site-Directed Mutagenesis to Improve Sensitivity of a Synthetic Two-Component Signaling System

    PubMed Central

    Kuldell, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Two-component signaling (2CS) systems enable bacterial cells to respond to changes in their local environment, often using a membrane-bound sensor protein and a cytoplasmic responder protein to regulate gene expression. Previous work has shown that Escherichia coli’s natural EnvZ/OmpR 2CS could be modified to construct a light-sensing bacterial photography system. The resulting bacterial photographs, or “coliroids,” rely on a phosphotransfer reaction between Cph8, a synthetic version of EnvZ that senses red light, and OmpR. Gene expression changes can be visualized through upregulation of a LacZ reporter gene by phosphorylated OmpR. Unfortunately, basal LacZ expression leads to a detectable reporter signal even when cells are grown in the light, diminishing the contrast of the coliroids. We performed site-directed mutagenesis near the phosphotransfer site of Cph8 to isolate mutants with potentially improved image contrast. Five mutants were examined, but only one of the mutants, T541S, increased the ratio of dark/light gene expression, as measured by β-galactosidase activity. The ratio changed from 2.57 fold in the starting strain to 5.59 in the T541S mutant. The ratio decreased in the four other mutant strains we examined. The phenotype observed in the T541S mutant strain may arise because the serine sidechain is chemically similar but physically smaller than the threonine sidechain. This may minimally change the protein’s local structure, but may be less sterically constrained when compared to threonine, resulting in a higher probability of a phosphotransfer event. Our initial success pairing synthetic biology and site-directed mutagenesis to optimize the bacterial photography system’s performance encourages us to imagine further improvements to the performance of this and other synthetic systems, especially those based on 2CS signaling. PMID:26799494

  4. Site-Directed Mutagenesis to Improve Sensitivity of a Synthetic Two-Component Signaling System.

    PubMed

    Olshefsky, Audrey; Shehata, Laila; Kuldell, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Two-component signaling (2CS) systems enable bacterial cells to respond to changes in their local environment, often using a membrane-bound sensor protein and a cytoplasmic responder protein to regulate gene expression. Previous work has shown that Escherichia coli's natural EnvZ/OmpR 2CS could be modified to construct a light-sensing bacterial photography system. The resulting bacterial photographs, or "coliroids," rely on a phosphotransfer reaction between Cph8, a synthetic version of EnvZ that senses red light, and OmpR. Gene expression changes can be visualized through upregulation of a LacZ reporter gene by phosphorylated OmpR. Unfortunately, basal LacZ expression leads to a detectable reporter signal even when cells are grown in the light, diminishing the contrast of the coliroids. We performed site-directed mutagenesis near the phosphotransfer site of Cph8 to isolate mutants with potentially improved image contrast. Five mutants were examined, but only one of the mutants, T541S, increased the ratio of dark/light gene expression, as measured by β-galactosidase activity. The ratio changed from 2.57 fold in the starting strain to 5.59 in the T541S mutant. The ratio decreased in the four other mutant strains we examined. The phenotype observed in the T541S mutant strain may arise because the serine sidechain is chemically similar but physically smaller than the threonine sidechain. This may minimally change the protein's local structure, but may be less sterically constrained when compared to threonine, resulting in a higher probability of a phosphotransfer event. Our initial success pairing synthetic biology and site-directed mutagenesis to optimize the bacterial photography system's performance encourages us to imagine further improvements to the performance of this and other synthetic systems, especially those based on 2CS signaling.

  5. Direct-View Multi-Point Two-Component Interferometric Rayleigh Scattering Velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivolaru, Daniel; Danehy, Paul M.; Gaffney, Richard L., Jr.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an instantaneous velocity measurement system based on the Doppler shift of elastically scattered laser light from gas molecules (Rayleigh scattering) relative to an incident laser. The system uses a pulsed laser as the light source, direct-viewing optics to collect the scattered light, an interferometer to analyze spectrally the scattered light mixed with the incident laser light, and a CCD camera to capture the resulting interferogram. The system is capable of simultaneous, spatially (approximately 0.2 mm(exp 3)) and temporally (approximately 40 ns) resolved, multiple point measurements of two orthogonal components of flow velocity in the presence of background scattered light, acoustic noise and vibrations, and flow particulates. Measurements in a large-scale axi-symmetric Mach 1.6 H2-air combustion-heated jet running at a flow sensible enthalpy specific to Mach 5.5 hypersonic flight are performed to demonstrate the technique. The measurements are compared with CFD calculations using a finite-volume discretization of the Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes equations (VULCAN code).

  6. Direct and maternal (co)variance components and heritability estimates for body weights in Chokla sheep.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, B P; Mandal, A; Arora, A L; Kumar, R; Kumar, S; Notter, D R

    2009-08-01

    Estimates of (co)variance components were obtained for weights at birth, weaning and 6, 9 and 12 months of age in Chokla sheep maintained at the Central Sheep and Wool Research Institute, Avikanagar, Rajasthan, India, over a period of 21 years (1980-2000). Records of 2030 lambs descended from 150 rams and 616 ewes were used in the study. Analyses were carried out by restricted maximum likelihood (REML) fitting an animal model and ignoring or including maternal genetic or permanent environmental effects. Six different animal models were fitted for all traits. The best model was chosen after testing the improvement of the log-likelihood values. Direct heritability estimates were inflated substantially for all traits when maternal effects were ignored. Heritability estimates for weight at birth, weaning and 6, 9 and 12 months of age were 0.20, 0.18, 0.16, 0.22 and 0.23, respectively in the best models. Additive maternal and maternal permanent environmental effects were both significant at birth, accounting for 9% and 12% of phenotypic variance, respectively, but the source of maternal effects (additive versus permanent environmental) at later ages could not be clearly identified. The estimated repeatabilities across years of ewe effects on lamb body weights were 0.26, 0.14, 0.12, 0.13, and 0.15 at birth, weaning, 6, 9 and 12 months of age, respectively. These results indicate that modest rates of genetic progress are possible for all weights.

  7. Remote sensing of row crop structure and component temperatures using directional radiometric temperatures and inversion techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    A physically based sensor response model of a row crop was used as the mathematical framework from which several inversion strategies were tested for extracting row structure information and component temperatures using a series of sensor view angles. The technique was evaluated on ground-based radiometric thermal infrared data of a cotton row crop that covered 48 percent of the ground in the vertical projection. The results showed that the accuracies of the predicted row heights and widths, vegetation temperatures, and soil temperatures of the cotton row crop were on the order of 5 cm, 1 deg, and 2 deg C, respectively. The inversion techniques can be applied to directional sensor data from aircraft platforms and even space platforms if the effects of atmospheric absorption and emission can be corrected. In theory, such inversion techniques can be applied to a wide variety of vegetation types and thus can have significant implications for remote sensing research and applications in disciplines that deal with incomplete vegetation canopies.

  8. Improving the Accuracy of Lunar Laser Ranging Tests of Gravitational Theory: Modeling and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, James G.; Turyshev, Slava; Dickey, Jean O.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate analysis of precision ranges to the Moon have provided several tests of gravitational theory: the equivalence principle, geodetic precession, PPN parameters beta and gamma, and the constancy of the gravitational constant G. Other possible tests include the inverse square law at 20,000 km length scales and the PPN parameter 1. The uncertainties of these tests have decreased as data accuracies have improved and data time span has lengthened. We are exploring the modeling improvements necessary to proceed from cm to mm range accuracies. Looking to future exploration, what characteristics are desired for the next generation of ranging devices, what fundamental questions can be investigated, and what are the challenges for modeling and data analysis?

  9. A technique of direct tracing for recording digital range of motion.

    PubMed

    Macionis, Valdas

    2008-04-01

    This report describes a technique for recording range of motion of digital joints. The technique involves tracing digital outlines with an angled marker on a sheet of paper attached to a special interray pad. A complete dorsal silhouette of the entire ray can be obtained by mounting the pad and the paper astride the palm parallel to the ray of the digit being evaluated. Fabrication and use of the equipment is described. This silhouetting system could be an alternative to wire tracing in visualizing tendencies of dynamics of digital range of motion.

  10. Direct observation and quantification of extracellular long-range electron flow in anaerobic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvankar, Nikhil; Yalcin, Sibel; Vargas, Madeline; Tuominen, Mark; Lovley, Derek

    2013-03-01

    Some anaerobic microorganisms are capable of transporting electrons outside their cell to distant electron acceptors such as metals, minerals or partner species. Previous studies have focused primarily on transport over short distances (< 1 μm) via diffusion of molecular intermediates, or alternatively via tunneling or thermally-activated hopping across biomolecules. However, we have found that Geobacter sulfurreducens can transport electrons over long distances (> 10 μm) using pili filaments that show organic metal-like conductivity. Pili also enable direct exchange of electrons among syntrophic Geobacter co-cultures. In order to establish the physical principles underlying this remarkable electron transport, we have employed a novel scanning probe microscopy-based method to perform quantitative measurements of electron flow at a single cell level under physiological conditions. Using this nanoscopic approach, we have directly observed the propagation and distribution of injected electrons in individual native bacterial extracellular proteins. Our direct measurements demonstrate unambiguously for the first time that the pili of G. sulfurreducens are a novel class of electronically functional proteins that can sustain electron flow in a surprising manner that has not been observed previously in any other natural protein. Funded by Office of Naval Research, DOE Genomic Sciences and NSF-NSEC Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing grant no. CMMI-1025020.

  11. Strategies for heart regeneration: approaches ranging from induced pluripotent stem cells to direct cardiac reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Hiroyuki; Ieda, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death for which current therapeutic regimens are limited. Following myocardial injury, endogenous cardiac fibroblasts, which account for more than half of the cells in the heart, proliferate and synthesize extracellular matrix, leading to fibrosis and heart failure. As terminally differentiated cardiomyocytes have little regenerative capacity following injury, development of cardiac regenerative therapy is highly desired. Embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are promising tools for regenerative medicine; however, these stem cells demonstrate variable cardiac differentiation efficiency and tumorigenicity, which should be solved for clinical applications. Up until the last decade, it was an established theory that cardiomyocytes could only be produced from fibroblasts mediating through stem cells. However, in 2010, we reported for the first time a novel method of the direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes, demonstrating various reprogramming pathways exist. This review summarizes the latest trends in stem cell and regenerative research, touching upon iPS cells, partial reprogramming strategy, and direct cardiac reprogramming. Specifically, we examine the many recent advances in both in vitro and in vivo direct cardiac reprogramming, and explore the application of these methods to cardiovascular regenerative medicine.

  12. Direct writing of fiber optic components in photonic crystal fibers and other specialty fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Luis Andre; Sezerman, Omur; Best, Garland; Ng, Mi Li; Kane, Saidou

    2016-04-01

    Femtosecond direct laser writing has recently shown great potential for the fabrication of complex integrated devices in the cladding of optical fibers. Such devices have the advantage of requiring no bulk optical components and no breaks in the fiber path, thus reducing the need for complicated alignment, eliminating contamination, and increasing stability. This technology has already found applications using combinations of Bragg gratings, interferometers, and couplers for the fabrication of optical filters, sensors, and power monitors. The femtosecond laser writing method produces a local modification of refractive index through non-linear absorption of the ultrafast laser pulses inside the dielectric material of both the core and cladding of the fiber. However, fiber geometries that incorporate air or hollow structures, such as photonic crystal fibers (PCFs), still present a challenge since the index modification regions created by the writing process cannot be generated in the hollow regions of the fiber. In this work, the femtosecond laser method is used together with a pre-modification method that consists of partially collapsing the hollow holes using an electrical arc discharge. The partial collapse of the photonic band gap structure provides a path for femtosecond laser written waveguides to couple light from the core to the edge of the fiber for in-line power monitoring. This novel approach is expected to have applications in other specialty fibers such as suspended core fibers and can open the way for the integration of complex devices and facilitate miniaturization of optical circuits to take advantage of the particular characteristics of the PCFs.

  13. The direction and range of ambient temperature change influences yawning in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Gallup, Andrew C; Miller, Michael L; Clark, Anne B

    2010-05-01

    Comparative research suggests that yawning is a thermoregulatory behavior in homeotherms. Our previous experiments revealed that yawning increased in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) as ambient temperature was raised toward body temperature (22-->34 degrees C). In this study, we identify the range of temperatures that triggers yawning to rule out the possible effect of changing temperature in any range. To corroborate its thermoregulatory function, we also related the incidence of yawning to other avian thermoregulatory behaviors in budgerigars (e.g., panting, wing venting). In a repeated measures design, 16 budgerigars were exposed to 4 separate 10-min periods of changing temperatures: (a) low-increasing (23-->27 degrees C), (b) high-increasing (27-->33 degrees C), (c) high-decreasing (34-->28 degrees C), and (d) low-decreasing (28-->24 degrees C). Birds yawned significantly more during the high-increasing temperature range, and yawning was positively correlated with ambient temperature across trials. Yawning was also positively correlated with other thermoregulatory behaviors. This research clarifies the previously demonstrated relationship between yawning rate and temperature by providing evidence that the physiological trigger for yawning is related to increasing body temperatures rather than the detection of changing external temperatures.

  14. High dynamic range detection of Chlamydia trachomatis growth by direct quantitative PCR of the infected cells.

    PubMed

    Eszik, Ildikó; Lantos, Ildikó; Önder, Kamil; Somogyvári, Ferenc; Burián, Katalin; Endrész, Valéria; Virok, Dezső P

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria developing in an intracytoplasmic niche, the inclusion. Chlamydia growth measurement by inclusion counting is a key task in the development of novel antichlamydial antibiotics and in vaccine studies. Most of the current counting methods rely on the immunofluorescent staining of the inclusions and either manual or automatic microscopy detection and enumeration. The manual method is highly labor intensive, while the automatic methods are either medium-throughput or require automatic microscopy. The sensitive and specific PCR technology could be an effective method for growth related chlamydial DNA detection; however the currently described PCR approaches have a major limitation, the requirement of purification of DNA or RNA from the infected cells. This limitation makes this approach unfeasible for high-throughput screenings. To overcome this, we developed a quantitative PCR (qPCR) method for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis DNA directly from the infected HeLa cells. With our method we were able to detect the bacterial growth in a 4 log scale (multiplicity of infection (MOI): 64 to 0.0039), with high correlation between the biological and technical replicates. As a further proof of the method, we applied the direct qPCR for antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measurements. The measured MICs of moxifloxacin, tetracycline, clarithromycin and compound PCC00213 were 0.031 μg/ml, 0.031 μg/ml, 0.0039 μg/ml and 6.2 μg/ml respectively, identical or close to the already published MIC values. Our direct qPCR method for chlamydial growth and antibiotic MIC determination is less time-consuming, more objective and more sensitive than the currently applied manual or automatic fluorescent microscopy- based methods.

  15. Range estimation techniques in single-station thunderstorm warning sensors based upon gated, wideband, magnetic direction finder technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifer, Alburt E.; Hiscox, William L.; Cummins, Kenneth L.; Neumann, William T.

    1991-01-01

    Gated, wideband, magnetic direction finders (DFs) were originally designed to measure the bearing of cloud-to-ground lightning relative to the sensor. A recent addition to this device uses proprietary waveform discrimination logic to select return stroke signatures and certain range dependent features in the waveform to provide an estimate of range of flashes within 50 kms. The enhanced ranging techniques are discussed which were designed and developed for use in single station thunderstorm warning sensor. Included are the results of on-going evaluations being conducted under a variety of meteorological and geographic conditions.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of Skin Lipids: Effects of the Molar Ratio of Individual Components over a Wide Temperature Range.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rakesh; Rai, Beena

    2015-09-03

    Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to systematically investigate the effects of the molar ratio of the individual components cholesterol (CHOL), free fatty acid (FFA), and ceramides (CER) on the properties of the skin lipid bilayer over a wide temperature range (300-400 K). Several independent simulations were performed for bilayers comprised of only CER, CHOL, or FFA molecules as well as those made up of a mixture of CER:CHOL:FFA molecules in different molar ratios. It was found that CHOL increases the stability of the bilayer, since the mixed (CER:CHOL:FFA) 1:1:0, 1:1:1, and 2:2:1 bilayers remained stable until 400 K while the pure ceramide bilayer disintegrated around ∼390 K. It was also observed that CHOL reduces the volume spanned by ceramide molecules, thereby leading to a higher area per CER and FFA molecule in the mixed bilayer system. The CHOL molecule provided more rigidity to the mixed bilayer and led to a more ordered phase at elevated temperatures. The CHOL molecule provided fluidity to the bilayer below the phase transition temperature of CER and kept the bilayer rigid above the phase transition temperature. The FFA interdigitizes with CER molecules and increases the thickness of the bilayer, while rigid CHOL decreases the bilayer thickness. The presence of CHOL increases the compressibility of the bilayer which is responsible for the high barrier function of skin. The CER molecule forms inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonds, while CHOL only forms intermolecular hydrogen bonds.

  17. Direct Numerical Simulation and Theories of Wall Turbulence with a Range of Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, G. N.; Garbaruk, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    A new Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of Couette-Poiseuille flow at a higher Reynolds number is presented and compared with DNS of other wall-bounded flows. It is analyzed in terms of testing semi-theoretical proposals for universal behavior of the velocity, mixing length, or eddy viscosity in pressure gradients, and in terms of assessing the accuracy of two turbulence models. These models are used in two modes, the traditional one with only a dependence on the wall-normal coordinate y, and a newer one in which a lateral dependence on z is added. For pure Couette flow and the Couette-Poiseuille case considered here, this z-dependence allows some models to generate steady streamwise vortices, which generally improves the agreement with DNS and experiment. On the other hand, it complicates the comparison between DNS and models.

  18. The 'not-so-strange' body in the mirror: A principal components analysis of direct and mirror self-observation.

    PubMed

    Jenkinson, Paul M; Preston, Catherine

    2017-02-01

    In this study we adopted a psychometric approach to examine how the body is subjectively experienced in a mirror. One hundred and twenty-four healthy participants viewed their body for five minutes directly or via a mirror, and then completed a 20-item questionnaire designed to capture subjective experiences of the body. PCA revealed a two-component structure for both direct and mirror conditions, comprising body evaluations (and alienation) and unusual feelings and perceptions. The relationship between these components and pre-existing tendencies for appearance anxiety, body dysmorphic-type beliefs, dissociative symptomatology, self-objectification and delusion ideation further supported the similarity between direct and mirror conditions; however, the occurrence of strange experiences like those reported to occur during prolonged face viewing was not confirmed. These results suggest that, despite obvious differences in visual feedback, observing the body via a mirror (as an outside observer) is subjectively equivalent to observing the body directly (from our own viewpoint).

  19. A strongly goal-directed close-range vision system for spacecraft docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, Kim L.; Goddard, Ralph E.

    1991-01-01

    In this presentation, we will propose a strongly goal-oriented stereo vision system to establish proper docking approach motions for automated rendezvous and capture (AR&C). From an input sequence of stereo video image pairs, the system produces a current best estimate of: contact position; contact vector; contact velocity; and contact orientation. The processing demands imposed by this particular problem and its environment dictate a special case solution; such a system should necessarily be, in some sense, minimalist. By this we mean the system should construct a scene description just sufficiently rich to solve the problem at hand and should do no more processing than is absolutely necessary. In addition, the imaging resolution should be just sufficient. Extracting additional information and constructing higher level scene representations wastes energy and computational resources and injects an unnecessary degree of complexity, increasing the likelihood of malfunction. We therefore take a departure from most prior stereopsis work, including our own, and propose a system based on associative memory. The purpose of the memory is to immediately associate a set of motor commands with a set of input visual patterns in the two cameras. That is, rather than explicitly computing point correspondences and object positions in world coordinates and trying to reason forward from this information to a plan of action, we are trying to capture the essence of reflex behavior through the action of associative memory. The explicit construction of point correspondences and 3D scene descriptions, followed by online velocity and point of impact calculations, is prohibitively expensive from a computational point of view for the problem at hand. Learned patterns on the four image planes, left and right at two discrete but closely spaced instants in time, will be bused directly to infer the spacecraft reaction. This will be a continuing online process as the docking collar approaches.

  20. Speciation and extinction drive the appearance of directional range size evolution in phylogenies and the fossil record.

    PubMed

    Pigot, Alex L; Owens, Ian P F; Orme, C David L

    2012-01-01

    While the geographic range of a species is a fundamental unit of macroecology and a leading predictor of extinction risk, the evolutionary dynamics of species' ranges remain poorly understood. Based on statistical associations between range size and species age, many studies have claimed support for general models of range evolution in which the area occupied by a species varies predictably over the course of its life. Such claims have been made using both paleontological data and molecular estimates of the age of extant species. However, using a stochastic model, we show that the appearance of trends in range size with species' age can arise even when range sizes have evolved at random through time. This occurs because the samples of species used in existing studies are likely to be biased with respect to range size: for example, only those species that happened to have large or expanding ranges are likely to survive to the present, while extinct species will tend to be those whose ranges, by chance, declined through time. We compared the relationship between the age and range size of species arising under our stochastic model to those observed across 1,269 species of extant birds and mammals and 140 species of extinct Cenozoic marine mollusks. We find that the stochastic model is able to generate the full spectrum of empirical age-area relationships, implying that such trends cannot be simply interpreted as evidence for models of directional range size evolution. Our results therefore challenge the theory that species undergo predictable phases of geographic expansion and contraction through time.

  1. A methodology for direct quantification of over-ranging length in helical computed tomography with real-time dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Tien, Christopher J; Winslow, James F; Hintenlang, David E

    2011-01-31

    In helical computed tomography (CT), reconstruction information from volumes adjacent to the clinical volume of interest (VOI) is required for proper reconstruction. Previous studies have relied upon either operator console readings or indirect extrapolation of measurements in order to determine the over-ranging length of a scan. This paper presents a methodology for the direct quantification of over-ranging dose contributions using real-time dosimetry. A Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 multislice helical CT scanner is used with a novel real-time "point" fiber-optic dosimeter system with 10 ms temporal resolution to measure over-ranging length, which is also expressed in dose-length-product (DLP). Film was used to benchmark the exact length of over-ranging. Over-ranging length varied from 4.38 cm at pitch of 0.5 to 6.72 cm at a pitch of 1.5, which corresponds to DLP of 131 to 202 mGy-cm. The dose-extrapolation method of Van der Molen et al. yielded results within 3%, while the console reading method of Tzedakis et al. yielded consistently larger over-ranging lengths. From film measurements, it was determined that Tzedakis et al. overestimated over-ranging lengths by one-half of beam collimation width. Over-ranging length measured as a function of reconstruction slice thicknesses produced two linear regions similar to previous publications. Over-ranging is quantified with both absolute length and DLP, which contributes about 60 mGy-cm or about 10% of DLP for a routine abdominal scan. This paper presents a direct physical measurement of over-ranging length within 10% of previous methodologies. Current uncertainties are less than 1%, in comparison with 5% in other methodologies. Clinical implantation can be increased by using only one dosimeter if codependence with console readings is acceptable, with an uncertainty of 1.1% This methodology will be applied to different vendors, models, and postprocessing methods--which have been shown to produce over-ranging lengths

  2. Skin and muscle components of forearm blood flow in directly heated resting man.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detry, J.-M. R.; Brengelmann, G. L.; Rowell, L. B.; Wyss, C.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in forearm muscle blood flow (FMBF) during direct whole-body heating were measured in 17 normal subjects using three different methods. We conclude that FMBF is not increased by direct whole-body heating. Since renal and splanchnic blood flow fall 30% under these conditions, maximal total skin blood flow in 12 previously studied subjects can be estimated from the rise in cardiac output to be 7.6 L/min (3.0-11.1 L/min).

  3. Direct estimation of dissolved organic carbon using synchronous fluorescence and independent component analysis (ICA): advantages of a multivariate calibration.

    PubMed

    De Almeida Brehm, Franciane; de Azevedo, Julio Cesar R; da Costa Pereira, Jorge; Burrows, Hugh D

    2015-11-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is frequently used as a diagnostic parameter for the identification of environmental contamination in aqueous systems. Since this organic matter is evolving and decaying over time. If samples are collected under environmental conditions, some sample stabilization process is needed until the corresponding analysis can be made. This may affect the analysis results. This problem can be avoided using the direct determination of DOC. We report a study using in situ synchronous fluorescence spectra, with independent component analysis to retrieve relevant major spectral contributions and their respective component contributions, for the direct determination of DOC. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a very powerful and sensitive technique to evaluate vestigial organic matter dissolved in water and is thus suited for the analytical task of direct monitoring of dissolved organic matter in water, thus avoiding the need for the stabilization step. We also report the development of an accurate calibration model for dissolved organic carbon determinations using environmental samples of humic and fulvic acids. The method described opens the opportunity for a fast, in locus, DOC estimation in environmental or other field studies using a portable fluorescence spectrometer. This combines the benefits of the use of fresh samples, without the need of stabilizers, and also allows the interpretation of various additional spectral contributions based on their respective estimated properties. We show how independent component analysis may be used to describe tyrosine, tryptophan, humic acid and fulvic acid spectra and, thus, to retrieve the respective individual component contribution to the DOC.

  4. The effect of tissue anisotropy on the radial and tangential components of the electric field in transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Metwally, Mohamed K; Han, Seung Moo; Kim, Tae-Seong

    2015-10-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is considered to be a promising technique for noninvasive brain stimulation and brain disease therapy. Recent studies have investigated the distribution of the electric field (EF) magnitude over gyri and sulci and the effect of tissue homogeneity with isotropic electrical conductivities. However, it is well known that the skull and white matter (WM) are highly anisotropic electrically, requiring investigations of their anisotropic effects on the magnitude and the directional components of the induced EF due to the high dependency between neuromodulation and the EF direction. In this study, we investigated the effects of the skull and WM anisotropy on the radial and tangential components of the EF via gyri-specific high-resolution finite element head models. For tDCS, three configurations were investigated: the conventional rectangular pad electrode, a 4(cathodes) +1(anode) ring configuration, and a bilateral configuration. The results showed that the skull anisotropy has a crucial influence on the distribution of the radial EF component. The affected cortical regions by the radial EF were reduced about 22 % when considering the skull anisotropy in comparison with the regions with the skull isotropy. On the other hand, the WM anisotropy strongly alters the EF directionality, especially within the sulci. The electric current tends to flow radially to the cortical surface with the WM anisotropy. This effect increases the affected cortical areas by the radial EF component within the sulcal regions. Our results suggest that one must examine the distribution of the EF components in tDCS, not just the magnitude of the EF alone.

  5. Impact of multi-component diffusion in turbulent combustion using direct numerical simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Bruno, Claudio; Sankaran, Vaidyanathan; Kolla, Hemanth; ...

    2015-08-28

    This study presents the results of DNS of a partially premixed turbulent syngas/air flame at atmospheric pressure. The objective was to assess the importance and possible effects of molecular transport on flame behavior and structure. To this purpose DNS were performed at with two proprietary DNS codes and with three different molecular diffusion transport models: fully multi-component, mixture averaged, and imposing the Lewis number of all species to be unity.

  6. Unimodal primary sensory cortices are directly connected by long-range horizontal projections in the rat sensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Stehberg, Jimmy; Dang, Phat T.; Frostig, Ron D.

    2014-01-01

    Research based on functional imaging and neuronal recordings in the barrel cortex subdivision of primary somatosensory cortex (SI) of the adult rat has revealed novel aspects of structure-function relationships in this cortex. Specifically, it has demonstrated that single whisker stimulation evokes subthreshold neuronal activity that spreads symmetrically within gray matter from the appropriate barrel area, crosses cytoarchitectural borders of SI and reaches deeply into other unimodal primary cortices such as primary auditory (AI) and primary visual (VI). It was further demonstrated that this spread is supported by a spatially matching underlying diffuse network of border-crossing, long-range projections that could also reach deeply into AI and VI. Here we seek to determine whether such a network of border-crossing, long-range projections is unique to barrel cortex or characterizes also other primary, unimodal sensory cortices and therefore could directly connect them. Using anterograde (BDA) and retrograde (CTb) tract-tracing techniques, we demonstrate that such diffuse horizontal networks directly and mutually connect VI, AI and SI. These findings suggest that diffuse, border-crossing axonal projections connecting directly primary cortices are an important organizational motif common to all major primary sensory cortices in the rat. Potential implications of these findings for topics including cortical structure-function relationships, multisensory integration, functional imaging, and cortical parcellation are discussed. PMID:25309339

  7. Development of neuroendocrine components of the thyroid axis in the direct-developing frog Eleutherodactylus coqui: formation of the median eminence and onset of pituitary TSH production.

    PubMed

    Jennings, David H; Evans, Bryce; Hanken, James

    2015-04-01

    Direct-developing frogs lack, wholly or in part, a wide range of larval features found in metamorphosing species and form adult-specific features precociously, during embryogenesis. Most information on thyroid regulation of direct development relies on hormone manipulations; the ontogeny of many thyroid axis components has not been fully described. This analysis examines differentiation of the median eminence of the hypothalamus and production of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) by the pituitary of the direct-developing frog Eleutherodactylus coqui. The median eminence is established two-thirds of the way through embryogenesis. Cells immunoreactive to human TSHβ antibodies are first detected during embryogenesis and quantitative changes in TSHβ-IR cells resemble those in metamorphosing amphibians. Formation of the median eminence of the hypothalamus and TSHβ production by the pituitary precede or coincide with morphological changes during embryogenesis that occur during metamorphosis in biphasic anurans. Thus, while the onset of neuroendocrine regulation has changed during the evolution of direct development, it is likely that these thyroid axis components still mediate the formation of adult features.

  8. Modular organization of directionally tuned cells in the motor cortex: Is there a short-range order?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirikian, Bagrat; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P.

    2003-10-01

    We investigated the presence of short-range order (<600 μm) in the directional properties of neurons in the motor cortex of the monkey. For that purpose, we developed a quantitative method for the detection of functional cortical modules and used it to examine such potential modules formed by directionally tuned cells. In the functional domain, we labeled each cell by its preferred direction (PD) vector in 3D movement space; in the spatial domain, we used the position of the tip of the recording microelectrode as the cell's coordinate. The images produced by this method represented two orthogonal dimensions in the cortex; one was parallel ("horizontal") and the other perpendicular ("vertical") to the cortical layers. The distribution of directionally tuned cells in these dimensions was nonuniform and highly structured. Specifically, cells with similar PDs tended to segregate into vertically oriented minicolumns 50-100 μm wide and at least 500 μm high. Such minicolumns aggregated across the horizontal dimension in a secondary structure of higher order. In this structure, minicolumns with similar PDs were 200 μm apart and were interleaved with minicolumns representing nearly orthogonal PDs; in addition, nonoverlapping columns representing nearly opposite PDs were 350 μm apart.

  9. Direct molecular dynamics simulation of liquid-solid phase equilibria for a three-component plasma.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Horowitz, C J; Schneider, A S; Medin, Zach; Cumming, Andrew; Berry, D K

    2012-12-01

    The neutron-rich isotope ²²Ne may be a significant impurity in carbon and oxygen white dwarfs and could impact how the stars freeze. We perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine the influence of ²²Ne in carbon-oxygen-neon systems on liquid-solid phase equilibria. Both liquid and solid phases are present simultaneously in our simulation volumes. We identify liquid, solid, and interface regions in our simulations using a bond angle metric. In general we find good agreement for the composition of liquid and solid phases between our MD simulations and the semianalytic model of Medin and Cumming. The trace presence of a third component, neon, does not appear to strongly impact the chemical separation found previously for two-component carbon and oxygen systems. This suggests that small amounts of ²²Ne may not qualitatively change how the material in white dwarf stars freezes. However, we do find systematically lower melting temperatures (higher Γ) in our MD simulations compared to the semianalytic model. This difference seems to grow with impurity parameter Q_{imp} and suggests a problem with simple corrections to the linear mixing rule for the free energy of multicomponent solid mixtures that is used in the semianalytic model.

  10. Multi-Component Molecular-Level Body Composition Reference Methods: Evolving Concepts and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Heymsfield, Steven B.; Ebbeling, Cara B.; Zheng, Jolene; Pietrobelli, Angelo; Strauss, Boyd J.; Silva, Analiza M.; Ludwig, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Excess adiposity is the main phenotypic feature that defines human obesity and that plays a pathophysiological role in most chronic diseases. Measuring the amount of fat mass present is thus a central aspect of studying obesity at the individual and population levels. Nevertheless, a consensus is lacking among investigators on a single accepted “reference” approach for quantifying fat mass in vivo. While the research community generally relies on the multicomponent body-volume class of “reference” models for quantifying fat mass, no definable guide discerns among different applied equations for partitioning the four (fat, water, protein, and mineral mass) or more quantified components, standardizes “adjustment” or measurement system approaches for model-required labeled water dilution volumes and bone mineral mass estimates, or firmly establishes the body temperature at which model physical properties are assumed. The resulting differing reference strategies for quantifying body composition in vivo leads to small but under some circumstances important differences in the amount of measured body fat. Recent technological advances highlight opportunities to expand model applications to new subject groups and measured components such as total body protein. The current report reviews the historical evolution of multicomponent body volume-based methods in the context of prevailing uncertainties and future potential. PMID:25645009

  11. Very low levels of direct additive genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in a red squirrel population

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Gorrell, Jamieson C; Coltman, David W; Humphries, Murray M; Boutin, Stan; McAdam, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    A trait must genetically correlate with fitness in order to evolve in response to natural selection, but theory suggests that strong directional selection should erode additive genetic variance in fitness and limit future evolutionary potential. Balancing selection has been proposed as a mechanism that could maintain genetic variance if fitness components trade off with one another and has been invoked to account for empirical observations of higher levels of additive genetic variance in fitness components than would be expected from mutation–selection balance. Here, we used a long-term study of an individually marked population of North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) to look for evidence of (1) additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success and (2) fitness trade-offs between fitness components, such as male and female fitness or fitness in high- and low-resource environments. “Animal model” analyses of a multigenerational pedigree revealed modest maternal effects on fitness, but very low levels of additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success overall as well as fitness measures within each sex and environment. It therefore appears that there are very low levels of direct genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in red squirrels to facilitate contemporary adaptation in this population. PMID:24963372

  12. Figure of merit and fundamental range limitations in surface sensing direct-detection mid-infrared random-modulation continuous-wave lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybaltowski, Adam; Taflove, Allen

    2002-01-01

    We perform maximum range calculations for surface sensing direct-detection mid-infrared Random-Modulation Continuous- Wave (RM-CW) lidar, and propose a system's figure of merit. In this type of lidar, noise can be additive and determined by detector's noise given by its specific detectivity D, area, and integration time. Fundamental limits of the sensing range are then imposed by diffraction, provided that the Background-Limited Infrared Photodetection (BLIP) limit (controlled by the field-of-view) is not exceeded. There is no dependence on a specific pseudorandom code (PRC) used since noise spectral density is assumed to be independent of frequency. Under most favorable conditions, including no losses due to optics or atmospheric attenuation, an object of angularly uniform unity reflectance and size not less than the laser beam can be detected within 1s with a 20-cm diameter telescope and a signal-to-noise ratio of one from a distance of about 200 km if a cooled detector and a laser emitting 500 mW cw at 5 micrometers are used. For an integration time of 0.1 ms (which is well below a typical atmospheric correlation time), or a room-temperature detector, the maximum range reduces to about 20 km. As the technology of Quantum-Cascade lasers (QCLs) advances, the maximum range of several tens of kilometers can be expected in this type of lidar with all-thermoelectrically-cooled semiconductor components, and, perhaps after some modifications in the technique, about 1 km with all-room-temperature components.

  13. Optimization of long-range BOTDA sensors with high resolution using first-order bi-directional Raman amplification.

    PubMed

    Soto, Marcelo A; Bolognini, Gabriele; Di Pasquale, Fabrizio

    2011-02-28

    In this paper we perform an optimization of Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA) sensors for achieving high resolution over long sensing ranges using distributed Raman amplification. By employing an optimized first-order bi-directional Raman amplification scheme and combining high-power fiber-Raman lasers and Fabry-Pérot lasers with low relative-intensity-noise (RIN), we demonstrate distributed sensing over 120 km of standard single-mode fiber with 2 meter spatial resolution and with a strain/temperature accuracy of 45με/2.1°C respectively.

  14. Performance of the Components of the XJ34-WE-32 Turbojet Engine over a Range of Engine and Flight Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaulay, John E; Sobolewski, Adam E; Smith, Ivan D

    1952-01-01

    Performance of the compressor, combustor, and turbine operating as integral parts of the XJ34-WE-32 turbojet engine was determined in the Lewis altitude wind tunnel over a range of altitudes from 5000 to 55,000 feet and flight Mach numbers from 0.28 to 1.05. Data were obtained for each of four exhaust-nozzle areas and are presented in graphical and tabular form.

  15. Direct measurement of the intermolecular forces between counterion-condensed DNA double helices. Evidence for long range attractive hydration forces.

    PubMed

    Rau, D C; Parsegian, V A

    1992-01-01

    Rather than acting by modifying van der Waals or electrostatic double layer interactions or by directly bridging neighboring molecules, polyvalent ligands bound to DNA double helices appear to act by reconfiguring the water between macromolecular surfaces to create attractive long range hydration forces. We have reached this conclusion by directly measuring the repulsive forces between parallel B-form DNA double helices pushed together from the separations at which they have self organized into hexagonal arrays of parallel rods. For all of the wide variety of "condensing agents" from divalent Mn to polymeric protamines, the resulting intermolecular force varies exponentially with a decay rate of 1.4-1.5 A, exactly one-half that seen previously for hydration repulsion. Such behavior qualitatively contradicts the predictions of all electrostatic double layer and van der Waals force potentials previously suggested. It fits remarkably well with the idea, developed and tested here, that multivalent counterion adsorption reorganizes the water at discrete sites complementary to unadsorbed sites on the apposing surface. The measured strength and range of these attractive forces together with their apparent specificity suggest the presence of a previously unexpected force in molecular organization.

  16. Direct measurement of the intermolecular forces between counterion-condensed DNA double helices. Evidence for long range attractive hydration forces.

    PubMed Central

    Rau, D C; Parsegian, V A

    1992-01-01

    Rather than acting by modifying van der Waals or electrostatic double layer interactions or by directly bridging neighboring molecules, polyvalent ligands bound to DNA double helices appear to act by reconfiguring the water between macromolecular surfaces to create attractive long range hydration forces. We have reached this conclusion by directly measuring the repulsive forces between parallel B-form DNA double helices pushed together from the separations at which they have self organized into hexagonal arrays of parallel rods. For all of the wide variety of "condensing agents" from divalent Mn to polymeric protamines, the resulting intermolecular force varies exponentially with a decay rate of 1.4-1.5 A, exactly one-half that seen previously for hydration repulsion. Such behavior qualitatively contradicts the predictions of all electrostatic double layer and van der Waals force potentials previously suggested. It fits remarkably well with the idea, developed and tested here, that multivalent counterion adsorption reorganizes the water at discrete sites complementary to unadsorbed sites on the apposing surface. The measured strength and range of these attractive forces together with their apparent specificity suggest the presence of a previously unexpected force in molecular organization. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:1540693

  17. Direct molecular dynamics simulation of liquid-solid phase equilibria for two-component plasmas.

    PubMed

    Schneider, A S; Hughto, J; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2012-06-01

    We determine the liquid-solid phase diagram for carbon-oxygen and oxygen-selenium plasma mixtures using two-phase molecular dynamics simulations. We identify liquid, solid, and interface regions using a bond angle metric. To study finite-size effects, we perform 27,648- and 55,296-ion simulations. To help monitor nonequilibrium effects, we calculate diffusion constants D(i). For the carbon-oxygen system we find that D(O) for oxygen ions in the solid is much smaller than D(C) for carbon ions and that both diffusion constants are 80 or more times smaller than diffusion constants in the liquid phase. There is excellent agreement between our carbon-oxygen phase diagram and that predicted by Medin and Cumming. This suggests that errors from finite-size and nonequilibrium effects are small and that the carbon-oxygen phase diagram is now accurately known. The oxygen-selenium system is a simple two-component model for more complex rapid proton capture nucleosynthesis ash compositions for an accreting neutron star. Diffusion of oxygen, in a predominantly selenium crystal, is remarkably fast, comparable to diffusion in the liquid phase. We find a somewhat lower melting temperature for the oxygen-selenium system than that predicted by Medin and Cumming. This is probably because of electron screening effects.

  18. Development of Continuous, Direct Feedback Control Systems for Sintering of Metallic Components

    SciTech Connect

    Diran Apelian; Marc M. Baum

    2006-09-18

    N,N.-Ethylenebisstearimide (EBS) is one of the most commonlyused lubricants in the powder metallurgy (PM) industry in the sintering process. During sintering, the lubricated powder compacts are heat-treated to temperatures in excess of 1,200 °C thus fusing adjacent particles and yielding a part with improved mechanical strength. Delubrication commonly is achieved in the first zone of a sintering furnace by heating the part to temperatures in the 500-600 °C temperature range at a fixed rate and under controlled atmospheric conditions; this strategy minimizes defects, carbon contamination, and compact deformation. The de-lubricated part then enters the second zone (commonly in the 1200-1300 °C temperature range) for sintering. The third zone cools the sintered part at a desired rate to obtain the requisite micro-structural properties. Controlled delubrication is imperative towards achieving high quality parts for the following reasons: the elevated thermal gradient at the transition between the first and second zones can cause parts to expand rapidly and develop microscopic fissures (.blistering.); improper gas flows and belt speeds can lead to carbon deposition on the part and at the grain boundaries (sooting); delubrication products deposit throughout the furnace, even in the coolers, which are far removed from the preheating chamber, leading to significant maintenance costs; pollutants emitted in the exhaust stream of furnaces operating inefficiently are increasingly of environmental concern. In practice, lubricant removal is difficult to control, which often leads to reduced yields in PM manufacturing processes. Throughput is another important issue: process control ideally should lead to a delubrication cycle that yields defect-free parts in a minimum of furnace time, thereby increasing productivity and reducing the net energy consumption. Efficient process control requires rapid monitoring of suitable indicators, preferably gasphase products of delubrication

  19. Application of Optical Parametric Generator for Lidar Sensing of Minor Gas Components of the Atmosphere in 3-4 μm Spectral Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovskii, O. A.; Sadovnikov, S. A.; Kharchenko, O. V.; Shumskii, V. K.; Yakovlev, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    Possibility of application of a laser system with parametric light generation based on a nonlinear KTA crystal for lidar sensing of the atmosphere in the 3-4 μm spectral range is investigated. A technique for lidar measurements of gas components in the atmosphere with the use of differential absorption lidar (DIAL) and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method is developed. The DIAL-DOAS technique is tested for estimating the possibility of laser sensing of minor gas components in the atmosphere.

  20. Laser direct writing of 40 GHz RF components on flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharatos, F.; Iliadis, N.; Kanakis, J.; Bakopoulos, P.; Avramopoulos, H.; Zergioti, I.

    2016-05-01

    Flexible electronics have emerged as a very promising alternative of CMOS compatible electronics for a plethora of applications. Laser microfabrication techniques, such as selective laser patterning and sintering are compatible with flexible substrates and have demonstrated impressive results in the field of flexible electronic circuits and sensors. However, laser based manufacturing of radio frequency (RF) passive components or devices is still at an early stage. In this work we report on the all-laser fabrication of Silver Co-Planar Waveguides (CPWs) on polyethylene-naphthalate (PEN) substrates employing flat-top optics to achieve uniform laser fluence and thus high fabrication precision and reproducibility but also to mitigate the thermal effects of nanosecond laser pulses. The CPWs have been fabricated to match the impedance of 50 Ω ports of an Anritsu vector network analyzer operating from 40 MHz to 40 GHz. The all laser fabrication process consisted in the selective laser sintering of square dies on a Silver Nano Particle layer spin-coated on a PEN substrate followed by the selective laser patterning of the CPWs with a ns pulsed Nd:YAG laser source operating at 532 nm, according to the optimized parameters extracted from a previous studies of the authors. The CPWs have been characterized electrically at the 0.04-40 GHz regime and found to be excellent transmission lines with a 40 GHz 3 dB bandwidth, owing to the high electrical conductivity of Ag and the excellent dielectric properties of PEN. This novel process is a milestone towards the RF technology transfer to flexible electronics with low cost and specs comparable to the CMOS compatible equivalents.

  1. Effects of ion source operating parameters on direct analysis in real time of 18 active components from traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Zeng, Shanshan; Qu, Haibin

    2016-03-20

    Direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) provides a new analytical method for traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The present study investigated the effects of key ion source operating parameters on DART-MS analysis of various TCM active components. A total of 18 active components, including phenylpropanoids, alkaloids, saponins, flavones, volatile oils, and glycosides, were examined. For each substance, the peak area and signal-to-noise of its characteristic ions under different reagent gases and heater temperatures were compared. Based on the comparison, the relationships among chemical structures, ion source parameters and instrument responses were revealed. Finally, some suggestions about choosing reagent gas and heater temperature were proposed for types of TCM active substance, which offered a reference for the application of DART-MS on TCM analysis.

  2. Direct observation of the magnetic spin component of samarium iron-based laves compound by magnetic Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizusaki, S.; Kawamura, N.; Taniguchi, T.; Itou, M.; Samata, H.; Noro, Y.; Sakurai, Y.; Nagata, Y.

    2007-03-01

    The spin-polarized electron momentum distributions (magnetic Compton profiles: MCP's) of SmFe 1.86Al 0.14 along the [1 1 1] direction have been measured at 10 and 300 K using the magnetic Compton scattering technique. It is found that the orbital moment dominates the magnetization in this compound. A comparison with a theoretical profile support that the shape of the experimental MCP's is reproduced by a sum of positive Fe and negative Sm 4f spin components. A slight difference is observed in the shape of MCP between 10 and 300 K.

  3. Direct functional consequences of ZRS enhancer mutation combine with secondary long range SHH signalling effects to cause preaxial polydactyly.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Edward J; Neely, David M; Dunn, Ian C; Davey, Megan G

    2014-08-15

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) plays a central role in patterning numerous embryonic tissues including, classically, the developing limb bud where it controls digit number and identity. This study utilises the polydactylous Silkie (Slk) chicken breed, which carries a mutation in the long range limb-specific regulatory element of SHH, the ZRS. Using allele specific SHH expression analysis combined with quantitative protein analysis, we measure allele specific changes in SHH mRNA and concentration of SHH protein over time. This confirms that the Slk ZRS enhancer mutation causes increased SHH expression in the posterior leg mesenchyme. Secondary consequences of this increased SHH signalling include increased FGF pathway signalling and growth as predicted by the SHH/GREM1/FGF feedback loop and the Growth/Morphogen models. Manipulation of Hedgehog, FGF signalling and growth demonstrate that anterior-ectopic expression of SHH and induction of preaxial polydactyly is induced secondary to increased SHH signalling and Hedgehog-dependent growth directed from the posterior limb. We predict that increased long range SHH signalling acts in combination with changes in activation of SHH transcription from the Slk ZRS allele. Through analysis of the temporal dynamics of anterior SHH induction we predict a gene regulatory network which may contribute to activation of anterior SHH expression from the Slk ZRS.

  4. Direct transcriptional activation of BT genes by NLP transcription factors is a key component of the nitrate response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takeo; Maekawa, Shugo; Konishi, Mineko; Yoshioka, Nozomi; Sasaki, Yuki; Maeda, Haruna; Ishida, Tetsuya; Kato, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Junji; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2017-01-29

    Nitrate modulates growth and development, functioning as a nutrient signal in plants. Although many changes in physiological processes in response to nitrate have been well characterized as nitrate responses, the molecular mechanisms underlying the nitrate response are not yet fully understood. Here, we show that NLP transcription factors, which are key regulators of the nitrate response, directly activate the nitrate-inducible expression of BT1 and BT2 encoding putative scaffold proteins with a plant-specific domain structure in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, the 35S promoter-driven expression of BT2 partially rescued growth inhibition caused by reductions in NLP activity in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, simultaneous disruption of BT1 and BT2 affected nitrate-dependent lateral root development. These results suggest that direct activation of BT1 and BT2 by NLP transcriptional activators is a key component of the molecular mechanism underlying the nitrate response in Arabidopsis.

  5. A Missing Data Approach to Correct for Direct and Indirect Range Restrictions with a Dichotomous Criterion: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Pfaffel, Andreas; Kollmayer, Marlene; Schober, Barbara; Spiel, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    A recurring methodological problem in the evaluation of the predictive validity of selection methods is that the values of the criterion variable are available for selected applicants only. This so-called range restriction problem causes biased population estimates. Correction methods for direct and indirect range restriction scenarios have widely studied for continuous criterion variables but not for dichotomous ones. The few existing approaches are inapplicable because they do not consider the unknown base rate of success. Hence, there is a lack of scientific research on suitable correction methods and the systematic analysis of their accuracies in the cases of a naturally or artificially dichotomous criterion. We aim to overcome this deficiency by viewing the range restriction problem as a missing data mechanism. We used multiple imputation by chained equations to generate complete criterion data before estimating the predictive validity and the base rate of success. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to investigate the accuracy of the proposed correction in dependence of selection ratio, predictive validity, and base rate of success in an experimental design. In addition, we compared our proposed missing data approach with Thorndike’s well-known correction formulas that have only been used in the case of continuous criterion variables so far. The results show that the missing data approach is more accurate in estimating the predictive validity than Thorndike’s correction formulas. The accuracy of our proposed correction increases as the selection ratio and the correlation between predictor and criterion increase. Furthermore, the missing data approach provides a valid estimate of the unknown base rate of success. On the basis of our findings, we argue for the use of multiple imputation by chained equations in the evaluation of the predictive validity of selection methods when the criterion is dichotomous. PMID:27019277

  6. Broad-Range Detection of Microorganisms Directly from Bronchoalveolar Lavage Specimens by PCR/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ullberg, Måns; Lüthje, Petra; Mölling, Paula; Strålin, Kristoffer

    2017-01-01

    The clinical demand on rapid microbiological diagnostic is constantly increasing. PCR coupled to electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, PCR/ESI-MS, offers detection and identification of over 750 bacteria and Candida species directly from clinical specimens within 6 hours. In this study, we investigated the clinical performance of the IRIDICA BAC LRT Assay for detection of bacterial pathogens in 121 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples that were received consecutively at our bacterial laboratory for BAL culture. Commensal or pathogenic microorganisms were detected in 118/121 (98%) BAL samples by PCR/ESI-MS, while in 104/121 (86%) samples by routine culture (P<0.01). Detection of potentially pathogenic microorganisms by PCR/ESI-MS was evaluated in comparison with conventional culture-based or molecular methods. The agreement between positive findings was overall good. Most Staphylococcus aureus-positive PCR/ESI-MS results were confirmed by culture or species-specific PCR (27/33, 82%). The identity of Streptococcus pneumoniae could however be confirmed for only 6/17 (35%) PCR/ESI-MS-positive samples. Non-cultivable and fastidious pathogens, which were not covered by standard culture procedures were readily detected by PCR/ESI-MS, including Legionella pneumophila, Bordetella pertussis, Norcadia species and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. In conclusion, PCR/ESI-MS detected a broad range of potential pathogens with equal or superior sensitivity compared to conventional methods within few hours directly from BAL samples. This novel method might thus provide a relevant tool for diagnostics in critically ill patients. PMID:28085931

  7. Direct force measurements reveal that protein Tau confers short-range attractions and isoform-dependent steric stabilization to microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Peter J.; Choi, Myung Chul; Miller, Herbert P.; Feinstein, H. Eric; Raviv, Uri; Li, Youli; Wilson, Leslie; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are hollow cytoskeletal filaments assembled from αβ-tubulin heterodimers. Tau, an unstructured protein found in neuronal axons, binds to MTs and regulates their dynamics. Aberrant Tau behavior is associated with neurodegenerative dementias, including Alzheimer’s. Here, we report on a direct force measurement between paclitaxel-stabilized MTs coated with distinct Tau isoforms by synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of MT-Tau mixtures under osmotic pressure (P). In going from bare MTs to MTs with Tau coverage near the physiological submonolayer regime (Tau/tubulin-dimer molar ratio; ΦTau = 1/10), isoforms with longer N-terminal tails (NTTs) sterically stabilized MTs, preventing bundling up to PB ∼ 10,000–20,000 Pa, an order of magnitude larger than bare MTs. Tau with short NTTs showed little additional effect in suppressing the bundling pressure (PB ∼ 1,000–2,000 Pa) over the same range. Remarkably, the abrupt increase in PB observed for longer isoforms suggests a mushroom to brush transition occurring at 1/13 < ΦTau < 1/10, which corresponds to MT-bound Tau with NTTs that are considerably more extended than SAXS data for Tau in solution indicate. Modeling of Tau-mediated MT–MT interactions supports the hypothesis that longer NTTs transition to a polyelectrolyte brush at higher coverages. Higher pressures resulted in isoform-independent irreversible bundling because the polyampholytic nature of Tau leads to short-range attractions. These findings suggest an isoform-dependent biological role for regulation by Tau, with longer isoforms conferring MT steric stabilization against aggregation either with other biomacromolecules or into tight bundles, preventing loss of function in the crowded axon environment. PMID:26542680

  8. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Absorption and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on airborne CO2 column absorption measurements made in 2009 with a pulsed direct-detection lidar operating at 1572.33 nm and utilizing the integrated path differential absorption technique. We demonstrated these at different altitudes from an aircraft in July and August in flights over four locations in the central and eastern United States. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The lidar measurement statistics were also calculated for each flight as a function of altitude. The optical depth varied nearly linearly with altitude, consistent with calculations based on atmospheric models. The scatter in the optical depth measurements varied with aircraft altitude as expected, and the median measurement precisions for the column varied from 0.9 to 1.2 ppm. The altitude range with the lowest scatter was 810 km, and the majority of measurements for the column within it had precisions between 0.2 and 0.9 ppm.

  9. A high dynamic range method for the direct readout of a dynamic phase change in homodyne interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marçal, L. A. P.; Kitano, C.; Higuti, R. T.; Nader, G.; Silva, E. C. N.

    2012-12-01

    Piezoelectric flextensional actuators (PFAs) are an efficient alternative to systems that demand nano-positioning of devices, such as in nanotechnology. Optical techniques constitute an excellent choice for contactless measurement of nano-displacements. In particular, optical interferometry constitutes an adequate choice for characterizing PFAs. There are several types of interferometers, as well as optical phase demodulation methods, used in practice. One interesting class of demodulation methods uses the spectrum of the photo-detected signal and its intrinsic properties when there is a harmonically varying time-domain modulating signal. In this work, a low cost homodyne Michelson interferometer, associated with simple electronic circuits for signal conditioning and acquisition, is used. A novel dynamic phase demodulation method, named Jm&Jm + 2, is proposed, which uses only the magnitude spectrum of the photo-detected signal, without the need to know its phase spectrum. The method is passive, direct, self-consistent, without problems of phase ambiguity and immune to fading, and presents a dynamic range from 0.45 to 100 rad displacements (between 22.6 nm and 5 µm, for λ = 632.8 nm). When applied to the measurement of half-wave voltage in a proof-of-concept Pockels cell, it presents errors smaller than 0.9% when compared to theory. For the estimation of PFA displacement, it allows the measurement of linearity and frequency response curves, with excellent results.

  10. Direct and maternal (co)variance components, genetic parameters, and annual trends for growth traits of Makooei sheep in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hossein; Shahrebabak, Mohammad Moradi; Vatankhah, Mahmood; Shahrebabak, Hossein Moradi

    2013-01-01

    Genetic parameters and genetic trends for birth weight (BW), weaning weight (WW), 6-month weight (6MW), and yearling weight (YW) traits were estimated by using records of 5,634 Makooei lambs, descendants of 289 sires and 1,726 dams, born between 1996 and 2009 at the Makooei sheep breeding station, West Azerbaijan, Iran. The (co)variance components were estimated with different animal models using a restricted maximum likelihood procedure and the most appropriate model for each trait was determined by Akaike's Information Criterion. Breeding values of animals were predicted with best linear unbiased prediction methodology under multi-trait animal models and genetic trends were estimated by regression mean breeding values on birth year. The most appropriate model for BW was a model including direct and maternal genetic effects, regardless of their covariance. The model for WW and 6MW included direct additive genetic effects. The model for YW included direct genetic effects only. Direct heritabilities based on the best model were estimated 0.15 ± 0.04, 0.16 ± 0.03, 0.21 ± 0.04, and 0.22 ± 0.06 for BW, WW, 6MW, and YW, respectively, and maternal heritability obtained 0.08 ± 0.02 for BW. Genetic correlations among the traits were positive and varied from 0.28 for BW-YW to 0.66 for BW-WW and phenotypic correlations were generally lower than the genetic correlations. Genetic trends were 8.1 ± 2, 67.4 ± 5, 38.7 ± 4, and 47.6 ± 6 g per year for BW, WW, 6MW, and YW, respectively.

  11. Survey of the response of standard limited streamer tubes over the complete range of three-component gas mixtures of isobutane, CO/sub 2/, argon

    SciTech Connect

    Calcaterra, A.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Burrows, P.; Cartwright, S.L.; Gonzalez, S.; Lath, A.; Schneekloth, U.; Williams, D.C.; Yamartino, J.M.

    1989-07-01

    We present the results of a systematic study of three-component gas mixtures containing argon, isobutane, and carbon dioxide. The study used production-type chambers from the SLD Warm Iron Calorimeter (WIC), instrumented with standard pleastic streamert tubes, and triggered by cosmic-ray muons. Pulse height spectra are presented as a function of high voltage, over a wide range of mixtures of these three gases. Various features and similarities observed throughout this three-dimensional mixture space are important clues to understanding the underlying physics of discharge mechanisms in wire detectors. 15 refs., 17 figs.

  12. Characterization of magnetized ore bodies based on three-component borehole magnetic and directional borehole seismic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgil, Christopher; Neuhaus, Martin; Hördt, Andreas; Giese, Rüdiger; Krüger, Kay; Jurczyk, Andreas; Juhlin, Christopher; Juhojuntti, Niklas

    2016-04-01

    In the last decades magnetic prospecting using total field data was used with great success for localization and characterization of ferromagnetic ore bodies. Especially borehole magnetic measurements reveal important constraints on the extent and depth of potential mining targets. However, due to the inherent ambiguity of the interpretation of magnetic data, the resulting models of the distribution of magnetized material, such as iron ore bodies, are not entirely reliable. Variations in derived parameters like volume and estimated ore content of the expected body have significant impact on the economic efficiency of a planned mine. An important improvement is the introduction of three-component borehole magnetic sondes. Modern tools comprise orientation modules which allow the continuous determination of the tool's heading regardless of the well inclination and independent of the magnetic field. Using the heading information the recorded three-component magnetic data can be transferred from the internal tool's frame to the geographic reference frame. The vector information yields a more detailed and reliable description of the ore bodies compared to total field or horizontal and vertical field data. Nevertheless complementary information to constrain the model is still advisable. The most important supplementary information for the interpretation of magnetic data is the knowledge of the structural environment of the target regions. By discriminating dissimilar rock units, a geometrical starting model can be derived, constraining the magnetic interpretation and leading to a more robust estimation of the rock magnetizations distribution. The most common approach to reveal the lithological setting rests upon seismic measurements. However, for deep drilling targets surface seismic and VSP lack the required spatial resolution of 10s of meters. A better resolution is achieved by using directed sources and receivers inside the borehole. Here we present the application of

  13. Extensions of the direct-semidirect model for calculating the high energy component of fast-nucleon induced gamma spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F S

    2000-05-22

    This section reviews extensions and variations of the direct-semidirect (DSD) model for understanding the high-energy component of gamma spectra resulting from radiative capture of fast nucleons; i.e., the part of the spectrum that is not amenable to standard statistical model (Hauser-Feshbach) treatments. We describe recent results on the extension of the DSD model to unbound final states, including comparison with proton and neutron capture data. The importance of including convective-current magnetic radiation to explain proton capture angular distributions in the 30 MeV region is shown. We conclude with a brief discussion of a model closely related to the DSD, the pure-resonance model.

  14. Factor analysis as a tool for spectral line component separation 21cm emission in the direction of L1780

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, L. V.; Mattila, K.; Haikala, L.; Balazs, L. G.

    1992-01-01

    The spectra of the 21cm HI radiation from the direction of L1780, a small high-galactic latitude dark/molecular cloud, were analyzed by multivariate methods. Factor analysis was performed on HI (21cm) spectra in order to separate the different components responsible for the spectral features. The rotated, orthogonal factors explain the spectra as a sum of radiation from the background (an extended HI emission layer), and from the L1780 dark cloud. The coefficients of the cloud-indicator factors were used to locate the HI 'halo' of the molecular cloud. Our statistically derived 'background' and 'cloud' spectral profiles, as well as the spatial distribution of the HI halo emission distribution were compared to the results of a previous study which used conventional methods analyzing nearly the same data set.

  15. Path integral Monte Carlo determination of the fourth-order virial coefficient for unitary two-component Fermi gas with zero-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yangqian; Blume, D.

    2016-05-01

    The unitary equal-mass Fermi gas with zero-range interactions constitutes a paradigmatic model system that is relevant to atomic, condensed matter, nuclear, particle, and astro physics. This work determines the fourth-order virial coefficient b4 of such a strongly-interacting Fermi gas using a customized ab inito path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) algorithm. In contrast to earlier theoretical results, which disagreed on the sign and magnitude of b4, our b4 agrees with the experimentally determined value, thereby resolving an ongoing literature debate. Utilizing a trap regulator, our PIMC approach determines the fourth-order virial coefficient by directly sampling the partition function. An on-the-fly anti-symmetrization avoids the Thomas collapse and, combined with the use of the exact two-body zero-range propagator, establishes an efficient general means to treat small Fermi systems with zero-range interactions. We gratefully acknowledge support by the NSF.

  16. Path-Integral Monte Carlo Determination of the Fourth-Order Virial Coefficient for a Unitary Two-Component Fermi Gas with Zero-Range Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yangqian; Blume, D.

    2016-06-01

    The unitary equal-mass Fermi gas with zero-range interactions constitutes a paradigmatic model system that is relevant to atomic, condensed matter, nuclear, particle, and astrophysics. This work determines the fourth-order virial coefficient b4 of such a strongly interacting Fermi gas using a customized ab initio path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) algorithm. In contrast to earlier theoretical results, which disagreed on the sign and magnitude of b4 , our b4 agrees within error bars with the experimentally determined value, thereby resolving an ongoing literature debate. Utilizing a trap regulator, our PIMC approach determines the fourth-order virial coefficient by directly sampling the partition function. An on-the-fly antisymmetrization avoids the Thomas collapse and, combined with the use of the exact two-body zero-range propagator, establishes an efficient general means to treat small Fermi systems with zero-range interactions.

  17. Human Ku70/80 interacts directly with hTR, the RNA component of human telomerase.

    PubMed

    Ting, Nicholas S Y; Yu, Yaping; Pohorelic, Brant; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Beattie, Tara L

    2005-01-01

    Maintenance of telomere integrity requires the dynamic interplay between telomerase, telomere-associated proteins and DNA repair proteins. These interactions are vital to suppress DNA damage responses and changes in chromosome dynamics that can result in aneuploidy or other transforming aberrations. The interaction between the DNA repair protein Ku and the RNA component of telomerase (TLC1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been shown to be important for maintaining telomere length. Here, we sought to determine whether this interaction was conserved in higher eukaryotes. Although there is no sequence similarity between TLC1 and the RNA component (hTR) of human telomerase, we show that human Ku70/80 interacts with hTR both in vitro and in a cellular context. Specifically, Ku70/80 interacts with a 47 nt region of the 3' end of hTR, which resembles the stem-loop region of the yeast Ku70/80 binding domain on TLC1. Furthermore, utilizing immunoprecipitation/RT-PCR experiments, we show that Ku interacts with hTR in cell lines deficient in the human telomerase reverse transcriptase protein (hTERT), suggesting that this interaction does not require hTERT. These data suggest that Ku interacts directly with hTR, independent of hTERT, providing evidence for the conservation of the interaction between Ku and telomerase RNA among various species and provide significant insight into how Ku is involved in telomere maintenance in higher eukaryotes.

  18. The effect of gaze direction on the different components of visuo-spatial short-term memory.

    PubMed

    Carlei, Christophe; Kerzel, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral asymmetries and cortical regions associated with the upper and lower visual field were investigated using shifts of gaze. Earlier research suggests that gaze shifts to the left or right increase activation of specific areas of the contralateral hemisphere. We asked whether looking at one quadrant of the visual field facilitates the recall in various visuo-spatial tasks. The different components of visuo-spatial memory were investigated by probing memory for a stimulus matrix in each quadrant of the screen. First, memory for visual images or patterns was probed with a matrix of squares that was simultaneously presented and had to be reconstructed by mouse click. Better memory performance was found in the upper left quadrant compared to the three other quadrants indicating that both laterality and elevation are important. Second, positional memory was probed by subsequently presenting squares which prevented the formation of a visual image. Again, we found that gaze to the upper left facilitated performance. Third, memory for object-location binding was probed by asking observers to associate objects to particular locations. Higher performance was found with gaze directed to the lower quadrants irrespective of lateralization, confirming that only some components of visual short-term memory have shared neural substrates.

  19. Human Ku70/80 interacts directly with hTR, the RNA component of human telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Nicholas S. Y.; Yu, Yaping; Pohorelic, Brant; Lees-Miller, Susan P.; Beattie, Tara L.

    2005-01-01

    Maintenance of telomere integrity requires the dynamic interplay between telomerase, telomere-associated proteins and DNA repair proteins. These interactions are vital to suppress DNA damage responses and changes in chromosome dynamics that can result in aneuploidy or other transforming aberrations. The interaction between the DNA repair protein Ku and the RNA component of telomerase (TLC1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been shown to be important for maintaining telomere length. Here, we sought to determine whether this interaction was conserved in higher eukaryotes. Although there is no sequence similarity between TLC1 and the RNA component (hTR) of human telomerase, we show that human Ku70/80 interacts with hTR both in vitro and in a cellular context. Specifically, Ku70/80 interacts with a 47 nt region of the 3′ end of hTR, which resembles the stem–loop region of the yeast Ku70/80 binding domain on TLC1. Furthermore, utilizing immunoprecipitation/RT–PCR experiments, we show that Ku interacts with hTR in cell lines deficient in the human telomerase reverse transcriptase protein (hTERT), suggesting that this interaction does not require hTERT. These data suggest that Ku interacts directly with hTR, independent of hTERT, providing evidence for the conservation of the interaction between Ku and telomerase RNA among various species and provide significant insight into how Ku is involved in telomere maintenance in higher eukaryotes. PMID:15824061

  20. Use of spectra in the visible and near-mid-ultraviolet range with principal component analysis and partial least squares processing for monitoring of suspended solids in municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Nídia D; Paixão, Fátima; Pinheiro, Helena M; Sousa, Alexandra

    2010-09-01

    The present work assesses the possibility of using spectrophotometry in the near-mid-ultraviolet and visible wavelength ranges (282-790 nm) for the direct monitoring of treatment performance in municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to analyze spectral data from samples collected along three WWTP process lines with different primary and secondary treatment units. The clustering observed in PCA score plots was mainly attributed to the suspended solids fraction present in the wastewater and highlighted differences in solids quality between plants and along the treatment lines. Thus, satisfactory partial least squares (PLS) calibration models to estimate total suspended solids (TSS) values from the acquired spectra could only be established per plant. The PLS models were established using 1-2 factors, with root mean error of cross-validation and coefficient of determination values in the 50-86 mg TSS L(-1) and 82-95% ranges, respectively.

  1. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Concentration and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection IPDA Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Ramanathan, Anand; Riris, Haris; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Weaver, Clark J.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated a pulsed direct detection IPDA lidar to measure range and the column concentration of atmospheric CO2. The lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and samples the shape of the 1,572.33 nm CO2 absorption line. We participated in the ASCENDS science flights on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during August 2011 and report here lidar measurements made on four flights over a variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US. These included over a stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, to a dry lake bed surrounded by mountains in Nevada, to a desert area with a coal-fired power plant, and from the Rocky Mountains to Iowa, with segments with both cumulus and cirrus clouds. Most flights were to altitudes >12 km and had 5-6 altitude steps. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range, CO2 column absorption, and CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds, between cumulus clouds, and to stratus cloud tops. The retrievals shows the decrease in column CO2 due to growing vegetation when flying over Iowa cropland as well as a sudden increase in CO2 concentration near a coal-fired power plant. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption lineshape (averaged for 50 s) matched the predicted shapes to better than 1% RMS error. For 10 s averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was typically 2-3 ppm and was limited by the received signal photon count. Retrievals were made using atmospheric parameters from both an atmospheric model and from in situ temperature and pressure from the aircraft. The retrievals had no free parameters and did not use empirical adjustments, and >70% of the measurements passed screening and were used in analysis. The differences between the lidar-measured retrievals and in situ measured average CO2 column concentrations were <1.4 ppm for flight measurement altitudes >6 km.

  2. Deconvolution enhanced direction of arrival estimation using one- and three-component seismic arrays applied to ocean induced microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, M.; Reading, A. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, R.; Gibbons, S. J.

    2016-07-01

    Microseisms in the period of 2-10 s are generated in deep oceans and near coastal regions. It is common for microseisms from multiple sources to arrive at the same time at a given seismometer. It is therefore desirable to be able to measure multiple slowness vectors accurately. Popular ways to estimate the direction of arrival of ocean induced microseisms are the conventional (fk) or adaptive (Capon) beamformer. These techniques give robust estimates, but are limited in their resolution capabilities and hence do not always detect all arrivals. One of the limiting factors in determining direction of arrival with seismic arrays is the array response, which can strongly influence the estimation of weaker sources. In this work, we aim to improve the resolution for weaker sources and evaluate the performance of two deconvolution algorithms, Richardson-Lucy deconvolution and a new implementation of CLEAN-PSF. The algorithms are tested with three arrays of different aperture (ASAR, WRA and NORSAR) using 1 month of real data each and compared with the conventional approaches. We find an improvement over conventional methods from both algorithms and the best performance with CLEAN-PSF. We then extend the CLEAN-PSF framework to three components (3C) and evaluate 1 yr of data from the Pilbara Seismic Array in northwest Australia. The 3C CLEAN-PSF analysis is capable in resolving a previously undetected Sn phase.

  3. Direct interactions between calcitonin-like receptor (CLR) and CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP) regulate CGRP receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Egea, Sophie C; Dickerson, Ian M

    2012-04-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide with multiple neuroendocrine roles, including vasodilation, migraine, and pain. The receptor for CGRP is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that requires three proteins for function. CGRP binds to a heterodimer composed of the GPCR calcitonin-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP1), a single transmembrane protein required for pharmacological specificity and trafficking of the CLR/RAMP1 complex to the cell surface. In addition, the CLR/RAMP1 complex requires a third protein named CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP) for signaling. Previous studies have demonstrated that depletion of RCP from cells inhibits CLR signaling, and in vivo studies have demonstrated that expression of RCP correlates with CLR signaling and CGRP efficacy. It is not known whether RCP interacts directly with CLR to exert its effect. The current studies identified a direct interaction between RCP and an intracellular domain of CLR using yeast two-hybrid analysis and coimmunoprecipitation. When this interacting domain of CLR was expressed as a soluble fusion protein, it coimmunoprecipitated with RCP and inhibited signaling from endogenous CLR. Expression of this dominant-negative domain of CLR did not significantly inhibit trafficking of CLR to the cell surface, and thus RCP may not have a chaperone function for CLR. Instead, RCP may regulate CLR signaling in the cell membrane, and direct interaction between RCP and CLR is required for CLR activation. To date, RCP has been found to interact only with CLR and represents a novel neuroendocrine regulatory step in GPCR signaling.

  4. Rapid metabolic profiling of Nicotiana tabacum defence responses against Phytophthora nicotianae using direct infrared laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and principal component analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Successful defence of tobacco plants against attack from the oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae includes a type of local programmed cell death called the hypersensitive response. Complex and not completely understood signaling processes are required to mediate the development of this defence in the infected tissue. Here, we demonstrate that different families of metabolites can be monitored in small pieces of infected, mechanically-stressed, and healthy tobacco leaves using direct infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The defence response was monitored for 1 - 9 hours post infection. Results Infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry allows rapid and simultaneous detection in both negative and positive ion mode of a wide range of naturally occurring primary and secondary metabolites. An unsupervised principal component analysis was employed to identify correlations between changes in metabolite expression (obtained at different times and sample treatment conditions) and the overall defence response. A one-dimensional projection of the principal components 1 and 2 obtained from positive ion mode spectra was used to generate a Biological Response Index (BRI). The BRI obtained for each sample treatment was compared with the number of dead cells found in the respective tissue. The high correlation between these two values suggested that the BRI provides a rapid assessment of the plant response against the pathogen infection. Evaluation of the loading plots of the principal components (1 and 2) reveals a correlation among three metabolic cascades and the defence response generated in infected leaves. Analysis of selected phytohormones by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry verified our findings. Conclusion The described methodology allows for rapid assessment of infection-specific changes in the plant metabolism, in particular of phenolics, alkaloids

  5. Human CHMP6, a myristoylated ESCRT-III protein, interacts directly with an ESCRT-II component EAP20 and regulates endosomal cargo sorting

    PubMed Central

    Yorikawa, Chiharu; Shibata, Hideki; Waguri, Satoshi; Hatta, Kazumi; Horii, Mio; Katoh, Keiichi; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Maki, Masatoshi

    2004-01-01

    CHMP6 (charged multivesicular body protein 6) is a human orthologue of yeast Vps (vacuolar protein sorting) 20, a component of ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport)-III. Various CHMP6 orthologues in organisms ranging from yeast to humans contain the N-myristoylation consensus sequence at each N-terminus. Metabolic labelling of HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney) cells showed the incorporation of [3H]myristate into CHMP6 fused C-terminally to GFP (green fluorescent protein) (CHMP6–GFP). Interactions of CHMP6 with another ESCRT-III component CHMP4b/Shax [Snf7 (sucrose non-fermenting 7) homologue associated with Alix] 1, one of three paralogues of human Vps32/Snf7, and with EAP20 (ELL-associated protein 20), a human counterpart of yeast Vps25 and component of ESCRT-II, were observed by co-immunoprecipitation of epitope-tagged proteins expressed in HEK-293 cells. The in vitro pull-down assays using their recombinant proteins purified from Escherichia coli demonstrated direct physical interactions which were mediated by the N-terminal basic half of CHMP6. Overexpressed CHMP6-GFP in HeLa cells exhibited a punctate distribution throughout the cytoplasm especially in the perinuclear area, as revealed by fluorescence microscopic analysis. Accumulation of LBPA (lysobisphosphatidic acid), a major phospholipid in internal vesicles of an MVB (multivesicular body), was observed in the CHMP6–GFP-localizing area. FLAG-tagged EAP20 distributed diffusely, but exhibited a punctate distribution on co-expression with CHMP6–GFP. Overexpression of CHMP6–GFP caused reduction of transferrin receptors on the plasma membrane surface, but caused their accumulation in the cytoplasm. Ubiquitinated proteins and endocytosed EGF continuously accumulated in CHMP6–GFP-expressing cells. These results suggest that CHMP6 acts as an acceptor for ESCRT-II on endosomal membranes and regulates cargo sorting. PMID:15511219

  6. From Principal Component to Direct Coupling Analysis of Coevolution in Proteins: Low-Eigenvalue Modes are Needed for Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Cocco, Simona; Monasson, Remi; Weigt, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Various approaches have explored the covariation of residues in multiple-sequence alignments of homologous proteins to extract functional and structural information. Among those are principal component analysis (PCA), which identifies the most correlated groups of residues, and direct coupling analysis (DCA), a global inference method based on the maximum entropy principle, which aims at predicting residue-residue contacts. In this paper, inspired by the statistical physics of disordered systems, we introduce the Hopfield-Potts model to naturally interpolate between these two approaches. The Hopfield-Potts model allows us to identify relevant ‘patterns’ of residues from the knowledge of the eigenmodes and eigenvalues of the residue-residue correlation matrix. We show how the computation of such statistical patterns makes it possible to accurately predict residue-residue contacts with a much smaller number of parameters than DCA. This dimensional reduction allows us to avoid overfitting and to extract contact information from multiple-sequence alignments of reduced size. In addition, we show that low-eigenvalue correlation modes, discarded by PCA, are important to recover structural information: the corresponding patterns are highly localized, that is, they are concentrated in few sites, which we find to be in close contact in the three-dimensional protein fold. PMID:23990764

  7. Potential of direct metal deposition technology for manufacturing thick functionally graded coatings and parts for reactors components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Laget, B.; Smurov, I.

    2009-03-01

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D deposition process arising from laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection to refine or refurbish parts. Recently DMD has been extended to manufacture large-size near-net-shape components. When applied for manufacturing new parts (or their refinement), DMD can provide tailored thermal properties, high corrosion resistance, tailored tribology, multifunctional performance and cost savings due to smart material combinations. In repair (refurbishment) operations, DMD can be applied for parts with a wide variety of geometries and sizes. In contrast to the current tool repair techniques such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), metal inert gas (MIG) and plasma welding, laser cladding technology by DMD offers a well-controlled heat-treated zone due to the high energy density of the laser beam. In addition, this technology may be used for preventative maintenance and design changes/up-grading. One of the advantages of DMD is the possibility to build functionally graded coatings (from 1 mm thickness and higher) and 3D multi-material objects (for example, 100 mm-sized monolithic rectangular) in a single-step manufacturing cycle by using up to 4-channel powder feeder. Approved materials are: Fe (including stainless steel), Ni and Co alloys, (Cu,Ni 10%), WC compounds, TiC compounds. The developed coatings/parts are characterized by low porosity (<1%), fine microstructure, and their microhardness is close to the benchmark value of wrought alloys after thermal treatment (Co-based alloy Stellite, Inox 316L, stainless steel 17-4PH). The intended applications concern cooling elements with complex geometry, friction joints under high temperature and load, light-weight mechanical support structures, hermetic joints, tubes with complex geometry, and tailored inside and outside surface properties, etc.

  8. Time-Variable Gravity from Satellite Laser-Ranging: The Low-Degree Components and Their Connections with Geophysical/Climatic Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Cox, Christopher M.

    2004-01-01

    Satellite laser-ranging (SLR) has been observing the tiny variations in Earth s global gravity for over 2 decades. The oblateness of the Earth's gravity field, J2, has been observed to undergo a secular decrease of J2 due mainly to the post-glacial rebound of the mantle. Sometime around 1998 this trend reversed quite suddenly. This reversal persisted until 2001, at which point the atmosphere-corrected time series appears to have reversed yet again towards normal. This anomaly signifies a large interannual change in global mass distribution. A number of possible causes have been considered, with oceanic mass redistribution as the leading candidate although other effects, such as glacial melting and core effects may be contributing. In fact, a strong correlation has been found between the J2 variability and the Pacific decadal oscillation. It is relatively more difficult to solve for corresponding signals in the shorter wavelength harmonics from the existing SLR-derived time variable gravity results, although it appears that geophysical fluid mass transport is being observed. For example, the recovered J3 time series shows remarkable agreement with NCEP-derived estimates of atmospheric gravity variations. Likewise, some of the non-zonal harmonic components have significant interannual signal that appears to be related to mass transport related to climatic effects such as El Nino Southern Oscillation. We will present recent updates on the J2 evolution, as well as a monthly time sequence of low-degree component map of the time-variable gravity complete through degree 4, and examine possible geophysical/climatic causes.

  9. Identification and assessment of groundwater flow and storage components of the relict Schöneben Rock Glacier, Niedere Tauern Range, Eastern Alps (Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Gerfried; Wagner, Thomas; Pauritsch, Marcus; Birk, Steffen; Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas; Benischke, Ralf; Leis, Albrecht; Morawetz, Rainer; Schreilechner, Marcellus G.; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    More than 2,600 relict rock glaciers are known in the Austrian Alps but the knowledge of their hydraulic properties is severely limited. The relict Schöneben Rock Glacier (Niedere Tauern Range, Austria), with an extension of 0.17 km2, was investigated based on spring data (2006-2014) and seismic refraction survey. Spring-discharge hydrographs and natural and artificial tracer data suggest a heterogeneous aquifer with a layered internal structure for the relict rock glacier. The discharge behavior exhibits a fast and a delayed flow component. The spring discharge responds to recharge events within a few hours but a mean residence time of several months can also be observed. The internal structure of the rock glacier (up to several tens of meters thick) consists of: an upper blocky layer with a few meters of thickness, which lacks fine-grained sediments; a main middle layer with coarse and finer-grained sediments, allowing for fast flow; and an approximately 10-m-thick basal till layer as the main aquifer body responsible for the base flow. The base-flow component is controlled by (fine) sandy to silty sediments with low hydraulic conductivity and high storage capacity, exhibiting a difference in hydraulic conductivity to the upper layer of about three orders of magnitude. The high storage capacity of relict rock glaciers has an impact on water resources management in alpine catchments and potentially regulates the risk of natural hazards such as floods and related debris flows. Thus, the results highlight the importance of such aquifer systems in alpine catchments.

  10. Direct measurements of thermodynamic functions and electrical resistivity of fluid tungsten over a wide range of densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenko, V. N.; Rakhel, A. D.

    2013-10-01

    Direct measurements of electrical resistivity and caloric equation of state have been performed for fluid tungsten in order to establish the relation between the liquid-vapor and the metal-to-nonmetal transition caused by thermal expansion. The measurements have been done with accuracy better than ±10% using mainly the experimental technique developed in our previous works. To estimate the systematic uncertainty of the measurements a supplementary technique has been developed which allows the thermal expansion of tungsten in the experiments to be measured directly. We demonstrate that fluid tungsten remains in a two-phase state at pressures of about one order of magnitude higher than the critical pressure of the liquid-vapor transition expected from theoretical estimates. Such behavior is very similar to that observed earlier in fluid iron [Korobenko and Rakhel, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.85.014208 85, 014208 (2012)].

  11. Characterization of the MEMS Directional Sound Sensor in the High Frequency (15-20 kHz) Range

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    and deposit her parasitic larvae on a live field cricket . The female fly locates her host at night, relying on auditory cues from the cricket’s...mating call [2]. The Ormia ochracea has the ability to locate a cricket acoustically despite the fact that its sensors are only separated by...However, the Ormia ochracea has the ability to determine the direction of the chirping cricket . How does this fly accomplish this seemingly difficult

  12. Method and apparatus for sensing a desired component of an incident magnetic field using magneto resistive elements biased in different directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pant, Bharat B. (Inventor); Wan, Hong (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing a desired component of a magnetic field using an isotropic magnetoresistive material. This is preferably accomplished by providing a bias field that is parallel to the desired component of the applied magnetic field. The bias field is applied in a first direction relative to a first set of magnetoresistive sensor elements, and in an opposite direction relative to a second set of magnetoresistive sensor elements. In this configuration, the desired component of the incident magnetic field adds to the bias field incident on the first set of magnetoresistive sensor elements, and subtracts from the bias field incident on the second set of magnetoresistive sensor elements. The magnetic field sensor may then sense the desired component of the incident magnetic field by simply sensing the difference in resistance of the first set of magnetoresistive sensor elements and the second set of magnetoresistive sensor elements.

  13. Wg and Wnt4 provide long-range directional input to planar cell polarity orientation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Roman, Angel-Carlos; Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria; Mlodzik, Marek

    2013-09-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is cellular polarity within the plane of an epithelial tissue or organ. PCP is established through interactions of the core Frizzled (Fz)/PCP factors and, although their molecular interactions are beginning to be understood, the upstream input providing the directional bias and polarity axis remains unknown. Among core PCP genes, Fz is unique as it regulates PCP both cell-autonomously and non-autonomously, with its extracellular domain acting as a ligand for Van Gogh (Vang). We demonstrate in Drosophila melanogaster wings that Wg (Wingless) and dWnt4 (Drosophila Wnt homologue) provide instructive regulatory input for PCP axis determination, establishing polarity axes along their graded distribution and perpendicular to their expression domain borders. Loss-of-function studies reveal that Wg and dWnt4 act redundantly in PCP determination. They affect PCP by modulating the intercellular interaction between Fz and Vang, which is thought to be a key step in setting up initial polarity, thus providing directionality to the PCP process.

  14. Tree demography suggests multiple directions and drivers for species range shifts in mountains of Northeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Wason, Jay W; Dovciak, Martin

    2016-12-09

    Climate change is expected to lead to upslope shifts in tree species distributions, but the evidence is mixed partly due to land-use effects and individualistic species responses to climate. We examined how individual tree species demography varies along elevational climatic gradients across four states in the northeastern United States to determine whether species elevational distributions and their potential upslope (or downslope) shifts were controlled by climate, land-use legacies (past logging), or soils. We characterized tree demography, microclimate, land-use legacies, and soils at 83 sites stratified by elevation (~500 to ~1200 m above sea level) across 12 mountains containing the transition from northern hardwood to spruce-fir forests. We modeled elevational distributions of tree species saplings and adults using logistic regression to test whether sapling distributions suggest ongoing species range expansion upslope (or contraction downslope) relative to adults, and we used linear mixed models to determine the extent to which climate, land use, and soil variables explain these distributions. Tree demography varied with elevation by species, suggesting a potential upslope shift only for American beech, downslope shifts for red spruce (more so in cool regions) and sugar maple, and no change with elevation for balsam fir. While soils had relatively minor effects, climate was the dominant predictor for most species and more so for saplings than adults of red spruce, sugar maple, yellow birch, cordate birch, and striped maple. On the other hand, logging legacies were positively associated with American beech, sugar maple, and yellow birch, and negatively with red spruce and balsam fir - generally more so for adults than saplings. All species exhibited individualistic rather than synchronous demographic responses to climate and land use, and the return of red spruce to lower elevations where past logging originally benefited northern hardwood species indicates

  15. Direct comparison of gluco-oligosaccharide oxidase variants and glucose oxidase: substrate range and H2O2 stability

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Thu V.; Foumani, Maryam; MacCormick, Benjamin; Kwan, Rachel; Master, Emma R.

    2016-01-01

    Glucose oxidase (GO) activity is generally restricted to glucose and is susceptible to inactivation by H2O2. By comparison, the Y300A variant of gluco-oligosaccharide oxidase (GOOX) from Sarocladium strictum showed broader substrate range and higher H2O2 stability. Specifically, Y300A exhibited up to 40 times higher activity on all tested sugars except glucose, compared to GO. Moreover, fusion of the Y300A variant to a family 22 carbohydrate binding module from Clostridium thermocellum (CtCBM22A) nearly doubled its catalytic efficiency on glucose, while retaining significant activity on oligosaccharides. In the presence of 200 mM of H2O2, the recombinant CtCBM22A_Y300A retained 80% of activity on glucose and 100% of activity on cellobiose, the preferred substrate for this enzyme. By contrast, a commercial glucose oxidase reported to contain ≤0.1 units catalase/ mg protein, retained 60% activity on glucose under the same conditions. GOOX variants appear to undergo a different mechanism of inactivation, as a loss of histidine instead of methionine was observed after H2O2 incubation. The addition of CtCBM22A also promoted functional binding of the fusion enzyme to xylan, facilitating its simultaneous purification and immobilization using edible oat spelt xylan, which might benefit the usage of this enzyme preparation in food and baking applications. PMID:27869125

  16. Direct Observation of Defect Range and Evolution in Ion-Irradiated Single Crystalline Ni and Ni Binary Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chenyang; Jin, Ke; Béland, Laurent K.; Zhang, Feifei; Yang, Taini; Qiao, Liang; Zhang, Yanwen; Bei, Hongbin; Christen, Hans M.; Stoller, Roger E.; Wang, Lumin

    2016-02-01

    Energetic ions have been widely used to evaluate the irradiation tolerance of structural materials for nuclear power applications and to modify material properties. It is important to understand the defect production, annihilation and migration mechanisms during and after collision cascades. In this study, single crystalline pure nickel metal and single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys of 50%Ni50%Co (NiCo) and 50%Ni50%Fe (NiFe) without apparent preexisting defect sinks were employed to study defect dynamics under ion irradiation. Both cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy characterization (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channeling (RBS-C) spectra show that the range of radiation-induced defect clusters far exceed the theoretically predicted depth in all materials after high-dose irradiation. Defects in nickel migrate faster than in NiCo and NiFe. Both vacancy-type stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) and interstitial loops coexist in the same region, which is consistent with molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetic activation relaxation technique (k-ART) simulations for nickel showed that small vacancy clusters, such as di-vacancies and tri-vacancies, created by collision cascades are highly mobile, even at room temperature. The slower migration of defects in the alloy along with more localized energy dissipation of the displacement cascade may lead to enhanced radiation tolerance.

  17. Direct comparison of gluco-oligosaccharide oxidase variants and glucose oxidase: substrate range and H2O2 stability.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Thu V; Foumani, Maryam; MacCormick, Benjamin; Kwan, Rachel; Master, Emma R

    2016-11-21

    Glucose oxidase (GO) activity is generally restricted to glucose and is susceptible to inactivation by H2O2. By comparison, the Y300A variant of gluco-oligosaccharide oxidase (GOOX) from Sarocladium strictum showed broader substrate range and higher H2O2 stability. Specifically, Y300A exhibited up to 40 times higher activity on all tested sugars except glucose, compared to GO. Moreover, fusion of the Y300A variant to a family 22 carbohydrate binding module from Clostridium thermocellum (CtCBM22A) nearly doubled its catalytic efficiency on glucose, while retaining significant activity on oligosaccharides. In the presence of 200 mM of H2O2, the recombinant CtCBM22A_Y300A retained 80% of activity on glucose and 100% of activity on cellobiose, the preferred substrate for this enzyme. By contrast, a commercial glucose oxidase reported to contain ≤0.1 units catalase/ mg protein, retained 60% activity on glucose under the same conditions. GOOX variants appear to undergo a different mechanism of inactivation, as a loss of histidine instead of methionine was observed after H2O2 incubation. The addition of CtCBM22A also promoted functional binding of the fusion enzyme to xylan, facilitating its simultaneous purification and immobilization using edible oat spelt xylan, which might benefit the usage of this enzyme preparation in food and baking applications.

  18. Direct Observation of Defect Range and Evolution in Ion-Irradiated Single Crystalline Ni and Ni Binary Alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Chenyang; Jin, Ke; Béland, Laurent K.; ...

    2016-02-01

    We report that energetic ions have been widely used to evaluate the irradiation tolerance of structural materials for nuclear power applications and to modify material properties. It is important to understand the defect production, annihilation and migration mechanisms during and after collision cascades. In this study, single crystalline pure nickel metal and single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys of 50%Ni50%Co (NiCo) and 50%Ni50%Fe (NiFe) without apparent preexisting defect sinks were employed to study defect dynamics under ion irradiation. Both cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy characterization (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channeling (RBS-C) spectra show that the range of radiation-induced defect clusters farmore » exceed the theoretically predicted depth in all materials after high-dose irradiation. Defects in nickel migrate faster than in NiCo and NiFe. Both vacancy-type stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) and interstitial loops coexist in the same region, which is consistent with molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetic activation relaxation technique (k-ART) simulations for nickel showed that small vacancy clusters, such as di-vacancies and tri-vacancies, created by collision cascades are highly mobile, even at room temperature. The slower migration of defects in the alloy along with more localized energy dissipation of the displacement cascade may lead to enhanced radiation tolerance.« less

  19. Direct Observation of Defect Range and Evolution in Ion-Irradiated Single Crystalline Ni and Ni Binary Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chenyang; Jin, Ke; Béland, Laurent K.; Zhang, Feifei; Yang, Taini; Qiao, Liang; Zhang, Yanwen; Bei, Hongbin; Christen, Hans M.; Stoller, Roger E.; Wang, Lumin

    2016-02-01

    We report that energetic ions have been widely used to evaluate the irradiation tolerance of structural materials for nuclear power applications and to modify material properties. It is important to understand the defect production, annihilation and migration mechanisms during and after collision cascades. In this study, single crystalline pure nickel metal and single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys of 50%Ni50%Co (NiCo) and 50%Ni50%Fe (NiFe) without apparent preexisting defect sinks were employed to study defect dynamics under ion irradiation. Both cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy characterization (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channeling (RBS-C) spectra show that the range of radiation-induced defect clusters far exceed the theoretically predicted depth in all materials after high-dose irradiation. Defects in nickel migrate faster than in NiCo and NiFe. Both vacancy-type stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) and interstitial loops coexist in the same region, which is consistent with molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetic activation relaxation technique (k-ART) simulations for nickel showed that small vacancy clusters, such as di-vacancies and tri-vacancies, created by collision cascades are highly mobile, even at room temperature. The slower migration of defects in the alloy along with more localized energy dissipation of the displacement cascade may lead to enhanced radiation tolerance.

  20. Direct Observation of Defect Range and Evolution in Ion-Irradiated Single Crystalline Ni and Ni Binary Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chenyang; Jin, Ke; Béland, Laurent K.; Zhang, Feifei; Yang, Taini; Qiao, Liang; Zhang, Yanwen; Bei, Hongbin; Christen, Hans M.; Stoller, Roger E.; Wang, Lumin

    2016-01-01

    Energetic ions have been widely used to evaluate the irradiation tolerance of structural materials for nuclear power applications and to modify material properties. It is important to understand the defect production, annihilation and migration mechanisms during and after collision cascades. In this study, single crystalline pure nickel metal and single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys of 50%Ni50%Co (NiCo) and 50%Ni50%Fe (NiFe) without apparent preexisting defect sinks were employed to study defect dynamics under ion irradiation. Both cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy characterization (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channeling (RBS-C) spectra show that the range of radiation-induced defect clusters far exceed the theoretically predicted depth in all materials after high-dose irradiation. Defects in nickel migrate faster than in NiCo and NiFe. Both vacancy-type stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) and interstitial loops coexist in the same region, which is consistent with molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetic activation relaxation technique (k-ART) simulations for nickel showed that small vacancy clusters, such as di-vacancies and tri-vacancies, created by collision cascades are highly mobile, even at room temperature. The slower migration of defects in the alloy along with more localized energy dissipation of the displacement cascade may lead to enhanced radiation tolerance. PMID:26829570

  1. Test Directions as a Critical Component of Test Design: Best Practices and the Impact of Examinee Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Joni M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of test directions is to familiarize examinees with a test so that they respond to items in the manner intended. However, changes in educational measurement as well as the U.S. student population present new challenges to test directions and increase the impact that differential familiarity could have on the validity of test score…

  2. Rating Scale Items: A Brief Review of Nomenclature, Components, and Formatting to Inform the Development of Direct Behavior Rating (DBR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christ, Theodore J.; Boice, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Ratings scales are a common component of many multisource, multimethod frameworks for socioemotional and behavior assessment of children. There is a modest literature base to support the use of attitudinal, behavioral, and personality rating scales. Much of that historic literature focuses on the characteristics and interpretations of specific…

  3. Emission intensity in the visible and IR spectral ranges from Si-based structures formed by direct bonding with simultaneous doping with erbium (Er) and europium (Eu)

    SciTech Connect

    Mezdrogina, M. M. Kostina, L. S.; Beliakova, E. I.; Kuzmin, R. V.

    2013-09-15

    The photo- and electroluminescence spectra of silicon-based structures formed by direct bonding with simultaneous doping with rare-earth metals are studied. It is shown that emission in the visible and IR spectral ranges can be obtained from n-Si:Er/p-Si and n-Si:Eu/p-Si structures fabricated by the method suggested in the study. The results obtained make this method promising for the fabrication of optoelectronic devices.

  4. Neural networks with excitatory and inhibitory components: Direct and inverse problems by a mean-field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Volo, Matteo; Burioni, Raffaella; Casartelli, Mario; Livi, Roberto; Vezzani, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamics of networks with inhibitory and excitatory leak-integrate-and-fire neurons with short-term synaptic plasticity in the presence of depressive and facilitating mechanisms. The dynamics is analyzed by a heterogeneous mean-field approximation, which allows us to keep track of the effects of structural disorder in the network. We describe the complex behavior of different classes of excitatory and inhibitory components, which give rise to a rich dynamical phase diagram as a function of the fraction of inhibitory neurons. Using the same mean-field approach, we study and solve a global inverse problem: reconstructing the degree probability distributions of the inhibitory and excitatory components and the fraction of inhibitory neurons from the knowledge of the average synaptic activity field. This approach unveils new perspectives on the numerical study of neural network dynamics and the possibility of using these models as a test bed for the analysis of experimental data.

  5. A multi-component domino reaction for the direct access to polyfunctionalized indoles via intermolecular allylic esterification and indolation†

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bo; Yi, Mian-Shuai; Shi, Feng; Pindi, Suresh; McDowell, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    A novel multi-component reaction for the synthesis of polyfunctionalized indoles and bis-indoles has been established. The reaction pathways were controlled by varying enamines with different substitution patterns to give polyfunctionalized indoles and bis-indoles selectively. The reaction proceeds at a fast speed within 15–30 min with water as the major byproduct, which makes work-up convenient. PMID:22038299

  6. 75 FR 64309 - Components for Evaluation of Direct-Reading Monitors for Gases and Vapors and Addendum

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ... environments. The 1995 document, entitled ``Guidelines for Air Sampling and Analytical Method Development and...: Hazard Detection in First Responder Environments.'' The draft documents and instructions for submitting... method development and evaluation experimental testing methods to direct-reading monitors for gases...

  7. Laboratory directed research and development final report: Intelligent tools for on-machine acceptance of precision machined components

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, N.G.; Harwell, L.D.; Hazelton, A.

    1997-02-01

    On-Machine Acceptance (OMA) is an agile manufacturing concept being developed for machine tools at SNL. The concept behind OMA is the integration of product design, fabrication, and qualification processes by using the machining center as a fabrication and inspection tool. This report documents the final results of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development effort to qualify OMA.

  8. Low cost 112 G direct detection metro transmission system with reduced bandwidth (10 G) components and MLSE compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshtein, Albert; Sadot, Dan; Sheffi, Nir; Sonkin, Eduard; Shachaf, Yuval; Becker, Don; Levy, Omri; Katz, Gilad

    2015-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a 100 G ADC-MLSE-based 4-lanes NRZ direct detection transceiver. The DSP engine enables the use of low cost 10 G optoelectronics and supports 40 km metro transmission suitable for both ASE limited and point-to-point applications. The fully implemented mixed signal ASIC is based on standard 65 nm CMOS process.

  9. Combustion noise level assessment in direct injection Diesel engines by means of in-cylinder pressure components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torregrosa, A. J.; Broatch, A.; Martín, J.; Monelletta, L.

    2007-07-01

    The low consumption achievable with Diesel engines and the subsequent reduction of CO2 emissions, together with the new technologies allowing to meet present and future legislation for pollutant emission reduction, make them attractive from an environmental viewpoint. However, current and future Diesel concepts are intrinsically noisy, and thus in the past few years, combustion noise was considered as an additional factor in engine development alongside performance, emissions and driveability. Otherwise, due to this negative issue intrinsic to Diesel combustion, end-users could be reluctant to drive Diesel-powered vehicles and their potential for environment preservation could thus be lost or underused. Evaluation procedures are then required, both for noise level and sound quality, that may be integrated into the global engine development process, avoiding the need to resort to long and expensive acoustic tests. In this paper, such a procedure, based on the noise source diagnostic through the definition of suitable components extracted from in-cylinder pressure, is proposed and validated. An innovative decomposition of the in-cylinder pressure signal is used to obtain such components, so that features associated with the excitation inside the cylinder may be properly identified. These combustion components, significant of the rate of heat release in the cylinder and the resonance in the combustion chamber, may be correlated with the overall noise level. A prediction of the radiated engine noise level more accurate than that obtained from the classical 'block attenuation' approach is achieved, while combustion process features related to the resulting noise level can be identified and thus corrective actions may be proposed.

  10. Directional location of buried objects using three-component magnetic borehole data demonstrated for the case of a drill string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehmann, S.; Virgil, C.; Hördt, A.; Leven, M.

    2016-06-01

    One of the main applications of magnetic field measurements in boreholes is the detection of unexploded ordnance or buried utility structures like pipes or tiebacks. Even though the advantage of fully oriented magnetic vector measurements have long been recognized and could significantly reduce costs and risks, the tools used for those purposes typically measure only the total magnetic field, the vertical and horizontal components or gradients thereof. The Göttingen Bohrloch Magnetometer uses three fibre optic gyros to record its orientation and thus enables us to compute high-quality three-component magnetic vector data regardless of borehole orientation. The measurements described in this paper were run in the scientific borehole Cuxhaven Lüdingworth 1/1A, which was drilled as a part of the `Coastal Aquifer Test field' project to study the dynamics of the saltwater/freshwater interface. As the drill string got stuck during drilling of the first borehole, a second hole was drilled in the immediate vicinity. The drill string lies at a depth between 80 and 114 m at a distance of only 2.5 m southeast of the borehole used for the measurements, making it an ideal target to demonstrate the benefits of vector magnetic surveys. Although the theories to calculate magnetic fields of objects with different shapes is well established and do not need to be tested, they almost exclusively include approximations of the geometry. It is not obvious whether these approximations are suited to describe real data, or whether additional effects or refinements have to be considered. We use both a simplified monopole model and a cylinder model to fit the data and are able to determine the position of the drill string within a statistical error of approximately 10 cm. Additionally, we show that the location of the drill string could not have been determined by measurements of the total field or its horizontal and vertical component alone and that those methods would require the drilling

  11. Storage and Non-Storage Components of Working Memory Predicting Reasoning: A Simultaneous Examination of a Wide Range of Ability Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumm, Stefan; Schmidt-Atzert, Lothar; Buehner, Markus; Ziegler, Matthias; Michalczyk, Kurt; Arrow, Katrin

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined basic cognitive abilities that are related to or included in the concept of working memory (WM): different WM components, three executive functions, simple short-term storage (STM), and sustained attention. Tasks were selected from well-established models and balanced in terms of content. The predictive power of storage…

  12. Direct Recruitment of ERK Cascade Components to Inducible Genes Is Regulated by Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K*

    PubMed Central

    Mikula, Michal; Bomsztyk, Karol

    2011-01-01

    Components of the ERK cascade are recruited to genes, but it remains unknown how they are regulated at these sites. The RNA-binding protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K interacts with kinases and is found along genes including the mitogen-inducible early response gene EGR-1. Here, we used chromatin immunoprecipitations to study co-recruitment of hnRNP K and ERK cascade activity along the EGR-1 gene. These measurements revealed that the spatiotemporal binding patterns of ERK cascade transducers (GRB2, SOS, B-Raf, MEK, and ERK) at the EGR-1 locus resemble both hnRNP K and RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Inhibition of EGR-1 transcription with either serum-responsive factor knockdown or 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole altered recruitment of all of the above ERK cascade components along this locus that mirrored the changes in Pol II and hnRNP K profiles. siRNA knockdown of hnRNP K decreased the levels of active MEK and ERK at the EGR-1, changes associated with decreased levels of elongating pre-mRNA and less efficient splicing. The hnRNP K dependence and pattern of ERK cascade activation at the c-MYC locus were different from at EGR-1. Ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitations revealed that hnRNP K was associated with the EGR-1 but not c-MYC mRNAs. These data suggest a model where Pol II transcription-driven recruitment of hnRNP K along the EGR-1 locus compartmentalizes activation of the ERK cascade at these genes, events that regulate synthesis of mature mRNA. PMID:21233203

  13. Non-invasive determination of ethanol, propylene glycol and water in a multi-component pharmaceutical oral liquid by direct measurement through amber plastic bottles using Fourier transform near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Broad, N W; Jee, R D; Moffat, A C; Eaves, M J; Mann, W C; Dziki, W

    2000-11-01

    Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy was used to quantify rapidly the ethanol (34-49% v/v), propylene glycol (20-35% v/v) and water (11-20% m/m) contents within a multi-component pharmaceutical oral liquid by measurement directly through the amber plastic bottle packaging. Spectra were collected in the range 7302-12,000 cm-1 and calibration models set-up using partial least-squares regression (PLSR) and multiple linear regression. Reference values for the three components were measured using capillary gas chromatography (ethanol and propylene glycol) and Karl Fischer (water) assay procedures. The calibration and test sets consisted of production as well as laboratory batches that were made to extend the concentration ranges beyond the natural production variation. The PLSR models developed gave standard errors of prediction (SEP) of 1.1% v/v for ethanol, 0.9% v/v for propylene glycol and 0.3% m/m for water. For each component the calibration model was validated in terms of: linearity, repeatability, intermediate precision and robustness. All the methods produced statistically favourable outcomes. Ten production batches independent of the calibration and test sets were also challenged against the PLSR models, giving SEP values of 1.3% v/v (ethanol), 1.0% v/v (propylene glycol) and 0.2% m/m (water). NIR transmission spectroscopy allowed all three liquid constituents to be non-invasively measured in under 1 min.

  14. A Direct Link between Abscisic Acid Sensing and the Chromatin-Remodeling ATPase BRAHMA via Core ABA Signaling Pathway Components.

    PubMed

    Peirats-Llobet, Marta; Han, Soon-Ki; Gonzalez-Guzman, Miguel; Jeong, Cheol Woong; Rodriguez, Lesia; Belda-Palazon, Borja; Wagner, Doris; Rodriguez, Pedro L

    2016-01-04

    Optimal response to drought is critical for plant survival and will affect biodiversity and crop performance during climate change. Mitotically heritable epigenetic or dynamic chromatin state changes have been implicated in the plant response to the drought stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA). The Arabidopsis SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling ATPase BRAHMA (BRM) modulates response to ABA by preventing premature activation of stress response pathways during germination. We show that core ABA signaling pathway components physically interact with BRM and post-translationally modify BRM by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. Genetic evidence suggests that BRM acts downstream of SnRK2.2/2.3 kinases, and biochemical studies identified phosphorylation sites in the C-terminal region of BRM at SnRK2 target sites that are evolutionarily conserved. Finally, the phosphomimetic BRM(S1760D S1762D) mutant displays ABA hypersensitivity. Prior studies showed that BRM resides at target loci in the ABA pathway in the presence and absence of the stimulus, but is only active in the absence of ABA. Our data suggest that SnRK2-dependent phosphorylation of BRM leads to its inhibition, and PP2CA-mediated dephosphorylation of BRM restores the ability of BRM to repress ABA response. These findings point to the presence of a rapid phosphorylation-based switch to control BRM activity; this property could be potentially harnessed to improve drought tolerance in plants.

  15. Energy use efficiency is characterized by an epigenetic component that can be directed through artificial selection to increase yield.

    PubMed

    Hauben, Miriam; Haesendonckx, Boris; Standaert, Evi; Van Der Kelen, Katrien; Azmi, Abdelkrim; Akpo, Hervé; Van Breusegem, Frank; Guisez, Yves; Bots, Marc; Lambert, Bart; Laga, Benjamin; De Block, Marc

    2009-11-24

    Quantitative traits, such as size and weight in animals and seed yield in plants, are distributed normally, even within a population of genetically identical individuals. For example, in plants, various factors, such as local soil quality, microclimate, and sowing depth, affect growth differences among individual plants of isogenic populations. Besides these physical factors, also epigenetic components contribute to differences in growth and yield. The network that regulates crop yield is still not well understood. Although this network is expected to have epigenetic elements, it is completely unclear whether it would be possible to shape the epigenome to increase crop yield. Here we show that energy use efficiency is an important factor in determining seed yield in canola (Brassica napus) and that it can be selected artificially through an epigenetic feature. From an isogenic canola population of which the individual plants and their self-fertilized progenies were recursively selected for respiration intensity, populations with distinct physiological and agronomical characteristics could be generated. These populations were found to be genetically identical, but epigenetically different. Furthermore, both the DNA methylation patterns as well as the agronomical and physiological characteristics of the selected lines were heritable. Hybrids derived from parent lines selected for high energy use efficiencies had a 5% yield increase on top of heterosis. Our results demonstrate that artificial selection allows the increase of the yield potential by selecting populations with particular epigenomic states.

  16. High-Performance Anti-Retransmission Deception Jamming Utilizing Range Direction Multiple Input and Multiple Output (MIMO) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruijia; Chen, Jie; Wang, Xing; Sun, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Retransmission deception jamming seriously degrades the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) detection efficiency and can mislead SAR image interpretation by forming false targets. In order to suppress retransmission deception jamming, this paper proposes a novel multiple input and multiple output (MIMO) SAR structure range direction MIMO SAR, whose multiple channel antennas are vertical to the azimuth. First, based on the multiple channels of range direction MIMO SAR, the orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) linear frequency modulation (LFM) signal was adopted as the transmission signal of each channel, which is defined as a sub-band signal. This sub-band signal corresponds to the transmission channel. Then, all of the sub-band signals are modulated with random initial phases and concurrently transmitted. The signal form is more complex and difficult to intercept. Next, the echoes of the sub-band signal are utilized to synthesize a wide band signal after preprocessing. The proposed method will increase the signal to interference ratio and peak amplitude ratio of the signal to resist retransmission deception jamming. Finally, well-focused SAR imagery is obtained using a conventional imaging method where the retransmission deception jamming strength is degraded and defocused. Simulations demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:28075367

  17. High-Performance Anti-Retransmission Deception Jamming Utilizing Range Direction Multiple Input and Multiple Output (MIMO) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruijia; Chen, Jie; Wang, Xing; Sun, Bing

    2017-01-09

    Retransmission deception jamming seriously degrades the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) detection efficiency and can mislead SAR image interpretation by forming false targets. In order to suppress retransmission deception jamming, this paper proposes a novel multiple input and multiple output (MIMO) SAR structure range direction MIMO SAR, whose multiple channel antennas are vertical to the azimuth. First, based on the multiple channels of range direction MIMO SAR, the orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) linear frequency modulation (LFM) signal was adopted as the transmission signal of each channel, which is defined as a sub-band signal. This sub-band signal corresponds to the transmission channel. Then, all of the sub-band signals are modulated with random initial phases and concurrently transmitted. The signal form is more complex and difficult to intercept. Next, the echoes of the sub-band signal are utilized to synthesize a wide band signal after preprocessing. The proposed method will increase the signal to interference ratio and peak amplitude ratio of the signal to resist retransmission deception jamming. Finally, well-focused SAR imagery is obtained using a conventional imaging method where the retransmission deception jamming strength is degraded and defocused. Simulations demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. {sup 63}Cu and {sup 197}Au nuclear quadrupole moments from four-component relativistic density-functional calculations using correct long-range exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Thierfelder, Christian; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Saue, Trond

    2007-09-15

    The electric field gradient in late transition metal compounds is incorrectly determined by most density functionals. We show that the coupling of short-range density functional based with long-range wave function based methods using a reparametrization of the Coulomb-attenuated Becke three-parameter Lee-Yang-Parr approximation gives reliable results for the electric field gradients of copper and gold for a series of compounds. This results in nuclear quadrupole moments of -0.208 b for {sup 63}Cu and +0.526 b for {sup 197}Au in good agreement with experimental values of -0.220(15) and +0.547(16)b, respectively.

  19. Component processes in contour integration: a direct comparison between snakes and ladders in a detection and a shape discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Vancleef, Kathleen; Wagemans, Johan

    2013-11-01

    In contour integration, a relevant question is whether snakes and ladders are processed similarly. Higher presentation time thresholds for ladders in detection tasks indicate this is not the case. However, in a detection task only processing differences at the level of element linking and possibly contour localization might be picked up, while differences at the shape encoding level cannot be noticed. In this study, we make a direct comparison of detection and shape discrimination tasks to investigate if processing differences in the visual system between snakes and ladders are limited to contour detection or extend to higher level contour processing, like shape encoding. Stimuli consisted of elements that were oriented collinearly (snakes) or orthogonally (ladders) to the contour path and were surrounded by randomly oriented background elements. In two tasks, six experienced subjects either detected the contour when presented with a contour and a completely random stimulus or performed a shape discrimination task when presented with two contours with different curvature. Presentation time was varied in 9 steps between 8 and 492 ms. By applying a generalized linear mixed model we found that differences in snake and ladder processing are not limited to a detection stage but are also apparent at a shape encoding stage.

  20. Helium heater design for the helium direct cycle component test facility. [for gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, V. R.; Gunn, S. V.; Lee, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a helium heater to be used to conduct non-nuclear demonstration tests of the complete power conversion loop for a direct-cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant. Requirements for the heater include: heating the helium to a 1500 F temperature, operating at a 1000 psia helium pressure, providing a thermal response capability and helium volume similar to that of the nuclear reactor, and a total heater system helium pressure drop of not more than 15 psi. The unique compact heater system design proposed consists of 18 heater modules; air preheaters, compressors, and compressor drive systems; an integral control system; piping; and auxiliary equipment. The heater modules incorporate the dual-concentric-tube 'Variflux' heat exchanger design which provides a controlled heat flux along the entire length of the tube element. The heater design as proposed will meet all system requirements. The heater uses pressurized combustion (50 psia) to provide intensive heat transfer, and to minimize furnace volume and heat storage mass.

  1. Two Components of the RNA-Directed DNA Methylation Pathway Associate with MORC6 and Silence Loci Targeted by MORC6 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhang-Wei; Zhou, Jin-Xing; Huang, Huan-Wei; Li, Yong-Qiang; Shao, Chang-Rong; Li, Lin; Cai, Tao; Chen, She

    2016-01-01

    The SU(VAR)3-9 homolog SUVH9 and the double-stranded RNA-binding protein IDN2 were thought to be components of an RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway in Arabidopsis. We previously found that SUVH9 interacts with MORC6 but how the interaction contributes to transcriptional silencing remains elusive. Here, our genetic analysis indicates that SUVH2 and SUVH9 can either act in the same pathway as MORC6 or act synergistically with MORC6 to mediate transcriptional silencing. Moreover, we demonstrate that IDN2 interacts with MORC6 and mediates the silencing of a subset of MORC6 target loci. Like SUVH2, SUVH9, and IDN2, other RdDM components including Pol IV, Pol V, RDR2, and DRM2 are also required for transcriptional silencing at a subset of MORC6 target loci. MORC6 was previously shown to mediate transcriptional silencing through heterochromatin condensation. We demonstrate that the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex components SWI3B, SWI3C, and SWI3D interact with MORC6 as well as with SUVH9 and then mediate transcriptional silencing. These results suggest that the RdDM components are involved not only in DNA methylation but also in MORC6-mediated heterochromatin condensation. This study illustrates how DNA methylation is linked to heterochromatin condensation and thereby enhances transcriptional silencing at methylated genomic regions. PMID:27171427

  2. MicroRNA-34 directly targets pair-rule genes and cytoskeleton component in the honey bee

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Flávia C. P.; Pires, Camilla V.; Claudianos, Charles; Cristino, Alexandre S.; Simões, Zilá L. P.

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of developmental processes, such as cell fate determination and differentiation. Previous studies showed Dicer knockdown in honeybee embryos disrupt the processing of functional mature miRNAs and impairs embryo patterning. Here we investigated the expression profiles of miRNAs in honeybee embryogenesis and the role of the highly conserved miR-34-5p in the regulation of genes involved in insect segmentation. A total of 221 miRNAs were expressed in honey bee embryogenesis among which 97 mature miRNA sequences have not been observed before. Interestingly, we observed a switch in dominance between the 5-prime and 3-prime arm of some miRNAs in different embryonic stages; however, most miRNAs present one dominant arm across all stages of embryogenesis. Our genome-wide analysis of putative miRNA-target networks and functional pathways indicates miR-34-5p is one of the most conserved and connected miRNAs associated with the regulation of genes involved in embryonic patterning and development. In addition, we experimentally validated that miR-34-5p directly interacts to regulatory elements in the 3′-untranslated regions of pair-rule (even-skipped, hairy, fushi-tarazu transcription factor 1) and cytoskeleton (actin5C) genes. Our study suggests that miR-34-5p may regulate the expression of pair-rule and cytoskeleton genes during early development and control insect segmentation. PMID:28098233

  3. MicroRNA-34 directly targets pair-rule genes and cytoskeleton component in the honey bee.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Flávia C P; Pires, Camilla V; Claudianos, Charles; Cristino, Alexandre S; Simões, Zilá L P

    2017-01-18

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of developmental processes, such as cell fate determination and differentiation. Previous studies showed Dicer knockdown in honeybee embryos disrupt the processing of functional mature miRNAs and impairs embryo patterning. Here we investigated the expression profiles of miRNAs in honeybee embryogenesis and the role of the highly conserved miR-34-5p in the regulation of genes involved in insect segmentation. A total of 221 miRNAs were expressed in honey bee embryogenesis among which 97 mature miRNA sequences have not been observed before. Interestingly, we observed a switch in dominance between the 5-prime and 3-prime arm of some miRNAs in different embryonic stages; however, most miRNAs present one dominant arm across all stages of embryogenesis. Our genome-wide analysis of putative miRNA-target networks and functional pathways indicates miR-34-5p is one of the most conserved and connected miRNAs associated with the regulation of genes involved in embryonic patterning and development. In addition, we experimentally validated that miR-34-5p directly interacts to regulatory elements in the 3'-untranslated regions of pair-rule (even-skipped, hairy, fushi-tarazu transcription factor 1) and cytoskeleton (actin5C) genes. Our study suggests that miR-34-5p may regulate the expression of pair-rule and cytoskeleton genes during early development and control insect segmentation.

  4. Direct-path acoustic ranging across the Japan Trench axis, Adjacent to the Large Shallow Thrusting in the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Y.; Kido, M.; Ito, Y.; Iinuma, T.; Fujimoto, H.; Hino, R.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor geodetic data, i.e. GPS/acoustic measurement and continuous seafloor pressure monitoring, brought important evidences showing that the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (Mw 9.0) caused huge (> 50 m) coseismic slip near the Japan Trench. The postseismic behavior of the large slipped area is required to clarify to understand why large amount seismic slip could occur there. We started making direct-path acoustic ranging across the trench axis to reveal the convergence rate between the subducting Pacific and overriding continental plates. We expect the change of the baseline length across the trench axis, the plate boundary, reflects the slip rate at the shallow megathrust, which is difficult to estimate only from other geodetic observations largely affected by intraplate deformation caused by the postseismic viscoelastic relaxation process.  To this end, we developed an ultra-deep seafloor acoustic ranging system. Our previous ranging systems have been designed to measure baseline length ~ 1 km and to be deployed up to 7,000 m water-depth (Osada et al., 2008, 2012). In order to realize the measurement across the Japan Trench, we improved this system to enhance range of acoustic ranging as well as operational depth of instruments. The improved system was designed to allow acoustic ranging up to 3 km and to be durable under the high-pressure equivalent to water depth of 9,000 m. In May 2013, we carried out a test deployment of the new ranging system. The system is composed of three seafloor instruments equipped with precision transponder (PXPs). Two of the PXPs were set on the landward slope of the Japan Trench, where large coseismic slip happened in 2011. Another PXP was deployed on the seaward side of the trench so that the baseline change associated with the slip on the plate boundary fault, if any, can be detected. Continuous records of baseline lengths were successfully obtained for four months. The repeatability of the distance measurements was about 20 mm for

  5. Direction-Specific Impairments in Cervical Range of Motion in Women with Chronic Neck Pain: Influence of Head Posture and Gravitationally Induced Torque

    PubMed Central

    Björklund, Martin; Svedmark, Åsa; Srinivasan, Divya; Djupsjöbacka, Mats

    2017-01-01

    Background Cervical range of motion (ROM) is commonly assessed in clinical practice and research. In a previous study we decomposed active cervical sagittal ROM into contributions from lower and upper levels of the cervical spine and found level- and direction-specific impairments in women with chronic non-specific neck pain. The present study aimed to validate these results and investigate if the specific impairments can be explained by the neutral posture (defining zero flexion/extension) or a movement strategy to avoid large gravitationally induced torques on the cervical spine. Methods Kinematics of the head and thorax was assessed in sitting during maximal sagittal cervical flexion/extension (high torque condition) and maximal protraction (low torque condition) in 120 women with chronic non-specific neck pain and 40 controls. We derived the lower and upper cervical angles, and the head centre of mass (HCM), from a 3-segment kinematic model. Neutral head posture was assessed using a standardized procedure. Findings Previous findings of level- and direction-specific impairments in neck pain were confirmed. Neutral head posture was equal between groups and did not explain the direction-specific impairments. The relative magnitude of group difference in HCM migration did not differ between high and low torques conditions, lending no support for our hypothesis that impairments in sagittal ROM are due to torque avoidance behaviour. Interpretation The direction- and level-specific impairments in cervical sagittal ROM can be generalised to the population of women with non-specific neck pain. Further research is necessary to clarify if torque avoidance behaviour can explain the impairments. PMID:28099504

  6. Short-range intervortex interaction and interacting dynamics of half-quantized vortices in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Eto, Minoru; Nitta, Muneto

    2016-01-01

    We study the interaction and dynamics of two half-quantized vortices in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates. Using the Padé approximation for the vortex core profile, we calculate the intervortex potential, whose asymptotic form for a large distance has been derived by Eto et al. [Phys. Rev. A 83, 063603 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.83.063603]. Through numerical simulations of the two-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equations, we reveal different kinds of dynamical trajectories of the vortices depending on the combinations of signs of circulations and the intercomponent density coupling. Under the adiabatic limit, we derive the equations of motion for the vortex coordinates, in which the motion is caused by the balance between Magnus force and the intervortex forces. The initial velocity of the vortex motion can be explained quantitatively by this point vortex approximation, but understanding the long-time behavior of the dynamics needs more consideration beyond our model.

  7. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Dynamic-Tracking Directional Wireless Antennas for Low Powered Applications that Require Reliable Extended Range Operations in Time Critical Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Scott G. Bauer; Matthew O. Anderson; James R. Hanneman

    2005-10-01

    The proven value of DOD Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) will ultimately transition to National and Homeland Security missions that require real-time aerial surveillance, situation awareness, force protection, and sensor placement. Public services first responders who routinely risk personal safety to assess and report a situation for emergency actions will likely be the first to benefit from these new unmanned technologies. ‘Packable’ or ‘Portable’ small class UAVs will be particularly useful to the first responder. They require the least amount of training, no fixed infrastructure, and are capable of being launched and recovered from the point of emergency. All UAVs require wireless communication technologies for real- time applications. Typically on a small UAV, a low bandwidth telemetry link is required for command and control (C2), and systems health monitoring. If the UAV is equipped with a real-time Electro-Optical or Infrared (EO/Ir) video camera payload, a dedicated high bandwidth analog/digital link is usually required for reliable high-resolution imagery. In most cases, both the wireless telemetry and real-time video links will be integrated into the UAV with unity gain omni-directional antennas. With limited on-board power and payload capacity, a small UAV will be limited with the amount of radio-frequency (RF) energy it transmits to the users. Therefore, ‘packable’ and ‘portable’ UAVs will have limited useful operational ranges for first responders. This paper will discuss the limitations of small UAV wireless communications. The discussion will present an approach of utilizing a dynamic ground based real-time tracking high gain directional antenna to provide extend range stand-off operation, potential RF channel reuse, and assured telemetry and data communications from low-powered UAV deployed wireless assets.

  8. Towards direct realisation of the SI unit of sound pressure in the audible hearing range based on optical free-field acoustic particle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos; Piper, Ben

    2015-04-01

    Since the introduction of the International System of Units (the SI system) in 1960, weights, measures, standardised approaches, procedures, and protocols have been introduced, adapted, and extensively used. A major international effort and activity concentrate on the definition and traceability of the seven base SI units in terms of fundamental constants, and consequently those units that are derived from the base units. In airborne acoustical metrology and for the audible range of frequencies up to 20 kHz, the SI unit of sound pressure, the pascal, is realised indirectly and without any knowledge or measurement of the sound field. Though the principle of reciprocity was originally formulated by Lord Rayleigh nearly two centuries ago, it was devised in the 1940s and eventually became a calibration standard in the 1960s; however, it can only accommodate a limited number of acoustic sensors of specific types and dimensions. International standards determine the device sensitivity either through coupler or through free-field reciprocity but rely on the continuous availability of specific acoustical artefacts. Here, we show an optical method based on gated photon correlation spectroscopy that can measure sound pressures directly and absolutely in fully anechoic conditions, remotely, and without disturbing the propagating sound field. It neither relies on the availability or performance of any measurement artefact nor makes any assumptions of the device geometry and sound field characteristics. Most importantly, the required units of sound pressure and microphone sensitivity may now be experimentally realised, thus providing direct traceability to SI base units.

  9. Towards direct realisation of the SI unit of sound pressure in the audible hearing range based on optical free-field acoustic particle measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos Piper, Ben

    2015-04-20

    Since the introduction of the International System of Units (the SI system) in 1960, weights, measures, standardised approaches, procedures, and protocols have been introduced, adapted, and extensively used. A major international effort and activity concentrate on the definition and traceability of the seven base SI units in terms of fundamental constants, and consequently those units that are derived from the base units. In airborne acoustical metrology and for the audible range of frequencies up to 20 kHz, the SI unit of sound pressure, the pascal, is realised indirectly and without any knowledge or measurement of the sound field. Though the principle of reciprocity was originally formulated by Lord Rayleigh nearly two centuries ago, it was devised in the 1940s and eventually became a calibration standard in the 1960s; however, it can only accommodate a limited number of acoustic sensors of specific types and dimensions. International standards determine the device sensitivity either through coupler or through free-field reciprocity but rely on the continuous availability of specific acoustical artefacts. Here, we show an optical method based on gated photon correlation spectroscopy that can measure sound pressures directly and absolutely in fully anechoic conditions, remotely, and without disturbing the propagating sound field. It neither relies on the availability or performance of any measurement artefact nor makes any assumptions of the device geometry and sound field characteristics. Most importantly, the required units of sound pressure and microphone sensitivity may now be experimentally realised, thus providing direct traceability to SI base units.

  10. Direct forecasting of subsurface flow response from non-linear dynamic data by linear least-squares in canonical functional principal component space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satija, Aaditya; Caers, Jef

    2015-03-01

    Inverse modeling is widely used to assist with forecasting problems in the subsurface. However, full inverse modeling can be time-consuming requiring iteration over a high dimensional parameter space with computationally expensive forward models and complex spatial priors. In this paper, we investigate a prediction-focused approach (PFA) that aims at building a statistical relationship between data variables and forecast variables, avoiding the inversion of model parameters altogether. The statistical relationship is built by first applying the forward model related to the data variables and the forward model related to the prediction variables on a limited set of spatial prior models realizations, typically generated through geostatistical methods. The relationship observed between data and prediction is highly non-linear for many forecasting problems in the subsurface. In this paper we propose a Canonical Functional Component Analysis (CFCA) to map the data and forecast variables into a low-dimensional space where, if successful, the relationship is linear. CFCA consists of (1) functional principal component analysis (FPCA) for dimension reduction of time-series data and (2) canonical correlation analysis (CCA); the latter aiming to establish a linear relationship between data and forecast components. If such mapping is successful, then we illustrate with several cases that (1) simple regression techniques with a multi-Gaussian framework can be used to directly quantify uncertainty on the forecast without any model inversion and that (2) such uncertainty is a good approximation of uncertainty obtained from full posterior sampling with rejection sampling.

  11. A Stock Market Forecasting Model Combining Two-Directional Two-Dimensional Principal Component Analysis and Radial Basis Function Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaiqing; Yang, Jie; Miller, David J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose and implement a hybrid model combining two-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis ((2D)2PCA) and a Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN) to forecast stock market behavior. First, 36 stock market technical variables are selected as the input features, and a sliding window is used to obtain the input data of the model. Next, (2D)2PCA is utilized to reduce the dimension of the data and extract its intrinsic features. Finally, an RBFNN accepts the data processed by (2D)2PCA to forecast the next day's stock price or movement. The proposed model is used on the Shanghai stock market index, and the experiments show that the model achieves a good level of fitness. The proposed model is then compared with one that uses the traditional dimension reduction method principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA). The empirical results show that the proposed model outperforms the PCA-based model, as well as alternative models based on ICA and on the multilayer perceptron. PMID:25849483

  12. A stock market forecasting model combining two-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis and radial basis function neural network.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaiqing; Yang, Jie; Miller, David J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose and implement a hybrid model combining two-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis ((2D)2PCA) and a Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN) to forecast stock market behavior. First, 36 stock market technical variables are selected as the input features, and a sliding window is used to obtain the input data of the model. Next, (2D)2PCA is utilized to reduce the dimension of the data and extract its intrinsic features. Finally, an RBFNN accepts the data processed by (2D)2PCA to forecast the next day's stock price or movement. The proposed model is used on the Shanghai stock market index, and the experiments show that the model achieves a good level of fitness. The proposed model is then compared with one that uses the traditional dimension reduction method principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA). The empirical results show that the proposed model outperforms the PCA-based model, as well as alternative models based on ICA and on the multilayer perceptron.

  13. Genetic susceptibility to chronic wasting disease in free-ranging white-tailed deer: complement component C1q and Prnp polymorphisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchong, Julie A.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Scribner, Kim T.; Libants, Scot V.; Johnson, Chad; Aiken, Judd M.; Langenberg, Julia A.; Samuel, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    The genetic basis of susceptibility to chronic wasting disease (CWD) in free-ranging cervids is of great interest. Association studies of disease susceptibility in free-ranging populations, however, face considerable challenges including: the need for large sample sizes when disease is rare, animals of unknown pedigree create a risk of spurious results due to population admixture, and the inability to control disease exposure or dose. We used an innovative matched case–control design and conditional logistic regression to evaluate associations between polymorphisms of complement C1q and prion protein (Prnp) genes and CWD infection in white-tailed deer from the CWD endemic area in south-central Wisconsin. To reduce problems due to admixture or disease-risk confounding, we used neutral genetic (microsatellite) data to identify closely related CWD-positive (n = 68) and CWD-negative (n = 91) female deer to serve as matched cases and controls. Cases and controls were also matched on factors (sex, location, age) previously demonstrated to affect CWD infection risk. For Prnp, deer with at least one Serine (S) at amino acid 96 were significantly less likely to be CWD-positive relative to deer homozygous for Glycine (G). This is the first characterization of genes associated with the complement system in white-tailed deer. No tests for association between any C1q polymorphism and CWD infection were significant at p < 0.05. After controlling for Prnp, we found weak support for an elevated risk of CWD infection in deer with at least one Glycine (G) at amino acid 56 of the C1qC gene. While we documented numerous amino acid polymorphisms in C1q genes none appear to be strongly associated with CWD susceptibility.

  14. Paired Associative Stimulation with High-Frequency Peripheral Component Leads to Enhancement of Corticospinal Transmission at Wide Range of Interstimulus Intervals

    PubMed Central

    Shulga, Anastasia; Zubareva, Aleksandra; Lioumis, Pantelis; Mäkelä, Jyrki P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In spinal paired associative stimulation (PAS), orthodromic and antidromic volleys elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) coincide at corticomotoneuronal synapses at the spinal cord. The interstimulus interval (ISI) between TMS and PNS determines whether PAS leads to motor-evoked potential (MEP) potentiation or depression. PAS applied as a long-term treatment for neurological patients might alter conduction of neural fibers over time. Moreover, measurements of motoneuron conductance for determination of ISIs may be challenging in these patients. Results: We sought to design a PAS protocol to induce MEP potentiation at wide range of ISIs. We tested PAS consisting of high-intensity (100% stimulator output, SO) TMS and high-frequency (50 Hz) PNS in five subjects at five different ISIs. Our protocol induced potentiation of MEP amplitudes in all subjects at all tested intervals. TMS and PNS alone did not result in MEP potentiation. The variant of PAS protocol described here does not require exact adjustment of ISIs in order to achieve effective potentiation of MEPs. Conclusions: This variant of PAS might be feasible as a long-term treatment in rehabilitation of neurological patients. PMID:27721747

  15. Rotary balance data for a typical single-engine general aviation design for an angle-of-attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg. 1: Influence of airplane components for model D. [Langley spin tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralston, J.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of airplane components, as well as wing location and tail length, on the rotational flow aerodynamics is discussed for a 1/6 scale general aviation airplane model. The airplane was tested in a built-up fashion (i.e., body, body-wing, body-wing-vertical, etc.) in the presence of two wing locations and two body lengths. Data were measured, using a rotary balance, over an angle-of-attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg, and for clockwise and counter-clockwise rotations covering an omega b/2V range of 0 to 0.9.

  16. Directed evolution and mutagenesis of glutamate decarboxylase from Lactobacillus brevis Lb85 to broaden the range of its activity toward a near-neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Xie, Yilong; Jiang, Junjun; Wang, Nannan; Li, Yongfu; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) transforms l-glutamate into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with the consumption of a proton. GAD derived from lactic acid bacteria exhibits optimum activity at pH 4.0-5.0 and significantly loses activity at near-neutral pH. To broaden the active range of the GAD GadB1 from Lactobacillus brevis Lb85 toward a near-neutral pH, irrational design using directed evolution and rational design using site-specific mutagenesis were performed. For directed evolution of GadB1, a sensitive high-throughput screening strategy based on a pH indicator was established. One improved mutant, GadB1(T17I/D294G/Q346H), was selected from 800 variants after one round of EP-PCR. It exhibited 3.9- and 25.0-fold increase in activity and catalytic efficiency, respectively at pH 6.0. Through site-specific mutagenesis, several improved mutants were obtained, with GadB1(E312S) being the best one. The combined mutant GadB1(T17I/D294G/E312S/Q346H) showed even higher catalytic efficiency, 13.1- and 43.2-fold that of wild-type GadB1 at pH 4.6 and 6.0, respectively. The amount of GABA produced in gadB1(T17I/D294G/Q346H)-, gadB1(E312S)- and gadB1(T17I/D294G/E312S/Q346H)-expressing Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 from endogenous l-glutamate increased by 9.6%, 20.3% and 63.9%, respectively. These results indicate that these mutations have beneficial effects on expanding the active pH range and on GABA biosynthesis, suggesting these GadB1 variants as potent candidates for GABA production.

  17. Using SpaceClaim/TD Direct for Modeling Components with Complex Geometries for the Thermal Desktop-Based Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabanich, William

    2014-01-01

    SpaceClaim/TD Direct has been used extensively in the development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) thermal model. This paper outlines the workflow for that aspect of the task and includes proposed best practices and lessons learned. The ASRG thermal model was developed to predict component temperatures and power output and to provide insight into the prime contractors thermal modeling efforts. The insulation blocks, heat collectors, and cold side adapter flanges (CSAFs) were modeled with this approach. The model was constructed using mostly TD finite difference (FD) surfaces solids. However, some complex geometry could not be reproduced with TD primitives while maintaining the desired degree of geometric fidelity. Using SpaceClaim permitted the import of original CAD files and enabled the defeaturing repair of those geometries. TD Direct (a SpaceClaim add-on from CRTech) adds features that allowed the mark-up of that geometry. These so-called mark-ups control how finite element (FE) meshes were generated and allowed the tagging of features (e.g. edges, solids, surfaces). These tags represent parameters that include: submodels, material properties, material orienters, optical properties, and radiation analysis groups. TD aliases were used for most tags to allow analysis to be performed with a variety of parameter values. Domain-tags were also attached to individual and groups of surfaces and solids to allow them to be used later within TD to populate objects like, for example, heaters and contactors. These tools allow the user to make changes to the geometry in SpaceClaim and then easily synchronize the mesh in TD without having to redefine these objects each time as one would if using TD Mesher.The use of SpaceClaim/TD Direct has helped simplify the process for importing existing geometries and in the creation of high fidelity FE meshes to represent complex parts. It has also saved time and effort in the subsequent analysis.

  18. Using SpaceClaimTD Direct for Modeling Components with Complex Geometries for the Thermal Desktop-Based Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabanich, William A., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    SpaceClaim/TD Direct has been used extensively in the development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) thermal model. This paper outlines the workflow for that aspect of the task and includes proposed best practices and lessons learned. The ASRG thermal model was developed to predict component temperatures and power output and to provide insight into the prime contractor's thermal modeling efforts. The insulation blocks, heat collectors, and cold side adapter flanges (CSAFs) were modeled with this approach. The model was constructed using mostly TD finite difference (FD) surfaces/solids. However, some complex geometry could not be reproduced with TD primitives while maintaining the desired degree of geometric fidelity. Using SpaceClaim permitted the import of original CAD files and enabled the defeaturing/repair of those geometries. TD Direct (a SpaceClaim add-on from CRTech) adds features that allowed the "mark-up" of that geometry. These so-called "mark-ups" control how finite element (FE) meshes are to be generated through the "tagging" of features (e.g. edges, solids, surfaces). These tags represent parameters that include: submodels, material properties, material orienters, optical properties, and radiation analysis groups. TD aliases were used for most tags to allow analysis to be performed with a variety of parameter values. "Domain-tags" were also attached to individual and groups of surfaces and solids to allow them to be used later within TD to populate objects like, for example, heaters and contactors. These tools allow the user to make changes to the geometry in SpaceClaim and then easily synchronize the mesh in TD without having to redefine the objects each time as one would if using TDMesher. The use of SpaceClaim/TD Direct helps simplify the process for importing existing geometries and in the creation of high fidelity FE meshes to represent complex parts. It also saves time and effort in the subsequent analysis.

  19. Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) acts directly on F-actin to accelerate cofilin-mediated actin severing across the range of physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Normoyle, Kieran P M; Brieher, William M

    2012-10-12

    Fast actin depolymerization is necessary for cells to rapidly reorganize actin filament networks. Utilizing a Listeria fluorescent actin comet tail assay to monitor actin disassembly rates, we observed that although a mixture of actin disassembly factors (cofilin, coronin, and actin-interacting protein 1 is sufficient to disassemble actin comet tails in the presence of physiological G-actin concentrations this mixture was insufficient to disassemble actin comet tails in the presence of physiological F-actin concentrations. Using biochemical complementation, we purified cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from thymus extracts as a factor that protects against the inhibition of excess F-actin. CAP has been shown to participate in actin dynamics but has been thought to act by liberating cofilin from ADP·G-actin monomers to restore cofilin activity. However, we found that CAP augments cofilin-mediated disassembly by accelerating the rate of cofilin-mediated severing. We also demonstrated that CAP acts directly on F-actin and severs actin filaments at acidic, but not neutral, pH. At the neutral pH characteristic of cytosol in most mammalian cells, we demonstrated that neither CAP nor cofilin are capable of severing actin filaments. However, the combination of CAP and cofilin rapidly severed actin at all pH values across the physiological range. Therefore, our results reveal a new function for CAP in accelerating cofilin-mediated actin filament severing and provide a mechanism through which cells can maintain high actin turnover rates without having to alkalinize cytosol, which would affect many biochemical reactions beyond actin depolymerization.

  20. Communication between thiamin cofactors in the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component active centers: evidence for a "direct pathway" between the 4'-aminopyrimidine N1' atoms.

    PubMed

    Nemeria, Natalia S; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-04-09

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4'-aminopyrimidine N1' atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu(571), Glu(235), and Glu(237)) and Arg(606) resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. 1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. 2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. 3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. 4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu(235) makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu(571) residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time.

  1. The essential yhcSR two-component signal transduction system directly regulates the lac and opuCABCD operons of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Meiying; Hall, Jeffrey W; Yang, Junshu; Ji, Yinduo

    2012-01-01

    Our previous studies suggested that the essential two-component signal transduction system, YhcSR, regulates the opuCABCD operon at the transcriptional level, and the Pspac-driven opuCABCD partially complements the lethal effects of yhcS antisense RNA expression in Staphylococcus aureus. However, the reason why yhcSR regulon is required for growth is still unclear. In this report, we present that the lac and opuC operons are directly transcriptionally regulated by YhcSR. Using real-time RT-PCR we showed that the down-regulation of yhcSR expression affected the transcription of lacA encoding galactose-6-phosphotase isomerase subunit LacA, and opuCA encoding a subunit of a glycine betaine/carnitine/choline ABC transporter. Promoter-lux reporter fusion studies further confirmed the transcriptional regulation of lac by YhcSR. Gel shift assays revealed that YhcR binds to the promoter regions of the lac and opuC operons. Moreover, the Pspac-driven lacABC expression in trans was able to partially complement the lethal effect of induced yhcS antisense RNA. Likewise, the Pspac-driven opuCABCD expression in trans complemented the growth defect of S. aureus in a high osmotic strength medium during the depletion of YhcSR. Taken together, the above data indicate that the yhcSR system directly regulates the expression of lac and opuC operons, which, in turn, may be partially associated with the essentiality of yhcSR in S. aureus. These results provide a new insight into the biological functions of the yhcSR, a global regulator.

  2. Dose Frequency Ranging Pharmacokinetic Study of Tenofovir-Emtricitabine After Directly Observed Dosing in Healthy Volunteers to Establish Adherence Benchmarks (HPTN 066)

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Adriana; Bumpus, Namandjé N.; Kashuba, Angela D.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Moore, Ayana; Anderson, Peter L.; Bushman, Lane R.; Fuchs, Edward J.; Wiggins, Ilene; Radebaugh, Christine; Prince, Heather A.; Bakshi, Rahul P.; Wang, Ruili; Richardson, Paul; Shieh, Eugenie; McKinstry, Laura; Li, Xin; Donnell, Deborah; Elharrar, Vanessa; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Patterson, Kristine B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oral preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) trials report disparate efficacy attributed to variable adherence. HPTN 066 was conducted to establish objective, quantitative benchmarks for discrete, regular levels of adherence using directly observed dosing of tenofovir (TFV) disoproxil fumarate (TDF)/emtricitabine (FTC). Healthy, HIV-uninfected men and women were randomized to one of four oral regimens of fixed-dose TDF 300 mg/FTC 200 mg tablet for 5 weeks with all doses observed: one tablet weekly (one/week), one tablet twice weekly (two/week), two tablets twice weekly (four/week), or one tablet daily (seven/week). Trough serum TFV and FTC, peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC), and CD4+ TFV-diphosphate (TFV-DP) and FTC-triphosphate (FTC-TP) concentrations were determined throughout dosing and 2 weeks after the last dose. Rectosigmoidal, semen, and cervicovaginal samples were collected for drug assessment at end of dosing and 2 weeks later in a subset of participants. The 49 enrolled participants tolerated the regimens well. All regimens achieved steady-state concentrations by the second dose for serum TFV/FTC and by 7 days for PBMC TFV-DP/FTC-TP. Steady-state median TFV-DP predose concentrations demonstrated dose proportionality: one/week 1.6 fmol/106 PBMCs, two/week 9.1, four/week 18.8, seven/week, 36.3. Further, TFV-DP was consistently quantifiable 2 weeks after the last dose for the ≥4/week regimens. Adherence benchmarks were identified using receiver operating characteristic curves, which had areas under the curve ≥0.93 for all analytes in serum and PBMCs. Intersubject and intrasubject coefficients of variation (%CV) ranged from 33% to 63% and 14% to 34%, respectively, for all analytes in serum and PBMCs. Steady-state PBMC TFV-DP was established earlier and at lower concentrations than predicted and was the only analyte demonstrating predose concentration dose proportionality. Steady-state daily dosing serum TFV and PBMC TFV-DP was consistent with

  3. Dose Frequency Ranging Pharmacokinetic Study of Tenofovir-Emtricitabine After Directly Observed Dosing in Healthy Volunteers to Establish Adherence Benchmarks (HPTN 066).

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Craig W; Andrade, Adriana; Bumpus, Namandjé N; Kashuba, Angela D; Marzinke, Mark A; Moore, Ayana; Anderson, Peter L; Bushman, Lane R; Fuchs, Edward J; Wiggins, Ilene; Radebaugh, Christine; Prince, Heather A; Bakshi, Rahul P; Wang, Ruili; Richardson, Paul; Shieh, Eugenie; McKinstry, Laura; Li, Xin; Donnell, Deborah; Elharrar, Vanessa; Mayer, Kenneth H; Patterson, Kristine B

    2016-01-01

    Oral preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) trials report disparate efficacy attributed to variable adherence. HPTN 066 was conducted to establish objective, quantitative benchmarks for discrete, regular levels of adherence using directly observed dosing of tenofovir (TFV) disoproxil fumarate (TDF)/emtricitabine (FTC). Healthy, HIV-uninfected men and women were randomized to one of four oral regimens of fixed-dose TDF 300 mg/FTC 200 mg tablet for 5 weeks with all doses observed: one tablet weekly (one/week), one tablet twice weekly (two/week), two tablets twice weekly (four/week), or one tablet daily (seven/week). Trough serum TFV and FTC, peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC), and CD4(+) TFV-diphosphate (TFV-DP) and FTC-triphosphate (FTC-TP) concentrations were determined throughout dosing and 2 weeks after the last dose. Rectosigmoidal, semen, and cervicovaginal samples were collected for drug assessment at end of dosing and 2 weeks later in a subset of participants. The 49 enrolled participants tolerated the regimens well. All regimens achieved steady-state concentrations by the second dose for serum TFV/FTC and by 7 days for PBMC TFV-DP/FTC-TP. Steady-state median TFV-DP predose concentrations demonstrated dose proportionality: one/week 1.6 fmol/10(6) PBMCs, two/week 9.1, four/week 18.8, seven/week, 36.3. Further, TFV-DP was consistently quantifiable 2 weeks after the last dose for the ≥4/week regimens. Adherence benchmarks were identified using receiver operating characteristic curves, which had areas under the curve ≥0.93 for all analytes in serum and PBMCs. Intersubject and intrasubject coefficients of variation (%CV) ranged from 33% to 63% and 14% to 34%, respectively, for all analytes in serum and PBMCs. Steady-state PBMC TFV-DP was established earlier and at lower concentrations than predicted and was the only analyte demonstrating predose concentration dose proportionality. Steady-state daily dosing serum TFV and PBMC TFV-DP was consistent with

  4. Direct and maternal (co)variance components, genetic parameters and annual trends for growth traits of Dorper sheep in semi-arid Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kariuki, C M; Ilatsia, Evans D; Kosgey, Isaac S; Kahi, Alexander K

    2010-03-01

    Genetic and phenotypic parameters were estimated for lamb growth traits for the Dorper sheep in semi-arid Kenya using an animal model. Data on lamb growth performance were extracted from available performance records at the Sheep and Goats Station in Naivasha, Kenya. Growth traits considered were body weights at birth (BW0, kg), at 1 month (BW1, kg), at 2 months (BW2, kg), at weaning (WW, kg), at 6 months (BW6, kg), at 9 months (BW9, kg) and at yearling (YW, kg), average daily gain from birth to 6 months (ADG(0-6), gm) and from 6 months to 1 year (ADG(6-12), gm). Direct heritability estimates were, correspondingly, 0.18, 0.36, 0.32, 0.28, 0.21, 0.14, 0.29, 0.12 and 0.30 for BW0, BW1, BW2, WW, BW6, BW9, YW, ADG(0-6) and ADG(6-12). The corresponding maternal genetic heritability estimates for body weights up to 9 months were 0.16, 0.10, 0.10, 0.19, 0.21 and 0.18. Direct-maternal genetic correlations were negative and high ranging between -0.47 to -0.94. Negative genetic correlations were observed for ADG(0-6)-ADG(6-12), BW2-ADG(6-12), WW-ADG(6-12) and BW6-ADG(6-12). Phenotypic correlations ranged from 0.15 to 0.96. Maternal effects are important in the growth performance of the Dorper sheep though a negative correlation exists between direct and maternal genetic effects. The current study has provided important information on the extent of additive genetic variation in the existing flocks that could now be used in determining the merit of breeding rams and ewes for sale to the commercial flocks. The estimates provided would form the basis of designing breeding schemes for the Dorper sheep in Kenya. Implications of the study to future Dorper sheep breeding programmes are also discussed.

  5. Acid-Induced Activation of the Urease Promoters Is Mediated Directly by the ArsRS Two-Component System of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Pflock, Michael; Kennard, Simone; Delany, Isabel; Scarlato, Vincenzo; Beier, Dagmar

    2005-01-01

    The nickel-containing enzyme urease is an essential colonization factor of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori which enables the bacteria to survive the low-pH conditions of the stomach. Transcription of the urease genes is positively controlled in response to increasing concentrations of nickel ions and acidic pH. Here we demonstrate that acid-induced transcription of the urease genes is mediated directly by the ArsRS two-component system. Footprint analyses identify binding sites of the phosphorylated ArsR response regulator within the ureA and ureI promoters. Furthermore, deletion of a distal upstream ArsR binding site of the ureA promoter demonstrates its role in acid-dependent activation of the promoter. In addition, acid-induced transcription of the ureA gene is unaltered in a nikR mutant, providing evidence that pH-responsive regulation and nickel-responsive regulation of the ureA promoter are mediated by independent mechanisms involving the ArsR response regulator and the NikR protein. PMID:16177315

  6. Prefrontocerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation increases amplitude and decreases latency of P3b component in patients with euthymic bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bersani, Francesco Saverio; Minichino, Amedeo; Fattapposta, Francesco; Bernabei, Laura; Spagnoli, Francesco; Mannarelli, Daniela; Francesconi, Marta; Pauletti, Caterina; Corrado, Alessandra; Vergnani, Lucilla; Taddei, Ines; Biondi, Massimo; Delle Chiaie, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Neurocognitive impairments have been observed in patients with bipolar disorder (BD) even during the euthymic phase of the disease, potentially representing trait-associated rather than state-associated characteristics of the disorder. In the present study, we used transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied to cerebellar and prefrontal cortices to improve the neurophysiological performances of patients with euthymic BD. Methods Twenty-five outpatients with BD underwent open-label prefrontocerebellar tDCS for 3 consecutive weeks. Neurophysiological performances were assessed through the examination of the P3b and P3a subcomponents of P300 event-related potential at baseline and after stimulation. Results Compared to baseline, P3b component after tDCS showed significantly higher amplitude and shorter latency (latency: Fz P=0.02, Cz P=0.03, and Pz P=0.04; amplitude: Fz P=0.24, Cz P=0.02, and Pz P=0.35). Conclusion In our sample of patients with euthymic BD, concomitant prefrontoexcitatory and cerebellar-inhibitory modulations led to improved brain information processing stream. This improvement may at least partially result from neuroplastic modulation of prefrontocerebellar circuitry activity. PMID:26640377

  7. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficient and determination of the imaginary component of the atomic form factor of tin over the energy range of 29-60keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jonge, Martin D.; Tran, Chanh Q.; Chantler, Christopher T.; Barnea, Zwi; Dhal, Bipin B.; Paterson, David; Kanter, Elliot P.; Southworth, Stephen H.; Young, Linda; Beno, Mark A.; Linton, Jennifer A.; Jennings, Guy

    2007-03-01

    We use the x-ray extended-range technique (XERT) [C. T. Chantler , Phys. Rev. A 64, 062506 (2001)] to measure the mass attenuation coefficients of tin in the x-ray energy range of 29-60keV to 0.04-3% accuracy, and typically in the range 0.1-0.2% . Measurements made over an extended range of the measurement parameter space are critically examined to identify, quantify, and correct a number of potential experimental systematic errors. These results represent the most extensive experimental data set for tin and include absolute mass attenuation coefficients in the regions of x-ray absorption fine structure, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, and x-ray absorption near-edge structure. The imaginary component of the atomic form factor f2 is derived from the photoelectric absorption after subtracting calculated Rayleigh and Compton scattering cross sections from the total attenuation. Comparison of the result with tabulations of calculated photoelectric absorption coefficients indicates that differences of 1-2% persist between calculated and observed values.

  8. Tau ranging revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that a ranging receiver with a sufficient and reasonable number of correlators is competitive with the current sequential component ranging system by some 1.5 to 2.5 dB. The optimum transmitter code, the optimum receiver, and a near-maximum-lilelihood range-estimation algorithm are presented.

  9. A study of microkinetic adjustments required to match shock wave experiments and Monte Carlo Direct Simulation for a wide Mach number range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham-van-Diep, Gerald C.; Muntz, E. Phillip; Erwin, Daniel A.

    1990-06-01

    Shock wave thickness predictions from Monte Carlo Direct Simulations, using differential scattering and the Maitland-Smith-Aziz interatomic potential, underpredict experiments as shock Mach numbers increase above about 4. Examination of several sources of data has indicated that at relatively high energies the repulsive portion of accepted potentials such as the Maitland-Smith-Aziz may be too steep. An Exponential-6 potential due to Ross, based on high energy molecular beam scattering data and shock velocity measurements in liquid argon, has been combined with the lower energy portion of the Maitland-Smith-Aziz potential. When this hybrid potential is used in Monte Carlo Direct Simulations, agreement with experiments is improved over the previous predictions using the pure Maitland-Smith-Aziz form.

  10. A study of microkinetic adjustments required to match shock wave experiments and Monte Carlo Direct Simulation for a wide Mach number range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham-Van-diep, Gerald C.; Muntz, E. Phillip; Erwin, Daniel A.

    1990-01-01

    Shock wave thickness predictions from Monte Carlo Direct Simulations, using differential scattering and the Maitland-Smith-Aziz interatomic potential, underpredict experiments as shock Mach numbers increase above about 4. Examination of several sources of data has indicated that at relatively high energies the repulsive portion of accepted potentials such as the Maitland-Smith-Aziz may be too steep. An Exponential-6 potential due to Ross, based on high energy molecular beam scattering data and shock velocity measurements in liquid argon, has been combined with the lower energy portion of the Maitland-Smith-Aziz potential. When this hybrid potential is used in Monte Carlo Direct Simulations, agreement with experiments is improved over the previous predictions using the pure Maitland-Smith-Aziz form.

  11. Site-directed spin-labeling of nucleotides and the use of in-cell EPR to determine long-range distances in a biologically relevant environment.

    PubMed

    Azarkh, Mykhailo; Singh, Vijay; Okle, Oliver; Seemann, Isabelle T; Dietrich, Daniel R; Hartig, Jörg S; Drescher, Malte

    2013-01-01

    Double electron-electron resonance (DEER) is an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique used to determine distance distributions in the nanometer range between spin labels by measuring their dipole-dipole interactions. Here we describe how in-cell DEER can be applied to spin-labeled DNA sequences to unravel their conformations in living cells by long-range distance measurements in cellula. As EPR detects unpaired electron spins only, diamagnetic molecules provide no background and do not reduce detection sensitivity of the specific signal. Compared with in-cell NMR spectroscopy, low concentrations of spin-labeled molecules can be used owing to the higher sensitivity of EPR per spin. This protocol describes the synthesis of the spin labels, their introduction in DNA strands, the injection of labeled DNA solutions in cells and the performance of in-cell EPR measurements. Completion of the entire protocol takes ~20 d.

  12. Energy Dependence of Directed Flow over a Wide Range of Pseudorapidity in Au+Au Collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Wuosmaa, A.H.; Baker, M.D.; Barton, D.S.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Gushue, S.; Hauer, M.; Heintzelman, G.A.; Holzman, B.; Pak, R.; Remsberg, L.P.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Stankiewicz, M.A.; Steinberg, P.; Sukhanov, A.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Decowski, M.P.

    2006-07-07

    We report on measurements of directed flow as a function of pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at energies of {radical}(s{sub NN})=19.6, 62.4, 130 and 200 GeV as measured by the PHOBOS detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. These results are particularly valuable because of the extensive, continuous pseudorapidity coverage of the PHOBOS detector. There is no significant indication of structure near midrapidity and the data surprisingly exhibit extended longitudinal scaling similar to that seen for elliptic flow and charged particle pseudorapidity density.

  13. Research Investigation Directed Toward Extending the Useful Range of the Electromagnetic Spectrum [Special Technical Report]: Further Aspects of the Theory of the Maser.

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Shimoda, K.; Wang, T. C.; Townes, C. H.

    1956-03-01

    The theory of the molecular transitions which are induced by the microwave field in a maser and the effects of various design parameters are examined in detail. It is shown that the theoretical minimum detectable beam intensity when the maser is used as a spectrometer for the 3-3 line of ammonia is about 10{sup 9} molecules/sec under typical experimental conditions. Various systematic frequency shifts and random frequency fluctuations of the maser oscillator are discussed and evaluated. The most prominent of the former are the "frequency-pulling" effect which arises from detuning of the cavity and the Doppler shift due to the asymmetrical coupling of the beam with the two travelling wave components of the standing waves which are set up in the cavity. These two effects may produce fractional shifts as large as one part in 10{sup 9}. If adequate precautions are taken, however, they can be reduced to one part in 10{sup 10} or possibly less. The random fluctuations are shown to be of the order of one part in 10{sup 13} under typical operating conditions. For molecular beams in which the electric-dipole transition is used the TM{sub 010} mode is usually the most suitable for the maser which atomic beams in which magnetic transitions are utilized, the TE{sub 011} mode is to be preferred.

  14. The direct influence of electromagnetic fields on nerve- and muscle cells of man within the frequency range of 1 Hz to 30 MHz.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, J

    1979-01-01

    By using several biophysical approximations and considering man as free space model limiting order-of-magnitude values for external electric and magnetic field strengths which may be hazardous for human beings were calculated. Danger may occur by excitation processes below 30 kHz for field strengths exceeding these limiting values; for frequencies larger than 60 kHz, thermal effects are predominant before excitation occurs. The external electric field strength necessary for causing action potentials in the central nervous system exceeds by far the corona forming level. But excitation is possible by strong alternating magnetic fields. Furthermore, by comparing the electrically and magnetically induced currents with the naturally flowing currents in man caused by the brain's and heart's electrical activity, a "lower boundary-line" was estimated. Regarding electric or magnetic field strengths undercutting this boundary-line, direct effects on the central nervous system may be excluded. Other mechanisms should be responsible for demonstrated biological effects.

  15. Near-infrared emitting In-rich InGaN layers grown directly on Si: Towards the whole composition range

    SciTech Connect

    Aseev, Pavel Rodriguez, Paul E. D. Soto; Gómez, Víctor J.; Alvi, Naveed ul Hassan; Calleja, Enrique; Morales, Francisco M.; Senichev, Alexander; Lienau, Christoph; and others

    2015-02-16

    The authors report compact and chemically homogeneous In-rich InGaN layers directly grown on Si (111) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. High structural and optical quality is evidenced by transmission electron microscopy, near-field scanning optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Photoluminescence emission in the near-infrared is observed up to room temperature covering the important 1.3 and 1.55 μm telecom wavelength bands. The n-InGaN/p-Si interface is ohmic due to the absence of any insulating buffer layers. This qualitatively extends the application fields of III-nitrides and allows their integration with established Si technology.

  16. Experimental Studies of Selected Aqueous Electrochemical Systems Relevant for Materials Processing in the Fabrications of Microelectronic Components and Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xingzhao

    A broad range of electrochemical techniques are employed in this dissertation to investigate a selected set of aqueous electrochemical systems that are relevant for materials processing in the fabrication of microelectronic devices and direct alcohol fuel cells. In terms of technical applications, this work covers three main experimental systems: (i) chemical mechanical planarization (CMP), (ii) electro-less nickel deposition, and (iii) direct alkaline glycerol fuel cells. The first two areas are related to electronic device fabrications and the third topic is related to cost-effective energy conversion. The common electrochemical aspect of these different systems is that, in all these cases the active material characteristics are governed by complex (often multi-step) reactions occurring at metal-liquid (aqueous) interfaces. Electro-analytical techniques are ideally suited for studying the detailed mechanisms of such reactions, and the present investigation is largely focused on developing adequate analytical strategies for probing these reaction mechanisms. In the fabrication of integrated circuits, certain steps of materials processing involve CMP of Al deposited on thin layers of diffusion barrier materials like Ta/TaN, Co, or Ti/TiN. A specific example of this situation is found in the processing of replacement metal gates used for high-k/metal-gate transistors. Since the commonly used barrier materials are nobler than Al, the Al interface in contact with the barrier can become prone to galvanic corrosion in the wet CMP environment. Using model systems of coupon electrodes and two specific barrier metals, Ta and Co, the electrochemical factors responsible for these corrosion effects are investigated here in a moderately acidic (pH = 4.0) abrasive-free solution. The techniques of cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy are combined with strategic measurements of galvanic currents and open circuit potentials (OCPs). L-ascorbic acid (AA) is employed as a

  17. Direct measurement and theoretical calculation of the rate coefficient for Cl+CH3 in the range from T=202-298 K.

    PubMed

    Parker, James K; Payne, Walter A; Cody, Regina J; Nesbitt, Fred L; Stief, Louis J; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Harding, Lawrence B

    2007-02-15

    The rate coefficient has been measured under pseudo-first-order conditions for the Cl+CH3 association reaction at T=202, 250, and 298 K and P=0.3-2.0 Torr helium using the technique of discharge-flow mass spectrometry with low-energy (12-eV) electron-impact ionization and collision-free sampling. Cl and CH3 were generated rapidly and simultaneously by reaction of F with HCl and CH4, respectively. Fluorine atoms were produced by microwave discharge in an approximately 1% mixture of F2 in He. The decay of CH3 was monitored under pseudo-first-order conditions with the Cl-atom concentration in large excess over the CH3 concentration ([Cl]0/[CH3]0=9-67). Small corrections were made for both axial and radial diffusion and minor secondary chemistry. The rate coefficient was found to be in the falloff regime over the range of pressures studied. For example, at T=202 K, the rate coefficient increases from 8.4x10(-12) at P=0.30 Torr He to 1.8x10(-11) at P=2.00 Torr He, both in units of cm3 molecule-1 s-1. A combination of ab initio quantum chemistry, variational transition-state theory, and master-equation simulations was employed in developing a theoretical model for the temperature and pressure dependence of the rate coefficient. Reasonable empirical representations of energy transfer and of the effect of spin-orbit interactions yield a temperature- and pressure-dependent rate coefficient that is in excellent agreement with the present experimental results. The high-pressure limiting rate coefficient from the RRKM calculations is k2=6.0x10(-11) cm3 molecule-1 s-1, independent of temperature in the range from 200 to 300 K.

  18. Scratch that itch: revisiting links between self-directed behaviour and parasitological, social and environmental factors in a free-ranging primate

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Valéria; MacIntosh, Andrew J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Different hypotheses explain variation in the occurrence of self-directed behaviour such as scratching and self-grooming: a parasite hypothesis linked with ectoparasite load, an environmental hypothesis linked with seasonal conditions and a social hypothesis linked with social factors. These hypotheses are not mutually exclusive but are often considered separately. Here, we revisited these hypotheses together in female Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata fuscata) of Kōjima islet, Japan. We input occurrences of scratching and self-grooming during focal observations in models combining parasitological (lice load), social (dominance rank, social grooming, aggression received and proximity), and environmental (rainfall, temperature and season) variables. Using an information-theory approach, we simultaneously compared the explanatory value of models against each other using variation in Akaike's information criterion and Akaike's weights. We found that evidence for models with lice load, with or without environmental–social parameters, was stronger than that for other models. In these models, scratching was positively associated with lice load and social grooming whereas self-grooming was negatively associated with lice load and positively associated with social grooming, dominance rank and number of female neighbours. This study indicates that the study animals scratch primarily because of an immune/stimulus itch, possibly triggered by ectoparasite bites/movements. It also confirms that self-grooming could act as a displacement activity in the case of social uncertainty. We advocate that biological hypotheses be more broadly considered even when investigating social processes, as one does not exclude the other. PMID:28018646

  19. Scratch that itch: revisiting links between self-directed behaviour and parasitological, social and environmental factors in a free-ranging primate.

    PubMed

    Duboscq, Julie; Romano, Valéria; Sueur, Cédric; MacIntosh, Andrew J J

    2016-11-01

    Different hypotheses explain variation in the occurrence of self-directed behaviour such as scratching and self-grooming: a parasite hypothesis linked with ectoparasite load, an environmental hypothesis linked with seasonal conditions and a social hypothesis linked with social factors. These hypotheses are not mutually exclusive but are often considered separately. Here, we revisited these hypotheses together in female Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata fuscata) of Kōjima islet, Japan. We input occurrences of scratching and self-grooming during focal observations in models combining parasitological (lice load), social (dominance rank, social grooming, aggression received and proximity), and environmental (rainfall, temperature and season) variables. Using an information-theory approach, we simultaneously compared the explanatory value of models against each other using variation in Akaike's information criterion and Akaike's weights. We found that evidence for models with lice load, with or without environmental-social parameters, was stronger than that for other models. In these models, scratching was positively associated with lice load and social grooming whereas self-grooming was negatively associated with lice load and positively associated with social grooming, dominance rank and number of female neighbours. This study indicates that the study animals scratch primarily because of an immune/stimulus itch, possibly triggered by ectoparasite bites/movements. It also confirms that self-grooming could act as a displacement activity in the case of social uncertainty. We advocate that biological hypotheses be more broadly considered even when investigating social processes, as one does not exclude the other.

  20. Improved ranging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry E.

    1989-01-01

    Spacecraft range measurements have provided the most accurate tests, to date, of some relativistic gravitational parameters, even though the measurements were made with ranging systems having error budgets of about 10 meters. Technology is now available to allow an improvement of two orders of magnitude in the accuracy of spacecraft ranging. The largest gains in accuracy result from the replacement of unstable analog components with high speed digital circuits having precisely known delays and phase shifts.

  1. Single phase bi-directional AC-DC converter with reduced passive components size and common mode electro-magnetic interference

    DOEpatents

    Mi, Chris; Li, Siqi

    2017-01-31

    A bidirectional AC-DC converter is presented with reduced passive component size and common mode electro-magnetic interference. The converter includes an improved input stage formed by two coupled differential inductors, two coupled common and differential inductors, one differential capacitor and two common mode capacitors. With this input structure, the volume, weight and cost of the input stage can be reduced greatly. Additionally, the input current ripple and common mode electro-magnetic interference can be greatly attenuated, so lower switching frequency can be adopted to achieve higher efficiency.

  2. Exploring hydrocarbon-bearing shale formations with multi-component seismic technology and evaluating direct shear modes produced by vertical-force sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkan, Engin

    It is essential to understand natural fracture systems embedded in shale-gas reservoirs and the stress fields that influence how induced fractures form in targeted shale units. Multicomponent seismic technology and elastic seismic stratigraphy allow geologic formations to be better images through analysis of different S-wave modes as well as the P-wave mode. Significant amounts of energy produced by P-wave sources radiate through the Earth as downgoing SV-wave energy. A vertical-force source is an effective source for direct SV radiation and provides a pure shear-wave mode (SV-SV) that should reveal crucial information about geologic surfaces located in anisotropic media. SV-SV shear wave modes should carry important information about petrophysical characteristics of hydrocarbon systems that cannot be obtained using other elastic-wave modes. Regardless of the difficulties of extracting good-quality SV-SV signal, direct shear waves as well as direct P and converted S energy should be accounted for in 3C seismic studies. Acquisition of full-azimuth seismic data and sampling data at small intervals over long offsets are required for detailed anisotropy analysis. If 3C3D data can be acquired with improved signal-to-noise ratio, more uniform illumination of targets, increased lateral resolution, more accurate amplitude attributes, and better multiple attenuation, such data will have strong interest by the industry. The objectives of this research are: (1) determine the feasibility of extracting direct SV-SV common-mid-point sections from 3-C seismic surveys, (2) improve the exploration for stratigraphic traps by developing systematic relationship between petrophysical properties and combinations of P and S wave modes, (3) create compelling examples illustrating how hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs in low-permeable rocks (particularly anisotropic shale formations) can be better characterized using different Swave modes (P-SV, SV-SV) in addition to the conventional P

  3. Angiotensin II-regulated microRNA 483-3p directly targets multiple components of the Renin-Angiotensin System

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Jacqueline R.; Unal, Hamiyet; Desnoyer, Russell; Yue, Hong; Bhatnagar, Anushree; Karnik, Sadashiva S.

    2014-01-01

    Improper regulation of signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) by angiotensin II (AngII) can lead to hypertension, vascular hypertrophy and atherosclerosis. The extent to which the homeostatic levels of the components of signaling networks are regulated through microRNAs (miRNA) modulated by AngII type 1 receptor (AT1R) in VSMCs is not fully understood. Whether AT1R blockers used to treat vascular disorders modulate expression of miRNAs is also not known. To report differential miRNA expression following AT1R activation by AngII, we performed microarray analysis in 23 biological and technical replicates derived from humans, rats and mice. Profiling data revealed a robust regulation of miRNA expression by AngII through AT1R, but not the AngII type 2 receptor (AT2R). The AT1R-specific blockers, losartan and candesartan antagonized >90% of AT1R-regulated miRNAs and AngII-activated AT2R did not modulate their expression. We discovered VSMC-specific modulation of 22 miRNAs by AngII, and validated AT1R-mediated regulation of 17 of those miRNAs by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. We selected miR-483-3p as a novel representative candidate for further study because mRNAs of multiple components of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) were predicted to contain the target sequence for this miRNA. MiR-483-3p inhibited the expression of luciferase reporters bearing 3′-UTRs of four different RAS genes and the inhibition was reversed by antagomir-483-3p. The AT1R-regulated expression levels of angiotensinogen and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 1 (ACE-1) proteins in VSMCs are modulated specifically by miR-483-3p. Our study demonstrates that the AT1R-regulated miRNA expression fingerprint is conserved in VSMCs of humans and rodents. Furthermore, we identify the AT1R-regulated miR-483-3p as a potential negative regulator of steady-state levels of RAS components in VSMCs. Thus, miRNA-regulation by AngII to affect cellular signaling is a novel aspect of RAS

  4. Passive Ranging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    1981). 5. R. Courant and D. Hilbert, Methods of Mathematical Physics , Vol. I, English ed., * Interscience, New York, 1953. 32 32 APPENDIX A CALCULATION...K Courant and D. Hilbert, Methods of Mathematical Physics , Vol. I, English ed., * Interscience, New York, 1953. A-8 APPENDIX B * RANGING ACCURACY IN

  5. Absolute distance measurement method without a non-measurable range and directional ambiguity based on the spectral-domain interferometer using the optical comb of the femtosecond pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Jin, J.; Kim, J.-A.; Kim, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    With the help of the optical comb of a femtosecond pulse laser, a spectral-domain interferometer has been utilized for measuring absolute distances. Even if the technique can measure distances at a high speed and with good precision, it has two fundamental problems: non-measurable range and directional ambiguity. First, the non-measurable range arises due to the sampling limit of the interference spectra at very short distances or the integer multiple of a double non-ambiguity range. Second, the peak corresponding to the desired distance in the Fourier domain has a directional ambiguity owing to the repeated property of the optical comb. Therefore, due to these two fundamental problems, most previous works never measure the absolute distances by itself in a single operation. In this letter, an interferometric method for measuring arbitrary absolute distances based on a spectral-domain interferometer operating with two reference mirrors is proposed and demonstrated. The two reference mirrors generate two distinguishable signals, primary and secondary, with a predetermined offset, thus solving these fundamental problems clearly. More importantly, as a practical advantage, the simple layout of the proposed method makes it readily applicable to most previous studies.

  6. A novel strategy for dissecting goal-directed action and arousal components of motivated behavior with a progressive hold-down task.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Matthew R; Jensen, Greg; Taylor, Kathleen; Mezias, Chris; Williamson, Cait; Silver, Rae; Simpson, Eleanor H; Balsam, Peter D

    2015-06-01

    Motivation serves 2 important functions: It guides actions to be goal-directed, and it provides the energy and vigor required to perform the work necessary to meet those goals. Dissociating these 2 processes with existing behavioral assays has been a challenge. In this article, we report a novel experimental strategy to distinguish the 2 processes in mice. First, we characterize a novel motivation assay in which animals must hold down a lever for progressively longer intervals to earn each subsequent reward; we call this the progressive hold-down (PHD) task. We find that performance on the PHD task is sensitive to both food deprivation level and reward value. Next, we use a dose of methamphetamine (METH) 1.0 mg/kg, to evaluate behavior in both the progressive ratio (PR) and PHD tasks. Treatment with METH leads to more persistent lever pressing for food rewards in the PR. In the PHD task, we found that METH increased arousal, which leads to numerous bouts of hyperactive responding but neither increases nor impairs goal-directed action. The results demonstrate that these tools enable a more precise understanding of the underlying processes being altered in manipulations that alter motivated behavior.

  7. Tracking and identification of antibacterial components in the essential oil of Tanacetum vulgare L. by the combination of high-performance thin-layer chromatography with direct bioautography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Móricz, Ágnes M; Häbe, Tim T; Böszörményi, Andrea; Ott, Péter G; Morlock, Gertrud E

    2015-11-27

    Two tansy (Tanacetum vulgare L.) essential oils were obtained by steam distillation of the capitula with subsequent liquid-liquid extraction (oil 1) or with use of an auxiliary phase for the trapping of the steam components (oil 2). These oils were investigated against Bacillus subtilis F1276, B. subtilis spizizenii (DSM 618), Xanthomonas euvesicatoria, Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola, Ralstonia solanacearum strain GMI1000 and Aliivibrio fischeri, using the coupling of high-performance thin-layer chromatography to direct bioautography (HPTLC-DB). Using this method with the potato and tomato pathogen R. solanacearum is shown for the first time. Due to the advanced extraction process, oil 2 was richer in components and provided more inhibition zones. The main bioactive components were identified by scanning HPTLC-Direct Analysis in Real Time mass spectrometry (HPTLC-DART-MS) and solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography electron impact MS (SPME-GC-EI-MS) as cis- and trans-chrysanthenol as well as trans-chrysanthenyl acetate. cis-Chrysanthenol exhibited antibacterial effects against all tested bacteria, whereas trans-chrysanthenol inhibited B. subtilis, R. solanacearum and A. fischeri. trans-Chrysanthenyl acetate was an inhibitor for X. euvesicatoria, R. solanacearum and A. fischeri. Although HPTLC-DART-MS resulted in a comparable fragmentation, the ionization characteristics and the recorded mass spectra clearly showed that DART is a softer ionization technique than EI. It is also more affected by ambient conditions and thus prone to additional oxidation products.

  8. Two-Component Signaling System VgrRS Directly Senses Extracytoplasmic and Intracellular Iron to Control Bacterial Adaptation under Iron Depleted Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Pan, Yue; Yuan, Zhi-Hui; Zhang, Huan; Peng, Bao-Yu; Wang, Fang-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Both iron starvation and excess are detrimental to cellular life, especially for animal and plant pathogens since they always live in iron-limited environments produced by host immune responses. However, how organisms sense and respond to iron is incompletely understood. Herein, we reveal that in the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, VgrS (also named ColS) is a membrane-bound receptor histidine kinase that senses extracytoplasmic iron limitation in the periplasm, while its cognate response regulator, VgrR (ColR), detects intracellular iron excess. Under iron-depleted conditions, dissociation of Fe3+ from the periplasmic sensor region of VgrS activates the VgrS autophosphorylation and subsequent phosphotransfer to VgrR, an OmpR-family transcription factor that regulates bacterial responses to take up iron. VgrR-VgrS regulon and the consensus DNA binding motif of the transcription factor VgrR were dissected by comparative proteomic and ChIP-seq analyses, which revealed that in reacting to iron-depleted environments, VgrR directly or indirectly controls the expressions of hundreds of genes that are involved in various physiological cascades, especially those associated with iron-uptake. Among them, we demonstrated that the phosphorylated VgrR tightly represses the transcription of a special TonB-dependent receptor gene, tdvA. This regulation is a critical prerequisite for efficient iron uptake and bacterial virulence since activation of tdvA transcription is detrimental to these processes. When the intracellular iron accumulates, the VgrR-Fe2+ interaction dissociates not only the binding between VgrR and the tdvA promoter, but also the interaction between VgrR and VgrS. This relieves the repression in tdvA transcription to impede continuous iron uptake and avoids possible toxic effects of excessive iron accumulation. Our results revealed a signaling system that directly senses both extracytoplasmic and intracellular iron to modulate

  9. Automatic range selector

    DOEpatents

    McNeilly, Clyde E.

    1977-01-04

    A device is provided for automatically selecting from a plurality of ranges of a scale of values to which a meter may be made responsive, that range which encompasses the value of an unknown parameter. A meter relay indicates whether the unknown is of greater or lesser value than the range to which the meter is then responsive. The rotatable part of a stepping relay is rotated in one direction or the other in response to the indication from the meter relay. Various positions of the rotatable part are associated with particular scales. Switching means are sensitive to the position of the rotatable part to couple the associated range to the meter.

  10. Direct characterization of the energy level alignments and molecular components in an organic hetero-junction by integrated photoemission spectroscopy and reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Dong-Jin; Shin, Weon-Ho; Bulliard, Xavier; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Seyun; Chung, Jae Gwan; Kim, Yongsu; Heo, Sung; Kim, Seong Heon

    2016-08-01

    A novel, direct method for the characterization of the energy level alignments at bulk-heterojunction (BHJ)/electrode interfaces on the basis of electronic spectroscopy measurements is proposed. The home-made in situ photoemission system is used to perform x-ray/ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (XPS/UPS), reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) and inverse photoemission spectroscopy of organic-semiconductors (OSCs) deposited onto a Au substrate. Through this analysis system, we are able to obtain the electronic structures of a boron subphthalocyanine chloride:fullerene (SubPC:C60) BHJ and those of the separate OSC/electrode structures (SubPC/Au and C60/Au). Morphology and chemical composition analyses confirm that the original SubPC and C60 electronic structures remain unchanged in the electrodes prepared. Using this technique, we ascertain that the position and area of the nearest peak to the Fermi energy (EF = 0 eV) in the UPS (REELS) spectra of SubPC:C60 BHJ provide information on the highest occupied molecular orbital level (optical band gap) and combination ratio of the materials, respectively. Thus, extracting the adjusted spectrum from the corresponding SubPC:C60 BHJ UPS (REELS) spectrum reveals its electronic structure, equivalent to that of the C60 materials. This novel analytical approach allows complete energy-level determination for each combination ratio by separating its electronic structure information from the BHJ spectrum.

  11. Fast heating induced impulse halogenation of refractory sample components in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry by direct injection of a liquid halogenating agent.

    PubMed

    György, Krisztina; Ajtony, Zsolt; Van Meel, Katleen; Van Grieken, René; Czitrovszky, Aladár; Bencs, László

    2011-09-15

    A novel electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) method was developed for the halogenation of refractory sample components (Er, Nd and Nb) of lithium niobate (LiNbO(3)) and bismuth tellurite (Bi(2)TeO(5)) optical single crystals to overcome memory effects and carry-over. For this purpose, the cleaning step of a regular graphite furnace heating program was replaced with a halogenation cycle. In this cycle, after the graphite tube cooled to room temperature, a 20 μL aliquot of liquid carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) was dispensed with a conventional autosampler into the graphite tube. The CCl(4) was partially dried at 80°C under the mini-flow (40 cm(3) min(-1)) condition of the Ar internal furnace gas (IFG), then the residue was decomposed (pyrolyzed) by fast furnace heating at 1900-2100°C under interrupted flow of the IFG. This step was followed by a clean-out stage at 2100°C under the maximum flow of the IFG. The advantage of the present method is that it does not require any alteration to the graphite furnace gas supply system in contrast to most of the formerly introduced halogenation techniques. The effectiveness of the halogenation method was verified with the determination of Er and Nd dopants in the optical crystals. In these analyses, a sensitivity decrease was observed, which was likely due to the enhanced deterioration of the graphite tube surface. Therefore, the application of mathematical correction (resloping) of the calibration was also required. The calibration curves were linear up to 1.5 and 10 μmol L(-1) for Er and Nd, respectively. Characteristic masses of 18 and 241 pg and the limit of detection (LOD) values of 0.017 and 0.27 μmol L(-1) were found for Er and Nd, respectively. These LOD data correspond to 0.68 μmol mol(-1) Er and 11 μmol mol(-1) Nd in solid bismuth tellurite samples. The analytical results were compared with those obtained by a conventional ETAAS method and validated with X-ray fluorescence spectrometry analysis.

  12. Killing Range

    PubMed Central

    Asal, Victor; Rethemeyer, R. Karl; Horgan, John

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the Provisional Irish Republican Army's (PIRA) brigade level behavior during the Northern Ireland Conflict (1970-1998) and identifies the organizational factors that impact a brigade's lethality as measured via terrorist attacks. Key independent variables include levels of technical expertise, cadre age, counter-terrorism policies experienced, brigade size, and IED components and delivery methods. We find that technical expertise within a brigade allows for careful IED usage, which significantly minimizes civilian casualties (a specific strategic goal of PIRA) while increasing the ability to kill more high value targets with IEDs. Lethal counter-terrorism events also significantly affect a brigade's likelihood of killing both civilians and high-value targets but in different ways. Killing PIRA members significantly decreases IED fatalities but also significantly decreases the possibility of zero civilian IED-related deaths in a given year. Killing innocent Catholics in a Brigade's county significantly increases total and civilian IED fatalities. Together the results suggest the necessity to analyze dynamic situational variables that impact terrorist group behavior at the sub-unit level. PMID:25838603

  13. Equivalent magnetic noise reduction at high frequency range due to polarized direction optimization in Terfenol-D/Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 magnetoelectric laminate sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Cong; Ma, Jiashuai; Yao, Meng; Di, Wenning; Lin, Di; Xu, Haiqing; Wang, Wei; Luo, Haosu

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the responsivities and output voltage noise power spectral densities of magnetoelectric (ME) laminate sensors, consisting of length magnetized Terfenol-D alloys and transverse/width poled Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PMNT) crystals (i.e. L-T mode and L-W mode respectively), which are directly integrated with custom-build low noise charge amplifier circuits. Both the theoretical analyses and experimental results prove that the L-W mode sensor with the optimized polarized direction of the PMNT plate possesses lower magnetic detection limit at the interested high frequency range of 10 kHz≤f≤50 kHz. The equivalent magnetic noise (EMN) of the L-W mode sensor is 0.78 pT/Hz1/2 at 30 kHz, which is about 1.7 times lower than the 1.35 pT/Hz1/2 for conventional L-T mode sensor. Furthermore, an effective method of using operational amplifiers with low equivalent input noise voltage and employing ME laminate composites with high voltage coefficient to reduce the EMNs of the ME laminate sensors at high frequency range has been established.

  14. Compressive laser ranging.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Wm Randall; Barber, Zeb W; Renner, Christoffer

    2011-12-15

    Compressive sampling has been previously proposed as a technique for sampling radar returns and determining sparse range profiles with a reduced number of measurements compared to conventional techniques. By employing modulation on both transmission and reception, compressive sensing in ranging is extended to the direct measurement of range profiles without intermediate measurement of the return waveform. This compressive ranging approach enables the use of pseudorandom binary transmit waveforms and return modulation, along with low-bandwidth optical detectors to yield high-resolution ranging information. A proof-of-concept experiment is presented. With currently available compact, off-the-shelf electronics and photonics, such as high data rate binary pattern generators and high-bandwidth digital optical modulators, compressive laser ranging can readily achieve subcentimeter resolution in a compact, lightweight package.

  15. Direct conversion of algal biomass to biofuel

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Shuguang; Patil, Prafulla D; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-10-14

    A method and system for providing direct conversion of algal biomass. Optionally, the method and system can be used to directly convert dry algal biomass to biodiesels under microwave irradiation by combining the reaction and combining steps. Alternatively, wet algae can be directly processed and converted to fatty acid methyl esters, which have the major components of biodiesels, by reacting with methanol at predetermined pressure and temperature ranges.

  16. How can the English-language scientific literature be made more accessible to non-native speakers? Journals should allow greater use of referenced direct quotations in 'component-oriented' scientific writing.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    In scientific writing, although clarity and precision of language are vital to effective communication, it seems undeniable that content is more important than form. Potentially valuable knowledge should not be excluded from the scientific literature merely because the researchers lack advanced language skills. Given that global scientific literature is overwhelmingly in the English-language, this presents a problem for non-native speakers. My proposal is that scientists should be permitted to construct papers using a substantial number of direct quotations from the already-published scientific literature. Quotations would need to be explicitly referenced so that the original author and publication should be given full credit for creating such a useful and valid description. At the extreme, this might result in a paper consisting mainly of a 'mosaic' of quotations from the already existing scientific literature, which are linked and extended by relatively few sentences comprising new data or ideas. This model bears some conceptual relationship to the recent trend in computing science for component-based or component-oriented software engineering - in which new programs are constructed by reusing programme components, which may be available in libraries. A new functionality is constructed by linking-together many pre-existing chunks of software. I suggest that journal editors should, in their instructions to authors, explicitly allow this 'component-oriented' method of constructing scientific articles; and carefully describe how it can be accomplished in such a way that proper referencing is enforced, and full credit is allocated to the authors of the reused linguistic components.

  17. Telemetry-Based Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamkins, Jon; Vilnrotter, Victor A.; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Shambayati, Shervin

    2011-01-01

    A telemetry-based ranging scheme was developed in which the downlink ranging signal is eliminated, and the range is computed directly from the downlink telemetry signal. This is the first Deep Space Network (DSN) ranging technology that does not require the spacecraft to transmit a separate ranging signal. By contrast, the evolutionary ranging techniques used over the years by NASA missions, including sequential ranging (transmission of a sequence of sinusoids) and PN-ranging (transmission of a pseudo-noise sequence) whether regenerative (spacecraft acquires, then regenerates and retransmits a noise-free ranging signal) or transparent (spacecraft feeds the noisy demodulated uplink ranging signal into the downlink phase modulator) relied on spacecraft power and bandwidth to transmit an explicit ranging signal. The state of the art in ranging is described in an emerging CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) standard, in which a pseudo-noise (PN) sequence is transmitted from the ground to the spacecraft, acquired onboard, and the PN sequence is coherently retransmitted back to the ground, where a delay measurement is made between the uplink and downlink signals. In this work, the telemetry signal is aligned with the uplink PN code epoch. The ground station computes the delay between the uplink signal transmission and the received downlink telemetry. Such a computation is feasible because symbol synchronizability is already an integral part of the telemetry design. Under existing technology, the telemetry signal cannot be used for ranging because its arrival-time information is not coherent with any Earth reference signal. By introducing this coherence, and performing joint telemetry detection and arrival-time estimation on the ground, a high-rate telemetry signal can provide all the precision necessary for spacecraft ranging.

  18. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 1, Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended, establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently considering amending standards for seven types of products: water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, pool heaters, room air conditioners, kitchen ranges and ovens (including microwave ovens), and fluorescent light ballasts and is considering establishing standards for television sets. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data, and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. This volume presents a general description of the analytic approach, including the structure of the major models.

  19. Quickness of trunk movements in a seated position, regardless of the direction, is more important to determine the mobility in the elderly than the range of the trunk movement.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Akira; Higuchi, Yumi; Sano, Yuki; Ogaya, Shinya; Kataoka, Masataka; Okuda, Kuniharu; Iwata, Hiroshi; Fuchioka, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Although trunk function is known to be critical for maintaining balance during gait, a detailed evaluation regarding the relationship between trunk function and mobility has not been performed. We previously reported that the ability of quick lateral trunk movements in a seated position reflects mobility in elderly people. In this study, we further examined whether trunk movement in the anterior-posterior direction is also a determinant of mobility. In addition, the correlation between range of lateral trunk movement and mobility was also examined. One hundred and forty community-dwelling elderly participants (73.3±6.2 years) were enrolled in this study. We performed various trunk movement tests in a seated position, such as the seated side tapping test (SST), the seated anterior-posterior tapping test (APT), and the lateral sitting functional reach test (sitting reach test). Maximum gait speed and the timed up and go test (TUG) were performed to determine mobility. Parameters of trunk movement were compared. SST and APT showed moderate significant correlations with both maximum gate speed and TUG, while the sitting reach test weakly correlated (SST r=-0.58, p<0.01, APT r=-0.63, p<0.01, sitting reach test r=0.30, p<0.01). Moreover, multiple regression analysis revealed that SST and APT were independent indicators of both maximum gate speed and TUG, while the sitting reach test was not. These findings indicate that quickness, regardless of the direction of the movement, is more important than range in determining mobility in the elderly.

  20. Brain components

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The brain is composed of more than a thousand billion neurons. Specific groups of them, working in concert, provide ... of information. The 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The ...

  1. Range Imaging without Moving Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. Bryan; Scott, V. Stanley, III; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Range-imaging instruments of a type now under development are intended to generate the equivalent of three-dimensional images from measurements of the round-trip times of flight of laser pulses along known directions. These instruments could also provide information on characteristics of targets, including roughnesses and reflectivities of surfaces and optical densities of such semi-solid objects as trees and clouds. Unlike in prior range-imaging instruments based on times of flight along known directions, there would be no moving parts; aiming of the laser beams along the known directions would not be accomplished by mechanical scanning of mirrors, prisms, or other optical components. Instead, aiming would be accomplished by using solid-state devices to switch input and output beams along different fiber-optic paths. Because of the lack of moving parts, these instruments could be extraordinarily reliable, rugged, and long-lasting. An instrument of this type would include an optical transmitter that would send out a laser pulse along a chosen direction to a target. An optical receiver coaligned with the transmitter would measure the temporally varying intensity of laser light reflected from the target to determine the distance and surface characteristics of the target. The transmitter would be a combination of devices for generating precise directional laser illumination. It would include a pulsed laser, the output of which would be coupled into a fiber-optic cable with a fan-out and solid-state optical switches that would enable switching of the laser beam onto one or more optical fibers terminated at known locations in an array on a face at the focal plane of a telescope. The array would be imaged by the telescope onto the target space. The receiver optical system could share the aforementioned telescope with the transmitter or could include a separate telescope aimed in the same direction as that of the transmitting telescope. In either case, light reflected

  2. Home range and travels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    . Peromyscus generally used and maintained several or many different home sites and refuges in various parts of their home ranges, and frequently shifted about so that their principal activities centered on different sets of holes at different times. Once established, many Peromyscus remained in the same general area for a long time, perhaps for the duration of their lives. Extent of their travels in different directions and intensity of use of different portions of their home ranges varied within a general area in response to habitat changes, loss of neighbors, or other factors. Various authors have obtained both direct and indirect evidence of territoriality, in some degree, among certain species of Peromyscus. Young mice dispersed from their birth sites to establish home ranges of their own. Adults also sometimes left their home areas; some re-established elsewhere; others returned after exploratory travels. Most populations contained a certain proportion of transients; these may have been wanderers or individuals exploring out from established home ranges or seeking new ones. When areas were depopulated by removal trapping, other Peromyscus invaded. Invasion rates generally followed seasonal trends of reproduction and population density. Peromyscus removed from their home areas and released elsewhere returned home from various distances, but fewer returned from greater distances than from nearby; speed of return increased with successive trials. The consensus from present evidence is that ho-ming is made possible by a combination of random wandering and familiarity with a larger area than the day-to-day range. Records of juvenile wanderings during the dispersal phase and of adult explorations very nearly encompassed the distances over which any substantial amount of successful homing occurred. Methods of measuring sizes of home ranges and the limitations of these measurements were discussed in brief synopsis. It was co

  3. Battery component

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, F.; Batson, D.C.; Miserendino, A.J.; Boyle, G.

    1988-03-15

    A mechanical component for reserve type electrochemical batteries having cylindrical porous members is described comprising a disc having: (i) circular grooves in one flat side for accepting the porous members; and (ii) at least one radial channel in the opposite flat side in fluid communication with the grooves.

  4. In the Staphylococcus aureus two-component system sae, the response regulator SaeR binds to a direct repeat sequence and DNA binding requires phosphorylation by the sensor kinase SaeS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Li, Chunling; Jeong, Dowon; Sohn, Changmo; He, Chuan; Bae, Taeok

    2010-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus uses the SaeRS two-component system to control the expression of many virulence factors such as alpha-hemolysin and coagulase; however, the molecular mechanism of this signaling has not yet been elucidated. Here, using the P1 promoter of the sae operon as a model target DNA, we demonstrated that the unphosphorylated response regulator SaeR does not bind to the P1 promoter DNA, while its C-terminal DNA binding domain alone does. The DNA binding activity of full-length SaeR could be restored by sensor kinase SaeS-induced phosphorylation. Phosphorylated SaeR is more resistant to digestion by trypsin, suggesting conformational changes. DNase I footprinting assays revealed that the SaeR protection region in the P1 promoter contains a direct repeat sequence (GTTAAN(6)GTTAA [where N is any nucleotide]). This sequence is critical to the binding of phosphorylated SaeR. Mutational changes in the repeat sequence greatly reduced both the in vitro binding of SaeR and the in vivo function of the P1 promoter. From these results, we concluded that SaeR recognizes the direct repeat sequence as a binding site and that binding requires phosphorylation by SaeS.

  5. Time-Variable Gravity from Satellite-Laser-Ranging and Doppler Measurements: An Update on the Low-degree components as well as the connections with Geophysical/Climatic Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Christopher M.; Chao, Benjamin F.; Au, Andrew Y.; Boy, J.-P.

    2003-01-01

    The oblateness of the Earth's gravity field, 52, has long been observed to undergo a slight decrease due to post-glacial rebound of the mantle. Sometime around 1998 this trend reversed quite suddenly. This reversal persisted until 2001, at which point the atmosphere-corrected time series appears to have reversed yet again. Presently, the time series appears to be returning to the value that would nominally have been reached had the anomaly not occurred. This anomaly signifies a large interannual change in global mass distribution whose J2 effect overshadows that of the post-glacial rebound over such timescales. A number of possible causes have been considered, with oceanic mass redistribution as the leading candidate although other effects, such as glacial melting and core effects may be contributing. The amount by which J2 returns to it's nominal value provides a valuable constraint on the separation of the causes, and will be considered. We will present our latest Satellite Laser Ranging and DORIS Doppler derived time series for J2, and various other low-degree harmonic terms, as well as our investigations into the causes. In addition, we will show the comparison of the J2 results with those derived from CHAMP, as computed at NASA GSFC, and the recently released GRACE gravity model.

  6. Laser Micromachining Fabrication of THz Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DrouetdAubigny, C.; Walker, C.; Jones, B.; Groppi, C.; Papapolymerou, J.; Tavenier, C.

    2001-01-01

    Laser micromachining techniques can be used to fabricate high-quality waveguide structures and quasi-optical components to micrometer accuracies. Successful GHz designs can be directly scaled to THz frequencies. We expect this promising technology to allow the construction of the first fully integrated THz heterodyne imaging arrays. At the University of Arizona, construction of the first laser micromachining system designed for THz waveguide components fabrication has been completed. Once tested and characterized our system will be used to construct prototype THz lx4 focal plane mixer arrays, magic tees, AR coated silicon lenses, local oscillator source phase gratings, filters and more. Our system can micro-machine structures down to a few microns accuracy and up to 6 inches across in a short time. This paper discusses the design and performance of our micromachining system, and illustrates the type, range and performance of components this exciting new technology will make accessible to the THz community.

  7. The PorX Response Regulator of the Porphyromonas gingivalis PorXY Two-Component System Does Not Directly Regulate the Type IX Secretion Genes but Binds the PorL Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Maxence S.; Durand, Eric; Cascales, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Type IX secretion system (T9SS) is a versatile multi-protein complex restricted to bacteria of the Bacteriodetes phylum and responsible for the secretion or cell surface exposition of diverse proteins that participate to S-layer formation, gliding motility or pathogenesis. The T9SS is poorly characterized but a number of proteins involved in the assembly of the secretion apparatus in the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis have been identified based on genome substractive analyses. Among these proteins, PorY, and PorX encode typical two-component system (TCS) sensor and CheY-like response regulator respectively. Although the porX and porY genes do not localize at the same genetic locus, it has been proposed that PorXY form a bona fide TCS. Deletion of porX in P. gingivalis causes a slight decrease of the expression of a number of other T9SS genes, including sov, porT, porP, porK, porL, porM, porN, and porY. Here, we show that PorX and the soluble cytoplasmic domain of PorY interact. Using electrophoretic mobility shift, DNA-protein co-purification and heterologous host expression assays, we demonstrate that PorX does not bind T9SS gene promoters and does not directly regulate expression of the T9SS genes. Finally, we show that PorX interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of PorL, a component of the T9SS membrane core complex and propose that the CheY-like PorX protein might be involved in the dynamics of the T9SS. PMID:27630829

  8. Communication between Thiamin Cofactors in the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex E1 Component Active Centers EVIDENCE FOR A DIRECT PATHWAY BETWEEN THE 4′-AMINOPYRIMIDINE N1′ ATOMS

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeria, Natalia S; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-11-03

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4{prime}-aminopyrimidine N1{prime} atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu{sup 571}, Glu{sup 235}, and Glu{sup 237}) and Arg{sup 606} resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. (1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. (2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. (3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. (4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu{sup 235} makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu{sup 571} residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time.

  9. A single-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging trial of oral hepatic-directed vesicle insulin add-on to oral antidiabetic treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Geho, W Blair; Rosenberg, Len N; Schwartz, Sherwyn L; Lau, John R; Gana, Theophilus J

    2014-05-01

    The dose response of postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) to add-on, premeal oral hepatic-directed vesicle-insulin (HDV-I), an investigational lipid bio-nanoparticle hepatocyte-targeted insulin delivery system, was evaluated in a 3-test-meal/day model in type 2 diabetes patients. The single-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalating trial enrolled 6 patients with HbA(1c) 8.6 ± 2.0% (70.0 ± 21.9 mmol/mol) and on stable metformin therapy. Patients received oral HDV-I capsules daily 30 minutes before breakfast, lunch, and dinner as follows: placebo capsules, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 U/kg on days 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. Outcome measures were PPG and incremental PPG area under the concentration-time curve (AUC). All 4 doses of oral HDV-I statistically significantly lowered mean PPG (P ≤ .0110 each) and incremental PPG (P ≤ .0352 each) AUC compared to placebo. A linear dose response was not observed. The 0.05 U/kg dose was the minimum effective dose in the dosage range studied. Three adverse events unrelated to treatment were observed. Add-on oral HDV-I 0.05-0.4 U/kg significantly lowered PPG excursions and the dose response curve was flat. These results are consistent with the lack of a linear dose response between portal and systemic plasma insulin concentrations in previous animal and human studies. Oral HDV-I was safe and well tolerated.

  10. Quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of multi-component fuel/air mixing in a firing gasoline-direct-injection engine: Effects of residual exhaust gas on quantitative PLIF

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Ben; Ewart, Paul; Wang, Xiaowei; Stone, Richard; Ma, Hongrui; Walmsley, Harold; Cracknell, Roger; Stevens, Robert; Richardson, David; Fu, Huiyu; Wallace, Stan

    2010-10-15

    A study of in-cylinder fuel-air mixing distributions in a firing gasoline-direct-injection engine is reported using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging. A multi-component fuel synthesised from three pairs of components chosen to simulate light, medium and heavy fractions was seeded with one of three tracers, each chosen to co-evaporate with and thus follow one of the fractions, in order to account for differential volatility of such components in typical gasoline fuels. In order to make quantitative measurements of fuel-air ratio from PLIF images, initial calibration was by recording PLIF images of homogeneous fuel-air mixtures under similar conditions of in-cylinder temperature and pressure using a re-circulation loop and a motored engine. This calibration method was found to be affected by two significant factors. Firstly, calibration was affected by variation of signal collection efficiency arising from build-up of absorbing deposits on the windows during firing cycles, which are not present under motored conditions. Secondly, the effects of residual exhaust gas present in the firing engine were not accounted for using a calibration loop with a motored engine. In order to account for these factors a novel method of PLIF calibration is presented whereby 'bookend' calibration measurements for each tracer separately are performed under firing conditions, utilising injection into a large upstream heated plenum to promote the formation of homogeneous in-cylinder mixtures. These calibration datasets contain sufficient information to not only characterise the quantum efficiency of each tracer during a typical engine cycle, but also monitor imaging efficiency, and, importantly, account for the impact of exhaust gas residuals (EGR). By use of this method EGR is identified as a significant factor in quantitative PLIF for fuel mixing diagnostics in firing engines. The effects of cyclic variation in fuel concentration on burn rate are analysed for different

  11. Scientific Software Component Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Dykman, N.; Kumfert, G.; Smolinski, B.

    2000-02-16

    parallel components. While industrial component systems do not directly address scientific computing issues, we leverage existing industry technologies and design concepts whenever possible.

  12. A strategy for the generation of specific human antibodies by directed evolution and phage display. An example of a single-chain antibody fragment that neutralizes a major component of scorpion venom.

    PubMed

    Riaño-Umbarila, Lidia; Juárez-González, Victor Rivelino; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Ortíz-León, Mauricio; Possani, Lourival Domingos; Becerril, Baltazar

    2005-05-01

    This study describes the construction of a library of single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs) from a single human donor by individual amplification of all heavy and light variable domains (1.1 x 10(8) recombinants). The library was panned using the phage display technique, which allowed selection of specific scFvs (3F and C1) capable of recognizing Cn2, the major toxic component of Centruroides noxius scorpion venom. The scFv 3F was matured in vitro by three cycles of directed evolution. The use of stringent conditions in the third cycle allowed the selection of several improved clones. The best scFv obtained (6009F) was improved in terms of its affinity by 446-fold, from 183 nm (3F) to 410 pm. This scFv 6009F was able to neutralize 2 LD(50) of Cn2 toxin when a 1 : 10 molar ratio of toxin-to-antibody fragment was used. It was also able to neutralize 2 LD(50) of the whole venom. These results pave the way for the future generation of recombinant human antivenoms.

  13. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Medium Range System Components do not Fit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    enemy activities and identification of targets. uAv systems typically include an air vehicle, a Page 1 GAO/NSIAW.91-2 Unmanned Aerial Vehicles 91 4 15 026...the current system’s existing problems. -’-- Page 3 GAO/NSTAD-91-2 Unmanned Aerial Vehicles B-242779 Recommendations We recommend that the Secretary...representative is still not a member of the KIAIzS configuration control board. Page 4 GAO/NSIAD-91-2 Unmanned Aerial Vehicles B-242779 We continue to believe

  14. Mid-Range Spatial Frequency Errors in Optical Components.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    pattern. Malacara (1978, pp. 356-359) describes the diffraction intensity distri- bution on either side of the focal plane and presents a diagram of the...Leoble and Co., Ltd., Aug. 1963. Kintner, Eric C., and Richard M. Sillitto. "A New Analytic Method for Computing the Optical Transfer Function." OPTICA ...2, 1976. Malacara , Daniel (ed). Optical Shop Testing. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 1978. Reticon Corporation. Reticon G Series Data Sheet. Sunnyvale, CA: Reticon, 1976. 41 FILMED 9-85 DTIC

  15. Sequential ranging: How it works

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baugh, Harold W.

    1993-01-01

    This publication is directed to the users of data from the Sequential Ranging Assembly (SRA), and to others who have a general interest in range measurements. It covers the hardware, the software, and the processes used in acquiring range data; it does not cover analytical aspects such as the theory of modulation, detection, noise spectral density, and other highly technical subjects. In other words, it covers how ranging is done, but not the details of why it works. The publication also includes an appendix that gives a brief discussion of PN ranging, a capability now under development.

  16. Components of Successful Magnet Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Faye B.

    This paper identifies and discusses components of successful magnet programs. It is based on a review of existing research literature and information gathered directly from school districts. First, the paper discusses separately the following elements, which are considered "core components": (1) leadership; (2) organizational structure; (3)…

  17. Range Process Simulation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Dave; Haas, William; Barth, Tim; Benjamin, Perakath; Graul, Michael; Bagatourova, Olga

    2005-01-01

    Range Process Simulation Tool (RPST) is a computer program that assists managers in rapidly predicting and quantitatively assessing the operational effects of proposed technological additions to, and/or upgrades of, complex facilities and engineering systems such as the Eastern Test Range. Originally designed for application to space transportation systems, RPST is also suitable for assessing effects of proposed changes in industrial facilities and large organizations. RPST follows a model-based approach that includes finite-capacity schedule analysis and discrete-event process simulation. A component-based, scalable, open architecture makes RPST easily and rapidly tailorable for diverse applications. Specific RPST functions include: (1) definition of analysis objectives and performance metrics; (2) selection of process templates from a processtemplate library; (3) configuration of process models for detailed simulation and schedule analysis; (4) design of operations- analysis experiments; (5) schedule and simulation-based process analysis; and (6) optimization of performance by use of genetic algorithms and simulated annealing. The main benefits afforded by RPST are provision of information that can be used to reduce costs of operation and maintenance, and the capability for affordable, accurate, and reliable prediction and exploration of the consequences of many alternative proposed decisions.

  18. Laser range profile of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yanjun; Wang, Mingjun; Gong, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Profile information about a three-dimensional target can be obtained by laser range profile (LRP). A mathematical LRP model from rough sphere is presented. LRP includes laser one-dimensional range profile and laser two-dimensional range profile. A target coordinate system and an imaging coordinate system are established, the mathematical model of the range profile is derived in the imaging coordinate system. The mathematical model obtained has nothing to do with the incidence direction of laser. It is shown that the laser range profile of the sphere is independent of the incidence direction of laser. This is determined by the symmetry of the sphere. The laser range profile can reflect the shape and material properties of the target. Simulations results of LRP about some spheres are given. Laser range profile of sphere, whose surface material with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser one-dimensional range profile of sphere, whose surface mater with diffuse materials whose retro-reflectance can be modeled closely with an exponential term that decays with increasing incidence angles, is given in this paper. Laser range profiles of different pulse width of sphere are given in this paper. The influences of geometric parameters, pulse width on the range profiles are analyzed.

  19. Do Advance Directives Direct?

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Susan P

    2015-06-01

    Resolution of long-standing debates about the role and impact of advance directives - living wills and powers of attorney for health care - has been hampered by a dearth of appropriate data, in particular data that compare the process and outcomes of end-of-life decision making on behalf of patients with and without advance directives. Drawing on a large ethnographic study of patients in two intensive care units in a large urban teaching hospital, this article compares aspects of the medical decision-making process and outcomes by advance-directive status. Controlling for demographic characteristics and severity of illness, the study finds few significant differences between patients without advance directives and those who claim to have them. Surprisingly, these few differences hold only for those whose directives are in their hospital chart. There are no significant differences between those with no directive and those claiming to have a copy at home or elsewhere. The article considers the implications if directives seemingly must be in hand to show even modest effects. Do advance directives direct? The intensive care unit data provide far more support for the growing body of literature that casts doubt on their impact than studies that promote the use of them.

  20. Apparatus for remotely handling components

    DOEpatents

    Szkrybalo, Gregory A.; Griffin, Donald L.

    1994-01-01

    The inventive apparatus for remotely handling bar-like components which define a longitudinal direction includes a gripper mechanism for gripping the component including first and second gripper members longitudinally fixedly spaced from each other and oriented parallel to each other in planes transverse to the longitudinal direction. Each gripper member includes a jaw having at least one V-groove with opposing surfaces intersecting at a base and extending radially relative to the longitudinal direction for receiving the component in an open end between the opposing surfaces. The V-grooves on the jaw plate of the first and second gripper members are aligned in the longitudinal direction to support the component in the first and second gripper members. A jaw is rotatably mounted on and a part of each of the first and second gripper members for selectively assuming a retracted mode in which the open end of the V-groove is unobstructed and active mode in which the jaw spans the open end of the V-groove in the first and second gripper members. The jaw has a locking surface for contacting the component in the active mode to secure the component between the locking surface of the jaw and the opposing surfaces of the V-groove. The locking surface has a plurality of stepped portions, each defining a progressively decreasing radial distance between the base of the V-groove and the stepped portion opposing the base to accommodate varying sizes of components.

  1. The development of direct write technology in BAE Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, J.; McDonald, J.; Morgan, S.; Wescott, Andrew; O'Driscoll, E. J.

    2006-12-01

    Direct Write (DW) is an emerging group of technologies that allow printing of electronic and other functional components out of vacuum, directly onto structural parts and assemblies. With its ability to deposit a wide range of dissimilar materials, and transfer details directly from CAD/CAM, the process is very flexible, enabling rapid progress from design to fabrication. This paper provides an introduction to direct write, and describes the BAE Systems activities in this field. The paper also describes the use of lasers in direct write, and some provisional results on laser curing are presented.

  2. Laser generating metallic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Marc A.; Shannon, G. J.; Steen, William M.

    1997-04-01

    Recent developments in rapid prototyping have led to the concept of laser generating, the first additive manufacturing technology. This paper presents an innovative process of depositing multi-layer tracks, by fusing successive powder tracks, to generate three dimensional components, thereby offering an alternative to casting for small metal component manufacture. A coaxial nozzle assembly has been designed and manufactured enabling consistent omni-directional multi-layer deposition. In conjunction with this the software route from a CAD drawing to machine code generation has been established. The part is manufactured on a six axes machining center incorporating a 1.8 kW carbon-dioxide laser, providing an integrated opto-mechanical workstation. The part build-up program is controlled by a P150 host computer, linked directly to the DNC machining center. The direct manufacturing route is shown, including initial examples of simple objects (primitives -- cube, cylinder, cone) leading to more complex turbine blade generation, incorporating build-up techniques and the associated mechanical properties.

  3. Revealing Optical Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Optical Vector Analyzer (OVA) 1550 significantly reduces the time and cost of testing sophisticated optical components. The technology grew from the research Luna Technologies' Dr. Mark Froggatt conducted on optical fiber strain measurement while working at Langley Research Center. Dr. Froggatt originally developed the technology for non- destructive evaluation testing at Langley. The new technique can provide 10,000 independent strain measurements while adding less than 10 grams to the weight of the vehicle. The OVA is capable of complete linear characterization of single-mode optical components used in high- bit-rate applications. The device can test most components over their full range in less than 30 seconds, compared to the more than 20 minutes required by other testing methods. The dramatically shortened measurement time results in increased efficiency in final acceptance tests of optical devices, and the comprehensive data produced by the instrument adds considerable value for component consumers. The device eliminates manufacturing bottlenecks, while reducing labor costs and wasted materials during production.

  4. Refrigerant directly cooled capacitors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.; Seiber, Larry E.; Marlino, Laura D.; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2007-09-11

    The invention is a direct contact refrigerant cooling system using a refrigerant floating loop having a refrigerant and refrigeration devices. The cooling system has at least one hermetic container disposed in the refrigerant floating loop. The hermetic container has at least one electronic component selected from the group consisting of capacitors, power electronic switches and gating signal module. The refrigerant is in direct contact with the electronic component.

  5. Determination of corrections to flow direction sensor measurements over an angle-of-attack range from 0 degree to 85 degrees. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ., August 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moul, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted into the nature of corrections for angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip measurements obtained with sensors mounted in front of each wingtip of a general aviation airplane. These flow corrections have been obtained from both wind-tunnel and flight tests over an angle-of-attack range from 0 to 85 deg. Both the angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip flow corrections were found to be substantial. The corrections were a function of the angle of attack and angle of sideslip and were fairly insensitive to configuration changes and rotational effects. The angle-of-attack flow correction determined from the static wind-tunnel tests agreed reasonably well with the correction determined from flight tests.

  6. Range determination for scannerless imaging

    DOEpatents

    Muguira, Maritza Rosa; Sackos, John Theodore; Bradley, Bart Davis; Nellums, Robert

    2000-01-01

    A new method of operating a scannerless range imaging system (e.g., a scannerless laser radar) has been developed. This method is designed to compensate for nonlinear effects which appear in many real-world components. The system operates by determining the phase shift of the laser modulation, which is a physical quantity related physically to the path length between the laser source and the detector, for each pixel of an image.

  7. Optimized Kernel Entropy Components.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo-Verdiguier, Emma; Laparra, Valero; Jenssen, Robert; Gomez-Chova, Luis; Camps-Valls, Gustau

    2016-02-25

    This brief addresses two main issues of the standard kernel entropy component analysis (KECA) algorithm: the optimization of the kernel decomposition and the optimization of the Gaussian kernel parameter. KECA roughly reduces to a sorting of the importance of kernel eigenvectors by entropy instead of variance, as in the kernel principal components analysis. In this brief, we propose an extension of the KECA method, named optimized KECA (OKECA), that directly extracts the optimal features retaining most of the data entropy by means of compacting the information in very few features (often in just one or two). The proposed method produces features which have higher expressive power. In particular, it is based on the independent component analysis framework, and introduces an extra rotation to the eigen decomposition, which is optimized via gradient-ascent search. This maximum entropy preservation suggests that OKECA features are more efficient than KECA features for density estimation. In addition, a critical issue in both the methods is the selection of the kernel parameter, since it critically affects the resulting performance. Here, we analyze the most common kernel length-scale selection criteria. The results of both the methods are illustrated in different synthetic and real problems. Results show that OKECA returns projections with more expressive power than KECA, the most successful rule for estimating the kernel parameter is based on maximum likelihood, and OKECA is more robust to the selection of the length-scale parameter in kernel density estimation.

  8. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  9. Experimental characterization of jet static forces impacting waste tank components

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, J.A.; Bates, J.M. ); Waters, E.D. )

    1990-06-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company plans to install mixer pumps in doubleshell waste tanks to mobilize and suspend settled sludge to allow eventual retrieval for treatment and permanent storage. The mixer pumps produce high momentum, horizontally directed jets that impact and mobilize the sludge and mix it into slurry for removal. There is concern that the force of the jet may damage tank internal components in its path. Scaled experiments were conducted to characterize the velocity profiles of the floor jet and to quantify the drag coefficients and impact forces for three tank components: radiation dry well, air lift circulator, and steam coil. Jet impact forces were measured on the scaled models at a 4 to 1 range of hydraulically scaled flow rates and a scaled range of distances between discharge nozzle and test component. The test were designed to provide hydraulic similarity between test conditions and expected actual waste tank conditions by using equal Reynolds number the jet maximum velocity impacted the test component. Forces measured on the models were used to calculate expected forces on the full scale components. Correlations of force on the test article versus distance from the nozzle were derived for the radiation dry well and air lift circulator based on the velocity correlation and drag parameter. The force data were also used to derive equivalent drag parameters which accounted for component shape factors including variation of jet impact area on the test article with distance from the nozzle. 8 refs., 44 figs., 42 tabs.

  10. Miniature probes for use in gas turbine testing. [component reliability measuring instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glawe, G. E.; Krause, L. N.

    1974-01-01

    Several examples of miniature probes (null type as well as fixed position) are presented which have proved useful in aircraft and space power systems component testing and are applicable to automotive gas turbine testing. These probes are used to determine component or system performance from the measurement of gas temperature as well as total and static pressure, and flow direction. Detailed drawings of the sensors are presented along with experimental data covering the flow characteristics over the range of intended use.

  11. Laser marking of component parts

    SciTech Connect

    Gress, A.V. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Permanent identification of components and subassemblies for traceability and historical purposes is essential for assemblies subject to long term storage. Marketing requirements run the gamut from simple functional alphanumerics for terminal or wire numbers to complex component identification involving program nomenclature, part number, manufacturer's code, serial number, data code, and lot or batch number. The wide range of opaque materials marked includes both ferrous and nonferrous materials, plastics, composites, and ceramics.

  12. Range Reference Notebook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-15

    rifle grenade (inert), tin can lid, 15” tent peg 3 Table FRD-7. Fort Ritchie Sector 3 Representative Examples of Non-MEC Clutter Description 1/2...Appendix B—Indirect Fire Range Examples SITES ( ADI ) Adak Naval Air Facility, AK, Mitt Lake Mortar Range (FRI) Fort Ritchie...example range. B- ADI -1 Indirect-Fire Range,: Adak, AK, Mitt Lake Mortar Range Impact Area Site-Specific References – Adak NAF Foster Wheeler

  13. A Long-Range Precision Ranging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easterling, Mahlon

    1961-01-01

    A technique is presented that may be used for precision real-time continuous range measuring at long ranges. The technique uses a carrier that is phase modulated by a pseudo-random binary sequence. The characteristics of the sequence that make it acquirable are discussed. The general form of a receiver capable of tracking the carrier is given and is shown to be a kind of phase-locked loop. A two-loop system capable of tracking a pseudo-random sequence and its clock is given. The combination of the receiver and the sequence tracking system form a ranging receiver. The power division necessary between the carrier and the sidebands is shown to be determined by the noise bandwidths of the two tracking systems. The bandwidths necessary for tracking space probes and Earth satellites are given and some experiments in radar-tracking Earth satellites are described. Based on these experiments, estimates are made of the useful range of such a system in tracking space probes.

  14. Airborne 2 color ranging experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millar, Pamela S.; Abshire, James B.; Mcgarry, Jan F.; Zagwodzki, Thomas W.; Pacini, Linda K.

    1993-01-01

    Horizontal variations in the atmospheric refractivity are a limiting error source for many precise laser and radio space geodetic techniques. This experiment was designed to directly measure horizontal variations in atmospheric refractivity, for the first time, by using 2 color laser ranging measurements to an aircraft. The 2 color laser system at the Goddard Optical Research Facility (GORF) ranged to a cooperative laser target package on a T-39 aircraft. Circular patterns which extended from the southern edge of the Washington D.C. Beltway to the southern edge of Baltimore, MD were flown counter clockwise around Greenbelt, MD. Successful acquisition, tracking, and ranging for 21 circular paths were achieved on three flights in August 1992, resulting in over 20,000 two color ranging measurements.

  15. Passive infrared ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonpacher, N. K.

    1983-12-01

    The range of an infrared source was estimated by analyzing the atmospheric absorption by CO2 in several wavelength intervals of its spectrum. These bandpasses were located at the edge of the CO2 absorption band near 2300 1/cm (4.3 micron). A specific algorithm to predict range was determined based on numerous computer generated spectra. When tested with these spectra, range estimates within 0.8 km were obtained for ranges between 0 and 18 km. Accuracy decreased when actual source spectra were tested. Although actual spectra were available only for ranges to 5 km, 63% of these spectra resulted in range estimates that were within 1.6 km of the actual range. Specific spectral conditions that affected the range predictions were found. Methods to correct the deficiencies were discussed. Errors from atmospheric variations, and the effects of background noise, were also investigated. Limits on accuracy and range resolution were determined.

  16. A computational analysis and suitability assessment of cold-gas dynamic spraying of glass-fiber-reinforced poly-amide 6 for use in direct-adhesion polymer metal hybrid components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Pandurangan, B.; Bell, W. C.; Daqaq, M.; Ma, L.; Seyr, Norbert; Erdmann, Marc; Holzleitner, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    SummaryA transient non-linear dynamics computational analysis of cold-gas dynamic spraying (CGDS) of glass-fiber-reinforced poly-amide (nylon) 6 has been carried out using Ansys-Autodyn [Century Dynamics Inc., Ansys-Autodyn Version 11.0, User Documentation, Century Dynamics Inc. (a subsidiary of ANSYS Inc.), 2007] in order to assess the suitability of this spraying technology for coating of metal stampings used in polymer metal hybrid (PMH) load-bearing automotive component applications. In addition, the suitability of the CGDS is assessed with respect to a need for metal stamping surface preparation/treatment, the ability to deposit polymeric material without significant material degradation, the ability to selectively overcoat the metal stamping, the resulting magnitude of the polymer-to-metal adhesion strength, durability of the polymer/metal bond with respect to prolonged exposure to high-temperature/high-humidity and mechanical/thermal fatigue service conditions, and compatibility with the automotive body-in-white ( BIW) manufacturing process chain. The analysis revealed that CGDS can be considered as a viable technology for coating of metal stampings used in PMH load-bearing automotive component applications.

  17. Flow-Field Matrix Solution for Direct Problem of Flow along S1 Relative Stream Surface Employing Non-Orthogonal Curvilinear Coordinates and Corresponding Non-Orthogonal Velocity Components,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-18

    two level fan , when the aerodynamic parameters are identical and only the mesh densities in the streamline direction are different, there are the...verifying computation of a highly loaded axial-flow two stage fan showed that the computed results and experimental results are in agreement. The principal...The condition used is that in the bladeless regions. Var remains a constant along the streamline. The tgy in the blade array varies according to the

  18. RADIO RANGING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Nieset, R.T.

    1961-05-16

    A radio ranging device is described. It utilizes a super regenerative detector-oscillator in which echoes of transmitted pulses are received in proper phase to reduce noise energy at a selected range and also at multiples of the selected range.

  19. Long Range Technology Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambron, Sueann, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    This summary of a meeting of the Apple Education Advisory Council, on long range technology plans at the state, county, district, and school levels, includes highlights from group discussions on future planning, staff development, and curriculum. Three long range technology plans at the state level are provided: Long Range Educational Technology…

  20. Hyaluronan: A Matrix Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rügheimer, Louise

    2008-09-01

    The glucosaminoglycan hyaluronan is a key component of the extracellular matrix. It is a large, negatively charged molecule that can act as an ion exchange reservoir for positive ions. Hyaluronan is involved in renomedullary water handling through its water-binding capacity. In the renal medulla, the main source for hyaluronan production is the renomedullary interstitial cells. Hyaluronan synthases are found in the inner part of the plasma membrane and polymerize hyaluronan chains which are extruded into the extracellular space. Hyaluronidases are a family of enzymes involved in the degradation of hyaluronan. They have a wide range of properties, including differences in size, inhibitor sensitivities, catalytic mechanisms, substrate specificities and pH optima.

  1. Telemetry Ranging: Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamkins, J.; Kinman, P.; Xie, H.; Vilnrotter, V.; Dolinar, S.

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the details of the signal processing used in a telemetry ranging system in which timing information is extracted from the downlink telemetry signal in order to compute spacecraft range. A previous article describes telemetry ranging concepts and architecture, which are a slight variation of a scheme published earlier. As in that earlier work, the telemetry ranging concept eliminates the need for a dedicated downlink ranging signal to communicate the necessary timing information. The present article describes the operation and performance of the major receiver functions on the spacecraft and the ground --- many of which are standard tracking loops already in use in JPL's flight and ground radios --- and how they can be used to provide the relevant information for making a range measurement. It also describes the implementation of these functions in software, and performance of an end-to-end software simulation of the telemetry ranging system.

  2. Future direction of direct writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam-Soo; Han, Kenneth N.

    2010-11-01

    Direct write technology using special inks consisting of finely dispersed metal nanoparticles in liquid is receiving an undivided attention in recent years for its wide range of applicability in modern electronic industry. The application of this technology covers radio frequency identification-tag (RFID-tag), flexible-electronics, organic light emitting diodes (OLED) display, e-paper, antenna, bumpers used in flip-chip, underfilling, frit, miniresistance applications and biological uses, artificial dental applications and many more. In this paper, the authors have reviewed various direct write technologies on the market and discussed their advantages and shortfalls. Emphasis has given on microdispensing deposition write (MDDW), maskless mesoscale materials deposition (M3D), and ink-jet technologies. All of these technologies allow printing various patterns without employing a mask or a resist with an enhanced speed with the aid of computer. MDDW and M3D are capable of drawing patterns in three-dimension and MDDW, in particular, is capable of writing nanoinks with high viscosity. However, it is still far away for direct write to be fully implemented in the commercial arena. One of the hurdles to overcome is in manufacturing conductive inks which are chemically and physically stable, capable of drawing patterns with acceptable conductivity, and also capable of drawing patterns with acceptable adhesiveness with the substrates. The authors have briefly discussed problems involved in manufacturing nanometal inks to be used in various writing devices. There are numerous factors to be considered in manufacturing such inks. They are reducing agents, concentrations, oxidation, compact ability allowing good conductivity, and stability in suspension.

  3. Direct Broad-Range Detection of Alphaviruses in Mosquito Extracts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-25

    has been reported to induce abortion or stillbirth in preg- nant swine (Kiyomasu et al., 1991) and Highlands J virus causes dramatic decreases in egg...CaAr508 French Guiana , 1968 M VEEV (VI) Ag80-663 Argentina, 1980 M WEEV Fleming California, H WEEV-AR58 CBA87 Argentina, 1958 H WEEV-SD83 R-43738 South...Dakota, 1983 H WEEV-ON41 McMillan Ontario, Canada, 1941 H WEEV-OR71 71V1658 Oregon, 1971 H Highlands J virus B230 Florida, 1960 B Sindbis virus UgMP6440

  4. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  5. Tropospheric range error parameters: Further studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopfield, H. S.

    1972-01-01

    Improved parameters are presented for predicting the tropospheric effect on electromagnetic range measurements from surface meteorological data. More geographic locations have been added to the earlier list. Parameters are given for computing the dry component of the zenith radio range effect from surface pressure alone with an rms error of 1 to 2 mm, or the total range effect from the dry and wet components of the surface refractivity and a two-part quartic profile model. The new parameters are obtained, as before, from meteorological balloon data but with improved procedures, including the conversion of the geopotential heights of the balloon data to actual or geometric heights before using the data. The revised values of the parameter k (dry component of vertical radio range effect per unit pressure at the surface) show more latitude variation than is accounted for by the variation of g, the acceleration of gravity.

  6. Detection and laser ranging of orbital objects using optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, P.; Hampf, D.; Sproll, F.; Hasenohr, T.; Humbert, L.; Rodmann, J.; Riede, W.

    2016-09-01

    Laser ranging to satellites (SLR) in earth orbit is an established technology used for geodesy, fundamental science and precise orbit determination. A combined active and passive optical measurement system using a single telescope mount is presented which performs precise ranging measurements of retro reflector equipped objects in low earth orbit (LEO). The German Aerospace Center (DLR) runs an observatory in Stuttgart where a system has been assembled completely from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components. The visible light directed to the tracking camera is used to perform angular measurements of objects under investigation. This is done astrometrically by comparing the apparent target position with cataloged star positions. First successful satellite laser ranging was demonstrated recently using an optical fiber directing laser pulses onto the astronomical mount. The transmitter operates at a wavelength of 1064 nm with a repetition rate of 3 kHz and pulse energy of 25 μJ. A motorized tip/tilt mount allows beam steering of the collimated beam with μrad accuracy. The returning photons reflected from the object in space are captured with the tracking telescope. A special low aberration beam splitter unit was designed to separate the infrared from visible light. This allows passive optical closed loop tracking and operation of a single photon detector for time of flight measurements at a single telescope simultaneously. The presented innovative design yields to a compact and cost effective but very precise ranging system which allows orbit determination.

  7. Explosive components facility certification tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dorrell, L.; Johnson, D.

    1995-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently completed construction of a new Explosive Components Facility (ECF) that will be used for the research and development of advanced explosives technology. The ECF includes nine indoor firing pads for detonating explosives and monitoring the detonations. Department of Energy requirements for certification of this facility include detonation of explosive levels up to 125 percent of the rated firing pad capacity with no visual structural degradation resulting from the explosion. The Explosives Projects and Diagnostics Department at Sandia decided to expand this certification process to include vibration and acoustic monitoring at various locations throughout the building during these explosive events. This information could then be used to help determine the best locations for noise and vibration sensitive equipment (e.g. scanning electron microscopes) used for analysis throughout the building. This facility has many unique isolation features built into the explosive chamber and laboratory areas of the building that allow normal operation of other building activities during explosive tests. This paper discusses the design of this facility and the various types of explosive testing performed by the Explosives Projects and Diagnostics Department at Sandia. However, the primary focus of the paper is directed at the vibration and acoustic data acquired during the certification process. This includes the vibration test setup and data acquisition parameters, as well as analysis methods used for generating peak acceleration levels and spectral information. Concerns over instrumentation issues such as the choice of transducers (appropriate ranges, resonant frequencies, etc.) and measurements with long cable lengths (500 feet) are also discussed.

  8. Agriculture, Forestry, Range Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crea, W. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Significant results obtained from ERTS-1 observations of agriculture, forestry, and range resources are summarized. Four major parts are covered: (1) crop classification and mensuration; (2) timber and range resources survey and classification; (3) soil survey and mapping; and (4) subdiscipline areas.

  9. Laser ranging data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Near real-time Lageos laser ranging data are analyzed in terms of range bias, time bias, and internal precision, and estimates for earth orientation parameters X(sub p), Y(sub p), and UT1 are obtained. The results of these analyses are reported in a variety of formats. Copies of monthly summaries from November, 1986 through November, 1987 are included.

  10. Long Range Facilities Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    Richard Muther range facilities Many alterna- analysis indi- cated that if NASSCO ever expected to surpass its output of the last several years, current...Marine Engineers (SNAME) SP-1 Panel Meeting. The Maritime Administration had Richard Muther (an authority on long range facility planning) address a

  11. Low-temperature demagnetization isolates stable magnetic vector components in magnetite-bearing diabase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, G. J.; Lucas, K.; Middleton, R. S.

    2004-05-01

    It may be difficult to isolate stable palaeomagnetic vectors of different ages if they lie in grain assemblages with overlapping ranges of coercivity or of unblocking temperature. This is because some moments associated with either vector may demagnetize at the same stage of experimental demagnetization. The sharp transition between vector components may be obscured and stable components may appear less linear on the demagnetization plot. Thermal and alternating field (AF) demagnetization techniques remove vector components on a quantitative basis, according to a discrete limiting unblocking temperature or coercivity. Low-temperature demagnetization (LTD) differs in that it removes vector components discretely, wherever there are mobile domain walls. Experiments tested the ability of LTD to improve the effectiveness of AF demagnetization on isothermal and anhysteretic remanent magnetizations (IRM, ARM) in diabase. Multicomponent NRMs were simulated IRMs or ARMs in different, non-overlapping coercivity ranges, along three orthogonal axes or along two non-orthogonal directions. The known directions of the experimentally applied vector components were always more successfully verified by AF demagnetization if LTD was first applied. For the same specimens, LTD reduced the same artificial remanences by ~50 per cent for the coercivity range 0-15 mT, by ~25 per cent for the range 15-30 mT, and negligibly for higher-coercivity fractions. LTD demagnetizes polydomain magnetite as domain walls rearrange on passing through a low-temperature transition, near 120 K.

  12. Geographic range limits: achieving synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Kevin J.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding of the determinants of species' geographic range limits remains poorly integrated. In part, this is because of the diversity of perspectives on the issue, and because empirical studies have lagged substantially behind developments in theory. Here, I provide a broad overview, drawing together many of the disparate threads, considering, in turn, how influences on the terms of a simple single-population equation can determine range limits. There is theoretical and empirical evidence for systematic changes towards range limits under some circumstances in each of the demographic parameters. However, under other circumstances, no such changes may take place in particular parameters, or they may occur in a different direction, with limitation still occurring. This suggests that (i) little about range limitation can categorically be inferred from many empirical studies, which document change in only one demographic parameter, (ii) there is a need for studies that document variation in all of the parameters, and (iii) in agreement with theoretical evidence that range limits can be formed in the presence or absence of hard boundaries, environmental gradients or biotic interactions, there may be few general patterns as to the determinants of these limits, with most claimed generalities at least having many exceptions. PMID:19324809

  13. Pamela observational capabilities of Jovian electrons component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Felice, V.; PAMELA Collaboration

    PAMELA is a satellite-borne experiment that will be launched in the first half of 2006 It will make long duration measurements of cosmic radiation over an extended energy range 80Mev to 200 GeV Specifically PAMELA will measure the cosmic-ray antiproton and positron spectra over the largest energy range ever achieved 80MeV -- 190 GeV and will search for antinuclei with unprecedented sensitivity Furthermore it will measure the light nuclear component of cosmic rays and investigate phenomena connected with solar and earth physics The apparatus consists of a time of flight system a magnetic spectrometer an electromagnetic imaging calorimeter a shower tail catcher scintillator a neutron detector and an anticoincidence system In this work a study of the PAMELA capabilities to detect Jovian electrons is presented The Jovian magnetosphere is a powerful accelerator of electrons to several tens of MeV as observed at first by Pioneer 10 spacecraft 1973 The propagation of Jovian electrons to Earth is affected by modulation due to Corotating Interaction Regions CIR Their flux at Earth is moreover modulated because every sim 13 months Earth and Jupiter are aligned along the average direction of the Parker spiral of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field PAMELA will be able to measure the high energy tail of the Jovian electrons in the energy range from 50 MeV up to 130 MeV Moreover it will be possible to extract the Jovian component reaccelated at the solar wind termination shock above 130 MeV up to 2 GeV from the galactic flux

  14. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1991-01-01

    The long range goal of this program is to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification and to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Current emphasis is on determining the influence of perturbations on directional solidification.

  15. Modelling Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.; Zhou, Jian; Yuan, Weijun

    1992-01-01

    The long range goal of this program has been to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification, in order to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Current emphasis is on determining the influence of perturbations on directional solidification.

  16. Extended range harmonic filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankowski, H.; Geia, A. J.; Allen, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Two types of filters, leaky-wall and open-guide, are combined into single component. Combination gives 10 db or greater additional attenuation to fourth and higher harmonics, at expense of increasing loss of fundamental frequency by perhaps 0.05 to 0.08 db. Filter is applicable to all high power microwave transmitters, but is especially desirable for satellite transmitters.

  17. Component Technology for Laser Plasma Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bosl, W J; Smith, S G; Dahlgren, T; Epperley, T; Kohn, S; Kumfert, G

    2002-06-17

    This paper will discuss the application of high performance component software technology developed for a complex physics simulation development effort. The primary tool used to build software components is called Babel and is used to create language-independent libraries for high performance computers. Components were constructed from legacy code and wrapped with a thin Python layer to enable run-time scripting. Low-level components in Fortran, C++, and Python were composed directly as Babel components and invoked interactively from a parallel Python script.

  18. Range Safety Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrock, Kenneth W.; Humphries, Ricky H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The high kinetic and potential energy of a launch vehicle mandates there be a mechanism to minimize possible damage to provide adequate safety for the launch facilities, range, and, most importantly, the general public. The Range Safety System, sometimes called the Flight Termination System or Flight Safety System, provides the required level of safety. The Range Safety System section of the Avionics chapter will attempt to describe how adequate safety is provided, the system's design, operation, and it's interface with the rest of the launch vehicle.

  19. Preliminary error budget for an optical ranging system: Range, range rate, and differenced range observables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Finger, M. H.

    1990-01-01

    Future missions to the outer solar system or human exploration of Mars may use telemetry systems based on optical rather than radio transmitters. Pulsed laser transmission can be used to deliver telemetry rates of about 100 kbits/sec with an efficiency of several bits for each detected photon. Navigational observables that can be derived from timing pulsed laser signals are discussed. Error budgets are presented based on nominal ground stations and spacecraft-transceiver designs. Assuming a pulsed optical uplink signal, two-way range accuracy may approach the few centimeter level imposed by the troposphere uncertainty. Angular information can be achieved from differenced one-way range using two ground stations with the accuracy limited by the length of the available baseline and by clock synchronization and troposphere errors. A method of synchronizing the ground station clocks using optical ranging measurements is presented. This could allow differenced range accuracy to reach the few centimeter troposphere limit.

  20. Robotic component preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Dokos, J.R.

    1986-04-01

    This report provides information on the preparation of robotic components. Component preparation includes pretinning or solder dipping, preforming, and pretrimming of component leads. Since about 70% of all components are axial-leaded resistor-type components, it was decided to begin with them and then later develop capabilities to handle other types. The first workcell is the first phase of an overall system to pretin, preform, and pretrim all components and to feed them to an automatic insertion system. Before use of the robot, a Unimation PUMA Modal 260, pretinning and preforming was done by first hand with a shield and vented booth.

  1. Fabrication of plastic microfluidic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter M.; Matson, Dean W.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Hammerstrom, D. J.

    1998-09-01

    Plastic components have many advantages, including ease of fabrication, low cost, chemical inertness, lightweight, and disposability. We report on the fabrication of three plastics-based microfluidic components: a motherboard, a dialysis unit, and a metal sensor. Microchannels, headers, and interconnects were produced in thin sheets (>=50 microns) of polyimide, PMMA, polyethylene, and polycarbonate using a direct-write excimer laser micromachining system. Machined sheets were laminated by thermal and adhesive bonding to form leak-tight microfluidic components. The microfluidic motherboard borrowed the `functionality on a chip' concept from the electronics industry and was the heart of a complex microfluidic analytical device. The motherboard platform was designed to be tightly integrated and self-contained (i.e., liquid flows are all confined within machined microchannels), reducing the need for tubing with fluid distribution and connectivity. This concept greatly facilitated system integration and miniaturization. As fabricated, the motherboard consisted of three fluid reservoirs connected to micropumps by microchannels. The fluids could either be pumped independently or mixed in microchannels prior to being directed to exterior analytical components via outlet ports. The microdialysis device was intended to separate electrolytic solutes from low volume samples prior to mass spectrometric analysis. The device consisted of a dialysis membrane laminated between opposed serpentine microchannels containing the sample fluid and a buffer solution. The laminated metal sensor consisted of fluid reservoirs, micro-flow channels, micropumps, mixing channels, reaction channels, and detector circuitry.

  2. Initial Ada components evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moebes, Travis

    1989-01-01

    The SAIC has the responsibility for independent test and validation of the SSE. They have been using a mathematical functions library package implemented in Ada to test the SSE IV and V process. The library package consists of elementary mathematical functions and is both machine and accuracy independent. The SSE Ada components evaluation includes code complexity metrics based on Halstead's software science metrics and McCabe's measure of cyclomatic complexity. Halstead's metrics are based on the number of operators and operands on a logical unit of code and are compiled from the number of distinct operators, distinct operands, and total number of occurrences of operators and operands. These metrics give an indication of the physical size of a program in terms of operators and operands and are used diagnostically to point to potential problems. McCabe's Cyclomatic Complexity Metrics (CCM) are compiled from flow charts transformed to equivalent directed graphs. The CCM is a measure of the total number of linearly independent paths through the code's control structure. These metrics were computed for the Ada mathematical functions library using Software Automated Verification and Validation (SAVVAS), the SSE IV and V tool. A table with selected results was shown, indicating that most of these routines are of good quality. Thresholds for the Halstead measures indicate poor quality if the length metric exceeds 260 or difficulty is greater than 190. The McCabe CCM indicated a high quality of software products.

  3. Laser Ranging Simulation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piazolla, Sabino; Hemmati, Hamid; Tratt, David

    2003-01-01

    Laser Ranging Simulation Program (LRSP) is a computer program that predicts selected aspects of the performances of a laser altimeter or other laser ranging or remote-sensing systems and is especially applicable to a laser-based system used to map terrain from a distance of several kilometers. Designed to run in a more recent version (5 or higher) of the MATLAB programming language, LRSP exploits the numerical and graphical capabilities of MATLAB. LRSP generates a graphical user interface that includes a pop-up menu that prompts the user for the input of data that determine the performance of a laser ranging system. Examples of input data include duration and energy of the laser pulse, the laser wavelength, the width of the laser beam, and several parameters that characterize the transmitting and receiving optics, the receiving electronic circuitry, and the optical properties of the atmosphere and the terrain. When the input data have been entered, LRSP computes the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of range, signal and noise currents, and ranging and pointing errors.

  4. New directions in lubrication, materials, wear, and surface interactions - Tribology in the 80's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, W. R. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    New directions in tribology are described. A range of topics is addressed, extending from fundamental research on tribological materials of all kinds and their surface effects, to final technological applications in mechanical components such as bearings, gears, and seals. The general topics addressed include: importance and definition of materials in tribology; future directions of research in adhesion and friction, wear and wear-resistant materials, and liquid lubricants and additives; status and new directions in elastohydrodynamic lubrication and solid lubricants; and tribological materials for mechanical components of the future.

  5. Software component quality evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clough, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a software inspection process that can be used to evaluate the quality of software components. Quality criteria, process application, independent testing of the process and proposed associated tool support are covered. Early results indicate that this technique is well suited for assessing software component quality in a standardized fashion. With automated machine assistance to facilitate both the evaluation and selection of software components, such a technique should promote effective reuse of software components.

  6. Combined GMSK Communications and PN Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Richard; Divsalar, Dariush

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses a method by which GMSK (Gaussian minimum shift keying) modulation and a pseudonoise (PN) ranging signal may be combined. By isolating the in-phase and quadrature components after carrier lock, and extracting their low-pass and band-pass filtered components, there is enough information available to both demodulate data and track the PN signal. The proposed combined GMSK communications and PN ranging is one potential approach to address emerging requirements for simultaneous high data rate communications from and tracking of vehicles in deep space or at the Moon.

  7. Reactor component automatic grapple

    DOEpatents

    Greenaway, Paul R.

    1982-01-01

    A grapple for handling nuclear reactor components in a medium such as liquid sodium which, upon proper seating and alignment of the grapple with the component as sensed by a mechanical logic integral to the grapple, automatically seizes the component. The mechanical logic system also precludes seizure in the absence of proper seating and alignment.

  8. Satellite Laser Ranging operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is currently providing precision orbit determination for measurements of: 1) Ocean surface topography from satellite borne radar altimetry, 2) Spatial and temporal variations of the gravity field, 3) Earth and ocean tides, 4) Plate tectonic and regional deformation, 5) Post-glacial uplift and subsidence, 6) Variations in the Earth's center-of-mass, and 7) Variations in Earth rotation. SLR also supports specialized programs in time transfer and classical geodetic positioning, and will soon provide precision ranging to support experiments in relativity.

  9. Broad host range plasmids.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aayushi; Srivastava, Preeti

    2013-11-01

    Plasmids are and will remain important cloning vehicles for biotechnology. They have also been associated with the spread of a number of diseases and therefore are a subject of environmental concern. With the advent of sequencing technologies, the database of plasmids is increasing. It will be of immense importance to identify the various bacterial hosts in which the plasmid can replicate. The present review article describes the features that confer broad host range to the plasmids, the molecular basis of plasmid host range evolution, and applications in recombinant DNA technology and environment.

  10. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). Maps show the general location of the WATR area that is used for aeronautical testing and evaluation. The products, services and facilities of WATR are discussed,

  11. Modeling human echolocation of near-range targets with an audible sonar.

    PubMed

    Kuc, Roman; Kuc, Victor

    2016-02-01

    Blind humans echolocate nearby targets by emitting palatal clicks and perceiving echoes that the auditory system is not able to resolve temporally. The mechanism for perceiving near-range echoes is not known. This paper models the direct mouth-to-ear signal (MES) and the echo to show that the echo enhances the high-frequency components in the composite MES/echo signal with features that allow echolocation. The mouth emission beam narrows with increasing frequency and exhibits frequency-dependent transmission notches in the backward direction toward the ears as predicted by the piston-in-sphere model. The ears positioned behind the mouth detect a MES that contains predominantly the low frequencies contained in the emission. Hence the high-frequency components in the emission that are perceived by the ears are enhanced by the echoes. A pulse/echo audible sonar verifies this model by echolocating targets from 5 cm range, where the MES and echo overlap significantly, to 55 cm. The model predicts that unambiguous ranging occurs over a limited range and that there is an optimal range that produces the highest range resolution.

  12. Agriculture, forestry, range resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crea, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    In the area of crop specie identification, it has been found that temporal data analysis, preliminary stratification, and unequal probability analysis were several of the factors that contributed to high identification accuracies. Single data set accuracies on fields of greater than 80,000 sq m (20 acres) are in the 70- to 90-percent range; however, with the use of temporal data, accuracies of 95 percent have been reported. Identification accuracy drops off significantly on areas of less than 80,000 sq m (20 acres) as does measurement accuracy. Forest stratification into coniferous and deciduous areas has been accomplished to a 90- to 95-percent accuracy level. Using multistage sampling techniques, the timber volume of a national forest district has been estimated to a confidence level and standard deviation acceptable to the Forest Service at a very favorable cost-benefit time ratio. Range specie/plant community vegetation mapping has been accomplished at various levels of success (69- to 90-percent accuracy). However, several investigators have obtained encouraging initial results in range biomass (forage production) estimation and range readiness predictions. Soil association map correction and soil association mapping in new area appear to have been proven feasible on large areas; however, testing in a complex soil area should be undertaken.

  13. Agriculture, forestry, range resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    The necessary elements to perform global inventories of agriculture, forestry, and range resources are being brought together through the use of satellites, sensors, computers, mathematics, and phenomenology. Results of ERTS-1 applications in these areas, as well as soil mapping, are described.

  14. Front Range Branch Officers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Front Range Branch of AGU has installed officers for 1990: Ray Noble, National Center for Atmospheric Research, chair; Sherry Oaks, U.S. Geological Survey, chair-elect; Howard Garcia, NOAA, treasurer; Catharine Skokan, Colorado School of Mines, secretary. JoAnn Joselyn of NOAA is past chair. Members at large are Wallace Campbell, NOAA; William Neff, USGS; and Stephen Schneider, NCAR.

  15. Nonscanning confocal ranging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, P. C.; Arons, E.

    1995-03-01

    We demonstrate a nonscanning confocal ranging system based on spatially incoherent interferometry. Such a system has significant advantages over the conventional confocal imaging system and other interferometric systems. We develop the theory in terms of coherence cells and demonstrate the equivalence of our method to the conventional confocal methods. Experimental results are also provided.

  16. Electric vehicles: Driving range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, Willett

    2016-09-01

    For uptake of electric vehicles to increase, consumers' driving-range needs must be fulfilled. Analysis of the driving patterns of personal vehicles in the US now shows that today's electric vehicles can meet all travel needs on almost 90% of days from a single overnight charge.

  17. RADIO RANGING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Bogle, R.W.

    1960-11-22

    A description is given of a super-regenerative oscillator ranging device provided with radiating and receiving means and being capable of indicating the occurrence of that distance between itself and a reflecting object which so phases the received echo of energy of a preceding emitted oscillation that the intervals between oscillations become uniform.

  18. Long Range Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson Coll., Hillsboro, MO.

    This document presents Jefferson College's "Long Range Plan," which is intended to provide the College's governing board, administration, and faculty and staff with a task-oriented blueprint for maximizing the delivery of higher education services to students and the community in a predictable, programmatic, and fiscally sound manner.…

  19. STDN ranging equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Final results of the Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (STDN) Ranging Equipment program are summarized. Basic design concepts and final design approaches are described. Theoretical analyses which define requirements and support the design approaches are presented. Design verification criteria are delineated and verification test results are specified.

  20. Agriculture, forest, and range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the panel for developing a satellite remote-sensing global information system in the next decade are reported. User requirements were identified in five categories: (1) cultivated crops, (2) land resources, (3)water resources, (4)forest management, and (5) range management. The benefits from the applications of satellite data are discussed.

  1. Fact Sheet: Range Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelson, C.; Fretter, E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Ames has a long tradition in leadership with the use of ballistic ranges and shock tubes for the purpose of studying the physics and phenomena associated with hypervelocity flight. Cutting-edge areas of research run the gamut from aerodynamics, to impact physics, to flow-field structure and chemistry. This legacy of testing began in the NACA era of the 1940's with the Supersonic Free Flight Tunnel, and evolved dramatically up through the late 1950s with the pioneering work in the Ames Hypersonic Ballistic Range. The tradition continued in the mid-60s with the commissioning of the three newest facilities: the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) in 1964, the Hypervelocity Free Flight Facility (HFFF) in 1965 and the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) in 1966. Today the Range Complex continues to provide unique and critical testing in support of the Nation's programs for planetary geology and geophysics; exobiology; solar system origins; earth atmospheric entry, planetary entry, and aerobraking vehicles; and various configurations for supersonic and hypersonic aircraft.

  2. Components of vestibular cortical function.

    PubMed

    Klingner, Carsten M; Volk, Gerd F; Flatz, Claudia; Brodoehl, Stefan; Dieterich, Marianne; Witte, Otto W; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the functional response (e.g., nystagmus) to caloric vestibular stimulation is delayed and prolonged compared with the stimulus-response timing of other sensory systems. Imaging studies have used different models to predict cortical responses and to determine the areas of the brain that are involved. These studies have revealed a widespread network of vestibular brain regions. However, there is some disagreement regarding the brain areas involved, which may partly be caused by differences in the models used. This disagreement indicates the possible existence of multiple cortical components with different temporal characteristics that underlie cortical vestibular processing. However, data-driven methods have yet to be used to analyze the underlying hemodynamic components during and after vestibular stimulation. We performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on 12 healthy subjects during caloric stimulation and analyzed these data using a model-free analysis method (ICA). We found seven independent stimulus-induced components that outline a robust pattern of cortical activation and deactivation. These independent components demonstrated significant differences in their time courses. No single-modeled response function was able to cover the entire range of these independent components. The response functions determined in the present study should improve model-based studies investigating vestibular cortical processing.

  3. Failure Analysis of Ceramic Components

    SciTech Connect

    B.W. Morris

    2000-06-29

    Ceramics are being considered for a wide range of structural applications due to their low density and their ability to retain strength at high temperatures. The inherent brittleness of monolithic ceramics requires a departure from the deterministic design philosophy utilized to analyze metallic structural components. The design program ''Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life'' (CARES/LIFE) developed by NASA Lewis Research Center uses a probabilistic approach to predict the reliability of monolithic components under operational loading. The objective of this study was to develop an understanding of the theories used by CARES/LIFE to predict the reliability of ceramic components and to assess the ability of CARES/LIFE to accurately predict the fast fracture behavior of monolithic ceramic components. A finite element analysis was performed to determine the temperature and stress distribution of a silicon carbide O-ring under diametral compression. The results of the finite element analysis were supplied as input into CARES/LIFE to determine the fast fracture reliability of the O-ring. Statistical material strength parameters were calculated from four-point flexure bar test data. The predicted reliability showed excellent correlation with O-ring compression test data indicating that the CARES/LIFE program can be used to predict the reliability of ceramic components subjected to complicated stress states using material properties determined from simple uniaxial tensile tests.

  4. Optical components damage parameters database system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yizheng; Li, Xinglan; Jin, Yuquan; Xie, Dongmei; Tang, Dingyong

    2012-10-01

    Optical component is the key to large-scale laser device developed by one of its load capacity is directly related to the device output capacity indicators, load capacity depends on many factors. Through the optical components will damage parameters database load capacity factors of various digital, information technology, for the load capacity of optical components to provide a scientific basis for data support; use of business processes and model-driven approach, the establishment of component damage parameter information model and database systems, system application results that meet the injury test optical components business processes and data management requirements of damage parameters, component parameters of flexible, configurable system is simple, easy to use, improve the efficiency of the optical component damage test.

  5. Affordable WDM components: the polymer solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay A.; Yin, Shing; Norwood, Robert A.; Yardley, James T.

    1998-02-01

    An advanced polymeric waveguide technology was developed for affordable WDM components that address the needs of both the Telecom and the Datacom industries. We engineered high- performance organic polymers that can be readily made into both multimode and single-mode optical waveguide structures of controlled numerical aperture and geometry. These materials are formed from highly-crosslinked acrylate monomers with specific linkages that determine properties such as flexibility, toughness, loss, and environmental stability. These monomers are intermiscible, providing for precise adjustment of the refractive index from 1.3 to 1.6. In polymer form, they exhibit state-of-the-art loss values, high thermal stability, high humidity resistance, low dispersion and low birefringence. Waveguides are formed photolithographically, with the liquid monomer mixture polymerizing upon illumination in the UV via either mask exposure or laser direct writing. A wide range of rigid and flexible substrates can be used, including glass, quartz, oxidized silicon, glass-filled epoxy printed circuit board substrate, and flexible polyimide film. Waveguiding structures measuring tens of inches in length can be produced on computer boards, and guides that are meters long can be printed on rolls of plastic. We describe the fabrication of both Bragg gratings and waveguide grating routes in our polymers for filtering and demultiplexing applications in Telecom WDM systems. In Datacom, we describe polymeric components that we produced for aerospace WDM sensor systems. The importance of CAD tools in designing WDM devices is emphasized in this work. We further discuss the low-cost manufacturing of WDM components in an industrial environment.

  6. Paleomagnetism, paleogeographic origins, and uplift history of the Coast Range ophiolite at Mount Diablo, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Jones, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    Divergent paleogeographic origins have been proposed for the Coast Range ophiolite of western California which are testable using paleomagnetic methods. Paleomagnetic data for Middle Jurassic pillow lavas and diabase sills of the Coast Range ophiolite at Mount Diablo, northern California, indicate that they contain two components of remanent magnetization. The characteristic directions have normal and reversed polarities and apparently are carried by Ti-poor magnetite. This magnetization is inferred to have been acquired during emplacement and seafloor alteration at an ancient spreading ridge. The paleolatitude calculated from its structurally corrected mean direction is 20??N ?? 9?? and agrees with the expected direction for stable North America; this result is also consistent with the concordant paleolatitude (32??N ?? 8??) recently determined for Upper Jurassic Coast Range ophiolite at Stanley Mountain in southern California. In addition, clockwise vertical axis rotation of Mount Diablo (143?? ?? 11??) is indicated by the characteristic magnetization direction. An overprint component is inferred to have been acquired during uplift of Mount Diablo since the Miocene.

  7. Blood component collection by apheresis.

    PubMed

    Burgstaler, Edwin A

    2006-07-01

    Apheresis component collection is a rapidly growing area in the blood collection field. Several instruments with varying capabilities are available. This is a brief review of the equipment available for granulocyte and apheresis component collection and indications for their use. In the United States, granulocytes are collected with the Fenwal CS3000, Fenwal CS3000 Plus, COBE (Gambro) Spectra, Haemonetics LN9000, and Fresenius AS 104. The use of hetastarch for sedimenting agent and stimulation with G-CSF and G-CSF plus dexamethasone have substantially increased granulocyte yields. Plateletapheresis is performed in the United States on the Fenwal CS3000, Fenwal CS3000 Plus, Fenwal Amicus, COBE (Gambro) Spectra, Gambro Trima Version 4, Gambro Trima Accel (Version 5), and Haemonetics LN9000. Automated red blood cell (RBC) collections are performed with the Haemonetics MCS+LN8150, Gambro Trima Version 4, Gambro Trima Accel (Version 5), Amicus, and Baxter Alyx. The RBC can be collected concurrently (with other components) in some instruments or separately in others. Plasma is collected concurrently on several instruments. Plasmapheresis for plasma only is performed on the Fenwal Autopheresis C and Haemonetics PCS2. Granulocyte yields range from 0.46 x 10(10) to 1.0 x 10(10) for unstimulated donors and 2.1 x 10(10) to 2.6 x 10(10) for donors stimulated with dexamethasone or prednisone. The use of G-CSF and G-CSF with dexamethasone has substantially increased granulocyte yields with yields of 4.1 x 10(10) to 10.8 x 10(10) reported. Platelet collection rates of 0.045-0.115 x 10(11) plt/min have been reported. Collection efficiencies of 46-85.7% have been reported. Automated (apheresis) component collection has the advantages of controlled volumes or doses of component, efficient use of the donor, multiple components from the same donor, better inventory control, and better quality control due to less manipulation of the individual components. Disadvantages of automated

  8. Range expansion of mutualists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Melanie J. I.; Korolev, Kirill S.; Murray, Andrew W.; Nelson, David R.

    2012-02-01

    The expansion of a species into new territory is often strongly influenced by the presence of other species. This effect is particularly striking for the case of mutualistic species that enhance each other's proliferation. Examples range from major events in evolutionary history, such as the spread and diversification of flowering plants due to their mutualism with pollen-dispersing insects, to modern examples like the surface colonisation of multi-species microbial biofilms. Here, we investigate the spread of cross-feeding strains of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae on an agar surface as a model system for expanding mutualists. Depending on the degree of mutualism, the two strains form distinctive spatial patterns during their range expansion. This change in spatial patterns can be understood as a phase transition within a stepping stone model generalized to two mutualistic species.

  9. Long Range Materials Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-31

    India, also called bulat steels, are known to have high carbon contents, commonly 1.5 to 2.0% carbon. The high quality of these steels is well...gamma-cementite range, essentially all of the cementite is converted to the spheroidized form. However, during transformation...plus additional cementite In non-spheroldlzed form, typically l>iates. As set forth above, It is Important that essentially

  10. Light beam range finder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    A "laser tape measure" for measuring distance which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%.

  11. Light beam range finder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-06-16

    A ``laser tape measure`` for measuring distance is disclosed which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%. 7 figs.

  12. Long range chromatin organization

    PubMed Central

    Acuña, Luciana I Gómez; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2014-01-01

    Splicing is a predominantly co-transcriptional process that has been shown to be tightly coupled to transcription. Chromatin structure is a key factor that mediates this functional coupling. In light of recent evidence that shows the importance of higher order chromatin organization in the coordination and regulation of gene expression, we discuss here the possible roles of long-range chromatin organization in splicing and alternative splicing regulation. PMID:25764333

  13. Photometric Passive Range Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argueta-Diaz, Victor; García-Valenzuela, Augusto

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we present a passive optical ranging method that consists of taking several photometric measurements from the light radiated by an object and deriving the range from these measurements. This passive ranging device uses an iris of radius a, a lens of radius larger than a, and a photodetector of radius p

  14. Front Range Report, Abstracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, William

    The second regional conference of the Front Range Branch, AGU, was attended by more than 80 professionals and some 20 outstanding high school students. The conference included 2 days of interdisciplinary talks, and lots of discussion, that primarily were keyed to geophysical studies of Colorado, Wyoming, and New Mexico. Other talks reported on nonregional, and sometimes global, studies being done by geophypsicists of the Front Range region.Topics included tectonics of the Front Range and the Colorado Plateau, pollution of the Arkansas and Mississippi rivers, and a supreme polluting event that caused the late-Cretaceous extinctions. Other notable talks were on toxic cleanup, microburst (wind shear) detection at U.S. airports, and other meteorological studies. Several talks treated the audience to the excitement of new work and surprise discoveries. The meeting was multimedia, including the playing of two videos through a projection TV and the playing of a fascinating tape between an airport control tower and incoming pilots during a severe microburst event.

  15. The contribution of the diffuse light component to the topographic effect on remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justice, C.; Holben, B.

    1980-01-01

    The topographic effect is measured by the difference between the global radiance from inclined surfaces as a function of their orientation relative to the sensor position and light source. The short wave radiant energy incident on a surface is composed of direct sunlight, scattered skylight, and light reflected from surrounding terrain. The latter two components are commonly known as the diffuse component. The contribution of the diffuse light component to the topographic effect was examined and the significance of this diffuse component with respect to two direct radiance models was assessed. Diffuse and global spectral radiances were measured for a series of slopes and aspects of a uniform and surface in the red and photographic infrared parts of the spectrum, using a nadir pointing two channel handheld radiometer. The diffuse light was found to produce a topographic effect which varied from the topographic effect for direct light. The topographic effect caused by diffuse light was found to increase slightly with solar elevation and wavelength for the channels examined. The correlations between data derived from two simple direct radiance simulation models and the field data were not significantly affected when the diffuse component was removed from the radiances. Radiances from a 60 percent reflective surface, assuming no atmospheric path radiance, the diffuse light topographic effect contributed a maximum range of 3 pixel values in simulated LANDSAT data from all aspects with slopes up to 30 degrees.

  16. Direct Manufacture of Components with Local Control of Composition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    sources onto photosensitive materials such as dichromated gelatin and iron-doped lithium niobate. The size and depth of the grating are generally limited...with silica and the availability of the aqueous salt solution of the dopant. Titania and alumina with their salt solutions of titanium(IV) bis( ammonium

  17. Directing 101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pintoff, Ernest

    Providing an introduction to anyone considering directing as a field of study or career, this book takes a broad look at the process of directing and encourages students and professionals alike to look outside of the movie industry for inspiration. Chapters in the book discuss selecting and acquiring material; budgeting and financing; casting and…

  18. The 1990 direct support infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The airport and cargo terminal were individually analyzed in depth as the principal direct infrastructure components having cross impacts with aircraft carrying cargo. Containerization was also addressed in depth as an infrastructure component since it categorically is linked with and cross impacted by the aircraft, the cargo terminal, the surface transport system, the shipper and consignee, and the actual cargo being moved.

  19. Psychological Component of Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  20. Direct effects protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Protection of an aircraft and each of its various systems against the direct effects of lightning were analyzed. Components located in different sections of the aircraft were individually examined since they are likely to experience different degrees of susceptibility to lightning, and may be vulnerable to different components of the lightning flash. The basic steps to be followed in establishing lightning protection were presented by discussing the varieties of arc entry and current flow-through damage. The lightning-strike zones and lightning current environments are established, since environmental conditions in the zones are those under which specific protective measures must perform. Airworthiness regulations which apply to lightning protection are cited.

  1. Laser Range Camera Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Storjohann, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes an imaging model that was derived for use with a laser range camera (LRC) developed by the Advanced Intelligent Machines Division of Odetics. However, this model could be applied to any comparable imaging system. Both the derivation of the model and the determination of the LRC's intrinsic parameters are explained. For the purpose of evaluating the LRC's extrinsic parameters, i.e., its external orientation, a transformation of the LRC's imaging model into a standard camera's (SC) pinhole model is derived. By virtue of this transformation, the evaluation of the LRC's external orientation can be found by applying any SC calibration technique.

  2. MiniAERCam Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talley, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Johnson Space Center (JSC) is designing a small, remotely controlled vehicle that will carry two color and one black and white video cameras in space. The device will launch and retrieve from the Space Vehicle and be used for remote viewing. Off the shelf cellular technology is being used as the basis for communication system design. Existing plans include using multiple antennas to make simultaneous estimates of the azimuth of the MiniAERCam from several sites on the Space Station and use triangulation to find the location of the device. Adding range detection capability to each of the nodes on the Space Vehicle would allow an estimate of the location of the MiniAERCam to be made at each Communication And Telemetry Box (CATBox) independent of all the other communication nodes. This project will investigate the techniques used by the Global Positioning System (GPS) to achieve accurate positioning information and adapt those strategies that are appropriate to the design of the CATBox range determination system.

  3. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). It is managed by the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) to provide the right facility at the right time. NASA is a tenant on Edwards Air Force Base and has an agreement with the Air Force Flight Test Center to use the land and airspace controlled by the Department of Defense (DoD). The topics include: 1) The WATR supports a variety of vehicles; 2) Dryden shares airspace with the AFFTC; 3) Restricted airspace, corridors, and special use areas are available for experimental aircraft; 4) WATR Products and Services; 5) WATR Support Configuration; 6) Telemetry Tracking; 7) Time Space Positioning; 8) Video; 9) Voice Communication; 10) Mobile Operations Facilities; 11) Data Processing; 12) Mission Control Center; 13) Real-Time Data Analysis; and 14) Range Safety.

  4. Tropospheric range error parameters: Further studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopfield, H. S.

    1972-01-01

    Improved parameters are presented for predicting the tropospheric effect on electromagnetic range measurements from surface meteorological data. Parameters are given for computing the dry component of the zenith radio range effect from surface pressure alone with an rms error of 1 to 2 mm, or the total range effect from the dry and wet components of the surface refractivity, N, and a two-part quartic profile model. The parameters were obtained from meteorological balloon data with improved procedures, including the conversion of the geopotential heights of the balloon data to actual or geometric heights before using the data. The revised values of the parameter k show more latitude variation than is accounted for by the variation of g. This excess variation of k indicates a small latitude variation in the mean molecular weight of air and yields information about the latitude-varying water vapor content of air.

  5. Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Takane, Yoshio

    2004-01-01

    We propose an alternative method to partial least squares for path analysis with components, called generalized structured component analysis. The proposed method replaces factors by exact linear combinations of observed variables. It employs a well-defined least squares criterion to estimate model parameters. As a result, the proposed method…

  6. The elusive third component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, J. F.

    The historical development of techniques for measuring three velocity components using laser velocimetry is presented. The techniques are described and their relative merits presented. Many of the approaches currently in use based on the fringe laser velocimeter have yielded inaccurate measurements of turbulence intensity in the on-axis component. A possible explanation for these inaccuracies is presented along with simulation results.

  7. The Elusive Third Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.

    2004-01-01

    The historical development of techniques for measuring three velocity components using laser velocimetry is presented. The techniques are described and their relative merits presented. Many of the approaches currently in use based on the fringe laser velocimeter have yielded inaccurate measurements of turbulence intensity in the on-axis component. A possible explanation for these inaccuracies is presented along with simulation results.

  8. Design of Critical Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2001-01-01

    Critical component design is based on minimizing product failures that results in loss of life. Potential catastrophic failures are reduced to secondary failures where components removed for cause or operating time in the system. Issues of liability and cost of component removal become of paramount importance. Deterministic design with factors of safety and probabilistic design address but lack the essential characteristics for the design of critical components. In deterministic design and fabrication there are heuristic rules and safety factors developed over time for large sets of structural/material components. These factors did not come without cost. Many designs failed and many rules (codes) have standing committees to oversee their proper usage and enforcement. In probabilistic design, not only are failures a given, the failures are calculated; an element of risk is assumed based on empirical failure data for large classes of component operations. Failure of a class of components can be predicted, yet one can not predict when a specific component will fail. The analogy is to the life insurance industry where very careful statistics are book-kept on classes of individuals. For a specific class, life span can be predicted within statistical limits, yet life-span of a specific element of that class can not be predicted.

  9. Range imaging laser radar

    DOEpatents

    Scott, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typically sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream. 2 figs.

  10. Range imaging laser radar

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Marion W.

    1990-01-01

    A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typicy sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream.

  11. Method for directional hydraulic fracturing

    DOEpatents

    Swanson, David E.; Daly, Daniel W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for directional hydraulic fracturing using borehole seals to confine pressurized fluid in planar permeable regions, comprising: placing a sealant in the hole of a structure selected from geologic or cemented formations to fill the space between a permeable planar component and the geologic or cemented formation in the vicinity of the permeable planar component; making a hydraulic connection between the permeable planar component and a pump; permitting the sealant to cure and thereby provide both mechanical and hydraulic confinement to the permeable planar component; and pumping a fluid from the pump into the permeable planar component to internally pressurize the permeable planar component to initiate a fracture in the formation, the fracture being disposed in the same orientation as the permeable planar component.

  12. Paleomagnetism of Jurassic radiolarian chert above the Coast Range ophiolite at Stanley Mountain, California, and implications for its paleogeographic origins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Murchey, B.L.

    1996-01-01

    Upper Jurassic red tuffaceous chert above the Coast Range ophiolite at Stanley Mountain, California (lat 35??N, long 240??E), contains three components of remanent magnetization. The first component (A; removed by ???100-???200 ??C) has a direction near the present-day field for southern California and is probably a recently acquired thermoviscous magnetization. A second component (B; removed between ???100 and ???600 ??C) is identical to that observed by previous workers in samples of underlying pillow basalt and overlying terrigenous sedimentary rocks. This component has constant normal polarity and direction throughout the entire section, although these rocks were deposited during a mixed polarity interval of the geomagnetic field. The B magnetization, therefore, is inferred to be a secondary magnetization acquired during accretion, uplift, or Miocene volcanism prior to regional clockwise rotation. The highest temperature component (C; removed between ???480 and 680 ??C) is of dual polarity and is tentatively interpreted as a primary magnetization, although it fails a reversal test possibly due to contamination by B. Separation of the B and C components is best shown by samples with negative-inclination C directions, and a corrected mean direction using only these samples indicates an initial paleolatitude of 32??N ?? 8??. Paleobiogeographic models relating radiolarian faunal distribution patterns to paleolatitude have apparently been incorrectly calibrated using the overprint B component. Few other paleomagnetic data have been incorporated in these models, and faunal distribution patterns are poorly known and mostly unqualified. The available data, therefore, do not support formation of the Coast Range ophiolite at Stanley Mountain near the paleoequator or accretion at ???10??N paleolatitude, as has been previously suggested based on paleomagnetic data, but indicate deposition near expected paleolatitudes for North America (35??N ?? 4??) during Late Jurassic

  13. Directionality of dog vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frommolt, Karl-Heinz; Gebler, Alban

    2004-07-01

    The directionality patterns of sound emission in domestic dogs were measured in an anechoic environment using a microphone array. Mainly long-distance signals from four dogs were investigated. The radiation pattern of the signals differed clearly from an omnidirectional one with average differences in sound-pressure level between the frontal and rear position of 3-7 dB depending from the individual. Frequency dependence of directionality was shown for the range from 250 to 3200 Hz. The results indicate that when studying acoustic communication in mammals, more attention should be paid to the directionality pattern of sound emission.

  14. To ~P or Not to ~P? Non-canonical activation by two-component response regulators

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Stuti K.; Kenney, Linda J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacteria sense and respond to their environment through the use of two-component regulatory systems. The ability to adapt to a wide range of environmental stresses is directly related to the number of two-component systems an organism possesses. Recent advances in this area have identified numerous variations on the archetype systems that employ a sensor kinase and a response regulator. It is now evident that many orphan regulators that lack cognate kinases do not rely on phosphorylation for activation and new roles for unphosphorylated response regulators have been identified. The significance of recent findings and suggestions for further research are discussed. PMID:27656860

  15. GCS component development cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Jose A.; Macias, Rosa; Molgo, Jordi; Guerra, Dailos; Pi, Marti

    2012-09-01

    The GTC1 is an optical-infrared 10-meter segmented mirror telescope at the ORM observatory in Canary Islands (Spain). First light was at 13/07/2007 and since them it is in the operation phase. The GTC control system (GCS) is a distributed object & component oriented system based on RT-CORBA8 and it is responsible for the management and operation of the telescope, including its instrumentation. GCS has used the Rational Unified process (RUP9) in its development. RUP is an iterative software development process framework. After analysing (use cases) and designing (UML10) any of GCS subsystems, an initial component description of its interface is obtained and from that information a component specification is written. In order to improve the code productivity, GCS has adopted the code generation to transform this component specification into the skeleton of component classes based on a software framework, called Device Component Framework. Using the GCS development tools, based on javadoc and gcc, in only one step, the component is generated, compiled and deployed to be tested for the first time through our GUI inspector. The main advantages of this approach are the following: It reduces the learning curve of new developers and the development error rate, allows a systematic use of design patterns in the development and software reuse, speeds up the deliverables of the software product and massively increase the timescale, design consistency and design quality, and eliminates the future refactoring process required for the code.

  16. The design of ultrasonic range finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Yongyi

    2017-03-01

    Electronic rangefinder measurement scope in 0.10˜5.00 m, 1 cm measurement precision, measurement with no direct contact with the object to be tested, able to display measurement results clear and stable. Because ultrasonic directivity is strong, energy consumption is slow, in the medium transmission distance is farther, so ultrasonic often used for distance measurement, such as range finder and level measurement instrument can be done by ultrasound.

  17. Bi-Directional DC-DC Converter for PHEV Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Abas Goodarzi

    2011-01-31

    Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV) require high power density energy storage system (ESS) for hybrid operation and high energy density ESS for Electric Vehicle (EV) mode range. However, ESS technologies to maximize power density and energy density simultaneously are not commercially feasible. The use of bi-directional DC-DC converter allows use of multiple energy storage, and the flexible DC-link voltages can enhance the system efficiency and reduce component sizing. This will improve fuel consumption, increase the EV mode range, reduce the total weight, reduce battery initial and life cycle cost, and provide flexibility in system design.

  18. Component-specific modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the second year effort of a 3-year program to develop methodology for component specific modeling of aircraft engine hot section components (turbine blades, turbine vanes, and burner liners). These accomplishments include: (1) engine thermodynamic and mission models; (2) geometry model generators; (3) remeshing; (4) specialty 3-D inelastic stuctural analysis; (5) computationally efficient solvers, (6) adaptive solution strategies; (7) engine performance parameters/component response variables decomposition and synthesis; (8) integrated software architecture and development, and (9) validation cases for software developed.

  19. Ceramic component for electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.

    1979-01-01

    A ceramic component suitable for preparing MHD generator electrodes consists of HfO.sub.2 and sufficient Tb.sub.4 O.sub.7 to stabilize at least 60 volume percent of the HfO.sub.2 into the cubic structure. The ceramic component may also contain a small amount of PrO.sub.2, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 or a mixture of both to improve stability and electronic conductivity of the electrode. The component is highly resistant to corrosion by molten potassium seed and molten coal slag in the MHD fluid and exhibits both ionic and electronic conductivity.

  20. Evaluating Performance of Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Daniel; Tisdale, Edwin; Norton, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Parallel Component Performance Benchmarks is a computer program developed to aid the evaluation of the Common Component Architecture (CCA) - a software architecture, based on a component model, that was conceived to foster high-performance computing, including parallel computing. More specifically, this program compares the performances (principally by measuring computing times) of componentized versus conventional versions of the Parallel Pyramid 2D Adaptive Mesh Refinement library - a software library that is used to generate computational meshes for solving physical problems and that is typical of software libraries in use at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  1. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Manglos, Stephen H.

    1989-06-06

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

  2. Decontamination of large components-test case

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, A.; Bosco, B.

    1996-12-31

    The rising per-cubic-foot burial costs, together with the trend toward standardized above-ground burial sites, provides the basis for seeking an alternative to direct burial of large components. Large contaminated components such as steam generators can be safely dismantled and decontaminated for free release, metals recycle, and volume reduction. This grand-scale disposal technology will prove to be an economical and ecological alternative to direct burial or interim storage. Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) in Bolton, operators and decommissioners of the Yankee Nuclear Power Station in Rowe, Massachusetts, has teamed with Frank W Hake Associates in Memphis, TN, to decontaminate a large component as a test case. The large component is YAEC`s reactor pressure vessel head (RPVH). The 79 100 lb RPVH is surface contaminated with 0.7 Ci (1500 mR/h contact) resulting from 32 yr of operating in a 2000 psi, 530{degrees}F pressurized water reactor environment.

  3. Multiple rate digital command detection system with range clean-up capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, J. R.; Butman, S. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A multi-rate digital command system is disclosed which uses the composite signal of a mu-type ranging system as a subcarrier to transmit range codes and data from a station to a receiver where the range codes are sequentially phase modulated on a subcarrier of frequency by one of its own subharmonics and data is phase modulated on a selected ranging component. A range cleanup loop in a spacecraft locks the phase of a locally generated reference component to a received ranging component and retransmits the component to a ground station. When the inverse phase of a ranging component is received and detected, the cleanup loop is modified to demodulate phase modulated command symbols while continuing tracking the same ranging component. The command symbol rate is coherently related to the ranging signal component bit rate.

  4. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  5. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons and methods for making such materials. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  6. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  7. Component Fixturing Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kling, Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An end-configuration of components to be moved or positioned is first obtained. This end-configuration determines the relative positioning and orientation of the components with respect to each other when in a final, desired configuration. A folding pattern is then obtained that is formed by interior vertices defining corresponding tessellation facets. The folding pattern can be induced to transition from a first folded configuration to a second folded configuration. When in the second folded configuration mounting facets, which are a subset of the tessellation facets, are arranged by the geometry of the folding pattern into positions and orientations with respect to each other that correspond to the end-configuration of the components. A foldable structure is then obtained that folds in accordance with the folding pattern, and the components are affixed to their respective mounting facets.

  8. Household Health Costs: Direct, Indirect and Intangible

    PubMed Central

    YOUSEFI, Mehdi; ASSARI ARANI, Abbas; SAHABI, Bahram; KAZEMNEJAD, Anoshirvan; FAZAELI, Somayeh

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background This study aimed at identifying components of the household health costs. Methods This study was a qualitative research conducted in two main phases. The first phase consisted of interviews with sample households selected in eight provinces of Iran. They were to identify components of the household health costs. In the second phase, components were determined as direct, indirect and intangible based on a content analysis. Results In the first phase of the study, 93 components of households’ health costs were identified. According to the content analysis, 44 components were categorized as direct costs, 10 components were indirect and 39 components were categorized as intangible. Conclusion All components of households’ health costs including: direct, indirect and intangible costs, should be considered in the planning and policy-making in the health system. PMID:26060744

  9. Develop a Model Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ensey, Tyler S.

    2013-01-01

    During my internship at NASA, I was a model developer for Ground Support Equipment (GSE). The purpose of a model developer is to develop and unit test model component libraries (fluid, electrical, gas, etc.). The models are designed to simulate software for GSE (Ground Special Power, Crew Access Arm, Cryo, Fire and Leak Detection System, Environmental Control System (ECS), etc. .) before they are implemented into hardware. These models support verifying local control and remote software for End-Item Software Under Test (SUT). The model simulates the physical behavior (function, state, limits and 110) of each end-item and it's dependencies as defined in the Subsystem Interface Table, Software Requirements & Design Specification (SRDS), Ground Integrated Schematic (GIS), and System Mechanical Schematic.(SMS). The software of each specific model component is simulated through MATLAB's Simulink program. The intensiv model development life cycle is a.s follows: Identify source documents; identify model scope; update schedule; preliminary design review; develop model requirements; update model.. scope; update schedule; detailed design review; create/modify library component; implement library components reference; implement subsystem components; develop a test script; run the test script; develop users guide; send model out for peer review; the model is sent out for verifictionlvalidation; if there is empirical data, a validation data package is generated; if there is not empirical data, a verification package is generated; the test results are then reviewed; and finally, the user. requests accreditation, and a statement of accreditation is prepared. Once each component model is reviewed and approved, they are intertwined together into one integrated model. This integrated model is then tested itself, through a test script and autotest, so that it can be concluded that all models work conjointly, for a single purpose. The component I was assigned, specifically, was a

  10. Tracking Honey Bees Using LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) Technology

    SciTech Connect

    BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; RODACY, PHILIP J.; SCHMITT, RANDAL L.; HARGIS JR., PHILIP J.; JOHNSON, MARK S.; KLARKOWSKI, JAMES R.; MAGEE, GLEN I.; BENDER, GARY LEE

    2003-01-01

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has recognized that biological and chemical toxins are a real and growing threat to troops, civilians, and the ecosystem. The Explosives Components Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been working with the University of Montana, the Southwest Research Institute, and other agencies to evaluate the feasibility of directing honeybees to specific targets, and for environmental sampling of biological and chemical ''agents of harm''. Recent work has focused on finding and locating buried landmines and unexploded ordnance (UXO). Tests have demonstrated that honeybees can be trained to efficiently and accurately locate explosive signatures in the environment. However, it is difficult to visually track the bees and determine precisely where the targets are located. Video equipment is not practical due to its limited resolution and range. In addition, it is often unsafe to install such equipment in a field. A technology is needed to provide investigators with the standoff capability to track bees and accurately map the location of the suspected targets. This report documents Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) tests that were performed by SNL. These tests have shown that a LIDAR system can be used to track honeybees. The LIDAR system can provide both the range and coordinates of the target so that the location of buried munitions can be accurately mapped for subsequent removal.

  11. Direct Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of Direct Instruction, an intensive instructional method for grades K-6 based on the theory that learning can be greatly accelerated if instructional presentations are clear, rule out likely misinterpretations and facilitate generalizations. Over 50 instructional programs have been developed based on this…

  12. Suppression of range sidelobes in bistatic radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCue, J. J. G.

    1980-03-01

    A bistatic radar is considered in which linear-FM pulses are employed to obtain the needed range resolution while using a long pulse. Range sidelobes of the pulse received over the direct path from the transmitter tend to interfere with the return from the target. It is shown that conventional weighting schemes give little or no suppression of some of the range sidelobes of a linear-FM rectangular pulse passed through a matched filter. This is explained by the irregular spacing of the sidelobes in the pulse when it passes through the matched filter.

  13. Feasibility of producing a range of food products from a limited range of undifferenitiated major food components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karel, M.; Kamarei, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    This report reviews current knowledge associated with producing safe, nutritious, and acceptable foods from a limited number of source independent macronutrients. The advantages, and disadvantages, of such an approach for use by space crews are discussed. The production of macronutrients from a variety of sources is covered in detail. The sources analyzed are: wheat, soybeans, algae (3 genera), glycerol, and digested cellulose. Fabrication of food from the above macronutrient sources is discussed and particular attention is addressed to nutrition, acceptability and reliability. The processes and concepts involved in food fabrication and macronutrient production are also considered for utilization in a space environment.

  14. Rate of change of the Quincy-Monument Peak baseline from a translocation analysis of Lageos laser range data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolz, A.; Bender, P. L.; Vincent, M. A.; Eanes, R. J.; Watkins, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Translocation studies of Lageos laser range data from Quincy and Monument Peak in California observed during 1984-1987 suggest that plate tectonic motion across the San Andreas fault system in the direction of the baseline between the two stations is uniform at a rate of -30(+ or - 3) mm/yr. Changes in the components of the baseline vector were inferred from repeat determinations using the solutions from successive 0.5-year intervals. The changes in the vertical and transverse components of the Quincy-Monument Peak baseline are -0.4(+ or - 5) mm/yr and +14(+ or -5) mm/yr, respectively. The vertical component determinations attest to the height stability of the laser ranging method. Lageos measurements made from Quincy and Monument Peak before 1984 are inaccurate enough to limit their usefulness for plate tectonic studies.

  15. Rate of change of the Quincy-Monument Peak baseline from a translocation analysis of Lageos laser range data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, A.; Bender, P. L.; Vincent, M. A.; Eanes, R. J.; Watkins, M. M.

    1989-06-01

    Translocation studies of Lageos laser range data from Quincy and Monument Peak in California observed during 1984-1987 suggest that plate tectonic motion across the San Andreas fault system in the direction of the baseline between the two stations is uniform at a rate of -30(+ or - 3) mm/yr. Changes in the components of the baseline vector were inferred from repeat determinations using the solutions from successive 0.5-year intervals. The changes in the vertical and transverse components of the Quincy-Monument Peak baseline are -0.4(+ or - 5) mm/yr and +14(+ or -5) mm/yr, respectively. The vertical component determinations attest to the height stability of the laser ranging method. Lageos measurements made from Quincy and Monument Peak before 1984 are inaccurate enough to limit their usefulness for plate tectonic studies.

  16. Rate of change of the Quincy-Monument Peak baseline from a translocation analysis of LAGEOS laser range data

    SciTech Connect

    Stolz, A.; Vincent, M.A.; Bender, P.L. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO ); Eanes, R.J.; Watkins, M.M.; Tapley, B.D. )

    1989-06-01

    Translocation studies of LAGEOS laser range data from Quincy and Monument Peak in California observed during 1984-1987 suggest that plate tectonic motion across the San Andreas fault system in the direction of the baseline between the two stations is uniform at a rate of {minus}30({plus minus}3) mm/a. Changes in the components of the baseline vector were inferred from repeat determinations using the solutions from successive 0.5-year intervals. The changes in the vertical and transverse components of the Quincy-Monument Peak baseline are {minus}0.4({plus minus}5) mm/a and +14({plus minus}5) mm/a respectively. The vertical component determinations attest to the height stability of the laser ranging method. LAGEOS measurements made from Quincy and Monument Peak before 1984 are inaccurate enough to limit their usefulness for plate tectonic studies.

  17. Emotional stability components of human performance problems

    SciTech Connect

    Wexler, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Over half of all significant events that occur in nuclear plants involve human performance problems. There is increasing worldwide recognition that human performance problems have a significant impact on the safety, cost, and efficiency of nuclear plant operations. Emotional stability components have an important direct and indirect impact on human performance problems. This paper examines emotional stability components that are currently incorporated into human performance evaluation systems (HPES) in nuclear plants. It describes HPES programs being developed around the world, the emotional stability components that are currently referred to in these programs, and suggestions for improving HPES programs through a greater understanding of emotion stability components. A review of emotional stability components that may hinder or promote a plant environment that encourages the voluntary reporting and correction of human error is also presented.

  18. Depleted Uranium Test Range Fragment Reclamation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    fragment drying was necessary in order to obtain adequate vacuum levels in the VIR furnaces . e. Vacuujm Induction Remelting Fragments and Casting...Acid Pickle and Water Rinse .... ........ 2 d. Drying the Fragments .... ............... 2 e. Vacuum Induction Remelting Fragments and Casting...feasibility of reclaiming test range fragments by vacuum induction remelting (VIR). The technical direction of Phase 11 was highly dependent upon the

  19. Wide temperature range seal for demountable joints

    DOEpatents

    Sixsmith, Herbert; Valenzuela, Javier A.; Nutt, William E.

    1991-07-23

    The present invention is directed to a seal for demountable joints operating over a wide temperature range down to liquid helium temperatures. The seal has anti-extrusion guards which prevent extrusion of the soft ductile sealant material, which may be indium or an alloy thereof.

  20. Wide temperature range seal for demountable joints

    DOEpatents

    Sixsmith, H.; Valenzuela, J.A.; Nutt, W.E.

    1991-07-23

    The present invention is directed to a seal for demountable joints operating over a wide temperature range down to liquid helium temperatures. The seal has anti-extrusion guards which prevent extrusion of the soft ductile sealant material, which may be indium or an alloy thereof. 6 figures.

  1. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOEpatents

    Burnside, Walter D.; Rudduck, Roger C.; Yu, Jiunn S.

    1988-01-01

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  2. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOEpatents

    Burnside, Walter D.; Rudduck, Roger C.; Yu, Jiunn S.

    1988-08-02

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  3. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOEpatents

    Burnside, W.D.; Rudduck, R.C.; Yu, J.S.

    1987-02-27

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector. 2 figs.

  4. RDCDS Meteorologoical Component Quick Installation Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.

    2007-11-20

    This guide provides step-by-step instructions for the deployment of one of the Rapidly Deployable Chemical Defense System (RDCDS) weather stations and central control system. Instructions for the deployment and operation of the Atmospheric Systems Corporation miniSODAR™ (SOnic Detection and Ranging) can be found in accompanying manuals developed by Atmospheric Systems Corporation. A detailed description of the system and its components can be found in the manual entitled Description of the RDCDS Meteorological Component.

  5. Encyclopedia of software components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanwarren, Lloyd (Inventor); Beckman, Brian C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Intelligent browsing through a collection of reusable software components is facilitated with a computer having a video monitor and a user input interface such as a keyboard or a mouse for transmitting user selections, by presenting a picture of encyclopedia volumes with respective visible labels referring to types of software, in accordance with a metaphor in which each volume includes a page having a list of general topics under the software type of the volume and pages having lists of software components for each one of the generic topics, altering the picture to open one of the volumes in response to an initial user selection specifying the one volume to display on the monitor a picture of the page thereof having the list of general topics and altering the picture to display the page thereof having a list of software components under one of the general topics in response to a next user selection specifying the one general topic, and then presenting a picture of a set of different informative plates depicting different types of information about one of the software components in response to a further user selection specifying the one component.

  6. Encyclopedia of Software Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Lloyd V. (Inventor); Beckman, Brian C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Intelligent browsing through a collection of reusable software components is facilitated with a computer having a video monitor and a user input interface such as a keyboard or a mouse for transmitting user selections, by presenting a picture of encyclopedia volumes with respective visible labels referring to types of software, in accordance with a metaphor in which each volume includes a page having a list of general topics under the software type of the volume and pages having lists of software components for each one of the generic topics, altering the picture to open one of the volumes in response to an initial user selection specifying the one volume to display on the monitor a picture of the page thereof having the list of general topics and altering the picture to display the page thereof having a list of software components under one of the general topics in response to a next user selection specifying the one general topic, and then presenting a picture of a set of different informative plates depicting different types of information about one of the software components in response to a further user selection specifying the one component.

  7. Scientific Component Technology Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S; Bosl, B; Dahlgren, T; Kumfert, G; Smith, S

    2003-02-07

    The laboratory has invested a significant amount of resources towards the development of high-performance scientific simulation software, including numerical libraries, visualization, steering, software frameworks, and physics packages. Unfortunately, because this software was not designed for interoperability and re-use, it is often difficult to share these sophisticated software packages among applications due to differences in implementation language, programming style, or calling interfaces. This LDRD Strategic Initiative investigated and developed software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address problems of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology is an extension of scripting and object-oriented software development techniques that specifically focuses on the needs of software interoperability. Component approaches based on CORBA, COM, and Java technologies are widely used in industry; however, they do not support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. Our research focused on the unique requirements of scientific computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections among components, language interoperability for scientific languages, and data distribution support for massively parallel SPMD components.

  8. Expansion-based passive ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1993-01-01

    A new technique of passive ranging which is based on utilizing the image-plane expansion experienced by every object as its distance from the sensor decreases is described. This technique belongs in the feature/object-based family. The motion and shape of a small window, assumed to be fully contained inside the boundaries of some object, is approximated by an affine transformation. The parameters of the transformation matrix are derived by initially comparing successive images, and progressively increasing the image time separation so as to achieve much larger triangulation baseline than currently possible. Depth is directly derived from the expansion part of the transformation. To a first approximation, image-plane expansion is independent of image-plane location with respect to the focus of expansion (FOE) and of platform maneuvers. Thus, an expansion-based method has the potential of providing a reliable range in the difficult image area around the FOE. In areas far from the FOE the shift parameters of the affine transformation can provide more accurate depth information than the expansion alone, and can thus be used similarly to the way they were used in conjunction with the Inertial Navigation Unit (INU) and Kalman filtering. However, the performance of a shift-based algorithm, when the shifts are derived from the affine transformation, would be much improved compared to current algorithms because the shifts - as well as the other parameters - can be obtained between widely separated images. Thus, the main advantage of this new approach is that, allowing the tracked window to expand and rotate, in addition to moving laterally, enables one to correlate images over a very long time span which, in turn, translates into a large spatial baseline - resulting in a proportionately higher depth accuracy.

  9. Expansion-based passive ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique of passive ranging which is based on utilizing the image-plane expansion experienced by every object as its distance from the sensor decreases. This technique belongs in the feature/object-based family. The motion and shape of a small window, assumed to be fully contained inside the boundaries of some object, is approximated by an affine transformation. The parameters of the transformation matrix are derived by initially comparing successive images, and progressively increasing the image time separation so as to achieve much larger triangulation baseline than currently possible. Depth is directly derived from the expansion part of the transformation. To a first approximation, image-plane expansion is independent of image-plane location with respect to the focus of expansion (FOE) and of platform maneuvers. Thus, an expansion-based method has the potential of providing a reliable range in the difficult image area around the FOE. In areas far from the FOE the shift parameters of the affine transformation can provide more accurate depth information than the expansion alone, and can thus be used similarly to the way they have been used in conjunction with the Inertial Navigation Unit (INU) and Kalman filtering. However, the performance of a shift-based algorithm, when the shifts are derived from the affine transformation, would be much improved compared to current algorithms because the shifts--as well as the other parameters--can be obtained between widely separated images. Thus, the main advantage of this new approach is that, allowing the tracked window to expand and rotate, in addition to moving laterally, enables one to correlate images over a very long time span which, in turn, translates into a large spatial baseline resulting in a proportionately higher depth accuracy.

  10. Component costs of foodborne illness: a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Governments require high-quality scientific evidence to prioritize resource allocation and the cost-of-illness (COI) methodology is one technique used to estimate the economic burden of a disease. However, variable cost inventories make it difficult to interpret and compare costs across multiple studies. Methods A scoping review was conducted to identify the component costs and the respective data sources used for estimating the cost of foodborne illnesses in a population. This review was accomplished by: (1) identifying the research question and relevant literature, (2) selecting the literature, (3) charting, collating, and summarizing the results. All pertinent data were extracted at the level of detail reported in a study, and the component cost and source data were subsequently grouped into themes. Results Eighty-four studies were identified that described the cost of foodborne illness in humans. Most studies (80%) were published in the last two decades (1992–2012) in North America and Europe. The 10 most frequently estimated costs were due to illnesses caused by bacterial foodborne pathogens, with non-typhoidal Salmonella spp. being the most commonly studied. Forty studies described both individual (direct and indirect) and societal level costs. The direct individual level component costs most often included were hospital services, physician personnel, and drug costs. The most commonly reported indirect individual level component cost was productivity losses due to sick leave from work. Prior estimates published in the literature were the most commonly used source of component cost data. Data sources were not provided or specifically linked to component costs in several studies. Conclusions The results illustrated a highly variable depth and breadth of individual and societal level component costs, and a wide range of data sources being used. This scoping review can be used as evidence that there is a lack of standardization in cost inventories in

  11. Growth directions of microstructures in directional solidification of crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, J; Georgelin, M; Pocheau, A

    2008-07-01

    In directional solidification, as the solidification velocity increases, the growth direction of cells or dendrites rotates from the direction of the thermal gradient to that of a preferred cristalline orientation. Meanwhile, their morphology varies with important implications for microsegregation. Here, we experimentally document the growth directions of these microstructures in a succinonitrile alloy in the whole accessible range of directions, velocities, and spacings. For this, we use a thin sample made of a single crystal on which the direction of the thermal gradient can be changed. This allows a fine monitoring of the misorientation angle between thermal gradient and preferred crystalline orientation. Data analysis shows evidence of an internal symmetry which traces back to a scale invariance of growth directions with respect to a Péclet number. This enables the identification of the relationship between growth directions and relevant variables, in fair agreement with experiment. Noticeable variations of growth directions with misorientation angles are evidenced and linked to a single parameter.

  12. Direct ELISA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Alice V

    2015-01-01

    First described by Engvall and Perlmann, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is a rapid and sensitive method for detection and quantitation of an antigen using an enzyme-labeled antibody. Besides routine laboratory usage, ELISA has been utilized in medical field and food industry as diagnostic and quality control tools. Traditionally performed in 96-well or 384-well polystyrene plates, the technology has expanded to other platforms with increase in automation. Depending on the antigen epitope and availability of specific antibody, there are variations in ELISA setup. The four basic formats are direct, indirect, sandwich, and competitive ELISAs. Direct ELISA is the simplest format requiring an antigen and an enzyme-conjugated antibody specific to the antigen. This chapter describes the individual steps for detection of a plate-bound antigen using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated antibody and luminol-based enhanced chemiluminescence (ECL) substrate. The methodological approach to optimize the assay by chessboard titration is also provided.

  13. DIRECTIONAL COUPLERS

    DOEpatents

    Nigg, D.J.

    1961-12-01

    A directional coupler of small size is designed. Stripline conductors of non-rectilinear configuration, and separated from each other by a thin dielectric spacer. cross each other at least at two locations at right angles, thus providing practically pure capacitive coupling which substantially eliminates undesirable inductive coupling. The conductors are sandwiched between a pair of ground planes. The coupling factor is dependent only on the thickness and dielectric constant of the dielectric spacer at the point of conductor crossover. (AEC)

  14. DIRECTIONAL ANTENNA

    DOEpatents

    Bittner, B.J.

    1958-05-20

    A high-frequency directional antenna of the 360 d scaring type is described. The antenna has for its desirable features the reduction in both size and complexity of the mechanism for rotating the antenna through its scanning movement. These advantages result from the rotation of only the driven element, the reflector remaining stationary. The particular antenna structure comprises a refiector formed by a plurality of metallic slats arranged in the configuration of an annular cage having the shape of a zone of revolution. The slats are parallel to each other and are disposed at an angle of 45 d to the axis of the cage. A directional radiator is disposed inside the cage at an angle of 45 d to the axis of the cage in the same direction as the reflecting slats which it faces. As the radiator is rotated, the electromagnetic wave is reflected from the slats facing the radiator and thereafter passes through the cage on the opposite side, since these slats are not parallel with the E vector of the wave.

  15. Attitude Control Propulsion Components, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Effort was made to include as much engineering information on each component as possible, consistent with usefulness and catalog size limitations. The contents of this catalog contain components which were qualified for use with spacecraft monopropellant hydrazine and inert gas attitude control systems. Thrust ranges up to 44.5 N (10.0 lbf) for hydrazine and inert gas sytems were considered. Additionally, some components qualified for uses other than spacecraft attitude control are included because they are suitable for use in attitude controls systems.

  16. Ceramic component for electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.; Bates, J. Lambert

    1980-01-01

    A ceramic component suitable for preparing MHD generator electrodes having the compositional formula: Y.sub.x (Mg.sub.y Cr.sub.z).sub.w Al.sub.(1-w) O.sub.3 where x=0.9 to 1.05, y=0.02 to 0.2, z=0.8 to 1.05 and w=1.0 to 0.5. The component is resistant to the formation of hydration products in an MHD environment, has good electrical conductivity and exhibits a lower electrochemical corrosion rate than do comparable compositions of lanthanum chromite.

  17. Component-specific modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A series of interdisciplinary modeling and analysis techniques that were specialized to address three specific hot section components are presented. These techniques will incorporate data as well as theoretical methods from many diverse areas including cycle and performance analysis, heat transfer analysis, linear and nonlinear stress analysis, and mission analysis. Building on the proven techniques already available in these fields, the new methods developed will be integrated into computer codes to provide an accurate, and unified approach to analyzing combustor burner liners, hollow air cooled turbine blades, and air cooled turbine vanes. For these components, the methods developed will predict temperature, deformation, stress and strain histories throughout a complete flight mission.

  18. Blood Component Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kelton, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Human blood has been transfused for about 60-70 years. Over this time, the practice of blood transfusion has changed dramatically. One major change is the separation of blood into its various components. As a result, the patient can receive only the blood component in which he is deficient. In this way, the risk of side effects—particularly hepatitis—is lessened. This article briefly reviews the various blood products, the indications for their use, and some associated risks. These products include oxygen-carrying products, plasma products, blood products used to correct hemostatic defects, and immune globulin. PMID:21279096

  19. Three component microseism analysis in Australia from deconvolution enhanced beamforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Martin; Reading, Anya; Ellingsen, Simon; Koper, Keith; Burlacu, Relu; Tkalčić, Hrvoje; Gibbons, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Ocean induced microseisms in the range 2-10 seconds are generated in deep oceans and near coastal regions as body and surface waves. The generation of these waves can take place over an extended area and in a variety of geographical locations at the same time. It is therefore common to observe multiple arrivals with a variety of slowness vectors which leads to the desire to measure multiple arrivals accurately. We present a deconvolution enhanced direction of arrival algorithm, for single and 3 component arrays, based on CLEAN. The algorithm iteratively removes sidelobe contributions in the power spectrum, therefore improves the signal-to-noise ratio of weaker sources. The power level on each component (vertical, radial and transverse) can be accurately estimated as the beamformer decomposes the power spectrum into point sources. We first apply the CLEAN aided beamformer to synthetic data to show its performance under known conditions and then evaluate real (observed) data from a range of arrays with apertures between 10 and 70 km (ASAR, WRA and NORSAR) to showcase the improvement in resolution. We further give a detailed analysis of the 3 component wavefield in Australia including source locations, power levels, phase ratios, etc. by two spiral arrays (PSAR and SQspa). For PSAR the analysis is carried out in the frequency range 0.35-1Hz. We find LQ, Lg and fundamental and higher mode Rg wave phases. Additionally, we also observe the Sn phase. This is the first time this has been achieved through beamforming on microseism noise and underlines the potential for extra seismological information that can be extracted using the new implementation of CLEAN. The fundamental mode Rg waves are dominant in power for low frequencies and show equal power levels with LQ towards higher frequencies. Generation locations between Rg and LQ are mildly correlated for low frequencies and uncorrelated for higher frequencies. Results from SQspa will discuss lower frequencies around the

  20. Designing Cool Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A NASA SBIR contract served as the beginning for the development of Daat Research Corporation's Coolit software. Coolit is a unique computational fluid dynamics (CFD) application aimed at thermal and cooling design problems. Coolit can generate 3-D representations of the thermofluid environment and "sketch" the component on the computer. The software modeling reduces time and effort in prototype building and testing.

  1. Component School Construction Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Brunswick Dept. of Economic Growth, Fredericton.

    In 1968, the Province of New Brunswick initiated a three-phase program to provide for elementary school facilities, employing a component systems approach to their construction. This booklet describes briefly the planning and construction of these schools, and provides graphic and photographic records of the construction in progress as well as of…

  2. Liquid rocket valve components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A monograph on valves for use with liquid rocket propellant engines is presented. The configurations of the various types of valves are described and illustrated. Design criteria and recommended practices for the various valves are explained. Tables of data are included to show the chief features of valve components in use on operational vehicles.

  3. Informed Test Component Weighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies and evaluates alternative methods for weighting tests. Presents formulas for composite reliability and validity as a function of component weights and suggests a rational process that identifies and considers trade-offs in determining weights. Discusses drawbacks to implicit weighting and explicit weighting and the difficulty of…

  4. Molecular Models Candy Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, William F.

    2007-01-01

    An explanation of various principles of chemistry in a paper by Fanny Ennever by the use of candy is described. The paper explains components of sucrose and the invert sugar that results from the hydrolysis of sucrose and will help students in determining whether the products are indeed hydrates of carbon.

  5. Removal of pedestals and directional ambiguity of optical anemometer signals.

    PubMed

    Durst, F; Zaré, M

    1974-11-01

    Laser Doppler anemometry permits, in principle, the measurement of both magnitude and direction of components of a particle's velocity vector. Most exiting anemometers, however, permit measurements only with a directional ambiguity of 180 degrees , resulting in errors in certain flow fields. Available methods of eliminating the directional ambiguity of Laser Doppler anemometers are reviewed, covering frequency shifting of the incident and scattered light beams, the use of beams with different polarization properties, and employment of multicolor laser beams. The advantages and disadvantages of existing methods are summarized, and suggestions for alterations are made. Different techniques used to remove the pedestal of laser Doppler anemometer signals are also reviewed. Optical techniques should be employed in any advanced optical anemometer system to avoid dynamic range limitations by electronic bandpass filters. Suggestions are made for advanced optical anemometers employing multielement avalanche photodiodes that can be used for simultaneous measurements of two velocity components. These anemometers incorporate devices to sense the direction of the velocity components and to eliminate optically the pedestal of laser Doppler signals.

  6. Developing a Model Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) Simulation Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI) is responsible for providing simulations to support test and verification of SCCS hardware and software. The Universal Coolant Transporter System (UCTS) was a Space Shuttle Orbiter support piece of the Ground Servicing Equipment (GSE). The initial purpose of the UCTS was to provide two support services to the Space Shuttle Orbiter immediately after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The UCTS is designed with the capability of servicing future space vehicles; including all Space Station Requirements necessary for the MPLM Modules. The Simulation uses GSE Models to stand in for the actual systems to support testing of SCCS systems during their development. As an intern at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), my assignment was to develop a model component for the UCTS. I was given a fluid component (dryer) to model in Simulink. I completed training for UNIX and Simulink. The dryer is a Catch All replaceable core type filter-dryer. The filter-dryer provides maximum protection for the thermostatic expansion valve and solenoid valve from dirt that may be in the system. The filter-dryer also protects the valves from freezing up. I researched fluid dynamics to understand the function of my component. The filter-dryer was modeled by determining affects it has on the pressure and velocity of the system. I used Bernoulli's Equation to calculate the pressure and velocity differential through the dryer. I created my filter-dryer model in Simulink and wrote the test script to test the component. I completed component testing and captured test data. The finalized model was sent for peer review for any improvements. I participated in Simulation meetings and was involved in the subsystem design process and team collaborations. I gained valuable work experience and insight into a career path as an engineer.

  7. Developing a Model Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) Simulation Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI) is,. responsible for providing simulations to support test and verification of SCCS hardware and software. The Universal Coolant Transporter System (UCTS) is a Space Shuttle Orbiter support piece of the Ground Servicing Equipment (GSE). The purpose of the UCTS is to provide two support services to the Space Shuttle Orbiter immediately after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The Simulation uses GSE Models to stand in for the actual systems to support testing of SCCS systems s:luring their development. As an intern at KSC, my assignment was to develop a model component for the UCTS. I was given a fluid component (drier) to model in Matlab. The drier was a Catch All replaceable core type filter-drier. The filter-drier provides maximum protection for the thermostatic expansion valve and solenoid valve from dirt that may be in the system. The filter-drier also protects the valves from freezing up. I researched fluid dynamics to understand the function of my component. I completed training for UNIX and Simulink to help aid in my assignment. The filter-drier was modeled by determining affects it has on the pressure, velocity and temperature of the system. I used Bernoulli's Equation to calculate the pressure and velocity differential through the dryer. I created my model filter-drier in Simulink and wrote the test script to test the component. I completed component testing and captured test data. The finalized model was sent for peer review for any improvements.

  8. Multibody dynamics: Modeling component flexibility with fixed, free, loaded, constraint, and residual modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, John T.; Tsuha, Walter S.

    1989-01-01

    The assumed-modes method in multibody dynamics allows the elastic deformation of each component in the system to be approximated by a sum of products of spatial and temporal functions commonly known as modes and modal coordinates respectively. The choice of component modes used to model articulating and non-articulating flexible multibody systems is examined. Attention is directed toward three classical Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) methods whereby component normal modes are generated by treating the component interface (I/F) as either fixed, free, or loaded with mass and stiffness contributions from the remaining components. The fixed and free I/F normal modes are augmented by static shape functions termed constraint and residual modes respectively. A mode selection procedure is outlined whereby component modes are selected from the Craig-Bampton (fixed I/F plus constraint), MacNeal-Rubin (free I/F plus residual), or Benfield-Hruda (loaded I/F) mode sets in accordance with a modal ordering scheme derived from balance realization theory. The success of the approach is judged by comparing the actuator-to-sensor frequency response of the reduced order system with that of the full order system over the frequency range of interest. A finite element model of the Galileo spacecraft serves as an example in demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed mode selection method.

  9. Sandia_HighTemperatureComponentEvaluation_2015

    SciTech Connect

    Cashion, Avery T.

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform independent evaluation of high temperature components to determine their suitability for use in high temperature geothermal tools. Development of high temperature components has been increasing rapidly due to demand from the high temperature oil and gas exploration and aerospace industries. Many of these new components are at the late prototype or first production stage of development and could benefit from third party evaluation of functionality and lifetime at elevated temperatures. In addition to independent testing of new components, this project recognizes that there is a paucity of commercial-off-the-shelf COTS components rated for geothermal temperatures. As such, high-temperature circuit designers often must dedicate considerable time and resources to determine if a component exists that they may be able to knead performance out of to meet their requirements. This project aids tool developers by characterization of select COTS component performances beyond published temperature specifications. The process for selecting components includes public announcements of project intent (e.g., FedBizOps), direct discussions with candidate manufacturers,and coordination with other DOE funded programs.

  10. Evaluation of silicon neutron resonance parameters in the thermal to 1800 keV energy range.

    PubMed

    Derrien, H; Leal, L C; Guber, K H; Larson, N M

    2005-01-01

    Because silicon is a major constituent of concrete and soil, neutron and gamma ray information on silicon is important for reactor shielding and criticality safety calculations. Therefore, much effort was put into the ENDF/B-VI evaluation for the three stable isotopes of silicon. The neutron capture cross section of natural silicon was recently measured at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the energy range 1-700 keV. Using the ENDF/B-VI evaluation for initial values, a new evaluation of the resonance parameters was performed by adding the results of the ORELA capture measurements to the experimental database. The computer code SAMMY was used for the analysis of the experimental data; the new version of SAMMY allows accurate calculations of the self-shielding and multiple scattering effects in the capture measurements. The accuracy of the radiative capture widths of the resonances was improved by this analysis. Accurate values of the s-, p- and d-wave neutron strength functions were also obtained. Although the resonance capture component of the present evaluation is 2-3 times smaller than that in ENDF/B-VI, the total capture cross section is much larger, at least for energies >250 keV, because the direct capture component contributes values of the same order of magnitude as the resonance component. The direct component was not taken into account in the ENDF/B-VI evaluation and was calculated for the first time in the present evaluation.

  11. Electric vehicle drive train components

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, F.

    1994-12-31

    Power Control Systems has developed a family of electric vehicle drive systems that range from 65 horsepower through 300 horse power. These propulsion systems support vehicle applications ranging from light cars and pickups to buses and trucks weighing as much as 40,000 lbs (18,400 kg). These robust systems are designed specifically for automotive applications including safety, electromagnetic emissions, and environment ruggedness. Dolphin Drive Systems are very flexible. Their inverter controllers are programmable and can be provided as stand alone components matched to customer specified motors. A selection of pre-calibrated systems including motor and inverter/controller can be provided. Accessory tools are also available for customer self programming. Dolphin Drive Systems provide precision control of AC induction motors providing excellent torque-speed performance usually eliminating the need for multistage transmissions. In addition, they are very efficient over a wide speed/torque range. This provides for excellent power management over a variety of continuous speed and stop and go applications.

  12. Characterisation of red supergiants in the Gaia spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorda, Ricardo; González-Fernández, Carlos; Negueruela, Ignacio

    2016-11-01

    Context. The infrared calcium triplet and its nearby spectral region have been used for spectral and luminosity classification of late-type stars, but the samples of cool supergiants (CSGs) used have been very limited (in size, metallicity range, and spectral types covered). The spectral range of the Gaia Radial Velocity Spectrograph (RVS) covers most of this region but does not reach the main TiO bands in this region, whose depths define the M sequence. Aims: We study the behaviour of spectral features around the calcium triplet and develop effective criteria to identify and classify CSGs, comparing their efficiency with other methods previously proposed. Methods: We measure the main spectral features in a large sample (almost 600) of red supergiants (RSGs) from three different galaxies, and we analyse their behaviour through a principal component analysis. Using the principal components, we develop an automatised method to differentiate CSGs from other bright late-type stars, and to classify them. Results: The proposed method identifies a high fraction (0.98 ± 0.04) of the supergiants in our test sample, which cover a wide metallicity range (supergiants from the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way) and with spectral types from G0 up to late-M. In addition, it is capable to separate most of the non-supergiants in the sample, identifying as supergiants only a very small fraction of them (0.02 ± 0.04). A comparison of this method with other previously proposed shows that it is more efficient and selects less interlopers. A way to automatically assign a spectral type to the supergiants is also developed. We apply this study to spectra at the resolution and spectral range of the Gaia RVS, with a similar success rate. Conclusions: The method developed identifies and classifies CSGs in large samples, with high efficiency and low contamination, even in conditions of wide metallicity and spectral-type ranges. As this method uses the infrared calcium triplet spectral

  13. A range extender hybrid electric vehicle dynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, B.K.; Pilutti, T.E.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a dynamic model possessing the key system components of a Range Extender Hybrid Electric Vehicle. The model is suitable for dynamic analysis, control law synthesis, and prototype simulation.

  14. Automatic identification of gray and white matter components in polarized light imaging.

    PubMed

    Dammers, Jürgen; Breuer, Lukas; Axer, Markus; Kleiner, Melanie; Eiben, Björn; Grässel, David; Dickscheid, Timo; Zilles, Karl; Amunts, Katrin; Shah, N Joni; Pietrzyk, Uwe

    2012-01-16

    Polarized light imaging (PLI) enables the visualization of fiber tracts with high spatial resolution in microtome sections of postmortem brains. Vectors of the fiber orientation defined by inclination and direction angles can directly be derived from the optical signals employed by PLI analysis. The polarization state of light propagating through a rotating polarimeter is varied in such a way that the detected signal of each spatial unit describes a sinusoidal signal. Noise, light scatter and filter inhomogeneities, however, interfere with the original sinusoidal PLI signals, which in turn have direct impact on the accuracy of subsequent fiber tracking. Recently we showed that the primary sinusoidal signals can effectively be restored after noise and artifact rejection utilizing independent component analysis (ICA). In particular, regions with weak intensities are greatly enhanced after ICA based artifact rejection and signal restoration. Here, we propose a user independent way of identifying the components of interest after decomposition; i.e., components that are related to gray and white matter. Depending on the size of the postmortem brain and the section thickness, the number of independent component maps can easily be in the range of a few ten thousand components for one brain. Therefore, we developed an automatic and, more importantly, user independent way of extracting the signal of interest. The automatic identification of gray and white matter components is based on the evaluation of the statistical properties of the so-called feature vectors of each individual component map, which, in the ideal case, shows a sinusoidal waveform. Our method enables large-scale analysis (i.e., the analysis of thousands of whole brain sections) of nerve fiber orientations in the human brain using polarized light imaging.

  15. Direct search for dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jonghee; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    Dark matter is hypothetical matter which does not interact with electromagnetic radiation. The existence of dark matter is only inferred from gravitational effects of astrophysical observations to explain the missing mass component of the Universe. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles are currently the most popular candidate to explain the missing mass component. I review the current status of experimental searches of dark matter through direct detection using terrestrial detectors.

  16. Liquid-Liquid phase transition in a single component system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzese, Giancarlo; Skibinsky, Anna; Buldyrev, Sergey; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2001-06-01

    Recent experimental results indicate that phosphorus, a single-component system, can have a high-density liquid (HDL) and a low-density liquid (LDL) phase. A first-order LDL-HDL transition line ending in a critical point is consistent with experimental data and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations for a variety of single-component systems such as water, silica and carbon, but a coherent and general interpretation of the LDL-HDL transition is lacking. By means of MD, we show that the LDL-HDL transition can be directly related to an interaction potential with an attractive part and with not one but `two' preferred short-range repulsive distances. This kind of interaction is common to other single-component materials in the liquid state, in particular liquid metals. For the fisrt time, we show that the LDL-HDL transition can occur in systems with no density anomaly, opening an experimental challenge to uncover a liquid-liquid transition in systems like liquid metals, regardless of the presence of the density anomaly.

  17. International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) 1999 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Michael (Editor); Taggert, Linda (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This 1999 Annual Report of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) is comprised of individual contributions from ILRS components within the international geodetic community. This report documents the work of the ILRS components from the inception of the Service through December 31,1999. Since the service has only recently been established, the ILRS associates decided to publish this Annual report as a reference to our organization and its components.

  18. Fast Steerable Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhizhen; Shkolnisky, Yoel; Singer, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy nowadays often requires the analysis of hundreds of thousands of 2-D images as large as a few hundred pixels in each direction. Here, we introduce an algorithm that efficiently and accurately performs principal component analysis (PCA) for a large set of 2-D images, and, for each image, the set of its uniform rotations in the plane and their reflections. For a dataset consisting of n images of size L × L pixels, the computational complexity of our algorithm is O(nL3 + L4), while existing algorithms take O(nL4). The new algorithm computes the expansion coefficients of the images in a Fourier–Bessel basis efficiently using the nonuniform fast Fourier transform. We compare the accuracy and efficiency of the new algorithm with traditional PCA and existing algorithms for steerable PCA. PMID:27570801

  19. Fast Steerable Principal Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhizhen; Shkolnisky, Yoel; Singer, Amit

    2016-03-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy nowadays often requires the analysis of hundreds of thousands of 2-D images as large as a few hundred pixels in each direction. Here, we introduce an algorithm that efficiently and accurately performs principal component analysis (PCA) for a large set of 2-D images, and, for each image, the set of its uniform rotations in the plane and their reflections. For a dataset consisting of n images of size L × L pixels, the computational complexity of our algorithm is O(nL(3) + L(4)), while existing algorithms take O(nL(4)). The new algorithm computes the expansion coefficients of the images in a Fourier-Bessel basis efficiently using the nonuniform fast Fourier transform. We compare the accuracy and efficiency of the new algorithm with traditional PCA and existing algorithms for steerable PCA.

  20. Short Range Correlations, Inclusive Electron-Nucleus Scattering, and Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Donal

    2008-10-13

    The presence of high momentum components in the nuclear wavefunction has been of great interest for many years. Unfortunately high momentum components, associated with the short range correlations (SRC), have been difficult to isolate unambiquously. Inclusive electron scattering cross sections in the quasielastic region have been measured over a wide range of energy and momentum transfers from very light to very heavy nuclei and the scaling analyses of these data can provide useful information on the presence of SRCs and more.

  1. Wide Range SET Pulse Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuler, Robert L.; Chen, Li

    2012-01-01

    A method for measuring a wide range of SET pulses is demonstrated. Use of dynamic logic, faster than ordinary CMOS, allows capture of short pulses. A weighted binning of SET lengths allows measurement of a wide range of pulse lengths with compact circuitry. A pulse-length-conservative pulse combiner tree routes SETs from combinational logic to the measurement circuit, allowing SET measurements in circuits that cannot easily be arranged in long chains. The method is applied to add-multiplex combinational logic, and to an array of NFET routing switches, at .35 micron. Pulses are captured in a chain of Domino Logic AND gates. Propagation through the chain is frozen on the trailing edge by dropping low the second "enable" input to the AND gates. Capacitive loading is increased in the latter stages to create an approximately logarithmic weighted binning, so that a broad range of pulse lengths can be captured with a 10 stage capture chain. Simulations show pulses can be captured which are 1/5th the length of those typically captured with leading edge triggered latch methods, and less than the length of those captured with a trailing edge latch method. After capture, the pulse pattern is transferred to an SEU protected shift register for readout. 64 instances of each of two types of logic are used as targets. One is a full adder with a 4 to 1 mux on its inputs. The other is a 4 x 4 NFET routing matrix. The outputs are passed through buffered XNOR comparators to identify pulses, which are merged in a buffered not-nand (OR) tree designed to avoid pulse absorption as much as possible. The output from each of the two test circuits are input into separate pulse measurement circuits. Test inputs were provided so that the circuit could be bench tested and calibrated. A third SET measurement circuit with no inputs was used to judge the contribution from direct hits on the measurement circuit. Heavy ions were used with an LET range from 12 to 176. At LET of 21 and below, the very

  2. Precision in the perception of direction of a moving pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.

    1988-01-01

    The precision of the model of pattern motion analysis put forth by Adelson and Movshon (1982) who proposed that humans determine the direction of a moving plaid (the sum of two sinusoidal gratings of different orientations) in two steps is qualitatively examined. The volocities of the grating components are first estimated, then combined using the intersection of constraints to determine the velocity of the plaid as a whole. Under the additional assumption that the noise sources for the component velocities are independent, an approximate expression can be derived for the precision in plaid direction as a function of the precision in the speed and direction of the components. Monte Carlo simulations verify that the expression is valid to within 5 percent over the natural range of the parameters. The expression is then used to predict human performance based on available estimates of human precision in the judgment of single component speed. Human performance is predicted to deteriorate by a factor of 3 as half the angle between the wavefronts (theta) decreases from 60 to 30 deg, but actual performance does not. The mean direction discrimination for three human observers was 4.3 plus or minus 0.9 deg (SD) for theta = 60 deg and 5.9 plus or minus 1.2 for theta = 30 deg. This discrepancy can be resolved in two ways. If the noises in the internal representations of the component speeds are smaller than the available estimates or if these noises are not independent, then the psychophysical results are consistent with the Adelson-Movshon hypothesis.

  3. Method and apparatus for component separation using microwave energy

    DOEpatents

    Morrow, Marvin S.; Schechter, Donald E.; Calhoun, Jr., Clyde L.

    2001-04-03

    A method for separating and recovering components includes the steps of providing at least a first component bonded to a second component by a microwave absorbent adhesive bonding material at a bonding area to form an assembly, the bonding material disposed between the components. Microwave energy is directly and selectively applied to the assembly so that substantially only the bonding material absorbs the microwave energy until the bonding material is at a debonding state. A separation force is applied while the bonding material is at the debonding state to permit disengaging and recovering the components. In addition, an apparatus for practicing the method includes holders for the components.

  4. Component-specific modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A series of interdisciplinary modeling and analysis techniques that were specialized to address three specific hot section components are presented. These techniques will incorporate data as well as theoretical methods from many diverse areas including cycle and performance analysis, heat transfer analysis, linear and nonlinear stress analysis, and mission analysis. Building on the proven techniques already available in these fields, the new methods developed will be integrated into computer codes to provide an accurate, efficient and unified approach to analyzing combustor burner liners, hollow air-cooled turbine blades and air-cooled turbine vanes. For these components, the methods developed will predict temperature, deformation, stress and strain histories throughout a complete flight mission.

  5. Component specific modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maffeo, R. J.; Mcknight, R. L.; Tipton, M. T.; Weber, G.

    1986-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop and verify a series of interdisciplinary modeling and analysis techniques that were specialized to address three specific hot section components. These techniques incorporate data as well as theoretical methods from many diverse areas including cycle and performance analysis, heat transfer analysis, linear and nonlinear stress analysis, and mission analysis. Building on the proven techniques already available in these fields, the new methods developed are integrated to provide an accurate, efficient, and unified approach to analyzing combustor burner liners, hollow air-cooled turbine blades, and air-cooled turbine vanes. For these components, the methods developed predict temperature, deformation, stress, and strain histories throughout a complete flight mission.

  6. Direct to Digital Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, P.R.; Tobin, K.W.

    2007-09-30

    In this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) assisted nLine Corporation of Austin, TX in the development of prototype semiconductor wafer inspection tools based on the direct-to-digital holographic (DDH) techniques invented at ORNL. Key components of this work included, testing of DDH for detection of defects in High Aspect Ratio (HAR) structures, development of image processing techniques to enhance detection capabilities through the use of both phase and intensity, and development of methods for autofocus on the DDH tools.

  7. Direct to Digital Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, P.R.; Tobin, K.W.

    2002-06-15

    In this CRADA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) assisted nLine Corporation of Austin, TX in the development of prototype semiconductor wafer inspection tools based on the direct-to-digital holographic (DDH) techniques invented at ORNL. Key components of this work included, testing of DDH for detection of defects in High Aspect Ratio (HAR) structures, development of image processing techniques to enhance detection capabilities through the use of both phase and intensity, and development of methods for autofocus on the DDH tools.

  8. Magnetic circular dichroism in the hard X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogalev, A.; Wilhelm, F.

    2015-12-01

    An overview of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectroscopy in the hard X-ray range is presented. A short historical overview shows how this technique has evolved from the early days of X-ray physics to become a workhorse technique in the modern magnetism research As with all X-ray spectroscopies, XMCD has the advantage of being element specific. Interpretation of the spectra based on magneto-optical sum rules can provide unique information about spin and orbital moment carried by absorbing atom in both amplitude and direction, can infer magnetic interactions from element selective magnetization curves, can allow separation of magnetic and non-magnetic components in heterogeneous systems. The review details the technology currently available for XMCD measurements in the hard X-ray range referring to the ESRF beamline ID12 as an example. The strengths of hard X-ray magnetic circular dichroism technique are illustrated with a wide variety of representative examples, such as actinide based ferromagnets, paramagnetism in metals, pure metallic nanoparticles, exchange spring magnets, half metallic ferromagnets, magnetism at interfaces, and dilute magnetic semiconductors. In this way, we aim to encourage researchers from various scientific communities to consider XMCD as a tool to understanding the electronic and magnetic properties of their samples.

  9. MEA Component Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Frisk, J. W.; Hicks, M.T.; Atanasoski, R. T.; Boand, W. M.; Schmoeckel, A. K.; Kurkowski, M. J.

    2004-11-01

    Membrane electrode assembly (MEA) lifetime of greater than 40,000 hours remains a goal of the fuel cell industry. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of MEA degradation. Specifically, the relationship between component physical property changes and MEA performance decay has not been established. We report preliminary data relating changes in gas diffusion layer (GDL) physical properties to fuel cell performance decay.

  10. Components of laboratory accreditation.

    PubMed

    Royal, P D

    1995-12-01

    Accreditation or certification is a recognition given to an operation or product that has been evaluated against a standard; be it regulatory or voluntary. The purpose of accreditation is to provide the consumer with a level of confidence in the quality of operation (process) and the product of an organization. Environmental Protection Agency/OCM has proposed the development of an accreditation program under National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program for Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) laboratories as a supplement to the current program. This proposal was the result of the Inspector General Office reports that identified weaknesses in the current operation. Several accreditation programs can be evaluated and common components identified when proposing a structure for accrediting a GLP system. An understanding of these components is useful in building that structure. Internationally accepted accreditation programs provide a template for building a U.S. GLP accreditation program. This presentation will discuss the traditional structure of accreditation as presented in the Organization of Economic Cooperative Development/GLP program, ISO-9000 Accreditation and ISO/IEC Guide 25 Standard, and the Canadian Association for Environmental Analytical Laboratories, which has a biological component. Most accreditation programs are managed by a recognized third party, either privately or with government oversight. Common components often include a formal review of required credentials to evaluate organizational structure, a site visit to evaluate the facility, and a performance evaluation to assess technical competence. Laboratory performance is measured against written standards and scored. A formal report is then sent to the laboratory indicating accreditation status. Usually, there is a scheduled reevaluation built into the program. Fee structures vary considerably and will need to be examined closely when building a GLP program.

  11. Solid state lighting component

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Thomas; Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald

    2010-10-26

    An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

  12. Solid state lighting component

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald; Yuan, Thomas

    2012-07-10

    An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

  13. Component for thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Purdy, David L.

    1977-01-01

    In a thermoelectric generator, a component comprises a ceramic insulator, having over limited areas thereof, each area corresponding to a terminal end of thermoelectric wires, a coating of a first metal which adheres to the insulator, and an electrical thermoelectric junction including a second metal which wets said first metal and adheres to said terminal ends but does not wet said insulator, and a cloth composed of electrically insulating threads interlaced with thermoelectric wires.

  14. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  15. Injection molded component

    SciTech Connect

    James, Allister W; Arrell, Douglas J

    2014-09-30

    An intermediate component includes a first wall member, a leachable material layer, and a precursor wall member. The first wall member has an outer surface and first connecting structure. The leachable material layer is provided on the first wall member outer surface. The precursor wall member is formed adjacent to the leachable material layer from a metal powder mixed with a binder material, and includes second connecting structure.

  16. Laser range profile of cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenzhen; Gong, Yanjun; Wang, Mingjun; Gong, Lei

    2016-10-01

    technology. Laser one-dimensional range profile can reflect the characteristics of the target shape and surface material. These techniques were motivated by applications of laser radar to target discrimination in ballistic missile defense. The radar equation of pulse laser about cone is given in this paper. This paper demonstrates the analytical model of laser one-dimensional range profile of cone based on the radar equation of the pulse laser. Simulations results of laser one-dimensional range profiles of some cones are given. Laser one-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface material with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser one-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface mater with diffuse materials whose retroreflectance can be modeled closely with an exponential term that decays with increasing incidence angles, is given in this paper. Laser one-dimensional range profiles of different pulse width of cone is given in this paper. The influences of surface material, pulse width, attitude on the one-dimensional range are analyzed. The laser two-dimensional range profile is two-dimensional scattering imaging of pulse laser of target. The two-dimensional range profile of roughness target can provide range resolved information. An analytical model of two-dimensional laser range profile of cone is proposed. The simulations of two-dimensional laser range profiles of some cones are given. Laser two-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface mater with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser two-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface mater with diffuse materials whose retroreflectance can be modeled closely with an exponential term that decays with increasing incidence angles, is given in this paper. The influence of pulse width, surface material on laser two-dimensional range profile is analyzed. Laser one-dimensional range profile and laser two-dimensional range profile are called as laser

  17. Artificial polarization components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cescato, L.; Gluch, Ekkehard; Stork, Wilhelm; Streibl, Norbert

    1990-07-01

    High frequency surface relief structures are optically anisotropic and show interesting polarisation properties 1 . These properties can be used to produce polarizations components such as wave plates polarizers. polarizing beamsplitters etc. Our experimental results show that even gratings with relatively low spatial frequency ( periods A ) exhibit a strong phase retardation and can be used as quarter-wave plates. k INTRODUC11ON The artificial birefringence exhibited by ultrahigh frequency gratings of dielectric materials can be used to produce various polarization components2 . Such components have applications in integrated optics as well as in free space optics. In order to produce the high spatial frequencies complex processes such as electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching are needed. We show in this paper that sinusoidal holographic gratings in photoresist exhibit also a strong phase ret even at relatively long periods. L EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENTS To obtain the phase retardation of a lower frequency ( period A ) grating a simple setup as used by Enger and 2 can be applied. In our case however there are three measurements necessary to obtain the phase retardation because transmission of the two perpendicularly polarized beams is different from each other. I GRATING PRODUCTION grating 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 period (pmj 0. 74 0. 74 0. 61 0. 54 0. 46 0. 32 0. 54 0. 54 0. 54 ne (sec) 60

  18. Surface mount component jig

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1990-08-07

    A device for bending and trimming the pins of a dual-inline-package component and the like for surface mounting rather than through mounting to a circuit board comprises, in a first part, in pin cutter astride a holder having a recess for holding the component, a first spring therebetween, and, in a second part, two flat members pivotally interconnected by a hinge and urged to an upward peaked position from a downward peaked position by a second spring. As a downward force is applied to the pin cutter it urges the holder downward, assisted by the first spring and a pair of ridges riding on shoulders of the holder, to carry the component against the upward peaked flat members which guide the pins outwardly. As the holder continues downwardly, the flat members pivot to the downward peaked position bending the pins upwardly against the sides of the holder. When the downward movement is met with sufficient resistance, the ridges of the pin cutter ride over the holder's shoulders to continue downward to cut any excess length of pin.

  19. Energetic component treatability study

    SciTech Connect

    Gildea, P.D.; Brandon, S.L.; Brown, B.G.

    1997-11-01

    The effectiveness of three environmentally sound processes for small energetic component disposal was examined experimentally in this study. The three destruction methods, batch reactor supercritical water oxidation, sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff were selected based on their potential for producing a clean solid residue and minimum release of toxic gases after component detonation. The explosive hazard was destroyed by all three processes. Batch supercritical water oxidation destroyed both the energetics and organics. Further development is desired to optimize process parameters. Sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff results indicated the potential for scrubbing gaseous detonation products. Further study and testing are needed to quantify the effectiveness of these later two processes for full-scale munition destruction. The preliminary experiments completed in this study have demonstrated the promise of these three processes as environmentally sound technologies for energetic component destruction. Continuation of these experimental programs is strongly recommended to optimize batch supercritical water oxidation processing, and to fully develop the sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff technologies.

  20. Inkjet deposited circuit components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidoki, S. M.; Nouri, J.; Heidari, A. A.

    2010-05-01

    All-printed electronics as a means of achieving ultra-low-cost electronic circuits has attracted great interest in recent years. Inkjet printing is one of the most promising techniques by which the circuit components can be ultimately drawn (i.e. printed) onto the substrate in one step. Here, the inkjet printing technique was used to chemically deposit silver nanoparticles (10-200 nm) simply by ejection of silver nitrate and reducing solutions onto different substrates such as paper, PET plastic film and textile fabrics. The silver patterns were tested for their functionality to work as circuit components like conductor, resistor, capacitor and inductor. Different levels of conductivity were achieved simply by changing the printing sequence, inks ratio and concentration. The highest level of conductivity achieved by an office thermal inkjet printer (300 dpi) was 5.54 × 105 S m-1 on paper. Inkjet deposited capacitors could exhibit a capacitance of more than 1.5 nF (parallel plate 45 × 45 mm2) and induction coils displayed an inductance of around 400 µH (planar coil 10 cm in diameter). Comparison of electronic performance of inkjet deposited components to the performance of conventionally etched items makes the technique highly promising for fabricating different printed electronic devices.

  1. Highly directional thermal emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Ribaudo, Troy; Shaner, Eric A; Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2015-03-24

    A highly directional thermal emitter device comprises a two-dimensional periodic array of heavily doped semiconductor structures on a surface of a substrate. The array provides a highly directional thermal emission at a peak wavelength between 3 and 15 microns when the array is heated. For example, highly doped silicon (HDSi) with a plasma frequency in the mid-wave infrared was used to fabricate nearly perfect absorbing two-dimensional gratings structures that function as highly directional thermal radiators. The absorption and emission characteristics of the HDSi devices possessed a high degree of angular dependence for infrared absorption in the 10-12 micron range, while maintaining high reflectivity of solar radiation (.about.64%) at large incidence angles.

  2. Smart velocity ranging quantifiable optical microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Zhongwei; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2011-03-01

    We introduce a new type of Optical Microangiography (OMAG) called Quantifiable Optical Microangiography (QOMAG) which is capable of performing quantitative flow imaging with smart velocity ranging. In order to extracting multi-range velocity, two three dimensional data sets need to be acquired at the same imaging area. One data set performs dense scanning in B-scan direction and Doppler analysis was done at the basis of subsequent A-scans, while the other data set performs dense scanning in C-scan direction and Doppler analysis was done at the basis of consecutive B-scan. Since the velocity ranging is determined by the time interval between consecutive measurements of the spectral fringes, longer time interval will give us higher sensitivity to slow velocity. By simultaneous acquiring data sets with different time intervals, we can perform smart velocity ranging quantification on blood flow characterized by different velocity values. The feasibility of QOMAG for variable blood flow imaging is demonstrated by in vivo studies executed on cerebral blood flow of mouse model. Multi-range detailed blood flow map within intracranial Dura mater and cortex of mouse brain can be given by QOMAG.

  3. Carbohydrates as enantioinduction components in stereoselective catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate derivatives are readily available chiral molecules, yet they are infrequently employed as enantioinduction components in stereoselective catalysis. In this review, synthetic approaches to carbohydrate-based ligands and catalysts are outlined, along with example applications in enantioselective catalysis. A wide range of carbohydrate-based functionality is covered, and key trends and future opportunities are identified. PMID:27064817

  4. Bioactive Components in Fish Venoms

    PubMed Central

    Ziegman, Rebekah; Alewood, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Animal venoms are widely recognized excellent resources for the discovery of novel drug leads and physiological tools. Most are comprised of a large number of components, of which the enzymes, small peptides, and proteins are studied for their important bioactivities. However, in spite of there being over 2000 venomous fish species, piscine venoms have been relatively underrepresented in the literature thus far. Most studies have explored whole or partially fractioned venom, revealing broad pharmacology, which includes cardiovascular, neuromuscular, cytotoxic, inflammatory, and nociceptive activities. Several large proteinaceous toxins, such as stonustoxin, verrucotoxin, and Sp-CTx, have been isolated from scorpaenoid fish. These form pores in cell membranes, resulting in cell death and creating a cascade of reactions that result in many, but not all, of the physiological symptoms observed from envenomation. Additionally, Natterins, a novel family of toxins possessing kininogenase activity have been found in toadfish venom. A variety of smaller protein toxins, as well as a small number of peptides, enzymes, and non-proteinaceous molecules have also been isolated from a range of fish venoms, but most remain poorly characterized. Many other bioactive fish venom components remain to be discovered and investigated. These represent an untapped treasure of potentially useful molecules. PMID:25941767

  5. Bayesian robust principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xinghao; He, Lihan; Carin, Lawrence

    2011-12-01

    A hierarchical Bayesian model is considered for decomposing a matrix into low-rank and sparse components, assuming the observed matrix is a superposition of the two. The matrix is assumed noisy, with unknown and possibly non-stationary noise statistics. The Bayesian framework infers an approximate representation for the noise statistics while simultaneously inferring the low-rank and sparse-outlier contributions; the model is robust to a broad range of noise levels, without having to change model hyperparameter settings. In addition, the Bayesian framework allows exploitation of additional structure in the matrix. For example, in video applications each row (or column) corresponds to a video frame, and we introduce a Markov dependency between consecutive rows in the matrix (corresponding to consecutive frames in the video). The properties of this Markov process are also inferred based on the observed matrix, while simultaneously denoising and recovering the low-rank and sparse components. We compare the Bayesian model to a state-of-the-art optimization-based implementation of robust PCA; considering several examples, we demonstrate competitive performance of the proposed model.

  6. Biochemical component identification by light scattering techniques in whispering gallery mode optical resonance based sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saetchnikov, Vladimir A.; Tcherniavskaia, Elina A.; Saetchnikov, Anton V.; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Experimental data on detection and identification of variety of biochemical agents, such as proteins (albumin, interferon, C reactive protein), microelements (Na+, Ca+), antibiotic of different generations, in both single and multi component solutions under varied in wide range concentration are represented. Analysis has been performed on the light scattering parameters of whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonance based sensor with dielectric microspheres from glass and PMMA as sensitive elements fixed by spin - coating techniques in adhesive layer on the surface of substrate or directly on the coupling element. Sensitive layer was integrated into developed fluidic cell with a digital syringe. Light from tuneable laser strict focusing on and scattered by the single microsphere was detected by a CMOS camera. The image was filtered for noise reduction and integrated on two coordinates for evaluation of integrated energy of a measured signal. As the entrance data following signal parameters were used: relative (to a free spectral range) spectral shift of frequency of WGM optical resonance in microsphere and relative efficiency of WGM excitation obtained within a free spectral range which depended on both type and concentration of investigated agents. Multiplexing on parameters and components has been realized using spatial and spectral parameters of scattered by microsphere light with developed data processing. Biochemical component classification and identification of agents under investigation has been performed by network analysis techniques based on probabilistic network and multilayer perceptron. Developed approach is demonstrated to be applicable both for single agent and for multi component biochemical analysis.

  7. Atmospheric refraction errors in laser ranging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Rowlett, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of horizontal refractivity gradients on the accuracy of laser ranging systems were investigated by ray tracing through three dimensional refractivity profiles. The profiles were generated by performing a multiple regression on measurements from seven or eight radiosondes, using a refractivity model which provided for both linear and quadratic variations in the horizontal direction. The range correction due to horizontal gradients was found to be an approximately sinusoidal function of azimuth having a minimum near 0 deg azimuth and a maximum near 180 deg azimuth. The peak to peak variation was approximately 5 centimeters at 10 deg elevation and decreased to less than 1 millimeter at 80 deg elevation.

  8. Inertial Range Dynamics in Boussinesq Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    1996-01-01

    L'vov and Falkovich have shown that the dimensionally possible inertial range scaling laws for Boussinesq turbulence, Kolmogorov and Bolgiano scaling, describe steady states with constant flux of kinetic energy and of entropy respectively. These scaling laws are treated as similarity solutions of the direct interaction approximation for Boussinesq turbulence. The Kolmogorov scaling solution corresponds to a weak perturbation by gravity of a state in which the temperature is a passive scalar but in which a source of temperature fluctuations exists. Using standard inertial range balances, the renormalized viscosity and conductivity, turbulent Prandtl number, and spectral scaling law constants are computed for Bolgiano scaling.

  9. Mechanical properties determination of AM components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzugan, J.; Sibr, M.; Konopík, P.; Procházka, R.; Rund, M.

    2017-02-01

    Characterisation of engineering materials and components is a crucial part for design and save service life utilization. Due to components processing technologies and exploitation conditions local properties can significantly vary from location to location over larger components as well as over small material volumes with gradual material changes such as welds, coatings or additively manufactured parts. The current paper is dealing with local properties characterisation for additively manufacture (AM) components by micro tensile test (M-TT). Components produced by additive manufacturing techniques yield properties variation in dependence of the considered location within the component regarding to direction in relation to deposition process. Properties vary over the thickness, length, angle or contacts with the supporting structures necessary for a successful components production by additive manufacturing techniques. The properties differences are mainly related to varying heating/reheating and cooling conditions at various locations of usually very complex parts produced mainly by these technologies. The standard testing procedures fail to characterize such local properties of complex shaped objects due to large size requirements on specimens. Therefore, new techniques have to be established for such detailed local characterizations. Results of miniaturized tensile tests application for local properties and orientations are shown here.

  10. Future directions.

    PubMed

    Erickson, David L; Kress, W John

    2012-01-01

    It is a risky task to attempt to predict the direction that DNA barcoding and its applications may take in the future. In a very short time, the endeavor of DNA barcoding has gone from being a tool to facilitate taxonomy in difficult to identify species, to an ambitious, global initiative that seeks to tackle such pertinent and challenging issues as quantifying global biodiversity, revolutionizing the forensic identifications of species, advancing the study of interactions among species, and promoting the reconstruction of evolutionary relationships within communities. The core element of DNA barcoding will always remain the same: the generation of a set of well-identified samples collected and genotyped at one or more genetic barcode markers and assembled into a properly curated database. But the application of this body of data will depend on the creativity and need of the research community in using a "gold standard" of annotated DNA sequence data at the species level. We foresee several areas where the application of DNA barcode data is likely to yield important evolutionary, ecological, and societal insights, and while far from exclusive, provide examples of how DNA barcode data will continue to empower scientists to address hypothesis-driven research. Three areas of immediate and obvious concern are (1) biodiversity inventories, (2) phylogenetic applications, and (3) species interactions.

  11. Precious-Metal-Free Heteroarylation of Azlactones: Direct Synthesis of α-Pyridyl, α-Substituted Amino Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tarn C; Marsden, Stephen P

    2016-10-21

    A one-pot, three-component synthesis of α-pyridyl, α-substituted amino acid derivatives is described. The key transformation is a direct, precious-metal-free heteroarylation of readily available, amino acid derived azlactones with electrophilically activated pyridine N-oxides. The resulting intermediates can be used directly as efficient acylating agents for a range of nucleophiles, leading to the heteroarylated amino acid derivatives in a single vessel.

  12. Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes

    DOEpatents

    Morman, James A.; Wei, Thomas Y. C.; Reifman, Jaques

    1999-01-01

    A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced.

  13. Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes

    DOEpatents

    Morman, J.A.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Reifman, J.

    1999-07-27

    A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced. 5 figs.

  14. Recursive principal components analysis.

    PubMed

    Voegtlin, Thomas

    2005-10-01

    A recurrent linear network can be trained with Oja's constrained Hebbian learning rule. As a result, the network learns to represent the temporal context associated to its input sequence. The operation performed by the network is a generalization of Principal Components Analysis (PCA) to time-series, called Recursive PCA. The representations learned by the network are adapted to the temporal statistics of the input. Moreover, sequences stored in the network may be retrieved explicitly, in the reverse order of presentation, thus providing a straight-forward neural implementation of a logical stack.

  15. Analysis Components Investigation Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    rebuildin in the vicin the school. ation of N t allow the ment of In est" can be med intere nts from a , this comp ervices wh ion of NLP rest (as w cify...releva ch as possi ecialize in ion of NLP ranking) on uses Alfre t allows m will be used e that offer sis compon the terms i rns the te ument Freq...order in ponent con nts in orde ASSIFIED December 2 LOSED TO ANY P onent performed is process sis task per ts, or a sele e Solution document ion of NLP t

  16. Components of Verbal Intelligence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-30

    is permitted for any purpose of the United States Government. 9 This research Was sponsored by the Personnel and Training Research Programs...FUNDING NUMBERS PROGRAM PROJECT TASK UNit ELEMENT NO NO NO IACCESSION NO 11. TITLE (Irclude Secu, l Olassfication) NR154-505 "Components of Verbal...a_ _ A , , . Z I l-l S"" -- ’s= -:s~ l - + 6 ’ E =:,. E cEIP d -= 5.,. ’-E ; Ea ,3 8.9.1 -=,o pr ,,v c+ -- + + - , ? + -+ + a; 0 1;- I " ’N Ev E.~4

  17. Visual information for judging temporal range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Mowafy, Lyn

    1993-01-01

    Work in our laboratory suggests that pilots can extract temporal range information (i.e., the time to pass a given waypoint) directly from out-the-window motion information. This extraction does not require the use of velocity or distance, but rather operates solely on a 2-D motion cue. In this paper, we present the mathematical derivation of this information, psychophysical evidence of human observers' sensitivity, and possible advantages and limitations of basing vehicle control on this parameter.

  18. Direct Photons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor,D.

    2008-07-29

    Direct photons are ideal tools to investigate kinematical and thermodynamical conditions of heavy ion collisions since they are emitted from all stages of the collision and once produced they leave the interaction region without further modification by the medium. The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured direct photon production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV over a wide transverse momentum (p{sub T}) range. The p+p measurements allow a fundamental test of QCD, and serve as a baseline when we try to disentangle more complex mechanisms producing high p{sub T} direct photons in Au+Au. As for thermal photons in Au+Au we overcome the difficulties due to the large background from hadronic decays by measuring 'almost real' virtual photons which appear as low invariant mass e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs: a significant excess of direct photons is measured above the above next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. Additional insights on the origin of direct photons can be gained with the study of the azimuthal anisotropy which benefits from the increased statistics and reaction plane resolution achieved in RHIC Year-7 data.

  19. Full-Range Mathematical Modeling of Turboshaft Engine in Aerospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Hanlin; Zhang, Tianhong; Jiang, Wei

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, an approximate computation method of low-speed component characteristics in aeroengine is used and full-range component characteristics is obtained by combining experimental data above idle. Moreover, based on components matching method and variable specific heat method, a full-range static and dynamic mathematical model of turboshaft engine is built, including start-up state. And the numerical simulation result of the engine whole working process is also showed in this paper. The comparison result between the simulation result and the experimental data shows that, the full-range model built by the computation method of low-speed component characteristics is of a certain accuracy, which can meet the needs of a turboshaft engine semi-physical simulation.

  20. Advanced Power Electronics Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will give a description and status of the Advanced Power Electronics Materials and Components Technology program being conducted by the NASA Glenn Research Center for future aerospace power applications. The focus of this research program is on the following: 1) New and/or significantly improved dielectric materials for the development of power capacitors with increased volumetric efficiency, energy density, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and composite ceramic dielectrics and diamond-like carbon films; 2) New and/or significantly improved high frequency, high temperature, low loss soft magnetic materials for the development of transformers/inductors with increased power/energy density, electrical efficiency, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and nanocomposite soft magnetic materials; 3) Packaged high temperature, high power density, high voltage, and low loss SiC diodes and switches. Development of high quality 4H- and 6H- SiC atomically smooth substrates to significantly improve device performance is a major emphasis of the SiC materials program; 4) Demonstration of high temperature (> 200 C) circuits using the components developed above.

  1. One-component nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Su, Hao; Koo, Jin Mo; Cui, Honggang

    2015-12-10

    One-component nanomedicine (OCN) represents an emerging class of therapeutic nanostructures that contain only one type of chemical substance. This one-component feature allows for fine-tuning and optimization of the drug loading and physicochemical properties of nanomedicine in a precise manner through molecular engineering of the underlying building blocks. Using a precipitation procedure or effective molecular assembly strategies, molecularly crafted therapeutic agents (e.g. polymer-drug conjugates, small molecule prodrugs, or drug amphiphiles) could involuntarily aggregate, or self-assemble into nanoscale objects of well-defined sizes and shapes. Unlike traditional carrier-based nanomedicines that are inherently multicomponent systems, an OCN does not require the use of additional carriers and could itself possess desired physicochemical features for preferential accumulation at target sites. We review here recent progress in the molecular design, conjugation methods, and fabrication strategies of OCN, and analyze the opportunities that this emerging platform could open for the new and improved treatment of devastating diseases such as cancer.

  2. Lifing of Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The successful development of advanced aerospace engines depends greatly on the capabilities of high performance materials and structures. Advanced materials, such as nickel based single crystal alloys, metal foam, advanced copper alloys, and ceramics matrix composites, have been engineered to provide higher engine temperature and stress capabilities. Thermal barrier coatings have been developed to improve component durability and fuel efficiency, by reducing the substrate hot wall metal temperature and protecting against oxidation and blanching. However, these coatings are prone to oxidation and delamination failures. In order to implement the use of these materials in advanced engines, it is necessary to understand and model the evolution of damage of the metal substrate as well as the coating under actual engine conditions. The models and the understanding of material behavior are utilized in the development of a life prediction methodology for hot section components. The research activities were focused on determining the stress and strain fields in an engine environment under combined thermo-mechanical loads to develop life prediction methodologies consistent with the observed damage formation of the coating and the substrates.

  3. Prognostics for Microgrid Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav

    2012-01-01

    Prognostics is the science of predicting future performance and potential failures based on targeted condition monitoring. Moving away from the traditional reliability centric view, prognostics aims at detecting and quantifying the time to impending failures. This advance warning provides the opportunity to take actions that can preserve uptime, reduce cost of damage, or extend the life of the component. The talk will focus on the concepts and basics of prognostics from the viewpoint of condition-based systems health management. Differences with other techniques used in systems health management and philosophies of prognostics used in other domains will be shown. Examples relevant to micro grid systems and subsystems will be used to illustrate various types of prediction scenarios and the resources it take to set up a desired prognostic system. Specifically, the implementation results for power storage and power semiconductor components will demonstrate specific solution approaches of prognostics. The role of constituent elements of prognostics, such as model, prediction algorithms, failure threshold, run-to-failure data, requirements and specifications, and post-prognostic reasoning will be explained. A discussion on performance evaluation and performance metrics will conclude the technical discussion followed by general comments on open research problems and challenges in prognostics.

  4. Laser hybrid joining of plastic and metal components for lightweight components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauschenberger, J.; Cenigaonaindia, A.; Keseberg, J.; Vogler, D.; Gubler, U.; Liébana, F.

    2015-03-01

    Plastic-metal hybrids are replacing all-metal structures in the automotive, aerospace and other industries at an accelerated rate. The trend towards lightweight construction increasingly demands the usage of polymer components in drive trains, car bodies, gaskets and other applications. However, laser joining of polymers to metals presents significantly greater challenges compared with standard welding processes. We present recent advances in laser hybrid joining processes. Firstly, several metal pre-structuring methods, including selective laser melting (SLM) are characterized and their ability to provide undercut structures in the metal assessed. Secondly, process parameter ranges for hybrid joining of a number of metals (steel, stainless steel, etc.) and polymers (MABS, PA6.6-GF35, PC, PP) are given. Both transmission and direct laser joining processes are presented. Optical heads and clamping devices specifically tailored to the hybrid joining process are introduced. Extensive lap-shear test results are shown that demonstrate that joint strengths exceeding the base material strength (cohesive failure) can be reached with metal-polymer joining. Weathering test series prove that such joints are able to withstand environmental influences typical in targeted fields of application. The obtained results pave the way toward implementing metalpolymer joints in manufacturing processes.

  5. The role of event water, a rapid shallow flow component, and catchment size in summer stormflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, V.A.; McDonnell, Jeffery J.; Burns, Douglas A.; Kendall, C.

    1999-01-01

    Seven nested headwater catchments (8 to 161 ha) were monitored during five summer rain events to evaluate storm runoff components and the effect of catchment size on water sources. Two-component isotopic hydrograph separation showed that event-water contributions near the time of peakflow ranged from 49% to 62% in the 7 catchments during the highest intensity event. The proportion of event water in stormflow was greater than could be accounted for by direct precipitation onto saturated areas. DOC concentrations in stormflow were strongly correlated with stream 18O composition. Bivariate mixing diagrams indicated that the large event water contributions were likely derived from flow through the soil O-horizon. Results from two-tracer, three-component hydrograph separations showed that the throughfall and O-horizon soil-water components together could account for the estimated contributions of event water to stormflow. End-member mixing analysis confirmed these results. Estimated event-water contributions were inversely related to catchment size, but the relation was significant for only the event with greatest rainfall intensity. Our results suggest that perched, shallow subsurface flow provides a substantial contribution to summer stormflow in these small catchments, but the relative contribution of this component decreases with catchment size.Seven nested headwater catchments (8 to 161 ha) were monitored during five summer rain events to evaluate storm runoff components and the effect of catchment size on water sources. Two-component isotopic hydrograph separation showed that event-water contributions near the time of peakflow ranged from 49% to 62% in the 7 catchments during the highest intensity event. The proportion of event water in stormflow was greater than could be accounted for by direct precipitation onto saturated areas. DOC concentrations in stormflow were strongly correlated with stream 18O composition. Bivariate mixing diagrams indicated that the

  6. Direction Finding Using an Antenna with Direction Dependent Impulse Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foltz, Heinrich; Kegege, Obadiah

    2016-01-01

    Wideband antennas may be designed to have an impulse response that is direction dependent, not only in amplitude but also in waveform shape. This property can be used to perform direction finding using a single fixed antenna, without the need for an array or antenna rotation. In this paper direction finding is demonstrated using a simple candelabra-shaped monopole operating in the 1-3 GHz range. The method requires a known transmitted pulse shape and high signal-to-noise ratio, and is not as accurate or robust as conventional methods. However, it can add direction finding capability to a wideband communication system without the addition of any hardware.

  7. Discrete range clustering using Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterji, G. B.; Sridhar, B.

    1993-01-01

    For automatic obstacle avoidance guidance during rotorcraft low altitude flight, a reliable model of the nearby environment is needed. Such a model may be constructed by applying surface fitting techniques to the dense range map obtained by active sensing using radars. However, for covertness, passive sensing techniques using electro-optic sensors are desirable. As opposed to the dense range map obtained via active sensing, passive sensing algorithms produce reliable range at sparse locations, and therefore, surface fitting techniques to fill the gaps in the range measurement are not directly applicable. Both for automatic guidance and as a display for aiding the pilot, these discrete ranges need to be grouped into sets which correspond to objects in the nearby environment. The focus of this paper is on using Monte Carlo methods for clustering range points into meaningful groups. One of the aims of the paper is to explore whether simulated annealing methods offer significant advantage over the basic Monte Carlo method for this class of problems. We compare three different approaches and present application results of these algorithms to a laboratory image sequence and a helicopter flight sequence.

  8. Three-component laser anemometer measurement systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Louis J.

    1991-01-01

    A brief overview of the different laser anemometer (LA) optical designs available is presented. Then, the LA techniques that can be used to design a three-component measurement system for annular geometries are described. Some of the facility design considerations unique to these LA systems are also addressed. Following this, the facilities and the LA systems that were used to successfully measure the three components of velocity in the blading of annular-flow machines are reviewed. Finally, possible LA system enhancements and future research directions are presented.

  9. An overview of the Small Engine Component Technology (SECT) studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanco, M. R.; Wintucky, W. T.; Niedzwiecki, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the joint NASA/Army SECT Studies were to identify high payoff technologies for year 2000 small gas turbine engine applications and to provide a technology plan for guiding future research and technology efforts applicable to rotorcraft, commuter and general aviation aircraft and cruise missiles. Competitive contracts were awarded to Allison, AVCO Lycoming, Garrett, Teledyne CAE and Williams International. This paper presents an overview of the contractors' study efforts for the commuter, rotorcraft, cruise missile, and auxiliary power (APU) applications with engines in the 250 to 1,000 horsepower size range. Reference aircraft, missions and engines were selected. Advanced engine configurations and cycles with projected year 2000 component technologies were evaluated and compared with a reference engine selected by the contractor. For typical commuter and rotorcraft applications, fuel savings of 22 percent to 42 percent can be attained. For $1/gallon and $2/gallon fuel, reductions in direct operating cost range from 6 percent to 16 percent and from 11 percent to 17 percent respectively. For subsonic strategic cruise missile applications, fuel savings of 38 percent to 54 percent can be achieved which allows 35 percent to 60 percent increase in mission range and life cycle cost reductions of 40 percent to 56 percent. High payoff technologies have been identified for all applications.

  10. Choice in a variable environment: effects of blackout duration and extinction between components.

    PubMed

    Davison, Michael; Baum, William M

    2002-01-01

    Pigeons were trained in a procedure in which sessions included seven four- or 10-reinforcer components, each providing a different reinforcer ratio that ranged from 27:1 to 1:27. The components were arranged in random order, and no signals differentiated the component reinforcer ratios. Each condition lasted 50 sessions, and the data from the last 35 sessions were analyzed. Previous results using 10-s blackouts between components showed some carryover of preference from one component to the next, and this effect was investigated in Experiment 1 by varying blackout duration from 1 s to 120 s. The amount of carryover decreased monotonically as the blackout duration was lengthened. Preference also decreased between reinforcers within components, suggesting that preference change during blackout might follow the same function as preference change between reinforcers. Experiment 2 was designed to measure preference change between components more directly and to relate this to preference change during blackout. In two conditions a 60-s blackout occurred between components, and in two other conditions a 60-s period of unsignaled extinction occurred between components. Preference during the extinction period progressively fell toward indifference, and the level of preference following extinction was much the same as that following blackout. Although these results are consistent with Davison and Baum's (2000) theory of the effects of reinforcers on local preference, other findings suggest that theory is incomplete: After a sequence of reinforcers from one alternative, some residual preference remained after 60 s of extinction or blackout, indicating the possibility of an additional longer term accumulation of reinforcer effects than originally suggested.

  11. Effective sampling range of a synthetic protein-based attractant for Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Epsky, Nancy D; Espinoza, Hernán R; Kendra, Paul E; Abernathy, Robert; Midgarden, David; Heath, Robert R

    2010-10-01

    Studies were conducted in Honduras to determine effective sampling range of a female-targeted protein-based synthetic attractant for the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae). Multilure traps were baited with ammonium acetate, putrescine, and trimethylamine lures (three-component attractant) and sampled over eight consecutive weeks. Field design consisted of 38 traps (over 0.5 ha) placed in a combination of standard and high-density grids to facilitate geostatistical analysis, and tests were conducted in coffee (Coffea arabica L.),mango (Mangifera indica L.),and orthanique (Citrus sinensis X Citrus reticulata). Effective sampling range, as determined from the range parameter obtained from experimental variograms that fit a spherical model, was approximately 30 m for flies captured in tests in coffee or mango and approximately 40 m for flies captured in orthanique. For comparison, a release-recapture study was conducted in mango using wild (field-collected) mixed sex C. capitata and an array of 20 baited traps spaced 10-50 m from the release point. Contour analysis was used to document spatial distribution of fly recaptures and to estimate effective sampling range, defined by the area that encompassed 90% of the recaptures. With this approach, effective range of the three-component attractant was estimated to be approximately 28 m, similar to results obtained from variogram analysis. Contour maps indicated that wind direction had a strong influence on sampling range, which was approximately 15 m greater upwind compared with downwind from the release point. Geostatistical analysis of field-captured insects in appropriately designed trapping grids may provide a supplement or alternative to release-recapture studies to estimate sampling ranges for semiochemical-based trapping systems.

  12. Anisotropy, inhomogeneity and inertial-range scalings in turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon, François

    2006-09-01

    This paper provides a detailed study of turbulent statistics and scale-by-scale budgets in turbulent Rayleigh Bénard convection. It aims at testing the applicability of Kolmogorov and Bolgiano theories in the case of turbulent convection and at improving the understanding of the underlying inertial-range scalings, for which a general agreement is still lacking. Particular emphasis is laid on anisotropic and inhomogeneous effects, which are often observed in turbulent convection between two differentially heated plates. For this purpose, the SO(3) decomposition of structure functions and a method of description of inhomogeneities are used to derive inhomogeneous and anisotropic generalizations of Kolmogorov and Yaglom equations applying to Rayleigh Bénard convection, which can be extended easily to other types of anisotropic and/or inhomogeneous flows. The various contributions to these equations are computed in and off the central plane of a convection cell using data produced by a direct numerical simulation of turbulent Boussinesq convection at Ra {=} 10(6) and Pr {=} 1 with aspect ratio A {=} 5. The analysis of the isotropic part of the Kolmogorov equation demonstrates that the shape of the third-order velocity structure function is significantly influenced by buoyancy forcing and large-scale inhomogeneities, while the isotropic part of the mixed third-order structure function <(Deltatheta)(2Deltavec{u}>) appearing in the Yaglom equation exhibits a clear scaling exponent 1 in a small range of scales. The magnitudes of the various low ℓ degree anisotropic components of the equations are also estimated and are shown to be comparable to their isotropic counterparts at moderate to large scales. The analysis of anisotropies notably reveals that computing reduced structure functions (structure functions computed at fixed depth for correlation vectors boldsymbol{r} lying in specific planes only) in order to reveal scaling exponents predicted by isotropic theories

  13. Adaptive reshaper for high dynamic range and wide color gamut video compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Taoran; Pu, Fangjun; Yin, Peng; Pytlarz, Jaclyn; Chen, Tao; Husak, Walt

    2016-09-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) and Wider Color Gamut (WCG) content represents a greater range of luminance levels and a more complete reproduction of colors found in real-world scenes. The characteristics of HDR/WCG content are very different from the SDR content. It poses a challenge to the compression system which is originally designed for SDR content. Recently in MPEG/VCEG, two directions have been taken to improve compression performances for HDR/WCG video using HEVC Main10 codec. The first direction is to improve HDR-10 using encoder optimization. The second direction is to modify the video signal in pre/post processing to better fit compression system. The process therefore is out of coding loop and does not involve changes to the HEVC specification. Among many proposals in the second direction, reshaper is identified to be the key component. In this paper, a novel luma reshaper is presented which re-allocates the codewords to help codec improve subjective quality. In addition, encoder optimization can be performed jointly with reshaping. Experiments are conducted with ICtCp color difference signal. Simulation results show that if both joint optimization of reshaper and encoder are carried out, there is evidence that improvement over the HDR-10 anchor can be achieved.

  14. Evolution of double white dwarf binaries undergoing direct-impact accretion: Implications for gravitational wave astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Kyle; Breivik, Katelyn; Larson, Shane L.; Kalogera, Vassiliki

    2017-01-01

    For close double white dwarf binaries, the mass-transfer phenomenon known as direct-impact accretion (when the mass transfer stream impacts the accretor directly rather than forming a disc) may play a pivotal role in the long-term evolution of the systems. In this analysis, we explore the long-term evolution of white dwarf binaries accreting through direct-impact and explore implications of such systems to gravitational wave astronomy. We cover a broad range of parameter space which includes initial component masses and the strength of tidal coupling, and show that these systems, which lie firmly within the LISA frequency range, show strong negative chirps which can last as long as several million years. Detections of double white dwarf systems in the direct-impact phase by detectors such as LISA would provide astronomers with unique ways of probing the physics governing close compact object binaries.

  15. Component failure data handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Gentillon, C.D.

    1991-04-01

    This report presents generic component failure rates that are used in reliability and risk studies of commercial nuclear power plants. The rates are computed using plant-specific data from published probabilistic risk assessments supplemented by selected other sources. Each data source is described. For rates with four or more separate estimates among the sources, plots show the data that are combined. The method for combining data from different sources is presented. The resulting aggregated rates are listed with upper bounds that reflect the variability observed in each rate across the nuclear power plant industry. Thus, the rates are generic. Both per hour and per demand rates are included. They may be used for screening in risk assessments or for forming distributions to be updated with plant-specific data.

  16. Sprayed skin turbine component

    DOEpatents

    Allen, David B

    2013-06-04

    Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

  17. Intracavity Rayleigh/Mie Scattering for Multipoint, Two-Component Velocity Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivolaru, Daniel; Danehy, Paul M.; Lee, Joseph W.

    2006-01-01

    A simultaneous multi-point two-component Doppler velocimeter is described. The system uses two optical cavities: a Fabry-Perot etalon and an optical cavity for collecting and re-circulating the Rayleigh/Mie scattered light that is collected from the measurement volume in two parallel, but opposite directions. Single-pulse measurements of two orthogonal components of the velocity vector in a supersonic free jet were performed to demonstrate the technique. The re-circulation of the light rejected by the interferometer input mirror also increased the signal intensity by a factor of 3.5. 2005 Optical Society of America Interferometric Rayleigh scattering has previously been used for single-point velocity measurements in unseeded gas flow. However, this past work has generally been limited to probing with continuous-wave lasers resulting in time-averaged measurements of velocity. Multiple velocity components have been measured simultaneously by separate instruments.1,2 It has also been demonstrated that two orthogonal velocity components can be measured simultaneously at one point using one interferometer by reflecting back the probing laser beam, although this approach results in directional ambiguity of the flow velocity vector.3 This measurement ambiguity was removed by prior knowledge of the approximate magnitude and sign of the velocity components. Furthermore, it was shown that multiple points could be measured simultaneously with a Rayleigh scattering interferometric approach, but only one component of velocity was measured.4 Another method of performing multiple component velocity measurements with Rayleigh scattering uses a pair of cameras to image the flow, one of which views the flow through an iodine gas filter. This iodine-filter technique has the advantage of allowing high-resolution velocity imaging, but it generally has a lower dynamic range.

  18. The Component-Based Application for GAMESS

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Fang

    2007-01-01

    GAMESS, a quantum chetnistry program for electronic structure calculations, has been freely shared by high-performance application scientists for over twenty years. It provides a rich set of functionalities and can be run on a variety of parallel platforms through a distributed data interface. While a chemistry computation is sophisticated and hard to develop, the resource sharing among different chemistry packages will accelerate the development of new computations and encourage the cooperation of scientists from universities and laboratories. Common Component Architecture (CCA) offers an enviromnent that allows scientific packages to dynamically interact with each other through components, which enable dynamic coupling of GAMESS with other chetnistry packages, such as MPQC and NWChem. Conceptually, a cotnputation can be constructed with "plug-and-play" components from scientific packages and require more than componentizing functions/subroutines of interest, especially for large-scale scientific packages with a long development history. In this research, we present our efforts to construct cotnponents for GAMESS that conform to the CCA specification. The goal is to enable the fine-grained interoperability between three quantum chemistry programs, GAMESS, MPQC and NWChem, via components. We focus on one of the three packages, GAMESS; delineate the structure of GAMESS computations, followed by our approaches to its component development. Then we use GAMESS as the driver to interoperate integral components from the other tw"o packages, arid show the solutions for interoperability problems along with preliminary results. To justify the versatility of the design, the Tuning and Analysis Utility (TAU) components have been coupled with GAMESS and its components, so that the performance of GAMESS and its components may be analyzed for a wide range of systetn parameters.

  19. Precision Cleaning Titanium Components

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, T.E.; Bohnert, G.W.

    2000-02-02

    Clean bond surfaces are critical to the operation of diffusion bonded titanium engine components. These components can be contaminated with machining coolant, shop dirt, and fingerprints during normal processing and handling. These contaminants must be removed to achieve acceptable bond quality. As environmental concerns become more important in manufacturing, elimination of the use of hazardous materials is desired. For this reason, another process (not using nitric-hydrofluoric acid solution) to clean titanium parts before bonding was sought. Initial cleaning trials were conducted at Honeywell to screen potential cleaning techniques and chemistries. During the initial cleaning process screening phase, Pratt and Whitney provided Honeywell with machined 3 inch x 3 inch x 1 inch titanium test blocks. These test blocks were machined with a water-based machining coolant and exposed to a normal shop environment and handling. (Honeywell sectioned one of these blocks into smaller samples to be used for additional cleanliness verification analyses.) The sample test blocks were ultrasonically cleaned in alkaline solutions and AUGER analysis was used by Honeywell FM and T to validate their cleanliness. This information enabled selection of final cleaning techniques and solutions to be used for the bonding trials. To validate Honeywell's AUGER data and to verify the cleaning processes in actual situations, additional sample blocks were cleaned (using the chosen processes) and then bonded. The bond quality of the test blocks was analyzed according to Pratt and Whitney's requirements. The Charpy impact testing was performed according to ASTM procedure {number_sign}E-23. Bond quality was determined by examining metallographic samples of the bonded test blocks for porosity along the bondline.

  20. Optical communication components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay

    2004-03-01

    We review and contrast key technologies developed to address the optical components market for communication applications. We first review the component requirements from a network perspective. We then look at different material systems, compare their properties, and describe the functions achieved to date in each of them. The material systems reviewed include silica fiber, silica on silicon, silicon on insulator, silicon oxynitride, sol-gels, polymers, thin-film dielectrics, lithium niobate, indium phosphide, gallium arsenide, magneto-optic materials, and birefringent crystals. We then describe the most commonly used classes of optical device technology and present their pros and cons as well as the functions achieved to date in each of them. The technologies reviewed include passive, actuation, and active technologies. The passive technologies described include fused fibers, dispersion-compensating fiber, beam steering, Bragg gratings, diffraction gratings, holographic elements, thin-film filters, photonic crystals, microrings, and birefringent elements. The actuation technologies include thermo-optics, electro-optics, acousto-optics, magneto-optics, electroabsorption, liquid crystals, total internal reflection technologies, and mechanical actuation. The active technologies include heterostructures, quantum wells, rare-earth doping, dye doping, Raman amplification, and semiconductor amplification. We also investigate the use of different material systems and device technologies to achieve building-block functions, including lasers, amplifiers, detectors, modulators, polarization controllers, couplers, filters, switches, attenuators, isolators, circulators, wavelength converters, chromatic dispersion compensators, and polarization mode dispersion compensators. Some of the technologies presented are well established in the industry and in some cases have reached the commodity stage, others have recently become ready for commercial introduction, while some others

  1. A Glossary of Range Terminology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    GLOSSARY OF RANGE TERMINOLOGY" Final 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(e) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMUER(e) Documentation Group Range Commanders...Council White Sands Missile Range, NM 88002 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS Same...ABSOLUTE ADDRESS -- The label or number permanently assigned to a specific storage location, device or register. binary words together with an origin

  2. A Long-Range Video Observation Post

    SciTech Connect

    Arlowe, D.

    1995-07-01

    The Long Range Video Observation Post (LRVOP) Project is a cooperative effort between the US and a Middle Eastern country to develop an improved version of their current video observation post. This project is part of a larger effort to cooperatively develop anti-terrorist technology. This particular equipment is required to facilitate the recording and identification of humans at a range of 1000 meters in day-light and 500 meters at night. The project objective was to take advantage of recent advances in camera technology, recorders, and image processing to provide an significant increase in performance with only a minimum increase in size, weight, and cost. The goal of the project was to convert the users general needs and desires into specific requirements that could be bid on by several companies. This paper covers the specific performance requirements, generally describe the components that might be used, and concentrate on describing the more difficult issues and technical challenges.

  3. Micro-Laser Range Finder Development: Using the Monolithic Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Micro- Laser Range Finder Development: Using the Monolithic Approach February 1999 John... Nettleton , Dallas Barr, Brad Schilling & Jonathan Lei US ARMY CECOM RDEC NVESD Fort Belvoir, VA Samuel M. Goldwasser Engineering Consultant Bala-Cynwyd, PA...ABSTRACT Laser range finders are a vital component of high precision targeting engagements. The precise and accurate range-to-target information is

  4. Effects of directed and kinetic energy weapons on spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Fraas, A P

    1986-12-01

    The characteristics of the various directed energy beams are reviewed, and their damaging effects on typical materials are examined for a wide range of energy pulse intensities and durations. Representative cases are surveyed, and charts are presented to indicate regions in which damage to spacecraft structures, particularly radiators for power plants, would be likely. The effects of kinetic energy weapons, such as bird-shot, are similarly examined. The charts are then applied to evaluate the effectiveness of various measures designed to reduce the vulnerability of spacecraft components, particularly nuclear electric power plants.

  5. Short-range Fundamental forces

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniadis, I; Baessler, Stefan; Buechner, M; Fedorov, General Victor; Hoedl, S.; Lambrecht, A; Nesvizhevsky, V.; Pignol, G; Reynaud, S.; Sobolev, Yu.

    2011-01-01

    We consider theoretical motivations to search for extra short-range fundamental forces as well as experiments constraining their parameters. The forces could be of two types: (1) spin-independent forces; and (2) spin-dependent axion-like forces. Different experimental techniques are sensitive in respective ranges of characteristic distances. The techniques include measurements of gravity at short distances, searches for extra interactions on top of the Casimir force, precision atomic and neutron experiments. We focus on neutron constraints, thus the range of characteristic distances considered here corresponds to the range accessible for neutron experiments.

  6. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Commercial free-range production has become a significant sector of the fresh egg market due to legislation banning conventional cages and consumer preference for products perceived as welfare friendly, as access to outdoor range can lead to welfare benefits such as greater freedom of movement and enhanced behavioural opportunities. This study investigated dispersal patterns, feather condition and activity of laying hens in three distinct zones of the range area; the apron area near shed; enriched zone 10–50 m from shed; and outer range beyond 50 m, in six flocks of laying hens under commercial free-range conditions varying in size between 4000 and 24,000 hens. Each flock was visited for four days to record number of hens in each zone, their behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distances (NND), as well as record temperature and relative humidity during the visit. Temperature and relative humidity varied across the study period in line with seasonal variations and influenced the use of range with fewer hens out of shed as temperature fell or relative humidity rose. On average, 12.5% of the hens were observed on the range and most of these hens were recorded in the apron zone as hen density decreased rapidly with increasing distance from the shed. Larger flocks appeared to have a lower proportion of hens on range. The hens used the range more in the early morning followed by a progressive decrease through to early afternoon. The NND was greatest in the outer range and decreased towards the shed. Feather condition was generally good and hens observed in the outer range had the best overall feather condition. Standing, pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded behaviours and of these, standing occurred most in the apron whereas walking and foraging behaviours were recorded most in the outer range. This study supported the findings of previous studies that reported few hens in the range and greater use of areas closer

  7. Direct interaction of microtubule- and actin-based transport motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. D.; Brady, S. T.; Richards, B. W.; Stenolen, D.; Resau, J. H.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1999-01-01

    The microtubule network is thought to be used for long-range transport of cellular components in animal cells whereas the actin network is proposed to be used for short-range transport, although the mechanism(s) by which this transport is coordinated is poorly understood. For example, in sea urchins long-range Ca2+-regulated transport of exocytotic vesicles requires a microtubule-based motor, whereas an actin-based motor is used for short-range transport. In neurons, microtubule-based kinesin motor proteins are used for long-range vesicular transport but microtubules do not extend into the neuronal termini, where actin filaments form the cytoskeletal framework, and kinesins are rapidly degraded upon their arrival in neuronal termini, indicating that vesicles may have to be transferred from microtubules to actin tracks to reach their final destination. Here we show that an actin-based vesicle-transport motor, MyoVA, can interact directly with a microtubule-based transport motor, KhcU. As would be expected if these complexes were functional, they also contain kinesin light chains and the localization of MyoVA and KhcU overlaps in the cell. These results indicate that cellular transport is, in part, coordinated through the direct interaction of different motor molecules.

  8. The diffuse component of erythemal ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Abel A

    2015-11-01

    The diffuse (Dif) component of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) plays an important role in the daily exposure of humans to solar radiation. This study proposes a semi-empirical method to obtain the Dif component of the erythemal dose rate, or the erythemally weighted irradiance, (EDRDif) calculated from synchronized measurements of the Dif component of UVR (UVDif) and the global (G) irradiances of both UVR (UVG) and the erythemal dose rate (EDRG). Since the study was conducted in the tropics, results involve a wide range of solar zenith angles to which EDRDif is seasonally dependent. Clouds are the main atmospheric agent affecting Dif radiation. The ratio between Dif and G (Dif/G) showed a quadratic dependence on cloud cover with a coefficient of determination r(2) = 0.79. The maxima of EDRDif were mainly above the moderate range (>137.5 mW m(-2)) of the UV-Index and reached the extreme range (>262.5 mW m(-2)) for the spring-summer period. The fraction of the global daily erythemal dose (daily EDG) corresponding to Dif radiation (daily EDDif) ranged from 936 J m(-2) to 5053 J m(-2) and averaged 2673 J m(-2). Daily EDDif corresponded to at least 48% of daily EDG for a practically cloudless sky. Therefore, Dif radiation is a real threat. Lighter skin people (types I and II) can get sunburnt in a couple of minutes under such an incidence of radiation. Moreover, accumulative harm can affect all skin types.

  9. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Robert C.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy.

  10. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, R.C.; Schubert, W.K.

    1994-01-18

    An apparatus is described for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy. 6 figures.

  11. GMES Space Component: Programme overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschbacher, J.; Milagro-Perez, M. P.

    2012-04-01

    The European Union (EU) and the European Space Agency (ESA) have developed the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) programme as Europe's answer to the vital need for joined-up data about our climate, environment and security. Through a unique combination of satellite, atmospheric and Earth-based monitoring systems, the initiative will provide new insight into the state of the land, sea and air, providing policymakers, scientists, businesses and the public with accurate and timely information. GMES capabilities include monitoring and forecasting of climatic change, flood risks, soil and coastal erosion, crop and fish resources, air pollution, greenhouse gases, iceberg distribution and snow cover, among others. To accomplish this, GMES has been divided into three main components: Space, In-situ and Services. The Space Component, led by ESA, comprises five types of new satellites called Sentinels that are being developed by ESA specifically to meet the needs of GMES, the first of which to be launched in 2013. These missions carry a range of technologies, such as radar and multi-spectral imaging instruments for land, ocean and atmospheric monitoring. In addition, access to data from the so-called Contributing Missions guarantees that European space infrastructure is fully used for GMES. An integrated Ground Segment ensures access to Sentinels and Contributing Missions data. The in-situ component, under the coordination of the European Environment Agency (EEA), is composed of atmospheric and Earth based monitoring systems, and based on established networks and programmes at European and international levels. The European Commission is in charge of implementing the services component of GMES and of leading GMES overall. GMES services, fed with data from the Space and In-situ components, will provide essential information in five main domains, atmosphere, ocean and land monitoring as well as emergency response and security. Climate change has been added

  12. Ranging and tracking system for proximity operations, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Udalov, S.; Nilsen, P. W.

    1979-01-01

    A study task is reported which is directed towards developing a conceptual design of a small, lightweight range and range rate radar sensor system to meet NASA's requirements for accurate short-range and velocity measurements in an orbital environment. Within the context of the requirements, the short range implies system operation at 0 m to 1850 m (6000 ft) and accurate implies a range measurement to within 1 sigma accuracy of 0.20 m (0.67 ft) and a range rate (velocity) measurement to within 1 sigma accuracy of 0.01 m/sec (0.033 ft/sec).

  13. CO Component Estimation Based on the Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kaji, Ryohei; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.; Fukui, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA) is a component separation algorithm based on the levels of non-Gaussianity. Here we apply FastICA to the component separation problem of the microwave background, including carbon monoxide (CO) line emissions that are found to contaminate the PLANCK High Frequency Instrument (HFI) data. Specifically, we prepare 100 GHz, 143 GHz, and 217 GHz mock microwave sky maps, which include galactic thermal dust, NANTEN CO line, and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) emissions, and then estimate the independent components based on the kurtosis. We find that FastICA can successfully estimate the CO component as the first independent component in our deflection algorithm because its distribution has the largest degree of non-Gaussianity among the components. Thus, FastICA can be a promising technique to extract CO-like components without prior assumptions about their distributions and frequency dependences.

  14. CO component estimation based on the independent component analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kaji, Ryohei; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.; Fukui, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA) is a component separation algorithm based on the levels of non-Gaussianity. Here we apply FastICA to the component separation problem of the microwave background, including carbon monoxide (CO) line emissions that are found to contaminate the PLANCK High Frequency Instrument (HFI) data. Specifically, we prepare 100 GHz, 143 GHz, and 217 GHz mock microwave sky maps, which include galactic thermal dust, NANTEN CO line, and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) emissions, and then estimate the independent components based on the kurtosis. We find that FastICA can successfully estimate the CO component as the first independent component in our deflection algorithm because its distribution has the largest degree of non-Gaussianity among the components. Thus, FastICA can be a promising technique to extract CO-like components without prior assumptions about their distributions and frequency dependences.

  15. Small Engine Component Technology (SECT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Early, M.; Dawson, R.; Zeiner, P.; Turk, M.; Benn, K.

    1986-01-01

    A study of small gas turbine engines was conducted to identify high payoff technologies for year-2000 engines and to define companion technology plans. The study addressed engines in the 186 to 746 KW (250 to 1000 shp) or equivalent thrust range for rotorcraft, commuter (turboprop), cruise missile (turbojet), and APU applications. The results show that aggressive advancement of high payoff technologies can produce significant benefits, including reduced SFC, weight, and cost for year-2000 engines. Mission studies for these engines show potential fuel burn reductions of 22 to 71 percent. These engine benefits translate into reductions in rotorcraft and commuter aircraft direct operating costs (DOC) of 7 to 11 percent, and in APU-related DOCs of 37 to 47 percent. The study further shows that cruise missile range can be increased by as much as 200 percent (320 percent with slurry fuels) for a year-2000 missile-turbojet system compared to a current rocket-powered system. The high payoff technologies were identified and the benefits quantified. Based on this, technology plans were defined for each of the four engine applications as recommended guidelines for further NASA research and technology efforts to establish technological readiness for the year 2000.

  16. High dynamic range subjective testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Brahim; Nilsson, Mike

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes of a set of subjective tests that the authors have carried out to assess the end user perception of video encoded with High Dynamic Range technology when viewed in a typical home environment. Viewers scored individual single clips of content, presented in High Definition (HD) and Ultra High Definition (UHD), in Standard Dynamic Range (SDR), and in High Dynamic Range (HDR) using both the Perceptual Quantizer (PQ) and Hybrid Log Gamma (HLG) transfer characteristics, and presented in SDR as the backwards compatible rendering of the HLG representation. The quality of SDR HD was improved by approximately equal amounts by either increasing the dynamic range or increasing the resolution to UHD. A further smaller increase in quality was observed in the Mean Opinion Scores of the viewers by increasing both the dynamic range and the resolution, but this was not quite statistically significant.

  17. Paleomagnetism of the Newcastle Range, northern Queensland: Eastern Gondwana in the Late Paleozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Kari L.; Lackie, Mark A.; Clark, David A.; Schmidt, Phil W.

    2003-06-01

    The Newcastle Range is an extensive (2500 km2) and well-exposed caldera system erupted on the trailing edge of Eastern Gondwana between 325 and 295 Ma. Paleomagnetic samples were collected from ignimbrites and associated microgranitoid intrusions from the central, northern and southern calderas from which three components of magnetization are recognized. Component 1 is considered to be a viscous magnetization acquired during the Brunhes Chron. A presumed Permian component, C2, is found in seven paleomagnetic sites with a mean pole at 30.9°S, 139.7°E (K = 13.9, A95 = 16.8°, ASD = 21.7°), agreeing with previously reported Permian data from Australia. Carboniferous units have a well-defined characteristic component, C3, distinguished by dual polarity (predominantly reversed) and moderate to steep inclination directions. Paleomagnetic polarities in the Newcastle Range Volcanics are formation dependent and new constraints on the timing of Carboniferous volcanism (˜325-317 Ma) are consistent with recent reanalysis of the base of the Permo-Carboniferous Reversed Superchron (PCRS). A mean paleomagnetic pole, calculated from 15 VGPs, lies at 63.4°S, 125°E (K = 26.22, A95 = 7.6°, ASD = 15.8°), suggesting that Australia remained at midlatitudes into the Middle Carboniferous. This paleomagnetic pole is consistent with similarly aged poles from Western Gondwana, the conformity of which indicates contributions from nondipole components of the Earth's paleofield were probably not significant in the time immediately preceding the PCRS.

  18. Range indices of geomagnetic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, W.F.; Green, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    The simplest index of geomagnetic activity is the range in nT from maximum to minimum value of the field in a given time interval. The hourly range R was recommended by IAGA for use at observatories at latitudes greater than 65??, but was superceded by AE. The most used geomagnetic index K is based on the range of activity in a 3 h interval corrected for the regular daily variation. In order to take advantage of real time data processing, now available at many observatories, it is proposed to introduce a 1 h range index and also a 3 h range index. Both will be computed hourly, i.e. each will have a series of 24 per day, the 3 h values overlapping. The new data will be available as the range (R) of activity in nT and also as a logarithmic index (I) of the range. The exponent relating index to range in nT is based closely on the scale used for computing K values. The new ranges and range indices are available, from June 1987, to users in real time and can be accessed by telephone connection or computer network. Their first year of production is regarded as a trial period during which their value to the scientific and commercial communities will be assessed, together with their potential as indicators of regional and global disturbances' and in which trials will be conducted into ways of eliminating excessive bias at quiet times due to the rate of change of the daily variation field. ?? 1988.

  19. Foraging optimally for home ranges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, Michael S.; Powell, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Economic models predict behavior of animals based on the presumption that natural selection has shaped behaviors important to an animal's fitness to maximize benefits over costs. Economic analyses have shown that territories of animals are structured by trade-offs between benefits gained from resources and costs of defending them. Intuitively, home ranges should be similarly structured, but trade-offs are difficult to assess because there are no costs of defense, thus economic models of home-range behavior are rare. We present economic models that predict how home ranges can be efficient with respect to spatially distributed resources, discounted for travel costs, under 2 strategies of optimization, resource maximization and area minimization. We show how constraints such as competitors can influence structure of homes ranges through resource depression, ultimately structuring density of animals within a population and their distribution on a landscape. We present simulations based on these models to show how they can be generally predictive of home-range behavior and the mechanisms that structure the spatial distribution of animals. We also show how contiguous home ranges estimated statistically from location data can be misleading for animals that optimize home ranges on landscapes with patchily distributed resources. We conclude with a summary of how we applied our models to nonterritorial black bears (Ursus americanus) living in the mountains of North Carolina, where we found their home ranges were best predicted by an area-minimization strategy constrained by intraspecific competition within a social hierarchy. Economic models can provide strong inference about home-range behavior and the resources that structure home ranges by offering falsifiable, a priori hypotheses that can be tested with field observations.

  20. Component technology for Stirling power converters

    SciTech Connect

    Thieme, L.G.

    1994-09-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center has organized a component technology program as part of the efforts to develop Stirling converter technology for space power applications. The Stirling space power program is part of the NASA High Capacity Power Project of the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). NASA Lewis is also providing technical management for a DOE/Sandia program to develop Stirling converters for solar terrestrial power producing electricity for the utility grid. The primary contractors for the space power and solar terrestrial programs develop component technologies directly related to their program goals. This Lewis component technology effort, while coordinated with the main programs, aims at longer term issues, advanced technologies, and independent assessments. This paper will present an overview of work on linear alternators, engine/alternator/load interactions and controls, heat exchangers, materials, life and reliability, and bearings.