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Sample records for range facility pmrf

  1. 33 CFR 165.1406 - Safety Zone: Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zone: Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii. 165.1406 Section 165.1406 Navigation and... Areas Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1406 Safety Zone: Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF...

  2. 33 CFR 165.1406 - Safety Zone: Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zone: Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii. 165.1406 Section 165.1406 Navigation and... Areas Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1406 Safety Zone: Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF...

  3. 33 CFR 165.1406 - Safety Zone: Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone: Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii. 165.1406 Section 165.1406 Navigation and... Areas Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1406 Safety Zone: Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF...

  4. 33 CFR 165.1406 - Safety Zone: Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety Zone: Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii. 165.1406 Section 165.1406 Navigation and... Areas Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1406 Safety Zone: Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF...

  5. 33 CFR 165.1406 - Safety Zone: Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zone: Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii. 165.1406 Section 165.1406 Navigation and... Areas Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1406 Safety Zone: Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF...

  6. A Review of Solar-Powered Aircraft Flight Activity at the Pacific Missile Range Test Facility, Kauai, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehernberger, L. J.; Donohue, Casey; Teets, Edward H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    A series of solar-powered aircraft have been designed and operated by AeroVironment, Inc. (Monrovia, CA) as a part of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) objectives to develop energy-efficient high-altitude long-endurance platforms for earth observations and communications applications. Flight operations have been conducted at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards CA and at the U.S. Navy Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) at Barking Sands, Kauai, HI. These aircraft flown at PMRF are named Pathfinder , Pathfinder Plus and Helios . Sizes of these three aircraft range from 560 lb with a 99-ft wingspan to 2300 lb with a 247-ft wingspan. Available payload capacity reaches approximately 200 lb. Pathfinder uses six engines and propellers: Pathfinder Plus 8; and Helios 14. The 2003 Helios fuel cell configurations used 10 engines and propellers. The PMRF was selected as a base of operations because if offers optimal summertime solar exposure, low prevailing wind-speeds on the runway, modest upper-air wind-speeds and the availability of suitable airspace. Between 1997 and 2001, successive altitude records of 71,530 ft, 80,200 ft, and 96,863 ft were established. Flight durations extended to 18 hours.

  7. Long-Range Facilities - Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-31

    3. DATES COVERED 00-00-1981 to 00-00-1981 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Long-Range Facilities - Plan 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...sternwheeler “Mark Twain” for Disneyland and fabrication of eight 52 foot submarines for the Disneyland “Navy.” This was followed by fabrication of the masts...converting the PRESIDENT GRANT , PRESIDENT McKINLEY and PRESIDENT FILLMORE to container ships for American President Lines, Ltd. These ships were designed to

  8. The Development of an Information System Master Plan for the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Barking Sands, Hawaii

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    sites and support facilities are located on the islands of Niihau and Oahu. Figure 1 depicts the overall layout of PMRF. [Ref. 4: p. 2] In addition...the HIANG facility at Kokee: • a wideband microwave system serving Niihau Island remotely controls operation of the AN/APS-134 surveillance radar, and...provides relay of digitized radar data, control data and voice between the remotely operated, unmanned radar on Niihau Island and Barking Sands

  9. Concept definition study for an extremely large aerophysics range facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, H.; Witcofski, R.

    1992-01-01

    The development of a large aerophysical ballistic range facility is considered to study large-scale hypersonic flows at high Reynolds numbers for complex shapes. A two-stage light gas gun is considered for the hypervelocity launcher, and the extensive range tankage is discussed with respect to blast suppression, model disposition, and the sabot impact tank. A layout is given for the large aerophysics facility, and illustrations are provided for key elements such as the guide rail. The paper shows that such a facility could be used to launch models with diameters approaching 250 mm at velocities of 6.5 km/s with peak achievable accelerations of not more than 85.0 kgs. The envisioned range would provide gas-flow facilities capable of controlling the modeled quiescent atmospheric conditions. The facility is argued to be a feasible and important step in the investigation and experiment of such hypersonic vehicles as the National Aerospace Plane.

  10. Pacific Missile Range Facility Intercept Test Support. Environmental Assessment/Overseas Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    frequency monitoring, target control, and electronic warfare and networked operations. Kokee supports tracking radars, telemetry, communications, and...owned island of Niihau provide support and sites for a remotely operated PMRF surveillance radar, a Test Vehicle Recovery Site, an electronic warfare...site, multiple electronic warfare portable simulator sites, a marker for aircraft mining exercise programs, and a helicopter terrain-following

  11. Environmental Assessment for the Blair Lakes Bombing Range Facility Improvements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    None of these sites would be impacted by range activities. In the event that historic or cultura l sites are discovered during range construction or...willow. These areas often contain seasonally persistent water bodies. Along stream courses (Willow and Dry Creek, and tributaries ) soils are...The only identified fish stream in the immediate facility area is an unnamed tributary of Clear Creek. The ADF&G has catalogued this stream as

  12. Major Range and Test Facility Base Summary of Capabilities.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS 1963 A 3,i 4, S °.I i L -. ~ . % o,. ° . - ° . - . .I ¢ PHOTOGRAPH THIS SHEET LEVEL INVENTORY DOCUMENT...NUMBER DOD 3200.11-D 4. TTLE(~dS..tt~t@) S TYPE Of REPORT a PERIO’ COVERED Major Range and Test Facility Base Summary Reference Maerial of Capabilities...Electronic Warfare, Command, Control Communications and Intelligence (C31) Surveillance, Jammers, Radar, Test Facility ZG5 ABETW ACT f~ a "Afie Afr- s 444 eF~f

  13. The Wallops Flight Facility Rapid Response Range Operations Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Bruce E.; Kremer, Steven E.

    2004-01-01

    While the dominant focus on short response missions has appropriately centered on the launch vehicle and spacecraft, often overlooked or afterthought phases of these missions have been launch site operations and the activities of launch range organizations. Throughout the history of organized spaceflight, launch ranges have been the bane of flight programs as the source of expense, schedule delays, and seemingly endless requirements. Launch Ranges provide three basic functions: (1) provide an appropriate geographical location to meet orbital other mission trajectory requirements, (2) provide project services such as processing facilities, launch complexes, tracking and data services, and expendable products, and (3) assure safety and property protection to participating personnel and third-parties. The challenge with which launch site authorities continuously struggle, is the inherent conflict arising from projects whose singular concern is execution of their mission, and the range s need to support numerous simultaneous customers. So, while tasks carried out by a launch range committed to a single mission pale in comparison to efforts of a launch vehicle or spacecraft provider and could normally be carried out in a matter of weeks, major launch sites have dozens of active projects separate sponsoring organizations. Accommodating the numerous tasks associated with each mission, when hardware failures, weather, maintenance requirements, and other factors constantly conspire against the range resource schedulers, make the launch range as significant an impediment to responsive missions as launch vehicles and their cargo. The obvious solution to the launch site challenge was implemented years ago when the Department of Defense simply established dedicated infrastructure and personnel to dedicated missions, namely an Inter Continental Ballistic Missile. This however proves to be prohibitively expensive for all but the most urgent of applications. So the challenge

  14. X-33 Integrated Test Facility Extended Range Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Ashley

    1998-01-01

    In support of the X-33 single-stage-to-orbit program, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center was selected to provide continuous range communications of the X-33 vehicle from launch at Edwards Air Force Base, California, through landing at Malmstrom Air Force Base Montana, or at Michael Army Air Field, Utah. An extensive real-time range simulation capability is being developed to ensure successful communications with the autonomous X-33 vehicle. This paper provides an overview of various levels of simulation, integration, and test being developed to support the X-33 extended range subsystems. These subsystems include the flight termination system, L-band command uplink subsystem, and S-band telemetry downlink subsystem.

  15. Concept definition study for an extremely large aerophysics range facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Hallock F.

    1993-01-01

    A conceptual design of a very large aeroballistic range is presented, as are its operational characteristics and procedures. The proposed model launcher is a two-stage light-gas gun, having a launch tube diameter of 254 mm, and the capability of accelerating a 14 kg launch mass to 6.1 km/sec. The gun's 91.4 cm diameter piston is driven by pressurized helium. High pressures in the central breech are contained by a multiple disk arrangement. The blast tank and sabot separation tank are described, as are methods for arresting sabot segments. The conceptual design of the range itself includes a 3.3 m diameter test or flight chamber some 330 m in length. Provisions are made for testing of free flight models and tests in which the model is confined by a track system. Methods for model deceleration and recovery are described. Provisions required for future addition of advanced model launchers such as an electromagnetic launcher or ram accelerator are addressed. Siting and safety issues are also addressed.

  16. Temporal Variability of Upper-level Winds at the Eastern Range, Western Range and Wallops Flight Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Space launch vehicles incorporate upper-level wind profiles to determine wind effects on the vehicle and for a commit to launch decision. These assessments incorporate wind profiles measured hours prior to launch and may not represent the actual wind the vehicle will fly through. Uncertainty in the upper-level winds over the time period between the assessment and launch can be mitigated by a statistical analysis of wind change over time periods of interest using historical data from the launch range. Five sets of temporal wind pairs at various times (.75, 1.5, 2, 3 and 4-hrs) at the Eastern Range, Western Range and Wallops Flight Facility were developed for use in upper-level wind assessments. Database development procedures as well as statistical analysis of temporal wind variability at each launch range will be presented.

  17. 33 CFR 334.1390 - Pacific Ocean off the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; danger zone. 334.1390 Section 334.1390... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1390 Pacific Ocean off the Pacific Missile Range Facility at... Pacific Missile Range Facility range boats, beach markings including beach signs along the north and south...

  18. 33 CFR 334.1390 - Pacific Ocean at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility. 334.1390 Section 334.1390 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1390 Pacific Ocean at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility. (a... individual basis, by prior arrangement with the Commanding Officer, Pacific Missile Range Facility, Hawaiian...

  19. 33 CFR 334.1390 - Pacific Ocean at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility. 334.1390 Section 334.1390 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1390 Pacific Ocean at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility. (a... individual basis, by prior arrangement with the Commanding Officer, Pacific Missile Range Facility, Hawaiian...

  20. 33 CFR 334.1390 - Pacific Ocean at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility. 334.1390 Section 334.1390 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1390 Pacific Ocean at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility. (a... individual basis, by prior arrangement with the Commanding Officer, Pacific Missile Range Facility, Hawaiian...

  1. 33 CFR 334.1390 - Pacific Ocean at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility. 334.1390 Section 334.1390 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1390 Pacific Ocean at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility. (a... individual basis, by prior arrangement with the Commanding Officer, Pacific Missile Range Facility, Hawaiian...

  2. 78 FR 27124 - Pacific Ocean Off the Kekaha Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; Danger Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... the Kekaha Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; Danger Zone AGENCY: U.S. Army... Pacific Ocean off the Kekaha Range Facility, Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii. The proposed... Kekaha Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii. The Corps authority to establish this...

  3. Experimental forests and ranges. Field research facilities of the Pacific Southwest Research Station.

    Treesearch

    Neil H. Berg

    1990-01-01

    The 10 experimental forests and ranges in California administered by the Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, are described. The purposes of these facilities, and how to request their use for approved scientific study are given, and the natural resource base, data bases, studies, and general features of each are also...

  4. Long Range Facilities Master Plan: 1986-2000, San Diego Unified School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Billie; And Others

    The Long-Range Facilities Master Plan presents solution strategies and financing methods for accommodating a projected student enrollment increase of 45,000 between 1986 and 2000. This increase, plus limited financial resources, school use studies, and recent legislation, necessitated the plan. The issues include housing students, facility…

  5. The Wallops Flight Facility Model for an Integrated Federal/Commercial Launch Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    Historically, the federal government has been the predominant purchaser of space launches in the United States. The government met its needs through purchase of hardware and services. It also provided the infrastructure necessary to conduct launch operations through federal launch ranges, both military and NASA. Under this model, the government had the complete ownership, responsibility, liability, and expense for launch activities. As the commercial space sector grew, there emerged a corresponding growth in demand for launch range services. However, the expense and complexity of activities has thus far deterred a rapid rise in the establishment of purely commercial launch sites. In this context, purely commercial is defined as "without benefit of capabilities provided by the federal government." Consistent with the Commercial Space Launch Act, in recent years NASA and the Air Force have supported commercial launches from government launch ranges on a cost-reimbursable, non-interference basis. In this mode the commercial launch service providers contract with the government to provide services including use of facilities, tracking and data services, and range safety. As the commercial market projections began to show significant opportunities for economic development, several states established spaceports to provide the services necessary to meet these projected commercial needs. In 1997, NASA agreed to the establishment of the Virginia Space Flight Center (VSFC) at the Wallops Flight Facility. Under this arrangement, NASA agreed to allow Virginia Commercial Space Flight Authority (VCSFA) to construct facilities on NASA property and agreed to provide services in accordance with the Space Act of 1958 and the Commercial Space Launch Act of 1984 (as amended) to support VSFC launch customers. The relationship between NASA and VCSFA, however, has evolved beyond a customer supplier relationship. A partnership relationship has emerged which pairs the strengths of the

  6. Advanced Spectroscopic and Thermal Imaging Instrumentation for Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF, an aeroballistic range) at NASA Ames support basic research in aerothermodynamic phenomena of atmospheric entry, specifically shock layer radiation spectroscopy, convective and radiative heat transfer, and transition to turbulence. Innovative optical instrumentation has been developed and implemented to meet the challenges posed from obtaining such data in these impulse facilities. Spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of absolute radiance of a travelling shock wave in EAST are acquired using multiplexed, time-gated imaging spectrographs. Nearly complete spectral coverage from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near infrared is possible in a single experiment. Time-gated thermal imaging of ballistic range models in flight enables quantitative, global measurements of surface temperature. These images can be interpreted to determine convective heat transfer rates and reveal transition to turbulence due to isolated and distributed surface roughness at hypersonic velocities. The focus of this paper is a detailed description of the optical instrumentation currently in use in the EAST and HFFAF.

  7. 78 FR 39198 - Pacific Ocean Off the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; Danger Zone AGENCY: U.S... off the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii. The U.S. Navy... at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii by increasing the water area historically noted on nautical...

  8. Overview of the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Mobile Range Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Rodney A.; Semancik, Susan K.; Smith, Donna C.; Stancil, Robert K.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA GSFC's Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) Mobile Range Control System (MRCS) is based on the functionality of the WFF Range Control Center at Wallops Island, Virginia. The MRCS provides real time instantaneous impact predictions, real time flight performance data, and other critical information needed by mission and range safety personnel in support of range operations at remote launch sites. The MRCS integrates a PC telemetry processing system (TELPro), a PC radar processing system (PCDQS), multiple Silicon Graphics display workstations (IRIS), and communication links within a mobile van for worldwide support of orbital, suborbital, and aircraft missions. This paper describes the MRCS configuration; the TELPro's capability to provide single/dual telemetry tracking and vehicle state data processing; the PCDQS' capability to provide real time positional data and instantaneous impact prediction for up to 8 data sources; and the IRIS' user interface for setup/display options. With portability, PC-based data processing, high resolution graphics, and flexible multiple source support, the MRCS system is proving to be responsive to the ever-changing needs of a variety of increasingly complex missions.

  9. The Abbott School Construction Program: Report on the NJ Department of Education Proposed Regulations on Long-Range Facilities Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponessa, Joan

    2004-01-01

    This report on Long Range Facilities Plans (LRFPs) analyzes regulations proposed by the New Jersey Department of Education (NJDOE) to implement the Educational Facilities Construction and Financing Act. (EFCFA). EFCFA, which authorizes and governs New Jersey's public school construction program, was enacted in July 2000 to implement the State…

  10. Long Range Facilities Planning and Design Implementation for Students with Disabilities: A Guide for New Jersey School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenkron, Ruth; Ponessa, Joan

    2005-01-01

    The long range facilities planning (LRFP) process presents a wonderful opportunity for New Jersey's school districts to re-examine and strengthen their long term planning for educational adequacy in 21st century school facilities. It provides an opportunity for districts to work closely with the special education community to ensure that New…

  11. Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cornelison, Charles J.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and the Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) at NASA Ames Research Center are described. These facilities have been in operation since the 1960s and have supported many NASA missions and technology development initiatives. The facilities have world-unique capabilities that enable experimental studies of real-gas aerothermal, gas dynamic, and kinetic phenomena of atmospheric entry.

  12. Altus II high altitude science aircraft decending toward U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Altus II descends towards the Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. The Altus II was flown as a performance and propulsion testbed for future high-altitude science platform aircraft under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The rear-engined Altus II and its sister ship, the Altus I, were built by General Atomics/Aeronautical Systems, Inc., of San Diego, Calif. They are designed for high-altitude, long-duration scientific sampling missions, and are powered by turbocharged piston engines. The Altus I, built for the Naval Postgraduate School, reached over 43,500 feet with a single-stage turbocharger feeding its four-cylinder Rotax engine in 1997, while the Altus II, incorporating a two-stage turbocharger built by Thermo-Mechanical Systems, reached and sustained an altitudeof 55,000 feet for four hours in 1999. A pilot in a control station on the ground flies the craft by radio signals, using visual cues from a video camera in the nose of the Altus and information from the craft's air data system.

  13. Statistical Short-Range Forecast Guidance for Cloud Ceilings Over the Shuttle Landing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred C.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the results of the AMU's Short-Range Statistical Forecasting task. The cloud ceiling forecast over the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) is a critical element in determining whether a Shuttle should land. Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) forecasters find that ceilings at the SLF are challenging to forecast. The AMU was tasked to develop ceiling forecast equations to minimize the challenge. Studies in the literature that showed success in improving short-term forecasts of ceiling provided the basis for the AMU task. A 20-year record of cool-season hourly surface observations from stations in east-central Florida was used for the equation development. Two methods were used: an observations-based (OBS) method that incorporated data from all stations, and a persistence climatology (PCL) method used as the benchmark. Equations were developed for 1-, 2-, and 3-hour lead times at each hour of the day. A comparison between the two methods indicated that the OBS equations performed well and produced an improvement over the PCL equations. Therefore, the conclusion of the AMU study is that OBS equations produced more accurate forecasts than the PCL equations, and can be used in operations. They provide another tool with which to make the ceiling forecasts that are critical to safe Shuttle landings at KSC.

  14. Temporal Variability of Upper-level Winds at the Eastern Range, Western Range and Wallops Flight Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Space launch vehicle commit-to-launch decisions include an assessment of the upper-level (UL) atmospheric wind environment to assess the vehicle's controllability and structural integrity during ascent. These assessments occur at predetermined times during the launch countdown based on measured wind data obtained prior to the assessment. However, the pre-launch measured winds may not represent the wind environment during the vehicle ascent. Uncertainty in the UL winds over the time period between the assessment and launch can be mitigated by a statistical analysis of wind change over time periods of interest using historical data from the launch range. Without historical data, theoretical wind models must be used, which can result in inaccurate wind placards that misrepresent launch availability. Using an overconservative model could result in overly restrictive vehicle wind placards, thus potentially reducing launch availability. Conversely, using an under-conservative model could result in launching into winds that might damage or destroy the vehicle. A large sample of measured wind profiles best characterizes the wind change environment. These historical databases consist of a certain number of wind pairs, where two wind profile measurements spaced by the time period of interest define a pair.

  15. High-Resolution Mesoscale Model Setup for the Eastern Range and Wallops Flight Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscale weather conditions can have an adverse effect on space launch, landing, ground processing, and weather advisories, watches, and warnings at the Eastern Range (ER) in Florida and Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) in Virginia. During summer, land-sea interactions across Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) lead to sea breeze front formation, which can spawn deep convection that can hinder operations and endanger personnel and resources. Many other weak locally-driven low-level boundaries and their interactions with the sea breeze front and each other can also initiate deep convection in the KSC/CCAFS area. These convective processes often last 60 minutes or less and pose a significant challenge to the local forecasters. Surface winds during the transition seasons (spring and fall) pose the most difficulties for the forecasters at WFF. They also encounter problems forecasting convective activity and temperature during those seasons. Therefore, accurate mesoscale model forecasts are needed to better forecast a variety of unique weather phenomena. Global and national scale models cannot properly resolve important local-scale weather features at each location due to their horizontal resolutions being much too coarse. Therefore, a properly tuned local data assimilation (DA) and forecast model at a high resolution is needed to provide improved capability. To accomplish this, a number of sensitivity tests were performed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in order to determine the best DA/model configuration for operational use at each of the space launch ranges to best predict winds, precipitation, and temperature. A set of Perl scripts to run the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI)/WRF in real-time were provided by NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT). The GSI can analyze many types of observational data including satellite, radar, and conventional data. The GSI/WRF scripts

  16. Space Technology Demonstrations Using Low Cost, Short-Schedule Airborne and Range Facilities at the Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, John; Kelly, John; Jones, Dan; Lee, James

    2013-01-01

    There is a national effort to expedite advanced space technologies on new space systems for both government and commercial applications. In order to lower risk, these technologies should be demonstrated in a relevant environment before being installed in new space systems. This presentation introduces several low cost, short schedule space technology demonstrations using airborne and range facilities available at the Dryden Flight Research Center.

  17. Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    in gun performance and launching techniques enabled Mach numbers over 10 to be realized at flight-relevant Reynolds numbers. Although the SSFF...contoured nozzle produced an accelerating supersonic flow with a concomitant exponential decay in density. A two-stage light gas gun fired models upstream...km/s, or Mach 50. Such extreme conditions could not be met by a counterflow facility consisting of the highest performance light gas gun and a

  18. Role Of High Speed Photography In The Testing Capabilities Of The Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) Range And Track Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, Roy E.; Dugger, Paul H.

    1983-03-01

    Since the onset of user testing in the AEDC aeroballistic ranges in 1961, concentrated efforts in such areas as model launching techniques, test environment simulation, and specialized instrumentation have been made to enhance the usefulness of these test facilities. A wide selection of specialized instrumentation has been developed over the years to provide, among other features, panoramic photographic coverage of test models during flight. Pulsed ruby lasers, xenon flash lamps, visible-light spark sources, and flash X-ray systems are employed as short-duration radiation sources in various front-light and back-light photographic systems. Visible-light and near infrared image intensifier diodes are used to achieve high-speed shuttering in photographic pyrometry systems that measure surface temperatures of test models in flight. Turbine-driven framing cameras are used to provide multiframe photography of such high-speed phenomena as impact debris formation and model encounter with erosive fields. As a result, the capabilities of these ballistic range test units have increased significantly in regard to the types of tests that can be accommodated and to the quality and quantity of data that can be provided. Presently, five major range and companion track facilities are active in conducting hypervelocity testing in AEDC's von K6rman Gas Dynamics Facility (VKF): Ranges G, K, and S-1 and Tracks G and K. The following types of tests are conducted in these test units: ablation/erosion, transpiration-cooled nosetip (TCNT), nosetip transition, heat transfer, aerodynamic, cannon projectile, rocket contrail, reentry physics, and hypervelocity impact. The parallel achievements in high-speed photography and testing capabilities are discussed, and the significant role of photographic systems in the development of the overall testing capabilities of the AEDC range and track facilities is illustrated in numerous examples of photographic results.

  19. Management and Capability ot the Major Range and Test Facility Bases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-07-27

    The audit objective was to evaluate management oversight provided to the test ranges and determine whether management oversight could be streamlined... The audit also evaluated whether program managers were procuring test resources that already existed at the test ranges. Management controls related to the objectives were also evaluated.

  20. MLRS - A lunar/artificial satellite laser ranging facility at the McDonald Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelus, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    Experience from lunar and satellite laser ranging experiments carried out at McDonald Observatory has been used to design the McDonald Laser Ranging Station (MLRS). The MLRS is a dual-purpose installation designed to obtain observations from the LAGEOS satellite and lunar targets. The instruments used at the station include a telescope assembly 0.76 meters in diameter; a Q-switched doubled neodymium YAG laser with a pulse rate of three nanoseconds; and a GaAs photodetector with Fabry-Perot interferometric filter. A functional diagram of the system is provided. The operating parameters of the instruments are summarized in a table.

  1. PBO Facility Construction: Basin and Range and Rocky Mountain Regions Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, B.; Jenkins, F.; Kasmer, D.; Feaux, K.

    2007-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the larger NSF-funded EarthScope project, will study the three- dimensional strain field resulting from active plate boundary deformation across the western United States. PBO is a large construction project involving the reconnaissance, permitting, installation, documentation, and maintenance of 875 permanent GPS stations in five years. 163 of these stations lie within the Basin and Range and Rocky Mountain Regions consisting of the states of Montana, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona. During the fourth year of the project, the Basin and Range and Rocky Mountain regions of PBO completed reconnaissance and nearly all permitting activities, and maintained a fast pace of station installations. The fall of 2006 and spring of 2007 were devoted to the construction of a large push of 50 stations, most located on Bureau of Land Management controlled public lands in Nevada. This transect is located along Highway 50 and will profile the extension of the Basin and Range province. The Yellowstone area, including surrounding National Parks and Forests was the target of summer 2007, during which time 10 remote stations with difficult logistics were installed. To date, construction is complete for 135 of 163 GPS stations.

  2. Beam-Dynamics Analysis of Long-Range Wakefield Effects on the SCRF Cavities at the Fast Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min; Bishofberger, Kip; Carlsten, Bruce

    Long-range wakefields in superconducting RF (SCRF) cavities create complicated effects on beam dynamics in SCRF-based FEL beamlines. The driving bunch excites effectively an infinite number of structure modes (including HOMs) which oscillate within the SCRF cavity. Couplers with loads are used to damp the HOMs. However, these HOMs can persist for long periods of time in superconducting structures, which leads to long-range wakefields. Clear understanding of the long-range wakefield effects is a critical element for risk mitigation of future SCRF accelerators such as XFEL at DESY, LCLS-II XFEL, and MaRIE XFEL. We are currently developing numerical tools for simulating long-rangemore » wakefields in SCRF accelerators and plan to experimentally verify the tools by measuring these wakefields at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. This paper previews the experimental conditions at the FAST 50 MeV beamline based on the simulation results.« less

  3. The use of new facility by means internal balance with sting support for wide range Angle of Attack aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subagyo; Daryanto, Yanto; Risnawan, Novan

    2018-04-01

    The development of facilities for the testing of wide range angle of attack aircraft in the wind tunnel at subsonic regime has done and implemented. Development required to meet the test at an angle of attack from -20 ° to 40 °. Testing the wide range angle of attack aircraft with a wide variation of the angle of attack become important needs. This can be done simply by using the sting support-equipped by internal balance to measure the forces and moments component aerodynamics. The results of development and use on the wide range angle of attack aircraft testing are aerodynamics characteristics in the form of the coefficient three components forces and the three components of the moment. A series of test aircraft was successfully carried out and the results are shown in the form of graphs of characteristic of aerodynamics at wind speed 70 m/s.

  4. Calendar year 2002 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie

    2003-09-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, oversees TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility.more » This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2002. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990) and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).« less

  5. Calendar year 2003 : annual site enviromental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie

    2004-09-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility.more » This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2003. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2003) and DOE Order 231.1 Chg 2., Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).« less

  6. Automated acoustic localization and call association for vocalizing humpback whales on the Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility.

    PubMed

    Helble, Tyler A; Ierley, Glenn R; D'Spain, Gerald L; Martin, Stephen W

    2015-01-01

    Time difference of arrival (TDOA) methods for acoustically localizing multiple marine mammals have been applied to recorded data from the Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in order to localize and track humpback whales. Modifications to established methods were necessary in order to simultaneously track multiple animals on the range faster than real-time and in a fully automated way, while minimizing the number of incorrect localizations. The resulting algorithms were run with no human intervention at computational speeds faster than the data recording speed on over forty days of acoustic recordings from the range, spanning multiple years. Spatial localizations based on correlating sequences of units originating from within the range produce estimates having a standard deviation typically 10 m or less (due primarily to TDOA measurement errors), and a bias of 20 m or less (due primarily to sound speed mismatch). An automated method for associating units to individual whales is presented, enabling automated humpback song analyses to be performed.

  7. Swim track kinematics and calling behavior attributed to Bryde's whales on the Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility.

    PubMed

    Helble, Tyler A; Henderson, E Elizabeth; Ierley, Glenn R; Martin, Stephen W

    2016-12-01

    Time difference of arrival methods for acoustically localizing multiple marine mammals have been applied to recorded data from the Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in order to localize and track calls attributed to Bryde's whales. Data were recorded during the months of August-October 2014, and 17 individual tracks were identified. Call characteristics were compared to other Bryde's whale vocalizations from the Pacific Ocean, and locations of the recorded signals were compared to published visual sightings of Bryde's whales in the Hawaiian archipelago. Track kinematic information, such as swim speeds, bearing information, track duration, and directivity, was recorded for the species. The intercall interval was also established for most of the tracks, providing cue rate information for this species that may be useful for future acoustic density estimate calculations.

  8. Extended Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Analyses at the Shuttle Landing Facility: Phase II Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred C.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the results from Phase II of the AMU's Short-Range Statistical Forecasting task for peak winds at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). The peak wind speeds are an important forecast element for the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle programs. The 45th Weather Squadron and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group indicate that peak winds are challenging to forecast. The Applied Meteorology Unit was tasked to develop tools that aid in short-range forecasts of peak winds at tower sites of operational interest. A seven year record of wind tower data was used in the analysis. Hourly and directional climatologies by tower and month were developed to determine the seasonal behavior of the average and peak winds. Probability density functions (PDF) of peak wind speed were calculated to determine the distribution of peak speed with average speed. These provide forecasters with a means of determining the probability of meeting or exceeding a certain peak wind given an observed or forecast average speed. A PC-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) tool was created to display the data quickly.

  9. 2016 Annual Site Environmental report Sandia National Laboratories Tonopah Test Range Nevada & Kaua'i Test Facility Hawai'i.

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, Angela Maria; Griffith, Stacy R.

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology & Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) under contract DE-NA0003525. The DOE/NNSA Sandia Field Office administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at the SNL, Tonopah Test Range (SNL/TTR) in Nevada and the SNL, Kaua‘i Test Facility (SNL/KTF) in Hawai‘i. SNL personnel manage and conduct operations at SNL/TTR in support of the DOE/NNSA’s Weapons Ordnance Program and have operated the site since 1957. Navarro Research and Engineeringmore » personnel perform most of the environmental programs activities at SNL/TTR. The DOE/NNSA/Nevada Field Office retains responsibility for cleanup and management of SNL/TTR Environmental Restoration sites. SNL personnel operate SNL/KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of sustainability, environmental protection, and monitoring programs at SNL/TTR and SNL/KTF during calendar year 2016. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial and biological surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention, environmental restoration, oil and chemical spill prevention, and implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act. This ASER is prepared in accordance with and as required by DOE O 231.1B, Admin Change 1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting.« less

  10. Designing a range modulator wheel to spread-out the Bragg peak for a passive proton therapy facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, S. Bijan; Romano, F.; Cirrone, Giuseppe A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Hadizadeh, M. H.; Mowlavi, A. A.; Raffaele, L.

    2016-01-01

    In proton beam therapy, a Spread-Out Bragg peak (SOBP) is used to establish a uniform dose distribution in the target volume. In order to create a SOBP, several Bragg peaks of different ranges, corresponding to different entrance energies, with certain intensities (weights) should be combined each other. In a passive beam scattering system, the beam is usually extracted from a cyclotron at a constant energy throughout a treatment. Therefore, a SOBP is produced by a range modulator wheel, which is basically a rotating wheel with steps of variable thicknesses, or by using the ridge filters. In this study, we used the Geant4 toolkit to simulate a typical passive scattering beam line. In particular, the CATANA transport beam line of INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) in Catania has been reproduced in this work. Some initial properties of the entrance beam have been checked by benchmarking simulations with experimental data. A class dedicated to the simulation of the wheel modulators has been implemented. It has been designed in order to be easily modified for simulating any desired modulator wheel and, hence, any suitable beam modulation. By using some auxiliary range-shifters, a set of pristine Bragg peaks was obtained from the simulations. A mathematical algorithm was developed, using the simulated pristine dose profiles as its input, to calculate the weight of each pristine peak, reproduce the SOBP, and finally generate a flat dose distribution. Therefore, once the designed modulator has been realized, it has been tested at CATANA facility, comparing the experimental data with the simulation results.

  11. Product/Process (P/P) Models For The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF): Model Ranges And Validation Ranges For Future Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.; Edwards, T.

    Radioactive high level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it is poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-compositionmore » models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to guarantee, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository.« less

  12. Odontocete Studies Off the Pacific Missile Range Facility in February 2013: Satellite-Tagging, Photo-Identification, and Passive Acoustic Monitoring for Species Verification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-16

    ODONTOCETE STUDIES OFF THE PACIFIC MISSILE RANGE FACILITY IN FEBRUARY 2013: SATELLITE-TAGGING, PHOTO- IDENTIFICATION, AND PASSIVE ACOUSTIC...burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching...existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this

  13. Improved accuracy in ground-based facilities - Development of an automated film-reading system for ballistic ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Leslie A.

    1992-01-01

    Software for an automated film-reading system that uses personal computers and digitized shadowgraphs is described. The software identifies pixels associated with fiducial-line and model images, and least-squares procedures are used to calculate the positions and orientations of the images. Automated position and orientation readings for sphere and cone models are compared to those obtained using a manual film reader. When facility calibration errors are removed from these readings, the accuracy of the automated readings is better than the pixel resolution, and it is equal to, or better than, the manual readings. The effects of film-reading and facility-calibration errors on calculated aerodynamic coefficients is discussed.

  14. Thermo Physics Facilities Branch Brochure ARC Jet Complex Fact Sheets, Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility Fact Sheets, Ames Vertical Gun Range Fact Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fretter, E. F. (Editor); Kuhns, Jay (Editor); Nuez, Jay (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The Ames Arc Jet Complex has a rich heritage of over 40 years in Thermal Protection System (TPS) development for every NASA Space Transportation and Planetary program, including Apollo, Space Shuttle, Viking, Pioneer-Venus, Galileo, Mars Pathfinder,Stardust, NASP,X-33,X-34,SHARP-B1 and B2,X-37 and Mars Exploration Rovers. With this early TPS history came a long heritage in the development of the arc jet facilities. These are used to simulate the aerodynamic heating that occurs on the nose cap, wing leading edges and on other areas of the spacecraft requiring thermal protection. TPS samples have been run in the arc jets from a few minutes to over an hour,from one exposure to multiple exposures of the same sample, in order t o understand the TPS materials response to a hot gas flow environment (representative of real hyperthermal environments experienced in flight). The Ames Arc l e t Complex is a key enabler for customers involved in the three major areas of TPS development: selection, validation, and qualification. The arc jet data are critical for validating TPS thermal models, heat shield designs and repairs, and ultimately for flight qualification.

  15. Characterization of the Shuttle Landing Facility as a laser range for testing and evaluation of EO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromqvist Vetelino, Frida; Borbath, Michael R.; Andrews, Larry C.; Phillips, Ronald L.; Burdge, Geoffrey L.; Chin, Peter G.; Galus, Darren J.; Wayne, David; Pescatore, Robert; Cowan, Doris; Thomas, Frederick

    2005-08-01

    The Shuttle Landing Facility runway at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida is almost 5 km long and 100 m wide. Its homogeneous environment makes it a unique and ideal place for testing and evaluating EO systems. An experiment, with the goal of characterizing atmospheric parameters on the runway, was conducted in June 2005. Weather data was collected and the refractive index structure parameter was measured with a commercial scintillometer. The inner scale of turbulence was inferred from wind speed measurements and surface roughness. Values of the crosswind speed obtained from the scintillometer were compared with wind measurements taken by a weather station.

  16. 78 FR 76060 - Pacific Ocean off the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... military testing and training activities, increases in force protection and other mission-essential... protection, and other mission-essential evolutions. Residents and visitors who typically use these waters off... public access is controlled during the infrequent times of increased force protection, range operations...

  17. A tip/tilt mirror with large dynamic range for the ESO VLT Four Laser Guide Star Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijnveld, N.; Henselmans, R.; Nijland, B.

    2011-09-01

    One of the critical elements in the Four Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF) for the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) is the Optical Tube Assembly (OTA), consisting of a stable 20x laser beam expander and an active tip/tilt mirror, the Field Selector Mechanism (FSM). This paper describes the design and performance testing of the FSM. The driving requirement for the FSM is its large stroke of +/-6.1 mrad, in combination with less than 1.5 μrad RMS absolute accuracy. The FSM design consists of a Zerodur mirror, bonded to a membrane spring and strut combination to allow only tip and tilt. Two spindle drives actuate the mirror, using a stiffness based transmission to increase resolution. Absolute accuracy is achieved with two differential inductive sensor pairs. A prototype of the FSM is realized to optimize the control configuration and measure its performance. Friction in the spindle drive is overcome by creating a local velocity control loop between the spindle drives and the shaft encoders. Accuracy is achieved by using a cascaded low bandwidth control loop with feedback from the inductive sensors. The pointing jitter and settling time of the FSM are measured with an autocollimator. The system performance meets the strict requirements, and is ready to be implemented in the first OTA.

  18. Development of a bunch-by-bunch longitudinal feedback system with a wide dynamic range for the HIGS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. Z.; Kim, Y.; Li, J. Y.; Teytelman, D.; Busch, M.; Wang, P.; Swift, G.; Park, I. S.; Ko, I. S.; Wu, Y. K.

    2011-03-01

    Electron beam coupled-bunch instabilities can limit and degrade the performance of storage ring based light sources. A longitudinal feedback system has been developed for the Duke storage ring to suppress multi-bunch beam instabilities which prevent stable, high-current operation of the storage ring based free-electron lasers (FELs) and an FEL driven Compton gamma source, the high intensity gamma-ray source (HIGS) at Duke University. In this work, we report the development of a state-of-the-art second generation longitudinal feedback system which employs a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based processor, and a broadband, high shunt-impedance kicker cavity. With two inputs and two outputs, the kicker cavity was designed with a resonant frequency of 937 MHz, a bandwidth of 97 MHz, and a shunt impedance of 1530 Ω. We also developed an S-matrix based technique to fully characterize the performance of the kicker cavity in the cold test. This longitudinal feedback system has been commissioned and optimized to stabilize high-current electron beams with a wide range of electron beam energies (250 MeV to 1.15 GeV) and a number of electron beam bunch modes, including the single-bunch mode and all possible symmetric bunch modes. This feedback system has become a critical instrument to ensure stable, high-flux operation of HIGS to produce nearly monochromatic, highly polarized Compton gamma-ray beams.

  19. Physics and technology in the ion-cyclotron range of frequency on Tore Supra and TITAN test facility: implication for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Litaudon, X; Bernard, J. M.; Colas, L.

    2013-01-01

    To support the design of an ITER ion-cyclotron range of frequency heating (ICRH) system and to mitigate risks of operation in ITER, CEA has initiated an ambitious Research & Development program accompanied by experiments on Tore Supra or test-bed facility together with a significant modelling effort. The paper summarizes the recent results in the following areas: Comprehensive characterization (experiments and modelling) of a new Faraday screen concept tested on the Tore Supra antenna. A new model is developed for calculating the ICRH sheath rectification at the antenna vicinity. The model is applied to calculate the local heat flux on Toremore » Supra and ITER ICRH antennas. Full-wave modelling of ITER ICRH heating and current drive scenarios with the EVE code. With 20 MW of power, a current of 400 kA could be driven on axis in the DT scenario. Comparison between DT and DT(3He) scenario is given for heating and current drive efficiencies. First operation of CW test-bed facility, TITAN, designed for ITER ICRH components testing and could host up to a quarter of an ITER antenna. R&D of high permittivity materials to improve load of test facilities to better simulate ITER plasma antenna loading conditions.« less

  20. An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Aaron K; Webber, Michael E

    2012-07-01

    This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. X-ray grating spectrometer for opacity measurements in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range at the LULI 2000 laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Reverdin, Charles; Caillaud, T.; Gilleron, F.

    2012-10-15

    An x-ray grating spectrometer was built in order to measure opacities in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range with an average spectral resolution {approx} 50. It has been used at the LULI-2000 laser facility at Ecole Polytechnique (France) to measure the {Delta}n = 0, n = 3 transitions of several elements with neighboring atomic number: Cr, Fe, Ni, and Cu in the same experimental conditions. Hence a spectrometer with a wide spectral range is required. This spectrometer features one line of sight looking through a heated sample at backlighter emission. It is outfitted with one toroidal condensing mirrormore » and several flat mirrors cutting off higher energy photons. The spectral dispersion is obtained with a flatfield grating. Detection consists of a streak camera sensitive to soft x-ray radiation. Some experimental results showing the performance of this spectrometer are presented.« less

  2. A technique for extending by ~10 3 the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility and OMEGA a)

    SciTech Connect

    Sio, H.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.

    Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometers are routinely used on OMEGA and the NIF for diagnosing ρR and ρR asymmetries in direct- and indirect-drive implosions of D 3He-, D 2-, and DT-gas-filled capsules. By measuring the optical opacity distribution in CR-39 due to proton tracks in high-yield applications, as opposed to counting individual tracks, WRF dynamic range can be extended by 10 2 for obtaining the spectral shape, and by 10 3 for mean energy (ρR) measurement, corresponding to proton fluences of 10 8 and 10 9 cm -2, respectively. Finally, using this new technique, ρR asymmetries can be measuredmore » during both shock and compression burn (proton yield ~10 8 and ~10 12, respectively) in 2-shock National Ignition Facility implosions with the standard WRF accuracy of ±~10 mg/cm 2.« less

  3. X-ray grating spectrometer for opacity measurements in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range at the LULI 2000 laser facility.

    PubMed

    Reverdin, Charles; Thais, Frédéric; Loisel, Guillaume; Busquet, M; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S; Blenski, T; Caillaud, T; Ducret, J E; Foelsner, W; Gilles, D; Gilleron, F; Pain, J C; Poirier, M; Serres, F; Silvert, V; Soullie, G; Turck-Chieze, S; Villette, B

    2012-10-01

    An x-ray grating spectrometer was built in order to measure opacities in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range with an average spectral resolution ∼ 50. It has been used at the LULI-2000 laser facility at École Polytechnique (France) to measure the Δn = 0, n = 3 transitions of several elements with neighboring atomic number: Cr, Fe, Ni, and Cu in the same experimental conditions. Hence a spectrometer with a wide spectral range is required. This spectrometer features one line of sight looking through a heated sample at backlighter emission. It is outfitted with one toroidal condensing mirror and several flat mirrors cutting off higher energy photons. The spectral dispersion is obtained with a flatfield grating. Detection consists of a streak camera sensitive to soft x-ray radiation. Some experimental results showing the performance of this spectrometer are presented.

  4. Laser-optical measurements of the velocities of the plasma jets formed from different gases in a kilojoule-range plasma focus facility

    SciTech Connect

    Polukhin, S. N., E-mail: snpol@lebedev.ru; Dzhamankulov, A. M.; Gurei, A. E.

    The velocities of the plasma jets formed from Ne, N{sub 2}, Ar, and Xe gases in plasma focus facilities were determined by means of laser-optical shadowgraphy of the shock waves generated at the jet leading edge. In spite of the almost tenfold ratio between the atomic weights of these gases, the outflow velocities of the plasma jets formed in experiments with these gases differ by less than twice, in the range of (0.7–1.1) × 10{sup 7} cm/s under similar discharge conditions. The energies of the jet ions were found to vary from 0.7 keV for nitrogen to 4 keV formore » xenon.« less

  5. A technique for extending by ∼10{sup 3} the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility and OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Sio, H., E-mail: hsio@mit.edu; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.

    Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometers are routinely used on OMEGA and the NIF for diagnosing ρR and ρR asymmetries in direct- and indirect-drive implosions of D{sup 3}He-, D{sub 2}-, and DT-gas-filled capsules. By measuring the optical opacity distribution in CR-39 due to proton tracks in high-yield applications, as opposed to counting individual tracks, WRF dynamic range can be extended by 10{sup 2} for obtaining the spectral shape, and by 10{sup 3} for mean energy (ρR) measurement, corresponding to proton fluences of 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}, respectively. Using this new technique, ρR asymmetries can be measured duringmore » both shock and compression burn (proton yield ∼10{sup 8} and ∼10{sup 12}, respectively) in 2-shock National Ignition Facility implosions with the standard WRF accuracy of ±∼10 mg/cm{sup 2}.« less

  6. Geohydrology of the High Energy Laser System Test Facility site, White Sands Missile Range, Tularosa Basin, south-central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basabilvazo, G.T.; Nickerson, E.L.; Myers, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Yesum-HoHoman and Gypsum land (hummocky) soils at the High Energy Laser System Test Facility (HELSTF) represent wind deposits from recently desiccated lacustrine deposits and deposits from the ancestral Lake Otero. The upper 15-20 feet of the subsurface consists of varved gypsiferous clay and silt. Below these surfidai deposits the lithology consists of interbedded clay units, silty-clay units, and fine- to medium-grained quartz arenite units in continuous and discontinuous horizons. Clay horizons can cause perched water above the water table. Analyses of selected clay samples indicate that clay units are composed chiefly of kaolinire and mixed-layer illite/ smectite. The main aquifer is representative of a leaky-confined aquifer. Estimated aquifer properties are: transmissivity (T) = 780 feet squared per day, storage coefficient (S) = 3.1 x 10-3, and hydraulic conductivity (K) = 6.0 feet per day. Ground water flows south and southwest; the estimated hydraulic gradient is 5.3 feet per mile. Analyses of water samples indicate that ground water at the HELSTF site is brackish to slightly saline at the top of the main aquifer. Dissolved-solids concentration near the top of the main aquifer ranges from 5,940 to 11,800 milligrams per liter. Predominant ions are sodium and sulfate. At 815 feet below land surface, the largest dissolved-solids concentration measured is 111,000 milligrams per liter, which indicates increasing salinity with depth. Predominant ions are sodium and chloride.

  7. Anma massage (Japanese massage) therapy for patients with Parkinson's disease in geriatric health services facilities: Effectiveness on limited range of motion of the shoulder joint.

    PubMed

    Suoh, Sachie; Donoyama, Nozomi; Ohkoshi, Norio

    2016-04-01

    To determine the efficacy of Anma massage therapy for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) in geriatric health services facilities. (1) Immediate treatment effects: 10 PD patients, in the intervention period with Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) scale at stage 5, received 30-40 min sessions of Anma massage therapy. In the non-intervention period, six PD patients did not undergo this therapy. The shoulder joint range of motion (ROM) was measured before and after each session. (2) Continuous treatment effects: Six PD patients in the intervention period received the same massage sessions once a week continuously for seven weeks. One week after the completion of the treatment, the ROM of the shoulder joints was measured. (1) Shoulder abduction on the more affected side showed immediate significant improvements. (2) Shoulder abduction on the more affected side and less affected side showed notable effects of continuous treatment procedure leading to significant improvement. The above results suggested the efficacy of successive Anma massage therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Finding of No Significant Impact and Finding of No Practicable Aleternative for the Environmental Assessment for the 21 Point Enclosed Firing Range at Joint-Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-02

    Corps of Engineers Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Final EA – Firing Range October 2014 v WSSC Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission...are leaving the site with waste residue still on their skin and uniforms. Per section 7.6.1.7 [Latrines ( Sanitary Facilities)] in ETL 11-18 (Small...served by water, sanitary sewer, and power. A fire hydrant exists on the site, while another hydrant exists at the intersection of the entry road and

  9. The financial feasibility of delivering forest treatment residues to bioenergy facilities over a range of diesel fuel and delivered biomass prices

    Treesearch

    Greg Jones; Dan Loeffler; Edward Butler; Susan Hummel; Woodam Chung

    2013-01-01

    Forest treatments have the potential to produce significant quantities of forest residue biomass, which includes the tops and limbs from merchantable trees and smaller trees removed to meet management objectives. We spatially analyzed the sensitivity of financially feasible biomass volumes for delivery to a bioenergy facility across 16 combinations of delivered biomass...

  10. Facilities and Techniques for X-Ray Diagnostic Calibration in the 100-eV to 100-keV Energy Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaines, J. L.; Wittmayer, F. J.

    1986-08-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been a pioneer in the field of x-ray diagnostic calibration for more than 20 years. We have built steady state x-ray sources capable of supplying fluorescent lines of high spectral purity in the 100-eV to 100-keV energy range, and these sources have been used in the calibration of x-ray detectors, mirrors, crystals, filters, and film. This paper discusses our calibration philosophy and techniques, and describes some of our x-ray sources. Examples of actual calibration data are presented as well.

  11. ZEST Flight Test Experiments, Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    present on KTF/PMRF are 3 the Hawaiian monk seal and the Hawaiian hoary bat. The monk seal (Monachus schauinslandi) has established a colony on Niihau ...feeding and resting offshore of the Nohili Ditch (DOE, 1991). 3 The channel between Kauai and Niihau islands is along the migration route of the

  12. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Volume 1; Sharp Leading Edge; [conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 36 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at a Reynolds number of 6 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  13. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). Maps show the general location of the WATR area that is used for aeronautical testing and evaluation. The products, services and facilities of WATR are discussed,

  14. A green and facile approach for synthesizing imine to develop optical biosensor for wide range detection of bilirubin in human biofluids.

    PubMed

    Ellairaja, Sundaram; Shenbagavalli, Kathiravan; Ponmariappan, Sarkaraisamy; Vasantha, Vairathevar Sivasamy

    2017-05-15

    Bilirubin, a key biomarker for the jaundice and its clinical diagnosis needs a better analytical tool. A novel and simple fluorescent platform based on (2,2'-((1E,1'E)-((6-bromopyridine-2,3-diyl) bis(azanylylidene)) bis(methanylylidene diphenol) (BAMD) was designed. BAMD showed a remarkable fluorescent intensity with a very good quantum yield of 0.85 and lifetime of 870ps. Hence, it was applied for the determination of bilirubin using both colorimetric and fluorimetric techniques in physiological and basic pH. Under optimized experimental conditions, the probe detects bilirubin selectively in the presence of other interfering biomolecules and metal ions. The linear range of detection is 1pM-500µM at pH=7.4 and LOD is 2.8 and 3.3 pM at pH=7.4 and 9.0, respectively, which were reported so far. The probe detects the bilirubin through FRET mechanism. The practical application of the probe was successfully tested in the human blood and urine samples. Based on all above advantages, this simple idea can be applied to design a simple clinical diagnostic tool for jaundice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Facile Quantification and Identification Techniques for Reducing Gases over a Wide Concentration Range Using a MOS Sensor in Temperature-Cycled Operation.

    PubMed

    Schultealbert, Caroline; Baur, Tobias; Schütze, Andreas; Sauerwald, Tilman

    2018-03-01

    Dedicated methods for quantification and identification of reducing gases based on model-based temperature-cycled operation (TCO) using a single commercial MOS gas sensor are presented. During high temperature phases the sensor surface is highly oxidized, yielding a significant sensitivity increase after switching to lower temperatures (differential surface reduction, DSR). For low concentrations, the slope of the logarithmic conductance during this low-temperature phase is evaluated and can directly be used for quantification. For higher concentrations, the time constant for reaching a stable conductance during the same low-temperature phase is evaluated. Both signals represent the reaction rate of the reducing gas on the strongly oxidized surface at this low temperature and provide a linear calibration curve, which is exceptional for MOS sensors. By determining these reaction rates on different low-temperature plateaus and applying pattern recognition, the resulting footprint can be used for identification of different gases. All methods are tested over a wide concentration range from 10 ppb to 100 ppm (4 orders of magnitude) for four different reducing gases (CO, H₂, ammonia and benzene) using randomized gas exposures.

  16. Facile Quantification and Identification Techniques for Reducing Gases over a Wide Concentration Range Using a MOS Sensor in Temperature-Cycled Operation

    PubMed Central

    Schultealbert, Caroline; Baur, Tobias; Schütze, Andreas; Sauerwald, Tilman

    2018-01-01

    Dedicated methods for quantification and identification of reducing gases based on model-based temperature-cycled operation (TCO) using a single commercial MOS gas sensor are presented. During high temperature phases the sensor surface is highly oxidized, yielding a significant sensitivity increase after switching to lower temperatures (differential surface reduction, DSR). For low concentrations, the slope of the logarithmic conductance during this low-temperature phase is evaluated and can directly be used for quantification. For higher concentrations, the time constant for reaching a stable conductance during the same low-temperature phase is evaluated. Both signals represent the reaction rate of the reducing gas on the strongly oxidized surface at this low temperature and provide a linear calibration curve, which is exceptional for MOS sensors. By determining these reaction rates on different low-temperature plateaus and applying pattern recognition, the resulting footprint can be used for identification of different gases. All methods are tested over a wide concentration range from 10 ppb to 100 ppm (4 orders of magnitude) for four different reducing gases (CO, H2, ammonia and benzene) using randomized gas exposures. PMID:29494545

  17. Impact of the Number of Applied Current Meter Sensors on the Accuracy of Flow Rate Measurements across a Range of Hydroelectric Facilities Indicative of the Domestic Hydroelectric Fleet

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, Mark H; Hadjerioua, Boualem; Lee, Kyutae

    2015-01-01

    vertical resolution beyond the application of 49 transects. Moreover the research uncovered that the application of 5 CM (when applied at 49 vertical transects) resulted in an average accuracy of 95.6% and the application of additional sensors resulted in a linear increase in accuracy up to 17 CM which had an average accuracy of 98.5%. Beyond 17 CM incremental increases in accuracy due to the addition of CM was found decrease exponentially. Future work that will be performed in this area will investigate the use of computational fluid dynamics to acquire a broader range of flow fields within SCI.« less

  18. Passive Acoustic Methods for Tracking Marine Mammals Using Widely-Spaced Bottom-Mounted Hydrophones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-26

    standard time-of-arrival (TOA) tracking methods fail. Clicks and long duration calls (whistles or baleen whale calls) were both considered. Methods...Evaluation Center (AUTEC) and the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF). Beaked whales , minke whales , humpback whales , and sperm whales were the main species...of interest. io. auBJEUi i Lmvia Passive acoustic monitoring, localization, tracking, minke whale , beaked whale , sperm whale , humpback whale

  19. Research and test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A description is given of each of the following Langley research and test facilities: 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel, 7-by 10-Foot High Speed Tunnel, 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel, 13-Inch Magnetic Suspension & Balance System, 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel, 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel, 16-by 24-Inch Water Tunnel, 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel, 30-by 60-Foot Wind Tunnel, Advanced Civil Transport Simulator (ACTS), Advanced Technology Research Laboratory, Aerospace Controls Research Laboratory (ACRL), Aerothermal Loads Complex, Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF), Avionics Integration Research Laboratory, Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel (BART), Compact Range Test Facility, Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS), Enhanced/Synthetic Vision & Spatial Displays Laboratory, Experimental Test Range (ETR) Flight Research Facility, General Aviation Simulator (GAS), High Intensity Radiated Fields Facility, Human Engineering Methods Laboratory, Hypersonic Facilities Complex, Impact Dynamics Research Facility, Jet Noise Laboratory & Anechoic Jet Facility, Light Alloy Laboratory, Low Frequency Antenna Test Facility, Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel, Mechanics of Metals Laboratory, National Transonic Facility (NTF), NDE Research Laboratory, Polymers & Composites Laboratory, Pyrotechnic Test Facility, Quiet Flow Facility, Robotics Facilities, Scientific Visualization System, Scramjet Test Complex, Space Materials Research Laboratory, Space Simulation & Environmental Test Complex, Structural Dynamics Research Laboratory, Structural Dynamics Test Beds, Structures & Materials Research Laboratory, Supersonic Low Disturbance Pilot Tunnel, Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA), Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT), Transport Systems Research Vehicle, Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, and the Visual Motion Simulator (VMS).

  20. Institutional Long Range Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell Community Coll. and Technical Inst., Lenoir, NC.

    Long-range institutional planning has been in effect at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute since 1973. The first step in the process was the identification of planning areas: administration, organization, educational programs, learning resources, student services, faculty, facilities, maintenance/operation, and finances. The major…

  1. Latest developments on fibered MOPA in mJ range with hollow-core fiber beam delivery and fiber beam shaping used as seeder for large scale laser facilities (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleyze, Jean-François; Scol, Florent; Perrin, Arnaud; Gouriou, Pierre; Valentin, Constance; Bouwmans, Géraud; Hugonnot, Emmanuel

    2017-05-01

    The Laser Megajoule (LMJ) is a French large scale laser facility dedicated to inertial fusion and plasma physics research. LMJ front-ends are based on fiber laser technology at nanojoule range [1]. Scaling the energy of those fiber seeders to the millijoule range is a way to upgrade LMJ's front ends architecture and could also be used as seeder for lasers for ELI project for example. However, required performances are so restrictive (optical-signal-to-noise ratio higher than 50 dB, temporally-shaped nanosecond pulses and spatial single-mode top-hat beam output) that such fiber systems are very tricky to build. High-energy fiber amplifiers In 2015, we have demonstrated, an all-fiber MOPA prototype able to produce a millijoule seeder, but unfortunately not 100% conform for all LMJ's performances. A major difficulty was to manage the frequency modulation used to avoid stimulated Brillouin scattering, to amplitude modulation (FM-AM) conversion, this limits the energy at 170µJ. For upgrading the energy to the millijoule range, it's necessary to use an amplifier with a larger core fiber. However, this fiber must still be flexible; polarization maintaining and exhibit a strictly single-mode behaviour. We are thus developing a new amplifier architecture based on an Yb-doped tapered fiber: its core diameter is from a narrow input to a wide output (MFD 8 to 26 µm). A S² measurement on a 2,5m long tapered fiber rolled-up on 22 cm diameter confirmed that this original geometry allows obtaining strictly single-mode behaviour. In a 1 kHz repetition rate regime, we already obtain 750 µJ pulses, and we are on the way to mJ, respecting LMJ performances. Beam delivery In LMJ architecture the distance between the nanojoule fiber seeder and the amplifier stages is about 16 m. Beam delivery is achieved with a standard PM fiber, such a solution is no longer achievable with hundreds of kilowatt peak powers. An efficient way to minimize nonlinear effects is to use hollow-core (HC

  2. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). It is managed by the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) to provide the right facility at the right time. NASA is a tenant on Edwards Air Force Base and has an agreement with the Air Force Flight Test Center to use the land and airspace controlled by the Department of Defense (DoD). The topics include: 1) The WATR supports a variety of vehicles; 2) Dryden shares airspace with the AFFTC; 3) Restricted airspace, corridors, and special use areas are available for experimental aircraft; 4) WATR Products and Services; 5) WATR Support Configuration; 6) Telemetry Tracking; 7) Time Space Positioning; 8) Video; 9) Voice Communication; 10) Mobile Operations Facilities; 11) Data Processing; 12) Mission Control Center; 13) Real-Time Data Analysis; and 14) Range Safety.

  3. Dance Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Dudley, Ed.; Irey, Charlotte, Ed.

    This booklet represents an effort to assist teachers and administrators in the professional planning of dance facilities and equipment. Three chapters present the history of dance facilities, provide recommended dance facilities and equipment, and offer some adaptations of dance facilities and equipment, for elementary, secondary and college level…

  4. Ellsworth Range

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Ice on the Ellsworth Range in Antarctica as seen from the IceBridge DC-8 on Oct. 22, 2012. NASA's Operation IceBridge is an airborne science mission to study Earth's polar ice. For more information about IceBridge, visit: www.nasa.gov/icebridge NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  5. Fact Sheet: Range Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelson, C.; Fretter, E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Ames has a long tradition in leadership with the use of ballistic ranges and shock tubes for the purpose of studying the physics and phenomena associated with hypervelocity flight. Cutting-edge areas of research run the gamut from aerodynamics, to impact physics, to flow-field structure and chemistry. This legacy of testing began in the NACA era of the 1940's with the Supersonic Free Flight Tunnel, and evolved dramatically up through the late 1950s with the pioneering work in the Ames Hypersonic Ballistic Range. The tradition continued in the mid-60s with the commissioning of the three newest facilities: the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) in 1964, the Hypervelocity Free Flight Facility (HFFF) in 1965 and the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) in 1966. Today the Range Complex continues to provide unique and critical testing in support of the Nation's programs for planetary geology and geophysics; exobiology; solar system origins; earth atmospheric entry, planetary entry, and aerobraking vehicles; and various configurations for supersonic and hypersonic aircraft.

  6. Health Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  7. Range Process Simulation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Dave; Haas, William; Barth, Tim; Benjamin, Perakath; Graul, Michael; Bagatourova, Olga

    2005-01-01

    Range Process Simulation Tool (RPST) is a computer program that assists managers in rapidly predicting and quantitatively assessing the operational effects of proposed technological additions to, and/or upgrades of, complex facilities and engineering systems such as the Eastern Test Range. Originally designed for application to space transportation systems, RPST is also suitable for assessing effects of proposed changes in industrial facilities and large organizations. RPST follows a model-based approach that includes finite-capacity schedule analysis and discrete-event process simulation. A component-based, scalable, open architecture makes RPST easily and rapidly tailorable for diverse applications. Specific RPST functions include: (1) definition of analysis objectives and performance metrics; (2) selection of process templates from a processtemplate library; (3) configuration of process models for detailed simulation and schedule analysis; (4) design of operations- analysis experiments; (5) schedule and simulation-based process analysis; and (6) optimization of performance by use of genetic algorithms and simulated annealing. The main benefits afforded by RPST are provision of information that can be used to reduce costs of operation and maintenance, and the capability for affordable, accurate, and reliable prediction and exploration of the consequences of many alternative proposed decisions.

  8. Ames Hybrid Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Greg; Karabeyoglu, Mustafa A.; Cantwell, Brian; Hunt, Rusty; DeZilwa, Shane; Shoffstall, Mike; Soderman, Paul T.; Bencze, Daniel P. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The report summarizes the design, fabrication, safety features, environmental impact, and operation of the Ames Hybrid-Fuel Combustion Facility (HCF). The facility is used in conducting research into the scalability and combustion processes of advanced paraffin-based hybrid fuels for the purpose of assessing their applicability to practical rocket systems. The facility was designed to deliver gaseous oxygen at rates between 0.5 and 16.0 kg/sec to a combustion chamber operating at pressures ranging from 300 to 900. The required run times were of the order of 10 to 20 sec. The facility proved to be robust and reliable and has been used to generate a database of regression-rate measurements of paraffin at oxygen mass flux levels comparable to those of moderate-sized hybrid rocket motors.

  9. Starkey experimental forest and range.

    Treesearch

    Valerie. Rapp

    2004-01-01

    The Starkey Experimental Forest and Range. (Starkey) is a one-of-a-kind, world class research facility, located in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon. Starkey is the primary field location for scientific study of the effects of deer, elk, and cattle on ecosystems. Most of the 28,000-acre forest and range is enclosed by a game-proof fence.The research...

  10. Range Flight Safety Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftin, Charles E.; Hudson, Sandra M.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this NASA Technical Standard is to provide the technical requirements for the NPR 8715.5, Range Flight Safety Program, in regards to protection of the public, the NASA workforce, and property as it pertains to risk analysis, Flight Safety Systems (FSS), and range flight operations. This standard is approved for use by NASA Headquarters and NASA Centers, including Component Facilities and Technical and Service Support Centers, and may be cited in contract, program, and other Agency documents as a technical requirement. This standard may also apply to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory or to other contractors, grant recipients, or parties to agreements to the extent specified or referenced in their contracts, grants, or agreements, when these organizations conduct or participate in missions that involve range flight operations as defined by NPR 8715.5.1.2.2 In this standard, all mandatory actions (i.e., requirements) are denoted by statements containing the term “shall.”1.3 TailoringTailoring of this standard for application to a specific program or project shall be formally documented as part of program or project requirements and approved by the responsible Technical Authority in accordance with NPR 8715.3, NASA General Safety Program Requirements.

  11. Space-Based Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Space-Based Range (SBR), previously known as Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety (STARS), is a multicenter NASA proof-of-concept project to determine if space-based communications using NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) can support the Range Safety functions of acquiring tracking data and generating flight termination signals, while also providing broadband Range User data such as voice, video, and vehicle/payload data. There was a successful test of the Range Safety system at Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) on December 20, 2005, on a two-stage Terrier-Orion spin-stabilized sounding rocket. SBR transmitted GPS tracking data and maintained links with two TDRSS satellites simultaneously during the 10-min flight. The payload section deployed a parachute, landed in the Atlantic Ocean about 90 miles downrange from the launch site, and was successfully recovered. During the Terrier-Orion tests flights, more than 99 percent of all forward commands and more than 95 percent of all return frames were successfully received and processed. The time latency necessary for a command to travel from WFF over landlines to White Sands Complex and then to the vehicle via TDRSS, be processed onboard, and then be sent back to WFF was between 1.0 s and 1.1 s. The forward-link margins for TDRS-10 (TDRS East [TDE]) were 11 dB to 12 dB plus or minus 2 dB, and for TDRS-4 (TDRS Spare [TDS]) were 9 dB to 10 dB plus or minus 1.5 dB. The return-link margins for both TDE and TDS were 6 dB to 8 dB plus or minus 3 dB. There were 11 flights on an F-15B at Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) between November 2006 and February 2007. The Range User system tested a 184-element TDRSS Ku-band (15 GHz) phased-array antenna with data rates of 5 Mbps and 10 Mbps. This data was a combination of black-and-white cockpit video, Range Safety tracking and transceiver data, and aircraft and antenna controller data streams. IP data formatting was used.

  12. Facility rehabilitation

    Treesearch

    Edwin H. Ketchledge

    1971-01-01

    Restoration of vegetation on damaged sites is the most perplexing challenge in facility rehabilitation. In the Adirondack Mountains, the ecological impact of recreationists on the natural environment has become critical in two high-quality interior areas: on the steep higher slopes where trails soon become eroding stream channels, washing away the thin mountain soils;...

  13. Music Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto. School Planning and Building Research Section.

    The layouts and specifications in this booklet are intended to assist those involved in planning music facilities for elementary and secondary schools. Drawings, room plans, and text illustrate specifications for location; space relationship; combined and separate instrumental and vocal rooms; practice rooms; and auxiliary areas. Particular…

  14. User Facilities

    Science.gov Websites

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Search Site submit About Mission Business Newsroom Publications Los Innovation in New Mexico Los Alamos Collaboration for Explosives Detection (LACED) SensorNexus Exascale Computing Project (ECP) User Facilities Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Los Alamos Neutron

  15. Facile synthesis of Li2S-P2S5 glass-ceramics electrolyte with micron range particles for all-solid-state batteries via a low-temperature solution technique (LTST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sunho; Lee, Sewook; Park, Jongyeop; Nichols, William T.; Shin, Dongwook

    2018-06-01

    A lithium ion conductive 75Li2Sṡ25P2S5 glass-ceramics electrolyte is, for the first time, successfully synthesized via a new low-temperature solution technique (LTST) and compared to the conventional mechanical-milling technique. Both samples are composed of the highly lithium ion conductive thio-LISICON III analog phase. Due to the uniform dispersion of reactants in an organic liquid, the use of LTST produced significantly smaller and more uniform particle sizes (2.2 ± 1.68 μm) resulting in a 6.5 times higher specific surface area compared to the mechanically-milled sample. A pronounced enhancement of both the rate capability and cyclability is demonstrated for the LTST solid electrolyte sample due to the more intimate contact with the LiCoO2 active material. Furthermore, the LTST sample shows excellent electrochemical stability throughout the potential range of -1 to 5 V. These results suggest that the proposed technique using the optimized LTST process is promising for the preparation of 75Li2Sṡ25P2S5 solid electrolytes for use in advanced Li-ion batteries.

  16. 2014 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, James R.; Papka, Michael E.; Cerny, Beth A.

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility provides supercomputing capabilities to the scientific and engineering community to advance fundamental discovery and understanding in a broad range of disciplines.

  17. 2015 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, James R.; Papka, Michael E.; Cerny, Beth A.

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility provides supercomputing capabilities to the scientific and engineering community to advance fundamental discovery and understanding in a broad range of disciplines.

  18. Biotechnology Facility: An ISS Microgravity Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min

    2000-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will support several facilities dedicated to scientific research. One such facility, the Biotechnology Facility (BTF), is sponsored by the Microgravity Sciences and Applications Division (MSAD) and developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The BTF is scheduled for delivery to the ISS via Space Shuttle in April 2005. The purpose of the BTF is to provide: (1) the support structure and integration capabilities for the individual modules in which biotechnology experiments will be performed, (2) the capability for human-tended, repetitive, long-duration biotechnology experiments, and (3) opportunities to perform repetitive experiments in a short period by allowing continuous access to microgravity. The MSAD has identified cell culture and tissue engineering, protein crystal growth, and fundamentals of biotechnology as areas that contain promising opportunities for significant advancements through low-gravity experiments. The focus of this coordinated ground- and space-based research program is the use of the low-gravity environment of space to conduct fundamental investigations leading to major advances in the understanding of basic and applied biotechnology. Results from planned investigations can be used in applications ranging from rational drug design and testing, cancer diagnosis and treatments and tissue engineering leading to replacement tissues.

  19. The dynamic range of LZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.

    2016-02-01

    The electronics of the LZ experiment, the 7-tonne dark matter detector to be installed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), is designed to permit studies of physics where the energies deposited range from 1 keV of nuclear-recoil energy up to 3,000 keV of electron-recoil energy. The system is designed to provide a 70% efficiency for events that produce three photoelectrons in the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). This corresponds approximately to the lowest energy threshold achievable in multi-tonne time-projection chambers, and drives the noise specifications for the front end. The upper limit of the LZ dynamic range is defined to accommodate the electroluminescence (S2) signals. The low-energy channels of the LZ amplifiers provide the dynamic range required for the tritium and krypton calibrations. The high-energy channels provide the dynamic range required to measure the activated Xe lines.

  20. Physical Environment of the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    Macdonald, Davis, and Cox (1960), the island of Kauai and the adjacent island of Niihau are lava domes located at the top of one large marine volcanic...tidal current. 35 z Hnalei B. ~ IV* KAUAI 220 NIIHAU MnaP N Koeno P OAHU V, 0 10 20 -3.0 Scale in Nautical Miles Approx. * LEGEND ~-FLOOD CURRENT

  1. The Dynamic Range of LZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jun; LZ Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The electronics of the LZ experiment, the 7-ton dark matter detector to be installed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), is designed to provide a 70% efficiency for events that produce three photoelectrons in the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). This corresponds approximately to the lowest energy threshold achievable in such a detector, and drives the noise specifications for the front end. The upper limit of the LZ dynamic range is defined by the electroluminescence (S2) signals. The low-energy channels of the LZ amplifiers provide the dynamic range required for the tritium and krypton calibrations. The high-energy channels provide the dynamic range required to measure the activated Xe lines. S2 signals induced by alpha particles from radon decay will saturate one or more channels of the top PMT array but techniques are being developed to recover the information lost due to saturation. This work was supported by the Department of Energy, Grant DE-SC0006605.

  2. Downgrading Nuclear Facilities to Radiological Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jarry, Jeffrey F.; Farr, Jesse Oscar; Duran, Leroy

    2015-08-01

    Based on inventory reductions and the use of alternate storage facilities, the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) downgraded 4 SNL Hazard Category 3 (HC-3) nuclear facilities to less-than-HC-3 radiological facilities. SNL’s Waste Management and Pollution Prevention Department (WMPPD) managed the HC-3 nuclear facilities and implemented the downgrade. This paper will examine the downgrade process,

  3. RCRA Facility Information

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This asset includes hazardous waste information, which is mostly contained in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information (RCRAInfo) System, a national program management and inventory system addressing hazardous waste handlers. In general, all entities that generate, transport, treat, store, and dispose of hazardous waste are required to provide information about their activities to state environmental agencies. These agencies pass on that information to regional and national EPA offices. This regulation is governed by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984. RCRAInfo Search can be used to determine identification and location data for specific hazardous waste handlers and to find a wide range of information on treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regarding permit/closure status, compliance with Federal and State regulations, and cleanup activities. Categories of information in this asset include:-- Handlers-- Permit Information-- GIS information on facility location-- Financial Assurance-- Corrective Action-- Compliance Monitoring and Enforcement (CM&E)

  4. Breadboard Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    In the sixties, Chrysler was NASA's prime contractor for the Saturn I and IB test launch vehicles. The company installed and operated at Huntsville what was known as the Saturn I/IB Development Breadboard Facility. "Breadboard," means an array of electrical and electronic equipment for performing a variety of development and test functions. This work gave Chrysler a broad capability in computerized testing to assure quality control in development of solid-state electronic systems. Today that division is manufacturing many products not destined for NASA, most of them being associated with the company's automotive line. A major project is production and quality-control testing of the "lean-burn" engine, one that has a built-in Computer to control emission timing, and allow the engine to run on a leaner mixture of fuel and air. Other environment-related products include vehicle emission analyzers. The newest of the line is an accurate, portable solid state instrument for testing auto exhaust gases. The exhaust analyzers, now being produced for company dealers and for service

  5. Effect of Damping and Yielding on the Seismic Response of 3D Steel Buildings with PMRF

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Achintya; Rodelo-López, Ramon Eduardo; Bojórquez, Eden

    2014-01-01

    The effect of viscous damping and yielding, on the reduction of the seismic responses of steel buildings modeled as three-dimensional (3D) complex multidegree of freedom (MDOF) systems, is studied. The reduction produced by damping may be larger or smaller than that of yielding. This reduction can significantly vary from one structural idealization to another and is smaller for global than for local response parameters, which in turn depends on the particular local response parameter. The uncertainty in the estimation is significantly larger for local response parameter and decreases as damping increases. The results show the limitations of the commonly used static equivalent lateral force procedure where local and global response parameters are reduced in the same proportion. It is concluded that estimating the effect of damping and yielding on the seismic response of steel buildings by using simplified models may be a very crude approximation. Moreover, the effect of yielding should be explicitly calculated by using complex 3D MDOF models instead of estimating it in terms of equivalent viscous damping. The findings of this paper are for the particular models used in the study. Much more research is needed to reach more general conclusions. PMID:25097892

  6. Effect of damping and yielding on the seismic response of 3D steel buildings with PMRF.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Salazar, Alfredo; Haldar, Achintya; Rodelo-López, Ramon Eduardo; Bojórquez, Eden

    2014-01-01

    The effect of viscous damping and yielding, on the reduction of the seismic responses of steel buildings modeled as three-dimensional (3D) complex multidegree of freedom (MDOF) systems, is studied. The reduction produced by damping may be larger or smaller than that of yielding. This reduction can significantly vary from one structural idealization to another and is smaller for global than for local response parameters, which in turn depends on the particular local response parameter. The uncertainty in the estimation is significantly larger for local response parameter and decreases as damping increases. The results show the limitations of the commonly used static equivalent lateral force procedure where local and global response parameters are reduced in the same proportion. It is concluded that estimating the effect of damping and yielding on the seismic response of steel buildings by using simplified models may be a very crude approximation. Moreover, the effect of yielding should be explicitly calculated by using complex 3D MDOF models instead of estimating it in terms of equivalent viscous damping. The findings of this paper are for the particular models used in the study. Much more research is needed to reach more general conclusions.

  7. Digital Tone Ranging Modem.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1976-05-01

    This report describes a digital ranging modem implementation based on side-tone ranging concepts. The ranging technique implemented and tested in the DOT/TSC avionics laboratory has direct application to the AEROSAT surveillance system. The performan...

  8. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegand, D.L.

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of themore » effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.« less

  9. TRIO: Turbulent Response in Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, J. H.; Clemmons, J. H.; Katz, N.; Ben-Ami, M.; Carranza, P. A.; Larsen, M.

    2005-01-01

    This project was designed to build on the results from the successful launch of the Turbulent Oxygen Mixing Experiment (TOMEX) mother-daughter (instrumented and chemical-release) payload (21.126) that was launched in October 2000 from the White Sands Missile Range. The overall science objective was to investigate the evolution of the atmospheric response. at altitudes between 80 and 120 km, to the presence of unstable regions with vertical scales of the order of 1 to 10 km. TRIO was designed to use Na lidar measurements from the MAUUMALT observation on MAUI with a launch of a payload from Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), located on Kauai. During this project, Aerospace participated in a Mission Initiation Conference. put together a science requirements document. performed a site visit to PMRF. prepared a CDR document. and developed a production and calibration procedure for one of the payload instruments. the 3-channel photometer. Unfortunately. NASA decided to terminate the program because of unforeseen (by NASA) range costs. This CDR document represents our view of this project at termination and provides a roadmap to perform this experiment should it be proposed again.

  10. Range management visual impacts

    Treesearch

    Bruce R. Brown; David Kissel

    1979-01-01

    Historical overgrazing of western public rangelands has resulted in the passage of the Public Rangeland Improvement Act of 1978. The main purpose of this Act is to improve unsatisfactory range conditions. A contributing factor to unfavorable range conditions is adverse visual impacts. These visual impacts can be identified in three categories of range management: range...

  11. Tonopah Test Range - Index

    Science.gov Websites

    Capabilities Test Operations Center Test Director Range Control Track Control Communications Tracking Radars Us Range Videos/Photos Range Capabilities Test Operations Center Test Director Range Control Track Control Communications Tracking Radars Optical Systems Cinetheodolites Telescopes R&D Telescopes

  12. Advanced ballistic range technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Leslie A.

    1994-01-01

    The research conducted supported two facilities at NASA Ames Research Center: the Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility and the 16-Inch Shock Tunnel. During the grant period, a computerized film-reading system was developed, and five- and six-degree-of-freedom parameter-identification routines were written and successfully implemented. Studies of flow separation were conducted, and methods to extract phase shift information from finite-fringe interferograms were developed. Methods for constructing optical images from Computational Fluid Dynamics solutions were also developed, and these methods were used for one-to-one comparisons of experiment and computations.

  13. Facilities | Bioenergy | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    Facilities Facilities At NREL's state-of-the-art bioenergy research facilities, researchers design options. Photo of interior of industrial, two-story building with high-bay, piping, and large processing

  14. R2 REGULATED FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Facility Registry System (FRS) is a centrally managed database that identifies facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. FRS creates high-quality, accurate, and authoritative facility identification records through rigorous...

  15. Localization of marine mammals near Hawaii using an acoustic propagation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemann, Christopher O.; Porter, Michael B.; Frazer, L. Neil

    2004-06-01

    Humpback whale songs were recorded on six widely spaced receivers of the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) hydrophone network near Hawaii during March of 2001. These recordings were used to test a new approach to localizing the whales that exploits the time-difference of arrival (time lag) of their calls as measured between receiver pairs in the PMRF network. The usual technique for estimating source position uses the intersection of hyperbolic curves of constant time lag, but a drawback of this approach is its assumption of a constant wave speed and straight-line propagation to associate acoustic travel time with range. In contrast to hyperbolic fixing, the algorithm described here uses an acoustic propagation model to account for waveguide and multipath effects when estimating travel time from hypothesized source positions. A comparison between predicted and measured time lags forms an ambiguity surface, or visual representation of the most probable whale position in a horizontal plane around the array. This is an important benefit because it allows for automated peak extraction to provide a location estimate. Examples of whale localizations using real and simulated data in algorithms of increasing complexity are provided.

  16. Scaling laws between population and facility densities.

    PubMed

    Um, Jaegon; Son, Seung-Woo; Lee, Sung-Ik; Jeong, Hawoong; Kim, Beom Jun

    2009-08-25

    When a new facility like a grocery store, a school, or a fire station is planned, its location should ideally be determined by the necessities of people who live nearby. Empirically, it has been found that there exists a positive correlation between facility and population densities. In the present work, we investigate the ideal relation between the population and the facility densities within the framework of an economic mechanism governing microdynamics. In previous studies based on the global optimization of facility positions in minimizing the overall travel distance between people and facilities, it was shown that the density of facility D and that of population rho should follow a simple power law D approximately rho(2/3). In our empirical analysis, on the other hand, the power-law exponent alpha in D approximately rho(alpha) is not a fixed value but spreads in a broad range depending on facility types. To explain this discrepancy in alpha, we propose a model based on economic mechanisms that mimic the competitive balance between the profit of the facilities and the social opportunity cost for populations. Through our simple, microscopically driven model, we show that commercial facilities driven by the profit of the facilities have alpha = 1, whereas public facilities driven by the social opportunity cost have alpha = 2/3. We simulate this model to find the optimal positions of facilities on a real U.S. map and show that the results are consistent with the empirical data.

  17. Tau Ranging Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    Report reviews history of tau ranging and advocates use of advanced electronic circuitry to revive this composite-code-uplink spacecraft-ranging technique. Very-large-scale integration gives new life to abandoned distance-measuring technique.

  18. RADIO RANGING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Nieset, R.T.

    1961-05-16

    A radio ranging device is described. It utilizes a super regenerative detector-oscillator in which echoes of transmitted pulses are received in proper phase to reduce noise energy at a selected range and also at multiples of the selected range.

  19. Long Range Technology Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambron, Sueann, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    This summary of a meeting of the Apple Education Advisory Council, on long range technology plans at the state, county, district, and school levels, includes highlights from group discussions on future planning, staff development, and curriculum. Three long range technology plans at the state level are provided: Long Range Educational Technology…

  20. Facility Accessibility: Opening the Doors to All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Jeffrey C.; Piletic, Cindy K.

    2006-01-01

    A facility developed for fitness, physical activity, recreation, or sport is a vital community resource that contributes to the overall health and wellness of that community's citizens. In order to maximize the benefits derived from these facilities, it is imperative that they be accessible to as wide a range of people as possible. The Americans…

  1. Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov Websites

    Skip to main content Argonne National Laboratory Toggle Navigation Toggle Search Research Facilities Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Center for Transportation Research Distributed Energy Research Center Engine Research Facility Heat Transfer Laboratory Materials Engineering Research Facility

  2. Space - The long range future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Puttkamer, J.

    1985-01-01

    Space exploration goals for NASA in the year 2000 time frame are examined. A lunar base would offer the opportunity for continuous earth viewing, further cosmogeochemical exploration and rudimentary steps at self-sufficiency in space. The latter two factors are also compelling reasons to plan a manned Mars base. Furthermore, competition and cooperation in a Mars mission and further interplanetary exploration is an attractive substitute for war. The hardware requirements for various configurations of Mars missions are briefly addressed, along with other, unmanned missions to the asteroid belt, Mercury, Venus, Jupiter and the moons of Jupiter and Saturn. Finally, long-range technological requirements for providing adequate living/working facilities for larger human populations in Space Station environments are summarized.

  3. Transport Reactor Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, D.A.; Shoemaker, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is currently evaluating hot gas desulfurization (HGD)in its on-site transport reactor facility (TRF). This facility was originally constructed in the early 1980s to explore advanced gasification processes with an entrained reactor, and has recently been modified to incorporate a transport riser reactor. The TRF supports Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power systems, one of METC`s advanced power generation systems. The HGD subsystem is a key developmental item in reducing the cost and increasing the efficiency of the IGCC concept. The TRF is a unique facility with high-temperature, high-pressure, and multiple reactant gas composition capability.more » The TRF can be configured for reacting a single flow pass of gas and solids using a variety of gases. The gas input system allows six different gas inputs to be mixed and heated before entering the reaction zones. Current configurations allow the use of air, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, methane, nitrogen, oxygen, steam, or any mixture of these gases. Construction plans include the addition of a coal gas input line. This line will bring hot coal gas from the existing Fluidized-Bed Gasifier (FBG) via the Modular Gas Cleanup Rig (MGCR) after filtering out particulates with ceramic candle filters. Solids can be fed either by a rotary pocket feeder or a screw feeder. Particle sizes may range from 70 to 150 micrometers. Both feeders have a hopper that can hold enough solid for fairly lengthy tests at the higher feed rates, thus eliminating the need for lockhopper transfers during operation.« less

  4. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed. PMID:27583542

  5. Automatic range selector

    DOEpatents

    McNeilly, Clyde E.

    1977-01-04

    A device is provided for automatically selecting from a plurality of ranges of a scale of values to which a meter may be made responsive, that range which encompasses the value of an unknown parameter. A meter relay indicates whether the unknown is of greater or lesser value than the range to which the meter is then responsive. The rotatable part of a stepping relay is rotated in one direction or the other in response to the indication from the meter relay. Various positions of the rotatable part are associated with particular scales. Switching means are sensitive to the position of the rotatable part to couple the associated range to the meter.

  6. Skylab 2 facilities and environmental measurements program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A list of the facilities and environmental measurements to be monitored in support of the Skylab 2 vehicle is presented. The data include measurement identification number, description, transducer operating range, recorder type, and drawings illustrating measurement location.

  7. Evaluation of intermodal passenger transfer facilities

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1994-09-01

    The Wisconsin Department of Transportation has initiated a study into the feasibility of locating an intermodal passenger transportation facility in downtown Milwaukee. That feasibilty study requires an evaluation of a very wide range of alternatives...

  8. Role of Meteorology in Flights of a Solar-Powered Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, Casey

    2004-01-01

    In the summer of 2001, the Helios prototype solar-powered uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) [a lightweight, remotely piloted airplane] was deployed to the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), at Kauai, Hawaii, in an attempt to fly to altitudes above 100,000 ft (30.48 km). The goal of flying a UAV to such high altitudes has been designated a level-I milestone of the NASA Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. In support of this goal, meteorologists from NASA Dryden Flight Research Center were sent to PMRF, as part of the flight crew, to provide current and forecast weather information to the pilots, mission directors, and planners. Information of this kind is needed to optimize flight conditions for peak aircraft performance and to enable avoidance of weather conditions that could adversely affect safety. In general, the primary weather data of concern for ground and flight operations are wind speeds (see Figure 1). Because of its long wing span [247 ft (.75 m)] and low weight [1,500 to 1,600 lb (about 680 to 726 kg)], the Helios airplane is sensitive to wind speeds exceeding 7 kn (3.6 m/s) at the surface. Also, clouds are of concern because they can block sunlight needed to energize an array of solar photovoltaic cells that provide power to the airplane. Vertical wind shear is very closely monitored in order to prevent damage or loss of control due to turbulence.

  9. The ASTROCULTURE Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Research with plants in microgravity offers many exciting opportunities to gain new insights and could improve products on Earth ranging from crop production to fragrances and food flavorings. The ASTROCULTURE facility is a lead commercial facility for plant growth and plant research in microgravity and was developed by the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WSCAR), a NASA Commercial Space Center. On STS-95 it will support research that could help improve crop development leading to plants that are more disease resistant or have a higher yield and provide data on the production of plant essential oils---oils that contain the essence of the plant and provide both fragrance and flavoring. On STS-95, a flowering plant will be grown in ASTROCULTURE and samples taken using a method developed by the industry partner for this investigation. On Earth, the samples will be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and the data used to evaluate both the production of fragrant oils in microgravity and in the development of one or more products. The ASTROCULTURE payload uses these pourous tubes with precise pressure sensing and control for fluid delivery to the plant root tray.

  10. The ASTROCULTURE Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Research with plants in microgravity offers many exciting opportunities to gain new insights and could improve products on Earth ranging from crop production to fragrances and food flavorings. The ASTROCULTURE facility is a lead commercial facility for plant growth and plant research in microgravity and was developed by the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WSCAR), a NASA Commercial Space Center. On STS-95 it will support research that could help improve crop development leading to plants that are more disease resistant or have a higher yield and provide data on the production of plant essential oils---oils that contain the essence of the plant and provide both fragrance and flavoring. On STS-95, a flowering plant will be grown in ASTROCULTURE and samples taken using a method developed by the industry partner for this investigation. On Earth the samples will be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and the data used to evaluate both the production of fragrant oils in microgravity and in the development of one or more products.

  11. Succinonitrile Purification Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Succinonitrile (SCN) Purification Facility provides succinonitrile and succinonitrile alloys to several NRA selected investigations for flight and ground research at various levels of purity. The purification process employed includes both distillation and zone refining. Once the appropriate purification process is completed, samples are characterized to determine the liquidus and/or solidus temperature, which is then related to sample purity. The lab has various methods for measuring these temperatures with accuracies in the milliKelvin to tenths of milliKelvin range. The ultra-pure SCN produced in our facility is indistinguishable from the standard material provided by NIST to well within the stated +/- 1.5mK of the NIST triple point cells. In addition to delivering material to various investigations, our current activities include process improvement, characterization of impurities and triple point cell design and development. The purification process is being evaluated for each of the four vendors to determine the efficacy of each purification step. We are also collecting samples of the remainder from distillation and zone refining for analysis of the constituent impurities. The large triple point cells developed will contain SCN with a melting point of 58.0642 C +/- 1.5mK for use as a calibration standard for Standard Platinum Resistance Thermometers (SPRTs).

  12. Temperature dependent BRDF facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airola, Marc B.; Brown, Andrea M.; Hahn, Daniel V.; Thomas, Michael E.; Congdon, Elizabeth A.; Mehoke, Douglas S.

    2014-09-01

    Applications involving space based instrumentation and aerodynamically heated surfaces often require knowledge of the bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of an exposed surface at high temperature. Addressing this need, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) developed a BRDF facility that features a multiple-port vacuum chamber, multiple laser sources covering the spectral range from the longwave infrared to the ultraviolet, imaging pyrometry and laser heated samples. Laser heating eliminates stray light that would otherwise be seen from a furnace and requires minimal sample support structure, allowing low thermal conduction loss to be obtained, which is especially important at high temperatures. The goal is to measure the BRDF of ceramic-coated surfaces at temperatures in excess of 1000°C in a low background environment. Most ceramic samples are near blackbody in the longwave infrared, thus pyrometry using a LWIR camera can be very effective and accurate.

  13. Range Scheduling Aid (RSA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, J. R.; Pulvermacher, M. K.

    1991-01-01

    Range Scheduling Aid (RSA) is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: satellite control network; current and new approaches to range scheduling; MITRE tasking; RSA features; RSA display; constraint based analytic capability; RSA architecture; and RSA benefits.

  14. Home range and travels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  15. Soliton microcomb range measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Myoung-Gyun; Vahala, Kerry J.

    2018-02-01

    Laser-based range measurement systems are important in many application areas, including autonomous vehicles, robotics, manufacturing, formation flying of satellites, and basic science. Coherent laser ranging systems using dual-frequency combs provide an unprecedented combination of long range, high precision, and fast update rate. We report dual-comb distance measurement using chip-based soliton microcombs. A single pump laser was used to generate dual-frequency combs within a single microresonator as counterpropagating solitons. We demonstrated time-of-flight measurement with 200-nanometer precision at an averaging time of 500 milliseconds within a range ambiguity of 16 millimeters. Measurements at distances up to 25 meters with much lower precision were also performed. Our chip-based source is an important step toward miniature dual-comb laser ranging systems that are suitable for photonic integration.

  16. Low thrust rocket test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, Lynn A.; Schneider, Steven J.

    1990-01-01

    A low thrust chemical rocket test facility has recently become operational at the NASA-Lewis. The new facility is used to conduct both long duration and performance tests at altitude over a thruster's operating envelope using hydrogen and oxygen gas for propellants. The facility provides experimental support for a broad range of objectives, including fundamental modeling of fluids and combustion phenomena, the evaluation of thruster components, and life testing of full rocket designs. The major mechanical and electrical systems are described along with aspects of the various optical diagnostics available in the test cell. The electrical and mechanical systems are designed for low down time between tests and low staffing requirements for test operations. Initial results are also presented which illustrate the various capabilities of the cell.

  17. Advanced Hypervelocity Aerophysics Facility Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witcofski, Robert D. (Compiler); Scallion, William I. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    The primary objective of the workshop was to obtain a critical assessment of a concept for a large, advanced hypervelocity ballistic range test facility powered by an electromagnetic launcher, which was proposed by the Langley Research Center. It was concluded that the subject large-scale facility was feasible and would provide the required ground-based capability for performing tests at entry flight conditions (velocity and density) on large, complex, instrumented models. It was also concluded that advances in remote measurement techniques and particularly onboard model instrumentation, light-weight model construction techniques, and model electromagnetic launcher (EML) systems must be made before any commitment for the construction of such a facility can be made.

  18. NASA Range Safety Annual Report 2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumont, Alan G.

    2007-01-01

    As always, Range Safety has been involved in a number of exciting and challenging activities and events. Throughout the year, we have strived to meet our goal of protecting the public, the workforce, and property during range operations. During the past year, Range Safety was involved in the development, implementation, and support of range safety policy. Range Safety training curriculum development was completed this year and several courses were presented. Tailoring exercises concerning the Constellation Program were undertaken with representatives from the Constellation Program, the 45th Space Wing, and the Launch Constellation Range Safety Panel. Range Safety actively supported the Range Commanders Council and it subgroups and remained involved in updating policy related to flight safety systems and flight safety analysis. In addition, Range Safety supported the Space Shuttle Range Safety Panel and addressed policy concerning unmanned aircraft systems. Launch operations at Kennedy Space Center, the Eastern and Western ranges, Dryden Flight Research Center, and Wallops Flight Facility were addressed. Range Safety was also involved in the evaluation of a number of research and development efforts, including the space-based range (formerly STARS), the autonomous flight safety system, the enhanced flight termination system, and the joint advanced range safety system. Flight safety system challenges were evaluated. Range Safety's role in the Space Florida Customer Assistance Service Program for the Eastern Range was covered along with our support for the Space Florida Educational Balloon Release Program. We hope you have found the web-based format both accessible and easy to use. Anyone having questions or wishing to have an article included in the 2008 Range Safety Annual Report should contact Alan Dumont, the NASA Range Safety Program Manager located at the Kennedy Space Center, or Michael Dook at NASA Headquarters.

  19. The Ames Vertical Gun Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karcz, J. S.; Bowling, D.; Cornelison, C.; Parrish, A.; Perez, A.; Raiche, G.; Wiens, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    The Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) is a national facility for conducting laboratory- scale investigations of high-speed impact processes. It provides a set of light-gas, powder, and compressed gas guns capable of accelerating projectiles to speeds up to 7 km s(exp -1). The AVGR has a unique capability to vary the angle between the projectile-launch and gravity vectors between 0 and 90 deg. The target resides in a large chamber (diameter approximately 2.5 m) that can be held at vacuum or filled with an experiment-specific atmosphere. The chamber provides a number of viewing ports and feed-throughs for data, power, and fluids. Impacts are observed via high-speed digital cameras along with investigation-specific instrumentation, such as spectrometers. Use of the range is available via grant proposals through any Planetary Science Research Program element of the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) calls. Exploratory experiments (one to two days) are additionally possible in order to develop a new proposal.

  20. Live Fire Range Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    None

    1993-08-01

    The Central Training Academy (CTA) is a DOE Headquarters Organization located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with the mission to effectively and efficiently educate and train personnel involved in the protection of vital national security interests of DOE. The CTA Live Fire Range (LFR), where most of the firearms and tactical training occurs, is a complex separate from the main campus. The purpose of the proposed action is to expand the LFR to allow more options of implementing required training. The Department of Energy has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction and operation of an expanded Live Firemore » Range Facility at the Central Training Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).« less

  1. Space Transportation and Destination Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smitherman, David; McClure, Wallace

    1999-01-01

    The Space Transportation and Destination Facilities section focused on space transportation vehicles-from use of existing vehicles to development of specialized transports-and on space stations, space business parks, space hotels, and other facilities in space of the kind that eventually would provide services for general public space travel (PST) and tourism. For both transportation and destination facilities, the emphasis was on the identification of various strategies to enable a realistic incremental progression in the development and acquisition of such facilities, and the identification of issues that need resolution to enable formation of viable businesses. The approach was to determine the best: (1) Strategies for general PST and tourism development through the description and analysis of a wide range of possible future scenarios. With these scenarios in mind the section then identified. (2) Key issues to be explored. (3) opportunities to eliminate barriers. (4) Recommendations for future actions. (5) Top-level requirements and characteristics for general PST and tourism systems and services that would guide the development of transportation and destination facilities.

  2. Mu-2 ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, W. L.; Zygielbaum, A. I.

    1977-01-01

    The Mu-II Dual-Channel Sequential Ranging System designed as a model for future Deep Space Network ranging equipment is described. A list of design objectives is followed by a theoretical explanation of the digital demodulation techniques first employed in this machine. Hardware and software implementation are discussed, together with the details relating to the construction of the device. Two appendixes are included relating to the programming and operation of this equipment to yield the maximum scientific data.

  3. Space technology test facilities at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Rodrigues, Annette T.

    1990-01-01

    The major space research and technology test facilities at the NASA Ames Research Center are divided into five categories: General Purpose, Life Support, Computer-Based Simulation, High Energy, and the Space Exploraton Test Facilities. The paper discusses selected facilities within each of the five categories and discusses some of the major programs in which these facilities have been involved. Special attention is given to the 20-G Man-Rated Centrifuge, the Human Research Facility, the Plant Crop Growth Facility, the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility, the Arc-Jet Complex and Hypersonic Test Facility, the Infrared Detector and Cryogenic Test Facility, and the Mars Wind Tunnel. Each facility is described along with its objectives, test parameter ranges, and major current programs and applications.

  4. Advanced ballistic range technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Leslie A.

    1993-01-01

    Optical images, such as experimental interferograms, schlieren, and shadowgraphs, are routinely used to identify and locate features in experimental flow fields and for validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. Interferograms can also be used for comparing experimental and computed integrated densities. By constructing these optical images from flow-field simulations, one-to-one comparisons of computation and experiment are possible. During the period from February 1, 1992, to November 30, 1992, work has continued on the development of CISS (Constructed Interferograms, Schlieren, and Shadowgraphs), a code that constructs images from ideal- and real-gas flow-field simulations. In addition, research connected with the automated film-reading system and the proposed reactivation of the radiation facility has continued.

  5. Spacelab Data Processing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The capabilities of the Spacelab Data Processing Facility (SPDPF) are highlighted. The capturing, quality monitoring, processing, accounting, and forwarding of vital Spacelab data to various user facilities around the world are described.

  6. Facilities for US Radioastronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaddeus, Patrick

    1982-01-01

    Discusses major developments in radioastronomy since 1945. Topics include proposed facilities, very-long-baseline interferometric array, millimeter-wave telescope, submillimeter-wave telescope, and funding for radioastronomy facilities and projects. (JN)

  7. Facility safety study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The safety of NASA's in house microelectronics facility is addressed. Industrial health standards, facility emission control requirements, operation and safety checklists, and the disposal of epitaxial vent gas are considered.

  8. Plant Habitat Facility Clean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-03-12

    iss055e001931 (Mar. 12, 2018) --- Dwarf wheat plants during routine cleaning in the Advanced Plant Habitat Facility, a facility to conduct plant bioscience research on the International Space Stations (ISS).

  9. Soliton microcomb range measurement.

    PubMed

    Suh, Myoung-Gyun; Vahala, Kerry J

    2018-02-23

    Laser-based range measurement systems are important in many application areas, including autonomous vehicles, robotics, manufacturing, formation flying of satellites, and basic science. Coherent laser ranging systems using dual-frequency combs provide an unprecedented combination of long range, high precision, and fast update rate. We report dual-comb distance measurement using chip-based soliton microcombs. A single pump laser was used to generate dual-frequency combs within a single microresonator as counterpropagating solitons. We demonstrated time-of-flight measurement with 200-nanometer precision at an averaging time of 500 milliseconds within a range ambiguity of 16 millimeters. Measurements at distances up to 25 meters with much lower precision were also performed. Our chip-based source is an important step toward miniature dual-comb laser ranging systems that are suitable for photonic integration. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  10. Facilities maintenance handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This handbook is a guide for facilities maintenance managers. Its objective is to set minimum facilities maintenance standards. It also provides recommendations on how to meet the standards to ensure that NASA maintains its facilities in a manner that protects and preserves its investment in the facilities in a cost-effective manner while safely and efficiently performing its mission. This handbook implements NMI 8831.1, which states NASA facilities maintenance policy and assigns organizational responsibilities for the management of facilities maintenance activities on all properties under NASA jurisdiction. It is a reference for facilities maintenance managers, not a step-by-step procedural manual. Because of the differences in NASA Field Installation organizations, this handbook does not assume or recommend a typical facilities maintenance organization. Instead, it uses a systems approach to describe the functions that should be included in any facilities maintenance management system, regardless of its organizational structure. For documents referenced in the handbook, the most recent version of the documents is applicable. This handbook is divided into three parts: Part 1 specifies common definitions and facilities maintenance requirements and amplifies the policy requirements contained in NMI 8831. 1; Part 2 provides guidance on how to meet the requirements of Part 1, containing recommendations only; Part 3 contains general facilities maintenance information. One objective of this handbook is to fix commonality of facilities maintenance definitions among the Centers. This will permit the application of uniform measures of facilities conditions, of the relationship between current replacement value and maintenance resources required, and of the backlog of deferred facilities maintenance. The utilization of facilities maintenance system functions will allow the Centers to quantitatively define maintenance objectives in common terms, prepare work plans, and

  11. Satellite Laser Ranging operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is currently providing precision orbit determination for measurements of: 1) Ocean surface topography from satellite borne radar altimetry, 2) Spatial and temporal variations of the gravity field, 3) Earth and ocean tides, 4) Plate tectonic and regional deformation, 5) Post-glacial uplift and subsidence, 6) Variations in the Earth's center-of-mass, and 7) Variations in Earth rotation. SLR also supports specialized programs in time transfer and classical geodetic positioning, and will soon provide precision ranging to support experiments in relativity.

  12. Considerations on Facilities Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baule, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Most facilities renovation projects occur because someone at the executive or board level has lobbied successfully for them. Often in public schools, the voters have agreed to the project as well via a building referendum. Therefore, facilities projects are highly visible to the community. Unlike many other issues in schools, facilities projects…

  13. Indoor Athletic Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, E. Scott

    2000-01-01

    Examines the concept of shared-use facilities to help financially support and meet the demand for athletic facilities. Shared-use considerations are explored including cost sharing of ongoing operations, aesthetics, locker rooms, support facilities, parking and site access, and building access and security. (GR)

  14. Facilities Engineering in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagluiso, M. A.

    1970-01-01

    An overview of NASA facilities is given outlining some of the more interesting and unique aspects of engineering and facilities associated with the space program. Outlined are some of the policies under which the Office of Facilities conducts its business. Included are environmental quality control measures.

  15. Florida Educational Facilities, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This document contains information, photographs, and floor plans of many of Florida's new elementary through high school facilities occupied in 1996. Each entry lists the facility's type, building size, student capacity, and general structural information. Also provided is information on the facility's total construction cost; the architects and…

  16. Florida Educational Facilities, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This document contains information, photographs, and floor plans of many of Florida's new elementary through high school facilities occupied in 1997. Each entry lists the facility's type, building size, student capacity, and general structural information. Also provided is information on the facility's total construction cost; the architects and…

  17. Florida Educational Facilities, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This document contains information, photographs, and floor plans of many of Florida's new elementary through high school facilities occupied in 1998. Each entry lists the facility's type, building size, student capacity, and general structural information. Also provided is information on the facility's total construction cost; the architects and…

  18. Aeronautical facilities assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penaranda, F. E. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    A survey of the free world's aeronautical facilities was undertaken and an evaluation made on where the relative strengths and weaknesses exist. Special emphasis is given to NASA's own capabilities and needs. The types of facilities surveyed are: Wind Tunnels; Airbreathing Propulsion Facilities; and Flight Simulators

  19. Facility or Facilities? That is the Question.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viso, M.

    2018-04-01

    The management of the martian samples upon arrival on the Earth will require a lot of work to ensure a safe life detection and biohazard testing during the quarantine. This will induce a sharing of the load between several facilities.

  20. RADIO RANGING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Bogle, R.W.

    1960-11-22

    A description is given of a super-regenerative oscillator ranging device provided with radiating and receiving means and being capable of indicating the occurrence of that distance between itself and a reflecting object which so phases the received echo of energy of a preceding emitted oscillation that the intervals between oscillations become uniform.

  1. Himalayan Mountain Range

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1981-04-14

    STS001-12-350 (12-14 April 1981) --- India and China, the Ladokh and Zaskar Ranges of the Great Himalaya are clearly etched by snow and shadow. A detailed view shows the glaciation process over a wide area. Photo credit: NASA

  2. Agriculture, forest, and range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the panel for developing a satellite remote-sensing global information system in the next decade are reported. User requirements were identified in five categories: (1) cultivated crops, (2) land resources, (3)water resources, (4)forest management, and (5) range management. The benefits from the applications of satellite data are discussed.

  3. Survey of aircraft icing simulation test facilities in North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W.

    1981-01-01

    A survey was made of the aircraft icing simulation facilities in North America: there are 12 wind tunnels, 28 engine test facilities, 6 aircraft tankers and 14 low velocity facilities, that perform aircraft icing tests full or part time. The location and size of the facility, its speed and temperature range, icing cloud parameters, and the technical person to contact are surveyed. Results are presented in tabular form. The capabilities of each facility were estimated by its technical contact person. The adequacy of these facilities for various types of icing tests is discussed.

  4. Light beam range finder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    A "laser tape measure" for measuring distance which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%.

  5. Light beam range finder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-06-16

    A ``laser tape measure`` for measuring distance is disclosed which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%. 7 figs.

  6. Using the NPSS Environment to Model an Altitude Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Thomas M.; Owen, Albert K.; Huffman, Brian C.

    2013-01-01

    An altitude test facility was modeled using Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). This altitude test facility model represents the most detailed facility model developed in the NPSS architecture. The current paper demonstrates the use of the NPSS system to define the required operating range of a component for the facility. A significant number of additional component models were easily developed to complete the model. Discussed in this paper are the additional components developed and what was done in the development of these components.

  7. Research and test facilities for development of technologies and experiments with commercial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    One of NASA'S agency-wide goals is the commercial development of space. To further this goal NASA is implementing a policy whereby U.S. firms are encouraged to utilize NASA facilities to develop and test concepts having commercial potential. Goddard, in keeping with this policy, will make the facilities and capabilities described in this document available to private entities at a reduced cost and on a noninterference basis with internal NASA programs. Some of these facilities include: (1) the Vibration Test Facility; (2) the Battery Test Facility; (3) the Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator Facility; (4) the High Voltage Testing Facility; (5) the Magnetic Field Component Test Facility; (6) the Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility; (7) the High Capacity Centrifuge Facility; (8) the Acoustic Test Facility; (9) the Electromagnetic Interference Test Facility; (10) the Space Simulation Test Facility; (11) the Static/Dynamic Balance Facility; (12) the High Speed Centrifuge Facility; (13) the Optical Thin Film Deposition Facility; (14) the Gold Plating Facility; (15) the Paint Formulation and Application Laboratory; (16) the Propulsion Research Laboratory; (17) the Wallops Range Facility; (18) the Optical Instrument Assembly and Test Facility; (19) the Massively Parallel Processor Facility; (20) the X-Ray Diffraction and Scanning Auger Microscopy/Spectroscopy Laboratory; (21) the Parts Analysis Laboratory; (22) the Radiation Test Facility; (23) the Ainsworth Vacuum Balance Facility; (24) the Metallography Laboratory; (25) the Scanning Electron Microscope Laboratory; (26) the Organic Analysis Laboratory; (27) the Outgassing Test Facility; and (28) the Fatigue, Fracture Mechanics and Mechanical Testing Laboratory.

  8. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Manglos, S.H.

    1988-03-10

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

  9. MiniAERCam Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talley, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Johnson Space Center (JSC) is designing a small, remotely controlled vehicle that will carry two color and one black and white video cameras in space. The device will launch and retrieve from the Space Vehicle and be used for remote viewing. Off the shelf cellular technology is being used as the basis for communication system design. Existing plans include using multiple antennas to make simultaneous estimates of the azimuth of the MiniAERCam from several sites on the Space Station and use triangulation to find the location of the device. Adding range detection capability to each of the nodes on the Space Vehicle would allow an estimate of the location of the MiniAERCam to be made at each Communication And Telemetry Box (CATBox) independent of all the other communication nodes. This project will investigate the techniques used by the Global Positioning System (GPS) to achieve accurate positioning information and adapt those strategies that are appropriate to the design of the CATBox range determination system.

  10. Hydrogen Infrastructure Testing and Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2017-04-10

    Learn about the Hydrogen Infrastructure Testing and Research Facility (HITRF), where NREL researchers are working on vehicle and hydrogen infrastructure projects that aim to enable more rapid inclusion of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies in the market to meet consumer and national goals for emissions reduction, performance, and energy security. As part of NREL’s Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), the HITRF is designed for collaboration with a wide range of hydrogen, fuel cell, and transportation stakeholders.

  11. Langley Mach 4 scramjet test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, E. H., Jr.; Torrence, M. G.; Anderson, G. Y.; Northam, G. B.; Mackley, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    An engine test facility was constructed at the NASA Langley Research Center in support of a supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) technology development program. Hydrogen combustion in air with oxygen replenishment provides simulated air at Mach 4 flight velocity, pressure, and true total temperature for an altitude range from 57,000 to 86,000 feet. A facility nozzle with a 13 in square exit produces a Mach 3.5 free jet flow for engine propulsion tests. The facility is described and calibration results are presented which demonstrate the suitability of the test flow for conducting scramjet engine research.

  12. Photovoltaic Systems Test Facilities: Existing capabilities compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkmer, K.

    1982-01-01

    A general description of photovoltaic systems test facilities (PV-STFs) operated under the U.S. Department of Energy's photovoltaics program is given. Descriptions of a number of privately operated facilities having test capabilities appropriate to photovoltaic hardware development are given. A summary of specific, representative test capabilities at the system and subsystem level is presented for each listed facility. The range of system and subsystem test capabilities available to serve the needs of both the photovoltaics program and the private sector photovoltaics industry is given.

  13. [Factors influencing ammonia volatilization in a winter wheat field with plastic film mulched ridges and unmulched furrows].

    PubMed

    Shangguan, Yu-Xian; Shi, Ri-Peng; Li, Na; Han, Kun; Li, Hui-Ke; Wang, Lin-Quan

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this experiment was to quantify ammonia volatilization from a winter wheat field with plastic film mulched-ridges and unmulched-furrows (PMRF). The trial was conducted during the 2010-2011 winter wheat growing season at Yangling, Shaanxi Province. Ammonia volatilization from the soil was measured using the closed-chamber method. The results indicated that NH3 emission losses ranged between (1.66 +/- 0.3) and (3.28 +/- 0.51) kg x hm(-2) in the PMRF treatment. In comparison, the NH3 emission loss was (4.68 +/- 0.35) kg x ha(-1) in the conventional tillage treatment (i. e., smooth soil surface). The PMRF treatment reduced NH3 emissions by 29.8 to 63.8% compared with the conventional treatment. The NH3 emission losses were equivalent to 1.9% of the applied N in the conventional practice treatment. In contrast, the losses were equivalent to only 0.3% to 0.8% of the applied N in the PMRF treatment. Ammonia emissions were greatest during the first two weeks after sowing. Emissions before winter accounted for 82% of total NH3 emission in the conventional practice treatment, but only 49% to 61% of the total NH3 emission in the PMRF treatment. The soil NH4+ -N content and the soil moisture content had direct effects on NH3 emission before winter in the conventional treatment. In thePMRF treatment, the soil NH4+ -N content had a direct effect on NH3 emission before winter, whereas soil surface temperature and soil moisture had indirect effects. Ammonia emissions after the greening stage were mainly influenced by the soil NH4+ -N content. Simulation results indicated that logarithmic functions best described cumulative NH3 emission in the PMRF + high N rate treatment and the conventional treatment. A linear function best described cumulative NH3 emission in the PMRF + low N rate treatment and the unfertilized treatment. In conclusion, the PMRF treatment can significantly reduce N losses from winter wheat fields by changing the spatial-temporal dynamics of soil

  14. Mir training Facility view

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-02-22

    S95-04319 (22 Feb 1995) --- The neutral buoyancy facility at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, is used for underwater training for missions aboard the Russian Mir Space Station. The facility is similar to NASA's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WET-F) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas, and the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama.

  15. Future Facility: FAIR at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, Guenther

    2007-05-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, FAIR, is a new particle accelerator facility to be built at the GSI site in Germany. The research at FAIR will cover a wide range of topics in nuclear and hadron physics, high density plasma and atomic physics, and applications in condensed matter physics and biology. A 1.1 km circumference double ring of rapidly cycling 100 and 300 Tm synchrotrons, will be FAIR's central accelerator system. It will be used to produce, inter alia, high intensity secondary beams of antiprotons and short-lived radioactive nuclei. A subsequent suite of cooler and storage rings will deliver heavy ion and antiproton beams of unprecedented quality. Large experiments are presently being designed by the NUSTAR, PANDA, PAX, CBM, SPARC, FLAIR, HEDgeHOB and BIOMAT collaborations.

  16. Range imaging laser radar

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Marion W.

    1990-01-01

    A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typicy sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream.

  17. Range imaging laser radar

    DOEpatents

    Scott, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typically sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream. 2 figs.

  18. The Fluids and Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Sampa

    2004-01-01

    Microgravity is an environment with very weak gravitational effects. The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) on the International Space Station (ISS) will support the study of fluid physics and combustion science in a long-duration microgravity environment. The Fluid Combustion Facility's design will permit both independent and remote control operations from the Telescience Support Center. The crew of the International Space Station will continue to insert and remove the experiment module, store and reload removable data storage and media data tapes, and reconfigure diagnostics on either side of the optics benches. Upon completion of the Fluids Combustion Facility, about ten experiments will be conducted within a ten-year period. Several different areas of fluid physics will be studied in the Fluids Combustion Facility. These areas include complex fluids, interfacial phenomena, dynamics and instabilities, and multiphase flows and phase change. Recently, emphasis has been placed in areas that relate directly to NASA missions including life support, power, propulsion, and thermal control systems. By 2006 or 2007, a Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) and a Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) will be installed inside the International Space Station. The Fluids Integrated Rack will contain all the hardware and software necessary to perform experiments in fluid physics. A wide range of experiments that meet the requirements of the international space station, including research from other specialties, will be considered. Experiments will be contained in subsystems such as the international standard payload rack, the active rack isolation system, the optics bench, environmental subsystem, electrical power control unit, the gas interface subsystem, and the command and data management subsystem. In conclusion, the Fluids and Combustion Facility will allow researchers to study fluid physics and combustion science in a long-duration microgravity environment. Additional information is

  19. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Manglos, Stephen H.

    1989-06-06

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

  20. FACILITIES FOR PHYSICAL FITNESS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MUSIAL, STAN

    THIS ARTICLE CITES THE LOW PRIORITY THAT PHYSICAL EDUCATION GENERALLY HAS IN CURRICULUM AND SCHOOL FACILITY PLANNING. IT ALSO CITES THE REASONS FOR DEVELOPING MORE ADEQUATE PHYSICAL EDUCATION FACILITIES--(1) OUR WAY OF LIFE NO LONGER PROVIDES VIGOROUS PHYSICAL ACTIVITY NECESSARY FOR HEALTHY DEVELOPMENT, (2) A DIRECT RELATIONSHIP EXISTS BETWEEN…

  1. Florida Educational Facilities, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This publication describes Florida school and community college facilities completed in 2000, including photographs and floor plans. The facilities profiled are:J. R. Arnold High School (Bay County); Falcon Cove Middle School (Broward); Floranada Elementary School (Broward); Lyons Creek Middle School (Broward); Parkside Elementary School…

  2. Facilities | Photovoltaic Research | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    Centers (RTCs) The Department of Energy Regional Test Centers for solar technologies serve to validate PV development to provide foundational support for the photovoltaic (PV) industry and PV users. Photo of the Solar Research Energy Facility. Solar Energy Research Facility (SERF) The SERF houses various

  3. Facility Design Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, William W.

    1967-01-01

    Increasing need for vocational education under the impetus of federal aid is generating a demand for vocational teaching facilities. Factors to be considered in planning these facilities inclued--(1) site development, (2) program needs, (3) administrative considerations, (4) environmental controls. (5) mechanical systems, and (6) area and space…

  4. Science Facilities Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    A bibliographic collection on science buildings and facilities is cited with many different reference sources for those concerned with the design, planning, and layout of science facilities. References are given covering a broad scope of information on--(1) physical plant planning, (2) management and safety, (3) building type studies, (4) design…

  5. FACILITY POLLUTION PREVENTION GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) has developed the Facility Pollution Prevention Guide for those who are interested in and responsible for pollution prevention in industrial or service facilities. t summarizes the benefits of a company-wide pollution prevention...

  6. Florida Educational Facilities, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This publication describes Florida school and community college facilities completed in 1999, including photographs and floor plans. The facilities profiled are: Buchholz High School (Alachua County); Gator Run Elementary School (Broward); Corkscrew Elementary School (Collier); The 500 Role Models Academy of Excellence (Miami-Dade); Caribbean…

  7. INCINERATION RESEARCH FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cincinnati-based Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory, ORD, U.S. EPA operates the Incineration Research Facility *IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas. This facility's pilot-scale experimental incineration systems include a Rotary Kiln System and a Liquid Injection System. Each syste...

  8. Research Facilities | Wind | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    wearing hard hats in front of a wind turbine drivetrain inside a drivetrain test facility. Dynamometer Research Facilities Photo of five men in hard hards observing the end of a turbine blade while it's being

  9. Head Start Facilities Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Assessment Management, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    A quality Head Start facility should provide a physical environment responsive both to the needs of the children and families served and to the needs of staff, volunteers, and community agencies that share space with Head Start. This manual is a tool for Head Start grantees and delegate agencies for assessing existing facilities, making…

  10. NASA Regional Planetary Image Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, Raymond E.

    2001-01-01

    The Regional Planetary Image Facility (RPIF) provided access to data from NASA planetary missions and expert assistance about the data sets and how to order subsets of the collections. This ensures that the benefit/cost of acquiring the data is maximized by widespread dissemination and use of the observations and resultant collections. The RPIF provided education and outreach functions that ranged from providing data and information to teachers, involving small groups of highly motivated students in its activities, to public lectures and tours. These activities maximized dissemination of results and data to the educational and public communities.

  11. Engine component instrumentation development facility at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.; Buggele, Alvin E.; Lepicovsky, Jan

    1992-01-01

    The Engine Components Instrumentation Development Facility at NASA Lewis is a unique aeronautics facility dedicated to the development of innovative instrumentation for turbine engine component testing. Containing two separate wind tunnels, the facility is capable of simulating many flow conditions found in most turbine engine components. This facility's broad range of capabilities as well as its versatility provide an excellent location for the development of novel testing techniques. These capabilities thus allow a more efficient use of larger and more complex engine component test facilities.

  12. National Facilities study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This study provides a set of recommendations for improving the effectiveness of our nation's aeronautics and space facilities. The study plan considers current and future government and commercial needs as well as DOD and NASA mission requirements through the year 2023. It addresses shortfalls in existing capabilities, new facility requirements, upgrades, consolidations, and phase-out of existing facilities. If the recommendations are implemented, they will provide world-class capability where it is vital to our country's needs and make us more efficient in meeting future needs.

  13. Wind Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Laurie, Carol

    2017-02-01

    This book takes readers inside the places where daily discoveries shape the next generation of wind power systems. Energy Department laboratory facilities span the United States and offer wind research capabilities to meet industry needs. The facilities described in this book make it possible for industry players to increase reliability, improve efficiency, and reduce the cost of wind energy -- one discovery at a time. Whether you require blade testing or resource characterization, grid integration or high-performance computing, Department of Energy laboratory facilities offer a variety of capabilities to meet your wind research needs.

  14. Accreditation of ambulatory facilities.

    PubMed

    Urman, Richard D; Philip, Beverly K

    2014-06-01

    With the continued growth of ambulatory surgical centers (ASC), the regulation of facilities has evolved to include new standards and requirements on both state and federal levels. Accreditation allows for the assessment of clinical practice, improves accountability, and better ensures quality of care. In some states, ASC may choose to voluntarily apply for accreditation from a recognized organization, but in others it is mandated. Accreditation provides external validation of safe practices, benchmarking performance against other accredited facilities, and demonstrates to patients and payers the facility's commitment to continuous quality improvement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. GRC Ground Support Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SaintOnge, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    The ISS Program is conducting an "ISS Research Academy' at JSC the first week of August 2010. This Academy will be a tutorial for new Users of the International Space Station, focused primarily on the new ISS National Laboratory and its members including Non-Profit Organizations, other government agencies and commercial users. Presentations on the on-orbit research facilities accommodations and capabilities will be made, as well as ground based hardware development, integration and test facilities and capabilities. This presentation describes the GRC Hardware development, test and laboratory facilities.

  16. Wind Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    This book takes readers inside the places where daily discoveries shape the next generation of wind power systems. Energy Department laboratory facilities span the United States and offer wind research capabilities to meet industry needs. The facilities described in this book make it possible for industry players to increase reliability, improve efficiency, and reduce the cost of wind energy -- one discovery at a time. Whether you require blade testing or resource characterization, grid integration or high-performance computing, Department of Energy laboratory facilities offer a variety of capabilities to meet your wind research needs.

  17. The National Transonic Facility: A Research Retrospective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahls, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) from a research utilization perspective is provided. The facility was born in the 1970s from an internationally recognized need for a high Reynolds number test capability based on previous experiences with preflight predictions of aerodynamic characteristics and an anticipated need in support of research and development for future aerospace vehicle systems. Selection of the cryogenic concept to meet the need, unique capabilities of the facility, and the eventual research utilization of the facility are discussed. The primary purpose of the paper is to expose the range of investigations that have used the NTF since being declared operational in late 1984; limited research results are included, though many more can be found in the references.

  18. 18. Topside facility, interior of facility manager's room, view towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Topside facility, interior of facility manager's room, view towards west. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  19. The National Submicron Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Edward D.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the activities of the National Submicron Facility which was established at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York to serve as an information resource for the nation's research community in microstructure science and engineering. (HM)

  20. Facility Registry Service (FRS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a centrally managed database that identifies facilities either subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest, providing an integrated source of air, water, and waste environmental data.

  1. NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2018-01-26

    Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

  2. Facilities | Geothermal Technologies | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    research, development, analysis, and deployment. A photo of the Thermal Test Facility at NREL. Thermal Test development of building and thermal energy systems. For more information, read the fact sheet

  3. Automated Heat-Flux-Calibration Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    Computer control speeds operation of equipment and processing of measurements. New heat-flux-calibration facility developed at Lewis Research Center. Used for fast-transient heat-transfer testing, durability testing, and calibration of heat-flux gauges. Calibrations performed at constant or transient heat fluxes ranging from 1 to 6 MW/m2 and at temperatures ranging from 80 K to melting temperatures of most materials. Facility developed because there is need to build and calibrate very-small heat-flux gauges for Space Shuttle main engine (SSME).Includes lamp head attached to side of service module, an argon-gas-recirculation module, reflector, heat exchanger, and high-speed positioning system. This type of automated heat-flux calibration facility installed in industrial plants for onsite calibration of heat-flux gauges measuring fluxes of heat in advanced gas-turbine and rocket engines.

  4. Auditing radiation sterilization facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jeffrey A.

    The diversity of radiation sterilization systems available today places renewed emphasis on the need for thorough Quality Assurance audits of these facilities. Evaluating compliance with Good Manufacturing Practices is an obvious requirement, but an effective audit must also evaluate installation and performance qualification programs (validation_, and process control and monitoring procedures in detail. The present paper describes general standards that radiation sterilization operations should meet in each of these key areas, and provides basic guidance for conducting QA audits of these facilities.

  5. Aerothermodynamic Testing of Aerocapture and Planetary Probe Geometries in Hypersonic Ballistic-Range Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, M. C.; Reda, D. C.; Bogdanoff, D. W.; Olejniczak, J.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on aerothermodynamic testing of aerocapture and planetary probe design methods in hypersonic ballistic range environments is shown. The topics include: 1) Ballistic Range Testing; 2) NASA-Ames Hypervelocity Free Flight Facility; and 3) Representative Results.

  6. National remote computational flight research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rediess, Herman A.

    1989-01-01

    The extension of the NASA Ames-Dryden remotely augmented vehicle (RAV) facility to accommodate flight testing of a hypersonic aircraft utilizing the continental United States as a test range is investigated. The development and demonstration of an automated flight test management system (ATMS) that uses expert system technology for flight test planning, scheduling, and execution is documented.

  7. Engineering directorate technical facilities catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloy, Joseph E.

    1993-01-01

    The Engineering Directorate Technical Facilities Catalog is designed to provide an overview of the technical facilities available within the Engineering Directorate at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. The combined capabilities of these engineering facilities are essential elements of overall JSC capabilities required to manage and perform major NASA engineering programs. The facilities are grouped in the text by chapter according to the JSC division responsible for operation of the facility. This catalog updates the facility descriptions for the JSC Engineering Directorate Technical Facilities Catalog, JSC 19295 (August 1989), and supersedes the Engineering Directorate, Principle test and Development Facilities, JSC, 19962 (November 1984).

  8. 8-Channel Broadband Laser Ranging Hardware Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Corey; La Lone, Brandon; Younk, Patrick; Daykin, Ed; Rhodes, Michelle; Perry, Daniel; Tran, Vu; Miller, Edward

    2017-06-01

    Broadband Laser Ranging (BLR) is a new diagnostic being developed to precisely measure the position vs. time of surfaces, shock break out, particle clouds, jets, and debris moving at kilometers per second speeds. The instrument uses interferometry to encode distance into a modulation in the spectrum of pulses from a mode-locked fiber laser and uses a dispersive Fourier transformation to map the spectral modulation into time. Range information is thereby recorded on a fast oscilloscope at the repetition rate of the laser, approximately every 50 ns. Current R&D is focused on developing a compact 8-channel system utilizing one laser and one high-speed oscilloscope. This talk will emphasize the hardware being developed for applications at the Contained Firing Facility at LLNL, but has a common architecture being developed in collaboration with NSTec and LANL for applications at multiple other facilities. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, by LANL under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396, and by NSTec Contract DE-AC52-06NA25946.

  9. Recent Upgrades at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rominsky, Mandy

    2016-03-01

    The Fermilab Test Beam Facility is a world class facility for testing and characterizing particle detectors. The facility has been in operation since 2005 and has undergone significant upgrades in the last two years. A second beam line with cryogenic support has been added and the facility has adopted the MIDAS data acquisition system. The facility also recently added a cosmic telescope test stand and improved tracking capabilities. With two operational beam lines, the facility can deliver a variety of particle types and momenta ranging from 120 GeV protons in the primary beam line down to 200 MeV particles in the tertiary beam line. In addition, recent work has focused on analyzing the beam structure to provide users with information on the data they are collecting. With these improvements, the Fermilab Test Beam facility is capable of supporting High Energy physics applications as well as industry users. The upgrades will be discussed along with plans for future improvements.

  10. Space-Based Range Safety and Future Space Range Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Simpson, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety (STARS) study is a multiphase project to demonstrate the performance, flexibility and cost savings that can be realized by using space-based assets for the Range Safety [global positioning system (GPS) metric tracking data, flight termination command and range safety data relay] and Range User (telemetry) functions during vehicle launches and landings. Phase 1 included flight testing S-band Range Safety and Range User hardware in 2003 onboard a high-dynamic aircraft platform at Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California, USA) using the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) as the communications link. The current effort, Phase 2, includes hardware and packaging upgrades to the S-band Range Safety system and development of a high data rate Ku-band Range User system. The enhanced Phase 2 Range Safety Unit (RSU) provided real-time video for three days during the historic Global Flyer (Scaled Composites, Mojave, California, USA) flight in March, 2005. Additional Phase 2 testing will include a sounding rocket test of the Range Safety system and aircraft flight testing of both systems. Future testing will include a flight test on a launch vehicle platform. This paper discusses both Range Safety and Range User developments and testing with emphasis on the Range Safety system. The operational concept of a future space-based range is also discussed.

  11. Space-Based Range Safety and Future Space Range Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Simpson, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety study is a multiphase project to demonstrate the performance, flexibility and cost savings that can be realized by using space-based assets for the Range Safety (global positioning system metric tracking data, flight termination command and range safety data relay) and Range User (telemetry) functions during vehicle launches and landings. Phase 1 included flight testing S-band Range Safety and Range User hardware in 2003 onboard a high-dynamic aircraft platform at Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) using the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System as the communications link. The current effort, Phase 2, includes hardware and packaging upgrades to the S-band Range Safety system and development of a high data rate Ku-band Range User system. The enhanced Phase 2 Range Safety Unit provided real-time video for three days during the historic GlobalFlyer (Scaled Composites, Mojave, California) flight in March, 2005. Additional Phase 2 testing will include a sounding rocket test of the Range Safety system and aircraft flight testing of both systems. Future testing will include a flight test on a launch vehicle platform. This report discusses both Range Safety and Range User developments and testing with emphasis on the Range Safety system. The operational concept of a future space-based range is also discussed.

  12. Hardware test program for evaluation of baseline range/range rate sensor concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pernic, E.

    1985-01-01

    The test program Phase II effort provides additional design information in terms of range and range rate (R/R) sensor performance when observing and tracking a typical spacecraft target. The target used in the test program was a one-third scale model of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) available at the MSFC test site where the tests were performed. A modified Bendix millimeter wave radar served as the R/R sensor test bed for evaluation of range and range rate tracking performance, and generation of radar signature characteristics of the spacecraft target. A summary of program test results and conclusions are presented along with detailed description of the Bendix test bed radar with accompaning instrumentation. The MSFC test site and facilities are described. The test procedures used to establish background levels, and the calibration procedures used in the range accuracy tests and RCS (radar cross section) signature measurements, are presented and a condensed version of the daily log kept during the 5 September through 17 September test period is also presented. The test program results are given starting with the RCS signature measurements, then continuing with range measurement accuracy test results and finally the range and range rate tracking accuracy test results.

  13. Super-ranging. A new ranging strategy in European badgers.

    PubMed

    Gaughran, Aoibheann; Kelly, David J; MacWhite, Teresa; Mullen, Enda; Maher, Peter; Good, Margaret; Marples, Nicola M

    2018-01-01

    We monitored the ranging of a wild European badger (Meles meles) population over 7 years using GPS tracking collars. Badger range sizes varied seasonally and reached their maximum in June, July and August. We analysed the summer ranging behaviour, using 83 home range estimates from 48 individuals over 6974 collar-nights. We found that while most adult badgers (males and females) remained within their own traditional social group boundaries, several male badgers (on average 22%) regularly ranged beyond these traditional boundaries. These adult males frequently ranged throughout two (or more) social group's traditional territories and had extremely large home ranges. We therefore refer to them as super-rangers. While ranging across traditional boundaries has been recorded over short periods of time for extraterritorial mating and foraging forays, or for pre-dispersal exploration, the animals in this study maintained their super-ranges from 2 to 36 months. This study represents the first time such long-term extra-territorial ranging has been described for European badgers. Holding a super-range may confer an advantage in access to breeding females, but could also affect local interaction networks. In Ireland & the UK, badgers act as a wildlife reservoir for bovine tuberculosis (TB). Super-ranging may facilitate the spread of disease by increasing both direct interactions between conspecifics, particularly across social groups, and indirect interactions with cattle in their shared environment. Understanding super-ranging behaviour may both improve our understanding of tuberculosis epidemiology and inform future control strategies.

  14. Super-ranging. A new ranging strategy in European badgers

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, David J.; Good, Margaret; Marples, Nicola M.

    2018-01-01

    We monitored the ranging of a wild European badger (Meles meles) population over 7 years using GPS tracking collars. Badger range sizes varied seasonally and reached their maximum in June, July and August. We analysed the summer ranging behaviour, using 83 home range estimates from 48 individuals over 6974 collar-nights. We found that while most adult badgers (males and females) remained within their own traditional social group boundaries, several male badgers (on average 22%) regularly ranged beyond these traditional boundaries. These adult males frequently ranged throughout two (or more) social group’s traditional territories and had extremely large home ranges. We therefore refer to them as super-rangers. While ranging across traditional boundaries has been recorded over short periods of time for extraterritorial mating and foraging forays, or for pre-dispersal exploration, the animals in this study maintained their super-ranges from 2 to 36 months. This study represents the first time such long-term extra-territorial ranging has been described for European badgers. Holding a super-range may confer an advantage in access to breeding females, but could also affect local interaction networks. In Ireland & the UK, badgers act as a wildlife reservoir for bovine tuberculosis (TB). Super-ranging may facilitate the spread of disease by increasing both direct interactions between conspecifics, particularly across social groups, and indirect interactions with cattle in their shared environment. Understanding super-ranging behaviour may both improve our understanding of tuberculosis epidemiology and inform future control strategies. PMID:29444100

  15. Review of national association of city transportation officials (NACTO) bicycle facilities.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-04-06

    As bicycle facilities are installed on more streets in more cities across the country, innovative solutions have been introduced into the toolbox of facilities to address a wide range of contexts and serve bicyclists of all ages and abilities. These ...

  16. 38. 100,000 POUND STATIC TEST FACILITY: GENERAL VIEW OF TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. 100,000 POUND STATIC TEST FACILITY: GENERAL VIEW OF TEST BAY AND EXHAUST PIT, LOOKING WEST - White Sands Missile Range, V-2 Rocket Facilities, Near Headquarters Area, White Sands, Dona Ana County, NM

  17. 34. 100,000 POUND STATIC TEST FACILITY: GENERAL VIEW OF BLOCKHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. 100,000 POUND STATIC TEST FACILITY: GENERAL VIEW OF BLOCKHOUSE AND TOP OF TEST BAY, LOOKING NORTHEAST - White Sands Missile Range, V-2 Rocket Facilities, Near Headquarters Area, White Sands, Dona Ana County, NM

  18. 33. 100,000 POUND STATIC TEST FACILITY: GENERAL VIEW OF BLOCKHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. 100,000 POUND STATIC TEST FACILITY: GENERAL VIEW OF BLOCKHOUSE AND UPPER LEVEL OF TEST BAY, LOOKING NORTH - White Sands Missile Range, V-2 Rocket Facilities, Near Headquarters Area, White Sands, Dona Ana County, NM

  19. 37. 100,000 POUND STATIC TEST FACILITY: GENERAL VIEW OF TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. 100,000 POUND STATIC TEST FACILITY: GENERAL VIEW OF TEST BAY AND EXHAUST PIT, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - White Sands Missile Range, V-2 Rocket Facilities, Near Headquarters Area, White Sands, Dona Ana County, NM

  20. 40. 500,000 POUND STATIC TEST FACILITY: DISTANT VIEW WITH BLOCKHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. 500,000 POUND STATIC TEST FACILITY: DISTANT VIEW WITH BLOCKHOUSE IN FOREGROUND, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - White Sands Missile Range, V-2 Rocket Facilities, Near Headquarters Area, White Sands, Dona Ana County, NM

  1. 51. 500,000 POUND STATIC TEST FACILITY: CLOSEUP VIEW FROM EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. 500,000 POUND STATIC TEST FACILITY: CLOSE-UP VIEW FROM EAST SHOWING MOVABLE OBSERVATION MIRRORS WITH TRACKS - White Sands Missile Range, V-2 Rocket Facilities, Near Headquarters Area, White Sands, Dona Ana County, NM

  2. Comprehensive facilities plan

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s Comprehensive Facilities Plan (CFP) document provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly future development of land and capital assets at the Berkeley Lab site. The CFP directly supports Berkeley Lab`s role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California (UC) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The CFP is revised annually on Berkeley Lab`s Facilities Planning Website. Major revisions are consistent with DOE policy and review guidance. Facilities planing is motivated by the need to develop facilities for DOE programmatic needs; to maintain, replace and rehabilitatemore » existing obsolete facilities; to identify sites for anticipated programmatic growth; and to establish a planning framework in recognition of site amenities and the surrounding community. The CFP presents a concise expression of the policy for the future physical development of the Laboratory, based upon anticipated operational needs of research programs and the environmental setting. It is a product of the ongoing planning processes and is a dynamic information source.« less

  3. Kauai Test Facility hazards assessment document

    SciTech Connect

    Swihart, A

    1995-05-01

    The Department of Energy Order 55003A requires facility-specific hazards assessment be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Kauai Test Facility, Barking Sands, Kauai, Hawaii. The Kauai Test Facility`s chemical and radiological inventories were screened according to potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distance to themore » Early Severe Health Effects threshold is 4.2 kilometers. The highest emergency classification is a General Emergency at the {open_quotes}Main Complex{close_quotes} and a Site Area Emergency at the Kokole Point Launch Site. The Emergency Planning Zone for the {open_quotes}Main Complex{close_quotes} is 5 kilometers. The Emergency Planning Zone for the Kokole Point Launch Site is the Pacific Missile Range Facility`s site boundary.« less

  4. Accuracy limitations of range-range (spherical) multilateration systems.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1973-10-11

    This report presents a novel procedure for determining the accuracy of range-range (or spherical) multilateration systems. The procedure is a generalization of one previously described for hyperbolic multilateration systems. A central result is a dem...

  5. Preliminary design study for an atomospheric science facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchison, R.

    1972-01-01

    The activities and results of the Atmospheric Science Facility preliminary design study are reported. The objectives of the study were to define the scientific goals, to determine the range of experiment types, and to develop the preliminary instrument design requirements for a reusable, general purpose, optical research facility for investigating the earth's atmosphere from a space shuttle orbital vehicle.

  6. Site and Facilities: A Resource Book for Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Armand, Ed.; Ball, Beverly, Ed.

    This resource book draws together articles on the development and maintenance of camp sites and facilities. The articles, previously published by "Camping Magazine" and "Journal of Christian Camping," cover (1) site planning and long-range development, including redesigning multiple camp facilities for year-round programs, remodeling and…

  7. A Bridge over Troubled Water: Facility Needs for Inclusive Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Judy; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on ways to meet the facility needs of students with disabilities in inclusive classrooms. Provides a definition of inclusion; discusses some processes to design school environments that support a side range of student needs; and presents a process that will enable facility planning teams to move all students from self-contained classrooms…

  8. Low Gravity Freefall Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Composite of Marshall Space Flight Center's Low-Gravity Free Fall Facilities.These facilities include a 100-meter drop tower and a 100-meter drop tube. The drop tower simulates in-flight microgravity conditions for up to 4.2 seconds for containerless processing experiments, immiscible fluids and materials research, pre-flight hardware design test and flight experiment simulation. The drop tube simulates in-flight microgravity conditions for up to 4.6 seconds and is used extensively for ground-based microgravity convection research in which extremely small samples are studied. The facility can provide deep undercooling for containerless processing experiments that require materials to remain in a liquid phase when cooled below the normal solidification temperature.

  9. Modernizing sports facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dustin, R.

    Modernization and renovation of sports facilities challenge the design team to balance a number of requirements: spectator and owner expectations, existing building and site conditions, architectural layouts, code and legislation issues, time constraints and budget issues. System alternatives are evaluated and selected based on the relative priorities of these requirements. These priorities are unique to each project. At Alexander Memorial Coliseum, project schedules, construction funds and facility usage became the priorities. The ACC basketball schedule and arrival of the Centennial Olympics dictated the construction schedule. Initiation and success of the project depended on the commitment of the design team tomore » meet coliseum funding levels established three years ago. Analysis of facility usage and system alternative capabilities drove the design team to select a system that met the project requirements and will maximize the benefits to the owner and spectators for many years to come.« less

  10. Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.; Symons, E. P.; Kroeger, E. W.

    1984-01-01

    The Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility (CFMF) is a reusable test bed which is designed to be carried into space in the Shuttle cargo bay to investigate systems and technologies required to efficiently and effectively manage cryogens in space. The facility hardware is configured to provide low-g verification of fluid and thermal models of cryogenic storage, transfer concepts and processes. Significant design data and criteria for future subcritical cryogenic storage and transfer systems will be obtained. Future applications include space-based and ground-based orbit transfer vehicles (OTV), space station life support, attitude control, power and fuel depot supply, resupply tankers, external tank (ET) propellant scavenging, space-based weapon systems and space-based orbit maneuvering vehicles (OMV). This paper describes the facility and discusses the cryogenic fluid management technology to be investigated. A brief discussion of the integration issues involved in loading and transporting liquid hydrogen within the Shuttle cargo bay is also included.

  11. National Facilities Study. Volume 1: Facilities Inventory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The inventory activity was initiated to solve the critical need for a single source of site specific descriptive and parametric data on major public and privately held aeronautics and aerospace related facilities. This a challenging undertaking due to the scope of the effort and the short lead time in which to assemble the inventory and have it available to support the task group study needs. The inventory remains dynamic as sites are being added and the data is accessed and refined as the study progresses. The inventory activity also included the design and implementation of a computer database and analytical tools to simplify access to the data. This volume describes the steps which were taken to define the data requirements, select sites, and solicit and acquire data from them. A discussion of the inventory structure and analytical tools is also provided.

  12. Laser range profile of cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenzhen; Gong, Yanjun; Wang, Mingjun; Gong, Lei

    2016-10-01

    technology. Laser one-dimensional range profile can reflect the characteristics of the target shape and surface material. These techniques were motivated by applications of laser radar to target discrimination in ballistic missile defense. The radar equation of pulse laser about cone is given in this paper. This paper demonstrates the analytical model of laser one-dimensional range profile of cone based on the radar equation of the pulse laser. Simulations results of laser one-dimensional range profiles of some cones are given. Laser one-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface material with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser one-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface mater with diffuse materials whose retroreflectance can be modeled closely with an exponential term that decays with increasing incidence angles, is given in this paper. Laser one-dimensional range profiles of different pulse width of cone is given in this paper. The influences of surface material, pulse width, attitude on the one-dimensional range are analyzed. The laser two-dimensional range profile is two-dimensional scattering imaging of pulse laser of target. The two-dimensional range profile of roughness target can provide range resolved information. An analytical model of two-dimensional laser range profile of cone is proposed. The simulations of two-dimensional laser range profiles of some cones are given. Laser two-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface mater with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser two-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface mater with diffuse materials whose retroreflectance can be modeled closely with an exponential term that decays with increasing incidence angles, is given in this paper. The influence of pulse width, surface material on laser two-dimensional range profile is analyzed. Laser one-dimensional range profile and laser two-dimensional range profile are called as laser

  13. Rehabilitation Facilities in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, C. M.; Jousse, A. T.

    1963-01-01

    Rehabilitation centres in Ontario were surveyed and categorized as in-patient and outpatient services, specialized centres for particular diseases, and vocational retraining centres. It is evident that many gaps exist in the pattern of rehabilitation facilities and services in the province. In some areas the facilities are grouped too closely together, necessitating transport of patients from great distances. The serious shortage of trained personnel is noted. There is little provision for mentally ill patients in existing rehabilitation centres. The use of mobile clinics is discussed. There is no evidence of duplication of services among those at present available. PMID:14077812

  14. Electromagnetic propulsion test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooder, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    A test facility for the exploration of electromagnetic propulsion concept is described. The facility is designed to accommodate electromagnetic rail accelerators of various lengths (1 to 10 meters) and to provide accelerating energies of up to 240 kiloJoules. This accelerating energy is supplied as a current pulse of hundreds of kiloAmps lasting as long as 1 millisecond. The design, installation, and operating characteristics of the pulsed energy system are discussed. The test chamber and its operation at pressures down to 1300 Pascals (10 mm of mercury) are described. Some aspects of safety (interlocking, personnel protection, and operating procedures) are included.

  15. The laboratory astrophysics facility at University College

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyland, A. R.; Smith, R. G.; Robinson, G.

    A laboratory astrophysics facility for the study of the terrestrial analogues of interstellar dust grains is being developed in the Physics Department, University College, Australian Defence Force Academy. The facility consists of a gas handling system for the preparation of samples, a closed-cycle cooler and specimen chamber, and a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectrometer capable of high resolution (0.3/cm) and high sensitivity measurements, currently from 1-25 microns. The layout and construction of the laboratory are described, and the proposed initial experimental program aimed at determining the optical constants of ices, over a wide wavelength range for comparison with astronomical observations, is discussed.

  16. A Versatile Rocket Engine Hot Gas Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James M.

    1993-01-01

    The capabilities of a versatile rocket engine facility, located in the Rocket Laboratory at the NASA Lewis Research Center, are presented. The gaseous hydrogen/oxygen facility can be used for thermal shock and hot gas testing of materials and structures as well as rocket propulsion testing. Testing over a wide range of operating conditions in both fuel and oxygen rich regimes can be conducted, with cooled or uncooled test specimens. The size and location of the test cell provide the ability to conduct large amounts of testing in short time periods with rapid turnaround between programs.

  17. Advanced Simulation in Undergraduate Pilot Training (ASUPT) Facility Utilization Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagin, William V.; Smith, James F.

    The capabilities of a flight simulation research facility located at Williams AFB, Arizona are described. Research philosophy to be applied is discussed. Long range and short range objectives are identified. A time phased plan for long range research accomplishment is described. In addition, some examples of near term research efforts which will…

  18. Standards for material handling and facilities equipment proofload testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonn, S. P.

    1970-01-01

    Document provides information on verifying the safety of material handling and facilities equipment /MH/FE/, ranging from monorail systems to ladders and non-powered mobile equipment. Seven catagories of MH/FE equipment are defined.

  19. Vermont long range transportation plan

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-01-01

    Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTrans) conducted this update of the Long-Range Transportation Plan to review and revise the recommendations of the Long-Range Transportation Plan of 1995. The three objectives from the previous plan were further ref...

  20. Status of the national transonic facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinney, L. W.; Gloss, B. B.

    1982-01-01

    The National Transonic Facility at NASA Langley Research Center, scheduled for completion in July, 1982, is described with emphasis on model and instrumentation activities, calibration plans and some initial research plans. Performance capabilities include a Mach number range of 0.2-1.2, a pressure range of 1-9 atmospheres, and a temperature range of 77-350 K, which will produce a maximum Reynolds number of 120 million at a Mach number of 1.0, based on a 0.25 m chord. A comprehensive tunnel calibration program is planned, which will cover basic tunnel calibration, data qualities, and data comparisons with other facilites and flights.

  1. SD46 Facilities and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The displays for the Materials Conference presents some of the facilities and capabilities in SD46 that can be useful to a prospective researcher from University, Academia or other government labs. Several of these already have associated personnel as principal and co-investigators on NASA peer reviewed science investigations. 1. SCN purification facility 2. ESL facility 3. Static and Dynamic magnetic field facility 4. Microanalysis facility 5. MSG Investigation - PFMI 6. Thermo physical Properties Measurement Capabilities.

  2. Advanced Gradient Heating Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF) is a European Space Agency (ESA) developed hardware. The AGHF was flown on STS-78, which featured four European PI's and two NASA PI's. The AGHFsupports the production of advanced semiconductor materials and alloys using the directional process, which depends on establishing a hot side and a cold side in the sample.

  3. Shared Facilities Canadian Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galonski, Mark A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes two projects arising from an Ontario (Canada) Ministry of Education initiative that combined school and nonschool capital funds to build joint facilities. The Stratford Education and Recreation Centre and the Humberwood Community Centre demonstrate that government agencies can cooperate to benefit the community. Success depends on having…

  4. Facilities of Environmental Distinction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascopella, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Three of nine school buildings that have won the latest Educational Facility Design Awards from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Committee on Architecture for Education stand out from the crowd of other school buildings because they are sustainable and are connected to the nature that surrounds them. They are: (1) Thurston Elementary…

  5. Surveying School Facilities Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weichel, Harry J.; Dennell, James

    1990-01-01

    Ralston (Nebraska) Public School District's communitywide survey helped set school facilities priorities while keeping the district's finite resources firmly in mind. With an outline of maintenance costs for the next 10 years, the district can develop a strategic construction schedule. The board also has the option of financing projects through a…

  6. Los Alamos Science Facilities

    Science.gov Websites

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Search Site submit About Mission Business Newsroom Publications Los Innovation in New Mexico Los Alamos Collaboration for Explosives Detection (LACED) SensorNexus Exascale Computing Project (ECP) User Facilities Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Los Alamos Neutron

  7. Variable gravity research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Sean; Ancheta, Stan; Beine, Donna; Cink, Brian; Eagon, Mark; Eckstein, Brett; Luhman, Dan; Mccowan, Daniel; Nations, James; Nordtvedt, Todd

    1988-01-01

    Spin and despin requirements; sequence of activities required to assemble the Variable Gravity Research Facility (VGRF); power systems technology; life support; thermal control systems; emergencies; communication systems; space station applications; experimental activities; computer modeling and simulation of tether vibration; cost analysis; configuration of the crew compartments; and tether lengths and rotation speeds are discussed.

  8. Facilities of the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The bricks-and-mortar infrastructure of community colleges has not nearly kept pace with increases in student enrollments. Not only are colleges bursting at the proverbial seams, but, according to the American Graduation Initiative, many two-year institutions "face large needs due to deferred maintenance or lack the modern facilities and…

  9. Aid for Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Even before the state fire marshal ordered the Somersworth (N.H.) School District in 2007 to abandon the top two floors of Hilltop Elementary School because of safety concerns, folks in the city of 12,000 had been debating whether the aging facility should be replaced--and how to pay for it. Finally, in February 2009, the city council approved…

  10. Mineral facilities of Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almanzar, Francisco; Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This map displays over 1,700 records of mineral facilities within the countries of Europe and western Eurasia. Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recently published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2.

  11. Financing School Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honeyman, David S., Ed.

    Millions of students are attending classes in substandard schools, a condition that is becoming a major concern for many public school parents, teachers, students, and administrators. This report is the result of research investigating school facility issues, assessing the scope of the problem, and making recommendations to the membership of the…

  12. Facilities Data System Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acridge, Charles W.; Ford, Tim M.

    The purposes of this manual are to set forth the scope and procedures for the maintenance and operation of the University of California facilities Data System (FDX) and to serve as a reference document for users of the system. FDX is an information system providing planning and management data about the existing physical plant. That is, it…

  13. High energy forming facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciurlionis, B.

    1967-01-01

    Watertight, high-explosive forming facility, 25 feet in diameter and 15 feet deep, withstands repeated explosions of 10 pounds of TNT equivalent. The shell is fabricated of high strength steel and allows various structural elements to deform or move elastically and independently while retaining structural integrity.

  14. Administering the Preschool Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coonrod, Debbie

    Securing the right environment for a preschool program requires planning and research. Administrators or searching parties are advised to study zoning codes to become acquainted with state sanitation and safety regulations and laws, to involve teachers in cooperative planning, to design facilities which discourage vandalism, facilitate…

  15. Science and Technology Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moonen, Jean-Marie; Buono, Nicolas; Handfield, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    These four articles relate to science and technology infrastructure for secondary and tertiary institutions. The first article presents a view on approaches to teaching science in school and illustrates ideal science facilities for secondary education. The second piece reports on work underway to improve the Science Complex at the "Universite…

  16. Laser materials processing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    The laser materials processing facility and its capabilities are described. A CO2 laser with continuous wave, repetitive pulse, and shaped power-time cycles is employed. The laser heated crystal growth station was used to produce metal and metal oxide single crystals and for cutting and shaping experiments using Si3N4 to displace diamond shaping processes.

  17. Dramatic Arts Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto. School Planning and Building Research Section.

    This booklet begins by explaining the function, the common planning errors, some location specifications, and the general requirements for any dramatic arts area. Facilities for (1) a single classroom, (2) a double classroom, (3) a specifically designed studio, and (4) a specifically designed studio complex are then described and illustrated.…

  18. SEU Test Facility

    Science.gov Websites

    to the effects of ionizing radiation. This is of particular concern for space applications due to the develop a powerful and user-friendly test facility for investigating space-radiation effects on micro -electronic devices[1]. The main type of effects studied are the so called Single Event Upsets (SEUs) where

  19. Science Facilities Design Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

    These guidelines, presented in five chapters, propose a framework to support the planning, designing, constructing, and renovating of school science facilities. Some program issues to be considered in the articulation of a science program include environmental concerns, interdisciplinary approaches, space flexibility, and electronic…

  20. Neutron Scattering Facilities

    Science.gov Websites

    Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS), Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, USA McMaster Nuclear Reactor Research, Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN), Lima, Peru Spallation Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, Australia High-flux Advanced Neutron

  1. Instructional Facility Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalamazoo Valley Community Coll., MI.

    Data describing campus facility use for instructional and related purposes for one week of activity in Fall 1978 were collected and evaluated at Kalamazoo Valley Community College. Four measures of space utilization were used: (1) percent of available time used; (2) percent of available space used; (3) percent of scheduled space utilized; and (4)…

  2. Excellent Writers, Facile Thinkers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacoby, Russell

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the writing style of conservative writers. Here, the author describes conservatism and conservative writers as excellent and facile thinkers. He added that conservatives are best at puncturing liberal, especially academic, balderdash. Apart from that, they uphold a minimal government but maximum government…

  3. CERN IRRADIATION FACILITIES.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Fabio; Garcia Alia, Ruben; Brugger, Markus; Carbonez, Pierre; Danzeca, Salvatore; Gkotse, Blerina; Richard Jaekel, Martin; Ravotti, Federico; Silari, Marco; Tali, Maris

    2017-09-28

    CERN provides unique irradiation facilities for applications in dosimetry, metrology, intercomparison of radiation protection devices, benchmark of Monte Carlo codes and radiation damage studies to electronics. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Federal Facilities Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, William W.

    Brief descriptions are presented of a number of Office of Education federal funding programs directly supporting educational facilities planning and construction. Programs now in operation and several currently under consideration are pointed out. Consideration is also given to several programs in federal agencies other than the Office of…

  5. National facilities study. Volume 4: Space operations facilities task group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The principal objectives of the National Facilities Study (NFS) were to: (1) determine where U.S. facilities do not meet national aerospace needs; (2) define new facilities required to make U.S. capabilities 'world class' where such improvements are in the national interest; (3) define where consolidation and phase-out of existing facilities is appropriate; and (4) develop a long-term national plan for world-class facility acquisition and shared usage. The Space Operations Facilities Task Group defined discrete tasks to accomplish the above objectives within the scope of the study. An assessment of national space operations facilities was conducted to determine the nation's capability to meet the requirements of space operations during the next 30 years. The mission model used in the study to define facility requirements is described in Volume 3. Based on this model, the major focus of the Task Group was to identify any substantive overlap or underutilization of space operations facilities and to identify any facility shortfalls that would necessitate facility upgrades or new facilities. The focus of this initial study was directed toward facility recommendations related to consolidations, closures, enhancements, and upgrades considered necessary to efficiently and effectively support the baseline requirements model. Activities related to identifying facility needs or recommendations for enhancing U.S. international competitiveness and achieving world-class capability, where appropriate, were deferred to a subsequent study phase.

  6. The Multistage Compressor Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie

    2004-01-01

    Research and developments of new aerospace technologies is one of Glenn Research Center's specialties. One facility that deals with the research of aerospace technologies is the High-speed Multistage Compressor Facility. This facility will be testing the performance and efficiency of an Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) two-stage compressor. There is a lot of preparation involved with testing something of this caliber. Before the test article can be installed into the test rig, the facility must be fully operational and ready to run. Meaning all the necessary instrumentation must be calibrated and installed in the facility. The test rig should also be in safe operating condition, and the proper safety permits obtained. In preparation for the test, the Multistage Compressor Facility went through a few changes. For instance the facility will now be utilizing slip rings, the gearbox went through some maintenance, new lubrications systems replaced the old ones, and special instrumentation needs to be fine tuned to achieve the maximum amount of accurate data. Slips rings help gather information off of a rotating device - in this case from a shaft - onto stationary contacts. The contacts (or brushes) need to be cooled to reduce the amount of frictional heat produced between the slip ring and brushes. The coolant being run through the slip ring is AK-225, a material hazardous to the ozone. To abide by the safety regulations the coolant must be run through a closed chiller system. A new chiller system was purchased but the reservoir that holds the coolant was ventilated which doesn t make the system truly closed and sealed. My task was to design and have a new reservoir built for the chiller system that complies with the safety guidelines. The gearbox had some safety issues also. Located in the back of the gearbox an inching drive was set up. When the inching drive is in use the gears and chain are bare and someone can easily get caught up in it. So to prevent

  7. Comprehensive Long-Range Program for Library Services in Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison. Div. of Library Services.

    The main areas of concern in this long-range development program to meet the requirements of the Library Services and Construction Act are the following: public library development and facilities, public library services for the disadvantaged, library services for the blind, physically handicapped and institutionalized persons, intertype library…

  8. Santa Rita Experimental Range digital database: user's guide

    Treesearch

    Mitchel P. McClaran; Deborah L. Angell; Craig Wissler

    2002-01-01

    Long-term measurements and repeat photograph collections have been collected in a systematic manner on the approximately 21,000 ha Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER) since its establishment in 1903. This research facility, located in the Desert Grassland vegetation of southern Arizona, was administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture until 1988, when it was...

  9. The Western Aeronautical Test Range of NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) is presented in this paper. The three WATR facilities are discussed, and three WATR elements - mission control centerns, communications systems, real-time processing and display systems, and tracking systems -are reviewed. The relationships within the NASA WATR, with respect to the NASA aeronautics program, are also discussed.

  10. Red ball ranging optimization based on dual camera ranging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Lei; Sun, Weijia; Liu, Jiaming; Tang, Matthew Wai-Chung

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, the process of positioning and moving to target red ball by NAO robot through its camera system is analyzed and improved using the dual camera ranging method. The single camera ranging method, which is adapted by NAO robot, was first studied and experimented. Since the existing error of current NAO Robot is not a single variable, the experiments were divided into two parts to obtain more accurate single camera ranging experiment data: forward ranging and backward ranging. Moreover, two USB cameras were used in our experiments that adapted Hough's circular method to identify a ball, while the HSV color space model was used to identify red color. Our results showed that the dual camera ranging method reduced the variance of error in ball tracking from 0.68 to 0.20.

  11. Economically dispatching cogeneration facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, E.

    Economic dispatching has been used by utilities to meet the energy demands of their customers for decades. The objective was to first load those units which cost the least to run and slowly increase the loading of more expensive units as the incremental energy price increased. Although this concept worked well for utility based systems where incremental costs rose with peak demand, the independent power producers(IPPs) and the power purchase agreements (PPAs) have drastically changed this notion. Most PPAs structured for the IPP environment have negotiated rates which remain the same during peak periods and base their electrical generation onmore » specific process steam requirements. They also must maintain the required production balance of process steam and electrical load in order to qualify as a Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) facility. Consequently, economically dispatching Cogeneration facilities becomes an exercise in adhering to contractual guidelines while operating the equipment in the most efficient manner possible for the given condition. How then is it possible to dispatch a Cogeneration facility that maintains the electrical load demand of JFK Airport while satisfying all of its heating and cooling needs? Contractually, Kennedy International Airport Cogen (KIAC) has specific obligations concerning electrical and thermal energy exported to JFK Airport. The facility`s impressive array of heating and cooling apparatuses together with the newly installed cogen fulfilled the airport`s needs by utilizing an endless combination of new and previously installed equipment. Moreover, in order to economically operate the plant a well structured operating curriculum was necessary.« less

  12. Systematic Review of Multidisciplinary Chronic Pain Treatment Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Fashler, Samantha R.; Cooper, Lynn K.; Oosenbrug, Eric D.; Burns, Lindsay C.; Razavi, Shima; Goldberg, Lauren; Katz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This study reviewed the published literature evaluating multidisciplinary chronic pain treatment facilities to provide an overview of their availability, caseload, wait times, and facility characteristics. A systematic literature review was conducted using PRISMA guidelines following a search of MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases. Inclusion criteria stipulated that studies be original research, survey more than one pain treatment facility directly, and describe a range of available treatments. Fourteen articles satisfied inclusion criteria. Results showed little consistency in the research design used to describe pain treatment facilities. Availability of pain treatment facilities was scarce and the reported caseloads and wait times were generally high. A wide range of medical, physical, and psychological pain treatments were available. Most studies reported findings on the percentage of practitioners in different health care professions employed. Future studies should consider using more comprehensive search strategies to survey facilities, improving clarity on what is considered to be a pain treatment facility, and reporting on a consistent set of variables to provide a clear summary of the status of pain treatment facilities. This review highlights important information for policymakers on the scope, demand, and accessibility of pain treatment facilities. PMID:27445618

  13. Free range hens use the range more when the outdoor environment is enriched.

    PubMed

    Nagle, T A D; Glatz, P C

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the role of using forage, shade and shelterbelts in attracting birds into the range, three trials were undertaken with free range layers both on a research facility and on commercial farms. Each of the trials on the free range research facility in South Australia used a total of 120 laying hens (Hyline Brown). Birds were housed in an eco-shelter which had 6 internal pens of equal size with a free range area adjoining the shelter. The on-farm trials were undertaken on commercial free range layer farms in the Darling Downs in Southeast Queensland with bird numbers on farms ranging from 2,000-6,800 hens. The first research trial examined the role of shaded areas in the range; the second trial examined the role of forage and the third trial examined the influence of shelterbelts in the range. These treatments were compared to a free range area with no enrichment. Aggressive feather pecking was only observed on a few occasions in all of the trials due to the low bird numbers housed. Enriching the free range environment attracted more birds into the range. Shaded areas were used by 18% of the hens with a tendency (p = 0.07) for more hens to be in the paddock. When forage was provided in paddocks more control birds (55%) were observed in the range in morning than in the afternoon (30%) while for the forage treatments 45% of the birds were in the range both during the morning and afternoon. When shelterbelts were provided there was a significantly (p<0.05) higher % of birds in the range (43% vs. 24%) and greater numbers of birds were observed in areas further away from the poultry house. The results from the on-farm trials mirrored the research trials. Overall 3 times more hens used the shaded areas than the non shaded areas, with slightly more using the shade in the morning than in the afternoon. As the environmental temperature increased the number of birds using the outdoor shade also increased. Overall 17 times more hens used the shelterbelt areas than the

  14. The NASA Lewis Research Center Water Tunnel Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserbauer, Charles A.

    1997-01-01

    A water tunnel facility specifically designed to investigate internal fluid duct flows has been built at the NASA Research Center. It is built in a modular fashion so that a variety of internal flow test hardware can be installed in the facility with minimal facility reconfiguration. The facility and test hardware interfaces are discussed along with design constraints for future test hardware. The inlet chamber flow conditioning approach is also detailed. Instrumentation and data acquisition capabilities are discussed. The incoming flow quality has been documented for about one quarter of the current facility operating range. At that range, there is some scatter in the data in the turbulent boundary layer which approaches 10 percent of the duct radius leading to a uniform core.

  15. A low-density boundary-layer wind tunnel facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. R.

    1987-01-01

    This abstract describes a low-density wind-tunnel facility that was established at NASA Ames in order to aid interpretation and understanding of data received from the Mariner and Viking spacecraft through earth-based simulation. The wind tunnel is a boundary-layer type which is capable of operating over a range of air densities ranging from 0.01 to 1.24 kg/cu m, with the lower values being equivalent to the near-surface density of the planet Mars. Although the facility was developed for space and extraterrestrial simulation, it also can serve as a relatively large-scale, low-density aerodynamic test facility. A description of this unique test facility and some Pitot-tube and hot-wire anemometry data acquired in the facility are presented.

  16. Report of the committee on a commercially developed space facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, Joseph F.; Stever, H. Guyford; Cutter, W. Bowman, III; Demisch, Wolfgang H.; Fink, Daniel J.; Flax, Alexander H.; Gatos, Harry C.; Glicksman, Martin E.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.; Logsdon, John M., III

    1989-01-01

    Major facilities that could support significant microgravity research and applications activity are discussed. The ground-based facilities include drop towers, aircraft flying parabolic trajectories, and sounding rockets. Facilities that are intrinsically tied to the Space Shuttle range from Get-Away-Special canisters to Spacelab long modules. There are also orbital facilities which include recoverable capsules launched on expendable launch vehicles, free-flying spacecraft, and space stations. Some of these existing, planned, and proposed facilities are non-U.S. in origin, but potentially available to U.S. investigators. In addition, some are governmentally developed and operated whereas others are planned to be privately developed and/or operated. Tables are provided to show the facility, developer, duration, estimated gravity level, crew interaction, flight frequency, year available, power to payload, payload volume, and maximum payload mass. The potential of direct and indirect benefits of manufacturing in space are presented.

  17. Brief Survey of TSC Computing Facilities

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1972-05-01

    The Transportation Systems Center (TSC) has four, essentially separate, in-house computing facilities. We shall call them Honeywell Facility, the Hybrid Facility, the Multimode Simulation Facility, and the Central Facility. In addition to these four,...

  18. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-04-26

    In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources). These were: apron (0-10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments); enriched belt (10-50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided); and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture). Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND) of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower temperatures and increasing relative humidity, though use of apron and enriched belt was not affected by variation in these measures. These data support previous findings that outer range areas tend to be

  19. Matera Laser Ranging Observatory (MLRO): An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Thomas K.; Decker, Winfield M.; Crooks, Henry A.; Bianco, Giuseppe

    1993-01-01

    The Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) is currently under negotiation with the Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC) of the Allied Signal Aerospace Company (ASAC) to build a state-of-the-art laser ranging observatory for the Centro di Geodesia Spaziale, in Matera, Italy. The contract calls for the delivery of a system based on a 1.5 meter afocal Cassegrain astronomical quality telescope with multiple ports to support a variety of experiments for the future, with primary emphasis on laser ranging. Three focal planes, viz. Cassegrain, Coude, and Nasmyth will be available for these experiments. The open telescope system will be protected from dust and turbulence using a specialized dome which will be part of the building facilities to be provided by ASI. The fixed observatory facility will be partitioned into four areas for locating the following: laser, transmit/receive optics, telescope/dome enclosure, and the operations console. The optical tables and mount rest on a common concrete pad for added mechanical stability. Provisions will be in place for minimizing the effects of EMI, for obtaining maximum cleanliness for high power laser and transmit optics, and for providing an ergonomic environment fitting to a state-of-the-art multipurpose laboratory. The system is currently designed to be highly modular and adaptable for scaling or changes in technology. It is conceived to be a highly automated system with superior performance specifications to any currently operational system. Provisions are also made to adapt and accommodate changes that are of significance during the course of design and integration.

  20. FACILITY 316. EXTERIOR OBLIQUE OF FRONT AS SEEN FROM FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 316. EXTERIOR OBLIQUE OF FRONT AS SEEN FROM FACILITY 362. VIEW FACING SOUTH. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Housing Area Hospital Point, Pharmacist's Quarters Type, 13-16 First Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. VIEW TO NORTHWEST, SHOWING FACILITY NO. 525 AND HOSPITAL (FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW TO NORTHWEST, SHOWING FACILITY NO. 525 AND HOSPITAL (FACILITY No. 515) BEYOND. See CA-2398-CP-8 for detail of the stairway in the distance - Hamilton Field, Amphitheater, North Oakland Drive near East Hospital Drive, Novato, Marin County, CA

  2. View of Facility 222 (on right) and Facility 221 through ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Facility 222 (on right) and Facility 221 through trees (parapet of latter above trees) from the parade ground. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Gymnasium & Theater, Neville Way, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. Two-range magnetoelectric sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bichurin, M.; Petrov, V.; Leontyev, V.; Saplev, A.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we present a two-range magnetoelectric ME sensor design comprising of permendur (alloy of Fe-Co-V), nickel, and lead zirconate titanate (PZT) laminate composite. A systematic study was conducted to clarify the contribution of magnetostrictive layers variables to the ME response over the applied range of magnetic bias field. The two-range behavior was characterized by opposite sign of the ME response when magnetic dc bias is in different sub-ranges. The ME coefficient as a function of magnetic bias field was found to be dependent on the laminate composite structure.

  4. Spacelab Data Processing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Spacelab Data Processing Facility (SDPF) processes, monitors, and accounts for the payload data from Spacelab and other Shuttle missions and forwards relevant data to various user facilities worldwide. The SLDPF is divided into the Spacelab Input Processing System (SIPS) and the Spacelab Output Processing System (SOPS). The SIPS division demultiplexes, synchronizes, time tags, quality checks, accounts for the data, and formats the data onto tapes. The SOPS division further edits, blocks, formats, and records the data on tape for shipment to users. User experiments must conform to the Spacelab's onboard High Rate Multiplexer (HRM) format for maximum process ability. Audio, analog, instrumentation, high density, experiment data, input/output data, quality control and accounting, and experimental channel tapes along with a variety of spacelab ancillary tapes are provided to the user by SLDPF.

  5. Universal Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughery, Mike

    1994-01-01

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  6. Universal Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughery, Mike

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  7. The National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, H. K.

    1986-01-01

    The National Transonic Facility, NTF, is a high Reynolds Number facility where the increase in Reynolds Number is obtained by operating at high pressures and low temperatures. Liquid nitrogen is allowed to vaporize, making gaseous nitrogen the test medium with temperatures extending down to approximately 100 degrees Kelvin. These factors have created unique, new challenges to those developing sensors and instrumentation. Pressure vessels, thermal enclosures or elaborate temperature compensations schemes, are needed for environmental protection and special materials are needed for sensors and model fabrication. The need for a new measurement, model deformation, was also created. An extensive program to develop the unique sensors and instrumentation was initiated. The data acquisition system and systems to measure aerodynamic forces and pressures, model attitude, and model deformation, are discussed.

  8. The ISOLDE facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catherall, R.; Andreazza, W.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Dorsival, A.; Focker, G. J.; Gharsa, T. P.; J, Giles T.; Grenard, J.-L.; Locci, F.; Martins, P.; Marzari, S.; Schipper, J.; Shornikov, A.; Stora, T.

    2017-09-01

    The ISOLDE facility has undergone numerous changes over the last 17 years driven by both the physics and technical community with a common goal to improve on beam variety, beam quality and safety. Improvements have been made in civil engineering and operational equipment while continuing developments aim to ensure operations following a potential increase in primary beam intensity and energy. This paper outlines the principal technical changes incurred at ISOLDE by building on a similar publication of the facility upgrades by Kugler (2000 Hyperfine Interact. 129 23-42). It also provides an insight into future perspectives through a brief summary issues addressed in the HIE-ISOLDE design study Catherall et al (2013 Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 317 204-207).

  9. A survey of veterinary radiation facilities in 2010.

    PubMed

    Farrelly, John; McEntee, Margaret C

    2014-01-01

    A survey of veterinary radiation therapy facilities in the United States, Canada, and Europe was done in 2010, using an online survey tool, to determine the type of equipment available, radiation protocols used, caseload, tumor types irradiated, as well as other details of the practice of veterinary radiation oncology. The results of this survey were compared to a similar survey performed in 2001. A total of 76 facilities were identified including 24 (32%) academic institutions and 52 (68%) private practice external beam radiation therapy facilities. The overall response rate was 51% (39/76 responded). Based on this survey, there is substantial variation among facilities in all aspects ranging from equipment and personnel to radiation protocols and caseloads. American College of Veterinary Radiology boarded radiation oncologists direct 90% of the radiation facilities, which was increased slightly compared to 2001. All facilities surveyed in 2010 had a linear accelerator. More facilities reported having electron capability (79%) compared to the 2001 survey. Eight facilities had a radiation oncology resident, and academic facilities were more likely to have residents. Patient caseload information was available from 28 sites (37% of radiation facilities), and based on the responses 1376 dogs and 352 cats were irradiated in 2010. The most frequently irradiated tumors were soft tissue sarcomas in dogs, and oral squamous cell carcinoma in cats. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  10. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Commercial free-range production has become a significant sector of the fresh egg market due to legislation banning conventional cages and consumer preference for products perceived as welfare friendly, as access to outdoor range can lead to welfare benefits such as greater freedom of movement and enhanced behavioural opportunities. This study investigated dispersal patterns, feather condition and activity of laying hens in three distinct zones of the range area; the apron area near shed; enriched zone 10–50 m from shed; and outer range beyond 50 m, in six flocks of laying hens under commercial free-range conditions varying in size between 4000 and 24,000 hens. Each flock was visited for four days to record number of hens in each zone, their behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distances (NND), as well as record temperature and relative humidity during the visit. Temperature and relative humidity varied across the study period in line with seasonal variations and influenced the use of range with fewer hens out of shed as temperature fell or relative humidity rose. On average, 12.5% of the hens were observed on the range and most of these hens were recorded in the apron zone as hen density decreased rapidly with increasing distance from the shed. Larger flocks appeared to have a lower proportion of hens on range. The hens used the range more in the early morning followed by a progressive decrease through to early afternoon. The NND was greatest in the outer range and decreased towards the shed. Feather condition was generally good and hens observed in the outer range had the best overall feather condition. Standing, pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded behaviours and of these, standing occurred most in the apron whereas walking and foraging behaviours were recorded most in the outer range. This study supported the findings of previous studies that reported few hens in the range and greater use of areas closer

  11. Skilled nursing facilities reform.

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    The Medicare prospective payment system for skilled nursing facilities will take effect with cost reporting years beginning on or after July 1, 1998. HCFA is working on the implementation details. While final details are not expected to be published until Summer 1998, the following information has been provided through HCFA and/or the Nursing Home Case-Mix and Quality (NHCMQ) Demonstration project (RUGs-III) procedures.

  12. Optimal Facility-Location

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    Dr. Christoph Witzgall, the honoree of this Symposium, can count among his many contributions to applied mathematics and mathematical operations research a body of widely-recognized work on the optimal location of facilities. The present paper offers to non-specialists a sketch of that field and its evolution, with emphasis on areas most closely related to Witzgall’s research at NBS/NIST. PMID:27274920

  13. Test Track Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    the surface, together with the effect of flying flintstones results in severe wear to the tyres , brake pipes and all other fittings found underneath a...The building also contains the following test facilities. A 15 m square flat floor used for vehicle measurement accuracy checks, tyre deflections, and... tyres . The course is regularly maintained but dependant on weather, the surface condition may display marked differences. Alpine Course This is a

  14. BIOLOGICAL IRRADIATION FACILITY

    DOEpatents

    McCorkle, W.H.; Cern, H.S.

    1962-04-24

    A facility for irradiating biological specimens with neutrons is described. It includes a reactor wherein the core is off center in a reflector. A high-exposure room is located outside the reactor on the side nearest the core while a low-exposure room is located on the opposite side. Means for converting thermal neutrons to fast neutrons are movably disposed between the reactor core and the high and low-exposure rooms. (AEC)

  15. Microgravity Simulation Facility (MSF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Stephanie E. (Compiler); Levine, Howard G.; Zhang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    The Microgravity Simulator Facility (MSF) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) was established to support visiting scientists for short duration studies utilizing a variety of microgravity simulator devices that negate the directional influence of the "g" vector (providing simulated conditions of micro or partial gravity). KSC gravity simulators can be accommodated within controlled environment chambers allowing investigators to customize and monitor environmental conditions such as temperature, humidity, CO2, and light exposure.

  16. Thermal Simulation Facilities Handbook.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    tower provide incident radiation angles of 900 or less. Since each heliostat Is Individually controlled, the size of a test Item depends on application...designed such that it can be used for many other applications. (See also Section 3.) The solar furnace uses both a flat mirror ( heliostat ) that track...type solar thermal facility. It consists of four main components: (1) heliostat , (2) attenua- tor, (3) concentrator, and (4) test and control chamber

  17. Medical Image Analysis Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    To improve the quality of photos sent to Earth by unmanned spacecraft. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed a computerized image enhancement process that brings out detail not visible in the basic photo. JPL is now applying this technology to biomedical research in its Medical lrnage Analysis Facility, which employs computer enhancement techniques to analyze x-ray films of internal organs, such as the heart and lung. A major objective is study of the effects of I stress on persons with heart disease. In animal tests, computerized image processing is being used to study coronary artery lesions and the degree to which they reduce arterial blood flow when stress is applied. The photos illustrate the enhancement process. The upper picture is an x-ray photo in which the artery (dotted line) is barely discernible; in the post-enhancement photo at right, the whole artery and the lesions along its wall are clearly visible. The Medical lrnage Analysis Facility offers a faster means of studying the effects of complex coronary lesions in humans, and the research now being conducted on animals is expected to have important application to diagnosis and treatment of human coronary disease. Other uses of the facility's image processing capability include analysis of muscle biopsy and pap smear specimens, and study of the microscopic structure of fibroprotein in the human lung. Working with JPL on experiments are NASA's Ames Research Center, the University of Southern California School of Medicine, and Rancho Los Amigos Hospital, Downey, California.

  18. Robot Serviced Space Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purves, Lloyd R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A robot serviced space facility includes multiple modules which are identical in physical structure, but selectively differing in function. and purpose. Each module includes multiple like attachment points which are identically placed on each module so as to permit interconnection with immediately adjacent modules. Connection is made through like outwardly extending flange assemblies having identical male and female configurations for interconnecting to and locking to a complementary side of another flange. Multiple rows of interconnected modules permit force, fluid, data and power transfer to be accomplished by redundant circuit paths. Redundant modules of critical subsystems are included. Redundancy of modules and of interconnections results in a space complex with any module being removable upon demand, either for module replacement or facility reconfiguration. without eliminating any vital functions of the complex. Module replacement and facility assembly or reconfiguration are accomplished by a computer controlled articulated walker type robotic manipulator arm assembly having two identical end-effectors in the form of male configurations which are identical to those on module flanges and which interconnect to female configurations on other flanges. The robotic arm assembly moves along a connected set or modules by successively disconnecting, moving and reconnecting alternate ends of itself to a succession of flanges in a walking type maneuver. To transport a module, the robot keeps the transported module attached to one of its end-effectors and uses another flange male configuration of the attached module as a substitute end-effector during walking.

  19. Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility is a reusable test bed which is designed to be carried within the Shuttle cargo bay to investigate the systems and technologies associated with the efficient management of cryogens in space. Cryogenic fluid management consists of the systems and technologies for: (1) liquid storage and supply, including capillary acquisition/expulsion systems which provide single-phase liquid to the user system, (2) both passive and active thermal control systems, and (3) fluid transfer/resupply systems, including transfer lines and receiver tanks. The facility contains a storage and supply tank, a transfer line and a receiver tank, configured to provide low-g verification of fluid and thermal models of cryogenic storage and transfer processes. The facility will provide design data and criteria for future subcritical cryogenic storage and transfer system applications, such as Space Station life support, attitude control, power and fuel depot supply, resupply tankers, external tank (ET) propellant scavenging, and ground-based and space-based orbit transfer vehicles (OTV).

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Jim Landy (left), NDE specialist with United Space Alliance (USA), prepares to examine a Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel using flash thermography. Helping out, at right, is Dan Phillips, also with USA. Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-09

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Jim Landy (left), NDE specialist with United Space Alliance (USA), prepares to examine a Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel using flash thermography. Helping out, at right, is Dan Phillips, also with USA. Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, astronaut Scott E. Parazynski points to the Reinforced Carbon Carbon panels used on the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters. With Parazynski are engineers from around the Agency who are working on improving the RCC panels used on the wing leading edge. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, astronaut Scott E. Parazynski points to the Reinforced Carbon Carbon panels used on the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters. With Parazynski are engineers from around the Agency who are working on improving the RCC panels used on the wing leading edge. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers share the task of examining a Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel using flash thermography. From left are Paul Ogletree, Jim Landy (kneeling), Dan Phillips and Dan Kenna. Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-09

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers share the task of examining a Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel using flash thermography. From left are Paul Ogletree, Jim Landy (kneeling), Dan Phillips and Dan Kenna. Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Jim Landy, NDE specialist with United Space Alliance (USA), watches a monitor off-screen to examine a Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel using flash thermography. Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-09

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Jim Landy, NDE specialist with United Space Alliance (USA), watches a monitor off-screen to examine a Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel using flash thermography. Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  4. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers share the task of examining a Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel using flash thermography. From left are Dan Kenna, Jim Landy, Paul Ogletree and Dan Phillips. Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-09

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers share the task of examining a Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel using flash thermography. From left are Dan Kenna, Jim Landy, Paul Ogletree and Dan Phillips. Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  5. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, astronaut Scott E. Parazynski discusses the Reinforced Carbon Carbon panels used on the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters. With him are engineers from around the Agency who are working on improving the RCC panels used on the wing leading edge. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, astronaut Scott E. Parazynski discusses the Reinforced Carbon Carbon panels used on the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters. With him are engineers from around the Agency who are working on improving the RCC panels used on the wing leading edge. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  6. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Dan Kenna and Jim Landy prepare to examine a Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel using flash thermography. Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-09

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Dan Kenna and Jim Landy prepare to examine a Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel using flash thermography. Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  7. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt (above) finishes installing a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt (above) finishes installing a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  8. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (above), Saul Ngy (right) and Jerry Belt (below) install a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (above), Saul Ngy (right) and Jerry Belt (below) install a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  9. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt (above) completes installation of a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt (above) completes installation of a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  10. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers (left to right) Jim Landy, Dan Phillips, Paul Ogletree and Dan Kenna check results of flash thermography on the Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel on the table (foreground). Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-09

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers (left to right) Jim Landy, Dan Phillips, Paul Ogletree and Dan Kenna check results of flash thermography on the Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel on the table (foreground). Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  11. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Dan Kenna (right) positions a Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel on the table to perform flash thermography. In the background, Paul Ogletree observes the monitor. Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-09

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Dan Kenna (right) positions a Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel on the table to perform flash thermography. In the background, Paul Ogletree observes the monitor. Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  12. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (left) Saul Ngy (center) and Jerry Belt (right) lift a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to attach onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (left) Saul Ngy (center) and Jerry Belt (right) lift a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to attach onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  13. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (left), Saul Ngy (center) and Jerry Belt (right) prepare to install a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (left), Saul Ngy (center) and Jerry Belt (right) prepare to install a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt attaches a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt attaches a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (left) Jerry Belt (center), and Saul Ngy (right), lift a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel they will attach to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (left) Jerry Belt (center), and Saul Ngy (right), lift a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel they will attach to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt looks over a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel that will be attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt looks over a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel that will be attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (above) and Saul Ngy (below right) finish installing a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Mike Hyatt (above) and Saul Ngy (below right) finish installing a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers (left to right) Jim Landy, Paul Ogletree, Dan Kenna and Dan Phillips check results of flash thermography on the Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel on the table (foreground). Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-09

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers (left to right) Jim Landy, Paul Ogletree, Dan Kenna and Dan Phillips check results of flash thermography on the Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel on the table (foreground). Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Jerry Belt, with United Space Alliance, checks a spar attachment on the wing of the orbiter Atlantis before installing Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panels on the wing. The spars - floating joints - reduce loading on the panels caused by wing deflections. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Jerry Belt, with United Space Alliance, checks a spar attachment on the wing of the orbiter Atlantis before installing Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panels on the wing. The spars - floating joints - reduce loading on the panels caused by wing deflections. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Jim Landy (front), Dan Phillips and Dan Kenna watch a monitor showing results of flash thermography on the Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel on the table (foreground). Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-09

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers Jim Landy (front), Dan Phillips and Dan Kenna watch a monitor showing results of flash thermography on the Reinforced Carbon Carbon panel on the table (foreground). Attached to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiters, the gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt (right) attaches a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt (right) attaches a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers, from center, left to right, Saul Ngy, Jerry Belt and Mike Hyatt, prepare to attach a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel (on the table) to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance workers, from center, left to right, Saul Ngy, Jerry Belt and Mike Hyatt, prepare to attach a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel (on the table) to the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt (above) attaches a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance worker Mike Hyatt (above) attaches a Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panel onto the leading edge of the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. The gray carbon composite RCC panels have sufficient strength to withstand the aerodynamic forces experienced during launch and reentry, which can reach as high as 800 pounds per square foot. The operating range of RCC is from minus 250º F to about 3,000º F, the temperature produced by friction with the atmosphere during reentry.

  4. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During power-up of the orbiter Discovery in the Orbiter Processing Facility, a technician moves a switch. Discovery has been undergoing Orbiter Major Modifications in the past year, ranging from wiring, control panels and black boxes to gaseous and fluid systems tubing and components. These systems were deserviced, disassembled, inspected, modified, reassembled, checked out and reserviced, as were most other systems onboard. The work includes the installation of the Multifunction Electronic Display Subsystem (MEDS) - a state-of-the-art “glass cockpit.”

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-27

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During power-up of the orbiter Discovery in the Orbiter Processing Facility, a technician moves a switch. Discovery has been undergoing Orbiter Major Modifications in the past year, ranging from wiring, control panels and black boxes to gaseous and fluid systems tubing and components. These systems were deserviced, disassembled, inspected, modified, reassembled, checked out and reserviced, as were most other systems onboard. The work includes the installation of the Multifunction Electronic Display Subsystem (MEDS) - a state-of-the-art “glass cockpit.”

  5. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During power-up of the orbiter Discovery in the Orbiter Processing Facility, a technician turns on a switch. Discovery has been undergoing Orbiter Major Modifications in the past year, ranging from wiring, control panels and black boxes to gaseous and fluid systems tubing and components. These systems were deserviced, disassembled, inspected, modified, reassembled, checked out and reserviced, as were most other systems onboard. The work includes the installation of the Multifunction Electronic Display Subsystem (MEDS) - a state-of-the-art “glass cockpit.”

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-27

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During power-up of the orbiter Discovery in the Orbiter Processing Facility, a technician turns on a switch. Discovery has been undergoing Orbiter Major Modifications in the past year, ranging from wiring, control panels and black boxes to gaseous and fluid systems tubing and components. These systems were deserviced, disassembled, inspected, modified, reassembled, checked out and reserviced, as were most other systems onboard. The work includes the installation of the Multifunction Electronic Display Subsystem (MEDS) - a state-of-the-art “glass cockpit.”

  6. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During power-up of the orbiter Discovery in the Orbiter Processing Facility, a technician (left) looks at the circuit breaker lights in the cabin. Discovery has been undergoing Orbiter Major Modifications in the past year, ranging from wiring, control panels and black boxes to gaseous and fluid systems tubing and components. These systems were deserviced, disassembled, inspected, modified, reassembled, checked out and reserviced, as were most other systems onboard. The work includes the installation of the Multifunction Electronic Display Subsystem (MEDS) - a state-of-the-art “glass cockpit.”

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-27

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During power-up of the orbiter Discovery in the Orbiter Processing Facility, a technician (left) looks at the circuit breaker lights in the cabin. Discovery has been undergoing Orbiter Major Modifications in the past year, ranging from wiring, control panels and black boxes to gaseous and fluid systems tubing and components. These systems were deserviced, disassembled, inspected, modified, reassembled, checked out and reserviced, as were most other systems onboard. The work includes the installation of the Multifunction Electronic Display Subsystem (MEDS) - a state-of-the-art “glass cockpit.”

  7. NASA Wallops Flight Facility Air-Sea Interaction Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Steven R.

    1992-01-01

    This publication serves as an introduction to the Air-Sea Interaction Research Facility at NASA/GSFC/Wallops Flight Facility. The purpose of this publication is to provide background information on the research facility itself, including capabilities, available instrumentation, the types of experiments already done, ongoing experiments, and future plans.

  8. FACILITY 846, SOUTHEAST END ON LEFT, WITH FACILITY 845 ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 846, SOUTHEAST END ON LEFT, WITH FACILITY 845 ON RIGHT AND FACILITY 847 IN CENTER BACKGROUND, QUADRANGLE J, VIEW FACING NORTH. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Quadrangles I & J Barracks Type, Between Wright-Smith & Capron Avenues near Williston Avenue, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  9. BNL accelerator-based radiobiology facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowenstein, D. I.

    2001-01-01

    For the past several years, the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) has provided ions of iron, silicon and gold, at energies from 600 MeV/nucleon to 10 GeV/nucleon, for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) radiobiology research program. NASA has recently funded the construction of a new dedicated ion facility, the Booster Applications Facility (BAF). The Booster synchrotron will supply ion beams ranging from protons to gold, in an energy range from 40-3000 MeV/nucleon with maximum beam intensities of 10(10) to 10(11) ions per pulse. The BAF Project will be described and the future AGS and BAF operation plans will be presented.

  10. BNL accelerator-based radiobiology facilities.

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, D I

    2001-01-01

    For the past several years, the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) has provided ions of iron, silicon and gold, at energies from 600 MeV/nucleon to 10 GeV/nucleon, for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) radiobiology research program. NASA has recently funded the construction of a new dedicated ion facility, the Booster Applications Facility (BAF). The Booster synchrotron will supply ion beams ranging from protons to gold, in an energy range from 40-3000 MeV/nucleon with maximum beam intensities of 10(10) to 10(11) ions per pulse. The BAF Project will be described and the future AGS and BAF operation plans will be presented.

  11. Noise in animal facilities: why it matters.

    PubMed

    Turner, Jeremy G; Bauer, Carol A; Rybak, Leonard P

    2007-01-01

    Environmental noise can alter endocrine, reproductive and cardiovascular function, disturb sleep/wake cycles, and can mask normal communication between animals. These outcomes indicate that noise in the animal facility might have wide-ranging affects on animals, making what laboratory animals hear of consequence for all those who use animals in research, not just the hearing researcher. Given the wide-ranging effects of noise on laboratory animals, routine monitoring of noise in animal facilities would provide important information on the nature and stability of the animal environment. This special issue will highlight the need for more thorough monitoring and will serve as an introduction to noise and its various effects on animals.

  12. The design of a long-range megatransport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisshaar, Terrence A.; Allen, Carl L.

    1992-01-01

    Aircraft manufacturers are examining the market and feasibility of long-range passenger aircraft carrying more than 600 passengers. These aircraft would carry travelers at reduced cost and, at the same time, reduce congestion around major airports. The design of a large, long-range transport involves broad issues such as: the integration of airport terminal facilities; passenger loading and unloading; trade-offs between aircraft size and the cost to reconfigure these existing facilities; and, defeating the 'square-cube' law. Thirteen Purdue design teams generated RFP's that defined passenger capability and range, based upon team perception of market needs and infrastructure constraints. Turbofan engines were designed by each group to power these aircraft. The design problem and the variety of solutions developed are reviewed.

  13. NASA Ames Arc Jets and Range, Capabilities for Planetary Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fretter, Ernest F.

    2005-01-01

    NASA is pursuing innovative technologies and concepts as part of America's Vision for Space Exploration. The rapidly emerging field of nanotechnology has led to new concepts for multipurpose shields to prevent catastrophic loss of vehicles and crew against the triple threats of aeroheating during atmospheric entry, radiation (Solar and galactic cosmic rays) and Micrometorid/Orbital Debris (MMOD) strikes. One proposed concept is the Thermal Radiation Impact Protection System (TRIPS) using carbon nanotubes, hydrogenated carbon nanotubes, and ceramic coatings as a multi-use TPS. The Thermophysics Facilities Branch of the Space Technology Division at NASA Ames Research Center provides testing services for the development and validation of the present and future concepts being developed by NASA and national and International research firms. The Branch operates two key facilities - the Range Complex and the Arc Jets. The Ranges include both the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) and the Hypervelocity Free Flight (HFF) gas guns best suited for MMOD investigations. Test coupons can be installed in the AVGR or HFF and subjected to particle impacts from glass or metal particles from micron to _ inch (6.35-mm) diameters and at velocities from 5 to 8 kilometers per second. The facility can record high-speed data on film and provide damage assessment for analysis by the Principle Investigator or Ames personnel. Damaged articles can be installed in the Arc Jet facility for further testing to quantify the effects of damage on the heat shield s performance upon entry into atmospheric environments.

  14. Indoor Lighting Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Koji; Saito, Yoshinori; Ichikawa, Shigenori; Kawauchi, Takao; Tanaka, Tsuneo; Hirano, Rika; Tazuke, Fuyuki

    According to the statistics by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport, the total floor space of all building construction started was 188.87 million m2 (1.5% increase y/y), marking the fourth straight year of increase. Many large-scale buildings under construction in central Tokyo become fully occupied by tenants before completion. As for office buildings, it is required to develop comfortable and functional office spaces as working styles are becoming more and more diversified, and lighting is also an element of such functionalities. The total floor space of construction started for exhibition pavilions, multipurpose halls, conference halls and religious architectures decreased 11.1% against the previous year. This marked a decline for 10 consecutive years and the downward trend continues. In exhibition pavilions, the light radiation is measured and adjusted throughout the year so as not to damage the artworks by lighting. Hospitals, while providing higher quality medical services and enhancing the dwelling environment of patients, are expected to meet various restrictions and requirements, including the respect for privacy. Meanwhile, lighting designs for school classrooms tend to be homogeneous, yet new ideas are being promoted to strike a balance between the economical and functional aspects. The severe economic environment continues to be hampering the growth of theaters and halls in both the private and public sectors. Contrary to the downsizing trend of such facilities, additional installations of lighting equipment were conspicuous, and the adoption of high efficacy lighting appliances and intelligent function control circuits are becoming popular. In the category of stores/commercial facilities, the construction of complex facilities is a continuing trend. Indirect lighting, high luminance discharge lamps with excellent color rendition and LEDs are being effectively used in these facilities, together with the introduction of lighting designs

  15. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, R.C.; Schubert, W.K.

    1994-01-18

    An apparatus is described for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy. 6 figures.

  16. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Robert C.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy.

  17. Desert Experimental Range: Annotated bibliography

    Treesearch

    E. Durant McArthur; Stanley G. Kitchen

    2013-01-01

    Entries qualify for inclusion if they were conducted in whole or part at the Desert Experimental Range (DER, also known as the Desert Range Experiment Station) or were based on DER research in whole or part. They do not qualify merely by the author having worked at the DER when the research was performed or prepared. Entries were drawn from the original abstracts or...

  18. High dynamic range subjective testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Brahim; Nilsson, Mike

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes of a set of subjective tests that the authors have carried out to assess the end user perception of video encoded with High Dynamic Range technology when viewed in a typical home environment. Viewers scored individual single clips of content, presented in High Definition (HD) and Ultra High Definition (UHD), in Standard Dynamic Range (SDR), and in High Dynamic Range (HDR) using both the Perceptual Quantizer (PQ) and Hybrid Log Gamma (HLG) transfer characteristics, and presented in SDR as the backwards compatible rendering of the HLG representation. The quality of SDR HD was improved by approximately equal amounts by either increasing the dynamic range or increasing the resolution to UHD. A further smaller increase in quality was observed in the Mean Opinion Scores of the viewers by increasing both the dynamic range and the resolution, but this was not quite statistically significant.

  19. Campus Facilities: A Diminishing Endowment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rush, Sean; Johnson, Sandra

    1990-01-01

    Alarming findings were reported in a recent study of facility conditions. Two of the more common terms for describing the facilities problem are "capital renewal" and "deferred maintenance." How and why higher education reached this critical point is discussed. (MLW)

  20. New Ideas on Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Examines trends in facilities management relating to products and people. Reviews new trends in products, including processes, techniques, and programs that are being expounded by business and industry. Discusses the "people factors" involved in facilities management. (ABB)

  1. University of Maryland MRSEC - Facilities

    Science.gov Websites

    MRSEC Templates Opportunities Search Home » Facilities Shared Experimental Facilities The University of . Permission to redistribute the contents without alteration is granted to educational institutions for non

  2. Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000435.htm Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities To use the sharing features on this page, ... to go to a Skilled Nursing or Rehabilitation Facility? Your health care provider may determine that you ...

  3. DUF6 Conversion Facility EISs

    Science.gov Websites

    Conversion EIS Documents News FAQs Internet Resources Glossary Home » Conversion Facility EISs EIS Logo Guide | DU Uses | DUF6 Management | DUF6 Conversion Facility EISs | Documents News | FAQs | Internet

  4. Range indices of geomagnetic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, W.F.; Green, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    The simplest index of geomagnetic activity is the range in nT from maximum to minimum value of the field in a given time interval. The hourly range R was recommended by IAGA for use at observatories at latitudes greater than 65??, but was superceded by AE. The most used geomagnetic index K is based on the range of activity in a 3 h interval corrected for the regular daily variation. In order to take advantage of real time data processing, now available at many observatories, it is proposed to introduce a 1 h range index and also a 3 h range index. Both will be computed hourly, i.e. each will have a series of 24 per day, the 3 h values overlapping. The new data will be available as the range (R) of activity in nT and also as a logarithmic index (I) of the range. The exponent relating index to range in nT is based closely on the scale used for computing K values. The new ranges and range indices are available, from June 1987, to users in real time and can be accessed by telephone connection or computer network. Their first year of production is regarded as a trial period during which their value to the scientific and commercial communities will be assessed, together with their potential as indicators of regional and global disturbances' and in which trials will be conducted into ways of eliminating excessive bias at quiet times due to the rate of change of the daily variation field. ?? 1988.

  5. Foraging optimally for home ranges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, Michael S.; Powell, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Economic models predict behavior of animals based on the presumption that natural selection has shaped behaviors important to an animal's fitness to maximize benefits over costs. Economic analyses have shown that territories of animals are structured by trade-offs between benefits gained from resources and costs of defending them. Intuitively, home ranges should be similarly structured, but trade-offs are difficult to assess because there are no costs of defense, thus economic models of home-range behavior are rare. We present economic models that predict how home ranges can be efficient with respect to spatially distributed resources, discounted for travel costs, under 2 strategies of optimization, resource maximization and area minimization. We show how constraints such as competitors can influence structure of homes ranges through resource depression, ultimately structuring density of animals within a population and their distribution on a landscape. We present simulations based on these models to show how they can be generally predictive of home-range behavior and the mechanisms that structure the spatial distribution of animals. We also show how contiguous home ranges estimated statistically from location data can be misleading for animals that optimize home ranges on landscapes with patchily distributed resources. We conclude with a summary of how we applied our models to nonterritorial black bears (Ursus americanus) living in the mountains of North Carolina, where we found their home ranges were best predicted by an area-minimization strategy constrained by intraspecific competition within a social hierarchy. Economic models can provide strong inference about home-range behavior and the resources that structure home ranges by offering falsifiable, a priori hypotheses that can be tested with field observations.

  6. Systematic Planning for Educational Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuffey, Carroll W.

    This monograph provides a systematic approach to the problem of planning educational facilities. It first presents a conceptual framework for a general facilities planning and management system called Facilities Resource Allocation Management Evaluation System (FRAMES). The main components of FRAMES are identified as: (1) needs assessment, (2)…

  7. Capital Ideas for Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golding, Stephen T.; Gordon, Janet; Gravina, Arthur

    2001-01-01

    Asserting that just like chief financial officers, higher education facilities specialists must maximize the long-term performance of assets under their care, describes strategies for strategic facilities management. Discusses three main approaches to facilities management (insourcing, cosourcing, and outsourcing) and where boards of trustees fit…

  8. School Nutrition Facility Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannell, Dorothy VanEgmond

    This publication is designed to help superintendents, local facilities coordinators, and food-service directors in planning the remodeling of an outdated food-service facility or the building of a new one. The introduction describes the roles of the local facility coordinator, the local child-nutrition director, the architect, the food-service…

  9. Grid Facilities | Grid Modernization | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    groundbreaking innovations and collaboration in grid research. Photo of the Energy Systems Integration Facility Energy Systems Integration Facility The Energy Systems Integration Facility is the nation's premier user Located in Boulder, Colorado, the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) offers similar integration

  10. Overview of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility aeronautical flight projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Robert R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Several principal aerodynamics flight projects of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility are discussed. Key vehicle technology areas from a wide range of flight vehicles are highlighted. These areas include flight research data obtained for ground facility and computation correlation, applied research in areas not well suited to ground facilities (wind tunnels), and concept demonstration.

  11. GPS test range mission planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Iris P.; Hancock, Thomas P.

    The principal features of the Test Range User Mission Planner (TRUMP), a PC-resident tool designed to aid in deploying and utilizing GPS-based test range assets, are reviewed. TRUMP features time history plots of time-space-position information (TSPI); performance based on a dynamic GPS/inertial system simulation; time history plots of TSPI data link connectivity; digital terrain elevation data maps with user-defined cultural features; and two-dimensional coverage plots of ground-based test range assets. Some functions to be added during the next development phase are discussed.

  12. Intentionally Short Range Communications (ISRC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    ere known to the author. The first effort to develop a portable short-range communicator v, as in the carly- 1980s ( Hislop , 1982). The other was a...happenstance. The only previous effort known to the author to deliberately limit IR range was a proposal in the mid- 1980s . This attempt to develop an IR laser...B. Johnson, J. H. Yen. and G. A. Clapp. 1986. "Short-Range UV Communication Links," Proc. Tact. Comm. Conf. 1,60. Hislop , A. R. 1982. "A Head-Worn 60

  13. Fan Noise Test Facility

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-01-21

    The Fan Noise Test Facility built at the Lewis Research Center to obtain far-field noise data for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and General Electric Quiet Engine Program. The engine incorporated existing noise reduction methods into an engine of similar power to those that propelled the Boeing 707 or McDonnell-Douglas DC-8 airliner. The new the low-bypass ratio turbofan engines of the 1960s were inherently quieter than their turbojet counterparts, researchers had a better grasp of the noise generation problem, and new acoustic technologies had emerged. Lewis contracted General Electric in 1969 to build and aerodynamically test three experimental engines with 72-inch diameter fans. The engines were then brought to Lewis and tested with an acoustically treated nacelle. This Fan Noise Test Facility was built off of the 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel’s Main Compressor and Drive Building. Lewis researchers were able to isolate the fan’s noise during these initial tests by removing the core of the engine. The Lewis test rig drove engines to takeoff tip speeds of 1160 feet per second. The facility was later used to test a series of full-scale model fans and fan noise suppressors to be used with the quiet engine. NASA researchers predicted low-speed single-stage fans without inlet guide vanes and with large spacing between rotors and stators would be quieter. General Electric modified a TF39 turbofan engine by removing the the outer protion of the fan and spacing the blade rows of the inner portion. The tests revealed that the untreated version of the engine generated less noise than was anticipated, and the acoustically treated nacelle substantially reduced engine noise.

  14. Facilities removal working group

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address amore » majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.« less

  15. National Transonic Facility status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinney, L. W.; Bruce, W. E., Jr.; Gloss, B. B.

    1989-01-01

    The National Transonic Facility (NTF) was operational in a combined checkout and test mode for about 3 years. During this time there were many challenges associated with movement of mechanical components, operation of instrumentation systems, and drying of insulation in the cryogenic environment. Most of these challenges were met to date along with completion of a basic flow calibration and aerodynamic tests of a number of configurations. Some of the major challenges resulting from cryogenic environment are reviewed with regard to hardware systems and data quality. Reynolds number effects on several configurations are also discussed.

  16. The Fair Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    The FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Beams), under construction at the GSI site in Darmstadt, Germany, will be addressing a wealth of outstanding questions within the realm of subatomic, atomic and plasma physics through a combination of novel accelerators, storage rings and innovative experimental setups. The envisaged programme of FAIR yields a breadth that is unprecedented at an accelerator-based infrastructure. A brief review of the FAIR infrastructure and scientific reach is made, together with an update of the status of the construction.

  17. Constellation Training Facility Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, Jose M.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is developing the next set of vehicles that will take men back to the moon under the Constellation Program. The Constellation Training Facility (CxTF) is a project in development that will be used to train astronauts, instructors, and flight controllers on the operation of Constellation Program vehicles. It will also be used for procedure verification and validation of flight software and console tools. The CxTF will have simulations for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), Crew Module (CM), CEV Service Module (SM), Launch Abort System (LAS), Spacecraft Adapter (SA), Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), Pressurized Cargo Variant CM, Pressurized Cargo Variant SM, Cargo Launch Vehicle, Earth Departure Stage (EDS), and the Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). The Facility will consist of part-task and full-task trainers, each with a specific set of mission training capabilities. Part task trainers will be used for focused training on a single vehicle system or set of related systems. Full task trainers will be used for training on complete vehicles and all of its subsystems. Support was provided in both software development and project planning areas of the CxTF project. Simulation software was developed for the hydraulic system of the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) of the ARES I launch vehicle. The TVC system is in charge of the actuation of the nozzle gimbals for navigation control of the upper stage of the ARES I rocket. Also, software was developed using C standards to send and receive data to and from hand controllers to be used in CxTF cockpit simulations. The hand controllers provided movement in all six rotational and translational axes. Under Project Planning & Control, support was provided to the development and maintenance of integrated schedules for both the Constellation Training Facility and Missions Operations Facilities Division. These schedules maintain communication between projects in different levels. The Cx

  18. Genus Ranges of Chord Diagrams

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Jonathan; Jonoska, Nataša; Saito, Masahico

    2015-01-01

    A chord diagram consists of a circle, called the backbone, with line segments, called chords, whose endpoints are attached to distinct points on the circle. The genus of a chord diagram is the genus of the orientable surface obtained by thickening the backbone to an annulus and attaching bands to the inner boundary circle at the ends of each chord. Variations of this construction are considered here, where bands are possibly attached to the outer boundary circle of the annulus. The genus range of a chord diagram is the genus values over all such variations of surfaces thus obtained from a given chord diagram. Genus ranges of chord diagrams for a fixed number of chords are studied. Integer intervals that can be, and those that cannot be, realized as genus ranges are investigated. Computer calculations are presented, and play a key role in discovering and proving the properties of genus ranges. PMID:26478650

  19. Genus Ranges of Chord Diagrams.

    PubMed

    Burns, Jonathan; Jonoska, Nataša; Saito, Masahico

    2015-04-01

    A chord diagram consists of a circle, called the backbone, with line segments, called chords, whose endpoints are attached to distinct points on the circle. The genus of a chord diagram is the genus of the orientable surface obtained by thickening the backbone to an annulus and attaching bands to the inner boundary circle at the ends of each chord. Variations of this construction are considered here, where bands are possibly attached to the outer boundary circle of the annulus. The genus range of a chord diagram is the genus values over all such variations of surfaces thus obtained from a given chord diagram. Genus ranges of chord diagrams for a fixed number of chords are studied. Integer intervals that can be, and those that cannot be, realized as genus ranges are investigated. Computer calculations are presented, and play a key role in discovering and proving the properties of genus ranges.

  20. National long range transportation plan

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-07-01

    The NPS National Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) establishes a strategic framework for transportation investment service-wide over the next 20 years. It provides guidance to regional and park unit staff who make transportation investment and ma...

  1. Comparative range of orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Ingram, S B; Gipe, D P; Smith, R J

    1986-10-01

    ADA specification No. 32 for determining the range (elastic limit) of orthodontic wires uses the bending of a wire section treated as a cantilever beam. An alternative method for defining the range of orthodontic wires proposed by Waters (1981) is to wrap wire sections around mandrels of varying diameters and measure the deformation imparted after unwrapping. Four brass mandrels with a total of 46 test diameters ranging from 3.5 to 60.0 mm were used in this study. Wire sections 9 cm in length were rolled on the mandrel with a hand lathe. The mandrel cross section required to produce a predetermined amount of deformation (2 mm arc height for a 5 cm chord) was defined as the yield diameter for that particular wire. No individual wire was tested twice so as to avoid introduction of strain history. Test samples of 488 different orthodontic wires supplied by nine commercial distributors were evaluated (a total of 4,747 samples). Stainless steel wires of identical dimensions had a large variation in range, depending on the state of strain hardening and heat treatment. For example, 0.020 inch round wire had yield diameters ranging from 22.8 mm for Australian special plus orange (TP Laboratories) to 42.9 mm for Nubryte gold (G.A.C. International). Chromium cobalt wires had less range than stainless steel before heat treatment, but increased greatly in range after heat treatment. Nitinol (Unitek) had the greatest range of all wires tested (yield diameter of 8.7 mm for 0.016 inch Nitinol). Multistranded stainless steel wires had yield diameters between 9.0 and 14.0 mm.

  2. Facility Pollution Prevention Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) has developed the Facility Pollution Prevention Guide for those who are interested in and responsible for pollution prevention in industrial or service facilities. It summarizes the benefits of a company-wide pollution prevention program and suggests ways to incorporate pollution prevention in company policies and practices. The Guide describes how to establish a company-wide pollution prevention program. It outlines procedures for conducting a preliminary assessment to identify opportunities for waste reduction or elimination. Then, it describes how to use the results of the preassessment to prioritize areas for detailed assessment, how to use themore » detailed assessment to develop pollution prevention options, and how to implement those options that withstand feasibility analysis. Methods of evaluating, adjusting, and maintaining the program are described. Later chapters deal with cost analysis for pollution prevention projects and with the roles of product design and energy conservation in pollution prevention. Appendices consist of materials that will support the pollution prevention effort: assessment worksheets, sources of additional information, examples of evaluative methods, and a glossary.« less

  3. SPHERES National Lab Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jose

    2014-01-01

    SPHERES is a facility of the ISS National Laboratory with three IVA nano-satellites designed and delivered by MIT to research estimation, control, and autonomy algorithms. Since Fall 2010, The SPHERES system is now operationally supported and managed by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). A SPHERES Program Office was established and is located at NASA Ames Research Center. The SPHERES Program Office coordinates all SPHERES related research and STEM activities on-board the International Space Station (ISS), as well as, current and future payload development. By working aboard ISS under crew supervision, it provides a risk tolerant Test-bed Environment for Distributed Satellite Free-flying Control Algorithms. If anything goes wrong, reset and try again! NASA has made the capability available to other U.S. government agencies, schools, commercial companies and students to expand the pool of ideas for how to test and use these bowling ball-sized droids. For many of the researchers, SPHERES offers the only opportunity to do affordable on-orbit characterization of their technology in the microgravity environment. Future utilization of SPHERES as a facility will grow its capabilities as a platform for science, technology development, and education.

  4. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids andmore » slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.« less

  5. National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, R.

    We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research:more » fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H{sup -}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +}). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H{sup -} cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes.« less

  6. Status and Perspectives of Neutron Imaging Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, E.; Trtik, P.; Ridikas, D.

    The methodology and the application range of neutron imaging techniques have been significantly improved at numerous facilities worldwide in the last decades. This progress has been achieved by new detector systems, the setup of dedicated, optimized and flexible beam lines and the much better understanding of the complete imaging process thanks to complementary simulations. Furthermore, new applications and research topics were found and implemented. However, since the quality and the number of neutron imaging facilities depend much on the access to suitable beam ports, there is still an enormous potential to implement state-of-the-art neutron imaging techniques at many more facilities. On the one hand, there are prominent and powerful sources which do not intend/accept the implementation of neutron imaging techniques due to the priorities set for neutron scattering and irradiation techniques exclusively. On the other hand, there are modern and useful devices which remain under-utilized and have either not the capacity or not the know-how to develop attractive user programs and/or industrial partnerships. In this overview of the international status of neutron imaging facilities, we will specify details about the current situation.

  7. The Oliktok Point Arctic Research Facility (OPARF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, B. D.; Ivey, M.

    2011-12-01

    For the past year, the US Department of Energy, through Sandia National Laboratories, has operated a Designated User Facility at Oliktok Point Alaska, on the Arctic Ocean coast near the western end of the Prudhoe Bay oil fields. The primary purpose of this user facility is to accommodate and support manned and unmanned airborne measurement platforms over the Arctic Ocean and adjacent coastline as the arctic sea ice recedes. The speed at which the sea ice is receding exceeds model-projected speeds considerably for reasons that are not fully understood. The ultimate objective is to incorporate improved understanding of the radiative and other processes impacting sea ice recession into the relevant climate models. OPARF is based at a USAF Long Range Radar Station, an old Distant Early Warning (DEW) radar station built during the height of the Cold War, but continuing to be operated to track air traffic over the pole. The USAF has graciously granted Sandia and DOE use of selected facilities at Oliktok on a non-interference basis. DOE also maintains FAA-granted Restricted Airspace over Oliktok Point and adjacent ocean. In addition, DOE has also requested that the FAA establish a Warning Area over international waters 30 miles wide and 700 miles long stretching from near Oliktok towards the North Pole. That request is currently being processed by the FAA, with the public comment period now closed. This paper will update OPARF developments for potential users of the Oliktok user facility and other interested researchers.

  8. Murine norovirus infection in Brazilian animal facilities

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Daniele Masselli; Moreira, Josélia Cristina de Oliveira; Lancellotti, Marcelo; Gilioli, Rovilson; Corat, Marcus Alexandre Finzi

    2016-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a single-stranded positive-sense RNA virus of the Caliciviridae family. MNV has been reported to infect laboratory mice with the ability to cause lethal infections in strains lacking components of the innate immune response. Currently, MNV is considered the most prevalent infectious agent detected in laboratory mouse facilities. In this study, mice in 22 laboratory animal facilities within Brazil were analyzed for MNV infection. Using primers targeting a conserved region of the viral capsid, MNV was detected by RT-PCR in 137 of 359 mice from all 22 facilities. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the capsid region from the viral genome showed identity ranging from 87% to 99% when compared to reported MNV sequences. In addition, RAW264.7 cells inoculated with a mouse fecal suspension displayed cytopathic effect after the fifth passage. This study represents the first report of MNV in mouse colonies in Brazilian laboratory animal facilities, emphasizing the relevance of a health surveillance program in such environments. PMID:28049885

  9. NASA Satellite Laser Ranging Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, David L.

    2004-01-01

    I will be participating in the International Workshop on Laser Ranging. I will be presenting to the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) general body meeting on the recent accomplishments and status of the NASA Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) Network. The recent accomplishments and NASA's future plans will be outlined and the benefits to the scientific community will be addressed. I am member of the ILRS governing board, the Missions working group, and the Networks & Engineering working group. I am the chairman of the Missions Working and will be hosting a meeting during the week of the workshop. I will also represent the NASA SLR program at the ILRS governing board and other working group meetings.

  10. Evaluation of Facility Management by Multivariate Statistics - Factor Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singovszki, Miloš; Vranayová, Zuzana

    2013-06-01

    Facility management is evolving, there is no exact than other sciences, although its development is fast forward. The knowledge and practical skills in facility management is not replaced, on the contrary, they complement each other. The existing low utilization of science in the field of facility management is mainly caused by the management of support activities are many variables and prevailing immediate reaction to the extraordinary situation arising from motives of those who have substantial experience and years of proven experience. Facility management is looking for a system that uses organized knowledge and will form the basis, which grows from a wide range of disciplines. Significant influence on its formation as a scientific discipline is the "structure, which follows strategy". The paper deals evaluate technology building as part of an facility management by multivariate statistic - factor analysis.

  11. The NASA Lewis Research Center Internal Fluid Mechanics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. R.; Hingst, W. R.; Wasserbauer, C. A.; Andrews, T. B.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental facility specifically designed to investigate internal fluid duct flows is described. It is built in a modular fashion so that a variety of internal flow test hardware can be installed in the facility with minimal facility reconfiguration. The facility and test hardware interfaces are discussed along with design constraints of future test hardware. The plenum flow conditioning approach is also detailed. Available instrumentation and data acquisition capabilities are discussed. The incoming flow quality was documented over the current facility operating range. The incoming flow produces well behaved turbulent boundary layers with a uniform core. For the calibration duct used, the boundary layers approached 10 percent of the duct radius. Freestream turbulence levels at the various operating conditions varied from 0.64 to 0.69 percent of the average freestream velocity.

  12. Indoor Lighting Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Koji; Saito, Yoshinori; Ichikawa, Shigenori; Kawauchi, Takao; Tanaka, Tsuneo; Hirano, Rika; Tazuke, Fuyuki

    According to the statistics on building construction floor area from the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, the total floor area of building construction started in Japan in 2007 was 160,991 thousand square meters, or 14.8% less than the area of the previous year, and the reduction was the first reduction in the past five years. The office markets in Tokyo and Nagoya were active, as represented by the supplies of skyscrapers, and energy saving measures, such as the adoption of high efficiency lighting equipment, the control for initial stage illuminance, daylight harvesting, and the use of occupancy sensors, were well established. In the field of public construction, including museums, multi-purpose halls, and religious buildings, the total area of the new construction was 10.8% less than the total for the previous year, and this reduction was a continuation of an eleven-year trend. In spaces with high ceiling, the innovation for easy replacement of light sources used with reflection mirror systems and optical fibers was noted. Hospitals adapted to the expectation for improved services in their selection of lighting facilities to improve the residential environment for patients while taking into consideration the needs of the aging population, by their use of devices in corridors to help maintain a continuity of light. In libraries, a pendant system was developed to illuminate both ceilings and book shelves. In the field of theaters and halls, the time limit for repairing existing systems had come for the large facilities that were opened during the theater and hall construction boom of the 1960s through 1980s, and around 26 renovations were done. Almost all the renovations were conversions to intelligent dimming systems and lighting control desks. In the field of stores and commercial facilities, the atmosphere and glitter of the selling floor was produced by new light sources, such as ceramic metal halide lamps and LEDs, which have high

  13. RANGE INCREASER FOR PNEUMATIC GAUGES

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, A.H.; Seaborn, G.B. Jr.

    1960-09-27

    An improved pneumatic gage is offered in which the linear range has been increased without excessive air consumption. This has been accomplished by providing an expansible antechamber connected to the nozzle of the gage so that the position of the nozzle with respect to the workpiece is varied automatically by variation in pressure within the antechamber. This arrangement ensures that the nozzle-to-workpiece clearance is maintained within certain limits, thus obtaining a linear relation of air flow to nozzle-to-workpiece clearance over a wider range.

  14. GEA CRDA Range Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-28

    E1, July-August 1998 18 3.3. Example 3: SatMex, Solidaridad 2, May-June 1998 27 3.4. Example 4: PanAmSat, Galaxy IV, May-June 1998 33 3.5...17 Millstone measurements residuals for Telstar 401 on Days 181-263. 26 3-18 Millstone measurement residuals for Solidaridad 1 on Days 141-153...with 29 SatMex range data. 3-19 Hermosillo B-- Solidaridad 1 range residuals through Days 135-144 with bias 30 removed. 3-20 Iztapalapa D

  15. Space Power Facility-Capabilities for Space Environmental Testing Within a Single Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorge, Richard N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the current and near-term environmental test capabilities of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Space Power Facility (SPF) located at Sandusky, Ohio. The paper will present current and near-term capabilities for conducting electromagnetic interference and compatibility testing, base-shake sinusoidal vibration testing, reverberant acoustic testing, and thermal-vacuum testing. The paper will also present modes of transportation, handling, ambient environments, and operations within the facility to conduct those tests. The SPF is in the midst of completing and activating new or refurbished capabilities which, when completed, will provide the ability to conduct most or all required full-scale end-assembly space simulation tests at a single test location. It is envisioned that the capabilities will allow a customer to perform a wide range of space simulation tests in one facility at reasonable cost.

  16. Is the closest facility the one actually used? An assessment of travel time estimation based on mammography facilities.

    PubMed

    Alford-Teaster, Jennifer; Lange, Jane M; Hubbard, Rebecca A; Lee, Christoph I; Haas, Jennifer S; Shi, Xun; Carlos, Heather A; Henderson, Louise; Hill, Deirdre; Tosteson, Anna N A; Onega, Tracy

    2016-02-18

    Characterizing geographic access depends on a broad range of methods available to researchers and the healthcare context to which the method is applied. Globally, travel time is one frequently used measure of geographic access with known limitations associated with data availability. Specifically, due to lack of available utilization data, many travel time studies assume that patients use the closest facility. To examine this assumption, an example using mammography screening data, which is considered a geographically abundant health care service in the United States, is explored. This work makes an important methodological contribution to measuring access--which is a critical component of health care planning and equity almost everywhere. We analyzed one mammogram from each of 646,553 women participating in the US based Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium for years 2005-2012. We geocoded each record to street level address data in order to calculate travel time to the closest and to the actually used mammography facility. Travel time between the closest and the actual facility used was explored by woman-level and facility characteristics. Only 35% of women in the study population used their closest facility, but nearly three-quarters of women not using their closest facility used a facility within 5 min of the closest facility. Individuals that by-passed the closest facility tended to live in an urban core, within higher income neighborhoods, or in areas where the average travel times to work was longer. Those living in small towns or isolated rural areas had longer closer and actual median drive times. Since the majority of US women accessed a facility within a few minutes of their closest facility this suggests that distance to the closest facility may serve as an adequate proxy for utilization studies of geographically abundant services like mammography in areas where the transportation networks are well established.

  17. Uncertainty and Traceability for the CEESI Iowa Natural Gas Facility.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Aaron; Kegel, Tom

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyzes the uncertainty of a secondary flow measurement facility that calibrates a significant fraction of United States and foreign flow meters used for custody transfer of natural gas. The facility, owned by the Colorado Experimental Engineering Station Incorporated (CEESI), is located in Iowa. This facility measures flow with nine turbine meter standards, each of which is traceable to the NIST primary flow standard. The flow capacity of this facility ranges from 0.7 actual m(3)/s to 10.7 actual m(3)/s at nominal pressures of 7174 kPa and at ambient temperatures. Over this flow range the relative expanded flow uncertainty varies from 0.28 % to 0.30 % (depending on flow).

  18. Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility - A unique facility with new capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, P. A.; Stubbs, S. M.; Tanner, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF), formerly called the Landing Loads Track, is described. The paper gives a historical overview of the original NASA Langley Research Center Landing Loads Track and discusses the unique features of this national test facility. Comparisons are made between the original track characteristics and the new capabilities of the Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility following the recently completed facility update. Details of the new propulsion and arresting gear systems are presented along with the novel features of the new high-speed carriage. The data acquisition system is described and the paper concludes with a review of future test programs.

  19. Space Communications Emulation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Chante A.

    2004-01-01

    Establishing space communication between ground facilities and other satellites is a painstaking task that requires many precise calculations dealing with relay time, atmospheric conditions, and satellite positions, to name a few. The Space Communications Emulation Facility (SCEF) team here at NASA is developing a facility that will approximately emulate the conditions in space that impact space communication. The emulation facility is comprised of a 32 node distributed cluster of computers; each node representing a satellite or ground station. The objective of the satellites is to observe the topography of the Earth (water, vegetation, land, and ice) and relay this information back to the ground stations. Software originally designed by the University of Kansas, labeled the Emulation Manager, controls the interaction of the satellites and ground stations, as well as handling the recording of data. The Emulation Manager is installed on a Linux Operating System, employing both Java and C++ programming codes. The emulation scenarios are written in extensible Markup Language, XML. XML documents are designed to store, carry, and exchange data. With XML documents data can be exchanged between incompatible systems, which makes it ideal for this project because Linux, MAC and Windows Operating Systems are all used. Unfortunately, XML documents cannot display data like HTML documents. Therefore, the SCEF team uses XML Schema Definition (XSD) or just schema to describe the structure of an XML document. Schemas are very important because they have the capability to validate the correctness of data, define restrictions on data, define data formats, and convert data between different data types, among other things. At this time, in order for the Emulation Manager to open and run an XML emulation scenario file, the user must first establish a link between the schema file and the directory under which the XML scenario files are saved. This procedure takes place on the command

  20. A Short Range, High Accuracy Radar Ranging System,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    may be of any type and can perform the same functions as any other type of radar (pulsed or continuous wave (CW), coherent or noncoherent , etc.). The...use of an optical carrier frequency 4 enables laser radars to take advantage of the benefits inherent in higher frequencies: higher bandwidths allow...results that are inaccurate or incorrect. Also, directing a laser beam at an aircraft cockpit from a range of 25 feet would pose a serious safety

  1. 9 CFR 3.27 - Facilities, outdoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.27 Facilities, outdoor. (a) Hamsters shall not be housed in outdoor facilities. (b) Guinea pigs shall not be housed in outdoor facilities unless...

  2. 9 CFR 3.27 - Facilities, outdoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.27 Facilities, outdoor. (a) Hamsters shall not be housed in outdoor facilities. (b) Guinea pigs shall not be housed in outdoor facilities unless...

  3. 9 CFR 3.27 - Facilities, outdoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.27 Facilities, outdoor. (a) Hamsters shall not be housed in outdoor facilities. (b) Guinea pigs shall not be housed in outdoor facilities unless...

  4. 9 CFR 3.27 - Facilities, outdoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.27 Facilities, outdoor. (a) Hamsters shall not be housed in outdoor facilities. (b) Guinea pigs shall not be housed in outdoor facilities unless...

  5. The QUASAR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, David

    2013-10-01

    The QUAsi-Axisymmetric Research (QUASAR) stellarator is a new facility which can solve two critical problems for fusion, disruptions and steady-state, and which provides new insights into the role of magnetic symmetry in plasma confinement. If constructed it will be the only quasi-axisymmetric stellarator in the world. The innovative principle of quasi-axisymmetry (QA) will be used in QUASAR to study how ``tokamak-like'' systems can be made: 1) Disruption-free, 2) Steady-state with low recirculating power, while preserving or improving upon features of axisymmetric tokamaks, such as 1) Stable at high pressure simultaneous with 2) High confinement (similar to tokamaks), and 3) Scalable to a compact reactor Stellarator research is critical to fusion research in order to establish the physics basis for a magnetic confinement device that can operate efficiently in steady-state, without disruptions at reactor-relevant parameters. The two large stellarator experiments - LHD in Japan and W7-X under construction in Germany are pioneering facilities capable of developing 3D physics understanding at large scale and for very long pulses. The QUASAR design is unique in being QA and optimized for confinement, stability, and moderate aspect ratio (4.5). It projects to a reactor with a major radius of ~8 m similar to advanced tokamak concepts. It is striking that (a) the EU DEMO is a pulsed (~2.5 hour) tokamak with major R ~ 9 m and (b) the ITER physics scenarios do not presume steady-state behavior. Accordingly, QUASAR fills a critical gap in the world stellarator program. This work supported by DoE Contract No. DEAC02-76CH03073.

  6. About White Sands Missile Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Information on the White Sands Missile Range is given in viewgraph form. Navy programs, test sites, rocket programs, research rockets' booster capacity, current boost capabilities, ordnance and payload assembly areas, commercial space launch history and agreements, and lead times are among the topics covered.

  7. Helicopter fertilizing of Foothill Range

    Treesearch

    Don A. Duncan; Jack N. Reppert

    1966-01-01

    Helicopters may prove the best method of applying sulfur fertilizer on rangeland too steep for ground application, or with no nearby landing strip for fixed-wing aircraft. Helicopter fertilization of 457 acres of the San Joaquin Experimental Range in central California in 1960 and 1963 was fast and practical.

  8. Reseeding tarweed-infested ranges.

    Treesearch

    E.W. Stevenson

    1950-01-01

    Cluster tarweed(Madia glomerata) infests many livestock ranges in eastern Oregon, using soil moisture and nutrients that should be producing plants more valuable as forage and more effective in stabilizing watersheds. No completely satisfactory method of eliminating this obnoxious plant and replacing it, with forage has yet been found. Recent...

  9. Back Home on the Range.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breining, Greg

    1992-01-01

    Presents the history of the buffalo's demise and reemergence in the United States and Canada. Discusses the problems facing herds today caused by a small genetic pool, disease, range concerns, lack of predation, and culling. Points out the benefits of buffalo raising as compared to cattle raising, including the marketing advantages. (MCO)

  10. Multibin long-range correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, A.; Zalewski, K.

    2011-06-01

    A new method to study the long-range correlations in multiparticle production is developed. It is proposed to measure the joint factorial moments or cumulants of multiplicity distribution in several (more than two) bins. It is shown that this step dramatically increases the discriminative power of data.

  11. Hydrodynamics and long range correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, A.; Zalewski, K.

    2011-04-01

    It is shown that the recently proposed method of studying the long-range correlations in multiparticle production can be effectively used to verify the hydrodynamic nature of the longitudinal expansion of the partonic system created in the collision. The case of ALICE detector is explicitly considered.

  12. Anatomy of a Mountain Range.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chew, Berkeley

    1993-01-01

    Provides written tour of Colorado Rockies along San Juan Skyway in which the geological features and formation of the mountain range is explored. Discusses evidence of geologic forces and products such as plate tectonic movement and the Ancestral Rockies; subduction and the Laramide Orogeny; volcanism and calderas; erosion, faulting, land…

  13. Tonopah Test Range Flight Test

    SciTech Connect

    None

    From a distance, the drop of a mock nuclear weapon — containing only non-nuclear components — was a mere puff of dust rising from a dry lake bed at Nevada’s Tonopah Test Range. However, it marked the start of a new series of test flights vital to the nation’s B61-12 weapon refurbishment program.

  14. Mandibular movement range in children.

    PubMed

    Machado, Barbara Cristina Zanandréa; Medeiros, Ana Paula Magalhães; Felício, Cláudia Maria de

    2009-01-01

    identification of the mandibular movement range is an important procedure in the evaluation of the stomatognathic system. However, there are few studies in children that focus on normal parameters or abnormalities. to determine the average range of mandibular movements in Brazilian children aged 6 to 12 years; to verify the difference between genders, in each age group, and between the different age groups: 6-8 years; 8.1-10 years; and 10.1-12 years. participants of the study were 240 healthy children selected among regular students from local schools of São Paulo State. The maximum mandibular opening, lateral excursion and protrusive movements, and deviation of the medium line, if present, were measured using a digital caliper. Student T test, Analysis of variance and Tukey test were considered significant for p < 0.05. the mean values observed in the studied sample were: 44.51mm for maximum mandibular opening; 7.71mm for lateral excursion to the right; 7.92mm for lateral excursion to the left; 7.45mm for protrusive movements. No statistical difference was observed between genders. There was a gradual increase in the range of mandibular movements, with significant differences mainly between the ages of 6-8 years and 10.1-12 years. during childhood the range of mandibular movements increases. Age should be considered in this analysis for a greater precision in the diagnosis.

  15. High-Flux Solar Furnace Facility | Concentrating Solar Power | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    High-Flux Solar Furnace Facility High-Flux Solar Furnace Facility NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) is a 10-kW optical furnace for testing high-temperature processes or applications requiring high range of technologies with a diverse set of experimental requirements. The high heating rates create the

  16. 75 FR 68334 - Record of Decision (ROD) for Training Range and Garrison Support Facilities Construction and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... for the protection of the environment, mission needs, and Soldier and Family quality of life... Preservation Office is complete. Moderate adverse impacts have been identified for soils, water quality...

  17. Altus II high altitude science aircraft decending toward U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Altus II descending from a flight over Kauai, Hawaii. The Altus II was flown as a performance and propulsion testbed for future high-altitude science platform aircraft under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The rear-engined Altus II and its sister ship, the Altus I, were built by General Atomics/Aeronautical Systems, Inc., of San Diego, Calif. They are designed for high-altitude, long-duration scientific sampling missions, and are powered by turbocharged piston engines. The Altus I, built for the Naval Postgraduate School, reached over 43,500 feet with a single-stage turbocharger feeding its four-cylinder Rotax engine in 1997, while the Altus II, incorporating a two-stage turbocharger built by Thermo-Mechanical Systems, reached and sustained an altitudeof 55,000 feet for four hours in 1999. A pilot in a control station on the ground flies the craft by radio signals, using visual cues from a video camera in the nose of the Altus and information from the craft's air data system.

  18. NASA's Helios Prototype aircraft taking off from the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii,

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    As a follow-on to the Centurion (and earlier Pathfinder and Pathfinder-Plus) aircraft, the solar-powered Helios Prototype is the latest and largest example of a slow-flying ultralight flying wing designed for long-duration, high-altitude Earth science or telecommunications relay missions in the stratosphere. Developed by AeroVironment, Inc., of Monrovia, California, under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project, the unique craft is intended to demonstrate two key missions: the ability to reach and sustain horizontal flight at 100,000 feet altitude on a single-day flight in 2001, and to maintain flight above 50,000 feet altitude for at least four days in 2003, with the aid of a regenerative fuel cell-based energy storage system now in development. Both of these missions will be powered by electricity derived from non-polluting solar energy. The Helios Prototype is an enlarged version of the Centurion flying wing, which flew a series of test flights at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in late 1998. The craft has a wingspan of 247 feet, 41 feet greater than the Centurion, 2 1/2 times that of its solar-powered Pathfinder flying wing, and longer than the wingspans of either the Boeing 747 jetliner or Lockheed C-5 transport aircraft. The remotely piloted, electrically powered Helios Prototype went aloft on its maiden low-altitude checkout flight Sept. 8, 1999, over Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in the Southern California desert. The initial flight series was flown on battery power as a risk-reduction measure. In all, six flights were flown in the Helios Protoype's initial development series. In upgrading the Centurion to the Helios Prototype configuration, AeroVironment added a sixth wing section and a fifth landing gear pod, among other improvements. The additional wingspan increased the area available for installation of solar cells and improved aerodynamic efficiency, allowing the Helios Prototype to fly higher, longer and with a larger payload than the smaller craft. In addition, project engineers added a differential Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) system to improve navigation, an extensive turbulence monitoring system payload to record structural loads on the aircraft both in the air and on the ground, and radiator plates to assist in cooling the avionics at high altitudes where there is little air to dissipate heat. During 2000, more than 65,000 solar cells in 1,800 groups were mounted on the upper surface of Helios' wing. Produced by SunPower, Inc., these bi-facial silicon cells are about 19 percent efficient in the flight regime in which the helios is designed to operate, converting about 19 percent of the solar energy they receive into electrical current. The entire array is capable of producing a maximum output of about 35 kw at high noon on a summer day. The mission to reach and sustain flight at 100,000 feet in 2001 requires use of all 14 motors and minimal ballast to save weight, with the aircraft weighing in at only a little more than 1,600 lbs. The four-day mission above 50,000 feet envisioned for the Helios Prototype in 2003will see only eight motors powering the craft and the addition of the regenerative energy storage system now in development. The system will increase the Helios Prototype's flight weight to a little over 2,000 lbs. Fewer motors are needed for the long-endurance mission due to the lesser altitude requirements, and the excess electrical energy generated by the solar arrays during the daytime will be diverted to the hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell energy storage system, which will release the electricity to power the Helios after dark. With other system reliability improvements, production versions of the Helios are expected to fly missions lasting months at a time, becoming true 'atmospheric satellites.'

  19. Source Definition Issue for KN Power - Front Range Energy Associates, LLC/PSCo Generating Facility

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  20. 75 FR 17133 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for Training Range and Garrison Support Facilities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... constructed over a 4-year time period. It also examines potential impacts to surrounding lands and/or local... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for... prepared a DEIS to analyze the environmental and socioeconomic impacts resulting from the proposed...

  1. Major International R and D Ranges and Test Facilities. Summary of Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    with a maximum impulse of firing of large numbers of rounds by a weapon in order to 1500 G and a maximum test item weight of 200 pounds. produce...millimetres may be fired safely, using test item weight of 1,000 pounds. training practice or training practice tracer ammunition. The :ange butts consist of...predictions of coherent sound propagation loss in the ocean. This information is useful in estimating the performance of low-frequency passive sonars

  2. Advanced Spectroscopic and Thermal Imaging Instrumentation for Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    the development process, increase its quality and reduce development time through automation of synthesis, analysis or verification. For this purpose...made of time-non-deterministic systems, improving efficiency and reducing complexity of formal analysis . We also show how our theory relates to, and...of the most recent investigations for Earth and Mars atmospheres will be discussed in the following sections. 2.4.1 Earth: lunar return NASA’s

  3. Regulatory facility guide for Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.

    1994-02-28

    The Regulatory Facility Guide (RFG) has been developed for the DOE and contractor facilities located in the state of Ohio. It provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation-related regulations applicable to shipments originating at destined to Ohio facilities. This RFG was developed as an additional resource tool for use both by traffic managers who must ensure that transportation operations are in full compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements and by oversight personnel who must verify compliance activities.

  4. Data Management Facility Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, Nicole N

    2014-06-30

    The Data Management Facility (DMF) is the data center that houses several critical Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility services, including first-level data processing for the ARM Mobile Facilities (AMFs), Eastern North Atlantic (ENA), North Slope of Alaska (NSA), Southern Great Plains (SGP), and Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites, as well as Value-Added Product (VAP) processing, development systems, and other network services.

  5. Facilities Utilization Program Implementation Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This Facilities Utilization Program Implementation Handbook (FUPIH) prescribes procedures for the review and the reporting on the utilization of NASA facilities. The Directors of NASA Field Installations should designate an Installation Official responsible for coordinating the assignment of buildings space and implementing the facilities utilization reviews and annual report preparation. The individual designated shall be known as the 'Facilities Utilization Officer (FUO).' Functional responsibilities of the FUO are detailed in NASA Management Instruction (NMI) 7234.1. It is recognized that titles used in the implementation of the Facilities Utilization Program may vary between field installations. The Facilities Utilization Program (FUP) is designed to provide a uniform and orderly process for meeting or addressing the following objectives: the establishment of sound facilities requirements to meet NASA's programmatic and institutional needs; the optimum allocation of available facilities and related resources to meet these requirements; and the early identification and request for required additional facilities resources. The detailed review and reporting system enacted by NMI 7234.1 should encourage more comprehensive utilization planning for all NASA facilities and ensure, to the maximum extent practicable, that all such facilities are put to their highest and best use consistent with NASA programmatic and institutional priorities. A principal purpose of the FUP is the early identification of NASA facilities which may be or may become underutilized or excess to NASA needs and to provide a timely reference point from which corrective actions (i.e., consolidation, elimination of duplication, improved utilization of disposal) may be taken. Because the supply of this handbook is limited, distribution should be controlled at the field installation level.

  6. The Berkeley extreme ultraviolet calibration facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, Barry Y.; Jelinsky, Patrick; Malina, Roger F.

    1988-01-01

    The vacuum calibration facilities of the Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley are designed for the calibration and testing of EUV and FUV spaceborne instrumentation (spectral range 44-2500 A). The facility includes one large cylindrical vacuum chamber (3 x 5 m) containing two EUV collimators, and it is equipped with a 4-axis manipulator of angular-control resolution 1 arcsec for payloads weighing up to 500 kg. In addition, two smaller cylindrical chambers, each 0.9 x 1.2 m, are available for vacuum and thermal testing of UV detectors, filters, and space electronics hardware. All three chambers open into class-10,000 clean rooms, and all calibrations are referred to NBS secondary standards.

  7. Design of Aircraft Deicing Facilities

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1993-08-23

    Archival copy of original Federal Aviation Administration standards and : specifications for use in the design of aircraft deicing facilities. To ensure : review of all changes, user should consult . ...

  8. Challenges for proteomics core facilities.

    PubMed

    Lilley, Kathryn S; Deery, Michael J; Gatto, Laurent

    2011-03-01

    Many analytical techniques have been executed by core facilities established within academic, pharmaceutical and other industrial institutions. The centralization of such facilities ensures a level of expertise and hardware which often cannot be supported by individual laboratories. The establishment of a core facility thus makes the technology available for multiple researchers in the same institution. Often, the services within the core facility are also opened out to researchers from other institutions, frequently with a fee being levied for the service provided. In the 1990s, with the onset of the age of genomics, there was an abundance of DNA analysis facilities, many of which have since disappeared from institutions and are now available through commercial sources. Ten years on, as proteomics was beginning to be utilized by many researchers, this technology found itself an ideal candidate for being placed within a core facility. We discuss what in our view are the daily challenges of proteomics core facilities. We also examine the potential unmet needs of the proteomics core facility that may also be applicable to proteomics laboratories which do not function as core facilities. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Service quality in contracted facilities.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Fauziah; Pradhan, Nousheen Akber; Zaidi, Shehla; Azam, Syed Iqbal; Yousuf, Farheen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the readiness of contracted and non-contracted first-level healthcare facilities in Pakistan to deliver quality maternal and neonatal health (MNH) care. A balanced scorecard (BSC) was used as the assessment framework. Using a cross-sectional study design, two rural health centers (RHCs) contracted out to Aga Khan Health Service, Pakistan were compared with four government managed RHCs. A BSC was designed to assess RHC readiness to deliver good quality MNH care. In total 20 indicators were developed, representing five BSC domains: health facility functionality, service provision, staff capacity, staff and patient satisfaction. Validated data collection tools were used to collect information. Pearson χ2, Fisher's Exact and the Mann-Whitney tests were applied as appropriate to detect significant service quality differences among the two facilities. Contracted facilities were generally found to be better than non-contracted facilities in all five BSC domains. Patients' inclination for facility-based delivery at contracted facilities was, however, significantly higher than non-contracted facilities (80 percent contracted vs 43 percent non-contracted, p=0.006). The study shows that contracting out initiatives have the potential to improve MNH care. This is the first study to compare MNH service delivery quality across contracted and non-contracted facilities using BSC as the assessment framework.

  10. Safe design of healthcare facilities

    PubMed Central

    Reiling, J

    2006-01-01

    The physical environment has a significant impact on health and safety; however, hospitals have not been designed with the explicit goal of enhancing patient safety through facility design. In April 2002, St Joseph's Community Hospital of West Bend, a member of SynergyHealth, brought together leaders in healthcare and systems engineering to develop a set of safety‐driven facility design recommendations and principles that would guide the design of a new hospital facility focused on patient safety. By introducing safety‐driven innovations into the facility design process, environmental designers and healthcare leaders will be able to make significant contributions to patient safety. PMID:17142606

  11. Making of the NSTX Facility

    SciTech Connect

    C. Neumeyer; M. Ono; S.M. Kaye

    1999-11-01

    The NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) facility located at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is the newest national fusion science experimental facility for the restructured US Fusion Energy Science Program. The NSTX project was approved in FY 97 as the first proof-of-principle national fusion facility dedicated to the spherical torus research. On Feb. 15, 1999, the first plasma was achieved 10 weeks ahead of schedule. The project was completed on budget and with an outstanding safety record. This paper gives an overview of the NSTX facility construction and the initial plasma operations.

  12. Cascade Mountain Range in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Along its Oregon segment, the Cascade Range is almost entirely volcanic in origin. The volcanoes and their eroded remnants are the visible magmatic expression of the Cascadia subduction zone, where the offshore Juan de Fuca tectonic plate is subducted beneath North America. Subduction occurs as two lithospheric plates collide, and an underthrusted oceanic plate is commonly dragged into the mantle by the pull of gravity, carrying ocean-bottom rock and sediment down to where heat and pressure expel water. As this water rises, it lowers the melting temperature in the overlying hot mantle rocks, thereby promoting melting. The molten rock supplies the volcanic arcs with heat and magma. Cascade Range volcanoes are part of the Ring of Fire, a popular term for the numerous volcanic arcs that encircle the Pacific Ocean.

  13. Analysis of geomagnetic hourly ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danskin, D. W.; Lotz, S. I.

    2015-08-01

    In an attempt to develop better forecasts of geomagnetic activity, hourly ranges of geomagnetic data are analyzed with a focus on how the data are distributed. A lognormal distribution is found to be able to characterize the magnetic data for all observatories up to moderate disturbances with each distribution controlled by the mean of the logarithm of the hourly range. In the subauroral zone, the distribution deviates from the lognormal, which is interpreted as motion of the auroral electrojet toward the equator. For most observatories, a substantial deviation from the lognormal distribution was noted at the higher values and is best modeled with a power law extrapolation, which gives estimates of the extreme values that may occur at observatories which contribute to the disturbance storm time (Dst) index and in Canada.

  14. ASTP ranging system mathematical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, M. R.; Robinson, L. H.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented of the VHF ranging system to analyze the performance of the Apollo-Soyuz test project (ASTP). The system was adapted for use in the ASTP. The ranging system mathematical model is presented in block diagram form, and a brief description of the overall model is also included. A procedure for implementing the math model is presented along with a discussion of the validation of the math model and the overall summary and conclusions of the study effort. Detailed appendices of the five study tasks are presented: early late gate model development, unlock probability development, system error model development, probability of acquisition and model development, and math model validation testing.

  15. Ultrasonic ranging for the oculometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    Ultrasonic tracking techniques are investigated for an oculometer. Two methods are reported in detail. The first is based on measurements of time from the start of a transmit burst to a received echo. Knowing the sound velocity, distance can be calculated. In the second method, a continuous signal is transmitted. Target movement causes phase shifting of the echo. By accumulating these phase shifts, tracking from a set point can be achieved. Both systems have problems with contoured targets, but work well on flat plates and the back of a human head. Also briefly reported is an evaluation of an ultrasonic ranging system. Interface circuits make this system compatible with the echo time design. While the system is consistently accurate, it has a beam too narrow for oculometer use. Finally, comments are provided on a tracking system using the Doppler frequency shift to give range data.

  16. Annual water-resources review, White Sands Missile Range: 1971

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cruz, R.R.

    1972-01-01

    This report presents water-resource information that was collected at White Sands Missile Range during 1971 and early 1972 by personnel of the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division. Data on ground-water pumpage and resulting water-level fluctuation, chemical quality, percipitation, and surface-water runoff are summarized in the report. The data were obtained as a result of the continuing water-resources basic-data collection program sponsored by the Facilities Engineering Directorate, White Sands Missile Range.

  17. Design of a high capacity long range cargo aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisshaar, Terrence A.

    1994-01-01

    This report examines the design of a long range cargo transport to attempt to reduce ton-mile shipping costs and to stimulate the air cargo market. This design effort involves the usual issues but must also include consideration of: airport terminal facilities; cargo loading and unloading; and defeating the 'square-cube' law to design large structures. This report reviews the long range transport design problem and several solutions developed by senior student design teams at Purdue University. The results show that it will be difficult to build large transports unless the infrastructure is changed and unless the basic form of the airplane changes so that aerodynamic and structural efficiencies are employed.

  18. Range expansion of heterogeneous populations.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Matthias; Rulands, Steffen; Frey, Erwin

    2014-04-11

    Risk spreading in bacterial populations is generally regarded as a strategy to maximize survival. Here, we study its role during range expansion of a genetically diverse population where growth and motility are two alternative traits. We find that during the initial expansion phase fast-growing cells do have a selective advantage. By contrast, asymptotically, generalists balancing motility and reproduction are evolutionarily most successful. These findings are rationalized by a set of coupled Fisher equations complemented by stochastic simulations.

  19. Range determination for scannerless imaging

    DOEpatents

    Muguira, Maritza Rosa; Sackos, John Theodore; Bradley, Bart Davis; Nellums, Robert

    2000-01-01

    A new method of operating a scannerless range imaging system (e.g., a scannerless laser radar) has been developed. This method is designed to compensate for nonlinear effects which appear in many real-world components. The system operates by determining the phase shift of the laser modulation, which is a physical quantity related physically to the path length between the laser source and the detector, for each pixel of an image.

  20. Hammersley Range, northern Western Australia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-04-29

    The oval shaped basin of the sedimentary rocks of the Hammersley Range, northern Western Australia (23.0S, 119.0E) dominates the center of this near nadir view. The Fortescue River is the remarkably straight, fault controlled feature bordering the Hammersley on the north. Sand dunes are the main surface features in the northeast and southwest. Many dry lakebeds can be seen to the east as light grey colored patches along the watercourses.

  1. Range Precision of LADAR Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    photodetector, which is small compared to the receiver aperture. The photodetector converts the focused optical field into an electrical signal...Range Precision of LADAR Systems DISSERTATION Steven Johnson, AFIT/DEE/ENG/08-15 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF...TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. The views expressed in this dissertation are those

  2. Short-range communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A short-range communication system includes an antenna, a transmitter, and a receiver. The antenna is an electrical conductor formed as a planar coil with rings thereof being uniformly spaced. The transmitter is spaced apart from the plane of the coil by a gap. An amplitude-modulated and asynchronous signal indicative of a data stream of known peak amplitude is transmitted into the gap. The receiver detects the coil's resonance and decodes same to recover the data stream.

  3. Long-range electron tunneling.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Jay R; Gray, Harry B

    2014-02-26

    Electrons have so little mass that in less than a second they can tunnel through potential energy barriers that are several electron-volts high and several nanometers wide. Electron tunneling is a critical functional element in a broad spectrum of applications, ranging from semiconductor diodes to the photosynthetic and respiratory charge transport chains. Prior to the 1970s, chemists generally believed that reactants had to collide in order to effect a transformation. Experimental demonstrations that electrons can transfer between reactants separated by several nanometers led to a revision of the chemical reaction paradigm. Experimental investigations of electron exchange between redox partners separated by molecular bridges have elucidated many fundamental properties of these reactions, particularly the variation of rate constants with distance. Theoretical work has provided critical insights into the superexchange mechanism of electronic coupling between distant redox centers. Kinetics measurements have shown that electrons can tunnel about 2.5 nm through proteins on biologically relevant time scales. Longer-distance biological charge flow requires multiple electron tunneling steps through chains of redox cofactors. The range of phenomena that depends on long-range electron tunneling continues to expand, providing new challenges for both theory and experiment.

  4. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-03

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

  5. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

  6. ROYAL PALMLINED WALK TO FACILITY 1041 (QUARTERS J) WITH FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ROYAL PALM-LINED WALK TO FACILITY 1041 (QUARTERS J) WITH FACILITY 1040 (QUARTERS 1) TO LEFT. TAKEN AT CORNER OF HALE ALII AVENUE AND EIGHTH STREET. VIEW FACING EAST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Housing Area Hale Alii, Hale Alii Avenue, Eighth Street, & Avenue D, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. FACILITY 317. EXTERIOR OF FRONT SIDE, WITH FACILITY 316 BEYOND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 317. EXTERIOR OF FRONT SIDE, WITH FACILITY 316 BEYOND ON THE LEFT. VIEW FACING NORTH. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Housing Area Hospital Point, Pharmacist's Quarters Type, 13-16 First Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. Integrated Test Facility (ITF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA-Dryden Integrated Test Facility (ITF), also known as the Walter C. Williams Research Aircraft Integration Facility (RAIF), provides an environment for conducting efficient and thorough testing of advanced, highly integrated research aircraft. Flight test confidence is greatly enhanced by the ability to qualify interactive aircraft systems in a controlled environment. In the ITF, each element of a flight vehicle can be regulated and monitored in real time as it interacts with the rest of the aircraft systems. Testing in the ITF is accomplished through automated techniques in which the research aircraft is interfaced to a high-fidelity real-time simulation. Electric and hydraulic power are also supplied, allowing all systems except the engines to function as if in flight. The testing process is controlled by an engineering workstation that sets up initial conditions for a test, initiates the test run, monitors its progress, and archives the data generated. The workstation is also capable of analyzing results of individual tests, comparing results of multiple tests, and producing reports. The computers used in the automated aircraft testing process are also capable of operating in a stand-alone mode with a simulation cockpit, complete with its own instruments and controls. Control law development and modification, aerodynamic, propulsion, guidance model qualification, and flight planning -- functions traditionally associated with real-time simulation -- can all be performed in this manner. The Remotely Augmented Vehicles (RAV) function, now located in the ITF, is a mainstay in the research techniques employed at Dryden. This function is used for tests that are too dangerous for direct human involvement or for which computational capacity does not exist onboard a research aircraft. RAV provides the researcher with a ground-based computer that is radio linked to the test aircraft during actual flight. The Ground Vibration Testing (GVT) system, formerly housed

  9. Integrated Test Facility (ITF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The NASA-Dryden Integrated Test Facility (ITF), also known as the Walter C. Williams Research Aircraft Integration Facility (RAIF), provides an environment for conducting efficient and thorough testing of advanced, highly integrated research aircraft. Flight test confidence is greatly enhanced by the ability to qualify interactive aircraft systems in a controlled environment. In the ITF, each element of a flight vehicle can be regulated and monitored in real time as it interacts with the rest of the aircraft systems. Testing in the ITF is accomplished through automated techniques in which the research aircraft is interfaced to a high-fidelity real-time simulation. Electric and hydraulic power are also supplied, allowing all systems except the engines to function as if in flight. The testing process is controlled by an engineering workstation that sets up initial conditions for a test, initiates the test run, monitors its progress, and archives the data generated. The workstation is also capable of analyzing results of individual tests, comparing results of multiple tests, and producing reports. The computers used in the automated aircraft testing process are also capable of operating in a stand-alone mode with a simulation cockpit, complete with its own instruments and controls. Control law development and modification, aerodynamic, propulsion, guidance model qualification, and flight planning -- functions traditionally associated with real-time simulation -- can all be performed in this manner. The Remotely Augmented Vehicles (RAV) function, now located in the ITF, is a mainstay in the research techniques employed at Dryden. This function is used for tests that are too dangerous for direct human involvement or for which computational capacity does not exist onboard a research aircraft. RAV provides the researcher with a ground-based computer that is radio linked to the test aircraft during actual flight. The Ground Vibration Testing (GVT) system, formerly housed

  10. Medium Range Forecasts Representation (and Long Range Forecasts?)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincendon, J.-C.

    2009-09-01

    The progress of the numerical forecasts urges us to interest us in more and more distant ranges. We thus supply more and more forecasts with term of some days. Nevertheless, precautions of use are necessary to give the most reliable and the most relevant possible information. Available in a TV bulletin or on quite other support (Internet, mobile phone), the interpretation and the representation of a medium range forecast (5 - 15 days) must be different from those of a short range forecast. Indeed, the "foresee-ability” of a meteorological phenomenon decreases gradually in the course of the ranges, it decreases all the more quickly that the phenomenon is of small scale. So, at the end of some days, the probability character of a forecast becomes very widely dominating. That is why in Meteo-France the forecasts of D+4 to D+7 are accompanied with a confidence index since around ten years. It is a figure between 1 and 5: the more we approach 5, the more the confidence in the supplied forecast is good. In the practice, an indication is supplied for period D+4 / D+5, the other one for period D+6 / D+7, every day being able to benefit from a different forecast, that is be represented in a independent way. We thus supply a global tendency over 24 hours with less and less precise symbols as the range goes away. Concrete examples will be presented. From now on two years, we also publish forecasts to D+8 / J+9, accompanied with a sign of confidence (" good reliability " or " to confirm "). These two days are grouped together on a single map because for us, the described tendency to this term is relevant on a duration about 48 hours with a spatial scale slightly superior to the synoptic scale. So, we avoid producing more than two zones of types of weather over France and we content with giving an evolution for the temperatures (still, in increase or in decline). Newspapers began to publish this information, it should soon be the case of televisions. It is particularly

  11. Payment methods for outpatient care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Beibei; He, Li; Meng, Qingyue; Jia, Liying

    2017-01-01

    trials, non-randomised trials, controlled before-after studies, interrupted time series, and repeated measures studies that compared different payment methods for outpatient health facilities. We defined outpatient care facilities in this review as facilities that provide health services to individuals who do not require hospitalisation or institutionalisation. We only included methods used to transfer funds from the purchaser of healthcare services to health facilities (including groups of individual professionals). These include global budgets, line-item budgets, capitation, fee-for-service (fixed and unconstrained), pay for performance, and mixed payment. The primary outcomes were service provision outcomes, patient outcomes, healthcare provider outcomes, costs for providers, and any adverse effects. Data collection and analysis At least two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. We conducted a structured synthesis. We first categorised the comparisons and outcomes and then described the effects of different types of payment methods on different categories of outcomes. We used a fixed-effect model for meta-analysis within a study if a study included more than one indicator in the same category of outcomes. We used a random-effects model for meta-analysis across studies. If the data for meta-analysis were not available in some studies, we calculated the median and interquartile range. We reported the risk ratio (RR) for dichotomous outcomes and the relative change for continuous outcomes. Main results We included 21 studies from Afghanistan, Burundi, China, Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Tanzania, the United Kingdom, and the United States of health facilities providing primary health care and mental health care. There were three kinds of payment comparisons. 1) Pay for performance (P4P) combined with some existing payment method (capitation or different kinds of input-based payment) compared to the existing payment method We

  12. High Precision Laser Range Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge (Inventor); Lay, Oliver P. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is an improved distance measuring interferometer that includes high speed phase modulators and additional phase meters to generate and analyze multiple heterodyne signal pairs with distinct frequencies. Modulation sidebands with large frequency separation are generated by the high speed electro-optic phase modulators, requiring only a single frequency stable laser source and eliminating the need for a fist laser to be tuned or stabilized relative to a second laser. The combination of signals produced by the modulated sidebands is separated and processed to give the target distance. The resulting metrology apparatus enables a sensor with submicron accuracy or better over a multi- kilometer ambiguity range.

  13. BENTON RANGE ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Edwin H.; Rains, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey, two parts of the Benton Range Roadless Area, California are considered to have mineral-resource potential. The central and southern part of the roadless area, near several nonoperating mines, has a probable potential for tungsten and gold-silver mineralization in tactite zones. The central part of the area has a substantiated resource potential for gold and silver in quartz veins. Detailed mapping and geochemical sampling for tungsten, gold, and silver in the central and southern part of the roadless area might indicate targets for shallow drilling exploration.

  14. Extended-range tiltable micromirror

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, James J; Wiens, Gloria J; Bronson, Jessica R

    A tiltable micromirror device is disclosed in which a micromirror is suspended by a progressive linkage with an electrostatic actuator (e.g. a vertical comb actuator or a capacitive plate electrostatic actuator) being located beneath the micromirror. The progressive linkage includes a pair of torsion springs which are connected together to operate similar to a four-bar linkage with spring joints. The progressive linkage provides a non-linear spring constant which can allow the micromirror to be tilted at any angle within its range substantially free from any electrostatic instability or hysteretic behavior.

  15. Facilities Spending Criticized as Uneven

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greifner, Laura

    2006-01-01

    This article features a report on states and school districts spending almost $600 billion on building and renovating schools from 1995 to 2004, an amount that far exceed earlier expectations. The report also emphasized the uneven facilities spending between minority and affluent districts. Besides receiving the least money for facilities, the…

  16. RCRA Facilities and Environmental Indicators

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA Region 2 has established a list of contaminated facilities that are a priority for cleanup in New York, New Jersey, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Click below for a state-by-state list of these facilities, their Environmental Indicator status

  17. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Grames, Joseph; Higinbotham, Douglas; Montgomery, Hugh

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, USA, is one of ten national laboratories under the aegis of the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC. The primary facility at Jefferson Lab is the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) as shown in an aerial photograph in Figure 1. Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 as CEBAF and started operations for physics in 1995. The accelerator uses superconducting radio-frequency (srf) techniques to generate high-quality beams of electrons with high-intensity, well-controlled polarization. Themore » technology has enabled ancillary facilities to be created. The CEBAF facility is used by an international user community of more than 1200 physicists for a program of exploration and study of nuclear, hadronic matter, the strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics. Additionally, the exceptional quality of the beams facilitates studies of the fundamental symmetries of nature, which complement those of atomic physics on the one hand and of high-energy particle physics on the other. The facility is in the midst of a project to double the energy of the facility and to enhance and expand its experimental facilities. Studies are also pursued with a Free-Electron Laser produced by an energy-recovering linear accelerator.« less

  18. High-pressure water facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA Test Operations Group employees, from left, Todd Pearson, Tim Delcuze and Rodney Wilkinson maintain a water pump in Stennis Space Center's high-pressure water facility. The three were part of a group of employees who rode out Hurricane Katrina at the facility and helped protect NASA's rocket engine test complex.

  19. Life Sciences Centrifuge Facility assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of the status of the Centrifuge Facility being developed by ARC for flight on the International Space Station Alpha. The assessment includes technical status, schedules, budgets, project management, performance of facility relative to science requirements, and identifies risks and issues that need to be considered in future development activities.

  20. Empowering Facilities Teams through Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cormier, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Facilities departments at colleges and universities are facing the same challenge: how not to do just the most projects, but also the right projects with the limited funds they are given. In order to make the best decisions, they need more control over the capital planning process, which requires accurate, current facility condition data. Each…

  1. Energy Sourcebook for Educational Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Educational Facility Planners, Columbus, OH.

    The Council of Educational Facility Planners, International (CEFP/I) has assembled an authoritative and comprehensive sourcebook for the design and management of energy efficient educational facilities. Information that bridges the gap between scientific energy theory/research/technology and the needs of the educational community is published in…

  2. Test and User Facilities | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z B Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility High-Flux Solar Furnace I Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility L Large Payload Solar Tracker M

  3. Suicide Prevention in Juvenile Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Lindsay M.

    2000-01-01

    Youth suicide is recognized as a serious public health problem, but suicide within juvenile facilities has not received comparable attention, and the extent and nature of these deaths remain unknown. This article utilizes an example of a young man in a juvenile justice facility who succeeded in committing suicide to illustrate these points.…

  4. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF

    SciTech Connect

    None

    The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

  5. SGSLR Testing Facility at GGAO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Evan

    2016-01-01

    This document describes the SGSLR Test Facility at Goddards Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory (NASA Goddard area 200) and its features are described at a high level for users. This is the facility that the Contractor will be required to use for the Testing and Verification of all SGSLR systems.

  6. NIST Document Sharing Test Facility

    Science.gov Websites

    NIST Document Sharing Test Facility This site supports the IHE effort in Document Sharing as part . This test facility is based on the IHE IT Infrastructure Technical Framework. All testing done against that Patient IDs be pre-registered before submitting metadata about them. To allocate new patient IDs

  7. High-pressure water facility

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-02-15

    NASA Test Operations Group employees, from left, Todd Pearson, Tim Delcuze and Rodney Wilkinson maintain a water pump in Stennis Space Center's high-pressure water facility. The three were part of a group of employees who rode out Hurricane Katrina at the facility and helped protect NASA's rocket engine test complex.

  8. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2018-01-16

    The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

  9. Energy Systems Integration Facility Overview

    ScienceCinema

    Arvizu, Dan; Chistensen, Dana; Hannegan, Bryan; Garret, Bobi; Kroposki, Ben; Symko-Davies, Martha; Post, David; Hammond, Steve; Kutscher, Chuck; Wipke, Keith

    2018-01-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is located at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is the right tool, at the right time... a first-of-its-kind facility that addresses the challenges of large-scale integration of clean energy technologies into the energy systems that power the nation.

  10. EVA Training and Development Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cupples, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Overview: Vast majority of US EVA (ExtraVehicular Activity) training and EVA hardware development occurs at JSC; EVA training facilities used to develop and refine procedures and improve skills; EVA hardware development facilities test hardware to evaluate performance and certify requirement compliance; Environmental chambers enable testing of hardware from as large as suits to as small as individual components in thermal vacuum conditions.

  11. The Future of Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daigneau, William A.

    1997-01-01

    Reports on a conference of college facility managers at which facilities professionals identified forces affecting the profession's future in five areas (information technology, resource scarcity, societal changes, government role in education, environmental deterioration) and six important roles for the manager (operational efficiency expert,…

  12. Planning and Designing Safe Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidler, Todd

    2006-01-01

    Those who manage physical education, athletic, and recreation programs have a number of legal duties that they are expected to carry out. Among these are an obligation to take reasonable precautions to ensure safe programs and facilities for all participants, spectators, and staff. Physical education and sports facilities that are poorly planned,…

  13. Designing Facilities for Collaborative Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey; Powell, Mark; Backes, Paul; Steinke, Robert; Tso, Kam; Wales, Roxana

    2003-01-01

    A methodology for designing operational facilities for collaboration by multiple experts has begun to take shape as an outgrowth of a project to design such facilities for scientific operations of the planned 2003 Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission. The methodology could also be applicable to the design of military "situation rooms" and other facilities for terrestrial missions. It was recognized in this project that modern mission operations depend heavily upon the collaborative use of computers. It was further recognized that tests have shown that layout of a facility exerts a dramatic effect on the efficiency and endurance of the operations staff. The facility designs (for example, see figure) and the methodology developed during the project reflect this recognition. One element of the methodology is a metric, called effective capacity, that was created for use in evaluating proposed MER operational facilities and may also be useful for evaluating other collaboration spaces, including meeting rooms and military situation rooms. The effective capacity of a facility is defined as the number of people in the facility who can be meaningfully engaged in its operations. A person is considered to be meaningfully engaged if the person can (1) see, hear, and communicate with everyone else present; (2) see the material under discussion (typically data on a piece of paper, computer monitor, or projection screen); and (3) provide input to the product under development by the group. The effective capacity of a facility is less than the number of people that can physically fit in the facility. For example, a typical office that contains a desktop computer has an effective capacity of .4, while a small conference room that contains a projection screen has an effective capacity of around 10. Little or no benefit would be derived from allowing the number of persons in an operational facility to exceed its effective capacity: At best, the operations staff would be underutilized

  14. Accelerator Facilities for Radiation Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1999-01-01

    HSRP Goals in Accelerator Use and Development are: 1.Need for ground-based heavy ion and proton facility to understand space radiation effects discussed most recently by NAS/NRC Report (1996). 2. Strategic Program Goals in facility usage and development: -(1) operation of AGS for approximately 600 beam hours/year; (2) operation of Loma Linda University (LLU) proton facility for approximately 400 beam hours/year; (3) construction of BAF facility; and (4) collaborative research at HIMAC in Japan and with other existing or potential international facilities. 3. MOA with LLU has been established to provide proton beams with energies of 40-250 important for trapped protons and solar proton events. 4. Limited number of beam hours available at Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS).

  15. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Beesley

    The purpose of this facility description document (FDD) is to establish requirements and associated bases that drive the design of the Canister Handling Facility (CHF), which will allow the design effort to proceed to license application. This FDD will be revised at strategic points as the design matures. This FDD identifies the requirements and describes the facility design, as it currently exists, with emphasis on attributes of the design provided to meet the requirements. This FDD is an engineering tool for design control; accordingly, the primary audience and users are design engineers. This FDD is part of an iterative designmore » process. It leads the design process with regard to the flowdown of upper tier requirements onto the facility. Knowledge of these requirements is essential in performing the design process. The FDD follows the design with regard to the description of the facility. The description provided in this FDD reflects the current results of the design process.« less

  16. Range Imaging without Moving Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. Bryan; Scott, V. Stanley, III; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Range-imaging instruments of a type now under development are intended to generate the equivalent of three-dimensional images from measurements of the round-trip times of flight of laser pulses along known directions. These instruments could also provide information on characteristics of targets, including roughnesses and reflectivities of surfaces and optical densities of such semi-solid objects as trees and clouds. Unlike in prior range-imaging instruments based on times of flight along known directions, there would be no moving parts; aiming of the laser beams along the known directions would not be accomplished by mechanical scanning of mirrors, prisms, or other optical components. Instead, aiming would be accomplished by using solid-state devices to switch input and output beams along different fiber-optic paths. Because of the lack of moving parts, these instruments could be extraordinarily reliable, rugged, and long-lasting. An instrument of this type would include an optical transmitter that would send out a laser pulse along a chosen direction to a target. An optical receiver coaligned with the transmitter would measure the temporally varying intensity of laser light reflected from the target to determine the distance and surface characteristics of the target. The transmitter would be a combination of devices for generating precise directional laser illumination. It would include a pulsed laser, the output of which would be coupled into a fiber-optic cable with a fan-out and solid-state optical switches that would enable switching of the laser beam onto one or more optical fibers terminated at known locations in an array on a face at the focal plane of a telescope. The array would be imaged by the telescope onto the target space. The receiver optical system could share the aforementioned telescope with the transmitter or could include a separate telescope aimed in the same direction as that of the transmitting telescope. In either case, light reflected

  17. SIRTF, the Space Infrared Telescope Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Larry L.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) is the last of the NASA Great Observatories, and a cornerstone of the NASA Origins Missions. The Observatory will include an 85 cm telescope in a unique orbit around the sun. The telescope will be launched at ambient temperature and cooled to 5.5K in space. The science instruments will use large detector arrays that will be background limited, and capable of a broad range of astrophysical investigations. The SIRTF architecture will accommodate up to 5 years of cryogenic space operations. This talk will describe both the scientific and technical capabilities of SIRTF.

  18. The NEAR laser ranging investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.; Cheng, A. F.; Cole, T. D.

    1997-10-01

    The objective of the NEAR-Earth Asteriod Rendezvous (NEAR) laser ranging investigation is to obtain high integrity profiles and grids of topography for use in geophysical, geodetic and geological studies of asteroid 433 Eros. The NEAR laser rangefinder (NLR) will determine the slant range of the NEAR spacecraft to the asteroid surface by measuring precisely the round trip time of flight of individual laser pulses. Ranges will be converted to planetary radii measured with respect to the asteroid center of mass by subtracting the spacecraft orbit determined from X band Doppler tracking. The principal components of the NLR include a 1064 nm Cr:Nd:YAG laser, a gold-coated aluminum Dall-Kirkham Cassegrain telescope, an enhanced silicon avalanche photodiode hybrid detector, a 480-MHz crystal oscillator, and a digital processing unit. The instrument has a continuous in-flight calibration capability using a fiber-optic delay assembly. The single shot vertical resolution of the NLR is <6m, and the absolute accuracy of the global grid will be ~10m with respect to the asteroid center of mass. For the current mission orbital scenario, the laser spot size on the surface of Eros will vary from ~4-11m, and the along-track resolution for the nominal pulse repetition rate of 1 Hz will be approximately comparable to the spot size, resulting in contiguous along-track profiles. The across-track resolution will depend on the orbital mapping scenario, but will likely be <500m, which will define the spatial resolution of the global topographic model. Planned science investigations include global-scale analyses related to collisional and impact history and internal density distribution that utilize topographic grids as well as spherical harmonic topographic models that will be analyzed jointly with gravity at commensurate resolution. Attempts will be made to detect possible subtle time variations in internal structure that may be present if Eros is not a single coherent body, by analysis

  19. Medical surveillance and programs on industrial hygiene at RCRA facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.E.

    1994-12-31

    Some special areas where much progress in industrial hygiene and safety has been made in the past few years are; training, personal protective equipment, uniforms, personal monitoring, area monitoring, and medical surveillance. Before one can begin to construct programs for worker protection, some knowledge of potential exposures must be gained. The best place to start is the Waste Analysis Plan, and the list of wastes that a particular site is authorized to receive. Waste Codes are listed within a facility`s Part A and Part B permits. Actual facility receipt of wastes are well documented within Load Records and other documentation.more » A facility`s training program forms the heart of a health and safety program. Every TSD facility should have developed a matrix of job titles and required training. Every facility must also make a commitment to providing a wide range of personal protective equipment, including a wide array of disposables. Some facilities will benefit from the occasional use of the newer respirator quantitative fit-testing devices. All facilities are urged to rent or borrow this type of equipment periodically. Quantitative respirator fit-testers are capable of revealing important deficiencies in a respirator program. Providing uniforms is a newer means of protecting workers. The use of uniforms is an effective means for addressing the idea of carry-home-waste. The use of disposables including boots, must be integrated into a Uniform Program if the program is to be effective. In addition, employees must strictly understand that uniforms must not leave the facility at any time, including lunch time.« less

  20. Explosives characterization in terahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestrojuán, I.; Palacios, I.; Etayo, D.; Iriarte, J. C.; Teniente, J.; Ederra, I.; Gonzalo, R.

    2011-11-01

    A Thz spectral characterization of the behaviour of different explosives is presented in this paper. This characterization will be done in the frequency range from 20 GHz to 4 THz using a Teraview Spectra 3000. This system has a capacity of measuring from 20 GHz to 4 THz fed by a laser source. With the Teraview Spectra 3000 equipment will be possible to calculate the refractive index, the absorbance and other important parameters of the explosive samples. With this study it will be possible to characterize some of the most common used explosives, i.e., gun explosive, gunpowder mine, pent, TNT, RDX, etc, and it will allow to determine their electromagnetic peculiarities in order to design a future imaging system that allow detecting them in security and defense sectors.

  1. Wide speed range turboshaft study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dangelo, Martin

    1995-01-01

    NASA-Lewis and NASA-Ames have sponsored a series of studies over the last few years to identify key high speed rotorcraft propulsion and airframe technologies. NASA concluded from these studies that for near term aircraft with cruise speeds up to 450 kt, tilting rotor rotorcraft concepts are the most economical and technologically viable. The propulsion issues critical to tilting rotor rotorcraft are: (1) high speed cruise propulsion system efficiency and (2) adequate power to hover safely with one engine inoperative. High speed cruise propeller efficiency can be dramatically improved by reducing rotor speed, yet high rotor speed is critical for good hover performance. With a conventional turboshaft, this wide range of power turbine operating speeds would result in poor engine performance at one or more of these critical operating conditions. This study identifies several wide speed range turboshaft concepts, and analyzes their potential to improve performance at the diverse cruise and hover operating conditions. Many unique concepts were examined, and the selected concepts are simple, low cost, relatively low risk, and entirely contained within the power turbine. These power turbine concepts contain unique, incidence tolerant airfoil designs that allow the engine to cruise efficiently at 51 percent of the hover rotor speed. Overall propulsion system efficiency in cruise is improved as much as 14 percent, with similar improvements in engine weight and cost. The study is composed of a propulsion requirement survey, a concept screening study, a preliminary definition and evaluation of selected concepts, and identification of key technologies and development needs. In addition, a civil transport tilting rotor rotorcraft mission analysis was performed to show the benefit of these concepts versus a conventional turboshaft. Other potential applications for this technology are discussed.

  2. Expansion-based passive ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1993-01-01

    A new technique of passive ranging which is based on utilizing the image-plane expansion experienced by every object as its distance from the sensor decreases is described. This technique belongs in the feature/object-based family. The motion and shape of a small window, assumed to be fully contained inside the boundaries of some object, is approximated by an affine transformation. The parameters of the transformation matrix are derived by initially comparing successive images, and progressively increasing the image time separation so as to achieve much larger triangulation baseline than currently possible. Depth is directly derived from the expansion part of the transformation. To a first approximation, image-plane expansion is independent of image-plane location with respect to the focus of expansion (FOE) and of platform maneuvers. Thus, an expansion-based method has the potential of providing a reliable range in the difficult image area around the FOE. In areas far from the FOE the shift parameters of the affine transformation can provide more accurate depth information than the expansion alone, and can thus be used similarly to the way they were used in conjunction with the Inertial Navigation Unit (INU) and Kalman filtering. However, the performance of a shift-based algorithm, when the shifts are derived from the affine transformation, would be much improved compared to current algorithms because the shifts - as well as the other parameters - can be obtained between widely separated images. Thus, the main advantage of this new approach is that, allowing the tracked window to expand and rotate, in addition to moving laterally, enables one to correlate images over a very long time span which, in turn, translates into a large spatial baseline - resulting in a proportionately higher depth accuracy.

  3. Expansion-based passive ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique of passive ranging which is based on utilizing the image-plane expansion experienced by every object as its distance from the sensor decreases. This technique belongs in the feature/object-based family. The motion and shape of a small window, assumed to be fully contained inside the boundaries of some object, is approximated by an affine transformation. The parameters of the transformation matrix are derived by initially comparing successive images, and progressively increasing the image time separation so as to achieve much larger triangulation baseline than currently possible. Depth is directly derived from the expansion part of the transformation. To a first approximation, image-plane expansion is independent of image-plane location with respect to the focus of expansion (FOE) and of platform maneuvers. Thus, an expansion-based method has the potential of providing a reliable range in the difficult image area around the FOE. In areas far from the FOE the shift parameters of the affine transformation can provide more accurate depth information than the expansion alone, and can thus be used similarly to the way they have been used in conjunction with the Inertial Navigation Unit (INU) and Kalman filtering. However, the performance of a shift-based algorithm, when the shifts are derived from the affine transformation, would be much improved compared to current algorithms because the shifts--as well as the other parameters--can be obtained between widely separated images. Thus, the main advantage of this new approach is that, allowing the tracked window to expand and rotate, in addition to moving laterally, enables one to correlate images over a very long time span which, in turn, translates into a large spatial baseline resulting in a proportionately higher depth accuracy.

  4. Orbital Debris Assesment Tesing in the AEDC Range G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, Marshall; Woods, David; Roebuck, Brian; Opiela, John; Sheaffer, Patti; Liou, J.-C.

    2015-01-01

    The space environment presents many hazards for satellites and spacecraft. One of the major hazards is hypervelocity impacts from uncontrolled man-made space debris. Arnold Engineering Development Complex (AEDC), The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), The United States Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC), the University of Florida, and The Aerospace Corporation configured a large ballistic range to perform a series of hypervelocity destructive impact tests in order to better understand the effects of space collisions. The test utilized AEDC's Range G light gas launcher, which is capable of firing projectiles up to 7 km/s. A non-functional full-scale representation of a modern satellite called the DebriSat was destroyed in the enclosed range enviroment. Several modifications to the range facility were made to ensure quality data was obtained from the impact events. The facility modifcations were intended to provide a high impact energy to target mass ratio (>200 J/g), a non-damaging method of debris collection, and an instrumentation suite capable of providing information on the physics of the entire imapct event.

  5. Facility and Laboratory Equipment | Energy Systems Integration Facility |

    Science.gov Websites

    Energy Systems Integration Facility is its infrastructure. In addition to extensive fixed laboratory . Photo of researchers testing building loads and power networks in the Systems Performance Laboratory

  6. The Zwicky Transient Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    2016-01-01

    The Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) has been designed with a singular focus: a systematic exploration of the night sky at a magnitude level well suited for spectral classification and follow up with the existing class of 4-m to 10-m class telescopes. ZTF is the successor to the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). The discovery engine for ZTF is a 47 square degree camera (realized through 16 e2V monolithic CCDs) that fills the entire focal plane of the 48-inch Oschin telescope of the Palomar Observatory. Single 30-s epoch sensitivity is about 20.5 in g and R bands. The Infarared Processing & Analysis Center (IPAC) is the data center for ZTF. ZTF is a public-private partnership with equal contributions from a consortium of world-wide partners and an NSF MSIP grant. Forty percent of ZTF time is set aside for two major community surveys: a 3-day cadence survey of high latitudes (to mimic LSST) and a time domain survey of the entire Northern Galactic plane. We expect first light in February 2017 and begin a 3-year survey starting summer of 2017. The first year will be spent on building up deep reference images of the sky (a must for transient surveys). During the second year IPAC will deliver near archival quality photometric products within 12 hours of observations. By comparison to reference images photometric alerts will be sent out. Year 3 will see the near real-time release of image differencing products. A Community Science Advisory Committee (CSAC), chaired by S. Ridgway (NOAO), has been set up to both advise the PI and to ensure that the US community's interests are well served. Astronomers interested in getting a head start on ZTF may wish to peruse the data releases from PTF. Young people (or young at heart) may wish to attend the annual summer school on PTF/ZTF (August, Caltech campus). The Principal Investigator (PI) for the project is S. Kulkarni and the Project Scientist is Eric Bellm.For further details please consult http://www.ptf.caltech.edu/ztf

  7. Window Observational Research Facility (WORF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelfrey, Joseph; Sledd, Annette

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document concerns the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF) Rack, a unique facility designed for use with the US Lab Destiny Module window. WORF will provide valuable resources for Earth Science payloads along with serving the purpose of protecting the lab window. The facility can be used for remote sensing instrumentation test and validation in a shirt sleeve environment. WORF will also provide a training platform for crewmembers to do orbital observations of other planetary bodies. WORF payloads will be able to conduct terrestrial studies utilizing the data collected from utilizing WORF and the lab window.

  8. Structural dynamics verification facility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiraly, L. J.; Hirchbein, M. S.; Mcaleese, J. M.; Fleming, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    The need for a structural dynamics verification facility to support structures programs was studied. Most of the industry operated facilities are used for highly focused research, component development, and problem solving, and are not used for the generic understanding of the coupled dynamic response of major engine subsystems. Capabilities for the proposed facility include: the ability to both excite and measure coupled structural dynamic response of elastic blades on elastic shafting, the mechanical simulation of various dynamical loadings representative of those seen in operating engines, and the measurement of engine dynamic deflections and interface forces caused by alternative engine mounting configurations and compliances.

  9. TREAT neutron-radiography facility

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, L.J.

    1981-01-01

    The TREAT reactor was built as a transient irradiation test reactor. By taking advantage of built-in system features, it was possible to add a neutron-radiography facility. This facility has been used over the years to radiograph a wide variety and large number of preirradiated fuel pins in many different configurations. Eight different specimen handling casks weighing up to 54.4 t (60 T) can be accommodated. Thermal, epithermal, and track-etch radiographs have been taken. Neutron-radiography service can be provided for specimens from other reactor facilities, and the capacity for storing preirradiated specimens also exists.

  10. 9 CFR 3.51 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Facilities, indoor. 3.51 Section 3.51... Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.51 Facilities, indoor. (a) Heating. Indoor housing facilities for rabbits need not be heated. (b) Ventilation. Indoor housing facilities for rabbits shall be adequately...

  11. 33 CFR 154.1216 - Facility classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Facility classification. 154.1216... Vegetable Oils Facilities § 154.1216 Facility classification. (a) The Coast Guard classifies facilities that... classification of a facility that handles, stores, or transports animal fats or vegetable oils. The COTP may...

  12. 33 CFR 154.1216 - Facility classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Facility classification. 154.1216... Vegetable Oils Facilities § 154.1216 Facility classification. (a) The Coast Guard classifies facilities that... classification of a facility that handles, stores, or transports animal fats or vegetable oils. The COTP may...

  13. 33 CFR 154.1216 - Facility classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Facility classification. 154.1216... Vegetable Oils Facilities § 154.1216 Facility classification. (a) The Coast Guard classifies facilities that... classification of a facility that handles, stores, or transports animal fats or vegetable oils. The COTP may...

  14. 33 CFR 125.07 - Waterfront facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Waterfront facility. 125.07...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES IDENTIFICATION CREDENTIALS FOR PERSONS REQUIRING ACCESS TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR VESSELS § 125.07 Waterfront facility. The term waterfront facility as used in this subchapter, means all...

  15. 18 CFR 1317.410 - Comparable facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Comparable facilities... facilities. A recipient may provide separate toilet, locker room, and shower facilities on the basis of sex, but such facilities provided for students of one sex shall be comparable to such facilities provided...

  16. 10 CFR 611.206 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Existing facilities. 611.206 Section 611.206 Energy... PROGRAM Facility/Funding Awards § 611.206 Existing facilities. The Secretary shall, in making awards to those manufacturers that have existing facilities, give priority to those facilities that are oldest or...

  17. 33 CFR 154.1216 - Facility classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Vegetable Oils Facilities § 154.1216 Facility classification. (a) The Coast Guard classifies facilities that handle, store, or transport animal fats or vegetable oils as “substantial harm” facilities because they... classification of a facility that handles, stores, or transports animal fats or vegetable oils. The COTP may...

  18. 33 CFR 154.1216 - Facility classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Vegetable Oils Facilities § 154.1216 Facility classification. (a) The Coast Guard classifies facilities that handle, store, or transport animal fats or vegetable oils as “substantial harm” facilities because they... classification of a facility that handles, stores, or transports animal fats or vegetable oils. The COTP may...

  19. Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Air Force facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, David F.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program is an initiative within the US Air Force to acquire and validate advanced technologies that could be used to sustain superior capabilities in the area or space nuclear propulsion. The SNTP Program has a specific objective of demonstrating the feasibility of the particle bed reactor (PBR) concept. The term PIPET refers to a project within the SNTP Program responsible for the design, development, construction, and operation of a test reactor facility, including all support systems, that is intended to resolve program technology issues and test goals. A nuclear test facility has been designed that meets SNTP Facility requirements. The design approach taken to meet SNTP requirements has resulted in a nuclear test facility that should encompass a wide range of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) test requirements that may be generated within other programs. The SNTP PIPET project is actively working with DOE and NASA to assess this possibility.

  20. A button - type beam position monitor design for TARLA facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gündoǧan, M. Tural; Kaya, ć.; Yavaş, Ö.

    2016-03-01

    Turkish Accelerator and Radiation Laboratory in Ankara (TARLA) facility is proposed as an IR FEL and Bremsstrahlung facility as the first facility of Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC). TARLA is essentially proposed to generate oscillator mode FEL in 3-250 microns wavelengths range, will consist of normal conducting injector system with 250 keV beam energy, two superconducting RF accelerating modules in order to accelerate the beam 15-40 MeV. The TARLA facility is expected to provide two modes, Continuous wave (CW) and pulsed mode. Longitudinal electron bunch length will be changed between 1 and 10 ps. The bunch charge will be limited by 77pC. The design of the Button-type Beam Position Monitor for TARLA IR FEL is studied to operate in 1.3 GHz. Mechanical antenna design and simulations are completed considering electron beam parameters of TARLA. Ansoft HFSS and CST Particle Studio is used to compare with results of simulations.

  1. Factors affecting minority population proximity to hazardous facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, L.A.; Nieves, A.L.

    1995-04-01

    Disproportionate exposure of minority groups to environmental hazards has been attributed to ``environmental racism`` by some authors, without systematic investigation of the factors underlying this exposure pattern. This study examines regional differences in the proximity of African-Americans, Hispanics, Asians, and non-Hispanic Whites to a broad range of facility types and explores the effects of urban and income factors. A statistically significant inverse relationship is found between the percentage of non-Hispanic Whites and virtually all facility categories in all regions. Except for Hispanics in the South, all such associations for minority groups show a direct relationship, though some are nonsignificant. Themore » geographic concentration of facilities is more closely tied to urbanization than to economic factors. Controlling for both urban and economic factors, minority population concentration is still a significant explanatory variable for some facility types in some regions. This finding is most consistent for African-Americans.« less

  2. A User's Guide for the Spacecraft Fire Safety Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldmeer, Jeffrey S.

    2000-01-01

    The Spacecraft Fire Safety Facility (SFSF) is a test facility that can be flown on NASA's reduced gravity aircraft to perform various types of combustion experiments under a variety of experimental conditions. To date, this facility has flown numerous times on the aircraft and has been used to perform experiments ranging from an examination of the effects transient depressurization on combustion, to ignition and flame spread. A list of pubfications/presentations based on experiments performed in the SFSF is included in the reference section. This facility consists of five main subsystems: combustion chamber, sample holders, gas flow system, imaging system, and the data acquisition/control system. Each of these subsystems will be reviewed in more detail. These subsystems provide the experiment operator with the ability to monitor and/or control numerous experimental parameters.

  3. Man-Vehicle Systems Research Facility - Design and operating characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiner, Robert J.; Sullivan, Barry T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the full-mission flight simulation facility at the NASA Ames Research Center. The Man-Vehicle Systems Research Facility (MVSRF) supports aeronautical human factors research and consists of two full-mission flight simulators and an air-traffic-control simulator. The facility is used for a broad range of human factors research in both conventional and advanced aviation systems. The objectives of the research are to improve the understanding of the causes and effects of human errors in aviation operations, and to limit their occurrence. The facility is used to: (1) develop fundamental analytical expressions of the functional performance characteristics of aircraft flight crews; (2) formulate principles and design criteria for aviation environments; (3) evaluate the integration of subsystems in contemporary flight and air traffic control scenarios; and (4) develop training and simulation technologies.

  4. Sonic Detection and Ranging (SODAR) Wind Profiler Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, Richard L.

    2016-04-01

    The SODAR (Sonic Detection and Ranging) wind profiler measures wind profiles and backscattered signal strength between (nominally) 15 meters (m) and 500 m. It operates by transmitting acoustic energy into the atmosphere and measuring the strength and frequency of backscattered energy. The strength of the backscattered signal is determined by the strength of temperature inhomogeneities with size on the order of 10 centimeters (cm). Assuming the scattering elements in the atmosphere are moving with the mean wind, the horizontal wind field can be derived. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Mobile Facility (AMF)more » has a system developed by Scintec, Inc. that transmits a sequence of frequencies to enhance signal determination.« less

  5. Identity and distribution of residues of energetic compounds at army live-fire training ranges.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Thomas F; Hewitt, Alan D; Grant, Clarence L; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Walsh, Marianne E; Ranney, Thomas A; Ramsey, Charles A; Palazzo, Antonio J; Pennington, Judith C

    2006-05-01

    Environmental investigations have been conducted at 23 military firing ranges in the United States and Canada. The specific training facilities most frequently evaluated were hand grenade, antitank rocket, and artillery ranges. Energetic compounds (explosives and propellants) were determined and linked to the type of munition used and the major mechanisms of deposition.

  6. Pinon-juniper management research at Corona Range and Livestock Research Center in Central New Mexico

    Treesearch

    Andres Cibils; Mark Petersen; Shad Cox; Michael Rubio

    2008-01-01

    Description: New Mexico State University's Corona Range and Livestock Research Center (CRLRC) is located in a pinon-juniper (PJ)/grassland ecotone in the southern Basin and Range Province in south central New Mexico. A number of research projects conducted at this facility revolve around soil, plant, livestock, and wildlife responses to PJ woodland management. The...

  7. Rangeland livestock production: Developing the concept of sustainability on the Santa Rita Experimental Range

    Treesearch

    George B. Ruyle

    2003-01-01

    The Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER) was established in 1903 at the behest of concerned stockmen and researchers as the first facility in the United States set aside to study range livestock production. At the time, severe overgrazing of the public domain had seriously reduced carrying capacities of Southwestern rangelands. Researchers on the SRER developed and...

  8. Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Wind Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. H.; Schneider, T. A.; Vaughn, J. A.; Whittlesey, P. L.

    2017-01-01

    Historically, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has operated a Solar Wind Facility (SWF) to provide long term particle and photon exposure to material samples. The requirements on the particle beam details were not stringent as the cumulative fluence level is the test goal. Motivated by development of the faraday cup instrument on the NASA Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission, the MSFC SWF has been upgraded to included high fidelity particle beams providing broadbeam ions, broadbeam electrons, and narrow beam protons or ions, which cover a wide dynamic range of solar wind velocity and flux conditions. The large vacuum chamber with integrated cryo-shroud, combined with a 3-axis positioning system, provides an excellent platform for sensor development and qualification. This short paper provides some details of the SWF charged particle beams characteristics in the context of the Solar Probe Plus program requirements. Data will be presented on the flux and energy ranges as well as beam stability.

  9. Experimental Fuels Facility Re-categorization Based on Facility Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, Troy P.; Andrus, Jason

    The Experimental Fuels Facility (EFF) (MFC-794) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site was originally constructed to provide controlled-access, indoor storage for radiological contaminated equipment. Use of the facility was expanded to provide a controlled environment for repairing contaminated equipment and characterizing, repackaging, and treating waste. The EFF facility is also used for research and development services, including fuel fabrication. EFF was originally categorized as a LTHC-3 radiological facility based on facility operations and facility radiological inventories. Newly planned program activities identified the need to receive quantities of fissionable materials in excessmore » of the single parameter subcritical limit in ANSI/ANS-8.1, “Nuclear Criticality Safety in Operations with Fissionable Materials Outside Reactors” (identified as “criticality list” quantities in DOE-STD-1027-92, “Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports,” Attachment 1, Table A.1). Since the proposed inventory of fissionable materials inside EFF may be greater than the single parameter sub-critical limit of 700 g of U-235 equivalent, the initial re-categorization is Hazard Category (HC) 2 based upon a potential criticality hazard. This paper details the facility hazard categorization performed for the EFF. The categorization was necessary to determine (a) the need for further safety analysis in accordance with LWP-10802, “INL Facility Categorization,” and (b) compliance with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 830, Subpart B, “Safety Basis Requirements.” Based on the segmentation argument presented in this paper, the final hazard categorization for the facility is LTHC-3. Department of Energy Idaho (DOE-ID) approval of the final hazard categorization determined by this hazard assessment document (HAD) was required

  10. Regulatory Facility Guide for Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.

    1994-02-28

    This guide provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation related regulations applicable to shipments originating at or destined to Tennessee facilities. Information on preferred routes is also given.

  11. Design & layout of recreation facilities

    Treesearch

    Howard R. Orr

    1971-01-01

    Design and layout of recreation facilities is a problem solving process that must be divorced from the emotionalism that has shrouded outdoor recreation and must deal deliberately with the growing information concerning people and natural resources.

  12. Disaster Management and Educational Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Grace

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes discussions from a seminar focusing on earthquakes and educational facilities, including findings related to educational buildings; partnerships; training; standards, regulations, and procedures; finance and legislation; and research and support. (EV)

  13. Radar Training Facility initial validation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1983-05-01

    The Radar Training Facility (RTF), part of the Federal Aviation Administration Academy located at the Oklahoma City Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center, is designed to identify, as early as possible, air traffic control specialists who do not demonstra...

  14. Human error in airway facilities.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-01-01

    This report examines human errors in Airway Facilities (AF) with the intent of preventing these errors from being : passed on to the new Operations Control Centers. To effectively manage errors, they first have to be identified. : Human factors engin...

  15. High Pressure Industrial Water Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In conjunction with Space Shuttle Main Engine testing at Stennis, the Nordberg Water Pumps at the High Pressure Industrial Water Facility provide water for cooling the flame deflectors at the test stands during test firings.

  16. Production Facility SCADA Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E.; Holloway, Michael Andrew; Baily, Scott A.

    2015-03-23

    The following report covers FY 14 activities to develop supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system for the Northstar Moly99 production facility. The goal of this effort is to provide Northstar with a baseline system design.

  17. The Generic Data Capture Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Edward B.; Barnes, William P.; Stallings, William H.

    1987-01-01

    The Generic Data Capture Facility, which can provide data capture support for a variety of different types of spacecraft while enabling operations costs to be carefully controlled, is discussed. The data capture functions, data protection, isolation of users from data acquisition problems, data reconstruction, and quality and accounting are addressed. The TDM and packet data formats utilized by the system are described, and the development of generic facilities is considered.

  18. Supporting NASA Facilities Through GIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, Mary E.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA GIS Team supports NASA facilities and partners in the analysis of spatial data. Geographic Information System (G[S) is an integration of computer hardware, software, and personnel linking topographic, demographic, utility, facility, image, and other geo-referenced data. The system provides a graphic interface to relational databases and supports decision making processes such as planning, design, maintenance and repair, and emergency response.

  19. Space infrared telescope facility project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1988-01-01

    The functions undertaken during this reporting period were: to inform the planetary science community of the progress and status of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) Project; to solicit input from the planetary science community on needs and requirements of planetary science in the use of SIRTF at such time that it becomes an operational facility; and a white paper was prepared on the use of the SIRTF for solar system studies.

  20. Europlanet Research Infrastructure: Planetary Sample Analysis Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloquet, C.; Mason, N. J.; Davies, G. R.; Marty, B.

    2008-09-01

    committed to UK cosmochemical activity - but the remainder is free for other applications and users. The UK activity is managed by the UKCAN management committee and vetted through a local working group. Management of the remaining 25% of other activity will be organised through the local working group. This is the newest, and most advanced of three instruments of this type in Europe which routinely address cosmochemical analyses. The instrument is capable of providing high spatial resolution (down to 50nm) elemental and isotope distribution maps for a wide range of elements from across the periodic table. It is also capable of high precision (per mil) isotopic spot measurements with a spatial resolution of a few microns for a range of elements including C, N, O, S, Si, Mg, etc. Noble Gases facilities at CRPG and OU Ar/Ar Nu Instruments Noblesse is coupled with an ultra-low volume extraction line and with a choice of 213 nm UV laser or 1090 nm IR lasers, providing a wide range of analytical capability in Ar/Ar dating of lunar and meteorite samples. This instrument is unique with a mass resolution of 3000, and with the UV laser it has the capability to measure Ar isotope variation on a ca. 30 -micron resolution enabling detailed mapping of age and apparent age variation within minerals. The 1090 nm laser provides the capability to step-heat small samples. The laboratory is fully supported by sample preparation facilities and technical expertise in lunar and meteorite Ar/Ar analysis. Helium isotope facility. Analysis of the isotopes of helium in rocks and minerals. Determining the origin of gases in meteorites and ET return samples, dating surface exposure with cosmogenic 3He using the latest He isotope mass spectrometer, the GV Helix SFT, the first instrument installed in Europe. CRPG is an European leader in this domain. Non-Traditional stable Isotopes and radiogenic isotopes at VUA and CRPG The specific facility proposed for the TNA is the geochemistry labs used for the